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Sample records for monthly return visits

  1. Parental Language and Return Visits to the Emergency Department After Discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels-Kalow, Margaret E; Stack, Anne M; Amico, Kendra; Porter, Stephen C

    2017-06-01

    Return visits to the emergency department (ED) are used as a marker of quality of care. Limited English proficiency, along with other demographic and disease-specific factors, has been associated with increased risk of return visit, but the relationship between language, short-term return visits, and overall ED use has not been well characterized. This is a planned secondary analysis of a prospective cohort examining the ED discharge process for English- or Spanish-speaking parents of children aged 2 months to 2 years with fever and/or respiratory illness. At 1 year after the index visit, a standardized chart review was performed. The primary outcome was the number of ED visits within 72 hours of the index visit. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the relative importance of predictor variables and adjust for confounders. There were 202 parents eligible for inclusion, of whom 23% were Spanish speaking. In addition, 6.9% of the sample had a return visit within 72 hours. After adjustment for confounders, Spanish language was associated with return visit within 72 hours (odds ratio, 3.49; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-11.90) but decreased risk of a second visit within the year (odds ratio, 0.28; 95% confidence interval, 0.12-0.66). Spanish-speaking parents are at an increased risk of 72-hour return ED visit but do not seem to be at increased risk of ED use during the year after their ED visit.

  2. Predictors of Return Visits Among Insured Emergency Department Mental Health and Substance Abuse Patients, 2005–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangil; Herrin, Jeph; Bobo, William V.; Johnson, Ryan; Sangaralingham, Lindsey R.; Campbell, Ronna L.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Our goal was to describe the pattern and identify risk factors of early-return ED visits or inpatient admissions following an index mental health and substance abuse (MHSA)-related ED visit in the United States. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study using Optum Labs Data Warehouse, a nationally representative database containing administrative claims data on privately insured and Medicare Advantage enrollees. Authors identified patients presenting to an ED with a primary diagnosis of MHSA between 2005 and 2013 who were discharged home. Study inclusion required continuous insurance enrollment for the 12 months preceding and the 31 days following the index ED visit. During the study period we included only the first ED visit for each patient. Results A total of 49,672 (14.2%) had a return visit to the ED or had a hospitalization within 30 days following discharge. Mean time to the next ED visit or inpatient admission was 11.7 days. An increased age (age 65+ vs. age return visits within 30 days following discharge. Conclusion In an analysis of nearly 350,000 ED visits for MHSA, 14.2 % of patients returned to the ED or hospital within 30 days. This study identified a number of factors associated with return visits for acute care. PMID:28874941

  3. Unscheduled return visits to a Dutch inner-city emergency department

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. van der Linden (M. Christien); R. Lindeboom (Robert); R.J. de Haan (Rob); N. van der Linden (Naomi); E.R. de Deckere (Ernie RJT); C. Lucas (Cees); S. Rhemrev (Steven); J.C. Goslings (Carel)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground Unscheduled return visits to the emergency department (ED) may reflect shortcomings in care. This study characterized ED return visits with respect to incidence, risk factors, reasons and post-ED disposition. We hypothesized that risk factors for unscheduled return and reasons

  4. Unscheduled return visits to a Dutch inner-city emergency department

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. van der Linden (M. Christien); R. Lindeboom (Robert); R.J. de Haan (Rob); N. van der Linden (Naomi); E.R. de Deckere (Ernie RJT); C. Lucas (Cees); S. Rhemrev (Steven); J.C. Goslings (Carel)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground Unscheduled return visits to the emergency department (ED) may reflect shortcomings in care. This study characterized ED return visits with respect to incidence, risk factors, reasons and post-ED disposition. We hypothesized that risk factors for unscheduled return and reasons

  5. Research on return visit and investigation of the relapse rate of children allergic purpura after treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weihong; Zhou, Yudong; Zhang, Sisen; Yang, Fang; Zhuang, Tanyue; Wu, Xinyan

    2015-01-01

    This paper aimed to research on return visit and investigation of the relapse rate of children allergic purpura after treatment. Children with allergic purpura were divided into two groups. The treatment group was treated with the adrenocorticotrophic hormone while the control group did not. We tracked and observed two groups of discharged children in the first month and the second month. It can be found that, at the first month, 5 cases recurred in the treatment group with 20 cases, the relapse rate was 25%, 1 case recurred in control group, the relapse rate was 5%; at the second month, 2 cases recurred in treatment group, the relapse rate was 10%, no case recurred in the control group. There were 8 cases recurred in the past two months, and there were no replace after the second time treatment. In contrast, the children, who treated with adrenocorticotrophic hormone, had higher relapse rate, while the control group had lower relapse rate. Then we can get the conclusion that, the application of adrenocorticotrophic hormone may be one of the main reasons to induce the allergic purpura and we should notice and discuss this conclusion in the clinical practice.

  6. Causes, costs, and risk factors for unplanned return visits after adenotonsillectomy in children.

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    Duval, Melanie; Wilkes, Jacob; Korgenski, Kent; Srivastava, Rajendu; Meier, Jeremy

    2015-10-01

    To review the causes, costs, and risk factors for unplanned return visits and readmissions after pediatric adenotonsillectomy (T&A). Review of administrative database of outpatient adenotonsillectomy performed at any facility within a vertically integrated health care system in the Intermountain West on children age 1-18 years old between 1998 and 2012. Data reviewed included demographic variables, diagnosis associated with return visit and costs associated with return visits. Data from 39,906 children aged 1-18 years old were reviewed. A total of 2499 (6.3%) children had unplanned return visits. The most common reasons for return visits were bleeding (2.3%), dehydration, (2.3%) and throat pain (1.2%). After multivariate analysis, the main risk factors for any type of return visits were Medicaid insurance (OR=1.64 95% CI 1.47-1.84), Hispanic race (OR=1.36 95% CI 1.13-1.64), and increased severity of illness (SOI) (OR=11.29 95% CI 2.69-47.4 for SOI=3). The only factor associated with increased odds of requiring an inpatient admission on return visit was length of time spent in PACU (prisk of post-tonsillectomy hemorrhage. Children with increased severity of illness, those insured with Medicaid, and children of Hispanic ethnicity should be targeted with increased education and interventions in order to reduce unplanned visits after T&A. Further studies on post-tonsillectomy complications should include evaluating the effect of surgical technique and post-operative pain management on all complications and not solely post-tonsillectomy hemorrhage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Drug company's consumer health portal encourages return visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-07-01

    How do you get consumers to return to your site? For some health-site surfers, the offer of a portal where they can customize pages and store their own data may have so much appeal that they'll make it their home on the Web. But to really win their loyalty, a consumer portal has to offer a lot of features that will help them manage their health activities. A good example is My Health Zone, launched by pharmaceutical company Schering-Plough.

  8. Characteristics of patients and families who make early return visits to the pediatric emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logue EP

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Erin Patricia Logue,1 Samina Ali,2,3 Judith Spiers,4 Amanda S Newton,2,3 Janice A Lander4 1 Alberta Health Services, 2Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, 3Women and Children’s Health Research Institute, 4Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to identify reasons why parents make early return visits, within 72 hours of discharge from a tertiary care pediatric emergency department (PED. A secondary objective was to investigate associated demographic and diagnostic variables. Methods: A survey was conducted with a convenience sample of parents of children returning to the PED within 72 hours of discharge. A chart review was also completed for consented survey participants. Recruitment occurred from September 2005 to August 2006 at the Stollery Children's Hospital, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Results: A total of 264 parents were approached to participate. Overall, 231 surveys were returned and 212 (92% charts were reviewed. The overall rate of early return during the study period was 5.4%. More than half of parents stated that they returned because their child's condition worsened and many parents (66.7% reported feeling stressed. Patients were typically under 6 years of age (67.4%, and most frequently diagnosed with infectious diseases (38.0%. Patients triaged with the Canadian Emergency Department Triage and Acuity Scale (CTAS as CTAS 2 (emergent for initial visits were more likely to be admitted on return, regardless of age (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Variables associated with early returns included young age, diagnosis, triage acuity, and parental stress. Future variable definition should include a deeper exploration of modifiable factors such as parental stress and patient education. These next steps may help direct interventions and resources to address needs in this group and possibly pre-empt the need to return

  9. Risk Factors Associated With Emergency Department Return Visits Following Trauma System Discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttan, Timothy; Lawson, Karla A; Piper, Karen; Wilkinson, Matthew

    2017-06-06

    Little evidence exists in the pediatric trauma literature regarding what factors are associated with re-presentation to the hospital for patients discharged from the emergency department (ED). This was a retrospective cohort study of trauma system activations at a pediatric trauma center from June 30, 2007, through June 30, 2013, who were subsequently discharged from the ED or after a brief inpatient stay. Returns within 30 days were reviewed. χ, Student t test, and univariate logistical regression were used to compare predictive factors for those returning and not. One thousand eight hundred sixty-three patient encounters were included in the cohort. Seventy-two patients (3.9%) had at least 1 return visit that was related to the original trauma activation. Age, sex, language, race/ethnicity, ED length of stay, arrival mode, level of trauma activation, and transfer from an outside hospital did not vary significantly between the groups. Patients with public insurance were almost 2 times more likely to return compared with those with private insurance (odds ratio, 1.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.11-3.35). Income by zip code was associated with the risk of a return visit, with patients in neighborhoods at less than the 50th percentile income twice as likely to return to the ED (odds ratio, 2.15; 95% confidence interval, 1.30-3.54). Patients with public insurance and those from low-income neighborhoods were significantly more likely to return to the ED after trauma system activation. These data can be used to target interventions to decrease returns in high-risk trauma patients.

  10. Screening for violence risk factors identifies young adults at risk for return emergency department visit for injury.

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    Hankin, Abigail; Wei, Stanley; Foreman, Juron; Houry, Debra

    2014-08-01

    Homicide is the second leading cause of death among youth aged 15-24. Prior cross-sectional studies, in non-healthcare settings, have reported exposure to community violence, peer behavior, and delinquency as risk factors for violent injury. However, longitudinal cohort studies have not been performed to evaluate the temporal or predictive relationship between these risk factors and emergency department (ED) visits for injuries among at-risk youth. The objective was to assess whether self-reported exposure to violence risk factors in young adults can be used to predict future ED visits for injuries over a 1-year period. This prospective cohort study was performed in the ED of a Southeastern US Level I trauma center. Eligible participants were patients aged 18-24, presenting for any chief complaint. We excluded patients if they were critically ill, incarcerated, or could not read English. Initial recruitment occurred over a 6-month period, by a research assistant in the ED for 3-5 days per week, with shifts scheduled such that they included weekends and weekdays, over the hours from 8AM-8PM. At the time of initial contact in the ED, patients were asked to complete a written questionnaire, consisting of previously validated instruments measuring the following risk factors: a) aggression, b) perceived likelihood of violence, c) recent violent behavior, d) peer behavior, e) community exposure to violence, and f) positive future outlook. At 12 months following the initial ED visit, the participants' medical records were reviewed to identify any subsequent ED visits for injury-related complaints. We analyzed data with chi-square and logistic regression analyses. Three hundred thirty-two patients were approached, of whom 300 patients consented. Participants' average age was 21.1 years, with 60.1% female, 86.0% African American. After controlling for participant gender, ethnicity, or injury complaint at time of first visit, return visits for injuries were significantly

  11. Screening for Violence Risk Factors Identifies Young Adults at Risk for Return Emergency Department Visit for Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail Hankin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Homicide is the second leading cause of death among youth aged 15–24. Prior crosssectional studies, in non-healthcare settings, have reported exposure to community violence, peer behavior, and delinquency as risk factors for violent injury. However, longitudinal cohort studies have not been performed to evaluate the temporal or predictive relationship between these risk factors and emergency department (ED visits for injuries among at-risk youth. The objective was to assess whether self-reported exposure to violence risk factors in young adults can be used to predict future ED visits for injuries over a 1-year period. Methods: This prospective cohort study was performed in the ED of a Southeastern US Level I trauma center. Eligible participants were patients aged 18–24, presenting for any chief complaint. We excluded patients if they were critically ill, incarcerated, or could not read English. Initial recruitment occurred over a 6-month period, by a research assistant in the ED for 3–5 days per week, with shifts scheduled such that they included weekends and weekdays, over the hours from 8AM-8PM. At the time of initial contact in the ED, patients were asked to complete a written questionnaire, consisting of previously validated instruments measuring the following risk factors: a aggression, b perceived likelihood of violence, c recent violent behavior, d peer behavior, e community exposure to violence, and f positive future outlook. At 12 months following the initial ED visit, the participants’ medical records were reviewed to identify any subsequent ED visits for injury-related complaints. We analyzed data with chisquare and logistic regression analyses. Results: Three hundred thirty-two patients were approached, of whom 300 patients consented. Participants’ average age was 21.1 years, with 60.1% female, 86.0% African American. After controlling for participant gender, ethnicity, or injury complaint at time of first

  12. Physician’s changes in management of return visits to the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrianna Long

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Return visits to the Emergency Department (ED are estimated between 2-3.1%, which impacts ED care costs and wait times. Adverse events for unscheduled return visits (URVs have been reported to be as high as 30%. The objective of this study was to characterize the attitudes and management of Emergency Medicine (EM physicians regarding patients presenting with the same chief complaint to the ED for an URV. An online survey questionnaire was developed and sent to 160 accredited EM Graduate Medical Education programs in the United States. The questionnaire consisted of case vignettes wherein providers were asked to submit what orders they would place for each scenario. The mean numbers of tests and treatments were compared from initial visit to repeat visit with same chief complaint. Physicians also provided feedback regarding their management of URVs. There were estimated 6988 eligible participants with 397 responses (response rate 5.7%. There was a statistical significance (P<0.001 in provider management of URVs with pediatric fever, but there was no statistical significance for management of the other chief complaints. There were 77% of physicians that felt an increased work up is warranted for URVs. The results of this study indicate that majority of EM residents and staff working in training programs feel that they should approach the management of URV patients with a more extensive workup despite no clinical change. These findings suggest that further analysis should be performed regarding provider management of URVs and the associated healthcare costs.

  13. Risk factors for early return visits to the emergency department in patients with urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Sarah; Zurayk, Mira; Yeung, Samantha; Terry, Jill; Dunn, Maureen; Nieberg, Paul; Wong-Beringer, Annie

    2017-06-21

    Optimal management of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in the emergency department (ED) is challenging due to high patient turnover, decreased continuity of care, and treatment decisions made in the absence of microbiologic data. We sought to identify risk factors for return visits in ED patients treated for UTI. A random sample of 350 adult ED patients with UTI by ICD 9/10 codes was selected for review. Relevant data was extracted from medical charts and compared between patients with and without ED return visits within 30days (ERVs). We identified 51 patients (15%) with 59 ERVs, of whom 6% returned within 72h. Nearly half of ERVs (47%) were UTI-related and 33% of ERV patients required hospitalization. ERVs were significantly more likely (P100; and bacteremia. Escherichia coli was the most common uropathogen (70%) and susceptibility rates to most oral antibiotics were below 80% in both groups except nitrofurantoin (99% susceptible). Cephalexin was the most frequently prescribed antibiotic (51% vs. 44%; P=0.32). Cephalexin bug-drug mismatches were more common in ERV patients (41% vs. 15%; P=0.02). Culture follow-up occurred less frequently in ERV patients (75% vs. 100%; Prisk patients for post-discharge follow-up. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. 77 FR 15396 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection, Comments Requested; Monthly Return...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    ... Requested; Monthly Return of Human Trafficking Offenses Known to Law Enforcement ACTION: 30-day Notice of... collection. (2) The title of the form/collection: Monthly Return of Human Trafficking Offenses Known to Law... Abstract: This collection is needed to collect information on human trafficking incidents...

  15. Short-term return visits of 'general internal medicine' patients to the emergency department: extent and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanbrabant, P; Knockaert, D

    2009-01-01

    Although emergency department (ED) return visits are a significant problem universally, it has not been previously studied in our ED. The aim of this study was to determine the extent of the problem in our ED, to identify the relevant clinical predictor variables and to detect diagnostic errors. A retrospective observational study of ED return visits by patients managed by the General Internal Medicine (GIM) service was performed. The study was performed over a one year period at a tertiary hospital ED. Data are reported as relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). There were a total of 51.210 ED visits during the study period. The total number of ED return visits within 72 hours was 1.124 (2,19%; 95% CI 2,07 to 2,32). The total number of ED patients managed by the GIM service was 9.511. The percentage of patients treated by the GIM service who returned to the ED within 72 hours was 1,48% (95% CI 1,25 to 1,74) when calculated for the whole group and 2,9 % (95% CI 2,46-3,41) for those discharged home from the ED (n = 4.860). The majority (82,98%) of ED return visits by patients discharged from the GIM service were unscheduled and related to their index presenting complaint. Abdominal pain was the commonest initial presenting symptom in the patients who returned to the ED after discharge. Patients with diarrhoea as the initial initial presenting symptom had the highest relative risk of an ED return visit (RR = 4.07). The percentage ED return visits by patients discharged from the ED by the GIM service is 1,48%. Patients presenting with diarrhoea as the initial presenting symptom have the highest relative risk of an early ED return visit. Our main practical conclusion is that patients with abdominal pain need to be re-examined carefully and instructed about potential evolution before discharge.

  16. The Impact on Child Developmental Status at 12 Months of Volunteer Home-Visiting Support

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    Jacqueline Barnes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Home-visiting support during pregnancy or soon after the birth of an infant can be advantageous for maternal well-being and infant development. The best results have been identified when home visitors are professionals, especially nurses, and if a theoretically driven curriculum is followed with fidelity. Some suggest that disadvantaged families, who may avoid professional services, respond well to support from community volunteers, but there is less evidence about their impact. This study identified potentially vulnerable mothers during pregnancy in randomly allocated neighbourhoods where local volunteer home-visiting schemes agreed to offer proactive volunteer support and control areas where the local home-visiting schemes did not offer this proactive service. Taking demographic, child, and family factors into account, there were no significant differences in infant cognitive development at 12 months of age between families who had been supported by a volunteer and those who had not. Better cognitive development was predicted by less reported parenting stress when infants were 2 months and a more stimulating and responsive home environment at 12 months. The results suggest that unstructured proactive volunteer support for potentially vulnerable families is not likely to enhance infant development. Limitations of the cluster-randomised design are discussed.

  17. Predicting Factors and Risk Stratification for Return Visits to the Emergency Department Within 72 Hours in Pediatric Patients.

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    Sung, Sheng-Feng; Liu, Kang Ernest; Chen, Solomon Chih-Cheng; Lo, Chia-Lun; Lin, Kuei-Chih; Hu, Ya-Han

    2015-12-01

    A return visit (RV) to the emergency department (ED) is usually used as a quality indicator for EDs. A thorough comprehension of factors affecting RVs is beneficial to enhancing the quality of emergency care. We performed this study to identify pediatric patients at high risk of RVs using readily available characteristics during an ED visit. We retrospectively collected data of pediatric patients visiting 6 branches of an urban hospital during 2007. Potential variables were analyzed using a multivariable logistic regression analysis to determine factors associated with RVs and a classification and regression tree technique to identify high-risk groups. Of the 35,435 visits from which patients were discharged home, 2291 (6.47%) visits incurred an RV within 72 hours. On multivariable analysis, younger age, weekday visits, diagnoses belonging to the category of symptoms, signs, and ill-defined conditions, and being seen by a female physician were associated with a higher probability of RVs. Children younger than 6.5 years who visited on weekdays or between midnight and 8:00 AM on weekends or holidays had the highest probability of returning to the ED within 72 hours. Our study reexamined several important factors that could affect RVs of pediatric patients to the ED and identified high-risk groups of RVs. Further intervention studies or qualitative research could be targeted on these at-risk groups.

  18. Cardiometabolic Health in Submariners Returning from a 3-Month Patrol

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    Heath G. Gasier

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Confined space, limited exercise equipment, rotating shift work and reduced sleep may affect cardiometabolic health in submariners. To test this hypothesis, 53 male U.S. Submariners (20–39 years were studied before and after a 3-month routine submarine patrol. Measures included anthropometrics, dietary and physical activity, biomarkers of cardiometabolic health, energy and appetite regulation, and inflammation. Before deployment, 62% of submariners had a body fat % (BF% ≥ 25% (obesity, and of this group, 30% met the criteria for metabolic syndrome. In obese volunteers, insulin, the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, leptin, the leptin/adiponectin ratio, and pro-inflammatory chemokines growth-related oncogene and macrophage-derived chemokine were significantly higher compared to non-obese submariners. Following the patrol, a significant mean reduction in body mass (5% and fat-mass (11% occurred in the obese group as a result of reduced energy intake (~2000 kJ during the patrol; and, independent of group, modest improvements in serum lipids and a mean reduction in interferon γ-induced protein 10 and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 were observed. Since 43% of the submariners remained obese, and 18% continued to meet the criteria for metabolic syndrome following the patrol, the magnitude of weight loss was insufficient to completely abolish metabolic dysfunction. Submergence up to 3-months, however, does not appear to be the cause of obesity, which is similar to that of the general population.

  19. 77 FR 1511 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection, Comments Requested; Monthly Return...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-10

    ... Requested; Monthly Return of Human Trafficking Offenses Known to Law Enforcement ACTION: 60-day notice of... Return of Human Trafficking Offenses Known to Law Enforcement. (3) The agency form number, if any, and... collect information on human trafficking incidents committed throughout the United States. (5) An...

  20. Determinants of return to work 12 months after total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichtenberg, C S; Tilbury, C; Kuijer, Ppfm; Verdegaal, Shm; Wolterbeek, R; Nelissen, Rghh; Frings-Dresen, Mhw; Vliet Vlieland, Tpm

    2016-07-01

    Introduction A substantial number of patients undergoing total hip or knee arthroplasty (THA or TKA) do not or only partially return to work. This study aimed to identify differences in determinants of return to work in THA and TKA. Methods We conducted a prospective, observational study of working patients aged return to work 12 months postoperatively. Factors analysed included preoperative sociodemographic and work characteristics, alongside the Hip Disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS)/Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), and Oxford Hip and Knee Scores. Results Of 67 THA and 56 TKA patients, 9 (13%) and 10 (19%), respectively, returned partially and 5 (7%) and 6 (11%), respectively, did not return to work 1 year postoperatively. Preoperative factors associated with partial or no return to work in THA patients were self-employment, absence from work and a better HOOS Activities of Daily Living (ADL) subscale score, whereas only work absence was relevant in TKA patients. Type of surgery modified the impact of ADL scores on return to work. Conclusions In both THA and TKA, absence from work affected return to work, whereas self-employment and better preoperative ADL subscale scores were also associated in THA patients. The impact of ADL scores on return to work was modified by type of surgery. These results suggest that strategies aiming to influence modifiable factors should consider THA and TKA separately.

  1. ANALYSIS OF MONTHLY RATES OF RETURN IN APRIL ON THE EXAMPLE OF SELECTED WORLD STOCK EXCHANGE INDICES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Borowski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    ...-IPC, Nasdaq, Nikkei, Russel, TSE and WIG, the obtained monthly rates of return were statistically equal to zero. In the last part of the article, the correlation coefficients of rates of return for analyzed indices in month of April were surveyed. Introduction Efficient market hypothesis (EMH), the core of the influential paper ...

  2. Six-Month Market Exclusivity Extensions To Promote Research Offer Substantial Returns For Many Drug Makers.

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    Kesselheim, Aaron S; Rome, Benjamin N; Sarpatwari, Ameet; Avorn, Jerry

    2017-02-01

    To incentivize pharmaceutical manufacturers to invest in areas of unmet medical need, policy makers frequently propose extending the market exclusivity period of desired drugs. Some such proposals are modeled after the pediatric exclusivity patent extension program, which since 1997 has provided six additional months of market exclusivity for drugs studied in children. The most recent proposal would encourage rare disease research by providing six months of extended exclusivity for any existing drug that is granted subsequent FDA approval for a new rare disease indication. Yet the economic impact of such proposals is rarely addressed. We found that for the thirteen FDA-approved drugs that gained supplemental approval for a rare disease indication from 2005 through 2010, the median projected cost of clinical trials leading to approval was $29.8 million. If the exclusivity extension had been in place, the median discounted financial gain to manufacturers would have been $94.6 million. Median net returns would have been $82.4 million, with higher returns for drugs with higher annual sales. Extending market exclusivity would provide substantial compensation to many manufacturers, particularly for top-selling products, far in excess of the cost of conducting these trials. Alternative strategies to incentivize the study of approved drugs for rare diseases may offer similar benefits at a lower cost. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  3. Antenatal and neonatal visits increase complete immunization status among children aged 12-23 months in rural area of Indonesia

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    Suparmi Suparmi

    2015-01-01

    -23 months in rural area of Indonesia.Methods: The assessment used a part data of the 2013 Basic Health Research (Riskesdas. The sub- samples consisted of children aged 12-23 months livedin rural area. Out of the 8747 children aged 12-23 months who lived in rural area, 5452 children had complete data for the analysis. Complete basic immunization status based on record on immunization card and mother’s recall. Cox regression analysis with constant time was used for the analysis.Results: Out of 5452 children, 52.8% (2880/5452 had completed the basic immunization. Dominant factors related to basic complete immunization status were antenatal and neonatal visit, wealth index, mother’s education, and mother’s occupation. Compared with those who did not antenatal visit, those who had antenatal visit had 38% to be more complete basic immunization [adjusted relative risk (RRa = 1.38; 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.27 - 1.50; P = 0.000]. In term of neonatal visit, those who had neonatal visit had 37% to be more complete basic immunization compare to those who did not have neonatal visit (RRa = 1.37; 95% CI = 1.29 - 1.46; P = 0.000.Conclusion: In Indonesia rural areas the children who had antenatal and neonatal visits tend to have more complete basic immunization status. (Health Science Indones 2014;2:73-7Key words: complete basic immunization, antenatal and neonatal visits, rural

  4. Predictors of Better Self-Care in Patients with Heart Failure after Six Months of Follow-Up Home Visits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojahn, Melina Maria; Ruschel, Karen Brasil; Nogueira de Souza, Emiliane; Mussi, Cláudia Motta; Naomi Hirakata, Vânia; Nogueira Mello Lopes, Alexandra; Rabelo-Silva, Eneida Rejane

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the predictors of better self-care behavior in patients with heart failure (HF) in a home visiting program. This is a longitudinal study nested in a randomized controlled trial (ISRCTN01213862) in which the home-based educational intervention consisted of a six-month followup that included four home visits by a nurse, interspersed with four telephone calls. The self-care score was measured at baseline and at six months using the Brazilian version of the European Heart Failure Self-Care Behaviour Scale. The associations included eight variables: age, sex, schooling, having received the intervention, social support, income, comorbidities, and symptom severity. A simple linear regression model was developed using significant variables (P ≤ 0.20), followed by a multivariate model to determine the predictors of better self-care. One hundred eighty-eight patients completed the study. A better self-care behavior was associated with patients who received intervention (P < 0.001), had more years of schooling (P = 0.016), and had more comorbidities (P = 0.008). Having received the intervention (P < 0.001) and having a greater number of comorbidities (P = 0.038) were predictors of better self-care. In the multivariate regression model, being in the intervention group and having more comorbidities were a predictor of better self-care. PMID:24083023

  5. Predicting return visits to the emergency department for pediatric patients: Applying supervised learning techniques to the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ya-Han; Tai, Chun-Tien; Chen, Solomon Chih-Cheng; Lee, Hai-Wei; Sung, Sheng-Feng

    2017-06-01

    Return visits (RVs) to the emergency department (ED) consume medical resources and may represent a patient safety issue. The occurrence of unexpected RVs is considered a performance indicator for ED care quality. Because children are susceptible to medical errors and utilize considerable ED resources, knowing the factors that affect RVs in pediatric patients helps improve the quality of pediatric emergency care. We collected data on visits made by patients aged ≤18years to EDs from the National Health Insurance Research Database. The outcome of interest was a RV within 3days of the initial visit. Potential factors were categorized into demographics, medical history, features of ED visits, physician characteristics, hospital characteristics, and treatment-seeking behavior. A multivariate logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of RVs. We compared the performance of various data mining techniques, including Naïve Bayes, classification and regression tree (CART), random forest, and logistic regression, in predicting RVs. Finally, we developed a decision tree to stratify the risk of RVs. Of 125,940 visits, 6,282 (5.0%) were followed by a RV within 3 days. Predictors of RVs included younger age, higher acuity, intravenous fluid, more examination types, complete blood count, consultation, lower hospital level, hospitalization within one week before the initial visit, frequent ED visits in the past one year, and visits made in Spring or on Saturdays. Patients with allergic diseases and those underwent ultrasound examination were less likely to return. Decision tree models performed better in predicting RVs in terms of area under curve. The decision tree constructed using the CART technique showed that the number of ED visits in the past one year, diagnosis category, testing of complete blood count, and age were important discriminators of risk of RVs. We identified several factors which are associated with RVs to the ED in pediatric patients

  6. 26 CFR 1.443-1 - Returns for periods of less than 12 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Accounting Periods § 1.443-1 Returns for periods of less than 12...) Change of annual accounting period. In the case of a change in the annual accounting period of a taxpayer...-2. The computation of the tax for a short period required to effect a change of annual accounting...

  7. The application of return visit nursing in the comprehensive ICU after discharge from hospital%出科后回访护理在综合ICU的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨宝义; 马士崟; 方敏; 汪蓉; 郭学珍

    2014-01-01

    Objective To understand the existing nursing problems in ICU through return visit,in order to improve the ICU inpatients satisfaction.Methods According to ICU admission odd or even date,300 patients were divided into two groups,130 patients in control group had not been implemented return visit,170 patients in interview group were treated with return visit nursing.Two groups were compared with ICU nursing work satisfaction,complaint rate and praise rate.Results Compared with control group,in the interview group ICU nursing job satisfaction and praise rate were 90.59% and 48.24% respectively,the complaint rate was only 5.88%,the differences were significant (P < 0.01 for all).Conclusions Return visit nursing for ICU discharged patients may promote the ICU nursing service quality continuous improvement,improve the patients and their families to ICU nursing job satisfaction,enhance the brand image of ICU.%目的 通过回访以了解ICU护理工作中存在的问题,提高ICU住院患者满意度.方法 按入住ICU时间的单双号将300例患者分为两组,单日130例患者为对照组,未实施回访;双日170例患者为访视组,实施访视护理,比较两组患者对ICU护理工作的满意度、投诉率及表扬率.结果 访视组患者对ICU护理工作满意度和表扬率分别高达90.59%和48.24%,显著高于对照组,投诉率仅为5.88%,显著低于对照组,差异具有显著性(均P<0.01).结论 开展ICU出科患者回访护理,可促进ICU护理服务质量的持续改进,提高患者及家属对ICU护理工作满意度,提升ICU的品牌形象.

  8. The Effect of a Physical Activity Program on the Total Number of Primary Care Visits in Inactive Patients: A 15-Month Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Giné-Garriga

    Full Text Available Effective promotion of exercise could result in substantial savings in healthcare cost expenses in terms of direct medical costs, such as the number of medical appointments. However, this is hampered by our limited knowledge of how to achieve sustained increases in physical activity.To assess the effectiveness of a Primary Health Care (PHC based physical activity program in reducing the total number of visits to the healthcare center among inactive patients, over a 15-month period.Randomized controlled trial.Three hundred and sixty-two (n = 362 inactive patients suffering from at least one chronic condition were included. One hundred and eighty-three patients (n = 183; mean (SD; 68.3 (8.8 years; 118 women were randomly allocated to the physical activity program (IG. One hundred and seventy-nine patients (n = 179; 67.2 (9.1 years; 106 women were allocated to the control group (CG. The IG went through a three-month standardized physical activity program led by physical activity specialists and linked to community resources.The total number of medical appointments to the PHC, during twelve months before and after the program, was registered. Self-reported health status (SF-12 version 2 was assessed at baseline (month 0, at the end of the intervention (month 3, and at 12 months follow-up after the end of the intervention (month 15.The IG had a significantly reduced number of visits during the 12 months after the intervention: 14.8 (8.5. The CG remained about the same: 18.2 (11.1 (P = .002.Our findings indicate that a 3-month physical activity program linked to community resources is a short-duration, effective and sustainable intervention in inactive patients to decrease rates of PHC visits.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00714831.

  9. Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score at 3 months can predict patients' ability to return to sport 1 year after injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Maria Swennergren; Christensen, Marianne; Budolfsen, Thomas;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate how the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) at 3 months and 1 year after injury is associated with a patient's ability to return to work and sports as well as to investigate whether sex and age influence ATRS after 3 months and 1 year. METHOD: This is a retrospective...... study analysing the data from the Danish Achilles tendon Database. A total of 366 patients were included. Logistic regression was conducted to describe the effect of ATRS on return to work and sports. The effect of age and sex on ATRS was analysed by linear regression. RESULTS: Three months after injury...... patients had a significantly increased chance of return to sport after 1 year with an increased ATRS (OR 1.06, p = 0.001) but a non-significant effect on return to work. After 1 year, patients had a significantly increased probability of having returned to sport (OR 1.11, p

  10. Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score at 3 months can predict patients' ability to return to sport 1 year after injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Maria Swennergren; Christensen, Marianne; Budolfsen, Thomas; Østergaard, Thomas Friis; Kallemose, Thomas; Troelsen, Anders; Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner

    2016-04-01

    To investigate how the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) at 3 months and 1 year after injury is associated with a patient's ability to return to work and sports as well as to investigate whether sex and age influence ATRS after 3 months and 1 year. This is a retrospective study analysing the data from the Danish Achilles tendon Database. A total of 366 patients were included. Logistic regression was conducted to describe the effect of ATRS on return to work and sports. The effect of age and sex on ATRS was analysed by linear regression. Three months after injury patients had a significantly increased chance of return to sport after 1 year with an increased ATRS (OR 1.06, p = 0.001) but a non-significant effect on return to work. After 1 year, patients had a significantly increased probability of having returned to sport (OR 1.11, p < 0.001) and also having returned to work (OR 1.05, p = 0.007) with an increased ATRS. Men had an average 7 (p = 0.006) points higher ATRS at 3 months and an average 22 (p = 0.006) points higher at 1 year. ATRS is associated with patients' ability to return to sports and work. ATRS at 3 months can be used as a predictor of the patient's ability to return to sports after 1 year. Hereby, ATRS might help to individualise rehabilitation by identifying patients who do not respond adequately to the chosen treatment. II.

  11. Comparison of two strategies for the administration of injectable depot medroxyprogesterone acetate: among women who returned to a family planning clinic at three- or six-month intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Jéssica M; Bottura, Bruna F; Gonçalves, Mayara P; Monteiro, Ilza; Bahamondes, Luis

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the clinical performance of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) in women who received injections every 3 months at the Family Planning Clinic, and those who received every other injection at a health care facility near their place of residence, only returning to the clinic every 6 months. The medical charts of DMPA users from 2 January 1980 through 31 December 2012 were evaluated for this study. Two cohorts of women were created and compared: those who regularly received DMPA injections every 3 months (3-month group) at the clinic and those who received alternating 3-month injections at a health care facility near their residence house, returning to the clinic every 6 months for an injection (6-month group). In addition, effectiveness rates, reasons for discontinuation, and continuation rates were evaluated. Overall, 2637 women received all injections at 3-month intervals at the clinic, and 1190 women received every other injection at a health care facility near their residence. The women in the 3-month group had higher pregnancy rates and higher discontinuation rates (with the exception of discontinuation due to the loss of libido). The women who received alternating injections near their homes were more likely to continue using DMPA as a contraception method and presented lower pregnancy and discontinuation rates (for the majority of reasons), when compared to those women who returned to the clinic every 3 months.

  12. An open cluster-randomized, 18-month trial to compare the effectiveness of educational outreach visits with usual guideline dissemination to improve family physician prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Daniel; Heleno, Bruno; Rodrigues, David S; Papoila, Ana Luísa; Santos, Isabel; Caetano, Pedro A

    2014-01-15

    The Portuguese National Health Directorate has issued clinical practice guidelines on prescription of anti-inflammatory drugs, acid suppressive therapy, and antiplatelets. However, their effectiveness in changing actual practice is unknown. The study will compare the effectiveness of educational outreach visits regarding the improvement of compliance with clinical guidelines in primary care against usual dissemination strategies. A cost-benefit analysis will also be conducted. We will carry out a parallel, open, superiority, randomized trial directed to primary care physicians. Physicians will be recruited and allocated at a cluster-level (primary care unit) by minimization. Data will be analyzed at the physician level. Primary care units will be eligible if they use electronic prescribing and have at least four physicians willing to participate. Physicians in intervention units will be offered individual educational outreach visits (one for each guideline) at their workplace during a six-month period. Physicians in the control group will be offered a single unrelated group training session. Primary outcomes will be the proportion of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors prescribed in the anti-inflammatory class, and the proportion of omeprazole in the proton pump inhibitors class at 18 months post-intervention. Prescription data will be collected from the regional pharmacy claims database. We estimated a sample size of 110 physicians in each group, corresponding to 19 clusters with a mean size of 6 physicians. Outcome collection and data analysis will be blinded to allocation, but due to the nature of the intervention, physicians and detailers cannot be blinded. This trial will attempt to address unresolved issues in the literature, namely, long term persistence of effect, the importance of sequential visits in an outreach program, and cost issues. If successful, this trial may be the cornerstone for deploying large scale educational outreach programs within the Portuguese

  13. Functional and occupational characteristics predictive of a return to work within 18 months after stroke in Japan: implications for rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Hirotaka; Toyonaga, Toshihiro; Hashimoto, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study examined clinical, functional, and occupational factors associated with return to work within 18 months after stroke, specifically focusing on the impact of higher cortical dysfunction on return to work in the chronic phase. Methods This prospective cohort study in 21 hospitals specializing in clinical and occupational health recruited consecutive working-age inpatients receiving acute care for their first stroke (n = 351). A unified database was used to extract patient i...

  14. Increased emergency room visits or hospital admissions in females after 12-month MMR vaccination, but no difference after vaccinations given at a younger age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kumanan; Ducharme, Robin; Ward, Brian; Hawken, Steven

    2014-02-26

    Previous studies have suggested that a child's sex may be a predictor of vaccine reactions. We used a self-controlled case series design, an extension of retrospective cohort methodology which controls for fixed confounders using a conditional Poisson modeling approach. We compared a risk period immediately following vaccination to a control period farther removed from vaccination in each child and estimated the relative incidence of emergency room visits and/or hospital admissions following the 2-, 4-, 6-, and 12-month vaccinations to investigate the effect of sex on relative incidence. All infants born in Ontario, Canada between April 1, 2002 and March 31, 2009 were eligible for study inclusion. In analyses combining immunizations at 2, 4 and 6 months and examining these vaccinations separately, there was no significant relationship between the relative incidence of an event and sex of the child. At 12 months, we observed a significant effect of sex, with female sex being associated with a significantly higher relative incidence of events (P=0.0027). The relative incidence ratio (95% CI) comparing females to males following the 12-month vaccination was 1.08 (1.03 to 1.14), which translates to 192 excess events per 100,000 females vaccinated compared to the number of events that would have occurred in 100,000 males vaccinated. As the MMR vaccine is given at 12 months of age in Ontario, our findings suggest that girls may have an increased reactogenicity to the MMR vaccine which may be indicative of general sex differences in the responses to the measles virus. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Breast-feeding, return of menses, sexual activity and contraceptive practices among mothers in the first six months of lactation in Onitsha, South Eastern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbuonu, I; Ezechukwu, C C; Chukwuka, J O; Ikechebelu, J I

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the exclusive breast-feeding practices, return of menstruation, sexual activity and contraceptive practices among breast-feeding mothers in the first six months of lactation. The study was based in Onitsha, South Eastern Nigeria. A structured questionnaire was used to obtain data from breast-feeding mothers on their age, educational attainment, breast-feeding practices, return of menstruation, sexual activity and contraceptive practices within the first six months of lactation at intervals of 6 weeks, 10 weeks 14 weeks and 6 months post delivery. Analysis of the information obtained showed that out of the 178 mothers who participated in the study 81% of the mothers were within the ages of 20 - 34 years. While all the mothers had formal education, the majority (59%) had secondary education. Seventy-three percent initiated breast-feeding within one hour of delivery. On discharge from hospital, all of them had already established breast-feeding which continued up to six weeks and dropped to 97.8% at six months. Exclusive breast-feeding which was practised by 100% on discharge dropped to 3.9% at six months. The feeding regimen was on demand as practised by 98.9% of the mothers. Menstrual flow had returned in 33.8% of the mothers by 6 weeks of lactation, and had risen to 70.2% at six months. There was more prolonged lactational amenorrheoa in exclusively breast-feeding mothers than in those who were not. By 6 weeks post delivery 31.6% of the mothers had resumed sexual activity and this rose to 93.6% at six months. With the resumption of sexual activity only 5% of the mothers resorted to contraceptive practices other than lactational amenorrhea and this increased to 54% at six months. There was no pregnancy in any of these women during the six months period. While appreciating the role of lactational amenorrhea in child spacing and considering the early return of sexual activity among the mothers the practice of introducing

  16. Investigation of market efficiency and Financial Stability between S&P 500 and London Stock Exchange: Monthly and yearly Forecasting of Time Series Stock Returns using ARMA model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rounaghi, Mohammad Mahdi; Nassir Zadeh, Farzaneh

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the presence and changes in, long memory features in the returns and volatility dynamics of S&P 500 and London Stock Exchange using ARMA model. Recently, multifractal analysis has been evolved as an important way to explain the complexity of financial markets which can hardly be described by linear methods of efficient market theory. In financial markets, the weak form of the efficient market hypothesis implies that price returns are serially uncorrelated sequences. In other words, prices should follow a random walk behavior. The random walk hypothesis is evaluated against alternatives accommodating either unifractality or multifractality. Several studies find that the return volatility of stocks tends to exhibit long-range dependence, heavy tails, and clustering. Because stochastic processes with self-similarity possess long-range dependence and heavy tails, it has been suggested that self-similar processes be employed to capture these characteristics in return volatility modeling. The present study applies monthly and yearly forecasting of Time Series Stock Returns in S&P 500 and London Stock Exchange using ARMA model. The statistical analysis of S&P 500 shows that the ARMA model for S&P 500 outperforms the London stock exchange and it is capable for predicting medium or long horizons using real known values. The statistical analysis in London Stock Exchange shows that the ARMA model for monthly stock returns outperforms the yearly. ​A comparison between S&P 500 and London Stock Exchange shows that both markets are efficient and have Financial Stability during periods of boom and bust.

  17. Persistent detection of Zika virus RNA in semen for six months after symptom onset in a traveller returning from Haiti to Italy, February 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicastri, Emanuele; Castilletti, Concetta; Liuzzi, Giuseppina; Iannetta, Marco; Capobianchi, Maria R; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    A man in his early 30s reported in January 2016 a history of fever, asthenia and erythematous rash during a stay in Haiti. On his return to Italy, ZIKV RNA was detected in his urine and saliva 91 days after symptom onset, and in his semen on day 188, six months after symptom onset. Our findings support the possibility of sexual transmission of ZIKV and highlight the importance of continuing to investigate non-vector-borne ZIKV infection. PMID:27541989

  18. Persistent detection of Zika virus RNA in semen for six months after symptom onset in a traveller returning from Haiti to Italy, February 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicastri, Emanuele; Castilletti, Concetta; Liuzzi, Giuseppina; Iannetta, Marco; Capobianchi, Maria R; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2016-08-11

    A man in his early 30s reported in January 2016 a history of fever, asthenia and erythematous rash during a stay in Haiti. On his return to Italy, ZIKV RNA was detected in his urine and saliva 91 days after symptom onset, and in his semen on day 188, six months after symptom onset. Our findings support the possibility of sexual transmission of ZIKV and highlight the importance of continuing to investigate non-vector-borne ZIKV infection.

  19. [Medical visits before return to work, after a long lasting absence, above 60 days, for injuries or common diseases in a public transport company. Analysis and discussions of utility and consequences in term of evaluation of fitness to specific job].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verga, A; Bordini, L; Ricci, M G; Di Lucca, P; Todaro, A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the opportunity to do medical visits before return to work, after a long continuous absence, above 60 days, for injuries (occupational and non-occupational) or common diseases. We have examined medical records of 403 workers, in 2010 and 2011, occupied in a public transport company, in order to control the following variables: job, age, clinical conditions related to the absences, classification of the absence as injuries or common disease and conclusions about medical fitness to specific job. Our findings have shown an equal percentage of causes of absences in term of injuries or common diseases. The main cause of absence and of non fit to specific job, after medical evaluation, is depending on orthopaedic post-traumatic diseases. This evidence support the importance to do medical visits after long-lasting absence from work, particularly in case of jobs (bus, tram, subway drivers) at risk for other people.

  20. Visit safety

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Experiment areas, offices, workshops: it is possible to have co-workers or friends visit these places.     You already know about the official visits service, the VIP office, and professional visits. But do you know about the safety instruction GSI-OHS1, “Visits on the CERN site”? This is a mandatory General Safety Instruction that was created to assist you in ensuring safety for all your visits, whatever their nature—especially those that are non-official. Questions? The HSE Unit will be happy to answer them. Write to safety-general@cern.ch.   The HSE Unit

  1. Visit ISOLDE!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    CERN Internal Communication is organising a visit to ISOLDE – an opportunity for you to see the CERN set-up that can produce over 1000 different isotopes!   If you wish to participate, you can sign up for a visit by sending us an e-mail. Note that the visits will take place between 18 and 22 February, and will be open only to CERN access-card holders.   The visit will include an introduction by experts and a tour of the ISOLDE set-up. NB: For security reason, pregnant women and kids under the age of 16 can not take the tour.  

  2. Effectiveness of Multidisciplinary Group-Based Intervention versus Individual Physiotherapy for Improving Chronic Low Back Pain in Nursing Staff: A Clinical Trial with 3- and 6-Month Follow-Up Visits from Tehran, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadyani, Leila; Tavafian, Sedigheh Sadat; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan; Wagner, Joan

    2017-06-01

    Clinical trial. To evaluate the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary group-based intervention on improving pain and disability among Iranian nurses with chronic low back pain in Tehran, Iran. Although low back pain (LBP) is one of the most important health problems, the challenge remains on how to find an effective intervention to reduce pain and related disabilities. Overall, 136 eligible nurses with chronic mechanical LBP were classified into two groups. The intervention group (n=66 participants) participated in a physiotherapy educational program (for 120 minutes) plus a health educational program based on predictive constructs of the social cognitive theory (for 120 minutes). These interventions were delivered by a physiotherapist and a health education specialist. The control group (n=70 participants) participated in a physiotherapy educational program (for 120 minutes). Disability rate, pain severity, and back pain prevention behavior were measured initially and at 3- and 6-month follow-up visits using the visual analogue scale, Roland-Morris Disability, and Nursing Low Back Pain Preventive Behaviors Questionnaire. Data were analyzed by SPSS ver. 16. There were statistically significant differences between the two groups in the main outcome measures immediately after the educational program and at 3- and 6-month follow-up visits. Preventive behaviors of participants in the intervention group were improved at 3- and 6- month follow-up visits (ppreventive behaviors in the intervention group were improved after 3 and 6 months (p<0.001). Finally, in the intervention group, pain severity and disability were decreased significantly. This study showed that a multidisciplinary educational program intervention can be an effective approach for reducing LBP and related disabilities among nurses.

  3. Visit Itinerary

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The visit itinerary includes five area of halls 191 and 180:. End-Cap Toroid Integration Area . Barrel Toroid Integration Area . Cryogenic Test Facility for Toroid Magnets and Helium Pumps . Liquid Argon Cryostats Assembly Area . Central Solenoid Magnet Test Station

  4. 电话回访在门诊手术及急诊清创患者中的应用%Application of telephone return visit in outpatient surgery and emergency debridement patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李红霞; 张袆

    2016-01-01

    目的:通过通信工具对门诊手术及急诊清创患者以电话回访进行健康教育。方法:在患者离院前对所有资料做详细的记录,利用电话提供咨询、帮助、指导等服务。结果:通过电话回访,延伸健康教育,促进患者的身心健康,密切了护患关系,提高了护理工作的满意度,体现了护士的价值。结论:电话回访以患者的需要为中心,简单直接,效果明显。%Objective:Health education was carried out by means of communication tools for outpatient and emergency debridement patients.Methods:Patients before the hospital will do all the information to do a detailed record,the use of telephone to provide advice,help,guidance and other services.Results:Through the telephone return visit,extending the health education, promoting the patient's physical and mental health,closing the relationship between nurses and patients,improving the satisfaction of nursing work,reflecting the value of the nurse.Conclusion: Telephone visit to the needs of patients as the center,simple and direct,the effect is obvious.

  5. Tai Chi-based exercise program provided via telerehabilitation compared to home visits in a post-stroke population who have returned home without intensive rehabilitation: study protocol for a randomized, non-inferiority clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tousignant, Michel; Corriveau, Hélène; Kairy, Dahlia; Berg, Katherine; Dubois, Marie-France; Gosselin, Sylvie; Swartz, Richard H; Boulanger, Jean-Martin; Danells, Cynthia

    2014-01-30

    The incidence of strokes in industrialized nations is on the rise, particularly in the older population. In Canada, a minority of individuals who have had a stroke actually receive intensive rehabilitation because most stroke patients do not have access to services or because their motor recovery was judged adequate to return home. Thus, there is a considerable need to organize home-based rehabilitation services for everyone who has had a stroke. To meet this demand, telerehabilitation, particularly from a service center to the patient's home, is a promising alternative approach that can help improve access to rehabilitation services once patients are discharged home. This non-inferiority study will include patients who have returned home post-stroke without requiring intensive rehabilitation. To be included in the study, participants will: 1) not be referred to an Intensive Functional Rehabilitation Unit, 2) have a Rankin score of 2 or 3, and 3) have a balance problem (Berg Balance Scale score between 46 and 54). Participants will be randomly assigned to either the teletreatment group or the home visits group. Except for the delivery mode, the intervention will be the same for both groups, that is, a personalized Tai Chi-based exercise program conducted by a trained physiotherapist (45-minute session twice a week for eight consecutive weeks). The main objective of this research is to test the non-inferiority of a Tai Chi-based exercise program provided via telerehabilitation compared to the same program provided in person at home in terms of effectiveness for retraining balance in individuals who have had a stroke but do not require intensive functional rehabilitation. The main outcome of this study is balance and mobility measured with the Community Balance and Mobility Scale. Secondary outcomes include physical and psychological capacities related to balance and mobility, participants' quality of life, satisfaction with services received, and cost

  6. Austrian visit

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Hans Hoffmann, Director for Technology Transfer and Scientific Computing, and Maria Rauch-Kallat, Minister of Health and Women's Issues, Austria, signing the visitors' book.Maria Rauch-Kallat, Minister of Health and Women's Issues, Austria, was welcomed by Hans Hoffmann, Director for Technology Transfer and Scientific Computing, on her visit to CERN on 19 May 2003. The theme of the visit was Technology Transfer and spin-offs from CERN for medical applications. Maria Rauch-Kallat toured also the installations of ATLAS.

  7. Polish visit

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    On 6 October, Professor Michal Kleiber, Polish Minister of Science and Chairman of the State Committee for Scientific Research, visited CERN and met both the current and designated Director General, Luciano Maiani and Robert Aymar. Professor Kleiber visited the CMS and ATLAS detector assembly halls, the underground cavern for ATLAS, and the LHC superconducting magnet string test hall. Michal Kleiber (left), Polish minister of science and Jan Krolikowski, scientist at Warsaw University and working for CMS, who shows the prototypes of the Muon Trigger board of CMS.

  8. NOTE FROM VISITS SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    ETT Division; Division ETT; Service des visites

    2000-01-01

    The Visit Service noticed that for many years countries such as Great Britain, Germany, Spain, Portugal, the Netherlands and the Scandinavian countries visit CERN less than other member countries and that is due to the high price of the trip for the students. To improve the situation the Visit Service plans to create a network of 'Family-Accommodation' ('Famille-Accueil') in Geneva and in France nearbywith the aim to facilitate the trip to foreign students especially from the more distant member countries and to encourage them to visit our unique laboratory. We expect this exchange to be an interesting experience for both the students and the welcoming family ('famille d'accueil'). If you are interested in participating in this family network, please fill in the questionnaire below. The questionnaire is to be returned to the Visit Service, Mrs Christine Fromm, e-mail Christine.Fromm@cern.ch.Name: First name: CERN address: E-mail: Portable phone number: Home address...

  9. European visit

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The European Commissioner for Science and Research, Janez Potočnik, (on the right) visited the CMS assembly hall accompanied by Jim Virdee, Deputy Spokesman of CMS (on the left), and Robert Aymar, Director-General of CERN. The European Commissioner for Science and Research, Janez Potočnik, visited CERN on Tuesday 31 January. He was welcomed by the Director-General, Robert Aymar, who described the missions and current activities of CERN to him, in particular the realisation of the LHC with its three components: accelerator, detectors, storage and processing of data. The European Commissioner then visited the CMS assembly hall, then the hall for testing the LHC magnets and the ATLAS cavern. During this first visit since his appointment at the end of 2004, Janez Potočnik appeared very interested by the operation of CERN, an example of successful scientific co-operation on a European scale. The many projects (30 on average) that CERN and the European Commission carry out jointly for the benefit of res...

  10. Cosmic visits

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefania Pandolfi

    2015-01-01

    On Saturday, 19 September, ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano and Amalia Ercoli Finzi, Principal Investigator of the SD2 experiment on board the ESA Rosetta spacecraft, visited the AMS Control Centre and other CERN installations.   From left to right: Sergio Bertolucci (CERN Director of Research and Computing), Amalia Ercoli Finzi (Emeritus Professor in the Aerospace department of the Polytechnic University of Milan and Principal Investigator of the SD2 experiment on board the ESA Rosetta spacecraft), Maurice Bourquin (AMS-02 Senior Scientist and Honorary Professor in the Nuclear and Corpuscular Physics department of the University of Geneva) and Luca Parmitano (Major in the Italian Air Force and European Space Agency astronaut) in the AMS Payload and Operation Control Centre. They were welcomed in the early morning by Sergio Bertolucci and then headed to the Prévessin site to visit the CERN Control Centre and the Payload and Operation Control Centre (POCC) of the Alpha Magnetic Sp...

  11. Armenian visit

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    During his visit to CERN on 4 July 2003, Karen Chshmaritian, Armenian Minister for Trade and Economic Development, toured the ATLAS experimental cavern and assembly hall. From left to right: Aram Kotzinian, from the international organization JINR from Dubna, Marzio Nessi from ATLAS, Karen Chshmaritian, Armenian Minister for Trade and Economic Development, Zohrab Mnatsakanian, Ambassador at the Permanent Mission of the Republic of Armenia to the United Nations in Geneva, Alexandre Sissakian, Vice-Director of JINR and Peter Jenni, ATLAS spokesman.

  12. Spanish Visit

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    On 23 January, CERN welcomed a visit by Pedro Morenés Eulate, Spanish Secretary of State for Scientific and Technological Policy. He was taken on a tour of the LHC Superconducting test facility, the CMS magnet assembly hall and the civil engineering works at Point 5. After a brief presentation on the AMS (Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer) experiment, delivered by Sam Ting, and lunch hosted by Director General Robert Aymar, he continued his tour of the ATLAS assembly hall and the ISOLDE experimental hall. Pedro Morenés finished his visit by meeting with the Spanish scientific community working at CERN. From left to right: Juan-Antonio Rubio, CERN, Responsible for the Education & Communication, Technology transfer and Scientific Information groups; Gonzalo León, General Secretary of the Spanish Ministry; Joaquín Pérez-Villanueva y Tovar, Ambassador, Permanent Representative of Spain to the United Nations Office; Robert Aymar, CERN Director General; Maria-José Garcia-Borge, ISOLDE and NTOF, CSIC Madrid Tea...

  13. Infection dynamics in a traveller with persistent shedding of Zika virus RNA in semen for six months after returning from Haiti to Italy, January 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzon, Luisa; Pacenti, Monia; Franchin, Elisa; Lavezzo, Enrico; Trevisan, Marta; Sgarabotto, Dino; Palù, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    We describe the dynamics of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in a man in his early 40s who developed fever and rash after returning from Haiti to Italy, in January 2016. Follow-up laboratory testing demonstrated detectable ZIKV RNA in plasma up to day 9 after symptom onset and in urine and saliva up to days 15 and 47, respectively. Notably, persistent shedding of ZIKV RNA was demonstrated in semen, still detectable at 181 days after onset. PMID:27542178

  14. Infection dynamics in a traveller with persistent shedding of Zika virus RNA in semen for six months after returning from Haiti to Italy, January 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzon, Luisa; Pacenti, Monia; Franchin, Elisa; Lavezzo, Enrico; Trevisan, Marta; Sgarabotto, Dino; Palù, Giorgio

    2016-08-11

    We describe the dynamics of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in a man in his early 40s who developed fever and rash after returning from Haiti to Italy, in January 2016. Follow-up laboratory testing demonstrated detectable ZIKV RNA in plasma up to day 9 after symptom onset and in urine and saliva up to days 15 and 47, respectively. Notably, persistent shedding of ZIKV RNA was demonstrated in semen, still detectable at 181 days after onset. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2016.

  15. Return migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmelch, G

    1980-01-01

    The author reviews the findings of the growing literature on return migration. Topics covered include typologies of return migrants, reasons for return, adaptation and readjustment of returnees, and the impact of return migration on the migrants' home societies. The focus of the study is on international return migration, migration to Northern Europe and northeastern North America, and return migration to the southern and eastern fringes of Europe and the Caribbean

  16. Three European ministers visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    There have been three ministerial visits to CERN this month. Gediminas Kirkilas, Prime Minister of Lithuania, and Robert Aymar, CERN’s Director-General.On 2 July, the Prime Minister of Lithuania, Gediminas Kirkilas, was welcomed by CERN’s Director-General, Robert Aymar, before being taken on a visit of the ATLAS cavern at Point 2 and the LHC tunnel. Michal Sewerynski, Poland’s Minister for Science and Higher Education, and Robert Aymar, CERN’s Director-General.Ten days later, Poland’s Minister for Science and Higher Education, Michal Sewerynski, visited the CMS cavern and assembly hall and the LHC tunnel. He was also given a tour of the LHC Computer Centre and the CERN Control Centre. His visit was rounded off with a presentation of Polish companies involved in CERN’s activities, followed by a meeting with Polish personnel working at CERN. J�...

  17. ICU visitation policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, A M

    1994-09-01

    Critically ill patients need their families more than ever, but rigid policies often restrict family visitation in ICU. Family visitation is not a "privilege" granted by hospitals, it is a necessary adjunct to the therapeutic regimen. Though changing outdated visitation policies can be difficult, it must be done. The clinical nurse specialist can play an important role in planning and implementing needed change.

  18. Returning to the Forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Benedikte Møller

    This PhD thesis is about shamanism among the Duha in Mongolia. It is based on 22 months of fieldwork (1999 - 2012) among the Duha reindeer nomads in Northern Mongolia, and examines why the Duha return to their traditional livelihood as hunters and herders in the taiga has resulted in a turn to ward...

  19. Returning to the Forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Benedikte Møller

    This PhD thesis is about shamanism among the Duha in Mongolia. It is based on 22 months of fieldwork (1999 - 2012) among the Duha reindeer nomads in Northern Mongolia, and examines why the Duha return to their traditional livelihood as hunters and herders in the taiga has resulted in a turn to wa...

  20. A Significant Visit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI YONGMING

    2010-01-01

    @@ North Korean leader KimJong Ⅱ paid a visit to China from May 3-7. The trip was on the agenda as early as last January, when Wang Jiarui, head of the International Department of the Communist Party of China Central Committee visited North Korea and delivered Chinese President Hu Jintao's invitation to Kim.

  1. Berliner Philarmoniker ATLAS visit

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Berliner Philarmoniker in on tour through Europe. They stopped on June 27th in Geneva, for a concert at the Victoria Hall. An ATLAS visit was organised the morning after, lead by the ATLAS spokesperson Karl Jakobs (welcome and overview talk) and two ATLAS guides (AVC visit and 3D movie).

  2. 短信平台随访系统在糖尿病患者复诊率与血糖控制中的应用%Effects of short message service platform system on return visit rate, glycosylated hemoglobin level and glucose control rate for diabetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑玲玉; 张爱丽; 吕佳; 詹静; 谭擎缨

    2014-01-01

    A total of 296 patients were randomly divided into short message group (n =153) and non short message group (n =143).The former group received short message service (SMS) for follow-ups while the latter group had routine oral follow-ups.The return visit rate,recall rate of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c),HbAlc level and glucose control rate for diabetics were assessed after one-year follow-up.The return visit rate (96%) and recall rate of HbAlc (78%) in the short message group were significantly higher than those in the non-short message group (59%,25%,P <0.01 for both).The HbAlc level after one-year follow-up (6.51 ± 0.74) % was lower than that one year before (6.85 ± 1.26) % in the short message group.The glucose control rate after one year (82%) were significantly higher than that one year before in the short message group (65%) and that after one year in the non-short message group(59%,P < 0.01).Use of SMS platform system for follow-ups and health education can effectively improve the return visit rate and glucose control rate,lower the HbA1c level.in diabetics.%将2012年3-12月296例门诊糖尿病患者,分为短信组(153例)和非短信组(143例).非短信组给予常规口头健康宣教及告知复诊,短信组利用短信息平台随访系统定期发送糖尿病相关知识及通知复诊.随访1年,短信组复诊次数达标(门诊复诊10以上)率96%(147/153),糖化血红蛋白(HbA1c)监测次数达标(测定3次以上)率78%(120/153),高于非短信组的59%(85/143)和25%(36/143)(均P<0.01);HbA1c水平下降[(6.85±1.26)%降至(6.51±0.74)%](P<0.01),血糖达标率提高[65% (100/153)与82%(126/153),P<0.01],和非短信组干预后[71% (100/143)与59%(84/143)]比较差异有统计学意义(均P<0.01).说明应用短信息平台进行周期性短信干预能有效改善糖尿病患者遵医行为,降低HbA1c水平,提高血糖达标率.

  3. Visit-to-visit blood pressure variability and future functional decline in old age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ogliari, Giulia; Smit, Roelof A J; Westendorp, Rudi G J

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Higher blood pressure variability (BPV), independent of mean blood pressure (BP), has been associated with adverse health outcomes. We investigated the association between visit-to-visit BPV and functional decline in older adults at high cardiovascular risk. METHODS: In PROspective Study...... of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk, 4745 participants with mean age of 75.2 years and high cardiovascular risk were followed for a mean of 3.2 years. BP was measured in every 3 months during the first 18 months. BPV was defined as the intraindividual SD of measurements across these visits. Functional status.......008) in IADL score. These associations were not modified by sex, hypertension or antihypertensives. These findings were independent of mean BP, cardiovascular risk factors and morbidities and cognition. CONCLUSION: Higher visit-to-visit SBPV but not DBPV was associated with steeper functional decline in older...

  4. Returning home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agergaard, Jytte; Brøgger, Ditte

    2016-01-01

    flows. By focusing on these educational migrants, this paper explores how they connect to their rural homes. Guided by a critical reading of the migration-development scholarship, the paper examines how migrants and their relatives make sense of educational migrants’ remitting and returning practices...... and partake in important social remittance practices that represent a vision for impacting local development...

  5. CPAFFC Delegation Visits Ukraine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>A3-member delegation led by Su Guang, vice president of the CPAFFC and the China-Ukraine Friendship Association (CUFA), paid a goodwill working visit to Kiev, capital of Ukraine, and Yalta from June 20 to 27.

  6. CPAFFC Delegation Visits Ukraine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NiuYingli

    2004-01-01

    A3-member delegation led by Su Guang, vice president of the CPAFFC and the ChinaUkraine Friendship Association (CUFA), paid a goodwill working visit to Kiev, capital of Ukraine,and Yalta from June 20 to 27.

  7. Visits from two ministers

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Two ministers have recently paid visits to CERN. On 30 June, Mosibudi Mangena, South Africa's Minister for Science and Technology, was welcomed by CERN's Chief Scientific Officer, Jos Engelen. He also visited the ALICE experiment down at Point 2, accompanied by the ALICE spokesman, Jürgen Schukraft. Physicists from the University of Cape Town are members of the ALICE collaboration. Jürgen Schukraft, ALICE spokesman, accompanies Mosibudi Mangena, South Africa's Minister for Science and Technology. The Vice-Minister-President of the Flemish Government, Fientje Moerman, visited the CMS cavern and assembly hall, followed by Building SM18, where the LHC superconducting magnets are being tested. After lunch with the CERN Management, her visit ended with a tour of the ISOLDE facilities. Fientje Moerman, Flemish Vice-Minister-President, with members of her delegation and the CMS collaboration in front of the CMS detector.

  8. Visit by two Ministers

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    Last December CERN received visits from two Ministers. Bulgaria’s Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Science and Education, Daniel Vylchev, visited the CMS experiment in the company of the CMS Spokesman, T. Virdee, and several Bulgarian physicists. From left to right: J. Stamenov, M. Mateev, S. Stavrev, T. Virdee, V. Genchev, the Minister Daniel Vylchev, A. Hristova Vutsova, L. Litov and G. Soultanov. CERN Director-General, Robert Aymar, and Montenegro’s Minister of Education and Science, Slobodan Backović. On 18 December, Robert Aymar welcomed Bulgaria’s Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Science and Education, Daniel Vylchev. A particular highlight of his visit was a tour of the CMS site, during which he met the many Bulgarian physicists working on the experiment. He also attended a presentation of the LHC Computing Grid and visited the Computer Centre. Bulgaria has been a CERN ...

  9. Visit-to-visit variability of blood pressure and renal function decline in patients with diabetic chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Kei; Fukuda, Masamichi; Matsui, Yoshio; Kario, Kazuomi; Kimura, Kenjiro

    2014-05-01

    The authors previously reported that the visit-to-visit variability of blood pressure is correlated with renal function decline in nondiabetic chronic kidney disease. Little is known about the association between visit-to-visit variability and renal function decline in patients with diabetic chronic kidney disease. The authors retrospectively studied 69 patients with diabetic chronic kidney disease stage 3a, 3b, or 4. The standard deviation and coefficient of variation of blood pressure in 12 consecutive visits were defined as visit-to-visit variability of blood pressure. The median observation period was 32 months. In univariate correlation, the standard deviation and coefficient of variation of blood pressure were not significantly associated with the slope of estimated glomerular filtration rate. There was no significant association between the visit-to-visit variability of blood pressure and renal function decline in patients with diabetic chronic kidney disease, in contrast with our previous study of nondiabetic patients with chronic kidney disease.

  10. A Successful Visit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A state visit to China during the first year in office is unprecedented for a U. S.president, but Barack Obama has made it. Moreover, the fact that President Obama spent four days and three nights of his seven-day visit to four Asian nations in Beijing and Shanghai has demonstrated the importance his administration attaches to China and to Sino-U.S. relations in its global strategy.

  11. 47 CFR 65.600 - Rate of return reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rate of return reports. 65.600 Section 65.600... OF RETURN PRESCRIPTION PROCEDURES AND METHODOLOGIES Rate of Return Reports § 65.600 Rate of return...) months after the end of each calendar year, an annual rate of return monitoring report which shall be...

  12. Return Predictability, Model Uncertainty, and Robust Investment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukas, Manuel

    Stock return predictability is subject to great uncertainty. In this paper we use the model confidence set approach to quantify uncertainty about expected utility from investment, accounting for potential return predictability. For monthly US data and six representative return prediction models, we...

  13. ATLAS Virtual Visits

    CERN Document Server

    Goldfarb, Steven; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS Virtual Visits is a project initiated in 2011 for the Education & Outreach program of the ATLAS Experiment at CERN. Its goal is to promote public appreciation of the LHC physics program and particle physics, in general, through direct dialogue between ATLAS physicists and remote audiences. A Virtual Visit is an IP-based videoconference, coupled with a public webcast and video recording, between ATLAS physicists and remote locations around the world, that typically include high school or university classrooms, Masterclasses, science fairs, or other special events, usually hosted by collaboration members. Over the past two years, more than 10,000 people, from all of the world’s continents, have actively participated in ATLAS Virtual Visits, with many more enjoying the experience from the publicly available webcasts and recordings. We present an overview of our experience and discuss potential development for the future.

  14. Dutch ministerial visit

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Dutch Minister of Education, Culture and Science R. Plasterk (third from left) in the ATLAS cavern with NIKHEF Director F. Linde, CERN Chief Scientific Officer J. Engelen, Ambassador J. van Eenennaam, ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni, Mission Representative G. Vrielink and ATLAS Magnet Project Leader H. ten Kate.Minister of Education, Culture and Science from the Kingdom of the Netherlands, Ronald Plasterk, visited CERN on 25th October. With Jos Engelen, CERN Scientific Director, as his guide he visited Point 1 of the LHC tunnel and ATLAS, where Nikhef (the national institute for subatomic physics, a Dutch government and university collaboration) constructed all 96 of the largest muon drift chambers in the barrel as well as parts of the magnet system, the inner detector, the DAQ and triggering. Overall the Netherlands contribute 4.5% to the annual CERN budget and the minister’s visit celebrated the contributions of the 79 ...

  15. Visit by two Ministers

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Two European ministers have recently paid visits to CERN. On 11 June, the Austrian Minister for Science and Research, Johannes Hahn, visited the CMS cavern and assembly hall, before being given a tour of the CERN Control Centre. Following a lunch with the Ambassador, he was shown the LHC Computing Grid. His visit was rounded off with meetings with Robert Aymar and with Austrian students working at CERN. The Austrian Minister for Science and Research, Johannes Hahn, and Felicitas Pauss, Deputy Chair of the CMS Collaboration Committee, in front of one of the sections of the CMS detector. Jos Engelen, CERN’s Chief Scientific Officer, Jens Jorgen Gaardhoje, a physicist from the Niels Bohr Institute and a member of the ALICE collaboration, and the Danish Employment Minister, Claus Hjort Frederiksen, in front of the ALICE detector. On 12 June, Claus Hjort Frederiksen, the Danish Employment Minister,...

  16. Health Care Utilization Rates After Oregon's 2008 Medicaid Expansion: Within-Group and Between-Group Differences Over Time Among New, Returning, and Continuously Insured Enrollees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Jean P; O'Keeffe-Rosetti, Maureen; Lowe, Robert A; Angier, Heather; Gold, Rachel; Marino, Miguel; Hatch, Brigit; Hoopes, Megan; Bailey, Steffani R; Heintzman, John; Gallia, Charles; DeVoe, Jennifer E

    2016-11-01

    Although past research demonstrated that Medicaid expansions were associated with increased emergency department (ED) and primary care (PC) utilization, little is known about how long this increased utilization persists or whether postcoverage utilization is affected by prior insurance status. (1) To assess changes in ED, PC, mental and behavioral health care, and specialist care visit rates among individuals gaining Medicaid over 24 months postinsurance gain; and (2) to evaluate the association of previous insurance with utilization. Using claims data, we conducted a retrospective cohort analysis of adults insured for 24 months following Oregon's 2008 Medicaid expansion. Utilization rates among 1124 new and 1587 returning enrollees were compared with those among 5126 enrollees with continuous Medicaid coverage (≥1 y preexpansion). Visit rates were adjusted for propensity score classes and geographic region. PC visit rates in both newly and returning insured individuals significantly exceeded those in the continuously insured in months 4 through 12, but were not significantly elevated in the second year. In contrast, ED utilization rates were significantly higher in returning insured compared with newly or continuously insured individuals and remained elevated over time. New visits to PC and specialist care were higher among those who gained Medicaid compared with the continuously insured throughout the study period. Predicting the effect of insurance expansion on health care utilization should account for the prior coverage history of new enrollees. In addition, utilization of outpatient services changes with time after insurance, so expansion evaluations should allow for rate stabilization.

  17. Auger Physicists visit CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    Hoch, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Visit at CERN P5 CMS in the experimental cavern Alan Watson, Auger Spokesperson Emeritus, University of Leeds; Jim Cronin, Nobel Laureate, Auger Spokesperson Emeritus, University of Chicago; Jim Virdee, CMS Former Spokesperson, Imperial College; Jim Matthews, Auger Co-Spokesperson, Louisiana State University

  18. Albert Einstein visits Argentina

    CERN Document Server

    Gangui, A; Gangui, Alejandro; Ortiz, Eduardo L.

    2005-01-01

    This is a detailed, day by day, account of Albert Einstein's activities, both social and scientific, during his 30-day stay in Argentina in 1925, including his lectures on relativity at the various local universities and his visit to the National Academy of Sciences, as follows from his personal Diary of the trip to South-America and other contemporary documents.

  19. CPAFFC Delegation Visits Gabon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang; Ruimin

    2013-01-01

    <正>In March, when warm spring had come and flowers were in bloom, a CPAFFC delegation visited Gabon. It was accorded warm welcome from the Gabon-China Friendship Association (GCFA), with Ms. Pierrette Djouassa, former Procurator General of Gabon and President of the GCFA, leading all her members to greet the delegation at

  20. Pakistan Guest Visit HRC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Companied by CMEC Beijing representative, Dr. Eng. S.M.Bhutta,a technical advisor of Alternative Energy Development Board (AEDB) in Pakistan, paid a visit to HRC during June 3-5, 2005. Both sides exchanged ideas on micro & small hydropower development, and intended to further strengthen the cooperation in micro & small hydropower fields as to push forward the rural electrification program in Pakistan.

  1. Thomas Kibble visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2014-01-01

    Emeritus Professor Sir Thomas W.B. Kibble, from Imperial College London visited LHC for the first time last week and delivered a colloquium on the genesis of electroweak unification and the Brout-Englert-Higgs mechanism.   From left to right: Jim Virdee, Tiziano Camporesi, Tom Kibble and Austin Ball on the visit to CMS. On his way back from Trieste, where he received the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics' Dirac Medal, Tom Kibble stopped by CERN for his first visit to the LHC. Kibble had a standing invitation from Jim Virdee, former CMS spokesperson, who is also a researcher from Imperial College London. Peter Jenni (left) and Tom Kibble tour the ATLAS detector. (Image: Erwan Bertrand) Kibble made the trip to CERN a family outing and brought along 14 relatives,  including his children and grandchildren. He visited the ATLAS detector with Peter Jenni, its former spokesperson, on Friday 10 October. In the afternoon, Kibble delivered a colloquium in the...

  2. Italian Minister visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Passing through Geneva, the Italian Deputy Minister for Productive Activities, Dr. Adolfo Urso, came to visit the SM18 hall where LHC magnets are tested. From left to right: Adolfo Urso, Deputy Minister for Productive Activities, CERN's Roberto Saban, Director General Luciano Maiani, Mario Gerbino, Director General of the Ministry and Lucio Rossi, LHC Main Magnet and Superconductors Group Leader.

  3. Maternal return to paid work and breastfeeding practices in Bangkok, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, Tomomi; Pavadhgul, Patcharanee; Chongsuwat, Rewadee; Sawasdivorn, Siraporn; Boonshuyar, Chaweewon

    2015-03-01

    This study explored the association between mothers' work-related factors and breastfeeding practices in Bangkok, Thailand. Data were collected from 84 working mothers with a child aged 6 to 24 months who visited the breastfeeding mobile clinic at a nursery goods exhibition. Thai interviewers collected data using a structured questionnaire. Analysis of the data showed that exclusive breastfeeding for 3 months was 78.6%, and for 6 months it was 38.1%. Mothers who returned to work 3 months or more after giving birth exclusively breastfed more than the mothers who returned to work in less than 3 months (crude odds ratio [OR] = 4.26, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.39-13.05; adjusted OR = 4.15, 95% CI = 1.15-14.95). Moreover, mothers who worked at self-employed or family-owned businesses and some mothers working at private companies showed tendencies of returning to work in less than 3 months. Results suggest that longer maternity leave would help extend the duration of exclusive breastfeeding. In addition, the improvement of a breastfeeding supportive environment in the workplace would be valuable and may be an effective means to improve breastfeeding practices and infant health.

  4. [Nurse home visits in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monguillon, Dominique; Gracia, Pierre-Benjamin

    2011-10-01

    Nurse home visits in France. More and more nurses carry out home visits, either as freelance nurses or employees of a nurse home visits service, a home hospital care structure or a nursing care centre. These home visits are both demanded by patients and encouraged by the health authorities. As a consequence, the service is expanding every year.

  5. A royal visit

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    On Wednesday, 21 May, CERN received His Majesty Philippe, King of the Belgians, for a full-day visit of the Laboratory.   From left to right: Tiziano Camporesi, CMS Spokesperson; François Englert, Nobel Prize in Physics 2013; Rolf Heuer, CERN Director-General; His Majesty Philippe, King of the Belgians; Philippe Courard, Belgium's State Secretary for Scientific Policy and Walter Van Doninck, CERN Council Vice-President. Director-General Rolf Heuer welcomed King Philippe to CERN at Point 5 (Cessy). This was to be no small visit, with His Majesty accompanied by a host of diplomats, prominent Belgian physicists - including François Englert - and even members of Belgium's press corps. After quick introductions, the morning began with a tour of the CMS underground experimental area and the LHC tunnel at Point 5, guided by the CMS Collaboration Spokesperson, Tiziano Camporesi, and the Director for Accelerators and Technology, Frédérick Bord...

  6. Belgian Firms Visit CERN

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    Fifteen Belgian firms visited CERN last 2 and 3 April to present their know-how. Industrial sectors ranging from precision machining to electrical engineering and electronics were represented. And for the first time, companies from the Flemish and Brussels regions of the country joined their Walloon compatriots, who have come to CERN before. The visit was organised by Mr J.-M. Warêgne, economic and commercial attaché at the Belgian permanent mission for the French-speaking region, Mr J. Van de Vondel, his opposite number for the Flemish region, and Mrs E. Solowianiuk, economic and commercial counsellor at the Belgian permanent mission for the Brussels-Capital region.

  7. Romanian President Visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Director General Luciano Maiani watches as Romanian President Ion Iliescu signs the CERN guest book. On Friday the 12th of October, Romanian President Ion Iliescu arrived at CERN and was warmly greeted by Director General Luciano Maiani at the steps of building 500. After initial greetings and a general presentation of the laboratory, President Iliescu and his entourage embarked on a whistle stop tour of the CERN facilities. They visited the CMS magnet assembly hall and civil engineering work where presentations were made by CMS spokesperson Michel Della Negra and the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter where the president was introduced to Romanian physicists working here at CERN. Michel Della Negra explains some of the general principles behind CMS to President Iliescu during his visit last week. The Romanian teams working on CERN projects make very visible contributions, for example to the construction of the ATLAS experiment and to the preparation of its eventual scientific exploitation. 'Those of us on the ATLAS ...

  8. Indian President visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    On 1 October, her Excellency Mrs Pratibha Devisingh Patil, President of India, picked CERN as the first stop on her official state visit to Switzerland. Accompanied by a host of Indian journalists, a security team, and a group of presidential delegates, the president left quite an impression when she visited CERN’s Point 2!   Upon arrival, Pratibha Patil was greeted by CERN Director General Rolf Heuer, as well as senior Indian scientists working at CERN, and various department directors. After a quick overview of the Organization, Rolf Heuer and the President addressed India’s future collaboration with CERN. India is currently an Observer State of the Organization, and is considering becoming an Associate Member State. A short stop in LHC operations gave Steve Myers and the Accelerator team the opportunity to take the President on a tour through the LHC tunnel. From there, ALICE’s Tapan Nayak and Spokesperson Paolo Giubellino took Pratibha Patil to the experiment&am...

  9. Kandinsky College Visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Video productions; Angelos Alexopoulos

    2012-01-01

    This video documents the visit of nine senior high school students of the Kandinsky College in Nijmegen (Netherelands) to CERN. The students visited many of CERN's experimental facilities, took part in a Cloud Chamber workshop, attended talks and roundtable discussions of SpacePart12 and worked on the evaluation of the Microcosm exhibition as part of a school inquiry-based research project. The students and their teacher, Paul de Haas (a participant of the High School Teachers 2012 Programme at CERN) were connected with Prof. Christine Kourkoumelis and George Vasileiadis at the University of Athens and learned hands-on how to analyse real physics events, including Higgs-like ones, from the ATLAS experiment at the LHC using the HYPATIA Applet.

  10. German visits to CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    State secretary to Germany's Federal Ministry of Education and Research, Frieder Meyer-Krahmer, with CERN's Director-General Robert Aymar.On 21 February, Professor Frieder Meyer-Krahmer, State Secretary to Germany's Federal Ministry of Education and Research, came to CERN. He visited the ALICE and ATLAS experiments and the computing centre before meeting the CERN's Director-General, some German physicists and members of the top management. The Minister of Science, Research and the Arts of the Baden-Württemberg regional government, Peter Frankenberg, and CERN's Director-General, Robert Aymar, signing an agreement on education. In the background: Sigurd Lettow, CERN's Director of Finance and Human Resources, and Karl-Heinz Meisel, Rector of the Fachhochschule Karlsruhe. The Minister of Science, Research and the Arts of the Baden-Württemberg regional government, Prof. Peter Frankenberg, visited CERN on 23 February. He was accompanied by the Rector of the Fachhochschule Karlsruhe, Prof. Karl-Heinz Meisel, and b...

  11. Putin's Visit Bears Fruit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The Russian President's trip to China marks progress in overall cooperation between the two countries If one word could be used to describe Russian President Vladimir Putin's recent visit to China, it would be "fruitful." During his brief two-day stay, which began March 21, Putin had a compact agenda-he met with his Chinese counterpart, President Hu Jintao, Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao and China's top legis-

  12. On Visiting Our Dead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Clapps Herman

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A redefining of the meaning of death and grief: this essay explores a rejection of conventional ideas about mourning and describes the experiences of two daughters after they have lost their beloved father. In the one case, it is an evocation of his spirit that feels like a conversation and, in the other, visits by the father to the daughter through palpable signs.

  13. Spanish Visit to CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Last week CERN was visited by the Spanish Minister of Science and Technology, Josep Piqué i Camps. While here, he was able to visit the ATLAS assembly hall where many items of equipment are being built in collaboration with Spanish academic institutions or firms. These include the vacuum vessels for the ATLAS barrel toroid magnets supplied by the Spanish firm Felguera Construcciones Mechanics. Similarly, the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid is participating in the manufacture of the electromagnetic calorimeter endcaps, while the Barcelona Institute for High Energy Physics and the Valencia IFIC (Instituto de Física Corpuscular) are highly involved in the production of barrel modules for the tile calorimeter. The delegation, accompanied by Spanish scientists at CERN, also visited the LHC superconducting magnet test hall (photo). From left to right: Felix Rodriguez Mateos of CERN LHC Division, Josep Piqué i Camps, Spanish Minister of Science and Technology, César Dopazo, Director-General of CIEMAT (Spanish ...

  14. EUCYS prizewinner visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Jennifer Toes

    2016-01-01

    Young Turkish student Baris Volkan Gürses visited CERN from 4 to 8 July after winning the prize in the 2015 European Contest for Young Scientists (EUCYS).    Baris Volkan Gürses, EUCYS prizewinner, visiting the Microcosm. After winning both regional and national competitions in Turkey, 18-year-old student Baris Volkan Gürses competed against 169 young scientists and was awarded a visit to CERN by EIROforum for his physics project in EUCYS 2015. His project, entitled “Generation of artificial gravity by using electrostatic force for prevention of muscle atrophy and osteoporosis occurring in gravity-free environments”, focused on the design of a mechanism to help with the impact of spaceflight on the human body. “My objective was to eliminate the negative effects of a gravity-free environment on astronauts who stay in space for longer periods of time, like in the International Space Station,” explained Volkan. &...

  15. EU Commissioner visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    European Commissioner Viviane Reding in front of one of the computers showing how the Grid works and, from left to right, Robert Aymar, CERN's Director-General, Wolfgang von Rüden, Head of the Information Technology Department, and Bob Jones, the newly appointed director of the EGEE project since 1st November. Viviane Reding, European Commissioner for Information Society and Media, visited CERN on 28 October. Accompanied throughout by CERN's Director-General, Robert Aymar, and the Head of the Information Technology Department, Wolfgang von Rüden, the Commissioner visited the ATLAS cavern before going on to the Information Technology Department, where she was given a complete overview of CERN's activities in the strategic field of Grid computing. Viviane Reding's visit coincided with the end of the EGEE (Enabling Grids for E-sciencE) conference, which took place in Pisa in Italy. Co-ordinated by CERN and funded by the European Commission, the EGEE project aims to set up a worldwide grid infrastructure for sc...

  16. A boost to visits

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Several guides were rewarded by CERN's Director-General and Secretary-General for their contributions in 2004. Left to right: Géraldine Chuste, the Director-General Robert Aymar, Klaus Batzner, Philippe Moret, Joanna Weng, Alberto Ribon, Head of the Visits Service, Emma Sanders, and the Secretary-General, Maximilian Metzger. Three other guides not in the photograph, Antonio Francano, Christoph Ilgner and Tzanko Spassoff, were also rewarded for their contributions. As every year, the CERN Visits Service has paid tribute to its guides, all of whom are volunteers and devote some of their time to showing people around their Laboratory. The guides were invited to a get-together in Microcosm during which the Director-General, Robert Aymar, expressed his special gratitude for their efforts and presented awards to the most dedicated among them. He encouraged members of the Laboratory to become guides and underlined that 2004 had been an exceptional year for visits, which had risen by 15% to almost 22,000. Including ...

  17. Serbian President visits CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    On Tuesday 10 January, Serbian President Boris Tadić visited the Laboratory to sign the Agreement of granting the status of Associate Membership as the pre-stage to full Membership of CERN.    Before the signing ceremony, the President, welcomed by Director-General Rolf Heuer at CERN’s Point 5, took the opportunity to visit CERN. After a general introduction, the President took advantage of the shutdown to visit the LHC’s underground caverns. Leading the President through their respective experiments were spokespersons Fabiola Gianotti (ATLAS) and Joe Incandela (CMS).  After a morning of tours, President Tadić and Rolf Heuer signed the Agreement. Serbia’s status as an Associate Member as pre-stage to full Membership is expected to come into force following ratification by the Serbian Parliament. After a maximum period of five years, the CERN Council will decide on the admission of Serbia to full Membership. This new agreement continues Serbia&a...

  18. [The practice of postanesthesia visits - a questionnaire study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Tobias; Rensing, Hauke; Volk, Thomas; Huhn, Ragnar; Mathes, Alexander M

    2017-05-16

    Regular postanesthesia visits allow the detection of anesthesia related complications and increase patient satisfaction. Consequently, the performance of postanesthesia visits has been recommended after certain types of anesthesia. However, no data is available concerning the current practice of postanesthesia visits. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate quantity, organization, contents, significance and problems of postanesthesia visits in Germany. For this prospective closed-design survey, a questionnaire, consisting of 13 questions, was designed and tested for objectivity, reliability and validity. Subsequently, 3955 registered anesthesiologists were contacted via email to answer this survey. Return rate was 31.4%; 958 questionnaires were included in the study. Only a small portion of patients was estimated to receive a postanesthesia visit (median: 20.0%). In hospitals with a specific postanesthesia visit service, this number was significantly higher (median: 65.0%, p<0.001) vs. no postanesthesia visit service. Postanesthesia visits usually lasted less than 5minutes (60.0%), and were typically conducted on the day of surgery (48.0%), after regular working hours (55.0%). 38.0% of the respondents reported to detect perioperative complications intermittently during their visits. While 98.0% of all respondents believe that postanesthesia visits improve the quality of their own work, 86.0% of the participants complain a lack of time for this task. Our survey indicates that current working conditions prevent a regular postanesthesia visit routine. Considering the high appreciation of postanesthesia visits by anesthesiologists, as well as the relevant incidence of postoperative complications detected during these visits, it seems desirable to consider organizational improvements for postanesthesia care. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Patterns of Family Visitation During Immigration Detention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin Patler

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The population detained by Immigration and Customs Enforcement more than doubled between 2001 and 2013, swelling to over 477,000 individuals. Despite this growth, few studies analyze the experiences of detained immigrants. We draw from one of the first studies of detention in the United States, analyzing survey data from 565 noncitizens detained for six months or longer in California. Criminal incarceration literature finds that family visitation helps maintain social ties but is not evenly distributed. We analyze the predictors of contact and visitation with children during immigration detention. Results indicate that demographic background, the type of detention facility, and children’s legal status substantially affect contact and visitation experiences. Findings suggest that immigration detention replicates experiences of criminal incarceration and is perpetuating inequality in immigrant communities.

  20. Rethinking emergency department visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resar, Roger K; Griffin, Frances A

    2010-01-01

    Efforts to date have been unable to reverse the trend of increased emergency department utilization. The Institute for Healthcare Improvement has developed a framework for reducing avoidable emergency department visits on the basis of the formation of local coalitions. These coalitions include interested partners approaching improvement by integrating community resources and nonmedical solutions. Targeted patient populations are identified via homogeneous characteristics. Open-ended interview questions are used to identify possible community and nonmedical solutions to complement medical strategies. This article describes the framework and process of testing. If validated, this approach will have significant policy implications.

  1. CPAFFC Delegation Visits India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>A CPAFFC delegation headed by Wang Wenyuan,former vice chairman of the National Committee of the Chinese Peo-ple’s Political Consultative Conference and adviser to the CPAFFC,paid a goodwill visit to India from December 19 to 28,2007 at the invitation of the Indian Council for Cultural Relations(ICCR).Also on the delegation were CPAFFC President Chen Haosu and Vice President Feng Zuoku.It was the highest-level delegation the CPAFFC has sent to India over the last decade.

  2. Return-to-Work Program for Injured Workers: Factors of Successful Return to Employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awang, Halimah; Shahabudin, Sharifah Muhairah; Mansor, Norma

    2016-11-01

    This study examined the factors of successful return to employment among participants in the return to work program (RTW) following work-related injury. Data were obtained from the Social Security Organization database containing 9850 injured workers who underwent RTW in 2010 to 2013. About 65% had successfully returned to employment. Significant factors of successful return include gender, employer interest, motivation, age, intervention duration, and type of injury. Male and motivated employees were more likely to return to employment compared with female and unmotivated employees, respectively. Participants from interested employers were 23.22 times more likely to return to work than those from uninterested employers, whereas participants whose intervention period exceeded 5 months were 41% less likely to return to work compared with those whose intervention period was within 3 months. Appropriate strategy and enhanced collaboration between the stakeholders would improve the proportion of successful return to employment. © 2016 APJPH.

  3. Piloting a Statewide Home Visiting Quality Improvement Learning Collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Neera K; Rome, Martha G; Massie, Julie A; Mangeot, Colleen; Ammerman, Robert T; Breckenridge, Jye; Lannon, Carole M

    2017-02-01

    Objective To pilot test a statewide quality improvement (QI) collaborative learning network of home visiting agencies. Methods Project timeline was June 2014-May 2015. Overall objectives of this 8-month initiative were to assess the use of collaborative QI to engage local home visiting agencies and to test the use of statewide home visiting data for QI. Outcome measures were mean time from referral to first home visit, percentage of families with at least three home visits per month, mean duration of participation, and exit rate among infants learning. A statewide data system was used to generate monthly run charts. Results Mean time from referral to first home visit was 16.7 days, and 9.4% of families received ≥3 visits per month. Mean participation was 11.7 months, and the exit rate among infants learning network, agencies tested and measured changes using statewide and internal data. Potential next steps are to develop and test new metrics with current pilot sites and a larger collaborative.

  4. Emergency presurgical visit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Castro Díaz

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective has been to create a Protocol of Structured Presurgical Visit applicable to the patients who are undergoing an emergency surgery, to provide the user and his family all the necessary cares on the basis of those nursing diagnosis that prevail in all the cases of surgical emergency interventions. The used method has been an analysis of the emergency surgical interventions more prevalent from February 2007 until October 2008 in our area (a regional hospital, and statistic of those nursing diagnosis that more frequently appeared in these interventions, the previous moment to the intervention and in addition common to all of them. The results were the following ones: the more frequent emergency operations were: Caesarean, ginecological curettage, laparotomy, help in risk childbirth, orthopaedic surgery and appendectomy. The more frequent nursing diagnosis in all the emergency operations at the previous moment of the intervention were: risk of falls, pain, anxiety, deficit of knowledge, risk of infection, movement stress syndrome, risk of hemorrhage, cutaneous integrity deterioration. The conclusion is that users present at the previous moment to an emergency operation several problems, which force to the emergency surgical ward nurse to the introduction of the nursing methodology, in order to identify the problems, to mark results and to indicate the interventions to achieve those results, besides in a humanitarian way and with quality. This can be obtained by performing a Structured Emergency Presurgical Visit.

  5. Steven Weinberg visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Steven Weinberg visiting the ATLAS cavern accompanied by Peter JenniIt was no surprise that the CERN audience arrived early in the Globe of Science and Innovation for the colloquium on 7 July. Nobel laureate Steven Weinberg is one of the major contributors to the Standard Model of particle physics. He received the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1979 for his work on the unified theory of the electromagnetic and weak interactions, one of the essential pillars of the Standard Model. After lunch at CERN and a visit to ATLAS, Weinberg gave a colloquium on "The Quantum Theory of Fields: Effective or Fundamental" to a packed audience. In his talk, he looked at how the use of quantum field theory in particle physics has fluctuated in popularity since Paul Dirac first introduced the approach to describe the interaction of particles with electromagnetic fields in the late 1920s. In particular, he posed the question: Is quantum field theory fundamental or does it a...

  6. Kofi Annan visits CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    On Tuesday 13 September, former Secretary-General of the United Nations and Nobel Peace Laureate Kofi Annan paid a visit to CERN.   Arriving in the early afternoon, Kofi Annan and his family were greeted by Director-General Rolf Heuer on the steps of Building 500. After a quick introduction to the Laboratory, they were whisked off to SM18 for a tour of the LHC’s superconducting magnet test hall, guided by Technology Department Head Frédérick Bordry. After a light lunch in Restaurant 2, Kofi Annan added his signature to CERN’s Guest Book. He is the second UN Secretary-General to add their name to CERN’s roster; his successor Ban Ki-Moon’s visited CERN in 2008.  Kofi Annan was then guided by spokesperson Fabiola Gianotti on a tour of ATLAS’s Visitor Centre. This was an opportunity for some of the younger members of the ATLAS collaboration to meet the former Secretary-General and to answer his questions about the exper...

  7. Phobos Sample Return mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenyi, Lev; Zakharov, A.; Martynov, M.; Polischuk, G.

    Very mysterious objects of the Solar system are the Martian satellites, Phobos and Deimos. Attempt to study Phobos in situ from an orbiter and from landers have been done by the Russian mission FOBOS in 1988. However, due to a malfunction of the onboard control system the landers have not been delivered to the Phobos surface. A new robotics mission to Phobos is under development now in Russia. Its main goal is the delivery of samples of the Phobos surface material to the Earth for laboratory studies of its chemical, isotopic, mineral composition, age etc. Other goals are in situ studies of Phobos (regolith, internal structure, peculiarities in orbital and proper rotation), studies of Martian environment (dust, plasma, fields). The payload includes a number of scientific instruments: gamma and neutron spectrometers, gaschromatograph, mass spectrometers, IR spectrometer, seismometer, panoramic camera, dust sensor, plasma package. To implement the tasks of this mission a cruise-transfer spacecraft after the launch and the Earth-Mars interplanetary flight will be inserted into the first elliptical orbit around Mars, then after several corrections the spacecraft orbit will be formed very close to the Phobos orbit to keep the synchronous orbiting with Phobos. Then the spacecraft will encounter with Phobos and will land at the surface. After the landing the sampling device of the spacecraft will collect several samples of the Phobos regolith and will load these samples into the return capsule mounted at the returned vehicle. This returned vehicle will be launched from the mother spacecraft and after the Mars-Earth interplanetary flight after 11 monthes with reach the terrestrial atmosphere. Before entering into the atmosphere the returned capsule will be separated from the returned vehicle and will hopefully land at the Earth surface. The mother spacecraft at the Phobos surface carrying onboard scientific instruments will implement the "in situ" experiments during an year

  8. k-visit Attribute Grammars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielson, Hanne Riis; Skyum, S.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that any well-defined attribute grammar is k-visit for some k. Furthermore, it is shown that given a well-defined grammar G and an integer k, it is decidable whether G is k-visit. Finally it is shown that the k-visit grammars specify a proper hierarchy with respect to translations...

  9. Postanesthesia care unit visitation decreases family member anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Amy J; Deselms, JoAnn; Ruyle, Shelley; Morrissey-Lucas, Marcella; Kollar, Suzie; Cannon, Shelly; Schick, Lois

    2012-02-01

    Despite advocacy by professional nursing organizations, no randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have evaluated the response of family members to a visit with an adult patient during a postanesthesia care unit (PACU) stay. Therefore, the purpose of this RCT was to evaluate the impact of a brief PACU visitation on the anxiety of family members. The study was conducted in a phase I PACU of a large community-based hospital. Subjects were designated adult family members or significant others of an adult PACU patient who had undergone general anesthesia. A pretest-posttest RCT design was used. The dependent variable was the change in anxiety scores of the visitor after seeing his or her family member in the PACU. Student t test (unpaired, two tailed) was used to determine if changes in anxiety scores (posttest score-pretest score) were different for the PACU visit and no visit groups. A total of 45 participants were studied over a 3-month period, with N=24 randomly assigned to a PACU visit and N=21 assigned to usual care (no PACU visit). Participants in the PACU visit group had a statistically significant (P=.0001) decrease in anxiety after the visitation period (-4.11±6.4); participants in the usual care group (no PACU visit) had an increase in anxiety (+4.47±6.6). The results from this study support the value and importance of PACU visitation for family members.

  10. Hospital Readmission Following Emergency Room Visit for Cholelithiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Taylor P.; Dimou, Francesca M.; Adhikari, Deepak; Kimbrough, Thomas D.; Riall, Taylor S.

    2015-01-01

    Background For patients presenting with symptomatic cholelithiasis, cholecystectomy is the definitive treatment modality. Our goal was to evaluate the surgical follow-up and outcomes in patients seen in the Emergency Department (ED) for an episode of symptomatic cholelithiasis and discharged home for elective follow-up. Methods We performed a retrospective review of consecutive patients seen in the ED for cholelithiasis and discharged without hospital admission between August 2009 and May 2014. All patients were followed for two years from the date of initial ED visit. We evaluated outpatient surgeon visits, elective and emergent cholecystectomy rates, and additional ED visits. Cumulative incidence and Kaplan-Meier curves were used to examine the time from the initial ED visit to outpatient surgeon evaluation and the time from initial ED visit to ED readmission. Results Seventy-one patients were discharged from the ED with a diagnosis of symptomatic gallstones. 12.6% of patients had an elective cholecystectomy in the two years after the initial visit. In this group, the mean time from the initial ED visit to outpatient surgeon follow-up was 7.7 days and all elective cholecystectomies occurred within one month of the initial visit. Of the 62 patients who did not have an elective cholecystectomy, only 14.5% of patients in this group had outpatient surgeon follow-up at mean time of 137 days from the initial ED visit for symptomatic gallstones. In addition, 37.1% of patients in this group had additional ED visits for gallstone-related symptoms, with 17.7 % of patients having two or more additional ED visits, and 12.9% required emergent/urgent cholecystectomy. 43.5% of additional ED visits occurred within one month and 60.9% within three months of their initial ED visit. In patients with additional ED visits for symptomatic cholelithiasis, 60.9% had more than one abdominal Ultrasound (US) or Computed Tomography (CT) scan during the course of multiple visits. Conclusion

  11. Commissaire Moulin visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2014-01-01

    The French actor and film-maker Yves Rénier was shown around the Laboratory on Friday 6 June by friends at CERN.   Yves Rénier at LEIR. (Photo: Ludwig Pregernig) A keen diver and star of the long-running French television police drama Commissaire Moulin, Yves Rénier took advantage of a stopover in Geneva on his way to the Red Sea to meet up with his friends from the CERN Diving Club, who were only too pleased to take him on a tour of the Laboratory. In the morning, Yves Rénier visited the CERN Control Centre (CCC), Linac2 and LEIR. After lunch at the brasserie in Restaurant No. 2, the actor continued his tour with the CERN Computer Centre, the SM18 superconducting magnet test facility, and lastly the ATLAS experiment. “Thank you so much for showing me around and introducing me to a world I knew so little about,” confided Yves Rénier. “It’s fascinating to see so many scientists of different cultures,...

  12. Spaceflight participant visits CERN!

    CERN Document Server

    Kathryn Coldham

    2016-01-01

    On 15 July, CERN welcomed spaceflight participant Anousheh Ansari.   Anousheh Ansari’s grin stretches from ear to ear, during an intriguing conversation with Nobel laureate Samuel C.C. Ting at AMS POCC. (Image: Maximilien Brice/CERN) Iranian-American Anousheh Ansari was the first-ever female spaceflight participant, spending eight days on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2006. She now has a new addition to her list of extraordinary sights ­– the home of the world’s largest particle accelerator: CERN.   On 15 July, Anousheh Ansari came to CERN and, unsurprisingly, visited the control room of the experiment attached to the ISS: the AMS. At the AMS Payload Operations Control Centre (AMS POCC) on CERN’s Prévessin site, she met the Nobel laureate Samuel Ting, spokesperson of the AMS experiment. Ansari and her accompanying guests were thrilled to expand their knowledge about CERN, its research and its...

  13. A royal visit

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    On 19 February Albert II, King of the Belgians, visited CERN. He took a very active interest during his tour of the tunnel and the CMS cavern, in particular the pixel detector, which was made in Belgium. var flash_video_player=get_video_player_path(); insert_player_for_external('Video/Public/Movies/2009/CERN-MOVIE-2009-002/CERN-MOVIE-2009-002-0753-kbps-640x360-25-fps-audio-64-kbps-44-kHz-stereo', 'mms://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Video/Public/Movies/2009/CERN-MOVIE-2009-002/CERN-MOVIE-2009-002-Multirate-200-to-753-kbps-640x360-25-fps.wmv', 'false', 533, 300, 'https://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Video/Public/Movies/2009/CERN-MOVIE-2009-002/CERN-MOVIE-2009-002-posterframe-640x360-at-10-percent.jpg', '1164771', true, 'Video/Public/Movies/2009/CERN-MOVIE-2009-002/CERN-MOVIE-2009-002-0600-kbps-maxH-360-25-fps-audio-128-kbps-48-kHz-stereo.mp4'); Watch the video! Albert II, King of the Belgians receiving a souvenir from Sergio Bertolucci, Director for Research and...

  14. Claude Nicollier visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Jordan Juras

    2011-01-01

    Switzerland’s first astronaut, Claude Nicollier, paid a short visit to CERN on Thursday 22 June, to lead a colloquium about the Hubble Space Telescope. With the Shuttle programme soon coming to an end. Nicollier recalled the enriching experience he had at NASA and gave us a preview of the futuristic project that he is currently involved in.   The colloquium, Hubble, the astronomer, the telescope, the results, surveyed the three themes suggested by its title: the fundamental discoveries made by Edwin Hubble in the early 20th century, servicing the telescope in orbit and the main results recently obtained relating to the structure and history of our universe. Nicollier spoke from the rare perspective of an astronaut who has had real contact with Hubble in orbit and included some of his own photography from the missions. Nicollier has an intimate relationship with the telescope that very few astrophysicists share. “I had the opportunity to service Hubble twice, both from the comf...

  15. Monthly errors

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The 2006 monthly average statistical metrics for 2m Q (g kg-1) domain-wide for the base and MODIS WRF simulations against MADIS observations. This dataset is...

  16. Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, August 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1963-09-16

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, August 1963. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  17. Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, July 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1963-08-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, July 1963. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  18. Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, June 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1963-07-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, June 1963. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  19. Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, September 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1963-10-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, September 1963. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  20. Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, October 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1963-11-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, October 1963. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  1. Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, November 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1963-12-16

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, November 1963. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  2. Abnormal Returns and Contrarian Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Dall'Agnol

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available We test the hypothesis that strategies which are long on portfolios of looser stocks and short on portfolios of winner stocks generate abnormal returns in Brazil. This type of evidence for the US stock market was interpreted by The Bondt and Thaler (1985 as reflecting systematic evaluation mistakes caused by investors overreaction to news related to the firm performance. We found evidence of contrarian strategies profitability for horizons from 3 months to 3 years in a sample of stock returns from BOVESPA and SOMA from 1986 to 2000. The strategies are more profitable for shorter horizons. Therefore, there was no trace of the momentum effect found by Jagadeesh and Titman (1993 for the same horizons with US data. There are remaing unexplained positive returns for contrarian strategies after accounting for risk, size, and liquidity. We also found that the strategy profitability is reduced after the Real Plan, which suggests that the Brazilian stock market became more efficient after inflation stabilization.

  3. Oil Volatility Risk and Expected Stock Returns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Pan, Xuhui (Nick)

    After the financialization of commodity futures markets in 2004-05 oil volatility has become a strong predictor of returns and volatility of the overall stock market. Furthermore, stocks' exposure to oil volatility risk now drives the cross-section of expected returns. The difference in average...... return between the quintile of stocks with low exposure and high exposure to oil volatility is significant at 0.66% per month, and oil volatility risk carries a significant risk premium of -0.60% per month. In the post-financialization period, oil volatility risk is strongly related with various measures...

  4. Home Visiting in Two Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamorey, Suzanne

    2017-01-01

    The home visiting component of early childhood education programs provides an important portal through which to observe family interactions as well as gain insights about the ethnotheories of the home visitor. Home visits were videotaped in the United States and in Turkey to analyze training and program effectiveness. One striking feature of this…

  5. Effectiveness of Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment-Based Intervention to Reduce Frequent Emergency Department Visits: A Report of Four Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Chen Liao

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A small number of clustered visits by emergency department frequent users (EDFUs may over-consume emergency care resources. We report the effectiveness of comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA-based multidisciplinary team (MDT care for four EDFUs, in reducing ED visits. Case 1 had visited the ED twice/month due to chest discomfort. Her ED visits were significantly reduced to 0.2 visits/month following CGA-based MDT care. Case 2 had failed back surgery syndrome and bipolar disorder. His ED visit was reduced from 2.8 visits to 0.8 visits/month following CGA-based MDT intervention. Case 3 had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure, and urinary incontinence, with a urinary catheter in place. He made 31 ED visits (5.1 visits/month before his lung cancer and depression were discovered by CGA. He died 2 months later. Case 4 made 27 ED visits (2.7 visits/month due to dizziness. His problems of early dementia and neglect were identified by CGA, and he visited the ED only once following MDT intervention. In conclusion, CGA-based MDT intervention successfully reduced ED visits among these EDFUs, but further investigation is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of geriatric services in the ED.

  6. 150 Bulgarian students visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Alizée Dauvergne

    2010-01-01

    Between 27 March and 8 April 2010, 150 Bulgarian students from the Astronomical Observatory in Varna visited CERN as part of the “From Galileo to CERN” programme. Bulgarian students participating in the "From Galileo to CERN" educational programme. “It’s interesting to combine astronomy and particle physics”, explains Svejina Dimitrova, organiser of the programme and Director of Varna Astronomical Observatory. The three groups, each one comprising 50 students, first visited Pisa, Padua and other places in Italy  related to Galileo’s life. “Thanks to the visit, students understood telescopes and why Galileo is such an important scientist”, says Svejina. After Italy, they came to CERN for three days and visited several sites: Linac, the Computer Centre CCC, etc. Another group of Bulgarian students in their visit to CERN. “They became aware that particle physics is not only the...

  7. Temporal Oculomotor Inhibition of Return and Spatial Facilitation of Return in a Visual Encoding Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven G Luke

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Oculomotor inhibition of return (O-IOR is an increase in saccade latency prior to an eye movement to a recently fixated location compared to other locations. It has been proposed that this temporal O-IOR may have spatial consequences, facilitating foraging by inhibiting return to previously attended regions. In order to test this possibility, participants viewed arrays of objects and of words while their eye movements were recorded. Temporal O-IOR was observed, with equivalent effects for object and word arrays, indicating that temporal O-IOR is an oculomotor phenomenon independent of array content. There was no evidence for spatial inhibition of return. Instead, spatial facilitation of return was observed: Participants were significantly more likely than chance to make return saccades and to refixate just-visited locations. Further, the likelihood of making a return saccade to an object or word was contingent on the amount of time spent viewing that object or word before leaving it. This suggests that, unlike temporal O-IOR, return probability is influenced by cognitive processing. Taken together, these results are inconsistent with the hypothesis that inhibition of return functions as a foraging facilitator. The results also provide strong evidence for a different oculomotor bias that could serve as a foraging facilitator: saccadic momentum, a tendency to repeat the most recently executed saccade program. We suggest that models of visual attention could incorporate saccadic momentum in place of inhibition of return.

  8. Protected Area Tourism in a Changing Climate: Will Visitation at US National Parks Warm Up or Overheat?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A Fisichelli

    Full Text Available Climate change will affect not only natural and cultural resources within protected areas but also tourism and visitation patterns. The U.S. National Park Service systematically collects data regarding its 270+ million annual recreation visits, and therefore provides an opportunity to examine how human visitation may respond to climate change from the tropics to the polar regions. To assess the relationship between climate and park visitation, we evaluated historical monthly mean air temperature and visitation data (1979-2013 at 340 parks and projected potential future visitation (2041-2060 based on two warming-climate scenarios and two visitation-growth scenarios. For the entire park system a third-order polynomial temperature model explained 69% of the variation in historical visitation trends. Visitation generally increased with increasing average monthly temperature, but decreased strongly with temperatures > 25°C. Linear to polynomial monthly temperature models also explained historical visitation at individual parks (R2 0.12-0.99, mean = 0.79, median = 0.87. Future visitation at almost all parks (95% may change based on historical temperature, historical visitation, and future temperature projections. Warming-mediated increases in potential visitation are projected for most months in most parks (67-77% of months; range across future scenarios, resulting in future increases in total annual visits across the park system (8-23% and expansion of the visitation season at individual parks (13-31 days. Although very warm months at some parks may see decreases in future visitation, this potential change represents a relatively small proportion of visitation across the national park system. A changing climate is likely to have cascading and complex effects on protected area visitation, management, and local economies. Results suggest that protected areas and neighboring communities that develop adaptation strategies for these changes may be able

  9. Protected Area Tourism in a Changing Climate: Will Visitation at US National Parks Warm Up or Overheat?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisichelli, Nicholas A; Schuurman, Gregor W; Monahan, William B; Ziesler, Pamela S

    2015-01-01

    Climate change will affect not only natural and cultural resources within protected areas but also tourism and visitation patterns. The U.S. National Park Service systematically collects data regarding its 270+ million annual recreation visits, and therefore provides an opportunity to examine how human visitation may respond to climate change from the tropics to the polar regions. To assess the relationship between climate and park visitation, we evaluated historical monthly mean air temperature and visitation data (1979-2013) at 340 parks and projected potential future visitation (2041-2060) based on two warming-climate scenarios and two visitation-growth scenarios. For the entire park system a third-order polynomial temperature model explained 69% of the variation in historical visitation trends. Visitation generally increased with increasing average monthly temperature, but decreased strongly with temperatures > 25°C. Linear to polynomial monthly temperature models also explained historical visitation at individual parks (R2 0.12-0.99, mean = 0.79, median = 0.87). Future visitation at almost all parks (95%) may change based on historical temperature, historical visitation, and future temperature projections. Warming-mediated increases in potential visitation are projected for most months in most parks (67-77% of months; range across future scenarios), resulting in future increases in total annual visits across the park system (8-23%) and expansion of the visitation season at individual parks (13-31 days). Although very warm months at some parks may see decreases in future visitation, this potential change represents a relatively small proportion of visitation across the national park system. A changing climate is likely to have cascading and complex effects on protected area visitation, management, and local economies. Results suggest that protected areas and neighboring communities that develop adaptation strategies for these changes may be able to both

  10. Patterns of dental service utilization following nontraumatic dental condition visits to the emergency department in Wisconsin Medicaid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajewski, Nicholas M; Okunseri, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    To examine patterns of dental service utilization for adult Medicaid enrollees in Wisconsin following nontraumatic dental condition (NTDC) visits to the emergency department (ED). This is a retrospective, observational study of claims for NTDC visits to the ED and dental service encounters from the Wisconsin Medicaid Evaluation and Decision Support database (2001-2009). We used competing risk models to predict probabilities of returning to the ED versus obtaining follow-up care from a dentist. We observed a 43 percent increase in the rate of NTDC visits to the ED, with most of this increase occurring from 2001 to 2005. Within 30 days of an NTDC visit to the ED, ∼29.6 percent of enrollees will first visit a dentist office, while ∼9.9 percent will return to the ED. Young to middle-aged adults (18 to dental providers were more likely to return to the ED following a NTDC visit. Among the enrollees that first visited a dental office following an ED visit, 37.6 percent had an extraction performed at this visit. Almost one in five adult Medicaid enrollees will subsequently return to the ED following a previous NTDC visit. The provision of definitive care for these individuals appears to primarily consist of extractions. © 2012 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  11. SM18 Visits and Access

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

      VISITS The rules and conditions to be followed for visits in the SM18 Hall are laid out in the EDMS 1205328 document. No visit is allowed without prior reservation.   ACCESS Special access right is needed ONLY from 7 p.m. to 7 a.m. and during week-ends. From 1 December, the current SM18 access database will be closed and a new one “SM18-OWH outside normal hours” started from scratch. Requests, via EDH SM18-OWH, will have to be duly justified.   For further information, please contact Evelyne Delucinge.

  12. Home visits: why do rates vary so much?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stewart, P

    2012-03-01

    Data including information on patient age, gender, who initiated the visit and call classification was collected during office hours from 12 G.P. rural teaching practices with a combined GMS patient population of 24,720, over a 2 month period. There were a total of 603 home visits, giving an annual visiting rate of 143\\/1000. Visiting rates varied between practices from 45 to 305\\/1000 per year. When high visiting practices (>210\\/1000\\/year) were compared to low visiting rate practices (>90\\/1000\\/year), patients tended to be older (79.7 v. 74.5 years) and calls were 12 times more likely to be doctor initiated (16.6% v. 1.4%) or classified as routine( 50.7% v. 44.9%). The variation between practices was related in part to patient age but appears largely due to differences in doctor home visiting behaviour. There are no recent figures on home visiting in Ireland.

  13. What Happens during Prenatal Visits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at risk for complications? How does stress affect pregnancy? NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications What happens during prenatal visits? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content What happens during ...

  14. Doctor, Clinic, and Dental Visits

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Viral Suppression Doctor, Clinical & Dental Visits Treatment Adherence Mental Health Substance Abuse Issues Sexual Health Nutrition & Food Safety Exercise Immunizations Aging with HIV/AIDS Women’s Health Housing ...

  15. Skylab mission report, third visit

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    An evaluation is presented of the operational and engineering aspects of the third Skylab visit, including information on the performance of the command and service module and the experiment hardware, the crew's evaluation of the visit, and other visit-related areas of interest such as biomedical observations. The specific areas discussed are contained in the following: (1) solar physics and astrophysics investigations; (2) Comet Kohoutek experiments; (3) medical experiments; (4) earth observations, including data for the multispectral photographic facility, the earth terrain camera, and the microwave radiometer/scattermometer and altimeter; (5) engineering and technology experiments; (6) food and medical operational equipment; (7) hardware and experiment anomalies; and (8) mission support, mission objectives, flight planning, and launch phase summary. Conclusions discussed as a result of the third visit to Skylab involve the advancement of the sciences, practical applications, the durability of man and systems in space, and spaceflight effectiveness and economy.

  16. Tests and visits before surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Before surgery - tests; Before surgery - doctor visits ... Pre-op is the time before your surgery. It means "before operation." During this time, you will meet with one of your doctors. This may be your surgeon or primary care ...

  17. 75 FR 54447 - National Alcohol and Drug Addiction Recovery Month, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-07

    ... Cancer Awareness Month, 2010 Proclamation 8552--National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, 2010..., failure in school, job loss, child abuse, crimes, and death. I encourage all Americans to visit...

  18. Visit of Spanish Government delegation

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1982-01-01

    A Spanish Government delegation visited CERN before Spain rejoined CERN as a Member State(in 1983). Delegates interested in advanced technologies visited the ISR workshop clean room, where Romeo Perin explained fabrication and properties of stainless steel, titanium and inconel components of vacuum chambers for experiments at the ISR. Left to right: Technical Director Giorgio Brianti, the Spanish Minister of Industry and Energy Mr.Ignacio Bayon Marine , Romeo Perin, a delegate and Director-General Herwig Schopper. See also 8202369.

  19. WILL I AM visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Noemi Caraban

    2013-01-01

    Will.i.am visited CERN in December 2013, fulfilling a wish he made in a video-link appearance at TEDxCERN earlier that year http://tedxcern.web.cern.ch/video/choral-performance-reach-stars-william. During his visit, he was shown the Antimatter Decelerator, the underground ATLAS experiment cavern and the CERN Control Centre. He also took the opportunity to promote CERN’s beam line for schools competition.

  20. Return to the emergency department after ventricular shunt evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarda, Samir; Simon, Harold K; Hirsh, Daniel A; Wang, Andrew; Shane Tubbs, R; Chern, Joshua J

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT Patients with CSF shunts are medically complex and frequently present to the emergency department (ED) with suspected shunt malfunction. After adequate evaluation in the ED and proper disposition, some patients return to the ED within a short period of time. In this study, the authors examined the reasons for ED revisits within 7 days of the index ED visit to discern possible preventable returns. METHODS There were 3080 index ED visits made by patients with shunted hydrocephalus between 2010 and 2013. Index ED visits preceded by another ED visit or neurosurgical procedure within 60 days were excluded. Index ED visits for reasons unrelated to shunt function and those that led directly to admissions and shunt revision surgeries were also excluded. The remaining 1509 ED visits were eligible for analysis in this study. Final dispositions from the index ED visit included home (1176 cases), admission to the neurosurgery service for observation (134 cases), and admission to other services (199 cases). Subsequent events within 7 days, including ED revisits, hospital admissions, and shunt-related surgery were recorded, and reasons for the ED revisits were categorized based on whether the visit was related to shunt function concerns. Clinical and socioeconomic factors were analyzed for their association with ED revisits by using statistical methods. RESULTS Of the 1176 patients discharged home from the ED after shunt function evaluation, 101 (8.6%) returned to the ED within 7 days. Of the 134 patients admitted to the neurosurgery service for observation only, 8 (6.0%) returned to the ED within 7 days of discharge. Of the 199 patients admitted to hospital services other than neurosurgery, 13 (6.5%) returned to the ED within 7 days of discharge. The reasons for ED revisits vary (total of 122 visits combining the 3 groups), but at least 60% of the revisits were clearly unrelated to shunt function. A younger age, daytime arrival to the ED, and living within the

  1. Comet nucleus and asteroid sample return missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Three Advanced Design Projects have been completed this academic year at Penn State. At the beginning of the fall semester the students were organized into eight groups and given their choice of either a comet nucleus or an asteroid sample return mission. Once a mission had been chosen, the students developed conceptual designs. These were evaluated at the end of the fall semester and combined into three separate mission plans, including a comet nucleus same return (CNSR), a single asteroid sample return (SASR), and a multiple asteroid sample return (MASR). To facilitate the work required for each mission, the class was reorganized in the spring semester by combining groups to form three mission teams. An integration team consisting of two members from each group was formed for each mission so that communication and information exchange would be easier among the groups. The types of projects designed by the students evolved from numerous discussions with Penn State faculty and mission planners at the Johnson Space Center Human/Robotic Spacecraft Office. Robotic sample return missions are widely considered valuable precursors to manned missions in that they can provide details about a site's environment and scientific value. For example, a sample return from an asteroid might reveal valuable resources that, once mined, could be utilized for propulsion. These missions are also more adaptable when considering the risk to humans visiting unknown and potentially dangerous locations, such as a comet nucleus.

  2. Return inverval and investment horizon on Istanbul Stock Exchange

    OpenAIRE

    Demirci, Ebru; Gümrah, Ümit

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of return interval and investment horizon under the adjustment techniques of both Blume and Vasicek on ISE. By using daily, weekly, two weeks and monthly return intervals and one, two, three and four period investment horizons, beta regressions are estimated. Generally, as the return interval decreases from monthly to daily period, MSE decreases. Generally, as the investment horizon increases, MSE decreases. Results suggest that dai...

  3. UN Secretary General visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    UN Secretary General praises CERN in recent visit. Ban Ki-moon, Robert Aymar, CERN Director-General, and Sergei Ordzhonikidze, Director-General of the United Nations Office in Geneva at the CMS site.On Sunday 31 August, Ban Ki-moon, the UN Secretary General, made an important visit to CERN. Arriving in the late afternoon, he was warmly greeted at Point 5 by Robert Aymar, the Director-General, and the Sous-préfet of Gex, Olivier Laurens-Bernard. Accompanied by a UN delegation, Ban Ki-moon was also introduced to Jos Engelen, the Chief Scientific Officer, and Jim Virdee, the CMS spokesperson. He then took the opportunity to visit CMS and the machine tunnel. At the end of his short trip, Ban Ki-moon signed the Guest Book in the tradition of important dignitaries visiting CERN. Expressing his admiration for CERN’s spirit of collaboration, Ban Ki-moon said, "I am very honored to visit CERN, an invaluable scientific institution a...

  4. Visits from Croatia and Belarus

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    On 23 September, CERN was visited by two Ministers, Anatoly Rusetsky, Chairman of the Committee on Science and Technology of the Republic of Belarus, and Professor Gvozden Flego, Croatian Minister of Science and Technology. Mr Rusetsky met with Roger Cashmore, Research Director for Collider Programmes, and Michel Della Negra, spokesperson of the CMS experiment, and visited the CMS detector assembly hall. Professor Flego also met Mr Cashmore and visited the NA49 and CAST experiments, the LHC superconducting magnet test hall, the ALICE experiment cavern, and the assembly hall for the CMS experiment. From left to right: Nikola Godinovic, working at CMS, Jürgen Schukraft, ALICE spokesperson, Gordan Markotic, Ambassador and Permanent Representative of Croatia to the United Nations and other international organisations in Geneva, Professor Gvozden Flego, Minister of Science and Technology, Republic of Croatia.

  5. A Finnish delegation visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Minister Maija Rask (front, centre) led a Finnish delegation on a visit to CERN last week. Here the delegation inspects CMS preparations with the collaboration's spokesman Michel Della Negra (front, left). On 19 February Finnish Minister of Education, Mrs Maija Rask, visited CERN. She led a delegation composed of Mr. Pekka Huttaniemi, Permanent Representative of Finland to the United Nations, Mrs Pirjo Välinoro, Ministerial Counsellor (Economic affairs), Mr Markku Linna, Director General of the Ministry of Education, and Mr Tapio Kosunen, Special Adviser at the Ministry. Accompanied by Director General Luciano Maiani, the delegation visited CMS experiment and the LHC superconducting magnet test hall, and met Finnish students and scientists at CERN.

  6. Visit of the Italian President

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    "CERN stands as the demonstration of the great results that science can achieve [...] when it succeeds in getting all the main players in international scientific cooperation involved," stated the President of the Italian Republic, Carlo Azeglio Ciampi, in front of an overcrowded and enthusiastic Main Auditorium. The President visited CERN on 2nd December, and met the CERN directorate as well as the Italians at CERN. With about 1500 Italians working at CERN, which is one sixth of the total personnel, they are the second largest nationality at CERN. The Italian President visited the CMS assembly hall and the LHC superconducting magnet test hall before meeting the CERN community, in particular Italian personnel, in the main auditorium. There he emphasised the role of CERN as a transnational model for research which not only achieved great results in science but is also a powerful vehicle for progress in other fields. President Ciampi visits the LHC superconducting test hall together with Luciano Maiani and Lu...

  7. Italy's Prime Minister visits CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Stefania Pandolfi

    2015-01-01

    On Tuesday, 7 July 2015, the Prime Minister of the Italian Republic, Matteo Renzi, visited CERN. He was accompanied by a delegation that included Italy's Minister for Education, University and Research, Stefania Giannini.   From left to right: Fernando Ferroni, President of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN); Sergio Bertolucci, CERN Director for Research and Scientific Computing; Stefania Giannini, Italy's Minister of Education, University and Research; Matteo Renzi, Prime Minister of the Italian Republic; Fabiola Gianotti, CERN Director-General Designate; Rolf Heuer, CERN Director-General.   The Prime Minister was welcomed by members of the CERN Management together with former CERN Director-General and Senator for Life of the Italian Republic, Carlo Rubbia. After a brief general introduction to CERN’s activities by Rolf Heuer, the Italian delegation visited LHC Point 1. After a tour of the ATLAS control room, they donned helmets to visit th...

  8. Predictable return distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas Quistgaard

    This paper provides detailed insights into predictability of the entire stock and bond return distribution through the use of quantile regression. This allows us to examine speci…c parts of the return distribution such as the tails or the center, and for a suf…ciently …ne grid of quantiles we can...... are predictable as a function of economic state variables. The results are, however, very different for stocks and bonds. The state variables primarily predict only location shifts in the stock return distribution, while they also predict changes in higher-order moments in the bond return distribution. Out...... trace out the entire distribution. A univariate quantile regression model is used to examine stock and bond return distributions individually, while a multivariate model is used to capture their joint distribution. An empirical analysis on US data shows that certain parts of the return distributions...

  9. College Risk and Return

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalo Castex

    2011-01-01

    Attending college is thought of as a very profitable investment decision, as its estimated annualized return ranges from 8% to 13%. However, a large fraction of high school graduates do not enroll in college. I reconcile the observed high average returns to schooling with relatively low attendance rates when considering college as a risky investment decision. A high dropout risk has two important effects on the estimated average returns to college: selection bias and risk premium. In order to...

  10. Visit of the Austrian Ambassador

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The Austrian Ambassador Wolfgang Petritsch (light raincoat) learns about superconducting magnets at the LHC magnet test facility in building SM18 during a visit to CERN. The blue pipe-like structure in the left background is String 2: the 120-m long full-scale model of an LHC cell, which is used to test LHC systems.

  11. ATLAS Visit of Indian President

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Welcomed by CERN's Director General, Robert Aymar, the President of India Dr. A.P.J. Abdul Kalam visited the LHC tunnel, the ATLAS experimental cavern and the test facility for the LHC magnets. There the President had the chance to meet Indian scientists working at CERN.

  12. CPAFFC Delegation Visits New Zealand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu; Fenghua

    2016-01-01

    In early December 2015,a CPAFFC delegation,with representatives from six departments,visited New Zealand at the host’s invitation.Members conducted work exchanges with the New Zealand-China Maori Friendship Trust and held talks with the

  13. Dr. John Marburger visits DESY

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Dr. John Marburger, Director of the United States Office of Science and Technology Policy, visited the research center DESY in Hamburg. The American physicist wanted to inform himself about the status of the TESLA X-ray laser and the TESLA linear collider as well as the international collaboration at DESY (1/2 page).

  14. Visit of UK Prime Minister

    CERN Multimedia

    1982-01-01

    Wolfgang Schnell shows a prototype LEP r.f. accelerating cavity with a superposed storage cavity to U.K. Head of Government Mrs.Margareth Thatcher during her visit to CERN. Behind Mrs.Thatcher one can see CERN Director General Herwig Schopper.

  15. A Modern Visit to Galileo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freilich, Florence G.

    1970-01-01

    Describes the author's visit to the Italian cities where Galileo lived. Discusses the legendary swinging Cathedral lamp and the Leaning Tower of Pisa. Describes the science apparatus used by Galileo and other men of science which appear in the Museum of the History of Science in Florence. Presents six pictures of items viewed within the museum.…

  16. “VICO”, Visiting Colleagues

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    “Hello, I am your delegate” – have you heard this line? Maybe you have already had the pleasure of receiving a visit from a Staff Association delegate – then you know what this is all about. As for those of you, who have not yet heard these words, it’s time to get curious. The Staff Association has decided to embark upon an adventure called “VICO”, Visiting Colleagues. From past experience, we have understood the value of personal, direct contact with the people we represent. We believe that the best way to achieve this is to knock on your office door and pay you a short visit.  We do not want to make you fill in yet another online questionnaire and would much rather collect your feedback in a short conversation face to face. Of course, we have prepared ourselves thoroughly for these visit rounds, because we do not want to waste your time. We welcome criticism because it can make us aware of our shortcomings, tell us about how y...

  17. Gall's visit to The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eling, Paul; Draaisma, Douwe; Conradi, Matthijs

    2011-01-01

    In March 1805, Franz Joseph Gall left Vienna to start what has become known as his cranioscopic tour. He traveled through Germany, Denmark, and The Netherlands. In this article, we will describe his visit to The Netherlands in greater detail, as it has not yet received due attention. Gall was eager

  18. Gall's Visit to The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eling, P.A.T.M.; Draaisma, D.; Conradi, M.

    2011-01-01

    In March 1805, Franz Joseph Gall left Vienna to start what has become known as his cranioscopic tour. He traveled through Germany, Denmark, and The Netherlands. In this article, we will describe his visit to The Netherlands in greater detail, as it has not yet received due attention. Gall was eager

  19. Should Care Visits Be Enforced?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The China National Committee on Ageing recently announced the revision of the law which protects the rights of elderly people was completed. Among the revised sections,a provision that grown-up children will have to visit society’s elderly seniors more often was included in the draft law.

  20. President of Ecuador visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2014-01-01

    On Friday, 24 October, Dr. Rafael Correa Delgado, President of the Republic of Ecuador, visited CERN.   Visiting Geneva to deliver a lecture at the UN, Ecuadorian President Rafael Correa Delgado seized the chance to have a short but intense visit of the Laboratory. The President was met at LHC Point 1 by the Director for Research and Scientific Computing Sergio Bertolucci, who gave him an introduction to CERN’s activities.He was also introduced to the Director for Accelerators and Technology, Frédérick Bordry, and Department Heads José Miguel Jiménez (TE), Livio Mapelli (PH) and Roberto Saban (EN). President Correa Delgado also met with Martijn Mulders, co-organiser of the CERN Latin America School of High-Energy Physics, which will be held in Ecuador from 4 to 17 March 2015. Shortly after that, he visited the ATLAS experimental cavern which he toured with ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson David Charlton and Fernando Monticelli of t...

  1. Classifying Returns as Extreme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    I consider extreme returns for the stock and bond markets of 14 EU countries using two classification schemes: One, the univariate classification scheme from the previous literature that classifies extreme returns for each market separately, and two, a novel multivariate classification scheme tha...

  2. 28 CFR 540.41 - Visiting facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visiting facilities. 540.41 Section 540... WITH PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Visiting Regulations § 540.41 Visiting facilities. The Warden shall have... have a portion of the visiting room equipped and set up to provide facilities for the children of...

  3. Benefits of nurse teachers returning to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glossop, D; Hoyles, A; Lees, S; Pollard, C

    This article outlines an action research study developed to facilitate nurse teachers returning to clinical practice. The article explores how the teachers established partnerships with clinicians through which they were able to share the experience of returning to an area of nursing that they had previously only visited. It discusses four categories: expectations of self and others; entering someone else's world; more awareness of student needs; and teaching theory and practising nursing. These categories emerged following the analysis of journals, focus group interviews and individual interviews and led to a number of recommendations concerning the implications for other teachers wishing to return to clinical practice.

  4. The value of pre-discharge occupational therapy home visits for patients who have had a stroke: p erceptions of patients, occupational therapists and experts

    OpenAIRE

    Fellows, Karen Rachael

    2014-01-01

    Pre-discharge occupational therapy home visits after stroke are routinely conducted during the discharge planning process. However, there is limited research evidence about the value of these visits for patients. The aims of this study were two fold. Firstly, to identify and report on the value of pre- discharge occupational therapy home visits for patients returning home after stroke. Secondly, to gain knowledge to inform the design of future research into home visits after stroke. M...

  5. Replicating hedge fund returns: A factor model approach

    OpenAIRE

    Naser, Omar

    2007-01-01

    Growth in the Hedge Fund industry mirrors the growth in the Mutual Fund industry. This raises the possibility of creating a passive strategy that replicates Hedge Fund returns at lower cost using liquid, exchange-traded instruments. Using monthly returns for the period 1991-2005 on thirteen Hedge Fund strategies, I build a linear factor models (“clones”) that replicate Hedge Fund returns. I use six common factors to determine the amount of expected return and variation in returns that can be ...

  6. Two pioneering artists visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2015-01-01

    On Monday, 19 January, CERN physicists welcomed musician Tim Blake - progressive rock keyboard and theremin player - and architectural lighting designer Patrice Warrener - inventor of the Chromolithe Polychromatic Illumination system, used in Lyon’s “Fête des Lumières”. Together, they make up the musical duo "Crystal Machine".   The artists visit the Antiproton Decelerator. (Image: Django Manglunki.)   Their visit began with an introduction to CERN by their friend Django Manglunki, project leader for the ion injector chain, and an improvised discussion on the LHC extraction system with Roger Barlow, kicker magnet controls expert and progressive rock fan. This was followed by a quick trip to the CCC, the server room and the SPS RF amplifiers in BA3. Next on the itinerary was a tour of the AD and anti-hydrogen experiments led by Michael Doser, AEgIS Spokesperson. A leisurely lunch followed, in the company ...

  7. An Algerian Minister visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The Algerian Minister of Higher Education and Scientific Research, Rachid Haraoubia, visited CERN on 14 November. His party included the Rector of the University of Blida and the Director of the Algerian Ecole Nationale Polytechnique. Welcomed by CERN's Director-General, Robert Aymar, and Secretary-General, Maximilien Metzger, he signed the VIP Visitors' Book before going on to visit the ATLAS experiment and the LHC tunnel. He then had the opportunity to meet Algerian scientists working at CERN. Some fifteen Algerian physicists attached to European and US institutes are participating in the LHC experiments, in particular ATLAS. A formal collaboration agreement between Algeria and CERN is expected to be drawn up in the near future.

  8. CPAFFC Delegation Visits French Polynesia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YinShenglun

    2004-01-01

    At the invitation of Gaston Flosse, president of the Government of French Polynesia, a CPAFFC delegation headed by CPAFFC President Chen Haosu and Vice President Su Guang paid a goodwill visit to French Polynesia in September 2003. The Government of French Polynesia attached great importance to the visit. During their stay there, the delegation exchanged views with President Flosse many times on promoting friendship and cooperation between the Chinese and French Polynesian peoples. Both sides unanimously held that to promote friendship and strengthen cooperation are the common aspiration of the Chinese and French Polynesian people, which is conducive to the prosperity and development of the two sides and world peace. The delegation had extensive contacts with highranking officials and personages of various circles, and achieved its purpose of strengthening understanding, enhancing friendship and promoting cooperation.

  9. Young EIROforum prizewinner visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2015-01-01

    On 27 to 31 July, CERN welcomed Paul Clarke, an 18-year-old Irish mathematician who won a CERN EIROforum prize (second place) at EUCYS 2014 (European Union Contest for Young Scientists).   Paul Clarke, visiting the new Microcosm exhibit. In addition to a €5000 prize, Paul visited the Laboratory and its experiments, meeting and speaking with CERN physicists and computer scientists. Paul's winning project is entitled "Contributions to cyclic graph theory." As the summary of the project suggests, graph theory is an area of pure mathematics which studies properties of linkages and networks. It has applications in several areas including computing, molecular structure, neuroscience, search engines, engineering etc. This project makes a profound contribution to the study of graphs. It identifies key concepts and provides the methodology to apply them to some long-standing major problems in the subject with great success. Paul has just finished high sc...

  10. 77 FR 70835 - Centennial Challenges 2013 Sample Return Robot Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-27

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION Centennial Challenges 2013 Sample Return Robot Challenge AGENCY: National... that wish to compete may register. Centennial Challenges is a program of prize competitions to..., please visit: http://challenge.wpi.edu . For general information on the NASA Centennial Challenges...

  11. 76 FR 56819 - Centennial Challenges 2012 Sample Return Robot Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-14

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION Centennial Challenges 2012 Sample Return Robot Challenge AGENCY: National... compete may register. Centennial Challenges is a program of prize competitions to stimulate innovation in... general information on the NASA Centennial Challenges Program please visit: http://www.nasa.gov/challenges...

  12. A Croatian delegation visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Professor Hrvoje Kraljeviç signing the Golden book with Professor Roger Cashmore. A Croatian delegation composed of the Minister of Science and Technology, Professor Hrvoje Kraljeviç, his deputy for international collaboration Prof. Davor Butkovic have visited CERN on the 12 and 13th of February and held talks with the CERN authorities, ALICE and CMS spokespersons on the possibilities to increase the participation of Croatia to the LHC related activities.

  13. NGO Work Committee Visits Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    ON June 27, 19 members of the Work Committee of the UN FWCW’s 1995 NGO Forum on Women arrived in Beijing. During their five-day visit in the capital they talked with representatives from the host country about preparations for the forum, the meeting place, facilities and other relevant matters. Huang Qizao, Vice-Chairperson of the FWCW’s China Organizing Committee, Committee Director of the NGO Forum and

  14. A Visit to the CPAFFC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>The participants of the China International Friendship Conference in Commemoration of the 60th Anniversary of the CPAFFC took part in the Open House activities—visiting the exhibitions on the history and the collection of paintings and art works of the CPAFFC,watching the documentary on 60 years of people-to-people diplomacy,getting together with Chinese friends old and new—at the CPAFFC compound on the afternoon of May 14.

  15. US Cub Scouts visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    A group of young American Cub Scouts from Den 10, Pack 130 (based in Geneva) at the Microcosm last Saturday. On their trip to CERN, which included the first Visits Service tour of the ATLAS construction site, the scouts were able to satisfy most of the requirements for the Cub Scout engineering badge. From left to right: Edouard Vincent, Ariel Litke, Alexander Richter, Antoine Vidal de Saint Phalle, Jason Iredale and Daniel Reghelini.

  16. The relationship between visitor spending and repeat visits: An analysis of spectators at the Old Mutual Two Oceans Marathon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kruger

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this research is to determine the relationship between visitor spending patterns, and previous and planned return visits as well as demographic and trip characteristics of supporters to the Old Mutual Two Oceans Marathon held annually in Cape Town. Problem investigated: Spectator sport is a significant segment of the tourism industry which also has a considerable economic impact on host communities. For this reason, communities and destinations have recognised and attempt to capitalise on hosting large sporting events. In this regard visitor spending is crucial since information concerning the latter can provide sport event organisers to focus their marketing efforts to attract optimal economic benefits. In addition, the relationship of previous visits to a sport event and intended re-visits to visitor spending has received increasing attention since it is believed that repeat visitation is associated with higher levels of expenditure. However limited attention is currently being paid to the relationship between spectator spending patterns and previous and planned return visits in a South African sport spectator context even though the latter has a direct impact on the future sustainability of an event. Methodology: A supporter survey was done for the first time in 2010 (30 March - 2 April 2010 at the event and 430 questionnaires were completed. Factor analysis and regression analysis are used to analyse the data and to identify the relationship between repeat visits and visitor spending patterns. Findings: Results from this study shows that it is predominantly socio-demographic variables that influence travel behaviour. The significant socio-demographic determinants that influence spending per person are gender, language and province of origin while the only behavioural determinant was group size. The results also revealed that there is no significant relationship between spectator spending, repeat attendance and

  17. Prospective Multicenter Study of Bronchiolitis: Predictors of an Unscheduled Visit After Discharge From the Emergency Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norwood, Agatha; Mansbach, Jonathan M.; Clark, Sunday; Waseem, Muhammad; Camargo, Carlos A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives There is little evidence about which children with bronchiolitis will have worsened disease after discharge from the emergency department (ED). The objective of this study was to determine predictors of post-ED unscheduled visits. Methods The authors conducted a prospective cohort study of patients discharged from 2004 to 2006 at 30 EDs in 15 U.S. states. Inclusion criteria were diagnosis of bronchiolitis, age bronchiolitis within 2 weeks. Results Of 722 patients eligible for the current analysis, 717 (99%) had unscheduled visit data, of whom 121 (17%; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 14% to 20%) had unscheduled visits. Unscheduled visits were more likely for children age 0.10). Using multivariable logistic regression, independent predictors of unscheduled visits were age bronchiolitis, one of six children had unscheduled visits within 2 weeks of ED discharge. The three predictors of unscheduled visits were age under 2 months, male sex, and previous hospitalization. PMID:20370776

  18. Effects of home visiting on adolescent mothers' parenting attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvey, Lorraine M; Burrow, Nicola A; Balamurugan, Appathurai; Whiteside-Mansell, Leanne; Plummer, Pamela

    2012-10-01

    We examined the impact of a home visiting intervention on 227 adolescent mothers' parenting attitudes. At enrollment, half of mothers were at risk for child maltreatment. Mothers assigned to intervention (n = 161) received home visits and case management. Intervention and comparison mothers (n = 66) participated in monthly peer group meetings. Regression analyses controlling for enrollment differences indicated that intervention group mothers had significant improvements in 3 of 5 subscales and in total Adult-Adolescent Parenting Inventory-2 scores relative to the comparison group.

  19. I Return to my Second Home

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    LAST September, Chai Ran, my classmate and roommate in Shanxi, and I took a train to Yuanping to visit our second home. Twenty-five years ago, we 31 students from Beijing went to live in the Xiadalin Village in Yuanping, Shanxi Province, where we lived and labored for seven years. In our railway car, Chai told me that Yuanping, to which the Xiadalin Village belonged in the past administration, was celebrating its emergence as a city. Chai had married a villager and had returned to Beijing only two years ago. Her son and daughter, who were both born in the village, had just visited there and had brought her the news. Although I knew that Yuanping had changed a great deal, I was still unable to imagine what it had become, since I had left eighteen years ago. In my memory, it was only a series of streets with a

  20. Lidar 2009 - All Returns

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — LIDAR-derived binary (.las) files containing classified points of all returns. We have 3 classifications Unclassified, Ground, Low points. The average Ground Sample...

  1. Returning to Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... when work tasks can be upgraded to full duty. What can a person returning to work do? ... to-work program that includes transitional work for employees is an important component of a company's healthy ...

  2. Visiting relatives and friends (VFR), pregnant, and other vulnerable travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteelli, Alberto; Carvalho, Anna Cristina C; Bigoni, Sara

    2012-09-01

    With industrial development and expanding tourism, many people now have an opportunity to travel to many previously unreachable foreign destinations. Travelers with medical or physical conditions or who are vulnerable because of pregnancy or age (pediatric or elderly traveler), require specialist support and advice before traveling. Immigrants who return to their country of birth to visit relatives and friends should be classified as vulnerable travelers, as they have been shown to carry a disproportionate burden of travel-related morbidity. In this article, we explore the major risks to health and the main preventive strategies appropriate to the most vulnerable travelers.

  3. Consent Form Return Rates for Third-Grade Urban Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Peter; Flay, Brian R.; Phil, D.; DuBois, David L.; Brechling, Vanessa; Day, Joseph; Cantillon, Dan

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To maximize active parent consent form return rates for third-grade minority, urban students enrolled in predominantly low-income elementary schools in Chicago, Ill. Methods: Research staff used a class incentive and class visits to retrieve consent forms from students. Results: Of the 811 third-grade students, 98% returned a form and …

  4. Realized Jump Risk and Equity Return in China

    OpenAIRE

    Guojin Chen; Xiaoqun Liu; Peilin Hsieh; Xiangqin Zhao

    2014-01-01

    We utilize the realized jump components to explore a new jump (including nonsystematic jump and systematic jump) risk factor model. After estimating daily realized jumps from high-frequency transaction data of the Chinese A-share stocks, we calculate monthly jump size, monthly jump standard deviation, and monthly jump arrival rate and then use those monthly jump factors to explain the return of the following month. Our empirical results show that the jump tail risk can explain the equity retu...

  5. Follow-Up Visit Patterns in an Antiretroviral Therapy (ART programme in Zomba, Malawi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth Rachlis

    Full Text Available Identifying follow-up (FU visit patterns, and exploring which factors influence them are likely to be useful in determining which patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART may become Lost to Follow-Up (LTFU. Using an operation and implementation research approach, we sought 1 to describe the timing of FU visits amongst patients who have been on ART for shorter and longer periods of time; and 2 to determine the median time to late visits, and 3 to identify specific factors that may be associated with these patterns in Zomba, Malawi.Using routinely collected programme monitoring data from Zomba District, we performed descriptive analyses on all ART visits among patients who initiated ART between Jan. 1, 2007-June 30, 2010. Based on an expected FU date, each FU visit was classified as early (≥4 day before an expected FU date, on time (3 days before an expected FU date/up to 6 days after an expected FU date, or late (≥7 days after an expected FU date. In total, 7,815 patients with 76417 FU visits were included. Ninety-two percent of patients had ≥2 FU visits. At the majority of visits, patients were either on time or late. The median time to a first late visit among those with 2 or more visits was 216 days (IQR: 128-359. Various patient- and visit-level factors differed significantly across Early, On Time, and Late visit groups including ART adherence and frequency of, and type of side effects.The majority of patients do not demonstrate consistent FU visit patterns. Individuals were generally on ART for at least 6 months before experiencing their first late visit. Our findings have implications for the development of effective interventions that meet patient needs when they present early and can reduce patient losses to follow-up when they are late. In particular, time-varying visit characteristics need further research.

  6. Job Candidates' Views of Site Visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Laurence S.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Followed 62 Master of Business Administration students through job search involving 97 site visits to determine whether site visits changed perceptions of visited companies, attitudes toward those firms, and intentions to accept job offers. Findings suggest that organizations can improve recruitment success by paying attention to how site visits…

  7. Problem visits to a family planning clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, P D; Jacobson, J; Gaffikin, L

    1988-01-01

    In order to obtain information necessary for optimum delivery of services, data were collected on the nature of the services provided at a family planing clinic. Clinic visits were divided into initial, annual, routine, problem, supply, educational and unknown. An analysis of the "problem" visits was undertaken to assess various epidemiologic aspects of such visits and to identify areas of clinic efficiency that could be improved. Problem visits were defined as any visits for which the patient had a presenting complaint. Age, level of education, method of contraception and parity were statistically associated with problem visits. When compared to Pill users, diaphragm users, intrauterine device users and non-users had a higher-than-expected number of problem visits. Less educated women and teenagers had a lower-than-expected number of problem visits when compared to more educated and older women. Socioeconomic status and problem visits were not statistically associated. Problem visits required more time, utilized more medical services and resulted in more referrals to the gynecology clinic than did other visit types. As a result of this analysis, we have increased our educational efforts for patients at high risk of problem visits and have instituted a special problem-oriented family planning clinic in which a full complement of house staff and ancillary personnel are available. This arrangement makes the uncomplicated family planning clinic run more smoothly and efficiently and obviates the need for time-consuming and cost-ineffective referrals.

  8. Case Study of Home-School Visits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguerrebere, Yolanda

    2009-01-01

    This case study evaluated one site of a California teacher home visit program. Home visits have been an important means of connecting families and schooling. In 1999, California inaugurated a statewide home visit program to promote effective partnership between home and school for low-achieving schools. At this site, families in 3 kindergarten…

  9. The Economic Value of Predicting Stock Index Returns and Volatility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.A. Marquering (Wessel); M.J.C.M. Verbeek (Marno)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper, we analyze the economic value of predicting stock index returns as well as volatility. On the basis of simple linear models, estimated recursively, we produce genuine out-of-sample forecasts for the return on the S&P 500 index and its volatility. Using monthly data from

  10. The Economic Value of Predicting Stock Index Returns and Volatility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marquering, W.; Verbeek, M.J.C.M.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the economic value of predicting index returns as well as volatility. On the basis of fairly simple linear models, estimated recursively, we produce genuine out-of-sample forecasts for the return on the S&P 500 index and its volatility. Using monthly data from 1954-1998, we

  11. To return permanently or to return temporarily?: Explaining migrants' intentions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilgili, Ö.; Siegel, M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies migrants' intentions to return to their origin country by making the distinction between permanent return, temporary return and participation in temporary return programmes. Using survey data from first generation migrants in the Netherlands, we explore how migrants' experiences r

  12. Chikungunya in Singapore: imported cases among travelers visiting friends and relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Poh Lian; Oh, Helen May-Lin; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2009-01-01

    Chikungunya infections were detected in Singapore among returning travelers who had visited friends and relatives (VFR) in India and Malaysia. These sporadic imported cases occurred over a year before the 2008 chikungunya outbreaks in Singapore, demonstrating the potential for introducing this emerging viral infection into new areas via VFR travel.

  13. Realized Jump Risk and Equity Return in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guojin Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We utilize the realized jump components to explore a new jump (including nonsystematic jump and systematic jump risk factor model. After estimating daily realized jumps from high-frequency transaction data of the Chinese A-share stocks, we calculate monthly jump size, monthly jump standard deviation, and monthly jump arrival rate and then use those monthly jump factors to explain the return of the following month. Our empirical results show that the jump tail risk can explain the equity return. For the large capital-size stocks, large cap stock portfolios, and index, one-month lagged jump risk factor significantly explains the asset return variation. Our results remain the same even when we add the size and value factors in the robustness tests.

  14. 76 FR 25517 - Jewish American Heritage Month, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-05

    ...#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8660 of April 29, 2011 Jewish American Heritage Month, 2011 By the President of... laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim May 2011 as Jewish American Heritage Month. I call upon all Americans to visit ] www.JewishHeritageMonth.gov to learn more about the heritage...

  15. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, August 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1959-09-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, August, 1959. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, employee relations, and operations research and synthesis operation are discussed.

  16. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, June 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-07-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, July 1957. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  17. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, July 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1961-08-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, July 1969. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  18. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, November 1962

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1962-12-14

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, November 1962. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  19. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, November 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1959-12-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, November 1959. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  20. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, December 1962

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1963-01-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, December 1962. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  1. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, August 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-09-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, September 1957. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  2. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report for February 1956

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1956-02-21

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, February, 1956. Metallurgy, reactors fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, employee relations are discussed.

  3. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, March 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1961-04-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, April 1961. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  4. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, May 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-06-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, May, 1957. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  5. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, July 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1959-08-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, July, 1959. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  6. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, February 1960

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1960-03-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, February, 1960. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  7. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, March 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, H.M.

    1958-04-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, March, 1958. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  8. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, April 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-05-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, May, 1958. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  9. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, September 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1959-10-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, October 1959. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  10. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, June 1960

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1960-07-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, July 1960. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities,, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  11. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, January 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1961-02-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, January 1961. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  12. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, December 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1960-01-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, January 1960. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  13. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, April 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1961-05-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, April 1961. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  14. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, September 1960

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1960-10-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, October, 1960. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  15. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, November 1960

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sale, W.

    1960-12-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, November 1960. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  16. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, October 1960

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1960-11-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, October 1960. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  17. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, March 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albaugh, E.W.

    1957-04-15

    This is the monthly report of the Hanford Laboratories Operation, March, 1957. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  18. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, February 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1961-03-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, February 1961. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  19. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report for March 1956

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1956-04-20

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, March, 1956. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology; financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, employee relations, pile technology, safety and radiological sciences are discussed.

  20. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, September 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-10-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, September, 1957. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  1. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report, January 1956

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1956-02-24

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Atomic Laboratories Products Operation, February, 1956. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  2. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report for June 1955

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1955-07-28

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Atomic Products Operation, June, 1955. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  3. Swiss State Secretary visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The new Swiss State Secretary for Education and Research recently visited CERN. Peter Jenni, the spokesperson for ATLAS, gave Mauro Dell’Ambrogio, the new Swiss State Secretary for Education and Research, a tour of ATLAS and the LHC tunnel.On 2 April, the newly appointed Swiss State Secretary for Education and Research, Mauro Dell’Ambrogio, was welcomed to CERN by Director-General Robert Aymar. On arrival the Swiss minister was given a guided tour of ATLAS and the adjoining LHC tunnel by Peter Jenni, the ATLAS spokesperson. Dr Dell’Ambrogio was then greeted by Swiss scientists and attended presentations by young post doc physicists about Swiss contributions to CMS and LHCb, in particular their work concerning hardware contribution and data analysis. There are 120 physicists from Swiss universities working on CERN’s experiments, and many more Swiss people working at CERN in other departments due to Switzerland’s special position as a host state. Also before ...

  4. Boston children's hospital community asthma initiative: Five-year cost analyses of a home visiting program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaumik, Urmi; Sommer, Susan J; Giller-Leinwohl, Judith; Norris, Kerri; Tsopelas, Lindsay; Nethersole, Shari; Woods, Elizabeth R

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the costs and benefits of the Boston Children's Hospital Community Asthma Initiative (CAI) through reduction of Emergency Department (ED) visits and hospitalizations for the full pilot-phase program participants. A cost-benefit analyses was conducted using hospital administrative data to determine an adjusted Return on Investment (ROI): on all 268 patients enrolled in the CAI program during the 33-month pilot program phase of CAI intervention between October 1, 2005 and June 30, 2008 using a comparison group of 818 patients from a similar cohort in neighboring ZIP codes without CAI intervention. Cost data through June 30, 2013 were used to examine cost changes and calculate an adjusted ROI over a 5-year post-intervention period. CAI patients had a cost reduction greater than the comparison group of $1,216 in Year 1 (P = 0.001), $1,320 in Year 2 (P Year 3, $1,123 (P = 0.004) in Year 4, and $997 (P = 0.022) in Year 5. Adjusting for the cost savings for the comparison group, the cost savings from the intervention resulted in an adjusted ROI of 1.91 over 5 years. Community-based, multidisciplinary, coordinated disease management programs can decrease the incidence of costly hospitalizations and ED visits from asthma. An ROI of greater than one, as found in this cost analysis, supports the business case for the provision of community-based asthma services as part of patient-centered medical homes and Accountable Care Organizations.

  5. Steven Hawking to visit Texas A&M in spring

    CERN Multimedia

    Xavier, D

    2002-01-01

    Stephen Hawking will visit Texas A&M University from Feb. 24 to March 21 2003 to participate in the inaugural meeting of the George P. and Cynthia W. Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics. This institute will bring several of the world's top physicists to A&M for a month-long exploration of the latest ideas on topics ranging from superstrings to M-theory and supergravity (1/2 page).

  6. Higher Education Endowments Return

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahlmann, David; Walda, John D.; Sedlacek, Verne O.

    2012-01-01

    A new study of endowments by the National Association of College and University Business Officers (NACUBO) and the Commonfund Institute has brought good news to college and universities: While endowment returns dropped precipitously in fiscal year 2009 as a result of the financial crisis and accompanying slide in equity markets, they climbed to an…

  7. The 'successful' return

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olwig, Karen Fog

    2012-01-01

    Research on female migrant caregivers has tended to focus upon the emotional and social problems they encounter working abroad, given women’s traditional role as caregivers for their own families. This article analyses how Caribbean women who have returned after a period abroad as domestic workers...

  8. Return to Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Call it physical activity, call it games, or call it play. Whatever its name, it's a place we all need to return to. In the physical education, recreation, and dance professions, we need to redesign programs to address the need for and want of play that is inherent in all of us.

  9. Is polypharmacy an independent risk factor for adverse outcomes after an emergency department visit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, Fabio; Rossi, Lorena; Lattanzio, Fabrizia; Cherubini, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed at verifying the role of polypharmacy as an independent risk factor for adverse health outcomes in older emergency department (ED) patients. This was a large (n = 2057) sample of older ED patients (≥65 years) participating in an observational cohort study. Polypharmacy and excessive polypharmacy were defined as having 6-9 drug prescriptions and 10 or more drug prescriptions in the last 3 months, respectively. The total number of medication prescriptions was also available. Outcome measures were in-hospital mortality; 30-day ED return; ED revisit, hospital admission, and mortality at 6 months. Logistic and Cox regression models as well as receiver operating characteristic curves using the Youden index and the area under the curve were calculated. Polypharmacy and excessive polypharmacy were present in 624 (30.3 %) and 367 (17.8 %) subjects, respectively. The mean number of prescriptions in the last 3 months was 5.7 (range 0-25) drugs. Polypharmacy and, particularly, excessive polypharmacy were constantly and independently associated with worse outcomes. A cut-off of 6 had the highest value of the Youden Index in predicting the majority of the adverse outcomes considered. Polypharmacy and excessive polypharmacy are independent risk factors for adverse health outcomes after an ED visit. Further studies are needed to clarify whether drug related issues (such as non-compliance, inappropriate or suboptimal prescribing, adverse drug reactions, and drug-drug or drug-disease interactions) or underlying multimorbidity and disease severity, as well as clinical complexity and frailty, are responsible for the negative outcomes associated with polypharmacy.

  10. Ambient Ozone and Emergency Department Visits for Cellulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mieczysław Szyszkowicz

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives were to assess and estimate an association between exposure to ground-level ozone and emergency department (ED visits for cellulitis. All ED visits for cellulitis in Edmonton, Canada, in the period April 1992–March 2002 (N = 69,547 were examined. Case-crossover design was applied to estimate odds ratio (OR, and 95% confidence interval per one interquartile range (IQR increase in ozone concentration (IQR = 14.0 ppb. Delay of ED visit relating to exposure was probed using 0- to 5-day exposure lags. For all patients in the all months (January–December and lags 0 to 2 days, OR = 1.05 (1.02, 1.07. For male patients during the cold months (October-March: OR = 1.05 (1.02, 1.09 for lags 0 and 2 and OR = 1.06 (1.02, 1.10 for lag 3. For female patients in the warm months (April-September: OR = 1.12 (1.06, 1.18 for lags 1 and 2. Cellulitis developing on uncovered (more exposed skin was analyzed separately, observed effects being stronger. Cellulitis may be associated with exposure to ambient ground level ozone; the exposure may facilitate cellulitis infection and aggravate acute symptoms.

  11. Many Healthy Returns

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-02-08

    International travel is usually very safe but there are things you should do to stay safe and healthy. Experts show you how to avoid problems when visiting developing nations. This includes being cautious about the food you eat and the water you drink, and to be aware of vehicles and road conditions to prevent problems.  Created: 2/8/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Disease (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/8/2010.

  12. Creating a national home visiting research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Anne; Minkovitz, Cynthia S; Chaffin, Mark; Korfmacher, Jon; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Crowne, Sarah; Filene, Jill; Gonsalves, Kay; Landsverk, John; Harwood, Robin

    2013-11-01

    Home visiting can play a key role in the early childhood system of services. For home visiting to achieve its potential, decision-makers must make informed choices regarding adoption, adaptation, coordination, scale-up, and sustainment. We need a coordinated, focused, and theory-based home visiting research infrastructure to inform such decisions. The transdisciplinary Home Visiting Research Network (HVRN) was established in July 2012 with funding from the Health Resources and Services Administration. Its goal is to promote the translation of research findings into policy and practice. Its objectives are to (1) develop a national home visiting research agenda, (2) advance the use of innovative research methods; and (3) provide a research environment that is supportive of the professional development of emerging researchers interested in home visiting. A Management Team designs and directs activities to achieve these objectives through Work Teams. A Steering Committee of national leaders representing stakeholder groups oversees progress. HVRN's Coordinating Center supports the Work Teams and HVRN's Home visiting Applied Research Collaborative, a practice-based research network of home visiting programs. This article describes HVRN's rationale, approach, and anticipated products. We use home visiting-primary care coordination as an illustration, noting potential roles for pediatric practices and pediatric researchers and research educators in HVRN activities. HVRN creates the infrastructure for a rigorous program of research to inform policy and practice on home visiting as part of the system of services to improve family functioning, parenting, and child outcomes.

  13. Does a multidisciplinary diabetes group education visit improve patient outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Kristi J; O'Dell, Michael L; Taylor, James L

    2009-12-01

    Diabetes is a significant and growing public health concern, and patient education is the primary approach for self-management. The objective of this study is to assess the impact of a single session diabetes group education intervention. The design is a one-group pretest/posttest evaluation. Participants were adult outpatients with diabetes who attended a single session group education visit and volunteered to participate in the study. Survey questions include the Single Item Literacy Screener and diabetes knowledge questions. The survey was mailed and collected before the group visit. Diabetes knowledge was collected immediately after the group visit and again by telephone one to four months later. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), lipids, and blood pressure were collected from the patient electronic medical record before and, where available, three months after the group visit. Data analysis includes descriptive statistics and Students t-testing to determine pre- and posttest differences of diabetes knowledge and physiological markers. Thirty-eight adult outpatients participated in the study. Nearly half responded that they never needed to have someone help with written medical materials. There was a significant increase from pretest to immediate posttest diabetes knowledge scores (N = 3; M = 5.58 to M = 7.53 out of 10), t(38) = -5.217, p = education (M = 9.16 to M = 8.52), t(27) = 2.185, p = .038. A single session diabetes group education visit is effective in increasing patients' diabetes knowledge and decreasing HbA1c levels.

  14. Management of the Returning Traveler with Diarrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Abstract: Traveler's diarrhea (TD) strikes 20—60% of travelers visiting developing countries. It occurs shortly after the return and can be distinguished into two categories: acute and persistent TD. Acute TD, mostly caused by bacterial and viral pathogens, is usually mild and self-limited, and deserves empirical symptomatic and/or antibiotic therapy in selected cases. Fluoroquinolones are progressively superseded in this indication by azithromycin, a well tolerated macrolide active against most bacteria responsible for TD, including the quinolone-resistant species of Campylobacter jejuni that are now pervasive, especially in Southeast Asia and India. Persistent TD in the returning traveler is much rarer than its acute counterpart and may be associated with three types of causes. Persistent infections, among which Giardia and possibly Entamoeba predominate, account for a significant proportion of cases. Postinfectious processes represent a second cause and comprise temporary lactose malabsorption and postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome, now considered a major cause of persistent TD. Finally, apparently unrelated chronic diseases causing diarrhea are occasionally unmasked by TD and represent a third type of persistent TD, among which the well established case of incident inflammatory bowel disease poses intriguing pathogenesis questions. This review discusses recent advances in the field and provides practical recommendations for the management of TD in adult, immunocompetent returning travelers. PMID:21180583

  15. Management of the returning traveler with diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Saussure, Philippe P H

    2009-11-01

    Traveler's diarrhea (TD) strikes 20-60% of travelers visiting developing countries. It occurs shortly after the return and can be distinguished into two categories: acute and persistent TD. Acute TD, mostly caused by bacterial and viral pathogens, is usually mild and self-limited, and deserves empirical symptomatic and/or antibiotic therapy in selected cases. Fluoroquinolones are progressively superseded in this indication by azithromycin, a well tolerated macrolide active against most bacteria responsible for TD, including the quinolone-resistant species of Campylobacter jejuni that are now pervasive, especially in Southeast Asia and India. Persistent TD in the returning traveler is much rarer than its acute counterpart and may be associated with three types of causes. Persistent infections, among which Giardia and possibly Entamoeba predominate, account for a significant proportion of cases. Postinfectious processes represent a second cause and comprise temporary lactose malabsorption and postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome, now considered a major cause of persistent TD. Finally, apparently unrelated chronic diseases causing diarrhea are occasionally unmasked by TD and represent a third type of persistent TD, among which the well established case of incident inflammatory bowel disease poses intriguing pathogenesis questions. This review discusses recent advances in the field and provides practical recommendations for the management of TD in adult, immunocompetent returning travelers.

  16. HUBUNGAN RETURN SAHAM DAN INFLASI DI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyoman Triaryati

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of inflation to the stock return research had been held since three decades ago based on GeneralizeFisher’s Hypotheses, but ‘how inflation influenced stock return’ had become a debate until today. In Indonesiamost of the related research used inflation as one of the variables that influenced stock return despite of others inshort period of time. This research investigated the effect of inflation to the stock return in Indonesia within fifteenyears, which was divided into 3 (three periods of time reflecting different economic growth for each of it. Thepurpose of this allotment was to see the consistency how inflation influenced the stock market. Using a secondarydata from monthly inflation and IHSG period 1998 until 2012, included three hundred and sixty observation,simple regression model analyses was applied. This research acknowledged that inflation negatively influencedstock return in a long time period, but it did not exist in the short time period, except when the level of inflationreached 10%. In conclusion, inflation influence on the stock return was not ascertained by how long the investigationwas held but if there was any inflation rate reaching 10% within the period of investigation.

  17. Zizek's return to Lenin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subotić Milan M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper offers a critical discussion of the thesis about the revived philosophical and political significance of Lenin, as recently propounded by Slavoj Zizek. Analyzing Zizek's writings, the author argues that the call for a "return to Lenin" derives from Zizek's strategy of "textual provocation" and the frustrating position of the leftist, radical tradition of political thought after the collapse of communism.

  18. President Li Xiaolin Visits Saudi Arabia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang; Min

    2016-01-01

    At the invitation of Prince Alwaleed,chairman of Kingdom Holding Company of Saudi Arabia,CPAFFC President Li Xiaolin led a delegation to visit Saudi Arabia from Feb 16 to 20.During the visit,Ms.Li met with the prince,visited Kingdom Hospital and Kingdom School and held working talks with Alwaleed Philanthropies.During the meeting with Prince Alwaleed,Ms.Li mentioned that Chi-

  19. American high school students visit CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Fifteen final-year students from Columbus High School, Mississippi, USA visited CERN recently with their physics teacher Ken Wester (left at rear). Mr Wester organized the trip after his participation in the 2002 edition of CERN's High School Teachers programme. The students visited the CMS construction site and the AD antimatter factory during their two-day visit. They are pictured here with Michel Della Negra, CMS spokesman (kneeling), in front of the model of the CMS detector in building 40.

  20. STS-129 shuttle crew visits Stennis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Members of the STS-129 space shuttle crew visited NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center on Jan. 19 to share details of their November visit to the International Space Station. During their 11-day mission aboard shuttle Atlantis, crew members delivered equipment, supplies and spare parts to the ISS. Following their mission report, astronauts visited with Stennis employees during a brief reception. Astronauts visiting Stennis were Pilot Barry Wilmore, Mission Specialist Randy Bresnik, Commander Charles Hobaugh and Mission Specialists Mike Foreman and Robert Satcher.

  1. Pediatric Emergency Department Return: A Literature Review of Risk Factors and Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Quincy Khoi; Bayram, Jamil D; Boonyasai, Romsai T; Case, Meredith A; Connor, Christine; Doggett, David; Fawole, Oluwakemi A; Ijagbemi, O Mayowa; Levin, Scott; Wu, Albert W; Pham, Julius Cuong

    2016-08-01

    Children discharged from emergency departments (EDs) are often at risk for ED return. The objective was to identify risk factors and interventions to mitigate or prevent ED return among this patient population. Structured literature review of PubMed and clinicaltrials.gov was conducted to identify relevant studies. Inclusion criteria were studies evaluating ED returns by identifying risk factors and interventions in the pediatric population. Emergency department return was defined as returning to the ED within 1 year after initial visit. Abstract and full text articles were reviewed, and data were abstracted by 2 independent authors. A total of 963 articles were screened and yielded 42 potential relevant articles involving pediatric population. After full text review, a total of 12 articles were included in the final analysis (6 on risk factors and 6 on interventions). Risk factors for pediatric ED return included behavioral/psychiatric problems, younger age, acuity of illness, medical history of asthma, and social factors. Interventions included computer-generated instructions, postdischarge telephone coaching, ED-made appointments, case management, and home environment intervention. Emergency department-made appointments and postdischarge telephone coaching plus monetary incentive improved outpatient follow-up rate but not ED return. Home environment assessment coupled with case management reduced ED returns specifically among asthma patients. Several patient and visit characteristics can help predict children at risk for ED return. Although some interventions are successful at improving postdischarge follow-up, most did not reduce ED returns.

  2. A randomized comparison of home visits and hospital-based group follow-up visits after early postpartum discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, G J; Braveman, P A; Ackerson, L; Odouli, R; Coleman-Phox, K; Capra, A M; Wong, C; Lieu, T A

    2001-09-01

    Short postpartum stays are common. Current guidelines provide scant guidance on how routine follow-up of newly discharged mother-infant pairs should be performed. We aimed to compare 2 short-term (within 72 hours of discharge) follow-up strategies for low-risk mother-infant pairs with postpartum length of stay (LOS) of costs were studied using computerized databases and chart review. Breastfeeding continuation, maternal depressive symptoms, and maternal satisfaction were assessed by means of telephone interviews at 2 weeks postpartum. During a 17-month period in 1998 to 1999, we enrolled and randomized 1014 mother-infant pairs (506 to the control group and 508 to the intervention group). There were no significant differences between the study groups with respect to maternal age, race, education, household income, parity, previous breastfeeding experience, early initiation of prenatal care, or postpartum LOS. There were no differences with respect to neonatal LOS or Apgar scores. In the control group, 264 mother-infant pairs had an individual visit only, 157 had a group visit only, 64 had both a group and an individual visit, 4 had a home health and a hospital-based follow-up, 13 had no follow-up within 72 hours, and 4 were lost to follow-up. With respect to outcomes within 2 weeks after discharge, there were no significant differences in newborn or maternal hospitalizations or urgent care visits, breastfeeding discontinuation, maternal depressive symptoms, or a combined clinical outcome measure indicating whether a mother-infant pair had any of the above outcomes. However, mothers in the home visit group were more likely than those in the control group to rate multiple aspects of their care as excellent or very good. These included the preventive advice delivered (76% vs 59%) and the skills and abilities of the provider (84% vs 73%). Mothers in the home visit group also gave higher ratings on overall satisfaction with the newborn's posthospital care (71% vs 59

  3. Dental visits, oral hygiene behaviour, and orthodontic treatment in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadelmann, Pascale; Zemp, Elisabeth; Weiss, Carine; Weiger, Roland; Menghini, Giorgio; Zitzmann, Nicola U

    2012-01-01

    Since the first survey in 1992/93, the Swiss Health Survey (SHS) has been repeated every 5 years (1997, 2002 and 2007). In the present study, dental visits (dental care utilisation within the last 12 months), oral hygiene measures and the frequency of orthodontic treatments in the Swiss population in 2002 were examined and dental visits were compared with the years 1992/93, 1997 and 2007. Weighted data were analysed regarding different sociodemographic factors. From 1992 to 2002, dental visits among the 15-74-year-old declined continuously (1992/93: 70%, 1997: 66%, 2002: 63%), whereas in 2007 a slight increase (66%) was documented. In the survey from 2002, a large proportion (74%) of the population stated to clean their teeth or prostheses several times a day, predominantly with a manual toothbrush, whereas 28% applied an electric toothbrush and almost half of the respondents also used dental floss or toothpicks. Fewer visits and less intensive oral hygiene measures were observed among the elderly, men, weak social strata, smokers, persons with more than 8 missing teeth and in the group with removable dentures. Almost a quarter of the population had orthodontic treatment with the highest proportion among the 15-24-year-old (56%).

  4. Long-term Dental Visiting Patterns and Adult Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, W.M.; Williams, S.M.; Broadbent, J.M.; Poulton, R.; Locker, D.

    2010-01-01

    To date, the evidence supporting the benefits of dental visiting comes from cross-sectional studies. We investigated whether long-term routine dental visiting was associated with lower experience of dental caries and missing teeth, and better self-rated oral health, by age 32. A prospective cohort study in New Zealand examined 932 participants’ use of dentistry at ages 15, 18, 26, and 32. At each age, routine attenders (RAs) were identified as those who (a) usually visited for a check-up, and (b) had made a dental visit during the previous 12 months. Routine attending prevalence fell from 82% at age 15 to 28% by 32. At any given age, routine attenders had better-than-average oral health, fewer had teeth missing due to caries, and they had lower mean DS and DMFS scores. By age 32, routine attenders had better self-reported oral health and less tooth loss and caries. The longer routine attendance was maintained, the stronger the effect. Routine dental attendance is associated with better oral health. PMID:20093674

  5. Health visiting in rural Gambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoare, K

    1991-01-01

    A British nurse was the 1st health visitor in the village of Keneba in the Gambia. She was at a nutritional research center which provided basic medical services. In addition to visiting mothers in their homes to talk about health education, such as oral rehydration and advice on hand washing, she would also encourage them to bring their children to the infant welfare clinic for immunizations. She told the mothers that the health staff would check the growth and nutritional status of their children and why these activities were important. Staff at the clinic aimed to see all the children 2 years 9 times the 1st year and 4 times the 2nd year. All anthropometric data were forwarded to Cambridge, England to be included in a continuing study on the growth of the population. The clinic referred children with serious illnesses to the pediatrician or, if necessary, took them to a hospital on the coast. Children that came to the clinic with a fever 37.4 degrees Celsius during the wet season had a blood film taken to check for malaria parasites. Indeed cerebral malaria contributed greatly to child deaths in the Gambia. If malaria was present, children received their 1st dose of chloroquine immediately so the staff could determine tolerance. 3 doses followed this dose. The health visitor also organized the health education component of the clinic. The clinic dresser interpreted the British nurse's presentations to eventually conduct them alone. The nurse divided the mothers and fathers into 2 groups. In the future, she would evaluate the 2 groups to determine if weekly education on hand washing and skin hygiene would reduce diarrheal and cutaneous disease incidence in children 3 years old. The other group learned about family planning. Both groups learned about immunization, detection of illness, safety, sanitation, nutritional advice, dental care, and food preparation.

  6. Health care utilization before and after an outpatient ED visit in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horney, Carolyn; Schmader, Kenneth; Sanders, Linda L; Heflin, Mitchell; Ragsdale, Luna; McConnell, Eleanor; Hocker, Michael; Hastings, S Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Older adults in the United States receive a significant amount of care in the emergency department (ED), yet the associations between ED and other types of health care utilization have not been adequately studied in this population. The goals of this study were to examine the relationships between health care use before and after an ED visit among older adults. This retrospective cohort study examined health care use among 308 patients 65 years or older discharged from a university-affiliated ED. Proportional-hazards models were used to assess the relationship between pre-ED health care use (primary care physician [PCP], specialist, ED, and hospital) and risk of return ED visits. Older ED patients in this study had visited other types of providers frequently in the previous year (median number of PCP and specialist visits, 4). Patients who used the ED on 2 or more occasions in the previous year were found to have visited their PCP more often than those without frequent ED use (median number of visits, 7.0 vs 4.0; P < .001). Despite more PCP use in this population, frequent ED use was associated with increased risk of a repeat ED visit (hazard ratio, 2.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.15-4.21), in models adjusted for demographics and health status. Older adults who use the ED are also receiving significant amounts of care from other sources; simply providing additional access to care may not improve outcomes for these vulnerable individuals. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Property fund flows and returns

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen L. Lee

    2000-01-01

    This study is concerned with the impacts on property returns from property fund flows, and with the possibility of a reverse transmission from property fund flows to property returns. In other words this study investigates whether property returns “cause” fund flow changes, or whether fund flow changes “cause” property returns, or causality works in both directions.\\ud \\ud \\ud \\ud

  8. Property fund flows and returns

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Stephen L.

    2000-01-01

    This study is concerned with the impacts on property returns from property fund flows, and with the possibility of a reverse transmission from property fund flows to property returns. In other words this study investigates whether property returns “cause” fund flow changes, or whether fund flow changes “cause” property returns, or causality works in both directions.\\ud \\ud \\ud \\ud

  9. Monthly Meteorological Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monthly forms that do not fit into any regular submission. Tabulation sheets and generic monthly forms designed to capture miscellaneous monthly observations.

  10. Assessing Quality in Home Visiting Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korfmacher, Jon; Laszewski, Audrey; Sparr, Mariel; Hammel, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Defining quality and designing a quality assessment measure for home visitation programs is a complex and multifaceted undertaking. This article summarizes the process used to create the Home Visitation Program Quality Rating Tool (HVPQRT) and identifies next steps for its development. The HVPQRT measures both structural and dynamic features of…

  11. CPAFFC Agricultural Delegation Visits Germany and Austria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>At the invitation of the Germany-China Friendship Association-Stuttgart (GCFA-Stuttgart) and the Austrian-Chinese Friendship Association (ACFA),a delegation for studying agriculture composed of members from localities organized and sent by the CPAFFC paid a visit to Germany and Austria from June 11 to 23. The delegation visited farms and

  12. Notes on collecting flower-visiting insects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemstein, S.C.

    1974-01-01

    Flower-visiting insects may play a role in the pollination of the flowers they visit. An important indication for this is the pollen they carry on their body. The transport of pollen does not prove pollination without observations of the behaviour of the insects on the flowers, but at least it offer

  13. Notes on collecting flower-visiting insects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemstein, S.C.

    1974-01-01

    Flower-visiting insects may play a role in the pollination of the flowers they visit. An important indication for this is the pollen they carry on their body. The transport of pollen does not prove pollination without observations of the behaviour of the insects on the flowers, but at least it

  14. Four Outstanding Women Visit Hong Kong

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    ON March 2, four of the "Ten Outstanding Chinese Women" of 1995, joined the delegation of the All-China Women’s Federation (ACWF) on its visit to Hong Kong, and delivered speeches to more than 500 Hong Kong women. They visited Hong Kong with the ACWF delegation at the invitation of women’s organizations in Hong Kong.

  15. Home Visits: Shortening the Path between Home and School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Dolores; Keith, Joe; Patin, Debra

    1997-01-01

    Describes the Home Visit Initiative at Socorro Middle School in Texas. Discusses the purpose of home visits; selection of families for teacher home visits; the visiting team; parents', students', and teachers' reactions to visits, and the results of an evaluation of the home visits, especially the impact on parent volunteerism and schooling,…

  16. Titan Science Return Quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbin, Charles R.; Lincoln, William

    2014-01-01

    Each proposal for a NASA mission concept includes a Science Traceability Matrix (STM), intended to show that what is being proposed would contribute to satisfying one or more of the agency's top-level science goals. But the information traditionally provided cannot be used directly to quantitatively compare anticipated science return. We added numerical elements to NASA's STM and developed a software tool to process the data. We then applied this methodology to evaluate a group of competing concepts for a proposed mission to Saturn's moon, Titan.

  17. Return of the Pink Rabbit? A Visit to a Jewish School in Berlin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodden, John

    1996-01-01

    Describes a day in the life of teachers and students at a Jewish elementary school in Berlin, Germany. On this 1994 mid-October morning, the school is under tight security, since skinheads began defacing Jewish graves, neo-Nazis started chanting in the streets, and Palestinian radicals began attacking German Jews. Education toward faith is the…

  18. Forecasting emergency department visits using internet data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekström, Andreas; Kurland, Lisa; Farrokhnia, Nasim; Castrén, Maaret; Nordberg, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Using Internet data to forecast emergency department (ED) visits might enable a model that reflects behavioral trends and thereby be a valid tool for health care providers with which to allocate resources and prevent crowding. The aim of this study is to investigate whether Web site visits to a regional medical Web site, the Stockholm Health Care Guide, a proxy for the general public's concern of their health, could be used to predict the ED attendance for the coming day. In a retrospective, observational, cross-sectional study, a model for forecasting the daily number of ED visits was derived and validated. The model was derived through regression analysis, using visits to the Stockholm Health Care Guide Web site between 6 pm and midnight and day of the week as independent variables. Web site visits were measured with Google Analytics. The number of visits to the ED within the region was retrieved from the Stockholm County Council administrative database. All types of ED visits (including adult, pediatric, and gynecologic) were included. The period of August 13, 2011, to August 12, 2012, was used as a training set for the model. The hourly variation of visits was analyzed for both Web site and the ED visits to determine the interval of hours to be used for the prediction. The model was validated with mean absolute percentage error for August 13, 2012, to October 31, 2012. The correlation between the number of Web site visits between 6 pm and midnight and ED visits the coming day was significant (r=0.77; Pforecasting results for ED visits were achieved for the entire county, with a mean absolute percentage error of 4.8%. The result for the individual hospitals ranged between mean absolute percentage error 5.2% and 13.1%. Web site visits may be used in this fashion to predict attendance to the ED. The model works both for the entire region and for individual hospitals. The possibility of using Internet data to predict ED visits is promising. Copyright © 2014

  19. A profile of tourists visiting the Kruger National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Saayman

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to shrinking budgets for conservation and an increase in the number of government and privately owned parks, it has become very important for parks to determine who the tourists are who visit one of South Africa’s top tourist attractions. The reason for this is that park management and marketers need to focus their efforts to optimise their limited resources. This can only be done once there is a clear understanding of who the market is, where they come from and what they expect. The literature study clearly showed that market segmentation is essential for the effective marketing of a tourism product or destination. Two surveys were conducted, one in 2001 and a follow-up study in 2002, profiling tourists to the Kruger National Park. Different months were chosen to conduct the two surveys in order to get a more comprehensive profile of tourists visiting the park in different seasons.

  20. Junk food seen at pediatric clinic visits: is it a problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Johnnie P; Land, Megan; Hsieh, Pei-Hsuan; Barratt, Michelle S

    2014-04-01

    To document the prevalence of junk foods seen at clinic visits. A cross-sectional 23-item survey of observed food items were completed by medical staff using a convenience sample of families from June 2, 2011 to March 2, 2012. The study was conducted in pediatric clinics affiliated with the University of Texas Medical School at Houston. A convenience sample consisting of 738 families with children from 4 months to 16 years old presenting for visits were included in the study. Children exclusively breast and formula fed was excluded. Junk food was observed 20.9% at the clinic visits. Junk food was often seen at clinic visits. There was a trend toward higher body mass index in patients whose families had junk food at the visit.

  1. Cognition and Visit-to-Visit Variability of Blood Pressure and Heart Rate in De Novo Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Kyum-Yil; Pyo, Seon Jong; Lee, Hye Mi; Seo, Woo-Keun; Koh, Seong-Beom

    2016-01-01

    Objective We sought to identify whether the characteristics of long-term visit-to-visit blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) are related to baseline cognitive profiles in, Parkinson’s disease (PD). Methods We selected drug-naïve PD patients who visited our hospital at least 10 times with a baseline assessment of the Seoul neuropsychological battery. BP and HR were measured at each visit, and the variability of the systolic BP/diastolic BP (DBP) and HR was derived from the parameters of serial 10 office visits. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in PD patients was determined according to the proposed criteria with a cut-off value of z-score ≤ -2. Results Forty-seven patients with PD (mean follow-up duration = 22.3 months) were enrolled in the study. Compared with non-MCI PD patients, MCI PD patients revealed a significant increase in HR and/or variability in DBP. Conclusion This exploratory study showed that baseline cognition in drug-naïve PD patients might be related to the visit-to-visit variability of DBP and/or HR. PMID:27667186

  2. The return to foreign aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Carl-Johan Lars; Hansen, Henrik

    We investigate the marginal productivity of investment across countries. The aim is to estimate the return on investments financed by foreign aid and by domestic resource mobilization, using aggregate data. Both returns are expected to vary across countries and time. Consequently we develop a cor...... cent. This is in accord with micro estimates of the economic rate of return.......We investigate the marginal productivity of investment across countries. The aim is to estimate the return on investments financed by foreign aid and by domestic resource mobilization, using aggregate data. Both returns are expected to vary across countries and time. Consequently we develop...... a correlated random coefficients model, to estimate the average aggregate return on ‘aid investments’ and ‘domestic investments’. Across different estimators and two different sources for GDP and investment data our findings are remarkably robust; the average gross return on ‘aid investments’ is about 20 per...

  3. Diagnoses and visit length in complementary and mainstream medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Groot Judith

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The demand for complementary medicine (CM is growing worldwide and so is the supply. So far, there is not much insight in the activities in Dutch CM practices nor in how these activities differ from mainstream general practice. Comparisons on diagnoses and visit length can offer an impression of how Dutch CM practices operate. Methods Three groups of regularly trained physicians specialized in CM participated in this study: 16 homeopathic physicians, 13 physician acupuncturists and 11 naturopathy physicians. Every CM physician was asked to include a maximum of 75 new patients within a period of six months. For each patient an inclusion registration form had to be completed and the activities during a maximum of five repeat visits were subsequently registered. Registrations included patient characteristics, diagnoses and visit length. These data could be compared with similar data from general practitioners (GPs participating in the second Dutch national study in general practice (DNSGP-2. Differences between CM practices and between CM and mainstream GP data were tested using multilevel regression analysis. Results The CM physicians registered activities in a total of 5919 visits in 1839 patients. In all types of CM practices general problems (as coded in the ICPC were diagnosed more often than in mainstream general practice, especially fatigue, allergic reactions and infections. Psychological problems and problems with the nervous system were also diagnosed more frequently. In addition, each type of CM physician encountered specific health problems: in acupuncture problems with the musculoskeletal system prevailed, in homeopathy skin problems and in naturopathy gastrointestinal problems. Comparisons in visit length revealed that CM physicians spent at least twice as much time with patients compared to mainstream GPs. Conclusions CM physicians differed from mainstream GPs in diagnoses, partly related to general and partly to

  4. A clinical trial of in-home CBT for depressed mothers in home visitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammerman, Robert T; Putnam, Frank W; Altaye, Mekibib; Stevens, Jack; Teeters, Angelique R; Van Ginkel, Judith B

    2013-09-01

    Despite negative outcomes for depressed mothers and their children, no treatment specifically designed to address maternal depression in the context of home visitation has emerged. In-Home Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (IH-CBT) is an adapted treatment that is delivered in the home, focuses on the needs of new mothers, and leverages ongoing home visiting to optimize engagement and outcomes. This study examined the efficacy of IH-CBT using a randomized clinical trial. Subjects were 93 new mothers in a home visiting program. Mothers with major depressive disorder identified at 3months postpartum were randomized into IH-CBT and ongoing home visitation (n=47) or standard home visitation (SHV; n=46) in which they received home visitation alone and could obtain treatment in the community. Depression was measured at pre- and posttreatment, and 3-month follow-up using interviews, clinician ratings, and self-report. Mothers receiving IH-CBT showed improvements in all indicators of depression relative to the SHV condition and these gains were maintained at follow-up. For example, 70.7% of mothers receiving IH-CBT were no longer depressed at posttreatment in terms of meeting criteria for major depressive disorder compared to 30.2% in the SHV group. These findings suggest that IH-CBT is an efficacious treatment for depressed mothers in home visitation programs. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Visiting CERN… like “common people”

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    Paul Young, the British pop star who made his name in the 80s, came to visit CERN on 17 December. His son brought him here because of his passion for science in general and physics in particular. Father and son found the visit exciting and CERN’s activities really thrilling. We could even expect a surprise for Paul's next visit…   The visiting group in the CMS Control Room (Photo credit: P. Geeraert, ESO). Paul Young, famous for his interpretation of “Love of the Common People”, came to CERN because his teenage son is going to be studying A-level physics at school next year and wanted to visit the Laboratory. “I was fascinated by the visit. CERN is a place I didn’t know much about, but my son knows a lot more about science than I do. The explanations we got were great. We enjoyed the visit very much,” he said enthusiastically. Paul Young and his son visited the CMS underground cavern with Michael Hoch. &...

  6. Veterinarian satisfaction with companion animal visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jane R; Adams, Cindy L; Bonnett, Brenda N; Larson, Susan; Roter, Debra L

    2012-04-01

    To measure veterinarian satisfaction with companion animal visits through an adaptation of a previously validated physician visit satisfaction scale and to identify demographic, personality, appointment, and communication factors that contribute to veterinarian visit satisfaction. Cross-sectional descriptive study. Random sample of 50 companion animal practitioners in southern Ontario, Canada, and convenience sample of 300 clients and their pets. For each practitioner, 6 clinical appointments were videotaped, and the resulting 300 videotapes were analyzed by use of the Roter interaction analysis system. The physician satisfaction scale, Rosenberg self-esteem scale, and interpersonal reactivity index were used to measure veterinarian visit satisfaction, self-esteem, and empathy, respectively. Linear regression analysis was conducted to study the relationship between factors and veterinarian visit satisfaction. Veterinarian visit satisfaction ranged from 1 to 5 (mean ± SD, 3.97 ± 0.99) and differed significantly between wellness appointments (mean scale score, 4.13) and problem appointments (mean scale score, 3.81). Various elements of client and veterinarian communication as well as personality measures of veterinarian self-esteem and empathy were associated with veterinarian satisfaction. The specific factors differed depending on the nature of the appointment. Results suggested that veterinarian visit-specific satisfaction is enhanced through the use of communication that builds relationships with clients and is associated with degrees of veterinarian empathetic concern and veterinarian self-esteem. The implications extend to overall job satisfaction and its potential link to the health and well-being of individual veterinarians.

  7. First tooth, first visit, zero cavities: a practical approach to the infant oral health visit

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzgerald, Kirsten

    2017-04-01

    The IDA adopted a formal policy on children’s oral health in 2011. There is increasing evidence to support early dental visits for children. The background to the infant oral health visit is discussed and a systematic approach to the practicalities of the visit is offered. General dental practitioners are encouraged to offer the first oral health visit before the first birthday, and this paper aims to give them practical advice concerning this visit. The feature is accompanied by a companion paper that reviews the literature pertaining to the topic, and serves to complement the recent clinical feature published in the Journal of the Irish Dental Association.

  8. Health status, work limitations, and return-to-work trajectories in injured workers with musculoskeletal disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bultmann, U.; Franche, R.L.; Hogg-Johnson, S.; Cote, P.; Lee, H.; Severin, C.; Vidmar, M.; Carnide, N.

    2007-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to describe the health status and work limitations in injured workers with musculoskeletal disorders at 1 month post-injury, stratified by return-to-work status, and to document their return-to-work trajectories 6 months post-injury. Methods A sample of 632 w

  9. Proposal for a CERN Virtual Visit Service

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00085461; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Lapka, Marzena; Petrilli, Achille; Alexopoulos, Angelos; Bressan, Beatrice; Pietrzyk, Bolek; Papanestis, Antonis; Baron, Thomas; Domaracky, Marek; Fernandes, Joao; Lavrut, Loic; Gillies, James; Fichet, Jacques Herve; Noyes, Dan; Catapano, Paola; Landua, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    This note proposes the development of a CERN-wide Virtual Visit Service. Such a service would build upon the experience of the LHC Experiments, CERN DG EDU and DG COM, and the expertise of CERN IT CIS, to develop a world-leading communication and educational programme designed to serve the entire community in an effective and economical manner. Administration and Operation of the service would be modelled on the highly successful CERN Visits and Collaboration Services, and would extend the reach of Education, Outreach, and Communication to audiences around the globe, many of who might not have the opportunity to visit the laboratory in person.

  10. ATLAS Virtual Visit Trondheim-28-05

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim is interested in collaborating with CERN on multidisciplinary development project for master level students called Challenge Based Innovation (CBI). Now they are participating to the virtual visit in order to understand how CERN actually works and experience the context they would be working on during the CBI project. The session will be followed with a separate video call with CBI organizers where the students can discuss the practical arrangements of the course - See more at: http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2014/Trondheim-2014.html#sthash.Q1WUmbcc.dpuf

  11. Dunhuang Friendship Delegation Visits Japan and ROK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>A friendship delegation of Dunhuang City, Gansu Province paid a visit to Japan and the ROK from January 12 to 25, 2007. During its visit to Japan and the ROK, the delegation signed agreements on establishing friendship-city ties between Dunhuang and Nikko City of Japan and between Dunhuang and Namhae County of the ROK, and visited Kamakura and Usuki, Dunhuang’ s two friendship cities in Japan, and held meetings in Tokyo and Seoul to advertise Dunhuang’s tourist products.

  12. The Statistical Properties of Hedge Fund Index Returns

    OpenAIRE

    Chris Brooks; Harry M. Kat

    2001-01-01

    he monthly return distributions of many hedge fund indices exhibit highly unusual skewness and kurtosis properties as well as first-order serial correlation. This has important consequences for investors. We demonstrate that although hedge fund indices are highly attractive in mean-variance terms, this is much less the case when skewness, kurtosis and autocorrelation are taken into account. Sharpe Ratios will substantially overestimate the true risk-return performance of (portfolios containin...

  13. Comparing Destination Image and Loyalty between First-time and Repeat-visit Tourists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the difference between destination image and loyalty among first-time and repeat-visit tourists. The study was undertaken to examine aspects of underlying factors of destination image that influenced tourists’ willingness to recommend Malaysia to their friends and relatives as well as spread positive word-of-mouth to others. In addition, it was to ascertain the relationship between destination image and loyalty among first-time and repeat-visit tourists. The data was collected at Kuala Lumpur International Airport at the departure hall using self-administered questionnaires. 248 usable questionnaires were returned and analysed. The findings of the study revealed that both groups of tourists perceived Malaysia as providing a nature-based destination. The study also empirically proved that both first-time and repeat-visit tourists were willing to disseminate positive word-of-mouth and recommend Malaysia to their friends and relatives as a vacation destination to visit. However, there was a significant difference in destination loyalty between first-visit and repeat-visit tourists.

  14. Malian Minister Kafougouna Kone Visits China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>A Malian governors’ delegation led by Gen. Kafougouna Kone, minister of territorial administration and local communities, visited Beijing, Yunnan and Guangdong in early March at the invitation of the CPAFFC.

  15. Latin American Mayors Delegation Visits China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua; Jiaguang

    2013-01-01

    <正>ALatin American mayoral delegation visited Beijing and Tianjin from May 19 to 26 at the invitation of the CPAFFC.Of the 55 members,23were mayors from nine countries,namely Costa Rica,Panama,Honduras,

  16. RCISCC Chairperson Eleonora Mitrofanova Visits China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>At the invitation of the CPAFFC, Eleonora Mitrofanova, chairperson of the Russian Centre of International Scientific and Cultural Cooperation (RCISCC), paid a visit to Beijing, Sanya of Hainan Province and Shanghai from March 21 to 30.

  17. Preventive Visit and Yearly Wellness Exams

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... get about Medicare Lost/incorrect Medicare card Report fraud & abuse File a complaint Identity theft: protect yourself ... often is it covered? Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance) covers: A "Welcome to Medicare" preventive visit: You ...

  18. UK school visit: Alfriston School for girls

    CERN Multimedia

    Sophie Louise Hetherton

    2014-01-01

    Pupils with learning disabilities from Alfriston School in the UK visited the CMS detector last week. This visit was funded by the UK's Science and Technologies Facilities Council (STFC) as part of a grant awarded to support activities that will help to build the girls’ self-esteem and interest in physics.   Alfriston School students at CMS. On Friday, 10 October, pupils from Alfriston School – a UK secondary school catering for girls with a wide range of special educational needs and disabilities – paid a special visit to CERN. Dave Waterman, a science teacher at the school, recently received a Public Engagement Small Award from the STFC, which enabled the group of girls and accompanying teachers to travel to Switzerland and visit CERN. The awards form part of a project to boost the girls’ confidence and interest in physics. The aim is to create enthusiastic role models with first-hand experience of science who can inspire their peers back hom...

  19. Delegation of the Japanese Kokuminrengo Visits China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    正At the invitation of the Chinese Association for International Understanding (CAFIU), an 11-member delegation of Japanese Kokuminrengo (Japanese National Federation for Autonomy, Peace and Democracy) headed by Secretary-General Nishizawa Kiyoshi visited Beijing from

  20. ViSIT: Visitor Survey Information Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — ViSIT is an interactive web tool created by USGS to visualize the data collected as part of the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey. The national survey was...

  1. Visit to Three East African Countries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>In early December 2008, CPAFFC President Chen Haosu led a delegation to visit Rwanda, a "country of thousands of hills", Burundi, a "countryof drum dance"and Tanzania with ever changing scenery. In a friendly and

  2. Visiting The Pediatrician: The First Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Visiting The Pediatrician: The First Year Page Content Article Body Why does my baby need to see the pediatrician so often? You probably will see more ...

  3. Visits Service Launches New Seminar Series

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The CERN Visits Service is launching a new series of seminars for guides, and they are open to everyone. The series kicks off next week with a talk by Konrad Elsener on the CERN neutrinos to Gran Sasso, CNGS, project.

  4. VIP visit of LHC Computing Grid Project

    CERN Multimedia

    Krajewski, Yann Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    VIP visit of LHC Computing Grid Project with Dr -.Ing. Tarek Kamel [Senior Advisor to the President for Government Engagement, ICANN Geneva Office] and Dr Nigel Hickson [VP, IGO Engagement, ICANN Geneva Office

  5. Why we need asteroid sample return mission?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barucci, Maria Antonietta

    2016-07-01

    Small bodies retain evidence of the primordial solar nebula and the earliest solar system processes that shaped their evolution. They may also contain pre-solar material as well as complex organic molecules, which could have a major role to the development of life on Earth. For these reasons, asteroids and comets have been targets of interest for missions for over three decades. However, our knowledge of these bodies is still very limited, and each asteroid or comet visited by space mission has revealed unexpected scientific results, e.g. the structure and nature of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P/C-G) visited by the Rosetta mission. Only in the laboratory can instruments with the necessary precision and sensitivity be applied to individual components of the complex mixture of materials that forms a small body regolith, to determine their precise chemical and isotopic composition. Such measurements are vital for revealing the evidence of stellar, interstellar medium, pre-solar nebula and parent body processes that are retained in primitive material, unaltered by atmospheric entry or terrestrial contamination. For those reasons, sample return missions are considered a high priority by a number of the leading space agencies. Abundant within the inner Solar System and the main impactors on terrestrial planets, small bodies may have been the principal contributors of the water and organic material essential to create life on Earth. Small bodies can therefore be considered to be equivalent to DNA for unravelling our solar system's history, offering us a unique window to investigate both the formation of planets and the origin of life. A sample return mission to a primitive Near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) has been study at ESA from 2008 in the framework of ESA's Cosmic Vision (CV) programme, with the objective to answer to the fundamental CV questions "How does the Solar System work?" and "What are the conditions for life and planetary formations?". The returned material

  6. CPAFFC Delegation Visits Iran and Syria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>At the invitation of Ahad Mohammadi, president of the Iran-China Friendship Society (ICFS) and Mohammed Saeid Bekheitan, president of the Syria-China Friendship Association (SCFA), a CPAFFC delegation led by its President Chen Haosu paid a goodwill visit to the two countries from September 1 to 11, 2007. During the visit, the delegation met with the leaders of the two countries and made extensive contacts with

  7. CPAFFC Delegation Visits Bangladesh, India and Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    <正>At the invitation of the Bang-ladesh-China People’s Friendship Association (BCPFA), the Unity International Foundation of India (UIFI), the India-China Society and the Thai-Chinese Friendship Association (TCFA), from November 7 to 22, 2005, a CPAFFC delegation led by its Vice President Wang Yunze paid a visit to Bangladesh, India and Thailand, where they were accorded warm and friendly reception. The BCPFA attached great importance to the CPAFFC delegation’s visit.

  8. Satisfaction with visit to tourism attractions

    OpenAIRE

    Navrátil, Josef; Pícha, Kamil; Navrátilová, Jana

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the impact of a several factors on satisfaction with a visit to water-based natural attractions. After reviewing relevant studies, it was hypothesized that satisfaction is influenced by push motivations, pull motivations, on-site experience, perceived quality and perceived values of visit. As a method of data reduction, the factor analysis based on principal component analysis was used for multi-item constructs (push motivations, pull motivations, on-site ex...

  9. Visitation policies and practices in US ICUs

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Prior reports suggest that restrictive ICU visitation policies can negatively impact patients and their loved ones. However, visitation practices in US ICUs, and the hospital factors associated with them, are not well described. Methods A telephone survey was made of ICUs, stratified by US region and hospital type (community, federal, or university), between 2008 and 2009. Hospital characteristics were self-reported and included the hospitals' bed number, critical care unit numbe...

  10. Japanese PM Taro Aso Visited Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Yan

    2009-01-01

    @@ To continue of bilateral high-level exchanges and deepening of cooperation,Japanese Prime Minister Taro Aso visit China on April 29,2009.During his two days' visit,he met with Chinese counterpart Wen Jiabao on April 29 and President Hu Jintao on April 30.Aso first met Hu on the sidelines of a meeting of the Group of 20 rich and industrializing nations in London.

  11. Home visits as a strategy for health promotion by nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jucelia Salgueiro Nascimento

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the domiciliary visit performed by nurses in the Family Health Strategy as an activity to promote health. Methods: Exploratory/descriptive study with qualitative approach. The subjects were nine nurses of the Primary Health Units from Health Districts in Maceió-AL. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews in the months from April to August 2012 and were analyzed using content analysis and in light of the theoretical framework of Health Promotion. Results: The nurses recognize that the domiciliary visit can be a way to promote the health of individuals, families and community, but, in daily life, action maintains focus on disease, with curative actions of individual character, which do not take into account the social context where the user and his family are inserted. Conclusion: It is considered that the use of home visits by nurses in the family health strategy as a health promotion activity is still incipient because, although the nurses recognize the need for change in the model of care, in practice, it is observed that the focus of this action is directed to the biological model. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5020/18061230.2013.p513

  12. ATLAS Virtual Visit Marseille-28-05-2014

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    "From May 26 to May 30, Marseille (France) will host the 12th meeting in the Flavor Physics and CP Violation conference series, and celebrate the 50th anniversary of the discovery of CP violation. A few monthes after the Nobel Prize has been awarded to François Englert and Peter Higgs, this is an excellent opportunity to organize a public lecture on the history and discovery of the Higgs boson. The lecture is free, open to the general public and will take place in the audacious building of Villa Méditerranée on May 28. As a bonus and to put the audience inside the real work atmosphere, the speakers Yann Coadou and Michel Davier will embed a virtual visit to CERN into this evening dedicated to particle physics. More info in French and Poster. - See more at: http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2014/Marseille-2014.html#sthash.5P5F5oa1.dpuf

  13. Entertainment Venue Visiting and Commercial Sex in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chunqing; Li, Li; Wu, Zunyou; Guan, Jihui; Xu, Yu; Wu, Di; Lieber, Eli; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane

    2010-01-01

    Entertainment venues in China play an important role in the sexually transmitted disease (STD)/HIV epidemic. Most previous studies have focused on sex workers working in entertainment venues, but little is known about their clients. This study investigated the perceptions and behavior of the patrons visiting entertainment venues. Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with 30 male market vendors who visited entertainment venues at least once in the past 3 months in an eastern city in China. Information about their risky behavior, attitude toward commercial sex, and STD/HIV prevention approaches was collected. Saunas, karaoke bars, and massage centers are the most frequently visited entertainment venues. Seventy-three percent of study participants reported purchasing commercial sex at these entertainment venues. Participants expressed a very liberal attitude toward commercial sex. Seeking commercial sex was perceived as a characteristic of a male's nature. The perceived risks of STD/HIV infection do not deter participants from engaging in commercial sex. Commercial sex clients reported irregular condom use and a number of other misperceptions and improper practices toward preventing STD/HIV infection. Venue-based intervention is urgently needed to target the population. The sex workers themselves could potentially serve as "health educators" to communicate prevention information to their clients and encourage safer sex behavior.

  14. Homeward bound: Yemeni return migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colton, N A

    1993-01-01

    The author discusses the return migration of Yemenis from Saudi Arabia during the period 1970-1989. "Through the use of original, empirical data collected in Yemen, this article sheds light on who these returning migrants are, where they have come from, and what sort of future awaits them.... The survey conducted on return migration was administered in the winter and spring of 1989 in a region of North Yemen called al-Hujariyya."

  15. Monthly Weather Review

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Supplements to the Monthly Weather Review publication. The Weather Bureau published the Monthly weather review Supplement irregularly from 1914 to 1949. The...

  16. Proposing Chinese Pharmacists Month

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ Dear Pharmacists: Today I would like to share with you about the American Pharmacists Month which is celebrated in October every year.This month-long observance is promoted by American Pharmacist Association.

  17. Bulgarian Turkish emigration and return.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasileva, D

    1992-01-01

    The main factors which determined the 1989 migration of Turks in Bulgaria back to Turkey are discussed. Background history is provided. After World War I, Turks in bulgaria comprised 10% of the total population. Bulgarian policy had been, up to the 1980s to send Rumelian Turks back, but the policy after 1980 was one of a national revival process to integrate Turks into the developed socialist society. Muslim traditions, customs, and Turkish language were interfered with. International disfavor resulted. In May 1989, the Communist Party declared, in an effort to show democratic ideals, open borders. Thus began the new emigration wave. 369,839 people fled to the Turkish border. 43% of the 9.47 ethnic Turks in bulgaria went to Turkey within 4 months. The numbers decreased in November, and soon after the communist regime ended. New laws were adopted allowing Turks to assume their original Turkish names. The huge migration was clearly political, and as such, the emigrant Turks should be determined as refugees and asylum seekers. The provocation of ethnic Turks was used by the communist regime to solve potential social conflicts. Not only did Turks flee to escape from violence or for religious, cultural, and moral reasons but also due to free market initiatives begun in Turkey in the early 1980s which improved Turkish quality of life. Food and consumer goods were cheaper and economic advantages were perceived. Emigrants were primarily peasants with lower levels of education, professional qualifications, and labor skills. 154,937 (42%) returned to bulgaria and 58% stayed in Turkey to comprise 25% of the former Turkish population. During this period, tensions between countries was high.l Bulgarians actively encouraged emigration and Turkey welcomed it. The emigrants to Turkey were seen as foreigners (muhacir or gocmen) but were received with good will and were readily accepted into menial positions. Emigrants were confronted with political, linguistic, and cultural

  18. [Psychiatric Inpatient Treatment and Return to Work].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mernyi, Lena; Hölzle, Patricia; Hamann, Johannes

    2017-05-12

    Objective People with mental diseases have a high risk of unemployment and they have only limited access to the labor market. The return to work is often associated with fears.The present study aims to provide an overview of the number of hospitalized psychiatric patients with permanent employment. Moreover it should give an insight into the process of return to work, the experiences patients gain and the support they receive. Methods In the participating clinics we measured the number of patients with permanent employment. The main inclusion criteria for further survey were the status of permanent employment and age between 18 and 65. The participating patients were interviewed on two occasions, at the time of inclusion and 3 months after the patient was discharged. The questions addressed working conditions, job satisfaction and the process of return-to-work. For statistical analysis, descriptive statistics (frequencies, means, standard deviations) were used. Results Only 21 % of n = 815 inpatients of the participating hospitals were permanently employed. Many patients did not return to work after being discharged. In many cases the interviewed patients saw a connection between their job and their current episode of illness. In this context patients reported unsatisfying workplace conditions such as long working hours, bad work organization and social conflicts. Conclusions For mentally ill patients, the employment rate in the primary labor market is devastating low. After psychiatric inpatient treatment patients are at high risk to lose their jobs. In order to prevent this development, work-related stress factors should be discussed with inpatients at an early stage and support should be provided during the return-to-work-process. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Understanding Guyton's venous return curves

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beard, Daniel A; Feigl, Eric O

    2011-01-01

    ...) was experimentally increased the right atrial pressure decreased, Arthur Guyton and coworkers proposed an interpretation that right atrial pressure represents a back pressure restricting venous return...

  20. Effectiveness of a promotora home visitation program for underserved Hispanic children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Shumyla; Carcel, Consuelo; Morphew, Tricia; Amaro, Silvia; Galant, Stanley

    2015-06-01

    Retention in a mobile asthma clinic, the Breathmobile™, of ≥3 visits has previously been shown to be essential for attaining asthma control in underserved children. The objective of this study in primarily Hispanic-American children was to determine the difference in retention between those seen in the Breathmobile™ compared to those receiving an additional promotora-based home visit (HV). Children with asthma in the Breathmobile™ program were evaluated for asthma status and aeroallergen sensitivity. Indication for HV included poor asthma control, educational and environmental control needs. An initial visit consisted of environmental assessment as well as a 3-h interactive educational session covering asthma basics. A follow-up visit 1 month later assessed implementation. The primary outcome measure of retention was ≥6 months in the Breathmobile™ program. Of the 1007 asthmatic children seen between April 2002 and June of 2005, 136 received HV. These children showed significantly greater retention compared to those without HV with a median number of visits (5 visits versus 2 visits), ≥3 Breathmobile™ visits (86.0% versus 38.8%), median number of days in the program (299 versus 63 days) and percentage of patients in the program ≥6 months (67.8% versus 31.3%) p asthma severity were each independent predictors of retention. The addition of a promotora HV program proved effective in providing greater retention in the Breathmobile™ program essential for asthma control. Randomized clinical trials will be needed to show the impact on health care utilization and asthma control.

  1. Observational study to determine predictors of rheumatology clinic visit provider contact time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Lisa A.; Larson, Molly M.; Caplan, Liron

    2014-01-01

    Objective To address perceived inefficiencies in an academic rheumatology practice, a timing/work-flow evaluation was initiated to determine the factors that predict the Provider Contact Time (PCT)—the amount of time that attending physicians spend with patients during an outpatient encounter. Methods This prospective observational study was conducted at the University of Colorado Hospital rheumatology clinic for return patient visits in early 2008. Each patient encounter was subdivided into components and the time for each component was recorded. Up to 20 return visit encounters per provider were randomly selected for inclusion. Multivariate linear regression was used to predict the time, in minutes, that providers spend with patients and logistic regression was used to determine the time intervals associated with patients' perception that the visit ran on time. Results Variables associated with increased PCT were whether a procedure was performed in the clinic (p=0.037) and whether the visit occurred in the afternoon (p<0.025). For every minute a provider was late in beginning to see a patient, the PCT decreased by 0.32 minutes (C.I. 0.15-0.49). Variables associated with patient's perception that the visit ran on time include the Check In-To-Vital Delay (O.R. 0.95, C.I. 0.92-0.99) and the Provider Delay (O.R. 0.92, 95% CI 0.86-0.99). Conclusion Patients' punctuality and the presence of a resident were not significantly associated with the time that a provider spent with a patient. However, the degree to which the provider ran late was associated with decreased PCT and diminished the patient's perception that the visit ran on time. PMID:20583104

  2. First dental visit of a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meera R

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the study was to assess the common chief complaints of the Indian children and the average age group at which they report for in their first dental visit. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was carried out using the case records of 716 children who reported to the postgraduate section of Department of Pediatric dentistry, Meenakshi Ammal Dental College, Chennai, in 2007. The age groups of the children were divided into three categories 0-3 years, 3-6 years and 6-12 years. The various chief complaints were categorised as follows, Orientation to prevention, Routine visit, Deposits / Discoloration, Habits, Unerupted / Missing or Extra Tooth, Pain, Dental caries, Malocclusion, Trauma, others. The average age group and most common complaint at the first dental visit was assessed. A prospective study was done in January 2008, were 215 children were screened. The assessment was made as explained above. Results: Retrospective study Maximum number of children who reported for their first dental visit was between 6-12 years (59.08%. Most common chief complaint for the visit was pain (42.04%. Second common complaint being dental caries (28.49%. Prospective study Maximum number of children who reported for their first dental visit was between 6-12 years (69.77%. Most common chief complaint was dental caries (34.88%. Second common complaint being pain (27.91%. Conclusion: Children report for the first dental visit most commonly only after 6 years and for complaints like pain and dental caries. Orientation to prevention is not considered and preventive dentistry is yet to reach the common population in India.

  3. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    likelihood to be able to perform unrestricted duty. Author affiliations: Preventive Medicine Res- idency, Uniformed Services University of the Health...symptoms, health care visits, and absenteeism among Iraq War veterans. Am J Psychiatry. 2007;164(1):150–153. 20. Stein M, McAllister TW. Exploring the...demonstrated the increasing use and acceptance of these approaches in the gen- eral and military populations.6–8 For exam - ple, results of a 2012 survey

  4. The Return to Foreign Aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Carl-Johan Lars; Hansen, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    different estimators and two different data sources for GDP and investment our findings are remarkably robust; the average gross return on ‘aid investments’ is about 20 per cent. This is in accord with micro estimates of the economic rate of return on aid projects and with aggregate estimates of the rate...

  5. The return to foreign aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Carl-Johan Lars; Hansen, Henrik

    a correlated random coefficients model, to estimate the average aggregate return on ‘aid investments’ and ‘domestic investments’. Across different estimators and two different sources for GDP and investment data our findings are remarkably robust; the average gross return on ‘aid investments’ is about 20 per...

  6. [Return to the family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouaidou, N G

    1993-08-01

    Sahelian countries occupy an inglorious place in the global list of human development. The human development index is superior to the gross national product (GNP) at measuring the progress of a country in terms of development, because it includes income, longevity, and educational level. The highest ranked Sahelian country holds the 114th position out of a 173 countries. The low human development index scores for the Sahel reflects the socioeconomic crisis which has overcome these countries. In 1991, only 3 of 9 Sahelian countries had a mean GP equal or superior to US$500. Just 2 countries had a life expectancy greater than 50 years. In fact, the Sahel had a lower life expectancy than all of Africa (50 years) and much lower than Asia (64 years) and Latin America (67 years). The economic crisis is worse than the cold statistics show. It destabilizes the most disadvantaged populations. The pressure it exerts often leads public authorities to adopt unpopular measures. It depreciates some sociocultural values and disintegrates traditional social structures. It is accentuated by the effects of war and drought. Internal and external migration increases even as urban hope is uncertain. For most people, the family (the traditional framework of individual development) is ready to break apart, leaving only a disincarnate nuclear entity to subsist. Yet, African history is built around the extended family: the place of reproduction, production, distribution, formation, management, perpetuation of demographic behavior, and social control. Senegal and Mali have created ministries which invest in families. The Third African Conference on Population, in 1992, chose its theme to be the relationship between family, population, and sustainable development. It is important to return to the natural or primordial framework--family--as a refuge against the economic crisis.

  7. Temporal Trends in Emergency Department Visits for Bronchiolitis in the United States, 2006-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kohei; Tsugawa, Yusuke; Brown, David F.M.; Mansbach, Jonathan M.; Camargo, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    Background To examine temporal trends in emergency departments (ED) visits for bronchiolitis among US children between 2006 and 2010. Methods Serial, cross-sectional analysis of the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample, a nationally-representative sample of ED patients. We used ICD-9-CM code 466.1 to identify children bronchiolitis. Primary outcome measures were rate of bronchiolitis ED visits, hospital admission rate, and ED charges. Results Between 2006 and 2010, weighted national discharge data included 1,435,110 ED visits with bronchiolitis. There was a modest increase in the rate of bronchiolitis ED visits, from 35.6 to 36.3 per 1000 person-years (2% increase; Ptrend=0.008), due to increases in the ED visit rate among children from 12 months to 23 months (24% increase; Ptrendbronchiolitis increased from $337 million to $389 million (16% increase; Ptrendbronchiolitis ED visits by age group. Despite a significant increase in associated ED charges, ED-associated hospital admission rates for bronchiolitis significantly decreased over this same period. PMID:23934206

  8. VA Outpatient Visits by Administrative Parent, FY2010-2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Outpatient visits by Administrative Parent. A visit is counted as a visit to one or more clinics or units within 1 calendar day at the site of care level. A patient...

  9. Factors Associated With Emergency Department Visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parul Agarwal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to examine the association of patient- and county-level factors with the emergency department (ED visits among adult fee-for-service (FFS Medicaid beneficiaries residing in Maryland, Ohio, and West Virginia. Methods: A cross-sectional design using retrospective observational data was implemented. Patient-level data were obtained from 2010 Medicaid Analytic eXtract files. Information on county-level health-care resources was obtained from the Area Health Resource file and County Health Rankings file. Results: In adjusted analyses, the following patient-level factors were associated with higher number of ED visits: African Americans (incidence rate ratios [IRR] = 1.47, Hispanics (IRR = 1.63, polypharmacy (IRR = 1.89, and tobacco use (IRR = 2.23. Patients with complex chronic illness had a higher number of ED visits (IRR = 3.33. The county-level factors associated with ED visits were unemployment rate (IRR = 0.94 and number of urgent care clinics (IRR = 0.96. Conclusion: Patients with complex healthcare needs had a higher number of ED visits as compared to those without complex healthcare needs. The study results provide important baseline context for future policy analysis studies around Medicaid expansion options.

  10. PROFILE OF ROMANIAN RETURNED MIGRANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria ZAMFIR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the post-communist period, migration of the Romanians became an emergent phenomenon which went through many structural transformations. Within the context of the recent economic crisis and of some unfavourable collective attitudes regarding the immigration in some countries of destination, evidences of the reverse movement, of return of some migrants in Romania have appeared. This paper aims to examine the profile of Romanian returned migrants, with a special view on the returning motivations. Results show that the family related factors have the highest influence in the returning decision among Romanian migrants. Finally, future intentions of the returned migrants confirm the model of the circulatory migration as a strategy of life of the Romanians.

  11. Visit-to-Visit Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Variability Is an Independent Determinant of Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenouchi, Akiko; Tsuboi, Ayaka; Kitaoka, Kaori; Minato, Satomi; Kurata, Miki; Fukuo, Keisuke; Kazumi, Tsutomu

    2017-01-01

    Background Studies demonstrated that visit-to-visit variability in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLC) is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events in subjects with coronary artery disease. Whether visit-to-visit variability in LDLC levels affects subclinical atherosclerosis is unknown. This study sought to evaluate the role of visit-to-visit variability in LDLC levels on subclinical atherosclerosis. Methods We evaluated 162 type 2 diabetic patients with measurement of carotid intima-media thickness (IMT). Intrapersonal mean and standard deviation (SD) of six measurements of LDLC during 12 months were calculated. Multivariate linear regressions assessed the independent correlates of carotid IMT. Results The mean and SD of LDLC were 112 ± 22 and 15 ± 10 mg/dL, respectively, and 43.2% of patients were on hypolipidemic drugs. Age (standardized β = 0.355, P index (BMI), waist circumference, duration and treatment of diabetes, means and SDs of glycemic and other lipid variables, and uses of hypolipidemic and anti-hypertensive medications (R2 = 0.15). Results did not change when mean IMT was used instead of maximum IMT. After controlling for age and sex, maximum IMT was thicker in patients with the highest compared to those with other three quartiles of SD-LDLC combined (1.14 ± 0.04 (SE) vs. 1.01 ± 0.02 mm, P = 0.01). Independent determinants of SD-LDLC were mean LDLC, use of hypolipidemic drugs, fasting triglyceride and visit-to-visit variability in HbA1c. Conclusions Consistency of LDLC levels may be important to subclinical atherosclerosis in real-world patients with type 2 diabetes. It may be important for patients on lipid-lowering drugs to prevent non-compliance. PMID:28270891

  12. Comparing common reasons for inpatient and outpatient visits between commercially-insured duloxetine or pregabalin initiators with fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Y

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Yang Zhao,1 Peter Sun,2 Mark Bernauer31Eli Lilly and Company, 2Kailo Research Group, 3OptumInsight, Indianapolis, IN, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to examine the main reasons for inpatient or outpatient visits after initiating duloxetine or pregabalin.Methods: Commercially insured patients with fibromyalgia and aged 18–64 years who initiated duloxetine or pregabalin in 2006 with 12-month continuous enrollment before and after initiation were identified. Duloxetine and pregabalin cohorts with similar demographics, pre-index clinical and economic characteristics, and pre-index treatment patterns were constructed via propensity scoring stratification. Reasons for inpatient admissions, physician office visits, outpatient hospital visits, emergency room visits, and primary or specialty care visits over the 12 months post-index period were examined and compared. Logistic regression was used to assess the contribution of duloxetine versus pregabalin initiation to the most common reasons for visits, controlling for cross-cohort differences.Results: Per the study design, the duloxetine (n = 3711 and pregabalin (n = 4111 cohorts had similar demographics (mean age 51 years, 83% female and health care costs over the 12-month pre-index period. Total health care costs during the 12-month post-index period were significantly lower for duloxetine patients than for pregabalin patients ($19,378 versus $27,045, P < 0.05. Eight of the 10 most common reasons for inpatient admissions and outpatient hospital (physician office, emergency room, primary or specialty care visits were the same for both groups. Controlling for cross-cohort differences, duloxetine patients were less likely to be hospitalized due to an intervertebral disc disorder or major depressive disorder, to have a physician office visit due to nonspecific backache/other back/neck pain (NB/OB/NP disorder, or to go to specialty care due to a soft tissue, NB/OP/NP, or intervertebral disc

  13. Miller Early Childhood Sustained Home-visiting (MECSH trial: design, method and sample description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Teresa

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Home visiting programs comprising intensive and sustained visits by professionals (usually nurses over the first two years of life show promise in promoting child health and family functioning, and ameliorating disadvantage. Australian evidence of the effectiveness of sustained nurse home visiting in early childhood is limited. This paper describes the method and cohort characteristics of the first Australian study of sustained home visiting commencing antenatally and continuing to child-age two years for at-risk mothers in a disadvantaged community (the Miller Early Childhood Sustained Home-visiting trial. Methods and design Mothers reporting risks for poorer parenting outcomes residing in an area of socioeconomic disadvantage were recruited between February 2003 and March 2005. Mothers randomised to the intervention group received a standardised program of nurse home visiting. Interviews and observations covering child, maternal, family and environmental issues were undertaken with mothers antenatally and at 1, 12 and 24 months postpartum. Standardised tests of child development and maternal-child interaction were undertaken at 18 and 30 months postpartum. Information from hospital and community heath records was also obtained. Discussion A total of 338 women were identified and invited to participate, and 208 were recruited to the study. Rates of active follow-up were 86% at 12 months, 74% at 24 months and 63% at 30 months postpartum. Participation in particular data points ranged from 66% at 1 month to 51% at 24 months postpartum. Rates of active follow-up and data point participation were not significantly different for the intervention or comparison group at any data point. Mothers who presented for antenatal care prior to 20 weeks pregnant, those with household income from full-time employment and those who reported being abused themselves as a child were more likely to be retained in the study. The Miller Early

  14. Socioeconomic factors are associated with frequency of repeat emergency department visits for closed pediatric fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dy, Christopher J.; Lyman, Stephen; Do, Huong T.; Fabricant, Peter D.; Marx, Robert G.; Green, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous research has demonstrated both greater difficulty in obtaining follow-up appointments and increased likelihood of return visits to the emergency department (ED) for patients with government-funded insurance plans. The purpose of the current study is to determine whether socioeconomic factors, such as race and insurance type, are associated with the frequency of repeat ED visits in pediatric patients with closed fractures. Methods A review of ED visit data over a 2-year period from a statewide hospital discharge database in New York was conducted. Discharges for patients with a unique person identifier in the database age 17 and younger were examined for an ICD-9 diagnosis of closed upper or lower extremity fracture. Age, sex, race, and insurance type for patients with a return ED visit within 8 weeks for the same fracture diagnosis were compared to those without a return visit using standard univariate statistical tests and logistic regression analyses. Results Of the 68,236 visits reviewed, the revisit rate was 0.85%. Patients of non-white or unidentified race were significantly more likely to have a revisit than white patients (OR 1.27; p=0.006). Patients with government-funded insurance were significantly more likely to have a revisit than those without government-funded insurance (OR 1.55; p<0.001). Patients with private insurance were significantly less likely to have a revisit than those without private insurance (OR 0.72; p=0.001). Conclusions Our analysis revealed that non-white patients are more likely to return to the ED within 8 weeks for the same fracture diagnosis. Patients with government insurance are 55% more likely to have a revisit, while patients with private insurance are 28% less likely to have a revisit. Our results suggest that socioeconomic disparities exist in access to orthopaedic care for closed fractures in a pediatric population. Physicians and policy makers should be mindful of these health care disparities when

  15. Astronaut Returns Space-Flown Flag to NRAO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-04-01

    A NASA Astronaut who carried a flag bearing the logo of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) on last month's Shuttle flight returned that flag to the observatory on Friday, April 12, at a ceremony in Socorro. Dr. John M. Grunsfeld, payload commander of the STS-109 flight, also addressed students at the New Mexico State Science Fair on Saturday, April 13, on the campus of New Mexico Tech in Socorro. Dr. John M. Grunsfeld: Click on image for larger view Dr. John M. Grunsfeld Grunsfeld, an astronomer who observed with NRAO's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope in 1991, carried the 3-by-5-foot NRAO flag aboard Columbia during the March 1-12 mission to service the Hubble Space Telescope. The NRAO flag, made by Socorro resident Dora Spargo, had been sent to the observatory's facilities in Socorro; Tucson, AZ; Green Bank, WV; and Charlottesville, VA, where NRAO employees signed it prior to the flight. "With our signatures on that flag, we all felt like we were riding along with John aboard the Shuttle," said NRAO Director Paul Vanden Bout. "We are proud that NRAO was represented on a mission that was so important to astronomy," Vanden Bout added. During the flight, Grunsfeld performed three of the five spacewalks in which crew members successfully upgraded the Hubble Space Telescope. The astronauts left the space observatory with a new power unit, a new camera and new solar arrays. The upgrades, said Grunsfeld, leave the orbiting telescope with "its discovery potential significantly increased." STS-109 was Grunsfeld's fourth space flight and his second visit to Hubble. A research astronomer who received his bachelor's degree in physics from MIT and a Ph.D from the University of Chicago in 1988, Grunsfeld was selected to the astronaut corps in 1992. His first space flight, in 1995, featured astronomical observations using the Astro observatory, a three-telescope facility aboard the Shuttle Endeavour. In 1997, Grunsfeld rode Atlantis on a 10-day mission to the

  16. Ancylostoma ceylanicum hookworm infection in Japanese traveler who presented chronic diarrhea after return from Lao People's Democratic Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Daisuke; Yoshikawa, Masahide; Nakatani, Toshiya; Tomo-Oka, Fumimasa; Fujimoto, Yuki; Ishida, Koji; Fujinaga, Yukihisa; Aihara, Yosuke; Nagamatsu, Shinsaku; Matsuo, Eijo; Tokoro, Masaharu; Ouji, Yukiteru; Kikuchi, Eiryo

    2016-12-01

    Ancylostoma (A.) ceylanicum, one of the most common species of hookworms infecting dogs and cats, also causes patent infections in humans and is now considered to be the second most common hookworm species infecting populations in southeast Asia. A Japanese patient who returned from a visit to Thailand and Lao People's Democratic Republic (PDR) was presented with intermittent watery diarrhea with eosinophilia. Hookworm eggs were found in feces samples, and adult worms were confirmed to be present in the jejunum with capsule endoscopy and double balloon enteroscopy. A diagnosis of A. ceylanicum infection was made based on the morphology of the adult worms along with findings of a PCR-based molecular study using larvae obtained from a fecal sample culture. The infection was considered likely to have been obtained during a 1-month stay in a Laotian village, where the patient had eaten local food, worn sandals on bare feet, and lived as a local native villager, though he had stayed in modern hotels during the visit to Thailand. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. This way for the new CERN visits!

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    As the LHC start-up draws near, visits to the underground experiments by members of the public are no longer possible. Still, that doesn’t mean that there will be no more CERN visits. Far from it! Three new itineraries for visits to the above-ground facilities are already available to visitors. Follow the guide… CAST: How a magnet became a telescope. Hunting axions from the sun. Visitors to the CAST experiments will see, among other things, how a prototype dipole magnet built for the LHC has been turned into an unusual telescope that tracks the sun in search of the ‘axion’ particle postulated by theory. SM18: Super-cool magnets. This strategic building, where thousands of superconducting magnets for the LHC were assembled in their cryostats and tested, lets visitors into the secret world of magnet technology, radio frequency and cryogenics, ...

  18. A Visit to the Past and Awatovi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hester A. Davis

    1992-05-01

    Full Text Available It was a beautiful cool Arizona morning in August, 1991, when Anna Silas, Director of the Hopi Cultural Center Museum, guided me, Penny Davis Worman and Mott Davis to Awatovi, the large prehistoric and Spanish mission site on Antelope Mesa on the Hopi Reservation. The road consisted of two sandy ruts most of the way, well worn but, to a stranger, through a sameness of sage brush and small pinyon. Even for Anna, who had not visited the site for three years, a fork in the road was confusing, and we made a wrong turn. Reversing, we made our way back to the fork and continued anew to the fenced-in ruin. This was my first visit to this famous site. For Penny and Mott, it was the first visit in 52 years. They had both been a part of the Peabody Museum Expedition there in 1939.

  19. VIP Visit Her Excellency Dr Dalia Grybauskaite

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Her Excellency Dr Dalia Grybauskaite President Republic of Lithuania. Wednesday 20 January 2016. General introduction to CERN’s activities by CERN Director-General F. Gianotti. CERN Director-General introduces CMS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson K. Borras and CMS Lithuanians A. Rinkevicius with V. Rapsevicius. Met by J. Shiers, IT Department Data Preservation Project Leader, and walk to 1st floor Data Centre Visit Point. CERN Data Centre Visit Point, 1st floor, building 513. View the robotic arms of the CERN IT data centre automated libraries (J. Shiers) CERN Computer Centre, building 513, level -1. Physics hands-on and virtual visit with a High School class in Lithuania (S. Schmeling) CERN S’cool Lab, building 143. Meeting with the Lithuanian community at CERN. Signature of the Guest Book with CERN Director-General witnessed by the Lithuanian community at CERN. Family photograph with the Lithuanian community at CERN.

  20. Managing ecotourism visitation in protected areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, J.L.; Farrell, T.A.; Lindberg, Kreg; Wood, Megan Epler; Engeldrum, David

    1998-01-01

    Ecotourism management seeks to integrate and balance several potentially conflicting objectives: protection of natural and cultural resources, provision of recreation opportunities and generation of economic benefits. In the absence of effective planning and management, ecotourism can lead to significant negative impacts on vegetation, soil, water, wildlife, historic resources, cultures, and visitor experiences. This chapter reviews visitor-related natural resource and experience impacts associated with ecotourism within protected areas. The influence of factors that control the nature and extent of impacts are also reviewed, including type and amount of use, the variable resistance and resilience of environmental attributes such as vegetation and soil types, and the role of management in shaping visitation, resources and facilities to support visitation while minimizing associated impacts. Implications for managing the effects of protected area visitation are highlighted, including carrying capacity decision frameworks and selecting management strategies and tactics.

  1. China Knitting Delegation Visiting Turkey and Egypt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Mr.Zhao Hong,V.President of China National Knitting Industry Association,also the chief editor of this magazine,will visit Turkey and Egypt,taking with him a delegation from Zhutang Town,one of the most important knitting industry clusters in China.The purpose of the visit is to strengthen the business relationship with lzmir area,one of the textile clustering areas in Turkey,to encourage bilateral investment and cooperation between the two industries despite Turkish trade remedy cases against textile imports from China.Observers view the regular visits between the two industries as a positive and optimistic signal for"burying the hatchet"to shake hands for more successful investment promotion and business cooperation.Egypt is famous for its long-staple cotton,and the yarn made of it is always an interest to Chinese knitters.

  2. Thousands of kilometres to visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Students from the Columbus high school in the state of Mississippi with their physics teacher Ken Wester (left at rear) and Michel Della Negra, CMS spokesman (in front).An American school at CERN ? Unusual, to say the least... Yet 15 students from the class of Ken Wester, physics teacher in the Columbus High School, Mississippi, didn't hesitate to travel thousands of kilometres to come to CERN. Ken Wester participated last year in CERN's High School Teacher programme. Enthralled by his visit, he has organised the trip for his final year students to visit CERN. The 18-year-olds arrived on the 10th March and spent two days at the laboratory, visiting the CMS construction site and the AD antimatter factory, before leaving on a tour of Switzerland and Germany.

  3. CERT TST December 2015 Visit Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, Robert Currier [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bailey, Teresa S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gamblin, G. Todd [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Olinger, Chad Tracy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pautz, Shawn D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Williams, Alan B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-25

    The annual PSAAP II TST visit to Texas A&M’s CERT Center was held on December 1-3, 2015. The agenda for the visit is attached. Non-TAMU attendees were: TST Members – Teresa Bailey (LLNL), Todd Gamblin (LLNL), Bob Little (LANL) – Chair, Chad Olinger (LANL), Shawn Pautz (SNL), Alan Williams (SNL);Other Lab staff – Skip Kahler (LANL), Ana Kupresanin (LLNL), and Rob Lowrie (LANL); AST Members – Nelson Hoffman (LANL) and Bob Voigt (Leidos) The TST wishes to express our appreciation to all involved with CERT for the high-quality posters and presentations and for the attention to logistics that enabled a successful visit. We have broken our comments into four sections: (1) Kudos, (2) Recommendations, (3) Feedback on Priorities for April Review, and (4) Follow-Up Activities with Labs.

  4. Identifying potentially preventable emergency department visits by nursing home residents in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Robert E.; Rooks, Sean P.; Levy, Cari; Schwartz, Robert; Ginde, Adit A.

    2015-01-01

    . Conclusion This nationally representative sample of older nursing home residents suggests ED visits for injury, those that are associated with normal triage vital signs, and those that are not associated with any diagnostic testing are potentially preventable. Those discharged from the ED often undergo important testing and receive medications that may alter their physical exam on return to the nursing facility, highlighting the need for seamless communication of the ED course to nursing homes. PMID:25703449

  5. Return to work after lumbar disc surgery is related to the length of preoperative sick leave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikkel Ø; Ernst, Carsten; Rasmussen, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is associated with high morbidity and significant socio-economic impact as the majority of the patients are of working age. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of length of sick leave on the return-to-work rate after lumbar disc......% returned to work if surgically treated within three months. In contrast, only 50% of those whose sick leave exceeded three months returned to work. CONCLUSION: The present analysis suggests that the return-to-work rate after lumbar disc herniation surgery is affected by the length of sick leave. FUNDING...

  6. Life satisfaction and frequency of doctor visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eric S; Park, Nansook; Sun, Jennifer K; Smith, Jacqui; Peterson, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Identifying positive psychological factors that reduce health care use may lead to innovative efforts that help build a more sustainable and high-quality health care system. Prospective studies indicate that life satisfaction is associated with good health behaviors, enhanced health, and longer life, but little information about the association between life satisfaction and health care use is available. We tested whether higher life satisfaction was prospectively associated with fewer doctor visits. We also examined potential interactions between life satisfaction and health behaviors. Participants were 6379 adults from the Health and Retirement Study, a prospective and nationally representative panel study of American adults older than 50 years. Participants were tracked for 4 years. We analyzed the data using a generalized linear model with a gamma distribution and log link. Higher life satisfaction was associated with fewer doctor visits. On a 6-point life satisfaction scale, each unit increase in life satisfaction was associated with an 11% decrease in doctor visits--after adjusting for sociodemographic factors (relative risk = 0.89, 95% confidence interval = 0.86-0.93). The most satisfied respondents (n = 1121; 17.58%) made 44% fewer doctor visits than did the least satisfied (n = 182; 2.85%). The association between higher life satisfaction and reduced doctor visits remained even after adjusting for baseline health and a wide range of sociodemographic, psychosocial, and health-related covariates (relative risk = 0.96, 95% confidence interval = 0.93-0.99). Higher life satisfaction is associated with fewer doctor visits, which may have important implications for reducing health care costs.

  7. Workers' Compensation, Return to Work, and Lumbar Fusion for Spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Joshua T; Haas, Arnold R; Percy, Rick; Woods, Stephen T; Ahn, Uri M; Ahn, Nicholas U

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar fusion for spondylolisthesis is associated with consistent outcomes in the general population. However, workers' compensation is a risk factor for worse outcomes. Few studies have evaluated prognostic factors within this clinically distinct population. The goal of this study was to identify prognostic factors for return to work among patients with workers' compensation claims after fusion for spondylolisthesis. The authors used International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, and Current Procedural Terminology codes to identify 686 subjects from the Ohio Bureau of Workers' Compensation who underwent fusion for spondylolisthesis from 1993 to 2013. Positive return to work status was recorded in patients who returned to work within 2 years of fusion and remained working for longer than 6 months. The criteria for return to work were met by 29.9% (n=205) of subjects. The authors used multivariate logistic regression analysis to identify prognostic factors for return to work. Negative preoperative prognostic factors for postoperative return to work included: out of work for longer than 1 year before fusion (PReturn to work rates associated with these factors were 9.7%, 0.0%, 10.0%, 29.2%, and 25.0%, respectively. If these subjects were excluded, the return to work rate increased to 60.4%. The 70.1% (n=481) of subjects who did not return to work had markedly worse outcomes, shown by higher medical costs, chronic opioid dependence, and higher rates of failed back syndrome, total disability, and additional surgery. Psychiatric comorbidity increased after fusion but was much higher in those who did not return to work. Future studies are needed to identify how to better facilitate return to work among similar patients with workers' compensation claims.

  8. Can colorectal cancer survivors recall their medications and doctor visits reliably?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Louisa G

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evidence on the agreement between self-reported health resource use and administrative records is mixed and no gold standard exists. The objective of this study was to assess self-reported general practitioner (GP and specialist doctor visits, as well as medication use via telephone interview against national insurance administrative data for colorectal cancer survivors. Methods In a sample of 76 adults recently diagnosed with colorectal cancer, data was abstracted from telephone survey items on GP visits, specialist visits and medication use over the previous six months and compared with data on the same individuals from administrative data. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC were used to assess the reliability of frequency of visits and kappa statistics were derived for four broad categories of medicines used for gastrointestinal conditions, cardiovascular disease, psychological conditions and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Logistic regression was undertaken to assess factors associated with agreement (yes/no between the two data sources for doctors’ visits. Results Good agreement was found for GP visits (ICC 0.62, 95%CI: 0.38, 0.86 and specialist visits (ICC 0.73, 95%CI: 0.56, 0.91 across the two data sources. When costs were assigned to frequencies, mean costs for the two methods were not significantly different over six months. Over-reporting was more common among men and participants with frequent doctor encounters. Large discrepancies between self-reports and administration records were found for broad types of medications used (44% agreement, kappa 0.13. Conclusion Self-reported frequency of doctor’s visits using telephone interviews may be a reasonable substitute for administratively recorded data however, medication use by self-report appears to be unreliable. Administrative records are preferable to self-report for health service use in colorectal cancer survivors with high and complex service

  9. Psychological responses matter in returning to preinjury level of sport after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardern, Clare L; Taylor, Nicholas F; Feller, Julian A; Whitehead, Timothy S; Webster, Kate E

    2013-07-01

    Up to two-thirds of athletes may not return to their preinjury level of sport by 12 months after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery, despite being physically recovered. This has led to questions about what other factors may influence return to sport. To determine whether psychological factors predicted return to preinjury level of sport by 12 months after ACL reconstruction surgery. Case control study; Level of evidence, 3. Recreational and competitive-level athletes seen at a private orthopaedic clinic with an ACL injury were consecutively recruited. The primary outcome was return to the preinjury level of sports participation. The psychological factors evaluated were psychological readiness to return to sport, fear of reinjury, mood, emotions, sport locus of control, and recovery expectations. Participants were followed up preoperatively and at 4 and 12 months postoperatively. In total, 187 athletes participated. At 12 months, 56 athletes (31%) had returned to their preinjury level of sports participation. Significant independent contributions to returning to the preinjury level by 12 months after surgery were made by psychological readiness to return to sport, fear of reinjury, sport locus of control, and the athlete's estimate of the number of months it would take to return to sport, as measured preoperatively (χ(2) 2 = 18.3, P sport at 12 months, suggesting that attention to psychological recovery in addition to physical recovery after ACL injury and reconstruction surgery may be warranted. Clinical screening for maladaptive psychological responses in athletes before and soon after surgery may help clinicians identify athletes at risk of not returning to their preinjury level of sport by 12 months.

  10. Individual and organizational factors related to work engagement among home-visiting nurses in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naruse, Takashi; Sakai, Mahiro; Watai, Izumi; Taguchi, Atsuko; Kuwahara, Yuki; Nagata, Satoko; Murashima, Sachiyo

    2013-12-01

    The increasing number of elderly people has caused increased demand for home-visiting nurses. Nursing managers should develop healthy workplaces in order to grow their workforce. This study investigated the work engagement of home-visiting nurses as an index of workplace health. The aim of the present study was to reveal factors contributing to work engagement among Japanese home-visiting nurses. An anonymous, self-administered questionnaire was sent to 208 home-visiting nurses from 28 nursing agencies in three districts; 177 (85.1%) returned the questionnaires. The Job Demands-Resources model, which explains the relationship between work environment and employee well-being, was used as a conceptual guide. The authors employed three survey instruments: (i) questions on individual variables; (ii) questions on organizational variables; and (iii) the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (Japanese version). Multiple regression analyses were performed in order to examine the relationships between individual variables, organizational variables, and work engagement. Nurse managers and nurses who felt that there was a positive relationship between work and family had significantly higher work engagement levels than others. The support of a supervisor was significantly associated with work engagement. Nurses in middle-sized but not large agencies had significantly higher work engagement than nurses in small agencies. Supervisor support and an appropriate number of people reporting to each supervisor are important factors in fostering work engagement among home-visiting nurses. © 2013 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2013 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  11. Inhibition of Return across Eye and Object Movements: The Role of Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Hannah M.; Hunt, Amelia R.

    2013-01-01

    Responses are slower to targets appearing in recently inspected locations, an effect known as Inhibition of Return (IOR). IOR is typically viewed as the consequence of an involuntary mechanism that prevents reinspection of previously visited locations and thereby biases attention toward novel locations during visual search. For an inhibitory…

  12. What is the Expected Return on a Stock?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Ian; Wagner, Christian

    We derive a formula that expresses the expected return on a stock in terms of the risk-neutral variance of the market and the stock’s excess risk-neutral variance relative to the average stock. These components can be computed from index and stock option prices; the formula has no free parameters....... We test the theory in-sample by running panel regressions of stock returns onto risk-neutral variances. The formula performs well at 6-month and 1-year forecasting horizons, and our predictors drive out beta, size, book-to-market, and momentum. Out-of-sample, we find that the formula outperforms...... a range of competitors in forecasting individual stock returns. Our results suggest that there is considerably more variation in expected returns, both over time and across stocks, than has previously been acknowledged....

  13. INDIKATOR MAKROEKONOMI DAN RETURN SAHAM SYARIAH DI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utami Baroroh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study are to examine empirical test the long term equilibrium and simulteneous relationship between macroeconomics variables to stock return in Indonesia and to observe stock return response because shock/innovation of inflation, SBI discount rate and exchange rate Rupiah to US dollar. The data sample used in this study are monthly time series data from 2003.1 – 2010.6. Those data are SBI discount rate, inflation (CPI, exchange rate Rupiah to US dollar, money supply and stock return (IHSG. A method of analysis in this study are Granger Causality Test and Cointegration test. The empirical results shows that SBI discount rate, inflation (CPI, and exchange rate Rupiah to US dollar have causality relationship to stock return.. The cointegration test indicates that among research variables there is long term equilibrium and simultaneous relationshipDOI: 10.15408/sjie.v2i2.2421

  14. Hispanic Heritage Month

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Sherry

    2004-01-01

    Hispanic heritage month is from September 15 to October 15. One problem that arises when grouping people into categories such as Hispanic or Latino is stereotyping, stereotypes can be promoted or used in this Hispanic month to promote a greater understanding of Latino cultures.

  15. Progress report, 24 months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    The work performed during the past 12 months (months 13 – 24) of the project has included the conclusion of Task 1 – Fundamental Studies and Task 2 – Multimirror Cutting Head Design. Work on Task 3 – Compact Cutting Head Design, and Task 4 – Interface Design has been carried out and the tests...... of the multimirror cutting head have been started....

  16. Progress report, 36 months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    The work performed during the past 12 months (months 13 – 24) of the project has included the conclusion of Task 1 – Fundamental Studies and Task 2 – Multimirror Cutting Head Design. Work on Task 3 – Compact Cutting Head Design, and Task 4 – Interface Design has been carried out and the tests...... of the multimirror cutting head have been started....

  17. Progress report, 36 months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    The work performed during the past 12 months (months 13 – 24) of the project has included the conclusion of Task 1 – Fundamental Studies and Task 2 – Multimirror Cutting Head Design. Work on Task 3 – Compact Cutting Head Design, and Task 4 – Interface Design has been carried out and the tests of ...

  18. Progress report, 24 months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    The work performed during the past 12 months (months 13 – 24) of the project has included the conclusion of Task 1 – Fundamental Studies and Task 2 – Multimirror Cutting Head Design. Work on Task 3 – Compact Cutting Head Design, and Task 4 – Interface Design has been carried out and the tests of ...

  19. Estimating Marginal Returns to Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Pedro; Heckman, James J.; Vytlacil, Edward

    2011-01-01

    This paper estimates marginal returns to college for individuals induced to enroll in college by different marginal policy changes. The recent instrumental variables literature seeks to estimate this parameter, but in general it does so only under strong assumptions that are tested and found wanting. We show how to utilize economic theory and local instrumental variables estimators to estimate the effect of marginal policy changes. Our empirical analysis shows that returns are higher for individuals with values of unobservables that make them more likely to attend college. We contrast our estimates with IV estimates of the return to schooling. PMID:25110355

  20. Sovereign Risk and Currently Returns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Della Corte, Pasquale; Sarno, Lucio; Schmeling, Maik

    explanatory power for currency returns which is largely driven by shocks to global credit risk. Consistent with the notion that sovereign risk is priced, we find that a country's exposure to global credit risk forecasts excess returns to trading exchange rates as well as to trading on the volatility, skewness......We empirically investigate the relation between sovereign risk and exchange rates for a broad set of currencies. An increase in the credit default swap (CDS) spread of a country is accompanied by a significant depreciation of the exchange rate. More generally, CDS spread changes have substantial......, and kurtosis of currency returns....

  1. Metal Returns, Stock Returns and Stock Market Volatility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Zevallos

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Given the extensive participation of mining stocks in the Peruvian stock market, the Lima Stock Exchange (BVL provides an ideal setting for exploring both the impact of metal returns on mining stock returns and stock market volatility, and the comovements between mining stock returns and metal returns. This research is a first attempt to explore these issues using international metal prices and the prices of the most important mining stocks on the BVL and the IGBVL index. To achieve this, we use univariate GARCH models to model individual volatilities, and the Exponentially Weighted Moving Average (EWMA method and multivariate GARCH models with time-varying correlations to model comovements in returns. We found that Peruvian mining stock volatilities mimic the behavior of metal volatilities and that there are important correlation levels between metals and mining stock returns. In addition, we found time-varying correlations with distinctive behavior in different periods, with rises potentially related to international and local historical events.

  2. Return-to-work coordination programmes for improving return to work in workers on sick leave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Nicole; Schandelmaier, Stefan; Zumbrunn, Thomas; Ebrahim, Shanil; de Boer, Wout El; Busse, Jason W; Kunz, Regina

    2017-03-30

    To limit long-term sick leave and associated consequences, insurers, healthcare providers and employers provide programmes to facilitate disabled people's return to work. These programmes include a variety of coordinated and individualised interventions. Despite the increasing popularity of such programmes, their benefits remain uncertain. We conducted a systematic review to determine the long-term effectiveness of return-to-work coordination programmes compared to usual practice in workers at risk for long-term disability. To assess the effects of return-to-work coordination programmes versus usual practice for workers on sick leave or disability. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 11), MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL and PsycINFO up to 1 November 2016. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that enrolled workers absent from work for at least four weeks and randomly assigned them to return-to-work coordination programmes or usual practice. Two review authors independently screened titles, abstracts and full-text articles for study eligibility; extracted data; and assessed risk of bias from eligible trials. We contacted authors for additional data where required. We conducted random-effects meta-analyses and used the GRADE approach to rate the quality of the evidence. We identified 14 studies from nine countries that enrolled 12,568 workers. Eleven studies focused on musculoskeletal problems, two on mental health and one on both. Most studies (11 of 14) followed workers 12 months or longer. Risk of bias was low in 10 and high in 4 studies, but findings were not sensitive to their exclusion.We found no benefits for return-to-work coordination programmes on return-to-work outcomes.For short-term follow-up of six months, we found no effect on time to return to work (hazard ratio (HR) 1.32, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.93 to 1.88, low-quality evidence), cumulative sickness absence (mean difference (MD) -16.18 work

  3. Predictors of Non-Attendance to the Postpartum Follow-up Visit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Annemieke; Levi, Erika E; Garrett, Joanne M

    2016-11-01

    Objectives This study aimed to measure the incidence and identify predictors of postpartum visit non-attendance, using medical records of women who received prenatal care and went on to deliver live births at Montefiore Hospital in 2013. Methods Pearson's Chi square tests were used to assess the association between maternal demographics, insurance status, and delivery information with non-attendance of a postpartum visit. Logistic regression and modified Poisson regression models were then used to identify statistically significant predictors of postpartum visit non-attendance. Results We found that one-third of all women who attended a prenatal visit at Montefiore Hospital did not return for a postpartum visit. Variables significantly associated with non-attendance include having Medicaid or no insurance (RR 1.4, 95 % CI 1.2-1.6), being Hispanic or Latino (RR 1.2, 95 % CI 1.1-1.3), having a vaginal delivery (RR 1.2, 95 % CI 1.1-1.4), and age <20 years (RR 0.77, 95 % CI 0.64-0.92). Conclusions for Practice We conclude that the risk of postpartum visit non-attendance disproportionately impacts socially and economically vulnerable patients who are: younger, part of a minority ethnic background, and depend on state funded health insurance. Our results highlight the disparity in access to postpartum care and the importance of identifying barriers to attendance as well as developing creative strategies of providing postpartum care outside of the traditional postpartum visit framework.

  4. Health Care Utilization before and after an Outpatient Emergency Department Visit in Older People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horney, Carolyn; Schmader, Kenneth; Sanders, Linda L.; Heflin, Mitchell; Ragsdale, Luna; McConnell, Eleanor; Hocker, Michael; Hastings, S. Nicole

    2010-01-01

    Background Older adults in the U.S. receive a significant amount of care in the emergency department (ED), yet the associations between ED and other types of health care utilization has not been adequately studied in this population. Objectives The goal of this study were to examine the relationships between health care use before and after an ED visit among older adults. Methods This retrospective cohort study examined health care use among 308 patients ≥ 65 years old discharged from a university-affiliated ED. Proportional-hazards models were used to assess the relationship between pre-ED health care use (primary care physician (PCP), specialist, ED and hospital) and risk of return ED visits. Results Older ED patients in this study had visited other types of providers frequently in the previous year (median number of primary care physician (PCP) and specialist visits = 4). Patients who used the ED on 2 or more occasions in the previous year were found to have visited their PCP more often than those without frequent ED use (median number of visits 7.0 vs 4.0, p<.001). Despite more PCP use in this population, frequent ED use was associated with increased risk of a repeat ED visit (HR 2.20, 95% CI 1.15–4.21), in models adjusted for demographics and health status. Conclusion Older adults who use the ED are also receiving significant amounts of care from other sources; simply providing additional access to care may not improve outcomes for these vulnerable individuals. PMID:21216555

  5. Characterisation of a chikungunya virus from a German patient returning from Mauritius and development of a serological test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalzik, Stefan; Xuan, Nghia Vu; Weissbrich, Benedikt; Scheiner, Barbara; Schied, Tanja; Drosten, Christian; Müller, Andreas; Stich, August; Rethwilm, Axel; Bodem, Jochen

    2008-12-01

    We have isolated a Chikungunya (Chik) virus from a patient who returned to Germany after a three-month visit to Mauritius in spring 2006. Upon return she developed a transient fever up to 40 degrees C. This was followed by myalgia and joint pain. IgG antibodies in serum to Chik virus were undetectable. Virus (Chik-Wü1) was isolated on Vero cells. We molecularly cloned the whole genome of Chik-Wü1 from viral RNA by RT-PCR. The complete sequence was determined and functional domains of the genome were assigned. Chik-Wü1 clearly belongs to the group of viruses analysed from the recent Indian Ocean outbreak. In order to develop tools useful for further characterization of Chik-Wü1, we bacterially expressed and purified the capsid (C) and envelope (E) proteins and established an immunoblot assay. Twenty-two of 30 serum samples from Chik virus-infected patients that scored positive in indirect immunofluorescence previously were also reactive in immunoblot analysis with recombinant C and E2 antigens.

  6. Probability distribution of extreme share returns in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zin, Wan Zawiah Wan; Safari, Muhammad Aslam Mohd; Jaaman, Saiful Hafizah; Yie, Wendy Ling Shin

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the suitable probability distribution to model the extreme share returns in Malaysia. To achieve this, weekly and monthly maximum daily share returns are derived from share prices data obtained from Bursa Malaysia over the period of 2000 to 2012. The study starts with summary statistics of the data which will provide a clue on the likely candidates for the best fitting distribution. Next, the suitability of six extreme value distributions, namely the Gumbel, Generalized Extreme Value (GEV), Generalized Logistic (GLO) and Generalized Pareto (GPA), the Lognormal (GNO) and the Pearson (PE3) distributions are evaluated. The method of L-moments is used in parameter estimation. Based on several goodness of fit tests and L-moment diagram test, the Generalized Pareto distribution and the Pearson distribution are found to be the best fitted distribution to represent the weekly and monthly maximum share returns in Malaysia stock market during the studied period, respectively.

  7. Travel websites: Changing visits, evaluations and posts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronner, F.; de Hoog, R.

    2016-01-01

    Many studies concerning the role of web-based information in tourism measure one-time interactions. This paper presents results of a longitudinal study. Data collected in 2014 about website visits, evaluations and posts, are compared with data from 2007. The main finding is the advance of sites havi

  8. Notes from Visit to Norway and Germany

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DuanXiumin; ChangJiuqing

    2004-01-01

    At the invitation of Norway Moral Rearmament (MRA) and German Friedrich-Ebert Foundation (FES), CAFIU delegation headed by Mr. Zhu Dacheng, Vice-President of CAFIU visited Norway and Germany in the middle of May. As a member ofthe delegation,

  9. Impression about the visit in America

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XuBin; ZhengYao; ChangJiuqing

    2004-01-01

    At the invitation of the Asia Foundation of the United States,CAFIU's three-member team headed by Secretary-General Xu Jianguo paid a visit to U.S. from 4-11 November, 2003.ican side, the delegation eArranged by the Amerngaged in the extensive contacts with the Asia Foundation,

  10. Imperial College London mascot visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Hills, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Boanerges (‘Son of Thunder’) is one of the mascots of Imperial College and is looked after by volunteer students of the City and Guilds College Motor Club. Team Bo visited CERN as part of a wider tour of France and Switzerland.

  11. Japanese Visit CERN's Jardin d'Enfants

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    On 1 November twenty four Japanese teachers from the Association of Private Kindergartens in Osaka visited CERN’s Jardin d’Enfants to exchange experience and learn more about the Swiss educational system. The delegation was lead by Mrs. Nobuko Shirae, President of the Association, and Mr. Takeshi Kakimoto from the Japan Travel Bureau.

  12. Visiting a science centre: what's on offer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Ian

    1990-09-01

    Science centres are a valuable resource, used more frequently by family groups and primary school parties than by secondary schools. The importance of affective learning, involving attitude changes, is stressed. Provided the right approach is used, accompanying adults can help children get the most out of a visit.

  13. CPAFFC Delegation Visits Uganda And Botswana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>At the invitation of the Ministry of Local Government of Uganda and the Botswana-China Friendship Association, a 28-member Delegation of the CPAFFC, local government officials and Entrepreneurs led by CPAFFC Vice President Feng Zuoku, paid a goodwill visit to the two countries from May 27 to June 3.

  14. Leisure time and museums - motives of visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medić Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Leisure time, as the time used to engage in a variety of activities, should provide a sense of satisfaction and relaxation. In order to satisfy the needs of the visitors and their desire to experience something new and authentic in tourist destination, it is very important to know what their choices are with regard to leisure activities. The aim of this paper is to determine how museum public usually spends its leisure time, which factors influence the motivation to visit museums, and to try to find a correlation between the two. The paper is based on the results of the study conducted between the end of May and the end of August, 2014 in the museums in Vojvodina Province (northern part of the Republic of Serbia. The main findings of this paper indicate that spending leisure time is primarily related to socialization and education, and that museums are visited mostly due to their educational role. The findings also indicate that there are differences between the choice of leisure activity and motivation for visiting museums and sociodemographic characteristics of the respondents. Significant correlation has been found between the choice of leisure activity and motivation for visiting museums.

  15. Ed Deutschman Visit Images, May 2, 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Deutschman, Ed

    2011-01-01

    Background: Ed Deutschman was a Navy cadet at the Del Monte Pre-Flight School, located at the now (2013) Naval Postgraduate School. Mr Deutschman visited the Dudley Knox Library on May 2, 2011, and spoke about his service in World War II as a Corsair fighter pilot in the Pacific.

  16. CPAFFC President Chen Haosu Visits Japan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    <正>To further exchanges and cooperation between the people of China and Japan and enhance ties between the CPAFFC and Japanese non-governmental friendly organizations, President Chen Haosu visited Japan at the head of a CPAFFC delegation from February 7 to 12.

  17. Chinese Friendly Personages’ Delegation Visits Vietnam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>A 50-member "Meeting at Uncle Ho’s Hometown" Chinese friendly personages’delegation led by Wang Yunze, vice president of the China-Vietnam Friendship Association (CVFA), paid a visit to Vietnam from May 15 to 23. Nguyen Minh Triet, Vietnamese president;

  18. Chinese Painters Visit Ecuador and Guyana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>An eight-member painters delegation headed by Luo Qin, Executive Vice President of the China Friendship Art Exchange Association (CFAEA), visited Ecuador and Guyana from June 30 to July 19 at the invitation of the Ecuadorian Ministry of Tourism and the Guyananese Ministry of Culture.

  19. President of the Slovak Republic visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Caroline Duc

    2012-01-01

    On 11 September 2012, the President of the Slovak Republic, Ivan Gašparovič, visited CERN accompanied by the First Lady and a delegation of 67, including the Deputy Prime Minister, the Minister of Foreign Affairs, the Minister of Economy and the Ambassadors of the Slovak Republic to Switzerland, France and the Office of the United Nations. The visit by representatives of the Slovak Republic follows the Slovak Republic’s hosting of the CERN Accelerator School in the region of Bratislava. After being welcomed to CERN in the morning by CERN Director-General Rolf Heuer, the members of the Slovak government were given the opportunity to get a glimpse of the LHC and to visit the ALICE experiment at Point 2. The President and other members of the Slovak delegation then met representatives of Slovak universities and industries at an exhibition of their work in the hall of Building 500. The President then briefly spoke to Slovak journalists and signed the VIP visitors book. The visit last...

  20. PTSD in Depressed Mothers in Home Visitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammerman, Robert T.; Putnam, Frank W.; Chard, Kathleen M.; Stevens, Jack; Van Ginkel, Judith B.

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has suggested that mothers participating in home visitation programs have a high incidence of mental health problems, particularly depression. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a common comorbidity with depression, yet its prevalence among home visiting populations and implications for parenting and maternal functioning have not been examined. This study contrasted depressed mothers with (n = 35) and without PTSD (n = 55) who were enrolled in a home visitation program. Results indicated that depressed mothers with comorbid PTSD were more likely to have experienced childhood sexual abuse, had greater severity of depressive symptoms, increased social isolation, and lower overall functioning than their counterparts without PTSD. Among PTSD mothers, greater severity of PTSD symptoms, in particular avoidance and emotional numbness, were associated with increased maternal psychopathology and parenting deficits even after controlling for depression severity. These findings add to the literature documenting the negative impacts of PTSD on maternal functioning and parenting. Implications for screening and treatment in the context of home visitation are discussed. PMID:24307928

  1. Sexuality Talk During Adolescent Health Maintenance Visits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Stewart C.; Fortenberry, J. Dennis; Pollak, Kathryn I.; Bravender, Terrill; Davis, J. Kelly; Østbye, Truls; Tulsky, James A.; Dolor, Rowena J.; Shields, Cleveland G.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Physicians may be important sources of sexuality information and preventive services, and one-on-one confidential time during health maintenance visits is recommended to allow discussions of sexual development, behavior, and risk reduction. However, little is known about the occurrence and characteristics of physician-adolescent discussions about sexuality. Objective To examine predictors of time spent discussing sexuality, level of adolescent participation, and physician and patient characteristics associated with sexuality discussions during health maintenance visits by early and middle adolescents. Design, Setting, and Participants Observational study of audio-recorded conversations between 253 adolescents (mean age, 14.3 years; 53% female; 40% white; 47% African American) and 49 physicians (82% pediatricians; 84% white; 65% female; mean age, 40.9 years; mean [SD] duration in practice, 11.8 [8.7] years) coded for sexuality content at 11 clinics (3 academic and 8 community-based practices) located throughout the Raleigh/Durham, North Carolina, area. Main Outcomes and Measures Total time per visit during which sexuality issues were discussed. Results One hundred sixty-five (65%) of all visits had some sexual content within it. The average time of sexuality talk was 36 seconds (35% 0 seconds; 30% 1-35 seconds; and 35% ≥36 seconds). Ordinal logistic regression (outcome of duration: 0, 1-35, or ≥36 seconds), adjusted for clustering of patients within physicians, found that female patients (odds ratio [OR] = 2.58; 95% CI, 1.53-4.36), older patients (OR = 1.37; 95% CI, 1.13-1.65), conversations with explicit confidentiality discussions (OR = 4.33; 95% CI, 2.58-7.28), African American adolescents (OR = 1.58; 95% CI, 1.01-2.48), and longer overall visit (OR = 1.07; 95% CI, 1.03-1.11) were associated with more sexuality talk, and Asian physicians were associated with less sexuality talk (OR = 0.13; 95% CI, 0.08-0.20). In addition, the same significant

  2. Sexuality talk during adolescent health maintenance visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Stewart C; Fortenberry, J Dennis; Pollak, Kathryn I; Bravender, Terrill; Davis, J Kelly; Ostbye, Truls; Tulsky, James A; Dolor, Rowena J; Shields, Cleveland G

    2014-02-01

    Physicians may be important sources of sexuality information and preventive services, and one-on-one confidential time during health maintenance visits is recommended to allow discussions of sexual development, behavior, and risk reduction. However, little is known about the occurrence and characteristics of physician-adolescent discussions about sexuality. To examine predictors of time spent discussing sexuality, level of adolescent participation, and physician and patient characteristics associated with sexuality discussions during health maintenance visits by early and middle adolescents. Observational study of audio-recorded conversations between 253 adolescents (mean age, 14.3 years; 53% female; 40% white; 47% African American) and 49 physicians (82% pediatricians; 84% white; 65% female; mean age, 40.9 years; mean [SD] duration in practice, 11.8 [8.7] years) coded for sexuality content at 11 clinics (3 academic and 8 community-based practices) located throughout the Raleigh/Durham, North Carolina, area. Total time per visit during which sexuality issues were discussed. RESULTS One hundred sixty-five (65%) of all visits had some sexual content within it. The average time of sexuality talk was 36 seconds (35% 0 seconds; 30% 1-35 seconds; and 35% ≥ 36 seconds). Ordinal logistic regression (outcome of duration: 0, 1-35, or ≥ 36 seconds), adjusted for clustering of patients within physicians, found that female patients (odds ratio [OR] = 2.58; 95% CI, 1.53-4.36), older patients (OR = 1.37; 95% CI, 1.13-1.65), conversations with explicit confidentiality discussions (OR = 4.33; 95% CI, 2.58-7.28), African American adolescents (OR = 1.58; 95% CI, 1.01-2.48), and longer overall visit (OR = 1.07; 95% CI, 1.03-1.11) were associated with more sexuality talk, and Asian physicians were associated with less sexuality talk (OR = 0.13; 95% CI, 0.08-0.20). In addition, the same significant associations between adolescent, physician, and visit characteristics were

  3. Preventing Perinatal Depression in Low-Income Home Visiting Clients: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, S. Darius; Perry, Deborah F.; Mendelson, Tamar; Kemp, Karen; Leis, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy of a 6-week cognitive-behavioral intervention in preventing the onset of perinatal depression and reducing depressive symptoms among low-income women in home visitation programs. Method: Sixty-one women who were pregnant or who had a child less than 6 months of age and who were assessed as at risk for perinatal…

  4. Ketogenic Diet Decreases Emergency Room Visits and Hospitalizations Related to Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luniova, Anastasia; Abdelmoity, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Background. Approximately, one-third of patients with epilepsy are refractory to pharmacological treatment which mandates extensive medical care and imposes significant economic burden on patients and their societies. This study intends to assess the impact of the treatment with ketogenic diet (KD) on reducing seizure-related emergency room visits and hospitalizations in children with refractory epilepsy. Methods. This is a retrospective review of children treated with the KD in one tertiary center. We compared a 12 months' period prior to KD with 12 months after the diet was started in regard to the number of emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalizations, and hospital days as well as their associated charges. Results. 37 patients (57% males) were included. Their ages at time of KD initiation were (4.0 ± 2.78) years. Twelve months after the KD initiation, the total number of ED visits was reduced by 36% with a significant decrease of associated charges (p = 0.038). The number of hospital admissions was reduced by 40% and the number of hospital days was reduced by 39%. The cumulative charges showed net cost savings after 9 months when compared to the prediet baseline. Conclusion. In children with refractory epilepsy, treatment with the ketogenic diet reduces the number of ED visits and hospitalizations and their corresponding costs. PMID:27752367

  5. Community-Service Activities Versus Traditional Activities in an Intergenerational Visiting Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Marcia S.; Hubbard, Pamela; Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Dakheel-Ali, Maha; Thein, Khin

    2005-01-01

    The impact of traditional activities (e.g., playing board games) were compared with community-service activities (e.g., making first aid kits for a homeless shelter) during a monthly intergenerational visiting program. The participating seniors (n =19) gave high ratings to both types of activities. However, they felt that they had helped others…

  6. CARACALLA AND DACIA. IMPERIAL VISIT, A REALITY OR ONLY RUMOUR?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coriolan Horatiu Opreanu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The author is challenging the Romanian historiography’s interpretation concerning the visit in 213 of the emperor Caracalla in Dacia, until to the northern frontier at Porolissum, where three inscriptions with identical text were considered as the building inscriptions of the stone fortifications of the fort from Pomet Hill. He is mentioning the new inscriptions from different part of the Roman Empire that offer today a better knowledge of the emperor’s actions and journeys during year 213. The conclusion is that he travelled to Orient after October 213 when defeated the Alamanns over the border of Raetia, along the Danube frontier visiting military bases. The journey was probably on the same route as he already done in 202 with his father, but in the other direction, returning from Orient. That time is possible Septimius Severus, Caracalla and Geta were in Dacia, at Drobeta, Tibiscum and Ulpia Traiana Sarmizegetusa, as several inscriptions attest. For this reason, it is possible that in 213 Caracalla stopped for a short period at Drobeta and maybe went to Tibiscum to pray in the temple of Apollo. However, continuing the trip to Porolissum is impossible to imagine, the time being too short, as he arrived at Nicomedia on the 17th of December 213. At the end of the article, the author rejects the theory of any connection between the tile-stamps of the seventh legion Gemina Felix from Leon and those of the third legion Gallica found at Porolissum with Caracalla’s journey. Furthermore, the author also dismisses the idea that these vexillations were taken to Dacia to replace Dacian vexillations involved in the eastern expedition of Caracalla, as there is neither no any positive evidence nor other evidence for similar examples in the history of the Roman military expeditions (e.g., Trajan’s Parthian war.

  7. Library Website Visits and Enrollment Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Anderson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – Measures of trends in Iowa State University library website visits per student/faculty/staff headcount show decreased use. Analysis was conducted to test for a relationship between this decrease and decreasing graduate/undergraduate enrollment ratios and decreasing visits to a popular digital collection. The purpose was to measure the influence of these factors and to produce an adjusted measure of trend which accounts for these factors. Methods – Website transaction log data and enrollment data were modelled with Box and Jenkins time series analysis methods (regression with ARMA errors. Results – A declining graduate to undergraduate enrollment ratio at Iowa State University explained 23% of the innovation variance of library website visits per headcount over the study period, while visits to a popular digital collection also declined, explaining 34% of the innovation variance. Rolling windows analysis showed that the effect of the graduate/undergraduate ratio increased over the study period, while the effect of digital collection visits decreased. In addition, estimates of website usage by graduate students and undergraduates, after accounting for other factors, matched estimates from a survey. Conclusion – A rolling windows metric of mean change adjusted for changes in demographics and other factors allows for a fairer comparison of year-to-year website usage, while also measuring the change in influence of these factors. Adjusting for these influences provides a baseline for studying the effect of interventions, such as website design changes. Box-Jenkins methods of analysis for time series data can provide a more accurate measure than ordinary regression, demonstrated by estimating undergraduate and graduate website usage to corroborate survey data. While overall website usage is decreasing, it is not clear it is decreasing for all groups. Inferences were made about demographic groups with data that is not tied to

  8. Language Skills and Economic Returns

    OpenAIRE

    Garrouste, Christelle

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on the contributions from the emerging positivist epistemological approach, endorsed by the economics of language and the economics of education, to study the returns to language skills, assuming that language competencies constitute key components of human capital. It presents initial results from a study on economic returns to language skills in eight countries enrolled in the International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) – Chile, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, Hung...

  9. Language Skills and Economic Returns

    OpenAIRE

    Garrouste, Christelle

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on the contributions from the emerging positivist epistemological approach, endorsed by the economics of language and the economics of education, to study the returns to language skills, assuming that language competencies constitute key components of human capital. It presents initial results from a study on economic returns to language skills in eight countries enrolled in the International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) – Chile, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, Hung...

  10. Short Interest and Stock Returns

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Asquith; Pathak, Parag A.; Jay R. Ritter

    2004-01-01

    Using a longer time period and both NYSE-Amex and Nasdaq stocks, this paper examines short interest and stock returns in more detail than any previous study and finds that many documented patterns are not robust. While equally weighted high short interest portfolios generally underperform, value weighted portfolios do not. In addition, there is a negative correlation between market returns and short interest over our whole period. Finally, inferences from short time periods, such as 1988-1994...

  11. Cluster of Imported Vivax Malaria in Travelers Returning From Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzel, Thomas; Labarca, Jaime; Cortes, Claudia P; Rosas, Reinaldo; Balcells, M Elvira; Perret, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    We report a cluster of imported vivax malaria in three of five Chilean travelers returning from Peru in March 2015. The cluster highlights the high risk of malaria in the Loreto region in northern Peru, which includes popular destinations for international nature and adventure tourism. According to local surveillance data, Plasmodium vivax is predominating, but Plasmodium falciparum is also present, and the incidence of both species has increased during recent years. Travelers visiting this region should be counseled about the prevention of malaria and the options for chemoprophylaxis.

  12. Loiasis in a Japanese Traveler Returning from Central Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Mawatari, Momoko; Itoh, Makoto; Akao, Nobuaki; Yotsu, Rie R; Sugihara, Jun; Takeshita, Nozomi; Kutsuna, Satoshi; Fujiya, Yoshihiro; Kanagawa, Shuzo; Ohmagari, Norio; Kato, Yasuyuki

    2015-06-01

    We encountered a probable case of loiasis in a returned traveler from Central Africa. A 52-year-old Japanese woman presented to our hospital complaining of discomfort in her eyes and skin. She reported having frequently visited Central Africa over many years and having been extensively exposed to the rainforest climate and ecosystem. Although no microfilariae were found in her blood, there was an elevated level of IgG antibodies against the crude antigens of Brugia pahangi, which have cross-reactivity with Loa loa. She was treated with albendazole for 21 days, after which the antigen-specific IgG level decreased and no relapse occurred.

  13. REVERSE LOGISTICS RETAIL LEVEL RETURN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivona Bajor

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Conducting scientific research regarding reverse logistics systems includes certain difficulties. Developed logistics systems are aimed at analysing reverse logistics issues and tend to continuously detect differences and oscillations in the flow of returned products and their characteristics. Developing logistics systems, as Croatian, find reverse logistics issues, regarding product returns, significantly complex and very often these issues are not observed as issues of priority. As distributive flow, reverse logistics systems fundaments should be also based on detailed analysis. Analysis in this flow presents amounts, reasons, process flows and quality of returned items. Because of complex product evaluation on individual level, reverse logistics procedures should be implemented as a methodology individually developed for every supply chain subject. This paper presents a research of retail level returns on the Croatian market, where the analysis implicated that the majority of products in return for this level is directed from final consumers and presents noncurrent inventories of distribution chain. The paper will present conducted research regarding characteristics of returns and routing these products from the retail level.

  14. 42 CFR 405.2463 - What constitutes a visit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... self-management training services as defined in part 410, subpart H of this chapter. (2) Medical visit... practitioner, nurse midwife, visiting nurse, clinical psychologist, or clinical social worker. (ii) For FQHCs... visit also includes a separately billable medical nutrition therapy visit or a diabetes outpatient...

  15. A Visitation/Training Program for Institutionalized Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fling, Sheila; Tayloe, Bryan

    Research on the use of paraprofessionals and trained volunteers for visitation programs with elders is limited. To determine the effects of a visitation program on nursing home residents and their college student and elder visitors, and to explore the effectiveness of special training for such visitation, nursing home residents (N=25) visited with…

  16. Floral visitation by the Argentine ant reduces bee visitation and plant seed set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Cause; Naughton, Ida; Boser, Christina; Alarcón, Ruben; Hung, Keng-Lou James; Holway, David

    2015-01-01

    Ants often visit flowers, but have only seldom been documented to provide effective pollination services. Floral visitation by ants can also compromise plant reproduction in situations where ants interfere with more effective pollinators. Introduced ants may be especially likely to reduce plant reproductive success through floral visitation, but existing experimental studies have found little support for this hypothesis. Here, we combine experimental and observational approaches to examine the importance of floral visitation by the nonnative Argentine ant (Linepithema humile) on plant species native to Santa Cruz Island, California, USA. First, we determine how L. humile affects floral visitor diversity, bee visitation rates, and levels of pollen limitation for the common, focal plant species island morning glory (Calystegia macrostegia ssp. macrostegia). Second, we assess the broader ecological consequences of floral visitation by L. humile by comparing floral visitation networks between invaded and uninvaded sites. The Argentine ant and native ants both visited island morning glory flowers, but L. humile was much more likely to behave aggressively towards other floral visitors and to be the sole floral occupant. The presence of L. humile in morning glory flowers reduced floral visitor diversity, decreased rates of bee visitation, and increased levels of pollen limitation. Network comparisons between invaded and uninvaded. sites revealed differences in both network structure and species-level attributes. In. invaded sites, floral visitors were observed on fewer plant species, ants had a higher per-plant interaction strength relative to that of other visitors, and interaction strengths between bees and plants were weaker. These results illustrate that introduced ants can negatively affect plant reproduction and potentially disrupt pollination services at an ecosystem scale.

  17. 外来务工青年群体节假日返乡探望父母情况的调研分析——以武汉市外来务工的青年群体为例%The Analysis of Research on the Migrant Youth Group Which Would Return Home to Visit Parents during the Holidays——Samples Were Taken from the Migrant Youth Group in Wuhan City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文卓

    2015-01-01

    The regulation about"Going home more often"was issued in the revised"Senior citizens' relative rights and in-terests protection Law of the P.R.C."in 2013, and it has drawn extensive attention and heated discussion in the whole society. How is the situation of"Going home more often"of the migrant workers? The author tried to use migrant youth group in Wuhan city as the samples to have the research about their situation of going home to visit the parents during the holidays, to analyze the results based on the current situation, and propose effective measures to solve it.%2013年新修订的《中华人民共和国老年人权益保障法》关于"常回家看看"的规定,引起了社会广泛关注和热烈讨论.外来务工者"常回家看看"情况究竟怎样?笔者以武汉市外来务工的青年群体为样本,就其节假日返乡探望父母的情况进行了调查研究,结合返乡探亲现状剖析原因,并提出了有效的解决途径.

  18. TARP Monthly Housing Scorecard

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Treasury — Treasury and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) jointly produce a Monthly Housing Scorecard on the health of the nation’s housing market. The...

  19. Lightship Monthly Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Daily Weather Observations (Monthly Form 1001) from lightship stations in the United States. Please see the 'Surface Weather Observations (1001)' library for more...

  20. Oceanographic Monthly Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Monthly Summary contains sea surface temperature (SST) analyses on both regional and ocean basin scales for the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans....

  1. Re-visiting of plentiful food sources and food search strategies in desert ants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald eWolf

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available North African desert ants, Cataglyphis fortis, are established model organisms in animal navigation research. Cataglyphis re-visit plentiful feeding sites, but their decision to return to a feeder and the organisation of food searches has been little studied. Here we provide a review of recent advances regarding this topic. At least two parameters determine the ants’ assessment of site quality, namely, amount of food available and reliability of food encounter on subsequent visits. The amount of food appears to be judged by the concentration of items at the food uptake site. Initially the amount of food in a feeder dominates the foragers’ decision to return, whereas learning about reliability takes precedence in the course of a few visits. The location of a worthwhile site is determined by the animals’ path integration system. In particular, the distance of the feeding site is memorised as the arithmetic average of the distances covered during the previous outbound and homebound journeys. Feeding sites that are small and inconspicuous cannot be approached directly with sufficient certainty, due to inevitable inaccuracies of the path integrator. Instead, desert ants steer downwind of the goal to encounter the odour plume emanating from the food and they follow this plume to the feeder. The angle steered downwind reflects the animals’ maximal navigation error and is adjusted according to experience. In summary, food searches of desert ants provide an unexpected wealth of features that may advance our understanding of search, navigation and decision strategies. There are several aspects that warrant further scrutiny.

  2. Measuring recreational visitation at U.S. National Parks with crowd-sourced photographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessions, Carrie; Wood, Spencer A; Rabotyagov, Sergey; Fisher, David M

    2016-12-01

    Land managers rely on visitation data to inform policy and management decisions. However, visitation data is often costly and burdensome to obtain, and provides a limited depth of information. In this paper, we assess the validity of using crowd-sourced, online photographs to infer information about the habits and preferences of recreational visitors by comparing empirical data from the National Park Service to photograph data from the online platform Flickr for 38 National Parks in the western United States. Using multiple regression analysis, we find that the number of photos posted monthly in a park can reliably indicate the number of visitors to a park in a given month. Through additional statistical testing we also find that the home locations of photo-takers, provided voluntarily on an online profile, accurately show the home origins of park visitors. Together, these findings validate a new method for measuring recreational visitation, opening an opportunity for land managers worldwide to track and understand visitation by augmenting current data collection methods with crowd-sourced, online data that is easy and inexpensive to obtain. In addition, it enables future research on how visitation rates change with changes in access, management or infrastructure, weather events, or ecosystem health, and facilitates valuation research, such as travel cost studies.

  3. Child Maltreatment History and Response to CBT Treatment in Depressed Mothers Participating in Home Visiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammerman, Robert T; Peugh, James L; Teeters, Angelique R; Putnam, Frank W; Van Ginkel, Judith B

    2016-03-01

    Child maltreatment contributes to depression in adults. Evidence indicates that such experiences are associated with poorer outcomes in treatment. Mothers in home visiting programs display high rates of depression and child maltreatment histories. In-Home Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (IH-CBT) was developed to treat maternal depression in home visiting. The purpose of this study was to examine the moderating effects of child maltreatment history on depression, social functioning, and parenting in mothers participating in a clinical trial of IH-CBT. Ninety-three depressed mothers in home visiting between 2 and 10 months postpartum were randomly assigned to IH-CBT (n = 47) plus home visiting or standard home visiting (SHV; n = 46). Mothers were identified via screening and then confirmation of major depressive disorder diagnosis. Measures of child maltreatment history, depression, social functioning, and parenting were administered at pre-treatment, post-treatment, and 3-month follow-up. Results indicated high rates of maltreatment in both conditions relative to the general population. Mixed model analyses found a number of main effects in which experiences of different types of trauma were associated with poorer functioning regardless of treatment condition. Evidence of a moderating effect of maltreatment on treatment outcomes was found for physical abuse and parenting and emotional abuse and social network size. Future research should focus on increasing the effectiveness of IH-CBT with depressed mothers who have experienced child maltreatment. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Flowering dynamics and pollinator visitation of oilseed echium (Echium plantagineum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie A Eberle

    Full Text Available Echium (Echium plantagineum L. is an alternative oilseed crop in summer-wet temperate regions that provides floral resources to pollinators. Its seed oil is rich in omega-3 fatty acids, such as stearidonic acid, which is desired highly by the cosmetic industry. Seeds were sown in field plots over three years in western Minnesota in spring (early-sown or early summer (late-sown, and flower abundance, pollinator visitation, and seed yields were studied. Initial flowering commenced 41 to 55 d after sowing, and anthesis duration (first flowering to harvest was 34 to 70 d. Late sowing dates delayed anthesis, but increased the intensity of visitation by pollinators. Cumulative flower densities ranged from 1 to 4.5 billion ha-1. Flowers attracted numerous honey bees (Apis mellifera L., as many as 35 per minute of observation, which represented about 50% of all insect visitors. Early-sown echium produced seed yields up to 750 kg ha-1, which were 2-29 times higher than those of late-sown echium. Early sowing of echium in Minnesota provides abundant floral resources for pollinators for up to two months and simultaneously produces seed yields whose profits rival those of corn (Zea mays L..

  5. T.D Lee and Lisa Randall visit ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Pauline Gagnon

    Professor Tsung-Dao Lee, who received the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1957 for postulating that parity is not conserved in weak interactions, visited the ATLAS detector this month. He is seen here in the company of Peter Jenni, spokesperson for ATLAS. T.D. Lee is still very active at over 80, pursuing his theory work to this day. Professor Lisa Randall from Harvard University, the well-known theorist behind the Randall-Sundrum theory for extra dimensions, was also part of the group visiting the ATLAS detector. She is seen here with Fabiola Gianotti, deputy spokesperson for ATLAS. Lisa Randall's two initial papers have been quoted both more than 2500 times, making her the most cited theoretical physicist in the world in the last five years as of last autumn - a total of about 10,000 citations! One wonders here if Peter is pointing to a CP-violating graviton spotted in the ATLAS cavern... From left to right: Fabiola Gianotti, Gustaaf Brooijmans, convener of the ATLAS Exotics physics gro...

  6. Impact of systolic blood pressure on visit-to-visit blood pressure variability in middle-aged and elderly people

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈朔华

    2013-01-01

    Objective To observe the impact of systolic blood pressure(SBP)on visit-to-visit blood pressure variability(BPV) in middle-aged and elderly people.Methods Visit-to-visit BPV was determined in 5440 workers in the

  7. Attrition in longitudinal randomized controlled trials: home visits make a difference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peterson Janey C

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Participant attrition in longitudinal studies can introduce systematic bias, favoring participants who return for follow-up, and increase the likelihood that those with complications will be underestimated. Our aim was to examine the effectiveness of home follow-up (Home F/U to complete the final study evaluation on potentially “lost” participants by: 1 evaluating the impact of including and excluding potentially “lost” participants (e.g., those who required Home F/U to complete the final evaluation on the rates of study complications; 2 examining the relationship between timing and number of complications on the requirement for subsequent Home F/U; and 3 determining predictors of those who required Home F/U. Methods We used data from a randomized controlled trial (RCT conducted from 1991–1994 among coronary artery bypass graft surgery patients that investigated the effect of High mean arterial pressure (MAP (intervention vs. Low MAP (control during cardiopulmonary bypass on 5 complications: cardiac morbidity/mortality, neurologic morbidity/mortality, all-cause mortality, neurocognitive dysfunction and functional decline. We enhanced completion of the final 6-month evaluation using Home F/U. Results Among 248 participants, 61 (25% required Home F/U and the remaining 187 (75% received Routine F/U. By employing Home F/U, we detected 11 additional complications at 6 months: 1 major neurologic complication, 6 cases of neurocognitive dysfunction and 4 cases of functional decline. Follow-up of 61 additional Home F/U participants enabled us to reach statistical significance on our main trial outcome. Specifically, the High MAP group had a significantly lower rate of the Combined Trial Outcome compared to the Low MAP group, 16.1% vs. 27.4% (p=0.032. In multivariate analysis, participants who were ≥ 75 years (OR=3.23, 95% CI 1.52-6.88, p=0.002 or on baseline diuretic therapy (OR=2.44, 95% CI 1.14-5.21, p=0.02 were more

  8. The Role of Beta and Size in the Cross-Section of European Stock Returns

    OpenAIRE

    Steven Heston; K. Rouwenhorst; Roberto Wessels

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the ability of beta and size to explain cross-sectional variation in average returns in twelve European countries. We find that average stock returns are positively related to beta and negatively related to firm size. The beta premium is in part due to the fact that high beta countries outperform low beta countries. Within countries high beta stocks outperform low beta stocks only in January, not in other months. We reject the hypothesis that differences in average returns...

  9. Hanford Laboratories operation monthly activities report, November 1956

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1956-12-21

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, physics and instrumentation, reactor technology, chemistry, separation processes, biology, financial activities, employee relations, laboratories auxiliaries, radiation protection, operations research, inventions, visits, and personnel status are discussed. This report is for November, 1956.

  10. Hanford Laboratories operation monthly activities report, January 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-02-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, physics and instrumentation, reactor technology, chemistry, separation processes, biology, financial activities, employee relations, laboratories auxiliaries, radiation protection, operation research, inventions, visits, and personnel status are discussed. This report is for January 1957.

  11. 76 FR 25521 - National Physical Fitness and Sports Month, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-05

    ... essential to staying healthy. A balanced diet and exercise can help reduce the risk of developing chronic... Council on Fitness, Sports, and Nutrition, and for tips on exercise and nutrition, visit: www.Fitness.gov... together as a Nation to promote healthy habits. During National Physical Fitness and Sports Month, let...

  12. Hanford Laboratories operation monthly activities report, October 1956

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1956-11-21

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, physics and instrumentation, reactor technology, chemistry, separation processes, biology, financial activities, employee relations, laboratories auxiliaries, radiation protection, operation research, inventions, visits, and personnel status are discussed. This report is for October 1956.

  13. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, December 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-01-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, physics and instrumentation, reactor technology, chemistry, separation processes, biology, financial activities, employee relations, laboratories auxiliaries, radiation protection, operation research, inventions, visits, and personnel status are discussed. This report is for December 1957.

  14. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, March 1960

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1960-04-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, physics and instrumentation, reactor technology, chemistry, separation processes, biology, financial activities, employee relations, laboratories auxiliaries, radiation protection, operation research, inventions, visits, and personnel status are discussed. This report is for March 1960.

  15. Hanford Laboratories operation monthly activities report, November 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-12-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, physics and instrumentation, reactor technology, chemistry, separation processes, biology, financial activities, employee relations, laboratories auxiliaries, radiation protection, operation research, inventions, visits, and personnel status are discussed. This report is for November 1958.

  16. Hanford Laboratories operation monthly activities report, May 1960

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1960-06-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, physics and instrumentation, reactor technology, chemistry, separation processes, biology, financial activities, employee relations, laboratories auxiliaries, radiation protection, operation research, inventions, visits, and personnel status are discussed. This report is for May 1960.

  17. Hanford Laboratories operation monthly activities report, November 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-12-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, physics and instrumentation, reactor technology, chemistry, separation processes, biology, financial activities, employee relations, laboratories auxiliaries, radiation protection, operation research, inventions, visits, and personnel status are discussed. This report is for November 1957.

  18. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, October 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-11-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, physics and instrumentation, reactor technology, chemistry, separation processes, biology, financial activities, employee relations, laboratories auxiliaries, radiation protection, operation research, inventions, visits, and personnel status are discussed. This report is for October 1957.

  19. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, October 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-11-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, physics and instrumentation, reactor technology, chemistry, separation processes, biology, financial activities, employee relations, laboratories auxiliaries, radiation protection, operation research, inventions, visits, and personnel status are discussed. This report is for October 1958.

  20. Hanford Laboratories operation monthly activities report, February 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-03-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, physics and instrumentation, reactor technology, chemistry, separation processes, biology, financial activities, employee relations, laboratories auxiliaries, radiation protection, operation research, inventions, visits, and personnel status are discussed. This report is for February 1958.

  1. Sealed Planetary Return Canister (SPRC) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Sample return missions have primary importance in future planetary missions. A basic requirement is that samples be returned in pristine, uncontaminated condition,...

  2. Sealed Planetary Return Canister (SPRC) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Sample return missions have primary importance in future planetary missions. A basic requirement is that samples be returned in pristine, uncontaminated condition,...

  3. A cluster randomised controlled effectiveness trial evaluating perinatal home visiting among South African mothers/infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus

    Full Text Available Interventions are needed to reduce poor perinatal health. We trained community health workers (CHWs as home visitors to address maternal/infant risks.In a cluster randomised controlled trial in Cape Town townships, neighbourhoods were randomised within matched pairs to 1 the control, healthcare at clinics (n = 12 neighbourhoods; n = 594 women, or 2 a home visiting intervention by CBW trained in cognitive-behavioural strategies to address health risks (by the Philani Maternal, Child Health and Nutrition Programme, in addition to clinic care (n = 12 neighbourhoods; n = 644 women. Participants were assessed during pregnancy (2% refusal and 92% were reassessed at two weeks post-birth, 88% at six months and 84% at 18 months later. We analysed 32 measures of maternal/infant well-being over the 18 month follow-up period using longitudinal random effects regressions. A binomial test for correlated outcomes evaluated overall effectiveness over time. The 18 month post-birth assessment outcomes also were examined alone and as a function of the number of home visits received.Benefits were found on 7 of 32 measures of outcomes, resulting in significant overall benefits for the intervention compared to the control when using the binomial test (p = 0.008; nevertheless, no effects were observed when only the 18 month outcomes were analyzed. Benefits on individual outcomes were related to the number of home visits received. Among women living with HIV, intervention mothers were more likely to implement the PMTCT regimens, use condoms during all sexual episodes (OR = 1.25; p = 0.014, have infants with healthy weight-for-age measurements (OR = 1.42; p = 0.045, height-for-age measurements (OR = 1.13, p<0.001, breastfeed exclusively for six months (OR = 3.59; p<0.001, and breastfeed longer (OR = 3.08; p<0.001. Number of visits was positively associated with infant birth weight ≥2500 grams (OR = 1.07; p = 0

  4. The organisational perspective on the return to work of employees following treatment for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunfeld, Elizabeth A; Rixon, Lorna; Eaton, Emma; Cooper, Alethea F

    2008-12-01

    Due to improved survival rates across cancer types there is an ever increasing group of cancer survivors of working age with a unique set of needs associated with living with cancer and with returning to work. Little is known about the services provided for cancer survivors or the needs of organisations in the return to work process. This study aimed to provide this information through a survey of the organisational perspective of the return to work of cancer survivors. Questionnaires were sent to human resource or occupational health departments of 815 medium to large organisations. The questionnaire focussed on the companies' policies and procedures, their return to work services and beliefs about the experiences of cancer survivors returning to the workplace. 252 organisations returned completed questionnaires (response rate 31%). 48% of respondents were unable to provide information about the number of employees diagnosed with cancer in the past 12 months. A range of return to work services was provided although only 38% provided employees with written information or guidelines about return to work policies or services. Respondents tended to view employee related factors, such as employee attitude and emotional functioning, as key to a successful return to work. Organisations aim to be supportive of cancer survivors returning to the workplace and potentially offer a range of return to work services. However, employees may not be adequately informed of such services and a lack of information and clear communication may hinder a positive return to work experience.

  5. Google Science Fair winner visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Google Science Fair Grand Prize winner Brittany Michelle Wenger today wrapped up a day-and-a-half's visit of the CERN site. Her winning project uses an artificial neural network to diagnose breast cancer – a non-invasive technique with significant potential for use in hospitals.   Brittany Michelle Wenger at CERN's SM18 Hall. Besides winning a $50,000 scholarship from Google and work experience opportunities with some of the contest hosts, Brittany was offered a personal tour of CERN. “This visit has just been incredible,” she says. “I got to speak with [CERN's Director for Accelerators and Technology] Steve Myers about some of the medical applications and technologies coming out of the LHC experiments and how they can be used to treat cancer. We talked about proton therapy and hadron therapy, which could really change the way patients are treated, improving success rates and making treatment not such an excruciating process. That ...

  6. Prime Minister of Pakistan visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2016-01-01

    On Saturday, 23 January 2016, CERN welcomed Mr Muhammad Nawaz Sharif, Prime Minister of Pakistan.   From left to right: Minister of Finance Mr Mohammad Ishaq Dar, Prime Minister of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan, Muhammad Nawaz Sharif, CERN Director-General Fabiola Gianotti and CMS national contact physicist Hafeez Hoorani. Mr Muhammad Nawaz Sharif arrived at Point 5 in Cessy, where he was welcomed onto French soil by the sous-préfet of Cessy, Stéphane Donnot, and, representing CERN, Director-General Fabiola Gianotti, Directors Eckhard Elsen and Charlotte Warakaulle, and Rüdiger Voss, the adviser for relations with Pakistan. It was the first visit by a head of government of Pakistan since the country became CERN's latest Associate Member State in July 2015. The Prime Minister then had the opportunity to visit the CMS underground experimental area accompanied by the CMS Spokesperson, Tiziano Camporesi, and the CMS collaboration’...

  7. UK Minister enthusiastic after visit to CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    ON Tuesday 5 August the UK Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills, John Denham, came to CERN. The UK continues its strong links with CERN.The Minister was welcomed on arrival at CERN by Robert Aymar, the Director-General, and senior British scientists. Following a short presentation, he began a comprehensive tour of the Laboratory with a visit to both the LHC at point 5 and the CMS experiment. After lunch the Minister’s busy schedule continued, completing his overview of the main areas of UK participation at CERN. As soon as he had signed the guest book, he was whisked off to visit the LHCb experiment, the LHC computing grid project (LCG) and the ATLAS control room. However, the last item on his itinerary was perhaps the most illuminating. Meeting a diverse group of British scientists, from technical and summer students to staff members with more than 30 years of experience, the Minister had the opportunity...

  8. Members of the Forum Engelberg visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrive Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The Forum Engelberg is an annual interdisciplinary conference held in Engelberg, Switzerland intended to act as an international platform for debate and exchange of views on key issues affecting scientific research, technology, economics and philosophy. Its President is Hubert Curien - former French Minister of Research and Space Research, and President of the CERN Council from 1994 to 1996. Photo 01: CERN Director-General Prof. Luciano Maiani (left) speaks to Forum members and public figures from the Geneva area during the visit. In the background is Jean-Claude Landry from the Department of the Interior, Agriculture and Environment, State of Geneva. Photo 02: CERN Director-General Prof. Luciano Maiani (left) speaks to Forum members and public figures from the Geneva area during the visit. In the background is Bernard Ecoffey, Founder of the Forum Engelberg.

  9. The predictability of consumer visitation patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Krumme, Coco; Cebrián, Manuel; Alex,; Pentland,; Moro, Esteban; 10.1038/srep01645

    2013-01-01

    We consider hundreds of thousands of individual economic transactions to ask: how predictable are consumers in their merchant visitation patterns? Our results suggest that, in the long-run, much of our seemingly elective activity is actually highly predictable. Notwithstanding a wide range of individual preferences, shoppers share regularities in how they visit merchant locations over time. Yet while aggregate behavior is largely predictable, the interleaving of shopping events introduces important stochastic elements at short time scales. These short- and long-scale patterns suggest a theoretical upper bound on predictability, and describe the accuracy of a Markov model in predicting a person's next location. We incorporate population-level transition probabilities in the predictive models, and find that in many cases these improve accuracy. While our results point to the elusiveness of precise predictions about where a person will go next, they suggest the existence, at large time-scales, of regularities ac...

  10. The French Research Minister visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    On Friday, 6 June, the French Minister for Higher Education and Research, Valérie Pécresse, was welcomed by CERN Director-General, Robert Aymar. Robert Aymar accompanies Valérie Pécresse and Bernard Accoyer on a visit to CMS. A dozen physicists took part in the round-table discussion, including the Director-General, project leaders, deputy spokesmen, members of the experiments, CERN personnel and users.At first, the Minister was given a tour of the CMS experiment and the LHC tunnel, accompanied by the President of the French National Assembly, Bernard Accoyer. The delegation then took part in a round-table discussion. The main objective of the Minister’s visit was to obtain input on the organisation of large research infrastructures, based on information concerning CERN’s administrative and scientific configuration and the experiment collaborations. As J.-J. Blaising, Head of the PH Depa...

  11. Prime-Minister of Malta visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The Prime-Minister of Malta, Dr Lawrence Gonzi, visited CERN and met Director-General, Robert Aymar, on 10 January. The Prime-Minister of Malta, Dr Lawrence Gonzi, and CERN Director-General, Robert Aymar, signed a cooperation agreement. Dr Gonzi was given guided tours of the CMS experiment at Point 5 in Cessy and of the LHC magnet test facility, in which his country was involved. One of the high points of the day was the signing of a cooperation agreement between CERN and the Government of the Republic of Malta, aimed at the development of scientific and technical collaboration. "I’m really enthusiastic about this agreement, which constitutes a first step towards real collaboration between the Maltese government and CERN," said Nicholas Sammut, a Maltese engineer at CERN who was present throughout the visit (on the right). See also the video.

  12. CPAFFC Delegation Visits Italy and Portugal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>At the invitation of the Italian Union of Provinces (Unione delle Province d’Italia—UPI) and the League of Portugal-China Lasting Friendship (LPCLF),the Chinese People’s Friendship Delegation led by Chen Haosu,president of the CPAFFC,and Shi Zuofeng,vice chairman of the Standing Committee of the Gansu Provincial People’s Congress,paid friendly visits to Italy and Portugal from June 15 to 24.

  13. Chinese Peking Opera Troupe Visits France

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>At the invitation of the Municipal Government of Marmande, France and the Festival de Sylvanes, a Chinese Peking Opera troupe, drawn mainly from the National Academy of Chinese Theatre Arts and sent by the CPAFFC,visited France from August 19 to 31 to introduce the quintessence of Chinese culture through their performances.An additional purpose was to promote exchanges between the two countries in theatrical arts and culture,thus enhancing mutual

  14. CMS Virtual Visit - Researchers Night in Portugal

    CERN Multimedia

    Abreu, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Researchers Night at Planetarium Calouste Gulbenkian - Ciência Viva Centre in Lisbon. Organised by researchers from LIP (Laboratório de Instrumentação e Física Experimental de Partículas) and including CMS Virtual Visit during which André David Tinoco Mendes and José Rasteiro da Silva, based at Cessy, France, "virtually" discussed science and technology behind the CMS detector with the audience in Lisbon.

  15. US Local Government Delegation Visits Sichuan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuan; You

    2015-01-01

    A 12-member US Local Government Delegationled by Wisconsin Lieutenant Governor Rebecca Kleefisch visited Sichuan Province December 11-13 at the invitation of the CPAFFC.Consisting of lieutenant governors,state legislators,mayors,government officials of cities and counties from eight states—Wisconsin,Washington,New York,Colorado,Illinois,Tennessee,Kansas and Missouri—the delegation was organized by the China-United States Exchange Foundation(CUSEF).Established in Hong Kong in 2008

  16. ATLAS Virtual Visit from University of Liverpool

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    The event is part of a competition for female high school, being run jointly between Universities of Liverpool & Warwick in the UK. The girls will be competing for a residential visit to the XMaS research facility in Grenoble, France. The idea of the Science Gala is to enhance the competition by bringing the girls, their families & teachers together to meet with different science professionals (academic and industrial), and to learn more about the opportunities afforded by studying physical sciences courses.

  17. Neuroscientists' classroom visits positively impact student attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzakerley, Janet L; Michlin, Michael L; Paton, John; Dubinsky, Janet M

    2013-01-01

    The primary recommendation of the 2010 President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology report on K-12 education was to inspire more students so that they are motivated to study science. Scientists' visits to classrooms are intended to inspire learners and increase their interest in science, but verifications of this impact are largely qualitative. Our primary goal was to evaluate the impact of a longstanding Brain Awareness classroom visit program focused on increasing learners understanding of their own brains. Educational psychologists have established that neuroscience training sessions can improve academic performance and shift attitudes of students from a fixed mindset to a growth mindset. Our secondary goal was to determine whether short interactive Brain Awareness scientist-in-the-classroom sessions could similarly alter learners' perceptions of their own potential to learn. Teacher and student surveys were administered in 4(th)-6(th) grade classrooms throughout Minnesota either before or after one-hour Brain Awareness sessions that engaged students in activities related to brain function. Teachers rated the Brain Awareness program as very valuable and said that the visits stimulated students' interest in the brain and in science. Student surveys probed general attitudes towards science and their knowledge of neuroscience concepts (particularly the ability of the brain to change). Significant favorable improvements were found on 10 of 18 survey statements. Factor analyses of 4805 responses demonstrated that Brain Awareness presentations increased positive attitudes toward science and improved agreement with statements related to growth mindset. Overall effect sizes were small, consistent with the short length of the presentations. Thus, the impact of Brain Awareness presentations was positive and proportional to the efforts expended, demonstrating that short, scientist-in-the-classroom visits can make a positive contribution to primary school

  18. Neuroscientists' classroom visits positively impact student attitudes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet L Fitzakerley

    Full Text Available The primary recommendation of the 2010 President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology report on K-12 education was to inspire more students so that they are motivated to study science. Scientists' visits to classrooms are intended to inspire learners and increase their interest in science, but verifications of this impact are largely qualitative. Our primary goal was to evaluate the impact of a longstanding Brain Awareness classroom visit program focused on increasing learners understanding of their own brains. Educational psychologists have established that neuroscience training sessions can improve academic performance and shift attitudes of students from a fixed mindset to a growth mindset. Our secondary goal was to determine whether short interactive Brain Awareness scientist-in-the-classroom sessions could similarly alter learners' perceptions of their own potential to learn. Teacher and student surveys were administered in 4(th-6(th grade classrooms throughout Minnesota either before or after one-hour Brain Awareness sessions that engaged students in activities related to brain function. Teachers rated the Brain Awareness program as very valuable and said that the visits stimulated students' interest in the brain and in science. Student surveys probed general attitudes towards science and their knowledge of neuroscience concepts (particularly the ability of the brain to change. Significant favorable improvements were found on 10 of 18 survey statements. Factor analyses of 4805 responses demonstrated that Brain Awareness presentations increased positive attitudes toward science and improved agreement with statements related to growth mindset. Overall effect sizes were small, consistent with the short length of the presentations. Thus, the impact of Brain Awareness presentations was positive and proportional to the efforts expended, demonstrating that short, scientist-in-the-classroom visits can make a positive contribution to

  19. CPAFFC Delegation Visits South Africa And Namibia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang; Ruimin

    2015-01-01

    At the invitation of the South Africa-Chin a Friendship Association(SACFA)and the Erongo Region of Namibia,aCPAFFC delegation led by Vice President Feng Zuoku paid a visit last November.South Africa,known as the"Rainbow Nation",is the second largest economy in Africa.China is its largest trade partner,while South Africa is China’s largest regional trading partner.

  20. Visit of the Federal President of Germany

    CERN Multimedia

    Schopper,H

    1986-01-01

    Le D.G. H.Schopper a le plaisir de souhaiter la bienvenue au président de la République fédérale allemande, Richard von Weizsäcker (président féderale de 1984-1994). C'est la première visite d'un président allemand dans l'histoire du Cern.

  1. Neuroscientists’ Classroom Visits Positively Impact Student Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzakerley, Janet L.; Michlin, Michael L.; Paton, John; Dubinsky, Janet M.

    2013-01-01

    The primary recommendation of the 2010 President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology report on K-12 education was to inspire more students so that they are motivated to study science. Scientists’ visits to classrooms are intended to inspire learners and increase their interest in science, but verifications of this impact are largely qualitative. Our primary goal was to evaluate the impact of a longstanding Brain Awareness classroom visit program focused on increasing learners understanding of their own brains. Educational psychologists have established that neuroscience training sessions can improve academic performance and shift attitudes of students from a fixed mindset to a growth mindset. Our secondary goal was to determine whether short interactive Brain Awareness scientist-in-the-classroom sessions could similarly alter learners’ perceptions of their own potential to learn. Teacher and student surveys were administered in 4th-6th grade classrooms throughout Minnesota either before or after one-hour Brain Awareness sessions that engaged students in activities related to brain function. Teachers rated the Brain Awareness program as very valuable and said that the visits stimulated students’ interest in the brain and in science. Student surveys probed general attitudes towards science and their knowledge of neuroscience concepts (particularly the ability of the brain to change). Significant favorable improvements were found on 10 of 18 survey statements. Factor analyses of 4805 responses demonstrated that Brain Awareness presentations increased positive attitudes toward science and improved agreement with statements related to growth mindset. Overall effect sizes were small, consistent with the short length of the presentations. Thus, the impact of Brain Awareness presentations was positive and proportional to the efforts expended, demonstrating that short, scientist-in-the-classroom visits can make a positive contribution to primary school

  2. Japanese Dietmen's Delegation Visits China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YuanMindao

    2004-01-01

    Invited by the China-Japan Friendship Association, (CJFA), a 12-member Japanese dietmen's delegation headed by Takeshi Noda,Diet member and former minister of home affairs,paid a visit to China from August 24 to 26, 2004.Tang Jiaxuan, state councillor, Lu Yongxiang, vice chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress and president of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Song Jian,

  3. CPAFFC Delegation Visits Switzerland and Poland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang; Qing

    2013-01-01

    <正>At the invitation of the Swiss-Chinese Association(SCA) and the Adam Michiewicz Institute (AMI) of Poland,a CPAFFC delegation led by Vice President Jing Dunquan visited Switzerland and Poland from October 15 to 24, 2012,and met leading members of the relevant organizations. They discussed the international situation,cultural cooperation and exchanges between local governments and pledged further coopera-

  4. Crohn’s Disease: The Subsequent Visit

    OpenAIRE

    Manolakis, Catherine S.; Farraye, Francis A.; Di Palma, Jack A

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis and subsequent management of Crohn’s disease are challenging for both the patient and the gastroenterologist. After the initial assessment, subsequent visits should assess the patient’s readiness to begin therapy, monitor progress if therapy has been initiated, assess for complications of the disease or therapy, and ensure that all appropriate health maintenance measures are current. This article is intended to be a companion to our earlier paper “Crohn’s Disease: The First Visi...

  5. CPAFFC Delegation Visits Egypt and Uganda

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>At the invitation of the Egyptian-Chinese Friendship Association(ECFA) and the Uganda-China Friendship Association(UCFA),a goodwill delegation led by Wang Mingyi,vice chairman of the Standing Committee of the Henan Provincial People’s Congress and honorary president of the Henan Provincial People’s Association for Friendship with Foreign Countries,paid a friendly visit to Egypt and Uganda from November 3 to 14,2006.

  6. CPAFFC Delegation Visits Sierra Leone and Cameroon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    <正>At the invitation of the Sierra Leone-China Friendship Association (SLCFA) and the Ministry of Territorial Administration and Decentralization of Cameroon, a 14-member CPAFFC delegation headed by Wang Daoyu, vice chairman of the Standing Committee of the Shandong Provincial People’s Congress, paid a goodwill visit to Sierra Leone and Cameroon in early December 2005. In Sierra Leone Vice President Solomon Ekuma Berewa, President of the Parliament Edmond Cowan, and Vice Foreign Minister Mohamed Kamara, and in

  7. Best time to visit historical Chongqing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shawn Ray

    2011-01-01

    Chongqing is famous for having three hot things: weather, food and women. And if those arent good enough reasous to visit China's most over-looked city, this war-time capital has a lot more to offer. If you include the whole of the greater munidpality, Chongqing is one of, if not the biggest cities in the world, with a population of over 32 million.

  8. Members of the Forum Engelberg visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The Forum Engelberg is an annual interdisciplinary conference held in Engelberg, Switzerland intended to act as an international platform for debate and exchange of views on key issues affecting scientific research, technology, economics and philosophy. Its President is Hubert Curien - former French Minister of Research and Space Research, and President of the CERN Council from 1994 to 1996. He is pictured here (right) alongside CERN Director-General Prof. Luciano Maiani during the visit of Forum members to CERN.

  9. Members of the Forum Engelberg visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The Forum Engelberg is an annual interdisciplinary conference held in Engelberg, Switzerland intended to act as an international platform for debate and exchange of views on key issues affecting scientific research, technology, economics and philosophy. Its President is Hubert Curien - former French Minister of Research and Space Research, and President of the CERN Council from 1994 to 1996. This series of photos was taken during a speech he made as part of a visit to CERN.

  10. American Las Vegas Sands Corp. Visiting Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yinghong; Liu Jinliang

    2006-01-01

    @@ On August 29, Wan Jifei, Chairman of CCPIT, meets the visiting delegation led by Sheldon G. Adelson,Chairman of the Board and principal owner of Las Vegas Sands Corp. in CCPIT. Zhao Zhenge, Vice Director of International Connection Department of CCPIT, Luo Guoxiong from Beijing China Exhibition Investment Company, Xu Jingyi, Assistant Director of American and Oceanian Affairs Division of CCPIT, also attended the meeting.

  11. Return to TRI: Winston Churchill Fellow and Salford University Scholar travel to Miami and the Keys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, Jacqui; Mackereth, Peter A

    2003-11-01

    During May and June 2003, the 2 authors visited the internationally renowned Touch Research Institute based at the University of Miami and Jackson Memorial Hospital. For one of the authors, Peter Mackereth, this was a return visit. Both authors are Ph.D. students who have successfully obtained travel scholarships to participate in seminars and laboratory work. The paper will report on the experience of their visit, the current and future work of the TRI and its collaborators. Jacqui took the opportunity to spend time at the Dolphin Research Centre, this provided insight into the therapeutic value of interacting with these amazing mammals. Peter also took the opportunity to visit a group of massage therapists working in Key West.

  12. An unplanned delay between control visits influences the metabolic status in children with diabetes: an observational study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Thomsen, J; Ammentorp, J

    2010-01-01

    to and the first two visits after the strike were compared with the values from the same periods the previous year. Danish speaking patients answered a questionnaire. RESULTS: For 155 children included, the mean HbA1c values before the strike were 8.1 and 8.1 (p = 0.39), while the value increased to 8.......5 at the first visit (p 0.05). Of the 152 questionnaires handed out, 113 (74.3%) were returned. Of these, 48 (42.5%) stated to have needed help, and 49 (43...

  13. Return to work following ileostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whates, P D; Irving, M

    1984-08-01

    The experiences of 1033 members of the 51 English divisions of the Ileostomy Association of Great Britain and Ireland have been analysed in respect of their return to work after construction of an ileostomy. Although there was a fall in the number of patients returning to work after operation this was often for reasons unrelated to surgery. The majority of those returning to work resumed work with the same employer and usually in the same post. Fifty-nine (5.7 per cent) patients began work for the first time after operation, including 33 (3.2 per cent) who were previously inactive although of working age. Analysis of occupational class shows that, although a number of patients initially resumed work within a lower class, once established in employment successful career advancement was possible. Problems in the gaining or resumption of employment were reported by 56 (5.4 per cent) patients. In 22 (2.1 per cent) patients, almost all approaching or above retirement age, successful surgery resulted in a decision not to return to employment. An ileostomy is no barrier to successful return to work in nearly all occupations, and is accomplished by the majority of patients without major difficulty.

  14. Visits to Tier-1 Computing Centres

    CERN Multimedia

    Dario Barberis

    At the beginning of 2007 it became clear that an enhanced level of communication is needed between the ATLAS computing organisation and the Tier-1 centres. Most usual meetings are ATLAS-centric and cannot address the issues of each Tier-1; therefore we decided to organise a series of visits to the Tier-1 centres and focus on site issues. For us, ATLAS computing management, it is most useful to realize how each Tier-1 centre is organised, and its relation to the associated Tier-2s; indeed their presence at these visits is also very useful. We hope it is also useful for sites... at least, we are told so! The usual participation includes, from the ATLAS side: computing management, operations, data placement, resources, accounting and database deployment coordinators; and from the Tier-1 side: computer centre management, system managers, Grid infrastructure people, network, storage and database experts, local ATLAS liaison people and representatives of the associated Tier-2s. Visiting Tier-1 centres (1-4). ...

  15. Visit of the King of the Belgians

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2009-01-01

    19 février 2009 - Sa Majesté Albert II, Roi des Belges et le Ministre du Climat et de l’Energie P. Magnette visitent le site experimental de CMS au Point 5 du LHC avec le Directeur de la Recherche et de l’Informatique S. Bertolucci et le Porte-parole de la Collaboration CMS T. Virdee. Tirage 02 à 08: Sa Majesté Albert II, Roi des Belges signe le livre d'or dans le SDX5 en présence du Directeur des accélérateurs et de la technologie S. Myers et du Directeur de la recherche et de l’informatique S. Bertolucci; Tirage 09 à 22: Sa Majesté Albert II, Roi des Belges et le Ministre du Climat et de l’Energie P. Magnette visitent le tunnel du LHC avec le Chef du Projet sLHC L. Evans et K. Cornelis. Tirage 23 à 35: Sa Majesté Albert II, Roi des Belges et le Ministre du Climat et de l’Energie P. Magnette visitent la cerne expérimentale de CMS avec W. Van Doninck (VUB), D. Favart (UCL) et le Porte-parole de la Collaboration T. Virdee. Tirage 36 à 50: Welcome line au Point 5 du LHC: Accueil en t...

  16. It's all change at the visit points

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2011-01-01

    58,000 people visited CERN in 2010. In spite of this success, the Organization has plans to review the installations at the various visit points with a view to making the links between them clearer and, above all, making tours of the Laboratory more spectacular.   CERN Control Centre. The permanent exhibition in the Globe of Science and Innovation, the "Universe of Particles", attracts large numbers of visitors. A high-tech venue offering an overview of CERN's research goals, tools and impact throughout the world, the Globe acts as a showcase for the Laboratory. "The Globe is an ideal place to start a tour of CERN. After experiencing a virtual experiment at the heart of the Universe, visitors are keen to find out what's behind it all, to know more about the research we do here at CERN.When it was still possible to see the LHC detectors, visitors were bowled over by their huge size. To continue to surprise them to the same extent, we are planning to reorganise the visit...

  17. Special people visit the ATLAS cavern

    CERN Multimedia

    Muriel

    ATLAS has been host to many important visitors lately. Here are a selected few: Professor Stephen Hawking visits the ATLAS cavern On Tuesday 26 September 2006 the ATLAS Collaboration was honoured by a very special visit to the detector in the underground cavern. We were pleased to guide Professor Stephen Hawking, the famous cosmologist holding the post of Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at Cambridge University (position held by Isaac Newton in the 17th century), on a tour of the ATLAS pit and the LHC tunnel. The visit was accompanied by a few colleagues from the CERN Theory group, and was only possible thanks to the professional assistance of Olga Beltramello and Bernard Lebegue, who had also taken care of all the necessary preparatory work in the cavern. Professor Hawking was very keen to check for himself the status of the detector installation, and he admired, in particular, the spectacular TGC big wheel on side C. (left) Stephen Hawking in the ATLAS cavern side-C (right) and in the LHC tunnel...

  18. Nobel laureate in literature visits CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2015-01-01

    Gao Xingjian, winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2000, was invited to visit CERN as part of European Researchers’ Night. During his visit to the Laboratory, he took time out to give us a dose of his optimism.   Gao Xingjian in IdeaSquare's bus during his visit to CERN.   “The idea of bringing scientists and artists together is wonderful!” An enthusiastic first-time visitor to the Laboratory, Gao Xingjian regaled his audience with his thoughts on human reality at the conference 'Made of Shadow and Light', in which he took part on 24 September, alongside Sergio Bertolucci, CERN’s Director for Research and Computing. Interested in science since his childhood (his marks in physics and maths at school were excellent, he explains with a smile), he draws an interesting parallel between human consciousness and dark matter: “The concept of dark matter makes complete sense to me,”&nbs...

  19. ITU World Youth Forum visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    About 250 students selected by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) to participate in the 2009 Youth Forum made CERN a primary destination for this year’s World Youth Forum event. The 250 students participating in the 2009 Youth Forum attend a presentation in the Globe of Science and Innovation.On Tuesday 6 October, the group visited several sites including the Microcosm exhibition and the ATLAS cavern to get a glimpse of what CERN does and the exciting science that is studied here. Since 2001 and every three years, the ITU World Forum brings together young men and women, aged 18-23, to learn about new technologies and the world around them. This year’s group included participants from one hundred and twenty-five different countries. This was the first time that the event involved a visit to CERN. When asked why CERN was a destination, Pascal Biner, organizer of the visit for ITU, explained that CERN was a necessary stop given the Forum’s base in Gen...

  20. Iranian and Kazakh representatives visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    On 1st and 4th March respectively, CERN received visits from Asset Issekeshev, Kazakhstan's Vice-Minister of Industry and Trade, and Reza Mansouri, Deputy Minister for Science, Research and Technology of the Islamic Republic of Iran. Asset Issekeshev and his delegation came to CERN with the aim of learning "the European way of building strong and effective ties between science and the industrial sector". Welcomed by Maximilian Metzger, CERN's Secretary-General, he visited the ATLAS assembly hall and the CLIC installations before signing the visitors' book. After a short visit to Point 5 (CMS), Reza Mansouri met CERN's Director-General, Robert Aymar, before talking to Iranian PhD students working on their theses at CERN. Asset Issekeshev, Kazakhstan's Vice-Minister of Industry and Trade, signs the visitors' book, watched by Maximilian Metzger, CERN's Secretary-General.From left to right: Mojtaba Mohammadi and Majid Hashemi (Iranian PhD students at CERN); Dr Daniel Denegri (CMS), Professor Re...

  1. VisitSense: Sensing Place Visit Patterns from Ambient Radio on Smartphones for Targeted Mobile Ads in Shopping Malls

    OpenAIRE

    Byoungjip Kim; Seungwoo Kang; Jin-Young Ha; Junehwa Song

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel smartphone framework called VisitSense that automatically detects and predicts a smartphone user’s place visits from ambient radio to enable behavioral targeting for mobile ads in large shopping malls. VisitSense enables mobile app developers to adopt visit-pattern-aware mobile advertising for shopping mall visitors in their apps. It also benefits mobile users by allowing them to receive highly relevant mobile ads that are aware of their place visit pattern...

  2. Return-to-Work Self-Efficacy : Development and Validation of a Scale in Claimants with Musculoskeletal Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Sandra; Franche, Renee-Louise; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; Lee, Hyunmi; Krause, Niklas; Shaw, William S.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction We report on the development and validation of a 10-item scale assessing self-efficacy within the return-to-work context, the Return-to-Work Self-Efficacy (RTWSE) scale. Methods Lost-time claimants completed a telephone survey 1 month (n = 632) and 6 months (n = 446) after a work-relate

  3. Characteristics of patients returning to emergency departments in Naples, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinelli Paolo

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Crowding in hospital Emergency Departments (EDs is a problem in several countries. We evaluated the number and characteristics of patients who make repeated visits to the EDs in Naples, Italy. Methods All patients (≥ 16 years who presented to the EDs of three randomly selected non-academic acute care public hospitals, within randomly selected week periods, were studied. The two outcomes of interest were the re-utilization, within 72 hours, of the ED and the number of visits in the previous year. Results Of the 1430 sampled patients, 51.9% self-reported multiple visits in the previous year and 10.9% and 1.6% used the ED for 3 and ≥4 times, respectively. The number of visits in the previous year was significantly higher in those who live closer to hospital, with a more severe burden of overall comorbidity, and who were on pharmacological treatment. Overall, 72-hours return visits were found in 215 patients (15.8%. Patients were more likely to re-use within 72 hours the ED if younger, were not on pharmacological treatment, attended the ED more times in the previous year, were referred by a physician, arrived at the ED by car driven by other person, had problems of longer duration prior to arrival at the ED, had a surgical ED discharge diagnosis, and were admitted to the hospital. Conclusion The data may assist policymakers in the development and implementation of protocols to track changes in the re-utilization of the ED for the high financial impact and for the benefit of the patients.

  4. Patient satisfaction and willingness to return to the provider among women undergoing gynecological surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfelder, Tonio; Schaal, Tom; Klewer, Jörg; Kugler, Joachim

    2014-10-01

    To identify factors associated with 'patient satisfaction' and 'willingness to return to the provider' in gynecology and to assess similarities as well as differences between the two concepts. Study data were obtained from 968 randomly selected gynecology patients discharged from 22 hospitals who responded to a mailed survey. The validated instrument consisted of 37 items and assessed medical and service aspects of care, patient and visit characteristics. The dependent variables consisted of ratings of willingness to return to the provider and overall satisfaction. Bivariate and multivariate techniques were used to reveal relationships between indicators and both dependent variables. The multivariate analyses identified individualized medical care, kindness of medical practitioners, treatment outcome and organization of discharge as the most consistent predictors of the patients' likelihood to return and overall satisfaction. Differences between both concepts pertained to the significance of service variables (cleanliness and quality of food) for patient satisfaction and visit-related characteristics (length of stay and occurrence of complications) for willingness to return. Study findings suggest that patient satisfaction and willingness to return to the provider do not reflect the same concepts. Although service aspects such as quality of food influence satisfaction ratings, they do not increase the likelihood that patients choose the same hospital in case of another treatment. Communication between patients and medical practitioners is highly important. Revealed predictors of both concepts are alterable by healthcare professionals and should be focused on to enhance patient satisfaction and to increase the probability patients return to their provider.

  5. Ketogenic Diet Decreases Emergency Room Visits and Hospitalizations Related to Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husam R. Kayyali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Approximately, one-third of patients with epilepsy are refractory to pharmacological treatment which mandates extensive medical care and imposes significant economic burden on patients and their societies. This study intends to assess the impact of the treatment with ketogenic diet (KD on reducing seizure-related emergency room visits and hospitalizations in children with refractory epilepsy. Methods. This is a retrospective review of children treated with the KD in one tertiary center. We compared a 12 months’ period prior to KD with 12 months after the diet was started in regard to the number of emergency department (ED visits, hospitalizations, and hospital days as well as their associated charges. Results. 37 patients (57% males were included. Their ages at time of KD initiation were (4.0±2.78 years. Twelve months after the KD initiation, the total number of ED visits was reduced by 36% with a significant decrease of associated charges (p=0.038. The number of hospital admissions was reduced by 40% and the number of hospital days was reduced by 39%. The cumulative charges showed net cost savings after 9 months when compared to the prediet baseline. Conclusion. In children with refractory epilepsy, treatment with the ketogenic diet reduces the number of ED visits and hospitalizations and their corresponding costs.

  6. New technology markedly improves hand-hygiene performance among healthcare workers after restroom visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller-Sørensen, H; Korshin, A; Mogensen, T; Høiby, N

    2016-04-01

    The risks to patients from pathogens present on healthcare workers' (HCWs') hands are high; however, compliance with hand hygiene among HCWs is low. We devised a prospective intervention trial of a new hand-hygiene dispensing technology to improve HCWs' compliance with hand hygiene. Baseline hand-hygiene compliance was observed for three months before and after an intervention consisting of implementation of an electronic device that reminds people to comply with hand hygiene after restroom visits. Compliance in hand-hygiene performance after restroom visits increased among HCWs from 66% to 91% after the intervention.

  7. Predictors for adolescent visits to practitioners of complementary and alternative medicine in a total population (the Young-HUNT Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslak Steinsbekk

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the factors predicting adolescent visits to practitioners of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM. METHODS: A longitudinal cohort study conducted in an adolescent total population in Central Norway (The Nord-Trøndelag Health Studies (HUNT. In Young-HUNT 1, all inhabitants aged 13 to 19 years (N = 8944, 89% response rate were invited to participate, and the youngest group (13 to 15 year olds was surveyed again 4 years later (Young-HUNT 2, N = 2429, 82% response rate. The participants completed a comprehensive questionnaire on health and life style which included a question regarding visits to a CAM practitioner in the last 12 months. RESULTS: One in eleven (8.7%, 95%CI 7.6-9.8% had visited a CAM practitioner, an increase of 26% in 4 years (1.8% points. The final multivariable analysis predicted increased odds of an adolescent becoming a CAM visitor four years later (p<0.05 if she or he had previously visited a CAM practitioner (adjOR 3.4, had musculoskeletal pain (adjOR 1.5, had migraine (adjOR 2.3, used asthma medicines (adjOR 1.8 or suffered from another disease lasting more than three months (adjOR 2.1. Being male predicted reduced odds of visiting a CAM practitioner in the future (adjOR 0.6. CONCLUSION: We can conclude from this study that future visits to a CAM practitioner are predicted by both predisposing factors (being female, having visited a CAM practitioner previously and medical need factors (having had musculoskeletal pain, migraine, used asthma medicines or experienced another disease lasting more than three months. None of the specific variables associated with CAM visits were predictive for CAM visits four years later.

  8. Radiation monitoring handbook for visits by nuclear powered warships to Australian ports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, D.A

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this handbook is to detail the Radiation Monitoring (RMG) roles and procedures, and to provide technical and background information useful to RMG personnel. It has been written on the assumption that all members of the RMG have had appropriate radiation safety (Health Physics) training. Separate standing procedures, for both routine and emergency activities, are required for each port. These are incorporated in Port Safety Plans and specify the routine monitoring requirements for individual berths or anchorages and the procedures to be followed after indication of a reactor accident to a nuclear powered warship. A Visit Operation Order, issued for each Nuclear Powered warships (NPW) visit, presents information specific to that visit. Routine monitoring is performed to confirm normal conditions. The objectives of emergency radiation monitoring are: to provide early detection of a reactor accident of sufficient severity to possibly cause a major release of fission products to the environment; to determine the nature and extent of any fission product release; to provide information to assist in evaluating the accident; to assess the need and extent of required countermeasures; and to determine when the release has terminated and when affected areas have returned to normal Prepared on behalf of the Visiting Ship Panel (Nuclear), Department of Defence; 11 refs., 11 tabs., 21 figs.

  9. Monthly energy review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    This document presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors.

  10. Photos of the month

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni de Oliveira

    Congratulations to Adele Rimoldi, ATLAS physicist from Pavia, who ran her first marathon in New York last month. Adele completed the 42.2 km in a time of 4:49:19. She sure makes it look easy!!! The ATLAS pixel service quarter panel in SR1

  11. Monthly Energy Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-28

    This publication presents an overview of the Energy information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. Two brief ``energy plugs`` (reviews of EIA publications) are included, as well.

  12. Predictors of return rate for an HIV-positive result in a French Voluntary Counseling and Testing centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlavan, Golriz; Burdet, Charles; Laouénan, Cédric; Guiroy, Frédérique; Bouscarat, Fabrice; Tosini, William; Yazdanpanah, Yazdan; Bouvet, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Bichat Hospital's free and anonymous Voluntary Counseling and Testing centre in Paris is widely visited, with a high rate of HIV-positive diagnosis. This study proposed, in this centre, to describe the HIV newly-diagnosed patients over an 8-year period and to determinate risk factors for failure to return for a positive result. Higher risk for failure to return was found among the heterosexual subjects regardless of their socio-economic background.

  13. The Users Office returns to its premises

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The renovation work on the Users Office, which began on 29 November, was completed last week. The Office's staff have now returned to their modernised and more spacious premises in Building 61. For four months, the Users' Office was housed in Building 2-R-030 thanks to the LHCb experiment collaboration, which was kind enough to temporarily loan some office space. For 15 years, the team has been helping Users with their administrative tasks. It provides them with all the information necessary on the procedures to be followed after their arrival at CERN as well as on cultural activities in the region. Since the beginning of January, the team is also looking after the Unpaid Associates. CERN hosts 4489 Users from Member States and 1909 from non-Members States, representing over 50 nationalities.

  14. Your Child's Development: 9 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Your Baby's Growth: 9 Months Your Baby's Hearing, Vision, and Other Senses: 9 Months Your Child's Checkup: 9 Months Medical Care and Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Feeding Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Sleep and Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Contact ...

  15. Return of the Red Chips

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The mainland stock boom is drawing many profitable Hong Kong-listed Chinese companies back home September saw a wave of Hong Kong-listed Chinese companies returning to the mainland stock market,helping the Shanghai Stock Exchange surpass Hong Kong to become the sixth largest stock exchange in the world.

  16. Heat Pipe Blocks Return Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eninger, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Metal-foil reed valve in conventional slab-wick heat pipe limits heat flow to one direction only. With sink warmer than source, reed is forced closed and fluid returns to source side through annular transfer wick. When this occurs, wick slab on sink side of valve dries out and heat pipe ceases to conduct heat.

  17. The Return of the Old

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Daniel Bell's latest book,China's New Confucianism,is an in-depth look at how one of the Middle Kingdom's oldest and greatest traditions is gradually returning,and how a growing number of Chinese citizens are embracing its once-forgotten ideals.

  18. Return Migration of Foreign Students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijwaard, G.E.; Wang, Q.

    2016-01-01

    Using administrative panel data, this paper presents a comprehensive empirical analysis of the return of recent foreign students in the Netherlands. We focus on how individual labour market changes and marriage formation influence their decision to leave. Our model allows for correlated unobserved h

  19. Language Skills and Economic Returns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrouste, Christelle

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on the contributions from the emerging positivist epistemological approach, endorsed by the economics of language and the economics of education, to study the returns to language skills, assuming that language competencies constitute key components of human capital. It presents initial results from a study on economic returns…

  20. Return migration of foreign students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijwaard, G.E.; Wang, Qi

    2013-01-01

    Using unique administrative micro panel data, this paper presents a comprehensive empirical analysis of the return of recent foreign students in The Netherlands. The life course experiences of these students in the host, both on the labour market and in marriage formation, impact their decision to

  1. Preventive letter: doubling the return rate after gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmos, Pablo R; Borzone, Gisella R; Berkowitz, Loni; Mertens, Nicolás; Busso, Dolores; Santos, José L; Poblete, José A; Vera, Claudio; Belmar, Cristián; Goldenberg, Denisse; Samith, Bárbara; Acosta, Ana M; Escalona, Manuel

    2015-05-01

    To measure the impact of a "Preventive Letter" designed to encourage the return of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) mothers to follow up visit after delivery, in the context of a worldwide concern about low return rates after delivery of these patients. Mothers with GDM require medical evaluation and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) 6 weeks after delivery, in order to: [a] confirm remission of GDM and [b] provide advice on the prevention of type 2 diabetes. In the year 2003 we developed a "Preventive Letter", containing three aspects: [a] current treatment, [b] suggested management during labor, and [c] a stapled laboratory order for OGTT to be performed 6 weeks after delivery. The return rate after delivery was assessed in two groups of GDM mothers: [a] "Without Preventive Letter" (n = 253), and "With Preventive Letter" (n = 215). Both groups, similar with respect to age (33.0 ± 5.4 and 32.3 ± 4.9 years respectively, p = 0.166) and education time (14.9 ± 1.8 and 15.0 ± 1.8 years respectively, p = 0.494), showed a significant difference in the 1-year return rate after delivery, as assessed by the Kaplan-Meier test: 32.0 % for the group "Without Preventive Letter", and 76.0 % for the group "With Preventive Letter" (p return rate after delivery of GDM mothers was 2.4 times higher in the group "With Preventive Letter" than in the group without it. We believe that this low-cost approach could be useful in other institutions caring for pregnant women with diabetes.

  2. CPAFFC Working Group Visits the United States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>From April 13 to 21, a CPAFFC working group led by Yao Mingyu, director general of the Department of American and Oceanian Affairs of the CPAFFC, visited the United States, attended the 18th Forum on US-China Relations sponsored by the US-China Peoples Friendship Association (USCPFA) and had talks with the USCPFA, the Richard Nixon Library & Birthplace Foundation, the Richard Nixon Centre, the Sister Cities International of the U.S., the National Conference of State Legislatures, the Council of State

  3. A Nobel Prize winner visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Nobel Prize-winning astrophysicist George Smoot visited CERN on 2 February with a message for particle physicists and cosmologists alike. After a tour of ATLAS and CMS, Smoot gave a talk to a packed Council Chamber about the connections between particle physics and cosmology, and how the two disciplines can help each other to find answers to their cosmic questions. Smoot's group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is currently working on the development of the Max Planck Surveyor, the next generation of satellite to study cosmic microwave background anisotropy, which will teach us about how our universe was formed.

  4. Members of the Forum Engelberg visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The Forum Engelberg is an annual interdisciplinary conference held in Engelberg, Switzerland intended to act as an international platform for debate and exchange of views on key issues affecting scientific research, technology, economics and philosophy. Photo 01: Members of the Forum Engelberg and public figures from Geneva visit SM18, the test hall for LHC magnets: (left to right) N. Siegel, Prof. Dr. Med. Bernard Mach, Mr Alexander Höchli, H. Wenninger, Mrs Mireille Quirina, Mme Konrade Von Bremen, Mrs Thérèse Wolf, Prof. Roger Berthouzoz, Mrs Marie-Anne Heimo, Mr Bernard Ecoffey.

  5. François Bayrou visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    On 3 July, François Bayrou, president of the French political party MOuvement DÉMocrate, visited CERN and took part in a round-table discussion. François Bayrou and Yves Schutz, from the ALICE collaboration, on the experimental site.As a politician, Mr Bayrou greatly appreciated the opportunity to hold discussions with CERN scientists on the international and collaborative nature of the science being done here, and on the development of particle physics over the next fifty years.

  6. CIFCA Delegation Visits Brazil and Argentina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang; Bo

    2014-01-01

    <正>At the invitation of the UNALE(National Union of State Legislatures)of Brazi land La Plata City of Argentina,the China International Friendship Cities Association(CIFCA)Delegation,led by Vice President Hu Sishe,visited the two countries from May 4 to 13,during which it attended the 18th Conference of UNALE(18th CNLE)in Brasilia,the Brazilian capital.Broad Attendance at CNLE The CNLE,an annual event sponsored by the UNALE,seeks to promote

  7. New visiting scientists in NSF's Earth sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, Ian

    The National Science Foundation's Division of Earth Sciences has hired two new rotators to serve as program directors, as part of the ongoing visiting scientists program. The new directors are Jonathan Fink in Geochemistry and Petrology, and L. Douglas James in Hydrological Sciences.Fink has exchanged roles for 1 year with NSF's John Snyder, who is on sabbatical at Arizona State University. Fink's current research includes studies of how the Theological properties of magma govern the emplacement of volcanic domes and lava flows, and the gravitational control on their mass movements. This research extends to the mechanisms of igneous intrusion and interpretation of volcanic features in extraterrestrial and submarine environments.

  8. The preteen visit: an opportunity for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Outcalt, Doug

    2006-12-01

    All early adolescents should visit a physician at age 11 or 12 years to receive a set of recommended vaccines. Two vaccines are recommended for boys in this age group-quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV4) and tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria, and acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap). Three vaccines are recommended for girls--MCV4, Tdap, and human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine. In addition, 2 doses of varicella vaccine are now recommended before age 5 years; both boys and girls at age 11 or 12 who have received only 1 dose should be given a second.

  9. Visiting All Sites with Your Dog

    OpenAIRE

    Maheshwari, Anil; Sack, Jörg-Rüdiger; Shahbaz, Kaveh

    2012-01-01

    Given a polygonal curve P, a pointset S, and an \\epsilon > 0, we study the problem of finding a polygonal curve Q whose vertices are from S and has a Frechet distance less or equal to \\epsilon to curve P. In this problem, Q must visit every point in S and we are allowed to reuse points of pointset in building Q. First, we show that this problem in NP-Complete. Then, we present a polynomial time algorithm for a special cases of this problem, when P is a convex polygon.

  10. Petroleum marketing monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PPM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o. b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly.

  11. Petroleum marketing monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly.

  12. Electric power monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Electric Power Monthly (EPM) for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source, consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.

  13. Electric power monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Sandra R.; Johnson, Melvin; McClevey, Kenneth; Calopedis, Stephen; Bolden, Deborah

    1992-05-01

    The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Additionally, statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, new generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel.

  14. Preparing Your Child for Visits to the Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Preparing Your Child for Visits to the Doctor KidsHealth > For Parents > Preparing Your Child for Visits ... vital to making an informed diagnosis. Choose a Doctor Who Relates Well to Kids Because your doctor ...

  15. 76 FR 59659 - Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-27

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology AGENCY: National Institute of Standards and Technology, Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology (VCAT or Committee), National Institute of Standards...

  16. 76 FR 29195 - Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-20

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology AGENCY: National Institute of Standards and Technology, Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of Public Meeting. SUMMARY: The Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology (VCAT or Committee), National Institute of Standards...

  17. 77 FR 59592 - Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology AGENCY: National Institute of Standards and Technology, Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. ] SUMMARY: The Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology (VCAT or Committee), National Institute of Standards...

  18. 78 FR 57839 - Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-20

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology AGENCY: National Institute of Standards and Technology, Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology (VCAT or Committee), National Institute of Standards...

  19. 75 FR 60082 - Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology AGENCY: National Institute of Standards and Technology, Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of Public Meeting. SUMMARY: The Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology (VCAT), National Institute of Standards and...

  20. 78 FR 29704 - Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology AGENCY: National Institute of Standards and Technology, Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of Public Meeting. SUMMARY: The Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology (VCAT or Committee), National Institute of Standards...

  1. 76 FR 2662 - Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology AGENCY: National Institute of Standards and Technology, Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of partially closed meeting. SUMMARY: The Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology (VCAT), National Institute of Standards...

  2. 75 FR 28785 - Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-24

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology AGENCY: National Institute of Standards and Technology, Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of Partially Closed Meeting. SUMMARY: The Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology (VCAT), National Institute of Standards...

  3. Ambient air quality and the frequency of physician visits by preschool children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durmišević Smajil

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Ambient air pollution in the town of Kakanj, mostly of industrial origin, has become a major reason for increased use of health care services by children under the age of six years. The aim of this study was to examine the correlation between ambient concentrations of sulphur dioxide (SO2, suspended particles and nitrogenoxides (NOx, and the frequency/number of visits to health care institutions by children under the age of six years. Material and methods. The investigation was carried out in the period from January to December 2003, in the area of Kakanj and Brnjic. We examined the average number of monthly visits to health care institutions and concentrations of sulphur dioxide, suspended particles and nitrogen oxides in the town of Kakanj. Results. The investigation shows that there is a linear increase of visits to health care institutions in relation to linear increase of concetrations of sulphur dioxide, suspended particles and nitrogen oxides (Ovisits to health care institutions significantly correlates (0.05 with the average concetrations of sulphur dioxide (0.713 and suspended particles (0.433, and with the average concentrations of nitrogen oxides (0.901. Discussion. High correlation between the increase in visits to health care institutions and increased concentrations of nitrogen oxides and sulphur dioxide was also found by Berktas, Jazbec, Transande. Conclusion. Children under the age of six in the town of Kakanj visit health care institutions considerably more frequently than children of the same age in the village of Brnjic, which significantly correlates with the average monthly concentrations of sulphur dioxide, suspended particles and nitrogen oxides in the air. .

  4. Depression improvement and parenting in low-income mothers in home visiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammerman, Robert T; Altaye, Mekibib; Putnam, Frank W; Teeters, Angelique R; Zou, Yuanshu; Van Ginkel, Judith B

    2015-06-01

    Research on older children and high-resource families demonstrates that maternal improvement in depression often leads to parallel changes in parenting and child adjustment. It is unclear if this association extends to younger children and low-income mothers. This study examined if In-Home Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (IH-CBT), a treatment for depressed mothers participating in home visiting programs, contributes to improvements in parenting and child adjustment. Ninety-three depressed mothers in home visiting between 2 and 10 months postpartum were randomly assigned to IH-CBT (n = 47) plus home visiting or standard home visiting (SHV; n = 46). Mothers were identified via screening and subsequent diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD). Measures of depression, parenting stress, nurturing parenting, and child adjustment were administered at pre-treatment, post-treatment, and 3 months follow-up. Results indicated that there were no differences between IH-CBT and controls on parenting and child adjustment. Low levels of depression were associated with decreased parenting stress and increased nurturing parenting. Improvement in depression was related to changes in parenting in low-income mothers participating in home visiting programs. IH-CBT was not independently associated with these improvements, although to the extent that treatment facilitated improvement; there were corresponding benefits to parenting. Child adjustment was not associated with maternal depression, a finding possibly attributed to the benefits of concurrent home visiting or measurement limitations. Future research should focus on longer-term follow-up, implications of relapse, and child adjustment in later years.

  5. Depression Improvement and Parenting in Low Income Mothers in Home Visiting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammerman, Robert T.; Altaye, Mekibib; Putnam, Frank W.; Teeters, Angelique R.; Zou, Yuanshu; Van Ginkel, Judith B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Research on older children and high resource families demonstrates that maternal improvement in depression often leads to parallel changes in parenting and child adjustment. It is unclear if this association extends to younger children and low income mothers. This study examined if In-Home Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (IH-CBT), a treatment for depressed mothers participating in home visiting programs, contributes to improvements in parenting and child adjustment. Methods Ninety-three depressed mothers in home visiting between 2–10 months postpartum were randomly assigned to IH-CBT (n=47) plus home visiting or standard home visiting (SHV; n = 46). Mothers were identified via screening and subsequent of MDD diagnosis. Measures of depression, parenting stress, nurturing parenting, and child adjustment were administered at pre-treatment, post-treatment, and three month follow-up. Results Results indicated that there were no differences between IH-CBT and controls on parenting and child adjustment. Low levels of depression were associated with decreased parenting stress and increased nurturing parenting. There was no association between maternal depression and child adjustment. Conclusions Improvement in depression was related to changes in parenting in low income mothers participating in home visiting programs. IH-CBT was not independently associated with these improvements, although to the extent that treatment facilitated improvement there were corresponding benefits to parenting. Child adjustment was not associated with maternal depression, a finding possibly attributed to the benefits of concurrent home visiting or measurement limitations. Future research should focus on longer term follow-up, implications of relapse, and child adjustment in later years. PMID:25369906

  6. VisitSense: Sensing Place Visit Patterns from Ambient Radio on Smartphones for Targeted Mobile Ads in Shopping Malls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byoungjip; Kang, Seungwoo; Ha, Jin-Young; Song, Junehwa

    2015-07-16

    In this paper, we introduce a novel smartphone framework called VisitSense that automatically detects and predicts a smartphone user's place visits from ambient radio to enable behavioral targeting for mobile ads in large shopping malls. VisitSense enables mobile app developers to adopt visit-pattern-aware mobile advertising for shopping mall visitors in their apps. It also benefits mobile users by allowing them to receive highly relevant mobile ads that are aware of their place visit patterns in shopping malls. To achieve the goal, VisitSense employs accurate visit detection and prediction methods. For accurate visit detection, we develop a change-based detection method to take into consideration the stability change of ambient radio and the mobility change of users. It performs well in large shopping malls where ambient radio is quite noisy and causes existing algorithms to easily fail. In addition, we proposed a causality-based visit prediction model to capture the causality in the sequential visit patterns for effective prediction. We have developed a VisitSense prototype system, and a visit-pattern-aware mobile advertising application that is based on it. Furthermore, we deploy the system in the COEX Mall, one of the largest shopping malls in Korea, and conduct diverse experiments to show the effectiveness of VisitSense.

  7. VisitSense: Sensing Place Visit Patterns from Ambient Radio on Smartphones for Targeted Mobile Ads in Shopping Malls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byoungjip Kim

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce a novel smartphone framework called VisitSense that automatically detects and predicts a smartphone user’s place visits from ambient radio to enable behavioral targeting for mobile ads in large shopping malls. VisitSense enables mobile app developers to adopt visit-pattern-aware mobile advertising for shopping mall visitors in their apps. It also benefits mobile users by allowing them to receive highly relevant mobile ads that are aware of their place visit patterns in shopping malls. To achieve the goal, VisitSense employs accurate visit detection and prediction methods. For accurate visit detection, we develop a change-based detection method to take into consideration the stability change of ambient radio and the mobility change of users. It performs well in large shopping malls where ambient radio is quite noisy and causes existing algorithms to easily fail. In addition, we proposed a causality-based visit prediction model to capture the causality in the sequential visit patterns for effective prediction. We have developed a VisitSense prototype system, and a visit-pattern-aware mobile advertising application that is based on it. Furthermore, we deploy the system in the COEX Mall, one of the largest shopping malls in Korea, and conduct diverse experiments to show the effectiveness of VisitSense.

  8. Mapping and Visiting in Functional and Object-oriented Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørmark, Kurt; Thomsen, Bent; Thomsen, Lone Leth

    2008-01-01

    Mapping and visiting represent different programming styles for traversals of collections of data.  Mapping is rooted in the functional programming paradigm, and visiting is rooted in the object-oriented programming paradigm.  This paper explores the similarities and differences between mapping...... and visiting, seen across the traditions in the two different programming paradigms. The paper is concluded with recommendations for mapping and visiting in programming languages that support both the functional and the object-oriented paradigms....

  9. Family perspective on home visiting program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebahattin Ziyanak

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on a lately constructed survey instrument that was intended to test the family perspective on a home visiting program and school. The four areas investigated were parent-teacher communications, student-teacher interactions, the parent’s perception of the school and the parents’ understanding of the home visiting program. The participants were selected from parents/guardians of 7th, 8th, 9th and 10th grade students at a Charter school in a southwestern major city in Texas, the United States of America. Twenty-two questions were asked to evaluate parent’s viewpoint with the four designated areas of interaction and communication of among school-parent-teacher. The findings showed that 73.5% of the students’ families living were in low income. The outcomes for reliability were promising (a = .909. Yet, the factor analysis outcomes of a rotated four-factor solution were insufficient to assess validity. This might be related to a small sample size (n = 45.

  10. Florivory and pollinator visitation: a cautionary tale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Kaoru; Dhami, Manpreet K.; Cross, David J.R.; Rice, Carolyn P.; Romano, Nic H.; Fukami, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Florivory, or damage to flowers by herbivores, can make flowers less attractive to pollinators, potentially resulting in reduced plant fitness. However, not many studies have combined observations with experiments to assess the causal link between florivory and pollination. We conducted field observations at eight sites in northern California, combined with field experiments that involved artificial floral damage, to study the effect of florivory on pollination in the hummingbird-pollinated sticky monkeyflower, Mimulus aurantiacus. We used two indicators of pollinator visitation, stigma closure and the presence of microorganisms in floral nectar. The field observations revealed that stigma closure was less frequent in damaged flowers than in intact flowers. In the experiments, however, floral damage did not decrease stigma closure or microbial detection in nectar. Instead, neighbouring flowers were similar for both indicators. These results suggest that the observed negative association between florivory and pollination is not causal and that the location of flowers is more important to pollinator visitation than florivory in these populations of M. aurantiacus. PMID:27178063

  11. MedAustron board visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    On 14 October, the board of EBG MedAustron, which is overseeing the construction of Austria’s hadron therapy centre, visited CERN. The visit recognized the relationship of shared knowledge, technology and training between CERN and MedAustron.   Normal.dotm 0 0 1 17 98 cern 1 1 120 12.0 0 false 18 pt 18 pt 0 0 false false false /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} ...

  12. Reducing returns to theatre for neck of femur fracture patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Selina; Dahill, Mark; Robinson, Derek

    2017-01-01

    The Royal United Hospital, Bath, admits approximately 550 patients with neck of femur fractures per year. The risks from returning to theatre for this patient group are often life-threatening. Post-operative wound ooze was noted to cause a significant rate of return to theatre, with increased lengths of stay and patient morbidity. A wound closure protocol was agreed by the consultant body. This information was disseminated by email and teaching sessions to all members of the multidisciplinary team, including surgeons, theatre staff and ortho-geriatricians. The plan-do-study-act model for improvement was used to reduce rates of returns to theatre for wound ooze. Interventions included cyclical teaching during each trainee rotation, updated inductions, posters, email reminders and scrub team involvement to open the protocol sutures unprompted. The primary outcome measure was returns to theatre for wound complications. Baseline data showed 4 returns to theatre over a two month period (4.40% of patients). Length of stay for each patient affected by wound ooze was also compared to the departmental mean. In the 6 month intervention period there was one return to theatre (0.36% of patients). The observed reduction saved the department an estimated £13,831 in length of stay alone. The standardisation of wound closure protocol, with continued reinforcement to all members of the multidisciplinary team, improves patient outcome in this group. Mobilising a group of clinicians across a variety of specialities, with one common goal, is highly effective for patients, improves multidisciplinary working and reduces cost.

  13. Risk factors for recurrent emergency department visits for hyperglycemia in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Justin W; Gushulak, Katherine M; Columbus, Melanie P; van Aarsen, Kristine; Hamelin, Alexandra L; Wells, George A; Stiell, Ian G

    2017-12-01

    Patients with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus may present repeatedly to the emergency department (ED) for management and treatment of hyperglycemic episodes, including diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors that predict unplanned recurrent ED visits for hyperglycemia in patients with diabetes within 30 days of initial presentation. We conducted a 1-year health records review of patients ≥18 years presenting to one of four tertiary care EDs with a discharge diagnosis of hyperglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, or hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state. Trained research personnel collected data on patient characteristics and determined if patients had an unplanned recurrent ED visit for hyperglycemia within 30 days of their initial presentation. Multivariate logistic regression models using generalized estimating equations to account for patients with multiple visits determined predictor variables independently associated with recurrent ED visits for hyperglycemia within 30 days. There were 833 ED visits for hyperglycemia in the 1-year period. 54.6% were male and mean (SD) age was 48.8 (19.5). Of all visitors, 156 (18.7%) had a recurrent ED visit for hyperglycemia within 30 days. Factors independently associated with recurrent hyperglycemia visits included a previous hyperglycemia visit in the past month (odds ratio [OR] 3.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.1-5.8), age 20 mmol/L (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.3-3.7), having a family physician (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.0-4.6), and being on insulin (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.1). Having a systolic blood pressure between 90-150 mmHg (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.30-0.93) and heart rate >110 bpm (OR 0.41, 95% CI 0.23-0.72) were protective factors independently associated with not having a recurrent hyperglycemia visit. This unique ED-based study reports five risk factors and two protective factors associated with recurrent ED visits for hyperglycemia within 30 days in patients

  14. 42 CFR 405.2416 - Visiting nurse services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Visiting nurse services. 405.2416 Section 405.2416... Health Center Services § 405.2416 Visiting nurse services. (a) Visiting nurse services are covered if: (1... are furnished by a registered nurse, licensed practical nurse, or licensed vocational nurse who...

  15. Inequities in maternal postnatal visits among public and private patients: 2004 Pelotas cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Paula L

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The postnatal period is the ideal time to deliver interventions to improve the health of both the newborn and the mother. However, postnatal care shows low-level coverage in a large number of countries. The objectives of this study were to: 1 investigate inequities in maternal postnatal visits, 2 examine differences in postnatal care coverage between public and private providers and 3 explore the relationship between the absence of maternal postnatal visits and exclusive breastfeeding, use of contraceptive methods and maternal smoking three months after birth. Methods In the calendar year of 2004 a birth cohort study was started in the city of Pelotas, Brazil. Mothers were interviewed soon after delivery and at three months after birth. The absence of postnatal visits was defined as having no consultations between the time of hospital discharge and the third month post-partum. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the association between absence of postnatal visits and type of insurance scheme adjusting for potential confounding factors. Results Poorer women, black/mixed, those with lower level of education, single mothers, adolescents, multiparae, smokers, women who delivered vaginally and those who were not assisted by a physician were less likely to attend postnatal care. Postnatal visits were also less frequent among women who relied in the public sector than among private patients (72.4% vs 96% among public and private patients, respectively, x2 p Conclusion Postpartum care is available for every woman free of charge in the Brazilian Publicly-funded health care system. However, low levels of postpartum care were seen in the study (77%. Efforts should be made to increase the percentage of women receiving postpartum care, particularly those in socially disadvantaged groups. This could include locally-adapted health education interventions that address women's beliefs and attitudes towards postpartum care. There

  16. The Function of Letters and Visits System and Its Regression to the Right Position from the Perspective of Constitutionalism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Quanzeng; Zha Zhigang

    2011-01-01

    The Letters and Visits system is a kind of system with unique Chinese characteristics,whose function mainly includes democratic supervision,communication between governments and the public,and civil rights relief etc.The system itself does not conflict with the rule of law while the reason for the flooding of letters -or -visits' matters lies in the understanding of its misplaced function,particularly for the unlimited expansion of relief function and neglect of supervision and communication functions.Through the practice of democracy,the administrative self - restraint idea and protection of the independent status of the department for letters and visits,its function can return to the right position.

  17. Text messaging to improve attendance at post-operative clinic visits after adult male circumcision for HIV prevention: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odeny, Thomas A; Bailey, Robert C; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Simoni, Jane M; Tapia, Kenneth A; Yuhas, Krista; Holmes, King K; McClelland, R Scott

    2012-01-01

    Following male circumcision for HIV prevention, a high proportion of men fail to return for their scheduled seven-day post-operative visit. We evaluated the effect of short message service (SMS) text messages on attendance at this important visit. We enrolled 1200 participants >18 years old in a two-arm, parallel, randomized controlled trial at 12 sites in Nyanza province, Kenya. Participants received daily SMS text messages for seven days (n = 600) or usual care (n = 600). The primary outcome was attendance at the scheduled seven-day post-operative visit. The primary analysis was by intention-to-treat. Of participants receiving SMS, 387/592 (65.4%) returned, compared to 356/596 (59.7%) in the control group (relative risk [RR] = 1.09, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00-1.20; p = 0.04). Men who paid more than US$1.25 to travel to clinic were at higher risk for failure to return compared to those who spent ≤ US$1.25 (adjusted relative risk [aRR] 1.35, 95% CI 1.15-1.58; pText messaging resulted in a modest improvement in attendance at the 7-day post-operative clinic visit following adult male circumcision. Factors associated with failure to return were mainly structural, and included transportation costs and low educational level. ClinicalTrials.govNCT01186575.

  18. Petroleum marketing monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data.

  19. Philopatry: A return to origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, John M.

    2007-01-01

    The word “philopatry” is a combination of the prefix philo (from the Greekphilos, “beloved”) and the Latin patria, which means “fatherland” or “homeland.” Since the first English-language use of “philopatry” in an ornithological context by Huntington (1951), the term has been applied to two types of site-faithful behavior in birds. Closest to the etymological meaning is the first, “natal philopatry,” which means not dispersing far from, or returning to, a birthplace for reproduction. The second is “breeding philopatry,” which means returning to the same breeding area each year, though that area may not be an individual’s birth place (Shields 1982, Anderson et al. 1992). Therefore, any assessment of breeding philopatry likely includes some immigrant individuals, whereas assessments of natal philopatry include only locally hatched or born individuals.

  20. PENGARUH BULAN RAMADHAN TERHADAP RETURN PASAR SAHAM DI BURSA EFEK INDONESIA (1425H-1434H

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aprida Rusmayanti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of monthly effect is when the desire of financiers on the liquidity of stock changes from month to month in a year. This monthly effect of course is contrary to the concept of efficient markets, but it gives confidence to investors that there is still a gap to benefit by using information of price and sales volume in past. Ramadhan effect is monthly effect, it has been investigated several time in Islamic countries and it was found that there was a difference in market return during Ramadhan month rather than during any other months. The purpose of this study was to describe the effect of Ramadhan on the stock market return in the Indonesia Stock Exchange (IDX. Ramadhan effect, is a seasonal anomaly in the financial markets, when stock returns during Ramadhan is different from the other. The unit of analysis used in this study is a JSX composite of 1425H-1434H (February 21, 2004 -3 November 2013. The statistical method used to test the hypothesis is nonparametric test (sign test, because the data are not normally distributed. The results showed that there was no influence of Ramadhan on the stock market return in the Indonesia Stock Exchange.  The cause of the lack of differences in returns among others due to the stability of the value of JSX Composite which is basic calculation of returns, but it also may be due to cultural differences and different conditions during the month of Ramadhan between Indonesia and other countries. Investor behavior changes that occur in other countries during Ramadhan does not occur in Indonesia due to the investors’s composition in Indonesia is still dominated by foreign and institutional investors. The results of this study indicate that the capital market in Indonesia efficient in weak form, because the pattern of stock price movement is random or unpredictable  Keywords:Return of stock market, Ramadhan