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Sample records for mucorales

  1. Antifungal resistance in mucorales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannaoui, E

    2017-11-01

    The order Mucorales, which includes the agents of mucormycosis, comprises a large number of species. These fungi are characterised by high-level resistance to most currently available antifungal drugs. Standardised antifungal susceptibility testing methods are now available, allowing a better understanding of the in vitro activity of antifungal drugs against members of Mucorales. Such tests have made apparent that antifungal susceptibility within this group may be species-specific. Experimental animal models of mucormycosis have also been developed and are of great importance in bridging the gap between in vitro results and clinical trials. Amphotericin B, posaconazole and isavuconazole are currently the most active agents against Mucorales; however, their activity remains suboptimal and new therapeutic strategies are needed. Combination therapy could be a promising approach to overcome resistance, but further studies are required to confirm its benefits and safety for patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  2. Mucorales between food and infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolatabadi, S.

    2015-01-01

    Today, members of Mucoromycotina are ubiquitous organisms present all over the world in the soil, infecting and decomposing plants, animals, and other fungi. In daily practice they are renowned for two reasons. (1) Species of Mucorales have been used by humanity already for thousands of years in the

  3. Stress response in medically important Mucorales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pankaj; Paul, Saikat; Shivaprakash, M Rudramurthy; Chakrabarti, Arunaloke; Ghosh, Anup K

    2016-10-01

    Mucorales are saprobes, ubiquitously distributed and able to infect a heterogeneous population of human hosts. The fungi require robust stress responses to survive in human host. We tested the growth of Mucorales in the presence of different abiotic stress. Eight pathogenic species of Mucorales, including Rhizopus arrhizus, Rhizopus microsporus, Rhizomucor pusillus, Apophysomyces elegans, Licthemia corymbifera, Cunninghamella bertholletiae, Syncephalastrum racemosum and Mucor racemosus, were exposed to different stress inducers: osmotic (sodium chloride and d-sorbitol), oxidative (hydrogen peroxide and menadione), pH, cell wall and metal ions (Cu, Zn, Fe and Mg). Wide variation in stress responses was noted: R. arrhizus showed maximum resistance to both osmotic and oxidative stresses, whereas R. pusillus and M. indicus were relatively sensitive. Rhizopus arrhizus and R. microsporus showed maximum resistance to alkaline pH, whereas C. bertholletiae, L. corymbifera, M. racemosus and A. elegans were resistant to acidic pH. Maximum tolerance was noted in R. microsporus to Cu, R. microsporus and R. arrhizus to Fe and C. bertholletiae to Zn. In contrast, L. corymbifera, A. elegans and M. indicus were sensitive to Cu, Zn and Fe respectively. In conclusion, R. arrhizus showed high stress tolerance in comparison to other species of Mucorales, and this could be the possible reason for high pathogenic potential of this fungi. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  4. Mucorales from the semiarid of Pernambuco, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Azevedo Santiago, André Luiz Cabral Monteiro; Dos Santos, Paulo Jorge Parreira; Maia, Leonor Costa

    2013-01-01

    Nineteen taxa of Mucorales, belonging to Absidia, Apophysomyces, Cunninghamella, Fennellomyces, Lichtheimia, Mucor, Mycotypha, Rhizopus and Syncephalastrum were isolated from 36 composite soil samples in three semiarid areas in the State of Pernambuco (Triunfo, Cabrobó and Belém de São Francisco), Northeast Brazil, which are characterized by Caatinga vegetation. Triunfo is preserved, whereas Cabroró and Belém de São Francisco are experiencing low and severe desertification processes, respectively. Mucorales were isolated in Petri dishes in triplicate from 5 mg samples of soil placed on the surface of wheat germ agar plus chloramphenicol and Cercobin [Dimethyl 4,49-(103 phenylene) bis (3-thioallophanate)] medium. The plates were left on a bench at room temperature (28 ± 2 °C) for 72 h of alternating dark and light periods. Absidia cylindrospora presented the highest amount of CFU/g of soil, followed by L. hyalospora, C. phaeospora and C. echinulata var. echinulata. The latter, and R. microsporus var. microsporus, presented the highest frequencies of occurrence. Soils from Triunfo showed higher diversity of Mucorales than the samples from the other areas, although without differing statistically in relation to species richness. The communities of Mucorales from the degraded areas were more similar, while that from the preserved area was quite different. Most of the identified specimens have been commonly isolated from soil in other Brazilian regions, which indicates that they are not endemic of the semiarid. Eleven taxa are registered for the first time in this ecosystem, while F. heterothallicus is reported for the first time in Brazil.

  5. Mucorales from the semiarid of Pernambuco, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz Cabral Monteiro de Azevedo Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nineteen taxa of Mucorales, belonging to Absidi, Apophysomyces, Cunninghamella, Fennellomyces, Lichtheimi, Mucor, Mycotypha, Rhizopus and Syncephalastrum were isolated from 36 composite soil samples in three semiarid areas in the State of Pernambuco (Triunfo, Cabrobó and Belém de São Francisco, Northeast Brazil, which are characterized by Caatinga vegetation. Triunfo is preserved, whereas Cabroró and Belém de São Francisco are experiencing low and severe desertification processes, respectively. Mucorales were isolated in Petri dishes in triplicate from 5 mg samples of soil placed on the surface of wheat germ agar plus chloramphenicol and Cercobin [Dimethyl 4,49-(103 phenylene bis (3-thioallophanate] medium. The plates were left on a bench at room temperature (28 ± 2 ºC for 72 h of alternating dark and light periods. Absidia cylindrospora presented the highest amount of CFU/g of soil, followed by L. hyalospor, C. phaeospora and C. echinulata var. echinulata. The latter, and R. microsporus var. microsporus, presented the highest frequencies of occurrence. Soils from Triunfo showed higher diversity of Mucorales than the samples from the other areas, although without differing statistically in relation to species richness. The communities of Mucorales from the degraded areas were more similar, while that from the preserved area was quite different. Most of the identified specimens have been commonly isolated from soil in other Brazilian regions, which indicates that they are not endemic of the semiarid. Eleven taxa are registered for the first time in this ecosystem, while F. heterothallicus is reported for the first time in Brazil.

  6. Innate and Adaptive Immunity to Mucorales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghuman, Harlene; Voelz, Kerstin

    2017-09-05

    Mucormycosis is an invasive fungal infection characterised by rapid filamentous growth, which leads to angioinvasion, thrombosis, and tissue necrosis. The high mortality rates (50-100%) associated with mucormycosis are reflective of not only the aggressive nature of the infection and the poor therapeutics currently employed, but also the failure of the human immune system to successfully clear the infection. Immune effector interaction with Mucorales is influenced by the developmental stage of the mucormycete spore. In a healthy immune environment, resting spores are resistant to phagocytic killing. Contrarily, swollen spores and hyphae are susceptible to damage and degradation by macrophages and neutrophils. Under the effects of immune suppression, the recruitment and efficacy of macrophage and neutrophil activity against mucormycetes is considerably reduced. Following penetration of the endothelial lining, Mucorales encounter platelets. Platelets adhere to both mucormycete spores and hyphae, and exhibit germination suppression and hyphal damage capacity in vitro. Dendritic cells are activated in response to Mucorales hyphae only, and induce adaptive immunity. It is crucial to further knowledge regarding our immune system's failure to eradicate resting spores under intact immunity and inhibit fungal growth under immunocompromised conditions, in order to understand mucormycosis pathogenicity and enhance therapeutic strategies for mucormycosis.

  7. DNA barcoding in Mucorales: an inventory of biodiversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walther, G.; Pawlowska, J.; Alastruey-Izquierdo, A.; Wrzosek, M.; Rodriguez-Tudela, J.L.; Dolatabadi, S.; Chakrabarti, A.; de Hoog, G.S.

    2013-01-01

    The order Mucorales comprises predominantly fast-growing saprotrophic fungi, some of which are used for the fermentation of foodstuffs but it also includes species known to cause infections in patients with severe immune or metabolic impairments. To inventory biodiversity in Mucorales ITS barcodes

  8. Mucorales-Specific T Cells in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potenza, Leonardo; Vallerini, Daniela; Barozzi, Patrizia; Riva, Giovanni; Gilioli, Andrea; Forghieri, Fabio; Candoni, Anna; Cesaro, Simone; Quadrelli, Chiara; Maertens, Johan; Rossi, Giulio; Morselli, Monica; Codeluppi, Mauro; Mussini, Cristina; Colaci, Elisabetta; Messerotti, Andrea; Paolini, Ambra; Maccaferri, Monica; Fantuzzi, Valeria; Del Giovane, Cinzia; Stefani, Alessandro; Morandi, Uliano; Maffei, Rossana; Marasca, Roberto; Narni, Franco; Fanin, Renato; Comoli, Patrizia; Romani, Luigina; Beauvais, Anne; Viale, Pier Luigi; Latgè, Jean Paul; Lewis, Russell E; Luppi, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Invasive mucormycosis (IM) is an emerging life-threatening fungal infection. It is difficult to obtain a definite diagnosis and to initiate timely intervention. Mucorales-specific T cells occur during the course of IM and are involved in the clearance of the infection. We have evaluated the feasibility of detecting Mucorales-specific T cells in hematological patients at risk for IM, and have correlated the detection of such cells with the clinical conditions of the patients. By using an enzyme linked immunospot assay, the presence of Mucorales-specific T cells in peripheral blood (PB) samples has been investigated at three time points during high-dose chemotherapy for hematologic malignancies. Mucorales-specific T cells producing interferon-γ, interleukin-10 and interleukin-4 were analysed in order to detect a correlation between the immune response and the clinical picture. Twenty-one (10.3%) of 204 patients, accounting for 32 (5.3%) of 598 PB samples, tested positive for Mucorales-specific T cells. Two groups could be identified. Group 1, including 15 patients without signs or symptoms of invasive fungal diseases (IFD), showed a predominance of Mucorales-specific T cells producing interferon-gamma. Group 2 included 6 patients with a clinical picture consistent with invasive fungal disease (IFD): 2 cases of proven IM and 4 cases of possible IFD. The proven patients had significantly higher number of Mucorales-specific T cells producing interleukin-10 and interleukin-4 and higher rates of positive samples by using derived diagnostic cut-offs when compared with the 15 patients without IFD. Mucorales-specific T cells can be detected and monitored in patients with hematologic malignancies at risk for IM. Mucorales-specific T cells polarized to the production of T helper type 2 cytokines are associated with proven IM and may be evaluated as a surrogate diagnostic marker for IM.

  9. Mucorales-Specific T Cells in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Potenza

    Full Text Available Invasive mucormycosis (IM is an emerging life-threatening fungal infection. It is difficult to obtain a definite diagnosis and to initiate timely intervention. Mucorales-specific T cells occur during the course of IM and are involved in the clearance of the infection. We have evaluated the feasibility of detecting Mucorales-specific T cells in hematological patients at risk for IM, and have correlated the detection of such cells with the clinical conditions of the patients.By using an enzyme linked immunospot assay, the presence of Mucorales-specific T cells in peripheral blood (PB samples has been investigated at three time points during high-dose chemotherapy for hematologic malignancies. Mucorales-specific T cells producing interferon-γ, interleukin-10 and interleukin-4 were analysed in order to detect a correlation between the immune response and the clinical picture. Twenty-one (10.3% of 204 patients, accounting for 32 (5.3% of 598 PB samples, tested positive for Mucorales-specific T cells. Two groups could be identified. Group 1, including 15 patients without signs or symptoms of invasive fungal diseases (IFD, showed a predominance of Mucorales-specific T cells producing interferon-gamma. Group 2 included 6 patients with a clinical picture consistent with invasive fungal disease (IFD: 2 cases of proven IM and 4 cases of possible IFD. The proven patients had significantly higher number of Mucorales-specific T cells producing interleukin-10 and interleukin-4 and higher rates of positive samples by using derived diagnostic cut-offs when compared with the 15 patients without IFD.Mucorales-specific T cells can be detected and monitored in patients with hematologic malignancies at risk for IM. Mucorales-specific T cells polarized to the production of T helper type 2 cytokines are associated with proven IM and may be evaluated as a surrogate diagnostic marker for IM.

  10. Ubiquinone and carotene production in the Mucorales Blakeslea and Phycomyces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuzina, Vera; Cerda-Olmedo, E.

    2007-01-01

    The filamentous fungi Phycomyces blakesleeanus and Blakeslea trispora (Zygomycota, Mucorales) are actual or potential industrial sources of beta-carotene and lycopene. These chemicals and the large terpenoid moiety of ubiquinone derive from geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. We measured the ubiquinone...

  11. Mucorales-Specific T Cells in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    Potenza, L; Vallerini, D; Barozzi, P; Riva, G; Gilioli, A; Forghieri, F; Candoni, A; Cesaro, S; Quadrelli, C; Maertens, J; Rossi, G; Morselli, M; Codeluppi, M; Mussini, C; Colaci, E

    2016-01-01

    Background Invasive mucormycosis (IM) is an emerging life-threatening fungal infection. It is difficult to obtain a definite diagnosis and to initiate timely intervention. Mucorales-specific T cells occur during the course of IM and are involved in the clearance of the infection. We have evaluated the feasibility of detecting Mucorales-specific T cells in hematological patients at risk for IM, and have correlated the detection of such cells with the clinical conditions of the patients. Method...

  12. Invasive mold infections: virulence and pathogenesis of mucorales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morace, Giulia; Borghi, Elisa

    2012-01-01

    Mucorales have been increasingly reported as cause of invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised subjects, particularly in patients with haematological malignancies or uncontrolled diabetes mellitus and in those under deferoxamine treatment or undergoing dialysis. The disease often leads to a fatal outcome, but the pathogenesis of the infection is still poorly understood as well as the role of specific virulence determinants and the interaction with the host immune system. Members of the order Mucorales are responsible of almost all cases of invasive mucormycoses, the majority of the etiological agents belonging to the Mucoraceae family. Mucorales are able to produce various proteins and metabolic products toxic to animals and humans, but the pathogenic role of these potential virulence factors is unknown. The availability of free iron in plasma and tissues is believed to be crucial for the pathogenesis of these mycoses. Vascular invasion and neurotropism are considered common pathogenic features of invasive mucormycoses.

  13. Invasive Mold Infections: Virulence and Pathogenesis of Mucorales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Morace

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucorales have been increasingly reported as cause of invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised subjects, particularly in patients with haematological malignancies or uncontrolled diabetes mellitus and in those under deferoxamine treatment or undergoing dialysis. The disease often leads to a fatal outcome, but the pathogenesis of the infection is still poorly understood as well as the role of specific virulence determinants and the interaction with the host immune system. Members of the order Mucorales are responsible of almost all cases of invasive mucormycoses, the majority of the etiological agents belonging to the Mucoraceae family. Mucorales are able to produce various proteins and metabolic products toxic to animals and humans, but the pathogenic role of these potential virulence factors is unknown. The availability of free iron in plasma and tissues is believed to be crucial for the pathogenesis of these mycoses. Vascular invasion and neurotropism are considered common pathogenic features of invasive mucormycoses.

  14. Integrated genomics of Mucorales reveals novel therapeutic targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucormycosis is a life-threatening infection caused by Mucorales fungi. We sequenced 30 fungal genomes and performed transcriptomics with three representative Rhizopus and Mucor strains with human airway epithelial cells during fungal invasion to reveal key host and fungal determinants contributing ...

  15. Various aspects of the mating system in Mucorales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, M.A.A.; Stalpers, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    Several aspects of the sexuality in Mucorales are discussed. It is stated that neither heterothallism nor homothallism are absolute conditions and that a continuum exists between zygospores and azygospores. Mating type switching as known in ascomycetous yeasts would explain several up to now

  16. Human Fungal Pathogens of Mucorales and Entomophthorales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Leonel; Vilela, Raquel; Voelz, Kerstin; Ibrahim, Ashraf S; Voigt, Kerstin; Lee, Soo Chan

    2014-11-06

    In recent years, we have seen an increase in the number of immunocompromised cohorts as a result of infections and/or medical conditions, which has resulted in an increased incidence of fungal infections. Although rare, the incidence of infections caused by fungi belonging to basal fungal lineages is also continuously increasing. Basal fungal lineages diverged at an early point during the evolution of the fungal lineage, in which, in a simplified four-phylum fungal kingdom, Zygomycota and Chytridiomycota belong to the basal fungi, distinguishing them from Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. Currently there are no known human infections caused by fungi in Chytridiomycota; only Zygomycotan fungi are known to infect humans. Hence, infections caused by zygomycetes have been called zygomycosis, and the term "zygomycosis" is often used as a synonym for "mucormycosis." In the four-phylum fungal kingdom system, Zygomycota is classified mainly based on morphology, including the ability to form coenocytic (aseptated) hyphae and zygospores (sexual spores). In the Zygomycota, there are 10 known orders, two of which, the Mucorales and Entomophthorales, contain species that can infect humans, and the infection has historically been known as zygomycosis. However, recent multilocus sequence typing analyses (the fungal tree of life [AFTOL] project) revealed that the Zygomycota forms not a monophyletic clade but instead a polyphyletic clade, whereas Ascomycota and Basidiomycota are monophyletic. Thus, the term "zygomycosis" needed to be further specified, resulting in the terms "mucormycosis" and "entomophthoramycosis." This review covers these two different types of fungal infections. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  17. Etest Cannot Be Recommended for In Vitro Susceptibility Testing of Mucorales

    OpenAIRE

    Caramalho, Rita; Maurer, Elisabeth; Binder, Ulrike; Araújo, Ricardo; Dolatabadi, Somayeh; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Lackner, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    Amphotericin B and posaconazole susceptibility patterns were determined for the most prevalent Mucorales, following EUCAST (European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing) broth microdilution guidelines. In parallel, Etest was performed and evaluated against EUCAST. The overall agreement of MICs gained with Etest and EUCAST was 75.1%; therefore, Etest cannot be recommended for antifungal susceptibility testing of Mucorales. Amphotericin B was the most active drug against Mucorales...

  18. [Invasive fungal disease due to Scedosporium, Fusarium and mucorales].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemán, Javier; Salavert, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The number of emerging organisms causing invasive fungal infections has increased in the last decades. These etiological agents include Scedosporium, Fusarium and mucorales. All of them can cause disseminated, virulent, and difficult-to treat infections in immunosuppressed patients, the most affected, due to their resistance to most available antifungal agents. Current trends in transplantation including the use of new immunosuppressive treatments, the common prescription of antifungal agents for prophylaxis, and new ecological niches could explain the emergence of these fungal pathogens. These pathogens can also affect immunocompetent individuals, especially after natural disasters (earthquakes, floods, tsunamis), combat wounds or near drowning. All the invasive infections caused by Scedosporium, Fusarium, and mucorales are potentially lethal and a favourable outcome is associated with rapid diagnosis by direct microscopic examination of the involved tissue, wide debridement of infected material, early use of antifungal agents including combination therapy, and an improvement in host defenses, especially neutropenia. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Espana.

  19. Invasive mold infections : virulence and pathogenesis of mucorales

    OpenAIRE

    Morace, G.; Borghi, E.

    2012-01-01

    Mucorales have been increasingly reported as cause of invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised subjects, particularly in patients with haematological malignancies or uncontrolled diabetes mellitus and in those under deferoxamine treatment or undergoing dialysis. The disease often leads to a fatal outcome, but the pathogenesis of the infection is still poorly understood as well as the role of specific virulence determinants and the interaction with the host immune system. Members of the...

  20. Activity of Deferasirox in Mucorales: Influences of Species and Exogenous Iron▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Russell E.; Pongas, Georgios N.; Albert, Nathaniel; Ben-Ami, Ronen; Walsh, Thomas J.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2011-01-01

    Differences in deferasirox susceptibility among members of the order Mucorales are unknown. Here we show that Cunninghamella bertholletiae (four isolates) and Mucor species (five isolates) display higher deferasirox MICs and minimal fungicidal concentrations compared to Rhizopus species (six isolates). Exogenous iron further attenuated the deferasirox susceptibility of Mucorales isolates with low MICs. Vital staining revealed damage to subapical compartments in susceptible strains. PMID:20956598

  1. Activity of deferasirox in Mucorales: influences of species and exogenous iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Russell E; Pongas, Georgios N; Albert, Nathaniel; Ben-Ami, Ronen; Walsh, Thomas J; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2011-01-01

    Differences in deferasirox susceptibility among members of the order Mucorales are unknown. Here we show that Cunninghamella bertholletiae (four isolates) and Mucor species (five isolates) display higher deferasirox MICs and minimal fungicidal concentrations compared to Rhizopus species (six isolates). Exogenous iron further attenuated the deferasirox susceptibility of Mucorales isolates with low MICs. Vital staining revealed damage to subapical compartments in susceptible strains.

  2. Activity of Deferasirox in Mucorales: Influences of Species and Exogenous Iron▿

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Russell E.; Pongas, Georgios N.; Albert, Nathaniel; Ben-Ami, Ronen; Walsh, Thomas J.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2010-01-01

    Differences in deferasirox susceptibility among members of the order Mucorales are unknown. Here we show that Cunninghamella bertholletiae (four isolates) and Mucor species (five isolates) display higher deferasirox MICs and minimal fungicidal concentrations compared to Rhizopus species (six isolates). Exogenous iron further attenuated the deferasirox susceptibility of Mucorales isolates with low MICs. Vital staining revealed damage to subapical compartments in susceptible strains.

  3. Abradeosporangium, a new genus of Mucorales (Fungi: Zygomycetes from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Subrahmanyam

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abradeosporangium, a new genus of Mucorales with its type species A. variosporum, is described from India. The new genus is distinct in producing dimorphic sporangia and multispored, acolumellate and globose macrosporangia with persistent, thin peridium. Sparingly, portions of the sporangial wall at the top and bottom of the sporangia are dissolved at maturity to release the sporangiospores whilst, in its close ally Gilbertella, the sporangium breaks open via a longitudinal suture. Further, the smaller sporangia (microsporangia are without a longitudinal suture and produce variable number of spores. The sporangiospores are pale brown, longitudinally striated without any appendages. Besides, the new genus produces neither rhizoids nor zygospores.

  4. Mucorales isolated from copper-mining soils and production of amylase and inulinase

    OpenAIRE

    Santiago, André Luiz Cabral Monteiro Azevedo; Souza-Motta, Cristina Maria de

    2006-01-01

    A presença de metais pesados no solo proporciona impacto sobre os microrganismos, vegetação e os processos funcionais do ecossistema. Visando comprovar que Mucorales são afetados pela extração de cobre na Mineradora Caraíba, Jaguarari, BA, espécies de Mucorales foram isoladas de amostras de solo coletadas nas épocas seca e chuvosa. Os Mucorales foram identificados e caracterizados quanto à capacidade de degradar amido e inulina. Utilizando os métodos de diluição e placa de solo, foram obtidos...

  5. Etest cannot be recommended for in vitro susceptibility testing of mucorales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramalho, Rita; Maurer, Elisabeth; Binder, Ulrike; Araújo, Ricardo; Dolatabadi, Somayeh; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Lackner, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    Amphotericin B and posaconazole susceptibility patterns were determined for the most prevalent Mucorales, following EUCAST (European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing) broth microdilution guidelines. In parallel, Etest was performed and evaluated against EUCAST. The overall agreement of MICs gained with Etest and EUCAST was 75.1%; therefore, Etest cannot be recommended for antifungal susceptibility testing of Mucorales. Amphotericin B was the most active drug against Mucorales species in vitro, while the activities of posaconazole were more restricted. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Mucorales species activation of a serum leukotactic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, R S; Forsyth, K R; Hentz, S K

    1982-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the focal accumulation of phagocytic leukocytes is an important feature of the host response in mucormycosis. To ascertain the basis for this influx of inflammatory cells, we evaluated the effect of members of the order Mucorales, including species from the genera Rhizopus, Absidia, and Mucor, on the chemotactic activity of normal human serum for neutrophils and monocytes. Both hyphae and spores produced concentration-dependent chemotaxigenesis in serum to a maximum level equivalent to that produced by zymosan activation of serum. Chemotactic activity was similar for live and heat-killed hyphae. No leukotactic activity was demonstrated in the absence of serum. The pretreatment of serum with anti-C3 antibody, heating at 56 degrees C, or 0.01 M EDTA abolished the activity. The pretreatment of serum with 0.01 M ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N-tetraacetic acid did not abolish the activity. These data provide evidence that the leukotactic activity of Mucorales species is generated through the alternative complement pathway. PMID:6759409

  7. The family structure of the Mucorales: a synoptic revision based on comprehensive multigene-genealogies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffmann, K.; Pawłowska, J.; Walther, G.; Wrzosek, W.; de Hoog, G.S.; Benny, G.L.; Kirk, P.M.; Voigt, K.

    2013-01-01

    The Mucorales (Mucoromycotina) are one of the most ancient groups of fungi comprising ubiquitous, mostly saprotrophic organisms. The first comprehensive molecular studies 11 yr ago revealed the traditional classification scheme, mainly based on morphology, as highly artificial. Since then only

  8. Isolation of Mucorales from processed maize (Zea mays L.) and screening for protease activity

    OpenAIRE

    de Azevedo Santiago, Andr? Luiz Cabral Monteiro; de Souza Motta, Cristina Maria

    2008-01-01

    Mucorales were isolated from maize flour, corn meal and cooked cornflakes using surface and depth plate methods. Rhizopus oryzae, Circinella muscae, Mucor subtilissimus, Mucor hiemalis f. hiemalis, Syncephalastrum racemosum, Rhizopus microsporus var. chinensis and Absidia cylindrospora showed protease activity.

  9. Antifungal susceptibility and phylogeny of opportunistic members of the order mucorales.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vitale, R.G.; Hoog, G.S. de; Schwarz, P.; Dannaoui, E.; Deng, S.; Machouart, M.; Voigt, K.; Sande, W.W. van de; Dolatabadi, S.; Meis, J.F.G.M.; Walther, G.

    2012-01-01

    The in vitro susceptibilities of 66 molecularly identified strains of the Mucorales to eight antifungals (amphotericin B, terbinafine, itraconazole, posaconazole, voriconazole, caspofungin, micafungin, and 5-fluorocytosine) were tested. Molecular phylogeny was reconstructed based on the nuclear

  10. Antifungal susceptibility and phylogeny of opportunistic members of the order Mucorales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.G. Vitale (Roxana); G.S. de Hoog; P. Schwarz (Peter); E. Dannaoui (Eric); S. Deng (Shuwen); M. Machouart (Marie); K. Voigt (Kerstin); W.W.J. van de Sande (Wendy); S. Dolatabadi (Somayeh); J.F. Meis; G. Walther

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe in vitro susceptibilities of 66 molecularly identified strains of the Mucorales to eight antifungals (amphotericin B, terbinafine, itraconazole, posaconazole, voriconazole, caspofungin, micafungin, and 5-fluorocytosine) were tested. Molecular phylogeny was reconstructed based on the

  11. Antifungal Susceptibility and Phylogeny of Opportunistic Members of the Order Mucorales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vitale, R.G.; de Hoog, G.S.; Schwarz, P.; Dannaoui, E.; Deng, S.; Machouart, M.; Voigt, K.; de Sande, W.W.J.v.; Dolatabadi, S.; Meis, J.F.; Walther, G.

    2012-01-01

    The in vitro susceptibilities of 66 molecularly identified strains of the Mucorales to eight antifungals (amphotericin B, terbinafine, itraconazole, posaconazole, voriconazole, caspofungin, micafungin, and 5-fluorocytosine) were tested. Molecular phylogeny was reconstructed based on the nuclear

  12. Preliminary studies on the evolution of carbon assimilation abilities within Mucorales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawłowska, Julia; Aleksandrzak-Piekarczyk, Tamara; Banach, Agnieszka; Kiersztyn, Bartosz; Muszewska, Anna; Serewa, Lidia; Szatraj, Katarzyna; Wrzosek, Marta

    2016-05-01

    Representatives of Mucorales belong to one of the oldest lineages of terrestrial fungi. Although carbon is of fundamental importance for fungal growth and functioning, relatively little is known about enzymatic capacities of Mucorales. The evolutionary history and the variability of the capacity to metabolize different carbon sources among representatives of the order Mucorales was studied using Phenotypic Microarray Plates. The ability of 26 strains belonging to 23 nonpathogenic species of Mucorales to use 95 different carbon sources was tested. Intraspecies variability of carbon assimilation profiles was lower than interspecies variation for some selected strains. Although similarities between the phylogenetic tree and the dendrogram created from carbon source utilization data were observed, the ability of the various strains to use the analyzed substrates did not show a clear correlation with the evolutionary history of the group. Instead, carbon assimilation profiles are probably shaped by environmental conditions. Copyright © 2016 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Identification of mucorales from clinical specimens: a 4-year experience in a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mina; Lee, Jang Ho; Kim, Young Kwon; Ki, Chang Seok; Huh, Hee Jae; Lee, Nam Yong

    2016-01-01

    Mucormycosis, a fatal opportunistic infection in immunocompromised hosts, is caused by fungi belonging to the order Mucorales. Early diagnosis based on exact identification and multidisciplinary treatments is critical. However, identification of Mucorales fungi is difficult and often delayed, resulting in poor prognosis. This study aimed to compare the results of phenotypic and molecular identification of 12 Mucorales isolates collected from 4-yr-accumulated data. All isolates were identified on the basis of phenotypic characteristics such as growth rate, colony morphology, and reproductive structures. PCR and direct sequencing were performed to target internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and/or D1/D2 regions. Target DNA sequencing identified five Lichtheimia isolates, two Rhizopus microsporus isolates, two Rhizomucor pusillus isolates, one Cunninghamella bertholletiae isolate, one Mucor fragilis isolate, and one Syncephalastrum racemosum isolate. Five of the 12 (41.7%) isolates were incorrectly identified on the basis of phenotypic identification. DNA sequencing showed that of these five isolates, two were Lichtheimia isolates, one was Mucor isolate, one was Rhizomucor isolate, and one was Rhizopus microspores. All the isolates were identified at the species level by ITS and/or D1/D2 analyses. Phenotypic differentiation and identification of Mucorales is difficult because different Mucorales share similar morphology. Our results indicate that the molecular methods employed in this study are valuable for identifying Mucorales.

  14. Mucorales spores induce a proinflammatory cytokine response in human mononuclear phagocytes and harbor no rodlet hydrophobins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurster, Sebastian; Thielen, Vanessa; Weis, Philipp; Walther, Paul; Elias, Johannes; Waaga-Gasser, Ana Maria; Dragan, Mariola; Dandekar, Thomas; Einsele, Hermann; Löffler, Jürgen; Ullmann, Andrew J

    2017-11-17

    Mucormycoses are life-threatening infections in immunocompromised patients. This study characterizes the response of human mononuclear cells to different Mucorales and Ascomycota. PBMC, monocytes, and monocyte derived dendritic cells (moDCs) from healthy donors were stimulated with resting and germinated stages of Mucorales and Ascomycota. Cytokine response and expression of activation markers were studied. Both inactivated germ tubes and resting spores of Rhizopus arrhizus and other human pathogenic Mucorales species significantly stimulated mRNA synthesis and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Moreover, R. arrhizus spores induced the upregulation of co-stimulatory molecules on moDCs and a specific T-helper cell response. Removal of rodlet hydrophobins by hydrofluoric acid treatment of A. fumigatus conidia resulted in enhanced immunogenicity, whereas the cytokine response of PBMCs to dormant R. arrhizus spores was not influenced by hydrofluoric acid. Scanning electron micrographs of Mucorales spores did not exhibit any morphological correlates of rodlet hydrophobins. Taken together, this study revealed striking differences in the response of human mononuclear cells to resting stages of Ascomycota and Mucorales, which may be explained by absence of an immunoprotective hydrophobin layer in Mucorales spores.

  15. DNA barcoding in Mucorales: an inventory of biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, G; Pawłowska, J; Alastruey-Izquierdo, A; Wrzosek, M; Rodriguez-Tudela, J L; Dolatabadi, S; Chakrabarti, A; de Hoog, G S

    2013-06-01

    The order Mucorales comprises predominantly fast-growing saprotrophic fungi, some of which are used for the fermentation of foodstuffs but it also includes species known to cause infections in patients with severe immune or metabolic impairments. To inventory biodiversity in Mucorales ITS barcodes of 668 strains in 203 taxa were generated covering more than two thirds of the recognised species. Using the ITS sequences, Molecular Operational Taxonomic Units were defined by a similarity threshold of 99 %. An LSU sequence was generated for each unit as well. Analysis of the LSU sequences revealed that conventional phenotypic classifications of the Mucoraceae are highly artificial. The LSU- and ITS-based trees suggest that characters, such as rhizoids and sporangiola, traditionally used in mucoralean taxonomy are plesiomorphic traits. The ITS region turned out to be an appropriate barcoding marker in Mucorales. It could be sequenced directly in 82 % of the strains and its variability was sufficient to resolve most of the morphospecies. Molecular identification turned out to be problematic only for the species complexes of Mucor circinelloides, M. flavus, M. piriformis and Zygorhynchus moelleri. As many as 12 possibly undescribed species were detected. Intraspecific variability differed widely among mucorealean species ranging from 0 % in Backusella circina to 13.3 % in Cunninghamella echinulata. A high proportion of clinical strains was included for molecular identification. Clinical isolates of Cunninghamella elegans were identified molecularly for the first time. As a result of the phylogenetic analyses several taxonomic and nomenclatural changes became necessary. The genus Backusella was emended to include all species with transitorily recurved sporangiophores. Since this matched molecular data all Mucor species possessing this character were transferred to Backusella. The genus Zygorhynchus was shown to be polyphyletic based on ITS and LSU data. Consequently

  16. Occurrence and species distribution of pathogenic Mucorales in unselected soil samples from France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, B; Costa, J M; Arné, P; Guillot, J; Chermette, R; Botterel, F; Dannaoui, E

    2018-04-01

    Mucormycosis is a life-threatening invasive fungal disease that affects a variety of patient groups. Although Mucorales are mostly opportunistic pathogens originating from soil or decaying vegetation, there are currently few data on prevalence of this group of fungi in the environment. The aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence and diversity of species of Mucorales from soil samples collected in France. Two grams of soil were homogenized in sterile saline and plated on Sabouraud dextrose agar and RPMI agar supplemented with itraconazole or voriconazole. Both media contained chloramphenicol and gentamicin. The plates were incubated at 35 ± 2 °C and checked daily for fungal growth for a maximum of 7 d. Mucorales were subcultured for purity. Each isolate was identified phenotypically and molecular identification was performed by ITS sequencing. A total of 170 soil samples were analyzed. Forty-one isolates of Mucorales were retrieved from 38 culture-positive samples. Among the recovered isolates, 27 Rhizopus arrhizus, 11 Mucor circinelloides, one Lichtheimia corymbifera, one Rhizopus microsporus and one Cunninghamella bertholletiae were found. Positive soil samples came from cultivated fields but also from other types of soil such as flower beds. Mucorales were retrieved from samples obtained in different geographical regions of France. Voriconazole-containing medium improved the recovery of Mucorales compared with other media. The present study showed that pathogenic Mucorales are frequently recovered from soil samples in France. Species diversity should be further analyzed on a larger number of soil samples from different geographic areas in France and in other countries.

  17. Coprophilous Mucorales (ex Zygomycota from three areas in the semi-arid of Pernambuco, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Fragoso de Souza

    Full Text Available Abstract Mucorales comprises fungi commonly isolated as saprobes from soil, dung, stored grains and plants. Although these fungi have been studied in several countries, there are relatively a few reports of them in semi-arid areas. Therefore, the aims of the present study were to assess and compare the Mucorales communities in dung from different species and breeds of herbivores in the semi-arid of Pernambuco, based on the frequency of occurrence and species richness of these fungi. Samples of dung collected in the cities of Arcoverde, Serra Talhada and Sertânia were incubated in moist chambers in triplicate. Altogether, 24 taxa of Mucorales distributed in the genera Absidia, Circinella, Cunninghamella, Lichtheimia, Mucor, Pilobolus, Rhizopus and Syncephalastrum were identified. The highest species richness was found in sheep excrement. Mucor circinelloides f. griseo-cyanus was the most common taxon, followed by M. ramosissimus. The similarity of the composition of Mucorales species was greatest between the excrements of Guzerá and Sindi breeds (bovine. All mucoralean species isolated are being cited for the first time from animal dung found in Caatinga and a new species of Mucor was recorded. An identification key for species of Mucorales from dung in the semi-arid region of Brazil is provided.

  18. Coprophilous Mucorales (ex Zygomycota) from three areas in the semi-arid of Pernambuco, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Carlos Alberto Fragoso de; Lima, Diogo Xavier; Gurgel, Luciana M S; Santiago, André Luiz Cabral Monteiro de Azevedo

    Mucorales comprises fungi commonly isolated as saprobes from soil, dung, stored grains and plants. Although these fungi have been studied in several countries, there are relatively a few reports of them in semi-arid areas. Therefore, the aims of the present study were to assess and compare the Mucorales communities in dung from different species and breeds of herbivores in the semi-arid of Pernambuco, based on the frequency of occurrence and species richness of these fungi. Samples of dung collected in the cities of Arcoverde, Serra Talhada and Sertânia were incubated in moist chambers in triplicate. Altogether, 24 taxa of Mucorales distributed in the genera Absidia, Circinella, Cunninghamella, Lichtheimia, Mucor, Pilobolus, Rhizopus and Syncephalastrum were identified. The highest species richness was found in sheep excrement. Mucor circinelloides f. griseo-cyanus was the most common taxon, followed by M. ramosissimus. The similarity of the composition of Mucorales species was greatest between the excrements of Guzerá and Sindi breeds (bovine). All mucoralean species isolated are being cited for the first time from animal dung found in Caatinga and a new species of Mucor was recorded. An identification key for species of Mucorales from dung in the semi-arid region of Brazil is provided. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Genetic identification of the main opportunistic Mucorales by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machouart, M; Larché, J; Burton, K; Collomb, J; Maurer, P; Cintrat, A; Biava, M F; Greciano, S; Kuijpers, A F A; Contet-Audonneau, N; de Hoog, G S; Gérard, A; Fortier, B

    2006-03-01

    Mucormycosis is a rare and opportunistic infection caused by fungi belonging to the order Mucorales. Recent reports have demonstrated an increasing incidence of mucormycosis, which is frequently lethal, especially in patients suffering from severe underlying conditions such as immunodeficiency. In addition, even though conventional mycology and histopathology assays allow for the identification of Mucorales, they often fail in offering a species-specific diagnosis. Due to the lack of other laboratory tests, a precise identification of these molds is thus notoriously difficult. In this study we aimed to develop a molecular biology tool to identify the main Mucorales involved in human pathology. A PCR strategy selectively amplifies genomic DNA from molds belonging to the genera Absidia, Mucor, Rhizopus, and Rhizomucor, excluding human DNA and DNA from other filamentous fungi and yeasts. A subsequent digestion step identified the Mucorales at genus and species level. This technique was validated using both fungal cultures and retrospective analyses of clinical samples. By enabling a rapid and precise identification of Mucorales strains in infected patients, this PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism-based method should help clinicians to decide on the appropriate treatment, consequently decreasing the mortality of mucormycosis.

  20. Specific characteristics of family 45 endoglucanases from Mucorales in the use of textiles and laundry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimonaka, Atsushi; Koga, Jinichiro; Baba, Yuko; Nishimura, Tomoko; Murashima, Koichiro; Kubota, Hidetoshi; Kono, Toshiaki

    2006-04-01

    We examined the characteristics of family 45 endoglucanases (glycoside hydrolases family 45; GH45) from Mucorales belonging to Zygomycota in the use of textiles and laundry. The defibrillation activities on lyocell fabric of family 45 endoglucanases from Mucorales, such as RCE1 and RCE2 from Rhizopus oryzae, MCE1 and MCE2 from Mucor circinelloides, and PCE1 from Phycomyces nitens, were much higher than those of the other family 45 endoglucanases. By contrast, family 45 endoglucanases from Mucorales were less resistant to anionic surfactant and oxidizing agent, main components in detergents, than the other family 45 endoglucanases. RCE1 consists of two distinct modules, a catalytic module and a carbohydrate-binding module family 1 (CBM1), and these common specific characteristics were considered to due to the catalytic module, but not to the CBM1.

  1. Siderophore production by pathogenic mucorales and uptake of deferoxamine B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larcher, Gérald; Dias, Marylène; Razafimandimby, Bienvenue; Bomal, Danielle; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe

    2013-12-01

    Clinical reports have established that mucormycosis, mainly caused by Rhizopus spp., frequently occurs in patients treated with deferoxamine B (DFO, Desferal(®)) which is misappropriated by these fungi. Siderophore production by twenty mucoralean isolates was therefore investigated using a commercial iron-depleted culture medium. Siderophore production was detected for most of the isolates. Our experiments confirmed that feroxamine B (iron chelate of DFO) promoted in vitro growth of Rhizopus arrhizus. Electrophoretic analysis of somatic extracts revealed iron-regulated proteins of 60 and 32 kDa which were lacking in iron-depleted culture conditions. Using a fluorescent derivative of deferoxamine B, we showed by fluorescence microscopy the entry of the siderophore within the fungal cells, thus suggesting a shuttle mechanism encompassing the uptake of the entire siderophore-ion complex into the cell. This useful tool renders possible a better understanding of iron metabolism in Mucorales which could lead to the development of new diagnostic method or new antifungal therapy using siderophores as imaging contrast agents or active drug vectors.

  2. Metalaxyl Degradation by Mucorales Strains Gongronella sp. and Rhizopus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Maria Rosário; Santos, Cledir; Pereira, Pablo; Cruz-Morais, Júlio; Lima, Nelson

    2017-12-14

    In this study, the degradation of metalaxyl was investigated in the presence of two Mucorales strains, previously isolated from soil subjected to repeated treatments with this fungicide and selected after enrichment technique. Fungal strains were characterised by a polyphasic approach using phylogenetic analysis of the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) gene region, phenotypic characterisation by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) spectral analysis, and growth kinetics experiments. The strains were identified as Gongronella sp. and Rhizopus oryzae . The fungal growth kinetics in liquid cultures containing metalaxyl fits with Haldane model. Under laboratory conditions, the ability of Gongronella sp. and R. oryzae cultures to degrade metalaxyl was evaluated in liquid cultures and soil experiments. Both species were able to: (a) use metalaxyl as the main carbon and energy source; and (b) degrade metalaxyl in polluted soils, with rates around 1.0 mg kg - ¹ d - ¹. This suggests these strains could degrade metalaxyl in soils contaminated with this fungicide.

  3. Ubiquinone and carotene production in the Mucorales Blakeslea and Phycomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzina, Vera; Cerdá-Olmedo, Enrique

    2007-10-01

    The filamentous fungi Phycomyces blakesleeanus and Blakeslea trispora (Zygomycota, Mucorales) are actual or potential industrial sources of beta-carotene and lycopene. These chemicals and the large terpenoid moiety of ubiquinone derive from geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. We measured the ubiquinone and carotene contents of wild-type and genetically modified strains under various conditions. Light slightly increased the ubiquinone content of Blakeslea and had no effect on that of Phycomyces. Oxidative stress modified ubiquinone production in Phycomyces and carotene production in both fungi. Sexual interaction and mutations in both organisms made the carotene content vary from traces to 23 mg/g dry mass, while the ubiquinone content remained unchanged at 0.3 mg/g dry mass. We concluded that the biosyntheses of ubiquinone and carotene are not coregulated. The specific regulation for carotene biosynthesis does not affect even indirectly the production of ubiquinone, as would be expected if terpenoids were synthesized through a branched pathway that could divert precursor flows from one branch to another.

  4. Metalaxyl Degradation by Mucorales Strains Gongronella sp. and Rhizopus oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rosário Martins

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the degradation of metalaxyl was investigated in the presence of two Mucorales strains, previously isolated from soil subjected to repeated treatments with this fungicide and selected after enrichment technique. Fungal strains were characterised by a polyphasic approach using phylogenetic analysis of the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS gene region, phenotypic characterisation by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS spectral analysis, and growth kinetics experiments. The strains were identified as Gongronella sp. and Rhizopus oryzae. The fungal growth kinetics in liquid cultures containing metalaxyl fits with Haldane model. Under laboratory conditions, the ability of Gongronella sp. and R. oryzae cultures to degrade metalaxyl was evaluated in liquid cultures and soil experiments. Both species were able to: (a use metalaxyl as the main carbon and energy source; and (b degrade metalaxyl in polluted soils, with rates around 1.0 mg kg−1 d−1. This suggests these strains could degrade metalaxyl in soils contaminated with this fungicide.

  5. Pathogenesis and host defence against Mucorales: the role of cytokines and interaction with antifungal drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roilides, Emmanuel; Antachopoulos, Charalampos; Simitsopoulou, Maria

    2014-12-01

    Innate immune response, including macrophages, neutrophils and dendritic cells and their respective receptors, plays an important role in host defences against Mucorales with differential activity against specific fungal species, while adaptive immunity is not the first line of defence. A number of endogenous and exogenous factors, such as cytokines and growth factors as well as certain antifungal agents have been found that they influence innate immune response to these organisms. Used alone or especially in combination have been shown to exert antifungal effects against Mucorales species. These findings suggest novel ways of adjunctive therapy for patients with invasive mucormycosis. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Clinical evaluation of a Mucorales-specific real-time PCR assay in tissue and serum samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Jan; Lackner, Michaela; Ensinger, Christian; Risslegger, Brigitte; Morton, Charles Oliver; Nachbaur, David; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Einsele, Hermann; Heinz, Werner J; Loeffler, Juergen

    2016-12-01

    Molecular diagnostic assays can accelerate the diagnosis of fungal infections and subsequently improve patient outcomes. In particular, the detection of infections due to Mucorales is still challenging for laboratories and physicians. The aim of this study was to evaluate a probe-based Mucorales-specific real-time PCR assay (Muc18S) using tissue and serum samples from patients suffering from invasive mucormycosis (IMM). This assay can detect a broad range of clinically relevant Mucorales species and can be used to complement existing diagnostic tests or to screen high-risk patients. An advantage of the Muc18S assay is that it exclusively detects Mucorales species allowing the diagnosis of Mucorales DNA without sequencing within a few hours. In paraffin-embedded tissue samples this PCR-based method allowed rapid identification of Mucorales in comparison with standard methods and showed 91 % sensitivity in the IMM tissue samples. We also evaluated serum samples, an easily accessible material, from patients at risk from IMM. Mucorales DNA was detected in all patients with probable/proven IMM (100 %) and in 29 % of the possible cases. Detection of IMM in serum could enable an earlier diagnosis (up to 21 days) than current methods including tissue samples, which were gained mainly post-mortem. A screening strategy for high-risk patients, which would enable targeted treatment to improve patient outcomes, is therefore possible.

  7. Isothermal microcalorimetry for antifungal susceptibility testing of Mucorales, Fusarium spp., and Scedosporium spp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Furustrand Tafin, U.; Meis, J.F.G.M.; Trampuz, A.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated isothermal microcalorimetry for real-time susceptibility testing of non-Aspergillus molds. MIC and minimal effective concentration (MEC) values of Mucorales (n = 4), Fusarium spp. (n = 4), and Scedosporium spp. (n = 4) were determined by microbroth dilution according to the Clinical

  8. Isolation of Mucorales from processed maize (Zea mays L.) and screening for protease activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Azevedo Santiago, André Luiz Cabral Monteiro; de Souza Motta, Cristina Maria

    2008-01-01

    Mucorales were isolated from maize flour, corn meal and cooked cornflakes using surface and depth plate methods. Rhizopus oryzae, Circinella muscae, Mucor subtilissimus, Mucor hiemalis f. hiemalis, Syncephalastrum racemosum, Rhizopus microsporus var. chinensis and Absidia cylindrospora showed protease activity. PMID:24031292

  9. Sterol Composition of Clinically Relevant Mucorales and Changes Resulting from Posaconazole Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Christoph; Neugebauer, Thomas; Zill, Patrizia; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Bracher, Franz; Binder, Ulrike

    2018-05-19

    Mucorales are fungi with increasing importance in the clinics. Infections take a rapidly progressive course resulting in high mortality rates. The ergosterol biosynthesis pathway and sterol composition are of interest, since they are targeted by currently applied antifungal drugs. Nevertheless, Mucorales often exhibit resistance to these drugs, resulting in therapeutic failure. Here, sterol patterns of six clinically relevant Mucorales ( Lichtheimia corymbifera , Lichtheimia ramosa , Mucor circinelloides , Rhizomucor pusillus , Rhizopus arrhizus , and Rhizopus microsporus ) were analysed in a targeted metabolomics fashion after derivatization by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Additionally, the effect of posaconazole (POS) treatment on the sterol pattern of R. arrhizus was evaluated. Overall, fifteen different sterols were detected with species dependent variations in the total and relative sterol amount. Sterol analysis from R. arrhizus hyphae confronted with sublethal concentrations of posaconazole revealed the accumulation of 14-methylergosta-8,24-diene-3,6-diol, which is a toxic sterol that was previously only detected in yeasts. Sterol content and composition were further compared to the well-characterized pathogenic mold Aspergillus fumigatus . This work contributes to a better understanding of the ergosterol biosynthesis pathway of Mucorales, which is essential to improve antifungal efficacy, the identification of targets for novel drug design, and to investigate the combinatorial effects of drugs targeting this pathway.

  10. Fungal infection by Mucorales order in lung transplantation: 4 case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, F M F D; Camargo, P C L B; Costa, A N; Teixeira, R H O B; Carraro, R M; Afonso, J E; Campos, S V; Samano, M N; Fernandes, L M; Abdalla, L G; Pêgo-Fernandes, P M

    2014-01-01

    Mucorales is a fungus that causes systemic, highly lethal infections in immunocompromised patients. The overall mortality of pulmonary mucormycosis can reach 95%. This work is a review of medical records of 200 lung transplant recipients between the years of 2003 and 2013, in order to identify the prevalence of Mucorales in the Lung Transplantation service of Heart Institute (InCor), Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil, by culture results from bronchoalveolar lavage and necropsy findings. We report 4 cases found at this analyses: 3 in patients with cystic fibrosis and 1 in a patient with bronchiectasis due to Kartagener syndrome. There were 2 unfavorable outcomes related to the presence of Mucorales, 1 by reduction of immunosuppression, another by invasive infection. Another patient died from renal and septic complications from another etiology. One patient was diagnosed at autopsy just 5 days after lung transplantation, with the Mucor inside the pulmonary vein with a precise, well-defined involvement only of donor's segment, leading to previous colonization hypothesis. There are few case reports of Mucorales infection in lung transplantation in the literature. Surveillance for the presence of Mucor can lead to timely fungal treatment and reduce morbidity and mortality in the immunocompromised patients, especially lung transplant recipients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Impact of Mucorales and Other Invasive Molds on Clinical Outcomes of Polymicrobial Traumatic Wound Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warkentien, Tyler E; Shaikh, Faraz; Weintrob, Amy C; Rodriguez, Carlos J; Murray, Clinton K; Lloyd, Bradley A; Ganesan, Anuradha; Aggarwal, Deepak; Carson, M Leigh; Tribble, David R

    2015-07-01

    Combat trauma wounds with invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are often polymicrobial with fungal and bacterial growth, but the impact of the wound microbiology on clinical outcomes is uncertain. Our objectives were to compare the microbiological features between IFI and non-IFI wounds and evaluate whether clinical outcomes differed among IFI wounds based upon mold type. Data from U.S. military personnel injured in Afghanistan with IFI wounds were examined. Controls were matched by the pattern/severity of injury, including blood transfusion requirements. Wound closure timing was compared between IFI and non-IFI control wounds (with/without bacterial infections). IFI wound closure was also assessed according to mold species isolation. Eighty-two IFI wounds and 136 non-IFI wounds (63 with skin and soft tissue infections [SSTIs] and 73 without) were examined. The time to wound closure was longer for the IFI wounds (median, 16 days) than for the non-IFI controls with/without SSTIs (medians, 12 and 9 days, respectively; P Mucorales growth than for wounds with non-Mucorales growth (median, 17 days versus 13 days; P Mucorales and Aspergillus spp. growth were compared, there was no significant difference in wound closure timing. Trauma wounds with SSTIs were often polymicrobial, yet the presence of invasive molds (predominant types: order Mucorales, Aspergillus spp., and Fusarium spp.) significantly prolonged the time to wound closure. Overall, the times to wound closure were longest for the IFI wounds with Mucorales growth. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Development and application of two independent real-time PCR assays to detect clinically relevant Mucorales species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Jan; Goldenberger, Daniel; Schmidt, Friderike; Weisser, Maja; Wehrle-Wieland, Elisabeth; Einsele, Hermann; Frei, Reno; Löffler, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    PCR-based detection of Mucorales species could improve diagnosis of suspected invasive fungal infection, leading to a better patient outcome. This study describes two independent probe-based real-time PCR tests for detection of clinically relevant Mucorales, targeting specific fragments of the 18S and the 28S rRNA genes. Both assays have a short turnaround time, allow fast, specific and very sensitive detection of clinically relevant Mucorales and have the potential to be used as quantitative tests. They were validated on various clinical samples (fresh and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens, mainly biopsies, n = 17). The assays should be used as add-on tools to complement standard techniques; a combined approach of both real-time PCR assays has 100 % sensitivity. Genus identification by subsequent sequencing is possible for amplicons of the 18S PCR assay. In conclusion, combination of the two independent Mucorales assays described in this study, 18S and 28S, detected all clinical samples associated with proven Mucorales infection (n = 10). Reliable and specific identification of Mucorales is a prerequisite for successful antifungal therapy as these fungi show intrinsic resistance to voriconazole and caspofungin.

  13. Molecular identification of Mucorales in human tissues: contribution of PCR electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanio, A; Garcia-Hermoso, D; Mercier-Delarue, S; Lanternier, F; Gits-Muselli, M; Menotti, J; Denis, B; Bergeron, A; Legrand, M; Lortholary, O; Bretagne, S

    2015-06-01

    Molecular methods are crucial for mucormycosis diagnosis because cultures are frequently negative, even if microscopy suggests the presence of hyphae in tissues. We assessed PCR/electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS) for Mucorales identification in 19 unfixed tissue samples from 13 patients with proven or probable mucormycosis and compared the results with culture, quantitative real-time PCR, 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer region (ITS PCR) and 18S PCR sequencing. Concordance with culture identification to both genus and species levels was higher for PCR/ESI-MS than for the other techniques. Thus, PCR/ESI-MS is suitable for Mucorales identification, within 6 hours, for tissue samples for which microscopy results suggest the presence of hyphae. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. QPCR detection of Mucorales DNA in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid to diagnose pulmonary mucormycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Emeline E; Iriart, Xavier; Bellanger, Anne Pauline; Dupont, Damien; Guitard, Juliette; Gabriel, Frederic; Cassaing, Sophie; Charpentier, Eléna; Guenounou, Sarah; Cornet, Murielle; Botterel, Françoise; Rocchi, Steffi; Berceanu, Ana; Millon, Laurence

    2018-06-06

    Early diagnosis and treatment are essential to improving the outcome of mucormycosis. The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the contribution of quantitative PCR detection of Mucorales DNA in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids for early diagnosis of pulmonary mucormycosis.Bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (n=450) from 374 patients with pneumonia and immunosuppressive conditions were analyzed using a combination of 3 quantitative PCR assays targeting the main genera involved in mucormycosis in France ( Rhizomucor, Mucor/Rhizopus, Lichtheimia ).Among these 374 patients, 24 had at least one bronchoalveolar lavage with a positive PCR; 23/24 patients had radiological criteria for invasive fungal infections according to consensual criteria : 10 patients with probable or proven mucormycosis, and 13 additional patients with other invasive fungal infections (4 probable aspergillosis, 1 proven fusariosis, and 8 possible invasive fungal infections). Only 2/24 patients with a positive PCR on bronchoalveolar lavage had a positive Mucorales culture.PCR was also positive on serum in 17/24 patients. In most cases, PCR was first detected positive on sera (15/17). However, a positive PCR on bronchoalveolar lavage was the earliest and/or the only biological test revealing mucormycosis in 4 patients with a final diagnosis of probable or proven mucormycosis, 3 patients with probable aspergillosis and one patient with a possible invasive fungal infection.Mucorales PCR performed on bronchoalveolar lavage could provide additional arguments for earlier administration of Mucorales-directed antifungal therapy, thus improving the outcome of lung mucormycosis. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  15. Susceptibility profiles of amphotericin B and posaconazole against clinically relevant mucorales species under hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Elisabeth; Binder, Ulrike; Sparber, Manuela; Lackner, Michaela; Caramalho, Rita; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia

    2015-02-01

    The effect of hypoxic conditions on the in vitro efficacy of amphotericin B and posaconazole against Mucorales was evaluated by defining MICs with Etest and broth microdilution and identifying minimal fungicidal concentrations (MFCs). With Etest, oxygen-dependent changes were detected, while the MIC and the MFC determined with broth microdilution remained unaltered with reduced oxygen levels. The observed differences depended on the method used. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. An antimicrobial peptidomimetic induces Mucorales cell death through mitochondria-mediated apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Magda Barbu

    Full Text Available The incidence of mucormycosis has dramatically increased in immunocompromised patients. Moreover, the array of cellular targets whose inhibition results in fungal cell death is rather limited. Mitochondria have been mechanistically identified as central regulators of detoxification and virulence in fungi. Our group has previously designed and developed a proteolytically-resistant peptidomimetic motif D(KLAKLAK2 with pleiotropic action ranging from targeted (i.e., ligand-directed activity against cancer and obesity to non-targeted activity against antibiotic resistant gram-negative rods. Here we evaluated whether this non-targeted peptidomimetic motif is active against Mucorales. We show that D(KLAKLAK2 has marked fungicidal action, inhibits germination, and reduces hyphal viability. We have also observed cellular changes characteristic of apoptosis in D(KLAKLAK2-treated Mucorales cells. Moreover, the fungicidal activity was directly correlated with vacuolar injury, mitochondrial swelling and mitochondrial membrane depolarization, intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation (ROS, and increased caspase-like enzymatic activity. Finally, these apoptotic features were prevented by the addition of the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine indicating mechanistic pathway specificity. Together, these findings indicate that D(KLAKLAK2 makes Mucorales exquisitely susceptible via mitochondrial injury-induced apoptosis. This prototype may serve as a candidate drug for the development of translational applications against mucormycosis and perhaps other fungal infections.

  17. An antimicrobial peptidomimetic induces Mucorales cell death through mitochondria-mediated apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbu, E Magda; Shirazi, Fazal; McGrath, Danielle M; Albert, Nathaniel; Sidman, Richard L; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of mucormycosis has dramatically increased in immunocompromised patients. Moreover, the array of cellular targets whose inhibition results in fungal cell death is rather limited. Mitochondria have been mechanistically identified as central regulators of detoxification and virulence in fungi. Our group has previously designed and developed a proteolytically-resistant peptidomimetic motif D(KLAKLAK)2 with pleiotropic action ranging from targeted (i.e., ligand-directed) activity against cancer and obesity to non-targeted activity against antibiotic resistant gram-negative rods. Here we evaluated whether this non-targeted peptidomimetic motif is active against Mucorales. We show that D(KLAKLAK)2 has marked fungicidal action, inhibits germination, and reduces hyphal viability. We have also observed cellular changes characteristic of apoptosis in D(KLAKLAK)2-treated Mucorales cells. Moreover, the fungicidal activity was directly correlated with vacuolar injury, mitochondrial swelling and mitochondrial membrane depolarization, intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation (ROS), and increased caspase-like enzymatic activity. Finally, these apoptotic features were prevented by the addition of the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine indicating mechanistic pathway specificity. Together, these findings indicate that D(KLAKLAK)2 makes Mucorales exquisitely susceptible via mitochondrial injury-induced apoptosis. This prototype may serve as a candidate drug for the development of translational applications against mucormycosis and perhaps other fungal infections.

  18. Stereoselectivity of Mucorales lipases toward triradylglycerols--a simple solution to a complex problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheib, H.; Pleiss, J.; Kovac, A.; Paltauf, F.; Schmid, R. D.

    1999-01-01

    The lipases from Rhizopus and Rhizomucor are members of the family of Mucorales lipases. Although they display high sequence homology, their stereoselectivity toward triradylglycerols (sn-2 substituted triacylglycerols) varies. Four different triradylglycerols were investigated, which were classified into two groups: flexible substrates with rotatable O'-C1' ether or ester bonds adjacent to C2 of glycerol and rigid substrates with a rigid N'-C1' amide bond or a phenyl ring in sn-2. Although Rhizopus lipase shows opposite stereopreference for flexible and rigid substrates (hydrolysis in sn-1 and sn-3, respectively), Rhizomucor lipase hydrolyzes both groups of triradylglycerols preferably in sn-1. To explain these experimental observations, computer-aided molecular modeling was applied to study the molecular basis of stereoselectivity. A generalized model for both lipases of the Mucorales family highlights the residues mediating stereoselectivity: (1) L258, the C-terminal neighbor of the catalytic histidine, and (2) G266, which is located in a loop contacting the glycerol backbone of a bound substrate. Interactions with triradylglycerol substrates are dominated by van der Waals contacts. Stereoselectivity can be predicted by analyzing the value of a single substrate torsion angle that discriminates between sn-1 and sn-3 stereopreference for all substrates and lipases investigated here. This simple model can be easily applied in enzyme and substrate engineering to predict Mucorales lipase variants and synthetic substrates with desired stereoselectivity. PMID:10210199

  19. Mucorales-specific T cells emerge in the course of invasive mucormycosis and may be used as a surrogate diagnostic marker in high-risk patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potenza, Leonardo; Vallerini, Daniela; Barozzi, Patrizia; Riva, Giovanni; Forghieri, Fabio; Zanetti, Eleonora; Quadrelli, Chiara; Candoni, Anna; Maertens, Johan; Rossi, Giulio; Morselli, Monica; Codeluppi, Mauro; Paolini, Ambra; Maccaferri, Monica; Del Giovane, Cinzia; D'Amico, Roberto; Rumpianesi, Fabio; Pecorari, Monica; Cavalleri, Francesca; Marasca, Roberto; Narni, Franco; Luppi, Mario

    2011-11-17

    Mucorales-specific T cells were investigated in 28 hematologic patients during the course of their treatment. Three developed proven invasive mucormycosis (IM), 17 had infections of known origin but other than IM, and 8 never had fever during the period of observation. Mucorales-specific T cells could be detected only in patients with IM, both at diagnosis and throughout the entire course of the IM, but neither before nor for long after resolution of the infection. Such T cells predominantly produced IL-4, IFN-γ, IL-10, and to a lesser extent IL-17 and belonged to either CD4(+) or CD8(+) subsets. The specific T cells that produced IFN-γ were able to directly induce damage to Mucorales hyphae. None of the 25 patients without IM had Mucorales-specific T cells. Specific T cells contribute to human immune responses against fungi of the order Mucorales and could be evaluated as a surrogate diagnostic marker of IM.

  20. Mucorales isolados do solo de mineração de cobre e produção de amilase e inulinase Mucorales isolated from copper-mining soils and production of amylase and inulinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz Cabral Monteiro Azevedo Santiago

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A presença de metais pesados no solo proporciona impacto sobre os microrganismos, vegetação e os processos funcionais do ecossistema. Visando comprovar que Mucorales são afetados pela extração de cobre na Mineradora Caraíba, Jaguarari, BA, espécies de Mucorales foram isoladas de amostras de solo coletadas nas épocas seca e chuvosa. Os Mucorales foram identificados e caracterizados quanto à capacidade de degradar amido e inulina. Utilizando os métodos de diluição e placa de solo, foram obtidos 46 isolados de Mucorales pertencentes a sete diferentes espécies. Absidia blakesleeana Lendner, A. cylindrospora Hagem, A. hialospora (Saito Lendn., Cunninghamella elegans Lendner, Rhizopus microsporus V. Thieghen, R. oryzae Went. & Prinsen Geerl. e Syncephalastrum racemosum (Cohn. Schroet. foram isolados na época seca. A. blakesleeana e A. hialospora foram isoladas apenas na época chuvosa. Rhizopus oryzae apresentou maior número de isolados (30,43%, seguido por A. blakesleeana (26,09% e C. elegans (21,74%. O gênero que apresentou maior número de espécies foi Absidia seguido por Rhizopus. Entre as áreas, houve diferenças significativas no número de isolados de Mucorales, comprovando os efeitos negativos do impacto ambiental na abundância de Mucorales nos solos impactados. Todas as espécies degradaram o amido e apenas C. elegans degradou também inulina. Culturas de mesma espécie isoladas de áreas diferentes apresentaram o mesmo comportamento quanto à degradação de amido e inulina.The presence of heavy metals in soil causes impact on microorganisms, vegetation and functional processes in ecosystems. Aiming to prove that Mucorales are affected by copper extraction at the Caraíba mining site, Jaguarari, Bahia, species of Mucorales were isolated from samples collected in the dry and wet seasons. Mucorales were identified and characterized according to their capacity to degrade starch and inulin. Forty six isolates from seven

  1. [Significance of MUC5B antibody in differential diagnosis between Aspergillus species and Mucorales of fungal sinusitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Ying-shi; Liu, Hong-gang; Liu, Xian-jun

    2008-04-01

    To differentiate between Aspergillus species and Mucorales of fungal sinusitis by immunohistochemistry. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks of 66 cases of fungal sinusitis were retrieved from the archival files of Department of Pathology of Beijing Tongren Hospital during the period from 2001 to 2006. The samples included 29 cases of fungal balls, 12 cases of allergic fungal sinusitis, 24 cases of chronic invasive fungal sinusitis and 1 case of acute invasive fungal sinusitis. The types of fungi were 44 Aspergillus species (31 cases of A. fumigatus, 7 cases of A. flavus and 6 cases of A. terreus) and 22 Mucorales (14 cases of Mucor species and 8 cases of Rhizopus species). Immunohistochemistry was performed with MUC2, MUC5AC and MUC5B antibodies. The results were compared with histochemical study for periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) and Grocott methenamine silver (GMS) stains. Immunohistochemical study for MUC5B showed that the positive rate of Aspergillus species was 90.9%, in contrast to 4.5% in Mucorales (P Mucorales in fungal sinusitis.

  2. Invasive disease due to Mucorales: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, C K; Cheng, V C; Lie, A K; Yuen, K Y

    2001-06-01

    To review the mycology, pathogenesis, clinical characteristics, investigations, and treatment modalities of mucormycosis. A local case of mucormycosis; MEDLINE and non-MEDLINE search of the literature. Key words for the literature search were 'mucormycosis' and 'Mucorales'; all available years of study were reviewed. Original articles, review papers, meta-analyses, and relevant book chapters were reviewed. Mucormycosis is a fungal infection that is rare but increasingly recognised in the growing population of immunocompromised patients. It is caused by saprophytic non-septate hyphae of the order Mucorales. The pulmonary and disseminated forms commonly occur in patients with haematological malignancy, especially acute leukaemia and lymphoma, and those receiving treatment with immunosuppressive effects. The rhinocerebral form is more prevalent in patients with diabetes mellitus, particularly those with the complication of diabetic ketoacidosis. The use of amphotericin B combined with surgery remains the mainstay of treatment. The prognosis largely depends on prompt correction of the underlying risk factors. New strategies to combat this life-threatening infection will result from better understanding of its pathogenesis. A high index of suspicion is needed, in appropriate clinical settings, to diagnose and aggressively treat this infection in view of the high mortality rate for susceptible patients.

  3. Identification of Mucorales isolates from soil using morphological and molecular methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaee, A; Zia, M; Bayat, M; Hashemi, J

    2016-03-01

    Soil is the main habitat of saprophytic and pathogenic fungi. Mucoromycotina constitutes a large group of soil fungi, with certain opportunistic members causing systemic infections in immunocompromised hosts. The majority of human and animal infections are caused by the members of the genera Rhizopus , Mucor , Rhizomucor , Lichtheimia ( Absidia) , Cunninghamella, and Mortierella . Accordingly, in the present study, we aimed to isolate and identify the main genera of the order Mucorales, using molecular assays and morphological features . In total, 340 soil samples were collected from seven public parks throughout the city and sidewalk gardens in 14 municipal districts in Isfahan, Iran. All the samples were cultured on the appropriate media, incubated at 27°C for 2- 4 days, and examined daily for visible fungal growth. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method was applied and macroscopic, microscopic, and physiological characteristics were assessed to identify fungal colonies. 400 pure colonies, belonging to the orders Mucorales and Mortierellales, including the genera Lichtheimia , Rhizopus, Rhizomucor, Mucor, Cunninghamella, and Mortierella, were identified . The genus Rhizopus (35.5%) was the most frequent isolate, followed by Mucor (32.25%) and Rhizomucor (27.5%). The results emphasize the importance of opportunistic fungi in public areas and indicate the risk of exposure for immunocompromised individuals.

  4. Isothermal microcalorimetry for antifungal susceptibility testing of Mucorales, Fusarium spp., and Scedosporium spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furustrand Tafin, Ulrika; Meis, Jacques F; Trampuz, Andrej

    2012-08-01

    We evaluated isothermal microcalorimetry for real-time susceptibility testing of non-Aspergillus molds. MIC and minimal effective concentration (MEC) values of Mucorales (n = 4), Fusarium spp. (n = 4), and Scedosporium spp. (n = 4) were determined by microbroth dilution according to the Clinical Laboratory Standard Institute M38-A2 guidelines. Heat production of molds was measured at 37 °C in Sabouraud dextrose broth inoculated with 2.5 × 10(4) spores/mL in the presence of amphotericin B, voriconazole, posaconazole, caspofungin, and anidulafungin. As determined by microcalorimetry, amphotericin B was the most active agent against Mucorales (MHIC 0.06-0.125 μg/mL) and Fusarium spp. (MHIC 1-4 μg/mL), whereas voriconazole was the most active agent against Scedosporium spp. (MHIC 0.25 to 8 μg/mL). The percentage of agreement (within one 2-fold dilution) between the MHIC and MIC (or MEC) was 67%, 92%, 75%, and 83% for amphotericin B, voriconazole, posaconazole, and caspofungin, respectively. Microcalorimetry provides additional information on timing of antifungal activity, enabling further investigation of drug-mold and drug-drug interaction, and optimization of antifungal treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Bone and joint infections by Mucorales, Scedosporium, Fusarium and even rarer fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Philipp; Tacke, Daniela; Cornely, Oliver A

    2016-01-01

    Mucorales, Scedosporium and Fusarium species are rarely considered as cause for bone and joint infections. However, these moulds are emerging as important fungal pathogens in immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. Typical pre-disposing host conditions are immunosuppression and diabetes. Most common causative pathogens are Mucorales followed by Scedosporium and Fusarium. Acremonium and Phialemonium species are rare but some case reports exist. MRI is the gold standard imaging technique. Tissue specimens obtained as aspirates, imaging guided biopsy or open surgery need mycological and histopathological work-up for genus and species identification. Multimodal treatment strategies combine surgical debridement, drainage of joints or abscesses, removal of infected prosthetic joints and systemic antifungals. The treatment of mucormycosis is polyene based and may be combined with either posaconazole or - in rare cases - caspofungin. As Scedosporium species are intrinsically resistant to polyenes and azoles show absence of in vitro activity, voriconazole plus synergistic treatment regimens become the therapeutic standard. In fusariosis, fungal susceptibility is virtually impossible to predict, so that combination treatment of voriconazole and lipid-based amphotericin B should be the first-line strategy while susceptibility results are pending. In the absence of randomized controlled trials, infections due to the above moulds should be registered, e.g. in the registries of the European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM).

  6. [Clinicopathologic study of invasive fungal rhinosinusitis caused by Aspergillus and Mucorales].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chun-yan; Piao, Ying-shi; Tian, Cheng; Li, Li-li; Liu, Hong-gang

    2012-10-01

    To compare the differences in clinicopathologic features of invasive fungal rhinosinusitis caused by Aspergillus and Mucorales, and to discuss the pathogenesis of tissue injury induced by these two kinds of fungi. The clinical and pathologic features of 19 patients with invasive fungal rhinosinusitis due to Aspergillus (group A) and 16 patients with invasive fungal rhinosinusitis due to Mucorales (group M) were retrospectively reviewed. HE, PAS and GMS stains were performed on all the paraffin-embedded tissues. The diagnosis was confirmed by histologic examination and microbiological culture results. Amongst the group A patients, the clinical course was acute in 4 cases and chronic in 15 cases. Thirteen cases had underlying predisposing conditions, including diabetes (number = 4), malignant tumor (number = 5), history of trauma (number = 1) and radical maxillary sinus surgery (number = 3). Follow-up information was available in 13 patients. Seven of them died, 4 due to fungal encephalopathy and 3 due to underlying diseases. Amongst the group M patients, the clinical course was acute in 14 cases and chronic in 2 cases. Fourteen cases had underlying predisposing conditions, including diabetes (number = 8), malignant tumor (number = 5) and history of wisdom tooth extraction (number = 1). Follow-up information was available in 14 patients. Four of them died of fungal encephalopathy. There was significant difference in clinical onset between the two groups (P = 0.01). There was however no difference in terms of underlying predisposing conditions and disease mortality. Histologically, the microorganisms in group A patients formed fungal masses and attached to the mucosal surface, resulting in necrotic bands (11/19). Epithelioid granulomas were conspicuous but multinucleated giant cells were relatively rare. Deep-seated necrosis, granulomatous inflammation against fungal organisms (3/19) and vasculitis with thrombosis (4/19) were not common. On the other hand, large areas

  7. A long-term survivor of disseminated Aspergillus and mucorales infection: an instructive case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoudi, Setareh; Anderlini, Paolo; Fuller, Gregory N; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2014-12-01

    Invasive fungal infections remain major causes of infection-related mortality in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) patients. Mixed infections and multiple organ involvement have been reported in these patients. Here, we report a case of mixed Aspergillus and Mucorales infection involving the lungs, brain, spleen and bone in a HSCT patient with relapsed acute myeloid leukemia, who finally improved with triple antifungal therapy and neurosurgical evacuation of brain abscesses. She was put on lifelong secondary prophylaxis with posaconazole with excellent compliance and no sign of toxicity despite over 10 years of drug administration. Serial galactomannan measurements and positron emission tomography/computed tomography were used and were helpful for disease activity monitoring. This is an instructive case of long-term survival after a severe combined mould infection.

  8. Delimitation of Umbelopsis (Mucorales, Umbelopsidaceae fam. nov.) based on ITS sequence and RFLP data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Wieland; Gams, Walter

    2003-03-01

    In a continuation of studies started by de Ruiter et al. (1993), all known species of the Mortierella isabellina-group (Micromucor/Umbelopsis clade of O'Donnell et al. 2001) and a few other Mucorales and species of Mortierella were investigated by RFLP (including ITS1, 5.8S, ITS2 and the 5' end of the large subunit rDNA gene) and ITS1 sequence analyses. This monophyletic group is unrelated to Mortierella and is only distantly related to the core group of the Mucoraceae. M. longicollis falls outside the Umbelopsis clade. Molecular data resolved two subclades within the M. isabellina-group; however, they are not correlated with any differences in sporangial wall and shape, spore pigmentation and shape, or sporangiophore branching. Therefore we subsume all taxa in one genus, Umbelopsis. The new family Umbelopsidaceae and the new combinations U. isabellina, U. ramanniana, and U. autotrophica are proposed.

  9. Antifungal susceptibility and phylogeny of opportunistic members of the order mucorales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Roxana G; de Hoog, G Sybren; Schwarz, Patrick; Dannaoui, Eric; Deng, Shuwen; Machouart, Marie; Voigt, Kerstin; van de Sande, Wendy W J; Dolatabadi, Somayeh; Meis, Jacques F; Walther, Grit

    2012-01-01

    The in vitro susceptibilities of 66 molecularly identified strains of the Mucorales to eight antifungals (amphotericin B, terbinafine, itraconazole, posaconazole, voriconazole, caspofungin, micafungin, and 5-fluorocytosine) were tested. Molecular phylogeny was reconstructed based on the nuclear ribosomal large subunit to reveal taxon-specific susceptibility profiles. The impressive phylogenetic diversity of the Mucorales was reflected in susceptibilities differing at family, genus, and species levels. Amphotericin B was the most active drug, though somewhat less against Rhizopus and Cunninghamella species. Posaconazole was the second most effective antifungal agent but showed reduced activity in Mucor and Cunninghamella strains, while voriconazole lacked in vitro activity for most strains. Genera attributed to the Mucoraceae exhibited a wide range of MICs for posaconazole, itraconazole, and terbinafine and included resistant strains. Cunninghamella also comprised strains resistant to all azoles tested but was fully susceptible to terbinafine. In contrast, the Lichtheimiaceae completely lacked strains with reduced susceptibility for these antifungals. Syncephalastrum species exhibited susceptibility profiles similar to those of the Lichtheimiaceae. Mucor species were more resistant to azoles than Rhizopus species. Species-specific responses were obtained for terbinafine where only Rhizopus arrhizus and Mucor circinelloides were resistant. Complete or vast resistance was observed for 5-fluorocytosine, caspofungin, and micafungin. Intraspecific variability of in vitro susceptibility was found in all genera tested but was especially high in Mucor and Rhizopus for azoles and terbinafine. Accurate molecular identification of etiologic agents is compulsory to predict therapy outcome. For species of critical genera such as Mucor and Rhizopus, exhibiting high intraspecific variation, susceptibility testing before the onset of therapy is recommended.

  10. The calcineurin pathway inhibitor tacrolimus enhances the in vitro activity of azoles against Mucorales via apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, F; Kontoyiannis, D P

    2013-09-01

    The calcineurin pathway regulates antifungal drug resistance and the virulence of several major human-pathogenic fungi, including the recalcitrant Mucorales. We hypothesized that the fungistatic triazoles posaconazole (PCZ) and itraconazole (ICZ) become fungicidal in the setting of the calcineurin inhibitor tacrolimus (TCR) and that such an effect is mediated through apoptosis. Fungicidal activity and apoptosis were studied using standard microbiological techniques and hyphal metabolic and vital dye reduction assays at 37°C in RPMI 1640. Apoptosis was characterized by detecting intracellular Ca(2+), phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization, DNA fragmentation, plasma membrane integrity, chromatin condensation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, caspase-like activity, ATP, and cytochrome c release. MICs for PCZ and ICZ alone were significantly higher (8 to 128 μg/ml) than those of PCZ or ICZ plus TCR (0.25 to 4 μg/ml) for Rhizopus oryzae, Cunninghamella bertholletiae, and Mucor circinelloides. Both PCZ and ICZ in combination with TCR became fungicidal, and their activity was mediated through increased apoptotic cell death of R. oryzae (10 to 50%), C. bertholletiae (5 to 50%), and M. circinelloides (5 to 55%) germlings, with morphological apoptotic changes characterized by externalization of PS, nuclear condensation, and DNA fragmentation. Moreover, activation of the caspase-like activity was correlated with cell death induced by TCR plus PCZ or ICZ. These changes correlated with elevated intracellular Ca(2+) and ROS levels and disturbance of mitochondrial potential. We found that PCZ or ICZ in combination with TCR renders Mucorales sensitive to triazoles via apoptotic death. These observations could serve as a new paradigm for the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  11. Combination liposomal amphotericin B, posaconazole and oral amphotericin B for treatment of gastrointestinal Mucorales in an immunocompromised patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Anderson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is a life threatening infection caused by fungi in the order Mucorales. Mucormycosis can affect any organ system with rhino-orbital-cerebral and pulmonary infections being the most predominant infection types. Gastrointestinal mucormycosis is rare and accounts for only 4–7% of all cases. Here, we present a case of invasive gastrointestinal mucormycosis in an immunocompromised host treated with systemic and topical anti-mold therapy.

  12. Activity of Posaconazole and Other Antifungal Agents against Mucorales Strains Identified by Sequencing of Internal Transcribed Spacers▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alastruey-Izquierdo, Ana; Castelli, Maria Victoria; Cuesta, Isabel; Monzon, Araceli; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Rodriguez-Tudela, Juan Luis

    2009-01-01

    The antifungal susceptibility profiles of 77 clinical strains of Mucorales species, identified by internal transcribed spacer sequencing, were analyzed. MICs obtained at 24 and 48 h were compared. Amphotericin B was the most active agent against all isolates, except for Cunninghamella and Apophysomyces isolates. Posaconazole also showed good activity for all species but Cunninghamella bertholletiae. Voriconazole had no activity against any of the fungi tested. Terbinafine showed good activity, except for Rhizopus oryzae, Mucor circinelloides, and Rhizomucor variabilis isolates. PMID:19171801

  13. Combination liposomal amphotericin B, posaconazole and oral amphotericin B for treatment of gastrointestinal Mucorales in an immunocompromised patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Anthony; McManus, Dayna; Perreault, Sarah; Lo, Ying-Chun; Seropian, Stuart; Topal, Jeffrey E

    2017-09-01

    Mucormycosis is a life threatening infection caused by fungi in the order Mucorales. Mucormycosis can affect any organ system with rhino-orbital-cerebral and pulmonary infections being the most predominant infection types. Gastrointestinal mucormycosis is rare and accounts for only 4-7% of all cases. Here, we present a case of invasive gastrointestinal mucormycosis in an immunocompromised host treated with systemic and topical anti-mold therapy.

  14. Activity of posaconazole and other antifungal agents against Mucorales strains identified by sequencing of internal transcribed spacers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alastruey-Izquierdo, Ana; Castelli, Maria Victoria; Cuesta, Isabel; Monzon, Araceli; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Rodriguez-Tudela, Juan Luis

    2009-04-01

    The antifungal susceptibility profiles of 77 clinical strains of Mucorales species, identified by internal transcribed spacer sequencing, were analyzed. MICs obtained at 24 and 48 h were compared. Amphotericin B was the most active agent against all isolates, except for Cunninghamella and Apophysomyces isolates. Posaconazole also showed good activity for all species but Cunninghamella bertholletiae. Voriconazole had no activity against any of the fungi tested. Terbinafine showed good activity, except for Rhizopus oryzae, Mucor circinelloides, and Rhizomucor variabilis isolates.

  15. Chitosan produced from Mucorales fungi using agroindustrial by-products and its efficacy to inhibit Colletotrichum species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Berger, Lúcia Raquel; Montenegro Stamford, Thayza Christina; de Oliveira, Kataryne Árabe Rimá; de Miranda Pereira Pessoa, Adjane; de Lima, Marcos Antonio Barbosa; Estevez Pintado, Maria Manuela; Saraiva Câmara, Marcos Paz; de Oliveira Franco, Luciana; Magnani, Marciane; de Souza, Evandro Leite

    2018-03-01

    This study evaluated corn steep liquor (CSL) and papaya peel juice (PPJ) in mixture as substrates for the cultivation (96h, 28°C, pH 5.6, 150rpm) of Mucorales fungi for chitosan production, and determined the growth-inhibitory effect of the fungal chitosan (FuCS) obtained under optimized conditions against phytopathogenic Colletotrichum species. All Mucorales fungi tested were capable of growing in CSL-PPJ medium, showing FuCS production in the range of 5.02 (Fennelomyces heterothalicus SIS 28) - 15.63mg/g (Cunninghamella elegans SIS 41). Highest FuCS production (37.25mg/g) was achieved when C. elegans was cultivated in medium containing 9.43% CSL and 42.5% PPJ. FuCS obtained under these conditions showed a deacetylation degree of 86%, viscosity of 120cP and molecular weight of 4.08×10 4 g/mol. FuCS at 5000, 7500 and 10,000ppm inhibited the growth of all Colletotrichum species tested. FuCS also induced alterations in the morphology of C. fructicola hyphae. CSL-PPJ mixtures are suitable substrates for the cultivation of Mucorales fungi for FuCS production. Chitosan from C. elegans cultivated in CSL-PPJ medium is effective in inhibiting phytopathogenic Colletotrichum species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Antifungal Activity of Colistin against Mucorales Species In Vitro and in a Murine Model of Rhizopus oryzae Pulmonary Infection▿

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    Ben-Ami, Ronen; Lewis, Russell E.; Tarrand, Jeffrey; Leventakos, Konstantinos; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2010-01-01

    In immunosuppressed hosts, mucormycosis is a life-threatening infection with few treatment options. We studied the activity of colistin (polymyxin E) against Mucorales species in vitro and in a murine model of pulmonary Rhizopus oryzae infection. Colistin exhibited fungicidal activity in vitro against Mucorales spores and mycelia. At the colistin MIC, initial R. oryzae hyphal damage was followed by rapid regrowth; however, regrowth was prevented by combining colistin with a subinhibitory concentration of amphotericin B. Using electron microscopy and FM4-64 staining, we demonstrated that colistin disrupts R. oryzae cytoplasmic and vacuolar membranes, resulting in the leakage of intracellular contents. The prophylactic intranasal treatment of immunosuppressed mice with colistimethate significantly reduced the mortality rate and pulmonary fungal burden resulting from inhalational challenge with R. oryzae spores, whereas intraperitoneal colistimethate treatment had no effect. We conclude that colistin has modest in vitro and in vivo fungicidal activity against Mucorales spp. Further studies are warranted to assess the use of this drug in the prevention and treatment of mucormycosis. PMID:19858263

  17. Antifungal activity of colistin against mucorales species in vitro and in a murine model of Rhizopus oryzae pulmonary infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ami, Ronen; Lewis, Russell E; Tarrand, Jeffrey; Leventakos, Konstantinos; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2010-01-01

    In immunosuppressed hosts, mucormycosis is a life-threatening infection with few treatment options. We studied the activity of colistin (polymyxin E) against Mucorales species in vitro and in a murine model of pulmonary Rhizopus oryzae infection. Colistin exhibited fungicidal activity in vitro against Mucorales spores and mycelia. At the colistin MIC, initial R. oryzae hyphal damage was followed by rapid regrowth; however, regrowth was prevented by combining colistin with a subinhibitory concentration of amphotericin B. Using electron microscopy and FM4-64 staining, we demonstrated that colistin disrupts R. oryzae cytoplasmic and vacuolar membranes, resulting in the leakage of intracellular contents. The prophylactic intranasal treatment of immunosuppressed mice with colistimethate significantly reduced the mortality rate and pulmonary fungal burden resulting from inhalational challenge with R. oryzae spores, whereas intraperitoneal colistimethate treatment had no effect. We conclude that colistin has modest in vitro and in vivo fungicidal activity against Mucorales spp. Further studies are warranted to assess the use of this drug in the prevention and treatment of mucormycosis.

  18. Characterization of selected strains of mucorales using fatty acid profiles Caracterização de linhagens de mucorales através do perfil de ácidos graxos

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    Manuela da Silva

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available The fatty acid profiles of several fungi of the order Mucorales (Zygomycetes, including Backusella lamprospora (Lendner Benny and R.K. Benj., Benjaminiella youngii P.M. Kirk, Circinella simplex van Tieghem, Cunninghamella blakesleeana Lendner, Mortierella ramanniana (Möller Linnem., Mucor circinelloides f. janssenii (Lendner Schipper, Mycotypha microspora Fenner, Rhizomucor miehei (Cooney and R. Emerson Schipper and Rhizomucor pusillus (Lindt Schipper, and of Volutella sp. Fr., from the class Ascomycetes, were qualitatively analysed by gas-liquid chromatography in order to determine the taxonomic value of these chemotaxonomic markers. The fatty acids present in all strains were palmitic (16:0, oleic (18:1, linoleic (18:2 and g-linolenic (18:3 acid, with the exception that the latter was not found in Volutella sp. Chemotaxonomic markers for some species and genera were obtained, including a non-identified fatty acid, FAME8 (minimum and maximum retention times of 27.92 and 28.28 minutes for Rhizomucor miehei CCT 2236 and Rhizomucor pusillus CCT 4133, and FAME3 (minimum and maximum of 16.53 and 16.61 minutes for Benjaminiella youngii CCT 4121. The chemotaxonomic marker of the order Mucorales was the fatty acid 18:3w6, confirming previous data from literature. The results of the present study suggest that qualitative fatty acid analysis can be an important chemotaxonomic tool for the classification of fungi assigned to the order Mucorales (Zygomycetes.O perfil de ácidos graxos de Backusella lamprospora (Lendner Benny e R.K. Benj., Benjaminiella youngii P.M. Kirk, Circinella simplex van Tieghem, Cunninghamella blakesleeana Lendner, Mortierella ramanniana (Möller Linnem., Mucor circinelloides f. janssenii (Lendner Schipper, Mycotypha microspora Fenner, Rhizomucor miehei (Cooney e R. Emerson Schipper e Rhizomucor pusillus (Lindt Schipper, da ordem Mucorales (Zygomycetes, e Volutella sp. Fr., da classe Ascomycetes, foram analisados qualitativamente

  19. The family structure of the Mucorales: a synoptic revision based on comprehensive multigene-genealogies.

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    Hoffmann, K; Pawłowska, J; Walther, G; Wrzosek, M; de Hoog, G S; Benny, G L; Kirk, P M; Voigt, K

    2013-06-01

    The Mucorales (Mucoromycotina) are one of the most ancient groups of fungi comprising ubiquitous, mostly saprotrophic organisms. The first comprehensive molecular studies 11 yr ago revealed the traditional classification scheme, mainly based on morphology, as highly artificial. Since then only single clades have been investigated in detail but a robust classification of the higher levels based on DNA data has not been published yet. Therefore we provide a classification based on a phylogenetic analysis of four molecular markers including the large and the small subunit of the ribosomal DNA, the partial actin gene and the partial gene for the translation elongation factor 1-alpha. The dataset comprises 201 isolates in 103 species and represents about one half of the currently accepted species in this order. Previous family concepts are reviewed and the family structure inferred from the multilocus phylogeny is introduced and discussed. Main differences between the current classification and preceding concepts affects the existing families Lichtheimiaceae and Cunninghamellaceae, as well as the genera Backusella and Lentamyces which recently obtained the status of families along with the Rhizopodaceae comprising Rhizopus, Sporodiniella and Syzygites. Compensatory base change analyses in the Lichtheimiaceae confirmed the lower level classification of Lichtheimia and Rhizomucor while genera such as Circinella or Syncephalastrum completely lacked compensatory base changes.

  20. Comparison of the EUCAST and CLSI Broth Microdilution Methods for Testing Isavuconazole, Posaconazole, and Amphotericin B against Molecularly Identified Mucorales Species.

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    Chowdhary, Anuradha; Singh, Pradeep Kumar; Kathuria, Shallu; Hagen, Ferry; Meis, Jacques F

    2015-12-01

    We compared EUCAST and CLSI antifungal susceptibility testing (AFST) methods for triazoles and amphotericin B against 124 clinical Mucorales isolates. The EUCAST method yielded MIC values 1- to 3-fold dilutions higher than those of the CLSI method for amphotericin B. The essential agreements between the two methods for triazoles were high, i.e., 99.1% (voriconazole), 98.3% (isavuconazole), and 87% (posaconazole), whereas it was significantly lower for amphotericin B (66.1%). Strategies for harmonization of the two methods for Mucorales AFST are warranted. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Isolation of Mucorales from processed maize (Zea mays L. and screening for protease activity Isolamento de Mucorales de milho processado (Zea mays L. e seleção quanto à atividade proteásica

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    André Luiz Cabral Monteiro de Azevedo Santiago

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Mucoraleswere isolated from maize flour, corn meal and cooked cornflakes using surface and depth plate methods. Rhizopus oryzae, Circinella muscae, Mucor subtilissimus,Mucor hiemalis f. hiemalis, Syncephalastrum racemosum, Rhizopus microsporus var. chinensis and Absidia cylindrospora showed protease activity.Mucorales foram isolados da farinha de milho, fubá e flocos de milho pré-cozidos pelos métodos de plaqueamento em superfície e em profundidade. Rhizopus oryzae, Circinella muscae, Mucor subtilissimus,Mucor hiemalis f. hiemalis, Syncephalastrum racemosum, Rhizopus microsporus var. chinensis e Absidia cylindrospora exibiram atividade proteásica.

  2. Species Identification and Delineation of Pathogenic Mucorales by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jin; Wan, Zhe; Li, Ruoyu; Yu, Jin

    2018-04-01

    This study aimed to validate the effectiveness of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)-based identification of filamentous fungi of the order Mucorales. A total of 111 isolates covering six genera preserved at the Research Center for Medical Mycology of Peking University were selected for MALDI-TOF MS analysis. We emphasized the study of 23 strains of Mucor irregularis predominantly isolated from patients in China. We first used the Bruker Filamentous Fungi library (v1.0) to identify all 111 isolates. To increase the identification rate, we created a compensatory in-house database, the Beijing Medical University (BMU) database, using 13 reference strains covering 6 species, including M. irregularis , Mucor hiemalis , Mucor racemosus , Cunninghamella bertholletiae , Cunninghamella phaeospora , and Cunninghamella echinulata All 111 isolates were then identified by MALDI-TOF MS using a combination of the Bruker library and BMU database. MALDI-TOF MS identified 55 (49.5%) and 74 (66.7%) isolates at the species and genus levels, respectively, using the Bruker Filamentous Fungi library v1.0 alone. A combination of the Bruker library and BMU database allowed MALDI-TOF MS to identify 90 (81.1%) and 111 (100%) isolates at the species and genus levels, respectively, with a significantly increased accuracy rate. MALDI-TOF MS poorly identified Mucorales when the Bruker library was used alone due to its lack of some fungal species. In contrast, this technique perfectly identified M. irregularis after main spectrum profiles (MSPs) of relevant reference strains were added to the Bruker library. With an expanded Bruker library, MALDI-TOF MS is an effective tool for the identification of pathogenic Mucorales. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  3. In Vitro Activity of Isavuconazole and Comparators against Clinical Isolates of the Mucorales Order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Jensen, Rasmus Hare; Meletiadis, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    The in vitro activity of isavuconazole against Mucorales isolates measured by EUCAST E.Def 9.2 and CLSI M38-A2 methodologies was investigated in comparison with those of amphotericin B, posaconazole, and voriconazole. Seventy-two isolates were included: 12 of Lichtheimia corymbifera, 5 of Lichtheimia ramosa, 5 of group I and 9 of group II of Mucor circinelloides, 9 of Rhizomucor pusillus, 26 of Rhizopus microsporus, and 6 of Rhizopus oryzae. Species identification was confirmed by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing. EUCAST MICs were read on day 1 (EUCAST-d1) and day 2 (EUCAST-d2), and CLSI MICs were read on day 2 (CLSI-d2). Isavuconazole MIC50s (range) (mg/liter) by EUCAST-d1, CLSI-d2, and EUCAST-d2 were 1 (0.125 to 16), 1 (0.125 to 2), and 4 (0.5 to >16), respectively, across all isolates. The similar values for comparator drugs were as follows: posaconazole, 0.25 (≤ 0.03 to >16), 0.25 (0.06 to >16), and 1 (0.06 to >16); amphotericin, 0.06 (≤ 0.03 to 0.5), 0.06 (≤ 0.03 to 0.25), and 0.125 (≤ 0.03 to 1); voriconazole, 16 (2 to >16), 8 (1 to >16), and >16 (8 to >16), respectively. Isavuconazole activity varied by species: Lichtheimia corymbifera, 1 (0.5 to 2), 1 (1 to 2), and 2 (1 to 4); Lichtheimia ramosa, 0.25 (0.125 to 0.5), 1 (0.5 to 2), and 2 (0.5 to 4); Rhizomucor pusillus, 0.5 (0.5 to 1), 1 (0.125 to 1), and 2 (1 to 2); Rhizopus microsporus, 1 (0.5 to 4), 0.5 (0.125 to 1), and 4 (1 to 8); and Rhizopus oryzae, 1 (0.5 to 4), 1 (0.125 to 2), and 4 (0.5 to 8), respectively, were more susceptible than Mucor circinelloides: group I, 8 (4 to 8), 4 (2 to 4), and 16 (2 to 16), respectively, and group II, 8 (1 to 16), 8 (1 to 8), and 16 (4 to >16), respectively. This was also observed for posaconazole. The essential agreement was best between EUCAST-d1 and CLSI-d2 (75% to 83%). Isavuconazole displayed in vitro activity against Mucorales isolates with the exception of Mucor circinelloides. The MICs were in general 1 to 3 steps higher than those for

  4. Apophysomyces variabilis: draft genome sequence and comparison of predictive virulence determinants with other medically important Mucorales.

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    Prakash, Hariprasath; Rudramurthy, Shivaprakash Mandya; Gandham, Prasad S; Ghosh, Anup Kumar; Kumar, Milner M; Badapanda, Chandan; Chakrabarti, Arunaloke

    2017-09-18

    Apophysomyces species are prevalent in tropical countries and A. variabilis is the second most frequent agent causing mucormycosis in India. Among Apophysomyces species, A. elegans, A. trapeziformis and A. variabilis are commonly incriminated in human infections. The genome sequences of A. elegans and A. trapeziformis are available in public database, but not A. variabilis. We, therefore, performed the whole genome sequence of A. variabilis to explore its genomic structure and possible genes determining the virulence of the organism. The whole genome of A. variabilis NCCPF 102052 was sequenced and the genomic structure of A. variabilis was compared with already available genome structures of A. elegans, A. trapeziformis and other medically important Mucorales. The total size of genome assembly of A. variabilis was 39.38 Mb with 12,764 protein-coding genes. The transposable elements (TEs) were low in Apophysomyces genome and the retrotransposon Ty3-gypsy was the common TE. Phylogenetically, Apophysomyces species were grouped closely with Phycomyces blakesleeanus. OrthoMCL analysis revealed 3025 orthologues proteins, which were common in those three pathogenic Apophysomyces species. Expansion of multiple gene families/duplication was observed in Apophysomyces genomes. Approximately 6% of Apophysomyces genes were predicted to be associated with virulence on PHIbase analysis. The virulence determinants included the protein families of CotH proteins (invasins), proteases, iron utilisation pathways, siderophores and signal transduction pathways. Serine proteases were the major group of proteases found in all Apophysomyces genomes. The carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes) constitute the majority of the secretory proteins. The present study is the maiden attempt to sequence and analyze the genomic structure of A. variabilis. Together with available genome sequence of A. elegans and A. trapeziformis, the study helped to indicate the possible virulence determinants of

  5. In vitro antifungal activity of isavuconazole against 345 mucorales isolates collected at study centers in eight countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verweij, P E; González, G M; Wiedrhold, N P; Lass-Flörl, C; Warn, P; Heep, M; Ghannoum, M A; Guinea, J

    2009-06-01

    Although mucormycoses (formerly zygomycoses) are relatively uncommon, they are associated with high mortality and treatment options are limited. Isavuconazole is a novel, water soluble, broad-spectrum azole in clinical development for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis and candidiasis. The objective of this report was to collate data on the in vitro activity of isavuconazole against a collection of 345 diverse mucorales isolates, collected and tested at eight study centers in europe, mexico and North America. Each study center undertook minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) susceptibility testing of their isolates, according to EUCAST or CLSI guidelines. Across all study centers, isavuconazole exhibited MIC(50 )values of 1-4 mg/l and MIC(90 )values of 4-16 mg/l against the five genera. There were also marked differences in MIC distributions, which could be ascribed to differences in inoculum and/or endpoint. EUCAST guidelines appeared to generate modal MICs 2-fold higher than CLSI. These results confirm that isavuconazole possesses at least partial antifungal activity against mucorales.

  6. Serial monitoring of Mucorales DNA load in serum samples of a patient with disseminated mucormycosis after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemura, Tomonari; Nakazawa, Yozo; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Sano, Kenji; Yaguchi, Takashi; Motobayashi, Mitsuo; Saito, Shoji; Noda, Shunsuke; Kobayashi, Norimoto; Agematsu, Kazunaga; Honda, Takayuki; Koike, Kenichi

    2014-08-01

    Mucormycosis is a fatal complication in immunocompromised patients, and is additionally difficult to diagnose due to the lack of useful serum biomarkers. Using a quantitative PCR approach, we retrospectively analyzed Mucorales DNA load in sera collected serially from a 3-year-old patient with chronic granulomatous disease, who died of multi-organ failure probably due to dissemination of Rhizomucor pusillus, which was detected from necropsy specimens. Mucorales DNA load was below the detection limit on days 9, 2, and 4 after unrelated bone marrow transplantation. Rhizomucor DNA was first detected on day 14 (1.6 × 10(3) copies/mL), and subsequently fluctuated between 1.3 × 10(3) and 37.2 × 10(3) copies/mL until day 43. Rhizomucor achieved a peak value of 940.0 × 10(3) copies/mL on day 48 the day before death. The detection or fluctuation of Rhizomucor DNA appeared to be associated with corticosteroid dosages or C-reactive protein levels. This specific, noninvasive, and highly quantitative assay may be useful for the early diagnosis of mucormycosis and prediction of disease progression.

  7. Simultaneous detection and identification of Aspergillus and mucorales species in tissues collected from patients with fungal rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zuotao; Li, Lili; Wan, Zhe; Chen, Wei; Liu, Honggang; Li, Ruoyu

    2011-04-01

    Rapid detection and differentiation of Aspergillus and Mucorales species in fungal rhinosinusitis diagnosis are desirable, since the clinical management and prognosis associated with the two taxa are fundamentally different. We describe an assay based on a combination of broad-range PCR amplification and reverse line blot hybridization (PCR/RLB) to detect and differentiate the pathogens causing fungal rhinosinusitis, which include five Aspergillus species (A. fumigatus, A. flavus, A. niger, A. terreus, and A. nidulans) and seven Mucorales species (Mucor heimalis, Mucor racemosus, Mucor cercinelloidea, Rhizopus arrhizus, Rhizopus microsporus, Rhizomucor pusillus, and Absidia corymbifera). The assay was validated with 98 well-characterized clinical isolates and 41 clinical tissue specimens. PCR/RLB showed high sensitivity and specificity, with 100% correct identifications of 98 clinical isolates and no cross-hybridization between the species-specific probes. Results for five control isolates, Candida albicans, Fusarium solani, Scedosporium apiospermum, Penicillium marneffei, and Exophiala verrucosa, were negative as judged by PCR/RLB. The analytical sensitivity of PCR/RLB was found to be 1.8 × 10(-3) ng/μl by 10-fold serial dilution of Aspergillus genomic DNA. The assay identified 35 of 41 (85.4%) clinical specimens, exhibiting a higher sensitivity than fungal culture (22 of 41; 53.7%) and direct sequencing (18 of 41; 43.9%). PCR/RLB similarly showed high specificity, with correct identification 16 of 18 specimens detected by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing and 16 of 22 detected by fungal culture, but it also has the additional advantage of being able to detect mixed infection in a single clinical specimen. The PCR/RLB assay thus provides a rapid and reliable option for laboratory diagnosis of fungal rhinosinusitis.

  8. Simultaneous Detection and Identification of Aspergillus and Mucorales Species in Tissues Collected from Patients with Fungal Rhinosinusitis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zuotao; Li, Lili; Wan, Zhe; Chen, Wei; Liu, Honggang; Li, Ruoyu

    2011-01-01

    Rapid detection and differentiation of Aspergillus and Mucorales species in fungal rhinosinusitis diagnosis are desirable, since the clinical management and prognosis associated with the two taxa are fundamentally different. We describe an assay based on a combination of broad-range PCR amplification and reverse line blot hybridization (PCR/RLB) to detect and differentiate the pathogens causing fungal rhinosinusitis, which include five Aspergillus species (A. fumigatus, A. flavus, A. niger, A. terreus, and A. nidulans) and seven Mucorales species (Mucor heimalis, Mucor racemosus, Mucor cercinelloidea, Rhizopus arrhizus, Rhizopus microsporus, Rhizomucor pusillus, and Absidia corymbifera). The assay was validated with 98 well-characterized clinical isolates and 41 clinical tissue specimens. PCR/RLB showed high sensitivity and specificity, with 100% correct identifications of 98 clinical isolates and no cross-hybridization between the species-specific probes. Results for five control isolates, Candida albicans, Fusarium solani, Scedosporium apiospermum, Penicillium marneffei, and Exophiala verrucosa, were negative as judged by PCR/RLB. The analytical sensitivity of PCR/RLB was found to be 1.8 × 10−3 ng/μl by 10-fold serial dilution of Aspergillus genomic DNA. The assay identified 35 of 41 (85.4%) clinical specimens, exhibiting a higher sensitivity than fungal culture (22 of 41; 53.7%) and direct sequencing (18 of 41; 43.9%). PCR/RLB similarly showed high specificity, with correct identification 16 of 18 specimens detected by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing and 16 of 22 detected by fungal culture, but it also has the additional advantage of being able to detect mixed infection in a single clinical specimen. The PCR/RLB assay thus provides a rapid and reliable option for laboratory diagnosis of fungal rhinosinusitis. PMID:21325541

  9. Evaluation of Mucorales DNA load in cerebrospinal fluid in a patient with possible cerebral mucormycosis treated with intravenous liposomal amphotericin B.

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    Shigemura, Tomonari; Nakazawa, Yozo; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Motobayashi, Mitsuo; Saito, Shoji; Koike, Kenichi

    2014-12-01

    We report the case of a 19-year-old male with possible cerebral mucormycosis following chemotherapy. We detected a Lichtheimia DNA load of 2.0×10(4) copies/ml in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), although a CSF culture showed no growth. After treatment with intravenous liposomal amphotericin B, the Lichtheimia DNA load fell below the detection limit, and at the same time the patient's headache and imaging findings improved. The quantification of Mucorales DNA in CSF may be useful for evaluating cerebral mucormycosis. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of Mucorales DNA load in cerebrospinal fluid in a patient with possible cerebral mucormycosis treated with intravenous liposomal amphotericin B

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    Tomonari Shigemura

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 19-year-old male with possible cerebral mucormycosis following chemotherapy. We detected a Lichtheimia DNA load of 2.0 × 104 copies/ml in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, although a CSF culture showed no growth. After treatment with intravenous liposomal amphotericin B, the Lichtheimia DNA load fell below the detection limit, and at the same time the patient's headache and imaging findings improved. The quantification of Mucorales DNA in CSF may be useful for evaluating cerebral mucormycosis.

  11. Phylogeny and origin of 82 zygomycetes from all 54 genera of the Mucorales and Mortierellales based on combined analysis of actin and translation elongation factor EF-1alpha genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, K; Wöstemeyer, J

    2001-05-30

    True fungi (Eumycota) are heterotrophic eukaryotic microorganisms encompassing ascomycetes, basidiomycetes, chytridiomycetes and zygomycetes. The natural systematics of the latter group, Zygomycota, are very poorly understood due to the lack of distinguishing morphological characters. We have determined sequences for the nuclear-encoded genes actin (act) from 82 zygomycetes representing all 54 currently recognized genera from the two zygomycetous orders Mucorales and Mortierellales. We also determined sequences for translation elongation factor EF-1alpha (tef) from 16 zygomycetes (total of 96,837 bp). Phylogenetic analysis in the context of available sequence data (total 2,062 nucleotide positions per species) revealed that current classification schemes for the mucoralean fungi are highly unnatural at the family and, to a large extent, at the genus level. The data clearly indicate a deep, ancient and distinct dichotomy of the orders Mucorales and Mortierellales, which are recognized only in some zygomycete systems. Yet at the same time the data show that two genera - Umbelopsis and Micromucor - previously placed within the Mortierellales on the basis of their weakly developed columella (a morphological structure of the sporangiophore well-developed within all Mucorales) are in fact members of the Mucorales. Phylogenetic analyses of the encoded amino acid sequences in the context of homologues from eukaryotes and archaebacterial outgroups indicate that the Eumycota studied here are a natural group but provide little or no support for the monophyly of either zygomycetes, ascomycetes or basidiomycetes. The data clearly indicate that a complete revision of zygomycete natural systematics is necessary.

  12. Is It Time to Include CT "Reverse Halo Sign" and qPCR Targeting Mucorales in Serum to EORTC-MSG Criteria for the Diagnosis of Pulmonary Mucormycosis in Leukemia Patients?

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    Caillot, Denis; Valot, Stéphane; Lafon, Ingrid; Basmaciyan, Louise; Chretien, Marie Lorraine; Sautour, Marc; Million, Laurence; Legouge, Caroline; Payssot, Alexandre; Dalle, Frédéric

    2016-10-01

    In 23 leukemia patients with proven (n = 17) or possible (n = 6) pulmonary mucormycosis (PM), the presence of reversed halo sign on computed tomography was strongly associated with the positivity of quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays targeting Mucorales in the serum, confirming the value of these two tools for the diagnosis of PM in this setting.

  13. Mucorales (Zygomycotina da Mata Atlântica da Reserva Biológica do Alto da Serra de Paranapiacaba, Santo André, SP Mucorales (Zygomycotina of the Atlantic Rainforest in the "Reserva Biológica do Alto da Serra de Paranapiacaba", Santo André, SP, Brazil

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    Iracema Helena Schoenlein-Crusius

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Treze táxons de Mucorales (Zygomycotina, distribuídos num total de 266 registros, foram isolados de folhas de Alchornea triplinervia (Spreng. Müll. Arg. colocadas em ambientes terrestre e aquático, e de amostras de solo e de água de riacho, coletadas mensalmente, de julho de 1988 a maio de 1990 na Reserva Biológica do Alto da Serra de Paranapiacaba, no município de Santo André, SP. As espécies que apresentaram os maiores números de registro de ocorrência foram Mucor hiemalis Wehmer (78 registros, Mucor circinelloides van Tieghem f. janssenii (Ledner Schipper (42 registros e Rhizopus arrhizus Fischer (30 registros. Cinqüenta por cento dos Mucorales encontrados na região são constituídos por espécies que estão sendo citadas pela primeira vez para a Mata Atlântica: Mucor hiemalis Wehmer f. silvaticus (Hagem Schipper, Rhizopus arrhizus Fischer, Rhizopus oligosporus Fischer, Rhizopus oryzae (Went. & Prinsen Geerlings, Zygorhynchus japonicus Vuill. e Zygorhynchns macrocarpus Ling-Young.Thirteen taxa of Mucorales (Zygomycotina, distributed in 266 occurrences were isolated from leaves of Alchornea triplinervia (Spreng. Müll. Arg. disposed in the terrestrial and aquatic environment, and of soil and stream water samples, monthly taken from July of 1988 to May of 1990, in the "Reserva Biológica do Alto da Serra de Paranapiacaba", in the municipality of Santo André, São Paulo State, Brazil. Mucor hiemalis Wehmer (78 records, Mucor circinelloides van Tieghem f. janssenii (Ledner Schipper (42 records and Rhizopus arrhizus Fischer (30 records were the most frequent species. Fifty percent of the Mucorales found are formed by species that are mentioned for the first time in the Atlantic Rainforest: Mucor hiemalis Wehmer f. silvaticus (Hagem Schipper, Rhizopus arrhizus Fischer, Rhizopus oligosporus Fischer, Rhizopus oryzae (Went. & Prinsen Geerlings, Zygorhynchus japonicus Vuill. and Zygorhynchus macrocarpus Ling-Young.

  14. Multicenter evaluation of MIC distributions for epidemiologic cutoff value definition to detect amphotericin B, posaconazole, and itraconazole resistance among the most clinically relevant species of Mucorales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinel-Ingroff, A; Chakrabarti, A; Chowdhary, A; Cordoba, S; Dannaoui, E; Dufresne, P; Fothergill, A; Ghannoum, M; Gonzalez, G M; Guarro, J; Kidd, S; Lass-Flörl, C; Meis, J F; Pelaez, T; Tortorano, A M; Turnidge, J

    2015-03-01

    Clinical breakpoints (CBPs) have not been established for the Mucorales and any antifungal agent. In lieu of CBPs, epidemiologic cutoff values (ECVs) are proposed for amphotericin B, posaconazole, and itraconazole and four Mucorales species. Wild-type (WT) MIC distributions (organisms in a species-drug combination with no detectable acquired resistance mechanisms) were defined with available pooled CLSI MICs from 14 laboratories (Argentina, Australia, Canada, Europe, India, Mexico, and the United States) as follows: 10 Apophysomyces variabilis, 32 Cunninghamella bertholletiae, 136 Lichtheimia corymbifera, 10 Mucor indicus, 123 M. circinelloides, 19 M. ramosissimus, 349 Rhizopus arrhizus, 146 R. microsporus, 33 Rhizomucor pusillus, and 36 Syncephalastrum racemosum isolates. CLSI broth microdilution MICs were aggregated for the analyses. ECVs comprising ≥95% and ≥97.5% of the modeled populations were as follows: amphotericin B ECVs for L. corymbifera were 1 and 2 μg/ml, those for M. circinelloides were 1 and 2 μg/ml, those for R. arrhizus were 2 and 4 μg/ml, and those for R. microsporus were 2 and 2 μg/ml, respectively; posaconazole ECVs for L. corymbifera were 1 and 2, those for M. circinelloides were 4 and 4, those for R. arrhizus were 1 and 2, and those for R. microsporus were 1 and 2, respectively; both itraconazole ECVs for R. arrhizus were 2 μg/ml. ECVs may aid in detecting emerging resistance or isolates with reduced susceptibility (non-WT MICs) to the agents evaluated. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Faster chitosan production by mucoralean strains in submerged culture Rápida produção de quitosana por linhagens de Mucorales em cultura submersa

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    Rosa Valéria da Silva Amorim

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Production of chitosan was conducted using two Mucoralean strains, Mucor racemosus and Cunninghamella elegans. Chitosan was extracted from mycelia of M. racemosus and C. elegans at different growth phases on YPD medium. In both fungi, chitosan was rapidly produced, while highest yield of extractable chitosan was found in 24h of cultivation in submerged culture. The yield of chitosan isolated from dry mycelia of M. racemosus was about 40% higher than from C. elegans. The degree of N-acetylation of chitosan was 49% in M. racemosus and 20% in C. elegans, and the D-glucosamine contents were about 48% and 90%, respectively.A produção microbiológica da quitosana foi realizada usando-se duas linhagens de Mucorales, Mucor racemosus and Cunninghamella elegans. Quitosana foi extraída a partir dos micélios de M. racemosus e C. elegans em diferentes fases de crescimento em meio YPD. Para ambos os fungos, quitosana foi rapidamente produzida, com rendimentos de quitosana mais elevados após 24h de cultivo em cultura submersa. O rendimento de quitosana isolada a partir de micélio seco de M. racemosus foi cerca de 40% maior do que de C. elegans. O grau de N-acetilação da quitosana foi 49% em M. racemosus e 20% em C. elegans, e os conteúdos de D-glicosamina foram cerca de 48 and 90%, respectivamente.

  16. Gene expansion shapes genome architecture in the human pathogen Lichtheimia corymbifera: an evolutionary genomics analysis in the ancient terrestrial mucorales (Mucoromycotina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker U Schwartze

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Lichtheimia species are the second most important cause of mucormycosis in Europe. To provide broader insights into the molecular basis of the pathogenicity-associated traits of the basal Mucorales, we report the full genome sequence of L. corymbifera and compared it to the genome of Rhizopus oryzae, the most common cause of mucormycosis worldwide. The genome assembly encompasses 33.6 MB and 12,379 protein-coding genes. This study reveals four major differences of the L. corymbifera genome to R. oryzae: (i the presence of an highly elevated number of gene duplications which are unlike R. oryzae not due to whole genome duplication (WGD, (ii despite the relatively high incidence of introns, alternative splicing (AS is not frequently observed for the generation of paralogs and in response to stress, (iii the content of repetitive elements is strikingly low (<5%, (iv L. corymbifera is typically haploid. Novel virulence factors were identified which may be involved in the regulation of the adaptation to iron-limitation, e.g. LCor01340.1 encoding a putative siderophore transporter and LCor00410.1 involved in the siderophore metabolism. Genes encoding the transcription factors LCor08192.1 and LCor01236.1, which are similar to GATA type regulators and to calcineurin regulated CRZ1, respectively, indicating an involvement of the calcineurin pathway in the adaption to iron limitation. Genes encoding MADS-box transcription factors are elevated up to 11 copies compared to the 1-4 copies usually found in other fungi. More findings are: (i lower content of tRNAs, but unique codons in L. corymbifera, (ii Over 25% of the proteins are apparently specific for L. corymbifera. (iii L. corymbifera contains only 2/3 of the proteases (known to be essential virulence factors in comparison to R. oryzae. On the other hand, the number of secreted proteases, however, is roughly twice as high as in R. oryzae.

  17. Species identification of Aspergillus, Fusarium and Mucorales with direct surface analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Carolis, E; Posteraro, B; Lass-Flörl, C; Vella, A; Florio, A R; Torelli, R; Girmenia, C; Colozza, C; Tortorano, A M; Sanguinetti, M; Fadda, G

    2012-05-01

    Accurate species discrimination of filamentous fungi is essential, because some species have specific antifungal susceptibility patterns, and misidentification may result in inappropriate therapy. We evaluated matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for species identification through direct surface analysis of the fungal culture. By use of culture collection strains representing 55 species of Aspergillus, Fusarium and Mucorales, a reference database was established for MALDI-TOF MS-based species identification according to the manufacturer's recommendations for microflex measurements and MALDI BioTyper 2.0 software. The profiles of young and mature colonies were analysed for each of the reference strains, and species-specific spectral fingerprints were obtained. To evaluate the database, 103 blind-coded fungal isolates collected in the routine clinical microbiology laboratory were tested. As a reference method for species designation, multilocus sequencing was used. Eighty-five isolates were unequivocally identified to the species level (≥99% sequence similarity); 18 isolates producing ambiguous results at this threshold were initially rated as identified to the genus level only. Further molecular analysis definitively assigned these isolates to the species Aspergillus oryzae (17 isolates) and Aspergillus flavus (one isolate), concordant with the MALDI-TOF MS results. Excluding nine isolates that belong to the fungal species not included in our reference database, 91 (96.8%) of 94 isolates were identified by MALDI-TOF MS to the species level, in agreement with the results of the reference method; three isolates were identified to the genus level. In conclusion, MALDI-TOF MS is suitable for the routine identification of filamentous fungi in a medical microbiology laboratory. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2011 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  18. A Comparison of Aspergillus and Mucorales PCR Testing of Different Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid Fractions from Patients with Suspected Invasive Pulmonary Fungal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Jan; White, P Lewis; Kessel, Johanna; Wieters, Imke; Teschner, Daniel; Korczynski, Daniel; Liebregts, Tobias; Cornely, Oliver A; Schwartz, Stefan; Elgeti, Thomas; Meintker, Lisa; Krause, Stefan W; Posso, Raquel B; Heinz, Werner J; Fuhrmann, Sandra; Vehreschild, Jörg Janne; Einsele, Hermann; Rickerts, Volker; Loeffler, Juergen

    2018-02-01

    In patients with hematological malignancies, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) specimens are commonly used for the diagnosis of mold infections. However, it is not clear whether the cell pellet (P) or the supernatant fraction (S) of the BALF specimen is optimal for molecular diagnostic testing. Thus, 99 BALF specimens were collected from 96 hematology patients with or without allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant. The cell pellets and supernatants were processed alone and in combination (S/P) for testing by two fungus-specific real-time PCR assays compliant with international recommendations. The results achieved with S/P were revealed to be superior in comparison to those achieved with S and P alone, with the use of each single fraction showing a reduced sensitivity for the detection of Aspergillus DNA (82% and 43% for S and P, respectively). In 57% of the samples, testing of the combination of S and P generated a lower quantification cycle value than testing of S or P alone. Molds would have been missed in 5 and 16 out of 28 samples if only S or P, respectively, was analyzed. No sample was positive by testing of S or P only. Similar results were obtained for the detection of Mucorales DNA in BALF specimens (reduced sensitivity of 67% and 50% for S and P, respectively). Study patients were categorized according to the current European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer/Mycoses Study Group classification for invasive fungal disease (IFD), revealing that 35 patients had proven/probable IFD (36%), 47 patients had possible IFD (49%), and 14 patients had undetermined IFD (15%). Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Molecular phylogenetic and scanning electron microscopical analyses places the Choanephoraceae and the Gilbertellaceae in a monophyletic group within the Mucorales (Zygomycetes, Fungi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Kerstin; Olsson, L

    2008-09-01

    A multi-gene genealogy based on maximum parsimony and distance analyses of the exonic genes for actin (act) and translation elongation factor 1 alpha (tef), the nuclear genes for the small (18S) and large (28S) subunit ribosomal RNA (comprising 807, 1092, 1863, 389 characters, respectively) of all 50 genera of the Mucorales (Zygomycetes) suggests that the Choanephoraceae is a monophyletic group. The monotypic Gilbertellaceae appears in close phylogenetic relatedness to the Choanephoraceae. The monophyly of the Choanephoraceae has moderate to strong support (bootstrap proportions 67% and 96% in distance and maximum parsimony analyses, respectively), whereas the monophyly of the Choanephoraceae-Gilbertellaceae clade is supported by high bootstrap values (100% and 98%). This suggests that the two families can be joined into one family, which leads to the elimination of the Gilbertellaceae as a separate family. In order to test this hypothesis single-locus neighbor-joining analyses were performed on nuclear genes of the 18S, 5.8S, 28S and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1 ribosomal RNA and the translation elongation factor 1 alpha (tef) and beta tubulin (betatub) nucleotide sequences. The common monophyletic origin of the Choanephoraceae-Gilbertellaceae clade could be confirmed in all gene trees and by investigation of their ultrastructure. Sporangia with persistent, sutured walls splitting in half at maturity and ellipsoidal sporangiospores with striated ornamentations and polar ciliate appendages arising from spores in persistent sporangia and dehiscent sporangiola represent synapomorphic characters of this group. We discuss our data in the context of the historical development of their taxonomy and physiology and propose a reduction of the two families to one family, the Choanephoraceae sensu lato comprising species which are facultative plant pathogens and parasites, especially in subtropical to tropical regions.

  20. Gene expansion shapes genome architecture in the human pathogen Lichtheimia corymbifera: an evolutionary genomics analysis in the ancient terrestrial mucorales (Mucoromycotina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartze, Volker U; Winter, Sascha; Shelest, Ekaterina; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Horn, Fabian; Wehner, Stefanie; Linde, Jörg; Valiante, Vito; Sammeth, Michael; Riege, Konstantin; Nowrousian, Minou; Kaerger, Kerstin; Jacobsen, Ilse D; Marz, Manja; Brakhage, Axel A; Gabaldón, Toni; Böcker, Sebastian; Voigt, Kerstin

    2014-08-01

    Lichtheimia species are the second most important cause of mucormycosis in Europe. To provide broader insights into the molecular basis of the pathogenicity-associated traits of the basal Mucorales, we report the full genome sequence of L. corymbifera and compared it to the genome of Rhizopus oryzae, the most common cause of mucormycosis worldwide. The genome assembly encompasses 33.6 MB and 12,379 protein-coding genes. This study reveals four major differences of the L. corymbifera genome to R. oryzae: (i) the presence of an highly elevated number of gene duplications which are unlike R. oryzae not due to whole genome duplication (WGD), (ii) despite the relatively high incidence of introns, alternative splicing (AS) is not frequently observed for the generation of paralogs and in response to stress, (iii) the content of repetitive elements is strikingly low (<5%), (iv) L. corymbifera is typically haploid. Novel virulence factors were identified which may be involved in the regulation of the adaptation to iron-limitation, e.g. LCor01340.1 encoding a putative siderophore transporter and LCor00410.1 involved in the siderophore metabolism. Genes encoding the transcription factors LCor08192.1 and LCor01236.1, which are similar to GATA type regulators and to calcineurin regulated CRZ1, respectively, indicating an involvement of the calcineurin pathway in the adaption to iron limitation. Genes encoding MADS-box transcription factors are elevated up to 11 copies compared to the 1-4 copies usually found in other fungi. More findings are: (i) lower content of tRNAs, but unique codons in L. corymbifera, (ii) Over 25% of the proteins are apparently specific for L. corymbifera. (iii) L. corymbifera contains only 2/3 of the proteases (known to be essential virulence factors) in comparison to R. oryzae. On the other hand, the number of secreted proteases, however, is roughly twice as high as in R. oryzae.

  1. Detection of Circulating Mucorales DNA in Critically Ill Burn Patients: Preliminary Report of a Screening Strategy for Early Diagnosis and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrand, Matthieu; Gits-Muselli, Maud; Boutin, Louis; Garcia-Hermoso, Dea; Maurel, Véronique; Soussi, Sabri; Benyamina, Mourad; Ferry, Axelle; Chaussard, Maïté; Hamane, Samia; Denis, Blandine; Touratier, Sophie; Guigue, Nicolas; Fréalle, Emilie; Jeanne, Mathieu; Shaal, Jean-Vivien; Soler, Charles; Mimoun, Maurice; Chaouat, Marc; Lafaurie, Matthieu; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Bretagne, Stéphane; Alanio, Alexandre

    2016-11-15

     Invasive wound mucormycosis (IWM) is associated with an extremely poor outcome among critically ill burn patients. We describe the detection of circulating Mucorales DNA (cmDNA) for the early diagnosis of IWM in those patients and report the potential value of detecting cmDNA for treatment guidance.  Severely ill burn patients admitted to our tertiary referral center between October 2013 and February 2016 were included. Retrospective plasma samples were tested for the presence of cmDNA by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Patients were then prospectively screened twice a week, and liposomal amphotericin-B therapy initiated based on a positive qPCR. The primary endpoint was the time between cmDNA detection and standard diagnosis. Secondary endpoints were the time from cmDNA detection and treatment initiation and mortality.  Seventy-seven patients (418 samples) were included. The average age was 46 (28-60) years, abbreviated burn severity index was 8 (7-10), and simplified acute physiology score was 33 (23-46). The total body surface area was 33% (22%-52%). cmDNA was detected 11 (4.5-15) days before standard diagnosis. The in-hospital mortality was 62% for patients with IWM and 24% for those without (P = .03). The mortality due to IWM was 80% during period A and 33% during period B (P = .46).  This study suggests that the detection of cmDNA allows earlier diagnosis of IWM in severely ill burn patients and earlier initiation of treatment. Further studies are needed to confirm the impact of earlier treatment initiation on patient outcome. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Thermomucor abortosporangium sp. nov. (Fungi: Mucorales

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    A. Swathi Sri

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermomucor abortosporangium A. Swathi Sri & A. Subrahm., sp. nov. is described as the second species of Thermomucor. It differs from the type species of T. indicae-seudaticae in the branching pattern of sporangiophores, size and shape of sporangiospores and production of abortosporangia. Zygospores are reddish brown, globose, psilate, isogamic and formed at low (37°C temperature whilst the higher temperatures are prohibitive. The fungus grows well at 50°C on PDA, SMA and MEA.

  3. Dacryocystitis: an unusual form of Mucorales infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halawa, Ahmad; Yacoub, George; Al Hassan, Muhanad; Byrd, Ryland P; Roy, Thomas M

    2008-11-01

    Mucormycosis is an acute fungal infection in humans that is often fulminant and potentially fatal. It occurs most frequently in immunocompromised individuals. We report a diabetic patient who presented in ketoacidosis with lacrimal sac infection from this organism. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the second patient with dacryocystitis caused by this fungus described in the medical literature. Our patient is unique in that she had no evidence of concurrent sinus involvement. Surgical debridement and antifungal therapy were combined to ensure a successful outcome.

  4. Fungal necrotizing fasciitis, an emerging infectious disease caused by Apophysomyces (Mucorales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chander, Jagdish; Stchigel, Alberto Miguel; Alastruey-Izquierdo, Ana; Jayant, Mayank; Bala, Kiran; Rani, Hena; Handa, Uma; Punia, Rajpal Singh; Dalal, Usha; Attri, Ashok Kumar; Monzon, Araceli; Cano-Lira, José Francisco; Guarro, Josep

    2015-01-01

    The mucoralean fungi are emerging causative agents of primary cutaneous infections presenting in the form of necrotizing fasciitis. The aim of this study was to investigate a series of suspected necrotizing fasciitis cases by Apophysomyces species over one-year period in a northern Indian hospital. The clinical details of those patients suspected to suffer from fungal necrotizing fasciitis were recorded. Skin biopsies from local wounds were microscopically examined and fungal culturing was carried out on standard media. The histopathology was evaluated using conventional methods and special stains. Apophysomyces isolates were identified by their morphology and by molecular sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal genes. Antifungal susceptibility testing was carried out following EUCAST guidelines and treatment progress was monitored. Seven patients were found to be suffering from necrotizing fasciitis caused by Apophysomyces spp. Six isolates were identified as Apophysomyces variabilis and one as Apophysomyces elegans. Five patients had previously received intramuscular injections in the affected area. Three patients recovered, two died and the other two left treatment against medical advice and are presumed to have died due to their terminal illnesses. Posaconazole and terbinafine were found to be the most active compounds against A. variabilis, while the isolate of A. elegans was resistant to all antifungals tested. Apophysomyces is confirmed as an aggressive fungus able to cause fatal infections. All clinicians, microbiologists and pathologists need to be aware of these emerging mycoses as well as of the risks involved in medical practices, which may provoke serious fungal infections such as those produced by Apophysomyces. Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Healthcare-associated outbreaks due to Mucorales and other uncommon fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoudi, Setareh; Graviss, Linda S; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2015-07-01

    Healthcare-associated outbreaks of fungal infections, especially with uncommon and emerging fungi, have become more frequent in the past decade. Here, we reviewed the history and definition of healthcare-associated outbreaks of uncommon fungal infections and discussed the principles of investigating, containing and treatment of these outbreaks. In case of these uncommon diseases, occurrence of two or more cases in a short period is considered as an outbreak. Contaminated medical devices and hospital environment are the major sources of these outbreaks. Care must be taken to differentiate a real infection from colonization or contamination. Defining and identifying cases, describing epidemiologic feature of cases, finding and controlling the source of the outbreak, treating patients, and managing asymptomatic exposed patients are main steps for outbreak elimination. These fungal outbreaks are not only difficult to detect but also hard to treat. Early initiation of appropriate antifungal therapy is strongly associated with improved outcomes in infected patients. Choice of antifungal drugs should be made based on spectrum, pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic characteristics and adverse effects of available drugs. Combination antifungal therapy and surgical intervention may be also helpful in selected cases. A multidisciplinary approach and close collaboration between all key partners are necessary for successful control of fungal outbreaks. © 2015 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  6. Model of the synthesis of trisporic acid in Mucorales showing bistability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, S; Schroeter, A; Schimek, C; Vlaic, S; Wöstemeyer, J; Schuster, S

    2012-12-01

    An important substance in the signalling between individuals of Mucor-like fungi is trisporic acid (TA). This compound, together with some of its precursors, serves as a pheromone in mating between (+)- and (-)-mating types. Moreover, intermediates of the TA pathway are exchanged between the two mating partners. Based on differential equations, mathematical models of the synthesis pathways of TA in the two mating types of an idealised Mucor-fungus are here presented. These models include the positive feedback of TA on its own synthesis. The authors compare three sub-models in view of bistability, robustness and the reversibility of transitions. The proposed modelling study showed that, in a system where intermediates are exchanged, a reversible transition between the two stable steady states occurs, whereas an exchange of the end product leads to an irreversible transition. The reversible transition is physiologically favoured, because the high-production state of TA must come to an end eventually. Moreover, the exchange of intermediates and TA is compared with the 3-way handshake widely used by computers linked in a network.

  7. [Sinonasal fungal infections are not exclusively due to mucorales and Aspergillus!].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauziède-Espariat, Arnault; Wassef, Michel; Adle-Biassette, Homa; Alanio, Alexandre; Bretagne, Stéphane; Lanternier, Fanny; Boui, Mohammed; Bouchaud, Olivier; Vironneau, Pierre; Kania, Romain; Jouvion, Grégory; Chrétien, Fabrice; Classe, Marion

    2016-08-01

    Rhino-sinusal infections are serious diseases and possibly lethal. When they are invasive, we easily discuss apergilloses and mucormycoses. The confirmation of the diagnosis of mucormycosis need an extensive surgery for precise histopathological and mycological evaluation. The pathologist may be faced to other rare mycoses such as phaeohyphomycoses, which present different morphological features than mucormycoses and Aspergillus. Once the diagnosis is established, an appropriate antifungal treatment is quickly started. The aim of our work is to report two observations of phaeohyphomycoses, to describe their histopathological features, to discuss complementary diagnostic methods and to present the main differential diagnoses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Possible effects of glyphosate on Mucorales abundance in the rumen of dairy cows in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrödl, Wieland; Krüger, Susanne; Konstantinova-Müller, Theodora; Shehata, Awad A; Rulff, Ramon; Krüger, Monika

    2014-12-01

    Glyphosate (N-phosphonomethyl glycine) is registered as a herbicide for many food and non-food crops, as well as non-crop areas where total vegetation control is desired. Glyphosate influences the soil mycobiota; however, the possible effect of glyphosate residues in animal feed (soybean, corn, etc.) on animal mycobiota is almost unknown. Accordingly, the present study was initiated to investigate the mycological characteristics of dairy cows in relationship to glyphosate concentrations in urine. A total of 258 dairy cows on 14 dairy farms in Germany were examined. Glyphosate was detected in urine using ELISA. The fungal profile was analyzed in rumen fluid samples using conventional microbiological culture techniques and differentiated by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. LPS-binding protein (LBP) and antibodies (IgG1, IgG2, IgA, and IgM) against fungi were determined in blood using ELISA. Different populations of Lichtheimia corymbifera, Lichtheimia ramosa, Mucor, and Rhizopus were detected. L. corymbifera and L. ramosa were significantly more abundant in animals containing high glyphosate (>40 ng/ml) concentrations in urine. There were no significant changes in IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies toward isolated fungi that were related to glyphosate concentration in urine; however, IgA antibodies against L. corymbifera and L. ramosa were significantly lower in the higher glyphosate groups. Moreover, a negative correlation between IgM antibodies against L. corymbifera, L. ramosa, and Rhizopus relative to glyphosate concentration in urine was observed. LBP also was significantly decreased in animals with higher concentrations of glyphosate in their urine. In conclusion, glyphosate appears to modulate the fungal community. The reduction of IgM antibodies and LBP indicates an influence on the innate immune system of animals.

  9. Rapid screening for human-pathogenic Mucorales using rolling circle amplification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolatabadi, S; Najafzadeh, M J; de Hoog, G S

    2014-01-01

    Mucormycosis has emerged as a relatively common severe mycosis in patients with haematological and allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Source of transmission is from unidentified sources in the environment. Early diagnosis of infection and its source of contamination are paramount for rapid and

  10. Rapid screening for human-pathogenic Mucorales using rolling circle amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolatabadi, S; Najafzadeh, M J; de Hoog, G S

    2014-12-01

    Mucormycosis has emerged as a relatively common severe mycosis in patients with haematological and allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Source of transmission is from unidentified sources in the environment. Early diagnosis of infection and its source of contamination are paramount for rapid and appropriate therapy. In this study, rolling circle amplification (RCA) is introduced as a sensitive, specific and reproducible isothermal DNA amplification technique for rapid molecular identification of six of the most virulent species (Rhizopus microsporus, R. arrhizus var. arrhizus, R. arrhizus var. delemar, Mucor irregularis, Mucor circinelloides, Lichtheimia ramosa, Lichtheimia corymbifera). DNAs of target species were successfully amplified, with no cross reactivity between species. RCA can be considered as a rapid detection method with high specificity and sensitivity, suitable for large screening. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Identification of Mucorales isolates from soil using morphological and molecular methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardeshir Ziaee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Soil is the main habitat of saprophytic and pathogenic fungi. Mucormycetes are one of the most parts of soil fungi and certain members are among opportunistic fungi and can cause systemic fungal infections in immunocompromised patients. The majority of human and animal infections are caused by members of the genera Rhizopus, Mucor, Rhizomucor, Lichtheimia (Absidia, Cunninghamella and Mortierella. The objective of this research was to isolate and identify the main genera of Zygomycetes, using molecular assay and morphological features. Materials and Methods: A total of 340 soil samples were collected from different sites of seven public parks and 14 municipality districts in Isfahan. All samples were cultured on appropriate media and incubated at 27° C for 2 to 4 days, and then examined daily for visible fungal growth. PCR-RFLP method and macroscopic, microscopic and physiological characteristics were applied to identify fungal colonies. Results: Four hundred pure colonies belonging to six genera of Zygomycetes including Lichtheimia, Rhizopus, Rhizomucor, Mucor, Cunninghamella and Mortierella were identified. The genus Rhizopus (35.5% was the most frequent isolate, followed by Mucor (32.25% and Rhizomucor (27.5%. Conclusion: These finding may help us to understand about the importance of opportunistic fungi in public areas and the risk of exposure with immunocompromised persons.

  12. Construction of a Recyclable Genetic Marker and Serial Gene Deletions in the Human Pathogenic Mucorales Mucor circinelloides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Alexis; Adedoyin, Gloria; Heitman, Joseph; Lee, Soo Chan

    2017-07-05

    Mucor circinelloides is a human pathogen, biofuel producer, and model system that belongs to a basal fungal lineage; however, the genetics of this fungus are limited. In contrast to ascomycetes and basidiomycetes, basal fungal lineages have been understudied. This may be caused by a lack of attention given to these fungi, as well as limited tools for genetic analysis. Nonetheless, the importance of these fungi as pathogens and model systems has increased. M. circinelloides is one of a few genetically tractable organisms in the basal fungi, but it is far from a robust genetic system when compared to model fungi in the subkingdom Dikarya. One problem is the organism is resistant to drugs utilized to select for dominant markers in other fungal transformation systems. Thus, we developed a blaster recyclable marker system by using the pyrG gene (encoding an orotidine-5'-phosphate decarboxylase, ortholog of URA3 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae ). A 237-bp fragment downstream of the pyrG gene was tandemly incorporated into the upstream region of the gene, resulting in construction of a pyrG-dpl237 marker. To test the functionality of the pyrG-dpl237 marker, we disrupted the carRP gene that is involved in carotenoid synthesis in pyrG - mutant background. The resulting carRP :: pyrG-dpl237 mutants exhibit a white colony phenotype due to lack of carotene, whereas wild type displays yellowish colonies. The pyrG marker was then successfully excised, generating carRP-dpl237 on 5-FOA medium. The mutants became auxotrophic and required uridine for growth. We then disrupted the calcineurin B regulatory subunit cnbR gene in the carRP :: dpl237 strain, generating mutants with the alleles carRP :: dpl237 and cnbR :: pyrG These results demonstrate that the recyclable marker system is fully functional, and therefore the pyrG-dpl237 marker can be used for sequential gene deletions in M. circinelloides . Copyright © 2017 Garcia et al.

  13. First report of Syzygites megalocarpus (Mucorales) web mold on the commercial portabella button mushroom Agaricus bisporus in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agaricus bisporus (Lange) Imbach mushrooms are cultivated commercially under environmentally controlled conditions in several states within the US. They are the most important crop in Pennsylvania and an important high value crop in many other states. In August 2011 we first observed a mucoraceous m...

  14. Post-traumatic infection of the lower limb caused by rare Enterobacteriaceae and Mucorales in a young healthy male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti, Giampaolo; Mondanelli, Nicola; Losco, Michele; Bartolini, Laura; Fontanelli, Alessandra; Paradisi, Franco

    2009-03-01

    Enterobacter amnigenus and Leclercia adecarboxylata are gram-negative aerobic bacilli of the family Enterobacteriaceae that have been isolated from water and, rarely, from various clinical specimens. Absidia is a filamentous fungus of the class Zygomycetes that is ubiquitous in nature and can cause infection, primarily in immunocompromised hosts. Here, we describe an infection of the left lower limb caused by E. amnigenus and L. adecarboxylata with subsequent isolation of Absidia spp. in a patient with multiple traumatic injuries after a major motor vehicle accident. The severity of the clinical picture made amputation necessary, despite aggressive anti-infective therapy with both antibacterial and antifungal agents. Prompt diagnosis and management are mandatory in order to minimize morbidity and even mortality, and reduce the social and economic cost.

  15. Construction of a Recyclable Genetic Marker and Serial Gene Deletions in the Human Pathogenic Mucorales Mucor circinelloides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Garcia

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mucor circinelloides is a human pathogen, biofuel producer, and model system that belongs to a basal fungal lineage; however, the genetics of this fungus are limited. In contrast to ascomycetes and basidiomycetes, basal fungal lineages have been understudied. This may be caused by a lack of attention given to these fungi, as well as limited tools for genetic analysis. Nonetheless, the importance of these fungi as pathogens and model systems has increased. M. circinelloides is one of a few genetically tractable organisms in the basal fungi, but it is far from a robust genetic system when compared to model fungi in the subkingdom Dikarya. One problem is the organism is resistant to drugs utilized to select for dominant markers in other fungal transformation systems. Thus, we developed a blaster recyclable marker system by using the pyrG gene (encoding an orotidine-5′-phosphate decarboxylase, ortholog of URA3 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A 237-bp fragment downstream of the pyrG gene was tandemly incorporated into the upstream region of the gene, resulting in construction of a pyrG-dpl237 marker. To test the functionality of the pyrG-dpl237 marker, we disrupted the carRP gene that is involved in carotenoid synthesis in pyrG− mutant background. The resulting carRP::pyrG-dpl237 mutants exhibit a white colony phenotype due to lack of carotene, whereas wild type displays yellowish colonies. The pyrG marker was then successfully excised, generating carRP-dpl237 on 5-FOA medium. The mutants became auxotrophic and required uridine for growth. We then disrupted the calcineurin B regulatory subunit cnbR gene in the carRP::dpl237 strain, generating mutants with the alleles carRP::dpl237 and cnbR::pyrG. These results demonstrate that the recyclable marker system is fully functional, and therefore the pyrG-dpl237 marker can be used for sequential gene deletions in M. circinelloides.

  16. Differentiation of Clinically Relevant mucorales Rhizopus microsporus and R. arrhizus by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolatabadi, S.; Kolecka, A.; Versteeg, Matthijs; de Hoog, Sybren G; Boekhout, Teun

    This study addresses the usefulness of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for reliable identification of the two most frequently occuring clinical species of Rhizopus, namely R. arrhizus with its two varieties arrhizus and delemar and R.

  17. The use of compensatory base change analysis of ITS2 as a tool in the phylogeny of Mucorales, illustrated by the Mucor circinelloides complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pawlowska, J.; Walther, G.; Wilk, M.; de Hoog, S.; Wrzosek, M.

    2013-01-01

    Compensatory base changes (CBCs) in helix II of rDNA ITS2, suggested as a molecular classifier for fungi, were analyzed in Mucor circinelloides and its varieties. Only a few CBCs were found in the complex. Three out of the four accepted formae (f. circinelloides, f. lusitanicus, f. janssenii) did

  18. Phylogenetic relationship of the genus Gilbertella and related genera within the order Mucorales based on 5.8 S ribosomal DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, T; Acs, Klára; Nyilasi, Ildikó; Nagy, Erzsébet; Vágvölgyi, Cs

    2003-01-01

    The complete ITS (internal transcribed spacer) region coding the ITS1, the ITS2 and the 5.8S rDNA was amplified by polymerase chain reaction from two strains of Gilbertella persicaria, six strains in the Mucoraceae (Mucor piriformis, M. rouxii, M. circinelloides, Rhizomucor miehei, R. pusillus and R. tauricus) and four strains representing three species of the Choanephoraceae (Blakeslea trispora, Choanephora infundibulifera and Poitrasia circinans). Sequences of the amplified DNA fragments were determined and analysed. G. persicaria belongs to the monogeneric family (Gilbertellaceae), however, originally it was described as Choanephora persicaria. The goal of this study was to reveal the phylogenetic relationship among fungi belonging to Gilbertellaceae, Choanephoraceae and Mucoraceae. Our results support that the "intermediate" position of this family is between Choanephoraceae and Mucoraceae.

  19. Sequence-Based Identification of Aspergillus, Fusarium, and Mucorales in the Clinical Laboratory: Where Are We and Where Should We Go From Here?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurate identification of fungal species helps establish or exclude a fungal cause of disease. In the past, clinical microbiology labs were restricted to a limited array of phenotypic criteria for categorizing isolates to the species level. This scenario is shifting in favour of DNA sequence-base...

  20. Differentiation of clinically relevant Mucorales Rhizopus microsporus and R. arrhizus by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolatabadi, Somayeh; Kolecka, Anna; Versteeg, Matthijs; de Hoog, Sybren G; Boekhout, Teun

    2015-07-01

    This study addresses the usefulness of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) MS for reliable identification of the two most frequently occurring clinical species of Rhizopus, namely Rhizopus arrhizus with its two varieties, arrhizus and delemar, and Rhizopus microsporus. The test-set comprised 38 isolates of clinical and environmental origin previously identified by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing of rDNA. Multi-locus sequence data targeting three gene markers (ITS, ACT, TEF ) showed two monophylic clades for Rhizopus arrhizus and Rhizopus microsporus (bootstrap values of 99 %). Cluster analysis confirmed the presence of two distinct clades within Rhizopus arrhizus representing its varieties arrhizus and delemar. The MALDI Biotyper 3.0 Microflex LT platform (Bruker Daltonics) was used to confirm the distinction between Rhizopus arrhizus and Rhizopus microsporus and the presence of two varieties within the species Rhizopus arrhizus. An in-house database of 30 reference main spectra (MSPs) was initially tested for correctness using commercially available databases of Bruker Daltonics. By challenging the database with the same strains of which an in-house database was created, automatic identification runs confirmed that MALDI-TOF MS is able to recognize the strains at the variety level. Based on principal component analysis, two MSP dendrograms were created and showed concordance with the multi-locus tree; thus, MALDI-TOF MS is a useful tool for diagnostics of mucoralean species.

  1. Direct analysis and identification of opportunistic Lichtheimia species by Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization (MALDI) - Time-Of-Flight (TOF) analyzer-mediated mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrödl, W.; Heydel, T.; Schwartze, V.U.; Hoffmann, K.; Walther, G.; Alastruey-Izquierdo, A.; Rodriguez-Tudela, J.L.; Olias, P.; Jacobsen, I.D.; de Hoog, G.S.; Voigt, K.

    2012-01-01

    Zygomycetes of the order Mucorales can cause life-threatening infections in humans. These mucormycoses are emerging and associated with a rapid tissue destruction and high mortality. The resistance of Mucorales to antimycotic substances varies between and within clinically important genera such as

  2. In Situ/On-Site Biodegradation of Refined Oils and Fuels (A Technology Review). Volume 2. Appendix A. Supplementary Text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-01

    Naphthalene oxidation predominates in the order Mucorales , which includes species of Cunninghamella, Syncephalastrum, and Mucor (Cerniglia, Hebert, Szaniszlo...naphthal inicum nonl quifaciciens, Pseudomonas desmo 1yticum, P. fluorescens, P. putida biotype B)" ~seudomonas oleovoransg, P. put da ’v, ( Mucorales

  3. Fungal rhino sinusitisin in tehran, iran

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nazeri, M.; Hashemi, S.J.; Ardehali, M.; Rezaei, S.; Seyedmousavi, S.; Zareei, M.; Hosseinjani, E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fungal rhino sinusitis (FRS) is an important infection of para nasal sinuses, which encompasses two main categories; invasive and noninvasive forms according to histopathological findings. Aspergillus spp are the most common species isolated from noninvasive form, while Mucorales are

  4. 21 CFR 173.150 - Milk-clotting enzymes, microbial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...; family, Bacillaceae; genus, Bacillus; species, cereus (Frankland and Frankland). (3) Mucor pusillus Lindt...; genus, Mucor; species, pusillus; variety, Lindt. (4) Mucor miehei Cooney et Emerson classified as follows: Class, Phycomycetes; subclass, Zygomycetes; order, Mucorales; family, Mucoraceae; genus, Mucor...

  5. Molecular Methods To Improve Diagnosis and Identification of Mucormycosis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Sarah P.; Bialek, Ralf; Milner, Danny A.; Petschnigg, Eva M.; Baden, Lindsey R.; Marty, Francisco M.

    2011-01-01

    Mucormycosis is difficult to diagnose. Samples from suspected cases often fail to grow Mucorales in microbiologic cultures. We identified all hematologic malignancy and stem cell transplant patients diagnosed with proven mucormycosis between 2001 and 2009 at Brigham and Women's Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Seminested PCR targeting Mucorales 18S ribosomal DNA and sequencing were performed on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples. Of 29 cases of mucormycosis, 27 had tissue samples available for PCR and sequencing. Mucorales PCR was positive in 22. Among 12 culture-positive cases, 10 were PCR positive and sequencing was concordant with culture results to the genus level in 9. Among 15 culture-negative cases, PCR was positive and sequencing allowed genus identification in 12. Mucorales PCR is useful for confirmation of the diagnosis of mucormycosis and for further characterization of the infection in cases where cultures are negative. PMID:21508149

  6. An integrated genomic and transcriptomic survey of mucormycosis-causing fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibucos, Marcus C.; Soliman, Sameh; Gebremariam, Teclegiorgis; Lee, Hongkyu; Daugherty, Sean; Orvis, Joshua; Shetty, Amol C.; Crabtree, Jonathan; Hazen, Tracy H.; Etienne, Kizee A.; Kumari, Priti; O'Connor, Timothy D.; Rasko, David A.; Filler, Scott G.; Fraser, Claire M.; Lockhart, Shawn R.; Skory, Christopher D.; Ibrahim, Ashraf S.; Bruno, Vincent M.

    2016-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a life-threatening infection caused by Mucorales fungi. Here we sequence 30 fungal genomes, and perform transcriptomics with three representative Rhizopus and Mucor strains and with human airway epithelial cells during fungal invasion, to reveal key host and fungal determinants contributing to pathogenesis. Analysis of the host transcriptional response to Mucorales reveals platelet-derived growth factor receptor B (PDGFRB) signaling as part of a core response to divergent pathogenic fungi; inhibition of PDGFRB reduces Mucorales-induced damage to host cells. The unique presence of CotH invasins in all invasive Mucorales, and the correlation between CotH gene copy number and clinical prevalence, are consistent with an important role for these proteins in mucormycosis pathogenesis. Our work provides insight into the evolution of this medically and economically important group of fungi, and identifies several molecular pathways that might be exploited as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:27447865

  7. Molecular methods to improve diagnosis and identification of mucormycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Sarah P; Bialek, Ralf; Milner, Danny A; Petschnigg, Eva M; Baden, Lindsey R; Marty, Francisco M

    2011-06-01

    Mucormycosis is difficult to diagnose. Samples from suspected cases often fail to grow Mucorales in microbiologic cultures. We identified all hematologic malignancy and stem cell transplant patients diagnosed with proven mucormycosis between 2001 and 2009 at Brigham and Women's Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Seminested PCR targeting Mucorales 18S ribosomal DNA and sequencing were performed on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples. Of 29 cases of mucormycosis, 27 had tissue samples available for PCR and sequencing. Mucorales PCR was positive in 22. Among 12 culture-positive cases, 10 were PCR positive and sequencing was concordant with culture results to the genus level in 9. Among 15 culture-negative cases, PCR was positive and sequencing allowed genus identification in 12. Mucorales PCR is useful for confirmation of the diagnosis of mucormycosis and for further characterization of the infection in cases where cultures are negative.

  8. Update on mucormycosis pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Ashraf S; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2013-12-01

    Mucormycosis is an increasingly common fungal infection with unacceptably high mortality. The recent sequencing genome projects of Mucorales and the development of gene manipulation have enabled significant advances in understanding the pathogenesis of mucormycosis. Therefore, we review the pathogenesis of mucormycosis and highlight potential development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic modalities against this lethal disease. Much of the work has been focused on the role of iron uptake in the virulence of Mucorales. Additionally, host receptors and fungal ligands involved in the process of tissue invasion as well as sporangiospore size and sex loci and their contribution to virulence of Mucorales are discussed. Finally, the role of innate and adaptive immunity in protection against Mucorales and new evidence about drug-induced apoptosis in these fungi are discussed. Recent discoveries introduce several potentially novel diagnostic and therapeutic modalities, which are likely to improve management and outcome for mucormycosis. Future preclinical and clinical research is warranted to develop these diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  9. Molecular diagnosis of rhino-orbito-cerebral mucormycosis from fresh tissue samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Kamran; Rudramurthy, Shivaprakash Mandya; Das, Ashim; Panda, Naresh; Honnavar, Prasanna; Kaur, Harsimran; Chakrabarti, Arunaloke

    2017-08-01

    We aimed to evaluate a PCR-based technique for the diagnosis of mucormycosis and the identification of fungi from fresh tissue specimens in patients with rhino-orbito-cerebral-mucormycosis (ROCM). Fifty cases of ROCM were included in the study. Conventional identification was performed using microscopy and culture. Molecular diagnosis was performed by amplifying the ribosomal DNA using pan-fungal ITS primers and semi-nested Mucorales-specific primers of the 18S region. The amplified products were sequenced to identify the agents. The utility of PCR-RFLP of the 18S region of rDNA was evaluated to identify the Mucorales. The ROCM cases were diagnosed by the demonstration of aseptate ribbon-like hyphae in biopsy specimens collected from the patients. Isolation was possible in 24 (48 %) samples. The ITS2 PCR confirmed mucormycosis in 27 cases (54 %; CI 59.4-68.2). By comparison, Mucorales-specific PCR was able to amplify DNA and the sequence enabled the identification of Mucorales speciesin all the patients. PCR-RFLP of the 18S region of rDNA could only identify the agent to genus level. The molecular technique was able to identify Mucorales species in 26 (42 %) cases that were negative by culture. Mucorales-specific semi-nested PCR targeting the 18S region is a better technique than ITS2 PCR for diagnosis. PCR-RFLP of the 18S region helps in identification to genus level.

  10. Efficacy of Liposomal Amphotericin B and Posaconazole in Intratracheal Models of Murine Mucormycosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Guanpingsheng; Gebremariam, Teclegiorgis; Lee, Hongkyu; French, Samuel W.; Wiederhold, Nathan P.; Patterson, Thomas F.; Filler, Scott G.

    2013-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a life-threatening fungal infection almost uniformly affecting diabetics in ketoacidosis or other forms of acidosis and/or immunocompromised patients. Inhalation of Mucorales spores provides the most common natural route of entry into the host. In this study, we developed an intratracheal instillation model of pulmonary mucormycosis that hematogenously disseminates into other organs using diabetic ketoacidotic (DKA) or cyclophosphamide-cortisone acetate-treated mice. Various degrees of lethality were achieved for the DKA or cyclophosphamide-cortisone acetate-treated mice when infected with different clinical isolates of Mucorales. In both DKA and cyclophosphamide-cortisone acetate models, liposomal amphotericin B (LAmB) or posaconazole (POS) treatments were effective in improving survival, reducing lungs and brain fungal burdens, and histologically resolving the infection compared with placebo. These models can be used to study mechanisms of infection, develop immunotherapeutic strategies, and evaluate drug efficacies against life-threatening Mucorales infections. PMID:23650163

  11. Mucormycosis in a Renal Transplant Recipient: Case Report and Comprehensive Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamim Hamdi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is a rare but devastating infection. We present a case of fatal disseminated mucormycosis infection in a renal transplant patient. Uncontrolled diabetes mellitus and immunosuppression are the major predisposing factors to infection with Mucorales. Mucorales are angioinvasive and can infect any organ system. Lungs are the predominant site of infection in solid organ transplant recipients. Prompt diagnosis is challenging and influences outcome. Treatment involves a combination of surgical and medical therapies. Amphotericin B remains the cornerstone in the medical management of mucormycosis, although other agents have been used. Newer agents are promising.

  12. [Laboratory diagnosis of mucormycosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Hermoso, Dea

    2013-03-01

    Mucormycosis are deep infections caused by ubiquitous filamentous fungi of the order of Mucorales. The disease occurs mostly in immunocompromised, diabetic or solid organ transplant recipients. There are currently no specific diagnostic guidelines for mucormycosis. The histological examination and culture of the clinical sample remain the most useful approaches for diagnosis. Furthermore, alternative methods to the fungal culture are yet to be standardized. Here we review the current microbiological approaches used for the diagnosis and identification of Mucorales. © 2013 médecine/sciences – Inserm / SRMS.

  13. Successful Treatment of Cutaneous Mucormycosis in a Young ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... poorly controlled type 1 diabetic patient with end-stage renal disease using a combination of systemic antifungal agents and aggressive surgical debridement. Keywords: Cutaneous Mucormycosis, Diabetic, Echinocandin, Fungal, Liposomal Amphotericin-B, Mucorales, Polyene-Caspofungin Combination, Posaconazole ...

  14. Untitled

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Surprisingly, the organism showed its unique ability to reduce the C-20 keto group, a reaction never been reported earlier in organisms of the order Mucorales. However, the reduction of C-20 keto group has not been observed in the case of progesterone. (1), 16-dehydroxyprogesterone (12) and pregnenolone (17) (figures ...

  15. Species boundaries and nomenclature of Rhizopus arrhizus (syn. R. oryzae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolatabadi, Somayeh; de Hoog, G Sybren; Meis, Jacques F; Walther, Grit

    2014-01-01

    Rhizopus arrhizus (Mucorales, Mucoromycotina) is the prevalent opportunist worldwide among the mucoralean species causing human infections. On the other hand the species has been used since ancient times to ferment African and Asian traditional foods and condiments based on ground soybeans. As

  16. Immunological and biochemical characterization of extracellular polysaccharides of mucoralean moulds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, de G.A.

    1993-01-01

    In this thesis the characterization is described of the antigenic determinants (epitopes) of the extracellular polysaccharides (EPSs) from moulds belonging to the order of Mucorales. Detailed knowledge of the structure of these epitopes allows for further development of a new generation of

  17. Zygospore ornamentation in the genera Mucor and Zygorhynchus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, Maria A.A.; Samson, R.A.; Stalpers, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    Zygospores of species of the genera Mucor and Zygorhynchus were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy. The types of ornamentation are described and compared with those of some species of other genera of the Mucorales. The possibility of grouping the species according to zygospore

  18. Successful treatment of a necrotizing fasciitis patient caused by Mucor indicus with amphotericin B and skin grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yijin; Zeng, Fanqin; Huang, Xiaowen; Li, Qun; Tan, Guozhen; Xi, Liyan; Lu, Changming; Guo, Qing

    2014-04-01

    Cutaneous mucormycosis, an uncommon disease caused by Mucorales, predominantly occurs in immunocompromised host. The present case is a primary cutaneous mucormycosis due to Mucor indicus in an immunocompetent individual. It is with the features of necrotizing fasciitis over the right pretibial area. We are presenting this case owing to its rarity and the successful treatment with amphotericin B and skin grafting.

  19. Fob1 and Fob2 proteins are virulence determinants of Rhizopus oryzae via facilitating iron uptake from ferrioxamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dialysis patients with chronic renal failure receiving deferoxamine for treating iron overload are uniquely predisposed for mucormycosis. Although not secreted by Mucorales, previous studies established that Rhizopus species utilize iron from ferrioxamine (iron-rich form of deferoxamine). Here we de...

  20. Notes on Zygomycetes of Taiwan (III: Two Blakeslea Species (Choanephoraceae New to Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Man Ho

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Two species of Blakeslea (Choanephoraceae, Mucorales are reported as new records for Taiwan. They are Blakeslea monospora B. S. Mehrotra & Baijal and B. trispora Thaxter isolated from soil and fallen flowers. The morphological characters of both fungi are described.

  1. Mucoralean fungi for sustainable production of bioethanol and biologically active molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satari, Behzad; Karimi, Keikhosro

    2018-02-01

    Mucoralean fungi are suitable microorganisms for the sustainable production of food, fodder, and fuels from inexpensive natural resources. Ethanol-producing Mucorales are particularly advantageous for second-generation ethanol production in comparison to the conventional ethanolic yeasts and bacteria. They are able to ferment a wide range of sugars to a range of valuable products, while they are typically resistance against the inhibitors available in different substrates, including untreated lignocellulosic hydrolysates. In addition to a high ethanol yield, the fungi produce several commercially valuable by-products, including chitosan, microbial oil (mainly polyunsaturated fatty acids), and protein. Moreover, the fungal extracts can replace the expensive nutrients required in fermentation. Besides, their morphologies can be altered from filamentous to yeast like and are adjustable based on the process requirement. The focus of this review is on applying Mucorales in producing ethanol and the biomass by-products thereof.

  2. Variations in the morphology of Rhizomucor pusillus in granulomatous lesions of a Magellanic penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuta, Fumiko; Kimura, Kumiko; Urakawa, Ryo; Kusuda, Yukio; Tanaka, Shogo; Hanafusa, Yasuko; Haritani, Makoto

    2015-08-01

    This report presents a new case of mucormycosis encountered in penguin characterized by morphological variation of hyphae and presence of sporangia with numerous sporangiospores. A 4.5-year-old Magellanic penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) died after exhibiting anorexia, poor nutritional condition and dyspnea. Multiple nodular lesions were observed in the thoracic and abdominal regions. Histopathologically, hyphae of various sizes were seen in the lungs, air sac and nodular lesions. Myriad sporangiospores and several sporangia were observed in/around the bronchi or parabronchi. The very narrow and short hyphae in the nodules were not consistent with the characteristics of Mucorales. However, for most hyphae, including those in the nodules, sporangiospores and sporangia, immunohistochemistry revealed Mucorales-positive reactions. In addition, these fungi were identified as Rhizomucor pusillus by gene analysis.

  3. Outcome of mucormycosis after treatment: report of five cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Bellazreg

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycoses are serious infections caused by filamentous fungi of the order Mucorales. They occur most often in immunocompromised patients. We report five cases of mucormycosis in patients hospitalized in the Infectious Diseases Department in Sousse – Tunisia between 2000 and 2013. They were 4 males and one female, mean age 60 years. Three patients were diabetic and one patient had acute leukemia. The locations of mucormycosis were rhinocerebral, rhino-orbital, auricular, pulmonary and cutaneous. The Mucorales isolated were Rhizopus arrhizus in 3 cases and Lichteimia in 2 cases. All patients were treated with amphotericin B and 2 patients had, in addition, surgical debridement. Two patients died and 2 kept peripheral facial paralysis.

  4. Zigomicosis Zygomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Curutchet

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Zigomicosis es un término que alude a enfermedades infecciosas por agentes micóticos de la clase Zygomyces, que incluye los órdenes mucorales y entomoftorales productores de patologías clínicamente diferentes. La mucormicosis se caracteriza por invasión y necrosis vascular aguda, siderante, que afecta pacientes inmunodeprimidos mientras que la entomoftormicosis suele ser un proceso crónico en ciertos individuos inmunocompetentes de zonas tropicales y subtropicales. Se desarrolla el tema y se presenta un caso de mucormicosis.Zygomycosis is a term that refers to infectious fungal agents Zygomyces class, which includes the orders Mucorales and Entomophthorales producing different clinical conditions. Mucormycosis is characterized by hiperacute vascular invasion and necrosis, very serious, that affects immunocompromised patients while entomoftormicosis usually is a chronic process in immunocompetent individuals of certain tropical and subtropical areas. It develops the theme and presents a case of mucormycosis.

  5. Mucormycosis in immunochallenged patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pak Jane

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucorales species are deadly opportunistic fungi with a rapidly invasive nature. A rare disease, mucormycosis is most commonly reported in patients with diabetes mellitus, because the favorable carbohydrate-rich environment allows the Mucorales fungi to flourish, especially in the setting of ketoacidosis. However, case reports over the past 20 years show that a growing number of cases of mucormycosis are occurring during treatment following bone marrow transplants (BMT and hematological malignancies (HM such as leukemia and lymphoma. This is due to the prolonged treatment of these patients with steroids and immunosuppressive agents. Liposomal amphotericin B treatment and posaconazole are two pharmacologic agents that seem to be effective against mucormycosis, but the inherently rapid onset and course of the disease, in conjunction with the difficulty in correctly identifying it, hinder prompt institution of appropriate antifungal therapy. This review of the literature discusses the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of mucormycosis among the BMT and HM populations.

  6. Post-bronchoscopy fatal endobronchial hemorrhage in a woman with bronchopulmonary mucormycosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La Licata Francesco

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction During infection, Mucorales fungi invade major blood vessels, leading to extensive necrosis, and in cases of extensive pulmonary disease, bleeding into the lungs may occur. Case presentation We report an unexpected event of post-bronchoscopy fatal endobronchial hemorrhage in a 62-year-old HIV-negative Italian woman with well controlled diabetes mellitus who presented with diffuse cavitated pulmonary lesions. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy revealed bilateral obstruction of the segmental bronchi. Fatal massive bleeding occurred after standard biopsy procedures. Histologic examination showed that the hyphae were more deeply colored by hematoxylin-eosin (H&E than by other stains for fungi. Culture and autopsy confirmed bronchopulmonary mucormycosis. Conclusion Infection by Mucorales fungi should be considered in the diabetes population regardless of the degree of metabolic control. In these patients, particular caution should be taken during bronchoscopic procedures because of the greater friability of the fungal lesions.

  7. MAQUETTE ORL Décembre 2004

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mucorales à l'amphotéricine B (3), les thromboses vascu- laires et la nécrose tissulaire constituent des contraintes qui limitent l'efficacité du traitement médical et qui justi- fient la nécessité d'un traitement chirurgical adjuvant. L'exploration chirurgicale consiste en un débridement pré- coce, répété, et complet de la totalité du ...

  8. MAQUETTE ORL Décembre 2004

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mucorales (1). Les principaux germes responsables de l'infection chez l'homme sont Rhizopus, Mucor et Absidia. (1,2). Ces microorganismes sont ubiquitaires, ils sont omniprésents dans l'environnement sous formes de spores dans l'air, la terre, les végétaux en décomposition et les produits d'origine animale (3).

  9. [Mucormycosis cutanea- clinical case presentation souvenir etiopatogenia diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey Gutierrez, Miguel Enrique; Martinez, Gabriel W; Alvarez Milan, Lorena; Acuña Vassallo, Juan P; Trinajstic, Eduardo M

    2016-01-01

    Mucormycosis is serious emerging infection, caused by saprophytic fungi of the order Mucorales, which mainly affects immunocompromised patients. Presentation forms can be rinosinusal, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, disseminated and localized wounds and burns. The cutaneous presentation is caused by inoculation of spores into the dermis with the subsequent development compatible with gangrenous ecthyma. Our patient was treated with surgical lesion and antifungal cleaning. Presenting hemodynamic complication secondary to the administration of posaconazole.

  10. Investigation of the Microfungal Flora of the Bird Paradise National Park in Bandırma, Balıkesir (Turkey)

    OpenAIRE

    AZAZ, Ayşe Dilek

    2014-01-01

    Fifteen soil samples taken from the Bird Paradise National Park in Bandırma were investigated using the soil dilution plate and soil washing methods. Thirty-three species and four different sterile microfungal taxa were identified. Twenty-eight of these species belonged to the Hyphomycetes and 5 to the Mucorales. The genus with the highest species diversity found in the study area was Penicillium, represented by 16 species. Some chemical properties of the soil samples were also established. ...

  11. Devastating posttraumatic primary cutaneous mucormycosis in a diabetic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poongodi Lakshmi Santhana Kumarasamy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucorales are saprophytic fungi causing mucormycosis, which is a life threatening infection manifested as rhinocerebral, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, cutaneous, and disseminated forms. The cutaneous form is further divided into primary and secondary forms. The major risk factors include uncontrolled diabetes mellitus with or without ketoacidosis, other forms of metabolic acidosis, and trauma. We report here a case of primary cutaneous mucormycosis caused by Rhizopus oryzae, in a diabetic after a road traffic accident.

  12. Fatal haemorrhagic duodenal mucormycosis in a non-immunocompromised host: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simbarashe G. Mungazi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is an opportunistic infection caused by the fungi of the Mucorales order of the class Zygomycetes. Gastrointestinal mucormycosis is an uncommon, fatal condition accounting for only 7% of the cases. We present the case of a gastroduodenal mucormycosis presenting as recurrent massive hematemesis. We report this case to alert clinicians of this rare but fatal condition and to encourage further research into its pathogenesis and management.

  13. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction detection of circulating DNA in serum for early diagnosis of mucormycosis in immunocompromised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millon, Laurence; Larosa, Fabrice; Lepiller, Quentin; Legrand, Faezeh; Rocchi, Steffi; Daguindau, Etienne; Scherer, Emeline; Bellanger, Anne-Pauline; Leroy, Joel; Grenouillet, Frederic

    2013-05-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the detection of circulating DNA from the most common species of Mucorales for early diagnosis of mucormycosis in at-risk patients. We retrospectively evaluated a combination of 3 quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays using hydrolysis probes targeting Mucor/Rhizopus, Lichtheimia (formerly Absidia), and Rhizomucor for circulating Mucorales detection. Serial serum samples from 10 patients diagnosed with proven mucormycosis (2-9 samples per patient) were analyzed. No cross-reactivity was detected in the 3 qPCR assays using 19 reference strains of opportunistic fungi, and the limit of detection ranged from 3.7 to 15 femtograms/10 µL, depending on the species. DNA from Mucorales was detected in the serum of 9 of 10 patients between 68 and 3 days before mucormycosis diagnosis was confirmed by histopathological examination and/or positive culture. All the qPCR results were concordant with culture and/or PCR-based identification of the causing agents in tissue (Lichtheimia species, Rhizomucor species, and Mucor/Rhizopus species in 4, 3, and 2 patients, respectively). Quantitative PCR was negative in only 1 patient with proven disseminated mucormycosis caused by Lichtheimia species. Our study suggests that using specific qPCR targeting several species of Mucorales according to local ecology to screen at-risk patients could be useful in a clinical setting. The cost and efficacy of this strategy should be evaluated. However, given the human and economic cost of mucormycosis and the need for rapid diagnosis to initiate prompt directed antifungal therapy, this strategy could be highly attractive.

  14. Spontaneous gastric ulcer perforation and acute spleen infarction caused by invasive gastric and splenic mucormycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mushira Abdulaziz Enani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is a rare life-threatening fungal infection mostly affecting immunocompromised hosts. The main categories of human disease with the Mucorales are sinusitis/rhinocerebral, pulmonary, cutaneous/subcutaneous, gastrointestinal and disseminated disease. Other disease states occur with a much lower frequency and include cystitis, vaginitis; external otitis and allergic disease. We report a diabetic patient with comorbidities, who developed gastric perforation clinically indistinguishable from perforated peptic ulcer due to invasive gastric mucormycosis complicated by spleen infarction.

  15. Fungi isolated from the rhizosphere of spring cruciferous plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Majchrzak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Fungal communities isolated from the rhizosphere of spring cruciferous plants were analysed in the study. It was found that the rhizosphere of crucifers was colonized primarily by fungi of the order Mucorales and of the genus Fusarium. Members of the genus Fusarium dominated in the rhizoplane. The roots of cruciferous plants secrete glucosinolates – secondary metabolites known for their antifungal properties, thus affecting the communities of soil-dwelling fungi.

  16. Mucormicosis rinocerebral de origen dental, reporte de un caso clínico y revisión de la literatura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Acosta Behrends

    2014-04-01

    La mucormicosis es una enfermedad de baja prevalencia frecuentemente fatal y rápidamente progresiva causada por hongos de la familia Mucoraceae del orden mucorales. Es la enfermedad fúngica fatal de más rápida evolución en los humanos. Es una entidad importante de considerar, porque su rápida detección y tratamiento son los elementos claves para la supervivencia.

  17. Mucormycosis and Myiasis in Uncontrolled Diabetes: A Double Whammy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Om Prakash D Toshniwal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is a rare, often fatal opportunistic fungal infection that is caused by an aerobic saprophytic fungus belonging to the order mucorales and class zygomycetes. Myiasis is caused by the members of the Diptera fly family that lay eggs or larvae on food, necrotic tissue, open wounds, and unbroken skin or mucosa. We report a rare case of mucormycosis coexisting with oral myiasis in a 50-year-old woman with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus.

  18. RNAi-Based Functional Genomics Identifies New Virulence Determinants in Mucormycosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trung Anh Trieu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucorales are an emerging group of human pathogens that are responsible for the lethal disease mucormycosis. Unfortunately, functional studies on the genetic factors behind the virulence of these organisms are hampered by their limited genetic tractability, since they are reluctant to classical genetic tools like transposable elements or gene mapping. Here, we describe an RNAi-based functional genomic platform that allows the identification of new virulence factors through a forward genetic approach firstly described in Mucorales. This platform contains a whole-genome collection of Mucor circinelloides silenced transformants that presented a broad assortment of phenotypes related to the main physiological processes in fungi, including virulence, hyphae morphology, mycelial and yeast growth, carotenogenesis and asexual sporulation. Selection of transformants with reduced virulence allowed the identification of mcplD, which encodes a Phospholipase D, and mcmyo5, encoding a probably essential cargo transporter of the Myosin V family, as required for a fully virulent phenotype of M. circinelloides. Knock-out mutants for those genes showed reduced virulence in both Galleria mellonella and Mus musculus models, probably due to a delayed germination and polarized growth within macrophages. This study provides a robust approach to study virulence in Mucorales and as a proof of concept identified new virulence determinants in M. circinelloides that could represent promising targets for future antifungal therapies.

  19. pH manipulation as a novel strategy for treating mucormycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzaska, Wioleta J; Correia, Joao N; Villegas, Maria T; May, Robin C; Voelz, Kerstin

    2015-11-01

    Mucormycosis is a fatal fungal disease caused by several organisms within the order Mucorales. In recent years, traumatic injury has emerged as a novel risk factor for mucormycosis. Current antifungal therapy is ineffective, expensive, and typically requires extensive surgical debridement. There is thus a pressing need for safe prophylactic treatment that can be rapidly and easily applied to high-risk patients, such as those with major trauma injuries. Acetic acid has been used as a topical treatment for burn wounds for centuries and has proven activity against Gram-negative bacteria. Here, we demonstrate that acetic acid is also highly effective against major pathogenic groups of Mucorales, even at very low concentrations (0.3%). This antifungal effect is not seen with other acids, such as hydrochloric and lactic acid, suggesting that acetic acid activity against Mucorales spores is not solely evoked by low environmental pH. In agreement with this, we demonstrate that the antifungal activity of acetic acid arises from a combination of its ability to potently lower intracellular pH and from pH-independent toxicity. Thus, dilute acetic acid may offer a low-cost, safe, prophylactic treatment for patients at risk of invasive mucormycosis following traumatic injury. Copyright © 2015, Trzaska et al.

  20. Mucormycosis: New Developments into a Persistently Devastating Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danion, François; Aguilar, Claire; Catherinot, Emilie; Alanio, Alexandre; DeWolf, Susan; Lortholary, Olivier; Lanternier, Fanny

    2015-10-01

    Mucormycosis is a rare, though increasingly prevalent, life-threatening fungal disease caused by Mucorales. The incidence has increased over the last decade and its mortality remains high at around 50%. Mucormycosis occurs mostly in patients with diabetes mellitus and/or in the context of immunosuppression resulting from chemotherapy for hematological malignancy, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, or solid-organ transplantation. In this situation, lung and rhino-orbito-cerebral infections are the most frequent localizations of the disease. Prompt initiation of an effective treatment is essential to decrease mortality. However, mucormycosis and aspergillosis share close clinical and radiological features. Invasive procedures such as bronchial endoscopy and/or lung biopsy are necessary to confirm diagnosis, as no indirect tests are yet validated. Therefore, the challenge is to minimize the delay in diagnosis. When present, the reversed halo sign on CT scan is suggestive of mucormycosis. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction is a new promising approach to detect Mucorales DNA in serum and new molecular tools are available to detect Mucorales in tissues as well as to specify species. Recommendations from ECIL and ECMM/ESCMID have recently been published on management of mucormycosis. The recommended treatment is an amphotericin B lipid formulation in combination with surgery and modification of risk factors. High-dose (10 mg/kg) of liposomal amphotericin B is recommended in case of neurological involvement and posaconazole for maintenance therapy. Place of isavuconazole as well as posaconazole new formulations (tablets and intravenous) in first line treatment have to be defined. Improved radiologic descriptions of mucormycosis and new molecular tools may be key elements to help with rapid diagnosis in the future. Clinical trials are warranted to improve therapeutic success and hopefully survival. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001

  1. Isavuconazole for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis: current evidence, safety, efficacy, and clinical recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natesan SK

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Suganthini Krishnan Natesan,1,2 Pranatharthi H Chandrasekar1 1Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Wayne State University, 2John D Dingell VA Medical Center, Detroit, MI, USA Abstract: The majority of invasive mold infections diagnosed in immunocompromised cancer patients include invasive aspergillosis (IA and mucormycosis. Despite timely and effective therapy, mortality remains considerable. Antifungal agents currently available for the management of these serious infections include triazoles, polyenes, and echinocandins. Until recently, posaconazole has been the only triazole with a broad spectrum of anti-mold activity against both Aspergillus sp. and mucorales. Other clinically available triazoles voriconazole and itraconazole, with poor activity against mucorales, have significant drug interactions in addition to a side effect profile inherent for all triazoles. Polyenes including lipid formulations pose a problem with infusion-related side effects, electrolyte imbalance, and nephrotoxicity. Echinocandins are ineffective against mucorales and are approved as salvage therapy for refractory IA. Given that all available antifungal agents have limitations, there has been an unmet need for a broad-spectrum anti-mold agent with a favorable profile. Following phase III clinical trials that started in 2006, isavuconazole (ISZ seems to fit this profile. It is the first novel triazole agent recently approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA for the treatment of both IA and mucormycosis. This review provides a brief overview of the salient features of ISZ, its favorable profile with regard to spectrum of antifungal activity, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters, drug interactions and tolerability, clinical efficacy, and side effects. Keywords: isavuconazole, aspergillosis, mucormycosis, efficacy, antifungal therapy, novel azole, tolerability, drug interactions

  2. Rhino-oculo-cerebral aspergillus and mucor co-infections in an immunocompromised patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalidas Rit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis are pathogenic moulds of the mucorales species usually occurring in immunocompromised patients or in patients with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. Aspergillosis is the clinical condition caused by Aspergillus species and may cause an invasive disease with high case fatality rate, especially in immunosuppressed patients. A 46-year-old male patient with Type 2 diabetes mellitus with underlying malignancy presented with proptosis of left eye. Combined infections of Mucor and Aspergillus were diagnosed by means of computed tomography (CT scan and biopsy. Treatment with Amphotericin B and Voriconazole was started, the patient died within 3 months, from multi-organ failure.

  3. Production of eicosapentaenoic acid by representatives of the genus Mortierella on brewers’ spent grain

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jacobs, A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucorales and Mortierellales (Cavalier- Smith 1998; Dyal & Narine 2005). The oil produced by these fungi has the GRAS (generally recognised as safe) status (Cohen & Ratledge 2005) and Mortierella species have found industrial applications... fermentation (Shimizu et al. 1989; Jang et al. 2000; Dyal & Narine 2005). Linseed c©2009 Institute of Molecular Biology, Slovak Academy of Sciences 2 A. Jacobs et al. oil (LSO), which contains ∼57% of the ω-3 precursor α-linolenic acid (C18:3 n-3), could...

  4. Ileocolic Mucormycosis – an Unusual Cause of a Mass in the Right Iliac Fossa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishanchand Chethan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is a relatively uncommon, aggressive and lethal mycosis. Fungi from the order Mucorales are the etiological agents of mucormycosis. The condition is more common among the immunocompromised, diabetic patients with ketoacidosis and people with iron overload syndromes. Diagnosis of mucormycosis requires a high index of suspicion regarding the possibility of the condition in high-risk individuals. Timely diagnosis is critical to survival and minimization of morbidity. A favourable outcome is possible only if appropriate treatment is initiated as early as possible. The present article reports a case of ileocolic mucormycosis involving a patient with chronic renal failure and familial hyperuricemia.

  5. Onychomycosis due to Cunninghamella bertholletiae in an Immunocompetent Male from Central India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karuna Tadepalli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Onychomycosis is a fungal infection of nails seen frequently in immune competent and immune compromised patients due to dermatophytes, Candida spp., Fusarium spp., Scopulariopsis brevicaulis, Penicillium spp., and Aspergillus spp. We report a case of onychomycosis in a young immunocompetent male who presented onycholysis of a solitary nail without inflammation. The etiological agent was diagnosed to be Cunninghamella bertholletiae, a fungus pertaining to the order Mucorales (subdivision Mucoromycotina and known for some of the invasive lesions among immunocompromised patients. This case demonstrates the association of onychomycosis with Cunninghamella bertholletiae in an immune competent individual, not reported so far.

  6. Rhinocerebrocutaneous mucormycosis caused by Mucor species: A rare causation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snehal Balvant Lunge

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhinocerebral mucormycosis is the most common form of mucormycosis occurring commonly in patients of diabetic ketoacidosis. Fungi of the order Mucorales belong to six families, among whom Rhizopus is the most common, while Mucor is a rare cause. We report a 45-year-old female with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus diagnosed to have rhinocerebrocutaneous mucormycosis caused by Mucor species. The diagnosis was confirmed on histology and culture. A high-index of suspicion is required for early diagnosis and timely initiation of therapy to optimize the outcome. Our patient succumbed to her infection.

  7. Direct analysis and identification of pathogenic Lichtheimia species by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight analyzer-mediated mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrödl, Wieland; Heydel, Tilo; Schwartze, Volker U; Hoffmann, Kerstin; Grosse-Herrenthey, Anke; Walther, Grit; Alastruey-Izquierdo, Ana; Rodriguez-Tudela, Juan Luis; Olias, Philipp; Jacobsen, Ilse D; de Hoog, G Sybren; Voigt, Kerstin

    2012-02-01

    Zygomycetes of the order Mucorales can cause life-threatening infections in humans. These mucormycoses are emerging and associated with a rapid tissue destruction and high mortality. The resistance of Mucorales to antimycotic substances varies between and within clinically important genera such as Mucor, Rhizopus, and Lichtheimia. Thus, an accurate diagnosis before onset of antimycotic therapy is recommended. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI)-time of flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) is a potentially powerful tool to rapidly identify infectious agents on the species level. We investigated the potential of MALDI-TOF MS to differentiate Lichtheimia species, one of the most important agents of mucormycoses. Using the Bruker Daltonics FlexAnalysis (version 3.0) software package, a spectral database library with m/z ratios of 2,000 to 20,000 Da was created for 19 type and reference strains of clinically relevant Zygomycetes of the order Mucorales (12 species in 7 genera). The database was tested for accuracy by use of 34 clinical and environmental isolates of Lichtheimia comprising a total of five species. Our data demonstrate that MALDI-TOF MS can be used to clearly discriminate Lichtheimia species from other pathogenic species of the Mucorales. Furthermore, the method is suitable to discriminate species within the genus. The reliability and robustness of the MALDI-TOF-based identification are evidenced by high score values (above 2.3) for the designation to a certain species and by moderate score values (below 2.0) for the discrimination between clinically relevant (Lichtheimia corymbifera, L. ramosa, and L. ornata) and irrelevant (L. hyalospora and L. sphaerocystis) species. In total, all 34 strains were unequivocally identified by MALDI-TOF MS with score values of >1.8 down to the generic level, 32 out of 34 of the Lichtheimia isolates (except CNM-CM 5399 and FSU 10566) were identified accurately with score values of >2 (probable species

  8. Tumor shape pulmonary mucormycosis associated with sinonasal aspergillosis in a diabetic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Point

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is a rare and life-threatening fungal infection of the Mucorales order occurring mainly in immunosuppressed patients. The most common forms are rhinocerebral but pulmonary or disseminated forms may occur. We report the case of a 61-year-old patient in whom pulmonary mucormycosis was diagnosed during his first-ever episode of diabetic ketoacidosis. While receiving liposomal amphotericin B, a sinusal aspergillosis due to Aspergillus fumigatus occurred. Evolution was slowly favorable under antifungal tritherapy by liposomal amphotericin B, posaconazole and caspofungin.

  9. Direct Analysis and Identification of Pathogenic Lichtheimia Species by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Analyzer-Mediated Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrödl, Wieland; Heydel, Tilo; Schwartze, Volker U.; Hoffmann, Kerstin; Große-Herrenthey, Anke; Walther, Grit; Alastruey-Izquierdo, Ana; Rodriguez-Tudela, Juan Luis; Olias, Philipp; Jacobsen, Ilse D.; de Hoog, G. Sybren

    2012-01-01

    Zygomycetes of the order Mucorales can cause life-threatening infections in humans. These mucormycoses are emerging and associated with a rapid tissue destruction and high mortality. The resistance of Mucorales to antimycotic substances varies between and within clinically important genera such as Mucor, Rhizopus, and Lichtheimia. Thus, an accurate diagnosis before onset of antimycotic therapy is recommended. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI)–time of flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) is a potentially powerful tool to rapidly identify infectious agents on the species level. We investigated the potential of MALDI-TOF MS to differentiate Lichtheimia species, one of the most important agents of mucormycoses. Using the Bruker Daltonics FlexAnalysis (version 3.0) software package, a spectral database library with m/z ratios of 2,000 to 20,000 Da was created for 19 type and reference strains of clinically relevant Zygomycetes of the order Mucorales (12 species in 7 genera). The database was tested for accuracy by use of 34 clinical and environmental isolates of Lichtheimia comprising a total of five species. Our data demonstrate that MALDI-TOF MS can be used to clearly discriminate Lichtheimia species from other pathogenic species of the Mucorales. Furthermore, the method is suitable to discriminate species within the genus. The reliability and robustness of the MALDI-TOF-based identification are evidenced by high score values (above 2.3) for the designation to a certain species and by moderate score values (below 2.0) for the discrimination between clinically relevant (Lichtheimia corymbifera, L. ramosa, and L. ornata) and irrelevant (L. hyalospora and L. sphaerocystis) species. In total, all 34 strains were unequivocally identified by MALDI-TOF MS with score values of >1.8 down to the generic level, 32 out of 34 of the Lichtheimia isolates (except CNM-CM 5399 and FSU 10566) were identified accurately with score values of >2 (probable species

  10. Zigomicosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerson Arias León

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Las zigomicosis son infecciones fúngicas graves e inusuales, causadas por hongos ubicuos pertenecientes a la clase Zigomicetos, los cuales están subdivididos en dos órdenes: Mucorales y Entomoftorales. Las infecciones causadas por los Mucorales se caracterizan por su rápida evolución, con destrucción tisular e invasión de vasos sanguíneos. Se presentan en hospederos con factores de riesgo definidos, entre los que se incluyen alteraciones funcionales o cuantitativas de los neutrófilos, acidosis metabólica o aumento en los niveles séricos de hierro. Sus manifestaciones clínicas se dividen en rinocerebral, pulmonar, cutánea, gastrointestinal y diseminada. El principal mecanismo de infección es la vía inhalatoria, seguida por la mecánica por lesiones dérmicas. Tienen un curso clínico agresivo y a su vez inespecífico que usualmente pone en peligro la vida del paciente, por lo que se debe tener un alto índice de sospecha en aquellas personas con cuadro clínico sugestivo y factores de riesgo, para iniciar tratamiento agresivo temprano con antifúngicos y cirugía.Zygomycosis are severe and uncommon fungal infections caused by ubiquitous fungi members of the class zygomicetes, which are subdivided into two orders: Mucorales and Entomophtorales. Infections due to Mucorales are characterized by a rapid evolution along with a wide tissue destruction and direct invasion of blood vessels. These diseases are seen in individuals with clearly defined risk factors such as quantitative or qualitative neutrophil defects, metabolic acidosis, or elevated iron serum levels. The clinical forms of these diseases are divided into new categories: Rhinocerebral, pulmonary, cutaneous, gastrointestinal, and disseminated infections. The main mechanism of infection is by inhalation, but it is also possible to acquire the infection by direct inoculation into the dermis. The clinical course is aggressive but unspecified and usually threatens patients

  11. Isolation of fungi in Musca domestica Linnaeus, 1758 (Diptera: Muscidae captured at two natural breeding grounds in the municipality of Seropédica, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sales Márcia de Senna Nunes

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to isolate and identify fungal species found in natural association with adults of Musca domestica. The adult insects were collected from two natural breeding grounds: hog pens and an urban sanitary landfill. The isolated fungi were identified as: Aspergillus flavus (23.8%, A. niger var. niger (14.4%, Penicillium corylophilum (21.4%, P. fellutanum (11.9%, Cladosporium cladosporoides (4.7%, Fusarium sp. (4.7%, Alternaria alternata (11.9%, Curvularia brachyspora (2.4%, Mycelia sterilia (2.4% and the Mucorales order (2.4%.

  12. Manejo anestésico de la mucormicosis rinocerebral

    OpenAIRE

    San Juan Álvarez, Mónica; Aliña Mejía, Rossell; Casqueiro Sánchez, Juan Carlos; Robledo, María de la Flor

    2014-01-01

    La mucormicosis es una infección aguda causada por hongos aerobios saprofíticos y oportunistas de la clase Zygomycetes y del orden de los Mucorales. Por lo general no son patógenos en el huésped inmunocompetente, pero pueden ocasionar una infección de progresión rápida y mal pronóstico en aquéllos con alteraciones inmunitarias. Estos organismos se encuentran en la tierra y suelos húmedos con alto contenido en nitrógeno, en materia en descomposición, desperdicios vegetales, estiércol y aliment...

  13. Thermophillic and thermotolerant fungi isolated from the thermal effluent of nuclear power generating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rippon, J.W.; Gerhold, R.; Heath, M.

    1980-01-01

    Over a period of a year, samples of water, foam, microbial mat, soil and air were obtained from areas associated with the cooling canal of a nuclear power station. The seventeen sample sites included water in the cooling canal that was thermally enriched and soil and water adjacent to, up-stream, downstream and at a distance from the generator. Air samples were taken at the plant and at various disstances from the plant. Fifty-two species of thermotolerant and thermophilic fungi were isolated. Of these, eleven species are grouped as opportunistic Mucorales or opportunistic Aspergillus sp. One veterinary pathogen was also isolated (Dactylaria gallopara). The opportunistic/pathogenic fungi were found primarily in the intake bay, the discharge bay and the cooling canal. Smaller numbers were obtained at both upstream and downstream locations. Soil samples near the cooling canal reflected an enrichment of thermophilous organisms, the previously mentioned opportunistic Mucorales and Aspergillus spp. Their numbers were found to be greater than that usually encountered in a mesophilic environment. However, air and soil samples taken at various distances from the power station indicated no greater abundance of these thermophilous fungi than would be expected from a thermal enriched environment. Our results indicate that there was no significant dissemination of thermophilous fungi from the thermal enriched effluents to the adjacent environment. These findings are consistent with the results of other investigators. (orig.)

  14. Mating type gene homologues and putative sex pheromone-sensing pathway in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, a presumably asexual plant root symbiont.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Halary

    Full Text Available The fungal kingdom displays a fascinating diversity of sex-determination systems. Recent advances in genomics provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of sex, mating type determination, and evolution of sexual reproduction in many fungal species in both ancient and modern phylogenetic lineages. All major fungal groups have evolved sexual differentiation and recombination pathways. However, sexuality is unknown in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF of the phylum Glomeromycota, an ecologically vital group of obligate plant root symbionts. AMF are commonly considered an ancient asexual lineage dating back to the Ordovician, approximately 460 M years ago. In this study, we used genomic and transcriptomic surveys of several AMF species to demonstrate the presence of conserved putative sex pheromone-sensing mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinases, comparable to those described in Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. We also find genes for high mobility group (HMG transcription factors, homologous to SexM and SexP genes in the Mucorales. The SexM genes show a remarkable sequence diversity among multiple copies in the genome, while only a single SexP sequence was detected in some isolates of Rhizophagus irregularis. In the Mucorales and Microsporidia, the sexM gene is flanked by genes for a triosephosphate transporter (TPT and a RNA helicase, but we find no evidence for synteny in the vicinity of the Sex locus in AMF. Nonetheless, our results, together with previous observations on meiotic machinery, suggest that AMF could undergo a complete sexual reproduction cycle.

  15. Microscopic fungi in the Atlantic Rainforest in Cubatão, São Paulo, Brazil Fungos microscópicos de Mata Atlântica em Cubatão, São Paulo, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iracema Helena Schoenlein-Crusius

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a survey of fungi obtained from soil, water and mixed leaf litter samples taken from the Atlantic Rainforest in the municipality of Cubatão, in the State of São Paulo, during the years of 1993 to 1995. Using different techniques for the isolation of microscopic fungi, a total of 280 taxa was obtained (66 zoosporic fungi, 40 Mucorales, 45 Glomales, 125 anamorphs, three Ascomycota and one Basidiomycota, with 23 species being reported for the first time in Brazil.Este artigo apresenta o levantamento dos fungos obtidos de amostras de solo, água e folhedo mixto coletados da Mata Atlântica no município de Cubatão, estado de São Paulo, durante os anos de 1993 a 1995. Utilizando diferentes técnicas para isolamento de fungos microscópicos, um total de 280 táxons foram obtidos (66 fungos zoospóricos, 40 representantes de Mucorales, 45 de Glomales, 125 fungos anamorfos, três de Ascomycota e um representante de Basidiomycota, sendo 23 espécies reportadas pela primeira vez para o Brasil.

  16. Evolutionary novelty in gravity sensing through horizontal gene transfer and high-order protein assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tu Anh Nguyen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal gene transfer (HGT can promote evolutionary adaptation by transforming a species' relationship to the environment. In most well-understood cases of HGT, acquired and donor functions appear to remain closely related. Thus, the degree to which HGT can lead to evolutionary novelties remains unclear. Mucorales fungi sense gravity through the sedimentation of vacuolar protein crystals. Here, we identify the octahedral crystal matrix protein (OCTIN. Phylogenetic analysis strongly supports acquisition of octin by HGT from bacteria. A bacterial OCTIN forms high-order periplasmic oligomers, and inter-molecular disulphide bonds are formed by both fungal and bacterial OCTINs, suggesting that they share elements of a conserved assembly mechanism. However, estimated sedimentation velocities preclude a gravity-sensing function for the bacterial structures. Together, our data suggest that HGT from bacteria into the Mucorales allowed a dramatic increase in assembly scale and emergence of the gravity-sensing function. We conclude that HGT can lead to evolutionary novelties that emerge depending on the physiological and cellular context of protein assembly.

  17. The endothelial cell receptor GRP78 is required for mucormycosis pathogenesis in diabetic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingfu; Spellberg, Brad; Phan, Quynh T.; Fu, Yue; Fu, Yong; Lee, Amy S.; Edwards, John E.; Filler, Scott G.; Ibrahim, Ashraf S.

    2010-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a fungal infection of the sinuses, brain, or lungs that causes a mortality rate of at least 50% despite first-line therapy. Because angioinvasion is a hallmark of mucormycosis infections, we sought to define the endothelial cell receptor(s) for fungi of the order Mucorales (the fungi that cause mucormycosis). Furthermore, since patients with elevated available serum iron, including those with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), are uniquely susceptible to mucormycosis, we sought to define the role of iron and glucose in regulating the expression of such a receptor. Here, we have identified glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) as what we believe to be a novel host receptor that mediates invasion and damage of human endothelial cells by Rhizopus oryzae, the most common etiologic species of Mucorales, but not Candida albicans or Aspergillus fumigatus. Elevated concentrations of glucose and iron, consistent with those seen during DKA, enhanced GRP78 expression and the resulting R. oryzae invasion and damage of endothelial cells in a receptor-dependent manner. Mice with DKA, which have enhanced susceptibility to mucormycosis, exhibited increased expression of GRP78 in sinus, lungs, and brain compared with normal mice. Finally, GRP78-specific immune serum protected mice with DKA from mucormycosis. These results suggest a unique susceptibility of patients with DKA to mucormycosis and provide a foundation for the development of new therapeutic interventions for these deadly infections. PMID:20484814

  18. Fungal Sex: The Mucoromycota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Chan; Idnurm, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    Although at the level of resolution of genes and molecules most information about mating in fungi is from a single lineage, the Dikarya, many fundamental discoveries about mating in fungi have been made in the earlier branches of the fungi. These are nonmonophyletic groups that were once classified into the chytrids and zygomycetes. Few species in these lineages offer the potential of genetic tractability, thereby hampering the ability to identify the genes that underlie those fundamental insights. Research performed during the past decade has now established the genes required for mating type determination and pheromone synthesis in some species in the phylum Mucoromycota, especially in the order Mucorales. These findings provide striking parallels with the evolution of mating systems in the Dikarya fungi. Other discoveries in the Mucorales provide the first examples of sex-cell type identity being driven directly by a gene that confers mating type, a trait considered more of relevance to animal sex determination but difficult to investigate in animals. Despite these discoveries, there remains much to be gleaned about mating systems from these fungi.

  19. Mucormycosis: a rare fungal infection in tornado victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Cindy L; Finley, Phillip J; Mikkelson, Debbie R; Tibbs, Brian

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews four immunocompetent patients who developed a rare fungal infection, mucormycosis, secondary to multiple traumatic injuries sustained during an EF-5 tornado in Joplin, MO. Commonly found in soil and decaying organic matter, mucorales are fungi associated with soft tissue and cutaneous infections. Onset of this fungal infection can occur without clinical signs, presenting several days to several weeks after injury, delaying diagnosis. A multidisciplinary treatment approach including aggressive antifungal therapy and aggressive surgical debridement is critical. This diagnosis should be considered in all patients presenting with injuries sustained from high-velocity embedment of debris such as natural disasters or explosions. We present four cases of mucormycosis, species Apophysomyces trapeziformis. Data reported includes predisposing factors, number of days between injury and diagnosis of mucormycosis, surgical treatment, antifungal therapy, outcomes, and potential risk factors that may have contributed to the development of mucormycosis.

  20. Molecular systematics in the genus Mucor with special regards to species encountered in cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermet, Antoine; Méheust, Delphine; Mounier, Jérôme; Barbier, Georges; Jany, Jean-Luc

    2012-06-01

    The genus Mucor, a member of the order Mucorales, comprises different species encountered in cheeses. Although fungi play a fundamental role in cheese manufacturing and ripening, the taxonomy of many fungal species found in cheese is poorly defined; indeed, this is the case for Mucor spp. In the present study, we assessed the phylogenetic relationships among 70 Mucor strains, including 36 cheese isolates, by using a five gene phylogenetic approach combined with morphological analyses. Overall, at least six species of Mucor were identified among the cheese isolates including a possible new taxon. The present study also suggests that the genus Mucor comprises undescribed taxa and needs to be properly defined. Copyright © 2012 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cellulolytic potential of thermophilic species from four fungal orders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busk, Peter Kamp; Lange, Lene

    2013-01-01

    and in characterization of their industrially useful enzymes. In the present study we investigated the cellulolytic potential of 16 thermophilic fungi from the three ascomycete orders Sordariales, Eurotiales and Onygenales and from the zygomycete order Mucorales thus covering all fungal orders that include thermophiles....... Thermophilic fungi are the only described eukaryotes that can grow at temperatures above 45 ºC. All 16 fungi were able to grow on crystalline cellulose but their secreted enzymes showed widely different cellulolytic activities, pH optima and thermostabilities. Interestingly, in contrast to previous reports, we......Elucidation of fungal biomass degradation is important for understanding the turnover of biological materials in nature and has important implications for industrial biomass conversion. In recent years there has been an increasing interest in elucidating the biological role of thermophilic fungi...

  2. Necrotizing granulomatous pneumonia caused by fungal infection in a goat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wapf, P.; Braun, U.; Ossent, P.; Scharf, G.

    2011-01-01

    This case report describes the clinical and postmortem findings in a 2.5-year-old goat with necrotizing granulomatous pneumonia. The goat was referred to our clinic because of swelling of the head and neck, which was unresponsive to treatment, dysphagia, and deterioration in general condition. Thoracic radiographs showed two soft tissue densities, about 10 cm in diameter, in the left caudodorsal lung. The goat was euthanized and a necropsy was carried out. The two lesions in the left caudodorsal lung were round, firm and clearly demarcated from the surrounding lung tissue. They contained purulent material and compromised about 70 % of the diaphragmatic lung lobe. Histological examination of the lesions revealed a dense network of hyphae characteristic of Mucorales spp

  3. Production of extracellular proteases by Mucor circinelloides using D-glucose as carbon source / substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade Vânia Sousa

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, some Mucorales species have been reported as protease producers. The production of extracellular proteases by Mucor circinelloides using glucose as substrate was studied. Experiments were carried out with different D-glucose concentrations (40, 60 and 80 g/L. Biomass, pH and protease activity were determined. Although biomass production had reached best yields for the medium containing D-glucose in a concentration of 80 g/L, the enzymatic production was higher when the substrate concentration was reduced to 40 g/L. The yield factor for product on cell growth and the yield factor for product on carbon substrate were higher when the microorganism grew in medium containing 40 g/L glucose. The kinetics parameters suggest that this strain seems to be promising as an alternative microorganism for protease production.

  4. Rhinocerebral mucormycosis: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkateswarlu Nallapu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is an acute opportunistic infection caused by saprophytic fungus of class Phycomycetes order Mucorales and family Mucoracae, found in soil, bread molds, and decaying fruits and vegetables. Even though this fungus is ubiquitous in the nature, the disease is usually prevented by immune system and is therefore rare. Rhizopus, Rhizomucor, Absidia and Cunninghamella are the most common species associated with Mucormycosis. Diabetes, chronic kidney disease, desferroxamine use in dialysis, leukemia, lymphoma, immunocompromised state, burns and open wounds are the risk factors of mucormycosis. Out of six clinical entities of mucormycosis, rhinocerebral mucormycosis is the most common variety which includes three subtypes rhinomaxillary, rhino-orbital and rhino-orbitocerebral mucormycosis. Here are two case reports of Rhinocerebral mucormycosis of different subtypes emphasizing the role of early detection of the disease to limit the spread of infection and reducing the morbidity and mortality.

  5. Effects of Various Process Parameters on the Production of γ-Linolenic Acid in Submerged Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed U. Ahmed

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies were carried out on the fermentative production of γ-linolenic acid (GLA using seven strains belonging to Mucorales. An oleaginous fungal strain, isolated from the Western Ghats of Kerala produced GLA at a level of 8 % (by mass, when grown in a complex medium containing glucose as the sole carbon source. Effects of different culture conditions were investigated in shake flasks. Maximum dry biomass and total GLA obtained were 48.4 g/L and 636 mg/L, respectively, in the culture cultivated at 30 °C and 200 rpm for 7 days. Among the organic nitrogen sources investigated, yeast extract, and combination of corn steep liquor and baker’s yeast in 1:1 ratio were useful for enhancing the GLA production and the effects were comparable.

  6. Sequence of oral manifestations in rhino-maxillary mucormycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharati R Doni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis, caused by saprophytic fungi of the order Mucorales of the class Zygomycetes, is a rare opportunistic fungal infection, which has a rapidly progressive and fulminant course with fatal outcome. These fungi are ubiquitous, found in soil, bread molds, decaying fruits and vegetables. The most common form of mucormycosis is rhinocerebral and is usually seen in uncontrolled diabetes mellitus or in immunocompromised patients. This fungus invades the arteries, leading to thrombosis that subsequently causes necrosis of hard and soft tissues. We report a case of palatal perforation by rhino-maxillary mucormycosis in an immunocompromised patient. The aim of this article is to draw attention to the clinical presentation and pathogenesis of mucormycosis and to emphasize the need for high degree of suspicion in its diagnosis and management.

  7. Taxonomy of Fungi Causing Mucormycosis and Entomophthoramycosis (Zygomycosis) and Nomenclature of the Disease: Molecular Mycologic Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Molecular phylogenetic analysis confirmed the phylum Zygomycota to be polyphyletic, and the taxa conventionally classified in Zygomycota are now distributed among the new phylum Glomeromycota and 4 subphyla incertae sedis (uncertain placement). Because the nomenclature of the disease zygomycosis was based on the phylum Zygomycota (Zygomycetes) in which the etiologic agents had been classified, the new classification profoundly affects the name of the disease. Zygomycosis was originally described as a convenient and inclusive name for 2 clinicopathologically different diseases, mucormycosis caused by members of Mucorales and entomophthoramycosis caused by species in the order Entomophthorales of Zygomycota. Without revision of original definition, the name “zygomycosis,” however, has more often been used as a synonym only for mucormycosis. This article reviews the progress and changes in taxonomy and nomenclature of Zygomycota and the disease zygomycosis. The article also reiterates the reasons why the classic names “mucormycosis” and “entomophthoramycosis” are more appropriate than “zygomycosis.” PMID:22247451

  8. Guanophilic fungi in three caves of southwestern Puerto Rico

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    Nieves-Rivera Angel M.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Fifty species of guanophilic (bat guano-loving fungi were isolated from field-collected samples within three caves in southwesternPuerto Rico; most were mitosporic fungi (23 species. The caves studied were Cueva La Tuna (Cabo Rojo, Cueva de Malano(Sistema de Los Chorros, San Germán, and Cueva Viento (El Convento Cave-Spring System, Guayanilla-Peñuelas. The mostconspicuous fungus by far was the zygomycete Circinella umbellata (Mucorales. Circinella umbellata dominated the bat guanoincubation chambers (Petri dishes lined with sterile filter paper moistened with sterile water at ambient laboratory conditions.Nineteen species of basidiomycetes (e.g., Ganoderma cf. resinaceum, Geastrum cf. minimum, Lepiota sp., Polyporus sp., Ramariasp. and three species of ascomycetes (Hypoxylon sp., Xylaria anisopleura, and X. kegeliana were also recorded. They were foundon soil, rotting leaves, bark and rotting wood, buried in bat guano located below natural skylights or sinkholes.

  9. Capítulo 7 - Zigomicose Chapter 7 - Zygomycosis

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    Cecília Bittencourt Severo

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A zigomicose (mucormicose é uma infecção rara, mas altamente invasiva, causada por fungos da ordem Mucorales (gêneros Rhizopus, Mucor, Rhizomucor, Absidia, Apophysomyces, Saksenaea, Cunninghamella, Cokeromyces e Syncephalastrum. Esse tipo de infecção é usualmente associado a doenças hematológicas, cetoacidose diabética e transplante de órgãos. A apresentação clínica mais frequente é a mucormicose rinocerebral, com ou sem envolvimento pulmonar. A zigomicose pulmonar ocorre mais frequentemente em pacientes com neutropenia profunda e prolongada e pode se apresentar como infiltrado lobar ou segmentar, nódulos isolados, lesões cavitárias, hemorragia ou infarto. As manifestações clínicas e radiológicas são na maioria dos casos indistinguíveis daquelas associadas com aspergilose invasiva. Este artigo descreve as características gerais da zigomicose pulmonar, com ênfase no diagnóstico laboratorial, e ilustra a morfologia de algumas lesões.Zygomycosis (mucormycosis is a rare but highly invasive infection caused by fungi belonging to the order Mucorales, which includes the genera Rhizopus, Mucor, Rhizomucor, Absidia, Apophysomyces, Saksenaea, Cunninghamella, Cokeromyces and Syncephalastrum. This type of infection is usually associated with hematologic diseases, diabetic ketoacidosis and organ transplantation. The most common form of presentation is rhinocerebral mucormycosis, with or without pulmonary involvement. Pulmonary zygomycosis is more common in patients with profound, prolonged neutropenia and can present as segmental or lobar infiltrates, isolated nodules, cavitary lesions, hemorrhage or infarction. The clinical and radiological manifestations are often indistinguishable from those associated with invasive aspergillosis. This article describes the general characteristics of pulmonary zygomycosis, emphasizing laboratory diagnosis, and illustrates the morphology of some lesions.

  10. Cyclofarnesoids and methylhexanoids produced from β-carotene in Phycomyces blakesleeanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalde, Eugenio; Medina, Humberto R; Herrador, M Mar; Barrero, Alejandro F; Cerdá-Olmedo, Enrique

    2016-04-01

    The oxidative cleavage of β-carotene in the Mucorales produces three fragments of 18, 15, and 7 carbons, respective heads of three families of apocarotenoids: the methylhexanoids, the trisporoids, and the cyclofarnesoids (named after their 1,6-cyclofarnesane skeleton). The apocarotenoids are easily recognized because they are absent in white mutants unable to produce β-carotene. In cultures of Phycomyces blakesleeanus we detected thirty-two apocarotenoids by LC, UV absorbance, and MS. With additional IR and NMR we identified two methylhexanoids and the eight most abundant cyclofarnesoids. Four of them were previously-unknown natural compounds, including 4-dihydrocyclofarnesine S, the most abundant cyclofarnesoid in young cultures. We arranged the apocarotenoids of the Mucorales in a scheme that helps classifying and naming them and suggests possible metabolites and biosynthetic pathways. We propose specific biosynthetic pathways for cyclofarnesoids and methylhexanoids based on structural comparisons, the time course of appearance of individual compounds, and the bioconversion of β-apo-12-carotenol, an early precursor, to three more oxygenated cyclofarnesoids by the white mutants. Some of the reactions occur spontaneously in the increasingly acidic culture media. Mating increased the contents of methylhexanoids and cyclofarnesoids by ca. threefold in young cultures and ca. twelvefold in old ones (five days); cyclofarnesine S, the most abundant cyclofarnesoid in old cultures, increased over one hundredfold. We found no differences between the sexes and no activity as sexual pheromones, but we suggest that methylhexanoids and cyclofarnesoids could mediate species-specific physiology and behavior. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Fob1 and Fob2 Proteins Are Virulence Determinants of Rhizopus oryzae via Facilitating Iron Uptake from Ferrioxamine.

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    Mingfu Liu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Dialysis patients with chronic renal failure receiving deferoxamine for treating iron overload are uniquely predisposed for mucormycosis, which is most often caused by Rhizopus oryzae. Although the deferoxamine siderophore is not secreted by Mucorales, previous studies established that Rhizopus species utilize iron from ferrioxamine (iron-rich form of deferoxamine. Here we determined that the CBS domain proteins of Fob1 and Fob2 act as receptors on the cell surface of R. oryzae during iron uptake from ferrioxamine. Fob1 and Fob2 cell surface expression was induced in the presence of ferrioxamine and bound radiolabeled ferrioxamine. A R. oryzae strain with targeted reduced Fob1/Fob2 expression was impaired for iron uptake, germinating, and growing on medium with ferrioxamine as the sole source of iron. This strain also exhibited reduced virulence in a deferoxamine-treated, but not the diabetic ketoacidotic (DKA, mouse model of mucormycosis. The mechanism by which R. oryzae obtains iron from ferrioxamine involves the reductase/permease uptake system since the growth on ferrioxamine supplemented medium is associated with elevated reductase activity and the use of the ferrous chelator bathophenanthroline disulfonate abrogates iron uptake and growth on medium supplemented with ferrioxamine as a sole source of iron. Finally, R. oryzae mutants with reduced copies of the high affinity iron permease (FTR1 or with decreased FTR1 expression had an impaired iron uptake from ferrioxamine in vitro and reduced virulence in the deferoxamine-treated mouse model of mucormycosis. These two receptors appear to be conserved in Mucorales, and can be the subject of future novel therapy to maintain the use of deferoxamine for treating iron-overload.

  12. Early diagnosis and monitoring of mucormycosis by detection of circulating DNA in serum: retrospective analysis of 44 cases collected through the French Surveillance Network of Invasive Fungal Infections (RESSIF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millon, L; Herbrecht, R; Grenouillet, F; Morio, F; Alanio, A; Letscher-Bru, V; Cassaing, S; Chouaki, T; Kauffmann-Lacroix, C; Poirier, P; Toubas, D; Augereau, O; Rocchi, S; Garcia-Hermoso, D; Bretagne, S

    2016-09-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of a set of three Mucorales quantitative PCR assays in a retrospective multicentre study. Mucormycosis cases were recorded thanks to the French prospective surveillance programme (RESSIF network). The day of sampling of the first histological or mycological positive specimen was defined as day 0 (D0). Detection of circulating DNA was performed on frozen serum samples collected from D-30 to D30, using quantitative PCR assays targeting Rhizomucor, Lichtheimia, Mucor/Rhizopus. Forty-four patients diagnosed with probable (n = 19) or proven (n = 25) mucormycosis were included. Thirty-six of the 44 patients (81%) had at least one PCR-positive serum. The first PCR-positive sample was observed 9 days (range 0-28 days) before diagnosis was made using mycological criteria and at least 2 days (range 0-24 days) before imaging. The identifications provided with the quantitative PCR assays were all concordant with culture and/or PCR-based identification of the causal species. Survival rate at D84 was significantly higher for patients with an initially positive PCR that became negative after treatment initiation than for patients whose PCR remained positive (48% and 4%, respectively; p Mucorales quantitative PCR could not only confirm the mucormycosis diagnosis when other mycological arguments were present but could also anticipate this diagnosis. Quantification of DNA loads may also be a useful adjunct to treatment monitoring. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Breaking the Mold: A Review of Mucormycosis and Current Pharmacological Treatment Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Treavor T; Muzny, Christina A; Swiatlo, Edwin; Legendre, Davey P

    2016-09-01

    To review the current literature for the pathogenesis of mucormycosis, discuss diagnostic strategies, and evaluate the efficacy of polyenes, triazoles, and echinocandins as pharmacological treatment options. An electronic literature search was conducted in PubMed using the MESH terms Rhizopus, zygomycetes, zygomycosis, Mucorales and mucormycosis, with search terms amphotericin B, micafungin, anidulafungin, caspofungin, extended infusion amphotericin B, liposomal amphotericin B, combination therapy, triazole, posaconazole, isavuconazole, diagnosis, and clinical manifestations. Studies written in the English language from January 1960 to March 2016 were considered for this review article. All search results were reviewed, and the relevance of each article was determined by the authors independently. Mucormycosis is a rare invasive fungal infection with an exceedingly high mortality and few therapeutic options. It has a distinct predilection for invasion of endothelial cells in the vascular system, which is likely important in dissemination of disease from a primary focus of infection. Six distinct clinical syndromes can occur in susceptible hosts, including rhino-orbital-cerebral, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, cutaneous, widely disseminated, and miscellaneous infection. Diagnosis of mucormycosis is typically difficult to make based on imaging studies, sputum culture, bronchoalveolar lavage culture, or needle aspirate. Surgical debridement prior to dissemination of infection improves clinical outcomes. Surgery combined with early, high-dose systemic antifungal therapy yields greater than a 1.5-fold increase in survival rates. The Mucorales are inherently resistant to most widely used antifungal agents. Amphotericin B is appropriate for empirical therapy, whereas posaconazole and isavuconazole are best reserved for de-escalation, refractory cases, or patients intolerant to amphotericin B. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Seasonal clustering of sinopulmonary mucormycosis in patients with hematologic malignancies at a large comprehensive cancer center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobini Sivagnanam

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Invasive Mucorales infections (IMI lead to significant morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised hosts. The role of season and climatic conditions in case clustering of IMI remain poorly understood. Methods Following detection of a cluster of sinopulmonary IMIs in patients with hematologic malignancies, we reviewed center-based medical records of all patients with IMIs and other invasive fungal infections (IFIs between January of 2012 and August of 2015 to assess for case clustering in relation to seasonality. Results A cluster of 7 patients were identified with sinopulmonary IMIs (Rhizopus microsporus/azygosporus, 6; Rhizomucor pusillus, 1 during a 3 month period between June and August of 2014. All patients died or were discharged to hospice. The cluster was managed with institution of standardized posaconazole prophylaxis to high-risk patients and patient use of N-95 masks when outside of protected areas on the inpatient service. Review of an earlier study period identified 11 patients with IMIs of varying species over the preceding 29 months without evidence of clustering. There were 9 total IMIs in the later study period (12 month post-initial cluster with 5 additional cases in the summer months, again suggesting seasonal clustering. Extensive environmental sampling did not reveal a source of mold. Using local climatological data abstracted from National Centers for Environmental Information the clusters appeared to be associated with high temperatures and low precipitation. Conclusions Sinopulmonary Mucorales clusters at our center had a seasonal variation which appeared to be related to temperature and precipitation. Given the significant mortality associated with IMIs, local climatic conditions may need to be considered when considering center specific fungal prevention and prophylaxis strategies for high-risk patients.

  15. Mucormycosis and chromoblastomycosis occurring in a patient with leprosy type 2 reaction under prolonged corticosteroid and thalidomide therapy Mucormicose e cromoblastomicose em um paciente com reação hansênica tipo II sob terapia prolongada com corticosteróide e talidomida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Machado Alves Basílio

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is an uncommon fungal infection caused by Mucorales. It frequently occurs in patients with neutropenia, diabetes, malignancy and on corticoid therapy. However, it is rare in patients with AIDS. Clinical disease can be manifested in several forms. The case reported illustrates the rare occurrence of chromoblastomycosis and mucormycosis in an immunosuppressed patient with multibacillary leprosy, under prolonged corticosteroid and thalidomide therapy to control leprosy type 2 reaction. Neutrophil dysfunction, thalidomide therapy and work activities are some of the risk factors in this case. Chromoblastomycosis was treated by surgical excision and mucormycosis with amphotericin B. Although the prognosis of mucormycosis is generally poor, in the reported case the patient recovered successfully. This case should alert dermatologists to possible opportunistic infections in immunosuppressed patients.Mucormicose é uma infecção fúngica incomum causada por Mucorales. Ocorre frequentemente em pacientes com neutropenia, diabetes, corticoterapia e condições malignas. Porém, é rara em pacientes com AIDS. A doença pode apresentar-se em diferentes formas. Este caso ilustra a rara ocorrência de mucormicose e cromoblastomicose em um paciente com hanseníase multibacilar, que estava sendo tratado com prednisona e talidomida devido a eritema nodoso (reação hansênica tipo II. Disfunção de neutrófilos, uso de talidomida e atividades profissionais são alguns fatores de risco neste caso. A cromoblastomicose foi tratada por excisão cirúrgica e a mucormicose com anfotericina B. Embora o prognóstico da mucormicose seja ruim, neste caso o tratamento foi bem sucedido. Este caso alerta dermatologistas para a possibilidade de infecções oportunistas em pacientes imunossuprimidos.

  16. Increased virulence of Cunninghamella bertholletiae in experimental pulmonary mucormycosis: correlation with circulating molecular biomarkers, sporangiospore germination and hyphal metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petraitis, Vidmantas; Petraitiene, Ruta; Antachopoulos, Charalampos; Hughes, Johanna E; Cotton, Margaret P; Kasai, Miki; Harrington, Susan; Gamaletsou, Maria N; Bacher, John D; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Roilides, Emmanuel; Walsh, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Members of the order Mucorales are emerging invasive molds that cause infections in immunocompromised patients. However, little is known about the relation between different species of Mucorales and their virulence in invasive pulmonary mucormycosis. Based upon our earlier epidemiological studies, we hypothesized that Cunninghamella bertholletiae would demonstrate increased virulence. Therefore, we studied the relative virulence of C. bertholletiae (CB), Rhizopus oryzae (RO), R. microsporus (RM), and Mucor circinelloides (MC) in experimental invasive pulmonary mucormycosis in persistently neutropenic rabbits in relation to the fungi in vitro sporangiospore germination rate and hyphal metabolic activity. Rabbits infected with CB demonstrated (1) higher lung weights in comparison to RM (P ≤ 0.05), RO and MC (P ≤ 0.001), (2) pulmonary infarcts in comparison to RO and MC (P ≤ 0.001), (3) tissue fungal burden (CFU/g) vs. MC (P ≤ 0.001), and (4) the lowest survival of 0% (0/18), in comparison to 16% (3/18, P ≤ 0.01) of RM, 81% (21/26) of RO, and 83% (15/18) of MC-infected rabbits (P ≤ 0.001). Serum PCR concentration-time-curve showed the greatest amplitude for CB. Virulence correlated directly with sporangiospore germination rate at 4 h among species, i.e., CB (67-85%) > RM (14-56%) > RO (4-30%) > MC (0%), and hyphal metabolic activity, i.e., CB (1.22-1.51) > MC (0.54-0.64) = RM (0.38-0.41) = RO (0.37-0.59). C. bertholletiae was significantly more virulent in experimental invasive pulmonary mucormycosis than R. microsporus, R. oryzae, and M. circinelloides. In vivo virulence correlated with species-dependent differences of in vitro germination rate and hyphal metabolic activity.

  17. Isolation and characterization of a strain of Lichtheimia corymbifera (ex Absidia corymbifera from a case of bovine abortion

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    Taddei Simone

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lichtheimia corymbifera (previously Absidia corymbifera is a filamentous zygomycetes belonging to the order Mucorales and to the family Lichtheimiaceae. Members of genus Lichtheimia spp. are cosmopolitan and ubiquitous in nature. Lichtheimia corymbifera is a recognized agent of diseases in man and animals. In cattle it causes abortion and mastitis. Three cases of bovine abortion occurred in a herd located in the Po Valley. Serological examinations were performed on fetal and mother's blood. One of the aborted fetus was referred to our laboratory. The paper describes the isolation and characterization of Lichtheimia corymbifera from a bovine aborted fetus. Methods Serological examinations were performed on fetal and mother's blood. Lesions on fetal tissues and placenta leaded the diagnostic suspect towards a mycotic aetiology. Tissues were then put in culture, and at the same time an histological examination was performed, together with bacteriological and virological tests. The isolate from placenta and fetal tissues was identified and characterized by PCR and RFLP, using the ITS region as a target sequence and AclI restriction site within the amplicon to distinguish Lichtheimia corymbifera among the other fungi. Results Serological, bacteriological and virological tests gave aspecific results. Histological examination evidenced numerous PAS positive hyphae within the necrotic cotiledons and numerous fungal nonseptate hyphae to the GMS stain. Colonies with typical morphological features of fungi grew up on Sabouraud agar from fetal skin and placenta. On the developed colonies the microscopic examination has shown a large number of nonseptate hyphae and sporangia consistent with Mucorales. PCR and RFLP allowed the identification of the isolate as Lichtheimia corymbifera. Conclusion The present report describes the isolation and the molecular characterisation of a fungal isolate from bovine aborted fetus and placenta. The

  18. Mucormicosis: Una micosis emergente Mucormycosis: An emergent mycosis

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    Iris Tiraboschi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo es presentar la incidencia, frecuencia, características clínicas y evolución de los pacientes con mucormicosis atendidos en el Hospital de Clínicas José de San Martín, Universidad de Buenos Aires, entre los años 1982 y 2010. Durante ese período se diagnosticaron 10 casos de mucormicosis. Los tres primeros entre 1982 y 2004 y los últimos 7 entre 2005 y 2010. La incidencia y frecuencia de esta enfermedad, para el período 1980-2004 fue 0.13 pacientes/año y 0.1 casos/10 000 egresos (IC 95%: 0.00 a 0.3 respectivamente. En el período 2005-2010 la incidencia fue 0.86 pacientes/año y la frecuencia de 1.1 casos/10 000 egresos (IC 95%: 0.5 a 2.4. Hubo nueve casos de mucormicosis rinosinuso-orbitaria, siete en pacientes con diabetes mellitus, uno en una paciente con una hemopatía maligna y neutropenia, y el restante en un paciente con HIV/sida que además estaba neutropénico y con un síndrome hemofagocítico. En una paciente se realizó el diagnóstico post mortem de mucormicosis pulmonar. El diagnóstico se efectuó por la observación de filamentos cenocíticos en los diez casos. Hubo desarrollo de mucorales en los cultivos de 8/9 pacientes; cinco Rhizopus spp y tres Mucor spp. Todos los pacientes recibieron un tratamiento inicial con anfotericina B deoxicolato, que en tres de ellos fue continuado con anfotericina B liposomal, y cirugía. Tres enfermos recibieron además un tratamiento adyuvante con oxigeno hiperbárico. La mortalidad fue 30%.Mucormycosis is an opportunistic infection caused by fungi of the order Mucorales. It is characterized by rapid progression and high morbidity and mortality in the absence of early diagnosis and prompt treatment. It was an infrequent disease, but in recent years, its incidence appears to have increased. The aim of this paper is to report the cases of mucormycosis diagnosed from 1982 to 2010 at the Hospital de Clinicas José de San Martín, University of Buenos Aires. We

  19. Fungi associated to Platypus cylindrus Fab. (Coleoptera: Platypodidae in cork oak Fungos associados ao insecto Platypus cylindrus Fab. (Coleoptera: Platypodidae em sobreiro

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    Joana Henriques

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Platypus cylindrus is a pest that since the 80’s of the last century has been considered a cork oak mortality agent in Portugal. It is an ambrosia beetle that establishes complex symbioses with fungi whose role in the insect-fungus-host interaction has not been completely clarified. In order to characterize P. cylindrus associated micoflora in Portugal, fungi were isolated from different beetle organs and from its galleries in cork oak trees. Fungi of the genera Acremonium, Aspergillus, Beauveria, Botrytis, Chaetomium, Fusarium, Geotrichum, Gliocladium, Nodulisporium, Paecilomyces, Penicillium, Raffaelea, Scytalidium, Trichoderma and of the order Mucorales were identified. An actinomycete of the genus Streptomyces was also identified. Some of these genera were related for the first time to this interaction. In the present work the isolated fungi are characterized and their contribution for beetle population establishment and tree weakness is discussed.Platypus cylindrus é uma praga que desde os anos 80 do século passado tem sido referida como agente de mortalidade do sobreiro em Portugal. É um insecto ambrósia que estabelece simbioses complexas com fungos cujo papel não está completamente esclarecido na interacção insecto-fungo-sobreiro. Com o objectivo de caracterizar a micoflora associada a P. cylindrus em Portugal foram efectuados isolamentos a partir de diferentes órgãos do insecto e suas galerias em sobreiro. Identificaram-se fungos dos géneros Acremonium, Aspergillus, Beauveria, Botrytis, Chaetomium, Fusarium, Geotrichum, Gliocladium, Nodulisporium, Paecilomyces, Penicillium, Raffaelea, Scytalidium, Trichoderma e da ordem Mucorales. Foi igualmente identificado um actinomiceta do género Streptomyces. Alguns destes géneros são referidos pela primeira vez nesta interacção. No presente trabalho caracterizam-se os fungos isolados e discute-se a sua contribuição para o estabelecimento das populações do insecto e

  20. Pathogenic Fungal Species Associated with Digestive System of Periplaneta americana (Blattaria: Blattidae Trapped from Residential Dwellings in Ahvaz City, Southwestern Iran

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    Hamid Kassiri

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cockroaches are the most prevalent domestic pests of a worldwide distribution. They were recognized as possible vectors of pathogenic bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites in residential dwellings and hospital environ­ments. The present study isolated and identified yeasts and filamentous fungi from digestive tract of American cock­roaches, collected from three different residential regions of Iran.Methods: Seventy cockroaches were sampled using direct collection (hand catch, vacuum cleaner and sticky traps in Ahvaz, Iran in 2009–2010. Their medically important fungal microorganisms were isolated from digestive tract using standard mycological methods. Filamentous fungi were identified by macroscopic and microscopic examina­tion. Yeasts were identified by API ID32C-32100 kit.Results: A high percentage of cockroaches (88.6% were detected to carry fungi of medical importance. Overall, 23 fungi species/genera were isolated from the American cockroaches' alimentary tract. The fungi isolated from cock­roaches, from the residential regions were species of Aspergillus, Rhizopus, Penicillium, Mucorales, Alternaria, Cladosporium, Mycelia, Chrysosporium, Candida, Rhodotorula, Zygosaccharomyces, and Debaryomyces. Candida spp. (41.4%, Aspergillus spp. (37.1% and Rhodotorula spp (27.1% were the most common fungi recovered on cockroaches. Candida albicans and Candida glabrata were the commonest species of the genus Candida. In addi­tion, Aspergillus niger and A. flavus were the most frequent species of the genus Aspergillus.Conclusion: American cockroaches may carry pathogenic fungi in the urban areas of Ahvaz.

  1. Microbiota Dynamics Associated with Environmental Conditions and Potential Roles of Cellulolytic Communities in Traditional Chinese Cereal Starter Solid-State Fermentation.

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    Li, Pan; Liang, Hebin; Lin, Wei-Tie; Feng, Feng; Luo, Lixin

    2015-08-01

    Traditional Chinese solid-state fermented cereal starters contain highly complex microbial communities and enzymes. Very little is known, however, about the microbial dynamics related to environmental conditions, and cellulolytic communities have never been proposed to exist during cereal starter fermentation. In this study, we performed Illumina MiSeq sequencing combined with PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to investigate microbiota, coupled with clone library construction to trace cellulolytic communities in both fermentation stages. A succession of microbial assemblages was observed during the fermentation of starters. Lactobacillales and Saccharomycetales dominated the initial stages, with a continuous decline in relative abundance. However, thermotolerant and drought-resistant Bacillales, Eurotiales, and Mucorales were considerably accelerated during the heating stages, and these organisms dominated until the end of fermentation. Enterobacteriales were consistently ubiquitous throughout the process. For the cellulolytic communities, only the genera Sanguibacter, Beutenbergia, Agrobacterium, and Erwinia dominated the initial fermentation stages. In contrast, stages at high incubation temperature induced the appearance and dominance of Bacillus, Aspergillus, and Mucor. The enzymatic dynamics of amylase and glucoamylase also showed a similar trend, with the activities clearly increased in the first 7 days and subsequently decreased until the end of fermentation. Furthermore, β-glucosidase activity continuously and significantly increased during the fermentation process. Evidently, cellulolytic potential can adapt to environmental conditions by changes in the community structure during the fermentation of starters. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Effect of bioaugmented inoculation on microbiota dynamics during solid-state fermentation of Daqu starter using autochthonous of Bacillus, Pediococcus, Wickerhamomyces and Saccharomycopsis.

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    Li, Pan; Lin, Weifeng; Liu, Xiong; Wang, Xiaowen; Gan, Xing; Luo, Lixin; Lin, Wei-Tie

    2017-02-01

    Daqu, a traditional fermentation starter that is used for Chinese liquor and vinegar production, is still manufactured through a traditional spontaneous solid-state fermentation process with no selected microorganisms are intentionally inoculated. The aim of this work was to analyze the microbiota dynamics during the solid-state fermentation process of Daqu using a traditional and bioaugmented inoculation with autochthonous of Bacillus, Pediococcus, Saccharomycopsis and Wickerhamomyces at an industrial scale. Highly similar dynamics of physicochemical parameters, enzymatic activities and microbial communities were observed during the traditional and bioaugmented solid-state fermentation processes. Both in the two cases, groups of Streptophyta, Rickettsiales and Xanthomonadales only dominated the first two days, but Bacillales and Eurotiales became predominant members after 2 and 10 days fermentation, respectively. Phylotypes of Enterobacteriales, Lactobacillales, Saccharomycetales and Mucorales dominated the whole fermentation process. No significant difference (P > 0.05) in microbial structure was observed between the traditional and bioaugmented fermentation processes. However, slightly higher microbial richness was found during the bioaugmented fermentation process after 10 days fermentation. Our results reinforced the microbiota dynamic stability during the solid-state fermentation process of Daqu, and might aid in controlling the traditional Daqu manufacturing process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Fungi that Infect Humans.

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    Köhler, Julia R; Hube, Bernhard; Puccia, Rosana; Casadevall, Arturo; Perfect, John R

    2017-06-01

    Fungi must meet four criteria to infect humans: growth at human body temperatures, circumvention or penetration of surface barriers, lysis and absorption of tissue, and resistance to immune defenses, including elevated body temperatures. Morphogenesis between small round, detachable cells and long, connected cells is the mechanism by which fungi solve problems of locomotion around or through host barriers. Secretion of lytic enzymes, and uptake systems for the released nutrients, are necessary if a fungus is to nutritionally utilize human tissue. Last, the potent human immune system evolved in the interaction with potential fungal pathogens, so few fungi meet all four conditions for a healthy human host. Paradoxically, the advances of modern medicine have made millions of people newly susceptible to fungal infections by disrupting immune defenses. This article explores how different members of four fungal phyla use different strategies to fulfill the four criteria to infect humans: the Entomophthorales, the Mucorales, the Ascomycota, and the Basidiomycota. Unique traits confer human pathogenic potential on various important members of these phyla: pathogenic Onygenales comprising thermal dimorphs such as Histoplasma and Coccidioides ; the Cryptococcus spp. that infect immunocompromised as well as healthy humans; and important pathogens of immunocompromised patients- Candida , Pneumocystis , and Aspergillus spp. Also discussed are agents of neglected tropical diseases important in global health such as mycetoma and paracoccidiomycosis and common pathogens rarely implicated in serious illness such as dermatophytes. Commensalism is considered, as well as parasitism, in shaping genomes and physiological systems of hosts and fungi during evolution.

  4. [Emphysematous gastritis secondary to gastric mucormycosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Lezama, Julio; Espinosa-González, Omar; García-Cano, Eugenio; Sánchez-Córdova, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a rare fungal infection of the mucorales order, which affects mostly immunocompromised patients. The association with emphysematous gastritis is rare and often fatal produced by gas -forming bacteria. We report the case of a trauma patient with type 1 diabetes mellitus, and diabetic ketoacidosis complicated with gastric mucormycosis associated with emphysematous gastritis. A male aged 32 who is involved in a car accident, who suffered head trauma, is admitted to the Intensive Care Unit, presenting diabetic ketoacidosis and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. An endoscopy was performed and an erosive esophagitis Class C, ischemia and gastric necrosis was found. A computed tomography scan showed emphysematous gastritis and gastric necrosis. He underwent total gastrectomy with a histopathology report of gastric mucormycosis. After the surgical procedure the patient died because of sepsis secondary to pulmonary mucormycosis Mucormycosis is a rare fungical disease which infrequently affects the gastrointestinal tract, being the stomach the most affected site. The mortality is high if the diagnosis is not done promptly and appropriate treatment is given. Suspecting its existence is necessary in patients with immunocompromised status to diagnose and provide timely treatment to increase survival, because of its high mortality. Copyright © 2015. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A.

  5. Molecular phylogenetic diversity of the emerging mucoralean fungus Apophysomyces: proposal of three new species.

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    Alvarez, Eduardo; Stchigel, Alberto M; Cano, Josep; Sutton, Deanna A; Fothergill, Annette W; Chander, Jagdish; Salas, Valentina; Rinaldi, Michael G; Guarro, Josep

    2010-06-30

    Apophysomyces is a monotypic genus belonging to the order Mucorales. The species Apophysomyces elegans has been reported to cause severe infections in immunocompromised and immunocompetent people. In a previous study of Alvarez et al.(3) [J Clin Microbiol 2009;47:1650-6], we demonstrated a high variability among the 5.8S rRNA gene sequences of clinical strains of A. elegans. We performed a polyphasic study based on the analysis of the sequences of the histone 3 gene, the internal transcribed spacer region of the rDNA gene, and domains D1 and D2 of the 28S rRNA gene, as well as by evaluation of some relevant morphological and physiological characteristics of a set of clinical and environmental strains of A. elegans. We have demonstrated that A. elegans is a complex of species. We propose as new species Apophysomyces ossiformis, characterised by bone-shaped sporangiospores, Apophysomyces trapeziformis, with trapezoid-shaped sporangiospores, and Apophysomyces variabilis, with variable-shaped sporangiospores. These species failed to assimilate esculin, whereas A. elegans was able to assimilate that glycoside. Amphotericin B and posaconazole are the most active in vitro drugs against Apophysomyces. Copyright 2009 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Analysis of atmospheric particulate matter; application of optical and selected geochemical techniques

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    Mastalerz, M.; Glikson, M.; Simpson, R.W. [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN (United States). Indiana Geological Survey

    1998-09-01

    An increase in particulate matter in the atmosphere has been shown to be linked to increased mortality but this relationship is poorly understood. Light microscopy, electron microscopy, electron microprobe, and micro-FTIR techniques have been applied to study atmospheric particulates in Brisbane, Australia as a part of a study on asthma. The particulate matter samples were collected daily from April to August 1992, and the sampling covered the autumn period which is typically a time of high asthma incidence in Brisbane. Volumetrically, most atmospheric particulate matter is less than 2{mu}m in size. The microscopic analysis reveals that this material is composed mainly of combusted and incompletely burned hydrocarbons from motor vehicle exhaust emissions, quiescent spores of Mucorales, soil bacteria, and inorganic matter in the form of quartz and other silicates. Elemental and functional group analyses confirm microscope identification, documenting carbon-rich, aromatic exhaust material, more aliphatic pollen and spore material and inorganic matter. Fungal spores dominate bioaerosol and are very abundant from the end of April through May to mid-June. The cytoplasmic content of pollens or fungaonly regarded as allergenic. Particulates from the exhaust emissions and crustal material in a sub-micrometer size range may act as carriers or dispersive mechanisms for cytoplasmic material from fungal spores and pollens, perhaps causing periods of the highest exhaust emission to be the most allergenic. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Mitochondrial respiratory pathways inhibition in Rhizopus oryzae potentiates activity of posaconazole and itraconazole via apoptosis.

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    Fazal Shirazi

    Full Text Available The incidence of mucormycosis has increased drastically in immunocompromised patients. Also the array of targets whose inhibition results in Mucorales death is limited. Recently, researchers identified mitochondria as important regulators of detoxification and virulence mechanisms in fungi. In this context, targeting the mitochondrial respiratory chain may provide a new platform for antifungal development. We hypothesized that targeting respiratory pathways potentiates triazoles activity via apoptosis. We found that simultaneous administration of antimycin A (AA and benzohydroxamate (BHAM, inhibitors of classical and alternative mitochondrial pathways respectively, resulted in potent activity of posaconazole (PCZ and itraconazole (ICZ against Rhizopus oryzae. We observed cellular changes characteristic of apoptosis in R. oryzae cells treated with PCZ or ICZ in combination with AA and BHAM. The fungicidal activity of this combination against R. oryzae was correlated with intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation (ROS, phosphatidylserine externalization, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and increased caspase like activity. DNA fragmentation and condensation assays also revealed apoptosis of R. oryzae cells. These apoptotic features were prevented by the addition of the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine. Taken together, these findings suggest that the use of PCZ or ICZ in combination with AA and BHAM makes R. oryzae exquisitely sensitive to treatment with triazoles via apoptosis. This strategy may serve as a new model for the development of improved or novel antifungal agents.

  8. Isavuconazole in the treatment of invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis infections

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    Donnelley MA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Monica A Donnelley,1,2 Elizabeth S Zhu,1 George R Thompson 3rd3 1Department of Inpatient Pharmacy, University of California – Davis, Sacramento, 2Department of Clinical Sciences, Touro University College of Pharmacy, Vallejo, 3Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of California – Davis, Davis, CA, USAAbstract: We have a limited arsenal with which to treat invasive fungal infections caused by Aspergillus and Mucorales. The morbidity and mortality for both pathogens remains high. A triazole antifungal, isavuconazole, was recently granted approval by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis. A randomized double-blind comparison trial for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis found isavuconazole noninferior to voriconazole. A separate, open-label study evaluating the efficacy of isavuconazole in the treatment of mucormycosis found comparable response rates to amphotericin B and posaconazole treated historical controls. The prodrug isavuconazonium sulfate is commercially available in both an oral and intravenous formulation and is generally well tolerated. Isavuconazole’s broad spectrum of activity, limited side effect profile, and favorable pharmacokinetics will likely solidify its place in therapy. Keywords: isavuconazonium, antifungal, zygomycosis, mucor, mould infection, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, clinical efficacy, therapy, new agent

  9. Biodiversity of soil-mycoflora of islamabad pakistan using two isolation methods

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    Anjum, F.; Asif, M.; Ayub, N.

    2005-01-01

    The soil microfungal flora of Islamabad were investigated, by using the direct plate and dilution plate methods. A total of 4,225 fungal colonies were isolated from 80 samples collected from Islamabad, Pakistan. The species-composition revealed 66 different species belonging to 20 fungal genera. Among these, Penicillium, being most common and prevalent, was ranked as the dominant genus with respect to the test-sites. Most of the species belong to genera Aspergillus and Penicillium. The maximum number of colonies i.e. 1797 were developed on DRBC, followed by PDA (1320) and the minimum number was recorded on SDA (1108). The results indicate that 4 of these species belong to Mucorales, one to Sphaeriales, one to Coelomycetes and 60 to Hyphomycetes. The most widespread genera were Aspergillus (16 species), Penicillium (15 species) and Acremonium (7 species). The most common species were Aspergillus niger (241 colonies), Cladosporium cladosporioides (219 colonies), Penicillium charlesii (201 colonies), Aspergillus flavus (200 colonies), Penicillium frequantus (198 colonies), Penicillium purpurogenum (178 colonies) and Alternaria alternata (176 colonies). Direct plating and dilution plating with three media, i.e. Potato Dextrose Agar, Dichloran Rose Bengal Agar, and Sabrouad Dextrose Agar, were used in this study. Dilution plating with Dichloran Rose Bengal Chloramphenicol Agar (DRBC) was found to be the most suitable. Other two media i.e. Potato Dextrose Agar (PDA) and Sabrouad Dextrose Agar (SDA) were also tried for cultivation of fungal species with successful results. (author)

  10. [Necrotising fasciitis caused by Saksenaea vasiformis in an immunocompetent patient after a car accident].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayayo, Emilio; Stchigel, Alberto M; Cano, José F; Bernal-Escoté, Xana; Guarro, Josep

    2013-01-03

    Cutaneous mucormycosis (zygomycosis), with subcutaneous spreading and dissemination, in immunocompetent patients is an uncommon disease caused by species belonging to the fungal genera Apophysomyces, Rhizopus and Saksenaea, among others. A case of necrotising fasciitis by Saksenaea vasiformis in an immunocompetent woman is described. The infection was acquired through a car accident resulting in multiple injuries affecting mainly her right arm. After the surgical reduction of fractures, skin lesions worsened and led to necrosis. The patient quickly developed a severe necrotising fasciitis with negative cultures at first. Despite the extensive surgical debridement and the aggressive antifungal treatment, the patient died. The histopathological study showed a fungal infection due to a fungus belonging to the Mucorales order, which was confirmed by culturing the clinical sample on Sabouraud agar, and identifying the species by cultures on Czapek-Dox agar, and sequencing of the ITS region of the ribosomal DNA. This case confirm the presence of this fungus in Spain, the value of histopathology for the mucormycosis diagnosis, as well as the need to perform special cultures to facilitate their isolation and identification to the species level by the combined use of Czapek-Dox agar and sequencing of the ITS region. Copyright © 2012 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  11. Usefulness of molecular biology performed with formaldehyde-fixed paraffin embedded tissue for the diagnosis of combined pulmonary invasive mucormycosis and aspergillosis in an immunocompromised patient

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    Vénissac Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Immunocompromised patients who develop invasive filamentous mycotic infections can be efficiently treated if rapid identification of the causative fungus is obtained. We report a case of fatal necrotic pneumonia caused by combined pulmonary invasive mucormycosis and aspergillosis in a 66 year-old renal transplant recipient. Aspergillus was first identified during the course of the disease by cytological examination and culture (A. fumigatus of bronchoalveolar fluid. Hyphae of Mucorales (Rhizopus microsporus were subsequently identified by culture of a tissue specimen taken from the left inferior pulmonary lobe, which was surgically resected two days before the patient died. Histological analysis of the lung parenchyma showed the association of two different filamentous mycoses for which the morphological features were evocative of aspergillosis and mucormycosis. However, the definitive identification of the associative infection was made by polymerase chain reaction (PCR performed on deparaffinized tissue sections using specific primers for aspergillosis and mucormycosis. This case demonstrates that discrepancies between histological, cytological and mycological analyses can occur in cases of combined mycotic infection. In this regard, it shows that PCR on selected paraffin blocks is a very powerful method for making or confirming the association of different filamentous mycoses and that this method should be made available to pathology laboratories.

  12. Meningoencephalitis caused by a zygomycete fungus (Basidiobolus associated with septic shock in an immunocompetent patient: 1-year follow-up after treatment

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    M. Auxiliadora-Martins

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Zygomycosis is an infection caused by opportunistic fungi of the Zygomycetes class, specifically those from the Mucorales and Entomophthorales orders. It is an uncommon disease, mainly restricted to immunocompromised patients. We report a case of a 73-year-old male patient with a history of fever (39°C lasting for 1 day, accompanied by shivering, trembling, and intense asthenia. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit with complex partial seizures, and submitted to orotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation under sedation with midazolam. The electroencephalogram showed evidence of non-convulsive status epilepticus. There is no fast specific laboratory test that permits confirmation of invasive fungal disease. Unless the physician suspects this condition, the disease may progress rapidly while the patient is treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics. Differential diagnosis between fungal and bacterial infection is often difficult. The clinical presentation is sometimes atypical, and etiological investigation is not always successful. In the present case, the histopathological examination of the biopsy obtained from the right temporal lobe indicated the presence of irregular, round, thick-walled fungi forming papillae and elongated structures of irregular diameter, with no septa, indicative of zygomycete (Basidiobolus. Treatment with liposomal amphotericin B and fluconazole was initiated after diagnosis of meningoencephalitis by zygomycete, with a successful outcome.

  13. Microscopic and submicron components of atmospheric particulate matter during high asthma periods in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glikson, M.; Rutherford, S.; Simpson, R. W.; Mitchell, C. A.; Yago, A.

    The study identifies the various components contributing to atmospheric particulate matter in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, during the period from the end of April and the months of July-August in 1992, covering the autumn period which is typically the period of high asthma incidence in Brisbane. Most particulate matter is Mucorales, and soil bacteria. The contribution from pollen and fungal spores has been evaluated and quantified. Fungal spores counts dominate the bioaerosol counts in the 2-10 μm range and are very high in Brisbane from the end of April through May to mid-June. However even at peak periods the total bioaerosol count only contributes of the order of 5-10% of the total particulate mass. The results show that Pm 10 (particulate matter less than 10 μm in diameter) and nephelometer readings do not indicate peak periods of allergenic bioaerosol readings (in fact there is a negative correlation) due to the low contribution of the bioaerosol count to the total and the different influences of wind speed. However the electron microscopy results show that this does not mean there are no synergies between aerosols from anthropogenic sources and bioaerosols. The cytoplasmic content of spores and pollen was often found to be adhered to motor vehicle emission material and crustal matter. The latter may therefore act as carriers for dispersed cytoplasmic allergenic material released from pollen and fungal spores.

  14. Phosphorous availability influences the dissolution of apatite by soil fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosling, A.; Suttle, K. B.; Johansson, E.; van Hees, P. W.; Banfield, J. F.

    2007-12-01

    We conducted mineral dissolution experiments using fungi isolated from a grassland soil in northern California to determine the response of fungi to different levels of phosphorus availability and to identify pathways of apatite dissolution by fungal exudates. Fluorapatite dissolution experiments were performed either with fungi present or under abiotic conditions using cell-free liquid media conditioned by fungal growth at different phosphorus and calcium availabilities. Among biogeochemically active soil fungal isolates apatite dissolution was either active in response to phosphorus limiting growth conditions or passive as a result of mycelial growth. Zygomycete isolates in the order of Mucorales acidify their growth media substrate in the presence of phosphorus, mainly through production of oxalic acid. Cell-free exudates induced fluorapatite dissolution at a rate of 10 -0.9 ± 0.14 and 10 -1.2 ± 0.22 mmol P/m2/s. The Ascomycete isolate, in the family Trichocomaceae, induced fluorapatite dissolution at a rate of 10 - 1.1 ± 0.05 mmol P/m2/s by lowering the pH of the media under phosphorus-limited conditions, without producing significant amounts of low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs). Oxalate strongly etches fluorapatite along channels parallel to [001], forming needle like features, while exudates from Trichocomaceae induced surface rounding. We conclude that while LMWOAs are well-studied weathering agents these does not appear to be produced by fungi in response to phosphorus limiting growth conditions.

  15. Rhino-orbitocerebral mucormycosis associated with cavernous sinus thrombosis: case report

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    Haber, Daniel Martiniano

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mucormycosis is a rare opportunistic infection caused by Mucorales fungi, and the Rhizopus is the most common one (70% of the cases. It is an acute invasive fungal disease whose form is disseminated, cutaneous, pulmonary, gastrointestinal and rhino-orbitocerebral. The latter is the most common form and its symptoms comprise of unilateral sinusitis, fever and headache. Once established in the orbit the symptoms can be chemosis, diplopia and reduced vision. The infection can spread to the brain via the orbital apex, orbital arteries or via the cribriform plate. Mucormycosis is a medical emergency and the treatment consists of a surgery to an aggressive debridement and in the use of antifungal therapy. Despite the appropriate management, the mortality rate can reach 40% of the cases. One possible intracranial complication of Mucormycosis is the Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis which is a rare and fatal infective disease. The initial symptoms of Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis are headache, retro-orbital pain, periorbital edema, proptosis, diplopia and reduced vision. Case Report: We describe the case of 43-year-old woman with medical history of diabetes mellitus and use of immunosuppressant drugs after kidney transplantation. The patient developed Acute Bacterial Sinusitis and Rhino-orbitocerebral Mucormycosis associated with Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis.

  16. Mucormicosis ocular Ocular mucormycosis

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    Belmary Aragonés Cruz

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available La mucormicosis es una infección causada por hongos del orden de mucorales, esta entidad es poco frecuente y su aparición se relaciona con el estado inmune del paciente. Es muy importante sospecharla ante la presencia de una escara negra y realizar un diagnóstico precoz, tiene un pronóstico reservado. Las tasas de supervivencia se han ido incrementando de 6 hasta 73 % y se vinculan con la extensión de la lesión al momento del diagnóstico y la gravedad del inmunocompromiso del paciente.Mucormycosis is an infection caused by mucoral mushrooms; this illness is not very frequent and its occurence relates to the patient's immune state. It is very important to suspect about its existence whenever there is black eschar and to diagnose it early. Prognosis is conservative. Survival rates have increased from 6 to 73 % and they are linked with lesion extension at the time of diagnosis and the immunosuppresive condition of the patient.

  17. Rhino-orbitocerebral mucormycosis in a patient with idiopathic crescentic glomerulonephritis

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    Suzan Sanavi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis, caused by mucorales, is an acute, rapidly progressive infection associated with high mortality. Rhino-orbitocerebral infection is the most common variant and is generally seen in association with immune deficiency syndromes. Prompt medical treatment of this infection and debridement decreases the mortality rate. We describe a 47-year-old man with crescentic glomerulonephritis on maintenance prednisolone therapy. He had earlier received steroid and cyclophosphamide pulse therapies. Renal functions improved following immunosuppressive treatment. In the third month of maintenance therapy, he presented to us with left-sided facial swelling and bloody nasal discharge. He had high blood sugar and acidic blood pH (ketoacidosis, probably due to steroid therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging of the head and sinuses showed inflammation and mass in the ethmoid sinus and nose with partial septal destruction, proptosis, global destruction of the left eye, brain infarction and carotid artery obliteration. Endoscopic biopsy of the sinuses revealed severe tissue necrosis. Samples of nasal discharge and biopsy tissue showed aseptate hyphae on light microscopy and culture, compatible with Rhizopus. The patient was treated with amphotericin B and multiple wound debridements along with ethmoidectomy and enucleation of the left eye. He was discharged in good general condition but with mild right hemiparesis. On follow-up examination at one year, there were no signs of fungal infection or renal dysfunction.

  18. Phylogenetic and Phylogenomic Definition of Rhizopus Species

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    Andrii P. Gryganskyi

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Phylogenomic approaches have the potential to improve confidence about the inter-relationships of species in the order Mucorales within the fungal tree of life. Rhizopus species are especially important as plant and animal pathogens and bioindustrial fermenters for food and metabolite production. A dataset of 192 orthologous genes was used to construct a phylogenetic tree of 21 Rhizopus strains, classified into four species isolated from habitats of industrial, medical and environmental importance. The phylogeny indicates that the genus Rhizopus consists of three major clades, with R. microsporus as the basal species and the sister lineage to R. stolonifer and two closely related species R. arrhizus and R. delemar. A comparative analysis of the mating type locus across Rhizopus reveals that its structure is flexible even between different species in the same genus, but shows similarities between Rhizopus and other mucoralean fungi. The topology of single-gene phylogenies built for two genes involved in mating is similar to the phylogenomic tree. Comparison of the total length of the genome assemblies showed that genome size varies by as much as threefold within a species and is driven by changes in transposable element copy numbers and genome duplications.

  19. Invasive Fungal Infections Secondary to Traumatic Injury

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    Ryan Kronen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infection (IFI is a rare but serious complication of traumatic injury. The purpose of this article is to review the epidemiology, natural history, mycology, risk factors, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes associated with post-traumatic IFI in military and civilian populations. The epidemiology of post-traumatic IFI is poorly characterized, but incidence appears to be rising. Patients often suffer from severe injuries and require extensive medical interventions. Fungi belonging to the order Mucorales are responsible for most post-traumatic IFI in both civilian and military populations. Risk factors differ between these cohorts but include specific injury patterns and comorbidities. Diagnosis of post-traumatic IFI typically follows positive laboratory results in the appropriate clinical context. The gold standard of treatment is surgical debridement in addition to systemic antifungal therapy. Patients with post-traumatic IFI may be at greater risk of amputation, delays in wound healing, hospital complications, and death as compared to trauma patients who do not develop IFI. More research is needed to understand the factors surrounding the development and management of post-traumatic IFI to reduce the significant morbidity and mortality associated with this disease.

  20. Filamentous Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers-Fletcher, Margaret V; Kendall, Brian A; Griffin, Allen T; Hanson, Kimberly E

    2016-06-01

    Filamentous mycoses are often associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Prompt diagnosis and aggressive treatment are essential for good clinical outcomes in immunocompromised patients. The host immune response plays an essential role in determining the course of exposure to potential fungal pathogens. Depending on the effectiveness of immune response and the burden of organism exposure, fungi can either be cleared or infection can occur and progress to a potentially fatal invasive disease. Nonspecific cellular immunity (i.e., neutrophils, natural killer [NK] cells, and macrophages) combined with T-cell responses are the main immunologic mechanisms of protection. The most common potential mold pathogens include certain hyaline hyphomycetes, endemic fungi, the Mucorales, and some dematiaceous fungi. Laboratory diagnostics aimed at detecting and differentiating these organisms are crucial to helping clinicians make informed decisions about treatment. The purpose of this chapter is to provide an overview of the medically important fungal pathogens, as well as to discuss the patient characteristics, antifungal-therapy considerations, and laboratory tests used in current clinical practice for the immunocompromised host.

  1. The iron chelator deferasirox protects mice from mucormycosis through iron starvation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Ashraf S.; Gebermariam, Teclegiorgis; Fu, Yue; Lin,, Lin; Husseiny, Mohamed I.; French, Samuel W.; Schwartz, Julie; Skory, Christopher D.; Edwards, John E.; Spellberg, Brad J.

    2007-01-01

    Mucormycosis causes mortality in at least 50% of cases despite current first-line therapies. Clinical and animal data indicate that the presence of elevated available serum iron predisposes the host to mucormycosis. Here we demonstrate that deferasirox, an iron chelator recently approved for use in humans by the US FDA, is a highly effective treatment for mucormycosis. Deferasirox effectively chelated iron from Rhizopus oryzae and demonstrated cidal activity in vitro against 28 of 29 clinical isolates of Mucorales at concentrations well below clinically achievable serum levels. When administered to diabetic ketoacidotic or neutropenic mice with mucormycosis, deferasirox significantly improved survival and decreased tissue fungal burden, with an efficacy similar to that of liposomal amphotericin B. Deferasirox treatment also enhanced the host inflammatory response to mucormycosis. Most importantly, deferasirox synergistically improved survival and reduced tissue fungal burden when combined with liposomal amphotericin B. These data support clinical investigation of adjunctive deferasirox therapy to improve the poor outcomes of mucormycosis with current therapy. As iron availability is integral to the pathogenesis of other infections (e.g., tuberculosis, malaria), broader investigation of deferasirox as an antiinfective treatment is warranted. PMID:17786247

  2. Molecular Characterization of Fungal Biodiversity and Early Identification of Fungi Associated With Oil Palm Decay, Particularly Ganoderma Boninense

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    Alba ZAREMSKI

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available To date, there was no information available on thediversity and molecular characterization of fungi associatedwith oil palm decay. This study appeared as a response tothat need for essential information on the overall, globalbiodiversity of fungi associated with oil palm decay. In thisstudy, 5 isolates from 30 fresh samples from the Tanah-Gambus estates (infested fresh tissues and fruiting bodiesseemed to be Ganoderma boninense. In general, the strainsisolated belonged to the class of the Ascomycetes and ofthe Mucorales. Some of these strains had a very fast growthrate (48h, making them highly invasive, such as the generaTrichoderma or Fusarium. The PDA-Chloramphenicolmedium seemed to be the most appropriate. Adaptation ofthe protocol developed in this study enabled us to extractDNA from all our samples using just 40 mg of mycelium ofGanoderma fruiting bodies and of fresh oil palm tissues. Todate, the sequencing result for 250 samples gives a singlespecies name and very high BLAST performance criteria (evalue,% coverage for the best 10 results. After BLAST, weobtained 17% the genus Ganoderma, 41% of Ascomycetes,yeasts and other Basidiomycetes, 17% miscellaneous(plants etc. and 25% of unusable sequences. An initialanalysis of the interspecific phylogenetic relations ofGanoderma, based on a comparison of rDNA sequences,5.8S and ITS 2, revealed clearly distinct clades where thespecies tended to group according to the nature of thesample and the geographical origin, particularly the speciesfrom Benin and Indonesia, and the freeze-dried samplesfrom Indonesia.

  3. Early and Late Trisporoids Differentially Regulate β-Carotene Production and Gene Transcript Levels in the Mucoralean Fungi Blakeslea trispora and Mucor mucedo

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    Sahadevan, Yamuna; Richter-Fecken, Mareike; Kaerger, Kerstin; Voigt, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    The multistep cleavage of carotenoids in Mucorales during the sexual phase results in a cocktail of trisporic acid (C18) sex pheromones. We hypothesized that the C18 trisporoid intermediates have a specific regulatory function for sex pheromone production and carotenogenesis that varies with genus/species and vegetative and sexual phases of their life cycles. Real-time quantitative PCR kinetics determined for Blakeslea trispora displayed a very high transcript turnover in the gene for carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase, tsp3, during the sexual phase. An in vivo enzyme assay and chromatographic analysis led to the identification of β-apo-12′-carotenal as the first apocarotenoid involved in trisporic acid biosynthesis in B. trispora. Supplementation of C18 trisporoids, namely D'orenone, methyl trisporate C, and trisporin C, increased tsp3 transcripts in the plus compared to minus partners. Interestingly, the tsp1 gene, which is involved in trisporic acid biosynthesis, was downregulated compared to tsp3 irrespective of asexual or sexual phase. Only the minus partners of both B. trispora and Mucor mucedo had enhanced β-carotene production after treatment with C20 apocarotenoids, 15 different trisporoids, and their analogues. We conclude that the apocarotenoids and trisporoids influence gene transcription and metabolite production, depending upon the fungal strain, corresponding genus, and developmental phase, representing a “chemical dialect” during sexual communication. PMID:24056470

  4. Mitochondrial Carriers Link the Catabolism of Hydroxyaromatic Compounds to the Central Metabolism in Candida parapsilosis

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    Igor Zeman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenic yeast Candida parapsilosis metabolizes hydroxyderivatives of benzene and benzoic acid to compounds channeled into central metabolism, including the mitochondrially localized tricarboxylic acid cycle, via the 3-oxoadipate and gentisate pathways. The orchestration of both catabolic pathways with mitochondrial metabolism as well as their evolutionary origin is not fully understood. Our results show that the enzymes involved in these two pathways operate in the cytoplasm with the exception of the mitochondrially targeted 3-oxoadipate CoA-transferase (Osc1p and 3-oxoadipyl-CoA thiolase (Oct1p catalyzing the last two reactions of the 3-oxoadipate pathway. The cellular localization of the enzymes indicates that degradation of hydroxyaromatic compounds requires a shuttling of intermediates, cofactors, and products of the corresponding biochemical reactions between cytosol and mitochondria. Indeed, we found that yeast cells assimilating hydroxybenzoates increase the expression of genes SFC1, LEU5, YHM2, and MPC1 coding for succinate/fumarate carrier, coenzyme A carrier, oxoglutarate/citrate carrier, and the subunit of pyruvate carrier, respectively. A phylogenetic analysis uncovered distinct evolutionary trajectories for sparsely distributed gene clusters coding for enzymes of both pathways. Whereas the 3-oxoadipate pathway appears to have evolved by vertical descent combined with multiple losses, the gentisate pathway shows a striking pattern suggestive of horizontal gene transfer to the evolutionarily distant Mucorales.

  5. Rhinocerebral mucormycosis treated with 32 gram liposomal amphotericin B and incomplete surgery: a case report

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    Özsüt Halit H

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mucormycosis (or zygomycosis is the term for infection caused by fungi of the order Mucorales. Mucoraceae may produce severe disease in susceptible individuals, notably patients with diabetes and leukemia. Rhinocerebral mucormycosis most commonly manifests itself in the setting of poorly controlled diabetes, especially with ketoacidosis. Case Presentation A 31-year-old diabetic man presented to the outpatient clinic with the following signs and symptoms: headache, periorbital pain, swelling and loss of vision in the right eye. On physical examination his right eye was red and swollen. There was periorbital cellulitis and the conjunctiva was edematous. KOH preparation of purulent discharge showed broad, ribbonlike, aseptate hyphae when examined under a fluorescence microscope. Cranial MRI showed involvement of the right orbit, thrombosis in cavernous sinus and infiltrates at ethmoid and maxillary sinuses. Mucormycosis was diagnosed based on these findings. Amphotericin B (AmBisome®; 2 mg/kg.d was initiated after the test doses. Right orbitectomy and right partial maxillectomy were performed; the lesions in ethmoid and maxillary sinuses were removed. The duration of the liposomal amphotericin B therapy was approximately 6 months and the total dose of liposomal amphotericin B used was 32 grams. Liposomal amphotericin B therapy was stopped six months later and oral fluconazole was started. Conclusions Although a total surgical debridement of the lesions could not be performed, it is remarkable that regression of the disease could be achieved with medical therapy alone.

  6. BIOTECHNOLOGY AS A USEFUL TOOL FOR NUTRITIONAL IMPROVEMENT OF CEREAL-BASED MATERIALS ENRICHED WITH POLYUNSATURATED FATTY ACIDS AND PIGMENTS

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    M. Čertík

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Cereals represent a major food supply for humanity. Although these sources are rich in proteins and carbohydrates, many of them are deficient in several essential nutrients, such as polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs and carotenoid pigments. One possible approach how to enhance the content of PUFAs or carotenoids in cereal diet is based on biotechnological transformation of cereal materials by solid state fermentations. This technique is powerful tool for effective valorisation of these resources to various types of value-added bioproducts with demanded properties and functions. Selected filamentous Mucorales fungi were applied for conversion of numerous agroindustrial substrates to bioproducts enriched with PUFAs, such as gamma-linolenic acid (GLA, dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (DGLA, arachidonic acid (AA and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA. On the other hand, a range of yeast species utilizing agroindustrial substrates were employed for formation of carotenoids, such as β-carotene, torulene, torularhodine and astaxanthin. Such naturally prepared cereal based bioproducts enriched with either PUFAs or carotenoid pigments may be used as an inexpensive food and feed supplement. The work was supported by grant VEGA No. 1/0747/08 from the Grant Agency of Ministry of Education, Slovak Republic.

  7. Analysis of atmospheric paniculate matter; application of optical and selected geochemical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastalerz, Maria; Glikson, M.; Simpson, R.W.

    1999-01-01

    An increase in participate matter in the atmosphere has been shown to be linked to increased mortality but this relationship is poorly understood. Light microscopy, electron microscopy, electron microprobe, and micro-FTIR techniques have been applied to study atmospheric particulates in Brisbane, Australia as a part of a study on asthma. The particulate matter samples were collected daily from April to August 1992, and the sampling covered the autumn period which is typically a time of high asthma incidence in Brisbane. Volumetrically, most atmospheric particulate matter is less than 2 ??m in size. The microscopic analysis reveals that this material is composed mainly of combusted and incompletely burned hydrocarbons from motor vehicle exhaust emissions, quiescent spores of Mucorales, soil bacteria, and inorganic matter in the form of quartz and other silicates. Elemental and functional group analyses confirm microscope identification, documenting carbon-rich, aromatic exhaust material, more aliphatic pollen and spore material and inorganic matter. Fungal spores dominate bioaerosol and are very abundant from the end of April through May to mid-June. The cytoplasmic content of pollens or fungal spores is commonly regarded as allergenic. Particulates from the exhaust emissions and crustal material in a sub-micrometer size range may act as carriers or dispersive mechanisms for cytoplasmic material from fungal spores and pollens, perhaps causing periods of the highest exhaust emission to be the most allergenic. ?? 1998 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Case of early-disseminated Rhizopus microsporus var. microsporus mucormycosis in a renal transplant patient

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    Sharma D

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dikshya Sharma,1 Kumud Dahal,2 Bandana Pathak,3 Udip Dahal4 1Staten Island University Hospital, Staten Island, NY, 2University of Illinois College of Medicine, 3OSF Saint Francis Medical Center, Peoria, IL, 4University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA Abstract: Mucormycosis is a rare infection caused by the ubiquitous filamentous fungi of the order Mucorales and class Zygomycetes. These species are vasotropic, causing rapid onset of tissue infarctions and necrosis and subsequent thrombosis by invading vascular bed. The disease spectrum ranges from involvement of skin, sinuses, lung, and brain to disseminated and mostly fatal infections, especially in immunocompromised hosts. Here, we present a case of a fatal disseminated mucormycosis in a 56-year-old female who had deceased donor renal allograft transplantation ~2 weeks prior to presentation. She presented with shortness of breath and dry cough. Despite being on broad-spectrum antibiotics/antifungals and proper management by transplant, infectious disease, and primary team, she died within 3 weeks of admission. Autopsy showed disseminated mucormycosis of lungs and thyroid. Disseminated infection within 2 weeks of solid organ transplantation in this patient was one of the rare features of mucormycosis. Keywords: Zygomycetes, immunocompromised, transplant

  9. Diagnosis of filamentous fungi on tissue sections by immunohistochemistry using anti-aspergillus antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challa, Sundaram; Uppin, Shantveer G; Uppin, Megha S; Pamidimukkala, Umabala; Vemu, Lakshmi

    2015-06-01

    Identification based on histology alone has limitations as Aspergillus species share morphology with other filamentous fungi. Differentiation of Aspergillus species from hyalohyphomycetes and dematiaceous fungi is important as the antifungal susceptibility varies among different species and genera. Given these problems, ancillary techniques are needed to increase specificity. Our aim was to study the utility of immunohistochemistry (IHC) with anti-Aspergillus antibody in the identification of Aspergillus species and to differentiate them from other filamentous fungi. Fifty formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue sections including 47 from cases of culture proven filamentous fungi, 3 from colonies of cultures of hyalohyphomycetes, and 11 smears from cultures were subjected to IHC studies using polyclonal rabbit anti-Aspergillus antibody (Abcam, UK) after antigen retrieval. The IHC on tissue sections was positive in 88% cases involving culture proven Aspergillus species. There was no cross reactivity with Mucorales species, Candida species, dematiaceous fungi and hyalohyphomycetes. Hence immunohistochemistry can be used as an ancillary technique for the diagnosis of Aspergillus species. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Lichtheimia Infection in a Lymphoma Patient: Case Report and a Brief Review of the Available Diagnostic Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerli, Stefan; Bialek, Ralf; Blau, Igor W; Christe, Andreas; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Presterl, Elisabeth

    2016-08-01

    We describe the case of a patient with a T-lymphoblastic lymphoma whose disseminated mucormycosis was diagnosed with delay, and we address the diagnostic and therapeutic decision-making process and review the diagnostic workup of patients with potential IFD. The diagnosis was delayed despite a suggestive radiological presentation of the patient's pulmonary lesion. The uncommon risk profile (T-lymphoblastic lymphoma, short neutropenic phases) wrongly led to a low level of suspicion. The diagnosis was also hampered by the lack of indirect markers for infections caused by Mucorales, the low sensitivity of both fungal culture and panfungal PCR, and the limited availability of species-specific PCR. A high level of suspicion of IFD is needed, and aggressive diagnostic procedures should be promptly initiated even in apparently low-risk patients with uncommon presentations. The extent of the analytical workup should be decided on a case-by-case base. Diagnostic tests such as the galactomannan and β-D-glucan test and/or PCR on biological material followed by sequencing should be chosen according to their availability and after evaluation of their specificity and sensitivity. In high-risk patients, preemptive therapy with a broad-spectrum mould-active antifungal agent should be started before definitive diagnostic findings become available.

  11. Biological roles of fungal carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avalos, Javier; Carmen Limón, M

    2015-08-01

    Carotenoids are terpenoid pigments widespread in nature, produced by bacteria, fungi, algae and plants. They are also found in animals, which usually obtain them through the diet. Carotenoids in plants provide striking yellow, orange or red colors to fruits and flowers, and play important metabolic and physiological functions, especially relevant in photosynthesis. Their functions are less clear in non-photosynthetic microorganisms. Different fungi produce diverse carotenoids, but the mutants unable to produce them do not exhibit phenotypic alterations in the laboratory, apart of lack of pigmentation. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the functional basis for carotenoid production in fungi. Different lines of evidence support a protective role of carotenoids against oxidative stress and exposure to visible light or UV irradiation. In addition, the carotenoids are intermediary products in the biosynthesis of physiologically active apocarotenoids or derived compounds. This is the case of retinal, obtained from the symmetrical oxidative cleavage of β-carotene. Retinal is the light-absorbing prosthetic group of the rhodopsins, membrane-bound photoreceptors present also in many fungal species. In Mucorales, β-carotene is an intermediary in the synthesis of trisporoids, apocarotenoid derivatives that include the sexual hormones the trisporic acids, and they are also presumably used in the synthesis of sporopollenin polymers. In conclusion, fungi have adapted their ability to produce carotenoids for different non-essential functions, related with stress tolerance or with the synthesis of physiologically active by-products.

  12. [Iron and invasive fungal infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Florencio; Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; Aguado, José María

    2013-01-01

    Iron is an essential factor for both the growth and virulence of most of microorganisms. As a part of the innate (or nutritional) immune system, mammals have developed different mechanisms to store and transport this element in order to limit free iron bioavailability. To survive in this hostile environment, pathogenic fungi have specific uptake systems for host iron sources, one of the most important of which is based on the synthesis of siderophores-soluble, low-molecular-mass, high-affinity iron chelators. The increase in free iron that results from iron-overload conditions is a well-established risk factor for invasive fungal infection (IFI) such as mucormycosis or aspergillosis. Therefore, iron chelation may be an appealing therapeutic option for these infections. Nevertheless, deferoxamine -the first approved iron chelator- paradoxically increases the incidence of IFI, as it serves as a xeno-siderophore to Mucorales. On the contrary, the new oral iron chelators (deferiprone and deferasirox) have shown to exert a deleterious effect on fungal growth both in vitro and in animal models. The present review focuses on the role of iron metabolism in the pathogenesis of IFI and summarises the preclinical data, as well as the limited clinical experience so far, in the use of new iron chelators as treatment for mucormycosis and invasive aspergillosis. Copyright © 2012 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Environmental Factors Affecting Microbiota Dynamics during Traditional Solid-state Fermentation of Chinese Daqu Starter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pan; Lin, Weifeng; Liu, Xiong; Wang, Xiaowen; Luo, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the microbiota dynamics during two industrial-scale traditional solid-state fermentation (SSF) processes of Daqu starters. Similar evolution profiles of environmental parameters, enzymatic activities, microbial amounts, and communities were observed during the medium temperature SSF (MTSSF) and low temperature SSF (LTSSF) processes. Orders of Rickettsiales and Streptophyta only dominated the initial 2 days, and Eurotiales only predominated from days 10 to 24, however, phylotypes of Enterobacteriales, Lactobacillales, Bacillales, Saccharomycetales, and Mucorales both prevailed throughout the MTSSF and LTSSF processes. Nevertheless, the pH in MTSSF process on day 5 were 5.28, while in LTSSF process (4.87) significantly lower (P < 0.05). The glucoamylase activities in MTSSF process dropped from 902.71 to 394.33 mg glucose g-1 h-1 on days 5 to 24, while significantly lower (P < 0.05) in LTSSF process and decreased from 512.25 to 268.69 mg glucose g-1 h-1. The relative abundance of Enterobacteriales and Lactobacillales in MTSSF process constituted from 10.30 to 71.73% and 2.34 to 16.68%, while in LTSSF process ranged from 3.16 to 41.06% and 8.43 to 57.39%, respectively. The relative abundance of Eurotiales in MTSSF process on days 10 to 24 decreased from 36.10 to 28.63%, while obviously higher in LTSSF process and increased from 52.00 to 72.97%. Furthermore, lower bacterial richness but higher fungal richness were displayed, markedly differences in bacterial communities but highly similarities in fungal communities were exhibited, during MTSSF process comparatively to the LTSSF process. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed microbial structure transition happened at thermophilic stages under environmental stress of moisture, pH, acidity, and pile temperature. These profound understanding might help to effectively control the traditional Daqu SSF process by adjusting relevant environmental parameters. PMID:27540378

  14. Mould and mycotoxin exposure assessment of melon and bush mango seeds, two common soup thickeners consumed in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezekiel, Chibundu N; Sulyok, Michael; Somorin, Yinka; Odutayo, Foluke I; Nwabekee, Stella U; Balogun, Afeez T; Krska, Rudolf

    2016-11-21

    An examination of the mould and fungal metabolite pattern in melon and bush mango seeds locally produced in Nigeria was undertaken in order to understand the mycotoxicological risk posed to consumers of both of these important and commonly consumed soup thickeners. The variation in mycotoxin levels in graded categories of both foodstuffs were also determined. Aspergillus, Fusarium, Penicillium, Mucorales and Trichoderma were the recovered fungi from the foodstuffs with Aspergillus species dominating (melon=97.8%; bush mango=89.9%). Among the Aspergillus species identified Aspergillus section Flavi dominated (melon: 72%; bush mango: 57%) and A. flavus, A. parasiticus, A. parvisclerotigenus and A. tamarii were the recovered species. About 56% and 73% of the A. flavus isolates from melon and bush mango seed samples, respectively were aflatoxigenic. Thirty-four and 59 metabolites including notable mycotoxins were found in the melon and bush mango seeds respectively. Mean aflatoxin levels (μg/kg) in melon (aflatoxin B 1 (AFB 1 )=37.5 and total aflatoxins=142) and bush mango seeds (AFB 1 =68.1 and total aflatoxins=61.7) were higher than other mycotoxins, suggesting potential higher exposure for consumer populations. Significantly (p<0.05) higher levels of mycotoxins were found in hand-peeled melon and discoloured bush mango seeds than in machine-peeled melon and non-discoloured seeds except for HT-2 and T-2 toxins which occurred conversely. All melon and bush mango seeds exceeded the 2μg/kg AFB 1 limit whereas all melon and 55% of bush mango seeds exceeded the 4μg/kg total aflatoxin EU limit adopted in Nigeria. This is the first report of (1) mycotoxin co-occurrence in bush mango seeds, (2) cyclopiazonic acid, HT-2 toxin, moniliformin, mycophenolic acid, T-2 toxin and tenuazonic acid occurrence, and (3) mycotoxin exposure assessment of both foodstuffs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Previously unknown species of Aspergillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier, M; Normand, A-C; Ranque, S

    2016-08-01

    The use of multi-locus DNA sequence analysis has led to the description of previously unknown 'cryptic' Aspergillus species, whereas classical morphology-based identification of Aspergillus remains limited to the section or species-complex level. The current literature highlights two main features concerning these 'cryptic' Aspergillus species. First, the prevalence of such species in clinical samples is relatively high compared with emergent filamentous fungal taxa such as Mucorales, Scedosporium or Fusarium. Second, it is clearly important to identify these species in the clinical laboratory because of the high frequency of antifungal drug-resistant isolates of such Aspergillus species. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has recently been shown to enable the identification of filamentous fungi with an accuracy similar to that of DNA sequence-based methods. As MALDI-TOF MS is well suited to the routine clinical laboratory workflow, it facilitates the identification of these 'cryptic' Aspergillus species at the routine mycology bench. The rapid establishment of enhanced filamentous fungi identification facilities will lead to a better understanding of the epidemiology and clinical importance of these emerging Aspergillus species. Based on routine MALDI-TOF MS-based identification results, we provide original insights into the key interpretation issues of a positive Aspergillus culture from a clinical sample. Which ubiquitous species that are frequently isolated from air samples are rarely involved in human invasive disease? Can both the species and the type of biological sample indicate Aspergillus carriage, colonization or infection in a patient? Highly accurate routine filamentous fungi identification is central to enhance the understanding of these previously unknown Aspergillus species, with a vital impact on further improved patient care. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and

  16. [Histopathological Diagnosis of Invasive Fungal Infections in Formalin-Fixed and Paraffin-Embedded Tissues in Conjunction with Molecular Methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinozaki, Minoru; Tochigi, Naobumi; Sadamoto, Sota; Yamagata Murayama, Somay; Wakayama, Megumi; Nemoto, Tetsuo

    2018-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between histopathology, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and in situ hybridization (ISH) for the identification of causative fungi in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens. Since pathogenic fungi in tissue specimens can be difficult to identify morphologically, PCR and ISH have been usually employed as auxiliary procedures. However, little comparison has been made on the sensitivity and specificity of PCR and ISH using FFPE specimens. Therefore, to compare and clarify the reproducibility and usefulness of PCR and ISH as auxiliary procedures for histological identification, we performed histopathological review, PCR assays, and ISH to identify pathogenic fungi in 59 FFPE tissue specimens obtained from 49 autopsies. The following are the main findings for this retrospective review: i) even for cases classified as "mold not otherwise specified" (MNOS), two cases could be identified as Aspergillus species by molecular methods; ii) all cases classified as non-zygomycetes mold (NZM) were Aspergillus species and were not identified by molecular methods as other fungi; iii) all 3 cases classified as zygomycetes mold (ZM) could be identified by molecular methods as Mucorales; iv) except for 1 case identified by molecular methods as Trichosporon spp., 5 cases were originally identified as dimorphic yeast (DY). As a measure of nucleic acid integrity, PCR and ISH successfully detected human and fungal nucleic acids in approximately 60% of the specimens. Detection of Aspergillus DNA by nested PCR assay and by ISH against the A. fumigatus ALP gene were similarly sensitive and significant (pmolecular methods such as ISH and PCR on FFPE specimens with pathological diagnosis should improve diagnostic accuracy of fungal infection.

  17. Mucormycosis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    Mok, Chi Chiu; Que, Tak Lun; Tsui, Edmund Yik Kong; Lam, Wing Yin

    2003-10-01

    To describe a case of mucormycosis in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and to review other patients reported in the English literature. A Medline search for articles about mucormycosis in SLE published between 1970 and 2002 was performed by using the key words "lupus," "mucormycosis," "zygomycosis," "Mucorales," "Rhizopus," and "Mucor." Cases were pooled for analysis, and the mycology, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of mucormycosis in SLE was reviewed. Eight cases of mucormycosis in SLE were identified (female:male = 7:1). The mean age at the time of infection was 31.8 +/- 7.6 years and the mean duration of SLE was 6.3 +/- 3.9 years. All except 1 patient had active lupus and all were receiving high-dose corticosteroids. Concomitant cytotoxic agents were used in 4 patients. Additional predisposing factors for opportunistic infection included hypocomplementemia, nephrotic syndrome, uremia, leukopenia, and diabetes mellitus. The disseminated form of mucormycosis was the most common presentation and the diagnosis often was made only at autopsy (63%). For cases with positive culture results, Rhizopus was the causative species. In 4 patients, manifestations of the fungal infection mimicked those of active SLE. The overall mortality of mucormycosis was very high (88%) and, in most cases, was probably a function of delayed diagnosis and treatment. The cutaneous form appeared to have the best prognosis with combined medical and surgical treatment. Mucormycosis is a rare but usually fatal fungal infection in SLE. Judicious use of immunosuppressive agents, a high index of suspicion, early diagnosis, and combination treatment with amphotericin B and surgical debridement may improve the prognosis of this serious infection.

  18. Evaluating renewable carbon sources as substrates for single cell oil production by Cunninghamella echinulata and Mortierella isabellina

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    Fakas, Stylianos; Papanikolaou, Seraphim; Batsos, Athanasios; Galiotou-Panayotou, Maria; Mallouchos, Athanasios [Laboratory of Food Microbiology and Biotechnology, Department of Food Science and Technology, Agricultural University of Athens, 75 Iera Odos, 11855 Athens (Greece); Aggelis, George [Division of Genetics, Cell and Developmental Biology, Department of Biology, University of Patras, 26504 Patras (Greece)

    2009-04-15

    The biochemical behavior (biomass production, accumulation of total lipid, substrate uptake, fatty acid composition of fungal oil) of two oleaginous Mucorales strains, namely Mortierella isabellina ATHUM 2935 and Cunninghamella echinulata ATHUM 4411, was studied when the aforementioned microorganisms were cultivated on xylose, raw glycerol and glucose under nitrogen-limited conditions. Significant differences in the process of lipid accumulation as related to the carbon sources used were observed for both microorganisms. These differences were attributed to the different metabolic pathways involved in the assimilation of the above substrates. Therefore, the various carbon sources were channeled, at different extent, to storage lipid or to lipid-free biomass formation. Although glucose containing media favored the production of mycelial mass (15 g L{sup -1} of total biomass in the case of C. echinulata and 27 g L{sup -1} in the case of M. isabellina), the accumulated lipid in dry matter was 46.0% for C. echinulata and 44.6% for M. isabellina. Lipid accumulation was induced on xylose containing media (M. isabellina accumulated 65.5% and C. echinulata 57.7% of lipid, wt wt{sup -1}, in dry mycelial mass). In these conditions, lipids of C. echinulata contained significant quantities of {gamma}-linolenic acid (GLA). This fungus, when cultivated on xylose, produced 6.7 g L{sup -1} of single cell oil and 1119 mg L{sup -1} of GLA. Finally, the growth of both C. echinulata and M. isabellina on raw glycerol resulted in lower yields in terms of both biomass and oil produced than the growth on xylose. (author)

  19. The antibiotic polymyxin B exhibits novel antifungal activity against Fusarium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Li-Hang; Wang, Hsuan-Fu; Sun, Pei-Lun; Hu, Fung-Rong; Chen, Ying-Lien

    2017-06-01

    The genus Fusarium comprises many species, including Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium solani, Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium verticillioides, and causes severe infections in plants and humans. In clinical settings, Fusarium is the third most frequent mould to cause invasive fungal infections after Aspergillus and the Mucorales. F. solani and F. oxysporum are the most prevalent Fusarium spp. causing clinical disease. However, few effective antifungal drugs are available to treat human and plant Fusarium infections. The cationic peptide antibiotic polymyxin B (PMB) exhibits antifungal activity against the human fungal pathogens Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans, but its efficacy against Fusarium spp. is unknown. In this study, the antifungal activity of PMB was tested against 12 Fusarium strains that infect humans and plants (banana, tomato, melon, pea, wheat and maize). PMB was fungicidal against all 12 Fusarium strains, with minimum fungicidal concentrations of 32 µg/mL or 64 µg/mL for most strains tested, as evidenced by broth dilution, methylene blue staining and XTT reduction assays. PMB can reduce the germination rates of conidia, but not chlamydospores, and can cause defects in cell membrane integrity in Fusarium strains. PMB exhibits synergistic activity with posaconazole and can potentiate the effect of fluconazole, voriconazole or amphotericin B against Fusarium spp. However, PMB does not show synergistic effects with fluconazole against Fusarium spp. as it does against Candida glabrata and C. neoformans, indicating evolutionary divergence of mechanisms between yeast pathogens and the filamentous fungus Fusarium. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  20. A non-canonical RNA degradation pathway suppresses RNAi-dependent epimutations in the human fungal pathogen Mucor circinelloides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calo, Silvia; Nicolás, Francisco E; Lee, Soo Chan; Vila, Ana; Cervantes, Maria; Torres-Martinez, Santiago; Ruiz-Vazquez, Rosa M; Cardenas, Maria E; Heitman, Joseph

    2017-03-01

    Mucorales are a group of basal fungi that includes the casual agents of the human emerging disease mucormycosis. Recent studies revealed that these pathogens activate an RNAi-based pathway to rapidly generate drug-resistant epimutant strains when exposed to stressful compounds such as the antifungal drug FK506. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of this epimutation pathway, we performed a genetic analysis in Mucor circinelloides that revealed an inhibitory role for the non-canonical RdRP-dependent Dicer-independent silencing pathway, which is an RNAi-based mechanism involved in mRNA degradation that was recently identified. Thus, mutations that specifically block the mRNA degradation pathway, such as those in the genes r3b2 and rdrp3, enhance the production of drug resistant epimutants, similar to the phenotype previously described for mutation of the gene rdrp1. Our genetic analysis also revealed two new specific components of the epimutation pathway related to the quelling induced protein (qip) and a Sad-3-like helicase (rnhA), as mutations in these genes prevented formation of drug-resistant epimutants. Remarkably, drug-resistant epimutant production was notably increased in M. circinelloides f. circinelloides isolates from humans or other animal hosts. The host-pathogen interaction could be a stressful environment in which the phenotypic plasticity provided by the epimutant pathway might provide an advantage for these strains. These results evoke a model whereby balanced regulation of two different RNAi pathways is determined by the activation of the RNAi-dependent epimutant pathway under stress conditions, or its repression when the regular maintenance of the mRNA degradation pathway operates under non-stress conditions.

  1. Mucormycosis of the paranasal sinuses in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia

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    Čolović Nataša

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Invasive fungal infection is among the leading causes of morbidity, mortality, and economic burden for patients with acute leukemia after induction of chemotherapy. In the past few decades, the incidence of invasive fungal infection has increased dramatically. Its management has been further complicated by the increasing frequency of infection by non-Aspergillus molds (e.g. Mucorales. Neutropenic patients are at a high risk of developing an invasive mucormycosis with fulminant course and high mortality rate (35-100%. Case Outline. We are presenting the case of a 72-year-old male with an acute monoblastic leukemia. The patient was treated during five days with hydroxycarbamide 2 × 500 mg/day, followed by cytarabine 2 × 20 mg/sc over the next 10 days. He developed febrile neutropenia, headache, and edema of the right orbital region of the face. Computed tomography of the sinuses revealed shadow in sinuses with thickening of mucosa of the right paranasal sinuses. Lavage and aspirate from the sinuses revealed Rhizopus oryzae. Mucormycosis was successfully treated with amphotericin B (5 mg/kg/day followed by ketoconazole (400 mg/day. Two months later the patient died from primary disease. Conclusion. In patients with acute leukemia who developed aplasia, febrile neutropenia, and pain in paranasal sinuses, fungal infection should be taken into consideration. New and non-invasive methods for taking samples from sinuses should be standardized in order to establish an early and accurate diagnosis of mucormycosis with the source in paranasal sinuses, and to start early treatment by a proper antifungal drug. Clear communication between physician and mycologist is critical to ensure proper and timely sampling of lavage and aspirate from sinuses and correct specimen processing when mucormycosis is suspected clinically. [Projekat Ministartsva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI 175034

  2. Increasing incidence of mucormycosis in a large Spanish hospital from 2007 to 2015: Epidemiology and microbiological characterization of the isolates.

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    Jesús Guinea

    Full Text Available We studied 19 cases of proven/probable mucormycosis diagnosed from 2007 to 2015 in our hospital and assessed the microbiological characteristics of the isolates. We recorded the incidence of mucormycosis and clinical and microbiological data of infected patients. Isolates were identified to molecular level and tested for their antifungal susceptibility to azoles, amphotericin B, and liposomal amphotericin B according to the CLSI M-38 A2 procedure. The incidence of mucormycosis in cases/100,000 hospital admissions during 2007-2015 increased significantly with respect to that reported in 1988-2006 (3.3 vs. 1.2; P<0.05. Patients mainly had hematological malignancies (52.6% and/or trauma/surgical wounds (52.6% and had received antifungal agents before the diagnosis of mucormycosis in 68% of cases. Diagnosis was by isolation (n = 17/19 and/or direct staining (n = 17/18 of Mucorales fungi in clinical samples. Identification was by panfungal PCR in patients with negative results in culture and in direct staining. The microorganisms identified were Lichtheimia spp. (42%, Rhizopus spp. (21%, Cunninghamella bertholletiae (16%, and others (21%. Liposomal amphotericin B was always more active than the other drugs against all the microorganisms except C. bertholletiae. All patients received antifungal treatment with 1 or more antifungal agents, mainly liposomal amphotericin B (17/19. Mortality was 47.4%, although this was significantly lower in the 11 patients in whom debridement was performed (18% vs. 87.5% (P = 0.015. The incidence of mucormycosis has risen in recent years. The proportion of cases with soft tissue involvement was high, and Lichtheimia was the most frequently involved species. The highest antifungal activity was observed with liposomal amphotericin B.

  3. Environmental factors affecting microbiota dynamics during traditional solid-state fermentation of Chinese Daqu starter

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    Pan Li

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the microbiota dynamics during two industrial-scale traditional solid-state fermentation (SSF processes of Daqu starters. Similar evolution profiles of environmental parameters, enzymatic activities, microbial amounts and communities were observed during the medium temperature SSF (MTSSF and low temperature SSF (LTSSF processes. Orders of Rickettsiales and Streptophyta only dominated the initial two days, and Eurotiales only predominated from days 10 to 24, however, phylotypes of Enterobacteriales, Lactobacillales, Bacillales, Saccharomycetales and Mucorales both prevailed throughout the MTSSF and LTSSF processes. Nevertheless, the pH in MTSSF process on day 5 were 5.28, while in LTSSF process (4.87 significantly lower (P < 0.05. The glucoamylase activities in MTSSF process dropped from 902.71 to 394.33 mg glucose g-1 h-1 on days 5 to 24, while significantly lower (P < 0.05 in LTSSF process and decreased from 512.25 to 268.69 mg glucose g-1 h-1. The relative abundance of Enterobacteriales and Lactobacillales in MTSSF process constituted from 10.30% to 71.73% and 2.34% to 16.68%, while in LTSSF process ranged from 3.16% to 41.06% and 8.43% to 57.39%, respectively. The relative abundance of Eurotiales in MTSSF process on days 10 to 24 decreased from 36.10% to 28.63%, while obviously higher in LTSSF process and increased from 52.00% to 72.97%. Furthermore, lower bacterial richness but higher fungal richness were displayed, markedly differences in bacterial communities but highly similarities in fungal communities were exhibited, during MTSSF process comparatively to the LTSSF process. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed microbial structure transition happened at thermophilic stages under environmental stress of moisture, pH, acidity and pile temperature. These profound understanding might help to effectively control the traditional Daqu SSF process by adjusting relevant environmental parameters.

  4. The environmental source of emerging Apophysomyces variabilis infection in India.

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    Prakash, Hariprasath; Ghosh, Anup Kumar; Rudramurthy, Shivaprakash Mandya; Paul, Raees Ahmad; Gupta, Sunita; Negi, Vishwanand; Chakrabarti, Arunaloke

    2016-08-01

    The rare mucoraceous fungus, Apophysomyces species complex ranks second after Rhizopus arrhizus causing mucormycosis in India. The source of this agent in the environment is not clearly known. We conducted an environmental study to find its presence in Indian soil. The soil samples from different geographical locations were analyzed for isolation of Mucorales. Rhizopus arrhizus (24.6%) was most commonly isolated from soil, followed by Lichtheimia spp. (23.2%), Cunninghamella spp. (21.7%), Rhizopus microsporus (14%) and Apophysomyces spp. (4.5%). The isolation of Apophysomyces species complex was significantly associated with low nitrogen content of the soil. Based on sequencing of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and 28S (D1/D2) regions of ribosomal DNA, the Apophysomyces isolates were identified as Apophysomyces variabilis with 98 to 100% similarity to type strain A. variabilis (CBS658.93). The analysis of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprinting data demonstrated genomic diversity of A. variabilis isolates with multiple clades (similarity 40-90%). The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC), MIC50 and MIC90 for A. variabilis isolates were 1 and 4 μg/ml for amphotericin B, 0.25 and 0.5 μg/ml for itraconazole, 0.125 and 0.25 μg/ml for posaconazole, 0.06 and 0.12 μg/ml for terbinafine, respectively. The present study revealed abundant presence of A. variabilis in Indian soil with low nitrogen content, its genetic heterogeneity and relatively high MICs for amphotericin B. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. A non-canonical RNA degradation pathway suppresses RNAi-dependent epimutations in the human fungal pathogen Mucor circinelloides.

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    Silvia Calo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Mucorales are a group of basal fungi that includes the casual agents of the human emerging disease mucormycosis. Recent studies revealed that these pathogens activate an RNAi-based pathway to rapidly generate drug-resistant epimutant strains when exposed to stressful compounds such as the antifungal drug FK506. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of this epimutation pathway, we performed a genetic analysis in Mucor circinelloides that revealed an inhibitory role for the non-canonical RdRP-dependent Dicer-independent silencing pathway, which is an RNAi-based mechanism involved in mRNA degradation that was recently identified. Thus, mutations that specifically block the mRNA degradation pathway, such as those in the genes r3b2 and rdrp3, enhance the production of drug resistant epimutants, similar to the phenotype previously described for mutation of the gene rdrp1. Our genetic analysis also revealed two new specific components of the epimutation pathway related to the quelling induced protein (qip and a Sad-3-like helicase (rnhA, as mutations in these genes prevented formation of drug-resistant epimutants. Remarkably, drug-resistant epimutant production was notably increased in M. circinelloides f. circinelloides isolates from humans or other animal hosts. The host-pathogen interaction could be a stressful environment in which the phenotypic plasticity provided by the epimutant pathway might provide an advantage for these strains. These results evoke a model whereby balanced regulation of two different RNAi pathways is determined by the activation of the RNAi-dependent epimutant pathway under stress conditions, or its repression when the regular maintenance of the mRNA degradation pathway operates under non-stress conditions.

  6. Rare fungal infectious agents: a lurking enemy [version 1; referees: 4 approved

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    Anna Skiada

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In the expanding population of immunocompromised patients and those treated in intensive care units, rare fungal infectious agents have emerged as important pathogens, causing invasive infections associated with high morbidity and mortality. These infections may present either as de novo or as breakthrough invasive infections in high-risk patients with hematologic malignancies receiving prophylactic or empirical antifungal therapy or in patients with central venous catheters. Diagnosis and treatment are challenging. Physicians should have a high index of suspicion because early diagnosis is of paramount importance. Conventional diagnostic methods such as cultures and histopathology are still essential, but rapid and more specific molecular techniques for both detection and identification of the infecting pathogens are being developed and hopefully will lead to early targeted treatment. The management of invasive fungal infections is multimodal. Reversal of risk factors, if feasible, should be attempted. Surgical debridement is recommended in localized mold infections. The efficacy of various antifungal drugs is not uniform. Amphotericin B is active against most yeasts, except Trichosporon, as well as against Mucorales, Fusarium, and some species of Paecilomyces and dimorphic fungi. The use of voriconazole is suggested for the treatment of trichosporonosis and scedosporiosis. Combination treatment, though recommended as salvage therapy in some infections, is controversial in most cases. Despite the use of available antifungals, mortality remains high. The optimization of molecular-based techniques, with expansion of reference libraries and the possibility for direct detection of resistance mechanisms, is awaited with great interest in the near future. Further research is necessary, however, in order to find the best ways to confront and destroy these lurking enemies.

  7. Identification of fungal causative agents of rhinosinusitis from Mashhad, Iran

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    Mohammad Javad Najafzadeh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Rhinosinusitis is a common disorder, influencing approximately 20% of the population at some time of their lives. It was recognized and reported with expanding recurrence over the past two decades worldwide. Undoubtedly, correct diagnosis of fungi in patients with fungal rhinosinusitis affects the treatment planning and prognosis of the patients. Identification of the causative agents using the standard mycological procedures remains difficult and time-consuming. Materials and Methods: Based on clinical and radiological parameters, 106 patients suspected of fungal rhinosinusitis were investigated in this cross-sectional prospective study from April 2012 to March 2016 at an otorhinolaryngology department. In this study, internal transcribed spacer (ITS and calmodulin (CaM sequencing were respectively validated as reliable techniques for the identification of Mucorales and Aspergillus to species level (both agents of fungal rhinosinusitis. Results: Of these, 63 (59.4% patients were suspected of allergic fungal rhinosinusitis (AFRS, 40 (37.7% patients suspected of acute invasive fungal rhinosinusitis (AIFRS, and 3 (2.8% patients suspected of fungus ball. In patients suspected of AFRS, AIFRS, and fungus ball only 7, 29, and 1 had positive fungal culture, respectively. After ITS and CaM sequencing, Aspergillus flavus was the most common species isolated from non-invasive forms, and A. flavus and Rhizopus oryzae were more frequently isolated from invasive forms. Conclusion: Aspergillus flavus is the most common agent of fungal rhinosinusitis in Iran, unlike most other reports from throughout the world stating that A. fumigatus is the most frequent causative agent of this disease.

  8. The influence of different concentrations of bio-organic fertilizer on cucumber Fusarium wilt and soil microflora alterations.

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    Nan Huang

    Full Text Available Fusarium wilt is one of the main diseases of cucumber, and bio-organic fertilizer has been used to control Fusarium wilt. In this study, a pot experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of bio-organic fertilizer applied at four levels on the suppression of Fusarium wilt disease in cucumber, the soil physico-chemical properties and the microbial communities. In comparison with the control (CK, low concentrations of bio-organic fertilizer (BIO2.5 and BIO5 did not effectively reduce the disease incidence and had little effect on soil microorganisms. High concentrations of bio-organic fertilizer (BIO10 and BIO20 significantly reduced the disease incidence by 33.3%-66.7% and the production was significantly improved by 83.8%-100.3%. The soil population of F. oxysporum f. sp. cucumerinum was significantly lower in bio-organic fertilizer treatments, especially in BIO10 and BIO20. The microorganism activity increased with the bio-organic fertilizer concentration. High-throughput sequencing demonstrated that, at the order level, Sphingomonadales, Bacillales, Solibacterales and Xylariales were significantly abundant in BIO10 and BIO20 soils. At the genus level, the abundance and composition of bacterial and fungal communities in BIO10 and BIO20 were similar, illustrating that high concentrations of bio-organic fertilizer activated diverse groups of microorganisms. Redundancy analysis (RDA showed that Xanthomonadales, Sphingomonadales, Bacillales, Orbiliales, Sordariales, and Mucorales occurred predominantly in the BIO10 and BIO20. These microorganisms were related to the organic matter, available potassium and available phosphorus contents. In conclusion, a high concentration of bio-organic fertilizer application suppressed the Fusarium wilt disease and increased cucumber production after continuous cropping might through improving soil chemical condition and manipulating the composition of soil microbial community.

  9. A survey of the gene repertoire of Gigaspora rosea unravels conserved features among Glomeromycota for obligate biotrophy

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    Nianwu eTANG

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi are a diverse group of soil fungi (Glomeromycota that form the most ancient mutualistic association termed arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis with a majority of land plants, improving their nutrition uptake and resistance to stresses. In contrast to their great ecological implications, the knowledge of the molecular biological mechanisms involved is still scant, partly due to the limited genomic resources available. Here, we describe the gene repertoire of a new AM fungus Gigaspora rosea (Diversisporales. Among the 86332 nonredundant virtual transcripts assembled, 15346 presented similarities with proteins in the Refseq database and 10175 were assigned with GO terms. KOG and Interpro domain annotations clearly showed an enrichment of genes involved in signal transduction in G. rosea. KEGG pathway analysis indicates that most primary metabolic processes are active in G. rosea. However, as for R. irregularis, several metabolic genes were not found, including the fatty acid synthase gene. This finding supports the hypothesis that AM fungi depend on the lipids produced by their hosts. Furthermore, the presence of a large number of transporters and hundreds of secreted proteins, together with the reduced number of plant cell wall degrading enzymes could be interpreted as an evolutionary adaptation to its mutualistic obligate biotrophy. The detection of meiosis-related genes suggests that G. rosea might use a cryptic sexual process. Lastly, a phylogeny of basal fungi clearly shows Glomeromycota as a sister clade to Mucoromycotina, not only to the Mucorales or Mortierellales. The characterization of the gene repertoire from an AM fungal species belonging to the order of Diversisporales and its comparison with the gene sets of R. irregularis (Glomerales and Gigaspora margarita (Diversisporales, reveal that AM fungi share several features linked to mutualistic obligate biotrophy. This work contributes to lay the foundation

  10. Outbreak of Invasive Wound Mucormycosis in a Burn Unit Due to Multiple Strains of Mucor circinelloides f. circinelloides Resolved by Whole-Genome Sequencing

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    Dea Garcia-Hermoso

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Mucorales are ubiquitous environmental molds responsible for mucormycosis in diabetic, immunocompromised, and severely burned patients. Small outbreaks of invasive wound mucormycosis (IWM have already been reported in burn units without extensive microbiological investigations. We faced an outbreak of IWM in our center and investigated the clinical isolates with whole-genome sequencing (WGS analysis. We analyzed M. circinelloides isolates from patients in our burn unit (BU1, Héééôèéééûéôèôèôôèéôééôéôôèôpital Saint-Louis, Paris, France together with nonoutbreak isolates from Burn Unit 2 (BU2, Paris area and from France over a 2-year period (2013 to 2015. A total of 21 isolates, including 14 isolates from six BU1 patients, were analyzed by whole-genome sequencing (WGS. Phylogenetic classification based on de novo assembly and assembly free approaches showed that the clinical isolates clustered in four highly divergent clades. Clade 1 contained at least one of the strains from the six epidemiologically linked BU1 patients. The clinical isolates were specific to each patient. Two patients were infected with more than two strains from different clades, suggesting that an environmental reservoir of clonally unrelated isolates was the source of contamination. Only two patients from BU1 shared one strain, which could correspond to direct transmission or contamination with the same environmental source. In conclusion, WGS of several isolates per patients coupled with precise epidemiological data revealed a complex situation combining potential cross-transmission between patients and multiple contaminations with a heterogeneous pool of strains from a cryptic environmental reservoir.

  11. Changing Epidemiology of Mucoralean Fungi: Chronic Cutaneous Infection Caused by Mucor irregularis.

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    Chander, Jagdish; Kaur, Mandeep; Bhalla, Mala; Punia, Rajpal Singh; Singla, Nidhi; Bhola, Kalyani; Alastruey-Izquierdo, Ana; Stchigel, Alberto M; Guarro, Josep

    2015-10-01

    The fungi pertaining to order Mucorales usually cause an acute form of clinical disease called mucormycosis. A primary chronic presentation in an immunocompetent patient is a rare form of mucormycosis. Mucor irregularis is known for causing chronic cutaneous infections geographically confined to Asia, mainly in China. We describe a case of primary chronic cutaneous mucormycosis caused by M. irregularis from a new geographical niche in India, highlighting changing aspects of its epidemiology. The patient was a farmer with a history of skin lesions over the lower limb for the past 6 years. The biopsy taken from the lesions showed pauci-septate hyphae with right-angle branching on KOH wet mount as well as special fungal stains. On fungal culture, greyish-white cottony mycelial growth of Mucormycetes was obtained. The strain was finally identified as M. irregularis on macro- and microscopic features on 2 % MEA and DNA sequencing. The antifungal susceptibility was done using EUCAST broth microdilution method and was found to be susceptible to commonly used antifungal agents. The patient was started on oral itraconazole and saturated solution of potassium iodide (SSKI). While undergoing treatment for 2 months, he was lost to follow-up, however, after a year when he recently visited the hospital; the disease got completely healed with no new crops of skin lesions. Mucoralean fungi should also be suspected in cases with chronic presentation, in immunocompetent host, as there is emergence of such fungi in new endemic areas, particularly located in Asia. The role of other antifungal agents apart from amphotericin B for the treatment of chronic mucormycosis needs to be explored.

  12. Data partitions, Bayesian analysis and phylogeny of the zygomycetous fungal family Mortierellaceae, inferred from nuclear ribosomal DNA sequences.

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    Tamás Petkovits

    Full Text Available Although the fungal order Mortierellales constitutes one of the largest classical groups of Zygomycota, its phylogeny is poorly understood and no modern taxonomic revision is currently available. In the present study, 90 type and reference strains were used to infer a comprehensive phylogeny of Mortierellales from the sequence data of the complete ITS region and the LSU and SSU genes with a special attention to the monophyly of the genus Mortierella. Out of 15 alternative partitioning strategies compared on the basis of Bayes factors, the one with the highest number of partitions was found optimal (with mixture models yielding the best likelihood and tree length values, implying a higher complexity of evolutionary patterns in the ribosomal genes than generally recognized. Modeling the ITS1, 5.8S, and ITS2, loci separately improved model fit significantly as compared to treating all as one and the same partition. Further, within-partition mixture models suggests that not only the SSU, LSU and ITS regions evolve under qualitatively and/or quantitatively different constraints, but that significant heterogeneity can be found within these loci also. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that the genus Mortierella is paraphyletic with respect to the genera Dissophora, Gamsiella and Lobosporangium and the resulting phylogeny contradict previous, morphology-based sectional classification of Mortierella. Based on tree structure and phenotypic traits, we recognize 12 major clades, for which we attempt to summarize phenotypic similarities. M. longicollis is closely related to the outgroup taxon Rhizopus oryzae, suggesting that it belongs to the Mucorales. Our results demonstrate that traits used in previous classifications of the Mortierellales are highly homoplastic and that the Mortierellales is in a need of a reclassification, where new, phylogenetically informative phenotypic traits should be identified, with molecular phylogenies playing a decisive role.

  13. Soil eukaryotic microorganism succession as affected by continuous cropping of peanut--pathogenic and beneficial fungi were selected.

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    Mingna Chen

    Full Text Available Peanut is an important oil crop worldwide and shows considerable adaptability but growth and yield are negatively affected by continuous cropping. Soil micro-organisms are efficient bio-indicators of soil quality and plant health and are critical to the sustainability of soil-based ecosystem function and to successful plant growth. In this study, 18S rRNA gene clone library analyses were employed to study the succession progress of soil eukaryotic micro-organisms under continuous peanut cultivation. Eight libraries were constructed for peanut over three continuous cropping cycles and its representative growth stages. Cluster analyses indicated that soil micro-eukaryotic assemblages obtained from the same peanut cropping cycle were similar, regardless of growth period. Six eukaryotic groups were found and fungi predominated in all libraries. The fungal populations showed significant dynamic change and overall diversity increased over time under continuous peanut cropping. The abundance and/or diversity of clones affiliated with Eurotiales, Hypocreales, Glomerales, Orbiliales, Mucorales and Tremellales showed an increasing trend with continuous cropping but clones affiliated with Agaricales, Cantharellales, Pezizales and Pyxidiophorales decreased in abundance and/or diversity over time. The current data, along with data from previous studies, demonstrated that the soil microbial community was affected by continuous cropping, in particular, the pathogenic and beneficial fungi that were positively selected over time, which is commonplace in agro-ecosystems. The trend towards an increase in fungal pathogens and simplification of the beneficial fungal community could be important factors contributing to the decline in peanut growth and yield over many years of continuous cropping.

  14. Isavuconazole treatment for mucormycosis: a single-arm open-label trial and case-control analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, Francisco M; Ostrosky-Zeichner, Luis; Cornely, Oliver A; Mullane, Kathleen M; Perfect, John R; Thompson, George R; Alangaden, George J; Brown, Janice M; Fredricks, David N; Heinz, Werner J; Herbrecht, Raoul; Klimko, Nikolai; Klyasova, Galina; Maertens, Johan A; Melinkeri, Sameer R; Oren, Ilana; Pappas, Peter G; Ráčil, Zdeněk; Rahav, Galia; Santos, Rodrigo; Schwartz, Stefan; Vehreschild, J Janne; Young, Jo-Anne H; Chetchotisakd, Ploenchan; Jaruratanasirikul, Sutep; Kanj, Souha S; Engelhardt, Marc; Kaufhold, Achim; Ito, Masanori; Lee, Misun; Sasse, Carolyn; Maher, Rochelle M; Zeiher, Bernhardt; Vehreschild, Maria J G T

    2016-07-01

    Mucormycosis is an uncommon invasive fungal disease with high mortality and few treatment options. Isavuconazole is a triazole active in vitro and in animal models against moulds of the order Mucorales. We assessed the efficacy and safety of isavuconazole for treatment of mucormycosis and compared its efficacy with amphotericin B in a matched case-control analysis. In a single-arm open-label trial (VITAL study), adult patients (≥18 years) with invasive fungal disease caused by rare fungi, including mucormycosis, were recruited from 34 centres worldwide. Patients were given isavuconazole 200 mg (as its intravenous or oral water-soluble prodrug, isavuconazonium sulfate) three times daily for six doses, followed by 200 mg/day until invasive fungal disease resolution, failure, or for 180 days or more. The primary endpoint was independent data review committee-determined overall response-ie, complete or partial response (treatment success) or stable or progressive disease (treatment failure)-according to prespecified criteria. Mucormycosis cases treated with isavuconazole as primary treatment were matched with controls from the FungiScope Registry, recruited from 17 centres worldwide, who received primary amphotericin B-based treatment, and were analysed for day-42 all-cause mortality. VITAL is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00634049. FungiScope is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01731353. Within the VITAL study, from April 22, 2008, to June 21, 2013, 37 patients with mucormycosis received isavuconazole for a median of 84 days (IQR 19-179, range 2-882). By day 42, four patients (11%) had a partial response, 16 (43%) had stable invasive fungal disease, one (3%) had invasive fungal disease progression, three (8%) had missing assessments, and 13 (35%) had died. 35 patients (95%) had adverse events (28 [76%] serious). Day-42 crude all-cause mortality in seven (33%) of 21 primary-treatment isavuconazole cases was similar to 13 (39%) of 33

  15. Mucormicosis: Una micosis emergente

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    Iris Tiraboschi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo es presentar la incidencia, frecuencia, características clínicas y evolución de los pacientes con mucormicosis atendidos en el Hospital de Clínicas José de San Martín, Universidad de Buenos Aires, entre los años 1982 y 2010. Durante ese período se diagnosticaron 10 casos de mucormicosis. Los tres primeros entre 1982 y 2004 y los últimos 7 entre 2005 y 2010. La incidencia y frecuencia de esta enfermedad, para el período 1980-2004 fue 0.13 pacientes/año y 0.1 casos/10 000 egresos (IC 95%: 0.00 a 0.3 respectivamente. En el período 2005-2010 la incidencia fue 0.86 pacientes/año y la frecuencia de 1.1 casos/10 000 egresos (IC 95%: 0.5 a 2.4. Hubo nueve casos de mucormicosis rinosinuso-orbitaria, siete en pacientes con diabetes mellitus, uno en una paciente con una hemopatía maligna y neutropenia, y el restante en un paciente con HIV/sida que además estaba neutropénico y con un síndrome hemofagocítico. En una paciente se realizó el diagnóstico post mortem de mucormicosis pulmonar. El diagnóstico se efectuó por la observación de filamentos cenocíticos en los diez casos. Hubo desarrollo de mucorales en los cultivos de 8/9 pacientes; cinco Rhizopus spp y tres Mucor spp. Todos los pacientes recibieron un tratamiento inicial con anfotericina B deoxicolato, que en tres de ellos fue continuado con anfotericina B liposomal, y cirugía. Tres enfermos recibieron además un tratamiento adyuvante con oxigeno hiperbárico. La mortalidad fue 30%.

  16. Phylogenetic distribution of fungal sterols.

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    John D Weete

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ergosterol has been considered the "fungal sterol" for almost 125 years; however, additional sterol data superimposed on a recent molecular phylogeny of kingdom Fungi reveals a different and more complex situation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The interpretation of sterol distribution data in a modern phylogenetic context indicates that there is a clear trend from cholesterol and other Delta(5 sterols in the earliest diverging fungal species to ergosterol in later diverging fungi. There are, however, deviations from this pattern in certain clades. Sterols of the diverse zoosporic and zygosporic forms exhibit structural diversity with cholesterol and 24-ethyl -Delta(5 sterols in zoosporic taxa, and 24-methyl sterols in zygosporic fungi. For example, each of the three monophyletic lineages of zygosporic fungi has distinctive major sterols, ergosterol in Mucorales, 22-dihydroergosterol in Dimargaritales, Harpellales, and Kickxellales (DHK clade, and 24-methyl cholesterol in Entomophthorales. Other departures from ergosterol as the dominant sterol include: 24-ethyl cholesterol in Glomeromycota, 24-ethyl cholest-7-enol and 24-ethyl-cholesta-7,24(28-dienol in rust fungi, brassicasterol in Taphrinales and hypogeous pezizalean species, and cholesterol in Pneumocystis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Five dominant end products of sterol biosynthesis (cholesterol, ergosterol, 24-methyl cholesterol, 24-ethyl cholesterol, brassicasterol, and intermediates in the formation of 24-ethyl cholesterol, are major sterols in 175 species of Fungi. Although most fungi in the most speciose clades have ergosterol as a major sterol, sterols are more varied than currently understood, and their distribution supports certain clades of Fungi in current fungal phylogenies. In addition to the intellectual importance of understanding evolution of sterol synthesis in fungi, there is practical importance because certain antifungal drugs (e.g., azoles target reactions in

  17. Mucormycosis in two community hospitals and the role of infectious disease consultation: a case series

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    Dai Y

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Yue Dai,1 James W Walker,1 Ruba A Halloush,2 Faisal A Khasawneh3 1Department of Internal Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, 2Amarillo Pathology Group, 3Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Amarillo, TX, USA Background: Mucorales are ubiquitous filamentous fungi that can cause a devastating, invasive infection. This order has become an increasingly important pathogen during the last two decades, due to the dramatic increase in patients with predisposing factors. The aim of this retrospective study was to report the clinical characteristics, therapeutic options, and outcomes of patients diagnosed with mucormycosis in community hospitals in Amarillo, Texas, and to reflect on the role of infectious disease (ID physicians in managing this potentially life-threatening problem. Patients and methods: This was a retrospective chart review of patients hospitalized with mucormycosis in two community hospitals in Amarillo between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2011. Results: Ten patients were diagnosed with mucormycosis during the study period, with a mean age of 58.8 years. There were five cases of pulmonary infection, two cases of cutaneous infection, two cases of rhinocerebral infection, and one case of gastrointestinal infection. Poorly controlled diabetes was the most common risk factor, identified in six patients, followed by hematological malignancy, immunosuppression, and trauma. ID physicians were consulted in all cases, albeit late in some cases. Nine patients received antifungal therapy, and five patients received surgical debridement. Lipid formulations of amphotericin B were prescribed for eight patients, used alone in two cases, and combined with caspofungin and posaconazole in one and five cases, respectively. One patient was treated with posaconazole alone. Eight patients were discharged from the hospital alive. The mortality rate at 6-month

  18. Fındıkta Küf Florası ve Aflatoksin Oluşumunun Araştırılması

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    Cavidan Demir

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Bu çalışmada Giresun yöresinde yetiştirilen ticari öneme sahip tombul fındık örneklerinde aflatoksin varlığı ve küf florası araştırılmıştır. Bunlara bağlı olarak rutubet ve kül miktarı da belirlenmiştir. Giresun merkez ve ilçelerine ait 30 farklı örnek, iç fındık şeklinde alınmıştır. Çalışmada kullanılan 30 fındık örneğinin hiçbirinde tespit edilebilir seviyede aflatoksin belirlenmemiştir. Araştırma örneklerinde genel olarak %54-100 oranında fungal enfeksiyon görülmüş ve ortalama %85.93 olarak saptanmıştır. Tüm örneklerden depo fungusu olarak bilinen Aspergillus ve Penicillium cinsi küf izole edilirken, 9 örnekte Aspergillus flavus grubu küf bulunmuştur. Bunların toksijenitesi belirlenmemiştir. Ayrıca, Mucorales ve Rhizopus cinsi enfeksiyon oranı da yüksek bulunmuştur. Depolanmış fındıklarda küf oranının yüksek olması depolama şartlarının uygun olmadığını göstermektedir. Fındık örneklerinde aflatoksin saptanmaması memnun edici bir sonuçtur. Ancak, Aspergillus grubu küf enfeksiyonunun yüksek olması istenmeyen bir özelliktir.

  19. A molecular timescale of eukaryote evolution and the rise of complex multicellular life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedges, S. Blair; Blair, Jaime E.; Venturi, Maria L.; Shoe, Jason L.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pattern and timing of the rise in complex multicellular life during Earth's history has not been established. Great disparity persists between the pattern suggested by the fossil record and that estimated by molecular clocks, especially for plants, animals, fungi, and the deepest branches of the eukaryote tree. Here, we used all available protein sequence data and molecular clock methods to place constraints on the increase in complexity through time. RESULTS: Our phylogenetic analyses revealed that (i) animals are more closely related to fungi than to plants, (ii) red algae are closer to plants than to animals or fungi, (iii) choanoflagellates are closer to animals than to fungi or plants, (iv) diplomonads, euglenozoans, and alveolates each are basal to plants+animals+fungi, and (v) diplomonads are basal to other eukaryotes (including alveolates and euglenozoans). Divergence times were estimated from global and local clock methods using 20-188 proteins per node, with data treated separately (multigene) and concatenated (supergene). Different time estimation methods yielded similar results (within 5%): vertebrate-arthropod (964 million years ago, Ma), Cnidaria-Bilateria (1,298 Ma), Porifera-Eumetozoa (1,351 Ma), Pyrenomycetes-Plectomycetes (551 Ma), Candida-Saccharomyces (723 Ma), Hemiascomycetes-filamentous Ascomycota (982 Ma), Basidiomycota-Ascomycota (968 Ma), Mucorales-Basidiomycota (947 Ma), Fungi-Animalia (1,513 Ma), mosses-vascular plants (707 Ma), Chlorophyta-Tracheophyta (968 Ma), Rhodophyta-Chlorophyta+Embryophyta (1,428 Ma), Plantae-Animalia (1,609 Ma), Alveolata-plants+animals+fungi (1,973 Ma), Euglenozoa-plants+animals+fungi (1,961 Ma), and Giardia-plants+animals+fungi (2,309 Ma). By extrapolation, mitochondria arose approximately 2300-1800 Ma and plastids arose 1600-1500 Ma. Estimates of the maximum number of cell types of common ancestors, combined with divergence times, showed an increase from two cell types at 2500 Ma to

  20. A search for glomuferrin: a potential siderophore of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi of the genus Glomus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, Günther

    2017-08-01

    Most fungi are known to synthesize siderophores under iron limitation. However, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AM fungi) have so far not been reported to produce siderophores, although their metabolism is iron-dependent. In an approach to isolate siderophores from AM fungi, we have grown plants of Tagetes patula nana in the presence of spores from AM fungi of the genus Glomus (G. etunicatum, G. mossae & unidentified Glomus sp.) symbiotically under iron limitation and sterile conditions. A siderophore was isolated from infected roots after 2-3 weeks of growth in pots containing low-iron sand with Hoagland solution. HPLC analysis of the root cell lysate revealed a peak at a retention time of 6.7 min which showed iron-binding properties in a chrome azurol S test. The compound was isolated by preparative HPLC and the structure was determined by high resolution electrospray FTICR-MS and GC/MS analysis of the hydrolysis products. From an observed absolute mass to charge ratio (m/z) of 401.11925 [M+H] + with a relative mass error of ∆ = 0.47 ppm an elemental composition of C 16 H 21 N 2 O 10 [M+H] + was derived, suggesting a molecular weight of 400 Da for glomuferrin. Corresponnding ion masses of m/z 423.10 and m/z 439.06 were asigned to the Na-adduct and K-adduct respectively. A mass of 455.03836 confirmed an Fe- complex with an elemental composition of C 16 H 19 N 2 O 10 Fe (∆ = 0.15 ppm). GC/MS analysis of the HCl lysate (6 N HCL, 12 h) revealed 1,4 butanediamine. Thus the proposed structure of the isolated siderophore from Glomus species consisted of 1,4 butanediamine amidically linked to two dehydrated citrate residues, similar to the previously identified bis-amidorhizoferrin. Thus, the isolated siderophore (glomuferrin) is a member of the rhizoferrin family previously isolated from fungi of the Mucorales (Zygomycetes).

  1. A molecular timescale of eukaryote evolution and the rise of complex multicellular life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venturi Maria L

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pattern and timing of the rise in complex multicellular life during Earth's history has not been established. Great disparity persists between the pattern suggested by the fossil record and that estimated by molecular clocks, especially for plants, animals, fungi, and the deepest branches of the eukaryote tree. Here, we used all available protein sequence data and molecular clock methods to place constraints on the increase in complexity through time. Results Our phylogenetic analyses revealed that (i animals are more closely related to fungi than to plants, (ii red algae are closer to plants than to animals or fungi, (iii choanoflagellates are closer to animals than to fungi or plants, (iv diplomonads, euglenozoans, and alveolates each are basal to plants+animals+fungi, and (v diplomonads are basal to other eukaryotes (including alveolates and euglenozoans. Divergence times were estimated from global and local clock methods using 20–188 proteins per node, with data treated separately (multigene and concatenated (supergene. Different time estimation methods yielded similar results (within 5%: vertebrate-arthropod (964 million years ago, Ma, Cnidaria-Bilateria (1,298 Ma, Porifera-Eumetozoa (1,351 Ma, Pyrenomycetes-Plectomycetes (551 Ma, Candida-Saccharomyces (723 Ma, Hemiascomycetes-filamentous Ascomycota (982 Ma, Basidiomycota-Ascomycota (968 Ma, Mucorales-Basidiomycota (947 Ma, Fungi-Animalia (1,513 Ma, mosses-vascular plants (707 Ma, Chlorophyta-Tracheophyta (968 Ma, Rhodophyta-Chlorophyta+Embryophyta (1,428 Ma, Plantae-Animalia (1,609 Ma, Alveolata-plants+animals+fungi (1,973 Ma, Euglenozoa-plants+animals+fungi (1,961 Ma, and Giardia-plants+animals+fungi (2,309 Ma. By extrapolation, mitochondria arose approximately 2300-1800 Ma and plastids arose 1600-1500 Ma. Estimates of the maximum number of cell types of common ancestors, combined with divergence times, showed an increase from two cell types at 2500 Ma to ~10

  2. [Retrospective study of 25 cases of pulmonary mucormycosis in acute leukaemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillot, D; Legouge, C; Lafon, I; Ferrant, E; Pagès, P B; Plocque, A; Estivalet, L; Valot, S; Dalle, F; Abou Hanna, H; Chretien, M-L

    2018-04-01

    In acute leukaemia (AL), the occurrence of pulmonary mucormycosis (PM), the incidence of which is increasing, as a result of chemotherapy induced marrow aplasia, remains a life threatening complication. Analysis of clinical, biological and thoracic CT characteristics of patients with PM developing during the treatment of AL between 2000 and 2015. Day 0 (D0) was defined as the day with first CT evidence of PM. Among 1193 patients, 25 cases of PM were recorded during 2099 episodes of bone marrow aplasia. At time of diagnosis of PM, 24/25 patients had been neutropenic for a median of 12 days. None of the patients had diabetes mellitus. On initial CT (D0), the lesion was solitary in 20/25 cases and a reversed halo sign (RHS) was observed in 23/25 cases. From D1 to D7, D8 to D15 and after D15, RHS was seen in 100 %, 75 % and 27 % of cases, respectively. A tissue biopsy was positive in 17/18 cases. The detection of circulating Mucorales DNA in serum was positive in 23/24 patients and in 97/188 serum specimens between D-9 and D9. Bronchoalveolar lavage contributed to diagnosis in only 3/21 cases. The antifungal treatment was mainly based on liposomal amphotericin B combined with, or followed by, posaconazole. A pulmonary surgical resection was performed in 9/25 cases. At 3 months, 76 % of patients were alive and median overall survival was 14 months. In AL, early use of CT could improve the prognosis of PM. The presence of a RHS on CT suggests PM and is an indication for prompt antifungal treatment. Copyright © 2018 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Identificação da microbiota fúngica de ambientes considerados assépticos Identification of the fungic microbiota isolated in areas considered aseptic

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    Maria Elisabete Sbrogio de Almeida

    1988-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se isolar e identificar a microbiota fúngica em ambientes considerados assépticos, através de exposições com meios de cultivo adequados, em três épocas distintas do ano, antes e imediatamente após as manobras técnicas realizadas em três áreas de trabalho: ambiente aberto, ambiente fechado sem filtração de ar e ambiente fechado com filtração de ar, utilizadas em produção de imunobiológicos. Os meios ágar-Sabouraud e ágar-soja, enriquecidos com 0,2% de extrato de levedura e sem cloranfenicol, foram estudados quanto à sua eficácia no isolamento de bolores e leveduras, considerando-se o número de colônias desenvolvidas e a freqüência dos diversos fungos isolados. Isolaram-se 67 espécimens, sendo 64 fungos filamentosos (bolores e três leveduras. Dos bolores, 54 pertenciam a 22 gêneros da divisão Deuteromycota, famílias Moniliaceae e Dematiaceae, cinco amostras filamentosas foram incluídas na ordem Agonomycetales (Mycelia Sterilia, e uma amostra foi classificada na divisão Deuteromycota, ordem Sphaeropsidales, classe Coelomycetes. Da divisão Zygomycota, ordem Mucorales, família Mucoraceae, um único mucoráceo foi identificado até gênero. As três leveduras pertenciam também à divisão Deuteromycota (Fungi Imperfecti, família Cryptococcaceae, e foram identificadas como sendo duas Rhodotorula rubra e uma Torulopsis candida. Comprovou-se que o número de colônias isoladas aumentou após a realização das monobras técnicas e que a filtração de ar através de filtros tipo HEPA, reduzindo o número de colônias isoladas nos ambientes fechados, aumenta a segurança do trabalho; comumente é recomendada para áreas de atividade técnica cujos resultados satisfatórios estão diretamente relacionados com uma baixa incidência de contaminantes.The isolation and identification of the fungic microbiota present in areas considered aseptic (open and/or restricted, with or without air filtration (HEPA filters

  4. Decontamination of sliced and powdered okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) and some aspects of nutrient quality before and after gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ofori-Appiah, D.

    2012-01-01

    species was carried out in liquid cultures (okra meal broth and okra meal broth amended with glucose) using the conventional oven dry weight method at 300C for 5 days. The ability of Aspergillus flavus to produce aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, G2 in an artificially inoculated 'black' and 'white' market samples of okra powder was studied using the current Reverse-Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography (RP-HPLC) to quantify aflatoxins with post column derivatisation (PCD) involving bromination. Elemental composition (Cd, Cu, Pb, Ni, Zn, Mn, Na, K, Ca, Fe) was analysed by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry and Flame Photometer methods. A Bench Nuclear Magnetic Resonance equipment determined percentage moisture and fat concurrently; crude protein was ascertained by the Kjeldahl method, total ash was determined by the dry ashing method using Carblolite Eurotherm CW Furnace. Vitamin C was determined by the AOAC (2000) Iodometric Titration method and pH was estimated by AOAC (2000) method, while Brabender Viscograph measured viscosity of powdered samples of okra and Brookfield Viscometer was employed for the okra chips. Colour change was determined on L*a*b* system using a Minolta CR-30 Chromameter. The chips of Clemson spineless and Legon finger as well as the 'black' and 'white' okra powder were hygroscopic and equilibrated at 20-95% ERH with 6-8 days. Samples were visibly mouldy after 6-10 days and harboured a miscellany of fungal genera (Aspergillus, Penicillium, Pullularia, Fusarium, Cladosporium, Trichoderma, Paecilomyces, Rhodotorula sp). Potential toxin-producing fungi (A. flavus, A. alutaceus, A. sulphureus, P. digitatum, P. citrinum, P. brevicompactum, F. verticillioides, P. expansum) variably contaminated the samples. The Cigarette beetle, Lasioderma serricone was recorded for the first time in 'white' okra powder but not the remaining samples. The insect showed mycophagy, ingesting spores of the Mucorales. The okra fruit was a good medium for vegetative growth of the

  5. Efecto del uso del suelo sobre hongos solubilizadores de fosfato y bacterias diazotróficas en el páramo de Guerrero (Cundinamarca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moratto Claudia

    2005-12-01

    , suelos cultivados con papa actualmente en descanso (d y suelos de bosque (b. Se aislaron hongos en estado activo, mediante la técnica de lavado del suelo (14

    géneros, micelios estériles, con clamidosporas y tipo basidiomycete. Se presentó baja incidencia de mucorales en suelos cultivados y en descanso, a excepción de Mucor racemosus. En (d predominaron especies de los géneros Circinella, Mucor y Zygorrhynchus, evidenciándose la selección de hongos por efecto de uso del suelo. La determinación cuantitativa de la actividad solubilizadora evaluada en medio líquido, registró porcentajes altos en los hongos Trichocladium canadense, Mucor sp1 y Penicillium sp2, aislados de (d y (b, los cuales solubilizaron más de 15% del fosfato. No hubo relación entre el fósforo solubilizado y la biomasa, pero sí entre éste y el pH. En las BFN se comprobó el efecto significativo de la condición de uso del suelo sobre los recuentos de sus poblaciones. Se identificaron cuatro morfotipos aislados de (d, dos de (p, tres de (s y tres morfotipos de (b, correspondientes a especies de los géneros Azospirillum, Beijerinckia, Pseudomonas y Derxia. Se evidenció una respuesta sensible al uso del suelo por parte de los grupos funcionales estudiados.