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Sample records for mouse uterotrophic responses

  1. Lack of oestrogenic effects of food preservatives (parabens) in uterotrophic assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hossaini, A.; Larsen, Jens-Jørgen; Larsen, John Christian

    2000-01-01

    The oestrogenic activity of the parabens, methyl-, ethyl- and propyl p-hydroxybenzoate, widely used as antimicrobials in food, and butyl p-hydroxybenzoate, which is used in cosmetic products, and their shared main metabolite p-hydroxybenzoic acid was investigated in a mouse uterotrophic assay......, Immature B6D2F1 mice were treated with oral or subcutaneous doses of the test compounds for three consecutive days, p-Hydroxgybenzoic acid and butyl p-hydroxybenzoate were also tested by the subcutaneous route in a rat uterotrophic assay. A significant increase in the uterus weight at day 4 was considered...... an oestrogenic effect. In the mouse assay, none of the compounds tested produced any oestrogenic response at dose levels up to 100 mg/kg body weight per day, for ethyl p-hydroxybenzoate even at a dose level of 1000 mg/kg body weight per day. In immature Wistar rats, subcutaneous administration of butyl p...

  2. Raw drone milk of honeybees elicits uterotrophic effect in rats: evidence for estrogenic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seres, Adrienn B; Ducza, Eszter; Báthori, Mária; Hunyadi, Attila; Béni, Zoltán; Dékány, Miklós; Gáspár, Róbert

    2013-05-01

    Numerous honeybee products are used in medicine, but the literature furnishes no information concerning the effects of the drone milk (DM), although drone brood, which is similar to DM, was reported to elicit a hormone-like strengthening effect. In certain countries, DM is traditionally used to treat infertility and to promote vitality in both men and women. The aim of this study was to determine the putative estrogen hormone-like effect of raw DM in rats and to identify the effective compounds. Uterotrophic assays revealed that DM increased the relative weight of the immature rat uterus. This effect was confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain-reaction and Western blot methods, in which the mRNA and protein expression of the estrogen-dependent peptide complement component C3 was determined. Column chromatography and uterotrophic assays were used to fractionate and check bioactivity, respectively. The active compound after the last fractionation was identified by the nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry techniques as E-dec-2-enedioic acid, which is very similar to the fatty acids with estrogenic activity that were previously isolated from royal jelly. These results lead us to suppose that E-dec-2-enedioic acid is responsible for the estrogen-like effect of DM. This appears to be the first report on the pharmacological effects of DM and E-dec-2-enedioic acid in mammals.

  3. Mouse allergen exposure and immunologic responses: IgE-mediated mouse sensitization and mouse specific IgG and IgG4 levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matsui, Elizabeth C.; Krop, Esmeralda J. M.; Diette, Gregory B.; Aalberse, Rob C.; Smith, Abigail L.; Eggleston, Peyton A.

    2004-01-01

    Although there is evidence that contact with mice is associated with IgE-mediated mouse sensitization and mouse specific antibody responses, the exposure-response relationships remain unclear. To determine whether IgE-mediated mouse sensitization and mouse specific IgG (mIgG) and mIgG4 levels

  4. DNA damage response during mouse oocyte maturation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mayer, Alexandra; Baran, Vladimír; Sakakibara, Y.; Brzáková, Adéla; Ferencová, Ivana; Motlík, Jan; Kitajima, T.; Schultz, R. M.; Šolc, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 4 (2016), s. 546-558 ISSN 1538-4101 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12057; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0124 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : double strand DNA breaks * DNA damage * MRE11 * meiotic maturation * mouse oocytes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.530, year: 2016

  5. Mouse Models as Predictors of Human Responses: Evolutionary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhl, Elizabeth W; Warner, Natalie J

    Mice offer a number of advantages and are extensively used to model human diseases and drug responses. Selective breeding and genetic manipulation of mice have made many different genotypes and phenotypes available for research. However, in many cases, mouse models have failed to be predictive. Important sources of the prediction problem have been the failure to consider the evolutionary basis for species differences, especially in drug metabolism, and disease definitions that do not reflect the complexity of gene expression underlying disease phenotypes. Incorporating evolutionary insights into mouse models allow for unique opportunities to characterize the effects of diet, different gene expression profiles, and microbiomics underlying human drug responses and disease phenotypes.

  6. Ibrutinib suppresses alloantibody responses in a mouse model of allosensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Irene; Wu, Gordon; Chai, Ning-Ning; Klein, Andrew S; Jordan, Stanley

    2017-12-01

    Ibrutinib is a Bruton's tyrosine Kinase (BTK) antagonist that inhibits B cell receptor (BCR) signaling. Complete BTK deficiency is associated with absence of B-cells. Ibrutinb is currently approved by FDA for treatment of B-cell malignancies, including Waldenström macroglobulinaemia. We recently carried out studies to determine if ibrutinib could modify alloantibody responses. A mouse model of allogenic sensitization using a C57BL/6 mouse as the recipient of a skin allograft from an HLA-A2 transgenic mouse was utilized to examine the effects of ibrutinib on alloantibody responses and B cell effector functions. Donor-specific antibody (DSA) levels were measured in a flow-cytometric antibody binding assay. Splenic T and B cell subsets and plasma cells were analyzed in flow cytometry. Control mice developed peak levels of DSA IgM at day 14 PTx while the ibrutinib treated mice had significantly lower levels of DSA IgM (p=0.0047). Control mice developed HLA.A2-specific IgG antibodies at day 14 (230±60 MFI) and reached peak levels at day 21 (426±61 MFI). In contrast, mice in the treatment group had low levels of HLA.A2-specific IgG at day 14 (109±59 MFI, p=0.004) and day 21 (241±86 MFI, p=0.003). FACS analysis found a reduction of B220 + or CD19 + B cell population (pibrutinib attenuated recall DSA IgG responses to re-sensitization (pIbrutinib is effective in suppressing alloantibody responses through blocking BTK-mediated BCR signaling, leading to reduction of B cells and short-lived plasma cells in the spleens. Use of ibrutinib may provide benefits to HLA-sensitized transplant patients for alloantibody suppression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Antibody response to Giardia muris trophozoites in mouse intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyworth, M F

    1986-05-01

    The protozoan parasite Giardia muris colonizes the mouse small intestinal lumen. This parasite is cleared immunologically from the intestine of normal mice. In contrast, T-lymphocyte-deficient (nude) mice have an impaired immunological response to G. muris and become chronically infected. In the present study, trophozoites were harvested from the intestinal lumen of immunocompetent BALB/c mice and nude mice and examined for surface-bound mouse immunoglobulins by immunofluorescence microscopy. Immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG, but not IgM, were detected on trophozoites obtained from BALB/c mice, from day 10 of the infection onwards. Trophozoites from nude mice showed very little evidence of surface-bound mouse immunoglobulin at any time during the 5-week period immediately following infection of these animals with G. muris cysts. Intestinal G. muris infection was cleared by the BALB/c mice but not by the nude animals. The data suggest that parasite-specific IgA and IgG bind to G. muris trophozoites in the intestinal lumen of immunocompetent BALB/c mice. Intestinal antibodies that bind to trophozoite surfaces are likely to play an important part in the clearance of G. muris infection by immunocompetent mice. The inability of nude mice to clear this infection at a normal rate is likely to be due to impairment of Giardia-specific intestinal antibody production.

  8. Uterotrophic and Hershberger assays for endocrine disruption properties of plastic food contact materials polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Bu Young; Kyung, Minji; Lim, Seong Kwang; Choi, Seul Min; Lim, Duck Soo; Kwack, Seung Jun; Kim, Hyung Sik; Lee, Byung-Mu

    2013-01-01

    Plasticizers or plastic materials such as phthalates, bisphenol-A (BPA), and styrene are widely used in the plastic industry and are suspected endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDC). Although plastic materials such as polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) are not EDC and are considered to be safe, their potential properties as EDC have not been fully investigated. In this study, plastic samples eluted from plastic food containers (PP or PET) were investigated in Sprague-Dawley rats using Hershberger and uterotrophic assays. In the Hershberger assay, 6-wk-old castrated male rats were orally treated for 10 consecutive days with plastic effluent at 3 different doses (5 ml/kg) or vehicle control (corn oil, 1 ml/100 g) to determine the presence of both anti-androgenic and androgenic effects. Testosterone (0.4 mg/ml/kg) was subcutaneously administered for androgenic evaluation as a positive control, whereas testosterone (0.4 mg/ml/kg) and flutamide (3 mg/kg/day) were administered to a positive control group for anti-androgenic evaluation. The presence of any anti-androgenic or androgenic activities of plastic effluent was not detected. Sex accessory tissues such as ventral prostate or seminal vesicle showed no significant differences in weight between treated and control groups. For the uterotrophic assay, immature female rats were treated with plastic effluent at three different doses (5 ml/kg), with vehicle control (corn oil, 1 ml/100 g), or with ethinyl estradiol (3 μg/kg/d) for 3 d. There were no significant differences between test and control groups in vagina or uterine weight. Data suggest that effluents from plastic food containers do not appear to produce significant adverse effects according to Hershberger and uterotrophic assays.

  9. Mouse genetic approaches applied to the normal tissue radiation response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haston, Christina K.

    2012-01-01

    The varying responses of inbred mouse models to radiation exposure present a unique opportunity to dissect the genetic basis of radiation sensitivity and tissue injury. Such studies are complementary to human association studies as they permit both the analysis of clinical features of disease, and of specific variants associated with its presentation, in a controlled environment. Herein I review how animal models are studied to identify specific genetic variants influencing predisposition to radiation-induced traits. Among these radiation-induced responses are documented strain differences in repair of DNA damage and in extent of tissue injury (in the lung, skin, and intestine) which form the base for genetic investigations. For example, radiation-induced DNA damage is consistently greater in tissues from BALB/cJ mice, than the levels in C57BL/6J mice, suggesting there may be an inherent DNA damage level per strain. Regarding tissue injury, strain specific inflammatory and fibrotic phenotypes have been documented for principally, C57BL/6 C3H and A/J mice but a correlation among responses such that knowledge of the radiation injury in one tissue informs of the response in another is not evident. Strategies to identify genetic differences contributing to a trait based on inbred strain differences, which include linkage analysis and the evaluation of recombinant congenic (RC) strains, are presented, with a focus on the lung response to irradiation which is the only radiation-induced tissue injury mapped to date. Such approaches are needed to reveal genetic differences in susceptibility to radiation injury, and also to provide a context for the effects of specific genetic variation uncovered in anticipated clinical association studies. In summary, mouse models can be studied to uncover heritable variation predisposing to specific radiation responses, and such variations may point to pathways of importance to phenotype development in the clinic.

  10. Radiation response of spermatogonial stem cells in the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bootsma, A.L.

    1978-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells are able to repopulate the testis by forming clones that elongate along the walls of the seminiferous tubules depleted of spermatogenetic cells as a result of an irradiation. The surviving number of stem cells after irradiation was estimated by determining the fraction of repopulated tubules in cross-sections of the testis 11 weeks after irradiation. This fraction, called the 'repopulation index', is assumed to be directly proportional to the number of surviving stem cells. The response of spermatogonial stem cells in the CBA mouse to 1-MeV fission neutrons was investigated. Radioresistant, colony forming stem cells in the mouse testis move into a much more radiosensitive phase of their cell cycle shortly after irradiation. This is demonstrated in publication II in experiments in which total doses of 300 rad of neutrons and 1200 rad of X-rays were split into two equal fractions. The radiation response of spermatogonial stem cells in the mouse which survived various doses of fission neutrons 24 hours before was studied in publication III. Twenty four hours after a dose of 150 rad of fission neutrons all first-dose survivors have moved from a radioresistant (D 0 89+-4 rad in this study) towards a radiosensitive phase of their cell cycle. Spermatogonial stem cells which survive a neutron dose of 150 rad all belong to a radioresistant stem cell population in the seminiferous epithelium. The data in publication IV show that during the first 26 days after a dose of 150 rad of neutrons the stem cell population first increases and then slowly decreases its radiosensitivity, to stay fixed at a relatively high level. (Auth.)

  11. Radiation-induced adaptive response in the intact mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, Morio

    2009-01-01

    The author and coworkers have revealed that radiation adaptive response (AR) is seen also in the bone marrow of the intact mouse, of which details are described here. First, SPF ICR mice were pre-irradiated (PI) with 0-0.1 Gy of X-ray and after 2 months, subsequently irradiated (SI) with 7.75 Gy. Survival rates at 30 days after SI were about 14% in mice with PI 0-0.025 Gy whereas 40% or more in animals with PI 0.05-0.1 Gy: bone marrow death was found significantly suppressed in this effective PI dose range. The death 2 weeks after SI was found also inhibited at PI 0.3-0.5 Gy. Second, PI doses and interval between PI and SI for acquiring the radio-resistance (RR) were studied and third, the PI 0.3-0.5 Gy with SI 8.0 Gy at 9-17 days later revealed that regional PI of the head (central nervous system) was found unnecessary for RR and of abdomen (systems of hemopoiesis, immunity and digestion), essential. Fourth, strain difference of RR was shown by the fact that RR was observed only in C57BL mouse as well, but neither in BALB/c nor C3H strain. Next, at 12 days after SI 4.25-6.75 Gy (PI 0.5 Gy at 14 days before), mouse spleen cells were subjected to colony formation analysis by counting the endogenous hemopoietic stem cells, which revealed that those cells were increased to about 5 times by PI. Suppression of SI-induced hemorrhage was found in mice with PI by the decreased fecal hemoglobin content. Finally, AR was similarly studied in p53 +/+ and its knockout C57BL mice and was not found in the latter animal, indicating the participation of p53 in AR of the intact mouse. Elucidation of AR mechanisms in the intact animal seems to require somewhat different aspect from that in cells. The results were controvertible to the general concept that radiation risk is proportional to cumulative dose, suggesting that low dose radiation differs from high dose one in biological effect. (K.T.)

  12. Effects and Responses to Spaceflight in the Mouse Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanello, Susana B.; Theriot, Corey; Westby, Christian; Boyle, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Several stress environmental factors are combined in a unique fashion during spaceflight, affecting living beings widely across their physiological systems. Recently, attention has been placed on vision changes in astronauts returning from long duration missions. Alterations include hyperoptic shift, globe flattening, choroidal folds and optic disc edema, which are probably associated with increased intracranial pressure. These observations justify a better characterization of the ocular health risks associated with spaceflight. This study investigates the impact of spaceflight on the biology of the mouse retina. Within a successful tissue sharing effort, eyes from albino Balb/cJ mice aboard STS-133 were collected for histological analysis and gene expression profiling of the retina at 1 and 7 days after landing. Both vivarium and AEM (Animal Enclosure Module) mice were used as ground controls. Oxidative stress-induced DNA damage was higher in the flight samples compared to controls on R+1, and decreased on R+7. A trend toward higher oxidative and cellular stress response gene expression was also observed on R+1 compared to AEM controls, and these levels decreased on R+7. Several genes coding for key antioxidant enzymes, namely, heme-oxygenase-1, peroxiredoxin, and catalase, were among those upregulated after flight. Likewise, NF B and TGFbeta1, were upregulated in one flight specimen that overall showed the most elevated oxidative stress markers on R+1. In addition, retinas from vivarium control mice evidenced higher oxidative stress markers, NF B and TGFbeta1, likely due to the more intense illumination in vivarium cages versus the AEM. These preliminary data suggest that spaceflight represents a source of environmental stress that translates into oxidative and cellular stress in the retina, which is partially reversible upon return to Earth. Further work is needed to dissect the contribution of the various spaceflight factors (microgravity, radiation) and to

  13. COMPARATIVE GENOTOXIC RESPONSES TO ARSENITE IN GUINEA PIG, MOUSE, RAT AND HUMAN LYMPHOCYTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparative genotoxic responses to arsenite in guinea pig, mouse, rat and human lymphocytes.Inorganic arsenic is a known human carcinogen causing skin, lung, and bladder cancer following chronic exposures. Yet, long-term laboratory animal carcinogenicity studies have ...

  14. An antibiotic-responsive mouse model of fulminant ulcerative colitis.

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    Silvia S Kang

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The constellation of human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD includes ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, which both display a wide spectrum in the severity of pathology. One theory is that multiple genetic hits to the host immune system may contribute to the susceptibility and severity of IBD. However, experimental proof of this concept is still lacking. Several genetic mouse models that each recapitulate some aspects of human IBD have utilized a single gene defect to induce colitis. However, none have produced pathology clearly distinguishable as either ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease, in part because none of them reproduce the most severe forms of disease that are observed in human patients. This lack of severe IBD models has posed a challenge for research into pathogenic mechanisms and development of new treatments. We hypothesized that multiple genetic hits to the regulatory machinery that normally inhibits immune activation in the intestine would generate more severe, reproducible pathology that would mimic either ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We generated a novel mouse line (dnKO that possessed defects in both TGFbetaRII and IL-10R2 signaling. These mice rapidly and reproducibly developed a disease resembling fulminant human ulcerative colitis that was quite distinct from the much longer and more variable course of pathology observed previously in mice possessing only single defects. Pathogenesis was driven by uncontrolled production of proinflammatory cytokines resulting in large part from T cell activation. The disease process could be significantly ameliorated by administration of antibodies against IFNgamma and TNFalpha and was completely inhibited by a combination of broad-spectrum antibiotics. CONCLUSIONS: Here, we develop to our knowledge the first mouse model of fulminant ulcerative colitis by combining multiple genetic hits in immune regulation and demonstrate that the resulting

  15. Allergen and Epitope Targets of Mouse-Specific T Cell Responses in Allergy and Asthma

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    Véronique Schulten

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Mouse allergy has become increasingly common, mainly affecting laboratory workers and inner-city households. To date, only one major allergen, namely Mus m 1, has been described. We sought to identify T cell targets in mouse allergic patients. PBMC from allergic donors were expanded with either murine urine or epithelial extract and subsequently screened for cytokine production (IL-5 and IFNγ in response to overlapping peptides spanning the entire Mus m 1 sequence, peptides from various Mus m 1 isoforms [major urinary proteins (MUPs], peptides from mouse orthologs of known allergens from other mammalian species and peptides from proteins identified by immunoproteomic analysis of IgE/IgG immunoblots of mouse urine and epithelial extracts. This approach let to the identification of 106 non-redundant T cell epitopes derived from 35 antigens. Three major T cell-activating regions were defined in Mus m 1 alone. Moreover, our data show that immunodominant epitopes were largely shared between Mus m 1 and other MUPs even from different species, suggesting that sequence conservation in different allergens is a determinant for immunodominance. We further identified several novel mouse T cell antigens based on their homology to known mammalian allergens. Analysis of cohort-specific T cell responses revealed that rhinitis and asthmatic patients recognized different epitope repertoires. Epitopes defined herein can be formulated into an epitope “megapool” used to diagnose mouse allergy and study mouse-specific T cell responses directly ex vivo. This analysis of T cell epitopes provides a good basis for future studies to increase our understanding of the immunopathology associated with MO-allergy and asthma.

  16. The adaptive response of mouse tumours to anaemia and retransfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirst, D.G.; Wood, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    Exchange transfusion methods have been developed to alter the haematocrit of tumour-bearing mice. The effects of anaemia and its correction by blood transfusion on the radiosensitivity of two mouse tumours (SCCVII/St and RIF-1) were studied using excision, in vivo/in vitro assay. Acute reduction in haematocrit caused a high degree of radioresistance equivalent to an increase in the hypoxic fractions by factors of 10 (SCCVII/St) and 30 (RIF-1). As the duration of anaemia was prolonged, radioresistance was lost until within about 6 h normal radiosensitivity was observed even though the anaemia persisted. The restoration of the normal haematocrit by red blood cell transfusion after 24 h of anaemia caused increased radiosensitivity equivalent to a reduction in the hypoxic fraction by factors of 5 (SCCVII/St) and 10 (RIF-1), but again the effect was transient and normal radiosensitivity re-established within 24-48 h of retransfusion. Measurements of 14 C misonidazole (MISO) binding to RIF-1 tumours after these procedures indicated changes in the number of hypoxic cells which were qualitatively almost identical to those using the cell survival endpoint, leading to the belief that changes in oxygenation were reponsible for the altered radiosensitivity. (author)

  17. Response of maternal immune cells of irradiation of mouse embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholls, E.M.; Markovic, B.

    1988-01-01

    This work began as an attempt to explain the paradox of pregnancy - the survival and growth of the semi-allogenic embryo in an immunologically hostile environment. In 1982 and 1983 we reported the tracing of quinacrine labelled maternal leukocytes (WBC) in maternal, placental and embryonic mouse tissues by fluorescence microscopy. We found that cells in the placenta phagocytose labelled WBC, so that after 1-2 hours the labelled nuclear DNA is found as brightly fluorescing particles in the cytoplasm of the phagocytes with no evidence of it in the nuclei. Identical cells were observed in slide preparations of embryos which had been carefully separated from their placentas. We also found a small population of intact labelled lymphocytes, clearly maternal in origin, in the embryos. This seems to be another paradox - placental phagocytes are observed to be phagocytosing maternal WBC in the placenta and embryo, but there are also free maternal cells in the placenta and embryo. A theoretical explanation is that maternal lymphocytes alloreactive against the embryo will attempt to react with placental cells and in the process be phagocytosed, while other maternal cells will be able to enter the embryo where they could have a surveillance function, removing dead or mutant embryonic cells. To test this theory a series of experiments were carried out and are reported

  18. Allergen immunotherapy induces a suppressive memory response mediated by IL-10 in a mouse asthma model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, Joost L. M.; van Esch, Betty C. A. M.; Hofman, Gerard A.; Kapsenberg, Martien L.; Weller, Frank R.; van Oosterhout, Antoon J. M.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Human studies have demonstrated that allergen immunotherapy induces memory suppressive responses and IL-10 production by allergen-specific T cells. Previously, we established a mouse model in which allergen immunotherapy was effective in the suppression of allergen-induced asthma

  19. USING OF MOUSE MODEL TO ANALYZE IMMUNE RESPONSE TO INFECTIOUS PATHOGENS BY THE METHODS OF CLASSICAL GENETICS

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    A. Poltorak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Identification and studying of numerous functions of all genes of the human beings is one of the main objects of modern biological science. Due to high level of homology between mouse and human genomes the important role to reach above mentioned goal belongs to the mouse model which using in the classical genetics increase in connection with appearance of different inbred mouse lines. For instance, the differences in immune response to infectious pathogens in various mouse lines were used many times to determine immunologically competent genes. That is why the contribution of mouse model in understanding of the mechanisms of immune response to infectious pathogens is difficult to overestimate. In the current review some of the most successful and well known examples of mouse using in studies of anti-infectious response are described.

  20. Novel autoimmune response in a tauopathy mouse model

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    Carlos J Nogueras-Ortiz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular diagnostic tools with non-invasive properties that allow detection of pathological events in Alzheimer’s disease (AD and other neurodegenerative tauopathies are essential for the development of therapeutics. Several diagnostic strategies based on the identification of biomarkers have been proposed. However, its specificity among neurodegenerative disorders is disputable as the association with pathological events remains elusive. Recently, we showed that Amphiphysin-1 (AMPH1 protein’s abundance is reduced in the central nervous system (CNS of the tauopathy mouse model JNPL3 and AD brains. AMPH1 is a synaptic protein that plays an important role in clathrin-mediated endocytosis and associates with BIN1, one of the most important risk loci for AD. Also, it has been associated with a rare neurological disease known as Stiff-Person Syndrome (SPS. Auto-antibodies against AMPH1 are used as diagnostic biomarkers for a paraneoplastic variant of SPS. Therefore, we set up to evaluate the presence and abundance of auto-AMPH1 antibodies in tau-mediated neurodegeneration. Immunoblots and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA were conducted to detect the presence of auto-AMPH1 antibodies in sera from euthanized mice that developed neurodegeneration (JNPL3 and healthy control mice (NTg. Results showed increased levels of auto-AMPH1 antibodies in JNPL3 sera compared to NTg controls. The abundance of auto-AMPH1 antibodies correlated with motor impairment and AMPH1 protein level decrease in the CNS. The results suggest that auto-AMPH1 antibodies could serve as a biomarker for the progression of tau-mediated neurodegeneration in JNPL3 mice.

  1. Repopulation response of mouse oral mucosa during unconventional radiotherapy protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerr, Wolfgang; Weber-Frisch, Marion

    1995-01-01

    Repopulation in mouse tongue epithelium was determined during unconventional fractionation schedules, i.e., hyperfractionation (2 x 1.5 and 2 x 1.75 Gy/day) and accelerated treatment (2 x 3 Gy/day). The residual tolerance of the epithelium at defined days of the fractionated treatment was tested by graded single test doses (top-up design). The dose required to induce complete epithelial denudation in 50% of the animals (ED50) was used to calculate the number of fractions repopulated during the preceding treatment. After the first week of hyperfractionation, tolerance was reduced compared to untreated epithelium. However, subsequently no further change was observed, indicating complete compensation of the weekly dose with all doses per fraction used. Epithelial cell density, defined by histological examination in additional experiments, in all fractionation arms decreased similarly by ∼40% during the first week and remained constant at 60-80% in the subsequent 2 weeks. During accelerated fractionation, the residual mucosal tolerance decreased continuously with treatment time and resulted in epithelial denudation after 12 fractions. However, a substantial repopulation effect was observed, compensating 1.5 fractions by day 2, and 5 fractions by day 5, respectively. After cessation of the therapy the repopulation rate clearly decelerated to compensate a dose equivalent to about 0.5 fractions per day. Cell density decreased linearly during the treatment with 5, 10 or 12 fractions at a rate close to normal cell loss. Marked cell production, dependent on the total fractionated dose, was seen from one day after the last fraction in each experimental arm. These results indicate that maximum stem cell repopulation occurs predominantly during treatment, while major production of differentiating cells takes place in treatment splits

  2. Analysis of responses to angiotensin II in the mouse

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    Trinity J Bivalacqua

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Responses to angiotensin II (Ang II were investigated in anaesthetised CD1 mice. Injections of Ang II caused dose-related increases in systemic arterial pressure that were antagonised by candesartan. Responses to Ang II were not altered by PD 123319. At the lowest dose studied (20 µg/kg i.v., the inhibitory effects of candesartan were competitive, whereas at the highest dose (100 µg/kg i.v., the dose-response curve for Ang II was shifted to the right in a non-parallel manner. The inhibitory effects of candesartan were selective and were similar in animals pretreated with enalaprilat to reduce endogenous Ang II production. Pressor responses to Ang II were not altered by propranolol, phentolamine or atropine, but were enhanced by hexamethonium. Increases in total peripheral resistance were inhibited by the AT1-receptor antagonist (ARB but were not altered by AT2-receptor, alpha- or beta-receptor antagonists. These results suggest that pressor responses to Ang II are mediated by AT 1-receptors, are buffered by the baroreceptors, are not modulated by effects on AT2receptors, and that activation of the sympathetic nervous system plays little role in mediating rapid haemodynamic responses to the peptide in anaesthetised mice.

  3. A Mathematical Model of Skeletal Muscle Disease and Immune Response in the mdx Mouse

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    Abdul Salam Jarrah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a genetic disease that results in the death of affected boys by early adulthood. The genetic defect responsible for DMD has been known for over 25 years, yet at present there is neither cure nor effective treatment for DMD. During early disease onset, the mdx mouse has been validated as an animal model for DMD and use of this model has led to valuable but incomplete insights into the disease process. For example, immune cells are thought to be responsible for a significant portion of muscle cell death in the mdx mouse; however, the role and time course of the immune response in the dystrophic process have not been well described. In this paper we constructed a simple mathematical model to investigate the role of the immune response in muscle degeneration and subsequent regeneration in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Our model suggests that the immune response contributes substantially to the muscle degeneration and regeneration processes. Furthermore, the analysis of the model predicts that the immune system response oscillates throughout the life of the mice, and the damaged fibers are never completely cleared.

  4. Leptin Suppresses Mouse Taste Cell Responses to Sweet Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Ryusuke; Noguchi, Kenshi; Shigemura, Noriatsu; Jyotaki, Masafumi; Takahashi, Ichiro; Margolskee, Robert F; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2015-11-01

    Leptin is known to selectively suppress neural and behavioral responses to sweet-tasting compounds. However, the molecular basis for the effect of leptin on sweet taste is not known. Here, we report that leptin suppresses sweet taste via leptin receptors (Ob-Rb) and KATP channels expressed selectively in sweet-sensitive taste cells. Ob-Rb was more often expressed in taste cells that expressed T1R3 (a sweet receptor component) than in those that expressed glutamate-aspartate transporter (a marker for Type I taste cells) or GAD67 (a marker for Type III taste cells). Systemically administered leptin suppressed taste cell responses to sweet but not to bitter or sour compounds. This effect was blocked by a leptin antagonist and was absent in leptin receptor-deficient db/db mice and mice with diet-induced obesity. Blocking the KATP channel subunit sulfonylurea receptor 1, which was frequently coexpressed with Ob-Rb in T1R3-expressing taste cells, eliminated the effect of leptin on sweet taste. In contrast, activating the KATP channel with diazoxide mimicked the sweet-suppressing effect of leptin. These results indicate that leptin acts via Ob-Rb and KATP channels that are present in T1R3-expressing taste cells to selectively suppress their responses to sweet compounds. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  5. Inherently variable responses to glucocorticoid stress among endogenous retroviruses isolated from 23 mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Karen; Lee, Young-Kwan; Chew, Alex; Chiu, Sophia; Lim, Debora; Greenhalgh, David G; Cho, Kiho

    2017-10-01

    Active participation of endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) in disease processes has been exemplified by the finding that the HERV (human ERV)-W envelope protein is involved in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis, an autoimmune disease. We also demonstrated that injury-elicited stressors alter the expression of murine ERVs (MuERVs), both murine leukemia virus-type and mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-type (MMTV-MuERV). In this study, to evaluate MMTV-MuERVs' responses to stress (e.g., injury, infection)-elicited systemic glucocorticoid (GC) levels, we examined the GC-stress response of 64 MMTV-MuERV promoters isolated from the genomes of 23 mouse strains. All 64 promoters responded to treatment with a synthetic GC, dexamethasone (DEX), at a wide range from a 0.6- to 85.7-fold increase in reporter activity compared to no treatment. An analysis of the 10 lowest and 10 highest DEX responders revealed specific promoter elements exclusively present in either the three lowest or the two highest responders. Each promoter had a unique profile of transcription regulatory elements and the glucocorticoid response element (GRE) was identified in all promoters with the number of GREs ranging from 2 to 7. The three lowest DEX responders were the only promoters with two GREs. The findings from this study suggest that certain MMTV-MuERVs are more responsive to stress-elicited systemic GC elevation compared to the others. The mouse strain-specific genomic MMTV-MuERV profiles and individual MMTV-MuERVs' differential responses to GC-stress might explain, at least in part, the variable inflammatory responses to injury and/or infection, often observed among different mouse strains. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Immune and Metabolic Alterations in Trauma and Sepsis edited by Dr. Raghavan Raju. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Changes in Mouse Bone Turnover in Response to Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng-Campbell, M.; Blaber, E.; Almeida, E.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical unloading during spaceflight is known to adversely affect mammalian physiology. Our previous studies using the Animal Enclosure Module on short duration Shuttle missions enabled us to identify a deficit in stem cell based-tissue regeneration as being a significant concern for long-duration spaceflight. Specifically, we found that mechanical unloading in microgravity resulted in inhibition of differentiation of mesenchymal and hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow compartment. Also, we observed overexpression of a cell cycle arrest molecule, CDKN1a/p21, in osteoprecursor cells on the bone surface, chondroprogenitors in the articular cartilage, and in myofibers attached to bone tissue. Specifically in bone tissue during both short (15-day) and long (30-day) microgravity experiments, we observed significant loss of bone tissue and structure in both the pelvis and the femur. After 15-days of microgravity on STS-131, pelvic ischium displayed a 6.23% decrease in bone fraction (p=0.005) and 11.91% decrease in bone thickness (p=0.002). Furthermore, during long-duration spaceflight we observed onset of an accelerated aging-like phenotype and osteoarthritic disease state indicating that stem cells within the bone tissue fail to repair and regenerate tissues in a normal manner, leading to drastic tissue alterations in response to microgravity. The Rodent Research Hardware System provides the capability to investigate these effects during long-duration experiments on the International Space Station. During the Rodent Research-1 mission 10 16-week-old female C57Bl/6J mice were exposed to 37-days of microgravity. All flight animals were euthanized and frozen on orbit for future dissection. Ground (n=10) and vivarium controls (n=10) were housed and processed to match the flight animal timeline. During this study we collected pelvis, femur, and tibia from all animal groups to test the hypothesis that stem cell-based tissue regeneration is significantly altered

  7. Amelioration of Auditory Response by DA9801 in Diabetic Mouse

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    Yeong Ro Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a metabolic disease that involves disorders such as diabetic retinopathy, diabetic neuropathy, and diabetic hearing loss. Recently, neurotrophin has become a treatment target that has shown to be an attractive alternative in recovering auditory function altered by DM. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of DA9801, a mixture of Dioscorea nipponica and Dioscorea japonica extracts, in the auditory function damage produced in a STZ-induced diabetic model and to provide evidence of the mechanisms involved in enhancing these protective effects. We found a potential application of DA9801 on hearing impairment in the STZ-induced diabetic model, demonstrated by reducing the deterioration produced by DM in ABR threshold in response to clicks and normalizing wave I–IV latencies and Pa latencies in AMLR. We also show evidence that these effects might be elicited by inducing NGF related through Nr3c1 and Akt. Therefore, this result suggests that the neuroprotective effects of DA9801 on the auditory damage produced by DM may be affected by NGF increase resulting from Nr3c1 via Akt transformation.

  8. The response of previously irradiated mouse skin to heat alone or combined with irradiation: influence of thermotolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wondergem, J.; Haveman, J.

    1983-01-01

    The skin of the mouse foot was used to study the effects of previous irradiation on the response to hyperthermia (44 degrees C), to irradiation, or to irradiation combined with hyperthermia (43 degrees C or 44 degrees C). Hyperthermia was applied by immersing the mouse foot into a hot waterbath and

  9. Sulfur mustard induces an endoplasmic reticulum stress response in the mouse ear vesicant model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yoke-Chen; Wang, James D. [Rutgers University, Pharmacology and Toxicology, 170 Frelinghuysen Rd, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Svoboda, Kathy K. [Texas A and M University, Baylor College of Dentistry, Center for Craniofacial Research 3302 Gaston Ave, Dallas, Texas 75246 (United States); Casillas, Robert P. [MRIGlobal, 425 Volker Boulevard, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D. [UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Environmental and Occupational Medicine, 170 Frelinghuysen Rd, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Gordon, Marion K. [Rutgers University, Pharmacology and Toxicology, 170 Frelinghuysen Rd, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Gerecke, Donald R., E-mail: gerecke@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Rutgers University, Pharmacology and Toxicology, 170 Frelinghuysen Rd, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response is a cell survival pathway upregulated when cells are under severe stress. Severely damaged mouse ear skin exposed to the vesicant, sulfur mustard (bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide, SM), resulted in increased expression of ER chaperone proteins that accompany misfolded and incorrectly made proteins targeted for degradation. Time course studies with SM using the mouse ear vesicant model (MEVM) showed progressive histopathologic changes including edema, separation of the epidermis from the dermis, persistent inflammation, upregulation of laminin γ2 (one of the chains of laminin-332, a heterotrimeric skin glycoprotein required for wound repair), and delayed wound healing from 24 h to 168 h post exposure. This was associated with time related increased expression of the cell survival ER stress marker, GRP78/BiP, and the ER stress apoptosis marker, GADD153/CHOP, suggesting simultaneous activation of both cell survival and non-mitochondrial apoptosis pathways. Dual immunofluorescence labeling of a keratinocyte migration promoting protein, laminin γ2 and GRP78/BIP, showed colocalization of the two molecules 72 h post exposure indicating that the laminin γ2 was misfolded after SM exposure and trapped within the ER. Taken together, these data show that ER stress is induced in mouse skin within 24 h of vesicant exposure in a defensive response to promote cell survival; however, it appears that this response is rapidly overwhelmed by the apoptotic pathway as a consequence of severe SM-induced injury. - Highlights: ► We demonstrated ER stress response in the mouse ear vesicant model. ► We described the asymmetrical nature of wound repair in the MEVM. ► We identified the distribution of various ER stress markers in the MEVM.

  10. Responses of the mouse to microwave radiation during estrous cycle and pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rugh, R.; Ginns, E.I.; Ho, H.S.; Leach, W.M.

    1975-01-01

    A new facility for microwave irradiation of mice that will provide reproducible dosimetry is described. The waveguide used provided the integral dose rate to experimental animals under stable and controlled environmental conditions of relative humidity and temperature, variables which have been found to be critical in microwave studies. In terms of average absorbed lethal dose, the female mouse was found to be more sensitive to microwave irradiation during estrus than during diestrus. Teratogenesis (e.g., exencephalies) after sublethal irradiation of pregnant mice at 8 gestation days resulted from absorbed doses within the range of 3 to 5 calories per gram of body weight, and was never an all-or-none response. The incidence and variety of effects produced (hemorrhage, resorption, stunting, and fetal death) indicate that the cause and effect relationships are neither linear nor well enough established and understood to permit prediction of the biological effects either in the mouse of other species. As the absorbed dose of radiant energy is increased to the 8-day pregnant mouse, the probability of it producing at least one exencephaly is likewise increased. Nevertheless, the determination of the absorbed dose of microwave energy in each mouse is one step closer to determining the precise absorbed-dose-effect relationship for microwave exposures. A total of 1096 mice were exposed to microwave radiation and separately monitored to gather the related data. (U.S.)

  11. Dose-dependent transitions in Nrf2-mediated adaptive response and related stress responses to hypochlorous acid in mouse macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, Courtney G.; Fu Jingqi; Xue Peng; Hou Yongyong; Pluta, Linda J.; Yang Longlong; Zhang Qiang; Thomas, Russell S.; Andersen, Melvin E.; Pi Jingbo

    2009-01-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is potentially an important source of cellular oxidative stress. Human HOCl exposure can occur from chlorine gas inhalation or from endogenous sources of HOCl, such as respiratory burst by phagocytes. Transcription factor Nrf2 is a key regulator of cellular redox status and serves as a primary source of defense against oxidative stress. We recently demonstrated that HOCl activates Nrf2-mediated antioxidant response in cultured mouse macrophages in a biphasic manner. In an effort to determine whether Nrf2 pathways overlap with other stress pathways, gene expression profiling was performed in RAW 264.7 macrophages exposed to HOCl using whole genome mouse microarrays. Benchmark dose (BMD) analysis on gene expression data revealed that Nrf2-mediated antioxidant response and protein ubiquitination were the most sensitive biological pathways that were activated in response to low concentrations of HOCl (< 0.35 mM). Genes involved in chromatin architecture maintenance and DNA-dependent transcription were also sensitive to very low doses. Moderate concentrations of HOCl (0.35 to 1.4 mM) caused maximal activation of the Nrf2 pathway and innate immune response genes, such as IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10 and chemokines. At even higher concentrations of HOCl (2.8 to 3.5 mM) there was a loss of Nrf2-target gene expression with increased expression of numerous heat shock and histone cluster genes, AP-1-family genes, cFos and Fra1 and DNA damage-inducible Gadd45 genes. These findings confirm an Nrf2-centric mechanism of action of HOCl in mouse macrophages and provide evidence of interactions between Nrf2, inflammatory, and other stress pathways.

  12. Humanized mouse model for assessing the human immune response to xenogeneic and allogeneic decellularized biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Raymond M; Johnson, Todd D; He, Jingjin; Rong, Zhili; Wong, Michelle; Nigam, Vishal; Behfar, Atta; Xu, Yang; Christman, Karen L

    2017-06-01

    Current assessment of biomaterial biocompatibility is typically implemented in wild type rodent models. Unfortunately, different characteristics of the immune systems in rodents versus humans limit the capability of these models to mimic the human immune response to naturally derived biomaterials. Here we investigated the utility of humanized mice as an improved model for testing naturally derived biomaterials. Two injectable hydrogels derived from decellularized porcine or human cadaveric myocardium were compared. Three days and one week after subcutaneous injection, the hydrogels were analyzed for early and mid-phase immune responses, respectively. Immune cells in the humanized mouse model, particularly T-helper cells, responded distinctly between the xenogeneic and allogeneic biomaterials. The allogeneic extracellular matrix derived hydrogels elicited significantly reduced total, human specific, and CD4 + T-helper cell infiltration in humanized mice compared to xenogeneic extracellular matrix hydrogels, which was not recapitulated in wild type mice. T-helper cells, in response to the allogeneic hydrogel material, were also less polarized towards a pro-remodeling Th2 phenotype compared to xenogeneic extracellular matrix hydrogels in humanized mice. In both models, both biomaterials induced the infiltration of macrophages polarized towards a M2 phenotype and T-helper cells polarized towards a Th2 phenotype. In conclusion, these studies showed the importance of testing naturally derived biomaterials in immune competent animals and the potential of utilizing this humanized mouse model for further studying human immune cell responses to biomaterials in an in vivo environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. ART culture conditions change the probability of mouse embryo gestation through defined cellular and molecular responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzer, Caroline; Esteves, Telma Cristina; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Le Gac, Séverine; Nordhoff, Verena; Schlatt, Stefan; Boiani, Michele

    2012-09-01

    (low fetal rate), were analyzed in depth using outbred and inbred fertilization schemes. Resultant blastocysts show imbalances of cell lineage composition; culture medium-specific deviation of gene expression (38 genes, ≥ 4-fold) compared with the in vivo pattern; and produce different litter sizes (P ≤ 0.0076) after transfer into fosters. Confounding effects of subfertility, life style and genetic heterogeneity are reduced to a minimum in the mouse model compared with ART patients. This is an animal model study. Mouse embryo responses to human ART media are not transferable 1-to-1 to human development due to structural and physiologic differences between oocytes of the two species. Our data promote awareness that human ART culture media affect embryo development. Effects reported here in the mouse may apply also in human, because no ART medium presently available on the market has been optimized for human embryo development. The mouse embryo assay (MEA), which requires ART media to support at least 80% blastocyst formation, is in need of reform and should be extended to include post-implantation development.

  14. Potentiation of X-ray response by quinacrine in experimental mouse mammary carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neubort, S.; Goldfeder, A.

    1984-01-01

    Two mouse mammary carcinomas were subjected to various doses of 250 KV X-rays alone or in combination with quinacrine-HCl (Atabrine). The tumors, maintained by subcutaneous implant in isogenic mouse hosts, were: MT2 (X/Gf mouse strain) and DBAH (DBA/2J strain). X-rays were given locally in single doses to the tumor while the body was shielded. Quinacrine was given ad lib in drinking water (0.03%) for 5 days beginning 48 hr before X-rays. Quinacrine alone had no effect on tumor growth, and was well-tolerated by the mice, which recovered rapidly after slight, transient weight loss. In the MT2 tumor, quinacrine had only a small potentiating effect, reducing the TCD-50 from 57.5 Gy (54.9, 60.2 95% confidence) to 49.0 (47.5, 52.5) Gy for the combination treatment. Conversely, in the DBAH tumor a substantial potential was obtained (E.R. = 2.0), the TCD-50 being reduced from 50.1 (46.8, 53.7) Gy to 25.1 (22.9, 27.5) Gy. The mechanism of this potential is under investigation. Since the more responsive DBAH tumor is known to be less hypoxic than the MT2 tumor, sensitization of hypoxic cells does not appear to play a role in quinacrine-induced potentiation

  15. Intracellular responses to frequency modulated tones in the dorsal cortex of the mouse inferior colliculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruediger eGeis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Frequency modulations occur in many natural sounds, including vocalizations. The neuronal response to frequency modulated (FM stimuli has been studied extensively in different brain areas, with an emphasis on the auditory cortex and the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus. Here, we measured the responses to FM sweeps in whole-cell recordings from neurons in the dorsal cortex of the mouse inferior colliculus. Both up- and downward logarithmic FM sweeps were presented at two different speeds to both the ipsi- and the contralateral ear. Based on the number of action potentials that were fired, between 10-24% of cells were selective for rate or direction of the FM sweeps. A somewhat lower percentage of cells, 6-21%, showed selectivity based on EPSP size. To study the mechanisms underlying the generation of FM selectivity, we compared FM responses with responses to simple tones in the same cells. We found that if pairs of neurons responded in a similar way to simple tones, they generally also responded in a similar way to FM sweeps. Further evidence that FM selectivity can be generated within the dorsal cortex was obtained by reconstructing FM sweeps from the response to simple tones using three different models. In about half of the direction selective neurons the selectivity was generated by spectrally asymmetric synaptic inhibition. In addition, evidence for direction selectivity based on the timing of excitatory responses was also obtained in some cells. No clear evidence for the local generation of rate selectivity was obtained. We conclude that FM direction selectivity can be generated within the dorsal cortex of the mouse inferior colliculus by multiple mechanisms.

  16. NaCl responsive taste cells in the mouse fungiform taste buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, R; Horio, N; Murata, Y; Yasumatsu, K; Shigemura, N; Ninomiya, Y

    2009-03-17

    Previous studies have demonstrated that rodents' chorda tympani (CT) nerve fibers responding to NaCl can be classified according to their sensitivities to the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) blocker amiloride into two groups: amiloride-sensitive (AS) and -insensitive (AI). The AS fibers were shown to respond specifically to NaCl, whereas AI fibers broadly respond to various electrolytes, including NaCl. These data suggest that salt taste transduction in taste cells may be composed of at least two different systems; AS and AI ones. To further address this issue, we investigated the responses to NaCl, KCl and HCl and the amiloride sensitivity of mouse fungiform papilla taste bud cells which are innervated by the CT nerve. Comparable with the CT data, the results indicated that 56 NaCl-responsive cells tested were classified into two groups; 25 cells ( approximately 44%) narrowly responded to NaCl and their NaCl response were inhibited by amiloride (AS cells), whereas the remaining 31 cells ( approximately 56%) responded not only to NaCl, but to KCl and/or HCl and showed no amiloride inhibition of NaCl responses (AI cells). Amiloride applied to the basolateral side of taste cells had no effect on NaCl responses in the AS and AI cells. Single cell reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) experiments indicated that ENaC subunit mRNA was expressed in a subset of AS cells. These findings suggest that the mouse fungiform taste bud is composed of AS and AI cells that can transmit taste information differently to their corresponding types of CT fibers, and apical ENaCs may be involved in the NaCl responses of AS cells.

  17. Augmentation of sensory-evoked hemodynamic response in an early Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinho; Jeong, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Based on enlarged blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses in cognitively normal subjects at risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD), compensatory neuronal hyperactivation has been proposed as an early marker for diagnosis of AD. The BOLD response results from neurovascular coupling, i.e., hemodynamic response induced by neuronal activity. However, there has been no evidence of task-induced increases in hemodynamic response in animal models of AD. Here, we observed an augmented hemodynamic response pattern in a transgenic AβPP(SWE)/PS1ΔE9 mouse model of AD using three in vivo imaging methods: intrinsic optical signal imaging, multi-photon laser scanning microscopy, and laser Doppler flowmetry. Sensory stimulation resulted in augmented and prolonged hemodynamic responses in transgenic mice evidenced by changes in total, oxygenated, and deoxygenated hemoglobin concentration. This difference between transgenic and wild-type mice was significant at 7 months of age when amyloid plaques and cerebral amyloid angiopathy had developed but not at younger or older ages. Correspondingly, sensory stimulation-induced pial arteriole diameter was also augmented and prolonged in transgenic mice at 7 months of age. Cerebral blood flow response in transgenic mice was augmented but not prolonged. These results are consistent with the existence of BOLD signal hyperactivation in non-demented AD-risk human subjects, supporting its potential use as an early diagnostic marker of AD.

  18. Transcriptomic responses in mouse brain exposed to chronic excess of the neurotransmitter glutamate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pal Ranu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increases during aging in extracellular levels of glutamate (Glu, the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, may be linked to chronic neurodegenerative diseases. Little is known about the molecular responses of neurons to chronic, moderate increases in Glu levels. Genome-wide gene expression in brain hippocampus was examined in a unique transgenic (Tg mouse model that exhibits moderate Glu hyperactivity throughout the lifespan, the neuronal Glutamate dehydrogenase (Glud1 mouse, and littermate 9 month-old wild type mice. Results Integrated bioinformatic analyses on transcriptomic data were used to identify bio-functions, pathways and gene networks underlying neuronal responses to increased Glu synaptic release. Bio-functions and pathways up-regulated in Tg mice were those associated with oxidative stress, cell injury, inflammation, nervous system development, neuronal growth, and synaptic transmission. Increased gene expression in these functions and pathways indicated apparent compensatory responses offering protection against stress, promoting growth of neuronal processes (neurites and re-establishment of synapses. The transcription of a key gene in the neurite growth network, the kinase Ptk2b, was significantly up-regulated in Tg mice as was the activated (phosphorylated form of the protein. In addition to genes related to neurite growth and synaptic development, those associated with neuronal vesicle trafficking in the Huntington's disease signalling pathway, were also up-regulated. Conclusions This is the first study attempting to define neuronal gene expression patterns in response to chronic, endogenous Glu hyperactivity at brain synapses. The patterns observed were characterized by a combination of responses to stress and stimulation of nerve growth, intracellular transport and recovery.

  19. Influenza Virus Induces Inflammatory Response in Mouse Primary Cortical Neurons with Limited Viral Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gefei Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike stereotypical neurotropic viruses, influenza A viruses have been detected in the brain tissues of human and animal models. To investigate the interaction between neurons and influenza A viruses, mouse cortical neurons were isolated, infected with human H1N1 influenza virus, and then examined for the production of various inflammatory molecules involved in immune response. We found that replication of the influenza virus in neurons was limited, although early viral transcription was not affected. Virus-induced neuron viability decreased at 6 h postinfection (p.i. but increased at 24 h p.i. depending upon the viral strain. Virus-induced apoptosis and cytopathy in primary cortical neurons were not apparent at 24 h p.i. The mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and type I interferons were upregulated at 6 h and 24 h p.i. These results indicate that the influenza virus induces inflammatory response in mouse primary cortical neurons with limited viral replication. The cytokines released in viral infection-induced neuroinflammation might play critical roles in influenza encephalopathy, rather than in viral replication-induced cytopathy.

  20. Dynamic properties of sensory stimulation evoked responses in mouse cerebellar granule cell layer and molecular layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing, Yan-Hua; Zhang, Guang-Jian; Sun, Lei; Chu, Chun-Ping; Qiu, De-Lai

    2015-01-12

    Sensory information coming from climbing fiber and mossy fiber-granule cell pathways, generates motor-related outputs according to internal rules of integration and computation in the cerebellar cortex. However, the dynamic properties of sensory information processing in mouse cerebellar cortex are less understood. Here, we studied the dynamic properties of sensory stimulation-evoked responses in the cerebellar granule cell layer (GCL) and molecular layer (ML) by electrophysiological recordings method. Our data showed that air-puff stimulation (5-10 ms in duration) of the ipsilateral whisker pad evoked single-peak responses in the GCL and ML; whereas a duration of stimulation ≥30 ms in GCL and ≥60 ms in ML, evoked double-peak responses that corresponded with stimulation-on and -off responses via mossy fiber pathway. The highest frequency of stimulation train for evoking GCL responses was 33 Hz. In contrast, the highest frequency of stimulation train for evoking ML responses was 4 Hz. These results indicate that the cerebellar granule cells transfer the high-fidelity sensory information from mossy fibers, which is cut-off by molecular layer interneurons (MLIs). Our results suggest that the MLIs network acts as a low-pass filter during the processing of high-frequency sensory information. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Possible roles of long-chain sphingomyelines and sphingomyelin synthase 2 in mouse macrophage inflammatory response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Hideaki; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Sanaki, Takao; Shigaki, Shuhei; Morita, Hirotoshi; Oyama, Miki; Mitsui, Masaru; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Nakano, Toru; Mitsutake, Susumu; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Takemoto, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the precise role of sphingomyelin synthase 2 (SMS2) in sphingomyelin (SM) metabolism and their anti-inflammatory properties, we analyzed species of major SM and ceramide (Cer) (18:1, 18:0 sphingoid backbone, C14 - C26 N-acyl part) in SMS2 knockout and wild-type mouse plasma and liver using HPLC-MS. SMS2 deficiency significantly decreased very long chain SM (SM (d18:1/22:0) and SM (d18:1/24:0 or d18:0/24:1)) and increased very long chain Cer (Cer (d18:1/24:0 or d18:0/24:1) and Cer (d18:1/24:1)), but not long chain SM (SM (d18:1/16:0), SM (d18:1/18:0 or d18:0/18:1) and SM (d18:1/18:1)) in plasma. To examine the effects of SM on inflammation, we studied the role of very long chain SM in macrophage activation. Addition of SM (d18:1/24:0) strongly upregulated several macrophage activation markers, SM (d18:1/6:0) and Cer (d18:1/24:0) however, did not. It was suggested that very long chain SM but not long chain SM were decreased in SMS2-deficient mice liver and plasma. And the exogenously added very long chain SM (d18:1/24:0) could activate macrophages directly, suggesting a novel role of plasma very long chain SM in modulating macrophage activation and resulting inflammation. - Highlights: • Very long-chain SM species were decreased in SMS2 knockout mouse plasma and liver. • Very long-chain ceramide species were increased in SMS2 knockout mouse plasma. • SMS2 deficiency diminished the inflammatory response of macrophages. • Very long-chain SM enhanced ICAM1 and iNOS expression in peritoneal macrophages.

  2. Doxil Synergizes with Cancer Immunotherapies to Enhance Antitumor Responses in Syngeneic Mouse Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Rios-Doria

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Based on the previously described roles of doxorubicin in immunogenic cell death, both doxorubicin and liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil were evaluated for their ability to boost the antitumor response of different cancer immunotherapies including checkpoint blockers (anti–PD-L1, PD-1, and CTLA-4 mAbs and TNF receptor agonists (OX40 and GITR ligand fusion proteins in syngeneic mouse models. In a preventative CT26 mouse tumor model, both doxorubicin and Doxil synergized with anti–PD-1 and CTLA-4 mAbs. Doxil was active when CT26 tumors were grown in immunocompetent mice but not immunocompromised mice, demonstrating that Doxil activity is increased in the presence of a functional immune system. Using established tumors and maximally efficacious doses of Doxil and cancer immunotherapies in either CT26 or MCA205 tumor models, combination groups produced strong synergistic antitumor effects, a larger percentage of complete responders, and increased survival. In vivo pharmacodynamic studies showed that Doxil treatment decreased the percentage of tumor-infiltrating regulatory T cells and, in combination with anti–PD-L1, increased the percentage of tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells. In the tumor, Doxil administration increased CD80 expression on mature dendritic cells. CD80 expression was also increased on both monocytic and granulocytic myeloid cells, suggesting that Doxil may induce these tumor-infiltrating cells to elicit a costimulatory phenotype capable of activating an antitumor T-cell response. These results uncover a novel role for Doxil in immunomodulation and support the use of Doxil in combination with checkpoint blockade or TNFR agonists to increase response rates and antitumor activity.

  3. The ddY mouse: a model of postprandial hypertriglyceridemia in response to dietary fat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Tomomi; Kishimoto, Kyoko; Ezaki, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    Postprandial hyperlipidemia (lipemia) is a risk factor for atherosclerosis. However, mouse models of postprandial hyperlipidemia have not been reported. Here, we report that ddY mice display marked postprandial hypertriglyceridemia in response to dietary fat. In ddY mice, the fasting serum total triacylglyceride (TG) concentration was 134 mg/dl, which increased to 571 mg/dl after an intragastric safflower oil load (0.4 ml/mouse). In C57BL/6J mice, these concentrations were 57 and 106 mg/dl, respectively. By lipoprotein analysis, ddY mice showed increases in chylomicron- and VLDL-sized TG fractions (remnants and VLDL) after fat load. In C57BL/6J mice, post-heparin plasma LPL activity after fat load was increased 4.8-fold relative to fasting. However, in ddY mice, the increase of LPL activity after fat load was very small (1.2-fold) and not significant. High fat feeding for 10 weeks led to obesity in ddY mice. A difference in LPL amino acid composition between C57BL/6J and ddY mice was detected but was deemed unlikely to cause hypertriglyceridemia because hypertriglyceridemia was not evident in other strains harboring the ddY-type LPL sequence. These findings indicate that postprandial hypertriglyceridemia in ddY mice is induced by decreased LPL activity after fat load and is associated with obesity induced by a high-fat diet. PMID:22735545

  4. Effect of gabazine on sensory stimulation train evoked response in mouse cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing, Yan-Hua; Jin, Wen-Zhe; Sun, Lei; Chu, Chun-Ping; Qiu, De-Lai

    2015-02-01

    Cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) respond to sensory stimulation via climbing fiber and mossy fiber-granule cell pathways, and generate motor-related outputs according to internal rules of integration and computation. However, the dynamic properties of sensory information processed by PC in mouse cerebellar cortex are currently unclear. In the present study, we examined the effects of the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor A (GABA(A)) antagonist, gabazine, on the stimulation train on the simple spike firing of PCs by electrophysiological recordings method. Our data showed that the output of cerebellar PCs could be significantly affected by all pulses of the low-frequency (0.25 -2 Hz) sensory stimulation train, but only by the 1st and 2nd pulses of the high-frequency (≥ 4 Hz) sensory stimulation train. In the presence of gabazine (20 μM), each pulse of 1 Hz facial stimulation evoked simple spike firing in the PCs, but only the 1st and 2nd pulses of 4 Hz stimulation induced an increase in simple spike firing of the PCs. These results indicated that GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition did not significantly affect the frequency properties of sensory stimulation evoked responses in the mouse cerebellar PCs.

  5. Alcohol Exposure Alters Mouse Lung Inflammation in Response to Inhaled Dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill A. Poole

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol exposure is associated with increased lung infections and decreased mucociliary clearance. Occupational workers exposed to dusts from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs are at risk for developing chronic inflammatory lung diseases. Agricultural worker co-exposure to alcohol and organic dust has been established, although little research has been conducted on the combination effects of alcohol and organic dusts on the lung. Previously, we have shown in a mouse model that exposure to hog dust extract (HDE collected from a CAFO results in the activation of protein kinase C (PKC, elevated lavage fluid cytokines/chemokines including interleukin-6 (IL-6, and the development of significant lung pathology. Because alcohol blocks airway epithelial cell release of IL-6 in vitro, we hypothesized that alcohol exposure would alter mouse lung inflammatory responses to HDE. To test this hypothesis, C57BL/6 mice were fed 20% alcohol or water ad libitum for 6 weeks and treated with 12.5% HDE by intranasal inhalation method daily during the final three weeks. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF, tracheas and lungs were collected. HDE stimulated a 2–4 fold increase in lung and tracheal PKCε (epsilon activity in mice, but no such increase in PKCε activity was observed in dust-exposed mice fed alcohol. Similarly, alcohol-fed mice demonstrated significantly less IL-6 in lung lavage in response to dust than that observed in control mice instilled with HDE. TNFα levels were also inhibited in the alcohol and HDE-exposed mouse lung tissue as compared to the HDE only exposed group. HDE-induced lung inflammatory aggregates clearly present in the tissue from HDE only exposed animals were not visually detectable in the HDE/alcohol co-exposure group. Statistically significant weight reductions and 20% mortality were also observed in the mice co-exposed to HDE and alcohol. These data suggest that alcohol exposure depresses the ability

  6. Associations Between Paternal Responsiveness and Stress Responsiveness in the Biparental California Mouse, Peromyscus californicus

    OpenAIRE

    Chauke, Miyetani

    2012-01-01

    The mechanistic basis of paternal behavior in mammals is poorly understood. Assuming there are parallels between the factors mediating maternal and paternal behavior, it can be expected that the onset of paternal behavior is facilitated by reductions in stress responsiveness, as occurs in females of several mammalian species. This dissertation describes studies investigating the role of stress responsiveness in the expression of paternal behavior in biparental, monogamous California mice (Per...

  7. Distinctive behavioral and cellular responses to fluoxetine in the mouse model for Fragile X syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko eUutela

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Fluoxetine is used as a therapeutic agent for autism spectrum disorder (ASD, including Fragile X syndrome (FXS. The treatment often associates with disruptive behaviors such as agitation and disinhibited behaviors in FXS. To identify mechanisms that increase the risk to poor treatment outcome, we investigated the behavioral and cellular effects of fluoxetine on adult Fmr1 knockout (KO mice, a mouse model for FXS. We found that fluoxetine reduced anxiety-like behavior of both wild type and Fmr1 KO mice seen as shortened latency to enter the center area in the open field test. In Fmr1 KO mice, fluoxetine normalized locomotor hyperactivity but abnormally increased exploratory activity. Reduced Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and increased TrkB receptor expression levels in the hippocampus of Fmr1 KO mice associated with inappropriate coping responses under stressful condition and abolished antidepressant activity of fluoxetine. Fluoxetine response in the cell proliferation was also missing in the hippocampus of Fmr1 KO mice when compared with wild type controls. The postnatal expression of serotonin transporter was reduced in the thalamic nuclei of Fmr1 KO mice during the time of transient innervation of somatosensory neurons suggesting that developmental changes of serotonin transporter (SERT expression were involved in the differential cellular and behavioral responses to fluoxetine in wild type and Fmr1 mice. The results indicate that changes of BDNF/TrkB signaling contribute to differential behavioral responses to fluoxetine among individuals with ASD.

  8. Enhanced Antibody Responses in a Novel NOG Transgenic Mouse with Restored Lymph Node Organogenesis

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    Takeshi Takahashi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymph nodes (LNs are at the center of adaptive immune responses. Various exogenous substances are transported into LNs and a series of immune responses ensue after recognition by antigen–specific lymphocytes. Although humanized mice have been used to reconstitute the human immune system, most lack LNs due to deficiency of the interleukin (IL-2Rγ gene (cytokine common γ chain, γc. In this study, we established a transgenic strain, NOG-pRORγt-γc, in the NOD/shi-scid-IL-2Rγnull (NOG background, in which the γc gene was expressed in a lymph-tissue inducer (LTi lineage by the endogenous promoter of RORγt. In this strain, LN organogenesis was normalized and the number of human T cells substantially increased in the periphery after reconstitution of the human immune system by human hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The distribution of human T cells differed between NOG-pRORγt-γc Tg and NOG-non Tg mice. About 40% of human T cells resided in LNs, primarily the mesenteric LNs. The LN-complemented humanized mice exhibited antigen-specific immunoglobulin G responses together and an increased number of IL-21+–producing CD4+ T cells in LNs. This novel mouse strain will facilitate recapitulation of human immune responses.

  9. Mouse mannose-binding lectin-A and ficolin-A inhibit lipopolysaccharide-mediated pro-inflammatory responses on mast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ying Jie; Kang, Hee Jung; Kim, Ji Yeon

    2013-01-01

    It is unknown how soluble pattern-recognition receptors in blood, such as mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and ficolins, modulate mast cell-mediated inflammatory responses. We investigate how mouse MBL-A or ficolin-A regulate mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (mBMMCs)-derived inflammatory response...... cytokine production by LPS-mediated TLR4 in mBMMCs appears to be down-regulated, indicating that mouse MBL and ficolin may have an inhibitory function toward mouse TLR4-mediated excessive inflammation on the mast cells.......It is unknown how soluble pattern-recognition receptors in blood, such as mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and ficolins, modulate mast cell-mediated inflammatory responses. We investigate how mouse MBL-A or ficolin-A regulate mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (mBMMCs)-derived inflammatory response...

  10. Phenobarbital induces cell cycle transcriptional responses in mouse liver humanized for constitutive androstane and pregnane x receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luisier, Raphaëlle; Lempiäinen, Harri; Scherbichler, Nina; Braeuning, Albert; Geissler, Miriam; Dubost, Valerie; Müller, Arne; Scheer, Nico; Chibout, Salah-Dine; Hara, Hisanori; Picard, Frank; Theil, Diethilde; Couttet, Philippe; Vitobello, Antonio; Grenet, Olivier; Grasl-Kraupp, Bettina; Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, Heidrun; Thomson, John P; Meehan, Richard R; Elcombe, Clifford R; Henderson, Colin J; Wolf, C Roland; Schwarz, Michael; Moulin, Pierre; Terranova, Rémi; Moggs, Jonathan G

    2014-06-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and the pregnane X receptor (PXR) are closely related nuclear receptors involved in drug metabolism and play important roles in the mechanism of phenobarbital (PB)-induced rodent nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogenesis. Here, we have used a humanized CAR/PXR mouse model to examine potential species differences in receptor-dependent mechanisms underlying liver tissue molecular responses to PB. Early and late transcriptomic responses to sustained PB exposure were investigated in liver tissue from double knock-out CAR and PXR (CAR(KO)-PXR(KO)), double humanized CAR and PXR (CAR(h)-PXR(h)), and wild-type C57BL/6 mice. Wild-type and CAR(h)-PXR(h) mouse livers exhibited temporally and quantitatively similar transcriptional responses during 91 days of PB exposure including the sustained induction of the xenobiotic response gene Cyp2b10, the Wnt signaling inhibitor Wisp1, and noncoding RNA biomarkers from the Dlk1-Dio3 locus. Transient induction of DNA replication (Hells, Mcm6, and Esco2) and mitotic genes (Ccnb2, Cdc20, and Cdk1) and the proliferation-related nuclear antigen Mki67 were observed with peak expression occurring between 1 and 7 days PB exposure. All these transcriptional responses were absent in CAR(KO)-PXR(KO) mouse livers and largely reversible in wild-type and CAR(h)-PXR(h) mouse livers following 91 days of PB exposure and a subsequent 4-week recovery period. Furthermore, PB-mediated upregulation of the noncoding RNA Meg3, which has recently been associated with cellular pluripotency, exhibited a similar dose response and perivenous hepatocyte-specific localization in both wild-type and CAR(h)-PXR(h) mice. Thus, mouse livers coexpressing human CAR and PXR support both the xenobiotic metabolizing and the proliferative transcriptional responses following exposure to PB.

  11. Metabolomic screening using ESI-FT MS identifies potential radiation-responsive molecules in mouse urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizuka, Daisuke; Yoshioka, Susumu; Kawai, Hidehiko; Izumi, Shunsuke; Suzuki, Fumio; Kamiya, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    The demand for establishment of high-throughput biodosimetric methods is increasing. Our aim in this study was to identify low-molecular-weight urinary radiation-responsive molecules using electrospray ionization Fourier transform mass spectrometry (ESI-FT MS), and our final goal was to develop a sensitive biodosimetry technique that can be applied in the early triage of a radiation emergency medical system. We identified nine metabolites by statistical comparison of mouse urine before and 8 h after irradiation. Time-course analysis showed that, of these metabolites, thymidine and either thymine or imidazoleacetic acid were significantly increased dose-dependently 8 h after radiation exposure; these molecules have already been reported as potential radiation biomarkers. Phenyl glucuronide was significantly decreased 8 h after radiation exposure, irrespective of the dose. Histamine and 1-methylhistamine were newly identified by MS/MS and showed significant, dose-dependent increases 72 h after irradiation. Quantification of 1-methylhistamine by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis also showed a significant increase 72 h after 4 Gy irradiation. These results suggest that urinary metabolomics screening using ESI-FT MS can be a powerful tool for identifying promising radiation-responsive molecules, and that urinary 1-methylhistamine is a potential radiation-responsive molecule for acute, high-dose exposure.

  12. Myeloid Heme Oxygenase-1 Regulates the Acute Inflammatory Response to Zymosan in the Mouse Air Pouch

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    Rita Brines

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is induced by many stimuli to modulate the activation and function of different cell types during innate immune responses. Although HO-1 has shown anti-inflammatory effects in different systems, there are few data on the contribution of myeloid HO-1 and its role in inflammatory processes is not well understood. To address this point, we have used HO-1M-KO mice with myeloid-restricted deletion of HO-1 to specifically investigate its influence on the acute inflammatory response to zymosan in vivo. In the mouse air pouch model, we have shown an exacerbated inflammation in HO-1M-KO mice with increased neutrophil infiltration accompanied by high levels of inflammatory mediators such as interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, and prostaglandin E2. The expression of the degradative enzyme matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3 was also enhanced. In addition, we observed higher levels of serum MMP-3 in HO-1M-KO mice compared with control mice, suggesting the presence of systemic inflammation. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that myeloid HO-1 plays an anti-inflammatory role in the acute response to zymosan in vivo and suggest the interest of this target to regulate inflammatory processes.

  13. Segregation of Visual Response Properties in the Mouse Superior Colliculus and Their Modulation during Locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The superior colliculus (SC) receives direct input from the retina and integrates it with information about sound, touch, and state of the animal that is relayed from other parts of the brain to initiate specific behavioral outcomes. The superficial SC layers (sSC) contain cells that respond to visual stimuli, whereas the deep SC layers (dSC) contain cells that also respond to auditory and somatosensory stimuli. Here, we used a large-scale silicon probe recording system to examine the visual response properties of SC cells of head-fixed and alert male mice. We found cells with diverse response properties including: (1) orientation/direction-selective (OS/DS) cells with a firing rate that is suppressed by drifting sinusoidal gratings (negative OS/DS cells); (2) suppressed-by-contrast cells; (3) cells with complex-like spatial summation nonlinearity; and (4) cells with Y-like spatial summation nonlinearity. We also found specific response properties that are enriched in different depths of the SC. The sSC is enriched with cells with small RFs, high evoked firing rates (FRs), and sustained temporal responses, whereas the dSC is enriched with the negative OS/DS cells and with cells with large RFs, low evoked FRs, and transient temporal responses. Locomotion modulates the activity of the SC cells both additively and multiplicatively and changes the preferred spatial frequency of some SC cells. These results provide the first description of the negative OS/DS cells and demonstrate that the SC segregates cells with different response properties and that the behavioral state of a mouse affects SC activity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The superior colliculus (SC) receives visual input from the retina in its superficial layers (sSC) and induces eye/head-orientating movements and innate defensive responses in its deeper layers (dSC). Despite their importance, very little is known about the visual response properties of dSC neurons. Using high-density electrode recordings and novel

  14. Inducible protective processes in animal systems XIV: Cytogenetic adaptive response induced by EMS or MMS in bone marrow cells of diabetic mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.B. Dada Khalandar

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: (1 Methylating agents are a more effective inducer of adaptive response than ethylating agents in diabetic mouse. (2 Further, it is interesting to note that the percentage reduction of chromosomal breaks in diabetics is comparatively much less than in non diabetic mouse, inferring that there is variation in adaptive response between diseased and non diseased condition.

  15. Response Properties of a Newly Identified Tristratified Narrow Field Amacrine Cell in the Mouse Retina.

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    G S Newkirk

    Full Text Available Amacrine cells were targeted for whole cell recording using two-photon fluorescence microscopy in a transgenic mouse line in which the promoter for dopamine receptor 2 drove expression of green fluorescent protein in a narrow field tristratified amacrine cell (TNAC that had not been studied previously. Light evoked a multiphasic response that was the sum of hyperpolarizing and depolarization synaptic inputs consistent with distinct dendritic ramifications in the off and on sublamina of the inner plexiform layer. The amplitude and waveform of the response, which consisted of an initial brief hyperpolarization at light onset followed by recovery to a plateau potential close to dark resting potential and a hyperpolarizing response at the light offset varied little over an intensity range from 0.4 to ~10^6 Rh*/rod/s. This suggests that the cell functions as a differentiator that generates an output signal (a transient reduction in inhibitory input to downstream retina neurons that is proportional to the derivative of light input independent of its intensity. The underlying circuitry appears to consist of rod and cone driven on and off bipolar cells that provide direct excitatory input to the cell as well as to GABAergic amacrine cells that are synaptically coupled to TNAC. Canonical reagents that blocked excitatory (glutamatergic and inhibitory (GABA and glycine synaptic transmission had effects on responses to scotopic stimuli consistent with the rod driven component of the proposed circuit. However, responses evoked by photopic stimuli were paradoxical and could not be interpreted on the basis of conventional thinking about the neuropharmacology of synaptic interactions in the retina.

  16. Catalog of Differentially Expressed Long Non-Coding RNA following Activation of Human and Mouse Innate Immune Response

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    Benoit T. Roux

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite increasing evidence to indicate that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs are novel regulators of immunity, there has been no systematic attempt to identify and characterize the lncRNAs whose expression is changed following the induction of the innate immune response. To address this issue, we have employed next-generation sequencing data to determine the changes in the lncRNA profile in four human (monocytes, macrophages, epithelium, and chondrocytes and four mouse cell types (RAW 264.7 macrophages, bone marrow-derived macrophages, peritoneal macrophages, and splenic dendritic cells following exposure to the pro-inflammatory mediators, lipopolysaccharides (LPS, or interleukin-1β. We show differential expression of 204 human and 210 mouse lncRNAs, with positional analysis demonstrating correlation with immune-related genes. These lncRNAs are predominantly cell-type specific, composed of large regions of repeat sequences, and show poor evolutionary conservation. Comparison within the human and mouse sequences showed less than 1% sequence conservation, although we identified multiple conserved motifs. Of the 204 human lncRNAs, 21 overlapped with syntenic mouse lncRNAs, of which five were differentially expressed in both species. Among these syntenic lncRNA was IL7-AS (antisense, which was induced in multiple cell types and shown to regulate the production of the pro-inflammatory mediator interleukin-6 in both human and mouse cells. In summary, we have identified and characterized those lncRNAs that are differentially expressed following activation of the human and mouse innate immune responses and believe that these catalogs will provide the foundation for the future analysis of the role of lncRNAs in immune and inflammatory responses.

  17. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor-5 negatively regulates cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Yan; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Fukushima, Nobuyuki [Division of Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi, E-mail: ttujiuch@life.kindai.ac.jp [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • LPA{sub 5} inhibits the cell growth and motile activities of 3T3 cells. • LPA{sub 5} suppresses the cell motile activities stimulated by hydrogen peroxide in 3T3 cells. • Enhancement of LPA{sub 5} on the cell motile activities inhibited by LPA{sub 1} in 3T3 cells. • The expression and activation of Mmp-9 were inhibited by LPA{sub 5} in 3T3 cells. • LPA signaling via LPA{sub 5} acts as a negative regulator of cellular responses in 3T3 cells. - Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling via G protein-coupled LPA receptors (LPA{sub 1}–LPA{sub 6}) mediates a variety of biological functions, including cell migration. Recently, we have reported that LPA{sub 1} inhibited the cell motile activities of mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells. In the present study, to evaluate a role of LPA{sub 5} in cellular responses, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3-L5) cells were generated from 3T3 cells. In cell proliferation assays, LPA markedly stimulated the cell proliferation activities of 3T3-L5 cells, compared with control cells. In cell motility assays with Cell Culture Inserts, the cell motile activities of 3T3-L5 cells were significantly higher than those of control cells. The activity levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured by gelatin zymography. 3T3-L5 cells stimulated the activation of Mmp-2, correlating with the expression levels of Mmp-2 gene. Moreover, to assess the co-effects of LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 5} on cell motile activities, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3a1-L5) cells were also established from Lpar1 over-expressing (3T3a1) cells. 3T3a1-L5 cells increased the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells, while the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells were significantly lower than those of control cells. These results suggest that LPA{sub 5} may act as a negative regulator of cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells, similar to the case for LPA{sub 1}.

  18. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor-5 negatively regulates cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Yan; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • LPA 5 inhibits the cell growth and motile activities of 3T3 cells. • LPA 5 suppresses the cell motile activities stimulated by hydrogen peroxide in 3T3 cells. • Enhancement of LPA 5 on the cell motile activities inhibited by LPA 1 in 3T3 cells. • The expression and activation of Mmp-9 were inhibited by LPA 5 in 3T3 cells. • LPA signaling via LPA 5 acts as a negative regulator of cellular responses in 3T3 cells. - Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling via G protein-coupled LPA receptors (LPA 1 –LPA 6 ) mediates a variety of biological functions, including cell migration. Recently, we have reported that LPA 1 inhibited the cell motile activities of mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells. In the present study, to evaluate a role of LPA 5 in cellular responses, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3-L5) cells were generated from 3T3 cells. In cell proliferation assays, LPA markedly stimulated the cell proliferation activities of 3T3-L5 cells, compared with control cells. In cell motility assays with Cell Culture Inserts, the cell motile activities of 3T3-L5 cells were significantly higher than those of control cells. The activity levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured by gelatin zymography. 3T3-L5 cells stimulated the activation of Mmp-2, correlating with the expression levels of Mmp-2 gene. Moreover, to assess the co-effects of LPA 1 and LPA 5 on cell motile activities, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3a1-L5) cells were also established from Lpar1 over-expressing (3T3a1) cells. 3T3a1-L5 cells increased the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells, while the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells were significantly lower than those of control cells. These results suggest that LPA 5 may act as a negative regulator of cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells, similar to the case for LPA 1

  19. Spontaneous behavioral responses in the orofacial region: A model of trigeminal pain in mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Reyes, Marcela; Akerman, Simon; Nguyen, Elaine; Vijjeswarapu, Alice; Hom, Betty; Dong, Hong-Wei; Charles, Andrew C.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To develop a translational mouse model for the study and measurement of non-evoked pain in the orofacial region by establishing markers of nociceptive-specific grooming behaviors in the mouse. BACKGROUND Some of the most prevalent and debilitating conditions involve pain in the trigeminal distribution. Although there are current therapies for these pain conditions, for many patients they are far from optimal. Understanding the pathophysiology of pain disorders arising from structures innervated by the trigeminal nerve is still limited and most animal behavioral models focus on the measurement of evoked pain. In patients, spontaneous (non-evoked) pain responses provide a more accurate representation of the pain experience than do responses that are evoked by an artificial stimulus. Therefore, the development of animal models that measure spontaneous nociceptive behaviors may provide a significant translational tool for a better understanding of pain neurobiology. METHODS C57BL/6 mice received either an injection of 0.9% Saline solution or complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) into the right masseter muscle. Animals were video recorded and then analyzed by an observer blind to the experiment group. The duration of different facial grooming patterns performed in the area of injection were measured. After 2 hrs, mice were euthanized, perfused and the brainstem was removed. Fos protein expression in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis was quantified using immunohistochemistry to investigate nociceptive-specific neuronal activation. A separate group of animals was treated with morphine sulfate, to determine the nociceptive-specific nature of their behaviors. RESULTS We characterized and quantified 3 distinct patterns of acute grooming behaviors: fore-paw rubbing, lower lip skin/cheek rubbing against enclosure floor and hind paw scratching. These behaviors occurred with a reproducible frequency and time course, and were inhibited by the analgesic morphine. CFA

  20. Mangifera indica L. extract (Vimang) and mangiferin modulate mouse humoral immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, D; Leiro, J; Delgado, R; Sanmartín, M L; Ubeira, F M

    2003-12-01

    The present study investigated the effects of orally administered Vimang (an aqueous extract of Mangifera indica) and mangiferin (the major polyphenol present in Vimang) on mouse antibody responses induced by inoculation with spores of microsporidian parasites. Inoculation induced specific antibody production with an exponential timecourse, peaking after about one month. Vimang significantly inhibited this antibody production from about three weeks post-inoculation, and most markedly by four weeks post-inoculation; by contrast, mangiferin had no significant effect. Determination of Ig isotypes showed that the IgM to IgG switch began about four weeks post-inoculation, with IgG2a predominating. Vimang significantly inhibited IgG production, but had no effect on IgM. Mangiferin did no affect either IgM or IgG2a, but significantly enhanced production of IgG1 and IgG2b. Neither Vimang nor mangiferin enhanced specific antibody secretion by splenic plasma cells from mice inoculated with microsporidian spores, whether administered in vivo before serum extraction or in vitro to the culture medium. Inoculation with spores induced splenomegaly, which was significantly reduced by Vimang and significantly enhanced by mangiferin. These results suggest that components of Mangifera indica extracts may be of potential value for modulating the humoral response in different immunopathological disorders. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Refined mapping of a quantitative trait locus on chromosome 1 responsible for mouse embryonic death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magalie Vatin

    Full Text Available Recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA is defined as the loss of three or more consecutive pregnancies during the first trimester of embryonic intrauterine development. This kind of human infertility is frequent among the general population since it affects 1 to 5% of women. In half of the cases the etiology remains unelucidated. In the present study, we used interspecific recombinant congenic mouse strains (IRCS in the aim to identify genes responsible for embryonic lethality. Applying a cartographic approach using a genotype/phenotype association, we identified a minimal QTL region, of about 6 Mb on chromosome 1, responsible for a high rate of embryonic death (∼30%. Genetic analysis suggests that the observed phenotype is linked to uterine dysfunction. Transcriptomic analysis of the uterine tissue revealed a preferential deregulation of genes of this region compared to the rest of the genome. Some genes from the QTL region are associated with VEGF signaling, mTOR signaling and ubiquitine/proteasome-protein degradation pathways. This work may contribute to elucidate the molecular basis of a multifactorial and complex human disorder as RSA.

  2. Cineradiographic Analysis of Mouse Postural Response to Alteration of Gravity and Jerk (Gravity Deceleration Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuya Hasegawa

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability to maintain the body relative to the external environment is important for adaptation to altered gravity. However, the physiological limits for adaptation or the disruption of body orientation are not known. In this study, we analyzed postural changes in mice upon exposure to various low gravities. Male C57BL6/J mice (n = 6 were exposed to various gravity-deceleration conditions by customized parabolic flight-maneuvers targeting the partial-gravity levels of 0.60, 0.30, 0.15 and μ g (<0.001 g. Video recordings of postural responses were analyzed frame-by-frame by high-definition cineradiography and with exact instantaneous values of gravity and jerk. As a result, the coordinated extension of the neck, spine and hindlimbs was observed during the initial phase of gravity deceleration. Joint angles widened to 120%–200% of the reference g level, and the magnitude of the thoracic-curvature stretching was correlated with gravity and jerk, i.e., the gravity deceleration rate. A certain range of jerk facilitated mouse skeletal stretching efficiently, and a jerk of −0.3~−0.4 j (g/s induced the maximum extension of the thoracic-curvature. The postural response of animals to low gravity may undergo differential regulation by gravity and jerk.

  3. T-Cell Mediated Immune Responses Induced in ret Transgenic Mouse Model of Malignant Melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abschuetz, Oliver [Skin Cancer Unit, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg and Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Ruprecht-Karl University of Heidelberg, Mannheim , Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Osen, Wolfram [Division of Translational Immunology, German Cancer Center, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Frank, Kathrin [Skin Cancer Unit, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg and Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Ruprecht-Karl University of Heidelberg, Mannheim , Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Kato, Masashi [Unit of Environmental Health Sciences, Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Life and Health Sciences, Chubu University, Aichi 487-8501 (Japan); Schadendorf, Dirk [Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Essen, Essen 45122 (Germany); Umansky, Viktor, E-mail: v.umansky@dkfz.de [Skin Cancer Unit, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg and Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Ruprecht-Karl University of Heidelberg, Mannheim , Heidelberg 69120 (Germany)

    2012-04-26

    Poor response of human malignant melanoma to currently available treatments requires a development of innovative therapeutic strategies. Their evaluation should be based on animal models that resemble human melanoma with respect to genetics, histopathology and clinical features. Here we used a transgenic mouse model of spontaneous skin melanoma, in which the ret transgene is expressed in melanocytes under the control of metallothionein-I promoter. After a short latency, around 25% mice develop macroscopic skin melanoma metastasizing to lymph nodes, bone marrow, lungs and brain, whereas other transgenic mice showed only metastatic lesions without visible skin tumors. We found that tumor lesions expressed melanoma associated antigens (MAA) tyrosinase, tyrosinase related protein (TRP)-1, TRP-2 and gp100, which could be applied as targets for the immunotherapy. Upon peptide vaccination, ret transgenic mice without macroscopic melanomas were able to generate T cell responses not only against a strong model antigen ovalbumin but also against typical MAA TRP-2. Although mice bearing macroscopic primary tumors could also display an antigen-specific T cell reactivity, it was significantly down-regulated as compared to tumor-free transgenic mice or non-transgenic littermates. We suggest that ret transgenic mice could be used as a pre-clinical model for the evaluation of novel strategies of melanoma immunotherapy.

  4. Effects of cortisol on the primary response of mouse spleen cell cultures to heterologous erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dracott, B.N.

    1974-01-01

    Cell viability and the production of direct PFC were studied in mouse spleen cell cultures after cortisol treatment in vivo or in vitro at various times relative to primary stimulation with SRBC in vitro. Cortisol treatment in vivo reduced spleen cell numbers by 88 percent after 48 hr, but cultures of the remaining cells produced as many PFC in vitro as did cultures of equal numbers of normal spleen cells. In normal spleen cell cultures incubated with cortisol for 4 hr prior to the addition of antigen, peak responses of PFC/culture and PFC/10 6 cells occurred 24 hr later than in controls and averaged, respectively, 27 and 141 percent of control values. Minimum viable cell numbers were observed in cortisol-treated cultures after 3 days; thereafter cell numbers gradually increased. These results were not significantly altered when cultures were treated simultaneously with cortisol and antigen. The response was not suppressed if the addition of antigen preceded that of cortisol by more than 4 hr. Suppression was also considerably reduced if fetal calf serum was used when preparing cells for culture

  5. CD44 deficiency enhanced Streptococcus equi ssp. zooepidemicus dissemination and inflammation response in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Xiao, Pingping; Chen, Yaosheng; Wei, Zigong; Liu, Xiaohong

    2017-12-01

    Streptococcus equi ssp. zooepidemicus (S. zooepidemicus) is responsible for peritonitis, septicemia, meningitis, arthritis and several other serious diseases in various species. Recent studies have demonstrated that CD44 is implicated in the process of host defense against pathogenic microorganisms. In the present study, the role of CD44 in the host response to S. zooepidemicus infection was investigated in a mouse model. Upon intraperitoneal infection with S. zooepidemicus, the expression of CD44 on the peritoneal exudate cells from wild-type (WT) mice was increased. CD44 deficiency accelerated mortality, which was accompanied by increased peritoneal bacterial growth and dissemination to distant body sites. CD44 knock-out (KO) mice showed enhanced early inflammatory cell recruitment into the peritoneal fluid on S. zooepidemicus infection. In line with this, the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines in peritoneal exudate cells and peritoneal macrophages of CD44 KO mice were increased compared with those of WT mice. In addition, CD44 deficiency was associated with reduced expression of A20, a negative regulator in TLR signaling. Overall, the present study suggests that CD44 plays a protective role in antibacterial defense against S. zooepidemicus in mice. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. A Mouse Model of Hyperproliferative Human Epithelium Validated by Keratin Profiling Shows an Aberrant Cytoskeletal Response to Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samal Zhussupbekova

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A validated animal model would assist with research on the immunological consequences of the chronic expression of stress keratins KRT6, KRT16, and KRT17, as observed in human pre-malignant hyperproliferative epithelium. Here we examine keratin gene expression profile in skin from mice expressing the E7 oncoprotein of HPV16 (K14E7 demonstrating persistently hyperproliferative epithelium, in nontransgenic mouse skin, and in hyperproliferative actinic keratosis lesions from human skin. We demonstrate that K14E7 mouse skin overexpresses stress keratins in a similar manner to human actinic keratoses, that overexpression is a consequence of epithelial hyperproliferation induced by E7, and that overexpression further increases in response to injury. As stress keratins modify local immunity and epithelial cell function and differentiation, the K14E7 mouse model should permit study of how continued overexpression of stress keratins impacts on epithelial tumor development and on local innate and adaptive immunity.

  7. Transgenic Mouse Model Harboring the Transcriptional Fusion Ccl20-Luciferase as a Novel Reporter of Pro-Inflammatory Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispo, Martina; Van Maele, Laurye; Tabareau, Julien; Cayet, Delphine; Errea, Agustina; Ferreira, Ana María; Rumbo, Martin; Sirard, Jean Claude

    2013-01-01

    The chemokine CCL20, the unique ligand of CCR6 functions as an attractant of immune cells. Expression of CCL20 is induced by Toll-like Receptor (TLR) signaling or proinflammatory cytokine stimulation. However CCL20 is also constitutively produced at specific epithelial sites of mucosa. This expression profile is achieved by transcriptional regulation. In the present work we characterized regulatory features of mouse Ccl20 gene. Transcriptional fusions between the mouse Ccl20 promoter and the firefly luciferase (luc) encoding gene were constructed and assessed in in vitro and in vivo assays. We found that liver CCL20 expression and luciferase activity were upregulated by systemic administration of the TLR5 agonist flagellin. Using shRNA and dominant negative form specific for mouse TLR5, we showed that this expression was controlled by TLR5. To address in situ the regulation of gene activity, a transgenic mouse line harboring a functional Ccl20-luc fusion was generated. The luciferase expression was highly concordant with Ccl20 expression in different tissues. Our data indicate that the transgenic mouse model can be used to monitor activation of innate response in vivo. PMID:24265691

  8. A new knock-in mouse model of l-DOPA-responsive dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Samuel J; Yu, Xin Y; Heinzer, Ann K; Harrast, Porter; Fan, Xueliang; Raike, Robert S; Thompson, Valerie B; Pare, Jean-Francois; Weinshenker, David; Smith, Yoland; Jinnah, Hyder A; Hess, Ellen J

    2015-10-01

    Abnormal dopamine neurotransmission is associated with many different genetic and acquired dystonic disorders. For instance, mutations in genes critical for the synthesis of dopamine, including GCH1 and TH cause l-DOPA-responsive dystonia. Despite evidence that implicates abnormal dopamine neurotransmission in dystonia, the precise nature of the pre- and postsynaptic defects that result in dystonia are not known. To better understand these defects, we generated a knock-in mouse model of l-DOPA-responsive dystonia (DRD) mice that recapitulates the human p.381Q>K TH mutation (c.1141C>A). Mice homozygous for this mutation displayed the core features of the human disorder, including reduced TH activity, dystonia that worsened throughout the course of the active phase, and improvement in the dystonia in response to both l-DOPA and trihexyphenidyl. Although the gross anatomy of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons was normal in DRD mice, the microstructure of striatal synapses was affected whereby the ratio of axo-spinous to axo-dendritic corticostriatal synaptic contacts was reduced. Microinjection of l-DOPA directly into the striatum ameliorated the dystonic movements but cerebellar microinjections of l-DOPA had no effect. Surprisingly, the striatal dopamine concentration was reduced to ∼1% of normal, a concentration more typically associated with akinesia, suggesting that (mal)adaptive postsynaptic responses may also play a role in the development of dystonia. Administration of D1- or D2-like dopamine receptor agonists to enhance dopamine signalling reduced the dystonic movements, whereas administration of D1- or D2-like dopamine receptor antagonists to further reduce dopamine signalling worsened the dystonia, suggesting that both receptors mediate the abnormal movements. Further, D1-dopamine receptors were supersensitive; adenylate cyclase activity, locomotor activity and stereotypy were exaggerated in DRD mice in response to the D1-dopamine receptor agonist SKF

  9. Two different mechanisms of immune-complex trapping in the mouse spleen during immune responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoshida, K.; van den Berg, T. K.; Dijkstra, C. D.

    1993-01-01

    The capacity of immune-complex (IC) trapping was examined using purified horse radish peroxidase (HRP)-anti-HRP (PAP) on frozen sections of mouse spleen in vitro. We investigated the trapping mechanisms by applying the IC with or without fresh mouse serum added on the spleen sections of naive as

  10. Pathophysiological Responses in Rat and Mouse Models of Radiation-Induced Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lianhong; Yang, Jianhua; Li, Guoqian; Li, Yi; Wu, Rong; Cheng, Jinping; Tang, Yamei

    2017-03-01

    The brain is the major dose-limiting organ in patients undergoing radiotherapy for assorted conditions. Radiation-induced brain injury is common and mainly occurs in patients receiving radiotherapy for malignant head and neck tumors, arteriovenous malformations, or lung cancer-derived brain metastases. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanisms of radiation-induced brain injury are largely unknown. Although many treatment strategies are employed for affected individuals, the effects remain suboptimal. Accordingly, animal models are extremely important for elucidating pathogenic radiation-associated mechanisms and for developing more efficacious therapies. So far, models employing various animal species with different radiation dosages and fractions have been introduced to investigate the prevention, mechanisms, early detection, and management of radiation-induced brain injury. However, these models all have limitations, and none are widely accepted. This review summarizes the animal models currently set forth for studies of radiation-induced brain injury, especially rat and mouse, as well as radiation dosages, dose fractionation, and secondary pathophysiological responses.

  11. The effect of vitamin C on the radiation response of the Swiss mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milligan, A.J.; Dobelbower, R.R. Jr.; Westmeyer, M.; Herrmann, D.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of Vitamin C on the whole-body radiation response of the Swiss mouse was determined by comparison of LD50/30 values for control and Vitamin C treated animals. Animals received Vitamin C through drinking water for a period of 7 days prior to radiation and for 30 days post-irradiation. Each animal was weighed daily and Vitamin C intake was determined through measurement of daily drinking water consumed. Control and Vitamin C treated animals were given graded doses of radiation between 0 and 1200 cGY. The LD50/30 value for control animals was 796 rad (723-875) and the LD50/30 for Vitamin C treated animals was 850 rad (816-886). No statistically significant difference was observed between the two groups, although the LD50/30 value for Vitamin C animals was higher than that observed for control animals. A statistically significant difference was observed in the average weights of animals following whole-body radiation. For every dose group, the average weight increase for 30 days following irradiation was greater for the Vitamin C treated animals than for control animals. The mechanism of action for this effect is unclear at present; on-going studies will, hopefully, delineate some of these mechanisms

  12. Hippocampal adaptive response following extensive neuronal loss in an inducible transgenic mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristoffer Myczek

    Full Text Available Neuronal loss is a common component of a variety of neurodegenerative disorders (including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's disease and brain traumas (stroke, epilepsy, and traumatic brain injury. One brain region that commonly exhibits neuronal loss in several neurodegenerative disorders is the hippocampus, an area of the brain critical for the formation and retrieval of memories. Long-lasting and sometimes unrecoverable deficits caused by neuronal loss present a unique challenge for clinicians and for researchers who attempt to model these traumas in animals. Can these deficits be recovered, and if so, is the brain capable of regeneration following neuronal loss? To address this significant question, we utilized the innovative CaM/Tet-DT(A mouse model that selectively induces neuronal ablation. We found that we are able to inflict a consistent and significant lesion to the hippocampus, resulting in hippocampally-dependent behavioral deficits and a long-lasting upregulation in neurogenesis, suggesting that this process might be a critical part of hippocampal recovery. In addition, we provide novel evidence of angiogenic and vasculature changes following hippocampal neuronal loss in CaM/Tet-DTA mice. We posit that angiogenesis may be an important factor that promotes neurogenic upregulation following hippocampal neuronal loss, and both factors, angiogenesis and neurogenesis, can contribute to the adaptive response of the brain for behavioral recovery.

  13. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus infection causes modulation of inflammatory and immune response genes in mouse brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puri Raj K

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurovirulent Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV causes lethal encephalitis in equines and is transmitted to humans by mosquitoes. VEEV is highly infectious when transmitted by aerosol and has been developed as a bio-warfare agent, making it an important pathogen to study from a military and civilian standpoint. Molecular mechanisms of VEE pathogenesis are poorly understood. To study these, the gene expression profile of VEEV infected mouse brains was investigated. Changes in gene expression were correlated with histological changes in the brain. In addition, a molecular framework of changes in gene expression associated with progression of the disease was studied. Results Our results demonstrate that genes related to important immune pathways such as antigen presentation, inflammation, apoptosis and response to virus (Cxcl10, CxCl11, Ccl5, Ifr7, Ifi27 Oas1b, Fcerg1,Mif, Clusterin and MHC class II were upregulated as a result of virus infection. The number of over-expressed genes (>1.5-fold level increased as the disease progressed (from 197, 296, 400, to 1086 at 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours post infection, respectively. Conclusion Identification of differentially expressed genes in brain will help in the understanding of VEEV-induced pathogenesis and selection of biomarkers for diagnosis and targeted therapy of VEEV-induced neurodegeneration.

  14. Yersinia pestis subverts the dermal neutrophil response in a mouse model of bubonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Jeffrey G; Hasenkrug, Aaron M; Dorward, David W; Nair, Vinod; Carmody, Aaron B; Hinnebusch, B Joseph

    2013-08-27

    The majority of human Yersinia pestis infections result from introduction of bacteria into the skin by the bite of an infected flea. Once in the dermis, Y. pestis can evade the host's innate immune response and subsequently disseminate to the draining lymph node (dLN). There, the pathogen replicates to large numbers, causing the pathognomonic bubo of bubonic plague. In this study, several cytometric and microscopic techniques were used to characterize the early host response to intradermal (i.d.) Y. pestis infection. Mice were infected i.d. with fully virulent or attenuated strains of dsRed-expressing Y. pestis, and tissues were analyzed by flow cytometry. By 4 h postinfection, there were large numbers of neutrophils in the infected dermis and the majority of cell-associated bacteria were associated with neutrophils. We observed a significant effect of the virulence plasmid (pCD1) on bacterial survival and neutrophil activation in the dermis. Intravital microscopy of i.d. Y. pestis infection revealed dynamic interactions between recruited neutrophils and bacteria. In contrast, very few bacteria interacted with dendritic cells (DCs), indicating that this cell type may not play a major role early in Y. pestis infection. Experiments using neutrophil depletion and a CCR7 knockout mouse suggest that dissemination of Y. pestis from the dermis to the dLN is not dependent on neutrophils or DCs. Taken together, the results of this study show a very rapid, robust neutrophil response to Y. pestis in the dermis and that the virulence plasmid pCD1 is important for the evasion of this response. Yersinia pestis remains a public health concern today because of sporadic plague outbreaks that occur throughout the world and the potential for its illegitimate use as a bioterrorism weapon. Since bubonic plague pathogenesis is initiated by the introduction of Y. pestis into the skin, we sought to characterize the response of the host's innate immune cells to bacteria early after

  15. HFE Genotype Restricts the Response to Paraquat in a Mouse Model of Neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Anne M; Meadowcroft, Mark D; Neely, Elizabeth B; Snyder, Amanda M; Purnell, Carson J; Wright, Justin; Lamendella, Regina; Nandar, Wint; Huang, Xuemei; Connor, James R

    2018-05-01

    Parkinson's disease is marked clinically by motor dysfunction and pathologically by dopaminergic cell loss in the substantia nigra and iron accumulation in the substantia nigra. The driver underlying iron accumulation remains unknown and could be genetic or environmental. The HFE protein is critical for the regulation of cellular iron uptake. Mutations within this protein are associated with increased iron accumulation including in the brain. We have focused on the commonly occurring H63D variant of the HFE gene as a disease modifier in a number of neurodegenerative diseases. To investigate the role of H63D HFE genotype, we generated a mouse model in which the wild-type (WT) HFE gene is replaced by the H67D gene variant (mouse homolog of the human H63D gene variant). Using paraquat toxicity as the model for Parkinson's disease, we found that WT mice responded as expected with significantly greater motor function, loss of tyrosine hydroxylase staining and increase microglial staining in the substantia nigra, and an increase in R 2 relaxation rate within the substantia nigra of the paraquat-treated mice compared to their saline-treated counterparts. In contrast, the H67D mice showed a remarkable resistance to paraquat treatment; specifically differing from the WT mice with no changes in motor function or changes in R 2 relaxation rates following paraquat exposure. At baseline, there were differences between the H67D HFE mice and WT mice in gut microbiome profile and increased L-ferritin staining in the substantia nigra that could account for the resistance to paraquat. Of particular note, the H67D HFE mice regardless of whether or not they were treated with paraquat had significantly less tyrosine hydroxylase immunostaining than WT. Our results clearly demonstrate that the HFE genotype impacts the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase in the substantia nigra, the gut microbiome and the response to paraquat providing additional support that the HFE genotype is a disease

  16. Isoniazid suppresses antioxidant response element activities and impairs adipogenesis in mouse and human preadipocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yanyan; Xue, Peng; Hou, Yongyong; Zhang, Hao; Zheng, Hongzhi; Zhou, Tong; Qu, Weidong; Teng, Weiping; Zhang, Qiang; Andersen, Melvin E.; Pi, Jingbo

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptional signaling through the antioxidant response element (ARE), orchestrated by the Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), is a major cellular defense mechanism against oxidative or electrophilic stress. Here, we reported that isoniazid (INH), a widely used antitubercular drug, displays a substantial inhibitory property against ARE activities in diverse mouse and human cells. In 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, INH concentration-dependently suppressed the ARE-luciferase reporter activity and mRNA expression of various ARE-dependent antioxidant genes under basal and oxidative stressed conditions. In keeping with our previous findings that Nrf2-ARE plays a critical role in adipogenesis by regulating expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), suppression of ARE signaling by INH hampered adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells and human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). Following adipogenesis induced by hormonal cocktails, INH-treated 3T3-L1 cells and ADSCs displayed significantly reduced levels of lipid accumulation and attenuated expression of C/EBPα and PPARγ. Time-course studies in 3T3-L1 cells revealed that inhibition of adipogenesis by INH occurred in the early stage of terminal adipogenic differentiation, where reduced expression of C/EBPβ and C/EBPδ was observed. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to demonstrate that INH suppresses ARE signaling and interrupts with the transcriptional network of adipogenesis, leading to impaired adipogenic differentiation. The inhibition of ARE signaling may be a potential underlying mechanism by which INH attenuates cellular antioxidant response contributing to various complications. - Highlights: • Isoniazid suppresses ARE-mediated transcriptional activity. • Isoniazid inhibits adipogenesis in preadipocytes. • Isoniazid suppresses adipogenic gene expression during adipogenesis

  17. The response of mouse skin to multiple small doses of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denekamp, J.; Harris, S.R.

    1975-01-01

    The response of mouse skin has been tested by irradiating the foot of albino mice and scoring erythema and desquamation during the following month. Multiple small doses of 150, 250 and 350 rad have been given 'daily', and the test dose necessary to achieve a given reaction has been determined one day after the last small fraction. This test dose has been compared with the single dose necessary to produce the same reaction level in previously untreated mice, in order to determine the ratio of the slopes of the dose-response curve at low and high doses: Slope ratio = (single dose - test dose)/total fractionated priming dose. In three separate experiments the slope ratio decreased as the dose per fraction was reduced from 350 to 150 rad. This conflicts with the data of Dutreix et al, who found a constant slope ratio over this dose range. The present data are compared with those obtained by Denekamp using 4, 9 and 14 fractions of 300 rad and by Douglas et al, using the same experimental technique, over the dose range 45 to 200 rad/fraction. In addition, the results from multifraction experiments in which equal dose increments were administered until the requisite skin reaction was achieved are also analysed in terms of their slope ratio (Fowler et al. Douglas et al). When all these results are plotted it is impossible to be sure whether the slope ratio is decreasing over the range 300 to 45 rad per fraction, although it seems likely. Most of the values at low doses lie in the range 0.15 to 0.25, indicating that at low doses the radiation is only 15 to 25% as effective per rad in causing cell death as at higher doses. (author)

  18. Response of mouse tongue epithelium to single doses of bleomycin and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorr, W.; Hirler, E.; Honig, M.

    1993-01-01

    Both bleomycin (BLM) and local X-irradiation (25 kV) induce denudation in the tongue epithelium of the C3H-Neuherberg mouse in a dose-dependent manner. In the present study the effect of BLM alone and of combined single doses of drug and radiation were studied using the incidence of epithelial denudation as the end-point. In 'time-line' experiments, 8 mg/kg BLM were given before or after graded doses of X-rays. BLM treatment required a reduction of the radiation dose (ED 50 ) from 15 Gy to 5-7 Gy, independent of sequence or time interval. In contrast, the time course of the response was clearly dependent on the treatment interval. Latency decreased when the drug was injected less than 2 h before irradiation with minimum latency observed at 30 min. Isobologram analysis of experiments with varying combinations of X-rays and BLM demonstrated that small drug doses were relatively more effective than larger doses, suggesting an upward concavity of the BLM dose-effective curve in vivo, i.e. a 'negative shoulder' of the curve in the low dose region. In contrast to the response to X-rays alone, which has a constant latent time to ulcer of 10 days, the latency in combined treatment was clearly shortened with increasing drug dose and at high doses eventually approximated the epithelial turnover time of 5 days. The data suggest that BLM both as a single agent and in combination with X-rays reduced the probability of abortive divisions and through this effect shortened the latent time to epithelial denudation. (author)

  19. An activated unfolded protein response promotes retinal degeneration and triggers an inflammatory response in the mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, T; Shinde, V M; Starr, C R; Kruglov, A A; Boitet, E R; Kotla, P; Zolotukhin, S; Gross, A K; Gorbatyuk, M S

    2014-12-18

    Recent studies on the endoplasmic reticulum stress have shown that the unfolded protein response (UPR) is involved in the pathogenesis of inherited retinal degeneration caused by mutant rhodopsin. However, the main question of whether UPR activation actually triggers retinal degeneration remains to be addressed. Thus, in this study, we created a mouse model for retinal degeneration caused by a persistently activated UPR to assess the physiological and morphological parameters associated with this disease state and to highlight a potential mechanism by which the UPR can promote retinal degeneration. We performed an intraocular injection in C57BL6 mice with a known unfolded protein response (UPR) inducer, tunicamycin (Tn) and examined animals by electroretinography (ERG), spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and histological analyses. We detected a significant loss of photoreceptor function (over 60%) and retinal structure (35%) 30 days post treatment. Analysis of retinal protein extracts demonstrated a significant upregulation of inflammatory markers including interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and IBA1. Similarly, we detected a strong inflammatory response in mice expressing either Ter349Glu or T17M rhodopsin (RHO). These mutant rhodopsin species induce severe retinal degeneration and T17M rhodopsin elicits UPR activation when expressed in mice. RNA and protein analysis revealed a significant upregulation of pro- and anti-inflammatory markers such as IL-1β, IL-6, p65 nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) and MCP-1, as well as activation of F4/80 and IBA1 microglial markers in both the retinas expressing mutant rhodopsins. We then assessed if the Tn-induced inflammatory marker IL-1β was capable of inducing retinal degeneration by injecting C57BL6 mice with a recombinant IL-1β. We observed ~19% reduction in ERG a-wave amplitudes and a 29% loss of photoreceptor cells compared with

  20. Differential Peripheral Proteomic Biosignature of Fluoxetine Response in a Mouse Model of Anxiety/Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indira Mendez-David

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The incorporation of peripheral biomarkers in the treatment of major depressive disorders (MDD could improve the efficiency of treatments and increase remission rate. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs represent an attractive biological substrate allowing the identification of a drug response signature. Using a proteomic approach with high-resolution mass spectrometry, the present study aimed to identify a biosignature of antidepressant response (fluoxetine, a Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor in PBMCs in a mouse model of anxiety/depression. Following determination of an emotionality score, using complementary behavioral analysis of anxiety/depression across three different tests (Elevated Plus Maze, Novelty Suppressed Feeding, Splash Test, we showed that a 4-week corticosterone treatment (35 μg/ml, CORT model in C57BL/6NTac male mice induced an anxiety/depressive-like behavior. Then, chronic fluoxetine treatment (18 mg/kg/day for 28 days in the drinking water reduced corticosterone-induced increase in emotional behavior. However, among 46 fluoxetine-treated mice, only 30 of them presented a 50% decrease in emotionality score, defining fluoxetine responders (CORT/Flx-R. To determine a peripheral biological signature of fluoxetine response, proteomic analysis was performed from PBMCs isolated from the “most” affected corticosterone/vehicle (CORT/V, corticosterone/fluoxetine responders and non-responders (CORT/Flx-NR animals. In comparison to CORT/V, a total of 263 proteins were differently expressed after fluoxetine exposure. Expression profile of these proteins showed a strong similarity between CORT/Flx-R and CORT/Flx-NR (R = 0.827, p < 1e-7. Direct comparison of CORT/Flx-R and CORT/Flx-NR groups revealed 100 differently expressed proteins, representing a combination of markers associated either with the maintenance of animals in a refractory state, or associated with behavioral improvement. Finally, 19 proteins showed a

  1. Curine inhibits eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness in a mouse model of allergic asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro-Filho, Jaime; Calheiros, Andrea Surrage; Vieira-de-Abreu, Adriana; Moraes de Carvalho, Katharinne Ingrid; Silva Mendes, Diego da; Melo, Christianne Bandeira; Martins, Marco Aurélio; Silva Dias, Celidarque da; Piuvezam, Márcia Regina

    2013-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease with increasing prevalence around the world. Current asthma therapy includes drugs that usually cause significant side effects, justifying the search for new anti-asthmatic drugs. Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid that modulates calcium influx in many cell types; however, its anti-allergic and putative toxic effects remain to be elucidated. Our aim was to investigate the effects of curine on eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and to characterize its potential toxic effects. We used a mouse model of allergic asthma induced by sensitization and challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) to evaluate the anti-allergic effects of oral treatment with curine. The oral administration of curine significantly inhibited eosinophilic inflammation, eosinophil lipid body formation and AHR in animals challenged with OVA compared with animals in the untreated group. The curine treatment also reduced eotaxin and IL-13 production triggered by OVA. Verapamil, a calcium channel antagonist, had similar anti-allergic properties, and curine pre-treatment inhibited the calcium-induced tracheal contractile response ex-vivo, suggesting that the mechanism by which curine exerts its effects is through the inhibition of a calcium-dependent response. A toxicological evaluation showed that orally administered curine did not significantly alter the biochemical, hematological, behavioral and physical parameters measured in the experimental animals compared with saline-treated animals. In conclusion, curine showed anti-allergic activity through mechanisms that involve inhibition of IL-13 and eotaxin and of Ca ++ influx, without inducing evident toxicity and as such, has the potential for the development of anti-asthmatic drugs. - Highlights: • Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid from Chondrodendron platyphyllum. • Curine inhibits eosinophil influx and activation and airway hyper-responsiveness. • Curine

  2. Curine inhibits eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness in a mouse model of allergic asthma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro-Filho, Jaime [Laboratório de Imunofarmacologia, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Laboratório de Imunofarmacologia, Departamento de Fisiologia e Patologia, UFPB, João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil); Calheiros, Andrea Surrage; Vieira-de-Abreu, Adriana [Laboratório de Imunofarmacologia, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Moraes de Carvalho, Katharinne Ingrid [Laboratório de Inflamação, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Silva Mendes, Diego da [Laboratório de Imunofarmacologia, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Melo, Christianne Bandeira [Laboratório de Inflamação, Instituto Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Martins, Marco Aurélio [Laboratório de Inflamação, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Silva Dias, Celidarque da [Laboratório de Fitoquímica, Departamento de Ciências Farmacêuticas, UFPB, João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil); Piuvezam, Márcia Regina, E-mail: mrpiuvezam@ltf.ufpb.br [Laboratório de Imunofarmacologia, Departamento de Fisiologia e Patologia, UFPB, João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil); and others

    2013-11-15

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease with increasing prevalence around the world. Current asthma therapy includes drugs that usually cause significant side effects, justifying the search for new anti-asthmatic drugs. Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid that modulates calcium influx in many cell types; however, its anti-allergic and putative toxic effects remain to be elucidated. Our aim was to investigate the effects of curine on eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and to characterize its potential toxic effects. We used a mouse model of allergic asthma induced by sensitization and challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) to evaluate the anti-allergic effects of oral treatment with curine. The oral administration of curine significantly inhibited eosinophilic inflammation, eosinophil lipid body formation and AHR in animals challenged with OVA compared with animals in the untreated group. The curine treatment also reduced eotaxin and IL-13 production triggered by OVA. Verapamil, a calcium channel antagonist, had similar anti-allergic properties, and curine pre-treatment inhibited the calcium-induced tracheal contractile response ex-vivo, suggesting that the mechanism by which curine exerts its effects is through the inhibition of a calcium-dependent response. A toxicological evaluation showed that orally administered curine did not significantly alter the biochemical, hematological, behavioral and physical parameters measured in the experimental animals compared with saline-treated animals. In conclusion, curine showed anti-allergic activity through mechanisms that involve inhibition of IL-13 and eotaxin and of Ca{sup ++} influx, without inducing evident toxicity and as such, has the potential for the development of anti-asthmatic drugs. - Highlights: • Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid from Chondrodendron platyphyllum. • Curine inhibits eosinophil influx and activation and airway hyper-responsiveness. • Curine

  3. Single K ATP channel opening in response to action potential firing in mouse dentate granule neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Geoffrey R; Lutas, Andrew; Martínez-François, Juan Ramón; Yellen, Gary

    2011-06-08

    ATP-sensitive potassium channels (K(ATP) channels) are important sensors of cellular metabolic state that link metabolism and excitability in neuroendocrine cells, but their role in nonglucosensing central neurons is less well understood. To examine a possible role for K(ATP) channels in modulating excitability in hippocampal circuits, we recorded the activity of single K(ATP) channels in cell-attached patches of granule cells in the mouse dentate gyrus during bursts of action potentials generated by antidromic stimulation of the mossy fibers. Ensemble averages of the open probability (p(open)) of single K(ATP) channels over repeated trials of stimulated spike activity showed a transient increase in p(open) in response to action potential firing. Channel currents were identified as K(ATP) channels through blockade with glibenclamide and by comparison with recordings from Kir6.2 knock-out mice. The transient elevation in K(ATP) p(open) may arise from submembrane ATP depletion by the Na(+)-K(+) ATPase, as the pump blocker strophanthidin reduced the magnitude of the elevation. Both the steady-state and stimulus-elevated p(open) of the recorded channels were higher in the presence of the ketone body R-β-hydroxybutyrate, consistent with earlier findings that ketone bodies can affect K(ATP) activity. Using perforated-patch recording, we also found that K(ATP) channels contribute to the slow afterhyperpolarization following an evoked burst of action potentials. We propose that activity-dependent opening of K(ATP) channels may help granule cells act as a seizure gate in the hippocampus and that ketone-body-mediated augmentation of the activity-dependent opening could in part explain the effect of the ketogenic diet in reducing epileptic seizures.

  4. Dose-response relationship of cadmium or radiation-induced embryotoxicity in mouse whole embryo culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Kiyohito; Kawamata, Akitoshi; Matsuoka, Masato; Wakisaka, Takashi; Fujiki, Yoshishige

    1988-01-01

    Mouse embryos of B6C3F 1 strain were exposed in vitro to 1.2 to 2.2 μM cadmium chloride (Cd) or to 100 to 320 R x-rays, and the effects of the exposure on development were examined after 39 h of culture. Development of embryos was assessed from lethality, formation of the neural tube defect, diameter and protein of yolk sac, crown-rump and head lengths, embryonic protein, and number of somites. Incidence of the neural tube defect increased from 3.4 to 100% by 1.2 to 2.0 μM Cd, while embryo deaths increased from 13.8 to 93.3% by 2.0 to 2.2 μM Cd. Embryonic protein was significantly reduced at the teratogenic range, but the number of somites was only affected by 1.6 to 2.0 μM Cd. X-irradiation at 100 to 320 R induced the neural tube defect in 2.9 to 72.7% of the embryos. An embryolethal effect was observed only at the 320 R dose. Crown-rump and head lengths and embryonic protein were significantly affected at the teratogenic range, but the diameter and protein of yolk sac and number of somites were hardly affected. Cadmium- or radiation-induced response data of both teratogenicity and endpoints indicating inhibition of embryonic development were acceptably fitted to a linear log-probit regression. These regressions suggest that as an estimation of interference in development of embryos, embryonic protein and head length are sensitive endpoints while the number of somites is an insensitive criterion. (author)

  5. Tunicamycin-induced unfolded protein response in the developing mouse brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Haiping; Wang, Xin; Ke, Zun-Ji; Comer, Ashley L.; Xu, Mei; Frank, Jacqueline A.; Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin; Luo, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes ER stress, resulting in the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). ER stress and UPR are associated with many neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. The developing brain is particularly susceptible to environmental insults which may cause ER stress. We evaluated the UPR in the brain of postnatal mice. Tunicamycin, a commonly used ER stress inducer, was administered subcutaneously to mice of postnatal days (PDs) 4, 12 and 25. Tunicamycin caused UPR in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum of mice of PD4 and PD12, which was evident by the upregulation of ATF6, XBP1s, p-eIF2α, GRP78, GRP94 and MANF, but failed to induce UPR in the brain of PD25 mice. Tunicamycin-induced UPR in the liver was observed at all stages. In PD4 mice, tunicamycin-induced caspase-3 activation was observed in layer II of the parietal and optical cortex, CA1–CA3 and the subiculum of the hippocampus, the cerebellar external germinal layer and the superior/inferior colliculus. Tunicamycin-induced caspase-3 activation was also shown on PD12 but to a much lesser degree and mainly located in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, deep cerebellar nuclei and pons. Tunicamycin did not activate caspase-3 in the brain of PD25 mice and the liver of all stages. Similarly, immature cerebellar neurons were sensitive to tunicamycin-induced cell death in culture, but became resistant as they matured in vitro. These results suggest that the UPR is developmentally regulated and the immature brain is more susceptible to ER stress. - Highlights: • Tunicamycin caused a development-dependent UPR in the mouse brain. • Immature brain was more susceptible to tunicamycin-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress. • Tunicamycin caused more neuronal death in immature brain than mature brain. • Tunicamycin-induced neuronal death is region-specific

  6. Tunicamycin-induced unfolded protein response in the developing mouse brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haiping; Wang, Xin [Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Ke, Zun-Ji [Department of Biochemistry, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 1200 Cailun Road, Shanghai 201203 (China); Comer, Ashley L.; Xu, Mei; Frank, Jacqueline A. [Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Luo, Jia, E-mail: jialuo888@uky.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes ER stress, resulting in the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). ER stress and UPR are associated with many neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. The developing brain is particularly susceptible to environmental insults which may cause ER stress. We evaluated the UPR in the brain of postnatal mice. Tunicamycin, a commonly used ER stress inducer, was administered subcutaneously to mice of postnatal days (PDs) 4, 12 and 25. Tunicamycin caused UPR in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum of mice of PD4 and PD12, which was evident by the upregulation of ATF6, XBP1s, p-eIF2α, GRP78, GRP94 and MANF, but failed to induce UPR in the brain of PD25 mice. Tunicamycin-induced UPR in the liver was observed at all stages. In PD4 mice, tunicamycin-induced caspase-3 activation was observed in layer II of the parietal and optical cortex, CA1–CA3 and the subiculum of the hippocampus, the cerebellar external germinal layer and the superior/inferior colliculus. Tunicamycin-induced caspase-3 activation was also shown on PD12 but to a much lesser degree and mainly located in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, deep cerebellar nuclei and pons. Tunicamycin did not activate caspase-3 in the brain of PD25 mice and the liver of all stages. Similarly, immature cerebellar neurons were sensitive to tunicamycin-induced cell death in culture, but became resistant as they matured in vitro. These results suggest that the UPR is developmentally regulated and the immature brain is more susceptible to ER stress. - Highlights: • Tunicamycin caused a development-dependent UPR in the mouse brain. • Immature brain was more susceptible to tunicamycin-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress. • Tunicamycin caused more neuronal death in immature brain than mature brain. • Tunicamycin-induced neuronal death is region-specific.

  7. Autoradiographic study of gamma-irradiated mouse spleen during primary immune response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gitsov, L.G.; Kyncheva, L.S.; Burneva, V.G.; Martinova, J.Sh.; Viklichka, S.

    1978-01-01

    Study on the kinetics of the cells in the mouse spleen during the primary immune response against thymusdependent antigen after sublethal irradiation was carried out. For this purpose the animals were immunized with sheep erythrocytes one day after their irradiation with 700 r gamma rays. On the 5th day after the immunization, tritium labelled thymidine was injected three times at two hourly intervals. Mice were killed two hours after the third injection for preparation of routine histological samples and autoradiographs. Immunized, but not irradiated mice were utilized as controls. Extensive zones of lymphocyte destruction were observed in the spleen of the irradiated mice - accumulation of picnotic lymphocyte nuclei, surrounded by reticulo-histocyte elements. The number of the labelled cells and the intensity of labelled are lower than that of the germinal centres in control animal. There is no marked cell destruction in the periarteriolar zone nor labelled cells, whereas in the controls there is a considerable number of labelled blast cells. In the red pulp of the irradiated animals islands of erythroblasts were found, whereas in the controls - parallely to the erythroblast islands, there are islands of proliferating lymphocytes and plasmocytes. The decrease of lymphocyte number in irradiated mice is connected with their destruction and with the altered lymphocytopoiesis in the red pulp. It is assumed that the observed preservation of the periarteriolar lymphatic sheaths in an expression of a higher radioresistance of the T-cells as compared to the B-cells in the white pulp. This study contributes for elucidation of the irradiation immunosuppressive effect. It points out also that the post-irradiation lymphopaenia is due not only to the cell death but also to the exclusion of part of the T-lymphocytes from the circulation and their selective deposition in the thymus-dependent zones of the peripheral lymphoid organs. (A.B.)

  8. Electronmicroscopic study of gamma irradiated mouse spleen during primary immune response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burneva, V.G.; Gitsov, L.G.; Boyadzhieva-Mikhajlova, A.; Kyncheva, L.S.; Viklichka, St.

    1978-01-01

    An electronmicroscopic study of the mouse spleen immunocompetent cells during the productive phase of the primary immune response after sublethal gamma ray irradiation is carried out. For this purpose the animals were immunized with sheep red blood cells 24 hours after irradiation and sacrified on the 5th day after immunization. The number of small lymphocytes is reduced in all zones of the spleen. Only in the periarteriolar area the lymphoid sheaths are well outlines and the ultrastructure of the cells preserved. Three types of reticulohistocytic elements, according to their radiosensitivity are observed. The most radioresistant cells are the fixed ''dark'' reticular cells which do not complete phagocytosis. The ultrastructure of their nucleus and cytoplasm is not damaged. The macrophages are also quite resistant. The ''light'' reticular cells are the most radiosensitive. The chromatine of their nuclei is dispersed. The mitochondria are imbibed, with a reduced number of cristae. The cytoplasm contains many electron light vesicles, different in size. The changes in the processes of the dendridic cells in the spleen lymph follicles are of particular interest. Compared with the control animals the processes of dendritic reticular cells are markedly reduced. The postirradiation ultrastructural changes of the spleen cells indicate that parallel with the basic factor (the death of a considerable part of the small lymphocytes, precursors of the antibody-synthetizing cells) the reduced antibody-formation is due also to the limited capacity for ''traping'' the antigen on the processes of the dendritic follicular cells and to the reduced capacity of the reticulo-histocytic cells for antigen phagocytosis. The later is determined both by the damage of a considerable part of the phagocytes (radiosensitive ''light'' reticulo-histocytic cells) and by the blocking of the functionally undamaged phagocytes from ingested debris. (K.M.)

  9. Space-type radiation induces multimodal responses in the mouse gut microbiome and metabolome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casero, David; Gill, Kirandeep; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Koturbash, Igor; Nelson, Gregory; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Boerma, Marjan; Braun, Jonathan; Cheema, Amrita K

    2017-08-18

    Space travel is associated with continuous low dose rate exposure to high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Pathophysiological manifestations after low dose radiation exposure are strongly influenced by non-cytocidal radiation effects, including changes in the microbiome and host gene expression. Although the importance of the gut microbiome in the maintenance of human health is well established, little is known about the role of radiation in altering the microbiome during deep-space travel. Using a mouse model for exposure to high LET radiation, we observed substantial changes in the composition and functional potential of the gut microbiome. These were accompanied by changes in the abundance of multiple metabolites, which were related to the enzymatic activity of the predicted metagenome by means of metabolic network modeling. There was a complex dynamic in microbial and metabolic composition at different radiation doses, suggestive of transient, dose-dependent interactions between microbial ecology and signals from the host's cellular damage repair processes. The observed radiation-induced changes in microbiota diversity and composition were analyzed at the functional level. A constitutive change in activity was found for several pathways dominated by microbiome-specific enzymatic reactions like carbohydrate digestion and absorption and lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis, while the activity in other radiation-responsive pathways like phosphatidylinositol signaling could be linked to dose-dependent changes in the abundance of specific taxa. The implication of microbiome-mediated pathophysiology after low dose ionizing radiation may be an unappreciated biologic hazard of space travel and deserves experimental validation. This study provides a conceptual and analytical basis of further investigations to increase our understanding of the chronic effects of space radiation on human health, and points to potential new targets for intervention in adverse radiation

  10. Reduced acoustic startle response and peripheral hearing loss in the 5xFAD mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, T P; Shin, S; Fertan, E; Dingle, R N; Almuklass, A; Gunn, R K; Yu, Z; Wang, J; Brown, R E

    2017-06-01

    Hearing dysfunction has been associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) in humans, but there is little data on the auditory function of mouse models of AD. Furthermore, characterization of hearing ability in mouse models is needed to ensure that tests of cognition that use auditory stimuli are not confounded by hearing dysfunction. Therefore, we assessed acoustic startle response and pre-pulse inhibition in the double transgenic 5xFAD mouse model of AD from 3-4 to 16 months of age. The 5xFAD mice showed an age-related decline in acoustic startle as early as 3-4 months of age. We subsequently tested auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds at 4 and 13-14 months of age using tone bursts at frequencies of 2-32 kHz. The 5xFAD mice showed increased ABR thresholds for tone bursts between 8 and 32 kHz at 13-14 months of age. Finally, cochleae were extracted and basilar membranes were dissected to count hair cell loss across the cochlea. The 5xFAD mice showed significantly greater loss of both inner and outer hair cells at the apical and basal ends of the basilar membrane than wild-type mice at 15-16 months of age. These results indicate that the 5xFAD mouse model of AD shows age-related decreases in acoustic startle responses, which are at least partially due to age-related peripheral hearing loss. Therefore, we caution against the use of cognitive tests that rely on audition in 5xFAD mice over 3-4 months of age, without first confirming that performance is not confounded by hearing dysfunction. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  11. EBI3 regulates the NK cell response to mouse cytomegalovirus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Helle; Chen, Shih-Yu; Folkersen, Lasse Westergaard

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are key mediators in the control of cytomegalovirus infection. Here, we show that Epstein-Barr virus-induced 3 (EBI3) is expressed by human NK cells after NKG2D or IL-12 plus IL-18 stimulation and by mouse NK cells during mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. The induc......Natural killer (NK) cells are key mediators in the control of cytomegalovirus infection. Here, we show that Epstein-Barr virus-induced 3 (EBI3) is expressed by human NK cells after NKG2D or IL-12 plus IL-18 stimulation and by mouse NK cells during mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection....... The induction of EBI3 protein expression in mouse NK cells is a late activation event. Thus, early activation events of NK cells, such as IFNγ production and CD69 expression, were not affected in EBI3-deficient (Ebi3-/-) C57BL/6 (B6) mice during MCMV infection. Furthermore, comparable levels of early viral...... replication in spleen and liver were observed in MCMV-infected Ebi3-/- and wild-type (WT) B6 mice. Interestingly, the viral load in salivary glands and oral lavage was strongly decreased in the MCMV-infected Ebi3-/- B6 mice, suggesting that EBI3 plays a role in the establishment of MCMV latency. We detected...

  12. Estrogen Responsiveness of the TFIID Subunit TAF4B in the Normal Mouse Ovary and in Ovarian Tumors1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardell, Jennifer R.; Hodgkinson, Kendra M.; Binder, April K.; Seymour, Kimberly A.; Korach, Kenneth S.; Vanderhyden, Barbara C.; Freiman, Richard N.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Estrogen signaling in the ovary is a fundamental component of normal ovarian function, and evidence also indicates that excessive estrogen is a risk factor for ovarian cancer. We have previously demonstrated that the gonadally enriched TFIID subunit TAF4B, a paralog of the general transcription factor TAF4A, is required for fertility in mice and for the proliferation of ovarian granulosa cells following hormonal stimulation. However, the relationship between TAF4B and estrogen signaling in the normal ovary or during ovarian tumor initiation and progression has yet to be defined. Herein, we show that Taf4b mRNA and TAF4B protein, but not Taf4a mRNA or TAF4A protein, are increased in whole ovaries and granulosa cells of the ovary after exposure to 17beta-estradiol or the synthetic estrogen diethylstilbestrol and that this response occurs within hours after stimulation. Furthermore, this increase occurs via nuclear estrogen receptors both in vivo and in a mouse granulosa cancer cell line, NT-1. We observe a significant increase in Taf4b mRNA in estrogen-supplemented mouse ovarian tumors, which correlates with diminished survival of these mice. These data highlight the novel response of the general transcription factor TAF4B to estrogen in the normal ovary and during ovarian tumor progression in the mouse, suggesting its potential role in regulating actions downstream of estrogen stimulation. PMID:24068106

  13. Estrogen responsiveness of the TFIID subunit TAF4B in the normal mouse ovary and in ovarian tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardell, Jennifer R; Hodgkinson, Kendra M; Binder, April K; Seymour, Kimberly A; Korach, Kenneth S; Vanderhyden, Barbara C; Freiman, Richard N

    2013-11-01

    Estrogen signaling in the ovary is a fundamental component of normal ovarian function, and evidence also indicates that excessive estrogen is a risk factor for ovarian cancer. We have previously demonstrated that the gonadally enriched TFIID subunit TAF4B, a paralog of the general transcription factor TAF4A, is required for fertility in mice and for the proliferation of ovarian granulosa cells following hormonal stimulation. However, the relationship between TAF4B and estrogen signaling in the normal ovary or during ovarian tumor initiation and progression has yet to be defined. Herein, we show that Taf4b mRNA and TAF4B protein, but not Taf4a mRNA or TAF4A protein, are increased in whole ovaries and granulosa cells of the ovary after exposure to 17beta-estradiol or the synthetic estrogen diethylstilbestrol and that this response occurs within hours after stimulation. Furthermore, this increase occurs via nuclear estrogen receptors both in vivo and in a mouse granulosa cancer cell line, NT-1. We observe a significant increase in Taf4b mRNA in estrogen-supplemented mouse ovarian tumors, which correlates with diminished survival of these mice. These data highlight the novel response of the general transcription factor TAF4B to estrogen in the normal ovary and during ovarian tumor progression in the mouse, suggesting its potential role in regulating actions downstream of estrogen stimulation.

  14. Protection from lethal infection is determined by innate immune responses in a mouse model of Ebola virus infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahanty, Siddhartha; Gupta, Manisha; Paragas, Jason; Bray, Mike; Ahmed, Rafi; Rollin, Pierre E.

    2003-01-01

    A mouse-adapted strain of Ebola Zaire virus produces a fatal infection when BALB/cj mice are infected intraperitoneally (ip) but subcutaneous (sc) infection with the same virus fails to produce illness and confers long-term protection from lethal ip rechallenge. To identify immune correlates of protection in this model, we compared viral replication and cytokine/chemokine responses to Ebola virus in mice infected ip (10 PFU/mouse), or sc (100 PFU/mouse) and sc 'immune' mice rechallenged ip (10 6 PFU/mouse) at several time points postinfection (pi). Ebola viral antigens were detected in the serum, liver, spleen, and kidneys of ip-infected mice by day 2 pi, increasing up to day 6. Sc-infected mice and immune mice rechallenged ip had no detectable viral antigens until day 6 pi, when low levels of viral antigens were detected in the livers of sc-infected mice only. TNF-α and MCP-1 were detected earlier and at significantly higher levels in the serum and tissues of ip-infected mice than in sc-infected or immune mice challenged ip. In contrast, high levels of IFN-α and IFN-γ were found in tissues within 2 days after challenge in sc-infected and immune mice but not in ip-infected mice. Mice became resistant to ip challenge within 48 h of sc infection, coinciding with the rise in tissue IFN-α levels. In this model of Ebola virus infection, the nonlethal sc route of infection is associated with an attenuated inflammatory response and early production of antiviral cytokines, particularly IFN-α, as compared with lethal ip infection

  15. The position of a standard optical computer mouse affects cardiorespiratory responses during the operation of a computer under time constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sako, Shunji; Sugiura, Hiromichi; Tanoue, Hironori; Kojima, Makoto; Kono, Mitsunobu; Inaba, Ryoichi

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated the association between task-induced stress and fatigue by examining the cardiovascular responses of subjects using different mouse positions while operating a computer under time constraints. The study was participated by 16 young, healthy men and examined the use of optical mouse devices affixed to laptop computers. Two mouse positions were investigated: (1) the distal position (DP), in which the subjects place their forearms on the desk accompanied by the abduction and flexion of their shoulder joints, and (2) the proximal position (PP), in which the subjects place only their wrists on the desk without using an armrest. The subjects continued each task for 16 min. We assessed differences in several characteristics according to mouse position, including expired gas values, autonomic nerve activities (based on cardiorespiratory responses), operating efficiencies (based on word counts), and fatigue levels (based on the visual analog scale - VAS). Oxygen consumption (VO(2)), the ratio of inspiration time to respiration time (T(i)/T(total)), respiratory rate (RR), minute ventilation (VE), and the ratio of expiration to inspiration (Te/T(i)) were significantly lower when the participants were performing the task in the DP than those obtained in the PP. Tidal volume (VT), carbon dioxide output rates (VCO(2)/VE), and oxygen extraction fractions (VO(2)/VE) were significantly higher for the DP than they were for the PP. No significant difference in VAS was observed between the positions; however, as the task progressed, autonomic nerve activities were lower and operating efficiencies were significantly higher for the DP than they were for the PP. Our results suggest that the DP has fewer effects on cardiorespiratory functions, causes lower levels of sympathetic nerve activity and mental stress, and produces a higher total workload than the PP. This suggests that the DP is preferable to the PP when operating a computer.

  16. The position of a standard optical computer mouse affects cardiorespiratory responses during the operation of a computer under time constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunji Sako

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study investigated the association between task-induced stress and fatigue by examining the cardiovascular responses of subjects using different mouse positions while operating a computer under time constraints. Material and Methods: The study was participated by 16 young, healthy men and examined the use of optical mouse devices affixed to laptop computers. Two mouse positions were investigated: (1 the distal position (DP, in which the subjects place their forearms on the desk accompanied by the abduction and flexion of their shoulder joints, and (2 the proximal position (PP, in which the subjects place only their wrists on the desk without using an armrest. The subjects continued each task for 16 min. We assessed differences in several characteristics according to mouse position, including expired gas values, autonomic nerve activities (based on cardiorespiratory responses, operating efficiencies (based on word counts, and fatigue levels (based on the visual analog scale – VAS. Results: Oxygen consumption (VO2, the ratio of inspiration time to respiration time (Ti/Ttotal, respiratory rate (RR, minute ventilation (VE, and the ratio of expiration to inspiration (Te/Ti were significantly lower when the participants were performing the task in the DP than those obtained in the PP. Tidal volume (VT, carbon dioxide output rates (VCO2/VE, and oxygen extraction fractions (VO2/VE were significantly higher for the DP than they were for the PP. No significant difference in VAS was observed between the positions; however, as the task progressed, autonomic nerve activities were lower and operating efficiencies were significantly higher for the DP than they were for the PP. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the DP has fewer effects on cardiorespiratory functions, causes lower levels of sympathetic nerve activity and mental stress, and produces a higher total workload than the PP. This suggests that the DP is preferable to the PP when

  17. Study of mouse behavioural response in microgravity: ethogram and neurobiological related

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santucci, Daniela; Francia, Nadia; Schwartz, Silvia; Biticchi, Roberta; Liu, Yi; Cancedda, Ranieri; Aloe, Luigi

    The conquest of space, which started with the dog Laika in 1966 to be followed few years later by Yuri Gagarin, has witnessed an increasing numbers of both vertebrates (tadpoles, frogs, rats mice etc.) and invertebrates (flies, scorpions, protozoa) species exposed to zero gravity levels. Animals are sent into orbit to proactively foresee possible health problems in humans. The issue of animal exposure to un-physiological gravity is of primary importance to i) understand behavioural and physiological adaptations in such environment as well as ii) develop coun-termeasures to improve 0-g life conditions and reduce possible animal suffering. The Mouse Drawer System (MDS), an Italian facility, has been transferred to the International Space Sta-tion with a first experiment investigating mechanisms underlying bone mass loss in microgravity in mice. Preliminary and ground-based control experiments have been conducted with six mice housed individually inside the MDS facility for 20 and 100 days. The behavioural repertoire of wild-type and transgenic mice housed in the MDS has been videorecorded with the observation subsystem, which allows to monitor animal's behavior through the use of 6 video cameras. The behavioural patterns characterizing mice in the MDS system have been finely analysed at several time points during the the experiment. Moreover, neurobiological parameters, known to be involved in the response to stress, have been evaluated. In particular, NGF and BDNF levels have been measured in the central nervous system (hippocampus, striatum, and cortex), adrenal gland and limbs. Preliminary data from ground based experiment revealed Several dif-ferences in behavioural profile between wt and tg mice, with transgenic ones apparently more active than wild type controls. Moreover a clear difference in time spent in different areas of the MDS cage was observed. Finally changes in neurotrophins levels were observed in relation to both genotype and environmental

  18. Dose-response study of the hematological toxicity induced by vectorized radionuclides in a mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousseau-Poivet, J.; Sas, N.; Nguyen, F.; Abadie, J.; Chouin, N.; Barbet, J.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Aim: in internal radiotherapy, the dose-limiting factor is often the bone marrow (BM) toxicity. In patients, its relationship with the BM absorbed dose seems to be elusive. Most probable reasons are the BM depletion following previous treatments associated to dose assessment complexity. To avoid this and better understand myelotoxicity mechanisms, we investigated hematopoiesis from BM to blood after radionuclide injections in healthy mice associated to individual BM dosimetry. Based on these data, a compartmental model was developed to predict the depletion of each mouse hematopoietic cell in a dose-dependent manner. Materials and methods: C57/Bl6 mice were injected with increasing activities of 18 FNa, an osteo-tropic agent. Mean absorbed doses to the BM were calculated using the MIRD formalism with the mineralized bone considered as the principal source of 18 FNa. Time-integrated activities within the skeleton were derived from dynamic micro PET-CT images. Hematological toxicity was monitored via blood cell counts and myeloid progenitor colony assays over time after injection. The myelotoxicity model consists in compartments for each hematopoietic cell. Its parameters were adjusted to reproduce experimental toxicities. Results: for an absorbed dose to the BM of 0.8 ± 0.1 Gy, myeloid progenitors showed a 84% depletion 84% at day 7 post-injection (D7) and a recovery at D14 for all precursors and D21 for the less differentiated progenitor. In blood, neutrocytopenia was observed at D3 (80% decrease) and recovered at D7. Thrombocytopenia was also noticed between D7 and D17 with a nadir at D7 (26% of depletion). The compartmental model predicted platelets kinetics in a satisfying manner. The nadir value, time to nadir and time to recovery were estimated with errors of 4.9%, 10.2% and 10% respectively. Whereas higher absorbed doses only increased platelets depletion (62% associated to 1.4 Gy), they extended the recovery time for all

  19. ART culture conditions change the probability of mouse embryo gestation through defined cellular and molecular responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwarzer, Caroline; Esteves, Telma Cristina; Arau´zo-Bravo, Marcos J.; le Gac, Severine; Nordhoff, Verena; Schlatt, Stefan; Boiani, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Do different human ART culture protocols prepare embryos differently for post-implantation development? ... Our data promote awareness that human ART culture media affect embryo development. Effects reported here in the mouse may apply also in human, because no ART medium presently available on the

  20. Characterization of calcium responses and electrical activity in differentiating mouse neural progenitor cells in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Martje W G D M; Dingemans, Milou M L; Rus, Katinka H; de Groot, Aart; Westerink, Remco H S

    In vitro methods for developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) testing have the potential to reduce animal use and increase insight into cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying chemical-induced alterations in the development of functional neuronal networks. Mouse neural progenitor cells (mNPCs)

  1. Immunological characteristics and response to lipopolysaccharide of mouse lines selectively bred with natural and acquired immunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narahara, Hiroki; Sakai, Eri; Katayama, Masafumi; Ohtomo, Yukiko; Yamamoto, Kanako; Takemoto, Miki; Aso, Hisashi; Ohwada, Shyuichi; Mohri, Yasuaki; Nishimori, Katsuhiko; Isogai, Emiko; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Fukuda, Tomokazu

    2012-05-01

    Genetic improvement of resistance to infectious diseases is a challenging goal in animal breeding. Infection resistance involves multiple immunological characteristics, including natural and acquired immunity. In the present study, we developed an experimental model based on genetic selection, to improve immunological phenotypes. We selectively established three mouse lines based on phagocytic activity, antibody production and the combination of these two phenotypes. We analyzed the immunological characteristics of these lines using a lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which is one of the main components of Gram-negative bacteria. An intense immunological reaction was induced in each of the three mouse lines. Severe loss of body weight and liver damage were observed, and a high level of cytokine messenger RNA was detected in the liver tissue. The mouse line established using a combination of the two selection standards showed unique characteristics relative to the mouse lines selected on the basis of a single phenotype. Our results indicate that genetic selection and breeding is effective, even for immunological phenotypes with a relatively low heritability. Thus, it may be possible to improve resistance to infectious diseases by means of genetic selection. © 2011 The Authors. Animal Science Journal © 2011 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  2. Subspecies-specific response to ACTH challenge test in the house mouse (Mus musculus)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Daniszová, Kristina; Mikula, O.; Macholán, M.; Pospíšilová, I.; Vošlajerová Bímová, Barbora; Hiadlovská, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 252, October (2017), s. 186-192 ISSN 0016-6480 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP506/11/1792 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : ACTH challenge * Endocrine activity * Corticosterone * Hormone metabolites * Mouse * Noninvasive monitoring Subject RIV: EG - Zoology OBOR OECD: Zoology Impact factor: 2.585, year: 2016

  3. Tissue specific mutagenic and carcinogenic responses in NER defective mouse models.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnhoven, Susan W P; Hoogervorst, Esther M; Waard, Harm de; Horst, Gijsbertus T J van der; Steeg, Harry van

    2007-01-01

    Several mouse models with defects in genes encoding components of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway have been developed. In NER two different sub-pathways are known, i.e. transcription-coupled repair (TC-NER) and global-genome repair (GG-NER). A defect in one particular NER protein can

  4. STRAIN-SPECIFIC BEHAVIORAL-RESPONSE TO ENVIRONMENTAL ENRICHMENT IN THE MOUSE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDEWEERD, HA; BAUMANS, [No Value; KOOLHAAS, JM; VANZUTPHEN, LFM

    The influence of environmental enrichment on the behaviour of the mouse has been studied in two inbred strains (C57BL and BALB/c). Male mice of each of the two strains were subjected to behavioural tests after being housed for two months either under standard housing conditions or in an enriched

  5. Interval for the expression of the adaptive response induced by gamma radiation in leucocytes of mouse In vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendiola C, M.T.; Morales R, P.

    2002-01-01

    The interval between the adaptive gamma radiation dose (0.01 Gy) and challenge (1.0 Gy) capable to induce the maximum expression of the adaptive response in lymphocytes of mouse In vivo. The animals were exposed to the mentioned doses with different intervals among both (1, 1.5, 5 or 18 hr). By means of the unicellular electrophoresis in gel technique, four damage parameters were analysed. The results showed that from the 1 hr interval an adaptive response was produced since in the pretreated organisms with 0.01 Gy the cells present lesser damage than in those not adapted. The maximum response was induced with the intervals between 2.5 and 5 hr and even though it persisted until 18 hr, the effect was reducing. (Author)

  6. Subspecies-specific response to ACTH challenge test in the house mouse (Mus musculus)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Daniszová, K.; Mikula, Ondřej; Macholán, Miloš; Pospíšilová, I.; Vošlajerová Bímová, Barbora; Hiadlovská, Zuzana

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 252, October (2017), s. 186-192 ISSN 0016-6480 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP506/11/1792 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : ACTH challenge * endocrine activity * corticosterone * hormone metabolities * mouse * noninvasive monitoring Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology OBOR OECD: Biology (theoretical, mathematical, thermal, cryobiology, biological rhythm), Evolutionary biology Impact factor: 2.585, year: 2016

  7. Hypoxia-response plasmid vector producing bcl-2 shRNA enhances the apoptotic cell death of mouse rectum carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Takashi; Matsunaga, Naoya; Okazaki, Hiroyuki; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia-induced gene expression frequently occurs in malignant solid tumors because they often have hypoxic areas in which circulation is compromised due to structurally disorganized blood vessels. Hypoxia-response elements (HREs) are responsible for activating gene transcription in response to hypoxia. In this study, we constructed a hypoxia-response plasmid vector producing short hairpin RNA (shRNA) against B-cell leukemia/lymphoma-2 (bcl-2), an anti-apoptotic factor. The hypoxia-response promoter was made by inserting tandem repeats of HREs upstream of cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter (HRE-CMV). HRE-CMV shbcl-2 vector consisted of bcl-2 shRNA under the control of HRE-CMV promoter. In hypoxic mouse rectum carcinoma cells (colon-26), the production of bcl-2 shRNA driven by HRE-CMV promoter was approximately 2-fold greater than that driven by CMV promoter. A single intratumoral (i.t.) injection of 40 microg HRE-CMV shbcl-2 to colon-26 tumor-bearing mice caused apoptotic cell death, and repetitive treatment with HRE-CMV shbcl-2 (40 microg/mouse, i.t.) also significantly suppressed the growth of colon-26 tumor cells implanted in mice. Apoptotic and anti-tumor effects were not observed in tumor-bearing mice treated with CMV shbcl-2. These results reveal the ability of HRE-CMV shbcl-2 vector to suppress the expression of bcl-2 in hypoxic tumor cells and suggest the usefulness of our constructed hypoxia-response plasmid vector to treat malignant tumors. [Supplementary Figures: available only at http://dx.doi.org/10.1254/jphs.10054FP].

  8. MINOR HUMAN-ANTIBODY RESPONSE TO A MOUSE AND CHIMERIC MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODY AFTER A SINGLE IV INFUSION IN OVARIAN-CARCINOMA PATIENTS - A COMPARISON OF 5 ASSAYS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BUIST, MR; KENEMANS, P; VANKAMP, GJ; Haisma, Hidde

    The human anti-(mouse Ig) antibody (HAMA) response was measured in serum of 52 patients suspected of having ovarian carcinoma who had received an i.v. injection of either the murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) OV-TL 3 F(ab')(2) (n = 28, 1 mg) or the chimeric mouse/human mAb MOv18 (cMOv18; n = 24, 3

  9. Minor human antibody response to a mouse and chimeric monoclonal antibody after a single i.v. infusion in ovarian carcinoma patients: a comparison of five assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buist, M. R.; Kenemans, P.; van Kamp, G. J.; Haisma, H. J.

    1995-01-01

    The human anti-(mouse Ig) antibody (HAMA) response was measured in serum of 52 patients suspected of having ovarian carcinoma who had received an i.v. injection of either the murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) OV-TL 3 F(ab')2 (n = 28, 1 mg) or the chimeric mouse/human mAb MOv18 (cMOv18; n = 24, 3 mg).

  10. Cerebral hemodynamic responses to seizure in the mouse brain: simultaneous near-infrared spectroscopy-electroencephalography study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungduk; Lee, Mina; Koh, Dalkwon; Kim, Beop-Min; Choi, Jee Hyun

    2010-05-01

    We applied near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and electroencephalography (EEG) simultaneously on the mouse brain and investigated the hemodynamic response to epileptic episodes under pharmacologically driven seizure. γ-butyrolactone (GBL) and 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) were applied to induce absence and tonic-clonic seizures, respectively. The epileptic episodes were identified from the single-channel EEG, and the corresponding hemodynamic changes in different regions of the brain were characterized by multichannel frequency-domain NIRS. Our results are the following: (i) the oxyhemoglobin level increases in the case of GBL-treated mice but not 4-AP-treated mice compared to the predrug state; (ii) the dominant response to each absence seizure is a decrease in deoxyhemolobin; (iii) the phase shift between oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin reduces in GBL-treated mice but no 4-AP-treated mice; and (iv) the spatial correlation of hemodynamics increased significantly in 4-AP-treated mice but not in GBL-treated mice. Our results shows that spatiotemporal tracking of cerebral hemodynamics using NIRS can be successfully applied to the mouse brain in conjunction with electrophysiological recording, which will support the study of molecular, cellular, and network origin of neurovascular coupling in vivo.

  11. Abnormal GABAA-mediated metabolic response in the MDX mouse - an explanation for the mental deficit in Duchenne muscular dystrophy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rae, C.; Bubb, W.A.; Maitland, A.; Head, S.I.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Duchenne muscular dystrophy is an X-linked disorder associated with lack of the 728 kDa protein dystrophin. In addition to the well-known muscle wasting, sufferers also experience a 15 point downshift in IQ. Recently reduced clustering of GABA A receptors in cerebellar Purkinje and hippocampal CA1 neurons has been shown in the murine homologue of DMD, the mdx mouse. In this work, the functional efficacy of GABA A receptors in mdx mice (C57B1/10Sc-Sn-mdx) and control was tested by examining the metabolism of [1- 13 C]D-glucose under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions and also by examining the metabolic response to the GABA A agonist muscimol (5-aminomethyl-3-hydroxyisoxazole). Although total measured [ 13 C] was identical in mdx cf. control mice, the fractional enrichment of all metabolites was increased in mdx mice, suggesting decreased inhibitory input in these animals. Further, although flux into metabolites from [1- 13 C]D-glucose decreased as expected in control mice in the presence of muscimol, the GABA a agonist had weaker effect in mdx mice, consistent with weaker GABA A activation. Finally, the response of mdx mouse brain tissue slices to mild hypoxia (partially mediated by GABA A ) was altered cf. control mice, with increased production of lactate and decreased flux into Krebs cycle intermediates. These data are consistent with a functional lesion of a subset of GABA A receptors in DMD

  12. Mouse preimplantation embryo responses to culture medium osmolarity include increased expression of CCM2 and p38 MAPK activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watson Andrew J

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanisms that confer an ability to respond positively to environmental osmolarity are fundamental to ensuring embryo survival during the preimplantation period. Activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK occurs following exposure to hyperosmotic treatment. Recently, a novel scaffolding protein called Osmosensing Scaffold for MEKK3 (OSM was linked to p38 MAPK activation in response to sorbitol-induced hypertonicity. The human ortholog of OSM is cerebral cavernous malformation 2 (CCM2. The present study was conducted to investigate whether CCM2 is expressed during mouse preimplantation development and to determine whether this scaffolding protein is associated with p38 MAPK activation following exposure of preimplantation embryos to hyperosmotic environments. Results Our results indicate that Ccm2 along with upstream p38 MAPK pathway constituents (Map3k3, Map2k3, Map2k6, and Map2k4 are expressed throughout mouse preimplantation development. CCM2, MAP3K3 and the phosphorylated forms of MAP2K3/MAP2K6 and MAP2K4 were also detected throughout preimplantation development. Embryo culture in hyperosmotic media increased p38 MAPK activity in conjunction with elevated CCM2 levels. Conclusion These results define the expression of upstream activators of p38 MAPK during preimplantation development and indicate that embryo responses to hyperosmotic environments include elevation of CCM2 and activation of p38 MAPK.

  13. Enhancement of cell-cell contact by a nonmitogenic lectin increases blastogenic response and IL-2 release by mitogen-stimulated mouse thymocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favero, J; Marti, J; Dornand, J; Bonnafous, J C; Mani, J C

    1986-03-01

    We have examined the influence of peanut agglutinin (PNA), a lectin which agglutinates but does not stimulate mouse thymocytes, on the responsiveness of these cells to concanavalin A (Con A) or galactose oxidase stimulation. Binding low amounts of PNA on unseparated mouse thymocytes pretreated with neuraminidase highly enhances the mitogenic response and the level of interleukin 2 release in the culture medium upon Con A stimulation. We have shown that PNA present on the cell surface acts as a crosslinking agent which favors intercellular binding between accessory cells (macrophages) and thymocytes, leading through this enhanced cooperation by cell-cell contact to an enhanced blastogenic response.

  14. Response of mouse foetus to radiation from Na sup(99m)TcO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lathrop, K.A.; Gloria, I.V.; Harper, P.V.

    1976-01-01

    Technetium has assumed ecological importance as a source of law-level radiation, with the use of sup(99m)Tc in nuclear medicine and production of sup(99m)Tc in power generation reactions. Technetium introduced as pertechnetate into the bloodstream of pregnant females is transported across the placental barrier to the foetus, where a portion appears to be incorporated into biomolecules. When combined as biomolecules, radionuclides that decay by electron capture or isomeric transition show a lethality greater than that predicted in cell cultures and radiation therapy. The decay of sup(99m)Tc by isomeric transition, together with the above considerations, places a high priority on the investigation of its radiation effects due to clinical doses of up to 25 mCi. Female mice were given daily intravenous injections of 0, 5, 50 and 500 μCi of sup(99m)Tc as pertechnetate in isotonic saline throughout gestation, gestation and lactation, or lactation. At two months of age, the progeny were mated with randomly selected litter mates to produce a second generation; the process was repeated for production of the third generation. Only the first generation was irradiated. An injection of 5 μCi/mouse and 10 mCi/human both approximately equal 0.2 μCi/g of body weight; however, the mouse foetus receives an estimated radiation dose of 0.05 rad, and the human 1 rad. Throughout the gestation period, a mouse at the 5 μCi level receives about 100 μCi of sup(99m)Tc, resulting in approximately 1 rad to the foetus. Significant reduction of body weight was noted in all experimental groups. The greatest effects were seen in the progeny of mothers treated during gestation only. These preliminary results reinforce the existing concern about use of sup(99m)Tc-pertechnetate in pregnant or potentially pregnant subjects

  15. Radiation response of mouse lymphoid and myeloid cell lines. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, I.R.

    1994-01-01

    The sensitivity of 10 mouse lymphoid or myeloid cell lines to γ-ray- and DNA-associated 125 I-decay-induced clonogenic cell killing have been compared with their rate of loss of viability (membrane integrity) and with their putative cell type of origin. The increased sensitivity of haematopoietic cell lines to killing by DNA dsb may be related to their mode of death (apoptosis versus necrosis). Mode of cell death may thus be an important factor in determining the 'inherent radiosensitivity' of normal cells/tissues. Haematopoietic cell lines that undergo rapid interphase apoptotic death showed extreme sensitivity to DNA dsb. (author)

  16. A prenatal nicotine exposure mouse model of methylphenidate responsive ADHD-associated cognitive phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinmin; Fan, Fangfang; McCarthy, Deirdre M; Zhang, Lin; Cannon, Elisa N; Spencer, Thomas J; Biederman, Joseph; Bhide, Pradeep G

    2017-05-01

    Prenatal exposure to nicotine via cigarette smoke or other forms of tobacco use is a significant environmental risk factor for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The neurobiological mechanisms underlying the link between prenatal nicotine exposure (PNE) and ADHD are not well understood. Animal models, especially rodent models, are beginning to bridge this gap in knowledge. Although ADHD is characterized by hyperactivity, inattention, impulsivity and working memory deficits, the majority of the animal models are based on only one or two ADHD associated phenotypes, in particular, hyperactivity or inattention. We report a PNE mouse model that displays the full range of ADHD associated behavioral phenotypes including working memory deficit, attention deficit and impulsive-like behavior. All of the ADHD-associated phenotypes respond to a single administration of a therapeutic equivalent dose of methylphenidate. In an earlier study, we showed that PNE produces hyperactivity, frontal cortical hypodopaminergic state and thinning of the cingulate cortex. Collectively, these data suggest that the PNE mouse model recapitulates key features of ADHD and may be a suitable preclinical model for ADHD research. Copyright © 2017 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Unconventional transcriptional response to environmental enrichment in a mouse model of Rett syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bredford Kerr

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rett syndrome (RTT is an X-linked postnatal neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2 and one of the leading causes of mental retardation in females. RTT is characterized by psychomotor retardation, purposeless hand movements, autistic-like behavior and abnormal gait. We studied the effects of environmental enrichment (EE on the phenotypic manifestations of a RTT mouse model that lacks MeCP2 (Mecp2(-/y. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that EE delayed and attenuated some neurological alterations presented by Mecp2(-/y mice and prevented the development of motor discoordination and anxiety-related abnormalities. To define the molecular correlate of this beneficial effect of EE, we analyzed the expression of several synaptic marker genes whose expression is increased by EE in several mouse models. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We found that EE induced downregulation of several synaptic markers, suggesting that the partial prevention of RTT-associated phenotypes is achieved through a non-conventional transcriptional program.

  18. Essential oil from leaves of Liquidambar formosana ameliorates inflammatory response in lipopolysaccharide-activated mouse macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Kuo-Feng; Yang, Tzu-Jung; Chiu, Huan-Wen; Ho, Chen-Lung

    2014-06-01

    The essential oil from Liquidambar formosana leaves (EOLF) was demonstrated to exhibit anti-inflammatory activity in mouse macrophages. EOLF reduced nitrite oxide generation, secretion levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6, and expression levels of prointerleukin-beta, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and cyclooxygenase-2 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated mouse macrophages. EOLF also reduced NLRP3 inflammasome-derived interleukin-1beta secretion. The underlying mechanisms for the EOLF-mediated anti-inflammatory activity were (1) reduction of LPS-induced reactive oxygen species generation; (2) reduction of LPS-induced activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and p38 MAP kinase; (3) reduction of LPS-induced nuclear factor-kappaBeta activation. Furthermore, 25 compounds were identified in the EOLF using GC-FID and GC-MS and the major compounds were terpinen-4-ol (32.0%), beta-pinene (18.0%), gamma-terpinene (13.8%), and alpha-terpinene (9.7%). We found that LPS-induced nitrite oxide generation was inhibited significantly by terpinen-4-ol. Our results indicated that EOLF has anti-inflammatory activity and may provide a molecular rationale for future therapeutic interventions in immune modulation.

  19. Connective tissue growth factor/CCN2-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts retain intact transforming growth factor-β responsiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Yasuji; Hinchcliff, Monique; Wu, Minghua; Warner-Blankenship, Matthew; Lyons, Karen M.; Varga, John

    2008-01-01

    Background: The matricellular protein connective tissue growth factor (CCN2) has been implicated in pathological fibrosis, but its physiologic role remains elusive. In vitro, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) induces CCN2 expression in mesenchymal cells. Because CCN2 can enhance profibrotic responses elicited by TGF-β, it has been proposed that CCN2 functions as an essential downstream signaling mediator for TGF-β. To explore this notion, we characterized TGF-β-induced activation of fibroblasts from CCN2-null (CCN2 -/- ) mouse embryos. Methods: The regulation of CCN2 expression was examined in vivo in a model of fibrosis induced by bleomycin. Cellular TGF-β signal transduction and regulation of collagen gene expression were examined in CCN2 -/- MEFs by immunohistochemistry, Northern, Western and RT-PCR analysis, immunocytochemistry and transient transfection assays. Results: Bleomycin-induced skin fibrosis in the mouse was associated with substantial CCN2 up-regulation in lesional fibroblasts. Whereas in vitro proliferation rate of CCN2 -/- MEFs was markedly reduced compared to wild type MEFs, TGF-β-induced activation of the Smad pathways, including Smad2 phosphorylation, Smad2/3 and Smad4 nuclear accumulation and Smad-dependent transcriptional responses, were unaffected by loss of CCN2. The stimulation of COL1A2 and fibronectin mRNA expression and promoter activity, and of corresponding protein levels, showed comparable time and dose-response in wild type and CCN2 -/- MEFs, whereas stimulation of alpha smooth muscle actin and myofibroblast transdifferentiation showed subtle impairment in MEFs lacking CCN2. Conclusion: Whereas endogenous CCN2 plays a role in regulation of proliferation and TGF-β-induced myofibroblast transdifferentiation, it appears to be dispensable for Smad-dependent stimulation of collagen and extracellular matrix synthesis in murine embryonic fibroblasts

  20. PPARg mRNA in the adult mouse hypothalamus: distribution and regulation in response to dietary challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang eLiu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARg is a ligand-activated transcription factor that was originally identified as a regulator of peroxisome proliferation and adipocyte differentiation. Emerging evidence suggests that functional PPARg signaling also occurs within the hypothalamus. However, the exact distribution and identities of PPARg-expressing hypothalamic cells remains under debate. The present study systematically mapped PPARg mRNA expression in the adult mouse brain using in situ hybridization histochemistry. PPARg mRNA was found to be expressed at high levels outside the hypothalamus including the neocortex, the olfactory bulb, the organ of the vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, and the subfornical organ. Within the hypothalamus, PPARg was present at moderate levels in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and the ependymal of the 3rd ventricle. In all examined feeding-related hypothalamic nuclei, PPARg was expressed at very low levels that were close to the limit of detection. Using qPCR techniques, we demonstrated that PPARg mRNA expression was upregulated in the suprachiasmatic nucleus in response to fasting. Double in situ hybridization further demonstrated that PPARg was primarily expressed in neurons. Collectively, our observations provide a comprehensive map of PPARg distribution and regulation in the intact adult mouse hypothalamus.

  1. A mouse air pouch model for evaluating the immune response to Taenia crassiceps infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Emanuelle B; Sakai, Yuriko I; Gaspari, Elizabeth De

    2014-02-01

    The experimental system of Taenia crassiceps cysticerci infection in BALB/c mice is considered to be the most representative model of cysticercosis. In our work, mice were sacrificed 7 and 30days after infection, and pouch fluid was collected to determine the number of accumulated cells and the concentrations of IFNγ, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10 and nitric oxide. The injection of 50 nonbudding cysticerci into normal mouse dorsal air pouches induced a high level of IFNγ and nitric oxide production relative to the parasite load. The air pouch provides a convenient cavity that allows studying the cellular immunological aspects of the T. crassiceps parasite. The nonbudding cysticerci recovered from the air pouches contained cells that can reconstitute complete cysts in the peritoneal cavity of mice. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that the air pouch model is an alternative tool for the evaluation of the immune characteristics of T. crassiceps infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Radiation response of mouse lymphoid and myeloid cell lines. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, I.R.; Murphy, T.K.

    1994-01-01

    The authors have examined the timing of γ-irradiation-induced death in relation to cell cycle progression using a panel of mouse lymphoid or myeloid cell lines. Death was found to occur immediately after irradiation ('rapid interphase' death), or after arrest in G 2 phase ('delayed interphase' death), or following one or more mitoses ('mitotic/delayed mitotic' death). In part II of this series of papers the authors demonstrated the occurrence of radiation-induced apoptosis in all these cell lines. Several of the cell lines showed different timing of death dependent upon the radiation dose used. These differences in the timing of radiation-induced death are shown to be useful indicators of the relative radiosensitivity of haematopoietic cell lines. (author)

  3. The response of mouse skin to re-irradiation with x-rays or fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukiyama, Iwao; Egawa, Sunao; Kumazawa, Akiyoshi; Iino, Yuu.

    1986-01-01

    Effects of neutrons and x-rays on mouse skin which had been previously irradiated with x-rays were investigated. Two tattoo marks were placed in the hairless legs of mice at intervals of 15 mm. The legs were exposed to various doses of x-ray and neutrons to determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) using the contraction of the skin as an index. The RBE was 0.93 - 1.73. The legs of the mice were preexposed to 25 Gy of x-ray, and exposed 4 months later. The contraction of the skin began earlier than after the first irradiation. RBE was 2.18 - 2.47. This RBE was higher than that in untreated mice. These results suggest that previously irradiated normal tissues are much more sensitive to neutrons than to x-rays. (author)

  4. Fluoxetine Maintains a State of Heightened Responsiveness to Motor Training Early After Stroke in a Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kwan L; Gibson, Ellen M; Hubbard, Robert; Yang, Juemin; Caffo, Brian; O'Brien, Richard J; Krakauer, John W; Zeiler, Steven R

    2015-10-01

    Data from both humans and animal models suggest that most recovery from motor impairment after stroke occurs in a sensitive period that lasts only weeks and is mediated, in part, by an increased responsiveness to training. Here, we used a mouse model of focal cortical stroke to test 2 hypotheses. First, we investigated whether responsiveness to training decreases over time after stroke. Second, we tested whether fluoxetine, which can influence synaptic plasticity and stroke recovery, can prolong the period over which large training-related gains can be elicited after stroke. Mice were trained to perform a skilled prehension task to an asymptotic level of performance after which they underwent stroke induction in the caudal forelimb area. The mice were then retrained after a 1- or 7-day delay with and without fluoxetine. Recovery of prehension after a caudal forelimb area stroke was complete if training was initiated 1 day after stroke but incomplete if it was delayed by 7 days. In contrast, if fluoxetine was administered at 24 hours after stroke, then complete recovery of prehension was observed even with the 7-day training delay. Fluoxetine seemed to mediate its beneficial effect by reducing inhibitory interneuron expression in intact premotor cortex rather than through effects on infarct volume or cell death. There is a gradient of diminishing responsiveness to motor training over the first week after stroke. Fluoxetine can overcome this gradient and maintain maximal levels of responsiveness to training even 7 days after stroke. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Evaluation of 60Co radiation effect in the survival of different mouse strains. Radiomodifiers and celular response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villavicencio, A.L.C.H.

    1988-01-01

    The radiomodifier capacity of proteose-peptone (PP), imidazole derivatives such as azomycin and levamisole against an 8 or 9 Gy single dose of 60 Co irradiation of mice from IPEN animal house was evaluated, being the biological responses compared with other mouse strains. It is concluded that PP, azomycin and PP + azomycin behaved as radioprotectors, while lavamisole appeared as a radiossensitizer. The various strains showed differences in their survival indexes. The changes in body weight curves of mice from all the experiments were followed during 30 days. Qualitative and quantitative analysis 2 hours, 3 and 6 days after irradiation of typical macrophages, mononuclear cells (monocytes and lymphocytes), polimorphonuclear and mast cells from peritonium of test animals showed that radiation interfered in a differential way in the kinetics of peritoneal cells. (author) [pt

  6. Differential gene expression profiling of mouse skin after sulfur mustard exposure: Extended time response and inhibitor effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerecke, Donald R.; Chen Minjun; Isukapalli, Sastry S.; Gordon, Marion K.; Chang, Y.-C.; Tong Weida; Androulakis, Ioannis P.; Georgopoulos, Panos G.

    2009-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (HD, SM), is a chemical warfare agent that within hours causes extensive blistering at the dermal-epidermal junction of skin. To better understand the progression of SM-induced blistering, gene expression profiling for mouse skin was performed after a single high dose of SM exposure. Punch biopsies of mouse ears were collected at both early and late time periods following SM exposure (previous studies only considered early time periods). The biopsies were examined for pathological disturbances and the samples further assayed for gene expression profiling using the Affymetrix microarray analysis system. Principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis of the differently expressed genes, performed with ArrayTrack showed clear separation of the various groups. Pathway analysis employing the KEGG library and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) indicated that cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), and hematopoietic cell lineage are common pathways affected at different time points. Gene ontology analysis identified the most significantly altered biological processes as the immune response, inflammatory response, and chemotaxis; these findings are consistent with other reported results for shorter time periods. Selected genes were chosen for RT-PCR verification and showed correlations in the general trends for the microarrays. Interleukin 1 beta was checked for biological analysis to confirm the presence of protein correlated to the corresponding microarray data. The impact of a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, MMP-2/MMP-9 inhibitor I, against SM exposure was assessed. These results can help in understanding the molecular mechanism of SM-induced blistering, as well as to test the efficacy of different inhibitors

  7. The development and characterization of two types of chronic responses in irradiated mouse colon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Followill, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    The hypothesis to be tested is that there are two distinct types of chronic responses in irradiated normal tissues, each resulting from damage to different cell populations in the tissue. The first is a sequela of chronic epithelial depletion in which the tissue's integrity cannot be maintained. The other response is due to cell loss in the connective tissue and/or vascular stroma, i.e. a 'primary' chronic response. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis in the murine colon by first, establishing a model of each chronic response and then, by determining whether the responses differed in timing of expression, histology, and expression of specific collagen types. The model of late damage used was colonic obstructions/strictures induced by a single dose of 27 Gy ('consequential' response) and two equal doses of 14.75 Gy (t = 10 days) ('primary' response). 'Consequential' lesions appeared as early as 5 weeks after 27 Gy and were characterized by a deep mucosal ulceration and a thickened fibrotic serosa containing excessive accumulations of collagen types I and III. Both types were commingled in the scar at the base of the ulcer. Fibroblasts were synthesizing pro-collagen types I and III mRNA 10 weeks prior to measurable increases in collagen. A significant decrease in the ratio of collagen types I:III was associated with the 'consequential' response at 4-5 months post-irradiation. The 'primary' response, on the other hand, did not appear until 40 weeks after the split dose even though the total dose delivered was approximately the same as that for the 'consequential' response. The 'primary' response was characterized with an intact mucosa and a thickened fibrotic submucosa which contained excessive amounts of only collagen type I. An increased number of fibroblasts were synthesizing pro-collagen type I mRNA nearly 25 weeks before collage type I levels were increased

  8. Quantitative Methods for Measuring Repair Rates and Innate-Immune Cell Responses in Wounded Mouse Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Gothard, Elizabeth; Coles, Mark C; Ambler, Carrie A

    2018-01-01

    In skin wounds, innate-immune cells clear up tissue debris and microbial contamination, and also secrete cytokines and other growth factors that impact repair process such as re-epithelialization and wound closure. After injury, there is a rapid influx and efflux of immune cells at wound sites, yet the function of each innate cell population in skin repair is still under investigation. Flow cytometry is a valuable research tool for detecting and quantifying immune cells; however, in mouse back skin, the difficulty in extracting immune cells from small area of skin due to tissue complexity has made cytometric analysis an underutilized tool. In this paper, we provide detailed methods on the digestion of lesion-specific skin without disrupting antigen expression followed by multiplex cell staining that allows for identification of seven innate-immune populations, including rare subsets such as group-3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s), by flow-cytometry analysis. Furthermore, when studying the functions of immune cells to tissue repair an important metric to monitor is size of the wound opening. Normal wounds close steadily albeit at non-linear rates, while slow or stalled wound closure can indicate an underlying problem with the repair process. Calliper measurements are difficult and time-consuming to obtain and can require repeated sedation of experimental animals. We provide advanced methods for measuring of wound openness; digital 3D image capture and semi-automated image processing that allows for unbiased, reliable measurements that can be taken repeatedly over time.

  9. Mouse hepatitis virus infection upregulates genes involved in innate immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhriti Chatterjee

    Full Text Available Neurotropic recombinant strain of Mouse Hepatitis Virus, RSA59, induces meningo-encephalitis, myelitis and demyelination following intracranial inoculation. RSA59 induced neuropathology is partially caused by activation of CNS resident microglia, as demonstrated by changes in cellular morphology and increased expression of a microglia/macrophage specific calcium ion binding factor, Iba1. Affymetrix Microarray analysis for mRNA expression data reveals expression of inflammatory mediators that are known to be released by activated microglia. Microglia-specific cell surface molecules, including CD11b, CD74, CD52 and CD68, are significantly upregulated in contrast to CD4, CD8 and CD19. Protein analysis of spinal cord extracts taken from mice 6 days post-inoculation, the time of peak inflammation, reveals robust expression of IFN-γ, IL-12 and mKC. Data suggest that activated microglia and inflammatory mediators contribute to a local CNS microenvironment that regulates viral replication and IFN-γ production during the acute phase of infection, which in turn can cause phagolysosome maturation and phagocytosis of the myelin sheath, leading to demyelination.

  10. Enhanced gamma interferon responses of mouse spleen cells following immunotherapy for tuberculosis relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Olga; Vilaplana, Cristina; Guirado, Evelyn; Díaz, Jorge; Cáceres, Neus; Singh, Mahavir; Cardona, Pere-Joan

    2008-11-01

    Gamma interferon responses of spleen cells in mice were examined during postchemotherapy relapse of intraperitoneally induced latent tuberculous infection. The mycobacterial extract RUTI, which prevented the relapse, significantly enhanced the immune responses to secreted and structural recombinant mycobacterial antigens, suggesting that RUTI-mediated protection was mediated by activated T cells.

  11. Influence of a sublethal irradiation on the immune response of the mouse against sheep erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaumariage, M.L.; Hiesche, K.; Moeller, E.; Revesz, L.; Haot, J.

    1975-01-01

    In the CBA mice, the immunological response of the spleen cells (RFC and PFC direct and indirect) against the sheep erythrocytes is highly depressed by a 400R dose of X rays. The recovery is not complete at the 30th day after irradiation. The response of the bone marrow cells either irradiated or unirradiated to the antigenic stimulation is very low [fr

  12. Distinct agonist responsibilities of the first and second branches of mouse mesenteric artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobe, Koji; Hagiwara, Chiharu; Nezu, Yumiko; Honda, Kazuo

    2006-03-01

    The mesenteric artery (MA) is suitable for consideration as a typical micro-resistant artery for examination of arteriosclerosis. The MA is comprised of the first (MA1), second (MA2), and additional fine structural branches; however, differences in terms of responsibilities of these branches have not been assessed. The objective of this study was to differentiate contractile responses in the MAs of mice. MA2 rings (100 microm diameter, 1 mm length) displayed maximal force development (846.8 +/- 55.6 microN; n = 5) upon stimulation with 50 mM KCl under 400 microN resting tension. However, both MA1 and aorta required resting tension exceeding 600 microN. Treatment of MA2 with phenylephrine (PE; 10 microM), norepinephrine (NE; 10 microM), thromboxane A(2) (analog U46619; 100 nM), or prostaglandin F(2a) (PG; 10 microM) induced sustained contractions. Responses were 1507.8 +/- 88.8, 1543 + 5 +/- 149.6, 2088.6 +/- 151.6, and 1441.9 +/- 103.6 microN (n = 7), respectively. These values were markedly larger than those of the KCl-induced response. In MA1 and aorta, PE-induced and NE-induced responses were indistinct from the KCl response. This investigation revealed that MA1 exhibits responsibilities similar to those of the aorta, whereas MA2 possesses distinct responsibilities. MA2 might serve as a micro-resistant artery model.

  13. Live imaging of individual cell divisions in mouse neuroepithelium shows asymmetry in cilium formation and Sonic hedgehog response

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    Piotrowska-Nitsche Karolina

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary cilia are microtubule-based sensory organelles that play important roles in developmental signaling pathways. Recent work demonstrated that, in cell culture, the daughter cell that inherits the older mother centriole generates a primary cilium and responds to external stimuli prior to its sister cell. This asynchrony in timing of cilia formation could be especially critical during development as cell divisions are required for both differentiation and maintenance of progenitor cell niches. Methods Here we integrate several fluorescent markers and use ex vivo live imaging of a single cell division within the mouse E8.5 neuroepithelium to reveal both the formation of a primary cilium and the transcriptional response to Sonic hedgehog in the daughter cells. Results We show that, upon cell division, cilia formation and the Sonic hedgehog response are asynchronous between the daughter cells. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that we can directly observe single cell divisions within the developing neuroepithelium and concomitantly monitor cilium formation or Sonic hedgehog response. We expect this method to be especially powerful in examining whether cellular behavior can lead to both differentiation and maintenance of cells in a progenitor niche.

  14. Measuring mouse retina response near the detection threshold to direct stimulation of photons with sub-poisson statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavala, Amir; Dovzhik, Krishna; Schicker, Klaus; Koschak, Alexandra; Zeilinger, Anton

    Probing the visual system of human and animals at very low photon rate regime has recently attracted the quantum optics community. In an experiment on the isolated photoreceptor cells of Xenopus, the cell output signal was measured while stimulating it by pulses with sub-poisson distributed photons. The results showed single photon detection efficiency of 29 +/-4.7% [1]. Another behavioral experiment on human suggests a less detection capability at perception level with the chance of 0.516 +/-0.01 (i.e. slightly better than random guess) [2]. Although the species are different, both biological models and experimental observations with classical light stimuli expect that a fraction of single photon responses is filtered somewhere within the retina network and/or during the neural processes in the brain. In this ongoing experiment, we look for a quantitative answer to this question by measuring the output signals of the last neural layer of WT mouse retina using microelectrode arrays. We use a heralded downconversion single-photon source. We stimulate the retina directly since the eye lens (responsible for 20-50% of optical loss and scattering [2]) is being removed. Here, we demonstrate our first results that confirms the response to the sub-poisson distributied pulses. This project was supported by Austrian Academy of Sciences, SFB FoQuS F 4007-N23 funded by FWF and ERC QIT4QAD 227844 funded by EU Commission.

  15. Cytokine gene expression in a mouse model: The first instillations with viable bacillus Calmette-Guerin determine the succeeding Th1 response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Elizabeth C.; Rooijakkers, Sietske J.; Schamhart, Denis H.; Kurth, Karl-Heinz

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) therapy for superficial bladder cancer is immune dependent and activation of a Th1 immune response is probably required for clinical efficacy. Given the empirical approach to improving BCG therapy we investigated in a mouse model the consequences of

  16. Quantitative Methods for Measuring Repair Rates and Innate-Immune Cell Responses in Wounded Mouse Skin

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    Zhi Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In skin wounds, innate-immune cells clear up tissue debris and microbial contamination, and also secrete cytokines and other growth factors that impact repair process such as re-epithelialization and wound closure. After injury, there is a rapid influx and efflux of immune cells at wound sites, yet the function of each innate cell population in skin repair is still under investigation. Flow cytometry is a valuable research tool for detecting and quantifying immune cells; however, in mouse back skin, the difficulty in extracting immune cells from small area of skin due to tissue complexity has made cytometric analysis an underutilized tool. In this paper, we provide detailed methods on the digestion of lesion-specific skin without disrupting antigen expression followed by multiplex cell staining that allows for identification of seven innate-immune populations, including rare subsets such as group-3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s, by flow-cytometry analysis. Furthermore, when studying the functions of immune cells to tissue repair an important metric to monitor is size of the wound opening. Normal wounds close steadily albeit at non-linear rates, while slow or stalled wound closure can indicate an underlying problem with the repair process. Calliper measurements are difficult and time-consuming to obtain and can require repeated sedation of experimental animals. We provide advanced methods for measuring of wound openness; digital 3D image capture and semi-automated image processing that allows for unbiased, reliable measurements that can be taken repeatedly over time.

  17. Spectral summation and facilitation in on- and off-responses for optimized representation of communication calls in mouse inferior colliculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimov, Alexander G; Egorova, Marina A; Ehret, Günter

    2017-02-01

    Selectivity for processing of species-specific vocalizations and communication sounds has often been associated with the auditory cortex. The midbrain inferior colliculus, however, is the first center in the auditory pathways of mammals integrating acoustic information processed in separate nuclei and channels in the brainstem and, therefore, could significantly contribute to enhance the perception of species' communication sounds. Here, we used natural wriggling calls of mouse pups, which communicate need for maternal care to adult females, and further 15 synthesized sounds to test the hypothesis that neurons in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus of adult females optimize their response rates for reproduction of the three main harmonics (formants) of wriggling calls. The results confirmed the hypothesis showing that average response rates, as recorded extracellularly from single units, were highest and spectral facilitation most effective for both onset and offset responses to the call and call models with three resolved frequencies according to critical bands in perception. In addition, the general on- and/or off-response enhancement in almost half the investigated 122 neurons favors not only perception of single calls but also of vocalization rhythm. In summary, our study provides strong evidence that critical-band resolved frequency components within a communication sound increase the probability of its perception by boosting the signal-to-noise ratio of neural response rates within the inferior colliculus for at least 20% (our criterion for facilitation). These mechanisms, including enhancement of rhythm coding, are generally favorable to processing of other animal and human vocalizations, including formants of speech sounds. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Arsenite Effects on Mitochondrial Bioenergetics in Human and Mouse Primary Hepatocytes Follow a Nonlinear Dose Response

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    Hemantkumar Chavan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenite is a known carcinogen and its exposure has been implicated in a variety of noncarcinogenic health concerns. Increased oxidative stress is thought to be the primary cause of arsenite toxicity and the toxic effect is thought to be linear with detrimental effects reported at all concentrations of arsenite. But the paradigm of linear dose response in arsenite toxicity is shifting. In the present study we demonstrate that arsenite effects on mitochondrial respiration in primary hepatocytes follow a nonlinear dose response. In vitro exposure of primary hepatocytes to an environmentally relevant, moderate level of arsenite results in increased oxidant production that appears to arise from changes in the expression and activity of respiratory Complex I of the mitochondrial proton circuit. In primary hepatocytes the excess oxidant production appears to elicit adaptive responses that promote resistance to oxidative stress and a propensity to increased proliferation. Taken together, these results suggest a nonlinear dose-response characteristic of arsenite with low-dose arsenite promoting adaptive responses in a process known as mitohormesis, with transient increase in ROS levels acting as transducers of arsenite-induced mitohormesis.

  19. Mouse V1 population correlates of visual detection rely on heterogeneity within neuronal response patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montijn, Jorrit S; Goltstein, Pieter M; Pennartz, Cyriel MA

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the importance of the primary sensory cortex for the detection, discrimination, and awareness of visual stimuli, but it is unknown how neuronal populations in this area process detected and undetected stimuli differently. Critical differences may reside in the mean strength of responses to visual stimuli, as reflected in bulk signals detectable in functional magnetic resonance imaging, electro-encephalogram, or magnetoencephalography studies, or may be more subtly composed of differentiated activity of individual sensory neurons. Quantifying single-cell Ca2+ responses to visual stimuli recorded with in vivo two-photon imaging, we found that visual detection correlates more strongly with population response heterogeneity rather than overall response strength. Moreover, neuronal populations showed consistencies in activation patterns across temporally spaced trials in association with hit responses, but not during nondetections. Contrary to models relying on temporally stable networks or bulk signaling, these results suggest that detection depends on transient differentiation in neuronal activity within cortical populations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10163.001 PMID:26646184

  20. Response of mouse splenic lymphocytes to timothy pollen antigens in a microculture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, S S; Malley, A

    1975-12-01

    Spleen cells from LAF1 mice were stimulated in a microculture system with T and B cell mitogens or antigens of timothy pollen. Only cells from mice immunized with crude timothy pollen extract (WST) or a major antigen of timothy pollen conjugated to Ascaris (antigen B-Ascaris) responded to timothy antigens in vitro. Optimum responses were obtained at 120 to 144 hr of culture with 5 to 10 mug WST per culture and ranged from three to 10 times greater than cell background. No correlations could be found between the optimum antigen concentration or the maximum response and the immune status of the spleen cell donor. Response could be inhibited by a dialyzable fraction of timothy pollen, antigen D, which is a monovalent form of a major antigen of timothy pollen.

  1. Aeromonas caviae strain induces Th1 cytokine response in mouse intestinal tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, S L; Lye, D J; McKinstry, Craig A.; Vesper, Sephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Aeromonas caviae has been associated with human gastrointestinal disease. Strains of this species typically lack virulence factors (VFs) such as enterotoxins and hemolysins that are produced by other human pathogens of the Aeromonas genus. Microarray profiling of murine small intestinal extracts, 24 hours after oral infection with an A. caviae strain, provides evidence of a Th1 type immune response. A large number of gamma-interferon (γ-IFN) induced genes are up-regulated as well as several tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) transcripts. A. caviae has always been considered as opportunistic pathogen because it lacks obvious virulence factors. This current effort suggests that an A. caviae strain can colonize the murine intestinal tract and cause what has been described by others as a dysregulatory cytokine response. This response could explain why a number of diarrheal waterborne disease cases have been attributed to A. caviae even though it lacks obvious enteropathogenic properties.

  2. The response of previously irradiated mouse skin to heat alone or combined with irradiation: influence of thermotolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wondergem, J.; Haveman, J.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of previous x-irradiation on the response to hyperthermia (44 0 C), x-irradiation, and irradiation combined with hyperthermia (43 0 C or 44 0 C) was studied in mouse foot skin. Irradiation of mice feet 90 days before, with 20 Gy, increased the subsequent response to heat alone, or combined with irradiation, as well as to irradiation alone. It had little effect on the thermal enhancement ratios for both acute and late skin reactions. Memory of the previous irradiation treatment could be masked when the temperature of the subsequent heat treatment alone, or combined with irradiation, was 44 0 C. Priming heat treatment induced resistance to a subsequent heat treatment and to a subsequent combined irradiation-heat treatment in normal as well as previously irradiated skin. When late skin reaction was considered, a larger 'memory' of the previous irradiation treatment was always evident, compared to acute skin reaction: the 'remembered' dose in the late skin reaction was about twice the 'remembered' dose in the acute reaction. (U.K.)

  3. Dynamic activation of basilar membrane macrophages in response to chronic sensory cell degeneration in aging mouse cochleae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Mitchell D; Yang, Weiping; Zhang, Celia; Xiong, Binbin; Hu, Bo Hua

    2017-02-01

    In the sensory epithelium, macrophages have been identified on the scala tympani side of the basilar membrane. These basilar membrane macrophages are the spatially closest immune cells to sensory cells and are able to directly respond to and influence sensory cell pathogenesis. While basilar membrane macrophages have been studied in acute cochlear stresses, their behavior in response to chronic sensory cell degeneration is largely unknown. Here we report a systematic observation of the variance in phenotypes, the changes in morphology and distribution of basilar membrane tissue macrophages in different age groups of C57BL/6J mice, a mouse model of age-related sensory cell degeneration. This study reveals that mature, fully differentiated tissue macrophages, not recently infiltrated monocytes, are the major macrophage population for immune responses to chronic sensory cell death. These macrophages display dynamic changes in their numbers and morphologies as age increases, and the changes are related to the phases of sensory cell degeneration. Notably, macrophage activation precedes sensory cell pathogenesis, and strong macrophage activity is maintained until sensory cell degradation is complete. Collectively, these findings suggest that mature tissue macrophages on the basilar membrane are a dynamic group of cells that are capable of vigorous adaptation to changes in the local sensory epithelium environment influenced by sensory cell status. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Odorant responsiveness of embryonic mouse olfactory sensory neurons expressing the odorant receptors S1 or MOR23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Rebecca S; Mombaerts, Peter

    2013-07-01

    The mammalian olfactory system has developed some functionality by the time of birth. There is behavioral and limited electrophysiological evidence for prenatal olfaction in various mammalian species. However, there have been no reports, in any mammalian species, of recordings from prenatal olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) that express a given odorant receptor (OR) gene. Here we have performed patch-clamp recordings from mouse OSNs that express the OR gene S1 or MOR23, using the odorous ligands 2-phenylethyl alcohol or lyral, respectively. We found that, out of a combined total of 20 OSNs from embryos of these two strains at embryonic day (E)16.5 or later, all responded to a cognate odorous ligand. By contrast, none of six OSNs responded to the ligand at E14.5 or E15.5. The kinetics of the odorant-evoked electrophysiological responses of prenatal OSNs are similar to those of postnatal OSNs. The S1 and MOR23 glomeruli in the olfactory bulb are formed postnatally, but the axon terminals of OSNs expressing these OR genes may be synaptically active in the olfactory bulb at embryonic stages. The upper limit of the acquisition of odorant responsiveness for S1 and MOR23 OSNs at E16.5 is consistent with the developmental expression patterns of components of the olfactory signaling pathway. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Mouse Strain Affects Behavioral and Neuroendocrine Stress Responses Following Administration of Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus JB-1 or Traditional Antidepressant Fluoxetine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen-Anne McVey Neufeld

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is keen interest in the development of alternative therapies in the treatment of depression. Given the explosion of research focused on the microbiota-gut-brain axis, consideration has turned to the potential of certain probiotics to improve patient outcomes for those suffering from mood disorders. Here we examine the abilities of a known antidepressant, fluoxetine, and the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus JB-1™, to attenuate responses to two established criteria for depressive-like behavior in animal models, the tail suspension test (TST and the corticosterone response to an acute restraint stressor. We examine two different strains of mice known to differ in the extent to which they express both anxiety-like behavior and measures of despair—BALB/c and Swiss Webster—with respectively high and normal behavioral phenotypes for each. While adult male BALB/c mice responded with increased antidepressive-like behavior to both fluoxetine and L. rhamnosus JB-1 in both the TST and the corticosterone stress response, SW mice did not respond to either treatment as compared to controls. These findings highlight the importance of investigating putative antidepressants in mouse strains known to express face validity for some markers of depression. Clinical studies examining the activity of L. rhamnosus JB-1 in patients suffering from mood disorders are warranted, as well as further pre-clinical work examining how interactions between host genotype and intestinal microbial alterations may impact behavioral responses. This study adds to the literature supporting the possibility that modifying the intestinal microbiota via probiotics represents a promising potential therapeutic breakthrough in the treatment of psychiatric disease.

  6. Interactions Between Stress and Sex in Microbial Responses Within the Microbiota-Gut-Brain Axis in a Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsilimigras, Matthew C B; Gharaibeh, Raad Z; Sioda, Michael; Gray, Laura; Fodor, Anthony A; Lyte, Mark

    2018-05-01

    Animal models are frequently used to examine stress response, but experiments seldom include females. The connection between the microbiota-gut-brain axis and behavioral stress response is investigated here using a mixed-sex mouse cohort. CF-1 mice underwent alternating days of restraint and forced swim for 19 days (male n = 8, female n = 8) with matching numbers of control animals at which point the 16S rRNA genes of gut microbiota were sequenced. Mixed linear models accounting for stress status and sex with individuals nested in cage to control for cage effects evaluated these data. Murine behaviors in elevated plus-maze, open-field, and light/dark box were investigated. Community-level associations with sex, stress, and their interaction were significant. Males had higher microbial diversity than females (p = .025). Of the 638 operational taxonomic units detected in at least 25% of samples, 94 operational taxonomic units were significant: 31 (stress), 61 (sex), and 34 (sex-stress interaction). Twenty of the 39 behavioral measures were significant for stress, 3 for sex, and 6 for sex-stress. However, no significant associations between behavioral measures and specific microbes were detected. These data suggest sex influences stress response and the microbiota-gut-brain axis and that studies of behavior and the microbiome therefore benefit from consideration of how sex differences drive behavior and microbial community structure. Host stress resilience and absence of associations between stress-induced behaviors with specific microbes suggests that hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation represents a threshold for microbial influence on host behavior. Future studies are needed in examining the intersection of sex, stress response, and the microbiota-gut-brain axis.

  7. Characterisation of the p53-mediated cellular responses evoked in primary mouse cells following exposure to ultraviolet radiation.

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    Gillian D McFeat

    Full Text Available Exposure to ultraviolet (UV light can cause significant damage to mammalian cells and, although the spectrum of damage produced varies with the wavelength of UV, all parts of the UV spectrum are recognised as being detrimental to human health. Characterising the cellular response to different wavelengths of UV therefore remains an important aim so that risks and their moderation can be evaluated, in particular in relation to the initiation of skin cancer. The p53 tumour suppressor protein is central to the cellular response that protects the genome from damage by external agents such as UV, thus reducing the risk of tumorigenesis. In response to a variety of DNA damaging agents including UV light, wild-type p53 plays a role in mediating cell-cycle arrest, facilitating apoptosis and stimulating repair processes, all of which prevent the propagation of potentially mutagenic defects. In this study we examined the induction of p53 protein and its influence on the survival of primary mouse fibroblasts exposed to different wavelengths of UV light. UVC was found to elevate p53 protein and its sequence specific DNA binding capacity. Unexpectedly, UVA treatment failed to induce p53 protein accumulation or sequence specific DNA binding. Despite this, UVA exposure of wild-type cells induced a p53 dependent G1 cell cycle arrest followed by a wave of p53 dependent apoptosis, peaking 12 hours post-insult. Thus, it is demonstrated that the elements of the p53 cellular response evoked by exposure to UV radiation are wavelength dependent. Furthermore, the interrelationship between various endpoints is complex and not easily predictable. This has important implications not only for understanding the mode of action of p53 but also for the use of molecular endpoints in quantifying exposure to different wavelengths of UV in the context of human health protection.

  8. Mouse Strain Affects Behavioral and Neuroendocrine Stress Responses Following Administration of Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus JB-1 or Traditional Antidepressant Fluoxetine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVey Neufeld, Karen-Anne; Kay, Sebastian; Bienenstock, John

    2018-01-01

    Currently, there is keen interest in the development of alternative therapies in the treatment of depression. Given the explosion of research focused on the microbiota-gut-brain axis, consideration has turned to the potential of certain probiotics to improve patient outcomes for those suffering from mood disorders. Here we examine the abilities of a known antidepressant, fluoxetine, and the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus JB-1™, to attenuate responses to two established criteria for depressive-like behavior in animal models, the tail suspension test (TST) and the corticosterone response to an acute restraint stressor. We examine two different strains of mice known to differ in the extent to which they express both anxiety-like behavior and measures of despair-BALB/c and Swiss Webster-with respectively high and normal behavioral phenotypes for each. While adult male BALB/c mice responded with increased antidepressive-like behavior to both fluoxetine and L. rhamnosus JB-1 in both the TST and the corticosterone stress response, SW mice did not respond to either treatment as compared to controls. These findings highlight the importance of investigating putative antidepressants in mouse strains known to express face validity for some markers of depression. Clinical studies examining the activity of L. rhamnosus JB-1 in patients suffering from mood disorders are warranted, as well as further pre-clinical work examining how interactions between host genotype and intestinal microbial alterations may impact behavioral responses. This study adds to the literature supporting the possibility that modifying the intestinal microbiota via probiotics represents a promising potential therapeutic breakthrough in the treatment of psychiatric disease.

  9. Influenza A infection attenuates relaxation responses of mouse tracheal smooth muscle evoked by acrolein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Esther Y; Mann, Tracy S; Burcham, Philip C; Henry, Peter J

    2015-02-15

    The airway epithelium is an important source of relaxant mediators, and damage to the epithelium caused by respiratory tract viruses may contribute to airway hyperreactivity. The aim of this study was to determine whether influenza A-induced epithelial damage would modulate relaxation responses evoked by acrolein, a toxic and prevalent component of smoke. Male BALB/c mice were inoculated intranasally with influenza A/PR-8/34 (VIRUS-infected) or allantoic fluid (SHAM-infected). On day 4 post-inoculation, isometric tension recording studies were conducted on carbachol pre-contracted tracheal segments isolated from VIRUS and SHAM mice. Relaxant responses to acrolein (30 μM) were markedly smaller in VIRUS segments compared to SHAM segments (2 ± 1% relaxation vs. 28 ± 5%, n=14, pacrolein and SP were reduced in VIRUS segments (>35% reduction, n=6, pacrolein were profoundly diminished in tracheal segments isolated from influenza A-infected mice. The mechanism through which influenza A infection attenuates this response appears to involve reduced production of PGE2 in response to SP due to epithelial cell loss, and may provide insight into the airway hyperreactivity observed with influenza A infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cytogenetic adaptive response of mouse bone marrow cells to low level HTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Deqing; Zhang Zhaoyang; Zhou Xiangyan

    1993-01-01

    Mice were abdominally injected with a adaptive dose of 3.7 x 10 2 -3.7 x 10 5 Bq/gbw HTO, and then exposed to a challenge dose of 1.5 Gy of 6 '0Co γ-rays. In bone marrow cells that received both the adaptive and challenge doses, the chromatid breaks are lower than expected on the basis of additivity of the effects of the individual treatment. The adaptive response induced with 3.7 x 10 3 Bq/gbw HTO is the most remarkable, but at 3.7 x 10 5 Bq/gbw the adaptive response seems to disappear. The adaptive response can be observed by exposing to 1.5 Gy γ-rays from 1 to 5 days after injection of 3.7 x 10 3 Bq/gbw HTO, which is the most obvious one to reduce chromatid breaks to 50% of expected at the 5th day, but at the 7th day to equate to expected. The frequency of chromatid breaks is gradually reduced with time after challenge dose, the maximum index number of adaptive response is 0.50 and appears at 24 hr after challenge dose

  11. Novel remodeling of the mouse heart mitochondrial proteome in response to acute insulin stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Brian A; Yazdi, Puya G; Taylor, Jared F; Khattab, Omar S; Chen, Yu-Han; Chen, Yumay; Wang, Ping H

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the pathophysiology of diabetic cardiomyopathy. The aim of this study was to investigate the acute changes in the mitochondrial proteome in response to insulin stimulation. Cardiac mitochondria from C57BL/6 mice after insulin stimulation were analyzed using two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis. MALDI-TOF MS/MS was utilized to identify differences. Two enzymes involved in metabolism and four structural proteins were identified. Succinyl-CoA ligase [ADP forming] subunit beta was identified as one of the differentially regulated proteins. Upon insulin stimulation, a relatively more acidic isoform of this protein was increased by 53% and its functional activity was decreased by ∼32%. This proteomic remodeling in response to insulin stimulation may play an important role in the normal and diabetic heart. PMID:26610654

  12. Limiting dilution analysis for precursor frequency of Con A-responsive mouse Thy-1+ dendritic epidermal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takashima, A.; Bergstresser, P.R.; Nixon-Fulton, J.L.; Tigelaar, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have recently demonstrated in vitro proliferation of mouse Thy-1 + dendritic epidermal cells (EC) to Con A and IL-2. The purpose of the present study was to utilize limiting dilution analysis to determine the precursor frequency (PF) of Con A-responsive cells within EC enriched by Isolymph centrifugation for Thy-1 + cells (IEC). AKR IEC were cultured in 96 well U-plates (25-75 cells/well) with 2 μg/ml Con A and 2 x 10 5 irradiated (1600 R) AKR spleen cells/well. Cultures were harvested after 7-21 days following 3 H-thymidine pulsing. Results indicated a PF within IEC of 1.5-4.5%. Inclusion of 10 U/ml IL-2 enhanced significantly the proliferation in positive wells but did not alter this PF. In AKR mice, monoclonal antibody 20-10-5S has been shown to react with Thy-1 + EC, but not with peripheral T cells. FACS purification of IEC using 20-10-5S indicated that Con A responsiveness resides exclusively within the 20-10-5S + population. The PF of Con A-responsive Thy-1 + EC was calculated by dividing the PF of IEC by the fraction of 20-10-5S + cells (13-30%) in the IEC suspension. A significant proportion of Thy-1 + EC (∼12%) were found to possess Con A proliferative capacity. These studies will facilitate analysis at a clonal level of possible functional and phenotypic heterogeneity within the Thy-1 + EC population

  13. Attenuated hypertrophic response to pressure overload in a lamin A/C haploinsufficiency mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupesi, Mihaela; Yoshioka, Jun; Gannon, Joseph; Kudinova, Anastacia; Stewart, Colin L; Lammerding, Jan

    2010-06-01

    Inherited mutations cause approximately 30% of all dilated cardiomyopathy cases, with autosomal dominant mutations in the LMNA gene accounting for more than one third of these. The LMNA gene encodes the nuclear envelope proteins lamins A and C, which provide structural support to the nucleus and also play critical roles in transcriptional regulation. Functional deletion of a single allele is sufficient to trigger dilated cardiomyopathy in humans and mice. However, whereas Lmna(-/-) mice develop severe muscular dystrophy and dilated cardiomyopathy and die by 8 weeks of age, heterozygous Lmna(+/-) mice have a much milder phenotype, with changes in ventricular function and morphology only becoming apparent at 1 year of age. Here, we studied 8- to 20-week-old Lmna(+/-) mice and wild-type littermates in a pressure overload model to examine whether increased mechanical load can accelerate or exacerbate myocardial dysfunction in the heterozygotes. While overall survival was similar between genotypes, Lmna(+/-) animals had a significantly attenuated hypertrophic response to pressure overload as evidenced by reduced ventricular mass and myocyte size. Analysis of pressure overload-induced transcriptional changes suggested that the reduced hypertrophy in the Lmna(+/-) mice was accompanied by impaired activation of the mechanosensitive gene Egr-1. In conclusion, our findings provide further support for a critical role of lamins A and C in regulating the cellular response to mechanical stress in cardiomyocytes and demonstrate that haploinsufficiency of lamins A and C alone is sufficient to alter hypertrophic responses and cardiac function in the face of pressure overload in the heart. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. High-rate operant behavior in two mouse strains: a response-bout analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joshua E; Pesek, Erin F; Newland, M Christopher

    2009-06-01

    Operant behavior sometimes occurs in bouts characterized by an initiation rate, within-bout response rate, and bout length. The generality of this structure was tested using high-rate nose-poking in mice. Reinforcement of short interresponse times produced high response rates while a random-interval schedule held reinforcement rates constant. BALB/c mice produced bouts that were more frequent, longer, and contained a higher within-bout rate of responding (nine nose-pokes/s) than did the C57BL/6 mice (five nose-pokes/s). Adding a running wheel decreased total nose-pokes and bout length, and increased bout-initiation rate. Free-feeding reduced nose-poking by decreasing bout-initiation rate. Photoperiod reversal decreased bout-initiation rate but not total nose-poke rate. Despite strain differences in bout structure, both strains responded similarly to the interventions. The three bout measures were correlated with overall rate but not with each other. Log-survival analyses provided independent descriptors of the structure of high-rate responding in these two strains.

  15. Population coding in mouse visual cortex: response reliability and dissociability of stimulus tuning and noise correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorrit S. Montijn

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The primary visual cortex is an excellent model system for investigating how neuronal populations encode information, because of well-documented relationships between stimulus characteristics and neuronal activation patterns. We used two-photon calcium imaging data to relate the performance of different methods for studying population coding (population vectors, template matching, and Bayesian decoding algorithms to their underlying assumptions. We show that the variability of neuronal responses may hamper the decoding of population activity, and that a normalization to correct for this variability may be of critical importance for correct decoding of population activity. Second, by comparing noise correlations and stimulus tuning we find that these properties have dissociated anatomical correlates, even though noise correlations have been previously hypothesized to reflect common synaptic input. We hypothesize that noise correlations arise from large non-specific increases in spiking activity acting on many weak synapses simultaneously, while neuronal stimulus response properties are dependent on more reliable connections. Finally, this paper provides practical guidelines for further research on population coding and shows that population coding cannot be approximated by a simple summation of inputs, but is heavily influenced by factors such as input reliability and noise correlation structure.

  16. Testing Homeopathy in Mouse Emotional Response Models: Pooled Data Analysis of Two Series of Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bellavite

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two previous investigations were performed to assess the activity of Gelsemium sempervirens (Gelsemium s. in mice, using emotional response models. These two series are pooled and analysed here. Gelsemium s. in various homeopathic centesimal dilutions/dynamizations (4C, 5C, 7C, 9C, and 30C, a placebo (solvent vehicle, and the reference drugs diazepam (1 mg/kg body weight or buspirone (5 mg/kg body weight were delivered intraperitoneally to groups of albino CD1 mice, and their effects on animal behaviour were assessed by the light-dark (LD choice test and the open-field (OF exploration test. Up to 14 separate replications were carried out in fully blind and randomised conditions. Pooled analysis demonstrated highly significant effects of Gelsemium s. 5C, 7C, and 30C on the OF parameter “time spent in central area” and of Gelsemium s. 5C, 9C, and 30C on the LD parameters “time spent in lit area” and “number of light-dark transitions,” without any sedative action or adverse effects on locomotion. This pooled data analysis confirms and reinforces the evidence that Gelsemium s. regulates emotional responses and behaviour of laboratory mice in a nonlinear fashion with dilution/dynamization.

  17. Spontaneous oscillatory rhythms in the degenerating mouse retina modulate retinal ganglion cell responses to electrical stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Sook eGoo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of the electrical activity of the retina in the animal models of retinal degeneration has been carried out in part to understand the progression of retinal degenerative diseases like age-related macular degeneration (AMD and retinitis pigmentosa (RP, but also to determine optimum stimulus paradigms for use with retinal prosthetic devices. The models most studied in this regard have been the two lines of mice deficient in the β-subunit of phosphodiesterase (rd1 and rd10 mice, where the degenerating retinas exhibit characteristic spontaneous hyperactivity and oscillatory local field potentials (LFPs. Additionally, there is a robust ~10 Hz rhythmic burst of retinal ganglion cell (RGC spikes on the trough of the oscillatory LFP. In rd1 mice, the rhythmic burst of RGC spikes is always phase-locked with the oscillatory LFP and this phase-locking property is preserved regardless of postnatal ages. However, in rd10 mice, the frequency of the oscillatory rhythm changes according to postnatal age, suggesting that this rhythm might be a marker of the stage of degeneration. Furthermore when a biphasic current stimulus is applied to rd10 mice degenerate retina, distinct RGC response patterns that correlate with the stage of degeneration emerge. This review also considers the significance of these response properties.

  18. Diversity and maturation in the anti-dansyl antibody response of the Balb/C mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, F.R.

    1987-01-01

    Ten hybridoma cell lines that produce antibodies with specificity for the 5-dimethylaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl(dansyl)-lysine hapten, were studied. Single stranded cDNAs were generated by reverse transcription of the immunoglobulin (Ig) mRNAs primed by 5' P-32 labeled oligonucleotides complementary to specific regions of the Ig message. Nucleic acid sequences of 4 mu heavy chains was sufficient to reveal that the early immune response involves members of at least three distinct heavy chain variable region (V/sub H/) gene families. Nucleic acid sequences and Southern blot data from 6 gamma heavy chains reveal that the gamma response is comprised of members of only a single V/sub H/ family although representation from that family derives from at least three distinguishable germline genes. The abrupt restriction of V/sub H/ family usage at the point of class switch can not be explained on the basis of antigen driven selection or of idio-type repression. The data indicate a mechanism for preferential class switch of a particular V/sub H/ family independent of affinity considerations or repression of other idiotypes

  19. Diversity and maturation in the anti-dansyl antibody response of the Balb/C mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, F.R.

    1987-01-01

    Ten hybridoma cell lines that produce antibodies with specificity for the 5-dimethylaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl(dansyl)-lysine hapten, were studied. Single stranded cDNAs were generated by reverse transcription of the immunoglobulin (Ig) mRNAs primed by 5' P-32 labeled oligonucleotides complementary to specific regions of the Ig message. Nucleic acid sequences of 4 mu heavy chains was sufficient to reveal that the early immune response involves members of at least three distinct heavy chain variable region (V/sub H/) gene families. Nucleic acid sequences and Southern blot data from 6 gamma heavy chains reveal that the gamma response is comprised of members of only a single V/sub H/ family although representation from that family derives from at least three distinguishable germline genes. The abrupt restriction of V/sub H/ family usage at the point of class switch can not be explained on the basis of antigen driven selection or of idio-type repression. The data indicate a mechanism for preferential class switch of a particular V/sub H/ family independent of affinity considerations or repression of other idiotypes.

  20. Global transcriptional response to Hfe deficiency and dietary iron overload in mouse liver and duodenum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Rodriguez

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential trace element whose absorption is usually tightly regulated in the duodenum. HFE-related hereditary hemochromatosis (HH is characterized by abnormally low expression of the iron-regulatory hormone, hepcidin, which results in increased iron absorption. The liver is crucial for iron homeostasis as it is the main production site of hepcidin. The aim of this study was to explore and compare the genome-wide transcriptome response to Hfe deficiency and dietary iron overload in murine liver and duodenum. Illumina arrays containing over 47,000 probes were used to study global transcriptional changes. Quantitative RT-PCR (Q-RT-PCR was used to validate the microarray results. In the liver, the expression of 151 genes was altered in Hfe(-/- mice while dietary iron overload changed the expression of 218 genes. There were 173 and 108 differentially expressed genes in the duodenum of Hfe(-/- mice and mice with dietary iron overload, respectively. There was 93.5% concordance between the results obtained by microarray analysis and Q-RT-PCR. Overexpression of genes for acute phase reactants in the liver and a strong induction of digestive enzyme genes in the duodenum were characteristic of the Hfe-deficient genotype. In contrast, dietary iron overload caused a more pronounced change of gene expression responsive to oxidative stress. In conclusion, Hfe deficiency caused a previously unrecognized increase in gene expression of hepatic acute phase proteins and duodenal digestive enzymes.

  1. Response of mouse lung to irradiation at different dose-rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, R.P.

    1983-01-01

    Groups of LAF1 mice were given thoracic irradiation using 60 Co γ-rays at dose-rates of 0.05 Gy/min (LDR) or 1.1 Gy/min (HDR) and the death of the animals was monitored as a function of time. It was found that the time pattern of animal deaths was similar for the two different dose-rates. Dose response curves for animals dying at various times up to 500 days after irradiation were calculated and the LD 50 values determined. The curves for the LD 50 values, plotted as a function of the time at analysis for treatment at HDR or LDR, were essentially parallel to each other but separated by a factor (LDR/HDR) of about 1.8. This indicates that the sparing effect of LDR treatment is the same for deaths occurring during the early pneumonitis phase or during the late fibrotic phase of lung damage. The available information on the response of patients to whole thoracic irradiation, given for either palliation or piror to bone marrow transplantation, suggests that for similar dose-rates to those studied here the ratio (LDR/HDR) is only 1.2 to 1.3. This difference between the animal and human data may reflect the modifying effect of the large doses of cytotoxic drugs used in combination with the irradiation of bone marrow transplant patients

  2. Erythropoiesis in the aged mouse. I. Response to stimulation in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udupa, K.B.; Lipschitz, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    Changes in erythropoiesis with age were studied by examining the hematocrit increase in response to hypoxia in aged mice and by assessing the change in erythropoiesis following the injection of erythropoietin in young and old polycythemic mice. The increase in hematocrit after exposure to hypoxia was more variable and generally lower in old mice than in young mice. When erythropoietin was injected into polycythemic animals, the increase in differentiated erythroid cells and 59 Fe incorporation into erythroid marrow and peripheral blood cells was significantly lower in old mice than in young mice. In contrast to differentiated erythroid cells, there was less evidence of a reduced response to simulation of the more primitive erythroid progenitor cells of aged animals. The early undifferentiated erythroid progenitor, burst-forming units, did not decrease when either young or aged mice were made polycythemic, and no change following erythropoietin injection was noted. Polycythemia suppressed the late-differentiated erythroid progenitor, erythroid colony-forming units, to a greater extent in aged animals, but when erythropoietin was injected, the percent increase over the subsequent 24 hours was identical to that in young mice. These observations indicate a reduced erythropoietic capacity with age, the abnormality being most obvious in the more mature erythroid precursors

  3. Age-related changes in mouse taste bud morphology, hormone expression, and taste responsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yu-Kyong; Cong, Wei-na; Cai, Huan; Kim, Wook; Maudsley, Stuart; Egan, Josephine M; Martin, Bronwen

    2012-04-01

    Normal aging is a complex process that affects every organ system in the body, including the taste system. Thus, we investigated the effects of the normal aging process on taste bud morphology, function, and taste responsivity in male mice at 2, 10, and 18 months of age. The 18-month-old animals demonstrated a significant reduction in taste bud size and number of taste cells per bud compared with the 2- and 10-month-old animals. The 18-month-old animals exhibited a significant reduction of protein gene product 9.5 and sonic hedgehog immunoreactivity (taste cell markers). The number of taste cells expressing the sweet taste receptor subunit, T1R3, and the sweet taste modulating hormone, glucagon-like peptide-1, were reduced in the 18-month-old mice. Concordant with taste cell alterations, the 18-month-old animals demonstrated reduced sweet taste responsivity compared with the younger animals and the other major taste modalities (salty, sour, and bitter) remained intact.

  4. Therapeutic Touch Has Significant Effects on Mouse Breast Cancer Metastasis and Immune Responses but Not Primary Tumor Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronowicz, Gloria; Secor, Eric R; Flynn, John R; Jellison, Evan R; Kuhn, Liisa T

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based integrative medicine therapies have been introduced to promote wellness and offset side-effects from cancer treatment. Energy medicine is an integrative medicine technique using the human biofield to promote well-being. The biofield therapy chosen for study was Therapeutic Touch (TT). Breast cancer tumors were initiated in mice by injection of metastatic 66cl4 mammary carcinoma cells. The control group received only vehicle. TT or mock treatments were performed twice a week for 10 minutes. Two experienced TT practitioners alternated treatments. At 26 days, metastasis to popliteal lymph nodes was determined by clonogenic assay. Changes in immune function were measured by analysis of serum cytokines and by fluorescent activated cells sorting (FACS) of immune cells from the spleen and lymph nodes. No significant differences were found in body weight gain or tumor size. Metastasis was significantly reduced in the TT-treated mice compared to mock-treated mice. Cancer significantly elevated eleven cytokines. TT significantly reduced IL-1-a, MIG, IL-1b, and MIP-2 to control/vehicle levels. FACS demonstrated that TT significantly reduced specific splenic lymphocyte subsets and macrophages were significantly elevated with cancer. Human biofield therapy had no significant effect on primary tumor but produced significant effects on metastasis and immune responses in a mouse breast cancer model.

  5. Pentobarbital anesthesia and the response of tumor and normal tissue in the C3Hf/SED mouse to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suit, H.D.; Sedlacek, R.S.; Silver, G.; Dosoretz, D.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to assess the effect of sodium pentobarbital (NaPb) on the response of MCaIV, FSaII, and SCCVII using TCD50 and acute reaction of normal skin as end points. The TCD50 was lower or unchanged in the anesthetized than in the conscious mouse. There was no effect of NaPb on the acute reaction of skin. The ERs for NaPb on the TCD50 (ν = 1) for air breathing condition was essentially 1.0 for all three tumors. For the FSaII and SCCVII pentobarbital enhancement ratios were 1.29 and 1.34 for O/sub 2/3ATA conditions. For two dose (ν=2) irradiations ERs for the O/sub 2/3ATA were 1.46, 1.72 and 2.21 for MCaIV, FSaII and SCCVII respectively. For ν = 15, temperature 35 0 C ERs for O/sub 2/3ATA were 1.08 and 1.09 for MCaIV and FSaII but 1.22 for SCCVII

  6. Influenza A virus infection and cigarette smoke impair bronchodilator responsiveness to β-adrenoceptor agonists in mouse lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Chantal; Seow, Huei Jiunn; Bourke, Jane E; Vlahos, Ross

    2016-05-01

    β2-adrenoceptor agonists are the mainstay therapy for patients with asthma but their effectiveness in cigarette smoke (CS)-induced lung disease such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is limited. In addition, bronchodilator efficacy of β2-adrenoceptor agonists is decreased during acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD), caused by respiratory viruses including influenza A. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess the effects of the β2-adrenoceptor agonist salbutamol (SALB) on small airway reactivity using mouse precision cut lung slices (PCLS) prepared from CS-exposed mice and from CS-exposed mice treated with influenza A virus (Mem71, H3N1). CS exposure alone reduced SALB potency and efficacy associated with decreased β2-adrenoceptor mRNA expression, and increased tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) expression. This impaired relaxation was restored by day 12 in the absence of further CS exposure. In PCLS prepared after Mem71 infection alone, responses to SALB were transient and were not well maintained. CS exposure prior to Mem71 infection almost completely abolished relaxation, although β2-adrenoceptor and TNFα and IL-1β expression were unaltered. The present study has shown decreased sensitivity to SALB after CS or a combination of CS and Mem71 occurs by different mechanisms. In addition, the PCLS technique and our models of CS and influenza infection provide a novel setting for assessment of alternative bronchodilators. © 2016 The Author(s).

  7. TRAM-Derived Decoy Peptides inhibits the inflammatory response in mouse mammary epithelial cells and a mastitis model in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoyu; Tian, Yuan; Wang, Tiancheng; Zhang, Wenlong; Wang, Wei; Gao, Xuejiao; Qu, Shihui; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2015-10-05

    It has been proved that TRAM-Derived Decoy peptides have anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we synthesized a TRAM-Derived decoy peptide (TM6), belongs to TRAM TIR domain, of which sequence is "N"-RQIKIWFQNRRMKWK, KENFLRDTWCNFQFY-"C" and evaluated the effects of TM6 on lipopolysaccharide-induced mastitis in mice. In vivo, LPS-induced mice mastitis model was established by injection of LPS through the duct of mammary gland. TM6 was injected 1h before or after LPS treatment. In vitro, primary mouse mammary epithelial cells were used to investigate the effects of TM6 on LPS-induced inflammatory responses. The results showed that TM6 inhibited LPS-induced mammary gland histopathologic changes, MPO activity, and TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 production in mice. In vitro, TM6 significantly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 production, as well as NF-κB and MAPKs activation. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that TM6 had protective effects on LPS-mastitis and may be a promising therapeutic reagent for mastitis treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Adult Mouse DRG Explant and Dissociated Cell Models to Investigate Neuroplasticity and Responses to Environmental Insults Including Viral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaro, Michele; Sharthiya, Harsh; Tiwari, Vaibhav

    2018-03-09

    This protocol describes an ex vivo model of mouse-derived dorsal root ganglia (DRG) explant and in vitro DRG-derived co-culture of dissociated sensory neurons and glial satellite cells. These are useful and versatile models to investigate a variety of biological responses associated with physiological and pathological conditions of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) ranging from neuron-glial interaction, neuroplasticity, neuroinflammation, and viral infection. The usage of DRG explant is scientifically advantageous compared to simplistic single cells models for multiple reasons. For instance, as an organotypic culture, the DRG explant allows ex vivo transfer of an entire neuronal network including the extracellular microenvironment that play a significant role in all the neuronal and glial functions. Further, DRG explants can also be maintained ex vivo for several days and the culture conditions can be perturbed as desired. In addition, the harvested DRG can be further dissociated into an in vitro co-culture of primary sensory neurons and satellite glial cells to investigate neuronal-glial interaction, neuritogenesis, axonal cone interaction with the extracellular microenvironment, and more general, any aspect associated with the neuronal metabolism. Therefore, the DRG-explant system offers a great deal of flexibility to study a wide array of events related to biological, physiological, and pathological conditions in a cost-effective manner.

  9. Induction of a Radio-Adaptive Response by Low-dose Gamma Irradiation in Mouse Cardiomyocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westby, Christian M.; Seawright, John W.; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    One of the most significant occupational hazards to an astronaut is the frequent exposure to radiation. Commonly associated with increased risk for cancer related morbidity and mortality, radiation is also known to increase the risk for cardiovascular related disorders including: pericarditis, hypertension, and heart failure. It is believed that these radiation-induced disorders are a result of abnormal tissue remodeling. It is unknown whether radiation exposure promotes remodeling through fibrotic changes alone or in combination with programmed cell death. Furthermore, it is not known whether it is possible to mitigate the hazardous effects of radiation exposure. As such, we assessed the expression and mechanisms of radiation-induced tissue remodeling and potential radio-adaptive responses of p53-mediated apoptosis and fibrosis pathways along with markers for oxidative stress and inflammation in mice myocardium. 7 week old, male, C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to 6Gy (H) or 5cGy followed 24hr later with 6Gy (LH) 137Cs gamma radiation. Mice were sacrificed and their hearts extirpated 4, 24, or 72hr after final irradiation. Real Time - Polymerase Chain Reaction was used to evaluate target genes. Apoptotic genes Bad and Bax, pro-cell survival genes Bcl2 and Bcl2l2, fibrosis gene Vegfa, and oxidative stress genes Sod2 and GPx4 showed a reduced fold regulation change (Bad,-6.18; Bax,-6.94; Bcl2,-5.09; Bcl2l2,-4.03; Vegfa, -11.84; Sod2,-5.97; GPx4*,-28.72; * = Bonferroni adjusted p-value present compared to 24hr control. These data suggest a general reduction in genetic expression 4hrs after a high dose of gamma radiation. However, pre-exposure to 5cGy gamma radiation appears to facilitate a radio-adaptive response that mitigates the reduction in genetic expression associated with single high-dose gamma radiation exposure. This radio-adaptive response may serve as a potential countermeasure to radiation-induced myocardial remodeling and preserve the cardiovascular health of

  10. Gene expression response to EWS–FLI1 in mouse embryonic cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miwa Tanaka

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ewing's sarcoma is a rare bone tumor that affects children and adolescents. We have recently succeeded to induce Ewing's sarcoma-like small round cell tumor in mice by expression of EWS–ETS fusion genes in murine embryonic osteochondrogenic progenitors. The Ewing's sarcoma precursors are enriched in embryonic superficial zone (eSZ cells of long bone. To get insights into the mechanisms of Ewing's sarcoma development, gene expression profiles between EWS–FLI1-sensitive eSZ cells and EWS–FLI1-resistant embryonic growth plate (eGP cells were compared using DNA microarrays. Gene expression of eSZ and eGP cells (total, 30 samples was evaluated with or without EWS–FLI1 expression 0, 8 or 48 h after gene transduction. Our data provide useful information for gene expression responses to fusion oncogenes in human sarcoma.

  11. The D1CT-7 mouse model of Tourette syndrome displays sensorimotor gating deficits in response to spatial confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godar, Sean C; Mosher, Laura J; Strathman, Hunter J; Gochi, Andrea M; Jones, Cori M; Fowler, Stephen C; Bortolato, Marco

    2016-07-01

    The D1CT-7 mouse is one of the best known animal models of Tourette syndrome (TS), featuring spontaneous tic-like behaviours sensitive to standard TS therapies; these characteristics ensure a high face and predictive validity of this model, yet its construct validity remains elusive. To address this issue, we studied the responses of D1CT-7 mice to two critical components of TS pathophysiology: the exacerbation of tic-like behaviours in response to stress and the presence of sensorimotor gating deficits, which are thought to reflect the perceptual alterations causing the tics. D1CT-7 and wild-type (WT) littermates were subjected to a 20 min session of spatial confinement (SC) within an inescapable, 10 cm wide cylindrical enclosure. Changes in plasma corticosterone levels, tic-like behaviours and other spontaneous responses were measured. SC-exposed mice were also tested for the prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the startle response (a sensorimotor gating index) and other TS-related behaviours, including open-field locomotion, novel object exploration and social interaction and compared with non-confined counterparts. SC produced a marked increase in corticosterone concentrations in both D1CT-7 and WT mice. In D1CT-7, but not WT mice, SC exacerbated tic-like and digging behaviours, and triggered PPI deficits and aggressive responses. Conversely, SC did not modify locomotor activity or novel object exploration in D1CT-7 mice. Both tic-like behaviours and PPI impairments in SC-exposed D1CT-7 mice were inhibited by standard TS therapies and D1 dopamine receptor antagonism. These findings collectively support the translational and construct validity of D1CT-7 mice with respect to TS. This article is part of a themed section on Updating Neuropathology and Neuropharmacology of Monoaminergic Systems. To view the other articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.v173.13/issuetoc. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  12. MicroRNA-761 regulates mitochondrial biogenesis in mouse skeletal muscle in response to exercise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yanli [Affiliated Hospital of Hebei Engineering University, Handan, 056002, Hebei (China); Zhao, Chaoxian; Sun, Xuewen [Medical College of Hebei Engineering University, Handan, 056002, Hebei (China); Liu, Zhijun, E-mail: liuzhij1207@163.com [Affiliated Hospital of Hebei Engineering University, Handan, 056002, Hebei (China); Zhang, Jianzhong, E-mail: zhangjianzhong@icdc.cn [National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention (ICDC), Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China CDC), Beijing, 102206 (China)

    2015-11-06

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been suggested to play critical roles in skeletal muscle in response to exercise. Previous study has shown that miR-761 was involved in a novel model regulating the mitochondrial network. However, its role in mitochondrial biogenesis remains poorly understood. Therefore, the current study was aimed to examine the effect of miR-761 on mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis demonstrated that aberrantly expressed miR-761 is involved in exercise activity and miR-761 is decreased by exercise training compared with the sedentary control mice. miR-761 suppresses mitochondrial biogenesis of C{sub 2}C{sub 12} myocytes by targeting the 3′-UTR of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) coactivator-1 (PGC-1α). Overexpression of miR-761 was capable of inhibiting the protein expression levels of PGC-1α. Moreover, miR-761 overexpression suppressed the p38 MAPK signaling pathway and down-regulated the expression of phosphorylated MAPK-activated protein kinase-2 (P-MK2), a downstream kinase of p38 MAPK. The phosphorylation of activating transcription factors 2 (ATF2) that plays a functional role in linking the activation of the p38 MAPK pathway to enhanced transcription of the PGC-1α was also inhibited by the overexpression of miR-761. These findings revealed a novel regulation mechanism for miR-761 in skeletal myocytes, and contributed to a better understanding of the modulation of skeletal muscle in response to exercise. - Highlights: • Endurance exercise decreases miR-761 expression in skeletal muscle. • MiR-761 suppresses mitochondrial biogenesis in C{sub 2}C{sub 12} myocytes. • MiR-761 directly targeted PGC-1α expression. • MiR-761 suppresses p38 MAPK signaling pathways in C{sub 2}C{sub 12} myocytes. • A novel mechanism for miR-761 in skeletal myocytes is demonstrated.

  13. Change in Mouse Bone Turnover in Response to Microgravity on RR-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng-Campbell, Margareth A.; Blaber, Elizabeth A.; Almeida, Eduardo A. C.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical unloading during spaceflight is known to adversely affect mammalian physiology. Our previous studies using the Animal Enclosure Module on short duration Shuttle missions enabled us to identify a deficit in stem cell based-tissue regeneration as being a significant concern for long-duration spaceflight. Specifically, we found that mechanical unloading in microgravity resulted in inhibition of differentiation of mesenchymal and hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow compartment. Also, we observed overexpression of a cell cycle arrest molecule, CDKN1ap21, in osteoprecursor cells on the bone surface, chondroprogenitors in the articular cartilage, and in myofibers attached to bone tissue. Specifically in bone tissue during both short (15-day) and long (30-day) microgravity experiments, we observed significant loss of bone tissue and structure in both the pelvis and the femur. After 15-days of microgravity on STS-131, pelvic ischium displayed a 6.23 decrease in bone fraction (p0.005) and 11.91 decrease in bone thickness (p0.002). Furthermore, during long-duration spaceflight we observed onset of an accelerated aging-like phenotype and osteoarthritic disease state indicating that stem cells within the bone tissue fail to repair and regenerate tissues in a normal manner, leading to drastic tissue alterations in response to microgravity. The Rodent Research Hardware System provides the capability to investigate these effects during long-duration experiments on the International Space Station. During the Rodent Research-1 mission 10 16-week-old female C57Bl6J mice were exposed to 37-days of microgravity. All flight animals were euthanized and frozen on orbit for future dissection. Ground (n10) and vivarium controls (n10) were housed and processed to match the flight animal timeline. During this study we collected pelvis, femur, and tibia from all animal groups to test the hypothesis that stem cell-based tissue regeneration is significantly altered after 37

  14. Genotype-dependent activity of tryptophan hydroxylase-2 determines the response to citalopram in a mouse model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervo, Luigi; Canetta, Alessandro; Calcagno, Eleonora; Burbassi, Silvia; Sacchetti, Giuseppina; Caccia, Silvio; Fracasso, Claudia; Albani, Diego; Forloni, Gianluigi; Invernizzi, Roberto W

    2005-09-07

    Polymorphism of tryptophan hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of brain serotonin (5-HT), is associated with less synthesis of brain 5-HT in DBA/2J and BALB/c than in C57BL/6J and 129/Sv mice. We selected the forced swimming test, a mouse model used to assess the antidepressant potential of drugs, and neurochemical techniques to study strain differences in the response to citalopram, a selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor. Citalopram reduced immobility time in C57BL/6J and 129/Sv mice but had no such effect in DBA/2J and BALB/c mice. The drug reduced accumulation of 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), an indicator of 5-HT synthesis, in C57BL/6J and 129/Sv mice but much less in DBA/2J and BALB/c mice. Pretreatment with tryptophan raised 5-HTP accumulation and reinstated the antidepressant-like effect of citalopram in DBA/2J and BALB/c mice, whereas pharmacological inhibition of 5-HT synthesis prevented the effect of citalopram in C57BL/6J and 129/Sv mice. Because there were no strain differences in catecholamine synthesis, locomotor activity, and brain levels of citalopram at the end of the behavioral test, the results suggest that the failure of citalopram to reduce immobility time in DBA/2J and BALB/c mice is attributable to genotype-dependent impairment of 5-HT synthesis. Interstrain comparisons could probably be a useful strategy for understanding the mechanisms underlying the response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

  15. Oxygen sensing and conducted vasomotor responses in mouse cremaster arterioles in situ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngo, Thuc Anh; Jensen, Lars Jørn; Riemann, Mads Achen

    2010-01-01

    .0 +/- 4.9 mum) when changing from high (PO(2) = 242.5 +/- 13.3 mm Hg) to low (PO(2) = 22.5 +/- 4.8 mm Hg) oxygen tension as seen in the intact cremaster circulation (DeltaD = 18.7 +/- 1.0 mum). Blockade of NO synthases by L: -NAME and adenosine receptors by DPCPX had no effects on vasomotor responses...... to low or high oxygen. Induction of localized low (PO(2) = 23.3 +/- 5.7 mmHg) or high (PO(2) = 300.0 +/- 25.7 mm Hg) oxygen tension caused vasodilatation or -constriction locally and at a site 1,000 mum upstream (distantly). Glibenclamide blocker of ATP-sensitive K(+) channels inhibited vasodilatation...... and -constriction to low (PO(2) = 16.0 +/- 6.4 mm Hg) and high (PO(2) = 337.4 +/- 12.8 mm Hg) oxygen tension. 1) ATP-sensitive K(+) channels seem to mediate, at least in part, vasodilatation and vasoconstriction to low and high oxygen tension; 2) Red blood cells are not necessary for inducing vasodilatation...

  16. Differential role of tumor necrosis factor receptors in mouse brain inflammatory responses in cryolesion brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quintana, Albert; Giralt, Mercedes; Rojas, Santiago

    2005-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is one of the mediators dramatically increased after traumatic brain injury that leads to the activation, proliferation, and hypertrophy of mononuclear, phagocytic cells and gliosis. Eventually, TNF-alpha can induce both apoptosis and necrosis via intracell......Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is one of the mediators dramatically increased after traumatic brain injury that leads to the activation, proliferation, and hypertrophy of mononuclear, phagocytic cells and gliosis. Eventually, TNF-alpha can induce both apoptosis and necrosis via...... intracellular signaling. This cytokine exerts its functions via interaction with two receptors: type-1 receptor (TNFR1) and type-2 receptor (TNFR2). In this work, the inflammatory response after a freeze injury (cryolesion) in the cortex was studied in wild-type (WT) animals and in mice lacking TNFR1 (TNFR1 KO...... signaling also affected the expression of apoptosis/cell death-related genes (Fas, Rip, p53), matrix metalloproteinases (MMP3, MMP9, MMP12), and their inhibitors (TIMP1), suggesting a role of TNFR1 in extracellular matrix remodeling after injury. However, GDNF, NGF, and BDNF expression were not affected...

  17. Erythropoiesis in the aged mouse. II. Response to stimulation in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udupa, K.B.; Lipschitz, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    In this study, in vitro evidence is presented that erythropoietic precursors in aged mice respond less to stimulation by erythropoietin than do precursors in young mice. The effect of age on proliferation of differentiated erythroid cells from the marrow of young and old mice was examined in liquid culture to which increasing concentrations of erythropoietin were added. Cellular proliferation was measured indirectly by 59 Fe incorporation into heme and directly as tritiated thymidine incorporation into DNA. The number of normoblasts remaining in culture with and without the addition of erythropoietin was also measured. In each case, cellular proliferation was significantly lower in marrow in old than in young mice. In contrast, CFU-E colonies cultured with increasing doses of erythropoietin were similar in young and old animals. These findings indicate that aging causes a reduction in the proliferative response of differentiated erythroid cells. Failure of these cells to respond to stimulation is the likely mechanism for the reduced erythropoietic proliferative capacity found in aged animals

  18. Humanized Mouse Model of Ebola Virus Disease Mimics the Immune Responses in Human Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Brian H; Spengler, Jessica R; Chakrabarti, Ayan K; Khristova, Marina L; Sealy, Tara K; Coleman-McCray, JoAnn D; Martin, Brock E; Dodd, Kimberly A; Goldsmith, Cynthia S; Sanders, Jeanine; Zaki, Sherif R; Nichol, Stuart T; Spiropoulou, Christina F

    2016-03-01

    Animal models recapitulating human Ebola virus disease (EVD) are critical for insights into virus pathogenesis. Ebola virus (EBOV) isolates derived directly from human specimens do not, without adaptation, cause disease in immunocompetent adult rodents. Here, we describe EVD in mice engrafted with human immune cells (hu-BLT). hu-BLT mice developed EVD following wild-type EBOV infection. Infection with high-dose EBOV resulted in rapid, lethal EVD with high viral loads, alterations in key human antiviral immune cytokines and chemokines, and severe histopathologic findings similar to those shown in the limited human postmortem data available. A dose- and donor-dependent clinical course was observed in hu-BLT mice infected with lower doses of either Mayinga (1976) or Makona (2014) isolates derived from human EBOV cases. Engraftment of the human cellular immune system appeared to be essential for the observed virulence, as nonengrafted mice did not support productive EBOV replication or develop lethal disease. hu-BLT mice offer a unique model for investigating the human immune response in EVD and an alternative animal model for EVD pathogenesis studies and therapeutic screening. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  19. Strain differences in the response of mouse testicular stem cells to fractionated radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meistrich, M.L.; Finch, M.; Lu, C.C.; de Ruiter-Bootsma, A.L.; de Rooij, D.G.; Davids, J.A.G.

    1984-01-01

    The survival of spermatogonial stem cells in CBA and C3H mice after single and split-dose (24-hr interval) irradiation with fission neutrons and gamma rays was compared. The first doses of the fractionated regimes were either 150 rad (neutrons) or 600 rad (gamma). For both strains the neutron survival curves were exponential. The D 0 value of stem cells in CBA decreased from 83 to 25 rad upon fractionation; that of C3H stem cells decreased only from 54 to 36 rad. The survival curves for gamma irradiation, which all showed shoulders, indicated that C3H stem cells had larger repair capacities than CBA stem cells. However, the most striking difference between the two strains in response to gamma radiation was in the slopes of the second-dose curves. Whereas C3H stem cells showed a small increase of the D 0 upon fractionation (from 196 to 218 rad), CBA stem cells showed a marked decrease (from 243 to 148 rad). The decreases in D 0 upon fractionation, observed in both strains with neutron irradiation and also with gamma irradiation in CBA, are most likely the result of recruitment or progression of radioresistant survivors to a more sensitive state of proliferation or cell cycle phase. It may be that the survivng stem cells in C3H mice are recruited less rapidly and synchronously into active cycle than in CBA mice. Thus, it appears that the strain differences may be quantitative, rather than qualitative

  20. Adaptive responses of mouse skeletal muscle to contractile activity: The effect of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilaki, A; McArdle, F; Iwanejko, L M; McArdle, A

    2006-11-01

    This study has characterised the time course of two major transcriptional adaptive responses to exercise (changes in antioxidant defence enzyme activity and heat shock protein (HSP) content) in muscles of adult and old male mice following isometric contractions and has examined the mechanisms involved in the age-related reduction in transcription factor activation. Muscles of B6XSJL mice were subjected to isometric contractions and analysed for antioxidant defence enzyme activities, heat shock protein content and transcription factor DNA binding activity. Data demonstrated a significant increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activity and HSP content of muscles of adult mice following contractile activity which was associated with increased activation of the transcription factors, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), activator protein-1 (AP-1) and heat shock factor (HSF) following contractions. Significant increases in SOD and catalase activity and heat shock cognate (HSC70) content were seen in quiescent muscles of old mice. The increase in antioxidant defence enzyme activity following contractile activity seen in muscles of adult mice was not seen in muscles of old mice and this was associated with a failure to fully activate NF-kappaB and AP-1 following contractions. In contrast, although the production of HSPs was also reduced in muscles of old mice following contractile activity compared with muscles of adult mice following contractions, this was not due to a gross reduction in the DNA binding activity of HSF.

  1. Diminished thrombogenic responses by deletion of the Podocalyxin Gene in mouse megakaryocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Pericacho

    Full Text Available Podocalyxin (Podxl is a type I membrane sialoprotein of the CD34 family, originally described in the epithelial glomerular cells of the kidney (podocytes in which it plays an important function. Podxl can also be found in megakaryocytes and platelets among other extrarenal places. The surface exposure of Podxl upon platelet activation suggested it could play some physiological role. To elucidate the function of Podxl in platelets, we generated mice with restricted ablation of the podxl gene in megakaryocytes using the Cre-LoxP gene targeting methodology. Mice with Podxl-null megakaryocytes did not show any apparent phenotypical change and their rates of growth, life span and fertility did not differ from the floxed controls. However, Podxl-null mice showed prolonged bleeding time and decreased platelet aggregation in response to physiological agonists. The number, size-distribution and polyploidy of Podxl-null megakaryocytes were similar to the floxed controls. Podxl-null platelets showed normal content of surface receptors and normal activation by agonists. However, the mice bearing Podxl-null platelets showed a significant retardation in the ferric chloride-induced occlusion of the carotid artery. Moreover, acute thrombosis induced by the i.v. injection of sublethal doses of collagen and phenylephrine produced a smaller fall in the number of circulating platelets in Podxl-null mice than in control mice. In addition, perfusion of uncoagulated blood from Podxl-null mice in parallel flow chamber showed reduced adhesion of platelets and formation of aggregates under high shear stress. It is concluded that platelet Podxl is involved in the control of hemostasis acting as a platelet co-stimulator, likely due to its pro-adhesive properties.

  2. Heat response of mouse tumor cells treated with 5-thio-D-glucose and Rhodamine-123

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, J.G.; Lyons, J.C.; Song, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    Cellular heat-sensitivity has been known to depend on intracellular energy. The authors studied the thermal response of cultured SCK mammary carcinoma cells in vitro, following glycolytic inhibition with 5-thio-D-glucose (TG) and mitochondrial inactivation with Rhodamine-123 (Rh). The cells in exponential growth phase in RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with serum and antibiotics were exposed to medium containing Rh and/or TG, heated in a prewarmed water bath, and the clonogenic survivals of the heated cells were determined. Thermal cell killing by the 30 min. heating was increased, when 10 and 20 μg/ml Rh were present in the medium at temperatures above 42 0 and 40 0 C, respectively. The slope of the heat survival curve for 43 0 C heating became steeper in the presence of 10 and 20 μg/ml Rh, and the initial shoulder of the survival curve was unaltered at the dose of 10 μg/ml Rh, but disappeared at 20 μg/ml. A TG dose of 3 mg/ml, which is about 10 times that necessary to kill 90% of cells in 5 hrs. under hypoxic condition, was ineffective in altering any parameters of the heat survival curve of aerobic cells. The combined effect of TG and Rh on the thermal cell killing in aerobic condition did not exceed the effect of Rh alone. The above results indicate that the energy supply derived by mitochondria is an important determinant for the shape of heat survival curve of the proliferating and aerobic SCK tumor cells

  3. New gorilla adenovirus vaccine vectors induce potent immune responses and protection in a mouse malaria model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbach, Keith; Stefaniak, Maureen; Chen, Ping; Patterson, Noelle B; Liao, Grant; Weng, Shaojie; Krepkiy, Svetlana; Ekberg, Greg; Torano, Holly; Ettyreddy, Damodar; Gowda, Kalpana; Sonawane, Sharvari; Belmonte, Arnel; Abot, Esteban; Sedegah, Martha; Hollingdale, Michael R; Moormann, Ann; Vulule, John; Villasante, Eileen; Richie, Thomas L; Brough, Douglas E; Bruder, Joseph T

    2017-07-03

    A DNA-human Ad5 (HuAd5) prime-boost malaria vaccine has been shown to protect volunteers against a controlled human malaria infection. The potency of this vaccine, however, appeared to be affected by the presence of pre-existing immunity against the HuAd5 vector. Since HuAd5 seroprevalence is very high in malaria-endemic areas of the world, HuAd5 may not be the most appropriate malaria vaccine vector. This report describes the evaluation of the seroprevalence, immunogenicity and efficacy of three newly identified gorilla adenoviruses, GC44, GC45 and GC46, as potential malaria vaccine vectors. The seroprevalence of GC44, GC45 and GC46 is very low, and the three vectors are not efficiently neutralized by human sera from Kenya and Ghana, two countries where malaria is endemic. In mice, a single administration of GC44, GC45 and GC46 vectors expressing a murine malaria gene, Plasmodium yoelii circumsporozoite protein (PyCSP), induced robust PyCSP-specific T cell and antibody responses that were at least as high as a comparable HuAd5-PyCSP vector. Efficacy studies in a murine malaria model indicated that a prime-boost regimen with DNA-PyCSP and GC-PyCSP vectors can protect mice against a malaria challenge. Moreover, these studies indicated that a DNA-GC46-PyCSP vaccine regimen was significantly more efficacious than a DNA-HuAd5-PyCSP regimen. These data suggest that these gorilla-based adenovectors have key performance characteristics for an effective malaria vaccine. The superior performance of GC46 over HuAd5 highlights its potential for clinical development.

  4. Role of the mouse retinal photoreceptor ribbon synapse in visual motion processing for optokinetic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita, Yuko; Araki, Fumiyuki; Chaya, Taro; Kawano, Kenji; Furukawa, Takahisa; Miura, Kenichiro

    2015-01-01

    The ribbon synapse is a specialized synaptic structure in the retinal outer plexiform layer where visual signals are transmitted from photoreceptors to the bipolar and horizontal cells. This structure is considered important in high-efficiency signal transmission; however, its role in visual signal processing is unclear. In order to understand its role in visual processing, the present study utilized Pikachurin-null mutant mice that show improper formation of the photoreceptor ribbon synapse. We examined the initial and late phases of the optokinetic responses (OKRs). The initial phase was examined by measuring the open-loop eye velocity of the OKRs to sinusoidal grating patterns of various spatial frequencies moving at various temporal frequencies for 0.5 s. The mutant mice showed significant initial OKRs with a spatiotemporal frequency tuning (spatial frequency, 0.09 ± 0.01 cycles/°; temporal frequency, 1.87 ± 0.12 Hz) that was slightly different from the wild-type mice (spatial frequency, 0.11 ± 0.01 cycles/°; temporal frequency, 1.66 ± 0.12 Hz). The late phase of the OKRs was examined by measuring the slow phase eye velocity of the optokinetic nystagmus induced by the sinusoidal gratings of various spatiotemporal frequencies moving for 30 s. We found that the optimal spatial and temporal frequencies of the mutant mice (spatial frequency, 0.11 ± 0.02 cycles/°; temporal frequency, 0.81 ± 0.24 Hz) were both lower than those in the wild-type mice (spatial frequency, 0.15 ± 0.02 cycles/°; temporal frequency, 1.93 ± 0.62 Hz). These results suggest that the ribbon synapse modulates the spatiotemporal frequency tuning of visual processing along the ON pathway by which the late phase of OKRs is mediated.

  5. Role of the mouse retinal photoreceptor ribbon synapse in visual motion processing for optokinetic responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Sugita

    Full Text Available The ribbon synapse is a specialized synaptic structure in the retinal outer plexiform layer where visual signals are transmitted from photoreceptors to the bipolar and horizontal cells. This structure is considered important in high-efficiency signal transmission; however, its role in visual signal processing is unclear. In order to understand its role in visual processing, the present study utilized Pikachurin-null mutant mice that show improper formation of the photoreceptor ribbon synapse. We examined the initial and late phases of the optokinetic responses (OKRs. The initial phase was examined by measuring the open-loop eye velocity of the OKRs to sinusoidal grating patterns of various spatial frequencies moving at various temporal frequencies for 0.5 s. The mutant mice showed significant initial OKRs with a spatiotemporal frequency tuning (spatial frequency, 0.09 ± 0.01 cycles/°; temporal frequency, 1.87 ± 0.12 Hz that was slightly different from the wild-type mice (spatial frequency, 0.11 ± 0.01 cycles/°; temporal frequency, 1.66 ± 0.12 Hz. The late phase of the OKRs was examined by measuring the slow phase eye velocity of the optokinetic nystagmus induced by the sinusoidal gratings of various spatiotemporal frequencies moving for 30 s. We found that the optimal spatial and temporal frequencies of the mutant mice (spatial frequency, 0.11 ± 0.02 cycles/°; temporal frequency, 0.81 ± 0.24 Hz were both lower than those in the wild-type mice (spatial frequency, 0.15 ± 0.02 cycles/°; temporal frequency, 1.93 ± 0.62 Hz. These results suggest that the ribbon synapse modulates the spatiotemporal frequency tuning of visual processing along the ON pathway by which the late phase of OKRs is mediated.

  6. Impact of Age, Caloric Restriction, and Influenza Infection on Mouse Gut Microbiome: An Exploratory Study of the Role of Age-Related Microbiome Changes on Influenza Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Jenna M. Bartley; Jenna M. Bartley; Xin Zhou; Xin Zhou; George A. Kuchel; George A. Kuchel; George M. Weinstock; George M. Weinstock; Laura Haynes; Laura Haynes

    2017-01-01

    Immunosenescence refers to age-related declines in the capacity to respond to infections such as influenza (flu). Caloric restriction represents a known strategy to slow many aging processes, including those involving the immune system. More recently, some changes in the microbiome have been described with aging, while the gut microbiome appears to influence responses to flu vaccination and infection. With these considerations in mind, we used a well-established mouse model of flu infection t...

  7. Patterns of cross-sensitivity in the responses of clonal subpopulations isolated from the RIF-1 mouse sarcoma to selected nitrosoureas and nitrogen mustards.

    OpenAIRE

    Reeve, J. G.; Wright, K. A.; Workman, P.

    1984-01-01

    The response of clonal subpopulations isolated from the RIF-1 mouse sarcoma to melphalan treatment is independent of cell ploidy, whereas a clear relationship exists between ploidy and cell sensitivity to CCNU treatment. In the present study RIF-1 clones have been exposed to nitrogen mustard, aniline mustard and chlorambucil, and to nitrosoureas BCNU, MeCCNU and chlorozotocin, in order to evaluate whether or not the different physiochemical and biological activities of these agents would affe...

  8. Transcriptomic analysis of mouse EL4 T cells upon T cell activation and in response to protein synthesis inhibition via cycloheximide treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Pek Siew; Hardy, Kristine; Peng, Kaiman; Shannon, Frances M.

    2015-01-01

    T cell activation involves the recognition of a foreign antigen complexed to the major histocompatibility complex on the antigen presenting T cell to the T cell receptor. This leads to activation of signaling pathways, which ultimately leads to induction of key cytokine genes responsible for eradication of foreign antigens. We used the mouse EL4 T cell as a model system to study genes that are induced as a result of T cell activation using phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and calcium ionomycin...

  9. Definition of the locus responsible for systemic carnitine deficiency within a 1.6-cM region of mouse chromosome 11 by detailed linkage analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okita, Kohei; Tokino, Takashi; Nishimori, Hiroyuki [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

    1996-04-15

    Carnitine is an essential cofactor for oxidation of mitochondrial fatty acids. Carnitine deficiency results in failure of energy production by mitochondria and leads to metabolic encephalopathy, lipid-storage myopathy, and cardiomyopathy. The juvenile visceral steatosis (JVS) mouse, an animal model of systemic carnitine deficiency, inherits the JVS phenotype in autosomal recessive fashion, through a mutant allele mapped to mouse chromosome 11. As a step toward identifying the gene responsible for JVS by positional cloning, we attempted to refine the jvs locus in the mouse by detailed linkage analysis with 13 microsatellite markers, using 190 backcross progeny. Among the 13 loci tested, 5 (defined by markers D11Mit24, D11Mit111,D11Nds9, D11Mit86, and D11Mit23) showed no recombination, with a maximum lod score of 52.38. Our results implied that the jvs gene can be sought on mouse chromosome 11 within a genetic distance no greater than about 1.6 cM. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Dose-responsiveness and persistence of microRNA expression alterations induced by cigarette smoke in mouse lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izzotti, Alberto; Larghero, Patrizia; Longobardi, Mariagrazia; Cartiglia, Cristina; Camoirano, Anna; Steele, Vernon E.; De Flora, Silvio

    2011-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that exposure to cigarette smoke (CS), either mainstream or environmental, results in a remarkable downregulation of microRNA expression in the lung of both mice and rats. The goals of the present study were to evaluate the dose responsiveness to CS and the persistence of microRNA alterations after smoking cessation. ICR (CD-1) neonatal mice were exposed whole-body to mainstream CS, at the doses of 119, 292, 438, and 631 mg/m 3 of total particulate matter. Exposure started within 12 h after birth and continued daily for 4 weeks. The levels of bulky DNA adducts and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) were measured by 32 P postlabeling procedures, and the expression of 697 mouse microRNAs was analyzed by microarray. The highest CS dose was lethal. Exposure to CS caused a dose-dependent increase of DNA alterations. DNA adducts and, even more sharply, 8-oxodGuo were reverted 1 and 4 weeks after smoking cessation. Exposure to CS resulted in an evident dysregulation of microRNA expression profiles, mainly in the sense of downregulation. The two lowest doses were not particularly effective, while the highest nonlethal dose produced extensive microRNA alterations. The expression of most downregulated microRNAs, including among others 7 members of the let-7 family, was restored one week after smoking cessation. However, the recovery was incomplete for a limited array of microRNAs, including mir-34b, mir-345, mir-421, mir-450b, mir-466, and mir-469. Thus, it appears that microRNAs mainly behave as biomarkers of effect and that exposure to high-dose, lasting for an adequate period of time, is needed to trigger the CS-related carcinogenesis process in the experimental animal model used.

  11. In vivo functional requirement of the mouse Ifitm1 gene for germ cell development, interferon mediated immune response and somitogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingeborg Klymiuk

    Full Text Available The mammalian Interferon induced transmembrane protein 1 (Ifitm1 gene was originally identified as a member of a gene family highly inducible by type I and type II interferons. Based on expression analyses, it was suggested to be required for normal primordial germ cell migration. The knockdown of Ifitm1 in mouse embryos provided evidence for a role in somitogenesis. We generated the first targeted knockin allele of the Ifitm1 gene to systematically reassess all inferred functions. Sperm motility and the fertility of male and female mutant mice are as in wild type littermates. Embryonic somites and the adult vertebral column appear normal in homozygous Ifitm1 knockout mice, demonstrating that Ifitm1 is not essential for normal segmentation of the paraxial mesoderm. Proportions of leucocyte subsets, including granulocytes, monocytes, B-cells, T-cells, NK-cells, and NKT-cells, are unchanged in mutant mice. Based on a normal immune response to Listeria monocytogenes infection, there is no evidence for a dysfunction in downstream IFNγ signaling in Ifitm1 mutant mice. Expression from the Ifitm1 locus from E8.5 to E14.5 is highly dynamic. In contrast, in adult mice, Ifitm1 expression is highly restricted and strong in the bronchial epithelium. Intriguingly, IFITM1 is highly overexpressed in tumor epithelia cells of human squamous cell carcinomas and in adenocarcinomas of NSCLC patients. These analyses underline the general importance of targeted in vivo studies for the functional annotation of the mammalian genome. The first comprehensive description of the Ifitm1 expression pattern provides a rational basis for the further examination of Ifitm1 gene functions. Based on our data, the fact that IFITM1 can function as a negative regulator of cell proliferation, and because the gene maps to chromosome band 11p15.5, previously associated with NSCLC, it is likely that IFITM1 in man has a key role in tumor formation.

  12. Thiamine deficiency activates hypoxia inducible factor-1α to facilitate pro-apoptotic responses in mouse primary astrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristy Zera

    Full Text Available Thiamine is an essential enzyme cofactor required for proper metabolic function and maintenance of metabolism and energy production in the brain. In developed countries, thiamine deficiency (TD is most often manifested following chronic alcohol consumption leading to impaired mitochondrial function, oxidative stress, inflammation and excitotoxicity. These biochemical lesions result in apoptotic cell death in both neurons and astrocytes. Comparable histological injuries in patients with hypoxia/ischemia and TD have been described in the thalamus and mammillary bodies, suggesting a congruency between the cellular responses to these stresses. Consistent with hypoxia/ischemia, TD stabilizes and activates Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α (HIF-1α under physiological oxygen levels. However, the role of TD-induced HIF-1α in neurological injury is currently unknown. Using Western blot analysis and RT-PCR, we have demonstrated that TD induces HIF-1α expression and activity in primary mouse astrocytes. We observed a time-dependent increase in mRNA and protein expression of the pro-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory HIF-1α target genes MCP1, BNIP3, Nix and Noxa during TD. We also observed apoptotic cell death in TD as demonstrated by PI/Annexin V staining, TUNEL assay, and Cell Death ELISA. Pharmacological inhibition of HIF-1α activity using YC1 and thiamine repletion both reduced expression of pro-apoptotic HIF-1α target genes and apoptotic cell death in TD. These results demonstrate that induction of HIF-1α mediated transcriptional up-regulation of pro-apoptotic/inflammatory signaling contributes to astrocyte cell death during thiamine deficiency.

  13. The mouse cortical meninges are the site of immune responses to many different pathogens, and are accessible to intravital imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Jonathan A; Stewart-Hutchinson, Phillip J; Myburgh, Elmarie; Brewer, James M

    2017-08-15

    A wide range of viral and microbial infections are known to cause meningitis, and there is evidence that the meninges are the gateway to pathogenic invasion of the brain parenchyma. Hence observation of these regions has wide application to understanding host-pathogen interactions. Interactions between pathogens and cells of the immune response can be modified by changes in their environment, such as suppression of the flow of blood and lymph, and, particularly in the case of the meninges, with their unsupported membranes, invasive dissection can alter the tissue architecture. For these reasons, intravital imaging through the unperforated skull is the method of choice. We give a protocol for a simple method of two-photon microscopy through the thinned cortical skull of the anesthetized mouse to enable real-time imaging with sub-micron resolution through the meninges and into the superficial brain parenchyma. In reporter mice in which selected cell types express fluorescent proteins, imaging after infection with fluorescent pathogens (lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, Trypanosoma brucei or Plasmodium berghei) has shown strong recruitment to the cortical meninges of immune cells, including neutrophils, T cells, and putative dendritic cells and macrophages. Without special labeling, the boundaries between the dura mater, the leptomeninx, and the parenchyma are not directly visualized in intravital two-photon microscopy, but other landmarks and characteristics, which we illustrate, allow the researcher to identify the compartment being imaged. While most infectious meningitides are localized mainly in the dura mater, others involve recruitment of immune cells to the leptomeninx. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. MicroRNA-29b modulates innate and antigen-specific immune responses in mouse models of autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apolline Salama

    Full Text Available In addition to important regulatory roles in gene expression through RNA interference, it has recently been shown that microRNAs display immune stimulatory effects through direct interaction with receptors of innate immunity of the Toll-like receptor family, aggravating neuronal damage and tumour growth. Yet no evidence exists on consequences of microRNA immune stimulatory actions in the context of an autoimmune disease. Using microRNA analogues, we here show that pancreatic beta cell-derived microRNA sequences induce pro-inflammatory (TNFa, IFNa, IL-12, IL-6 or suppressive (IL-10 cytokine secretion by primary mouse dendritic cells in a sequence-dependent manner. For miR-29b, immune stimulation in RAW264.7 macrophages involved the endosomal Toll-like receptor-7, independently of the canonical RNA interference pathway. In vivo, the systemic delivery of miR-29b activates CD11b+B220- myeloid and CD11b-B220+ plasmacytoid dendritic cells and induces IFNa, TNFa and IL-6 production in the serum of recipient mice. Strikingly, in a murine model of adoptive transfer of autoimmune diabetes, miR-29b reduces the cytolytic activity of transferred effector CD8+ T-cells, insulitis and disease incidence in a single standalone intervention. Endogenous miR-29b, spontaneously released from beta-cells within exosomes, stimulates TNFa secretion from spleen cells isolated from diabetes-prone NOD mice in vitro. Hence, microRNA sequences modulate innate and ongoing adaptive immune responses raising the question of their potential role in the breakdown of tolerance and opening up new applications for microRNA-based immune therapy.

  15. TH-E-BRF-07: Raman Spectroscopy for Radiation Treatment Response Assessment in a Lung Metastases Mouse Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devpura, S; Barton, K; Brown, S; Siddiqui, F; Chetty, I; Sethi, S; Klein, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Raman spectroscopy is an optical spectroscopic method used to probe chemical information about a target tissue. Our goal was to investigate whether Raman spectroscopy is able to distinguish lung tumors from normal lung tissue and whether this technique can identify the molecular changes induced by radiation. Methods: 4T1 mouse breast cancer cells were implanted subcutaneously into the flanks of 6 Balb/C female mice. Four additional mice were used as “normal lung” controls. After 14 days, 3 mice bearing tumors received 6Gy to the left lung with 6MV photons and the other three were treated as “unirradiated tumor” controls. At a 24-hour time point, lungs were excised and the specimens were sectioned using a cryostat; alternating sections were either stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) for evaluation by a pathologist or unstained for Raman measurements. 240 total Raman spectra were collected; 84 from normal lung controls; 63 from unirradiated tumors and 64 from tumors irradiated with 6Gy in a single fraction. Raman spectra were also collected from normal lung tissues of mice with unirradiated tumors. Principal component analysis (PCA) and discriminant function analysis (DFA) were performed to analyze the data. Results: Raman bands assignable to DNA/RNA showed prominent contributions in tumor tissues while Raman bands associated with hemoglobin showed strong contributions in normal lung tissue. PCA/DFA analysis identified normal lung tissue and tumor with 100% and 98.4% accuracy, respectively, relative to pathologic scoring. Additionally, normal lung tissues from unirradiated mice bearing tumors were classified as normal with 100% accuracy. In a model consisting of unirradiated and irradiated tumors identification accuracy was 79.4% and 93.8% respectively, relative to pathologic assessment. Conclusion: Initial results demonstrate the promise for Raman spectroscopy in the diagnosis normal vs. lung metastases as well as the assessment of

  16. TH-E-BRF-07: Raman Spectroscopy for Radiation Treatment Response Assessment in a Lung Metastases Mouse Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devpura, S; Barton, K; Brown, S; Siddiqui, F; Chetty, I [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Sethi, S [Karmanos Cancer Center, Detroit, MI (United States); Klein, M [Children' s Hospital of Michigan, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Raman spectroscopy is an optical spectroscopic method used to probe chemical information about a target tissue. Our goal was to investigate whether Raman spectroscopy is able to distinguish lung tumors from normal lung tissue and whether this technique can identify the molecular changes induced by radiation. Methods: 4T1 mouse breast cancer cells were implanted subcutaneously into the flanks of 6 Balb/C female mice. Four additional mice were used as “normal lung” controls. After 14 days, 3 mice bearing tumors received 6Gy to the left lung with 6MV photons and the other three were treated as “unirradiated tumor” controls. At a 24-hour time point, lungs were excised and the specimens were sectioned using a cryostat; alternating sections were either stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) for evaluation by a pathologist or unstained for Raman measurements. 240 total Raman spectra were collected; 84 from normal lung controls; 63 from unirradiated tumors and 64 from tumors irradiated with 6Gy in a single fraction. Raman spectra were also collected from normal lung tissues of mice with unirradiated tumors. Principal component analysis (PCA) and discriminant function analysis (DFA) were performed to analyze the data. Results: Raman bands assignable to DNA/RNA showed prominent contributions in tumor tissues while Raman bands associated with hemoglobin showed strong contributions in normal lung tissue. PCA/DFA analysis identified normal lung tissue and tumor with 100% and 98.4% accuracy, respectively, relative to pathologic scoring. Additionally, normal lung tissues from unirradiated mice bearing tumors were classified as normal with 100% accuracy. In a model consisting of unirradiated and irradiated tumors identification accuracy was 79.4% and 93.8% respectively, relative to pathologic assessment. Conclusion: Initial results demonstrate the promise for Raman spectroscopy in the diagnosis normal vs. lung metastases as well as the assessment of

  17. Metabolomics (liver and blood profiling) in a mouse model in response to fasting: A study of hepatic steatosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginneken, V. van; Verhey, E.; Poelmann, R.; Ramakers, R.; Dijk, K.W. van; Ham, L.; Voshol, P.; Havekes, L.; Eck, M. van; Greef, J. van der

    2007-01-01

    A metabolomic approach was applied to a mouse model of starvation-induced hepatic steatosis. After 24 h of fasting it appears that starvation reduced the phospholipids (PL), free cholesterol (FC), and cholesterol esters (CE) content of low-density lipoproteins (LDL). In liver lipid profiles major

  18. Cytogenetic comparison of the responses of mouse and human peripheral blood lymphocytes to 60Co gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kligerman, A.D.; Halperin, E.C.; Erexson, G.L.; Honore, G.; Westbrook-Collins, B.; Allen, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to compare the chromosome damaging effects of 60 Co gamma radiation on mouse and human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). Either whole blood or isolated and pelleted mononuclear leucocytes (MNLs) were irradiated with a 60 Co unit to yield exposures of 1, 2, 3, or 4 Gy. In addition, mice were whole-body irradiated in vivo with the same doses so that an in vitro-in vivo comparison could be made. The results indicate that mouse PBLs irradiated in whole blood, whether in vivo or in vitro, respond similarly to 60 Co gamma rays as measured by dicentric chromosome formation. In addition, mouse and human PBLs showed a similar radiosensitivity, but because the mouse PBL data were best fitted to an exponential function and the human PBL data to a quadratic function, direct comparisons were difficult to make. Pelleted MNLs from mice were much less sensitive to the clastogenic effects of gamma radiation than whole blood. This is believed to be due to hypoxic conditions that developed during irradiation and transport. Human PBLs did not show a marked difference whether irradiated in whole blood or as pelleted MNLs in tissue culture medium

  19. Deficiency in adipocyte chemokine receptor CXCR4 exacerbates obesity and compromises thermoregulatory responses of brown adipose tissue in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Longbiao; Heuser-Baker, Janet; Herlea-Pana, Oana; Zhang, Nan; Szweda, Luke I.; Griffin, Timothy M.; Barlic-Dicen, Jana

    2014-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CXCR4 is expressed on adipocytes and macrophages in adipose tissue, but its role in this tissue remains unknown. We evaluated whether deficiency in either adipocyte or myeloid leukocyte CXCR4 affects body weight (BW) and adiposity in a mouse model of high-fat-diet (HFD)-induced obesity. We found that ablation of adipocyte, but not myeloid leukocyte, CXCR4 exacerbated obesity. The HFD-fed adipocyte-specific CXCR4-knockout (AdCXCR4ko) mice, compared to wild-type C57BL/6 control mice, had increased BW (average: 52.0 g vs. 35.5 g), adiposity (average: 49.3 vs. 21.0% of total BW), and inflammatory leukocyte content in white adipose tissue (WAT), despite comparable food intake. As previously reported, HFD feeding increased uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) expression (fold increase: 3.5) in brown adipose tissue (BAT) of the C57BL/6 control mice. However, no HFD-induced increase in UCP1 expression was observed in the AdCXCR4ko mice, which were cold sensitive. Thus, our study suggests that adipocyte CXCR4 limits development of obesity by preventing excessive inflammatory cell recruitment into WAT and by supporting thermogenic activity of BAT. Since CXCR4 is conserved between mouse and human, the newfound role of CXCR4 in mouse adipose tissue may parallel the role of this chemokine receptor in human adipose tissue.—Yao, L., Heuser-Baker, J., Herlea-Pana, O., Zhang, N., Szweda, L. I., Griffin, T. M., Barlic-Dicen, J. Deficiency in adipocyte chemokine receptor CXCR4 exacerbates obesity and compromises thermoregulatory responses of brown adipose tissue in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. PMID:25016030

  20. Chemotactic and inflammatory responses in the liver and brain are associated with pathogenesis of Rift Valley fever virus infection in the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly K Gray

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV is a major human and animal pathogen associated with severe disease including hemorrhagic fever or encephalitis. RVFV is endemic to parts of Africa and the Arabian Peninsula, but there is significant concern regarding its introduction into non-endemic regions and the potentially devastating effect to livestock populations with concurrent infections of humans. To date, there is little detailed data directly comparing the host response to infection with wild-type or vaccine strains of RVFV and correlation with viral pathogenesis. Here we characterized clinical and systemic immune responses to infection with wild-type strain ZH501 or IND vaccine strain MP-12 in the C57BL/6 mouse. Animals infected with live-attenuated MP-12 survived productive viral infection with little evidence of clinical disease and minimal cytokine response in evaluated tissues. In contrast, ZH501 infection was lethal, caused depletion of lymphocytes and platelets and elicited a strong, systemic cytokine response which correlated with high virus titers and significant tissue pathology. Lymphopenia and platelet depletion were indicators of disease onset with indications of lymphocyte recovery correlating with increases in G-CSF production. RVFV is hepatotropic and in these studies significant clinical and histological data supported these findings; however, significant evidence of a pro-inflammatory response in the liver was not apparent. Rather, viral infection resulted in a chemokine response indicating infiltration of immunoreactive cells, such as neutrophils, which was supported by histological data. In brains of ZH501 infected mice, a significant chemokine and pro-inflammatory cytokine response was evident, but with little pathology indicating meningoencephalitis. These data suggest that RVFV pathogenesis in mice is associated with a loss of liver function due to liver necrosis and hepatitis yet the long-term course of disease for those that

  1. Role of an ER stress response element in regulating the bidirectional promoter of the mouse CRELD2 - ALG12 gene pair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirata Yoko

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, we identified cysteine-rich with EGF-like domains 2 (CRELD2 as a novel endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress-inducible gene and characterized its transcriptional regulation by ATF6 under ER stress conditions. Interestingly, the CRELD2 and asparagine-linked glycosylation 12 homolog (ALG12 genes are arranged as a bidirectional (head-to-head gene pair and are separated by less than 400 bp. In this study, we characterized the transcriptional regulation of the mouse CRELD2 and ALG12 genes that is mediated by a common bidirectional promoter. Results This short intergenic region contains an ER stress response element (ERSE sequence and is well conserved among the human, rat and mouse genomes. Microarray analysis revealed that CRELD2 and ALG12 mRNAs were induced in Neuro2a cells by treatment with thapsigargin (Tg, an ER stress inducer, in a time-dependent manner. Other ER stress inducers, tunicamycin and brefeldin A, also increased the expression of these two mRNAs in Neuro2a cells. We then tested for the possible involvement of the ERSE motif and other regulatory sites of the intergenic region in the transcriptional regulation of the mouse CRELD2 and ALG12 genes by using variants of the bidirectional reporter construct. With regards to the promoter activities of the CRELD2-ALG12 gene pair, the entire intergenic region hardly responded to Tg, whereas the CRELD2 promoter constructs of the proximal region containing the ERSE motif showed a marked responsiveness to Tg. The same ERSE motif of ALG12 gene in the opposite direction was less responsive to Tg. The direction and the distance of this motif from each transcriptional start site, however, has no impact on the responsiveness of either gene to Tg treatment. Additionally, we found three putative sequences in the intergenic region that antagonize the ERSE-mediated transcriptional activation. Conclusions These results show that the mouse CRELD2 and ALG12 genes are arranged as a

  2. Effects of lithium chloride as a potential radioprotective agent on radiation response of DNA synthesis in mouse germinal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, D. [Radiation Biology and Biochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Rajan, R. [Radiation Biology and Biochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Krishnamoorthy, L. [Kidwai Memorial Institute of Oncology, Bangalore 560 029 (India); Singh, B.B. [Radiation Biology and Biochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    1997-06-01

    Mouse spermatogonial germ cells are highly sensitive to ionizing radiation. Lithium salts are reported to stimulate the postirradiation recovery of hematopoietic marrow cells. We have, therefore, examined whether administered lithium chloride (LiCl) would also be able to protect the mouse germinal cells against radiation injury. Taking DNA synthesis as an endpoint, our results show that the testicular DNA-specific activity in irradiated mice was higher by 61% on average when they had been pretreated with LiCl both 24 h and 1 h prior to {gamma}-irradiation (2.0 Gy). It was also observed that the DNA synthetic activity in the germinal cells fully recovered after LiCl pretreatment at doses of 40 mg per kg body weight prior to total body irradiation of 0.05-0.25 Gy, whereas at doses of 0.5-6.0 Gy, following the same procedure of LiCl pretreatment, only an incomplete recovery was observed. The dose reduction factor for LiCl is 1.84. The current findings indicate that pretreatment with LiCl provides considerable protection against radiation damage in mouse spermatogonia. (orig.). With 3 tabs.

  3. Effects of lithium chloride as a potential radioprotective agent on radiation response of DNA synthesis in mouse germinal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, D; Rajan, R; Krishnamoorthy, L; Singh, B B

    1997-06-01

    Mouse spermatogonial germ cells are highly sensitive to ionizing radiation. Lithium salts are reported to stimulate the postirradiation recovery of hematopoietic marrow cells. We have, therefore, examined whether administered lithium chloride (LiCl) would also be able to protect the mouse germinal cells against radiation injury. Taking DNA synthesis as an endpoint, our results show that the testicular DNA-specific activity in irradiated mice was higher by 61% on average when they had been pretreated with LiCl both 24 h and 1 h prior to gamma-irradiation (2.0 Gy). It was also observed that the DNA synthetic activity in the germinal cells fully recovered after LiCl pretreatment at doses of 40 mg per kg body weight prior to total body irradiation of 0.05-0.25 Gy, whereas at doses of 0.5-6.0 Gy, following the same procedure of LiCl pretreatment, only an incomplete recovery was observed. The dose reduction factor for LiCl is 1.84. The current findings indicate that pretreatment with LiCl provides considerable protection against radiation damage in mouse spermatogonia.

  4. Effects of reproductive status on behavioral and endocrine responses to acute stress in a biparental rodent, the California mouse (Peromyscus californicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauke, Miyetani; Malisch, Jessica L; Robinson, Cymphonee; de Jong, Trynke R; Saltzman, Wendy

    2011-06-01

    In several mammalian species, lactating females show blunted neural, hormonal, and behavioral responses to stressors. It is not known whether new fathers also show stress hyporesponsiveness in species in which males provide infant care. To test this possibility, we determined the effects of male and female reproductive status on stress responsiveness in the biparental, monogamous California mouse (Peromyscus californicus). Breeding (N=8 females, 8 males), nonbreeding (N=10 females, 10 males) and virgin mice (N=12 females, 9 males) were exposed to a 5-min predator-urine stressor at two time points, corresponding to the early postpartum (5-7 days postpartum) and mid/late postpartum (19-21 days postpartum) phases, and blood samples were collected immediately afterwards. Baseline blood samples were obtained 2 days prior to each stress test. Baseline plasma corticosterone (CORT) concentrations did not differ among male or female groups. CORT responses to the stressor did not differ among female reproductive groups, and all three groups showed distinct behavioral responses to predator urine. Virgin males tended to increase their CORT response from the first to the second stress test, while breeding and nonbreeding males did not. Moreover, virgin and nonbreeding males showed significant behavioral changes in response to predator urine, whereas breeding males did not. These results suggest that adrenocortical responses to a repeated stressor in male California mice may be modulated by cohabitation with a female, whereas behavioral responses to stress may be blunted by parental status. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Transcriptomic analysis of mouse EL4 T cells upon T cell activation and in response to protein synthesis inhibition via cycloheximide treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pek Siew Lim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available T cell activation involves the recognition of a foreign antigen complexed to the major histocompatibility complex on the antigen presenting T cell to the T cell receptor. This leads to activation of signaling pathways, which ultimately leads to induction of key cytokine genes responsible for eradication of foreign antigens. We used the mouse EL4 T cell as a model system to study genes that are induced as a result of T cell activation using phorbol myristate acetate (PMA and calcium ionomycin (I as stimuli. We were also interested to examine the importance of new protein synthesis in regulating the expression of genes involved in T cell activation. Thus we have pre-treated mouse EL4 T cells with cycloheximide, a protein synthesis inhibitor, and left the cells unstimulated or stimulated with PMA/I for 4 h. We performed microarray expression profiling of these cells to correlate the gene expression with chromatin state of T cells upon T cell activation [1]. Here, we detail further information and analysis of the microarray data, which shows that T cell activation leads to differential expression of genes and inducible genes can be further classified as primary and secondary response genes based on their protein synthesis dependency. The data is available in the Gene Expression Omnibus under accession number GSE13278. Keywords: EL4 T cell, Microarray, T cell activation, Inducible genes

  6. Transcriptomic analysis of mouse EL4 T cells upon T cell activation and in response to protein synthesis inhibition via cycloheximide treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Pek Siew; Hardy, Kristine; Peng, Kaiman; Shannon, Frances M

    2016-03-01

    T cell activation involves the recognition of a foreign antigen complexed to the major histocompatibility complex on the antigen presenting T cell to the T cell receptor. This leads to activation of signaling pathways, which ultimately leads to induction of key cytokine genes responsible for eradication of foreign antigens. We used the mouse EL4 T cell as a model system to study genes that are induced as a result of T cell activation using phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and calcium ionomycin (I) as stimuli. We were also interested to examine the importance of new protein synthesis in regulating the expression of genes involved in T cell activation. Thus we have pre-treated mouse EL4 T cells with cycloheximide, a protein synthesis inhibitor, and left the cells unstimulated or stimulated with PMA/I for 4 h. We performed microarray expression profiling of these cells to correlate the gene expression with chromatin state of T cells upon T cell activation [1]. Here, we detail further information and analysis of the microarray data, which shows that T cell activation leads to differential expression of genes and inducible genes can be further classified as primary and secondary response genes based on their protein synthesis dependency. The data is available in the Gene Expression Omnibus under accession number GSE13278.

  7. An attempt to distinguish a modified genetic response of the mouse testis to X-ray exposure by the action of a spermatogonial chalone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cattanach, B.M.; Jones, J.T.; Andrews, S.J.; Crocker, M.

    1979-01-01

    The results of an experiment designed to distinguish whether the action of a spermatogonial chalone in the mouse testis could modify the genetic response of a depleted stem spermatogonial population to X-radiation are reported. The results are consistent with the view that the stem cell population of the depleted adult testis a few days after damage closely approximates that of the early post-natal or immature animal, do not provide any indication that the testis extract in any way influence the response of the depleted testis to the 500-rad challenging dose. The yield of genetic damage was almost identical to that in the two control groups and the sterile period and testis weight data provided little reason to suspect that the amount of spermatogonial killing was altered. (Auth.)

  8. Improved cellular response of ion modified poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) substrates for mouse fibroblast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adhikari, Ananta Raj, E-mail: aa8381@gmail.com [Department of Sciences, Wentworth Institute of Technology, Boston MA 02115 (United States); Geranpayeh, Tanya [Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Chu, Wei Kan [Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Otteson, Deborah C. [Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Department of Basic and Vision Sciences, College of Optometry, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States)

    2016-03-01

    In this report, the effects of argon (Ar) ion irradiation on poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) substrates on biocompatibility were studied. PLGA scaffold substrates were prepared by spin coating glass surfaces with PLGA dissolved in anhydrous chloroform. Previously, we showed that surface modifications of PLGA films using ion irradiation modulate the inherent hydrophobicity of PLGA surface. Here we show that with increasing ion dose (1 × 10{sup 12} to 1 × 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}), hydrophobicity and surface roughness decreased. Biocompatibility for NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cells was increased by argon irradiation of PLGA substrates. On unirradiated PLGA films, fibroblasts had a longer doubling time and cell densities were 52% lower than controls after 48 h in vitro. Argon irradiated PLGA substrates supported growth rates similar to control. Despite differences in cell cycle kinetics, there was no detectible cytotoxicity observed on any substrate. This demonstrates that argon ion irradiation can be used to tune the surface microstructure and generate substrates that are more compatible for the cell growth and proliferation. - Highlights: • Argon irradiation modifies surface chemistry and increases hydrophilicity of poly(lactic-glycolic) acid (PLGA) films. • Both native and irradiated PLGA films were not cytotoxic for mouse fibroblasts. • Fibroblast proliferation increased on PLGA substrates modified with higher doses of Argon irradiation. • Surface modification with Argon irradiation increases biocompatibility of PLGA films.

  9. Improved cellular response of ion modified poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) substrates for mouse fibroblast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikari, Ananta Raj; Geranpayeh, Tanya; Chu, Wei Kan; Otteson, Deborah C.

    2016-01-01

    In this report, the effects of argon (Ar) ion irradiation on poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) substrates on biocompatibility were studied. PLGA scaffold substrates were prepared by spin coating glass surfaces with PLGA dissolved in anhydrous chloroform. Previously, we showed that surface modifications of PLGA films using ion irradiation modulate the inherent hydrophobicity of PLGA surface. Here we show that with increasing ion dose (1 × 10 12 to 1 × 10 14 ions/cm 2 ), hydrophobicity and surface roughness decreased. Biocompatibility for NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cells was increased by argon irradiation of PLGA substrates. On unirradiated PLGA films, fibroblasts had a longer doubling time and cell densities were 52% lower than controls after 48 h in vitro. Argon irradiated PLGA substrates supported growth rates similar to control. Despite differences in cell cycle kinetics, there was no detectible cytotoxicity observed on any substrate. This demonstrates that argon ion irradiation can be used to tune the surface microstructure and generate substrates that are more compatible for the cell growth and proliferation. - Highlights: • Argon irradiation modifies surface chemistry and increases hydrophilicity of poly(lactic-glycolic) acid (PLGA) films. • Both native and irradiated PLGA films were not cytotoxic for mouse fibroblasts. • Fibroblast proliferation increased on PLGA substrates modified with higher doses of Argon irradiation. • Surface modification with Argon irradiation increases biocompatibility of PLGA films.

  10. Mouse-specific antibody responses to a monoclonal antibody during repeated immunoscintigraphy investigations: Comparison of antibody titres and imaging studies in a rat model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimm, M.V.; Gribben, S.J.; Markham, A.J.; Perkins, A.C.

    1990-01-01

    As a model for human mouse-specific antibody responses in patients undergoing immunoscintigraphy, we have investigated in rats the production of mouse-specific antibodies (MA) to the mouse monoclonal antibody 791T/36. At intervals of between 5 and 16 weeks the rats were given repeated cycles of intravenous (IV) injections of antibody with or without a simultaneous intradermal (ID) injection. The IV dose was 60 μg/kg, a dose similar to that used in many clinical immunoscintigraphy studies. The ID injection was 2 μg, which mimicks the skin test dose often given in clinical imaging protocols. The study was carried out with both 131 I-labelled antibody and with antibody labelled with 111 In by DTPA chelation. MA was measured with a passive haemagglutination assay using sheep red blood cells coated with the monoclonal antibody. Of rats given ID injections of unlabelled antibody at the same time as the IV imaging doses, 9/20 produced MA during 4 cycles of injections. In contrast, only 2/16 rats given only the IV dose produced MA. Both 131 I- and 111 In-labelled antibody appeared equally immunogenic with 5/18 and 6/18 overall responders, respectively. The production of MA was associated with a significant perturbation in the biodistribution of the IV dose of labelled antibody as seen by gamma-camera imaging of the rats given 111 In-labelled antibody. There was clearance of immune complexes to the liver, this organ accumulating up to 90% of the whole body count rate of radiolabel. MA titres of between 1/100 and 1/78000 caused equal perturbation of biodistribution, although below 1/100 the effect was more variable. (orig.)

  11. Mouse adhalin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, L; Vachon, P H; Kuang, W

    1997-01-01

    . To analyze the biological roles of adhalin, we cloned the mouse adhalin cDNA, raised peptide-specific antibodies to its cytoplasmic domain, and examined its expression and localization in vivo and in vitro. The mouse adhalin sequence was 80% identical to that of human, rabbit, and hamster. Adhalin...... was specifically expressed in striated muscle cells and their immediate precursors, and absent in many other cell types. Adhalin expression in embryonic mouse muscle was coincident with primary myogenesis. Its expression was found to be up-regulated at mRNA and protein levels during myogenic differentiation...

  12. Nonstructural 5A Protein of Hepatitis C Virus Interferes with Toll-Like Receptor Signaling and Suppresses the Interferon Response in Mouse Liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeya Tsutsumi

    Full Text Available The hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein NS5A is involved in resistance to the host immune response, as well as the viral lifecycle such as replication and maturation. Here, we established transgenic mice expressing NS5A protein in the liver and examined innate immune responses against lipopolysaccharide (LPS in vivo. Intrahepatic gene expression levels of cytokines such as interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ were significantly suppressed after LPS injection in the transgenic mouse liver. Induction of the C-C motif chemokine ligand 2, 4, and 5 was also suppressed. Phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, which is activated by cytokines, was also reduced, and expression levels of interferon-stimulated genes, 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthase, interferon-inducible double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase, and myxovirus resistance 1 were similarly suppressed. Since LPS binds to toll-like receptor 4 and stimulates the downstream pathway leading to induction of these genes, we examined the extracellular signal-regulated kinase and IκB-α. The phosphorylation levels of these molecules were reduced in transgenic mouse liver, indicating that the pathway upstream of the molecules was disrupted by NS5A. Further analyses revealed that the interaction between interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-1 and tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor-6 was dispersed in transgenic mice, suggesting that NS5A may interfere with this interaction via myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88, which was shown to interact with NS5A. Since the gut microbiota, a source of LPS, is known to be associated with pathological conditions in liver diseases, our results suggest the involvement of NS5A in the pathogenesis of HCV infected-liver via the suppression of innate immunity.

  13. Differential response of the liver to bile acid treatment in a mouse model of Niemann-Pick disease type C [version 2; referees: 2 approved, 1 not approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena-Raluca Nicoli

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC disease is a neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in the NPC1 or NPC2 genes. Liver disease is also a common feature of NPC that can present as cholestatic jaundice in the neonatal period. Liver enzymes can remain elevated above the normal range in some patients as they age. We recently reported suppression of the P450 detoxification system in a mouse model of NPC disease and also in post-mortem liver from NPC patients. We demonstrated the ability of the hydrophobic bile acid ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA (3α, 7β-dihydroxy-5β-cholanic acid to correct the P450 system suppression. UDCA is used to treat several cholestatic disorders and was tested in NPC due to the P450 system being regulated by bile acids. Here, we compare the effect of UDCA and cholic acid (CA, another bile acid, in the NPC mouse model. We observed unexpected hepatotoxicity in response to CA treatment of NPC mice. No such hepatotoxicity was associated with UDCA treatment. These results suggest that CA treatment is contraindicated in NPC patients, whilst supporting the use of UDCA as an adjunctive therapy in NPC patients.

  14. PSK, a biological response modifier, modifies p53 expression, mitosis and apoptosis in X-ray irradiated mouse embryos. Possible cellular mechanism of the anti-teratogenic effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagohashi, Yukiko; Naora, Hiroyuki; Otani, Hiroki

    2002-01-01

    We previously showed that PSK, a biological response modifier, suppressed X-ray irradiation induced ocular anomalies in mouse embryos. In the present study, in mouse embryos irradiated at E7.5, PSK, when administered immediately after irradiation, suppressed mitosis and increased apoptosis as compared with embryos not treated with PSK at 12 hrs after irradiation. In the irradiated embryos, p53, which is normally expressed at a high level in early embryos, increased at 6 hrs and decreased at 12 hrs after irradiation. In the irradiated and PSK-treated embryos, the p53 level did not change at 6 hrs, increased at 12 hrs and decreased at 24 hrs after irradiation. This timing of PSK-induced delayed increase of p53 coincided with that of the PSK-induced decrease in mitosis and increase in apoptosis. These results suggested that PSK modified the p53 level and affected cell proliferation and apoptosis, which might contribute to the suppression of teratogenesis. (author)

  15. Motavizumab, A Neutralizing Anti-Respiratory Syncytial Virus (Rsv Monoclonal Antibody Significantly Modifies The Local And Systemic Cytokine Responses Induced By Rsv In The Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafri Hasan S

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Motavizumab (MEDI-524 is a monoclonal antibody with enhanced neutralizing activity against RSV. In mice, motavizumab suppressed RSV replication which resulted in significant reduction of clinical parameters of disease severity. We evaluated the effect of motavizumab on the local and systemic immune response induced by RSV in the mouse model. Balb/c mice were intranasally inoculated with 106.5 PFU RSV A2 or medium. Motavizumab was given once intraperitoneally (1.25 mg/mouse as prophylaxis, 24 h before virus inoculation. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL and serum samples were obtained at days 1, 5 (acute and 28 (long-term post inoculation and analyzed with a multiplex assay (Beadlyte Upstate, NY for simultaneous quantitation of 18 cytokines: IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, KC (similar to human IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, IL-13, IL-17, TNF-α, MCP-1, RANTES, IFN-γ and GM-CSF. Overall, cytokine concentrations were lower in serum than in BAL samples. By day 28, only KC was detected in BAL specimens at low concentrations in all groups. Administration of motavizumab significantly reduced (p

  16. Deoxynivalenol (DON) is toxic to human colonic, lung and monocytic cell lines, but does not increase the IgE response in a mouse model for allergy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Instanes, Christine; Hetland, Geir

    2004-01-01

    We examined whether the common crop mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) from Fusarium species is toxic to human colonic (Caco-2), lung (A549) and monocytic (U937) cell lines. Moreover, since DON reportedly induces increased levels of Th2 cytokines and total IgE, and we have observed that mould extracts adjuvated allergy development in mice, possible adjuvant effect of DON on allergy was studied in a mouse model. For all the cells, exposure to DON for 24 h reduced cellular protein synthesis, proliferation and survival rate dose-dependently. In addition, production of IL-8 in the U937 cell line increased up to eight-fold at levels of DON just lower than the most toxic one, suggesting that IL-8 can be used as an additional index for cytotoxicity in mononuclear phagocytes. However, DON did not increase levels of allergen-specific IgE or IgG1 in the mouse model for allergy. These results suggest that DON, when inhaled or ingested, may have toxic effect on human alveolar macrophages and epithelial cells in lungs and colon, but does not increase the allergic response to allergens

  17. Identification of a peroxisome proliferator responsive element (PPRE)-like cis-element in mouse plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jiegen; Li Xi; Huang Haiyan; Liu Honglei; Liu Deguo; Song Tanjing; Ma Chungu; Ma Duan; Song Houyan; Tang Qiqun

    2006-01-01

    PAI-1 is expressed and secreted by adipose tissue which may mediate the pathogenesis of obesity-associated cardiovascular complications. Evidence is presented in this report that PAI-1 is not expressed by preadipocyte, but significantly induced during 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation and the PAI-1 expression correlates with the induction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). A peroxisome proliferator responsive element (PPRE)-like cis-element (-206TCCCCCATGCCCT-194) is identified in the mouse PAI-1 gene promoter by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) combined with transient transfection experiments; the PPRE-like cis-element forms a specific DNA-protein complex only with adipocyte nuclear extracts, not with preadipocyte nuclear extracts; the DNA-protein complex can be totally competed away by non-labeled consensus PPRE, and can be supershifted with PPARγ antibody. Mutation of this PPRE-like cis-element can abolish the transactivation of mouse PAI-1 promoter mediated by PPARγ. Specific PPARγ ligand Pioglitazone can significantly induce the PAI-1 expression, and stimulate the secretion of PAI-1 into medium

  18. Improvement of ovarian response and oocyte quality of aged female by administration of bone morphogenetic protein-6 in a mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Seung S

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advancing female age remains a difficult problem in infertility treatment. Ovarian angiogenesis plays an important role in follicular development and the activation of ovarian angiogenesis has been emerged as a new strategy for the improvement of age-related decline of oocyte quality. BMP-6 affect gonadotropin signals in granulosa cells and it promotes normal fertility by enabling appropriate response to LH and normal oocyte quality. BMP-6 has a potential role in regulation of angiogenesis and regulates the expression of inhibitor of DNA-binding proteins (Ids. Ids involved in the control and timing of follicle selection and granulosa cells differentiation. Especially, Id-1 is well-characterized target of BMP-6 signaling. Therefore, this study investigated whether co-administration of BMP-6 during superovulation process improves ovarian response, oocyte quality and expression of Id-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF in the ovary of aged female using a mouse model. Methods Aged C57BL/6 female mice (26–31 weeks old were superovulated by injection with 0.1 mL of 5 IU equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG containing recombinant mouse BMP-6 at various doses (0, 0.01, 0.1, 1, and 10 ng, followed by injection with 5 IU human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG 48 h later. Then, the mice were immediately paired with an individual male. The aged control group was superovulated without BMP-6. Young mice of 6–9 weeks old were superovulated without BMP-6 as a positive control for superovulation and in vitro culture of embryos. Eighteen hours after hCG injection, zygotes were retrieved and cultured for 4 days. Both ovaries of each mouse were provided in the examination of ovarian expression of Id-1 and VEGF by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Results Administration of 0.1 ng BMP-6 significantly increased the number and blastocyst formation rate of oocytes ovulated and ovarian

  19. Adaptive response to ionizing radiation in bone marrow mouse cells (CFU-s) in vivo. Oxygen effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saenko, A.S.; Semina, O.V.; Semenets, T.N.; Smirnova, S.G.; Orlova, N.V. [Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Kaluga Region (Russian Federation). Medical Radiological Research Centre

    1997-03-01

    An acute gamma-irradiation of mice in small doses of 0.003-0.05 Gy results in elevated radioresistance of bone marrow CFU-s to challenge dose of 1.5 Gy. Hypoxia during exposure to conditioning dose abolishes or strongly decreases AR in CFU-s of mice marrow. Ascorbic acid and menadione induce cross-adaptation of mouse bone marrow CFU-s to action of gamma-radiation. The increase radioresistance was observed during 4 days after orally administration of vitamins C and K in doses of 1 mg and 0.06 mg/animal, accordingly, AR in Lewis lung carcinoma cells did not be observed in two independent experiments. (authors)

  20. Adaptive response to ionizing radiation in bone marrow mouse cells (CFU-s) in vivo. Oxygen effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saenko, A.S.; Semina, O.V.; Semenets, T.N.; Smirnova, S.G.; Orlova, N.V.

    1997-01-01

    An acute gamma-irradiation of mice in small doses of 0.003-0.05 Gy results in elevated radioresistance of bone marrow CFU-s to challenge dose of 1.5 Gy. Hypoxia during exposure to conditioning dose abolishes or strongly decreases AR in CFU-s of mice marrow. Ascorbic acid and menadione induce cross-adaptation of mouse bone marrow CFU-s to action of gamma-radiation. The increase radioresistance was observed during 4 days after orally administration of vitamins C and K in doses of 1 mg and 0.06 mg/animal, accordingly, AR in Lewis lung carcinoma cells did not be observed in two independent experiments. (authors)

  1. Acute response of mouse kidney clonogens to fractionated irradiation in situ and then assayed in primary culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeemin Jen; Hendry, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    The radiosensitivity of mouse kidney cells after in situ single-dose, 2, 8, and 16 fraction X-irradiations was measured in primary culture using a clonogenic assay. The assay was made 12 h after single doses or 12 h after the last dose of the multifraction regimens. When analysed using the linear-quadratic model, as predicted the individual α components for all the different fractionation schedules were not significantly different, and the changes in the β values were consistent with those expected on the basis of the reciprocal fraction numbers. When all four data sets were integrated to derive a common α/β ratio, the result was 4.4±1.3 (1SE) Gy, or 2.8±0.9 Gy (a better fit) if the single-dose data set was excluded. These values fall into the range reported for kidney using assays of tissue function at long times after irradiation. (author)

  2. Comparative proteomic analysis of the molecular responses of mouse macrophages to titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles unravels some toxic mechanisms for copper oxide nanoparticles in macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Triboulet

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles are more and more widely used because of their catalytic properties, of their light absorbing properties (titanium dioxide or of their biocidal properties (copper oxide, increasing the risk of adverse health effects. In this frame, the responses of mouse macrophages were studied. Both proteomic and targeted analyses were performed to investigate several parameters, such as phagocytic capacity, cytokine release, copper release, and response at sub toxic doses. Besides titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles, copper ions were used as controls. We also showed that the overall copper release in the cell does not explain per se the toxicity observed with copper oxide nanoparticles. In addition, both copper ion and copper oxide nanoparticles, but not titanium oxide, induced DNA strands breaks in macrophages. As to functional responses, the phagocytic capacity was not hampered by any of the treatments at non-toxic doses, while copper ion decreased the lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine and nitric oxide productions. The proteomic analyses highlighted very few changes induced by titanium dioxide nanoparticles, but an induction of heme oxygenase, an increase of glutathione synthesis and a decrease of tetrahydrobiopterin in response to copper oxide nanoparticles. Subsequent targeted analyses demonstrated that the increase in glutathione biosynthesis and the induction of heme oxygenase (e.g. by lovastatin/monacolin K are critical for macrophages to survive a copper challenge, and that the intermediates of the catecholamine pathway induce a strong cross toxicity with copper oxide nanoparticles and copper ions.

  3. Comparative proteomic analysis of the molecular responses of mouse macrophages to titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles unravels some toxic mechanisms for copper oxide nanoparticles in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triboulet, Sarah; Aude-Garcia, Catherine; Armand, Lucie; Collin-Faure, Véronique; Chevallet, Mireille; Diemer, Hélène; Gerdil, Adèle; Proamer, Fabienne; Strub, Jean-Marc; Habert, Aurélie; Herlin, Nathalie; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Carrière, Marie; Rabilloud, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles are more and more widely used because of their catalytic properties, of their light absorbing properties (titanium dioxide) or of their biocidal properties (copper oxide), increasing the risk of adverse health effects. In this frame, the responses of mouse macrophages were studied. Both proteomic and targeted analyses were performed to investigate several parameters, such as phagocytic capacity, cytokine release, copper release, and response at sub toxic doses. Besides titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles, copper ions were used as controls. We also showed that the overall copper release in the cell does not explain per se the toxicity observed with copper oxide nanoparticles. In addition, both copper ion and copper oxide nanoparticles, but not titanium oxide, induced DNA strands breaks in macrophages. As to functional responses, the phagocytic capacity was not hampered by any of the treatments at non-toxic doses, while copper ion decreased the lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine and nitric oxide productions. The proteomic analyses highlighted very few changes induced by titanium dioxide nanoparticles, but an induction of heme oxygenase, an increase of glutathione synthesis and a decrease of tetrahydrobiopterin in response to copper oxide nanoparticles. Subsequent targeted analyses demonstrated that the increase in glutathione biosynthesis and the induction of heme oxygenase (e.g. by lovastatin/monacolin K) are critical for macrophages to survive a copper challenge, and that the intermediates of the catecholamine pathway induce a strong cross toxicity with copper oxide nanoparticles and copper ions.

  4. Optogenetic activation of CA1 pyramidal neurons at the dorsal and ventral hippocampus evokes distinct brain-wide responses revealed by mouse fMRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norio Takata

    Full Text Available The dorsal and ventral hippocampal regions (dHP and vHP are proposed to have distinct functions. Electrophysiological studies have revealed intra-hippocampal variances along the dorsoventral axis. Nevertheless, the extra-hippocampal influences of dHP and vHP activities remain unclear. In this study, we compared the spatial distribution of brain-wide responses upon dHP or vHP activation and further estimate connection strengths between the dHP and the vHP with corresponding extra-hippocampal areas. To achieve this, we first investigated responses of local field potential (LFP and multi unit activities (MUA upon light stimulation in the hippocampus of an anesthetized transgenic mouse, whose CA1 pyramidal neurons expressed a step-function opsin variant of channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2. Optogenetic stimulation increased hippocampal LFP power at theta, gamma, and ultra-fast frequency bands, and augmented MUA, indicating light-induced activation of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Brain-wide responses examined using fMRI revealed that optogenetic activation at the dHP or vHP caused blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD fMRI signals in situ. Although activation at the dHP induced BOLD responses at the vHP, the opposite was not observed. Outside the hippocampal formation, activation at the dHP, but not the vHP, evoked BOLD responses at the retrosplenial cortex (RSP, which is in line with anatomical evidence. In contrast, BOLD responses at the lateral septum (LS were induced only upon vHP activation, even though both dHP and vHP send axonal fibers to the LS. Our findings suggest that the primary targets of dHP and vHP activation are distinct, which concurs with attributed functions of the dHP and RSP in spatial memory, as well as of the vHP and LS in emotional responses.

  5. A mouse strain less responsive to dioxin-induced prostaglandin E2 synthesis is resistant to the onset of neonatal hydronephrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aida-Yasuoka, Keiko; Yoshioka, Wataru; Kawaguchi, Tatsuya; Ohsako, Seiichiroh; Tohyama, Chiharu

    2014-10-01

    Dioxin is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant that induces toxicity when bound to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Significant differences in susceptibility of mouse strains to dioxin toxicity are largely accounted for by the dissociation constant of binding to dioxins of AhR subtypes encoded by different alleles. We showed that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1), components of a prostanoid synthesis pathway, play essential roles in the onset of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induced hydronephrosis of neonatal mice. Although C57BL/6J and BALB/cA mice harbor AhR receptors highly responsive to TCDD, they were found by chance to differ significantly in the incidence of TCDD-induced hydronephrosis. Therefore, the goal of the present study was to determine the molecular basis of this difference in susceptibility to TCDD toxicity. For this purpose, we administered C57BL/6J and BALB/cA dams' TCDD at an oral dose of 15 or 80 μg/kg on postnatal day (PND) 1 to expose pups to TCDD via lactation, and the pups' kidneys were collected on PND 7. The incidence of hydronephrosis in C57BL/6J pups (64%) was greater than in BALB/cA pups (0%, p hydronephrosis in these mouse strains paralleled the levels of renal mPGES-1 mRNA and early growth response 1 (Egr-1) that modulates mPGES-1 gene expression, as well as PGE2 concentrations in urine. Although these mouse strains possess AhR alleles tightly bound to TCDD, their difference in incidence and severity of hydronephrosis can be explained, in part, by differences in the expression of mPGES-1 and Egr-1. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Extracts of Porphyra tenera (Nori Seaweed) Activate the Immune Response in Mouse RAW264.7 Macrophages via NF-κB Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ji-Hye; Kang, Hee-Bum; Park, Seung-Ho; Jeong, Ji-Hoon; Park, Jeongjin; You, Yanghee; Lee, Yoo-Hyun; Lee, Jeongmin; Kim, Eungpil; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Jun, Woojin

    2017-12-01

    Porphyra tenera, also known as nori, is a red algal species of seaweed. It is cultivated in Asia for culinary purposes. We report that P. tenera extract (PTE) enhances the immune response in mouse macrophages. We found that P. tenera extract regulates the NF-κB IκB kinase (IKK) signaling pathway, and we assessed the expression and translocation of p65, a subunit of NF-κB, in RAW264.7 mouse macrophage cells after treatment with PTE. We also investigated the effects of 10% ethanol PTE (PTE10) in RAW264.7 cells. The production of IL-10, IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ was induced by PTE treatment of the macrophages, and PTE also enhanced p-IκB and p-AKT. PTE10 showed no cytotoxicity at 10-20 μg/mL in RAW264.7 cells. PTE10, in fact, increased cell viability at 24 h, stimulated macrophage cells, and induced the phosphorylation of Akt. Akt stimulates IKK activity through the phosphorylation of IKKα and enhances immune activity through the activation of NF-κB. In this study, NF-κB activation was induced by increasing p-NF-κB and p-IKK. A subunit of NF-κB, p65, was located in the nucleus and increased the expression of various cytokines. PTE thus enhanced the immune response through IκB-α immunostimulation signaling in RAW264.7 cells. PTE10 has potential therefore for development of future treatments requiring immune system stimulation.

  7. MWCNTs of different physicochemical properties cause similar inflammatory responses, but differences in transcriptional and histological markers of fibrosis in mouse lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulsen, Sarah S.; Saber, Anne T.; Williams, Andrew; Andersen, Ole; Købler, Carsten; Atluri, Rambabu; Pozzebon, Maria E.; Mucelli, Stefano P.; Simion, Monica; Rickerby, David; Mortensen, Alicja; Jackson, Petra; Kyjovska, Zdenka O.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are an inhomogeneous group of nanomaterials that vary in lengths, shapes and types of metal contamination, which makes hazard evaluation difficult. Here we present a toxicogenomic analysis of female C57BL/6 mouse lungs following a single intratracheal instillation of 0, 18, 54 or 162 μg/mouse of a small, curled (CNT Small , 0.8 ± 0.1 μm in length) or large, thick MWCNT (CNT Large , 4 ± 0.4 μm in length). The two MWCNTs were extensively characterized by SEM and TEM imaging, thermogravimetric analysis, and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area analysis. Lung tissues were harvested 24 h, 3 days and 28 days post-exposure. DNA microarrays were used to analyze gene expression, in parallel with analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, lung histology, DNA damage (comet assay) and the presence of reactive oxygen species (dichlorodihydrofluorescein assay), to profile and characterize related pulmonary endpoints. Overall changes in global transcription following exposure to CNT Small or CNT Large were similar. Both MWCNTs elicited strong acute phase and inflammatory responses that peaked at day 3, persisted up to 28 days, and were characterized by increased cellular influx in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, interstitial pneumonia and gene expression changes. However, CNT Large elicited an earlier onset of inflammation and DNA damage, and induced more fibrosis and a unique fibrotic gene expression signature at day 28, compared to CNT Small . The results indicate that the extent of change at the molecular level during early response phases following an acute exposure is greater in mice exposed to CNT Large , which may eventually lead to the different responses observed at day 28. - Highlights: • We evaluate the toxicogenomic response in mice following MWCNT instillation. • Two MWCNTs of different properties were examined and thoroughly characterized. • MWCNT exposure leads to increased pulmonary inflammation and acute phase

  8. MWCNTs of different physicochemical properties cause similar inflammatory responses, but differences in transcriptional and histological markers of fibrosis in mouse lungs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulsen, Sarah S., E-mail: spo@nrcwe.dk [National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen DK-2100 (Denmark); Department of Science, Systems and Models, Roskilde University, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Saber, Anne T., E-mail: ats@nrcwe.dk [National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen DK-2100 (Denmark); Williams, Andrew, E-mail: Andrew.williams@hc-sc.gc.ca [Environmental and Radiation Health Sciences Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9 (Canada); Andersen, Ole, E-mail: oa@ruc.dk [Department of Science, Systems and Models, Roskilde University, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Købler, Carsten, E-mail: carko@nanotech.dtu.dk [Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Atluri, Rambabu, E-mail: rba@nrcwe.dk [Nanologica AB, SE-114 28 Stockholm (Sweden); Pozzebon, Maria E., E-mail: mariaelena.pozzebon@yahoo.it [Veneto Nanotech SCpA, ECSIN — European Centre for the Sustainable Impact of Nanotechnology, I-45100 Rovigo (Italy); Mucelli, Stefano P., E-mail: stefano.pozzimucelli@venetonanotech.it [Veneto Nanotech SCpA, ECSIN — European Centre for the Sustainable Impact of Nanotechnology, I-45100 Rovigo (Italy); Simion, Monica, E-mail: moni304ro@gmail.com [Laboratory of Nanobiotechnology, National Institute for Research and Development in Microtechnologies, 077190 Bucharest (Romania); Rickerby, David, E-mail: david.rickerby@jrc.ec.europa.eu [European Commission Joint Research Centre Institute for Environment and Sustainability, I-21027 Ispra, VA (Italy); Mortensen, Alicja, E-mail: almo@food.dtu.dk [National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Søborg (Denmark); Jackson, Petra, E-mail: pja@nrcwe.dk [National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen DK-2100 (Denmark); Kyjovska, Zdenka O., E-mail: zky@nrcwe.dk [National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen DK-2100 (Denmark); and others

    2015-04-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are an inhomogeneous group of nanomaterials that vary in lengths, shapes and types of metal contamination, which makes hazard evaluation difficult. Here we present a toxicogenomic analysis of female C57BL/6 mouse lungs following a single intratracheal instillation of 0, 18, 54 or 162 μg/mouse of a small, curled (CNT{sub Small}, 0.8 ± 0.1 μm in length) or large, thick MWCNT (CNT{sub Large}, 4 ± 0.4 μm in length). The two MWCNTs were extensively characterized by SEM and TEM imaging, thermogravimetric analysis, and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area analysis. Lung tissues were harvested 24 h, 3 days and 28 days post-exposure. DNA microarrays were used to analyze gene expression, in parallel with analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, lung histology, DNA damage (comet assay) and the presence of reactive oxygen species (dichlorodihydrofluorescein assay), to profile and characterize related pulmonary endpoints. Overall changes in global transcription following exposure to CNT{sub Small} or CNT{sub Large} were similar. Both MWCNTs elicited strong acute phase and inflammatory responses that peaked at day 3, persisted up to 28 days, and were characterized by increased cellular influx in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, interstitial pneumonia and gene expression changes. However, CNT{sub Large} elicited an earlier onset of inflammation and DNA damage, and induced more fibrosis and a unique fibrotic gene expression signature at day 28, compared to CNT{sub Small}. The results indicate that the extent of change at the molecular level during early response phases following an acute exposure is greater in mice exposed to CNT{sub Large}, which may eventually lead to the different responses observed at day 28. - Highlights: • We evaluate the toxicogenomic response in mice following MWCNT instillation. • Two MWCNTs of different properties were examined and thoroughly characterized. • MWCNT exposure leads to increased pulmonary

  9. Dysregulated LIF-STAT3 pathway is responsible for impaired embryo implantation in a Streptozotocin-induced diabetic mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong-Song Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of diabetes is increasing worldwide with the trend of patients being young and creating a significant burden on health systems, including reproductive problems, but the effects of diabetes on embryo implantation are still poorly understood. Our study was to examine effects of diabetes on mouse embryo implantation, providing experimental basis for treating diabetes and its complications. Streptozotocin (STZ was applied to induce type 1 diabetes from day 2 of pregnancy or pseudopregnancy in mice. Embryo transfer was used to analyze effects of uterine environment on embryo implantation. Our results revealed that the implantation rate is significantly reduced in diabetic mice compared to controls, and the change of uterine environment is the main reason leading to the decreased implantation rate. Compared to control, the levels of LIF and p-STAT3 are significantly decreased in diabetic mice on day 4 of pregnancy, and serum estrogen level is significantly higher. Estrogen stimulates LIF expression under physiological level, but the excessive estrogen inhibits LIF expression. LIF, progesterone or insulin supplement can rescue embryo implantation in diabetic mice. Our data indicated that the dysregulated LIF-STAT3 pathway caused by the high level of estrogen results in the impaired implantation in diabetic mice, which can be rescued by LIF, progesterone or insulin supplement.

  10. Neutrophils responsive to endogenous IFN-beta regulate tumor angiogenesis and growth in a mouse tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonska, Jadwiga; Leschner, Sara; Westphal, Kathrin; Lienenklaus, Stefan; Weiss, Siegfried

    2010-04-01

    Angiogenesis is a hallmark of malignant neoplasias, as the formation of new blood vessels is required for tumors to acquire oxygen and nutrients essential for their continued growth and metastasis. However, the signaling pathways leading to tumor vascularization are not fully understood. Here, using a transplantable mouse tumor model, we have demonstrated that endogenous IFN-beta inhibits tumor angiogenesis through repression of genes encoding proangiogenic and homing factors in tumor-infiltrating neutrophils. We determined that IFN-beta-deficient mice injected with B16F10 melanoma or MCA205 fibrosarcoma cells developed faster-growing tumors with better-developed blood vessels than did syngeneic control mice. These tumors displayed enhanced infiltration by CD11b+Gr1+ neutrophils expressing elevated levels of the genes encoding the proangiogenic factors VEGF and MMP9 and the homing receptor CXCR4. They also expressed higher levels of the transcription factors c-myc and STAT3, known regulators of VEGF, MMP9, and CXCR4. In vitro, treatment of these tumor-infiltrating neutrophils with low levels of IFN-beta restored expression of proangiogenic factors to control levels. Moreover, depletion of these neutrophils inhibited tumor growth in both control and IFN-beta-deficient mice. We therefore suggest that constitutively produced endogenous IFN-beta is an important mediator of innate tumor surveillance. Further, we believe our data help to explain the therapeutic effect of IFN treatment during the early stages of cancer development.

  11. Vascular pattern of the spontaneous C3H mouse mammary carcinoma and its significance in radiation response and in hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falk, P [Hammersmith Hospital, London (UK). M.R.C. Cyclotron Unit

    1980-02-01

    This study showed that the vascular pattern of the spontaneous C3H mouse mammary carcinoma develops from a capillary network into an afferent system lacking arterioles and consisting only of capillary-like vessels and an efferent system characterized by large sinuses. Lack of correlation between the growth of stroma and parenchyma leads to a circuitous and uneven supply of blood and to a high degree of occlusion of the efferent system with consequent reduction in the rate of flow of blood. The parenchyma consists of tubules formed of single or multiple layers of cells between which capillaries do not penetrate. The diffusion pathway of oxygen and nutrients to the inner cells of the multi-layered tubules is considerably longer than that to their outer cells or to the cells of the single-layered tubules. Consequently it is in the former parts that anoxia and severe hypoxia are likely to prevail. The pattern of necrosis agrees with this supposition. It is predicted that radiation hyperthermia will act differentially and in opposite senses on these two tumour components, hyperthermia being more effective on the former, radiation on the latter.

  12. Activation of an immune-regulatory macrophage response and inhibition of lung inflammation in a mouse model of COPD using heat-shock protein alpha B-crystallin-loaded PLGA microparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noort, J.M.; Bsibsi, M.; Nacken, P.J.; Gerritsen, W.H.; Amor, S.; Holtman, I.R.; Boddeke, E.; van Ark, I.; Leusink-Muis, T.; Folkerts, G.; Hennink, W.E.; Amidi, M.

    2013-01-01

    As an extracellular protein, the small heat-shock protein alpha B-crystallin (HSPB5) has anti-inflammatory effects in several mouse models of inflammation. Here, we show that these effects are associated with the ability of HSPB5 to activate an immune-regulatory response in macrophages via

  13. Activation of an immune-regulatory macrophage response and inhibition of lung inflammation in a mouse model of COPD using heat-shock protein alpha B-crystallin-loaded PLGA microparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noort, Johannes M.; Bsibsi, Malika; Nacken, Peter J.; Gerritsen, Wouter H.; Amor, Sandra; Holtman, Inge R.; Boddeke, Erik; van Ark, Ingrid; Leusink-Muis, Thea; Folkerts, Gert; Hennink, Wim E.; Amidi, Maryam

    As an extracellular protein, the small heat-shock protein alpha B-crystallin (HSPB5) has anti-inflammatory effects in several mouse models of inflammation. Here, we show that these effects are associated with the ability of HSPB5 to activate an immune-regulatory response in macrophages via

  14. Enhancement of radiation response of SqII mouse tumors by combined treatment with misonidazole, vidarabine, and ACNU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asakura, Hideo; Akita, Yuzo; Kosaka, Noboru; Majima, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Norio.

    1987-01-01

    It is well known that misonidazole (Miso.) is a hypoxic cell sensitizer, vidarabine (Ara-A) is a PLD repair inhibitor, and ACNU is an anticancer drug derivative of nitrosourea. The effect of combined use of these drugs and radiation was studied. SqII tumor, an anaplastic squamous cell carcinoma was transplanted to the right thighs of WHT male mice. At 9 days after transplantation, the tumors of about 600 mm 3 were treated by several protocols. After the treatment, tumor growth curves were drawn and the time required to reach twice the initial volume of the treatment was determined. The results were as follows. The combination of 3 agents, Miso., Ara-A, and radiation was the most effective, followed by that of Miso., ACNU, and radiation, which was better than another combination of Miso. and radiation. The effect of Ara-A, ACNU and radiation was inferior to Miso. and radiation. The effect of Miso., Ara-A and ACNU was further inferior to radiation alone. The combination of 4 agents, Miso., Ara-A, ACNU and radiation was effective in the same degree or slightly inferior to Miso., Ara-A and radiation. On the other hand, effect of combined treatment with drugs and radiation without Miso. was not so remarkable on this mouse tumor, in other words, Miso. played the most important role among these 3 drugs. This study showed that the combination of Miso., Ara-A and radiation was the most effective among these tested and may be useful for the clinical control of cancer. Furthermore, this combination did not include anticancer drugs which cause bone marrow suppression and intestinal disorders. (author)

  15. QTL and systems genetics analysis of mouse grooming and behavioral responses to novelty in an open field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delprato, A; Algéo, M-P; Bonheur, B; Bubier, J A; Lu, L; Williams, R W; Chesler, E J; Crusio, W E

    2017-11-01

    The open field is a classic test used to assess exploratory behavior, anxiety and locomotor activity in rodents. Here, we mapped quantitative trait loci (QTLs) underlying behaviors displayed in an open field, using a panel of 53 BXD recombinant inbred mouse strains with deep replication (10 per strain and sex). The use of these strains permits the integration and comparison of data obtained in different laboratories, and also offers the possibility to study trait covariance by exploiting powerful bioinformatics tools and resources. We quantified behavioral traits during 20-min test sessions including (1) percent time spent and distance traveled near the wall (thigmotaxis), (2) leaning against the wall, (3) rearing, (4) jumping, (5) grooming duration, (6) grooming frequency, (7) locomotion and (8) defecation. All traits exhibit moderate heritability making them amenable to genetic analysis. We identified a significant QTL on chromosome M.m. 4 at approximately 104 Mb that modulates grooming duration in both males and females (likelihood ratio statistic values of approximately 18, explaining 25% and 14% of the variance, respectively) and a suggestive QTL modulating locomotion that maps to the same locus. Bioinformatic analysis indicates Disabled 1 (Dab1, a key protein in the reelin signaling pathway) as a particularly strong candidate gene modulating these behaviors. We also found 2 highly suggestive QTLs for a sex by strain interaction for grooming duration on chromosomes 13 and 17. In addition, we identified a pairwise epistatic interaction between loci on chromosomes 12 at 36-37 Mb and 14 at 34-36 Mb that influences rearing frequency in males. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  16. Enhancement of radiation response of SqII mouse tumors by combined treatment with misonidazole, vidarabine, and ACNU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asakura, Hideo; Akita, Yuzo; Kosaka, Noboru; Majima, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Norio

    1987-01-01

    It is well known that misonidazole (Miso.) is a hypoxic cell sensitizer, vidarabine (Ara-A) is a PLD repair inhibitor, and ACNU is an anticancer drug derivative of nitrosourea. The effect of combined use of these drugs and radiation was studied. SqII tumor, an anaplastic squamous cell carcinoma was transplanted to the right thighs of WHT male mice. At 9 days after transplantation, the tumors of about 600 mm/sup 3/ were treated by several protocols. After the treatment, tumor growth curves were drawn and the time required to reach twice the initial volume of the treatment was determined. The results were as follows. The combination of 3 agents, Miso., Ara-A, and radiation was the most effective, followed by that of Miso., ACNU, and radiation, which was better than another combination of Miso. and radiation. The effect of Ara-A, ACNU and radiation was inferior to Miso. and radiation. The effect of Miso., Ara-A and ACNU was further inferior to radiation alone. The combination of 4 agents, Miso., Ara-A, ACNU and radiation was effective in the same degree or slightly inferior to Miso., Ara-A and radiation. On the other hand, effect of combined treatment with drugs and radiation without Miso. was not so remarkable on this mouse tumor, in other words, Miso. played the most important role among these 3 drugs. This study showed that the combination of Miso., Ara-A and radiation was the most effective among these tested and may be useful for the clinical control of cancer. Furthermore, this combination did not include anticancer drugs which cause bone marrow suppression and intestinal disorders.

  17. Generation of glucose-responsive functional islets with a three-dimensional structure from mouse fetal pancreatic cells and iPS cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Saito

    Full Text Available Islets of Langerhans are a pancreatic endocrine compartment consisting of insulin-producing β cells together with several other hormone-producing cells. While some insulin-producing cells or immature pancreatic cells have been generated in vitro from ES and iPS cells, islets with proper functions and a three-dimensional (3D structure have never been successfully produced. To test whether islets can be formed in vitro, we first examined the potential of mouse fetal pancreatic cells. We found that E16.5 pancreatic cells, just before forming islets, were able to develop cell aggregates consisting of β cells surrounded by glucagon-producing α cells, a structure similar to murine adult islets. Moreover, the transplantation of these cells improved blood glucose levels in hyperglycemic mice. These results indicate that functional islets are formed in vitro from fetal pancreatic cells at a specific developmental stage. By adopting these culture conditions to the differentiation of mouse iPS cells, we developed a two-step system to generate islets, i.e. immature pancreatic cells were first produced from iPS cells, and then transferred to culture conditions that allowed the formation of islets from fetal pancreatic cells. The islets exhibited distinct 3D structural features similar to adult pancreatic islets and secreted insulin in response to glucose concentrations. Transplantation of the islets improved blood glucose levels in hyperglycemic mice. In conclusion, the two-step culture system allows the generation of functional islets with a 3D structure from iPS cells.

  18. Impact of Age, Caloric Restriction, and Influenza Infection on Mouse Gut Microbiome: An Exploratory Study of the Role of Age-Related Microbiome Changes on Influenza Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna M. Bartley

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Immunosenescence refers to age-related declines in the capacity to respond to infections such as influenza (flu. Caloric restriction represents a known strategy to slow many aging processes, including those involving the immune system. More recently, some changes in the microbiome have been described with aging, while the gut microbiome appears to influence responses to flu vaccination and infection. With these considerations in mind, we used a well-established mouse model of flu infection to explore the impact of flu infection, aging, and caloric restriction on the gut microbiome. Young, middle-aged, and aged caloric restricted (CR and ad lib fed (AL mice were examined after a sublethal flu infection. All mice lost 10–20% body weight and, as expected for these early time points, losses were similar at different ages and between diet groups. Cytokine and chemokine levels were also similar with the notable exception of IL-1α, which rose more than fivefold in aged AL mouse serum, while it remained unchanged in aged CR serum. Fecal microbiome phyla abundance profiles were similar in young, middle-aged, and aged AL mice at baseline and at 4 days post flu infection, while increases in Proteobacteria were evident at 7 days post flu infection in all three age groups. CR mice, compared to AL mice in each age group, had increased abundance of Proteobacteria and Verrucomicrobia at all time points. Interestingly, principal coordinate analysis determined that diet exerts a greater effect on the microbiome than age or flu infection. Percentage body weight loss correlated with the relative abundance of Proteobacteria regardless of age, suggesting flu pathogenicity is related to Proteobacteria abundance. Further, several microbial Operational Taxonomic Units from the Bacteroidetes phyla correlated with serum chemokine/cytokines regardless of both diet and age suggesting an interplay between flu-induced systemic inflammation and gut microbiota. These

  19. Allergic Responses Induced by a Fungal Biopesticide Metarhizium anisopliae and House Dust Mite Are Compared in a Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsha D. W. Ward

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biopesticides can be effective in controlling their target pest. However, research regarding allergenicity and asthma development is limited. We compared the ability of fungal biopesticide Metarhizium anisopliae (MACA and house dust mite (HDM extracts to induce allergic responses in BALB/c mice. The extracts were administered by intratracheal aspiration at doubling doses (2.5–80 g protein 4X over a four-week period. Three days after the last exposure, serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF were collected. The extracts' relative allergenicity was evaluated based on response robustness (lowest significant dose response compared to control (0 g. MACA induced a more robust serum total IgE response than HDM. However, in the antigen-specific IgE assay, a similar dose of both MACA and HDM was required to achieve the same response level. Our data suggest a threshold dose of MACA for allergy induction and that M. anisopliae may be similar to HDM in allergy induction potential.

  20. Conserved host response to highly pathogenic avian influenza virus infection in human cell culture, mouse and macaque model systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDermott Jason E

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding host response to influenza virus infection will facilitate development of better diagnoses and therapeutic interventions. Several different experimental models have been used as a proxy for human infection, including cell cultures derived from human cells, mice, and non-human primates. Each of these systems has been studied extensively in isolation, but little effort has been directed toward systematically characterizing the conservation of host response on a global level beyond known immune signaling cascades. Results In the present study, we employed a multivariate modeling approach to characterize and compare the transcriptional regulatory networks between these three model systems after infection with a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus of the H5N1 subtype. Using this approach we identified functions and pathways that display similar behavior and/or regulation including the well-studied impact on the interferon response and the inflammasome. Our results also suggest a primary response role for airway epithelial cells in initiating hypercytokinemia, which is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of H5N1 viruses. We further demonstrate that we can use a transcriptional regulatory model from the human cell culture data to make highly accurate predictions about the behavior of important components of the innate immune system in tissues from whole organisms. Conclusions This is the first demonstration of a global regulatory network modeling conserved host response between in vitro and in vivo models.

  1. Preceding weak noise sharpens the frequency tuning and elevates the response threshold of the mouse inferior collicular neurons through GABAergic inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Jen, Philip H-S; Wu, Fei-Jian; Chen, Qi-Cai

    2007-09-05

    In acoustic communication, animals must extract biologically relevant signals that are embedded in noisy environment. The present study examines how weak noise may affect the auditory sensitivity of neurons in the central nucleus of the mouse inferior colliculus (IC) which receives convergent excitatory and inhibitory inputs from both lower and higher auditory centers. Specifically, we studied the frequency sensitivity and minimum threshold of IC neurons using a pure tone probe and a weak white noise masker under forward masking paradigm. For most IC neurons, probe-elicited response was decreased by a weak white noise that was presented at a specific gap (i.e. time window). When presented within this time window, weak noise masking sharpened the frequency tuning curve and increased the minimum threshold of IC neurons. The degree of weak noise masking of these two measurements increased with noise duration. Sharpening of the frequency tuning curve and increasing of the minimum threshold of IC neurons during weak noise masking were mostly mediated through GABAergic inhibition. In addition, sharpening of frequency tuning curve by the weak noise masker was more effective at the high than at low frequency limb. These data indicate that in the real world the ambient noise may improve frequency sensitivity of IC neurons through GABAergic inhibition while inevitably decrease the frequency response range and sensitivity of IC neurons.

  2. Patterns of cross-sensitivity in the responses of clonal subpopulations isolated from the RIF-1 mouse sarcoma to selected nitrosoureas and nitrogen mustards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, J. G.; Wright, K. A.; Workman, P.

    1984-01-01

    The response of clonal subpopulations isolated from the RIF-1 mouse sarcoma to melphalan treatment is independent of cell ploidy, whereas a clear relationship exists between ploidy and cell sensitivity to CCNU treatment. In the present study RIF-1 clones have been exposed to nitrogen mustard, aniline mustard and chlorambucil, and to nitrosoureas BCNU, MeCCNU and chlorozotocin, in order to evaluate whether or not the different physiochemical and biological activities of these agents would affect the patterns of drug sensitivity obtained for melphalan and CCNU. Irrespective of the different lipophilicities, transport properties and chemical reactivities of the nitrogen mustards, RIF-1 clones showed the same pattern of sensitivity as previously observed for melphalan. Similarly, RIF-1 clones when exposed to nitrosoureas BCNU, MeCCNU and chlorozotocin, showed the same pattern of sensitivity as that obtained for CCNU exposure. These data suggest (a) that the variation in the sensitivity of RIF-1 clones to treatment by the nitrogen mustards is unlikely to reflect differences in either membrane permeability or in drug transport and (b) that the ploidy dependent nitrosourea responses shown by RIF-1 clones similarly do not reflect differences in drug uptake. PMID:6466534

  3. Identification of radiation response genes and proteins from mouse pulmonary tissues after high-dose per fraction irradiation of limited lung volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hee; Jeon, Seulgi; Kang, Ga-Young; Lee, Hae-June; Cho, Jaeho; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2017-02-01

    The molecular effects of focal exposure of limited lung volumes to high-dose per fraction irradiation (HDFR) such as stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) have not been fully characterized. In this study, we used such an irradiation system and identified the genes and proteins after HDFR to mouse lung, similar to those associated with human therapy. High focal radiation (90 Gy) was applied to a 3-mm volume of the left lung of C57BL6 mice using a small-animal stereotactic irradiator. As well as histological examination for lungs, a cDNA micro array using irradiated lung tissues and a protein array of sera were performed until 4 weeks after irradiation, and radiation-responsive genes and proteins were identified. For comparison, the long-term effects (12 months) of 20 Gy radiation wide-field dose to the left lung were also investigated. The genes ermap, epb4.2, cd200r3 (up regulation) and krt15, hoxc4, gdf2, cst9, cidec, and bnc1 (down-regulation) and the proteins of AIF, laminin, bNOS, HSP27, β-amyloid (upregulation), and calponin (downregulation) were identified as being responsive to 90 Gy HDFR. The gdf2, cst9, and cidec genes also responded to 20 Gy, suggesting that they are universal responsive genes in irradiated lungs. No universal proteins were identified in both 90 Gy and 20 Gy. Calponin, which was downregulated in protein antibody array analysis, showed a similar pattern in microarray data, suggesting a possible HDFR responsive serum biomarker that reflects gene alteration of irradiated lung tissue. These genes and proteins also responded to the lower doses of 20 Gy and 50 Gy HDFR. These results suggest that identified candidate genes and proteins are HDFR-specifically expressed in lung damage induced by HDFR relevant to SBRT in humans.

  4. Mouse Model of Devil Facial Tumour Disease establishes that an effective immune response can be generated against the cancer cells

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    Terry L Pinfold

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The largest carnivorous marsupial in Australia, the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii is facing extinction in the wild due to a transmissible cancer known as Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD. DFTD is a clonal cell line transmitted from host to host with 100% mortality and no known immunity. While it was first considered that low genetic diversity of the population of devils enabled the allograft transmission of DFTD recent evidence reveals that genetically diverse animals succumb to the disease. The lack of an immune response against the DFTD tumor cells may be due to a lack of immunogenicity of the tumor cells. This could facilitate transmission between devils. To test immunogenicity, mice were injected with viable DFTD cells and anti-DFTD immune responses analyzed. A range of antibody isotypes against DFTD cells was detected, indicating that as DFTD cells can induce an immune response they are immunogenic. This was supported by cytokine production, when splenocytes from mice injected with DFTD cells were cultured in vitro with DFTD cells and the supernatant analyzed. There was a significant production of IFN-γ and TNF-α following the first injection with DFTD cells and a significant production of IL-6 and IL-10 following the second injection. Splenocytes from naïve or immunized mice killed DFTD cells in in vitro cytotoxicity assays. Thus they are also targets for immunological destruction. We conclude that as an immune response can be generated against DFTD cells they would be suitable targets for a vaccine.

  5. In vivo characterization of the electrophysiological and astrocytic responses to a silicon neuroprobe implanted in the mouse neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mols, Katrien; Musa, Silke; Nuttin, Bart; Lagae, Liesbet; Bonin, Vincent

    2017-11-15

    Silicon neuroprobes hold great potential for studies of large-scale neural activity and brain computer interfaces, but data on brain response in chronic implants is limited. Here we explored with in vivo cellular imaging the response to multisite silicon probes for neural recordings. We tested a chronic implant for mice consisting of a CMOS-compatible silicon probe rigidly implanted in the cortex under a cranial imaging window. Multiunit recordings of cortical neurons with the implant showed no degradation of electrophysiological signals weeks after implantation (mean spike and noise amplitudes of 186 ± 42 µV pp and 16 ± 3.2 µV rms , respectively, n = 5 mice). Two-photon imaging through the cranial window allowed longitudinal monitoring of fluorescently-labeled astrocytes from the second week post implantation for 8 weeks (n = 3 mice). The imaging showed a local increase in astrocyte-related fluorescence that remained stable from the second to the tenth week post implantation. These results demonstrate that, in a standard electrophysiology protocol in mice, rigidly implanted silicon probes can provide good short to medium term chronic recording performance with a limited astrocyte inflammatory response. The precise factors influencing the response to silicon probe implants remain to be elucidated.

  6. The acute effects of alpha and beta irradiation of mouse skin and the factors affecting the response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Needham, S.G.; Coggle, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    Several problems regarding acute effects of alpha and beta irradiation were investigated in order to clarify protection problems of localised doses to the skin. A study into the acute biological effects of different energy beta emitters and the effects of energy and area on the response showed direct relationships between these criteria for a range of different acute responses with different time courses. Three different types of acute response were found and these are described as 'moist desquamation', 'acute ulceration' and 'acute epidermal necrosis'. An unexpected finding was that the lower energy beta emitter 170 Tm was as efficient at inducing scab formation as the higher energy 90 Sr sources for the same area of exposure. Experiments using 2x4 cm 2 exposures to 224 Cm alpha particles showed that the response to this poorly penetrating radiation was minimal after doses as high as 180 Gy measured at 10 μm into the skin. In comparison, large area exposure to 170 Tm produced areas of prolonged scabbing after doses up to 100 Gy. However, the intensity of the reaction varied between strains. (author)

  7. RNA-Seq Based Transcriptome Analysis of the Type I Interferon Host Response upon Vaccinia Virus Infection of Mouse Cells

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    Bruno Hernáez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccinia virus (VACV encodes the soluble type I interferon (IFN binding protein B18 that is secreted from infected cells and also attaches to the cell surface, as an immunomodulatory strategy to inhibit the host IFN response. By using next generation sequencing technologies, we performed a detailed RNA-seq study to dissect at the transcriptional level the modulation of the IFN based host response by VACV and B18. Transcriptome profiling of L929 cells after incubation with purified recombinant B18 protein showed that attachment of B18 to the cell surface does not trigger cell signalling leading to transcriptional activation. Consistent with its ability to bind type I IFN, B18 completely inhibited the IFN-mediated modulation of host gene expression. Addition of UV-inactivated virus particles to cell cultures altered the expression of a set of 53 cellular genes, including genes involved in innate immunity. Differential gene expression analyses of cells infected with replication competent VACV identified the activation of a broad range of host genes involved in multiple cellular pathways. Interestingly, we did not detect an IFN-mediated response among the transcriptional changes induced by VACV, even after the addition of IFN to cells infected with a mutant VACV lacking B18. This is consistent with additional viral mechanisms acting at different levels to block IFN responses during VACV infection.

  8. Clinical responses to adoptive T-cell transfer can be modeled in an autologous immune-humanized mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Henrik; Lindberg, Mattias F; Donia, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors and adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of autologous tumor-infiltrating T cells have shown durable responses in patients with melanoma. To study ACT and immunotherapies in a humanized model, we have developed PDXv2.0 - a melanoma PDX model where tumor cells and tumor...

  9. Influence of sex and developmental stage on acute hepatotoxic and inflammatory responses to liver procarcinogens in the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, Daniel; Riedmaier, Ariane Emami; Sugamori, Kim S.; Grant, Denis M.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of liver cancer is higher in men than in women. This sex difference is also observed in murine tumor induction models that result in the appearance of liver tumors in adult mice following their exposure on postnatal days 8 and/or 15 to carcinogens such as 4-aminobiphenyl (ABP) or diethylnitrosamine (DEN). Previous studies performed in adult mice showed that acute hepatotoxic and inflammatory responses to high-dose DEN exposure were greater in males than in females, leading to the suggestion that these responses could account for the sex difference in tumor development. We also recently observed that female but not male mice exposed postnatally to ABP had slightly increased expression of the antioxidant defense genes Nqo1 and Ggt1, which are regulated by the oxidative stress response protein nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2), while expression of Hmox1 was increased in both sexes. The goal of the present study was therefore to compare selected acute hepatotoxic, inflammatory and oxidative stress defense responses to ABP, DEN, or the prototype hepatotoxicant carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 ), in male and female mice exposed to these chemicals either postnatally or as adults. Exposure of adult mice to ABP, DEN or CCl 4 produced a 2-fold greater acute elevation in serum levels of the hepatotoxicity biomarker alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in males than in females, while levels of the inflammatory biomarker interleukin-6 (IL-6) showed no sex difference. However, treatment of immature mice with either ABP or DEN using standard tumor-inducing postnatal exposure protocols produced no increase in serum ALT or IL-6 levels in either males or females, while CCl 4 produced a 40-fold ALT elevation but with no sex difference. Basal expression of the NRF2-responsive gene Nqo1 was higher in adult females than in males, but there was no sex difference in basal expression of Ggt1 or Hmox1. Sexually immature animals showed no sex difference in basal

  10. Targeting a Cross-Reactive Gly m 5 Soy Peptide as Responsible for Hypersensitivity Reactions in a Milk Allergy Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curciarello, Renata; Smaldini, Paola L.; Candreva, Angela M.; González, Virginia; Parisi, Gustavo; Cauerhff, Ana; Barrios, Ivana; Blanch, Luis Bruno; Fossati, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cross-reactivity between soybean allergens and bovine caseins has been previously reported. In this study we aimed to map epitopes of the major soybean allergen Gly m 5 that are co-recognized by casein specific antibodies, and to identify a peptide responsible for the cross-reactivity. Methods Cow's milk protein (CMP)-specific antibodies were used in different immunoassays (immunoblotting, ELISA, ELISA inhibition test) to evaluate the in vitro recognition of soybean proteins (SP). Recombinant Gly m 5 (α), a truncated fragment containing the C-terminal domain (α-T) and peptides of α-T were obtained and epitope mapping was performed with an overlapping peptide assay. Bioinformatics tools were used for epitope prediction by sequence alignment, and for modelling the cross-recognized soy proteins and peptides. The binding of SP to a monoclonal antibody was studied by surface Plasmon resonance (SPR). Finally, the in vivo cross-recognition of SP was assessed in a mouse model of milk allergy. Results Both α and α-T reacted with the different CMP-specific antibodies. α-T contains IgG and IgE epitopes in several peptides, particularly in the peptide named PA. Besides, we found similar values of association and dissociation constants between the α-casein specific mAb and the different milk and soy components. The food allergy mouse model showed that SP and PA contain the cross-reactive B and T epitopes, which triggered hypersensitivity reactions and a Th2-mediated response on CMP-sensitized mice. Conclusions Gly m 5 is a cross-reactive soy allergen and the α-T portion of the molecule contains IgG and IgE immunodominant epitopes, confined to PA, a region with enough conformation to be bound by antibodies. These findings contribute to explain the intolerance to SP observed in IgE-mediated CMA patients, primarily not sensitised to SP, as well as it sets the basis to propose a mucosal immunotherapy for milk allergy using this soy peptide. PMID:24416141

  11. Stress responsive miR-31 is a major modulator of mouse intestinal stem cells during regeneration and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yuhua; Ma, Xianghui; Lv, Cong; Sheng, Xiaole; Li, Xiang; Zhao, Ran; Song, Yongli; Andl, Thomas; Plikus, Maksim V; Sun, Jinyue; Ren, Fazheng; Shuai, Jianwei; Lengner, Christopher J; Cui, Wei; Yu, Zhengquan

    2017-09-05

    Intestinal regeneration and tumorigenesis are believed to be driven by intestinal stem cells (ISCs). Elucidating mechanisms underlying ISC activation during regeneration and tumorigenesis can help uncover the underlying principles of intestinal homeostasis and disease including colorectal cancer. Here we show that miR-31 drives ISC proliferation, and protects ISCs against apoptosis, both during homeostasis and regeneration in response to ionizing radiation injury. Furthermore, miR-31 has oncogenic properties, promoting intestinal tumorigenesis. Mechanistically, miR-31 acts to balance input from Wnt, BMP, TGFβ signals to coordinate control of intestinal homeostasis, regeneration and tumorigenesis. We further find that miR-31 is regulated by the STAT3 signaling pathway in response to radiation injury. These findings identify miR-31 as a critical modulator of ISC biology, and a potential therapeutic target for a broad range of intestinal regenerative disorders and cancers.

  12. Seasonal variations in fine particle composition from Beijing prompt oxidative stress response in mouse lung and liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Michal; Xu, Fanfan; Qiu, Xinghua; Zhu, Tong; Rudich, Yinon

    2018-06-01

    Exposure to air pollution can induce oxidative stress, inflammation and adverse health effects. To understand how seasonal and chemical variations drive health impacts, we investigated indications for oxidative stress and inflammation in mice exposed to water and organic extracts from urban fine particles/PM 2.5 (particles with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 μm) collected in Beijing, China. Higher levels of pollution components were detected in heating season (HS, winter and part of spring) PM 2.5 than in the non-heating season (NHS, summer and part of spring and autumn) PM 2.5 . HS samples were high in metals for the water extraction and high in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) for the organic extraction compared to their controls. An increased inflammatory response was detected in the lung and liver following exposure to the organic extracts compared to the water extracts, and mostly in the HS PM 2.5 . While reduced antioxidant response was observed in the lung, it was activated in the liver, again, more in the HS extracts. Nrf2 transcription factor, a master regulator of stress response that controls the basal oxidative capacity and induces the expression of antioxidant response, and its related genes were induced. In the liver, elevated levels of lipid peroxidation adducts were measured, correlated with histologic analysis that revealed morphologic features of cell damage and proliferation, indicating oxidative and toxic damage. In addition, expression of genes related to detoxification of PAHs was observed. Altogether, the study suggests that the acute effects of PM 2.5 can vary seasonally with stronger health effects in the HS than in the NHS in Beijing, China and that some secondary organs may be susceptible for the exposure damage. Specifically, the liver is a potential organ influenced by exposure to organic components such as PAHs from coal or biomass burning and heating. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Synaptic responses evoked by tactile stimuli in Purkinje cells in mouse cerebellar cortex Crus II in vivo.

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    Chun-Ping Chu

    Full Text Available Sensory stimuli evoke responses in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs via the mossy fiber-granule cell pathway. However, the properties of synaptic responses evoked by tactile stimulation in cerebellar PCs are unknown. The present study investigated the synaptic responses of PCs in response to an air-puff stimulation on the ipsilateral whisker pad in urethane-anesthetized mice.Thirty-three PCs were recorded from 48 urethane-anesthetized adult (6-8-week-old HA/ICR mice by somatic or dendritic patch-clamp recording and pharmacological methods. Tactile stimulation to the ipsilateral whisker pad was delivered by an air-puff through a 12-gauge stainless steel tube connected with a pressurized injection system. Under current-clamp conditions (I = 0, the air-puff stimulation evoked strong inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs in the somata of PCs. Application of SR95531, a specific GABA(A receptor antagonist, blocked IPSPs and revealed stimulation-evoked simple spike firing. Under voltage-clamp conditions, tactile stimulation evoked a sequence of transient inward currents followed by strong outward currents in the somata and dendrites in PCs. Application of SR95531 blocked outward currents and revealed excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs in somata and a temporal summation of parallel fiber EPSCs in PC dendrites. We also demonstrated that PCs respond to both the onset and offset of the air-puff stimulation.These findings indicated that tactile stimulation induced asynchronous parallel fiber excitatory inputs onto the dendrites of PCs, and failed to evoke strong EPSCs and spike firing in PCs, but induced the rapid activation of strong GABA(A receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents in the somata and dendrites of PCs in the cerebellar cortex Crus II in urethane-anesthetized mice.

  14. Innate and Adaptive Immune Response to Pneumonia Virus of Mice in a Resistant and a Susceptible Mouse Strain

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    Ellen R. T. Watkiss

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the leading cause of infant bronchiolitis. The closely related pneumonia virus of mice (PVM causes a similar immune-mediated disease in mice, which allows an analysis of host factors that lead to severe illness. This project was designed to compare the immune responses to lethal and sublethal doses of PVM strain 15 in Balb/c and C57Bl/6 mice. Balb/c mice responded to PVM infection with an earlier and stronger innate response that failed to control viral replication. Production of inflammatory cyto- and chemokines, as well as infiltration of neutrophils and IFN-γ secreting natural killer cells into the lungs, was more predominant in Balb/c mice. In contrast, C57Bl/6 mice were capable of suppressing both viral replication and innate inflammatory responses. After a sublethal infection, PVM-induced IFN-γ production by splenocytes was stronger early during infection and weaker at late time points in C57Bl/6 mice when compared to Balb/c mice. Furthermore, although the IgG levels were similar and the mucosal IgA titres lower, the virus neutralizing antibody titres were higher in C57Bl/6 mice than in Balb/c mice. Overall, the difference in susceptibility of these two strains appeared to be related not to an inherent T helper bias, but to the capacity of the C57Bl/6 mice to control both viral replication and the immune response elicited by PVM.

  15. The effect of hyperglycemia with or without hyperthermia on the radiation response of a spontaneous mouse fibrosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urano, M.; Todoroki, T.; Kahn, J.

    1985-01-01

    Hyperglycemia facilitates glycolysis with a resultant decrease in the tissue, particularly tumor pH. Another effect of hyperglycemia is to increase osmotic pressure in the extracellular fluid. The affect of hyperglycemia on the radiation response of our spontaneous tumor, FSa-II was examined. Further experiment includes the effect of hyperglycemia given 1 hour before local hyperthermia which was given in a 43.5 0 C water bath. Animals were C/sub 3/Hf/Sed mice from our defined flora colony. Tumor cell suspension was transplanted into the animal foot and the treatment was given when tumors reached an average diameter of 7 mm. Tumors were irradiated under clamped hypoxia, in air or under HPO (30 psi). Hyperglycemia, 5 mg/g given 1 hour before radiation, increased hypoxic cell fraction of the tumor without altering the slope fo the dose response curve. Hyperthermia enhanced the tumor response and increased hypoxic cell fraction. Further increase in the hypoxic cell fraction was noted following combined hyperglycemia and hyperthermia. Hyperthermia given 24 hours before radiation with or without glucose also increased hypoxic cell fraction, but decrease chronically hypoxic cell fraction (fraction not oxygenated under HPO)

  16. The Mutyh base excision repair gene influences the inflammatory response in a mouse model of ulcerative colitis.

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    Ida Casorelli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Mutyh DNA glycosylase is involved in the repair of oxidized DNA bases. Mutations in the human MUTYH gene are responsible for colorectal cancer in familial adenomatous polyposis. Since defective DNA repair genes might contribute to the increased cancer risk associated with inflammatory bowel diseases, we compared the inflammatory response of wild-type and Mutyh(-/- mice to oxidative stress. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The severity of colitis, changes in expression of genes involved in DNA repair and inflammation, DNA 8-oxoguanine levels and microsatellite instability were analysed in colon of mice treated with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS. The Mutyh(-/- phenotype was associated with a significant accumulation of 8-oxoguanine in colon DNA of treated mice. A single DSS cycle induced severe acute ulcerative colitis in wild-type mice, whereas lesions were modest in Mutyh(-/- mice, and this was associated with moderate variations in the expression of several cytokines. Eight DSS cycles caused chronic colitis in both wild-type and Mutyh(-/- mice. Lymphoid hyperplasia and a significant reduction in Foxp3(+ regulatory T cells were observed only in Mutyh(-/- mice. CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicate that, in this model of ulcerative colitis, Mutyh plays a major role in maintaining intestinal integrity by affecting the inflammatory response.

  17. Antibody formation in mouse bone marrow. IV. The influence of splenectomy on the bone marrow plaque-forming cell response to sheep red blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benner, R.; Oudenaren, A. van

    1975-01-01

    Mouse bone marrow is barely capable of plaque-forming cell (PFC) activity during the primary response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC). However, during the secondary response, it becomes the major center of activity containing IgM-, IgG- and IgA-PFC. In the present paper the influence of splenectomy was studied on primary and secondary PFC activity in the bone marrow. Differences in primary and secondary bone marrow PFC responses are probably related to the presence of B and T memory cells in situ. Therefore the effect of splenectomy on the appearance of B and T memory cells in the bone marrow was also investigated. iv.plenectomy before intravenous (iv) immunization with 4 x 10 8 SRBC prevented any primary PFC activity in the bone marrow. The influence of splenectomy before priming on secondary PFC activity in the bone marrow depended on the priming dose of SRBC. Splenectomy before priming with 10 7 SRBC iv completely prevented IgM-, IgG-, and IgA-PFC activity in the bone marrow upon subsequent boosting with 4 x 10 8 SRBC iv. By means of cell transfer experiments it was shown that after splenectomy no B or T memory cells appeared in the bone marrow after priming with 10 7 SRBC iv. Cell transfer experiments showed that splenectomy before priming with 10 7 SRBC iv not only interfered with the appearance of B and T memory cells in the bone marrow, but also with the appearance of B memory cells in peripheral lymph nodes, mesenteric lymph node, Peyer's patches, thymus, and blood. Immunization of spenectomized mice with 4 x 10 8 SRBC iv induced the appearance of B memory cells in peripheral lymph nodes, mesenteric lymph node, Peyer's patches, thymus, and blood

  18. Bm-muted, orthologous to mouse muted and encoding a subunit of the BLOC-1 complex, is responsible for the otm translucent mutation of the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haokun; Kiuchi, Takashi; Wang, Lingyan; Kawamoto, Munetaka; Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio; Banno, Yutaka; Katsuma, Susumu; Shimada, Toru

    2017-09-20

    "Tanaka's mottled translucent" (otm) is a mutation of the silkworm Bombyx mori that exhibits translucent skin during larval stages. We performed positional cloning of the gene responsible for otm and mapped it to a 364-kb region on chromosome 5 that contains 22 hypothetical protein-coding genes. We performed RNA-seq analysis of the epidermis and fat body of otm larvae and determined that the gene BGIBMGA002619 may be responsible for the otm mutation. BGIBMGA002619 encodes the biosynthesis of lysosome-related organelles complex 1 (BLOC-1) subunit 5, whose ortholog is responsible for the Muted mutant in mouse. Accordingly, we named this gene Bm-muted. We discovered that the expression of Bm-muted in the epidermis and fat body of otm mutants was dramatically suppressed compared with the wild type. We determined the nucleotide sequences of the full-length cDNA and genomic region corresponding to Bm-muted and found that a 538-bp long DNA sequence similar to B. mori transposon Organdy was inserted into the 3' end of the first intron of Bm-muted in two otm strains. The Bm-muted cDNA of otm mutants lacked exon 2, and accordingly generated a premature stop codon in exon 3. In addition, short interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of this gene caused localized partial translucency of larval skin. These data indicate that the mutation in Bm-muted caused the otm-mutant phenotype. We propose that the insertion of Organdy caused a splicing disorder in Bm-muted in the otm mutant, resulting in a null mutation of Bm-muted. This mutation is likely to cause deficiencies in urate granule formation in epidermal cells that result in translucent larval skin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Treatment response assessment with (R)-[11CPAQ PET in the MMTV-PyMT mouse model of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegnebratt, T; Lu, L; Eksborg, S; Chireh, A; Damberg, P; Nikkhou-Aski, S; Foukakis, T; Rundqvist, H; Holmin, S; Kuiper, R V; Samen, E

    2018-04-03

    The goal of the study was to assess the potential of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-2-targeting carbon-11 labeled (R)-N-(4-bromo-2-fluorophenyl)-6-methoxy-7-((1-methyl-3-piperidinyl)methoxy)-4-quinazolineamine ((R)-[ 11 C]PAQ) as a positron emission tomography (PET) imaging biomarker for evaluation of the efficacy of anticancer drugs in preclinical models. MMTV-PyMT mice were treated with vehicle alone (VEH), murine anti-VEGFA antibody (B20-4.1.1), and paclitaxel (PTX) in combination or as single agents. The treatment response was measured with (R)-[ 11 C]PAQ PET as standardized uptake value (SUV) mean , SUV max relative changes at the baseline (day 0) and follow-up (day 4) time points, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-derived PyMT mammary tumor volume (TV) changes. Expression of Ki67, VEGFR-2, and CD31 in tumor tissue was determined by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Non-parametric statistical tests were used to evaluate the relation between (R)-[ 11 C]PAQ radiotracer uptake and therapy response biomarkers. The (R)-[ 11 C]PAQ SUV max in tumors was significantly reduced after 4 days in the B20-4.1.1/PTX combinational and B20-4.1.1 monotherapy groups (p R)-[ 11 C]PAQ SUV max change and TV reduction in the B20-4.1.1/PTX group. Statistical testing showed a significant difference in the blood vessel density between the B20-4.1.1/PTX combinational group and the VEH group (p R)-[ 11 C]PAQ can be approved as a predictive radiotracer for cancer therapy response.

  20. Differential and site specific impact of B cells in the protective immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the mouse.

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    Egídio Torrado

    Full Text Available Cell-mediated immune responses are known to be critical for control of mycobacterial infections whereas the role of B cells and humoral immunity is unclear. B cells can modulate immune responses by secretion of immunoglobulin, production of cytokines and antigen-presentation. To define the impact of B cells in the absence of secreted immunoglobulin, we analyzed the progression of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb infection in mice that have B cells but which lack secretory immunoglobulin (AID(-/-µS(-/-mice. AID(-/-µS(-/- mice accumulated a population of activated B cells in the lungs when infected and were more susceptible to aerosol Mtb when compared to wild type (C57BL/6 mice or indeed mice that totally lack B cells. The enhanced susceptibility of AID(-/-µS(-/- mice was not associated with defective T cell activation or expression of a type 1 immune response. While delivery of normal serum to AID(-/-µS(-/- mice did not reverse susceptibility, susceptibility in the spleen was dependent upon the presence of B cells and susceptibility in the lungs of AID(-/-µS(-/-mice was associated with elevated expression of the cytokines IL-6, GM-CSF, IL-10 and molecules made by alternatively activated macrophages. Blocking of IL-10 signaling resulted in reversal of susceptibility in the spleens and lungs of AID(-/-µS(-/- mice. These data support the hypothesis that B cells can modulate immunity to Mtb in an organ specific manner via the modulation of cytokine production and macrophage activation.

  1. Diverse and Tissue Specific Mitochondrial Respiratory Response in A Mouse Model of Sepsis-Induced Multiple Organ Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Michael; Hara, Naomi; Morata, Saori

    2016-01-01

    control ratio was also significantly increased. Maximal Protonophore-induced respiratory (uncoupled) capacity was similar between the two treatment groups.The present study suggests a diverse and tissue specific mitochondrial respiratory response to sepsis. The brain displayed an early impaired...... C57BL/6 mice were analyzed at either 6 hours or 24 hours. ROS-production was simultaneously measured in brain samples using fluorometry.Septic brain tissue exhibited an early increased uncoupling of respiration. Temporal changes between the two time points were diminutive and no difference in ROS...

  2. ER stress responses in the absence of apoptosome: a comparative study in CASP9 proficient vs deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Shane; Saveljeva, Svetlana; Gupta, Sanjeev; MacDonald, David C; Samali, Afshin

    2014-08-29

    Cells respond to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress through the unfolded protein response (UPR), autophagy and cell death. In this study we utilized casp9(+/+) and casp9(-/-) MEFs to determine the effect of inhibition of mitochondrial apoptosis pathway on ER stress-induced-cell death, UPR and autophagy. We observed prolonged activation of UPR and autophagy in casp9(-/-) cells as compared with casp9(+/+) MEFs, which displayed transient activation of both pathways. Furthermore we showed that while casp9(-/-) MEFs were resistant to ER stress, prolonged exposure led to the activation of a non-canonical, caspase-mediated mode of cell death. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. PGC-1alpha is not mandatory for exercise- and training-induced adaptive gene responses in mouse skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leick, Lotte; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F P; Johansen, Sune T.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma coactivator (PGC) 1alpha is required for exercise-induced adaptive gene responses in skeletal muscle. Whole body PGC-1alpha knockout (KO) and littermate wild-type (WT) mice performed....... Resting muscles of the PGC-1alpha KO mice had lower ( approximately 20%) cytochrome c (cyt c), cytochrome oxidase (COX) I, and aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS) 1 mRNA and protein levels than WT, but similar levels of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) alpha1, AMPKalpha2, and hexokinase (HK) II compared...

  4. Stage specificity and dose-response relationships for chromosome aberrations induced in mouse primary spermatocytes following X-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Y.; Tobari, I.; Utsugi, T.

    1986-05-01

    In this study, dose-response relationships were examined for chromosome aberrations observed at diakinesis-metaphase I of spermatocytes with X-irradiation at various stages of meiosis (diplotene, mid-pachytene, zygotene and leptotene). The frequencies of cells with X-ray-induced chromosome aberrations increased with dose at all stages in the applied range of 0.5-3.0 Gy and tended to increase as the irradiated stages descended after leptotene stage. In three stages, the frequencies increased exponentially with dose, but the rates of induction of chromosome breaks were markedly different depending on the stages at which spermatocytes were irradiated with X-rays. The rate of induction was the highest at diplotene and the lowest at leptotene, suggesting that diplotene spermatocytes had the highest radiosensitivity to the induction of chromosome breaks, followed by pachytene, zygotene and leptotene spermatocytes in that order. The dose-response relationships fitted well to linear equations for deletion-type aberrations at each stage, and to linear-quadratic equations for exchange-type aberrations at all stages except for leptotene. At leptotene, the chromatid exchanges were hardly observed, the aberrations being mainly consisted of iso-chromatid fragments. On the contrary, chromatid exchanges and iso-chromatide deletions were mainly observed at later stages (zygotene-diplotene).

  5. Attempts to Image the Early Inflammatory Response during Infection with the Lymphatic Filarial Nematode Brugia pahangi in a Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmarie Myburgh

    Full Text Available Helminth parasites remain a major constraint upon human health and well-being in many parts of the world. Treatment of these infections relies upon a very small number of therapeutics, most of which were originally developed for use in animal health. A lack of high throughput screening systems, together with limitations of available animal models, has restricted the development of novel chemotherapeutics. This is particularly so for filarial nematodes, which are long-lived parasites with a complex cycle of development. In this paper, we describe attempts to visualise the immune response elicited by filarial parasites in infected mice using a non-invasive bioluminescence imaging reagent, luminol, our aim being to determine whether such a model could be developed to discriminate between live and dead worms for in vivo compound screening. We show that while imaging can detect the immune response elicited by early stages of infection with L3, it was unable to detect the presence of adult worms or, indeed, later stages of infection with L3, despite the presence of worms within the lymphatic system of infected animals. In the future, more specific reagents that detect secreted products of adult worms may be required for developing screens based upon live imaging of infected animals.

  6. Tetrachloro-p-benzoquinone induces hepatic oxidative damage and inflammatory response, but not apoptosis in mouse: The prevention of curcumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Demei; Hu, Lihua; Su, Chuanyang; Xia, Xiaomin; Zhang, Pu; Fu, Juanli; Wang, Wenchao; Xu, Duo; Du, Hong; Hu, Qiuling; Song, Erqun; Song, Yang

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the protective effects of curcumin on tetrachloro-p-benzoquinone (TCBQ)-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. TCBQ-treatment causes significant liver injury (the elevation of serum AST and ALT activities, histopathological changes in liver section including centrilobular necrosis and inflammatory cells), oxidative stress (the elevation of TBAR level and the inhibition of SOD and catalase activities) and inflammation (up-regulation of iNOS, COX-2, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and NF-κB). However, these changes were alleviated upon pretreatment with curcumin. Interestingly, TCBQ has no effect on caspase family genes or B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)/Bcl-2 associated X (Bax) protein expressions, which implied that TCBQ-induced hepatotoxicity is independent of apoptosis. Moreover, curcumin was shown to induce phase II detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes HO-1 and NQO1 through the activation of nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2). In summary, the protective mechanisms of curcumin against TCBQ-induced hepatoxicity may be related to the attenuation of oxidative stress, along with the inhibition of inflammatory response via the activation of Nrf2 signaling. - Highlights: • TCBQ-intoxication significantly increased AST and ALT activities. • TCBQ-intoxication induced oxidative stress in mice liver. • TCBQ-intoxication induced inflammatory response in mice liver. • TCBQ-intoxication induced hepatotoxicity is independent of apoptosis. • Curcumin relieved TCBQ-induced liver damage remarkably

  7. Tetrachloro-p-benzoquinone induces hepatic oxidative damage and inflammatory response, but not apoptosis in mouse: The prevention of curcumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Demei; Hu, Lihua; Su, Chuanyang; Xia, Xiaomin; Zhang, Pu; Fu, Juanli; Wang, Wenchao; Xu, Duo; Du, Hong; Hu, Qiuling; Song, Erqun; Song, Yang, E-mail: songyangwenrong@hotmail.com

    2014-10-15

    This study investigated the protective effects of curcumin on tetrachloro-p-benzoquinone (TCBQ)-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. TCBQ-treatment causes significant liver injury (the elevation of serum AST and ALT activities, histopathological changes in liver section including centrilobular necrosis and inflammatory cells), oxidative stress (the elevation of TBAR level and the inhibition of SOD and catalase activities) and inflammation (up-regulation of iNOS, COX-2, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and NF-κB). However, these changes were alleviated upon pretreatment with curcumin. Interestingly, TCBQ has no effect on caspase family genes or B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)/Bcl-2 associated X (Bax) protein expressions, which implied that TCBQ-induced hepatotoxicity is independent of apoptosis. Moreover, curcumin was shown to induce phase II detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes HO-1 and NQO1 through the activation of nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2). In summary, the protective mechanisms of curcumin against TCBQ-induced hepatoxicity may be related to the attenuation of oxidative stress, along with the inhibition of inflammatory response via the activation of Nrf2 signaling. - Highlights: • TCBQ-intoxication significantly increased AST and ALT activities. • TCBQ-intoxication induced oxidative stress in mice liver. • TCBQ-intoxication induced inflammatory response in mice liver. • TCBQ-intoxication induced hepatotoxicity is independent of apoptosis. • Curcumin relieved TCBQ-induced liver damage remarkably.

  8. Histamine Induces Alzheimer’s Disease-Like Blood Brain Barrier Breach and Local Cellular Responses in Mouse Brain Organotypic Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan C. Sedeyn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the top ten causes of death in the United States, Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the only one that cannot be cured, prevented, or even slowed down at present. Significant efforts have been exerted in generating model systems to delineate the mechanism as well as establishing platforms for drug screening. In this study, a promising candidate model utilizing primary mouse brain organotypic (MBO cultures is reported. For the first time, we have demonstrated that the MBO cultures exhibit increased blood brain barrier (BBB permeability as shown by IgG leakage into the brain parenchyma, astrocyte activation as evidenced by increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, and neuronal damage-response as suggested by increased vimentin-positive neurons occur upon histamine treatment. Identical responses—a breakdown of the BBB, astrocyte activation, and neuronal expression of vimentin—were then demonstrated in brains from AD patients compared to age-matched controls, consistent with other reports. Thus, the histamine-treated MBO culture system may provide a valuable tool in combating AD.

  9. Intervention of Dietary Dipeptide Gamma-l-Glutamyl-l-Valine (γ-EV) Ameliorates Inflammatory Response in a Mouse Model of LPS-Induced Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, MacKenzie E; Majumder, Kaustav; Mine, Yoshinori

    2017-07-26

    Sepsis, the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) with infection is one of the leading causes of death in critically ill patients in the developed world due to the lack of effective antisepsis treatments. This study examined the efficacy of dietary dipeptide gamma-l-glutamyl-l-valine (γ-EV), which was characterized previously as an anti-inflammatory peptide, in an LPS-induced mouse model of sepsis. BALB/c mice were administered γ-EV via oral gavage followed by an intraperitoneal injection of LPS to induce sepsis. The γ-EV exhibited antisepsis activity by reducing the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β in plasma and small intestine. γ-EV also reduced the phosphorylation of the signaling proteins JNK and IκBα. We concluded that γ-EV could possess an antisepsis effect against bacterial infection in intestine. This study proposes a signaling mechanism whereby the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) allosterically activated by γ-EV stimulates the interaction of β-arrestin2 with the TIR(TLR/IL-1R) signaling proteins TRAF6, TAB1, and IκBα to suppress inflammatory signaling.

  10. T-2 toxin impairment of enteric reovirus clearance in the mouse associated with suppressed immunoglobulin and IFN-γ responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Maoxiang; Cuff, Christopher F.; Pestka, James J.

    2006-01-01

    Trichothecenes are exquisitely toxic to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and leukocytes and thus are likely to impair gut immunity. The purpose of this research was to test the hypothesis that the Type A trichothecene T-2 toxin interferes with the gut mucosal immune response to enteric reovirus infection. Mice were exposed i.p. first to 1.75 mg/kg bw T-2 and then 2 h later with 3 x 10 7 plaque-forming units of reovirus serotype 1, strain Lang (T1/L). As compared to vehicle-treated control, T-2-treated mice had dramatically elevated intestinal plaque-forming viral titers after 5 days and failed to completely clear the virus from intestine by 10 days. Levels of reovirus λ2 core spike (L2 gene) RNA in feces in T-2-treated mice were significantly higher at 1, 3, 5, and 7 days than controls. T-2 potentiated L2 mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner with as little as 50 μg/kg of the toxin having a potentiative effect. T-2 exposure transiently suppressed induction of reovirus-specific IgA in feces (6 and 8 days) as well as specific IgA and IgG 2a in serum (5 days). This suppression corresponded to decreased secretion of reovirus-specific IgA and IgG 2a in Peyer's patch (PP) and lamina propria fragment cultures prepared 5 days after infection. T-2 suppressed IFN-γ responses in PP to reovirus at 3 and 7 days as compared to infected controls whereas IL-2 mRNA concentrations were unaffected. PP IL-6 mRNA levels were increased 2-fold 2 h after T-2 treatment, but no differences between infected T-2-exposed and infected vehicle-treated mice were detectable over the next 7 days. Overall, the results suggest that T-2 toxin increased both the extent of GI tract reovirus infection and fecal shedding which corresponded to both suppressed immunoglobulin and IFN-γ responses

  11. Effect of oral administration of Lactobacillus paracasei L9 on mouse systemic immunity and the immune response in the intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Yuanbo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A probiotic strain Lactobacillus paracasei L9,which was isolated from human intestine, was investigated for its immunomodulatory activity in vivo. Results showed that L9 improved systemic immunity by enhancing the phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages, the proliferation ratio of splenocytes, the IgG level in the serum and the level of IgA in the mucosa. Further, L9induced theTh1-polarized immune response by elevating the IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio in the mucosa. This effect was confirmed by the enhanced IL-12-inducing activity of macrophages after in vitro stimulation of L9. Also detected was increased expression of TLR-2mRNA in the mucosa. We predict that L9 could enhance innate immunity by activating TLR-2 in the mucosa, and enhance acquired immunity by promoting Th1 polarization through induced production of IL-12 by macrophages.

  12. Activity-Dependent Calcium, Oxygen, and Vascular Responses in a Mouse Model of Familial Hemiplegic Migraine Type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khennouf, Lila; Gesslein, Bodil; Lind, Barbara Lykke

    2016-01-01

    it with assessment of local field potentials by electrophysiological recordings, cerebral blood flow by laser Doppler flowmetry, and oxygen consumption with measurement of the oxygen tissue tension. Results: During spreading depression, the evoked increase in cytosolic Ca2+ was larger and faster in FHM1 mice than...... wild-type (WT) mice. It was accompanied by larger increases in oxygen consumption in FHM1 mice, leading to tissue anoxia, but moderate hypoxia, in WT mice. In comparison, before CSD, Ca2+ and hemodynamic responses to somatosensory stimulations were smaller in FHM1 mice than WT mice and almost abolished...... after CSD. The CSD-induced Ca2+ changes were mitigated by the CaV2.1 gating modifier, tert-butyl dihydroquinone. Interpretation: Our findings suggest that tissue anoxia might be a mechanism for prolonged aura in FHM1. Reduced Ca2+ signals during normal network activity in FHM1 as compared to WT mice may...

  13. Use of dexpanthenol and aloe vera to influence the irradiation response of the oral mucous membrane (mouse)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlichting, S.; Spekl, K.; Doerr, W.

    2004-01-01

    In summarising the outcome of the present study it can be said spraying the agent on the oral mucous membrane once a day had an effect on the incidence of mucous membrane ulceration in the case of both placebo and dexpanthenol treatment. However, there was no significant difference between placebo and dexpanthenol treatment, the only finding being a slight prolongation of latency time through aloe vera. These experimental findings give good reason to critically reconsider the clinical use of dexpanthenol as a supportive treatment for the prevention of radiogenic mucositis enoralis following irradiation of tumours in the head and neck region. However thorough oral lavage is an effective means of moderating the irradiation response of the oral mucous membrane [de

  14. Phagocytic and chemiluminescent responses of mouse peritoneal macrophages to living and killed Salmonella typhimurium and other bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, T.; Blumenstock, E.; Kanegasaki, S.

    1981-01-01

    In the presence of luminol, resident as well as thioglycolate-induced and immunized macrophages emitted chemiluminescence more efficiently when the cells were exposed to living Salmonella typhimurium than when they were exposed to the same bacterium killed by ultraviolet light or heat. This phenomenon was observed whether or not the bacterium was opsonized. The different response to living and killed bacteria was also found with Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus morganii, and Enterobacter aerogenes, but not with Shigella sonnei, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Propionibacterium acnes. The results suggest that macrophages respond better to living, motile bacteria than to nonmotile or killed bacteria. The experimental results obtained with motility mutants of S. typhimurium, E. coli, and P. aeruginosa confirm that macrophages exposed to the motile bacteria emit chemiluminescence more efficiently and ingest the motile bacteria at a much faster rate than the nonmotile bacteria

  15. Male Seminal Relaxin Contributes to Induction of the Post-mating Cytokine Response in the Female Mouse Uterus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle J. Glynn

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The hormone relaxin is important in female reproduction for embryo implantation, cardiovascular function, and during labor and lactation. Relaxin is also synthesized in males by organs of the male tract. We hypothesized that relaxin might be one component of seminal plasma responsible for eliciting the female cytokine response induced in the uterus at mating. When recombinant relaxin was injected into the uterus of wild-type (Rln+/+ mice at estrus, it evoked the production of Cxcl1 mRNA and its secreted protein product CXCL1 in four of eight animals. Mating experiments were then conducted using mice with a null mutation in the relaxin gene (Rln−/− mice. qRT-PCR analysis of mRNA expression in wild-type females showed diminished uterine expression of several cytokine and chemokine genes in the absence of male relaxin. Similar differences were also noted comparing Rln−/− and Rln+/+ females mated to wild-type males. Quantification of uterine luminal fluid cytokine content confirmed that male relaxin provokes the production of CXCL10 and CSF3 in Rln+/+ females. Differences were also seen comparing Rln−/− and Rln+/+ females mated with Rln−/− males for CXCL1, CSF3, and CCL5, implying that endogenous relaxin in females might prime the uterus to respond appropriately to seminal fluid at coitus. Finally, pan-leukocyte CD45 mRNA was increased in wild-type matings compared to other combinations, implying that male and female relaxin may trigger leukocyte expansion in the uterus. We conclude that male and/or female relaxin may be important in activating the uterine cytokine/chemokine network required to initiate maternal immune adaptation to pregnancy.

  16. A novel Zika virus mouse model reveals strain specific differences in virus pathogenesis and host inflammatory immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashank Tripathi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is a mosquito borne flavivirus, which was a neglected tropical pathogen until it emerged and spread across the Pacific Area and the Americas, causing large human outbreaks associated with fetal abnormalities and neurological disease in adults. The factors that contributed to the emergence, spread and change in pathogenesis of ZIKV are not understood. We previously reported that ZIKV evades cellular antiviral responses by targeting STAT2 for degradation in human cells. In this study, we demonstrate that Stat2-/- mice are highly susceptible to ZIKV infection, recapitulate virus spread to the central nervous system (CNS, gonads and other visceral organs, and display neurological symptoms. Further, we exploit this model to compare ZIKV pathogenesis caused by a panel of ZIKV strains of a range of spatiotemporal history of isolation and representing African and Asian lineages. We observed that African ZIKV strains induce short episodes of severe neurological symptoms followed by lethality. In comparison, Asian strains manifest prolonged signs of neuronal malfunctions, occasionally causing death of the Stat2-/- mice. African ZIKV strains induced higher levels of inflammatory cytokines and markers associated with cellular infiltration in the infected brain in mice, which may explain exacerbated pathogenesis in comparison to those of the Asian lineage. Interestingly, viral RNA levels in different organs did not correlate with the pathogenicity of the different strains. Taken together, we have established a new murine model that supports ZIKV infection and demonstrate its utility in highlighting intrinsic differences in the inflammatory response induced by different ZIKV strains leading to severity of disease. This study paves the way for the future interrogation of strain-specific changes in the ZIKV genome and their contribution to viral pathogenesis.

  17. Adult Brtl/+ mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta demonstrates anabolic response to sclerostin antibody treatment with increased bone mass and strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinder, B P; White, L E; Salemi, J D; Ominsky, M S; Caird, M S; Marini, J C; Kozloff, K M

    2014-08-01

    Treatments to reduce fracture rates in adults with osteogenesis imperfecta are limited. Sclerostin antibody, developed for treating osteoporosis, has not been explored in adults with OI. This study demonstrates that treatment of adult OI mice respond favorably to sclerostin antibody therapy despite retention of the OI-causing defect. Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heritable collagen-related bone dysplasia, characterized by brittle bones with increased fracture risk. Although OI fracture risk is greatest before puberty, adults with OI remain at risk of fracture. Antiresorptive bisphosphonates are commonly used to treat adult OI, but have shown mixed efficacy. New treatments which consistently improve bone mass throughout the skeleton may improve patient outcomes. Neutralizing antibodies to sclerostin (Scl-Ab) are a novel anabolic therapy that have shown efficacy in preclinical studies by stimulating bone formation via the canonical wnt signaling pathway. The purpose of this study was to evaluate Scl-Ab in an adult 6 month old Brtl/+ model of OI that harbors a typical heterozygous OI-causing Gly > Cys substitution on Col1a1. Six-month-old WT and Brtl/+ mice were treated with Scl-Ab (25 mg/kg, 2×/week) or Veh for 5 weeks. OCN and TRACP5b serum assays, dynamic histomorphometry, microCT and mechanical testing were performed. Adult Brtl/+ mice demonstrated a strong anabolic response to Scl-Ab with increased serum osteocalcin and bone formation rate. This anabolic response led to improved trabecular and cortical bone mass in the femur. Mechanical testing revealed Scl-Ab increased Brtl/+ femoral stiffness and strength. Scl-Ab was successfully anabolic in an adult Brtl/+ model of OI.

  18. Comparison of the neuroinflammatory responses to selective retina therapy and continuous-wave laser photocoagulation in mouse eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jung Woo; Choi, Juhye; Kim, Young Shin; Kim, Jina; Brinkmann, Ralf; Lyu, Jungmook; Park, Tae Kwann

    2018-02-01

    This study investigated microglia and inflammatory cell responses after selective retina therapy (SRT) with microsecond-pulsed laser in comparison to continuous-wave laser photocoagulation (cwPC). Healthy C57BL/6 J mice were treated with either a train of short pulses (SRT; 527-nm, Q-switched, 1.7-μs pulse) or a conventional thermal continuous-wave (532-nm, 100-ms pulse duration) laser. The mice were sacrificed and their eyes were enucleated 1, 3, 7, and 14 days after both laser treatments. Pattern of cell death on retinal section was evaluated by TUNEL assay, and the distribution of activated inflammatory cells and glial cells were observed under immunohistochemistry. Consecutive changes for the expression of cytokines such as IL-1β, TNF-α, and TGF-β were also examined using immunohistochemistry, and compared among each period after quantification by Western blotting. The numbers of TUNEL-positive cells in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) layer did not differ in SRT and cwPC lesions, but TUNEL-positive cells in neural retinas were significantly less on SRT. Vague glial cell activation was observed in SRT-treated lesions. The population of inflammatory cells was also significantly decreased after SRT, and the cells were located in the RPE layer and subretinal space. Proinflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β and TNF-α, showed significantly lower levels after SRT; conversely, the level of TGF-β was similar to the cwPC-treated lesion. SRT resulted in selective RPE damage without collateral thermal injury to the neural retina, and apparently produced negligible glial activation. In addition, SRT showed a markedly less inflammatory response than cwPC, which may have important therapeutic implications for several macular diseases.

  19. Intratumoral delivery of IL-18 naked DNA induces T-cell activation and Th1 response in a mouse hepatic cancer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Chi-Young; Lee, Jienny; Kim, Eun-Young; Park, Hae-Jung; Kwon, Choon-Hyuck; Joh, Jae-Won; Kim, Sung-Joo

    2007-01-01

    The novel cytokine, interleukin (IL)-18, is a strong interferon-γ inducer and costimulatory factor in Th1 cell activation. IL-18 triggers IFN-γ production and enhances cytolytic activity in both T and NK cells. However, the exact mechanism of antitumor action of IL-18 remains to be clarified. To determine the effects of IL-18 plasmid DNA on hepatic cancer in mice, CT26 murine colon adenocarcinoma cells were established in mouse liver. Plasmid vectors encoding IL-18 were transferred directly into the liver 7 days after tumor injection to restrict IL-18 expression within the tumor site. The IL-18 protein level was increased in the liver 4 days after plasmid injection, and a marked antitumoral effect was observed at day 7. Antitumor effects were evaluated by measuring tumor regression, immune cell population, and IFN-γ production. The IL-18 plasmid controlled the growth of hepatic tumors and proliferation of splenic immune cells. Moreover, treatment of CT26 tumors with the IL-18 plasmid significantly enhanced the population of the effector T and NK cells in the spleen and peripheral blood. In spleen, the population of CD4 + CD62 Low cells was augmented in response to IL-18 on day 7. These results are consistent with the increase in CD4 + T cells secreting IFN-γ, but not CD8 + T cells. The marked reduction of tumor growth in tumor-bearing mice was associated with the maintenance of IFN-γ production in spleen in response to IL-18. These antitumoral effects were maintained until 14 days after plasmid injection. Our results suggest that direct plasmid DNA transfer of IL-18 with no accompanying reagents to augment transfection efficiency may be useful in tumor immunotherapy

  20. Cholesterol regulates contractility and inotropic response to β2-adrenoceptor agonist in the mouse atria: Involvement of Gi-protein-Akt-NO-pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odnoshivkina, Yulia G; Sytchev, Vaycheslav I; Petrov, Alexey M

    2017-06-01

    Majority of cardiac β2-adrenoceptors is located in cholesterol-rich microdomains. Here, we have investigated the underlying mechanisms by which a slight to moderate cholesterol depletion with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD, 1 and 5mM) interferes with contractility and inotropic effect of β2-adrenergic agonist (fenoterol, 50μM) in the mouse atria. Treatment with MβCD itself increased amplitude of Ca 2+ transient but did not change the contraction amplitude due to a clamping action of elevated NO. Cholesterol depletion significantly attenuated the positive inotropic response to fenoterol which is accompanied by increase in NO generation and decrease in Ca 2+ transient. Influence of 1mM MβCD on the fenoterol-driven changes in both contractility and NO level was strongly attenuated by inhibition of G i -protein (pertussis toxin), Akt (Akt 1/2 kinase inhibitor) or NO-synthase (L-NAME). After exposure to 5mM MβCD, pertussis toxin or Akt inhibitor could recover the β2-agonist effects on contractility, NO production and Ca 2+ transient, while L-NAME only reduced NO level. An adenylyl cyclase activator (forskolin, 50nM) had no influence on the MβCD-induced changes in the β2-agonist effects. Obtained results suggest that slight cholesterol depletion upregulates G i -protein/Akt/NO-synthase signaling that attenuates the positive inotropic response to β2-adrenergic stimulation without altering the Ca 2+ transient. Whilst moderate cholesterol depletion additionally could suppress the enhancement of the Ca 2+ transient amplitude caused by the β2-adrenergic agonist administration in G i -protein/Akt-dependent but NO-independent manner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Sleep deprivation decreases phase-shift responses of circadian rhythms to light in the mouse: role of serotonergic and metabolic signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challet, E; Turek, F W; Laute, M; Van Reeth, O

    2001-08-03

    The circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nuclei is primarily synchronized to the daily light-dark cycle. The phase-shifting and synchronizing effects of light can be modulated by non-photic factors, such as behavioral, metabolic or serotonergic cues. The present experiments examine the effects of sleep deprivation on the response of the circadian pacemaker to light and test the possible involvement of serotonergic and/or metabolic cues in mediating the effects of sleep deprivation. Photic phase-shifting of the locomotor activity rhythm was analyzed in mice transferred from a light-dark cycle to constant darkness, and sleep-deprived for 8 h from Zeitgeber Time 6 to Zeitgeber Time 14. Phase-delays in response to a 10-min light pulse at Zeitgeber Time 14 were reduced by 30% in sleep-deprived mice compared to control mice, while sleep deprivation without light exposure induced no significant phase-shifts. Stimulation of serotonin neurotransmission by fluoxetine (10 mg/kg), a serotonin reuptake inhibitor that decreases light-induced phase-delays in non-deprived mice, did not further reduce light-induced phase-delays in sleep-deprived mice. Impairment of serotonin neurotransmission with p-chloroamphetamine (three injections of 10 mg/kg), which did not increase light-induced phase-delays in non-deprived mice significantly, partially normalized light-induced phase-delays in sleep-deprived mice. Injections of glucose increased light-induced phase-delays in control and sleep-deprived mice. Chemical damage of the ventromedial hypothalamus by gold-thioglucose (600 mg/kg) prevented the reduction of light-induced phase-delays in sleep-deprived mice, without altering phase-delays in control mice. Taken together, the present results indicate that sleep deprivation can reduce the light-induced phase-shifts of the mouse suprachiasmatic pacemaker, due to serotonergic and metabolic changes associated with the loss of sleep.

  2. Curcumin attenuates inflammatory response in IL-1beta-induced human synovial fibroblasts and collagen-induced arthritis in mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Dong-Oh; Kim, Mun-Ok; Choi, Yung Hyun; Park, Yung-Min; Kim, Gi-Young

    2010-05-01

    Curcumin, a major component of turmeric, has been shown to exhibit anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The present study was performed to determine whether curcumin is efficacious against both collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice and IL-1beta-induced activation in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs). DBA/1 mice were immunized with bovine type II collagen (CII) and treated with curcumin every other day for 2weeks after the initial immunization. For arthritis, we evaluated the incidence of disease and used an arthritis index based on paw thickness. In vitro proliferation of CII- or concanavalin A-induced splenic T cells was examined using IFN-gamma production. Pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-1beta were examined in the mouse ankle joint and serum IgG1 and IgG2a isotypes were analyzed. The expression levels of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in human FLSs were also determined. The results showed that compared with untreated CIA mice, curcumin-treated mice downregulated clinical arthritis score, the proliferation of splenic T cells, expression levels of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta in the ankle joint, and expression levels of IgG2a in serum. Additionally, by altering nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB transcription activity in FLSs, curcumin inhibited PGE(2) production, COX-2 expression, and MMP secretion. These results suggest that curcumin can effectively suppress inflammatory response by inhibiting pro-inflammatory mediators and regulating humoral and cellular immune responses. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Distinct Fiber Type Signature in Mouse Muscles Expressing a Mutant Lamin A Responsible for Congenital Muscular Dystrophy in a Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Barateau

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Specific mutations in LMNA, which encodes nuclear intermediate filament proteins lamins A/C, affect skeletal muscle tissues. Early-onset LMNA myopathies reveal different alterations of muscle fibers, including fiber type disproportion or prominent dystrophic and/or inflammatory changes. Recently, we identified the p.R388P LMNA mutation as responsible for congenital muscular dystrophy (L-CMD and lipodystrophy. Here, we asked whether viral-mediated expression of mutant lamin A in murine skeletal muscles would be a pertinent model to reveal specific muscle alterations. We found that the total amount and size of muscle fibers as well as the extent of either inflammation or muscle regeneration were similar to wildtype or mutant lamin A. In contrast, the amount of fast oxidative muscle fibers containing myosin heavy chain IIA was lower upon expression of mutant lamin A, in correlation with lower expression of genes encoding transcription factors MEF2C and MyoD. These data validate this in vivo model for highlighting distinct muscle phenotypes associated with different lamin contexts. Additionally, the data suggest that alteration of muscle fiber type identity may contribute to the mechanisms underlying physiopathology of L-CMD related to R388P mutant lamin A.

  4. Morphological differences in the response of mouse small intestine to radiobiologically equivalent doses of X and neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, K.E.; Hamlet, R.; Nias, A.H.; Watt, C.

    1984-01-01

    A scale has been developed to describe the effects of radiation on small intestinal villi. The scale has been used to compare the damage done to the villi in the period 0-5 days after irradiation by X-irradiation or neutron irradiation, using 10 Gy X-rays and 5 Gy neutrons, doses which are radiobiologically equivalent when assessed by the microcolony assay method. Use of the scale indicates that the damage done to the villi by neutrons is greater than that produced by X-rays. This has implications for the interpretation of radiobiological equivalent doses (R.B.E.). Resin light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (T.E.M.) have also been used to examine small intestinal damage after 10 Gy X-irradiation and 5 Gy neutron irradiation. Differences include variations in crypt shape, mitotic activity and the proportion of crypts which are heavily parasitised. As well as the differences in villous shape which have been reflected in the different values on the scoring system, there are also variations in the response of the constituent cells of the epithelial compartment of the villi. In general, the effect of the neutron irradiation is more severe than that of the X-rays, particularly as would be suggested by a simple quantitation of crypt regeneration

  5. Response of mouse skin to tattooing: use of SKH-1 mice as a surrogate model for human tattooing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopee, Neera V.; Cui, Yanyan; Olson, Greg; Warbritton, Alan R.; Miller, Barbara J.; Couch, Letha H.; Wamer, Wayne G.; Howard, Paul C.

    2005-01-01

    Tattooing is a popular cosmetic practice involving more than 45 million US citizens. Since the toxicology of tattoo inks and pigments used to formulate tattoo inks has not been reported, we studied the immunological impact of tattooing and determined recovery time from this trauma. SKH-1 hairless mice were tattooed using commercial tattoo inks or suspensions of titanium dioxide, cadmium sulfide, or iron oxide, and sacrificed at 0.5, 1, 3, 4, 7, or 14 days post-tattooing. Histological evaluation revealed dermal hemorrhage at 0.5 and 1 day. Acute inflammation and epidermal necrosis were initiated at 0.5 day decreasing in incidence by day 14. Dermal necrosis and epidermal hyperplasia were prominent by day 3, reducing in severity by day 14. Chronic active inflammation persisted in all tattooed mice from day 3 to 14 post-tattooing. Inguinal and axillary lymph nodes were pigmented, the inguinal being most reactive as evidenced by lymphoid hyperplasia and polymorphonuclear infiltration. Cutaneous nuclear protein concentrations of nuclear factor-kappa B were elevated between 0.5 and 4 days. Inflammatory and proliferative biomarkers, cyclooxygenase-1, cyclooxygenase-2, and ornithine decarboxylase protein levels were elevated between 0.5 and 4 days in the skin and decreased to control levels by day 14. Interleukin-1 beta and interleukin-10 were elevated in the lymph nodes but suppressed in the tattooed skin, with maximal suppression occurring between days 0.5 and 4. These data demonstrate that mice substantially recover from the tattooing insult by 14 days, leaving behind pigment in the dermis and the regional lymph nodes. The response seen in mice is similar to acute injury seen in humans, suggesting that the murine model might be a suitable surrogate for investigating the toxicological and phototoxicological properties of ingredients used in tattooing

  6. Responses of the L51781Y tk/sup +//tk/sup -/ mouse lymphoma cell forward mutation assay: III. 72 coded chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGregor, D.B.; Brown, A.; Cattanach, P.; Edwards, I.; McBride, D.; Riach, C.; Caspary, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    Seventy-two chemicals were tested for their mutagenic potential in the L51781Y tk/sup +///sup -/ mouse lymphoma cell forward mutation assay, using procedures based upon those described previously. Cultures were exposed to the chemicals for 4 hr, then cultured for 2 days before planting in soft agar with or without trifluorothymidine (TFT), 3 ..mu..g/ml. The chemicals were tested at least twice. Significant responses were obtained with allyl isothiocyanate, p-benzoquinone dioxime, benzyl acetate, 2-biphenylamine HCl, bis(2-chloro-1-methylethyl)ether, cadmium chloride, chlordane, chlorobenzene, chlorobenzilate, 2-chloroethanol, chlorothalonil, cytarabine x HCl, p,p'-DDE, diazinon, 2,6-dichloro-p-phenylenediamine, N,N-diethylthiourea, diglycidylresorcinol ether, 2,4-dimethoxy aniline x HCl, disperse yellow 3, endosulfan, 1,2-epoxyhexadecane, ethyl acrylate, ethyl benzene, ethylene thiourea, F D and C yellow Number 6, furan, heptachlor, isophorone, mercuric chloride, 4,4'-methylenedianiline x 2 HCl, methyl viologen, nickel sulfate x 6H/sub 2/O, 4,4'-oxydianiline, pentachloroethane, piperonyl butoxide, propyl gallate, quinoline, rotenone, 2,4,5,6-tetrachloro-4-nitro-anisole, 1,1,1,2-tetrachloroethane, trichlorfon, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, 2,4,5-trimethoxybenzaldehyde, 1,1,3-trimethyl-2-thiourea, 1-vinyl-3-cyclopetene dioxide, vinyl toluene, and ziram. The assay was incapable of providing a clear indication of whether some chemicals were mutagens; these benzyl alcohol, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, phenol, succinic acid-2,2-dimethyl hydrazide, and toluene.

  7. A Chimeric Antibody against ACKR3/CXCR7 in Combination with TMZ Activates Immune Responses and Extends Survival in Mouse GBM Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Nicole; Carlson, Jeffrey C; Huang, Kexin; Zheng, Yayue; Oderup, Cecilia; Gross, Julia; Jang, Andrew D; Burke, Thomas M; Lewén, Susanna; Scholz, Alexander; Huang, Serina; Nease, Leona; Kosek, Jon; Mittelbronn, Michel; Butcher, Eugene C; Tu, Hua; Zabel, Brian A

    2018-05-02

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the least treatable type of brain tumor, afflicting over 15,000 people per year in the United States. Patients have a median survival of 16 months, and over 95% die within 5 years. The chemokine receptor ACKR3 is selectively expressed on both GBM cells and tumor-associated blood vessels. High tumor expression of ACKR3 correlates with poor prognosis and potential treatment resistance, making it an attractive therapeutic target. We engineered a single chain FV-human FC-immunoglobulin G1 (IgG 1 ) antibody, X7Ab, to target ACKR3 in human and mouse GBM cells. We used hydrodynamic gene transfer to overexpress the antibody, with efficacy in vivo. X7Ab kills GBM tumor cells and ACKR3-expressing vascular endothelial cells by engaging the cytotoxic activity of natural killer (NK) cells and complement and the phagocytic activity of macrophages. Combining X7Ab with TMZ allows the TMZ dosage to be lowered, without compromising therapeutic efficacy. Mice treated with X7Ab and in combination with TMZ showed significant tumor reduction by MRI and longer survival overall. Brain-tumor-infiltrating leukocyte analysis revealed that X7Ab enhances the activation of M1 macrophages to support anti-tumor immune response in vivo. Targeting ACKR3 with immunotherapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in combination with standard of care therapies may prove effective in treating GBM. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Transcriptional Response in Mouse Thyroid Tissue after 211At Administration: Effects of Absorbed Dose, Initial Dose-Rate and Time after Administration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Rudqvist

    Full Text Available 211At-labeled radiopharmaceuticals are potentially useful for tumor therapy. However, a limitation has been the preferential accumulation of released 211At in the thyroid gland, which is a critical organ for such therapy. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of absorbed dose, dose-rate, and time after 211At exposure on genome-wide transcriptional expression in mouse thyroid gland.BALB/c mice were i.v. injected with 1.7, 7.5 or 100 kBq 211At. Animals injected with 1.7 kBq were killed after 1, 6, or 168 h with mean thyroid absorbed doses of 0.023, 0.32, and 1.8 Gy, respectively. Animals injected with 7.5 and 100 kBq were killed after 6 and 1 h, respectively; mean thyroid absorbed dose was 1.4 Gy. Total RNA was extracted from pooled thyroids and the Illumina RNA microarray platform was used to determine mRNA levels. Differentially expressed transcripts and enriched GO terms were determined with adjusted p-value 1.5, and p-value <0.05, respectively.In total, 1232 differentially expressed transcripts were detected after 211At administration, demonstrating a profound effect on gene regulation. The number of regulated transcripts increased with higher initial dose-rate/absorbed dose at 1 or 6 h. However, the number of regulated transcripts decreased with mean absorbed dose/time after 1.7 kBq 211At administration. Furthermore, similar regulation profiles were seen for groups administered 1.7 kBq. Interestingly, few previously proposed radiation responsive genes were detected in the present study. Regulation of immunological processes were prevalent at 1, 6, and 168 h after 1.7 kBq administration (0.023, 0.32, 1.8 Gy.

  9. Phosphatase and tensin homolog-β-catenin signaling modulates regulatory T cells and inflammatory responses in mouse liver ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qiang; Li, Changyong; Wang, Kunpeng; Yue, Shi; Jiang, Longfeng; Ke, Michael; Busuttil, Ronald W; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W; Zhang, Feng; Lu, Ling; Ke, Bibo

    2017-06-01

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) deleted on chromosome 10 plays an important role in regulating T cell activation during inflammatory response. Activation of β-catenin is crucial for maintaining immune homeostasis. This study investigates the functional roles and molecular mechanisms by which PTEN-β-catenin signaling promotes regulatory T cell (Treg) induction in a mouse model of liver ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI). We found that mice with myeloid-specific phosphatase and tensin homolog knockout (PTEN M-KO ) exhibited reduced liver damage as evidenced by decreased levels of serum alanine aminotransferase, intrahepatic macrophage trafficking, and proinflammatory mediators compared with the PTEN-proficient (floxed phosphatase and tensin homolog [PTEN FL/FL ]) controls. Disruption of myeloid PTEN-activated b-catenin promoted peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ)-mediated Jagged-1/Notch signaling and induced forkhead box P3 (FOXP3)1 Tregs while inhibiting T helper 17 cells. However, blocking of Notch signaling by inhibiting γ-secretase reversed myeloid PTEN deficiency-mediated protection in ischemia/reperfusion-triggered liver inflammation with reduced FOXP3 + and increased retinoid A receptor-related orphan receptor gamma t-mediated interleukin 17A expression in ischemic livers. Moreover, knockdown of β-catenin or PPARγ in PTEN-deficient macrophages inhibited Jagged-1/Notch activation and reduced FOXP3 + Treg induction, leading to increased proinflammatory mediators in macrophage/T cell cocultures. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that PTEN-β-catenin signaling is a novel regulator involved in modulating Treg development and provides a potential therapeutic target in liver IRI. Liver Transplantation 23 813-825 2017 AASLD. © 2017 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  10. IL-33/ST2 signaling excites sensory neurons and mediates itch response in a mouse model of poison ivy contact allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Boyi; Tai, Yan; Achanta, Satyanarayana; Kaelberer, Melanie M; Caceres, Ana I; Shao, Xiaomei; Fang, Jianqiao; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2016-11-22

    Poison ivy-induced allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is the most common environmental allergic condition in the United States. Case numbers of poison ivy ACD are increasing due to growing biomass and geographical expansion of poison ivy and increasing content of the allergen, urushiol, likely attributable to rising atmospheric CO 2 Severe and treatment-resistant itch is the major complaint of affected patients. However, because of limited clinical data and poorly characterized models, the pruritic mechanisms in poison ivy ACD remain unknown. Here, we aim to identify the mechanisms of itch in a mouse model of poison ivy ACD by transcriptomics, neuronal imaging, and behavioral analysis. Using transcriptome microarray analysis, we identified IL-33 as a key cytokine up-regulated in the inflamed skin of urushiol-challenged mice. We further found that the IL-33 receptor, ST2, is expressed in small to medium-sized dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, including neurons that innervate the skin. IL-33 induces Ca 2+ influx into a subset of DRG neurons through neuronal ST2. Neutralizing antibodies against IL-33 or ST2 reduced scratching behavior and skin inflammation in urushiol-challenged mice. Injection of IL-33 into urushiol-challenged skin rapidly exacerbated itch-related scratching via ST2, in a histamine-independent manner. Targeted silencing of neuronal ST2 expression by intrathecal ST2 siRNA delivery significantly attenuated pruritic responses caused by urushiol-induced ACD. These results indicate that IL-33/ST2 signaling is functionally present in primary sensory neurons and contributes to pruritus in poison ivy ACD. Blocking IL-33/ST2 signaling may represent a therapeutic approach to ameliorate itch and skin inflammation related to poison ivy ACD.

  11. Circadian expression of steroidogenic cytochromes P450 in the mouse adrenal gland--involvement of cAMP-responsive element modulator in epigenetic regulation of Cyp17a1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Košir, Rok; Zmrzljak, Ursula Prosenc; Bele, Tanja; Acimovic, Jure; Perse, Martina; Majdic, Gregor; Prehn, Cornelia; Adamski, Jerzy; Rozman, Damjana

    2012-05-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes Cyp51, Cyp11a1, Cyp17a1, Cyb11b1, Cyp11b2 and Cyp21a1 are involved in the adrenal production of corticosteroids, whose circulating levels are circadian. cAMP signaling plays an important role in adrenal steroidogenesis. By using cAMP responsive element modulator (Crem) knockout mice, we show that CREM isoforms contribute to circadian expression of steroidogenic CYPs in the mouse adrenal gland. Most striking was the CREM-dependent hypomethylation of the Cyp17a1 promoter at zeitgeber time 12, which resulted in higher Cyp17a1 mRNA and protein expression in the knockout adrenal glands. The data indicate that products of the Crem gene control the epigenetic repression of Cyp17 in mouse adrenal glands. © 2011 The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 FEBS.

  12. Humanizing π-class glutathione S-transferase regulation in a mouse model alters liver toxicity in response to acetaminophen overdose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P Vaughn

    Full Text Available Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs metabolize drugs and xenobiotics. Yet despite high protein sequence homology, expression of π-class GSTs, the most abundant of the enzymes, varies significantly between species. In mouse liver, hepatocytes exhibit high mGstp expression, while in human liver, hepatocytes contain little or no hGSTP1 mRNA or hGSTP1 protein. π-class GSTs are known to be critical determinants of liver responses to drugs and toxins: when treated with high doses of acetaminophen, mGstp1/2+/+ mice suffer marked liver damage, while mGstp1/2-/- mice escape liver injury.To more faithfully model the contribution of π-class GSTs to human liver toxicology, we introduced hGSTP1, with its exons, introns, and flanking sequences, into the germline of mice carrying disrupted mGstp genes. In the resultant hGSTP1+mGstp1/2-/- strain, π-class GSTs were regulated differently than in wild-type mice. In the liver, enzyme expression was restricted to bile duct cells, Kupffer cells, macrophages, and endothelial cells, reminiscent of human liver, while in the prostate, enzyme production was limited to basal epithelial cells, reminiscent of human prostate. The human patterns of hGSTP1 transgene regulation were accompanied by human patterns of DNA methylation, with bisulfite genomic sequencing revealing establishment of an unmethylated CpG island sequence encompassing the gene promoter. Unlike wild-type or mGstp1/2-/- mice, when hGSTP1+mGstp1/2-/- mice were overdosed with acetaminophen, liver tissues showed limited centrilobular necrosis, suggesting that π-class GSTs may be critical determinants of toxin-induced hepatocyte injury even when not expressed by hepatocytes.By recapitulating human π-class GST expression, hGSTP1+mGstp1/2-/- mice may better model human drug and xenobiotic toxicology.

  13. Correlations Between Bone Mechanical Properties and Bone Composition Parameters in Mouse Models of Dominant and Recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta and the Response to Anti-TGF-β Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiaohong; Grafe, Ingo; Ding, Hao; Flores, Rene; Munivez, Elda; Jiang, Ming Ming; Dawson, Brian; Lee, Brendan; Ambrose, Catherine G

    2017-02-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a group of genetic disorders characterized by brittle bones that are prone to fracture. Although previous studies in animal models investigated the mechanical properties and material composition of OI bone, little work has been conducted to statistically correlate these parameters to identify key compositional contributors to the impaired bone mechanical behaviors in OI. Further, although increased TGF-β signaling has been demonstrated as a contributing mechanism to the bone pathology in OI models, the relationship between mechanical properties and bone composition after anti-TGF-β treatment in OI has not been studied. Here, we performed follow-up analyses of femurs collected in an earlier study from OI mice with and without anti-TGF-β treatment from both recessive (Crtap -/- ) and dominant (Col1a2 +/P.G610C ) OI mouse models and WT mice. Mechanical properties were determined using three-point bending tests and evaluated for statistical correlation with molecular composition in bone tissue assessed by Raman spectroscopy. Statistical regression analysis was conducted to determine significant compositional determinants of mechanical integrity. Interestingly, we found differences in the relationships between bone composition and mechanical properties and in the response to anti-TGF-β treatment. Femurs of both OI models exhibited increased brittleness, which was associated with reduced collagen content and carbonate substitution. In the Col1a2 +/P.G610C femurs, reduced hydroxyapatite crystallinity was also found to be associated with increased brittleness, and increased mineral-to-collagen ratio was correlated with increased ultimate strength, elastic modulus, and bone brittleness. In both models of OI, regression analysis demonstrated that collagen content was an important predictor of the increased brittleness. In summary, this work provides new insights into the relationships between bone composition and material properties in

  14. Differential response of biochemical parameters to EMS and MMS treatments and their dose effect relationship on chromosomes in induced diabetic mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.B.D. Khalandar

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: (1 Even though alkylating agents induce chromosomal aberrations in diabetic mice, MMS, a methylating agent is a more potent inducer of chromatid type of aberrations than EMS, an ethylating agent. (2 Diabetic mouse is more resistant than the non diabetic to alkylating agents and (3 the tested agents altered the analyzed biochemical parameters.

  15. MWCNTs of different physicochemical properties cause similar inflammatory responses, but differences in transcriptional and histological markers of fibrosis in mouse lungs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Sarah S.; Saber, Anne T.; Williams, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are an inhomogeneous group of nanomaterials that vary in lengths, shapes and types of metal contamination, which makes hazard evaluation difficult. Here we present a toxicogenomic analysis of female C57BL/6 mouse lungs following a single intratracheal instil...

  16. Expression of acute phase proteins and inflammatory cytokines in mouse mammary gland following Staphylococcus aureus challenge and in response to milk accumulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazemi, Sasan; Aalbæk, Bent; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads

    2014-01-01

    We used a mouse model of pathogenic (Staphylococcus aureus) and non-pathogenic (teat sealing) mammary inflammation to investigate mRNA expression of several inflammatory cytokines and acute phase proteins (APP) in mammary tissue and liver, and the appearance of some of these factors in plasma and...

  17. Mouse models of Fanconi anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parmar, Kalindi; D'Andrea, Alan; Niedernhofer, Laura J.

    2009-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is a rare inherited disease characterized by congenital anomalies, growth retardation, aplastic anemia and an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia and squamous cell carcinomas. The disease is caused by mutation in genes encoding proteins required for the Fanconi anemia pathway, a response mechanism to replicative stress, including that caused by genotoxins that cause DNA interstrand crosslinks. Defects in the Fanconi anemia pathway lead to genomic instability and apoptosis of proliferating cells. To date, 13 complementation groups of Fanconi anemia were identified. Five of these genes have been deleted or mutated in the mouse, as well as a sixth key regulatory gene, to create mouse models of Fanconi anemia. This review summarizes the phenotype of each of the Fanconi anemia mouse models and highlights how genetic and interventional studies using the strains have yielded novel insight into therapeutic strategies for Fanconi anemia and into how the Fanconi anemia pathway protects against genomic instability.

  18. Mouse models of Fanconi anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmar, Kalindi; D' Andrea, Alan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, 44 Binney Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Niedernhofer, Laura J., E-mail: niedernhoferl@upmc.edu [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Cancer Institute, 5117 Centre Avenue, Hillman Cancer Center, Research Pavilion 2.6, Pittsburgh, PA 15213-1863 (United States)

    2009-07-31

    Fanconi anemia is a rare inherited disease characterized by congenital anomalies, growth retardation, aplastic anemia and an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia and squamous cell carcinomas. The disease is caused by mutation in genes encoding proteins required for the Fanconi anemia pathway, a response mechanism to replicative stress, including that caused by genotoxins that cause DNA interstrand crosslinks. Defects in the Fanconi anemia pathway lead to genomic instability and apoptosis of proliferating cells. To date, 13 complementation groups of Fanconi anemia were identified. Five of these genes have been deleted or mutated in the mouse, as well as a sixth key regulatory gene, to create mouse models of Fanconi anemia. This review summarizes the phenotype of each of the Fanconi anemia mouse models and highlights how genetic and interventional studies using the strains have yielded novel insight into therapeutic strategies for Fanconi anemia and into how the Fanconi anemia pathway protects against genomic instability.

  19. cAMP response element binding protein1 is essential for activation of steroyl co-enzyme a desaturase 1 (Scd1 in mouse lung type II epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Antony

    Full Text Available Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein 1 (Creb1 is a transcription factor that mediates cyclic adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (cAMP signalling in many tissues. Creb1(-/- mice die at birth due to respiratory failure and previous genome-wide microarray analysis of E17.5 Creb1(-/- fetal mouse lung identified important Creb1-regulated gene targets during lung development. The lipogenic enzymes stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (Scd1 and fatty acid synthase (Fasn showed highly reduced gene expression in Creb1(-/- lungs. We therefore hypothesized that Creb1 plays a crucial role in the transcriptional regulation of genes involved in pulmonary lipid biosynthetic pathways during lung development. In this study we confirmed that Scd1 and Fasn mRNA levels were down regulated in the E17.5 Creb1(-/- mouse lung while the lipogenic-associated transcription factors SrebpF1, C/ebpα and Pparγ were increased. In vivo studies using germline (Creb1(-/- and lung epithelial-specific (Creb1(EpiΔ/Δ Creb1 knockout mice showed strongly reduced Scd1, but not Fasn gene expression and protein levels in lung epithelial cells. In vitro studies using mouse MLE-15 epithelial cells showed that forskolin-mediated activation of Creb1 increased both Scd1 gene expression and protein synthesis. Additionally, MLE15 cells transfected with a dominant-negative ACreb vector blocked forskolin-mediated stimulation of Scd1 gene expression. Lipid profiling in MLE15 cells showed that dominant-negative ACreb suppressed forskolin-induced desaturation of ether linked lipids to produce plasmalogens, as well as levels of phosphatidylethanolamine, ceramide and lysophosphatidylcholine. Taken together these results demonstrate that Creb1 is essential for the induction and maintenance of Scd1 in developing fetal mouse lung epithelial cells.

  20. Centralized mouse repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Leah Rae; Hrabe de Angelis, Martin; Hagn, Michael; Franklin, Craig; Lloyd, K C Kent; Magnuson, Terry; McKerlie, Colin; Nakagata, Naomi; Obata, Yuichi; Read, Stuart; Wurst, Wolfgang; Hörlein, Andreas; Davisson, Muriel T

    2012-10-01

    Because the mouse is used so widely for biomedical research and the number of mouse models being generated is increasing rapidly, centralized repositories are essential if the valuable mouse strains and models that have been developed are to be securely preserved and fully exploited. Ensuring the ongoing availability of these mouse strains preserves the investment made in creating and characterizing them and creates a global resource of enormous value. The establishment of centralized mouse repositories around the world for distributing and archiving these resources has provided critical access to and preservation of these strains. This article describes the common and specialized activities provided by major mouse repositories around the world.

  1. Interval for the expression of the adaptive response induced by gamma radiation in leucocytes of mouse In vivo; Intervalo para la expresion de la respuesta adaptativa inducida por radiacion gamma en leucocitos de raton In vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendiola C, M T; Morales R, P [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    The interval between the adaptive gamma radiation dose (0.01 Gy) and challenge (1.0 Gy) capable to induce the maximum expression of the adaptive response in lymphocytes of mouse In vivo. The animals were exposed to the mentioned doses with different intervals among both (1, 1.5, 5 or 18 hr). By means of the unicellular electrophoresis in gel technique, four damage parameters were analysed. The results showed that from the 1 hr interval an adaptive response was produced since in the pretreated organisms with 0.01 Gy the cells present lesser damage than in those not adapted. The maximum response was induced with the intervals between 2.5 and 5 hr and even though it persisted until 18 hr, the effect was reducing. (Author)

  2. Chronic oral nicotine increases brain [3H]epibatidine binding and responsiveness to antidepressant drugs, but not nicotine, in the mouse forced swim test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen T., Jesper; Nielsen, Elsebet O; Redrobe, John P

    2009-01-01

    Smoking rates among depressed individuals is higher than among healthy subjects, and nicotine alleviates depressive symptoms. Nicotine increases serotonergic and noradrenergic neuronal activity and facilitates serotonin and noradrenaline release. In mice, acute nicotine administration enhances...... the activity of antidepressants in the mouse forced swim (mFST) and tail suspension tests. Here, we investigated if this action of nicotine is also reflected in a chronic treatment regimen....

  3. The use of urinary and kidney SILAM proteomics to monitor kidney response to high dose morpholino oligonucleotides in the mdx mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiping Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligonucleotides (PMO are used as a promising exon-skipping gene therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. One potential complication of high dose PMO therapy is its transient accumulation in the kidneys. Therefore new urinary biomarkers are needed to monitor this treatment. Here, we carried out a pilot proteomic profiling study using stable isotope labeling in mammals (SILAM strategy to identify new biomarkers to monitor the effect of PMO on the kidneys of the dystrophin deficient mouse model for DMD (mdx-23. We first assessed the baseline renal status of the mdx-23 mouse compared to the wild type (C57BL10 mouse, and then followed the renal outcome of mdx-23 mouse treated with a single high dose intravenous PMO injection (800 mg/kg. Surprisingly, untreated mdx-23 mice showed evidence of renal injury at baseline, which was manifested by albuminuria, increased urine output, and changes in established urinary biomarker of acute kidney injury (AKI. The PMO treatment induced further transient renal injury, which peaked at 7 days, and returned to almost the baseline status at 30 days post-treatment. In the kidney, the SILAM approach followed by western blot validation identified changes in Meprin A subunit alpha at day 2, then returned to normal levels at days 7 and 30 after PMO injection. In the urine, SILAM approach identified an increase in Clusterin and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase 1 as potential candidates to monitor the transient renal accumulation of PMO. These results, which were confirmed by Western blots or ELISA, demonstrate the value of the SILAM approach to identify new candidate biomarkers of renal injury in mdx-23 mice treated with high dose PMO.

  4. Maysin and Its Flavonoid Derivative from Centipedegrass Attenuates Amyloid Plaques by Inducting Humoral Immune Response with Th2 Skewed Cytokine Response in the Tg (APPswe, PS1dE9 Alzheimer's Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuno Song

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a slow, progressive neurodegenerative disease and the most common type of dementia in the elderly. The etiology of AD and its underlying mechanism are still not clear. In a previous study, we found that an ethyl acetate extract of Centipedegrass (CG (i.e., EA-CG contained 4 types of Maysin derivatives, including Luteolin, Isoorientin, Rhamnosylisoorientin, and Derhamnosylmaysin, and showed protective effects against Amyloid beta (Aβ by inhibiting oligomeric Aβ in cellular and in vitro models. Here, we examined the preventative effects of EA-CG treatment on the Aβ burden in the Tg (Mo/Hu APPswe PS1dE9 AD mouse model. We have investigated the EA-CG efficacy as novel anti-AD likely preventing amyloid plaques using immunofluorescence staining to visually analyze Aβ40/42 and fibril formation with Thioflavin-S or 6E10 which are the profile of immunoreactivity against epitope Aβ1-16 or neuritic plaque, the quantitation of humoral immune response against Aβ, and the inflammatory cytokine responses (Th1 and Th2 using ELISA and QRT-PCR. To minimize the toxicity of the extracted CG, we addressed the liver toxicity in response to the CG extract treatment in Tg mice using relevant markers, such as aspartate aminotransferase (AST/ alanine aminotransferase (ALT measurements in serum. The EA-CG extract significantly reduced the Aβ burden, the concentration of soluble Aβ40/42 protein, and fibril formation in the hippocampus and cortex of the Tg mice treated with EA-CG (50 mg/kg BW/day for 6 months compared with the Tg mice treated with a normal diet. Additionally, the profile of anti-inflammatory cytokines revealed that the levels of Th2 (interleukin-4 (IL-4 and interleukin-10 (IL-10 cytokines are more significantly increased than Th1 (interferon-γ (IFN-γ, interleukin-2(IL-2 in the sera. These results suggest that the EA-CG fraction induces IL-4/IL-10-dependent anti-inflammatory cytokines (Th2 rather than pro

  5. Response of immunocompetent cells of bone marrow and spleen of mouse males of several strains to stress and to pyrazine containing chemosignals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene V Daev

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The quantity of antibody producing cells and mitotic disturbances in dividing bone marrow cells of mice were studied after exposure of animals to a physical stressor or various pyrazinecontaining chemosignals. Several different strains of mice were used. We demonstrate that immune suppression and destabilization of the chromosome apparatus in dividing cells depend on: а mouse genotype and b side chains position  in the pyrazine ring. Importance of this effects in the light of wide usage of pyrazine containing substances in perfume industry, food production and pharmacology is discussed.

  6. Temporal aspects of tumorigenic response to individual and mixed carcinogens. Comprehensive progress report, June 1, 1975--May 31, 1978. [Mouse skin, rats, hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, R.E.; Burns, F.J.; Altshuler, B.

    1978-02-01

    The research proposed here is designed to obtain a better understanding of the temporal kinetics of tumor induction when one or more carcinogens are present simultaneously or sequentially for prolonged periods of time. Studies done to date under this contract have shown that carcinogenesis in mouse skin by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon carcinogens is consistent with the induction of dependent and autonomous cell transformations by the carcinogen followed by the conversion of autonomous tumor cells into malignancies at a rate which is determined by the level of carcinogen exposure. Dependent cell transformations remain latent in the skin unless expressed by a promoting agent. Dependent neoplasia appears to follow one-hit kinetics while malignancy is a multihit endpoint. Dose-related and time-related aspects of tumor induction are separable in the initiation-promotion system of mouse skin which along with rat skin and hamster lung is being used as a model for testing hypotheses. Results to date provide the basis for a new interpretation of the linear non-threshold extrapolation model. The broad aim of the study is to provide a basis or rationale for estimating risks associated with prolonged exposures to carcinogens found in the environment and to predict how different tissues and species respond to the same carcinogens.

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa alginate is refractory to Th1 immune response and impedes host immune clearance in a mouse model of acute lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Zhijun; Wu, Hong; Ciofu, Oana

    2003-01-01

    . The effect of alginate production on pathogenicity was investigated by using an acute lung infection mouse model that compared a non-mucoid P. aeruginosa strain, PAO1, to its constitutive alginate-overproducing derivative, Alg(+) PAOmucA22, and an alginate-defective strain, Alg(-) PAOalgD. Bacterial......Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic respiratory pathogen that accounts for most of the morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. In CF-affected lungs, the bacteria undergo conversion from a non-mucoid to a non-tractable mucoid phenotype, due to overproduction of alginate...... suspensions were instilled into the left bronchus and examined 24 and 48 h post-infection. The highest bacterial loads and the most severe lung pathology were observed with strain Alg(-) PAOalgD at 24 h post-infection, which may have been due to an increase in expression of bacterial elastase by the mutant...

  8. Non-tumor cell IDO1 predominantly contributes to enzyme activity and response to CTLA-4/PD-L1 inhibition in mouse glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Lijie; Ladomersky, Erik; Dostal, Carlos R; Lauing, Kristen L; Swoap, Kathleen; Billingham, Leah K; Gritsina, Galina; Wu, Meijing; McCusker, Robert H; Binder, David C; Wainwright, Derek A

    2017-05-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common malignant brain tumor in adults with a median survival of 14.6months. A contributing factor to GBM aggressiveness is the intratumoral expression of the potently immunosuppressive enzyme, indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase 1 (IDO1). The enzymatic activity of IDO1 is associated with the conversion of tryptophan into downstream kynurenine (Kyn), which has previously been hypothesized to contribute toward the suppression of tumor immunity. Utilizing the syngeneic, immunocompetent, intracranial GL261 cell GBM model, we previously demonstrated that tumor cell, but not non-tumor cell IDO1, suppresses T cell-mediated brain tumor regression in mice. Paradoxically, we also showed that the survival advantage mediated by immune checkpoint blockade is abrogated by non-tumor cell IDO1 deficiency. Here, we have built on our past observations and confirm the maladaptive role of tumor cell IDO1 in a novel mouse GBM model. We also demonstrate that, non-tumor cells, rather than mouse GBM cells, are the dominant contributor to IDO1-mediated enzyme activity. Finally, we show the novel associations between maximally-effective immune-checkpoint blockade-mediated survival, non-tumor cell IDO1 and intra-GBM Kyn levels. These data suggest for the first time that, GBM cell-mediated immunosuppression is IDO1 enzyme independent, while the survival benefits of immune checkpoint blockade require non-tumor cell IDO1 enzyme activity. Given that current clinical inhibitors vary in their mechanism of action, in terms of targeting IDO1 enzyme activity versus enzyme-independent effects, this work suggests that choosing an appropriate IDO1 pharmacologic will maximize the effectiveness of future immune checkpoint blockade approaches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Low-dose ionizing irradiation triggers a 53BP1 response to DNA double strand breaks in mouse spermatogonial stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Wei; Qi, Lixin; Li, Jiaxuan; Wu, DengIong; Xu, Jun; Zhang, Jinfu

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to examine the effect of low-dose ionizing irradiation on DNA double strand breaks (DSB) in mouse spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) and reveal the underlying pathways for the DNA repair for DSB in SSCs. Eighteen one-month-old mice were divided into 6 groups and sacrificed separately at 45 minutes, 2 hours, 24 hours, 48 hours, and 72 hours after 0.1Gy X-ray irradiation (mice without receiving ionizing irradiation served as control). After perfusion fixation, testes were removed, sectioned, and followed by staining of γH2AX, 53BP1, Caspase 3, and promyelocytic leukemia zinc-finger (PLZF) for analysis among the different groups. The staining was observed by immunofluorescence visualized by confocal laser scanning. After low-dose irradiation, only 53BP1, but not Caspase3 or γH2AX was upregulated in PLZF positive SSCs within 45 minutes. The expression level of 53BP1 gradually decreased 24 hours after irradiation. Moreover, low-dose irradiation had no effect on the cell number and apoptotic status of SSCs. However other spermatogenic cells highly expressed γH2AX shortly after irradiation which was dramatically reduced following the events of DNA repair. It appears that low-dose ionizing irradiation may cause the DNA DSB of mouse spermatogenic cells. 53BP1, but not γH2AX, is involved in the DNA repair for DSB in SSCs. Our data indicates that 53BP1 plays an important role in the pathophysiological repair of DNA DSB in SSCs. This may open a new avenue to understanding the mechanisms of DNA repair of SSCs and male infertility.

  10. Discrimination of tumorigenic triazole conazoles from phenobarbital by transcriptional analyses of mouse liver gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conazoles are fungicides used to control fungal growth in environmental settings and to treat humans with fungal infections. Mouse hepatotumorigenic conazoles display many of the same hepatic toxicologic responses as the mouse liver carcinogen phenobarbital (PB): constitutive and...

  11. Association of H2A{sup b} with resistance to collagen-induced arthritis in H2-recombinant mouse strains: An allele associated with reduction of several apparently unrelated responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchison, N.A.; Brunner, M.C. [Deutsches Rheuma-Forschungszentrum, Berlin (Germany)

    1995-02-01

    HLA class II alleles can protect against immunological diseases. Seeking an animal model for a naturally occurring protective allele, we screened a panel of H2-congenic and recombinant mouse strains for ability to protect against collagen-induced arthritis. The strains were crossed with the susceptible strain DBA/1, and the F{sub 1} hybrids immunized with cattle and chicken type II collagen. Hybrids having the H2A{sup b} allele displayed a reduced incidence and duration of the disease. They also had a reduced level of pre-disease inflammation, but not of anti-collagen antibodies. The allele is already known to be associated with reduction of other apparently unrelated immune responses, suggesting that some form of functional differentiation may operate that is not exclusively related to epitope-binding. It is suggested that this may reflect allelic variation in the class II major histocompatibility complex promoter region. 42 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Response of the mouse lung transcriptome to welding fume: effects of stainless and mild steel fumes on lung gene expression in A/J and C57BL/6J mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonini James M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Debate exists as to whether welding fume is carcinogenic, but epidemiological evidence suggests that welders are an at risk population for the development of lung cancer. Recently, we found that exposure to welding fume caused an acutely greater and prolonged lung inflammatory response in lung tumor susceptible A/J versus resistant C57BL/6J (B6 mice and a trend for increased tumor incidence after stainless steel (SS fume exposure. Here, our objective was to examine potential strain-dependent differences in the regulation and resolution of the lung inflammatory response induced by carcinogenic (Cr and Ni abundant or non-carcinogenic (iron abundant metal-containing welding fumes at the transcriptome level. Methods Mice were exposed four times by pharyngeal aspiration to 5 mg/kg iron abundant gas metal arc-mild steel (GMA-MS, Cr and Ni abundant GMA-SS fume or vehicle and were euthanized 4 and 16 weeks after the last exposure. Whole lung microarray using Illumina Mouse Ref-8 expression beadchips was done. Results Overall, we found that tumor susceptibility was associated with a more marked transcriptional response to both GMA-MS and -SS welding fumes. Also, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that gene regulation and expression in the top molecular networks differed between the strains at both time points post-exposure. Interestingly, a common finding between the strains was that GMA-MS fume exposure altered behavioral gene networks. In contrast, GMA-SS fume exposure chronically upregulated chemotactic and immunomodulatory genes such as CCL3, CCL4, CXCL2, and MMP12 in the A/J strain. In the GMA-SS-exposed B6 mouse, genes that initially downregulated cellular movement, hematological system development/function and immune response were involved at both time points post-exposure. However, at 16 weeks, a transcriptional switch to an upregulation for neutrophil chemotactic genes was found and included genes such as S100A8, S100A9 and

  13. Adverse hepatic and cardiac responses to rosiglitazone in a new mouse model of type 2 diabetes: relation to dysregulated phosphatidylcholine metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Huei-Ju; Lin, Yiming; Chen, Yuqing E; Vance, Dennis E; Leiter, Edward H

    2006-07-01

    Given the heterogeneous nature of metabolic dysfunctions associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D), a single pharmaceutical cannot be expected to provide complication-free therapy in all patients. Thiazolidinediones (TZD) increase insulin sensitivity, reduce blood glucose and improve cardiovascular parameters. However, in addition to increasing fat mass, TZD have the potential in certain individuals to exacerbate underlying hepatosteatosis and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Pharmacogenetics should allow patient selection to maximize therapy and minimize risk. To this end, we have combined two genetically diverse inbred strains, NON/Lt and NZO/Lt, to produce a "negative heterosis" increasing the frequency of T2D in F1 males. As in humans with T2D, treatment of diabetic and hyperlipemic F1 males with rosiglitazone (Rosi), an agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated gamma receptor (PPARgamma), reverses these disease phenotypes. However, the hybrid genome perturbed both major pathways for phosphatidylcholine (PC) biosynthesis in the liver, and effected remarkable alterations in the composition of cardiolipin in heart mitochondria. These metabolic defects severely exacerbated an underlying hepatosteatosis and increased levels of the adipokine, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), a risk factor for cardiovascular events. This model system demonstrates how the power of mouse genetics can be used to identify the metabolic signatures of individuals who may be prone to drug side effects.

  14. Mouse embryonic stem cells undergo charontosis, a novel programmed cell death pathway dependent upon cathepsins, p53, and EndoG, in response to etoposide treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichy, Elisia D; Stephan, Zachary A; Osterburg, Andrew; Noel, Greg; Stambrook, Peter J

    2013-05-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are hypersensitive to many DNA damaging agents and can rapidly undergo cell death or cell differentiation following exposure. Treatment of mouse ESCs (mESCs) with etoposide (ETO), a topoisomerase II poison, followed by a recovery period resulted in massive cell death with characteristics of a programmed cell death pathway (PCD). While cell death was both caspase- and necroptosis-independent, it was partially dependent on the activity of lysosomal proteases. A role for autophagy in the cell death process was eliminated, suggesting that ETO induces a novel PCD pathway in mESCs. Inhibition of p53 either as a transcription factor by pifithrin α or in its mitochondrial role by pifithrin μ significantly reduced ESC death levels. Finally, EndoG was newly identified as a protease participating in the DNA fragmentation observed during ETO-induced PCD. We coined the term charontosis after Charon, the ferryman of the dead in Greek mythology, to refer to the PCD signaling events induced by ETO in mESCs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Cell surface response of chemically transformed, malignant mouse embryonal fibroblasts and human colon cancer cells to the maturation-promoting agent, N,N-dimethylformamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    The lactoperoxidase/ 125 I radioiodination procedure was used to probe the cell surface of normal, nontransformed AKR-2B mouse embryo fibroblasts and malignant, permanently methylcholanthrene-transformed AKR-2B (AKR-MCA) cells to establish the relationship between cell surface changes and transformation/differentiation in this call system. AKR-MCA cells displayed surface alterations secondary to N,N-dimethylformamide (DFM)-promoted differentiation. Growth of AKR-MCA cells in DMF virtually eliminated the 85,000 and 63,000 molecular weight surface proteins susceptible to radioiodination and increased surface material of ∼200,000 molecular weight. Thus, surface profiles of DFM-treated AKR-MCA cells were essentially identical to those of nontransformed AKR-2B cells. Experimentation was extended to a cultured human colon cancer cell line (HCT MOSER). HCT MOSER cells exposed to DMF manifested marked, reversible morphological and surface changes which occurred as a function of time of growth in DMF and DMF concentration. Interestingly, material reactive with anti-fibronectin was found on the surfaces and in the culture medium of DFM-treated HCT MOSER cells

  16. The vascular pattern of the spontaneous C3H mouse mammary carcinoma and its significance in radiation response and in hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, P.

    1980-01-01

    This study showed that the vascular pattern of the spontaneous C3H mouse mammary carcinoma develops from a capillary network into an afferent system lacking arterioles and consisting only of capillary-like vessels and an efferent system characterized by large sinuses. Lack of correlation between the growth of stroma and parenchyma leads to a circuitous and uneven supply of blood and to a high degree of occlusion of the efferent system with consequent reduction in the rate of flow of blood. The parenchyma consists of tubules formed of single or multiple layers of cells between which capillaries do not penetrate. The diffusion pathway of oxygen and nutrients to the inner cells of the multi-layered tubules is considerably longer than that to their outer cells or to the cells of the single-layered tubules. Consequently it is in the former parts that anoxia and severe hypoxia are likely to prevail. The pattern of necrosis agrees with this supposition. It is predicted that radiation hyperthermia will act differentially and in opposite senses on these two tumour components, hyperthermia being more effective on the former, radiation on the latter. (author)

  17. Connexin31.1 deficiency in the mouse impairs object memory and modulates open-field exploration, acetylcholine esterase levels in the striatum, and cAMP response element-binding protein levels in the striatum and piriform cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dere, E; Zheng-Fischhöfer, Q; Viggiano, D; Gironi Carnevale, U A; Ruocco, L A; Zlomuzica, A; Schnichels, M; Willecke, K; Huston, J P; Sadile, A G

    2008-05-02

    Neuronal gap junctions in the brain, providing intercellular electrotonic signal transfer, have been implicated in physiological and behavioral correlates of learning and memory. In connexin31.1 (Cx31.1) knockout (KO) mice the coding region of the Cx31.1 gene was replaced by a LacZ reporter gene. We investigated the impact of Cx31.1 deficiency on open-field exploration, the behavioral response to an odor, non-selective attention, learning and memory performance, and the levels of memory-related proteins in the hippocampus, striatum and the piriform cortex. In terms of behavior, the deletion of the Cx31.1 coding DNA in the mouse led to increased exploratory behaviors in a novel environment, and impaired one-trial object recognition at all delays tested. Despite strong Cx31.1 expression in the peripheral and central olfactory system, Cx31.1 KO mice exhibited normal behavioral responses to an odor. We found increased levels of acetylcholine esterase (AChE) and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in the striatum of Cx31.1 KO mice. In the piriform cortex the Cx31.1 KO mice had an increased heterogeneity of CREB expression among neurons. In conclusion, gap-junctions featuring the Cx31.1 protein might be involved in open-field exploration as well as object memory and modulate levels of AChE and CREB in the striatum and piriform cortex.

  18. Gaze beats mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mateo, Julio C.; San Agustin, Javier; Hansen, John Paulin

    2008-01-01

    Facial EMG for selection is fast, easy and, combined with gaze pointing, it can provide completely hands-free interaction. In this pilot study, 5 participants performed a simple point-and-select task using mouse or gaze for pointing and a mouse button or a facial-EMG switch for selection. Gaze...

  19. E3B1, a human homologue of the mouse gene product Abi-1, sensitizes activation of Rap1 in response to epidermal growth factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenei, Veronika; Andersson, Tommy; Jakus, Judit; Dib, Karim

    2005-01-01

    E3B1, a human homologue of the mouse gene product Abi-1, has been implicated in growth-factor-mediated regulation of the small GTPases p21 Ras and Rac. E3b1 is a regulator of Rac because it can form a complex with Sos-1 and eps8, and such a Sos-1-e3B1-eps8 complex serves as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rac. In the present study, we found that overexpression of e3B1 in NIH3T3/EGFR cells sensitized EGF-induced activation of Rac1, whereas it had no impact on EGF-induced activation of p21 Ras . Remarkably, we found that EGF-induced activation of the p21 Ras -related GTPase Rap1 was also sensitized in NIH3T3/EGFR-e3B1 cells. Thus, in NIH3T3/EGFR-e3B1 cells, maximal EGF-induced activation of Rap1 occurs with a dose of EGF much lower than in NIH3T3/EGFR cells. We also report that overexpression of e3B1 in NIH3T3/EGFR cells renders EGF-induced activation of Rap1 completely dependent on Src tyrosine kinases but not on c-Abl. However, EGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the Rap GEF C3G occurred regardless of whether e3B1 was overexpressed or not, and this did not involve Src tyrosine kinases. Accordingly, we propose that overexpression of e3B1 in NIH3T3/EGFR cells leads to mobilization of Src tyrosine kinases that participate in EGF-induced activation of Rap1 and inhibition of cell proliferation

  20. 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) alters acute gammaherpesvirus burden and limits Interleukin 27 responses in a mouse model of viral infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Daniel A.; Singh, Sam J.; Young, Amy B.; Tolbert, Melanie D.; Bost, Kenneth L.

    2011-01-01

    Aims To test whether 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, “Ecstasy”) abuse might increase the susceptibility, or alter the immune response, to murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (HV-68) and/or bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Methods Groups of experimental and control mice were subjected to three day binges of MDMA, and the effect of this drug abuse on acute and latent HV-68 viral burden were assessed. In vitro and in vivo studies were also performed to assess the MDMA effect on IL-27 expression in virally infected or LPS-exposed macrophages and dendritic cells, and latently infected animals, exposed to this drug of abuse. Results Acute viral burden was significantly increased in MDMA-treated mice when compared to controls. However the latent viral burden, and physiological and behavioral responses were not altered in infected mice despite repeated bingeing with MDMA. MDMA could limit the IL-27 response of HV-68 infected or LPS-exposed macrophages and dendritic cells in vitro and in vivo, demonstrating the ability of this drug to alter normal cytokine responses in the context of a viral infection and/or a TLR4 agonist. Conclusion MDMA bingeing could alter the host’s immune response resulting in greater acute viral replication and reductions in the production of the cytokine, IL-27 during immune responses. PMID:21269783

  1. Focal exposure of limited lung volumes to high-dose irradiation down-regulated organ development-related functions and up-regulated the immune response in mouse pulmonary tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bu-Yeo; Jin, Hee; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Kang, Ga-Young; Cho, Jaeho; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2016-01-27

    Despite the emergence of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for treatment of medically inoperable early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer patients, the molecular effects of focal exposure of limited lung volumes to high-dose radiation have not been fully characterized. This study was designed to identify molecular changes induced by focal high-dose irradiation using a mouse model of SBRT. Central areas of the mouse left lung were focally-irradiated (3 mm in diameter) with a single high-dose of radiation (90 Gy). Temporal changes in gene expression in the irradiated and non-irradiated neighboring lung regions were analyzed by microarray. For comparison, the long-term effect (12 months) of 20 Gy radiation on a diffuse region of lung was also measured. The majority of genes were down-regulated in the focally-irradiated lung areas at 2 to 3 weeks after irradiation. This pattern of gene expression was clearly different than gene expression in the diffuse region of lungs exposed to low-dose radiation. Ontological and pathway analyses indicated these down-regulated genes were mainly associated with organ development. Although the number was small, genes that were up-regulated after focal irradiation were associated with immune-related functions. The temporal patterns of gene expression and the associated biological functions were also similar in non-irradiated neighboring lung regions, although statistical significance was greatly reduced when compared with those from focally-irradiated areas of the lung. From network analysis of temporally regulated genes, we identified inter-related modules associated with diverse functions, including organ development and the immune response, in both the focally-irradiated regions and non-irradiated neighboring lung regions. Focal exposure of lung tissue to high-dose radiation induced expression of genes associated with organ development and the immune response. This pattern of gene expression was also observed in non

  2. Comparison of Airway Responses Induced in a Mouse Model by the Gas and Particulate Fractions of Gasoline Direct Injection Engine Exhaust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maikawa, Caitlin L; Zimmerman, Naomi; Ramos, Manuel; Shah, Mittal; Wallace, James S; Pollitt, Krystal J Godri

    2018-03-01

    Diesel exhaust has been associated with asthma, but its response to other engine emissions is not clear. The increasing prevalence of vehicles with gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines motivated this study, and the objective was to evaluate pulmonary responses induced by acute exposure to GDI engine exhaust in an allergic asthma murine model. Mice were sensitized with an allergen to induce airway hyperresponsiveness or treated with saline (non-allergic group). Animals were challenged for 2-h to exhaust from a laboratory GDI engine operated at conditions equivalent to a highway cruise. Exhaust was filtered to assess responses induced by the particulate and gas fractions. Short-term exposure to particulate matter from GDI engine exhaust induced upregulation of genes related to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) metabolism ( Cyp1b1 ) and inflammation ( TNFα ) in the lungs of non-allergic mice. High molecular weight PAHs dominated the particulate fraction of the exhaust, and this response was therefore likely attributable to the presence of these PAHs. The particle fraction of GDI engine exhaust further contributed to enhanced methacholine responsiveness in the central and peripheral tissues in animals with airway hyperresponsiveness. As GDI engines gain prevalence in the vehicle fleet, understanding the health impacts of their emissions becomes increasingly important.

  3. Comparison of Airway Responses Induced in a Mouse Model by the Gas and Particulate Fractions of Gasoline Direct Injection Engine Exhaust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin L. Maikawa

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Diesel exhaust has been associated with asthma, but its response to other engine emissions is not clear. The increasing prevalence of vehicles with gasoline direct injection (GDI engines motivated this study, and the objective was to evaluate pulmonary responses induced by acute exposure to GDI engine exhaust in an allergic asthma murine model. Mice were sensitized with an allergen to induce airway hyperresponsiveness or treated with saline (non-allergic group. Animals were challenged for 2-h to exhaust from a laboratory GDI engine operated at conditions equivalent to a highway cruise. Exhaust was filtered to assess responses induced by the particulate and gas fractions. Short-term exposure to particulate matter from GDI engine exhaust induced upregulation of genes related to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH metabolism (Cyp1b1 and inflammation (TNFα in the lungs of non-allergic mice. High molecular weight PAHs dominated the particulate fraction of the exhaust, and this response was therefore likely attributable to the presence of these PAHs. The particle fraction of GDI engine exhaust further contributed to enhanced methacholine responsiveness in the central and peripheral tissues in animals with airway hyperresponsiveness. As GDI engines gain prevalence in the vehicle fleet, understanding the health impacts of their emissions becomes increasingly important.

  4. SU-C-204-05: Magnetic Resonance-Induced Adaptive Response to Orthovoltage Radiation Therapy in FSa and SA-NH Mouse Tumor Cell Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendel, K; Miller, R; Murley, J; Sadinski, M; Grdina, D [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the effect of pre-treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) on cell survival following orthovoltage radiation therapy. Methods: This in vitro study examined the survival of FSa cells (extracted from methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcoma in the flank of a C3H female mouse) and SA-NH cells (derived from a spontaneously arising murine sarcoma tumor) having undergone an MRI scan prior to radiation exposure. Cell cultures were kept at 37 C, in a humidified environment with 5% CO2, and were grown to confluence prior to the start of the experiment. Each cell culture underwent two, 25 minute MRIs spaced 24 hours apart using a standard brain imaging protocol. The cultures were exposed to a 2 Gy dose of radiation beginning 15 minutes after the end of each MRI scan. Irradiations were performed by a Philips RT250 X-ray generator at 250 kVp and 15 mA. All MR imaging was performed on a 1.5 T Philips Achieva scanner using a head and neck vasculature coil. Results: Cells given an MRI scan prior to radiation exhibited an increase in mean surviving fraction of 10.8% and 9.6% in FSa and SA-NH cells, respectively. The difference was found to be statistically significant in both cell types by a student two-tailed t test with P = 0.011 and P < 0.001 for FSa and SA-NH, respectively. Conclusion: MRI may cause an increase in radio-resistance in FSa and SA-NH cells. If this biological effect is found to be consistent across other cell types and voltage ranges, these results could help inform treatment planning by improving our understanding of the joint effects of MRI and ionizing radiation. This work was supported in part under NIH grant numbers T32 EB002103, NCI R01-CA 132998, DOE Low Dose Program/Project Grant DE-413 SC0001271. DJ Grdina is a paid consultant to Pinnacle Biologics. DJ Grdina and JS Murley are minority equity partners in Pinnacle Oncology LLC.

  5. SU-C-204-05: Magnetic Resonance-Induced Adaptive Response to Orthovoltage Radiation Therapy in FSa and SA-NH Mouse Tumor Cell Lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendel, K; Miller, R; Murley, J; Sadinski, M; Grdina, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the effect of pre-treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) on cell survival following orthovoltage radiation therapy. Methods: This in vitro study examined the survival of FSa cells (extracted from methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcoma in the flank of a C3H female mouse) and SA-NH cells (derived from a spontaneously arising murine sarcoma tumor) having undergone an MRI scan prior to radiation exposure. Cell cultures were kept at 37 C, in a humidified environment with 5% CO2, and were grown to confluence prior to the start of the experiment. Each cell culture underwent two, 25 minute MRIs spaced 24 hours apart using a standard brain imaging protocol. The cultures were exposed to a 2 Gy dose of radiation beginning 15 minutes after the end of each MRI scan. Irradiations were performed by a Philips RT250 X-ray generator at 250 kVp and 15 mA. All MR imaging was performed on a 1.5 T Philips Achieva scanner using a head and neck vasculature coil. Results: Cells given an MRI scan prior to radiation exhibited an increase in mean surviving fraction of 10.8% and 9.6% in FSa and SA-NH cells, respectively. The difference was found to be statistically significant in both cell types by a student two-tailed t test with P = 0.011 and P < 0.001 for FSa and SA-NH, respectively. Conclusion: MRI may cause an increase in radio-resistance in FSa and SA-NH cells. If this biological effect is found to be consistent across other cell types and voltage ranges, these results could help inform treatment planning by improving our understanding of the joint effects of MRI and ionizing radiation. This work was supported in part under NIH grant numbers T32 EB002103, NCI R01-CA 132998, DOE Low Dose Program/Project Grant DE-413 SC0001271. DJ Grdina is a paid consultant to Pinnacle Biologics. DJ Grdina and JS Murley are minority equity partners in Pinnacle Oncology LLC.

  6. Rats and mice immunised with chimeric human/mouse proteinase 3 produce autoantibodies to mouse Pr3 and rat granulocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geld, Ymke M.; Hellmark, Thomas; Selga, Daina; Heeringa, Peter; Huitema, Minke G.; Limburg, Pieter C.; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: In this study, we employed chimeric human/ mouse Proteinase 3 ( PR3) proteins as tools to induce an autoantibody response to PR3 in rats and mice. Method: Rats and mice were immunised with recombinant human PR3 ( HPR3), recombinant murine PR3 ( mPR3), single chimeric human/ mouse PR3 ( HHm,

  7. Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) enhances cAMP-responsive element binding (CREB) protein phosphorylation and phospho-CREB interaction with the mouse steroidogenic acute regulatory protein gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clem, Brian F; Hudson, Elizabeth A; Clark, Barbara J

    2005-03-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) transcription is regulated through cAMP-protein kinase A-dependent mechanisms that involve multiple transcription factors including the cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) family members. Classically, binding of phosphorylated CREB to cis-acting cAMP-responsive elements (5'-TGACGTCA-3') within target gene promoters leads to recruitment of the coactivator CREB binding protein (CBP). Herein we examined the extent of CREB family member phosphorylation on protein-DNA interactions and CBP recruitment with the StAR promoter. Immunoblot analysis revealed that CREB, cAMP-responsive element modulator (CREM), and activating transcription factor (ATF)-1 are expressed in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells, yet only CREB and ATF-1 are phosphorylated. (Bu)2cAMP treatment of MA-10 cells increased CREB phosphorylation approximately 2.3-fold within 30 min but did not change total nuclear CREB expression levels. Using DNA-affinity chromatography, we now show that CREB and ATF-1, but not CREM, interact with the StAR promoter, and this interaction is dependent on the activator protein-1 (AP-1) cis-acting element within the cAMP-responsive region. In addition, (Bu)2cAMP-treatment increased phosphorylated CREB (P-CREB) association with the StAR promoter but did not influence total CREB interaction. In vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated CREB binding to the StAR proximal promoter is independent of (Bu)2cAMP-treatment, confirming our in vitro analysis. However, (Bu)2cAMP-treatment increased P-CREB and CBP interaction with the StAR promoter, demonstrating for the first time the physical role of P-CREB:DNA interactions in CBP recruitment to the StAR proximal promoter.

  8. Administration of sulfosuccinimidyl-4-[N-maleimidomethyl] cyclohexane-1-carboxylate conjugated GP10025–33 peptide-coupled spleen cells effectively mounts antigen-specific immune response against mouse melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Xiaoli; Xia, Chang-Qing

    2015-01-01

    It remains a top research priority to develop immunotherapeutic approaches to induce potent antigen-specific immune responses against tumors. However, in spite of some promising results, most strategies are ineffective because they generate low numbers of tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Here we designed a strategy to enhance antigen-specific immune response via administering sulfosuccinimidyl-4-[N-maleimidomethyl] cyclohexane-1-carboxylate (sulfo-SMCC)-conjugated melanoma tumor antigen GP100 25–33 peptide-coupled syngeneic spleen cells in a mouse model of melanoma. We found that infusion of GP100 25–33 peptide-coupled spleen cells significantly attenuated the growth of melanoma in prophylactic and therapeutic immunizations. Consistent with these findings, the adoptive transfer of spleen cells from immunized mice to naïve syngeneic mice was able to transfer anti-tumor effect, suggesting that GP100 25–33 peptide-specific immune response was induced. Further studies showed that, CD8+ T cell proliferation and the frequency of interferon (IFN)-γ-producing CD8+ T cells upon ex vivo stimulation by GP100 25–33 were significantly increased compared to control groups. Tumor antigen, GP100 25–23 specific immune response was also confirmed by ELISpot and GP100-tetramer assays. This approach is simple, easy-handled, and efficiently delivering antigens to lymphoid tissues. Our study offers an opportunity for clinically translating this approach into tumor immunotherapy. - Highlights: • Infusion of GP100 25–33 -coupled spleen cells leads to potent anti-melanoma immunity. • GP100 25–33 -coupled spleen cell treatment induces antigen-specific IFN-γ-producing CD8 T cells. • This approach takes advantage of homing nature of immune cells.

  9. Administration of sulfosuccinimidyl-4-[N-maleimidomethyl] cyclohexane-1-carboxylate conjugated GP100{sub 25–33} peptide-coupled spleen cells effectively mounts antigen-specific immune response against mouse melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Xiaoli [Department of Hematology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Xia, Chang-Qing, E-mail: cqx65@yahoo.com [Department of Hematology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Department of Pathology, Immunology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL32610 (United States)

    2015-12-04

    It remains a top research priority to develop immunotherapeutic approaches to induce potent antigen-specific immune responses against tumors. However, in spite of some promising results, most strategies are ineffective because they generate low numbers of tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Here we designed a strategy to enhance antigen-specific immune response via administering sulfosuccinimidyl-4-[N-maleimidomethyl] cyclohexane-1-carboxylate (sulfo-SMCC)-conjugated melanoma tumor antigen GP100{sub 25–33} peptide-coupled syngeneic spleen cells in a mouse model of melanoma. We found that infusion of GP100{sub 25–33} peptide-coupled spleen cells significantly attenuated the growth of melanoma in prophylactic and therapeutic immunizations. Consistent with these findings, the adoptive transfer of spleen cells from immunized mice to naïve syngeneic mice was able to transfer anti-tumor effect, suggesting that GP100{sub 25–33} peptide-specific immune response was induced. Further studies showed that, CD8+ T cell proliferation and the frequency of interferon (IFN)-γ-producing CD8+ T cells upon ex vivo stimulation by GP100{sub 25–33} were significantly increased compared to control groups. Tumor antigen, GP100{sub 25–23} specific immune response was also confirmed by ELISpot and GP100-tetramer assays. This approach is simple, easy-handled, and efficiently delivering antigens to lymphoid tissues. Our study offers an opportunity for clinically translating this approach into tumor immunotherapy. - Highlights: • Infusion of GP100{sub 25–33}-coupled spleen cells leads to potent anti-melanoma immunity. • GP100{sub 25–33}-coupled spleen cell treatment induces antigen-specific IFN-γ-producing CD8 T cells. • This approach takes advantage of homing nature of immune cells.

  10. Disruption of cyclooxygenase-2 prevents downregulation of cortical AQP2 and AQP3 in response to bilateral ureteral obstruction in the mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Line; Madsen, Kirsten Morill; Topcu, Sukru Oguzkan

    2012-01-01

    Bilateral ureteral obstruction (BUO) in rats is associated with increased cyclooxygenase type 2 (COX-2) expression, and selective COX-2 inhibition prevents downregulation of aquaporins (AQPs) in response to BUO. It was hypothesized that a murine model would display similar changes in renal COX-2 ...

  11. The Assessment of Cytokine and Antibody Responses to Recombinant 31kDa Brucella Cell-Surface Protein in Brucella Abortus Infected Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Khoramabadi

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: These findings suggest that specific humoral and cell-mediated responses to BCSP31 is formed during murine host infection with B. abortus. Based on these findings, rBCSP31 can be used in further design of immunogenic strategies for vaccination against brucellosis.

  12. Analysis of Mouse Brain Transcriptome After Experimental Duvenhage Virus Infection Shows Activation of Innate Immune Response and Pyroptotic Cell Death Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope Koraka

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Rabies is an important neglected disease, characterized by invariably fatal encephalitis. Several studies focus on understanding the pathogenic mechanisms of the prototype lyssavirus rabies virus (RABV infection, and little is known about the pathogenesis of rabies caused by other lyssaviruses. We sought to characterize the host response to Duvenhage virus infection and compare it with responses observed during RABV infection by gene expression profiling of brains of mice with the respective infections. We found in both infections differentially expressed genes leading to increased expression of type I interferons (IFNs, chemokines, and proinflammatory cytokines. In addition several genes of the IFN signaling pathway are up-regulated, indicating a strong antiviral response and activation of the negative feedback mechanism to limit type I IFN responses. Furthermore we provide evidence that in the absence of significant neuronal apoptotic death, cell death of neurons is mediated via the pyroptotic pathway in both infections. Taken together, we have identified several genes and/or pathways for both infections that could be used to explore novel approaches for intervention strategies against rabies.

  13. BET protein function is required for inflammation: Brd2 genetic disruption and BET inhibitor JQ1 impair mouse macrophage inflammatory responses1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkina, Anna C.; Nikolajczyk, Barbara S.; Denis, Gerald V.

    2013-01-01

    Histone acetylation regulates activation and repression of multiple inflammatory genes known to play critical roles in chronic inflammatory diseases. However, proteins responsible for translating the histone acetylation code into an orchestrated pro-inflammatory cytokine response remain poorly characterized. Bromodomain extra terminal (BET) proteins are “readers” of histone acetylation marks with demonstrated roles in gene transcription, but the ability of BET proteins to coordinate the response of inflammatory cytokine genes through translation of histone marks is unknown. We hypothesize that members of the BET family of dual bromodomain-containing transcriptional regulators directly control inflammatory genes. We examined the genetic model of brd2 lo mice, a BET protein hypomorph, to show that Brd2 is essential for pro-inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages. Studies that utilize siRNA knockdown and a small molecule inhibitor of BET protein binding, JQ1, independently demonstrate BET proteins are critical for macrophage inflammatory responses. Furthermore, we show that Brd2 and Brd4 physically associate with the promoters of inflammatory cytokine genes in macrophages. This association is absent in the presence of BET inhibition by JQ1. Finally, we demonstrate that JQ1 ablates cytokine production in vitro and blunts the “cytokine storm” in endotoxemic mice by reducing levels of IL-6 and TNF-α while rescuing mice from LPS-induced death. We propose that targeting BET proteins with small molecule inhibitors will benefit hyper-inflammatory conditions associated with high levels of cytokine production. PMID:23420887

  14. BET protein function is required for inflammation: Brd2 genetic disruption and BET inhibitor JQ1 impair mouse macrophage inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkina, Anna C; Nikolajczyk, Barbara S; Denis, Gerald V

    2013-04-01

    Histone acetylation regulates activation and repression of multiple inflammatory genes known to play critical roles in chronic inflammatory diseases. However, proteins responsible for translating the histone acetylation code into an orchestrated proinflammatory cytokine response remain poorly characterized. Bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) proteins are "readers" of histone acetylation marks, with demonstrated roles in gene transcription, but the ability of BET proteins to coordinate the response of inflammatory cytokine genes through translation of histone marks is unknown. We hypothesize that members of the BET family of dual bromodomain-containing transcriptional regulators directly control inflammatory genes. We examined the genetic model of brd2 lo mice, a BET protein hypomorph, to show that Brd2 is essential for proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages. Studies that use small interfering RNA knockdown and a small-molecule inhibitor of BET protein binding, JQ1, independently demonstrate BET proteins are critical for macrophage inflammatory responses. Furthermore, we show that Brd2 and Brd4 physically associate with the promoters of inflammatory cytokine genes in macrophages. This association is absent in the presence of BET inhibition by JQ1. Finally, we demonstrate that JQ1 ablates cytokine production in vitro and blunts the "cytokine storm" in endotoxemic mice by reducing levels of IL-6 and TNF-α while rescuing mice from LPS-induced death. We propose that targeting BET proteins with small-molecule inhibitors will benefit hyperinflammatory conditions associated with high levels of cytokine production.

  15. Optical Imaging of Tumor Response to Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatment and Irradiation in an Orthotopic Mouse Model of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A.M. Braks (Joanna); L. Spiegelberg (Linda); S. Koljenović (Senada); Y. Ridwan (Yanto); S. Keereweer (Stijn); R. Kanaar (Roland); E.B. Wolvius (Eppo); J. Essers (Jeroen)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is used in the treatment of radiation-induced tissue injury but its effect on (residual) tumor tissue is indistinct and therefore investigated in this study. Procedures: Orthotopic FaDu tumors were established in mice, and the response of the

  16. ROLE OF THE MATERNAL ACUTE PHASE RESPONSE AND TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR ALPHA IN THE DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE IN THE CD-1 MOUSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT The acute phase response (APR) functions to reset metabolic homeostasis following infectious, toxic or traumatic insult. TNF- , a putative mediator of the APR, has been associated with fetal death in rodents and preterm labor and delivery in humans. We hypothesized...

  17. Roles of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors during the sensory stimulation-evoked field potential responses in mouse cerebellar cortical molecular layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yin-Hua; Zhang, Guang-Jian; Zhao, Jing-Tong; Chu, Chun-Ping; Li, Yu-Zi; Qiu, De-Lai

    2017-11-01

    The functions of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) in cerebellar cortex have been widely studied under in vitro condition, but their roles during the sensory stimulation-evoked responses in the cerebellar cortical molecular layer in living animals are currently unclear. We here investigated the roles of NMDARs during the air-puff stimulation on ipsilateral whisker pad-evoked field potential responses in cerebellar cortical molecular layer in urethane-anesthetized mice by electrophysiological recording and pharmacological methods. Our results showed that cerebellar surface administration of NMDA induced a dose-dependent decrease in amplitude of the facial stimulation-evoked inhibitory responses (P1) in the molecular layer, accompanied with decreases in decay time, half-width and area under curve (AUC) of P1. The IC 50 of NMDA induced inhibition in amplitude of P1 was 46.5μM. In addition, application of NMDA induced significant increases in the decay time, half-width and AUC values of the facial stimulation-evoked excitatory responses (N1) in the molecular layer. Application of an NMDAR blocker, D-APV (250μM) abolished the facial stimulation-evoked P1 in the molecular layer. These results suggested that NMDARs play a critical role during the sensory information processing in cerebellar cortical molecular layer in vivo in mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Expression quantitative trait loci and genetic regulatory network analysis reveals that Gabra2 is involved in stress responses in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jiajuan; Wang, Xusheng; Chen, Ying; Wang, Xiaodong; Zhu, Jun; Lu, Lu

    2009-11-01

    Previous studies have revealed that the subunit alpha 2 (Gabra2) of the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor plays a critical role in the stress response. However, little is known about the gentetic regulatory network for Gabra2 and the stress response. We combined gene expression microarray analysis and quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping to characterize the genetic regulatory network for Gabra2 expression in the hippocampus of BXD recombinant inbred (RI) mice. Our analysis found that the expression level of Gabra2 exhibited much variation in the hippocampus across the BXD RI strains and between the parental strains, C57BL/6J, and DBA/2J. Expression QTL (eQTL) mapping showed three microarray probe sets of Gabra2 to have highly significant linkage likelihood ratio statistic (LRS) scores. Gene co-regulatory network analysis showed that 10 genes, including Gria3, Chka, Drd3, Homer1, Grik2, Odz4, Prkag2, Grm5, Gabrb1, and Nlgn1 are directly or indirectly associated with stress responses. Eleven genes were implicated as Gabra2 downstream genes through mapping joint modulation. The genetical genomics approach demonstrates the importance and the potential power of the eQTL studies in identifying genetic regulatory networks that contribute to complex traits, such as stress responses.

  19. Chromosome Y variants from different inbred mouse strains are linked to differences in the morphologic and molecular responses of cardiac cells to postpubertal testosterone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Churchill Gary A

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have reported previously that when chromosome Y (chrY from the mouse strain C57BL/6J (ChrYC57 was substituted for that of A/J mice (ChrYA, cardiomyocytes from the resulting "chromosome substitution" C57BL/6J-chrYA strain were smaller than that of their C57BL/6J counterparts. In reverse, when chrYA from A/J mice was substituted for that of chrYC57, cardiomyocytes from the resulting A/J-chrYC57 strain were larger than in their A/J counterparts. We further used these strains to test whether: 1 the origin of chrY could also be linked to differences in the profile of gene expression in the hearts of adult male mice, and 2 post-pubertal testosterone could play a role in the differential morphologic and/or molecular effects of chrYC57 and chrYA. Results The increased size of cardiomyocytes from adult male C57BL/6J mice compared to C57BL/6J-chrYA resulted from the absence of hypertrophic effects of post-pubertal testosterone on cells from the latter strain. However, gene profiling revealed that the latter effect could not be explained on the basis of an insensitivity of cells from C57BL/6J-chrYA to androgens, since even more cardiac genes were affected by post-pubertal testosterone in C57BL/6J-chrYA hearts than in C57BL/6J. By testing for interaction between the effects of surgery and strain, we identified 249 "interaction genes" whose expression was affected by post-pubertal testosterone differentially according to the genetic origin of chrY. These interaction genes were found to be enriched within a limited number of signaling pathways, including: 1 p53 signaling, which comprises the interacting genes Ccnd1, Pten and Cdkn1a that are also potential co-regulators of the androgen receptors, and 2 circadian rhythm, which comprises Arntl/Bmal1, which may in turn regulate cell growth via the control of Cdkn1a. Conclusion Although post-pubertal testosterone increased the size of cardiomyocytes from male C56BL/6J mice but not that from

  20. Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — MGI is the international database resource for the laboratory mouse, providing integrated genetic, genomic, and biological data to facilitate the study of human...

  1. Mouse Phenome Database (MPD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mouse Phenome Database (MPD) has characterizations of hundreds of strains of laboratory mice to facilitate translational discoveries and to assist in selection...

  2. Characterization of Genotoxic Response to 15 Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes with Variable Physicochemical Properties Including Surface Functionalizations in the FE1-Muta(TM) Mouse Lung Epithelial Cell Line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, Petra; Kling, Kirsten; Jensen, Keld Alstrup

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes vary greatly in physicochemical properties. We compared cytotoxic and genotoxic response to 15 multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) with varying physicochemical properties to identify drivers of toxic responses. The studied MWCNT included OECD Working Party on Manufactured...... Nanomaterials (WPMN) (NM-401, NM-402, and NM-403), materials (NRCWE-026 and MWCNT-XNRI-7), and three sets of surface-modified MWCNT grouped by physical characteristics (thin, thick, and short I-III, respectively). Each Groups I-III included pristine, hydroxylated and carboxylated MWCNT. Group III also included...... an amino-functionalized MWCNT. The level of surface functionalization of the MWCNT was low. The level and type of elemental impurities of the MWCNT varied by...

  3. Chronic Pancreatitis and Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome Prevent Impact of Chemotherapy with Gemcitabine in a Genetically Engineered Mouse Model of Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard F. Knoop

    2014-06-01

    CONCLUSION: We could demonstrate for the first time that an improvement in median overall survival with gemcitabine is significantly abolished by a persistent mild chronic pancreatitis and a systemic inflammatory response syndrome. In particular, the inflammation biomarkers C-reactive protein, IL-6, and IL-1α could indicate the prognostic benefit of gemcitabine chemotherapy and should now be tested in prospective patient-controlled trials.

  4. Increased gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in mouse brain induce loss of righting reflex, but not immobility, in response to noxious stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Sohtaro; Irifune, Masahiro; Kikuchi, Nobuhito; Takarada, Tohru; Shimizu, Yoshitaka; Endo, Chie; Takata, Takashi; Dohi, Toshihiro; Sato, Tomoaki; Kawahara, Michio

    2007-06-01

    The general anesthetic state comprises behavioral and perceptual components, including amnesia, unconsciousness, and immobility. gamma-Aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) inhibitory neurotransmission is an important target for anesthetic action at the in vitro cellular level. In vivo, however, the functional relevance of enhancing GABAergic neurotransmission in mediating essential components of the general anesthetic state is unknown. Gabaculine is a GABA-transaminase inhibitor that inhibits degradation of released GABA, and consequently increases endogenous GABA in the central nervous system. Here, we examined, behaviorally, the ability of increased GABA levels to produce components of the general anesthetic state. All drugs were administered systemically in adult male ddY mice. To assess the general anesthetic components, two end-points were used. One was loss of righting reflex (LORR; as a measure of unconsciousness); the other was loss of movement in response to tail-clamp stimulation (as a measure of immobility). Gabaculine induced LORR in a dose-dependent fashion with a 50% effective dose of 100 (75-134; 95% confidence limits) mg/kg. The behavioral and microdialysis studies revealed that the endogenous GABA-induced LORR occurred in a brain concentration-dependent manner. However, even larger doses of gabaculine (285-400 mg/kg) produced no loss of tail-clamp response. In contrast, all the tested volatile anesthetics concentration-dependently abolished both righting and tail-clamp response, supporting the evidence that volatile anesthetics act on a variety of molecular targets. These findings indicate that LORR is associated with enhanced GABAergic neurotransmission, but that immobility in response to noxious stimulation is not, suggesting that LORR and immobility are mediated through different neuronal pathways and/or regions in the central nervous system.

  5. Early transcriptional response to aminoglycoside antibiotic suggests alternate pathways leading to apoptosis of sensory hair cells in the mouse inner ear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil eSegil

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aminoglycoside antibiotics are the drug of choice for treating many bacterial infections, but their administration results in hearing loss in nearly one fourth of the patients who receive them. Several biochemical pathways have been implicated in aminoglycoside antibiotic ototoxicity; however, little is known about how hair cells respond to aminoglycoside antibiotics at the transcriptome level. Here we have investigated the genome-wide response to the aminoglycoside antibiotic gentamicin. Using organotypic cultures of the perinatal organ of Corti, we performed RNA sequencing using cDNA libraries obtained from FACS-purified hair cells. Within 3 hours of gentamicin treatment, the messenger RNA level of more than three thousand genes in hair cells changed significantly. Bioinformatic analysis of these changes highlighted several known signal transduction pathways, including the JNK pathway and the NF-κB pathway, in addition to genes involved in the stress response, apoptosis, cell cycle control, and DNA damage repair. In contrast, only 698 genes, mainly involved in cell cycle and metabolite biosynthetic processes, were significantly affected in the non-hair cell population. The gene expression profiles of hair cells in response to gentamicin share a considerable similarity with those previously observed in gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. Our findings suggest that previously observed early responses to gentamicin in hair cells in specific signaling pathways are reflected in changes in gene expression. Additionally, the observed changes in gene expression of cell cycle regulatory genes indicate a disruption of the postmitotic state, which may suggest an alternative pathway regulating gentamicin-induced hair cell death. This work provides a more comprehensive view of aminoglycoside antibiotic ototoxicity, and thus contribute to identifying potential pathways or therapeutic targets to alleviate this important side effect of aminoglycoside

  6. Vapors produced by electronic cigarettes and e-juices with flavorings induce toxicity, oxidative stress, and inflammatory response in lung epithelial cells and in mouse lung.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad A Lerner

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress and inflammatory response are the key events in the pathogenesis of chronic airway diseases. The consumption of electronic cigarettes (e-cigs with a variety of e-liquids/e-juices is alarmingly increasing without the unrealized potential harmful health effects. We hypothesized that electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS/e-cigs pose health concerns due to oxidative toxicity and inflammatory response in lung cells exposed to their aerosols. The aerosols produced by vaporizing ENDS e-liquids exhibit oxidant reactivity suggesting oxidants or reactive oxygen species (OX/ROS may be inhaled directly into the lung during a "vaping" session. These OX/ROS are generated through activation of the heating element which is affected by heating element status (new versus used, and occurs during the process of e-liquid vaporization. Unvaporized e-liquids were oxidative in a manner dependent on flavor additives, while flavors containing sweet or fruit flavors were stronger oxidizers than tobacco flavors. In light of OX/ROS generated in ENDS e-liquids and aerosols, the effects of ENDS aerosols on tissues and cells of the lung were measured. Exposure of human airway epithelial cells (H292 in an air-liquid interface to ENDS aerosols from a popular device resulted in increased secretion of inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6 and IL-8. Furthermore, human lung fibroblasts exhibited stress and morphological change in response to treatment with ENDS/e-liquids. These cells also secrete increased IL-8 in response to a cinnamon flavored e-liquid and are susceptible to loss of cell viability by ENDS e-liquids. Finally, exposure of wild type C57BL/6J mice to aerosols produced from a popular e-cig increase pro-inflammatory cytokines and diminished lung glutathione levels which are critical in maintaining cellular redox balance. Thus, exposure to e-cig aerosols/juices incurs measurable oxidative and inflammatory responses in lung cells and tissues that

  7. CD40 Ligand Deficient C57BL/6 Mouse Is a Potential Surrogate Model of Human X-Linked Hyper IgM (X-HIGM Syndrome for Characterizing Immune Responses against Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Lopez-Saucedo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with X-HIGM syndrome fail to express functional CD40 ligand; consequently they cannot mount effective protective antibody responses against pathogenic bacteria. We evaluated, compared, and characterized the humoral immune response of wild type (WT and C57-CD40L deficient (C57-CD40L−/− mice infected with Citrobacter rodentium. Basal serum isotype levels were similar for IgM and IgG3 among mice, while total IgG and IgG2b concentrations were significantly lower in C57-CD40L−/− mice compared with WT. Essentially IgG1 and IgG2c levels were detectable only in WT mice. C57-CD40L−/− animals, orally inoculated with 2×109 CFU, presented several clinical manifestations since the second week of infection and eventually died. In contrast at this time point no clinical manifestations were observed among C57-CD40L−/− mice infected with 1×107 CFU. Infection was subclinical in WT mice inoculated with either bacterial dose. The serum samples from infected mice (1×107 CFU, collected at day 14 after infection, had similar C. rodentium-specific IgM titres. Although C57-CD40L−/− animals had lower IgG and IgG2b titres than WT mice, C57-CD40L−/− mice sera displayed complement-mediated bactericidal activity against C. rodentium. C. rodentium-infected C57-CD40L−/− mice are capable of producing antibodies that are protective. C57-CD40L−/− mouse is a useful surrogate model of X-HIGM syndrome for studying immune responses elicited against pathogens.

  8. Hepatic expression of the GH/JAK/STAT/IGF pathway, acute-phase response signalling and complement system are affected in mouse offspring by prenatal and early postnatal exposure to maternal high-protein diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanselow, Jens; Kucia, Marzena; Langhammer, Martina; Koczan, Dirk; Rehfeldt, Charlotte; Metges, Cornelia C

    2011-12-01

    Effects of pre- and early postnatal exposure to maternal high-protein diets are not well understood. Transcription profiling was performed in male mouse offspring exposed to maternal high-protein diet during pregnancy and/or lactation to identify affected hepatic molecular pathways. Dams were fed isoenergetic diets with control (20% w/w) or high protein levels (40%). The hepatic expression profiles were evaluated by differential microarray analysis 3 days (d3) and 3 weeks (d21) after birth. Offspring from three different high-protein dietary groups, HP (d3, high-protein diet during pregnancy), HPHP (d21, high-protein diet during pregnancy and lactation) and CHP (d21, control diet during pregnancy and high-protein diet during lactation), were compared with age-matched offspring from dams fed control diet. Offspring body and liver mass of all high-protein groups were decreased. Prenatal high-protein diet affected hepatic expression of genes mapping to the acute response/complement system and the GH/JAK/STAT/IGF signalling pathways. Maternal exposure to high-protein diet during lactation affected hepatic gene expression of the same pathways but additionally affected genes mapping to protein, fatty acid, hexose and pyruvate metabolism. (1) Genes of the acute response/complement system and GH/JAK/STAT/IGF pathways were down-regulated in offspring of dams exposed to high-protein diets during pregnancy and/or lactation. (2) Genes related to nutrient and energy metabolism, however, were only affected when high-protein diet was administered during lactation. (3) Modulation of the GH/JAK/STAT/IGF pathway might be responsible for reduced body and liver masses by maternal high-protein diet.

  9. The role of NF-κB signaling pathway in polyhexamethylene guanidine phosphate induced inflammatory response in mouse macrophage RAW264.7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ha Ryong; Shin, Da Young; Chung, Kyu Hyuck

    2015-03-04

    Polyhexamethylene guanidine (PHMG) phosphate is a competitive disinfectant with strong antibacterial activity. However, epidemiologists revealed that inhaled PHMG-phosphate may increase the risk of pulmonary fibrosis associated with inflammation, resulting in the deaths of many people, including infants and pregnant women. In addition, in vitro and in vivo studies reported the inflammatory effects of PHMG-phosphate. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to clarify the inflammatory effects and its mechanism induced by PHMG-phosphate in murine RAW264.7 macrophages. Cell viability, inflammatory cytokine secretion, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were investigated in macrophages exposed to PHMG-phosphate. PHMG-phosphate induced dose-dependent cytotoxicity, with LC50 values of 11.15-0.99mg/ml at 6 and 24h, respectively. PHMG-phosphate induced pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8. In particular, IL-8 expression was completely inhibited by the NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082. In addition, PHMG-phosphate decreased IκB-α protein expression and increased NF-κB-mediated luciferase activity, which was diminished by N-acetyl-l-cystein. However, abundant amounts of ROS were generated in the presence of PHMG-phosphate at high concentrations with a cytotoxic effect. Our results demonstrated that PHMG-phosphate triggered the activation of NF-κB signaling pathway by modulating the degradation of IκB-α. Furthermore, the NF-κB signaling pathway plays a critical role in the inflammatory responses induced by PHMG-phosphate. We assumed that ROS generated by PHMG-phosphate were associated with inflammatory responses as secondary mechanism. In conclusion, we suggest that PHMG-phosphate induces inflammatory responses via NF-κB signaling pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Roles of adjuvant and route of vaccination in antibody response and protection engendered by a synthetic matrix protein 2-based influenza A virus vaccine in the mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cudic Mare

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The M2 ectodomain (M2e of influenza A virus (IAV strains that have circulated in humans during the past 90 years shows remarkably little structural diversity. Since M2e-specific antibodies (Abs are capable of restricting IAV replication in vivo but are present only at minimal concentration in human sera, efforts are being made to develop a M2e-specific vaccine. We are exploring a synthetic multiple antigenic peptide (MAP vaccine and here report on the role of adjuvants (cholera toxin and immunostimulatory oligodeoxynucleotide and route of immunization on Ab response and strength of protection. Results Independent of adjuvants and immunization route, on average 87% of the M2e-MAP-induced Abs were specific for M2e peptide and a variable fraction of these M2e(pep-specific Abs (average 15% cross-reacted with presumably native M2e expressed by M2-transfected cells. The titer of these cross-reactive M2e(pep-nat-specific Abs in sera of parenterally immunized mice displayed a sigmoidal relation to level of protection, with EC50 of ~20 μg Ab/ml serum, though experiments with passive M2e(pep-nat Abs indicated that serum Abs did not fully account for protection in parenterally vaccinated mice, particularly in upper airways. Intranasal vaccination engendered stronger protection and a higher proportion of G2a Abs than parenteral vaccination, and the strength of protection failed to correlate with M2e(pep-nat-specific serum Ab titers, suggesting a role of airway-associated immunity in protection of intranasally vaccinated mice. Intranasal administration of M2e-MAP without adjuvant engendered no response but coadministration with infectious IAV slightly enhanced the M2e(pep-nat Ab response and protection compared to vaccination with IAV or adjuvanted M2e-MAP alone. Conclusion M2e-MAP is an effective immunogen as ~15% of the total M2e-MAP-induced Ab response is of desired specificity. While M2e(pep-nat-specific serum Abs have an important

  11. Liposome delivery of Chlamydia muridarum major outer membrane protein primes a Th1 response that protects against genital chlamydial infection in a mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jon; Jensen, Klaus Thorleif; Follmann, Frank

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Immunity to chlamydia is thought to rely on interferon (IFN)-gamma-secreting T helper cells type 1 (Th1) with an additional effect of secreted antibodies. A need for Th1-polarizing adjuvants in experimental chlamydia vaccines has been demonstrated, and antigen conformation has also been......-alpha and a profoundly reduced vaginal chlamydial load, compared with control mice. The protection was CD4(+) T cell dependent and was not dependent on MOMP conformation. CONCLUSION: CAF01 adjuvant facilitates a protective anti-MOMP CD4(+) T cell response independent of MOMP conformation....

  12. Dose-response relationship of induction kinetics of In vivo DNA damage and repair in mouse leukocytes exposed to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendiola C, M.T.; Morales, R.P.

    2000-01-01

    The Unicellular electrophoresis in gel technique is a useful tool in the determination of simple ruptures and labile sites to the alkali in DNA of eucariontes cells. The determination of the induction kinetics of damage and repair of DNA can give more information. The objective of this work was to determine whether the analysis of the area under the damage/repair induction kinetics curve in comets percent or the comets frequency in the two peaks of maximum induction is adequate for determining the dose-response relationship. The mice were exposed at the doses of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 Gy. (Author)

  13. The endocrine stress response is linked to one specific locus on chromosome 3 in a mouse model based on extremes in trait anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonik Mariya

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis is essential to control physiological stress responses in mammals. Its dysfunction is related to several mental disorders, including anxiety and depression. The aim of this study was to identify genetic loci underlying the endocrine regulation of the HPA axis. Method High (HAB and low (LAB anxiety-related behaviour mice were established by selective inbreeding of outbred CD-1 mice to model extremes in trait anxiety. Additionally, HAB vs. LAB mice exhibit comorbid characteristics including a differential corticosterone response upon stress exposure. We crossbred HAB and LAB lines to create F1 and F2 offspring. To identify the contribution of the endocrine phenotypes to the total phenotypic variance, we examined multiple behavioural paradigms together with corticosterone secretion-based phenotypes in F2 mice by principal component analysis. Further, to pinpoint the genomic loci of the quantitative trait of the HPA axis stress response, we conducted genome-wide multipoint oligogenic linkage analyses based on Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo approach as well as parametric linkage in three-generation pedigrees, followed by a two-dimensional scan for epistasis and association analysis in freely segregating F2 mice using 267 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, which were identified to consistently differ between HAB and LAB mice as genetic markers. Results HPA axis reactivity measurements and behavioural phenotypes were represented by independent principal components and demonstrated no correlation. Based on this finding, we identified one single quantitative trait locus (QTL on chromosome 3 showing a very strong evidence for linkage (2ln (L-score > 10, LOD > 23 and significant association (lowest Bonferroni adjusted p -28 to the neuroendocrine stress response. The location of the linkage peak was estimated at 42.3 cM (95% confidence interval: 41.3 - 43.3 cM and was shown to be in

  14. V-set and Ig domain-containing 4 (VSIG4)-expressing hepatic F4/80+ cells regulate oral antigen-specific responses in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Wonhwa; Jeon, Youkyoung; Choi, Inhak; Kim, Yeon-Jeong

    2018-04-01

    Oral tolerance can prevent unnecessary immune responses against dietary antigens. Members of the B7 protein family play critical roles in the positive and/or negative regulation of T cell responses to interactions between APCs and T cells. V-set and Ig domain-containing 4 (VSIG4), a B7-related co-signaling molecule, has been known to act as a co-inhibitory ligand and may be critical in establishing immune tolerance. Therefore, we investigated the regulation of VSIG4 signaling in a food allergy and experimental oral tolerance murine models. We analyzed the contributions of the two main sites involved in oral tolerance, the mesenteric lymph node (MLN) and the liver, in VSIG4-mediated oral tolerance induction. Through the comparative analysis of major APCs, dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages, we found that Kupffer cells play a critical role in inducing regulatory T cells (Tregs) and establishing immune tolerance against oral antigens via VSIG4 signaling. Taken together, these results suggest the possibility of VSIG4 signaling-based regulation of orally administered antigens. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. BOLD fMRI of C-Fiber Mediated Nociceptive Processing in Mouse Brain in Response to Thermal Stimulation of the Forepaws.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone C Bosshard

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI in rodents enables non-invasive studies of brain function in response to peripheral input or at rest. In this study we describe a thermal stimulation paradigm using infrared laser diodes to apply noxious heat to the forepaw of mice in order to study nociceptive processing. Stimulation at 45 and 46°C led to robust BOLD signal changes in various brain structures including the somatosensory cortices and the thalamus. The BOLD signal amplitude scaled with the temperature applied but not with the area irradiated by the laser beam. To demonstrate the specificity of the paradigm for assessing nociceptive signaling we administered the quaternary lidocaine derivative QX-314 to the forepaws, which due to its positive charge cannot readily cross biological membranes. However, upon activation of TRPV1 channels following the administration of capsaicin the BOLD signal was largely abolished, indicative of a selective block of the C-fiber nociceptors due to QX-314 having entered the cells via the now open TRPV1 channels. This demonstrates that the cerebral BOLD response to thermal noxious paw stimulation is specifically mediated by C-fibers.

  16. Engineering a new mouse model for vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manga, Prashiela; Orlow, Seth J

    2012-07-01

    Although the precise mechanisms that trigger vitiligo remain elusive, autoimmune responses mediate its progression. The development of therapies has been impeded by a paucity of animal models, since mice lack interfollicular melanocytes, the primary targets in vitiligo. In this issue, Harris et al. describe a mouse model in which interfollicular melanocytes are retained by Kit ligand overexpression and an immune response is initiated by transplanting melanocyte-targeting CD8+ T cells.

  17. Reduced response of splenocytes after mitogen-stimulation in the prion protein (PrP) gene-deficient mouse: PrPLP/Doppel production and cerebral degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chi-Kyeong; Hirose, Yuko; Sakudo, Akikazu; Takeyama, Natsumi; Kang, Chung-Boo; Taniuchi, Yojiro; Matsumoto, Yoshitsugu; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Sakaguchi, Suehiro; Onodera, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    Splenocytes of wild-type (Prnp +/+ ) and prion protein gene-deficient (Prnp -/- ) mice were treated with various activation stimuli such as T cell mitogen concanavalin A (ConA), phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) + ionomycin (Io), or B cell mitogen lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Cellular prion protein (PrP C ) expression was enhanced following ConA stimulation, but not PMA + Io or LPS in Prnp +/+ splenocytes. Rikn Prnp -/- splenocytes elicited lower cell proliferations than Prnp +/+ or Zrch I Prnp -/- splenocytes after LPS stimulation and showed sporadic nerve cells in the cerebral cortex and deeper structure. Around the degenerated nerve cells, mild vacuolation in the neuropil was observed. This neural alteration correlated well to the suppressed response of B cells in the spleen. The finding that discrete lesions within the central nervous systems induced marked modulation of immune function probably indicates the existence of a delicately balanced neural-endocrine network by PrP C and PrPLP/Doppel

  18. Stat6 Promotes Intestinal Tumorigenesis in a Mouse Model of Adenomatous Polyposis by Expansion of MDSCs and Inhibition of Cytotoxic CD8 Response

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    Asha Jayakumar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal tumorigenesis in the ApcMin/+ model is initiated by aberrant activation of Wnt pathway. Increased IL-4 expression in human colorectal cancer tissue and growth of colon cancer cell lines implied that IL-4–induced Stat6-mediated tumorigenic signaling likely contributes to intestinal tumor progression in ApcMin/+ mice. Stat6 also appears to promote expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs cells. MDSCs promote polyp formation in the ApcMin/+ model. Hence, Stat6 could have a broad role in coordinating both polyp cell proliferation and MDSC expansion. We found that IL-4–induced Stat6-mediated proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells is augmented by platelet-derived growth factor–BB, a tumor-promoting growth factor. To determine whether polyp progression in ApcMin/+ mice is dependent on Stat6 signaling, we disrupted Stat6 in this model. Total polyps in the small intestine were fewer in ApcMin/+ mice lacking Stat6. Furthermore, proliferation of polyp epithelial cells was reduced, indicating that Stat6 in part controlled polyp formation. Stat6 also promoted expansion of MDSCs in the spleen and lamina propria of ApcMin/+ mice, implying regulation of antitumor T-cell response. More CD8 cells and reduced PD-1 expression on CD4 cells correlated with reduced polyps. In addition, a strong CD8-mediated cytotoxic response led to killing of tumor cells in Stat6-deficient ApcMin/+ mice. Therefore, these findings show that Stat6 has an oncogenic role in intestinal tumorigenesis by promoting polyp cell proliferation and immunosuppressive mediators, and preventing an active cytotoxic process.

  19. Stat6 Promotes Intestinal Tumorigenesis in a Mouse Model of Adenomatous Polyposis by Expansion of MDSCs and Inhibition of Cytotoxic CD8 Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Asha; Bothwell, Alfred L M

    2017-08-01

    Intestinal tumorigenesis in the ApcMin/+ model is initiated by aberrant activation of Wnt pathway. Increased IL-4 expression in human colorectal cancer tissue and growth of colon cancer cell lines implied that IL-4-induced Stat6-mediated tumorigenic signaling likely contributes to intestinal tumor progression in ApcMin/+ mice. Stat6 also appears to promote expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) cells. MDSCs promote polyp formation in the ApcMin/+ model. Hence, Stat6 could have a broad role in coordinating both polyp cell proliferation and MDSC expansion. We found that IL-4-induced Stat6-mediated proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells is augmented by platelet-derived growth factor-BB, a tumor-promoting growth factor. To determine whether polyp progression in ApcMin/+ mice is dependent on Stat6 signaling, we disrupted Stat6 in this model. Total polyps in the small intestine were fewer in ApcMin/+ mice lacking Stat6. Furthermore, proliferation of polyp epithelial cells was reduced, indicating that Stat6 in part controlled polyp formation. Stat6 also promoted expansion of MDSCs in the spleen and lamina propria of ApcMin/+ mice, implying regulation of antitumor T-cell response. More CD8 cells and reduced PD-1 expression on CD4 cells correlated with reduced polyps. In addition, a strong CD8-mediated cytotoxic response led to killing of tumor cells in Stat6-deficient ApcMin/+ mice. Therefore, these findings show that Stat6 has an oncogenic role in intestinal tumorigenesis by promoting polyp cell proliferation and immunosuppressive mediators, and preventing an active cytotoxic process. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolomic Profiling Reveals Alterations in Mouse Plasma and Liver in Response to Fava Beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Man; Du, Guankui; Zhong, Guobing; Yan, Dongjing; Zeng, Huazong; Cai, Wangwei

    2016-01-01

    Favism is a life-threatening hemolytic anemia resulting from the intake of fava beans by susceptible individuals with low erythrocytic glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity. However, little is known about the metabolomic changes in plasma and liver after the intake of fava beans in G6PD normal and deficient states. In this study, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to analyze the plasma and liver metabolic alterations underlying the effects of fava beans in C3H- and G6PD-deficient (G6PDx) mice, and to find potential biomarkers and metabolic changes associated with favism. Our results showed that fava beans induced oxidative stress in both C3H and G6PDx mice. Significantly, metabolomic differences were observed in plasma and liver between the control and fava bean treated groups of both C3H and G6PDx mice. The levels of 7 and 21 metabolites in plasma showed significant differences between C3H-control (C3H-C)- and C3H fava beans-treated (C3H-FB) mice, and G6PDx-control (G6PDx-C)- and G6PDx fava beans-treated (G6PDx-FB) mice, respectively. Similarly, the levels of 7 and 25 metabolites in the liver showed significant differences between C3H and C3H-FB, and G6PDx and G6PDx-FB, respectively. The levels of oleic acid, linoleic acid, and creatinine were significantly increased in the plasma of both C3H-FB and G6PDx-FB mice. In the liver, more metabolic alterations were observed in G6PDx-FB mice than in C3H-FB mice, and were involved in a sugar, fatty acids, amino acids, cholesterol biosynthesis, the urea cycle, and the nucleotide metabolic pathway. These findings suggest that oleic acid, linoleic acid, and creatinine may be potential biomarkers of the response to fava beans in C3H and G6PDx mice and therefore that oleic acid and linoleic acid may be involved in oxidative stress induced by fava beans. This study demonstrates that G6PD activity in mice can affect their metabolic pathways in response to fava beans.

  1. Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolomic Profiling Reveals Alterations in Mouse Plasma and Liver in Response to Fava Beans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Xiao

    Full Text Available Favism is a life-threatening hemolytic anemia resulting from the intake of fava beans by susceptible individuals with low erythrocytic glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD activity. However, little is known about the metabolomic changes in plasma and liver after the intake of fava beans in G6PD normal and deficient states. In this study, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to analyze the plasma and liver metabolic alterations underlying the effects of fava beans in C3H- and G6PD-deficient (G6PDx mice, and to find potential biomarkers and metabolic changes associated with favism. Our results showed that fava beans induced oxidative stress in both C3H and G6PDx mice. Significantly, metabolomic differences were observed in plasma and liver between the control and fava bean treated groups of both C3H and G6PDx mice. The levels of 7 and 21 metabolites in plasma showed significant differences between C3H-control (C3H-C- and C3H fava beans-treated (C3H-FB mice, and G6PDx-control (G6PDx-C- and G6PDx fava beans-treated (G6PDx-FB mice, respectively. Similarly, the levels of 7 and 25 metabolites in the liver showed significant differences between C3H and C3H-FB, and G6PDx and G6PDx-FB, respectively. The levels of oleic acid, linoleic acid, and creatinine were significantly increased in the plasma of both C3H-FB and G6PDx-FB mice. In the liver, more metabolic alterations were observed in G6PDx-FB mice than in C3H-FB mice, and were involved in a sugar, fatty acids, amino acids, cholesterol biosynthesis, the urea cycle, and the nucleotide metabolic pathway. These findings suggest that oleic acid, linoleic acid, and creatinine may be potential biomarkers of the response to fava beans in C3H and G6PDx mice and therefore that oleic acid and linoleic acid may be involved in oxidative stress induced by fava beans. This study demonstrates that G6PD activity in mice can affect their metabolic pathways in response to fava beans.

  2. Use of dexpanthenol and aloe vera to influence the irradiation response of the oral mucous membrane (mouse); Beeinflussung der Strahlenreaktion der Mundschleimhaut (Maus) durch Dexpanthenol {+-} Aloe vera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlichting, S. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Dresden Univ. (Germany); Spekl, K.; Doerr, W. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Dresden Univ. (Germany)]|[Experimentelles Zentrum, Medizinische Fakultaet Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden Univ. (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    In summarising the outcome of the present study it can be said spraying the agent on the oral mucous membrane once a day had an effect on the incidence of mucous membrane ulceration in the case of both placebo and dexpanthenol treatment. However, there was no significant difference between placebo and dexpanthenol treatment, the only finding being a slight prolongation of latency time through aloe vera. These experimental findings give good reason to critically reconsider the clinical use of dexpanthenol as a supportive treatment for the prevention of radiogenic mucositis enoralis following irradiation of tumours in the head and neck region. However thorough oral lavage is an effective means of moderating the irradiation response of the oral mucous membrane. [German] Zusammenfassend ist festzustellen, dass in den vorliegenden Versuchen mit einmal taeglichem Aufspruehen des Praeparates auf die Mundschleimhaut sowohl die Placebo - wie auch die Dexpanthenol-Behandlung die Inzidenz von Schleimhautulzerationen modifiziert hat; zwischen Placebo- und Dexpanthenol-Behandlung ergab sich jedoch kein signifikanter Unterschied. Lediglich eine geringe Verlaengerung der Latenzzeit durch Aloe vera war zu beobachten. Auf der Basis dieser experimentellen Ergebnisse muss der klinische Einsatz von Dexpanthenol im Rahmen der Supportivtherapie zur Prophylaxe der radiogenen Mucositis enoralis bei der Bestrahlung von Kopf-Hals-Tumoren kritisch ueberdacht werden. Regelmaessige, intensive Mundspuelungen sind jedoch ein probates Mittel zur Verminderung der Strahlenreaktion der Mundschleimhaut. (orig.)

  3. Maintenance of membrane organization in the aging mouse brain as the determining factor for preventing receptor dysfunction and for improving response to anti-Alzheimer treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, Julie; Thomas, Mélanie H; Gregory-Pauron, Lynn; Pinçon, Anthony; Lanhers, Marie-Claire; Corbier, Catherine; Claudepierre, Thomas; Yen, Frances T; Oster, Thierry; Malaplate-Armand, Catherine

    2017-06-01

    Although a major risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), the "aging" parameter is not systematically considered in preclinical validation of anti-AD drugs. To explore how aging affects neuronal reactivity to anti-AD agents, the ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF)-associated pathway was chosen as a model. Comparison of the neuroprotective properties of CNTF in 6- and 18-month old mice revealed that CNTF resistance in the older animals is associated with the exclusion of the CNTF-receptor subunits from rafts and their subsequent dispersion to non-raft cortical membrane domains. This age-dependent membrane remodeling prevented both the formation of active CNTF-receptor complexes and the activation of prosurvival STAT3 and ERK1/2 pathways, demonstrating that age-altered membranes impaired the reactivity of potential therapeutic targets. CNTF-receptor distribution and CNTF signaling responses were improved in older mice receiving dietary docosahexaenoic acid, with CNTF-receptor functionality being similar to those of younger mice, pointing toward dietary intervention as a promising adjuvant strategy to maintain functional neuronal membranes, thus allowing the associated receptors to respond appropriately to anti-AD agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterization of Wnt and Notch-Responsive Lgr5+ Hair Cell Progenitors in the Striolar Region of the Neonatal Mouse Utricle

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Dan; Guo, Luo; Li, Wenyan; Sun, Shan; Chen, Yan; Chai, Renjie; Li, Huawei

    2018-01-01

    Dysfunctions in hearing and balance are largely connected with hair cell (HC) loss. Although regeneration of HCs in the adult cochlea does not occur, there is still limited capacity for HC regeneration in the mammalian utricle from a distinct population of supporting cells (SCs). In response to HC damage, these Lgr5+ SCs, especially those in the striolar region, can regenerate HCs. In this study, we isolated Lgr5+ SCs and Plp1+ SCs (which originate from the striolar and extrastriolar regions, respectively) from transgenic mice by flow cytometry so as to compare the properties of these two subsets of SCs. We found that the Lgr5+ progenitors had greater proliferation and HC regeneration ability than the Plp1+ SCs and that the Lgr5+ progenitors responded more strongly to Wnt and Notch signaling than Plp1+ SCs. We then compared the gene expression profiles of the two populations by RNA-Seq and identified several genes that were significantly differentially expressed between the two populations, including genes involved in the cell cycle, transcription and cell signaling pathways. Targeting these genes and pathways might be a potential way to activate HC regeneration. PMID:29760650

  5. Prenatal metformin exposure in a maternal high fat diet mouse model alters the transcriptome and modifies the metabolic responses of the offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomäki, Henriikka; Heinäniemi, Merja; Vähätalo, Laura H; Ailanen, Liisa; Eerola, Kim; Ruohonen, Suvi T; Pesonen, Ullamari; Koulu, Markku

    2014-01-01

    Despite the wide use of metformin in metabolically challenged pregnancies, the long-term effects on the metabolism of the offspring are not known. We studied the long-term effects of prenatal metformin exposure during metabolically challenged pregnancy in mice. Female mice were on a high fat diet (HFD) prior to and during the gestation. Metformin was administered during gestation from E0.5 to E17.5. Male and female offspring were weaned to a regular diet (RD) and subjected to HFD at adulthood (10-11 weeks). Body weight and several metabolic parameters (e.g. body composition and glucose tolerance) were measured during the study. Microarray and subsequent pathway analyses on the liver and subcutaneous adipose tissue of the male offspring were performed at postnatal day 4 in a separate experiment. Prenatal metformin exposure changed the offspring's response to HFD. Metformin exposed offspring gained less body weight and adipose tissue during the HFD phase. Additionally, prenatal metformin exposure prevented HFD-induced impairment in glucose tolerance. Microarray and annotation analyses revealed metformin-induced changes in several metabolic pathways from which electron transport chain (ETC) was prominently affected both in the neonatal liver and adipose tissue. This study shows the beneficial effects of prenatal metformin exposure on the offspring's glucose tolerance and fat mass accumulation during HFD. The transcriptome data obtained at neonatal age indicates major effects on the genes involved in mitochondrial ATP production and adipocyte differentiation suggesting the mechanistic routes to improved metabolic phenotype at adulthood.

  6. Responsiveness to Thyroid Hormone and to Ambient Temperature Underlies Differences Between Brown Adipose Tissue and Skeletal Muscle Thermogenesis in a Mouse Model of Diet-Induced Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueta, Cintia B.; Olivares, Emerson L.

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid hormone accelerates energy expenditure (EE) and is critical for cold-induced thermogenesis. To define the metabolic role played by thyroid hormone in the dissipation of calories from diet, hypothyroid mice were studied for 60 d in a comprehensive lab animal monitoring system. Hypothyroidism decreased caloric intake and body fat while down-regulating genes in the skeletal muscle but not brown adipose tissue thermogenic programs, without affecting daily EE. Only at thermoneutrality (30 C) did hypothyroid mice exhibit slower rate of EE, indicating a metabolic response to hypothyroidism that depends on ambient temperature. A byproduct of this mechanism is that at room temperature (22 C), hypothyroid mice are protected against diet-induced obesity, i.e. only at thermoneutrality did hypothyroid mice become obese when placed on a high-fat diet (HFD). This is in contrast to euthyroid controls, which on a HFD gained more body weight and fat at any temperature while activating the brown adipose tissue and accelerating daily EE but not the skeletal muscle thermogenic program. In the liver of euthyroid controls, HFD caused an approximately 5-fold increase in triglyceride content and expression of key metabolic genes, whereas acclimatization to 30 C cut triglyceride content by half and normalized gene expression. However, in hypothyroid mice, HFD-induced changes in liver persisted at 30 C, resulting in marked liver steatosis. Acclimatization to thermoneutrality dramatically improves glucose homeostasis, but this was not affected by hypothyroidism. In conclusion, hypothyroid mice are metabolically sensitive to environmental temperature, constituting a mechanism that defines resistance to diet-induced obesity and hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:21771890

  7. Cell-type specific role of the RNA-binding protein, NONO, in the DNA double-strand break response in the mouse testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuyi; Shu, Feng-Jue; Li, Zhentian; Jaafar, Lahcen; Zhao, Shourong; Dynan, William S

    2017-03-01

    The tandem RNA recognition motif protein, NONO, was previously identified as a candidate DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair factor in a biochemical screen for proteins with end-joining stimulatory activity. Subsequent work showed that NONO and its binding partner, SFPQ, have many of the properties expected for bona fide repair factors in cell-based assays. Their contribution to the DNA damage response in intact tissue in vivo has not, however, been demonstrated. Here we compare DNA damage sensitivity in the testes of wild-type mice versus mice bearing a null allele of the NONO homologue (Nono gt ). In wild-type mice, NONO protein was present in Sertoli, peritubular myoid, and interstitial cells, with an increase in expression following induction of DNA damage. As expected for the product of an X-linked gene, NONO was not detected in germ cells. The Nono gt/0 mice had at most a mild testis developmental phenotype in the absence of genotoxic stress. However, following irradiation at sublethal, 2-4 Gy doses, Nono gt/0 mice displayed a number of indicators of radiosensitivity as compared to their wild-type counterparts. These included higher levels of persistent DSB repair foci, increased numbers of apoptotic cells in the seminiferous tubules, and partial degeneration of the blood-testis barrier. There was also an almost complete loss of germ cells at later times following irradiation, evidently arising as an indirect effect reflecting loss of stromal support. Results demonstrate a role for NONO protein in protection against direct and indirect biological effects of ionizing radiation in the whole animal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Prenatal metformin exposure in a maternal high fat diet mouse model alters the transcriptome and modifies the metabolic responses of the offspring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henriikka Salomäki

    Full Text Available AIMS: Despite the wide use of metformin in metabolically challenged pregnancies, the long-term effects on the metabolism of the offspring are not known. We studied the long-term effects of prenatal metformin exposure during metabolically challenged pregnancy in mice. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Female mice were on a high fat diet (HFD prior to and during the gestation. Metformin was administered during gestation from E0.5 to E17.5. Male and female offspring were weaned to a regular diet (RD and subjected to HFD at adulthood (10-11 weeks. Body weight and several metabolic parameters (e.g. body composition and glucose tolerance were measured during the study. Microarray and subsequent pathway analyses on the liver and subcutaneous adipose tissue of the male offspring were performed at postnatal day 4 in a separate experiment. RESULTS: Prenatal metformin exposure changed the offspring's response to HFD. Metformin exposed offspring gained less body weight and adipose tissue during the HFD phase. Additionally, prenatal metformin exposure prevented HFD-induced impairment in glucose tolerance. Microarray and annotation analyses revealed metformin-induced changes in several metabolic pathways from which electron transport chain (ETC was prominently affected both in the neonatal liver and adipose tissue. CONCLUSION: This study shows the beneficial effects of prenatal metformin exposure on the offspring's glucose tolerance and fat mass accumulation during HFD. The transcriptome data obtained at neonatal age indicates major effects on the genes involved in mitochondrial ATP production and adipocyte differentiation suggesting the mechanistic routes to improved metabolic phenotype at adulthood.

  9. Role of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) in responses to trichloroethylene and metabolites, trichloroacetate and dichloroacetate in mouse liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laughter, Ashley R.; Dunn, Corrie S.; Swanson, Cynthia L.; Howroyd, Paul; Cattley, Russell C.; Christopher Corton, J.

    2004-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is an industrial solvent and a widespread environmental contaminant. Induction of liver cancer in mice by TCE is thought to be mediated by two carcinogenic metabolites, dichloroacetate (DCA) and trichloroacetate (TCA). TCE is considered to be a relatively weak peroxisome proliferator (PP), a group of rodent hepatocarcinogens that cause adaptive responses in liver through the PP-activated receptor alpha (PPARα). The objectives of this study were to determine whether effects of TCE, TCA and DCA in the liver associated with carcinogenesis are mediated by PPARα. Male wild-type and PPARα-null mice were given TCE by gavage for 3 days or 3 weeks; TCA or DCA were given in the drinking water for 1 week. Increases in relative liver and kidney weights by TCE were dependent on PPARα whereas liver weight increases by DCA were PPARα-independent. Dose-dependent increases in hepatocyte proliferation observed in wild-type mice after TCE exposure as determined by BrdU-labeling of hepatocytes were PPARα-dependent. Transcript profiling using macroarrays containing ∼1200 genes showed that 93% (40 out of 43) of all expression changes observed in wild-type mice upon TCE exposure were dependent on PPARα and included known targets of PP (Cyp4a12, epidermal growth factor receptor) and additional genes involved in cell growth. Increases in enzymes that catalyze β- and ω-oxidation of fatty acids were dependent on PPARα after exposure to TCE, TCA or DCA. TCE altered a unique set of genes in the livers of PPARα-null mice compared to wild-type mice including those that respond to different forms of stress. These data support the hypothesis that PPARα plays a dominant role in mediating the effects associated with hepatocarcinogenesis upon TCE exposure

  10. 18FDG-PET predicts pharmacodynamic response to OSI-906, a dual IGF-1R/IR inhibitor, in preclinical mouse models of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinley, Eliot T; Bugaj, Joseph E; Zhao, Ping; Guleryuz, Saffet; Mantis, Christine; Gokhale, Prafulla C; Wild, Robert; Manning, H Charles

    2011-05-15

    To evaluate 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-d-glucose positron emission tomography imaging ((18)FDG-PET) as a predictive, noninvasive, pharmacodynamic (PD) biomarker of response following administration of a small-molecule insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor and insulin receptor (IGF-1R/IR) inhibitor, OSI-906. In vitro uptake studies of (3)H-2-deoxy glucose following OSI-906 exposure were conducted evaluating correlation of dose with inhibition of IGF-1R/IR as well as markers of downstream pathways and glucose metabolism. Similarly, in vivo PD effects were evaluated in human tumor cell line xenografts propagated in athymic nude mice by (18)FDG-PET at 2, 4, and 24 hours following a single treatment of OSI-906 for the correlation of inhibition of receptor targets and downstream markers. Uptake of (3)H-2-deoxy glucose and (18)FDG was significantly diminished following OSI-906 exposure in sensitive tumor cells and subcutaneous xenografts (NCI-H292) but not in an insensitive model lacking IGF-1R expression (NCI-H441). Diminished PD (18)FDG-PET, collected immediately following the initial treatment agreed with inhibition of pIGF-1R/pIR, reduced PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) and MAPK (mitogen activated protein kinase) pathway activity, and predicted tumor growth arrest as measured by high-resolution ultrasound imaging. (18)FDG-PET seems to serve as a rapid, noninvasive PD marker of IGF-1R/IR inhibition following a single dose of OSI-906 and should be explored clinically as a predictive clinical biomarker in patients undergoing IGF-1R/IR-directed cancer therapy. ©2011 AACR.

  11. Curcumin modulates the inflammatory response and inhibits subsequent fibrosis in a mouse model of viral-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avasarala, Sreedevi; Zhang, Fangfang; Liu, Guangliang; Wang, Ruixue; London, Steven D; London, Lucille

    2013-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a clinical syndrome characterized by diffuse alveolar damage usually secondary to an intense host inflammatory response of the lung to a pulmonary or extrapulmonary infectious or non-infectious insult often leading to the development of intra-alveolar and interstitial fibrosis. Curcumin, the principal curcumoid of the popular Indian spice turmeric, has been demonstrated as an anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory agent in a broad spectrum of diseases. Using our well-established model of reovirus 1/L-induced acute viral pneumonia, which displays many of the characteristics of the human ALI/ARDS, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects of curcumin. Female CBA/J mice were treated with curcumin (50 mg/kg) 5 days prior to intranasal inoculation with 10(7)pfu reovirus 1/L and daily, thereafter. Mice were evaluated for key features associated with ALI/ARDS. Administration of curcumin significantly modulated inflammation and fibrosis, as revealed by histological and biochemical analysis. The expression of IL-6, IL-10, IFNγ, and MCP-1, key chemokines/cytokines implicated in the development of ALI/ARDS, from both the inflammatory infiltrate and whole lung tissue were modulated by curcumin potentially through a reduction in the phosphorylated form of NFκB p65. While the expression of TGFß1 was not modulated by curcumin, TGFß Receptor II, which is required for TGFß signaling, was significantly reduced. In addition, curcumin also significantly inhibited the expression of α-smooth muscle actin and Tenascin-C, key markers of myofibroblast activation. This data strongly supports a role for curcumin in modulating the pathogenesis of viral-induced ALI/ARDS in a pre-clinical model potentially manifested through the alteration of inflammation and myofibroblast differentiation.

  12. Immunostimulatory mouse granuloma protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontan, E; Fauve, R M; Hevin, B; Jusforgues, H

    1983-10-01

    Earlier studies have shown that from subcutaneous talc-induced granuloma in mice, a fraction could be extracted that fully protected mice against Listeria monocytogenes. Using standard biochemical procedures--i.e., ammonium sulfate fractionation, preparative electrophoresis, gel filtration chromatography, isoelectric focusing, and preparative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis--we have now purified an active factor to homogeneity. A single band was obtained in NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gel with an apparent Mr of 55,000. It migrated with alpha 1-globulins and the isoelectric point was 5 +/- 0.1. The biological activity was destroyed with Pronase but not with trypsin and a monospecific polyclonal rabbit antiserum was obtained. The intravenous injection of 5 micrograms of this "mouse granuloma protein" fully protects mice against a lethal inoculum of L. monocytogenes. Moreover, after their incubation with 10 nM mouse granuloma protein, mouse peritoneal cells became cytostatic against Lewis carcinoma cells.

  13. Burn mouse models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calum, Henrik; Høiby, Niels; Moser, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Severe thermal injury induces immunosuppression, involving all parts of the immune system, especially when large fractions of the total body surface area are affected. An animal model was established to characterize the burn-induced immunosuppression. In our novel mouse model a 6 % third-degree b......Severe thermal injury induces immunosuppression, involving all parts of the immune system, especially when large fractions of the total body surface area are affected. An animal model was established to characterize the burn-induced immunosuppression. In our novel mouse model a 6 % third...... with infected burn wound compared with the burn wound only group. The burn mouse model resembles the clinical situation and provides an opportunity to examine or develop new strategies like new antibiotics and immune therapy, in handling burn wound victims much....

  14. A Mouse Model of Chronic West Nile Virus Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica B Graham

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Infection with West Nile virus (WNV leads to a range of disease outcomes, including chronic infection, though lack of a robust mouse model of chronic WNV infection has precluded identification of the immune events contributing to persistent infection. Using the Collaborative Cross, a population of recombinant inbred mouse strains with high levels of standing genetic variation, we have identified a mouse model of persistent WNV disease, with persistence of viral loads within the brain. Compared to lines exhibiting no disease or marked disease, the F1 cross CC(032x013F1 displays a strong immunoregulatory signature upon infection that correlates with restraint of the WNV-directed cytolytic response. We hypothesize that this regulatory T cell response sufficiently restrains the immune response such that a chronic infection can be maintained in the CNS. Use of this new mouse model of chronic neuroinvasive virus will be critical in developing improved strategies to prevent prolonged disease in humans.

  15. Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Chris

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to the reviews of his book, "The Good Life of Teaching: An Ethics of Professional Practice." He begins by highlighting some of the main concerns of his book. He then offers a brief response, doing his best to address the main criticisms of his argument and noting where the four reviewers (Charlene…

  16. TL transgenic mouse strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obata, Y.; Matsudaira, Y.; Hasegawa, H.; Tamaki, H.; Takahashi, T.; Morita, A.; Kasai, K.

    1993-01-01

    As a result of abnormal development of the thymus of these mice, TCR αβ lineage of the T cell differentiation is disturbed and cells belonging to the TCR γδ CD4 - CD8 - double negative (DN) lineage become preponderant. The γδ DN cells migrate into peripheral lymphoid organs and constitute nearly 50% of peripheral T cells. Immune function of the transgenic mice is severely impaired, indicating that the γδ cells are incapable of participating in these reactions. Molecular and serological analyses of T-cell lymphomas reveal that they belong to the γδ lineage. Tg.Tla a -3-1 mice should be useful in defining the role of TL in normal and abnormal T cell differentiation as well as in the development of T-cell lymphomas, and further they should facilitate studies on the differentiation and function of γδ T cells. We isolated T3 b -TL gene from B6 mice and constructed a chimeric gene in which T3 b -TL is driven by the promoter of H-2K b . With the chimeric gene, two transgenic mouse strains, Tg. Con.3-1 and -2 have been derived in C3H background. Both strains express TL antigen in various tissues including skin. The skin graft of transgenic mice on C3H and (B6 X C3H)F 1 mice were rejected. In the mice which rejected the grafts, CD8 + TCRαβ cytotoxic T cells (CTL) against TL antigens were recognized. The recognition of TL by CTL did not require the antigen presentation by H-2 molecules. The results indicated that TL antigen in the skin becomes a transplantation antigen and behaves like a typical allogeneic MHC class I antigen. The facts that (B6 X C3H)F 1 mice rejected the skin expressing T3 b -TL antigen and induced CTL that killed TL + lymphomas of B6 origin revealed that TL antigen encoded by T3 b -TL is recognized as non-self in B6 mice. Experiments are now extended to analyze immune responses to TL antigen expressed on autochthonous T cell lymphomas. (J.P.N.)

  17. Colonization, mouse-style

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Searle Jeremy B

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several recent papers, including one in BMC Evolutionary Biology, examine the colonization history of house mice. As well as background for the analysis of mouse adaptation, such studies offer a perspective on the history of movements of the humans that accidentally transported the mice. See research article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2148/10/325

  18. Expression patterns of regulatory RNAs, including lncRNAs and tRNAs, during postnatal growth of normal and dystrophic (mdx) mouse muscles, and their response to taurine treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butchart, Lauren C; Terrill, Jessica R; Rossetti, Giulia; White, Robert; Filipovska, Aleksandra; Grounds, Miranda D

    2018-06-01

    Post-natal skeletal muscle growth in mice is very rapid and involves complex changes in many cells types over the first 6 weeks of life. The acute onset of dystropathology also occurs around 3 weeks of age in the mdx mouse model of the human disease Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). This study investigated (i) alterations in expression patterns of regulatory non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) in vivo, including miRNAs, lncRNAs and tRNAs, during early growth of skeletal muscles in normal control C57Bl/10Scsn (C57) compared with dystrophic mdx mice from 2 to 6 weeks of postnatal age, and revealed inherent differences in vivo for levels of 3 ncRNAs between C57 and mdx muscles before the onset of dystropathology. Since the amino acid taurine has many benefits and reduces disease severity in mdx mice, this study also (ii) determined the impact of taurine treatment on these expression patterns in mdx muscles at the onset of dystropathology (3 weeks) and after several bouts of myonecrosis and regeneration (6 weeks). Taurine treatment of mdx mice only altered ncRNA levels when administered from 18 days to 6 weeks of age, but a deficiency in tRNA levels was rectified earlier in mdx skeletal muscles treated from 14 days to 3 weeks. Myogenesis in tissue culture was also used to (iii) compare ncRNA expression patterns for both strains, and (iv) the response to taurine treatment. These analyses revealed intrinsic differences in ncRNA expression patterns during myogenesis between strains, as well as increased sensitivity of mdx ncRNA levels to taurine treatment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Communication Framework For the Mionix Naos QG Mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff-Jensen, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The Mionix Naos QG mouse has multiple sensors integrated. It can record all the metrics native to mice: being scroll, clicks and mouse movements. Moreover, this mouse has heart rate (HR) and Galvanic Skin Response (GSR) sensors embedded. Through Mionics API [1] WebSocket can be used to access all...... or be recorded. Another Unity implementation have been developed as well. This was directly connected to the WebSocket, and has the same properties as the first Unity development. Since two nearly identical implementations were made, the quality of their recordings and data communication were tested. Based...

  20. Spatial integration in mouse primary visual cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Vaiceliunaite, Agne; Erisken, Sinem; Franzen, Florian; Katzner, Steffen; Busse, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Responses of many neurons in primary visual cortex (V1) are suppressed by stimuli exceeding the classical receptive field (RF), an important property that might underlie the computation of visual saliency. Traditionally, it has proven difficult to disentangle the underlying neural circuits, including feedforward, horizontal intracortical, and feedback connectivity. Since circuit-level analysis is particularly feasible in the mouse, we asked whether neural signatures of spatial integration in ...

  1. The Mouse That Soared

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-01

    Astronomers have used an X-ray image to make the first detailed study of the behavior of high-energy particles around a fast moving pulsar. The image, from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, shows the shock wave created as a pulsar plows supersonically through interstellar space. These results will provide insight into theories for the production of powerful winds of matter and antimatter by pulsars. Chandra's image of the glowing cloud, known as the Mouse, shows a stubby bright column of high-energy particles, about four light years in length, swept back by the pulsar's interaction with interstellar gas. The intense source at the head of the X-ray column is the pulsar, estimated to be moving through space at about 1.3 million miles per hour. VLA Radio Image of the Mouse, Full Field VLA Radio Image of the Mouse, Full Field A cone-shaped cloud of radio-wave-emitting particles envelopes the X-ray column. The Mouse, a.k.a. G359.23-0.82, was discovered in 1987 by radio astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array in New Mexico. It gets its name from its appearance in radio images that show a compact snout, a bulbous body, and a remarkable long, narrow, tail that extends for about 55 light years. "A few dozen pulsar wind nebulae are known, including the spectacular Crab Nebula, but none have the Mouse's combination of relatively young age and incredibly rapid motion through interstellar space," said Bryan Gaensler of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and lead author of a paper on the Mouse that will appear in an upcoming issue of The Astrophysical Journal. "We effectively are seeing a supersonic cosmic wind tunnel, in which we can study the effects of a pulsar's motion on its pulsar wind nebula, and test current theories." Illustration of the Mouse System Illustration of the Mouse System Pulsars are known to be rapidly spinning, highly magnetized neutron stars -- objects so dense that a mass equal to that of the Sun is packed into a

  2. Mouse manipulation through single-switch scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackstien-Adler, Susie; Shein, Fraser; Quintal, Janet; Birch, Shae; Weiss, Patrice L Tamar

    2004-01-01

    Given the current extensive reliance on the graphical user interface, independent access to computer software requires that users be able to manipulate a pointing device of some type (e.g., mouse, trackball) or be able to emulate a mouse by some other means (e.g., scanning). The purpose of the present study was to identify one or more optimal single-switch scanning mouse emulation strategies. Four alternative scanning strategies (continuous Cartesian, discrete Cartesian, rotational, and hybrid quadrant/continuous Cartesian) were selected for testing based on current market availability as well as on theoretical considerations of their potential speed and accuracy. Each strategy was evaluated using a repeated measures study design by means of a test program that permitted mouse emulation via any one of four scanning strategies in a motivating environment; response speed and accuracy could be automatically recorded and considered in view of the motor, cognitive, and perceptual demands of each scanning strategy. Ten individuals whose disabilities required them to operate a computer via single-switch scanning participated in the study. Results indicated that Cartesian scanning was the preferred and most effective scanning strategy. There were no significant differences between results from the Continuous Cartesian and Discrete Cartesian scanning strategies. Rotational scanning was quite slow with respect to the other strategies, although it was equally accurate. Hybrid Quadrant scanning improved access time but at the cost of fewer correct selections. These results demonstrated the importance of testing and comparing alternate single-switch scanning strategies.

  3. The Mouse Tumor Biology Database: A Comprehensive Resource for Mouse Models of Human Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupke, Debra M; Begley, Dale A; Sundberg, John P; Richardson, Joel E; Neuhauser, Steven B; Bult, Carol J

    2017-11-01

    Research using laboratory mice has led to fundamental insights into the molecular genetic processes that govern cancer initiation, progression, and treatment response. Although thousands of scientific articles have been published about mouse models of human cancer, collating information and data for a specific model is hampered by the fact that many authors do not adhere to existing annotation standards when describing models. The interpretation of experimental results in mouse models can also be confounded when researchers do not factor in the effect of genetic background on tumor biology. The Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB) database is an expertly curated, comprehensive compendium of mouse models of human cancer. Through the enforcement of nomenclature and related annotation standards, MTB supports aggregation of data about a cancer model from diverse sources and assessment of how genetic background of a mouse strain influences the biological properties of a specific tumor type and model utility. Cancer Res; 77(21); e67-70. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Human hepatocytes support the hypertrophic but not the hyperplastic response to the murine nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogen sodium phenobarbital in an in vivo study using a chimeric mouse with humanized liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Tomoya; Okuda, Yu; Kushida, Masahiko; Sumida, Kayo; Takeuchi, Hayato; Nagahori, Hirohisa; Fukuda, Takako; Lake, Brian G; Cohen, Samuel M; Kawamura, Satoshi

    2014-11-01

    High doses of sodium phenobarbital (NaPB), a constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activator, have been shown to produce hepatocellular tumors in rodents by a mitogenic mode of action (MOA) involving CAR activation. The effect of 1-week dietary treatment with NaPB on liver weight and histopathology, hepatic CYP2B enzyme activity and CYP2B/3A mRNA expression, replicative DNA synthesis and selected genes related to cell proliferation, and functional transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses was studied in male CD-1 mice, Wistar Hannover (WH) rats, and chimeric mice with human hepatocytes. The treatment of chimeric mice with 1000-1500-ppm NaPB resulted in plasma levels around 3-5-fold higher than those observed in human subjects given therapeutic doses of NaPB. NaPB produced dose-dependent increases in hepatic CYP2B activity and CYP2B/3A mRNA levels in all animal models. Integrated functional metabolomic and transcriptomic analyses demonstrated that the responses to NaPB in the human liver were clearly different from those in rodents. Although NaPB produced a dose-dependent increase in hepatocyte replicative DNA synthesis in CD-1 mice and WH rats, no increase in replicative DNA synthesis was observed in human hepatocyte-originated areas of chimeric mice. In addition, treatment with NaPB had no effect on Ki-67, PCNA, GADD45β, and MDM2 mRNA expression in chimeric mice, whereas significant increases were observed in CD-1 mice and/or WH rats. However, increases in hepatocyte replicative DNA synthesis were observed in chimeric mice both in vivo and in vitro after treatment epidermal growth factor. Thus, although NaPB could activate CAR in both rodent and human hepatocytes, NaPB did not increase replicative DNA synthesis in human hepatocytes of chimeric mice, whereas it was mitogenic to rat and mouse hepatocytes. As human hepatocytes are refractory to the mitogenic effects of NaPB, the MOA for NaPB-induced rodent liver tumor formation is thus not relevant for humans. © The

  5. Comparative effects of n-3, n-6 and n-9 unsaturated fatty acid-rich diet consumption on lupus nephritis, autoantibody production and CD4+ T cell-related gene responses in the autoimmune NZBWF1 mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Pestka

    Full Text Available Mortality from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, a prototypical autoimmune disease, correlates with the onset and severity of kidney glomerulonephritis. There are both preclinical and clinical evidence that SLE patients may benefit from consumption of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA found in fish oil, but the mechanisms remain unclear. Here we employed the NZBWF1 SLE mouse model to compare the effects of dietary lipids on the onset and severity of autoimmune glomerulonephritis after consuming: 1 n-3 PUFA-rich diet containing docosahexaenoic acid-enriched fish oil (DFO, 2 n-6 PUFA-rich Western-type diet containing corn oil (CRN or 3 n-9 monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA-rich Mediterranean-type diet containing high oleic safflower oil (HOS. Elevated plasma autoantibodies, proteinuria and glomerulonephritis were evident in mice fed either the n-6 PUFA or n-9 MUFA diets, however, all three endpoints were markedly attenuated in mice that consumed the n-3 PUFA diet until 34 wk of age. A focused PCR array was used to relate these findings to the expression of 84 genes associated with CD4+ T cell function in the spleen and kidney both prior to and after the onset of the autoimmune nephritis. n-3 PUFA suppression of autoimmunity in NZBWF1 mice was found to co-occur with a generalized downregulation of CD4+ T cell-related genes in kidney and/or spleen at wk 34. These genes were associated with the inflammatory response, antigen presentation, T cell activation, B cell activation/differentiation and leukocyte recruitment. Quantitative RT-PCR of representative affected genes confirmed that n-3 PUFA consumption was associated with reduced expression of CD80, CTLA-4, IL-10, IL-18, CCL-5, CXCR3, IL-6, TNF-α and osteopontin mRNAs in kidney and/or spleens as compared to mice fed n-6 PUFA or n-9 MUFA diets. Remarkably, many of the genes identified in this study are currently under consideration as biomarkers and/or biotherapeutic targets for SLE and other

  6. TLR2 and TLR4 signaling pathways are required for recombinant Brucella abortus BCSP31-induced cytokine production, functional upregulation of mouse macrophages, and the Th1 immune response in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia-Yun; Liu, Yuan; Gao, Xiao-Xue; Gao, Xiang; Cai, Hong

    2014-09-01

    Brucella abortus is a zoonotic Gram-negative pathogen that causes brucelosis in ruminants and humans. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize Brucella abortus and initiate antigen-presenting cell activities that affect both innate and adaptive immunity. In this study, we focused on recombinant Brucella cell-surface protein 31 (rBCSP31) to determine its effects on mouse macrophages. Our results demonstrated that rBCSP31 induced TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-12p40 production, which depended on the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) by stimulating the rapid phosphorylation of p38 and JNK and the activation of transcription factor NF-κB in macrophages. In addition, continuous exposure (>24 h) of RAW264.7 cells to rBCSP31 significantly enhanced IFN-γ-induced expression of MHC-II and the ability to present rBCSP31 peptide to CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, we found that rBCSP31 could interact with both TLR2 and TLR4. The rBCSP31-induced cytokine production by macrophages from TLR2(-/-) and TLR4(-/-) mice was lower than that from C57BL/6 macrophages, and the activation of NF-κB and MAPKs was attenuated in macrophages from TLR2(-/-) and TLR4(-/-) mice. In addition, CD4(+) T cells from C57BL/6 mice immunized with rBCSP31 produced higher levels of IFN-γ and IL-2 compared with CD4(+) T cells from TLR2(-/-) and TLR4(-/-) mice. Macrophages from immunized C57BL/6 mice produced higher levels of IL-12p40 than those from TLR2(-/-) and TLR4(-/-) mice. Furthermore, immunization with rBCSP31 provided better protection in C57BL/6 mice than in TLR2(-/-) and TLR4(-/-) mice after B. abortus 2308 challenge. These results indicate that rBCSP31 is a TLR2 and TLR4 agonist that induces cytokine production, upregulates macrophage function and induces the Th1 immune response.

  7. Transcription Factor NF-IL6 (C/EBPbeta) Activates the Expression of the Mouse MHC Class I H2-Kb Gene in Response to TNF-alpha via the Intragenic Downstream Regulatory Element

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hatina, J.; Jansa, Petr; Reischig, J.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 22, - (2002), s. 741-749 ISSN 1079-9907 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LN00A079 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : Mouse MHC Class I Gene, Intragenic Downstream Regulatory Element Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.885, year: 2002

  8. Mouse Activity across Time Scales: Fractal Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, G. Z. dos Santos; Lobão-Soares, B.; do Nascimento, G. C.; França, Arthur S. C.; Muratori, L.; Ribeiro, S.; Corso, G.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we devise a classification of mouse activity patterns based on accelerometer data using Detrended Fluctuation Analysis. We use two characteristic mouse behavioural states as benchmarks in this study: waking in free activity and slow-wave sleep (SWS). In both situations we find roughly the same pattern: for short time intervals we observe high correlation in activity - a typical 1/f complex pattern - while for large time intervals there is anti-correlation. High correlation of short intervals ( to : waking state and to : SWS) is related to highly coordinated muscle activity. In the waking state we associate high correlation both to muscle activity and to mouse stereotyped movements (grooming, waking, etc.). On the other side, the observed anti-correlation over large time scales ( to : waking state and to : SWS) during SWS appears related to a feedback autonomic response. The transition from correlated regime at short scales to an anti-correlated regime at large scales during SWS is given by the respiratory cycle interval, while during the waking state this transition occurs at the time scale corresponding to the duration of the stereotyped mouse movements. Furthermore, we find that the waking state is characterized by longer time scales than SWS and by a softer transition from correlation to anti-correlation. Moreover, this soft transition in the waking state encompass a behavioural time scale window that gives rise to a multifractal pattern. We believe that the observed multifractality in mouse activity is formed by the integration of several stereotyped movements each one with a characteristic time correlation. Finally, we compare scaling properties of body acceleration fluctuation time series during sleep and wake periods for healthy mice. Interestingly, differences between sleep and wake in the scaling exponents are comparable to previous works regarding human heartbeat. Complementarily, the nature of these sleep-wake dynamics could lead to a better

  9. Noninvasive photoacoustic computed tomography of mouse brain metabolism in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Junjie; Xia, Jun; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Demchenko, Alexei V.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-01-01

    We have demonstrated the feasibility of imaging mouse brain metabolism using photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT), a fast, noninvasive and functional imaging modality with optical contrast and acoustic resolution. Brain responses to forepaw stimulations were imaged transdermally and transcranially. 2-NBDG, which diffuses well across the blood–brain-barrier, provided exogenous contrast for photoacoustic imaging of glucose response. Concurrently, hemoglobin provided endogenous contrast for ...

  10. Immunologic applications of conditional gene modification technology in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Suveena; Zhu, Jinfang

    2014-04-02

    Since the success of homologous recombination in altering mouse genome and the discovery of Cre-loxP system, the combination of these two breakthroughs has created important applications for studying the immune system in the mouse. Here, we briefly summarize the general principles of this technology and its applications in studying immune cell development and responses; such implications include conditional gene knockout and inducible and/or tissue-specific gene over-expression, as well as lineage fate mapping. We then discuss the pros and cons of a few commonly used Cre-expressing mouse lines for studying lymphocyte development and functions. We also raise several general issues, such as efficiency of gene deletion, leaky activity of Cre, and Cre toxicity, all of which may have profound impacts on data interpretation. Finally, we selectively list some useful links to the Web sites as valuable mouse resources. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  11. The scarless heart and the MRL mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heber-Katz, Ellen; Leferovich, John; Bedelbaeva, Khamilia; Gourevitch, Dmitri; Clark, Lise

    2004-05-29

    The ability to regenerate tissues and limbs in its most robust form is seen in many non-mammalian species. The serendipitous discovery that the MRL mouse has a profound capacity for regeneration in some ways rivalling the classic newt and axolotl species raises the possibility that humans, too, may have an innate regenerative ability. The adult MRL mouse regrows cartilage, skin, hair follicles and myocardium with near perfect fidelity and without scarring. This is seen in the ability to close through-and-through ear holes, which are generally used for lifelong identification of mice, and the anatomic and functional recovery of myocardium after a severe cryo-injury. We present histological, biochemical and genetic data indicating that the enhanced breakdown of scar-like tissue may be an underlying factor in the MRL regenerative response. Studies as to the source of the cells in the regenerating MRL tissue are discussed. Such studies appear to support multiple mechanisms for cell replacement.

  12. A resposta oxidativa em corações de camundongos é modulada por background genético The oxidative response of mouse hearts is modulated by genetic background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurélio Santos-Silva

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: o tabagismo apresenta importante papel sobre as doenças cardiovasculares, entretanto permanecem pouco compreendidos os motivos pelos quais alguns seres humanos as desenvolvem e outros não. OBJETIVO: nosso objetivo foi analisar o perfil redox do coração de diferentes linhagens de camundongos após exposição à fumaça de cigarro. MÉTODOS: camundongos machos suíços (n = 10, C3H (n = 10, BALB/c (n = 10 e C57BL/6 (n = 10 foram expostos à fumaça de cigarro (12 cigarros/dia, enquanto os respectivos controles (n = 10 ao ar ambiente por 60 dias. Após sacrifício, o coração foi retirado para análises bioquímicas. RESULTADOS: embora o conteúdo de malondialdeído não tenha aumentado em nenhum grupo, a atividade da catalase diminuiu no grupo suíço (p BACKGROUND: Smoking plays an important role in cardiovascular diseases. However, the reasons why some individuals develop those diseases and others do not remain to be explained. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed at assessing the redox profile of the heart of different mouse strains after exposure to cigarette smoke. METHODS: Male mice of the Swiss (n = 10, C3H (n = 10, BALB/c (n = 10 and C57BL/6 (n = 10 strains were exposed to cigarette smoke (12 cigarettes/day, while their respective controls (n = 10 were exposed to ambient air for 60 days. After being euthanized, their heart was removed for biochemical analyses. RESULTS: Although the malondialdehyde content did not increase in any of the groups, catalase activity decreased in the Swiss (p < 0.05 and BALB/c (p < 0.05 strain mice as compared with their respective control groups, while myeloperoxidase decreased in the C3H (p < 0.05 and C57BL/6 (p < 0.001 strain mice as compared with their respective control groups. The reduced glutathione content decreased in the Swiss, C3H, C57BL/6 (p < 0.05 and BALB/c (p < 0,001 strain mice as compared with their respective control groups. Regarding reduced glutathione content, an increase was

  13. Spatial integration in mouse primary visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiceliunaite, Agne; Erisken, Sinem; Franzen, Florian; Katzner, Steffen; Busse, Laura

    2013-08-01

    Responses of many neurons in primary visual cortex (V1) are suppressed by stimuli exceeding the classical receptive field (RF), an important property that might underlie the computation of visual saliency. Traditionally, it has proven difficult to disentangle the underlying neural circuits, including feedforward, horizontal intracortical, and feedback connectivity. Since circuit-level analysis is particularly feasible in the mouse, we asked whether neural signatures of spatial integration in mouse V1 are similar to those of higher-order mammals and investigated the role of parvalbumin-expressing (PV+) inhibitory interneurons. Analogous to what is known from primates and carnivores, we demonstrate that, in awake mice, surround suppression is present in the majority of V1 neurons and is strongest in superficial cortical layers. Anesthesia with isoflurane-urethane, however, profoundly affects spatial integration: it reduces the laminar dependency, decreases overall suppression strength, and alters the temporal dynamics of responses. We show that these effects of brain state can be parsimoniously explained by assuming that anesthesia affects contrast normalization. Hence, the full impact of suppressive influences in mouse V1 cannot be studied under anesthesia with isoflurane-urethane. To assess the neural circuits of spatial integration, we targeted PV+ interneurons using optogenetics. Optogenetic depolarization of PV+ interneurons was associated with increased RF size and decreased suppression in the recorded population, similar to effects of lowering stimulus contrast, suggesting that PV+ interneurons contribute to spatial integration by affecting overall stimulus drive. We conclude that the mouse is a promising model for circuit-level mechanisms of spatial integration, which relies on the combined activity of different types of inhibitory interneurons.

  14. Neutron issues in the JANUS mouse program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnes, B.A.; Grahn, D.

    1990-01-01

    Over the last 25 years, the JANUS program in the Biological and Medical Research Division at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has compiled a database on the response of both sexes of an F 1 hybrid mouse, the B6CF 1 (C57BL/6 x BALB/c), to external whole- body irradiation by 60 Co γ-rays and fission neutrons. Three basic patterns of exposure for both neutrons and γ-rays have been investigated: single exposures, 24 equal once-weekly exposures, and 60 equal once-weekly exposures. All irradiations were terminated at predetermined total doses, with dose calculated in centigrays at the midline of the mouse. Three endpoints will be discussed in this paper: (1) life shortening, (2) a point estimate for cumulative mortality, and (3) the hazard function. Life shortening is used as an analysis endpoint because it summarizes, in a single index, the integrated effect of all injuries accumulated by an organism. Histopathological analyses of the mice used in the ANL studies have indicated that 85% of the deaths were caused by neoplasms. Connective tissue tumors were the dominant tumor in the B6CF 1 mouse, with tumors of lymphoreticular origin accounting for approximately 80% of this class. The latter two endpoints will therefore be used to describe the life table experience of mice dying from the lymphoreticular class of tumors. Dose-response models will be applied to the three endpoints in order to describe the response function for neutron exposures, evaluate the effect of dose range and pattern of exposure on the response function for neutrons, and provide a set of neutron relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values of the ANL database. 25 refs

  15. Genome-wide identification of estrogen receptor alpha-binding sites in mouse liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Hui; Fält, Susann; Sandelin, Albin

    2007-01-01

    We report the genome-wide identification of estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha)-binding regions in mouse liver using a combination of chromatin immunoprecipitation and tiled microarrays that cover all nonrepetitive sequences in the mouse genome. This analysis identified 5568 ERalpha-binding regions...... genes. The majority of ERalpha-binding regions lie in regions that are evolutionarily conserved between human and mouse. Motif-finding algorithms identified the estrogen response element, and variants thereof, together with binding sites for activator protein 1, basic-helix-loop-helix proteins, ETS...... signaling in mouse liver, by characterizing the first step in this signaling cascade, the binding of ERalpha to DNA in intact chromatin....

  16. Development of a mouse-feline chimeric antibody against feline tumor necrosis factor-alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    DOKI, Tomoyoshi; TAKANO, Tomomi; HOHDATSU, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal inflammatory disease caused by FIP virus infection. Feline tumor necrosis factor (fTNF)-alpha is closely involved in the aggravation of FIP pathology. We previously described the preparation of neutralizing mouse anti-fTNF-alpha monoclonal antibody (mAb 2–4) and clarified its role in the clinical condition of cats with FIP using in vitro systems. However, administration of mouse mAb 2–4 to cat may lead to a production of feline anti-mouse antibodies. In the present study, we prepared a mouse-feline chimeric mAb (chimeric mAb 2–4) by fusing the variable region of mouse mAb 2–4 to the constant region of feline antibody. The chimeric mAb 2–4 was confirmed to have fTNF-alpha neutralization activity. Purified mouse mAb 2–4 and chimeric mAb 2–4 were repeatedly administered to cats, and the changes in the ability to induce feline anti-mouse antibody response were investigated. In the serum of cats treated with mouse mAb 2–4, feline anti-mouse antibody production was induced, and the fTNF-alpha neutralization effect of mouse mAb 2–4 was reduced. In contrast, in cats treated with chimeric mAb 2–4, the feline anti-mouse antibody response was decreased compared to that of mouse mAb 2–4-treated cats. PMID:27264736

  17. Towards a mouse model of depression : a psychoneuroendocrine approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalm, Sergiu

    2012-01-01

    Chronic stress is considered a vulnerability factor for depression. A key symptom is anhedonia; a reduced response to positive stimuli. Drugs are effective for only 20-40% of the patients and new drugs are urgently needed. The objective of the research was to develop a mouse model of depression that

  18. NIH mouse study finds gut microorganisms may determine cancer treatment outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    An intact gut commensal microbiota, which is a population of microorganisms living in the intestine, is required for optimal response to cancer therapy, according to a mouse study by scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI)

  19. A Reverse Stroop Task with Mouse Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Naohide; Incera, Sara; McLennan, Conor T.

    2016-01-01

    In a reverse Stroop task, observers respond to the meaning of a color word irrespective of the color in which the word is printed—for example, the word red may be printed in the congruent color (red), an incongruent color (e.g., blue), or a neutral color (e.g., white). Although reading of color words in this task is often thought to be neither facilitated by congruent print colors nor interfered with incongruent print colors, this interference has been detected by using a response method that does not give any bias in favor of processing of word meanings or processing of print colors. On the other hand, evidence for the presence of facilitation in this task has been scarce, even though this facilitation is theoretically possible. By modifying the task such that participants respond to a stimulus color word by pointing to a corresponding response word on a computer screen with a mouse, the present study investigated the possibility that not only interference but also facilitation would take place in a reverse Stroop task. Importantly, in this study, participants’ responses were dynamically tracked by recording the entire trajectories of the mouse. Arguably, this method provided richer information about participants’ performance than traditional measures such as reaction time and accuracy, allowing for more detailed (and thus potentially more sensitive) investigation of facilitation and interference in the reverse Stroop task. These trajectories showed that the mouse’s approach toward correct response words was significantly delayed by incongruent print colors but not affected by congruent print colors, demonstrating that only interference, not facilitation, was present in the current task. Implications of these findings are discussed within a theoretical framework in which the strength of association between a task and its response method plays a critical role in determining how word meanings and print colors interact in reverse Stroop tasks. PMID:27199881

  20. Mass spectrometry analysis of hepcidin peptides in experimental mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold Tjalsma

    Full Text Available The mouse is a valuable model for unravelling the role of hepcidin in iron homeostasis, however, such studies still report hepcidin mRNA levels as a surrogate marker for bioactive hepcidin in its pivotal function to block ferroportin-mediated iron transport. Here, we aimed to assess bioactive mouse Hepcidin-1 (Hep-1 and its paralogue Hepcidin-2 (Hep-2 at the peptide level. To this purpose, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR and tandem-MS was used for hepcidin identification, after which a time-of-flight (TOF MS-based methodology was exploited to routinely determine Hep-1 and -2 levels in mouse serum and urine. This method was biologically validated by hepcidin assessment in: i 3 mouse strains (C57Bl/6; DBA/2 and BABL/c upon stimulation with intravenous iron and LPS, ii homozygous Hfe knock out, homozygous transferrin receptor 2 (Y245X mutated mice and double affected mice, and iii mice treated with a sublethal hepatotoxic dose of paracetamol. The results showed that detection of Hep-1 was restricted to serum, whereas Hep-2 and its presumed isoforms were predominantly present in urine. Elevations in serum Hep-1 and urine Hep-2 upon intravenous iron or LPS were only moderate and varied considerably between mouse strains. Serum Hep-1 was decreased in all three hemochromatosis models, being lowest in the double affected mice. Serum Hep-1 levels correlated with liver hepcidin-1 gene expression, while acute liver damage by paracetamol depleted Hep-1 from serum. Furthermore, serum Hep-1 appeared to be an excellent indicator of splenic iron accumulation. In conclusion, Hep-1 and Hep-2 peptide responses in experimental mouse agree with the known biology of hepcidin mRNA regulators, and their measurement can now be implemented in experimental mouse models to provide novel insights in post-transcriptional regulation, hepcidin function, and kinetics.

  1. The cellular cancer resistance of the SR/CR mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Janne; Hau, Jann; Jensen, Henrik Elvang

    2012-01-01

    The SR/CR mouse phenotype, first described in 1999 in BALB/c and later bred into C57BL/6 mice, is resistant to cancer formation following high doses of cancer cells administered intraperitoneally. The tumor cell targeting and destruction mechanisms have not been identified. By fluorescence-activa...... controls. Importantly, this differentially regulated immune response of SR/CR mice could not be found in response to challenge with the lymphoma cell line EL-4....

  2. Lipopolysaccharide administration in the dominant mouse destabilizes social hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Daniel Wagner Hamada; Gabanyi, Ilana; Kinoshita, Denise; de Sá-Rocha, Luiz Carlos

    2012-09-01

    Sickness behavior is a set of behavioral changes that are part of an adaptive strategy to overcome infection. Mice that interact with conspecifics displaying sickness behavior also show relevant behavioral changes. In this work we sought to determine the role of sickness behavior display by a dominant mouse as a promoter of hierarchy instability. We treated the dominant mouse within a dyad with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (400 μg/kg, i.p.) for three consecutive days and assessed social dominance behavior. Since elder animals display increased inflammatory responses and the behaviors toward conspecifics are influenced by kinship we also assessed whether kinship and age, might influence sickness related hierarchy instability. Our results show that administration of LPS in the dominant mouse promotes social instability within a dyad, and indicates that this instability could be influenced by kinship and age. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A Transgenic Mouse Model of Poliomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Satoshi; Nagata, Noriyo

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic mice (tg mice) that express the human poliovirus receptor (PVR), CD155, are susceptible to poliovirus and develop a neurological disease that resembles human poliomyelitis. Assessment of the neurovirulence levels of poliovirus strains, including mutant viruses produced by reverse genetics, circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus, and vaccine candidates, is useful for basic research of poliovirus pathogenicity, the surveillance of circulating polioviruses, and the quality control of oral live poliovirus vaccines, and does not require the use of monkeys. Furthermore, PVR-tg mice are useful for studying poliovirus tissue tropism and host immune responses. PVR-tg mice can be bred with mice deficient in the genes involved in viral pathogenicity. This report describes the methods used to analyze the pathogenicity and immune responses of poliovirus using the PVR-tg mouse model.

  4. Characterization of 7A7, an anti-mouse EGFR monoclonal antibody proposed to be the mouse equivalent of cetuximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xuzhi; Cruz, Jazmina L; Joseph, Shannon; Pett, Nicola; Chew, Hui Yi; Tuong, Zewen K; Okano, Satomi; Kelly, Gabrielle; Veitch, Margaret; Simpson, Fiona; Wells, James W

    2018-02-23

    The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) is selectively expressed on the surface of numerous tumours, such as non-small cell lung, ovarian, colorectal and head and neck carcinomas. EGFR has therefore become a target for cancer therapy. Cetuximab is a chimeric human/mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb) that binds to EGFR, where it both inhibits signaling and induces cell death by antibody-dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Cetuximab has been approved for clinical use in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and colorectal cancer. However, only 15-20% patients benefit from this drug, thus new strategies to improve cetuximab efficiency are required. We aimed to develop a reliable and easy preclinical mouse model to evaluate the efficacy of EGFR-targeted antibodies and examine the immune mechanisms involved in tumour regression. We selected an anti-mouse EGFR mAb, 7A7, which has been reported to be "mouse cetuximab" and to exhibit similar properties to its human counterpart. Unfortunately, we were unable to reproduce previous results obtained with the 7A7 mAb. In our hands, 7A7 failed to recognize mouse EGFR, both in native and reducing conditions. Moreover, in vivo administration of 7A7 in an EGFR-expressing HPV38 tumour model did not have any impact on tumour regression or animal survival. We conclude that 7A7 does not recognize mouse EGFR and therefore cannot be used as the mouse equivalent of cetuximab use in humans. As a number of groups have spent effort and resources with similar issues we feel that publication is a responsible approach.

  5. Mouse SNP Miner: an annotated database of mouse functional single nucleotide polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramensky Vasily E

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mapping of quantitative trait loci in rat and mouse has been extremely successful in identifying chromosomal regions associated with human disease-related phenotypes. However, identifying the specific phenotype-causing DNA sequence variations within a quantitative trait locus has been much more difficult. The recent availability of genomic sequence from several mouse inbred strains (including C57BL/6J, 129X1/SvJ, 129S1/SvImJ, A/J, and DBA/2J has made it possible to catalog DNA sequence differences within a quantitative trait locus derived from crosses between these strains. However, even for well-defined quantitative trait loci ( Description To help identify functional DNA sequence variations within quantitative trait loci we have used the Ensembl annotated genome sequence to compile a database of mouse single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that are predicted to cause missense, nonsense, frameshift, or splice site mutations (available at http://bioinfo.embl.it/SnpApplet/. For missense mutations we have used the PolyPhen and PANTHER algorithms to predict whether amino acid changes are likely to disrupt protein function. Conclusion We have developed a database of mouse SNPs predicted to cause missense, nonsense, frameshift, and splice-site mutations. Our analysis revealed that 20% and 14% of missense SNPs are likely to be deleterious according to PolyPhen and PANTHER, respectively, and 6% are considered deleterious by both algorithms. The database also provides gene expression and functional annotations from the Symatlas, Gene Ontology, and OMIM databases to further assess candidate phenotype-causing mutations. To demonstrate its utility, we show that Mouse SNP Miner successfully finds a previously identified candidate SNP in the taste receptor, Tas1r3, that underlies sucrose preference in the C57BL/6J strain. We also use Mouse SNP Miner to derive a list of candidate phenotype-causing mutations within a previously

  6. 10. international mouse genome conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisler, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    Ten years after hosting the First International Mammalian Genome Conference in Paris in 1986, Dr. Jean-Louis Guenet presided over the Tenth Conference at the Pasteur Institute, October 7--10, 1996. The 1986 conference was a satellite to the Human Gene Mapping Workshop and had approximately 50 attendees. The 1996 meeting was attended by 300 scientists from around the world. In the interim, the number of mapped loci in the mouse increased from 1,000 to over 20,000. This report contains a listing of the program and its participants, and two articles that review the meeting and the role of the laboratory mouse in the Human Genome project. More than 200 papers were presented at the conference covering the following topics: International mouse chromosome committee meetings; Mutant generation and identification; Physical and genetic maps; New technology and resources; Chromatin structure and gene regulation; Rate and hamster genetic maps; Informatics and databases; and Quantitative trait analysis.

  7. Teratology studies in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Edward; Leroy, Mariline

    2013-01-01

    The rat is the routine species of choice as the rodent model for regulatory safety testing of xenobiotics such as medicinal products, food additives, and other chemicals. However, the rat is not always suitable for pharmacological, toxicological, immunogenic, pharmacokinetic, or even practical reasons. Under such circumstances, the mouse offers an alternative for finding a suitable rodent model acceptable to the regulatory authorities. Since all essential routes of administration are possible, the short reproductive cycle and large litter size of the mouse make it a species well adapted for use in teratology studies. Given that good quality animals, including virgin mated females, can be acquired relatively easily and inexpensively, the mouse has been used in reproductive toxicity studies for decades and study protocols are well established.

  8. Mouse Resource Browser-a database of mouse databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zouberakis, Michael; Chandras, Christina; Swertz, Morris; Smedley, Damian; Gruenberger, Michael; Bard, Jonathan; Schughart, Klaus; Rosenthal, Nadia; Hancock, John M.; Schofield, Paul N.; Kollias, George; Aidinis, Vassilis

    2010-01-01

    The laboratory mouse has become the organism of choice for discovering gene function and unravelling pathogenetic mechanisms of human diseases through the application of various functional genomic approaches. The resulting deluge of data has led to the deployment of numerous online resources and the

  9. Stimulation of growth in the little mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beamer, W H; Eicher, E M

    1976-10-01

    The new mouse mutation little (lit) in the homozygous state causes a pituitary deficiency involving at least growth hormone (GH) and prolactin. The resultant growth failure of lit/lit mice was shown to be reversed by experimental conditions that enhanced levels of GH or GH and prolactin in the circulation. Two measures of growth, actual weight gain and bone dimension, were significantly improved by the physiological processes of pregnancy and pseudopregnancy, by extra-sellar graft of a normal mouse pituitary, and by treatment with GH but not prolactin. These data confirmed pituitary dysfunction as the basic defect caused by the mutation lit and showed that the GH deficiency is responsible for growth failure. However, the biological site of gene action, the pituitary or hypothalamus, has not been established. Little mice exhibit a number of characteristics similar to those of human genetic ateleotic dwarfism Type 1, namely genetic inheritance, time of onset of growth retardation, proportionate skeletal size reduction, and pituitary GH deficiency.

  10. IL-6 and mouse oocyte spindle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jashoman Banerjee

    Full Text Available Interleukin 6 (IL-6 is considered a major indicator of the acute-phase inflammatory response. Endometriosis and pelvic inflammation, diseases that manifest elevated levels of IL-6, are commonly associated with higher infertility. However, the mechanistic link between elevated levels of IL-6 and poor oocyte quality is still unclear. In this work, we explored the direct role of this cytokine as a possible mediator for impaired oocyte spindle and chromosomal structure, which is a critical hurdle in the management of infertility. Metaphase-II mouse oocytes were exposed to recombinant mouse IL-6 (50, 100 and 200 ng/mL for 30 minutes and subjected to indirect immunofluorescent staining to identify alterations in the microtubule and chromosomal alignment compared to untreated controls. The deterioration in microtubule and chromosomal alignment were evaluated utilizing both fluorescence and confocal microscopy, and were quantitated with a previously reported scoring system. Our results showed that IL-6 caused a dose-dependent deterioration in microtubule and chromosomal alignment in the treated oocytes as compared to the untreated group. Indeed, IL-6 at a concentration as low as 50 ng/mL caused deterioration in the spindle structure in 60% of the oocytes, which increased significantly (P<0.0001 as IL-6 concentration was increased. In conclusion, elevated levels of IL-6 associated with endometriosis and pelvic inflammation may reduce the fertilizing capacity of human oocyte through a mechanism that involves impairment of the microtubule and chromosomal structure.

  11. 111In-cetuximab-F(ab')2 SPECT and 18F-FDG PET for prediction and response monitoring of combined-modality treatment of human head and neck carcinomas in a mouse model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, L.K. van; Boerman, O.C.; Franssen, G.M.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Bussink, J.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas with radiotherapy and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor cetuximab shows an improved response in a subgroup of patients. The aim of this study was to noninvasively monitor treatment response by visualizing systemically accessible

  12. A Transgenic Tri-Modality Reporter Mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Xinrui; Ray, Pritha; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Tong, Ricky; Gong, Yongquan; Sathirachinda, Ataya; Wu, Joseph C.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic mouse with a stably integrated reporter gene(s) can be a valuable resource for obtaining uniformly labeled stem cells, tissues, and organs for various applications. We have generated a transgenic mouse model that ubiquitously expresses a tri-fusion reporter gene (fluc2-tdTomato-ttk) driven by a constitutive chicken β-actin promoter. This "Tri-Modality Reporter Mouse" system allows one to isolate most cells from this donor mouse and image them for bioluminescent (fluc2), fluorescent...

  13. Spallanzani's mouse: a model of restoration and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heber-Katz, E; Leferovich, J M; Bedelbaeva, K; Gourevitch, D

    2004-01-01

    The ability to regenerate is thought to be a lost phenotype in mammals, though there are certainly sporadic examples of mammalian regeneration. Our laboratory has identified a strain of mouse, the MRL mouse, which has a unique capacity to heal complex tissue in an epimorphic fashion, i.e., to restore a damaged limb or organ to its normal structure and function. Initial studies using through-and-through ear punches showed rapid full closure of the ear holes with cartilage growth, new hair follicles, and normal tissue architecture reminiscent of regeneration seen in amphibians as opposed to the scarring usually seen in mammals. Since the ear hole closure phenotype is a quantitative trait, this has been used to show-through extensive breeding and backcrossing--that the trait is heritable. Such analysis reveals that there is a complex genetic basis for this trait with multiple loci. One of the major phenotypes of the MRL mouse is a potent remodeling response with the absence or a reduced level of scarring. MRL healing is associated with the upregulation of the metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 and the downregulation of their inhibitors TIMP-2 and TIMP-3, both present in inflammatory cells such as neutrophils and macrophages. This model has more recently been extended to the heart. In this case, a cryoinjury to the right ventricle leads to near complete scarless healing in the MRL mouse whereas scarring is seen in the control mouse. In the MRL heart, bromodeoxyuridine uptake by cardiomyocytes filling the wound site can be seen 60 days after injury. This does not occur in the control mouse. Function in the MRL heart, as measured by echocardiography, returns to normal.

  14. Assessing molecular initiating events (MIEs), key events (KEs) and modulating factors (MFs) for styrene responses in mouse lungs using whole genome gene expression profiling following 1-day and multi-week exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Melvin E; Cruzan, George; Black, Michael B; Pendse, Salil N; Dodd, Darol; Bus, James S; Sarang, Satinder S; Banton, Marcy I; Waites, Robbie; McMullen, Patrick D

    2017-11-15

    Styrene increased lung tumors in mice at chronic inhalation exposures of 20ppm and greater. MIEs, KEs and MFs were examined using gene expression in three strains of male mice (the parental C57BL/6 strain, a CYP2F2(-/-) knock out and a CYP2F2(-/-) transgenic containing human CYP2F1, 2A13 and 2B6). Exposures were for 1-day and 1, 4 and 26weeks. After 1-day exposures at 1, 5, 10, 20, 40 and 120ppm significant increases in differentially expressed genes (DEGs) occurred only in parental strain lungs where there was already an increase in DEGs at 5ppm and then many thousands of DEGs by 120ppm. Enrichment for 1-day and 1-week exposures included cell cycle, mitotic M-M/G1 phases, DNA-synthesis and metabolism of lipids and lipoproteins pathways. The numbers of DEGs decreased steadily over time with no DEGs meeting both statistical significance and fold-change criteria at 26weeks. At 4 and 26weeks, some key transcription factors (TFs) - Nr1d1, Nr1d2, Dbp, Tef, Hlf, Per3, Per2 and Bhlhe40 - were upregulated (|FC|>1.5), while others - Npas, Arntl, Nfil3, Nr4a1, Nr4a2, and Nr4a3 - were down-regulated. At all times, consistent changes in gene expression only occurred in the parental strain. Our results support a MIE for styrene of direct mitogenicity from mouse-specific CYP2F2-mediated metabolites activating Nr4a signaling. Longer-term MFs include down-regulation of Nr4a genes and shifts in both circadian clock TFs and other TFs, linking circadian clock to cellular metabolism. We found no gene expression changes indicative of cytotoxicity or activation of p53-mediated DNA-damage pathways. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Review and Comparison of Mouse and Rat Responses to Micro Gravity, Hyper Gravity and Simulated Models of Partial Gravity; Species Differences, Gaps in the Available Data, and Consideration of the Advantages and Caveats of Each Model for Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, F. M.; Gresser, A. L.; Sato, Kevin Y.; Taylor, Elizabeth M.

    2018-01-01

    Laboratory strains of mice and rat are widely used to study mammalian responses to stimulus, and both have been studied under a variety of gravity conditions, including space flight. We compared results obtained from exposure to spaceflight and microgravity, hyper gravity via centrifugation, earth gravity, and models of simulated partial gravity (hind-limb unloading and partial weight bearing treatments). We examined the reported changes in survival, body mass, circadian rhythm (body temperature and activity levels), behavior, bone, muscle, immune, cardio-vasculature, vestibular, reproduction and neonate survival, microbiome, and the visual system. Not all categories have published data for both species, some have limited data, and there are variations in experiment design that allow for only relative comparisons to be considered. The data reveal species differences in both the level of gravity required to obtain a response, degree of response, and in temporal expression of responses. Examination of the data across the gravity levels allows consideration of the hypothesis that gravitational responses follow a continuum, and organ specific differences are noted. In summary, we present advantages and caveats of each model system as pertains to gravitational biology research and identify gaps in our knowledge of how these mammals respond to gravity.

  16. The Mouse SAGE Site: database of public mouse SAGE libraries

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Divina, Petr; Forejt, Jiří

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 32, - (2004), s. D482-D483 ISSN 0305-1048 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A079; GA ČR GV204/98/K015 Grant - others:HHMI(US) 555000306 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : mouse SAGE libraries * web -based database Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.260, year: 2004

  17. Modulation of hepatocyte growth factor gene expression by estrogen in mouse ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Lin, L; Zarnegar, R

    1994-09-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is expressed in a variety of tissues and cell types under normal conditions and in response to various stimuli such as tissue injury. In the present study, we demonstrate that the transcription of the HGF gene is stimulated by estrogen in mouse ovary. A single injection of 17 beta-estradiol results in a dramatic and transient elevation of the levels of mouse HGF mRNA. Sequence analysis has found that two putative estrogen responsive elements (ERE) reside at -872 in the 5'-flanking region and at +511 in the first intron, respectively, of the mouse HGF gene. To test whether these ERE elements are responsible for estrogen induction of HGF gene expression, chimeric plasmids containing variable regions of the 5'-flanking sequence of HGF gene and the coding region for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene were transiently transfected into both human endometrial carcinoma RL 95-2 cells and mouse fibroblast NIH 3T3 cells to assess hormone responsiveness. Transfection results indicate that the ERE elements of the mouse HGF gene can confer estrogen action to either homologous or heterologous promoters. Nuclear protein extracts either from RL95-2 cells transfected with the estrogen receptor expression vector or from mouse liver bound in vitro to ERE elements specifically, as shown by band shift assay. Therefore, our results demonstrate that the HGF gene is transcriptionally regulated by estrogen in mouse ovary; and such regulation is mediated via a direct interaction of the estrogen receptor complex with cis-acting ERE elements identified in the mouse HGF gene.

  18. Endogenous Mouse Dicer Is an Exclusively Cytoplasmic Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Much

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dicer is a large multi-domain protein responsible for the ultimate step of microRNA and short-interfering RNA biogenesis. In human and mouse cell lines, Dicer has been shown to be important in the nuclear clearance of dsRNA as well as the establishment of chromatin modifications. Here we set out to unambiguously define the cellular localization of Dicer in mice to understand if this is a conserved feature of mammalian Dicer in vivo. To this end, we utilized an endogenously epitope tagged Dicer knock-in mouse allele. From primary mouse cell lines and adult tissues, we determined with certainty by biochemical fractionation and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy that endogenous Dicer is exclusively cytoplasmic. We ruled out the possibility that a fraction of Dicer shuttles to and from the nucleus as well as that FGF or DNA damage signaling induce Dicer nuclear translocation. We also explored Dicer localization during the dynamic and developmental context of embryogenesis, where Dicer is ubiquitously expressed and strictly cytoplasmic in all three germ layers as well as extraembryonic tissues. Our data exclude a direct role for Dicer in the nuclear RNA processing in the mouse.

  19. Endogenous Mouse Dicer Is an Exclusively Cytoplasmic Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Much, Christian; Auchynnikava, Tania; Pavlinic, Dinko; Buness, Andreas; Rappsilber, Juri; Benes, Vladimir; Allshire, Robin; O'Carroll, Dónal

    2016-06-01

    Dicer is a large multi-domain protein responsible for the ultimate step of microRNA and short-interfering RNA biogenesis. In human and mouse cell lines, Dicer has been shown to be important in the nuclear clearance of dsRNA as well as the establishment of chromatin modifications. Here we set out to unambiguously define the cellular localization of Dicer in mice to understand if this is a conserved feature of mammalian Dicer in vivo. To this end, we utilized an endogenously epitope tagged Dicer knock-in mouse allele. From primary mouse cell lines and adult tissues, we determined with certainty by biochemical fractionation and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy that endogenous Dicer is exclusively cytoplasmic. We ruled out the possibility that a fraction of Dicer shuttles to and from the nucleus as well as that FGF or DNA damage signaling induce Dicer nuclear translocation. We also explored Dicer localization during the dynamic and developmental context of embryogenesis, where Dicer is ubiquitously expressed and strictly cytoplasmic in all three germ layers as well as extraembryonic tissues. Our data exclude a direct role for Dicer in the nuclear RNA processing in the mouse.

  20. Inhibition of RM-1 prostate carcinoma and eliciting robust immune responses in the mouse model by using VEGF-M2-GnRH3-hinge-MVP vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiqin; Alahdal, Murad; Ye, Jia; Jing, Liangliang; Liu, Xiaoxin; Chen, Huan; Jin, Liang; Cao, Rongyue

    2018-01-23

    GnRH and VEGF have been investigated as prostate carcinoma enhancers that support tumor spread and progression. Although both have documented roles in prostate carcinoma and many cancer types, the weak immunogenicity of these peptides has remained a major challenge for use in immunotherapy. Here, we describe a novel strategy to inhibit GnRH and VEGF production and assess the effect on the immune responses against these hormones using the RM-1 prostate cancer model. We designed a novel recombinant fusion protein which combined GnRH and VEGF as a vaccine against this tumor. The newly constructed fusion protein hVEGF121-M2-GnRH3-hinge-MVP contains the human vascular endothelial growth factor (hVEGF121) and three copies of GnRH in sequential linear alignment and T helper epitope MVP as an immunogenic vaccine. The effectiveness of the vaccine in eliciting an immune response and attenuating the prostate tumor growth was evaluated. Results showed that administration of a new vaccine effectively elicited humoral and cellular immune responses. We found that, a novel fusion protein, hVEGF121-M2-GnRH3-hinge-MVP, effectively inhibited growth of RM-1 prostate model and effectively promoted immune response. In conclusion, hVEGF121-M2-GnRH3-hinge-MVP is an effective dual mechanism tumor vaccine that limits RM-1 prostate growth. This vaccine may be a promising strategy for the treatment of hormone refractory prostate malignancies.

  1. The absence of Ser389 phosphorylation in p53 affects the basal gene expression level of many p53-dependent genes and alters the biphasic response to UV exposure in mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins, Wendy; Bruning, Oskar; Jonker, Martijs J.; Zwart, Edwin; van der Hoeven, Tessa V.; Pennings, Jeroen L. A.; Rauwerda, Han; de Vries, Annemieke; Breit, Timo M.

    2008-01-01

    Phosphorylation is important in p53-mediated DNA damage responses. After UV irradiation, p53 is phosphorylated specifically at murine residue Ser389. Phosphorylation mutant p53.S389A cells and mice show reduced apoptosis and compromised tumor suppression after UV irradiation. We investigated the

  2. Mouse infection models for space flight immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapes, Stephen Keith; Ganta, Roman Reddy; Chapers, S. K. (Principal Investigator)

    2005-01-01

    Several immunological processes can be affected by space flight. However, there is little evidence to suggest that flight-induced immunological deficits lead to illness. Therefore, one of our goals has been to define models to examine host resistance during space flight. Our working hypothesis is that space flight crews will come from a heterogeneous population; the immune response gene make-up will be quite varied. It is unknown how much the immune response gene variation contributes to the potential threat from infectious organisms, allergic responses or other long term health problems (e.g. cancer). This article details recent efforts of the Kansas State University gravitational immunology group to assess how population heterogeneity impacts host health, either in laboratory experimental situations and/or using the skeletal unloading model of space-flight stress. This paper details our use of several mouse strains with several different genotypes. In particular, mice with varying MHCII allotypes and mice on the C57BL background with different genetic defects have been particularly useful tools with which to study infections by Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium, Pasteurella pneumotropica and Ehrlichia chaffeensis. We propose that some of these experimental challenge models will be useful to assess the effects of space flight on host resistance to infection.

  3. Combinatorial effects of odorants on mouse behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, Luis R.; Kondoh, Kunio; Ye, Xiaolan; Yoon, Kyoung-hye; Hernandez, Marcus; Buck, Linda B.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which odors induce instinctive behaviors are largely unknown. Odor detection in the mouse nose is mediated by >1, 000 different odorant receptors (ORs) and trace amine-associated receptors (TAARs). Odor perceptions are encoded combinatorially by ORs and can be altered by slight changes in the combination of activated receptors. However, the stereotyped nature of instinctive odor responses suggests the involvement of specific receptors and genetically programmed neural circuits relatively immune to extraneous odor stimuli and receptor inputs. Here, we report that, contrary to expectation, innate odor-induced behaviors can be context-dependent. First, different ligands for a given TAAR can vary in behavioral effect. Second, when combined, some attractive and aversive odorants neutralize one another’s behavioral effects. Both a TAAR ligand and a common odorant block aversion to a predator odor, indicating that this ability is not unique to TAARs and can extend to an aversive response of potential importance to survival. In vitro testing of single receptors with binary odorant mixtures indicates that behavioral blocking can occur without receptor antagonism in the nose. Moreover, genetic ablation of a single receptor prevents its cognate ligand from blocking predator odor aversion, indicating that the blocking requires sensory input from the receptor. Together, these findings indicate that innate odor-induced behaviors can depend on context, that signals from a single receptor can block innate odor aversion, and that instinctive behavioral responses to odors can be modulated by interactions in the brain among signals derived from different receptors. PMID:27208093

  4. Cultures of preimplantation mouse embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streffer, C.; Molls, M.

    1987-01-01

    In the preimplantation mouse embryos the chromosomal damage develops through several postradiation cell cycles and mitoses. New chromosome aberrations are seen during the second and third postradiation mitoses. Also, more micronuclei appear during later postradiation interphases. This is in agreement with the assumption that unrepaired chromosomal radiation damage develops during the cell generation cycle to such a form (i.e. double-strand breaks in DNA) that chromosomal breaks occur. This proposition is strengthened by the observation that radiation-induced damage is more rapidly expressed after neutron exposure (first or second postradiation mitosis) than after exposure to X rays at the one- or two-cell stage. The preimplantation mouse embryo culture is an inviting system for additional studies at the molecular level, especially now that within the last few years more sensitive methods have been developed for study of DNA and protein structure, regulation, and synthesis. The results from these studies of cultures of preimplantation mouse embryos present a favorable case for the study of complex biological systems under very defined conditions in vitro for extrapolation to effects in vivo

  5. Mouse Models of Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Yoku; Fox, James G.; Gonda, Tamas; Worthley, Daniel L.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Wang, Timothy C.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models have greatly enriched our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of numerous types of cancers. Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, with a poor prognosis and high incidence of drug-resistance. However, most inbred strains of mice have proven resistant to gastric carcinogenesis. To establish useful models which mimic human gastric cancer phenotypes, investigators have utilized animals infected with Helicobacter species and treated with carcinogens. In addition, by exploiting genetic engineering, a variety of transgenic and knockout mouse models of gastric cancer have emerged, such as INS-GAS mice and TFF1 knockout mice. Investigators have used the combination of carcinogens and gene alteration to accelerate gastric cancer development, but rarely do mouse models show an aggressive and metastatic gastric cancer phenotype that could be relevant to preclinical studies, which may require more specific targeting of gastric progenitor cells. Here, we review current gastric carcinogenesis mouse models and provide our future perspectives on this field. PMID:24216700

  6. Noninvasive photoacoustic computed tomography of mouse brain metabolism in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Junjie; Xia, Jun; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Demchenko, Alexei V.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-01-01

    We have demonstrated the feasibility of imaging mouse brain metabolism using photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT), a fast, noninvasive and functional imaging modality with optical contrast and acoustic resolution. Brain responses to forepaw stimulations were imaged transdermally and transcranially. 2-NBDG, which diffuses well across the blood-brain-barrier, provided exogenous contrast for photoacoustic imaging of glucose response. Concurrently, hemoglobin provided endogenous contrast for photoacoustic imaging of hemodynamic response. Glucose and hemodynamic responses were quantitatively decoupled by using two-wavelength measurements. We found that glucose uptake and blood perfusion around the somatosensory region of the contralateral hemisphere were both increased by stimulations, indicating elevated neuron activity. While the glucose response area was more homogenous and confined within the somatosensory region, the hemodynamic response area had a clear vascular pattern and spread wider than the somatosensory region. Our results demonstrate that 2-NBDG-enhanced PACT is a promising tool for noninvasive studies of brain metabolism. PMID:22940116

  7. Mechanisms of protective immunity against Schistosoma mansoni infection in mice vaccinated with irradiated cercaria- I. analysis of antibody and T-lymphocyte responses in mouse strains developing differing levels of immunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, S.L.; Labine, M.; Sher, A.

    1981-01-01

    The kinetics of cellular and humoral responses directed against schistosomula were examined in mice of three inbred strains which demonstrate differences in the degree of resistance induced by immunization with irradiated cercariae. T-Cell reactivity was observed during the first 4 weeks after vaccination but declined to control levels thereafter. Anti-schistosomulum antibody was first detected 2 weeks after vaccination, peaked by 6 weeks, and persisted as late as 15 weeks. In sera obtained at 6 weeks, antibody activity was detected in affinity chromatography-purified fractions containing IgM, IgA, IgG 1 , IgG 2 /sub a/, and IgG 3 immunoglobulins. In general, the cellular and humoral responses observed in C57Bl/6J mice, which consistently developed a high level of immunity after vaccination, were not significantly different from those observed in C3H/HeJ or CBA/J mice, which achieved only low to moderate levels of immunity. Thus, although antibody production appears to correlate more closely than T lymphocyte responsiveness with the typical long-term resistance pattern observed in this model, the absence of striking differences in parasite-specific antibody levels between mice of these different strains suggests that additional mechanisms may be involved in the development of immunity after vaccination

  8. Evaluation of an in vitro toxicogenetic mouse model for hepatotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Stephanie M.; Bradford, Blair U.; Soldatow, Valerie Y.; Kosyk, Oksana; Sandot, Amelia; Witek, Rafal; Kaiser, Robert; Stewart, Todd; Amaral, Kirsten; Freeman, Kimberly; Black, Chris; LeCluyse, Edward L.; Ferguson, Stephen S.; Rusyn, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Numerous studies support the fact that a genetically diverse mouse population may be useful as an animal model to understand and predict toxicity in humans. We hypothesized that cultures of hepatocytes obtained from a large panel of inbred mouse strains can produce data indicative of inter-individual differences in in vivo responses to hepato-toxicants. In order to test this hypothesis and establish whether in vitro studies using cultured hepatocytes from genetically distinct mouse strains are feasible, we aimed to determine whether viable cells may be isolated from different mouse inbred strains, evaluate the reproducibility of cell yield, viability and functionality over subsequent isolations, and assess the utility of the model for toxicity screening. Hepatocytes were isolated from 15 strains of mice (A/J, B6C3F1, BALB/cJ, C3H/HeJ, C57BL/6J, CAST/EiJ, DBA/2J, FVB/NJ, BALB/cByJ, AKR/J, MRL/MpJ, NOD/LtJ, NZW/LacJ, PWD/PhJ and WSB/EiJ males) and cultured for up to 7 days in traditional 2-dimensional culture. Cells from B6C3F1, C57BL/6J, and NOD/LtJ strains were treated with acetaminophen, WY-14,643 or rifampin and concentration-response effects on viability and function were established. Our data suggest that high yield and viability can be achieved across a panel of strains. Cell function and expression of key liver-specific genes of hepatocytes isolated from different strains and cultured under standardized conditions are comparable. Strain-specific responses to toxicant exposure have been observed in cultured hepatocytes and these experiments open new opportunities for further developments of in vitro models of hepatotoxicity in a genetically diverse population.

  9. Genetic analysis of radiation-induced mouse thymic lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kominami, R.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Niwa, O.

    2003-01-01

    Mouse thymic lymphomas are one of the classic models of radiation-induced malignancies, and the model has been used for the study of genes involved in carcinogenesis. ras oncogenes are the first isolate which undergoes mutations in 10 to 30 % of lymphomas, and p16INK4a and p19ARF in the INK4a-ARF locus are also frequently inactivated. In our previous study, the inactivation of Ikaros, a key regurator of lymphoid system, was found in those lymphomas, and it was suggested that there are other responsible genes yet to be discovered. On the other hand, genetic predisposition to radiation-induced lymphoma often differs in different strains, and this reflects the presence of low penetrance genes that can modify the impact of a given mutation. Little study of such modifiers or susceptibility genes has been performed, either. Recent availability of databases on mouse genome information and the power of mouse genetic system underline usefulness of the lymphoma model in search for novel genes involved, which may provide clues to molecular mechanisms of development of the radiogenic lymphoma and also genes involved in human lymphomas and other malignancies. Accordingly, we have carried out positional cloning for the two different types of tumor-related genes. In this symposium, our current progress is presented that includes genetic mapping of susceptibility/ resistance loci on mouse chromosomes 4, 5 and 19, and also functional analysis of a novel tumor suppressor gene, Rit1/Bcl11b, that has been isolated from allelic loss (LOH) mapping and sequence analysis for γ -ray induced mouse thymic lymphomas

  10. Antibody Response to Serpin B13 Induces Adaptive Changes in Mouse Pancreatic Islets and Slows Down the Decline in the Residual Beta Cell Function in Children with Recent Onset of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryvalap, Yury; Lo, Chi-Wen; Manuylova, Ekaterina; Baldzizhar, Raman; Jospe, Nicholas; Czyzyk, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is characterized by a heightened antibody (Ab) response to pancreatic islet self-antigens, which is a biomarker of progressive islet pathology. We recently identified a novel antibody to clade B serpin that reduces islet-associated T cell accumulation and is linked to the delayed onset of T1D. As natural immunity to clade B arises early in life, we hypothesized that it may influence islet development during that time. To test this possibility healthy young Balb/c male mice were injected with serpin B13 mAb or IgG control and examined for the number and cellularity of pancreatic islets by immunofluorescence and FACS. Beta cell proliferation was assessed by measuring nucleotide analog 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (5-EdU) incorporation into the DNA and islet Reg gene expression was measured by real time PCR. Human studies involved measuring anti-serpin B13 autoantibodies by Luminex. We found that injecting anti-serpin B13 monoclonal Ab enhanced beta cell proliferation and Reg gene expression, induced the generation of ∼80 pancreatic islets per animal, and ultimately led to increase in the beta cell mass. These findings are relevant to human T1D because our analysis of subjects just diagnosed with T1D revealed an association between baseline anti-serpin activity and slower residual beta cell function decline in the first year after the onset of diabetes. Our findings reveal a new role for the anti-serpin immunological response in promoting adaptive changes in the endocrine pancreas and suggests that enhancement of this response could potentially help impede the progression of T1D in humans. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Utrophin Compensates dystrophin Loss during Mouse Spermatogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Hung-Chih; Chin, Yu-Feng; Lundy, David J.; Liang, Chung-Tiang; Chi, Ya-Hui; Kuo, Paolin; Hsieh, Patrick C. H.

    2017-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked genetic disorder resulting from mutations in the dystrophin gene. The mdx/utrn ?/? mouse, lacking in both dystrophin and its autosomal homologue utrophin, is commonly used to model the clinical symptoms of DMD. Interestingly, these mice are infertile but the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain unclear. Using dystrophin deficient mdx mouse and utrophin haplodeficient mdx/utrn +/? mouse models, we demonstrate the contribution of Dp427 (f...

  12. Significance of CaV3.2 T-type Ca2+ channels for pressure- and flow-dependent vasomotor responses in rat and mouse mesenteric small arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Jørn; Björling, K.; Hansen, Pernille B. Lærkegaard

    RNA was similar in WT vs. CaV3.2-/- mice. CONCLUSION: FMVD responses appear to rely on an endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization in rat small mesenteric arteries. CaV3.2 channels are negative feedback modulators of myogenic tone in small mesenteric artery in young mice. The age-dependent decline in CaV3...... in young CaV3.2-/- mice (8-15 weeks) vs. age-matched WT mice (Pyoung WT mice, the CaV3.2 blocker NiCl2 (30 µM) significantly enhanced myogenic tone (P... was not seen (N=4). In young and old CaV3.2-/- mice no effects of NiCl2 were observed. The FMVD response in rat mesenteric arteries was not blocked by L-NAME, but was almost abolished by the SKCa/IKCa channel blockers apamin/TRAM-34 (50 nM/1 µM) (P

  13. Steroid metabolism in the mouse placenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okker-Reitsma, G.H.

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of the study described in this thesis was to investigate the capacity for steroid synthesis of the mouse placenta - especially the production of progesterone, androgens and estrogens - and to determine, if possible, the relation of steroid synthesis to special cell types. In an introductory chapter the androgen production in the mouse placenta is surveyed by means of a histochemical and bioindicator study of different stages of development of the placenta. The metabolism of [ 3 H]-dehydroepiandrosterone and [ 3 H]-progesterone by mouse placental tissue in vitro is studied. The metabolism of [ 3 H]-progesterone by the mouse fetal adrenal in vitro is also studied

  14. Radioadaptive Cytoprotective Pathways in the Mouse Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanello, Susana B.; Wotring, V.; Theriot, C.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to cosmic radiation implies a risk of tissue degeneration. Radiation retinopathy is a complication of radiotherapy and exhibits common features with other retinopathies and neuropathies. Exposure to a low radiation dose elicits protective cellular events (radioadaptive response), reducing the stress of a subsequent higher dose. To assess the risk of radiation-induced retinal changes and the extent to which a small priming dose reduces this risk, we used a mouse model exposed to a source of Cs-137-gamma radiation. Gene expression profiling of retinas from non-irradiated control C57BL/6J mice (C) were compared to retinas from mice treated with a low 50 mGy dose (LD), a high 6 Gy dose (HD), and a combined treatment of 50 mGy (priming) and 6 Gy (challenge) doses (LHD). Whole retina RNA was isolated and expression analysis for selected genes performed by RTqPCR. Relevant target genes associated with cell death/survival, oxidative stress, cellular stress response and inflammation pathways, were analyzed. Cellular stress response genes were upregulated at 4 hr after the challenge dose in LHD retinas (Sirt1: 1.5 fold, Hsf1: 1.7 fold, Hspa1a: 2.5 fold; Hif1a: 1.8 fold, Bag1: 1.7). A similar trend was observed in LD animals. Most antioxidant enzymes (Hmox1, Sod2, Prdx1, Cygb, Cat1) and inflammatory mediators (NF B, Ptgs2 and Tgfb1) were upregulated in LHD and LD retinas. Expression of the pro-survival gene Bcl2 was upregulated in LD (6-fold) and LHD (4-fold) retinas. In conclusion, cytoprotective gene networks activation in the retina suggests a radioadaptive response to a priming irradiation dose, with mitigation of the deleterious effects of a subsequent high dose exposure. The enhancement of these cytoprotective mechanisms has potential value as a countermeasure to ocular alterations caused by radiation alone or in combination with other factors in spaceflight environments.

  15. Serviceberry [Amelanchier alnifolia (Nutt.) Nutt. ex. M. Roem (Rosaceae)] leaf extract inhibits mammalian α-glucosidase activity and suppresses postprandial glycemic response in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity and hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Albert J; Rimando, Agnes M; Fish, Wilbert; Mentreddy, Srinivasa R; Mathews, Suresh T

    2012-09-28

    Serviceberry or Saskatoon berry [Amelanchier alnifolia (Nutt.) Nutt. ex. M. Roem (Rosaceae)], native to the North Glacier forests of the Rocky Mountains in Montana, has been used by the Blackfeet Indian tribe in alleviation of diabetes. Anecdotally, tea made from twigs and leaves have been used for optimum health and diabetes management. However, such traditional knowledge of the medicinal properties of Amelanchier alnifolia has not been validated by scientific studies. The goal of this study was to identify potential antidiabetic mechanisms of serviceberry. Serviceberry plant samples consisting of leaves, twigs, and leaves with berries were extracted and fractionated. Ethyl acetate and water fractions were tested for inhibition of α-glucosidase activity in vitro. Diet-induced obese, hyperglycemic C57Bl6 mice were administered serviceberry leaf extract prior to sucrose-, starch-, or glucose-loading to test for α-glucosidase inhibition and decreased post-prandial glycemic response. In the course of screening for potential antidiabetic mechanisms, serviceberry leaf extracts and subfractions demonstrated potent inhibitory activity against mammalian intestinal α-glucosidase activity (EC 3.2.1.20). Further, in an animal model of diet-induced obesity and hyperglycemia, serviceberry leaf subfraction demonstrated significant inhibition of intestinal α-glucosidase activity, and delayed the absorption of carbohydrates, resulting in significant lowering of post-prandial blood glucose concentrations, similar to the antidiabetic drug Acarbose™. These findings indicating that serviceberry leaf extract may lower post-prandial glycemic response corroborate traditional knowledge of the Blackfeet Indians of Montana, and potentially offer a complementary approach in the treatment of diabetes. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  16. Fast and Reliable Mouse Picking Using Graphics Hardware

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanli Zhao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Mouse picking is the most commonly used intuitive operation to interact with 3D scenes in a variety of 3D graphics applications. High performance for such operation is necessary in order to provide users with fast responses. This paper proposes a fast and reliable mouse picking algorithm using graphics hardware for 3D triangular scenes. Our approach uses a multi-layer rendering algorithm to perform the picking operation in linear time complexity. The objectspace based ray-triangle intersection test is implemented in a highly parallelized geometry shader. After applying the hardware-supported occlusion queries, only a small number of objects (or sub-objects are rendered in subsequent layers, which accelerates the picking efficiency. Experimental results demonstrate the high performance of our novel approach. Due to its simplicity, our algorithm can be easily integrated into existing real-time rendering systems.

  17. Gain and frequency tuning within the mouse cochlear apex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oghalai, John S.; Raphael, Patrick D. [Department of Otolaryngology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Gao, Simon [Department of Otolaryngology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas (United States); Lee, Hee Yoon [Department of Otolaryngology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Groves, Andrew K. [Department of Neuroscience, Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, and Program in Developmental Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Zuo, Jian [Department of Developmental Neurobiology, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Applegate, Brian E. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas (United States)

    2015-12-31

    Normal mammalian hearing requires cochlear outer hair cell active processes that amplify the traveling wave with high gain and sharp tuning, termed cochlear amplification. We have used optical coherence tomography to study cochlear amplification within the apical turn of the mouse cochlea. We measured not only classical basilar membrane vibratory tuning curves but also vibratory responses from the rest of the tissues that compose the organ of Corti. Basilar membrane tuning was sharp in live mice and broad in dead mice, whereas other regions of the organ of Corti demonstrated phase shifts consistent with additional filtering beyond that provided by basilar membrane mechanics. We use these experimental data to support a conceptual framework of how cochlear amplification is tuned within the mouse cochlear apex. We will also study transgenic mice with targeted mutations that affect different biomechanical aspects of the organ of Corti in an effort to localize the underlying processes that produce this additional filtering.

  18. Transcriptomic profiling of trichloroethylene exposure in male mouse liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Jiang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Trichloroethylene (TCE exposure could induce hepatocellular carcinoma in mice, and occupational exposure in humans was suggested to be associated with liver cancer. To understand the role of non-genotoxic mechanism(s for TCE action, we examined the gene expression and DNA methylation changes in the liver of B6C3F1 mice orally administered with TCE for 5 days. As a beginning step, we profiled gene expression alterations induced by the TCE in mouse livers. Here we describe in detail the experimental methods, quality controls, and other information associated with our data deposited into Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO under GSE58819. Our data provide useful information for gene expression responses to TCE in mouse liver.

  19. Gain and frequency tuning within the mouse cochlear apex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oghalai, John S.; Raphael, Patrick D.; Gao, Simon; Lee, Hee Yoon; Groves, Andrew K.; Zuo, Jian; Applegate, Brian E.

    2015-01-01

    Normal mammalian hearing requires cochlear outer hair cell active processes that amplify the traveling wave with high gain and sharp tuning, termed cochlear amplification. We have used optical coherence tomography to study cochlear amplification within the apical turn of the mouse cochlea. We measured not only classical basilar membrane vibratory tuning curves but also vibratory responses from the rest of the tissues that compose the organ of Corti. Basilar membrane tuning was sharp in live mice and broad in dead mice, whereas other regions of the organ of Corti demonstrated phase shifts consistent with additional filtering beyond that provided by basilar membrane mechanics. We use these experimental data to support a conceptual framework of how cochlear amplification is tuned within the mouse cochlear apex. We will also study transgenic mice with targeted mutations that affect different biomechanical aspects of the organ of Corti in an effort to localize the underlying processes that produce this additional filtering

  20. A dose-surviving fraction curve for mouse colonic mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, S.L.; Thames, H.D. Jr.; Withers, H.R.; Mason, K.A.

    1983-01-01

    A dose-surviving fraction curve representing the response of the mouse colonic mucosa to single doses of 137 Cs gamma radiation was obtained from the results of a multifraction in vivo colony assay. Construction of the curve required an estimated of the average number of clonogens initially present per colonic crypt. The estimated clonogen count (88) was determined by a statistical method based on the use of doses per fraction common to different fractionation protocols. Parameters for the LQ and TC models of cell survival were obtained by weighted least-squares fits to the data. A comparison of the survival characteristics of cells from the mouse colonic and jejunal crypts suggested that the epithelium of the colon is less radiosensitive than that of the jejunum. (author)

  1. Therapeutic cloning in the mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mombaerts, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear transfer technology can be applied to produce autologous differentiated cells for therapeutic purposes, a concept termed therapeutic cloning. Countless articles have been published on the ethics and politics of human therapeutic cloning, reflecting the high expectations from this new opportunity for rejuvenation of the aging or diseased body. Yet the research literature on therapeutic cloning, strictly speaking, is comprised of only four articles, all in the mouse. The efficiency of derivation of embryonic stem cell lines via nuclear transfer is remarkably consistent among these reports. However, the efficiency is so low that, in its present form, the concept is unlikely to become widespread in clinical practice. PMID:12949262

  2. ATM localization and gene expression in the adult mouse eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leemput, Julia; Masson, Christel; Bigot, Karine; Errachid, Abdelmounaim; Dansault, Anouk; Provost, Alexandra; Gadin, Stéphanie; Aoufouchi, Said; Menasche, Maurice; Abitbol, Marc

    2009-01-01

    High levels of metabolism and oxygen consumption in most adult murine ocular compartments, combined with exposure to light and ultraviolet (UV) radiation, are major sources of oxidative stress, causing DNA damage in ocular cells. Of all mammalian body cells, photoreceptor cells consume the largest amount of oxygen and generate the highest levels of oxidative damage. The accumulation of such damage throughout life is a major factor of aging tissues. Several multiprotein complexes have recently been identified as the major sensors and mediators involved in the maintenance of DNA integrity. The activity of these complexes initially seemed to be restricted to dividing cells, given their ultimate role in major cell cycle checkpoints. However, it was later established that they are also active in post-mitotic cells. Recent findings demonstrate that the DNA damage response (DDR) is essential for the development, maintenance, and normal functioning of the adult central nervous system. One major molecular factor in the DDR is the protein, ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM). It is required for the rapid induction of cellular responses to DNA double-strand breaks. These cytotoxic DNA lesions may be caused by oxidative damage. To understand how ATM prevents oxidative stress and participates in the maintenance of genomic integrity and cell viability of the adult retina, we determined the ATM expression patterns and studied its localization in the adult mouse eye. Atm gene expression was analyzed by RT-PCR experiments and its localization by in situ hybridization on adult mouse ocular and cerebellar tissue sections. ATM protein expression was determined by western blot analysis of proteins homogenates extracted from several mouse tissues and its localization by immunohistochemistry experiments performed on adult mouse ocular and cerebellar tissue sections. In addition, subcellular localization was realized by confocal microscopy imaging of ocular tissue sections, with a special

  3. Increased apoptosis and DNA double-strand breaks in the embryonic mouse brain in response to very low-dose X-rays but not 50 Hz magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Shreya; Woodbine, Lisa; Haines, Jackie; Coster, Margaret; Ricket, Nicole; Barazzuol, Lara; Ainsbury, Elizabeth; Sienkiewicz, Zenon; Jeggo, Penny

    2014-01-01

    The use of X-rays for medical diagnosis is enhancing exposure to low radiation doses. Exposure to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic or magnetic fields is also increasing. Epidemiological studies show consistent associations of childhood leukaemia with exposure to magnetic fields but any causal relationship is unclear. A limitation in assessing the consequence of such exposure is the availability of sensitive assays. The embryonic neuronal stem and progenitor cell compartments are radiosensitive tissues. Using sensitive assays, we report a statistically significant increase in DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation and apoptosis in the embryonic neuronal stem cell compartment following in utero exposure to 10–200 mGy X-rays. Both endpoints show a linear response. We also show that DSB repair is delayed following exposure to doses below 50 mGy compared with 100 mGy. Thus, we demonstrate in vivo consequences of low-dose radiation. In contrast to these impacts, we did not observe any significant induction of DSBs or apoptosis following exposure to 50 Hz magnetic fields (100 or 300 µT). We conclude that any DSB induction by treatment with magnetic fields is lower than following exposure to 10 mGy X-rays. For comparison, certain procedures involving computed tomography scanning are equivalent to 1–5 mGy X-rays. PMID:25209403

  4. Increased apoptosis and DNA double-strand breaks in the embryonic mouse brain in response to very low-dose X-rays but not 50 Hz magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Shreya; Woodbine, Lisa; Haines, Jackie; Coster, Margaret; Ricket, Nicole; Barazzuol, Lara; Ainsbury, Elizabeth; Sienkiewicz, Zenon; Jeggo, Penny

    2014-11-06

    The use of X-rays for medical diagnosis is enhancing exposure to low radiation doses. Exposure to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic or magnetic fields is also increasing. Epidemiological studies show consistent associations of childhood leukaemia with exposure to magnetic fields but any causal relationship is unclear. A limitation in assessing the consequence of such exposure is the availability of sensitive assays. The embryonic neuronal stem and progenitor cell compartments are radiosensitive tissues. Using sensitive assays, we report a statistically significant increase in DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation and apoptosis in the embryonic neuronal stem cell compartment following in utero exposure to 10-200 mGy X-rays. Both endpoints show a linear response. We also show that DSB repair is delayed following exposure to doses below 50 mGy compared with 100 mGy. Thus, we demonstrate in vivo consequences of low-dose radiation. In contrast to these impacts, we did not observe any significant induction of DSBs or apoptosis following exposure to 50 Hz magnetic fields (100 or 300 µT). We conclude that any DSB induction by treatment with magnetic fields is lower than following exposure to 10 mGy X-rays. For comparison, certain procedures involving computed tomography scanning are equivalent to 1-5 mGy X-rays.

  5. Take care of your mouse!

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2011-01-01

    “Stop --- Think --- Click" is the basic recommendation for securely browsing the Internet and for securely reading e-mails. Users who have followed this recommendation in the past were less likely to have their computer infected or their computing account compromised. We would like to thank all those who donated their mouse to the CERN Animal Shelter for Computer Mice (http://cern.ch/c-a-s). For those who still use a mouse, please stay vigilant and  alert: do not click on links whose origin you do not trust or which look like gibberish. Do not install untrusted software or plug-ins, since software from untrusted sources may infect or compromise your computer, or violate copyrights. Finally, take particular care with e-mails: Do not open unexpected or suspicious e-mails or attachments. Delete them if they do not concern you or if they appear strange. If in doubt, or if you have questions, please do not hesitate to contact Computer.Security@cern.ch

  6. Noninvasive photoacoustic computed tomography of mouse brain metabolism in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Junjie; Xia, Jun; Maslov, Konstantin; Avanaki, Mohammadreza R. N.; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Demchenko, Alexei V.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    To control the overall action of the body, brain consumes a large amount of energy in proportion to its volume. In humans and many other species, the brain gets most of its energy from oxygen-dependent metabolism of glucose. An abnormal metabolic rate of glucose and/or oxygen usually reflects a diseased status of brain, such as cancer or Alzheimer's disease. We have demonstrated the feasibility of imaging mouse brain metabolism using photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT), a fast, noninvasive and functional imaging modality with optical contrast and acoustic resolution. Brain responses to forepaw stimulations were imaged transdermally and transcranially. 2-NBDG, which diffuses well across the blood-brain-barrier, provided exogenous contrast for photoacoustic imaging of glucose response. Concurrently, hemoglobin provided endogenous contrast for photoacoustic imaging of hemodynamic response. Glucose and hemodynamic responses were quantitatively unmixed by using two-wavelength measurements. We found that glucose uptake and blood perfusion around the somatosensory region of the contralateral hemisphere were both increased by stimulations, indicating elevated neuron activity. The glucose response amplitude was about half that of the hemodynamic response. While the glucose response area was more homogenous and confined within the somatosensory region, the hemodynamic response area showed a clear vascular pattern and spread about twice as wide as that of the glucose response. The PACT of mouse brain metabolism was validated by high-resolution open-scalp OR-PAM and fluorescence imaging. Our results demonstrate that 2-NBDG-enhanced PACT is a promising tool for noninvasive studies of brain metabolism.

  7. Towards mouse models of perseveration: a heritable component in extinction of operant behavior in fourteen standard and recombinant inbred mouse lines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malkki, H.A.I.; Donga, L.A.B.; de Groot, S.E.; Brussaard, A.B.; Borst, J.G.G.; Elgersma, J.W.; Galjart, N.; van der Horst, G.T.; Levelt, C.N.; Pennartz, C.M.A.; Smit, A.B.; Spruijt, B.M.; Verhage, M.; de Zeeuw, C.I.; Battaglia, F.P.

    2011-01-01

    Extinction of instrumental responses is an essential skill for adaptive behavior such as foraging. So far, only few studies have focused on extinction following appetitive conditioning in mice. We studied extinction of appetitive operant lever-press behavior in six standard inbred mouse strains

  8. The wobbler mouse, an ALS animal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moser, Jakob Maximilian; Bigini, Paolo; Schmitt-John, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This review article is focused on the research progress made utilizing the wobbler mouse as animal model for human motor neuron diseases, especially the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The wobbler mouse develops progressive degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons and shows striking...

  9. Mouse adenovirus type 1 infection of macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashley, S.L.; Welton, A.R.; Harwood, K.M.; Rooijen, van N.; Spindler, K.R.

    2009-01-01

    Mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1) causes acute and persistent infections in mice, with high levels of virus found in the brain, spinal cord and spleen in acute infections. MAV-1 infects endothelial cells throughout the mouse, and monocytes/macrophages have also been implicated as targets of the virus.

  10. Induction of a robust immune response against avian influenza virus following transdermal inoculation with H5-DNA vaccine formulated in modified dendrimer-based delivery system in mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadoran, Azadeh; Ebrahimi, Mehdi; Yeap, Swee Keong; Safi, Nikoo; Moeini, Hassan; Hair-Bejo, Mohd; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Omar, Abdul Rahman

    2017-01-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the immunogenicity of recombinant plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), pBud-H5-green fluorescent protein (GFP)-interferon-regulatory factor (IRF)3 following delivery using polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer and transactivator of transcription (TAT)-conjugated PAMAM dendrimer as well as the effect of IRF3 as the genetic adjuvant. BALB/c mice were vaccinated transdermally with pBud-H5-GFP, PAMAM/pBud-H5-GFP, TAT-PAMAM/pBud-H5-GFP, and TAT-PAMAM/pBud-H5-GFP-IRF3. The expression analysis of H5 gene from the blood by using quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction confirmed the ability of PAMAM dendrimer as a carrier for gene delivery, as well as the ability of TAT peptide to enhance the delivery efficiency of PAMAM dendrimer. Mice immunized with modified PAMAM by TAT peptide showed higher hemagglutination inhibition titer, and larger CD3 + /CD4 + T cells and CD3 + /CD8 + T cells population, as well as the production of cytokines, namely, interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-2, IL-15, IL-12, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α compared with those immunized with native PAMAM. These results suggest that the function of TAT peptide as a cell-penetrating peptide is able to enhance the gene delivery, which results in rapid distribution of H5 in the tissues of the immunized mice. Furthermore, pBud-H5-GFP co-expressing IRF3 as a genetic adjuvant demonstrated the highest hemagglutination inhibition titer besides larger CD3 + /CD4 + and CD3 + /CD8 + T cells population, and strong Th1-like cytokine responses among all the systems tested. In conclusion, TAT-PAMAM dendrimer-based delivery system with IRF3 as a genetic adjuvant is an attractive transdermal DNA vaccine delivery system utilized to evaluate the efficacy of the developed DNA vaccine in inducing protection during challenge with virulent H5N1 virus.

  11. DNA repair in spermatocytes and spermatids of the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sega, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    When male mice are exposed to chemical agents that reach the germ cells several outcomes are possible in terms of the germ cell unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) response and removal of DNA adducts. It is possible that: the chemical binds to the DNA and induces a UDS response with concomittant removal of DNA adducts; the chemical binds to the DNA but no UDS response is induced; or the chemical does not bind to DNA and no UDS is induced. Many mutagens have been shown to induce a UDS response in postgonial germ cell stages of the male mouse up through midspermatids, but the relationship between this UDS and the repair of genetic damage within the germ cells is still unknown. While some mutagens appear to have an effect only in germ-cell stages where no UDS occurs, others are able to induce genetic damage in stages where UDS has been induced

  12. Senescent mouse cells fail to overtly regulate the HIRA histone chaperone and do not form robust Senescence Associated Heterochromatin Foci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enders Greg H

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular senescence is a permanent growth arrest that occurs in response to cellular stressors, such as telomere shortening or activation of oncogenes. Although the process of senescence growth arrest is somewhat conserved between mouse and human cells, there are some critical differences in the molecular pathways of senescence between these two species. Recent studies in human fibroblasts have defined a cell signaling pathway that is initiated by repression of a specific Wnt ligand, Wnt2. This, in turn, activates a histone chaperone HIRA, and culminates in formation of specialized punctate domains of facultative heterochromatin, called Senescence-Associated Heterochromatin Foci (SAHF, that are enriched in the histone variant, macroH2A. SAHF are thought to repress expression of proliferation-promoting genes, thereby contributing to senescence-associated proliferation arrest. We asked whether this Wnt2-HIRA-SAHF pathway is conserved in mouse fibroblasts. Results We show that mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs and mouse skin fibroblasts, do not form robust punctate SAHF in response to an activated Ras oncogene or shortened telomeres. However, senescent MEFs do exhibit elevated levels of macroH2A staining throughout the nucleus as a whole. Consistent with their failure to fully activate the SAHF assembly pathway, the Wnt2-HIRA signaling axis is not overtly regulated between proliferating and senescent mouse cells. Conclusions In addition to the previously defined differences between mouse and human cells in the mechanisms and phenotypes associated with senescence, we conclude that senescent mouse and human fibroblasts also differ at the level of chromatin and the signaling pathways used to regulate chromatin. These differences between human and mouse senescence may contribute to the increased propensity of mouse fibroblasts (and perhaps other mouse cell types to become immortalized and transformed, compared to human cells.

  13. Nonspecific airway reactivity in a mouse model of asthma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collie, D.D.; Wilder, J.A.; Bice, D.E.

    1995-12-01

    Animal models are indispensable for studies requiring an intact immune system, especially for studying the pathogenic mechanisms in atopic diseases, regulation of IgE production, and related biologic effects. Mice are particularly suitable and have been used extensively for such studies because their immune system is well characterized. Further, large numbers of mutants or inbred strains of mice are available that express deficiencies of individual immunologic processes, inflammatory cells, or mediator systems. By comparing reactions in such mice with appropriate control animals, the unique roles of individual cells or mediators may be characterized more precisely in the pathogenesis of atopic respiratory diseases including asthma. However, given that asthma in humans is characterized by the presence of airway hyperresponsiveness to specific and nonspecific stimuli, it is important that animal models of this disease exhibit similar physiologic abnormalities. In the past, the size of the mouse has limited its versatility in this regard. However, recent studies indicate the feasibility of measuring pulmonary responses in living mice, thus facilitating the physiologic evaluation of putative mouse models of human asthma that have been well charcterized at the immunologic and patholigic level. Future work will provide details of the morphometry of the methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction and will further seek to determine the relationship between cigarette smoke exposure and the development of NS-AHR in the transgenic mouse model.

  14. Female presence and estrous state influence mouse ultrasonic courtship vocalizations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L Hanson

    Full Text Available The laboratory mouse is an emerging model for context-dependent vocal signaling and reception. Mouse ultrasonic vocalizations are robustly produced in social contexts. In adults, male vocalization during courtship has become a model of interest for signal-receiver interactions. These vocalizations can be grouped into syllable types that are consistently produced by different subspecies and strains of mice. Vocalizations are unique to individuals, vary across development, and depend on social housing conditions. The behavioral significance of different syllable types, including the contexts in which different vocalizations are made and the responses listeners have to different types of vocalizations, is not well understood. We examined the effect of female presence and estrous state on male vocalizations by exploring the use of syllable types and the parameters of syllables during courtship. We also explored correlations between vocalizations and other behaviors. These experimental manipulations produced four main findings: 1 vocalizations varied among males, 2 the production of USVs and an increase in the use of a specific syllable type were temporally related to mounting behavior, 3 the frequency (kHz, bandwidth, and duration of syllables produced by males were influenced by the estrous phase of female partners, and 4 syllable types changed when females were removed. These findings show that mouse ultrasonic courtship vocalizations are sensitive to changes in female phase and presence, further demonstrating the context-sensitivity of these calls.

  15. Precise and in situ genetic humanization of 6 Mb of mouse immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Lynn E; Karow, Margaret; Stevens, Sean; Auerbach, Wojtek; Poueymirou, William T; Yasenchak, Jason; Frendewey, David; Valenzuela, David M; Giallourakis, Cosmas C; Alt, Frederick W; Yancopoulos, George D; Murphy, Andrew J

    2014-04-08

    Genetic humanization, which involves replacing mouse genes with their human counterparts, can create powerful animal models for the study of human genes and diseases. One important example of genetic humanization involves mice humanized for their Ig genes, allowing for human antibody responses within a mouse background (HumAb mice) and also providing a valuable platform for the generation of fully human antibodies as therapeutics. However, existing HumAb mice do not have fully functional immune systems, perhaps because of the manner in which they were genetically humanized. Heretofore, most genetic humanizations have involved disruption of the endogenous mouse gene with simultaneous introduction of a human transgene at a new and random location (so-called KO-plus-transgenic humanization). More recent efforts have attempted to replace mouse genes with their human counterparts at the same genetic location (in situ humanization), but such efforts involved laborious procedures and were limited in size and precision. We describe a general and efficient method for very large, in situ, and precise genetic humanization using large compound bacterial artificial chromosome-based targeting vectors introduced into mouse ES cells. We applied this method to genetically humanize 3-Mb segments of both the mouse heavy and κ light chain Ig loci, by far the largest genetic humanizations ever described. This paper provides a detailed description of our genetic humanization approach, and the companion paper reports that the humoral immune systems of mice bearing these genetically humanized loci function as efficiently as those of WT mice.

  16. Mouse ENU Mutagenesis to Understand Immunity to Infection: Methods, Selected Examples, and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégory Caignard

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Infectious diseases are responsible for over 25% of deaths globally, but many more individuals are exposed to deadly pathogens. The outcome of infection results from a set of diverse factors including pathogen virulence factors, the environment, and the genetic make-up of the host. The completion of the human reference genome sequence in 2004 along with technological advances have tremendously accelerated and renovated the tools to study the genetic etiology of infectious diseases in humans and its best characterized mammalian model, the mouse. Advancements in mouse genomic resources have accelerated genome-wide functional approaches, such as gene-driven and phenotype-driven mutagenesis, bringing to the fore the use of mouse models that reproduce accurately many aspects of the pathogenesis of human infectious diseases. Treatment with the mutagen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU has become the most popular phenotype-driven approach. Our team and others have employed mouse ENU mutagenesis to identify host genes that directly impact susceptibility to pathogens of global significance. In this review, we first describe the strategies and tools used in mouse genetics to understand immunity to infection with special emphasis on chemical mutagenesis of the mouse germ-line together with current strategies to efficiently identify functional mutations using next generation sequencing. Then, we highlight illustrative examples of genes, proteins, and cellular signatures that have been revealed by ENU screens and have been shown to be involved in susceptibility or resistance to infectious diseases caused by parasites, bacteria, and viruses.

  17. Olfaction in three genetic and two MPTP-induced Parkinson's disease mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Kurtenbach

    Full Text Available Various genetic or toxin-induced mouse models are frequently used for investigation of early PD pathology. Although olfactory impairment is known to precede motor symptoms by years, it is not known whether it is caused by impairments in the brain, the olfactory epithelium, or both. In this study, we investigated the olfactory function in three genetic Parkinson's disease (PD mouse models and mice treated with MPTP intraperitoneally and intranasally. To investigate olfactory function, we performed electro-olfactogram recordings (EOGs and an olfactory behavior test (cookie-finding test. We show that neither a parkin knockout mouse strain, nor intraperitoneal MPTP treated animals display any olfactory impairment in EOG recordings and the applied behavior test. We also found no difference in the responses of the olfactory epithelium to odorants in a mouse strain over-expressing doubly mutated α-synuclein, while this mouse strain was not suitable to test olfaction in a cookie-finding test as it displays a mobility impairment. A transgenic mouse expressing mutated α-synuclein in dopaminergic neurons performed equal to control animals in the cookie-finding test. Further we show that intranasal MPTP application can cause functional damage of the olfactory epithelium.

  18. Low-cost computer mouse for the elderly or disabled in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C-C; Chen, W-L; Chen, B-N; Shih, Y-Y; Lai, J-S; Chen, Y-L

    2014-01-01

    A mouse is an important communication interface between a human and a computer, but it is still difficult to use for the elderly or disabled. To develop a low-cost computer mouse auxiliary tool. The principal structure of the low-cost mouse auxiliary tool is the IR (infrared ray) array module and the Wii icon sensor module, which combine with reflective tape and the SQL Server database. This has several benefits including cheap hardware cost, fluent control, prompt response, adaptive adjustment and portability. Also, it carries the game module with the function of training and evaluation; to the trainee, it is really helpful to upgrade the sensitivity of consciousness/sense and the centralization of attention. The intervention phase/maintenance phase, with regard to clicking accuracy and use of time, p value (p< 0.05) reach the level of significance. The development of the low cost adaptive computer mouse auxiliary tool was completed during the study and was also verified as having the characteristics of low cost, easy operation and the adaptability. To patients with physical disabilities, if they have independent control action parts of their limbs, the mouse auxiliary tool is suitable for them to use, i.e. the user only needs to paste the reflective tape by the independent control action parts of the body to operate the mouse auxiliary tool.

  19. Radiosensitivity of mouse germ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Yoichi; Takeuchi, Toyoko; Maemori, Mamiko; Seki, Naohiko; Tobari, Izuo

    1991-01-01

    To estimate radiosensitivity of mouse germ cells the analysis of chromosome aberrations was performed at diakinesis-metaphase I of spermatocytes and first-cleavage metaphase of one-cell embryos after exposure to radiations at various stages of primary spermatocytes and spermatids. The result provided evidence that there are two major types of DNA damage in X-irradiated sperm : (1) short-lived DNA lesions ; the lesions are subject to repair inhibition by agents added in G 1 , and are converted into chromosome-type aberrations during G 1 , and (2) long-lived DNA lesions ; the lesions persist until S phase and repair of the lesions is inhibited by caffeine, hydroxyurea and arabinofuranosyl cytosine in G 2 . The characteristic of X-ray damage induced in spermiogenic stage and repair mechanism for the damage in the fertilized egg were discussed comparing with the results with two chemicals, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and mitomycin C (MMC). (J.P.N.)

  20. Late effects of irradiation in mouse jejunum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynaud, A.; Travis, E.L.

    1984-01-01

    The response of mouse jejunum at intervals up to 1 year after single 'priming' doses of X-rays has been assessed by crypt survival after retreatment with single doses of X-rays and morphometric analysis of changes in the intestinal submucosa. The crypt dose-survival curves in mice re-irradiated at 2, 6, or 12 months after priming irradiation were displaced to higher doses in pre-treated than in non-pre-treated mice and were characterized by higher D 0 values. Misonidazole given before the test exposure reversed this effect so that the dose survival curve for crypts in pre-treated mice were superimposed on that for mice not previously irradiated, suggesting that the increase in isoeffect dose and the change in the D 0 in previously exposed mice was due to crypt hypoxia. Quantifications of the area of the submucosa showed that its area was increased at all three times after the priming doses and was a result of collagen deposition and oedema. Thus, the hypoxia in the crypts was probably secondary to these changes. Deaths began at 6-7 months after priming irradiation and were due to intestinal obstruction and stenosis. Thus, as in other tissues, two phases of injury can be assayed in the intestine of experimental animals. (author)