WorldWideScience

Sample records for mri rf coils

  1. Modeling Endovascular MRI Coil Coupling with Transmit RF Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswaran, Madhav; Unal, Orhan; Hurley, Samuel; Samsonov, Alexey; Wang, Peng; Fain, Sean; Kurpad, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Objective To model inductive coupling of endovascular coils with transmit RF excitation for selecting coils for MRI-guided interventions. Methods Independent and computationally efficient FEM models are developed for the endovascular coil, cable, transmit excitation and imaging domain. Electromagnetic and circuit solvers are coupled to simulate net B1+ fields and induced currents and voltages. Our models are validated using the Bloch Siegert B1+ mapping sequence for a series-tuned multimode coil, capable of tracking, wireless visualization and high resolution endovascular imaging. Results Validation shows good agreement at 24, 28 and 34 μT background RF excitation within experimental limitations. Quantitative coil performance metrics agree with simulation. A parametric study demonstrates trade off in coil performance metrics when varying number of coil turns. Tracking, imaging and wireless marker multimode coil features and their integration is demonstrated in a pig study. Conclusion Developed models for the multimode coil were successfully validated. Modeling for geometric optimization and coil selection serves as a precursor to time-consuming and expensive experiments. Specific applications demonstrated include parametric optimization, coil selection for a cardiac intervention and an animal imaging experiment. Significance Our modular, adaptable and computationally efficient modeling approach enables rapid comparison, selection and optimization of inductively-coupled coils for MRI-guided interventions. PMID:26960218

  2. Stacked magnetic resonators for MRI RF coils decoupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georget, Elodie; Luong, Michel; Vignaud, Alexandre; Giacomini, Eric; Chazel, Edouard; Ferrand, Guillaume; Amadon, Alexis; Mauconduit, Franck; Enoch, Stefan; Tayeb, Gérard; Bonod, Nicolas; Poupon, Cyril; Abdeddaim, Redha

    2017-02-01

    Parallel transmission is a very promising method to tackle B1+ field inhomogeneities at ultrahigh field in magnetic resonant imaging (MRI). This technique is however limited by the mutual coupling between the radiating elements. Here we propose to solve this problem by designing a passive magneto-electric resonator that we here refer to as stacked magnetic resonator (SMR). By combining numerical and experimental methodologies, we prove that this novelty passive solution allows an efficient decoupling of elements of a phased-array coil. We demonstrate the ability of this technique to significantly reduce by more than 10 dB the coupling preserving the quality of images compared to ideally isolated linear resonators on a spherical salty agar gel phantom in a 7 T MRI scanner.

  3. Designing a Hemispherical Breast RF Coil Array for MRI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Wen-long; ZHANG Ju-cheng; WANG Zhi-kang; LI Xing-xin; LOU Hai-fang

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an approach to the design of hemispherical breast RF coil array is proposedThe target field method is applied to find the current density distribution on the hemisphere surface, which induces a homogeneous magnetic field in a hemispherical volumeThe components of current density are expanded into Fourier series, and the highly ill-conditioned character of the linear equation related to Fourier coefficients is solved using the Tikhonov regularization method with a minimum curvature penalty functionThe winding pattern was acquired using the stream function techniqueThe results indicate that a simple winding pattern with homogeneous magnetic field can be obtained through manually selecting the penalty factor.

  4. A novel endorectal RF coil for high resolution MRI and spectroscopy of the prostate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hongjie; SONG Xiaoyu; WANG Xiaoying; XU Pingfang; BAO Shanglian

    2005-01-01

    The diagnosis of prostate diseases by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in vivo is sometimes difficult for the lower signal to noise ratio (SNR). To increase the SNR of the prostate image, we designed a RF coil that can be inserted into rectum and was named endorectal coil. The properties of RF coil were evaluated using a network analyzer. Moreover the images and spectroscopy of a special phantom were acquired and the results were compared to those of the commercial TORSO coil (G. E. Medical Systems, USA). Our coil gave a significantly higher SNR at the region of interest (ROI). The achieved high local SNR and resulting high spatial resolution would add more anatomic and biochemical information to the diagnosis of prostate diseases.

  5. RF Head Coil Design with Improved RF Magnetic Near-Fields Uniformity for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Sung-Min; DelaBarre, Lance; Gopinath, Anand; Vaughan, John Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Higher magnetic field strength in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems offers higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast, and spatial resolution in MR images. However, the wavelength in ultra-high fields (7 tesla and beyond) becomes shorter than the human body at the Larmor frequency with increasing static magnetic field (B0) of MRI system. At short wavelengths, interference effect appears resulting in non- uniformity of the RF magnetic near-field (B1) over the subject and MR images may have spatially anomalous contrast. The B1 near-field generated by the transverse electromagnetic (TEM) RF coil's microstrip line element has a maximum near the center of its length and falls off towards both ends. In this study, a double trapezoidal shaped microstrip transmission line element is proposed to obtain uniform B1 field distribution by gradual impedance variation. Two multi-channel RF head coils with uniform and trapezoidal shape elements were built and tested with a phantom at 7T MRI scanner for comparison. The simulation and experimental results show stronger and more uniform B1(+) near-field with the trapezoidal shape.

  6. A PIN diode controlled dual-tuned MRI RF coil and phased array for multi nuclear imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Seunghoon; Hamamura, Mark J.; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Tugan Muftuler, L.

    2010-05-01

    MR imaging of nuclei other than hydrogen has been used to investigate metabolism in humans and animals. However, MRI observable nuclei other than hydrogen are not as abundant and as a result the image SNR is lower. Dual-tuned radio frequency (RF) coils are developed for these studies in which high-resolution structural images are acquired using hydrogen and metabolic information is acquired by exciting the other nucleus. Using a dual-tuned coil, the experimenter avoids the inconvenience of moving the patient out and replacing the RF coil for imaging different nuclei. This also eliminates image registration problems. However, the common scheme of using trap circuits for dual-tuned operation results in increased coil losses as well as problems in obtaining optimal tuning and matching at both frequencies. Here, a new approach is presented using PIN diodes to switch the coil between two resonance frequencies. This design eliminates the need for the trap circuit and associated losses from the self-resistance of the trap circuit inductors. At the operating frequencies we used, the equivalent series resistance of an inductor is higher than that of the PIN diodes. In order to test the efficacy of this new approach, we first built two surface coils of identical geometry, one with the conventional trap circuits and one with the PIN diode switches. We also studied the performances of both coils when the coils are divided into shorter conductors segments by adding more tuning elements. It is known that dividing the coil into shorter conductor segments helps reduce radiation and electric field losses. We explored this effect for both coils at both operating frequencies. Finally, a dual-tuned receive-only phased array was designed and built with the PIN diode circuit to switch between two resonance frequencies. A conventional dual-tuned birdcage coil was designed and built to transmit RF power. A unique feature of this coil is that the RF power is fed through two separate sets

  7. Development of a new RF coil and gamma-ray radiation shielding assembly for improved MR image quality in SPECT/MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Seunghoon; Hamamura, Mark J; Roeck, Werner W; Muftuler, L Tugan; Nalcioglu, Orhan

    2010-05-07

    Magnetic resonance (MR)-based multimodality imaging systems, such as single-photon emission tomography (SPECT)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or positron emission tomography (PET)/MRI, face many difficulties because of problems with the compatibility of the nuclear detector system with the MR system. However, several studies have reported on the design considerations of MR-compatible nuclear detectors for combined SPECT/MRI. In this study, we developed a new radiofrequency (RF) coil and gamma-ray radiation shielding assembly to advance the practical implementation of SPECT/MRI in providing high sensitivity while minimizing the interference between the MRI and SPECT systems. The proposed assembly consists of a three-channel receive-only RF coil and gamma-ray radiation shields made of a specialized lead composite powder designed to reduce conductivity and thus minimizing any effect on the magnetic field arising from the induced eddy currents. A conventional birdcage RF coil was also tested for comparison with the proposed RF coil. Quality (Q)-factors were measured using both RF coils without any shielding, with solid lead shielding, and with our composite lead shielding. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were calculated using 4 T MR images of phantoms both with and without the new gamma-ray radiation shields. The Q-factor and SNR measurements demonstrate the improved MRI performance due to the new RF coil/gamma-ray radiation shield assembly designed for SPECT/MRI, making it a useful addition to multimodality imaging technology not only for animal studies but also for in vivo study of humans.

  8. Design and performance issues of RF coils utilized in ultra high field MRI: experimental and numerical evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Tamer S; Kangarlu, Alayar; Chakeress, Donald W

    2005-07-01

    In this paper, two TEM resonators were evaluated experimentally and numerically at 8 tesla (T) (340 MHz for 1H imaging). The coils were constructed to be 21.2-cm long (standard) and 11-cm long (a proposed less claustrophobic design). The experimental evaluation was done on a single cadaver using an ultra high field, 8 T, whole-body magnet. The numerical modeling was performed using an in-house finite difference time domain packagethat treats the coil and the load (anatomically detailed human head model) as a single system. The coils were tested with quadrature excitation at different coil alignment positions with respect to human head. For head imaging at 8 T, the overall numerical and experimental results demonstrated that when compared to the longer coil, the shorter coil provides superior signal-to-noise ratio, coil sensitivity, and excite field in the biological regions that lie within both of the coils' structures. A study of the RF (excite/receive fields) homogeneity showed variations in the performance of both coils that are mostly dependant on the region of interest and the position of coil with respect to the head. As such, depending on the application, the shorter coil could be effectively utilized.

  9. Characterization of Flexible RF Microcoil Dedicated to Surface Mri

    CERN Document Server

    Woytasik, M; Raynaud, J -S; Poirier-Quinot, M; Dufour-Gergam, E; Grandchamp, J -P; Darrasse, L; Robert, P; Gilles, J -P; Martincic, E; Girard, O

    2007-01-01

    In Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), to achieve sufficient Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR), the electrical performance of the RF coil is critical. We developed a device (microcoil) based on the original concept of monolithic resonator. This paper presents the used fabrication process based on micromoulding. The dielectric substrates are flexible thin films of polymer, which allow the microcoil to be form fitted to none-plane surface. Electrical characterizations of the RF coils are first performed and results are compared to the attempted values. Proton MRI of a saline phantom using a flexible RF coil of 15 mm in diameter is performed. When the coil is conformed to the phantom surface, a SNR gain up to 2 is achieved as compared to identical but planar RF coil. Finally, the flexible coil is used in vivo to perform MRI with high spatial resolution on a mouse using a small animal dedicated scanner operating at in a 2.35 T.

  10. Design and test of a double-nuclear RF coil for (1)H MRI and (13)C MRSI at 7T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Omar; Kwak, Tiffany; Cao, Peng; Zhang, Xiaoliang

    2016-06-01

    RF coil operation at the ultrahigh field of 7T is fraught with technical challenges that limit the advancement of novel human in vivo applications at 7T. In this work, a hybrid technique combining a microstrip transmission line and a lumped-element L-C loop coil to form a double-nuclear RF coil for proton magnetic resonance imaging and carbon magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 7T was proposed and investigated. Network analysis revealed a high Q-factor and excellent decoupling between the coils. Proton images and localized carbon spectra were acquired with high sensitivity. The successful testing of this novel double-nuclear coil demonstrates the feasibility of this hybrid design for double-nuclear MR imaging and spectroscopy studies at the ultrahigh field of 7T.

  11. Feasibility study of a unilateral RF array coil for MR-scintimammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Seunghoon; Hamamura, Mark J.; Roeck, Werner W.; Hugg, James; Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Meier, Dirk; Patt, Bradley E.; Nalcioglu, Orhan

    2011-11-01

    Despite its high sensitivity, the variable specificity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in breast cancer diagnosis can lead to unnecessary biopsies and over-treatment. Scintimammography (SMM) could potentially supplement MRI to improve the diagnostic specificity. The synergistic combination of MRI and SMM (MRSMM) could result in both high sensitivity from MRI and high specificity from SMM. Development of such a dual-modality system requires the integration of a radio frequency (RF) coil and radiation detector in a strong magnetic field without significant mutual interference. In this study, we developed and tested a unilateral breast array coil specialized for MRSMM imaging. The electromagnetic field, specific absorption ratio and RF coil parameters with cadmium-zinc-telluride detectors encapsulated in specialized RF and gamma-ray shielding mounted within the RF coil were investigated through simulation and experimental measurements. Simultaneous MR and SMM images of a breast phantom were also acquired using the integrated MRSMM system. This work, we feel, represents an important step toward the fabrication of a working MRSMM system.

  12. Feasibility study of a unilateral RF array coil for MR-scintimammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Seunghoon; Hamamura, Mark J; Roeck, Werner W; Nalcioglu, Orhan [Tu and Yuen Center for Functional Onco-Imaging, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Hugg, James; Wagenaar, Douglas J; Patt, Bradley E [Gamma Medica, Inc. (Clinical Division), Northridge, CA (United States); Meier, Dirk, E-mail: seunghoh@uci.edu [Gamma Medica, Inc. (Industrial Division), Fornebu (Norway)

    2011-11-07

    Despite its high sensitivity, the variable specificity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in breast cancer diagnosis can lead to unnecessary biopsies and over-treatment. Scintimammography (SMM) could potentially supplement MRI to improve the diagnostic specificity. The synergistic combination of MRI and SMM (MRSMM) could result in both high sensitivity from MRI and high specificity from SMM. Development of such a dual-modality system requires the integration of a radio frequency (RF) coil and radiation detector in a strong magnetic field without significant mutual interference. In this study, we developed and tested a unilateral breast array coil specialized for MRSMM imaging. The electromagnetic field, specific absorption ratio and RF coil parameters with cadmium-zinc-telluride detectors encapsulated in specialized RF and gamma-ray shielding mounted within the RF coil were investigated through simulation and experimental measurements. Simultaneous MR and SMM images of a breast phantom were also acquired using the integrated MRSMM system. This work, we feel, represents an important step toward the fabrication of a working MRSMM system.

  13. Developments of RF Coil for P in vivo NMR Spectroscopy .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Khushu

    1993-07-01

    Full Text Available RF receiver coils are very important parts of an NMR System. The design of these coils is very critical and has a dramatic effect on the SNR of the NMR signal and are generally developed in TRA/REC mode. This paper reports the developments of a 3.5 cm TRA/REC 26 MHz RF coil for P spectroscopy of small organs like thyroid. The coil is small in size, fits well in the neck for thyroid spectroscopy and is successfully working with the 1.5 tesla whole body Superconducting NMR System available at INMAS.

  14. An Antenna-Theory Method for Modeling High-Frequency RF Coils: A Segmented Birdcage Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Chen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We suggest that center-fed dipole antenna analytics can be employed in the optimized design of high-frequency MRI RF coil applications. The method is illustrated in the design of a single-segmented birdcage model and a short multisegmented birdcage model. As a byproduct, it is shown that for a long single-segmented birdcage model, the RF field within it is essentially a TEM mode and has excellent planar uniformity. For a short shielded multisegmented birdcage model, the RF field is optimized with a target-field approach with an average SAR functional. The planar homogeneity of the optimized RF field is significantly improved compared with that of a single-segmented birdcage model with the same geometry. The accuracy of the antenna formulae is also verified with numerical simulations performed via commercial software. The model discussed herein provides evidence for the effectiveness of antenna methods in future RF coil analysis.

  15. Using a modified 3D-printer for mapping the magnetic field of RF coils designed for fetal and neonatal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavoulas, Alexander; Vaiopoulos, Nicholas; Hedström, Erik; Xanthis, Christos G.; Sandalidis, Harilaos G.; Aletras, Anthony H.

    2016-08-01

    An experimental setup for characterizing the magnetic field of MRI RF coils was proposed and tested. The setup consisted of a specially configured 3D-printer, a network analyzer and a mid-performance desktop PC. The setup was tested on a single loop RF coil, part of a phased array for fetal imaging. Then, the setup was used for determining the magnetic field characteristics of a high-pass birdcage coil used for neonatal MR imaging with a vertical static field. The scattering parameter S21, converted into power ratio, was used for mapping the B1 magnetic field. The experimental measurements from the loop coil were close to the theoretical results (R = 0.924). A high degree of homogeneity was measured for the neonatal birdcage RF coil. The development of MR RF coils is time consuming and resource intensive. The proposed experimental setup provides an alternative method for magnetic field characterization of RF coils used in MRI.

  16. Local Multi-Channel RF Surface Coil versus Body RF Coil Transmission for Cardiac Magnetic Resonance at 3 Tesla: Which Configuration Is Winning the Game?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Oliver; Winter, Lukas; Dieringer, Matthias A; Els, Antje; Oezerdem, Celal; Rieger, Jan; Kuehne, Andre; Cassara, Antonino M; Pfeiffer, Harald; Wetterling, Friedrich; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility and efficiency of cardiac MR at 3 Tesla using local four-channel RF coil transmission and benchmark it against large volume body RF coil excitation. Electromagnetic field simulations are conducted to detail RF power deposition, transmission field uniformity and efficiency for local and body RF coil transmission. For both excitation regimes transmission field maps are acquired in a human torso phantom. For each transmission regime flip angle distributions and blood-myocardium contrast are examined in a volunteer study of 12 subjects. The feasibility of the local transceiver RF coil array for cardiac chamber quantification at 3 Tesla is demonstrated. Our simulations and experiments demonstrate that cardiac MR at 3 Tesla using four-channel surface RF coil transmission is competitive versus current clinical CMR practice of large volume body RF coil transmission. The efficiency advantage of the 4TX/4RX setup facilitates shorter repetition times governed by local SAR limits versus body RF coil transmission at whole-body SAR limit. No statistically significant difference was found for cardiac chamber quantification derived with body RF coil versus four-channel surface RF coil transmission. Our simulation also show that the body RF coil exceeds local SAR limits by a factor of ~2 when driven at maximum applicable input power to reach the whole-body SAR limit. Pursuing local surface RF coil arrays for transmission in cardiac MR is a conceptually appealing alternative to body RF coil transmission, especially for patients with implants.

  17. An Antenna-Theory Method for Modeling High-Frequency RF Coils: A Segmented Birdcage Example

    OpenAIRE

    Xin Chen; Victor Taracila; Timothy Eagan; Hiroyuki Fujita; Xingxian Shou; Tanvir Baig; Robert Brown

    2008-01-01

    We suggest that center-fed dipole antenna analytics can be employed in the optimized design of high-frequency MRI RF coil applications. The method is illustrated in the design of a single-segmented birdcage model and a short multisegmented birdcage model. As a byproduct, it is shown that for a long single-segmented birdcage model, the RF field within it is essentially a TEM mode and has excellent planar uniformity. For a short shielded multisegmented birdcage model, the RF field is optimized ...

  18. FPGA-based RF interference reduction techniques for simultaneous PET-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhardt, P; Wehner, J; Weissler, B; Botnar, R; Marsden, P K; Schulz, V

    2016-05-07

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a multi-modal imaging technique is considered very promising and powerful with regard to in vivo disease progression examination, therapy response monitoring and drug development. However, PET-MRI system design enabling simultaneous operation with unaffected intrinsic performance of both modalities is challenging. As one of the major issues, both the PET detectors and the MRI radio-frequency (RF) subsystem are exposed to electromagnetic (EM) interference, which may lead to PET and MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) deteriorations. Early digitization of electronic PET signals within the MRI bore helps to preserve PET SNR, but occurs at the expense of increased amount of PET electronics inside the MRI and associated RF field emissions. This raises the likelihood of PET-related MRI interference by coupling into the MRI RF coil unwanted spurious signals considered as RF noise, as it degrades MRI SNR and results in MR image artefacts. RF shielding of PET detectors is a commonly used technique to reduce PET-related RF interferences, but can introduce eddy-current-related MRI disturbances and hinder the highest system integration. In this paper, we present RF interference reduction methods which rely on EM field coupling-decoupling principles of RF receive coils rather than suppressing emitted fields. By modifying clock frequencies and changing clock phase relations of digital circuits, the resulting RF field emission is optimised with regard to a lower field coupling into the MRI RF coil, thereby increasing the RF silence of PET detectors. Our methods are demonstrated by performing FPGA-based clock frequency and phase shifting of digital silicon photo-multipliers (dSiPMs) used in the PET modules of our MR-compatible Hyperion II (D) PET insert. We present simulations and magnetic-field map scans visualising the impact of altered clock phase pattern on the spatial RF field

  19. FPGA-based RF interference reduction techniques for simultaneous PET–MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhardt, P; Wehner, J; Weissler, B; Botnar, R; Marsden, P K; Schulz, V

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a multi-modal imaging technique is considered very promising and powerful with regard to in vivo disease progression examination, therapy response monitoring and drug development. However, PET–MRI system design enabling simultaneous operation with unaffected intrinsic performance of both modalities is challenging. As one of the major issues, both the PET detectors and the MRI radio-frequency (RF) subsystem are exposed to electromagnetic (EM) interference, which may lead to PET and MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) deteriorations. Early digitization of electronic PET signals within the MRI bore helps to preserve PET SNR, but occurs at the expense of increased amount of PET electronics inside the MRI and associated RF field emissions. This raises the likelihood of PET-related MRI interference by coupling into the MRI RF coil unwanted spurious signals considered as RF noise, as it degrades MRI SNR and results in MR image artefacts. RF shielding of PET detectors is a commonly used technique to reduce PET-related RF interferences, but can introduce eddy-current-related MRI disturbances and hinder the highest system integration. In this paper, we present RF interference reduction methods which rely on EM field coupling–decoupling principles of RF receive coils rather than suppressing emitted fields. By modifying clock frequencies and changing clock phase relations of digital circuits, the resulting RF field emission is optimised with regard to a lower field coupling into the MRI RF coil, thereby increasing the RF silence of PET detectors. Our methods are demonstrated by performing FPGA-based clock frequency and phase shifting of digital silicon photo-multipliers (dSiPMs) used in the PET modules of our MR-compatible Hyperion IID PET insert. We present simulations and magnetic-field map scans visualising the impact of altered clock phase pattern on the spatial RF field

  20. FPGA-based RF interference reduction techniques for simultaneous PET-MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhardt, P.; Wehner, J.; Weissler, B.; Botnar, R.; Marsden, P. K.; Schulz, V.

    2016-05-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a multi-modal imaging technique is considered very promising and powerful with regard to in vivo disease progression examination, therapy response monitoring and drug development. However, PET-MRI system design enabling simultaneous operation with unaffected intrinsic performance of both modalities is challenging. As one of the major issues, both the PET detectors and the MRI radio-frequency (RF) subsystem are exposed to electromagnetic (EM) interference, which may lead to PET and MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) deteriorations. Early digitization of electronic PET signals within the MRI bore helps to preserve PET SNR, but occurs at the expense of increased amount of PET electronics inside the MRI and associated RF field emissions. This raises the likelihood of PET-related MRI interference by coupling into the MRI RF coil unwanted spurious signals considered as RF noise, as it degrades MRI SNR and results in MR image artefacts. RF shielding of PET detectors is a commonly used technique to reduce PET-related RF interferences, but can introduce eddy-current-related MRI disturbances and hinder the highest system integration. In this paper, we present RF interference reduction methods which rely on EM field coupling-decoupling principles of RF receive coils rather than suppressing emitted fields. By modifying clock frequencies and changing clock phase relations of digital circuits, the resulting RF field emission is optimised with regard to a lower field coupling into the MRI RF coil, thereby increasing the RF silence of PET detectors. Our methods are demonstrated by performing FPGA-based clock frequency and phase shifting of digital silicon photo-multipliers (dSiPMs) used in the PET modules of our MR-compatible Hyperion II D PET insert. We present simulations and magnetic-field map scans visualising the impact of altered clock phase pattern on the spatial RF field distribution

  1. Composite pulses for RF phase encoded MRI: A simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salajeghe, Somaie; Babyn, Paul; Sarty, Gordon E

    2017-02-01

    In B1 encoded MRI, a realistic non-linear phase RF encoding coil will generate an inhomogeneous B1 field that leads to spatially dependent flip angles. The non-linearity of the B1 phase gradient can be compensated for in the reconstruction, but B1 inhomogeneity remains a problem. The effect of B1 inhomogeneity on tip angles for conventional, B0 encoded MRI, may be minimized using composite pulses. The objective of this study was to explore the feasibility of using composite pulses with non-linear RF phase encoding coils and to identify the most appropriate composite pulse scheme. RF encoded signals were simulated via the Bloch equation for various symmetric, asymmetric and antisymmetric composite pulses. The simulated signals were reconstructed using a constrained least squares method. Root mean square reconstruction errors varied from 6% (for an asymmetric composite pulse) to 9.7% (for an antisymmetric composite pulse). An asymmetric composite pulse scheme created images with fewer artifacts than other composite pulse schemes in inhomogeneous B0 and B1 fields making it the best choice for decreasing the effects of spatially varying flip angles. This is contrary to the conclusion that antisymmetric composite pulses are the best ones to use for spin echo sequences in conventional, B0 encoded, MRI. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A multi-slot surface coil for MRI of dual-rat imaging at 4 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solis, S E; Rodriguez, A O [Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa, Mexico, DF 09340 (Mexico); Wang, R; Tomasi, D, E-mail: arog@xanum.uam.mx [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2011-06-21

    A slotted surface coil inspired by the hole-and-slot cavity magnetron was developed for magnetic resonance imaging of obese rats at 4 T. Full-wave analysis of the magnetic field was carried out at 170 MHz for both the slotted and circular-shaped coils. The noise figure values of two coils were investigated via the numerical calculation of the quality factors. Fat simulated phantoms to mimic overweight rats were included in the analysis with weights ranging from 300 to 900 g. The noise figures were 1.2 dB for the slotted coil and 2.4 dB for the circular coil when loaded with 600 g of simulated phantom. A slotted surface coil with eight circular slots and a circular coil with similar dimensions were built and operated in the transceiver mode, and their performances were experimentally compared. The imaging tests in phantoms demonstrated that the slotted surface coil has a deeper RF-sensitivity and better field uniformity than the single-loop RF-coil. High quality images of two overweight Zucker rats were acquired simultaneously with the slotted surface coil using standard spin-echo pulse sequences. Experimental results showed that the slotted surface coil outperformed the circular coil for imaging considerably overweight rats. Thus, the slotted surface coil can be a good tool for MRI experiments in rats on a human whole-body 4 T scanner.

  3. A multi-slot surface coil for MRI of dual-rat imaging at 4T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solis, S.E.; Tomasi, D.; Solis, S.E.; Wang, R.; Tomasi, D.; Rodriguez, A.O.

    2011-07-01

    A slotted surface coil inspired by the hole-and-slot cavity magnetron was developed for magnetic resonance imaging of obese rats at 4 T. Full-wave analysis of the magnetic field was carried out at 170 MHz for both the slotted and circular-shaped coils. The noise figure values of two coils were investigated via the numerical calculation of the quality factors. Fat simulated phantoms to mimic overweight rats were included in the analysis with weights ranging from 300 to 900 g. The noise figures were 1.2 dB for the slotted coil and 2.4 dB for the circular coil when loaded with 600 g of simulated phantom. A slotted surface coil with eight circular slots and a circular coil with similar dimensions were built and operated in the transceiver mode, and their performances were experimentally compared. The imaging tests in phantoms demonstrated that the slotted surface coil has a deeper RF-sensitivity and better field uniformity than the single-loop RF-coil. High quality images of two overweight Zucker rats were acquired simultaneously with the slotted surface coil using standard spin-echo pulse sequences. Experimental results showed that the slotted surface coil outperformed the circular coil for imaging considerably overweight rats. Thus, the slotted surface coil can be a good tool for MRI experiments in rats on a human whole-body 4 T scanner.

  4. A finite difference method for the design of gradient coils in MRI--an initial framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Minhua; Xia, Ling; Liu, Feng; Zhu, Jianfeng; Kang, Liyi; Crozier, Stuart

    2012-09-01

    This paper proposes a finite-difference (FD)-based method for the design of gradient coils in MRI. The design method first uses the FD approximation to describe the continuous current density of the coil space and then employs the stream function method to extract the coil patterns. During the numerical implementation, a linear equation is constructed and solved using a regularization scheme. The algorithm details have been exemplified through biplanar and cylindrical gradient coil design examples. The design method can be applied to unusual coil designs such as ultrashort or dedicated gradient coils. The proposed gradient coil design scheme can be integrated into a FD-based electromagnetic framework, which can then provide a unified computational framework for gradient and RF design and patient-field interactions.

  5. Automatic tuning of flexible interventional RF receiver coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venook, Ross D; Hargreaves, Brian A; Gold, Garry E; Conolly, Steven M; Scott, Greig C

    2005-10-01

    Microcontroller-based circuitry was built and tested for automatically tuning flexible RF receiver coils at the touch of a button. This circuitry is robust to 10% changes in probe center frequency, is in line with the scanner, and requires less than 1 s to tune a simple probe. Images were acquired using this circuitry with a varactor-tunable 1-inch flexible probe in a phantom and in an in vitro porcine knee model. The phantom experiments support the use of automatic tuning by demonstrating 30% signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) losses for 5% changes in coil center frequency, in agreement with theoretical calculations. Comparisons between patellofemoral cartilage images obtained using a 3-inch surface coil and the surgically-implanted 1-inch flexible coil reveal a worst-case local SNR advantage of a factor of 4 for the smaller coil. This work confirms that surgically implanted coils can greatly improve resolution in small-field-of-view (FOV) applications, and demonstrates the importance and feasibility of automatically tuning such probes.

  6. [Development of RF coil of permanent magnet mini-magnetic resonance imager and mouse imaging experiments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Shulian; Xie, Huantong; Chen, Wei; Wang, Guangxin; Zhao, Qiang; Li, Shiyu

    2014-10-01

    In the development of radio frequency (RF) coils for better quality of the mini-type permanent magnetic resonance imager for using in the small animal imaging, the solenoid RF coil has a special advantage for permanent magnetic system based on analyses of various types.of RF coils. However, it is not satisfied for imaging if the RF coils are directly used. By theoretical analyses of the magnetic field properties produced from the solenoid coil, the research direction was determined by careful studies to raise further the uniformity of the magnetic field coil, receiving coil sensitivity for signals and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The method had certain advantages and avoided some shortcomings of the other different coil types, such as, birdcage coil, saddle shaped coil and phased array coil by using the alloy materials (from our own patent). The RF coils were designed, developed and made for keeled applicable to permanent magnet-type magnetic resonance imager, multi-coil combination-type, single-channel overall RF receiving coil, and applied for a patent. Mounted on three instruments (25 mm aperture, with main magnetic field strength of 0.5 T or 1.5 T, and 50 mm aperture, with main magnetic field strength of 0.48 T), we performed experiments with mice, rats, and nude mice bearing tumors. The experimental results indicated that the RF receiving coil was fully applicable to the permanent magnet-type imaging system.

  7. Tilt optimized flip uniformity (TOFU) RF pulse for uniform image contrast at low specific absorption rate levels in combination with a surface breast coil at 7 Tesla

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kalleveen, Irene M. L.; Boer, VO; Luijten, Peter R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304821098; Klomp, DWJ|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/298206382

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Going to ultrahigh field MRI (e. g., 7 Tesla [ T]), the nonuniformity of the B_1 field and the increased radiofrequency (RF) power deposition become challenging. While surface coils improve the power efficiency in B_1, its field remains nonuniform. In this work, an RF pulse was designed tha

  8. A Green's function approach to local rf heating in interventional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, C J; Atalar, E

    2001-05-01

    Current safety regulations for local radiofrequency (rf) heating, developed for externally positioned rf coils, may not be suitable for internal rf coils that are being increasingly used in interventional MRI. This work presents a two-step model for rf heating in an interventional MRI setting: (1) the spatial distribution of power in the sample from the rf pulse (Maxwell's equations); and (2) the transformation of that power to temperature change according to thermal conduction and tissue perfusion (tissue bioheat equation). The tissue bioheat equation is approximated as a linear, shift-invariant system in the case of local rf heating and is fully characterized by its Green's function. Expected temperature distributions are calculated by convolving (averaging) transmit coil specific absorption rate (SAR) distributions with the Green's function. When the input SAR distribution is relatively slowly varying in space, as is the case with excitation by external rf coils, the choice of averaging methods makes virtually no difference on the expected heating as measured by temperature change (deltaT). However, for highly localized SAR distributions, such as those encountered with internal coils in interventional MRI, the Green's function method predicts heating that is significantly different from the averaging method in current regulations. In our opinion, the Green's function method is a better predictor since it is based on a physiological model. The Green's function also elicits a time constant and scaling factor between SAR and deltaT that are both functions of the tissue perfusion rate. This emphasizes the critical importance of perfusion in the heating model. The assumptions made in this model are only valid for local rf heating and should not be applied to whole body heating.

  9. Using a modified 3D-printer for mapping the magnetic field of RF coils designed for fetal and neonatal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavoulas, Alexander; Vaiopoulos, Nicholas; Hedström, Erik; Xanthis, Christos G; Sandalidis, Harilaos G; Aletras, Anthony H

    2016-08-01

    An experimental setup for characterizing the magnetic field of MRI RF coils was proposed and tested. The setup consisted of a specially configured 3D-printer, a network analyzer and a mid-performance desktop PC. The setup was tested on a single loop RF coil, part of a phased array for fetal imaging. Then, the setup was used for determining the magnetic field characteristics of a high-pass birdcage coil used for neonatal MR imaging with a vertical static field. The scattering parameter S21, converted into power ratio, was used for mapping the B1 magnetic field. The experimental measurements from the loop coil were close to the theoretical results (R=0.924). A high degree of homogeneity was measured for the neonatal birdcage RF coil. The development of MR RF coils is time consuming and resource intensive. The proposed experimental setup provides an alternative method for magnetic field characterization of RF coils used in MRI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Determination of position and shape of flexible mri surface coils using the Microsoft Kinect for attenuation correction in PET/MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frohwein, Lynn; He, Mirco; Buther, Florian; Safers, Klaus [European Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of Muenster (Germany)

    2015-05-18

    Due to the varying position and shape of flexible MRI RF surface coils, the creation of attenuation maps for these coils is a challenging task. Nevertheless, coil material (metal, plastic, rubber) attenuates the PET signal to a considerable amount. Thus, including a coil μ-map into the human μ-map is essential. In this work, we present a method to determine the position and shape of flexible coils with the help of the Microsoft Kinect depth camera. Phantom PET/MRI (Siemens Biograph mMR) and CT scans (Siemens Biograph mCT) were performed with and without the flexible 32-channel coil equipped with 15 markers visible in CT and Kinect. Prior to the PET/MRI acquisition, Kinect data is acquired of the phantom with the coil on top. The manually extracted marker positions from CT and Kinect are used to non-rigidly transform the template CT according to the Kinect marker positions describing the shape of the coil during PET/MRI acquisition. An appropriate μ-map can then be calculated from the transformed CT dataset. Subsequently, the μ-map is placed in relation to the patient table according to the Kinect-derived marker positions. First results show that the coil shape can be determined with the help of the Kinect camera. The transformation of the template CT dataset according to Kinect marker positions during PET/MRI leads to appropriate results. Furthermore, the position of the coil can also be determined for an accurate placement of the μ-map in relation to the patient table. The determination of position and shape of flexible surface coils using the Kinect camera can be a way to include the CT-based coil μ-map in PET/MRI acquisitions without the need for additional MRI scans. Accuracy and practicability of the method have to be tested in further experiments.

  11. Electromagnetic fields inside a lossy, multilayered spherical head phantom excited by MRI coils: models and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart

    2004-05-21

    The precise evaluation of electromagnetic field (EMF) distributions inside biological samples is becoming an increasingly important design requirement for high field MRI systems. In evaluating the induced fields caused by magnetic field gradients and RF transmitter coils, a multilayered dielectric spherical head model is proposed to provide a better understanding of electromagnetic interactions when compared to a traditional homogeneous head phantom. This paper presents Debye potential (DP) and Dyadic Green's function (DGF)-based solutions of the EMFs inside a head-sized, stratified sphere with similar radial conductivity and permittivity profiles as a human head. The DP approach is formulated for the symmetric case in which the source is a circular loop carrying a harmonic-formed current over a wide frequency range. The DGF method is developed for generic cases in which the source may be any kind of RF coil whose current distribution can be evaluated using the method of moments. The calculated EMFs can then be used to deduce MRI imaging parameters. The proposed methods, while not representing the full complexity of a head model, offer advantages in rapid prototyping as the computation times are much lower than a full finite difference time domain calculation using a complex head model. Test examples demonstrate the capability of the proposed models/methods. It is anticipated that this model will be of particular value for high field MRI applications, especially the rapid evaluation of RF resonator (surface and volume coils) and high performance gradient set designs.

  12. Assessment of a PML Boundary Condition for Simulating an MRI Radio Frequency Coil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunsuo Duan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational methods such as the finite difference time domain (FDTD play an important role in simulating radiofrequency (RF coils used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The choice of absorbing boundary conditions affects the final outcome of such studies. We have used FDTD to assess the Berenger's perfectly matched layer (PML as an absorbing boundary condition for computation of the resonance patterns and electromagnetic fields of RF coils. We first experimentally constructed a high-pass birdcage head coil, measured its resonance pattern, and used it to acquire proton (1H phantom MRI images. We then computed the resonance pattern and B1 field of the coil using FDTD with a PML as an absorbing boundary condition. We assessed the accuracy and efficiency of PML by adjusting the parameters of the PML and comparing the calculated results with measured ones. The optimal PML parameters that produce accurate (comparable to the experimental findings FDTD calculations are then provided for the birdcage head coil operating at 127.72 MHz, the Larmor frequency of 1H at 3 Tesla (T.

  13. MRI surface-coil pair with strong inductive coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mett, Richard R; Sidabras, Jason W; Hyde, James S

    2016-12-01

    A novel inductively coupled coil pair was used to obtain magnetic resonance phantom images. Rationale for using such a structure is described in R. R. Mett et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 87, 084703 (2016)]. The original rationale was to increase the Q-value of a small diameter surface coil in order to achieve dominant loading by the sample. A significant improvement in the vector reception field (VRF) is also seen. The coil assembly consists of a 3-turn 10 mm tall meta-metallic self-resonant spiral (SRS) of inner diameter 10.4 mm and outer diameter 15.1 mm and a single-loop equalization coil of 25 mm diameter and 2 mm tall. The low-frequency parallel mode was used in which the rf currents on each coil produce magnetic fields that add constructively. The SRS coil assembly was fabricated and data were collected using a tissue-equivalent 30% polyacrylamide phantom. The large inductive coupling of the coils produces phase-coherency of the rf currents and magnetic fields. Finite-element simulations indicate that the VRF of the coil pair is about 4.4 times larger than for a single-loop coil of 15 mm diameter. The mutual coupling between coils influences the current ratio between the coils, which in turn influences the VRF and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Data on a tissue-equivalent phantom at 9.4 T show a total SNR increase of 8.8 over the 15 mm loop averaged over a 25 mm depth and diameter. The experimental results are shown to be consistent with the magnetic resonance theory of the emf induced by spins in a coil, the theory of inductively coupled resonant circuits, and the superposition principle. The methods are general for magnetic resonance and other types of signal detection and can be used over a wide range of operating frequencies.

  14. Fetal MRI on a multi-element digital coil platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serai, Suraj D.; Merrow, Arnold C.; Kline-Fath, Beth M. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, 3333 Burnett Ave., MLC 5031, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Fetal MRI has an increasing list of indications and is most commonly employed when anomalies detected by prenatal ultrasonography require further characterization. This may occur when sonography is technically challenging or where specific MRI findings will determine pre- and postnatal management, including critical in utero and/or peripartum interventions. In these circumstances, there are high expectations for MRI to sort out complex diagnostic dilemmas through exquisite anatomical imaging that fetal surgeons and obstetricians can comprehend and relay to their patients. These expectations, in light of evolving clinical innovations, continue to drive advances in fetal imaging. Increasing signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is fundamental to improving MR image quality, and proper coil selection is a key component of this pursuit. Since the introduction of parallel imaging techniques, the numbers of elements in phased-array coils have been continuously increased to achieve high SNR and shorter scan times. With the invention of a digital coil platform, it is now possible to connect combinations of multiple coil elements to enhance SNR beyond the capabilities of the adult eight-channel torso-coil routinely used in fetal imaging. This paper describes the application of multi-element radiofrequency coils on a digital broadband imaging platform with unique coil combinations to perform dedicated fetal MRI. (orig.)

  15. Development of double-layer coupled coil for improving S/N in 7 T small-animal MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Seo, Jeung-Hoon; Han, Sang-Doc; Heo, Phil; Im, Geun Ho; Lee, Jung Hee

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a new double-layer coupled (DLC) surface radiofrequency (RF) coil using a combination of single-layer planar (SLP) and single-layer circular (SLC) coils, for enhancement of magnetic flux (B1 ) sensitivity and RF penetration in 7 T rat-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The proposed DLC surface coil was fabricated according to an electromagnetic (EM) simulation and validated based on the B1 distribution and bench measurements. The DLC coil performance was quantitatively evaluated based on the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) and coil-response signal intensity curves in phantom and in vivo rat-body images. In the computational EM calculation and 7 T in vivo experimental results, the DLC surface coil clearly showed an increased S/N and higher RF transmit (B1 (+) ) profiles, compared to those of the SLP and SLC coils. While all surface coils displayed a rapid decrease in the MR signal from the near-coil region to the subject, the results reveal that the DLC coil concept may be used to provide sufficient RF penetration and high S/N and degrees of freedom for use in partial body imaging for 7 T ultra-high-field small-animal MRI.

  16. Screen-printed flexible MRI receive coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corea, Joseph R; Flynn, Anita M; Lechêne, Balthazar; Scott, Greig; Reed, Galen D; Shin, Peter J; Lustig, Michael; Arias, Ana C

    2016-03-10

    Magnetic resonance imaging is an inherently signal-to-noise-starved technique that limits the spatial resolution, diagnostic image quality and results in typically long acquisition times that are prone to motion artefacts. This limitation is exacerbated when receive coils have poor fit due to lack of flexibility or need for padding for patient comfort. Here, we report a new approach that uses printing for fabricating receive coils. Our approach enables highly flexible, extremely lightweight conforming devices. We show that these devices exhibit similar to higher signal-to-noise ratio than conventional ones, in clinical scenarios when coils could be displaced more than 18 mm away from the body. In addition, we provide detailed material properties and components performance analysis. Prototype arrays are incorporated within infant blankets for in vivo studies. This work presents the first fully functional, printed coils for 1.5- and 3-T clinical scanners.

  17. Reduction of implant RF heating through modification of transmit coil electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eryaman, Yigitcan; Akin, Burak; Atalar, Ergin

    2011-05-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the possibility to modify the electric-field distribution of a radio frequency (RF) coil to generate electric field-free zones in the body without significantly altering the transmit sensitivity. Because implant heating is directly related to the electric-field distribution, implant-friendly RF transmit coils can be obtained by this approach. We propose a linear birdcage transmit coil with a zero electric-field plane as an example of such implant-friendly coils. When the zero electric-field plane coincides with the implant position, implant heating is reduced, as we demonstrated by the phantom experiments. By feeding RF pulses with identical phases and shapes but different amplitudes to the two orthogonal ports of the coil, the position of the zero electric-field plane can also be adjusted. Although implant heating is reduced with this method, a linear birdcage coil results in a whole-volume average specific absorption rate that is twice that of a quadrature birdcage coil. To solve this issue, we propose alternative methods to design implant-friendly RF coils with optimized electromagnetic fields and reduced whole-volume average specific absorption rate. With these methods, the transmit field was modified to reduce RF heating of implants and obtain uniform transmit sensitivity. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. An iterative method for coil sensitivity estimation in multi-coil MRI systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Qiang; Li, Zhaohui; Song, Kaikai; Li, Feng

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents an iterative coil sensitivity estimation method for multi-coil MRI systems. The proposed method works with coil images in the magnitude image domain. It determines a region of support (RoS), a region being composed of the same type of tissues, by a region growing algorithm, which makes use of both intensities and intensity gradients of pixels. By repeating this procedure, it can determine multiple regions of support, which together cover most of the concerned image area. The union of these regions of support provides a rough estimate of the sensitivity of each coil through dividing the intensities of pixels by the average intensity inside every region of support. The obtained rough coil sensitivity estimate is further approached with the product of multiple low-order polynomials, rather than a single one. The product of these polynomials provides a smooth estimate of the sensitivity of each coil. With the obtained sensitivities of coils, it can produce a better reconstructed image, which determines more correct regions of support and yields preciser estimates of the sensitivities of coils. In other words, the method can be iteratively implemented to improve the estimation performance. The proposed method was verified through both simulated data and clinical data from different body parts. The experimental results confirm the superiority of our method to some conventional methods.

  19. SU-E-J-239: Influence of RF Coil Materials On Surface and Buildup Dose From a 6MV Photon Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghila, A; Fallone, B; Rathee, S [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In order to perform real time tumour tracking using an integrated Linac-MR, images have to be acquired during irradiation. MRI uses RF coils in close proximity to the imaged volume. Given current RF coil designs this means that the high energy photons will be passing through the coil before reaching the patient. This study experimentally investigates the dose modifications that occur due to the presence of various RF coil materials in the treatment beam. Methods: Polycarbonate, copper or aluminum tape, and Teflon were used to emulate the base, conductor and cover respectively of a surface RF coil. These materials were placed at various distances from the surface of polystyrene or solid water phantoms which were irradiated in the presence of no magnetic field, a transverse 0.2T magnetic field, and a parallel 0.2T magnetic field. Percent depth doses were measured using ion chambers. Results: A significant increase in surface and buildup dose is observed. The surface dose is seen to decrease with an increasing separation between the emulated coil and the phantom surface, when no magnetic field is present. When a transverse magnetic field is applied the surface dose decreases faster with increasing separation, as some of the electrons created in the coil are curved away from the phantom’s surface. When a parallel field is present the surface dose stays approximately constant for small separations, only slightly decreasing for separations greater than 5cm, since the magnetic field focuses the electrons produced in the coil materials not allowing them to scatter. Conclusion: Irradiating a patient through an RF coil leads to an increase in the surface and buildup doses. Mitigating this increase is important for the successful clinical use of either a transverse or a parallel configuration Linac-MR unit. This project is partially supported by an operating grant from the Canadian Institute of Health Research (CIHR MOP 93752)

  20. MLAA-based RF surface coil attenuation estimation in hybrid PET/MR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heußer, Thorsten; Rank, Christopher M.; Freitag, Martin T.; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2017-03-01

    Attenuation correction (AC) for both patient and hardware attenuation of the 511 keV annihilation photons is required for accurate PET quantification. In hybrid PET/MR imaging, AC for stationary hardware components such as patient table and MR head coil is performed using CT{derived attenuation templates. AC for flexible hardware components such as MR radiofrequency (RF) surface coils is more challenging. Registration{based approaches, aligning scaled CT{derived attenuation templates with the current patient position, have been proposed but are not used in clinical routine. Ignoring RF coil attenuation has been shown to result in regional activity underestimation values of up to 18 %. We propose to employ a modified version of the maximum{ likelihood reconstruction of attenuation and activity (MLAA) algorithm to obtain an estimate of the RF coil attenuation. Starting with an initial attenuation map not including the RF coil, the attenuation update of MLAA is applied outside the body outline only, allowing to estimate RF coil attenuation without changing the patient attenuation map. Hence, the proposed method is referred to as external MLAA (xMLAA). In this work, xMLAA for RF surface coil attenuation estimation is investigated using phantom and patient data acquired with a Siemens Biograph mMR. For the phantom data, average activity errors compared to the ground truth was reduced from -8:1% to +0:8% when using the proposed method. Patient data revealed an average activity underestimation of -6:1% for the abdominal region and -5:3% for the thoracic region when ignoring RF coil attenuation.

  1. The noise factor of receiver coil matching networks in MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xueming; Fischer, Elmar; Gruschke, Oliver; Korvink, Jan G; Hennig, Jürgen; Maunder, Adam M; De Zanche, Nicola; Zaitsev, Maxim

    2017-04-01

    In typical MRI applications the dominant noise sources in the received signal are the sample, the coil loop and the preamplifier. We hypothesize that in some cases (e.g. for very small receiver coils) the matching network noise has to be considered explicitly. Considering the difficulties of direct experimental determinations of the noise factor of matching networks with sufficient accuracy, it is helpful to estimate the noise factor by calculation. A useful formula of the coil matching network is obtained by separating commonly used coil matching network into different stages and calculating their noise factor analytically by a combination of the noise from these stages. A useful formula of the coil matching network is obtained. ADS simulations are performed to verify the theoretical predictions. Thereafter carefully-designed proof-of-concept phantom experiments are carried out to qualitatively confirm the predicted SNR behavior. The matching network noise behavior is further theoretically investigated for a variety of scenarios. It is found that in practice the coil matching network noise can be improved by adjusting the coil open port resonant frequency.

  2. A 4-channel 3 Tesla phased array receive coil for awake rhesus monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Khachaturian, Mark Haig

    2010-01-01

    Awake monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI combined with conventional neuroscience techniques has the potential to study the structural and functional neural network. The majority of monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments are performed with single coils which suffer from severe EPI distortions which limit resolution. By constructing phased array coils for monkey MRI studies, gains in SNR and anatomical accuracy (i.e., reduction of EPI distortions) can be achieved using parallel imaging. The major...

  3. An improved trap design for decoupling multinuclear RF coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerspeer, Martin; Serés Roig, Eulalia; Gruetter, Rolf; Magill, Arthur W

    2014-08-01

    Multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging require a radiofrequency probe capable of transmitting and receiving at the proton and non-proton frequencies. To minimize coupling between probe elements tuned to different frequencies, LC (inductor-capacitor) traps blocking current at the (1)H frequency can be inserted in non-proton elements. This work compares LC traps with LCC traps, a modified design incorporating an additional capacitor, enabling control of the trap reactance at the low frequency while maintaining (1)H blocking. Losses introduced by both types of trap were analysed using circuit models. Radiofrequency coils incorporating a series of LC and LCC traps were then built and evaluated at the bench. LCC trap performance was then confirmed using (1)H and (13)C measurements in a 7T human scanner. LC and LCC traps both effectively block interaction between non-proton and proton coils at the proton frequency. LCC traps were found to introduce a sensitivity reduction of 5±2%, which was less than half of that caused by LC traps. Sensitivity of non-proton coils is critical. The improved trap design, incorporating one extra capacitor, significantly reduces losses introduced by the trap in the non-proton coil. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A novel optically transparent RF shielding for fully integrated PET/MRI systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parl, C; Kolb, A; Schmid, A M; Wehrl, H F; Disselhorst, J A; Soubiran, P D; Stricker-Shaver, D; Pichler, B J

    2017-09-01

    Preclinical imaging benefits from simultaneous acquisition of high-resolution anatomical and molecular data. Additionally, PET/MRI systems can provide functional PET and functional MRI data. To optimize PET sensitivity, we propose a system design that fully integrates the MRI coil into the PET system. This allows positioning the scintillators near the object but requires an optimized design of the MRI coil and PET detector. It further requires a new approach in realizing the radiofrequency (RF) shielding. Thus, we propose the use of an optically transparent RF shielding material between the PET scintillator and the light sensor, suppressing the interference between both systems. We evaluated two conductive foils (ITO, 9900) and a wire mesh. The PET performance was tested on a dual-layer scintillator consisting of 12  ×  12 LSO matrices, shifted by half a pitch. The pixel size was 0.9  ×  0.9 mm(2); the lengths were 10.0 mm and 5.0 mm, respectively. For a light sensor, we used a 4  ×  4 SiPM array. The RF attenuation was measured from 320 kHz to 420 MHz using two pick-up coils. MRI-compatibility and shielding effect of the materials were evaluated with an MRI system. The average FWHM energy resolution at 511 keV of all 144 crystals of the layer next to the SiPM was deteriorated from 15.73  ±  0.24% to 16.32  ±  0.13%, 16.60  ±  0.25%, and 19.16  ±  0.21% by the ITO foil, 9900 foil, mesh material, respectively. The average peak-to-valley ratio of the PET detector changed from 5.77  ±  0.29 to 4.50  ±  0.39, 4.78  ±  0.48, 3.62  ±  0.16, respectively. The ITO, 9900, mesh attenuated the scintillation light by 11.3  ±  1.6%, 11.0  ±  1.8%, 54.3  ±  0.4%, respectively. To attenuate the RF from 20 MHz to 200 MHz, mesh performed better than copper. The results show that an RF shielding material that is sufficiently transparent for

  5. A novel optically transparent RF shielding for fully integrated PET/MRI systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parl, C.; Kolb, A.; Schmid, A. M.; Wehrl, H. F.; Disselhorst, J. A.; Soubiran, P. D.; Stricker-Shaver, D.; Pichler, B. J.

    2017-09-01

    Preclinical imaging benefits from simultaneous acquisition of high-resolution anatomical and molecular data. Additionally, PET/MRI systems can provide functional PET and functional MRI data. To optimize PET sensitivity, we propose a system design that fully integrates the MRI coil into the PET system. This allows positioning the scintillators near the object but requires an optimized design of the MRI coil and PET detector. It further requires a new approach in realizing the radiofrequency (RF) shielding. Thus, we propose the use of an optically transparent RF shielding material between the PET scintillator and the light sensor, suppressing the interference between both systems. We evaluated two conductive foils (ITO, 9900) and a wire mesh. The PET performance was tested on a dual-layer scintillator consisting of 12  ×  12 LSO matrices, shifted by half a pitch. The pixel size was 0.9  ×  0.9 mm2 the lengths were 10.0 mm and 5.0 mm, respectively. For a light sensor, we used a 4  ×  4 SiPM array. The RF attenuation was measured from 320 kHz to 420 MHz using two pick-up coils. MRI-compatibility and shielding effect of the materials were evaluated with an MRI system. The average FWHM energy resolution at 511 keV of all 144 crystals of the layer next to the SiPM was deteriorated from 15.73  ±  0.24% to 16.32  ±  0.13%, 16.60  ±  0.25%, and 19.16  ±  0.21% by the ITO foil, 9900 foil, mesh material, respectively. The average peak-to-valley ratio of the PET detector changed from 5.77  ±  0.29 to 4.50  ±  0.39, 4.78  ±  0.48, 3.62  ±  0.16, respectively. The ITO, 9900, mesh attenuated the scintillation light by 11.3  ±  1.6%, 11.0  ±  1.8%, 54.3  ±  0.4%, respectively. To attenuate the RF from 20 MHz to 200 MHz, mesh performed better than copper. The results show that an RF shielding material that is sufficiently transparent for

  6. High-resolution small field-of-view magnetic resonance image acquisition system using a small planar coil and a pneumatic manipulator in an open MRI scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Kohei; Masamune, Ken

    2015-10-01

    Low-field open magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently used for performing image-guided neurosurgical procedures. Intraoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images are useful for tracking brain shifts and verifying residual tumors. However, it is difficult to precisely determine the boundary of the brain tumors and normal brain tissues because the MR image resolution is low, especially when using a low-field open MRI scanner. To overcome this problem, a high-resolution MR image acquisition system was developed and tested. An MR-compatible manipulator with pneumatic actuators containing an MR signal receiver with a small radiofrequency (RF) coil was developed. The manipulator had five degrees of freedom for position and orientation control of the RF coil. An 8-mm planar RF coil with resistance and inductance of 2.04 [Formula: see text] and 1.00 [Formula: see text] was attached to the MR signal receiver at the distal end of the probe. MR images of phantom test devices were acquired using the MR signal receiver and normal head coil for signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) testing. The SNR of MR images acquired using the MR signal receiver was 8.0 times greater than that of MR images acquired using the normal head coil. The RF coil was moved by the manipulator, and local MR images of a phantom with a 2-mm grid were acquired using the MR signal receiver. A wide field-of-view MR image was generated from a montage of local MR images. A small field-of-view RF system with a pneumatic manipulator was integrated in a low-field MRI scanner to allow acquisition of both wide field-of-view and high-resolution MR images. This system is promising for image-guided neurosurgery as it may allow brain tumors to be observed more clearly and removed precisely.

  7. Tailored RF Pulse Modulation for RF Refocussed Variable Flip Angle MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ajit S.; Ortendahl, Douglas A.; Carlson, Joseph W.; Kramer, David M.; Crooks, Larry E.

    1989-05-01

    Advances in Magnetice Resonance Imaging (MRI) techniques have recently made MRI the imaging modality of choice for many applications of clinical imaging. MRI provides the diagnosing clinician a non-invasive method for obtaining soft tissue differentiation with sub-millimeter resolution. Clinical MRI techniques include 3-dimensional imaging, spectroscopic imaging, arterial angiography and cardiac imaging. One MRI technique which has recently gained popularity is a class of protocols known as variable/partial flip angle MRI. Partial flip angle MRI techniques are useful because of their ability to vary contrast between tissues and/or maintain a particular level of contrast with a reduction in acquisition time [1]. Variable flip angle techniques differ from conventional MRI protocols in that the initial RF excitation/rotation pulse is not constrained to a 90 degree rotation of the longitudinal magnetization. Instead, the initial excitation flip angle is calculated to provide improved contrast between two tissues and/or maximize the intensity of a particular tissue. For tissues with reduced TR/T1 ratios, variable flip angle techniques may also be used to increase the image signal to noise within a localized region.

  8. On the estimation of the worst-case implant-induced RF-heating in multi-channel MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córcoles, Juan; Zastrow, Earl; Kuster, Niels

    2017-06-01

    The increasing use of multiple radiofrequency (RF) transmit channels in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems makes it necessary to rigorously assess the risk of RF-induced heating. This risk is especially aggravated with inclusions of medical implants within the body. The worst-case RF-heating scenario is achieved when the local tissue deposition in the at-risk region (generally in the vicinity of the implant electrodes) reaches its maximum value while MRI exposure is compliant with predefined general specific absorption rate (SAR) limits or power requirements. This work first reviews the common approach to estimate the worst-case RF-induced heating in multi-channel MRI environment, based on the maximization of the ratio of two Hermitian forms by solving a generalized eigenvalue problem. It is then shown that the common approach is not rigorous and may lead to an underestimation of the worst-case RF-heating scenario when there is a large number of RF transmit channels and there exist multiple SAR or power constraints to be satisfied. Finally, this work derives a rigorous SAR-based formulation to estimate a preferable worst-case scenario, which is solved by casting a semidefinite programming relaxation of this original non-convex problem, whose solution closely approximates the true worst-case including all SAR constraints. Numerical results for 2, 4, 8, 16, and 32 RF channels in a 3T-MRI volume coil for a patient with a deep-brain stimulator under a head imaging exposure are provided as illustrative examples.

  9. A 4-channel 3 Tesla phased array receive coil for awake rhesus monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khachaturian, Mark Haig

    2010-01-01

    Awake monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI combined with conventional neuroscience techniques has the potential to study the structural and functional neural network. The majority of monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments are performed with single coils which suffer from severe EPI distortions which limit resolution. By constructing phased array coils for monkey MRI studies, gains in SNR and anatomical accuracy (i.e., reduction of EPI distortions) can be achieved using parallel imaging. The major challenges associated with constructing phased array coils for monkeys are the variation in head size and space constraints. Here, we apply phased array technology to a 4-channel phased array coil capable of improving the resolution and image quality of full brain awake monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments. The phased array coil is that can adapt to different rhesus monkey head sizes (ages 4-8) and fits in the limited space provided by monkey stereotactic equipment and provides SNR gains in primary visual cortex and anatomical accuracy in conjunction with parallel imaging and improves resolution in fMRI experiments by a factor of 2 (1.25 mm to 1.0 mm isotropic) and diffusion MRI experiments by a factor of 4 (1.5 mm to 0.9 mm isotropic).

  10. Monte Carlo-based Noise Compensation in Coil Intensity Corrected Endorectal MRI

    CERN Document Server

    Lui, Dorothy; Haider, Masoom; Wong, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prostate cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer found in males making early diagnosis important. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been useful in visualizing and localizing tumor candidates and with the use of endorectal coils (ERC), the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) can be improved. The coils introduce intensity inhomogeneities and the surface coil intensity correction built into MRI scanners is used to reduce these inhomogeneities. However, the correction typically performed at the MRI scanner level leads to noise amplification and noise level variations. Methods: In this study, we introduce a new Monte Carlo-based noise compensation approach for coil intensity corrected endorectal MRI which allows for effective noise compensation and preservation of details within the prostate. The approach accounts for the ERC SNR profile via a spatially-adaptive noise model for correcting non-stationary noise variations. Such a method is useful particularly for improving the image quality of coil i...

  11. Design of a loop resonator with a split-ring-resonator (SRR) for a human-body coil in 3 T MRI systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Hyeok Woo; Cho, Young Ki; Kim, Byung Mun; Back, Hyun Man; Yoo, Hyoungsuk

    2016-04-01

    A new radio-frequency (RF) resonator for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) imaging at clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems is proposed in this paper. An approach based on the effects of the properties of metamaterials in split-ring resonators (SRRs) is used to design a new loop resonator with a SRR for NMR imaging. This loop resonator with a SRR is designed for NMR imaging at 3 T MRI systems. The 3D electromagnetic simulation was used to optimize the design of the proposed RF resonator and analyze it's performance at 3 T MRI systems. The proposed RF resonator provides strong penetrating magnetic fields at the center of the human phantom model, approximately 10%, as compared to the traditional loop-type RF resonator used for NMR imaging at clinical MRI systems. We also designed an 8-channel body coil for human-body NMR imaging by using the proposed loop resonator with a SRR. This body coil also produces more homogeneous and highly penetrating magnetic fields into the human phantom model.

  12. Development of a full-ring ;add-on PET; prototype: A head coil with DOI-PET detectors for integrated PET/MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikido, F.; Fujiwara, M.; Tashima, H.; Akram, M. S. H.; Suga, M.; Obata, T.; Yamaya, T.

    2017-08-01

    We developed a full-ring ;add-on PET; prototype which is brain-dedicated and consists of a RF-head coil with four-layer depth-of-interaction (DOI) PET detectors for integrated PET/MRI in order to evaluate performance of our previously proposed add-on PET system and to investigate the mutual influences between the individual PET and MRI modalities when they are integrated in simultaneous measurements. In this add-on PET prototype, the DOI detectors are mounted on the head coil and close to the patient head. As a result, higher sensitivity and higher spatial resolution can be achieved for the integrated PET/MRI, compared with conventional whole body PET/MRI systems. In addition, implementation cost can be reduced, tuning of the RF-coil can be optimized and PET and MRI images can be obtained simultaneously in exactly the same positions. Specifically, the full-ring prototype consists of eight DOI-PET detectors and a birdcage type head coil of a 3T MRI. The radius of the PET ring is 123.9 mm. The distance from the center to the RF-coil elements is 130.5 mm. The scintillator blocks consist of lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate scintillators arranged in 19×6×4 layers with reflectors inserted between them. The size of each crystal element is 2.0 mm×2.0 mm ×5.0 mm. We evaluated performance of the full-ring prototype in simultaneous measurements of the integrated PET/MRI. We obtained spatial resolutions of 2.3 mm at the center of the field-of-view (FOV) and lower than 3.5 mm in the whole FOV. The energy resolution of 19.4% was obtained for 511 keV gamma-rays. In addition, we observed no degradation of PET performance caused by the MRI measurement. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the MRI image was 209.4 in simultaneous measurements with the PET. The maximum ΔB0 and maximum difference of the secondary magnetic field due to the eddy current effect were smaller than 0.8 ppm and ±5.0 μT, respectively. We concluded that sufficient spatial resolution and detector

  13. MRI evaluation of RF ablation scarring for atrial fibrillation treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Yuri; Nazafat, Reza; Wylie, John V.; Linguraru, Marius G.; Josephson, Mark E.; Howe, Robert D.; Manning, Warren J.; Peters, Dana C.

    2007-03-01

    This study presents a multi-modality image registration method that evaluates left atrial scarring after radiofrequency (RF) ablation for pulmonary vein (PV) isolation. Our group has recently developed a delayed enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (DE-MRI) method with the potential to visualize and monitor non-invasively post-ablation scarring in the left atrium and the PV ostia. We wished to compare the 3D configuration of scarring in the DE-MRI image and the ablation points recorded by electroanatomical mapping (EAM) system, hypothesizing that scarring detected by DE-MRI overlaps with ablation points recorded by the EAM system used in the procedure. Methods and Results: Three data sets, DE-MRI images and pulmonary vein MR angiography (PV-MRA) images, and EAM data (CARTO-XP, Biosense-Webster, Inc., Diamond Bar, CA) from a patient who underwent PV ablation, were used for the multi-modal image registration. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging was performed 38 days after the ablation procedure. PV-MRA and DE-MRI were fused by intensity-based rigid registration. Scar tissue was extracted from the DE-MRI images using multiple threshold values. EAM data was further fused with segmented PV-MRA by the iterative closest point algorithm (ICP). After registration, the distance from PV-MRA to the scar was 2.6 +/- 2.1 mm, and from ablation points to the surface of the scar was 2.5 +/- 2.3 mm. The fused image demonstrates the 3D relationship between the PV ostia, the scar and the EAM recording of ablation points. Conclusion: Multimodal data fusion indicated that the scar tissue lesion after PV isolation showed good overlap with the ablation points.

  14. Endoluminal ultrasound applicator with an integrated RF coil for high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-intensity contact ultrasound thermotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rata, Mihaela; Salomir, Rares; Umathum, Reiner; Jenne, Jürgen; Lafon, Cyril; Cotton, François; Bock, Michael

    2008-11-01

    High-intensity contact ultrasound (HICU) under MRI guidance may provide minimally invasive treatment of endocavitary digestive tumors in the esophagus, colon or rectum. In this study, a miniature receive-only coil was integrated into an endoscopic ultrasound applicator to offer high-resolution MRI guidance of thermotherapy. A cylindrical plastic support with an incorporated single element flat transducer (9.45 MHz, water cooling tip) was made and equipped with a rectangular RF loop coil surrounding the active element. The integrated coil provided significantly higher sensitivity than a four-element extracorporeal phased array coil, and the standard deviation of the MR thermometry (SDT) improved up to a factor of 7 at 10 mm depth in tissue. High-resolution morphological images (T1w-TFE and IR-T1w-TSE with a voxel size of 0.25 × 0.25 × 3 mm3) and accurate thermometry data (the PRFS method with a voxel size of 0.5 × 0.5 × 5 mm3, 2.2 s/image, 0.3 °C voxel-wise SDT) were acquired in an ex vivo esophagus sample, on a clinical 1.5T scanner. The endoscopic device was actively operated under automatic temperature control, demonstrating a high level of accuracy (1.7% standard deviation, 1.1% error of mean value), which indicates that this technology may be suitable for HICU therapy of endoluminal cancer.

  15. Endoluminal ultrasound applicator with an integrated RF coil for high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-intensity contact ultrasound thermotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rata, Mihaela; Salomir, Rares; Lafon, Cyril [Inserm, U556, Universite de Lyon, Lyon, F-69003 (France); Umathum, Reiner; Jenne, Juergen; Bock, Michael [DKFZ, Innovative Cancer Diagnostics and Therapy, Heidelberg (Germany); Cotton, Francois [Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Lyon F-69003 (France)], E-mail: rares.salomir@inserm.fr

    2008-11-21

    High-intensity contact ultrasound (HICU) under MRI guidance may provide minimally invasive treatment of endocavitary digestive tumors in the esophagus, colon or rectum. In this study, a miniature receive-only coil was integrated into an endoscopic ultrasound applicator to offer high-resolution MRI guidance of thermotherapy. A cylindrical plastic support with an incorporated single element flat transducer (9.45 MHz, water cooling tip) was made and equipped with a rectangular RF loop coil surrounding the active element. The integrated coil provided significantly higher sensitivity than a four-element extracorporeal phased array coil, and the standard deviation of the MR thermometry (SDT) improved up to a factor of 7 at 10 mm depth in tissue. High-resolution morphological images (T1w-TFE and IR-T1w-TSE with a voxel size of 0.25 x 0.25 x 3 mm{sup 3}) and accurate thermometry data (the PRFS method with a voxel size of 0.5 x 0.5 x 5 mm{sup 3}, 2.2 s/image, 0.3 deg. C voxel-wise SDT) were acquired in an ex vivo esophagus sample, on a clinical 1.5T scanner. The endoscopic device was actively operated under automatic temperature control, demonstrating a high level of accuracy (1.7% standard deviation, 1.1% error of mean value), which indicates that this technology may be suitable for HICU therapy of endoluminal cancer.

  16. Multi-slice MRI with the dynamic multi-coil technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juchem, Christoph; Nahhass, Omar M; Nixon, Terence W; de Graaf, Robin A

    2015-11-01

    To date, spatial encoding for MRI is based on linear X, Y and Z field gradients generated by dedicated X, Y and Z wire patterns. We recently introduced the dynamic multi-coil technique (DYNAMITE) for the generation of magnetic field shapes for biomedical MR applications from a set of individually driven localized coils. The benefits for B0 magnetic field homogenization have been shown, as well as proof of principle of radial and algebraic MRI. In this study the potential of DYNAMITE MRI is explored further and the first multi-slice MRI implementation in which all gradient fields are purely DYNAMITE based is presented. The obtained image fidelity is shown to be virtually identical to that of a conventional MRI system with dedicated X, Y and Z gradient coils. Comparable image quality is a milestone towards the establishment of fully functional DYNAMITE MRI (and shim) systems.

  17. Minimizing RF heating of conducting wires in MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Christopher J; Karmarkar, Parag; McVeigh, Elliot R

    2007-11-01

    Performing interventions using long conducting wires in MRI introduces the risk of focal RF heating at the wire tip. Comprehensive EM simulations are combined with carefully measured experimental data to show that method-of-moments EM field modeling coupled with heat transfer modeling can adequately predict RF heating with wires partially inserted into the patient-mimicking phantom. The effects of total wire length, inserted length, wire position in the phantom, phantom position in the scanner, and phantom size are examined. Increasing phantom size can shift a wire's length of maximum tip heating from about a half wave toward a quarter wave. In any event, with wires parallel to the scanner bore, wire tip heating is minimized by keeping the patient and wires as close as possible to the central axis of the scanner bore. At 1.5T, heating is minimized if bare wires are shorter than 0.6 m or between approximately 2.4 m and approximately 3.0 m. Heating is further minimized if wire insertion into phantoms equivalent to most aqueous soft tissues is less than 13 cm or greater than 40 cm (longer for fatty tissues, bone, and lung). The methods demonstrated can be used to estimate the absolute amount of heating in order to set RF power safety thresholds.

  18. A compact spin-exchange optical pumping system for 3He polarization based on a solenoid coil, a VBG laser diode, and a cosine theta RF coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungman; Kim, Jongyul; Moon, Myung Kook; Lee, Kye Hong; Lee, Seung Wook; Ino, Takashi; Skoy, Vadim R.; Lee, Manwoo; Kim, Guinyun

    2013-02-01

    For use as a neutron spin polarizer or analyzer in the neutron beam lines of the HANARO (High-flux Advanced Neutron Application ReactOr) nuclear research reactor, a 3He polarizer was designed based on both a compact solenoid coil and a VBG (volume Bragg grating) diode laser with a narrow spectral linewidth of 25 GHz. The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal was measured and analyzed using both a built-in cosine radio-frequency (RF) coil and a pick-up coil. Using a neutron transmission measurement, we estimated the polarization ratio of the 3He cell as 18% for an optical pumping time of 8 hours.

  19. Modular Coils with Low Hydrogen Content Especially for MRI of Dry Solids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timon Eichhorn

    Full Text Available Recent advances have enabled fast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of solid materials. This development has opened up new applications for MRI, but, at the same time, uncovered new challenges. Previously, MRI-invisible materials like the housing of MRI detection coils are now readily depicted and either cause artifacts or lead to a decreased image resolution. In this contribution, we present versatile, multi-nuclear single and dual-tune MRI coils that stand out by (1 a low hydrogen content for high-resolution MRI of dry solids without artifacts; (2 a modular approach with exchangeable inductors of variable volumes to optimally enclose the given object; (3 low cost and low manufacturing effort that is associated with the modular approach; (4 accurate sample placement in the coil outside of the bore, and (5 a wide, single- or dual-tune frequency range that covers several nuclei and enables multinuclear MRI without moving the sample.The inductors of the coils were constructed from self-supporting copper sheets to avoid all plastic materials within or around the resonator. The components that were mounted at a distance from the inductor, including the circuit board, coaxial cable and holder were manufactured from polytetrafluoroethylene.Residual hydrogen signal was sufficiently well suppressed to allow 1H-MRI of dry solids with a minimum field of view that was smaller than the sensitive volume of the coil. The SNR was found to be comparable but somewhat lower with respect to commercial, proton-rich quadrature coils, and higher with respect to a linearly-polarized commercial coil. The potential of the setup presented was exemplified by 1H/23Na high-resolution zero echo time (ZTE MRI of a model solution and a dried human molar at 9.4 T. A full 3D image dataset of the tooth was obtained, rich in contrast and similar to the resolution of standard cone-beam computed tomography.

  20. In vivo sensitivity estimation and imaging acceleration with rotating RF coil arrays at 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingyan; Jin, Jin; Zuo, Zhentao; Liu, Feng; Trakic, Adnan; Weber, Ewald; Zhuo, Yan; Xue, Rong; Crozier, Stuart

    2015-03-01

    Using a new rotating SENSitivity Encoding (rotating-SENSE) algorithm, we have successfully demonstrated that the rotating radiofrequency coil array (RRFCA) was capable of achieving a significant reduction in scan time and a uniform image reconstruction for a homogeneous phantom at 7 Tesla. However, at 7 Tesla the in vivo sensitivity profiles (B1(-)) become distinct at various angular positions. Therefore, sensitivity maps at other angular positions cannot be obtained by numerically rotating the acquired ones. In this work, a novel sensitivity estimation method for the RRFCA was developed and validated with human brain imaging. This method employed a library database and registration techniques to estimate coil sensitivity at an arbitrary angular position. The estimated sensitivity maps were then compared to the acquired sensitivity maps. The results indicate that the proposed method is capable of accurately estimating both magnitude and phase of sensitivity at an arbitrary angular position, which enables us to employ the rotating-SENSE algorithm to accelerate acquisition and reconstruct image. Compared to a stationary coil array with the same number of coil elements, the RRFCA was able to reconstruct images with better quality at a high reduction factor. It is hoped that the proposed rotation-dependent sensitivity estimation algorithm and the acceleration ability of the RRFCA will be particularly useful for ultra high field MRI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A 22-channel receive array with Helmholtz transmit coil for anesthetized macaque MRI at 3 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, Thomas; Keil, Boris; Serano, Peter; Mareyam, Azma; McNab, Jennifer A; Wald, Lawrence L; Vanduffel, Wim

    2013-11-01

    The macaque monkey is an important model for cognitive and sensory neuroscience that has been used extensively in behavioral, electrophysiological, molecular and, more recently, neuroimaging studies. However, macaque MRI has unique technical differences relative to human MRI, such as the geometry of highly parallel receive arrays, which must be addressed to optimize imaging performance. A 22-channel receive coil array was constructed specifically for rapid high-resolution anesthetized macaque monkey MRI at 3 T. A local Helmholtz transmit coil was used for excitation. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and noise amplification for parallel imaging were compared with those of single- and four-channel receive coils routinely used for macaque MRI. The 22-channel coil yielded significant improvements in SNR throughout the brain. Using this coil, the SNR in peripheral brain was 2.4 and 1.7 times greater than that obtained with single- or four-channel coils, respectively. In the central brain, the SNR gain was 1.5 times that of both the single- and four-channel coils. Finally, the performance of the array for functional, anatomical and diffusion-weighted imaging was evaluated. For all three modalities, the use of the 22-channel array allowed for high-resolution and accelerated image acquisition.

  2. Optimal Value of Series Capacitors for Uniform Field Distribution in Transmission Line MRI Coils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2016-01-01

    Transmission lines are often used as coils in high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Due to the distributed nature of transmission lines, coils based on them produce inhomogeneous field. This work investigates application of series capacitors to improve field homogeneity along the coil....... The equations for optimal values of evenly distributed capacitors are derived and expressed in terms of the implemented transmission line parameters.The achieved magnetic field homogeneity is estimated under quasistatic approximation and compared to the regular transmission line resonator. Finally, a more...... practical case of a microstrip line coil with two series capacitors is considered....

  3. Integrated RF/shim coil array for parallel reception and localized B0 shimming in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Trong-Kha; Darnell, Dean; Song, Allen W

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a novel integrated radiofrequency and shim (RF/shim) coil array that can perform parallel reception and localized B0 shimming in the human brain with the same coils, thereby maximizing both the signal-to-noise ratio and shimming efficiency. A 32-channel receive-only head coil array was modified to enable both RF currents (for signal reception) and direct currents (for B0 shimming) to flow in individual coil elements. Its in vivo performance was assessed in the frontal brain region, which is affected by large susceptibility-induced B0 inhomogeneities. The coil modifications did not reduce their quality factor or signal-to-noise ratio. Axial B0 maps and echo-planar images acquired in vivo with direct currents optimized to shim specific slices showed substantially reduced B0 inhomogeneities and image distortions in the frontal brain region. The B0 root-mean-square error in the anterior half of the brain was reduced by 60.3% as compared to that obtained with second-order spherical harmonic shimming. These results demonstrate that the integrated RF/shim coil array can perform parallel reception and localized B0 shimming in the human brain and provide a much more effective shimming than conventional spherical harmonic shimming alone, without taking up additional space in the magnet bore and without compromising the signal-to-noise ratio or shimming performance.

  4. RF safety of wires in interventional MRI: using a safety index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Christopher J; Susil, Robert C; Atalar, Ergin

    2002-01-01

    With the rapid growth of interventional MRI, radiofrequency (RF) heating at the tips of guidewires, catheters, and other wire-shaped devices has become an important safety issue. Previous studies have identified some of the variables that affect the relative magnitude of this heating but none could predict the absolute amount of heating to formulate safety margins. This study presents the first theoretical model of wire tip heating that can accurately predict its absolute value, assuming a straight wire, a homogeneous RF coil, and a wire that does not extend out of the tissue. The local specific absorption rate (SAR) amplification from induced currents on insulated and bare wires was calculated using the method of moments. This SAR gain was combined with a semianalytic solution to the bioheat transfer equation to generate a safety index. The safety index ( degrees C/(W/kg)) is a measure of the in vivo temperature change that can occur with the wire in place, normalized to the SAR of the pulse sequence. This index can be used to set limits on the spatial peak SAR of pulse sequences that are used with the interventional wire. For the case of a straight resonant wire in a tissue with very low perfusion, only about 100 mW/kg/ degrees C spatial peak SAR may be used at 1.5 T. But for wires with an insulation thickness > or =30% of the wire radius that are placed in well-perfused tissues, normal operating conditions of 4 W/kg spatial peak SAR are possible at 1.5 T. Further model development to include the influence of inhomogeneous RF, curved wires, and wires that extend out of the sample are required to generate safety indices that are applicable to common clinical situations. We propose a simple way to ensure safety when using an interventional wire: set a limit on the SAR of allowable pulse sequences that is a factor of a safety index below the tolerable temperature increase.

  5. Research and development of MRI surface coil for TMJ MR imaging; Modulated Helmholtz surface coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukimoto, Yoshiaki; Kukimoto, Kyoko (Kameda General Hospital, Kamogawa, Chiba (Japan)); Shirakawa, Toyomi

    1989-12-01

    Internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are a major cause of jaw pain and dysfunction as well as other related clinical symptoms. TMJ diagnosis is the abnormal position and appearance of the disk. Most X-ray-based methods are useful for evaluating bony abnormalities, but their reduced soft-tissue contrast often makes the diagnostic evaluation of TMJ disorders difficult. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a very recent addition to the medical diagnostic of TMJ diseases. MR imaging can produce high-quality tomographic images of greater soft-tissue contrast without ionizing radiation or known biological hazards. MR system was circular type Simens Magnetom 1.5 tesla. Display matrix was 256x256. A Modulated Helmholtz type coil of 17 cm in diameter was developed in Kameda General Hospital in order to increase signal to noise ratio in the area of bilateral TMJs. The distance between two coils was 16-20 cm. The head was placed in supine position in the center of two surface coils. A Modulated Helmholtz type coil: 1. Modulated Helmholtz type coil was used as an emitter and a receiver. 2. Modulated Helmholtz type coil had a pair of 17 cm coils, which were movable according to head width of each patient. 3. MR imaging of bilateral TMJs was taken at once because of no necessity to reset a surfacecoil. 4. It was easy to set positioning of the head. (author).

  6. 3D model of a matrix source of negative ions: RF driving by a large area planar coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demerdzhiev, A.; Lishev, St.; Tarnev, Kh.; Shivarova, A.

    2015-04-01

    Based on three-dimensional (3D) modeling, different manners of a planar-coil inductive discharge driving of a plasma source completed as a matrix of small-radius hydrogen discharges are studied regarding a proper choice of an efficient and alike rf power deposition into the separate discharges of the matrix. Driving the whole matrix by a single coil and splitting it to blocks of discharge tubes, with single coil driving of each block, are the two cases considered. The results from the self-consistent model presented for a block of discharge tubes show its reliability in ensuring the same spatial distribution of the plasma parameters in the discharges completing the block. Since regarding the construction of the matrix, its driving as a whole by a single coil is the most reasonable decision, three modifications of the coil design have been tested: two zigzag coils with straight conductors passing, respectively, between and through the bottoms of the discharge tubes and a coil with an "omega" shaped conductor on the bottom of each tube. Among these three configurations, the latter ‒ a coil with an Ω-shaped conductor on the bottom of each tube ‒ shows up with the highest rf efficiency of an inductive discharge driving, shown by results for the rf current induced in the discharges obtained from an electrodynamical description. In all the cases considered the spatial distribution of the induced current density is analysed based on the manner of the penetration into the plasma of the wave field sustaining the inductive discharges.

  7. Optimized (31) P MRS in the human brain at 7 T with a dedicated RF coil setup

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bank, B.L. van de; Orzada, S.; Smits, F.; Lagemaat, M.W.; Rodgers, C.T.; Bitz, A.K.; Scheenen, T.W.J.

    2015-01-01

    The design and construction of a dedicated RF coil setup for human brain imaging ((1) H) and spectroscopy ((31) P) at ultra-high magnetic field strength (7 T) is presented. The setup is optimized for signal handling at the resonance frequencies for (1) H (297.2 MHz) and (31) P (120.3 MHz). It consis

  8. Comparison of CT and MRI artefacts from coils and vascular plugs used for portal vein embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisel, Dominik, E-mail: dominik.geisel@charite.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Charité, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Gebauer, Bernhard [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Charité, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Malinowski, Maciej; Stockmann, Martin [Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, Charité, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Denecke, Timm [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Charité, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze the degree of artefacts in CT and MRI scans caused by coils and vascular plugs used for portal vein embolization (PVE). Materials and methods: All patients who underwent PVE between July 2011 and December 2012 and received either plug or coil embolization additional to particle embolization were retrospectively analyzed. Artefacts causes by embolization materials were measured in CT and MRI scans following PVE. Results: The sum of the artefact diameters caused from coils was significantly higher in CT (188.3 ± 26.1 mm) than in MRI T1 (50.5 ± 6.5 mm) or T2 imaging (39.5 ± 9.7 mm) (P < 0.05). In MRI, the diameter in T1 and T2 sequences did not differ significantly (P = 0.977). The sum of the artefact diameters from vascular plugs in MRI T1 sequences (62.5 ± 8.7 mm) was significantly higher than in CT (46.6 ± 4.8 mm; P < 0.05) and MRI T2 sequences (52.8 ± 3.8 mm; P < 0.05). Conclusion: PVE with particles and vascular plug causes significantly fewer artefacts than PVE with particles and coils on CT scans following embolization, which can be important in the event of vascular complications or in follow-up scans, should the patient become unresectable.

  9. Temperature dependency of magnetic field drifts of HTS pancake coils for NMR/MRI applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyeong Dal; Lee, Se Yeon; Kim, Woo Seok [Dept. of Energy and Electrical Engineering, Korea Polytechnic University, Siheung (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Min [Dept. of Radiology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    We had proposed a winding method so called “Wind-and-Flip”, which enables a persistent current operation of an HTS pancake coil without any electrical joint. In order to improve the magnetic field drift characteristics, a prototype HTS coil with the technique was fabricated, and tested under various temperatures. Because the coil does not have any electric terminals for current leads, an HTS background magnet was used to induce the persistent current in the coil by field cooling process. A conduction cooling system with a GM cryocooler was prepared to keep the operating temperatures of the prototype coil much below the 77 K. We investigated the magnetic field drift characteristics under the various operating temperatures by measuring the center magnetic field with a cryogenic Hall sensor. The persistent current mode operation at 20 ∽ 50K showed a strong possibility of the winding technique for the application such as MRI or NMR.

  10. Accuracy of MRI with an endorectal coil for staging endometrial cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alt, Celine D.; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Hallscheidt, Peter [Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Univ. of Heidelberg Medical School, Heidelberg (Germany)], e-mail: celine.alt@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Brocker, Kerstin A.; Eichbaum, Michael; Sohn, Christof [Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Univ. of Heidelberg Medical School, Heidelberg (Germany); Kopp-Schneider, Annette [Dept. of Biostatistics, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    Background: The very good results of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using an endorectal coil in staging prostate cancer at 1.5T suggested that this imaging technique might be able to be used to stage endometrial cancer, the most common tumor in postmenopausal women. Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of MRI with an endorectal surface coil for staging primary endometrial carcinoma. Material and Methods: A total of 33 consecutive patients with biopsy-proven endometrial cancer underwent 1.5T MRI with an endorectal surface coil (eMRI) using sagittal and axial T2-weighted (T2w) turbo spin echo (TSE), axial T1 gradient echo 2D fat-saturated (fs), sagittal T1 gradient echo 3D with and without contrast enhancement (CE), and axial T1 TSE fs CE sequence. Evaluation of local tumor extension was based on the revised standard TNM classification for endometrial cancer. eMRI staging was compared with the histopathological results after surgery. Results: A total of 33 consecutive patients underwent eMRI for staging endometrial cancer, and 21 of these underwent primary surgery. The histological stages were as follows: T1a (n = 8), T1b (n = 10), T2b (n = 2), and T3a (n = 1). Overall staging accuracy by eMRI was 71% (15 of 21). With regard to depth of myometrial invasion, eMRI correctly diagnosed stage T1a in 75% (6/8) and stage T1b in 80% (8/10). eMRI overstaged the tumor in four patients and understaged it in two. Conclusion: eMRI is highly accurate in staging myometrial invasion. However, eMRI at 1.5T does not seem to be significantly more accurate than pelvic MRI without an endorectal coil at 1.5T for staging primary endometrial cancer. eMRI for endometrial carcinoma therefore might not meet expectations compared with the results obtained using eMRI for staging prostate cancer at 1.5T.

  11. Characterization of a custom-built RF coil for a high-resolution phase-contrast magnetic resonance velocimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Byungkuen; Cho, Jee-Hyun; Song, Simon

    2016-11-01

    For the use of clinical purpose magnetic resonance velocimeter (MRV) is a versatile flow visualization technique in that it allows opaque flow, complex geometry, no use of tracer particles and facile fast non-invasive measurements of 3 dimensional and 3 component velocity vectors. However, the spatial resolution of a commercial MR machine is lower than optics-based techniques like PIV. On the other hand, the use of MRV for clinical purposes like cardiovascular flow visualization requires accurate measurements or estimations on wall shear stress (WSS) with a high spatial resolution. We developed a custom-built solenoid RF coil for phase-contrast (PC) MRV to improve its resolution. We compared signal-to-noise ratio, WSS estimations, partial volume effects near wall between the custom RF coil and a commercial coil. Also, a Hagen-Poiseuille flow was analyzed with the custom RF coil. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) Grant funded by the Korea government (MSIP) (No. 2016R1A2B3009541).

  12. Helmholtz-pair transmit coil with integrated receive array for high-resolution MRI of trabecular bone in the distal tibia at 7 T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Alexander C.; Lemdiasov, Rostislav; Connick, Thomas J.; Bhagat, Yusuf A.; Magland, Jeremy F.; Song, Hee Kwon; Toddes, Steven P.; Ludwig, Reinhold; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2011-05-01

    A Helmholtz-pair local transmit RF coil with an integrated four-element receive array RF coil and foot immobilization platform was designed and constructed for imaging the distal tibia in a whole-body 7 T MRI scanner. Simulations and measurements of the B1 field distribution of the transmit coil are described, along with SAR considerations for operation at 7 T. Results of imaging the trabecular bone of three volunteers at 1.5 T, 3 T and 7 T are presented, using identical 1.5 T and 3 T versions of the 7 T four-element receive array. The spatially registered images reveal improved visibility for individual trabeculae and show average gains in SNR of 2.8× and 4.9× for imaging at 7 T compared to 3 T and 1.5 T, respectively. The results thus display an approximately linear dependence of SNR with field strength and enable the practical utility of 7 T scanners for micro-MRI of trabecular bone.

  13. Tx/Rx Head Coil Induces Less RF Transmit-Related Heating than Body Coil in Conductive Metallic Objects Outside the Active Area of the Head Coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Zoltan; Oliver-Taylor, Aaron; Kuehne, Andre; Goluch, Sigrun; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2017-01-01

    The transmit-receive (Tx/Rx) birdcage head coil is often used for excitation instead of the body coil because of the presumably lower risk of heating in and around conductive implants. However, this common practice has not been systematically tested. To investigate whether the Tx/Rx birdcage head coil produces less heating than the body coil when scanning individuals with implants, we used a 3T clinical scanner and made temperature measurements around a straight 15 cm conductor using either the Tx/Rx body or the head coil for excitation. Additionally, the transmitted fields of a Tx/Rx head coil were measured both in air and in gel using a resonant and a non-resonant B field probes as well as a non-resonant E field probe. Simulations using a finite-difference time domain solver were compared with the experimental findings. When the body coil was used for excitation, we observed heating around the 15 cm wire at various anatomical locations (both within and outside of the active volume of the head coil). Outside its active area, no such heating was observed while using the Tx/Rx head coil for excitation. The E and B fields of the Tx/Rx birdcage head coil extended well-beyond the physical dimensions of the coil. In air, the fields were monotonically decreasing, while in gel they were more complex with local maxima at the end of the ASTM phantom. These experimental findings were line with the simulations. While caution must always be exercised when scanning individuals with metallic implants, these findings support the use of the Tx/Rx birdcage head coil in place of the body coil at 3T in order to reduce the risk of heating in and around conductive implants that are remote from the head coil.

  14. Tx/Rx Head Coil Induces Less RF Transmit-Related Heating than Body Coil in Conductive Metallic Objects Outside the Active Area of the Head Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Zoltan; Oliver-Taylor, Aaron; Kuehne, Andre; Goluch, Sigrun; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2017-01-01

    The transmit–receive (Tx/Rx) birdcage head coil is often used for excitation instead of the body coil because of the presumably lower risk of heating in and around conductive implants. However, this common practice has not been systematically tested. To investigate whether the Tx/Rx birdcage head coil produces less heating than the body coil when scanning individuals with implants, we used a 3T clinical scanner and made temperature measurements around a straight 15 cm conductor using either the Tx/Rx body or the head coil for excitation. Additionally, the transmitted fields of a Tx/Rx head coil were measured both in air and in gel using a resonant and a non-resonant B field probes as well as a non-resonant E field probe. Simulations using a finite-difference time domain solver were compared with the experimental findings. When the body coil was used for excitation, we observed heating around the 15 cm wire at various anatomical locations (both within and outside of the active volume of the head coil). Outside its active area, no such heating was observed while using the Tx/Rx head coil for excitation. The E and B fields of the Tx/Rx birdcage head coil extended well-beyond the physical dimensions of the coil. In air, the fields were monotonically decreasing, while in gel they were more complex with local maxima at the end of the ASTM phantom. These experimental findings were line with the simulations. While caution must always be exercised when scanning individuals with metallic implants, these findings support the use of the Tx/Rx birdcage head coil in place of the body coil at 3T in order to reduce the risk of heating in and around conductive implants that are remote from the head coil.

  15. Non-uniformity of Clinical Head, Head and Neck, and Body Coils in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Nazarpoor

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Signal intensity uniformity in a magnetic resonance (MR image indicates how well the MR imaging (MRI system represents an object. One of the major sources of image non-uniformity in high-field MRI scanners is inhomogeneity of radio-frequency coil. The aim of this study was to investigate non-uniformity in head, head and neck, and body coils and compare the obtained results to determine the best clinical coil for future clinical application. Materials and Methods A phantom was designed to investigate the non-uniformity of coils. All evaluations were carried out using a 1.5 T clinical MRI scanner. T1-weighted inversion recovery sequence (linear phase encoding and turbo fast low angle shot (TurboFLASH images were used to find non-uniformity in the clinical coils. For testing the uniformity of coils, signal intensity profiles in parts of the coronal image of phantom were measured over X and Y axes. Results The results showed that body coil was the most uniform coil of all; in addition, the head and neck coil was more uniform than the head coil. The results also indicated that signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of the head and neck coil was higher than the head and body coils. Moreover, SNR of the head coil was higher than that of the body coil. Conclusion In order to accurately find or apply an image signal intensity for measuring organ blood flow or perfusion, coil non-uniformity corrections are required.

  16. Influence of standard RF coil materials on surface and buildup dose from a 6 MV photon beam in magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghila, A; Fallone, B G; Rathee, S

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic resonance guided teletherapy systems aspire to image the patient concurrently with the radiation delivery. Thus, the radiofrequency (RF) coils used for magnetic resonance imaging, placed on or close to patient skin and in close proximity to the treatment volume, would be irradiated leading to modifications of radiation dose to the skin and in the buildup region. The purpose of this work is to measure and assess these dose modifications due to standard off-the-shelf RF coil materials. A typical surface coil was approximated as layered sheets of polycarbonate, copper tape, and Teflon to emulate the base, conductor, and cover, respectively. A separate investigation used additional coil materials, such as copper pipe, plastic coil housing, a typical coil padding material, and a thin copper conductor. The materials were placed in the path of a 6 MV photon beam at various distances from polystyrene phantoms in which the surface and buildup doses were measured. The experiments were performed on a clinical Varian linac with no magnetic field and with a 0.21 T electromagnet producing a magnetic field parallel to the beam central axis. The authors repeated similar experiments in the presence of a 0.22 T magnetic field oriented perpendicular to the beam central axis using an earlier linac-MR prototype, with a biplanar permanent magnet. The radiation detectors used for the measurements were two different parallel plate ion chambers and GAFChromic films. A typical open beam surface dose of 20% (relative to open beam Dmax) was increased to 63% by the coil padding material and to >74% by all other materials when placed in direct contact with the phantom, irrespective of magnetic field presence or orientation. Without a magnetic field, the surface dose decreased as the test materials were moved away from the phantom surface toward the radiation source, reaching between 30% and 40% at 10 cm gap between the phantom and the test materials. In the presence of the transverse

  17. A new design method for asymmetrical head gradient coils used for superconducting MRI scanner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Xin; ZU Donglin; BAO Shanglian

    2004-01-01

    A novel approach of asymmetrical gradient coil design for head imaging in MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is presented in this paper. The design is based on a modified target field method in which the stream function is introduced to replace Blaine's scheme for the length control. The transverse head coil calculated by this method has a high performance. The coil efficiency is 0.41 mT/m/A and the inductance is 512 μH. The coil has an inner diameter of 32 cm and a length of 45.8 cm. The size of the ROU (region of uniformity) is 20 cm along the transverse direction and 17 cm along the axial direction and it is close to one end of the coil. The ROU of the coil matches the ROI (region of interest) of human head very well. Compared with previous designs, our design has relatively high performance and the overlap between the ROU and the ROI is larger (the overlap percent is 95 % ).

  18. Decoupling Scheme for a Cryogenic Rx-Only RF Coil for 13C Imaging at 3T

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sánchez-Heredia, Juan D.; Søvsø Szocska Hansen, Esben; Laustsen, Christoffer;

    In this study we evaluate the different active decoupling schemes that can be used to drive an Rx-only coil, in order to determine the optimal design for 13C MRI at 3T. Three different circuit schemes are studied: two known ones (with regular series and parallel tuning respectively), and a novel...... one which we found to be optimal for this case. The circuits have been cooled to 77K to reduce coil noise. Preliminary tests with the preamplifier cooled to 77K for reduction of noise figure, are also reported....

  19. Monitoring local heating around an interventional MRI antenna with RF radiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertürk, M. Arcan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 and Division of MR Research, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Bottomley, Paul A., E-mail: bottoml@mri.jhu.edu [Division of MR Research, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Radiofrequency (RF) radiometry uses thermal noise detected by an antenna to measure the temperature of objects independent of medical imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, an active interventional MRI antenna can be deployed as a RF radiometer to measure local heating, as a possible new method of monitoring device safety and thermal therapy. Methods: A 128 MHz radiometer receiver was fabricated to measure the RF noise voltage from an interventional 3 T MRI loopless antenna and calibrated for temperature in a uniformly heated bioanalogous gel phantom. Local heating (ΔT) was induced using the antenna for RF transmission and measured by RF radiometry, fiber-optic thermal sensors, and MRI thermometry. The spatial thermal sensitivity of the antenna radiometer was numerically computed using a method-of-moment electric field analyses. The gel’s thermal conductivity was measured by MRI thermometry, and the localized time-dependent ΔT distribution computed from the bioheat transfer equation and compared with radiometry measurements. A “H-factor” relating the 1 g-averaged ΔT to the radiometric temperature was introduced to estimate peak temperature rise in the antenna’s sensitive region. Results: The loopless antenna radiometer linearly tracked temperature inside a thermally equilibrated phantom up to 73 °C to within ±0.3 °C at a 2 Hz sample rate. Computed and MRI thermometric measures of peak ΔT agreed within 13%. The peak 1 g-average temperature was H = 1.36 ± 0.02 times higher than the radiometric temperature for any media with a thermal conductivity of 0.15–0.50 (W/m)/K, indicating that the radiometer can measure peak 1 g-averaged ΔT in physiologically relevant tissue within ±0.4 °C. Conclusions: Active internal MRI detectors can serve as RF radiometers at the MRI frequency to provide accurate independent measures of local and peak temperature without the artifacts that can accompany MRI thermometry or

  20. A six-channel pediatric coil array for detection of children spinal pathologies by MRI at 1.5 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López Terrones, Marcos Alonso, E-mail: malt.marcos@gmail.com [Ingeniería Biomédica, Dirección de Planeación, Servicios de Salud de Durango. Cuauhtémoc 225 Norte, Durango, Durango 34000 (Mexico); Solís-Nájera, Sergio Enrique, E-mail: solisnajera@ciencias.unam.mx [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México, DF 04510 (Mexico)

    2014-11-07

    Nowadays, magnetic resonance (MR) in Mexico has become a standard technique for clinical imaging. Although most of the times the MR systems contain only coils oriented for adults. Radiologists use these coils for children studies due to the non-availability of pediatric coils. Image quality is decreased due to the low signal to noise ratio delivered to the system. The development of RF coils is always focused towards increasing SNR and optimizing the RF penetration into the sample. Moreover, spinal pathologies in children, which are an important topic in pediatric care, cover congenital and neuromuscular disorders that occur in childhood. In this work, the design of a dedicated six-channel coil for detection of spinal pathologies at 1.5 Tesla is addressed. Numerical electromagnetic simulations were performed in order to evaluate their magnetic field performance at (63.6 MHz) 1.5 Tesla. The magnetic field uniformity as well as the RF penetration depth of the coil configurations was evaluated in order to find the best/optimized coil array configuration. The coil is comprised of three rows, one with 4 coil elements and two with only one coil element. Phantom and in vivo images were acquired with the six-channel pediatric coil array. The phantom images agree with the simulated data. In vivo images acquired with the 6-channel pediatric coil array have shown very good penetration depth and homogeneity, which allow better image quality throughout the whole FOV. In addition, the parallel imaging capabilities of the array allow the acceleration of the experiments avoiding possible motion artifacts.

  1. A six-channel pediatric coil array for detection of children spinal pathologies by MRI at 1.5 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Terrones, Marcos Alonso; Solís-Nájera, Sergio Enrique

    2014-11-01

    Nowadays, magnetic resonance (MR) in Mexico has become a standard technique for clinical imaging. Although most of the times the MR systems contain only coils oriented for adults. Radiologists use these coils for children studies due to the non-availability of pediatric coils. Image quality is decreased due to the low signal to noise ratio delivered to the system. The development of RF coils is always focused towards increasing SNR and optimizing the RF penetration into the sample. Moreover, spinal pathologies in children, which are an important topic in pediatric care, cover congenital and neuromuscular disorders that occur in childhood. In this work, the design of a dedicated six-channel coil for detection of spinal pathologies at 1.5 Tesla is addressed. Numerical electromagnetic simulations were performed in order to evaluate their magnetic field performance at (63.6 MHz) 1.5 Tesla. The magnetic field uniformity as well as the RF penetration depth of the coil configurations was evaluated in order to find the best/optimized coil array configuration. The coil is comprised of three rows, one with 4 coil elements and two with only one coil element. Phantom and in vivo images were acquired with the six-channel pediatric coil array. The phantom images agree with the simulated data. In vivo images acquired with the 6-channel pediatric coil array have shown very good penetration depth and homogeneity, which allow better image quality throughout the whole FOV. In addition, the parallel imaging capabilities of the array allow the acceleration of the experiments avoiding possible motion artifacts.

  2. Finite element analysis of gradient z-coil induced eddy currents in a permanent MRI magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Xia, Ling; Chen, Wufan; Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart; Xie, Dexin

    2011-01-01

    In permanent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems, pulsed gradient fields induce strong eddy currents in the conducting structures of the magnet body. The gradient field for image encoding is perturbed by these eddy currents leading to MR image distortions. This paper presents a comprehensive finite element (FE) analysis of the eddy current generation in the magnet conductors. In the proposed FE model, the hysteretic characteristics of ferromagnetic materials are considered and a scalar Preisach hysteresis model is employed. The developed FE model was applied to study gradient z-coil induced eddy currents in a 0.5 T permanent MRI device. The simulation results demonstrate that the approach could be effectively used to investigate eddy current problems involving ferromagnetic materials. With the knowledge gained from this eddy current model, our next step is to design a passive magnet structure and active gradient coils to reduce the eddy current effects.

  3. Improved Field Homogeneity for Transmission Line MRI Coils Using Series Capacitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Dong, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    High field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems often use short sections of transmission lines for generating and sensing alternating magnetic fields. Due to distributed nature of transmission lines, the generated field is inhomogeneous. This work investigates the application of series capaci...... capacitors to improve the field homogeneity. The resulting magnetic field distribution is estimated analytically and evaluated numerically. The results are compared to a case of a conventional transmission line coil realization....

  4. Motion Correction using Coil Arrays (MOCCA) for Free-Breathing Cardiac Cine MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Peng; Hong, Susie; Moghari, Mehdi H.; Goddu, Beth; Goepfert, Lois; Kissinger, Kraig V.; Hauser, Thomas H.; Manning, Warren J; Nezafat, Reza

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we present a motion compensation technique based on coil arrays (MOCCA) and evaluate its application in free-breathing respiratory self-gated cine MRI. MOCCA takes advantages of the fact that motion-induced changes in k-space signal are modulated by individual coil sensitivity profiles. In the proposed implementation of MOCCA self-gating for free-breathing cine MRI, the k-space center line is acquired at the beginning of each k-space segment for each cardiac cycle with 4 repetitions. For each k-space segment, the k-space center line acquired immediately before was used to select one of the 4 acquired repetitions to be included in the final self-gated cine image by calculating the cross-correlation between the k-space center line with a reference line. The proposed method was tested on a cohort of healthy adult subjects for subjective image quality and objective blood-myocardium border sharpness. The method was also tested on a cohort of patients to compare the left and right ventricular volumes and ejection fraction measurements with that of standard breath-hold cine MRI. Our data indicate that the proposed MOCCA method provides significantly improved image quality and sharpness compared to free-breathing cine without respiratory self-gating, and provides similar volume measurements compared with breath-hold cine MRI. PMID:21773986

  5. All-planar SQUIDs and pickup coils for combined MEG and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luomahaara, J; Kiviranta, M; Groenberg, L; Hassel, J [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO BOX 1000, 02044 VTT (Finland); Vesanen, P T; Nieminen, J O; Dabek, J; Zevenhoven, C J; Ilmoniemi, R J [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Science, Aalto University, PO BOX 12200, 00076 Aalto (Finland); Penttilae, J [Aivon Oy, Tietotie 3, 02150 Espoo (Finland); Simola, J, E-mail: juho.luomahaara@vtt.fi [Elekta Oy, PO Box 34, 00531 Helsinki (Finland)

    2011-07-15

    Flux trapping and random flux movement are common problems in superconducting thin-film devices. Ultrasensitive magnetic field sensors based on superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) coupled to large pickup coils are especially vulnerable to strong external fields. The issue has become particularly relevant with the introduction of SQUID-based ultra-low-field (ULF) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. In this paper, we study the constraints of thin-film-based magnetometers and gradiometers as exposed to magnetic field sequences of ULF MRI. In particular, we address issues such as response recovery, transient noise, magnetization and behaviour under shielded room conditions after prepolarization. As a result, we demonstrate sensors that are suitable for a combined multi-channel magnetoencephalography (MEG) and MRI imaging system.

  6. A simulation study on the design of gradient coils in MRI for the imaging area above the patient bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yang; Wang, Qiuliang; Hu, Xinning; Zhu, Xuchen; Crozier, Stuart; Wang, Yaohui; Liu, Feng

    2017-03-01

    A novel method is proposed for the simulation study the design of gradient coils in a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system which generate linear magnetic field gradients only in the region above the patient’s bed. In MRI, the gradient coils are usually designed to create linear-varying magnetic gradient fields in a region that is typically described as a diameter of spherical volume (DSV). In practice, the space under the patient’s bed is not used for imaging, but is still treated as part of the design target in conventional approaches. This work proposes a new design scheme in which only the DSV space above the patient’s bed is considered. In the simulation study, the coil patterns have been obtained using a boundary element method (BEM). Compared to conventional gradient coil design methods, the new scheme produces similar fields above the patient’s bed with much sparser wire spacing (for the case tested: the primary layer and shielding layer have 36%/10% and 6%/17% larger wire spacing for X- and Y-gradient coils, respectively). The new design therefore has reduced inductance compared to conventional coils; a reduction of approximately 23% and 11% for the X- and Y-gradient coils, respectively. The resistances of the coils are also reduced. Based on an acoustic analysis, the new gradient coils are slightly quieter (3 dB for the typical operating frequency) than conventional gradient systems.

  7. RF safety assessment of a bilateral four-channel transmit/receive 7 Tesla breast coil: SAR versus tissue temperature limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Thomas M; Ladd, Mark E; Bitz, Andreas K

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to perform an RF safety evaluation for a bilateral four-channel transmit/receive breast coil and to determine the maximum permissible input power for which RF exposure of the subject stays within recommended limits. The safety evaluation was done based on SAR as well as on temperature simulations. In comparison to SAR, temperature is more directly correlated with tissue damage, which allows a more precise safety assessment. The temperature simulations were performed by applying three different blood perfusion models as well as two different ambient temperatures. The goal was to evaluate whether the SAR and temperature distributions correlate inside the human body and whether SAR or temperature is more conservative with respect to the limits specified by the IEC. A simulation model was constructed including coil housing and MR environment. Lumped elements and feed networks were modeled by a network co-simulation. The model was validated by comparison of S-parameters and B1(+) maps obtained in an anatomical phantom. Three numerical body models were generated based on 3 Tesla MRI images to conform to the coil housing. SAR calculations were performed and the maximal permissible input power was calculated based on IEC guidelines. Temperature simulations were performed based on the Pennes bioheat equation with the power absorption from the RF simulations as heat source. The blood perfusion was modeled as constant to reflect impaired patients as well as with a linear and exponential temperature-dependent increase to reflect two possible models for healthy subjects. Two ambient temperatures were considered to account for cooling effects from the environment. The simulation model was validated with a mean deviation of 3% between measurement and simulation results. The highest 10 g-averaged SAR was found in lung and muscle tissue on the right side of the upper torso. The maximum permissible input power was calculated to be 17 W. The

  8. A target field design of open multi-purpose RF coil for musculoskeletal MR imaging at 3T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Zhang, Rui; Zhou, Diange; Wang, Xiaoying; Huang, Kefu; Zhang, Jue

    2016-10-01

    Musculoskeletal MR imaging under multi-angle situations plays an increasingly important role in assessing joint and muscle tissues system. However, there are still limitations due to the closed structures of most conventional RF coils. In this study, a time-harmonic target-field method was employed to design open multi-purpose coil (OMC) for multi-angle musculoskeletal MR imaging. The phantom imaging results suggested that the proposed OMC could achieve homogeneously distributed magnetic field and high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 239.04±0.83 in the region of interest (ROI). The maximum temperature in the heating hazard test was 16°C lower than the standard regulation, which indicated the security of the designed OMC. Furthermore, to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed OMC for musculoskeletal MR imaging, especially for multi-angle imaging, a healthy volunteer was examined for MR imaging of elbow, ankle and knee using OMC. The in vivo imaging results showed that the proposed OMC is effective for MR imaging of musculoskeletal tissues at different body parts, with satisfied B1 field homogeneity and SNR. Moreover, the open structure of the OMC could provide a large joint movement region. The proposed open multi-purpose coil is feasible for musculoskeletal MR imaging, and potentially, it is more suitable for the evaluation of musculoskeletal tissues under multi-angle conditions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. A new holder and surface MRI coil for the examination of the newborn infant hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasny, R; Casser, H R; Requardt, H; Botschek, A

    1993-01-01

    A special holder was developed for examination of the infant hip joint using MRI. This holder allows the infant hip joint to be examined both in a neutral position and in various defined functional positions. A special integrated surface coil, also developed for this purpose, provides the high spatial resolution required for assessment of the fine joint structures. Thirty infants were examined and the new device has proved useful in advanced hip dysplasia, therapy-resistant subluxation and luxation, and for operative therapy planning (reconstruction of the acetabular roof, redirectional osteotomies). Interpretation errors due to misprojection can be eliminated to a large extent since the holder allows standardized and reproducible positioning.

  10. A 2-in-1 single-element coil design for transcranial magnetic stimulation and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hai; Wang, Shumin

    2017-02-10

    To demonstrate the feasibility of turning transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) coil for MRI signal reception. A critically coupled network was formed by using a resonated turn of TMS coil as the secondary and a regular radiofrequency (RF) coil as the primary. A third coil was positioned between the two coils for detuning during RF transmission. Bench measurement, numerical simulation, and MRI experiment were performed for validation. The signal-to-noise ratio of the proposed 2-in-1 coil is 35% higher in its field of view, compared with a MRI-only reference coil of the same size, made by the same material, and backed up by an untuned TMS coil, but lower than a RF surface coil of the same size without any TMS coil nearby. Spin-echo images of the human brain further validated its performance. The proposed method can transform TMS coil for MRI signal acquisition with virtually no modifications on the TMS side. It not only enables flexible and close positioning of TMS coil inside MRI scanner, but also improves the signal-to-noise ratio compared with conventional implementations. It can be applied as a building block for developing advanced concurrent TMS/MRI hardware. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  11. Assessment of RF heating by MR-based measurements and models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simonis, F.F.J.

    2016-01-01

    RF transmit signals are an inherent part of MRI that is crucial for spin excitation. Current developments in MRI are moving towards higher magnetic field strengths and more transmit coils leading to more inhomogeneous RF distributions. This increases the possibility of SAR hotspots, creating higher

  12. Sub-pixel localisation of passive micro-coil fiducial markers in interventional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Marc; McRobbie, Donald; Elhawary, Haytham; Tse, Zion T H; Lamperth, Michael; Young, Ian

    2009-04-01

    Electromechanical devices enable increased accuracy in surgical procedures, and the recent development of MRI-compatible mechatronics permits the use of MRI for real-time image guidance. Integrated imaging of resonant micro-coil fiducials provides an accurate method of tracking devices in a scanner with increased flexibility compared to gradient tracking. Here we report on the ability of ten different image-processing algorithms to track micro-coil fiducials with sub-pixel accuracy. Five algorithms: maximum pixel, barycentric weighting, linear interpolation, quadratic fitting and Gaussian fitting were applied both directly to the pixel intensity matrix and to the cross-correlation matrix obtained by 2D convolution with a reference image. Using images of a 3 mm fiducial marker and a pixel size of 1.1 mm, intensity linear interpolation, which calculates the position of the fiducial centre by interpolating the pixel data to find the fiducial edges, was found to give the best performance for minimal computing power; a maximum error of 0.22 mm was observed in fiducial localisation for displacements up to 40 mm. The inherent standard deviation of fiducial localisation was 0.04 mm. This work enables greater accuracy to be achieved in passive fiducial tracking.

  13. Influence of field strength, coil type and image resolution on assessment of synovitis by unenhanced MRI - a comparison with contrast-enhanced MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eshed, Iris [The Sheba Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Tel Hashomer (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Krabbe, Simon; Axelsen, Mette; Pedersen, Susanne Juhl [Copenhagen University Hospital Glostrup, Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research, Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Copenhagen (Denmark); Oestergaard, Mikkel [Copenhagen University Hospital Glostrup, Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research, Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Copenhagen (Denmark); Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Department of Rheumatology/C, Copenhagen (Denmark); Boeyesen, Pernille [Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Department of Rheumatology, Oslo (Norway); Moeller, Jakob M. [Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev, Department of Radiology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Therkildsen, Flemming [Metropolitan University College, Copenhagen (Denmark); Madsen, Ole Rintek [Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Department of Rheumatology/C, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2015-04-01

    To explore if the reliability of synovitis assessment by unenhanced MRI is influenced by different MRI field-strengths, coil types and image resolutions in RA patients. Forty-one RA patients and 12 healthy controls underwent hand MRI (wrist and 2{sup nd}-5{sup th} metacarpophalangeal joints) at 4 different field-strengths (0.23 T/0.6 T/1.5 T/3.0 T) on the same day. Seven protocols using a STIR sequence with different field-strengths, coils (flex coils/dedicated phased-array extremity coils) and resolution were applied and scored blindly for synovitis (OMERACT-RAMRIS method). A 1.5 T post-contrast T1-weighted sequence was used as gold standard reference. Fair-good agreement (ICC=0.38-0.72) between the standard reference and the different STIR protocols (best agreement with extremity coil and small voxel size at 1.5 T). The accuracy for presence/absence of synovitis was very high per person (0.80-1.0), and moderate-high per joint (0.63-0.85), whereas exact agreements on scores were moderate (0.50-0.66). The intrareader agreement (15 patients and 3 controls) on presence/absence of synovitis was very high (0.87-1.0). Unenhanced MRI using STIR sequence is only moderately reliable for assessing hand synovitis in RA, when contrast-enhanced MRI is considered the gold standard reference. Contrast injection, field strength and coil type influence synovitis assessment, and should be considered before performing MRI in clinical trials and practice. (orig.)

  14. Influence of field strength, coil type and image resolution on assessment of synovitis by unenhanced MRI--a comparison with contrast-enhanced MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eshed, Iris; Krabbe, Simon; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To explore if the reliability of synovitis assessment by unenhanced MRI is influenced by different MRI field-strengths, coil types and image resolutions in RA patients. METHODS: Forty-one RA patients and 12 healthy controls underwent hand MRI (wrist and 2(nd)--5(th) metacarpophalangeal...... was very high per person (0.80--1.0), and moderate-high per joint (0.63--0.85), whereas exact agreements on scores were moderate (0.50--0.66). The intrareader agreement (15 patients and 3 controls) on presence/absence of synovitis was very high (0.87--1.0). CONCLUSIONS: Unenhanced MRI using STIR sequence...

  15. Evaluation of a dedicated dual phased-array surface coil using a black-blood FSE sequence for high resolution MRI of the carotid vessel wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Ouhlous (Mohamed); F. Lethimonnier; D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); M.R.H.M. van Sambeek (Marc); L.C.J. van Heerebeek (Lambertus C.); P.M.T. Pattynama (Peter); A. van der Lugt (Aad)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To investigate the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize the carotid vessel wall using a phased-array coil and a black-blood (BB) fast spin-echo (FSE) sequence. Materials and Methods: The phased-array coil was compared with a three-inch coil. Images from volun

  16. Is the Ellipsoid Formula the New Standard for 3-Tesla MRI Prostate Volume Calculation without Endorectal Coil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Matthias; Günzel, Karsten; Miller, Kurt; Hamm, Bernd; Cash, Hannes; Asbach, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Prostate volume in multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) is of clinical importance. For 3-Tesla mpMRI without endorectal coil, there is no distinctive standard for volume calculation. We tested the accuracy of the ellipsoid formula with planimetric volume measurements as reference and investigated the correlation of gland volume and cancer detection rate on MRI/ultrasound (MRI/US) fusion-guided biopsy. One hundred forty-three patients with findings on 3-Tesla mpMRI suspicious of cancer and subsequent MRI/US fusion-guided targeted biopsy and additional systematic biopsy were analyzed. T2-weighted images were used for measuring the prostate diameters and for planimetric volume measurement by a segmentation software. Planimetric and calculated prostate volumes were compared with clinical data. The median prostate volume was 48.1 ml (interquartile range (IQR) 36.9-62.1 ml). Volume calculated by the ellipsoid formula showed a strong concordance with planimetric volume, with a tendency to underestimate prostate volume (median volume 43.1 ml (IQR 31.2-58.8 ml); r = 0.903, p < 0.001). There was a moderate, significant inverse correlation of prostate volume to a positive biopsy result (r = -0.24, p = 0.004). The ellipsoid formula gives sufficient approximation of prostate volume on 3-Tesla mpMRI without endorectal coil. It allows a fast, valid volume calculation in prostate MRI datasets.

  17. SAR Computation inside Fetus by RF Coil during MR Imaging Employing Realistic Numerical Pregnant Woman Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Satoru; Saito, Kazuyuki; Takahashi, Masaharu; Ito, Koichi; Ikehira, Hiroo

    This paper presents the computational electromagnetic dosimetry inside an anatomically based pregnant woman models exposed to electromagnetic wave during magnetic resonance imaging. The two types of pregnant woman models corresponding to early gestation and 26 weeks gestation were used for this study. The specific absorption rate (SAR) in and around a fetus were calculated by radiated electromagnetic wave from highpass and lowpass birdcage coil. Numerical calculation results showed that high SAR region is observed at the body in the vicinity of gaps of the coil, and is related to concentrated electric field in the gaps of human body such as armpit and thigh. Moreover, it has confirmed that the SAR in the fetus is less than International Electrotechnical Commission limit of 10W/kg, when whole-body average SARs are 2W/kg and 4W/kg, which are the normal operating mode and first level controlled operating mode, respectively.

  18. A novel radio frequency coil for veterinary magnetic resonance imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Bin; Huang, Kai-Wen; Wang, Wei-Min

    2010-07-01

    In this article, a novel designed radio frequency (RF) coil is designed and built for the imaging of puppies in a V-shape permanent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. Two sets of Helmholtz coil pairs with a V-shape structure are used to improve the holding of an animal in the coil. The homogeneity and the sensitivity of the RF field in the coil are analysed by theoretical calculation. The size and the shape of the new coil are optimized and validated by simulation through using the finite element method (FEM). Good magnetic resonance (MR) images are achieved on a shepherd dog.

  19. Simple coil-powering techniques for generating 10KA/m alternating magnetic field at multiple frequencies using 0.5KW RF power for magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Daqing; Sun, Tengfei; Ranjan, Ashish

    2017-02-01

    Alternating magnetic field (AMF) configurable at a range of frequencies is a critical need for optimization of magnetic nanoparticle based hyperthermia, and for their application in targeted drug delivery. Currently, most commercial AMF devices including induction heaters operate at one factory-fixed frequency, thereby limiting customized frequency configuration required for triggered drug release at mild hyperthermia (40-42°C) and ablations (>55°C). Most AMF devices run as an inductor-capacitor resonance network that could allow AMF frequencies to be changed by changing the capacitor bank or the coil looped with it. When developing AMF inhouse, the most expensive component is usually the RF power amplifier, and arguably the most critical step of building a strong AMF field is impedance-matched coupling of RF power to the coolant-cooled AMF coil. AMF devices running at 10KA/m strength are quite common, but generating AMF at that level of field strength using RF power less than 1KW has remained challenging. We practiced a few techniques for building 10KA/m AMFs at different frequencies, by utilizing a 0.5KW 80-800KHz RF power amplifier. Among the techniques indispensable to the functioning of these AMFs, a simple cost-effective technique was the tapping methods for discretely or continuously adjusting the position of an RF-input-tap on a single-layer or the outer-layer of a multi-layer AMF coil for maximum power coupling into the AMF coil. These in-house techniques when combined facilitated 10KA/m AMF at frequencies of 88.8 KHz and higher as allowed by the inventory of capacitors using 0.5KW RF power, for testing heating of 10-15nm size magnetic particles and on-going evaluation of drug-release by low-level temperature-sensitive liposomes loaded with 15nm magnetic nanoparticles.

  20. A cradle-shaped gradient coil to expand the clear-bore width of an animal MRI scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, K M; Gati, J S; Klassen, L M; Menon, R S

    2010-01-21

    The never ending quest for higher magnetic field strengths in MRI and MRS has led to small and medium bore scanners at 9.4 T and above for both human and animal use; however, these bore diameters restrict the size of object that can be accommodated when using a conventional gradient coil. By replacing a cylindrical gradient-coil insert with a single-sided gradient coil, the scanner's functionality can be extended to include localized imaging of wider samples. As a prototype, a three-axis, cradle-shaped gradient coil was designed, fabricated and implemented in a 9.4 T animal MRI scanner. Since gradient fields are required only to be monotonic over the desired field of view, the cradle gradient coil was designed to produce high gradient efficiencies (up to 2.25 mT m(-1) A(-1) over a 5 cm imaging region) at the expense of gradient linearity. A dedicated three-dimensional algorithm was developed to correct the resultant image distortion. Preliminary images of a grid phantom and a mouse demonstrated the fidelity of the algorithm in correcting image distortion of greater than 200%. Eddy currents were measured along each gradient axis. A large 65.2 (Hz mT(-1) m) B(0) eddy current was produced by the y-axis, suggesting potential limitations of single-sided gradient coils.

  1. B1 homogeneity of breast MRI using RF shimming with individual specific values in volunteers simulating patients after mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Takayuki

    2016-11-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a 3-T MRI scanner is now widely used for clinical examinations. However, B1 inhomogeneity becomes larger with MRI scanners using 3-T and higher. It especially becomes a problem in the breast. To improve B1 homogeneity, a RF shimming technique has been developed. Purpose To evaluate the B1 homogeneity of breast MRI using RF shimming with individual specific values for subjects after mastectomy. Material and Methods The subjects are healthy female volunteers who underwent normal breast imaging, followed by imaging of one breast while the other breast was bound tightly to the chest by bleached cotton cloths (simulating volunteers after mastectomy). B1 mappings were performed with RF shimming using two techniques: (i) optimized fixed value; and (ii) individual specific values using a 3-T MRI scanner. The means and standard deviations of the B1 maps for all slices in the breast were measured and compared between the fixed value and the individual specific value cases. Results For normal volunteers, the breast B1 variation was not statistically significantly different between the RF shimming techniques. For volunteers after simulated surgery, the breast B1 variation was (1.02 ± 0.29) with the fixed value and (0.98 ± 0.22) with the individual specific value ( P volunteers after simulated surgery. Conclusion RF shimming with individual specific values has the potential to improve the B1 homogeneity of breast MRI in patients after mastectomy.

  2. T1 ρ-weighted MRI using a surface coil to transmit spin-lock pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borthakur, Arijitt; Charagundla, Sridhar R.; Wheaton, Andrew; Reddy, Ravinder

    2004-04-01

    T1 ρ-weighted MRI is a novel basis for generating tissue contrast. However, it suffers from sensitivity to B1 inhomogeneity. First, excitation with a spatially varying B1 causes flip-angle artifacts and second, spin locking with an inhomogeneous B1 results in non-uniform T1 ρ contrast. In this study, we overcome the former complication with a specially designed spin-locking pulse sequence and we successfully obtain T1 ρ-weighted images with a surface coil. In this pulse sequence, the spin-lock pulse was divided into segments of equal duration and alternating phase. This "self-compensating" T1 ρ-preparatory pulse sequence was analyzed and the effect of an inhomogeneous B1 field was simulated using the Bloch equations. T1 ρ-weighted MR images of a phantom and a human knee joint in vivo were obtained on a clinical scanner with a surface coil to demonstrate the utility of the pulse sequence. The self-compensating T1 ρ-prepared pulses sequence resulted in substantially reduced image artifacts compared to the conventional, single-phase spin-lock pulse.

  3. CSI-EPT in Presence of RF-Shield for MR-Coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduino, Alessandro; Zilberti, Luca; Chiampi, Mario; Bottauscio, Oriano

    2017-07-01

    Contrast source inversion electric properties tomography (CSI-EPT) is a recently developed technique for the electric properties tomography that recovers the electric properties distribution starting from measurements performed by magnetic resonance imaging scanners. This method is an optimal control approach based on the contrast source inversion technique, which distinguishes itself from other electric properties tomography techniques for its capability to recover also the local specific absorption rate distribution, essential for online dosimetry. Up to now, CSI-EPT has only been described in terms of integral equations, limiting its applicability to homogeneous unbounded background. In order to extend the method to the presence of a shield in the domain-as in the recurring case of shielded radio frequency coils-a more general formulation of CSI-EPT, based on a functional viewpoint, is introduced here. Two different implementations of CSI-EPT are proposed for a 2-D transverse magnetic model problem, one dealing with an unbounded domain and one considering the presence of a perfectly conductive shield. The two implementations are applied on the same virtual measurements obtained by numerically simulating a shielded radio frequency coil. The results are compared in terms of both electric properties recovery and local specific absorption rate estimate, in order to investigate the requirement of an accurate modeling of the underlying physical problem.

  4. Multi-port-driven birdcage coil for multiple-mouse MR imaging at 7 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Phil; Seo, Jeung-Hoon; Han, Sang-Doc; Ryu, Yeunchul; Byun, Jong-Deok; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Lee, Jung Hee

    2016-11-01

    In ultra-high field (UHF) imaging environments, it has been demonstrated that multiple-mouse magnetic resonance imaging (MM-MRI) is dependent on key factors such as the radiofrequency (RF) coil hardware, imaging protocol, and experimental setup for obtaining high-resolution MR images. A key aspect is the RF coil, and a number of MM-MRI studies have investigated the application of single-channel RF transmit (Tx)/receive (Rx) coils or multi-channel phased array (PA) coil configurations under a single gradient coil set. However, despite applying a variety of RF coils, Tx (|B1(+) |)-field inhomogeneity still remains a major problem due to the relative shortening of the effective RF wavelength in the UHF environment. To address this issue, we propose a relatively smaller size of individual Tx-only coils in a multiple birdcage (MBC) coil for MM-MRI to image up to three mice. We use electromagnetic (EM) simulations in the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) environment to obtain the |B1 |-field distribution. Our results clearly show that the single birdcage (SBC) high-pass filter (HPF) configuration, which is referred to as the SBCHPF , under the absence of an RF shield exhibits a high |B1 |-field intensity in comparison with other coil configurations such as the low-pass filter (LPF) and band-pass filter (BPF) configurations. In a 7-T MRI experiment, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) map of the SBCHPF configuration shows the highest coil performance compared to other coil configurations. The MBCHPF coil, which is comprised of a triple-SBCHPF configuration combined with additional decoupling techniques, is developed for simultaneous image acquisition of three mice. SCANNING 38:747-756, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. High-resolution MRI using orbit surface coils for the evaluation of metastatic risk factors in 143 children with retinoblastoma. Part 1: MRI vs. histopathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirin, Selma; Schlamann, Marc; Schweiger, Bernd; Goericke, Sophia L. [University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Metz, Klaus A. [University Hospital Essen, Department of Pathology and Neuropathology, Essen (Germany); Bornfeld, Norbert; Holdt, Markus [University Hospital Essen, Department of Ophthalmology, Essen (Germany); Temming, Petra; Schuendeln, Michael M. [University Hospital Essen, Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Essen (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    A reliable detection of metastatic risk factors is important for children with retinoblastoma to choose the right therapeutic regimen. First studies using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with orbit surface coils were promising. The aim of this study was therefore to evaluate the ability of high-resolution MRI to detect metastatic and especially advanced metastatic risk factors in a large group of children with retinoblastoma. One hundred forty-three consecutive children with retinoblastoma (148 enucleated eyes, 64 girls, 79 boys, mean age 19.7 ± 15.3) who received pretherapeutical high-resolution MRI with orbit surface coils on 1.5 T MR scanner systems between 2007 and 2012 and subsequent primary enucleation within 14 days were included in this retrospective study. Image analysis was performed by two neuroradiologists experienced in ocular imaging in consensus. Histopathology served as gold standard. Sensitivity/specificity for the detection of metastatic risk factors using high-resolution MRI with orbit surface coils were 60 %/88.7 % for postlaminar optic nerve infiltration, 65.5 %/95.6 % for choroidal invasion, 100 %/99.3 % for scleral invasion, and 100 %/100 % for peribulbar fat invasion, respectively. The results increased for the detection of advanced metastatic risk factors, 81.8 %/89.1 % for deep postlaminar optic nerve infiltration, 70.6 %/97.6 % for massive choroidal invasion. High-resolution MRI is clinically valuable for the detection of metastatic, especially of advanced metastatic risk factors in children with retinoblastoma. (orig.)

  6. Optimization of magnetic flux density measurement using multiple RF receiver coils and multi-echo in MREIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Woo Chul; Chauhan, Munish; Sajib, Saurav Z K; Kim, Hyung Joong; Serša, Igor; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic Resonance Electrical Impedance Tomography (MREIT) is an MRI method that enables mapping of internal conductivity and/or current density via measurements of magnetic flux density signals. The MREIT measures only the z-component of the induced magnetic flux density B = (Bx, By, Bz) by external current injection. The measured noise of Bz complicates recovery of magnetic flux density maps, resulting in lower quality conductivity and current-density maps. We present a new method for more accurate measurement of the spatial gradient of the magnetic flux density gradient (∇ Bz). The method relies on the use of multiple radio-frequency receiver coils and an interleaved multi-echo pulse sequence that acquires multiple sampling points within each repetition time. The noise level of the measured magnetic flux density Bz depends on the decay rate of the signal magnitude, the injection current duration, and the coil sensitivity map. The proposed method uses three key steps. The first step is to determine a representative magnetic flux density gradient from multiple receiver coils by using a weighted combination and by denoising the measured noisy data. The second step is to optimize the magnetic flux density gradient by using multi-echo magnetic flux densities at each pixel in order to reduce the noise level of ∇ Bz and the third step is to remove a random noise component from the recovered ∇ Bz by solving an elliptic partial differential equation in a region of interest. Numerical simulation experiments using a cylindrical phantom model with included regions of low MRI signal to noise ('defects') verified the proposed method. Experimental results using a real phantom experiment, that included three different kinds of anomalies, demonstrated that the proposed method reduced the noise level of the measured magnetic flux density. The quality of the recovered conductivity maps using denoised ∇ Bz data showed that the proposed method reduced the conductivity

  7. Analysis of an integrated 8-channel Tx/Rx body array for use as a body coil in 7-Tesla MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzada, Stephan; Bitz, Andreas K.; Johst, Sören; Gratz, Marcel; Völker, Maximilian N.; Kraff, Oliver; Abuelhaija, Ashraf; Fiedler, Thomas M.; Solbach, Klaus; Quick, Harald H.; Ladd, Mark E.

    2017-06-01

    Object In this work an 8-channel array integrated into the gap between the gradient coil and bore liner of a 7-Tesla whole-body magnet is presented that would allow a workflow closer to that of systems at lower magnetic fields that have a built-in body coil; this integrated coil is compared to a local 8-channel array built from identical elements placed directly on the patient. Materials and Methods SAR efficiency and the homogeneity of the right-rotating B1 field component (B_1^+) are investigated numerically and compared to the local array. Power efficiency measurements are performed in the MRI System. First in vivo gradient echo images are acquired with the integrated array. Results While the remote array shows a slightly better performance in terms of B_1^+ homogeneity, the power efficiency and the SAR efficiency are inferior to those of the local array: the transmit voltage has to be increased by a factor of 3.15 to achieve equal flip angles in a central axial slice. The g-factor calculations show a better parallel imaging g-factor for the local array. The field of view of the integrated array is larger than that of the local array. First in vivo images with the integrated array look subjectively promising. Conclusion Although some RF performance parameters of the integrated array are inferior to a tight-fitting local array, these disadvantages might be compensated by the use of amplifiers with higher power and the use of local receive arrays. In addition, the distant placement provides the potential to include more elements in the array design.

  8. Analysis of an Integrated 8-Channel Tx/Rx Body Array for Use as a Body Coil in 7-Tesla MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Orzada

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Object: In this work an 8-channel array integrated into the gap between the gradient coil and bore liner of a 7-Tesla whole-body magnet is presented that would allow a workflow closer to that of systems at lower magnetic fields that have a built-in body coil; this integrated coil is compared to a local 8-channel array built from identical elements placed directly on the patient.Materials and Methods: SAR efficiency and the homogeneity of the right-rotating B1 field component (B1+ are investigated numerically and compared to the local array. Power efficiency measurements are performed in the MRI System. First in vivo gradient echo images are acquired with the integrated array.Results: While the remote array shows a slightly better performance in terms of (B1+ homogeneity, the power efficiency and the SAR efficiency are inferior to those of the local array: the transmit voltage has to be increased by a factor of 3.15 to achieve equal flip angles in a central axial slice. The g-factor calculations show a better parallel imaging g-factor for the local array. The field of view of the integrated array is larger than that of the local array. First in vivo images with the integrated array look subjectively promising.Conclusion: Although some RF performance parameters of the integrated array are inferior to a tight-fitting local array, these disadvantages might be compensated by the use of amplifiers with higher power and the use of local receive arrays. In addition, the distant placement provides the potential to include more elements in the array design.

  9. Surface Coil for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Taimy Ricardo Ferro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, has become a vital tool for the clinical diagnosis of various diseases, especially in the Nervisos Central System and the Musculos keletal System. Coils(RF are an essential component in the generation of these images, are responsible for exciting thespins of nuclei in a sample and/or detect the resultant signal coming from them. The use of surface RF coils has increased considerably, because they have a high signal to noise ratio, a parameter that defines the quality of the image. In the present work, there was realized the theoretical design and practical implementation of a circular surface RF coil. The experimental prototype was optimized to be used in the tomograph Giroimag03  built in Medical Biophysics Center

  10. Design of an interventional magnetic resonance imaging coil for cerebral surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Yue; Wang Wen-Tao; Wang Wei-Min

    2012-01-01

    In clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI),the design of the radiofrequency (RF) coil is very important.For certain applications,the appropriate coil can produce an improved image quality.However,it is difficult to achieve a uniform B1 field and a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) simultaneously.In this article,we design an interventional transmitter-and-receiver RF coil for cerebral surgery.This coil adopts a disassembly structure that can be assembled and disassembled repeatedly on the cerebral surgery gantry to reduce the amount of interference from the MRI during surgery.The simulation results and the imaging experiments demonstrate that this coil can produce a uniform RF field,a high SNR,and a large imaging range to meet the requirements of the cerebral surgery.

  11. Comparing Saddle, Slotted-tube and Parallel-plate Coils for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nespor D.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper is concerned with a comparison of the properties of RF coils of three configurations for MRI measurements on small animals. In comparison with the classical saddle coil the proposed modification of slotted-tube coil exhibits identical homogeneity of B1 field in a larger space. The parallel-plate coil has a satisfactory homogeneity of B1 field over the whole internal space. The signal-to-noise ratio measured for all three coils is roughly the same and is given by the magnitude of RF pre-amplifier noise. As the slotted-tube and parallel-plate coils have a lower inductance compared with the saddle coil, they can be tuned to resonance on the 200 MHz frequency even at larger dimensions. The results show that the parallel-plate coil has very good properties for the measurement of small animals.

  12. Evaluation of a 32-channel versus a 12-channel head coil for high-resolution post-contrast MRI in giant cell arteritis (GCA) at 3T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Philipp; Markl, Michael; Heinzelmann, Sonja; Vaith, Peter; Bürk, Jonas; Langer, Mathias; Geiger, J

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of a 32-channel head coil for the characterization of mural inflammation patterns in the superficial cranial arteries in patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA) compared to a standard 12-channel coil at 3T MRI. 55 patients with suspected GCA underwent high resolution T1-weighted post-contrast MRI at 3T to detect inflammation related vessel wall enhancement using both coils. To account for different time delays between contrast agent injection and sequence acquisition, the patients were divided into two cohorts: 27 patients were examined with the 32-channel coil first and 28 patients with the 12-channel coil first. Images were evaluated by two blinded readers with regard to image quality, artifact level and arteries' inflammation according to a standardized ranking scale; furthermore signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measurements were performed at three locations. Identification of arteries' inflammation was achieved with both coils with excellent inter-observer agreement (κ=0.89 for 12-channel and κ=0.96 for 32-channel coil). Regarding image grading, the inter-observer variability was moderate for the 12-channel (κ=0.5) and substantial for the 32-channel coil (κ=0.63). Significantly higher SNR and improved image quality (pcoil in either coil order. Image quality for depiction of the superficial cranial arteries was superior for the 32-channel coil. For standardized GCA diagnosis, the 12-channel coil was sufficient.

  13. Endorectal coil MRI and MR-spectroscopic imaging in patients with elevated serum prostate specific antigen with negative trus transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farooq Ahmad Ganie

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Prostatic biopsy directed with endorectal coil MRI and MR-spectroscopic imaging findings in patients with elevated serum PSA and prior negative biopsy, improves the early diagnosis of prostatic carcinoma and accurate localization of prostate cancer within the gland.

  14. An improved asymmetric gradient coil design for high-resolution MRI head imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fangfang; Liu, Feng; Freschi, Fabio; Li, Yu; Repetto, Maurizio; Giaccone, Luca; Wang, Yaohui; Crozier, Stuart

    2016-12-01

    For head magnetic resonance imaging, local gradient coils are often used to achieve high solution images. To accommodate the human head and shoulder, the head gradient coils are usually designed in an asymmetric configuration, allowing the region-of-uniformity (ROU) close to the coil’s patient end. However, the asymmetric configuration leads to technical difficulties in maintaining a high gradient performance for the insertable head coil with very limited space. In this work, we present a practical design configuration of an asymmetric insertable gradient head coil offering an improved performance. In the proposed design, at the patient end, the primary and secondary coils are connected using an additional radial surface, thus allowing the coil conductors distributed on the flange to ensure an improvement in the coil performance. At the service end, the primary and shielding coils are not connected, to permit access to shim trays, cooling system piping, cabling, and so on. The new designs are compared with conventional coil configurations and the simulation results show that, with a similar field quality in the ROU, the proposed coil pattern has improved construction characteristics (open service end, well-distributed wire pattern) and offers a better coil performance (lower inductance, higher efficiency, etc) than conventional head coil configurations.

  15. A heterogeneous human tissue mimicking phantom for RF heating and MRI thermal monitoring verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yu; Wyatt, Cory; Maccarini, Paolo; Stauffer, Paul; Craciunescu, Oana; MacFall, James; Dewhirst, Mark; Das, Shiva K.

    2012-04-01

    This paper describes a heterogeneous phantom that mimics a human thigh with a deep-seated tumor, for the purpose of studying the performance of radiofrequency (RF) heating equipment and non-invasive temperature monitoring with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The heterogeneous cylindrical phantom was constructed with an outer fat layer surrounding an inner core of phantom material mimicking muscle, tumor and marrow-filled bone. The component materials were formulated to have dielectric and thermal properties similar to human tissues. The dielectric properties of the tissue mimicking phantom materials were measured with a microwave vector network analyzer and impedance probe over the frequency range of 80-500 MHz and at temperatures of 24, 37 and 45 °C. The specific heat values of the component materials were measured using a differential scanning calorimeter over the temperature range of 15-55 °C. The thermal conductivity value was obtained from fitting the curves obtained from one-dimensional heat transfer measurement. The phantom was used to verify the operation of a cylindrical four-antenna annular phased array extremity applicator (140 MHz) by examining the proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS) thermal imaging patterns for various magnitude/phase settings (including settings to focus heating in tumors). For muscle and tumor materials, MRI was also used to measure T1/T2* values (1.5 T) and to obtain the slope of the PRFS phase change versus temperature change curve. The dielectric and thermal properties of the phantom materials were in close agreement to well-accepted published results for human tissues. The phantom was able to successfully demonstrate satisfactory operation of the tested heating equipment. The MRI-measured thermal distributions matched the expected patterns for various magnitude/phase settings of the applicator, allowing the phantom to be used as a quality assurance tool. Importantly, the material formulations for the various tissue types

  16. Effect of insulating layer material on RF-induced heating for external fixation system in 1.5 T MRI system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Kainz, Wolfgang; Qian, Songsong; Wu, Wen; Chen, Ji

    2014-09-01

    The radio frequency (RF)-induced heating is a major concern when patients with medical devices are placed inside a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. In this article, numerical studies are applied to investigate the potentials of using insulated materials to reduce the RF heating for external fixation devices. It is found that by changing the dielectric constant of the insulation material, the RF-induced heating at the tips of devices can be altered. This study indicates a potential technique of developing external fixation device with low MRI RF heating.

  17. RF transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James L.; Helenberg, Harold W.; Kilsdonk, Dennis J.

    1979-01-01

    There is provided an improved RF transformer having a single-turn secondary of cylindrical shape and a coiled encapsulated primary contained within the secondary. The coil is tapered so that the narrowest separation between the primary and the secondary is at one end of the coil. The encapsulated primary is removable from the secondary so that a variety of different capacity primaries can be utilized with one secondary.

  18. Evaluation of a 32-channel versus a 12-channel head coil for high-resolution post-contrast MRI in giant cell arteritis (GCA) at 3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, Philipp, E-mail: philipp.franke@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Institut für Diagnostische Radiologie, Gartenstr. 28, 79098 Freiburg (Germany); Markl, Michael, E-mail: mmarkl@northwestern.edu [Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University Chicago, 737 North Michigan Avenue, Suite 1600, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Heinzelmann, Sonja, E-mail: sonja.heinzelmann@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Freiburg, Killianstr. 5, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Vaith, Peter, E-mail: peter.vaith@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, University Hospital Freiburg, Hugstetter Str. 55, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Bürk, Jonas, E-mail: jonas.buerk@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Freiburg, Hugstetter Str. 55, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Langer, Mathias, E-mail: mathias.langer@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Freiburg, Hugstetter Str. 55, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Geiger, J., E-mail: julia.geiger@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Freiburg, Hugstetter Str. 55, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Department of Radiology, University Children‘s Hospital Zurich, Steinwiesstr. 75, 8032 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-10-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of a 32-channel head coil for the characterization of mural inflammation patterns in the superficial cranial arteries in patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA) compared to a standard 12-channel coil at 3 T MRI. 55 patients with suspected GCA underwent high resolution T1-weighted post-contrast MRI at 3 T to detect inflammation related vessel wall enhancement using both coils. To account for different time delays between contrast agent injection and sequence acquisition, the patients were divided into two cohorts: 27 patients were examined with the 32-channel coil first and 28 patients with the 12-channel coil first. Images were evaluated by two blinded readers with regard to image quality, artifact level and arteries’ inflammation according to a standardized ranking scale; furthermore signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measurements were performed at three locations. Identification of arteries’ inflammation was achieved with both coils with excellent inter-observer agreement (κ = 0.89 for 12-channel and κ = 0.96 for 32-channel coil). Regarding image grading, the inter-observer variability was moderate for the 12-channel (κ = 0.5) and substantial for the 32-channel coil (κ = 0.63). Significantly higher SNR and improved image quality (p < 0.01) were obtained with the 32-channel coil in either coil order. Image quality for depiction of the superficial cranial arteries was superior for the 32-channel coil. For standardized GCA diagnosis, the 12-channel coil was sufficient.

  19. A general method of design of axial and radial shim coils for NMR and MRI magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobrov, E.S.; Punchard, W.F.B.

    1988-01-01

    The paper describes a general and efficient method of design of axial and radial shim coils to correct field impurities of various harmonic orders in regions of homogeneity of high resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Resonance Imaging magnets.

  20. Full automatic fiducial marker detection on coil arrays for accurate instrumentation placement during MRI guided breast interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippatos, Konstantinos; Boehler, Tobias; Geisler, Benjamin; Zachmann, Harald; Twellmann, Thorsten

    2010-02-01

    With its high sensitivity, dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) of the breast is today one of the first-line tools for early detection and diagnosis of breast cancer, particularly in the dense breast of young women. However, many relevant findings are very small or occult on targeted ultrasound images or mammography, so that MRI guided biopsy is the only option for a precise histological work-up [1]. State-of-the-art software tools for computer-aided diagnosis of breast cancer in DCE-MRI data offer also means for image-based planning of biopsy interventions. One step in the MRI guided biopsy workflow is the alignment of the patient position with the preoperative MR images. In these images, the location and orientation of the coil localization unit can be inferred from a number of fiducial markers, which for this purpose have to be manually or semi-automatically detected by the user. In this study, we propose a method for precise, full-automatic localization of fiducial markers, on which basis a virtual localization unit can be subsequently placed in the image volume for the purpose of determining the parameters for needle navigation. The method is based on adaptive thresholding for separating breast tissue from background followed by rigid registration of marker templates. In an evaluation of 25 clinical cases comprising 4 different commercial coil array models and 3 different MR imaging protocols, the method yielded a sensitivity of 0.96 at a false positive rate of 0.44 markers per case. The mean distance deviation between detected fiducial centers and ground truth information that was appointed from a radiologist was 0.94mm.

  1. Extended RF shimming: Sequence-level parallel transmission optimization applied to steady-state free precession MRI of the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beqiri, Arian; Price, Anthony N; Padormo, Francesco; Hajnal, Joseph V; Malik, Shaihan J

    2017-06-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at high field presents challenges because of the high specific absorption rate and significant transmit field (B1(+) ) inhomogeneities. Parallel transmission MRI offers the ability to correct for both issues at the level of individual radiofrequency (RF) pulses, but must operate within strict hardware and safety constraints. The constraints are themselves affected by sequence parameters, such as the RF pulse duration and TR, meaning that an overall optimal operating point exists for a given sequence. This work seeks to obtain optimal performance by performing a 'sequence-level' optimization in which pulse sequence parameters are included as part of an RF shimming calculation. The method is applied to balanced steady-state free precession cardiac MRI with the objective of minimizing TR, hence reducing the imaging duration. Results are demonstrated using an eight-channel parallel transmit system operating at 3 T, with an in vivo study carried out on seven male subjects of varying body mass index (BMI). Compared with single-channel operation, a mean-squared-error shimming approach leads to reduced imaging durations of 32 ± 3% with simultaneous improvement in flip angle homogeneity of 32 ± 8% within the myocardium. © 2017 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Low-Noise Active Decoupling Circuit and its Application to 13C Cryogenic RF Coils at 3T

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez, Juan Diego; Søvsø Szocska Hansen, Esben; Laustsen, Christoffer

    2017-01-01

    that a circuit using unsegmented tuning and split matching capacitors can provide 20% SNR enhancement at room temperature compared with that using more traditional designs. The performance of the proposed circuit was also measured when cryogenically cooled to 105 K, and an additional 1.6-fold SNR enhancement...... this circuit particularly suitable for receive-only cryogenic coils and/or small coils for low-gamma nuclei....

  3. Removing Signal Intensity Inhomogeneity From Surface Coil MRI Using Discrete Wavelet Transform and Wavelet Packet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-25

    We evaluate a combined discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and wavelet packet algorithm to improve the homogeneity of magnetic resonance imaging when a...image and uses this information to normalize the image intensity variations. Estimation of the coil sensitivity profile based on the wavelet transform of

  4. T1 weighted Brain Images at 7 Tesla Unbiased for Proton Density, T2* contrast and RF Coil Receive B1 Sensitivity with Simultaneous Vessel Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Moortele, Pierre-François; Auerbach, Edwards J.; Olman, Cheryl; Yacoub, Essa; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Moeller, Steen

    2009-01-01

    At high magnetic field, MR images exhibit large, undesirable signal intensity variations commonly referred to as “intensity field bias”. Such inhomogeneities mostly originate from heterogeneous RF coil B1 profiles and, with no appropriate correction, are further pronounced when utilizing rooted sum of square reconstruction with receive coil arrays. These artifacts can significantly alter whole brain high resolution T1-weighted (T1w) images that are extensively utilized for clinical diagnosis, for gray/white matter segmentation as well as for coregistration with functional time series. In T1 weighted 3D-MPRAGE sequences, it is possible to preserve a bulk amount of T1 contrast through space by using adiabatic inversion RF pulses that are insensitive to transmit B1 variations above a minimum threshold. However, large intensity variations persist in the images, which are significantly more difficult to address at very high field where RF coil B1 profiles become more heterogeneous. Another characteristic of T1w MPRAGE sequences is their intrinsic sensitivity to Proton Density and T2* contrast, which cannot be removed with post-processing algorithms utilized to correct for receive coil sensitivity. In this paper, we demonstrate a simple technique capable of producing normalized, high resolution T1w 3D-MPRAGE images that are devoid of receive coil sensitivity, Proton Density and T2* contrast. These images, which are suitable for routinely obtaining whole brain tissue segmentation at 7 Tesla, provide higher T1 contrast specificity than standard MPRAGE acquisitions. Our results show that removing the Proton Density component can help identifying small brain structures and that T2* induced artifacts can be removed from the images. The resulting unbiased T1w images can also be used to generate Maximum Intensity Projection angiograms, without additional data acquisition, that are inherently registered with T1w structural images. In addition, we introduce a simple technique

  5. Starfire poloidal coil systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, K. Jr.; Kim, S.H.; Turner, L.R.; Wang, S.T.

    1980-01-01

    The poloidal coils for STARFIRE consists of three systems: (1) equilibrium field (EF) coils; (2) ohmic heating (OH) coils; and (3) correction field (CF) coils. The EF coils are superconducting and lie outside the toroidal field (TF) coils. These coils provide the bulk of the equilibrium field necessary to keep the plasma positioned in the vacuum chamber with the desired cross sectional shape and pressure and current distributions. Having these coils outside of the TF coils requires that they have a larger stored energy and larger currents but eases the assembly, maintenance, and reliability of the coils. The STARFIRE OH system is relatively small compared to tokamaks in which the current is entirely ohmically driven. It is designed to provide sufficient flux in the early startup to raise the plasma current to the point (1 to 2 MA) where the rf current drive can take over.

  6. Improving the quality factor of an RF spiral inductor with non-uniform metal width and non-uniform coil spacing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Pei; Zhang Wanrong; Huang Lu; Jin Dongyue; Xie Hongyun, E-mail: shenpei1@126.com [School of Electronic Information and Control Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100024 (China)

    2011-06-15

    An improved inductor layout with non-uniform metal width and non-uniform spacing is proposed to increase the quality factor (Q factor). For this inductor layout, from outer coil to inner coil, the metal width is reduced by an arithmetic-progression step, while the metal spacing is increased by a geometric-progression step. An improved layout with variable width and changed spacing is of benefit to the Q factor of RF spiral inductor improvement (approximately 42.86%), mainly due to the suppression of eddy-current loss by weakening the current crowding effect in the center of the spiral inductor. In order to increase the Q factor further, for the novel inductor, a patterned ground shield is used with optimized layout together. The results indicate that, in the range of 0.5 to 16 GHz, the Q factor of the novel inductor is at an optimum, which improves by 67% more than conventional inductors with uniform geometry dimensions (equal width and equal spacing), is enhanced by nearly 23% more than a PGS inductor with uniform geometry dimensions, and improves by almost 20% more than an inductor with an improved layout. (semiconductor devices)

  7. Improving the quality factor of an RF spiral inductor with non-uniform metal width and non-uniform coil spacing*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Pe; Zhang Wanrong; Huang Lu; Jin Dongyue; Xie Hongyun

    2011-01-01

    An improved inductor layout with non-uniform metal width and non-uniform spacing is proposed to increase the quality factor (Q factor). For this inductor layout, from outer coil to inner coil, the metal width is reduced by an arithmetic-progression step, while the metal spacing is increased by a geometric-progression step.An improved layout with variable width and changed spacing is of benefit to the Q factor of RF spiral inductor improvement (approximately 42.86%), mainly due to the suppression of eddy-current loss by weakening the current crowding effect in the center of the spiral inductor. In order to increase the Q factor further, for the novel inductor,a patterned ground shield is used with optimized layout together. The results indicate that, in the range of 0.5 to 16 GHz, the Q factor of the novel inductor is at an optimum, which improves by 67% more than conventional inductors with uniform geometry dimensions (equal width and equal spacing), is enhanced by nearly 23% more than a PGS inductor with uniform geometry dimensions, and improves by almost 20% more than an inductor with an improved layout.

  8. CLINICALLY LOCALIZED PROSTATE CANCER: CAPACITIES OF MATRIX COIL MRI TO DETECT MINIMAL EXTRACAPSULAR TUMOR SPREAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Petrova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Retrospective assessment of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI data in 37 patients with prostate cancer, who had undergone radical prostatectomy, established the most diagnostically valuable MRI signs of minimal extracapsular spread (ECS: asymmetry of neurovascular fascicles (72 % accuracy, 93 % sensitivity, 77 % specificity, 73 % positive and 94% negative predictive values and iron outline deformity/irregularity (66/80/64/60/82 %, respectively; as well as their higher diagnostic efficiency versus the clinical and laboratory predictors of ECS: total Gleason scores (58/87/55/57/86 %, respectively and serum PSA levels (uninformative, which permits their consideration while choosing a more or less radical prostatectomy modality.

  9. CLINICALLY LOCALIZED PROSTATE CANCER: CAPACITIES OF MATRIX COIL MRI TO DETECT MINIMAL EXTRACAPSULAR TUMOR SPREAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Petrova

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Retrospective assessment of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI data in 37 patients with prostate cancer, who had undergone radical prostatectomy, established the most diagnostically valuable MRI signs of minimal extracapsular spread (ECS: asymmetry of neurovascular fascicles (72 % accuracy, 93 % sensitivity, 77 % specificity, 73 % positive and 94% negative predictive values and iron outline deformity/irregularity (66/80/64/60/82 %, respectively; as well as their higher diagnostic efficiency versus the clinical and laboratory predictors of ECS: total Gleason scores (58/87/55/57/86 %, respectively and serum PSA levels (uninformative, which permits their consideration while choosing a more or less radical prostatectomy modality.

  10. Functional Laterality of Task-Evoked Activation in Sensorimotor Cortex of Preterm Infants: An Optimized 3 T fMRI Study Employing a Customized Neonatal Head Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Collins, Adam PR; Müller, Nicole; Stegmann-Woessner, Gaby; Jankowski, Jacob; Gieseke, Jürgen; Born, Mark; Seitz, Hermann; Bartmann, Peter; Schild, Hans H.; Pruessmann, Klaas P.; Boecker, Henning

    2017-01-01

    Background Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in neonates has been introduced as a non-invasive method for studying sensorimotor processing in the developing brain. However, previous neonatal studies have delivered conflicting results regarding localization, lateralization, and directionality of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) responses in sensorimotor cortex (SMC). Amongst the confounding factors in interpreting neonatal fMRI studies include the use of standard adult MR-coils providing insufficient signal to noise, and liberal statistical thresholds, compromising clinical interpretation at the single subject level. Patients / methods Here, we employed a custom-designed neonatal MR-coil adapted and optimized to the head size of a newborn in order to improve robustness, reliability and validity of neonatal sensorimotor fMRI. Thirteen preterm infants with a median gestational age of 26 weeks were scanned at term-corrected age using a prototype 8-channel neonatal head coil at 3T (Achieva, Philips, Best, NL). Sensorimotor stimulation was elicited by passive extension/flexion of the elbow at 1 Hz in a block design. Analysis of temporal signal to noise ratio (tSNR) was performed on the whole brain and the SMC, and was compared to data acquired with an ‘adult’ 8 channel head coil published previously. Task-evoked activation was determined by single-subject SPM8 analyses, thresholded at p lateralization of SMC activation, as found in children and adults, is already present in the newborn period. PMID:28076368

  11. Complex-Difference Constrained Compressed Sensing Reconstruction for Accelerated PRF Thermometry with Application to MRI Induced RF Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhipeng; Oh, Sukhoon; Otazo, Ricardo; Sica, Christopher T.; Griswold, Mark A.; Collins, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Introduce a novel compressed sensing reconstruction method to accelerate proton resonance frequency (PRF) shift temperature imaging for MRI induced radiofrequency (RF) heating evaluation. Methods A compressed sensing approach that exploits sparsity of the complex difference between post-heating and baseline images is proposed to accelerate PRF temperature mapping. The method exploits the intra- and inter-image correlations to promote sparsity and remove shared aliasing artifacts. Validations were performed on simulations and retrospectively undersampled data acquired in ex-vivo and in-vivo studies by comparing performance with previously proposed techniques. Results The proposed complex difference constrained compressed sensing reconstruction method improved the reconstruction of smooth and local PRF temperature change images compared to various available reconstruction methods in a simulation study, a retrospective study with heating of a human forearm in vivo, and a retrospective study with heating of a sample of beef ex vivo . Conclusion Complex difference based compressed sensing with utilization of a fully-sampled baseline image improves the reconstruction accuracy for accelerated PRF thermometry. It can be used to improve the volumetric coverage and temporal resolution in evaluation of RF heating due to MRI, and may help facilitate and validate temperature-based methods for safety assurance. PMID:24753099

  12. MRI Slice Segmentation and 3D Modelling of Temporomandibular Joint Measured by Microscopic Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirg, O.; Liberda, O.; Smekal, Z.; Sprlakova-Pukova, A.

    2012-01-01

    The paper focuses on the segmentation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) slices and 3D modelling of the temporomandibular joint disc in order to help physicians diagnose patients with dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The TMJ is one of the most complex joints in the human body. The most common joint dysfunction is due to the disc. The disc is a soft tissue, which in principle cannot be diagnosed by the CT method. Therefore, a 3D model is made from the MRI slices, which can image soft tissues. For the segmentation of the disc in individual slices a new method is developed based on spatial distribution and anatomical TMJ structure with automatic thresholding. The thresholding is controlled by a genetic algorithm. The 3D model is realized using the marching cube method.

  13. Simplified quantification of labile proton concentration-weighted chemical exchange rate (kws) with RF saturation time dependent ratiometric analysis (QUESTRA) - Normalization of relaxation and RF irradiation spillover effects for improved quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2012-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI is an emerging imaging technique capable of detecting dilute proteins/peptides and microenvironmental properties, with promising in vivo applications. However, CEST MRI contrast is complex, varying not only with the labile proton concentration and exchange rate, but also with experimental conditions such as field strength and RF irradiation scheme. Furthermore, the optimal RF irradiation power depends on the exchange rate, which must be estimated in order to optimize the CEST MRI experiments. Although methods including numerical fitting with modified Bloch-McConnell equations, quantification of exchange rate with RF saturation time and power (QUEST and QUESP), have been proposed to address this relationship, they require multiple-parameter non-linear fitting and accurate relaxation measurement. Our work here extended the QUEST algorithm with ratiometric analysis (QUESTRA) that normalizes the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) at labile and reference frequencies, which effectively eliminates the confounding relaxation and RF spillover effects. Specifically, the QUESTRA contrast approaches its steady state mono-exponentially at a rate determined by the reverse exchange rate (kws), with little dependence on bulk water T1, T2, RF power and chemical shift. The proposed algorithm was confirmed numerically, and validated experimentally using a tissue-like phantom of serially titrated pH compartments. PMID:21842497

  14. Simplified quantification of labile proton concentration-weighted chemical exchange rate (k(ws) ) with RF saturation time dependent ratiometric analysis (QUESTRA): normalization of relaxation and RF irradiation spillover effects for improved quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2012-04-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI is an emerging imaging technique capable of detecting dilute proteins/peptides and microenvironmental properties, with promising in vivo applications. However, chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI contrast is complex, varying not only with the labile proton concentration and exchange rate, but also with experimental conditions such as field strength and radiofrequency (RF) irradiation scheme. Furthermore, the optimal RF irradiation power depends on the exchange rate, which must be estimated in order to optimize the chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI experiments. Although methods including numerical fitting with modified Bloch-McConnell equations, quantification of exchange rate with RF saturation time and power (QUEST and QUESP), have been proposed to address this relationship, they require multiple-parameter non-linear fitting and accurate relaxation measurement. Our work extended the QUEST algorithm with ratiometric analysis (QUESTRA) that normalizes the magnetization transfer ratio at labile and reference frequencies, which effectively eliminates the confounding relaxation and RF spillover effects. Specifically, the QUESTRA contrast approaches its steady state mono-exponentially at a rate determined by the reverse exchange rate (k(ws) ), with little dependence on bulk water T(1) , T(2) , RF power and chemical shift. The proposed algorithm was confirmed numerically, and validated experimentally using a tissue-like phantom of serially titrated pH compartments.

  15. High-resolution MRI using orbit surface coils for the evaluation of metastatic risk factors in 143 children with retinoblastoma. Part 2: new vs. old imaging concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirin, Selma; Schlamann, Marc; Schweiger, Bernd; Goericke, Sophia L. [University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Metz, Klaus A. [University Hospital Essen, Department of Pathology and Neuropathology, Essen (Germany); Bornfeld, Norbert; Holdt, Markus [University Hospital Essen, Department of Ophthalmology, Essen (Germany); Temming, Petra; Schuendeln, Michael M. [University Hospital Essen, Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Essen (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is recommended for the evaluation of metastatic risk factors in children with retinoblastoma according to recent guidelines. The aim of this study was to compare diagnostic accuracy of a new imaging concept with two orbit surface coils to that of an old imaging concept with one orbit surface coil. One hundred forty-three patients (148 eyes, 64 girls, 79 boys) underwent high-resolution MRI on 1.5 T scanners using orbit surface coils. The old imaging concept (one orbit surface coil focusing on the (most) effected eye additionally to the standard head coil) was used in 100 patients/103 eye; the new imaging concept (two orbit surface coils (each focusing on one eye) additionally to the standard head coil) in 43 patients/45 eyes. Image analysis was performed by two neuroradiologists in consensus. Histopathology served as gold standard. Detection rate for choroidal invasion was higher for the new compared to that for the old imaging concept (sensitivity/specificity 87.5/94.6 % vs. 57.1/96.1 % for choroidal invasion and 100/97.5 % vs. 58.3/97.7 % for massive choroidal invasion, respectively). Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of postlaminar optic nerve infiltration, peribulbar fat, and scleral invasion were comparable in both imaging concepts; however positive predictive value was higher in the new imaging concept (new vs. old imaging concept: 60 vs. 31.6 % for postlaminar and deep postlaminar optic nerve infiltration, respectively, and 100 vs. 66.7 % for scleral invasion). The new imaging concept shows a trend towards improving the accuracy of detecting metastatic risk factors in children with retinoblastoma and is therefore recommended for pretherapeutic imaging and follow-up. (orig.)

  16. Mid-Range Coil Array for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Small Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, S. E.; Tomasi, D.; Rodríguez, A. O.

    2008-08-01

    The vast majority of articles on MRI RF coils over the past two decades have focused on large coils, where sample losses dominate, or on micro-coils, where sample and capacitor losses are negligible. Few have addressed the mid-range coils, seen in the majority of small-animal applications, where all the sources of loss are important, for example, mouse brain and body coils from 125 to 750 MHz. We developed a four-saddle coil array for magnetic resonance imaging of small animals. The saddle coil elements in the array were evenly distributed to cover the rat's head. The coil array was tuned to the resonant frequency of 170 MHz. Due to the close proximity of the coil elements, it was necessary to decouple the coil array using nonmagnetic trimmers and, it was operated in the transceiver mode and quadrature-driven. To test the coil array performance at high field, phantom images were acquired with our saddle coil array and standard pulse sequences on a research-dedicated 4 Tesla scanner. Ex vivo brain images of a rat were also acquired, and proved the feasibility of the scaled version of a saddle coil array and, its compatibility with standard pulse sequences when used in a high field magnetic resonance imager.

  17. Characterizing ProstivaTM RF Treatments of the Prostate for BPH with Gadolinium-Enhanced MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Huidobro

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Transurethral needle ablation (TUNA is an accepted and effective therapy for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH. ProstivaTM (Medtronic, Shoreview, MN is the newest-generation device, which includes a new needle design and radio frequency (RF generator. This device creates temperatures of 120°C and necrotic lesions in less than 2.5 min. Using previously described techniques, we analyzed dynamic, gadolinium-enhanced MRIs to characterize the ablative properties of the new ProstivaTM RF device.

  18. Design, evaluation and application of an eight channel transmit/receive coil array for cardiac MRI at 7.0 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gräßl, Andreas, E-mail: Andreas.Graessl@mdc-berlin.de [Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility (B.U.F.F.), Max-Delbrueck-Center for Molecular Medicine, Robert-Roessle-Strasse 10, 13125 Berlin (Germany); Winter, Lukas, E-mail: Lukas.Winter@mdc-berlin.de [Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility (B.U.F.F.), Max-Delbrueck-Center for Molecular Medicine, Robert-Roessle-Strasse 10, 13125 Berlin (Germany); Thalhammer, Christof, E-mail: Christof.Thalhammer@mdc-berlin.de [Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility (B.U.F.F.), Max-Delbrueck-Center for Molecular Medicine, Robert-Roessle-Strasse 10, 13125 Berlin (Germany); Renz, Wolfgang, E-mail: Wolfgang.Renz@mdc-berlin.de [Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility (B.U.F.F.), Max-Delbrueck-Center for Molecular Medicine, Robert-Roessle-Strasse 10, 13125 Berlin (Germany); Siemens Healthcare, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Kellman, Peter, E-mail: kellmanp@mail.nih.gov [Laboratory of Cardiac Energetics, National Institutes of Health/NHLBI, Bethesda, MD (United States); Martin, Conrad, E-mail: Conrad.Martin@mdc-berlin.de [Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility (B.U.F.F.), Max-Delbrueck-Center for Molecular Medicine, Robert-Roessle-Strasse 10, 13125 Berlin (Germany); Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian von, E-mail: florian.von-knobelsdorff@charite.de [Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility (B.U.F.F.), Max-Delbrueck-Center for Molecular Medicine, Robert-Roessle-Strasse 10, 13125 Berlin (Germany); HELIOS Klinikum Berlin-Buch, Department of Cardiology and Nephrology, 13125 Berlin (Germany); Experimental and Clinical Research Center (ECRC), Charité – University Medicine Campus Berlin Buch, 13125 Berlin (Germany); Tkachenko, Valeriy, E-mail: v.o.tkachenko@googlemail.com [Experimental and Clinical Research Center (ECRC), Charité – University Medicine Campus Berlin Buch, 13125 Berlin (Germany); and others

    2013-05-15

    The objective of this work is to design, examine and apply an eight channel transmit/receive coil array tailored for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging at 7.0 T that provides image quality suitable for clinical use, patient comfort, and ease of use. The cardiac coil array was designed to consist of a planar posterior section and a modestly curved anterior section. For radio frequency (RF) safety validation, numerical computations of the electromagnetic field (EMF) and the specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution were conducted. In vivo cardiac imaging was performed using a 2D CINE FLASH technique. For signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) assessment reconstructed images were scaled in SNR units. The parallel imaging capabilities of the coil were examined using GRAPPA and SENSE reconstruction with reduction factors of up to R = 4. The assessment of the RF characteristics yielded a maximum noise correlation of 0.33. The baseline SNR advantage at 7.0 T was put to use to acquire 2D CINE images of the heart with a spatial resolution of 1 mm × 1 mm × 4 mm. The coil array supports 1D acceleration factors of up to R = 3 without impairing image quality significantly. For un-accelerated 2D CINE FLASH acquisitions the results revealed an SNR of approximately 140 for the left ventricular blood pool. Blood/myocardium contrast was found to be approximately 90 for un-accelerated 2D CINE FLASH acquisitions. The proposed 8 channel cardiac transceiver surface coil has the capability to acquire high contrast, high spatial and temporal resolution in vivo images of the heart at 7.0 T.

  19. An equivalent distributed magnetic current based FDTD method for the calculation of E-fields induced by gradient coils in MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozier, S; Liu, F; Wei, Q

    2004-01-01

    This paper evaluates a low-frequency FDTD method applied to the problem of induced E-fields/eddy currents in the human body resulting from the pulsed magnetic field gradients in MRI. In this algorithm, a distributed equivalent magnetic current (DEMC) is proposed as the electromagnetic source and is obtained by quasistatic calculation of the empty coil's vector potential or measurements therein. This technique circumvents the discretizing of complicated gradient coil geometries into a mesh of Yee cells, and thereby enables any type of gradient coil modeling or other complex low frequency sources. The proposed method has been verified against an example with an analytical solution. Results are presented showing the spatial distribution of gradient-induced electric fields in a multilayered spherical phantom model and a complete body model.

  20. Detection of local recurrent prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy in terms of salvage radiotherapy using dynamic contrast enhanced-MRI without endorectal coil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rischke Hans Christian

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate the value of dynamic contrast enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI without endorectal coil (EC in the detection of local recurrent prostate cancer (PC after radical prostatectomy (RP. Material and methods Thirty-three patients with recurrent PC underwent DCE-MRI without EC before salvage radiotherapy (RT. At median 15 (mean 16±4.9, range 12–27 months after completion of RT all patients showed complete biochemical response. Additional follow up post RT DCE-MRI scans were available. Prostate specific antigen (PSA levels at the time of imaging were correlated to the imaging findings. Results In 22/33 patients (67% early contrast enhancing nodules were detected in the post-prostatectomy fossa on pre-RT DCE-MRI images. The average pre-RT PSA level of the 22 patients with positive pre-RT DCE-MRI findings was significantly higher (mean, 0.74±0.64 ng/mL compared to the pre-RT PSA level of the 11 patients with negative pre-RT DCE-MRI (mean, 0.24±0.13 ng/mL (p Conclusions This is the first study that shows that DCE-MRI without EC can detect local recurrent PC with an estimated accuracy of 83% at low PSA levels. All false negative DCE-MRI scans were detected using a PSA cut-off of ≥0.54 ng/mL.

  1. Decoupling capabilities of split-loop resonator structure for 7 Tesla MRI surface array coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurshkainen, A.; Kurdjumov, S.; Simovski, C.; Glybovski, S.; Melchakova, I.; van den Berg, C. A. T.; Raaijmakers, A.; Belov, P.

    2017-09-01

    In this work we studied electromagnetic properties of one-dimentional periodic structures composed of split-loop res-onators (SLRs) and investigated their capabilities in decoupling of two dipole antennas for full-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Two different finite structures comprising a single-SLR and a double-SLR constitutive elements were studied. Numerical simulations of the structures were performed to evaluate their decoupling capabilities. As it was demonstrated two dipole antennas equipped with either a single or a double-SLR structure exhibit high isolation even for an electrically short distance between the dipoles. Double-SLR structure while dramatically improving isolation of the dipoles keeps the field created by each of the decoupled dipoles comparable with one of a single dipole inside the target area.

  2. U-shaped Ladder TEM-Coil Structure with Truncated Sensitivity Profile in z-Direction for High Field MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leussler, C.; Wirtz, D.; Wuelbern, J.H.; Vernickel, P.; Forthmann, P.

    2012-01-01

    Conventional TEM-coils [1] come with a sensitivity profile and field-of view (FOV) that is largely extended in the z-direction comparedwith birdcage coils (BC) [2]. There is an analog situation when comparing TEM coil arrays [3] and degenerate birdcages (DBC) [4]. The excess z-FOV leads to safety is

  3. Consideration of the effects of intense tissue heating on the RF electromagnetic fields during MRI: simulations for MRgFUS in the hip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuegang Xin, Sherman; Gu, Shiyong; Carluccio, Giuseppe; Collins, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the strong dependence of tissue electrical properties on temperature, it is important to consider the potential effects of intense tissue heating on the RF electromagnetic fields during MRI, as can occur in MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery. In principle, changes of the RF electromagnetic fields could affect both efficacy of RF pulses, and the MRI-induced RF heating (SAR) pattern. In this study, the equilibrium temperature distribution in a whole-body model with 2 mm resolution before and during intense tissue heating up to 60 °C at the target region was calculated. Temperature-dependent electric properties of tissues were assigned to the model to establish a temperature-dependent electromagnetic whole-body model in a 3T MRI system. The results showed maximum changes in conductivity, permittivity, ≤ft|\\mathbf{B}1+\\right|, and SAR of about 25%, 6%, 2%, and 20%, respectively. Though the B1 field and SAR distributions are both temperature-dependent, the potential harm to patients due to higher SARs is expected to be minimal and the effects on the B1 field distribution should have minimal effect on images from basic MRI sequences.

  4. A combined solenoid-surface RF coil for high-resolution whole-brain rat imaging on a 3.0 Tesla clinical MR scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underhill, Hunter R; Yuan, Chun; Hayes, Cecil E

    2010-09-01

    Rat brain models effectively simulate a multitude of human neurological disorders. Improvements in coil design have facilitated the wider utilization of rat brain models by enabling the utilization of clinical MR scanners for image acquisition. In this study, a novel coil design, subsequently referred to as the rat brain coil, is described that exploits and combines the strengths of both solenoids and surface coils into a simple, multichannel, receive-only coil dedicated to whole-brain rat imaging on a 3.0 T clinical MR scanner. Compared with a multiturn solenoid mouse body coil, a 3-cm surface coil, a modified Helmholtz coil, and a phased-array surface coil, the rat brain coil improved signal-to-noise ratio by approximately 72, 61, 78, and 242%, respectively. Effects of the rat brain coil on amplitudes of static field and radiofrequency field uniformity were similar to each of the other coils. In vivo, whole-brain images of an adult male rat were acquired with a T(2)-weighted spin-echo sequence using an isotropic acquisition resolution of 0.25 x 0.25 x 0.25 mm(3) in 60.6 min. Multiplanar images of the in vivo rat brain with identification of anatomic structures are presented. Improvement in signal-to-noise ratio afforded by the rat brain coil may broaden experiments that utilize clinical MR scanners for in vivo image acquisition.

  5. The technological future of 7 T MRI hardware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, A G; Van de Moortele, P F

    2016-09-01

    In this article we present our projections of future hardware developments on 7 T human MRI systems. These include compact cryogen-light magnets, improved gradient performance, integrated RF-receive and direct current shimming coil arrays, new RF technology with adaptive impedance matching, patient-specific specific absorption rate estimation and monitoring, and increased integration of physiological monitoring systems. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Coil-to-coil physiological noise correlations and their impact on functional MRI time-series signal-to-noise ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafyllou, Christina; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Keil, Boris; Wald, Lawrence L

    2016-12-01

    Physiological nuisance fluctuations ("physiological noise") are a major contribution to the time-series signal-to-noise ratio (tSNR) of functional imaging. While thermal noise correlations between array coil elements have a well-characterized effect on the image Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR0 ), the element-to-element covariance matrix of the time-series fluctuations has not yet been analyzed. We examine this effect with a goal of ultimately improving the combination of multichannel array data. We extend the theoretical relationship between tSNR and SNR0 to include a time-series noise covariance matrix Ψt , distinct from the thermal noise covariance matrix Ψ0 , and compare its structure to Ψ0 and the signal coupling matrix SS(H) formed from the signal intensity vectors S. Inclusion of the measured time-series noise covariance matrix into the model relating tSNR and SNR0 improves the fit of experimental multichannel data and is shown to be distinct from Ψ0 or SS(H) . Time-series noise covariances in array coils are found to differ from Ψ0 and more surprisingly, from the signal coupling matrix SS(H) . Correct characterization of the time-series noise has implications for the analysis of time-series data and for improving the coil element combination process. Magn Reson Med 76:1708-1719, 2016. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  7. Pregnant women models analyzed for RF exposure and temperature increase in 3T RF shimmed birdcages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murbach, Manuel; Neufeld, Esra; Samaras, Theodoros; Córcoles, Juan; Robb, Fraser J; Kainz, Wolfgang; Kuster, Niels

    2017-05-01

    MRI is increasingly used to scan pregnant patients. We investigated the effect of 3 Tesla (T) two-port radiofrequency (RF) shimming in anatomical pregnant women models. RF shimming improves B1(+) uniformity, but may at the same time significantly alter the induced current distribution and result in large changes in both the level and location of the absorbed RF energy. In this study, we evaluated the electrothermal exposure of pregnant women in the third, seventh, and ninth month of gestation at various imaging landmarks in RF body coils, including modes with RF shimming. Although RF shimmed configurations may lower the local RF exposure for the mother, they can increase the thermal load on the fetus. In worst-case configurations, whole-body exposure and local peak temperatures-up to 40.8°C-are equal in fetus and mother. Two-port RF shimming can significantly increase the fetal exposure in pregnant women, requiring further research to derive a very robust safety management. For the time being, restriction to the CP mode, which reduces fetal SAR exposure compared with linear-horizontal polarization modes, may be advisable. Results from this study do not support scanning pregnant patients above the normal operating mode. Magn Reson Med 77:2048-2056, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  8. Offline RF thermal ablation planning using CT/MRI scan data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Faruk Ali

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, steady state temperature variations in the human brain due to different electrical and physical changes have been studied considering different thermal ablation treatment requirements using RF probe. Initially, a subject specific voxel-based electrical model has been constructed from Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM formatted Computed Tomography (CT or Magnetic Resonance (MR based image stacks with different pixel characteristics using the Hounsfield unit extraction technique. This subject specific electrical model that consists of different dielectric constant and conductivity, considering different anatomical organs and tissues is simulated using commercially available finite integral technique (FIT based EM simulation software CST Microwave Studio®. This study clearly shows the possibility of subject specific precise offline microwave thermal ablation treatment planning.

  9. A fourth gradient to overcome slice dependent phase effects of voxel-sized coils in planar arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosshard, John C; Eigenbrodt, Edwin P; McDougall, Mary P; Wright, Steven M

    2010-01-01

    The signals from an array of densely spaced long and narrow receive coils for MRI are complicated when the voxel size is of comparable dimension to the coil size. The RF coil causes a phase gradient across each voxel, which is dependent on the distance from the coil, resulting in a slice dependent shift of k-space. A fourth gradient coil has been implemented and used with the system's gradient set to create a gradient field which varies with slice. The gradients are pulsed together to impart a slice dependent phase gradient to compensate for the slice dependent phase due to the RF coils. However the non-linearity in the fourth gradient which creates the desired slice dependency also results in a through-slice phase ramp, which disturbs normal slice refocusing and leads to additional signal cancelation and reduced field of view. This paper discusses the benefits and limitations of using a fourth gradient coil to compensate for the phase due to RF coils.

  10. Quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (qCEST) MRI--RF spillover effect-corrected omega plot for simultaneous determination of labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Yu; Dai, ZhuoZhi; Xiao, Gang; Wu, Renhua

    2014-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI is sensitive to dilute proteins and peptides as well as microenvironmental properties. However, the complexity of the CEST MRI effect, which varies with the labile proton content, exchange rate and experimental conditions, underscores the need for developing quantitative CEST (qCEST) analysis. Towards this goal, it has been shown that omega plot is capable of quantifying paramagnetic CEST MRI. However, the use of the omega plot is somewhat limited for diamagnetic CEST (DIACEST) MRI because it is more susceptible to direct radio frequency (RF) saturation (spillover) owing to the relatively small chemical shift. Recently, it has been found that, for dilute DIACEST agents that undergo slow to intermediate chemical exchange, the spillover effect varies little with the labile proton ratio and exchange rate. Therefore, we postulated that the omega plot analysis can be improved if RF spillover effect could be estimated and taken into account. Specifically, simulation showed that both labile proton ratio and exchange rate derived using the spillover effect-corrected omega plot were in good agreement with simulated values. In addition, the modified omega plot was confirmed experimentally, and we showed that the derived labile proton ratio increased linearly with creatine concentration (p exchange rate (p = 0.32). In summary, our study extends the conventional omega plot for quantitative analysis of DIACEST MRI.

  11. Impact of the use of an endorectal coil for 3 T prostate MRI on image quality and cancer detection rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawlitza, Josephin; Reiss-Zimmermann, Martin; Thörmer, Gregor; Schaudinn, Alexander; Linder, Nicolas; Garnov, Nikita; Horn, Lars-Christian; Minh, Do Hoang; Ganzer, Roman; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Kahn, Thomas; Moche, Michael; Busse, Harald

    2017-02-01

    This work aims to assess the impact of an additional endorectal coil on image quality and cancer detection rate within the same patients. At a single academic medical center, this transversal study included 41 men who underwent T2- and diffusion-weighted imaging at 3 T using surface coils only or in combination with an endorectal coil in the same session. Two blinded readers (A and B) randomly evaluated all image data in separate sessions. Image quality with respect to localization and staging was rated on a five-point scale. Lesions were classified according to their prostate imaging reporting and data system (PIRADS) score version 1. Standard of reference was provided by whole-mount step-section analysis. Mean image quality scores averaged over all localization-related items were significantly higher with additional endorectal coil for both readers (p < 0.001), corresponding staging-related items were only higher for reader B (p < 0.001). With an endorectal coil, the rate of correctly detecting cancer per patient was significantly higher for reader B (p < 0.001) but not for reader A (p = 0.219). The numbers of histologically confirmed tumor lesions were rather similar for both settings. The subjectively rated 3-T image quality was improved with an endorectal coil. In terms of diagnostic performance, the use of an additional endorectal coil was not superior.

  12. Improving the spatial accuracy in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) based on the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect: benefits from parallel imaging and a 32-channel head array coil at 1.5 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellner, C; Doenitz, C; Finkenzeller, T; Jung, E M; Rennert, J; Schlaier, J

    2009-01-01

    Geometric distortions and low spatial resolution are current limitations in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The aim of this study was to evaluate if application of parallel imaging or significant reduction of voxel size in combination with a new 32-channel head array coil can reduce those drawbacks at 1.5 T for a simple hand motor task. Therefore, maximum t-values (tmax) in different regions of activation, time-dependent signal-to-noise ratios (SNR(t)) as well as distortions within the precentral gyrus were evaluated. Comparing fMRI with and without parallel imaging in 17 healthy subjects revealed significantly reduced geometric distortions in anterior-posterior direction. Using parallel imaging, tmax only showed a mild reduction (7-11%) although SNR(t) was significantly diminished (25%). In 7 healthy subjects high-resolution (2 x 2 x 2 mm3) fMRI was compared with standard fMRI (3 x 3 x 3 mm3) in a 32-channel coil and with high-resolution fMRI in a 12-channel coil. The new coil yielded a clear improvement for tmax (21-32%) and SNR(t) (51%) in comparison with the 12-channel coil. Geometric distortions were smaller due to the smaller voxel size. Therefore, the reduction in tmax (8-16%) and SNR(t) (52%) in the high-resolution experiment seems to be tolerable with this coil. In conclusion, parallel imaging is an alternative to reduce geometric distortions in fMRI at 1.5 T. Using a 32-channel coil, reduction of the voxel size might be the preferable way to improve spatial accuracy.

  13. Functional and morphological cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of mice using a cryogenic quadrature radiofrequency coil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babette Wagenhaus

    Full Text Available Cardiac morphology and function assessment by magnetic resonance imaging is of increasing interest for a variety of mouse models in pre-clinical cardiac research, such as myocardial infarction models or myocardial injury/remodeling in genetically or pharmacologically induced hypertension. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR constraints, however, limit image quality and blood myocardium delineation, which crucially depend on high spatial resolution. Significant gains in SNR with a cryogenically cooled RF probe have been shown for mouse brain MRI, yet the potential of applying cryogenic RF coils for cardiac MR (CMR in mice is, as of yet, untapped. This study examines the feasibility and potential benefits of CMR in mice employing a 400 MHz cryogenic RF surface coil, compared with a conventional mouse heart coil array operating at room temperature. The cryogenic RF coil affords SNR gains of 3.0 to 5.0 versus the conventional approach and hence enables an enhanced spatial resolution. This markedly improved image quality--by better deliniation of myocardial borders and enhanced depiction of papillary muscles and trabeculae--and facilitated a more accurate cardiac chamber quantification, due to reduced intraobserver variability. In summary the use of a cryogenically cooled RF probe represents a valuable means of enhancing the capabilities of CMR of mice.

  14. Controlling the object phase for g-factor reduction in phase-Constrained parallel MRI using spatially selective RF pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettinger, Adam O; Kannengiesser, Stephan A R; Breuer, Felix A; Vidnyanszky, Zoltan; Blaimer, Martin

    2017-09-01

    Parallel imaging generally entails a reduction in the signal-to-noise ratio of the final image. Phase-constrained methods aim to improve reconstruction quality by using symmetry properties of k-space. Noise amplification in phase-constrained reconstruction depends heavily on the object background phase. The purpose of this work is to present a new approach of using tailored radiofrequency pulses to optimize the object phase distribution in order to maximize the benefit of phase-constrained reconstruction, and to minimize the noise amplification. Intrinsic object phase and coil sensitivity profiles are measured in a prescan. Optimal phase distribution is computed to maximize signal-to-noise ratio in the given setup. Tailored radiofrequency pulses are designed to introduce the optimal phase map in the following accelerated acquisitions, subsequently reconstructed by phase-constrained methods. The potential of the method is demonstrated in vivo with in-plane accelerated (8x) and simultaneous multislice (3x) acquisitions. Mean g-factors are reduced by up to a factor of 2 compared with conventional techniques when an appropriate phase-constrained reconstruction is applied to phase-optimized acquisitions, enhancing the signal-to-noise ratio of the final images and the visibility of small details. Combining phase-constrained reconstruction and phase optimization by tailored radiofrequency pulses can provide notable improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio and reconstruction quality of accelerated MRI. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  15. Parallel imaging methods for phased array MRI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Two parallel methods for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using radio frequency (RF) phased array surface coils, named spatial local Fourier encoding (SLFE) and spatial RF encoding (SRFE), are presented. The MR signals are acquired from separate channels across the coils, each of which covers a sub-FOV (field-of-view) in a parallel fashion, and the acquired data are combined to form an image of entire FOV. These two parallel encoding techniques can accelerate MR imaging greatly, yet associated artifact may appear, although the SLFE is an effective image reconstruction method which can reduce the localized artifact in some degrees. By the SRFE, RF coil array can be utilized for spatial encoding through a specialized coil design. The images are acquired in a snapshot with a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) without the costly gradient system, resulting in great saving of cost. Both mutual induction and aliasing effect of adjacent coils are critical to the success of SRFE. The strategies of inverse source problem and wavelet transform (WT) can be employed to eliminate them. The results simulated by MATLAB are reported.

  16. Rectangle Surface Coil Array in a Grid Arrangement for Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-13

    switchable array, RF magnetic field, NQR, MRI, NMR, tuning, decoupling I. INTRODUCTION ESONANCE imaging can be accomplished using Nuclear Magnetic...Resonance (NMR) or Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) techniques. REF [1] and [6] explain the differences between NMR and NQR. What NMR and NQR...inductances due to physical dimensions. A wider bandwidth will insure all surface coils are individually tuned and matched within the bandwidth

  17. Thin film MRI-high resolution depth imaging with a local surface coil and spin echo SPI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouriadov, Alexei V; MacGregor, Rodney P; Balcom, Bruce J

    2004-07-01

    A multiple echo, single point imaging technique, employing a local surface coil probe, is presented for examination of thin film samples. Depth images with a nominal resolution of 5 microm were acquired with acquisition times on the order of 10 min. The method may be used to observe dynamic phenomenon such as polymerization, wetting, and drying in thin film samples. It is readily adapted to spatially resolved diffusion coefficient and T2 relaxation time mapping.

  18. Remote detected Low-Field MRI using an optically pumped atomic magnetometer combined with a liquid cooled pre-polarization coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilschenz, Ingo; Ito, Yosuke; Natsukawa, Hiroaki; Oida, Takenori; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    Superconducting quantum interference devices are widely used in basic and clinical biomagnetic measurements such as low-field magnetic resonance imaging and magnetoencephalography primarily because they exhibit high sensitivity at low frequencies and have a wide bandwidth. The main disadvantage of these devices is that they require cryogenic coolants, which are rather expensive and not easily available. Meanwhile, with the advances in laser technology in the past few years, optically pumped atomic magnetometers (OPAMs) have been shown to be a good alternative as they can have adequate noise levels and are several millimeters in size, which makes them significantly easier to use. In this study, we used an OPAM module operating at a Larmor frequency of 5 kHz to acquire NMR and MRI signals. This study presents these initial results as well as our initial attempts at imaging using this OPAM module. In addition, we have designed a liquid-cooled pre-polarizing coil that reduces the measurement time significantly.

  19. Remote detected Low-Field MRI using an optically pumped atomic magnetometer combined with a liquid cooled pre-polarization coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilschenz, Ingo; Ito, Yosuke; Natsukawa, Hiroaki; Oida, Takenori; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    Superconducting quantum interference devices are widely used in basic and clinical biomagnetic measurements such as low-field magnetic resonance imaging and magnetoencephalography primarily because they exhibit high sensitivity at low frequencies and have a wide bandwidth. The main disadvantage of these devices is that they require cryogenic coolants, which are rather expensive and not easily available. Meanwhile, with the advances in laser technology in the past few years, optically pumped atomic magnetometers (OPAMs) have been shown to be a good alternative as they can have adequate noise levels and are several millimeters in size, which makes them significantly easier to use. In this study, we used an OPAM module operating at a Larmor frequency of 5kHz to acquire NMR and MRI signals. This study presents these initial results as well as our initial attempts at imaging using this OPAM module. In addition, we have designed a liquid-cooled pre-polarizing coil that reduces the measurement time significantly.

  20. Breast MRI at 7 Tesla with a bilateral coil and T1-weighted acquisition with robust fat suppression: image evaluation and comparison with 3 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Ryan; Storey, Pippa; McGorty, KellyAnne; Klautau Leite, Ana Paula; Babb, James; Sodickson, Daniel K.; Wiggins, Graham C.; Moy, Linda [New York University Langone Medical Center, Bernard and Irene Schwartz Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Geppert, Christian [Siemens Medical Solutions USA Inc., New York, NY (United States)

    2013-11-15

    To evaluate the image quality of T1-weighted fat-suppressed breast MRI at 7 T and to compare 7-T and 3-T images. Seventeen subjects were imaged using a 7-T bilateral transmit-receive coil and 3D gradient echo sequence with adiabatic inversion-based fat suppression (FS). Images were graded on a five-point scale and quantitatively assessed through signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), fibroglandular/fat contrast and signal uniformity measurements. Image scores at 7 and 3 T were similar on standard-resolution images (1.1 x 1.1 x 1.1-1.6 mm{sup 3}), indicating that high-quality breast imaging with clinical parameters can be performed at 7 T. The 7-T SNR advantage was underscored on 0.6-mm isotropic images, where image quality was significantly greater than at 3 T (4.2 versus 3.1, P {<=} 0.0001). Fibroglandular/fat contrast was more than two times higher at 7 T than at 3 T, owing to effective adiabatic inversion-based FS and the inherent 7-T signal advantage. Signal uniformity was comparable at 7 and 3 T (P < 0.05). Similar 7-T image quality was observed in all subjects, indicating robustness against anatomical variation. The 7-T bilateral transmit-receive coil and adiabatic inversion-based FS technique produce image quality that is as good as or better than at 3 T. (orig.)

  1. Designing shielded radio-frequency phased-array coils for magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Wen-Long; Zhang Ju-Cheng; Li Xia; Xu Bing-Qiao; Tao Gui-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    In this paper,an approach to the design of shielded radio-frequency (RF) phased-array coils for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is proposed.The target field method is used to find current densities distributed on primary and shield coils.The stream function technique is used to discretize current densities and to obtain the winding patterns of the coils.The corresponding highly ill-conditioned integral equation is solved by the Tikhonov regularization with a penalty function related to the minimum curvature.To balance the simplicity and smoothness with the homogeneity of the magnetic field of the coil's winding pattern,the selection of a penalty factor is discussed in detail.

  2. On the Procedures for the Demonstration of the RF Safety of Active and Passive Implants in MRI Environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eugenia CABOT; Maria CABANES-SEMPERE; Niels KUSTER

    2016-01-01

    As a diagnostic method, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is not allowed to be used in patients with medical implants, including both active implants (such as cardiac deifbrillators or deep brain stimulators) and passive implants (such as orthopedics implants and support). MRI imaging scanning can produce magnetic ifelds, which will produce concentrated electromagnetic induction on metal edges of the implants, such as electrodes. The magnetic ifeld can also signiifcantly increase the temperature of surrounding tissues. Besides, the currents and voltage produced by active implants when exposed to MRI scanning can lead to damage and malfunction of pulse generators. Therefore, patients with medical implants cannot receive MRI as a diagnostic method. This safety protocol prevents a large group of patients from receiving MRI diagnosis. This leads to the conclusion that the safety evaluation of implants under MRI environment requires the combination of accurate data analysis and experimental techniques so as to establish the standard testing program.

  3. Application of direct virtual coil to dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and MR angiography with data-driven parallel imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kang; Beatty, Philip J; Nagle, Scott K; Reeder, Scott B; Holmes, James H; Rahimi, Mahdi S; Bell, Laura C; Korosec, Frank R; Brittain, Jean H

    2014-02-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of direct virtual coil (DVC) in the setting of 4D dynamic imaging used in multiple clinical applications. Three dynamic imaging applications were chosen: pulmonary perfusion, liver perfusion, and peripheral MR angiography (MRA), with 18, 11, and 10 subjects, respectively. After view-sharing, the k-space data were reconstructed twice: once with channel-by-channel (CBC) followed by sum-of-squares coil combination and once with DVC. Images reconstructed using CBC and DVC were compared and scored based on overall image quality by two experienced radiologists using a five-point scale. The CBC and DVC showed similar image quality in image domain. Time course measurements also showed good agreement in the temporal domain. CBC and DVC images were scored as equivalent for all pulmonary perfusion cases, all liver perfusion cases, and four of the 10 peripheral MRA cases. For the remaining six peripheral MRA cases, DVC were scored as slightly better (not clinically significant) than the CBC images by Radiologist A and as equivalent by Radiologist B. For dynamic contrast-enhanced MR applications, it is clinically feasible to reduce image reconstruction time while maintaining image quality and time course measurement using the DVC technique. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Solution to axillary lymph node imaging problems during breast MRI scaning using the body matrix coil%体部线圈解决MRI乳腺扫描中腋窝淋巴结成像问题

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈富珍; 钟华; 刘立红

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨体部相控阵线圈(Body matrix Coil)在解决常规M RI乳腺检查中腋窝淋巴结成像问题的价值。方法搜集2011年7月~2013年6月间来我院做M RI乳腺检查患者50例,在使用常规乳腺线圈做乳腺扫描的同时,加盖BODY matrix线圈扫描腋窝部位,观察腋窝淋巴结显示情况及对整个图像质量,诊断结果的影响。结果加盖BODY matrix线圈对常规乳腺扫描图像质量无明显影响,且可以根据需要加做冠状位或横轴位显示双侧腋窝淋巴结,对诊断的价值具有统计学意义。结论利用乳腺线圈加BODY matrix线圈的方法既不影响常规乳腺成像,又可以以不同切面显示双侧腋窝组织,对诊断是否有腋窝淋巴结侵润具有很大价值。%Objective To study the value of body matrix coil in solving axillary lymph node imaging problems during breast MRI scaning .Methods In this work ,50 patients ,who were are reffered for examination in our hospital from July , 2011 to June ,2013 ,simultaneously underwent routine breast MRI scaning as well as the MRI scaning with a body matrix coil placed under armpits .Then ,imaging status of axillary lymph nodes ,the quality of image ,and diagnostic effect were observed .Results The addition of BODY Matrix Coil had no significant effect on image quality of conventional MRI sca‐ning .Also ,MRI scan with BODY Matrix Coil can be performed at coronal position or axial position to show axillary lymph nodes ,which had significant value for the diagnosis .Conclusion Breast MRI scan with Coil and BODY Matrix Coil not only exerts no effect on normal breast imaging ,but also ,displays bilateral armpits in different sections ,which has great value in diagnosing whether or not axillary lymph node invasion occurs .

  5. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. Other ... that are detected by the coils. The electric current does not come in contact with the patient. ...

  6. MRI of prostate zonal anatomy with an endorectal surface coil; Anatomie zonale de la prostate par IRM endorectale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornud, F.; Belin, X.; Melki, P.; Helenon, O.; Cretien, Y.; Dufour, B.; Moreau, J.F. [Hopital Necker-Enfants-Malades, 75 - Paris (France)

    1995-01-01

    The development of an endorectal surface coil now permits a partial study of the anatomical model developed by McNeal. Axial and coronal views, which were used to establish the model can be obtained in a short period of time with fast spin echo sequences. Axial views are performed along the proximal urethra and coronal views are performed along the axis of the distal urethra and the ejaculatory duts. Anatomical boundaries of the transitional zone are well delineated on axial views, illustrating the concept of `inner gland`. The prostatic capsule and the neuro-vascular bundles, pathways of extension of the cancer out of the prostate are also well delineated. Coronal sections allow a very good anatomical study of the caudal junction of the vas deferens and the seminal vesicles (the so called weak space), pathway of tumor extension to the seminal vesicles. Differences in signal of the prostatic zones make the outer gland cancers very conspicuous as well as some transitional cancers which can show, in some cases, an homogeneous hyposignal. (authors). 15 refs., 14 figs.

  7. Minimax Current Density Coil Design

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Michael; Lopez, Hector Sanchez; Ng, Michael; Crozier, Stuart; 10.1088/0022-3727/43/9/095001

    2010-01-01

    'Coil design' is an inverse problem in which arrangements of wire are designed to generate a prescribed magnetic field when energized with electric current. The design of gradient and shim coils for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are important examples of coil design. The magnetic fields that these coils generate are usually required to be both strong and accurate. Other electromagnetic properties of the coils, such as inductance, may be considered in the design process, which becomes an optimization problem. The maximum current density is additionally optimized in this work and the resultant coils are investigated for performance and practicality. Coils with minimax current density were found to exhibit maximally spread wires and may help disperse localized regions of Joule heating. They also produce the highest possible magnetic field strength per unit current for any given surface and wire size. Three different flavours of boundary element method that employ different basis functions (triangular elements...

  8. Diffusion and perfusion MRI in patients with ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms treated by endovascular coiling: complications, procedural results, MR findings and clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronqvist, M.; Ramgren, B.; Holtaas, S.; Larsson, E.-M. [Lund University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Lund (Sweden); Wirestam, R. [Lund University Hospital, Department of Radiation Physics, Lund (Sweden); Brandt, L.; Nilsson, O.; Saeveland, H. [Lund University Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Lund (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate treatment safety as well as complications frequency and management in endovascular coiling of intracerebral aneurysms using MR diffusion and perfusion imaging. In this prospective study, 77 MR examinations were performed in conjunction with 43 procedures in 40 patients, 14 patients presented with ruptured and 26 with unruptured aneurysms. Mean time interval between treatment and post-procedure MRI was 29 and 25 h for the ruptured and unruptured aneurysm group, respectively. Peri-procedural complications, including five major events and five minor transient events, occurred in 10/43 procedures (23%), necessitating thrombolytic therapy in two patients and angioplasty in one, all three within the unruptured aneurysm group. Fifty-one new lesions were found on post-treatment DWI and 47 of them were regarded as of ischemic origin. Most lesions were small (<3 mm), ipsilateral to the treated aneurysm and asymptomatic (37/40 patients). Sixty-seven percent of the lesions were found in the ruptured and 33% in the unruptured aneurysm group. The ischemic lesions did occur more frequently in patients treated for aneurysm of large neck size and according to the remodelling technique. The overall morbidity and mortality rates were 14.6 and 7.3% whereas morbidity and mortality rates related to the technique were only 2.6 and 0%, respectively. (orig.)

  9. Comparison of three multichannel transmit/receive radiofrequency coil configurations for anatomic and functional cardiac MRI at 7.0T: implications for clinical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, Lukas; Graessl, Andreas; Hezel, Fabian; Thalhammer, Christof [Max-Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility, Berlin (Germany); Kellman, Peter [National Institutes of Health/NHLBI, Laboratory of Cardiac Energetics, Bethesda, MD (United States); Renz, Wolfgang [Max-Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility, Berlin (Germany); Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen (Germany); Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian von; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette [Max-Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility, Berlin (Germany); HELIOS Klinikum Berlin-Buch, Department of Cardiology and Nephrology, Berlin (Germany); Charite Medical Faculty and the Max-Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Experimental and Clinical Research Center, Berlin (Germany); Tkachenko, Valeriy [Charite Medical Faculty and the Max-Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Experimental and Clinical Research Center, Berlin (Germany); Niendorf, Thoralf [Max-Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility, Berlin (Germany); Charite Medical Faculty and the Max-Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Experimental and Clinical Research Center, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    To implement, examine, and compare three multichannel transmit/receive coil configurations for cardiovascular MR (CMR) at 7T. Three radiofrequency transmit-receive (TX/RX) coils with 4-, 8-, and 16-coil elements were used. Ten healthy volunteers (seven males, age 28 {+-} 4 years) underwent CMR at 7T. For all three RX/TX coils, 2D CINE FLASH images of the heart were acquired. Cardiac chamber quantification, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) analysis, parallel imaging performance assessment, and image quality scoring were performed. Mean total examination time was 29 {+-} 5 min. All images obtained with the 8- and 16-channel coils were diagnostic. No significant difference in ejection fraction (EF) (P > 0.09) or left ventricular mass (LVM) (P > 0.31) was observed between the coils. The 8- and 16-channel arrays yielded a higher mean SNR in the septum versus the 4-channel coil. The lowest geometry factors were found for the 16-channel coil (mean {+-} SD 2.3 {+-} 0.5 for R = 4). Image quality was rated significantly higher (P < 0.04) for the 16-channel coil versus the 8- and 4-channel coils. All three coil configurations are suitable for CMR at 7.0T under routine circumstances. A larger number of coil elements enhances image quality and parallel imaging performance but does not impact the accuracy of cardiac chamber quantification. (orig.)

  10. MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    MRI does not use ionizing radiation. No side effects from the magnetic fields and radio waves have been reported. The most common type of contrast (dye) used is gadolinium. It is very safe. Allergic reactions rarely ...

  11. A 16-channel receive, forced current excitation dual-transmit coil for breast imaging at 7T.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha By

    Full Text Available To enable high spatial and temporal breast imaging resolution via combined use of high field MRI, array coils, and forced current excitation (FCE multi channel transmit.A unilateral 16-channel receive array insert was designed for use in a transmit volume coil optimized for quadrature operation with dual-transmit RF shimming at 7 T. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR maps, g-factor maps, and high spatial and temporal resolution in vivo images were acquired to demonstrate the utility of the coil architecture.The dual-transmit FCE coil provided homogeneous excitation and the array provided an increase in average SNR of 3.3 times (max 10.8, min 1.5 compared to the volume coil in transmit/receive mode. High resolution accelerated in vivo breast imaging demonstrated the ability to achieve isotropic spatial resolution of 0.5 mm within clinically relevant 90 s scan times, as well as the ability to perform 1.0 mm isotropic resolution imaging, 7 s per dynamics, with the use of bidirectional SENSE acceleration of up to R = 9.The FCE design of the transmit coil easily accommodates the addition of a sixteen channel array coil. The improved spatial and temporal resolution provided by the high-field array coil with FCE dual-channel transmit will ultimately be beneficial in lesion detection and characterization.

  12. α/β coiled coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Marcus D; Mendler, Claudia T; Bassler, Jens; Karamichali, Ioanna; Ridderbusch, Oswin; Lupas, Andrei N; Hernandez Alvarez, Birte

    2016-01-15

    Coiled coils are the best-understood protein fold, as their backbone structure can uniquely be described by parametric equations. This level of understanding has allowed their manipulation in unprecedented detail. They do not seem a likely source of surprises, yet we describe here the unexpected formation of a new type of fiber by the simple insertion of two or six residues into the underlying heptad repeat of a parallel, trimeric coiled coil. These insertions strain the supercoil to the breaking point, causing the local formation of short β-strands, which move the path of the chain by 120° around the trimer axis. The result is an α/β coiled coil, which retains only one backbone hydrogen bond per repeat unit from the parent coiled coil. Our results show that a substantially novel backbone structure is possible within the allowed regions of the Ramachandran space with only minor mutations to a known fold.

  13. The Problem of Metal Needles in Acupuncture-fMRI Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Beissner

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture is a therapy based on sensory stimulation of the human body by means of metal needles. The exact underlying mechanisms of acupuncture have not been clarified so far. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI has become an important tool in acupuncture research. Standard acupuncture needles, which are made of ferromagnetic steel, however, are problematic in acupuncture-fMRI studies for several reasons, such as attraction by the scanner's magnetic field, significant image distortions and signal-dropouts, when positioned close to the head or even heating due to absorption of radio frequency (RF. The aim of this study was to compare two novel types of acupuncture needles with a standard needle for their effect on MRI image quality. The standard needle severely reduced image quality, when located inside the RF coil. The nonferromagnetic metal needle may pose a risk due to RF heating, while the plastic needle has a significantly larger diameter. In conclusion, our recommendations are: (1 standard needles should not be used in MRI; (2 Nonferromagnetic metal needles seem to be the best choice for acupoints outside of the transmitter coil; and (3 only plastic needles are suited for points inside the coil. Laser acupuncture may be a safe alternative, too.

  14. Interference between PET and MRI sub-systems in a silicon-photomultiplier-based PET/MRI system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Watabe, Hiroshi; Kanai, Yasukazu; Aoki, Masaaki; Sugiyama, Eiji; Watabe, Tadashi; Imaizumi, Masao; Shimosegawa, Eku; Hatazawa, Jun

    2011-07-07

    The silicon-photomultiplier (Si-PM) is a promising photodetector, especially for integrated PET/MRI systems, due to its small size, high gain, and low sensitivity to static magnetic fields. The major problem using a Si-PM-based PET system within the MRI system is the interference between the PET and MRI units. We measured the interference by combining a Si-PM-based PET system with a permanent-magnet MRI system. When the RF signal-induced pulse height exceeded the lower energy threshold level of the PET system, interference between the Si-PM-based PET system and MRI system was detected. The prompt as well as the delayed coincidence count rates of the Si-PM-based PET system increased significantly. These noise counts produced severe artifacts on the reconstructed images of the Si-PM-based PET system. In terms of the effect of the Si-PM-based PET system on the MRI system, although no susceptibility artifact was observed on the MR images, electronic noise from the PET detector ring was detected by the RF coil and reduced the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the MR images. The S/N degradation of the MR images was reduced when the distance between the RF coil and the Si-PM-based PET system was increased. We conclude that reducing the interference between the PET and MRI systems is essential for achieving the optimum performance of integrated Si-PM PET/MRI systems.

  15. Variable power combiner for RF mode shimming in 7-T MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanbakhsh, Pedram; Solbach, Klaus; Bitz, Andreas K

    2012-09-01

    This contribution discusses the utilization of RF power in an MRI system with RF mode shimming which enables the superposition of circularly polarized modes of a transmit RF coil array driven by a Butler matrix. Since the required power for the individual modes can vary widely, mode-shimming can result in a significant underutilization of the total available RF power. A variable power combiner (VPC) is proposed to improve the power utilization: it can be realized as a reconfiguration of the MRI transmit system by the inclusion of one additional matrix network which receives the power from all transmit amplifiers at its input ports and provides any desired (combined) power distribution at its output ports by controlling the phase and amplitude of the amplifiers' input signals. The power distribution at the output ports of the VPC is then fed into the "mode" ports of the coil array Butler matrix in order to superimpose the spatial modes at the highest achievable power utilization. The VPC configuration is compared to the standard configuration of the transmit chain of our MRI system with 8 transmit channels and 16 coils. In realistic scenarios, improved power utilization was achieved from 17% to 60% and from 14% to 55% for an elliptical phantom and a region of interest in the abdomen, respectively, and an increase of the power utilization of 1 dB for a region of interest in the upper leg. In general, it is found that the VPC allows significant improvement in power utilization when the shimming solution demands only a few modes to be energized, while the technique can yield loss in power utilization in cases with many modes required at high power level.

  16. From complex B(1) mapping to local SAR estimation for human brain MR imaging using multi-channel transceiver coil at 7T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaotong; Schmitter, Sebastian; Van de Moortele, Pierre-Francois; Liu, Jiaen; He, Bin

    2013-06-01

    Elevated specific absorption rate (SAR) associated with increased main magnetic field strength remains a major safety concern in ultra-high-field (UHF) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications. The calculation of local SAR requires the knowledge of the electric field induced by radio-frequency (RF) excitation, and the local electrical properties of tissues. Since electric field distribution cannot be directly mapped in conventional MR measurements, SAR estimation is usually performed using numerical model-based electromagnetic simulations which, however, are highly time consuming and cannot account for the specific anatomy and tissue properties of the subject undergoing a scan. In the present study, starting from the measurable RF magnetic fields (B1) in MRI, we conducted a series of mathematical deduction to estimate the local, voxel-wise and subject-specific SAR for each single coil element using a multi-channel transceiver array coil. We first evaluated the feasibility of this approach in numerical simulations including two different human head models. We further conducted experimental study in a physical phantom and in two human subjects at 7T using a multi-channel transceiver head coil. Accuracy of the results is discussed in the context of predicting local SAR in the human brain at UHF MRI using multi-channel RF transmission.

  17. Low-field MRI can be more sensitive than high-field MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Aaron M.; Truong, Milton L.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2013-12-01

    MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is the key factor for image quality. Conventionally, SNR is proportional to nuclear spin polarization, which scales linearly with magnetic field strength. Yet ever-stronger magnets present numerous technical and financial limitations. Low-field MRI can mitigate these constraints with equivalent SNR from non-equilibrium ‘hyperpolarization' schemes, which increase polarization by orders of magnitude independently of the magnetic field. Here, theory and experimental validation demonstrate that combination of field independent polarization (e.g. hyperpolarization) with frequency optimized MRI detection coils (i.e. multi-turn coils using the maximum allowed conductor length) results in low-field MRI sensitivity approaching and even rivaling that of high-field MRI. Four read-out frequencies were tested using samples with identical numbers of 1H and 13C spins. Experimental SNRs at 0.0475 T were ∼40% of those obtained at 4.7 T. Conservatively, theoretical SNRs at 0.0475 T 1.13-fold higher than those at 4.7 T were possible despite an ∼100-fold lower detection frequency, indicating feasibility of high-sensitivity MRI without technically challenging, expensive high-field magnets. The data at 4.7 T and 0.0475 T was obtained from different spectrometers with different RF probes. The SNR comparison between the two field strengths accounted for many differences in parameters such as system noise figures and variations in the probe detection coils including Q factors and coil diameters.

  18. Assessment of early-stage optic nerve invasion in retinoblastoma using high-resolution 1.5 Tesla MRI with surface coils: a multicentre, prospective accuracy study with histopathological correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brisse, Herve J. [Institut Curie, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Institut CURIE, Imaging Department, Paris (France); Graaf, Pim de; Rodjan, Firazia; Jong, Marcus C. de; Castelijns, Jonas A. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Galluzzi, Paolo [Neuroimaging and Neurointerventional Unit (NINT) Azienda Ospedaliera e Universitaria Senese, Siena (Italy); Cosker, Kristel; Savignoni, Alexia [Institut Curie, Department of Biostatistics, Paris (France); Maeder, Philippe [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV) and University of Lausanne, Department of Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Goericke, Sophia [University Hospital Essen, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Aerts, Isabelle [Institut Curie, Department of Pediatric Oncology, Paris (France); Desjardins, Laurence [Institut Curie, Department of Ophthalmology, Paris (France); Moll, Annette C. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hadjistilianou, Theodora [Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Department of Ophthalmology, Siena (Italy); Toti, Paolo [University of Siena, Department of Medical Biotechnologies, Pathology Unit, Siena (Italy); Valk, Paul van der [VU University Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sastre-Garau, Xavier [Institut Curie, Department of Biopathology, Paris (France); Collaboration: European Retinoblastoma Imaging Collaboration (ERIC)

    2015-05-01

    To assess the accuracy of high-resolution (HR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing early-stage optic nerve (ON) invasion in a retinoblastoma cohort. This IRB-approved, prospective multicenter study included 95 patients (55 boys, 40 girls; mean age, 29 months). 1.5-T MRI was performed using surface coils before enucleation, including spin-echo unenhanced and contrast-enhanced (CE) T1-weighted sequences (slice thickness, 2 mm; pixel size <0.3 x 0.3 mm{sup 2}). Images were read by five neuroradiologists blinded to histopathologic findings. ROC curves were constructed with AUC assessment using a bootstrap method. Histopathology identified 41 eyes without ON invasion and 25 with prelaminar, 18 with intralaminar and 12 with postlaminar invasion. All but one were postoperatively classified as stage I by the International Retinoblastoma Staging System. The accuracy of CE-T1 sequences in identifying ON invasion was limited (AUC = 0.64; 95 % CI, 0.55 - 0.72) and not confirmed for postlaminar invasion diagnosis (AUC = 0.64; 95 % CI, 0.47 - 0.82); high specificities (range, 0.64 - 1) and negative predictive values (range, 0.81 - 0.97) were confirmed. HR-MRI with surface coils is recommended to appropriately select retinoblastoma patients eligible for primary enucleation without the risk of IRSS stage II but cannot substitute for pathology in differentiating the first degrees of ON invasion. (orig.)

  19. Endorectal coil MRI in local staging of prostate carcinoma. Comparative assessment with histologic macro section in 40 cases; La Risonanza Magnetica con bobina endorettale nella stadiazione locale del carcinoma prostatico. Confronto con macrosezioni istologiche in 40 casi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torricelli, P.; Iadanza, M.; De Santis, M.; Pollastri, C.A. [Modena Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze Mediche, Oncologiche e Radiologiche. Dipt. di Chirurgia. Div. di Urologia; Cesinari, A.M.; Trentini, G.; Romagnoli, R. [Modena Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze Mediche, Oncologiche e Radiologiche. Dipt. di Scienze Morfologiche e Medico Legali

    1999-06-01

    Endorectal coil MRI is widely used in the diagnostic workup of prostate cancer, but diagnostic accuracy rates reported in the literature are quite variable. The authors report them personal experience with endorectal coil MRI in the local staging of prostate carcinoma. MRI showed moderate overall and particularly MRI had good accuracy in detecting seminal vesicle involvement but moderate sensitivity and specificity in demonstrating capsular infiltration and apex involvement. Due to its high cost, MRI should not be routinely used in prostate cancer standing but should be reserved to the patient whose clinical and serological data suggest extra prostatic tumor spread, whose preoperative demonstration could avoid non curative surgery. [Italian] La RM con bobina endorettale viene oggi ampiamente impiegata nella stadiazione del carcinoma prostatico, sebbene i risultati relativi al suo impiego siano tuttora piuttosto difformi tra i diversi autori. Scopo del presente lavoro e' presentare la personale esperienza relativo all'impiego della RM con bobina endorettale nella stadiazione locale del carcinoma prostatico. La RM ha consentito di ottenere discreti risultati e soprattutto di evidenziare con buona accuratezza l'invasione delle vescicole seminali, mentre ha presentato sensibilita' e specificita' inferiori nella valutazione della penetrazione capsulare e dell'apice prostatico. Visti gli elevati costi della metodica si conclude che la RM non possa essere considerata indagine abituale nella stadiazione del carcinoma prostatico, ma possa essere riservata alla valutazione di quei pazienti ove, sulla base di altri dati clinici, bioumorali o strumentali, sia ritenuta probabile l'estensione extracapsulare macroscopica della neoplasia, evento che, confermato preoperatoriamente, puo' costituire criterio di esclusione della terapia chirurgica.

  20. Dipole antennas for ultrahigh-field body imaging: a comparison with loop coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaijmakers, A J E; Luijten, P R; van den Berg, C A T

    2016-09-01

    Although the potential of dipole antennas for ultrahigh-field (UHF) MRI is largely recognized, they are still relatively unknown to the larger part of the MRI community. This article intends to provide electromagnetic insight into the general operating principles of dipole antennas by numerical simulations. The major part focuses on a comparison study of dipole antennas and loop coils at frequencies of 128, 298 and 400 MHz. This study shows that dipole antennas are only efficient radiofrequency (RF) coils in the presence of a dielectric and/or conducting load. In addition, the conservative electric fields (E-fields) at the ends of a dipole are negligible in comparison with the induced E-fields in the center. Like loop coils, long dipole antennas perform better than short dipoles for deeply located imaging targets and vice versa. When the optimal element is chosen for each depth, loop coils have higher B1 (+) efficiency for shallow depths, whereas dipole antennas have higher B1 (+) efficiency for large depths. The cross-over point depth decreases with increasing frequency: 11.6, 6.2 and 5.0 cm for 128, 298 and 400 MHz, respectively. For single elements, loop coils demonstrate a better B1 (+) /√SARmax ratio for any target depth and any frequency. However, one example study shows that, in an array setup with loop coil overlap for decoupling, this relationship is not straightforward. The overlapping loop coils may generate increased specific absorption rate (SAR) levels under the overlapping parts of the loops, depending on the drive phase settings. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. Other ... that are detected by the coils. The electric current does not come in contact with the patient. ...

  2. Ophthalmic magnetic resonance imaging at 7 T using a 6-channel transceiver radiofrequency coil array in healthy subjects and patients with intraocular masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graessl, Andreas; Muhle, Maximilian; Schwerter, Michael; Rieger, Jan; Oezerdem, Celal; Santoro, Davide; Lysiak, Darius; Winter, Lukas; Hezel, Fabian; Waiczies, Sonia; Guthoff, Rudolf F; Falke, Karen; Hosten, Norbert; Hadlich, Stefan; Krueger, Paul-Christian; Langner, Soenke; Stachs, Oliver; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2014-05-01

    This study was designed to examine the feasibility of ophthalmic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 7 T using a local 6-channel transmit/receive radiofrequency (RF) coil array in healthy volunteers and patients with intraocular masses. A novel 6-element transceiver RF coil array that makes uses of loop elements and that is customized for eye imaging at 7 T is proposed. Considerations influencing the RF coil design and the characteristics of the proposed RF coil array are presented. Numerical electromagnetic field simulations were conducted to enhance the RF coil characteristics. Specific absorption rate simulations and a thorough assessment of RF power deposition were performed to meet the safety requirements. Phantom experiments were carried out to validate the electromagnetic field simulations and to assess the real performance of the proposed transceiver array. Certified approval for clinical studies was provided by a local notified body before the in vivo studies. The suitability of the RF coil to image the human eye, optical nerve, and orbit was examined in an in vivo feasibility study including (a) 3-dimensional (3D) gradient echo (GRE) imaging, (b) inversion recovery 3D GRE imaging, and (c) 2D T2-weighted fast spin-echo imaging. For this purpose, healthy adult volunteers (n = 17; mean age, 34 ± 11 years) and patients with intraocular masses (uveal melanoma, n = 5; mean age, 57 ± 6 years) were investigated. All subjects tolerated all examinations well with no relevant adverse events. The 6-channel coil array supports high-resolution 3D GRE imaging with a spatial resolution as good as 0.2 × 0.2 × 1.0 mm, which facilitates the depiction of anatomical details of the eye. Rather, uniform signal intensity across the eye was found. A mean signal-to-noise ratio of approximately 35 was found for the lens, whereas the vitreous humor showed a signal-to-noise ratio of approximately 30. The lens-vitreous humor contrast-to-noise ratio was 8, which allows good

  3. A magnetic resonance (MR) microscopy system using a microfluidically cryo-cooled planar coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Chiwan; Godley, Richard F; Park, Jaewon; McDougall, Mary P; Wright, Steven M; Han, Arum

    2011-07-07

    We present the development of a microfluidically cryo-cooled planar coil for magnetic resonance (MR) microscopy. Cryogenically cooling radiofrequency (RF) coils for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can improve the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the experiment. Conventional cryostats typically use a vacuum gap to keep samples to be imaged, especially biological samples, at or near room temperature during cryo-cooling. This limits how close a cryo-cooled coil can be placed to the sample. At the same time, a small coil-to-sample distance significantly improves the MR imaging capability due to the limited imaging depth of planar MR microcoils. These two conflicting requirements pose challenges to the use of cryo-cooling in MR microcoils. The use of a microfluidic based cryostat for localized cryo-cooling of MR microcoils is a step towards eliminating these constraints. The system presented here consists of planar receive-only coils with integrated cryo-cooling microfluidic channels underneath, and an imaging surface on top of the planar coils separated by a thin nitrogen gas gap. Polymer microfluidic channel structures fabricated through soft lithography processes were used to flow liquid nitrogen under the coils in order to cryo-cool the planar coils to liquid nitrogen temperature (-196 °C). Two unique features of the cryo-cooling system minimize the distance between the coil and the sample: (1) the small dimension of the polymer microfluidic channel enables localized cooling of the planar coils, while minimizing thermal effects on the nearby imaging surface. (2) The imaging surface is separated from the cryo-cooled planar coil by a thin gap through which nitrogen gas flows to thermally insulate the imaging surface, keeping it above 0 °C and preventing potential damage to biological samples. The localized cooling effect was validated by simulations, bench testing, and MR imaging experiments. Using this cryo-cooled planar coil system inside a 4.7 Tesla MR system

  4. Unconventional gradient coil designs in magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Minhua; Xia, Ling; Liu, Feng

    2014-01-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the gradient coils are used to encode the spatial positions of protons by varying the magnetic field linearly across the imaging subject. With the latest development of MRI technique and new clinical and research applications, the gradient coil system requires increasingly innovative designs. In this paper, four unconventional gradient coil designs are reviewed: (1) local gradient coils; (2) new coil configurations with reduced peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS); (3) dedicated structures designed for hybrid systems (combining MRI with other medical devices); and (4) the full 3D coil designs. For the first type, the development of local gradient coils (mainly head coils) is discussed chronologically and divided into three stages: the "golden" stage in the 1990s, the "wane" stage in the 2000s, and the "revival" stage in the 2010s. For the second type, various designs for the reduction of PNS problems have been described, including local and whole-body gradient coil systems. For the third design, a dedicated gradient coil design for multi-modality combination is illustrated with an MRI-LINAC system. Finally, gradient systems with non-layered coil structure are described in the fourth design type. We hope that this review on unconventional gradient coil designs will be useful for the new development of MRI technology and emerging medical applications.

  5. Minimum Inductance Optimal Design for the Gradient Coil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging), a crucial role of gradient coils is to image organism, meanwhile the inductance of the coils determines the speed of imaging. So it is of great importance to optimize designs of the gradient coils. The target field approach is an effective method to design the gradient coils. Having applied this method and performing many numerical tests, we achieved the designs of the x-、y-、z- gradient coils , with the linearity of the fields generated by the coils in a sphere of radius 0.30 m less than 5%, in which the inductance and resistance of the coils also meet the requirements.

  6. Analysis of the local worst-case SAR exposure caused by an MRI multi-transmit body coil in anatomical models of the human body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, Esra; Gosselin, Marie-Christine; Murbach, Manuel; Christ, Andreas; Cabot, Eugenia; Kuster, Niels

    2011-08-01

    Multi-transmit coils are increasingly being employed in high-field magnetic resonance imaging, along with a growing interest in multi-transmit body coils. However, they can lead to an increase in whole-body and local specific absorption rate (SAR) compared to conventional body coils excited in circular polarization for the same total incident input power. In this study, the maximum increase of SAR for three significantly different human anatomies is investigated for a large 3 T (128 MHz) multi-transmit body coil using numerical simulations and a (generalized) eigenvalue-based approach. The results demonstrate that the increase of SAR strongly depends on the anatomy. For the three models and normalization to the sum of the rung currents squared, the whole-body averaged SAR increases by up to a factor of 1.6 compared to conventional excitation and the peak spatial SAR (averaged over any 10 cm3 of tissue) by up to 13.4. For some locations the local averaged SAR goes up as much as 800 times (130 when looking only at regions where it is above 1% of the peak spatial SAR). The ratio of the peak spatial SAR to the whole-body SAR increases by a factor of up to 47 and can reach values above 800. Due to the potentially much larger power deposition, additional, preferably patient-specific, considerations are necessary to avoid injuries by such systems.

  7. Analysis of the local worst-case SAR exposure caused by an MRI multi-transmit body coil in anatomical models of the human body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neufeld, Esra; Gosselin, Marie-Christine; Murbach, Manuel; Christ, Andreas; Cabot, Eugenia; Kuster, Niels, E-mail: neufeld@itis.ethz.ch [Foundation for Research on Information Technologies in Society (IT' IS), Zeughausstr. 43, 8004 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2011-08-07

    Multi-transmit coils are increasingly being employed in high-field magnetic resonance imaging, along with a growing interest in multi-transmit body coils. However, they can lead to an increase in whole-body and local specific absorption rate (SAR) compared to conventional body coils excited in circular polarization for the same total incident input power. In this study, the maximum increase of SAR for three significantly different human anatomies is investigated for a large 3 T (128 MHz) multi-transmit body coil using numerical simulations and a (generalized) eigenvalue-based approach. The results demonstrate that the increase of SAR strongly depends on the anatomy. For the three models and normalization to the sum of the rung currents squared, the whole-body averaged SAR increases by up to a factor of 1.6 compared to conventional excitation and the peak spatial SAR (averaged over any 10 cm{sup 3} of tissue) by up to 13.4. For some locations the local averaged SAR goes up as much as 800 times (130 when looking only at regions where it is above 1% of the peak spatial SAR). The ratio of the peak spatial SAR to the whole-body SAR increases by a factor of up to 47 and can reach values above 800. Due to the potentially much larger power deposition, additional, preferably patient-specific, considerations are necessary to avoid injuries by such systems.

  8. RF-EMF exposure of fetus and mother during magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pediaditis, M.; Leitgeb, N.; Cech, R.

    2008-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) avoids risks of genetic damage but may be associated with excess heating of body tissues. To investigate the exposure to MRI radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF), low-pass and high-pass birdcage coils were simulated and the whole-body pregnant woman model SILVY used to determine local and whole-body specific absorption rates (SAR) in mother and fetus. Resonant RF-EMF of MRI devices were investigated at 0.3, 1, 1.5, 2, 3 and 4 T. Results allow extrapolation also to higher fields. They showed that local SAR in mother's trunk reaches exposure limits first. However, data show that during abdominal MRI meeting exposure limits of the mother is not sufficient to protect the fetus if limits of the general populations are applied to it. In that case fetal whole-body SAR exceeds limits by 7.4-fold. It is up to the physician and/or the ethics commission to decide upon justification for abdominal MRI of pregnant women if limits are exceeded. The results indicate the need for specifically addressing fetal exposure to EMF and elaborating general recommendations by radiation protection bodies.

  9. Calorimetric calibration of head coil SAR estimates displayed on a clinical MR scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorny, Krzysztof R; Bernstein, Matt A; Felmlee, Joel P; Ward, Heidi A; McGee, Kiaran P; Lanners, Diana M [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Lee, Kendall H [Department of Neurosurgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 5505 (United States)

    2008-05-21

    Calorimetric measurements were performed to determine the average specific absorption rates (SAR) resulting from MRI head examinations. The data were compared with average head coil SAR estimates displayed by the MR scanner in order to refine the imaging protocols used in imaging patients with implanted deep brain stimulators (DBS). The experiments were performed using transmit-receive (TR) head coil on clinical 1.5 T General Electric MR scanners running 11.0 M4 revision software. The average applied SAR was derived from temperature increases measured inside a head phantom, due to deposition of RF energy during MRI scanning with a spin echo imaging sequence. The measurements were repeated for varied levels of RF transmit gain (TG) and analyzed with a range of entered patient weights. The measurements demonstrate that the ratio of the actual average head SAR to the scanner-displayed value (coil correction factor) decreases for decreasing TG or for increasing patient weight and may vary between 0.3 and 2.1. An additional retrospective patient study, however, shows that not all combinations of TG and patient weight are encountered clinically and, instead, TG generally increases with the patient weight. As a result, a much narrower range of coil correction factors (e.g., typically 0.5-1.0) will be encountered in practice. The calorimetric method described in this work could aid the physicians and technologists in refinement of the model-dependent SAR estimates displayed by the MR scanner, and in selection of imaging parameters for MR head examinations within allowable SAR safety levels.

  10. Contrast-enhanced dynamic MRI protocol with improved spatial and time resolution for in vivo microimaging of the mouse with a 1.5-T body scanner and a superconducting surface coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginefri, Jean-Christophe; Poirier-Quinot, Marie; Robert, Philippe; Darrasse, Luc

    2005-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is well suited for small animal model investigations to study various human pathologies. However, the assessment of microscopic information requires a high-spatial resolution (HSR) leading to a critical problem of signal-to-noise ratio limitations in standard whole-body imager. As contrast mechanisms are field dependent, working at high field do not allow to derive MRI criteria that may apply to clinical settings done in standard whole-body systems. In this work, a contrast-enhanced dynamic MRI protocol with improved spatial and time resolution was used to perform in vivo tumor model imaging on the mouse at 1.5 T. The needed sensitivity is provided by the use of a 12-mm superconducting surface coil operating at 77 K. High quality in vivo images were obtained and revealed well-defined internal structures of the tumor. A 3-D HSR sequence with voxels of 59x59x300 microm3 encoded within 6.9 min and a 2-D sequence with subsecond acquisition time and isotropic in-plane resolution of 234 microm were used to analyze the contrast enhancement kinetics in tumoral structures at long and short time scales. This work is a first step to better characterize and differentiate the dynamic behavior of tumoral heterogeneities.

  11. Double-tuned radiofrequency coil for (19)F and (1)H imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otake, Yosuke; Soutome, Yoshihisa; Hirata, Koji; Ochi, Hisaaki; Bito, Yoshitaka

    2014-01-01

    We developed a double-tuned radiofrequency (RF) coil using a novel circuit method to double tune for fluorine-19 (19F) and 1H magnetic resonance imaging, whose frequencies are very close to each other. The RF coil consists of 3 parallel-connected series inductor capacitor circuits. A computer simulation for our double-tuned RF coil with a phantom demonstrated that the coil has tuned resonant frequency and high sensitivity for both 19F and 1H. Drug distribution was visualized at 7 tesla using this RF coil and a rat administered perfluoro 15-crown-5-ether emulsion. The double-tune RF coil we developed may be a powerful tool for 19F and 1H imaging.

  12. Combined PET/MRI scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlyer, David; Woody, Craig L.; Rooney, William; Vaska, Paul; Stoll, Sean; Pratte, Jean-Francois; O'Connor, Paul

    2007-10-23

    A combined PET/MRI scanner generally includes a magnet for producing a magnetic field suitable for magnetic resonance imaging, a radiofrequency (RF) coil disposed within the magnetic field produced by the magnet and a ring tomograph disposed within the magnetic field produced by the magnet. The ring tomograph includes a scintillator layer for outputting at least one photon in response to an annihilation event, a detection array coupled to the scintillator layer for detecting the at least one photon outputted by the scintillator layer and for outputting a detection signal in response to the detected photon and a front-end electronic array coupled to the detection array for receiving the detection signal, wherein the front-end array has a preamplifier and a shaper network for conditioning the detection signal.

  13. Mri: Selected Topics in Quantitation and Image Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Yun

    1990-10-01

    This research has focused on four areas of MRI with the objectives being a critical evaluation of the factors both visually and instrumentation that effect the quantitative indices of MRI. The following four areas of MRI were investigated:. Project #1. In both of the r.f. transmitter and receiver, many non-linearities exist which produce image distortions and loss of quantitative information. Key factors in spin echo (SE) imaging involve phase and gain adjustment of the quadrature phase detectors. To compensate for these nonlinearities, NMR spectroscopist developed techniques involving phase rolling of the rf pulses for dealing with one dimensional spectra. In this project, the effect of these nonlinearities were investigated for MR imaging on a 2.0T small bore system in respect to image uniformity and artifacts. Project #2. In the presence of surface coils, image artifacts are generated which oftentimes produce large signal intensities and suppress the image gray scale in clinically useful regions. In this study, eight image renormalization algorithms were evaluated for their effects on image contrast, suppression of artifacts, and texture. In addition, images were evaluated independently by four radiologists. Project #3. The use of MRI to follow and characterize serial changes in vertebral marrow, as a function of therapy, age or sex, has produced inconsistent results. Systematic examinations were made of the effects of RF tuning and tip angles as well as RF coil response on both T1 and T2 relaxation times. Using calibration phantoms, algorithms were developed which reduce the instrumental variation in MR signal to less than 10% from the cervical (C7) to the lumbar (L2) vertebral bodies. These algorithms were evaluated by use of serial MRI on volunteers and a few patients receiving radiation therapy (RT) of the chest and abdomen for lymphoma. Project #4. Evaluation of sensitivity of chemical shift RF pulse sequences for water/lipid separation were evaluated on a

  14. Negative ion source with external RF antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Hahto, Sami K.; Hahto, Sari T.

    2007-02-13

    A radio frequency (RF) driven plasma ion source has an external RF antenna, i.e. the RF antenna is positioned outside the plasma generating chamber rather than inside. The RF antenna is typically formed of a small diameter metal tube coated with an insulator. An external RF antenna assembly is used to mount the external RF antenna to the ion source. The RF antenna tubing is wound around the external RF antenna assembly to form a coil. The external RF antenna assembly is formed of a material, e.g. quartz, which is essentially transparent to the RF waves. The external RF antenna assembly is attached to and forms a part of the plasma source chamber so that the RF waves emitted by the RF antenna enter into the inside of the plasma chamber and ionize a gas contained therein. The plasma ion source is typically a multi-cusp ion source. A converter can be included in the ion source to produce negative ions.

  15. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... will hear and feel loud tapping or thumping sounds when the coils that generate the radiofrequency pulses ... use headphones to reduce the intensity of the sounds made by the MRI machine. You may be ...

  16. Prostate cancer: 1.5 T endo-coil dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and MR spectroscopy-correlation with prostate biopsy and prostatectomy histopathological data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chabanova, E.; Balslev, I.; Løgager, Vibeke Berg

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate diagnostic accuracy of detection of prostate cancer by magnetic resonance: to evaluate the performance of T2WI, DCEMRI and CSI and to correlate the results with biopsy and radical prostatectomy histopathological data. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 43 patients, scheduled for radical...... prostatectomy, underwent prostate MR examination. Prostate cancer was identified by transrectal ultrasonographically (TRUS) guided sextant biopsy. MR examination was performed at 1.5T with an endorectal MR coil. Cancer localisation was performed on sextant-basis - for comparison between TRUS biopsy, MR...

  17. Differential diagnosis of intraconal orbital masses using high-resolution MRI with surface coils in 78 patients; Differenzialdiagnostik intrakonaler orbitaler Raumforderungen unter Verwendung der hochaufloesenden MRT mit Oberflaechenspulen anhand von 78 Patienten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemke, A.-J.; Kazi, I.; Felix, R. [Universitaetsklinikum Charite, Berlin (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde; Landeck, L.M. [Universitaetsklinikum Charite, Berlin (Germany). Venerologie und Allergologie; Zaspel, U. [Universitaetsklinikum Charite, Berlin (Germany). Institut fuer Radiologie; Hosten, N. [Universitaet Greifswald (Germany). Institut fuer Diagnostische Radiologie

    2004-10-01

    Purpose: Over the last decade, MRI has become the standard procedure for the diagnosis of orbital masses. Purpose of the study was to evaluate criteria for differential diagnosis for intraconal masses on MRI in a large patient group. Material and Methods: In a retrospective study, MR examinations of 78 patients with intraconal masses were evaluated. All examinations were performed using surface coils for high spatial resolution. Signal behavior on T2-WI and T1-WI before and after contrast application as well as further tumor characteristics (i.e., shape, size, position, delineation and infiltration) were evaluated. Every diagnosis was proven by histopathological results from extirpation (n=18) or biopsy (n=22), or confirmed by other imaging modalities (n=13) or clinical course (n=25). Results: Different tumor characteristics are helpful in the differentiation between cavernous hemangioma, lymphangioma, varices, AV malformations and solid tumors. Due to overlapping in the imaging appearance, the differentiation between inflammatory pseudotumor, lymphoma and orbital metastasis was more difficult. (orig.)

  18. Dynamic contrast-enhanced susceptibility-weighted perfusion MRI (DSC-MRI) in a glioma model of the rat brain using a conventional receive-only surface coil with a inner diameter of 47 mm at a clinical 1.5 T scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, Stephan; Reeh, Matthias; Krause, Joerg; Herdegen, Thomas; Heldt-Feindt, Janka; Jansen, Olav; Rohr, Axel

    2008-07-30

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in animal models is usually performed in expensive dedicated small bore animal scanners of limited availability. In the present study a standard clinical 1.5 T MR scanner was used for morphometric and dynamic contrast-enhanced susceptibility-weighted MR imaging (DSC-MRI) of a glioma model of the rat brain. Ten male Wistar rats were examined with coronal T2-weighted, and T1-weighted images (matrix 128 x 128, FOV 64 mm) after implantation of an intracerebral tumor xenografts (C6) using a conventional surface coil. For DSC-MRI a T2*-weighted sequence (TR/TE=30/14 ms, matrix 64 x 64, FOV 90 mm; slice thickness of 1.5mm) was performed. Regions of interest were defined within the tumor and the non-affected contralateral hemisphere and the mean transit time (MTT) was determined. Tumor dimensions in MR predicted well its real size as proven by histology. The MTT of contrast agent passing through the brain was significantly decelerated in the tumor compared to the unaffected hemisphere (pscanners or dedicated custom-made coils.

  19. First in vivo potassium-39 (³⁹K) MRI at 9.4 T using conventional copper radio frequency surface coil cooled to 77 K

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elabyad, Ibrahim A.; Kalayciyan, Raffi; Shanbhag, Nagesh C.; Schad, Lothar R.

    2014-01-01

    Potassium-39 (K-39) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive technique which could potentially allow for detecting intracellular physiological variations in common human pathologies such as stroke and cancer. However, the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) achieved in K-39-MR images hampered d

  20. First in vivo potassium-39 (³⁹K) MRI at 9.4 T using conventional copper radio frequency surface coil cooled to 77 K

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elabyad, Ibrahim A.; Kalayciyan, Raffi; Shanbhag, Nagesh C.; Schad, Lothar R.

    2014-01-01

    Potassium-39 (K-39) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive technique which could potentially allow for detecting intracellular physiological variations in common human pathologies such as stroke and cancer. However, the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) achieved in K-39-MR images hampered d

  1. An eight-channel T/R head coil for parallel transmit MRI at 3T using ultra-low output impedance amplifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Katherine Lynn; Hollingsworth, Neal A; Zhao, Feng; Nielsen, Jon-Fredrik; Noll, Douglas C; Wright, Steven M; McDougall, Mary Preston

    2014-09-01

    Parallel transmit is an emerging technology to address the technical challenges associated with MR imaging at high field strengths. When developing arrays for parallel transmit systems, one of the primary factors to be considered is the mechanism to manage coupling and create independently operating channels. Recent work has demonstrated the use of amplifiers to provide some or all of the channel-to-channel isolation, reducing the need for on-coil decoupling networks in a manner analogous to the use of isolation preamplifiers with receive coils. This paper discusses an eight-channel transmit/receive head array for use with an ultra-low output impedance (ULOI) parallel transmit system. The ULOI amplifiers eliminated the need for a complex lumped element network to decouple the eight-rung array. The design and construction details of the array are discussed in addition to the measurement considerations required for appropriately characterizing an array when using ULOI amplifiers. B1 maps and coupling matrices are used to verify the performance of the system.

  2. Rf-inhomogeneity compensation using method of Fourier synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaneja, Navin

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method for design of composite pulses that are robust to rf-amplitude (rf-inhomogeneity). We call this, the method of Fourier synthesis. The method is general enough to design excitation, inversion, refocusing or arbitary flip angle pulses that are robust to rf-amplitude. The method can be tailored to have amplitude selective excitation. We experimentally show rf-compensation over a order of magnitude (20 db) variation in rf-amplitude. The method is expected to find use in invivo NMR studies using surface coils, where there is large dispersion in rf-amplitude over the sample.

  3. A novel method to decrease electric field and SAR using an external high dielectric sleeve at 3 T head MRI: numerical and experimental results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bu S; Rajan, Sunder S; Guag, Joshua W; Angelone, Leonardo M

    2015-04-01

    Materials with high dielectric constant (HDC) have been used in high field MRI to decrease specific absorption rate (SAR), increase magnetic field intensity, and increase signal-to-noise ratio. In previous studies, the HDC materials were placed inside the RF coil decreasing the space available. This study describes an alternative approach that considers an HDC-based sleeve placed outside the RF coil. The effects of an HDC on the electromagnetic (EM) field were studied using numerical simulations with a coil unloaded and loaded with a human head model. In addition, experimental EM measurements at 128 MHz were performed inside a custom-made head coil, fitted with a distilled water sleeve. The numerical simulations showed up to 40% decrease in maximum 10 g-avg. SAR on the surface of the head model with an HDC material of barium titanate. Experimental measurements also showed up to 20% decrease of maximum electric field using an HDC material of distilled water. The proposed method can be incorporated in the design of high field transmit RF coils.

  4. Prostate cancer: 1.5 T endo-coil dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and MR spectroscopy-correlation with prostate biopsy and prostatectomy histopathological data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chabanova, E.; Balslev, I.; Løgager, Vibeke Berg

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate diagnostic accuracy of detection of prostate cancer by magnetic resonance: to evaluate the performance of T2WI, DCEMRI and CSI and to correlate the results with biopsy and radical prostatectomy histopathological data. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 43 patients, scheduled for radical...... prostatectomy, underwent prostate MR examination. Prostate cancer was identified by transrectal ultrasonographically (TRUS) guided sextant biopsy. MR examination was performed at 1.5T with an endorectal MR coil. Cancer localisation was performed on sextant-basis - for comparison between TRUS biopsy, MR......% and 69% for DCEMRI, and 46% and 78% for CSI. CONCLUSION: T2WI, DCEMRI and CSI in combination can identify prostate cancer. Further development of MR technologies for these MR methods is necessary to improve the detection of the prostate cancer...

  5. Experimental and numerical analysis of B1+ field and SAR with a new transmit array design for 7 T breast MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junghwan; Krishnamurthy, Narayan; Santini, Tales; Zhao, Yujuan; Zhao, Tiejun; Bae, Kyongtae Ty; Ibrahim, Tamer S.

    2016-08-01

    Developing a radiofrequency (RF) coil system that produces a uniform B1+ field (circularly polarized component of the transverse magnetic field responsible for excitation) and low specific absorption rate (SAR) is critical for high performance ultrahigh field human imaging. In this study, we provide the design of a new eight channel radiofrequency (RF) transmit (Tx) array for breast MRI at 7 T. A numerical analysis utilizing an in-house finite difference time domain (FDTD) package was carried out in (1) four breast models, (2) homogeneous spherical model and (3) full body model to calculate the B1+ intensity (μT) and homogeneity represented by coefficient of variation (CoV = standard deviation/mean) in the proposed RF array design. The numerical results were compared with that measured in breast phantom (Bphantom) and homogeneous spherical phantom at 7 T MRI and showed very good agreement. Average and peak SARs were also calculated in the four breast models and the temperature rises due to the operation of the RF array were also measured in the Bphantom. The proposed RF array; which can operate in a single or multi transmit modes, demonstrates homogeneous RF field excitation with acceptable local/average SAR levels for breast MRI at 7 T.

  6. Design of transverse head gradient coils using a layer-sharing scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaohui; Liu, Feng; Zhou, Xiaorong; Crozier, Stuart

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, a new design for transverse asymmetric head gradient coils is proposed for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Unlike the conventional coil designs where the x and y coils are placed onto separate radial layers, the new design has windings for both the x and y coils in each transverse coil layer. The coil performance using the new design was compared with the conventional coils with the same dimensions and constraints. The results showed that the new design can improve coil performance in terms of a lower inductance, lower resistance and a higher figure of merit.

  7. Coiled-Coil Design: Updated and Upgraded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolfson, Derek N

    2017-01-01

    α-Helical coiled coils are ubiquitous protein-folding and protein-interaction domains in which two or more α-helical chains come together to form bundles. Through a combination of bioinformatics analysis of many thousands of natural coiled-coil sequences and structures, plus empirical protein engineering and design studies, there is now a deep understanding of the sequence-to-structure relationships for this class of protein architecture. This has led to considerable success in rational design and what might be termed in biro de novo design of simple coiled coils, which include homo- and hetero-meric parallel dimers, trimers and tetramers. In turn, these provide a toolkit for directing the assembly of both natural proteins and more complex designs in protein engineering, materials science and synthetic biology. Moving on, the increased and improved use of computational design is allowing access to coiled-coil structures that are rare or even not observed in nature, for example α-helical barrels, which comprise five or more α-helices and have central channels into which different functions may be ported. This chapter reviews all of these advances, outlining improvements in our knowledge of the fundamentals of coiled-coil folding and assembly, and highlighting new coiled coil-based materials and applications that this new understanding is opening up. Despite considerable progress, however, challenges remain in coiled-coil design, and the next decade promises to be as productive and exciting as the last.

  8. Surface Coil Intensity Correction in Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Spinal Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hong; Lin, Wei; Ding, Xianjun

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical application of phased-array surface coil intensity correction in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in spinal metastases. 3 phantoms and 50 patients with a corresponding total number of 80 spinal metastases were included in this study. Fast spin echo T1- and T2- weighted MRI with and without surface coil intensity correction was routinely performed for all phantoms and patients. Phantoms were evaluated by means of variance to mean ratio of signal intensity on both T1- and T2- weighted MRI obtained with and without surface coil intensity correction. Spinal metastases were evaluated by image quality scores; reading time per case on both T1- and T2- weighted MRI obtained with and without surface coil intensity correction. Spinal metastases were diagnosed more successfully on MRI with surface coil intensity correction than on MRI with conventional surface coil technique. The variance to mean ratio of signal intensity was 53.36% for original T1-weighted MRI and 53.58% for original T2-weighted MRI. The variance to mean ratio of signal intensity was reduced to 18.99% for T1-weighted MRI with surface coil intensity correction and 22.77% for T2-weighted MRI with surface coil intensity correction. The overall image quality scores (interface conspicuity of lesion and details of lesion) were significantly higher than those of the original MRI. The reading time per case was shorter for MRI with surface coil intensity correction than for MRI without surface coil intensity correction. Phased-array surface coil intensity correction in MRIs of spinal metastases provides improvements in image quality that leads to more successfully detection and assessment of spinal metastases than original MRI.

  9. DC SQUIDS with planar input coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pegrum, C.M.; Donaldson, G.B.; Hutson, D.; Tugwell, A.

    1985-03-01

    We describe the key parts of our recent work to develop a planar thin-film DC SQUID with a closely-coupled spiral input coil. Our aim has been to make a device that is superior to present RF SQUID sensors in terms of sensitivity and long-term reliability. To be compatible with an RF SQUID the inductance of the input coils must be relatively large, typically 2..mu..H, and the input noise current in the white noise region should be below 10pA Hz /SUP -1/2/ . A low level of 1/f noise is also necessary for many applications and should be achieved without the use of complex noisecancelling circuitry. Our devices meet these criteria. We include a description of work on window and edge junction fabrication using ion beam cleaning, thermal oxidation and RF plasma processing.

  10. High-resolution MRI encoding using radiofrequency phase gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Jonathan C; King, Scott B; Deng, Qunli; Volotovskyy, Vyacheslav; Tomanek, Boguslaw

    2013-11-01

    Although MRI offers highly diagnostic medical imagery, patient access to this modality worldwide is very limited when compared with X-ray or ultrasound. One reason for this is the expense and complexity of the equipment used to generate the switched magnetic fields necessary for MRI encoding. These field gradients are also responsible for intense acoustic noise and have the potential to induce nerve stimulation. We present results with a new MRI encoding principle which operates entirely without the use of conventional B0 field gradients. This new approach--'Transmit Array Spatial Encoding' (TRASE)--uses only the resonant radiofrequency (RF) field to produce Fourier spatial encoding equivalent to conventional MRI. k-space traversal (image encoding) is achieved by spin refocusing with phase gradient transmit fields in spin echo trains. A transmit coil array, driven by just a single transmitter channel, was constructed to produce four phase gradient fields, which allows the encoding of two orthogonal spatial axes. High-resolution two-dimensional-encoded in vivo MR images of hand and wrist were obtained at 0.2 T. TRASE exploits RF field phase gradients, and offers the possibility of very low-cost diagnostics and novel experiments exploiting unique capabilities, such as imaging without disturbance of the main B0 magnetic field. Lower field imaging (imaging are favorable application domains as, in both cases, it is technically easier to achieve the short RF pulses desirable for long echo trains, and also to limit RF power deposition. As TRASE is simply an alternative mechanism (and technology) of moving through k space, there are many close analogies between it and conventional B0 -encoded techniques. TRASE is compatible with both B0 gradient encoding and parallel imaging, and so hybrid sequences containing all three spatial encoding approaches are possible.

  11. An object-oriented designed finite-difference time-domain simulator for electromagnetic analysis and design in MRI--applications to high field analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Q; Liu, F; Xia, L; Crozier, S

    2005-02-01

    This paper presents a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulator for electromagnetic analysis and design applications in MRI. It is intended to be a complete FDTD model of an MRI system including all RF and low-frequency field generating units and electrical models of the patient. The program has been constructed in an object-oriented framework. The design procedure is detailed and the numerical solver has been verified against analytical solutions for simple cases and also applied to various field calculation problems. In particular, the simulator is demonstrated for inverse RF coil design, optimized source profile generation, and parallel imaging in high-frequency situations. The examples show new developments enabled by the simulator and demonstrate that the proposed FDTD framework can be used to analyze large-scale computational electromagnetic problems in modern MRI engineering.

  12. Design and implementation of a simple multinuclear MRI system for ultra high-field imaging of animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chang-Hoon; Ha, YongHyun; Veeraiah, Pandichelvam; Felder, Jörg; Möllenhoff, Klaus; Shah, N. Jon

    2016-12-01

    Non-proton MRI has recently garnered gathering interest with the increased availability of ultra high-field MRI system. Assuming the availability of a broadband RF amplifier, performing multinuclear MR experiments essentially requires additional hardware, such as an RF resonator and a T/R switch for each nucleus. A double- or triple-resonant RF probe is typically constructed using traps or PIN-diode circuits, but this approach degrades the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and image quality compared to a single-resonant coil and this is a limiting factor. In this work, we have designed the required hardware for multinuclear MR imaging experiments employing six single-resonant coil sets and a purpose-built animal bed; these have been implemented into a home-integrated 9.4 T preclinical MRI scanner. System capabilities are demonstrated by distinguishing concentration differences and sensitivity of X-nuclei imaging and spectroscopy without SNR penalty for any nuclei, no subject interruption and no degradation of the static shim conditions.

  13. Practical aspects of 13C surface receive coils with active decoupling and tuning circuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Daniel; Mohr, Johan Jacob; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of nuclei other than 1H (e.g. 13C) allows for characterisation of metabolic processes. Imaging of such nuclei, however, requires development of sensitive MRI coils. This paper describes the design of surface receive coils for 13C imaging in small animals. The design...... is based on application-specified coil profile and includes impedance matching and balancing circuits. Active decoupling is implemented in order to minimize the influence of the receiving coil on the homogeneity of the transmit-coil field. Measurement results for a coil prototype are presented, including...

  14. A novel low-E field coil to minimize heating of biological samples in solid-state multinuclear NMR experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillmann, Baudouin; Elbayed, Karim; Zeiger, Heinz; Weingertner, Marie-Catherine; Piotto, Martial; Engelke, Frank

    2007-07-01

    A novel coil, called Z coil, is presented. Its function is to reduce the strong thermal effects produced by rf heating at high frequencies. The results obtained at 500 MHz in a 50 μl sample prove that the Z coil can cope with salt concentrations that are one order of magnitude higher than in traditional solenoidal coils. The evaluation of the rf field is performed by numerical analysis based on first principles and by carrying out rf field measurements. Reduction of rf heating is probed with a DMPC/DHPC membrane prepared in buffers of increasing salt concentrations. The intricate correlation that exists between the magnetic and electric field is presented. It is demonstrated that, in a multiply tuned traditional MAS coil, the rf electric field E1 cannot be reduced without altering the rf magnetic field. Since the detailed distribution differs when changing the coil geometry, a comparison involving the following three distinct designs is discussed: (1) a regular coil of 5.5 turns, (2) a variable pitch coil with the same number of turns, (3) the new Z coil structure. For each of these coils loaded with samples of different salt concentrations, the nutation fields obtained at a certain power level provide a basis to discuss the impact of the dielectric and conductive losses on the rf efficiency.

  15. A novel low-E field coil to minimize heating of biological samples in solid-state multinuclear NMR experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillmann, Baudouin; Elbayed, Karim; Zeiger, Heinz; Weingertner, Marie-Catherine; Piotto, Martial; Engelke, Frank

    2007-07-01

    A novel coil, called Z coil, is presented. Its function is to reduce the strong thermal effects produced by rf heating at high frequencies. The results obtained at 500MHz in a 50 microl sample prove that the Z coil can cope with salt concentrations that are one order of magnitude higher than in traditional solenoidal coils. The evaluation of the rf field is performed by numerical analysis based on first principles and by carrying out rf field measurements. Reduction of rf heating is probed with a DMPC/DHPC membrane prepared in buffers of increasing salt concentrations. The intricate correlation that exists between the magnetic and electric field is presented. It is demonstrated that, in a multiply tuned traditional MAS coil, the rf electric field E(1) cannot be reduced without altering the rf magnetic field. Since the detailed distribution differs when changing the coil geometry, a comparison involving the following three distinct designs is discussed: (1) a regular coil of 5.5 turns, (2) a variable pitch coil with the same number of turns, (3) the new Z coil structure. For each of these coils loaded with samples of different salt concentrations, the nutation fields obtained at a certain power level provide a basis to discuss the impact of the dielectric and conductive losses on the rf efficiency.

  16. Prostate cancer: 1.5 T endo-coil dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and MR spectroscopy-correlation with prostate biopsy and prostatectomy histopathological data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chabanova, Elizaveta, E-mail: elcha@heh.regionh.dk [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark); Balslev, Ingegerd [Department of Pathology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark); Logager, Vibeke [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark); Hansen, Alastair [Department of Pathology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark); Jakobsen, Henrik; Kromann-Andersen, Bjarne; Norgaard, Nis [Department of Urology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev, (Denmark); Horn, Thomas [Department of Pathology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark); Thomsen, Henrik S. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev (Denmark)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate diagnostic accuracy of detection of prostate cancer by magnetic resonance: to evaluate the performance of T2WI, DCEMRI and CSI and to correlate the results with biopsy and radical prostatectomy histopathological data. Materials and methods: 43 patients, scheduled for radical prostatectomy, underwent prostate MR examination. Prostate cancer was identified by transrectal ultrasonographically (TRUS) guided sextant biopsy. MR examination was performed at 1.5T with an endorectal MR coil. Cancer localisation was performed on sextant-basis - for comparison between TRUS biopsy, MR techniques and histopathological findings on prostatectomy specimens. Results: Prostate cancer was identified in all 43 patients by combination of the three MR techniques. The detection of prostate cancer on sextant-basis showed sensitivity and specificity: 50% and 91% for TRUS, 72% and 55% for T2WI, 49% and 69% for DCEMRI, and 46% and 78% for CSI. Conclusion: T2WI, DCEMRI and CSI in combination can identify prostate cancer. Further development of MR technologies for these MR methods is necessary to improve the detection of the prostate cancer.

  17. Designing Stable Antiparallel Coiled Coil Dimers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾宪纲; 周海梦

    2001-01-01

    The history of antiparallel coiled coil dimer design is briefly reviewed and the main principles governing the successful designs are explained. They include analysis of the inter-subunit electrostatic repulsion for determining partners for dimerization and of the buried polar interaction for determining the relative orientation of the partners. A theory is proposed to explain the lack of antiparallel coiled coil homodimers in nature.

  18. Comparison of the utility of whole-body MRI with and without contrast-enhanced Quick 3D and double RF fat suppression techniques, conventional whole-body MRI, PET/CT and conventional examination for assessment of recurrence in NSCLC patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu, E-mail: yosirad@kobe-u.ac.jp [Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Nishio, Mizuho [Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Koyama, Hisanobu [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Sumiaki [Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Takenaka, Daisuke [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Department of Radiology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi (Japan); Seki, Shinichiro [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Tsubakimoto, Maho [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara, Okinawa (Japan); Sugimura, Kazuro [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare diagnostic capabilities for assessment of recurrence in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients by contrast-enhanced whole-body MRI (CE-WB-MRI) with and without CE-Quick 3D and double RF fat suppression technique (DFS), FDG-PET/CT and conventional radiological examinations. Materials and methods: A total of 134 pathologically proven and completely resected NSCLC patients (78 males, 56 females; mean age: 72 years) underwent FDG-PET/CT, CE-WB-MRI with and without Quick 3D and DFS at 3 T as well as conventional radiological examinations. The probability of recurrence was assessed with a 5-point scoring system on a per-patient basis, and final diagnosis was made by consensus between two readers. The capability for overall recurrence assessment by all the methods was compared by means of ROC analysis and their sensitivity, specificity and accuracy by means of McNemar's test. Results: Although areas under the curve did not show any significant differences, specificity (100%) and accuracy (95.5%) of CE-WB-MRI with CE-Quick 3D and DFS were significantly higher than those of FDG-PET/CT (specificity: 93.6%, p = 0.02; accuracy: 89.6%, p = 0.01) and conventional radiological examinations (specificity: 92.7%, p = 0.01; accuracy: 91.0%, p = 0.03). In addition, specificity of CE-WB-MRI without CE-Quick 3D and DFS (100%) was significantly higher than that of FDG-PET/CT (p = 0.02) and conventional radiological examinations (p = 0.01). Conclusion: Specificity and accuracy of CE-WB-MRI with CE-Quick 3D and DFS for assessment of recurrence in NSCLC patients are at least as high as, or higher than those of others.

  19. Coil Welding Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesenbach, W. T.; Clark, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    Positioner holds coil inside cylinder during tack welding. Welding aid spaces turns of coil inside cylinder and applies contact pressure while coil is tack-welded to cylinder. Device facilitates fabrication of heat exchangers and other structures by eliminating hand-positioning and clamping of individual coil turns.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... will hear and feel loud tapping or thumping sounds when the coils that generate the radiofrequency pulses ... use headphones to reduce the intensity of the sounds made by the MRI machine. You may be ...

  1. Progress on the Coupling Coil for the MICE Channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, M.A.; Li, D.; Virostek, S.P.; Lau, W.; Witte, H.; Yang,S.Q.; Drumm, P.; Ivanyushenkov, Y.

    2005-05-08

    This report describes the progress on the coupling magnet for the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). MICE consists of two cells of a SFOFO cooling channel that is similar to that studied in the level 2 study of a neutrino factory. The MICE RF coupling coil module (RFCC module) consists of a 1.56 m diameter superconducting solenoid, mounted around four cells of conventional 201.25 MHz closed RF cavities. This report discusses the progress that has been made on the superconducting coupling coil that is around the center of the RF coupling module. This report describes the process by which one would cool the coupling coil using a single small 4 K cooler. In addition, the coupling magnet power system and quench protection system are also described.

  2. Protective link for superconducting coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umans, Stephen D.

    2009-12-08

    A superconducting coil system includes a superconducting coil and a protective link of superconducting material coupled to the superconducting coil. A rotating machine includes first and second coils and a protective link of superconducting material. The second coil is operable to rotate with respect to the first coil. One of the first and second coils is a superconducting coil. The protective link is coupled to the superconducting coil.

  3. Real-time 2D spatially selective MRI experiments: Comparative analysis of optimal control design methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximov, Ivan I; Vinding, Mads S; Tse, Desmond H Y; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Shah, N Jon

    2015-05-01

    There is an increasing need for development of advanced radio-frequency (RF) pulse techniques in modern magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems driven by recent advancements in ultra-high magnetic field systems, new parallel transmit/receive coil designs, and accessible powerful computational facilities. 2D spatially selective RF pulses are an example of advanced pulses that have many applications of clinical relevance, e.g., reduced field of view imaging, and MR spectroscopy. The 2D spatially selective RF pulses are mostly generated and optimised with numerical methods that can handle vast controls and multiple constraints. With this study we aim at demonstrating that numerical, optimal control (OC) algorithms are efficient for the design of 2D spatially selective MRI experiments, when robustness towards e.g. field inhomogeneity is in focus. We have chosen three popular OC algorithms; two which are gradient-based, concurrent methods using first- and second-order derivatives, respectively; and a third that belongs to the sequential, monotonically convergent family. We used two experimental models: a water phantom, and an in vivo human head. Taking into consideration the challenging experimental setup, our analysis suggests the use of the sequential, monotonic approach and the second-order gradient-based approach as computational speed, experimental robustness, and image quality is key. All algorithms used in this work were implemented in the MATLAB environment and are freely available to the MRI community.

  4. Quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (qCEST) MRI - omega plot analysis of RF-spillover-corrected inverse CEST ratio asymmetry for simultaneous determination of labile proton ratio and exchange rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Renhua; Xiao, Gang; Zhou, Iris Yuwen; Ran, Chongzhao; Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2015-03-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI is sensitive to labile proton concentration and exchange rate, thus allowing measurement of dilute CEST agent and microenvironmental properties. However, CEST measurement depends not only on the CEST agent properties but also on the experimental conditions. Quantitative CEST (qCEST) analysis has been proposed to address the limitation of the commonly used simplistic CEST-weighted calculation. Recent research has shown that the concomitant direct RF saturation (spillover) effect can be corrected using an inverse CEST ratio calculation. We postulated that a simplified qCEST analysis is feasible with omega plot analysis of the inverse CEST asymmetry calculation. Specifically, simulations showed that the numerically derived labile proton ratio and exchange rate were in good agreement with input values. In addition, the qCEST analysis was confirmed experimentally in a phantom with concurrent variation in CEST agent concentration and pH. Also, we demonstrated that the derived labile proton ratio increased linearly with creatine concentration (P exchange rate followed a dominantly base-catalyzed exchange relationship (P exchange rate in a relatively complex in vitro CEST system.

  5. A Method for Evaluating the Magnetic Field Homogeneity of a Radiofrequency Coil by Its Field Histogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Q. X.; Li, S. H.; Smith, M. B.

    The magnetic field homogeneity of a radiofrequency coil is very important in both magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. In this report, a method is proposed for quantitatively evaluating the RF magnetic field homogeneity from its histogram, which is obtained by either experimental measurement or theoretical calculation. The experimental histogram and theoretical histogram can be compared directly to verify the theoretical findings. The RF field homogeneities of the bird-cage coil, slotted-tube resonator, cosine wire coil, and a new radial plate coil design were evaluated using this method. The results showed that the experimental histograms and the corresponding theoretical histograms are consistent. This method provides an easy and sensitive way of evaluating the magnetic field homogeneity and facilitates the design and evaluation of new RF coil configurations.

  6. Integral electrical characteristics and local plasma parameters of a RF ion thruster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masherov, P. E.; Riaby, V. A., E-mail: riaby2001@yahoo.com [Research Institute of Applied Mechanics and Electrodynamics of the Moscow Aviation Institute (National Research University), Moscow (Russian Federation); Godyak, V. A. [Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA and RF Plasma Consulting, Brookline, Massachusetts 02446 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Comprehensive diagnostics has been carried out for a RF ion thruster based on inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source with an external flat antenna coil enhanced by ferrite core. The ICP was confined within a cylindrical chamber with low aspect ratio to minimize plasma loss to the chamber wall. Integral diagnostics of the ICP electrical parameters (RF power balance and coil current) allowed for evaluation of the antenna coils, matching networks, and eddy current loss and the true RF power deposited to plasma. Spatially resolved electron energy distribution functions, plasma density, electron temperatures, and plasma potentials were measured with movable Langmuir probes.

  7. Comparison of pelvic phased-array versus endorectal coil magnetic resonance imaging at 3 Tesla for local staging of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bum Soo; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kwon, Tae Gyun; Yoo, Eun Sang

    2012-05-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the superiority of endorectal coil magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) over pelvic phased-array coil MRI at 1.5 Tesla for local staging of prostate cancer. However, few have studied which evaluation is more accurate at 3 Tesla MRI. In this study, we compared the accuracy of local staging of prostate cancer using pelvic phased-array coil or endorectal coil MRI at 3 Tesla. Between January 2005 and May 2010, 151 patients underwent radical prostatectomy. All patients were evaluated with either pelvic phased-array coil or endorectal coil prostate MRI prior to surgery (63 endorectal coils and 88 pelvic phased-array coils). Tumor stage based on MRI was compared with pathologic stage. We calculated the specificity, sensitivity and accuracy of each group in the evaluation of extracapsular extension and seminal vesicle invasion. Both endorectal coil and pelvic phased-array coil MRI achieved high specificity, low sensitivity and moderate accuracy for the detection of extracapsular extension and seminal vesicle invasion. There were statistically no differences in specificity, sensitivity and accuracy between the two groups. Overall staging accuracy, sensitivity and specificity were not significantly different between endorectal coil and pelvic phased-array coil MRI.

  8. Dual coil ignition system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huberts, Garlan J.; Qu, Qiuping; Czekala, Michael Damian

    2017-03-28

    A dual coil ignition system is provided. The dual coil ignition system includes a first inductive ignition coil including a first primary winding and a first secondary winding, and a second inductive ignition coil including a second primary winding and a second secondary winding, the second secondary winding connected in series to the first secondary winding. The dual coil ignition system further includes a diode network including a first diode and a second diode connected between the first secondary winding and the second secondary winding.

  9. Three-dimensional isotropic fat-suppressed proton density-weighted MRI at 3 tesla using a T/R-coil can replace multiple plane two-dimensional sequences in knee imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homsi, R.; Luetkens, J.A. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Gieseke, J. [Philips Healthcare, Hamburg (Germany); and others

    2016-10-15

    To evaluate whether a 3D proton density-weighted fat-suppressed sequence (PDwFS) of the knee is able to replace multiplanar 2D-PDwFS. 52 patients (26 men, mean age: 41.9±14.5 years) underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee at 3.0 Tesla using a T/R-coil. The imaging protocol included 3 planes of 2D-PDwFS (acquisition time (AT): 6:40 min; voxel sizes: 0.40-0.63 x 0.44-0.89 x 3 mm{sup 3}) and a 3D-PDwFS (AT: 6:31 min; voxel size: 0.63 x 0.68 x 0.63 mm{sup 3}). Homogeneity of fat suppression (HFS), artifacts, and image sharpness (IS) were evaluated on a 5-point scale (5[excellent] - 1[non-diagnostic]). The sum served as a measure for the overall image quality (OIQ). Contrast ratios (CR) compared to popliteal muscle were calculated for the meniscus (MEN), anterior (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligaments (PCL). In 13 patients who underwent arthroscopic knee surgery, two radiologists evaluated the presence of meniscal, ligamental and cartilage lesions to estimate the sensitivity and specificity of lesion detection. The CR was higher in the ACL, PCL and MEN in 3D- PDwFS compared to 2D-PDwFS (p<0.01 for ACL and PCL; p=0.07 for MEN). Compared to 2D images, the OIQ was rated higher in 3D-PDwFS images (p<0.01) due to fewer artifacts and HFS despite the lower IS (p<0.01). The sensitivity and specificity of lesion detection in 3D- and 2D-PDwFS were similar. Compared to standard multiplanar 2D-PDwFS knee imaging, isotropic high spatial resolution 3D-PDwFS of the knee at 3.0T can be acquired with high image quality in a reasonable scan time. Multiplanar reformations in arbitrary planes may serve as an additional benefit of 3D-PDwFS.

  10. Analysis of random noise, coil inhomogeneity, and ghost artifacts in spin echo imaging on a 1.5 T commercial magnetic resonance imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Ramesh; Rusinek, Henry

    1990-05-01

    Noise in spin echo (SE) images in MRI consists of random and structured components Structured noise arises mainly from the non-uniformity of the B1 field. We have studied these errors using a cylindrical phantom. Random noise analysis by subtraction of a 4,9, or 25 points smoothed image from the original image showed small but significant differences between the three methods, though it was uniform over the phantom and changed little with time over a span of 8 months. The rf coil nonuniformity ( coefficient of variation,CV) in two areas of interest (ROI). a central area (40 cm2) and a ring outside the central region (130 cm2) was measured to be 21% and 45% respectively for the saddle coil and 1 5% and 6.0% respectively for the bird cage coil Using the first day flood image for correction of the later images. CV in the two ROI's of the corrected images were 1.3% and 2.2% for the saddle coil respectively and 0.9% and 1.6% respectively.

  11. Slice-to-volume registration and its potential application to interventional MRI-guided radio-frequency thermal ablation of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Baowei; Duerk, Jeffrey L; Boll, Daniel T; Lewin, Jonathan S; Wilson, David L

    2003-04-01

    In this study, we registered live-time interventional magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) slices with a previously obtained high-resolution MRI volume that in turn can be registered with a variety of functional images, e.g., PET, SPECT, for tumor targeting. We created and evaluated a slice-to-volume (SV) registration algorithm with special features for its potential use in iMRI-guided radio-frequency (RF) thermal ablation of prostate cancer. The algorithm features included a multiresolution approach, two similarity measures, and automatic restarting to avoid local minima. Imaging experiments were performed on volunteers using a conventional 1.5-T MR scanner and a clinical 0.2-T C-arm iMRI system under realistic conditions. Both high-resolution MR volumes and actual iMRI image slices were acquired from the same volunteers. Actual and simulated iMRI images were used to test the dependence of SV registration on image noise, receive coil inhomogeneity, and RF needle artifacts. To quantitatively assess registration, we calculated the mean voxel displacement over a volume of interest between SV registration and volume-to-volume registration, which was previously shown to be quite accurate. More than 800 registration experiments were performed. For transverse image slices covering the prostate, the SV registration algorithm was 100% successful with an error of bladder filling. These preliminary experiments indicate that MR SV registration is sufficiently accurate to aid image-guided therapy.

  12. Contrast-enhanced ultra-high-field liver MRI: A feasibility trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umutlu, Lale, E-mail: Lale.Umutlu@uk-essen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen (Germany); Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); Bitz, Andreas K.; Maderwald, Stefan; Orzada, Stephan; Kinner, Sonja; Kraff, Oliver; Brote, Irina; Ladd, Susanne C.; Schroeder, Tobias; Forsting, Michael; Antoch, Gerald; Ladd, Mark E. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen (Germany); Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); Quick, Harald H. [Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); Institute of Medical Physics, University Nuernberg-Erlangen (Germany); Lauenstein, Thomas C. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen (Germany); Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of dynamic contrast-enhanced 7 T MRI of the liver using an eight-channel radiofrequency (RF) transmit/receive body-coil. 16 healthy subjects were examined on a 7 T MR system utilizing a custom-built eight-channel RF body-coil suitable for RF-shimming. The following data were acquired: (1) steady state free precession imaging, (2) T2w turbo spin echo imaging, (3) T1w in and opposed-phase imaging, (4) T1w 3D FLASH images pre-contrast and in arterial, portal-venous and venous phase and (5) a fat-saturated pre- and post-contrast 2D FLASH sequence. Visual evaluation of (1) the delineation of liver vasculature, (2) the overall image quality, and (3) artifact presence and consequent image impairment was performed. SNR of the liver parenchyma was measured for the contrast-enhanced 2D and 3D FLASH sequences. For statistical analysis, a Wilcoxon-Rank Test was used. Best delineation of non-enhanced liver vasculature and overall image quality was found for 2D FLASH MRI, with only slight improvement in vessel conspicuity after the application of contrast media. T2-weighted TSE imaging remained strongly impaired, falling short of diagnostic relevance and precluding a clinical application. Our results demonstrate the feasibility and diagnostic potential of dedicated contrast-enhanced 7 T liver MRI as well as the potential for non-contrast-enhanced angiographic application.

  13. Theoretical signal-to-noise ratio of a slotted surface coil for magnetic resonance imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Ocegueda, K; Solis, S E; Rodriguez, A O

    2011-01-01

    The analytical expression for the signal-to-noise ratio of a slotted surface coil with an arbitrary number of slots was derived using the quasi-static approach. This surface coil based on the vane-type magnetron tube. To study the coil perfomance, the theoretical signal-to-noise ratio predictions of this coil design were computed using a different number of slots. Results were also compared with theoretical results obtained for a circular coil with similar dimensions. It can be appreciated that slotted surface coil performance improves as the number of coils increases and, outperformed the circular-shaped coil. This makes it a good candidate for other MRI applications involving coil array techniques.

  14. RF Driven Multicusp H- Ion Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, K.N.; DeVries, G.J.; DiVergilio, W.F.; Hamm, R.W.; Hauck, C.A.; Kunkel, W.B.; McDonald, D.S.; Williams, M.D.

    1990-06-01

    An rf driven multicusp source capable of generating 1-ms H{sup -} beam pulses with a repetition rate as high as 150 Hz has been developed. This source can be operated with a filament or other types of starter. There is almost no lifetime limitation and a clean plasma can be maintained for a long period of operation. It is demonstrated that rf power as high as 25 kW could be coupled inductively to the plasma via a glass-coated copper-coil antenna. The extracted H{sup -} current density achieved is about 200 mA/cm{sup 2}.

  15. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation-coil design with improved focality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, P.; Lee, E. G.; Hadimani, R. L.; Jiles, D. C.

    2017-05-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a technique for neuromodulation that can be used as a non-invasive therapy for various neurological disorders. In TMS, a time varying magnetic field generated from an electromagnetic coil placed on the scalp is used to induce an electric field inside the brain. TMS coil geometry plays an important role in determining the focality and depth of penetration of the induced electric field responsible for stimulation. Clinicians and basic scientists are interested in stimulating a localized area of the brain, while minimizing the stimulation of surrounding neural networks. In this paper, a novel coil has been proposed, namely Quadruple Butterfly Coil (QBC) with an improved focality over the commercial Figure-8 coil. Finite element simulations were conducted with both the QBC and the conventional Figure-8 coil. The two coil's stimulation profiles were assessed with 50 anatomically realistic MRI derived head models. The coils were positioned on the vertex and the scalp over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex to stimulate the brain. Computer modeling of the coils has been done to determine the parameters of interest-volume of stimulation, maximum electric field, location of maximum electric field and area of stimulation across all 50 head models for both coils.

  16. Oval gradient coils for an open magnetic resonance imaging system with a vertical magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzawa, Koki; Abe, Mitsushi; Kose, Katsumi; Terada, Yasuhiko

    2017-05-01

    Existing open magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems use biplanar gradient coils for the spatial encoding of signals. We propose using novel oval gradient coils for an open vertical-field MRI. We designed oval gradients for a 0.3 T open MRI system and showed that such a system could outperform a traditional biplanar gradient system while maintaining adequate gradient homogeneity and subject accessibility. Such oval gradient coils would exhibit high efficiency, low inductance and resistance, and high switching capability. Although the designed oval Y and Z coils showed more heat dissipation and less cooling capability than biplanar coils with the same gap, they showed an efficient heat-dissipation path to the surrounding air, which would alleviate the heat problem. The performance of the designed oval-coil system was demonstrated experimentally by imaging a human hand.

  17. Resonant Mode Reduction in Radiofrequency Volume Coils for Ultrahigh Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoliang Zhang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In a multimodal volume coil, only one mode can generate homogeneous Radiofrequency (RF field for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The existence of other modes may increase the volume coil design difficulties and potentially decreases coil performance. In this study, we introduce common-mode resonator technique to high and ultrahigh field volume coil designs to reduce the resonant mode while maintain the homogeneity of the RF field. To investigate the design method, the common-mode resonator was realized by using a microstrip line which was split along the central to become a pair of parallel transmission lines within which common-mode currents exist. Eight common-mode resonators were placed equidistantly along the circumference of a low loss dielectric cylinder to form a volume coil. Theoretical analysis and comparison between the 16-strut common-mode volume coil and a conventional 16-strut volume coil in terms of RF field homogeneity and efficiency was performed using Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD method at 298.2 MHz. MR imaging experiments were performed by using a prototype of the common-mode volume coil on a whole body 7 Tesla scanner. FDTD simulation results showed the reduced number of resonant modes of the common-mode volume coil over the conventional volume coil, while the RF field homogeneity of the two type volume coils was kept at the same level. MR imaging of a water phantom and a kiwi fruit showing the feasibility of the proposed method for simplifying the volume coil design is also presented.

  18. Development of High-Field Permanent Magnetic Circuits for NMRI/MRI and Imaging on Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangxin Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The high-field permanent magnetic circuits of 1.2 T and 1.5 T with novel magnetic focusing and curved-surface correction are developed. The permanent magnetic circuit comprises a magnetic yoke, main magnetic steel, nonspherical curved-surface magnetic poles, plugging magnetic steel, and side magnetic steel. In this work, a novel shimming method is proposed for the effective correction of base magnetic field (B0 inhomogeneities, which is based on passive shimming on the telescope aspheric cutting, grinding, and fine processing technology of the nonspherical curved-surface magnetic poles and active shimming adding higher-order gradient coils. Meanwhile, the magnetic resonance imaging dedicated alloy with high-saturation magnetic field induction intensity and high electrical resistivity is developed, and nonspherical curved-surface magnetic poles which are made of the dedicated alloy have very good anti-eddy-current effect. In addition, the large temperature coefficient problem of permanent magnet can be effectively controlled by using a high quality temperature controller and deuterium external locking technique. Combining our patents such as gradient coil, RF coil, and integration computer software, two kinds of small animal Micro-MRI instruments are developed, by which the high quality MRI images of mice were obtained.

  19. Early localization of recurrent prostate cancer after prostatectomy by endorectal coil magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Brian J; Kawashima, Akira; Woodrum, David A; Tollefson, Matthew K; Karnes, Jeffrey; Davis, Brian J; Rangel, Laureano J; King, Bernard F; Mynderse, Lance A

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the ability of endorectal coil (e-coil) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to identify early prostatic fossa recurrence after radical prostatectomy. We identified 187 patients from 2005-2011 who underwent e-coil MRI with dynamic gadolinium-contrast enhancement followed by transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostatic fossa biopsy for possible local prostate cancer recurrence. For analysis, local recurrence was defined as a negative evaluation for distant metastatic disease with a positive prostatic fossa biopsy, decreased prostate-specific antigen (PSA) following salvage radiation therapy, or increased lesion size on serial imaging. Local recurrence was identified in 132 patients, with 124 (94%) detected on e-coil MRI. The median PSA was 0.59 ng/mL (range coil MRI was 86%. When a lesion was identified on MRI, the positive biopsy rate was 65% and lesion size was a significant predictor of positive biopsies. The positive biopsy rates were 51%, 74%, and 88% when the lesion was 2 cm, respectively (p = 0.0006). E-coil MRI has a high level of sensitivity in identifying local recurrence of prostate cancer following radical prostatectomy, even at low PSA levels. E-coil MRI should be considered as the first imaging evaluation for biochemical recurrence for identifying patients suitable for localized salvage therapy.

  20. Commissioning and quality control of a dedicated wide bore 3T MRI simulator for radiotherapy planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aitang Xing

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe a practical approach to commissioning and quality assurance (QA of a dedicated wide-bore 3 Tesla (3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scanner for radiotherapy planning.Methods: A comprehensive commissioning protocol focusing on radiotherapy (RT specific requirements was developed and performed. RT specific tests included: uniformity characteristics of radio-frequency (RF coil, couch top attenuation, geometric distortion, laser and couch movement and an end-to-end radiotherapy treatment planning test. General tests for overall system performance and safety measurements were also performed.Results: The use of pre-scan based intensity correction increased the uniformity from 61.7% to 97% (body flexible coil, from 50% to 90% (large flexible coil and from 51% to 98% (small flexible coil. RT flat top couch decreased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR by an average of 42%. The mean and maximum geometric distortion was found to be 1.25 mm and 4.08 mm for three dimensional (3D corrected image acquisition, 2.07 mm and 7.88 mm for two dimensional (2D corrected image acquisition over 500 mm × 375 mm × 252 mm field of view (FOV. The accuracy of the laser and couch movement was less than ±1 mm. The standard deviation of registration parameters for the end-to-end test was less than 0.41 mm. An on-going QA program was developed to monitor the system’s performance.Conclusion: A number of RT specific tests have been described for commissioning and subsequent performance monitoring of a dedicated MRI simulator (MRI-Sim. These tests have been important in establishing and maintaining its operation for RT planning.

  1. Magnetic field sensitivity at 7-T using dual-helmholtz transmit-only coil and 12-channel receive-only bended coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Ryu, Yeunchul; Seo, Jeung-Hoon; Kim, Young-Bo

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to combine a dual-Helmholtz (DH) transmit (Tx)-only coil and 12-channel receive (Rx)-only bended phased array (PA) coil to improve the magnetic flux (|B1 |) sensitivity in the superior-to-inferior (S-I) direction during human brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 7-T. The proposed coil combination was primarily implemented by electromagnetic (EM) simulation and compared with the 16-leg birdcage coil and 8-channel PA coil, which are generally used for the Tx- and Rx-only modes, respectively. The optimal coil combinations for the proposed structure were determined by |B1 | field calculations using the |BT(+) | and |BR(-) | fields, which are respectively the transmit and receive components of the |B1 | field. The coil performance was then evaluated by a bench test and 7-T MRI experiment. The results of the computational calculations indicated that the |BT(+) | field of the DH coil was distributed similarly to that of the 16-leg birdcage coil despite the fewer conducting legs of the former. However, the 12-channel Rx-only bended PA coil had clearly higher |BR(-) | profiles compared to the 8-channel PA coil. The results of the 7-T in vivo experiment showed that the proposed combination of the DH Tx-only coil and 12-channel Rx-only bended PA coil had better |B1 | field homogeneity in the sagittal slice as well as higher |B1 | field sensitivity during human brain MRI compared to an 8-channel Rx-only PA coil. SCANNING 38:515-524, © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. An Asymmetric Birdcage Coil for Small-animal MR Imaging at 7T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Han, Sang-Doc; Seo, Jeung-Hoon; Heo, Phil; Yoo, Dongkyeom; Im, Geun Ho; Lee, Jung Hee

    2016-09-30

    The birdcage (BC) coil is currently being utilized for uniform radiofrequency (RF) transmit/receive (Tx/Rx) or Tx-only configuration in many magnetic resonance (MR) imaging applications, but insufficient magnetic flux (|B1|) density and their non-uniform distribution still exists in high-field (HF) environments. We demonstrate that the asymmetric birdcage (ABC) transmit/receive (Tx/Rx) volume coil, which is a modified standard birdcage (SBC) coil with the end ring split into two halves, is suitable for improving the |B1| sensitivity in 7T small-animal MR imaging. Cylindrical SBC and ABC coils with 35 mm diameter were constructed and bench tested for mouse body MR imaging at 300 MHz using a 7T scanner. To assess the ABC coil performance, computational electromagnetic (EM) simulation and 7T MR experiment were performed by using a cylindrical phantom and in vivo mouse body and quantitatively compared with the SBC coil in terms of |B1| distribution, RF transmit (|B1(+)|) field, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The bench measurements of the two BC coils are similar, yielding a quality value (Q-value) of 74.42 for the SBC coil and 77.06 for the ABC coil. The computational calculation results clearly show that the proposed ABC coil offers superior |B1| field and |B1(+)| field sensitivity in the central axial slice compared with the SBC coil. There was also high SNR and uniformly distributed flip angle (FA) under the loaded condition of mouse body in the 7T experiment. Although ABC geometry allows a further increase in the |B1| field and |B1(+)| field sensitivity in only the central axial slice, the geometrical modification of the SBC coil can make a high performance RF coil feasible in the central axial slice and also make target imaging possible in the diagonal direction.

  3. Coil system for plasmoid thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskridge, Richard H. (Inventor); Lee, Michael H. (Inventor); Martin, Adam K. (Inventor); Fimognari, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A coil system for a plasmoid thruster includes a bias coil, a drive coil and field coils. The bias and drive coils are interleaved with one another as they are helically wound about a conical region. A first field coil defines a first passage at one end of the conical region, and is connected in series with the bias coil. A second field coil defines a second passage at an opposing end of the conical region, and is connected in series with the bias coil.

  4. Liquid rope coiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.M. Ribe; M. Habibi; D. Bonn

    2012-01-01

    A thin stream or rope of viscous fluid falling from a sufficient height onto a surface forms a steadily rotating helical coil. Tabletop laboratory experiments in combination with a numerical model for slender liquid ropes reveal that finite-amplitude coiling can occur in four distinct regimes (visco

  5. Optimal Bitter Coil Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Kobelev, V

    2016-01-01

    Bitter coil is an electromagnet used for the generation of exceptionally strong magnetic fields. The upper bound of magnet flux density is restricted by several factors. One principal restriction is the high stresses due to Lorentz forces in the coil. The Lorentz forces generate the distributed body force, which acts as the pressure of magnetic field. The common radial thickness profile of the Bitter coil is constant. In this paper the possibility of optimization by means of non-constant radial thickness profile of the Bitter coil is studied. The close form expression for optimal thickness profile is obtained. Both designs are compared and the considerable improvement of magnetic flux density is demonstrated. Moreover, the optimal design improves the shape of cooling channels. Namely, the highest cross-section of cooling channel is at the most thermally loaded inner surface of the coil.

  6. Theory of the quadrature elliptic birdcage coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifer, M C

    1997-11-01

    This paper presents the theory of the quadrature birdcage coil wound on an elliptic cylindrical former. A conformal transformation of the ellipse to a circular geometry is used to derive the optimal sampling of the continuous surface current distribution to produce uniform magnetic fields within an elliptic cylinder. The analysis is rigorous for ellipses of any aspect ratio and shows how to produce quadrature operation of the elliptic birdcage with a conventional hybrid combiner. Insight gained from the transformation is also used to analyze field homogeneity, find the optimal RF shield shape, and specify component values to produce the correct current distribution in practice. Measurements and images from a 16-leg elliptic birdcage coil at both low and high frequencies show good quadrature performance, homogeneity, and sensitivity.

  7. A Micro Saddle Coil with Switchable Sensitivity for Local High-Resolution Imaging of Luminal Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Tetsuji Dohi; Kousuke Murashige

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a micro saddle coil for local high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) fabricated by embedding a flexible coil pattern into a polydimethyilsiloxane (PDMS) tube. We can change the sensitivity of the micro coil by deforming the shape of the coil from a saddle-shaped mode to a planar-shaped mode. The inductance, the resistance, and the Q-factor of the coil in the saddle-shaped mode were 2.45 μH, 3.31 Ω, and 39.9, respectively. Those of the planar-shaped mode were 3....

  8. Multi-Slice Magnetic Resonance Imaging with the Dynamic Multi-Coil Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juchem, Christoph; Nahhass, Omar M.; Nixon, Terence W.; de Graaf, Robin A.

    2015-01-01

    To date, spatial encoding for MRI is based on linear X, Y and Z field gradients generated by dedicated X, Y and Z wire patterns. We recently introduced the Dynamic Multi-Coil Technique (DYNAMITE) for the generation of magnetic field shapes for biomedical MR applications from a set of individually driven localized coils. The benefits for B0 magnetic field homogenization have been shown as well as proof-of-principle of radial and algebraic MRI. In this study the potential of DYNAMITE MRI is explored further and the first multi-slice MRI implementation is presented in which all gradient fields are purely DYNAMITE-based. The obtained image fidelity is shown to be virtually identical to a conventional MRI system with dedicated X, Y and Z gradient coils. Comparable image quality is a milestone towards the establishment of fully functional DYNAMITE MRI (and shim) systems. PMID:26419649

  9. Endourethral MRI Guidance for Prostatic RF Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    caused by leakage of injected ethanol into the urethra and periurethral tissue, which then damages the endothelium and muscular sphincter, resulting...techniques (23, 24). Also, it prevents distension of the rectal wall during needle guide positioning, improving patient comfort. Finally, we do not rely

  10. Commercial applications for COIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Wayne C.; Carroll, David L.; King, D. M.; Fockler, L. A.; Stromberg, D. S.; Sexauer, M.; Milmoe, A.; Sentman, Lee H.

    2000-01-01

    The chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) is a high power, fiber deliverable tool, which can be used for a number of different industrial applications. COIL is of particular interest because of its short fiber deliverable wavelength, high scaleable continuous wave power, and excellent material interaction properties. In past research the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign identified and decommissioning and decontamination (DD) of nuclear facilities as a primary focus for COIL technology. DD will be a major challenge in the coming decades. The use of a robotically driven fiber delivered cutting/ablation tool in contaminated areas promises to lower risks to workers for the DD mission. Further, the high cutting speed of COIL will significantly reduce the time required to cut contaminated equipment, reducing costs. The high power of COIL will permit the dismantling of thick stacks of piping and equipment as well as reactor vessels. COIL is very promising for the removal of material from contaminated surfaces, perhaps to depths thicker than an inch. Laser cutting and ablation minimizes dust and fumes, which reduces the required number of high efficiency particulate accumulator filters, thus reducing costly waste disposal. Other potential industrial applications for COIL are shipbuilding, automotive manufacturing, heavy machinery manufacturing, tasks requiring underwater cutting or welding, and there appear to be very promising applications for high powers lasers in the oil industry.

  11. A periodic table of coiled-coil protein structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutevelis, Efrosini; Woolfson, Derek N

    2009-01-23

    Coiled coils are protein structure domains with two or more alpha-helices packed together via interlacing of side chains known as knob-into-hole packing. We analysed and classified a large set of coiled-coil structures using a combination of automated and manual methods. This led to a systematic classification that we termed a "periodic table of coiled coils," which we have made available at http://coiledcoils.chm.bris.ac.uk/ccplus/search/periodic_table. In this table, coiled-coil assemblies are arranged in columns with increasing numbers of alpha-helices and in rows of increased complexity. The table provides a framework for understanding possibilities in and limits on coiled-coil structures and a basis for future prediction, engineering and design studies.

  12. Recycler barrier RF buckets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The Recycler Ring at Fermilab uses a barrier rf systems for all of its rf manipulations. In this paper, I will give an overview of historical perspective on barrier rf system, the longitudinal beam dynamics issues, aspects of rf linearization to produce long flat bunches and methods used for emittance measurements of the beam in the RR barrier rf buckets. Current rf manipulation schemes used for antiproton beam stacking and longitudinal momentum mining of the RR beam for the Tevatron collider operation are explained along with their importance in spectacular success of the Tevatron luminosity performance.

  13. A titanium dioxide filled toroidal coil for magnetic resonance imaging at high field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterworth, Edward J.

    1999-09-01

    This study demonstrates the advantages of filling the resonating cavity of a radio frequency NMR coil with a substance that more closely matches the dielectric properties of human tissue. The chosen design is a toroidal RF coil of reduced aspect ratio, and the dielectric material of choice is powdered titanium dioxide. RF coil performance is limited significantly by the dielectric discontinuity and consequent wavelength discontinuity between the air-filled cavity and human tissue. Filling the coil with titanium dioxide (with a published relative dielectric constant of 114 for randomly oriented rutile crystals and a measured dielectric constant under operating conditions of 70) alters its electromagnetic properties in a way which approximates human tissue (most of which has a dielectric constant between 50 and 70), without introducing spurious magnetic effects. In particular, brain NMR can benefit from these advantages. Analytic expressions for the electric and magnetic fields within the coil are derived here. The physical and electromagnetic parameters of the coil are developed with reference to these computations. The redesigned and filled resonator focuses the magnetic field lines, producing a more uniform B1 field as compared with the unfilled coil, with reduced power requirements. The filled coil has a well-defined imaging zone, in which the magnetic field is relatively uniform and homogeneous. The Q of the coil is significantly higher than that of conventional designs and is not significantly reduced by loading. Test results and images are presented showing these effects.

  14. LHCb magnet coils arrive

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Each of the two coils for the LHCb magnet comprises 15 individual monolayer 'pancakes' of identical trapezoidal racetrack shape, and is bent at 45 degrees on the two transverse sides. Each pancake consists of eight turns of conductor, wound from a single length (approx. 290 m) of extruded aluminium. The coils have arrived at CERN; one of them is seen here being unloaded above the LHCb experimental cavern.

  15. Coiling of yield stress fluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Rahmani; M. Habibi; A. Javadi; D. Bonn

    2011-01-01

    We present an experimental investigation of the coiling of a filament of a yield stress fluid falling on a solid surface. We use two kinds of yield stress fluids, shaving foam and hair gel, and show that the coiling of the foam is similar to the coiling of an elastic rope. Two regimes of coiling (el

  16. Characterization of vibration and acoustic noise in a gradient-coil insert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, G Z; Mechefske, C K; Rutt, B K

    2004-09-01

    High-speed switching of current in gradient coils within high magnetic field strength magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners results in high acoustic sound pressure levels (SPL) in and around these machines. To characterize the vibration properties as well as the acoustic noise properties of the gradient coil, a finite-element (FE) model was developed using the dimensional design specifications of an available gradient-coil insert and the concentration of the copper windings in the coil. This FE model was then validated using experimentally collected vibration data. A computational acoustic noise model was then developed based on the validated FE model. The validation of the finite-element analysis results was done using experimental modal testing of the same gradient coil in a free-free state (no boundary constraints). Based on the validated FE model, boundary conditions (supports) were added to the model to simulate the operating condition when the gradient-coil insert is in place in an MRI machine. Vibration analysis results from the FE model were again validated through experimental vibration testing with the gradient-coil insert installed in the MRI scanner and excited using swept sinusoidal time waveforms. The simulation results from the computational acoustic noise model were also validated through experimental noise measurement from the gradient-coil insert in the MRI scanner using swept sinusoidal time waveform inputs. Comparisons show that the FE model predicts the vibration properties and the computational acoustic noise model predicts the noise characteristic properties extremely accurately.

  17. Modulation of Muscle Atrophy, Fatigue and MLC Phosphorylation by MuRF1 as Indicated by Hindlimb Suspension Studies on MuRF1-KO Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegfried Labeit

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available MuRF1 is a member of the TRIM/RBCC superfamily, a gene family that encompasses a large variety of proteins, all sharing the conserved TRIM (Tripartite Motive sequential array of RING, B-box, and coiled-coil domains. Within this family, MuRF1(also named TRIM63 is a specialized member that contributes to the development of muscle atrophy and sarcopenia. Here we studied MuRF1's role in muscle atrophy during muscle unloading induced by hindlimb suspension. Consistent with previous studies, we found that MuRF1 inactivation leads to an attenuated muscle atrophy response. The amount of protection was higher as compared to the denervation model, and within the 10 day-suspension period the soleus muscle was spared from atrophy in MuRF1-KO mice. Contractility studies on hindlimb suspended muscle tissues suggested that MuRF1's functions extend beyond muscle trophicity and implicate MuRF1 in muscle fatigue and MLC phosphorylation control: soleus muscle from MuRF1-KO mice fatigued significantly faster and in addition showed a reduced posttetanic twitch potentiation. Thus the present work further established the role of MuRF1 in muscle atrophy and for the first time shows that MuRF1 plays a role in muscle fatigue and twitch potentiation.

  18. Linear Rogowski coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassisi, V.; Delle Side, D.

    2017-02-01

    Nowadays, the employment and development of fast current pulses require sophisticated systems to perform measurements. Rogowski coils are used to diagnose cylindrical shaped beams; therefore, they are designed and built with a toroidal structure. Recently, to perform experiments of radiofrequency biophysical stresses, flat transmission lines have been developed. Therefore, in this work we developed a linear Rogowski coil to detect current pulses inside flat conductors. The system is first approached by means of transmission line theory. We found that, if the pulse width to be diagnosed is comparable with the propagation time of the signal in the detector, it is necessary to impose a uniform current as input pulse, or to use short coils. We further analysed the effect of the resistance of the coil and the influence of its magnetic properties. As a result, the device we developed is able to record pulses lasting for some hundreds of nanoseconds, depending on the inductance, load impedance, and resistance of the coil. Furthermore, its response is characterized by a sub-nanosecond rise time (˜100 ps). The attenuation coefficient depends mainly on the turn number of the coil, while the fidelity of the response depends both on the magnetic core characteristics and on the current distribution along the plane conductors.

  19. A Modified Alderman-Grant Coil makes possible an efficient cross-coil probe for high field solid-state NMR of lossy biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Christopher V.; Yang, Yuan; Glibowicka, Mira; Wu, Chin H.; Park, Sang Ho; Deber, Charles M.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2009-11-01

    The design, construction, and performance of a cross-coil double-resonance probe for solid-state NMR experiments on lossy biological samples at high magnetic fields are described. The outer coil is a Modified Alderman-Grant Coil (MAGC) tuned to the 1H frequency. The inner coil consists of a multi-turn solenoid coil that produces a B 1 field orthogonal to that of the outer coil. This results in a compact nested cross-coil pair with the inner solenoid coil tuned to the low frequency detection channel. This design has several advantages over multiple-tuned solenoid coil probes, since RF heating from the 1H channel is substantially reduced, it can be tuned for samples with a wide range of dielectric constants, and the simplified circuit design and high inductance inner coil provides excellent sensitivity. The utility of this probe is demonstrated on two electrically lossy samples of membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers (bicelles) that are particularly difficult for conventional NMR probes. The 72-residue polypeptide embedding the transmembrane helices 3 and 4 of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) (residues 194-241) requires a high salt concentration in order to be successfully reconstituted in phospholipid bicelles. A second application is to paramagnetic relaxation enhancement applied to the membrane-bound form of Pf1 coat protein in phospholipid bicelles where the resistance to sample heating enables high duty cycle solid-state NMR experiments to be performed.

  20. RF multipole implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Latina, A

    2012-01-01

    The electromagnetic radio-frequency (RF) field of accelerating structures and crab-cavities can exhibit transverse field components due to asymmetries in the azimuthal direction of the element geometry. Tracking simulations must be performed to evaluate the impact of such transverse RF deflections on the beam dynamics. In an ultra-relativistic regime where the Panofsky-Wenzel theorem is applicable, these RF deflections can be modeled via a multipolar expansion of the generating RF field similarly to what is done with static magnetic elements. The element implementing such RF multipolar fields has been called RF multipole. In this note we present an analytical formulation of a thin RF multipole Hamiltonian, and we explicitly calculate the RF kick and the elements of its first- and second- order transfer matrices. Also, we present the implementation of the corresponding code in MAD-X, plus some tests of tracking, simplecticity, consistency, and reflected maps that we successfully applied to verify the correctne...

  1. Design and Construction of a Prototype Solenoid Coil for MICE Coupling Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Guo, XingLong; Xu, FengYu; Liu, XiaoKun; Wu, Hong; Zheng, ShiXian; Green, Michael A; Li, Derun; Virostek, Steve; Zisman, Michael

    2010-06-28

    A superconducting coupling solenoid mounted around four conventional RF cavities, which produces up to 2.6 T central magnetic field to keep the muons within the cavities, is to be used for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). The coupling coil made from copper matrix NbTi conductors is the largest of three types of magnets in MICE both in terms of 1.5 m inner diameter and about 13MJ stored magnetic energy at full operation current of 210A. The stress induced inside the coil assembly during cool down and magnet charging is relatively high. In order to validate the design method and develop the coil winding technique with inside-wound SC splices required for the coupling coil, a prototype coil made from the same conductor and with the same diameter and thickness but only one-fourth long as the coupling coil was designed and fabricated by ICST. The prototype coil was designed to be charged to strain conditions that are equivalent or greater than would be encountered in the coupling coil. This paper presents detailed design of the prototype coil as well as developed coil winding skills. The analyses on stress in the coil assembly and quench process were carried out.

  2. Experimental MRI-SPECT insert system with Hybrid Semiconductor detectors Timepix for MR animal scanner Bruker 47/20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajicek, J.; Burian, M.; Soukup, P.; Novak, V.; Macko, M.; Jakubek, J.

    2017-01-01

    Multimodal medical imaging based on Magnetic Resonance is mainly combinated with one of the scintigraphic method like PET or SPECT. These methods provide functional information whereas magnetic resonance imaging provides high spatial resolution of anatomical information or complementary functional information. Fusion of imaging modalities allows researchers to obtain complimentary information in a single measurement. The combination of MRI with SPECT is still relatively new and challenging in many ways. The main complication of using SPECT in MRI systems is the presence of a high magnetic field therefore (ferro)magnetic materials have to be eliminated. Furthermore the application of radiofrequency fields within the MR gantry does not allow for the use of conductive structures such as the common heavy metal collimators. This work presents design and construction of an experimental MRI-SPECT insert system and its initial tests. This unique insert system consists of an MR-compatible SPECT setup with CdTe pixelated sensors Timepix tungsten collimators and a radiofrequency coil. Measurements were performed on a gelatine and tissue phantom with an embedded radioisotopic source (57Co 122 keV γ ray) inside the RF coil by the Bruker BioSpec 47/20 (4.7 T) MR animal scanner. The project was performed in the framework of the Medipix Collaboration.

  3. Coiled coils and SAH domains in cytoskeletal molecular motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, Michelle

    2011-10-01

    Cytoskeletal motors include myosins, kinesins and dyneins. Myosins move along tracks of actin filaments, whereas kinesins and dyneins move along microtubules. Many of these motors are involved in trafficking cargo in cells. However, myosins are mostly monomeric, whereas kinesins are mostly dimeric, owing to the presence of a coiled coil. Some myosins (myosins 6, 7 and 10) contain an SAH (single α-helical) domain, which was originally thought to be a coiled coil. These myosins are now known to be monomers, not dimers. The differences between SAH domains and coiled coils are described and the potential roles of SAH domains in molecular motors are discussed.

  4. The Novel Design of a Single-Sided MRI Probe for Assessing Burn Depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonghua He

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Burn depth assessment in clinics is still inaccurate because of the lack of feasible and practical testing devices and methods. Therefore, this process often depends on subjective judgment of burn surgeons. In this study, a new unilateral magnetic resonance imaging (UMRI sensor equipped with a 2D gradient coil system was established, and we attempted to assess burns using unilateral nuclear magnetic resonance devices. A reduced Halbach magnet was utilized to generate a magnetic field that was relatively homogeneous on a target plane with a suitable field of view for 2D spatial localization. A uniplanar gradient coil system was designed by utilizing the mainstream target field method, and a uniplanar RF (radio frequency coil was designed by using a timeharmonic inverse method for the UMRI sensor. A 2D image of the cross sections of a simple burn model was obtained by a fast 2D pure-phase encoding imaging method. The design details of the novel single-sided MRI probe and imaging tests are also presented.

  5. Electromechanical design and construction of a rotating radio-frequency coil system for applications in magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trakic, Adnan; Weber, Ewald; Li, Bing Keong; Wang, Hua; Liu, Feng; Engstrom, Craig; Crozier, Stuart

    2012-04-01

    While recent studies have shown that rotating a single radio-frequency (RF) coil during the acquisition of magnetic resonance (MR) images provides a number of hardware advantages (i.e., requires only one RF channel, avoids coil-coil coupling and facilitates large-scale multinuclear imaging), they did not describe in detail how to build a rotating RF coil system. This paper presents detailed engineering information on the electromechanical design and construction of a MR-compatible RRFC system for human head imaging at 2 T. A custom-made (bladeless) pneumatic Tesla turbine was used to rotate the RF coil at a constant velocity, while an infrared optical encoder measured the selected frequency of rotation. Once the rotating structure was mechanically balanced and the compressed air supply suitably regulated, the maximum frequency of rotation measured ~14.5 Hz with a 2.4% frequency variation over time. MR images of a water phantom and human head were obtained using the rotating RF head coil system.

  6. RF electric field penetration and power deposition into nonequilibrium planar-type inductively coupled plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mao Ming; Wang Shuai; Dai Zhong-Ling; Wang You-Nian

    2007-01-01

    The RF electric field penetration and the power deposition into planar-type inductively coupled plasmas in lowpressure discharges have been studied by means of a self-consistent model which consists of Maxwell equations combined with the kinetic equation of electrons. The Maxwell equations are solved based on the expansion of the Fourier-Bessel series for determining the RF electric field. Numerical results show the influence of a non-Maxwellian electron energy distribution on the RF electric field penetration and the power deposition for different coil currents. Moreover, the two-dimensional spatial profiles of RF electric field and power density are also shown for different numbers of RF coil turns.

  7. On the heating of inductively coupled resonators (stents) during MRI examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Martin; Vollmann, Wolfgang; Bertsch, Thomas; Wetzler, Rainer; Bornstedt, Axel; Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Schnorr, Jörg; Kivelitz, Dietmar; Taupitz, Matthias; Grönemeyer, Dietrich

    2005-10-01

    Stents that have been implanted to preserve the results of vascular dilatation are frequently affected by in-stent restenosis, which ideally should be followed up by a noninvasive diagnostic modality. Active MRI stents can enable this kind of follow-up, while normal metallic stents can not. The prototype stents investigated in this study were designed as electric resonating circuits without a direct connection to the MR imager, and function as inductively coupled transmit coils. The model of a long solenoid coil is used to describe the additional power loss caused by such resonators. The theoretically estimated temperature increase is verified by measurements for different resonators and discussed for worst-case conditions. The RF power absorption of an active resonator is negligible compared to the total power absorbed during MRI. The local temperature increase observed for prototypes embedded in phantoms is in a range that excludes direct tissue damage. However, ruptures in the conducting structure of a resonator can cause hot spots, which may establish a high local temperature. This hazard can be reduced by designing resonators with a low quality (Q) factor or by setting the circuit slightly off resonance; however, this would lower the nominal amplification for which the resonator was designed.

  8. TESLA Coil Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-01

    Sloan’s work was actually predated by the earlier work of Nikola Tesla . Sloan mistakenly identified " Tesla Coils" as lumped tuned resonators. The...Lefvw WsnJ L REPORT o]i 3. REPRT TYPE AND OATES COVEIRD May 1992 Special/Aug 1992 - May 1992 Z TITLE AND 5U§nUT S. FUNDING NUMIHRS Tesla Coil Research...STATEMENT 1211. ’ISTRIUUTION COOD Approved for public release; dis~ribution is unlimited 13. ABSTRACT (Masrmum 200 worw) High repetition rate Tesla

  9. Comparison of a 32-channel head coil and a 2-channel surface coil for MR imaging of the temporomandibular joint at 3.0 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoliu, Andrei; Spinner, Georg; Wyss, Michael; Filli, Lukas; Erni, Stefan; Ettlin, Dominik A; Ulbrich, Erika J; Kuhn, Felix P; Gallo, Luigi M; Andreisek, Gustav

    2016-01-01

    To quantitatively and qualitatively compare MRI of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) using a standard TMJ surface coil and a head coil at 3.0 T. 22 asymptomatic volunteers were MR imaged using a 2-channel surface coil (standard TMJ coil) and a 32-channel head coil at 3.0 T (Philips Ingenia; Philips Healthcare, Netherlands). Imaging protocol consisted of an oblique sagittal proton density weighted turbo spin echo sequence (repetition time/echo time, 2700/26 ms). For quantitative assessment, a spherical phantom was imaged using the same sequence including a noise scan and a B1+ scan. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) maps and B1+ maps were calculated on a voxelwise basis. For qualitative evaluation, all volunteers underwent MRI of both TMJs with the jaw in the closed position. Two independent blinded readers assessed accuracy of TMJ anatomical representation and overall image quality on a 5-point scale. Quantitative and qualitative measurements were compared between coils using t-tests and Wilcoxon signed-rank test, respectively. Quantitative analysis showed similar B1+ and significantly higher SNR for the head coil than the TMJ surface coil. Qualitative analysis showed significantly better visibility and delineation of clinically relevant anatomical structures of the TMJ, including the articular disc, bilaminar zone and lateral pterygoid muscle. Furthermore, better overall image quality was observed for the head coil than for the TMJ surface coil. A 32-channel head coil is preferable to a standard 2-channel TMJ surface coil when imaging the TMJ at 3.0 T, because it yields higher SNR, thus increasing accuracy of the anatomical representation of the TMJ.

  10. Meiosis specific coiled-coil proteins in Shizosaccharomyces pombe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okuzaki Daisuke

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many meiosis-specific proteins in Schizosaccharomyces pombe contain coiled-coil motifs which play essential roles for meiotic progression. For example, the coiled-coil motifs present in Meu13 and Mcp7 are required for their function as a putative recombinase cofactor complex during meiotic recombination. Mcp6/Hrs1 and Mcp5/Num1 control horsetail chromosome movement by astral microtubule organization and anchoring dynein respectively. Dhc1 and Ssm4 are also required for horsetail chromosome movement. It is clear from these examples that the coiled-coil motif in these proteins plays an important role during the progression of cells through meiosis. However, there are still many unanswered questions on how these proteins operate. In this paper, we briefly review recent studies on the meiotic coiled-coil proteins in Sz. pombe.

  11. Molecular basis for the fold organization and sarcomeric targeting of the muscle atrogin MuRF1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franke, B.; Gasch, A.; Rodriguez, D.; Chami, M.; Khan, M.M.; Rudolf, R.; Bibby, J.; Hanashima, A.; Bogomolovas, J.; Castelmur, E. von; Rigden, D.J.; Uson, I.; Labeit, S.; Mayans, O.

    2014-01-01

    MuRF1 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase central to muscle catabolism. It belongs to the TRIM protein family characterized by a tripartite fold of RING, B-box and coiled-coil (CC) motifs, followed by variable C-terminal domains. The CC motif is hypothesized to be responsible for domain organization in the fo

  12. Equilibrium modeling of the TFCX poloidal field coil system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strickler, D.J.; Miller, J.B.; Rothe, K.E.; Peng, Y.K.M.

    1984-04-01

    The Toroidal Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) isproposed to be an ignition device with a low safety factor (q approx. = 2.0), rf or rf-assisted startup, long inductive burn pulse (approx. 300 s), and an elongated plasma cross section (kappa = 1.6) with moderate triangularity (delta = 0.3). System trade studies have been carried out to assist in choosing an appropriate candidate for TFCX conceptual design. This report describes an important element in these system studies - the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium modeling of the TFCX poloidal field (PF) coil system and its impact on the choice of machine size. Reference design points for the all-super-conducting toroidal field (TF) coil (TFCX-S) and hybrid (TFCX-H) options are presented that satisfy given PF system criteria, including volt-second requirements during burn, mechanical configuration constraints, maximum field constraints at the superconducting PF coils, and plasma shape parameters. Poloidal coil current waveforms for the TFCX-S and TFCX-H reference designs consistent with the equilibrium requirements of the plasma startup, heating, and burn phases of a typical discharge scenario are calculated. Finally, a possible option for quasi-steady-state operation is discussed.

  13. Planar, monolithically integrated coil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozeboom, F.; Reefman, D.; Klootwijk, J.H.; Tiemeijer, L.F.; Ruigrok, J.

    2013-01-01

    The present invention provides a means to integrate planar coils on silicon, while providing a high inductance. This high inductance is achieved through a special back- and front sided shielding of a material. In many applications, high-value inductors are a necessity. In particular, this holds for

  14. An orientable search coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, P. J.; Poblocki, M.

    2017-01-01

    We provide a design for a low cost orientable search coil that can be used to investigate the variation of magnetic flux with angle. This experiment is one of the required practical activities in the current A level physics specification for the AQA examination board in the UK. We demonstrate its performance and suggest other suitable investigations that can be undertaken.

  15. Development of PET/MRI with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jin Ho; Choi, Yong, E-mail: ychoi.image@gmail.com; Jung, Jiwoong; Kim, Sangsu; Lim, Hyun Keong; Im, Ki Chun [Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, 35 Baekbeom-ro, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Chang Hyun; Park, Hyun-wook [Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyung Min; Kim, Jong Guk [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, 75 Nowon-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul 139-709 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a dual-modality positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of the human brain. Methods: The PET detector block was composed of a 4 × 4 matrix of detector modules, each consisting of a 4 × 4 array LYSO coupled to a 4 × 4 Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (GAPD) array. The PET insert consisted of 18 detector blocks, circularly mounted on a custom-made plastic base to form a ring with an inner diameter of 390 mm and axial length of 60 mm. The PET gantry was shielded with gold-plated conductive fabric tapes with a thickness of 0.1 mm. The charge signals of PET detector transferred via 4 m long flat cables were fed into the position decoder circuit. The flat cables were shielded with a mesh-type aluminum sheet with a thickness of 0.24 mm. The position decoder circuit and field programmable gate array-embedded DAQ modules were enclosed in an aluminum box with a thickness of 10 mm and located at the rear of the MR bore inside the MRI room. A 3-T human MRI system with a Larmor frequency of 123.7 MHz and inner bore diameter of 60 cm was used as the PET/MRI hybrid system. A custom-made radio frequency (RF) coil with an inner diameter of 25 cm was fabricated. The PET was positioned between gradient and the RF coils. PET performance was measured outside and inside the MRI scanner using echo planar imaging, spin echo, turbo spin echo, and gradient echo sequences. MRI performance was also evaluated with and without the PET insert. The stability of the newly developed PET insert was evaluated and simultaneous PET and MR images of a brain phantom were acquired. Results: No significant degradation of the PET performance caused by MR was observed when the PET was operated using various MR imaging sequences. The signal-to-noise ratio of MR images was slightly degraded due to the PET insert installed inside the MR bore while the homogeneity was

  16. Development of PET/MRI with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jin Ho; Choi, Yong; Jung, Jiwoong; Kim, Sangsu; Lim, Hyun Keong; Im, Ki Chun; Oh, Chang Hyun; Park, Hyun-wook; Kim, Kyung Min; Kim, Jong Guk

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a dual-modality positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of the human brain. The PET detector block was composed of a 4 × 4 matrix of detector modules, each consisting of a 4 × 4 array LYSO coupled to a 4 × 4 Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (GAPD) array. The PET insert consisted of 18 detector blocks, circularly mounted on a custom-made plastic base to form a ring with an inner diameter of 390 mm and axial length of 60 mm. The PET gantry was shielded with gold-plated conductive fabric tapes with a thickness of 0.1 mm. The charge signals of PET detector transferred via 4 m long flat cables were fed into the position decoder circuit. The flat cables were shielded with a mesh-type aluminum sheet with a thickness of 0.24 mm. The position decoder circuit and field programmable gate array-embedded DAQ modules were enclosed in an aluminum box with a thickness of 10 mm and located at the rear of the MR bore inside the MRI room. A 3-T human MRI system with a Larmor frequency of 123.7 MHz and inner bore diameter of 60 cm was used as the PET/MRI hybrid system. A custom-made radio frequency (RF) coil with an inner diameter of 25 cm was fabricated. The PET was positioned between gradient and the RF coils. PET performance was measured outside and inside the MRI scanner using echo planar imaging, spin echo, turbo spin echo, and gradient echo sequences. MRI performance was also evaluated with and without the PET insert. The stability of the newly developed PET insert was evaluated and simultaneous PET and MR images of a brain phantom were acquired. No significant degradation of the PET performance caused by MR was observed when the PET was operated using various MR imaging sequences. The signal-to-noise ratio of MR images was slightly degraded due to the PET insert installed inside the MR bore while the homogeneity was maintained. The change of gain of

  17. A game of RF and gradient pulses: Obtaining an efficient homogeneous flip angle with strong inhomogeneous B1 fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kalleveen, IML

    2016-01-01

    Adiabatic RF pulses are useful pulses for inhomogeneous B1 fields caused by surface RF coils, however the increase in SAR will lengthen the TR, and possibly also the TE if the adiabatic pulses become too long. Using the superadiabaticity theorem the increase in SAR can already be reduced, making it

  18. A twenty-eight channel coil array for improved optic nerve imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Robb Phillip

    The purpose of this work was to design and construct a radio-frequency coil optimized for imaging the Optic Nerve (ON) on a Siemens 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. The specific goals were to optimize signal sensitivity from the orbit to the optic chiasm and improve SNR over designs currently in use. The constructed coil features two fiberglass formers that can slide over each other to accommodate any arbitrary head size, while maintaining close coupling near the eyes and around the head in general. This design eliminates the air void regions that occur between the coil elements and the forehead when smaller heads are imaged in one-piece, nonadjustable coil formers. The 28 coil elements were placed using a soccer-ball pattern layout to maximize head coverage. rSNR profiles from phantom imaging studies show that the ON coil provides approximately 55% greater rSNR at the region of the optic chiasm and approximately 400% near the orbits compared to the 12-channel commercial coil. The improved rSNR in the optic nerve region allows performance of high resolution DTI, which provides a qualitative measurement for evaluating optic neuritis. Images from volunteer and patient studies with the ON coil reveal plaques that correspond well with the patient disease history of chronic bilateral optic neuritis. Correspondence of image findings with patient disease histories demonstrates that optic neuritis can be visualized and detected in patients using 3T MRI with advanced imaging coils, providing improved patient care.

  19. RF feedback for KEKB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezura, Eizi; Yoshimoto, Shin-ichi; Akai, Kazunori [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes the present status of the RF feedback development for the KEK B-Factory (KEKB). A preliminary experiment concerning the RF feedback using a parallel comb-filter was performed through a choke-mode cavity and a klystron. The RF feedback has been tested using the beam of the TRISTAN Main Ring, and has proved to be effective in damping the beam instability. (author)

  20. MRI of the Achilles tendon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naegele, M.; Lienemann, A.; Hahn, D.; Lissner, J.; Boehm, P.

    1987-06-01

    The Achilles tendon and preachillar space of 30 patients was studied by MRI. A surface coil (Helmholtz' principle) was applied and all patients were examined with a superconducting magnet operating at 1.0 Tesla field strength. The purpose of the study was to illustrate pathological changes of the tendon and the surrounding soft tissue. In 3 cases MRI diagnosed a total rupture of the Achilles tendon. Furthermore, the strain of the tendon and side effects of an inflammatory process could be demonstrated. The use of a surface coil yields a high resolution of the normal anatomy of the region and of the pathological changes of the tendon and the surrounding soft tissue structures. The advantages of MRI for Achilles tendon diagnostics against competitive modalities are 1) excellent soft tissue contrast, 2) multiplanar imaging, 3) as well as exact delineation and visualisation of the lesion.

  1. Functional connectomics from resting-state fMRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, S.M.; Vidaurre, D.; Beckmann, C.F.; Jenkinson, M.; Nichols, T.E.; Robinson, E.C.; Woolrich, M.W.; Barch, D.M.

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous fluctuations in activity in different parts of the brain can be used to study functional brain networks. We review the use of resting-state functional MRI (rfMRI) for the purpose of mapping the macroscopic functional connectome. After describing MRI acquisition and image-processing metho

  2. Temperature Changes in the Brain of Patients Undergoing MRI Examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Bebaaku Dery

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance Imaging scanners have become important tools in modern day health care. During the imaging process, total radiofrequency power is transferred from the RF coil to the brain tissues resulting in increase in temperature in the subject being imaged. Currently, reliable and validated means to predict RF heating are not unavailable.This research was conducted to determine temperature changes in the human brain during MRI examination.This study was carried out at two MRI Units in Ghana. One hundred and twenty-six patients were investigated. Data collected include pre- and post-scan tympanic temperatures and specific absorption rates values. The average pre- and post-scan tympanic temperatures measured for Centre A were 36.5±0.1 °C and 37.0±0.1 °C respectively with an average change in temperature of 0.5±0.1 °C for 30.68 minutes scan and an average SAR value of 1.25 W/kg. Centre B measured average pre- and post-scan tympanic temperatures of 36.4±0.1 °C and 36.8±0.1 °C respectively with an average change in temperature of 0.4±0.1 °C for 41.58 minutes scan and an average SAR value of 0.1 W/kg.The rise in tympanic temperature and SAR values were within guidance level of 1 °C recommended by theUnited States Food and Administration and the International Electrotechnical Commission.

  3. Magnetic field modeling with a set of individual localized coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juchem, Christoph; Nixon, Terence W; McIntyre, Scott; Rothman, Douglas L; de Graaf, Robin A

    2010-06-01

    A set of generic, circular individual coils is shown to be capable of generating highly complex magnetic field distributions in a flexible fashion. Arbitrarily oriented linear field gradients can be generated in three-dimensional as well as sliced volumes at amplitudes that allow imaging applications. The multi-coil approach permits the simultaneous generation of linear MRI encoding fields and complex shim fields by the same setup, thereby reducing system complexity. The choice of the sensitive volume over which the magnetic fields are optimized remains temporally and spatially variable at all times. The restriction of the field synthesis to experimentally relevant, smaller volumes such as single slices directly translates into improved efficiency, i.e. higher magnetic field amplitudes and/or reduced coil currents. For applications like arterial spin labeling, signal spoiling and diffusion weighting, perfect linearity of the gradient fields is not required and reduced demands on accuracy can also be readily translated into improved efficiency. The first experimental realization was achieved for mouse head MRI with 24 coils that were mounted on the surface of a cylindrical former. Oblique linear field gradients of 20 kHz/cm (47 mT/m) were generated with a maximum current of 1.4A which allowed radial imaging of a mouse head. The potential of the new approach for generating arbitrary magnetic field shapes is demonstrated by synthesizing the more complex, higher order spherical harmonic magnetic field distributions X2-Y2, Z2 and Z2X. The new multi-coil approach provides the framework for the integration of conventional imaging and shim coils into a single multi-coil system in which shape, strength, accuracy and spatial coverage of the magnetic field can be specifically optimized for the application at hand.

  4. Unruptured Basilar Tip Aneurysm with Internal Septation: Coiling Implications?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An internal septum within a basilar artery aneurysm is an infrequent anomaly and is very rarely reported in the literature. We report a 62-year-old lady that was incidentally diagnosed with basilar tip aneurysm. Further imaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed internal septation within this aneurysm which was later confirmed with digital subtraction angiography (DSA. She underwent coil embolisation, which involved technical manipulation of the microcatheter and the balloon to enable coiling of each separate aneurysm compartment. We present this case to illustrate the effect of this anatomical variation on the selection of endovascular treatment strategy.

  5. rf driven multicusp H sup minus ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, K.N.; DeVries, G.J.; DiVergilio, W.F.; Hamm, R.W.; Hauck, C.A.; Kunkel, W.B.; McDonald, D.S.; Williams, M.D. (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (US))

    1991-01-01

    An rf driven multicusp source capable of generating 1-ms H{sup {minus}} beam pulses with a repetition rate as high as 150 Hz has been developed. This source can be operated with a filament or other types of starter. There is almost no lifetime limitation and a clean plasma can be maintained for a long period of operation. It is demonstrated that rf power as high as 25 kW could be coupled inductively to the plasma via a glass-coated copper-coil antenna. The extracted H{sup {minus}} current density achieved is about 200 mA/cm{sup 2}.

  6. Three-dimensional high-inductance birdcage coil for NQR applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peshkovsky, A S; Cerioni, L; Osan, T M; Avdievich, N I; Pusiol, D J

    2006-09-01

    A birdcage coil capable of operating simultaneously and independently in three orthogonal dimensions has been developed. A co-rotational end-ring mode producing an RF field in the longitudinal direction was utilized in addition to the two common transverse orthogonal modes. Two conductor turns were used for each of the coil's windows, increasing its inductance by a factor of four, thereby, making the coil suitable for low-frequency applications. Two or three-frequency detection can be easily carried out with this device. Orthogonality of the coil's channels allows arbitrarily close frequency positioning of each resonant mode, potentially useful in wide-line NQR studies, in which simultaneous excitation/detection of signals from three adjacent regions of a single wide line can be performed. The coil's performance was evaluated using a three-dimensional scheme, in which a circularly polarized experiment was combined with a linearly polarized measurement at another frequency, resulting in SNR improvement by 55%.

  7. MRI & MR SPECTROSCOPIC EVALUATION OF PROSTATIC CARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupak

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy among men more than fifty years of age (Cancer foundation of India. Imaging may help in clarifying several important issues in localized prostate cancer. MRI provides the best depiction of the contours of the prostate as well as its internal zonal anatomy. Recent evidence suggests that multi - parametric MRI could improve the accuracy of diagnostic assessment in prostate cancer. In addition, MRI also allows functional assessment with techniques such as diffusion - weighted MRI (DWI, MR spectroscopy (MRS, and dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE - MRI. Strong opinions are held about the need for endorectal coil imaging. Endorectal coils provide large gains in signal with reductions in noise, most noticeably at 1.5 T; however, endorectal coils are uncomfortable and expensive. At 3 T, the need for endorectal coils has been debated. Clearly, the highest - quality MRI results from the combined use of endorectal coils and phased array body coils at 3 T. Prostate cancer is associated with proportionately lower levels of citrate and higher levels of choline and creatine than are seen in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH or in normal prostate tissu e. This difference can be detected by magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI. MRSI uses a strong magnetic field to obtain metabolic information (spectra that identifies the relative concentrations of various metabolites in the cell cytoplasm and the extracellular space. This technique can identify metabolic differences in prostate tissue (BPH, prostate cance r, and normal prostate tissue. AIM: To evaluate the role of MRI and MR Spectroscopy in the diagnosis of prostatic carcinoma by pelvic phased array coil in the detection of prostatic carcinoma in men with Prostatomegaly & elevated PSA levels and establishing statistical analysis of the same. METHOD: A prospective study of minimum 50 consecutive cases with Prostatomegaly & raised PSA levels

  8. Preliminary evaluation of a brain PET insertable to MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Gyuseng [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-701 South (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yong [Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul, 121-742 South (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Sung; An, Hyun Joon [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul, 110-744 South (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jin Ho [Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul, 121-742 South (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyun Wook; Oh, Chang Hyun; Park, Kyeongjin; Lim, Kyung Taek; Cho, Minsik [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-701 South (Korea, Republic of); Sul, Woo Suk [National NanoFab Center, Deajeon, 305-806 South (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoungtaek; Kim, Hyunduk [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-701 South (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-29

    There is a new trend of the medical image that diagnoses a brain disease as like Alzheimer dementia. The first qualified candidate is a PET-MRI fusion modality because MRI is a more powerful anatomic diagnosis tool than other modalities. In our study, in order to solve the high magnetic field from MRI, the development was consisted with four main items such as photo-sensor, PET scanner, MRI head-coil and attenuation correction algorithm development.

  9. Large field-of-view transmission line resonator for high field MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Johannesson, Kristjan Sundgaard; Boer, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Transmission line resonators is often a preferable choice for coils in high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), because they provide a number of advantages over traditional loop coils. The size of such resonators, however, is limited to shorter than half a wavelength due to high standing wave....... Achieved magnetic field distribution is compared to the conventional transmission line resonator. Imaging experiments are performed using 7 Tesla MRI system. The developed resonator is useful for building coils with large field-of-view....

  10. Large field-of-view transmission line resonator for high field MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Johannesson, Kristjan Sundgaard; Boer, Vincent;

    2016-01-01

    Transmission line resonators is often a preferable choice for coils in high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), because they provide a number of advantages over traditional loop coils. The size of such resonators, however, is limited to shorter than half a wavelength due to high standing wave....... Achieved magnetic field distribution is compared to the conventional transmission line resonator. Imaging experiments are performed using 7 Tesla MRI system. The developed resonator is useful for building coils with large field-of-view....

  11. De-repression of RaRF-mediated RAR repression by adenovirus E1A in the nucleolus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, Soo-Jong; Youn, Hye Sook; Kim, Eun-Joo

    2014-02-21

    Transcriptional activity of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) is regulated by diverse binding partners, including classical corepressors and coactivators, in response to its ligand retinoic acid (RA). Recently, we identified a novel corepressor of RAR called the retinoic acid resistance factor (RaRF) (manuscript submitted). Here, we report how adenovirus E1A stimulates RAR activity by associating with RaRF. Based on immunoprecipitation (IP) assays, E1A interacts with RaRF through the conserved region 2 (CR2), which is also responsible for pRb binding. The first coiled-coil domain of RaRF was sufficient for this interaction. An in vitro glutathione-S-transferase (GST) pull-down assay was used to confirm the direct interaction between E1A and RaRF. Further fluorescence microscopy indicated that E1A and RaRF were located in the nucleoplasm and nucleolus, respectively. However, RaRF overexpression promoted nucleolar translocation of E1A from the nucleoplasm. Both the RA-dependent interaction of RAR with RaRF and RAR translocation to the nucleolus were disrupted by E1A. RaRF-mediated RAR repression was impaired by wild-type E1A, but not by the RaRF binding-defective E1A mutant. Taken together, our data suggest that E1A is sequestered to the nucleolus by RaRF through a specific interaction, thereby leaving RAR in the nucleoplasm for transcriptional activation.

  12. Investigation of high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging by means of surface and array radiofrequency coils at 7 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zwaag, Wietske; Marques, José P; Hergt, Martin; Gruetter, Rolf

    2009-10-01

    In this investigation, high-resolution, 1x1x1-mm(3) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at 7 T is performed using a multichannel array head coil and a surface coil approach. Scan geometry was optimized for each coil separately to exploit the strengths of both coils. Acquisitions with the surface coil focused on partial brain coverage, while whole-brain coverage fMRI experiments were performed with the array head coil. BOLD sensitivity in the occipital lobe was found to be higher with the surface coil than with the head array, suggesting that restriction of signal detection to the area of interest may be beneficial for localized activation studies. Performing independent component analysis (ICA) decomposition of the fMRI data, we consistently detected BOLD signal changes and resting state networks. In the surface coil data, a small negative BOLD response could be detected in these resting state network areas. Also in the data acquired with the surface coil, two distinct components of the positive BOLD signal were consistently observed. These two components were tentatively assigned to tissue and venous signal changes.

  13. In vitro assessment of MRI issues at 3-Tesla for a breast tissue expander with a remote port.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnemeyer, Hannah; Shellock, Frank G; Ahn, Christina Y

    2014-04-01

    A patient with a breast tissue expander may require a diagnostic assessment using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To ensure patient safety, this type of implant must undergo in vitro MRI testing using proper techniques. Therefore, this investigation evaluated MRI issues (i.e., magnetic field interactions, heating, and artifacts) at 3-Tesla for a breast tissue expander with a remote port. A breast tissue expander with a remote port (Integra Breast Tissue Expander, Model 3612-06 with Standard Remote Port, PMT Corporation, Chanhassen, MN) underwent evaluation for magnetic field interactions (translational attraction and torque), MRI-related heating, and artifacts using standardized techniques. Heating was evaluated by placing the implant in a gelled-saline-filled phantom and MRI was performed using a transmit/receive RF body coil at an MR system reported, whole body averaged specific absorption rate of 2.9-W/kg. Artifacts were characterized using T1-weighted and GRE pulse sequences. Magnetic field interactions were not substantial and, thus, will not pose a hazard to a patient in a 3-Tesla or less MRI environment. The highest temperature rise was 1.7°C, which is physiologically inconsequential. Artifacts were large in relation to the remote port and metal connector of the implant but will only present problems if the MR imaging area of interest is where these components are located. A patient with this breast tissue expander with a remote port may safely undergo MRI at 3-Tesla or less under the conditions used for this investigation. These findings are the first reported at 3-Tesla for a tissue expander. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Visualizing electromagnetic vacuum by MRI

    CERN Document Server

    Chandrashekar, Chandrika S; Chandrashekar, S; Taylor, Erika A; Taylor, Deanne M

    2016-01-01

    Based upon Maxwell's equations, it has long been established that oscillating electromagnetic (EM) fields incident upon a metal surface decay exponentially inside the conductor, leading to a virtual EM vacuum at sufficient depths. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) utilizes radiofrequency (r.f.) EM fields to produce images. Here we present the first visualization of an EM vacuum inside a bulk metal strip by MRI, amongst several novel findings. We uncover unexpected MRI intensity patterns arising from two orthogonal pairs of faces of a metal strip, and derive formulae for their intensity ratios. Further, we furnish chemical shift imaging (CSI) results that discriminate different faces (surfaces) of a metal block according to their distinct nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts, which holds much promise for monitoring surface chemical reactions noninvasively. Bulk metals are ubiquitous, and MRI is a premier noninvasive diagnostic tool. Combining the two, the emerging field of bulk metal MRI can be expe...

  15. Tailored RF pulse optimization for magnetization inversion at ultra high field

    CERN Document Server

    Hurley, Aaron C; Li, Bai; Aickelin, Uwe; Coxon, Ron; Glover, Paul; Gowland, Penny A

    2010-01-01

    The radiofrequency (RF) transmit field is severely inhomogeneous at ultrahigh field due to both RF penetration and RF coil design issues. This particularly impairs image quality for sequences that use inversion pulses such as magnetization prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo and limits the use of quantitative arterial spin labeling sequences such as flow-attenuated inversion recovery. Here we have used a search algorithm to produce inversion pulses tailored to take into account the heterogeneity of the RF transmit field at 7 T. This created a slice selective inversion pulse that worked well (good slice profile and uniform inversion) over the range of RF amplitudes typically obtained in the head at 7 T while still maintaining an experimentally achievable pulse length and pulse amplitude in the brain at 7 T. The pulses used were based on the frequency offset correction inversion technique, as well as time dilation of functions, but the RF amplitude, frequency sweep, and gradient functions were all generate...

  16. Is your system calibrated? MRI gradient system calibration for pre-clinical, high-resolution imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James O'Callaghan

    Full Text Available High-field, pre-clinical MRI systems are widely used to characterise tissue structure and volume in small animals, using high resolution imaging. Both applications rely heavily on the consistent, accurate calibration of imaging gradients, yet such calibrations are typically only performed during maintenance sessions by equipment manufacturers, and potentially with acceptance limits that are inadequate for phenotyping. To overcome this difficulty, we present a protocol for gradient calibration quality assurance testing, based on a 3D-printed, open source, structural phantom that can be customised to the dimensions of individual scanners and RF coils. In trials on a 9.4 T system, the gradient scaling errors were reduced by an order of magnitude, and displacements of greater than 100 µm, caused by gradient non-linearity, were corrected using a post-processing technique. The step-by-step protocol can be integrated into routine pre-clinical MRI quality assurance to measure and correct for these errors. We suggest that this type of quality assurance is essential for robust pre-clinical MRI experiments that rely on accurate imaging gradients, including small animal phenotyping and diffusion MR.

  17. Microfluidic stretchable RF electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shi; Wu, Zhigang

    2010-12-07

    Stretchable electronics is a revolutionary technology that will potentially create a world of radically different electronic devices and systems that open up an entirely new spectrum of possibilities. This article proposes a microfluidic based solution for stretchable radio frequency (RF) electronics, using hybrid integration of active circuits assembled on flex foils and liquid alloy passive structures embedded in elastic substrates, e.g. polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). This concept was employed to implement a 900 MHz stretchable RF radiation sensor, consisting of a large area elastic antenna and a cluster of conventional rigid components for RF power detection. The integrated radiation sensor except the power supply was fully embedded in a thin elastomeric substrate. Good electrical performance of the standalone stretchable antenna as well as the RF power detection sub-module was verified by experiments. The sensor successfully detected the RF radiation over 5 m distance in the system demonstration. Experiments on two-dimensional (2D) stretching up to 15%, folding and twisting of the demonstrated sensor were also carried out. Despite the integrated device was severely deformed, no failure in RF radiation sensing was observed in the tests. This technique illuminates a promising route of realizing stretchable and foldable large area integrated RF electronics that are of great interest to a variety of applications like wearable computing, health monitoring, medical diagnostics, and curvilinear electronics.

  18. Chest MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance - chest; Magnetic resonance imaging - chest; NMR - chest; MRI of the thorax; Thoracic MRI ... healthy enough to filter the contrast. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ...

  19. Dependence of B1+ and B1− Field Patterns of Surface Coils on the Electrical Properties of the Sample and the MR Operating Frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Manushka V.; Collins, Christopher M.; Sodickson, Daniel K.; Brown, Ryan; Wiggins, Graham C.; Lattanzi, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    In high field MRI, the spatial distribution of the radiofrequency magnetic (B1) field is usually affected by the presence of the sample. For hardware design and to aid interpretation of experimental results, it is important both to anticipate and to accurately simulate the behavior of these fields. Fields generated by a radiofrequency surface coil were simulated using dyadic Green’s functions, or experimentally measured over a range of frequencies inside an object whose electrical properties were varied to illustrate a variety of transmit (B1+) and receive (B1−) field patterns. In this work, we examine how changes in polarization of the field and interference of propagating waves in an object can affect the B1 spatial distribution. Results are explained conceptually using Maxwell’s equations and intuitive illustrations. We demonstrate that the electrical conductivity alters the spatial distribution of distinct polarized components of the field, causing “twisted” transmit and receive field patterns, and asymmetries between |B1+| and |B1−|. Additionally, interference patterns due to wavelength effects are observed at high field in samples with high relative permittivity and near-zero conductivity, but are not present in lossy samples due to the attenuation of propagating EM fields. This work provides a conceptual framework for understanding B1 spatial distributions for surface coils and can provide guidance for RF engineers.

  20. Dependence of B1+ and B1- Field Patterns of Surface Coils on the Electrical Properties of the Sample and the MR Operating Frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Manushka V; Collins, Christopher M; Sodickson, Daniel K; Brown, Ryan; Wiggins, Graham C; Lattanzi, Riccardo

    2016-02-01

    In high field MRI, the spatial distribution of the radiofrequency magnetic ( B1) field is usually affected by the presence of the sample. For hardware design and to aid interpretation of experimental results, it is important both to anticipate and to accurately simulate the behavior of these fields. Fields generated by a radiofrequency surface coil were simulated using dyadic Green's functions, or experimentally measured over a range of frequencies inside an object whose electrical properties were varied to illustrate a variety of transmit [Formula: see text] and receive [Formula: see text] field patterns. In this work, we examine how changes in polarization of the field and interference of propagating waves in an object can affect the B1 spatial distribution. Results are explained conceptually using Maxwell's equations and intuitive illustrations. We demonstrate that the electrical conductivity alters the spatial distribution of distinct polarized components of the field, causing "twisted" transmit and receive field patterns, and asymmetries between [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. Additionally, interference patterns due to wavelength effects are observed at high field in samples with high relative permittivity and near-zero conductivity, but are not present in lossy samples due to the attenuation of propagating EM fields. This work provides a conceptual framework for understanding B1 spatial distributions for surface coils and can provide guidance for RF engineers.

  1. Image quality assessment of a 1.5T dedicated magnetic resonance-simulator for radiotherapy with a flexible radio frequency coil setting using the standard American College of Radiology magnetic resonance imaging phantom test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Oi Lei; Yuan, Jing; Yu, Siu Ki; Cheung, Kin Yin

    2017-04-01

    A flexible RF coil setting has to be used on an MR-simulator (MR-sim) in the head and neck simulation scan for radiotherapy (RT) purpose, while the image quality might be compromised due to the sub-optimized flexible coil compared to the normal diagnostic radiological (DR) head coil. In this study, we assessed the image quality of an MR-sim by conducting the standard American College of Radiology (ACR) MRI phantom test on a 1.5T MR-sim under RT-setting and comparing it to DR-setting. A large ACR MRI phantom was carefully positioned, aligned and scanned 9 times for each under RT- and DR-setting on a 1.5T MR-sim, following the ACR scanning instruction. Images were analyzed following the ACR guidance. Measurement results under two coil settings were quantitatively compared. Inter-observer disagreements under RT-setting between two physicists were compared using Bland-Altman (BA) analysis and intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). The MR-sim with RT-setting obtained sufficiently good image quality to pass all ACR recommended criteria. No significant difference was found in phantom length accuracy, high-contrast spatial resolution, slice thickness accuracy, slice position accuracy, and percent-signal ghosting. RT-setting significantly under-performed in low-contrast object detectability, while better performed in image intensity uniformity. BA analysis showed that 95% limit of agreement and biases of phantom test measurement under RT-setting between two observers were very small. Excellent inter-observer agreement (ICC >0.75) was achieved in all measurements except for slice thickness accuracy (ICC =0.42, moderate agreement) under RT-setting. Very good and highly reproducible image quality could be achieved on a 1.5T MR-sim with a flexible coil setting as revealed by the standard ACR MRI phantom test. The flexible RT-setting compromised in image signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) compared to the normal DR-setting, and resulted in reduced low-contrast object detectability.

  2. RF gymnastics in synchrotrons

    CERN Document Server

    Garoby, R

    2011-01-01

    The RF systems installed in synchrotrons can be used to change the longitudinal beam characteristics. 'RF gymnastics' designates manipulations of the RF parameters aimed at providing such non-trivial changes. Some keep the number of bunches constant while changing bunch length, energy spread, emittance, or distance between bunches. Others are used to change the number of bunches. After recalling the basics of longitudinal beam dynamics in a hadron synchrotron, this paper deals with the most commonly used gymnastics. Their principle is described as well as their performance and limitations.

  3. RF Gymnastics in Synchrotrons

    CERN Document Server

    Garoby, R

    2005-01-01

    The RF systems installed in synchrotrons can be used to change the longitudinal beam characteristics. "RF gymnastics" designates manipulations of the RF parameters aimed at providing such non-trivial changes. Some keep the number of bunches constant while changing bunch length, energy spread, emittance or distance between bunches. Others are used to change the number of bunches. After recalling the basics of longitudinal beam dynamics in a hadron synchrotron, this paper deals with the most commonly used gymnastics. Their principle is described as well as their performance and limitations.

  4. Geolocation of RF signals

    CERN Document Server

    Progri, Ilir

    2011-01-01

    ""Geolocation of RF Signals - Principles and Simulations"" offers an overview of the best practices and innovative techniques in the art and science of geolocation over the last twenty years. It covers all research and development aspects including theoretical analysis, RF signals, geolocation techniques, key block diagrams, and practical principle simulation examples in the frequency band from 100 MHz to 18 GHz or even 60 GHz. Starting with RF signals, the book progressively examines various signal bands - such as VLF, LF, MF, HF, VHF, UHF, L, S, C, X, Ku, and, K and the corresponding geoloca

  5. MRI staging of prostate cancer with combined endorectal body phased-array coil and histologic correlation; Kernspintomographisches Staging des Prostatakarzinoms mittels kombinierter Endorektal-Body-Phased-Array-Spule und histopathologische Korrelation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pegios, W. [Basel Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie; Bentas, W.; Wittmann, L.; Mack, M.G.; Zangos, S.; Soellner, O.; Binder, J.; Fellbaum, C.; Jonas, D.; Vogl, T.J.

    2003-12-01

    Purpose: Evaluation of the diagnostic value of the combined endorectal body-phased array technique regarding the staging of prostate cancers, especially in the differentiation between stages T2 and T3. Materials and Methods: Forty-two patients with biopsy-proven or clinically suspected prostate cancer were examined on a 1.5 T scanner (Siemens, Symphony) prior to radical prostatectomy. T{sub 2}-weighted TSE (axial, coronal) and T{sub 2}-weighted FSE (axial) sequences were obtained with and without fat suppression. After application of 0.2 mmol/kg bodyweight Gd-DTPA, T{sub 1}-weighted GRE sequences were obtained using dynamic MRI. All images were prospectively interpreted by two observers. The MR images were correlated with the histopathological findings of wide-area sections of prostatectomy specimens. Results: For the detection of extracapsular growth and seminal vesicle infiltration (T2 versus T3) the accuracy was between 94% and 97% (sensitivity 100%, specificity between 87% and 93%, observer 1 and 2). In two cases with a histologically proven stadium pT2b, observer 1 had diagnosed stadium pT3a. The results of observer 2 were marginally better in only one case, which was histologically proven to be pT2b and overstaged as pT3a. MRI did not lead to under-staging of a single tumor with regard to the differentiation between T2 and T3. Overall, the staging of the tumor stages (T1-T4) was correct in 25 of 33 cases (75%). The dynamic MRI showed no improvement regarding sensitivity (100%) and specificity (62%) and achieved a staging accuracy of only 75%. (orig.) [German] Zielsetzung: Evaluation der diagnostischen Wertigkeit der kombinierten Endorektal-Body-Array-Technik hinsichtlich des Stagings von Prostatakarzinomen, insbesondere der in der Abgrenzung der Stadien T2 gegen T3. Material und Methodik: Bei 42 Patienten mit bioptisch gesichertem oder klinisch hochgradigem Verdacht auf ein Prostatakarzinom wurden MRT-Untersuchungen an einem 1,5 Tesla-Geraet (Siemens

  6. Introduction to COIL

    OpenAIRE

    Kane, David

    2008-01-01

    By reciprocal arrangement between WIT and the National College of Ireland, you are now able to access their collection directly - more than 100,000 items. This form of direct consortial borrowing has never been tried before in Ireland. Before you borrow your first book, you will have to set up a COIL account, which is straightforward. The items which you reserve online will be posted to us, for you to collect, at the front desk in the Luke Wadding library, afterwards. The Initiat...

  7. Advances in Clinical PET/MRI Instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Hans; Lerche, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    In 2010, the first whole-body PET/MRI scanners installed for clinical use were the sequential Philips PET/MRI with PMT-based, TOF-capable technology and the integrated simultaneous Siemens PET/MRI. Avalanche photodiodes as non-magneto-sensitive readout electronics allowed PET integrated within the MRI. The experiences with these scanners showed that improvements of software aspects, such as attenuation correction, were necessary and that efficient protocols combining optimally PET and MRI must be still developed. In 2014, General Electric issued an integrated PET/MRI with SiPM-based PET detectors, allowing TOF-PET. Looking at the MRI components of current PET/MR imaging systems, primary improvements come from sequences and new coils.

  8. SU-D-18C-06: Initial Experience with Implementing MRI Safety Guidelines for Patients with Pacemakers - Medical Physicist Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, J; Place, V; Panda, A [Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Edmonson, H [Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Felmlee, J [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Pooley, R [Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Several institutions have developed MRI guidelines for patients with MR-unsafe or MR-conditional pacemakers. Here we highlight the role of a medical physicist in implementing these guidelines for non-pacemaker dependent patients. Guidelines: Implementing these guidelines requires involvement from several medical specialties and a strong collaboration with the site MRI supervisor to develop a structured workflow. A medical physicist is required to be present during the scan to supervise the MR scanning and to maintain a safety checklist that ensures: 1) uninterrupted patient communication with the technologist, 2) continuous patient physiologic monitoring (e.g. blood pressure and electrocardiography) by a trained nurse, 3) redundant patient vitals monitoring (e.g. pulse oximetry) due to the possibility of in vivo electrocardiography reading fluctuations during image acquisition. A radiologist is strongly recommended to be available to review the images before patients are discharged from the scanner. Pacemaker MRI should be restricted to 1.5T field strength. The MRI sequences should be optimized by the physicist with regards to: a) SAR: limited to <1.5 W/Kg for MR-unsafe pacemakers in normal operating mode, b) RF exposure time: <30 min, c) Coils: use T/R coils but not restricted to such, d) Artifacts: further optimization of sequences whenever image quality is compromised due to the pacemaker. In particular, cardiac, breast and left-shoulder MRIs are most susceptible to these artifacts. Possible strategies to lower the SAR include: a) BW reduction, 2) echo-train-length reduction, 3) increase TR, 4) decrease number of averages, 5) decrease flip angle, 6) reduce slices and/or a combination of all the options. Conclusion: A medical physicist in collaboration with the MR supervisor plays an important role in the supervision/implementation of safe MR scanning of pacemaker patients. Developing and establishing a workflow has enabled our institution to scan over

  9. Low Field Squid MRI Devices, Components and Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H. (Inventor); Hahn, Inseob (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods are disclosed. They include a portable low field (SQUID)-based MRI instrument and a portable low field SQUID-based MRI system to be operated under a bed where a subject is adapted to be located. Also disclosed is a method of distributing wires on an image encoding coil system adapted to be used with an NMR or MRI device for analyzing a sample or subject and a second order superconducting gradiometer adapted to be used with a low field SQUID-based MRI device as a sensing component for an MRI signal related to a subject or sample.

  10. Reconfigurable RF Filters Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space Micro proposes to build upon our existing space microelectronics and hardening technologies and products, to research and develop a novel rad hard/tolerant RF...

  11. MRI and low back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backache - MRI; Low back pain - MRI; Lumbar pain - MRI; Back strain - MRI; Lumbar radiculopathy - MRI; Herniated intervertebral disk - MRI; Prolapsed intervertebral disk - MRI; Slipped disk - MRI; Ruptured ...

  12. Microbunching and RF Compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venturini, M.; Migliorati, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ferrario, M.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2010-05-23

    Velocity bunching (or RF compression) represents a promising technique complementary to magnetic compression to achieve the high peak current required in the linac drivers for FELs. Here we report on recent progress aimed at characterizing the RF compression from the point of view of the microbunching instability. We emphasize the development of a linear theory for the gain function of the instability and its validation against macroparticle simulations that represents a useful tool in the evaluation of the compression schemes for FEL sources.

  13. Triple Halo Coil: Development and Comparison with Other TMS Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Priyam; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive stimulation technique that can be used for the treatment of various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's Disease, PTSD, TBI and anxiety by regulating synaptic activity. TMS is FDA approved for the treatment of major depressive disorder. There is a critical need to develop deep TMS coils that can stimulate deeper regions of the brain without excessively stimulating the cortex in order to provide an alternative to surgical methods. We have developed a novel multi-coil configuration called ``Triple Halo Coil'' (THC) that can stimulate deep brain regions. Investigation of induced electric and magnetic field in these regions have been achieved by computer modelling. Comparison of the results due to THC configuration have been conducted with other TMS coils such as ``Halo Coil'', circular coil and ``Figure of Eight'' coil. There was an improvement of more than 15 times in the strength of magnetic field, induced by THC configuration at 10 cm below the vertex of the head when compared with the ``Figure of Eight'' coil alone. Carver Charitable Trust.

  14. RF Measurement Concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, F

    2014-01-01

    For the characterization of components, systems and signals in the radiofrequency (RF) and microwave ranges, several dedicated instruments are in use. In this article the fundamentals of the RF signal techniques are discussed. The key element in these front ends is the Schottky diode which can be used either as a RF mixer or as a single sampler. The spectrum analyser has become an absolutely indispensable tool for RF signal analysis. Here the front end is the RF mixer as the RF section of modern spectrum analyses has a ra ther complex architecture. The reasons for this complexity and certain working principles as well as limitations are discussed. In addition, an overview of the development of scalar and vector signal analysers is given. For the determination of the noise temperature of a one-port and the noise figure of a two-port, basic concepts and relations are shown as well as a brief discussion of commonly used noise-measurement techniques. In a further part of this article the operating principles of n...

  15. Hydrogen Plasma Generation with 200 MHz RF Ion Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeongtae; Park, Kwangmook; Seo, Dong Hyuk; Kim, Han-Sung; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Cho, Yong-Sub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The ion source for the system is required to be rugged with 2000 hours maintenance free operation time because it is installed in the vessel filled with SF6 gas at the pressure of 10 bar. A 200 MHz RF ion source is considered as an ion source. It is a simple construction and provides long life operation. The specifications of the ion source are 5 kV extraction voltage and 1 mA beam current referenced to the proton. RF ion source has been developed and undergone a performance test. Results of the test are presented. 200 MHz RF ion source is designated and manufactured. First of all test stand test of ion source are set up for a performance test of ion source. It includes a RF ion source, a 200-MHz RF system, beam extraction system, vacuum system, beam extraction system, and beam diagnostic system. At pressure of 1.2E-5 torr, hydrogen plasma is generated with net RF power 70 W. Pyrex tube surrounded by an inductive coil takes the role of vessel and discharge is enhanced with field of permanent magnets.

  16. RF-Compensated Langmuir Probe Measurements in an IPVD System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliano, Daniel R.; Ruzic, David N.

    1998-10-01

    The experimental apparatus consists of a commercial-scale magnetron with an RF coil between the target and substrate holder. This coil creates a secondary inductive plasma that ionizes a significant portion of the sputter flux en route from target to substrate. In order to understand and predict the ionization of the sputter flux arriving at the substrate, Langmuir probe measurements of this secondary inductive plasma were made under various combinations of powers (magnetron and RF), pressures, and working gas mixtures. The probe apparatus is RF-compensated in order to keep the voltage difference between the probe tip and plasma constant throughout the RF cycle. In order to yield accurate measurements in the dirty depositing environment of the IPVD system, the back of probe tip is recessed in a small ceramic tube, preventing shorting. Further, the potential on the probe tip is kept low except during the data-collecting voltage sweeps in order to continuously clean it and maintain stable electrical characterisitics.

  17. Application of Ferrite Nanomaterial in RF On-Chip Inductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Lin Cai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Several kinds of ferrite-integrated on-chip inductors are presented. Ferrite nanomaterial applied in RF on-chip inductors is prepared and analyzed to show the properties of high permeability, high ferromagnetic resonance frequency, high resistivity, and low loss, which has the potential that will improve the performance of RF on-chip inductors. Simulations of different coil and ferrite nanomaterial parameters, inductor structures, and surrounding structures are also conducted to achieve the trend of gains of inductance and quality factor of on-chip inductors. By integrating the prepared ferrite magnetic nanomaterial to the on-chip inductors with different structures, the measurement performances show an obvious improvement even in GHz frequency range. In addition, the studies of CMOS compatible process to integrate the nanomaterial promote the widespread application of magnetic nanomaterial in RF on-chip inductors.

  18. A Micro Saddle Coil with Switchable Sensitivity for Local High-Resolution Imaging of Luminal Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuji Dohi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a micro saddle coil for local high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI fabricated by embedding a flexible coil pattern into a polydimethyilsiloxane (PDMS tube. We can change the sensitivity of the micro coil by deforming the shape of the coil from a saddle-shaped mode to a planar-shaped mode. The inductance, the resistance, and the Q-factor of the coil in the saddle-shaped mode were 2.45 μH, 3.31 Ω, and 39.9, respectively. Those of the planar-shaped mode were 3.07 μH, 3.92 Ω, and 42.9, respectively. In MRI acquired in saddle-shaped mode, a large visible area existed around the coil. Although the sensitive area was considerably reduced in the planar-shaped mode, clear MRI images were obtained. The signal-to-noise ratios (SNR of the saddle-shaped and planar-shaped modes were 194.9 and 505.9, respectively, at voxel size of 2.0 × 2.0 × 2.0 mm3 and 11.7 and 37.4, respectively, at voxel size of 0.5 × 0.5 × 1.0 mm3. The sensitivity of the saddle-shaped and the planar-shaped modes were about 3 times and 10 times higher, respectively, than those of the medical head coil at both voxel sizes. Thus, the micro saddle coil enabled large-area imaging and highly sensitive imaging by switching the shape of the coil.

  19. Novel TMS coils designed using an inverse boundary element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobos Sánchez, Clemente; María Guerrero Rodriguez, Jose; Quirós Olozábal, Ángel; Blanco-Navarro, David

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a new method to design TMS coils is presented. It is based on the inclusion of the concept of stream function of a quasi-static electric current into a boundary element method. The proposed TMS coil design approach is a powerful technique to produce stimulators of arbitrary shape, and remarkably versatile as it permits the prototyping of many different performance requirements and constraints. To illustrate the power of this approach, it has been used for the design of TMS coils wound on rectangular flat, spherical and hemispherical surfaces, subjected to different constraints, such as minimum stored magnetic energy or power dissipation. The performances of such coils have been additionally described; and the torque experienced by each stimulator in the presence of a main magnetic static field have theoretically found in order to study the prospect of using them to perform TMS and fMRI concurrently. The obtained results show that described method is an efficient tool for the design of TMS stimulators, which can be applied to a wide range of coil geometries and performance requirements.

  20. A 16-channel MR coil for simultaneous PET/MR imaging in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dregely, Isabel [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Nuklearmedizinische Klinik, Munich (Germany); Department of Radiological Sciences, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Lanz, Titus; Mueller, Matthias F. [Rapid Biomedical GmbH, Rimpar (Germany); Metz, Stephan [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Institut fuer diagnostische und interventionelle Radiologie, Munich (Germany); Kuschan, Marika [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Nuklearmedizinische Klinik, Munich (Germany); IMETUM, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Nimbalkar, Manoj; Ziegler, Sibylle I.; Nekolla, Stephan G.; Schwaiger, Markus [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Nuklearmedizinische Klinik, Munich (Germany); Bundschuh, Ralph A. [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Nuklearmedizinische Klinik, Munich (Germany); Universitaetsklinikum Bonn, Nuklearmedizinische Klinik, Bonn (Germany); Haase, Axel [IMETUM, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    To implement and evaluate a dedicated receiver array coil for simultaneous positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) imaging in breast cancer. A 16-channel receiver coil design was optimized for simultaneous PET/MR imaging. To assess MR performance, the signal-to-noise ratio, parallel imaging capability and image quality was evaluated in phantoms, volunteers and patients and compared to clinical standard protocols. For PET evaluation, quantitative {sup 18} F-FDG PET images of phantoms and seven patients (14 lesions) were compared to images without the coil. In PET image reconstruction, a CT-based template of the coil was combined with the MR-acquired attenuation correction (AC) map of the phantom/patient. MR image quality was comparable to clinical MR-only examinations. PET evaluation in phantoms showed regionally varying underestimation of the standardised uptake value (SUV; mean 22 %) due to attenuation caused by the coil. This was improved by implementing the CT-based coil template in the AC (<2 % SUV underestimation). Patient data indicated that including the coil in the AC increased the SUV values in the lesions (21 ± 9 %). Using a dedicated PET/MR breast coil, state-of-the-art MRI was possible. In PET, accurate quantification and image homogeneity could be achieved if a CT-template of this coil was included in the AC for PET image reconstruction. (orig.)

  1. Asymmetric gradient coil design for use in a short, open bore magnetic resonance imaging scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaohui; Liu, Feng; Li, Yu; Tang, Fangfang; Crozier, Stuart

    2016-08-01

    A conventional cylindrical whole-body MRI scanner has a long bore that may cause claustrophobia for some patients in addition to being inconvenient for healthcare workers accessing the patient. A short-bore scanner usually offers a small sized imaging area, which is impractical for imaging some body parts, such as the torso. This work proposes a novel asymmetric gradient coil design that offers a full-sized imaging area close to one end of the coil. In the new design, the primary and shielding coils are connected at one end whilst separated at the other, allowing the installation of the cooling system and shim trays. The proposed coils have a larger wire gap, higher efficiency, lower inductance, less resistance and a higher figure of merit than the non-connected coils. This half-connected coil structure not only improves the coils' electromagnetic performance, but also slightly attenuates acoustic radiation at most frequencies when compared to a non-connected gradient coil. It is also quieter in some frequency bands than a conventional symmetric gradient coil.

  2. Development of the Current Bypassing Methods into the Transverse Direction in Non-insulation HTS Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, K.; Kim, S. B.; Ikoma, H.; Kanemoto, D.

    In the case of motors and generators, the benefits of using high temperature superconducting (HTS) coils can be represented by the reduction of 50% in both losses and sizes compared to conventional machines. However, it is hard to establish quench detection and protection devices for the HTS coils applied to the rotors of motors and generators. So, the stability of the coils is lower than for the quiescent coils applied to NMR, MRI and so on. Therefore, it is important to improve the self-protection ability of HTS coils. We have studied the methods to improve the self-protection ability of HTS coils by removing the layer-to-layer insulation and inserting metal tape instead of the electrical insulation. The operating current in the non-insulated HTS coil was bypassed into the transverse direction by the generated normal region because of their electrical contact among the winding. In this study, we examined the method to control the current bypassing on layer-to-layer for controlling the inductance of the non-insulated HTS coil. The current bypassing properties on non-insulated HTS coil wound with 2G wires will be discussed.

  3. Relaxometry changes in a gel dosimetry phantom due to continued RF exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liney, Gary P; Godber, Mark J; Wilson, Andrew D; Goodby, John W; Turnbull, Lindsay W [Centre for MR Investigations, Hull Royal Infirmary, Hull (United Kingdom) and Imagel Ltd, York Science Park, York (United Kingdom)], E-mail: g.p.liney@hull.ac.uk

    2009-05-01

    This study investigates the potential alteration in relaxation times in phantoms used for MRI gel-dosimetry due to their continued RF exposure from the MRI scanner used in the measurement process. The work quantifies these changes and establishes a tolerance for the image acquisition time as well as mapping the spatial distribution of these effects.

  4. Analysing radio-frequency coil arrays in high-field magnetic resonance imaging by the combined field integral equation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shumin; Duyn, Jeff H

    2006-06-21

    We present the combined field integral equation (CFIE) method for analysing radio-frequency coil arrays in high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Three-dimensional models of coils and the human body were used to take into account the electromagnetic coupling. In the method of moments formulation, we applied triangular patches and the Rao-Wilton-Glisson basis functions to model arbitrarily shaped geometries. We first examined a rectangular loop coil to verify the CFIE method and also demonstrate its efficiency and accuracy. We then studied several eight-channel receive-only head coil arrays for 7.0 T SENSE functional MRI. Numerical results show that the signal dropout and the average SNR are two major concerns in SENSE coil array design. A good design should be a balance of these two factors.

  5. Simulation of RF power and multi-cusp magnetic field requirement for H- ion sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Manish; Senecha, V. K.; Kumar, Rajnish; Ghodke, Dharmraj. V.

    2016-12-01

    A computer simulation study for multi-cusp RF based H- ion source has been carried out using energy and particle balance equation for inductively coupled uniformly dense plasma considering sheath formation near the boundary wall of the plasma chamber for RF ion source used as high current injector for 1 Gev H- Linac project for SNS applications. The average reaction rates for different reactions responsible for H- ion production and destruction have been considered in the simulation model. The RF power requirement for the caesium free H- ion source for a maximum possible H- ion beam current has been derived by evaluating the required current and RF voltage fed to the coil antenna using transformer model for Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP). Different parameters of RF based H- ion source like excited hydrogen molecular density, H- ion density, RF voltage and current of RF antenna have been calculated through simulations in the presence and absence of multicusp magnetic field to distinctly observe the effect of multicusp field. The RF power evaluated for different H- ion current values have been compared with the experimental reported results showing reasonably good agreement considering the fact that some RF power will be reflected from the plasma medium. The results obtained have helped in understanding the optimum field strength and field free regions suitable for volume emission based H- ion sources. The compact RF ion source exhibits nearly 6 times better efficiency compare to large diameter ion source.

  6. Insulation and Heat Treatment of Bi-2212 Wire for Wind-and-React Coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter K. F. Hwang

    2007-10-22

    Higher Field Magnets demand higher field materials such as Bi-2212 round superconducting wire. The Bi-2212 wire manufacture process depends on the coil fabrication method and wire insulation material. Considering the wind-and-react method, the coil must unifirmly heated to the melt temperature and uniformly cooled to the solidification temperature. During heat treat cycle for tightly wound coils, the leakage melt from conductor can chemically react with insulation on the conductor and creat short turns in the coils. In this research project, conductor, insulation, and coils are made to systemically study the suitable insulation materials, coil fabrication method, and heat treatment cycles. In this phase I study, 800 meters Bi-2212 wire with 3 different insulation materials have been produced. Best insulation material has been identified after testing six small coils for insulation integrity and critical current at 4.2 K. Four larger coils (2" dia) have been also made with Bi-2212 wrapped with best insulation and with different heattreatment cycle. These coils were tested for Ic in a 6T background field and at 4.2 K. The test result shows that Ic from 4 coils are very close to short samples (1 meter) result. It demonstrates that HTS coils can be made with Bi-2212 wire with best insulation consistently. Better wire insulation, improving coil winding technique, and wire manufacture process can be used for a wide range of high field magnet application including acclerators such as Muon Collider, fusion energy research, NMR spectroscopy, MRI, and other industrial magnets.

  7. Structural and biochemical characterizations of an intramolecular tandem coiled coil protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Donghyuk; Kim, Gwanho; Kim, Gyuhee; Zheng, Xu; Kim, Yang-Gyun; Lee, Sangho

    2014-12-12

    Coiled coil has served as an excellent model system for studying protein folding and developing protein-based biomaterials. Most designed coiled coils function as oligomers, namely intermolecular coiled coils. However, less is known about structural and biochemical behavior of intramolecular coiled coils where coiled coil domains are covalently linked in one polypeptide. Here we prepare a protein which harbors three coiled coil domains with two short linkers, termed intramolecular tandem coiled coil (ITCC) and characterize its structural and biochemical behavior in solution. ITCC consists of three coiled coil domains whose sequences are derived from Coil-Ser and its domain swapped dimer. Modifications include positioning E (Glu) residue at "e" and K (Lys) at "g" positions throughout heptad repeats to enhance ionic interaction among its constituent coiled coil domains. Molecular modeling of ITCC suggests a compact triple helical bundle structure with the second and the third coiled coil domains forming a canonical coiled coil. ITCC exists as a mixture of monomeric and dimeric species in solution. Small-angle X-ray scattering reveals ellipsoidal molecular envelopes for both dimeric and monomeric ITCC in solution. The theoretically modeled structures of ITCC dock well into the envelopes of both species. Higher ionic strength shifts the equilibrium into monomer with apparently more compact structure while secondary structure remains unchanged. Taken together, our results suggest that our designed ITCC is predominantly monomeric structure through the enhanced ionic interactions, and its conformation is affected by the concentration of ionic species in the buffer.

  8. A novel method for coil efficiency estimation: Validation with a 13C birdcage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giovannetti, Giulio; Frijia, Francesca; Hartwig, Valentina;

    2012-01-01

    -to-noise ratio. In this work, we propose a novel method for RF coil efficiency estimation based on the use of a perturbing loop. The proposed method consists of loading the coil with a known resistor by inductive coupling and measuring the quality factor with and without the load. We tested the method...... by measuring the efficiency of a 13C birdcage coil tuned at 32.13 MHz and verified its accuracy by comparing the results with the nuclear magnetic resonance nutation experiment. The method allows coil performance characterization in a short time and with great accuracy, and it can be used both on the bench...... and inside the scanner. (c) 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Concepts Magn Reson Part B (Magn Reson Engineering) 41B: 139143, 2012...

  9. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imager)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Yoshinori [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1995-05-01

    MRI is a widely used diagnostic imaging modality because it has excellent diagnostic capabilities, is safe to use and generates images not affected by bone artifacts. Images are obtained by utilizing the phenomenon of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) by which protons located in a static magnetic field absorb radio frequency (RF) pulses with a specific frequency and release a part of the energy as a NMR signal. Potentially MRI has the ability to provide functional and metabolic information (such as flow, temperature, diffusion, neuron activity) in addition to morphological information. This paper describes the imaging principles and provides a general outline of some applications: flow imaging, metabolite imaging and temperature imaging. (J.P.N.).

  10. A YBCO RF-squid variable temperature susceptometer and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Luwei; Qiu, Jinwu; Zhang, Xianfeng; Tang, Zhimin; Cai, Yimin; Qian, Yongjia

    1991-01-01

    The Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) susceptibility using a high-temperature radio-frequency (rf) SQUID and a normal metal pick-up coil is employed in testing weak magnetization of the sample. The magnetic moment resolution of the device is 1 x 10(exp -6) emu, and that of the susceptibility is 5 x 10(exp -6) emu/cu cm.

  11. Basics of RF electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Gallo, A

    2011-01-01

    RF electronics deals with the generation, acquisition and manipulation of high-frequency signals. In particle accelerators signals of this kind are abundant, especially in the RF and beam diagnostics systems. In modern machines the complexity of the electronics assemblies dedicated to RF manipulation, beam diagnostics, and feedbacks is continuously increasing, following the demands for improvement of accelerator performance. However, these systems, and in particular their front-ends and back-ends, still rely on well-established basic hardware components and techniques, while down-converted and acquired signals are digitally processed exploiting the rapidly growing computational capability offered by the available technology. This lecture reviews the operational principles of the basic building blocks used for the treatment of high-frequency signals. Devices such as mixers, phase and amplitude detectors, modulators, filters, switches, directional couplers, oscillators, amplifiers, attenuators, and others are d...

  12. Endometrial cancer: results of clinical and histopathological staging compared to magnetic resonance imaging using an endorectal surface coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocker, Kerstin A; Alt, Céline D; Breyer, Ulrike; Hallscheidt, Peter; Sohn, Christof

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the staging accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with an endorectal surface coil on patients with endometrial cancer compared to results obtained using the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) classification and histopathology. In this prospective study, patients with biopsy-proven endometrial cancer were staged clinically using the FIGO classification before undergoing 1.5 T MRI with an endorectal surface coil (eMRI). The staging results from the FIGO classification and from eMRI were compared with the histopathological results after surgery. Furthermore, each patient was given a questionnaire designed by the authors to evaluate the patients' opinions on eMRI. The responses were examined using the methods of descriptive analysis. A total of 33 consecutive patients were recruited and clinically staged before undergoing eMRI. Subsequently, 21 patients underwent primary surgery and 12 patients primary radiochemotherapy. The FIGO stages were identical to the histopathological results in 17 (81 %) cases, and those of eMRI were identical in 15 (71 %). In 13 (62 %) cases, FIGO and eMRI staged identically. In 12 (57 %) of the 21 cases, all three staging modalities diagnosed the same tumor stage. eMRI overstaged the tumor in four patients and understaged it in two. All T1a tumors were staged correctly by eMRI. Eighteen patients answered the questionnaire, of whom 11 (61 %) patients stated that their experience with eMRI was overall positive. It seems feasible in principle to employ eMRI for diagnosing patients with endometrial cancer stage T1a. Yet, the results of eMRI for our study population were not better than the results obtained using the FIGO classification or than those from using MRI without an endorectal surface coil. eMRI thus does not meet the expectations based on its use in other pelvic tumor entities.

  13. Study on the RF power necessary to ignite plasma for the ICP test facility at HUST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yue, Haikun [School of Electronic Information and Communications, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Li, Dong; Wang, Chenre; Li, Xiaofei; Chen, Dezhi; Liu, Kaifeng; Zhou, Chi; Pan, Ruimin [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China)

    2015-10-15

    An Radio-Frequency (RF) Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) ion source test facility has been successfully developed at Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST). As part of a study on hydrogen plasma, the influence of three main operation parameters on the RF power necessary to ignite plasma was investigated. At 6 Pa, the RF power necessary to ignite plasma influenced little by the filament heating current from 5 A to 9 A. The RF power necessary to ignite plasma increased rapidly with the operation pressure decreasing from 8 Pa to 4 Pa. The RF power necessary to ignite plasma decreased with the number of coil turns from 6 to 10. During the experiments, plasma was produced with the electron density of the order of 10{sup 16}m{sup -3} and the electron temperature of around 4 eV. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. CCHMM_PROF: a HMM-based coiled-coil predictor with evolutionary information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartoli, Lisa; Fariselli, Piero; Krogh, Anders;

    2009-01-01

    MOTIVATION: The widespread coiled-coil structural motif in proteins is known to mediate a variety of biological interactions. Recognizing a coiled-coil containing sequence and locating its coiled-coil domains are key steps towards the determination of the protein structure and function. Different...... tools are available for predicting coiled-coil domains in protein sequences, including those based on position-specific score matrices and machine learning methods. RESULTS: In this article, we introduce a hidden Markov model (CCHMM_PROF) that exploits the information contained in multiple sequence...... alignments (profiles) to predict coiled-coil regions. The new method discriminates coiled-coil sequences with an accuracy of 97% and achieves a true positive rate of 79% with only 1% of false positives. Furthermore, when predicting the location of coiled-coil segments in protein sequences, the method reaches...

  15. ISR RF cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    In each ISR ring the radiofrequency cavities were installed in one 9 m long straight section. The RF system of the ISR had the main purpose to stack buckets of particles (most of the time protons)coming from the CPS and also to accelerate the stacked beam. The installed RF power per ring was 18 kW giving a peak accelerating voltage of 20 kV. The system had a very fine regulation feature allowing to lower the voltage down to 75 V in a smooth and well controlled fashion.

  16. Coiled-coil conformation of a pentamidine-DNA complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Tadeo; Pous, Joan; Subirana, Juan A; Campos, J Lourdes

    2010-03-01

    The coiled-coil structure formed by the complex of the DNA duplex d(ATATATATAT)(2) with pentamidine is presented. The duplex was found to have a mixed structure containing Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen base pairs. The drug stabilizes the coiled coil through the formation of cross-links between neighbouring duplexes. The central part of the drug is found in the minor groove as expected, whereas the charged terminal amidine groups protrude and interact with phosphates from neighbouring molecules. The formation of cross-links may be related to the biological effects of pentamidine, which is used as an antiprotozoal agent in trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis and pneumonias associated with AIDS. The DNA sequence that was used is highly abundant in most eukaryotic genomes. However, very few data are available on DNA sequences which only contain A.T base pairs.

  17. Rf2a and rf2b transcription factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beachy, Roger N.; Petruccelli, Silvana; Dai, Shunhong

    2007-10-02

    A method of activating the rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV) promoter in vivo is disclosed. The RTBV promoter is activated by exposure to at least one protein selected from the group consisting of Rf2a and Rf2b.

  18. The cortex-based alignment approach to TMS coil positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duecker, Felix; Frost, Martin A; de Graaf, Tom A; Graewe, Britta; Jacobs, Christianne; Goebel, Rainer; Sack, Alexander T

    2014-10-01

    TMS allows noninvasive manipulation of brain activity in healthy participants and patients. The effectiveness of TMS experiments critically depends on precise TMS coil positioning, which is best for most brain areas when a frameless stereotactic system is used to target activation foci based on individual fMRI data. From a purely scientific perspective, individual fMRI-guided TMS is thus the method of choice to ensure optimal TMS efficiency. Yet, from a more practical perspective, such individual functional data are not always available, and therefore alternative TMS coil positioning approaches are often applied, for example, based on functional group data reported in Talairach coordinates. We here propose a novel method for TMS coil positioning that is based on functional group data, yet only requires individual anatomical data. We used cortex-based alignment (CBA) to transform individual anatomical data to an atlas brain that includes probabilistic group maps of two functional regions (FEF and hMT+/V5). Then, these functional group maps were back-transformed to the individual brain anatomy, preserving functional-anatomical correspondence. As a proof of principle, the resulting CBA-based functional targets in individual brain space were compared with individual FEF and hMT+/V5 hotspots as conventionally localized with individual fMRI data and with targets based on Talairach coordinates as commonly done in TMS research in case only individual anatomical data are available. The CBA-based approach significantly improved localization of functional brain areas compared with traditional Talairach-based targeting. Given the widespread availability of CBA schemes and preexisting functional group data, the proposed procedure is easy to implement and at no additional measurement costs. However, the accuracy of individual fMRI-guided TMS remains unparalleled, and the CBA-based approach should only be the method of choice when individual functional data cannot be obtained or

  19. MRI Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a large magnet and radio waves to look at organs and structures inside your body. Health care professionals use MRI scans to diagnose a variety of conditions, from ...

  20. Shoulder MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  1. Gain of Imaging Fidelity by Employing a Higher Number of Independent Transmit Channels Together with Slice-Selective Radio-Frequency (RF Shimming at 7T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niravkumar Darji

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Dielectric resonance effects and radio-frequency (RF power deposition have become challenging issues for magnetic resonance imaging at ultrahigh-field (UHF strengths. The use of transmit (Tx coil arrays with independently-driven RF sources using a parallel transmission system is a promising method for alleviating the resulting RF inhomogeneities. In this study, the effect on homogeneity and RF-power when employing a higher number of transmit channels with multi-slice acquisition in vivo at high field strength (7T is scrutinized. An 8-channel head coil array was driven to emulate circular polarized (CP and 2-, 4-, and 8-channel independent transmit configurations at 7T. Static RF shimming was employed on human subjects in order to homogenize the B1+ field in the excited volume. Slice-selective and global RF shimming methods were applied with CP and 2-, 4-, and 8-channel transmit channel configurations. RF shimming was performed from CP to 2-, 4-, and 8-channel Tx configurations globally and slice-selectively. Systematic improvement in B1+ homogeneity and/or reduction in RF-power were observed. RF shimming in the human brain with 8-channel transmit and slice-selective shimming yields an increase in B1+ homogeneity of 43% and/or reduces RF-power by 68% when compared with CP global RF shimming at 7T.

  2. AC/RF Superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  3. Remote RF Battery Charging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, H.J.; Pop, V.; Op het Veld, J.H.G.; Vullers, R.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    The design of a remote RF battery charger is discussed through the analysis and design of the subsystems of a rectenna (rectifying antenna): antenna, rectifying circuit and loaded DC-to-DC voltage (buck-boost) converter. Optimum system power generation performance is obtained by adopting a system in

  4. Can Magnetic Coil Ease Tinnitus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Updates Technology Horizons Can magnetic coil ease tinnitus? VA trial aims to find out February 3, ... pain. See, for example, this 2009 review study . Tinnitus and Veterans Tinnitus has been one of the ...

  5. First coil for the SC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1955-01-01

    The coils for the SC magnet were stored in the large hangar of the Cointrin Airport (to make sure that they would be available before snow and ice would block the roads and canals from Belgium, where they were built).

  6. Adjustable Induction-Heating Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Rod; Bartolotta, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Improved design for induction-heating work coil facilitates optimization of heating in different metal specimens. Three segments adjusted independently to obtain desired distribution of temperature. Reduces time needed to achieve required temperature profiles.

  7. Safety testing and operational procedures for self-developed radiofrequency coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Jens; Henning, Anke; Giapitzakis, Ioannis A; Scheffler, Klaus; Shajan, G; Pohmann, Rolf; Avdievich, Nikolai I

    2016-09-01

    The development of novel radiofrequency (RF) coils for human ultrahigh-field (≥7 T), non-proton and body applications is an active field of research in many MR groups. Any RF coil must meet the strict requirements for safe application on humans with respect to mechanical and electrical safety, as well as the specific absorption rate (SAR) limits. For this purpose, regulations such as the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standard for medical electrical equipment, vendor-suggested test specifications for third party coils and custom-developed test procedures exist. However, for higher frequencies and shorter wavelengths in ultrahigh-field MR, the RF fields may become extremely inhomogeneous in biological tissue and the risk of localized areas with elevated power deposition increases, which is usually not considered by existing safety testing and operational procedures. In addition, important aspects, such as risk analysis and comprehensive electrical performance and safety tests, are often neglected. In this article, we describe the guidelines used in our institution for electrical and mechanical safety tests, SAR simulation and verification, risk analysis and operational procedures, including coil documentation, user training and regular quality assurance testing, which help to recognize and eliminate safety issues during coil design and operation. Although the procedure is generally applicable to all field strengths, specific requirements with regard to SAR-related safety and electrical performance at ultrahigh-field are considered. The protocol describes an internal procedure and does not reflect consensus among a large number of research groups, but rather aims to stimulate further discussion related to minimum coil safety standards. Furthermore, it may help other research groups to establish their own procedures. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Nylon screws make inexpensive coil forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucoin, G.; Rosenthal, C.

    1978-01-01

    Standard nylon screws act as coil form copper wire laid down in spiral thread. Completed coil may be bonded to printed-circuit board. However, it is impossible to tune coil by adjusting spacing between windings, technique sometimes used with air-core coils.

  9. Nylon screws make inexpensive coil forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucoin, G.; Rosenthal, C.

    1978-01-01

    Standard nylon screws act as coil form copper wire laid down in spiral thread. Completed coil may be bonded to printed-circuit board. However, it is impossible to tune coil by adjusting spacing between windings, technique sometimes used with air-core coils.

  10. HELMHOLTZ COILS FOR MEASURING MAGNETIC MOMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Dobrodeyev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The optimal configuration of the double Helmholtz coils for measuring of the magnetic dipole moments was defined. It was determined that measuring coils should have round shape and compensative coils – the square one. Analytically confirmed the feasibility of the proposed configuration of these coils as primary transmitters of magnetic dipole moments.

  11. Development of a MPPC-based prototype gantry for future MRI-PET scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurei, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Kato, T.; Fujita, T.; Ohshima, T.; Taya, T.; Yamamoto, S.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a high spatial resolution, compact Positron Emission Tomography (PET) module designed for small animals and intended for use in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems. This module consists of large-area, 4 × 4 ch MPPC arrays (S11830-3344MF; Hamamatsu Photonics K.K.) optically coupled with Ce-doped (Lu,Y)2(SiO4)O (Ce:LYSO) scintillators fabricated into 16 × 16 matrices of 0.5 × 0.5 mm2 pixels. We set the temperature sensor (LM73CIMK-0; National Semiconductor Corp.) at the rear of the MPPC acceptance surface, and apply optimum voltage to maintain the gain. The eight MPPC-based PET modules and coincidence circuits were assembled into a gantry arranged in a ring 90 mm in diameter to form the MPPC-based PET system. We have developed two types PET gantry: one made of non-magnetic metal and the other made of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) resins. The PET gantry was positioned around the RF coil of the 4.7 T MRI system. We took an image of a point }22Na source under fast spin echo (FSE) and gradient echo (GE), in order to measure the interference between the MPPC-based PET and MRI. The spatial resolution of PET imaging in a transaxial plane of about 1 mm (FWHM) was achieved in all cases. Operating with PET made of ABS has no effect on MR images, while operating with PET made of non-magnetic metal has a significant detrimental effect on MR images. This paper describes our quantitative evaluations of PET images and MR images, and presents a more advanced version of the gantry for future MRI/DOI-PET systems.

  12. Reliability engineering in RF CMOS

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis new developments are presented for reliability engineering in RF CMOS. Given the increase in use of CMOS technology in applications for mobile communication, also the reliability of CMOS for such applications becomes increasingly important. When applied in these applications, CMOS is typically referred to as RF CMOS, where RF stands for radio frequencies.

  13. Magnetic shielding for superconducting RF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuzawa, M.; Terashima, A.; Tsuchiya, K.; Ueki, R.

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic shielding is a key technology for superconducting radio frequency (RF) cavities. There are basically two approaches for shielding: (1) surround the cavity of interest with high permeability material and divert magnetic flux around it (passive shielding); and (2) create a magnetic field using coils that cancels the ambient magnetic field in the area of interest (active shielding). The choice of approach depends on the magnitude of the ambient magnetic field, residual magnetic field tolerance, shape of the magnetic shield, usage, cost, etc. However, passive shielding is more commonly used for superconducting RF cavities. The issue with passive shielding is that as the volume to be shielded increases, the size of the shielding material increases, thereby leading to cost increase. A recent trend is to place a magnetic shield in a cryogenic environment inside a cryostat, very close to the cavities, reducing the size and volume of the magnetic shield. In this case, the shielding effectiveness at cryogenic temperatures becomes important. We measured the permeabilities of various shielding materials at both room temperature and cryogenic temperature (4 K) and studied shielding degradation at that cryogenic temperature.

  14. Comparison of Coil Designs for Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Priyam; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2015-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive treatment for neurological disorders using time varying magnetic field. The electric field generated by the time varying magnetic field is used to depolarize the brain neurons which can lead to measurable effects. TMS provides a surgical free method for the treatment of neurological brain disorders like depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury and Parkinson's disease. Before using TMS on human subjects, it is appropriate that its effects are verified on animals such as mice. The magnetic field intensity and stimulated region of the brain can be controlled by the shape, position and current in the coils. There are few reports on the designs of the coils for mice. In this paper, different types of coils are developed and compared using an anatomically realistic mouse model derived from MRI images. Parameters such as focality, depth of the stimulation, electric field strength on the scalp and in the deep brain regions, are taken into account. These parameters will help researchers to determine the most suitable coil design according to their need. This should result in improvements in treatment of specific disorders. Carver Charitable Trust.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of intraoral hard and soft tissues using an intraoral coil and FLASH sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fluegge, Tabea; Eisenbeiss, Anne-Kathrin; Schmelzeisen, Rainer; Nelson, Katja [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Freiburg (Germany); Hoevener, Jan-Bernd; Ludwig, Ute; Hennig, Juergen [University Medical Center Freiburg, Medical Physics, Department of Radiology, Freiburg (Germany); Spittau, Bjoern [Albert Ludwig University of Freiburg, Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Freiburg (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    To ascertain the feasibility of MRI as a non-ionizing protocol for routine dentomaxillofacial diagnostic imaging. Wireless coils were used for MRI of intraoral hard and soft tissues. FLASH MRI was applied in vivo with a mandible voxel size of 250 x 250 x 500 μm{sup 3}, FOV of 64 x 64 x 28 mm{sup 3} and acquisition time of 3:57 min and with a maxilla voxel size of 350 μm{sup 3} and FOV of 34 cm{sup 3} in 6:40 min. Ex vivo imaging was performed in 4:38 min, with a resolution of 200 μm{sup 3} and FOV of 36.5 cm{sup 3}. Cone beam (CB) CT of the mandible and subjects were acquired. MRI was compared to CBCT and histological sections. Deviations were calculated with intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and coefficient of variation (c{sub v}). A high congruence between CBCT, MRI and specimens was demonstrated. Hard and soft tissues including dental pulp, periodontium, gingiva, cancellous bone and mandibular canal contents were adequately displayed with MRI. Imaging of select intraoral tissues was achieved using custom MRI protocols with an easily applicable intraoral coil in a clinically acceptable acquisition time. Comparison with CBCT and histological sections helped demonstrate dimensional accuracy of the MR images. The course of the mandibular canal was accurately displayed with CBCT and MRI. (orig.)

  16. Superconducting magnets for MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, J.E.

    1984-08-01

    Three types of magnets are currently used to provide the background field required for magnet resonance imaging (MRI). (i) Permanent magnets produce fields of up to 0.3 T in volumes sufficient for imaging the head or up to 0.15 T for whole body imaging. Cost and simplicity of operation are advantages, but relatively low field, weight (up to 100 tonnes) and, to a small extent, instability are limitations. (ii) Water-cooled magnets provide fields of up to 0.25 T in volumes suitable for whole body imaging, but at the expense of power (up to 150 kW for 0.25 T) and water-cooling. Thermal stability of the field requires the maintenance of constant temperature through periods both of use and of quiescence. (iii) Because of the limitations imposed by permanent and resistive magnets, particularly on field strength, the superconducting magnet is now most widely used to provide background fields of up to 2 T for whole body MRI. It requires very low operating power and that only for refrigeration. Because of the constant low temperature, 4.2 K, at which its stressed structure operates, its field is stable. The following review deals principally with superconducting magnets for MRI. However, the sections on field analysis apply to all types of magnet and the description of the source terms of circular coils and of the principals of design of solenoids apply equally to resistive solenoidal magnets.

  17. [MRI compatibility of deep brain stimulator].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yujing

    2013-07-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy develops rapidly in clinical application. The structures of deep brain stimulator and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) equipment are introduced, the interactions are analyzed, and the two compatible problems of radio frequency (RF) heating and imaging artifact are summarized in this paper.

  18. Sinogram-based coil selection for streak artifact reduction in undersampled radial real-time magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, H Christian M; Frahm, Jens

    2016-10-01

    Streak artifacts are a common problem in radial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We therefore developed a method for automatically excluding receiver coil elements which lead to these artifacts. The proposed coil selection relates to real-time MRI data based on highly undersampled radial acquisitions. It exploits differences between high- and low-resolution sinograms reconstructed from datasets acquired during preparatory scans. Apart from phantom validations, the performance was assessed for real-time MRI studies of different human organ systems in vivo. The algorithm greatly reduces streak artifact strength without compromising image quality in other parts of the image. It is robust with respect to different experimental settings and fast to be included in the online reconstruction pipeline for real-time MRI. The proposed method enables a fast reduction of streak artifacts in radial real-time MRI.

  19. rf SQUID metamaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Lazarides, N.; Tsironis, G. P.

    2007-01-01

    An rf superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) array in an alternating magnetic field is investigated with respect to its effective magnetic permeability, within the effective medium approximation. This system acts as an inherently nonlinear magnetic metamaterial, leading to negative magnetic response, and thus negative permeability, above the resonance frequency of the individual SQUIDs. Moreover, the permeability exhibits oscillatory behavior at low field intensities, allowing it...

  20. RF Power Amplifier Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lokay

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available The special program is presented for the demonstration of RF power transistor amplifiers for the purposes of the high-school education in courses of radio transmitters. The program is written in Turbo Pascal 6. 0 and enables to study the waveforms in selected points of the amplifier and to draw the trajectories of the working point in a plot of output transistor characteristics.

  1. Microwave and RF engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Sorrentino, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    An essential text for both students and professionals, combining detailed theory with clear practical guidance This outstanding book explores a large spectrum of topics within microwave and radio frequency (RF) engineering, encompassing electromagnetic theory, microwave circuits and components. It provides thorough descriptions of the most common microwave test instruments and advises on semiconductor device modelling. With examples taken from the authors' own experience, this book also covers:network and signal theory;electronic technology with guided electromagnetic pr

  2. RF Pulsed Heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pritzkau, David P.

    2002-01-03

    RF pulsed heating is a process by which a metal is heated from magnetic fields on its surface due to high-power pulsed RF. When the thermal stresses induced are larger than the elastic limit, microcracks and surface roughening will occur due to cyclic fatigue. Pulsed heating limits the maximum magnetic field on the surface and through it the maximum achievable accelerating gradient in a normal conducting accelerator structure. An experiment using circularly cylindrical cavities operating in the TE{sub 011} mode at a resonant frequency of 11.424 GHz is designed to study pulsed heating on OFE copper, a material commonly used in normal conducting accelerator structures. The high-power pulsed RF is supplied by an X-band klystron capable of outputting 50 MW, 1.5 {micro}s pulses. The test pieces of the cavity are designed to be removable to allow testing of different materials with different surface preparations. A diagnostic tool is developed to measure the temperature rise in the cavity utilizing the dynamic Q change of the resonant mode due to heating. The diagnostic consists of simultaneously exciting a TE{sub 012} mode to steady-state in the cavity at 18 GHz and measuring the change in reflected power as the cavity is heated from high-power pulsed RF. Two experimental runs were completed. One run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 120 K for 56 x 10{sup 6} pulses. The second run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 82 K for 86 x 10{sup 6} pulses. Scanning electron microscope pictures show extensive damage occurring in the region of maximum temperature rise on the surface of the test pieces.

  3. RF Based Spy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robot Prerna Jain

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The intention of this paper is to reduce human victims in terrorist attack such as 26/11. So this problem can be overcome by designing the RF based spy robot which involves wireless camera. so that from this we can examine rivals when it required. This robot can quietly enter into enemy area and sends us the information via wireless camera. On the other hand one more feature is added in this robot that is colour sensor. Colour sensor senses the colour of surface and according to that robot will change its colour. Because of this feature this robot can’t easily detected by enemies. The movement of this robot is wirelessly controlled by a hand held RF transmitter to send commands to the RF receiver mounted on the moving robot. Since human life is always Valueable, these robots are the substitution of soldiers in war areas. This spy robot can also be used in star hotels, shopping malls, jewelry show rooms, etc where there can be threat from intruders or terrorists.

  4. Computational analysis of residue contributions to coiled-coil topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Jorge; Lazaridis, Themis

    2011-11-01

    A variety of features are thought to contribute to the oligomeric and topological specificity of coiled coils. In previous work, we examined the determinants of oligomeric state. Here, we examine the energetic basis for the tendency of six coiled-coil peptides to align their α-helices in antiparallel orientation using molecular dynamics simulations with implicit solvation (EEF1.1). We also examine the effect of mutations known to disrupt the topology of these peptides. In agreement with experiment, ARG or LYS at a or d positions were found to stabilize the antiparallel configuration. The modeling suggests that this is not due to a-a' or d-d' repulsions but due to interactions with e' and g' residues. TRP at core positions also favors the antiparallel configuration. Residues that disfavor parallel dimers, such as ILE at d, are better tolerated in, and thus favor the antiparallel configuration. Salt bridge networks were found to be more stabilizing in the antiparallel configuration for geometric reasons: antiparallel helices point amino acid side chains in opposite directions. However, the structure with the largest number of salt bridges was not always the most stable, due to desolvation and configurational entropy contributions. In tetramers, the extent of stabilization of the antiparallel topology by core residues is influenced by the e' residue on a neighboring helix. Residues at b and c positions in some cases also contribute to stabilization of antiparallel tetramers. This work provides useful rules toward the goal of designing coiled coils with a well-defined and predictable three-dimensional structure.

  5. Assessment of MRI issues at 3-Tesla for metallic surgical implants: findings applied to 61 additional skin closure staples and vessel ligation clips

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Metallic skin closure staples and vessel ligation clips should be tested at 3-Tesla to characterize MRI issues in order to ensure patient safety. Therefore, metallic surgical implants were assessed at 3-Tesla for magnetic field interactions, MRI-related heating, and artifacts. Methods A skin closure staple (Visistat Skin Stapler, staple, Polytetrafluoroethylene, PTFE, coated 316L/316LVM stainless steel; Teleflex Medical, Durham, NC) and a vessel ligation clip (Hemoclip Traditional, stainless steel; Teleflex Medical, Durham, NC) that represented the largest metallic sizes made from materials with the highest magnetic susceptibilities (i.e., based on material information) among 61 other surgical implants (52 metallic implants, 9 nonmetallic implants) underwent evaluation for magnetic field interactions, MRI-related heating, and artifacts using standardized techniques. MRI-related heating was assessed by placing each implant in a gelled-saline-filled phantom with MRI performed using a transmit/receive RF body coil at an MR system reported, whole body averaged SAR of 2.9-W/kg for 15-min. Artifacts were characterized using T1-weighted, SE and GRE pulse sequences. Results Each surgical implant showed minor magnetic field interactions (20- and 27-degrees, which is acceptable from a safety consideration). Heating was not substantial (highest temperature change, ≤ 1.6°C). Artifacts may create issues if the area of interest is in the same area or close to the respective surgical implant. Conclusions The results demonstrated that it would be acceptable for patients with these metallic surgical implants to undergo MRI at 3-Tesla or less. Because of the materials and dimensions of the surgical implants that underwent testing, these findings pertain to 61 additional similar implants. PMID:22230200

  6. Numerical study of RF exposure and the resulting temperature rise in the foetus during a magnetic resonance procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hand, J W; Li, Y; Hajnal, J V [Imaging Sciences Department, Imperial College London (Hammersmith Campus), London W12 0NN (United Kingdom)], E-mail: j.hand@imperial.ac.uk

    2010-02-21

    Numerical simulations of specific absorption rate (SAR) and temperature changes in a 26-week pregnant woman model within typical birdcage body coils as used in 1.5 T and 3 T MRI scanners are described. Spatial distributions of SAR and the resulting spatial and temporal changes in temperature are determined using a finite difference time domain method and a finite difference bio-heat transfer solver that accounts for discrete vessels. Heat transfer from foetus to placenta via the umbilical vein and arteries as well as that across the foetal skin/amniotic fluid/uterine wall boundaries is modelled. Results suggest that for procedures compliant with IEC normal mode conditions (maternal whole-body averaged SAR{sub MWB} {<=} 2 W kg{sup -1} (continuous or time-averaged over 6 min)), whole foetal SAR, local foetal SAR{sub 10g} and average foetal temperature are within international safety limits. For continuous RF exposure at SAR{sub MWB} = 2 W kg{sup -1} over periods of 7.5 min or longer, a maximum local foetal temperature >38 deg. C may occur. However, assessment of the risk posed by such maximum temperatures predicted in a static model is difficult because of frequent foetal movement. Results also confirm that when SAR{sub MWB} = 2 W kg{sup -1}, some local SAR{sub 10g} values in the mother's trunk and extremities exceed recommended limits.

  7. The structure of the GemC1 coiled coil and its interaction with the Geminin family of coiled-coil proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caillat, Christophe; Fish, Alexander [The Netherlands Cancer Institute, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pefani, Dafni-Eleftheria; Taraviras, Stavros; Lygerou, Zoi [University of Patras, 26505 Rio, Patras (Greece); Perrakis, Anastassis, E-mail: a.perrakis@nki.nl [The Netherlands Cancer Institute, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-10-31

    The GemC1 coiled-coil structure has subtle differences compared with its homologues Geminin and Idas. Co-expression experiments in cells and biophysical stability analysis of the Geminin-family coiled coils suggest that the GemC1 coiled coil alone is unstable. GemC1, together with Idas and Geminin, an important regulator of DNA-replication licensing and differentiation decisions, constitute a superfamily sharing a homologous central coiled-coil domain. To better understand this family of proteins, the crystal structure of a GemC1 coiled-coil domain variant engineered for better solubility was determined to 2.2 Å resolution. GemC1 shows a less typical coiled coil compared with the Geminin homodimer and the Geminin–Idas heterodimer structures. It is also shown that both in vitro and in cells GemC1 interacts with Geminin through its coiled-coil domain, forming a heterodimer that is more stable that the GemC1 homodimer. Comparative analysis of the thermal stability of all of the possible superfamily complexes, using circular dichroism to follow the unfolding of the entire helix of the coiled coil, or intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of a unique conserved N-terminal tryptophan, shows that the unfolding of the coiled coil is likely to take place from the C-terminus towards the N-terminus. It is also shown that homodimers show a single-state unfolding, while heterodimers show a two-state unfolding, suggesting that the dimer first falls apart and the helices then unfold according to the stability of each protein. The findings argue that Geminin-family members form homodimers and heterodimers between them, and this ability is likely to be important for modulating their function in cycling and differentiating cells.

  8. Deformation of Linked Polymer Coils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董朝霞; 李明远; 吴肇亮; 林梅钦

    2003-01-01

    Linked polymer solution (LPS) is defined as the solution of linked polymer coils (LPCs) dispersed in water, composed of low concentration partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM) and aluminum citrate (crosslinker). In the work, the conformational changes of LPCs under different conditions were investigated by the methods of membrane filtering under low pressure, dynamic light scattering and core flooding experiments. The results showed that in some conditions the LPCs could be compressed mechanically to 1/158.5 of their original volume because of relatively lower HPAM cross-linking. The hydration property of LPCs was similar to that of normal polymer coils. The deformation of LPCs was more restricted than that of ordinary polymer coils under the flow shear stress or the shift of hydration equilibrium caused in the variation of the electrolyte concentration which is responsible for the effective plugging in the throats of porous media when LPCs are used for deep diverting.

  9. Observation of spatio-temporal pattern in magnetised rf plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Bandyopadhyay, P; Konopka, U; Morfill, G

    2016-01-01

    We address an experimental observation of pattern formation in a magnetised rf plasma. The experiments are carried out in a electrically grounded aluminium chamber which is housed inside a rotatable superconducting magnetic coil. The plasma is formed by applying a rf voltage in parallel plate electrodes in push-pull mode under the background of argon gas. The time evolution of plasma intensity shows that a homogeneous plasma breaks into several concentric radial spatiotemoral bright and dark rings. These rings propagate radially at considerably low pressure and a constant magnetic field. These patterns are observed to trap small dust particles/grains in their potential. Exploiting this property of the patterns, a novel technique to measure the electric field associated with the patterns is described. The resulting estimates of the corresponding field intensity are presented. At other specific discharge parameters the plasma shows a range of special type of characteristic structures observed in certain other c...

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of intraoral hard and soft tissues using an intraoral coil and FLASH sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flügge, Tabea; Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Ludwig, Ute; Eisenbeiss, Anne-Kathrin; Spittau, Björn; Hennig, Jürgen; Schmelzeisen, Rainer; Nelson, Katja

    2016-12-01

    To ascertain the feasibility of MRI as a non-ionizing protocol for routine dentomaxillofacial diagnostic imaging. Wireless coils were used for MRI of intraoral hard and soft tissues. FLASH MRI was applied in vivo with a mandible voxel size of 250 × 250 × 500 μm(3), FOV of 64 × 64 × 28 mm(3) and acquisition time of 3:57 min and with a maxilla voxel size of 350 μm(3) and FOV of 34 cm(3) in 6:40 min. Ex vivo imaging was performed in 4:38 min, with a resolution of 200 μm(3) and FOV of 36.5 cm(3). Cone beam (CB) CT of the mandible and subjects were acquired. MRI was compared to CBCT and histological sections. Deviations were calculated with intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and coefficient of variation (cv). A high congruence between CBCT, MRI and specimens was demonstrated. Hard and soft tissues including dental pulp, periodontium, gingiva, cancellous bone and mandibular canal contents were adequately displayed with MRI. Imaging of select intraoral tissues was achieved using custom MRI protocols with an easily applicable intraoral coil in a clinically acceptable acquisition time. Comparison with CBCT and histological sections helped demonstrate dimensional accuracy of the MR images. The course of the mandibular canal was accurately displayed with CBCT and MRI. • MRI is a clinically available diagnostic tool in dentistry • Intraoral hard and soft tissues can be imaged with a high resolution with MRI • The dimensional accuracy of MRI is comparable to cone beam CT.

  11. Numerical optimization of a three-channel radiofrequency coil for open, vertical-field, MR-guided, focused ultrasound surgery using the hybrid method of moment/finite difference time domain method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Xuegang; Wang, Di; Han, Jijun; Feng, Yanqiu; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan

    2012-07-01

    The numerical optimization of a three-channel radiofrequency (RF) coil with a physical aperture for the open, vertical-field, MR-guided, focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) system using the hybrid method of moment (MoM)/finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is reported. The numerical simulation of the current density distribution on an RF coil with a complicated irregular structure was performed using MoM. The electromagnetic field simulation containing the full coil-tissue interactions within the region of interest was accomplished using the FDTD method. Huygens' equivalent box with six surfaces smoothly connected the MoM and FDTD method. An electromagnetic model of the human pelvic region was reconstructed and loaded in the FDTD zone to optimize the three-channel RF coil and compensate for the lower sensitivity at the vertical field. In addition, the numerical MoM was used to model the resonance, decoupling and impedance matching of the RF coil in compliance with engineering practices. A prototype RF coil was constructed to verify the simulation results. The results demonstrate that the signal-to-noise ratio and the homogeneity of the B(1) field were both greatly improved compared with previously published results.

  12. Coil Optimization for HTS Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijatovic, Nenad; Jensen, Bogi Bech; Abrahamsen, Asger Bech

    for different tape parameters Ici, ni and Ci, where Ici, ni and Ci are critical current, n - value and price of the ith tape respectively and i=1, 2, 3…, further optimization with respect to cost vs. HTS losses has been performed. Allowing for different types of HTS tapes in the coils, a guidance to which tape....... The proposed coil design is optimized with respect to minimizing the perpendicular field while still maximizing the amplitude of fundamental space harmonic. This guarantees the lowest HTS loss density and best utilization of expensive HTS material in the field winding of the SM. Additionally, accounting...

  13. Electromagnetic Gun With Commutated Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, David G.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed electromagnetic gun includes electromagnet coil, turns of which commutated in sequence along barrel. Electrical current fed to two armatures by brushes sliding on bus bars in barrel. Interaction between armature currents and magnetic field from coil produces force accelerating armature, which in turn, pushes on projectile. Commutation scheme chosen so magnetic field approximately coincides and moves with cylindrical region defined by armatures. Scheme has disadvantage of complexity, but in return, enables designer to increase driving magnetic field without increasing armature current. Attainable muzzle velocity increased substantially.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Atherosclerotic Lesion with New Devised Animal Surface Coil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Bing-hui; LI Ming-hua; ZHAO Qing; CHENG Ying-sheng; XIAO Yun-feng; ZHAO Jia-min

    2008-01-01

    The ability of dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI) with a new devised animal surface coil was analyzed in identifying atherosclerotic plaques in the rabbit medium-sized iliac artery (IA).Then a comparative analysis of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) and DCE MRI was clone in discerning morphology and components of 80 atherosclerotic plaques identified by histopathology.It shows that the DCE MRI may be an emerging noninvasive and economic way to characterize atherosclerotic plaques at present.What's more,a new devised animal surface coil would further improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the quality of imaging.However,CT angiography (CTA) may be better than MR angiography(MRA) in detecting vessel stenosis.

  15. [Two Cases of Ruptured Cerebral Aneurysm Complicated with Delayed Coil Protrusion after Coil Embolization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Takashi; Ogata, Atsushi; Ebashi, Ryo; Takase, Yukinori; Masuoka, Jun; Kawashima, Masatou; Abe, Tatsuya

    2016-07-01

    We report two cases of delayed coil protrusion after coil embolization for ruptured cerebral aneurysms. Case 1:An 82-year-old woman with a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured small anterior communicating artery aneurysm underwent successful coil embolization. Eighteen days after the procedure, coil protrusion from the aneurysm into the right anterior cerebral artery was observed without any symptoms. Further coil protrusion did not develop after 28 days. Case 2:A 78-year-old woman with a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured small left middle cerebral artery aneurysm underwent successful coil embolization. Twenty days after the procedure, coil protrusion from the aneurysm into the left middle cerebral artery was observed, with a transient ischemic attack. Further coil protrusion did not develop. Both patients recovered with antithrombotic treatment. Even though delayed coil protrusion after coil embolization is rare, it should be recognized as a long-term complication of coil embolization for cerebral aneurysms.

  16. RF power generation

    CERN Document Server

    Carter, R G

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the main types of r.f. power amplifiers which are, or may be, used for particle accelerators. It covers solid-state devices, tetrodes, inductive output tubes, klystrons, magnetrons, and gyrotrons with power outputs greater than 10 kW c.w. or 100 kW pulsed at frequencies from 50 MHz to 30 GHz. Factors affecting the satisfactory operation of amplifiers include cooling, matching and protection circuits are discussed. The paper concludes with a summary of the state of the art for the different technologies.

  17. Other RF power sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurkin, G.Ya. [Budker Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    1999-09-01

    The main subjects discussed in this paper are as follows. Triode tube; main characteristics of the equivalent schematic of the amplifying stage. Requirements for operation of a triode stage loaded with an accelerating cavity. Influence of parameters of the output stage and transmission line length on the output impedance of RF system for the beam. Typical design of the power output stage. Magnetron, travelling-wave tube, principles of operation, main parameters. Magnetron loaded with a microtron cavity, methods of coupling, requirements for stable operation. Magnicon - BHF generator with a circular deflection of the electron beam, principle of operation, results of development. (author)

  18. SPS RF cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. A power of up to 790 kW can be supplied to each giving a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities.

  19. RF Characterization of Superconducting Samples

    CERN Document Server

    Junginger, T; Welsch, C

    2009-01-01

    At CERN a compact Quadrupole Resonator has been re-commissioned for the RF characterization of superconducting materials at 400 MHz. In addition the resonator can also be excited at multiple integers of this frequency. Besides Rs it enables determination of the maximum RF magnetic field, the thermal conductivity and the penetration depth of the attached samples, at different temperatures. The features of the resonator will be compared with those of similar RF devices and first results will be presented.

  20. Wireless Displacement Sensing of Micromachined Spiral-Coil Actuator Using Resonant Frequency Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Sultan Mohamed Ali

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a method that enables real-time displacement monitoring and control of micromachined resonant-type actuators using wireless radiofrequency (RF. The method is applied to an out-of-plane, spiral-coil microactuator based on shape-memory-alloy (SMA. The SMA spiral coil forms an inductor-capacitor resonant circuit that is excited using external RF magnetic fields to thermally actuate the coil. The actuation causes a shift in the circuit’s resonance as the coil is displaced vertically, which is wirelessly monitored through an external antenna to track the displacements. Controlled actuation and displacement monitoring using the developed method is demonstrated with the microfabricated device. The device exhibits a frequency sensitivity to displacement of 10 kHz/µm or more for a full out-of-plane travel range of 466 µm and an average actuation velocity of up to 155 µm/s. The method described permits the actuator to have a self-sensing function that is passively operated, thereby eliminating the need for separate sensors and batteries on the device, thus realizing precise control while attaining a high level of miniaturization in the device.

  1. Coupled Coils, Magnets and Lenz's Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Great scientists in the past have experimented with coils and magnets. Here we have a variation where coupling occurs between two coils and the oscillatory motion of two magnets to give somewhat surprising results. (Contains 6 figures and 1 footnote.)

  2. Generalization of Helmholtz coil problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petković Dejan M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary intent of this work is to propose a simple analytical method for designing coil systems for homogeneous and gradient magnetostatic field generation. Coil system consists of two identical coaxial (regular polygonal current loops. In the space between the loops, there is nearly homogeneous or nearly linear distribution of the magnetic field along the axes depending on the currents' direction. First, we derived a suitable, simple and general expression for the magnetic field along the axes due to a polygonal current loop. We emphasize the importance of the role of this expression for further analysis. The total on-axes magnetic field is the result of superposition of the magnetic fields that each loop generates separately. The proper distance between the loops and the current orientation make the system to become either Helmholtz coil or anti-Helmholtz coil. In this paper we give exact, analytical and general expression for this optimal distance that provides the magnetic field to be homogeneous (linear as much as possible. We based our study on Taylor series expansion of the total magnetic field, demanding that the first contaminating term must be canceled, in both, symmetric and asymmetric case.

  3. A novel compact model for on-chip stacked transformers in RF-CMOS technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Jun; Wen Jincai; Zhao Qian; Sun Lingling

    2013-01-01

    A novel compact model for on-chip stacked transformers is presented.The proposed model topology gives a clear distinction to the eddy current,resistive and capacitive losses of the primary and secondary coils in the substrate.A method to analytically determine the non-ideal parasitics between the primary coil and substrate is provided.The model is further verified by the excellent match between the measured and simulated S-parameters on the extracted parameters for a 1 ∶ 1 stacked transformer manufactured in a commercial RF-CMOS technology.

  4. Rotor assembly including superconducting magnetic coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snitchler, Gregory L. (Shrewsbury, MA); Gamble, Bruce B. (Wellesley, MA); Voccio, John P. (Somerville, MA)

    2003-01-01

    Superconducting coils and methods of manufacture include a superconductor tape wound concentrically about and disposed along an axis of the coil to define an opening having a dimension which gradually decreases, in the direction along the axis, from a first end to a second end of the coil. Each turn of the superconductor tape has a broad surface maintained substantially parallel to the axis of the coil.

  5. LANSCE RF System Refurbishment

    CERN Document Server

    Rees, Daniel; Kwon, Sung-il; Lyles, John T M; Lynch, Michael; Prokop, Mark; Reass, William; Tallerico, Paul J

    2005-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is in the planning phase of a refurbishment project that will sustain reliable facility operations well into the next decade. The LANSCE accelerator was constructed in the late 1960s and early 1970s and is a national user facility that provides pulsed protons and spallation neutrons for defense and civilian research and applications. We will be replacing all the 201 MHz RF systems and a substantial fraction of the 805 MHz RF systems and high voltage systems. The current 44 LANSCE 805 MHz, 1.25 MW klystrons have an average in-service time in excess of 110,000 hours. All 44 must be in service to operate the accelerator. There are only 9 spares left. The klystrons receive their DC power from the power system originally installed in 1960. Although this power system has been extremely reliable, gas analysis of the insulating oil is indicating age related degradation that will need attention in the next few years. This paper will provide the design details of the new R...

  6. SPS RF Accelerating Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    This picture shows one of the 2 new cavities installed in 1978-1979. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also increased: to the first 2 MW plant a second 2 MW plant was added and by end 1979 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412016X, 7412017X, 7411048X

  7. SPS RF Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    The picture shows one of the two initially installed cavities. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also gradually increased: by end 1980 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412017X, 7411048X, 7505074.

  8. Plasmodium vivax antigen discovery based on alpha-helical coiled coil protein motif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Céspedes, Nora; Habel, Catherine; Lopez-Perez, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Protein α-helical coiled coil structures that elicit antibody responses, which block critical functions of medically important microorganisms, represent a means for vaccine development. By using bioinformatics algorithms, a total of 50 antigens with α-helical coiled coil motifs orthologous...

  9. The many types of interhelical ionic interactions in coiled coils - an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Markus; Stetefeld, Jörg; Burkhard, Peter

    2010-05-01

    Coiled coils represent the most frequent protein oligomerization motif in nature and are involved in many important biological processes. The prototype interhelical ionic interaction for coiled coils described in literature is an i to i+5 ionic interaction from heptad position g to e', but other possible ionic interactions have also been described. Here we use a statistical approach to systematically analyze all high-quality coiled-coil structures in the RCSB protein database for their interhelical ionic interactions. We provide a complete listing of all possible arrangements and analyze the frequency of their occurrence in the primary sequence together with their probability of formation in the quaternary structure of the coiled coils. We show that the classical i to i+5 ionic interaction is indeed characteristic for parallel dimeric and trimeric coiled coils. But we also show that there are many more i to i+2 ionic interactions in parallel tetrameric and pentameric coiled coils, and in antiparallel coiled coils the classical i to i+5 ionic interaction is in none of the oligomerizations states the most frequently observed ionic interaction. We also demonstrate that many ionic interactions involve residues at the core positions that are usually occupied by hydrophobic residues and that such interhelical ionic interactions are a hallmark feature of dimeric coiled coils.

  10. Ventricular Assist Device implant (AB 5000 prototype cannula: In vitro assessment of MRI issues at 3-Tesla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valencerina Samuel

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate MRI issues at 3-Tesla for a ventricular assist device (VAD. Methods The AB5000 Ventricle with a prototype Nitinol wire-reinforced In-Flow Cannula and Out-Flow Cannula attached (Abiomed, Inc., Danvers, MA was evaluated for magnetic field interactions, heating, and artifacts at 3-Tesla. MRI-related heating was assessed with the device in a gelled-saline-filled, head/torso phantom using a transmit/received RF body coil while performing MRI at a whole body averaged SAR of 3-W/kg for 15-min. Artifacts were assessed for the main metallic component of this VAD (atrial cannula using T1-weighted, spin echo and gradient echo pulse sequences. Results The AB5000 Ventricle with the prototype In-Flow Cannula and Out-Flow Cannula attached showed relatively minor magnetic field interactions that will not cause movement in situ. Heating was not excessive (highest temperature change, +0.8°C. Artifacts may create issues for diagnostic imaging if the area of interest is in the same area or close to the implanted metallic component of this VAD (i.e., the venous cannula. Conclusion The results of this investigation demonstrated that it would be acceptable for a patient with this VAD (AB5000 Ventricle with a prototype Nitinol wire-reinforced In-Flow Cannula and Out-Flow Cannula attached to undergo MRI at 3-Tesla or less. Notably, it is likely that the operation console for this device requires positioning a suitable distance (beyond the 100 Gauss line or in the MR control room from the 3-Tesla MR system to ensure proper function of the VAD.

  11. MRI of the Prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Prostate Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate ... limitations of MRI of the Prostate? What is MRI of the Prostate? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  12. Design of a shielded coil element of a matrix gradient coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Feng; Littin, Sebastian; Layton, Kelvin J.; Kroboth, Stefan; Yu, Huijun; Zaitsev, Maxim

    2017-08-01

    The increasing interest in spatial encoding with non-linear magnetic fields has intensified the need for coils that generates such fields. Matrix coils consisting of multiple coil elements appear to offer a high flexibility in generating customized encoding fields and are particularly promising for localized high resolution imaging applications. However, coil elements of existing matrix coils were primarily designed and constructed for better shimming and therefore are not expected to achieve an optimal performance for local spatial encoding. Moreover, eddy current properties of such coil elements were not fully explored. In this work, an optimization problem is formulated based on the requirement of local non-linear encoding and eddy current reduction that results in novel designs of coil elements for an actively-shielded matrix gradient coil. Two metrics are proposed to assess the performance of different coil element designs. The results are analyzed to reveal new insights into coil element design.

  13. Scaffolds, levers, rods and springs: diverse cellular functions of long coiled-coil proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, A; Meier, I

    2004-08-01

    Long alpha-helical coiled-coil proteins are involved in a variety of organizational and regulatory processes in eukaryotic cells. They provide cables and networks in the cyto- and nucleoskeleton, molecular scaffolds that organize membrane systems, motors, levers, rotating arms and possibly springs. A growing number of human diseases are found to be caused by mutations in long coiled-coil proteins. This review summarizes our current understanding of the multifaceted group of long coiled-coil proteins in the cytoskeleton, nucleus, Golgi and cell division apparatus. The biophysical features of coiled-coil domains provide first clues toward their contribution to the diverse protein functions and promise potential future applications in the area of nanotechnology. Combining the power of fully sequenced genomes and structure prediction algorithms, it is now possible to comprehensively summarize and compare the complete inventory of coiled-coil proteins of different organisms.

  14. Repeats in transforming acidic coiled-coil (TACC) genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Seema

    2013-06-01

    Transforming acidic coiled-coil proteins (TACC1, 2, and 3) are essential proteins associated with the assembly of spindle microtubules and maintenance of bipolarity. Dysregulation of TACCs is associated with tumorigenesis, but studies of microsatellite instability in TACC genes have not been extensive. Microsatellite or simple sequence repeat instability is known to cause many types of cancer. The present in silico analysis of SSRs in human TACC gene sequences shows the presence of mono- to hexa-nucleotide repeats, with the highest densities found for mono- and di-nucleotide repeats. Density of repeats is higher in introns than in exons. Some of the repeats are present in regulatory regions and retained introns. Human TACC genes show conservation of many repeat classes. Microsatellites in TACC genes could be valuable markers for monitoring numerical chromosomal aberrations and or cancer.

  15. MRI of the cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imhof, H.; Noebauer-Huhmann, I.-M.; Krestan, C.; Gahleitner, A.; Marlovits, S.; Trattnig, S. [Department of Osteology, Universitaetklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, AKH-Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Sulzbacher, I. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Pathologie Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2002-11-01

    With the introduction of fat-suppressed gradient-echo and fast spin-echo (FSE) sequences in clinical routine MR visualization of the hyaline articular cartilage is routinely possible in the larger joints. While 3D gradient-echo with fat suppression allows exact depiction of the thickness and surface of cartilage, FSE outlines the normal and abnormal internal structures of the hyaline cartilage; therefore, both sequences seem to be necessary in a standard MRI protocol for cartilage visualization. In diagnostically ambiguous cases, in which important therapeutic decisions are required, direct MR arthrography is the established imaging standard as an add-on procedure. Despite the social impact and prevalence, until recent years there was a paucity of knowledge about the pathogenesis of cartilage damage. With the introduction of high-resolution MRI with powerful surface coils and fat-suppression techniques, visualization of the articular cartilage is now routinely possible in many joints. After a short summary of the anatomy and physiology of the hyaline cartilage, the different MR imaging methods are discussed and recommended standards are suggested. (orig.)

  16. Coil Migration through a Neuroform 3 Stent during Endovascular Coiling. A Case Report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Hare, A

    2009-07-29

    Summary: A 43-year-old woman attended for stent assisted coiling. A Neuroform 30 x 4.5 mm stent had been successfully placed over the left periophthalmic aneurysm. During the coiling the first coil migrated through the crowns in the stent, lodging at the MCA bifurcation. We believe that the coil herniated through the overlying stent due to the carotid siphon curvature and the open cell design. Furthermore the distal markers of the stent impeded coil extraction with a MERCI device.

  17. NSLS-II RF SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, J.; Gash, W.; Holub, B.; Kawashima, Y.; Ma, H.; Towne, N.; Yeddulla, M.

    2011-03-28

    The NSLS-II is a new third generation light source being constructed at Brookhaven Lab. The storage ring is optimized for low emittance by use of damping wigglers to reduce the emittance to below 1 nm-rad. The RF systems are designed to provide stable beam through tight RF phase and amplitude stability requirements.

  18. RF MEMS Based Reconfigurable Antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Rainee N.

    2004-01-01

    The presentation will first of all address the advantages of RF MEMS circuit in antenna applications and also the need for electronically reconfigurable antennas. Next, discuss some of the recent examples of RF MEMS based reconfigurable microstrip antennas. Finally, conclude the talk with a summary of MEMS antenna performance.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of cervical carcinoma using an endorectal surface coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brocker, Kerstin A., E-mail: kerstin.brocker@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Heidelberg Medical School, Voßstr. 9, 69115 Heidelberg (Germany); Alt, Céline D., E-mail: celine.alt@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Heidelberg Medical School, INF 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Gebauer, Gerhard, E-mail: gebauer.frauen@marienkrankenhaus.org [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kath. Marienkrankenhaus Hamburg, Alfredstr. 9, 22087 Hamburg (Germany); Sohn, Christof, E-mail: christof.sohn@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Heidelberg Medical School, Voßstr. 9, 69115 Heidelberg (Germany); Hallscheidt, Peter, E-mail: hallscheidt@yahoo.de [Radiologie Darmstadt am Alice-Hospital, Dieburger Str. 29-31, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    Introduction: The objective of this trial is to investigate the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with an endorectal surface coil for precise local staging of patients with histologically proven cervical cancer by comparing the radiological, clinical, and histological results. Materials and methods: Women with cervical cancer were recruited for this trial between February 2007, and September 2010. All the patients were clinically staged according to the FIGO classification and underwent radiological staging by MRI that employed an endorectal surface coil. The staging results after surgery were compared to histopathology in all the operable patients. Results: A total of 74 consecutive patients were included in the trial. Forty-four (59.5%) patients underwent primary surgery, whereas 30 (40.5%) patients were inoperable according to FIGO and underwent primary radiochemotherapy. The mean age of the patients was 50.6 years. In 11 out of the 44 patients concordant staging results were obtained by all three staging modalities. Thirty-two of the 44 patients were concordantly staged by FIGO and histopathological examination, while only 16 were concordantly staged by eMRI and histopathological examination. eMRI overstaged tumors in 14 cases and understaged them in 7 cases. Conclusions: eMRI is applicable in patients with cervical cancer, yet of no benefit than staging with FIGO or standard pelvic MRI. The most precise preoperative staging procedure still appears to be the clinical examination.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of cervical carcinoma using an endorectal surface coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocker, Kerstin A; Alt, Céline D; Gebauer, Gerhard; Sohn, Christof; Hallscheidt, Peter

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this trial is to investigate the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with an endorectal surface coil for precise local staging of patients with histologically proven cervical cancer by comparing the radiological, clinical, and histological results. Women with cervical cancer were recruited for this trial between February 2007, and September 2010. All the patients were clinically staged according to the FIGO classification and underwent radiological staging by MRI that employed an endorectal surface coil. The staging results after surgery were compared to histopathology in all the operable patients. A total of 74 consecutive patients were included in the trial. Forty-four (59.5%) patients underwent primary surgery, whereas 30 (40.5%) patients were inoperable according to FIGO and underwent primary radiochemotherapy. The mean age of the patients was 50.6 years. In 11 out of the 44 patients concordant staging results were obtained by all three staging modalities. Thirty-two of the 44 patients were concordantly staged by FIGO and histopathological examination, while only 16 were concordantly staged by eMRI and histopathological examination. eMRI overstaged tumors in 14 cases and understaged them in 7 cases. eMRI is applicable in patients with cervical cancer, yet of no benefit than staging with FIGO or standard pelvic MRI. The most precise preoperative staging procedure still appears to be the clinical examination. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. MRI zoo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Christoffer

    The basic idea was to use MRI to produce a sequence of 3D gray scale image slices of various animals, subsequentlyimaged with a clinical CT system. For this purpose, these animals were used: toad, lungfish, python snake and a horseshoe crab. Each animal was sacrificed according to standard....... MRI was done using a Philips Achieva 1.5 T system and CT was performed using a Siemens Somatom system. Axial and sagittal slices were acquired using standard T1w and T2w MRI sequences, and visualization was made using the Mistar software (Apollo Imaging Technology, Melbourne, Australia). Images were...

  2. Enhanced responsivity resonant RF photodetectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, R; Dev, S; Zhong, Y; Lu, R; Streyer, W; Allen, J W; Allen, M S; Wenner, B R; Gong, S; Wasserman, D

    2016-11-14

    The responsivity of room-temperature, semiconductor-based photodetectors consisting of resonant RF circuits coupled to microstrip buslines is investigated. The dependence of the photodetector response on the semiconductor material and RF circuit geometry is presented, as is the detector response as a function of the spatial position of the incident light. We demonstrate significant improvement in detector response by choice of photoconductive material, and for a given material, by positioning our optical signal to overlap with positions of RF field enhancement. Design of RF circuits with strong field enhancement are demonstrated to further improve detector response. The improved detector response demonstrated offers opportunities for applications in RF photonics, materials metrology, or single read-out multiplexed detector arrays.

  3. Modeling rf breakdown arcs

    CERN Document Server

    Insepov, Zeke; Huang, Dazhang; Mahalingam, Sudhakar; Veitzer, Seth

    2010-01-01

    We describe breakdown in 805 MHz rf accelerator cavities in terms of a number of mechanisms. We devide the breakdown process into three stages: (1) we model surface failure using molecular dynamics of fracture caused by electrostatic tensile stress, (2) we model the ionization of neutrals responsible for plasma initiation and plasma growth using a particle in cell code, and (3) we model surface damage by assuming a process similar to unipolar arcing. Although unipolar arcs are strictly defined with equipotential boundaries, we find that the cold, dense plasma in contact with the surface produces very small Debye lengths and very high electric fields over a large area. These high fields produce strong erosion mechanisms, primarily self sputtering, compatible with the crater formation that we see. Results from the plasma simulation are included as a guide to experimental verification of this model.

  4. Performance evaluation of matrix gradient coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Feng; Schultz, Gerrit; Testud, Frederik; Welz, Anna Masako; Weber, Hans; Littin, Sebastian; Yu, Huijun; Hennig, Jürgen; Zaitsev, Maxim

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we present a new performance measure of a matrix coil (also known as multi-coil) from the perspective of efficient, local, non-linear encoding without explicitly considering target encoding fields. An optimization problem based on a joint optimization for the non-linear encoding fields is formulated. Based on the derived objective function, a figure of merit of a matrix coil is defined, which is a generalization of a previously known resistive figure of merit for traditional gradient coils. A cylindrical matrix coil design with a high number of elements is used to illustrate the proposed performance measure. The results are analyzed to reveal novel features of matrix coil designs, which allowed us to optimize coil parameters, such as number of coil elements. A comparison to a scaled, existing multi-coil is also provided to demonstrate the use of the proposed performance parameter. The assessment of a matrix gradient coil profits from using a single performance parameter that takes the local encoding performance of the coil into account in relation to the dissipated power.

  5. Quenching in coupled adiabatic coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, J.E.C.

    1985-03-01

    The prediction of the effects of a quench on stress and temperature is an important aspect of the design of superconducting magnets. Of particular interest, and the exclusive topic of this study, is the prediction of the effects of quenching in coupled adiabatic coils, such as the multi-section windings of a high field NMR spectrometer magnet. The predictive methods used here are based on the measurement of the time of propagation of quench between turns. From this measurement an approximate algorithum for the propagation time is used in a code which solves the linear differential equations for the coil currents and calculates the movement of normal zone boundaries and hence the associated winding resistance.

  6. Starch gelatinization in coiled heaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelder, J D H; Ptasinski, K J; Kerkhof, P J A M

    2004-01-01

    A gelatinizing model food derived from a 5% w/w cross-linked waxy maize starch suspension was simulated in coiled heaters to assess the impact of centrifugal forces on flow and heat transfer. For four coil diameters (D = 0.25, 1, 2.5, and infinity m) and three flow rates (w = 0.5, 1, and 2 m/s), heat transfer, viscous development, and the severity of channeling were evaluated. Increasing curvature proved to suppress channeling as a result of more uniform heating and gelatinization. The maximum attainable viscosity was also higher, implying a lower starch consumption for a target viscosity. Higher flow rates necessitated longer heaters, and the maximum viscosity decreased. Moderate product velocities are therefore recommended.

  7. Pediatric MRI

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIH Study of Normal Brain Development is a longitudinal study using anatomical MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS) to map pediatric...

  8. Knee MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... air-conditioned and well-lit. Some scanners have music to help you pass the time. When the ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  9. Coiled transmission line pulse generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, Kenneth Fox (Columbia, MO)

    2010-11-09

    Methods and apparatus are provided for fabricating and constructing solid dielectric "Coiled Transmission Line" pulse generators in radial or axial coiled geometries. The pour and cure fabrication process enables a wide variety of geometries and form factors. The volume between the conductors is filled with liquid blends of monomers, polymers, oligomers, and/or cross-linkers and dielectric powders; and then cured to form high field strength and high dielectric constant solid dielectric transmission lines that intrinsically produce ideal rectangular high voltage pulses when charged and switched into matched impedance loads. Voltage levels may be increased by Marx and/or Blumlein principles incorporating spark gap or, preferentially, solid state switches (such as optically triggered thyristors) which produce reliable, high repetition rate operation. Moreover, these Marxed pulse generators can be DC charged and do not require additional pulse forming circuitry, pulse forming lines, transformers, or an a high voltage spark gap output switch. The apparatus accommodates a wide range of voltages, impedances, pulse durations, pulse repetition rates, and duty cycles. The resulting mobile or flight platform friendly cylindrical geometric configuration is much more compact, light-weight, and robust than conventional linear geometries, or pulse generators constructed from conventional components. Installing additional circuitry may accommodate optional pulse shape improvements. The Coiled Transmission Lines can also be connected in parallel to decrease the impedance, or in series to increase the pulse length.

  10. A Micromechanical RF Channelizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgul, Mehmet

    The power consumption of a radio generally goes as the number and strength of the RF signals it must process. In particular, a radio receiver would consume much less power if the signal presented to its electronics contained only the desired signal in a tiny percent bandwidth frequency channel, rather than the typical mix of signals containing unwanted energy outside the desired channel. Unfortunately, a lack of filters capable of selecting single channel bandwidths at RF forces the front-ends of contemporary receivers to accept unwanted signals, and thus, to operate with sub-optimal efficiency. This dissertation focuses on the degree to which capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators can achieve the aforementioned RF channel-selecting filters. It aims to first show theoretically that with appropriate scaling capacitive-gap transducers are strong enough to meet the needed coupling requirements; and second, to fully detail an architecture and design procedure needed to realize said filters. Finally, this dissertation provides an actual experimentally demonstrated RF channel-select filter designed using the developed procedures and confirming theoretical predictions. Specifically, this dissertation introduces four methods that make possible the design and fabrication of RF channel-select filters. The first of these introduces a small-signal equivalent circuit for parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators that employs negative capacitance to model the dependence of resonance frequency on electrical stiffness in a way that facilitates the analysis of micromechanical circuits loaded with arbitrary electrical impedances. The new circuit model not only correctly predicts the dependence of electrical stiffness on the impedances loading the input and output electrodes of parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical device, but does so in a visually intuitive way that identifies current drive as most appropriate for

  11. Electromagnetic and Thermal Aspects of Radiofrequency Field Propagation in Ultra-High Field MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lier, A.L.H.M.W.

    2012-01-01

    In MRI, a radiofrequency (RF) pulse is used to generate a signal from the spins that are polarized by a strong magnetic field. For higher magnetic field strengths, a higher frequency of the RF pulse is required in order to match the Larmor frequency. A higher frequency, in turn, leads to a shorter w

  12. Automatic high-bandwidth calibration and reconstruction of arbitrarily sampled parallel MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Aelterman

    Full Text Available Today, many MRI reconstruction techniques exist for undersampled MRI data. Regularization-based techniques inspired by compressed sensing allow for the reconstruction of undersampled data that would lead to an ill-posed reconstruction problem. Parallel imaging enables the reconstruction of MRI images from undersampled multi-coil data that leads to a well-posed reconstruction problem. Autocalibrating pMRI techniques encompass pMRI techniques where no explicit knowledge of the coil sensivities is required. A first purpose of this paper is to derive a novel autocalibration approach for pMRI that allows for the estimation and use of smooth, but high-bandwidth coil profiles instead of a compactly supported kernel. These high-bandwidth models adhere more accurately to the physics of an antenna system. The second purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of a parameter-free reconstruction algorithm that combines autocalibrating pMRI and compressed sensing. Therefore, we present several techniques for automatic parameter estimation in MRI reconstruction. Experiments show that a higher reconstruction accuracy can be had using high-bandwidth coil models and that the automatic parameter choices yield an acceptable result.

  13. Self-correction coil: operation mechanism of self-correction coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosoyama, K.

    1983-06-01

    We discuss here the operation mechanism of self-correction coil with a simple model. At the first stage, for the ideal self-correction coil case we calculate the self-inductance L of self-correction coil, the mutual inductance M between the error field coil and the self-correction coil, and using the model the induced curent in the self-correction coil by the external magnetic error field and induced magnetic field by the self-correction coil. And at the second stage, we extend this calculation method to non-ideal self-correction coil case, there we realize that the wire distribution of self-correction coil is important to get the high enough self-correction effect. For measure of completeness of self-correction effect, we introduce the efficiency eta of self-correction coil by the ratio of induced magnetic field by the self-correction coil and error field. As for the examples, we calculate L, M and eta for two cases; one is a single block approximation of self-correction coil winding and the other is a two block approximation case. By choosing the adequate angles of self-correction coil winding, we can get about 98% efficiency for single block approximation case and 99.8% for two block approximation case. This means that by using the self-correction coil we can improve the field quality about two orders.

  14. MRI versus radiography of acromioclavicular joint dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, Ursula; Oberleitner, Gerhard; Nemec, Stefan F; Gruber, Michael; Weber, Michael; Czerny, Christian; Krestan, Christian R

    2011-10-01

    Acromioclavicular joint injuries are usually diagnosed by clinical and radiographic assessment with the Rockwood classification, which is crucial for treatment planning. In view of the implementation of MRI for visualization of the acromioclavicular joint, the purpose of this study was to describe the MRI findings of acromioclavicular joint dislocation in comparison with the radiographic findings. Forty-four patients with suspected unilateral acromioclavicular joint dislocation after acute trauma were enrolled in this prospective study. All patients underwent digital radiography and 1-T MRI with a surface phased-array coil. MRI included coronal proton density-weighted turbo spin-echo and coronal 3D T1-weighted fast field-echo water-selective sequences. The Rockwood classification was used to assess acromioclavicular joint injuries at radiography and MRI. An adapted Rockwood classification was used for MRI evaluation of the acromioclavicular joint ligaments. The classifications of acromioclavicular joint dislocations diagnosed with radiography and MRI were compared. Among 44 patients with Rockwood type I-IV injuries on radiographs, classification on radiographs and MR images was concordant in 23 (52.2%) patients. At MRI, the injury was reclassified to a less severe type in 16 (36.4%) patients and to a more severe type in five (11.4%) patients. Compared with the findings according to the original Rockwood system, with the adapted system that included MRI findings, additional ligamentous lesions were found in 11 (25%) patients. In a considerable number of patients, the MRI findings change the Rockwood type determined with radiography. In addition to clinical assessment and radiography, MRI may yield important findings on ligaments that may influence management.

  15. Development of a volume coil (PAAC) for 7T/400MMISS system (NIRS/ KOBELCO /Brucker)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manabu, Nakajima; Iwao, Nakajima; Eiji, Yoshitome; Hiroo, Ikehira [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage-ku, Chiba (Japan)

    2006-07-01

    We developed a new RF volume coil, P.A.A.C. (Path Antenna Array Coil), for monkey imaging by our 7 T MR System. We will report its structure and electrical characteristics. P.A.A.C. is configured by several Patch Antennas which were placed like an circular cylinder. Patch Antenna consists of it by plate like radiation device and ground board (a screen), and radiation device is covered by ground board. Each antenna was put on the parallel to the axis of the circular cylinder. This coil was designed to an antenna either for transmission and reception, experimentally. In transmission mode, the coil elements circularly polarized. We assumed the coil inside diameter 150 mm, it hold enough space to monkey' s head. As for Q, a very high value was obtained more than 450 at no loading at 300.3 MHz. Loaded by salt water, the Q value was 270. About 4 times signal-to-noise ratio signal was obtained with olive oil phantom i n this 7 Tesla system, compared to the 1.5 Tesla MR system. There are following characteristics to this coil. (1) Because the outside of ground board does not have most electric field, it i s easy to post a circuit attached to things such as an adjustment circuit and a blocking circuit in the inside of a coil. (2) We can choose feeding point at any place other than an element end an d can coordinate feeding point impedance hereby. We make use of such a good point and want to review more characteristic improvement. (author)

  16. Coiled-coil protein composition of 22 proteomes – differences and common themes in subcellular infrastructure and traffic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meier Iris

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long alpha-helical coiled-coil proteins are involved in diverse organizational and regulatory processes in eukaryotic cells. They provide cables and networks in the cyto- and nucleoskeleton, molecular scaffolds that organize membrane systems and tissues, motors, levers, rotating arms, and possibly springs. Mutations in long coiled-coil proteins have been implemented in a growing number of human diseases. Using the coiled-coil prediction program MultiCoil, we have previously identified all long coiled-coil proteins from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and have established a searchable Arabidopsis coiled-coil protein database. Results Here, we have identified all proteins with long coiled-coil domains from 21 additional fully sequenced genomes. Because regions predicted to form coiled-coils interfere with sequence homology determination, we have developed a sequence comparison and clustering strategy based on masking predicted coiled-coil domains. Comparing and grouping all long coiled-coil proteins from 22 genomes, the kingdom-specificity of coiled-coil protein families was determined. At the same time, a number of proteins with unknown function could be grouped with already characterized proteins from other organisms. Conclusion MultiCoil predicts proteins with extended coiled-coil domains (more than 250 amino acids to be largely absent from bacterial genomes, but present in archaea and eukaryotes. The structural maintenance of chromosomes proteins and their relatives are the only long coiled-coil protein family clearly conserved throughout all kingdoms, indicating their ancient nature. Motor proteins, membrane tethering and vesicle transport proteins are the dominant eukaryote-specific long coiled-coil proteins, suggesting that coiled-coil proteins have gained functions in the increasingly complex processes of subcellular infrastructure maintenance and trafficking control of the eukaryotic cell.

  17. Do carotid MR surface coils affect PET quantification in PET/MR imaging?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willemink, Martin J; Eldib, Mootaz [Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Leiner, Tim [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Fayad, Zahi A; Mani, Venkatesh [Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-05-18

    To evaluate the effect of surface coils for carotid MR imaging on PET quantification in a clinical simultaneous whole-body PET/MR scanner. A cylindrical phantom was filled with a homogeneous 2L water-FDG mixture at a starting dose of 301.2MBq. Clinical PET/MR and PET/CT systems were used to acquire PET-data without a coil (reference standard) and with two carotid MRI coils (Siemens Special Purpose 8-Channel and Machnet 4-Channel Phased Array). PET-signal attenuation was evaluated with Osirix using 51 (PET/MR) and 37 (PET/CT) circular ROIs. Mean and maximum standardized uptake values (SUVs) were quantified for each ROI. Furthermore, SUVs of PET/MR and PET/CT were compared. For validation, a patient was scanned with an injected dose of 407.7MBq on both a PET/CT and a PET/MR system without a coil and with both coils. PET/MR underestimations were -2.2% (Siemens) and -7.8% (Machnet) for SUVmean, and -1.2% (Siemens) and -3.3% (Machnet) for SUVmax, respectively. For PET/CT, underestimations were -1.3% (Siemens) and -1.4% (Machnet) for SUVmean and -0.5% (both Siemens and Machnet) for SUVmax, respectively using no coil data as reference. Except for PET/CT SUVmax values all differences were significant. SUVs differed significantly between PET/MR and PET/CT with SUVmean values of 0.51-0.55 for PET/MR and 0.68-0.69 for PET/CT, respectively. The patient examination showed that median SUVmean values measured in the carotid arteries decreased from 0.97 without a coil to 0.96 (Siemens) and 0.88 (Machnet). Carotid surface coils do affect attenuation correction in both PET/MR and PET/CT imaging. Furthermore, SUVs differed significantly between PET/MR and PET/CT.

  18. Occupational RF Exposures (invited paper)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jokela, K.; Puranen, L

    1999-07-01

    Potentially adverse levels of RF electromagnetic fields, exceeding the present limits for occupational exposure, arise near industrial high frequency (HF) heaters, high power broadcast antennas, and high power radar antennas. Other significant emitters of RF fields in the occupational environment are radiotelephones, induction heaters, short-wave and microwave therapy devices, base station antennas, magnetic resonance imaging devices, microwave ovens, and industrial microwave heaters. In terms of the intensity and duration of the exposure as well as the number of exposed workers, the HF sealers, particularly plastic sealers, constitute the most significant RF radiation safety problem in the working environment. (author)

  19. Residential RF Exposures (invited paper)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahme, M

    1999-07-01

    In many areas of the world there are publications on Governmental Regulations, Standards or Guidelines to protect workers and the general public against harmful effects of exposure to electromagnetic fields. Against this background, information is given about different radiation sources of electromagnetic fields in the RF part of the spectrum, which may be typical for residential exposure. Relevant radiation characteristics of the sources and field strength numbers and distributions are given. In addition some general aspects of field structure in the near- and far-field of RF radiation sources are described. On this basis principles of measurement and calculation of RF fields are explained. (author)

  20. Mosquito coil emissions and health implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weili; Zhang, Junfeng; Hashim, Jamal H; Jalaludin, Juliana; Hashim, Zailina; Goldstein, Bernard D

    2003-09-01

    Burning mosquito coils indoors generates smoke that can control mosquitoes effectively. This practice is currently used in numerous households in Asia, Africa, and South America. However, the smoke may contain pollutants of health concern. We conducted the present study to characterize the emissions from four common brands of mosquito coils from China and two common brands from Malaysia. We used mass balance equations to determine emission rates of fine particles (particulate matter pollutant concentrations resulting from burning mosquito coils could substantially exceed health-based air quality standards or guidelines. Under the same combustion conditions, the tested Malaysian mosquito coils generated more measured pollutants than did the tested Chinese mosquito coils. We also identified a large suite of volatile organic compounds, including carcinogens and suspected carcinogens, in the coil smoke. In a set of experiments conducted in a room, we examined the size distribution of particulate matter contained in the coil smoke and found that the particles were ultrafine and fine. The findings from the present study suggest that exposure to the smoke of mosquito coils similar to the tested ones can pose significant acute and chronic health risks. For example, burning one mosquito coil would release the same amount of PM(2.5) mass as burning 75-137 cigarettes. The emission of formaldehyde from burning one coil can be as high as that released from burning 51 cigarettes.

  1. rf traveling-wave electron gun for photoinjectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaer, Mattia; Citterio, Alessandro; Craievich, Paolo; Reiche, Sven; Stingelin, Lukas; Zennaro, Riccardo

    2016-07-01

    The design of a photoinjector, in particular that of the electron source, is of central importance for free electron laser (FEL) machines where a high beam brightness is required. In comparison to standard designs, an rf traveling-wave photocathode gun can provide a more rigid beam with a higher brightness and a shorter pulse. This is illustrated by applying a specific optimization procedure to the SwissFEL photoinjector, for which a brightness improvement up to a factor 3 could be achieved together with a double gun output energy compared to the reference setup foreseeing a state-of-the-art S-band rf standing-wave gun. The higher brightness is mainly given by a (at least) double peak current at the exit of the gun which brings benefits for both the beam dynamics in the linac and the efficiency of the FEL process. The gun design foresees an innovative coaxial rf coupling at both ends of the structure which allows a solenoid with integrated bucking coil to be placed around the cathode in order to provide the necessary focusing right after emission.

  2. A Statistical Model-based Technique for Accounting for Prostate Gland Deformation in Endorectal Coil-based MR Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tahmasebi, A.M.; Sharifi, R.; Agarwal, H.K.; Turkbey, B.; Bernardo, M.; Choyke, P.; Pinto, P.; Wood, B.; Kruecker, J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction of endorectal coil (ERC) in magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) of the prostate gland has significantly improved the visualization of the prostate anatomy and provides a better contrast betweencancerous and healthy tissue in the prostate. In prostate brachytherapy procedures, combining high

  3. The coiled coils of cohesin are conserved in animals, but not in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn E White

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The SMC proteins are involved in DNA repair, chromosome condensation, and sister chromatid cohesion throughout Eukaryota. Long, anti-parallel coiled coils are a prominent feature of SMC proteins, and are thought to serve as spacer rods to provide an elongated structure and to separate domains. We reported recently that the coiled coils of mammalian condensin (SMC2/4 showed moderate sequence divergence (approximately 10-15% consistent with their functioning as spacer rods. The coiled coils of mammalian cohesins (SMC1/3, however, were very highly constrained, with amino acid sequence divergence typically <0.5%. These coiled coils are among the most highly conserved mammalian proteins, suggesting that they make extensive contacts over their entire surface. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we broaden our initial analysis of condensin and cohesin to include additional vertebrate and invertebrate organisms and multiple species of yeast. We found that the coiled coils of SMC1/3 are highly constrained in Drosophila and other insects, and more generally across all animal species. However, in yeast they are no more constrained than the coils of SMC2/4 and Ndc80/Nuf2p, suggesting that they are serving primarily as spacer rods. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: SMC1/3 functions for sister chromatid cohesion in all species. Since its coiled coils apparently serve only as spacer rods in yeast, it is likely that this is sufficient for sister chromatid cohesion in all species. This suggests an additional function in animals that constrains the sequence of the coiled coils. Several recent studies have demonstrated that cohesin has a role in gene expression in post-mitotic neurons of Drosophila, and other animal cells. Some variants of human Cornelia de Lange Syndrome involve mutations in human SMC1/3. We suggest that the role of cohesin in gene expression may involve intimate contact of the coiled coils of SMC1/3, and impose the constraint on sequence

  4. Optimum coil insertion speed of various coils in brain aneurysm embolization in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Yoshifumi; Takeuchi, Masataka; Fukasaku, Kazuaki

    2016-10-01

    A coil must comprise material with shape memory to perform optimal coil embolization. To achieve this, the alloy characteristics of the coil (hardness, shape, and thickness) must be understood. In this experiment, a catheter was fixed in the bright position and the movement of the coil was observed under a constant rate of insertion; the optimal insertion rate during clinical use was investigated. The first coil insertion speed was evaluated using simulated aneurysms in an in vivo arterial model. The results showed that the insertion force relates to the deployment shape of the coil, that the feedback through the force indicator using sound is very effective, and that the recorder is useful for analysis of coil embolization. The inserted coils during aneurysm embolization were able to wind uniformly within the aneurysm due to a variety of factors (guiding or micro-catheter position and kick-back phenomenon such as delivery wire). Optimal speed is achieved with proper coil design, which allows the coil to be inserted into the aneurysm. The shape and size of the aneurysm can help determine the necessary size and design of the coil that should be used during the optimal speed range. Aneurysm wall and coil characteristics are considered, along with the friction state of the coil (hardness, shape, and thickness), leading to improvements in safety during the insertion procedure at optimum speed.

  5. Novel Photonic RF Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Leveraging on recent breakthroughs in broadband photonic devices and components for RF and microwave applications, SML proposes a new type of broadband microwave...

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging for radiotherapy planning of brain cancer patients using immobilization and surface coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanvey, S; Glegg, M; Foster, J [Department of Clinical Physics and Bioengineering, Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, 1053 Great Western Road, Glasgow G12 0YN (United Kingdom)], E-mail: scott.hanvey@ggc.scot.nhs.uk

    2009-09-21

    This study investigated the compatibility of a head and neck immobilization device with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The immobilization device is used to position a patient in the same way as when receiving a computed tomography (CT) scan for radiotherapy planning and radiation treatment. The advantage of using immobilization in MR is improved accuracy in CT/MR image registration enabling greater confidence in the delineation of structures. The main practical difficulty in using an immobilization device in MRI is that physical constraints make their use incompatible with head imaging coils. Within this paper we describe a method for MR imaging of the brain which allows the use of head and neck immobilization devices. By a series of image quality tests we obtained the same or better image quality as a multi-channel head coil.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging for radiotherapy planning of brain cancer patients using immobilization and surface coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanvey, S.; Glegg, M.; Foster, J.

    2009-09-01

    This study investigated the compatibility of a head and neck immobilization device with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The immobilization device is used to position a patient in the same way as when receiving a computed tomography (CT) scan for radiotherapy planning and radiation treatment. The advantage of using immobilization in MR is improved accuracy in CT/MR image registration enabling greater confidence in the delineation of structures. The main practical difficulty in using an immobilization device in MRI is that physical constraints make their use incompatible with head imaging coils. Within this paper we describe a method for MR imaging of the brain which allows the use of head and neck immobilization devices. By a series of image quality tests we obtained the same or better image quality as a multi-channel head coil.

  8. Unusually Stable Helical Coil Allotrope of Phosphorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Guan, Jie; Jiang, Jingwei; Tománek, David

    2016-12-14

    We have identified an unusually stable helical coil allotrope of phosphorus. Our ab initio density functional theory calculations indicate that the uncoiled, isolated straight one-dimensional chain is equally stable as a monolayer of black phosphorus dubbed phosphorene. The coiling tendency and the attraction between adjacent coil segments add an extra stabilization energy of ∼12 meV/atom to the coil allotrope, similar in value to the ∼16 meV/atom interlayer attraction in bulk black phosphorus. Thus, the helical coil structure is essentially as stable as black phosphorus, the most stable phosphorus allotrope known to date. With an optimum radius of 2.4 nm, the helical coil of phosphorus may fit well and even form inside wide carbon nanotubes.

  9. The Golgin Family of Coiled-Coil Tethering Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz M Witkos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The golgins are a family of predominantly coiled-coil proteins that are localized to the Golgi apparatus. Golgins are present in all eukaryotes, suggesting an evolutionary conserved function. Golgins are anchored to the Golgi membrane by their carboxy terminus and are predicted to adopt an extended conformation that projects into the surrounding cytoplasm. This arrangement is ideal for the capture or tethering of nearby membranes or cytoskeletal elements. Golgin-mediated tethering is thought to be important for vesicular traffic at the Golgi apparatus, the maintenance of Golgi architecture, as well as the positioning of the Golgi apparatus within cells. In addition to acting as tethers, some golgins can also sequester various factors at the Golgi membrane, allowing for the spatiotemporal regulation of downstream cellular functions. Although it is now established that golgins are membrane and cytoskeleton tethers, the mechanisms underlying tethering remain poorly defined. Moreover, the importance of golgin-mediated tethering in a physiological context remains to be fully explored. This review will describe our current understanding of golgin function, highlighting recent progress that has been made, and goes on to discuss outstanding questions and potential avenues for future research with regard to this family of conserved Golgi-associated proteins.

  10. Force modulated conductance of artificial coiled-coil protein monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanassov, Alexander; Hendler, Ziv; Berkovich, Inbal; Ashkenasy, Gonen; Ashkenasy, Nurit

    2013-01-01

    Studies of charge transport through proteins bridged between two electrodes have been the subject of intense research in recent years. However, the complex structure of proteins makes it difficult to elucidate transport mechanisms, and the use of simple peptide oligomers may be an over simplified model of the proteins. To bridge this structural gap, we present here studies of charge transport through artificial parallel coiled-coil proteins conducted in dry environment. Protein monolayers uniaxially oriented at an angle of ∼ 30° with respect to the surface normal were prepared. Current voltage measurements, obtained using conductive-probe atomic force microscopy, revealed the mechano-electronic behavior of the protein films. It was found that the low voltage conductance of the protein monolayer increases linearly with applied force, mainly due to increase in the tip contact area. Negligible compression of the films for loads below 26 nN allowed estimating a tunneling attenuation factor, β(0) , of 0.5-0.6 Å(-1) , which is akin to charge transfer by tunneling mechanism, despite the comparably large charge transport distance. These studies show that mechano-electronic behavior of proteins can shed light on their complex charge transport mechanisms, and on how these mechanisms depend on the detailed structure of the proteins. Such studies may provide insightful information on charge transfer in biological systems.

  11. Unbalanced field RF electron gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofler, Alicia

    2013-11-12

    A design for an RF electron gun having a gun cavity utilizing an unbalanced electric field arrangement. Essentially, the electric field in the first (partial) cell has higher field strength than the electric field in the second (full) cell of the electron gun. The accompanying method discloses the use of the unbalanced field arrangement in the operation of an RF electron gun in order to accelerate an electron beam.

  12. Concepts for a short wavelength rf gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzikov, S. V.; Shchelkunov, S.; Vikharev, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    Three concepts of an rf gun to be operated at 0.1-10 mm wavelengths are considered. In all the concepts, the rf system exploits an accelerating traveling wave. In comparison with a classical decimeter standing-wave rf gun, we analyze the advantages of new concepts, available rf sources, and achievable beam parameters.

  13. MRI Artifacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abed Al Nasser Assi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available   "nMagnetic resonance imaging (MRI has become more and more frequently used in medical imaging diagnostic in recent years. Radiologists and technicians working at these systems are relatively often confronted with image artifacts related to the radiowave with strong magnetic in the scanner. Many artifacts may be corrected or modulated through an understanding of their cause. This requires familiarity with scanner design; theory of operation; and image acquisition. The purpose of this review article is to present the most relevant artifacts that arise in MRI scanner, to provide some physical background on the formation of artifacts, and to suggest strategies to reduce or avoid these artifacts. The most frequent artifacts that can occur during MRI scanning are Motion related artifacts; Para-magnetic artifacts; Phase Wrap artifacts; Frequency artifacts; Susceptibility artifacts; Clipping artefact; Chemical Shift artifact and "Zebra" artefact .    "n  

  14. Portable MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espy, Michelle A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-29

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  15. Numerical simulation of the RF plasma discharge in the Linac4 H- ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattei, S.; Nishida, K.; Onai, M.; Lettry, J.; Tran, M. Q.; Hatayama, A.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents a Particle-In-Cell Monte Carlo Collision simulation of the Radio-Frequency (RF) plasma heating in the Linac4 H- ion source at CERN. The model self-consistently takes into account the electromagnetic field generated by the RF coil, the external static magnetic fields and the resulting plasma response, including a kinetic description of the charged species (e-, H+, H2-, H3+, H-), as well as the atomic and molecular (vibrationally resolved) populations. The simulation is performed for the nominal operational condition of 40 kW RF power and 3 Pa H2 pressure. Results show that the plasma spatial distribution is non-uniform in the plasma chamber, with a density peak of ne = 5 . 1019 m-3 in the RF coil region. In the filter field region the electron density drops by two orders of magnitude, with a substantial reduction of the electron energy as well. This results in a ratio e/H- ≈ 1 in the extraction region. The vibrational population is characterized by a two temperature distribution, with the high vibrational states showing a factor 2 higher termperature. A very good agreement is found between the simulation results and optical emission spectroscopy measurement performed on a dedicated test stand at CERN.

  16. An Experimental Study on Constraint Cooling Process of Hot-rolled CoilS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lijuan WANG; Chunli ZHANG

    2003-01-01

    In order to master mechanical property, surface quality and microstructure of constraint cooling (CC) coils undervarious water cooling parameters, more than 100 coils cooling experiments were done with real production process,of which is designed a coolin

  17. Transport vesicle tethering at the trans Golgi network: coiled coil proteins in action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pak-yan Patricia Cheung

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Golgi complex is decorated with so-called Golgin proteins that share a common feature: a large proportion of their amino acid sequences are predicted to form coiled-coil structures. The possible presence of extensive coiled coils implies that these proteins are highly elongated molecules that can extend a significant distance from the Golgi surface. This property would help them to capture or trap inbound transport vesicles and to tether Golgi mini-stacks together. This review will summarize our current understanding of coiled coil tethers that are needed for the receipt of transport vesicles at the trans Golgi network. How do long tethering proteins actually catch vesicles? Golgi-associated, coiled coil tethers contain numerous binding sites for small GTPases, SNARE proteins, and vesicle coat proteins. How are these interactions coordinated and are any or all of them important for the tethering process? Progress towards understanding these questions and remaining, unresolved mysteries will be discussed.

  18. Pelvic varices diagnosed with endorectal surface coil magnetic resonance imaging: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gullo, G.; Russ, P.D. [Univ. of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Dept. of Radiology, Denver, Colorado (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Pelvic varices are a well-recognized cause of pain, especially in multiparous women, and are often associated with pelvic congestion syndrome. These dilated veins have been imaged using positive-contrast venography and ultrasonography (US). We present a case of painless pelvic varices that presented as an amorphous, non-specific-appearing parametrial and pericervical mass on computed tomography (CT), but which were diagnosed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using an endorectal surface coil. (author)

  19. Breast MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    MRI - breast; Magnetic resonance imaging - breast; Breast cancer - MRI; Breast cancer screening - MRI ... radiologist) see some areas more clearly. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ...

  20. MRI Safety during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z MRI Safety During Pregnancy Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) Illness ... during the exam? Contrast material MRI during pregnancy Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) If you are pregnant and your doctor ...

  1. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... usually given through an IV in the arm. MRI Research Programs at FDA Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the limitations of MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... ray, CT and ultrasound. top of page How is the procedure performed? MRI examinations may be performed ...

  3. Diagnostics of a negative hydrogen ion source based on a planar-coil inductively-driven discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lishev, Stiliyan St.; Shivarova, Antonia P.; Iordanov, Dimitar I.; Todorov, Dimitar T.; Demerdzhiev, Angel P. [Faculty of Physics, Sofia University, 5 J. Bourchier Blvd., BG-1164 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2013-02-08

    Recent activity on a volume-production negative-hydrogen-ion source with the design of a matrix of small-radius discharges inductively driven by a planar coil is reported. A single discharge of the matrix has been studied by employing probe-and laser-photodetachment diagnostics. The measurements have been carried out in the first - small-size - chamber of a two-chamber discharge vessel, with rf power introduced by a planar coil positioned on its front wall. The measured profiles of the negative ion density show strong axial dependence, with two maxima located at the positions corresponding to the maxima of the dc potential, where the maxima of the electron density are also located. The first maximum is in the vicinity of the rf power input and the second one is close to the interface between the two chambers of the discharge vessel.

  4. Superconducting Coil of Po Dipole

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    The Po superconducting dipole was built as a prototype beam transport magnet for the SPS extracted proton beam P0. Its main features were: coil aperture 72 mm, length 5 m, room-temperature yoke, NbTi cable conductor impregnated with solder, nominal field 4.2 T at 4.7 K (87% of critical field). It reached its nominal field without any quench.After this successful test up to its nominal field of 4.2 T, the power was not raised to reach a quench. The magnet was not installed in a beam and had no other further use. Nevertheless its construction provided knowledges and experience which became useful in the design and construction of the LHC magnets. The photo shows a detail of the inner layer winding before superposing the outer layer to form the complete coil of a pole. Worth noticing is the interleaved glass-epoxy sheet (white) with grooved channels for the flow of cooling helium. See also 8211532X.

  5. Multicoil2: predicting coiled coils and their oligomerization states from sequence in the twilight zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Trigg

    Full Text Available The alpha-helical coiled coil can adopt a variety of topologies, among the most common of which are parallel and antiparallel dimers and trimers. We present Multicoil2, an algorithm that predicts both the location and oligomerization state (two versus three helices of coiled coils in protein sequences. Multicoil2 combines the pairwise correlations of the previous Multicoil method with the flexibility of Hidden Markov Models (HMMs in a Markov Random Field (MRF. The resulting algorithm integrates sequence features, including pairwise interactions, through multinomial logistic regression to devise an optimized scoring function for distinguishing dimer, trimer and non-coiled-coil oligomerization states; this scoring function is used to produce Markov Random Field potentials that incorporate pairwise correlations localized in sequence. Multicoil2 significantly improves both coiled-coil detection and dimer versus trimer state prediction over the original Multicoil algorithm retrained on a newly-constructed database of coiled-coil sequences. The new database, comprised of 2,105 sequences containing 124,088 residues, includes reliable structural annotations based on experimental data in the literature. Notably, the enhanced performance of Multicoil2 is evident when tested in stringent leave-family-out cross-validation on the new database, reflecting expected performance on challenging new prediction targets that have minimal sequence similarity to known coiled-coil families. The Multicoil2 program and training database are available for download from http://multicoil2.csail.mit.edu.

  6. Accommodation of structural rearrangements in the huntingtin-interacting protein 1 coiled-coil domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilbur, Jeremy D., E-mail: jwilbur@msg.ucsf.edu [Graduate Program in Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Hwang, Peter K. [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Brodsky, Frances M. [The G. W. Hooper Foundation, Departments of Microbiology and Immunology and of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Fletterick, Robert J. [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Graduate Program in Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Variable packing interaction related to the conformational flexibility within the huntingtin-interacting protein 1 coiled coil domain. Huntingtin-interacting protein 1 (HIP1) is an important link between the actin cytoskeleton and clathrin-mediated endocytosis machinery. HIP1 has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of Huntington’s disease. The binding of HIP1 to actin is regulated through an interaction with clathrin light chain. Clathrin light chain binds to a flexible coiled-coil domain in HIP1 and induces a compact state that is refractory to actin binding. To understand the mechanism of this conformational regulation, a high-resolution crystal structure of a stable fragment from the HIP1 coiled-coil domain was determined. The flexibility of the HIP1 coiled-coil region was evident from its variation from a previously determined structure of a similar region. A hydrogen-bond network and changes in coiled-coil monomer interaction suggest that the HIP1 coiled-coil domain is uniquely suited to allow conformational flexibility.

  7. RF power transfer efficiency of inductively coupled low pressure H2 and D2 discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauner, D.; Briefi, S.; Fantz, U.

    2017-09-01

    The RF power transfer efficiency and the relevant power absorption mechanisms of inductively heated hydrogen and deuterium plasmas are investigated in the low-pressure region between 0.25 and 10 Pa. The discharges are generated in a cylindrical vessel via a helical coil applying a frequency of 1 MHz and delivered RF powers up to 800 W. The power transfer efficiency η is quantified by a subtractive method that relies on the measurement of the delivered RF power and of the RF current through the plasma coil both with and without discharge operation. By means of optical emission spectroscopy and electrical probe measurements, the key plasma parameters are obtained. For both H2 and D2, the relative behavior of the power transfer efficiency is well comparable, which increases with increasing delivered RF power and describes a maximum at pressures between 1 and 3 Pa where more than 90 % of the provided power are absorbed by the plasma. The observed relative dependencies of η on the operational parameters are found to be well explained by an analytical approach that considers the power absorption by the plasma via evaluating the RF plasma conductivity based on the measured plasma parameters. At the parameters present, non-collisional stochastic heating of electrons has to be considered for pressures p≤slant 1 {Pa}, while collisional heating dominates at higher pressure. Molecular dissociation is found to have a significant influence on the power transfer efficiency of light molecular discharges. The direct comparison of H2 and D2 identifies the higher atomic density in deuterium to cause a systematically increased power transfer efficiency due to an increased ionization rate in the present electron temperature region.

  8. Evaluation of the Chondromalacia Patella Using a Microscopy Coil: Comparison of the Two-Dimensional Fast Spin Echo Techniques and the Three-Dimensional Fast Field Echo Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Objective We wanted to compare the two-dimensional (2D) fast spin echo (FSE) techniques and the three-dimensional (3D) fast field echo techniques for the evaluation of the chondromalacia patella using a microscopy coil. Materials and Methods Twenty five patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty were included in this study. Preoperative MRI evaluation of the patella was performed using a microscopy coil (47 mm). The proton density-weighted fast spin echo images (PD), the fat-suppressed PD...

  9. MRI zoo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Christoffer

    The basic idea was to use MRI to produce a sequence of 3D gray scale image slices of various animals, subsequentlyimaged with a clinical CT system. For this purpose, these animals were used: toad, lungfish, python snake and a horseshoe crab. Each animal was sacrificed according to standard proced...

  10. A New Approach to Research Graphical Performance of MRI RF Coil Based on the Quantitative Comparison Method%基于定量对比方法的磁共振射频线圈的MatLAB图形化性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱高杰; 李斌; 魏小二

    2010-01-01

    目的 为了验证磁共振成像中不同类型射频线圈的临床性能,我们以表面线圈、收发兼用型鸟笼线圈和八通道相控阵线圈为研究对象,分别测量了这三种线圈在Philips 3.0T磁共振成像系统中的信噪比和图像均匀度.材料和方法 在AAPM(美国医学物理师学会)推荐的方案测量信噪比和均匀度的基础上,增加对最终图像的MatLAB图形化分析,分别得到其两个互相垂直方向和整个平面上的信噪比空间分布.结果 在体模中心的感兴趣区(ROI)中,收发兼用型鸟笼线圈和八通道相控阵线圈的信噪比分别是表面线圈信噪比的7倍和12倍以上,均匀度也都高于表面线圈的均匀度.结论: 收发兼用型鸟笼线圈和相控阵线圈在成像效果上均优于表面线圈;相控阵线圈能获得最好的信噪比,而收发兼用型鸟笼线圈则具有最好的均匀度.

  11. Cardiac MRI of ischemic heart disease at 3 T: Potential and challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieben, Oliver [Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53792-3252 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53792-3252 (United States)], E-mail: owieben@wisc.edu; Francois, Christopher [Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53792-3252 (United States)], E-mail: cfrancois@uwhealth.org; Reeder, Scott B. [Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53792-3252 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53792-3252 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53792-3252 (United States); Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53792-3252 (United States)], E-mail: sreeder@wisc.edu

    2008-01-15

    Cardiac MRI has become a routinely used imaging modality in the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease and is considered the clinically accepted gold standard modality for the assessment of cardiac function and myocardial viability. In recent years, commercially available clinical scanners with a higher magnetic field strength (3.0 T) and dedicated multi-element coils have become available. The superior signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of these systems has lead to their rapid acceptance in cranial and musculoskeletal MRI while the adoption of 3.0 T for cardiovascular imaging has been somewhat slower. This review article describes the benefits and pitfalls of magnetic resonance imaging of ischemic heart disease at higher field strengths. The fundamental changes in parameters such as SNR, transversal and longitudinal relaxation times, susceptibility artifacts, RF (B{sub 1}) inhomogeneity, and specific absorption rate are discussed. We also review approaches to avoid compromised image quality such as banding artifacts and inconsistent or suboptimal flip angles. Imaging sequences for the assessment of cardiac function with CINE balanced SSFP imaging and MR tagging, myocardial perfusion, and delayed enhancement and their adjustments for higher field imaging are explained in detail along with several clinical examples. We also explore the use of parallel imaging at 3.0 T to improve cardiac imaging by trading the SNR gain for higher field strengths for acquisition speed with increased coverage or improved spatial and temporal resolution. This approach is particularly useful for dynamic applications that are usually limited to the duration of a single breath-hold.

  12. RF Group Annual Report 2011

    CERN Document Server

    Angoletta, M E; Betz, M; Brunner, O; Baudrenghien, P; Calaga, R; Caspers, F; Ciapala, E; Chambrillon, J; Damerau, H; Doebert, S; Federmann, S; Findlay, A; Gerigk, F; Hancock, S; Höfle, W; Jensen, E; Junginger, T; Liao, K; McMonagle, G; Montesinos, E; Mastoridis, T; Paoluzzi, M; Riddone, G; Rossi, C; Schirm, K; Schwerg, N; Shaposhnikova, E; Syratchev, I; Valuch, D; Venturini Delsolaro, W; Völlinger, C; Vretenar, M; Wuensch, W

    2012-01-01

    The highest priority for the RF group in 2011 was to contribute to a successful physics run of the LHC. This comprises operation of the superconducting 400 MHz accelerating system (ACS) and the transverse damper (ADT) of the LHC itself, but also all the individual links of the injector chain upstream of the LHC – Linac2, the PSB, the PS and the SPS – don’t forget that it is RF in all these accelerators that truly accelerates! A large variety of RF systems had to operate reliably, often near their limit. New tricks had to be found and implemented to go beyond limits; not to forget the equally demanding operation with Pb ions using in addition Linac3 and LEIR. But also other physics users required the full attention of the RF group: CNGS required in 2011 beams with very short, intense bunches, AD required reliable deceleration and cooling of anti-protons, Isolde the post-acceleration of radioactive isotopes in Rex, just to name a few. In addition to the supply of beams for physics, the RF group has a num...

  13. 49 CFR 236.730 - Coil, receiver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coil, receiver. 236.730 Section 236.730 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Coil, receiver. Concentric layers of insulated wire wound around the core of a receiver of an...

  14. Operator coil monitoring Acceptance Test Procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erhart, M.F.

    1995-05-16

    The readiness of the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) to provide monitoring and control of the Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) abort coils from the Master and RSS stations will be systematically tested during performance of this procedure. It should be noted that these are not physical abort coils but software coils controlled by the software`s ladder logic. The readiness of the DACS to properly interface with the ENRAF wire level gauge installed in the SY-101 storage tank will also be tested. During this test, a verification of all abort coil indications will be conducted at the DACS Development Facility in the 306E Building by injecting an input signal for each DACS sensor that has an associated abort coil until the abort coil actuates, and then ensuring that the status of the abort coil indicated at the Master and RSS stations is correct. Each abort coil will also be tested to ensure that the ``ENABLE`` and ``DISABLE`` controls from the Master and RSS stations function correctly, and only with the use of proper passwords.

  15. Evidence-based pathology: umbilical cord coiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khong, T Y

    2010-12-01

    The generation of a pathology test result must be based on criteria that are proven to be acceptably reproducible and clinically relevant to be evidence-based. This review de-constructs the umbilical cord coiling index to illustrate how it can stray from being evidence-based. Publications related to umbilical cord coiling were retrieved and analysed with regard to how the umbilical coiling index was calculated, abnormal coiling was defined and reference ranges were constructed. Errors and other influences that can occur with the measurement of the length of the umbilical cord or of the number of coils can compromise the generation of the coiling index. Definitions of abnormal coiling are not consistent in the literature. Reference ranges defining hypocoiling or hypercoiling have not taken those potential errors or the possible effect of gestational age into account. Even the way numerical test results in anatomical pathology are generated, as illustrated by the umbilical coiling index, warrants a critical analysis into its evidence base to ensure that they are reproducible or free from errors.

  16. Coil Optimization for High Temperature Superconductor Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijatovic, Nenad; Jensen, Bogi Bech; Abrahamsen, Asger Bech

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents topology optimization of HTS racetrack coils for large HTS synchronous machines. The topology optimization is used to acquire optimal coil designs for the excitation system of 3 T HTS machines. Several tapes are evaluated and the optimization results are discussed. The optimiz...

  17. Functional investigation of the plant-specific long coiled-coil proteins PAMP-INDUCED COILED-COIL (PICC and PICC-LIKE (PICL in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowmya Venkatakrishnan

    Full Text Available We have identified and characterized two Arabidopsis long coiled-coil proteins PAMP-INDUCED COILED-COIL (PICC and PICC-LIKE (PICL. PICC (147 kDa and PICL (87 kDa are paralogs that consist predominantly of a long coiled-coil domain (expanded in PICC, with a predicted transmembrane domain at the immediate C-terminus. Orthologs of PICC and PICL were found exclusively in vascular plants. PICC and PICL GFP fusion proteins are anchored to the cytoplasmic surface of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER membrane by a C-terminal transmembrane domain and a short tail domain, via a tail-anchoring mechanism. T-DNA-insertion mutants of PICC and PICL as well as the double mutant show an increased sensitivity to the plant abiotic stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA in a post-germination growth response. PICC, but not PICL gene expression is induced by the bacterial pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP flg22. T-DNA insertion alleles of PICC, but not PICL, show increased susceptibility to the non-virulent strain P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 hrcC, but not to the virulent strain P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000. This suggests that PICC mutants are compromised in PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI. The data presented here provide first evidence for the involvement of a plant long coiled-coil protein in a plant defense response.

  18. Magnetic Fields at the Center of Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Philippe; Hui, Kaleonui; Goldman, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    In this note we synthesize and extend expressions for the magnetic field at the center of very short and very long current-carrying coils. Elementary physics textbooks present the following equation for the magnetic field inside a very long current-carrying coil (solenoid): B[subscript sol] = µ[subscript 0] (N/L) I, (1) where I is the current, N…

  19. An RF-input outphasing power amplifier with RF signal decomposition network

    OpenAIRE

    Barton, Taylor W.; Perreault, David J.

    2015-01-01

    This work presents an outphasing power amplifier that directly amplifies a modulated RF input. The approach eliminates the need for multiple costly IQ modulators and baseband signal component separation found in conventional outphasing power amplifier systems, which have previously required both an RF carrier input and a separate baseband input to synthesize a modulated RF output. A novel RF signal decomposition network enables direct RF-input / RF-output outphasing by directly synthesizing t...

  20. NMR local coil with adjustable spacing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dembinski, G.T.

    1988-03-22

    A local coil assembly for use in NMR imaging is described which comprises: a base; a first local coil module mounted to the base and extending upward therefrom; sockets disposed in the base, each at a different distance from the first local coil module; a second local coil module having a connector therein which mates with each of the sockets to enable the second local coil module to be connected to the base at any one of the sockets; and a set of reactive components. The values of the respective reactive components are selected such that the second local oil module may be connected to any of the sockets without any substantial change in the resonant frequency of the assembly.

  1. A study on geometry effect of transmission coil for micro size magnetic induction coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Hwa; Jun, Byoung Ok; Kim, Seunguk; Lee, Gwang Jun; Ryu, Mingyu; Choi, Ji-Woong; Jang, Jae Eun

    2016-05-01

    The effects of transmission (Tx) coil structure have been studied for micro-size magnetic induction coil. The size of the receiving (Rx) coil should be shrunk to the micrometer level for the various new applications such as micro-robot and wireless body implanted devices. In case of the macro-scale magnetic induction coil, the power transmission efficiency is generally considered to be higher as the inductance of the transmission coil became larger; however, the large size difference between macro-size Tx coil and micro-size Rx coil can decrease the power transmission efficiency due to the difference of resonance frequency. Here, we study a correlation of the power transmission with the size and distance between the macro-size Tx and micro-size Rx coils using magnetic induction technique. The maximum power efficiency was 0.28/0.23/0.13/0.12% at the distance of 0.3/1/3/5 cm between Rx and Tx coil. In addition, more efficient wireless power transferring method is suggested with a floating coil for the body implantable devices. The voltage output increased up to 5.4 mV than the original one Tx coil system. The results demonstrated the foundational wireless power transferring system with enhanced power efficiency.

  2. Detection of alpha-helical coiled-coil dimer formation by spin-labeled synthetic peptides: a model parallel coiled-coil peptide and the antiparallel coiled coil formed by a replica of the ProP C-terminus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillar, Alexander; Tripet, Brian; Zoetewey, David; Wood, Janet M; Hodges, Robert S; Boggs, Joan M

    2003-12-30

    Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to determine relative peptide orientation within homodimeric, alpha-helical coiled-coil structures. Introduction of cysteine (Cys) residues into peptides/proteins for spin labeling allows detection of their oligomerization from exchange broadening or dipolar interactions between residues within 25 A of each other. Two synthetic peptides containing Cys substitutions were used: a 35-residue model peptide and the 30-residue ProP peptide. The model peptide is known to form a stable, parallel homodimeric coiled coil, which is partially destabilized by Cys substitutions at heptad a and d positions (peptides C30a and C33d). The ProP peptide, a 30-residue synthetic peptide, corresponds to residues 468-497 of osmoregulatory transporter ProP from Escherichia coli. It forms a relatively unstable, homodimeric coiled coil that is predicted to be antiparallel in orientation. Cys was introduced in heptad g positions of the ProP peptide, near the N-terminus (K473C, creating peptide C473g) or closer to the center of the sequence (E480C, creating peptide C480g). In contrast to the destabilizing effect of Cys substitution at the core heptad a or d positions of model peptides C30a and C33d, circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that Cys substitutions at the heptad g positions of the ProP peptide had little or no effect on coiled-coil stability. Thermal denaturation analysis showed that spin labeling increased the stability of the coiled coil for all peptides. Strong exchange broadening was detected for both C30a and C33d, in agreement with a parallel structure. EPR spectra of C480g had a large hyperfine splitting of about 90 G, indicative of strong dipole-dipole interactions and a distance between spin-labeled residues of less than 9 A. Spin-spin interactions were much weaker for C473g. These results supported the hypothesis that the ProP peptide primarily formed an antiparallel coiled coil, since formation of a parallel dimer

  3. The Safety of Using Body-Transmit MRI in Patients with Implanted Deep Brain Stimulation Devices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Kahan

    Full Text Available Deep brain stimulation (DBS is an established treatment for patients with movement disorders. Patients receiving chronic DBS provide a unique opportunity to explore the underlying mechanisms of DBS using functional MRI. It has been shown that the main safety concern with MRI in these patients is heating at the electrode tips - which can be minimised with strict adherence to a supervised acquisition protocol using a head-transmit/receive coil at 1.5T. MRI using the body-transmit coil with a multi-channel receive head coil has a number of potential advantages including an improved signal-to-noise ratio.We compared the safety of cranial MRI in an in vitro model of bilateral DBS using both head-transmit and body-transmit coils. We performed fibre-optic thermometry at a Medtronic ActivaPC device and Medtronic 3389 electrodes during turbo-spin echo (TSE MRI using both coil arrangements at 1.5T and 3T, in addition to gradient-echo echo-planar fMRI exposure at 1.5T. Finally, we investigated the effect of transmit-coil choice on DBS stimulus delivery during MRI.Temperature increases were consistently largest at the electrode tips. Changing from head- to body-transmit coil significantly increased the electrode temperature elevation during TSE scans with scanner-reported head SAR 0.2W/kg from 0.45°C to 0.79°C (p<0.001 at 1.5T, and from 1.25°C to 1.44°C (p<0.001 at 3T. The position of the phantom relative to the body coil significantly impacted on electrode heating at 1.5T; however, the greatest heating observed in any position tested remained <1°C at this field strength.We conclude that (1 with our specific hardware and SAR-limited protocol, body-transmit cranial MRI at 1.5T does not produce heating exceeding international guidelines, even in cases of poorly positioned patients, (2 cranial MRI at 3T can readily produce heating exceeding international guidelines, (3 patients with ActivaPC Medtronic systems are safe to be recruited to future fMRI

  4. Cryogenic vacuumm RF feedthrough device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Genfa [Yorktown, VA; Phillips, Harry Lawrence [Hayes, VA

    2008-12-30

    A cryogenic vacuum rf feedthrough device comprising: 1) a probe for insertion into a particle beam; 2) a coaxial cable comprising an inner conductor and an outer conductor, a dielectric/insulating layer surrounding the inner conductor, the latter being connected to the probe for the transmission of higher mode rf energy from the probe; and 3) a high thermal conductivity stub attached to the coaxial dielectric about and in thermal contact with the inner conductor which high thermal conductivity stub transmits heat generated in the vicinity of the probe efficiently and radially from the area of the probe and inner conductor all while maintaining useful rf transmission line characteristics between the inner and outer coaxial conductors.

  5. Ion bombardment in RF photoguns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozdeyev,E.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V. N.

    2009-05-04

    A linac-ring eRHIC design requires a high-intensity CW source of polarized electrons. An SRF gun is viable option that can deliver the required beam. Numerical simulations presented elsewhere have shown that ion bombardment can occur in an RF gun, possibly limiting lifetime of a NEA GaAs cathode. In this paper, we analytically solve the equations of motion of ions in an RF gun using the ponderomotive potential of the Rf field. We apply the method to the BNL 1/2-cell SRF photogun and demonstrate that a significant portion of ions produced in the gun can reach the cathode if no special precautions are taken. Also, the paper discusses possible mitigation techniques that can reduce the rate of ion bombardment.

  6. RF breakdown by toroidal helicons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K P Tripathi; D Bora; M Mishra

    2001-04-01

    Bounded whistlers are well-known for their efficient plasma production capabilities in thin cylindrical tubes. In this paper we shall present their radio frequency (RF) breakdown and discharge sustaining capabilities in toroidal systems. Pulsed RF power in the electronmagnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) frequency regime is fed to the neutral background medium. After the breakdown stage, discharge is sustained by toroidal bounded whistlers. In these pulsed experiments the behaviour of the time evolution of the discharge could be studied in four distinct phases of RF breakdown, steady state attainment, decay and afterglow. In the steady state average electron density of ≈ 1012 per cc and average electron temperature of ≈ 20 eV are obtained at 10-3 mbar of argon filling pressure. Experimental results on toroidal mode structure, background effects and time evolution of the electron distribution function will be presented and their implications in understanding the breakdown mechanism are discussed.

  7. Battlefield MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espy, Michelle [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging is the best method for non-invasive imaging of soft tissue anatomy, saving countless lives each year. It is regarded as the gold standard for diagnosis of mild to moderate traumatic brain injuries. Furthermore, conventional MRI relies on very high, fixed strength magnetic fields (> 1.5 T) with parts-per-million homogeneity, which requires very large and expensive magnets.

  8. Excitation of global Alfven Eigenmodes by RF heating in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerner, W.; Borba, D.; Gormezano, C.; Huysmans, G.; Porcelli, F.; Start, D. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Fasoli, A. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasma (CRPP); Sharapov, S. [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1994-07-01

    The alpha-particle confinement of future D-T experiments at JET can be severely degraded by Global Alfven Eigenmodes (AE). Scenarios for the excitation of Alfven Eigenmodes in usual (e.g. D-D) plasmas are proposed, which provide a MHD diagnostic and allow the study of the transport of super-Alfvenic ions. Active studies with separate control of TAE amplitude and energetic particle destabilization, measuring the plasma response, give more information than passive studies, in particular concerning the damping mechanisms. The TAE excitation can be achieved by means of the saddle coil and the ICRH antenna. The experimental method is introduced together with a theoretical model for RF excitation. (authors). 6 refs., 3 figs.

  9. RF Loads for Energy Recovery

    CERN Document Server

    Federmann, S; Caspers, F

    2012-01-01

    Different conceptional designs for RF high power loads are presented. One concept implies the use of solid state rectifier modules for direct RF to DC conversion with efficiencies beyond 80%. In addition, robust metallic low-Q resonant structures, capable of operating at high temperatures (>150 ◦C) are discussed. Another design deals with a very high temperature (up to 800 ◦C) air cooled load using a ceramic foam block inside a metal enclosure. This porous ceramic block is the microwave absorber and is not brazed to the metallic enclosure.

  10. Directly detected (55)Mn MRI: application to phantoms for human hyperpolarized (13)C MRI development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Morze, Cornelius; Carvajal, Lucas; Reed, Galen D; Swisher, Christine Leon; Tropp, James; Vigneron, Daniel B

    2014-12-01

    In this work we demonstrate for the first time directly detected manganese-55 ((55)Mn) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a clinical 3T MRI scanner designed for human hyperpolarized (13)C clinical studies with no additional hardware modifications. Due to the similar frequency of the (55)Mn and (13)C resonances, the use of aqueous permanganate for large, signal-dense, and cost-effective "(13)C" MRI phantoms was investigated, addressing the clear need for new phantoms for these studies. Due to 100% natural abundance, higher intrinsic sensitivity, and favorable relaxation properties, (55)Mn MRI of aqueous permanganate demonstrates dramatically increased sensitivity over typical (13)C phantom MRI, at greatly reduced cost as compared with large (13)C-enriched phantoms. A large sensitivity advantage (22-fold) was demonstrated. A cylindrical phantom (d=8 cm) containing concentrated aqueous sodium permanganate (2.7 M) was scanned rapidly by (55)Mn MRI in a human head coil tuned for (13)C, using a balanced steady state free precession acquisition. The requisite penetration of radiofrequency magnetic fields into concentrated permanganate was investigated by experiments and high frequency electromagnetic simulations, and found to be sufficient for (55)Mn MRI with reasonably sized phantoms. A sub-second slice-selective acquisition yielded mean image signal-to-noise ratio of ~60 at 0.5 cm(3) spatial resolution, distributed with minimum central signal ~40% of the maximum edge signal. We anticipate that permanganate phantoms will be very useful for testing HP (13)C coils and methods designed for human studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Simultaneous formation of right- and left-handed anti-parallel coiled-coil interfaces by a coil2 fragment of human lamin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapinos, Larisa E; Burkhard, Peter; Herrmann, Harald; Aebi, Ueli; Strelkov, Sergei V

    2011-04-22

    The elementary building block of all intermediate filaments (IFs) is a dimer featuring a central α-helical rod domain flanked by the N- and C-terminal end domains. In nuclear IF proteins (lamins), the rod domain consists of two coiled-coil segments, coil1 and coil2, that are connected by a short non-helical linker. Coil1 and the C-terminal part of coil2 contain the two highly conserved IF consensus motifs involved in the longitudinal assembly of dimers. The previously solved crystal structure of a lamin A fragment (residues 305-387) corresponding to the second half of coil2 has yielded a parallel left-handed coiled coil. Here, we present the crystal structure and solution properties of another human lamin A fragment (residues 328-398), which is largely overlapping with fragment 305-387 but harbors a short segment of the tail domain. Unexpectedly, no parallel coiled coil forms within the crystal. Instead, the α-helices are arranged such that two anti-parallel coiled-coil interfaces are formed. The most significant interface has a right-handed geometry, which is accounted for by a characteristic 15-residue repeat pattern that overlays with the canonical heptad repeat pattern. The second interface is a left-handed anti-parallel coiled coil based on the predicted heptad repeat pattern. In solution, the fragment reveals only a weak dimerization propensity. We speculate that the C-terminus of coil2 might unzip, thereby allowing for a right-handed coiled-coil interface to form between two laterally aligned dimers. Such an interface might co-exist with a heterotetrameric left-handed coiled-coil assembly, which is expected to be responsible for the longitudinal A(CN) contact.

  12. N@a and N@d: Oligomer and Partner Specification by Asparagine in Coiled-Coil Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Jordan M; Bartlett, Gail J; Boyle, Aimee L; Danon, Jonathan J; Rush, Laura E; Lupas, Andrei N; Woolfson, Derek N

    2017-02-17

    The α-helical coiled coil is one of the best-studied protein-protein interaction motifs. As a result, sequence-to-structure relationships are available for the prediction of natural coiled-coil sequences and the de novo design of new ones. However, coiled coils adopt a wide range of oligomeric states and topologies, and our understanding of the specification of these and the discrimination between them remains incomplete. Gaps in our knowledge assume more importance as coiled coils are used increasingly to construct biomimetic systems of higher complexity; for this, coiled-coil components need to be robust, orthogonal, and transferable between contexts. Here, we explore how the polar side chain asparagine (Asn, N) is tolerated within otherwise hydrophobic helix-helix interfaces of coiled coils. The long-held view is that Asn placed at certain sites of the coiled-coil sequence repeat selects one oligomer state over others, which is rationalized by the ability of the side chain to make hydrogen bonds, or interactions with chelated ions within the coiled-coil interior of the favored state. We test this with experiments on de novo peptide sequences traditionally considered as directing parallel dimers and trimers, and more widely through bioinformatics analysis of natural coiled-coil sequences and structures. We find that when located centrally, rather than near the termini of such coiled-coil sequences, Asn does exert the anticipated oligomer-specifying influence. However, outside of these bounds, Asn is observed less frequently in the natural sequences, and the synthetic peptides are hyperthermostable and lose oligomer-state specificity. These findings highlight that not all regions of coiled-coil repeat sequences are equivalent, and that care is needed when designing coiled-coil interfaces.

  13. Activation of Visuomotor Systems during Visually Guided Movements: A Functional MRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellermann, Jutta M.; Siegal, Joel D.; Strupp, John P.; Ebner, Timothy J.; Ugurbil, Kâmil

    1998-04-01

    The dorsal stream is a dominant visuomotor pathway that connects the striate and extrastriate cortices to posterior parietal areas. In turn, the posterior parietal areas send projections to the frontal primary motor and premotor areas. This cortical pathway is hypothesized to be involved in the transformation of a visual input into the appropriate motor output. In this study we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the entire brain to determine the patterns of activation that occurred while subjects performed a visually guided motor task. In nine human subjects, fMRI data were acquired on a 4-T whole-body MR system equipped with a head gradient coil and a birdcage RF coil using aT*2-weighted EPI sequence. Functional activation was determined for three different tasks: (1) a visuomotor task consisting of moving a cursor on a screen with a joystick in relation to various targets, (2) a hand movement task consisting of moving the joystick without visual input, and (3) a eye movement task consisting of moving the eyes alone without visual input. Blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast-based activation maps of each subject were generated using period cross-correlation statistics. Subsequently, each subject's brain was normalized to Talairach coordinates, and the individual maps were compared on a pixel by pixel basis. Significantly activated pixels common to at least four out of six subjects were retained to construct the final functional image. The pattern of activation during visually guided movements was consistent with the flow of information from striate and extrastriate visual areas, to the posterior parietal complex, and then to frontal motor areas. The extensive activation of this network and the reproducibility among subjects is consistent with a role for the dorsal stream in transforming visual information into motor behavior. Also extensively activated were the medial and lateral cerebellar structures, implicating the cortico

  14. QC in MRI: useful or superfluous?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Infantino, S.; Malchair, F. [Biomed Engineering, Boncelles (France)

    1995-12-01

    A European task group has developed a protocol for quality control (QC) in MRI. This protocol is essentially based on the control of image properties (uniformity of the signal, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), resolution, distortion, ...). We applied this protocol to the Magnetom SP (Siemens) of the University Hospital in Liege (Belgium). We used the Siemens multi-purpose phantom, which does not permit a QC as complete and accurate as the test objects used in the protocol. The phantom simulates the magnetic properties of the body. The body and head coils were tested with and without a loading annulus that simulates the body conductivity. The following results were obtained: body coil: the signal, SNR, uniformity and artifacts were satisfactory just after a maintenance but had changed significantly and became unacceptable two weeks later. Head coil: the uniformity of the signal and SNR were satisfactory without the annulus. With the annulus the signal increased from the right to the left of the phantom of nearly 20%. This came from a lack of correction of uniformity in the static field. Other parameters (slice width and spacing, resolution and distortion) were satisfactory. Since the head coil problem did not appear during the maintenance we suggest Siemens QC should include observation of intensity profiles. It is recommended to archive the obtained images so that the evolution of performances of the scanner can be followed.

  15. Spaced-based search coil magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospodarsky, George B.

    2016-12-01

    Search coil magnetometers are one of the primary tools used to study the magnetic component of low-frequency electromagnetic waves in space. Their relatively small size, mass, and power consumption, coupled with a good frequency range and sensitivity, make them ideal for spaceflight applications. The basic design of a search coil magnetometer consists of many thousands of turns of wire wound on a high permeability core. When a time-varying magnetic field passes through the coil, a time-varying voltage is induced due to Faraday's law of magnetic induction. The output of the coil is usually attached to a preamplifier, which amplifies the induced voltage and conditions the signal for transmission to the main electronics (usually a low-frequency radio receiver). Search coil magnetometers are usually used in conjunction with electric field antenna to measure electromagnetic plasma waves in the frequency range of a few hertz to a few tens of kilohertzs. Search coil magnetometers are used to determine the properties of waves, such as comparing the relative electric and magnetic field amplitudes of the waves, or to investigate wave propagation parameters, such as Poynting flux and wave normal vectors. On a spinning spacecraft, they are also sometimes used to determine the background magnetic field. This paper presents some of the basic design criteria of search coil magnetometers and discusses design characteristics of sensors flown on a number of spacecraft.

  16. Switching transients in a superconducting coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, E.W.; Shimer, D.W.

    1983-11-18

    A study is made of the transients caused by the fast dump of large superconducting coils. Theoretical analysis, computer simulation, and actual measurements are used. Theoretical analysis can only be applied to the simplest of models. In the computer simulations two models are used, one in which the coil is divided into ten segments and another in which a single coil is employed. The circuit breaker that interrupts the current to the power supply, causing a fast dump, is represented by a time and current dependent conductance. Actual measurements are limited to measurements made incidental to performance tests on the MFTF Yin-yang coils. It is found that the breaker opening time is the critical factor in determining the size and shape of the transient. Instantaneous opening of the breaker causes a lightly damped transient with large amplitude voltages to ground. Increasing the opening time causes the transient to become a monopulse of decreasing amplitude. The voltages at the external terminals are determined by the parameters of the external circuit. For fast opening times the frequency depends on the dump resistor inductance, the circuit capacitance, and the amplitude on the coil current. For slower openings the dump resistor inductance and the current determine the amplitude of the voltage to ground at the terminals. Voltages to ground are less in the interior of the coil, where transients related to the parameters of the coil itself are observed.

  17. Crystal structure of a coiled-coil domain from human ROCK I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daqi Tu

    Full Text Available The small GTPase Rho and one of its targets, Rho-associated kinase (ROCK, participate in a variety of actin-based cellular processes including smooth muscle contraction, cell migration, and stress fiber formation. The ROCK protein consists of an N-terminal kinase domain, a central coiled-coil domain containing a Rho binding site, and a C-terminal pleckstrin homology domain. Here we present the crystal structure of a large section of the central coiled-coil domain of human ROCK I (amino acids 535-700. The structure forms a parallel α-helical coiled-coil dimer that is structurally similar to tropomyosin, an actin filament binding protein. There is an unusual discontinuity in the coiled-coil; three charged residues (E613, R617 and D620 are positioned at what is normally the hydrophobic core of coiled-coil packing. We speculate that this conserved irregularity could function as a hinge that allows ROCK to adopt its autoinhibited conformation.

  18. Crystal Structure of the Central Coiled-Coil Domain from Human Liprin-[beta]2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stafford, Ryan L.; Tang, Ming-Yun; Sawaya, Michael R.; Phillips, Martin L.; Bowie, James U. (UCLA)

    2012-02-07

    Liprins are a conserved family of scaffolding proteins important for the proper regulation and development of neuronal synapses. Humans have four liprin-{alpha}s and two liprin-{beta}s which all contain long coiled-coil domains followed by three tandem SAM domains. Complex interactions between the coiled-coil and SAM domains are thought to create liprin scaffolds, but the structural and biochemical properties of these domains remain largely uncharacterized. In this study we find that the human liprin-{beta}2 coiled-coil forms an extended dimer. Several protease-resistant subdomains within the liprin-{beta}1 and liprin-{beta}2 coiled-coils were also identified. A 2.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of the central, protease-resistant core of the liprin-{beta}2 coiled-coil reveals a parallel helix orientation. These studies represent an initial step toward determining the overall architecture of liprin scaffolds and understanding the molecular basis for their synaptic functions.

  19. Coil migration after endovascular coil occlusion of internal carotid artery pseudoaneurysms within the sphenoid sinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struffert, T; Buhk, J H; Buchfelder, M; Rohde, V; Doerfler, A; Knauth, M

    2009-04-01

    We report two cases of coil migration after endovascular treatment of pseudoaneurysm of the internal carotid artery within the sphenoid sinus with coils and noncovered stents. Two patients underwent sphenoid sinus exposure for pituitary adenoma and chronic infection, respectively. As a complication pseudoaneurysms of the internal carotid artery within the sphenoid sinus developed. One patient was treated with stent and coils, the second with coils alone. Both patients experienced coil migration after 9 and 26 months, respectively, with the necessity for further treatment. Imaging was performed using flat detector computed tomography (FD-CT). Literature review revealed two additional cases of coil migration and four patients with the same treatment in stable condition. Pseudoaneurysms of the internal carotid artery are a special entity and the environment of the aneurysm within the sphenoid sinus may change over a long time. Coil embolization may lead to the late onset complication of coil migration with the possible risk of acute epistaxis. As a consequence, these patients need a careful and prolonged follow up. FD-CT is an appropriate technique to visualize the implanted coils and if present the migration of coil material.

  20. Microwave techniques for electron density measurements in low pressure RF plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheltukhin, Viktor; Gafarov, Ildar; Shemakhin, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Results of the experimental studying of RF plasma jet at low pressure in the range of 10 - 300 Pa is presented. The electron density distribution both in inductive and in capacitive coupled RF discharges was measured at 1.76 MHz and 13.56 MHz consequently. We used three independent microwave diagnostic techniques such as free space (the ``two-frequency'' and ``on the cut-off signal'') and a resonator. It is found that the electron density in the RF plasma jets is by 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than in the decaying plasma jet, and by 1-2 orders of magnitude less than in the RF plasma torch. Thus the RF plasma jet is similar to the additional discharge between the electrodes or the coil and the vacuum chamber walls. As a consequence, the formation of the positive charge sheath near the specimen placed in plasma stream is observed. It is found that the maximum of ionization degree as well as more uniform electron density distribution across the stream is observed in the range of the gas flow rate Gg = 0 . 06 - 0 . 12 g/s and the discharge power Pd = 0 . 5 - 2 . 5 kW. The work was funded by RFBR, according to the research projects No. 16-31-60081 mol_a_dk.

  1. Dedicated low-field MRI in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choquet, P; Breton, E; Goetz, C; Constantinesco, A [Laboratoire de Biomecanique, IMFS, Service de Biophysique et Medecine Nucleaire, Hopitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, CHU Hautepierre, 1 Avenue Moliere, 67098 Strasbourg (France); Marin, C [Service d' Anatomo-Pathologie, Hopitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, CHU Hautepierre, 1 Avenue Moliere, 67098 Strasbourg (France)], E-mail: Andre.CONSTANTINESCO@chru-strasbourg.fr

    2009-09-07

    The rationale of this work is to point out the relevance of in vivo MR images of mice obtained using a dedicated low-field system. For this purpose a small 0.1 T water-cooled electro-magnet and solenoidal radio frequency (RF) transmit-receive coils were used. All MR images were acquired in three-dimensional (3D) mode. An isolation cell was designed allowing easy placement of the RF coils and simple delivery of gaseous anesthesia as well as warming of the animal. Images with and without contrast agent were obtained in total acquisition times on the order of half an hour to four hours on normal mice as well as on animals bearing tumors. Typical in plane pixel dimensions range from 200 x 200 to 500 x 500 {mu}m{sup 2} with slice thicknesses ranging between 0.65 and 1.50 mm. This work shows that, besides light installation and low cost, dedicated low-field MR systems are suitable for small rodents imaging, opening this technique even to small research units.

  2. RF Magnetic Field Uniformity of Rectangular Planar Coils for Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-04

    voltage variable capacitor from Jennings Tech San Jose, CA USA shown in Fig.2. The NRC and RCOS both have an added series resistance of 2.2 ohms and...respectively. The purpose of this added resistance is to lower the Q to widen the bandwidth. The RCOS is taped, using electrical tape, to the same particle...and Imaginary signals from the sample were stored on a CPU and post-processed in Excel and MATLAB . The same process was accomplished for the RCOS

  3. Broadband direct RF digitization receivers

    CERN Document Server

    Jamin, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    This book discusses the trade-offs involved in designing direct RF digitization receivers for the radio frequency and digital signal processing domains.  A system-level framework is developed, quantifying the relevant impairments of the signal processing chain, through a comprehensive system-level analysis.  Special focus is given to noise analysis (thermal noise, quantization noise, saturation noise, signal-dependent noise), broadband non-linear distortion analysis, including the impact of the sampling strategy (low-pass, band-pass), analysis of time-interleaved ADC channel mismatches, sampling clock purity and digital channel selection. The system-level framework described is applied to the design of a cable multi-channel RF direct digitization receiver. An optimum RF signal conditioning, and some algorithms (automatic gain control loop, RF front-end amplitude equalization control loop) are used to relax the requirements of a 2.7GHz 11-bit ADC. A two-chip implementation is presented, using BiCMOS and 65nm...

  4. The LHC Low Level RF

    CERN Document Server

    Baudrenghien, Philippe; Molendijk, John Cornelis; Olsen, Ragnar; Rohlev, Anton; Rossi, Vittorio; Stellfeld, Donat; Valuch, Daniel; Wehrle, Urs

    2006-01-01

    The LHC RF consists of eight 400 MHz superconducting cavities per ring, with each cavity independently powered by a 300 kW klystron, via a circulator. The challenge for the Low Level is to cope with very high beam current (more than 1 A RF component) and achieve excellent beam lifetime (emittance growth time in excess of 25 hours). Each cavity has an associated Cavity Controller rack consisting of two VME crates which implement high gain RF Feedback, a Tuner Loop with a new algorithm, a Klystron Ripple Loop and a Conditioning system. In addition each ring has a Beam Control system (four VME crates) which includes a Frequency Program, Phase Loop, Radial Loop and Synchronization Loop. A Longitudinal Damper (dipole and quadrupole mode) acting via the 400 MHz cavities is included to reduce emittance blow-up due to filamentation from phase and energy errors at injection. Finally an RF Synchronization system implements the bunch into bucket transfer from the SPS into each LHC ring. When fully installed in 2007, the...

  5. MOSFET Degradation Under RF Stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sasse, G.T.; Kuper, F.G.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2008-01-01

    We report on the degradation of MOS transistors under RF stress. Hot-carrier degradation, negative-bias temperature instability, and gate dielectric breakdown are investigated. The findings are compared to established voltage- and field-driven models. The experimental results indicate that the

  6. Automatic calorimetry system monitors RF power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harness, B. W.; Heiberger, E. C.

    1969-01-01

    Calorimetry system monitors the average power dissipated in a high power RF transmitter. Sensors measure the change in temperature and the flow rate of the coolant, while a multiplier computes the power dissipated in the RF load.

  7. Simulation of synchrotron motion with rf noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leemann, B.T.; Forest, E.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    1986-08-01

    The theoretical formulation is described that is behind an algorithm for synchrotron phase-space tracking with rf noise and some preliminary simulation results of bunch diffusion under rf noise obtained by actual tracking.

  8. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the chest ... limitations of MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  9. Superconducting coil development and motor demonstration: Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubser, D. U.

    1995-12-01

    Superconducting bismuth-cuprate wires, coils, and magnets are being produced by industry as part of a program to test the viability of using such magnets in Naval systems. Tests of prototype magnets, coils, and wires reveal progress in commercially produced products. The larger magnets will be installed in an existing superconducting homopolar motor and operated initially at 4.2K to test the performance. It is anticipated that approximately 400 Hp will be achieved by the motor. This article reports on the initial tests of the magnets, coils, and wires as well as the development program to improve their performance.

  10. Magnetic field mapper based on rotating coils

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2087244; Arpaia, Pasquale

    This thesis presents a magnetic field mapper based on rotating coils. The requirements, the architecture, the conceptual design, and the prototype for straight magnets were shown. The proposed system is made up of a rotating coil transducer and a train-like system for longitudinal motion and positioning inside magnet bore. The mapper allows a localized measurement of magnetic fields and the variation of the harmonic multipole content in the magnet ends. The proof-of-principle demonstration and the experimental characterization of the rotating-coil transducer specifically conceived for mapping validated the main objective of satisfying the magnetic measurement needs of the next generation of compact accelerators.

  11. Photosensing Resolution of Wireless Communication Chip in Inhomogeneous RF-Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasebe, Takehiko; Yazawa, Yoshiaki; Tase, Takashi; Kamahori, Masao; Watanabe, Kazuki; Oonishi, Tadashi

    2006-04-01

    We have developed a wireless biosensing system for bioluminescence measurements that includes a sensor chip with a volume of 2.5 × 2.5 × 0.5 mm3 and a read/write (R/W) coil. This sensor chip monolithically integrates a photosensor for detecting bioluminescence, a control circuit, and a coil for communication. In order to operate the sensor chip in a sample solution, we employed an RF magnetic field for the transmission of data and electric power between the chip and the R/W unit. The magnitude of the field around the chip changes significantly with the positional relationship between the sensor chip and the R/W coil. Therefore, evaluating the stability of the sensor chip operation, especially the resolution of signal processing, is important. In our system, a resolution of ± 30 μV was achieved in an inhomogeneous field ranging from 160 to 379 A/m. We also quantified the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) by measuring bioluminescence to demonstrate the stability of the sensing operation. Although the RF magnetic field fluctuated in the reaction cell where the sensor chip was located, an almost linear relationship between the ATP amount and the sensor response was obtained.

  12. An analysis and optimization of elliptical RF probes used in magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Lawrence K.; Crozier, Stuart; Doddrell, David M.

    1996-09-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging of the entire body, it is often desirable to use an elliptical RF probe, rather than a circular one. As an ellipse more closely conforms to the anatomical cross section of the human thorax and head, better filling factors and therefore improved signal-to-noise ratios may be achieved by the use of elliptical RF coils. The probe is usually of bird-cage type, but the rungs are of finite width due to the high-frequency signals involved. This paper presents a method for computing the magnetic fields produced inside elliptical probes, and the current distributions on the rungs. A slotted shield is assumed to surround the probe, and its influence on field homogeneity is studied. In particular, the currents in a 16-runged unshielded elliptical coil of practical interest were determined optimally in one case, using simulated annealing to optimize the homogeneity of the magnetic field within the probe. The effects of a segmented shield of both elliptical and circular cross section on this coil are discussed, and the results are confirmed by experiment.

  13. MRI of cervical spine injuries complicating ankylosing spondylitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koivikko, Mika P.; Koskinen, Seppo K. [Helsinki Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Toeoeloe Hospital, Department of Radiology, Helsinki (Finland)

    2008-09-15

    The objective was to study characteristic MRI findings in cervical spine fractures complicating ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Technical issues related to MRI are also addressed. A review of 6,774 consecutive cervical spine multidetector CT (MDCT) scans obtained during 6.2 years revealed 33 ankylosed spines studied for suspected acute cervical spine injury complicating AS. Of these, 20 patients also underwent MRI. On MRI, of these 20 patients, 19 had a total of 29 cervical and upper thoracic spine fractures. Of 20 transverse fractures traversing both anterior and posterior columns, 7 were transdiskal and exhibited less bone marrow edema than did those traversing vertebral bodies. One Jefferson's, 1 atlas posterior arch (Jefferson's on MDCT), 2 odontoid process, and 5 non-contiguous spinous process fractures were detectable. MRI showed 2 fractures that were undetected by MDCT, and conversely, MDCT detected 6 fractures not seen on MRI; 16 patients had spinal cord findings ranging from impingement and contusion to complete transection. Magnetic resonance imaging can visualize unstable fractures of the cervical and upper thoracic spine. Paravertebral hemorrhages and any ligamentous injuries should alert radiologists to seek transverse fractures. Multiple fractures are common and often complicated by spinal cord injuries. Diagnostic images can be obtained with a flexible multipurpose coil if the use of standard spine array coil is impossible due to a rigid collar or excessive kyphosis. (orig.)

  14. On the theory of photocathode rf guns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Jie

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we give a set of analytical formulae to describe the characteristics of photocathode rf guns at any rf frequencies, such as energy, energy spread, bunch length, out going current, and emittance etc.as functions of the laser injection phase, which are useful in the design and practical operation of rf guns.

  15. High-brightness rf linear accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jameson, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The issue of high brightness and its ramifications in linacs driven by radio-frequency fields is discussed. A history of the RF linacs is reviewed briefly. Some current applications are then examined that are driving progress in RF linacs. The physics affecting the brightness of RF linacs is then discussed, followed by the economic feasibility of higher brightness machines. (LEW)

  16. RF power coupling for the CSNS DTL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘华昌; 彭军; 殷学军; 欧阳华甫; 傅世年

    2011-01-01

    The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) drift tube linac (DTL) consists of four tanks and each tank is fed by a 2.5 MW klystron. Accurate predication of RF coupling between the RF cavity and ports is very important for DTL RF coupler design. An iris-ty

  17. High-brightness rf linear accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jameson, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The issue of high brightness and its ramifications in linacs driven by radio-frequency fields is discussed. A history of the RF linacs is reviewed briefly. Some current applications are then examined that are driving progress in RF linacs. The physics affecting the brightness of RF linacs is then discussed, followed by the economic feasibility of higher brightness machines. (LEW)

  18. Numerical Analysis of a Flexible Dual Loop Coil and its Experimental Validation for pre-Clinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Rodents at 7 T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis-Najera, S.; Vazquez, F.; Hernandez, R.; Marrufo, O.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2016-12-01

    A surface radio frequency coil was developed for small animal image acquisition in a pre-clinical magnetic resonance imaging system at 7 T. A flexible coil composed of two circular loops was developed to closely cover the object to be imaged. Electromagnetic numerical simulations were performed to evaluate its performance before the coil construction. An analytical expression of the mutual inductance for the two circular loops as a function of the separation between them was derived and used to validate the simulations. The RF coil is composed of two circular loops with a 5 cm external diameter and was tuned to 300 MHz and 50 Ohms matched. The angle between the loops was varied and the Q factor was obtained from the S11 simulations for each angle. B1 homogeneity was also evaluated using the electromagnetic simulations. The coil prototype was designed and built considering the numerical simulation results. To show the feasibility of the coil and its performance, saline-solution phantom images were acquired. A correlation of the simulations and imaging experimental results was conducted showing a concordance of 0.88 for the B1 field. The best coil performance was obtained at the 90° aperture angle. A more realistic phantom was also built using a formaldehyde-fixed rat phantom for ex vivo imaging experiments. All images showed a good image quality revealing clearly defined anatomical details of an ex vivo rat.

  19. Helical coil thermal hydraulic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramello, M.; Bertani, C.; De Salve, M.; Panella, B.

    2014-11-01

    A model has been developed in Matlab environment for the thermal hydraulic analysis of helical coil and shell steam generators. The model considers the internal flow inside one helix and its associated control volume of water on the external side, both characterized by their inlet thermodynamic conditions and the characteristic geometry data. The model evaluates the behaviour of the thermal-hydraulic parameters of the two fluids, such as temperature, pressure, heat transfer coefficients, flow quality, void fraction and heat flux. The evaluation of the heat transfer coefficients as well as the pressure drops has been performed by means of the most validated literature correlations. The model has been applied to one of the steam generators of the IRIS modular reactor and a comparison has been performed with the RELAP5/Mod.3.3 code applied to an inclined straight pipe that has the same length and the same elevation change between inlet and outlet of the real helix. The predictions of the developed model and RELAP5/Mod.3.3 code are in fairly good agreement before the dryout region, while the dryout front inside the helical pipes is predicted at a lower distance from inlet by the model.

  20. Coil measurement data acquisition and curing press control system for SSC dipole magnet coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickey, C.E.

    1989-03-01

    A coil matching program, similar in theory to the methods used to match Tevatron coils, is being developed at Fermilab. Modulus of elasticity and absolute coil size will be determined at 18-inch intervals along the coils while in the coil curing press immediately following the curing process. A data acquisition system is under construction to automatically acquire and manage the large quantities of data that result. Data files will be transferred to Fermilab's VAX Cluster for long-term storage and actual coil matching. The data acquisition system will also provide the control algorithm for the curing press hydraulic system. A description of the SSC Curing Press Data Acquisition and Controls System will be reported. 20 figs.