WorldWideScience

Sample records for mouse comparative sequencing

  1. Comparative analysis of protein coding sequences from human, mouse and the domesticated pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Frank Grønlund; Hobolth, Asger; Hornshøj, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    Background: The availability of abundant sequence data from key model organisms has made large scale studies of mulecular evolution an exciting possibility. Here we use full length cDNA alignments comprising more than 700,000 nucleotides from human, mouse, pig and the Japanese pufferfish Fugu rub...... rubrices in order to investigate 1) the relationships between three major lineages of mammals: rodents, artiodactys and primates, and 2) the rate of evolution and the occurrence of positive Darwinian selection using codon based models of sequence evolution. Results: We provide evidence...

  2. High-resolution comparative mapping among man, cattle and mouse suggests a role for repeat sequences in mammalian genome evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolphe François

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative mapping provides new insights into the evolutionary history of genomes. In particular, recent studies in mammals have suggested a role for segmental duplication in genome evolution. In some species such as Drosophila or maize, transposable elements (TEs have been shown to be involved in chromosomal rearrangements. In this work, we have explored the presence of interspersed repeats in regions of chromosomal rearrangements, using an updated high-resolution integrated comparative map among cattle, man and mouse. Results The bovine, human and mouse comparative autosomal map has been constructed using data from bovine genetic and physical maps and from FISH-mapping studies. We confirm most previous results but also reveal some discrepancies. A total of 211 conserved segments have been identified between cattle and man, of which 33 are new segments and 72 correspond to extended, previously known segments. The resulting map covers 91% and 90% of the human and bovine genomes, respectively. Analysis of breakpoint regions revealed a high density of species-specific interspersed repeats in the human and mouse genomes. Conclusion Analysis of the breakpoint regions has revealed specific repeat density patterns, suggesting that TEs may have played a significant role in chromosome evolution and genome plasticity. However, we cannot rule out that repeats and breakpoints accumulate independently in the few same regions where modifications are better tolerated. Likewise, we cannot ascertain whether increased TE density is the cause or the consequence of chromosome rearrangements. Nevertheless, the identification of high density repeat clusters combined with a well-documented repeat phylogeny should highlight probable breakpoints, and permit their precise dating. Combining new statistical models taking the present information into account should help reconstruct ancestral karyotypes.

  3. End Sequencing and Finger Printing of Human & Mouse BAC Libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, C

    2005-09-27

    This project provided for continued end sequencing of existing and new BAC libraries constructed to support human sequencing as well as to initiate BAC end sequencing from the mouse BAC libraries constructed to support mouse sequencing. The clones, the sequences, and the fingerprints are now an available resource for the community at large. Research and development of new metaodologies for BAC end sequencing have reduced costs and increase throughput.

  4. Nuclear RNA sequencing of the mouse erythroid cell transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Mitchell

    Full Text Available In addition to protein coding genes a substantial proportion of mammalian genomes are transcribed. However, most transcriptome studies investigate steady-state mRNA levels, ignoring a considerable fraction of the transcribed genome. In addition, steady-state mRNA levels are influenced by both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms, and thus do not provide a clear picture of transcriptional output. Here, using deep sequencing of nuclear RNAs (nucRNA-Seq in parallel with chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq of active RNA polymerase II, we compared the nuclear transcriptome of mouse anemic spleen erythroid cells with polymerase occupancy on a genome-wide scale. We demonstrate that unspliced transcripts quantified by nucRNA-seq correlate with primary transcript frequencies measured by RNA FISH, but differ from steady-state mRNA levels measured by poly(A-enriched RNA-seq. Highly expressed protein coding genes showed good correlation between RNAPII occupancy and transcriptional output; however, genome-wide we observed a poor correlation between transcriptional output and RNAPII association. This poor correlation is due to intergenic regions associated with RNAPII which correspond with transcription factor bound regulatory regions and a group of stable, nuclear-retained long non-coding transcripts. In conclusion, sequencing the nuclear transcriptome provides an opportunity to investigate the transcriptional landscape in a given cell type through quantification of unspliced primary transcripts and the identification of nuclear-retained long non-coding RNAs.

  5. Sequencing and comparing whole mitochondrial genomes ofanimals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boore, Jeffrey L.; Macey, J. Robert; Medina, Monica

    2005-04-22

    Comparing complete animal mitochondrial genome sequences is becoming increasingly common for phylogenetic reconstruction and as a model for genome evolution. Not only are they much more informative than shorter sequences of individual genes for inferring evolutionary relatedness, but these data also provide sets of genome-level characters, such as the relative arrangements of genes, that can be especially powerful. We describe here the protocols commonly used for physically isolating mtDNA, for amplifying these by PCR or RCA, for cloning,sequencing, assembly, validation, and gene annotation, and for comparing both sequences and gene arrangements. On several topics, we offer general observations based on our experiences to date with determining and comparing complete mtDNA sequences.

  6. eShadow: A tool for comparing closely related sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovcharenko, Ivan; Boffelli, Dario; Loots, Gabriela G.

    2004-01-15

    Primate sequence comparisons are difficult to interpret due to the high degree of sequence similarity shared between such closely related species. Recently, a novel method, phylogenetic shadowing, has been pioneered for predicting functional elements in the human genome through the analysis of multiple primate sequence alignments. We have expanded this theoretical approach to create a computational tool, eShadow, for the identification of elements under selective pressure in multiple sequence alignments of closely related genomes, such as in comparisons of human to primate or mouse to rat DNA. This tool integrates two different statistical methods and allows for the dynamic visualization of the resulting conservation profile. eShadow also includes a versatile optimization module capable of training the underlying Hidden Markov Model to differentially predict functional sequences. This module grants the tool high flexibility in the analysis of multiple sequence alignments and in comparing sequences with different divergence rates. Here, we describe the eShadow comparative tool and its potential uses for analyzing both multiple nucleotide and protein alignments to predict putative functional elements. The eShadow tool is publicly available at http://eshadow.dcode.org/

  7. A comparative evaluation of sequence classification programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazinet Adam L

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A fundamental problem in modern genomics is to taxonomically or functionally classify DNA sequence fragments derived from environmental sampling (i.e., metagenomics. Several different methods have been proposed for doing this effectively and efficiently, and many have been implemented in software. In addition to varying their basic algorithmic approach to classification, some methods screen sequence reads for ’barcoding genes’ like 16S rRNA, or various types of protein-coding genes. Due to the sheer number and complexity of methods, it can be difficult for a researcher to choose one that is well-suited for a particular analysis. Results We divided the very large number of programs that have been released in recent years for solving the sequence classification problem into three main categories based on the general algorithm they use to compare a query sequence against a database of sequences. We also evaluated the performance of the leading programs in each category on data sets whose taxonomic and functional composition is known. Conclusions We found significant variability in classification accuracy, precision, and resource consumption of sequence classification programs when used to analyze various metagenomics data sets. However, we observe some general trends and patterns that will be useful to researchers who use sequence classification programs.

  8. Supplementary data: Comparative studies on sequence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Page 1. Supplementary data: Comparative studies on sequence characteristics around translation initiation codon in four eukaryotes. Qingpo Liu and Qingzhong Xue. J. Genet. 84, 317–322. Table 1. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients of 39 base positions around the AUG codon in the four eukaryotic species studied.

  9. Genome-wide comparative analysis reveals human-mouse regulatory landscape and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denas, Olgert; Sandstrom, Richard; Cheng, Yong; Beal, Kathryn; Herrero, Javier; Hardison, Ross C; Taylor, James

    2015-02-14

    Because species-specific gene expression is driven by species-specific regulation, understanding the relationship between sequence and function of the regulatory regions in different species will help elucidate how differences among species arise. Despite active experimental and computational research, relationships among sequence, conservation, and function are still poorly understood. We compared transcription factor occupied segments (TFos) for 116 human and 35 mouse TFs in 546 human and 125 mouse cell types and tissues from the Human and the Mouse ENCODE projects. We based the map between human and mouse TFos on a one-to-one nucleotide cross-species mapper, bnMapper, that utilizes whole genome alignments (WGA). Our analysis shows that TFos are under evolutionary constraint, but a substantial portion (25.1% of mouse and 25.85% of human on average) of the TFos does not have a homologous sequence on the other species; this portion varies among cell types and TFs. Furthermore, 47.67% and 57.01% of the homologous TFos sequence shows binding activity on the other species for human and mouse respectively. However, 79.87% and 69.22% is repurposed such that it binds the same TF in different cells or different TFs in the same cells. Remarkably, within the set of repurposed TFos, the corresponding genome regions in the other species are preferred locations of novel TFos. These events suggest exaptation of some functional regulatory sequences into new function. Despite TFos repurposing, we did not find substantial changes in their predicted target genes, suggesting that CRMs buffer evolutionary events allowing little or no change in the TFos - target gene associations. Thus, the small portion of TFos with strictly conserved occupancy underestimates the degree of conservation of regulatory interactions. We mapped regulatory sequences from an extensive number of TFs and cell types between human and mouse using WGA. A comparative analysis of this correspondence unveiled the

  10. Sequence and chromosomal localization of the mouse brevican gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rauch, U; Meyer, H; Brakebusch, C

    1997-01-01

    Brevican is a brain-specific proteoglycan belonging to the aggrecan family. Phage clones containing the complete mouse brevican open reading frame of 2649 bp and the complete 3'-untranslated region of 341 bp were isolated from a mouse brain cDNA library, and cosmid clones containing the mouse...

  11. Comparative analysis of sequences from PT 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Susie Sommer

    Sheatfish and not EHNV. Generally, mistakes occurred at the ends of the sequences. This can be due to several factors. One is that the sequence has not been trimmed of the sequence primer sites. Another is the lack of quality control of the chromatogram. Finally, sequencing in just one direction can result...... diseases in Europe. As part of the EURL proficiency test for fish diseases it is required to sequence any RANA virus isolates found in any of the samples. It is also highly recommended to sequence the ISA virus to determine whether it be HPRΔ or HPR0. Furthermore, it is recommended that any VHSV and IHNV...... isolates be genotyped. As part of the evaluation of the proficiency results it was decided this year to look into the quality and similarity of the sequence results for selected viruses. Ampoule III in the proficiency test 2013 contained an EHNV isolate. The EURL received 43 sequences from 41 laboratories...

  12. Mouse tetranectin: cDNA sequence, tissue-specific expression, and chromosomal mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibaraki, K; Kozak, C A; Wewer, U M

    1995-01-01

    regulation, mouse tetranectin cDNA was cloned from a 16-day-old mouse embryo library. Sequence analysis revealed a 992-bp cDNA with an open reading frame of 606 bp, which is identical in length to the human tetranectin cDNA. The deduced amino acid sequence showed high homology to the human cDNA with 76......(s) of tetranectin. The sequence analysis revealed a difference in both sequence and size of the noncoding regions between mouse and human cDNAs. Northern analysis of the various tissues from mouse, rat, and cow showed the major transcript(s) to be approximately 1 kb, which is similar in size to that observed...

  13. Comparative genomics beyond sequence-based alignments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Þórarinsson, Elfar; Yao, Zizhen; Wiklund, Eric D.

    2008-01-01

    Recent computational scans for non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) in multiple organisms have relied on existing multiple sequence alignments. However, as sequence similarity drops, a key signal of RNA structure--frequent compensating base changes--is increasingly likely to cause sequence-based alignment me...

  14. An evaluation of Comparative Genome Sequencing (CGS by comparing two previously-sequenced bacterial genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herring Christopher D

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the development of new technology, it has recently become practical to resequence the genome of a bacterium after experimental manipulation. It is critical though to know the accuracy of the technique used, and to establish confidence that all of the mutations were detected. Results In order to evaluate the accuracy of genome resequencing using the microarray-based Comparative Genome Sequencing service provided by Nimblegen Systems Inc., we resequenced the E. coli strain W3110 Kohara using MG1655 as a reference, both of which have been completely sequenced using traditional sequencing methods. CGS detected 7 of 8 small sequence differences, one large deletion, and 9 of 12 IS element insertions present in W3110, but did not detect a large chromosomal inversion. In addition, we confirmed that CGS also detected 2 SNPs, one deletion and 7 IS element insertions that are not present in the genome sequence, which we attribute to changes that occurred after the creation of the W3110 lambda clone library. The false positive rate for SNPs was one per 244 Kb of genome sequence. Conclusion CGS is an effective way to detect multiple mutations present in one bacterium relative to another, and while highly cost-effective, is prone to certain errors. Mutations occurring in repeated sequences or in sequences with a high degree of secondary structure may go undetected. It is also critical to follow up on regions of interest in which SNPs were not called because they often indicate deletions or IS element insertions.

  15. Genome-wide identification of coding and non-coding conserved sequence tags in human and mouse genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggi Giorgio P

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The accurate detection of genes and the identification of functional regions is still an open issue in the annotation of genomic sequences. This problem affects new genomes but also those of very well studied organisms such as human and mouse where, despite the great efforts, the inventory of genes and regulatory regions is far from complete. Comparative genomics is an effective approach to address this problem. Unfortunately it is limited by the computational requirements needed to perform genome-wide comparisons and by the problem of discriminating between conserved coding and non-coding sequences. This discrimination is often based (thus dependent on the availability of annotated proteins. Results In this paper we present the results of a comprehensive comparison of human and mouse genomes performed with a new high throughput grid-based system which allows the rapid detection of conserved sequences and accurate assessment of their coding potential. By detecting clusters of coding conserved sequences the system is also suitable to accurately identify potential gene loci. Following this analysis we created a collection of human-mouse conserved sequence tags and carefully compared our results to reliable annotations in order to benchmark the reliability of our classifications. Strikingly we were able to detect several potential gene loci supported by EST sequences but not corresponding to as yet annotated genes. Conclusion Here we present a new system which allows comprehensive comparison of genomes to detect conserved coding and non-coding sequences and the identification of potential gene loci. Our system does not require the availability of any annotated sequence thus is suitable for the analysis of new or poorly annotated genomes.

  16. Systematic Analysis of Long Noncoding RNAs in the Senescence-accelerated Mouse Prone 8 Brain Using RNA Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs may play an important role in Alzheimer's disease (AD pathogenesis. However, despite considerable research in this area, the comprehensive and systematic understanding of lncRNAs in AD is still limited. The emergence of RNA sequencing provides a predictor and has incomparable advantage compared with other methods, including microarray. In this study, we identified lncRNAs in a 7-month-old mouse brain through deep RNA sequencing using the senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8 and senescence-accelerated mouse resistant 1 (SAMR1 models. A total of 599,985,802 clean reads and 23,334 lncRNA transcripts were obtained. Then, we identified 97 significantly upregulated and 114 significantly downregulated lncRNA transcripts from all cases in SAMP8 mice relative to SAMR1 mice. Gene ontology (GO and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analyses revealed that these significantly dysregulated lncRNAs were involved in regulating the development of AD from various angles, such as nerve growth factor term (GO: 1990089, mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway, and AD pathway. Furthermore, the most probable AD-associated lncRNAs were predicted and listed in detail. Our study provided the systematic dissection of lncRNA profiling in SAMP8 mouse brain and accelerated the development of lncRNA biomarkers in AD. These attracting biomarkers could provide significant insights into AD therapy in the future.

  17. Comparative sequence analyses of genome and transcriptome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-12-04

    Dec 4, 2015 ... 2011), unique vocal communication. (Payne 2003; Nair et al. ... induction of apoptosis when compared to human cells. In this study, we have .... based on calculated Pearson correlation and displayed based on centroid of the ...

  18. Establishing a framework for comparative analysis of genome sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bansal, A.K.

    1995-06-01

    This paper describes a framework and a high-level language toolkit for comparative analysis of genome sequence alignment The framework integrates the information derived from multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree (hypothetical tree of evolution) to derive new properties about sequences. Multiple sequence alignments are treated as an abstract data type. Abstract operations have been described to manipulate a multiple sequence alignment and to derive mutation related information from a phylogenetic tree by superimposing parsimonious analysis. The framework has been applied on protein alignments to derive constrained columns (in a multiple sequence alignment) that exhibit evolutionary pressure to preserve a common property in a column despite mutation. A Prolog toolkit based on the framework has been implemented and demonstrated on alignments containing 3000 sequences and 3904 columns.

  19. Functional role of a highly repetitive DNA sequence in anchorage of the mouse genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuer-Nitsche, B; Lu, X N; Werner, D

    1988-09-12

    The major portion of the eukaryotic genome consists of various categories of repetitive DNA sequences which have been studied with respect to their base compositions, organizations, copy numbers, transcription and species specificities; their biological roles, however, are still unclear. A novel quality of a highly repetitive mouse DNA sequence is described which points to a functional role: All copies (approximately 50,000 per haploid genome) of this DNA sequence reside on genomic Alu I DNA fragments each associated with nuclear polypeptides that are not released from DNA by proteinase K, SDS and phenol extraction. By this quality the repetitive DNA sequence is classified as a member of the sub-set of DNA sequences involved in tight DNA-polypeptide complexes which have been previously shown to be components of the subnuclear structure termed 'nuclear matrix'. From these results it has to be concluded that the repetitive DNA sequence characterized in this report represents or comprises a signal for a large number of site specific attachment points of the mouse genome in the nuclear matrix.

  20. Sequence relationships between the genome and the intracellular RNA species 1,3,6 and 7 of mouse hepatitis virus strain A59

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Spaan, W.J.M.; Rottier, P.J.M.; Zeijst, B.A.M. van der

    1982-01-01

    We have shown by T1 oligonucleotide fingerprinting that the genome of mouse hepatitis virus strain A59 and its intracellular RNA 1 have identical fingerprints and that RNA 1 and the subgenomic RNAs 3, 6, and 7 contain common sequences. To localize the homologous region between the RNAs, we compared

  1. Swallow Event Sequencing: Comparing Healthy Older and Younger Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzberg, Erica G; Lazarus, Cathy L; Steele, Catriona M; Molfenter, Sonja M

    2018-04-23

    Previous research has established that a great deal of variation exists in the temporal sequence of swallowing events for healthy adults. Yet, the impact of aging on swallow event sequence is not well understood. Kendall et al. (Dysphagia 18(2):85-91, 2003) suggested there are 4 obligatory paired-event sequences in swallowing. We directly compared adherence to these sequences, as well as event latencies, and quantified the percentage of unique sequences in two samples of healthy adults: young ( 65). The 8 swallowing events that contribute to the sequences were reliably identified from videofluoroscopy in a sample of 23 healthy seniors (10 male, mean age 74.7) and 20 healthy young adults (10 male, mean age 31.5) with no evidence of penetration-aspiration or post-swallow residue. Chi-square analyses compared the proportions of obligatory pairs and unique sequences by age group. Compared to the older subjects, younger subjects had significantly lower adherence to two obligatory sequences: Upper Esophageal Sphincter (UES) opening occurs before (or simultaneous with) the bolus arriving at the UES and UES maximum distention occurs before maximum pharyngeal constriction. The associated latencies were significantly different between age groups as well. Further, significantly fewer unique swallow sequences were observed in the older group (61%) compared with the young (82%) (χ 2  = 31.8; p < 0.001). Our findings suggest that paired swallow event sequences may not be robust across the age continuum and that variation in swallow sequences appears to decrease with aging. These findings provide normative references for comparisons to older individuals with dysphagia.

  2. Accurate quantification of mouse mitochondrial DNA without co-amplification of nuclear mitochondrial insertion sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Afshan N; Czajka, Anna; Cunningham, Phil

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondria contain an extra-nuclear genome in the form of mitochondrial DNA (MtDNA), damage to which can lead to inflammation and bioenergetic deficit. Changes in MtDNA levels are increasingly used as a biomarker of mitochondrial dysfunction. We previously reported that in humans, fragments in the nuclear genome known as nuclear mitochondrial insertion sequences (NumtS) affect accurate quantification of MtDNA. In the current paper our aim was to determine whether mouse NumtS affect the quantification of MtDNA and to establish a method designed to avoid this. The existence of NumtS in the mouse genome was confirmed using blast N, unique MtDNA regions were identified using FASTA, and MtDNA primers which do not co-amplify NumtS were designed and tested. MtDNA copy numbers were determined in a range of mouse tissues as the ratio of the mitochondrial and nuclear genome using real time qPCR and absolute quantification. Approximately 95% of mouse MtDNA was duplicated in the nuclear genome as NumtS which were located in 15 out of 21 chromosomes. A unique region was identified and primers flanking this region were used. MtDNA levels differed significantly in mouse tissues being the highest in the heart, with levels in descending order (highest to lowest) in kidney, liver, blood, brain, islets and lung. The presence of NumtS in the nuclear genome of mouse could lead to erroneous data when studying MtDNA content or mutation. The unique primers described here will allow accurate quantification of MtDNA content in mouse models without co-amplification of NumtS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparative histology of mouse, rat, and human pelvic ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaga, Ritsuko; Orlicky, David J; Arnett, Jameson; Guess, Marsha K; Hurt, K Joseph; Connell, Kathleen A

    2016-11-01

    The uterosacral (USL) and cardinal ligaments (CL) provide support to the uterus and pelvic organs, and the round ligaments (RL) maintain their position in the pelvis. In women with pelvic organ prolapse (POP), the connective tissue, smooth muscle, vasculature, and innervation of the pelvic support structures are altered. Rodents are commonly used animal models for POP research. However, the pelvic ligaments have not been defined in these animals. In this study, we hypothesized that the gross anatomy and histological composition of pelvic ligaments in rodents and humans are similar. We performed an extensive literature search for anatomical and histological descriptions of the pelvic support ligaments in rodents. We also performed anatomical dissections of the pelvis to define anatomical landmarks in relation to the ligaments. In addition, we identified the histological components of the pelvic ligaments and performed quantitative analysis of the smooth muscle bundles and connective tissue of the USL and RL. The anatomy of the USL, CL, and RL and their anatomical landmarks are similar in mice, rats, and humans. All species contain the same cellular components and have similar histological architecture. However, the cervical portion of the mouse USL and RL contain more smooth muscle and less connective tissue compared with rat and human ligaments. The pelvic support structures of rats and mice are anatomically and histologically similar to those of humans. We propose that both mice and rats are appropriate, cost-effective models for directed studies in POP research.

  4. Determining and comparing protein function in Bacterial genome sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesth, Tammi Camilla

    of this class have very little homology to other known genomes making functional annotation based on sequence similarity very difficult. Inspired in part by this analysis, an approach for comparative functional annotation was created based public sequenced genomes, CMGfunc. Functionally related groups......In November 2013, there was around 21.000 different prokaryotic genomes sequenced and publicly available, and the number is growing daily with another 20.000 or more genomes expected to be sequenced and deposited by the end of 2014. An important part of the analysis of this data is the functional...... annotation of genes – the descriptions assigned to genes that describe the likely function of the encoded proteins. This process is limited by several factors, including the definition of a function which can be more or less specific as well as how many genes can actually be assigned a function based...

  5. CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 expression: Comparing 'humanized' mouse lines and wild-type mice; comparing human and mouse hepatoma-derived cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uno, Shigeyuki; Endo, Kaori; Ishida, Yuji; Tateno, Chise; Makishima, Makoto; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Nebert, Daniel W.

    2009-01-01

    Human and rodent cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes sometimes exhibit striking species-specific differences in substrate preference and rate of metabolism. Human risk assessment of CYP substrates might therefore best be evaluated in the intact mouse by replacing mouse Cyp genes with human CYP orthologs; however, how 'human-like' can human gene expression be expected in mouse tissues? Previously a bacterial-artificial-chromosome-transgenic mouse, carrying the human CYP1A1 C YP1A2 locus and lacking the mouse Cyp1a1 and Cyp1a2 orthologs, was shown to express robustly human dioxin-inducible CYP1A1 and basal versus inducible CYP1A2 (mRNAs, proteins, enzyme activities) in each of nine mouse tissues examined. Chimeric mice carrying humanized liver have also been generated, by transplanting human hepatocytes into a urokinase-type plasminogen activator(+/+) s evere-combined-immunodeficiency (uPA/SCID) line with most of its mouse hepatocytes ablated. Herein we compare basal and dioxin-induced CYP1A mRNA copy numbers, protein levels, and four enzymes (benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylase, ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase, acetanilide 4-hydroxylase, methoxyresorufin O-demethylase) in liver of these two humanized mouse lines versus wild-type mice; we also compare these same parameters in mouse Hepa-1c1c7 and human HepG2 hepatoma-derived established cell lines. Most strikingly, mouse liver CYP1A1-specific enzyme activities are between 38- and 170-fold higher than human CYP1A1-specific enzyme activities (per unit of mRNA), whereas mouse versus human CYP1A2 enzyme activities (per unit of mRNA) are within 2.5-fold of one another. Moreover, both the mouse and human hepatoma cell lines exhibit striking differences in CYP1A mRNA levels and enzyme activities. These findings are relevant to risk assessment involving human CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 substrates, when administered to mice as environmental toxicants or drugs.

  6. Comparative analysis of European bat lyssavirus 1 pathogenicity in the mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Eggerbauer

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available European bat lyssavirus 1 is responsible for most bat rabies cases in Europe. Although EBLV-1 isolates display a high degree of sequence identity, different sublineages exist. In individual isolates various insertions and deletions have been identified, with unknown impact on viral replication and pathogenicity. In order to assess whether different genetic features of EBLV-1 isolates correlate with phenotypic changes, different EBLV-1 variants were compared for pathogenicity in the mouse model. Groups of three mice were infected intracranially (i.c. with 102 TCID50/ml and groups of six mice were infected intramuscularly (i.m. with 105 TCID50/ml and 102 TCID50/ml as well as intranasally (i.n. with 102 TCID50/ml. Significant differences in survival following i.m. inoculation with low doses as well as i.n. inoculation were observed. Also, striking variations in incubation periods following i.c. inoculation and i.m. inoculation with high doses were seen. Hereby, the clinical picture differed between general symptoms, spasms and aggressiveness depending on the inoculation route. Immunohistochemistry of mouse brains showed that the virus distribution in the brain depended on the inoculation route. In conclusion, different EBLV-1 isolates differ in pathogenicity indicating variation which is not reflected in studies of single isolates.

  7. Comparative analysis of European bat lyssavirus 1 pathogenicity in the mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggerbauer, Elisa; Pfaff, Florian; Finke, Stefan; Höper, Dirk; Beer, Martin; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Nolden, Tobias; Teifke, Jens-Peter; Müller, Thomas; Freuling, Conrad M

    2017-06-01

    European bat lyssavirus 1 is responsible for most bat rabies cases in Europe. Although EBLV-1 isolates display a high degree of sequence identity, different sublineages exist. In individual isolates various insertions and deletions have been identified, with unknown impact on viral replication and pathogenicity. In order to assess whether different genetic features of EBLV-1 isolates correlate with phenotypic changes, different EBLV-1 variants were compared for pathogenicity in the mouse model. Groups of three mice were infected intracranially (i.c.) with 102 TCID50/ml and groups of six mice were infected intramuscularly (i.m.) with 105 TCID50/ml and 102 TCID50/ml as well as intranasally (i.n.) with 102 TCID50/ml. Significant differences in survival following i.m. inoculation with low doses as well as i.n. inoculation were observed. Also, striking variations in incubation periods following i.c. inoculation and i.m. inoculation with high doses were seen. Hereby, the clinical picture differed between general symptoms, spasms and aggressiveness depending on the inoculation route. Immunohistochemistry of mouse brains showed that the virus distribution in the brain depended on the inoculation route. In conclusion, different EBLV-1 isolates differ in pathogenicity indicating variation which is not reflected in studies of single isolates.

  8. Comparative effectiveness of inter-simple sequence repeat and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study to compare the effectiveness of inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSR) and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) profiling was carried out with a total of 65 DNA samples using 12 species of Indian Garcinia. ISSR and RAPD profiling were performed with 19 and 12 primers, respectively. ISSR markers ...

  9. CloVR-Comparative: automated, cloud-enabled comparative microbial genome sequence analysis pipeline

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Sonia; Arze, Cesar; Adkins, Ricky S.; Crabtree, Jonathan; Riley, David; Vangala, Mahesh; Galens, Kevin; Fraser, Claire M.; Tettelin, Herv?; White, Owen; Angiuoli, Samuel V.; Mahurkar, Anup; Fricke, W. Florian

    2017-01-01

    Background The benefit of increasing genomic sequence data to the scientific community depends on easy-to-use, scalable bioinformatics support. CloVR-Comparative combines commonly used bioinformatics tools into an intuitive, automated, and cloud-enabled analysis pipeline for comparative microbial genomics. Results CloVR-Comparative runs on annotated complete or draft genome sequences that are uploaded by the user or selected via a taxonomic tree-based user interface and downloaded from NCBI. ...

  10. Systematic identification of cis-regulatory sequences active in mouse and human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marica Grskovic

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the transcriptional regulation of pluripotent cells is of fundamental interest and will greatly inform efforts aimed at directing differentiation of embryonic stem (ES cells or reprogramming somatic cells. We first analyzed the transcriptional profiles of mouse ES cells and primordial germ cells and identified genes upregulated in pluripotent cells both in vitro and in vivo. These genes are enriched for roles in transcription, chromatin remodeling, cell cycle, and DNA repair. We developed a novel computational algorithm, CompMoby, which combines analyses of sequences both aligned and non-aligned between different genomes with a probabilistic segmentation model to systematically predict short DNA motifs that regulate gene expression. CompMoby was used to identify conserved overrepresented motifs in genes upregulated in pluripotent cells. We show that the motifs are preferentially active in undifferentiated mouse ES and embryonic germ cells in a sequence-specific manner, and that they can act as enhancers in the context of an endogenous promoter. Importantly, the activity of the motifs is conserved in human ES cells. We further show that the transcription factor NF-Y specifically binds to one of the motifs, is differentially expressed during ES cell differentiation, and is required for ES cell proliferation. This study provides novel insights into the transcriptional regulatory networks of pluripotent cells. Our results suggest that this systematic approach can be broadly applied to understanding transcriptional networks in mammalian species.

  11. Deep sequencing analysis of the developing mouse brain reveals a novel microRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piltz Sandra

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that can exert multilevel inhibition/repression at a post-transcriptional or protein synthesis level during disease or development. Characterisation of miRNAs in adult mammalian brains by deep sequencing has been reported previously. However, to date, no small RNA profiling of the developing brain has been undertaken using this method. We have performed deep sequencing and small RNA analysis of a developing (E15.5 mouse brain. Results We identified the expression of 294 known miRNAs in the E15.5 developing mouse brain, which were mostly represented by let-7 family and other brain-specific miRNAs such as miR-9 and miR-124. We also discovered 4 putative 22-23 nt miRNAs: mm_br_e15_1181, mm_br_e15_279920, mm_br_e15_96719 and mm_br_e15_294354 each with a 70-76 nt predicted pre-miRNA. We validated the 4 putative miRNAs and further characterised one of them, mm_br_e15_1181, throughout embryogenesis. Mm_br_e15_1181 biogenesis was Dicer1-dependent and was expressed in E3.5 blastocysts and E7 whole embryos. Embryo-wide expression patterns were observed at E9.5 and E11.5 followed by a near complete loss of expression by E13.5, with expression restricted to a specialised layer of cells within the developing and early postnatal brain. Mm_br_e15_1181 was upregulated during neurodifferentiation of P19 teratocarcinoma cells. This novel miRNA has been identified as miR-3099. Conclusions We have generated and analysed the first deep sequencing dataset of small RNA sequences of the developing mouse brain. The analysis revealed a novel miRNA, miR-3099, with potential regulatory effects on early embryogenesis, and involvement in neuronal cell differentiation/function in the brain during late embryonic and early neonatal development.

  12. Statistical method to compare massive parallel sequencing pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsensohn, M H; Leblay, N; Dimassi, S; Campan-Fournier, A; Labalme, A; Roucher-Boulez, F; Sanlaville, D; Lesca, G; Bardel, C; Roy, P

    2017-03-01

    Today, sequencing is frequently carried out by Massive Parallel Sequencing (MPS) that cuts drastically sequencing time and expenses. Nevertheless, Sanger sequencing remains the main validation method to confirm the presence of variants. The analysis of MPS data involves the development of several bioinformatic tools, academic or commercial. We present here a statistical method to compare MPS pipelines and test it in a comparison between an academic (BWA-GATK) and a commercial pipeline (TMAP-NextGENe®), with and without reference to a gold standard (here, Sanger sequencing), on a panel of 41 genes in 43 epileptic patients. This method used the number of variants to fit log-linear models for pairwise agreements between pipelines. To assess the heterogeneity of the margins and the odds ratios of agreement, four log-linear models were used: a full model, a homogeneous-margin model, a model with single odds ratio for all patients, and a model with single intercept. Then a log-linear mixed model was fitted considering the biological variability as a random effect. Among the 390,339 base-pairs sequenced, TMAP-NextGENe® and BWA-GATK found, on average, 2253.49 and 1857.14 variants (single nucleotide variants and indels), respectively. Against the gold standard, the pipelines had similar sensitivities (63.47% vs. 63.42%) and close but significantly different specificities (99.57% vs. 99.65%; p < 0.001). Same-trend results were obtained when only single nucleotide variants were considered (99.98% specificity and 76.81% sensitivity for both pipelines). The method allows thus pipeline comparison and selection. It is generalizable to all types of MPS data and all pipelines.

  13. The function analysis of full-length cDNA sequence from IRM-2 mouse cDNA library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qin; Liu Xiaoqiu; Xu Chang; Du Liqing; Sun Zhijuan; Wang Yan; Liu Qiang; Song Li; Li Jin; Fan Feiyue

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To identify the function of full-length cDNA sequence from IRM-2 mouse cDNA library. Methods: Full-length cDNA products were amplified by PCR from IRM-2 mouse cDNA library according to twenty-one pieces of expressed sequence tag. The expression of full-length cDNAs were detected after mouse embryonic fibroblasts were exposed to 6.5 Gy γ-ray radiation. And the effect on the growth of radiosensitivity cells AT5B1VA transfected with full-length cDNAs was investigated. Results: The expression of No.4, 5 and 2 full-length cDNAs from IRM-2 mouse were higher than that of parental ICR and 615 mouse after mouse embryonic fibroblasts irradiated with γ-ray radiation. And the survival rate of AT5B1VA cells transfected with No.4, 5 and 2 full-length cDNAs was high. Conclusion: No.4, 5 and 2 full-length cDNAs of IRM-2 mouse are of high radioresistance. (authors)

  14. COMPARATIVE GENOTOXIC RESPONSES TO ARSENITE IN GUINEA PIG, MOUSE, RAT AND HUMAN LYMPHOCYTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparative genotoxic responses to arsenite in guinea pig, mouse, rat and human lymphocytes.Inorganic arsenic is a known human carcinogen causing skin, lung, and bladder cancer following chronic exposures. Yet, long-term laboratory animal carcinogenicity studies have ...

  15. Correlation between sequence conservation and structural thermodynamics of microRNA precursors from human, mouse, and chicken genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Shengqi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have shown that microRNA precursors (pre-miRNAs have considerably more stable secondary structures than other native RNAs (tRNA, rRNA, and mRNA and artificial RNA sequences. However, pre-miRNAs with ultra stable secondary structures have not been investigated. It is not known if there is a tendency in pre-miRNA sequences towards or against ultra stable structures? Furthermore, the relationship between the structural thermodynamic stability of pre-miRNA and their evolution remains unclear. Results We investigated the correlation between pre-miRNA sequence conservation and structural stability as measured by adjusted minimum folding free energies in pre-miRNAs isolated from human, mouse, and chicken. The analysis revealed that conserved and non-conserved pre-miRNA sequences had structures with similar average stabilities. However, the relatively ultra stable and unstable pre-miRNAs were more likely to be non-conserved than pre-miRNAs with moderate stability. Non-conserved pre-miRNAs had more G+C than A+U nucleotides, while conserved pre-miRNAs contained more A+U nucleotides. Notably, the U content of conserved pre-miRNAs was especially higher than that of non-conserved pre-miRNAs. Further investigations showed that conserved and non-conserved pre-miRNAs exhibited different structural element features, even though they had comparable levels of stability. Conclusions We proposed that there is a correlation between structural thermodynamic stability and sequence conservation for pre-miRNAs from human, mouse, and chicken genomes. Our analyses suggested that pre-miRNAs with relatively ultra stable or unstable structures were less favoured by natural selection than those with moderately stable structures. Comparison of nucleotide compositions between non-conserved and conserved pre-miRNAs indicated the importance of U nucleotides in the pre-miRNA evolutionary process. Several characteristic structural elements were

  16. Antibiotic selection of Escherichia coli sequence type 131 in a mouse intestinal colonization model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Frederik Boetius; Løbner-Olesen, Anders; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2014-01-01

    The ability of different antibiotics to select for extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli remains a topic of discussion. In a mouse intestinal colonization model, we evaluated the selective abilities of nine common antimicrobials (cefotaxime, cefuroxime, dicloxacillin...... day, antibiotic treatment was initiated and given subcutaneously once a day for three consecutive days. CFU of E. coli ST131, Bacteroides, and Gram-positive aerobic bacteria in fecal samples were studied, with intervals, until day 8. Bacteroides was used as an indicator organism for impact on the Gram......, clindamycin, penicillin, ampicillin, meropenem, ciprofloxacin, and amdinocillin) against a CTX-M-15-producing E. coli sequence type 131 (ST131) isolate with a fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype. Mice (8 per group) were orogastrically administered 0.25 ml saline with 10(8) CFU/ml E. coli ST131. On that same...

  17. Detailed analysis of sequence changes occurring during vlsE antigenic variation in the mouse model of Borrelia burgdorferi infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïc Coutte

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Lyme disease Borrelia can infect humans and animals for months to years, despite the presence of an active host immune response. The vls antigenic variation system, which expresses the surface-exposed lipoprotein VlsE, plays a major role in B. burgdorferi immune evasion. Gene conversion between vls silent cassettes and the vlsE expression site occurs at high frequency during mammalian infection, resulting in sequence variation in the VlsE product. In this study, we examined vlsE sequence variation in B. burgdorferi B31 during mouse infection by analyzing 1,399 clones isolated from bladder, heart, joint, ear, and skin tissues of mice infected for 4 to 365 days. The median number of codon changes increased progressively in C3H/HeN mice from 4 to 28 days post infection, and no clones retained the parental vlsE sequence at 28 days. In contrast, the decrease in the number of clones with the parental vlsE sequence and the increase in the number of sequence changes occurred more gradually in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice. Clones containing a stop codon were isolated, indicating that continuous expression of full-length VlsE is not required for survival in vivo; also, these clones continued to undergo vlsE recombination. Analysis of clones with apparent single recombination events indicated that recombinations into vlsE are nonselective with regard to the silent cassette utilized, as well as the length and location of the recombination event. Sequence changes as small as one base pair were common. Fifteen percent of recovered vlsE variants contained "template-independent" sequence changes, which clustered in the variable regions of vlsE. We hypothesize that the increased frequency and complexity of vlsE sequence changes observed in clones recovered from immunocompetent mice (as compared with SCID mice is due to rapid clearance of relatively invariant clones by variable region-specific anti-VlsE antibody responses.

  18. Mouse mammary tumor virus-like gene sequences are present in lung patient specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-Padilla Cristina

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have reported on the presence of Murine Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV-like gene sequences in human cancer tissue specimens. Here, we search for MMTV-like gene sequences in lung diseases including carcinomas specimens from a Mexican population. This study was based on our previous study reporting that the INER51 lung cancer cell line, from a pleural effusion of a Mexican patient, contains MMTV-like env gene sequences. Results The MMTV-like env gene sequences have been detected in three out of 18 specimens studied, by PCR using a specific set of MMTV-like primers. The three identified MMTV-like gene sequences, which were assigned as INER6, HZ101, and HZ14, were 99%, 98%, and 97% homologous, respectively, as compared to GenBank sequence accession number AY161347. The INER6 and HZ-101 samples were isolated from lung cancer specimens, and the HZ-14 was isolated from an acute inflammatory lung infiltrate sample. Two of the env sequences exhibited disruption of the reading frame due to mutations. Conclusion In summary, we identified the presence of MMTV-like gene sequences in 2 out of 11 (18% of the lung carcinomas and 1 out of 7 (14% of acute inflamatory lung infiltrate specimens studied of a Mexican Population.

  19. Low-pass sequencing for microbial comparative genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy Sean

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We studied four extremely halophilic archaea by low-pass shotgun sequencing: (1 the metabolically versatile Haloarcula marismortui; (2 the non-pigmented Natrialba asiatica; (3 the psychrophile Halorubrum lacusprofundi and (4 the Dead Sea isolate Halobaculum gomorrense. Approximately one thousand single pass genomic sequences per genome were obtained. The data were analyzed by comparative genomic analyses using the completed Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 genome as a reference. Low-pass shotgun sequencing is a simple, inexpensive, and rapid approach that can readily be performed on any cultured microbe. Results As expected, the four archaeal halophiles analyzed exhibit both bacterial and eukaryotic characteristics as well as uniquely archaeal traits. All five halophiles exhibit greater than sixty percent GC content and low isoelectric points (pI for their predicted proteins. Multiple insertion sequence (IS elements, often involved in genome rearrangements, were identified in H. lacusprofundi and H. marismortui. The core biological functions that govern cellular and genetic mechanisms of H. sp. NRC-1 appear to be conserved in these four other halophiles. Multiple TATA box binding protein (TBP and transcription factor IIB (TFB homologs were identified from most of the four shotgunned halophiles. The reconstructed molecular tree of all five halophiles shows a large divergence between these species, but with the closest relationship being between H. sp. NRC-1 and H. lacusprofundi. Conclusion Despite the diverse habitats of these species, all five halophiles share (1 high GC content and (2 low protein isoelectric points, which are characteristics associated with environmental exposure to UV radiation and hypersalinity, respectively. Identification of multiple IS elements in the genome of H. lacusprofundi and H. marismortui suggest that genome structure and dynamic genome reorganization might be similar to that previously observed in the

  20. Comparative action spectra for pyrimidine dimer formation in Cloudman S91 mouse melanoma and EMT6 mouse mammary carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, H Z [New Jersey, Medical School, Newark (USA); Setlow, R B [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)

    1982-05-01

    Pyrimidine dimer formation in melanotic mouse melanoma cells, Cloudman S91H-, and in mouse mammary carcinoma cells, EMT6, was compared as a function of wavelength by irradiating equal numbers of cells from the two cell lines simultaneously. More dimers were formed in EMT6 than in S91H- by light of wavelengths less than 289nm, while light of higher wavelengths caused equivalent dimer formation, as measured by the Micrococcus luteus UV-endonuclease assay. The cells of S91H- are lightly melanotic, yet shielding at lower wavelengths is considerable. It is speculated that melanin pigmentation arose by selection during an evolutionary period when UV-C light reaching the earth's surface was significantly greater than it is today.

  1. Mouse Nkrp1-Clr gene cluster sequence and expression analyses reveal conservation of tissue-specific MHC-independent immunosurveillance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhang

    Full Text Available The Nkrp1 (Klrb1-Clr (Clec2 genes encode a receptor-ligand system utilized by NK cells as an MHC-independent immunosurveillance strategy for innate immune responses. The related Ly49 family of MHC-I receptors displays extreme allelic polymorphism and haplotype plasticity. In contrast, previous BAC-mapping and aCGH studies in the mouse suggest the neighboring and related Nkrp1-Clr cluster is evolutionarily stable. To definitively compare the relative evolutionary rate of Nkrp1-Clr vs. Ly49 gene clusters, the Nkrp1-Clr gene clusters from two Ly49 haplotype-disparate inbred mouse strains, BALB/c and 129S6, were sequenced. Both Nkrp1-Clr gene cluster sequences are highly similar to the C57BL/6 reference sequence, displaying the same gene numbers and order, complete pseudogenes, and gene fragments. The Nkrp1-Clr clusters contain a strikingly dissimilar proportion of repetitive elements compared to the Ly49 clusters, suggesting that certain elements may be partly responsible for the highly disparate Ly49 vs. Nkrp1 evolutionary rate. Focused allelic polymorphisms were found within the Nkrp1b/d (Klrb1b, Nkrp1c (Klrb1c, and Clr-c (Clec2f genes, suggestive of possible immune selection. Cell-type specific transcription of Nkrp1-Clr genes in a large panel of tissues/organs was determined. Clr-b (Clec2d and Clr-g (Clec2i showed wide expression, while other Clr genes showed more tissue-specific expression patterns. In situ hybridization revealed specific expression of various members of the Clr family in leukocytes/hematopoietic cells of immune organs, various tissue-restricted epithelial cells (including intestinal, kidney tubular, lung, and corneal progenitor epithelial cells, as well as myocytes. In summary, the Nkrp1-Clr gene cluster appears to evolve more slowly relative to the related Ly49 cluster, and likely regulates innate immunosurveillance in a tissue-specific manner.

  2. CloVR-Comparative: automated, cloud-enabled comparative microbial genome sequence analysis pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Sonia; Arze, Cesar; Adkins, Ricky S; Crabtree, Jonathan; Riley, David; Vangala, Mahesh; Galens, Kevin; Fraser, Claire M; Tettelin, Hervé; White, Owen; Angiuoli, Samuel V; Mahurkar, Anup; Fricke, W Florian

    2017-04-27

    The benefit of increasing genomic sequence data to the scientific community depends on easy-to-use, scalable bioinformatics support. CloVR-Comparative combines commonly used bioinformatics tools into an intuitive, automated, and cloud-enabled analysis pipeline for comparative microbial genomics. CloVR-Comparative runs on annotated complete or draft genome sequences that are uploaded by the user or selected via a taxonomic tree-based user interface and downloaded from NCBI. CloVR-Comparative runs reference-free multiple whole-genome alignments to determine unique, shared and core coding sequences (CDSs) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Output includes short summary reports and detailed text-based results files, graphical visualizations (phylogenetic trees, circular figures), and a database file linked to the Sybil comparative genome browser. Data up- and download, pipeline configuration and monitoring, and access to Sybil are managed through CloVR-Comparative web interface. CloVR-Comparative and Sybil are distributed as part of the CloVR virtual appliance, which runs on local computers or the Amazon EC2 cloud. Representative datasets (e.g. 40 draft and complete Escherichia coli genomes) are processed in genomics projects, while eliminating the need for on-site computational resources and expertise.

  3. Generation of mast cells from mouse fetus: analysis of differentiation and functionality, and transcriptome profiling using next generation sequencer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Fukuishi

    Full Text Available While gene knockout technology can reveal the roles of proteins in cellular functions, including in mast cells, fetal death due to gene manipulation frequently interrupts experimental analysis. We generated mast cells from mouse fetal liver (FLMC, and compared the fundamental functions of FLMC with those of bone marrow-derived mouse mast cells (BMMC. Under electron microscopy, numerous small and electron-dense granules were observed in FLMC. In FLMC, the expression levels of a subunit of the FcεRI receptor and degranulation by IgE cross-linking were comparable with BMMC. By flow cytometry we observed surface expression of c-Kit prior to that of FcεRI on FLMC, although on BMMC the expression of c-Kit came after FcεRI. The surface expression levels of Sca-1 and c-Kit, a marker of putative mast cell precursors, were slightly different between bone marrow cells and fetal liver cells, suggesting that differentiation stage or cell type are not necessarily equivalent between both lineages. Moreover, this indicates that phenotypically similar mast cells may not have undergone an identical process of differentiation. By comprehensive analysis using the next generation sequencer, the same frequency of gene expression was observed for 98.6% of all transcripts in both cell types. These results indicate that FLMC could represent a new and useful tool for exploring mast cell differentiation, and may help to elucidate the roles of individual proteins in the function of mast cells where gene manipulation can induce embryonic lethality in the mid to late stages of pregnancy.

  4. Generation of mast cells from mouse fetus: analysis of differentiation and functionality, and transcriptome profiling using next generation sequencer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuishi, Nobuyuki; Igawa, Yuusuke; Kunimi, Tomoyo; Hamano, Hirofumi; Toyota, Masao; Takahashi, Hironobu; Kenmoku, Hiromichi; Yagi, Yasuyuki; Matsui, Nobuaki; Akagi, Masaaki

    2013-01-01

    While gene knockout technology can reveal the roles of proteins in cellular functions, including in mast cells, fetal death due to gene manipulation frequently interrupts experimental analysis. We generated mast cells from mouse fetal liver (FLMC), and compared the fundamental functions of FLMC with those of bone marrow-derived mouse mast cells (BMMC). Under electron microscopy, numerous small and electron-dense granules were observed in FLMC. In FLMC, the expression levels of a subunit of the FcεRI receptor and degranulation by IgE cross-linking were comparable with BMMC. By flow cytometry we observed surface expression of c-Kit prior to that of FcεRI on FLMC, although on BMMC the expression of c-Kit came after FcεRI. The surface expression levels of Sca-1 and c-Kit, a marker of putative mast cell precursors, were slightly different between bone marrow cells and fetal liver cells, suggesting that differentiation stage or cell type are not necessarily equivalent between both lineages. Moreover, this indicates that phenotypically similar mast cells may not have undergone an identical process of differentiation. By comprehensive analysis using the next generation sequencer, the same frequency of gene expression was observed for 98.6% of all transcripts in both cell types. These results indicate that FLMC could represent a new and useful tool for exploring mast cell differentiation, and may help to elucidate the roles of individual proteins in the function of mast cells where gene manipulation can induce embryonic lethality in the mid to late stages of pregnancy.

  5. Comparative analysis of proteome and transcriptome variation in mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatole Ghazalpour

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationships between the levels of transcripts and the levels of the proteins they encode have not been examined comprehensively in mammals, although previous work in plants and yeast suggest a surprisingly modest correlation. We have examined this issue using a genetic approach in which natural variations were used to perturb both transcript levels and protein levels among inbred strains of mice. We quantified over 5,000 peptides and over 22,000 transcripts in livers of 97 inbred and recombinant inbred strains and focused on the 7,185 most heritable transcripts and 486 most reliable proteins. The transcript levels were quantified by microarray analysis in three replicates and the proteins were quantified by Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry using O(18-reference-based isotope labeling approach. We show that the levels of transcripts and proteins correlate significantly for only about half of the genes tested, with an average correlation of 0.27, and the correlations of transcripts and proteins varied depending on the cellular location and biological function of the gene. We examined technical and biological factors that could contribute to the modest correlation. For example, differential splicing clearly affects the analyses for certain genes; but, based on deep sequencing, this does not substantially contribute to the overall estimate of the correlation. We also employed genome-wide association analyses to map loci controlling both transcript and protein levels. Surprisingly, little overlap was observed between the protein- and transcript-mapped loci. We have typed numerous clinically relevant traits among the strains, including adiposity, lipoprotein levels, and tissue parameters. Using correlation analysis, we found that a low number of clinical trait relationships are preserved between the protein and mRNA gene products and that the majority of such relationships are specific to either the protein levels or transcript levels

  6. A genome survey sequencing of the Java mouse deer (Tragulus javanicus) adds new aspects to the evolution of lineage specific retrotransposons in Ruminantia (Cetartiodactyla).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallus, S; Kumar, V; Bertelsen, M F; Janke, A; Nilsson, M A

    2015-10-25

    Ruminantia, the ruminating, hoofed mammals (cow, deer, giraffe and allies) are an unranked artiodactylan clade. Around 50-60 million years ago the BovB retrotransposon entered the ancestral ruminantian genome through horizontal gene transfer. A survey genome screen using 454-pyrosequencing of the Java mouse deer (Tragulus javanicus) and the lesser kudu (Tragelaphus imberbis) was done to investigate and to compare the landscape of transposable elements within Ruminantia. The family Tragulidae (mouse deer) is the only representative of Tragulina and phylogenetically important, because it represents the earliest divergence in Ruminantia. The data analyses show that, relative to other ruminantian species, the lesser kudu genome has seen an expansion of BovB Long INterspersed Elements (LINEs) and BovB related Short INterspersed Elements (SINEs) like BOVA2. In comparison the genome of Java mouse deer has fewer BovB elements than other ruminants, especially Bovinae, and has in addition a novel CHR-3 SINE most likely propagated by LINE-1. By contrast the other ruminants have low amounts of CHR SINEs but high numbers of actively propagating BovB-derived and BovB-propagated SINEs. The survey sequencing data suggest that the transposable element landscape in mouse deer (Tragulina) is unique among Ruminantia, suggesting a lineage specific evolutionary trajectory that does not involve BovB mediated retrotransposition. This shows that the genomic landscape of mobile genetic elements can rapidly change in any lineage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Next generation sequencing and comparative analyses of Xenopus mitogenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lloyd Rhiannon E

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial genomes comprise a small but critical component of the total DNA in eukaryotic organisms. They encode several key proteins for the cell’s major energy producing apparatus, the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Additonally, their nucleotide and amino acid sequences are of great utility as markers for systematics, molecular ecology and forensics. Their characterization through nucleotide sequencing is a fundamental starting point in mitogenomics. Methods to amplify complete mitochondrial genomes rapidly and efficiently from microgram quantities of tissue of single individuals are, however, not always available. Here we validate two approaches, which combine long-PCR with Roche 454 pyrosequencing technology, to obtain two complete mitochondrial genomes from individual amphibian species. Results We obtained two new xenopus frogs (Xenopus borealis and X. victorianus complete mitochondrial genome sequences by means of long-PCR followed by 454 of individual genomes (approach 1 or of multiple pooled genomes (approach 2, the mean depth of coverage per nucleotide was 9823 and 186, respectively. We also characterised and compared the new mitogenomes against their sister taxa; X. laevis and Silurana tropicalis, two of the most intensely studied amphibians. Our results demonstrate how our approaches can be used to obtain complete amphibian mitogenomes with depths of coverage that far surpass traditional primer-walking strategies, at either the same cost or less. Our results also demonstrate: that the size, gene content and order are the same among xenopus mitogenomes and that S. tropicalis form a separate clade to the other xenopus, among which X. laevis and X. victorianus were most closely related. Nucleotide and amino acid diversity was found to vary across the xenopus mitogenomes, with the greatest diversity observed in the Complex 1 gene nad4l and the least diversity observed in Complex 4 genes (cox1-3. All protein

  8. High-resolution gene expression profiling using RNA sequencing in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and in mouse models of colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holgersen, Kristine; Kutlu, Burak; Fox, Brian

    2015-01-01

    pathways and assess the similarity between the experimental models and human disease. RNA sequencing was performed on colon biopsies from CD patients, UC patients and non-IBD controls. Genes shown to be significantly dysregulated in human IBD were used to study gene expression in colons from a piroxicam......Proper interpretation of data from preclinical animal studies requires a thorough knowledge about the pathophysiology of both the human disease and animal models. In this study, the expression of IBD-associated genes was characterised in mouse models of colitis to examine the underlying molecular......-accelerated colitis interleukin-10 knockout (PAC IL-10 k.o.), an adoptive transfer (AdTr) and a dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) colitis mouse model. 92 out of 115 literature-defined genes linked to IBD were significantly differentially expressed in inflamed mucosa of CD and/or UC patients compared with non-IBD controls...

  9. Comparative analysis of genome maintenance genes in naked mole rat, mouse, and human

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.L. Macrae (Sheila L.); Q. Zhang (Quanwei); C. Lemetre (Christophe); I. Seim (Inge); R.B. Calder (Robert B.); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); Y. Suh (Yousin); V.N. Gladyshev (Vadim N.); A. Seluanov (Andrei); V. Gorbunova (Vera); J. Vijg (Jan); Z.D. Zhang (Zhengdong D.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractGenome maintenance (GM) is an essential defense system against aging and cancer, as both are characterized by increased genome instability. Here, we compared the copy number variation and mutation rate of 518 GM-associated genes in the naked mole rat (NMR), mouse, and human genomes. GM

  10. Comparative analysis of genome maintenance genes in naked mole rat, mouse, and human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacRae, Sheila L; Zhang, Quanwei; Lemetre, Christophe; Seim, Inge; Calder, Robert B; Hoeijmakers, Jan; Suh, Yousin; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera; Vijg, Jan; Zhang, Zhengdong D

    2015-04-01

    Genome maintenance (GM) is an essential defense system against aging and cancer, as both are characterized by increased genome instability. Here, we compared the copy number variation and mutation rate of 518 GM-associated genes in the naked mole rat (NMR), mouse, and human genomes. GM genes appeared to be strongly conserved, with copy number variation in only four genes. Interestingly, we found NMR to have a higher copy number of CEBPG, a regulator of DNA repair, and TINF2, a protector of telomere integrity. NMR, as well as human, was also found to have a lower rate of germline nucleotide substitution than the mouse. Together, the data suggest that the long-lived NMR, as well as human, has more robust GM than mouse and identifies new targets for the analysis of the exceptional longevity of the NMR. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Comparative metabonomics of differential hydrazine toxicity in the rat and mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollard, Mary E.; Keun, Hector C.; Beckonert, Olaf; Ebbels, Tim M.D.; Antti, Henrik; Nicholls, Andrew W.; Shockcor, John P.; Cantor, Glenn H.; Stevens, Greg; Lindon, John C.; Holmes, Elaine; Nicholson, Jeremy K.

    2005-01-01

    Interspecies variation between rats and mice has been studied for hydrazine toxicity using a novel metabonomics approach. Hydrazine hydrochloride was administered to male Sprague-Dawley rats (30 mg/kg, n = 10 and 90 mg/kg, n = 10) and male B6C3F mice (100 mg/kg, n = 8 and 250 mg/kg, n = 8) by oral gavage. In each species, the high dose was selected to produce the major histopathologic effect, hepatocellular lipid accumulation. Urine samples were collected at sequential time points up to 168 h post dose and analyzed by 1 H NMR spectroscopy. The metabolites of hydrazine, namely diacetyl hydrazine and 1,4,5,6-tetrahydro-6-oxo-3-pyridazine carboxylic acid (THOPC), were detected in both the rat and mouse urine samples. Monoacetyl hydrazine was detected only in urine samples from the rat and its absence in the urine of the mouse was attributed to a higher activity of N-acetyl transferases in the mouse compared with the rat. Differential metabolic effects observed between the two species included elevated urinary β-alanine, 3-D-hydroxybutyrate, citrulline, N-acetylcitrulline, and reduced trimethylamine-N-oxide excretion unique to the rat. Metabolic principal component (PC) trajectories highlighted the greater degree of toxic response in the rat. A data scaling method, scaled to maximum aligned and reduced trajectories (SMART) analysis, was used to remove the differences between the metabolic starting positions of the rat and mouse and varying magnitudes of effect, to facilitate comparison of the response geometries between the rat and mouse. Mice followed 'biphasic' open PC trajectories, with incomplete recovery 7 days after dosing, whereas rats followed closed 'hairpin' time profiles, indicating functional reversibility. The greater magnitude of metabolic effects observed in the rat was supported by the more pronounced effect on liver pathology in the rat when compared with the mouse

  12. Genomic sequences of murine gamma B- and gamma C-crystallin-encoding genes: promoter analysis and complete evolutionary pattern of mouse, rat and human gamma-crystallins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graw, J; Liebstein, A; Pietrowski, D; Schmitt-John, T; Werner, T

    1993-12-22

    The murine genes, gamma B-cry and gamma C-cry, encoding the gamma B- and gamma C-crystallins, were isolated from a genomic DNA library. The complete nucleotide (nt) sequences of both genes were determined from 661 and 711 bp, respectively, upstream from the first exon to the corresponding polyadenylation sites, comprising more than 2650 and 2890 bp, respectively. The new sequences were compared to the partial cDNA sequences available for the murine gamma B-cry and gamma C-cry, as well as to the corresponding genomic sequences from rat and man, at both the nt and predicted amino acid (aa) sequence levels. In the gamma B-cry promoter region, a canonical CCAAT-box, a TATA-box, putative NF-I and C/EBP sites were detected. An R-repeat is inserted 366 bp upstream from the transcription start point. In contrast, the gamma C-cry promoter does not contain a CCAAT-box, but some other putative binding sites for transcription factors (AP-2, UBP-1, LBP-1) were located by computer analysis. The promoter regions of all six gamma-cry from mouse, rat and human, except human psi gamma F-cry, were analyzed for common sequence elements. A complex sequence element of about 70-80 bp was found in the proximal promoter, which contains a gamma-cry-specific and almost invariant sequence (crygpel) of 14 nt, and ends with the also invariant TATA-box. Within the complex sequence element, a minimum of three further features specific for the gamma A-, gamma B- and gamma D/E/F-cry genes can be defined, at least two of which were recently shown to be functional. In addition to these four sequence elements, a subtype-specific structure of inverted repeats with different-sized spacers can be deduced from the multiple sequence alignment. A phylogenetic analysis based on the promoter region, as well as the complete exon 3 of all gamma-cry from mouse, rat and man, suggests separation of only five gamma-cry subtypes (gamma A-, gamma B-, gamma C-, gamma D- and gamma E/F-cry) prior to species separation.

  13. Comparative study of the organisation and phenotypes of bladder interstitial cells in human, mouse and rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevaert, Thomas; Neuhaus, Jochen; Vanstreels, Els; Daelemans, Dirk; Everaerts, Wouter; Der Aa, Frank Van; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Roskams, Tania; Steiner, Clara; Pintelon, Isabel; De Ridder, Dirk

    2017-12-01

    With most research on interstitial cells (IC) in the bladder being conducted on animal models, it remains unclear whether all structural and functional data on IC from animal models can be translated to the human context. This prompted us to compare the structural and immunohistochemical properties of IC in bladders from mouse, rat and human. Tissue samples were obtained from the bladder dome and subsequently processed for immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. The ultrastructural properties of IC were compared by means of electron microscopy and IC were additionally characterized with single/double immunohistochemistry/immunofluorescence. Our results reveal a similar organization of the IC network in the upper lamina propria (ULP), the deep lamina propria (DLP) and the detrusor muscle in human, rat and mouse bladders. Furthermore, despite several similarities in IC phenotypes, we also found several obvious inter-species differences in IC, especially in the ULP. Most remarkably in this respect, ULP IC in human bladder predominantly displayed a myoid phenotype with abundant presence of contractile micro-filaments, while those in rat and mouse bladders showed a fibroblast phenotype. In conclusion, the organization of ULP IC, DLP IC and detrusor IC is comparable in human, rat and mouse bladders, although several obvious inter-species differences in IC phenotypes were found. The present data show that translating research data on IC in laboratory animals to the human setting should be carried out with caution.

  14. Comparative mapping in the beige-satin region of mouse chromosome 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perou, C.M.; Pryor, R.; Kaplan, J. [Univ. of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)] [and others

    1997-01-15

    The proximal end of mouse chromosome (Chr) 13 contains regions conserved on human chromosomes 1q42-q44, 6p23-p21, and 7p22-p13. This region also contains mutations that may be models for human disease, including beige (human Chediak-Higashi syndrome). An interspecific backcross of SB/Le and Mus spretus mice was used to generate a molecular genetic linkage map of mouse chromosome 13 with an emphasis on the proximal region including beige (bg) and satin (sa). This map provides the gene order of the two phenotypic markers bg and sa relative to restriction fragment length polymorphisms and simple sequence length polymorphisms in 131 backcross animals. In parallel, we have created a physical map of the region using Nidogen (Nid) as a molecular starting point for cloning a YAC contig that was used to identify the beige gene. The physical map provides the fine-structure order of genes and anonymous DNA fragments that was not resolved by the genetic linkage mapping. The results show that the bg region of mouse Chr 13 is highly conserved on human Chr 1q42-q44 and provide a starting point for a complete functional analysis of the entire bg-sa interval. 37 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Expression profiling and comparative sequence derived insights into lipid metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callow, Matthew J.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2001-12-19

    Expression profiling and genomic DNA sequence comparisons are increasingly being applied to the identification and analysis of the genes involved in lipid metabolism. Not only has genome-wide expression profiling aided in the identification of novel genes involved in important processes in lipid metabolism such as sterol efflux, but the utilization of information from these studies has added to our understanding of the regulation of pathways participating in the process. Coupled with these gene expression studies, cross species comparison, searching for sequences conserved through evolution, has proven to be a powerful tool to identify important non-coding regulatory sequences as well as the discovery of novel genes relevant to lipid biology. An example of the value of this approach was the recent chance discovery of a new apolipoprotein gene (apo AV) that has dramatic effects upon triglyceride metabolism in mice and humans.

  16. International interlaboratory study comparing single organism 16S rRNA gene sequencing data: Beyond consensus sequence comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Nathan D.; Lund, Steven P.; Zook, Justin M.; Rojas-Cornejo, Fabiola; Beck, Brian; Foy, Carole; Huggett, Jim; Whale, Alexandra S.; Sui, Zhiwei; Baoutina, Anna; Dobeson, Michael; Partis, Lina; Morrow, Jayne B.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the results from an interlaboratory sequencing study for which we developed a novel high-resolution method for comparing data from different sequencing platforms for a multi-copy, paralogous gene. The combination of PCR amplification and 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S rRNA) sequencing has revolutionized bacteriology by enabling rapid identification, frequently without the need for culture. To assess variability between laboratories in sequencing 16S rRNA, six laboratories sequenced the gene encoding the 16S rRNA from Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain EDL933 and Listeria monocytogenes serovar 4b strain NCTC11994. Participants performed sequencing methods and protocols available in their laboratories: Sanger sequencing, Roche 454 pyrosequencing®, or Ion Torrent PGM®. The sequencing data were evaluated on three levels: (1) identity of biologically conserved position, (2) ratio of 16S rRNA gene copies featuring identified variants, and (3) the collection of variant combinations in a set of 16S rRNA gene copies. The same set of biologically conserved positions was identified for each sequencing method. Analytical methods using Bayesian and maximum likelihood statistics were developed to estimate variant copy ratios, which describe the ratio of nucleotides at each identified biologically variable position, as well as the likely set of variant combinations present in 16S rRNA gene copies. Our results indicate that estimated variant copy ratios at biologically variable positions were only reproducible for high throughput sequencing methods. Furthermore, the likely variant combination set was only reproducible with increased sequencing depth and longer read lengths. We also demonstrate novel methods for evaluating variable positions when comparing multi-copy gene sequence data from multiple laboratories generated using multiple sequencing technologies. PMID:27077030

  17. International interlaboratory study comparing single organism 16S rRNA gene sequencing data: Beyond consensus sequence comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan D. Olson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the results from an interlaboratory sequencing study for which we developed a novel high-resolution method for comparing data from different sequencing platforms for a multi-copy, paralogous gene. The combination of PCR amplification and 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S rRNA sequencing has revolutionized bacteriology by enabling rapid identification, frequently without the need for culture. To assess variability between laboratories in sequencing 16S rRNA, six laboratories sequenced the gene encoding the 16S rRNA from Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain EDL933 and Listeria monocytogenes serovar 4b strain NCTC11994. Participants performed sequencing methods and protocols available in their laboratories: Sanger sequencing, Roche 454 pyrosequencing®, or Ion Torrent PGM®. The sequencing data were evaluated on three levels: (1 identity of biologically conserved position, (2 ratio of 16S rRNA gene copies featuring identified variants, and (3 the collection of variant combinations in a set of 16S rRNA gene copies. The same set of biologically conserved positions was identified for each sequencing method. Analytical methods using Bayesian and maximum likelihood statistics were developed to estimate variant copy ratios, which describe the ratio of nucleotides at each identified biologically variable position, as well as the likely set of variant combinations present in 16S rRNA gene copies. Our results indicate that estimated variant copy ratios at biologically variable positions were only reproducible for high throughput sequencing methods. Furthermore, the likely variant combination set was only reproducible with increased sequencing depth and longer read lengths. We also demonstrate novel methods for evaluating variable positions when comparing multi-copy gene sequence data from multiple laboratories generated using multiple sequencing technologies.

  18. Sequence and comparative analysis of Leuconostoc dairy bacteriophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kot, Witold; Hansen, Lars Henrik; Neve, Horst

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophages attacking Leuconostoc species may significantly influence the quality of the final product. There is however limited knowledge of this group of phages in the literature. We have determined the complete genome sequences of nine Leuconostoc bacteriophages virulent to either Leuconostoc...

  19. Borders and Comparative Cytoarchitecture of the Perirhinal and Postrhinal Cortices in an F1 Hybrid Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudin, Stephane A.; Singh, Teghpal; Agster, Kara L.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the cytoarchitectonic and chemoarchitectonic organization of the cortical regions associated with the posterior rhinal fissure in the mouse brain, within the framework of what is known about these regions in the rat. Primary observations were in a first-generation hybrid mouse line, B6129PF/J1. The F1 hybrid was chosen because of the many advantages afforded in the study of the molecular and cellular bases of learning and memory. Comparisons with the parent strains, the C57BL6/J and 129P3/J are also reported. Mouse brain tissue was processed for visualization of Nissl material, myelin, acetyl cholinesterase, parvalbumin, and heavy metals. Tissue stained for heavy metals by the Timm’s method was particularly useful in the assignment of borders and in the comparative analyses because the patterns of staining were similar across species and strains. As in the rat, the areas examined were parcellated into 2 regions, the perirhinal and the postrhinal cortices. The perirhinal cortex was divided into areas 35 and 36, and the postrhinal cortex was divided into dorsal (PORd) and ventral (PORv) subregions. In addition to identifying the borders of the perirhinal cortex, we were able to identify a region in the mouse brain that shares signature features with the rat postrhinal cortex. PMID:22368084

  20. Conservation of Tcrg-V5 and limited allelic sequence polymorphism of the other Tcrg-V genes used by mouse tissue-specific gd-T lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roger, T.; Morisset, J.; Seman, M. [Universite Denis Diderot, Paris (France)

    1996-12-31

    The mouse Tcrg locus comprises seven Tcrg-V, four Tcrg-J, and four Tcrg-C segments which generate only six major types of functional g chains, Vg7-, Vg4-, Vg6-, or Vg5-Jg1-Cg1, Vg2-Jg2-Cg2, and Vg1-Jg4-Cg4. A complete analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the Tcrg locus in wild and inbred mice suggested its relative conservation compared to other loci of the immunoglobulin (Ig) gene family. Three haplotypes have been characterized in laboratory mice: gA, gB, and gC, represented by BALB/c, DBA/2, and AKR prototypes. Tcr-gA and -gC haplotypes are highly related. By contrast, Tcr-gB, likely inherited from Asian mouse subspecies, appeared very different by RFLP analysis. Yet only partial sequence data have been reported on gA and gB Tcrg-V genes. Here, the complete sequence of all Tcrg-V genes of the two haplotypes is described. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  1. The PRC2-binding long non-coding RNAs in human and mouse genomes are associated with predictive sequence features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Shiqi; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Shao, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    Recently, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as an important class of molecules involved in many cellular processes. One of their primary functions is to shape epigenetic landscape through interactions with chromatin modifying proteins. However, mechanisms contributing to the specificity of such interactions remain poorly understood. Here we took the human and mouse lncRNAs that were experimentally determined to have physical interactions with Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), and systematically investigated the sequence features of these lncRNAs by developing a new computational pipeline for sequences composition analysis, in which each sequence is considered as a series of transitions between adjacent nucleotides. Through that, PRC2-binding lncRNAs were found to be associated with a set of distinctive and evolutionarily conserved sequence features, which can be utilized to distinguish them from the others with considerable accuracy. We further identified fragments of PRC2-binding lncRNAs that are enriched with these sequence features, and found they show strong PRC2-binding signals and are more highly conserved across species than the other parts, implying their functional importance.

  2. Characterizing embryonic gene expression patterns in the mouse using nonredundant sequence-based selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sousa-Nunes, Rita; Rana, Amer Ahmed; Kettleborough, Ross

    2003-01-01

    This article investigates the expression patterns of 160 genes that are expressed during early mouse development. The cDNAs were isolated from 7.5 d postcoitum (dpc) endoderm, a region that comprises visceral endoderm (VE), definitive endoderm, and the node-tissues that are required for the initi...

  3. Binocular video ophthalmoscope for simultaneous recording of sequences of the human retina to compare dynamic parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornow, Ralf P.; Milczarek, Aleksandra; Odstrcilik, Jan; Kolar, Radim

    2017-07-01

    A parallel video ophthalmoscope was developed to acquire short video sequences (25 fps, 250 frames) of both eyes simultaneously with exact synchronization. Video sequences were registered off-line to compensate for eye movements. From registered video sequences dynamic parameters like cardiac cycle induced reflection changes and eye movements can be calculated and compared between eyes.

  4. Functional and structural analysis of the DNA sequence conferring glucocorticoid inducibility to the mouse mammary tumor virus gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skroch, P.

    1987-05-01

    In the first part of my thesis I show that the DNA element conferring glucocorticoid inducibility to the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (HRE) has enhancer properties. It activates a heterologous promoter - that of the β-globin gene, independently of distance, position and orientation. These properties however have to be regarded in relation to the remaining regulatory elements of the activated gene as the recombinants between HRE and the TK gene have demonstrated. In the second part of my thesis I investigated the biological significance of certain sequence motifs of the HRE, which are remarkable by their interaction with transacting factors or sequence homologies with other regulatory DNA elements. I could confirm the generally postulated modular structure of enhancers for the HRE and bring the relevance of the single subdomains for the function of the element into relationship. (orig.) [de

  5. Secretion of mature mouse interleukin-2 by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: use of a general secretion vector containing promoter and leader sequences of the mating pheromone alpha-factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyajima, A; Bond, M W; Otsu, K; Arai, K; Arai, N

    1985-01-01

    We have constructed a general expression vector which allows the synthesis and secretion of processed gene products in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This vector contains yeast DNA, including the promoter of the mating pheromone (alpha-factor), its downstream leader sequence, and the TRP5 terminator. A cDNA [encoding mature mouse interleukin-2 (IL-2); Yokota et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82 (1984) 68-72] was fused immediately downstream to the alpha-factor leader sequence. The resulting recombinant plasmid directed the synthesis of mature mouse IL-2 in S. cerevisiae, with most of the T-cell growth-factor (TCGF) activity secreted into the culture fluid and extracellular space. TCGF activities in the cell extract, as well as in the culture fluid, increased in parallel with cell growth. Production of mature mouse IL-2 was inhibited by tunicamycin (TM), with precursor molecules accumulating in the cell extract. The precursor was processed accurately at the junction between the alpha-factor peptide leader sequence and the coding sequence downstream, yielding mature IL-2. The Mr of the secreted mouse IL-2 determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) was 17 kDal, a value expected for the mature mouse IL-2 polypeptide based on the nucleotide (nt) sequence.

  6. Comparative performance of the BGISEQ-500 versus Illumina HiSeq2500 sequencing platforms for palaeogenomic sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mak, Sarah Siu Tze Mak; Gopalakrishnan, Shyam Sunder; Carøe, Christian

    2017-01-01

    on degraded DNA, then directly compared the sequencing performance and data quality of the BGISEQ-500 to the Illumina HiSeq2500 platform, on DNA extracted from eight historic and ancient dog and wolf samples. Results: The data generated was largely comparable between sequencing platforms...... difference was also observed in the mitochondrial DNA percentages recovered (p = 0.018), although we believe this is likely a stochastic effect relating to the extremely low levels of mitochondria that were sequenced from three of the samples with overall very low levels of endogenous DNA. Conclusions......: Although we acknowledge our analyses were limited to animal material, our observations suggest that the BGISEQ-500 holds the potential to represent valid and potentially valuable alternative platform for palaeogenomic data generation, that is worthy of future exploration by those interested...

  7. Comparative cardiac toxicity of anthracyclines in vitro and in vivo in the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Toldo

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The antineoplastic efficacy of anthracyclines is limited by their cardiac toxicity. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity of doxorubicin, non-pegylated liposomal-delivered doxorubicin, and epirubicin in HL-1 adult cardiomyocytes in culture as well as in the mouse in vivo. METHODS: The cardiomyocytes were incubated with the three anthracyclines (1 µM to assess reactive oxygen generation, DNA damage and apoptotic cell death. CF-1 mice (10/group received doxorubicin, epirubicin or non-pegylated liposomal-doxorubicin (10 mg/kg and cardiac function was monitored by Doppler echocardiography to measure left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, heart rate (HR and cardiac output (CO both prior to and 10 days after drug treatment. RESULTS: In HL-1 cells, non-pegylated liposomal-doxorubicin generated significantly less reactive oxygen species (ROS, as well as less DNA damage and apoptosis activation when compared with doxorubicin and epirubicin. Cultured breast tumor cells showed similar sensitivity to the three anthracyclines. In the healthy mouse, non-pegylated liposomal doxorubicin showed a minimal and non-significant decrease in LVEF with no change in HR or CO, compared to doxorubicin and epirubicin. CONCLUSION: This study provides evidence for reduced cardiac toxicity of non-pegylated-liposomal doxorubicin characterized by attenuation of ROS generation, DNA damage and apoptosis in comparison to epirubicin and doxorubicin.

  8. Discovery of candidate disease genes in ENU-induced mouse mutants by large-scale sequencing, including a splice-site mutation in nucleoredoxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa K Boles

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available An accurate and precisely annotated genome assembly is a fundamental requirement for functional genomic analysis. Here, the complete DNA sequence and gene annotation of mouse Chromosome 11 was used to test the efficacy of large-scale sequencing for mutation identification. We re-sequenced the 14,000 annotated exons and boundaries from over 900 genes in 41 recessive mutant mouse lines that were isolated in an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU mutation screen targeted to mouse Chromosome 11. Fifty-nine sequence variants were identified in 55 genes from 31 mutant lines. 39% of the lesions lie in coding sequences and create primarily missense mutations. The other 61% lie in noncoding regions, many of them in highly conserved sequences. A lesion in the perinatal lethal line l11Jus13 alters a consensus splice site of nucleoredoxin (Nxn, inserting 10 amino acids into the resulting protein. We conclude that point mutations can be accurately and sensitively recovered by large-scale sequencing, and that conserved noncoding regions should be included for disease mutation identification. Only seven of the candidate genes we report have been previously targeted by mutation in mice or rats, showing that despite ongoing efforts to functionally annotate genes in the mammalian genome, an enormous gap remains between phenotype and function. Our data show that the classical positional mapping approach of disease mutation identification can be extended to large target regions using high-throughput sequencing.

  9. Full-Length Sequence of Mouse Acupuncture-Induced 1-L (Aig1l Gene Including Its Transcriptional Start Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Ohta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have been investigating the molecular efficacy of electroacupuncture (EA, which is one type of acupuncture therapy. In our previous molecular biological study of acupuncture, we found an EA-induced gene, named acupuncture-induced 1-L (Aig1l, in mouse skeletal muscle. The aims of this study consisted of identification of the full-length cDNA sequence of Aig1l including the transcriptional start site, determination of the tissue distribution of Aig1l and analysis of the effect of EA on Aig1l gene expression. We determined the complete cDNA sequence including the transcriptional start site via cDNA cloning with the cap site hunting method. We then analyzed the tissue distribution of Aig1l by means of northern blot analysis and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We used the semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction to examine the effect of EA on Aig1l gene expression. Our results showed that the complete cDNA sequence of Aig1l was 6073 bp long, and the putative protein consisted of 962 amino acids. All seven tissues that we analyzed expressed the Aig1l gene. In skeletal muscle, EA induced expression of the Aig1l gene, with high expression observed after 3 hours of EA. Our findings thus suggest that the Aig1l gene may play a key role in the molecular mechanisms of EA efficacy.

  10. Consensus coding sequence (CCDS) database: a standardized set of human and mouse protein-coding regions supported by expert curation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujar, Shashikant; O'Leary, Nuala A; Farrell, Catherine M; Loveland, Jane E; Mudge, Jonathan M; Wallin, Craig; Girón, Carlos G; Diekhans, Mark; Barnes, If; Bennett, Ruth; Berry, Andrew E; Cox, Eric; Davidson, Claire; Goldfarb, Tamara; Gonzalez, Jose M; Hunt, Toby; Jackson, John; Joardar, Vinita; Kay, Mike P; Kodali, Vamsi K; Martin, Fergal J; McAndrews, Monica; McGarvey, Kelly M; Murphy, Michael; Rajput, Bhanu; Rangwala, Sanjida H; Riddick, Lillian D; Seal, Ruth L; Suner, Marie-Marthe; Webb, David; Zhu, Sophia; Aken, Bronwen L; Bruford, Elspeth A; Bult, Carol J; Frankish, Adam; Murphy, Terence; Pruitt, Kim D

    2018-01-04

    The Consensus Coding Sequence (CCDS) project provides a dataset of protein-coding regions that are identically annotated on the human and mouse reference genome assembly in genome annotations produced independently by NCBI and the Ensembl group at EMBL-EBI. This dataset is the product of an international collaboration that includes NCBI, Ensembl, HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee, Mouse Genome Informatics and University of California, Santa Cruz. Identically annotated coding regions, which are generated using an automated pipeline and pass multiple quality assurance checks, are assigned a stable and tracked identifier (CCDS ID). Additionally, coordinated manual review by expert curators from the CCDS collaboration helps in maintaining the integrity and high quality of the dataset. The CCDS data are available through an interactive web page (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CCDS/CcdsBrowse.cgi) and an FTP site (ftp://ftp.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pub/CCDS/). In this paper, we outline the ongoing work, growth and stability of the CCDS dataset and provide updates on new collaboration members and new features added to the CCDS user interface. We also present expert curation scenarios, with specific examples highlighting the importance of an accurate reference genome assembly and the crucial role played by input from the research community. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research 2017.

  11. Optimal choice of word length when comparing two Markov sequences using a χ 2-statistic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xin; Tang, Kujin; Ren, Jie; Waterman, Michael; Sun, Fengzhu

    2017-10-03

    Alignment-free sequence comparison using counts of word patterns (grams, k-tuples) has become an active research topic due to the large amount of sequence data from the new sequencing technologies. Genome sequences are frequently modelled by Markov chains and the likelihood ratio test or the corresponding approximate χ 2 -statistic has been suggested to compare two sequences. However, it is not known how to best choose the word length k in such studies. We develop an optimal strategy to choose k by maximizing the statistical power of detecting differences between two sequences. Let the orders of the Markov chains for the two sequences be r 1 and r 2 , respectively. We show through both simulations and theoretical studies that the optimal k= max(r 1 ,r 2 )+1 for both long sequences and next generation sequencing (NGS) read data. The orders of the Markov chains may be unknown and several methods have been developed to estimate the orders of Markov chains based on both long sequences and NGS reads. We study the power loss of the statistics when the estimated orders are used. It is shown that the power loss is minimal for some of the estimators of the orders of Markov chains. Our studies provide guidelines on choosing the optimal word length for the comparison of Markov sequences.

  12. Comparative genome sequencing of Drosophila pseudoobscura: Chromosomal, gene, and cis-element evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richards, Stephen; Liu, Yue; Bettencourt, Brian R.

    2005-01-01

    years (Myr) since the pseudoobscura/melanogaster divergence. Genes expressed in the testes had higher amino acid sequence divergence than the genome-wide average, consistent with the rapid evolution of sex-specific proteins. Cis-regulatory sequences are more conserved than random and nearby sequences......We have sequenced the genome of a second Drosophila species, Drosophila pseudoobscura, and compared this to the genome sequence of Drosophila melanogaster, a primary model organism. Throughout evolution the vast majority of Drosophila genes have remained on the same chromosome arm, but within each...... between the species-but the difference is slight, suggesting that the evolution of cis-regulatory elements is flexible. Overall, a pattern of repeat-mediated chromosomal rearrangement, and high coadaptation of both male genes and cis-regulatory sequences emerges as important themes of genome divergence...

  13. Intestinal lesions in pediatric Crohn disease: comparative detectability among pulse sequences at MR enterography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Beomseok; Kim, Myung-Joon; Lee, Mi-Jung; Koh, Hong; Han, Kyung Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Variable sequences can be used in MR enterography, and no consensus exists for the best protocol in children with Crohn disease. To compare the lesion detectability of various MR enterography sequences and to correlate the findings of these sequences with the Pediatric Crohn's Disease Activity Index (PCDAI) in children with Crohn disease. Children with clinically or pathologically confirmed Crohn disease underwent MR enterography, including a single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE) sequence, motility imaging (coronal 2-D balanced fast field echo), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and dynamic contrast enhancement imaging (including arterial, portal and delayed phases). The lesion detectability of each sequence was graded 0-2 for each involved bowel segment. The lesion detectability and PCDAI result on different sequences were compared using the weighted least squares method and Student's t-test, respectively. Fifteen children (11 boys, 4 girls, mean age 13.7 ± 1.4 years) with a total of 41 lesions were included in this study. All lesions detected in more than two sequences were visible on the single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE) sequence. The relative lesion detection rate was 78.1% on motility imaging, 90.2% on DWI, and 92.7% on arterial, 95.1% on portal and 95.1% on delayed phase imaging. Compared to the SSFSE sequence, motility imaging (P < 0.001) and DWI (P = 0.039) demonstrated lower detectability. The mean PCDAI result in the detected lesions was statistically higher only on dynamic enhancement imaging (P < 0.001). All MR enterography sequences were found to have relatively high lesion detectability in children with Crohn disease, while motility imaging showed the lowest lesion detectability. Lesions detected on dynamic enhancement imaging showed a higher PCDAI result, which suggests that this sequence is specific for active inflammation. (orig.)

  14. Spatially conserved regulatory elements identified within human and mouse Cd247 gene using high-throughput sequencing data from the ENCODE project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pundhir, Sachin; Hannibal, Tine Dahlbæk; Bang-Berthelsen, Claus Heiner

    2014-01-01

    . In this study, we have utilized the wealth of high-throughput sequencing data produced during the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project to identify spatially conserved regulatory elements within the Cd247 gene from human and mouse. We show the presence of two transcription factor binding sites...

  15. Virulence Studies of Different Sequence Types and Geographical Origins of Streptococcus suis Serotype 2 in a Mouse Model of Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Auger

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Multilocus sequence typing previously identified three predominant sequence types (STs of Streptococcus suis serotype 2: ST1 strains predominate in Eurasia while North American (NA strains are generally ST25 and ST28. However, ST25/ST28 and ST1 strains have also been isolated in Asia and NA, respectively. Using a well-standardized mouse model of infection, the virulence of strains belonging to different STs and different geographical origins was evaluated. Results demonstrated that although a certain tendency may be observed, S. suis serotype 2 virulence is difficult to predict based on ST and geographical origin alone; strains belonging to the same ST presented important differences of virulence and did not always correlate with origin. The only exception appears to be NA ST28 strains, which were generally less virulent in both systemic and central nervous system (CNS infection models. Persistent and high levels of bacteremia accompanied by elevated CNS inflammation are required to cause meningitis. Although widely used, in vitro tests such as phagocytosis and killing assays require further standardization in order to be used as predictive tests for evaluating virulence of strains. The use of strains other than archetypal strains has increased our knowledge and understanding of the S. suis serotype 2 population dynamics.

  16. Comparative Analysis of Pain Behaviours in Humanized Mouse Models of Sickle Cell Anemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxun Lei

    Full Text Available Pain is a hallmark feature of sickle cell anemia (SCA but management of chronic as well as acute pain remains a major challenge. Mouse models of SCA are essential to examine the mechanisms of pain and develop novel therapeutics. To facilitate this effort, we compared humanized homozygous BERK and Townes sickle mice for the effect of gender and age on pain behaviors. Similar to previously characterized BERK sickle mice, Townes sickle mice show more mechanical, thermal, and deep tissue hyperalgesia with increasing age. Female Townes sickle mice demonstrate more hyperalgesia compared to males similar to that reported for BERK mice and patients with SCA. Mechanical, thermal and deep tissue hyperalgesia increased further after hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R treatment in Townes sickle mice. Together, these data show BERK sickle mice exhibit a significantly greater degree of hyperalgesia for all behavioral measures as compared to gender- and age-matched Townes sickle mice. However, the genetically distinct "knock-in" strategy of human α and β transgene insertion in Townes mice as compared to BERK mice, may provide relative advantage for further genetic manipulations to examine specific mechanisms of pain.

  17. Survey sequencing and comparative analysis of the elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byrappa Venkatesh

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Owing to their phylogenetic position, cartilaginous fishes (sharks, rays, skates, and chimaeras provide a critical reference for our understanding of vertebrate genome evolution. The relatively small genome of the elephant shark, Callorhinchus milii, a chimaera, makes it an attractive model cartilaginous fish genome for whole-genome sequencing and comparative analysis. Here, the authors describe survey sequencing (1.4x coverage and comparative analysis of the elephant shark genome, one of the first cartilaginous fish genomes to be sequenced to this depth. Repetitive sequences, represented mainly by a novel family of short interspersed element-like and long interspersed element-like sequences, account for about 28% of the elephant shark genome. Fragments of approximately 15,000 elephant shark genes reveal specific examples of genes that have been lost differentially during the evolution of tetrapod and teleost fish lineages. Interestingly, the degree of conserved synteny and conserved sequences between the human and elephant shark genomes are higher than that between human and teleost fish genomes. Elephant shark contains putative four Hox clusters indicating that, unlike teleost fish genomes, the elephant shark genome has not experienced an additional whole-genome duplication. These findings underscore the importance of the elephant shark as a critical reference vertebrate genome for comparative analysis of the human and other vertebrate genomes. This study also demonstrates that a survey-sequencing approach can be applied productively for comparative analysis of distantly related vertebrate genomes.

  18. Ultra-deep sequencing of mouse mitochondrial DNA: mutational patterns and their origins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Ameur

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Somatic mutations of mtDNA are implicated in the aging process, but there is no universally accepted method for their accurate quantification. We have used ultra-deep sequencing to study genome-wide mtDNA mutation load in the liver of normally- and prematurely-aging mice. Mice that are homozygous for an allele expressing a proof-reading-deficient mtDNA polymerase (mtDNA mutator mice have 10-times-higher point mutation loads than their wildtype siblings. In addition, the mtDNA mutator mice have increased levels of a truncated linear mtDNA molecule, resulting in decreased sequence coverage in the deleted region. In contrast, circular mtDNA molecules with large deletions occur at extremely low frequencies in mtDNA mutator mice and can therefore not drive the premature aging phenotype. Sequence analysis shows that the main proportion of the mutation load in heterozygous mtDNA mutator mice and their wildtype siblings is inherited from their heterozygous mothers consistent with germline transmission. We found no increase in levels of point mutations or deletions in wildtype C57Bl/6N mice with increasing age, thus questioning the causative role of these changes in aging. In addition, there was no increased frequency of transversion mutations with time in any of the studied genotypes, arguing against oxidative damage as a major cause of mtDNA mutations. Our results from studies of mice thus indicate that most somatic mtDNA mutations occur as replication errors during development and do not result from damage accumulation in adult life.

  19. Comparative sequence analysis of Sordaria macrospora and Neurospora crassa as a means to improve genome annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowrousian, Minou; Würtz, Christian; Pöggeler, Stefanie; Kück, Ulrich

    2004-03-01

    One of the most challenging parts of large scale sequencing projects is the identification of functional elements encoded in a genome. Recently, studies of genomes of up to six different Saccharomyces species have demonstrated that a comparative analysis of genome sequences from closely related species is a powerful approach to identify open reading frames and other functional regions within genomes [Science 301 (2003) 71, Nature 423 (2003) 241]. Here, we present a comparison of selected sequences from Sordaria macrospora to their corresponding Neurospora crassa orthologous regions. Our analysis indicates that due to the high degree of sequence similarity and conservation of overall genomic organization, S. macrospora sequence information can be used to simplify the annotation of the N. crassa genome.

  20. Comparative analysis of MR sequences to detect structural brain lesions in tuberous sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto Gama, Hugo Pereira; Campos Meirelles, Rogerio Goncalves de; Mendonca do Rego, Jose Iram; Rocha, Antonio Jose da; Silva, Carlos Jorge da; Braga, Flavio Tulio; Martins Maia, Antonio Carlos; Lederman, Henrique Manoel

    2006-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis (TS) is a neurocutaneous genetically inherited disease with variable penetrance characterized by dysplasias and hamartomas affecting multiple organs. MR is the imaging method of choice to demonstrate structural brain lesions in TS. To compare MR sequences and determine which is most useful for the demonstration of each type of brain lesion in TS patients. We reviewed MR scans of 18 TS patients for the presence of cortical tubers, white matter lesions (radial bands), subependymal nodules, and subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SGCA) on the following sequences: (1) T1-weighted spin-echo (T1 SE) images before and after gadolinium (Gd) injection; (2) nonenhanced T1 SE sequence with an additional magnetization transfer contrast medium pulse on resonance (T1 SE/MTC); and (3) fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence. Cortical tubers were found in significantly (P<0.05) larger numbers and more conspicuously in FLAIR and T1 SE/MTC sequences. The T1 SE/MTC sequence was far superior to other methods in detecting white matter lesions (P<0.01). There was no significant difference between the T1 SE/MTC and T1 SE (before and after Gd injection) sequences in the detection of subependymal nodules; FLAIR sequence showed less sensitivity than the others in identifying the nodules. T1 SE sequences after Gd injection demonstrated better the limits of the SGCA. We demonstrated the importance of appropriate MRI sequences for diagnosis of the most frequent brain lesions in TS. Our study reinforces the fact that each sequence has a particular application according to the type of TS lesion. Gd injection might be useful in detecting SGCA; however, the parameters of size and location are also important for a presumptive diagnosis of these tumors. (orig.)

  1. Post-contrast T1-weighted sequences in pediatric abdominal imaging: comparative analysis of three different sequences and imaging approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roque, Andreia; Ramalho, Miguel; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Heredia, Vasco; Burke, Lauren M.; De Campos, Rafael O.P.; Semelka, Richard C. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Department of Radiology, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Post-contrast T1-weighted imaging is an essential component of a comprehensive pediatric abdominopelvic MR examination. However, consistent good image quality is challenging, as respiratory motion in sedated children can substantially degrade the image quality. To compare the image quality of three different post-contrast T1-weighted imaging techniques - standard three-dimensional gradient-echo (3-D-GRE), magnetization-prepared gradient-recall echo (MP-GRE) and 3-D-GRE with radial data sampling (radial 3-D-GRE) - acquired in pediatric patients younger than 5 years of age. Sixty consecutive exams performed in 51 patients (23 females, 28 males; mean age 2.5 ± 1.4 years) constituted the final study population. Thirty-nine scans were performed at 3 T and 21 scans were performed at 1.5 T. Two different reviewers independently and blindly qualitatively evaluated all sequences to determine image quality and extent of artifacts. MP-GRE and radial 3-D-GRE sequences had the least respiratory motion (P < 0.0001). Standard 3-D-GRE sequences displayed the lowest average score ratings in hepatic and pancreatic edge definition, hepatic vessel clarity and overall image quality. Radial 3-D-GRE sequences showed the highest scores ratings in overall image quality. Our preliminary results support the preference of fat-suppressed radial 3-D-GRE as the best post-contrast T1-weighted imaging approach for patients under the age of 5 years, when dynamic imaging is not essential. (orig.)

  2. Comparative analysis of myostatin gene and promoter sequences of Qinchuan and Red Angus cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Y L; Wu, Y H; Quan, F S; Liu, Y G; Zhang, Y

    2013-09-04

    To better understand the function of the myostatin gene and its promoter region in bovine, we amplified and sequenced the myostatin gene and promoter from the blood of Qinchuan and Red Angus cattle by using polymerase chain reaction. The sequences of Qinchuan and Red Angus cattle were compared with those of other cattle breeds available in GenBank. Exon splice sites were confirmed by mRNA sequencing. Compared to the published sequence (GenBank accession No. AF320998), 69 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified in the Qinchuan myostatin gene, only one of which was an insertion mutation in Qinchuan cattle. There was a 16-bp insertion in the first 705-bp intron in 3 Qinchuan cattle. A total of 7 SNPs were identified in exon 3, in which the mutation occurred in the third base of the codon and was synonymous. On comparing the Qinchuan myostatin gene sequence to that of Red Angus cattle, a total of 50 SNPs were identified in the first and third exons. In addition, there were 18 SNPs identified in the Qinchuan cattle promoter region compared with those of other cattle compared to the Red Angus cattle myostatin promoter region. breeds (GenBank accession No. AF348479), but only 14 SNPs when compared to the Red Angus cattle myostatin promoter region.

  3. A comparative analysis of double inversion recovery TFE and TSE sequences on carotid artery wall imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jun; Di Yujin; Bu Chunqing; Zhang Yanfeng; Li Shuhua

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the characteristics of double inversion recovery (DIR) turbo field echo (TFE) and turbo spin echo (TSE) sequences and explore the value of double inversion recovery TFE sequence on carotid artery wall imaging. Patients and methods: 56 patients (32 males and 24 females, aged 31–76 years with a mean age of 53 years) were performed with DIR TFE and DIR TSE T1 weighted imaging (T1WI) sequences on carotid artery bifurcations. Image quality acquired by different techniques were evaluated and scored by two physicians. Whether there is significant difference is determined by SPSS 11.0 software. Paired-samples t test was used for statistics. Results: There was no significant difference in the image quality scores between two sequences (t = 0.880, P = 0.383 > 0.05). Conclusions: DIR TFE sequence has short scanning time and high spatial resolution. DIR TFE sequence can be used as the preferred sequence for screening carotid atherosclerotic plaque compared with DIR TSE sequence.

  4. Plastome Sequence Determination and Comparative Analysis for Members of the Lolium-Festuca Grass Species Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Melanie L.; Spangenberg, German C.; Forster, John W.; Cogan, Noel O. I.

    2013-01-01

    Chloroplast genome sequences are of broad significance in plant biology, due to frequent use in molecular phylogenetics, comparative genomics, population genetics, and genetic modification studies. The present study used a second-generation sequencing approach to determine and assemble the plastid genomes (plastomes) of four representatives from the agriculturally important Lolium-Festuca species complex of pasture grasses (Lolium multiflorum, Festuca pratensis, Festuca altissima, and Festuca ovina). Total cellular DNA was extracted from either roots or leaves, was sequenced, and the output was filtered for plastome-related reads. A comparison between sources revealed fewer plastome-related reads from root-derived template but an increase in incidental bacterium-derived sequences. Plastome assembly and annotation indicated high levels of sequence identity and a conserved organization and gene content between species. However, frequent deletions within the F. ovina plastome appeared to contribute to a smaller plastid genome size. Comparative analysis with complete plastome sequences from other members of the Poaceae confirmed conservation of most grass-specific features. Detailed analysis of the rbcL–psaI intergenic region, however, revealed a “hot-spot” of variation characterized by independent deletion events. The evolutionary implications of this observation are discussed. The complete plastome sequences are anticipated to provide the basis for potential organelle-specific genetic modification of pasture grasses. PMID:23550121

  5. Comparative analysis of complete chloroplast genome sequence and inversion variation in Lasthenia burkei (Madieae, Asteraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Joseph F; Zanis, Michael J; Emery, Nancy C

    2014-04-01

    Complete chloroplast genome studies can help resolve relationships among large, complex plant lineages such as Asteraceae. We present the first whole plastome from the Madieae tribe and compare its sequence variation to other chloroplast genomes in Asteraceae. We used high throughput sequencing to obtain the Lasthenia burkei chloroplast genome. We compared sequence structure and rates of molecular evolution in the small single copy (SSC), large single copy (LSC), and inverted repeat (IR) regions to those for eight Asteraceae accessions and one Solanaceae accession. The chloroplast sequence of L. burkei is 150 746 bp and contains 81 unique protein coding genes and 4 coding ribosomal RNA sequences. We identified three major inversions in the L. burkei chloroplast, all of which have been found in other Asteraceae lineages, and a previously unreported inversion in Lactuca sativa. Regions flanking inversions contained tRNA sequences, but did not have particularly high G + C content. Substitution rates varied among the SSC, LSC, and IR regions, and rates of evolution within each region varied among species. Some observed differences in rates of molecular evolution may be explained by the relative proportion of coding to noncoding sequence within regions. Rates of molecular evolution vary substantially within and among chloroplast genomes, and major inversion events may be promoted by the presence of tRNAs. Collectively, these results provide insight into different mechanisms that may promote intramolecular recombination and the inversion of large genomic regions in the plastome.

  6. Comparative analysis of catfish BAC end sequences with the zebrafish genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abernathy Jason

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative mapping is a powerful tool to transfer genomic information from sequenced genomes to closely related species for which whole genome sequence data are not yet available. However, such an approach is still very limited in catfish, the most important aquaculture species in the United States. This project was initiated to generate additional BAC end sequences and demonstrate their applications in comparative mapping in catfish. Results We reported the generation of 43,000 BAC end sequences and their applications for comparative genome analysis in catfish. Using these and the additional 20,000 existing BAC end sequences as a resource along with linkage mapping and existing physical map, conserved syntenic regions were identified between the catfish and zebrafish genomes. A total of 10,943 catfish BAC end sequences (17.3% had significant BLAST hits to the zebrafish genome (cutoff value ≤ e-5, of which 3,221 were unique gene hits, providing a platform for comparative mapping based on locations of these genes in catfish and zebrafish. Genetic linkage mapping of microsatellites associated with contigs allowed identification of large conserved genomic segments and construction of super scaffolds. Conclusion BAC end sequences and their associated polymorphic markers are great resources for comparative genome analysis in catfish. Highly conserved chromosomal regions were identified to exist between catfish and zebrafish. However, it appears that the level of conservation at local genomic regions are high while a high level of chromosomal shuffling and rearrangements exist between catfish and zebrafish genomes. Orthologous regions established through comparative analysis should facilitate both structural and functional genome analysis in catfish.

  7. Plastome Sequence Determination and Comparative Analysis for Members of the Lolium-Festuca Grass Species Complex

    OpenAIRE

    Hand, Melanie L.; Spangenberg, German C.; Forster, John W.; Cogan, Noel O. I.

    2013-01-01

    Chloroplast genome sequences are of broad significance in plant biology, due to frequent use in molecular phylogenetics, comparative genomics, population genetics, and genetic modification studies. The present study used a second-generation sequencing approach to determine and assemble the plastid genomes (plastomes) of four representatives from the agriculturally important Lolium-Festuca species complex of pasture grasses (Lolium multiflorum, Festuca pratensis, Festuca altissima, and Festuca...

  8. Temporal Sequence of Autolysis in the Cerebellar Cortex of the Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnie, J W; Blumbergs, P C; Manavis, J

    2016-05-01

    This study examined the temporal sequence of post-mortem changes in the cerebellar cortical granular and Purkinje cell layers of mice kept at a constant ambient temperature for up to 4 weeks. Nuclei of granule cell microneurons became pyknotic early after death, increasing progressively until, by 7 days, widespread nuclear lysis resulted in marked cellular depletion of the granular layer. Purkinje cells were relatively unaltered until about 96 h post mortem, at which time there was shrinkage and multivacuolation of the amphophilic cytoplasm, nuclear hyperchromasia and, sometimes, a perinuclear clear space. By 7 days, Purkinje cells had hypereosinophilic cytoplasm and frequent nuclear pyknosis. By 2 weeks after death, Purkinje cells showed homogenization, the cytoplasm being uniformly eosinophilic, progressing to a 'ghost-like' appearance in which the cytoplasm had pale eosinophilic staining with indistinct cell boundaries, and nuclei often absent. The results of this study could assist in differentiating post-mortem autolysis from ante-mortem lesions in the cerebellar cortex and determining the post-mortem interval. Moreover, this information could be useful when interpreting brain lesions in valuable mice found dead unexpectedly during the course of biomedical experiments. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Percoll gradient-centrifuged capacitated mouse sperm have increased fertilizing ability and higher contents of sulfogalactosylglycerolipid and docosahexaenoic acid-containing phosphatidylcholine compared to washed capacitated mouse sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furimsky, Anna; Vuong, Ngoc; Xu, Hongbin; Kumarathasan, Premkumari; Xu, Min; Weerachatyanukul, Wattana; Bou Khalil, Maroun; Kates, Morris; Tanphaichitr, Nongnuj

    2005-03-01

    Although Percoll gradient centrifugation has been used routinely to prepare motile human sperm, its use in preparing motile mouse sperm has been limited. Here, we showed that Percoll gradient-centrifuged (PGC) capacitated mouse sperm had markedly higher fertilizing ability (sperm-zona pellucida [ZP] binding and in vitro fertilization) than washed capacitated mouse sperm. We also showed that the lipid profiles of PGC capacitated sperm and washed capacitated sperm differed significantly. The PGC sperm had much lower contents of cholesterol and phospholipids. This resulted in relative enrichment of male germ cell-specific sulfogalactosylglycerolipid (SGG), a ZP-binding ligand, in PGC capacitated sperm, and this would explain, in part, their increased ZP-binding ability compared with that of washed capacitated sperm. Analyses of phospholipid fatty acyl chains revealed that PGC capacitated sperm were enriched in phosphatidylcholine (PC) molecular species containing highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFAs), with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; C22: 6n-3) being the predominant HUFA (42% of total hydrocarbon chains of PC). In contrast, the level of PC-HUFAs comprising arachidonic acid (20:4n-6), docosapentaenoic acid (C22:5n-6), and DHA in washed capacitated sperm was only 27%. Having the highest unsaturation degree among all HUFAs in PC, DHA would enhance membrane fluidity to the uppermost. Therefore, membranes of PGC capacitated sperm would undergo fertilization-related fusion events at higher rates than washed capacitated sperm. These results suggested that PGC mouse sperm should be used in fertilization experiments and that SGG and DHA should be considered to be important biomarkers for sperm fertilizing ability.

  10. Comparing methods of classifying life courses: Sequence analysis and latent class analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elzinga, C.H.; Liefbroer, Aart C.; Han, Sapphire

    2017-01-01

    We compare life course typology solutions generated by sequence analysis (SA) and latent class analysis (LCA). First, we construct an analytic protocol to arrive at typology solutions for both methodologies and present methods to compare the empirical quality of alternative typologies. We apply this

  11. Comparing methods of classifying life courses: sequence analysis and latent class analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, Y.; Liefbroer, A.C.; Elzinga, C.

    2017-01-01

    We compare life course typology solutions generated by sequence analysis (SA) and latent class analysis (LCA). First, we construct an analytic protocol to arrive at typology solutions for both methodologies and present methods to compare the empirical quality of alternative typologies. We apply this

  12. Characterization of Liaoning cashmere goat transcriptome: sequencing, de novo assembly, functional annotation and comparative analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongliang Liu

    Full Text Available Liaoning cashmere goat is a famous goat breed for cashmere wool. In order to increase the transcriptome data and accelerate genetic improvement for this breed, we performed de novo transcriptome sequencing to generate the first expressed sequence tag dataset for the Liaoning cashmere goat, using next-generation sequencing technology.Transcriptome sequencing of Liaoning cashmere goat on a Roche 454 platform yielded 804,601 high-quality reads. Clustering and assembly of these reads produced a non-redundant set of 117,854 unigenes, comprising 13,194 isotigs and 104,660 singletons. Based on similarity searches with known proteins, 17,356 unigenes were assigned to 6,700 GO categories, and the terms were summarized into three main GO categories and 59 sub-categories. 3,548 and 46,778 unigenes had significant similarity to existing sequences in the KEGG and COG databases, respectively. Comparative analysis revealed that 42,254 unigenes were aligned to 17,532 different sequences in NCBI non-redundant nucleotide databases. 97,236 (82.51% unigenes were mapped to the 30 goat chromosomes. 35,551 (30.17% unigenes were matched to 11,438 reported goat protein-coding genes. The remaining non-matched unigenes were further compared with cattle and human reference genes, 67 putative new goat genes were discovered. Additionally, 2,781 potential simple sequence repeats were initially identified from all unigenes.The transcriptome of Liaoning cashmere goat was deep sequenced, de novo assembled, and annotated, providing abundant data to better understand the Liaoning cashmere goat transcriptome. The potential simple sequence repeats provide a material basis for future genetic linkage and quantitative trait loci analyses.

  13. Comparing the mechanical influence of vinculin, focal adhesion kinase and p53 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klemm, Anna H.; Diez, Gerold; Alonso, Jose-Luis; Goldmann, Wolfgang H.

    2009-01-01

    Cytoskeletal reorganization is an ongoing process when cells adhere, move or invade extracellular substrates. The cellular force generation and transmission are determined by the intactness of the actomyosin-(focal adhesion complex)-integrin connection. We investigated the intracellular course of action in mouse embryonic fibroblasts deficient in the focal adhesion proteins vinculin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and the nuclear matrix protein p53 using magnetic tweezer and nanoparticle tracking techniques. Results show that the lack of these proteins decrease cellular stiffness and affect cell rheological behavior. The decrease in cellular binding strength was higher in FAK- to vinculin-deficient cells, whilst p53-deficient cells showed no effect compared to wildtype cells. The intracellular cytoskeletal activity was lowest in wildtype cells, but increased in the following order when cells lacked FAK+p53 > p53 > vinculin. In summary, cell mechanical processes are differently affected by the focal adhesion proteins vinculin and FAK than by the nuclear matrix protein, p53.

  14. Integrating Multiple Analytical Datasets to Compare Metabolite Profiles of Mouse Colonic-Cecal Contents and Feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huawei; Grapov, Dmitry; Jackson, Matthew I; Fahrmann, Johannes; Fiehn, Oliver; Combs, Gerald F

    2015-09-11

    The pattern of metabolites produced by the gut microbiome comprises a phenotype indicative of the means by which that microbiome affects the gut. We characterized that phenotype in mice by conducting metabolomic analyses of the colonic-cecal contents, comparing that to the metabolite patterns of feces in order to determine the suitability of fecal specimens as proxies for assessing the metabolic impact of the gut microbiome. We detected a total of 270 low molecular weight metabolites in colonic-cecal contents and feces by gas chromatograph, time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF) and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography, quadrapole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF). Of that number, 251 (93%) were present in both types of specimen, representing almost all known biochemical pathways related to the amino acid, carbohydrate, energy, lipid, membrane transport, nucleotide, genetic information processing, and cancer-related metabolism. A total of 115 metabolites differed significantly in relative abundance between both colonic-cecal contents and feces. These data comprise the first characterization of relationships among metabolites present in the colonic-cecal contents and feces in a healthy mouse model, and shows that feces can be a useful proxy for assessing the pattern of metabolites to which the colonic mucosum is exposed.

  15. Integrating Multiple Analytical Datasets to Compare Metabolite Profiles of Mouse Colonic-Cecal Contents and Feces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huawei Zeng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The pattern of metabolites produced by the gut microbiome comprises a phenotype indicative of the means by which that microbiome affects the gut. We characterized that phenotype in mice by conducting metabolomic analyses of the colonic-cecal contents, comparing that to the metabolite patterns of feces in order to determine the suitability of fecal specimens as proxies for assessing the metabolic impact of the gut microbiome. We detected a total of 270 low molecular weight metabolites in colonic-cecal contents and feces by gas chromatograph, time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography, quadrapole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF. Of that number, 251 (93% were present in both types of specimen, representing almost all known biochemical pathways related to the amino acid, carbohydrate, energy, lipid, membrane transport, nucleotide, genetic information processing, and cancer-related metabolism. A total of 115 metabolites differed significantly in relative abundance between both colonic-cecal contents and feces. These data comprise the first characterization of relationships among metabolites present in the colonic-cecal contents and feces in a healthy mouse model, and shows that feces can be a useful proxy for assessing the pattern of metabolites to which the colonic mucosum is exposed.

  16. Structure of a mouse immunoglobulin G that lacks the entire CH1 domain: Protein sequencing and small-angle X-ray scattering studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Takako; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Nakanishi, Mamoru; Arata, Yoji; Sato, Mamoru; Katsube, Yukiteru; Takio, Koji

    1990-01-01

    The structure of a short-chain IgG2a antibody, which is a member of the family of mouse anti-dansyl switch variant antibodies with identical variable regions but different heavy-chain constant regions, is reported. Amino acid sequencing analyses have demonstrated that in the short-chain IgG2a antibody the entire C H 1 domain is deleted whereas the hinge region remains intact. Small-angle X-ray scattering data were collected for the short-chain IgG2a antibody and compared with those for the switch variant IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b antibodies with the normal heavy chain. It has been concluded that deletion of the C H 1 domain results in a large structural change and the short-chain IgG2a antibody possesses an elongated molecular shape with a much smaller hinge angle as compared with the normal IgG2a antibody that is a Y-shaped molecule

  17. Structure of a mouse immunoglobulin G that lacks the entire C sub H 1 domain: Protein sequencing and small-angle X-ray scattering studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igarashi, Takako; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Nakanishi, Mamoru; Arata, Yoji (Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)); Sato, Mamoru; Katsube, Yukiteru (Osaka Univ. (Japan)); Takio, Koji (Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Saitama (Japan))

    1990-06-19

    The structure of a short-chain IgG2a antibody, which is a member of the family of mouse anti-dansyl switch variant antibodies with identical variable regions but different heavy-chain constant regions, is reported. Amino acid sequencing analyses have demonstrated that in the short-chain IgG2a antibody the entire C{sub H}1 domain is deleted whereas the hinge region remains intact. Small-angle X-ray scattering data were collected for the short-chain IgG2a antibody and compared with those for the switch variant IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b antibodies with the normal heavy chain. It has been concluded that deletion of the C{sub H}1 domain results in a large structural change and the short-chain IgG2a antibody possesses an elongated molecular shape with a much smaller hinge angle as compared with the normal IgG2a antibody that is a Y-shaped molecule.

  18. Comparative genome sequencing of drosophila pseudoobscura: Chromosomal, gene and cis-element evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, Stephen; Liu, Yue; Bettencourt, Brian R.; Hradecky, Pavel; Letovsky, Stan; Nielsen, Rasmus; Thornton, Kevin; Todd, Melissa J.; Chen, Rui; Meisel, Richard P.; Couronne, Olivier; Hua, Sujun; Smith, Mark A.; Bussemaker, Harmen J.; van Batenburg, Marinus F.; Howells, Sally L.; Scherer, Steven E.; Sodergren, Erica; Matthews, Beverly B.; Crosby, Madeline A.; Schroeder, Andrew J.; Ortiz-Barrientos, Daniel; Rives, Catherine M.; Metzker, Michael L.; Muzny, Donna M.; Scott, Graham; Steffen, David; Wheeler, David A.; Worley, Kim C.; Havlak, Paul; Durbin, K. James; Egan, Amy; Gill, Rachel; Hume, Jennifer; Morgan, Margaret B.; Miner, George; Hamilton, Cerissa; Huang, Yanmei; Waldron, Lenee; Verduzco, Daniel; Blankenburg, Kerstin P.; Dubchak, Inna; Noor, Mohamed A.F.; Anderson, Wyatt; White, Kevin P.; Clark, Andrew G.; Schaeffer, Stephen W.; Gelbart, William; Weinstock, George M.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2004-04-01

    The genome sequence of a second fruit fly, D. pseudoobscura, presents an opportunity for comparative analysis of a primary model organism D. melanogaster. The vast majority of Drosophila genes have remained on the same arm, but within each arm gene order has been extensively reshuffled leading to the identification of approximately 1300 syntenic blocks. A repetitive sequence is found in the D. pseudoobscura genome at many junctions between adjacent syntenic blocks. Analysis of this novel repetitive element family suggests that recombination between offset elements may have given rise to many paracentric inversions, thereby contributing to the shuffling of gene order in the D. pseudoobscura lineage. Based on sequence similarity and synteny, 10,516 putative orthologs have been identified as a core gene set conserved over 35 My since divergence. Genes expressed in the testes had higher amino acid sequence divergence than the genome wide average consistent with the rapid evolution of sex-specific proteins. Cis-regulatory sequences are more conserved than control sequences between the species but the difference is slight, suggesting that the evolution of cis-regulatory elements is flexible. Overall, a picture of repeat mediated chromosomal rearrangement, and high co-adaptation of both male genes and cis-regulatory sequences emerges as important themes of genome divergence between these species of Drosophila.

  19. Comparative pathogenicity of Coxsackievirus A16 circulating and noncirculating strains in vitro and in a neonatal mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, L.; Liu, X.; Li, J.L.; Chang, J.L.; Liu, G.C.; Yu, X.F.; Zhang, W.Y.

    2015-01-01

    An enterovirus 71 (EV71) vaccine for the prevention of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HMFD) is available, but it is not known whether the EV71 vaccine cross-protects against Coxsackievirus (CV) infection. Furthermore, although an inactivated circulating CVA16 Changchun 024 (CC024) strain vaccine candidate is effective in newborn mice, the CC024 strain causes severe lesions in muscle and lung tissues. Therefore, an effective CV vaccine with improved pathogenic safety is needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo safety and in vitro replication capability of a noncirculating CVA16 SHZH05 strain. The replication capacity of circulating CVA16 strains CC024, CC045, CC090 and CC163 and the noncirculating SHZH05 strain was evaluated by cytopathic effect in different cell lines. The replication capacity and pathogenicity of the CC024 and SHZH05 strains were also evaluated in a neonatal mouse model. Histopathological and viral load analyses demonstrated that the SHZH05 strain had an in vitro replication capacity comparable to the four CC strains. The CC024, but not the SHZH05 strain, became distributed in a variety of tissues and caused severe lesions and mortality in neonatal mice. The differences in replication capacity and in vivo pathogenicity of the CC024 and SHZH05 strains may result from differences in the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of viral functional polyproteins P1, P2 and P3. Our findings suggest that the noncirculating SHZH05 strain may be a safer CV vaccine candidate than the CC024 strain

  20. Comparative pathogenicity of Coxsackievirus A16 circulating and noncirculating strains in vitro and in a neonatal mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, L. [Institute of Virology and AIDS Research, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun (China); The 208th Hospital of PLA, Changchun (China); Liu, X.; Li, J.L.; Chang, J.L.; Liu, G.C. [Institute of Virology and AIDS Research, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun (China); Yu, X.F. [Institute of Virology and AIDS Research, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun (China); Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Zhang, W.Y. [Institute of Virology and AIDS Research, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun (China)

    2015-03-27

    An enterovirus 71 (EV71) vaccine for the prevention of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HMFD) is available, but it is not known whether the EV71 vaccine cross-protects against Coxsackievirus (CV) infection. Furthermore, although an inactivated circulating CVA16 Changchun 024 (CC024) strain vaccine candidate is effective in newborn mice, the CC024 strain causes severe lesions in muscle and lung tissues. Therefore, an effective CV vaccine with improved pathogenic safety is needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo safety and in vitro replication capability of a noncirculating CVA16 SHZH05 strain. The replication capacity of circulating CVA16 strains CC024, CC045, CC090 and CC163 and the noncirculating SHZH05 strain was evaluated by cytopathic effect in different cell lines. The replication capacity and pathogenicity of the CC024 and SHZH05 strains were also evaluated in a neonatal mouse model. Histopathological and viral load analyses demonstrated that the SHZH05 strain had an in vitro replication capacity comparable to the four CC strains. The CC024, but not the SHZH05 strain, became distributed in a variety of tissues and caused severe lesions and mortality in neonatal mice. The differences in replication capacity and in vivo pathogenicity of the CC024 and SHZH05 strains may result from differences in the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of viral functional polyproteins P1, P2 and P3. Our findings suggest that the noncirculating SHZH05 strain may be a safer CV vaccine candidate than the CC024 strain.

  1. Comparative analysis of the prion protein gene sequences in African lion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chang-De; Pang, Wan-Yong; Zhao, De-Ming

    2006-10-01

    The prion protein gene of African lion (Panthera Leo) was first cloned and polymorphisms screened. The results suggest that the prion protein gene of eight African lions is highly homogenous. The amino acid sequences of the prion protein (PrP) of all samples tested were identical. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (C42T, C81A, C420T, T600C) in the prion protein gene (Prnp) of African lion were found, but no amino acid substitutions. Sequence analysis showed that the higher homology is observed to felis catus AF003087 (96.7%) and to sheep number M31313.1 (96.2%) Genbank accessed. With respect to all the mammalian prion protein sequences compared, the African lion prion protein sequence has three amino acid substitutions. The homology might in turn affect the potential intermolecular interactions critical for cross species transmission of prion disease.

  2. Comparative molecular analysis of early and late cancer cachexia-induced muscle wasting in mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rulin; Zhang, Santao; Lu, Xing; Hu, Wenjun; Lou, Ning; Zhao, Yan; Zhou, Jia; Zhang, Xiaoping; Yang, Hongmei

    2016-12-01

    Cancer-induced muscle wasting, which commonly occurs in cancer cachexia, is characterized by impaired quality of life and poor patient survival. To identify an appropriate treatment, research on the mechanism underlying muscle wasting is essential. Thus far, studies on muscle wasting using cancer cachectic models have generally focused on early cancer cachexia (ECC), before severe body weight loss occurs. In the present study, we established models of ECC and late cancer cachexia (LCC) and compared different stages of cancer cachexia using two cancer cachectic mouse models induced by colon-26 (C26) adenocarcinoma or Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC). In each model, tumor-bearing (TB) and control (CN) mice were injected with cancer cells and PBS, respectively. The TB and CN mice, which were euthanized on the 24th day or the 36th day after injection, were defined as the ECC and ECC-CN mice or the LCC and LCC-CN mice. In addition, the tissues were harvested and analyzed. We found that both the ECC and LCC mice developed cancer cachexia. The amounts of muscle loss differed between the ECC and LCC mice. Moreover, the expression of some molecules was altered in the muscles from the LCC mice but not in those from the ECC mice compared with their CN mice. In conclusion, the molecules with altered expression in the muscles from the ECC and LCC mice were not exactly the same. These findings may provide some clues for therapy which could prevent the muscle wasting in cancer cachexia from progression to the late stage.

  3. Comparative therapeutic effects of velaglucerase alfa and imiglucerase in a Gaucher disease mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Hai Xu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Gaucher disease type 1 is caused by the defective activity of the lysosomal enzyme, acid beta-glucosidase (GCase. Regular infusions of purified recombinant GCase are the standard of care for reversing hematologic, hepatic, splenic, and bony manifestations. Here, similar in vitro enzymatic properties, and in vivo pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (PK/PD and therapeutic efficacy of GCase were found with two human GCases, recombinant GCase (CHO cell, imiglucerase, Imig and gene-activated GCase (human fibrosarcoma cells, velaglucerase alfa, Vela, in a Gaucher mouse, D409V/null. About 80+% of either enzyme localized to the liver interstitial cells and <5% was recovered in spleens and lungs after bolus i.v. injections. Glucosylceramide (GC levels and storage cell numbers were reduced in a dose (5, 15 or 60 U/kg/wk dependent manner in livers (60-95% and in spleens ( approximately 10-30%. Compared to Vela, Imig (60 U/kg/wk had lesser effects at reducing hepatic GC (p = 0.0199 by 4 wks; this difference disappeared by 8 wks when nearly WT levels were achieved by Imig. Anti-GCase IgG was detected in GCase treated mice at 60 U/kg/wk, and IgE mediated acute hypersensitivity and death occurred after several injections of 60 U/kg/wk (21% with Vela and 34% with Imig. The responses of GC levels and storage cell numbers in Vela- and Imig-treated Gaucher mice at various doses provide a backdrop for clinical applications and decisions.

  4. Genomic sequence around butterfly wing development genes: annotation and comparative analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês C Conceição

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Analysis of genomic sequence allows characterization of genome content and organization, and access beyond gene-coding regions for identification of functional elements. BAC libraries, where relatively large genomic regions are made readily available, are especially useful for species without a fully sequenced genome and can increase genomic coverage of phylogenetic and biological diversity. For example, no butterfly genome is yet available despite the unique genetic and biological properties of this group, such as diversified wing color patterns. The evolution and development of these patterns is being studied in a few target species, including Bicyclus anynana, where a whole-genome BAC library allows targeted access to large genomic regions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We characterize ∼1.3 Mb of genomic sequence around 11 selected genes expressed in B. anynana developing wings. Extensive manual curation of in silico predictions, also making use of a large dataset of expressed genes for this species, identified repetitive elements and protein coding sequence, and highlighted an expansion of Alcohol dehydrogenase genes. Comparative analysis with orthologous regions of the lepidopteran reference genome allowed assessment of conservation of fine-scale synteny (with detection of new inversions and translocations and of DNA sequence (with detection of high levels of conservation of non-coding regions around some, but not all, developmental genes. CONCLUSIONS: The general properties and organization of the available B. anynana genomic sequence are similar to the lepidopteran reference, despite the more than 140 MY divergence. Our results lay the groundwork for further studies of new interesting findings in relation to both coding and non-coding sequence: 1 the Alcohol dehydrogenase expansion with higher similarity between the five tandemly-repeated B. anynana paralogs than with the corresponding B. mori orthologs, and 2 the high

  5. Comparative and Mixture Effect of Cynodon Dactylon, ElectroMagnetic Field and Insulin on Diabetic Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafisi, Saeid; Nezhady, Mohammad Ali Mohammad; Asghari, Mohammad Hossein

    2012-12-01

    New investigations are in progress to find some alternative treatments for diabetes mellitus. Herbs are some of the interesting medications in this regard. Cynodon dactylon (C.d) is a potential plant to be considered as a new medication. On the other hand, the effect of the Electromagnetic Field (EMF) on bio organisms is becoming clearer. In this study, the effect of C.d, EMF and insulin have been investigated on the diabetic mouse. Diabetes was induced by a combination of ketamine (60 mg/Kg) and xylazine (10 mg/Kg) which induces a sustained hyperglycemia. Mice were divided into 12 groups: 1) control, 2) normal saline, 3 and 4) 50mg/Kg C.d, 5 and 6) 100 mg/Kg C.d, 7) insulin, 8) insulin and C.d, 9) EMF (110 KHz, 700±20 mG), 10) insulin and EMF, 11) EMF plus C.d and 12) insulin plus C.d and EMF. Blood glucose level was measured after 5 and 60 minutes in C.d administrated groups, and 5 minutes in the other groups by a glucometer set. The data were analyzed by ANOVA and different means were compared by Tukey and Bonferroni tests (p<0.05). According to results, both dosages of C.d had significant lowering effect on blood glucose level. The first dose was more effective than the second, and its impact was just like insulin. The 6(th), 9(th) and 10(th) groups were significant, also. However, they did not show a higher effect than insulin or C.d. The application of EMF had a significant effect compared to the second group, but it did not reduce the glucose level to the normal range. The effect of the 8th group was very impressive and the mean glucose levels in this group were lower than the control group. Considering the data, C.d is a good alternative medication for diabetes mellitus.

  6. The toxicity of silver and silica nanoparticles in comparable human and mouse cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foldbjerg, Rasmus; Beer, Christiane; Sutherland, Duncan S

    The toxicity of silica (SiO2) and PVP-coated silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NPs) was investigated in two pairs of human or mouse cell lines originating from lung epithelium (A549 and ASB-XIV) and macrophages (THP-1 and J744A.1). Both NPs were characterized in H2O and cell media and demonstrated to be...

  7. Identifying novel genes for atherosclerosis through mouse-human comparative genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, XS; Ishimori, N; Korstanje, R; Rollins, J; Paigen, B

    Susceptibility to atherosclerosis is determined by both environmental and genetic factors. Its genetic determinants have been studied by use of quantitative- trait - locus ( QTL) analysis. So far, 21 atherosclerosis QTLs have been identified in the mouse: 7 in a high- fat - diet model only, 9 in a

  8. Quantitative miRNA expression analysis: comparing microarrays with next-generation sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willenbrock, Hanni; Salomon, Jesper; Søkilde, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    Recently, next-generation sequencing has been introduced as a promising, new platform for assessing the copy number of transcripts, while the existing microarray technology is considered less reliable for absolute, quantitative expression measurements. Nonetheless, so far, results from the two...... technologies have only been compared based on biological data, leading to the conclusion that, although they are somewhat correlated, expression values differ significantly. Here, we use synthetic RNA samples, resembling human microRNA samples, to find that microarray expression measures actually correlate...... better with sample RNA content than expression measures obtained from sequencing data. In addition, microarrays appear highly sensitive and perform equivalently to next-generation sequencing in terms of reproducibility and relative ratio quantification....

  9. Microbiological profile of chicken carcasses: A comparative analysis using shotgun metagenomic sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra De Cesare

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years metagenomic and 16S rRNA sequencing have completly changed the microbiological investigations of food products. In this preliminary study, the microbiological profile of chicken carcasses collected from animals fed with different diets were tested by using shotgun metagenomic sequencing. A total of 15 carcasses have been collected at the slaughetrhouse at the end of the refrigeration tunnel from chickens reared for 35 days and fed with a control diet (n=5, a diet supplemented with 1500 FTU/kg of commercial phytase (n=5 and a diet supplemented with 1500 FTU/kg of commercial phytase and 3g/kg of inositol (n=5. Ten grams of neck and breast skin were obtained from each carcass and submited to total DNA extraction by using the DNeasy Blood & Tissue Kit (Qiagen. Sequencing libraries have been prepared by using the Nextera XT DNA Library Preparation Kit (Illumina and sequenced in a HiScanSQ (Illumina at 100 bp in paired ends. A number of sequences ranging between 5 and 9 million was obtained for each sample. Sequence analysis showed that Proteobacteria and Firmicutes represented more than 98% of whole bacterial populations associated to carcass skin in all groups but their abundances were different between groups. Moraxellaceae and other degradative bacteria showed a significantly higher abundance in the control compared to the treated groups. Furthermore, Clostridium perfringens showed a relative frequency of abundance significantly higher in the group fed with phytase and Salmonella enterica in the group fed with phytase plus inositol. The results of this preliminary study showed that metagenome sequencing is suitable to investigate and monitor carcass microbiota in order to detect specific pathogenic and/or degradative populations.

  10. Comparative genetics: synergizing human and NOD mouse studies for identifying genetic causation of type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, John P; Chen, Yi-Guang; Mathews, Clayton E

    2012-01-01

    Although once widely anticipated to unlock how human type 1 diabetes (T1D) develops, extensive study of the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse has failed to yield effective treatments for patients with the disease. This has led many to question the usefulness of this animal model. While criticism about the differences between NOD and human T1D is legitimate, in many cases disease in both species results from perturbations modulated by the same genes or different genes that function within the same biological pathways. Like in humans, unusual polymorphisms within an MHC class II molecule contributes the most T1D risk in NOD mice. This insight supports the validity of this model and suggests the NOD has been improperly utilized to study how to cure or prevent disease in patients. Indeed, clinical trials are far from administering T1D therapeutics to humans at the same concentration ranges and pathological states that inhibit disease in NOD mice. Until these obstacles are overcome it is premature to label the NOD mouse a poor surrogate to test agents that cure or prevent T1D. An additional criticism of the NOD mouse is the past difficulty in identifying genes underlying T1D using conventional mapping studies. However, most of the few diabetogenic alleles identified to date appear relevant to the human disorder. This suggests that rather than abandoning genetic studies in NOD mice, future efforts should focus on improving the efficiency with which diabetes susceptibility genes are detected. The current review highlights why the NOD mouse remains a relevant and valuable tool to understand the genes and their interactions that promote autoimmune diabetes and therapeutics that inhibit this disease. It also describes a new range of technologies that will likely transform how the NOD mouse is used to uncover the genetic causes of T1D for years to come.

  11. Comparative performance of double-digest RAD sequencing across divergent arachnid lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Mercedes; Starrett, James; Derkarabetian, Shahan; Richart, Casey H; Cabrero, Allan; Hedin, Marshal

    2017-05-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies now allow researchers of non-model systems to perform genome-based studies without the requirement of a (often unavailable) closely related genomic reference. We evaluated the role of restriction endonuclease (RE) selection in double-digest restriction-site-associated DNA sequencing (ddRADseq) by generating reduced representation genome-wide data using four different RE combinations. Our expectation was that RE selections targeting longer, more complex restriction sites would recover fewer loci than RE with shorter, less complex sites. We sequenced a diverse sample of non-model arachnids, including five congeneric pairs of harvestmen (Opiliones) and four pairs of spiders (Araneae). Sample pairs consisted of either conspecifics or closely related congeneric taxa, and in total 26 sample pair analyses were tested. Sequence demultiplexing, read clustering and variant calling were performed in the pyRAD program. The 6-base pair cutter EcoRI combined with methylated site-specific 4-base pair cutter MspI produced, on average, the greatest numbers of intra-individual loci and shared loci per sample pair. As expected, the number of shared loci recovered for a sample pair covaried with the degree of genetic divergence, estimated with cytochrome oxidase I sequences, although this relationship was non-linear. Our comparative results will prove useful in guiding protocol selection for ddRADseq experiments on many arachnid taxa where reference genomes, even from closely related species, are unavailable. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Chromosome-scale comparative sequence analysis unravels molecular mechanisms of genome evolution between two wheat cultivars

    KAUST Repository

    Thind, Anupriya Kaur

    2018-02-08

    Background: Recent improvements in DNA sequencing and genome scaffolding have paved the way to generate high-quality de novo assemblies of pseudomolecules representing complete chromosomes of wheat and its wild relatives. These assemblies form the basis to compare the evolutionary dynamics of wheat genomes on a megabase-scale. Results: Here, we provide a comparative sequence analysis of the 700-megabase chromosome 2D between two bread wheat genotypes, the old landrace Chinese Spring and the elite Swiss spring wheat line CH Campala Lr22a. There was a high degree of sequence conservation between the two chromosomes. Analysis of large structural variations revealed four large insertions/deletions (InDels) of >100 kb. Based on the molecular signatures at the breakpoints, unequal crossing over and double-strand break repair were identified as the evolutionary mechanisms that caused these InDels. Three of the large InDels affected copy number of NLRs, a gene family involved in plant immunity. Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) density revealed three haploblocks of 8 Mb, 9 Mb and 48 Mb with a 35-fold increased SNP density compared to the rest of the chromosome. Conclusions: This comparative analysis of two high-quality chromosome assemblies enabled a comprehensive assessment of large structural variations. The insight obtained from this analysis will form the basis of future wheat pan-genome studies.

  13. Comparing Whole-Genome Sequencing with Sanger Sequencing for spa Typing of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Mette Damkjaer; Petersen, Andreas; Worning, Peder

    2014-01-01

    spa typing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has traditionally been done by PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing of the spa repeat region. At Hvidovre Hospital, Denmark, whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of all MRSA isolates has been performed routinely since January 2013, and ...

  14. Comparative analysis of TCDD-induced AhR-mediated gene expression in human, mouse and rat primary B cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalova, Natalia, E-mail: kovalova@msu.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Michigan State University, Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Institute for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Nault, Rance, E-mail: naultran@msu.edu [Institute for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Crawford, Robert, E-mail: crawfo28@msu.edu [Institute for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Zacharewski, Timothy R., E-mail: tzachare@msu.edu [Institute for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Kaminski, Norbert E., E-mail: kamins11@msu.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Michigan State University, Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Institute for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2017-02-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a persistent environmental pollutant that activates the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) resulting in altered gene expression. In vivo, in vitro, and ex vivo studies have demonstrated that B cells are directly impaired by TCDD, and are a sensitive target as evidenced by suppression of antibody responses. The window of sensitivity to TCDD-induced suppression of IgM secretion among mouse, rat and human B cells is similar. Specifically, TCDD must be present within the initial 12 h post B cell stimulation, indicating that TCDD disrupts early signaling network(s) necessary for B lymphocyte activation and differentiation. Therefore, we hypothesized that TCDD treatment across three different species (mouse, rat and human) triggers a conserved, B cell-specific mechanism that is involved in TCDD-induced immunosuppression. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) was used to identify B cell-specific orthologous genes that are differentially expressed in response to TCDD in primary mouse, rat and human B cells. Time course studies identified TCDD-elicited differential expression of 515 human, 2371 mouse and 712 rat orthologous genes over the 24-h period. 28 orthologs were differentially expressed in response to TCDD in all three species. Overrepresented pathways enriched in all three species included cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, ECM-receptor interaction, focal adhesion, regulation of actin cytoskeleton and pathways in cancer. Differentially expressed genes functionally associated with cell-cell signaling in humans, immune response in mice, and oxidation reduction in rats. Overall, these results suggest that despite the conservation of the AhR and its signaling mechanism, TCDD elicits species-specific gene expression changes. - Highlights: • Kovalova TAAP Highlights Nov. 2016 • RNA-Seq identified TCDD-induced gene expression in PWM-activated primary B cells. • TCDD elicited differential expression of 515 human, 2371 mouse and 712

  15. Aggression and commensalism in house mouse: a comparative study across Europe and the Near East

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frynta, D.; Slábová, M.; Váchová, H.; Volfová, R.; Munclinger, Pavel

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 31, - (2005), s. 283-293 ISSN 0096-140X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/01/0989; GA ČR GP206/03/D148; GA AV ČR IAA6111410 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : agonistic behaviour * wild mouse * hybrid zone Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.112, year: 2005

  16. Comparing sequencing assays and human-machine analyses in actionable genomics for glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrzeszczynski, Kazimierz O; Frank, Mayu O; Koyama, Takahiko; Rhrissorrakrai, Kahn; Robine, Nicolas; Utro, Filippo; Emde, Anne-Katrin; Chen, Bo-Juen; Arora, Kanika; Shah, Minita; Vacic, Vladimir; Norel, Raquel; Bilal, Erhan; Bergmann, Ewa A; Moore Vogel, Julia L; Bruce, Jeffrey N; Lassman, Andrew B; Canoll, Peter; Grommes, Christian; Harvey, Steve; Parida, Laxmi; Michelini, Vanessa V; Zody, Michael C; Jobanputra, Vaidehi; Royyuru, Ajay K; Darnell, Robert B

    2017-08-01

    To analyze a glioblastoma tumor specimen with 3 different platforms and compare potentially actionable calls from each. Tumor DNA was analyzed by a commercial targeted panel. In addition, tumor-normal DNA was analyzed by whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and tumor RNA was analyzed by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). The WGS and RNA-seq data were analyzed by a team of bioinformaticians and cancer oncologists, and separately by IBM Watson Genomic Analytics (WGA), an automated system for prioritizing somatic variants and identifying drugs. More variants were identified by WGS/RNA analysis than by targeted panels. WGA completed a comparable analysis in a fraction of the time required by the human analysts. The development of an effective human-machine interface in the analysis of deep cancer genomic datasets may provide potentially clinically actionable calls for individual patients in a more timely and efficient manner than currently possible. NCT02725684.

  17. Mouse adhalin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, L; Vachon, P H; Kuang, W

    1997-01-01

    . To analyze the biological roles of adhalin, we cloned the mouse adhalin cDNA, raised peptide-specific antibodies to its cytoplasmic domain, and examined its expression and localization in vivo and in vitro. The mouse adhalin sequence was 80% identical to that of human, rabbit, and hamster. Adhalin...... was specifically expressed in striated muscle cells and their immediate precursors, and absent in many other cell types. Adhalin expression in embryonic mouse muscle was coincident with primary myogenesis. Its expression was found to be up-regulated at mRNA and protein levels during myogenic differentiation...

  18. Comparative molecular cytogenetics of major repetitive sequence families of three Dendrobium species (Orchidaceae) from Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Rabeya; Alam, Sheikh Shamimul; Menzel, Gerhard; Schmidt, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Dendrobium species show tremendous morphological diversity and have broad geographical distribution. As repetitive sequence analysis is a useful tool to investigate the evolution of chromosomes and genomes, the aim of the present study was the characterization of repetitive sequences from Dendrobium moschatum for comparative molecular and cytogenetic studies in the related species Dendrobium aphyllum, Dendrobium aggregatum and representatives from other orchid genera. Methods In order to isolate highly repetitive sequences, a c0t-1 DNA plasmid library was established. Repeats were sequenced and used as probes for Southern hybridization. Sequence divergence was analysed using bioinformatic tools. Repetitive sequences were localized along orchid chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Key Results Characterization of the c0t-1 library resulted in the detection of repetitive sequences including the (GA)n dinucleotide DmoO11, numerous Arabidopsis-like telomeric repeats and the highly amplified dispersed repeat DmoF14. The DmoF14 repeat is conserved in six Dendrobium species but diversified in representative species of three other orchid genera. FISH analyses showed the genome-wide distribution of DmoF14 in D. moschatum, D. aphyllum and D. aggregatum. Hybridization with the telomeric repeats demonstrated Arabidopsis-like telomeres at the chromosome ends of Dendrobium species. However, FISH using the telomeric probe revealed two pairs of chromosomes with strong intercalary signals in D. aphyllum. FISH showed the terminal position of 5S and 18S–5·8S–25S rRNA genes and a characteristic number of rDNA sites in the three Dendrobium species. Conclusions The repeated sequences isolated from D. moschatum c0t-1 DNA constitute major DNA families of the D. moschatum, D. aphyllum and D. aggregatum genomes with DmoF14 representing an ancient component of orchid genomes. Large intercalary telomere-like arrays suggest chromosomal

  19. Sequencing, Characterization, and Comparative Analyses of the Plastome of Caragana rosea var. rosea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Jiang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available To exploit the drought-resistant Caragana species, we performed a comparative study of the plastomes from four species: Caragana rosea, C. microphylla, C. kozlowii, and C. Korshinskii. The complete plastome sequence of the C. rosea was obtained using the next generation DNA sequencing technology. The genome is a circular structure of 133,122 bases and it lacks inverted repeat. It contains 111 unique genes, including 76 protein-coding, 30 tRNA, and four rRNA genes. Repeat analyses obtained 239, 244, 258, and 246 simple sequence repeats in C. rosea, C. microphylla, C. kozlowii, and C. korshinskii, respectively. Analyses of sequence divergence found two intergenic regions: trnI-CAU-ycf2 and trnN-GUU-ycf1, exhibiting a high degree of variations. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the four Caragana species belong to a monophyletic clade. Analyses of Ka/Ks ratios revealed that five genes: rpl16, rpl20, rps11, rps7, and ycf1 and several sites having undergone strong positive selection in the Caragana branch. The results lay the foundation for the development of molecular markers and the understanding of the evolutionary process for drought-resistant characteristics.

  20. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Dodonaea viscosa: comparative and phylogenetic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saina, Josphat K; Gichira, Andrew W; Li, Zhi-Zhong; Hu, Guang-Wan; Wang, Qing-Feng; Liao, Kuo

    2018-02-01

    The plant chloroplast (cp) genome is a highly conserved structure which is beneficial for evolution and systematic research. Currently, numerous complete cp genome sequences have been reported due to high throughput sequencing technology. However, there is no complete chloroplast genome of genus Dodonaea that has been reported before. To better understand the molecular basis of Dodonaea viscosa chloroplast, we used Illumina sequencing technology to sequence its complete genome. The whole length of the cp genome is 159,375 base pairs (bp), with a pair of inverted repeats (IRs) of 27,099 bp separated by a large single copy (LSC) 87,204 bp, and small single copy (SSC) 17,972 bp. The annotation analysis revealed a total of 115 unique genes of which 81 were protein coding, 30 tRNA, and four ribosomal RNA genes. Comparative genome analysis with other closely related Sapindaceae members showed conserved gene order in the inverted and single copy regions. Phylogenetic analysis clustered D. viscosa with other species of Sapindaceae with strong bootstrap support. Finally, a total of 249 SSRs were detected. Moreover, a comparison of the synonymous (Ks) and nonsynonymous (Ka) substitution rates in D. viscosa showed very low values. The availability of cp genome reported here provides a valuable genetic resource for comprehensive further studies in genetic variation, taxonomy and phylogenetic evolution of Sapindaceae family. In addition, SSR markers detected will be used in further phylogeographic and population structure studies of the species in this genus.

  1. Comparative study and application of MR sialography using different pulse sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Ruihua; Qi Jianping; Feng Dingyi; Zou Mingli; Hu Junwu; Zhu Wenzhen; Xia Liming; Wang Chengyuan

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the accuracy of MR sialography in demonstrating the main salivary duct systems by using a series of pulse sequences and stimulation of salivation by vitamin C. Methods: MR sialography was prospectively performed with STIR, heavily T 2 weighted FSE, and SS FSE sequences in 17 patients suspected with salivary duct abnormalities and 13 volunteers, respectively, and MR sialography was further performed in 16 patients after vitamin C stimulation. The results of the above three sequences were compared with each other. Results: The main salivary gland duct was depicted in all cases by any of the mentioned sequence. The STIR images were significantly superior to SS FSE and heavily T 2 weighted FSE images for demonstrating the salivary duct system, followed by heavily T 2 weighted FSE images. On STIR images, first- and second- order intraglandular branches were clearly depicted in all cases, and the thinnest branches were about 0.8 mm. On heavily T 2 weighted FSE images, the first-order and the second-order intraglandular branches were delineated in 25 of 30 and 18 of 30 cases, respectively. But on SS FSE images, only 20 to 30 first-order and 10 of 30 second-order intraglandular branches could be detected. MR sialography with vitamin C stimulation revealed the good visualization of the salivary duct system, and the ducts became wider than before. In 7 cases with acute sialadenitis, the main duct became slightly wider and the distal ducts were dilated; In 7 cases with benign tumor, the ducts were displaced but remained continuous; The duct in one patients with submandibular gland cancer showed destruction and discontinuity. The ducts of one patient with Sjogren syndrome and one with sialidosis displayed normal. Conclusion: MR sialography with evoked salivation is noninvasive and allows delineation of both normal and abnormal parotid and submandibular gland duct systems, and the images are especially better on STIR sequence

  2. Complete sequence and comparative analysis of the chloroplast genome of coconut palm (Cocos nucifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ya-Yi; Matzke, Antonius J M; Matzke, Marjori

    2013-01-01

    Coconut, a member of the palm family (Arecaceae), is one of the most economically important trees used by mankind. Despite its diverse morphology, coconut is recognized taxonomically as only a single species (Cocos nucifera L.). There are two major coconut varieties, tall and dwarf, the latter of which displays traits resulting from selection by humans. We report here the complete chloroplast (cp) genome of a dwarf coconut plant, and describe the gene content and organization, inverted repeat fluctuations, repeated sequence structure, and occurrence of RNA editing. Phylogenetic relationships of monocots were inferred based on 47 chloroplast protein-coding genes. Potential nodes for events of gene duplication and pseudogenization related to inverted repeat fluctuation were mapped onto the tree using parsimony criteria. We compare our findings with those from other palm species for which complete cp genome sequences are available.

  3. Transcriptome sequencing and comparative transcriptome analysis of the scleroglucan producer Sclerotium rolfsii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stahl Ulf

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The plant pathogenic basidiomycete Sclerotium rolfsii produces the industrially exploited exopolysaccharide scleroglucan, a polymer that consists of (1 → 3-β-linked glucose with a (1 → 6-β-glycosyl branch on every third unit. Although the physicochemical properties of scleroglucan are well understood, almost nothing is known about the genetics of scleroglucan biosynthesis. Similarly, the biosynthetic pathway of oxalate, the main by-product during scleroglucan production, has not been elucidated yet. In order to provide a basis for genetic and metabolic engineering approaches, we studied scleroglucan and oxalate biosynthesis in S. rolfsii using different transcriptomic approaches. Results Two S. rolfsii transcriptomes obtained from scleroglucan-producing and scleroglucan-nonproducing conditions were pooled and sequenced using the 454 pyrosequencing technique yielding ~350,000 reads. These could be assembled into 21,937 contigs and 171,833 singletons, for which 6,951 had significant matches in public protein data bases. Sequence data were used to obtain first insights into the genomics of scleroglucan and oxalate production and to predict putative proteins involved in the synthesis of both metabolites. Using comparative transcriptomics, namely Agilent microarray hybridization and suppression subtractive hybridization, we identified ~800 unigenes which are differently expressed under scleroglucan-producing and non-producing conditions. From these, candidate genes were identified which could represent potential leads for targeted modification of the S. rolfsii metabolism for increased scleroglucan yields. Conclusions The results presented in this paper provide for the first time genomic and transcriptomic data about S. rolfsii and demonstrate the power and usefulness of combined transcriptome sequencing and comparative microarray analysis. The data obtained allowed us to predict the biosynthetic pathways of scleroglucan and

  4. Comparative genomics and repetitive sequence divergence in the species of diploid Nicotiana section Alatae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, K Yoong; Kovarik, Ales; Matyasek, Roman; Chase, Mark W; Knapp, Sandra; McCarthy, Elizabeth; Clarkson, James J; Leitch, Andrew R

    2006-12-01

    Combining phylogenetic reconstructions of species relationships with comparative genomic approaches is a powerful way to decipher evolutionary events associated with genome divergence. Here, we reconstruct the history of karyotype and tandem repeat evolution in species of diploid Nicotiana section Alatae. By analysis of plastid DNA, we resolved two clades with high bootstrap support, one containing N. alata, N. langsdorffii, N. forgetiana and N. bonariensis (called the n = 9 group) and another containing N. plumbaginifolia and N. longiflora (called the n = 10 group). Despite little plastid DNA sequence divergence, we observed, via fluorescent in situ hybridization, substantial chromosomal repatterning, including altered chromosome numbers, structure and distribution of repeats. Effort was focussed on 35S and 5S nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and the HRS60 satellite family of tandem repeats comprising the elements HRS60, NP3R and NP4R. We compared divergence of these repeats in diploids and polyploids of Nicotiana. There are dramatic shifts in the distribution of the satellite repeats and complete replacement of intergenic spacers (IGSs) of 35S rDNA associated with divergence of the species in section Alatae. We suggest that sequence homogenization has replaced HRS60 family repeats at sub-telomeric regions, but that this process may not occur, or occurs more slowly, when the repeats are found at intercalary locations. Sequence homogenization acts more rapidly (at least two orders of magnitude) on 35S rDNA than 5S rDNA and sub-telomeric satellite sequences. This rapid rate of divergence is analogous to that found in polyploid species, and is therefore, in plants, not only associated with polyploidy.

  5. Comparative Lipidomic Analysis of Mouse and Human Brain with Alzheimer Disease*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Robin B.; Oliveira, Tiago G.; Cortes, Etty P.; Honig, Lawrence S.; Duff, Karen E.; Small, Scott A.; Wenk, Markus R.; Shui, Guanghou; Di Paolo, Gilbert

    2012-01-01

    Lipids are key regulators of brain function and have been increasingly implicated in neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer disease (AD). Here, a systems-based approach was employed to determine the lipidome of brain tissues affected by AD. Specifically, we used liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to profile extracts from the prefrontal cortex, entorhinal cortex, and cerebellum of late-onset AD (LOAD) patients, as well as the forebrain of three transgenic familial AD (FAD) mouse models. Although the cerebellum lacked major alterations in lipid composition, we found an elevation of a signaling pool of diacylglycerol as well as sphingolipids in the prefrontal cortex of AD patients. Furthermore, the diseased entorhinal cortex showed specific enrichment of lysobisphosphatidic acid, sphingomyelin, the ganglioside GM3, and cholesterol esters, all of which suggest common pathogenic mechanisms associated with endolysosomal storage disorders. Importantly, a significant increase in cholesterol esters and GM3 was recapitulated in the transgenic FAD models, suggesting that these mice are relevant tools to study aberrant lipid metabolism of endolysosomal dysfunction associated with AD. Finally, genetic ablation of phospholipase D2, which rescues the synaptic and behavioral deficits of an FAD mouse model, fully normalizes GM3 levels. These data thus unmask a cross-talk between the metabolism of phosphatidic acid, the product of phospholipase D2, and gangliosides, and point to a central role of ganglioside anomalies in AD pathogenesis. Overall, our study highlights the hypothesis generating potential of lipidomics and identifies novel region-specific lipid anomalies potentially linked to AD pathogenesis. PMID:22134919

  6. Comparative Sequence Analysis of Multidrug-Resistant IncA/C Plasmids from Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Maria; Pettengill, James B; Gonzalez-Escalona, Narjol; Miller, John; Ayers, Sherry L; Zhao, Shaohua; Allard, Marc W; McDermott, Patrick F; Brown, Eric W; Monday, Steven R

    2017-01-01

    Determinants of multidrug resistance (MDR) are often encoded on mobile elements, such as plasmids, transposons, and integrons, which have the potential to transfer among foodborne pathogens, as well as to other virulent pathogens, increasing the threats these traits pose to human and veterinary health. Our understanding of MDR among Salmonella has been limited by the lack of closed plasmid genomes for comparisons across resistance phenotypes, due to difficulties in effectively separating the DNA of these high-molecular weight, low-copy-number plasmids from chromosomal DNA. To resolve this problem, we demonstrate an efficient protocol for isolating, sequencing and closing IncA/C plasmids from Salmonella sp. using single molecule real-time sequencing on a Pacific Biosciences (Pacbio) RS II Sequencer. We obtained six Salmonella enterica isolates from poultry, representing six different serovars, each exhibiting the MDR-Ampc resistance profile. Salmonella plasmids were obtained using a modified mini preparation and transformed with Escherichia coli DH10Br. A Qiagen Large-Construct kit™ was used to recover highly concentrated and purified plasmid DNA that was sequenced using PacBio technology. These six closed IncA/C plasmids ranged in size from 104 to 191 kb and shared a stable, conserved backbone containing 98 core genes, with only six differences among those core genes. The plasmids encoded a number of antimicrobial resistance genes, including those for quaternary ammonium compounds and mercury. We then compared our six IncA/C plasmid sequences: first with 14 IncA/C plasmids derived from S. enterica available at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), and then with an additional 38 IncA/C plasmids derived from different taxa. These comparisons allowed us to build an evolutionary picture of how antimicrobial resistance may be mediated by this common plasmid backbone. Our project provides detailed genetic information about resistance genes in

  7. Comparative Sequence Analysis of Multidrug-Resistant IncA/C Plasmids from Salmonella enterica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Hoffmann

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Determinants of multidrug resistance (MDR are often encoded on mobile elements, such as plasmids, transposons, and integrons, which have the potential to transfer among foodborne pathogens, as well as to other virulent pathogens, increasing the threats these traits pose to human and veterinary health. Our understanding of MDR among Salmonella has been limited by the lack of closed plasmid genomes for comparisons across resistance phenotypes, due to difficulties in effectively separating the DNA of these high-molecular weight, low-copy-number plasmids from chromosomal DNA. To resolve this problem, we demonstrate an efficient protocol for isolating, sequencing and closing IncA/C plasmids from Salmonella sp. using single molecule real-time sequencing on a Pacific Biosciences (Pacbio RS II Sequencer. We obtained six Salmonella enterica isolates from poultry, representing six different serovars, each exhibiting the MDR-Ampc resistance profile. Salmonella plasmids were obtained using a modified mini preparation and transformed with Escherichia coli DH10Br. A Qiagen Large-Construct kit™ was used to recover highly concentrated and purified plasmid DNA that was sequenced using PacBio technology. These six closed IncA/C plasmids ranged in size from 104 to 191 kb and shared a stable, conserved backbone containing 98 core genes, with only six differences among those core genes. The plasmids encoded a number of antimicrobial resistance genes, including those for quaternary ammonium compounds and mercury. We then compared our six IncA/C plasmid sequences: first with 14 IncA/C plasmids derived from S. enterica available at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI, and then with an additional 38 IncA/C plasmids derived from different taxa. These comparisons allowed us to build an evolutionary picture of how antimicrobial resistance may be mediated by this common plasmid backbone. Our project provides detailed genetic information about

  8. Genome sequence and comparative analysis of a putative entomopathogenic Serratia isolated from Caenorhabditis briggsae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abebe-Akele, Feseha; Tisa, Louis S; Cooper, Vaughn S; Hatcher, Philip J; Abebe, Eyualem; Thomas, W Kelley

    2015-07-18

    Entomopathogenic associations between nematodes in the genera Steinernema and Heterorhabdus with their cognate bacteria from the bacterial genera Xenorhabdus and Photorhabdus, respectively, are extensively studied for their potential as biological control agents against invasive insect species. These two highly coevolved associations were results of convergent evolution. Given the natural abundance of bacteria, nematodes and insects, it is surprising that only these two associations with no intermediate forms are widely studied in the entomopathogenic context. Discovering analogous systems involving novel bacterial and nematode species would shed light on the evolutionary processes involved in the transition from free living organisms to obligatory partners in entomopathogenicity. We report the complete genome sequence of a new member of the enterobacterial genus Serratia that forms a putative entomopathogenic complex with Caenorhabditis briggsae. Analysis of the 5.04 MB chromosomal genome predicts 4599 protein coding genes, seven sets of ribosomal RNA genes, 84 tRNA genes and a 64.8 KB plasmid encoding 74 genes. Comparative genomic analysis with three of the previously sequenced Serratia species, S. marcescens DB11 and S. proteamaculans 568, and Serratia sp. AS12, revealed that these four representatives of the genus share a core set of ~3100 genes and extensive structural conservation. The newly identified species shares a more recent common ancestor with S. marcescens with 99% sequence identity in rDNA sequence and orthology across 85.6% of predicted genes. Of the 39 genes/operons implicated in the virulence, symbiosis, recolonization, immune evasion and bioconversion, 21 (53.8%) were present in Serratia while 33 (84.6%) and 35 (89%) were present in Xenorhabdus and Photorhabdus EPN bacteria respectively. The majority of unique sequences in Serratia sp. SCBI (South African Caenorhabditis briggsae Isolate) are found in ~29 genomic islands of 5 to 65 genes and are

  9. Complete sequence and comparative analysis of the chloroplast genome of Plinia trunciflora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Eguiluz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Plinia trunciflora is a Brazilian native fruit tree from the Myrtaceae family, also known as jaboticaba. This species has great potential by its fruit production. Due to the high content of essential oils in their leaves and of anthocyanins in the fruits, there is also an increasing interest by the pharmaceutical industry. Nevertheless, there are few studies focusing on its molecular biology and genetic characterization. We herein report the complete chloroplast (cp genome of P. trunciflora using high-throughput sequencing and compare it to other previously sequenced Myrtaceae genomes. The cp genome of P. trunciflora is 159,512 bp in size, comprising inverted repeats of 26,414 bp and single-copy regions of 88,097 bp (LSC and 18,587 bp (SSC. The genome contains 111 single-copy genes (77 protein-coding, 30 tRNA and four rRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis using 57 cp protein-coding genes demonstrated that P. trunciflora, Eugenia uniflora and Acca sellowiana form a cluster with closer relationship to Syzygium cumini than with Eucalyptus. The complete cp sequence reported here can be used in evolutionary and population genetics studies, contributing to resolve the complex taxonomy of this species and fill the gap in genetic characterization.

  10. Complete sequence and comparative analysis of the chloroplast genome of Plinia trunciflora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguiluz, Maria; Yuyama, Priscila Mary; Guzman, Frank; Rodrigues, Nureyev Ferreira; Margis, Rogerio

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Plinia trunciflora is a Brazilian native fruit tree from the Myrtaceae family, also known as jaboticaba. This species has great potential by its fruit production. Due to the high content of essential oils in their leaves and of anthocyanins in the fruits, there is also an increasing interest by the pharmaceutical industry. Nevertheless, there are few studies focusing on its molecular biology and genetic characterization. We herein report the complete chloroplast (cp) genome of P. trunciflora using high-throughput sequencing and compare it to other previously sequenced Myrtaceae genomes. The cp genome of P. trunciflora is 159,512 bp in size, comprising inverted repeats of 26,414 bp and single-copy regions of 88,097 bp (LSC) and 18,587 bp (SSC). The genome contains 111 single-copy genes (77 protein-coding, 30 tRNA and four rRNA genes). Phylogenetic analysis using 57 cp protein-coding genes demonstrated that P. trunciflora, Eugenia uniflora and Acca sellowiana form a cluster with closer relationship to Syzygium cumini than with Eucalyptus. The complete cp sequence reported here can be used in evolutionary and population genetics studies, contributing to resolve the complex taxonomy of this species and fill the gap in genetic characterization. PMID:29111566

  11. Complete sequence and comparative analysis of the chloroplast genome of Plinia trunciflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguiluz, Maria; Yuyama, Priscila Mary; Guzman, Frank; Rodrigues, Nureyev Ferreira; Margis, Rogerio

    2017-01-01

    Plinia trunciflora is a Brazilian native fruit tree from the Myrtaceae family, also known as jaboticaba. This species has great potential by its fruit production. Due to the high content of essential oils in their leaves and of anthocyanins in the fruits, there is also an increasing interest by the pharmaceutical industry. Nevertheless, there are few studies focusing on its molecular biology and genetic characterization. We herein report the complete chloroplast (cp) genome of P. trunciflora using high-throughput sequencing and compare it to other previously sequenced Myrtaceae genomes. The cp genome of P. trunciflora is 159,512 bp in size, comprising inverted repeats of 26,414 bp and single-copy regions of 88,097 bp (LSC) and 18,587 bp (SSC). The genome contains 111 single-copy genes (77 protein-coding, 30 tRNA and four rRNA genes). Phylogenetic analysis using 57 cp protein-coding genes demonstrated that P. trunciflora, Eugenia uniflora and Acca sellowiana form a cluster with closer relationship to Syzygium cumini than with Eucalyptus. The complete cp sequence reported here can be used in evolutionary and population genetics studies, contributing to resolve the complex taxonomy of this species and fill the gap in genetic characterization.

  12. Draft Genome Sequencing and Comparative Analysis of Aspergillus sojae NBRC4239

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Atsushi; Oshima, Kenshiro; Noguchi, Hideki; Ogawa, Masahiro; Takahashi, Tadashi; Oguma, Tetsuya; Koyama, Yasuji; Itoh, Takehiko; Hattori, Masahira; Hanya, Yoshiki

    2011-01-01

    We conducted genome sequencing of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus sojae NBRC4239 isolated from the koji used to prepare Japanese soy sauce. We used the 454 pyrosequencing technology and investigated the genome with respect to enzymes and secondary metabolites in comparison with other Aspergilli sequenced. Assembly of 454 reads generated a non-redundant sequence of 39.5-Mb possessing 13 033 putative genes and 65 scaffolds composed of 557 contigs. Of the 2847 open reading frames with Pfam domain scores of >150 found in A. sojae NBRC4239, 81.7% had a high degree of similarity with the genes of A. oryzae. Comparative analysis identified serine carboxypeptidase and aspartic protease genes unique to A. sojae NBRC4239. While A. oryzae possessed three copies of α-amyalse gene, A. sojae NBRC4239 possessed only a single copy. Comparison of 56 gene clusters for secondary metabolites between A. sojae NBRC4239 and A. oryzae revealed that 24 clusters were conserved, whereas 32 clusters differed between them that included a deletion of 18 508 bp containing mfs1, mao1, dmaT, and pks-nrps for the cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) biosynthesis, explaining the no productivity of CPA in A. sojae. The A. sojae NBRC4239 genome data will be useful to characterize functional features of the koji moulds used in Japanese industries. PMID:21659486

  13. Comparing whole-genome sequencing with Sanger sequencing for spa typing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Mette Damkjær; Petersen, Andreas; Worning, Peder; Nielsen, Jesper Boye; Larner-Svensson, Hanna; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Andersen, Leif Percival; Jarløv, Jens Otto; Boye, Kit; Larsen, Anders Rhod; Westh, Henrik

    2014-12-01

    spa typing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has traditionally been done by PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing of the spa repeat region. At Hvidovre Hospital, Denmark, whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of all MRSA isolates has been performed routinely since January 2013, and an in-house analysis pipeline determines the spa types. Due to national surveillance, all MRSA isolates are sent to Statens Serum Institut, where the spa type is determined by PCR and Sanger sequencing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability of the spa types obtained by 150-bp paired-end Illumina WGS. MRSA isolates from new MRSA patients in 2013 (n = 699) in the capital region of Denmark were included. We found a 97% agreement between spa types obtained by the two methods. All isolates achieved a spa type by both methods. Nineteen isolates differed in spa types by the two methods, in most cases due to the lack of 24-bp repeats in the whole-genome-sequenced isolates. These related but incorrect spa types should have no consequence in outbreak investigations, since all epidemiologically linked isolates, regardless of spa type, will be included in the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. This will reveal the close relatedness of the spa types. In conclusion, our data show that WGS is a reliable method to determine the spa type of MRSA. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequences and Comparative Analysis of Chenopodium quinoa and C. album.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Su-Young; Cheon, Kyeong-Sik; Yoo, Ki-Oug; Lee, Hyun-Oh; Cho, Kwang-Soo; Suh, Jong-Taek; Kim, Su-Jeong; Nam, Jeong-Hwan; Sohn, Hwang-Bae; Kim, Yul-Ho

    2017-01-01

    The Chenopodium genus comprises ~150 species, including Chenopodium quinoa and Chenopodium album , two important crops with high nutritional value. To elucidate the phylogenetic relationship between the two species, the complete chloroplast (cp) genomes of these species were obtained by next generation sequencing. We performed comparative analysis of the sequences and, using InDel markers, inferred phylogeny and genetic diversity of the Chenopodium genus. The cp genome is 152,099 bp ( C. quinoa ) and 152,167 bp ( C. album ) long. In total, 119 genes (78 protein-coding, 37 tRNA, and 4 rRNA) were identified. We found 14 ( C. quinoa ) and 15 ( C. album ) tandem repeats (TRs); 14 TRs were present in both species and C. album and C. quinoa each had one species-specific TR. The trnI-GAU intron sequences contained one ( C. quinoa ) or two ( C. album ) copies of TRs (66 bp); the InDel marker was designed based on the copy number variation in TRs. Using the InDel markers, we detected this variation in the TR copy number in four species, Chenopodium hybridum, Chenopodium pumilio, Chenopodium ficifolium , and Chenopodium koraiense , but not in Chenopodium glaucum . A comparison of coding and non-coding regions between C. quinoa and C. album revealed divergent sites. Nucleotide diversity >0.025 was found in 17 regions-14 were located in the large single copy region (LSC), one in the inverted repeats, and two in the small single copy region (SSC). A phylogenetic analysis based on 59 protein-coding genes from 25 taxa resolved Chenopodioideae monophyletic and sister to Betoideae. The complete plastid genome sequences and molecular markers based on divergence hotspot regions in the two Chenopodium taxa will help to resolve the phylogenetic relationships of Chenopodium .

  15. Comparative Analysis and Modeling of the Severity of Steatohepatitis in DDC-Treated Mouse Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Vikash; Sultan, Marc; Kashofer, Karl; Ralser, Meryem; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav; Starmann, Julia; Osprian, Ingrid; Grimm, Christina; Hache, Hendrik; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Sültmann, Holger; Trauner, Michael; Denk, Helmut; Zatloukal, Kurt; Lehrach, Hans; Wierling, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has a broad spectrum of disease states ranging from mild steatosis characterized by an abnormal retention of lipids within liver cells to steatohepatitis (NASH) showing fat accumulation, inflammation, ballooning and degradation of hepatocytes, and fibrosis. Ultimately, steatohepatitis can result in liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Methodology and Results In this study we have analyzed three different mouse strains, A/J, C57BL/6J, and PWD/PhJ, that show different degrees of steatohepatitis when administered a 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC) containing diet. RNA-Seq gene expression analysis, protein analysis and metabolic profiling were applied to identify differentially expressed genes/proteins and perturbed metabolite levels of mouse liver samples upon DDC-treatment. Pathway analysis revealed alteration of arachidonic acid (AA) and S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) metabolism upon other pathways. To understand metabolic changes of arachidonic acid metabolism in the light of disease expression profiles a kinetic model of this pathway was developed and optimized according to metabolite levels. Subsequently, the model was used to study in silico effects of potential drug targets for steatohepatitis. Conclusions We identified AA/eicosanoid metabolism as highly perturbed in DDC-induced mice using a combination of an experimental and in silico approach. Our analysis of the AA/eicosanoid metabolic pathway suggests that 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE), 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE) and prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) are perturbed in DDC mice. We further demonstrate that a dynamic model can be used for qualitative prediction of metabolic changes based on transcriptomics data in a disease-related context. Furthermore, SAMe metabolism was identified as being perturbed due to DDC treatment. Several genes as well as some metabolites of this module show differences between A/J and C57BL/6J

  16. Comparative analysis and modeling of the severity of steatohepatitis in DDC-treated mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Vikash; Sultan, Marc; Kashofer, Karl; Ralser, Meryem; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav; Starmann, Julia; Osprian, Ingrid; Grimm, Christina; Hache, Hendrik; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Sültmann, Holger; Trauner, Michael; Denk, Helmut; Zatloukal, Kurt; Lehrach, Hans; Wierling, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has a broad spectrum of disease states ranging from mild steatosis characterized by an abnormal retention of lipids within liver cells to steatohepatitis (NASH) showing fat accumulation, inflammation, ballooning and degradation of hepatocytes, and fibrosis. Ultimately, steatohepatitis can result in liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study we have analyzed three different mouse strains, A/J, C57BL/6J, and PWD/PhJ, that show different degrees of steatohepatitis when administered a 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC) containing diet. RNA-Seq gene expression analysis, protein analysis and metabolic profiling were applied to identify differentially expressed genes/proteins and perturbed metabolite levels of mouse liver samples upon DDC-treatment. Pathway analysis revealed alteration of arachidonic acid (AA) and S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) metabolism upon other pathways. To understand metabolic changes of arachidonic acid metabolism in the light of disease expression profiles a kinetic model of this pathway was developed and optimized according to metabolite levels. Subsequently, the model was used to study in silico effects of potential drug targets for steatohepatitis. We identified AA/eicosanoid metabolism as highly perturbed in DDC-induced mice using a combination of an experimental and in silico approach. Our analysis of the AA/eicosanoid metabolic pathway suggests that 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE), 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE) and prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) are perturbed in DDC mice. We further demonstrate that a dynamic model can be used for qualitative prediction of metabolic changes based on transcriptomics data in a disease-related context. Furthermore, SAMe metabolism was identified as being perturbed due to DDC treatment. Several genes as well as some metabolites of this module show differences between A/J and C57BL/6J on the one hand and PWD/PhJ on the other.

  17. Comparative analysis and modeling of the severity of steatohepatitis in DDC-treated mouse strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikash Pandey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD has a broad spectrum of disease states ranging from mild steatosis characterized by an abnormal retention of lipids within liver cells to steatohepatitis (NASH showing fat accumulation, inflammation, ballooning and degradation of hepatocytes, and fibrosis. Ultimately, steatohepatitis can result in liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: In this study we have analyzed three different mouse strains, A/J, C57BL/6J, and PWD/PhJ, that show different degrees of steatohepatitis when administered a 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC containing diet. RNA-Seq gene expression analysis, protein analysis and metabolic profiling were applied to identify differentially expressed genes/proteins and perturbed metabolite levels of mouse liver samples upon DDC-treatment. Pathway analysis revealed alteration of arachidonic acid (AA and S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe metabolism upon other pathways. To understand metabolic changes of arachidonic acid metabolism in the light of disease expression profiles a kinetic model of this pathway was developed and optimized according to metabolite levels. Subsequently, the model was used to study in silico effects of potential drug targets for steatohepatitis. CONCLUSIONS: We identified AA/eicosanoid metabolism as highly perturbed in DDC-induced mice using a combination of an experimental and in silico approach. Our analysis of the AA/eicosanoid metabolic pathway suggests that 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE, 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE and prostaglandin D2 (PGD2 are perturbed in DDC mice. We further demonstrate that a dynamic model can be used for qualitative prediction of metabolic changes based on transcriptomics data in a disease-related context. Furthermore, SAMe metabolism was identified as being perturbed due to DDC treatment. Several genes as well as some metabolites of this module show differences between A

  18. Chromosomal structures and repetitive sequences divergence in Cucumis species revealed by comparative cytogenetic mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunxia; Cheng, Chunyan; Li, Ji; Yang, Shuqiong; Wang, Yunzhu; Li, Ziang; Chen, Jinfeng; Lou, Qunfeng

    2015-09-25

    Differentiation and copy number of repetitive sequences affect directly chromosome structure which contributes to reproductive isolation and speciation. Comparative cytogenetic mapping has been verified an efficient tool to elucidate the differentiation and distribution of repetitive sequences in genome. In present study, the distinct chromosomal structures of five Cucumis species were revealed through genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) technique and comparative cytogenetic mapping of major satellite repeats. Chromosome structures of five Cucumis species were investigated using GISH and comparative mapping of specific satellites. Southern hybridization was employed to study the proliferation of satellites, whose structural characteristics were helpful for analyzing chromosome evolution. Preferential distribution of repetitive DNAs at the subtelomeric regions was found in C. sativus, C hystrix and C. metuliferus, while majority was positioned at the pericentromeric heterochromatin regions in C. melo and C. anguria. Further, comparative GISH (cGISH) through using genomic DNA of other species as probes revealed high homology of repeats between C. sativus and C. hystrix. Specific satellites including 45S rDNA, Type I/II, Type III, Type IV, CentM and telomeric repeat were then comparatively mapped in these species. Type I/II and Type IV produced bright signals at the subtelomeric regions of C. sativus and C. hystrix simultaneously, which might explain the significance of their amplification in the divergence of Cucumis subgenus from the ancient ancestor. Unique positioning of Type III and CentM only at the centromeric domains of C. sativus and C. melo, respectively, combining with unique southern bands, revealed rapid evolutionary patterns of centromeric DNA in Cucumis. Obvious interstitial telomeric repeats were observed in chromosomes 1 and 2 of C. sativus, which might provide evidence of the fusion hypothesis of chromosome evolution from x = 12 to x = 7 in

  19. Comparative analysis of function and interaction of transcription factors in nematodes: Extensive conservation of orthology coupled to rapid sequence evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Rama S

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Much of the morphological diversity in eukaryotes results from differential regulation of gene expression in which transcription factors (TFs play a central role. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is an established model organism for the study of the roles of TFs in controlling the spatiotemporal pattern of gene expression. Using the fully sequenced genomes of three Caenorhabditid nematode species as well as genome information from additional more distantly related organisms (fruit fly, mouse, and human we sought to identify orthologous TFs and characterized their patterns of evolution. Results We identified 988 TF genes in C. elegans, and inferred corresponding sets in C. briggsae and C. remanei, containing 995 and 1093 TF genes, respectively. Analysis of the three gene sets revealed 652 3-way reciprocal 'best hit' orthologs (nematode TF set, approximately half of which are zinc finger (ZF-C2H2 and ZF-C4/NHR types and HOX family members. Examination of the TF genes in C. elegans and C. briggsae identified the presence of significant tandem clustering on chromosome V, the majority of which belong to ZF-C4/NHR family. We also found evidence for lineage-specific duplications and rapid evolution of many of the TF genes in the two species. A search of the TFs conserved among nematodes in Drosophila melanogaster, Mus musculus and Homo sapiens revealed 150 reciprocal orthologs, many of which are associated with important biological processes and human diseases. Finally, a comparison of the sequence, gene interactions and function indicates that nematode TFs conserved across phyla exhibit significantly more interactions and are enriched in genes with annotated mutant phenotypes compared to those that lack orthologs in other species. Conclusion Our study represents the first comprehensive genome-wide analysis of TFs across three nematode species and other organisms. The findings indicate substantial conservation of transcription

  20. Comparative genomic sequence analysis of strawberry and other rosids reveals significant microsynteny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbott Albert

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fragaria belongs to the Rosaceae, an economically important family that includes a number of important fruit producing genera such as Malus and Prunus. Using genomic sequences from 50 Fragaria fosmids, we have examined the microsynteny between Fragaria and other plant models. Results In more than half of the strawberry fosmids, we found syntenic regions that are conserved in Populus, Vitis, Medicago and/or Arabidopsis with Populus containing the greatest number of syntenic regions with Fragaria. The longest syntenic region was between LG VIII of the poplar genome and the strawberry fosmid 72E18, where seven out of twelve predicted genes were collinear. We also observed an unexpectedly high level of conserved synteny between Fragaria (rosid I and Vitis (basal rosid. One of the strawberry fosmids, 34E24, contained a cluster of R gene analogs (RGAs with NBS and LRR domains. We detected clusters of RGAs with high sequence similarity to those in 34E24 in all the genomes compared. In the phylogenetic tree we have generated, all the NBS-LRR genes grouped together with Arabidopsis CNL-A type NBS-LRR genes. The Fragaria RGA grouped together with those of Vitis and Populus in the phylogenetic tree. Conclusions Our analysis shows considerable microsynteny between Fragaria and other plant genomes such as Populus, Medicago, Vitis, and Arabidopsis to a lesser degree. We also detected a cluster of NBS-LRR type genes that are conserved in all the genomes compared.

  1. Estimating and comparing microbial diversity in the presence of sequencing errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chun-Huo

    2016-01-01

    Estimating and comparing microbial diversity are statistically challenging due to limited sampling and possible sequencing errors for low-frequency counts, producing spurious singletons. The inflated singleton count seriously affects statistical analysis and inferences about microbial diversity. Previous statistical approaches to tackle the sequencing errors generally require different parametric assumptions about the sampling model or about the functional form of frequency counts. Different parametric assumptions may lead to drastically different diversity estimates. We focus on nonparametric methods which are universally valid for all parametric assumptions and can be used to compare diversity across communities. We develop here a nonparametric estimator of the true singleton count to replace the spurious singleton count in all methods/approaches. Our estimator of the true singleton count is in terms of the frequency counts of doubletons, tripletons and quadrupletons, provided these three frequency counts are reliable. To quantify microbial alpha diversity for an individual community, we adopt the measure of Hill numbers (effective number of taxa) under a nonparametric framework. Hill numbers, parameterized by an order q that determines the measures’ emphasis on rare or common species, include taxa richness (q = 0), Shannon diversity (q = 1, the exponential of Shannon entropy), and Simpson diversity (q = 2, the inverse of Simpson index). A diversity profile which depicts the Hill number as a function of order q conveys all information contained in a taxa abundance distribution. Based on the estimated singleton count and the original non-singleton frequency counts, two statistical approaches (non-asymptotic and asymptotic) are developed to compare microbial diversity for multiple communities. (1) A non-asymptotic approach refers to the comparison of estimated diversities of standardized samples with a common finite sample size or sample completeness. This

  2. Complete chloroplast genome sequence of Elodea canadensis and comparative analyses with other monocot plastid genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huotari, Tea; Korpelainen, Helena

    2012-10-15

    Elodea canadensis is an aquatic angiosperm native to North America. It has attracted great attention due to its invasive nature when transported to new areas in its non-native range. We have determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the chloroplast (cp) genome of Elodea. Taxonomically Elodea is a basal monocot, and only few monocot cp genomes representing early lineages of monocots have been sequenced so far. The genome is a circular double-stranded DNA molecule 156,700 bp in length, and has a typical structure with large (LSC 86,194 bp) and small (SSC 17,810 bp) single-copy regions separated by a pair of inverted repeats (IRs 26,348 bp each). The Elodea cp genome contains 113 unique genes and 16 duplicated genes in the IR regions. A comparative analysis showed that the gene order and organization of the Elodea cp genome is almost identical to that of Amborella trichopoda, a basal angiosperm. The structure of IRs in Elodea is unique among monocot species with the whole cp genome sequenced. In Elodea and another monocot Lemna minor the borders between IRs and LSC are located upstream of rps 19 gene and downstream of trnH-GUG gene, while in most monocots, IR has extended to include both trnH and rps 19 genes. A phylogenetic analysis conducted using Bayesian method, based on the DNA sequences of 81 chloroplast genes from 17 monocot taxa provided support for the placement of Elodea together with Lemna as a basal monocot and the next diverging lineage of monocots after Acorales. In comparison with other monocots, the Elodea cp genome has gone through only few rearrangements or gene losses. IR of Elodea has a unique structure among the monocot species studied so far as its structure is similar to that of a basal angiosperm Amborella. This result together with phylogenetic analyses supports the placement of Elodea as a basal monocot to the next diverging lineage of monocots after Acorales. So far, only few cp genomes representing early lineages of monocots have been

  3. Comparative genome sequence analysis of Choristoneura occidentalis Freeman and C. rosaceana Harris (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae alphabaculoviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David K Thumbi

    Full Text Available The complete genome sequences of Choristoneura occidentalis and C. rosaceana nucleopolyhedroviruses (ChocNPV and ChroNPV, respectively (Baculoviridae: Alphabaculovirus were determined and compared with each other and with those of other baculoviruses, including the genome of the closely related C. fumiferana NPV (CfMNPV. The ChocNPV genome was 128,446 bp in length (1147 bp smaller than that of CfMNPV, had a G+C content of 50.1%, and contained 148 open reading frames (ORFs. In comparison, the ChroNPV genome was 129,052 bp in length, had a G+C content of 48.6% and contained 149 ORFs. ChocNPV and ChroNPV shared 144 ORFs in common, and had a 77% sequence identity with each other and 96.5% and 77.8% sequence identity, respectively, with CfMNPV. Five homologous regions (hrs, with sequence similarities to those of CfMNPV, were identified in ChocNPV, whereas the ChroNPV genome contained three hrs featuring up to 14 repeats. Both genomes encoded three inhibitors of apoptosis (IAP-1, IAP-2, and IAP-3, as reported for CfMNPV, and the ChocNPV IAP-3 gene represented the most divergent functional region of this genome relative to CfMNPV. Two ORFs were unique to ChocNPV, and four were unique to ChroNPV. ChroNPV ORF chronpv38 is a eukaryotic initiation factor 5 (eIF-5 homolog that has also been identified in the C. occidentalis granulovirus (ChocGV and is believed to be the product of horizontal gene transfer from the host. Based on levels of sequence identity and phylogenetic analysis, both ChocNPV and ChroNPV fall within group I alphabaculoviruses, where ChocNPV appears to be more closely related to CfMNPV than does ChroNPV. Our analyses suggest that it may be appropriate to consider ChocNPV and CfMNPV as variants of the same virus species.

  4. Whole Genome Sequencing Increases Molecular Diagnostic Yield Compared with Current Diagnostic Testing for Inherited Retinal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingford, Jamie M; Barton, Stephanie; Bhaskar, Sanjeev; Williams, Simon G; Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I; O'Sullivan, James; Lamb, Janine A; Perveen, Rahat; Hall, Georgina; Newman, William G; Bishop, Paul N; Roberts, Stephen A; Leach, Rick; Tearle, Rick; Bayliss, Stuart; Ramsden, Simon C; Nemeth, Andrea H; Black, Graeme C M

    2016-05-01

    To compare the efficacy of whole genome sequencing (WGS) with targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) in the diagnosis of inherited retinal disease (IRD). Case series. A total of 562 patients diagnosed with IRD. We performed a direct comparative analysis of current molecular diagnostics with WGS. We retrospectively reviewed the findings from a diagnostic NGS DNA test for 562 patients with IRD. A subset of 46 of 562 patients (encompassing potential clinical outcomes of diagnostic analysis) also underwent WGS, and we compared mutation detection rates and molecular diagnostic yields. In addition, we compared the sensitivity and specificity of the 2 techniques to identify known single nucleotide variants (SNVs) using 6 control samples with publically available genotype data. Diagnostic yield of genomic testing. Across known disease-causing genes, targeted NGS and WGS achieved similar levels of sensitivity and specificity for SNV detection. However, WGS also identified 14 clinically relevant genetic variants through WGS that had not been identified by NGS diagnostic testing for the 46 individuals with IRD. These variants included large deletions and variants in noncoding regions of the genome. Identification of these variants confirmed a molecular diagnosis of IRD for 11 of the 33 individuals referred for WGS who had not obtained a molecular diagnosis through targeted NGS testing. Weighted estimates, accounting for population structure, suggest that WGS methods could result in an overall 29% (95% confidence interval, 15-45) uplift in diagnostic yield. We show that WGS methods can detect disease-causing genetic variants missed by current NGS diagnostic methodologies for IRD and thereby demonstrate the clinical utility and additional value of WGS. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparative analyses of two Geraniaceae transcriptomes using next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Ruhlman, Tracey A; Mower, Jeffrey P; Jansen, Robert K

    2013-12-29

    Organelle genomes of Geraniaceae exhibit several unusual evolutionary phenomena compared to other angiosperm families including accelerated nucleotide substitution rates, widespread gene loss, reduced RNA editing, and extensive genomic rearrangements. Since most organelle-encoded proteins function in multi-subunit complexes that also contain nuclear-encoded proteins, it is likely that the atypical organellar phenomena affect the evolution of nuclear genes encoding organellar proteins. To begin to unravel the complex co-evolutionary interplay between organellar and nuclear genomes in this family, we sequenced nuclear transcriptomes of two species, Geranium maderense and Pelargonium x hortorum. Normalized cDNA libraries of G. maderense and P. x hortorum were used for transcriptome sequencing. Five assemblers (MIRA, Newbler, SOAPdenovo, SOAPdenovo-trans [SOAPtrans], Trinity) and two next-generation technologies (454 and Illumina) were compared to determine the optimal transcriptome sequencing approach. Trinity provided the highest quality assembly of Illumina data with the deepest transcriptome coverage. An analysis to determine the amount of sequencing needed for de novo assembly revealed diminishing returns of coverage and quality with data sets larger than sixty million Illumina paired end reads for both species. The G. maderense and P. x hortorum transcriptomes contained fewer transcripts encoding the PLS subclass of PPR proteins relative to other angiosperms, consistent with reduced mitochondrial RNA editing activity in Geraniaceae. In addition, transcripts for all six plastid targeted sigma factors were identified in both transcriptomes, suggesting that one of the highly divergent rpoA-like ORFs in the P. x hortorum plastid genome is functional. The findings support the use of the Illumina platform and assemblers optimized for transcriptome assembly, such as Trinity or SOAPtrans, to generate high-quality de novo transcriptomes with broad coverage. In addition

  6. Comparative Transcriptomes and EVO-DEVO Studies Depending on Next Generation Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiancheng Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High throughput technology has prompted the progressive omics studies, including genomics and transcriptomics. We have reviewed the improvement of comparative omic studies, which are attributed to the high throughput measurement of next generation sequencing technology. Comparative genomics have been successfully applied to evolution analysis while comparative transcriptomics are adopted in comparison of expression profile from two subjects by differential expression or differential coexpression, which enables their application in evolutionary developmental biology (EVO-DEVO studies. EVO-DEVO studies focus on the evolutionary pressure affecting the morphogenesis of development and previous works have been conducted to illustrate the most conserved stages during embryonic development. Old measurements of these studies are based on the morphological similarity from macro view and new technology enables the micro detection of similarity in molecular mechanism. Evolutionary model of embryo development, which includes the “funnel-like” model and the “hourglass” model, has been evaluated by combination of these new comparative transcriptomic methods with prior comparative genomic information. Although the technology has promoted the EVO-DEVO studies into a new era, technological and material limitation still exist and further investigations require more subtle study design and procedure.

  7. COMPARATIVE EFFICIENCIES STUDY OF SLOT MODEL AND MOUSE MODEL IN PRESSURISED PIPE FLOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj K. Pandit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The flow in sewers is unsteady and variable between free-surfac e to full pipe pressurized flow. Sewers are designed on the basis of free surf ace flow (gravity flow however they may carry pressurized flow. Preissmann Slot concep t is widely used numerical approach in unsteady free surface-pressurized flow as it provides the advantage of using free surface flow as a single type flow. Slo t concept uses the Saint- Venant’s equations as a basic equation for one-dimensional unst eady free surface flow. This paper includes two different numerical models using Saint Venant’s equations. The Saint Venant’s e quations of continuity and momen tum are solved by the Method of Characteristics and presented in forms for direct substitution into FORTRAN programming for numerical analysis in the first model. The MOUSE model carries out computation of unsteady flows which is founde d on an implicit, finite difference numerical solut ion of the basic one dimension al Saint Venant’s equations of free surface flow. The simulation results are comp ared to analyze the nature and degree of errors for further improvement.

  8. Comparative metabolism of honokiol in mouse, rat, dog, monkey, and human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hyeon-Uk; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Kong, Tae Yeon; Choi, Won Gu; Lee, Hye Suk

    2016-04-01

    Honokiol has antitumor, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and antithrombotic effects. Here we aimed to identify the metabolic profile of honokiol in mouse, rat, dog, monkey, and human hepatocytes and to characterize the enzymes responsible for the glucuronidation and sulfation of honokiol. Honokiol had a high hepatic extraction ratio in all five species, indicating that it was extensively metabolized. A total of 32 metabolites, including 17 common and 15 different metabolites, produced via glucuronidation, sulfation, and oxidation of honokiol allyl groups were tentatively identified using liquid chromatography-high resolution quadrupole Orbitrap mass spectrometry. Glucuronidation of honokiol to M8 (honokiol-4-glucuronide) and M9 (honokiol-2'-glucuronide) was the predominant metabolic pathway in hepatocytes of all five species; however, interspecies differences between 4- and 2'-glucuronidation of honokiol were observed. UGT1A1, 1A8, 1A9, 2B15, and 2B17 played major roles in M8 formation, whereas UGT1A7 and 1A9 played major roles in M9 formation. Human cDNA-expressed SULT1C4 played a major role in M10 formation (honokiol-2'-sulfate), whereas SULT1A1*1, 1A1*2, and 1A2 played major roles in M11 formation (honokiol-4-sulfate). In conclusion, honokiol metabolism showed interspecies differences.

  9. Comparative glycopattern analysis of mucins in the Brunner's glands of the guinea-pig and the house mouse (Rodentia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scillitani, Giovanni; Mentino, Donatella

    2015-09-01

    The mucins secreted by the Brunner's glands and the duodenal goblet cells of the Guinea-pig and the house mouse were compared by conventional and FITC-conjugated lectin histochemistry. Methylation/saponification and sialidase digestion were performed prior to lectin binding to detect the residues subterminal to sulfated groups and sialic acid, respectively. In the Guinea-pig the Brunner's glands produce class-III stable sulfosialomucins. Sialic acid is mostly 2,6-linked to galactose or to N-acetylgalactosamine and is in part O-acetylated in C7, C8, and C9. Sulfated groups are probably linked to sialic acid and N-acetylgalactosamine. Terminal residuals of N-acetylglucosamine, galactose, N-acetylgalactosamine and fucose linked in α1,2, α1,3, and α1,4 are also present. Duodenal goblet cells of the Guinea-pig present a lower number of residuals in respect to the Brunner's glandular ones, with sialic acid and N-acetylgalactosamine subterminal to sulfated groups. In the house mouse the Brunner's glands produce class-III stable neutral mucins, binding to same lectins as in the Guinea-pig except for those specific to sialic acid. A diversity of fucosylated residuals higher than in the Guinea-pig is observed. The mouse duodenal goblet cells lack stable class-III mucins, have little sialic acid and present a lower number of residuals in respect to the correspondent Brunner's glands. Regulation of the acidic intestinal microenvironment, prevention of pathologies and hosting of microflora can explain the observed results and the differences observed between the two rodents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Dynamic Evolution of Pathogenicity Revealed by Sequencing and Comparative Genomics of 19 Pseudomonas syringae Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanchuk, Artur; Chang, Jeff H.; Mukhtar, M. Shahid; Cherkis, Karen; Roach, Jeff; Grant, Sarah R.; Jones, Corbin D.; Dangl, Jeffery L.

    2011-01-01

    Closely related pathogens may differ dramatically in host range, but the molecular, genetic, and evolutionary basis for these differences remains unclear. In many Gram- negative bacteria, including the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae, type III effectors (TTEs) are essential for pathogenicity, instrumental in structuring host range, and exhibit wide diversity between strains. To capture the dynamic nature of virulence gene repertoires across P. syringae, we screened 11 diverse strains for novel TTE families and coupled this nearly saturating screen with the sequencing and assembly of 14 phylogenetically diverse isolates from a broad collection of diseased host plants. TTE repertoires vary dramatically in size and content across all P. syringae clades; surprisingly few TTEs are conserved and present in all strains. Those that are likely provide basal requirements for pathogenicity. We demonstrate that functional divergence within one conserved locus, hopM1, leads to dramatic differences in pathogenicity, and we demonstrate that phylogenetics-informed mutagenesis can be used to identify functionally critical residues of TTEs. The dynamism of the TTE repertoire is mirrored by diversity in pathways affecting the synthesis of secreted phytotoxins, highlighting the likely role of both types of virulence factors in determination of host range. We used these 14 draft genome sequences, plus five additional genome sequences previously reported, to identify the core genome for P. syringae and we compared this core to that of two closely related non-pathogenic pseudomonad species. These data revealed the recent acquisition of a 1 Mb megaplasmid by a sub-clade of cucumber pathogens. This megaplasmid encodes a type IV secretion system and a diverse set of unknown proteins, which dramatically increases both the genomic content of these strains and the pan-genome of the species. PMID:21799664

  11. Thermodynamic Molecular Switch in Sequence-Specific Hydrophobic Interaction: Two Computational Models Compared

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Chun

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We have shown in our published work the existence of a thermodynamic switch in biological systems wherein a change of sign in ΔCp°(Treaction leads to a true negative minimum in the Gibbs free energy change of reaction, and hence, a maximum in the related Keq. We have examined 35 pair-wise, sequence-specific hydrophobic interactions over the temperature range of 273–333 K, based on data reported by Nemethy and Scheraga in 1962. A closer look at a single example, the pair-wise hydrophobic interaction of leucine-isoleucine, will demonstrate the significant differences when the data are analyzed using the Nemethy-Scheraga model or treated by the Planck-Benzinger methodology which we have developed. The change in inherent chemical bond energy at 0 K, ΔH°(T0 is 7.53 kcal mol-1 compared with 2.4 kcal mol-1, while ‹ts› is 365 K as compared with 355 K, for the Nemethy-Scheraga and Planck-Benzinger model, respectively. At ‹tm›, the thermal agitation energy is about five times greater than ΔH°(T0 in the Planck-Benzinger model, that is 465 K compared to 497 K in the Nemethy-Scheraga model. The results imply that the negative Gibbs free energy minimum at a well-defined ‹ts›, where TΔS° = 0 at about 355 K, has its origin in the sequence-specific hydrophobic interactions, which are highly dependent on details of molecular structure. The Nemethy-Scheraga model shows no evidence of the thermodynamic molecular switch that we have found to be a universal feature of biological interactions. The Planck-Benzinger method is the best known for evaluating the innate temperature-invariant enthalpy, ΔH°(T0, and provides for better understanding of the heat of reaction for biological molecules.

  12. Detection of molecular markers by comparative sequence analysis of enzymes from mycobacteria species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asad, S.; Hussain, M.; Siddiqua, A.; Ain, Q.U.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterial species are one of the most important pathogens and among these members of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) and mycobacterial tuberculousis complex (MTC) are the causative agent of a relatively milder form of Tuberculosis. Traditional methods for identification of these groups of pathogens are time consuming, lack specificity and sensitivity and furthermore lead to the misidentification due to high similarity index. Therefore, more rapid, specific and cost-effective methods are required for the accurate identification of Mycobacterium species in routine diagnostics. In our study, we identified molecular markers in order to differentiate closely related cousin species of genus Mycobacterium including M. bovis, M. avium, M. leprae and M. tuberculosis. The nucleotide sequences of selected unique markers, i.e., enzymes (used previously in various biochemical tests for the identification of M. species) were selected and their ORFs were retrieved and selected functional proteins of respective biosynthetic pathways were compared in-silico. Result suggested that the variations in nucleotide sequences of the selected enzymes can be directly used for M. species discrimination in one step PCR test. We believe that the in-silico identification and storage of these distinctive characteristics of individual M. species will help in more precise recognition of pathogenic strains and hence specie specific targeted therapy. (author)

  13. Comparative genomics of human and non-human Listeria monocytogenes sequence type 121 strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Rychli

    Full Text Available The food-borne pathogen Listeria (L. monocytogenes is able to survive for months and even years in food production environments. Strains belonging to sequence type (ST121 are particularly found to be abundant and to persist in food and food production environments. To elucidate genetic determinants characteristic for L. monocytogenes ST121, we sequenced the genomes of 14 ST121 strains and compared them with currently available L. monocytogenes ST121 genomes. In total, we analyzed 70 ST121 genomes deriving from 16 different countries, different years of isolation, and different origins-including food, animal and human ST121 isolates. All ST121 genomes show a high degree of conservation sharing at least 99.7% average nucleotide identity. The main differences between the strains were found in prophage content and prophage conservation. We also detected distinct highly conserved subtypes of prophages inserted at the same genomic locus. While some of the prophages showed more than 99.9% similarity between strains from different sources and years, other prophages showed a higher level of diversity. 81.4% of the strains harbored virtually identical plasmids. 97.1% of the ST121 strains contain a truncated internalin A (inlA gene. Only one of the seven human ST121 isolates encodes a full-length inlA gene, illustrating the need of better understanding their survival and virulence mechanisms.

  14. Comparative study of methods for recognition of an unknown person's action from a video sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Takayuki; Ohya, Jun; Kurumisawa, Jun

    2009-02-01

    This paper proposes a Tensor Decomposition Based method that can recognize an unknown person's action from a video sequence, where the unknown person is not included in the database (tensor) used for the recognition. The tensor consists of persons, actions and time-series image features. For the observed unknown person's action, one of the actions stored in the tensor is assumed. Using the motion signature obtained from the assumption, the unknown person's actions are synthesized. The actions of one of the persons in the tensor are replaced by the synthesized actions. Then, the core tensor for the replaced tensor is computed. This process is repeated for the actions and persons. For each iteration, the difference between the replaced and original core tensors is computed. The assumption that gives the minimal difference is the action recognition result. For the time-series image features to be stored in the tensor and to be extracted from the observed video sequence, the human body silhouette's contour shape based feature is used. To show the validity of our proposed method, our proposed method is experimentally compared with Nearest Neighbor rule and Principal Component analysis based method. Experiments using 33 persons' seven kinds of action show that our proposed method achieves better recognition accuracies for the seven actions than the other methods.

  15. Next Generation Semiconductor Based Sequencing of the Donkey (Equus asinus) Genome Provided Comparative Sequence Data against the Horse Genome and a Few Millions of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolini, Francesca; Scimone, Concetta; Geraci, Claudia; Schiavo, Giuseppina; Utzeri, Valerio Joe; Chiofalo, Vincenzo; Fontanesi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Few studies investigated the donkey (Equus asinus) at the whole genome level so far. Here, we sequenced the genome of two male donkeys using a next generation semiconductor based sequencing platform (the Ion Proton sequencer) and compared obtained sequence information with the available donkey draft genome (and its Illumina reads from which it was originated) and with the EquCab2.0 assembly of the horse genome. Moreover, the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Analyzer was used to sequence reduced representation libraries (RRL) obtained from a DNA pool including donkeys of different breeds (Grigio Siciliano, Ragusano and Martina Franca). The number of next generation sequencing reads aligned with the EquCab2.0 horse genome was larger than those aligned with the draft donkey genome. This was due to the larger N50 for contigs and scaffolds of the horse genome. Nucleotide divergence between E. caballus and E. asinus was estimated to be ~ 0.52-0.57%. Regions with low nucleotide divergence were identified in several autosomal chromosomes and in the whole chromosome X. These regions might be evolutionally important in equids. Comparing Y-chromosome regions we identified variants that could be useful to track donkey paternal lineages. Moreover, about 4.8 million of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the donkey genome were identified and annotated combining sequencing data from Ion Proton (whole genome sequencing) and Ion Torrent (RRL) runs with Illumina reads. A higher density of SNPs was present in regions homologous to horse chromosome 12, in which several studies reported a high frequency of copy number variants. The SNPs we identified constitute a first resource useful to describe variability at the population genomic level in E. asinus and to establish monitoring systems for the conservation of donkey genetic resources. PMID:26151450

  16. Next Generation Semiconductor Based Sequencing of the Donkey (Equus asinus Genome Provided Comparative Sequence Data against the Horse Genome and a Few Millions of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Bertolini

    Full Text Available Few studies investigated the donkey (Equus asinus at the whole genome level so far. Here, we sequenced the genome of two male donkeys using a next generation semiconductor based sequencing platform (the Ion Proton sequencer and compared obtained sequence information with the available donkey draft genome (and its Illumina reads from which it was originated and with the EquCab2.0 assembly of the horse genome. Moreover, the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Analyzer was used to sequence reduced representation libraries (RRL obtained from a DNA pool including donkeys of different breeds (Grigio Siciliano, Ragusano and Martina Franca. The number of next generation sequencing reads aligned with the EquCab2.0 horse genome was larger than those aligned with the draft donkey genome. This was due to the larger N50 for contigs and scaffolds of the horse genome. Nucleotide divergence between E. caballus and E. asinus was estimated to be ~ 0.52-0.57%. Regions with low nucleotide divergence were identified in several autosomal chromosomes and in the whole chromosome X. These regions might be evolutionally important in equids. Comparing Y-chromosome regions we identified variants that could be useful to track donkey paternal lineages. Moreover, about 4.8 million of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the donkey genome were identified and annotated combining sequencing data from Ion Proton (whole genome sequencing and Ion Torrent (RRL runs with Illumina reads. A higher density of SNPs was present in regions homologous to horse chromosome 12, in which several studies reported a high frequency of copy number variants. The SNPs we identified constitute a first resource useful to describe variability at the population genomic level in E. asinus and to establish monitoring systems for the conservation of donkey genetic resources.

  17. The genome sequence of Caenorhabditis briggsae: a platform for comparative genomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lincoln D Stein

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available The soil nematodes Caenorhabditis briggsae and Caenorhabditis elegans diverged from a common ancestor roughly 100 million years ago and yet are almost indistinguishable by eye. They have the same chromosome number and genome sizes, and they occupy the same ecological niche. To explore the basis for this striking conservation of structure and function, we have sequenced the C. briggsae genome to a high-quality draft stage and compared it to the finished C. elegans sequence. We predict approximately 19,500 protein-coding genes in the C. briggsae genome, roughly the same as in C. elegans. Of these, 12,200 have clear C. elegans orthologs, a further 6,500 have one or more clearly detectable C. elegans homologs, and approximately 800 C. briggsae genes have no detectable matches in C. elegans. Almost all of the noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs known are shared between the two species. The two genomes exhibit extensive colinearity, and the rate of divergence appears to be higher in the chromosomal arms than in the centers. Operons, a distinctive feature of C. elegans, are highly conserved in C. briggsae, with the arrangement of genes being preserved in 96% of cases. The difference in size between the C. briggsae (estimated at approximately 104 Mbp and C. elegans (100.3 Mbp genomes is almost entirely due to repetitive sequence, which accounts for 22.4% of the C. briggsae genome in contrast to 16.5% of the C. elegans genome. Few, if any, repeat families are shared, suggesting that most were acquired after the two species diverged or are undergoing rapid evolution. Coclustering the C. elegans and C. briggsae proteins reveals 2,169 protein families of two or more members. Most of these are shared between the two species, but some appear to be expanding or contracting, and there seem to be as many as several hundred novel C. briggsae gene families. The C. briggsae draft sequence will greatly improve the annotation of the C. elegans genome. Based on similarity to C

  18. Comparing the Microsoft Kinect to a traditional mouse for adjusting the viewed tissue densities of three-dimensional anatomical structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhnke, Bethany; Berron, Monica; Philip, Adriana; Williams, Jordan; Holub, Joseph; Winer, Eliot

    2013-03-01

    Advancements in medical image visualization in recent years have enabled three-dimensional (3D) medical images to be volume-rendered from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) scans. Medical data is crucial for patient diagnosis and medical education, and analyzing these three-dimensional models rather than two-dimensional (2D) slices would enable more efficient analysis by surgeons and physicians, especially non-radiologists. An interaction device that is intuitive, robust, and easily learned is necessary to integrate 3D modeling software into the medical community. The keyboard and mouse configuration does not readily manipulate 3D models because these traditional interface devices function within two degrees of freedom, not the six degrees of freedom presented in three dimensions. Using a familiar, commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) device for interaction would minimize training time and enable maximum usability with 3D medical images. Multiple techniques are available to manipulate 3D medical images and provide doctors more innovative ways of visualizing patient data. One such example is windowing. Windowing is used to adjust the viewed tissue density of digital medical data. A software platform available at the Virtual Reality Applications Center (VRAC), named Isis, was used to visualize and interact with the 3D representations of medical data. In this paper, we present the methodology and results of a user study that examined the usability of windowing 3D medical imaging using a Kinect™ device compared to a traditional mouse.

  19. Phylogenetic and Comparative Sequence Analysis of Thermostable Alpha Amylases of kingdom Archea, Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huma, Tayyaba; Maryam, Arooma; Rehman, Shahid Ur; Qamar, Muhammad Tahir Ul; Shaheen, Tayyaba; Haque, Asma; Shaheen, Bushra

    2014-01-01

    Alpha amylase family is generally defined as a group of enzymes that can hydrolyse and transglycosylase α-(1, 4) or α-(1, 6) glycosidic bonds along with the preservation of anomeric configuration. For the comparative analysis of alpha amylase family, nucleotide sequences of seven thermo stable organisms of Kingdom Archea i.e. Pyrococcus furiosus (100-105°C), Kingdom Prokaryotes i.e. Bacillus licheniformis (90-95°C), Geobacillus stearothermophilus (75°C), Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (72°C), Bacillus subtilis (70°C) and Bacillus KSM K38 (55°C) and Eukaryotes i.e. Aspergillus oryzae (60°C) were selected from NCBI. Primary structure composition analysis and Conserved sequence analysis were conducted through Bio Edit tools. Results from BioEdit shown only three conserved regions of base pairs and least similarity in MSA of the above mentioned alpha amylases. In Mega 5.1 Phylogeny of thermo stable alpha amylases of Kingdom Archea, Prokaryotes and Eukaryote was handled by Neighbor-Joining (NJ) algorithm. Mega 5.1 phylogenetic results suggested that alpha amylases of thermo stable organisms i.e. Pyrococcus furiosus (100-105°C), Bacillus licheniformis (90-95°C), Geobacillus stearothermophilus (75°C) and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (72°C) are more distantly related as compared to less thermo stable organisms. By keeping in mind the characteristics of most thermo stable alpha amylases novel and improved features can be introduced in less thermo stable alpha amylases so that they become more thermo tolerant and productive for industry.

  20. Effects of Acanthopanax senticosus on Brain Injury Induced by Simulated Spatial Radiation in Mouse Model Based on Pharmacokinetics and Comparative Proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingyu Zhou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The active compounds in Acanthopanax senticosus (AS have different pharmacokinetic characteristics in mouse models. Cmax and AUC of Acanthopanax senticosus polysaccharides (ASPS were significantly reduced in radiation-injured mice, suggesting that the blood flow of mouse was blocked or slowed, due to the pathological state of ischemia and hypoxia, which are caused by radiation. In contrast, the ability of various metabolizing enzymes to inactivate, capacity of biofilm transport decrease, and lessening of renal blood flow accounts for radiation, resulting in the accumulation of syringin and eleutheroside E in the irradiated mouse. Therefore, there were higher pharmacokinetic parameters—AUC, MRT, and t1/2 of the two compounds in radiation-injured mouse, when compared with normal mouse. In order to investigate the intrinsic mechanism of AS on radiation injury, AS extract’s protective effects on brain, the main part of mouse that suffered from radiation, were explored. The function of AS extract in repressing expression changes of radiation response proteins in prefrontal cortex (PFC of mouse brain included tubulin protein family (α-, β-tubulin subunits, dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 2 (CRMP2, γ-actin, 14-3-3 protein family (14-3-3ζ, ε, heat shock protein 90β (HSP90β, and enolase 2. The results demonstrated the AS extract had positive effects on nerve cells’ structure, adhesion, locomotion, fission, and phagocytosis, through regulating various action pathways, such as Hippo, phagosome, PI3K/Akt (phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/protein kinase B, Neurotrophin, Rap1 (Ras-related protein RAP-1A, gap junction glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, and HIF-1 (Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 signaling pathways to maintain normal mouse neurological activity. All of the results indicated that AS may be a promising alternative medicine for the treatment of radiation injury in mouse brain. It would be tested that whether the bioactive ingredients of AS could

  1. Sequencing analysis of mutations induced by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea at different sampling times in mouse bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianyong; Chen, Tao

    2010-03-01

    In our previous study (Wang et al., 2004, Toxicol. Sci. 82: 124-128), we observed that the cII gene mutant frequency (MF) in the bone marrow of Big Blue mice showed significant increase as early as day 1, reached the maximum at day 3 and then decreased to a plateau by day 15 after a single dose of carcinogen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) treatment, which is different from the longer mutation manifestation time and the constancy of MFs after reaching their maximum in some other tissues. To determine the mechanism underlying the quick increase in MF and the peak formation in the mutant manifestation, we examined the mutation frequencies and spectra of the ENU-induced mutants collected from different sampling times in this study. The cII mutants from days 1, 3 and 120 after ENU treatment were randomly selected from different animals. The mutation frequencies were 33, 217, 305 and 144 x 10(-6) for control, days 1, 3, and 120, respectively. The mutation spectra at days 1 and 3 were significantly different from that at day 120. Considering that stem cells are responsible for the ultimate MF plateau (day 120) and transit cells are accountable for the earlier MF induction (days 1 or 3) in mouse bone marrow, we conclude that transit cells are much more sensitive to mutation induction than stem cells in mouse bone marrow, which resulted in the specific mutation manifestation induced by ENU.

  2. A Case Study of MasterMind Chess: Comparing Mouse/Keyboard Interaction with Kinect-Based Gestural Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Alves Mendes Vasiljevic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As gestural interfaces emerged as a new type of user interface, their use has been vastly explored by the entertainment industry to better immerse the player in games. Despite being mainly used in dance and sports games, little use was made of gestural interaction in more slow-paced genres, such as board games. In this work, we present a Kinect-based gestural interface for an online and multiplayer chess game and describe a case study with users with different playing skill levels. Comparing the mouse/keyboard interaction with the gesture-based interaction, the results of the activity were synthesized into lessons learned regarding general usability and design of game control mechanisms. These results could be applied to slow-paced board games like chess. Our findings indicate that gestural interfaces may not be suitable for competitive chess matches, yet it can be fun to play while using them in casual matches.

  3. Identification and characterization of earthquake clusters: a comparative analysis for selected sequences in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peresan, Antonella; Gentili, Stefania

    2017-04-01

    Identification and statistical characterization of seismic clusters may provide useful insights about the features of seismic energy release and their relation to physical properties of the crust within a given region. Moreover, a number of studies based on spatio-temporal analysis of main-shocks occurrence require preliminary declustering of the earthquake catalogs. Since various methods, relying on different physical/statistical assumptions, may lead to diverse classifications of earthquakes into main events and related events, we aim to investigate the classification differences among different declustering techniques. Accordingly, a formal selection and comparative analysis of earthquake clusters is carried out for the most relevant earthquakes in North-Eastern Italy, as reported in the local OGS-CRS bulletins, compiled at the National Institute of Oceanography and Experimental Geophysics since 1977. The comparison is then extended to selected earthquake sequences associated with a different seismotectonic setting, namely to events that occurred in the region struck by the recent Central Italy destructive earthquakes, making use of INGV data. Various techniques, ranging from classical space-time windows methods to ad hoc manual identification of aftershocks, are applied for detection of earthquake clusters. In particular, a statistical method based on nearest-neighbor distances of events in space-time-energy domain, is considered. Results from clusters identification by the nearest-neighbor method turn out quite robust with respect to the time span of the input catalogue, as well as to minimum magnitude cutoff. The identified clusters for the largest events reported in North-Eastern Italy since 1977 are well consistent with those reported in earlier studies, which were aimed at detailed manual aftershocks identification. The study shows that the data-driven approach, based on the nearest-neighbor distances, can be satisfactorily applied to decompose the seismic

  4. Sequencing and comparative analysis of the straw mushroom (Volvariella volvacea genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dapeng Bao

    Full Text Available Volvariella volvacea, the edible straw mushroom, is a highly nutritious food source that is widely cultivated on a commercial scale in many parts of Asia using agricultural wastes (rice straw, cotton wastes as growth substrates. However, developments in V. volvacea cultivation have been limited due to a low biological efficiency (i.e. conversion of growth substrate to mushroom fruit bodies, sensitivity to low temperatures, and an unclear sexuality pattern that has restricted the breeding of improved strains. We have now sequenced the genome of V. volvacea and assembled it into 62 scaffolds with a total genome size of 35.7 megabases (Mb, containing 11,084 predicted gene models. Comparative analyses were performed with the model species in basidiomycete on mating type system, carbohydrate active enzymes, and fungal oxidative lignin enzymes. We also studied transcriptional regulation of the response to low temperature (4°C. We found that the genome of V. volvacea has many genes that code for enzymes, which are involved in the degradation of cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin. The molecular genetics of the mating type system in V. volvacea was also found to be similar to the bipolar system in basidiomycetes, suggesting that it is secondary homothallism. Sensitivity to low temperatures could be due to the lack of the initiation of the biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids, trehalose and glycogen biosyntheses in this mushroom. Genome sequencing of V. volvacea has improved our understanding of the biological characteristics related to the degradation of the cultivating compost consisting of agricultural waste, the sexual reproduction mechanism, and the sensitivity to low temperatures at the molecular level which in turn will enable us to increase the industrial production of this mushroom.

  5. Sequencing and Comparative Analysis of the Straw Mushroom (Volvariella volvacea) Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Dapeng; Gong, Ming; Zheng, Huajun; Chen, Mingjie; Zhang, Liang; Wang, Hong; Jiang, Jianping; Wu, Lin; Zhu, Yongqiang; Zhu, Gang; Zhou, Yan; Li, Chuanhua; Wang, Shengyue; Zhao, Yan; Zhao, Guoping; Tan, Qi

    2013-01-01

    Volvariella volvacea, the edible straw mushroom, is a highly nutritious food source that is widely cultivated on a commercial scale in many parts of Asia using agricultural wastes (rice straw, cotton wastes) as growth substrates. However, developments in V. volvacea cultivation have been limited due to a low biological efficiency (i.e. conversion of growth substrate to mushroom fruit bodies), sensitivity to low temperatures, and an unclear sexuality pattern that has restricted the breeding of improved strains. We have now sequenced the genome of V. volvacea and assembled it into 62 scaffolds with a total genome size of 35.7 megabases (Mb), containing 11,084 predicted gene models. Comparative analyses were performed with the model species in basidiomycete on mating type system, carbohydrate active enzymes, and fungal oxidative lignin enzymes. We also studied transcriptional regulation of the response to low temperature (4°C). We found that the genome of V. volvacea has many genes that code for enzymes, which are involved in the degradation of cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin. The molecular genetics of the mating type system in V. volvacea was also found to be similar to the bipolar system in basidiomycetes, suggesting that it is secondary homothallism. Sensitivity to low temperatures could be due to the lack of the initiation of the biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids, trehalose and glycogen biosyntheses in this mushroom. Genome sequencing of V. volvacea has improved our understanding of the biological characteristics related to the degradation of the cultivating compost consisting of agricultural waste, the sexual reproduction mechanism, and the sensitivity to low temperatures at the molecular level which in turn will enable us to increase the industrial production of this mushroom. PMID:23526973

  6. The complete genome sequence and comparative genome analysis of the high pathogenicity Yersinia enterocolitica strain 8081.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas R Thomson

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The human enteropathogen, Yersinia enterocolitica, is a significant link in the range of Yersinia pathologies extending from mild gastroenteritis to bubonic plague. Comparison at the genomic level is a key step in our understanding of the genetic basis for this pathogenicity spectrum. Here we report the genome of Y. enterocolitica strain 8081 (serotype 0:8; biotype 1B and extensive microarray data relating to the genetic diversity of the Y. enterocolitica species. Our analysis reveals that the genome of Y. enterocolitica strain 8081 is a patchwork of horizontally acquired genetic loci, including a plasticity zone of 199 kb containing an extraordinarily high density of virulence genes. Microarray analysis has provided insights into species-specific Y. enterocolitica gene functions and the intraspecies differences between the high, low, and nonpathogenic Y. enterocolitica biotypes. Through comparative genome sequence analysis we provide new information on the evolution of the Yersinia. We identify numerous loci that represent ancestral clusters of genes potentially important in enteric survival and pathogenesis, which have been lost or are in the process of being lost, in the other sequenced Yersinia lineages. Our analysis also highlights large metabolic operons in Y. enterocolitica that are absent in the related enteropathogen, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, indicating major differences in niche and nutrients used within the mammalian gut. These include clusters directing, the production of hydrogenases, tetrathionate respiration, cobalamin synthesis, and propanediol utilisation. Along with ancestral gene clusters, the genome of Y. enterocolitica has revealed species-specific and enteropathogen-specific loci. This has provided important insights into the pathology of this bacterium and, more broadly, into the evolution of the genus. Moreover, wider investigations looking at the patterns of gene loss and gain in the Yersinia have highlighted common

  7. Genome Sequencing and Comparative Analysis of the Biocontrol Agent Trichoderma harzianum sensu stricto TR274

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steindorff, Andrei S.; Noronha, Elilane F.; Ulhoa, Cirano J.; Kuo, Alan; Salamov, Asaf A.; Haridas, Sajeet; Riley, Robert W.; Druzhinina, Irina S.; Kubicek, Christian P.; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2015-03-17

    Biological control is a complex process which requires many mechanisms and a high diversity of biochemical pathways. The species of Trichoderma harzianum are well known for their biocontrol activity against many plant pathogens. To gain new insights into the biocontrol mechanism used by T. harzianum, we sequenced the isolate TR274 genome using Illumina. The assembly was performed using AllPaths-LG with a maximum coverage of 100x. The assembly resulted in 2282 contigs with a N50 of 37033bp. The genome size generated was 40.8 Mb and the GC content was 47.7%, similar to other Trichoderma genomes. Using the JGI Annotation Pipeline we predicted 13,932 genes with a high transcriptome support. CEGMA tests suggested 100% genome completeness and 97.9% of RNA-SEQ reads were mapped to the genome. The phylogenetic comparison using orthologous proteins with all Trichoderma genomes sequenced at JGI, corroborates the Trichoderma (T. asperellum and T. atroviride), Longibrachiatum (T. reesei and T. longibrachiatum) and Pachibasium (T. harzianum and T. virens) section division described previously. The comparison between two Trichoderma harzianum species suggests a high genome similarity but some strain-specific expansions. Analyses of the secondary metabolites, CAZymes, transporters, proteases, transcription factors were performed. The Pachybasium section expanded virtually all categories analyzed compared with the other sections, specially Longibrachiatum section, that shows a clear contraction. These results suggests that these proteins families have an important role in their respective phenotypes. Future analysis will improve the understanding of this complex genus and give some insights about its lifestyle and the interactions with the environment.

  8. Genome-wide ENU mutagenesis in combination with high density SNP analysis and exome sequencing provides rapid identification of novel mouse models of developmental disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina Caruana

    Full Text Available Mice harbouring gene mutations that cause phenotypic abnormalities during organogenesis are invaluable tools for linking gene function to normal development and human disorders. To generate mouse models harbouring novel alleles that are involved in organogenesis we conducted a phenotype-driven, genome-wide mutagenesis screen in mice using the mutagen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU.ENU was injected into male C57BL/6 mice and the mutations transmitted through the germ-line. ENU-induced mutations were bred to homozygosity and G3 embryos screened at embryonic day (E 13.5 and E18.5 for abnormalities in limb and craniofacial structures, skin, blood, vasculature, lungs, gut, kidneys, ureters and gonads. From 52 pedigrees screened 15 were detected with anomalies in one or more of the structures/organs screened. Using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP-based linkage analysis in conjunction with candidate gene or next-generation sequencing (NGS we identified novel recessive alleles for Fras1, Ift140 and Lig1.In this study we have generated mouse models in which the anomalies closely mimic those seen in human disorders. The association between novel mutant alleles and phenotypes will lead to a better understanding of gene function in normal development and establish how their dysfunction causes human anomalies and disease.

  9. Development of a Method to Implement Whole-Genome Bisulfite Sequencing of cfDNA from Cancer Patients and a Mouse Tumor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine C. Maggi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to develop a method for whole genome cell-free DNA (cfDNA methylation analysis in humans and mice with the ultimate goal to facilitate the identification of tumor derived DNA methylation changes in the blood. Plasma or serum from patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors or lung cancer, and plasma from a murine model of pancreatic adenocarcinoma was used to develop a protocol for cfDNA isolation, library preparation and whole-genome bisulfite sequencing of ultra low quantities of cfDNA, including tumor-specific DNA. The protocol developed produced high quality libraries consistently generating a conversion rate >98% that will be applicable for the analysis of human and mouse plasma or serum to detect tumor-derived changes in DNA methylation.

  10. Comparative anatomy of the human APRT gene and enzyme: nucleotide sequence divergence and conservation of a nonrandom CpG dinucleotide arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broderick, T.P.; Schaff, D.A.; Bertino, A.M.; Dush, M.K.; Tischfield, J.A.; Stambrook, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    The functional human adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) gene is <2.6 kilobases in length and contains five exons. The amino acid sequences of APRTs have been highly conserved throughout evolution. The human enzyme is 82%, 90%, and 40% identical to the mouse, hamster, and Escherichia coli enzymes, respectively. The promoter region of the human APRT gene, like that of several other housekeeping genes, lacks TATA and CCAAT boxes but contains five GC boxes that are potential binding sites for the Sp1 transcription factor. The distal three, however, are dispensable for gene expression. Comparison between human and mouse APRT gene nucleotide sequences reveals a high degree of homology within protein coding regions but an absence of significant homology in 5' flanking, 3' untranslated, and intron sequences, except for similarly positioned GC boxes in the promoter region and a 26-base-pair region in intron 3. This 26-base-pair sequence is 92% identical with a similarly positioned sequence in the mouse gene and is also found in intron 3 of the hamster gene, suggesting that its retention may be a consequence of stringent selection. The positions of all introns have been precisely retained in the human and both rodent genes. Retention of an elevated CpG dinucleotide content, despite loss of sequence homology, suggests that there may be selection for CpG dinucleotides in these regions and that their maintenance may be important for APRT gene function

  11. Comparative sequence analysis of nitrogen fixation-related genes in six legumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Hyun eKim

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Legumes play an important role as food and forage crops in international agriculture especially in developing countries. Legumes have a unique biological process called nitrogen fixation (NF by which they convert atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia. Although legume genomes have undergone polyploidization, duplication and divergence, NF-related genes, because of their essential functional role for legumes, might have remained conserved. To understand the relationship of divergence and evolutionary processes in legumes, this study analyzes orthologs and paralogs for selected 20 NF-related genes by using comparative genomic approaches in six legumes i.e. Medicago truncatula (Mt, Cicer arietinum, Lotus japonicus, Cajanus cajan (Cc, Phaseolus vulgaris (Pv and Glycine max (Gm. Subsequently, sequence distances, numbers of synonymous substitutions per synonymous site (Ks and nonsynonymous substitutions per nonsynonymous site (Ka between orthologs and paralogs were calculated and compared across legumes. These analyses suggest the closest relationship between Gm and Cc and the farthest distance between Mt and Pv in 6 legumes. Ks proportional plots clearly showed ancient genome duplication in all legumes, whole genome duplication event in Gm and also speciation pattern in different legumes. This study also reported some interesting observations e.g. no peak at Ks 0.4 in Gm-Gm, location of two independent genes next to each other in Mt and low Ks values for outparalogs for three genes as compared to other 12 genes. In summary, this study underlines the importance of NF-related genes and provides important insights in genome organization and evolutionary aspects of six legume species analyzed.

  12. Comparative d2/d3 LSU–rDNA sequence study of some Iranian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-11-05

    Nov 5, 2007 ... segments yielded one fragment at over all sequenced isolates as 787 bp in size. The DNA sequences were aligned .... expansion segments of the 28S rDNA subunit (D2/D3. LSU-rDNA) are the ... isolated from different geographical location from tea shrubs infested roots of Guilan province, Iran (Table 1).

  13. Comparative analysis of differentially expressed sequence tags of sweet orange and mandarin infected with Xylella fastidiosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra A. de Souza

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The Citrus ESTs Sequencing Project (CitEST conducted at Centro APTA Citros Sylvio Moreira/IAC has identified and catalogued ESTs representing a set of citrus genes expressed under relevant stress responses, including diseases such as citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC, caused by Xylella fastidiosa. All sweet orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osb. varieties are susceptible to X. fastidiosa. On the other hand, mandarins (C. reticulata Blanco are considered tolerant or resistant to the disease, although the bacterium can be sporadically detected within the trees, but no disease symptoms or economic losses are observed. To study their genetic responses to the presence of X. fastidiosa, we have compared EST libraries of leaf tissue of sweet orange Pêra IAC (highly susceptible cultivar to X. fastidiosa and mandarin ‘Ponkan’ (tolerant artificially infected with the bacterium. Using an in silico differential display, 172 genes were found to be significantly differentially expressed in such conditions. Sweet orange presented an increase in expression of photosynthesis related genes that could reveal a strategy to counterbalance a possible lower photosynthetic activity resulting from early effects of the bacterial colonization in affected plants. On the other hand, mandarin showed an active multi-component defense response against the bacterium similar to the non-host resistance pattern.

  14. Comparative sequence analysis of acid sensitive/resistance proteins in Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, Selvaraj; Balaji, Seetharaaman; Kumar, Anil; Kumar, Rita

    2007-01-01

    The molecular basis for the survival of bacteria under extreme conditions in which growth is inhibited is a question of great current interest. A preliminary study was carried out to determine residue pattern conservation among the antiporters of enteric bacteria, responsible for extreme acid sensitivity especially in Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri. Here we found the molecular evidence that proved the relationship between E. coli and S. flexneri. Multiple sequence alignment of the gadC coded acid sensitive antiporter showed many conserved residue patterns at regular intervals at the N-terminal region. It was observed that as the alignment approaches towards the C-terminal, the number of conserved residues decreases, indicating that the N-terminal region of this protein has much active role when compared to the carboxyl terminal. The motif, FHLVFFLLLGG, is well conserved within the entire gadC coded protein at the amino terminal. The motif is also partially conserved among other antiporters (which are not coded by gadC) but involved in acid sensitive/resistance mechanism. Phylogenetic cluster analysis proves the relationship of Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri. The gadC coded proteins are converged as a clade and diverged from other antiporters belongs to the amino acid-polyamine-organocation (APC) superfamily. PMID:21670792

  15. Characterization of Three Mycobacterium spp. with Potential Use in Bioremediation by Genome Sequencing and Comparative Genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sarbashis; Pettersson, B M Fredrik; Behra, Phani Rama Krishna; Ramesh, Malavika; Dasgupta, Santanu; Bhattacharya, Alok; Kirsebom, Leif A

    2015-06-16

    We provide the genome sequences of the type strains of the polychlorophenol-degrading Mycobacterium chlorophenolicum (DSM43826), the degrader of chlorinated aliphatics Mycobacterium chubuense (DSM44219) and Mycobacterium obuense (DSM44075) that has been tested for use in cancer immunotherapy. The genome sizes of M. chlorophenolicum, M. chubuense, and M. obuense are 6.93, 5.95, and 5.58 Mb with GC-contents of 68.4%, 69.2%, and 67.9%, respectively. Comparative genomic analysis revealed that 3,254 genes are common and we predicted approximately 250 genes acquired through horizontal gene transfer from different sources including proteobacteria. The data also showed that the biodegrading Mycobacterium spp. NBB4, also referred to as M. chubuense NBB4, is distantly related to the M. chubuense type strain and should be considered as a separate species, we suggest it to be named Mycobacterium ethylenense NBB4. Among different categories we identified genes with potential roles in: biodegradation of aromatic compounds and copper homeostasis. These are the first nonpathogenic Mycobacterium spp. found harboring genes involved in copper homeostasis. These findings would therefore provide insight into the role of this group of Mycobacterium spp. in bioremediation as well as the evolution of copper homeostasis within the Mycobacterium genus. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  16. Sequence and comparative analysis of the chicken genome provide unique perspectives on vertebrate evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-09

    We present here a draft genome sequence of the red jungle fowl, Gallus gallus. Because the chicken is a modern descendant of the dinosaurs and the first non-mammalian amniote to have its genome sequenced, the draft sequence of its genome--composed of approximately one billion base pairs of sequence and an estimated 20,000-23,000 genes--provides a new perspective on vertebrate genome evolution, while also improving the annotation of mammalian genomes. For example, the evolutionary distance between chicken and human provides high specificity in detecting functional elements, both non-coding and coding. Notably, many conserved non-coding sequences are far from genes and cannot be assigned to defined functional classes. In coding regions the evolutionary dynamics of protein domains and orthologous groups illustrate processes that distinguish the lineages leading to birds and mammals. The distinctive properties of avian microchromosomes, together with the inferred patterns of conserved synteny, provide additional insights into vertebrate chromosome architecture.

  17. Kinetics of sublethal damage recovery in mouse lip mucosa comparing low and high-LET radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scalliet, P.; Landuyt, W.; Schueren, E. van der; Vynckier, S.; Wambersie, A.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of d(50)+Be neutrons on the lip mucosa in mice were investigated as a model of early effects. The biological endpoint eas the incidence of desquamation in the lower lip after selective irradiation of the snout of the animals. ED 50 (dose leading to desquamation in 50% of the animals) were calculated by probit analysis. Fractionated (two, four and ten fractions) and protracted (43.5, 11.5 and 0.88 Gy.h -1 ) irradiations have been carried out. Results were analysed using the mathematical method of Dale. An α/β of 39.6 Gy and a t 1/2 of recovery of sublethal damage of 47 min have been derived. These results have been compared to data previously obtained with cobalt-60 gamma rays. Using the same mathematical approach, and comparing similar fractionated and protracted experiments, an α/β of 7.4 Gy and a t 1/2 of recovery of 47 min have been calculated. There was no significant difference in the repair kinetics after irradiations with gamma rays or d(50)+Be neutrons. (orig.) [de

  18. Structural and functional analysis of mouse Msx1 gene promoter: sequence conservation with human MSX1 promoter points at potential regulatory elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, S M; Ferland, L H; Robert, B; Abdelhay, E

    1998-06-01

    Vertebrate Msx genes are related to one of the most divergent homeobox genes of Drosophila, the muscle segment homeobox (msh) gene, and are expressed in a well-defined pattern at sites of tissue interactions. This pattern of expression is conserved in vertebrates as diverse as quail, zebrafish, and mouse in a range of sites including neural crest, appendages, and craniofacial structures. In the present work, we performed structural and functional analyses in order to identify potential cis-acting elements that may be regulating Msx1 gene expression. To this end, a 4.9-kb segment of the 5'-flanking region was sequenced and analyzed for transcription-factor binding sites. Four regions showing a high concentration of these sites were identified. Transfection assays with fragments of regulatory sequences driving the expression of the bacterial lacZ reporter gene showed that a region of 4 kb upstream of the transcription start site contains positive and negative elements responsible for controlling gene expression. Interestingly, a fragment of 130 bp seems to contain the minimal elements necessary for gene expression, as its removal completely abolishes gene expression in cultured cells. These results are reinforced by comparison of this region with the human Msx1 gene promoter, which shows extensive conservation, including many consensus binding sites, suggesting a regulatory role for them.

  19. Pharmacokinetics in Mouse and Comparative Effects of Frondosides in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasem Al Shemaili

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The frondosides are triterpenoid glycosides from the Atlantic sea cucumber Cucumaria frondosa. Frondoside A inhibits growth, invasion, metastases and angiogenesis and induces apoptosis in diverse cancer types, including pancreatic cancer. We compared the growth inhibitory effects of three frondosides and their aglycone and related this to the pharmocokinetics and route of administration. Frondoside A potently inhibited growth of pancreatic cancer cells with an EC50 of ~1 µM. Frondoside B was less potent (EC50 ~2.5 µM. Frondoside C and the aglycone had no effect. At 100 µg/kg, frondoside A administered to CD2F1 mice as an i.v. bolus, the Cpmax was 129 nM, Cltb was 6.35 mL/min/m2, and half-life was 510 min. With i.p. administration the Cpmax was 18.3 nM, Cltb was 127 mL/min/m2 and half-life was 840 min. Oral dosing was ineffective. Frondoside A (100 µg/kg/day i.p. markedly inhibited growth cancer xenografts in nude mice. The same dose delivered by oral gavage had no effect. No evidence of acute toxicity was seen with frondoside A. Frondoside A is more potent inhibitor of cancer growth than other frondosides. The glycoside component is essential for bioactivity. Frondoside A is only effective when administered systemically. Based on the current and previous studies, frondoside A appears safe and may be valuable in the treatment of cancer.

  20. Fast T1 and T2 mapping methods: the zoomed U-FLARE sequence compared with EPI and snapshot-FLASH for abdominal imaging at 11.7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, Géraldine; Jiménez-González, María; Plaza-García, Sandra; Beraza, Marta; Reese, Torsten

    2017-06-01

    A newly adapted zoomed ultrafast low-angle RARE (U-FLARE) sequence is described for abdominal imaging applications at 11.7 Tesla and compared with the standard echo-plannar imaging (EPI) and snapshot fast low angle shot (FLASH) methods. Ultrafast EPI and snapshot-FLASH protocols were evaluated to determine relaxation times in phantoms and in the mouse kidney in vivo. Owing to their apparent shortcomings, imaging artefacts, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and variability in the determination of relaxation times, these methods are compared with the newly implemented zoomed U-FLARE sequence. Snapshot-FLASH has a lower SNR when compared with the zoomed U-FLARE sequence and EPI. The variability in the measurement of relaxation times is higher in the Look-Locker sequences than in inversion recovery experiments. Respectively, the average T1 and T2 values at 11.7 Tesla are as follows: kidney cortex, 1810 and 29 ms; kidney medulla, 2100 and 25 ms; subcutaneous tumour, 2365 and 28 ms. This study demonstrates that the zoomed U-FLARE sequence yields single-shot single-slice images with good anatomical resolution and high SNR at 11.7 Tesla. Thus, it offers a viable alternative to standard protocols for mapping very fast parameters, such as T1 and T2, or dynamic processes in vivo at high field.

  1. Genome Sequencing and Comparative Transcriptomics of the Model Entomopathogenic Fungi Metarhizium anisopliae and M. acridum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yanfang; Duan, Zhibing; Hu, Xiao; Xie, Xue-Qin; Zhou, Gang; Peng, Guoxiong; Luo, Zhibing; Huang, Wei; Wang, Bing; Fang, Weiguo; Wang, Sibao; Zhong, Yi; Ma, Li-Jun; St. Leger, Raymond J.; Zhao, Guo-Ping; Pei, Yan; Feng, Ming-Guang; Xia, Yuxian; Wang, Chengshu

    2011-01-01

    Metarhizium spp. are being used as environmentally friendly alternatives to chemical insecticides, as model systems for studying insect-fungus interactions, and as a resource of genes for biotechnology. We present a comparative analysis of the genome sequences of the broad-spectrum insect pathogen Metarhizium anisopliae and the acridid-specific M. acridum. Whole-genome analyses indicate that the genome structures of these two species are highly syntenic and suggest that the genus Metarhizium evolved from plant endophytes or pathogens. Both M. anisopliae and M. acridum have a strikingly larger proportion of genes encoding secreted proteins than other fungi, while ∼30% of these have no functionally characterized homologs, suggesting hitherto unsuspected interactions between fungal pathogens and insects. The analysis of transposase genes provided evidence of repeat-induced point mutations occurring in M. acridum but not in M. anisopliae. With the help of pathogen-host interaction gene database, ∼16% of Metarhizium genes were identified that are similar to experimentally verified genes involved in pathogenicity in other fungi, particularly plant pathogens. However, relative to M. acridum, M. anisopliae has evolved with many expanded gene families of proteases, chitinases, cytochrome P450s, polyketide synthases, and nonribosomal peptide synthetases for cuticle-degradation, detoxification, and toxin biosynthesis that may facilitate its ability to adapt to heterogenous environments. Transcriptional analysis of both fungi during early infection processes provided further insights into the genes and pathways involved in infectivity and specificity. Of particular note, M. acridum transcribed distinct G-protein coupled receptors on cuticles from locusts (the natural hosts) and cockroaches, whereas M. anisopliae transcribed the same receptor on both hosts. This study will facilitate the identification of virulence genes and the development of improved biocontrol strains

  2. Efficient use of unlabeled data for protein sequence classification: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuksa, Pavel; Huang, Pai-Hsi; Pavlovic, Vladimir

    2009-04-29

    Recent studies in computational primary protein sequence analysis have leveraged the power of unlabeled data. For example, predictive models based on string kernels trained on sequences known to belong to particular folds or superfamilies, the so-called labeled data set, can attain significantly improved accuracy if this data is supplemented with protein sequences that lack any class tags-the unlabeled data. In this study, we present a principled and biologically motivated computational framework that more effectively exploits the unlabeled data by only using the sequence regions that are more likely to be biologically relevant for better prediction accuracy. As overly-represented sequences in large uncurated databases may bias the estimation of computational models that rely on unlabeled data, we also propose a method to remove this bias and improve performance of the resulting classifiers. Combined with state-of-the-art string kernels, our proposed computational framework achieves very accurate semi-supervised protein remote fold and homology detection on three large unlabeled databases. It outperforms current state-of-the-art methods and exhibits significant reduction in running time. The unlabeled sequences used under the semi-supervised setting resemble the unpolished gemstones; when used as-is, they may carry unnecessary features and hence compromise the classification accuracy but once cut and polished, they improve the accuracy of the classifiers considerably.

  3. Comparative Genomics in Switchgrass Using 61,585 High-Quality Expressed Sequence Tags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian M. Tobias

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of genomic resources for switchgrass ( L., a perennial NAD-malic enzyme type C grass, is required to enable molecular breeding and biotechnological approaches for improving its value as a forage and bioenergy crop. Expressed sequence tag (EST sequencing is one method that can quickly sample gene inventories and produce data suitable for marker development or analysis of tissue-specific patterns of expression. Toward this goal, three cDNA libraries from callus, crown, and seedling tissues of ‘Kanlow’ switchgrass were end-sequenced to generate a total of 61,585 high-quality ESTs from 36,565 separate clones. Seventy-three percent of the assembled consensus sequences could be aligned with the sorghum [ (L. Moench] genome at a -value of <1 × 10, indicating a high degree of similarity. Sixty-five percent of the ESTs matched with gene ontology molecular terms, and 3.3% of the sequences were matched with genes that play potential roles in cell-wall biogenesis. The representation in the three libraries of gene families known to be associated with C photosynthesis, cellulose and β-glucan synthesis, phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, and peroxidase activity indicated likely roles for individual family members. Pairwise comparisons of synonymous codon substitutions were used to assess genome sequence diversity and indicated an overall similarity between the two genome copies present in the tetraploid. Identification of EST–simple sequence repeat markers and amplification on two individual parents of a mapping population yielded an average of 2.18 amplicons per individual, and 35% of the markers produced fragment length polymorphisms.

  4. Mitochondrial genome sequences and comparative genomics ofPhytophthora ramorum and P. sojae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Frank N.; Douda, Bensasson; Tyler, Brett M.; Boore,Jeffrey L.

    2007-01-01

    The complete sequences of the mitochondrial genomes of theoomycetes of Phytophthora ramorum and P. sojae were determined during thecourse of their complete nuclear genome sequencing (Tyler, et al. 2006).Both are circular, with sizes of 39,314 bp for P. ramorum and 42,975 bpfor P. sojae. Each contains a total of 37 identifiable protein-encodinggenes, 25 or 26 tRNAs (P. sojae and P. ramorum, respectively)specifying19 amino acids, and a variable number of ORFs (7 for P. ramorum and 12for P. sojae) which are potentially additional functional genes.Non-coding regions comprise approximately 11.5 percent and 18.4 percentof the genomes of P. ramorum and P. sojae, respectively. Relative to P.sojae, there is an inverted repeat of 1,150 bp in P. ramorum thatincludes an unassigned unique ORF, a tRNA gene, and adjacent non-codingsequences, but otherwise the gene order in both species is identical.Comparisons of these genomes with published sequences of the P. infestansmitochondrial genome reveals a number of similarities, but the gene orderin P. infestans differs in two adjacent locations due to inversions.Sequence alignments of the three genomes indicated sequence conservationranging from 75 to 85 percent and that specific regions were morevariable than others.

  5. Comparative Analysis Between Flaviviruses Reveals Specific Neural Stem Cell Tropism for Zika Virus in the Mouse Developing Neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste Brault

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The recent Zika outbreak in South America and French Polynesia was associated with an epidemic of microcephaly, a disease characterized by a reduced size of the cerebral cortex. Other members of the Flavivirus genus, including West Nile virus (WNV, can cause encephalitis but were not demonstrated to cause microcephaly. It remains unclear whether Zika virus (ZIKV and other flaviviruses may infect different cell populations in the developing neocortex and lead to distinct developmental defects. Here, we describe an assay to infect mouse E15 embryonic brain slices with ZIKV, WNV and dengue virus serotype 4 (DENV-4. We show that this tissue is able to support viral replication of ZIKV and WNV, but not DENV-4. Cell fate analysis reveals a remarkable tropism of ZIKV infection for neural stem cells. Closely related WNV displays a very different tropism of infection, with a bias towards neurons. We further show that ZIKV infection, but not WNV infection, impairs cell cycle progression of neural stem cells. Both viruses inhibited apoptosis at early stages of infection. This work establishes a powerful comparative approach to identify ZIKV-specific alterations in the developing neocortex and reveals specific preferential infection of neural stem cells by ZIKV.

  6. Comparing three-dimensional serial optical coherence tomography histology to MRI imaging in the entire mouse brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castonguay, Alexandre; Lefebvre, Joël; Pouliot, Philippe; Lesage, Frédéric

    2018-01-01

    An automated serial histology setup combining optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging with vibratome sectioning was used to image eight wild type mouse brains. The datasets resulted in thousands of volumetric tiles resolved at a voxel size of (4.9×4.9×6.5) μm3 stitched back together to give a three-dimensional map of the brain from which a template OCT brain was obtained. To assess deformation caused by tissue sectioning, reconstruction algorithms, and fixation, OCT datasets were compared to both in vivo and ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) imaging. The OCT brain template yielded a highly detailed map of the brain structure, with a high contrast in white matter fiber bundles and was highly resemblant to the in vivo MRI template. Brain labeling using the Allen brain framework showed little variation in regional brain volume among imaging modalities with no statistical differences. The high correspondence between the OCT template brain and its in vivo counterpart demonstrates the potential of whole brain histology to validate in vivo imaging.

  7. Antibody-based screening for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma compared with microsatellite analysis and sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mariann; Katballe, Niels; Wikman, Friedrik

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes, MSH2, MLH1, and others are associated with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Due to the high costs of sequencing, cheaper screening methods are needed to identify HNPCC cases. Ideally, these methods should have a high...... carcinoma of whom 11 met the Amsterdam criteria and 31 were suspected to belong to HNPCC families. Thirty-five patients were examined by microsatellite analysis, 40 by immunohistochemical staining, and in 31 patients both the MLH1 and MSH2 genes were sequenced. RESULTS: Ninety-two percent of patients...... the three methods was found in 74 % of the tumors. CONCLUSIONS: The authors suggest that immunohistochemistry should be used in combination with microsatellite analysis to prescreen suspected HNPCC patients for the selection of cases where sequencing of the MLH1 and MSH2 mismatch repair genes is indicated....

  8. Quantification of massively parallel sequencing libraries - a comparative study of eight methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussing, Christian; Kampmann, Marie-Louise; Mogensen, Helle Smidt

    2018-01-01

    Quantification of massively parallel sequencing libraries is important for acquisition of monoclonal beads or clusters prior to clonal amplification and to avoid large variations in library coverage when multiple samples are included in one sequencing analysis. No gold standard for quantification...... estimates followed by Qubit and electrophoresis-based instruments (Bioanalyzer, TapeStation, GX Touch, and Fragment Analyzer), while SYBR Green and TaqMan based qPCR assays gave the lowest estimates. qPCR gave more accurate predictions of sequencing coverage than Qubit and TapeStation did. Costs, time......-consumption, workflow simplicity, and ability to quantify multiple samples are discussed. Technical specifications, advantages, and disadvantages of the various methods are pointed out....

  9. Comparative analysis of full genomic sequences among different genotypes of dengue virus type 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Ting-Hsiang

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the previous study demonstrated the envelope protein of dengue viruses is under purifying selection pressure, little is known about the genetic differences of full-length viral genomes of DENV-3. In our study, complete genomic sequencing of DENV-3 strains collected from different geographical locations and isolation years were determined and the sequence diversity as well as selection pressure sites in the DENV genome other than within the E gene were also analyzed. Results Using maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches, our phylogenetic analysis revealed that the Taiwan's indigenous DENV-3 isolated from 1994 and 1998 dengue/DHF epidemics and one 1999 sporadic case were of the three different genotypes – I, II, and III, each associated with DENV-3 circulating in Indonesia, Thailand and Sri Lanka, respectively. Sequence diversity and selection pressure of different genomic regions among DENV-3 different genotypes was further examined to understand the global DENV-3 evolution. The highest nucleotide sequence diversity among the fully sequenced DENV-3 strains was found in the nonstructural protein 2A (mean ± SD: 5.84 ± 0.54 and envelope protein gene regions (mean ± SD: 5.04 ± 0.32. Further analysis found that positive selection pressure of DENV-3 may occur in the non-structural protein 1 gene region and the positive selection site was detected at position 178 of the NS1 gene. Conclusion Our study confirmed that the envelope protein is under purifying selection pressure although it presented higher sequence diversity. The detection of positive selection pressure in the non-structural protein along genotype II indicated that DENV-3 originated from Southeast Asia needs to monitor the emergence of DENV strains with epidemic potential for better epidemic prevention and vaccine development.

  10. Comparative Sequence Analysis of Plasmids from Lactobacillus delbrueckii and Construction of a Shuttle Cloning Vector▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju-Hoon; Halgerson, Jamie S.; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; O'Sullivan, Daniel J.

    2007-01-01

    While plasmids are very commonly associated with the majority of the lactic acid bacteria, they are only very rarely associated with Lactobacillus delbrueckii, with only four characterized to date. In this study, the complete sequence of a native plasmid, pDOJ1, from a strain of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus was determined. It consisted of a circular DNA molecule of 6,220 bp with a G+C content of 44.6% and a characteristic ori and encoded six open reading frames (ORFs), of which functions could be predicted for three—a mobilization (Mob) protein, a transposase, and a fused primase-helicase replication protein. Comparative analysis of pDOJ1 and the other available L. delbrueckii plasmids (pLBB1, pJBL2, pN42, and pLL1212) revealed a very similar organization and amino acid identities between 85 and 98% for the putative proteins of all six predicted ORFs from pDOJ1, reflecting a common origin for L. delbrueckii plasmids. Analysis of the fused primase-helicase replication gene found a similar fused organization only in the theta replicating group B plasmids from Streptococcus thermophilus. This observation and the ability of the replicon to function in S. thermophilus support the idea that the origin of plasmids in L. delbrueckii was likely from S. thermophilus. This may reflect the close association of these two species in dairy fermentations, particularly yogurt production. As no vector based on plasmid replicons from L. delbrueckii has previously been constructed, an Escherichia coli-L. delbrueckii shuttle cloning vector, pDOJ4, was constructed from pDOJ1, the p15A ori, the chloramphenicol resistance gene of pCI372, and the lacZ polylinker from pUC18. This cloning vector was successfully introduced into E. coli, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, S. thermophilus, and Lactococcus lactis. This shuttle cloning vector provides a new tool for molecular analysis of Lactobacillus delbrueckii and other lactic acid bacteria. PMID:17526779

  11. Rapid sequence induction and intubation with rocuronium-sugammadex compared with succinylcholine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M K; Bretlau, C; Gätke, M R

    2012-01-01

    An unanticipated difficult airway may arise during rapid sequence induction and intubation (RSII). The aim of the trial was to assess how rapidly spontaneous ventilation could be re-established after RSII. We hypothesized that the time period from tracheal intubation to spontaneous ventilation wo...... would be shorter with rocuronium-sugammadex than with succinylcholine....

  12. Identification of Novel STAT6-Regulated Proteins in Mouse B Cells by Comparative Transcriptome and Proteome Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokada-Gopal, Lavanya; Boeser, Alexander; Lehmann, Christian H K; Drepper, Friedel; Dudziak, Diana; Warscheid, Bettina; Voehringer, David

    2017-05-01

    The transcription factor STAT6 plays a key role in mediating signaling downstream of the receptors for IL-4 and IL-13. In B cells, STAT6 is required for class switch recombination to IgE and for germinal center formation during type 2 immune responses directed against allergens or helminths. In this study, we compared the transcriptomes and proteomes of primary mouse B cells from wild-type and STAT6-deficient mice cultured for 4 d in the presence or absence of IL-4. Microarray analysis revealed that 214 mRNAs were upregulated and 149 were downregulated >3-fold by IL-4 in a STAT6-dependent manner. Across all samples, ∼5000 proteins were identified by label-free quantitative liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. A total of 149 proteins was found to be differentially expressed >3-fold between IL-4-stimulated wild-type and STAT6 -/- B cells (75 upregulated and 74 downregulated). Comparative analysis of the proteome and transcriptome revealed that expression of these proteins was mainly regulated at the transcriptional level, which argues against a major role for posttranscriptional mechanisms that modulate the STAT6-dependent proteome. Nine proteins were selected for confirmation by flow cytometry or Western blot. We show that CD30, CD79b, SLP-76, DEC205, IL-5Rα, STAT5, and Thy1 are induced by IL-4 in a STAT6-dependent manner. In contrast, Syk and Fc receptor-like 1 were downregulated. This dataset provides a framework for further functional analysis of newly identified IL-4-regulated proteins in B cells that may contribute to germinal center formation and IgE switching in type 2 immunity. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  13. Characterization of the transcriptome, nucleotide sequence polymorphism, and natural selection in the desert adapted mouse Peromyscus eremicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D. MacManes

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available As a direct result of intense heat and aridity, deserts are thought to be among the most harsh of environments, particularly for their mammalian inhabitants. Given that osmoregulation can be challenging for these animals, with failure resulting in death, strong selection should be observed on genes related to the maintenance of water and solute balance. One such animal, Peromyscus eremicus, is native to the desert regions of the southwest United States and may live its entire life without oral fluid intake. As a first step toward understanding the genetics that underlie this phenotype, we present a characterization of the P. eremicus transcriptome. We assay four tissues (kidney, liver, brain, testes from a single individual and supplement this with population level renal transcriptome sequencing from 15 additional animals. We identified a set of transcripts undergoing both purifying and balancing selection based on estimates of Tajima’s D. In addition, we used the branch-site test to identify a transcript—Slc2a9, likely related to desert osmoregulation—undergoing enhanced selection in P. eremicus relative to a set of related non-desert rodents.

  14. Towards high-throughput phenotyping of complex patterned behaviors in rodents: focus on mouse self-grooming and its sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyzar, Evan; Gaikwad, Siddharth; Roth, Andrew; Green, Jeremy; Pham, Mimi; Stewart, Adam; Liang, Yiqing; Kobla, Vikrant; Kalueff, Allan V

    2011-12-01

    Increasingly recognized in biological psychiatry, rodent self-grooming is a complex patterned behavior with evolutionarily conserved cephalo-caudal progression. While grooming is traditionally assessed by the latency, frequency and duration, its sequencing represents another important domain sensitive to various experimental manipulations. Such behavioral complexity requires novel objective approaches to quantify rodent grooming, in addition to time-consuming and highly variable manual observation. The present study combined modern behavior-recognition video-tracking technologies (CleverSys, Inc.) with manual observation to characterize in-depth spontaneous (novelty-induced) and artificial (water-induced) self-grooming in adult male C57BL/6J mice. We specifically focused on individual episodes of grooming (paw licking, head washing, body/leg washing, and tail/genital grooming), their duration and transitions between episodes. Overall, the frequency, duration and transitions detected using the automated approach significantly correlated with manual observations (R=0.51-0.7, pgrooming, also indicating that behavior-recognition tools can be applied to characterize both the amount and sequential organization (patterning) of rodent grooming. Together with further refinement and methodological advancement, this approach will foster high-throughput neurophenotyping of grooming, with multiple applications in drug screening and testing of genetically modified animals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Five Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequences from Diospyros: Genome Organization and Comparative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jianmin; Liu, Huimin; Hu, Jingjing; Liang, Yuqin; Liang, Jinjun; Wuyun, Tana; Tan, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Diospyros is the largest genus in Ebenaceae, comprising more than 500 species with remarkable economic value, especially Diospyros kaki Thunb., which has traditionally been an important food resource in China, Korea, and Japan. Complete chloroplast (cp) genomes from D. kaki, D. lotus L., D. oleifera Cheng., D. glaucifolia Metc., and Diospyros 'Jinzaoshi' were sequenced using Illumina sequencing technology. This is the first cp genome reported in Ebenaceae. The cp genome sequences of Diospyros ranged from 157,300 to 157,784 bp in length, presenting a typical quadripartite structure with two inverted repeats each separated by one large and one small single-copy region. For each cp genome, 134 genes were annotated, including 80 protein-coding, 31 tRNA, and 4 rRNA unique genes. In all, 179 repeats and 283 single sequence repeats were identified. Four hypervariable regions, namely, intergenic region of trnQ_rps16, trnV_ndhC, and psbD_trnT, and intron of ndhA, were identified in the Diospyros genomes. Phylogenetic analyses based on the whole cp genome, protein-coding, and intergenic and intron sequences indicated that D. oleifera is closely related to D. kaki and could be used as a model plant for future research on D. kaki; to our knowledge, this is proposed for the first time. Further, these analyses together with two large deletions (301 and 140 bp) in the cp genome of D. 'Jinzaoshi', support its placement as a new species in Diospyros. Both maximum parsimony and likelihood analyses for 19 taxa indicated the basal position of Ericales in asterids and suggested that Ebenaceae is monophyletic in Ericales.

  16. Five Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequences from Diospyros: Genome Organization and Comparative Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmin Fu

    Full Text Available Diospyros is the largest genus in Ebenaceae, comprising more than 500 species with remarkable economic value, especially Diospyros kaki Thunb., which has traditionally been an important food resource in China, Korea, and Japan. Complete chloroplast (cp genomes from D. kaki, D. lotus L., D. oleifera Cheng., D. glaucifolia Metc., and Diospyros 'Jinzaoshi' were sequenced using Illumina sequencing technology. This is the first cp genome reported in Ebenaceae. The cp genome sequences of Diospyros ranged from 157,300 to 157,784 bp in length, presenting a typical quadripartite structure with two inverted repeats each separated by one large and one small single-copy region. For each cp genome, 134 genes were annotated, including 80 protein-coding, 31 tRNA, and 4 rRNA unique genes. In all, 179 repeats and 283 single sequence repeats were identified. Four hypervariable regions, namely, intergenic region of trnQ_rps16, trnV_ndhC, and psbD_trnT, and intron of ndhA, were identified in the Diospyros genomes. Phylogenetic analyses based on the whole cp genome, protein-coding, and intergenic and intron sequences indicated that D. oleifera is closely related to D. kaki and could be used as a model plant for future research on D. kaki; to our knowledge, this is proposed for the first time. Further, these analyses together with two large deletions (301 and 140 bp in the cp genome of D. 'Jinzaoshi', support its placement as a new species in Diospyros. Both maximum parsimony and likelihood analyses for 19 taxa indicated the basal position of Ericales in asterids and suggested that Ebenaceae is monophyletic in Ericales.

  17. Sequence-based comparative study of classical swine fever virus genogroup 2.2 isolate with pestivirus reference strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ravi; Rajak, Kaushal Kishor; Chandra, Tribhuwan; Muthuchelvan, Dhanavelu; Saxena, Arpit; Chaudhary, Dheeraj; Kumar, Ajay; Pandey, Awadh Bihari

    2015-09-01

    This study was undertaken with the aim to compare and establish the genetic relatedness between classical swine fever virus (CSFV) genogroup 2.2 isolate and pestivirus reference strains. The available complete genome sequences of CSFV/IND/UK/LAL-290 strain and other pestivirus reference strains were retrieved from GenBank. The complete genome sequence, complete open reading frame, 5' and 3' non-coding region (NCR) sequences were analyzed and compared with reference pestiviruses strains. Clustal W model in MegAlign program of Lasergene 6.0 software was used for analysis of genetic heterogeneity. Phylogenetic analysis was carried out using MEGA 6.06 software package. The complete genome sequence alignment of CSFV/IND/UK/LAL-290 isolate and reference pestivirus strains showed 58.9-72% identities at the nucleotide level and 50.3-76.9% at amino acid level. Sequence homology of 5' and 3' NCRs was found to be 64.1-82.3% and 22.9-71.4%, respectively. In phylogenetic analysis, overall tree topology was found similar irrespective of sequences used in this study; however, whole genome phylogeny of pestivirus formed two main clusters, which further distinguished into the monophyletic clade of each pestivirus species. CSFV/IND/UK/LAL-290 isolate placed with the CSFV Eystrup strain in the same clade with close proximity to border disease virus and Aydin strains. CSFV/IND/UK/LAL-290 exhibited the analogous genomic organization to those of all reference pestivirus strains. Based on sequence identity and phylogenetic analysis, the isolate showed close homology to Aydin/04-TR virus and distantly related to Bungowannah virus.

  18. Whole-Genome Sequencing and Comparative Genome Analysis of Bacillus subtilis Strains Isolated from Non-Salted Fermented Soybean Foods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayumi Kamada

    Full Text Available Bacillus subtilis is the main component in the fermentation of soybeans. To investigate the genetics of the soybean-fermenting B. subtilis strains and its relationship with the productivity of extracellular poly-γ-glutamic acid (γPGA, we sequenced the whole genome of eight B. subtilis stains isolated from non-salted fermented soybean foods in Southeast Asia. Assembled nucleotide sequences were compared with those of a natto (fermented soybean food starter strain B. subtilis BEST195 and the laboratory standard strain B. subtilis 168 that is incapable of γPGA production. Detected variants were investigated in terms of insertion sequences, biotin synthesis, production of subtilisin NAT, and regulatory genes for γPGA synthesis, which were related to fermentation process. Comparing genome sequences, we found that the strains that produce γPGA have a deletion in a protein that constitutes the flagellar basal body, and this deletion was not found in the non-producing strains. We further identified diversity in variants of the bio operon, which is responsible for the biotin auxotrophism of the natto starter strains. Phylogenetic analysis using multilocus sequencing typing revealed that the B. subtilis strains isolated from the non-salted fermented soybeans were not clustered together, while the natto-fermenting strains were tightly clustered; this analysis also suggested that the strain isolated from "Tua Nao" of Thailand traces a different evolutionary process from other strains.

  19. Sequences within both the 5' UTR and Gag are required for optimal in vivo packaging and propagation of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV genomic RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Mustafa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study mapped regions of genomic RNA (gRNA important for packaging and propagation of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV. MMTV is a type B betaretrovirus which preassembles intracellularly, a phenomenon distinct from retroviruses that assemble the progeny virion at cell surface just before budding such as the type C human and feline immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and FIV. Studies of FIV and Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV, a type D betaretrovirus with similar intracellular virion assembly processes as MMTV, have shown that the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR and 5' end of gag constitute important packaging determinants for gRNA. METHODOLOGY: Three series of MMTV transfer vectors containing incremental amounts of gag or 5' UTR sequences, or incremental amounts of 5' UTR in the presence of 400 nucleotides (nt of gag were constructed to delineate the extent of 5' sequences that may be involved in MMTV gRNA packaging. Real time PCR measured the packaging efficiency of these vector RNAs into MMTV particles generated by co-transfection of MMTV Gag/Pol, vesicular stomatitis virus envelope glycoprotein (VSV-G Env, and individual transfer vectors into human 293T cells. Transfer vector RNA propagation was monitored by measuring transduction of target HeLaT4 cells following infection with viral particles containing a hygromycin resistance gene expression cassette on the packaged RNA. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MMTV requires the entire 5' UTR and a minimum of ~120 nucleotide (nt at the 5' end of gag for not only efficient gRNA packaging but also propagation of MMTV-based transfer vector RNAs. Vector RNAs without the entire 5' UTR were defective for both efficient packaging and propagation into target cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results reveal that the 5' end of MMTV genome is critical for both gRNA packaging and propagation, unlike the recently delineated FIV and MPMV packaging determinants that have been shown to be of bipartite nature.

  20. Comparative analysis of idiom selection and sequencing 5 in Estonian basic school EFL coursebooks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Anita Forssten

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates the selection and sequencing of the idioms encountered in two locally-produced and international coursebook series currently employed in Estonian basic schools. It is hypothesized that there exists a positive correlation between idioms’ difficulty and coursebooks’ language proficiency level. The hypothesis is tested through a statistical analysis of the idioms found which are categorized in terms of their analysability into three categories where category 1 includes analysable semi-literal idioms, category 2 comprises analysable semi-transparent idioms, and category 3 encompasses non-analysable opaque idioms, and then analysed through an online language corpus (British National Corpus. The results of the study reveal that the coursebook authors under discussion have disregarded idioms’ frequency as a criterion for selection or sequencing, whereas the factor utilized to some extent is the degree of analysability.

  1. Comparative genome sequence analysis underscores mycoparasitism as the ancestral life style of Trichoderma

    OpenAIRE

    Kubicek, Christian P.; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo; Seidl-Seiboth, Verena; Martinez, Diego A.; Druzhinina, Irina S.; Thon, Michael; Zeilinger, Susanne; Casas-Flores, Sergio; Horwitz, Benjamin A.; Mukherjee, Prasun K.; Mukherjee, Mala; Kredics, László; Alcaraz, Luis D.; Aerts, Andrea; Antal, Zsuzsanna

    2011-01-01

    Background Mycoparasitism, a lifestyle where one fungus is parasitic on another fungus, has special relevance when the prey is a plant pathogen, providing a strategy for biological control of pests for plant protection. Probably, the most studied biocontrol agents are species of the genus Hypocrea/Trichoderma. Results Here we report an analysis of the genome sequences of the two biocontrol species Trichoderma atroviride (teleomorph Hypocrea atroviridis) and Trichoderma virens (formerly Gliocl...

  2. The First Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequences in Actinidiaceae: Genome Structure and Comparative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xiaohong; Tang, Ping; Li, Zuozhou; Li, Dawei; Liu, Yifei; Huang, Hongwen

    2015-01-01

    Actinidia chinensis is an important economic plant belonging to the basal lineage of the asterids. Availability of a complete Actinidia chloroplast genome sequence is crucial to understanding phylogenetic relationships among major lineages of angiosperms and facilitates kiwifruit genetic improvement. We report here the complete nucleotide sequences of the chloroplast genomes for Actinidia chinensis and A. chinensis var deliciosa obtained through de novo assembly of Illumina paired-end reads produced by total DNA sequencing. The total genome size ranges from 155,446 to 157,557 bp, with an inverted repeat (IR) of 24,013 to 24,391 bp, a large single copy region (LSC) of 87,984 to 88,337 bp and a small single copy region (SSC) of 20,332 to 20,336 bp. The genome encodes 113 different genes, including 79 unique protein-coding genes, 30 tRNA genes and 4 ribosomal RNA genes, with 16 duplicated in the inverted repeats, and a tRNA gene (trnfM-CAU) duplicated once in the LSC region. Comparisons of IR boundaries among four asterid species showed that IR/LSC borders were extended into the 5' portion of the psbA gene and IR contraction occurred in Actinidia. The clap gene has been lost from the chloroplast genome in Actinidia, and may have been transferred to the nucleus during chloroplast evolution. Twenty-seven polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci were identified in the Actinidia chloroplast genome. Maximum parsimony analyses of a 72-gene, 16 taxa angiosperm dataset strongly support the placement of Actinidiaceae in Ericales within the basal asterids.

  3. Comparative transcriptome sequencing and de novo analysis of Vaccinium corymbosum during fruit and color development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lingli; Zhang, Hehua; Liu, Zhongshuai; Cui, Xiaoyue; Zhang, Tong; Li, Yanfang; Zhang, Lingyun

    2016-10-12

    Blueberry is an economically important fruit crop in Ericaceae family. The substantial quantities of flavonoids in blueberry have been implicated in a broad range of health benefits. However, the information regarding fruit development and flavonoid metabolites based on the transcriptome level is still limited. In the present study, the transcriptome and gene expression profiling over berry development, especially during color development were initiated. A total of approximately 13.67 Gbp of data were obtained and assembled into 186,962 transcripts and 80,836 unigenes from three stages of blueberry fruit and color development. A large number of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and candidate genes, which are potentially involved in plant development, metabolic and hormone pathways, were identified. A total of 6429 sequences containing 8796 SSRs were characterized from 15,457 unigenes and 1763 unigenes contained more than one SSR. The expression profiles of key genes involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis were also studied. In addition, a comparison between our dataset and other published results was carried out. Our high quality reads produced in this study are an important advancement and provide a new resource for the interpretation of high-throughput data for blueberry species whether regarding sequencing data depth or species extension. The use of this transcriptome data will serve as a valuable public information database for the studies of blueberry genome and would greatly boost the research of fruit and color development, flavonoid metabolisms and regulation and breeding of more healthful blueberries.

  4. Artemis and ACT: viewing, annotating and comparing sequences stored in a relational database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Tim; Berriman, Matthew; Tivey, Adrian; Patel, Chinmay; Böhme, Ulrike; Barrell, Barclay G; Parkhill, Julian; Rajandream, Marie-Adèle

    2008-12-01

    Artemis and Artemis Comparison Tool (ACT) have become mainstream tools for viewing and annotating sequence data, particularly for microbial genomes. Since its first release, Artemis has been continuously developed and supported with additional functionality for editing and analysing sequences based on feedback from an active user community of laboratory biologists and professional annotators. Nevertheless, its utility has been somewhat restricted by its limitation to reading and writing from flat files. Therefore, a new version of Artemis has been developed, which reads from and writes to a relational database schema, and allows users to annotate more complex, often large and fragmented, genome sequences. Artemis and ACT have now been extended to read and write directly to the Generic Model Organism Database (GMOD, http://www.gmod.org) Chado relational database schema. In addition, a Gene Builder tool has been developed to provide structured forms and tables to edit coordinates of gene models and edit functional annotation, based on standard ontologies, controlled vocabularies and free text. Artemis and ACT are freely available (under a GPL licence) for download (for MacOSX, UNIX and Windows) at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute web sites: http://www.sanger.ac.uk/Software/Artemis/ http://www.sanger.ac.uk/Software/ACT/

  5. Complete Plastid Genome Sequencing of Four Tilia Species (Malvaceae: A Comparative Analysis and Phylogenetic Implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Cai

    Full Text Available Tilia is an ecologically and economically important genus in the family Malvaceae. However, there is no complete plastid genome of Tilia sequenced to date, and the taxonomy of Tilia is difficult owing to frequent hybridization and polyploidization. A well-supported interspecific relationships of this genus is not available due to limited informative sites from the commonly used molecular markers. We report here the complete plastid genome sequences of four Tilia species determined by the Illumina technology. The Tilia plastid genome is 162,653 bp to 162,796 bp in length, encoding 113 unique genes and a total number of 130 genes. The gene order and organization of the Tilia plastid genome exhibits the general structure of angiosperms and is very similar to other published plastid genomes of Malvaceae. As other long-lived tree genera, the sequence divergence among the four Tilia plastid genomes is very low. And we analyzed the nucleotide substitution patterns and the evolution of insertions and deletions in the Tilia plastid genomes. Finally, we build a phylogeny of the four sampled Tilia species with high supports using plastid phylogenomics, suggesting that it is an efficient way to resolve the phylogenetic relationships of this genus.

  6. Artemis and ACT: viewing, annotating and comparing sequences stored in a relational database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Tim; Berriman, Matthew; Tivey, Adrian; Patel, Chinmay; Böhme, Ulrike; Barrell, Barclay G.; Parkhill, Julian; Rajandream, Marie-Adèle

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: Artemis and Artemis Comparison Tool (ACT) have become mainstream tools for viewing and annotating sequence data, particularly for microbial genomes. Since its first release, Artemis has been continuously developed and supported with additional functionality for editing and analysing sequences based on feedback from an active user community of laboratory biologists and professional annotators. Nevertheless, its utility has been somewhat restricted by its limitation to reading and writing from flat files. Therefore, a new version of Artemis has been developed, which reads from and writes to a relational database schema, and allows users to annotate more complex, often large and fragmented, genome sequences. Results: Artemis and ACT have now been extended to read and write directly to the Generic Model Organism Database (GMOD, http://www.gmod.org) Chado relational database schema. In addition, a Gene Builder tool has been developed to provide structured forms and tables to edit coordinates of gene models and edit functional annotation, based on standard ontologies, controlled vocabularies and free text. Availability: Artemis and ACT are freely available (under a GPL licence) for download (for MacOSX, UNIX and Windows) at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute web sites: http://www.sanger.ac.uk/Software/Artemis/ http://www.sanger.ac.uk/Software/ACT/ Contact: artemis@sanger.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:18845581

  7. The effects of ageing on mouse muscle microstructure: a comparative study of time-dependent diffusion MRI and histological assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcari, Paola; Hall, Matt G; Clark, Chris A; Greally, Elizabeth; Straub, Volker; Blamire, Andrew M

    2018-03-01

    The investigation of age-related changes in muscle microstructure between developmental and healthy adult mice may help us to understand the clinical features of early-onset muscle diseases, such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We investigated the evolution of mouse hind-limb muscle microstructure using diffusion imaging of in vivo and in vitro samples from both actively growing and mature mice. Mean apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) of the gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior muscles were determined as a function of diffusion time (Δ), age (7.5, 22 and 44 weeks) and diffusion gradient direction, applied parallel or transverse to the principal axis of the muscle fibres. We investigated a wide range of diffusion times with the goal of probing a range of diffusion lengths characteristic of muscle microstructure. We compared the diffusion time-dependent ADC of hind-limb muscles with histology. ADC was found to vary as a function of diffusion time in muscles at all stages of maturation. Muscle water diffusivity was higher in younger (7.5 weeks) than in adult (22 and 44 weeks) mice, whereas no differences were observed between the older ages. In vitro data showed the same diffusivity pattern as in vivo data. The highlighted differences in diffusion properties between young and mature muscles suggested differences in underlying muscle microstructure, which were confirmed by histological assessment. In particular, although diffusion was more restricted in older muscle, muscle fibre size increased significantly from young to adult age. The extracellular space decreased with age by only ~1%. This suggests that the observed diffusivity differences between young and adult muscles may be caused by increased membrane permeability in younger muscle associated with properties of the sarcolemma. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. A Comparative Proteome Profile of Female Mouse Gonads Suggests a Tight Link between the Electron Transport Chain and Meiosis Initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Cong; Li, Mingrui; Zhang, Pan; Guo, Yueshuai; Zhang, Hao; Zheng, Bo; Teng, Hui; Zhou, Tao; Guo, Xuejiang; Huo, Ran

    2018-01-01

    Generation of haploid gametes by meiosis is a unique property of germ cells and is critical for sexual reproduction. Leaving mitosis and entering meiosis is a key step in germ cell development. Several inducers or intrinsic genes are known to be important for meiotic initiation, but the regulation of meiotic initiation, especially at the protein level, is still not well understood. We constructed a comparative proteome profile of female mouse fetal gonads at specific time points (11.5, 12.5, and 13.5 days post coitum), spanning a critical window for initiation of meiosis in female germ cells. We identified 3666 proteins, of which 473 were differentially expressed. Further bioinformatics analysis showed that these differentially expressed proteins were enriched in the mitochondria, especially in the electron transport chain and, notably, 9 proteins in electron transport chain Complex I were differentially expressed. We disrupted the mitochondrial electron transport chain function by adding the complex I inhibitor, rotenone to 11.5 days post coitum female gonads cultured in vitro. This treatment resulted in a decreased proportion of meiotic germ cells, as assessed by staining for histone γH2AX. Rotenone treatment also caused decreased ATP levels, increased reactive oxygen species levels and failure of the germ cells to undergo premeiotic DNA replication. These effects were partially rescued by adding Coenzyme Q10. Taken together, our results suggested that a functional electron transport chain is important for meiosis initiation. Our characterization of the quantitative proteome of female gonads provides an inventory of proteins, useful for understanding the mechanisms of meiosis initiation and female fertility. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Full-length cDNA sequences from Rhesus monkey placenta tissue: analysis and utility for comparative mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Sang-Rae

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta are widely-used as experimental animals in biomedical research and are closely related to other laboratory macaques, such as cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis, and to humans, sharing a last common ancestor from about 25 million years ago. Although rhesus monkeys have been studied extensively under field and laboratory conditions, research has been limited by the lack of genetic resources. The present study generated placenta full-length cDNA libraries, characterized the resulting expressed sequence tags, and described their utility for comparative mapping with human RefSeq mRNA transcripts. Results From rhesus monkey placenta full-length cDNA libraries, 2000 full-length cDNA sequences were determined and 1835 rhesus placenta cDNA sequences longer than 100 bp were collected. These sequences were annotated based on homology to human genes. Homology search against human RefSeq mRNAs revealed that our collection included the sequences of 1462 putative rhesus monkey genes. Moreover, we identified 207 genes containing exon alterations in the coding region and the untranslated region of rhesus monkey transcripts, despite the highly conserved structure of the coding regions. Approximately 10% (187 of all full-length cDNA sequences did not represent any public human RefSeq mRNAs. Intriguingly, two rhesus monkey specific exons derived from the transposable elements of AluYRa2 (SINE family and MER11B (LTR family were also identified. Conclusion The 1835 rhesus monkey placenta full-length cDNA sequences described here could expand genomic resources and information of rhesus monkeys. This increased genomic information will greatly contribute to the development of evolutionary biology and biomedical research.

  10. Insights from Human/Mouse genome comparisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennacchio, Len A.

    2003-03-30

    Large-scale public genomic sequencing efforts have provided a wealth of vertebrate sequence data poised to provide insights into mammalian biology. These include deep genomic sequence coverage of human, mouse, rat, zebrafish, and two pufferfish (Fugu rubripes and Tetraodon nigroviridis) (Aparicio et al. 2002; Lander et al. 2001; Venter et al. 2001; Waterston et al. 2002). In addition, a high-priority has been placed on determining the genomic sequence of chimpanzee, dog, cow, frog, and chicken (Boguski 2002). While only recently available, whole genome sequence data have provided the unique opportunity to globally compare complete genome contents. Furthermore, the shared evolutionary ancestry of vertebrate species has allowed the development of comparative genomic approaches to identify ancient conserved sequences with functionality. Accordingly, this review focuses on the initial comparison of available mammalian genomes and describes various insights derived from such analysis.

  11. Comparative high-throughput transcriptome sequencing and development of SiESTa, the Silene EST annotation database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marais Gabriel AB

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Silene is widely used as a model system for addressing ecological and evolutionary questions in plants, but advances in using the genus as a model system are impeded by the lack of available resources for studying its genome. Massively parallel sequencing cDNA has recently developed into an efficient method for characterizing the transcriptomes of non-model organisms, generating massive amounts of data that enable the study of multiple species in a comparative framework. The sequences generated provide an excellent resource for identifying expressed genes, characterizing functional variation and developing molecular markers, thereby laying the foundations for future studies on gene sequence and gene expression divergence. Here, we report the results of a comparative transcriptome sequencing study of eight individuals representing four Silene and one Dianthus species as outgroup. All sequences and annotations have been deposited in a newly developed and publicly available database called SiESTa, the Silene EST annotation database. Results A total of 1,041,122 EST reads were generated in two runs on a Roche GS-FLX 454 pyrosequencing platform. EST reads were analyzed separately for all eight individuals sequenced and were assembled into contigs using TGICL. These were annotated with results from BLASTX searches and Gene Ontology (GO terms, and thousands of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were characterized. Unassembled reads were kept as singletons and together with the contigs contributed to the unigenes characterized in each individual. The high quality of unigenes is evidenced by the proportion (49% that have significant hits in similarity searches with the A. thaliana proteome. The SiESTa database is accessible at http://www.siesta.ethz.ch. Conclusion The sequence collections established in the present study provide an important genomic resource for four Silene and one Dianthus species and will help to

  12. Comparative high-throughput transcriptome sequencing and development of SiESTa, the Silene EST annotation database

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The genus Silene is widely used as a model system for addressing ecological and evolutionary questions in plants, but advances in using the genus as a model system are impeded by the lack of available resources for studying its genome. Massively parallel sequencing cDNA has recently developed into an efficient method for characterizing the transcriptomes of non-model organisms, generating massive amounts of data that enable the study of multiple species in a comparative framework. The sequences generated provide an excellent resource for identifying expressed genes, characterizing functional variation and developing molecular markers, thereby laying the foundations for future studies on gene sequence and gene expression divergence. Here, we report the results of a comparative transcriptome sequencing study of eight individuals representing four Silene and one Dianthus species as outgroup. All sequences and annotations have been deposited in a newly developed and publicly available database called SiESTa, the Silene EST annotation database. Results A total of 1,041,122 EST reads were generated in two runs on a Roche GS-FLX 454 pyrosequencing platform. EST reads were analyzed separately for all eight individuals sequenced and were assembled into contigs using TGICL. These were annotated with results from BLASTX searches and Gene Ontology (GO) terms, and thousands of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were characterized. Unassembled reads were kept as singletons and together with the contigs contributed to the unigenes characterized in each individual. The high quality of unigenes is evidenced by the proportion (49%) that have significant hits in similarity searches with the A. thaliana proteome. The SiESTa database is accessible at http://www.siesta.ethz.ch. Conclusion The sequence collections established in the present study provide an important genomic resource for four Silene and one Dianthus species and will help to further develop Silene as a

  13. Core Genome Multilocus Sequence Typing Scheme for Stable, Comparative Analyses of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli Human Disease Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, Alison J; Bray, James E; Jolley, Keith A; McCarthy, Noel D; Maiden, Martin C J

    2017-07-01

    Human campylobacteriosis, caused by Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli , remains a leading cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in many countries, but the epidemiology of campylobacteriosis outbreaks remains poorly defined, largely due to limitations in the resolution and comparability of isolate characterization methods. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data enable the improvement of sequence-based typing approaches, such as multilocus sequence typing (MLST), by substantially increasing the number of loci examined. A core genome MLST (cgMLST) scheme defines a comprehensive set of those loci present in most members of a bacterial group, balancing very high resolution with comparability across the diversity of the group. Here we propose a set of 1,343 loci as a human campylobacteriosis cgMLST scheme (v1.0), the allelic profiles of which can be assigned to core genome sequence types. The 1,343 loci chosen were a subset of the 1,643 loci identified in the reannotation of the genome sequence of C. jejuni isolate NCTC 11168, chosen as being present in >95% of draft genomes of 2,472 representative United Kingdom campylobacteriosis isolates, comprising 2,207 (89.3%) C. jejuni isolates and 265 (10.7%) C. coli isolates. Validation of the cgMLST scheme was undertaken with 1,478 further high-quality draft genomes, containing 150 or fewer contiguous sequences, from disease isolate collections: 99.5% of these isolates contained ≥95% of the 1,343 cgMLST loci. In addition to the rapid and effective high-resolution analysis of large numbers of diverse isolates, the cgMLST scheme enabled the efficient identification of very closely related isolates from a well-defined single-source campylobacteriosis outbreak. Copyright © 2017 Cody et al.

  14. Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequence of Tartary Buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum and Comparative Analysis with Common Buckwheat (F. esculentum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Soo Cho

    Full Text Available We report the chloroplast (cp genome sequence of tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum obtained by next-generation sequencing technology and compared this with the previously reported common buckwheat (F. esculentum ssp. ancestrale cp genome. The cp genome of F. tataricum has a total sequence length of 159,272 bp, which is 327 bp shorter than the common buckwheat cp genome. The cp gene content, order, and orientation are similar to those of common buckwheat, but with some structural variation at tandem and palindromic repeat frequencies and junction areas. A total of seven InDels (around 100 bp were found within the intergenic sequences and the ycf1 gene. Copy number variation of the 21-bp tandem repeat varied in F. tataricum (four repeats and F. esculentum (one repeat, and the InDel of the ycf1 gene was 63 bp long. Nucleotide and amino acid have highly conserved coding sequence with about 98% homology and four genes--rpoC2, ycf3, accD, and clpP--have high synonymous (Ks value. PCR based InDel markers were applied to diverse genetic resources of F. tataricum and F. esculentum, and the amplicon size was identical to that expected in silico. Therefore, these InDel markers are informative biomarkers to practically distinguish raw or processed buckwheat products derived from F. tataricum and F. esculentum.

  15. Fine mapping and candidate gene search of quantitative trait loci for growth and obesity using mouse intersubspecific subcongenic intercrosses and exome sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Ishikawa

    Full Text Available Although growth and body composition traits are quantitative traits of medical and agricultural importance, the genetic and molecular basis of those traits remains elusive. Our previous genome-wide quantitative trait locus (QTL analyses in an intersubspecific backcross population between C57BL/6JJcl (B6 and wild Mus musculus castaneus mice revealed a major growth QTL (named Pbwg1 on a proximal region of mouse chromosome 2. Using the B6.Cg-Pbwg1 intersubspecific congenic strain created, we revealed 12 closely linked QTLs for body weight and body composition traits on an approximately 44.1-Mb wild-derived congenic region. In this study, we narrowed down genomic regions harboring three (Pbwg1.12, Pbwg1.3 and Pbwg1.5 of the 12 linked QTLs and searched for possible candidate genes for the QTLs. By phenotypic analyses of F2 intercross populations between B6 and each of four B6.Cg-Pbwg1 subcongenic strains with overlapping and non-overlapping introgressed regions, we physically defined Pbwg1.12 affecting body weight to a 3.8-Mb interval (61.5-65.3 Mb on chromosome 2. We fine-mapped Pbwg1.3 for body length to an 8.0-Mb interval (57.3-65.3 and Pbwg1.5 for abdominal white fat weight to a 2.1-Mb interval (59.4-61.5. The wild-derived allele at Pbwg1.12 and Pbwg1.3 uniquely increased body weight and length despite the fact that the wild mouse has a smaller body size than that of B6, whereas it decreased fat weight at Pbwg1.5. Exome sequencing and candidate gene prioritization suggested that Gcg and Grb14 are putative candidate genes for Pbwg1.12 and that Ly75 and Itgb6 are putative candidate genes for Pbwg1.5. These genes had nonsynonymous SNPs, but the SNPs were predicted to be not harmful to protein functions. These results provide information helpful to identify wild-derived quantitative trait genes causing enhanced growth and resistance to obesity.

  16. Assembly and comparative analysis of complete mitochondrial genome sequence of an economic plant Salix suchowensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Ye

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Willow is a widely used dioecious woody plant of Salicaceae family in China. Due to their high biomass yields, willows are promising sources for bioenergy crops. In this study, we assembled the complete mitochondrial (mt genome sequence of S. suchowensis with the length of 644,437 bp using Roche-454 GS FLX Titanium sequencing technologies. Base composition of the S. suchowensis mt genome is A (27.43%, T (27.59%, C (22.34%, and G (22.64%, which shows a prevalent GC content with that of other angiosperms. This long circular mt genome encodes 58 unique genes (32 protein-coding genes, 23 tRNA genes and 3 rRNA genes, and 9 of the 32 protein-coding genes contain 17 introns. Through the phylogenetic analysis of 35 species based on 23 protein-coding genes, it is supported that Salix as a sister to Populus. With the detailed phylogenetic information and the identification of phylogenetic position, some ribosomal protein genes and succinate dehydrogenase genes are found usually lost during evolution. As a native shrub willow species, this worthwhile research of S. suchowensis mt genome will provide more desirable information for better understanding the genomic breeding and missing pieces of sex determination evolution in the future.

  17. Novel insights into embryonic stem cell self-renewal revealed through comparative human and mouse systems biology networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowell, Karen G; Simons, Allen K; Bai, Hao; Kell, Braden; Wang, Zack Z; Yun, Kyuson; Hibbs, Matthew A

    2014-05-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs), characterized by their ability to both self-renew and differentiate into multiple cell lineages, are a powerful model for biomedical research and developmental biology. Human and mouse ESCs share many features, yet have distinctive aspects, including fundamental differences in the signaling pathways and cell cycle controls that support self-renewal. Here, we explore the molecular basis of human ESC self-renewal using Bayesian network machine learning to integrate cell-type-specific, high-throughput data for gene function discovery. We integrated high-throughput ESC data from 83 human studies (~1.8 million data points collected under 1,100 conditions) and 62 mouse studies (~2.4 million data points collected under 1,085 conditions) into separate human and mouse predictive networks focused on ESC self-renewal to analyze shared and distinct functional relationships among protein-coding gene orthologs. Computational evaluations show that these networks are highly accurate, literature validation confirms their biological relevance, and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) validation supports our predictions. Our results reflect the importance of key regulatory genes known to be strongly associated with self-renewal and pluripotency in both species (e.g., POU5F1, SOX2, and NANOG), identify metabolic differences between species (e.g., threonine metabolism), clarify differences between human and mouse ESC developmental signaling pathways (e.g., leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF)-activated JAK/STAT in mouse; NODAL/ACTIVIN-A-activated fibroblast growth factor in human), and reveal many novel genes and pathways predicted to be functionally associated with self-renewal in each species. These interactive networks are available online at www.StemSight.org for stem cell researchers to develop new hypotheses, discover potential mechanisms involving sparsely annotated genes, and prioritize genes of interest for experimental validation

  18. Comparative transcriptome analysis within the Lolium/Festuca species complex reveals high sequence conservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czaban, Adrian; Sharma, Sapna; Byrne, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    species from the Lolium-Festuca complex, ranging from 52,166 to 72,133 transcripts per assembly. We have also predicted a set of proteins and validated it with a high-confidence protein database from three closely related species (H. vulgare, B. distachyon and O. sativa). We have obtained gene family...... clusters for the four species using OrthoMCL and analyzed their inferred phylogenetic relationships. Our results indicate that VRN2 is a candidate gene for differentiating vernalization and non-vernalization types in the Lolium-Festuca complex. Grouping of the gene families based on their BLAST identity...... enabled us to divide ortholog groups into those that are very conserved and those that are more evolutionarily relaxed. The ratio of the non-synonumous to synonymous substitutions enabled us to pinpoint protein sequences evolving in response to positive selection. These proteins may explain some...

  19. Comparing microarrays and next-generation sequencing technologies for microbial ecology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Seong Woon; Abell, Guy C J; Kim, Kyoung-Ho; Nam, Young-Do; Bae, Jin-Woo

    2010-06-01

    Recent advances in molecular biology have resulted in the application of DNA microarrays and next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to the field of microbial ecology. This review aims to examine the strengths and weaknesses of each of the methodologies, including depth and ease of analysis, throughput and cost-effectiveness. It also intends to highlight the optimal application of each of the individual technologies toward the study of a particular environment and identify potential synergies between the two main technologies, whereby both sample number and coverage can be maximized. We suggest that the efficient use of microarray and NGS technologies will allow researchers to advance the field of microbial ecology, and importantly, improve our understanding of the role of microorganisms in their various environments.

  20. Capacity for patterns and sequences in Kanerva's SDM as compared to other associative memory models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, James D.

    1987-01-01

    The information capacity of Kanerva's Sparse Distributed Memory (SDM) and Hopfield-type neural networks is investigated. Under the approximations used, it is shown that the total information stored in these systems is proportional to the number connections in the network. The proportionality constant is the same for the SDM and Hopfield-type models independent of the particular model, or the order of the model. The approximations are checked numerically. This same analysis can be used to show that the SDM can store sequences of spatiotemporal patterns, and the addition of time-delayed connections allows the retrieval of context dependent temporal patterns. A minor modification of the SDM can be used to store correlated patterns.

  1. No more non-model species: the promise of next generation sequencing for comparative immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheilly, Nolwenn M; Adema, Coen; Raftos, David A; Gourbal, Benjamin; Grunau, Christoph; Du Pasquier, Louis

    2014-07-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) allows for the rapid, comprehensive and cost effective analysis of entire genomes and transcriptomes. NGS provides approaches for immune response gene discovery, profiling gene expression over the course of parasitosis, studying mechanisms of diversification of immune receptors and investigating the role of epigenetic mechanisms in regulating immune gene expression and/or diversification. NGS will allow meaningful comparisons to be made between organisms from different taxa in an effort to understand the selection of diverse strategies for host defence under different environmental pathogen pressures. At the same time, it will reveal the shared and unique components of the immunological toolkit and basic functional aspects that are essential for immune defence throughout the living world. In this review, we argue that NGS will revolutionize our understanding of immune responses throughout the animal kingdom because the depth of information it provides will circumvent the need to concentrate on a few "model" species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Bioactivation of food genotoxicants 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and furfuryl alcohol by sulfotransferases from human, mouse and rat: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachse, Benjamin; Meinl, Walter; Sommer, Yasmin; Glatt, Hansruedi; Seidel, Albrecht; Monien, Bernhard H

    2016-01-01

    5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and furfuryl alcohol (FFA) are moderately potent rodent carcinogens that are present in thermally processed foodstuffs. The carcinogenic effects were hypothesized to originate from sulfotransferase (SULT)-mediated bioactivation yielding DNA-reactive and mutagenic sulfate esters, a confirmed metabolic pathway of HMF and FFA in mice. It is known that orthologous SULT forms substantially differ in substrate specificity and tissue distribution. This could influence HMF- and FFA-induced carcinogenic effects. Here, we studied HMF and FFA sulfoconjugation by 30 individual SULT forms of humans, mice and rats. The catalytic efficiencies (k cat/K M) of HMF sulfoconjugation of human SULT1A1 (13.7 s(-1) M(-1)), mouse Sult1a1 (15.8 s(-1) M(-1)) and 1d1 (4.8 s(-1) M(-1)) and rat Sult1a1 (5.3 s(-1) M(-1)) were considerably higher than those of all other SULT forms investigated (≤0.73 s(-1 )M(-1)). FFA sulfoconjugation was monitored using adenosine as a nucleophilic scavenger for the reactive 2-sulfoxymethylfuran (t 1/2 = 20 s at 37 °C). The resulting adduct N (6)-((furan-2-yl)methyl)-adenosine (N (6)-MF-A) was quantified by isotope-dilution UPLC-MS/MS. The rates of N (6)-MF-A formation showed that hSULT1A1 and its orthologues in mice and rats were also the most important contributors to FFA sulfoconjugation in each of the species. Taken together, the catalytic capacity of hSULT1A1 is comparable to that of mSult1a1 in mice, the species in which carcinogenic effects of HMF and FFA were detected. This is of primary concern due to the expression of hSULT1A1 in many different tissues.

  3. Sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release compared in slow-twitch and fast-twitch fibres of mouse muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylor, S M; Hollingworth, S

    2003-08-15

    Experiments were carried out to compare the amplitude and time course of Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in intact slow-twitch and fast-twitch mouse fibres. Individual fibres within small bundles were injected with furaptra, a low-affinity, rapidly responding Ca2+ indicator. In response to a single action potential at 16 degrees C, the peak amplitude and half-duration of the change in myoplasmic free [Ca2+] (Delta[Ca2+]) differed significantly between fibre types (slow-twitch: peak amplitude, 9.4 +/- 1.0 microM (mean +/- S.E.M.); half-duration, 7.7 +/- 0.6 ms; fast-twitch: peak amplitude 18.5 +/- 0.5 microM; half-duration, 4.9 +/- 0.3 ms). SR Ca2+ release was estimated from Delta[Ca2+] with a computational model that calculated Ca2+ binding to the major myoplasmic Ca2+ buffers (troponin, ATP and parvalbumin); buffer concentrations and reaction rate constants were adjusted to reflect fibre-type differences. In response to an action potential, the total concentration of released Ca2+ (Delta[CaT]) and the peak rate of Ca2+ release ((d/dt)Delta[CaT]) differed about 3-fold between the fibre types (slow-twitch: Delta[CaT], 127 +/- 7 microM; (d/dt)Delta[CaT], 70 +/- 6 microM ms-1; fast-twitch: Delta[CaT], 346 +/- 6 microM; (d/dt)Delta[CaT], 212 +/- 4 microM ms-1). In contrast, the half-duration of (d/dt)Delta[CaT] was very similar in the two fibre types (slow-twitch, 1.8 +/- 0.1 ms; fast-twitch, 1.6 +/- 0.0 ms). When fibres were stimulated with a 5-shock train at 67 Hz, the peaks of (d/dt)Delta[CaT] in response to the second and subsequent shocks were much smaller than that due to the first shock; the later peaks, expressed as a fraction of the amplitude of the first peak, were similar in the two fibre types (slow-twitch, 0.2-0.3; fast-twitch, 0.1-0.3). The results support the conclusion that individual SR Ca2+ release units function similarly in slow-twitch and fast-twitch mammalian fibres.

  4. The European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax genome puzzle: comparative BAC-mapping and low coverage shotgun sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volckaert Filip AM

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Food supply from the ocean is constrained by the shortage of domesticated and selected fish. Development of genomic models of economically important fishes should assist with the removal of this bottleneck. European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax L. (Moronidae, Perciformes, Teleostei is one of the most important fishes in European marine aquaculture; growing genomic resources put it on its way to serve as an economic model. Results End sequencing of a sea bass genomic BAC-library enabled the comparative mapping of the sea bass genome using the three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus genome as a reference. BAC-end sequences (102,690 were aligned to the stickleback genome. The number of mappable BACs was improved using a two-fold coverage WGS dataset of sea bass resulting in a comparative BAC-map covering 87% of stickleback chromosomes with 588 BAC-contigs. The minimum size of 83 contigs covering 50% of the reference was 1.2 Mbp; the largest BAC-contig comprised 8.86 Mbp. More than 22,000 BAC-clones aligned with both ends to the reference genome. Intra-chromosomal rearrangements between sea bass and stickleback were identified. Size distributions of mapped BACs were used to calculate that the genome of sea bass may be only 1.3 fold larger than the 460 Mbp stickleback genome. Conclusions The BAC map is used for sequencing single BACs or BAC-pools covering defined genomic entities by second generation sequencing technologies. Together with the WGS dataset it initiates a sea bass genome sequencing project. This will allow the quantification of polymorphisms through resequencing, which is important for selecting highly performing domesticated fish.

  5. Complete chloroplast genome sequence of MD-2 pineapple and its comparative analysis among nine other plants from the subclass Commelinidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redwan, R M; Saidin, A; Kumar, S V

    2015-08-12

    Pineapple (Ananas comosus var. comosus) is known as the king of fruits for its crown and is the third most important tropical fruit after banana and citrus. The plant, which is indigenous to South America, is the most important species in the Bromeliaceae family and is largely traded for fresh fruit consumption. Here, we report the complete chloroplast sequence of the MD-2 pineapple that was sequenced using the PacBio sequencing technology. In this study, the high error rate of PacBio long sequence reads of A. comosus's total genomic DNA were improved by leveraging on the high accuracy but short Illumina reads for error-correction via the latest error correction module from Novocraft. Error corrected long PacBio reads were assembled by using a single tool to produce a contig representing the pineapple chloroplast genome. The genome of 159,636 bp in length is featured with the conserved quadripartite structure of chloroplast containing a large single copy region (LSC) with a size of 87,482 bp, a small single copy region (SSC) with a size of 18,622 bp and two inverted repeat regions (IRA and IRB) each with the size of 26,766 bp. Overall, the genome contained 117 unique coding regions and 30 were repeated in the IR region with its genes contents, structure and arrangement similar to its sister taxon, Typha latifolia. A total of 35 repeats structure were detected in both the coding and non-coding regions with a majority being tandem repeats. In addition, 205 SSRs were detected in the genome with six protein-coding genes contained more than two SSRs. Comparative chloroplast genomes from the subclass Commelinidae revealed a conservative protein coding gene albeit located in a highly divergence region. Analysis of selection pressure on protein-coding genes using Ka/Ks ratio showed significant positive selection exerted on the rps7 gene of the pineapple chloroplast with P less than 0.05. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed the recent taxonomical relation among the member of

  6. The Cu(II) affinity of the N-terminus of human copper transporter CTR1: Comparison of human and mouse sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossak, Karolina; Drew, Simon C; Stefaniak, Ewelina; Płonka, Dawid; Bonna, Arkadiusz; Bal, Wojciech

    2018-05-01

    Copper Transporter 1 (CTR1) is a homotrimeric membrane protein providing the main route of copper transport into eukaryotic cells from the extracellular milieu. Its N-terminal extracellular domain, rich in His and Met residues, is considered responsible for directing copper into the transmembrane channel. Most of vertebrate CTR1 proteins contain the His residue in position three from N-terminus, creating a well-known Amino Terminal Cu(II)- and Ni(II)-Binding (ATCUN) site. CTR1 from humans, primates and many other species contains the Met-Asp-His (MDH) sequence, while some rodents including mouse have the Met-Asn-His (MNH) N-terminal sequence. CTR1 is thought to collect Cu(II) ions from blood copper transport proteins, including albumin, but previous reports indicated that the affinity of N-terminal peptide/domain of CTR1 is significantly lower than that of albumin, casting serious doubt on this aspect of CTR1 function. Using potentiometry and spectroscopic techniques we demonstrated that MDH-amide, a tripeptide model of human CTR1 N-terminus, binds Cu(II) with K of 1.3 × 10 13  M -1 at pH 7.4, ~13 times stronger than Human Serum Albumin (HSA), and MNH-amide is even stronger, K of 3.2 × 10 14  M -1 at pH 7.4. These results indicate that the N-terminus of CTR1 may serve as intermediate binding site during Cu(II) transfer from blood copper carriers to the transporter. MDH-amide, but not MNH-amide also forms a low abundance complex with non-ATCUN coordination involving the Met amine, His imidazole and Asp carboxylate. This species might assist Cu(II) relay down the peptide chain or its reduction to Cu(I), both steps necessary for the CTR1 function. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The complete chloroplast genome sequences of Lychnis wilfordii and Silene capitata and comparative analyses with other Caryophyllaceae genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jong-Soo; Lee, Byoung Yoon; Kwak, Myounghai

    2017-01-01

    The complete chloroplast genomes of Lychnis wilfordii and Silene capitata were determined and compared with ten previously reported Caryophyllaceae chloroplast genomes. The chloroplast genome sequences of L. wilfordii and S. capitata contain 152,320 bp and 150,224 bp, respectively. The gene contents and orders among 12 Caryophyllaceae species are consistent, but several microstructural changes have occurred. Expansion of the inverted repeat (IR) regions at the large single copy (LSC)/IRb and small single copy (SSC)/IR boundaries led to partial or entire gene duplications. Additionally, rearrangements of the LSC region were caused by gene inversions and/or transpositions. The 18 kb inversions, which occurred three times in different lineages of tribe Sileneae, were thought to be facilitated by the intermolecular duplicated sequences. Sequence analyses of the L. wilfordii and S. capitata genomes revealed 39 and 43 repeats, respectively, including forward, palindromic, and reverse repeats. In addition, a total of 67 and 56 simple sequence repeats were discovered in the L. wilfordii and S. capitata chloroplast genomes, respectively. Finally, we constructed phylogenetic trees of the 12 Caryophyllaceae species and two Amaranthaceae species based on 73 protein-coding genes using both maximum parsimony and likelihood methods.

  8. Mason: a JavaScript web site widget for visualizing and comparing annotated features in nucleotide or protein sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaschob, Daniel; Davis, Trisha N; Riffle, Michael

    2015-03-07

    Sequence feature annotations (e.g., protein domain boundaries, binding sites, and secondary structure predictions) are an essential part of biological research. Annotations are widely used by scientists during research and experimental design, and are frequently the result of biological studies. A generalized and simple means of disseminating and visualizing these data via the web would be of value to the research community. Mason is a web site widget designed to visualize and compare annotated features of one or more nucleotide or protein sequence. Annotated features may be of virtually any type, ranging from annotating transcription binding sites or exons and introns in DNA to secondary structure or domain boundaries in proteins. Mason is simple to use and easy to integrate into web sites. Mason has a highly dynamic and configurable interface supporting multiple sets of annotations per sequence, overlapping regions, customization of interface and user-driven events (e.g., clicks and text to appear for tooltips). It is written purely in JavaScript and SVG, requiring no 3(rd) party plugins or browser customization. Mason is a solution for dissemination of sequence annotation data on the web. It is highly flexible, customizable, simple to use, and is designed to be easily integrated into web sites. Mason is open source and freely available at https://github.com/yeastrc/mason.

  9. Expressed sequence tags of differential genes in the radioresistant mice and their parental mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qin; Yue Jingyin; Li Jin; Song Li; Liu Qiang; Mu Chuanjie; Wu Hongying

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore radioresistance correlative genes in IRM-2 inbred mouse. Methods: The total RNA was extracted from spleen cells of IRM-2 and their parent 615 and ICR/JCL mouse. The mRNA differential display technique was used to analyze gene expression differences. Each differential bands were amplified by PCR, cloned and sequenced. Results: There were 75 differential expression bands appearing in IRM-2 mouse but not in 615 and ICR/JCL mouse. Fifty-two pieces of cDNA sequences were got by sequencing. Twenty-one expressed sequence tags (EST) that were not the same as known mice genes were found and registered by comparing with GenBank database. Conclusion: Twenty-one EST denote that radioresistance correlative genes may be in IRM-2 mouse, which have laid a foundation for isolating and identifying radioresistance correlative genes in further study. (authors)

  10. Comparative exome sequencing of metastatic lesions provides insights into the mutational progression of melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gartner Jared J

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metastasis is characterized by spreading of neoplastic cells to an organ other than where they originated and is the predominant cause of death among cancer patients. This holds true for melanoma, whose incidence is increasing more rapidly than any other cancer and once disseminated has few therapeutic options. Here we performed whole exome sequencing of two sets of matched normal and metastatic tumor DNAs. Results Using stringent criteria, we evaluated the similarities and differences between the lesions. We find that in both cases, 96% of the single nucleotide variants are shared between the two metastases indicating that clonal populations gave rise to the distant metastases. Analysis of copy number variation patterns of both metastatic sets revealed a trend similar to that seen with our single nucleotide variants. Analysis of pathway enrichment on tumor sets shows commonly mutated pathways enriched between individual sets of metastases and all metastases combined. Conclusions These data provide a proof-of-concept suggesting that individual metastases may have sufficient similarity for successful targeting of driver mutations.

  11. Comparative genome sequence analysis underscores mycoparasitism as the ancestral life style of Trichoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubicek, Christian P; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo; Seidl-Seiboth, Verena; Martinez, Diego A; Druzhinina, Irina S; Thon, Michael; Zeilinger, Susanne; Casas-Flores, Sergio; Horwitz, Benjamin A; Mukherjee, Prasun K; Mukherjee, Mala; Kredics, László; Alcaraz, Luis D; Aerts, Andrea; Antal, Zsuzsanna; Atanasova, Lea; Cervantes-Badillo, Mayte G; Challacombe, Jean; Chertkov, Olga; McCluskey, Kevin; Coulpier, Fanny; Deshpande, Nandan; von Döhren, Hans; Ebbole, Daniel J; Esquivel-Naranjo, Edgardo U; Fekete, Erzsébet; Flipphi, Michel; Glaser, Fabian; Gómez-Rodríguez, Elida Y; Gruber, Sabine; Han, Cliff; Henrissat, Bernard; Hermosa, Rosa; Hernández-Oñate, Miguel; Karaffa, Levente; Kosti, Idit; Le Crom, Stéphane; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Lübeck, Mette; Lübeck, Peter S; Margeot, Antoine; Metz, Benjamin; Misra, Monica; Nevalainen, Helena; Omann, Markus; Packer, Nicolle; Perrone, Giancarlo; Uresti-Rivera, Edith E; Salamov, Asaf; Schmoll, Monika; Seiboth, Bernhard; Shapiro, Harris; Sukno, Serenella; Tamayo-Ramos, Juan Antonio; Tisch, Doris; Wiest, Aric; Wilkinson, Heather H; Zhang, Michael; Coutinho, Pedro M; Kenerley, Charles M; Monte, Enrique; Baker, Scott E; Grigoriev, Igor V

    2011-01-01

    Mycoparasitism, a lifestyle where one fungus is parasitic on another fungus, has special relevance when the prey is a plant pathogen, providing a strategy for biological control of pests for plant protection. Probably, the most studied biocontrol agents are species of the genus Hypocrea/Trichoderma. Here we report an analysis of the genome sequences of the two biocontrol species Trichoderma atroviride (teleomorph Hypocrea atroviridis) and Trichoderma virens (formerly Gliocladium virens, teleomorph Hypocrea virens), and a comparison with Trichoderma reesei (teleomorph Hypocrea jecorina). These three Trichoderma species display a remarkable conservation of gene order (78 to 96%), and a lack of active mobile elements probably due to repeat-induced point mutation. Several gene families are expanded in the two mycoparasitic species relative to T. reesei or other ascomycetes, and are overrepresented in non-syntenic genome regions. A phylogenetic analysis shows that T. reesei and T. virens are derived relative to T. atroviride. The mycoparasitism-specific genes thus arose in a common Trichoderma ancestor but were subsequently lost in T. reesei. The data offer a better understanding of mycoparasitism, and thus enforce the development of improved biocontrol strains for efficient and environmentally friendly protection of plants. © 2011 Kubicek et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  12. Comparative genome sequence analysis underscores mycoparasitism as the ancestral life style of Trichoderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Mycoparasitism, a lifestyle where one fungus is parasitic on another fungus, has special relevance when the prey is a plant pathogen, providing a strategy for biological control of pests for plant protection. Probably, the most studied biocontrol agents are species of the genus Hypocrea/Trichoderma. Results Here we report an analysis of the genome sequences of the two biocontrol species Trichoderma atroviride (teleomorph Hypocrea atroviridis) and Trichoderma virens (formerly Gliocladium virens, teleomorph Hypocrea virens), and a comparison with Trichoderma reesei (teleomorph Hypocrea jecorina). These three Trichoderma species display a remarkable conservation of gene order (78 to 96%), and a lack of active mobile elements probably due to repeat-induced point mutation. Several gene families are expanded in the two mycoparasitic species relative to T. reesei or other ascomycetes, and are overrepresented in non-syntenic genome regions. A phylogenetic analysis shows that T. reesei and T. virens are derived relative to T. atroviride. The mycoparasitism-specific genes thus arose in a common Trichoderma ancestor but were subsequently lost in T. reesei. Conclusions The data offer a better understanding of mycoparasitism, and thus enforce the development of improved biocontrol strains for efficient and environmentally friendly protection of plants. PMID:21501500

  13. Deep Sequencing of Porphyromonas gingivalis and comparative transcriptome analysis of a LuxS mutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takanoi eHirano

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is a major etiological agent and chronic and aggressive forms of periodontal disease. The organism is an assacharolytic anaerobe and is a constituent of mixed species biofilms in a variety of microenvironments in the oral cavity. P. gingivalis expresses a range of virulence factors over which it exerts tight control. High-throughput sequencing technologies provide the opportunity to relate functional genomics to basic biology. In this study we report qualitative and quantitative RNA-Seq analysis of the transcriptome of P. gingivalis. We have also applied RNA-Seq to the transcriptome of a ΔluxS mutant of P. gingivalis deficient in AI-2-mediated bacterial communication. The transcriptome analysis confirmed the expression of all predicted ORFs for strain ATCC 33277, including 854 hypothetical proteins, and allowed the identification of hitherto unknown transcriptional units. Twelve noncoding RNAs were identified, including 11 small RNAs and one cobalamine riboswitch. Fifty seven genes were differentially regulated in the LuxS mutant. Addition of exogenous synthetic 4,5-dihydroxy-2,3-pentanedione (DPD, AI-2 precursor to the ΔluxS mutant culture complemented expression of a subset of genes, indicating that LuxS is involved in both AI-2 signaling and non-signaling dependent systems in P. gingivalis. This work provides an important dataset for future study of P. gingivalis pathophysiology and further defines the LuxS regulon in this oral pathogen.

  14. Comparative molecular analysis of Herbaspirillum strains by RAPD, RFLP, and 16S rDNA sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soares-Ramos Juliana R.L.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbaspirillum spp. are endophytic diazotrophic bacteria associated with important agricultural crops. In this work, we analyzed six strains of H. seropedicae (Z78, M2, ZA69, ZA95, Z152, and Z67 and one strain of H. rubrisubalbicans (M4 by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP using HindIII or DraI restriction endonucleases, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD, and partial sequencing of 16S rDNA. The results of these analyses ascribed the strains studied to three distinct groups: group I, consisting of M2 and M4; group II, of ZA69; and group III, of ZA95, Z78, Z67, and Z152. RAPD fingerprinting showed a higher variability than the other methods, and each strain had a unique electrophoretic pattern with five of the six primers used. Interestingly, H. seropedicae M2 was found by all analyses to be genetically very close to H. rubrisubalbicans M4. Our results show that RAPD can distinguish between all Herbaspirillum strains tested.

  15. Mouse to human comparative genetics reveals a novel immunoglobulin E-controlling locus on Hsa8q12

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gusareva, Elena; Havelková, Helena; Blažková, Hana; Kosařová, Marcela; Kučera, P.; Král, V.; Salyakina, D.; Mulller-Myhsok, b.; Lipoldová, Marie

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 1 (2009), s. 15-25 ISSN 0093-7711 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/06/1745; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06009 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : atopy * specific IgE * genetic loci * mouse-human homology * Czech population * 8q12 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.988, year: 2009

  16. Comparative analysis of codon usage bias and codon context patterns between dipteran and hymenopteran sequenced genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanta K Behura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Codon bias is a phenomenon of non-uniform usage of codons whereas codon context generally refers to sequential pair of codons in a gene. Although genome sequencing of multiple species of dipteran and hymenopteran insects have been completed only a few of these species have been analyzed for codon usage bias. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we use bioinformatics approaches to analyze codon usage bias and codon context patterns in a genome-wide manner among 15 dipteran and 7 hymenopteran insect species. Results show that GAA is the most frequent codon in the dipteran species whereas GAG is the most frequent codon in the hymenopteran species. Data reveals that codons ending with C or G are frequently used in the dipteran genomes whereas codons ending with A or T are frequently used in the hymenopteran genomes. Synonymous codon usage orders (SCUO vary within genomes in a pattern that seems to be distinct for each species. Based on comparison of 30 one-to-one orthologous genes among 17 species, the fruit fly Drosophila willistoni shows the least codon usage bias whereas the honey bee (Apis mellifera shows the highest bias. Analysis of codon context patterns of these insects shows that specific codons are frequently used as the 3'- and 5'-context of start and stop codons, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Codon bias pattern is distinct between dipteran and hymenopteran insects. While codon bias is favored by high GC content of dipteran genomes, high AT content of genes favors biased usage of synonymous codons in the hymenopteran insects. Also, codon context patterns vary among these species largely according to their phylogeny.

  17. Discovery of human inversion polymorphisms by comparative analysis of human and chimpanzee DNA sequence assemblies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available With a draft genome-sequence assembly for the chimpanzee available, it is now possible to perform genome-wide analyses to identify, at a submicroscopic level, structural rearrangements that have occurred between chimpanzees and humans. The goal of this study was to investigate chromosomal regions that are inverted between the chimpanzee and human genomes. Using the net alignments for the builds of the human and chimpanzee genome assemblies, we identified a total of 1,576 putative regions of inverted orientation, covering more than 154 mega-bases of DNA. The DNA segments are distributed throughout the genome and range from 23 base pairs to 62 mega-bases in length. For the 66 inversions more than 25 kilobases (kb in length, 75% were flanked on one or both sides by (often unrelated segmental duplications. Using PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization we experimentally validated 23 of 27 (85% semi-randomly chosen regions; the largest novel inversion confirmed was 4.3 mega-bases at human Chromosome 7p14. Gorilla was used as an out-group to assign ancestral status to the variants. All experimentally validated inversion regions were then assayed against a panel of human samples and three of the 23 (13% regions were found to be polymorphic in the human genome. These polymorphic inversions include 730 kb (at 7p22, 13 kb (at 7q11, and 1 kb (at 16q24 fragments with a 5%, 30%, and 48% minor allele frequency, respectively. Our results suggest that inversions are an important source of variation in primate genome evolution. The finding of at least three novel inversion polymorphisms in humans indicates this type of structural variation may be a more common feature of our genome than previously realized.

  18. Comparing Seismic And Magnetic Responses To Copper Gold Deposits Under Different Cover Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okan Evans Onojasun

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate application of geophysical techniques is required to effectively explore through the cover sequences that will allow the discovery of deep seated orebodies within the 1-3km depth range. Whilst potential field methods that are traditionally used for Cu-Au exploration seems effective they lack the expected resolution required to detect deeper mineral deposits under 500 m cover. Seismic reflection techniques offers a distinct advantage over all other geophysical techniques because of its ability to penetrate deeper into the subsurface without losing its resolution. We present in this report modelling results from magnetic and seismic responses to Cu-Au deposits when located within 100-1000m depth range. In the case of magnetic modelling we apply upward continuation filters which calculate the potential field that would have been recorded at 100m 250m 500m and 1000 m levels by filtering away shallow anomalies from the initial data. For seismic modelling simple but realistic geological model with varying cover thicknesses 100m 250m 500m and 1000m were created and then populate these models with petrophysical data. Simulated synthetic seismic responses from the models was processed using basic processing flows to obtained depth migrated images. Results show that for shower depths 0-100m good correlation exist between the magnetic and the seismic responses. From 100-250m depth cover though we can still see some magnetic anomalies within the target zone its effectiveness decreases with depths whereas seismic responses was maintain within the depth range. From 500m to 1000m magnetic response becomes spear or fuzzy as much useful information is practically missed out. Similarly high resolution power of seismic was ably demonstrated as the depth of even 2km did not degrade its resolution. Thus both magnetic and seismic methods are very useful for shallow investigation but at greater depth seismic method appears to be a more valid exploration

  19. A Proteomic Workflow Using High-Throughput De Novo Sequencing Towards Complementation of Genome Information for Improved Comparative Crop Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turetschek, Reinhard; Lyon, David; Desalegn, Getinet; Kaul, Hans-Peter; Wienkoop, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    The proteomic study of non-model organisms, such as many crop plants, is challenging due to the lack of comprehensive genome information. Changing environmental conditions require the study and selection of adapted cultivars. Mutations, inherent to cultivars, hamper protein identification and thus considerably complicate the qualitative and quantitative comparison in large-scale systems biology approaches. With this workflow, cultivar-specific mutations are detected from high-throughput comparative MS analyses, by extracting sequence polymorphisms with de novo sequencing. Stringent criteria are suggested to filter for confidential mutations. Subsequently, these polymorphisms complement the initially used database, which is ready to use with any preferred database search algorithm. In our example, we thereby identified 26 specific mutations in two cultivars of Pisum sativum and achieved an increased number (17 %) of peptide spectrum matches.

  20. Complete genome sequences and comparative genome analysis of Lactobacillus plantarum strain 5-2 isolated from fermented soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen-Jian; Wang, Rui; Gong, Fu-Ming; Liu, Xiao-Feng; Zheng, Hua-Jun; Luo, Yi-Yong; Li, Xiao-Ran

    2015-12-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is an important probiotic and is mostly isolated from fermented foods. We sequenced the genome of L. plantarum strain 5-2, which was derived from fermented soybean isolated from Yunnan province, China. The strain was determined to contain 3114 genes. Fourteen complete insertion sequence (IS) elements were found in 5-2 chromosome. There were 24 DNA replication proteins and 76 DNA repair proteins in the 5-2 genome. Consistent with the classification of L. plantarum as a facultative heterofermentative lactobacillus, the 5-2 genome encodes key enzymes required for the EMP (Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas) and phosphoketolase (PK) pathways. Several components of the secretion machinery are found in the 5-2 genome, which was compared with L. plantarum ST-III, JDM1 and WCFS1. Most of the specific proteins in the four genomes appeared to be related to their prophage elements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparative genomics and repetitive sequence divergence in the species of diploid Nicotiana section Alatae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lim, Y.K.; Kovařík, Aleš; Matyášek, Roman; Chase, M.W.; Knapp, S.; McCarthy, E.; Clarkson, J.; Leitch, A.R.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 6 (2006), s. 907-919 ISSN 0960-7412 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA521/04/0775 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : comparative genomics * DNA phylogenetics * tandem repeats Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 6.565, year: 2006

  2. Comparative systems biology between human and animal models based on next-generation sequencing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu-Qi; Li, Gong-Hua; Huang, Jing-Fei

    2013-04-01

    Animal models provide myriad benefits to both experimental and clinical research. Unfortunately, in many situations, they fall short of expected results or provide contradictory results. In part, this can be the result of traditional molecular biological approaches that are relatively inefficient in elucidating underlying molecular mechanism. To improve the efficacy of animal models, a technological breakthrough is required. The growing availability and application of the high-throughput methods make systematic comparisons between human and animal models easier to perform. In the present study, we introduce the concept of the comparative systems biology, which we define as "comparisons of biological systems in different states or species used to achieve an integrated understanding of life forms with all their characteristic complexity of interactions at multiple levels". Furthermore, we discuss the applications of RNA-seq and ChIP-seq technologies to comparative systems biology between human and animal models and assess the potential applications for this approach in the future studies.

  3. Library sequencing strategies for comparative analysis of stress resistance mechanisms in Escherichia coli strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lennen, Rebecca; Bonde, Ida; Koza, Anna

    2014-01-01

    and subjected to growth selections. Following selection, the locations of all insertions in the population are counted and can be compared between a control and a target condition, enabling the identification of genes that are both conditionally essential and conditionally detrimental. We have exploited Tn....... Tn-Seq revealed many differences and similarities in resistance mechanisms at the genetic level across strains, allowing correlations to be made with growth phenotypes. Cross-strain comparisons of conditionally essential genes and their relative essentiality also suggest a large degree of variation...

  4. Comparative Analysis of the Relationship between Trichloroethylene Metabolism and Tissue-Specific Toxicity among Inbred Mouse Strains: Liver Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hong Sik; Bradford, Blair U.; Kosyk, Oksana; Shymonyak, Svitlana; Uehara, Takeki; Collins, Leonard B.; Bodnar, Wanda M.; Ball, Louise M.; Gold, Avram; Rusyn, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a widely used organic solvent. Although TCE is classified as carcinogenic to humans, substantial gaps remain in our understanding of inter-individual variability in TCE metabolism and toxicity, especially in the liver. We tested a hypothesis that amounts of oxidative metabolites of TCE in mouse liver are associated with liver-specific toxicity. Oral dosing with TCE was conducted in sub-acute (600 mg/kg/d; 5 days; 7 inbred mouse strains) and sub-chronic (100 or 400 mg/kg/d; 1, 2, or 4 weeks; 2 inbred mouse strains) designs. We evaluated the quantitative relationship between strain-, dose-, and time-dependent formation of TCE metabolites from cytochrome P450-mediated oxidation [trichloroacetic acid (TCA), dichloroacetic acid (DCA), and trichloroethanol] and glutathione conjugation [S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine and S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)glutathione] in serum and liver, and various liver toxicity phenotypes. In sub-acute study, inter-strain variability in TCE metabolite amounts was observed in serum and liver. No induction of Cyp2e1 protein levels in liver was detected. Serum and liver levels of TCA and DCA were correlated with increased transcription of peroxisome proliferator-marker genes Cyp4a10 and Acox1, but not with degree of induction in hepatocellular proliferation. In sub-chronic study, serum and liver levels of oxidative metabolites gradually decreased over time despite continuous dosing. Liver protein levels of Cyp2e1, Adh and Aldh2 were unaffected by treatment with TCE. While the magnitude of induction of peroxisome proliferator-marker genes also declined, hepatocellular proliferation increased. This study offers a unique opportunity to provide a scientific data-driven rationale for some of the major assumptions in human health assessment of TCE. PMID:25424544

  5. Comparative analysis of the internalization of the macrophage receptor sialoadhesin in human and mouse primary macrophages and cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Schryver, Marjorie; Leemans, Annelies; Pintelon, Isabel; Cappoen, Davie; Maes, Louis; Caljon, Guy; Cos, Paul; Delputte, Peter L

    2017-06-01

    Sialoadhesin (Sn) is a surface receptor expressed on resident macrophages with the ability to bind with sialic acids. During inflammation, an upregulation of Sn is observed. Upon binding of monoclonal antibodies to Sn, the receptor becomes internalized and this has been observed in multiple species. The latter characteristic, combined with the strong upregulation of Sn on inflammatory macrophages and the fact that Sn-positive macrophages contribute to certain inflammatory diseases, makes Sn an interesting entry portal for phenotype-modulating or cytotoxic drugs. Such drugs or toxins can be linked to Sn-specific antibodies which should enable their targeted uptake by macrophages. However, the activity of such drugs depends not only on their internalization but also on the intracellular trafficking and final fate in the endolysosomal system. Although information is available for porcine Sn, the detailed mechanisms of human and mouse Sn internalization and subsequent intracellular trafficking are currently unknown. To allow development of Sn-targeted therapies, differences across species and cellular background need to be characterized in more detail. In the current report, we show that internalization of human and mouse Sn is dynamin-dependent and clathrin-mediated, both in primary macrophages and CHO cell lines expressing a recombinant Sn. In primary macrophages, internalized Sn-specific F(ab') 2 fragments are located mostly in the early endosomes. With Fc containing Sn-specific antibodies, there is a slight shift towards lysosomal localization in mouse macrophages, possibly because of an interaction with Fc receptors. Surprisingly, in CHO cell lines expressing Sn, there is a predominant lysosomal localization. Our results show that the mechanism of Sn internalization and intracellular trafficking is concurrent in the tested species. The cellular background in which Sn is expressed and the type of antibody used can affect the intracellular fate, which in turn can

  6. Comparative gene expression analysis of two mouse models of autism:transcriptome profiling of the BTBR and En2-/- hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Provenzano

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASD are characterized by a high degree of genetic heterogeneity. Genomic studies identified common pathological processes underlying the heterogeneous clinical manifestations of ASD, and transcriptome analyses revealed that gene networks involved in synapse development, neuronal activity and immune function are deregulated in ASD. Mouse models provide unique tools to investigate the neurobiological basis of ASD; however, a comprehensive approach to identify transcriptional abnormalities in different ASD models has never been performed. Here we used two well-recognized ASD mouse models, BTBR T+ Itpr3tf/J (BTBR and Engrailed-2 knockout (En2-/-, to identify conserved ASD-related molecular signatures. En2-/- mice bear a mutation within the EN2 transcription factor homeobox, while BTBR is an inbred strain with unknown genetic defects. Hippocampal RNA samples from BTBR, En2-/- and respective control (C57Bl/6J and En2+/+ adult mice were assessed for differential gene expression using microarrays. A total of 153 genes were similarly deregulated in the BTBR and En2-/- hippocampus. Mouse phenotype and gene ontology enrichment analyses were performed on BTBR and En2-/- hippocampal differentially expressed genes (DEGs. Pathways represented in both BTBR and En2-/- hippocampal DEGs included abnormal behavioral response and chemokine/MAP kinase signaling. Genes involved in abnormal function of the immune system and abnormal synaptic transmission/seizures were significantly represented among BTBR and En2-/- DEGs, respectively. Interestingly, both BTBR and En2-/- hippocampal DEGs showed a significant enrichment of ASD and schizophrenia (SCZ-associated genes. Specific gene sets were enriched in the two models: microglial genes were significantly enriched among BTBR DEGs, whereas GABAergic/glutamatergic postsynaptic genes, FMRP-interacting genes and epilepsy-related genes were significantly enriched among En2-/- DEGs. Weighted

  7. Cloning and comparative mapping of a human chromosome 4-specific alpha satellite DNA sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Aiuto, L.; Marzella, R.; Archidiacono, N.; Rocchi, M. (Universita di Bari (Italy)); Antonacci, R. (Instituto Anatomia Umana Normale, Modena (Italy))

    1993-11-01

    The authors have isolated and characterized two human alphoid DNA clones: p4n1/4 and pZ4.1. Clone p4n1/4 identifies specifically the centromeric region of chromosome 4; pZ4.1 recognizes a subset of alphoid DNA shared by chromosomes 4 and 9. The specificity was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments on metaphase spreads and Southern blotting analysis of human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. The genomic organization of both subsets was also investigated. Comparative mapping on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes was performed. p4n1/4 hybridizes to chimpanzee chromosomes 11 and 13, homologs of human chromosomes 9 and 2q, respectively. On gorilla metaphase spreads, p4n1/4 hybridizes exclusively to the centromeric region of chromosome 19, partially homologous to human chromosome 17. No hybridization signal was detected on chromosome 3 of both chimpanzee and gorilla, in both species homolog of human chromosome 4. Identical comparative mapping results were obtained using pZ4.1 probe, although the latter recognizes an alphoid subset distinct from the one recognized by p4n1/4. The implications of these results in the evolution of centromeric regions of primate chromosomes are discussed. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Complete genome sequence and comparative genomics of the probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Indu; Tomar, Rajul; Ganesan, K; Prasad, G S; Subramanian, Srikrishna

    2017-03-23

    The probiotic yeast, Saccharomyces boulardii (Sb) is known to be effective against many gastrointestinal disorders and antibiotic-associated diarrhea. To understand molecular basis of probiotic-properties ascribed to Sb we determined the complete genomes of two strains of Sb i.e. Biocodex and unique28 and the draft genomes for three other Sb strains that are marketed as probiotics in India. We compared these genomes with 145 strains of S. cerevisiae (Sc) to understand genome-level similarities and differences between these yeasts. A distinctive feature of Sb from other Sc is absence of Ty elements Ty1, Ty3, Ty4 and associated LTR. However, we could identify complete Ty2 and Ty5 elements in Sb. The genes for hexose transporters HXT11 and HXT9, and asparagine-utilization are absent in all Sb strains. We find differences in repeat periods and copy numbers of repeats in flocculin genes that are likely related to the differential adhesion of Sb as compared to Sc. Core-proteome based taxonomy places Sb strains along with wine strains of Sc. We find the introgression of five genes from Z. bailii into the chromosome IV of Sb and wine strains of Sc. Intriguingly, genes involved in conferring known probiotic properties to Sb are conserved in most Sc strains.

  9. [Comparative study of expression of homeobox gene Msx-1, Msx-2 mRNA during the hard tissue formation of mouse tooth development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Wang, J; Gao, Y

    2001-07-01

    To observe and compare the expression pattern of Msx-1, Msx-2 mRNA during the different stages of hard tissue formation in the first mandibular molar of mouse and investigate the relationship between the two genes. First mandibular molar germs from 1, 3, 7 and 14-days old mouse were separated and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed on the total RNA of them using Msx-1, Msx-2 specific primers separately. Expression of both genes were detected during the different stages of hard tissue formation in the mouse first mandibular molars, but there was some interesting differences in the quantitiy between the two genes. Msx-1 transcripts appeared at the 1 day postnatally, and increase through 3 day, 7 day, then maximally expressed at 14 days postnatally; while Msx-2 mRNA was seen and expressed maximally at the 3 days postnatally, then there was a gradual reduction at 7 days, and 14 days postnatally. The homeobox gene Msx-1, Msx-2 may play a role in the events of the hard tissue formation. The complementary expression pattern of them during the specific stage of hard tissue formation indicates that there may be some functional redundancy between them during the biomineralization.

  10. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Gentiana lawrencei var. farreri (Gentianaceae) and comparative analysis with its congeneric species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Peng-Cheng; Zhang, Yan-Zhao; Geng, Hui-Min; Chen, Shi-Long

    2016-01-01

    The chloroplast (cp) genome is useful in plant systematics, genetic diversity analysis, molecular identification and divergence dating. The genus Gentiana contains 362 species, but there are only two valuable complete cp genomes. The purpose of this study is to report the characterization of complete cp genome of G. lawrencei var. farreri , which is endemic to the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP). Using high throughput sequencing technology, we got the complete nucleotide sequence of the G. lawrencei var. farreri cp genome. The comparison analysis including genome difference and gene divergence was performed with its congeneric species G. straminea . The simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and phylogenetics were studied as well. The cp genome of G. lawrencei var. farreri is a circular molecule of 138,750 bp, containing a pair of 24,653 bp inverted repeats which are separated by small and large single-copy regions of 11,365 and 78,082 bp, respectively. The cp genome contains 130 known genes, including 85 protein coding genes (PCGs), eight ribosomal RNA genes and 37 tRNA genes. Comparative analyses indicated that G. lawrencei var. farreri is 10,241 bp shorter than its congeneric species G. straminea. Four large gaps were detected that are responsible for 85% of the total sequence loss. Further detailed analyses revealed that 10 PCGs were included in the four gaps that encode nine NADH dehydrogenase subunits. The cp gene content, order and orientation are similar to those of its congeneric species, but with some variation among the PCGs. Three genes, ndhB , ndhF and clpP , have high nonsynonymous to synonymous values. There are 34 SSRs in the G. lawrencei var. farreri cp genome, of which 25 are mononucleotide repeats: no dinucleotide repeats were detected. Comparison with the G. straminea cp genome indicated that five SSRs have length polymorphisms and 23 SSRs are species-specific. The phylogenetic analysis of 48 PCGs from 12 Gentianales taxa cp genomes clearly identified

  11. [Molecular phylogeny of Turbellaria, based on data from comparing the nucleotide sequences of 18S ribosomal RNA genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznedelov, K D; Timoshkin, O A

    1995-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing of the 5'-end region of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene were used to infer phylogenetic relationship among turbellarian flatworms from Lake Baikal. Representatives of 5 orders (Tricladida--10 spp., Lecithoepitheliata--5 spp., Prolecithophora--3 spp., Proseriata and Kalyptorhynchia one for each) were studied; nucleotide sequence of more than 340 nucleotides was determined for each species. Consensus sequence for each order having more than one representative species was determined. Distance matrix and maximum parsimony approaches were applied to infer phylogenies. Bootstrap procedure was used to estimate confidence limits, at the 100% level by bootstrapping, the group of three orders: Kalyptorhynchia, Proseriata and Lecithoepitheliata was found to be monophyletic. However, subsets inside the group had no significant support to be preferred or rejected. Our data do not support traditional systematics which joins two suborders Tricladida and Proseriata into the single order Seriata, and also do not support comparative anatomical data which show close relationship of Lecithoepitheliata and lower Prolecithophora.

  12. KRAS mutation detection in colorectal cancer by a commercially available gene chip array compares well with Sanger sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Deborah; Smith, Andrew; Powers, Martin P; Wu, Alan H B

    2011-08-17

    Binding of a ligand to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) stimulates various intracellular signaling pathways resulting in cell cycle progression, proliferation, angiogenesis and apoptosis inhibition. KRAS is involved in signaling pathways including RAF/MAPK and PI3K and mutations in this gene result in constitutive activation of these pathways, independent of EGFR activation. Seven mutations in codons 12 and 13 of KRAS comprise around 95% of the observed human mutations, rendering monoclonal antibodies against EGFR (e.g. cetuximab and panitumumab) useless in treatment of colorectal cancer. KRAS mutation testing by two different methodologies was compared; Sanger sequencing and AutoGenomics INFINITI® assay, on DNA extracted from colorectal cancers. Out of 29 colorectal tumor samples tested, 28 were concordant between the two methodologies for the KRAS mutations that were detected in both assays with the INFINITI® assay detecting a mutation in one sample that was indeterminate by Sanger sequencing and a third methodology; single nucleotide primer extension. This study indicates the utility of the AutoGenomics INFINITI® methodology in a clinical laboratory setting where technical expertise or access to equipment for DNA sequencing does not exist. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Gene Discovery in the Apicomplexa as Revealed by EST Sequencing and Assembly of a Comparative Gene Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Brunk, Brian P.; Kissinger, Jessica C.; Pape, Deana; Tang, Keliang; Cole, Robert H.; Martin, John; Wylie, Todd; Dante, Mike; Fogarty, Steven J.; Howe, Daniel K.; Liberator, Paul; Diaz, Carmen; Anderson, Jennifer; White, Michael; Jerome, Maria E.; Johnson, Emily A.; Radke, Jay A.; Stoeckert, Christian J.; Waterston, Robert H.; Clifton, Sandra W.; Roos, David S.; Sibley, L. David

    2003-01-01

    Large-scale EST sequencing projects for several important parasites within the phylum Apicomplexa were undertaken for the purpose of gene discovery. Included were several parasites of medical importance (Plasmodium falciparum, Toxoplasma gondii) and others of veterinary importance (Eimeria tenella, Sarcocystis neurona, and Neospora caninum). A total of 55,192 ESTs, deposited into dbEST/GenBank, were included in the analyses. The resulting sequences have been clustered into nonredundant gene assemblies and deposited into a relational database that supports a variety of sequence and text searches. This database has been used to compare the gene assemblies using BLAST similarity comparisons to the public protein databases to identify putative genes. Of these new entries, ∼15%–20% represent putative homologs with a conservative cutoff of p neurona: , , , , , , , , , , , , , –, –, –, –, –. Eimeria tenella: –, –, –, –, –, –, –, –, – , –, –, –, –, –, –, –, –, –, –, –. Neospora caninum: –, –, , – , –, –.] PMID:12618375

  14. Genome sequencing and comparative genomics reveal a repertoire of putative pathogenicity genes in chilli anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum truncatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Soumya; Nandineni, Madhusudan R

    2017-01-01

    Colletotrichum truncatum, a major fungal phytopathogen, causes the anthracnose disease on an economically important spice crop chilli (Capsicum annuum), resulting in huge economic losses in tropical and sub-tropical countries. It follows a subcuticular intramural infection strategy on chilli with a short, asymptomatic, endophytic phase, which contrasts with the intracellular hemibiotrophic lifestyle adopted by most of the Colletotrichum species. However, little is known about the molecular determinants and the mechanism of pathogenicity in this fungus. A high quality whole genome sequence and gene annotation based on transcriptome data of an Indian isolate of C. truncatum from chilli has been obtained. Analysis of the genome sequence revealed a rich repertoire of pathogenicity genes in C. truncatum encoding secreted proteins, effectors, plant cell wall degrading enzymes, secondary metabolism associated proteins, with potential roles in the host-specific infection strategy, placing it next only to the Fusarium species. The size of genome assembly, number of predicted genes and some of the functional categories were similar to other sequenced Colletotrichum species. The comparative genomic analyses with other species and related fungi identified some unique genes and certain highly expanded gene families of CAZymes, proteases and secondary metabolism associated genes in the genome of C. truncatum. The draft genome assembly and functional annotation of potential pathogenicity genes of C. truncatum provide an important genomic resource for understanding the biology and lifestyle of this important phytopathogen and will pave the way for designing efficient disease control regimens.

  15. Musicians' and nonmusicians' short-term memory for verbal and musical sequences: comparing phonological similarity and pitch proximity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Victoria J; Baddeley, Alan D; Hitch, Graham J

    2010-03-01

    Language-music comparative studies have highlighted the potential for shared resources or neural overlap in auditory short-term memory. However, there is a lack of behavioral methodologies for comparing verbal and musical serial recall. We developed a visual grid response that allowed both musicians and nonmusicians to perform serial recall of letter and tone sequences. The new method was used to compare the phonological similarity effect with the impact of an operationalized musical equivalent-pitch proximity. Over the course of three experiments, we found that short-term memory for tones had several similarities to verbal memory, including limited capacity and a significant effect of pitch proximity in nonmusicians. Despite being vulnerable to phonological similarity when recalling letters, however, musicians showed no effect of pitch proximity, a result that we suggest might reflect strategy differences. Overall, the findings support a limited degree of correspondence in the way that verbal and musical sounds are processed in auditory short-term memory.

  16. Genome Sequencing and Comparative Analysis of Stenotrophomonas acidaminiphila Reveal Evolutionary Insights Into Sulfamethoxazole Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Ting Huang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Stenotrophomonas acidaminiphila is an aerobic, glucose non-fermentative, Gram-negative bacterium that been isolated from various environmental sources, particularly aquatic ecosystems. Although resistance to multiple antimicrobial agents has been reported in S. acidaminiphila, the mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, for the first time, we report the complete genome and antimicrobial resistome analysis of a clinical isolate S. acidaminiphila SUNEO which is resistant to sulfamethoxazole. Comparative analysis among closely related strains identified common and strain-specific genes. In particular, comparison with a sulfamethoxazole-sensitive strain identified a mutation within the sulfonamide-binding site of folP in SUNEO, which may reduce the binding affinity of sulfamethoxazole. Selection pressure analysis indicated folP in SUNEO is under purifying selection, which may be owing to long-term administration of sulfonamide against Stenotrophomonas.

  17. Genome wide characterization of simple sequence repeats in watermelon genome and their application in comparative mapping and genetic diversity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Huayu; Song, Pengyao; Koo, Dal-Hoe; Guo, Luqin; Li, Yanman; Sun, Shouru; Weng, Yiqun; Yang, Luming

    2016-08-05

    Microsatellite markers are one of the most informative and versatile DNA-based markers used in plant genetic research, but their development has traditionally been difficult and costly. The whole genome sequencing with next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies provides large amounts of sequence data to develop numerous microsatellite markers at whole genome scale. SSR markers have great advantage in cross-species comparisons and allow investigation of karyotype and genome evolution through highly efficient computation approaches such as in silico PCR. Here we described genome wide development and characterization of SSR markers in the watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) genome, which were then use in comparative analysis with two other important crop species in the Cucurbitaceae family: cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) and melon (Cucumis melo L.). We further applied these markers in evaluating the genetic diversity and population structure in watermelon germplasm collections. A total of 39,523 microsatellite loci were identified from the watermelon draft genome with an overall density of 111 SSRs/Mbp, and 32,869 SSR primers were designed with suitable flanking sequences. The dinucleotide SSRs were the most common type representing 34.09 % of the total SSR loci and the AT-rich motifs were the most abundant in all nucleotide repeat types. In silico PCR analysis identified 832 and 925 SSR markers with each having a single amplicon in the cucumber and melon draft genome, respectively. Comparative analysis with these cross-species SSR markers revealed complicated mosaic patterns of syntenic blocks among the genomes of three species. In addition, genetic diversity analysis of 134 watermelon accessions with 32 highly informative SSR loci placed these lines into two groups with all accessions of C.lanatus var. citorides and three accessions of C. colocynthis clustered in one group and all accessions of C. lanatus var. lanatus and the remaining accessions of C. colocynthis

  18. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of an endemic monotypic genus Hagenia (Rosaceae: structural comparative analysis, gene content and microsatellite detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew W. Gichira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hagenia is an endangered monotypic genus endemic to the topical mountains of Africa. The only species, Hagenia abyssinica (Bruce J.F. Gmel, is an important medicinal plant producing bioactive compounds that have been traditionally used by African communities as a remedy for gastrointestinal ailments in both humans and animals. Complete chloroplast genomes have been applied in resolving phylogenetic relationships within plant families. We employed high-throughput sequencing technologies to determine the complete chloroplast genome sequence of H. abyssinica. The genome is a circular molecule of 154,961 base pairs (bp, with a pair of Inverted Repeats (IR 25,971 bp each, separated by two single copies; a large (LSC, 84,320 bp and a small single copy (SSC, 18,696. H. abyssinica’s chloroplast genome has a 37.1% GC content and encodes 112 unique genes, 78 of which code for proteins, 30 are tRNA genes and four are rRNA genes. A comparative analysis with twenty other species, sequenced to-date from the family Rosaceae, revealed similarities in structural organization, gene content and arrangement. The observed size differences are attributed to the contraction/expansion of the inverted repeats. The translational initiation factor gene (infA which had been previously reported in other chloroplast genomes was conspicuously missing in H. abyssinica. A total of 172 microsatellites and 49 large repeat sequences were detected in the chloroplast genome. A Maximum Likelihood analyses of 71 protein-coding genes placed Hagenia in Rosoideae. The availability of a complete chloroplast genome, the first in the Sanguisorbeae tribe, is beneficial for further molecular studies on taxonomic and phylogenomic resolution within the Rosaceae family.

  19. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of an endemic monotypic genus Hagenia (Rosaceae): structural comparative analysis, gene content and microsatellite detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gichira, Andrew W; Li, Zhizhong; Saina, Josphat K; Long, Zhicheng; Hu, Guangwan; Gituru, Robert W; Wang, Qingfeng; Chen, Jinming

    2017-01-01

    Hagenia is an endangered monotypic genus endemic to the topical mountains of Africa. The only species, Hagenia abyssinica (Bruce) J.F. Gmel, is an important medicinal plant producing bioactive compounds that have been traditionally used by African communities as a remedy for gastrointestinal ailments in both humans and animals. Complete chloroplast genomes have been applied in resolving phylogenetic relationships within plant families. We employed high-throughput sequencing technologies to determine the complete chloroplast genome sequence of H. abyssinica. The genome is a circular molecule of 154,961 base pairs (bp), with a pair of Inverted Repeats (IR) 25,971 bp each, separated by two single copies; a large (LSC, 84,320 bp) and a small single copy (SSC, 18,696). H. abyssinica 's chloroplast genome has a 37.1% GC content and encodes 112 unique genes, 78 of which code for proteins, 30 are tRNA genes and four are rRNA genes. A comparative analysis with twenty other species, sequenced to-date from the family Rosaceae, revealed similarities in structural organization, gene content and arrangement. The observed size differences are attributed to the contraction/expansion of the inverted repeats. The translational initiation factor gene ( infA ) which had been previously reported in other chloroplast genomes was conspicuously missing in H. abyssinica . A total of 172 microsatellites and 49 large repeat sequences were detected in the chloroplast genome. A Maximum Likelihood analyses of 71 protein-coding genes placed Hagenia in Rosoideae. The availability of a complete chloroplast genome, the first in the Sanguisorbeae tribe, is beneficial for further molecular studies on taxonomic and phylogenomic resolution within the Rosaceae family.

  20. Comparative sequence analysis revealed altered chromosomal organization and a novel insertion sequence encoding DNA modification and potentially stress-related functions in an Escherichia coli O157:H7 foodborne isolate

    Science.gov (United States)

    We recently described the complete genome of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 strain NADC 6564, an isolate of strain 86-24 linked to the 1986 disease outbreak. In the current study, we compared the chromosomal sequence of NADC 6564 to the well-characterized chromosomal sequences of ...

  1. Sequencing and comparative genome analysis of two pathogenic Streptococcus gallolyticus subspecies: genome plasticity, adaptation and virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Hsuan Lin

    Full Text Available Streptococcus gallolyticus infections in humans are often associated with bacteremia, infective endocarditis and colon cancers. The disease manifestations are different depending on the subspecies of S. gallolyticus causing the infection. Here, we present the complete genomes of S. gallolyticus ATCC 43143 (biotype I and S. pasteurianus ATCC 43144 (biotype II.2. The genomic differences between the two biotypes were characterized with comparative genomic analyses. The chromosome of ATCC 43143 and ATCC 43144 are 2,36 and 2,10 Mb in length and encode 2246 and 1869 CDS respectively. The organization and genomic contents of both genomes were most similar to the recently published S. gallolyticus UCN34, where 2073 (92% and 1607 (86% of the ATCC 43143 and ATCC 43144 CDS were conserved in UCN34 respectively. There are around 600 CDS conserved in all Streptococcus genomes, indicating the Streptococcus genus has a small core-genome (constitute around 30% of total CDS and substantial evolutionary plasticity. We identified eight and five regions of genome plasticity in ATCC 43143 and ATCC 43144 respectively. Within these regions, several proteins were recognized to contribute to the fitness and virulence of each of the two subspecies. We have also predicted putative cell-surface associated proteins that could play a role in adherence to host tissues, leading to persistent infections causing sub-acute and chronic diseases in humans. This study showed evidence that the S. gallolyticus still possesses genes making it suitable in a rumen environment, whereas the ability for S. pasteurianus to live in rumen is reduced. The genome heterogeneity and genetic diversity among the two biotypes, especially membrane and lipoproteins, most likely contribute to the differences in the pathogenesis of the two S. gallolyticus biotypes and the type of disease an infected patient eventually develops.

  2. Genome sequences and comparative genomics of two Lactobacillus ruminis strains from the bovine and human intestinal tracts

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-08-30

    Abstract Background The genus Lactobacillus is characterized by an extraordinary degree of phenotypic and genotypic diversity, which recent genomic analyses have further highlighted. However, the choice of species for sequencing has been non-random and unequal in distribution, with only a single representative genome from the L. salivarius clade available to date. Furthermore, there is no data to facilitate a functional genomic analysis of motility in the lactobacilli, a trait that is restricted to the L. salivarius clade. Results The 2.06 Mb genome of the bovine isolate Lactobacillus ruminis ATCC 27782 comprises a single circular chromosome, and has a G+C content of 44.4%. In silico analysis identified 1901 coding sequences, including genes for a pediocin-like bacteriocin, a single large exopolysaccharide-related cluster, two sortase enzymes, two CRISPR loci and numerous IS elements and pseudogenes. A cluster of genes related to a putative pilin was identified, and shown to be transcribed in vitro. A high quality draft assembly of the genome of a second L. ruminis strain, ATCC 25644 isolated from humans, suggested a slightly larger genome of 2.138 Mb, that exhibited a high degree of synteny with the ATCC 27782 genome. In contrast, comparative analysis of L. ruminis and L. salivarius identified a lack of long-range synteny between these closely related species. Comparison of the L. salivarius clade core proteins with those of nine other Lactobacillus species distributed across 4 major phylogenetic groups identified the set of shared proteins, and proteins unique to each group. Conclusions The genome of L. ruminis provides a comparative tool for directing functional analyses of other members of the L. salivarius clade, and it increases understanding of the divergence of this distinct Lactobacillus lineage from other commensal lactobacilli. The genome sequence provides a definitive resource to facilitate investigation of the genetics, biochemistry and host

  3. Comparative sequence and structural analyses of G-protein-coupled receptor crystal structures and implications for molecular models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine L Worth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Up until recently the only available experimental (high resolution structure of a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR was that of bovine rhodopsin. In the past few years the determination of GPCR structures has accelerated with three new receptors, as well as squid rhodopsin, being successfully crystallized. All share a common molecular architecture of seven transmembrane helices and can therefore serve as templates for building molecular models of homologous GPCRs. However, despite the common general architecture of these structures key differences do exist between them. The choice of which experimental GPCR structure(s to use for building a comparative model of a particular GPCR is unclear and without detailed structural and sequence analyses, could be arbitrary. The aim of this study is therefore to perform a systematic and detailed analysis of sequence-structure relationships of known GPCR structures. METHODOLOGY: We analyzed in detail conserved and unique sequence motifs and structural features in experimentally-determined GPCR structures. Deeper insight into specific and important structural features of GPCRs as well as valuable information for template selection has been gained. Using key features a workflow has been formulated for identifying the most appropriate template(s for building homology models of GPCRs of unknown structure. This workflow was applied to a set of 14 human family A GPCRs suggesting for each the most appropriate template(s for building a comparative molecular model. CONCLUSIONS: The available crystal structures represent only a subset of all possible structural variation in family A GPCRs. Some GPCRs have structural features that are distributed over different crystal structures or which are not present in the templates suggesting that homology models should be built using multiple templates. This study provides a systematic analysis of GPCR crystal structures and a consistent method for identifying

  4. Comparative sequence and structural analyses of G-protein-coupled receptor crystal structures and implications for molecular models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worth, Catherine L; Kleinau, Gunnar; Krause, Gerd

    2009-09-16

    Up until recently the only available experimental (high resolution) structure of a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) was that of bovine rhodopsin. In the past few years the determination of GPCR structures has accelerated with three new receptors, as well as squid rhodopsin, being successfully crystallized. All share a common molecular architecture of seven transmembrane helices and can therefore serve as templates for building molecular models of homologous GPCRs. However, despite the common general architecture of these structures key differences do exist between them. The choice of which experimental GPCR structure(s) to use for building a comparative model of a particular GPCR is unclear and without detailed structural and sequence analyses, could be arbitrary. The aim of this study is therefore to perform a systematic and detailed analysis of sequence-structure relationships of known GPCR structures. We analyzed in detail conserved and unique sequence motifs and structural features in experimentally-determined GPCR structures. Deeper insight into specific and important structural features of GPCRs as well as valuable information for template selection has been gained. Using key features a workflow has been formulated for identifying the most appropriate template(s) for building homology models of GPCRs of unknown structure. This workflow was applied to a set of 14 human family A GPCRs suggesting for each the most appropriate template(s) for building a comparative molecular model. The available crystal structures represent only a subset of all possible structural variation in family A GPCRs. Some GPCRs have structural features that are distributed over different crystal structures or which are not present in the templates suggesting that homology models should be built using multiple templates. This study provides a systematic analysis of GPCR crystal structures and a consistent method for identifying suitable templates for GPCR homology modelling that will

  5. Ensembl 2002: accommodating comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clamp, M; Andrews, D; Barker, D; Bevan, P; Cameron, G; Chen, Y; Clark, L; Cox, T; Cuff, J; Curwen, V; Down, T; Durbin, R; Eyras, E; Gilbert, J; Hammond, M; Hubbard, T; Kasprzyk, A; Keefe, D; Lehvaslaiho, H; Iyer, V; Melsopp, C; Mongin, E; Pettett, R; Potter, S; Rust, A; Schmidt, E; Searle, S; Slater, G; Smith, J; Spooner, W; Stabenau, A; Stalker, J; Stupka, E; Ureta-Vidal, A; Vastrik, I; Birney, E

    2003-01-01

    The Ensembl (http://www.ensembl.org/) database project provides a bioinformatics framework to organise biology around the sequences of large genomes. It is a comprehensive source of stable automatic annotation of human, mouse and other genome sequences, available as either an interactive web site or as flat files. Ensembl also integrates manually annotated gene structures from external sources where available. As well as being one of the leading sources of genome annotation, Ensembl is an open source software engineering project to develop a portable system able to handle very large genomes and associated requirements. These range from sequence analysis to data storage and visualisation and installations exist around the world in both companies and at academic sites. With both human and mouse genome sequences available and more vertebrate sequences to follow, many of the recent developments in Ensembl have focusing on developing automatic comparative genome analysis and visualisation.

  6. Genome sequencing and comparative genomics analysis revealed pathogenic potential in Penicillium capsulatum as a novel fungal pathogen belonging to Eurotiales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Yang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Penicillium capsulatum is a rare Penicillium species used in paper manufacturing, but recently it has been reported to cause invasive infection. To research the pathogenicity of the clinical Penicillium strain, we sequenced the genomes and transcriptome of the clinical and environmental strains of P. capsulatum. Comparative analyses of these two P. capsulatum strains and close related strains belonging to Eurotiales were performed. The assembled genome sizes of P. capsulatum are approximately 34.4 Mbp in length and encode 11,080 predicted genes. The different isolates of P. capsulatum are highly similar, with the exception of several unique genes, INDELs or SNP in the genes coding for glycosyl hydrolases, amino acid transporters and circumsporozoite protein. A phylogenomic analysis was performed based on the whole genome data of 38 strains belonging to Eurotiales. By comparing the whole genome sequences and the virulence-related genes from 20 important related species, including fungal pathogens and non-human pathogens belonging to Eurotiales, we found meaningful pathogenicity characteristics between P. capsulatum and its closely related species. Our research indicated that P. capsulatum may be a neglected opportunistic pathogen. This study is beneficial for mycologists, geneticists and epidemiologists to achieve a deeper understanding of the genetic basis of the role of P. capsulatum as a newly reported fungal pathogen.

  7. spa Typing and Multilocus Sequence Typing Show Comparable Performance in a Macroepidemiologic Study of Staphylococcus aureus in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, F Patrick; Suaya, Jose A; Ray, G Thomas; Baxter, Roger; Brown, Megan L; Mera, Robertino M; Close, Nicole M; Thomas, Elizabeth; Amrine-Madsen, Heather

    2016-01-01

    A number of molecular typing methods have been developed for characterization of Staphylococcus aureus isolates. The utility of these systems depends on the nature of the investigation for which they are used. We compared two commonly used methods of molecular typing, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) (and its clustering algorithm, Based Upon Related Sequence Type [BURST]) with the staphylococcal protein A (spa) typing (and its clustering algorithm, Based Upon Repeat Pattern [BURP]), to assess the utility of these methods for macroepidemiology and evolutionary studies of S. aureus in the United States. We typed a total of 366 clinical isolates of S. aureus by these methods and evaluated indices of diversity and concordance values. Our results show that, when combined with the BURP clustering algorithm to delineate clonal lineages, spa typing produces results that are highly comparable with those produced by MLST/BURST. Therefore, spa typing is appropriate for use in macroepidemiology and evolutionary studies and, given its lower implementation cost, this method appears to be more efficient. The findings are robust and are consistent across different settings, patient ages, and specimen sources. Our results also support a model in which the methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) population in the United States comprises two major lineages (USA300 and USA100), which each consist of closely related variants.

  8. Parallel computation for biological sequence comparison: comparing a portable model to the native model for the Intel Hypercube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, P M; Miller, P L

    1991-01-01

    A parallel program for inter-database sequence comparison was developed on the Intel Hypercube using two models of parallel programming. One version was built using machine-specific Hypercube parallel programming commands. The other version was built using Linda, a machine-independent parallel programming language. The two versions of the program provide a case study comparing these two approaches to parallelization in an important biological application area. Benchmark tests with both programs gave comparable results with a small number of processors. As the number of processors was increased, the Linda version was somewhat less efficient. The Linda version was also run without change on Network Linda, a virtual parallel machine running on a network of desktop workstations.

  9. Second generation DNA sequencing of the mitogenome of the Chinstrap penguin and comparative genomics of Antarctic penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Sankar; Lingala, Syamala Gowri; Swaminathan, Siva; Huynen, Leon; Lambert, David

    2014-08-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the Chinstrap penguin (Pygoscelis antarcticus) was sequenced and compared with other penguin mitogenomes. The genome is 15,972 bp in length with the number and order of protein coding genes and RNAs being very similar to that of other known penguin mitogenomes. Comparative nucleotide analysis showed the Chinstrap mitogenome shares 94% homology with the mitogenome of its sister species, Pygoscelis adelie (Adélie penguin). Divergence at nonsynonymous nucleotide positions was found to be up to 23 times less than that observed in synonymous positions of protein coding genes, suggesting high selection constraints. The complete mitogenome data will be useful for genetic and evolutionary studies of penguins.

  10. Comparative Analyses of H3K4 and H3K27 Trimethylations Between the Mouse Cerebrum and Testis

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Peng

    2012-06-08

    The global features of H3K4 and H3K27 trimethylations (H3K4me3 and H3K27me3) have been well studied in recent years, but most of these studies were performed in mammalian cell lines. In this work, we generated the genome-wide maps of H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 of mouse cerebrum and testis using ChIP-seq and their high-coverage transcriptomes using ribominus RNA-seq with SOLiD technology. We examined the global patterns of H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 in both tissues and found that modifications are closely-associated with tissue-specific expression, function and development. Moreover, we revealed that H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 rarely occur in silent genes, which contradicts the findings in previous studies. Finally, we observed that bivalent domains, with both H3K4me3 and H3K27me3, existed ubiquitously in both tissues and demonstrated an invariable preference for the regulation of developmentally-related genes. However, the bivalent domains tend towards a “winner-takes-all” approach to regulate the expression of associated genes. We also verified the above results in mouse ES cells. As expected, the results in ES cells are consistent with those in cerebrum and testis. In conclusion, we present two very important findings. One is that H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 rarely occur in silent genes. The other is that bivalent domains may adopt a “winner-takes-all” principle to regulate gene expression.

  11. Comparative Analysis of the Relationship between Trichloroethylene Metabolism and Tissue-Specific Toxicity among Inbred Mouse Strains: Kidney Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hong Sik; Bradford, Blair U.; Kosyk, Oksana; Uehara, Takeki; Shymonyak, Svitlana; Collins, Leonard B.; Bodnar, Wanda M.; Ball, Louise M.; Gold, Avram; Rusyn, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a well-known environmental and occupational toxicant that is classified as carcinogenic to humans based on the epidemiological evidence of an association with higher risk of renal cell carcinoma. A number of scientific issues critical for assessing human health risks from TCE remain unresolved, such as the amount of kidney-toxic glutathione conjugation metabolites formed, inter-species and -individual differences, and the mode of action for kidney carcinogenicity. We hypothesized that TCE metabolite levels in the kidney are associated with kidney-specific toxicity. Oral dosing with TCE was conducted in sub-acute (600 mg/kg/d; 5 days; 7 inbred mouse strains) and sub-chronic (100 or 400 mg/kg/d; 1, 2, or 4 weeks; 2 inbred mouse strains) designs. We evaluated the quantitative relationship between strain-, dose-, and time-dependent formation of TCE metabolites from cytochrome P450-mediated oxidation [trichloroacetic acid (TCA), dichloroacetic acid (DCA), and trichloroethanol] and glutathione conjugation [S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine and S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)glutathione], and various kidney toxicity phenotypes. In sub-acute study, we observed inter-strain differences in TCE metabolite levels in the kidney. In addition, we found that in several strains kidney-specific effects of TCE included induction of peroxisome proliferator-marker genes Cyp4a10 and Acox1, increased cell proliferation, and expression of KIM-1, a marker of tubular damage and regeneration. In sub-chronic study, peroxisome proliferator-marker gene induction and kidney toxicity diminished while cell proliferative response was elevated in a dose-dependent manner in NZW/LacJ, but not C57BL/6J mice. Overall, we show that TCE metabolite levels in the kidney are associated with kidney-specific toxicity and that these effects are strain-dependent. PMID:25424545

  12. Comparative analysis of expressed sequence tags from three castes and two life stages of the termite Reticulitermes flavipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steller Matthew M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Termites (Isoptera are eusocial insects whose colonies consist of morphologically and behaviorally specialized castes of sterile workers and soldiers, and reproductive alates. Previous studies on eusocial insects have indicated that caste differentiation and behavior are underlain by differential gene expression. Although much is known about gene expression in the honey bee, Apis mellifera, termites remain relatively understudied in this regard. Therefore, our objective was to assemble an expressed sequence tag (EST data base for the eastern subterranean termite, Reticulitermes flavipes, for future gene expression studies. Results Soldier, worker, and alate caste and two larval cDNA libraries were constructed, and approximately 15,000 randomly chosen clones were sequenced to compile an EST data base. Putative gene functions were assigned based on a BLASTX Swissprot search. Categorical in silico expression patterns for each library were compared using the R-statistic. A significant proportion of the ESTs of each caste and life stages had no significant similarity to those in existing data bases. All cDNA libraries, including those of non-reproductive worker and soldier castes, contained sequences with putative reproductive functions. Genes that showed a potential expression bias among castes included a putative antibacterial humoral response and translation elongation protein in soldiers and a chemosensory protein in alates. Conclusions We have expanded upon the available sequences for R. flavipes and utilized an in silico method to compare gene expression in different castes of an eusocial insect. The in silico analysis allowed us to identify several genes which may be differentially expressed and involved in caste differences. These include a gene overrepresented in the alate cDNA library with a predicted function of neurotransmitter secretion or cholesterol absorption and a gene predicted to be involved in protein

  13. A gene-based high-resolution comparative radiation hybrid map as a framework for genome sequence assembly of a bovine chromosome 6 region associated with QTL for growth, body composition, and milk performance traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Pascal

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of different quantitative trait loci (QTL for various phenotypic traits, including milk production, functional, and conformation traits in dairy cattle as well as growth and body composition traits in meat cattle, have been mapped consistently in the middle region of bovine chromosome 6 (BTA6. Dense genetic and physical maps and, ultimately, a fully annotated genome sequence as well as their mutual connections are required to efficiently identify genes and gene variants responsible for genetic variation of phenotypic traits. A comprehensive high-resolution gene-rich map linking densely spaced bovine markers and genes to the annotated human genome sequence is required as a framework to facilitate this approach for the region on BTA6 carrying the QTL. Results Therefore, we constructed a high-resolution radiation hybrid (RH map for the QTL containing chromosomal region of BTA6. This new RH map with a total of 234 loci including 115 genes and ESTs displays a substantial increase in loci density compared to existing physical BTA6 maps. Screening the available bovine genome sequence resources, a total of 73 loci could be assigned to sequence contigs, which were already identified as specific for BTA6. For 43 loci, corresponding sequence contigs, which were not yet placed on the bovine genome assembly, were identified. In addition, the improved potential of this high-resolution RH map for BTA6 with respect to comparative mapping was demonstrated. Mapping a large number of genes on BTA6 and cross-referencing them with map locations in corresponding syntenic multi-species chromosome segments (human, mouse, rat, dog, chicken achieved a refined accurate alignment of conserved segments and evolutionary breakpoints across the species included. Conclusion The gene-anchored high-resolution RH map (1 locus/300 kb for the targeted region of BTA6 presented here will provide a valuable platform to guide high-quality assembling and

  14. Soybean (Glycine max) SWEET gene family: insights through comparative genomics, transcriptome profiling and whole genome re-sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Gunvant; Valliyodan, Babu; Deshmukh, Rupesh; Prince, Silvas; Nicander, Bjorn; Zhao, Mingzhe; Sonah, Humira; Song, Li; Lin, Li; Chaudhary, Juhi; Liu, Yang; Joshi, Trupti; Xu, Dong; Nguyen, Henry T

    2015-07-11

    SWEET (MtN3_saliva) domain proteins, a recently identified group of efflux transporters, play an indispensable role in sugar efflux, phloem loading, plant-pathogen interaction and reproductive tissue development. The SWEET gene family is predominantly studied in Arabidopsis and members of the family are being investigated in rice. To date, no transcriptome or genomics analysis of soybean SWEET genes has been reported. In the present investigation, we explored the evolutionary aspect of the SWEET gene family in diverse plant species including primitive single cell algae to angiosperms with a major emphasis on Glycine max. Evolutionary features showed expansion and duplication of the SWEET gene family in land plants. Homology searches with BLAST tools and Hidden Markov Model-directed sequence alignments identified 52 SWEET genes that were mapped to 15 chromosomes in the soybean genome as tandem duplication events. Soybean SWEET (GmSWEET) genes showed a wide range of expression profiles in different tissues and developmental stages. Analysis of public transcriptome data and expression profiling using quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) showed that a majority of the GmSWEET genes were confined to reproductive tissue development. Several natural genetic variants (non-synonymous SNPs, premature stop codons and haplotype) were identified in the GmSWEET genes using whole genome re-sequencing data analysis of 106 soybean genotypes. A significant association was observed between SNP-haplogroup and seed sucrose content in three gene clusters on chromosome 6. Present investigation utilized comparative genomics, transcriptome profiling and whole genome re-sequencing approaches and provided a systematic description of soybean SWEET genes and identified putative candidates with probable roles in the reproductive tissue development. Gene expression profiling at different developmental stages and genomic variation data will aid as an important resource for the soybean research

  15. Specific versus non-specific immune responses in an invertebrate species evidenced by a comparative de novo sequencing study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emeline Deleury

    Full Text Available Our present understanding of the functioning and evolutionary history of invertebrate innate immunity derives mostly from studies on a few model species belonging to ecdysozoa. In particular, the characterization of signaling pathways dedicated to specific responses towards fungi and Gram-positive or Gram-negative bacteria in Drosophila melanogaster challenged our original view of a non-specific immunity in invertebrates. However, much remains to be elucidated from lophotrochozoan species. To investigate the global specificity of the immune response in the fresh-water snail Biomphalaria glabrata, we used massive Illumina sequencing of 5'-end cDNAs to compare expression profiles after challenge by Gram-positive or Gram-negative bacteria or after a yeast challenge. 5'-end cDNA sequencing of the libraries yielded over 12 millions high quality reads. To link these short reads to expressed genes, we prepared a reference transcriptomic database through automatic assembly and annotation of the 758,510 redundant sequences (ESTs, mRNAs of B. glabrata available in public databases. Computational analysis of Illumina reads followed by multivariate analyses allowed identification of 1685 candidate transcripts differentially expressed after an immune challenge, with a two fold ratio between transcripts showing a challenge-specific expression versus a lower or non-specific differential expression. Differential expression has been validated using quantitative PCR for a subset of randomly selected candidates. Predicted functions of annotated candidates (approx. 700 unisequences belonged to a large extend to similar functional categories or protein types. This work significantly expands upon previous gene discovery and expression studies on B. glabrata and suggests that responses to various pathogens may involve similar immune processes or signaling pathways but different genes belonging to multigenic families. These results raise the question of the importance

  16. Complete genome sequence of the fire blight pathogen Erwinia pyrifoliae DSM 12163T and comparative genomic insights into plant pathogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frey Jürg E

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Erwinia pyrifoliae is a newly described necrotrophic pathogen, which causes fire blight on Asian (Nashi pear and is geographically restricted to Eastern Asia. Relatively little is known about its genetics compared to the closely related main fire blight pathogen E. amylovora. Results The genome of the type strain of E. pyrifoliae strain DSM 12163T, was sequenced using both 454 and Solexa pyrosequencing and annotated. The genome contains a circular chromosome of 4.026 Mb and four small plasmids. Based on their respective role in virulence in E. amylovora or related organisms, we identified several putative virulence factors, including type III and type VI secretion systems and their effectors, flagellar genes, sorbitol metabolism, iron uptake determinants, and quorum-sensing components. A deletion in the rpoS gene covering the most conserved region of the protein was identified which may contribute to the difference in virulence/host-range compared to E. amylovora. Comparative genomics with the pome fruit epiphyte Erwinia tasmaniensis Et1/99 showed that both species are overall highly similar, although specific differences were identified, for example the presence of some phage gene-containing regions and a high number of putative genomic islands containing transposases in the E. pyrifoliae DSM 12163T genome. Conclusions The E. pyrifoliae genome is an important addition to the published genome of E. tasmaniensis and the unfinished genome of E. amylovora providing a foundation for re-sequencing additional strains that may shed light on the evolution of the host-range and virulence/pathogenicity of this important group of plant-associated bacteria.

  17. Analysis of the Complete Mitochondrial Genome Sequence of the Diploid Cotton Gossypium raimondii by Comparative Genomics Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changwei Bi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cotton is one of the most important economic crops and the primary source of natural fiber and is an important protein source for animal feed. The complete nuclear and chloroplast (cp genome sequences of G. raimondii are already available but not mitochondria. Here, we assembled the complete mitochondrial (mt DNA sequence of G. raimondii into a circular genome of length of 676,078 bp and performed comparative analyses with other higher plants. The genome contains 39 protein-coding genes, 6 rRNA genes, and 25 tRNA genes. We also identified four larger repeats (63.9 kb, 10.6 kb, 9.1 kb, and 2.5 kb in this mt genome, which may be active in intramolecular recombination in the evolution of cotton. Strikingly, nearly all of the G. raimondii mt genome has been transferred to nucleus on Chr1, and the transfer event must be very recent. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that G. raimondii, as a member of Malvaceae, is much closer to another cotton (G. barbadense than other rosids, and the clade formed by two Gossypium species is sister to Brassicales. The G. raimondii mt genome may provide a crucial foundation for evolutionary analysis, molecular biology, and cytoplasmic male sterility in cotton and other higher plants.

  18. T1 Gd-enhanced compared with CISS sequences in retinoblastoma: superiority of T1 sequences in evaluation of tumour extension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gizewski, Elke R.; Wanke, Isabel; Guengoer, Ali-Riza; Forsting, Michael [University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Jurklies, Christine [University Hospital Essen, Department of Ophthalmology (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    Background As adequate therapy for retinoblastoma in young children depends on infiltration of extra-retinal structures, diagnostic modalities play an essential role. Methods: In this widely extended study, 80 children with retinoblastoma were studied with MRI (standard fat-suppressed Gd-enhanced T1, T2 thin-slice sequences (additionally with small loop surface coil), constructive interference in steady state (CISS) sequence covering the orbita). The images were analysed by two blinded neuroradiologists. Histology was used as the gold standard. MRI assumed infiltration of extra-retinal structures in 13 of 80 patients of which ten were confirmed by histology. Affected extra-retinal structures were: optic nerve (five, of which two were on CISS and three on T1 with higher image resolution using the surface coil), scleral infiltration (five, of which four on CISS and T1) and ciliary body infiltration (one on CISS and T1). Another 61 enucleated patients did not have any extra-retinal infiltration in histology. The CISS sequence with multiplanar reconstruction was mainly helpful in revealing exact three-dimensional tumour extension with excellent clinical acceptance and pre-surgical planning but T1 fat-suppressed Gd-enhanced images were superior in revealing exact tumour extension. CISS sequences allow to produce excellent anatomical images and to perform multiplanar reconstruction to better demonstrate tumour extension. However, T1-weighted sequences after contrast application are more sensitive (60 versus 40%) in detecting infiltration of the optic nerve but equal in detecting scleral infiltration. (orig.)

  19. Studies on Dasyaceae. 3. Towards a phylogeny of the Dasyaceae (Ceramiales, Rhodophyta), based on comparative rbcL gene sequences and morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Y.S D M; van der Wurff, A.W G; Stam, W.T.; Olsen, J.L.

    Phylogenetic analyses of the Dasyaceae based on sequence analysis of the large subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rbcL) and 42 morphological characters are presented. Comparative sequence analysis confirms the general view of the Ceramiaceae as a primitive, paraphyletic

  20. Optimal pulse sequence for ferumoxides-enhanced MR imaging used in the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma: a comparative study using seven pulse sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Hoon; Choi, Dongil; Lim, Jae Hoon; Lee, Won Jae; Jang, Hyun Jung; Lim, Kyo Keun; Lee, Soon Jin; Cho, Jae Min; Kim, Seung Kwon; Kim, Gab Chul

    2002-01-01

    To identify the optimal pulse sequence for ferumoxides-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the detection of hepatocelluar carcinomas (HCCs). Sixteen patients with 25 HCCs underwent MR imaging following intravenous infusion of ferumoxides. All MR studies were performed on a 1.5-T MR system, using a phased-array coil. Ferumoxides (Feridex IV) at a dose of 15 μmol/Kg was slowly infused intravenously, and axial images of seven sequences were obtained 30 minutes after the end of infusion. The MR protocol included fast spin-echo (FSE) with two echo times (TR3333-8571/TE18 and 90-117), singleshot FSE (SSFSE) with two echo times (TR∞/TE39 and 98), T2-weighted gradient-recalled acquisition in the steady state (GRASS) (TR216/TE20), T2-weighted fast multiplanar GRASS (FMPGR) (TR130/TE8.4-9.5), and T2-weighted fast multiplanar spoiled GRASS (FMPSPGR) (TR130/TE8.4-9.5). Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) of HCCs determined during the imaging sequences formed the basis of quantitative analysis, and images were qualitatively assessed in terms of lesion conspicuity and image artifacts. The diagnostic accuracy of all sequences was assessed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Quantitative analysis revealed that the CNRs of T2-weighted FMPGR and T2-weighted FMPSPGR were significantly higher than those of the other sequences, while qualitative analysis showed that image artifacts were prominent at T2-weighted GRASS imaging. Lesion conspicuity was statistically significantly less clear at SSFSE imaging. In term of lesion detection, T-weighted FMPGR, T2- weighted FMPSPGR, and proton density FSE imaging were statistically superior to the others. T2-weighted FMPGR, T2- weighted FMPSPGR, and proton density FSE appear to be the optimal pulse sequences for ferumoxidesenhanced MR imaging in the detection of HCCs

  1. Ultrastructural characteristics of three undifferentiated mouse embryonic stem cell lines and their differentiated three-dimensional derivatives: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Suzan; Elsafadi, Mona; Mobarak, Mohammed; Alrwili, Ali; Vishnubalaji, Radhakrishnan; Manikandan, Muthurangan; Al-Qudsi, Fatma; Karim, Saleh; Al-Nabaheen, May; Aldahmash, Abdullah; Mahmood, Amer

    2014-04-01

    The fine structures of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) grown as colonies and differentiated in three-dimensional (3D) culture as embryoid bodies (EBs) were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. Undifferentiated mESCs expressed markers that proved their pluripotency. Differentiated EBs expressed different differentiation marker proteins from the three germ layers. The ultrastructure of mESCs revealed the presence of microvilli on the cell surfaces, large and deep infolded nuclei, low cytoplasm-to-nuclear ratios, frequent lipid droplets, nonprominent Golgi apparatus, and smooth endoplasmic reticulum. In addition, we found prominent juvenile mitochondria and free ribosomes-rich cytoplasm in mESCs. Ultrastructure of the differentiated mESCs as EBs showed different cell arrangements, which indicate the different stages of EB development and differentiation. The morphologies of BALB/c and 129 W9.5 EBs were very similar at day 4, whereas C57BL/6 EBs were distinct from the others at day 4. This finding suggested that differentiation of EBs from different cell lines occurs in the same pattern but not at the same rate. Conversely, the ultrastructure results of BALB/c and 129 W9.5 ESCs revealed differentiating features, such as the dilated profile of a rough endoplasmic reticulum. In addition, we found low expression levels of undifferentiated markers on the outer cells of BALB/c and 129 W9.5 mESC colonies, which suggests a faster differentiation potential.

  2. RNA-Sequencing Reveals Unique Transcriptional Signatures of Running and Running-Independent Environmental Enrichment in the Adult Mouse Dentate Gyrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine-Alexandra Grégoire

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Environmental enrichment (EE is a powerful stimulus of brain plasticity and is among the most accessible treatment options for brain disease. In rodents, EE is modeled using multi-factorial environments that include running, social interactions, and/or complex surroundings. Here, we show that running and running-independent EE differentially affect the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG, a brain region critical for learning and memory. Outbred male CD1 mice housed individually with a voluntary running disk showed improved spatial memory in the radial arm maze compared to individually- or socially-housed mice with a locked disk. We therefore used RNA sequencing to perform an unbiased interrogation of DG gene expression in mice exposed to either a voluntary running disk (RUN, a locked disk (LD, or a locked disk plus social enrichment and tunnels [i.e., a running-independent complex environment (CE]. RNA sequencing revealed that RUN and CE mice showed distinct, non-overlapping patterns of transcriptomic changes versus the LD control. Bio-informatics uncovered that the RUN and CE environments modulate separate transcriptional networks, biological processes, cellular compartments and molecular pathways, with RUN preferentially regulating synaptic and growth-related pathways and CE altering extracellular matrix-related functions. Within the RUN group, high-distance runners also showed selective stress pathway alterations that correlated with a drastic decline in overall transcriptional changes, suggesting that excess running causes a stress-induced suppression of running’s genetic effects. Our findings reveal stimulus-dependent transcriptional signatures of EE on the DG, and provide a resource for generating unbiased, data-driven hypotheses for novel mediators of EE-induced cognitive changes.

  3. RNA-Sequencing Reveals Unique Transcriptional Signatures of Running and Running-Independent Environmental Enrichment in the Adult Mouse Dentate Gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grégoire, Catherine-Alexandra; Tobin, Stephanie; Goldenstein, Brianna L; Samarut, Éric; Leclerc, Andréanne; Aumont, Anne; Drapeau, Pierre; Fulton, Stephanie; Fernandes, Karl J L

    2018-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) is a powerful stimulus of brain plasticity and is among the most accessible treatment options for brain disease. In rodents, EE is modeled using multi-factorial environments that include running, social interactions, and/or complex surroundings. Here, we show that running and running-independent EE differentially affect the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG), a brain region critical for learning and memory. Outbred male CD1 mice housed individually with a voluntary running disk showed improved spatial memory in the radial arm maze compared to individually- or socially-housed mice with a locked disk. We therefore used RNA sequencing to perform an unbiased interrogation of DG gene expression in mice exposed to either a voluntary running disk (RUN), a locked disk (LD), or a locked disk plus social enrichment and tunnels [i.e., a running-independent complex environment (CE)]. RNA sequencing revealed that RUN and CE mice showed distinct, non-overlapping patterns of transcriptomic changes versus the LD control. Bio-informatics uncovered that the RUN and CE environments modulate separate transcriptional networks, biological processes, cellular compartments and molecular pathways, with RUN preferentially regulating synaptic and growth-related pathways and CE altering extracellular matrix-related functions. Within the RUN group, high-distance runners also showed selective stress pathway alterations that correlated with a drastic decline in overall transcriptional changes, suggesting that excess running causes a stress-induced suppression of running's genetic effects. Our findings reveal stimulus-dependent transcriptional signatures of EE on the DG, and provide a resource for generating unbiased, data-driven hypotheses for novel mediators of EE-induced cognitive changes.

  4. Comparative analyses of plastid sequences between native and introduced populations of aquatic weeds Elodea canadensis and E. nuttallii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tea Huotari

    Full Text Available Non-indigenous species (NIS are species living outside their historic or native range. Invasive NIS often cause severe environmental impacts, and may have large economical and social consequences. Elodea (Hydrocharitaceae is a New World genus with at least five submerged aquatic angiosperm species living in fresh water environments. Our aim was to survey the geographical distribution of cpDNA haplotypes within the native and introduced ranges of invasive aquatic weeds Elodea canadensis and E. nuttallii and to reconstruct the spreading histories of these invasive species. In order to reveal informative chloroplast (cp genome regions for phylogeographic analyses, we compared the plastid sequences of native and introduced individuals of E. canadensis. In total, we found 235 variable sites (186 SNPs, 47 indels and two inversions between the two plastid sequences consisting of 112,193 bp and developed primers flanking the most variable genomic areas. These 29 primer pairs were used to compare the level and pattern of intraspecific variation within E. canadensis to interspecific variation between E. canadensis and E. nuttallii. Nine potentially informative primer pairs were used to analyze the phylogeographic structure of both Elodea species, based on 70 E. canadensis and 25 E. nuttallii individuals covering native and introduced distributions. On the whole, the level of variation between the two Elodea species was 53% higher than that within E. canadensis. In our phylogeographic analysis, only a single haplotype was found in the introduced range in both species. These haplotypes H1 (E. canadensis and A (E. nuttallii were also widespread in the native range, covering the majority of native populations analyzed. Therefore, we were not able to identify either the geographic origin of the introduced populations or test the hypothesis of single versus multiple introductions. The divergence between E. canadensis haplotypes was surprisingly high, and future

  5. Comparative analyses of plastid sequences between native and introduced populations of aquatic weeds Elodea canadensis and E. nuttallii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huotari, Tea; Korpelainen, Helena

    2013-01-01

    Non-indigenous species (NIS) are species living outside their historic or native range. Invasive NIS often cause severe environmental impacts, and may have large economical and social consequences. Elodea (Hydrocharitaceae) is a New World genus with at least five submerged aquatic angiosperm species living in fresh water environments. Our aim was to survey the geographical distribution of cpDNA haplotypes within the native and introduced ranges of invasive aquatic weeds Elodea canadensis and E. nuttallii and to reconstruct the spreading histories of these invasive species. In order to reveal informative chloroplast (cp) genome regions for phylogeographic analyses, we compared the plastid sequences of native and introduced individuals of E. canadensis. In total, we found 235 variable sites (186 SNPs, 47 indels and two inversions) between the two plastid sequences consisting of 112,193 bp and developed primers flanking the most variable genomic areas. These 29 primer pairs were used to compare the level and pattern of intraspecific variation within E. canadensis to interspecific variation between E. canadensis and E. nuttallii. Nine potentially informative primer pairs were used to analyze the phylogeographic structure of both Elodea species, based on 70 E. canadensis and 25 E. nuttallii individuals covering native and introduced distributions. On the whole, the level of variation between the two Elodea species was 53% higher than that within E. canadensis. In our phylogeographic analysis, only a single haplotype was found in the introduced range in both species. These haplotypes H1 (E. canadensis) and A (E. nuttallii) were also widespread in the native range, covering the majority of native populations analyzed. Therefore, we were not able to identify either the geographic origin of the introduced populations or test the hypothesis of single versus multiple introductions. The divergence between E. canadensis haplotypes was surprisingly high, and future research may

  6. Sex-comparative study of mouse cerebellum physiology under adult-onset hypothyroidism: The significance of GC-MS metabolomic data normalization in meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maga-Nteve, Christoniki; Vasilopoulou, Catherine G; Constantinou, Caterina; Margarity, Marigoula; Klapa, Maria I

    2017-01-15

    A systematic data quality validation and normalization strategy is an important component of the omic profile meta-analysis, ensuring comparability of the profiles and exclusion of experimental biases from the derived biological conclusions. In this study, we present the normalization methodology applied on the sets of cerebellum gas chromatography-mass spectrometry metabolic profiles of 124days old male and female animals in an adult-onset-hypothyroidism (AOH) mouse model before combining them into a sex-comparative analysis. The employed AOH model concerns the monitoring of the brain physiology of Balb/cJ mice after eight-week administration of 1%w/v KClO 4 in the drinking water, initiated on the 60th day of their life. While originating from the same animal study, the tissues of the two sexes were processed and their profiles acquired and analyzed at different time periods. Hence, the previously published profile set of male mice was first re-annotated based on the presently available resources. Then, after being validated as acquired under the same analytical conditions, both profiles sets were corrected for derivatization biases and filtered for low-confidence measurements based on the same criteria. The final normalized 73-metabolite profiles contribute to the currently few available omic datasets of the AOH effect on brain molecular physiology, especially with respect to sex differentiation. Multivariate statistical analysis indicated one (unknown) and three (succinate, benzoate, myristate) metabolites with significantly higher and lower, respectively, cerebellum concentration in the hypothyroid compared to the euthyroid female mice. The respective numbers for the males were two and 24. Comparison of the euthyroid cerebellum metabolic profiles between the two sexes indicated 36 metabolites, including glucose, myo- and scyllo-inositol, with significantly lower concentration in the females versus the males. This implies that the female mouse cerebellum has

  7. Whole-genome sequence of the Tibetan frog Nanorana parkeri and the comparative evolution of tetrapod genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan-Bo; Xiong, Zi-Jun; Xiang, Xue-Yan; Liu, Shi-Ping; Zhou, Wei-Wei; Tu, Xiao-Long; Zhong, Li; Wang, Lu; Wu, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Bao-Lin; Zhu, Chun-Ling; Yang, Min-Min; Chen, Hong-Man; Li, Fang; Zhou, Long; Feng, Shao-Hong; Huang, Chao; Zhang, Guo-Jie; Irwin, David; Hillis, David M; Murphy, Robert W; Yang, Huan-Ming; Che, Jing; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2015-03-17

    The development of efficient sequencing techniques has resulted in large numbers of genomes being available for evolutionary studies. However, only one genome is available for all amphibians, that of Xenopus tropicalis, which is distantly related from the majority of frogs. More than 96% of frogs belong to the Neobatrachia, and no genome exists for this group. This dearth of amphibian genomes greatly restricts genomic studies of amphibians and, more generally, our understanding of tetrapod genome evolution. To fill this gap, we provide the de novo genome of a Tibetan Plateau frog, Nanorana parkeri, and compare it to that of X. tropicalis and other vertebrates. This genome encodes more than 20,000 protein-coding genes, a number similar to that of Xenopus. Although the genome size of Nanorana is considerably larger than that of Xenopus (2.3 vs. 1.5 Gb), most of the difference is due to the respective number of transposable elements in the two genomes. The two frogs exhibit considerable conserved whole-genome synteny despite having diverged approximately 266 Ma, indicating a slow rate of DNA structural evolution in anurans. Multigenome synteny blocks further show that amphibians have fewer interchromosomal rearrangements than mammals but have a comparable rate of intrachromosomal rearrangements. Our analysis also identifies 11 Mb of anuran-specific highly conserved elements that will be useful for comparative genomic analyses of frogs. The Nanorana genome offers an improved understanding of evolution of tetrapod genomes and also provides a genomic reference for other evolutionary studies.

  8. Comparative genomic assessment of Multi-Locus Sequence Typing: rapid accumulation of genomic heterogeneity among clonal isolates of Campylobacter jejuni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nash John HE

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST has emerged as a leading molecular typing method owing to its high ability to discriminate among bacterial isolates, the relative ease with which data acquisition and analysis can be standardized, and the high portability of the resulting sequence data. While MLST has been successfully applied to the study of the population structure for a number of different bacterial species, it has also provided compelling evidence for high rates of recombination in some species. We have analyzed a set of Campylobacter jejuni strains using MLST and Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH on a full-genome microarray in order to determine whether recombination and high levels of genomic mosaicism adversely affect the inference of strain relationships based on the analysis of a restricted number of genetic loci. Results Our results indicate that, in general, there is significant concordance between strain relationships established by MLST and those based on shared gene content as established by CGH. While MLST has significant predictive power with respect to overall genome similarity of isolates, we also found evidence for significant differences in genomic content among strains that would otherwise appear to be highly related based on their MLST profiles. Conclusion The extensive genomic mosaicism between closely related strains has important implications in the context of establishing strain to strain relationships because it suggests that the exact gene content of strains, and by extension their phenotype, is less likely to be "predicted" based on a small number of typing loci. This in turn suggests that a greater emphasis should be placed on analyzing genes of clinical interest as we forge ahead with the next generation of molecular typing methods.

  9. Comparative analysis of the complete genome sequence of the California MSW strain of myxoma virus reveals potential host adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Peter J; Rogers, Matthew B; Fitch, Adam; Depasse, Jay V; Cattadori, Isabella M; Hudson, Peter J; Tscharke, David C; Holmes, Edward C; Ghedin, Elodie

    2013-11-01

    Myxomatosis is a rapidly lethal disease of European rabbits that is caused by myxoma virus (MYXV). The introduction of a South American strain of MYXV into the European rabbit population of Australia is the classic case of host-pathogen coevolution following cross-species transmission. The most virulent strains of MYXV for European rabbits are the Californian viruses, found in the Pacific states of the United States and the Baja Peninsula, Mexico. The natural host of Californian MYXV is the brush rabbit, Sylvilagus bachmani. We determined the complete sequence of the MSW strain of Californian MYXV and performed a comparative analysis with other MYXV genomes. The MSW genome is larger than that of the South American Lausanne (type) strain of MYXV due to an expansion of the terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) of the genome, with duplication of the M156R, M154L, M153R, M152R, and M151R genes and part of the M150R gene from the right-hand (RH) end of the genome at the left-hand (LH) TIR. Despite the extreme virulence of MSW, no novel genes were identified; five genes were disrupted by multiple indels or mutations to the ATG start codon, including two genes, M008.1L/R and M152R, with major virulence functions in European rabbits, and a sixth gene, M000.5L/R, was absent. The loss of these gene functions suggests that S. bachmani is a relatively recent host for MYXV and that duplication of virulence genes in the TIRs, gene loss, or sequence variation in other genes can compensate for the loss of M008.1L/R and M152R in infections of European rabbits.

  10. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of the CAM epiphyte Spanish moss (Tillandsia usneoides, Bromeliaceae and its comparative analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péter Poczai

    Full Text Available Spanish moss (Tillandsia usneoides is an epiphytic bromeliad widely distributed throughout tropical and warm temperate America. This plant is highly adapted to extreme environmental conditions. Striking features of this species include specialized trichomes (scales covering the surface of its shoots aiding the absorption of water and nutrients directly from the atmosphere and a specific photosynthesis using crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM. Here we report the plastid genome of Spanish moss and present the comparison of genome organization and sequence evolution within Poales. The plastome of Spanish moss has a quadripartite structure consisting of a large single copy (LSC, 87,439 bp, two inverted regions (IRa and IRb, 26,803 bp and short single copy (SSC, 18,612 bp region. The plastid genome had 37.2% GC content and 134 genes with 88 being unique protein-coding genes and 20 of these are duplicated in the IR, similar to other reported bromeliads. Our study shows that early diverging lineages of Poales do not have high substitution rates as compared to grasses, and plastid genomes of bromeliads show structural features considered to be ancestral in graminids. These include the loss of the introns in the clpP and rpoC1 genes and the complete loss or partial degradation of accD and ycf genes in the Graminid clade. Further structural rearrangements appeared in the graminids lacking in Spanish moss, which include a 28-kb inversion between the trnG-UCC-rps14 region and 6-kb in the trnG-UCC-psbD, followed by a third <1kb inversion in the trnT sequence.

  11. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of the CAM epiphyte Spanish moss (Tillandsia usneoides, Bromeliaceae) and its comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poczai, Péter; Hyvönen, Jaakko

    2017-01-01

    Spanish moss (Tillandsia usneoides) is an epiphytic bromeliad widely distributed throughout tropical and warm temperate America. This plant is highly adapted to extreme environmental conditions. Striking features of this species include specialized trichomes (scales) covering the surface of its shoots aiding the absorption of water and nutrients directly from the atmosphere and a specific photosynthesis using crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). Here we report the plastid genome of Spanish moss and present the comparison of genome organization and sequence evolution within Poales. The plastome of Spanish moss has a quadripartite structure consisting of a large single copy (LSC, 87,439 bp), two inverted regions (IRa and IRb, 26,803 bp) and short single copy (SSC, 18,612 bp) region. The plastid genome had 37.2% GC content and 134 genes with 88 being unique protein-coding genes and 20 of these are duplicated in the IR, similar to other reported bromeliads. Our study shows that early diverging lineages of Poales do not have high substitution rates as compared to grasses, and plastid genomes of bromeliads show structural features considered to be ancestral in graminids. These include the loss of the introns in the clpP and rpoC1 genes and the complete loss or partial degradation of accD and ycf genes in the Graminid clade. Further structural rearrangements appeared in the graminids lacking in Spanish moss, which include a 28-kb inversion between the trnG-UCC-rps14 region and 6-kb in the trnG-UCC-psbD, followed by a third <1kb inversion in the trnT sequence.

  12. Complete chloroplast genome sequence of common bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.) and comparative analysis within the family Poaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ya-Yi; Cho, Shu-Ting; Haryono, Mindia; Kuo, Chih-Horng

    2017-01-01

    Common bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.) belongs to the subfamily Chloridoideae of the Poaceae family, one of the most important plant families ecologically and economically. This grass has a long connection with human culture but its systematics is relatively understudied. In this study, we sequenced and investigated the chloroplast genome of common bermudagrass, which is 134,297 bp in length with two single copy regions (LSC: 79,732 bp; SSC: 12,521 bp) and a pair of inverted repeat (IR) regions (21,022 bp). The annotation contains a total of 128 predicted genes, including 82 protein-coding, 38 tRNA, and 8 rRNA genes. Additionally, our in silico analyses identified 10 sets of repeats longer than 20 bp and predicted the presence of 36 RNA editing sites. Overall, the chloroplast genome of common bermudagrass resembles those from other Poaceae lineages. Compared to most angiosperms, the accD gene and the introns of both clpP and rpoC1 genes are missing. Additionally, the ycf1, ycf2, ycf15, and ycf68 genes are pseudogenized and two genome rearrangements exist. Our phylogenetic analysis based on 47 chloroplast protein-coding genes supported the placement of common bermudagrass within Chloridoideae. Our phylogenetic character mapping based on the parsimony principle further indicated that the loss of the accD gene and clpP introns, the pseudogenization of four ycf genes, and the two rearrangements occurred only once after the most recent common ancestor of the Poaceae diverged from other monocots, which could explain the unusual long branch leading to the Poaceae when phylogeny is inferred based on chloroplast sequences.

  13. Comparing treatment outcomes of different chemotherapy sequences during intensity modulated radiotherapy for advanced N-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Xueming; Zeng, Lei; Chen, Chunyan; Huang, Ying; Han, Fei; Xiao, Weiwei; Liu, Shuai; Lu, Taixiang

    2013-01-01

    N-stage is related to distant metastasis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. We performed this study to compare the efficacy of different chemotherapy sequences in advanced N-stage (N2 and N3) NPC patients treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). From 2001 to 2008, 198 advanced N-stage NPC patients were retrospectively analyzed. Thirty-three patients received IMRT alone. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) was delivered to 72 patients, neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) + CCRT to 82 patients and CCRT + adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) to 11 patients. The 5-year overall survival rate, recurrence-free survival rate, distant metastasis-free survival rate and progress-free survival rate were 47.7% and 73.1%(p<0.001), 74.5% and 91.3% (p = 0.004), 49.2% and 68.5% (p = 0.018), 37.5% and 63.8% (p<0.001) in IMRT alone and chemoradiotherapy group. Subgroup analyses indicated that there were no significant differences among the survival curves of CCRT, NACT + CCRT and CCRT + AC groups. The survival benefit mainly came from CCRT. However, there was only an improvement attendency in distant metastasis-free survival rate of CCRT group (p = 0.107) when compared with RT alone group, and NACT + CCRT could significantly improve distant metastasis-free survival (p = 0.017). For advanced N-stage NPC patients, NACT + CCRT might be a reasonable treatment strategy

  14. An update on the mouse liver proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borlak Jürgen

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Decoding of the liver proteome is subject of intense research, but hampered by methodological constraints. We recently developed an improved protocol for studying rat liver proteins based on 2-DE-MALDI-TOF-MS peptide mass finger printing. This methodology was now applied to develop a mouse liver protein database. Results Liver proteins were extracted by two different lysis buffers in sequence followed by a liquid-phase IEF pre-fractionation and separation of proteins by 2 DE at two different pH ranges, notably 5-8 and 7-10. Based on 9600 in gel digests a total of 643 mouse liver proteins with high sequence coverage (> 20 peptides per protein could be identified by MALDI-TOF-MS peptide mass finger printing. Notably, 255 proteins are novel and have not been reported so far by conventional two-dimensional electrophoresis proteome mapping. Additionally, the results of the present findings for mouse liver were compared to published data of the rat proteome to compile as many proteins as possible in a rodent liver database. Conclusion Based on 2-DE MALDI-TOF-MS a significantly improved proteome map of mouse liver was obtained. We discuss some prominent members of newly identified proteins for a better understanding of liver biology.

  15. Performance of single and multi-atlas based automated landmarking methods compared to expert annotations in volumetric microCT datasets of mouse mandibles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ryan; Maga, A Murat

    2015-01-01

    Here we present an application of advanced registration and atlas building framework DRAMMS to the automated annotation of mouse mandibles through a series of tests using single and multi-atlas segmentation paradigms and compare the outcomes to the current gold standard, manual annotation. Our results showed multi-atlas annotation procedure yields landmark precisions within the human observer error range. The mean shape estimates from gold standard and multi-atlas annotation procedure were statistically indistinguishable for both Euclidean Distance Matrix Analysis (mean form matrix) and Generalized Procrustes Analysis (Goodall F-test). Further research needs to be done to validate the consistency of variance-covariance matrix estimates from both methods with larger sample sizes. Multi-atlas annotation procedure shows promise as a framework to facilitate truly high-throughput phenomic analyses by channeling investigators efforts to annotate only a small portion of their datasets.

  16. Allergic Responses Induced by a Fungal Biopesticide Metarhizium anisopliae and House Dust Mite are Compared in a Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biopesticides can be effective in controlling their target pest. However, research regarding mammalian health impacts of these agents has focused on toxicity and pathogenicity, with limited research regarding allergenicity and asthma development. We compared the ability of funga...

  17. Low-field MR imaging of the spine. A comparative study of a traditional and a new, completely balanced gradient-echo sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drejer, J.; Thomsen, H.S.; Tanttu, J.

    1995-01-01

    49 patients underwent 53 examinations with both a traditional T1-weighted gradient-echo (PS) sequence and a new completely balanced steady-state 3-D (CBASS3D) sequence; 20 examinations included the cervical spine, 8 the thoracic spine and 25 the lumbar spine. All 106 examinations were reviewed twice regarding visibility of selected structures in the spinal region and diagnostic usefulness. The CBASS3D sequence delineated the medulla, nerve roots, CSF, the intervertebral discs and the posterior longitudinal ligament significantly better than the PS sequence. Disc hernia was also better visualised (p<0.01). There were significantly more artefacts on images obtained with the CBASS3D sequence, but they were usually outside the region of interest and occurred less frequently over time due to increased experience of the staff. Both reviewers found the diagnostic usefulness of CBASS3D to be superior compared to that of PS and excellent for diagnostic purposes. (orig./MG)

  18. Low-field MR imaging of the spine. A comparative study of a traditional and a new, completely balanced gradient-echo sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drejer, J. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Herlev Hospital, Univ. Copenhagen (Denmark); Thomsen, H.S. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Herlev Hospital, Univ. Copenhagen (Denmark); Tanttu, J. [Picker Nordstar, Helsinki (Finland)

    1995-09-01

    49 patients underwent 53 examinations with both a traditional T1-weighted gradient-echo (PS) sequence and a new completely balanced steady-state 3-D (CBASS3D) sequence; 20 examinations included the cervical spine, 8 the thoracic spine and 25 the lumbar spine. All 106 examinations were reviewed twice regarding visibility of selected structures in the spinal region and diagnostic usefulness. The CBASS3D sequence delineated the medulla, nerve roots, CSF, the intervertebral discs and the posterior longitudinal ligament significantly better than the PS sequence. Disc hernia was also better visualised (p<0.01). There were significantly more artefacts on images obtained with the CBASS3D sequence, but they were usually outside the region of interest and occurred less frequently over time due to increased experience of the staff. Both reviewers found the diagnostic usefulness of CBASS3D to be superior compared to that of PS and excellent for diagnostic purposes. (orig./MG).

  19. A comparative, BAC end sequence enabled map of the genome of the American mink (Neovison vison)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benkel, Bernhard F.; Smith, Amanda; Christensen, Knud

    2012-01-01

    In this report we present the results of the analysis of approximately 2.7 Mb of genomic information for the American mink (Neovison vison) derived through BAC end sequencing. Our study, which encompasses approximately 1/1000th of the mink genome, suggests that simple sequence repeats (SSRs...

  20. A comparative study of sequence- and structure-based features of small RNAs and other RNAs of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Amita; Das, Santasabuj

    2018-01-02

    Small RNAs (sRNAs) in bacteria have emerged as key players in transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Here, we present a statistical analysis of different sequence- and structure-related features of bacterial sRNAs to identify the descriptors that could discriminate sRNAs from other bacterial RNAs. We investigated a comprehensive and heterogeneous collection of 816 sRNAs, identified by northern blotting across 33 bacterial species and compared their various features with other classes of bacterial RNAs, such as tRNAs, rRNAs and mRNAs. We observed that sRNAs differed significantly from the rest with respect to G+C composition, normalized minimum free energy of folding, motif frequency and several RNA-folding parameters like base-pairing propensity, Shannon entropy and base-pair distance. Based on the selected features, we developed a predictive model using Random Forests (RF) method to classify the above four classes of RNAs. Our model displayed an overall predictive accuracy of 89.5%. These findings would help to differentiate bacterial sRNAs from other RNAs and further promote prediction of novel sRNAs in different bacterial species.

  1. A comparative study of cold- and warm-adapted Endonucleases A using sequence analyses and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Michetti

    Full Text Available The psychrophilic and mesophilic endonucleases A (EndA from Aliivibrio salmonicida (VsEndA and Vibrio cholera (VcEndA have been studied experimentally in terms of the biophysical properties related to thermal adaptation. The analyses of their static X-ray structures was no sufficient to rationalize the determinants of their adaptive traits at the molecular level. Thus, we used Molecular Dynamics (MD simulations to compare the two proteins and unveil their structural and dynamical differences. Our simulations did not show a substantial increase in flexibility in the cold-adapted variant on the nanosecond time scale. The only exception is a more rigid C-terminal region in VcEndA, which is ascribable to a cluster of electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonds, as also supported by MD simulations of the VsEndA mutant variant where the cluster of interactions was introduced. Moreover, we identified three additional amino acidic substitutions through multiple sequence alignment and the analyses of MD-based protein structure networks. In particular, T120V occurs in the proximity of the catalytic residue H80 and alters the interaction with the residue Y43, which belongs to the second coordination sphere of the Mg2+ ion. This makes T120V an amenable candidate for future experimental mutagenesis.

  2. Comparative analyses of six solanaceous transcriptomes reveal a high degree of sequence conservation and species-specific transcripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouyang Shu

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Solanaceae is a family of closely related species with diverse phenotypes that have been exploited for agronomic purposes. Previous studies involving a small number of genes suggested sequence conservation across the Solanaceae. The availability of large collections of Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs for the Solanaceae now provides the opportunity to assess sequence conservation and divergence on a genomic scale. Results All available ESTs and Expressed Transcripts (ETs, 449,224 sequences for six Solanaceae species (potato, tomato, pepper, petunia, tobacco and Nicotiana benthamiana, were clustered and assembled into gene indices. Examination of gene ontologies revealed that the transcripts within the gene indices encode a similar suite of biological processes. Although the ESTs and ETs were derived from a variety of tissues, 55–81% of the sequences had significant similarity at the nucleotide level with sequences among the six species. Putative orthologs could be identified for 28–58% of the sequences. This high degree of sequence conservation was supported by expression profiling using heterologous hybridizations to potato cDNA arrays that showed similar expression patterns in mature leaves for all six solanaceous species. 16–19% of the transcripts within the six Solanaceae gene indices did not have matches among Solanaceae, Arabidopsis, rice or 21 other plant gene indices. Conclusion Results from this genome scale analysis confirmed a high level of sequence conservation at the nucleotide level of the coding sequence among Solanaceae. Additionally, the results indicated that part of the Solanaceae transcriptome is likely to be unique for each species.

  3. Structural modifications in the arterial wall during physiological aging and as a result of diabetes mellitus in a mouse model: are the changes comparable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prévost, G; Bulckaen, H; Gaxatte, C; Boulanger, E; Béraud, G; Creusy, C; Puisieux, F; Fontaine, P

    2011-04-01

    Vascular accelerated aging represents the major cause of morbidity and mortality in subjects with diabetes mellitus. In the present study, our aim was to compare premature functional and morphological changes in the arterial wall resulting from streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes mellitus in mice over a short-term period with those that develop during physiological aging. The effect of aminoguanidine (AG) on the prevention of these alterations in the diabetic group was also analyzed. The vascular relaxation response to acetylcholine (ACh) in the mouse was tested in isolated segments of phenylephrine (Phe)-precontracted aorta at 2, 4 and 8 weeks (wk) of STZ-induced diabetes and compare to 12- and 84-wk-old mice. Aortic structural changes were investigated, and receptor for AGE (RAGE) aortic expression was quantified by western blot. Compared to the 12-wk control group (76 ± 5%), significant endothelium-dependant relaxation (EDR) impairment was found in the group of 12-wk-old mice, which underwent a 4-wk diabetes-inducing STZ treatment (12wk-4WD) (52 ± 4%; P aging preventive effect on the structural changes of the arterial wall. Our study compared EDR linked to physiological aging with that observed in the case of STZ-induced diabetes over a short-term period, and demonstrated the beneficial effect of AG. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparative analysis of the intracerebral mouse protection test and serological method for potency assays of pertussis component in DTP vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Cristina Souza Matos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the PSPT standardized in-house as an alternative to MPT for potency assays of pertussis component. Statistical analyses have showed similar pertussis potency values when PSPT was compared to MPT. Significant correlation between the potency results obtained by in vivo and in vitro assays was also been observed. Results by PSPT have demonstrated reproducibility and accuracy for potency pertussis control and this approach has been considered promising for use at least during the steps of production.

  5. Comparative analysis of response to selection with three insecticides in the dengue mosquito Aedes aegypti using mRNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Jean-Philippe; Faucon, Frédéric; Chandor-Proust, Alexia; Poupardin, Rodolphe; Riaz, Muhammad Asam; Bonin, Aurélie; Navratil, Vincent; Reynaud, Stéphane

    2014-03-05

    Mosquito control programmes using chemical insecticides are increasingly threatened by the development of resistance. Such resistance can be the consequence of changes in proteins targeted by insecticides (target site mediated resistance), increased insecticide biodegradation (metabolic resistance), altered transport, sequestration or other mechanisms. As opposed to target site resistance, other mechanisms are far from being fully understood. Indeed, insecticide selection often affects a large number of genes and various biological processes can hypothetically confer resistance. In this context, the aim of the present study was to use RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) for comparing transcription level and polymorphism variations associated with adaptation to chemical insecticides in the mosquito Aedes aegypti. Biological materials consisted of a parental susceptible strain together with three child strains selected across multiple generations with three insecticides from different classes: the pyrethroid permethrin, the neonicotinoid imidacloprid and the carbamate propoxur. After ten generations, insecticide-selected strains showed elevated resistance levels to the insecticides used for selection. RNA-seq data allowed detecting over 13,000 transcripts, of which 413 were differentially transcribed in insecticide-selected strains as compared to the susceptible strain. Among them, a significant enrichment of transcripts encoding cuticle proteins, transporters and enzymes was observed. Polymorphism analysis revealed over 2500 SNPs showing > 50% allele frequency variations in insecticide-selected strains as compared to the susceptible strain, affecting over 1000 transcripts. Comparing gene transcription and polymorphism patterns revealed marked differences among strains. While imidacloprid selection was linked to the over transcription of many genes, permethrin selection was rather linked to polymorphism variations. Focusing on detoxification enzymes revealed that permethrin

  6. An Alignment-Free Algorithm in Comparing the Similarity of Protein Sequences Based on Pseudo-Markov Transition Probabilities among Amino Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yushuang; Song, Tian; Yang, Jiasheng; Zhang, Yi; Yang, Jialiang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we have proposed a novel alignment-free method for comparing the similarity of protein sequences. We first encode a protein sequence into a 440 dimensional feature vector consisting of a 400 dimensional Pseudo-Markov transition probability vector among the 20 amino acids, a 20 dimensional content ratio vector, and a 20 dimensional position ratio vector of the amino acids in the sequence. By evaluating the Euclidean distances among the representing vectors, we compare the similarity of protein sequences. We then apply this method into the ND5 dataset consisting of the ND5 protein sequences of 9 species, and the F10 and G11 datasets representing two of the xylanases containing glycoside hydrolase families, i.e., families 10 and 11. As a result, our method achieves a correlation coefficient of 0.962 with the canonical protein sequence aligner ClustalW in the ND5 dataset, much higher than those of other 5 popular alignment-free methods. In addition, we successfully separate the xylanases sequences in the F10 family and the G11 family and illustrate that the F10 family is more heat stable than the G11 family, consistent with a few previous studies. Moreover, we prove mathematically an identity equation involving the Pseudo-Markov transition probability vector and the amino acids content ratio vector.

  7. Sequence-based prediction of protein-binding sites in DNA: comparative study of two SVM models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byungkyu; Im, Jinyong; Tuvshinjargal, Narankhuu; Lee, Wook; Han, Kyungsook

    2014-11-01

    As many structures of protein-DNA complexes have been known in the past years, several computational methods have been developed to predict DNA-binding sites in proteins. However, its inverse problem (i.e., predicting protein-binding sites in DNA) has received much less attention. One of the reasons is that the differences between the interaction propensities of nucleotides are much smaller than those between amino acids. Another reason is that DNA exhibits less diverse sequence patterns than protein. Therefore, predicting protein-binding DNA nucleotides is much harder than predicting DNA-binding amino acids. We computed the interaction propensity (IP) of nucleotide triplets with amino acids using an extensive dataset of protein-DNA complexes, and developed two support vector machine (SVM) models that predict protein-binding nucleotides from sequence data alone. One SVM model predicts protein-binding nucleotides using DNA sequence data alone, and the other SVM model predicts protein-binding nucleotides using both DNA and protein sequences. In a 10-fold cross-validation with 1519 DNA sequences, the SVM model that uses DNA sequence data only predicted protein-binding nucleotides with an accuracy of 67.0%, an F-measure of 67.1%, and a Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.340. With an independent dataset of 181 DNAs that were not used in training, it achieved an accuracy of 66.2%, an F-measure 66.3% and a MCC of 0.324. Another SVM model that uses both DNA and protein sequences achieved an accuracy of 69.6%, an F-measure of 69.6%, and a MCC of 0.383 in a 10-fold cross-validation with 1519 DNA sequences and 859 protein sequences. With an independent dataset of 181 DNAs and 143 proteins, it showed an accuracy of 67.3%, an F-measure of 66.5% and a MCC of 0.329. Both in cross-validation and independent testing, the second SVM model that used both DNA and protein sequence data showed better performance than the first model that used DNA sequence data. To the best of

  8. A Comparative Analysis of Perinatal Development of Barrel Cortex in Rat, Mouse and Guinea Pig Using Acetylcholinesterase Histochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    ŞENDEMİR, Erdoğan

    2014-01-01

    The role of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the developing neocortex was reexamined by comparing its expression in rats, mice and guinea pigs, following the protocol for acetylcholinesterase histochemistry (described in Sendemir et al., 1996) in order to determine the suitability of the breeding colony at UludaÛ University for use as an animal model. A total of 103 pups as well as two adult animals of each species were used. In the rat pups, acetylcholinesterase-rich patches were d...

  9. Is there an added value of T1-weighted contrast-enhanced fat-suppressed spin-echo MR sequences compared to STIR sequences in MRI of the foot and ankle?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubler, Veronika; Zanetti, Marco; Dietrich, Tobias J.; Pfirrmann, Christian W.; Mamisch-Saupe, Nadja; Espinosa, Norman

    2017-01-01

    To prospectively compare T1-weighted fat-suppressed spin-echo magnetic resonance (MR) sequences after gadolinium application (T1wGdFS) to STIR sequences in patients with acute and chronic foot pain. In 51 patients referred for MRI of the foot and ankle, additional transverse and sagittal T1wGdFS sequences were obtained. Two sets of MR images (standard protocol with STIR or T1wGdFS) were analysed. Diagnosis, diagnostic confidence, and localization of the abnormality were noted. Standard of reference was established by an expert panel of two experienced MSK radiologists and one experienced foot surgeon based on MR images, clinical charts and surgical reports. Patients reported prospectively localization of pain. Descriptive statistics, McNemar test and Kappa test were used. Diagnostic accuracy with STIR protocol was 80% for reader 1, 67% for reader 2, with contrast-protocol 84%, both readers. Significance was found for reader 2. Diagnostic confidence for reader 1 was 1.7 with STIR, 1.3 with contrast-protocol; reader 2: 2.1/1.7. Significance was found for reader 1. Pain location correlated with STIR sequences in 64% and 52%, with gadolinium sequences in 70% and 71%. T1-weighted contrast material-enhanced fat-suppressed spin-echo magnetic resonance sequences improve diagnostic accuracy, diagnostic confidence and correlation of MR abnormalities with pain location in MRI of the foot and ankle. However, the additional value is small. (orig.)

  10. Is there an added value of T1-weighted contrast-enhanced fat-suppressed spin-echo MR sequences compared to STIR sequences in MRI of the foot and ankle?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubler, Veronika; Zanetti, Marco; Dietrich, Tobias J.; Pfirrmann, Christian W.; Mamisch-Saupe, Nadja [University of Zurich, Faculty of Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Orthopedic University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Espinosa, Norman [University of Zurich, Faculty of Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Orthopedic University Hospital Balgrist, Orthopedic Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2017-08-15

    To prospectively compare T1-weighted fat-suppressed spin-echo magnetic resonance (MR) sequences after gadolinium application (T1wGdFS) to STIR sequences in patients with acute and chronic foot pain. In 51 patients referred for MRI of the foot and ankle, additional transverse and sagittal T1wGdFS sequences were obtained. Two sets of MR images (standard protocol with STIR or T1wGdFS) were analysed. Diagnosis, diagnostic confidence, and localization of the abnormality were noted. Standard of reference was established by an expert panel of two experienced MSK radiologists and one experienced foot surgeon based on MR images, clinical charts and surgical reports. Patients reported prospectively localization of pain. Descriptive statistics, McNemar test and Kappa test were used. Diagnostic accuracy with STIR protocol was 80% for reader 1, 67% for reader 2, with contrast-protocol 84%, both readers. Significance was found for reader 2. Diagnostic confidence for reader 1 was 1.7 with STIR, 1.3 with contrast-protocol; reader 2: 2.1/1.7. Significance was found for reader 1. Pain location correlated with STIR sequences in 64% and 52%, with gadolinium sequences in 70% and 71%. T1-weighted contrast material-enhanced fat-suppressed spin-echo magnetic resonance sequences improve diagnostic accuracy, diagnostic confidence and correlation of MR abnormalities with pain location in MRI of the foot and ankle. However, the additional value is small. (orig.)

  11. Insights into bacterioplankton community structure from Sundarbans mangrove ecoregion using Sanger and Illumina MiSeq sequencing approaches: A comparative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwesha Ghosh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing using platforms such as Illumina MiSeq provides a deeper insight into the structure and function of bacterioplankton communities in coastal ecosystems compared to traditional molecular techniques such as clone library approach which incorporates Sanger sequencing. In this study, structure of bacterioplankton communities was investigated from two stations of Sundarbans mangrove ecoregion using both Sanger and Illumina MiSeq sequencing approaches. The Illumina MiSeq data is available under the BioProject ID PRJNA35180 and Sanger sequencing data under accession numbers KX014101-KX014140 (Stn1 and KX014372-KX014410 (Stn3. Proteobacteria-, Firmicutes- and Bacteroidetes-like sequences retrieved from both approaches appeared to be abundant in the studied ecosystem. The Illumina MiSeq data (2.1 GB provided a deeper insight into the structure of bacterioplankton communities and revealed the presence of bacterial phyla such as Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Tenericutes, Verrucomicrobia which were not recovered based on Sanger sequencing. A comparative analysis of bacterioplankton communities from both stations highlighted the presence of genera that appear in both stations and genera that occur exclusively in either station. However, both the Sanger sequencing and Illumina MiSeq data were coherent at broader taxonomic levels. Pseudomonas, Devosia, Hyphomonas and Erythrobacter-like sequences were the abundant bacterial genera found in the studied ecosystem. Both the sequencing methods showed broad coherence although as expected the Illumina MiSeq data helped identify rarer bacterioplankton groups and also showed the presence of unassigned OTUs indicating possible presence of novel bacterioplankton from the studied mangrove ecosystem.

  12. ER stress responses in the absence of apoptosome: a comparative study in CASP9 proficient vs deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Shane; Saveljeva, Svetlana; Gupta, Sanjeev; MacDonald, David C; Samali, Afshin

    2014-08-29

    Cells respond to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress through the unfolded protein response (UPR), autophagy and cell death. In this study we utilized casp9(+/+) and casp9(-/-) MEFs to determine the effect of inhibition of mitochondrial apoptosis pathway on ER stress-induced-cell death, UPR and autophagy. We observed prolonged activation of UPR and autophagy in casp9(-/-) cells as compared with casp9(+/+) MEFs, which displayed transient activation of both pathways. Furthermore we showed that while casp9(-/-) MEFs were resistant to ER stress, prolonged exposure led to the activation of a non-canonical, caspase-mediated mode of cell death. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. De novo transcriptome sequencing and comparative analysis to discover genes involved in ovarian maturity in Strongylocentrotus nudus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhiying; Wang, Qiai; Wu, Kaikai; Wei, Zhenlin; Zhou, Zunchun; Liu, Xiaolin

    2017-09-01

    Strongylocentrotus nudus is an edible sea urchin, mainly harvested in China. Correlation studies indicated that S. nudus with larger diameter have a prolonged marketing time and better palatability owing to their precocious gonads and extended maturation process. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon is still unknown. Here, transcriptome sequencing was applied to study the ovaries of adult S. nudus with different shell diameters to explore the possible mechanism. In this study, four independent cDNA libraries were constructed, including two from the big size urchins and two from the small ones using a HiSeq™2500 platform. A total of 88,581 unigenes were acquired with a mean length of 1354bp, of which 66,331 (74.88%) unigenes could be annotated using six major publicly available databases. Comparative analysis revealed that 353 unigenes were differentially expressed (with log2(ratio)≥1, FDR≤0.001) between the two groups. Of these, 20 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were selected to confirm the accuracy of RNA-seq data by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Furthermore, gene ontology and KEGG pathway enrichment analyses were performed to find the putative genes and pathways related to ovarian maturity. Eight unigenes were identified as significant DEGs involved in reproduction related pathways; these included Mos, Cdc20, Rec8, YP30, cytochrome P450 2U1, ovoperoxidase, proteoliaisin, and rendezvin. Our research fills the gap in the studies on the S. nudus ovaries using transcriptome analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Allergic Responses Induced by a Fungal Biopesticide Metarhizium anisopliae and House Dust Mite Are Compared in a Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsha D. W. Ward

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biopesticides can be effective in controlling their target pest. However, research regarding allergenicity and asthma development is limited. We compared the ability of fungal biopesticide Metarhizium anisopliae (MACA and house dust mite (HDM extracts to induce allergic responses in BALB/c mice. The extracts were administered by intratracheal aspiration at doubling doses (2.5–80 g protein 4X over a four-week period. Three days after the last exposure, serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF were collected. The extracts' relative allergenicity was evaluated based on response robustness (lowest significant dose response compared to control (0 g. MACA induced a more robust serum total IgE response than HDM. However, in the antigen-specific IgE assay, a similar dose of both MACA and HDM was required to achieve the same response level. Our data suggest a threshold dose of MACA for allergy induction and that M. anisopliae may be similar to HDM in allergy induction potential.

  15. A comparative evaluation of a novel vaccine in APP/PS1 mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Iván; Etcheverría, Ignacio; Fernández-Novoa, Lucía; Lombardi, Valter Ruggero Maria; Lakshmana, Madepalli Krishnappa; Cacabelos, Ramón; Vigo, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Immunization against amyloid-beta-peptide (Aβ) has been widely investigated as a potential immunotherapeutic approach for Alzheimer's disease (AD). With the aim of developing an active immunogenic vaccine without need of coadjuvant modification for human trials and therefore avoiding such side effects, we designed the Aβ 1-42 vaccine (EB101), delivered in a liposomal matrix, that based on our previous studies significantly prevents and reverses the AD neuropathology, clearing Aβ plaques while markedly reducing neuronal degeneration, behavioral deficits, and minimizing neuroinflammation in APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Here, the efficacy of our immunogenic vaccine EB101 was compared with the original immunization vaccine cocktail Aβ 42 + CFA/IFA (Freund's adjuvant), in order to characterize the effect of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in the immunotherapeutic response. Quantitative analysis of amyloid burden showed a notable decrease in the neuroinflammation reaction against Aβ plaques when S1P was compared with other treatments, suggesting that S1P plays a key role as a neuroprotective agent. Moreover, EB101 immunized mice presented a protective immunogenic reaction resulting in the increase of Aβ-specific antibody response and decrease of reactive glia in the affected brain areas, leading to a Th2 immunological reaction.

  16. SOLiD sequencing of four Vibrio vulnificus genomes enables comparative genomic analysis and identification of candidate clade-specific virulence genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telonis-Scott Marina

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vibrio vulnificus is the leading cause of reported death from consumption of seafood in the United States. Despite several decades of research on molecular pathogenesis, much remains to be learned about the mechanisms of virulence of this opportunistic bacterial pathogen. The two complete and annotated genomic DNA sequences of V. vulnificus belong to strains of clade 2, which is the predominant clade among clinical strains. Clade 2 strains generally possess higher virulence potential in animal models of disease compared with clade 1, which predominates among environmental strains. SOLiD sequencing of four V. vulnificus strains representing different clades (1 and 2 and biotypes (1 and 2 was used for comparative genomic analysis. Results Greater than 4,100,000 bases were sequenced of each strain, yielding approximately 100-fold coverage for each of the four genomes. Although the read lengths of SOLiD genomic sequencing were only 35 nt, we were able to make significant conclusions about the unique and shared sequences among the genomes, including identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Comparative analysis of the newly sequenced genomes to the existing reference genomes enabled the identification of 3,459 core V. vulnificus genes shared among all six strains and 80 clade 2-specific genes. We identified 523,161 SNPs among the six genomes. Conclusions We were able to glean much information about the genomic content of each strain using next generation sequencing. Flp pili, GGDEF proteins, and genomic island XII were identified as possible virulence factors because of their presence in virulent sequenced strains. Genomic comparisons also point toward the involvement of sialic acid catabolism in pathogenesis.

  17. Complete chloroplast genome sequences of Hordeum vulgare, Sorghum bicolor and Agrostis stolonifera, and comparative analyses with other grass genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saski, Christopher; Lee, Seung-Bum; Fjellheim, Siri; Guda, Chittibabu; Jansen, Robert K.; Luo, Hong; Tomkins, Jeffrey; Rognli, Odd Arne; Clarke, Jihong Liu

    2009-01-01

    Comparisons of complete chloroplast genome sequences of Hordeum vulgare, Sorghum bicolor and Agrostis stolonifera to six published grass chloroplast genomes reveal that gene content and order are similar but two microstructural changes have occurred. First, the expansion of the IR at the SSC/IRa boundary that duplicates a portion of the 5′ end of ndhH is restricted to the three genera of the subfamily Pooideae (Agrostis, Hordeum and Triticum). Second, a 6 bp deletion in ndhK is shared by Agrostis, Hordeum, Oryza and Triticum, and this event supports the sister relationship between the subfamilies Erhartoideae and Pooideae. Repeat analysis identified 19–37 direct and inverted repeats 30 bp or longer with a sequence identity of at least 90%. Seventeen of the 26 shared repeats are found in all the grass chloroplast genomes examined and are located in the same genes or intergenic spacer (IGS) regions. Examination of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) identified 16–21 potential polymorphic SSRs. Five IGS regions have 100% sequence identity among Zea mays, Saccharum officinarum and Sorghum bicolor, whereas no spacer regions were identical among Oryza sativa, Triticum aestivum, H. vulgare and A. stolonifera despite their close phylogenetic relationship. Alignment of EST sequences and DNA coding sequences identified six C–U conversions in both Sorghum bicolor and H. vulgare but only one in A. stolonifera. Phylogenetic trees based on DNA sequences of 61 protein-coding genes of 38 taxa using both maximum parsimony and likelihood methods provide moderate support for a sister relationship between the subfamilies Erhartoideae and Pooideae. PMID:17534593

  18. Development and characterization of multiplex panels of microsatellite markers for Syphacia obvelata, a parasite of the house mouse (Mus musculus), using a high throughput DNA sequencing approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wasimuddin, Wasimuddin; Čížková, Dagmar; Ribas, Alexis; Piálek, Jaroslav; Goüy de Bellocq, Joëlle; Bryja, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 185, č. 2 (2012), s. 154-156 ISSN 0166-6851 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/08/0640; GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Microsatellites * Next-generation sequencing * Nematoda * Population genetics Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 2.734, year: 2012

  19. Whole-exome sequencing gives additional benefits compared to candidate gene sequencing in the molecular diagnosis of children with growth hormone or IGF-1 insensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Lucy; Chatterjee, Sumana; Ramadan, Dina G; Davies, Kate M; Savage, Martin O; Metherell, Louise A; Storr, Helen L

    2017-12-01

    GH insensitivity (GHI) is characterised by short stature, IGF-1 deficiency and normal/elevated serum GH. IGF-1 insensitivity results in pre- and post-natal growth failure with normal/high IGF-1 levels. The prevalence of genetic defects is unknown. To identify the underlying genetic diagnoses in a paediatric cohort with GH or IGF-1 insensitivity using candidate gene (CGS) and whole-exome sequencing (WES) and assess factors associated with the discovery of a genetic defect. We undertook a prospective study of 132 patients with short stature and suspected GH or IGF-1 insensitivity referred to our centre for genetic analysis. 107 (96 GHI, 88 probands; 11 IGF-1 insensitivity, 9 probands) underwent CGS. WES was performed in those with no defined genetic aetiology following CGS. A genetic diagnosis was discovered 38/107 (36%) patients (32% probands) by CGS. WES revealed 11 patients with genetic variants in genes known to cause short stature. A further 2 patients had hypomethylation in the H19/IGF2 region or mUPD7 consistent with Silver-Russell Syndrome (total with genetic diagnosis 51/107, 48% or 41/97, 42% probands). WES also identified homozygous putative variants in FANCA and PHKB in 2 patients. Low height SDS and consanguinity were highly predictive for identifying a genetic defect. Comprehensive genetic testing confirms the genetic heterogeneity of GH/IGF-1 insensitivity and successfully identified the genetic aetiology in a significant proportion of cases. WES is rapid and may isolate genetic variants that have been missed by traditional clinically driven genetic testing. This emphasises the benefits of specialist diagnostic centres. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  20. Characterization of Lgr6+ Cells as an Enriched Population of Hair Cell Progenitors Compared to Lgr5+ Cells for Hair Cell Generation in the Neonatal Mouse Cochlea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanping Zhang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Hair cell (HC loss is irreversible because only very limited HC regeneration has been observed in the adult mammalian cochlea. Wnt/β-catenin signaling regulates prosensory cell proliferation and differentiation during cochlear development, and Wnt activation promotes the proliferation of Lgr5+ cochlear HC progenitors in newborn mice. Similar to Lgr5, Lgr6 is also a Wnt downstream target gene. Lgr6 is reported to be present in adult stem cells in the skin, nail, tongue, lung, and mammary gland, and this protein is very important for adult stem cell maintenance in rapidly proliferating organs. Our previous studies showed that Lgr6+ cells are a subpopulation of Lgr5+ progenitor cells and that both Lgr6+ and Lgr5+ progenitors can generate Myosin7a+ HCs in vitro. Thus we hypothesized that Lgr6+ cells are an enriched population of cochlear progenitor cells. However, the detailed distinctions between the Lgr5+ and Lgr6+ progenitors are unclear. Here, we systematically compared the proliferation, HC differentiation, and detailed transcriptome expression profiles of these two progenitor populations. We found that the same number of isolated Lgr6+ progenitors generated significantly more Myosin7a+ HCs compared to Lgr5+ progenitors; however, Lgr5+ progenitors formed more epithelial colonies and more spheres than Lgr6+ progenitors in vitro. Using RNA-Seq, we compared the transcriptome differences between Lgr5+ and Lgr6+ progenitors and identified a list of significantly differential expressed genes that might regulate the proliferation and differentiation of these HC progenitors, including 4 cell cycle genes, 9 cell signaling pathway genes, and 54 transcription factors. In conclusion, we demonstrate that Lgr6+ progenitors are an enriched population of inner ear progenitors that generate more HCs compared to Lgr5+ progenitors in the newborn mouse cochlea, and the our research provides a series of genes that might regulate the proliferation of progenitors

  1. Molecular and phylogenetic characterizations of an Eimeria krijgsmanni Yakimoff & Gouseff, 1938 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) mouse intestinal protozoan parasite by partial 18S ribosomal RNA gene sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeo, Toshinori; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Matsubayashi, Makoto; Maeda, Hiroki; Kusakisako, Kodai; Matsui, Toshihiro; Mochizuki, Masami; Matsuo, Tomohide

    2014-08-01

    Previously, we characterized an undocumented strain of Eimeria krijgsmanni by morphological and biological features. Here, we present a detailed molecular phylogenetic analysis of this organism. Namely, 18S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) sequences of E. krijgsmanni were analyzed to incorporate this species into a comprehensive Eimeria phylogeny. As a result, partial 18S rDNA sequence from E. krijgsmanni was successfully determined, and two different types, Type A and Type B, that differed by 1 base pair were identified. E. krijgsmanni was originally isolated from a single oocyst, and thus the result show that the two types might have allelic sequence heterogeneity in the 18S rDNA. Based on phylogenetic analyses, the two types of E. krijgsmanni 18S rDNA formed one of two clades among murine Eimeria spp.; these Eimeria clades reflected morphological similarity among the Eimeria spp. This is the third molecular phylogenetic characterization of a murine Eimeria spp. in addition to E. falciformis and E. papillata. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cytoplasmic protein binding to highly conserved sequences in the 3' untranslated region of mouse protamine 2 mRNA, a translationally regulated transcript of male germ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Y.K.; Hecht, N.B.

    1991-01-01

    The expression of the protamines, the predominant nuclear proteins of mammalian spermatozoa, is regulated translationally during male germ-cell development. The 3' untranslated region (UTR) of protamine 1 mRNA has been reported to control its time of translation. To understand the mechanisms controlling translation of the protamine mRNAs, we have sought to identify cis elements of the 3' UTR of protamine 2 mRNA that are recognized by cytoplasmic factors. From gel retardation assays, two sequence elements are shown to form specific RNA-protein complexes. Protein binding sites of the two complexes were determined by RNase T1 mapping, by blocking the putative binding sites with antisense oligonucleotides, and by competition assays. The sequences of these elements, located between nucleotides + 537 and + 572 in protamine 2 mRNA, are highly conserved among postmeiotic translationally regulated nuclear proteins of the mammalian testis. Two closely linked protein binding sites were detected. UV-crosslinking studies revealed that a protein of about 18 kDa binds to one of the conserved sequences. These data demonstrate specific protein binding to a highly conserved 3' UTR of translationally regulated testicular mRNA

  3. Comparing an accelerated 3D fast spin-echo sequence (CS-SPACE) for knee 3-T magnetic resonance imaging with traditional 3D fast spin-echo (SPACE) and routine 2D sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altahawi, Faysal F.; Blount, Kevin J.; Omar, Imran M. [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Morley, Nicholas P. [Marshfield Clinic, Department of Radiology, Marshfield, WI (United States); Raithel, Esther [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    To compare a faster, new, high-resolution accelerated 3D-fast-spin-echo (3D-FSE) acquisition sequence (CS-SPACE) to traditional 2D and high-resolution 3D sequences for knee 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Twenty patients received knee MRIs that included routine 2D (T1, PD ± FS, T2-FS; 0.5 x 0.5 x 3 mm{sup 3}; ∝10 min), traditional 3D FSE (SPACE-PD-FS; 0.5 x 0.5 x 0.5 mm{sup 3}; ∝7.5 min), and accelerated 3D-FSE prototype (CS-SPACE-PD-FS; 0.5 x 0.5 x 0.5 mm{sup 3}; ∝5 min) acquisitions on a 3-T MRI system (Siemens MAGNETOM Skyra). Three musculoskeletal radiologists (MSKRs) prospectively and independently reviewed the studies with graded surveys comparing image and diagnostic quality. Tissue-specific signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were also compared. MSKR-perceived diagnostic quality of cartilage was significantly higher for CS-SPACE than for SPACE and 2D sequences (p < 0.001). Assessment of diagnostic quality of menisci and synovial fluid was higher for CS-SPACE than for SPACE (p < 0.001). CS-SPACE was not significantly different from SPACE but had lower assessments than 2D sequences for evaluation of bones, ligaments, muscles, and fat (p ≤ 0.004). 3D sequences had higher spatial resolution, but lower overall assessed contrast (p < 0.001). Overall image quality from CS-SPACE was assessed as higher than SPACE (p = 0.007), but lower than 2D sequences (p < 0.001). Compared to SPACE, CS-SPACE had higher fluid SNR and CNR against all other tissues (all p < 0.001). The CS-SPACE prototype allows for faster isotropic acquisitions of knee MRIs over currently used protocols. High fluid-to-cartilage CNR and higher spatial resolution over routine 2D sequences may present a valuable role for CS-SPACE in the evaluation of cartilage and menisci. (orig.)

  4. A comparative study of pseudorandom sequences used in a c-VEP based BCI for online wheelchair control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaksen, Jonas L.; Mohebbi, Ali; Puthusserypady, Sadasivan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a c-VEP based BCI system was developed to run on three distinctive pseudorandom sequences, namely the m-code, the Gold-code, and the Barker-code. The Visual Evoked Potentials (VEPs) were provoked using these codes. In the online session, subjects controlled a LEGO® Mindstorms® robot...

  5. A comparative study on the frequencies of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in the somatic and germ cells in mouse and monkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobels, F.H.

    1976-06-01

    Two systems were mainly used for studying the relationship between radiation induced chromosome aberration frequencies in somatic and germ cells. The first consists of reciprocal translocation induced in bone-marrow cells of mice compared to reciprocal translocation induced spermatogonia (scored in descending spermatocytes) of the same mice. Dose-response curves for induced aberrations in both cell types (0-100-200-300-400-500 and 600 R X-rays) and dose rate effects indicated that (130-1.92-0.0287 R/min) of a 400 R γ-ray exposure of the two cell types mitotically dividing germ cells respond to radiation similarly to mitotic dividing germ cells. Clonal proliferation or selective elimination of aberration-carrying cells, and other post-irradiation factors can, however, cause great differences in absolute aberration frequencies. A similar study was attempted, using the rhesus monkey as a second system. Its bone-marrow cells were proved unsuitable for induced reciprocal translocations. Stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes were studied instead. Following 100, 200 and 300 R of X-rays, the frequencies of induced dicentric chromosomes were compared to those of induced reciprocal translocations in spermatogonia. Human peripheral blood was studied similarly. It was concluded that: (a) The absolute frequencies of chromosome aberrations in somatic and germ cells of the rhesus monkey are low compared to most other mammalian species. (b) The ratio between dicentric frequencies and reciprocal translocation frequencies at 100 R and 200 R differed significantly from 4:1 reported for mouse and Chinese hamster and 2:1 for marmoset and man. (c) Although the numbers of 'effective chromosome arms' in man and rhesus monkey are similar (81 vs 83), the rhesus monkey showed at all doses a lower rate of induction of dicentrics in blood lymphocytes than man, reaching statistical significance at the 300 R level

  6. Comparative sequence analyses of the major quantitative trait locus phosphorus uptake 1 (Pup1) reveal a complex genetic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Sigrid; Lu, Xiaochun; Chin, Joong Hyoun; Tanaka, Juan Pariasca; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Takashi; De Leon, Teresa; Ulat, Victor Jun; Ismail, Abdelbagi M; Yano, Masahiro; Wissuwa, Matthias

    2009-06-01

    The phosphorus uptake 1 (Pup1) locus was identified as a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) for tolerance of phosphorus deficiency in rice. Near-isogenic lines with the Pup1 region from tolerant donor parent Kasalath typically show threefold higher phosphorus uptake and grain yield in phosphorus-deficient field trials than the intolerant parent Nipponbare. In this study, we report the fine mapping of the Pup1 locus to the long arm of chromosome 12 (15.31-15.47 Mb). Genes in the region were initially identified on the basis of the Nipponbare reference genome, but did not reveal any obvious candidate genes related to phosphorus uptake. Kasalath BAC clones were therefore sequenced and revealed a 278-kbp sequence significantly different from the syntenic regions in Nipponbare (145 kb) and in the indica reference genome of 93-11 (742 kbp). Size differences are caused by large insertions or deletions (INDELs), and an exceptionally large number of retrotransposon and transposon-related elements (TEs) present in all three sequences (45%-54%). About 46 kb of the Kasalath sequence did not align with the entire Nipponbare genome, and only three Nipponbare genes (fatty acid alpha-dioxygenase, dirigent protein and aspartic proteinase) are highly conserved in Kasalath. Two Nipponbare genes (expressed proteins) might have evolved by at least three TE integrations in an ancestor gene that is still present in Kasalath. Several predicted Kasalath genes are novel or unknown genes that are mainly located within INDEL regions. Our results highlight the importance of sequencing QTL regions in the respective donor parent, as important genes might not be present in the current reference genomes.

  7. Comparative costs of the Mouse Inoculation Test (MIT) and Virus Isolation in Cell Culture (VICC) for use in rabies diagnosis in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bones, Vanessa C; Gameiro, Augusto H; Castilho, Juliana G; Molento, Carla F M

    2015-05-01

    The decision to use laboratory animals rather than in vitro methods is frequently based on the financial costs involved, so the objective of our study was to compare the costs of performing the Mouse Inoculation Test (MIT) and Virus Isolation in Cell Culture (VICC) for use in rabies diagnosis in Brazil. Based on observations of laboratory routines at the Pasteur Institute, São Paulo, we listed the fixed cost (FC) and variable cost (VC) items necessary to perform both tests. Considering that 200 MITs are equivalent to 350 VICC assays, in terms of facilities and staff-hours needed per month, we calculated, for both tests, the average total cost per sample, the costs of the implementation of the laboratory structure, and the costs of routine use. With regard to absolute values, the total cost was mainly influenced by FC items, as they represented 60% of the cost for the MIT and 86% of the cost for VICC. A sample analysed by the MIT costs around 205% more than one analysed by using VICC. The MIT costs 74% and 406% more than VICC, when implementation costs and routine use per month, respectively, are taken into account. Our results can assist in the resolution of costing disputes that could hinder the replacement of animals for rabies diagnosis in Brazil. The method demonstrated here might also be useful for cost comparisons in other situations where animal use still continues when validated alternatives exist. 2015 FRAME.

  8. Comparative Neuroprotective Effects of Dietary Curcumin and Solid Lipid Curcumin Particles in Cultured Mouse Neuroblastoma Cells after Exposure to Aβ42

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panchanan Maiti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aggregation of amyloid beta protein (Aβ and phosphorylated tau (p-Tau plays critical roles in pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. As an antiamyloid natural polyphenol, curcumin (Cur has a potential role in prevention of neurodegeneration in AD. However, due to limited absorption of the dietary Cur, the solid lipid Cur particles (SLCP have been suggested as being more effective for AD therapy. In the present study, we compared the role of dietary Cur and SLCP on oxidative stress, neuronal death, p-Tau level, and certain cell survival markers in vitro, after exposure to Aβ42. Mouse neuroblastoma cells were exposed to Aβ42 for 24 h and incubated with or without dietary Cur and/or SLCP. Reactive oxygen species (ROS, apoptotic cell death, p-Tau, and tau kinase (including GSK-3β and cell survival markers, such as total Akt, phosphorylated Akt, and PSD95 levels were investigated. SLCP showed greater permeability than dietary Cur in vitro, decreased ROS production, and prevented apoptotic death. In addition, SLCP also inhibited p-Tau formation and significantly decreased GSK-3β levels. Further, the cell survival markers, such as total Akt, p-Akt, and PSD95 levels, were more effectively maintained by SLCP than dietary Cur in Aβ42 exposed cells. Therefore, SLCP may provide greater neuroprotection than dietary Cur in Alzheimer’s disease.

  9. Naked mole-rat has increased translational fidelity compared with the mouse, as well as a unique 28S ribosomal RNA cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azpurua, Jorge; Ke, Zhonghe; Chen, Iris X; Zhang, Quanwei; Ermolenko, Dmitri N; Zhang, Zhengdong D; Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei

    2013-10-22

    The naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber) is a subterranean eusocial rodent with a markedly long lifespan and resistance to tumorigenesis. Multiple data implicate modulation of protein translation in longevity. Here we report that 28S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) of the naked mole-rat is processed into two smaller fragments of unequal size. The two breakpoints are located in the 28S rRNA divergent region 6 and excise a fragment of 263 nt. The excised fragment is unique to the naked mole-rat rRNA and does not show homology to other genomic regions. Because this hidden break site could alter ribosome structure, we investigated whether translation rate and amino acid incorporation fidelity were altered. We report that naked mole-rat fibroblasts have significantly increased translational fidelity despite having comparable translation rates with mouse fibroblasts. Although we cannot directly test whether the unique 28S rRNA structure contributes to the increased fidelity of translation, we speculate that it may change the folding or dynamics of the large ribosomal subunit, altering the rate of GTP hydrolysis and/or interaction of the large subunit with tRNA during accommodation, thus affecting the fidelity of protein synthesis. In summary, our results show that naked mole-rat cells produce fewer aberrant proteins, supporting the hypothesis that the more stable proteome of the naked mole-rat contributes to its longevity.

  10. Encoding and recall of finger sequences in experienced pianists compared with musically naïve controls: a combined behavioral and functional imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pau, S; Jahn, G; Sakreida, K; Domin, M; Lotze, M

    2013-01-01

    Long-term intensive sensorimotor training alters functional representation of the motor and sensory system and might even result in structural changes. However, there is not much knowledge about how previous training impacts learning transfer and functional representation. We tested 14 amateur pianists and 15 musically naïve participants in a short-term finger sequence training procedure, differing considerably from piano playing and measured associated functional representation with functional magnetic resonance imaging. The conditions consisted of encoding a finger sequence indicated by hand symbols ("sequence encoding") and subsequently replaying the sequence from memory, both with and without auditory feedback ("sequence retrieval"). Piano players activated motor areas and the mirror neuron system more strongly than musically naïve participants during encoding. When retrieving the sequence, musically naïve participants showed higher activation in similar brain areas. Thus, retrieval activations of naïve participants were comparable to encoding activations of piano players, who during retrieval performed the sequences more accurately despite lower motor activations. Interestingly, both groups showed primary auditory activation even during sequence retrieval without auditory feedback, supporting previous reports about coactivation of the auditory cortex after learned association with motor performance. When playing with auditory feedback, only pianists lateralized to the left auditory cortex. During encoding activation in left primary somatosensory cortex in the height of the finger representations had a predictive value for increased motor performance later on (error rates). Contrarily, decreased performance was associated with increased visual cortex activation during encoding. Our study extends previous reports about training transfer of motor knowledge resulting in superior training effects in musicians. Performance increase went along with activity in

  11. Aberrant splicing in transgenes containing introns, exons, and V5 epitopes: lessons from developing an FSHD mouse model expressing a D4Z4 repeat with flanking genomic sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugénie Ansseau

    Full Text Available The DUX4 gene, encoded within D4Z4 repeats on human chromosome 4q35, has recently emerged as a key factor in the pathogenic mechanisms underlying Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD. This recognition prompted development of animal models expressing the DUX4 open reading frame (ORF alone or embedded within D4Z4 repeats. In the first published model, we used adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV and strong viral control elements (CMV promoter, SV40 poly A to demonstrate that the DUX4 cDNA caused dose-dependent toxicity in mouse muscles. As a follow-up, we designed a second generation of DUX4-expressing AAV vectors to more faithfully genocopy the FSHD-permissive D4Z4 repeat region located at 4q35. This new vector (called AAV.D4Z4.V5.pLAM contained the D4Z4/DUX4 promoter region, a V5 epitope-tagged DUX4 ORF, and the natural 3' untranslated region (pLAM harboring two small introns, DUX4 exons 2 and 3, and the non-canonical poly A signal required for stabilizing DUX4 mRNA in FSHD. AAV.D4Z4.V5.pLAM failed to recapitulate the robust pathology of our first generation vectors following delivery to mouse muscle. We found that the DUX4.V5 junction sequence created an unexpected splice donor in the pre-mRNA that was preferentially utilized to remove the V5 coding sequence and DUX4 stop codon, yielding non-functional DUX4 protein with 55 additional residues on its carboxyl-terminus. Importantly, we further found that aberrant splicing could occur in any expression construct containing a functional splice acceptor and sequences resembling minimal splice donors. Our findings represent an interesting case study with respect to AAV.D4Z4.V5.pLAM, but more broadly serve as a note of caution for designing constructs containing V5 epitope tags and/or transgenes with downstream introns and exons.

  12. Separation of the Components of a Commercial Analgesic Tablet: A Two-Week Sequence Comparing Purification by Two-Base Extraction and Column Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revell, Kevin D.

    2011-01-01

    A new laboratory experiment is described in which students compare two benchtop separation methods to isolate the three active components of the commercial analgesic Excedrin. In the two-week sequence, aspirin, acetaminophen, and caffeine are separated using either a two-base liquid-liquid extraction or silica column chromatography. Students then…

  13. Comparative sequence analysis of Solanum and Arabidopsis in a hot spot for pathogen resistance on potato chromosome V reveals a patchwork of conserved and rapidly evolving genome segments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruggmann Rémy

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative phenotypic variation of agronomic characters in crop plants is controlled by environmental and genetic factors (quantitative trait loci = QTL. To understand the molecular basis of such QTL, the identification of the underlying genes is of primary interest and DNA sequence analysis of the genomic regions harboring QTL is a prerequisite for that. QTL mapping in potato (Solanum tuberosum has identified a region on chromosome V tagged by DNA markers GP21 and GP179, which contains a number of important QTL, among others QTL for resistance to late blight caused by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans and to root cyst nematodes. Results To obtain genomic sequence for the targeted region on chromosome V, two local BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome contigs were constructed and sequenced, which corresponded to parts of the homologous chromosomes of the diploid, heterozygous genotype P6/210. Two contiguous sequences of 417,445 and 202,781 base pairs were assembled and annotated. Gene-by-gene co-linearity was disrupted by non-allelic insertions of retrotransposon elements, stretches of diverged intergenic sequences, differences in gene content and gene order. The latter was caused by inversion of a 70 kbp genomic fragment. These features were also found in comparison to orthologous sequence contigs from three homeologous chromosomes of Solanum demissum, a wild tuber bearing species. Functional annotation of the sequence identified 48 putative open reading frames (ORF in one contig and 22 in the other, with an average of one ORF every 9 kbp. Ten ORFs were classified as resistance-gene-like, 11 as F-box-containing genes, 13 as transposable elements and three as transcription factors. Comparing potato to Arabidopsis thaliana annotated proteins revealed five micro-syntenic blocks of three to seven ORFs with A. thaliana chromosomes 1, 3 and 5. Conclusion Comparative sequence analysis revealed highly conserved collinear regions

  14. Comparative Analysis of Osteogenic/Chondrogenic Differentiation Potential in Primary Limb Bud-Derived and C3H10T1/2 Cell Line-Based Mouse Micromass Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Róza Zákány

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Murine micromass models have been extensively applied to study chondrogenesis and osteogenesis to elucidate pathways of endochondral bone formation. Here we provide a detailed comparative analysis of the differentiation potential of micromass cultures established from either BMP-2 overexpressing C3H10T1/2 cells or mouse embryonic limb bud-derived chondroprogenitor cells, using micromass cultures from untransfected C3H10T1/2 cells as controls. Although the BMP-2 overexpressing C3H10T1/2 cells failed to form chondrogenic nodules, cells of both models expressed mRNA transcripts for major cartilage-specific marker genes including Sox9, Acan, Col2a1, Snorc, and Hapln1 at similar temporal sequence, while notable lubricin expression was only detected in primary cultures. Furthermore, mRNA transcripts for markers of osteogenic differentiation including Runx2, Osterix, alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin and osteocalcin were detected in both models, along with matrix calcification. Although the adipogenic lineage-specific marker gene FABP4 was also expressed in micromass cultures, Oil Red O-positive cells along with PPARγ2 transcripts were only detected in C3H10T1/2-derived micromass cultures. Apart from lineage-specific marker genes, pluripotency factors (Nanog and Sox2 were also expressed in these models, reflecting on the presence of various mesenchymal lineages as well as undifferentiated cells. This cellular heterogeneity has to be taken into consideration for the interpretation of data obtained by using these models.

  15. Comparison of methods for genomic localization of gene trap sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrin Thomas E

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene knockouts in a model organism such as mouse provide a valuable resource for the study of basic biology and human disease. Determining which gene has been inactivated by an untargeted gene trapping event poses a challenging annotation problem because gene trap sequence tags, which represent sequence near the vector insertion site of a trapped gene, are typically short and often contain unresolved residues. To understand better the localization of these sequences on the mouse genome, we compared stand-alone versions of the alignment programs BLAT, SSAHA, and MegaBLAST. A set of 3,369 sequence tags was aligned to build 34 of the mouse genome using default parameters for each algorithm. Known genome coordinates for the cognate set of full-length genes (1,659 sequences were used to evaluate localization results. Results In general, all three programs performed well in terms of localizing sequences to a general region of the genome, with only relatively subtle errors identified for a small proportion of the sequence tags. However, large differences in performance were noted with regard to correctly identifying exon boundaries. BLAT correctly identified the vast majority of exon boundaries, while SSAHA and MegaBLAST missed the majority of exon boundaries. SSAHA consistently reported the fewest false positives and is the fastest algorithm. MegaBLAST was comparable to BLAT in speed, but was the most susceptible to localizing sequence tags incorrectly to pseudogenes. Conclusion The differences in performance for sequence tags and full-length reference sequences were surprisingly small. Characteristic variations in localization results for each program were noted that affect the localization of sequence at exon boundaries, in particular.

  16. Comparative In silico Study of Sex-Determining Region Y (SRY) Protein Sequences Involved in Sex-Determining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakili Azghandi, Masoume; Nasiri, Mohammadreza; Shamsa, Ali; Jalali, Mohsen; Shariati, Mohammad Mahdi

    2016-04-01

    The SRY gene (SRY) provides instructions for making a transcription factor called the sex-determining region Y protein. The sex-determining region Y protein causes a fetus to develop as a male. In this study, SRY of 15 spices included of human, chimpanzee, dog, pig, rat, cattle, buffalo, goat, sheep, horse, zebra, frog, urial, dolphin and killer whale were used for determine of bioinformatic differences. Nucleotide sequences of SRY were retrieved from the NCBI databank. Bioinformatic analysis of SRY is done by CLC Main Workbench version 5.5 and ClustalW (http:/www.ebi.ac.uk/clustalw/) and MEGA6 softwares. The multiple sequence alignment results indicated that SRY protein sequences from Orcinus orca (killer whale) and Tursiopsaduncus (dolphin) have least genetic distance of 0.33 in these 15 species and are 99.67% identical at the amino acid level. Homosapiens and Pantroglodytes (chimpanzee) have the next lowest genetic distance of 1.35 and are 98.65% identical at the amino acid level. These findings indicate that the SRY proteins are conserved in the 15 species, and their evolutionary relationships are similar.

  17. Comparative In silico Study of Sex-Determining Region Y (SRY Protein Sequences Involved in Sex-Determining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoume Vakili Azghandi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The SRY gene (SRY provides instructions for making a transcription factor called the sex-determining region Y protein. The sex-determining region Y protein causes a fetus to develop as a male. In this study, SRY of 15 spices included of human, chimpanzee, dog, pig, rat, cattle, buffalo, goat, sheep, horse, zebra, frog, urial, dolphin and killer whale were used for determine of bioinformatic differences. Methods: Nucleotide sequences of SRY were retrieved from the NCBI databank. Bioinformatic analysis of SRY is done by CLC Main Workbench version 5.5 and ClustalW (http:/www.ebi.ac.uk/clustalw/ and MEGA6 softwares. Results: The multiple sequence alignment results indicated that SRY protein sequences from Orcinus orca (killer whale and Tursiopsaduncus (dolphin have least genetic distance of 0.33 in these 15 species and are 99.67% identical at the amino acid level. Homosapiens and Pantroglodytes (chimpanzee have the next lowest genetic distance of 1.35 and are 98.65% identical at the amino acid level. Conclusion: These findings indicate that the SRY proteins are conserved in the 15 species, and their evolutionary relationships are similar.

  18. De novo transcriptome sequencing and comparative analysis of differentially expressed genes in dryoperis fragrans under temperature stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, W.Z.; Tong, W.S.; Gao, R.

    2016-01-01

    Dryopteris fragrans is a species of fern and contains flavonoids compounds with medicinal value. This study explain the temperature stress impact flavonoids synthesis in D. fragrans tissue culture seedlings under the low temperature at 4 degree C, high temperature at 35 degree C and moderate temperature at 25 degree C. By using Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing, 80.9 million raw sequence reads were de novo assembled into 66,716 non-redundant unigenes. 38,486 unigenes (57.7%) were annotated for their function. 13,973 unigenes and 29,598 unigenes were allocated to gene ontology (GO) and clusters of orthologous group (COG), respectively. 18,989 sequences mapped to 118 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Pathway database (KEGG), 204 genes were involved in flavonoid biosynthesis, regulation and transport. 25,292 and 16,817 unigenes exhibited marked differential expression in response to temperature shifts of 25 degree C to 4 degree C and 25 degree C to 35 degree C, respectively. 4CL and CHS genes involved in flavonoid biosynthesis were tested and suggested that they were responsible for biosynthesis of flavonoids. This study provides the first published data to describe the D. fragrans transcriptome and should accelerate understanding of flavonoids biosynthesis, regulation and transport mechanisms. Since most unigenes described here were successfully annotated, these results should facilitate future functional genomic understanding and research of D. fragrans. (author)

  19. Comparative genomic analysis of translation initiation mechanisms for genes lacking the Shine–Dalgarno sequence in prokaryotes

    KAUST Repository

    Nakagawa, So

    2017-02-15

    In prokaryotes, translation initiation is believed to occur through an interaction between the 3\\' tail of a 16S rRNA and a corresponding Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence in the 5\\' untranslated region (UTR) of an mRNA. However, some genes lack SD sequences (non-SD genes), and the fraction of non-SD genes in a genome varies depending on the prokaryotic species. To elucidate non-SD translation initiation mechanisms in prokaryotes from an evolutionary perspective, we statistically examined the nucleotide frequencies around the initiation codons in non-SD genes from 260 prokaryotes (235 bacteria and 25 archaea). We identified distinct nucleotide frequency biases upstream of the initiation codon in bacteria and archaea, likely because of the presence of leaderless mRNAs lacking a 5\\' UTR. Moreover, we observed overall similarities in the nucleotide patterns between upstream and downstream regions of the initiation codon in all examined phyla. Symmetric nucleotide frequency biases might facilitate translation initiation by preventing the formation of secondary structures around the initiation codon. These features are more prominent in species\\' genomes that harbor large fractions of non-SD sequences, suggesting that a reduced stability around the initiation codon is important for efficient translation initiation in prokaryotes.

  20. Analysis of Comparative Sequence and Genomic Data to Verify Phylogenetic Relationship and Explore a New Subfamily of Bacterial Lipases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malihe Masomian

    Full Text Available Thermostable and organic solvent-tolerant enzymes have significant potential in a wide range of synthetic reactions in industry due to their inherent stability at high temperatures and their ability to endure harsh organic solvents. In this study, a novel gene encoding a true lipase was isolated by construction of a genomic DNA library of thermophilic Aneurinibacillus thermoaerophilus strain HZ into Escherichia coli plasmid vector. Sequence analysis revealed that HZ lipase had 62% identity to putative lipase from Bacillus pseudomycoides. The closely characterized lipases to the HZ lipase gene are from thermostable Bacillus and Geobacillus lipases belonging to the subfamily I.5 with ≤ 57% identity. The amino acid sequence analysis of HZ lipase determined a conserved pentapeptide containing the active serine, GHSMG and a Ca(2+-binding motif, GCYGSD in the enzyme. Protein structure modeling showed that HZ lipase consisted of an α/β hydrolase fold and a lid domain. Protein sequence alignment, conserved regions analysis, clustal distance matrix and amino acid composition illustrated differences between HZ lipase and other thermostable lipases. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that this lipase represented a new subfamily of family I of bacterial true lipases, classified as family I.9. The HZ lipase was expressed under promoter Plac using IPTG and was characterized. The recombinant enzyme showed optimal activity at 65 °C and retained ≥ 97% activity after incubation at 50 °C for 1h. The HZ lipase was stable in various polar and non-polar organic solvents.

  1. Comparative genomic analysis of translation initiation mechanisms for genes lacking the Shine–Dalgarno sequence in prokaryotes

    KAUST Repository

    Nakagawa, So; Niimura, Yoshihito; Gojobori, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    In prokaryotes, translation initiation is believed to occur through an interaction between the 3' tail of a 16S rRNA and a corresponding Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence in the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of an mRNA. However, some genes lack SD sequences (non-SD genes), and the fraction of non-SD genes in a genome varies depending on the prokaryotic species. To elucidate non-SD translation initiation mechanisms in prokaryotes from an evolutionary perspective, we statistically examined the nucleotide frequencies around the initiation codons in non-SD genes from 260 prokaryotes (235 bacteria and 25 archaea). We identified distinct nucleotide frequency biases upstream of the initiation codon in bacteria and archaea, likely because of the presence of leaderless mRNAs lacking a 5' UTR. Moreover, we observed overall similarities in the nucleotide patterns between upstream and downstream regions of the initiation codon in all examined phyla. Symmetric nucleotide frequency biases might facilitate translation initiation by preventing the formation of secondary structures around the initiation codon. These features are more prominent in species' genomes that harbor large fractions of non-SD sequences, suggesting that a reduced stability around the initiation codon is important for efficient translation initiation in prokaryotes.

  2. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Aconitum coreanum and Aconitum carmichaelii and comparative analysis with other Aconitum species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inkyu Park

    Full Text Available Aconitum species (belonging to the Ranunculaceae are well known herbaceous medicinal ingredients and have great economic value in Asian countries. However, there are still limited genomic resources available for Aconitum species. In this study, we sequenced the chloroplast (cp genomes of two Aconitum species, A. coreanum and A. carmichaelii, using the MiSeq platform. The two Aconitum chloroplast genomes were 155,880 and 157,040 bp in length, respectively, and exhibited LSC and SSC regions separated by a pair of inverted repeat regions. Both cp genomes had 38% GC content and contained 131 unique functional genes including 86 protein-coding genes, eight ribosomal RNA genes, and 37 transfer RNA genes. The gene order, content, and orientation of the two Aconitum cp genomes exhibited the general structure of angiosperms, and were similar to those of other Aconitum species. Comparison of the cp genome structure and gene order with that of other Aconitum species revealed general contraction and expansion of the inverted repeat regions and single copy boundary regions. Divergent regions were also identified. In phylogenetic analysis, Aconitum species positon among the Ranunculaceae was determined with other family cp genomes in the Ranunculales. We obtained a barcoding target sequence in a divergent region, ndhC-trnV, and successfully developed a SCAR (sequence characterized amplified region marker for discrimination of A. coreanum. Our results provide useful genetic information and a specific barcode for discrimination of Aconitum species.

  3. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Aconitum coreanum and Aconitum carmichaelii and comparative analysis with other Aconitum species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Inkyu; Kim, Wook-Jin; Yang, Sungyu; Yeo, Sang-Min; Li, Hulin; Moon, Byeong Cheol

    2017-01-01

    Aconitum species (belonging to the Ranunculaceae) are well known herbaceous medicinal ingredients and have great economic value in Asian countries. However, there are still limited genomic resources available for Aconitum species. In this study, we sequenced the chloroplast (cp) genomes of two Aconitum species, A. coreanum and A. carmichaelii, using the MiSeq platform. The two Aconitum chloroplast genomes were 155,880 and 157,040 bp in length, respectively, and exhibited LSC and SSC regions separated by a pair of inverted repeat regions. Both cp genomes had 38% GC content and contained 131 unique functional genes including 86 protein-coding genes, eight ribosomal RNA genes, and 37 transfer RNA genes. The gene order, content, and orientation of the two Aconitum cp genomes exhibited the general structure of angiosperms, and were similar to those of other Aconitum species. Comparison of the cp genome structure and gene order with that of other Aconitum species revealed general contraction and expansion of the inverted repeat regions and single copy boundary regions. Divergent regions were also identified. In phylogenetic analysis, Aconitum species positon among the Ranunculaceae was determined with other family cp genomes in the Ranunculales. We obtained a barcoding target sequence in a divergent region, ndhC-trnV, and successfully developed a SCAR (sequence characterized amplified region) marker for discrimination of A. coreanum. Our results provide useful genetic information and a specific barcode for discrimination of Aconitum species.

  4. Comparative proteomic profiling of soleus, extensor digitorum longus, flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscles from the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carberry, Steven; Brinkmeier, Heinrich; Zhang, Yaxin; Winkler, Claudia K; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2013-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is due to genetic abnormalities in the dystrophin gene and represents one of the most frequent genetic childhood diseases. In the X-linked muscular dystrophy (mdx) mouse model of dystrophinopathy, different subtypes of skeletal muscles are affected to a varying degree albeit the same single base substitution within exon 23 of the dystrophin gene. Thus, to determine potential muscle subtype-specific differences in secondary alterations due to a deficiency in dystrophin, in this study, we carried out a comparative histological and proteomic survey of mdx muscles. We intentionally included the skeletal muscles that are often used for studying the pathomechanism of muscular dystrophy. Histological examinations revealed a significantly higher degree of central nucleation in the soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles compared with the flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscles. Muscular hypertrophy of 20-25% was likewise only observed in the soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles from mdx mice, but not in the flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscles. For proteomic analysis, muscle protein extracts were separated by fluorescence two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis. Proteins with a significant change in their expression were identified by mass spectrometry. Proteomic profiling established an altered abundance of 24, 17, 19 and 5 protein species in the dystrophin-deficient soleus, extensor digitorum longus, flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscle, respectively. The key proteomic findings were verified by immunoblot analysis. The identified proteins are involved in the contraction-relaxation cycle, metabolite transport, muscle metabolism and the cellular stress response. Thus, histological and proteomic profiling of muscle subtypes from mdx mice indicated that distinct skeletal muscles are differentially affected by the loss of the membrane cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. Varying degrees of perturbed protein

  5. The heterozygous disproportionate micromelia (dmm) mouse: morphological changes in fetal cartilage precede postnatal dwarfism and compared with lethal homozygotes can explain the mild phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seegmiller, Robert E; Bomsta, Brandon D; Bridgewater, Laura C; Niederhauser, Cindy M; Montaño, Carolina; Sudweeks, Sterling; Eyre, David R; Fernandes, Russell J

    2008-11-01

    The disproportionate micromelia (Dmm) mouse has a mutation in the C-propeptide coding region of the Col2a1 gene that causes lethal dwarfism when homozygous (Dmm/Dmm) but causes only mild dwarfism observable approximately 1-week postpartum when heterozygous (Dmm/+). The purpose of this study was 2-fold: first, to analyze and quantify morphological changes that precede the expression of mild dwarfism in Dmm/+ animals, and second, to compare morphological alterations between Dmm/+ and Dmm/Dmm fetal cartilage that may correlate with the marked skeletal differences between mild and lethal dwarfism. Light and electron transmission microscopy were used to visualize structure of chondrocytes and extracellular matrix (ECM) of fetal rib cartilage. Both Dmm/+ and Dmm/Dmm fetal rib cartilage had significantly larger chondrocytes, greater cell density, and less ECM per unit area than +/+ littermates. Quantitative RT-PCR showed a decrease in aggrecan mRNA in Dmm/+ vs +/+ cartilage. Furthermore, the cytoplasm of chondrocytes in Dmm/+ and Dmm/Dmm cartilage was occupied by significantly more distended rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) compared with wild-type chondrocytes. Fibril diameters and packing densities of +/+ and Dmm/+ cartilage were similar, but Dmm/Dmm cartilage showed thinner, sparsely distributed fibrils. These findings support the prevailing hypothesis that a C-propeptide mutation could interrupt the normal assembly and secretion of Type II procollagen trimers, resulting in a buildup of proalpha1(II) chains in the RER and a reduced rate of matrix synthesis. Thus, intracellular entrapment of proalpha1(II) seems to be primarily responsible for the dominant-negative effect of the Dmm mutation in the expression of dwarfism.

  6. Gene discovery in EST sequences from the wheat leaf rust fungus Puccinia triticina sexual spores, asexual spores and haustoria, compared to other rust and corn smut fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Rust fungi are biotrophic basidiomycete plant pathogens that cause major diseases on plants and trees world-wide, affecting agriculture and forestry. Their biotrophic nature precludes many established molecular genetic manipulations and lines of research. The generation of genomic resources for these microbes is leading to novel insights into biology such as interactions with the hosts and guiding directions for breakthrough research in plant pathology. Results To support gene discovery and gene model verification in the genome of the wheat leaf rust fungus, Puccinia triticina (Pt), we have generated Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) by sampling several life cycle stages. We focused on several spore stages and isolated haustorial structures from infected wheat, generating 17,684 ESTs. We produced sequences from both the sexual (pycniospores, aeciospores and teliospores) and asexual (germinated urediniospores) stages of the life cycle. From pycniospores and aeciospores, produced by infecting the alternate host, meadow rue (Thalictrum speciosissimum), 4,869 and 1,292 reads were generated, respectively. We generated 3,703 ESTs from teliospores produced on the senescent primary wheat host. Finally, we generated 6,817 reads from haustoria isolated from infected wheat as well as 1,003 sequences from germinated urediniospores. Along with 25,558 previously generated ESTs, we compiled a database of 13,328 non-redundant sequences (4,506 singlets and 8,822 contigs). Fungal genes were predicted using the EST version of the self-training GeneMarkS algorithm. To refine the EST database, we compared EST sequences by BLASTN to a set of 454 pyrosequencing-generated contigs and Sanger BAC-end sequences derived both from the Pt genome, and to ESTs and genome reads from wheat. A collection of 6,308 fungal genes was identified and compared to sequences of the cereal rusts, Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt) and stripe rust, P. striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), and poplar

  7. Gene discovery in EST sequences from the wheat leaf rust fungus Puccinia triticina sexual spores, asexual spores and haustoria, compared to other rust and corn smut fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wynhoven Brian

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rust fungi are biotrophic basidiomycete plant pathogens that cause major diseases on plants and trees world-wide, affecting agriculture and forestry. Their biotrophic nature precludes many established molecular genetic manipulations and lines of research. The generation of genomic resources for these microbes is leading to novel insights into biology such as interactions with the hosts and guiding directions for breakthrough research in plant pathology. Results To support gene discovery and gene model verification in the genome of the wheat leaf rust fungus, Puccinia triticina (Pt, we have generated Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs by sampling several life cycle stages. We focused on several spore stages and isolated haustorial structures from infected wheat, generating 17,684 ESTs. We produced sequences from both the sexual (pycniospores, aeciospores and teliospores and asexual (germinated urediniospores stages of the life cycle. From pycniospores and aeciospores, produced by infecting the alternate host, meadow rue (Thalictrum speciosissimum, 4,869 and 1,292 reads were generated, respectively. We generated 3,703 ESTs from teliospores produced on the senescent primary wheat host. Finally, we generated 6,817 reads from haustoria isolated from infected wheat as well as 1,003 sequences from germinated urediniospores. Along with 25,558 previously generated ESTs, we compiled a database of 13,328 non-redundant sequences (4,506 singlets and 8,822 contigs. Fungal genes were predicted using the EST version of the self-training GeneMarkS algorithm. To refine the EST database, we compared EST sequences by BLASTN to a set of 454 pyrosequencing-generated contigs and Sanger BAC-end sequences derived both from the Pt genome, and to ESTs and genome reads from wheat. A collection of 6,308 fungal genes was identified and compared to sequences of the cereal rusts, Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt and stripe rust, P. striiformis f. sp

  8. Comparative mapping of DNA markers from the familial Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome regions of human chromosome 21 to mouse chromosomes 16 and 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, S.V.; Nadeau, J.H.; Tanzi, R.E.; Watkins, P.C.; Jagadesh, J.; Taylor, B.A.; Haines, J.L.; Sacchi, N.; Gusella, J.F. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (USA))

    1988-08-01

    Mouse trisomy 16 has been proposed as an animal model of Down syndrome (DS), since this chromosome contains homologues of several loci from the q22 band of human chromosome 21. The recent mapping of the defect causing familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) and the locus encoding the Alzheimer amyloid {beta} precursor protein (APP) to human chromosome 21 has prompted a more detailed examination of the extent of conservation of this linkage group between the two species. Using anonymous DNA probes and cloned genes from human chromosome 21 in a combination of recombinant inbred and interspecific mouse backcross analyses, the authors have established that the linkage group shared by mouse chromosome 16 includes not only the critical DS region of human chromosome 21 but also the APP gene and FAD-linked markers. Extending from the anonymous DNA locus D21S52 to ETS2, the linkage map of six loci spans 39% recombination in man but only 6.4% recombination in the mouse. A break in synteny occurs distal to ETS2, with the homologue of the human marker D21S56 mapping to mouse chromosome 17. Conservation of the linkage relationships of markers in the FAD region suggests that the murine homologue of the FAD locus probably maps to chromosome 16 and that detailed comparison of the corresponding region in both species could facilitate identification of the primary defect in this disorder. The break in synteny between the terminal portion of human chromosome 21 and mouse chromosome 16 indicates, however, that mouse trisomy 16 may not represent a complete model of DS.

  9. Comparative mapping of DNA markers from the familial Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome regions of human chromosome 21 to mouse chromosomes 16 and 17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, S.V.; Nadeau, J.H.; Tanzi, R.E.; Watkins, P.C.; Jagadesh, J.; Taylor, B.A.; Haines, J.L.; Sacchi, N.; Gusella, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    Mouse trisomy 16 has been proposed as an animal model of Down syndrome (DS), since this chromosome contains homologues of several loci from the q22 band of human chromosome 21. The recent mapping of the defect causing familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) and the locus encoding the Alzheimer amyloid β precursor protein (APP) to human chromosome 21 has prompted a more detailed examination of the extent of conservation of this linkage group between the two species. Using anonymous DNA probes and cloned genes from human chromosome 21 in a combination of recombinant inbred and interspecific mouse backcross analyses, the authors have established that the linkage group shared by mouse chromosome 16 includes not only the critical DS region of human chromosome 21 but also the APP gene and FAD-linked markers. Extending from the anonymous DNA locus D21S52 to ETS2, the linkage map of six loci spans 39% recombination in man but only 6.4% recombination in the mouse. A break in synteny occurs distal to ETS2, with the homologue of the human marker D21S56 mapping to mouse chromosome 17. Conservation of the linkage relationships of markers in the FAD region suggests that the murine homologue of the FAD locus probably maps to chromosome 16 and that detailed comparison of the corresponding region in both species could facilitate identification of the primary defect in this disorder. The break in synteny between the terminal portion of human chromosome 21 and mouse chromosome 16 indicates, however, that mouse trisomy 16 may not represent a complete model of DS

  10. Comparison of G protein sequences of South African street rabies viruses showing distinct progression of the disease in a mouse model of experimental rabies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Wonhyo; Servat, Alexandre; Cliquet, Florence; Akinbowale, Jenkins; Prehaud, Christophe; Lafon, Monique; Sabeta, Claude

    Rabies is a fatal zoonotic disease and infections generally lead to a fatal encephalomyelitis in both humans and animals. In South Africa, domestic (dogs) and the wildlife (yellow mongoose) host species maintain the canid and mongoose rabies variants respectively. In this study, pathogenicity differences of South African canid and mongoose rabies viruses were investigated in a murine model, by assessing the progression of clinical signs and survivorship. Comparison of glycoprotein gene sequences revealed amino acid differences that may underpin the observed pathogenicity differences. Cumulatively, our results suggest that the canid rabies virus may be more neurovirulent in mice than the mongoose rabies variant. Copyright © 2017 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. De novo transcriptome sequencing of Isaria cateniannulata and comparative analysis of gene expression in response to heat and cold stresses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dingfeng Wang

    Full Text Available Isaria cateniannulata is a very important and virulent entomopathogenic fungus that infects many insect pest species. Although I. cateniannulata is commonly exposed to extreme environmental temperature conditions, little is known about its molecular response mechanism to temperature stress. Here, we sequenced and de novo assembled the transcriptome of I. cateniannulata in response to high and low temperature stresses using Illumina RNA-Seq technology. Our assembly encompassed 17,514 unigenes (mean length = 1,197 bp, in which 11,445 unigenes (65.34% showed significant similarities to known sequences in NCBI non-redundant protein sequences (Nr database. Using digital gene expression analysis, 4,483 differentially expressed genes (DEGs were identified after heat treatment, including 2,905 up-regulated genes and 1,578 down-regulated genes. Under cold stress, 1,927 DEGs were identified, including 1,245 up-regulated genes and 682 down-regulated genes. The expression patterns of 18 randomly selected candidate DEGs resulting from quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR were consistent with their transcriptome analysis results. Although DEGs were involved in many pathways, we focused on the genes that were involved in endocytosis: In heat stress, the pathway of clathrin-dependent endocytosis (CDE was active; however at low temperature stresses, the pathway of clathrin-independent endocytosis (CIE was active. Besides, four categories of DEGs acting as temperature sensors were observed, including cell-wall-major-components-metabolism-related (CWMCMR genes, heat shock protein (Hsp genes, intracellular-compatible-solutes-metabolism-related (ICSMR genes and glutathione S-transferase (GST. These results enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of I. cateniannulata in response to temperature stresses and provide a valuable resource for the future investigations.

  12. De Novo Sequencing and Comparative Analysis of Schima superba Seedlings to Explore the Response to Drought Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao-Cai Han

    Full Text Available Schima superba is an important dominant species in subtropical evergreen broadleaved forests of China, and plays a vital role in community structure and dynamics. However, the survival rate of its seedlings in the field is low, and water shortage could be a factor that limits its regeneration. In order to better understand the response of its seedlings to drought stress on a functional genomics scale, RNA-seq technology was utilized in this study to perform a large-scale transcriptome sequencing of the S. superba seedlings under drought stress. More than 320 million clean reads were generated and 72218 unique transcripts were obtained through de novo assembly. These unigenes were further annotated by blasting with different public databases and a total of 53300 unique transcripts were annotated. A total of 31586 simple sequence repeat (SSR loci were presented. Through gene expression profiling analysis between drought treatment and control, 11038 genes were found to be significantly enriched in drought-stressed seedlings. Based on these differentially expressed genes (DEGs, Gene Ontology (GO terms enrichment and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway (KEGG enrichment analysis indicated that drought stress caused a number of changes in the types of sugars, enzymes, secondary mechanisms, and light responses, and induced some potential physical protection mechanisms. In addition, the expression patterns of 18 transcripts induced by drought, as determined by quantitative real-time PCR, were consistent with their transcript abundance changes, as identified by RNA-seq. This transcriptome study provides a rapid method for understanding the response of S. superba seedlings to drought stress and provides a number of gene sequences available for further functional genomics studies.

  13. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Ampelopsis: gene organization, comparative analysis and phylogenetic relationships to other angiosperms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurusamy eRaman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ampelopsis brevipedunculata is an economically important plant that belongs to the Vitaceae family of angiosperms. The phylogenetic placement of Vitaceae is still unresolved. Recent phylogenetic studies suggested that it should be placed in various alternative families including Caryophyllaceae, asteraceae, Saxifragaceae, Dilleniaceae, or with the rest of the rosid families. However, these analyses provided weak supportive results because they were based on only one of several genes. Accordingly, complete chloroplast genome sequences are required to resolve the phylogenetic relationships among angiosperms. Recent phylogenetic analyses based on the complete chloroplast genome sequence suggested strong support for the position of Vitaceae as the earliest diverging lineage of rosids and placed it as a sister to the remaining rosids. These studies also revealed relationships among several major lineages of angiosperms; however, they highlighted the significance of taxon sampling for obtaining accurate phylogenies. In the present study, we sequenced the complete chloroplast genome of A. brevipedunculata and used these data to assess the relationships among 32 angiosperms, including 18 taxa of rosids. The Ampelopsis chloroplast genome is 161,090 bp in length, and includes a pair of inverted repeats of 26,394 bp that are separated by small and large single copy regions of 19,036 bp and 89,266 bp, respectively. The gene content and order of Ampelopsis is identical to many other unrearranged angiosperm chloroplast genomes, including Vitis and tobacco. A phylogenetic tree constructed based on 70 protein-coding genes of 33 angiosperms showed that both Saxifragales and Vitaceae diverged from the rosid clade and formed two clades with 100% bootstrap value. The position of the Vitaceae is sister to Saxifragales, and both are the basal and earliest diverging lineages. Moreover, Saxifragales forms a sister clade to Vitaceae of rosids. Overall, the results of

  14. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors show different anti-brain metastases efficacy in NSCLC: A direct comparative analysis of icotinib, gefitinib, and erlotinib in a nude mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jianlong; Li, Min; Zhong, Wen; Hu, Chengping; Gu, Qihua; Xie, Yali

    2017-11-17

    Brain metastasis is an increasing problem in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), including gefitinib, erlotinib, and icotinib, are reported to be effective in patients with brain metastases. However, direct comparative studies of the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of these three drugs in treating brain metastases are lacking. In the present investigation, we found that gefitinib penetrated the blood-tumor barrier and was distributed to brain metastases more effectively than erlotinib or icotinib in a nude mouse model. The 1-h ratio of brain metastases to plasma concentration for gefitinib, erlotinib, and icotinib was 9.82±1.03%, 4.83±0.25%, and 2.62±0.21%, respectively. The 2-h ratio of brain metastases to plasma concentration for gefitinib, erlotinib, and icotinib was 15.11±2.00%, 5.73±1.31%, and 2.69±0.31%, respectively. Gefitinib exhibited the strongest antitumor activity ( p gefitinib vs. erlotinib =0.005; p gefitinib vs. icotinib =0.002). Notably, erlotinib exhibited a better treatment efficacy than icotinib ( p =0.037). Consistently, immunohistochemical data showed that TKIs differentially inhibit the proliferation of metastatical tumor cells. Gefitinib and erlotinib markedly inhibited the proliferation of tumor cells, while there were more ki-67-positive tumor cells in the icotinib group. Additionally, gefitinib inhibited the phosphorylation of EGFR better than the other drugs, whereas pEGFR expression levels in erlotinib groups were lower than levels in the icotinib group ( p gefitinib vs. erlotinib =0.995; p gefitinib vs. icotinib =0.028; p erlotinib vs. icotinib =0.042).Altogether, our findings suggest that gefitinib and erlotinib can inhibit the growth of PC-9-luc brain tumors. Gefitinib demonstrated better antitumor activity and penetration rate in brain metastases than erlotinib or icotinib.

  15. Comparative analysis of transcriptomes in aerial stems and roots of Ephedra sinica based on high-throughput mRNA sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taketo Okada

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ephedra plants are taxonomically classified as gymnosperms, and are medicinally important as the botanical origin of crude drugs and as bioresources that contain pharmacologically active chemicals. Here we show a comparative analysis of the transcriptomes of aerial stems and roots of Ephedra sinica based on high-throughput mRNA sequencing by RNA-Seq. De novo assembly of short cDNA sequence reads generated 23,358, 13,373, and 28,579 contigs longer than 200 bases from aerial stems, roots, or both aerial stems and roots, respectively. The presumed functions encoded by these contig sequences were annotated by BLAST (blastx. Subsequently, these contigs were classified based on gene ontology slims, Enzyme Commission numbers, and the InterPro database. Furthermore, comparative gene expression analysis was performed between aerial stems and roots. These transcriptome analyses revealed differences and similarities between the transcriptomes of aerial stems and roots in E. sinica. Deep transcriptome sequencing of Ephedra should open the door to molecular biological studies based on the entire transcriptome, tissue- or organ-specific transcriptomes, or targeted genes of interest.

  16. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Taxus chinensis var. mairei (Taxaceae): loss of an inverted repeat region and comparative analysis with related species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanzhen; Ma, Ji; Yang, Bingxian; Li, Ruyi; Zhu, Wei; Sun, Lianli; Tian, Jingkui; Zhang, Lin

    2014-05-01

    Taxus chinensis var. mairei (Taxaceae) is a domestic variety of yew species in local China. This plant is one of the sources for paclitaxel, which is a promising antineoplastic chemotherapy drugs during the last decade. We have sequenced the complete nucleotide sequence of the chloroplast (cp) genome of T. chinensis var. mairei. The T. chinensis var. mairei cp genome is 129,513 bp in length, with 113 single copy genes and two duplicated genes (trnI-CAU, trnQ-UUG). Among the 113 single copy genes, 9 are intron-containing. Compared to other land plant cp genomes, the T. chinensis var. mairei cp genome has lost one of the large inverted repeats (IRs) found in angiosperms, fern, liverwort, and gymnosperm such as Cycas revoluta and Ginkgo biloba L. Compared to related species, the gene order of T. chinensis var. mairei has a large inversion of ~110kb including 91 genes (from rps18 to accD) with gene contents unarranged. Repeat analysis identified 48 direct and 2 inverted repeats 30 bp long or longer with a sequence identity greater than 90%. Repeated short segments were found in genes rps18, rps19 and clpP. Analysis also revealed 22 simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci and almost all are composed of A or T. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparing adjuvanted H28 and modified vaccinia virus ankara expressingH28 in a mouse and a non-human primate tuberculosis model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billeskov, Rolf; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Aagaard, Claus

    2013-01-01

    a significant positive correlation with protection at week 6 post infection, whereas the opposite was observed for post infection CD4 T cells producing only IFN-γ. Moreover, as a BCG booster vaccine in a clinically relevant non-human primate TB model, the H28/H28 vaccine strategy induced a slightly more......-γ single producing CD4 T cell subsets correlated with protection in the mouse TB model. Moreover, our data demonstrated that the H28 vaccine antigen was able to induce strong protection in both a mouse and a non-human primate TB model....

  18. Pigs in sequence space: A 0.66X coverage pig genome survey based on shotgun sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wei

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative whole genome analysis of Mammalia can benefit from the addition of more species. The pig is an obvious choice due to its economic and medical importance as well as its evolutionary position in the artiodactyls. Results We have generated ~3.84 million shotgun sequences (0.66X coverage from the pig genome. The data are hereby released (NCBI Trace repository with center name "SDJVP", and project name "Sino-Danish Pig Genome Project" together with an initial evolutionary analysis. The non-repetitive fraction of the sequences was aligned to the UCSC human-mouse alignment and the resulting three-species alignments were annotated using the human genome annotation. Ultra-conserved elements and miRNAs were identified. The results show that for each of these types of orthologous data, pig is much closer to human than mouse is. Purifying selection has been more efficient in pig compared to human, but not as efficient as in mouse, and pig seems to have an isochore structure most similar to the structure in human. Conclusion The addition of the pig to the set of species sequenced at low coverage adds to the understanding of selective pressures that have acted on the human genome by bisecting the evolutionary branch between human and mouse with the mouse branch being approximately 3 times as long as the human branch. Additionally, the joint alignment of the shot-gun sequences to the human-mouse alignment offers the investigator a rapid way to defining specific regions for analysis and resequencing.

  19. Capacity for patterns and sequences in Kanerva's SDM as compared to other associative memory models. [Sparse, Distributed Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, James D.

    1988-01-01

    The information capacity of Kanerva's Sparse Distributed Memory (SDM) and Hopfield-type neural networks is investigated. Under the approximations used here, it is shown that the total information stored in these systems is proportional to the number connections in the network. The proportionality constant is the same for the SDM and Hopfield-type models independent of the particular model, or the order of the model. The approximations are checked numerically. This same analysis can be used to show that the SDM can store sequences of spatiotemporal patterns, and the addition of time-delayed connections allows the retrieval of context dependent temporal patterns. A minor modification of the SDM can be used to store correlated patterns.

  20. COMPAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuefner, K.

    1976-01-01

    COMPAR works on FORTRAN arrays with four indices: A = A(i,j,k,l) where, for each fixed k 0 ,l 0 , only the 'plane' [A(i,j,k 0 ,l 0 ), i = 1, isub(max), j = 1, jsub(max)] is held in fast memory. Given two arrays A, B of this type COMPAR has the capability to 1) re-norm A and B ind different ways; 2) calculate the deviations epsilon defined as epsilon(i,j,k,l): =[A(i,j,k,l) - B(i,j,k,l)] / GEW(i,j,k,l) where GEW (i,j,k,l) may be chosen in three different ways; 3) calculate mean, standard deviation and maximum in the array epsilon (by several intermediate stages); 4) determine traverses in the array epsilon; 5) plot these traverses by a printer; 6) simplify plots of these traverses by the PLOTEASY-system by creating input data blocks for this system. The main application of COMPAR is given (so far) by the comparison of two- and three-dimensional multigroup neutron flux-fields. (orig.) [de

  1. Laser-capture micro dissection combined with next-generation sequencing analysis of cell type-specific deafness gene expression in the mouse cochlea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Shin-Ya; Takumi, Yutaka; Usami, Shin-Ichi

    2017-05-01

    Cochlear implantation (CI), which directly stimulates the cochlear nerves, is the most effective and widely used medical intervention for patients with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss. The etiology of the hearing loss is speculated to have a major influence of CI outcomes, particularly in cases resulting from mutations in genes preferentially expressed in the spiral ganglion region. To elucidate precise gene expression levels in each part of the cochlea, we performed laser-capture micro dissection in combination with next-generation sequencing analysis and determined the expression levels of all known deafness-associated genes in the organ of Corti, spiral ganglion, lateral wall, and spiral limbs. The results were generally consistent with previous reports based on immunocytochemistry or in situ hybridization. As a notable result, the genes associated with many kinds of syndromic hearing loss (such as Clpp, Hars2, Hsd17b4, Lars2 for Perrault syndrome, Polr1c and Polr1d for Treacher Collins syndrome, Ndp for Norrie Disease, Kal for Kallmann syndrome, Edn3 and Snai2 for Waardenburg Syndrome, Col4a3 for Alport syndrome, Sema3e for CHARGE syndrome, Col9a1 for Sticker syndrome, Cdh23, Cib2, Clrn1, Pcdh15, Ush1c, Ush2a, Whrn for Usher syndrome and Wfs1 for Wolfram syndrome) showed higher levels of expression in the spiral ganglion than in other parts of the cochlea. This dataset will provide a base for more detailed analysis in order to clarify gene functions in the cochlea as well as predict CI outcomes based on gene expression data. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Insulin-sparing and fungible effects of E4orf1 combined with an adipocyte-targeting sequence in mouse models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, I-S; Park, S; Kim, R-H; Ko, H L; Nam, J-H

    2017-10-01

    Obesity impairs glycemic control and causes insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Adenovirus 36 (Ad36) infection can increase the uptake of excess glucose from blood into adipocytes by increasing GLUT4 translocation through the Ras-Akt signaling pathway, which bypasses PI3K-Akt-mediated insulin receptor signaling. E4orf1, a viral gene expressed early during Ad36 infection, is responsible for this insulin-sparing effect and may be an alternative target for improving insulin resistance. To deliver the gene to adipocytes only, we connected the adipocyte-targeting sequence (ATS) to the 5' end of E4orf1 (ATS-E4orf1). In vitro transfection of ATS-E4orf1 into preadipocytes activated factors for GLUT4 translocation and adipogenesis to the same extent as did Hemagglutinin (HA)-E4orf1 transfection as positive reference. Moreover, the Transwell migration assay also showed that ATS-E4orf1 secreted by liver cells activated Akt in preadipocytes. We used a hydrodynamic gene delivery technique to deliver ATS-E4orf1 into high-fat diet-fed and streptozotocin-injected mice (disease models of type 2 and type 1 diabetes, respectively). ATS-E4orf1 improved the ability to eliminate excess glucose from the blood and ameliorated liver function in both disease models. These findings suggest that ATS-E4orf1 has insulin-sparing and fungible effects in type 2 and 1 diabetes independent of the presence of insulin.

  3. Number and location of mouse mammary tumor virus proviral DNA in mouse DNA of normal tissue and of mammary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groner, B; Hynes, N E

    1980-01-01

    The Southern DNA filter transfer technique was used to characterize the genomic location of the mouse mammary tumor proviral DNA in different inbred strains of mice. Two of the strains (C3H and CBA) arose from a cross of a Bagg albino (BALB/c) mouse and a DBA mouse. The mouse mammary tumor virus-containing restriction enzyme DNA fragments of these strains had similar patterns, suggesting that the proviruses of these mice are in similar genomic locations. Conversely, the pattern arising from the DNA of the GR mouse, a strain genetically unrelated to the others, appeared different, suggesting that its mouse mammary tumor proviruses are located in different genomic sites. The structure of another gene, that coding for beta-globin, was also compared. The mice strains which we studied can be categorized into two classes, expressing either one or two beta-globin proteins. The macroenvironment of the beta-globin gene appeared similar among the mice strains belonging to one genetic class. Female mice of the C3H strain exogenously transmit mouse mammary tumor virus via the milk, and their offspring have a high incidence of mammary tumor occurrence. DNA isolated from individual mammary tumors taken from C3H mice or from BALB/c mice foster nursed on C3H mothers was analyzed by the DNA filter transfer technique. Additional mouse mammary tumor virus-containing fragments were found in the DNA isolated from each mammary tumor. These proviral sequences were integrated into different genomic sites in each tumor. Images PMID:6245257

  4. A complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Ogura-type male-sterile cytoplasm and its comparative analysis with that of normal cytoplasm in radish (Raphanus sativus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka Yoshiyuki

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant mitochondrial genome has unique features such as large size, frequent recombination and incorporation of foreign DNA. Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS is caused by rearrangement of the mitochondrial genome, and a novel chimeric open reading frame (ORF created by shuffling of endogenous sequences is often responsible for CMS. The Ogura-type male-sterile cytoplasm is one of the most extensively studied cytoplasms in Brassicaceae. Although the gene orf138 has been isolated as a determinant of Ogura-type CMS, no homologous sequence to orf138 has been found in public databases. Therefore, how orf138 sequence was created is a mystery. In this study, we determined the complete nucleotide sequence of two radish mitochondrial genomes, namely, Ogura- and normal-type genomes, and analyzed them to reveal the origin of the gene orf138. Results Ogura- and normal-type mitochondrial genomes were assembled to 258,426-bp and 244,036-bp circular sequences, respectively. Normal-type mitochondrial genome contained 33 protein-coding and three rRNA genes, which are well conserved with the reported mitochondrial genome of rapeseed. Ogura-type genomes contained same genes and additional atp9. As for tRNA, normal-type contained 17 tRNAs, while Ogura-type contained 17 tRNAs and one additional trnfM. The gene orf138 was specific to Ogura-type mitochondrial genome, and no sequence homologous to it was found in normal-type genome. Comparative analysis of the two genomes revealed that radish mitochondrial genome consists of 11 syntenic regions (length >3 kb, similarity >99.9%. It was shown that short repeats and overlapped repeats present in the edge of syntenic regions were involved in recombination events during evolution to interconvert two types of mitochondrial genome. Ogura-type mitochondrial genome has four unique regions (2,803 bp, 1,601 bp, 451 bp and 15,255 bp in size that are non-syntenic to normal-type genome, and the gene orf138

  5. Assembly of the Lactuca sativa, L. cv. Tizian draft genome sequence reveals differences within major resistance complex 1 as compared to the cv. Salinas reference genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verwaaijen, Bart; Wibberg, Daniel; Nelkner, Johanna; Gordin, Miriam; Rupp, Oliver; Winkler, Anika; Bremges, Andreas; Blom, Jochen; Grosch, Rita; Pühler, Alfred; Schlüter, Andreas

    2018-02-10

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa, L.) is an important annual plant of the family Asteraceae (Compositae). The commercial lettuce cultivar Tizian has been used in various scientific studies investigating the interaction of the plant with phytopathogens or biological control agents. Here, we present the de novo draft genome sequencing and gene prediction for this specific cultivar derived from transcriptome sequence data. The assembled scaffolds amount to a size of 2.22 Gb. Based on RNAseq data, 31,112 transcript isoforms were identified. Functional predictions for these transcripts were determined within the GenDBE annotation platform. Comparison with the cv. Salinas reference genome revealed a high degree of sequence similarity on genome and transcriptome levels, with an average amino acid identity of 99%. Furthermore, it was observed that two large regions are either missing or are highly divergent within the cv. Tizian genome compared to cv. Salinas. One of these regions covers the major resistance complex 1 region of cv. Salinas. The cv. Tizian draft genome sequence provides a valuable resource for future functional and transcriptome analyses focused on this lettuce cultivar. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Classification, expression pattern and comparative analysis of sugarcane expressed sequences tags (ESTs encoding glycine-rich proteins (GRPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fusaro Adriana

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the isolation of the first glycine-rich proteins (GRPs in plants a wealth of new GRPs have been identified. The highly specific but diverse expression pattern of grp genes, taken together with the distinct sub-cellular localization of some GRP groups, clearly indicate that these proteins are involved in several independent physiological processes. Notwithstanding the absence of a clear definition of the role of GRPs in plant cells, studies conducted with these proteins have provided new and interesting insights into the molecular biology and cell biology of plants. Complexly regulated promoters and distinct mechanisms for the regulation of gene expression have been demonstrated and new protein targeting pathways, as well as the exportation of GRPs from different cell types have been discovered. These data show that GRPs can be useful as markers and/or models to understand distinct aspects of plant biology. In this paper, the structural and functional features of these proteins in sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L. are summarized. Since this is the first description of GRPs in sugarcane, special emphasis has been given to the expression pattern of these GRP genes by studying their abundance and prevalence in the different cDNA-libraries of the Sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tag (SUCEST project . The comparison of sugarcane GRPs with GRPs from other species is also discussed.

  7. Comparative Effects of Phosphoenolpyruvate, a Glycolytic Intermediate, as an Organ Preservation Agent with Glucose and N-Acetylcysteine against Organ Damage during Cold Storage of Mouse Liver and Kidney

    OpenAIRE

    Ishitsuka, Yoichi; Fukumoto, Yusuke; Kondo, Yuki; Irikura, Mitsuru; Kadowaki, Daisuke; Narita, Yuki; Hirata, Sumio; Moriuchi, Hiroshi; Maruyama, Toru; Hamasaki, Naotaka; Irie, Tetsumi

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP), a glycolytic intermediate with antioxidative and energy supplementation potentials, as an organ preservation agent. Using ex vivo mouse liver and kidney of a static cold storage model, we compared the effects of PEP against organ damage and oxidative stress during cold preservation with those of glucose or N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage, histological changes, and oxidative stress parameters (measured as thi...

  8. Acinetobacter baumannii Virulence Traits: A Comparative Study of a Novel Sequence Type with Other Italian Endemic International Clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Ambrosi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAb have emerged in recent decades as major causes of nosocomial infections. Resistance is mainly due to overexpression of intrinsic and/or acquired carbapenemases, especially oxacillinases (OXA. In Italy, although the sequence type (ST 2 and the ST78 are the most frequently detected, we recently reported ST632, a single locus variant of ST2. Therefore, this study was aimed at unraveling common bacterial surface virulence factors involved in pathogenesis and antibiotic resistance in representative CRAb of these ST genotypes. Outer membrane protein (OMP composition together with motility, biofilm formation, in vitro adherence to, invasion of, and survival within pneumocytes were analyzed. Differently from the carbapenem-susceptible reference strain ATCC 17978, either overexpressed OXA-51 or both OXA-23 and OXA-51 co-purified with OMPs in CRAb. This tight association ensures their maximal concentration on the inner surface of the outer membrane to provide the best protection against carbapenems. These findings led us to propose for the first time a common behavior of OXA enzymes in CRAb. Despite the presence of both OmpA and phosphorylcholine-porinD and the ability of all the strains to adhere to cells, invasion, and survival within pneumocytes was shown only by ST2 and ST78 isolates, sharing the highest number of identified OMPs. Conversely, notwithstanding genetic and OMPs similarities with ST2, ST632 was unable to invade and survive within epithelial cells. Overall, our study shows that different STs share a specific OMP composition, also shaped by overexpressed OXA, that is needed for invasiveness and survival of CRAb.

  9. Acinetobacter baumannii Virulence Traits: A Comparative Study of a Novel Sequence Type with Other Italian Endemic International Clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosi, Cecilia; Scribano, Daniela; Aleandri, Marta; Zagaglia, Carlo; Di Francesco, Laura; Putignani, Lorenza; Palamara, Anna Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAb) have emerged in recent decades as major causes of nosocomial infections. Resistance is mainly due to overexpression of intrinsic and/or acquired carbapenemases, especially oxacillinases (OXA). In Italy, although the sequence type (ST) 2 and the ST78 are the most frequently detected, we recently reported ST632, a single locus variant of ST2. Therefore, this study was aimed at unraveling common bacterial surface virulence factors involved in pathogenesis and antibiotic resistance in representative CRAb of these ST genotypes. Outer membrane protein (OMP) composition together with motility, biofilm formation, in vitro adherence to, invasion of, and survival within pneumocytes were analyzed. Differently from the carbapenem-susceptible reference strain ATCC 17978, either overexpressed OXA-51 or both OXA-23 and OXA-51 co-purified with OMPs in CRAb. This tight association ensures their maximal concentration on the inner surface of the outer membrane to provide the best protection against carbapenems. These findings led us to propose for the first time a common behavior of OXA enzymes in CRAb. Despite the presence of both OmpA and phosphorylcholine-porinD and the ability of all the strains to adhere to cells, invasion, and survival within pneumocytes was shown only by ST2 and ST78 isolates, sharing the highest number of identified OMPs. Conversely, notwithstanding genetic and OMPs similarities with ST2, ST632 was unable to invade and survive within epithelial cells. Overall, our study shows that different STs share a specific OMP composition, also shaped by overexpressed OXA, that is needed for invasiveness and survival of CRAb.

  10. Insights into the evolution of Darwin’s finches from comparative analysis of the Geospiza magnirostris genome sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rands Chris M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A classical example of repeated speciation coupled with ecological diversification is the evolution of 14 closely related species of Darwin’s (Galápagos finches (Thraupidae, Passeriformes. Their adaptive radiation in the Galápagos archipelago took place in the last 2–3 million years and some of the molecular mechanisms that led to their diversification are now being elucidated. Here we report evolutionary analyses of genome of the large ground finch, Geospiza magnirostris. Results 13,291 protein-coding genes were predicted from a 991.0 Mb G. magnirostris genome assembly. We then defined gene orthology relationships and constructed whole genome alignments between the G. magnirostris and other vertebrate genomes. We estimate that 15% of genomic sequence is functionally constrained between G. magnirostris and zebra finch. Genic evolutionary rate comparisons indicate that similar selective pressures acted along the G. magnirostris and zebra finch lineages suggesting that historical effective population size values have been similar in both lineages. 21 otherwise highly conserved genes were identified that each show evidence for positive selection on amino acid changes in the Darwin's finch lineage. Two of these genes (Igf2r and Pou1f1 have been implicated in beak morphology changes in Darwin’s finches. Five of 47 genes showing evidence of positive selection in early passerine evolution have cilia related functions, and may be examples of adaptively evolving reproductive proteins. Conclusions These results provide insights into past evolutionary processes that have shaped G. magnirostris genes and its genome, and provide the necessary foundation upon which to build population genomics resources that will shed light on more contemporaneous adaptive and non-adaptive processes that have contributed to the evolution of the Darwin’s finches.

  11. Cofactor-binding sites in proteins of deviating sequence: comparative analysis and clustering in torsion angle, cavity, and fold space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegemann, Björn; Klebe, Gerhard

    2012-02-01

    Small molecules are recognized in protein-binding pockets through surface-exposed physicochemical properties. To optimize binding, they have to adopt a conformation corresponding to a local energy minimum within the formed protein-ligand complex. However, their conformational flexibility makes them competent to bind not only to homologous proteins of the same family but also to proteins of remote similarity with respect to the shape of the binding pockets and folding pattern. Considering drug action, such observations can give rise to unexpected and undesired cross reactivity. In this study, datasets of six different cofactors (ADP, ATP, NAD(P)(H), FAD, and acetyl CoA, sharing an adenosine diphosphate moiety as common substructure), observed in multiple crystal structures of protein-cofactor complexes exhibiting sequence identity below 25%, have been analyzed for the conformational properties of the bound ligands, the distribution of physicochemical properties in the accommodating protein-binding pockets, and the local folding patterns next to the cofactor-binding site. State-of-the-art clustering techniques have been applied to group the different protein-cofactor complexes in the different spaces. Interestingly, clustering in cavity (Cavbase) and fold space (DALI) reveals virtually the same data structuring. Remarkable relationships can be found among the different spaces. They provide information on how conformations are conserved across the host proteins and which distinct local cavity and fold motifs recognize the different portions of the cofactors. In those cases, where different cofactors are found to be accommodated in a similar fashion to the same fold motifs, only a commonly shared substructure of the cofactors is used for the recognition process. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Fold-recognition and comparative modeling of human α2,3-sialyltransferases reveal their sequence and structural similarities to CstII from Campylobacter jejuni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji Petety V

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 3-D structure of none of the eukaryotic sialyltransferases (SiaTs has been determined so far. Sequence alignment algorithms such as BLAST and PSI-BLAST could not detect a homolog of these enzymes from the protein databank. SiaTs, thus, belong to the hard/medium target category in the CASP experiments. The objective of the current work is to model the 3-D structures of human SiaTs which transfer the sialic acid in α2,3-linkage viz., ST3Gal I, II, III, IV, V, and VI, using fold-recognition and comparative modeling methods. The pair-wise sequence similarity among these six enzymes ranges from 41 to 63%. Results Unlike the sequence similarity servers, fold-recognition servers identified CstII, a α2,3/8 dual-activity SiaT from Campylobacter jejuni as the homolog of all the six ST3Gals; the level of sequence similarity between CstII and ST3Gals is only 15–20% and the similarity is restricted to well-characterized motif regions of ST3Gals. Deriving template-target sequence alignments for the entire ST3Gal sequence was not straightforward: the fold-recognition servers could not find a template for the region preceding the L-motif and that between the L- and S-motifs. Multiple structural templates were identified to model these regions and template identification-modeling-evaluation had to be performed iteratively to choose the most appropriate templates. The modeled structures have acceptable stereochemical properties and are also able to provide qualitative rationalizations for some of the site-directed mutagenesis results reported in literature. Apart from the predicted models, an unexpected but valuable finding from this study is the sequential and structural relatedness of family GT42 and family GT29 SiaTs. Conclusion The modeled 3-D structures can be used for docking and other modeling studies and for the rational identification of residues to be mutated to impart desired properties such as altered stability, substrate

  13. Comparative diversity of ammonia oxidizer 16S rRNA gene sequences in native, tilled, and successional soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruns, M.A.; Stephen, J.R.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; Prosser, J.I.; Paul, E.A.

    1999-01-01

    Autotrophic ammonia oxidizer (AAO) populations in soils from native, tilled, and successional treatments at the Kellogg Biological Station Long-Term Ecological Research site in southwestern Michigan were compared to assess effects of disturbance on these bacteria. N fertilization effects on AAO

  14. GenHtr: a tool for comparative assessment of genetic heterogeneity in microbial genomes generated by massive short-read sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu GongXin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microevolution is the study of short-term changes of alleles within a population and their effects on the phenotype of organisms. The result of the below-species-level evolution is heterogeneity, where populations consist of subpopulations with a large number of structural variations. Heterogeneity analysis is thus essential to our understanding of how selective and neutral forces shape bacterial populations over a short period of time. The Solexa Genome Analyzer, a next-generation sequencing platform, allows millions of short sequencing reads to be obtained with great accuracy, allowing for the ability to study the dynamics of the bacterial population at the whole genome level. The tool referred to as GenHtr was developed for genome-wide heterogeneity analysis. Results For particular bacterial strains, GenHtr relies on a set of Solexa short reads on given bacteria pathogens and their isogenic reference genome to identify heterogeneity sites, the chromosomal positions with multiple variants of genes in the bacterial population, and variations that occur in large gene families. GenHtr accomplishes this by building and comparatively analyzing genome-wide heterogeneity genotypes for both the newly sequenced genomes (using massive short-read sequencing and their isogenic reference (using simulated data. As proof of the concept, this approach was applied to SRX007711, the Solexa sequencing data for a newly sequenced Staphylococcus aureus subsp. USA300 cell line, and demonstrated that it could predict such multiple variants. They include multiple variants of genes critical in pathogenesis, e.g. genes encoding a LysR family transcriptional regulator, 23 S ribosomal RNA, and DNA mismatch repair protein MutS. The heterogeneity results in non-synonymous and nonsense mutations, leading to truncated proteins for both LysR and MutS. Conclusion GenHtr was developed for genome-wide heterogeneity analysis. Although it is much more time

  15. Gaucher disease: transcriptome analyses using microarray or mRNA sequencing in a Gba1 mutant mouse model treated with velaglucerase alfa or imiglucerase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nupur Dasgupta

    Full Text Available Gaucher disease type 1, an inherited lysosomal storage disorder, is caused by mutations in GBA1 leading to defective glucocerebrosidase (GCase function and consequent excess accumulation of glucosylceramide/glucosylsphingosine in visceral organs. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT with the biosimilars, imiglucerase (imig or velaglucerase alfa (vela improves/reverses the visceral disease. Comparative transcriptomic effects (microarray and mRNA-Seq of no ERT and ERT (imig or vela were done with liver, lung, and spleen from mice having Gba1 mutant alleles, termed D409V/null. Disease-related molecular effects, dynamic ranges, and sensitivities were compared between mRNA-Seq and microarrays and their respective analytic tools, i.e. Mixed Model ANOVA (microarray, and DESeq and edgeR (mRNA-Seq. While similar gene expression patterns were observed with both platforms, mRNA-Seq identified more differentially expressed genes (DEGs (∼3-fold than the microarrays. Among the three analytic tools, DESeq identified the maximum number of DEGs for all tissues and treatments. DESeq and edgeR comparisons revealed differences in DEGs identified. In 9V/null liver, spleen and lung, post-therapy transcriptomes approximated WT, were partially reverted, and had little change, respectively, and were concordant with the corresponding histological and biochemical findings. DEG overlaps were only 8-20% between mRNA-Seq and microarray, but the biological pathways were similar. Cell growth and proliferation, cell cycle, heme metabolism, and mitochondrial dysfunction were most altered with the Gaucher disease process. Imig and vela differentially affected specific disease pathways. Differential molecular responses were observed in direct transcriptome comparisons from imig- and vela-treated tissues. These results provide cross-validation for the mRNA-Seq and microarray platforms, and show differences between the molecular effects of two highly structurally similar ERT

  16. Comparative sequence, structure and redox analyses of Klebsiella pneumoniae DsbA show that anti-virulence target DsbA enzymes fall into distinct classes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Kurth

    Full Text Available Bacterial DsbA enzymes catalyze oxidative folding of virulence factors, and have been identified as targets for antivirulence drugs. However, DsbA enzymes characterized to date exhibit a wide spectrum of redox properties and divergent structural features compared to the prototypical DsbA enzyme of Escherichia coli DsbA (EcDsbA. Nonetheless, sequence analysis shows that DsbAs are more highly conserved than their known substrate virulence factors, highlighting the potential to inhibit virulence across a range of organisms by targeting DsbA. For example, Salmonella enterica typhimurium (SeDsbA, 86 % sequence identity to EcDsbA shares almost identical structural, surface and redox properties. Using comparative sequence and structure analysis we predicted that five other bacterial DsbAs would share these properties. To confirm this, we characterized Klebsiella pneumoniae DsbA (KpDsbA, 81 % identity to EcDsbA. As expected, the redox properties, structure and surface features (from crystal and NMR data of KpDsbA were almost identical to those of EcDsbA and SeDsbA. Moreover, KpDsbA and EcDsbA bind peptides derived from their respective DsbBs with almost equal affinity, supporting the notion that compounds designed to inhibit EcDsbA will also inhibit KpDsbA. Taken together, our data show that DsbAs fall into different classes; that DsbAs within a class may be predicted by sequence analysis of binding loops; that DsbAs within a class are able to complement one another in vivo and that compounds designed to inhibit EcDsbA are likely to inhibit DsbAs within the same class.

  17. An artery accompanying the sciatic nerve (arteria comitans nervi ischiadici) and the position of the hip joint: a comparative histological study using chick, mouse, and human foetal specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizawa, A; Hayashi, S; Nasu, H; Abe, H; Rodríguez-Vázquez, J F; Murakami, G

    2013-02-01

    Birds and reptiles always carry a long and thick artery accompanying the sciatic nerve (i.e., the sciatic artery), whereas mammals do not. We attempted to demonstrate a difference in courses of the nerve and artery in fetuses in relation with the hip joint posture. Eight mid-term human fetuses (15-18 weeks), five mouse fetuses (E18) and five chick embryos (11 days after incubation) were examined histologically. Thin feeding arteries in the sciatic nerve were consistently observed in human fetuses in spite of the long, inferiorly curved course of the nerve around the ischium. The tissue around the human sciatic nerve was not so tight because of the medial and inferior shift of the nerve away from the hip joint. The fetal hip joint position differed among the species, being highly flexed in humans and almost at right angle flexion in mice and chicks. Because of deep adduction of the hip joint in the mouse, the knee was located near the midline of the body. The mouse sciatic nerve ran through the tight tissue along the head of the femur, whereas the chick nerve ran through the loose space even in the gluteal region. In birds, evolution of the pelvis including the hip joint without adduction seemed to make the arterial development possible. In mammals, highly flexed or adducted hip joint seemed to be one of the disturbing factors against development of the long and thick artery. A slight change in posture may cause significant arterial variation.

  18. Burn mouse models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calum, Henrik; Høiby, Niels; Moser, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Severe thermal injury induces immunosuppression, involving all parts of the immune system, especially when large fractions of the total body surface area are affected. An animal model was established to characterize the burn-induced immunosuppression. In our novel mouse model a 6 % third-degree b......Severe thermal injury induces immunosuppression, involving all parts of the immune system, especially when large fractions of the total body surface area are affected. An animal model was established to characterize the burn-induced immunosuppression. In our novel mouse model a 6 % third...... with infected burn wound compared with the burn wound only group. The burn mouse model resembles the clinical situation and provides an opportunity to examine or develop new strategies like new antibiotics and immune therapy, in handling burn wound victims much....

  19. Fine-scale maps of recombination rates and hotspots in the mouse genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunschwig, Hadassa; Levi, Liat; Ben-David, Eyal; Williams, Robert W; Yakir, Benjamin; Shifman, Sagiv

    2012-07-01

    Recombination events are not uniformly distributed and often cluster in narrow regions known as recombination hotspots. Several studies using different approaches have dramatically advanced our understanding of recombination hotspot regulation. Population genetic data have been used to map and quantify hotspots in the human genome. Genetic variation in recombination rates and hotspots usage have been explored in human pedigrees, mouse intercrosses, and by sperm typing. These studies pointed to the central role of the PRDM9 gene in hotspot modulation. In this study, we used single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from whole-genome resequencing and genotyping studies of mouse inbred strains to estimate recombination rates across the mouse genome and identified 47,068 historical hotspots--an average of over 2477 per chromosome. We show by simulation that inbred mouse strains can be used to identify positions of historical hotspots. Recombination hotspots were found to be enriched for the predicted binding sequences for different alleles of the PRDM9 protein. Recombination rates were on average lower near transcription start sites (TSS). Comparing the inferred historical recombination hotspots with the recent genome-wide mapping of double-strand breaks (DSBs) in mouse sperm revealed a significant overlap, especially toward the telomeres. Our results suggest that inbred strains can be used to characterize and study the dynamics of historical recombination hotspots. They also strengthen previous findings on mouse recombination hotspots, and specifically the impact of sequence variants in Prdm9.

  20. Full sequence and comparative analysis of the plasmid pAPEC-1 of avian pathogenic E. coli chi7122 (O78:K80:H9.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melha Mellata

    Full Text Available Extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC, including Avian Pathogenic E. coli (APEC, are very diverse. They cause a complex of diseases in Human, animals, and birds. Even though large plasmids are often associated with the virulence of ExPEC, their characterization is still in its infancy.We fully sequenced and analyzed the large plasmid pAPEC-1 (103,275-bp associated with the APEC strain chi7122, from worldwide serogroup O78ratioK80ratioH9. A putative virulence region spanning an 80-kb region of pAPEC-1 possesses four iron acquisition systems (iutA iucABCD, sitABCD, iroBCDN, and temperature-sensitive hemagglutinin tsh, a colicin V operon, increasing serum sensitivity iss, ompT, hlyF, and etsABC. Thirty three ORFs in pAPEC-1 are identified as insertion sequences (ISs that belong to nine families with diverse origins. The full length of the transfer region in pAPEC-1 (11 kb is shorter compared to the tra region of other sequenced F plasmids; the absence of some tra genes in pAPEC-1 affects its self-transferability, and the conjugative function of the plasmid was effective only in the presence of other plasmids. Two-replicon systems, repFIIA-repFIC and repFIB, and two post-segregational systems, srnB and hok/sok, are also present in the sequence of pAPEC-1. The comparison of the pAPEC-1 sequence with the two available plasmid sequences reveals more gene loss and reorganization than previously appreciated. The presence of pAPEC-1-associated genes is assessed in human ExPEC by PCR. Many patterns of association between genes are found.The pathotype typical of pAPEC-1 was present in some human strains, which indicates a horizontal transfer between strains and the zoonotic risk of APEC strains. ColV plasmids could have common virulence genes that could be acquired by transposition, without sharing genes of plasmid function.

  1. RNA sequencing reveals differential expression of mitochondrial and oxidation reduction genes in the long-lived naked mole-rat when compared to mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chuanfei; Li, Yang; Holmes, Andrew; Szafranski, Karol; Faulkes, Chris G; Coen, Clive W; Buffenstein, Rochelle; Platzer, Matthias; de Magalhães, João Pedro; Church, George M

    2011-01-01

    The naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber) is a long-lived, cancer resistant rodent and there is a great interest in identifying the adaptations responsible for these and other of its unique traits. We employed RNA sequencing to compare liver gene expression profiles between naked mole-rats and wild-derived mice. Our results indicate that genes associated with oxidoreduction and mitochondria were expressed at higher relative levels in naked mole-rats. The largest effect is nearly 300-fold higher expression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (Epcam), a tumour-associated protein. Also of interest are the protease inhibitor, alpha2-macroglobulin (A2m), and the mitochondrial complex II subunit Sdhc, both ageing-related genes found strongly over-expressed in the naked mole-rat. These results hint at possible candidates for specifying species differences in ageing and cancer, and in particular suggest complex alterations in mitochondrial and oxidation reduction pathways in the naked mole-rat. Our differential gene expression analysis obviated the need for a reference naked mole-rat genome by employing a combination of Illumina/Solexa and 454 platforms for transcriptome sequencing and assembling transcriptome contigs of the non-sequenced species. Overall, our work provides new research foci and methods for studying the naked mole-rat's fascinating characteristics.

  2. RNA sequencing reveals differential expression of mitochondrial and oxidation reduction genes in the long-lived naked mole-rat when compared to mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanfei Yu

    Full Text Available The naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber is a long-lived, cancer resistant rodent and there is a great interest in identifying the adaptations responsible for these and other of its unique traits. We employed RNA sequencing to compare liver gene expression profiles between naked mole-rats and wild-derived mice. Our results indicate that genes associated with oxidoreduction and mitochondria were expressed at higher relative levels in naked mole-rats. The largest effect is nearly 300-fold higher expression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (Epcam, a tumour-associated protein. Also of interest are the protease inhibitor, alpha2-macroglobulin (A2m, and the mitochondrial complex II subunit Sdhc, both ageing-related genes found strongly over-expressed in the naked mole-rat. These results hint at possible candidates for specifying species differences in ageing and cancer, and in particular suggest complex alterations in mitochondrial and oxidation reduction pathways in the naked mole-rat. Our differential gene expression analysis obviated the need for a reference naked mole-rat genome by employing a combination of Illumina/Solexa and 454 platforms for transcriptome sequencing and assembling transcriptome contigs of the non-sequenced species. Overall, our work provides new research foci and methods for studying the naked mole-rat's fascinating characteristics.

  3. Whole-Genome Sequencing and Comparative Analysis of Mycobacterium brisbanense Reveals a Possible Soil Origin and Capability in Fertiliser Synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yee Wee

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium brisbanense is a member of Mycobacterium fortuitum third biovariant complex, which includes rapidly growing Mycobacterium spp. that normally inhabit soil, dust and water, and can sometimes cause respiratory tract infections in humans. We present the first whole-genome analysis of M. brisbanense UM_WWY which was isolated from a 70-year-old Malaysian patient. Molecular phylogenetic analyses confirmed the identification of this strain as M. brisbanense and showed that it has an unusually large genome compared with related mycobacteria. The large genome size of M. brisbanense UM_WWY (~7.7Mbp is consistent with further findings that this strain has a highly variable genome structure that contains many putative horizontally transferred genomic islands and prophage. Comparative analysis showed that M. brisbanense UM_WWY is the only Mycobacterium species that possesses a complete set of genes encoding enzymes involved in the urea cycle, suggesting that this soil bacterium is able to synthesize urea for use as plant fertilizers. It is likely that M. brisbanense UM_WWY is adapted to live in soil as its primary habitat since the genome contains many genes associated with nitrogen metabolism. Nevertheless, a large number of predicted virulence genes were identified in M. brisbanense UM_WWY that are mostly shared with well-studied mycobacterial pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium abscessus. These findings are consistent with the role of M. brisbanense as an opportunistic pathogen of humans. The whole-genome study of UM_WWY has provided the basis for future work of M. brisbanense.

  4. Whole-Genome Sequencing and Comparative Analysis of Mycobacterium brisbanense Reveals a Possible Soil Origin and Capability in Fertiliser Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Wei Yee; Tan, Tze King; Jakubovics, Nicholas S; Choo, Siew Woh

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium brisbanense is a member of Mycobacterium fortuitum third biovariant complex, which includes rapidly growing Mycobacterium spp. that normally inhabit soil, dust and water, and can sometimes cause respiratory tract infections in humans. We present the first whole-genome analysis of M. brisbanense UM_WWY which was isolated from a 70-year-old Malaysian patient. Molecular phylogenetic analyses confirmed the identification of this strain as M. brisbanense and showed that it has an unusually large genome compared with related mycobacteria. The large genome size of M. brisbanense UM_WWY (~7.7Mbp) is consistent with further findings that this strain has a highly variable genome structure that contains many putative horizontally transferred genomic islands and prophage. Comparative analysis showed that M. brisbanense UM_WWY is the only Mycobacterium species that possesses a complete set of genes encoding enzymes involved in the urea cycle, suggesting that this soil bacterium is able to synthesize urea for use as plant fertilizers. It is likely that M. brisbanense UM_WWY is adapted to live in soil as its primary habitat since the genome contains many genes associated with nitrogen metabolism. Nevertheless, a large number of predicted virulence genes were identified in M. brisbanense UM_WWY that are mostly shared with well-studied mycobacterial pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium abscessus. These findings are consistent with the role of M. brisbanense as an opportunistic pathogen of humans. The whole-genome study of UM_WWY has provided the basis for future work of M. brisbanense.

  5. Comparative genomic analysis of single-molecule sequencing and hybrid approaches for finishing the Clostridium autoethanogenum JA1-1 strain DSM 10061 genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Nagaraju, Shilpa [LanzaTech; Utturkar, Sagar M [ORNL; De Tissera, Sashini [LanzaTech; Segovia, Simón [LanzaTech; Mitchell, Wayne [LanzaTech; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Dassanayake, Asela [LanzaTech; Köpke, Michael [LanzaTech

    2014-01-01

    Background Clostridium autoethanogenum strain JA1-1 (DSM 10061) is an acetogen capable of fermenting CO, CO2 and H2 (e.g. from syngas or waste gases) into biofuel ethanol and commodity chemicals such as 2,3-butanediol. A draft genome sequence consisting of 100 contigs has been published. Results A closed, high-quality genome sequence for C. autoethanogenum DSM10061 was generated using only the latest single-molecule DNA sequencing technology and without the need for manual finishing. It is assigned to the most complex genome classification based upon genome features such as repeats, prophage, nine copies of the rRNA gene operons. It has a low G + C content of 31.1%. Illumina, 454, Illumina/454 hybrid assemblies were generated and then compared to the draft and PacBio assemblies using summary statistics, CGAL, QUAST and REAPR bioinformatics tools and comparative genomic approaches. Assemblies based upon shorter read DNA technologies were confounded by the large number repeats and their size, which in the case of the rRNA gene operons were ~5 kb. CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Paloindromic Repeats) systems among biotechnologically relevant Clostridia were classified and related to plasmid content and prophages. Potential associations between plasmid content and CRISPR systems may have implications for historical industrial scale Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol (ABE) fermentation failures and future large scale bacterial fermentations. While C. autoethanogenum contains an active CRISPR system, no such system is present in the closely related Clostridium ljungdahlii DSM 13528. A common prophage inserted into the Arg-tRNA shared between the strains suggests a common ancestor. However, C. ljungdahlii contains several additional putative prophages and it has more than double the amount of prophage DNA compared to C. autoethanogenum. Other differences include important metabolic genes for central metabolism (as an additional hydrogenase and the absence of a

  6. Colorimetric and dynamic light scattering detection of DNA sequences by using positively charged gold nanospheres: a comparative study with gold nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pylaev, T. E.; Khanadeev, V. A.; Khlebtsov, B. N.; Dykman, L. A.; Bogatyrev, V. A.; Khlebtsov, N. G.

    2011-07-01

    We introduce a new genosensing approach employing CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide)-coated positively charged colloidal gold nanoparticles (GNPs) to detect target DNA sequences by using absorption spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering. The approach is compared with a previously reported method employing unmodified CTAB-coated gold nanorods (GNRs). Both approaches are based on the observation that whereas the addition of probe and target ssDNA to CTAB-coated particles results in particle aggregation, no aggregation is observed after addition of probe and nontarget DNA sequences. Our goal was to compare the feasibility and sensitivity of both methods. A 21-mer ssDNA from the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 HIV-1 U5 long terminal repeat (LTR) sequence and a 23-mer ssDNA from the Bacillus anthracis cryptic protein and protective antigen precursor (pagA) genes were used as ssDNA models. In the case of GNRs, unexpectedly, the colorimetric test failed with perfect cigar-like particles but could be performed with dumbbell and dog-bone rods. By contrast, our approach with cationic CTAB-coated GNPs is easy to implement and possesses excellent feasibility with retention of comparable sensitivity—a 0.1 nM concentration of target cDNA can be detected with the naked eye and 10 pM by dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements. The specificity of our method is illustrated by successful DLS detection of one-three base mismatches in cDNA sequences for both DNA models. These results suggest that the cationic GNPs and DLS can be used for genosensing under optimal DNA hybridization conditions without any chemical modifications of the particle surface with ssDNA molecules and signal amplification. Finally, we discuss a more than two-three-order difference in the reported estimations of the detection sensitivity of colorimetric methods (0.1 to 10-100 pM) to show that the existing aggregation models are inconsistent with the detection limits of about 0.1-1 pM DNA and that

  7. Global MLST of Salmonella Typhi Revisited in Post-Genomic Era: Genetic conservation, Population Structure and Comparative genomics of rare sequence types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kien-Pong eYap

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Typhoid fever, caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, remains an important public health burden in Southeast Asia and other endemic countries. Various genotyping methods have been applied to study the genetic variations of this human-restricted pathogen. Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST is one of the widely accepted methods, and recently, there is a growing interest in the re-application of MLST in the post-genomic era. In this study, we provide the global MLST distribution of S. Typhi utilizing both publicly available 1,826 S. Typhi genome sequences in addition to performing conventional MLST on S. Typhi strains isolated from various endemic regions spanning over a century. Our global MLST analysis confirms the predominance of two sequence types (ST1 and ST2 co-existing in the endemic regions. Interestingly, S. Typhi strains with ST8 are currently confined within the African continent. Comparative genomic analyses of ST8 and other rare STs with genomes of ST1/ST2 revealed unique mutations in important virulence genes such as flhB, sipC and tviD that may explain the variations that differentiate between seemingly successful (widespread and unsuccessful (poor dissemination S. Typhi populations. Large scale whole-genome phylogeny demonstrated evidence of phylogeographical structuring and showed that ST8 may have diverged from the earlier ancestral population of ST1 and ST2, which later lost some of its fitness advantages, leading to poor worldwide dissemination. In response to the unprecedented increase in genomic data, this study demonstrates and highlights the utility of large-scale genome-based MLST as a quick and effective approach to narrow the scope of in-depth comparative genomic analysis and consequently provide new insights into the fine scale of pathogen evolution and population structure.

  8. BLAST and FASTA similarity searching for multiple sequence alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, William R

    2014-01-01

    BLAST, FASTA, and other similarity searching programs seek to identify homologous proteins and DNA sequences based on excess sequence similarity. If two sequences share much more similarity than expected by chance, the simplest explanation for the excess similarity is common ancestry-homology. The most effective similarity searches compare protein sequences, rather than DNA sequences, for sequences that encode proteins, and use expectation values, rather than percent identity, to infer homology. The BLAST and FASTA packages of sequence comparison programs provide programs for comparing protein and DNA sequences to protein databases (the most sensitive searches). Protein and translated-DNA comparisons to protein databases routinely allow evolutionary look back times from 1 to 2 billion years; DNA:DNA searches are 5-10-fold less sensitive. BLAST and FASTA can be run on popular web sites, but can also be downloaded and installed on local computers. With local installation, target databases can be customized for the sequence data being characterized. With today's very large protein databases, search sensitivity can also be improved by searching smaller comprehensive databases, for example, a complete protein set from an evolutionarily neighboring model organism. By default, BLAST and FASTA use scoring strategies target for distant evolutionary relationships; for comparisons involving short domains or queries, or searches that seek relatively close homologs (e.g. mouse-human), shallower scoring matrices will be more effective. Both BLAST and FASTA provide very accurate statistical estimates, which can be used to reliably identify protein sequences that diverged more than 2 billion years ago.

  9. A Comparative Prospective Study of Two Different Treatment Sequences i.e. Bottom Up-Inside Out and Topdown-Outside in, in the Treatment of Panfacial Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degala, Saikrishna; Sundar, S Shyam; Mamata, K S

    2015-12-01

    To compare the sequence bottom-up inside-out with top-down outside-in, in the treatment of pan facial fractures and to evaluate the outcome of these approaches. The data from 11 patients with panfacial fracture are prospectively analysed. Five cases are treated with bottom-up approach and six patients with top-down approach. There were 11 male patients (six in top-down approach and five in bottom-up approach), ranging in age from 24 to 50 years. All injuries were result of RTA (n = 11, 100 %). Final treatment outcome was excellent in 3 (50 %), 1 (16 %) good and 2 (32 %) cases were fair in topdown approach, 3 (60 %) excellent and 2 (40 %) fair in bottom up approach with contingency coefficient value (P reconstruction of the remaining. Choice of the bottom-up inside-out or top-down outside-in sequence should be according to the pattern of fractures and preference of the surgeon. However, further controlled clinical trials, comparative studies with a larger sample size would be better to evaluate the final clinical outcome of individual techniques.

  10. Oral-Only Linezolid-Rifampin Is Highly Effective Compared with Other Antibiotics for Periprosthetic Joint Infection: Study of a Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, John M; Saini, Vikram; Ashbaugh, Alyssa G; Miller, Robert J; Ordonez, Alvaro A; Ortines, Roger V; Wang, Yu; Sterling, Robert S; Jain, Sanjay K; Miller, Lloyd S

    2017-04-19

    The medical treatment of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) involves prolonged systemic antibiotic courses, often with suboptimal clinical outcomes including increased morbidity and health-care costs. Oral and intravenous monotherapies and combination antibiotic regimens were evaluated in a mouse model of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) PJI. Oral linezolid with or without oral rifampin, intravenous vancomycin with oral rifampin, intravenous daptomycin or ceftaroline with or without oral rifampin, oral doxycycline, or sham treatment were administered at human-exposure doses for 6 weeks in a mouse model of PJI. Bacterial burden was assessed by in vivo bioluminescent imaging and ex vivo counting of colony-forming units (CFUs), and reactive bone changes were evaluated with radiographs and micro-computed tomography (μCT) imaging. Oral-only linezolid-rifampin and all intravenous antibiotic-rifampin combinations resulted in no recoverable bacteria and minimized reactive bone changes. Although oral linezolid was the most effective monotherapy, all oral and intravenous antibiotic monotherapies failed to clear infection or prevent reactive bone changes. Combination antibiotic-rifampin regimens, including oral-only linezolid-rifampin and the newer ceftaroline-rifampin combinations, were highly effective and more efficacious than monotherapies when used against a preclinical MRSA PJI. This study provides important preclinical evidence to better optimize future antibiotic therapy against PJIs. In particular, the oral-only linezolid-rifampin option might reduce venous access complications and health-care costs.

  11. Differential tumor biology effects of double-initiation in a mouse skin chemical carcinogenesis model comparing wild type versus protein kinase Cepsilon overexpression mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yafan; Wheeler, Deric L; Ananthaswamy, Honnavara N; Verma, Ajit K; Oberley, Terry D

    2007-12-01

    Our previous studies showed that protein kinase Cepsilon (PKCepsilon) verexpression in mouse skin resulted in metastatic squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) elicited by single 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-initiation and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-promotion in the absence of preceding papilloma formation as is typically observed in wild type mice. The present study demonstrates that double-DMBA initiation modulates tumor incidence, multiplicity, and latency period in both wild type and PKCepsilon overexpression transgenic (PKCepsilon-Tg) mice. After 17 weeks (wks) of tumor promotion, a reduction in papilloma multiplicity was observed in double- versus single-DMBA initiated wild type mice. Papilloma multiplicity was inversely correlated with cell death indices of interfollicular keratinocytes, indicating decreased papilloma formation was caused by increased cell death and suggesting the origin of papillomas is in interfollicular epidermis. Double-initiated PKCepsilon-Tg mice had accelerated carcinoma formation and cancer incidence in comparison to single-initiated PKCepsilon-Tg mice. Morphologic analysis of mouse skin following double initiation and tumor promotion showed a similar if not identical series of events to those previously observed following single initiation and tumor promotion: putative preneoplastic cells were observed arising from hyperplastic hair follicles (HFs) with subsequent cancer cell infiltration into the dermis. Single-initiated PKCepsilon-Tg mice exhibited increased mitosis in epidermal cells of HFs during tumor promotion.

  12. Comparative Analyses of Transcriptional Profiles in Mouse Organs Using a Pneumonic Plague Model after Infection with Wild-Type Yersinia pestis CO92 and Its Braun Lipoprotein Mutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristi L. Galindo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We employed Murine GeneChips to delineate the global transcriptional profiles of the livers, lungs, and spleens in a mouse pneumonic plague infection model with wild-type (WT Y. pestis CO92 and its Braun lipoprotein (Δlpp mutant with reduced virulence. These organs showed differential transcriptional responses to infection with WT Y. pestis, but the overall host functional processes affected were similar across all three tissues. Gene expression alterations were found in inflammation, cytokine signaling, and apoptotic cell death-associated genes. Comparison of WT and Δlpp mutant-infected mice indicated significant overlap in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- associated gene expression, but the absence of Lpp perturbed host cell signaling at critical regulatory junctions resulting in altered immune response and possibly host cell apoptosis. We generated a putative signaling pathway including major inflammatory components that could account for the synergistic action of LPS and Lpp and provided the mechanistic basis of attenuation caused by deletion of the lpp gene from Y. pestis in a mouse model of pneumonic plague.

  13. Evaluation of Dixon Sequence on Hybrid PET/MR Compared with Contrast-Enhanced PET/CT for PET-Positive Lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Ju Hye; Cho, Ihn Ho; Kong, Eun Jung; Chun, Kyung Ah

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance (PET/MR) imaging performs a two-point Dixon MR sequence for attenuation correction. However, MR data in hybrid PET/MR should provide anatomic and morphologic information as well as an attenuation map. We evaluated the Dixon sequence of hybrid PET/MR for anatomic correlation of PET-positive lesions compared with contrast-enhanced PET/computed tomography (CT) in patients with oncologic diseases. Twelve patients underwent a single injection, dual imaging protocol. PET/CT was performed with an intravenous contrast agent (85±13 min after 18 F-FDG injection of 403± 45 MBq) and then (125±19 min after injection) PET/MR was performed. Attenuation correction and anatomic allocation of PET were performed using contrast-enhanced CT for PET/CT and Dixon MR sequence for hybrid PET/MR. The Dixon MR sequence and contrast-enhanced CT were compared for anatomic correlation of PET-positive lesions (scoring scale ranging from 0 to 3 for visual ratings). Additionally, standardized uptake values (SUVs) for the detected lesions were assessed for quantitative comparison. Both hybrid PET/MR and contrast-enhanced PET/CT identified 55 lesions with increased FDG uptake in ten patients. In total, 28 lymph nodes, 11 bone lesions, 3 dermal nodules, 3 pleural thickening lesions, 2 thyroid nodules, 1 pancreas, 1 liver, 1 ovary, 1 uterus, 1 breast, 1 soft tissue and 2 lung lesions were present. The best performance was observed for anatomic correlation of PET findings by the contrast-enhanced CT scans (contrast-enhanced CT, 2.64± 0.70; in-phase, 1.29±1.01; opposed-phase, 1.29±1.15; water-weighted, 1.71±1.07; fat weighted, 0.56±1.03). A significant difference was observed between the scores obtained from the contrast-enhanced CT and all four coregistered Dixon MR images. Quantitative evaluation revealed a high correlation between the SUVs measured with hybrid PET/MR (SUVmean, 2.63±1.62; SUVmax, 4.30±2.88) and contrast-enhanced PET

  14. Evaluation of Dixon Sequence on Hybrid PET/MR Compared with Contrast-Enhanced PET/CT for PET-Positive Lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Ju Hye; Cho, Ihn Ho; Kong, Eun Jung; Chun, Kyung Ah [Yeungnam Univ. Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    Hybrid positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance (PET/MR) imaging performs a two-point Dixon MR sequence for attenuation correction. However, MR data in hybrid PET/MR should provide anatomic and morphologic information as well as an attenuation map. We evaluated the Dixon sequence of hybrid PET/MR for anatomic correlation of PET-positive lesions compared with contrast-enhanced PET/computed tomography (CT) in patients with oncologic diseases. Twelve patients underwent a single injection, dual imaging protocol. PET/CT was performed with an intravenous contrast agent (85±13 min after {sup 18}F-FDG injection of 403± 45 MBq) and then (125±19 min after injection) PET/MR was performed. Attenuation correction and anatomic allocation of PET were performed using contrast-enhanced CT for PET/CT and Dixon MR sequence for hybrid PET/MR. The Dixon MR sequence and contrast-enhanced CT were compared for anatomic correlation of PET-positive lesions (scoring scale ranging from 0 to 3 for visual ratings). Additionally, standardized uptake values (SUVs) for the detected lesions were assessed for quantitative comparison. Both hybrid PET/MR and contrast-enhanced PET/CT identified 55 lesions with increased FDG uptake in ten patients. In total, 28 lymph nodes, 11 bone lesions, 3 dermal nodules, 3 pleural thickening lesions, 2 thyroid nodules, 1 pancreas, 1 liver, 1 ovary, 1 uterus, 1 breast, 1 soft tissue and 2 lung lesions were present. The best performance was observed for anatomic correlation of PET findings by the contrast-enhanced CT scans (contrast-enhanced CT, 2.64± 0.70; in-phase, 1.29±1.01; opposed-phase, 1.29±1.15; water-weighted, 1.71±1.07; fat weighted, 0.56±1.03). A significant difference was observed between the scores obtained from the contrast-enhanced CT and all four coregistered Dixon MR images. Quantitative evaluation revealed a high correlation between the SUVs measured with hybrid PET/MR (SUVmean, 2.63±1.62; SUVmax, 4.30±2.88) and contrast

  15. [Comparative analysis on the complete genome sequence of mumps epidemic strain and mumps vaccine strain S79 isolated in Zhejiang province, China between year 2005 and 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong-Yan; Feng, Yan; Zhong, Shu-Ling; Lu, Yi-Yu; Zhuang, Fang-Cheng; Xu, Chang-Ping

    2012-03-01

    To compare the differences in the complete genome sequence between mumps epidemic strain and mumps vaccine strain S79 isolated in Zhejiang province. A total of 4 mumps epidemic strains, which were separated from Zhejiang province during 2005 to 2010, named as ZJ05-1, ZJ06-3, ZJ08-1 and ZJ10-1 were selected in the study. The complete genome sequences were amplified using RT-PCR. The genetic differences between vaccine strain S79 and other genotype strains were compared; while the genetic-distance was calculated and the evolution was analyzed. The biggest difference between the 4 epidemic strains and the vaccine strain S79 was found on the membrane associated protein gene; whose average nucleotide differential number was 42.5 +/- 3.0 and the average variant ratio was 13.6%; while the mean amino acid differential number was 12.8 +/- 1.5 and the average variant ratio was 22.4%. The smallest difference among the 4 epidemic strains and the vaccine strain was found in stromatin genes, whose average nucleotide differential number was 73.8 +/- 2.5 and the average variant ratio was 5.9%; while the mean amino acid differential number was 3.0 +/- 0.8 and the average variant ratio was 0.8%. The dn/ds value of the stromatin genes of the 4 epidemic strains reached the highest, as 0.6526; but without any positive pressure (dn/ds 0.05). There were mutations happened on the known antigen epitope, as 8th amino acid of membrane associated protein genes and on the 336th and 356th amino acid of hemagglutinin/neuraminidase proteins. Compared with the vaccine strain, the glycosylation sites of ZJ05-1, ZJ06-3, ZJ08-1 and ZJ10-1 increased 1, 1, 2 and 2 respectively. The complete amino acid sequence of all strains showed that there were 17 characteristic sites found on the genotype-F mumps strain. Within the complete genome, the genetic-distance between epidemic strains and vaccine strains in Zhejiang province (0.071) was significantly larger than the genetic-distance between strains in

  16. Introduction of the human proα1(I) collagen gene into proα1(I)-deficient Mov-13 mouse cells leads to formation of functional mouse-human hybrid type I collagen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnieke, A.; Dziadek, M.; Bateman, J.; Mascara, T.; Harbers, K.; Gelinas, R.; Jaenisch, R.

    1987-01-01

    The Mov-13 mouse strain carries a retroviral insertion in the proα1(I) collagen gene that prevents transcription of the gene. Cell lines derived from homozygous embryos do not express type I collagen although normal amounts of proα2 mRNA are synthesized. The authors have introduced genomic clones of either the human or mouse proα1(I) collagen gene into homozygous cell lines to assess whether the human or mouse proα1(I) chains can associate with the endogenous mouse proα2(I) chain to form stable type I collagen. The human gene under control of the simian virus 40 promoter was efficiently transcribed in the transfected cells. Protein analyses revealed that stable heterotrimers consisting of two human α1 chains and one mouse α2 chain were formed and that type I collagen was secreted by the transfected cells at normal rates. However, the electrophoretic migration of both α1(I) and α2(I) chains in the human-mouse hybrid molecules were retarded, compared to the α(I) chains in control mouse cells. Inhibition of the posttranslational hydroxylation of lysine and proline resulted in comigration of human and mouse α1 and α2 chains, suggesting that increased posttranslational modification caused the altered electrophoretic migration in the human-mouse hybrid molecules. Amino acid sequence differences between the mouse and human α chains may interfere with the normal rate of helix formation and increase the degree of posttranslational modifications similar to those observed in patients with lethal perinatal osteogenesis imperfecta. The Mov-13 mouse system should allow the authors to study the effect specific mutations introduced in transfected proα1(I) genes have on the synthesis, assembly, and function of collagen I

  17. Novel nonphosphorylated peptides with conserved sequences selectively bind to Grb7 SH2 domain with affinity comparable to its phosphorylated ligand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Zhang

    Full Text Available The Grb7 (growth factor receptor-bound 7 protein, a member of the Grb7 protein family, is found to be highly expressed in such metastatic tumors as breast cancer, esophageal cancer, liver cancer, etc. The src-homology 2 (SH2 domain in the C-terminus is reported to be mainly involved in Grb7 signaling pathways. Using the random peptide library, we identified a series of Grb7 SH2 domain-binding nonphosphorylated peptides in the yeast two-hybrid system. These peptides have a conserved GIPT/K/N sequence at the N-terminus and G/WD/IP at the C-terminus, and the region between the N-and C-terminus contains fifteen amino acids enriched with serines, threonines and prolines. The association between the nonphosphorylated peptides and the Grb7 SH2 domain occurred in vitro and ex vivo. When competing for binding to the Grb7 SH2 domain in a complex, one synthesized nonphosphorylated ligand, containing the twenty-two amino acid-motif sequence, showed at least comparable affinity to the phosphorylated ligand of ErbB3 in vitro, and its overexpression inhibited the proliferation of SK-BR-3 cells. Such nonphosphorylated peptides may be useful for rational design of drugs targeted against cancers that express high levels of Grb7 protein.

  18. Characterization of fungi in office dust: Comparing results of microbial secondary metabolites, fungal internal transcribed spacer region sequencing, viable culture and other microbial indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J-H; Sulyok, M; Lemons, A R; Green, B J; Cox-Ganser, J M

    2018-05-04

    Recent developments in molecular and chemical methods have enabled the analysis of fungal DNA and secondary metabolites, often produced during fungal growth, in environmental samples. We compared 3 fungal analytical methods by analysing floor dust samples collected from an office building for fungi using viable culture, internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing and secondary metabolites using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Of the 32 metabolites identified, 29 had a potential link to fungi with levels ranging from 0.04 (minimum for alternariol monomethylether) to 5700 ng/g (maximum for neoechinulin A). The number of fungal metabolites quantified per sample ranged from 8 to 16 (average = 13/sample). We identified 216 fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs) with the number per sample ranging from 6 to 29 (average = 18/sample). We identified 37 fungal species using culture, and the number per sample ranged from 2 to 13 (average = 8/sample). Agreement in identification between ITS sequencing and culturing was weak (kappa = -0.12 to 0.27). The number of cultured fungal species poorly correlated with OTUs, which did not correlate with the number of metabolites. These suggest that using multiple measurement methods may provide an improved understanding of fungal exposures in indoor environments and that secondary metabolites may be considered as an additional source of exposure. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Study of canine parvovirus evolution: comparative analysis of full-length VP2 gene sequences from Argentina and international field strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo Calderón, Marina; Wilda, Maximiliano; Boado, Lorena; Keller, Leticia; Malirat, Viviana; Iglesias, Marcela; Mattion, Nora; La Torre, Jose

    2012-02-01

    The continuous emergence of new strains of canine parvovirus (CPV), poorly protected by current vaccination, is a concern among breeders, veterinarians, and dog owners around the world. Therefore, the understanding of the genetic variation in emerging CPV strains is crucial for the design of disease control strategies, including vaccines. In this paper, we obtained the sequences of the full-length gene encoding for the main capsid protein (VP2) of 11 canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) Argentine representative field strains, selected from a total of 75 positive samples studied in our laboratory in the last 9 years. A comparative sequence analysis was performed on 9 CPV-2c, one CPV-2a, and one CPV-2b Argentine strains with respect to international strains reported in the GenBank database. In agreement with previous reports, a high degree of identity was found among CPV-2c Argentine strains (99.6-100% and 99.7-100% at nucleotide and amino acid levels, respectively). However, the appearance of a new substitution in the 440 position (T440A) in four CPV-2c Argentine strains obtained after the year 2009 gives support to the variability observed for this position located within the VP2, three-fold spike. This is the first report on the genetic characterization of the full-length VP2 gene of emerging CPV strains in South America and shows that all the Argentine CPV-2c isolates cluster together with European and North American CPV-2c strains.

  20. Motif-independent prediction of a secondary metabolism gene cluster using comparative genomics: application to sequenced genomes of Aspergillus and ten other filamentous fungal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Itaru; Umemura, Myco; Koike, Hideaki; Asai, Kiyoshi; Machida, Masayuki

    2014-08-01

    Despite their biological importance, a significant number of genes for secondary metabolite biosynthesis (SMB) remain undetected due largely to the fact that they are highly diverse and are not expressed under a variety of cultivation conditions. Several software tools including SMURF and antiSMASH have been developed to predict fungal SMB gene clusters by finding core genes encoding polyketide synthase, nonribosomal peptide synthetase and dimethylallyltryptophan synthase as well as several others typically present in the cluster. In this work, we have devised a novel comparative genomics method to identify SMB gene clusters that is independent of motif information of the known SMB genes. The method detects SMB gene clusters by searching for a similar order of genes and their presence in nonsyntenic blocks. With this method, we were able to identify many known SMB gene clusters with the core genes in the genomic sequences of 10 filamentous fungi. Furthermore, we have also detected SMB gene clusters without core genes, including the kojic acid biosynthesis gene cluster of Aspergillus oryzae. By varying the detection parameters of the method, a significant difference in the sequence characteristics was detected between the genes residing inside the clusters and those outside the clusters. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  1. Comparative analysis of human cytomegalovirus a-sequence in multiple clinical isolates by using polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaia, J A; Gallez-Hawkins, G; Churchill, M A; Morton-Blackshere, A; Pande, H; Adler, S P; Schmidt, G M; Forman, S J

    1990-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) a-sequence (a-seq) is located in the joining region between the long (L) and short (S) unique sequences of the virus (L-S junction), and this hypervariable junction has been used to differentiate HCMV strains. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there are differences among strains of human cytomegalovirus which could be characterized by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the a-seq of HCMV DNA and to compare a PCR method of strain differentiation with conventional restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) methodology by using HCMV junction probes. Laboratory strains of HCMV and viral isolates from individuals with HCMV infection were characterized by using both RFLPs and PCR. The PCR assay amplified regions in the major immediate-early gene (IE-1), the 64/65-kDa matrix phosphoprotein (pp65), and the a-seq of the L-S junction region. HCMV laboratory strains Towne, AD169, and Davis were distinguishable, in terms of size of the amplified product, when analyzed by PCR with primers specific for the a-seq but were indistinguishable by using PCR targeted to IE-1 and pp65 sequences. When this technique was applied to a characterization of isolates from individuals with HCMV infection, selected isolates could be readily distinguished. In addition, when the a-seq PCR product was analyzed with restriction enzyme digestion for the presence of specific sequences, these DNA differences were confirmed. PCR analysis across the variable a-seq of HCMV demonstrated differences among strains which were confirmed by RFLP in 38 of 40 isolates analyzed. The most informative restriction enzyme sites in the a-seq for distinguishing HCMV isolates were those of MnlI and BssHII. This indicates that the a-seq of HCMV is heterogeneous among wild strains, and PCR of the a-seq of HCMV is a practical way to characterize differences in strains of HCMV. Images PMID:1980680

  2. Developing a framework to assess the cost-effectiveness of COMPARE -A global platform for the exchange of sequence-based pathogen data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alleweldt, F.; Kara, Sami; Osinski, A.

    2017-01-01

    Analysing the genomic data of pathogens with the help of next-generation sequencing (NGS) is an increasingly important part of disease outbreak investigations and helps guide responses. While this technology has already been successfully employed to elucidate and control disease outbreaks, wider...... implementation of NGS also depends on its cost-effectiveness. COMPARE - short for 'Collaborative Management Platform for detection and Analyses of (Re-) emerging and foodborne outbreaks' - is a major project, funded by the European Union, to develop a global platform for sharing and analysing NGS data...... and thereby improve the rapid identification, containment and mitigation of emerging infectious diseases and foodborne outbreaks. This article introduces the project and presents the results of a review of the literature, composed of previous relevant cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analyses. The authors...

  3. Comparative genomics and prediction of conditionally dispensable sequences in legume-infecting Fusarium oxysporum formae speciales facilitates identification of candidate effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Angela H; Sharma, Mamta; Thatcher, Louise F; Azam, Sarwar; Hane, James K; Sperschneider, Jana; Kidd, Brendan N; Anderson, Jonathan P; Ghosh, Raju; Garg, Gagan; Lichtenzveig, Judith; Kistler, H Corby; Shea, Terrance; Young, Sarah; Buck, Sally-Anne G; Kamphuis, Lars G; Saxena, Rachit; Pande, Suresh; Ma, Li-Jun; Varshney, Rajeev K; Singh, Karam B

    2016-03-05

    Soil-borne fungi of the Fusarium oxysporum species complex cause devastating wilt disease on many crops including legumes that supply human dietary protein needs across many parts of the globe. We present and compare draft genome assemblies for three legume-infecting formae speciales (ff. spp.): F. oxysporum f. sp. ciceris (Foc-38-1) and f. sp. pisi (Fop-37622), significant pathogens of chickpea and pea respectively, the world's second and third most important grain legumes, and lastly f. sp. medicaginis (Fom-5190a) for which we developed a model legume pathosystem utilising Medicago truncatula. Focusing on the identification of pathogenicity gene content, we leveraged the reference genomes of Fusarium pathogens F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (tomato-infecting) and F. solani (pea-infecting) and their well-characterised core and dispensable chromosomes to predict genomic organisation in the newly sequenced legume-infecting isolates. Dispensable chromosomes are not essential for growth and in Fusarium species are known to be enriched in host-specificity and pathogenicity-associated genes. Comparative genomics of the publicly available Fusarium species revealed differential patterns of sequence conservation across F. oxysporum formae speciales, with legume-pathogenic formae speciales not exhibiting greater sequence conservation between them relative to non-legume-infecting formae speciales, possibly indicating the lack of a common ancestral source for legume pathogenicity. Combining predicted dispensable gene content with in planta expression in the model legume-infecting isolate, we identified small conserved regions and candidate effectors, four of which shared greatest similarity to proteins from another legume-infecting ff. spp. We demonstrate that distinction of core and potential dispensable genomic regions of novel F. oxysporum genomes is an effective tool to facilitate effector discovery and the identification of gene content possibly linked to host

  4. Comparative studies of some vitamin D and its analogs on 47Ca-release from mouse calvaria in an organ culture system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Itsuo; Fukunaga, Masao; Dokoh, Shigeharu; Konishi, Junji; Morita, Rikushi

    1978-01-01

    47 Ca-releasing activities of some vitamin D derivatives from prelabelled mouse calvaria were examined, using the organ-culture system established by Raisz and Reynold. D 2 and D 3 of 1 μg/ml caused significant release of 47 Ca from the bone, while DHT 2 and DHT 3 had no effect at this concentration. 25-OH-D 3 , 24R-OH-D 3 , and 24,25-(OH) 2 -D 3 were effective at 100 ng/ml, and 1α-OH-D 3 at 10 ng/ml, 1α,24-(OH) 2 -D 3 was slightly less active than 1α-OH-D 3 . 24S-OH-D 3 and 1α,24S-(OH) 2 -D 3 were about 10 times less active than 24R-OH-D 3 and 1α,24R-(OH) 2 -D 3 , respectively, i.e., S-form was less active than R-form. In this experimental system, 1α,25-(OH) 2 -D 3 , a natural vitamin D, was effective even at 50 pg/ml. Thus, this system may be used for the assay of 1α,15-(OH) 2 -D 3 in human serum. The effect of 1α,25-(OH) 2 -D 3 was inhibited by calcitonin but not by hydrocortisone, 25-OH-D 3 or 24,25-(OH) 2 -D 3 . (Kaihara, S.)

  5. Comparative proteomic analysis of the molecular responses of mouse macrophages to titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles unravels some toxic mechanisms for copper oxide nanoparticles in macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Triboulet

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles are more and more widely used because of their catalytic properties, of their light absorbing properties (titanium dioxide or of their biocidal properties (copper oxide, increasing the risk of adverse health effects. In this frame, the responses of mouse macrophages were studied. Both proteomic and targeted analyses were performed to investigate several parameters, such as phagocytic capacity, cytokine release, copper release, and response at sub toxic doses. Besides titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles, copper ions were used as controls. We also showed that the overall copper release in the cell does not explain per se the toxicity observed with copper oxide nanoparticles. In addition, both copper ion and copper oxide nanoparticles, but not titanium oxide, induced DNA strands breaks in macrophages. As to functional responses, the phagocytic capacity was not hampered by any of the treatments at non-toxic doses, while copper ion decreased the lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine and nitric oxide productions. The proteomic analyses highlighted very few changes induced by titanium dioxide nanoparticles, but an induction of heme oxygenase, an increase of glutathione synthesis and a decrease of tetrahydrobiopterin in response to copper oxide nanoparticles. Subsequent targeted analyses demonstrated that the increase in glutathione biosynthesis and the induction of heme oxygenase (e.g. by lovastatin/monacolin K are critical for macrophages to survive a copper challenge, and that the intermediates of the catecholamine pathway induce a strong cross toxicity with copper oxide nanoparticles and copper ions.

  6. Comparative analysis of methods for gene transcription profiling data derived from different microarray technologies in rat and mouse models of diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bihoreau Marie-Thérèse

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray technologies are widely used to quantify the abundance of transcripts corresponding to thousands of genes. To maximise the robustness of transcriptome results, we have tested the performance and reproducibility of rat and mouse gene expression data obtained with Affymetrix, Illumina and Operon platforms. Results We present a thorough analysis of the degree of reproducibility provided by analysing the transcriptomic profile of the same animals of several experimental groups under different popular microarray technologies in different tissues. Concordant results from inter- and intra-platform comparisons were maximised by testing many popular computational methods for generating fold changes and significances and by only considering oligonucleotides giving high expression levels. The choice of Affymetrix signal extraction technique was shown to have the greatest effect on the concordance across platforms. In both species, when choosing optimal methods, the agreement between data generated on the Affymetrix and Illumina was excellent; this was verified using qRT-PCR on a selection of genes present on all platforms. Conclusion This study provides an extensive assessment of analytical methods best suited for processing data from different microarray technologies and can assist integration of technologically different gene expression datasets in biological systems.

  7. Comparative proteome analysis of three mouse lung adenocarcinoma CMT cell lines with different metastatic potential by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kelan; Wrzesinski, Krzysztof; Stephen, J Fey; Larsen, Peter Mose; Zhang, Xumin; Roepstorff, Peter

    2008-12-01

    Metastasis is a lethal attribute of a cancer and presents a continuing therapeutic challenge. Metastasis is a highly complex process and more knowledge about the mechanisms behind metastasis is highly desirable. Isogenic CMT cell lines were selected from a spontaneous mouse lung adenocarcinoma and characterized in vivo to have different metastatic potential. In this study, the comprehensive protein expression profiles of three of these CMT cell lines at passage 5, 15 and 35 were analyzed by 2-DE separation followed by MS identification. As a result, 82 and 40 unique proteins were found to be significantly up- or down-regulated between cell lines with different metastatic potential at passages 5 and 15, respectively. These proteins were identified by MS and most of them have previously been reported to be related to cancer development and/or metastasis. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that several of the proteins were involved in proteasome, cell-cycle and cell-communication pathways. Among them, some keratins, 14-3-3 proteins and 26S proteasome proteins were identified and their aberrant expression may be directly or indirectly involved in cancer development and metastasis. In conclusion, our comprehensive 2-DE-based proteomics studies revealed some candidate proteins, protein families and signaling pathways, which might be important in cancer development and metastasis.

  8. Comparative proteomic analysis of the molecular responses of mouse macrophages to titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles unravels some toxic mechanisms for copper oxide nanoparticles in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triboulet, Sarah; Aude-Garcia, Catherine; Armand, Lucie; Collin-Faure, Véronique; Chevallet, Mireille; Diemer, Hélène; Gerdil, Adèle; Proamer, Fabienne; Strub, Jean-Marc; Habert, Aurélie; Herlin, Nathalie; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Carrière, Marie; Rabilloud, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles are more and more widely used because of their catalytic properties, of their light absorbing properties (titanium dioxide) or of their biocidal properties (copper oxide), increasing the risk of adverse health effects. In this frame, the responses of mouse macrophages were studied. Both proteomic and targeted analyses were performed to investigate several parameters, such as phagocytic capacity, cytokine release, copper release, and response at sub toxic doses. Besides titanium dioxide and copper oxide nanoparticles, copper ions were used as controls. We also showed that the overall copper release in the cell does not explain per se the toxicity observed with copper oxide nanoparticles. In addition, both copper ion and copper oxide nanoparticles, but not titanium oxide, induced DNA strands breaks in macrophages. As to functional responses, the phagocytic capacity was not hampered by any of the treatments at non-toxic doses, while copper ion decreased the lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine and nitric oxide productions. The proteomic analyses highlighted very few changes induced by titanium dioxide nanoparticles, but an induction of heme oxygenase, an increase of glutathione synthesis and a decrease of tetrahydrobiopterin in response to copper oxide nanoparticles. Subsequent targeted analyses demonstrated that the increase in glutathione biosynthesis and the induction of heme oxygenase (e.g. by lovastatin/monacolin K) are critical for macrophages to survive a copper challenge, and that the intermediates of the catecholamine pathway induce a strong cross toxicity with copper oxide nanoparticles and copper ions.

  9. Next-generation sequence analysis of cancer xenograft models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando J Rossello

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS studies in cancer are limited by the amount, quality and purity of tissue samples. In this situation, primary xenografts have proven useful preclinical models. However, the presence of mouse-derived stromal cells represents a technical challenge to their use in NGS studies. We examined this problem in an established primary xenograft model of small cell lung cancer (SCLC, a malignancy often diagnosed from small biopsy or needle aspirate samples. Using an in silico strategy that assign reads according to species-of-origin, we prospectively compared NGS data from primary xenograft models with matched cell lines and with published datasets. We show here that low-coverage whole-genome analysis demonstrated remarkable concordance between published genome data and internal controls, despite the presence of mouse genomic DNA. Exome capture sequencing revealed that this enrichment procedure was highly species-specific, with less than 4% of reads aligning to the mouse genome. Human-specific expression profiling with RNA-Seq replicated array-based gene expression experiments, whereas mouse-specific transcript profiles correlated with published datasets from human cancer stroma. We conclude that primary xenografts represent a useful platform for complex NGS analysis in cancer research for tumours with limited sample resources, or those with prominent stromal cell populations.

  10. Genome-wide identification and comparative analysis of conserved and novel microRNAs in grafted watermelon by high-throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Na; Yang, Jinghua; Guo, Shaogui; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Mingfang

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenous small non-coding RNAs involved in the post-transcriptional gene regulation and play a critical role in plant growth, development and stresses response. However less is known about miRNAs involvement in grafting behaviors, especially with the watermelon (Citrullus lanatus L.) crop, which is one of the most important agricultural crops worldwide. Grafting method is commonly used in watermelon production in attempts to improve its adaptation to abiotic and biotic stresses, in particular to the soil-borne fusarium wilt disease. In this study, Solexa sequencing has been used to discover small RNA populations and compare miRNAs on genome-wide scale in watermelon grafting system. A total of 11,458,476, 11,614,094 and 9,339,089 raw reads representing 2,957,751, 2,880,328 and 2,964,990 unique sequences were obtained from the scions of self-grafted watermelon and watermelon grafted on-to bottle gourd and squash at two true-leaf stage, respectively. 39 known miRNAs belonging to 30 miRNA families and 80 novel miRNAs were identified in our small RNA dataset. Compared with self-grafted watermelon, 20 (5 known miRNA families and 15 novel miRNAs) and 47 (17 known miRNA families and 30 novel miRNAs) miRNAs were expressed significantly different in watermelon grafted on to bottle gourd and squash, respectively. MiRNAs expressed differentially when watermelon was grafted onto different rootstocks, suggesting that miRNAs might play an important role in diverse biological and metabolic processes in watermelon and grafting may possibly by changing miRNAs expressions to regulate plant growth and development as well as adaptation to stresses. The small RNA transcriptomes obtained in this study provided insights into molecular aspects of miRNA-mediated regulation in grafted watermelon. Obviously, this result would provide a basis for further unravelling the mechanism on how miRNAs information is exchanged between scion and rootstock in grafted

  11. Comparative genomic survey, exon-intron annotation and phylogenetic analysis of NAT-homologous sequences in archaea, protists, fungi, viruses, and invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have previously published extensive genomic surveys [1-3], reporting NAT-homologous sequences in hundreds of sequenced bacterial, fungal and vertebrate genomes. We present here the results of our latest search of 2445 genomes, representing 1532 (70 archaeal, 1210 bacterial, 43 protist, 97 fungal,...

  12. Treatment of mature landfill leachate by internal micro-electrolysis integrated with coagulation: a comparative study on a novel sequencing batch reactor based on zero valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Diwen; Peng, Juan; Xu, Xinyan; Li, Kan; Wang, Yalin; Jia, Jinping

    2012-08-30

    A comparative study of treating mature landfill leachate with various treatment processes was conducted to investigate whether the method of combined processes of internal micro-electrolysis (IME) without aeration and IME with full aeration in one reactor was an efficient treatment for mature landfill leachate. A specifically designed novel sequencing batch internal micro-electrolysis reactor (SIME) with the latest automation technology was employed in the experiment. Experimental data showed that combined processes obtained a high COD removal efficiency of 73.7 ± 1.3%, which was 15.2% and 24.8% higher than that of the IME with and without aeration, respectively. The SIME reactor also exhibited a COD removal efficiency of 86.1 ± 3.8% to mature landfill leachate in the continuous operation, which is much higher (p<0.05) than that of conventional treatments of electrolysis (22.8-47.0%), coagulation-sedimentation (18.5-22.2%), and the Fenton process (19.9-40.2%), respectively. The innovative concept behind this excellent performance is a combination effect of reductive and oxidative processes of the IME, and the integration electro-coagulation. Optimal operating parameters, including the initial pH, Fe/C mass ratio, air flow rate, and addition of H(2)O(2), were optimized. All results show that the SIME reactor is a promising and efficient technology in treating mature landfill leachate. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparative sequence analysis of the potato cyst nematode resistance locus H1 reveals a major lack of co-linearity between three haplotypes in potato (Solanum tuberosum ssp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkers-Tomczak, Anna; Bakker, Erin; de Boer, Jan; van der Vossen, Edwin; Achenbach, Ute; Golas, Tomasz; Suryaningrat, Suwardi; Smant, Geert; Bakker, Jaap; Goverse, Aska

    2011-02-01

    The H1 locus confers resistance to the potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis pathotypes 1 and 4. It is positioned at the distal end of chromosome V of the diploid Solanum tuberosum genotype SH83-92-488 (SH) on an introgression segment derived from S. tuberosum ssp. andigena. Markers from a high-resolution genetic map of the H1 locus (Bakker et al. in Theor Appl Genet 109:146-152, 2004) were used to screen a BAC library to construct a physical map covering a 341-kb region of the resistant haplotype coming from SH. For comparison, physical maps were also generated of the two haplotypes from the diploid susceptible genotype RH89-039-16 (S. tuberosum ssp. tuberosum/S. phureja), spanning syntenic regions of 700 and 319 kb. Gene predictions on the genomic segments resulted in the identification of a large cluster consisting of variable numbers of the CC-NB-LRR type of R genes for each haplotype. Furthermore, the regions were interspersed with numerous transposable elements and genes coding for an extensin-like protein and an amino acid transporter. Comparative analysis revealed a major lack of gene order conservation in the sequences of the three closely related haplotypes. Our data provide insight in the evolutionary mechanisms shaping the H1 locus and will facilitate the map-based cloning of the H1 resistance gene.

  14. Treatment of mature landfill leachate by internal micro-electrolysis integrated with coagulation: A comparative study on a novel sequencing batch reactor based on zero valent iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying, Diwen; Peng, Juan; Xu, Xinyan; Li, Kan; Wang, Yalin; Jia, Jinping

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Specifically-designed SIME reactor for treatment of mature landfill leachate. ► Excellent removal efficiencies of COD (86.1%), color (95.3%), and HA (81.8%). ► Combination effect of IME without aeration and IME with aeration. ► Optimal pH of 5, Fe/C of 1:1, gas flow rate of 80 L h −1 , and H 2 O 2 of 100 mg L −1 . - Abstract: A comparative study of treating mature landfill leachate with various treatment processes was conducted to investigate whether the method of combined processes of internal micro-electrolysis (IME) without aeration and IME with full aeration in one reactor was an efficient treatment for mature landfill leachate. A specifically designed novel sequencing batch internal micro-electrolysis reactor (SIME) with the latest automation technology was employed in the experiment. Experimental data showed that combined processes obtained a high COD removal efficiency of 73.7 ± 1.3%, which was 15.2% and 24.8% higher than that of the IME with and without aeration, respectively. The SIME reactor also exhibited a COD removal efficiency of 86.1 ± 3.8% to mature landfill leachate in the continuous operation, which is much higher (p 2 O 2 , were optimized. All results show that the SIME reactor is a promising and efficient technology in treating mature landfill leachate.

  15. 3D double-echo steady-state sequence assessment of hip joint cartilage and labrum at 3 Tesla: comparative analysis of magnetic resonance imaging and intraoperative data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleich, Christoph; Antoch, Gerald [University of Dusseldorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); Hesper, Tobias; Rettegi, Fanni; Zilkens, Christoph; Krauspe, Ruediger; Bittersohl, Bernd [University of Dusseldorf, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); Hosalkar, Harish S. [Paradise Valley Hospital, Joint Preservation and Deformity Correction, San Diego, CA (United States); Tri-city Medical Center, Hip Preservation, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2017-10-15

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of a high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) double-echo steady-state (DESS) sequence with radial imaging at 3 Tesla (T) for evaluating cartilage and labral alterations in the hip. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data obtained at 3 T, including radially reformatted DESS images and intraoperative data of 45 patients (mean age 42 ± 13.7 years) who underwent hip arthroscopy, were compared. The acetabular cartilage and labrum of the upper hemisphere of the acetabulum and the central femoral head cartilage were evaluated. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and negative and positive predictive values were determined. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the DESS technique were 96.7%, 75% and 93.7% for detecting cartilage lesions and 98%, 76.2% and 95.9% for detecting labral lesions. The positive and negative predictive values for detecting or ruling out cartilage lesions were 96% and 78.9%. For labral lesions, the positive and negative predictive values were 97.5% and 80%. A high-resolution, 3D DESS technique with radial imaging at 3 T demonstrated high accuracy for detecting hip cartilage and labral lesions with excellent interobserver agreement and moderate correlation between MRI and intraoperative assessment. (orig.)

  16. Genome-wide identification and comparative analysis of grafting-responsive mRNA in watermelon grafted onto bottle gourd and squash rootstocks by high-throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Na; Yang, Jinghua; Fu, Xinxing; Zhang, Li; Tang, Kai; Guy, Kateta Malangisha; Hu, Zhongyuan; Guo, Shaogui; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Mingfang

    2016-04-01

    Grafting is an important agricultural technique widely used to improve plant growth, yield, and adaptation to either biotic or abiotic stresses. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying grafting-induced physiological processes remain unclear. Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus L.) is an important horticultural crop worldwide. Grafting technique is commonly used in watermelon production for improving its tolerance to stresses, especially to the soil-borne fusarium wilt disease. In the present study, we used high-throughput sequencing to perform a genome-wide transcript analysis of scions from watermelon grafted onto bottle gourd and squash rootstocks. Our transcriptome and digital gene expression (DGE) profiling data provided insights into the molecular aspects of gene regulation in grafted watermelon. Compared with self-grafted watermelon, there were 787 and 3485 genes differentially expressed in watermelon grafted onto bottle gourd and squash rootstocks, respectively. These genes were associated with primary and secondary metabolism, hormone signaling, transcription factors, transporters, and response to stimuli. Grafting led to changes in expression of these genes, suggesting that they may play important roles in mediating the physiological processes of grafted seedlings. The potential roles of the grafting-responsive mRNAs in diverse biological and metabolic processes were discussed. Obviously, the data obtained in this study provide an excellent resource for unraveling the mechanisms of candidate genes function in diverse biological processes and in environmental adaptation in a graft system.

  17. Genome Sequence of Azospirillum brasilense CBG497 and Comparative Analyses of Azospirillum Core and Accessory Genomes provide Insight into Niche Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski-Dyé, Florence; Lozano, Luis; Acosta-Cruz, Erika; Borland, Stéphanie; Drogue, Benoît; Prigent-Combaret, Claire; Rouy, Zoé; Barbe, Valérie; Mendoza Herrera, Alberto; González, Victor; Mavingui, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Azospirillum colonize roots of important cereals and grasses, and promote plant growth by several mechanisms, notably phytohormone synthesis. The genomes of several Azospirillum strains belonging to different species, isolated from various host plants and locations, were recently sequenced and published. In this study, an additional genome of an A. brasilense strain, isolated from maize grown on an alkaline soil in the northeast of Mexico, strain CBG497, was obtained. Comparative genomic analyses were performed on this new genome and three other genomes (A. brasilense Sp245, A. lipoferum 4B and Azospirillum sp. B510). The Azospirillum core genome was established and consists of 2,328 proteins, representing between 30% to 38% of the total encoded proteins within a genome. It is mainly chromosomally-encoded and contains 74% of genes of ancestral origin shared with some aquatic relatives. The non-ancestral part of the core genome is enriched in genes involved in signal transduction, in transport and in metabolism of carbohydrates and amino-acids, and in surface properties features linked to adaptation in fluctuating environments, such as soil and rhizosphere. Many genes involved in colonization of plant roots, plant-growth promotion (such as those involved in phytohormone biosynthesis), and properties involved in rhizosphere adaptation (such as catabolism of phenolic compounds, uptake of iron) are restricted to a particular strain and/or species, strongly suggesting niche-specific adaptation. PMID:24705077

  18. Genome Sequence of Azospirillum brasilense CBG497 and Comparative Analyses of Azospirillum Core and Accessory Genomes provide Insight into Niche Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor González

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria of the genus Azospirillum colonize roots of important cereals and grasses, and promote plant growth by several mechanisms, notably phytohormone synthesis. The genomes of several Azospirillum strains belonging to different species, isolated from various host plants and locations, were recently sequenced and published. In this study, an additional genome of an A. brasilense strain, isolated from maize grown on an alkaline soil in the northeast of Mexico, strain CBG497, was obtained. Comparative genomic analyses were performed on this new genome and three other genomes (A. brasilense Sp245, A. lipoferum 4B and Azospirillum sp. B510. The Azospirillum core genome was established and consists of 2,328 proteins, representing between 30% to 38% of the total encoded proteins within a genome. It is mainly chromosomally-encoded and contains 74% of genes of ancestral origin shared with some aquatic relatives. The non-ancestral part of the core genome is enriched in genes involved in signal transduction, in transport and in metabolism of carbohydrates and amino-acids, and in surface properties features linked to adaptation in fluctuating environments, such as soil and rhizosphere. Many genes involved in colonization of plant roots, plant-growth promotion (such as those involved in phytohormone biosynthesis, and properties involved in rhizosphere adaptation (such as catabolism of phenolic compounds, uptake of iron are restricted to a particular strain and/or species, strongly suggesting niche-specific adaptation.

  19. Determination of Trichuris skrjabini by sequencing of the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 segment of the ribosomal DNA: comparative molecular study of different species of trichurids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutillas, C; Oliveros, R; de Rojas, M; Guevara, D C

    2004-06-01

    Adults of Trichuris skrjahini have been isolated from the cecum of caprine hosts (Capra hircus), Trichuris ovis and Trichuris globulosa from Ovis aries (sheep) and C. hircus (goats), and Trichuris leporis from Lepus europaeus (rabbits) in Spain. Genomic DNA was isolated and the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 segment from the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) was amplified and sequenced by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques. The ITS1 of T. skrjabini, T. ovis, T. globulosa, and T. leporis was 495, 757, 757, and 536 nucleotides in length, respectively, and had G + C contents of 59.6, 58.7, 58.7, and 60.8%, respectively. Intraindividual variation was detected in the ITSI sequences of the 4 species. Furthermore, the 5.8S sequences of T. skrjabini, T. ovis, T. globulosa, and T. leporis were compared. A total of 157, 152, 153, and 157 nucleotides in length was observed in the 5.8S sequences of these 4 species, respectively. There were no sequence differences of ITS1 and 5.8S products between T. ovis and T. globulosa. Nevertheless, clear differences were detected between the ITS1 sequences of T. skrjabini, T. ovis, T. leporis, Trichuris muris, and T. arvicolae. The ITS2 fragment from the rDNA of T. skrjabini was sequenced. A comparative study of the ITS2 sequence of T. skrjabini with the previously published ITS2 sequence data of T. ovis, T. leporis, T. muris, and T. arvicolae suggested that the combined use of sequence data from both spacers would be useful in the molecular characterization of trichurid parasites.

  20. Semiquantitative assessment of focal cartilage damage at 3 T MRI: A comparative study of dual echo at steady state (DESS) and intermediate-weighted (IW) fat suppressed fast spin echo sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roemer, Frank W., E-mail: froemer@bu.edu [Quantitative Imaging Center (QIC), Department of Radiology, Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiology, Klinikum Augsburg, Augsburg (Germany); Kwoh, C. Kent [Division of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine (United States); VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System (United States); Hannon, Michael J. [Division of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine (United States); Crema, Michel D. [Quantitative Imaging Center (QIC), Department of Radiology, Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Moore, Carolyn E. [Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Texas Woman' s University (United States); Jakicic, John M. [Department of Health and Physical Activity, University of Pittsburgh (United States); Green, Stephanie M. [Division of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine (United States); Guermazi, Ali [Quantitative Imaging Center (QIC), Department of Radiology, Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to compare semiquantitative assessment of focal cartilage damage using the dual echo at steady state (DESS)- and intermediate-weighted (IW) fat suppressed (fs) sequences at 3 T MRI. Methods: Included were 201 subjects aged 35-65 with frequent knee pain. MRI was performed with the same sequence protocol as in the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI): sagittal IW fs, triplanar DESS and coronal IW sequences. Cartilage status was scored according to the WORMS system using all five sequences. A total of 243 focal defects were detected. In an additional consensus reading, the lesions were evaluated side-by-side using only the sagittal DESS and IW fs sequences. Lesion conspicuity was graded from 0 to 3, intrachondral signal changes adjacent to the defect were recorded and the sequence that depicted the lesion with larger diameter was noted. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, controlled for clustering by person, were used to examine differences between the sequences. Results: 37 (17.5%) of the scorable lesions were located in the medial tibio-femoral (TF), 48 (22.7%) in the lateral TF and 126 (59.7%) in the patello-femoral compartment. 82.5% were superficial and 17.5% full-thickness defects. Conspicuity was superior for the IW sequence (p < 0.001). The DESS sequence showed more associated intrachondral signal changes (p < 0.001). In 103 (48.8%) cases, the IW fs sequence depicted the lesions as being larger (p < 0.001). Conclusions: The IW fs sequence detected more and larger focal cartilage defects than the DESS. More intrachondral signal changes were observed with the DESS.

  1. Whole-body MRI in children: Would a 3D STIR sequence alone be sufficient for investigating common paediatric conditions? A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merlini, Laura, E-mail: laura.merlini@hcuge.ch [Department of Radiology, Unit of Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital Rue Willy-Donzé 6, 1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Carpentier, Marc [Department of Epidemiology, University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, 1205 Geneva Switzerland (Switzerland); Ferrey, Solène; Anooshiravani, Mehrak [Department of Radiology, Unit of Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital Rue Willy-Donzé 6, 1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre [Department of Radiology, University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, 1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Hanquinet, Sylviane [Department of Radiology, Unit of Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital Rue Willy-Donzé 6, 1205 Geneva (Switzerland)

    2017-03-15

    Objectives: To test the performance of a single 3D IR T2-Weighted sequence compared to a Whole-body MRI protocol including DWI, T1-Weighted and STIR 3D IR (3S) in a pediatric population. Methods: Two radiologists (15 and 30 years of experience),reviewed WBMRIs: first the STIR alone and 2 weeks later the 3S protocol. The indications were variable. Only positive findings were explicitly reported. A third reader compared the results to gold standard (GS) exams specific for the pathology. Agreement between the two readers, sensitivity and positive predictive value of STIR were calculated. Results: fifty-four WBMRIs were included (16 suspected child abuse, 8 chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO), 11 lymphomas, 4 osteosarcomas, 9 neuroblastomas, 6 histiocytosis). The mean age was 6 years 10 months, range: 1 month to 15 years. Agreement between readers was of 0.87 [0.82–0.91] for 3D STIR, and 0.89 [0.83–0.93] for the 3S protocol. For reader 1 sensitivity of 3D STIR was 81.6% and of 3S 81.0%. For reader 2 it was 74.1% for 3D STIR and 74.7% for 3S. For both readers and for both protocols, the positive predictive value (PPV) depended on the type of disease (for example 100% histocytosis and osteosarcomas, >90% for child abuse, >85% CRMO but <70% for lymphoma and neuroblastoma). Conclusions: Sensitivities were not different between the 2 protocols, for each reader and were different between the 2 readers for each protocol.

  2. Whole-body MRI in children: Would a 3D STIR sequence alone be sufficient for investigating common paediatric conditions? A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merlini, Laura; Carpentier, Marc; Ferrey, Solène; Anooshiravani, Mehrak; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Hanquinet, Sylviane

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To test the performance of a single 3D IR T2-Weighted sequence compared to a Whole-body MRI protocol including DWI, T1-Weighted and STIR 3D IR (3S) in a pediatric population. Methods: Two radiologists (15 and 30 years of experience),reviewed WBMRIs: first the STIR alone and 2 weeks later the 3S protocol. The indications were variable. Only positive findings were explicitly reported. A third reader compared the results to gold standard (GS) exams specific for the pathology. Agreement between the two readers, sensitivity and positive predictive value of STIR were calculated. Results: fifty-four WBMRIs were included (16 suspected child abuse, 8 chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO), 11 lymphomas, 4 osteosarcomas, 9 neuroblastomas, 6 histiocytosis). The mean age was 6 years 10 months, range: 1 month to 15 years. Agreement between readers was of 0.87 [0.82–0.91] for 3D STIR, and 0.89 [0.83–0.93] for the 3S protocol. For reader 1 sensitivity of 3D STIR was 81.6% and of 3S 81.0%. For reader 2 it was 74.1% for 3D STIR and 74.7% for 3S. For both readers and for both protocols, the positive predictive value (PPV) depended on the type of disease (for example 100% histocytosis and osteosarcomas, >90% for child abuse, >85% CRMO but <70% for lymphoma and neuroblastoma). Conclusions: Sensitivities were not different between the 2 protocols, for each reader and were different between the 2 readers for each protocol.

  3. T2-weighted MR imaging of liver lesions: a prospective evaluation comparing turbo spin-echo, breath-hold turbo spin-echo and half-Fourier turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.; Villajos, M.; Oses, M. J.; Veintemillas, M.; Rue, M.; Puig, J.; Sentis, M.

    2000-01-01

    To compare turbo spin-echo (TSE), breath-hold TSE and half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequences quantitatively and qualitatively in T2-weighted images of liver lesions. The authors evaluated prospectively 89 liver lesions in 73 patients using a 1.0-T magnetic resonance system to compare TSE, breath-hold TSE and HASTE sequences. The quantitative parameters were: lesion-to-liver contrast and lesion-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio. The qualitative analysis was performed by two observers in consensus who examined four parameters: respiratory artifacts, lesion edge definition, intrahepatic vessel definition and image quality. Repeated measures analysis of variance was utilized to compare the quantitative variables and Friedman's nonparametric test for the qualitative parameters. In quantitative terms, the lesion-to-liver contrast was similar in TSE and breath-hold TSE sequences (2.45±1.44 versus 2.60±1.66), both of which were significantly better than the HASTE sequence (1.12±0.72; p<0.001). The lesion-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio was significantly higher in the TSE sequence (62.60±46.40 versus 40.22±25.35 versus 50.90±32.10 for TSE, breath-hold TSE and HASTE sequences, respectively; p<0.001). In the qualitative comparisons, the HASTE sequence was significantly better than the TSE and breath-hold TSE sequences (p<0.001) in terms of artifacts and definition of lesion edge and intrahepatic vessels. Image quality was also significantly greater in the HASTE sequence (p<0.001). In quantitative terms, the TSE sequence is better than the breath-hold TSE and HASTE sequences, but there are no movement artifacts in the HASTE sequence, which is also significantly superior to TSE and breath-hold TSE sequences in qualitative terms and, thus, can be employed for T2-weighted images in liver studies. (Author) 17 refs

  4. Nonparametric combinatorial sequence models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauthier, Fabian L; Jordan, Michael I; Jojic, Nebojsa

    2011-11-01

    This work considers biological sequences that exhibit combinatorial structures in their composition: groups of positions of the aligned sequences are "linked" and covary as one unit across sequences. If multiple such groups exist, complex interactions can emerge between them. Sequences of this kind arise frequently in biology but methodologies for analyzing them are still being developed. This article presents a nonparametric prior on sequences which allows combinatorial structures to emerge and which induces a posterior distribution over factorized sequence representations. We carry out experiments on three biological sequence families which indicate that combinatorial structures are indeed present and that combinatorial sequence models can more succinctly describe them than simpler mixture models. We conclude with an application to MHC binding prediction which highlights the utility of the posterior distribution over sequence representations induced by the prior. By integrating out the posterior, our method compares favorably to leading binding predictors.

  5. Long sequence correlation coprocessor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Douglas W.

    1994-09-01

    A long sequence correlation coprocessor (LSCC) accelerates the bitwise correlation of arbitrarily long digital sequences by calculating in parallel the correlation score for 16, for example, adjacent bit alignments between two binary sequences. The LSCC integrated circuit is incorporated into a computer system with memory storage buffers and a separate general purpose computer processor which serves as its controller. Each of the LSCC's set of sequential counters simultaneously tallies a separate correlation coefficient. During each LSCC clock cycle, computer enable logic associated with each counter compares one bit of a first sequence with one bit of a second sequence to increment the counter if the bits are the same. A shift register assures that the same bit of the first sequence is simultaneously compared to different bits of the second sequence to simultaneously calculate the correlation coefficient by the different counters to represent different alignments of the two sequences.

  6. Genomes of the Mouse Collaborative Cross.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Anuj; Morgan, Andrew P; Najarian, Maya L; Sarsani, Vishal Kumar; Sigmon, J Sebastian; Shorter, John R; Kashfeen, Anwica; McMullan, Rachel C; Williams, Lucy H; Giusti-Rodríguez, Paola; Ferris, Martin T; Sullivan, Patrick; Hock, Pablo; Miller, Darla R; Bell, Timothy A; McMillan, Leonard; Churchill, Gary A; de Villena, Fernando Pardo-Manuel

    2017-06-01

    new genetic variants introduced by mutation and drift in the CC genomes. We estimate that new SNP mutations are accumulating in each CC strain at a rate of 2.4 ± 0.4 per gigabase per generation. The fixation of new mutations by genetic drift has introduced thousands of new variants into the CC strains. The majority of these mutations are novel compared to currently sequenced laboratory stocks and wild mice, and some are predicted to alter gene function. Approximately one-third of the CC inbred strains have acquired large deletions (>10 kb) many of which overlap known coding genes and functional elements. The sequence of these mice is a critical resource to CC users, increases threefold the number of mouse inbred strain genomes available publicly, and provides insight into the effect of mutation and drift on common resources. Copyright © 2017 Srivastava et al.

  7. Identification and comparative profiling of miRNAs in an early flowering mutant of trifoliate orange and its wild type by genome-wide deep sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei-Ming Sun

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a new class of small, endogenous RNAs that play a regulatory role in various biological and metabolic processes by negatively affecting gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. While the number of known Arabidopsis and rice miRNAs is continuously increasing, information regarding miRNAs from woody plants such as citrus remains limited. Solexa sequencing was performed at different developmental stages on both an early flowering mutant of trifoliate orange (precocious trifoliate orange, Poncirus trifoliata L. Raf. and its wild-type in this study, resulting in the obtainment of 141 known miRNAs belonging to 99 families and 75 novel miRNAs in four libraries. A total of 317 potential target genes were predicted based on the 51 novel miRNAs families, GO and KEGG annotation revealed that high ranked miRNA-target genes are those implicated in diverse cellular processes in plants, including development, transcription, protein degradation and cross adaptation. To characterize those miRNAs expressed at the juvenile and adult development stages of the mutant and its wild-type, further analysis on the expression profiles of several miRNAs through real-time PCR was performed. The results revealed that most miRNAs were down-regulated at adult stage compared with juvenile stage for both the mutant and its wild-type. These results indicate that both conserved and novel miRNAs may play important roles in citrus growth and development, stress responses and other physiological processes.

  8. Research resources: comparative microRNA profiles in human corona radiata cells and cumulus oophorus cells detected by next-generation small RNA sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-Hong Tong

    Full Text Available During folliculogenesis, cumulus cells surrounding the oocyte differentiate into corona radiata cells (CRCs and cumulus oophorus cells (COCs, which are involved in gonadal steroidogenesis and the development of germ cells. Several studies suggested that microRNAs (miRNAs play an important regulatory role at the post-transcriptional level in cumulus cells. However, comparative miRNA profiles and associated processes in human CRCs and COCs have not been reported before. In this study, miRNA profiles were obtained from CRCs and COCs using next generation sequencing in women undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation for IVF. A total of 785 and 799 annotated miRNAs were identified in CRCs and COCs, while high expression levels of six novel miRNAs were detected both in CRCs and in COCs. In addition, different expression patterns in CRCs and COCs were detected in 72 annotated miRNAs. To confirm the miRNA profile in COCs and CRCs, quantitative real-time PCR was used to validate the expression of annotated miRNAs, differentially expressed miRNAs, and novel miRNAs. The miRNAs in the let-7 family were found to be involved in the regulation of a broad range of biological processes in both cumulus cell populations, which was accompanied by a large amount of miRNA editing. Bioinformatics analysis showed that amino acid and energy metabolism were targeted significantly by miRNAs that were differentially expressed between CRCs and COCs. Our work extends the current knowledge of the regulatory role of miRNAs and their targeted pathways in folliculogenesis, and provides novel candidates for molecular biomarkers in the research of female infertility.

  9. Mouse myocardial first-pass perfusion MR imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coolen, Bram F.; Moonen, Rik P. M.; Paulis, Leonie E. M.; Geelen, Tessa; Nicolay, Klaas; Strijkers, Gustav J.

    2010-01-01

    A first-pass myocardial perfusion sequence for mouse cardiac MRI is presented. A segmented ECG-triggered acquisition combined with parallel imaging acceleration was used to capture the first pass of a Gd-DTPA bolus through the mouse heart with a temporal resolution of 300-400 msec. The method was

  10. Mouse myocardial first-pass perfusion MR imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coolen, B.F.; Moonen, R.P.M.; Paulis, L.E.M.; Geelen, T.; Nicolay, K.; Strijkers, G.J.

    2010-01-01

    A first-pass myocardial perfusion sequence for mouse cardiac MRI is presented. A segmented ECG-triggered acquisition combined with parallel imaging acceleration was used to capture the first pass of a Gd-DTPA bolus through the mouse heart with a temporal resolution of 300–400 msec. The method was

  11. Comparing the Expression of Genes Related to Serotonin (5-HT in C57BL/6J Mice and Humans Based on Data Available at the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas and Allen Human Brain Atlas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Acevedo-Triana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain atlases are tools based on comprehensive studies used to locate biological characteristics (structures, connections, proteins, and gene expression in different regions of the brain. These atlases have been disseminated to the point where tools have been created to store, manage, and share the information they contain. This study used the data published by the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas (2004 for mice (C57BL/6J and Allen Human Brain Atlas (2010 for humans (6 donors to compare the expression of serotonin-related genes. Genes of interest were searched for manually in each case (in situ hybridization for mice and microarrays for humans, normalized expression data (z-scores were extracted, and the results were graphed. Despite the differences in methodology, quantification, and subjects used in the process, a high degree of similarity was found between expression data. Here we compare expression in a way that allows the use of translational research methods to infer and validate knowledge. This type of study allows part of the relationship between structures and functions to be identified, by examining expression patterns and comparing levels of expression in different states, anatomical correlations, and phenotypes between different species. The study concludes by discussing the importance of knowing, managing, and disseminating comprehensive, open-access studies in neuroscience.

  12. Centralized mouse repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Leah Rae; Hrabe de Angelis, Martin; Hagn, Michael; Franklin, Craig; Lloyd, K C Kent; Magnuson, Terry; McKerlie, Colin; Nakagata, Naomi; Obata, Yuichi; Read, Stuart; Wurst, Wolfgang; Hörlein, Andreas; Davisson, Muriel T

    2012-10-01

    Because the mouse is used so widely for biomedical research and the number of mouse models being generated is increasing rapidly, centralized repositories are essential if the valuable mouse strains and models that have been developed are to be securely preserved and fully exploited. Ensuring the ongoing availability of these mouse strains preserves the investment made in creating and characterizing them and creates a global resource of enormous value. The establishment of centralized mouse repositories around the world for distributing and archiving these resources has provided critical access to and preservation of these strains. This article describes the common and specialized activities provided by major mouse repositories around the world.

  13. A catalog of the mouse gut metagenome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Liang; Feng, Qiang; Liang, Suisha

    2015-01-01

    laboratories and fed either a low-fat or high-fat diet. Similar to the human gut microbiome, >99% of the cataloged genes are bacterial. We identified 541 metagenomic species and defined a core set of 26 metagenomic species found in 95% of the mice. The mouse gut microbiome is functionally similar to its human......We established a catalog of the mouse gut metagenome comprising ∼2.6 million nonredundant genes by sequencing DNA from fecal samples of 184 mice. To secure high microbiome diversity, we used mouse strains of diverse genetic backgrounds, from different providers, kept in different housing...... counterpart, with 95.2% of its Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) orthologous groups in common. However, only 4.0% of the mouse gut microbial genes were shared (95% identity, 90% coverage) with those of the human gut microbiome. This catalog provides a useful reference for future studies....

  14. Prenatal developmental toxicity testing of petroleum substances: Application of the mouse embryonic stem cell test (EST) to compare in vitro potencies with potencies observed in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamelia, Lenny; Louisse, Jochem; de Haan, Laura; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Boogaard, Peter J

    2017-10-01

    Prenatal developmental toxicity (PDT) as observed with some petroleum substances (PS) has been associated with the presence of 3-7 ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In the present study, the applicability of ES-D3 cell differentiation assay of the EST to evaluate in vitro embryotoxicity potencies of PS and gas-to-liquid (GTL) products as compared to their in vivo potencies was investigated. DMSO-extracts of a range of PS, containing different amounts of PAHs, and GTL-products, which are devoid of PAHs, were tested in the ES-D3 cell proliferation and differentiation assays of the EST. The results show that PS inhibited the differentiation of ES-D3 cells into cardiomyocytes in a concentration-dependent manner at non-cytotoxic concentrations, and that their potency was proportional to their PAH content. In contrast, as expected, GTL-products did not inhibit ES-D3 cell viability or differentiation at all. The in vitro PDT potencies were compared to published in vivo PDT studies, and a good correlation was found between in vitro and in vivo results (R 2 =0.97). To conclude, our results support the hypothesis that PAHs are the primary inducers of the PDT in PS. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparative Functional Alanine Positional Scanning of the α-Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone and NDP-Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone Demonstrates Differential Structure-Activity Relationships at the Mouse Melanocortin Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorovic, Aleksandar; Ericson, Mark D; Palusak, Ryan D; Sorensen, Nicholas B; Wood, Michael S; Xiang, Zhimin; Haskell-Luevano, Carrie

    2016-07-20

    The melanocortin system has been implicated in the regulation of various physiological functions including melanogenesis, steroidogenesis, energy homeostasis, and feeding behavior. Five melanocortin receptors have been identified to date and belong to the family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). Post-translational modification of the proopiomelanocortin (POMC) prohormone leads to the biosynthesis of the endogenous melanocortin agonists, including α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH), β-MSH, γ-MSH, and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). All the melanocortin agonists derived from the POMC prohormone contain a His-Phe-Arg-Trp tetrapeptide sequence that has been implicated in eliciting the pharmacological responses at the melanocortin receptors. Herein, an alanine (Ala) positional scan is reported for the endogenous α-MSH ligand and the synthetic, more potent, NDP-MSH peptide (Ac-Ser(1)-Tyr(2)-Ser(3)-Nle(4)-Glu(5)-His(6)-DPhe(7)-Arg(8)-Trp(9)-Gly(10)-Lys(11)-Pro(12)-Val(13)-NH2) at the cloned mouse melanocortin receptors to test the assumption that the structure-activity relationships of one ligand would apply to the other. Several residues outside of the postulated pharmacophore altered potency at the melanocortin receptors, most notably the 1560-, 37-, and 15-fold potency loss when the Glu(5) position of α-MSH was substituted with Ala at the mMC1R, mMC3R, and mMC4R, respectively. Importantly, the altered potencies due to Ala substitutions in α-MSH did not necessarily correlate with equivalent Ala substitutions in NDP-MSH, indicating that structural modifications and corresponding biological activities in one of these melanocortin ligands may not be predictive for the other agonist.

  16. An analysis of possible off target effects following CAS9/CRISPR targeted deletions of neuropeptide gene enhancers from the mouse genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Elizabeth Anne; Khalaf, Abdulla Razak; Marini, Pietro; Brown, Andrew; Heath, Karyn; Sheppard, Darrin; MacKenzie, Alasdair

    2017-08-01

    We have successfully used comparative genomics to identify putative regulatory elements within the human genome that contribute to the tissue specific expression of neuropeptides such as galanin and receptors such as CB1. However, a previous inability to rapidly delete these elements from the mouse genome has prevented optimal assessment of their function in-vivo. This has been solved using CAS9/CRISPR genome editing technology which uses a bacterial endonuclease called CAS9 that, in combination with specifically designed guide RNA (gRNA) molecules, cuts specific regions of the mouse genome. However, reports of "off target" effects, whereby the CAS9 endonuclease is able to cut sites other than those targeted, limits the appeal of this technology. We used cytoplasmic microinjection of gRNA and CAS9 mRNA into 1-cell mouse embryos to rapidly generate enhancer knockout mouse lines. The current study describes our analysis of the genomes of these enhancer knockout lines to detect possible off-target effects. Bioinformatic analysis was used to identify the most likely putative off-target sites and to design PCR primers that would amplify these sequences from genomic DNA of founder enhancer deletion mouse lines. Amplified DNA was then sequenced and blasted against the mouse genome sequence to detect off-target effects. Using this approach we were unable to detect any evidence of off-target effects in the genomes of three founder lines using any of the four gRNAs used in the analysis. This study suggests that the problem of off-target effects in transgenic mice have been exaggerated and that CAS9/CRISPR represents a highly effective and accurate method of deleting putative neuropeptide gene enhancer sequences from the mouse genome. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification of hamster inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) promoter sequences that influence basal and inducible iNOS expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldarriaga, Omar A.; Travi, Bruno L.; Choudhury, Goutam Ghosh; Melby, Peter C.

    2012-01-01

    IFN-γ/LPS-activated hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) macrophages express significantly less iNOS (NOS2) than activated mouse macrophages, which contributes to the hamster's susceptibility to intracellular pathogens. We determined a mechanism responsible for differences in iNOS promoter activity in hamsters and mice. The HtPP (1.2 kb) showed low basal and inducible promoter activity when compared with the mouse, and sequences within a 100-bp region (−233 to −133) of the mouse and hamster promoters influenced this activity. Moreover, within this 100 bp, we identified a smaller region (44 bp) in the mouse promoter, which recovered basal promoter activity when swapped into the hamster promoter. The mouse homolog (100-bp region) contained a cis-element for NF-IL-6 (−153/−142), which was absent in the hamster counterpart. EMSA and supershift assays revealed that the hamster sequence did not support the binding of NF-IL-6. Introduction of a functional NF-IL-6 binding sequence into the hamster promoter or its alteration in the mouse promoter revealed the critical importance of this transcription factor for full iNOS promoter activity. Furthermore, the binding of NF-IL-6 to the iNOS promoter (−153/−142) in vivo was increased in mouse cells but was reduced in hamster cells after IFN-γ/LPS stimulation. Differences in the activity of the iNOS promoters were evident in mouse and hamster cells, so they were not merely a result of species-specific differences in transcription factors. Thus, we have identified unique DNA sequences and a critical transcription factor, NF-IL-6, which contribute to the overall basal and inducible expression of hamster iNOS. PMID:22517919

  18. Treatment of mature landfill leachate by internal micro-electrolysis integrated with coagulation: A comparative study on a novel sequencing batch reactor based on zero valent iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ying, Diwen [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai, 200240 (China); Peng, Juan [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Xu, Xinyan; Li, Kan; Wang, Yalin [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai, 200240 (China); Jia, Jinping, E-mail: jpjia@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai, 200240 (China)

    2012-08-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Specifically-designed SIME reactor for treatment of mature landfill leachate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Excellent removal efficiencies of COD (86.1%), color (95.3%), and HA (81.8%). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combination effect of IME without aeration and IME with aeration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optimal pH of 5, Fe/C of 1:1, gas flow rate of 80 L h{sup -1}, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} of 100 mg L{sup -1}. - Abstract: A comparative study of treating mature landfill leachate with various treatment processes was conducted to investigate whether the method of combined processes of internal micro-electrolysis (IME) without aeration and IME with full aeration in one reactor was an efficient treatment for mature landfill leachate. A specifically designed novel sequencing batch internal micro-electrolysis reactor (SIME) with the latest automation technology was employed in the experiment. Experimental data showed that combined processes obtained a high COD removal efficiency of 73.7 {+-} 1.3%, which was 15.2% and 24.8% higher than that of the IME with and without aeration, respectively. The SIME reactor also exhibited a COD removal efficiency of 86.1 {+-} 3.8% to mature landfill leachate in the continuous operation, which is much higher (p < 0.05) than that of conventional treatments of electrolysis (22.8-47.0%), coagulation-sedimentation (18.5-22.2%), and the Fenton process (19.9-40.2%), respectively. The innovative concept behind this excellent performance is a combination effect of reductive and oxidative processes of the IME, and the integration electro-coagulation. Optimal ope