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  1. Reducing six-month inpatient psychiatric recidivism and costs through case management.

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    Kolbasovsky, Andrew; Reich, Leonard; Meyerkopf, Neil

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the reduction in inpatient psychiatric recidivism and costs associated with an intensive case management (ICM) program among high-risk adults with chronic mental health conditions. An intent-to-treat, historical control design was used to examine utilization differences between 306 intervention group (IG) members eligible to receive ICM services and a cohort of 290 baseline group (BG) members over a six-month outcome period. Members were identified retrospectively using identical criteria during one year prior to implementation of the program. The six-month recidivism rate for BG members was 49.67% compared to 22.07% among IG members. Forward stepwise regression results indicated a significant main effect for the ICM intervention on inpatient psychiatric costs. Inpatient psychiatric costs for the six-month outcome period were $4,982.90 lower per member in the IG group. Additional models demonstrated that the ICM intervention was associated with significantly lower inpatient substance abuse costs and psychiatric emergency department costs. There were no statistically significant increases in utilization associated with the ICM intervention. After factoring in program costs, it is estimated that the ICM services contributed to almost $1,500,000 in cost savings over the six-month outcome period. The ICM intervention was associated with significant reductions in inpatient, psychiatric six-month readmission rates and associated costs among adult members who are at elevated risk of inpatient, psychiatric recidivism. The intervention, enrollment process, and measurement strategies can be adapted for use by health plans looking to reduce psychiatric costs.

  2. [Delirium in elderly inpatients. An 18 month follow-up].

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    Vázquez, Fernando J; Benchimol, Javier; Giunta, Diego; Cafferata, Carlos; Freixas, Antonio; Vallone, Marcelo; Andresik, Diego; Pollan, Javier; Aprile, Ana; Lorenzo, Jimena; Waisman, Gabriel; Camera, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Delirium usually hardens care during hospitalization and increases morbidity during hospital stay and after discharge. The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence of delirium in elderly inpatients in a Buenos Aires hospital, its morbidity and mortality during hospital stay and the next 18 month follow-up. Patients aged 70 or older admitted to internal medicine unit between September 2005 and May 2006 were enrolled. Delirium was assessed with the Spanish version of Confusion Assessment Method. Demographic data, cause of admition and length of stay, destination after discharge and mortality were registered. A new evaluation was made 18 months after discharge. We evaluated 194 patients and 74 were excluded. Of the 120 included, 52 (43.3%) presented delirium. We found significant differences between patients with and without delirium in previous placement in nursing home (17.3% vs. 1.5%; p < 0.002), dementia (40.4% vs. 8.8%; p < 0.001), median activity of daily living (5 vs. 6; p < 0.001), length-of-stay (7 vs. 5; p = 0.04) and mortality rate (21.2% vs. 1.5%; p < 0.001). Evaluation 18 months later showed differences between patients with and without delirium in median of activity of daily living (1/6 vs. 5/6), patients living in nursing homes (27.5% vs. 7.9%), estimated survival 35.3% (CI 95%: 24-49%) at day 569 and 49% (CI 95%: 32.9-65.4%) at day 644. The difference between survival curves was statistically significant (p = 0.027). Delirium increases morbidity and mortality during hospital stay. Elderly with delirium are at risk of worsening disability and of becoming dependent after discharge and it is a risk factor for higher mortality during the following months after discharge.

  3. Intensive lifestyle treatment for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in children with severe obesity: inpatient versus ambulatory treatment.

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    Koot, B G P; van der Baan-Slootweg, O H; Vinke, S; Bohte, A E; Tamminga-Smeulders, C L J; Jansen, P L M; Stoker, J; Benninga, M A

    2016-01-01

    Lifestyle intervention is the only established therapy for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The optimal treatment schedule and predictors of response of this treatment have not been established in children. We aimed to evaluate the 2-year efficacy of an inpatient versus ambulatory intensive lifestyle intervention for treating NAFLD in children with severe obesity. A cohort study of 51 severely obese non-diabetic children (mean age 14.7 (±2.4) years; BMI-z-score 3.5 (±0.5)) with liver steatosis were non-randomly allocated to inpatient treatment (2 or 6 months), ambulatory treatment or usual care. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy determined liver steatosis and serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) at 6 months were the primary outcome measures. Baseline variables were evaluated as predictors of treatment response. Liver steatosis had disappeared in 43, 29 and 22% and serum ALT normalized in 41, 33 and 6% at the end of 6 months in the inpatient, ambulatory or usual care treatment groups, respectively. Only the proportions of ALT normalization in inpatient and ambulatory treatment compared with usual care were significantly higher. Treatment effects of inpatient and ambulatory treatment were sustained at 1.5 years follow-up. No baseline characteristic, including PNPLA3 polymorphism or leptin, was consistently predictive for treatment response. A 6-month intensive inpatient and ambulatory lifestyle treatment in children with severe obesity reverses NAFLD in a minority of patients. This study suggests that inpatient compared with ambulatory intensive treatment does not importantly increase treatment success. Further efforts to optimize and individualize lifestyle interventions and additional treatments options are needed particular for children with severe obesity resistant to conventional lifestyle interventions.

  4. A Case Report Exploring Activity Intensity in Inpatient Rehabilitation after Stroke

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    Kathryn Zalewski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose. Inpatient rehabilitation in countries other than the United States (US has been described as a time where patients are often not engaged in intensive physical activity. The purpose of this case report is to explore the amount and intensity of physical activity provided in inpatient rehabilitation after stroke in the US. Methods. This study presents a case report of a person admitted to an inpatient rehabilitation unit after sustaining a first stroke. A customized data collection tracked type of activity, activity intensity and social interaction every 5 minutes during the rehabilitation day. Results. 74 percent of the day was spent in low intensity, often seated, physical activity; 14% of the day was spent resting or sleeping. Only 2.91% the day was spent in moderate or high intensity activity with a mobility focus. Conclusions. Consistent with other studies, this case report suggests a relatively low physical demand to rehabilitation delivered in inpatient stroke rehabilitation. This case begins to raise questions about optimized rehabilitation parameters for acute stroke rehabilitation.

  5. Quality of life changes following inpatient and outpatient treatment in obsessive-compulsive disorder: a study with 12 months follow-up

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    Hertenstein Elisabeth

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quality of life (QoL is increasingly recognized as a critical outcome parameter in mental health studies. The aim of this study was to investigate different domains of the QoL in persons with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD before and after a multimodal, disorder-specific in- and outpatient treatment. Methods Data of 73 persons with OCD treated in an inpatient setting followed by outpatient treatment were analyzed. The World Health Organization Quality of Life abbreviated (a multidimensional measure of the QoL and the Beck Depression Inventory were administered prior to (baseline and 12 months after the inpatient treatment (follow-up. Results At baseline, participants reported a significantly diminished psychological, social, physical, and global QoL compared to the German general population. Environmental QoL was not impaired in the present sample. The QoL was significantly improved at follow-up, except for social QoL, but remained below norm values. The QoL improvement was predicted by improvements of depressive symptoms. Conclusions The results indicate that persons with OCD suffer from a very low QoL. The QoL was significantly improved after 12 months of intensive state-of-the-art treatment. However, the QoL indices remained considerably lower than population norm values, indicating the need for additional research into novel treatment options for persons with OCD.

  6. Neonatal Intensive Care and Child Psychiatry Inpatient Care: Do Different Working Conditions Influence Stress Levels?

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    Evalotte Mörelius

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Nurses often experience work-related stress. High stress can negatively affect job satisfaction and lead to emotional exhaustion with risk of burnout. Aim. To analyse possible differences in biological stress markers, psychosocial working conditions, health, and well-being between nurses working in two different departments. Methods. Stress was evaluated in nurses working in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU (n=33 and nurses working in a child and adolescent psychiatry inpatient ward (CAP (n=14 using salivary cortisol and HbA1c. Salivary cortisol was measured three times a day on two consecutive days during two one-week periods, seven weeks apart (= 12 samples/person. Psychosocial working conditions, health, and well-being were measured once. Results. NICU nurses had better social support and more self-determination. CAP nurses had a lower salivary cortisol quotient, poorer general health, and higher client-related burnout scores. Conclusion. When comparing these nurses with existing norm data for Sweden, as a group their scores reflect less work-related stress than Swedes overall. However, the comparison between NICU and CAP nurses indicates a less healthy work situation for CAP nurses. Relevance to Clinical Practice. Healthcare managers need to acknowledge the less healthy work situation CAP nurses experience in order to provide optimal support and promote good health.

  7. Consumer-Based Physical Activity Monitor as a Practical Way to Measure Walking Intensity During Inpatient Stroke Rehabilitation.

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    Klassen, Tara D; Semrau, Jennifer A; Dukelow, Sean P; Bayley, Mark T; Hill, Michael D; Eng, Janice J

    2017-09-01

    Identifying practical ways to accurately measure exercise intensity and dose in clinical environments is essential to advancing stroke rehabilitation. This is especially relevant in monitoring walking activity during inpatient rehabilitation where recovery is greatest. This study evaluated the accuracy of a readily available consumer-based physical activity monitor during daily inpatient stroke rehabilitation physical therapy sessions. Twenty-one individuals admitted to inpatient rehabilitation were monitored for a total of 471 one-hour physical therapy sessions which consisted of walking and nonwalking therapeutic activities. Participants wore a consumer-based physical activity monitor (Fitbit One) and the gold standard for assessing step count (StepWatch Activity Monitor) during physical therapy sessions. Linear mixed modeling was used to assess the relationship of the step count of the Fitbit to the StepWatch Activity Monitor. Device accuracy is reported as the percent error of the Fitbit compared with the StepWatch Activity Monitor. A strong relationship (slope=0.99; 95% confidence interval, 0.97-1.01) was found between the number of steps captured by the Fitbit One and the StepWatch Activity Monitor. The Fitbit One had a mean error of 10.9% (5.3) for participants with walking velocities 0.8 m/s. This study provides preliminary evidence that the Fitbit One, when positioned on the nonparetic ankle, can accurately measure walking steps early after stroke during inpatient rehabilitation physical therapy sessions. URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01915368. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Delirium en ancianos hospitalizados: Seguimiento de 18 meses Delirium in elderly inpatients: An 18 month follow-up

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    Fernando J. Vázquez

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue describir la prevalencia de síndrome confusional agudo en ancianos hospitalizados, la evolución durante la internación y a los 18 meses. Se evaluó en forma prospectiva a pacientes de 70 años de edad o mayores, internados en el Servicio de Clínica Médica de nuestro hospital, entre septiembre de 2005 y mayo de 2006. Se utilizó una versión validada en español del Confussion Assessment Method para diagnosticar delirium. A los 18 meses se evaluó el estado vital, lugar de residencia, actividades de la vida diaria, dependencia de cuidadores y reinternaciones. Se evaluaron 194 pacientes y 74 fueron excluidos. De los 120 casos incluidos, 52 (43.3% presentaron delirium. La edad media fue de 82.6 años (DS: 7.4 en el grupo de pacientes con síndrome confusional agudo y de 80.4 años (DS: 5.6 en el grupo de pacientes sin delirium. Al comparar estos dos grupos encontramos diferencias significativas en las características, siendo más frecuentes en el grupo con delirium la residencia previa en un centro de tercer nivel (17.3% vs. 1.5%; p Delirium usually hardens care during hospitalization and increases morbidity during hospital stay and after discharge. The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence of delirium in elderly inpatients in a Buenos Aires hospital, its morbidity and mortality during hospital stay and the next 18 month follow-up. Patients aged 70 or older admitted to internal medicine unit between September 2005 and May 2006 were enrolled. Delirium was assessed with the Spanish version of Confusion Assessment Method. Demographic data, cause of admition and length of stay, destination after discharge and mortality were registered. A new evaluation was made 18 months after discharge. We evaluated 194 patients and 74 were excluded. Of the 120 included, 52 (43.3% presented delirium. We found significant differences between patients with and without delirium in previous placement in nursing home

  9. A description of the outcomes, frequency, duration, and intensity of occupational, physical, and speech therapy in inpatient stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karges, Joy; Smallfied, Stacy

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the outcomes, frequency, duration, intensity, and the specific types of therapeutic intervention of inpatient stroke rehabilitation specific to one hospital in the upper midwestern region of the United States following implementation of the IRF PPS. This was a non-experimental retrospective chart review of individuals who received inpatient stroke rehabilitation from January 2003 to June 2004. A total of 80 medical records met inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data were collected on patient and clinical characteristics, FIM scores, LOS, and discharge location as well as the intensity, frequency, and total number of occupational therapy (OT), physical therapy (PT), and speech therapy (ST) treatment sessions, the type of therapy sessions provided, and the type of therapy service providers. LOS was 15.19 days +/- 11.69. There was a significant difference (t =-12.163; p = .000) between FIM total admission score (71.90 +/- 21.47) and FIM total discharge score (92.23 +/- 24.43) ). There was a significant difference in FIM discharge scores (F = 26.494; p = 000) based on discharge location with differences found between the discharge locations of home and skilled nursing facilities (p = .000) and skilled nursing facilities and assisted living facilities (p = .019). Mean number of therapy sessions per subject was 21.73 +/- 18.11 for OT, 21.99 +/- 18.10 for PT, and 18.86 +/- 18.71 for ST. Mean number of sessions per day was 1.72 +/- 0.31 sessions for OT, 1.65 +/- 0.36 sessions for PT, and 1.52 +/- 0.48 for ST. Mean number of minutes provided per session was 29.87 +/- 1.77 minutes for OT, 29.70 +/- 1.65 minutes for PT, and 27.23 +/- 6.64 minutes for ST. Mean intensity (days of therapy/length of stay) was 0.82 +/- 0.13 for OT, 0.85 +/- 0.13 for PT and 0.70 +/- 0.24 for ST. Of the total OT sessions, 97.41% were conducted by the OT and 77.68% were intervention only. Of the total PT sessions, 65.66% were conducted by the PT, 15.35% were

  10. Multidisciplinary predialysis education reduced the inpatient and total medical costs of the first 6 months of dialysis in incident hemodialysis patients.

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    Yu-Jen Yu

    Full Text Available The multidisciplinary pre-dialysis education (MPE retards renal progression, reduce incidence of dialysis and mortality of CKD patients. However, the financial benefit of this intervention on patients starting hemodialysis has not yet been evaluated in prospective and randomized trial.We studied the medical expenditure and utilization incurred in the first 6 months of dialysis initiation in 425 incident hemodialysis patients who were randomized into MPE and non-MPE groups before reaching end-stage renal disease. The content of the MPE was standardized in accordance with the National Kidney Foundation Dialysis Outcomes Quality Initiative guidelines.The mean age of study patients was 63.8±13.2 years, and 221 (49.7% of them were men. The mean serum creatinine level and estimated glomerular filtration rate was 6.1±4.0 mg/dL and 7.6±2.9 mL⋅min(-1⋅1.73 m(-2, respectively, at dialysis initiation. MPE patients tended to have lower total medical cost in the first 6 months after hemodialysis initiation (9147.6±0.1 USD/patient vs. 11190.6±0.1 USD/patient, p = 0.003, fewer in numbers [0 (1 vs. 1 (2, p<0.001] and length of hospitalization [0 (15 vs. 8 (27 days, p<0.001], and also lower inpatient cost [0 (2617.4 vs. 1559,4 (5019.6 USD/patient, p<0.001] than non-MPE patients, principally owing to reduced cardiovascular hospitalization and vascular access-related surgeries. The decreased inpatient and total medical cost associated with MPE were independent of patients' demographic characteristics, concomitant disease, baseline biochemistry and use of double-lumen catheter at initiation of hemodialysis.Participation of multidisciplinary education in pre-dialysis period was independently associated with reduction in the inpatient and total medical expenditures of the first 6 months post-dialysis owing to decreased inpatient service utilization secondary to cardiovascular causes and vascular access-related surgeries.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00644046.

  11. Painful Memories: Reliability of Pain Intensity Recall at 3 Months in Senior Patients

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    Lee, Jacques S.; Griffith, Lauren E.; Paquet, Jean; Chauny, Jean-Marc

    2017-01-01

    Background. Validity of pain recall is questioned in research. Objective. To evaluate the reliability of pain intensity recall for seniors in an emergency department (ED). Methods. This study was part of a prospective multicenter project for seniors (≥65 years old) treated in an ED for minor traumatic injury. Pain intensity (0–10 numerical rating scale) was evaluated at the initial ED visit, at one week (baseline), and 3 months. At three months, patients were asked to recall the pain intensity they had at baseline. Results. 482 patients were interviewed (mean age 76.6 years, SD ± 7.3) and 72.8% were female. Intraclass correlation coefficient between pain at baseline and its recall was 0.24 (95% CI: 0.14–0.33). Senior patients tended to overestimate their pain intensity by a mean of 1.2 (95% CI: 0.9–1.5) units. A stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that the variance of baseline pain recall at 3 months was explained by pain at ED visit (11%), pain at 3 months (7%), and pain at baseline (2%). Conclusion. The accuracy of pain intensity recall after three months is poor in seniors and seems to be influenced by the pain experienced at the time of injury.

  12. Multidisciplinary predialysis education reduced the inpatient and total medical costs of the first 6 months of dialysis in incident hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yu-Jen; Wu, I-Wen; Huang, Chun-Yu; Hsu, Kuang-Hung; Lee, Chin-Chan; Sun, Chio-Yin; Hsu, Heng-Jung; Wu, Mai-Szu

    2014-01-01

    The multidisciplinary pre-dialysis education (MPE) retards renal progression, reduce incidence of dialysis and mortality of CKD patients. However, the financial benefit of this intervention on patients starting hemodialysis has not yet been evaluated in prospective and randomized trial. We studied the medical expenditure and utilization incurred in the first 6 months of dialysis initiation in 425 incident hemodialysis patients who were randomized into MPE and non-MPE groups before reaching end-stage renal disease. The content of the MPE was standardized in accordance with the National Kidney Foundation Dialysis Outcomes Quality Initiative guidelines. The mean age of study patients was 63.8±13.2 years, and 221 (49.7%) of them were men. The mean serum creatinine level and estimated glomerular filtration rate was 6.1±4.0 mg/dL and 7.6±2.9 mL⋅min(-1)⋅1.73 m(-2), respectively, at dialysis initiation. MPE patients tended to have lower total medical cost in the first 6 months after hemodialysis initiation (9147.6±0.1 USD/patient vs. 11190.6±0.1 USD/patient, p = 0.003), fewer in numbers [0 (1) vs. 1 (2), pcatheter at initiation of hemodialysis. Participation of multidisciplinary education in pre-dialysis period was independently associated with reduction in the inpatient and total medical expenditures of the first 6 months post-dialysis owing to decreased inpatient service utilization secondary to cardiovascular causes and vascular access-related surgeries. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00644046.

  13. Incidence and Severity of Prescribing Errors in Parenteral Nutrition for Pediatric Inpatients at a Neonatal and Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

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    Theresa Hermanspann

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesPediatric inpatients are particularly vulnerable to medication errors (MEs, especially in highly individualized preparations like parenteral nutrition (PN. Aside from prescribing via a computerized physician order entry system (CPOE, we evaluated the effect of cross-checking by a clinical pharmacist to prevent harm from PN order errors in a neonatal and pediatric intensive care unit (NICU/PICU.MethodsThe incidence of prescribing errors in PN in a tertiary level NICU/PICU was surveyed prospectively between March 2012 and July 2013 (n = 3,012 orders. A pharmacist cross-checked all PN orders prior to preparation. Errors were assigned to seven different error-type categories. Three independent experts from different academic tertiary level NICUs judged the severity of each error according to the National Coordinating Council for Medication Error Reporting and Prevention (NCC MERP Index (categories A–I.ResultsThe error rate was 3.9% for all 3,012 orders (118 prescribing errors in 111 orders. 77 (6.0%, 1,277 orders errors occurred in the category concentration range, all concerning a relative overdose of calcium gluconate for peripheral infusion. The majority of all events (60% were assigned to categories C and D (without major harmful consequences while 28% could not be assigned due to missing majority decision. Potential harmful consequences requiring interventions (category E could have occurred in 12% of assessments.ConclusionNext to systematic application of clinical guidelines and prescribing via CPOE, order review by a clinical pharmacist is still required to effectively reduce MEs and thus to prevent minor and major adverse drug events with the aim to enhance medication safety.

  14. Preventing compulsory admission to psychiatric inpatient care: Perceived coercion, empowerment and self-reported mental health functioning after 12 months of preventive monitoring

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    Barbara eLay

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate effects of a preventive monitoring program targeted to reduce compulsory re-hospitalization and perceived coercion in patients with severe mental disorder. We analyze patient outcomes in terms of perceived coercion, empowerment and self-reported mental health functioning at 12 months. Methods: The program consists of individualized psycho-education, crisis cards and, after discharge from the psychiatric hospital, a 24-month preventive monitoring. In total, 238 psychiatric inpatients who had had compulsory admission(s during the past 24 months were included in the trial. T1-assessment 12 months after baseline was achieved for 182 patients. Results: Study participants reported lower levels of perceived coercion, negative pressures and process exclusion, a higher level of optimism, and a lesser degree of distress due to symptoms, interpersonal relations and social role functioning (significant time effects. However, improvements were not confined to the intervention group, but seen also in the TAU group (no significant group or interaction effects. Altered perceptions were linked to older age, shorter illness duration, female sex, non-psychotic disorder, and compulsory hospitalization not due to risk of harm to others. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that changes in the subjective perspective were fuelled primarily by participation in this study, rather than by having received the specific intervention. The study contributes to a better understanding of the interaction between 'objective' measures (compulsory readmissions and patients’ perceptions and highlights the need for treatment approaches promoting empowerment in individuals with a history of involuntary psychiatric hospitalizations.

  15. Preventing Compulsory Admission to Psychiatric Inpatient Care: Perceived Coercion, Empowerment, and Self-Reported Mental Health Functioning after 12 Months of Preventive Monitoring.

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    Lay, Barbara; Drack, Thekla; Bleiker, Marco; Lengler, Silke; Blank, Christina; Rössler, Wulf

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of a preventive monitoring program targeted to reduce compulsory rehospitalization and perceived coercion in patients with severe mental disorder. We analyze patient outcomes in terms of perceived coercion, empowerment, and self-reported mental health functioning at 12 months. The program consists of individualized psychoeducation, crisis cards and, after discharge from the psychiatric hospital, a 24-month preventive monitoring. In total, 238 psychiatric inpatients who had had compulsory admission(s) during the past 24 months were included in the trial. T1-assessment 12 months after baseline was achieved for 182 patients. Study participants reported lower levels of perceived coercion, negative pressures, and process exclusion, a higher level of optimism, and a lesser degree of distress due to symptoms, interpersonal relations, and social role functioning (significant time effects). However, improvements were not confined to the intervention group, but seen also in the treatment-as-usual group (no significant group or interaction effects). Altered perceptions were linked to older age, shorter illness duration, female sex, non-psychotic disorder, and compulsory hospitalization not due to risk of harm to others. Our findings suggest that changes in the subjective perspective were fueled primarily by participation in this study rather than by having received the specific intervention. The study contributes to a better understanding of the interaction between "objective" measures (compulsory readmissions) and patients' perceptions and highlights the need for treatment approaches promoting empowerment in individuals with a history of involuntary psychiatric hospitalizations.

  16. An Evaluation of the Italian Version of the Yale Food Addiction Scale in Obese Adult Inpatients Engaged in a 1-Month-Weight-Loss Treatment.

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    Ceccarini, Martina; Manzoni, Gian Mauro; Castelnuovo, Gianluca; Molinari, Enrico

    2015-11-01

    Addiction is a compulsive need for and use of a specific substance leading to a habit, tolerance, and psychophysiological symptoms. Excessive food consumption is similar to that of substance addiction. Some individuals who have trouble losing weight display addictive eating symptoms. To investigate food addiction in a sample of obese adults referred to hospital for a 1-month-weight-loss treatment. The Italian version of the Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS-16) was used as a screening tool in 88 obese inpatients. The construct validity of the YFAS-16 was assessed by testing its correlations with measures of binge eating (Binge Eating Scale), impulsiveness (Barratt Impulsiveness Scale), and emotional dysregulation (Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale). 34.1% of our sample was diagnosed with YFAS food addiction. Such diagnosis was also supported by strong associations between FA and psychological and behavioral features, typically descriptive of classic addiction. Patients who endorsed the YFAS-16 criteria for food addiction (FA) had significantly higher binge eating levels, greater emotional dysregulation, and nonacceptance of negative feelings; they lacked goal-oriented behavior, had little impulse control, had difficulty in emotion recognition, and attentional impulsivity; and they were unable to concentrate and lacked inhibitory control behavior, unlike participants who did not meet the FA criteria. Further research is needed to support the reliability of the YFAS-16. This measure has the potential to be applied in epidemiological research, estimating the prevalence of FA within the Italian population and to assess new treatments' efficacy for obese patients with food addiction symptoms seeking weight-loss treatments.

  17. A 9-month follow-up of a 3-month web-based alcohol treatment program using intensive asynchronous therapeutic support.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postel, Marloes Gerda; ter Huurne, E.D.; de Haan, H.A.; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; de Jong, Cor A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Web-based alcohol interventions have demonstrated efficacy in randomized controlled trials. However, most studies have involved self-help interventions without therapeutic support. Objectives: To examine the results of a 3-month web-based alcohol treatment program using intensive,

  18. A 9-month follow-up of a 3-month web-based alcohol treatment program using intensive asynchronous therapeutic support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postel, M.G.; Huurne, E.D. ter; Haan, H.A. de; Palen, J.A.M. van der; Jong, C.A.J. de

    2015-01-01

    Background: Web-based alcohol interventions have demonstrated efficacy in randomized controlled trials. However, most studies have involved self-help interventions without therapeutic support. Objectives: To examine the results of a 3-month web-based alcohol treatment program using intensive,

  19. A 9-month follow-up of a 3-month web-based alcohol treatment program using intensive asynchronous therapeutic support.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postel, M.G.; Huurne, ter E.D.; Haan, de H.A.; Palen, van der Job; Jong, de Cor A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Web-based alcohol interventions have demonstrated efficacy in randomized controlled trials. However, most studies have involved self-help interventions without therapeutic support. Objectives: To examine the results of a 3-month web-based alcohol treatment program using intensive, asynch

  20. Development of Specific Aspects of Spirituality during a 6-Month Intensive Yoga Practice

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    Arndt Büssing

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The majority of research on yoga focuses on its psychophysiological and therapeutic benefits, while the spiritual aspects are rarely addressed. Changes of specific aspects of spirituality were thus investigated among 160 individuals (91% women, mean age 40.9±8.3 years; 57% Christians starting a 2-year yoga teacher training. We used standardized questionnaires to measure aspects of spirituality (ASP, mindfulness (FMI—Freiburg Mindfulness Inventory, life satisfaction (BMLSS—Brief Multidimensional Life Satisfaction Scale, and positive mood (lightheartedness/relief. At the start of the course, scores of the respective ASP subscales for search for insight/wisdom, transcendence conviction, and conscious interactions/compassion were high, while those for religious orientation were low. Within the 6 month observation period, both conscious interactions/compassion (effect size, Cohen’s =.33, Religious orientation (=.21, Lightheartedness/Relief (=.75 and mindfulness (=.53 increased significantly. Particularly non-religious/non-spiritual individuals showed moderate effects for an increase of conscious interactions/compassion. The results from this study suggest that an intensive yoga practice (1 may significantly increase specific aspects of practitioners’ spirituality, mindfulness, and mood, (2 that these changes are dependent in part on their original spiritual/religious self-perception, and (3 that there are strong correlations amongst these constructs (i.e., conscious interactions/compassion, and mindfulness.

  1. Health-related quality of life of patients 12 months following surgical intensive care discharge

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    F. Karachi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Health  related  quality  of  life  (HRQoL  and  the  effect  of  selected  socio-demographic  and  clinical  intensive  care  variables  on  HRQoL of  patients  12  months  following  adult  surgical  intensive  care  unit  discharge in  the  Western  Cape  was  evaluated.  A  prospective  observational  study  was conducted.  The  sample  comprised  46  patients  who  had  survived  12  months following discharge. Structured telephonic interviews were conducted using a self-developed  and  SF-36v2  HRQoL  questionnaire.  Data  was  analyzed  using Stastica 7 and values were accepted as significant at the 5% level. Low mean HRQoL  domain  scores  (43%  -  53%  were  found  implying  a  poor  HRQoL outcome. Physical functioning [43.5%], Role Play [44.5%] and Role Emotion [43.1%] scores were specifically lower than the other HRQoL domain scores. Age and severity of illness scores (APACHE II were significantly associated with the social functioning (p=0.01 and physical functioning (p=0.02 scores  respectively. APACHE  II  may  be  a  useful  contributor  in  predicting  long-term  physical  functioning  outcomes  in  patients  following  surgical  ICU  discharge.  The  HRQoL  outcomes  are  slightly  lower  than  that  found  for  inter-national ICU populations however responses in the domains affected are comparable. Low physical functioning, role play  and  role  emotion  scores  indicate  a  need  for  further  physical  and  emotional  rehabilitation  following  surgical  ICU discharge.

  2. Does exercise intensity affect blood pressure and heart rate in obese adolescents? A 6-month multidisciplinary randomized intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, B Q; Ritti-Dias, R M; Balagopal, P B; Hill, J O; Prado, W L

    2014-04-01

    Aerobic exercise improves cardiovascular health in general, but whether the impact varies with exercise intensity is not clear. The aim of the current study was to compare the effects of a high-intensity aerobic exercise training (HIT) vs. a low-intensity aerobic exercise training (LIT) on blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) in obese adolescents. Forty-three (13-18 years) Tanner stage (III-IV) matched obese adolescents were studied in a randomized trial of either HIT (corresponding to the ventilatory threshold I; n = 20) or LIT (corresponding to 20% below the ventilatory threshold I; n = 23) programme for a period of 6 months. All participants also received a multidisciplinary therapy that included nutritional, psychological and clinical counselling. Both HIT and LIT sessions were isocaloric, with energy expenditure set at 350 kcal. BP, HR and HRV were measured along with markers of body adiposity and insulin resistance before and after the respective interventions. The participants in both groups had similar physical and clinical characteristics. After the 6-month intervention, systolic, diastolic and mean BP decreased (P exercise training set at a high intensity compared with the low intensity appears to have additional benefits on abdominal obesity and cardiovascular health in that it enhances the parasympathetic and autonomic modulation of the heart in obese adolescents. © 2013 The Authors. Pediatric Obesity © 2013 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  3. Inpatient-based intensive interdisciplinary pain treatment for highly impaired children with severe chronic pain: randomized controlled trial of efficacy and economic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechler, Tanja; Ruhe, Ann-Kristin; Schmidt, Pia; Hirsch, Jessica; Wager, Julia; Dobe, Michael; Krummenauer, Frank; Zernikow, Boris

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric chronic pain, which can result in deleterious effects for the child, bears the risk of aggravation into adulthood. Intensive interdisciplinary pain treatment (IIPT) might be an effective treatment, given the advantage of consulting with multiple professionals on a daily basis. Evidence for the effectiveness of IIPT is scarce. We investigated the efficacy of an IIPT within a randomized controlled trial by comparing an intervention group (IG) (n=52) to a waiting-list control group (WCG) (n=52). We made assessments before treatment (PRE), immediately after treatment (POST), as well as at short-term (POST6MONTHS) and long-term (POST12MONTHS) follow-up. We determined a combined endpoint, improvement (pain intensity, disability, school absence), and investigated 3 additional outcome domains (anxiety, depression, catastrophizing). We also investigated changes in economic parameters (health care use, parental work absenteeism, subjective financial burden) and their relationship to the child's improvement. Results at POST showed that significantly more children in the IG than in the WCG were assigned to improvement (55% compared to 14%; Fisher Ppain intensity and anxiety did not change until short-term follow-up. More than 60% of the children in both groups were improved long-term. The parents reported significant reductions in all economic parameters. The results from the present study support the efficacy of the IIPT. Future research is warranted to investigate differences in treatment response and to understand the changes in economic parameters in nonimproved children.

  4. Prevalence of acute post-operative pain in patients in adult age-group undergoing inpatient abdominal surgery and correlation of intensity of pain and satisfaction with analgesic management: A cross-sectional single institute-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prashant Kumar; Saikia, Priyam; Lahakar, Mangala

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Considering the paucity of regional data, this study was designed to investigate the prevalence of post-operative pain and determine if there exists any correlation between the intensity of post-operative pain and patient's level of satisfaction with their pain management after inpatient abdominal surgery at an academic tertiary care government centre. Methods: Pain intensity was measured in 120 patients with numeric rating scale at the fifth post-operative hour, second and third post-operative day. A questionnaire was used to measure the level of satisfaction with nurse's and doctor's response to their pain and overall pain management. Results: The prevalence of post-operative pain was 84.17%, 92.5% and 96.66% at the fifth post-operative hour, second and third post-operative day, respectively. Less number of patients experienced severe intensity pain on the third post-operative day (P = 0.00046), whereas the number of patients experiencing mild pain increased (P management was − 0.0218 (P = 0.8107), 0.1307 (P = 0.1553) and 0.0743 (P = 0.4195), respectively. Conclusion: There is a high prevalence of acute post-operative pain in patients undergoing inpatient abdominal surgery at our institute. There is a weak correlation between the intensity of pain and level of satisfaction with pain management.

  5. Changes in health-related quality of life from 6 months to 2 years after discharge from intensive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flaatten Hans

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intensive care patients have, both before and after the ICU stay, a health-related quality of life (HRQOL that differs from that of the normal population. Studies have described changes in HRQOL in the period from before the ICU stay and up to 12 months after. The aim of this study was to investigate possible longitudinal changes in HRQOL in adult patients (>18 years from 6 months to 2 years after discharge from a general, mixed intensive care unit (ICU in a university hospital. Methods This is a prospective cohort study. Follow-up patients were found using the ICU database and the Peoples Registry. HRQOL was measured with the Short Form 36 (SF-36 questionnaire. Answers at 6 months and 2 years were compared for all patients, surgical and medical patients, and different admission cohorts. Differences are presented with 95% confidence intervals. The SF-36 data were scored according to designed equations. SPSS 11.0 was used to perform t-tests and Mann-Whitney tests. Results A total of 100 patients (26 medical and 74 surgical answered the SF-36 after 6 months and again after 2 years. There was overall moderate improvement in 6 out of 8 dimensions of the SF-36, and the average increase in score was + 4.0 for all 8 dimensions. The changes for surgical and medical patients were similar. Neurological and respiratory patients reported increased average HRQOL scores, while cardiovascular patients did not. Patients with worsening of scores from 6 months to 2 years were insignificantly older than patients with improved scores (55.3 vs. 49.7 years, and both groups had comparable severity scores (simplified acute physiology score, SAPS II, 37.2 vs. 36.3 and length of ICU stay (2.7 vs. 3.2 days. The statistically significant changes in HRQOL (in the Role Physical and Social Functioning dimensions were, due to sample size, barely clinically relevant. Conclusion In a mixed ICU population we found moderate increases in HRQOL both for medical

  6. Update of Inpatient Treatment for Refractory Chronic Daily Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Tzu-Hsien; Wang, Shuu-Jiun

    2016-01-01

    Chronic daily headache (CDH) is a group of headache disorders, in which headaches occur daily or near-daily (>15 days per month) and last for more than 3 months. Important CDH subtypes include chronic migraine, chronic tension-type headache, hemicrania continua, and new daily persistent headache. Other headaches with shorter durations (<4 h/day) are usually not included in CDH. Common comorbidities of CDH are medication overuse headache and various psychiatric disorders, such as depression and anxiety. Indications of inpatient treatment for CDH patients include poor responses to outpatient management, need for detoxification for overuse of specific medications (particularly opioids and barbiturates), and severe psychiatric comorbidities. Inpatient treatment usually involves stopping acute pain, preventing future attacks, and detoxifying medication overuse if present. Multidisciplinary integrated care that includes medical staff from different disciplines (e.g., psychiatry, clinical psychology, and physical therapy) has been recommended. The outcomes of inpatient treatment are satisfactory in terms of decreasing headache intensity or frequency, withdrawal from medication overuse, reducing disability, and improving life quality, although long-term relapse is not uncommon. In conclusion, inpatient treatment may be useful for select patients with refractory CDH and should be incorporated in a holistic headache care program.

  7. Inpatient resource use and costs associated with switching from oral antipsychotics to aripiprazole once-monthly for the treatment of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Wilson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Schizophrenia is associated with high direct healthcare costs due to progression of disease and frequent occurrence of relapses. Aripiprazole once-monthly (AOM has been shown to reduce total psychiatric hospitalizations among patients who switched from oral standard of care (SOC therapy to AOM in a multicenter, open-label, mirror-image study of patients with schizophrenia. Because of the increasing need to improve patient outcomes while containing costs, it is important to understand the impact of AOM treatment initiation on medical costs associated with psychiatric hospitalizations and antipsychotic pharmacy costs. Methods: In the current study, an economic model was developed using data from the AOM mirror-image study to evaluate the psychiatric hospitalization-related medical costs and antipsychotic pharmacy costs during a 6-month period before (retrospective period and after (prospective period the AOM treatment initiation. The economic model evaluated cost-saving potential of AOM among all patients (n=433 as well as a subset of patients with ≥1 prior hospitalization (n=165 who switched from oral SOC to AOM. Unit cost data were obtained from publicly available sources. Results: Both hospitalizations and hospital days were reduced following a switch from oral SOC to AOM. As a result, psychiatric hospitalization-related costs were lower during the prospective period when compared with the retrospective period. Furthermore, the increase in antipsychotic pharmacy costs due to switching from oral SOC to AOM was offset by a reduction in psychiatric hospitalization-related medical costs. Per-patient costs were reduced by $1,046 (USD in the overall population and by $20,353 in a subset of patients who had at least 1 psychiatric hospitalization during the retrospective period. Results were most sensitive to changes in hospitalization costs. Conclusions: AOM is associated with reducing the risk of relapse among patients with

  8. Use of dialectical behavior therapy in inpatient treatment of borderline personality disorder: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Jill Myerow; Woodward, Eva N; Susmaras, Teresa; Pantalone, David W

    2012-09-01

    Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) is an empirically supported treatment for outpatients with borderline personality disorder. However, the utility of DBT strategies for inpatients with the disorder is unclear. This review summarizes and synthesizes findings from trials of DBT in inpatient settings. Multiple research databases were searched for articles published through June 2011 that reported on any implementation of DBT in an inpatient setting to address symptoms related to borderline personality disorder, including suicidal and self-injurious behavior. Eleven studies that reported pre- and posttreatment symptoms related to borderline personality disorder were evaluated. Studies indicated that many variations of standard DBT have been used in inpatient settings, including approaches that do not include phone consultation, that include group therapy only, and that vary in treatment duration (from two weeks to three months). Most studies reported reductions in suicidal ideation, self-injurious behaviors, and symptoms of depression and anxiety, whereas results for reducing anger and violent behaviors were mixed. Follow-up data indicated that symptom reduction was often maintained between one and 21 months posttreatment. On the basis of the evidence, the authors identify essential components of an inpatient DBT package and discuss its potential function as an "intensive orientation" to outpatient DBT services. There is considerable variation in the configuration and duration of DBT implementation for inpatients with borderline personality disorder. However, findings suggest that DBT may be effective in reducing symptoms related to borderline personality disorder in inpatient settings. Future research should standardize and systematically test inpatient DBT. (Psychiatric Services 63:881-888, 2012; doi: 10.1176/appi.ps.201100311).

  9. Prevalence of acute post-operative pain in patients in adult age-group undergoing inpatient abdominal surgery and correlation of intensity of pain and satisfaction with analgesic management: A cross-sectional single institute-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Kumar Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Considering the paucity of regional data, this study was designed to investigate the prevalence of post-operative pain and determine if there exists any correlation between the intensity of post-operative pain and patient′s level of satisfaction with their pain management after inpatient abdominal surgery at an academic tertiary care government centre. Methods: Pain intensity was measured in 120 patients with numeric rating scale at the fifth post-operative hour, second and third post-operative day. A questionnaire was used to measure the level of satisfaction with nurse′s and doctor′s response to their pain and overall pain management. Results: The prevalence of post-operative pain was 84.17%, 92.5% and 96.66% at the fifth post-operative hour, second and third post-operative day, respectively. Less number of patients experienced severe intensity pain on the third post-operative day (P = 0.00046, whereas the number of patients experiencing mild pain increased (P < 0.000 compared to the fifth post-operative hour. The number of patients with complete analgesia decreased on the third post-operative day (P = 0.001 compared to fifth post-operative day. The Spearman correlation coefficient between pain score on the third post-operative day and level of satisfaction with nurse′s response, doctor′s response to pain and the overall pain management was − 0.0218 (P = 0.8107, 0.1307 (P = 0.1553 and 0.0743 (P = 0.4195, respectively. Conclusion: There is a high prevalence of acute post-operative pain in patients undergoing inpatient abdominal surgery at our institute. There is a weak correlation between the intensity of pain and level of satisfaction with pain management.

  10. Recovery rate and associated factors of children age 6 to 59 months admitted with severe acute malnutrition at inpatient unit of Bahir Dar Felege Hiwot Referral hospital therapeutic feeding unite, northwest Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desyibelew, Hanna Demelash; Fekadu, Abel; Woldie, Haile

    2017-01-01

    Background Despite numerous advances made in improving child health and the clinical management protocols for treating severe acute malnutrition at treatment centers, evidences concerning the treatment outcomes are scarce. Therefore, this study was conducted to assess the recovery rate and associated factors of severely acute malnourished children of age 6 to 59 months admitted to inpatient therapeutic feeding unit at Felege Hiwot Referral Hospital. Methods We conducted a hospital-based cross-sectional study including 401 severely malnourished children who were admitted from September 2012 to January 2016. Bivariable and a Multivariable logistic regression model were fitted to identify factors associated with recovery rate. Adjusted Odds ratio with its 95% CI was reported and P-value less than 0.05 was considered as significant. Results Fifty eight percent (58.4%) (95%CI: 53.1–64.1) of admitted children were recovered with a mean recovery time of 18 (±6.3) days. Being female, children who were fully and partially vaccinated, who had better MUAC measurement, who stayed longer in the hospital, and children who took routine vitamin-A supplementation had better recovery rate. However, children who had co-morbidity at admission, had human immune virus (HIV) and Tuberculosis (TB) infection, and who had edema were less likely to recover. Interpretation Recovery rate was low as compared to international SPHERE cutoff points (> 75% recovery rate). Interventions that could address the outlined factors would be helpful to improve treatment recovery rate of admitted children. PMID:28166247

  11. High-intensity Statin Treatments in Clinically Stable Patients on Aspirin Monotherapy 12 Months After Drug-eluting Stent Implantation: A Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Eui; Cho, Yun-Hyeong; Suh, Yongsung; Cho, Deok-Kyu; Her, Ae-Young; Kim, Yong Hoon; Lee, Kyounghoon; Kang, Woong Chol; Yun, Kyeong Ho; Yoo, Sang-Yong; Cheong, Sang-Sig; Shin, Dong-Ho; Ahn, Chul-Min; Kim, Jung-Sun; Kim, Byeong-Keuk; Ko, Young-Guk; Choi, Donghoon; Jang, Yangsoo; Hong, Myeong-Ki

    2017-07-14

    Current guidelines on the treatment of blood cholesterol recommend continuous maintenance of high-intensity statin treatment in drug-eluting stent (DES)-treated patients. However, high-intensity statin treatment is frequently underused in clinical practice after stabilization of DES-treated patients. Currently, the impact of continuous high-intensity statin treatment on the incidence of late adverse events in these patients is unknown. We investigated whether high-intensity statin treatment reduces late adverse events in clinically stable patients on aspirin monotherapy 12 months after DES implantation. Clinically stable patients who underwent DES implantation 12 months previously and received aspirin monotherapy were randomly assigned to receive either high-intensity (40mg atorvastatin, n = 1000) or low-intensity (20mg pravastatin, n = 1000) statin treatment. The primary endpoint was adverse clinical events at 12-month follow-up (a composite of all death, myocardial infarction, revascularization, stent thrombosis, stroke, renal deterioration, intervention for peripheral artery disease, and admission for cardiac events). The primary endpoint at 12-month follow-up occurred in 25 patients (2.5%) receiving high-intensity statin treatment and in 40 patients (4.1%) receiving low-intensity statin treatment (HR, 0.58; 95%CI, 0.36-0.92; P = .018). This difference was mainly driven by a lower rate of cardiac death (0 vs 0.4%, P = .025) and nontarget vessel myocardial infarction (0.1 vs 0.7%, P = .033) in the high-intensity statin treatment group. Among clinically stable DES-treated patients on aspirin monotherapy, high-intensity statin treatment significantly reduced late adverse events compared with low-intensity statin treatment. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01557075. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Asthma and myocardial infarction inpatient hospitalization and emergency room visit counts and rates by county, year and month of admission, age group, race/ethnicity and gender of California residents, 2000-2009.

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Environmental Health Tracking Program — This dataset contains case counts, rates, and confidence intervals of asthma (ICD9-CM 493.0-493.9) and myocardial infarction (ICD9-CM 410) inpatient hospitalizations...

  13. Health-related quality of life before planned admission to intensive care: memory over three and six months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadini Laura

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The validity of Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQOL recalled by ICU admitted patients have not been published. The aim of this study was to compare the baseline HRQOL measured before surgery and ICU admission with that recalled at 3 and 6 months in a population of patients with planned ICU admission after surgery. Methods This prospective study was performed in three Italian centres on patients who had undergone General, Orthopaedic or Urologic surgery. All adult patients with planned ICU admission between October 2007 and July 2008 were considered for enrolment. At hospital admission, the Mini Mental Status Examination and EuroQoL (EQ questionnaire (referring to the last two weeks were administered to the patients who consented. Three and six months after ICU admission, the researchers administered by phone the EQ questionnaire and Post-Traumatic Stress Syndrome 14 questions Inventory, asking the patients to rate their HRQOL before surgery and ICU admission. Past medical history demographic and clinical ICU-related variables were collected. Statistical analysis Chi-square test and non parametric statistics were used to compare groups of patients. The EQ-5D was transformed in the time trade-off (TTO to obtain a continuous variable, subsequently analysed using the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC. Results Of the 104 patients assessed at baseline and discharged from the hospital, 93 had the EQ administered at 3 months, and 89 at 6 months. The ICC for TTO recalled at 3 months vs pre-ICU TTO was 0.851, and that for TTO recalled at 6 months vs pre-ICU TTO was 0.833. The ICC for the EQ-VAS recalled at 3 months vs pre-ICU EQ-VAS was 0.648, and that for the EQ-VAS recalled at 6 months vs pre-ICU EQ-VAS was 0.580. Forty-two (45% patients assessed at 3 months gave the same score in all EQ-5D items as at baseline. They underwent mainly orthopaedic surgery (p 0.011, and perceived the severity of their illness as lower (p 0

  14. [Change in distribution of pathogens and nosocomial antibiotic resistant Gram-negative Bacilli infection in intensive care units one month after an earthquake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Qing-quan; Tu, Chong-qi; Pei, Fu-xing; Huang, Fu-guo; Liu, Hao; Song, Yue-ming; Yang, Tian-fu; Kang, Yan; Wang, Guang-lin; Liu, Li-min; Fang, Yue; Zhang, Hui

    2010-03-01

    To investigate the change in distribution of pathogens and nosocomial antibiotic resistant Gram-negative Bacilli infection in intensive care units one month after an earthquake. A retrospective survey on the distribution of nosocomial Gram-negative bacilli infection in intensive care units before and one month after the Wenchuan Earthquake was conducted in the West China Hospital. MicroScan Walkaway 96SI or PHOENIX 100 Automatic System in combined with manual identification, was employed to identify the Gram-negative bacilli infection and antibiotic resistance. The proportion of wound infection increased from 7.9% to 20.2% one month after the earthquake, but infection in respiratory tract stayed the most common infection. The common pathogens included Acinetobacter spp. (36.2%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (22.7%), and Klebsiella spp. (12.3%) before the earthquake. One month after the earthquake, Imipenem remained highly sensitive against Escherichia coli and Klebsiella. spp., while their resistance to ceftazidime increased. Amikacin became the most sensitive antibiotics against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Acinetobacter spp. had increased resistance to imipenem, but was highly sensitive to gatifloxacin and cefoxitin. The prevalence of extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) in Klebsiella spp. and Escherichia coli increased from 52.6% and 48.8% before the earthquake to 55.0% and 87.5% one month after the earthquake, respectively. There is a significant change in distribution of pathogens and nosocomial antibiotic resistant Gram-negative Bacilli infection in intensive care units one month after the Earthquake, which might be associated with a sudden increase in injured patients. It is essential to regularly monitor the resistant rate of bacilli to antibiotics.

  15. Inpatient Psychiatric Facility PPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Since October 1, 1983, most hospitals have been paid under the hospital inpatient prospective payment system (PPS). However, certain types of specialty hospitals and...

  16. Quality of life in children three and nine months after discharge from a paediatric intensive care unit: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bos Albert P

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improved survival in children with critical illnesses has led to new disease patterns. As a consequence evaluation of the well being of survivors of Pediatric Intensive Care Units (PICU has become important. Outcome assessment should therefore consist of evaluation of morbidity, functional health and Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL. Awareness of HRQoL consequences and physical sequelae could lead to changes in support during the acute phase and thereafter. The aim of this study was to evaluate HRQoL in PICU survivors. Methods Prospective follow-up study three and nine months after discharge from a 14-bed tertiary PICU. Eighty-one of 142 eligible, previously healthy children were included from December 2002 through October 2005. HRQoL was assessed with the TNO-AZL Preschool Children Quality of Life Questionnaire (TAPQOL-PF for children aged 1 to 6 years of age, the TNO-AZL Children's Quality of Life Questionnaire Parent Form (TACQOL-PF for children aged 6 to 12 years of age, and the TNO-AZL Children's Quality of Life Questionnaire Child Form (TACQOL-CF for children aged 8 to 15 years of age. The studied patients were compared with age appropriate normative data using non-parametric tests and effect sizes. Results Thirty-one and 27 children, and 55 and 50 parents completed questionnaires respectively three and nine months after discharge. In 1–6 year old children parents reported more lung problems (3 and 9 months, worse liveliness (9 months and better appetite and problem behaviour (3 months; in 6–12 year old children parents reported worse motor functioning (3 months; and 12–15 year old adolescents reported worse motor functioning (3 months. Large effect sizes indicating clinical significant differences in HRQoL with healthy control subjects were found on more domains. Conclusion In this small group of PICU survivors differences in HRQoL with the normative population exist three and nine months after discharge

  17. Infrared LED irradiation applied during high-intensity treadmill training improves maximal exercise tolerance in postmenopausal women: a 6-month longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolillo, Fernanda Rossi; Corazza, Adalberto Vieira; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antonio; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador

    2013-02-01

    Reduced aerobic fitness is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases among the older population. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of LED irradiation (850 nm) applied during treadmill training on the maximal exercise tolerance in postmenopausal women. At the beginning of the study, 45 postmenopausal women were assigned randomly to three groups, and 30 women completed the entire 6 months of the study. The groups were: (1) the LED group (treadmill training associated with phototherapy, n = 10), (2) the exercise group (treadmill training, n = 10), and (3) the sedentary group (neither physical training nor phototherapy, n = 10). The training was performed for 45 min twice a week for 6 months at intensities between 85% and 90% maximal heart rate (HRmax). The irradiation parameters were 39 mW/cm(2), 45 min and 108 J/cm(2). The cardiovascular parameters were measured at baseline and after 6 months. As expected, no significant differences were found in the sedentary group (p ≥ 0.05). The maximal time of tolerance (Tlim), metabolic equivalents (METs) and Bruce stage reached significantly higher values in the LED group and the exercise group (p training (delta values) for the Tlim, METs and HR at isotime were greater in the LED group than in the exercise group with a significant intergroup difference (p training can improve maximal performance and post-exercise recovery in postmenopausal women.

  18. Neuro-developmental outcome at 18 months in premature infants with diffuse excessive high signal intensity on MR imaging of the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Anthony [Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Neonatology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); University of Sheffield, Department of Academic Radiology, Sheffield, South Yorkshire (United Kingdom); Whitby, Elspeth; Paley, Martyn [University of Sheffield, Department of Academic Radiology, Sheffield, South Yorkshire (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Stuart; Smith, Michael [Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Neonatology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Alladi, Sathya [Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Child Development, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-15

    Diffuse excessive high signal intensity (DEHSI) may represent damage to the white matter in preterm infants, but may be best studied alongside quantitative markers. Limited published data exists on its neuro-developmental implications. The purpose of this study was to assess whether preterm children with DEHSI at term-corrected age have abnormal neuro-developmental outcome. This was a prospective observational study of 67 preterm infants with MRI of the brain around term-equivalent age, including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). Images were reported as being normal, overtly abnormal or to show DEHSI. A single observer placed six regions of interest in the periventricular white matter and calculated the apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC). DEHSI was defined as (1) high signal on T2-weighted images alone, (2) high signal with raised ADC values or (3) raised ADC values independent of visual appearances. The neuro-development was assessed around 18 months' corrected age using the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development (3rd Edition). Standard t tests compared outcome scores between imaging groups. No statistically significant difference in neuro-developmental outcome scores was seen between participants with normal MRI and DEHSI, regardless of which definition was used. Preterm children with DEHSI have similar neuro-developmental outcome to those with normal brain MRI, even if the definition includes objective markers alongside visual appearances. (orig.)

  19. Health education improves effectively therapy of inpatients with hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Gu; Chunzhi Shi; Yibai Feng; Xianggui Wang; Hongbin Nie; Yongming Zhou; Yeqiang Liu; Xiangdong Xu

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Low rate of medication usage and blood pressure (BP) control, bad lifestyle, poor cognition to hypertension, have been obstacles in prevention from hypertensive disease and complication in Chinese cohort. Health education appears to be an impendent measure to improve this situation. To study the effect of health education on the rate of medication usage and BP control, the lifestyle, and the incidence of complication among patients with hypertension. Methods: 284 hypertensive inpatients were divided randomly into two groups: the control group was intervened with routine medication; the education group was intervened with routine medication in combination with intensive health education according to the investigation on the risk factors of cardiocerebrovascular diseases and cognitive levels of hypertensivedisease. During 12.16 ± 1.95 months of following up,the status of lifestyle, the rate of medication usage and BP control, and incidence of complications between two groups were analyzed. Results: In education group, the rate of smoking, alcohol intake, lower-salt ingesting, exercise, medication usage and BP control were improved after intervention and significantly different from those before intervention (P < 0.01). After intervention,the incidence of complications in education group and control group was 10.9% and 30.5% respectively (P < 0.01 ). Conclusion:Intensive health education is an important measure in preventing from hypertension.

  20. A Novel Mental Health Crisis Service - Outcomes of Inpatient Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, R; McGlennon, D; McDonnell, C

    2016-01-01

    Northern Ireland has high mental health needs and a rising suicide rate. Our area has suffered a 32% reduction of inpatient beds consistent with the national drive towards community based treatment. Taking these factors into account, a new Mental Health Crisis Service was developed incorporating a high fidelity Crisis Response Home Treatment Team (CRHTT), Acute Day Care facility and two inpatient wards. The aim was to provide alternatives to inpatient admission. The new service would facilitate transition between inpatient and community care while decreasing bed occupancy and increasing treatment in the community. All services and processes were reviewed to assess deficiencies in current care. There was extensive consultation with internal and external stakeholders and process mapping using the COBRAs framework as a basis for the service improvement model. The project team set the service criteria and reviewed progress. In the original service model, the average inpatient occupancy rate was 106.6%, admission rate was 48 patients per month and total length of stay was 23.4 days. After introducing the inpatient consultant hospital model, the average occupancy rate decreased to 90%, admissions to 43 per month and total length of stay to 22 days. The results further decreased to 83% occupancy, 32 admissions per month and total length of stay 12 days after CRHTT initiation. The Crisis Service is still being evaluated but currently the model has provided safe alternatives to inpatient care. Involvement with patients, carers and all multidisciplinary teams is maximised to improve the quality and safety of care. Innovative ideas including structured weekly timetable and regular interface meetings have improved communication and allowed additional time for patient care.

  1. Training Intensity Distribution and Changes in Performance and Physiology of a 2nd Place Finisher Team of the Race across America Over a 6 Month Preparation Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manunzio, Christian; Mester, Joachim; Kaiser, Walter; Wahl, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To monitor the training intensity distribution (TID) and the development of physiological and performance parameters. Methods: During their preparation period for the RAAM, 4 athletes (plus 1 additional backup racer) performed 3 testing sessions; one before, one after 3, and one after 6 months of training. VO2max, maximal rate of lactate accumulation (dLa/dtmax), critical power, power output at lactate minimum (MLSSP), peak and mean power output during a sprint test, heart rate recovery, isometric strength, jumping height, and body composition were determined. All training sessions were recorded with a power meter. The endurance TID was analyzed based on the time in zone approach, according to a classical 3-zone model, including all power data of training sessions, and a power specific 3-zone model, where time with power output below 50% of MLSSP was not considered. Results: The TID using the classical 3-zone model reflected a pyramidal TID (zone 1: 63 ± 16, zone 2: 28 ± 13 and zone 3: 9 ± 4%). The power specific 3-zone model resulted in a threshold-based TID (zone 1: 48 ± 13, zone 2: 39 ± 10, zone 3: 13 ± 4%). VO2max increased by 7.1 ± 5.3% (P = 0.06). dLa/dtmax decreased by 16.3 ± 8.1% (P = 0.03). Power output at lactate minimum and critical power increased by 10.3 ± 4.1 and 16.8 ± 6.2% (P = 0.01), respectively. No changes were found for strength parameters and jumps. Conclusion: The present study underlines that a threshold oriented TID results in only moderate increases in physiological parameters. The amount of training below 50% of MLSSp (~28% of total training time) is remarkably high. Researchers, trainers, and athletes should pay attention to the different ways of interpreting training power data, to gain realistic insights into the TID and the corresponding improvements in performance and physiological parameters. PMID:28082909

  2. Hospitalisation costs for infant bronchiolitis are up to 20 times higher if intensive care is needed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, Paula; Forma, Leena; Korppi, Matti

    2015-03-01

    Up to 3% of infants with bronchiolitis under 12 months of age are hospitalised, and up to 9% require intensive care. We evaluated the costs of bronchiolitis hospitalisation, with a special focus on whether infants needed intensive care. Baseline and cost data were retrospectively collected, using electronic hospital files, for 80 infants under 12 months old who were treated in the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) for bronchiolitis during a 13-year period. We calculated the daily costs for patients admitted to the PICU and compared them with 104 admitted to inpatient wards and 56 outpatients treated in the emergency department. The mean hospitalisation cost for PICU patients was €8061 (95% CI 6193-9929), compared to €1834 (1649-2020) for other inpatients and €359 (331-387) for the outpatients. The hospitalisation cost per patient was associated with length of hospital stay, but not gender, age on admission or gestational age. There was no constant increase or decrease in hospitalisation costs during the study period. The hospitalisation costs of infants treated in the PICU for bronchiolitis at <12 months of age were approximately four times more than for other inpatients and over 20 times more than for outpatients. Strategies are needed to reduce the need for intensive care. ©2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Suicides following inpatient psychiatric hospitalization: A nationwide case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Petr; Mladá, Karolína; Csémy, Ladislav; Nechanská, Blanka; Höschl, Cyril

    2015-09-15

    Research shows the elevated risk of suicide associated with current or recent inpatient psychiatric hospitalization. However, it is unclear whether this applies in the area of post-communist Central and Eastern Europe where mental health care has not been deinstitutionalized yet. The present study aims to examine the rates of suicides among psychiatric patients during and shortly after discharge from inpatient hospitalization in the Czech Republic. All inpatient psychiatric hospitalizations and all suicides committed between 2008 and 2012 have been merged on an individual data basis. The time horizon between the admission and two months after the discharge from inpatient psychiatric facility was utilized and multiple logistic regression was performed to calculate the odds of committing suicide. A total of 137,290 inpatients were hospitalized in Czech psychiatric facilities between 2008 and 2012, and 402 of the inpatients committed suicide during the hospitalization or within the 2 months after the discharge. Highly elevated risks of suicides were found to be associated with being a male, having a history of multiple hospitalizations, and having a diagnosis of affective, anxiety, or personality disorder. Limitations are related to the design of the study, and its reliance on routinely collected data. Also, it was not possible to assess the odds of suicide associated with inpatient psychiatric hospitalization against the odds of suicide in general population. During psychiatric treatment and recovery, suicial behavior and idealiation is increased. In psychiatry, hospitalization may be a risky period for suicide behavior. Suicide rates during and soon after the psychiatric hospitalization identified in this study from Central and Eastern Europe are similar to the findings from Western Europe. Preventive strategies should be tailored accordingly. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Attachment styles in alcoholic inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rick, Ann; Vanheule, Stijn

    2007-01-01

    Despite the fact that addiction has often been identified as an attachment disorder, empirical studies on this topic are rather scarce. In our study we explore attachment style (secure vs. insecure) in alcoholic inpatients and its relationship with perceived parenting and alcohol-related and psychiatric problems in a sample of 101 alcoholic inpatients (Belgium). Our results reveal that in comparison to the securely-attached group, insecurely-attached alcoholic inpatients perceived their mother as more controlling, reported more severe psychiatric problems in the European Addiction Severity Index, had higher scores on the Beck Depression Inventory, showed more schizotypal and depressive personality traits and had more difficulties with communicating emotions (alexithymia). We argue that it makes sense to differentiate alcoholic inpatients on the basis of attachment style and that both groups (secure/insecure) need different treatment approaches.

  5. Serotonin Transporter Gene ("SLC6A4") Methylation Associates with Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Stay and 3-month-old Temperament in Preterm Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montirosso, Rosario; Provenzi, Livio; Fumagalli, Monica; Sirgiovanni, Ida; Giorda, Roberto; Pozzoli, Uberto; Beri, Silvana; Menozzi, Giorgia; Tronick, Ed; Morandi, Francesco; Mosca, Fabio; Borgatti, Renato

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) stay are early adverse stressful experiences, which may result in an altered temperamental profile. The serotonin transporter gene ("SLC6A4"), which has been linked to infant temperament, is susceptible to epigenetic regulation associated with early stressful experience. This study…

  6. [Psychiatric Inpatient Treatment and Return to Work].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mernyi, Lena; Hölzle, Patricia; Hamann, Johannes

    2017-05-12

    Objective People with mental diseases have a high risk of unemployment and they have only limited access to the labor market. The return to work is often associated with fears.The present study aims to provide an overview of the number of hospitalized psychiatric patients with permanent employment. Moreover it should give an insight into the process of return to work, the experiences patients gain and the support they receive. Methods In the participating clinics we measured the number of patients with permanent employment. The main inclusion criteria for further survey were the status of permanent employment and age between 18 and 65. The participating patients were interviewed on two occasions, at the time of inclusion and 3 months after the patient was discharged. The questions addressed working conditions, job satisfaction and the process of return-to-work. For statistical analysis, descriptive statistics (frequencies, means, standard deviations) were used. Results Only 21 % of n = 815 inpatients of the participating hospitals were permanently employed. Many patients did not return to work after being discharged. In many cases the interviewed patients saw a connection between their job and their current episode of illness. In this context patients reported unsatisfying workplace conditions such as long working hours, bad work organization and social conflicts. Conclusions For mentally ill patients, the employment rate in the primary labor market is devastating low. After psychiatric inpatient treatment patients are at high risk to lose their jobs. In order to prevent this development, work-related stress factors should be discussed with inpatients at an early stage and support should be provided during the return-to-work-process. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Quality Metrics in Inpatient Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhand, Amar

    2015-12-01

    Quality of care in the context of inpatient neurology is the standard of performance by neurologists and the hospital system as measured against ideal models of care. There are growing regulatory pressures to define health care value through concrete quantifiable metrics linked to reimbursement. Theoretical models of quality acknowledge its multimodal character with quantitative and qualitative dimensions. For example, the Donabedian model distils quality as a phenomenon of three interconnected domains, structure-process-outcome, with each domain mutually influential. The actual measurement of quality may be implicit, as in peer review in morbidity and mortality rounds, or explicit, in which criteria are prespecified and systemized before assessment. As a practical contribution, in this article a set of candidate quality indicators for inpatient neurology based on an updated review of treatment guidelines is proposed. These quality indicators may serve as an initial blueprint for explicit quality metrics long overdue for inpatient neurology.

  8. Frequent use of hospital inpatient services during a nine year period: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Adelle M; Condon, John R; Li, Shu Q; Guthridge, Steven L

    2017-05-12

    Frequent use (FU) of hospital services impacts on patients and health service expenditure. Studies examining FU in emergency departments and inpatient settings have found heterogeneity and the need to differentiate between potentially preventable FU and that associated with ongoing management of complex conditions. Psychosocial factors have often been reported as underpinning or exacerbating the phenomena. Most FU studies have been limited by time, to a single study site, or restricted to specific diagnoses or patient groups. This study provides a comprehensive description of adult patient characteristics, conditions and risk factors associated with FU, based on admissions to the five public hospitals in the Northern Territory (NT) of Australia over a nine year period. The study population is distinctive comprising both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal patients. Data on all inpatient episodes in NT public hospitals between 2005 and 2013 was analysed to identify patients with any FU (four or more episodes within any 12-month period) and measure FU duration (number of FU years) and intensity (mean number of episodes per FU year). Pregnancy, alcohol-related and mental health condition flags were assigned to patients with any episode with relevant diagnoses during the study period. Multivariate analysis was used to assess factors associated with any FU, FU duration and FU intensity, separately for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal patients. Of people with any inpatient episodes during the study period, 13.6% were frequent users (Aboriginal 22%, non-Aboriginal 10%) accounting for 46.6% of all episodes. 73% of frequent users had only one FU year. Any FU and increased FU duration were more common among individuals who were: Aboriginal; older; female; and those with a pregnancy, alcohol or mental health flag. Having two or more alcohol-related episodes in the nine-year period was strongly associated with any FU for both Aboriginal (odds ratio 8.9, 95% CI. 8.20-9.66) and non

  9. Health care-associated rotavirus illness in pediatric inpatients in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foppa, Ivo M; Karmaus, Wilfried; Ehlken, Birgit; Fruhwirth, Martin; Heininger, Ulrich; Plenge-Bonig, Anita; Forster, Johannes

    2006-06-01

    A longitudinal study of health care-associated transmission of rotaviruses (RVs) in pediatric inpatients 0-48 months old in Austria, Germany, and Switzerland showed that almost one third of all cases occurred in patients 2 months old or younger. The effectiveness of vaccination against RV from 2 months of age onward remains to be evaluated.

  10. Basic Stand Alone Medicare Inpatient Claims PUF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This release contains the Basic Stand Alone (BSA) Inpatient Public Use Files (PUF) named CMS 2008 BSA Inpatient Claims PUF with information from 2008 Medicare...

  11. Care coordinators: a controlled evaluation of an inpatient mental health service innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Malcolm W; Wilson, Michael; Bergquist, Karla; Thorburn, John

    2012-02-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the impact of introducing designated care coordinators into an acute mental health inpatient unit in terms of service delivery, clinical outcomes, and service user and significant other perceptions. A pre-post-controlled design was implemented with a consecutive sample of 292 service users admitted and staying more than 5 days in two wards, with care coordinators introduced in one ward. Data were obtained from clinical records, standard measures, and service user and significant other surveys. Care coordinator input was associated with significant improvements in service delivery and stronger involvement of significant others and community resources. Care-coordinated clients showed significantly better clinical outcomes, including the Health of Nations Outcome Scales behaviour subscale, less time in the intensive care subunit, less community crisis team input in the week following discharge, and lower rates of readmission in the month following discharge. Care-coordinated service users and their significant others gave higher ratings of service delivery, outcome, and satisfaction. The results indicate that designated care coordinators significantly improve care processes, outcomes, and service user experience in acute inpatient mental health settings. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2011 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  12. Inpatient and outpatient cardiac rehabilitation programmes improve cardiometabolic risk in revascularized coronary patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudiu Avram

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to evaluate cardiometabolic risk reduction of diabetic patients following coronary revascularizationprocedures after participation in outpatients or inpatients cardiac rehabilitation programmes. Materials and methods: weperformed a retrospective analytical study which included a group of 103 revascularized coronary patients with diabetesmellitus. Depending on participation in a cardiac rehabilitation program we have defined the following subgroups of patients:Group O (N=37 - attended the outpatient cardiac rehabilitation program; Group H (N=37 - attended the inpatient cardiacrehabilitation program; Group C (N=34 - did not participate in any cardiac rehabilitation program. Between those two momentsof assessment: T0 - revascularization / early post-revascularization and T1 - time of the interview (16±2.3 months afterrevascularization, patients in groups A and S participated in outpatient cardiac rehabilitation program (12 weeks, 3sessions/week of exercise training, with clinical and paraclinical evaluation scheduled at 1, 6, 12 months afterrevascularization, or inpatient cardiac rehabilitation program (3 weeks, intensive sessions, scheduled at 1, 3, 6 and 12months after revascularization. Results: at the end of the study, we found significant differences among the three groups forthe following parameters: body mass index (p=0.01, systolic blood pressure (p=0.002, total cholesterol (p<0.001, LDLcholesterol(p<0.001 and non-HDL cholesterol (p=0.004 in favor of groups A and S, that have participated in comprehensivecardiac rehabilitation programs. Conclusions: comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation programmes, performed outpatient orinpatient, are effective methods of reducing the high cardiometabolic risk, specific in revascularized coronary patients withdiabetes.

  13. Nursing Diagnoses in Inpatient Psychiatry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frauenfelder, F.; Achterberg, T. van; Needham, I.; Staub, M. Muller

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study explored how well NANDA-I covers the reality of adult inpatient psychiatric nursing care. METHODS: Patient observations documented by registered nurses in records were analyzed using content analysis and mapped with the classification NANDA-I. FINDINGS: A total of 1,818 notes wer

  14. Two stage study of wound microorganisms affecting burns and plastic surgery inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Benjamin H; Ali, Syed N; Jeffery, Steven L A; Thomas, Sunil S

    2008-01-01

    This study was designed to identify wound microorganisms and the reasons for differing prevalence between the wards, burns unit and intensive care unit (ICU) in a regional centre for burns and plastic surgery. Antibiotic sensitivities of the 10 most prevalent microorganisms cultured from inpatient wound swabs were also investigated. Inpatient wound swab data were collected retrospectively using notes and departmental database information between January and June 2007. Data were analyzed using chi-squared tests and P-values. Eight hundred five positive wound swabs from 204 swab positive inpatients were analyzed. Stage 1 of this study demonstrated 917 positive swab episodes and 30 varieties of organism. The five most prevalent organisms cultured were Staphylococcus (23.9%), Acinetobacter (21.2%), Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (20.8%), Pseudomonas (9.7%) and Enterococcus (5.2%). Stage 2 revealed that Acinetobacter baumanni (ABAU) was significantly more prevalent in military over civilian inpatients (P PAER) was significantly more prevalent in military inpatients over civilian inpatients (P PAER were significantly more prevalent in the ICU setting. Furthermore, military inpatient wounds grew more ABAU, MRSA, and PAER than civilians, probably due to the longer inpatient stay, dirty nature of wounds, site and complex mechanism of injury. Finally, this study suggests that ABAU was brought into the unit by military patients.

  15. Prosecuting Assaultive Forensic and Psychiatric Inpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Kerri C.; Reddon, John R.; Chudleigh, Michele D.

    2008-01-01

    Inpatient assault of forensic and psychiatric staff is a complex and multifaceted issue. Hence, the consequences reported in the literature regarding prosecuting assaultive inpatients are quite variable. In this article, issues pertaining to the prosecution of violent inpatients are reviewed. Illustrative cases, challenges of prosecution,…

  16. 29 CFR 825.114 - Inpatient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inpatient care. 825.114 Section 825.114 Labor Regulations... LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.114 Inpatient care. Inpatient care means an overnight stay in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical care facility,...

  17. Using Automated HbA1c Testing to Detect Diabetes Mellitus in Orthopedic Inpatients and Its Effect on Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekinci, Elif I.; Kong, Alvin; Churilov, Leonid; Nanayakkara, Natalie; Chiu, Wei Ling; Sumithran, Priya; Djukiadmodjo, Frida; Premaratne, Erosha; Owen-Jones, Elizabeth; Hart, Graeme Kevin; Robbins, Raymond; Hardidge, Andrew; Johnson, Douglas; Baker, Scott T.; Zajac, Jeffrey D.

    2017-01-01

    Aims The prevalence of diabetes is rising, and people with diabetes have higher rates of musculoskeletal-related comorbidities. HbA1c testing is a superior option for diabetes diagnosis in the inpatient setting. This study aimed to (i) demonstrate the feasibility of routine HbA1c testing to detect the presence of diabetes mellitus, (ii) to determine the prevalence of diabetes in orthopedic inpatients and (iii) to assess the association between diabetes and hospital outcomes and post-operative complications in orthopedic inpatients. Methods All patients aged ≥54 years admitted to Austin Health between July 2013 and January 2014 had routine automated HbA1c measurements using automated clinical information systems (CERNER). Patients with HbA1c ≥6.5% were diagnosed with diabetes. Baseline demographic and clinical data were obtained from hospital records. Results Of the 416 orthopedic inpatients included in this study, 22% (n = 93) were known to have diabetes, 4% (n = 15) had previously unrecognized diabetes and 74% (n = 308) did not have diabetes. Patients with diabetes had significantly higher Charlson comorbidity scores compared to patients without diabetes (median, IQR; 1 [0,2] vs 0 [0,0], p<0.001). After adjusting for age, gender, comorbidity score and estimated glomerular filtration rate, no significant differences in the length of stay (IRR = 0.92; 95%CI: 0.79–1.07; p = 0.280), rates of intensive care unit admission (OR = 1.04; 95%CI: 0.42–2.60, p = 0.934), 6-month mortality (OR = 0.52; 95%CI: 0.17–1.60, p = 0.252), 6-month hospital readmission (OR = 0.93; 95%CI: 0.46–1.87; p = 0.828) or any post-operative complications (OR = 0.98; 95%CI: 0.53–1.80; p = 0.944) were observed between patients with and without diabetes. Conclusions Routine HbA1c measurement using CERNER allows for rapid identification of inpatients admitted with diabetes. More than one in four patients admitted to a tertiary hospital orthopedic ward have diabetes. No statistically

  18. Inpatient cognitive behaviour therapy for adolescents with anorexia nervosa: immediate and longer-term effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo eDalle Grave

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Inpatient treatment for anorexia nervosa is often successful in restoring body weight, but a high percentage of patients relapse following discharge. The aim of the present study was to establish the immediate and longer-term effects of a novel inpatient program for adolescents that was designed to produce enduring change. Method: Twenty-seven consecutive patients with severe anorexia nervosa were admitted to a 20-week inpatient treatment program based upon enhanced cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT-E. The patients were assessed before and after hospitalization, and six and 12 months later. Results: Twenty-six patients (96% completed the program. In these patients there was a substantial improvement in weight, eating disorder features and general psychopathology that was well maintained at 12-month follow-up. Conclusions: These findings suggest that inpatient CBT-E is a promising approach to the treatment of adolescents with severe anorexia nervosa.

  19. Addressing Inpatient Glycaemic Control with an Inpatient Glucometry Alert System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. N. Seheult

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Poor inpatient glycaemic control has a prevalence exceeding 30% and results in increased length of stay and higher rates of hospital complications and inpatient mortality. The aim of this study was to improve inpatient glycaemic control by developing an alert system to process point-of-care blood glucose (POC-BG results. Methods. Microsoft Excel Macros were developed for the processing of daily glucometry data downloaded from the Cobas IT database. Alerts were generated according to ward location for any value less than 4 mmol/L (hypoglycaemia or greater than 15 mmol/L (moderate-severe hyperglycaemia. The Diabetes Team provided a weekday consult service for patients flagged on the daily reports. This system was implemented for a 60-day period. Results. There was a statistically significant 20% reduction in the percentage of hyperglycaemic patient-day weighted values >15 mmol/L compared to the preimplementation period without a significant change in the percentage of hypoglycaemic values. The time-to-next-reading after a dysglycaemic POC-BG result was reduced by 14% and the time-to-normalization of a dysglycaemic result was reduced from 10.2 hours to 8.4 hours. Conclusion. The alert system reduced the percentage of hyperglycaemic patient-day weighted glucose values and the time-to-normalization of blood glucose.

  20. Addressing Inpatient Glycaemic Control with an Inpatient Glucometry Alert System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seheult, J N; Pazderska, A; Gaffney, P; Fogarty, J; Sherlock, M; Gibney, J; Boran, G

    2015-01-01

    Background. Poor inpatient glycaemic control has a prevalence exceeding 30% and results in increased length of stay and higher rates of hospital complications and inpatient mortality. The aim of this study was to improve inpatient glycaemic control by developing an alert system to process point-of-care blood glucose (POC-BG) results. Methods. Microsoft Excel Macros were developed for the processing of daily glucometry data downloaded from the Cobas IT database. Alerts were generated according to ward location for any value less than 4 mmol/L (hypoglycaemia) or greater than 15 mmol/L (moderate-severe hyperglycaemia). The Diabetes Team provided a weekday consult service for patients flagged on the daily reports. This system was implemented for a 60-day period. Results. There was a statistically significant 20% reduction in the percentage of hyperglycaemic patient-day weighted values >15 mmol/L compared to the preimplementation period without a significant change in the percentage of hypoglycaemic values. The time-to-next-reading after a dysglycaemic POC-BG result was reduced by 14% and the time-to-normalization of a dysglycaemic result was reduced from 10.2 hours to 8.4 hours. Conclusion. The alert system reduced the percentage of hyperglycaemic patient-day weighted glucose values and the time-to-normalization of blood glucose.

  1. Acute psychiatric inpatient care: A cross-cultural comparison between two hospitals in Germany and Japan

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Background: Intercultural differences influence acute inpatient psychiatric care systems. Aims: To evaluate characteristics of acute inpatient care in a German and a Japanese hospital. Method: Based on a sample of 465 admissions to the Psychiatric State Hospital Regensburg (BKR) and 91 admissions to the Hirakawa Hospital (HH) over a six-month period in 2008, data from the psychiatric basic documentation system (BADO) were analysed with regard to socio-demographic characteristics, treatm...

  2. Paraphilias in adult psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Patrick J; Odlaug, Brian L; Thomarios, Nick; Davis, Andrew A; Buchanan, Stephanie N; Meyer, Craig S; Grant, Jon E

    2010-05-01

    The goal of the present study was to examine the prevalence of paraphilias in an adult inpatient psychiatric population. One hundred twelve consecutive, voluntarily admitted, adult male psychiatric inpatients were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, Sexual Disorders Module, Male Version, to assess the rates of DSM-IV paraphilias. Fifteen patients (13.4%) reported symptoms consistent with at least one lifetime DSM-IV paraphilia. The most common paraphilias were voyeurism (n = 9 [8.0%]), exhibitionism (n = 6 [5.4%]), and sexual masochism (n = 3 [2.7%]). Patients who screened positive for a paraphilia had significantly more psychiatric hospitalizations (P = .006) and, on a trend level, were more likely to have attempted suicide. In addition, patients with paraphilias were significantly more likely to report having been sexually abused than patients without a paraphilia (P = paraphilia. Paraphilias appear to be more common in adult male psychiatric inpatients than previously estimated. The study also demonstrated that these disorders were not screened for by the treating physician and thus may go untreated. Further, larger-scale studies are necessary in order to further examine the rates of these disorders in the general population.

  3. Monthly errors

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The 2006 monthly average statistical metrics for 2m Q (g kg-1) domain-wide for the base and MODIS WRF simulations against MADIS observations. This dataset is...

  4. Using Lean principles to optimise inpatient phlebotomy services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Rachel D; Melanson, Stacy E F; Santos, Katherine S; Paredes, Jose D; Baum, Jonathan M; Goonan, Ellen M; Torrence-Hill, Joi N; Gustafson, Michael L; Tanasijevic, Milenko J

    2014-08-01

    In the USA, inpatient phlebotomy services are under constant operational pressure to optimise workflow, improve timeliness of blood draws, and decrease error in the context of increasing patient volume and complexity of work. To date, the principles of Lean continuous process improvement have been rarely applied to inpatient phlebotomy. To optimise supply replenishment and cart standardisation, communication and workload management, blood draw process standardisation, and rounding schedules and assignments using Lean principles in inpatient phlebotomy services. We conducted four Lean process improvement events and implemented a number of interventions in inpatient phlebotomy over a 9-month period. We then assessed their impact using three primary metrics: (1) percentage of phlebotomists drawing their first patient by 05:30 for 05:00 rounds, (2) percentage of phlebotomists completing 08:00 rounds by 09:30, and (3) number of errors per 1000 draws. We saw marked increases in the percentage of phlebotomists drawing their first patient by 05:30, and the percentage of phlebotomists completing rounds by 09:30 postprocess improvement. A decrease in the number of errors per 1000 draws was also observed. This study illustrates how continuous process improvement through Lean can optimise workflow, improve timeliness, and decrease error in inpatient phlebotomy. We believe this manuscript adds to the field of clinical pathology as it can be used as a guide for other laboratories with similar goals of optimising workflow, improving timeliness, and decreasing error, providing examples of interventions and metrics that can be tailored to specific laboratories with particular services and resources. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Recent developments in alcoholism: inpatient treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nace, E P

    1993-01-01

    The historical role of inpatient treatment for alcoholism is reviewed in terms of its advantages and disadvantages. The factors that have forced a change in the utilization of inpatient treatment include increasing recognition of the heterogeneity of alcoholic patients, negative outcome studies, and cost-containment efforts. The clinical domains that warrant inpatient treatment are outlined, and decisions of treatment placement are necessarily guided by the factors of acuteness, ability, safety, and stabilization.

  6. Positive effects on bone mineralisation and muscular fitness after 10 months of intense school-based physical training for children aged 8–10 years: the FIT FIRST randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Malte Nejst; Nielsen, Claus Malta; Helge, Eva Wulff

    2017-01-01

    classes), a circuit strength training group (CST) (n=83, four schools, four classes) or a control group (CON, n=116, two schools, five classes). Intervention SSG or CST was performed 3×40 min/week over 10 months. Whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans were used to determine areal bone...... vs CST: 12 mg/cm2, 95%CI 3 to 21, ptraining types resulted in higher change scores in postural balance (SSG vs CON: 2.4 fewer falls/min, 95% CI 0.3 to 4.5, CST vs CON: 3...... improves bone mineralisation and several aspects of muscular fitness of children aged 8–10 years, suggesting that well-organised intense physical education classes can contribute positively to develop musculoskeletal health in young children. Trial registration number NCT02000492, post results....

  7. Effects of Peer Mentoring on Self-Efficacy and Hospital Readmission After Inpatient Rehabilitation of Individuals With Spinal Cord Injury: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassaway, Julie; Jones, Michael L; Sweatman, W Mark; Hong, Minna; Anziano, Peter; DeVault, Karen

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the effect of intensive peer mentoring on patient-reported outcomes of self-efficacy and unplanned hospital readmissions for persons with spinal cord injury/disease (SCI/D) within the first 6 months after discharge from inpatient rehabilitation. Randomized controlled trial. Nonprofit inpatient rehabilitation hospital specializing in care of persons with SCI/D and brain injury. Patients (N=158) admitted to the SCI/D rehabilitation program whose discharge location was a community setting. Participants (51% with paraplegia and 49% with tetraplegia) were 73% white and 77% men, with a mean age of 38 years. Participants in the experimental group received initial consult/introduction with a peer support program liaison and were assigned a peer mentor, who met with the participant weekly throughout the inpatient stay and made weekly contact by phone, e-mail, or in person for 90 days postdischarge. Participants also were encouraged to participate in regularly scheduled peer support activities. Nonexperimental group participants were introduced to peer support and provided services only on request. General Self-efficacy Scale (adapted to SCI/D), project-developed community integration self-efficacy scale, and patient-reported unplanned rehospitalizations. Growth rate for self-efficacy in the first 6 months postdischarge was significantly higher for experimental group participants than nonexperimental group participants. Experimental group participants also had significantly fewer unplanned hospital days. This study provides evidence that individuals receiving intensive peer mentoring during and after rehabilitation for SCI/D demonstrate greater gains in self-efficacy over time and have fewer days of unplanned rehospitalization in the first 180 days postdischarge. More research is needed to examine the long-term effects of this intervention on health care utilization and the relation between improved health and patient-reported quality of life outcomes

  8. A CBT Approach to Inpatient Psychiatric Hospitalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Kim J.

    2005-01-01

    During a psychiatric hospitalization of 5 to 10 days, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) strategies can be used for the management of inpatients and to support the transition to outpatient treatment. This format was chosen after several years of frustration dealing with crisis inpatient care. The use of CBT is well known, and it seemed that an…

  9. Dietary Issues Inpatients Face With Being Vegetarian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter-Dunlop, Julie A.; Tse, Alice M.

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the literature from 1985 through 2010 on research related to the dietary issues vegetarian inpatients may encounter in the acute care setting. A thematic portrayal of vegetarianism in the context of the inpatient setting is described. Implications for future research and nursing practice are identified. PMID:22157507

  10. The logistics of an inpatient dermatology service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbach, Misha

    2017-03-01

    Inpatient dermatology represents a unique challenge as caring for hospitalized patients with skin conditions is different from most dermatologists' daily outpatient practice. Declining rates of inpatient dermatology participation are often attributed to a number of factors, including challenges navigating the administrative burdens of hospital credentialing, acclimating to different hospital systems involving potential alternate electronic medical records systems, medical-legal concerns, and reimbursement concerns. This article aims to provide basic guidelines to help dermatologists establish a presence as a consulting physician in the inpatient hospital-based setting. The emphasis is on identifying potential pitfalls, problematic areas, and laying out strategies for tackling some of the challenges of inpatient dermatology including balancing financial concerns and optimizing reimbursements, tracking data and developing a plan for academic productivity, optimizing workflow, and identifying metrics to document the impact of an inpatient dermatology consult service. ©2017 Frontline Medical Communications.

  11. Hostility and violence of acute psychiatric inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzoni Antonella

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The aim of the present study was to find out the extent of hostility and violence and the factors that are associated with such hostility and violence in a psychiatric intensive care unit. Methods Retrospective analysis of data prospectively collected in a 6-year period. Results No hostility was observed in 56.1%, hostility in 40.9%, and violence in 3.0% of the admitted cases. Seclusion was never used. Six cases (2,5‰ required physical restraint. Risk factors associated with violence were younger age, suicidal risk, and diagnosis of schizophrenia. Risk factors associated with hostile and violent behavior were younger age at the onset of the disorder, being single, having no children, lower GAF scores, higher BPRS hostility, SAPS, and CGI scores, lower BPRS anxiety-depression score, higher doses of psychoactive drugs, more frequent use of neuroleptics, diagnosis of mania, personality disorder, substance and alcohol related disorders, no diagnosis of depression. Conclusion The study confirms the low rate of violence among Italian psychiatric in-patients, the major relevance of clinical rather than socio-demographic factors in respect of aggressive behavior, the possibility of a no seclusion-no physical restraint policy, not associated either with higher rates of hostility or violence or with more severe drug side effects.

  12. Unit-based clinical pharmacists' prevention of serious medication errors in pediatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, Rainu; Bates, David W; Abramson, Erika L; Soukup, Jane R; Goldmann, Donald A

    2008-07-01

    Rates of serious medication errors in three pediatric inpatient units (intensive care, general medical, and general surgical) were measured before and after introduction of unit-based clinical pharmacists. Error rates on the study units and similar patient care units in the same hospital that served as controls were determined during six- to eight-week baseline periods and three-month periods after the introduction of unit-based clinical pharmacists (full-time in the intensive care unit [ICU] and mornings only on the general units). Nurses trained by the investigators reviewed medication orders, medication administration records, and patient charts daily to detect errors, near misses, and adverse drug events (ADEs) and determine whether near misses were intercepted. Two physicians independently reviewed and rated all data collected by the nurses. Serious medication errors were defined as preventable ADEs and nonintercepted near misses. The baseline rates of serious medication errors per 1000 patient days were 29 for the ICU, 8 for the general medical unit, and 7 for the general surgical unit. With unit-based clinical pharmacists, the ICU rate dropped to 6 per 1000 patient days. In the general care units, there was no reduction from baseline in the rates of serious medication errors. A full-time unit-based clinical pharmacist substantially decreased the rate of serious medication errors in a pediatric ICU, but a part-time pharmacist was not as effective in decreasing errors in pediatric general care units.

  13. A Novel Mental Health Crisis Service – Outcomes of Inpatient Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlennon, D; McDonnell, C

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Northern Ireland has high mental health needs and a rising suicide rate. Our area has suffered a 32% reduction of inpatient beds consistent with the national drive towards community based treatment. Taking these factors into account, a new Mental Health Crisis Service was developed incorporating a high fidelity Crisis Response Home Treatment Team (CRHTT), Acute Day Care facility and two inpatient wards. The aim was to provide alternatives to inpatient admission. The new service would facilitate transition between inpatient and community care while decreasing bed occupancy and increasing treatment in the community. Methods All services and processes were reviewed to assess deficiencies in current care. There was extensive consultation with internal and external stakeholders and process mapping using the COBRAs framework as a basis for the service improvement model. The project team set the service criteria and reviewed progress. Results In the original service model, the average inpatient occupancy rate was 106.6%, admission rate was 48 patients per month and total length of stay was 23.4 days. After introducing the inpatient consultant hospital model, the average occupancy rate decreased to 90%, admissions to 43 per month and total length of stay to 22 days. The results further decreased to 83% occupancy, 32 admissions per month and total length of stay 12 days after CRHTT initiation. Discussion The Crisis Service is still being evaluated but currently the model has provided safe alternatives to inpatient care. Involvement with patients, carers and all multidisciplinary teams is maximised to improve the quality and safety of care. Innovative ideas including structured weekly timetable and regular interface meetings have improved communication and allowed additional time for patient care. PMID:27158159

  14. The Effect of Acute Exercise on Affect and Arousal in Inpatient Mental Health Consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Robert; Reaburn, Peter; Happell, Brenda

    2016-09-01

    Acute exercise performed at a self-selected intensity improves affect and may improve long-term adherence. Similarly, in people with severe depression, acute aerobic exercise performed at self-selected intensity improves affect and arousal. However, the relationship between changes in affect and arousal and perceived exercise intensity in people with mental illness has not been evaluated. Affect and arousal were assessed immediately prior to, and immediately following, a group exercise program performed at a self-selected intensity in 40 inpatient mental health consumers who received a diagnosis of anxiety or bipolar or depressive disorders. Exercise intensity was assessed immediately after exercise. Postexercise affect was significantly improved for people with bipolar and depressive disorders but not for people with anxiety disorders. For the group as a whole, results showed a significant curvilinear relationship between ratings of perceived exertion and postexercise affect. These data will inform the development and delivery of future exercise interventions for inpatient mental health consumers.

  15. Suicide among older psychiatric inpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlangsen, Annette; Zarit, Steven H; Tu, Xin;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Older adults have elevated suicide rates, especially in the presence of a psychiatric disorder, yet not much is known about predictors for suicide within this high-risk group. The current study examines the characteristics associated with suicide among older adults who are admitted...... to a psychiatric hospital. METHOD: All persons aged 60 and older living in Denmark who were hospitalized with psychiatric disorders during 1990-2000 were included in the study. Using a case-control design and logistic regression analysis, the authors calculated the suicide risk associated with specific patient...... characteristics. RESULTS: Affective disorders were found to be associated with an almost twofold higher risk of suicide among psychiatric inpatients than other types of disorders (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.5-2.6). Patients with dementia had a significantly lower risk ratio of 0.2 (95% CI: 0...

  16. A study on first intake assessments of in-patient referrals to psychiatric rehabilitation services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetha Desai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychiatric rehabilitation is an important component in mental health services. The rehabilitation needs of patients with mental illness have been highlighted in various studies. The studies on in-patient referrals to rehabilitation services however are sparse. This study describes the clinical and demographic details and the reasons for referrals to rehabilitation services during the in-patients stay. Materials and Methods: A semi-structured pro forma was used for the assessment of in-patients referred for the psychiatric rehabilitation services. The pro forma included socio-demographic details such as background, family resources, illness related details such as symptom status, risk assessment, medication details. The total number of referrals for a period of 5 months was collected and coded. Results: The total number of referrals for a period of 5 months was 216 and there were 197 forms available for the study. The mean age of the sample was 31.48 ± 10.46 years. Vocational rehabilitation was the commonest reason for referral to the in-patient services. Severe mental disorders were the most common diagnosis of patients refereed to the services. Conclusions: Patients with severe mental illness were most often referred to the in-patient services. This indicates that we need include to rehabilitation in the management plan at the earliest. Vocational rehabilitation is the most common reason for referrals and there is a need to develop services to cater to these needs.

  17. The Dougados Functional Index with the 5-point Likert scale is sensitive to change due to intensive physiotherapy and exercise in spondyloarthropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, S

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the Dougados Functional Index (DFI) with 5-point Likert scale is sensitive enough to demonstrate the efficacy of intensive physiotherapy and exercise. Eight-one consecutive patients with spondyloarthropathy (SpA) completed self-administered questionnaires on functional analysis, the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI) and the DFI with 5-point Likert scale, at the beginning and end of a 3-week in-patient course based on intensive physiotherapy and exercise. The objective effect of the course was measured with 10 ranges of movement. After a 6-month follow-up the patients completed the questionnaires by mail for analysis of the lasting impact of rehabilitation on function. The in-patient course was highly effective: all ranges of movement and both functional indices including the DFI with 5-point Likert scale improved to a highly significant degree. Six months later functional ability as measured by the DFI remained significantly better than at baseline before the in-patient course, but the BASFI had returned to the baseline level. The DFI with 5-point Likert scale is sensitive enough to demonstrate the effect of intensive physiotherapy and exercise.

  18. The effect of July admission on inpatient morbidity and mortality after adult spinal deformity surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Garza-Ramos, Rafael; Passias, Peter G.; Schwab, Frank J.; Lafage, Virginie

    2016-01-01

    Background Some studies have suggested patients who undergo surgery in July have worse outcomes compared to patients treated during other months. The purpose of this study is to compare inpatient morbidity and mortality among patients who underwent adult spinal deformity (ASD) surgery in July with those who underwent surgery in other months. Methods Admission data for patients who underwent ASD surgery were extracted from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample for the years 2002 to 2011. Only adult patients (over 21 years of age) and elective admissions to teaching hospitals were included. A multivariable regression analysis was performed to examine the independent effect of July admissions on overall complications, major complications, and inpatient mortality. Results A total of 27,794 patients were identified, with 2,023 (7.8%) admitted in July and 25,771 (92.2%) in other months. Overall complication rates in July (43.1%) were not different from rates in other months (44.9%, p=0.468). Similarly, major complication rates were similar; 12.9% in July and 12.4% in other months (p=0.764). Mortality was not different between groups (p=0.807). After multivariable analysis, July admissions were not found to increase the odds of developing any complication (OR 0.94; 95% CI, 0.77 - 1.12; p=0.403), major complications (OR 1.04; 95% CI, 0.76 - 1.41; p=0.788) or inpatient mortality (OR 1.35; 95% CI, 0.31 - 5.84; p=0.684). Conclusion In this study of a nationwide database, patients who underwent ASD surgery in July did not have increased odds of developing a complication or inpatient mortality compared to patients admitted in other months. PMID:26913223

  19. Medicare Provider Utilization and Payment Data - Inpatient

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The data provided here include hospital-specific charges for the more than 3,000 U.S. hospitals that receive Medicare Inpatient Prospective Payment System (IPPS)...

  20. Inpatient Psychiatric Prospective Payment System (IPF PPS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This file contains case level data for inpatient psychiatric stays and is derived from 2011 MEDPAR data file and the latest available provider specific file. The...

  1. 42 CFR 412.405 - Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. 412.405 Section 412.405 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR...

  2. 42 CFR 424.14 - Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for inpatient services of inpatient psychiatric facilities. 424.14 Section 424.14 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM CONDITIONS FOR MEDICARE PAYMENT Certification and Plan Requirements §...

  3. Social Recovery Model: An 8-Year Investigation of Adolescent 12-step Group Involvement following Inpatient Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, John F.; Brown, Sandra A.; Abrantes, Ana; Kahler, Christopher; Myers, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite widespread use of 12-step treatment approaches and referrals to Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and Narcotics Anonymous (NA) by youth providers, little is known about the significance of these organizations in youth addiction recovery. Furthermore, existing evidence is based mostly on short-term follow-up and is limited methodologically. Methods Adolescent inpatients (N = 160; M age = 16, 40% female) were followed at 6-months, and at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 years post-treatment. Time-lagged, generalized estimating equations (GEE) modeled treatment outcome in relation to AA/NA attendance controlling for static and time-varying covariates. Robust regression (LOWESS) explored dose-response thresholds of AA/NA attendance on outcome. Results AA/NA attendance was common and intensive early post-treatment, but declined sharply and steadily over the 8-year period. Patients with greater addiction severity and those who believed they could not use substances in moderation were more likely to attend. Despite declining attendance, the effects related to AA/NA remained significant and consistent. Greater early participation was associated with better long-term outcomes. Conclusions Even though many youth discontinue AA/NA over time, attendees appear to benefit, and more severely substance-involved youth attend most. Successful early post-treatment engagement of youth in abstinence-supportive social contexts, such as AA/NA, may have long-term implications for alcohol and drug involvement into young adulthood. PMID:18557829

  4. Access to health insurance and the use of inpatient medical care: evidence from the Affordable Care Act young adult mandate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akosa Antwi, Yaa; Moriya, Asako S; Simon, Kosali I

    2015-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act of 2010 expanded coverage to young adults by allowing them to remain on their parent's private health insurance until they turn 26 years old. While there is evidence on insurance effects, we know very little about use of general or specific forms of medical care. We study the implications of the expansion on inpatient hospitalizations. Given the prevalence of mental health needs for young adults, we also specifically study mental health related inpatient care. We find evidence that compared to those aged 27-29 years, treated young adults aged 19-25 years increased their inpatient visits by 3.5 percent while mental illness visits increased 9.0 percent. The prevalence of uninsurance among hospitalized young adults decreased by 12.5 percent; however, it does not appear that the intensity of inpatient treatment changed despite the change in reimbursement composition of patients.

  5. Impulse control disorders in adult psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Jon E; Levine, Laura; Kim, Daniel; Potenza, Marc N

    2005-11-01

    The authors' goal was to examine the prevalence of impulse control disorders in psychiatric inpatients. They used the Minnesota Impulsive Disorders Interview, a semistructured clinical interview assessing pathological gambling, trichotillomania, kleptomania, pyromania, intermittent explosive disorder, compulsive buying, and compulsive sexual behavior, to screen 204 consecutively admitted psychiatric inpatients. One hundred twelve of the inpatients were women (54.9%), and the mean age of the 204 inpatients was 40.5 years (SD=13.2, range=18-83). Patients whose screen was positive for an impulse control disorder were evaluated with structured clinical interviews. Sixty-three patients (30.9%) were diagnosed with at least one current impulse control disorder. The most common impulse control disorders were compulsive buying (N=19 [9.3%]), kleptomania (N=16 [7.8%]), and pathological gambling (N=14 [6.9%]). Patients with and without co-occurring impulse control disorders did not differ significantly from each other on demographic measures or number or type of psychiatric diagnoses other than impulse control disorders. Impulse control disorders appear common among psychiatric inpatients. Additional, larger studies are needed to examine the prevalence of impulse control disorders in the general population and specific psychiatric groups.

  6. Point prevalence study of pediatric inpatients who are unable to communicate effectively about pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Douglas L; Carroll, Karen W; Dougherty, Susan; Vega, Cassandra; Feudtner, Chris

    2014-11-01

    Pediatric inpatients may be at risk for inadequate pain management if they are unable to communicate effectively because of age, physical or cognitive impairment, or medical procedures. We conducted a point prevalence study to estimate the proportion of inpatients at a children's hospital who have difficulty communicating to hospital staff. We obtained nurse reports of ability to communicate for all inpatients aged ≥12 months in a pediatric hospital. Demographic information was obtained from the medical record. Questionnaires were completed for 254 inpatients. Forty percent of inpatients had some difficulty communicating, and 69% had experienced pain during the hospitalization. Patient ability to communicate was not related to experiencing pain (χ(2) test, P = .30) or effectiveness of pain management (χ(2) test, P = .80) but was associated with difficulty communicating about pain and nurses needing help from the caretaker to communicate with the patient (χ(2) tests, Ps communicating effectively and experienced pain during hospitalization. These communication difficulties were not associated with nurse reports of the effectiveness of pain management. However, patients who had difficulties communicating in general were also more likely to have difficulty communicating about pain specifically, and nurses were more likely to need help from the caregiver to understand these patients. Future directions include identifying which conditions, procedures, and medications are associated with inability to communicate. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  7. The effect of the TIM program (Transfer ICU Medication reconciliation) on medication transfer errors in two Dutch intensive care units: design of a prospective 8-month observational study with a before and after period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosma, Bertha Elizabeth; Meuwese, Edmé; Tan, Siok Swan; van Bommel, Jasper; Melief, Piet Herman Gerard Jan; Hunfeld, Nicole Geertruida Maria; van den Bemt, Patricia Maria Lucia Adriana

    2017-02-10

    The transfer of patients to and from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is prone to medication errors. The aim of the present study is to determine whether the number of medication errors at ICU admission and discharge and the associated potential harm and costs are reduced by using the Transfer ICU and Medication reconciliation (TIM) program. This prospective 8-month observational study with a pre- and post-design will assess the effects of the TIM program compared with usual care in two Dutch hospitals. Patients will be included if they are using at least one drug before hospital admission and will stay in the ICU for at least 24 h. They are excluded if they are transferred to another hospital, admitted and discharged in the same weekend or unable to communicate in Dutch or English. In the TIM program, a clinical pharmacist reconciles patient's medication history within 24 h after ICU admission, resulting in a "best possible" medication history and presents it to the ICU doctor. At ICU discharge the clinical pharmacist reconciles the prescribed ICU medication and the medication history with the ICU doctor, resulting in an ICU discharge medication list with medication prescription recommendations for the general ward doctor. Primary outcome measures are the proportions of patients with one or more medication transfer errors 24 h after ICU admission and 24 h after ICU discharge. Secondary outcome measures are the proportion of patients with potential adverse drug events, the severity of potential adverse drug events and the associated costs. For the primary outcome relative risks and 95% confidence intervals will be calculated. Strengths of this study are the tailor-made design of the TIM program and two participating hospitals. This study also has some limitations: A potential selection bias since this program is not performed during the weekends, collecting of potential rather than actual adverse drug events and finally a relatively short study period. Nevertheless

  8. Variability in inpatient management of children hospitalized with bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, Charles G; Mansbach, Jonathan M; Fisher, Erin S; Riederer, Mark; Piedra, Pedro A; Sullivan, Ashley F; Espinola, Janice A; Camargo, Carlos A

    2015-01-01

    To determine the variability between hospitals in diagnostic testing and management interventions for children with bronchiolitis admitted to inpatient wards and identify its association with patient characteristics. A prospective, multicenter (16 hospitals), multiyear (2007-2010) observational study of children (age bronchiolitis. Outcomes included variability in diagnostic testing (complete blood count, chest radiographs) and medications or interventions (bronchodilator, systemic corticosteroid, antibiotic, IV placement) by hospital. A modified Respiratory Distress Severity Score was utilized to assess severity of illness. For all outcomes, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated from a model to estimate the random effects of hospital without added covariates and compared to ICCs from a second model that adjusted for demographic and clinical patient characteristics. A second unadjusted and adjusted model was created for age ≥ 2 months. Of 2207 subjects, 1715 were identified as admitted to inpatient wards. We observed wide variations in the proportion of patients who received diagnostic testing (complete blood count 21-75%, chest radiograph 36-85%) and medications/interventions (bronchodilators 19-91%, systemic corticosteroids 8-44%, antibiotics 17-43%, IV placement 38-93%). Adjusting for demographic and clinical patient characteristics did not materially affect the proportion of variability attributable to hospitals (differences in ICCs with and without model adjustment bronchiolitis treated on the inpatient wards at 16 US hospitals were not attributable to demographic or clinical patient characteristics. These results further support efforts to standardize care for bronchiolitis through active quality improvement strategies. Copyright © 2015 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. An Update on Inpatient Hypertension Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axon, R Neal; Turner, Mason; Buckley, Ryan

    2015-11-01

    Hypertension is highly prevalent affecting nearly one third of the US adult population. Though generally approached as an outpatient disorder, elevated blood pressure is observed in a majority of hospitalized patients. The spectrum of hypertensive disease ranges from patients with hypertensive emergency including markedly elevated blood pressure and associated end-organ damage to asymptomatic patients with minimally elevated pressures of unclear significance. It is important to note that current evidence-based hypertension guidelines do not specifically address inpatient hypertension. This narrative review focuses primarily on best practices for diagnosing and managing nonemergent hypertension in the inpatient setting. We describe examples of common hypertensive syndromes, provide suggestions for optimal post-acute management, and point to evidence-based or consensus guidelines where available. In addition, we describe a practical approach to managing asymptomatic elevated blood pressure observed in the inpatient setting. Finally, arranging effective care transitions to ensure optimal ongoing hypertension management is appropriate in all cases.

  10. Determining adolescents' suitability for inpatient psychotherapy: utility of the clinician-rated Readiness for Inpatient Psychotherapy Scale with an adolescent inpatient sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggerty, Greg; Siefert, Caleb; Stoycheva, Valentina; Sinclair, Samuel Justin; Baity, Matthew; Zodan, Jennifer; Mehra, Ashwin; Chand, Vijay; Blais, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Growing economic pressure on inpatient services for adolescents has resulted in fewer clinicians to provide individual psychotherapy. As a result, inpatient treatment trends have favored group psychotherapy modalities and psychopharmacological interventions. Currently, no clinician-rated measures exist to assist clinicians in determining who would be able to better utilize individual psychotherapy on inpatient units. The current study sought to demonstrate the utility of the Readiness for Inpatient Psychotherapy Scale with an adolescent inpatient sample. This study also used the RIPS as it is intended to be used in everyday practice. Results from the authors' analyses reveal that the RIPS demonstrates good psychometrics and interrater reliability, as well as construct validity.

  11. Inpatient Therapeutic Assessment With Narcissistic Personality Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence supporting the effectiveness of Collaborative/Therapeutic Assessment (C/TA) has led clinicians and researchers to apply C/TA to a variety of clinical populations and treatment settings. This case example presents a C/TA inpatient adaptation illustrated with narcissistic personality disorder. After a brief overview of salient concepts, I provide a detailed account of the clinical interview, test interpretation paired with diagnostic considerations specific to narcissism, planned intervention, and discussion of assessment results. Throughout the case study, I attempt to demonstrate defining features of C/TA, inpatient adaptations, and clinical techniques that encourage meaningful engagement with a "hard to reach" personality.

  12. Dysphagia outcomes in patients with brain tumors undergoing inpatient rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesling, Michele; Brady, Susan; Jensen, Mary; Nickell, Melissa; Statkus, Donna; Escobar, Nelson

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare functional dysphagia outcomes following inpatient rehabilitation for patients with brain tumors with that of patients following a stroke. Group 1 (n = 24) consisted of consecutive admissions to the brain injury program with the diagnosis of brain tumor and dysphagia. Group 2 (n = 24) consisted of matched, consecutive admissions, with the diagnosis of acute stroke and dysphagia. Group 2 was matched for age, site of lesion, and initial composite cognitive FIM score. The main outcome measures for this study included the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) National Outcome Measurement System (NOMS) swallowing scale, length of stay, hospital charges, and medical complications. Results showed that swallowing gains made by both groups as evaluated by the admission and discharge ASHA NOMS levels were considered to be statistically significant. The differences for length of stay, total hospital charges, and speech charges between the two groups were not considered to be statistically significant. Three patients in the brain tumor group (12.5%) demonstrated dysphagia complications of either dehydration or pneumonia during their treatment course as compared to 0% in the stroke group. This study confirms that functional dysphagia gains can be achieved for patients with brain tumors undergoing inpatient rehabilitation and that they should be afforded the same type and intensity of rehabilitation for their swallowing that is provided to patients following a stroke.

  13. Outpatient- and inpatient-based buckling surgery: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee JC

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Jin Cheol Lee,* Yu Cheol Kim*Department of Ophthalmology, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Dongsan Medical Center, Daegu, Korea *Both authors contributed equally to this workPurpose: To evaluate the clinical outcomes of ambulatory buckling surgery, comparing outpatient- with inpatient-based surgery.Methods: The authors performed a retrospective study of 80 consecutive cases of rhegmato genous retinal detachment from January 2009 to December 2011 treated by scleral buckling surgery. Two groups of patients were defined according to inpatient (group 1 or outpatient (group 2 surgery, and a comparison of several parameters between these two groups was performed.Results: Of the 80 subjects in this study, the average age of group 1 (50 patients was 49.7 years, and that of group 2 (30 patients was 47.5 years. There were no statistically significant differences in the average logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution-visual acuity, the condition of the lens, or the presence of retinal lattice degeneration prior to the surgery between the groups. There were no statistically significant differences in the patterns of tear or retinal detachment or in surgical procedure between the groups. Comparing the best-corrected visual acuity after 6 months with that prior to the surgery, the changes in group 1 and group 2 were 0.26 and 0.31, respectively. The functional success rates of group 1 and group 2 after 6 months were 90% and 93%, respectively, and the anatomical success rates of group 1 and group 2 after 6 months were 94% and 96%, respectively, but these were also statistically insignificant.Conclusion: Hospitalization is not essential for buckling surgery in uncomplicated rhegmatogenous retinal detachment surgery.Keywords: ambulatory, scleral buckling, rhegmatogenous retinal detachment

  14. Risk factors for requiring intensive care among children admitted to ward with bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kohei; Pate, Brian M; Mansbach, Jonathan M; Macias, Charles G; Fisher, Erin S; Piedra, Pedro A; Espinola, Janice A; Sullivan, Ashley F; Camargo, Carlos A

    2015-01-01

    To examine risk factors for transfer of bronchiolitis patients from the ward to the intensive care unit (ICU) and/or initiation of critical care interventions. We performed a 16-center, prospective cohort study of hospitalized children age bronchiolitis. During the winters of 2007 to 2010, researchers collected clinical data and nasopharyngeal aspirates from study participants. The primary outcome was late intensive care use, defined as a transfer to the ICU and/or use of mechanical ventilation (regardless of location) after the child's first inpatient day. Among 2104 children hospitalized with bronchiolitis, 1762 (84%) were identified as initial ward patients, comprising the analysis cohort. The median age was 4 months (interquartile range, 2-9 months), and 1048 (59%) were boys. The most frequently detected pathogens were respiratory syncytial virus (72%) and rhinovirus (25%). After the first inpatient day, 47 (3%; 95% confidence interval, 2-4) were subsequently transferred to the ICU or required mechanical ventilation. In the multivariable logistic regression model predicting subsequent transfer to the ICU or mechanical ventilation use, the significant predictors were birth weight bronchiolitis, low birth weight and tachypnea were significantly associated with subsequent transfer to the ICU and/or use of mechanical ventilation. Copyright © 2015 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A guideline for the inpatient care of children with pyelonephritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chishti, Aftab S.; Maul, Erich C.; Nazario, Rubén J.; Bennett, Jeffrey S.; Kiessling, Stefan G.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Febrile urinary tract infections and pyelonephritis are common in children and frequently lead to hospitalization for management, especially in the child who appears toxic. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) practice parameter on the diagnosis, treatment and evaluation of the initial urinary tract infection in febrile infants and young children provides experience and evidence-based guidelines for the practitioner caring for children between the ages of 2 months to 2 years. No established guideline exists for older children and the AAP guideline does not specifically focus on inpatient care. METHODS: We conducted a comprehensive review of recently published literature and practice guidelines to develop a consensus on the inpatient diagnosis and management of children with pyelonephritis. RESULTS: Eight recommendations are proposed for the diagnosis and management, including revised guidelines for the imaging studies postpyelonephritis on the basis of current best evidence. CONCLUSION: Proper diagnosis of pyelonephritis, timely initiation of appropriate therapy and identification of children at risk for renal injury will help to reduce immediate as well as long-term complications due to chronic kidney disease. PMID:20716830

  16. Inpatient hospital care of children with trisomy 13 and trisomy 18 in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Katherine E; Hexem, Kari R; Feudtner, Chris

    2012-05-01

    Trisomy 13 and trisomy 18 are generally considered fatal anomalies, with a majority of infants dying in the first year after birth. The inpatient hospital care that these patients receive has not been adequately described. This study characterized inpatient hospitalizations of children with trisomy 13 and trisomy 18 in the United States, including number and types of procedures performed. Retrospective repeated cross-sectional assessment of hospitalization data from the nationally representative US Kids' Inpatient Database, for the years 1997, 2000, 2003, 2006, and 2009. Included hospitalizations were of patients aged 0 to 20 years with a diagnosis of trisomy 13 or trisomy 18. The number of hospitalizations for each trisomy type ranged from 846 to 907 per year for trisomy 13 (P = .77 for temporal trend) and 1036 to 1616 per year for trisomy 18 (P < .001 for temporal trend). Over one-third (36%) of the hospitalizations were of patients older than 1 year of age. Patients underwent a total of 2765 major therapeutic procedures, including creation of esophageal sphincter (6% of hospitalizations; mean age 23 months), repair of atrial and ventricular septal defects (4%; mean age 9 months), and procedures on tendons (4%; mean age 8 years). Children with trisomy 13 and trisomy 18 receive significant inpatient hospital care. Despite the conventional understanding of these syndromes as lethal, a substantial number of children are living longer than 1 year and undergoing medical and surgical procedures as part of their treatment.

  17. The cost of inpatient death associated with acute coronary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Page II RL

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Robert L Page II,1 Vahram Ghushchyan,2 Jill Van Den Bos,3 Travis J Gray,3 Greta L Hoetzer,4 Durgesh Bhandary,4 Kavita V Nair1 1Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, 2College of Business and Economics, American University of Armenia, Yerevan, Armenia; 3Milliman, Inc, Denver, CO, 4AstraZeneca, US Medical Affairs, Wilmington, DE, USA Background: No studies have addressed the cost of inpatient mortality during an acute coronary syndrome (ACS admission. Objective: Compare ACS-related length of stay (LOS, total admission cost, and total admission cost by day of discharge/death for patients who died during an inpatient admission with a matched cohort discharged alive following an ACS-related inpatient stay. Methods: Medical and pharmacy claims (2009–2012 were used to identify admissions with a primary diagnosis of ACS from patients with at least 6 months of continuous enrollment prior to an ACS admission. Patients who died during their ACS admission (deceased cohort were matched (one-to-one to those who survived (survived cohort on age, sex, year of admission, Chronic Condition Index score, and prior revascularization. Mean LOS, total admission cost, and total admission cost by the day of discharge/death for the deceased cohort were compared with the survived cohort. A generalized linear model with log transformation was used to estimate the differences in the total expected incremental cost of an ACS admission and by the day of discharge/death between cohorts. A negative binomial model was used to estimate differences in the LOS between the two cohorts. Costs were inflated to 2013 dollars. Results: A total of 1,320 ACS claims from patients who died (n=1,320 were identified and matched to 1,319 claims from the survived patients (n=1,319. The majority were men (68% and mean age was 56.7±6.4 years. The LOS per claim for the deceased cohort was

  18. HCUP State Inpatient Databases (SID) - Restricted Access File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The State Inpatient Databases (SID) contain the universe of hospital inpatient discharge abstracts in States participating in HCUP that release their data through...

  19. A randomised controlled trial linking mental health inpatients to community smoking cessation supports: A study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clancy Richard

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mental health inpatients smoke at higher rates than the general population and are disproportionately affected by tobacco dependence. Despite the advent of smoke free policies within mental health hospitals, limited systems are in place to support a cessation attempt post hospitalisation, and international evidence suggests that most smokers return to pre-admission smoking levels following discharge. This protocol describes a randomised controlled trial that will test the feasibility, acceptability and efficacy of linking inpatient smoking care with ongoing community cessation support for smokers with a mental illness. Methods/Design This study will be conducted as a randomised controlled trial. 200 smokers with an acute mental illness will be recruited from a large inpatient mental health facility. Participants will complete a baseline survey and will be randomised to either a multimodal smoking cessation intervention or provided with hospital smoking care only. Randomisation will be stratified by diagnosis (psychotic, non-psychotic. Intervention participants will be provided with a brief motivational interview in the inpatient setting and options of ongoing smoking cessation support post discharge: nicotine replacement therapy (NRT; referral to Quitline; smoking cessation groups; and fortnightly telephone support. Outcome data, including cigarettes smoked per day, quit attempts, and self-reported 7-day point prevalence abstinence (validated by exhaled carbon monoxide, will be collected via blind interview at one week, two months, four months and six months post discharge. Process information will also be collected, including the use of cessation supports and cost of the intervention. Discussion This study will provide comprehensive data on the potential of an integrated, multimodal smoking cessation intervention for persons with an acute mental illness, linking inpatient with community cessation support. Trial Registration

  20. Communicating with inpatients with memory impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valitchka, Lindsey; Turkstra, Lyn S

    2013-08-01

    Many patients with acquired brain injury have acute impairments in declarative memory, the memory system responsible for learning facts and remembering events, whereas implicit memory for skills, habits, and emotional associations remains intact. The combination of impaired declarative memory and preserved implicit memory has implications for communicating with patients in inpatient rehabilitation, not only in therapy sessions but also in nontherapy interactions with rehabilitation staff. The aim of this study was to describe communication patterns among inpatients with declarative memory impairments and rehabilitation staff members during the early stage postinjury. Participants were five adults with acquired brain injury and declarative memory impairments. Each participant was observed for a full inpatient rehabilitation day. Results showed that staff and visitors frequently asked participants declarative questions to which answers were not verifiable (e.g., questions about preinjury events). Answers that could be verified often were incorrect but were accepted by staff as correct. Results suggest that acute rehabilitation staff may need training in communicating with patients with declarative memory impairments. We suggest strategies to create a more supportive communication environment for inpatients with memory impairment. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  1. Qualify of Life of Forensic Psychiatric Inpatients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuizen, C. van; Nijman, H.L.I.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the quality of life (QoL) of mentally disordered offenders was investigated. The data of 44 forensic psychiatric inpatients were analyzed using the Lancashire Quality of Life Profile (LQoLP), Rehabilitation Evaluation Hall and Baker (REHAB), and the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PC

  2. Depression in Geriatric and Adult Medical Inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magni, Guido; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Administered two scales for the evaluation of depression to two groups of medical inpatients: adults (N=201) and geriatric subjects (N=178). Results confirmed a high presence of depressive symptoms among patients with medical problems, particularly among geriatric subjects. Factors most predictive of depressive symptoms are identified. (JAC)

  3. The Transition from Inpatient to Outpatient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Alan L.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Presents case of 29-year-old white male veteran, whose case illustrates need for coordination of inpatient and outpatient services for chronically suicidal patients to reduce risk during transition. Includes comments on case from Phillip Kleespies, Sarah Marshall, Teri Pokrajac, and Richard Amodio and from Mark Goldblatt. (NB)

  4. Detecting Depression in Elderly Medical Inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Stephen R.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Used Research Diagnostic Criteria to assess base rate of detection of depression in 150 elderly medical inpatients by nonpsychiatric physicians, and evaluated psychometric properties of screening instruments to assess depression. Found detection of depression by house staff extremely low (8.7 percent). Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), BDI…

  5. Impulse control disorders in psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Astrid; Rein, Katharina; Kollei, Ines; Jacobi, Andrea; Rotter, Andrea; Schütz, Patricia; Hillemacher, Thomas; de Zwaan, Martina

    2011-08-15

    The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of impulse control disorders (ICDs) in a European psychiatric inpatient sample. Two hundred thirty four consecutive psychiatric inpatients (62% female) were examined using a module of the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders fourth edition (DSM-IV) that has been developed for ICDs (SCID-ICD). In addition to intermittent explosive disorder, pyromania, kleptomania, pathological gambling, and trichotillomania, the proposed ICDs not otherwise specified were assessed, including compulsive buying, nonparaphilic compulsive sexual behavior, pathological internet use, and pathological skin picking. Based on the SCID-ICD, a lifetime ICD rate of 23.5% and a current ICD rate of 18.8% were found. The most frequent ICDs were pathological skin picking (lifetime 7.3%, current 6.8%), compulsive buying (lifetime 6.8%, current 6.0%), and intermittent explosive disorder (lifetime 5.6%, current 3.4%). In contrast, referring to admission diagnoses taken from patients' charts only 3.8% of the inpatients were diagnosed with any current ICD. Individuals with comorbid ICD were significantly younger and had more admission diagnoses other than ICD. The results suggest high rates of ICDs among psychiatric inpatients that remain to be under-diagnosed in clinical routine. 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. 42 CFR 441.12 - Inpatient hospital tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inpatient hospital tests. 441.12 Section 441.12... General Provisions § 441.12 Inpatient hospital tests. Except in an emergency situation (see § 440.170(e)(1) of this chapter for definition), FFP is not available in expenditures for inpatient hospital tests...

  7. Inpatient Financial Burden of Atopic Dermatitis in the United States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Narla, Shanthi; Hsu, Derek Y; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the inpatient burden of atopic dermatitis (AD). We sought to determine the risk factors and financial burden of hospitalizations for AD in the United States. Data were analyzed from the 2002-2012 National Inpatient Sample, including a 20% representative sample of all......, there is a substantial inpatient financial burden of AD in the United States....

  8. Predictors of Readmission after Inpatient Plastic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umang Jain

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Understanding risk factors that increase readmission rates may help enhance patient education and set system-wide expectations. We aimed to provide benchmark data on causes and predictors of readmission following inpatient plastic surgery. Methods The 2011 National Surgical Quality Improvement Program dataset was reviewed for patients with both "Plastics" as their recorded surgical specialty and inpatient status. Readmission was tracked through the "Unplanned Readmission" variable. Patient characteristics and outcomes were compared using chi-squared analysis and Student's t-tests for categorical and continuous variables, respectively. Multivariate regression analysis was used for identifying predictors of readmission. Results A total of 3,671 inpatient plastic surgery patients were included. The unplanned readmission rate was 7.11%. Multivariate regression analysis revealed a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD (odds ratio [OR], 2.01; confidence interval [CI], 1.12-3.60; P=0.020, previous percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI (OR, 2.69; CI, 1.21-5.97; P=0.015, hypertension requiring medication (OR, 1.65; CI, 1.22-2.24; P<0.001, bleeding disorders (OR, 1.70; CI, 1.01-2.87; P=0.046, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA class 3 or 4 (OR, 1.57; CI, 1.15-2.15; P=0.004, and obesity (body mass index ≥30 (OR, 1.43; CI, 1.09-1.88, P=0.011 to be significant predictors of readmission. Conclusions Inpatient plastic surgery has an associated 7.11% unplanned readmission rate. History of COPD, previous PCI, hypertension, ASA class 3 or 4, bleeding disorders, and obesity all proved to be significant risk factors for readmission. These findings will help to benchmark inpatient readmission rates and manage patient and hospital system expectations.

  9. Violent images, anger and physical aggression among male forensic inpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Stine Bjerrum; Gondan, Matthias; Novaco, Raymond

    2017-01-01

    the follow-up period. Imagined violence and trauma-related intrusions separately contributed to anger and aggressive behaviour. Conclusions. The study calls attention to violent images as an important variable involved in aggressive responding. The role of violent images as a mediator of the well......Purpose. The present study of forensic hospital patients examined whether their imagination of violence is related to self-reported anger, psychological distress, and to staff observations of aggressive behaviour in hospital. In view of the relevance of psychological trauma for anger and aggression......, we further investigate whether the associations of imagined violence to anger and aggression are stronger when the patient has trauma-related intrusion symptoms. Methods. Participating male forensic inpatients (N = 54) were individually tested and followed-up for five months. Aggressive episodes were...

  10. Effects of cognitive behavioral coaching on depressive symptoms in a sample of type 2 diabetic inpatients in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyechi, Kay Chinonyelum Nwamaka; Eseadi, Chiedu; Okere, Anthony U; Onuigbo, Liziana N; Umoke, Prince C I; Anyaegbunam, Ngozi Joannes; Otu, Mkpoikanke Sunday; Ugorji, Ngozi Juliet

    2016-08-01

    Depression is one of the mental health problems confronting those with diabetes mellitus and may result from self-defeating thoughts and lifestyles. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of cognitive behavioral coaching (CBC) program on depressive symptoms in a sample of the Type 2 diabetic inpatients in Onitsha metropolis of Anambra State, Nigeria. The design of the study was pretest-post-test randomized control group design. The participants were 80 Type 2 diabetic inpatients randomly assigned to the treatment and control groups. The primary outcome measures were Beck's Depression Inventory-II and a Diabetic Inpatient's Depressive Symptoms Observation Checklist. Mean, standard deviation, repeated measures analysis of covariance, and partial eta squared were used for data analysis. The results revealed that the baseline of depressive symptoms was similar between the control and treatment groups of the Type 2 diabetic inpatients. But, exposing the Type 2 diabetic inpatients to a cognitive behavioral coaching program significantly reduced the depressive symptoms in the treatment group compared to those in the control group at the end of the intervention. The effects of cognitive behavioral coaching program on the depressive symptoms of those in the treatment group remained consistent at a 6 month follow-up meetings compared to the control group. Given the potential benefits of a cognitive behavioral coaching program, clinicians and mental health professionals are urged to support and implement evidence-based cognitive-behavioral coaching interventions aimed at promoting diabetic inpatients' wellbeing in the Nigerian hospitals.

  11. Audit of an inpatient liaison psychiatry consultation service.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lyne, John

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this paper is to examine an audit that was performed of all patients referred to a liaison psychiatry inpatient consultation service which sought to establish a baseline for demographics, type of referral, and management of referrals, with a view to introducing improved evidence-based treatments. It also aims to examine timeliness of response to referrals benchmarked against published standards. DESIGN\\/METHODOLOGY\\/APPROACH: All inpatient referrals to a liaison psychiatry service were recorded over a six-month period, including demographics, diagnosis, management and timeliness of response to referrals. The data were retrospectively analysed and compared against international standards. FINDINGS: A total of 172 referrals were received in the six months. Commonest referral reasons included assessments regarding depressive disorders (23.8 per cent), delirium\\/other cognitive disorders (19.2 per cent), alcohol-related disorders (18.6 per cent), anxiety disorders (14.5 per cent), and risk management (12.2 per cent). Evidence-based practices were not utilised effectively for a number of different types of presentations. A total of 40.1 per cent of referrals were seen on the same day, 75.4 per cent by the end of the next day, and 93.4 per cent by the end of the following day. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Use of a hospital protocol for management of delirium may improve outcomes for these patients. Evidence-based techniques, such as brief intervention therapies, may be beneficial for referrals involving alcohol dependence. Referrals were seen reasonably quickly, but there is room for improvement when compared with published standards. ORIGINALITY\\/VALUE: This paper provides valuable information for those involved in management of liaison psychiatry consultation services, providing ideas for development and implementation of evidence based practices.

  12. Inpatient hospital complications and lengths of stay: a short report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Pamela E

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasingly, efforts are being made to link health care outcomes with more efficient use of resources. The current difficult economic times and health care reform efforts provide incentives for specific efforts in this area. Findings This study defined relationships between inpatient complications for urinary tract infection and pneumonia and hospital lengths of stay in three general hospitals in the metropolitan area of Syracuse, New York. It employed the Potentially Preventable Complications (PPC software developed by 3M™ Health Information Services to identify lengths of stay for patients with and without urinary tract infection and pneumonia. The patient populations included individuals assigned to the same All Patients Refined Diagnosis Related Groups and severity of illness. The comparisons involved two nine month periods in 2008 and 2009. The study demonstrated that patients who experienced the complications had substantially longer inpatient hospital stays than those who did not. Patients with a PPC of urinary tract infection stayed a mean of 8.9 - 11.9 days or 161 - 216 percent longer than those who did not for the two time periods. This increased stay produced 2,020 - 2,427 additional patient days. The study demonstrated that patients who experienced the complications had substantially longer inpatient hospital stays than those who did not. Patients with a PPC of pneumonia stayed a mean of 13.0 - 16.3 days or 232 - 281 percent longer than those who did not for the two time periods. This increased stay produced 2,626 - 3,456 additional patient days. Similar differences were generated for median lengths of stay. Conclusions The differences in hospital stays for patients in the same APR DRGs and severity of illness with and without urinary tract infection and pneumonia in the Syracuse hospitals were substantial. The additional utilization for these complications was valued at between $2,000,000 - $3,000,000 for a

  13. Family Nurture Intervention in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Improves Social-Relatedness, Attention, and Neurodevelopment of Preterm Infants at 18 Months in a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Martha G.; Firestein, Morgan R.; Austin, Judy; Hane, Amie A.; Stark, Raymond I.; Hofer, Myron A.; Garland, Marianne; Glickstein, Sara B.; Brunelli, Susan A.; Ludwig, Robert J.; Myers, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Preterm infants are at high risk for adverse neurodevelopmental and behavioral outcomes. Family Nurture Intervention (FNI) in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) is designed to counteract adverse effects of separation of mothers and their preterm infants. Here, we evaluate effects of FNI on neurobehavioral outcomes. Methods: Data…

  14. The effect of the TIM program (Transfer ICU Medication reconciliation) on medication transfer errors in two Dutch intensive care units : Design of a prospective 8-month observational study with a before and after period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.E. Bosma; E. Meuwese; Tan, S.S. (Siok Swan); J. van Bommel (Jasper); Melief, P.H.G.J. (Piet Herman Gerard Jan); N.G. Hunfeld; P.M.L.A. van den Bemt (Patricia)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The transfer of patients to and from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is prone to medication errors. The aim of the present study is to determine whether the number of medication errors at ICU admission and discharge and the associated potential harm and costs are reduced by usi

  15. Management of high-risk patients with hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy in Germany: differences between cardiac specialists in the inpatient and outpatient setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wegscheider Karl

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among patients with hypertension, those with established left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH represent a high risk cohort with poor prognosis. We aimed to investigate differences in characteristics and health care management of such patients treated as inpatients or outpatients by cardiac specialists. Methods Prospective cross-sectional study in patients with hypertension and LVH who were referred to either inpatient care (rehabilitation hospitals or to outpatient care (cardiology practices. Results A total of 6358 inpatients (59.6% males; mean age 66.6 years and 2246 outpatients (59.5% males; mean age 63.2 years were followed up for a mean of 23 vs. 52 days, respectively. Inpatients compared to outpatients had a significantly higher prevalence of coronary heart disease, history of stroke, renal failure or diabetes. Mean blood pressure of inpatients compared to outpatients was significantly lower both at entry (150/84 vs. 161/93 mmHg and at end of follow-up (129/75 vs. 139/83 mmHg. After adjustment for baseline blood pressure and a propensity score, differences between out- and inpatients at end of follow-up were 8.0/5.1 mmHg in favour of inpatients. Blood pressure goals as specified by guidelines were not met by 32% of inpatients and 55% of outpatients. Conclusion Inpatients had a higher rate of comorbidities and more advanced atherosclerotic disease than outpatients. Control of hypertension of inpatients was already better on admission than in outpatients, and treatment intensity in this group was also higher during the observation period. While blood pressure lowering was substantial in both groups, there were still a high proportion of patients who did not achieve treatment goals at discharge.

  16. Dissociative disorders among alcohol-dependent inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evren, Cuneyt; Sar, Vedat; Karadag, Figen; Tamar Gurol, Defne; Karagoz, Mustafa

    2007-08-30

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of dissociative disorders among inpatients with alcohol dependency. The Dissociative Experiences Scale was used to screen 111 alcohol-dependent patients consecutively admitted to the inpatient unit of a dependency treatment center. Subgroups of 29 patients who scored 30.0 or above and 25 patients who scored below 10.0 were then evaluated with the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule and the Structured Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders. The interviewers were blind to the Dissociative Experiences Scale scores. Of the 54 patients evaluated, 10 (9.0% of the original 111) patients had a dissociative disorder. A considerable number of the remaining patients reported a high level of dissociative experiences. Among the dissociative disorder group, nine patients had dissociative disorder not otherwise specified and one patient had depersonalization disorder. Female gender, younger age, history of suicide attempt, childhood emotional and sexual abuse, and neglect were more frequent in the dissociative disorder group than among non-dissociative patients. The dissociative disorder group also had somatization disorder, borderline personality disorder, and lifetime major depression more frequently. For 9 of the 10 dissociative patients, dissociative symptoms started before the onset of alcohol use. Although the probability of having a comorbid dissociative disorder was not higher among alcohol-dependent inpatients than among the general psychiatric inpatients, the dissociative subgroup had distinct features. Many patients without a dissociative disorder diagnosis (predominantly men) provided hints of subtle dissociative psychopathology. Implications of comorbid dissociative disorders and dissociative experiences on prevention and treatment of alcohol dependency and the importance of gender-specific characteristics in this relationship require further study.

  17. Inpatient care in Kazakhstan: A comparative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainur B Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reforms in inpatient care are critical for the enhancement of the efficiency of health systems. It still remains the main costly sector of the health system, accounting for more than 60% of all expenditures. Inappropriate and ineffective use of the hospital infrastructure is also a big issue. We aimed to analyze statistical data on health indices and dynamics of the hospital stock in Kazakhstan in comparison with those of developed countries. Materials and Methods: Study design is comparative quantitative analysis of inpatient care indicators. We used information and analytical methods, content analysis, mathematical treatment, and comparative analysis of statistical data on health system and dynamics of hospital stock in Kazakhstan and some other countries of the world [Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD, USA, Canada, Russia, China, Japan, and Korea] over the period 2001-2011. Results : Despite substantial and continuous reductions over the past 10 years, hospitalization rates in Kazakhstan still remain high compared to some developed countries, including those of the OECD. In fact, the hospital stay length for all patients in Kazakhstan in 2011 is around 9.9 days, hospitalization ratio per 100 people is 16.3, and hospital beds capacity is 100 per 10,000 inhabitants. Conclusion: The decreased level of beds may adversely affect both medical organization and health system operations. Alternatives to the existing inpatient care are now being explored. The introduction of the unified national healthcare system allows shifting the primary focus on primary care organizations, which can decrease the demand on inpatient care as a result of improving the health status of people at the primary care level.

  18. Changes in pain-related coping strategies and their importance for treatment outcome following multimodal inpatient treatment: does sex matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechler, Tanja; Kosfelder, Joachim; Vocks, Silja; Mönninger, Theresa; Blankenburg, Markus; Dobe, Michael; Gerlach, Alexander L; Denecke, Heide; Zernikow, Boris

    2010-05-01

    While sex differences in pain-related coping have been widely reported, little is known on sex differences in changes in coping following multimodal pain treatment and how these changes relate to treatment outcome. The present prospective study therefore aimed to investigate sex differences in coping strategies between boys and girls with chronic pain prior to multimodal inpatient treatment and at 3-month follow-up. Sixty-four boys and 103 girls with various pain disorders were evaluated. Core outcomes (pain intensity and pain-related disability) and coping were assessed via validated questionnaires. At admission, boys and girls used similar coping strategies. Three months following treatment, boys and girls decreased passive pain coping and seeking social support while they maintained the degree of positive self-instruction. Girls displayed higher seeking social support than boys and of importance, only for girls, a reduction in seeking social support was related to decreases in pain intensity. In both groups, the changes in coping were related to positive treatment outcome. Results suggest that both groups may benefit from reductions in passive pain coping and seeking social support. The causal quality of this relationship remains to be determined in future studies. Gender-role expectations and family interactions may account for the sex differences demonstrated for seeking social support. Boys and girls with chronic pain show profound similarities in pain-related coping strategies prior and after multimodal pain treatment. The changes in coping are related to positive treatment outcomes. Sex-specific treatment strategies for changing seeking social support may need to be developed and tested for their differential efficacy in boys and girls. Copyright 2010 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Postoperative mortality after inpatient surgery: Incidence and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karamarie Fecho

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Karamarie Fecho1, Anne T Lunney1, Philip G Boysen1, Peter Rock2, Edward A Norfleet11Department of Anesthesiology, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 2Department of Anesthesiology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD, USAPurpose: This study determined the incidence of and identified risk factors for 48 hour (h and 30 day (d postoperative mortality after inpatient operations.Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted using Anesthesiology’s Quality Indicator database as the main data source. The database was queried for data related to the surgical procedure, anesthetic care, perioperative adverse events, and birth/death/operation dates. The 48 h and 30 d cumulative incidence of postoperative mortality was calculated and data were analyzed using Chi-square or Fisher’s exact test and generalized estimating equations.Results: The 48 h and 30 d incidence of postoperative mortality was 0.57% and 2.1%, respectively. Higher American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status scores, extremes of age, emergencies, perioperative adverse events and postoperative Intensive Care Unit admission were identified as risk factors. The use of monitored anesthesia care or general anesthesia versus regional or combined anesthesia was a risk factor for 30 d postoperative mortality only. Time under anesthesia care, perioperative hypothermia, trauma, deliberate hypotension and invasive monitoring via arterial, pulmonary artery or cardiovascular catheters were not identified as risk factors.Conclusions: Our findings can be used to track postoperative mortality rates and to test preventative interventions at our institution and elsewhere.Keywords: postoperative mortality, risk factors, operations, anesthesia, inpatient surgery

  20. Intensive Outpatient Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Eating Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Dalle Grave

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to describe a novel model of intensive outpatient cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT indicated for eating disorder patients who are having difficulty modifying their eating habits in response to conventional outpatient CBT. Intensive outpatient CBT is a manual based treatment derived by the CBT-Enhanced (CBT-E for eating disorders. The treatment has four features that distinguish it from the conventional outpatient CBT-E: (1 it is designed to be suitable for both adult and adolescent patients, (2 it is delivered by a multidisciplinary non-eclectic team trained in CBT, (3 there is assistance with eating, (4 there is a family therapy module for patients under the age of 18 years. Preliminary outcome of intensive outpatient CBT-E are encouraging. The treatment has been applied to 20 consecutive underweight eating disorder patients (age 18.2 ± 6.5 years; BMI 14.6 ± 1.5 kg/m2. Thirteen patients (65% concluded the treatment, five (25% were admitted at an eating disorder inpatient unit, and two (10% prematurely interrupted the treatment. Completers obtained significant weight regain and improvement of eating disorder and general psychopathology. Most of the improvements were maintained at six-month follow-up.

  1. Quarterly individual outpatients lifestyle counseling after initial inpatients education on type 2 diabetes: the REDIA Prev-2 randomized controlled trial in Reunion Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debussche, X; Rollot, O; Le Pommelet, C; Fianu, A; Le Moullec, N; Régnier, C; Boyer, M C; Cogne, M; Bakiri, F; Schwager, J C; Favier, F

    2012-02-01

    This study aimed to describe the 1-year evolution of type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients who attended inpatients education, and to assess whether quarterly outpatients counseling visits by nurses and dietitians can improve metabolic control and health-related behaviours. Following in-hospital educational sessions, 398 adult T2D patients were randomized to either attend quarterly individual lifestyle counseling visits by a nurse and a dietitian (intervention group), or receive the usual care (control group). Primary (HbA(1c)) and secondary endpoints (fasting blood glucose, lipids, body mass index, waist circumference, fat mass, blood pressure, diet, physical activity) were assessed at baseline and at 12 months. HbA(1c) changes from baseline to 12 months were -1.74±2.64% (P<0.0001) for the intervention group and -2.02±2.57% (P<0.0001) for the control group. There was no statistically significant difference between the intervention group (n=153) and the controls (n=166) for any of the clinical and biological outcomes. In both groups, total energy and fat intakes decreased significantly from baseline levels. Also, no difference was found between the groups for any dietary outcome. A slight enhancement in sports activity was observed in the intervention group, but the difference between the two groups did not reach statistical significance, and no difference was found concerning any other physical activity scores. In this study of adults with T2D, patients significantly improved their metabolic control, and dietary and exercise habits, 1 year after receiving intensive inpatients education, whereas subsequent quarterly outpatients counseling visits with nurses and dietitians have not demonstrated any superiority compared with the usual care. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Monthly Meteorological Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monthly forms that do not fit into any regular submission. Tabulation sheets and generic monthly forms designed to capture miscellaneous monthly observations.

  3. Pain characteristics and management of inpatients admitted to a comprehensive cancer centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurita, G P; Tange, U B; Farholt, H

    2013-01-01

    AIMS: This prospective, cross-sectional study aimed to assess cancer pain and its management in an inpatient setting at a comprehensive cancer centre in Denmark. METHODS: One hundred and eighty-eight inpatients with cancer were invited to participate (May/June 2011). Demographics, diagnoses, World.......5%. Adjuvant medication was sparsely used and not always correctly indicated. Out of 88 patients with pain, 62.5% were left untreated according to the Electronic Medication System. Higher health-related quality of life was associated with lower pain intensity. The use of opioids with or without adjuvants...... and number of breakthrough episodes; however, analgesic medication seemed to be underused. Measures to improve pain assessment and management are highly required....

  4. Inpatient psychiatric care in the 21st century: the need for reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, Ira D; Sharfstein, Steven S; Schwartz, Harold I

    2011-02-01

    Driven by financial pressures, the sole focus of psychiatric inpatient treatment has become safety and crisis stabilization. Data are lacking on outcomes of ultrashort-stay hospitalizations; however, such stays may diminish opportunities for a sustained recovery. In the absence of an evidence base to guide clinicians and policy makers, mental health professionals have an ethical obligation to promote what they consider to be best practice. This Open Forum focuses on the need to reconsider the current model of inpatient hospitalization in order to maximize positive outcomes and emphasize appropriate transition to the community and less intensive levels of care. A model of care is presented based on rapid formulation of diagnosis, goals, and treatment modalities before treatment begins. Three phases are described--assessment, implementation, and resolution--with specific principles to guide length-of-stay decisions and requirements for staffing.

  5. [Treatment satisfaction of patients with borderline personality disorder in inpatient schema therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Neele; Vogel, Friederike; Nill, Marco; Graf-Morgenstern, Mechthild; Finkelmeier, Britta; Lieb, Klaus

    2013-02-01

    Patients with severe and chronic psychiatric disorders, such as Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD), are hospitalized frequently, but we often find a high ambivalence regarding treatment in this group of patients. 31 patients with severe BPD participated in an inpatient Schema Therapy (ST) treatment program and evaluated both the intensive ST treatment program and group therapy elements regarding their treatment -satisfaction. A high global treatment satisfaction with the ST treatment program was demonstrated and we found a higher treatment satisfaction in patients with than without BPD specific symptom reductions. Remarkable differences in treatment satisfaction showed when looking at the evaluation of group therapies. The results of the present study demonstrate treatment satisfaction of BPD patients in inpatient ST and give directions for the future development of these programs.

  6. A cross sectional study of satisfaction of in-patients in a private medical college hospital in A.P

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajagopal Rao Kodali

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To study the level of satisfaction of in-patients and to find out the causes for dissatisfaction. Materials and Methods : Study area - Pinnamaneni Siddhartha General Hospital.Study population: In-patients admitted in the Medicine, Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Orthopedics wards. Sample size: 200. Study Design: A well designed cross-sectional study using pre tested structural pro forma. Duration of study: 2 Months. Survey method: The sample size is randomly selected. Respondent is the patient. Patient satisfaction was assessed in relation to doctors, nurses, housekeeping and billing. The satisfactory levels were divided into Very good, Good, Fair, Bad, and Very bad. Results: The satisfaction of in-patients expressed by majority was Good followed by Fair, Bad, Very good, and Very bad. The satisfaction expressed was more with nursing services followed by doctors and billing and least with housekeeping.

  7. Early and intensive nutritional strategy combining parenteral and enteral feeding promotes neurodevelopment and growth at 18months of corrected age and 3years of age in extremely low birth weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Satoshi; Ichiba, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Yuko; Harada, Sayaka; Matsumura, Hisako; Kan, Ayako; Asada, Yuki; Shintaku, Haruo

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate whether aggressive nutrition can improve long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes and growth in extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants born appropriate for gestational age (AGA). This single-center cohort study included 137 ELBW AGA infants born in two epochs. The first group received standard nutrition (SN; n=79) consisting of amino acids started at 0.5g/kg/day on Day 4 of life and increased to 1.0g/kg/day. The second aggressive nutrition (AN) group received amino acids started at 1.5-2.0g/kg/day within 24h of life and increased to 3.5g/kg/day. Parenteral and enteral feedings were combined in both groups. Neurodevelopmental outcomes by the Kyoto Scale of Psychological Development and growth were followed up to 18months of corrected age or 3years of age and compared by univariate and multivariate analyses. Baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups. At 3years of age, AN children had a significantly greater mean value of head circumference, but not length or weight, than SN children (49.1 vs 48.0cm, p=0.014). The cognitive-adaptive (C-A) score in the AN group was also significantly higher than that in the SN group (98.3 vs 91.9 at 18months, p=0.039 and 89.5 vs 83.1 at 3years, p=0.047). AN infants born ≥26weeks of gestation were less likely to develop borderline disability in C-A, language-social and overall developmental scores compared to gestational age-matched SN infants. Parenteral and enteral AN after birth improved the long-term cognitive neurodevelopment in ELBW AGA infants, especially in those born ≥26weeks of gestational age, however results need to be confirmed in a larger, multi-site randomized trial. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Prevalence of multimorbidity in medical inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Florian; Kaplan, Vladimir; Rodak, Roksana; Battegay, Edouard; Holzer, Barbara

    2012-03-09

    To validate the estimates of the prevalence of multimorbidity based on administrative hospital discharge data, with medical records and chart reviews as benchmarks. Retrospective cohort study. Medical division of a tertiary care teaching hospital. A total of 170 medical inpatients admitted from the emergency unit in January 2009. The prevalence of multimorbidity for three different definitions (≥2 diagnoses, ≥2 diagnoses from different ICD-10 chapters, and ≥2 medical conditions as defined by Charlson/Deyo) and three different data sources (administrative data, chart reviews, and medical records). The prevalence of multimorbidity in medical inpatients derived from administrative data, chart reviews and medical records was very high and concurred for the different definitions of multimorbidity (≥2 diagnoses: 96.5%, 95.3%, and 92.9% [p = 0.32], ≥2 diagnoses from different ICD-10 chapters: 86.5%, 90.0%, and 85.9% [p = 0.46], and ≥2 medical conditions as defined by Charlson/Deyo: 48.2%, 50.0%, and 46.5% [p = 0.81]). The agreement of rating of multimorbidity for administrative data and chart reviews and administrative data and medical records was 94.1% and 93.0% (kappa statistics 0.47) for ≥2 diagnoses; 86.0% and 86.5% (kappa statistics 0.52) for ≥2 diagnoses from different ICD-10 chapters; and 82.9% and 85.3% (kappa statistics 0.69) for ≥2 medical conditions as defined by Charlson/Deyo. Estimates of the prevalence of multimorbidity in medical inpatients based on administrative data, chart reviews and medical records were very high and congruent for the different definitions of multimorbidity. Agreement for rating multimorbidity based on the different data sources was moderate to good. Administrative hospital discharge data are a valid source for exploring the burden of multimorbidity in hospital settings.

  9. Opportunistic hearing screening in elderly inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishan Ramdoo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the prevalence of occult hearing loss in elderly inpatients, to evaluate feasibility of opportunistic hearing screening and to determine subsequent provision of hearing aids. Materials and methods: Subjects (>65 years were recruited from five elderly care wards. Hearing loss was detected by a ward-based hearing screen comprising patient-reported assessment of hearing disability and a whisper test. Subjects failing the whisper test or reporting hearing difficulties were offered formal audiological assessment. Results: Screening was performed on 51 patients aged between 70 and 95 years. Of the patients, 21 (41% reported hearing loss and 16 (31% failed the whisper test. A total of 37 patients (73% were referred for audiological assessment with 17 (33% found to have aidable hearing loss and 11 were fitted with hearing aids (22%. Discussion: This study highlights the high prevalence of occult hearing loss in elderly inpatients. Easy two-step screening can accurately identify patients with undiagnosed deafness resulting in significant proportions receiving hearing aids. Key sentences Approximately 14% of the elderly population use hearing aids despite a reported prevalence of deafness in up to 55%. The use of hearing aids is associated with an improvement in physical, emotional, mental and social well-being. An easy screening test for hearing loss consists of patient-reported hearing loss and a whisper test. Opportunistic screening of elderly inpatients resulted in referral of 73% of screened patients for formal audiology. Of the screened patients, 22% were provided with hearing aids.

  10. [In-patient smoker? - Providing appropriate intervention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamplona, Paula

    2007-01-01

    Tobacco use is the most avoidable cause of death. Other than provoking multiple diseases requiring hospitalisation, Tobacco Use is also a disease requiring management in the hospital setting, not only in terms of controlling the withdrawal symptoms of the patient, who has been abruptly prohibited from smoking, but also for fulfilling legislation which prohibits tobacco use in the health services, the only efficient way of preventing exposure of non-smokers to environmental tobacco smoke. Treating the in-patient smoker in an appropriate way also provides a window of opportunity for promoting not just a temporary but a complete smoking cessation.

  11. The effects of expanding outpatient and inpatient evaluation and management services in a pediatric interventional radiology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edalat, Faramarz; Lindquester, Will S; Gill, Anne E; Simoneaux, Stephen F; Gaines, Jennifer; Hawkins, C Matthew

    2017-03-01

    Despite a continuing emphasis on evaluation and management clinical services in adult interventional radiology (IR) practice, the peer-reviewed literature addressing these services - and their potential economic benefits - is lacking in pediatric IR practice. To measure the effects of expanding evaluation and management (E&M) services through the establishment of a dedicated pediatric interventional radiology outpatient clinic and inpatient E&M reporting system. We collected and analyzed E&M current procedural terminology (CPT) codes from all patients seen in a pediatric interventional radiology outpatient clinic between November 2014 and August 2015. We also calculated the number of new patients seen in the clinic who had a subsequent procedure (procedural conversion rate). For comparison, we used historical data comprising pediatric patients seen in a general interventional radiology (IR) clinic for the 2 years immediately prior. An inpatient E&M reporting system was implemented and all inpatient E&M (and subsequent procedural) services between July 2015 and September 2015 were collected and analyzed. We estimated revenue for both outpatient and inpatient services using the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule global non-facility price as a surrogate. Following inception of a pediatric IR clinic, the number of new outpatients (5.5/month; +112%), procedural conversion rate (74.5%; +19%), estimated E&M revenue (+158%), and estimated procedural revenue from new outpatients (+228%) all increased. Following implementation of an inpatient clinic reporting system, there were 8.3 consults and 7.3 subsequent hospital encounters per month, with a procedural conversion rate of 88%. Growth was observed in all meaningful metrics following expansion of outpatient and inpatient pediatric IR E&M services.

  12. [Effectiveness of an inpatient multimodal psychiatric-psychotherapeutic program for the treatment of job burnout].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzkopf, Kathleen; Conrad, Nathalie; Straus, Doris; Porschke, Hildburg; von Känel, Roland

    2016-03-16

    We studied the clinical course and long-term effects of inpatient treatment in 723 patients with job burnout referred with an ICD-10 F diagnosis and Z73.0 code («overwhelming exhaustion») to a Swiss hospital specialized in the treatment of job stress-related disorders. Patients were characterized in terms of age, gender, socioeconomic status. Self-rated psychological measures related to general and burnout-specific symptoms (i. e., emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and diminished personal accomplishments) were applied before and after a six-week treatment program, as well as at 15 months after hospital discharge in 232 patients. The results show that the multimodal inpatient psychiatric-psychotherapeutic treatment was successful with a sustainable effect on psychological well-being (>90 %), including improvements regarding emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and personal accomplishments as well as professional reintegration in 71 % of cases.

  13. Vitamin D status of psychiatric inpatients in New Zealand’s Waikato region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menkes David B

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vitamin D deficiency is widespread in New Zealand, confers multiple health risks, and may be particularly common among people with psychiatric illness. We studied vitamin D status in an unselected sample of adult psychiatric inpatients in Hamilton (latitude 37.5 S during late winter. Methods We recruited 102 consenting subjects and measured 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 levels in venous blood using a competitive electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. In addition to descriptive statistics, we used one-sample t-tests to determine the extent to which ethnic and diagnostic subgroups fell below the vitamin D deficiency threshold of 50 nM. Results 75 subjects (74% had vitamin D levels Conclusions Vitamin D deficiency is prevalent in the psychiatric inpatient setting in New Zealand and may be relevant to poor physical health outcomes, notably among Maori and those with schizophrenia. These findings support proposals to provide vitamin D supplementation, particularly during the winter months.

  14. Negative life events and non-suicidal self-injury in an adolescent inpatient sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Richard T; Frazier, Elisabeth A; Cataldo, Andrea M; Simon, Valerie A; Spirito, Anthony; Prinstein, Mitchell J

    2014-01-01

    Although life stressors have been implicated in the aetiology of various forms of psychopathology related to non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), particularly depression and suicidal behavior, they have rarely been examined in relation with NSSI. The objective of the current study was to assess the association between life stressors and NSSI in adolescent inpatients. Adolescent inpatients (n = 110) completed measures of life events, NSSI, and depressive symptoms at 3 time-points over a 9-month period. Higher rates of life stressors were significantly associated with greater NSSI. This finding held even after covarying concurrent depressive symptoms and gender. Life stressors may have a unique role in the pathogenesis of NSSI. Directions for future research and clinical implications are discussed.

  15. Efficacy of an adjunctive brief psychodynamic psychotherapy to usual inpatient treatment of depression: rationale and design of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambresin Gilles

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A few recent studies have found indications of the effectiveness of inpatient psychotherapy for depression, usually of an extended duration. However, there is a lack of controlled studies in this area and to date no study of adequate quality on brief psychodynamic psychotherapy for depression during short inpatient stay exists. The present article describes the protocol of a study that will examine the relative efficacy, the cost-effectiveness and the cost-utility of adding an Inpatient Brief Psychodynamic Psychotherapy to pharmacotherapy and treatment-as-usual for inpatients with unipolar depression. Methods/Design The study is a one-month randomized controlled trial with a two parallel group design and a 12-month naturalistic follow-up. A sample of 130 consecutive adult inpatients with unipolar depression and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale score over 18 will be recruited. The study is carried out in the university hospital section for mood disorders in Lausanne, Switzerland. Patients are assessed upon admission, and at 1-, 3- and 12- month follow-ups. Inpatient therapy is a manualized brief intervention, combining the virtues of inpatient setting and of time-limited dynamic therapies (focal orientation, fixed duration, resource-oriented interventions. Treatment-as-usual represents the best level of practice for a minimal treatment condition usually proposed to inpatients. Final analyses will follow an intention–to-treat strategy. Depressive symptomatology is the primary outcome and secondary outcome includes measures of psychiatric symptomatology, psychosocial role functioning, and psychodynamic-emotional functioning. The mediating role of the therapeutic alliance is also examined. Allocation to treatment groups uses a stratified block randomization method with permuted block. To guarantee allocation concealment, randomization is done by an independent researcher. Discussion Despite the large number of studies

  16. 42 CFR 409.83 - Inpatient hospital coinsurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... chargeable to a beneficiary for each day after the first 60 days of inpatient hospital care or inpatient CAH care or both in a benefit period. (2) For each day from the 61st to the 90th day, the coinsurance... the hospital long enough to use coinsurance days in 1982, the coinsurance amount charged for...

  17. The Use of Inpatient Mental Health Services by Hispanic Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Nancy Felipe; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Provides a profile of Hispanic women's use of inpatient mental health facilities. Presents gender differences for Hispanic and non-Hispanic inpatient admissions regarding age, marital status, and diagnosis. Women, particularly Hispanics, used service less than men; admission rates were higher for men with schizophrenia and alcohol-related…

  18. Naltrexone implants after in-patient treatment for opioid dependence: randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunøe, Nikolaj; Lobmaier, Philipp; Vederhus, John Kåre; Hjerkinn, Bjørg; Hegstad, Solfrid; Gossop, Michael; Kristensen, Øistein; Waal, Helge

    2009-06-01

    Naltrexone has considerable potential in helping to prevent relapse in heroin dependency. A longer-lasting formulation for naltrexone treatment is desirable to further reduce non-adherence and relapse during treatment of opiate dependence. To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a 6-month naltrexone implant in reducing opioid use after in-patient treatment. A group of 56 abstinence-oriented patients who completed in-patient treatment for opioid dependence were randomly and openly assigned to receive either a 6-month naltrexone implant or their usual aftercare. Drug use and other outcomes were assessed at 6-month follow-up. Patients receiving naltrexone had on average 45 days less heroin use and 60 days less opioid use than controls in the 180-day period (both P<0.05). Blood tests showed naltrexone levels above 1 ng/ml for the duration of 6 months. Two patients died, neither of whom had received an implant. Naltrexone implant treatment safely and significantly reduces opioid use in a motivated population of patients.

  19. An occurrence of sepsis during inpatient fecal disimpaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Cory J; Devito, Justin F

    2014-01-01

    Functional constipation is a common pediatric problem that is often treated through well-established algorithms. Fecal disimpaction is the initial therapeutic step, and severe cases require hospitalization for intensive therapies. We describe a significant unexpected complication of this common clinical situation. An 8-year-old boy with suspected chronic functional constipation was hospitalized for disimpaction by continuous nasogastric administration of polyethylene glycol electrolyte (PEG-E) solution. On the sixth day of disimpaction, the patient abruptly developed fever, tachycardia, and tachypnea. Evaluation included blood culture, which grew Escherichia coli, and treatment with a course of appropriate antibiotics was provided. The safety of PEG-E solutions has been shown in studies of children with constipation, which made this patient's illness surprising. Several potential etiologies of his infection were considered, including bacterial translocation (BT). BT is defined as the passage of live microbes and microbial products from the gastrointestinal tract to extraintestinal sites, such as the bloodstream. It has been shown to occur in a variety of clinical conditions but is of unclear clinical significance. In this case, physical damage to the intestinal mucosa was thought to contribute to the potential occurrence of BT, and prolonged disimpaction was considered as a risk factor. E coli sepsis in a child undergoing inpatient nasogastric fecal disimpaction with PEG-E represents a clinical problem never before reported in the literature and should increase clinicians' indices of suspicion for uncommon complications of common procedures.

  20. Trends in Receipt of Intensive Procedures at the End of Life Among Patients Treated With Maintenance Dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eneanya, Nwamaka D; Hailpern, Susan M; O'Hare, Ann M; Kurella Tamura, Manjula; Katz, Ronit; Kreuter, William; Montez-Rath, Maria E; Hebert, Paul L; Hall, Yoshio N

    2017-01-01

    Many dialysis patients receive intensive procedures intended to prolong life at the very end of life. However, little is known about trends over time in the use of these procedures. We describe temporal trends in receipt of inpatient intensive procedures during the last 6 months of life among patients treated with maintenance dialysis. Mortality follow-back study. 649,607 adult Medicare beneficiaries on maintenance dialysis therapy who died in 2000 to 2012. Period of death (2000-2003, 2004-2008, or 2009-2012), age at time of death (18-59, 60-64, 65-69, 70-74, 75-79, 80-84, and ≥85 years), and race/ethnicity (Hispanic, non-Hispanic black, or non-Hispanic white). Receipt of an inpatient intensive procedure (defined as invasive mechanical ventilation/intubation, tracheostomy, gastrostomy/jejunostomy tube insertion, enteral or parenteral nutrition, or cardiopulmonary resuscitation) during the last 6 months of life. Overall, 34% of cohort patients received an intensive procedure in the last 6 months of life, increasing from 29% in 2000 to 36% in 2012 (with 2000-2003 as the referent category; adjusted risk ratios [RRs] were 1.06 [95% CI, 1.05-1.07] and 1.10 [95% CI, 1.09-1.12] for 2004-2008 and 2009-2012, respectively). Use of intensive procedures increased more markedly over time in younger versus older patients (comparing 2009-2012 to 2000-2003, adjusted RR was 1.18 [95% CI, 1.15-1.20] for the youngest age group as opposed to 1.00 [95% CI, 0.96-1.04] for the oldest group). Comparing 2009 to 2012 to 2000 to 2003, the use of intensive procedures increased more dramatically for Hispanic patients than for non-Hispanic black or non-Hispanic white patients (adjusted RRs of 1.18 [95% CI, 1.14-1.22], 1.09 [95% CI, 1.07-1.11], and 1.10 [95% CI, 1.08-1.12], respectively). Data sources do not provide insight into reasons for observed trends in the use of intensive procedures. Among patients treated with maintenance dialysis, there is a trend toward more frequent use of

  1. Criteria of medical care evaluation in daily in-patient department in pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grozdova T.U.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The research goal is to work out criteria for the evaluation of medical care quality. Materials included 386 medical cards of daily in-patients, 216 medical cards of in-patients; 602 cards of analysis of case histories; 4 computer data bases. Methods of mathematical statistics were successfully used in the study. The comparative method of data analysis was applied to the research work. Intensity of medical care in values from 0,1 to 0,5 conditional units corresponded to requirements of criterion of estimation of medical care quality. Parameters of medicinal treatment were close to the standards of treatment in interval from 44,4 to 100%, as criterion of quality of medical care. Specific weight of apparatus and instrumental researches constituted an interval from 7, 4% to 22, 6%, forming corresponding criterion. Interval of effectiveness according to standards of consultations is from 0, 26 to 1, 04 conditional units. In conclusion the article stated that the characteristics for criteria to evaluate medical care in daily in-patient departments were worked out on the basis of indices obtained during the research work

  2. 42 CFR 409.68 - Guarantee of payment for inpatient hospital or inpatient CAH services furnished before...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Guarantee of payment for inpatient hospital or inpatient CAH services furnished before notification of exhaustion of benefits. 409.68 Section 409.68 Public... HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Scope of Hospital Insurance Benefits § 409.68 Guarantee of payment...

  3. Can "patient keeper" help in-patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hinnawi, M F

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to present our "Patient Keeper" application, which is a client-server medical application. "Patient Keeper" is designed to run on a mobile phone for the client application and on a PC for the server application using J2ME and JAVA2, respectively. This application can help doctors during visits to their patients in hospitals. The client application allows doctors to store on their mobile phones the results of their diagnoses and findings such as temperature, blood pressure, medications, analysis, etc., and send this information to the server via short message service (SMS) for storage in a database. The server can also respond to any request from the client and send the result via Bluetooth, infrared, or over the air. Experimental results showed a significant improvement of the healthcare delivery and reduction for in-patient stay.

  4. Does hospital need more hospice beds? Hospital charges and length of stays by lung cancer inpatients at their end of life: A retrospective cohort design of 2002-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Jung; Han, Kyu-Tae; Kim, Tae Hyun; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies found that hospice and palliative care reduces healthcare costs for end-of-life cancer patients. To investigate hospital inpatient charges and length-of-stay differences by availability of hospice care beds within hospitals using nationwide data from end-of-life inpatients with lung cancer. A retrospective cohort study was performed using nationwide lung cancer health insurance claims from 2002 to 2012 in Korea. Descriptive and multi-level (patient-level and hospital-level) mixed models were used to compare inpatient charges and lengths of stay. Using 673,122 inpatient health insurance claims, we obtained aggregated hospital inpatient charges and lengths of stay from a total of 114,828 inpatients and 866 hospital records. Hospital inpatient charges and length of stay drastically increased as patients approached death; a significant portion of hospital inpatient charges and lengths of stay occurred during the end-of-life period. According to our multi-level analysis, hospitals with hospice care beds tend to have significantly lower end-of-life hospital inpatient charges; however, length of stay did not differ. Hospitals with more hospice care beds were associated with reduction in hospital inpatient charges within 3 months before death. Higher end-of-life healthcare hospital charges were found for lung cancer inpatients who were admitted to hospitals without hospice care beds. This study suggests that health policy-makers and the National Health Insurance program need to consider expanding the use of hospice care beds within hospitals and hospice care facilities for end-of-life patients with lung cancer in South Korea, where very limited numbers of resources are currently available. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Monthly Weather Review

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Supplements to the Monthly Weather Review publication. The Weather Bureau published the Monthly weather review Supplement irregularly from 1914 to 1949. The...

  6. Proposing Chinese Pharmacists Month

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ Dear Pharmacists: Today I would like to share with you about the American Pharmacists Month which is celebrated in October every year.This month-long observance is promoted by American Pharmacist Association.

  7. Assessment of inpatient multimodal cardiac imaging appropriateness at large academic medical centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remfry, Andrew; Abrams, Howard; Dudzinski, David M; Weiner, Rory B; Bhatia, R Sacha

    2015-11-14

    Responding to concerns regarding the growth of cardiac testing, the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF) published Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) for various cardiac imaging modalities. Single modality cardiac imaging appropriateness has been reported but there have been no studies assessing the appropriateness of multiple imaging modalities in an inpatient environment. A retrospective study of the appropriateness of cardiac tests ordered by the inpatient General Internal Medicine (GIM) and Cardiology services at three Canadian academic hospitals was conducted over two one-month periods. Cardiac tests characterized were transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), single-photon emission tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT), and diagnostic cardiac catheterization. Overall, 553 tests were assessed, of which 99.8% were classifiable by AUC. 91% of all studies were categorized as appropriate, 4% may be appropriate and 5% were rarely appropriate. There were high rates of appropriate use of all modalities by GIM and Cardiology throughout. Significantly more appropriate diagnostic catheterizations were ordered by Cardiology than GIM (93% vs. 82%, p = imaging modalities in this multi-centered study on Cardiology and GIM inpatients in the acute care setting. The rate of appropriate ordering was high across all imaging modalities. We recommend further work towards improving appropriate utilization of cardiac imaging resources focus on the out-patient setting.

  8. Comparison of standardized versus individualized caloric prescriptions in the nutritional rehabilitation of inpatients with anorexia nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynos, Ann F.; Snipes, Cassandra; Guarda, Angela; Mayer, Laurel E.; Attia, Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    Objective Sparse research informs how caloric prescriptions should be advanced during nutritional rehabilitation of inpatients with anorexia nervosa (AN). This study compared the impact of a standardized caloric increase approach, in which increases occurred on a predetermined schedule, to an individualized approach, in which increases occurred only following insufficient weight gain, on rate, pattern, and cumulative amount of weight gain and other weight restoration outcomes. Method This study followed a natural experiment design comparing AN inpatients consecutively admitted before (n = 35) and after (n = 35) an institutional change from individualized to standardized caloric prescriptions. Authors examined the impact of prescription plan on weekly weight gain in the first treatment month using multilevel modeling. Within a subsample remaining inpatient through weight restoration (n = 40), multiple regressions examined the impact of caloric prescription plan on time to weight restoration, length of hospitalization, maximum caloric prescription, discharge BMI, and incidence of activity restriction and edema. Results There were significant interactions between prescription plan and quadratic time on average weekly weight gain (p = .03) and linear time on cumulative weekly weight gain (p < .001). Under the standardized plan, patients gained in an accelerated curvilinear pattern (p = .04) and, therefore, gained cumulatively greater amounts of weight over time (p < .001). Additionally, 30% fewer patients required activity restriction under the standardized plan. Discussion Standardized caloric prescriptions may confer advantage by facilitating accelerated early weight gain and lower incidence of bed rest without increasing the incidence of refeeding syndrome. PMID:26769581

  9. Evaluation of factors affecting plate waste of inpatients in different healthcare settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Valero Díaz

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction/aims: Satisfaction of inpatients with served food within a hospital care system still constitutes one of the main attempts to modernize food services. The impact of type of menu, food category, hospital centre and timetable on the meals wastage produced in different Spanish healthcare settings, was evaluated. Methods: Meal wastage was measured through a semiquantitative 5-point scale ("nothing on plate"; "¼ on plate"; "half on plate"; "¾ on plate" and "all on plate". The study was carried out in two periods of three months each in 2010 and 2011. A trained person took charge of measuring plate waste classified into 726 servings belonging to 11 menus. In total 31,392 plates were served to 7,868 inpatients. A Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric test (P 0.05. Conclusion: Visual inspections of plate waste might be useful to optimize type and quality of menus served. The type of menu served and the food category could have a great influence on food acceptability by the inpatients studied.

  10. Cost analysis of in-patient cancer chemotherapy at a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ashraf Wani

    2013-01-01

    Materials and Methods: After permission from the Ethical Committee, a prospective study of 6 months duration was carried out to study the cost of treatment provided to in-patients in Medical Oncology. Direct costs that include the cost of material, labor and laboratory investigations, along with indirect costs were calculated, and data analyzed to compute unit cost of treatment. Results: The major cost components of in-patient cancer chemotherapy are cost of drugs and materials as 46.88% and labor as 48.45%. The average unit cost per patient per bed day for in-patient chemotherapy is Rs. 5725.12 ($125.96. This includes expenditure incurred both by the hospital and the patient (out of pocket. Conclusion: The economic burden of cancer treatment is quite high both for the patient and the healthcare provider. Modalities in the form of health insurance coverage need to be established and strengthened for pooling of resources for the treatment and transfer of risks of these patients.

  11. Specialist inpatient treatment for severe motor conversion disorder: a retrospective comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Ruaidhri; Moriarty, John; Mellers, John D; Shotbolt, Paul; Pastena, Rosa; Landes, Nadine; Goldstein, Laura; Fleminger, Simon; David, Anthony S

    2014-08-01

    Gold standard protocols have yet to be established for the treatment of motor conversion disorder (MCD). There is limited evidence to support inpatient, multidisciplinary intervention in chronic, severe cases. To evaluate the characteristics and outcomes of MCD patients admitted to a specialist neuropsychiatric inpatient unit. All patients admitted to the Lishman Unit (years 2007-2011) with a diagnosis of MCD were included. Data relevant to characteristics and status with regard to mobility, activities of daily living (ADLs) and Modified Rankin Scale (MRS) score at admission and discharge were extracted. Thirty-three cases (78.8% female) were included; the median duration of illness was 48 months. In comparison with brain injury patients admitted to the same unit, more cases had histories of childhood sexual abuse (36.4%, n=12), premorbid non-dissociative mental illness (81.1%, n=27) and employment as a healthcare/social-care worker (45.5%, n=15). Cases showed significant improvements in MRS scores (p<0.001), mobility (p<0.001) and ADL (p=0.002) following inpatient treatment. Patients with severe, long-standing MCD can achieve significant improvements in functioning after admission to a neuropsychiatry unit. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. Inpatient treatment time across disciplines in spinal cord injury rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteneck, Gale; Gassaway, Julie; Dijkers, Marcel; Backus, Deborah; Charlifue, Susan; Chen, David; Hammond, Flora; Hsieh, Ching-Hui; Smout, Randall J.

    2011-01-01

    Background/objective Length of stay (LOS) for rehabilitation treatment after spinal cord injury (SCI) has been documented extensively. However, there is almost no published research on the nature, extent, or intensity of the various treatments patients receive during their stay. This study aims at providing such information on a large sample of patients treated by specialty rehabilitation inpatient programs. Methods Six hundred patients with traumatic SCI admitted to six rehabilitation centers were enrolled. Time spent on various therapeutic activities was documented by each rehabilitation clinician after each patient encounter. Patients were grouped by neurologic level and completeness of injury. Total time spent by each rehabilitation discipline over a patient's stay and total minutes of treatment per week were calculated. Ordinary least squares stepwise regression models were used to identify patient and injury characteristics associated with time spent in rehabilitation treatment overall and within each discipline. Results Average LOS was 55 days (standard deviation 37), during which 180 (106) hours of treatment were received, or 24 (5) hours per week. Extensive variation was found in the amount of treatment received, between and within neurologic groups. Total hours of treatment provided throughout a patient's stay were primarily determined by LOS, which in turn was primarily predicted by medical acuity. Variation in minutes per week of treatment delivered by individual disciplines was predicted poorly by patient and injury characteristics. Conclusions Variations between and within SCI rehabilitation patient groups in LOS, minutes of treatment per week overall, and for each rehabilitation discipline are large. Variation in treatment intensity was not well explained by patient and injury characteristics. In accordance with practice-based evidence methodology, the next step in the SCIRehab study will be to determine which treatment interventions are related with

  13. Quality of inpatient care in public and private hospitals in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rannan-Eliya, Ravindra P; Wijemanne, Nilmini; Liyanage, Isurujith K; Dalpatadu, Shanti; de Alwis, Sanil; Amarasinghe, Sarasi; Shanthikumar, Shivanthan

    2015-03-01

    To compare the quality of inpatient clinical care in public and private hospitals in Sri Lanka. A retrospective, cross-sectional comparison was done of inpatient quality, in a sample of 11 public and 10 private hospitals in three of 25 districts. Data were collected for 55 quality indicators from medical records of 2523 public and 1815 private inpatient admissions. These covered treatment of asthma, acute myocardial infarction (AMI), childbirth and five other conditions, along with outcome indicators, and medicine prescribing indicators. Overall quality scores were better in the public sector than the private sector (77 vs 69%). Performance was similar for management of AMI and childbirth and somewhat better in the private sector for management of asthma. The public sector performed better in those indicators that are not constrained by resources (94 vs 81%), but worse in indicators that are highly resource intensive (10 vs 31%). Quality was comparable in assessment and investigation, but the public sector performed better in treatment and management (70 vs 62%) and drug prescribing (68 vs 60%), and modestly worse in terms of outcomes (92 vs 97%). For a range of indicators where comparisons were possible, quality of inpatient clinical care in Sri Lanka was comparable to levels reported from upper-middle income Asian countries, and often approaches that in developed countries, although the findings cannot be generalized. Quality in the public sector is better than in the private sector in many areas, despite spending being substantially less. Quality in public hospitals is resource constrained, and needs greater government investment for improvement, but when resource limitations are not critical, the public sector appears able to deliver equal or better quality than the private sector. Overall similarities in quality between the two sectors suggest the importance of physician training and other factors. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The

  14. Hospital-based inpatient resource utilization associated with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchette, Christopher M; Craver, Christopher; Belk, Kathy W; Lubeck, Deborah P; Rossetti, Sandro; Gutierrez, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous class of genetic disorders characterized by development of renal cysts leading to renal failure and end stage renal disease (ESRD). Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) accounts for the majority of PKD cases and is the predominant monogenic cause of ESRD. Limited information on patient characteristics and healthcare resource utilization is available in this population. This study assessed hospital-based inpatient utilization of patients with ADPKD in the US to help further understand the disease, which may lead to treatments that delay progression and reduce healthcare resource utilization. A cross-sectional analysis was conducted using MedAssets Health System Data to investigate inpatient resource utilization for a total of 1876 patients hospitalized with ADPKD or chronic kidney disease (CKD). Patient characteristics and inpatient resource utilization were compared between hospitalized patients with ADPKD and CKD, including demographic and clinical characteristics, overall health, rates of complications and surgical interventions, and average length of hospital and intensive care unit stay. Compared with patients with CKD, patients with ADPKD were more likely to have commercial insurance as their primary payer (36.1 vs 17.8%) and were significantly younger (mean age 57.9 vs 69.5 years) and generally healthier (Charlson Comorbidity Score of 2.0 vs 3.3). Patients with ADPKD also had a substantially shorter average length of hospital stay (6.3 vs 10.3 days). However, patients with ADPKD experienced more kidney-related complications and a higher surgical procedure rate (mainly for transplant and complete nephrectomy). Although patients with ADPKD were generally healthier than patients with CKD, specific kidney function complications were more frequent. Patients with ADPKD had a higher rate of major kidney procedures, which may contribute to the high burden of ADPKD

  15. Observer Ratings of Interpersonal Behavior as Predictors of Aggression and Self-Harm in a High-Security Sample of Male Forensic Inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernham, Zarah; Tapp, James; Moore, Estelle

    2016-05-01

    Incidents of aggression and self-harm in forensic mental health inpatient settings present a significant challenge to practitioners in terms of safely managing and reducing the harm they cause. Research has been conducted to explore the possible predictors of these incidents and has identified a range of environmental, situational, and individual risk factors. However, despite the often interpersonal nature of the majority of aggressive incidents, few studies have investigated forensic inpatient interpersonal styles as predictors of aggression and even fewer have explored the potential interpersonal function of self-harming behaviors. The current study investigated the predictive validity of the Chart of Interpersonal Reactions in Closed Living Environments (CIRCLE) for incidents of verbal and physical aggression, and self-harm recorded from 204 high-secure forensic inpatients. Means comparisons, correlations, and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) were conducted on recorded incident data at 12, 24, and 48 months following baseline assessment using the CIRCLE. Dominant and coercive interpersonal styles were significant predictors of aggression, and a coercive interpersonal style was a significant predictor of self-harm, over the recorded time periods. When categorizing the inpatients on the basis of short- and long-term admissions, these findings were only replicated for inpatients with shorter lengths of stay. The findings support previous research which has demonstrated the benefits of assessing interpersonal style for the purposes of risk planning and management of forensic inpatients. The predictive value may be time-limited in terms of stage of admission.

  16. An inpatient rehabilitation model of care targeting patients with cognitive impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGilton Katherine S

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The course and outcomes of hip fracture patients are often complicated by the presence of dementia and delirium, referred to as cognitive impairment (CI, which limits access to in-patient rehabilitation. In response to this concern, members of our team developed and piloted an in-patient rehabilitation model of care (Patient-Centred Rehabilitation Model; PCRM targeting patients with hip fracture and CI (PCRM-CI. We are now conducting a 3-year study comparing an inpatient rehabilitation model of care for community dwelling individuals with hip fracture and CI (PCRM-CI to usual care to determine whether it results in improved mobility at the time of discharge from inpatient rehabilitation. Methods/Design A non-equivalent pre-post design is being used to evaluate the PCRM-CI compared to usual care. All community dwelling (private home or retirement home patients following a hip fracture are eligible to participate. Recruitment of both cohorts is taking place at two facilities. Target accrual is 70 hip fracture patients in the PCRM-CI cohort and 70 patients in the usual care cohort. We are also recruiting 70 health care providers (HCPs, who are being trained to implement the PCRM-CI, and their unit managers. Patient data are collected at baseline, discharge, and 6 months post-discharge from an inpatient rehabilitation program. Evaluations include mobility, physical function, and living arrangement. Additional outcome variables are being collected from medical records and from the patients via their proxies. Data on the prevalence and severity of dementia and delirium are being collected. Staff data are collected at baseline and one year after implementation of the model to determine change in staff knowledge and attitudes toward patients with hip fracture and CI. Bi-monthly semi-structured interviews with unit managers have been conducted to examine factors and barriers influencing the model implementation. Data collection

  17. Interventions to improve antibiotic prescribing practices for hospital inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Peter; Brown, Erwin; Charani, Esmita; Fenelon, Lynda; Gould, Ian M; Holmes, Alison; Ramsay, Craig R; Wiffen, Philip J; Wilcox, Mark

    2013-04-30

    included any professional or structural interventions as defined by EPOC. The intervention had to include a component that aimed to improve antibiotic prescribing to hospital inpatients, either by increasing effective treatment or by reducing unnecessary treatment. The results had to include interpretable data about the effect of the intervention on antibiotic prescribing or microbial outcomes or relevant clinical outcomes. Two authors extracted data and assessed quality. We performed meta-regression of ITS studies to compare the results of persuasive and restrictive interventions. Persuasive interventions advised physicians about how to prescribe or gave them feedback about how they prescribed. Restrictive interventions put a limit on how they prescribed; for example, physicians had to have approval from an infection specialist in order to prescribe an antibiotic. We standardized the results of some ITS studies so that they are on the same scale (percent change in outcome), thereby facilitating comparisons of different interventions. To do this, we used the change in level and change in slope to estimate the effect size with increasing time after the intervention (one month, six months, one year, etc) as the percent change in level at each time point. We did not extrapolate beyond the end of data collection after the intervention. The meta-regression was performed using standard weighted linear regression with the standard errors of the coefficients adjusted where necessary. For this update we included 89 studies that reported 95 interventions. Of the 89 studies, 56 were ITSs (of which 4 were controlled ITSs), 25 were RCT (of which 5 were cluster-RCTs), 5 were CBAs and 3 were CCTs (of which 1 was a cluster-CCT).Most (80/95, 84%) of the interventions targeted the antibiotic prescribed (choice of antibiotic, timing of first dose and route of administration). The remaining 15 interventions aimed to change exposure of patients to antibiotics by targeting the decision to treat

  18. Evaluation of an inpatient fall risk screening tool to identify the most critical fall risk factors in inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Wen-Hsuan; Kang, Chun-Mei; Ho, Mu-Hsing; Kuo, Jessie Ming-Chuan; Chen, Hsiao-Lien; Chang, Wen-Yin

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of the inpatient fall risk screening tool and to identify the most critical fall risk factors in inpatients. Variations exist in several screening tools applied in acute care hospitals for examining risk factors for falls and identifying high-risk inpatients. Secondary data analysis. A subset of inpatient data for the period from June 2011-June 2014 was extracted from the nursing information system and adverse event reporting system of an 818-bed teaching medical centre in Taipei. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, receiver operating characteristic curve analysis and logistic regression analysis. During the study period, 205 fallers and 37,232 nonfallers were identified. The results revealed that the inpatient fall risk screening tool (cut-off point of ≥3) had a low sensitivity level (60%), satisfactory specificity (87%), a positive predictive value of 2·0% and a negative predictive value of 99%. The receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed an area under the curve of 0·805 (sensitivity, 71·8%; specificity, 78%). To increase the sensitivity values, the Youden index suggests at least 1·5 points to be the most suitable cut-off point for the inpatient fall risk screening tool. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed a considerably increased fall risk in patients with impaired balance and impaired elimination. The fall risk factor was also significantly associated with days of hospital stay and with admission to surgical wards. The findings can raise awareness about the two most critical risk factors for falls among future clinical nurses and other healthcare professionals and thus facilitate the development of fall prevention interventions. This study highlights the needs for redefining the cut-off points of the inpatient fall risk screening tool to effectively identify inpatients at a high risk of falls. Furthermore, inpatients with impaired balance and impaired elimination should be closely

  19. A novel and effective acupuncture modality as a complementary therapy to acute pain relief in inpatients with rib fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Yi Ho

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pain control has been emphasized as a priority for both practitioners and inpatients with rib fractures, since analgesia could only offer limited relief from severe pain. A prospective and randomized controlled trial was conducted to analyze the efficacy and efficiency of acupuncture in acute pain relief for inpatients with rib fractures. Methods: A total of 58 inpatients were recruited and allocated to two groups, receiving identical doses of conventional oral analgesics as well as filiform needles as treatment and thumbtack intradermal (TI needles placed upon the skin surface as a control, respectively, via novel acupuncture modality once daily for three consecutive days. The effect of pain relief was evaluated during activities that induce pain, and sustained maximal inspiration (SMI lung volumes and sleep quality were assessed. Results: The patients treated with filiform needles had more effective pain relief than those in the TI needle group during deep breathing, coughing, and turning over the body (p < 0.05, and the effect persisted for at least 6 h in most patients. Sustained maximal inspiration lung volumes and sleep quality did not show improvement through every acupuncture intervention, and they could not respond accurately to pain relief via acupuncture. Conclusion: The active evaluation could provide a more adaptive model for assessing pain intensity due to rib fractures. This novel acupuncture modality in which the needle insertion sites are corresponding to the pain spots can be a safe and viable therapy for relieving pain in inpatients with rib fractures.

  20. A novel and effective acupuncture modality as a complementary therapy to acute pain relief in inpatients with rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Hsin-Yi; Chen, Chao-Wei; Li, Ming-Chieh; Hsu, Yu-Pao; Kang, Shih-Ching; Liu, Erh-Hao; Lee, Ko-Hung

    2014-01-01

    Pain control has been emphasized as a priority for both practitioners and inpatients with rib fractures, since analgesia could only offer limited relief from severe pain. A prospective and randomized controlled trial was conducted to analyze the efficacy and efficiency of acupuncture in acute pain relief for inpatients with rib fractures. A total of 58 inpatients were recruited and allocated to two groups, receiving identical doses of conventional oral analgesics as well as filiform needles as treatment and thumbtack intradermal (TI) needles placed upon the skin surface as a control, respectively, via novel acupuncture modality once daily for three consecutive days. The effect of pain relief was evaluated during activities that induce pain, and sustained maximal inspiration (SMI) lung volumes and sleep quality were assessed. The patients treated with filiform needles had more effective pain relief than those in the TI needle group during deep breathing, coughing, and turning over the body (p pain relief via acupuncture. The active evaluation could provide a more adaptive model for assessing pain intensity due to rib fractures. This novel acupuncture modality in which the needle insertion sites are corresponding to the pain spots can be a safe and viable therapy for relieving pain in inpatients with rib fractures.

  1. Clinical Evaluation of Inpatients with Acute Urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Serap

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: To determine the clinical and etiological features of inpatients with acute urticaria and angioedema and to assess the need for laboratory tests. Material and Methods: We recruited 105 patients with acute urticaria and angioedema who were admitted to our inpatient unit. The lesions and the characteristics of the patients were analyzed. Routine diagnostic tests including complete blood count, thyroid function tests, hepatitis panel, stool parasite, total IgE levels, cultures, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, anti-nuclear antibody, and posterior anterior lung X-ray were ordered. A psychiatric consultation was obtained, when needed. The results were analyzed with SPSS 15.0 statistical software.Results: Among 105 patients, 28 (26.7% had urticaria, 7 (6.7% had angioedema, and 70 (66.7% suffered from both urticaria and angioedema. The most common accompanying symptoms were itching (91.4% and burning (34.3%. The most common systemic symptoms were fatigue (15.2% and headache (12.4%. The lesions usually appeared in the evening hours (24.8%. Twenty-five patients were waking up due to itching during the night. Some lesions were associated with physical activities. Systemic diseases accompanied the lesions in 12 patients (11%. In terms of etiological factors, 33 patients (22.5% had infections. Food- related lesions were encountered in 14 (13% patients. Thirty patients (28.5% had history of medication use. Stress was detected in 37.1% of the patients; anxiety was diagnosed in 3% of patients. The stool was positive for parasites in 10 (9% patients. Conclusion: Acute urticaria is a benign disorder. Although the underlying cause of urticaria can not always be identified, infections and medications are the most common causes. A comprehensive and detailed history is very important to discover the underlying cause. The diagnostic tests should be ordered according to the patient’s history. Conducting diagnostic tests

  2. Shrinking inpatient psychiatric capacity: cause for celebration or concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinsky, Eileen; Loftis, Christopher

    2007-08-01

    This issue brief examines reported capacity constraints in inpatient psychiatric services and describes how these services fit within the continuum of care for mental health treatment. The paper summarizes the type and range of acute care services used to intervene in mental health crises, including both traditional hospital-based services and alternative crisis interventions, such as mobile response teams. It reviews historical trends in the supply of inpatient psychiatric beds and explores the anticipated influence of prospective payment for inpatient psychiatric services under Medicare. The paper also considers other forces that may affect the need for and supply of acute mental health services, including key factors that could improve the quality and efficiency of inpatient psychiatric care.

  3. Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) - National Inpatient Sample

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2001 to 2013. The National (Nationwide) Inpatient Sample (NIS) is part of a family of databases and software tools developed for the Healthcare Cost and Utilization...

  4. Aggression in Inpatient Adolescents: The Effects of Gender and Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Michele; Carey, Michael; Kim, Wun Jung

    2003-01-01

    Examined differences in aggressive behavior among predominantly white adolescent inpatients with and without depression. Survey data indicated that depression and gender interacted significantly. Depressed females demonstrated more physical aggression than nondepressed females, and depressed males demonstrated less aggression than nondepressed…

  5. HCUP National (Nationwide) Inpatient Sample (NIS) - Restricted Access File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIS is the largest publicly available all-payer inpatient care database in the United States. It contains data from approximately 8 million hospital stays each...

  6. Inpatient consultations to an orthopaedic service: the hidden workload.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Malley, N T

    2011-12-01

    While the quality and efficiency of out-patient orthopaedic referrals are well documented in the literature, there is little on the standard and appropriateness of inpatient orthopaedic consultations.

  7. Age-Specific Characteristics of Inpatients with Severe Asthma Exacerbation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoshi Sekiya

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: The characteristics of inpatients with severe asthma vary depending on age. We need to establish countermeasures for asthma exacerbation according to the characteristics of patients depending on age.

  8. Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) - National Inpatient Sample

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2001 forward. The National (Nationwide) Inpatient Sample (NIS) is part of a family of databases and software tools developed for the Healthcare Cost and Utilization...

  9. Aggressive behaviour of inpatients with acquired brain injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henk Nijman; prof Berno van Meijel; Joost Stolker; Ada Visscher

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To study the prevalence, nature and determinants of aggression among inpatients with acquired brain injury. Background. Patients with acquired brain injury often have difficulty in controlling their aggressive impulses. Design. A prospective observational study design. Methods. By means o

  10. Gastrostomy Tube Weaning and Treatment of Severe Selective Eating in Childhood: Experience in Israel Using an Intensive Three Week Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalem, Tzippora; Fradkin, Akiva; Dunitz-Scheer, Marguerite; Sadeh-Kon, Tal; Goz-Gulik, Tali; Fishler, Yael; Weiss, Batia

    2016-06-01

    Children dependent on gastrostomy tube feeding and those with extremely selective eating comprise the most challenging groups of early childhood eating disorders. We established, for the first time in Israel, a 3 week intensive weaning and treatment program for these patients based on the "Graz model." To investigate the Graz model for tube weaning and for treating severe selective eating disorders in one center in Israel. Pre-program assessment of patients' suitability to participate was performed 3 months prior to the study, and a treatment goal was set for each patient. The program included a multidisciplinary outpatient or inpatient 3 week treatment course. The major outcome measures were achievement of the target goal of complete or partial tube weaning for those with tube dependency, and expansion of the child's nutritional diversity for those with selective eating. Thirty-four children, 28 with tube dependency and 6 with selective eating, participated in four programs conducted over 24 months. Their mean age was 4.3 ± 0.37 years. Of all patients, 29 (85%) achieved the target goal (24 who were tube-dependent and 5 selective eaters). One patient was excluded due to aspiration pneumonia. After 6 months follow-up, 24 of 26 available patients (92%) maintained their target or improved. This intensive 3 week program was highly effective in weaning children with gastrostomy tube dependency and ameliorating severe selective eating. Preliminary evaluation of the family is necessary for completion of the program and achieving the child's personal goal, as are an experienced multidisciplinary team and the appropriate hospital setup, i.e., inpatient or outpatient.

  11. Enhanced identification of postoperative infections among inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoe, Deborah S; Noskin, Gary A; Cunnigham, Susan M; Zuccotti, Gianna; Plaskett, Theresa; Fraser, Victoria J; Olsen, Margaret A; Tokars, Jerome I; Solomon, Steven; Perl, Trish M; Cosgrove, Sara E; Tilson, Richard S; Greenbaum, Maurice; Hooper, David C; Sands, Kenneth E; Tully, John; Herwaldt, Loreen a; Diekema, Daniel J; Wong, Edward S; Climo, Michael; Platt, Richard

    2004-11-01

    We evaluated antimicrobial exposure, discharge diagnoses, or both to identify surgical site infections (SSI). This retrospective cohort study in 13 hospitals involved weighted, random samples of records from 8,739 coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) procedures, 7,399 cesarean deliveries, and 6,175 breast procedures. We compared routine surveillance to detection through inpatient antimicrobial exposure (> 9 days for CABG, > 2 days for cesareans, and > 6 days for breast procedures), discharge diagnoses, or both. Together, all methods identified SSI after 7.4% of CABG, 5.0% of cesareans, and 2.0% of breast procedures. Antimicrobial exposure had the highest sensitivity, 88%-91%, compared with routine surveillance, 38%-64%. Diagnosis codes improved sensitivity of detection of antimicrobial exposure after cesareans. Record review confirmed SSI after 31% to 38% of procedures that met antimicrobial surveillance criteria. Sufficient antimicrobial exposure days, together with diagnosis codes for cesareans, identified more postoperative SSI than routine surveillance methods. This screening method was efficient, readily standardized, and suitable for most hospitals.

  12. Pediatric Inpatient Headache Therapy: What is Available.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabbouche, Marielle

    2015-01-01

    Status migrainosus is defined by the international classification of headache disorders (ICHD) criteria as a debilitating migraine lasting more then 72 hours. The epidemiology of status migrainosus is still unknown in adult and children, and frequently underdiagnosed. Children and adolescents often end up in the emergency room with an intractable headache that failed outpatient therapy. Six to seven percent of these children do not respond to acute infusion therapy and require hospitalization. It is imperative that more aggressive therapy is considered when patients are affected by a severe intractable headache to prevent further disability and returning the child to baseline activity. Multiple therapies are available for adults and children. Studies for acute therapy in the emergency room are available in adults and pediatric groups. Small studies are available for inpatient therapy in children and, along with available therapies for children and adolescents, are described in this review. A review of the literature shows growing evidence regarding the use of dihydroergotamine intravenously once patients are hospitalized. Effectiveness and safety have been proven in the last decades in adults and small studies in the pediatric populations.

  13. Nutritional approach of inpatients with anorexia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Marugán de Miguelsanz

    Full Text Available Anorexia nervosa (AN is the most prevalent of eating disorders in children and adolescents, and its treatment is long and complex, involving a multidisciplinary team. Nutritional rehabilitation and restoration of a healthy body weight is one of the central goals in the initial stages of inpatient treatment. However, current recommendations on initial energy requirements for these patients are inconsistent, with a clear lack of controlled studies, available scientific evidence and global consensus on the most effective and safe refeeding practices in hospitalized adolescents with anorexia nervosa (AN. Conservative refeeding recommendations have been classically established in order to prevent the refeeding syndrome. Nevertheless, various works have recently appeared advocating a higher initial caloric intake, without observing more complications or refeeding syndrome, and allowing a shorter average stay. We present our experience in the treatment of restricting AN with a conservative progressive treatment. We have obtained good results with this approach, which was well tolerated by patients, with no observing complications. As a consequence, the medical team could establish a pact about the therapeutic goals with the patients in an easier way.

  14. Morale is high in acute inpatient psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Len; Allan, Teresa; Simpson, Alan; Jones, Julia; Whittington, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Morale on acute psychiatric wards has been considered to be problematic, and is reported to contribute to low quality patient care. To assess the relationship of staff morale to patient, service environment, physical environment, patient routines, conflict, containment, staff demographics, and staff group variables. A multivariate cross sectional study was undertaken collecting data on morale, as measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory, and other variables on 136 acute admission psychiatric wards in England. Morale was higher than published comparison samples. Length of time in post was correlated with low morale, and qualified nurses had higher emotional exhaustion but also higher personal accomplishment. The level of verbal abuse on a ward was associated with low morale, as was a higher level of social deprivation among patients. Higher levels of order and organisation correlated with better morale. Clear policies relating to the management of verbal abuse by patients, high levels of order and organisation, and staff rotation and education, may all support high morale. Acute inpatient psychiatry is generally a happy and rewarding work environment, and identified problems are likely to be due to other factors.

  15. [Performance indicators of maxillofacial surgery inpatient departments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marada, Gyula; Nagy, Ákos; Sebestyén, Andor; Zemplényi, Antal; Radnai, Márta; Boncz, Imre

    2017-03-01

    In Hungary, the number and structure of the maxillofacial surgery departments underwent significant changes in recent decades. The aim of our study was to present the actual performance indicators of maxillofacial inpatient departments and based on the available data to compare the departments. The study was based on the number of beds founded by the National Health Insurance Fund. Performance data were supplied by the National Health Insurance Fund Administration. The assessment included the following indicators: number of beds institutional breakdown by type, number of reimbursed cases, the weighted case number, hospital stay, bed occupancy rates and average length of stay. In the examined period 40% of active beds (65) were in university hospitals. The distribution of reimbursed cases was similar. The university hospitals showed higher weighted case number and case-mix index. The oral surgery departments' bed occupancy rate (45.75%) was below the national average. The indicators show significant differences among different departments in the examined period. Orv. Hetil., 2017, 158(12), 447-453.

  16. Hispanic Heritage Month

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Sherry

    2004-01-01

    Hispanic heritage month is from September 15 to October 15. One problem that arises when grouping people into categories such as Hispanic or Latino is stereotyping, stereotypes can be promoted or used in this Hispanic month to promote a greater understanding of Latino cultures.

  17. Progress report, 24 months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    The work performed during the past 12 months (months 13 – 24) of the project has included the conclusion of Task 1 – Fundamental Studies and Task 2 – Multimirror Cutting Head Design. Work on Task 3 – Compact Cutting Head Design, and Task 4 – Interface Design has been carried out and the tests...... of the multimirror cutting head have been started....

  18. Progress report, 36 months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    The work performed during the past 12 months (months 13 – 24) of the project has included the conclusion of Task 1 – Fundamental Studies and Task 2 – Multimirror Cutting Head Design. Work on Task 3 – Compact Cutting Head Design, and Task 4 – Interface Design has been carried out and the tests...... of the multimirror cutting head have been started....

  19. Progress report, 36 months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    The work performed during the past 12 months (months 13 – 24) of the project has included the conclusion of Task 1 – Fundamental Studies and Task 2 – Multimirror Cutting Head Design. Work on Task 3 – Compact Cutting Head Design, and Task 4 – Interface Design has been carried out and the tests of ...

  20. Progress report, 24 months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    The work performed during the past 12 months (months 13 – 24) of the project has included the conclusion of Task 1 – Fundamental Studies and Task 2 – Multimirror Cutting Head Design. Work on Task 3 – Compact Cutting Head Design, and Task 4 – Interface Design has been carried out and the tests of ...

  1. Inpatient management of alcohol withdrawal: a practical approach

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Alcohol intake contributes directly or indirectly to 15 to 20% of medical problems in primary care or an inpatient setting. It is estimated that approximately 500,000 episodes of withdrawal will be severe enough to require pharmacologic intervention. The total cost to the United States economy from alcohol abuse was estimated to be $185 billion for 1998. This review attempts to put forth a practical and evidence based approach towards the inpatient management of alcohol withdrawal. Various ag...

  2. Benefits and limitations of Bowen therapy with psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbe, K J; Fabacher, J E

    1989-11-01

    The authors discuss the benefits and limitations of Bowen family systems therapy for psychiatric inpatients. Although this method may enable some patients to deal more effectively with crucial problems in their families of origins, its application for psychiatric inpatients has met with varying results. The authors discuss why hospitalized patients may have particular difficulties using Bowen therapy. The assumptions of Bowen theory are reviewed and critiqued in the context of the special problems encountered when working in a psychiatric hospital system.

  3. Emetic and Electric Shock Alcohol Aversion Therapy: Six- and Twelve-Month Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Dale S.; Baker, Timothy B.

    1981-01-01

    Follow-up data are presented for 6- and 12-months on male alcoholics (N=20) who received either a multifaceted inpatient alcoholism treatment program alone (controls) or emetic or shock aversion therapy in addition to that program. Both emetic and control subjects compiled more days of abstinence than shock subjects. (Author)

  4. Two RFID-based solutions for secure inpatient medication administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Yi-Chung; Lo, Nai-Wei; Wu, Tzong-Chen

    2012-10-01

    Medication error can easily cause serious health damage to inpatients in hospital. Consequently, the whole society has to spend huge amount of extra resources for additional therapies and medication on those affected inpatients. In order to prevent medication errors, secure inpatient medication administration system is required in a hospital. Using RFID technology, such administration system provides automated medication verification for inpatient's medicine doses and generates corresponding medication evidence, which may be audited later for medical dispute. Recently, Peris-Lopez et al. (Int. J. Med. Inform., 2011) proposed an IS-RFID system to enhance inpatient medication safety. Nevertheless, IS-RFID system does not detect the denial of proof attack efficiently and the generated medication evidence cannot defend against counterfeit evidence generated from the hospital. That is, the hospital possesses enough privilege from the design of IS-RFID system to modify generated medication evidence whenever it is necessary. Hence, we design two lightweight RFID-based solutions for secure inpatient medication administration, one for online verification environment and the other for offline validation situation, to achieve system security on evidence generation and provide early detection on denial of proof attack.

  5. Patient engagement in the inpatient setting: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prey, Jennifer E; Woollen, Janet; Wilcox, Lauren; Sackeim, Alexander D; Hripcsak, George; Bakken, Suzanne; Restaino, Susan; Feiner, Steven; Vawdrey, David K

    2014-01-01

    To systematically review existing literature regarding patient engagement technologies used in the inpatient setting. PubMed, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Digital Library, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Xplore, and Cochrane databases were searched for studies that discussed patient engagement ('self-efficacy', 'patient empowerment', 'patient activation', or 'patient engagement'), (2) involved health information technology ('technology', 'games', 'electronic health record', 'electronic medical record', or 'personal health record'), and (3) took place in the inpatient setting ('inpatient' or 'hospital'). Only English language studies were reviewed. 17 articles were identified describing the topic of inpatient patient engagement. A few articles identified design requirements for inpatient engagement technology. The remainder described interventions, which we grouped into five categories: entertainment, generic health information delivery, patient-specific information delivery, advanced communication tools, and personalized decision support. Examination of the current literature shows there are considerable gaps in knowledge regarding patient engagement in the hospital setting and inconsistent use of terminology regarding patient engagement overall. Research on inpatient engagement technologies has been limited, especially concerning the impact on health outcomes and cost-effectiveness. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. Using routine inpatient data to identify patients at risk of hospital readmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howell Stuart

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A relatively small percentage of patients with chronic medical conditions account for a much larger percentage of inpatient costs. There is some evidence that case-management can improve health and quality-of-life and reduce the number of times these patients are readmitted. To assess whether a statistical algorithm, based on routine inpatient data, can be used to identify patients at risk of readmission and who would therefore benefit from case-management. Methods Queensland database study of public-hospital patients, who had at least one emergency admission for a chronic medical condition (e.g., congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes or dementia during 2005/2006. Multivariate logistic regression was used to develop an algorithm to predict readmission within 12 months. The performance of the algorithm was tested against recorded readmissions using sensitivity, specificity, and Likelihood Ratios (positive and negative. Results Several factors were identified that predicted readmission (i.e., age, co-morbidities, economic disadvantage, number of previous admissions. The discriminatory power of the model was modest as determined by area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve (c = 0.65. At a risk score threshold of 50, the algorithm identified only 44.7% (95% CI: 42.5%, 46.9% of patients admitted with a reference condition who had an admission in the next 12 months; 37.5% (95% CI: 35.0%, 40.0% of patients were flagged incorrectly (they did not have a subsequent admission. Conclusion A statistical algorithm based on Queensland hospital inpatient data, performed only moderately in identifying patients at risk of readmission. The main problem is that there are too many false negatives, which means that many patients who might benefit would not be offered case-management.

  7. Sound Intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crocker, M.J.; Jacobsen, Finn

    1997-01-01

    This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique....

  8. Sound Intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crocker, M.J.; Jacobsen, Finn

    1997-01-01

    This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique.......This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique....

  9. Sound intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crocker, Malcolm J.; Jacobsen, Finn

    1998-01-01

    This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique.......This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique....

  10. An unfolding case with a linked OSCE: a curriculum in inpatient geriatric medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karani, Reena; Callahan, Eileen H; Thomas, David C

    2002-09-01

    conducted one week after the unfolding case-based conferences have ended. Learners are evaluated by attending physicians and given immediate feedback after each station and interstation. This newly developed project has been implemented as a standardized curriculum on our inpatient geriatrics unit since September 2001. Thus far, it has been extremely well received by housestaff because of real-time assessment and review of the materials covered during the month. In addition, this progressive approach has provided an excellent forum for geriatrics fellows to develop teaching skills. Attending physicians have shown their support, finding the content to be appropriate and relevant to inpatient geriatrics. Finally, this didactic approach will be continued on our unit and a modified version is being developed and piloted for other unit staff.

  11. [Evaluation of ambulatory orthopedic-traumatologic rehabilitation by compensation insurance. A comparison with inpatient rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, N; von Törne, I; Weber-Falkensammer, H

    1999-08-01

    In 1994, "Ambulant Orthopaedic-Traumatologic Rehabilitation" (AOTR) was introduced by the Ersatzkassen health insurance funds. This study investigated structural, process and outcome quality. One of the study questions asked is whether AOTR is as effective for (1) patients with low back pain and clinical signs of disc problems and (2) patients with cruciate ligament injury as the routinely practised inpatient rehabilitation. In a quasi-experimental cohort study patients from five AOTR centers were compared to patients from five orthopedic rehabilitation clinics with regard to their rehabilitation outcome measured on the clinical, disability and handicap level. At the beginning (t0) and the end (t1) of the rehabilitation, data were collected from patients and therapists and 6 months later (t2) only from patients by means of questionnaires. The inclusion criteria for patients with back problems had to be broadened ("patients with low back pain") because of difficulties with patient sampling. Sample sizes were n = 166 (AOTR: 100, inpatient: 66) for t0 and t1 and n = 101 (AOTR: 47, inpatient: 54) for t0, t1 and t2. At baseline, ambulant patients with low back pain were younger (43 vs. 49 years) and better off with regard to disabilities and handicaps than patients from rehabilitation clinics. Clinical signs (e.g., neurological signs, Lasègue sign, flexibility of the spine) showed smaller differences. At t1 clinical, disability and handicaps variables had improved considerably in both groups. At t2 the improvements had stabilized or had become greater. Analyses of variance showed that improvements in the ambulant group were not much greater after accounting for the different baseline status. The sample size of patients with knee ligament injury was n = 66 (AOTR: 50, inpatient: 16). Ambulant patients considerably improved with regard to knee function and handicaps. Despite of small sample sizes this study provides some evidence that (1) AOTR and inpatient rehabilitation

  12. Patient experience and satisfaction with inpatient service: development of short form survey instrument measuring the core aspect of inpatient experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza L Y Wong

    Full Text Available Patient experience reflects quality of care from the patients' perspective; therefore, patients' experiences are important data in the evaluation of the quality of health services. The development of an abbreviated, reliable and valid instrument for measuring inpatients' experience would reflect the key aspect of inpatient care from patients' perspective as well as facilitate quality improvement by cultivating patient engagement and allow the trends in patient satisfaction and experience to be measured regularly. The study developed a short-form inpatient instrument and tested its ability to capture a core set of inpatients' experiences. The Hong Kong Inpatient Experience Questionnaire (HKIEQ was established in 2010; it is an adaptation of the General Inpatient Questionnaire of the Care Quality Commission created by the Picker Institute in United Kingdom. This study used a consensus conference and a cross-sectional validation survey to create and validate a short-form of the Hong Kong Inpatient Experience Questionnaire (SF-HKIEQ. The short-form, the SF-HKIEQ, consisted of 18 items derived from the HKIEQ. The 18 items mainly covered relational aspects of care under four dimensions of the patient's journey: hospital staff, patient care and treatment, information on leaving the hospital, and overall impression. The SF-HKIEQ had a high degree of face validity, construct validity and internal reliability. The validated SF-HKIEQ reflects the relevant core aspects of inpatients' experience in a hospital setting. It provides a quick reference tool for quality improvement purposes and a platform that allows both healthcare staff and patients to monitor the quality of hospital care over time.

  13. [Improving inpatient pharmacoterapeutic process by Lean Six Sigma methodology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font Noguera, I; Fernández Megía, M J; Ferrer Riquelme, A J; Balasch I Parisi, S; Edo Solsona, M D; Poveda Andres, J L

    2013-01-01

    Lean Six Sigma methodology has been used to improve care processes, eliminate waste, reduce costs, and increase patient satisfaction. To analyse the results obtained with Lean Six Sigma methodology in the diagnosis and improvement of the inpatient pharmacotherapy process during structural and organisational changes in a tertiary hospital. 1.000 beds tertiary hospital. prospective observational study. The define, measure, analyse, improve and control (DMAIC), were deployed from March to September 2011. An Initial Project Charter was updated as results were obtained. 131 patients with treatments prescribed within 24h after admission and with 4 drugs. safety indicators (medication errors), and efficiency indicators (complaints and time delays). Proportion of patients with a medication error was reduced from 61.0% (25/41 patients) to 55.7% (39/70 patients) in four months. Percentage of errors (regarding the opportunities for error) decreased in the different phases of the process: Prescription: from 5.1% (19/372 opportunities) to 3.3% (19/572 opportunities); Preparation: from 2.7% (14/525 opportunities) to 1.3% (11/847 opportunities); and administration: from 4.9% (16/329 opportunities) to 3.0% (13/433 opportunities). Nursing complaints decreased from 10.0% (2119/21038 patients) to 5.7% (1779/31097 patients). The estimated economic impact was 76,800 euros saved. An improvement in the pharmacotherapeutic process and a positive economic impact was observed, as well as enhancing patient safety and efficiency of the organization. Standardisation and professional training are future Lean Six Sigma candidate projects. Copyright © 2012 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. TARP Monthly Housing Scorecard

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Treasury — Treasury and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) jointly produce a Monthly Housing Scorecard on the health of the nation’s housing market. The...

  15. Lightship Monthly Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Daily Weather Observations (Monthly Form 1001) from lightship stations in the United States. Please see the 'Surface Weather Observations (1001)' library for more...

  16. Oceanographic Monthly Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Monthly Summary contains sea surface temperature (SST) analyses on both regional and ocean basin scales for the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans....

  17. Comparing common reasons for inpatient and outpatient visits between commercially-insured duloxetine or pregabalin initiators with fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Y

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Yang Zhao,1 Peter Sun,2 Mark Bernauer31Eli Lilly and Company, 2Kailo Research Group, 3OptumInsight, Indianapolis, IN, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to examine the main reasons for inpatient or outpatient visits after initiating duloxetine or pregabalin.Methods: Commercially insured patients with fibromyalgia and aged 18–64 years who initiated duloxetine or pregabalin in 2006 with 12-month continuous enrollment before and after initiation were identified. Duloxetine and pregabalin cohorts with similar demographics, pre-index clinical and economic characteristics, and pre-index treatment patterns were constructed via propensity scoring stratification. Reasons for inpatient admissions, physician office visits, outpatient hospital visits, emergency room visits, and primary or specialty care visits over the 12 months post-index period were examined and compared. Logistic regression was used to assess the contribution of duloxetine versus pregabalin initiation to the most common reasons for visits, controlling for cross-cohort differences.Results: Per the study design, the duloxetine (n = 3711 and pregabalin (n = 4111 cohorts had similar demographics (mean age 51 years, 83% female and health care costs over the 12-month pre-index period. Total health care costs during the 12-month post-index period were significantly lower for duloxetine patients than for pregabalin patients ($19,378 versus $27,045, P < 0.05. Eight of the 10 most common reasons for inpatient admissions and outpatient hospital (physician office, emergency room, primary or specialty care visits were the same for both groups. Controlling for cross-cohort differences, duloxetine patients were less likely to be hospitalized due to an intervertebral disc disorder or major depressive disorder, to have a physician office visit due to nonspecific backache/other back/neck pain (NB/OB/NP disorder, or to go to specialty care due to a soft tissue, NB/OP/NP, or intervertebral disc

  18. Potentially avoidable inpatient nights among warfarin receiving patients; an audit of a single university teaching hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Forde, Dónall

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Warfarin is an oral anticoagulant (OAT) that needs active management to ensure therapeutic range. Initial management is often carried out as an inpatient, though not requiring inpatient facilities. This mismatch results in financial costs which could be directed more efficaciously. The extent of this has previously been unknown. Here we aim to calculate the potential number of bed nights which may be saved among those being dose optimized as inpatients and examine associated factors. METHODS: A 6 week prospective audit of inpatients receiving OAT, at Cork University Hospital, was carried out. The study period was from 11th June 2007 to 20th July 2007. Data was collected from patient\\'s medications prescription charts, medical record files, and computerised haematology laboratory records. The indications for OAT, the patient laboratory coagulation results and therapeutic intervals along with patient demographics were analysed. The level of potentially avoidable inpatient nights in those receiving OAT in hospital was calculated and the potential cost savings quantified. Potential avoidable bed nights were defined as patients remaining in hospital for the purpose of optimizing OAT dosage, while receiving subtherapeutic or therapeutic OAT (being titred up to therapeutic levels) and co-administered covering low molecular weight heparin, and requiring no other active care. The average cost of euro638 was taken as the per night hospital stay cost for a non-Intensive Care bed. Ethical approval was granted from the Ethical Committee of the Cork Teaching Hospitals, Cork, Ireland. RESULTS: A total of 158 patients were included in the audit. There was 94 men (59.4%) and 64 women (40.6%). The mean age was 67.8 years, with a median age of 70 years.Atrial Fibrillation (43%, n = 70), followed by aortic valve replacement (15%, n = 23) and pulmonary emboli (11%, n = 18) were the commonest reasons for prescribing OAT. 54% had previously been prescribed OAT prior to

  19. Cannabis and Alcohol Abuse Among First Psychotic Episode Inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Gregory; Kunyvsky, Yehuda; Hornik-Lurie, Tzipi; Raskin, Sergey; Abramowitz, Moshe Z

    2016-01-01

    Psychoactive substance abuse, which includes abuse of alcohol and street drugs, is common among first-episode psychosis patients, but the prevalence of cannabis abuse is particularly high. However, there have been very few reported studies concerning the occurrence of psychoactive substance abuse among first-episode psychotic individuals using standard toxicological testing. We study the prevalence of cannabis and alcohol abuse among first-psychoticepisode inpatients as well as compare the demographic, diagnostic, and psychopathological profiles of substance abusers versus nonusers. Subjects were recruited from the Jerusalem Mental Health Center between 2012 and 2014. Ninety-one consecutively admitted psychiatric patients diagnosed using the DSM-IV criteria with a first psychotic episode due to schizophrenia, schizophreniform disorder, bipolar disorder, brief psychotic episode, and psychosis NOS disorder entered the study. The diagnoses of schizophrenia (all types), psychosis NOS disorder, brief psychotic episode, and schizophreniform disorder were categorized as "only psychosis" and those of bipolar disorder manic episode with psychotic features (congruent and incongruent) and severe depression with psychotic features were categorized as "predominantly affective symptoms." Urine tests for tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) were performed during the first 48 hours of admission, and likewise self-report questionnaires were administered. Alcohol abuse and dependence were diagnosed by self-report. Of the 91 subjects in the study, 49 (53.8%) did not abuse any illegal psychoactive substance. Twenty patients (22%) abused only cannabis; 14 (15.4%) abused cannabis and another psychoactive substance; 54 (59.3%) of the subjects reported no alcohol abuse; 33 (36.3%) reported occasional drinking (between two and ten times a month); and 4 (4.4%) reported continuous repeated drinking (more than ten times a month). There was no correlation between the demographic characteristics and the

  20. Results of a 2-Week Inpatient Stay at the Department for Internal and Integrative Medicine: An Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauche, Romy; Cramer, Holger; Moebus, Susanne; Paul, Anna; Michalsen, Andreas; Langhorst, Jost; Dobos, Gustav

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. The Department for Internal and Integrative Medicine in Essen utilizes mind/body medical elements in order to empower patients with chronic diseases to better cope with their symptoms and to adopt a healthy lifestyle. This study explored the influence and predictors of a 2-week integrative treatment program on patients' quality of life. Methods. This observational study was conducted with inpatients as part of the quality assurance program. Patients' quality of life, psychological symptoms, and health locus of control were measured on admission and discharge and again 3, 6, and 12 months after discharge. Regression analyses were conducted to determine the factors predicting improved quality of life. Results. Data from 2486 inpatients treated in 2001–2004 were included (80% female, mean age 53.9 ± 14.3 years). Response rates decreased to 50% at 12 months. Small-to-moderate effects were found on patients' quality of life, anxiety, and depression. Patients' internal locus of control significantly increased. Improved quality of life was mainly predicted by lower baseline scores. Conclusion. Results of this study suggest that a 2-week inpatient treatment might sustainably reduce patients' symptoms and increase their quality of life; however, conclusions are only preliminary. More research is needed to enable the effectiveness to be judged conclusively. PMID:23133499

  1. Results of a 2-Week Inpatient Stay at the Department for Internal and Integrative Medicine: An Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romy Lauche

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The Department for Internal and Integrative Medicine in Essen utilizes mind/body medical elements in order to empower patients with chronic diseases to better cope with their symptoms and to adopt a healthy lifestyle. This study explored the influence and predictors of a 2-week integrative treatment program on patients’ quality of life. Methods. This observational study was conducted with inpatients as part of the quality assurance program. Patients’ quality of life, psychological symptoms, and health locus of control were measured on admission and discharge and again 3, 6, and 12 months after discharge. Regression analyses were conducted to determine the factors predicting improved quality of life. Results. Data from 2486 inpatients treated in 2001–2004 were included (80% female, mean age 53.9 ± 14.3 years. Response rates decreased to 50% at 12 months. Small-to-moderate effects were found on patients’ quality of life, anxiety, and depression. Patients’ internal locus of control significantly increased. Improved quality of life was mainly predicted by lower baseline scores. Conclusion. Results of this study suggest that a 2-week inpatient treatment might sustainably reduce patients’ symptoms and increase their quality of life; however, conclusions are only preliminary. More research is needed to enable the effectiveness to be judged conclusively.

  2. Predictive validity of the Suicide Trigger Scale (STS-3 for post-discharge suicide attempt in high-risk psychiatric inpatients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimri S Yaseen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The greatly increased risk of suicide after psychiatric hospitalization is a critical problem, yet we are unable to identify individuals who would attempt suicide upon discharge. The Suicide Trigger Scale v.3 (STS-3, was designed to measure the construct of an affective 'suicide trigger state' hypothesized to precede a suicide attempt (SA. This study aims to test the predictive validity of the STS-3 for post-discharge SA on a high-risk psychiatric-inpatient sample. METHODS: The STS-3, and a psychological test battery measuring suicidality, mood, impulsivity, trauma history, and attachment style were administered to 161 adult psychiatric patients hospitalized following suicidal ideation (SI or SA. Receiver Operator Characteristic and logistic regression analyses were used to assess prediction of SA in the 6-month period following discharge from hospitalization. RESULTS: STS-3 scores for the patients who made post-discharge SA followed a bimodal distribution skewed to high and low scores, thus a distance from median transform was applied to the scores. The transformed score was a significant predictor of post-discharge SA (AUC 0.731, and a subset of six STS-3 scale items was identified that produced improved prediction of post-discharge SA (AUC 0.814. Scores on C-SSRS and BSS were not predictive. Patients with ultra-high (90(th percentile STS-3 scores differed significantly from ultra-low (10(th percentile scorers on measures of affective intensity, depression, impulsiveness, abuse history, and attachment security. CONCLUSION: STS-3 transformed scores at admission to the psychiatric hospital predict suicide attempts following discharge among the high-risk group of suicidal inpatients. Patients with high transformed scores appear to comprise two clinically distinct groups; an impulsive, affectively intense, fearfully attached group with high raw STS-3 scores and a low-impulsivity, low affect and low trauma-reporting group with low raw

  3. Inpatient Rehabilitation Performance of Patients with Paraneoplastic Cerebellar Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jack B.; Raj, Vishwa S.; Asher, Arash; Lee, Jay; Guo, Ying; Konzen, Benedict S.; Bruera, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the functional improvement of rehabilitation inpatients with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Design Retrospective Review Setting Three tertiary referral based hospitals. Interventions Medical records were retrospectively analyzed for demographic, laboratory, medical and functional data. Main Outcome Measure Functional Independence Measure (FIM) Participants Cancer rehabilitation inpatients admitted to three different cancer centers with a diagnosis of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (n=7). Results All 7 patients were white females. Median age was 62. Primary cancers included ovarian carcinoma (2), small cell lung cancer (2), uterine carcinoma (2), and invasive ductal breast carcinoma. Mean admission total FIM score was 61.0 (SD=23.97). Mean discharge total FIM score was 73.6 (SD=29.35). The mean change in total FIM score was 12.6 (p=.0018). The mean length of rehabilitation stay was 17.1 days. The mean total FIM efficiency was 0.73. 5/7 (71%) patients were discharged home. 1/7 (14%) was discharged to a nursing home. 1/7 (14%) transferred to the primary acute care service. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate the functional performance of a group of rehabilitation inpatients with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Despite the poor neurologic prognosis associated with this syndrome, these patients made significant functional improvements on inpatient rehabilitation. When appropriate, inpatient rehabilitation should be considered. Further studies with larger sample sizes are needed. PMID:25051460

  4. Assessing inpatient glycemic control: what are the next steps?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Curtiss B; Wellik, Kay E; Kongable, Gail L; Shu, Jianfen

    2012-03-01

    Despite the emergence of glucometrics (i.e., systematic analysis of data on blood glucose levels of inpatients) as a subject of high interest, there remains a lack of standardization on how glucose parameters are measured and reported. This dilemma must be resolved before a national benchmarking process can be developed that will allow institutions to track and compare inpatient glucose control performance against established guidelines and that can also be supported by quality care organizations. In this article, we review some of the questions that need to be resolved through consensus and review of the evidence, and discuss some of the limitations in analyzing and reporting inpatient glucose data that must be addressed (or at least accepted as limitations) before hospitals can commit resources to gathering, compiling, and presenting inpatient glucose statistics as a health care quality measure. Standards must include consensus on which measures to report, the unit of analysis, definitions of targets for hyperglycemia treatment, a definition of hypoglycemia, determination of how data should be gathered (from chart review or from laboratory information systems), and which type of sample (blood or point of care) should be used for analysis of glycemic control. Hospitals and/or their representatives should be included in the discussion. For inpatient glucose control to remain a focus of interest, further dialogue and consensus on the topic are needed.

  5. [Inpatients days in patients with respiratory diseases and periodontal disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Plata, Rosario; Olmedo-Torres, Daniel; Martínez-Briseño, David; González-Cruz, Herminia; Casa-Medina, Guillermo; García-Sancho, Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory gingival process that has been associated with the severity of respiratory diseases. In Mexico a prevalence of 78% was found in population with social security and > 60 years old. The aim of this study is to establish the association between periodontal disease and respiratory diseases according to the inpatient days. A cross-sectional study was conducted from January to December 2011. We included hospitalized patients, ≥ 18 years of age, without sedation or intubated. A dentist classified patients into two groups according to the severity of the periodontal disease: mild-to-moderate and severe. We estimated medians of inpatient days by disease and severity. Negative binomial models were adjusted to estimate incidence rate ratios and predicted inpatient days. 3,059 patients were enrolled. The median of observed and predicted inpatient days was higher in the group of severe periodontal disease (p disease, tuberculosis, and influenza had the highest incidence rates ratios of periodontal disease (p periodontal disease is positively -associated with inpatient days of patients with respiratory diseases.

  6. Inpatient Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Severe Eating Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Dalle Grave

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT-E for eating disorders has been developed and evaluated only in outpatient setting. Aim of the paper is to describe a novel model of inpatient treatment, termed inpatient CBT-E, indicated for patients with an eating disorder of clinical severity not manageable in an outpatient setting or that failed outpatient treatment. Inpatient CBT-E is derived by the outpatients CBT-E with some adaptations to rend the treatments suitable for an inpatient setting. The principal adaptations include: 1 multidisciplinary and non-eclectic team composed of physicians, psychologists, dieticians and nurses all trained in CBT; 2 assisted eating; 3 group sessions; and a CBT family module for patients younger than 18 years. The treatment lasts 20 weeks (13 for inpatients followed by seven weeks of residential day treatment and, as CBT-E, is divided in four stages and can be administered in a focused form (CBT-F or in a broad form (CBT-B. A randomized control trial is evaluating the effectiveness of the treatment.

  7. Predictors of quality of life in inpatients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimaki, Koichiro; Morinobu, Shigeru; Yamashita, Hidehisa; Takahashi, Terumichi; Yamawaki, Shigeto

    2012-05-30

    Shortening hospital stays has become a key focus in psychiatric care in recent years. However, patients with schizophrenia account for about 60% of inpatients in psychiatry departments in Japan. This study was designed to investigate the relationship between quality of life (QOL) and key indicators for long-term hospital stays among schizophrenia inpatients. A further aim was to elucidate the clinical determinants of QOL among long-stay inpatients. The study sample consisted of 217 inpatients with schizophrenia. Age, duration of illness, duration of hospitalization, years of education, body mass index, neurocognitive function, drug-induced extrapyramidal symptoms, involuntary movements, psychiatric symptoms, and dose equivalents of antipsychotics and anticholinergic agents were used as index factors. Pearson linear correlation and regression analyses were performed to examine the associations between QOL and the above-mentioned factors. Negative symptoms, psychological discomfort, and resistance as rated on the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) were correlated with all subscale scores of the Japanese version of the Schizophrenia Quality of Life Scale (JSQLS). Stepwise regression showed that negative symptoms, psychological discomfort, and resistance predicted the dysfunction of psycho-social activity score and the dysfunction of motivation and energy score on the JSQLS. This study shows that active treatment for negative symptoms, psychological discomfort, and resistance should be recommended to improve QOL among inpatients with schizophrenia.

  8. Low rate of obesity among psychiatric inpatients in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marthoenis, M; Aichberger, Marion; Puteh, Ibrahim; Schouler-Ocak, Meryam

    2014-01-01

    A vast majority of psychiatric medication causes weight gain, however the rate of obesity in psychiatric patients has yet to be thoroughly studied in Indonesia. The present study aims to assess the prevalence of obesity among psychiatric inpatients in Indonesia. This cross sectional study was conducted in Banda Aceh Psychiatric Hospital, Indonesia from December 2012 to January 2013. The Body Mass Index (BMI) and blood pressure of a total 242 inpatients was measured, and data on their demographic information and medication were collected from the patient's chart. The prevalence rate of obesity among psychiatric inpatients was 5% (95% CI = 2.6-8.5%), and overweight was 8% (95% CI = 5.1-12.4). The mean BMI was 21.44 kg/m² (SD: 3.43). Stage I hypertension and stage II hypertension was found among 7% (95% CI = 4.1-11), and 2% (95% CI = 0.9-5.3%) inpatients, respectively. The findings suggest that the rate of overweight, obesity and hypertension in the present study population was relatively low compared to rates of the general population. The inpatients have limited access to food and only eat meals that are provided to them by the hospital.

  9. Acute inpatient palliative medicine in a cancer center: clinical problems and medical interventions--a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagman, Ruth; Rivera, Nilo; Walsh, Declan; LeGrand, Susan; Davis, Mellar P

    2007-01-01

    The clinical characteristics and medical interventions of the 100 consecutive cancer admissions to the acute care inpatient palliative medicine unit at the Cleveland Clinic for 2 months are described. Median age was 62 years (range, 31 to 92 years). The male-female ratio was 1:1. Most admissions were referred by hematology-oncology and had prior antineoplastic therapy. Reasons for admission were symptom control and cancer-related complications. Patients underwent invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, hydration, transfusions, radiation, or chemotherapy, or a combination, during their admission. Most were discharged home with hospice care or had outpatient clinic follow-up. The mortality rate was 20%. Aggressive multidisciplinary management of symptoms, disease complications, comorbid conditions, and psychosocial problems were provided. Palliative medicine physicians provided continuity of care in the outpatient clinic and at home. An acute inpatient palliative medicine unit within a tertiary level medical center has a definable and important role in comprehensive cancer care.

  10. The injury trajectory for young people 16-24 years in the six months following injury: A mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, Rebekah; Foster, Kim; McCloughen, Andrea; Curtis, Kate

    2016-09-01

    Adolescents and young people are the population at greatest risk of injury and therefore injury-related mortality and morbidity. Inquiry into the injury trajectory of young people is needed to identify this group's specific needs for healthcare. This paper reports the integration of quantitative and qualitative findings from a sequential explanatory mixed methods study examining young people aged 16-24 years' experience and trajectory of traumatic physical injury in the initial six months. The aim of integration was to address the question: In what ways are injured young peoples' experiences and self-management during the initial six months of the injury trajectory impacted by their injury, family support, and provision of healthcare? Key findings from epidemiological datasets on young person injuries from hospital and coronial databases (Phase 1) were combined with key findings from qualitative interviews with 12 injured young people and 10 family members (Phase 2). The integration of findings from Phase 1 and Phase 2 resulted in three new findings; [1] (Alfred Health, 2014). A young person's perception of the severity of their injury, as well as the amount of time spent in hospital, impacts substantially on the way in which they experience injury, and this is managed differently between genders; [2] (Newnam et al., 2014). Admission to an Intensive care unit, including the intensity and duration of care, is the primary influence on how a family will provide support to the young person in the inpatient period; and [3] (Lyons et al., 2010). Young people's perception and understanding of their recovery from injury is in contrast with how healthcare systems are structured to provide rehabilitation and recovery care. The injury trajectory and recovery process of young people in the six months following injury have been have conceptualised. These trajectories of recovery can inform the development of anticipatory guidance frameworks for clinicians and guide the

  11. Monthly energy review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    This document presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors.

  12. Photos of the month

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni de Oliveira

    Congratulations to Adele Rimoldi, ATLAS physicist from Pavia, who ran her first marathon in New York last month. Adele completed the 42.2 km in a time of 4:49:19. She sure makes it look easy!!! The ATLAS pixel service quarter panel in SR1

  13. Monthly Energy Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-28

    This publication presents an overview of the Energy information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. Two brief ``energy plugs`` (reviews of EIA publications) are included, as well.

  14. Inpatient cost analysis for treatment of myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omorodion, Jacklyn O; Pines, Jesse M; Kaminski, Henry J

    2017-02-27

    We explore trends in U.S. inpatient costs of care over a 10-year period. We compare myasthenia gravis (MG) with multiple sclerosis (MS) and overall U.S. hospital admissions using the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Nationwide Inpatient Sample database for 2003-2013. Total costs of MG inpatient care rose 13-fold from 2003 to 2013. This was accounted for by a greater than sixfold increase in discharges and a greater than twofold increase in cost per discharge. The 85 years age groups experienced the greatest increases in discharges. Medicare and Medicaid use increased. Regional variations in cost were apparent. There were greater rises in the Midwestern and Southern United States, which is dissimilar to MS and all hospital admissions. There was a dramatic and disproportionate rise in the number of MG discharges, most likely because of changes in practice patterns. Muscle Nerve, 2016. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Risk Estimates and Risk Factors Related to Psychiatric Inpatient Suicide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Trine; Erlangsen, Annette; Nordentoft, Merete

    2017-01-01

    trends, and socio-demographic and clinical risk factors of suicide in psychiatric inpatients. Psychiatric inpatients have a very high risk of suicide relative to the background population, but it remains challenging for clinicians to identify those patients that are most likely to die from suicide during...... admission. Most studies are based on low power, thus compromising quality and generalisability. The few studies with sufficient statistical power mainly identified non-modifiable risk predictors such as male gender, diagnosis, or recent deliberate self-harm. Also, the predictive value of these predictors......People with mental illness have an increased risk of suicide. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of suicide risk estimates among psychiatric inpatients based on the body of evidence found in scientific peer-reviewed literature; primarily focusing on the relative risks, rates, time...

  16. How Do Intensity and Duration of Rehabilitation Services Affect Outcomes from Severe Traumatic Brain Injury?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hart, Tessa; Whyte, John; Poulsen, Ingrid;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Determine effects of inpatient and outpatient treatment intensity on functional and emotional well-being outcomes at 1 year post severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). DESIGN: Prospective, quasi-experimental study comparing outcomes in a US TBI treatment center with those in a Denmark (DK......) center providing significantly greater intensity and duration of rehabilitation. SETTING: Inpatient and outpatient TBI rehabilitation. PARTICIPANTS: 274 persons with severe traumatic brain injury. INTERVENTIONS: Inpatient rehabilitation interventions were counted daily by discipline. Outpatient....... CONCLUSIONS: Contrary to expectation, DK patients who received significantly more rehabilitation services during the year following severe TBI did not differ in outcome from their less intensively treated US counterparts, after adjusting for initial severity. The negative association of functional treatment...

  17. Your Child's Development: 9 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Your Baby's Growth: 9 Months Your Baby's Hearing, Vision, and Other Senses: 9 Months Your Child's Checkup: 9 Months Medical Care and Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Feeding Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Sleep and Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Contact ...

  18. The Effect of Outpatient Interventional Audiology on Inpatient Audiology Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitelli, Lori; Palmer, Catherine V

    2017-05-01

    Although older adults are likely to experience some degree of hearing loss that if untreated will interfere with treatment for other disorders and result in less-than-optimal health care outcomes, health care providers do not have a reliable and cost-effective way to identify these individuals when admitted to a hospital for inpatient care. This article addresses the impact of untreated hearing loss on health care in a hospital setting and shares how the implementation of interventional audiology in an outpatient clinic has impacted the inpatient audiology services provided at a large tertiary care hospital. A discussion of how these services can be further expanded is provided.

  19. Child and Adolescent Inpatient Unit in General Hospital “Tzaneio”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Tseva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Inpatient Service offers comprehensive diagnostic evaluation and treatment of children and adolescents (typical age ranges from 3-16 years old with a variety of emotional and behavioral problems including mood disorders, anxiety disorders, psychotic disorders, severe disruptive behavior, and suicide attempts. Treatment Team. The inpatient treatment team includes psychiatrists, psychologists, registered nurses, special education teacher, social worker, speech and occupational therapists. In addition, pediatricians from a full range of medical subspecialties are available for consultations. The multi-disciplinary staff emphasizes a family-oriented approach and parents and care-givers are encouraged to be active participants in the treatment team throughout a child’s stay. Treatment Program. The program offers developmentally appropriate therapeutic activities in a closely supervised environment. Extensive opportunities for observation, assessment, and intervention are possible in this intensive setting. Specialized assessments including neuropsychological testing, speech and language testing, and occupational therapy assessments are all available. Treatment plans typically include a combination of individual psychotherapy, behavior management, family counseling and medications. Staff members develop an individualized treatment plan emphasizing safety for each patient during the hospital stay. The plan is closely coordinated with families, outpatient providers, and resource programs to coordinate aftercare plans and facilitate a smooth transition to home.

  20. Economic burden of heart failure: investigating outpatient and inpatient costs in Abeokuta, Southwest Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okechukwu S Ogah

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Heart failure (HF is a deadly, disabling and often costly syndrome world-wide. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of data describing its economic impact in sub Saharan Africa; a region in which the number of relatively younger cases will inevitably rise. METHODS: Heath economic data were extracted from a prospective HF registry in a tertiary hospital situated in Abeokuta, southwest Nigeria. Outpatient and inpatient costs were computed from a representative cohort of 239 HF cases including personnel, diagnostic and treatment resources used for their management over a 12-month period. Indirect costs were also calculated. The annual cost per person was then calculated. RESULTS: Mean age of the cohort was 58.0 ± 15.1 years and 53.1% were men. The total computed cost of care of HF in Abeokuta was 76, 288,845 Nigerian Naira (US$508, 595 translating to 319,200 Naira (US$2,128 US Dollars per patient per year. The total cost of in-patient care (46% of total health care expenditure was estimated as 34,996,477 Naira (about 301,230 US dollars. This comprised of 17,899,977 Naira- 50.9% ($US114,600 and 17,806,500 naira -49.1%($US118,710 for direct and in-direct costs respectively. Out-patient cost was estimated as 41,292,368 Naira ($US 275,282. The relatively high cost of outpatient care was largely due to cost of transportation for monthly follow up visits. Payments were mostly made through out-of-pocket spending. CONCLUSION: The economic burden of HF in Nigeria is particularly high considering, the relatively young age of affected cases, a minimum wage of 18,000 Naira ($US120 per month and considerable component of out-of-pocket spending for those affected. Health reforms designed to mitigate the individual to societal burden imposed by the syndrome are required.

  1. Petroleum marketing monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PPM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o. b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly.

  2. Petroleum marketing monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly.

  3. Electric power monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Electric Power Monthly (EPM) for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source, consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.

  4. Electric power monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Sandra R.; Johnson, Melvin; McClevey, Kenneth; Calopedis, Stephen; Bolden, Deborah

    1992-05-01

    The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Additionally, statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, new generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel.

  5. The Impact of Falls on Motor and Cognitive Recovery after Discharge from In-Patient Stroke Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jennifer S; Brooks, Dina; Inness, Elizabeth L; Mansfield, Avril

    2016-07-01

    Falls are common among community-dwelling stroke survivors. The aims of this study were (1) to compare motor and cognitive outcomes between individuals who fell in the 6 months' postdischarge from in-patient stroke rehabilitation and those who did not fall, and (2) to explore potential mechanisms underlying the relationship between falls and recovery of motor and cognitive function. Secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study of individuals discharged home from in-patient rehabilitation was conducted. Participants were recruited at discharge and completed a 6-month falls monitoring period using postcards with follow-up. Nonfallers and fallers were compared at the 6-month follow-up assessment on the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), the Chedoke-McMaster Stroke Assessment (CMSA), gait speed, and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). Measures of balance confidence and physical activity were also assessed. Twenty-three fallers were matched to 23 nonfallers on age and functional balance scores at discharge. A total of 43 falls were reported during the study period (8 participants fell more than once). At follow-up, BBS scores (P = .0066) and CMSA foot scores (P = .0033) were significantly lower for fallers than for nonfallers. The 2 groups did not differ on CMSA leg scores (P = .049), gait speed (P = .47), or MoCA score (P = .23). There was no significant association between change in balance confidence scores and change in physical activity levels among all participants from the first and third questionnaire (r = .27, P = .08). Performance in balance and motor recovery of the foot were compromised in fallers when compared to nonfallers at 6 months post discharge from in-patient stroke rehabilitation. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Improving venous thromboembolic disease prophylaxis in medical inpatients: a role for education and audit.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kent, B D

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Venous thromboembolic disease (VTED) prophylaxis is a key strategy in reducing preventable deaths in medical inpatients. We assessed compliance with internationally published guidelines for VTED prophylaxis in at-risk medical patients before and 1 month after an educational intervention to enhance compliance with such guidelines. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty patients were assessed on each occasion. Pre-intervention, VTED prophylaxis was prescribed in only 48% of at-risk cases. Compliance was best among patients under stroke services and worst for those under acute medical teams. Patients within specialist units were more likely to be prescribed prophylaxis than those in general wards (75 vs. 53%; p = 0.0019). Post-intervention, overall compliance improved to 63% (p = 0.041 for comparison). There was a significant improvement among general medical teams (48 vs. 75%; p = 0.001), and in general wards (52 vs. 74%; p = 0.003). CONCLUSIONS: Thromboprophylaxis is under-prescribed in medical inpatients, but compliance with international guidelines can be significantly enhanced with targeted educational intervention.

  7. Effects of a Humor Therapy Program on Stress Levels in Pediatric Inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Julio C; Echeverri, Luis F; Londoño, Manuel J; Ochoa, Sergio A; Quiroz, Andrés F; Romero, César R; Ruiz, Joaquín O

    2017-01-01

    Disease and hospitalization generate stress, which can affect the response to treatment. Humor has been used in many hospitals to decrease stress. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a humor therapy program on stress levels in pediatric inpatients. In the first phase, an intervention and a control group were studied over 2 consecutive 3-month periods; the interventions were performed by a team of artists trained in humor therapy. Salivary cortisol levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the Weisz test, a pictorial chart that determines subjective stress perception, and the Parker test, which assesses objective stress, were applied. In the second phase, salivary cortisol levels were measured and the Weisz test was administered before and after the interventions. A total of 306 patients were recruited into this study: 198 in the first phase (94 in the intervention group and 104 in the nonintervention group) and 108 in the second phase. There were no differences between groups regarding age, sex, or medical diagnosis. The children in the intervention group presented lower cortisol levels, lower scores on the Parker test, and higher scores on the Weisz test than children in the nonintervention group. In the second phase, the children showed lower salivary cortisol levels and higher scores on the Weisz test after the intervention. Humor therapy has beneficial effects on stress and cortisol levels in pediatric inpatients. This supports the implementation and reinforcement of these therapies in pediatric hospitals. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  8. Adolescent inpatient girls׳ report of dependent life events predicts prospective suicide risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Lindsey B; Liu, Richard T; Yen, Shirley

    2014-09-30

    Adolescents with a history of suicidal behavior are especially vulnerable for future suicide attempts, particularly following discharge from an inpatient psychiatric admission. This study is the first to test whether adolescents׳ tendency to generate stress, or report more dependent events to which they contributed, was predictive of prospective suicide events. Ninety adolescent psychiatric inpatients who were admitted for recent suicide risk, completed diagnostic interviews, assessments of history of suicidal behavior, and a self-report questionnaire of major life events at baseline. Participants were followed over the subsequent 6 months after discharge to assess stability vs. onset of suicide events. Cox proportional hazard regressions were used to predict adolescents׳ time to suicide events. Results supported hypothesis, such that only recent greater dependent events, not independent or overall events, predicted risk for prospective suicide events. This effect was specific to adolescent girls. Importantly, dependent events maintained statistical significance as a predictor of future suicide events after co-varying for the effects of several established risk factors and psychopathology. Results suggest that the tendency to generate dependent events may contribute unique additional prediction for adolescent girls׳ prospective suicide risk, and highlight the need for future work in this area.

  9. Effect of Health Services Quality to Inpatient Satisfaction in Health Centre of Jayapura Regency, Papua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taufik A AWibowo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available To measure the quality of health care using five dimensions of service quality that is direct evidence (Tangibles responsiveness (responsiveness, reliability (realibility, security (assurance, and empathy. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of the quality of inpatient health care with patient satisfaction in the health center Jayapura district. Survey method with cross sectional analytic study population in this study that all patients hospitalized at the health center during the month of August to September 2016. Sampling was conducted with a total sampling technique with a number of 106 respondents. Sources of primary data obtained from questionnaires and secondary data from six health centers in the county inpatient Jayapura. Analysis of data using multiple linear regression. The results showed that the most dominant variables linked to patient satisfaction compared with other variable is direct evidence (tangibles. The quality of health services at the health center Jayapura district has a significant relationship to the direct evidence (tangibles with patient satisfaction. Jayapura Regency Government through the Department of Health to maintain and continuously improve the quality of health care is the most basic health centers by strengthening institutions, infrastructure, and financing of adequate health centers so as to improve the quality of health centers and satisfaction to the patient.

  10. A time series analysis of falls and injury in the inpatient rehabilitation setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisina, Pasquale G; Guellnitz, Rita; Alverzo, Joan

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess whether falls and injuries are influenced by a temporal pattern (defined as a pattern based on the time of day) in the inpatient acute rehabilitation unit/hospital (IRU/H) setting. A retrospective chart review and analysis of falls and injuries among inpatients admitted to our facility during a 9-month period was performed. The sample consisted of 367 patients who had fallen at least once; 71 had repeated falls, bringing the total number of falls to 438. Significant variation in the prevalence of falls (chi2 = 24.1, p <. 01) and injuries (chi2 = 12.90, p < .01) based on time of day and shift was observed. In addition, a temporal pattern of fall-related injuries with patients who had sustained stroke and brain injury (chi2 = 12.74, p = .045) was also observed. The findings from this study allow for the development of interventions that are appropriate when falls and injury are most prevalent for different clinical populations in the IRU/H setting.

  11. 75 FR 70013 - Medicare Program; Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility Prospective Payment System for Federal Fiscal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services RIN 0938-AP89 Medicare Program; Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility Prospective Payment System for Federal Fiscal Year 2011; Correction AGENCY: Centers for..., ``Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility Prospective Payment System for Federal Fiscal Year 2011.''...

  12. Inpatient Treatment of Children and Adolescents With Severe Obesity in the Netherlands: a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baan-Slootweg, van der Olga; Benninga, Marc A.; Beelen, Anita; Palen, van der Job; Tamminga-Smeulders, Christine; Tijssen, Jan G.P.; Aalderen, van Wim M.C.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Severe childhood obesity has become a major health problem, and effective, evidence-based interventions are needed. The relative effectiveness of inpatient compared with ambulatory treatment remains unknown. Objective To determine whether an inpatient treatment program is more effectiv

  13. Inpatient Treatment of Children and Adolescents With Severe Obesity in the Netherlands: a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Baan-Slootweg, Olga; Benninga, Marc A.; Beelen, Anita; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; Tamminga-Smeulders, Christine; Tijssen, Jan G.P.; van Aalderen, Wim M.C.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Severe childhood obesity has become a major health problem, and effective, evidence-based interventions are needed. The relative effectiveness of inpatient compared with ambulatory treatment remains unknown. Objective To determine whether an inpatient treatment program is more effective

  14. Parâmetros para equações mensais de estimativas de precipitação de intensidade máxima para o estado de São Paulo: fase I Parameters for monthly equations of maximum intensity estimates of rain for the São Paulo state: phase I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Ferreira

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Nesta fase do trabalho objetivou-se estimar parâmetros para equações mensais de estimativas de precipitação de intensidade máxima em intervalos de 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 e 60 minutos para 165 localidades do Estado de São Paulo. A partir de dados mensais de séries históricas de 31 anos de precipitação máxima de "um dia", utilizou-se da distribuição de probabilidade de Gumbel para os cálculos da probabilidade de ocorrência de valores extremos em cada mês. Utilizando-se da metodologia proposta por Occhipinti & Santos (1966, as chuvas máximas de "um dia" foram desagregadas para precipitações de intensidade máxima em 24 horas e nos sete intervalos de tempo acima descritos, para cada uma das 165 localidades e em cada mês. Os parâmetros alfa e beta foram calculados, para cada um dos sete intervalos de duração da chuva, com F(x= 90% e em cada uma das 165 localidades propostas. As séries de precipitação máxima de "um dia" foram submetidas ao teste de Kolmogorov-Smirnov, confirmando bom ajuste com distribuição de Gumbel. A metodologia mostrou bom desempenho, considerando-se que as diferenças percentuais relativas dos resultados das precipitações máximas obtidas com os parâmetros alfa e beta, de 25 localidades, comparadas com os obtidos pela metodologia de Occhipinti, foram de modo geral menores que 0,5%.The objective of this phase of the work was to obtain parameters for monthly equations of maximum of estimations precipitation intensity in intervals of 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 and 60 minutes covering 165 places of São Paulo State. Starting from the historical series of 31 years of maximum precipitation of "one day", it was used Gumbel probability distribution for calculating the probability of occurrence of extreme values in every month. Using the methodology proposed by Occhipinti & Santos (1966, the maximum rains of "one day" were dissociated in precipitation of maximum intensity in 24 hours in the seven intervals of

  15. Intensive mobilities:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vannini, Phillip; Bissell, David; Jensen, Ole B.

    This paper explores the intensities of long distance commuting journeys as a way of exploring how bodily sensibilities are being changed by the mobilities that they undertake. The context of this paper is that many people are travelling further to work than ever before owing to a variety of facto....... By exploring how experiences of long-distance workers become constituted by a range of different material forces enables us to more sensitively consider the practical, technical, and political implications of this increasingly prevalent yet underexplored regime of work....... which relate to transport, housing and employment. Yet we argue that the experiential dimensions of long distance mobilities have not received the attention that they deserve within geographical research on mobilities. This paper combines ideas from mobilities research and contemporary social theory...... with fieldwork conducted in Canada, Denmark and Australia to develop our understanding of the experiential politics of long distance workers. Rather than focusing on the extensive dimensions of mobilities that are implicated in patterns and trends, our paper turns to the intensive dimensions of this experience...

  16. Locked doors in acute inpatient psychiatry: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Merwe, M; Bowers, L; Jones, J; Simpson, A; Haglund, K

    2009-04-01

    Many acute inpatient psychiatric wards in the UK are permanently locked, although this is contrary to the current Mental Health Act Code of Practice. To conduct a literature review of empirical articles concerning locked doors in acute psychiatric inpatient wards, an extensive literature search was performed in SAGE Journals Online, EBM Reviews, British Nursing Index, CINAHL, EMBASE Psychiatry, International Bibliography of the Social Sciences, Ovid MEDLINE, PsycINFO and Google, using the search terms 'open$', 'close$', '$lock$', 'door', 'ward', 'hospital', 'psychiatr', 'mental health', 'inpatient' and 'asylum'. A total of 11 empirical papers were included in the review. Both staff and patients reported advantages (e.g. preventing illegal substances from entering the ward and preventing patients from absconding and harming themselves or others) and disadvantages (e.g. making patients feel depressed, confined and creating extra work for staff) regarding locked doors. Locked wards were associated with increased patient aggression, poorer satisfaction with treatment and more severe symptoms. The limited literature available showed the urgent need for research to determine the real effects of locked doors in inpatient psychiatry.

  17. Domains of Chronic Stress and Suicidal Behaviors among Inpatient Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, Jeremy W.; Green, Kelly L.; Grover, Kelly E.; Schatte, Dawnelle J.; Morgan, Sharon T.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the role of chronic stress in youth suicidal behaviors. This study examined the relations between specific domains of chronic stress and suicidal behaviors among 131 inpatient youth (M age = 15.02 years) who completed measures of stress, suicidal ideation, suicide attempt, and suicide intent. After controlling for…

  18. Can mental healthcare nurses improve sleep quality for inpatients?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niet, G.J. De; Tiemens, B.G.; Hutschemaekers, G.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a pilot study that was carried out to in order to gain an indication as to whether mental healthcare nurses can apply evidence-based interventions for sleep problems effectively in inpatient mental health care. The study had a pre-test/post-test design and a comparison group w

  19. Mental health inpatient experiences of adults with intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taua, Chris; Neville, Christine; Scott, Theresa

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents findings from a study exploring the mental health inpatient care of people with a dual disability of intellectual disability and mental health issues from the perspective of those people with the dual disability. A mixture of semi-structured interviews and focus group interviews were carried out with nine participants who had been admitted to an inpatient unit for mental health care exploring their experience of care. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed using open coding and Leximancer (an online data mining tool) analysis to identify dominant themes in the discourse. Analysis revealed themes around 'Therapeutic and Meaningful Activity', 'Emotion Focussed Care', and 'Feeling Safe?' Participants were able to identify the aspects of inpatient care that worked for them in terms of coping with time in hospital. This research suggests that there are several factors that should be considered in providing effective mental health inpatient care for people with dual disability. A number of strategies and recommendations for responding to their needs are identified and discussed.

  20. Inpatient healthcare provider bypassing by women and their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... to a person's decision to seek care at a healthcare facility that is not the nearest one ... Methods: this study examined inpatient care facility bypassing in urban Bo, ... The locations of residential structures and hospitals were identified using a ...

  1. Accounting for Inpatient Wards When Developing Master Surgical Schedules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanberkel, Peter T.; Boucherie, Richard J.; Hans, Erwin W.; Hurink, Johann L.; Lent, van Wineke A.M.; Harten, van Wim H.

    2011-01-01

    Background:As the demand for health care services increases, the need to improve patient flow between departments has likewise increased. Understanding how the master surgical schedule (MSS) affects the inpatient wards and exploiting this relationship can lead to a decrease in surgery cancellations,

  2. Prognostic Validity of Clinical and Psychometric Variables in Psychogeriatric Inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appell, Julian; Kazarian, Shahe S.

    1990-01-01

    Evaluated prognostic validity of clinical and psychometric variables in psychogeriatric inpatients. Divided elderly patients into three outcome groups: nondischarged (n=29), discharged-readmitted (n=38), and discharged-nonreadmitted (n=67). Discriminant analysis of data yielded two predictive functions, which appeared to represent physical status…

  3. Vitamin D Deficiency in an Inpatient Forensic Intellectual Disability Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Verity; Simmons, Hayley; Henriksen, Marie; Alexander, Regi T.

    2017-01-01

    No research has examined vitamin D deficiency among inpatients within forensic intellectual disability services, despite their potentially increased risk. Tests of serum 25(OHD) concentration in blood are routinely offered to patients within the service as part of the admission and annual physical health check. Results were classified as deficient…

  4. Sampling the Experience of Chronically Aggressive Psychiatric Inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Bradley M.

    1994-01-01

    Studies the application of the Experience Sampling Method (ESM) to chronically aggressive psychiatric inpatients. ESM allows for the sampling of behavior, thoughts, and feelings of persons across time and situations by signalling subjects to record these aspects using a questionnaire at random times. (JPS)

  5. Domains of Chronic Stress and Suicidal Behaviors among Inpatient Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, Jeremy W.; Green, Kelly L.; Grover, Kelly E.; Schatte, Dawnelle J.; Morgan, Sharon T.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the role of chronic stress in youth suicidal behaviors. This study examined the relations between specific domains of chronic stress and suicidal behaviors among 131 inpatient youth (M age = 15.02 years) who completed measures of stress, suicidal ideation, suicide attempt, and suicide intent. After controlling for…

  6. Accounting for Inpatient Wards when developing Master Surgical Schedules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanberkel, P.T.; Boucherie, Richardus J.; Hans, Elias W.; Hurink, Johann L.; van Lent, W.A.M.; van Harten, Willem H.; van Harten, Wim H.

    BACKGROUND: As the demand for health care services increases, the need to improve patient flow between departments has likewise increased. Understanding how the master surgical schedule (MSS) affects the inpatient wards and exploiting this relationship can lead to a decrease in surgery

  7. Surgical inpatient cancer-related mortality in a Nigerian tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surgical inpatient cancer-related mortality in a Nigerian tertiary hospital. ... One hundred and eight (63.2 %) were male. The yearly mortality ... The leading causes of mortality were cancer of prostate 50(29.2 %) and breast cancer 40(23.4 %).

  8. Pediatric aspects of inpatient health information technology systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Christoph U

    2015-03-01

    In the past 3 years, the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act accelerated the adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) with providers and hospitals, who can claim incentive monies related to meaningful use. Despite the increase in adoption of commercial EHRs in pediatric settings, there has been little support for EHR tools and functionalities that promote pediatric quality improvement and patient safety, and children remain at higher risk than adults for medical errors in inpatient environments. Health information technology (HIT) tailored to the needs of pediatric health care providers can improve care by reducing the likelihood of errors through information assurance and minimizing the harm that results from errors. This technical report outlines pediatric-specific concepts, child health needs and their data elements, and required functionalities in inpatient clinical information systems that may be missing in adult-oriented HIT systems with negative consequences for pediatric inpatient care. It is imperative that inpatient (and outpatient) HIT systems be adapted to improve their ability to properly support safe health care delivery for children.

  9. Proactive and Reactive Aggression in a Child Psychiatric Inpatient Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fite, Paula J.; Stoppelbein, Laura; Greening, Leilani

    2009-01-01

    This study examined relations between proactive and reactive aggression and indicators of antisocial behavior (callous/unemotional traits and behavioral consequences) and negative affect (depression and suicidal behavior) in a sample of 105 children admitted to an acute child psychiatric inpatient unit. The majority of the children were male (69%)…

  10. Predictors of Inpatient Utilization among Veterans with Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyler M. Godwin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dementia is prevalent and costly, yet the predictors of inpatient hospitalization are not well understood. Logistic and negative binomial regressions were used to identify predictors of inpatient hospital utilization and the frequency of inpatient hospital utilization, respectively, among veterans. Variables significant at the P<0.15 level were subsequently analyzed in a multivariate regression. This study of veterans with a diagnosis of dementia (n=296 and their caregivers found marital status to predict hospitalization in the multivariate logistic model (B=0.493, P=0.029 and personal-care dependency to predict hospitalization and readmission in the multivariate logistic model and the multivariate negative binomial model (B=1.048, P=0.007, B=0.040, and P=0.035, resp.. Persons with dementia with personal-care dependency and spousal caregivers have more inpatient admissions; appropriate care environments should receive special care to reduce hospitalization. This study was part of a larger clinical trial; this trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00291161.

  11. Profiles of Personal Resiliency in Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Geetha; Steer, Robert A.; Gulab, Nazli A.

    2010-01-01

    To ascertain whether children and adolescents whose ages ranged from 9 to 17 years described distinct profiles of personal resiliency, the Resiliency Scales for Children and Adolescents (RSCA) were administered to 100 youth who were admitted to an inpatient psychiatric unit and were diagnosed with various "DSM-IV-TR" disorders along with the Beck…

  12. Nurses' experiences of inpatients suicide in a general hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mirriam Matandela

    assist the nurses to deal with their emotions following experience of adverse events. Copyright .... gation. Inpatient suicide is an unnatural death that is reported ... were in fear of being disciplined and reported to the SANC. ... happened during the period 2008e2012 (Gauteng Provincial ... Discovering the body of the patient.

  13. Managing Bipolar Youths in a Psychiatric Inpatient Emergency Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, Gabriele; Mucci, Maria; Pias, Paola; Muratori, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    Among the youths referred to our Psychiatric Inpatient Emergency Service, we focused on bipolar disorder (BD), to explore predictive elements for the outcome. Fifty-one patients (30 males, 21 females, age range 8-18 years, mean age 14.2 plus or minus 3.1 years) received a diagnosis of BD, according to historical information, prolonged…

  14. Suicide Inside A Systematic Review of Inpatient Suicides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bowers, L.; Nijman, H.L.I.; Banda, T.

    2010-01-01

    The literature on inpatient suicides was systematically reviewed. English, German, and Dutch articles were identified by means of the electronic databases PsycInfo, Cochrane, Medline, EMBASE psychiatry, CINAHL, and British Nursing Index. In total, 98 articles covering almost 15,000 suicides were

  15. Psychological treatment of depression in inpatients: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, Pim; Clignet, Frans; Meijel, Berno van; Straten, Annemieke van; Li, Juan; Andersson, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    Research on psychological treatment of depression in inpatients is not conclusive,with some studies finding clear positive effects and other studies finding no significant benefit compared to usual care or structured pharmacotherapy. The results of a meta-analysis investigating how effective psychol

  16. Contribution of ED admissions to inpatient hospital revenue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchetti, Alfred; Harris, Russell H; Warden, Todd; Roth, Sandra

    2002-01-01

    Emergency department (ED) practices are traditionally profiled in terms of their patient encounters. Such evaluations reflect a preponderance of outpatient visits while crediting income from admitted patients to traditional hospital-based services. This study evaluates the contribution of ED admissions to inpatient hospital revenue. The study was set at an urban tertiary care community hospital with university affiliation. Information referable to ED patients was collected from the hospital's Universal Billing Code (UB-92)-based patient information warehouse. Data fields referable to hospital charges, insurance type, and disposition were used for analysis of a 1-year period from September 1, 1998 to August 31, 1999. Statistical analysis was through chi square and ANOVA. During the study period 33,174 patients were treated in the ED with 6,671 (20%) admitted to inpatient services. Total hospital charges for all ED patients during this time were $107 million dollars with $9.1 million (8.5%) generated from discharged patients and $98.0 million (91.5%) from admitted ED patients (P revenue for inpatient services for the study period was $288 million of which 34% was contributed from admitted ED patients. ED services represent a major source of inpatient hospital revenue. The recognition of the ED's potential in this area may be lost if income from patients admitted through the ED is credited to traditional hospital-based services.

  17. Accounting for Inpatient Wards when developing Master Surgical Schedules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanberkel, P.T.; Boucherie, Richardus J.; Hans, Elias W.; Hurink, Johann L.; van Lent, W.A.M.; van Harten, Willem H.; van Harten, Wim H.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As the demand for health care services increases, the need to improve patient flow between departments has likewise increased. Understanding how the master surgical schedule (MSS) affects the inpatient wards and exploiting this relationship can lead to a decrease in surgery cancellations

  18. Predictors of Specialized Inpatient Admissions for Adults with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Miti; McMorris, Carly; Palucka, Anna; Raina, Poonam; Lunsky, Yona

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with intellectual disability (ID) have complex mental health needs and may seek specialized ID psychiatric services. This study reports on predictors of specialized inpatient admissions for 234 individuals with ID who received outpatient services at a psychiatric hospital. Overall, from 2007-2012, 55 of the 234 outpatients were triaged…

  19. Psychiatric Inpatient Admissions of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: Predictive Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Amy; Newton, Jonathan; Sturmey, Peter; Bouras, Nick; Holt, Geraldine

    2005-01-01

    Information on admission to psychiatric inpatient units is lacking from the literature on contemporary services for people with intellectual disability and mental health needs. Here we report on predictors of admission for a cohort of 752 adults from this population living in community settings; 83 were admitted. We also report on two subsamples…

  20. Suicide Inside A Systematic Review of Inpatient Suicides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bowers, L.; Nijman, H.L.I.; Banda, T.

    2010-01-01

    The literature on inpatient suicides was systematically reviewed. English, German, and Dutch articles were identified by means of the electronic databases PsycInfo, Cochrane, Medline, EMBASE psychiatry, CINAHL, and British Nursing Index. In total, 98 articles covering almost 15,000 suicides were rev

  1. Petroleum marketing monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data.

  2. A study of costs and length of stay of inpatient naturopathy--evidence from Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeyke, Tobias; Stummer, Harald

    2011-05-01

    Classical naturopathy in an acute, inpatient, internal medicine setting is rare in Germany. Procedure 8-975 regulates the structures and processes for providing naturopathic complex therapy in German hospitals. An interdisciplinary team is required to provide therapy from at least five therapeutic areas of classical naturopathy, all applied within a narrow time-frame. The entry criteria for being entitled to receive naturopathy in an acute hospital depend upon the degree of chronicity, the intensity of the symptoms and the complexity of the disease. In the present study, a total of 918 patients who received naturopathic complex therapy were investigated regarding their clinical picture and the length of their stay in hospital. The results showed that the duration of hospitalization was significantly greater than that of the comparison group of patients (cases from 263 German hospitals) receiving purely internal medical treatment in hospitals at national level. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Financial Loss for Inpatient Care of Medicaid-Insured Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Jeffrey D; Hall, Matt; Berry, Jay G; Gottlieb, Laura M; Bettenhausen, Jessica L; Shah, Samir S; Fieldston, Evan S; Conway, Patrick H; Chung, Paul J

    2016-11-01

    Medicaid payments tend to be less than the cost of care. Federal Disproportionate Share Hospital (DSH) payments help hospitals recover such uncompensated costs of Medicaid-insured and uninsured patients. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act reduces DSH payments in anticipation of fewer uninsured patients and therefore decreased uncompensated care. However, unlike adults, few hospitalized children are uninsured, while many have Medicaid coverage. Therefore, DSH payment reductions may expose extensive Medicaid financial losses for hospitals serving large absolute numbers of children. To identify types of hospitals with the highest Medicaid losses from pediatric inpatient care and to estimate the proportion of losses recovered through DSH payments. This retrospective cross-sectional analysis evaluated Medicaid-insured hospital discharges of patients 20 years and younger from 23 states in the 2009 Kids' Inpatient Database. The dates of the analysis were March to September 2015. Hospitals were categorized as freestanding children's hospitals (FSCHs), children's hospitals within general hospitals, non-children's hospital teaching hospitals, and non-children's hospital nonteaching hospitals. Financial records of FSCHs in the data set were used to estimate the proportion of Medicaid losses recovered through DSH payments. Hospital financial losses from inpatient care of Medicaid-insured children (defined as the reimbursement minus the cost of care) were compared across hospital types. For our subsample of FSCHs, Medicaid-insured inpatient financial losses were calculated with and without each hospital's DSH payment. The 2009 Kids' Inpatient Database study population included 1485 hospitals and 843 725 Medicaid-insured discharges. Freestanding children's hospitals had a higher median number of Medicaid-insured discharges (4082; interquartile range [IQR], 3524-5213) vs non-children's hospital teaching hospitals (674; IQR, 258-1414) and non-children's hospital

  4. Health-related quality of life and physical activity in children and adolescents 2 years after an inpatient weight-loss program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rank, Melanie; Wilks, Desiree C; Foley, Louise; Jiang, Yannan; Langhof, Helmut; Siegrist, Monika; Halle, Martin

    2014-10-01

    To investigate changes in health-related quality of life (HRQOL), body mass index (BMI), physical activity, and sedentary behavior at 24 months after an inpatient weight-loss program and to examine correlations between changes in HRQOL and BMI or physical activity. This prospective study included 707 overweight and obese individuals (mean age, 14 ± 2 years; 57% girls) participating in a 4- to 6-week inpatient weight-loss program, 381 of whom completed a 24-month follow-up. HRQOL, physical activity, sedentary behavior, and BMI were assessed at baseline, at discharge, and at 6, 12, and 24 months after starting therapy. Longitudinal analyses were conducted using repeated-measures mixed models, adjusted for age, sex, and baseline outcome and accounting for attrition over time. All variables improved over treatment and 6-month follow-up (P physical activity explained 30% of the variation in overall HRQOL (P = .01), and change in BMI was not associated with a change in HRQOL. This inpatient weight-loss program was associated with positive changes in HRQOL over the long term, with particular improvements in self-esteem. The results indicate the potential role of physical activity in improving HRQOL without a substantial change in body composition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Inpatient multimodal pain therapy : Additive value of neuromuscular core stability exercises for chronic back pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesche, F; Streicher, H; Maiwald, M; Wagner, P

    2017-04-01

    The medical and healthcare economic burden caused by chronic lumbar back pain (CLBP) requires the use of interdisciplinary treatment approaches. The present study aimed to evaluate whether the effectiveness of inpatient multimodal pain therapy (MPT, operations and procedures (OPS) coding 8-918.02), can be increased by implementing additional neuromuscular core stability exercises (NCSE). As part of a prospective controlled study, subjects with CLBP (n = 48, 17 males, 58.2 ± 11.7 years) were allocated to one of two groups. One group received standard care (SC, n =23) encompassing manual, pharmacological and psychological therapy in addition to passive physiotherapeutic applications. The intervention group (IG, n =25) additionally completed NCSE. On the day of admission and on discharge as well as 1 and 6 weeks after inpatient care, pain intensity (numeric rating scale), pain-related routine daily functions (Oswestry disability index), well-being (SF-12 Health Survey) and motor function parameters (trunk strength, endurance and postural control) were assessed. Data analysis was performed using statistical inference methods. In addition, effect sizes (Cohen's d) of intergroup differences were calculated. Both groups showed significant reductions in pain intensity (p  0.6) at all measurement points (MP). Physical well-being and disability (p  0.6) were improved 1 week after discharge in the intervention group only. Overall, no systematic differences between groups were detected (p > 0.05). In relation to the motor outcomes, no significant changes over time nor between groups were verified (p > 0.05). Despite the use of an additional NCSE, no significant added value in individuals with CLBP could be detected, although a systematic pre-post effect in daily functions and physical well-being (one week after discharge) was observed for the IG only. Therefore, on the basis of the study results, the implementation of additional NCSE into the inpatient MPT cannot

  6. Characterization of Medication Use in a Multicenter Sample of Pediatric Inpatients with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, Logan K; Pedapati, Ernest V; Adams, Ryan; Erickson, Craig A; Pedersen, Kahsi A; Morrow, Eric M; Kaplan, Desmond; Siegel, Matthew

    2017-05-17

    Nearly 11% of youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) undergo psychiatric hospitalization, and 65% are treated with psychotropic medication. Here we characterize psychotropic medication usage in subjects enrolled in the Autism Inpatient Collection. Participant psychotropic medication usage rates topped 90% at admission and discharge, though there was a decline at 2-month follow-up. Antipsychotics, ADHD medications, and sleep aids were the most commonly reported classes of medications. The impact of age, gender, and non-verbal IQ on medication usage rates was minimal, though age and IQ may play a role in prescribing practices. Future work is indicated to explore medication usage trends, the impact of clinical factors on medication use rates, and the safety of psychotropic medications in youth with ASD.

  7. The inpatient evaluation and treatment of a self-professed budding serial killer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisner, Andrew D; McGee, Mark; Noffsinger, Stephen G

    2003-02-01

    The authors present the case of a man who was hospitalized after claiming that he was about to become a serial killer. The patient presented with extensive written homicidal fantasies and homicidal intentions without evidence of actual homicidal acts. In addition to routine assessments, hospital staff members used case conferences, psychological testing, outside forensic consultation, and a forensic review process to make decisions regarding diagnosis, treatment planning, and discharge. The patient was discharged after 8 months of inpatient treatment and was apparently free of homicidal impulses or symptoms of severe mental illness. A 2-year court commitment allowed for the enactment and potential enforcement of a discharge plan that was endorsed by the patient, the hospital, and community care providers. The authors review diagnostic and risk management issues. Comparisons with known features of typical serial killers are made.

  8. Commissioners' Monthly Case Activity Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission — Total cases pending at the beginning of the month, total cases added to the docket during the month, total cases disposed of during the month, and total cases...

  9. Hypokalaemia: Improving the investigation, management and therapeutic monitoring of hypokalaemic medical inpatients at a district general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Mark; Caesar, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Hypokalaemia is prevalent in 20% of hospitalised patients. Furthermore, inadequate management of hypokalemia was identified in 24% of these patients. Associated with significant patient morbidity and mortality, the identification, investigation, and treatment of hypokalaemia was identified as an area for improvement in the management of medical inpatients. The project aims to measure the assessment, management, and therapeutic monitoring of medical inpatients with hypokalaemia in a district general hospital. All medical inpatients over a one week period who met the criteria for hypokalaemia (serum potassium <3.5 mmol/L on standard biochemical sample) were included in the audit. Patient's notes were located and evaluated to identify if they had mild, moderate, or severe hypokalaemia. Further data on ECG requests, repeat U&Es, serum magnesium analysis, treatment prescribed, and medication review dates was collated. A re-audit was completed after the introduction of a set of interventions which included a hypokalaemia treatment algorithm. Pre-intervention analysis of all medical inpatients, who met our inclusion criteria for hypokalaemia, identified 32 patients. 25 of these patients met the criteria for mild hypokalaemia (3.1-3.4 mmol/L) and 7 met the criteria for moderate hypokalaemia (2.5-3.0 mmol/L). Only 7/32 (22 %) patients were receiving adequate treatment based on trust guidelines. Post intervention results showed marked improvement in the management of patients with hypokalaemia. A total of 30 patients were identified in this post-intervention group. There were 16/30 patients who qualified as mild hypokalaemia (3.1-3.4 mmol/L) and 14/30 with moderate hypokalaemia (2.5-3.0 mmol/L). 19/30 (63%) patients in the post-intervention group were correctly prescribed appropriate medication doses consistent with the treatment algorithm. Following the initial success of the project, analysis at 3 months showed a positive trend for sustained improvement when compared to

  10. Benchmarking monthly homogenization algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. C. Venema

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology Action ES0601: Advances in homogenization methods of climate series: an integrated approach (HOME has executed a blind intercomparison and validation study for monthly homogenization algorithms. Time series of monthly temperature and precipitation were evaluated because of their importance for climate studies and because they represent two important types of statistics (additive and multiplicative. The algorithms were validated against a realistic benchmark dataset. The benchmark contains real inhomogeneous data as well as simulated data with inserted inhomogeneities. Random break-type inhomogeneities were added to the simulated datasets modeled as a Poisson process with normally distributed breakpoint sizes. To approximate real world conditions, breaks were introduced that occur simultaneously in multiple station series within a simulated network of station data. The simulated time series also contained outliers, missing data periods and local station trends. Further, a stochastic nonlinear global (network-wide trend was added.

    Participants provided 25 separate homogenized contributions as part of the blind study as well as 22 additional solutions submitted after the details of the imposed inhomogeneities were revealed. These homogenized datasets were assessed by a number of performance metrics including (i the centered root mean square error relative to the true homogeneous value at various averaging scales, (ii the error in linear trend estimates and (iii traditional contingency skill scores. The metrics were computed both using the individual station series as well as the network average regional series. The performance of the contributions depends significantly on the error metric considered. Contingency scores by themselves are not very informative. Although relative homogenization algorithms typically improve the homogeneity of temperature data, only the best ones improve

  11. Preventing compulsory admission to psychiatric inpatient care through psycho-education and crisis focused monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The high number of involuntary placements of people with mental disorders in Switzerland and other European countries constitutes a major public health issue. In view of the ethical and personal relevance of compulsory admission for the patients concerned and given the far-reaching effects in terms of health care costs, innovative interventions to improve the current situation are much needed. A number of promising approaches to prevent involuntary placements have been proposed that target continuity of care by increasing self-management skills of patients. However, the effectiveness of such interventions in terms of more robust criteria (e.g., admission rates) has not been sufficiently analysed in larger study samples. The current study aims to evaluate an intervention programme for patients at high risk of compulsory admission to psychiatric hospitals. Effectiveness will be assessed in terms of a reduced number of psychiatric hospitalisations and days of inpatient care in connection with involuntary psychiatric admissions as well as in terms of cost-containment in inpatient mental health care. The intervention furthermore intends to reduce the degree of patients’ perceived coercion and to increase patient satisfaction, their quality of life and empowerment. Methods/Design This paper describes the design of a randomised controlled intervention study conducted currently at four psychiatric hospitals in the Canton of Zurich. The intervention programme consists of individualised psycho-education focusing on behaviours prior to and during illness-related crisis, the distribution of a crisis card and, after inpatient admission, a 24-month preventive monitoring of individual risk factors for compulsory re-admission to hospital. All measures are provided by a mental health care worker who maintains permanent contact to the patient over the course of the study. In order to prove its effectiveness the intervention programme will be compared with standard care

  12. Preventing compulsory admission to psychiatric inpatient care through psycho-education and crisis focused monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lay Barbara

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high number of involuntary placements of people with mental disorders in Switzerland and other European countries constitutes a major public health issue. In view of the ethical and personal relevance of compulsory admission for the patients concerned and given the far-reaching effects in terms of health care costs, innovative interventions to improve the current situation are much needed. A number of promising approaches to prevent involuntary placements have been proposed that target continuity of care by increasing self-management skills of patients. However, the effectiveness of such interventions in terms of more robust criteria (e.g., admission rates has not been sufficiently analysed in larger study samples. The current study aims to evaluate an intervention programme for patients at high risk of compulsory admission to psychiatric hospitals. Effectiveness will be assessed in terms of a reduced number of psychiatric hospitalisations and days of inpatient care in connection with involuntary psychiatric admissions as well as in terms of cost-containment in inpatient mental health care. The intervention furthermore intends to reduce the degree of patients’ perceived coercion and to increase patient satisfaction, their quality of life and empowerment. Methods/Design This paper describes the design of a randomised controlled intervention study conducted currently at four psychiatric hospitals in the Canton of Zurich. The intervention programme consists of individualised psycho-education focusing on behaviours prior to and during illness-related crisis, the distribution of a crisis card and, after inpatient admission, a 24-month preventive monitoring of individual risk factors for compulsory re-admission to hospital. All measures are provided by a mental health care worker who maintains permanent contact to the patient over the course of the study. In order to prove its effectiveness the intervention programme will be

  13. Marijuana use and inpatient outcomes among hospitalized patients: analysis of the nationwide inpatient sample database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vin-Raviv, Neomi; Akinyemiju, Tomi; Meng, Qingrui; Sakhuja, Swati; Hayward, Reid

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between marijuana use and health outcomes among hospitalized patients, including those hospitalized with a diagnosis of cancer. A total of 387,608 current marijuana users were identified based on ICD-9 codes for marijuana use among hospitalized patients in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database between 2007 and 2011. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the association between marijuana use and heart failure, cardiac disease, stroke, and in-hospital mortality. All models were adjusted for age, gender, race, residential income, insurance, residential region, pain, and number of comorbidities. Among hospitalized patients, marijuana use was associated with a 60% increased odds of stroke (OR: 1.60, 95% CI: 1.44-1.77) compared with non-users, but significantly reduced odds of heart failure (OR: 0.78, 95% CI: 0.75-0.82), cardiac disease (OR: 0.86, 95% CI: 0.82-0.91), or in-hospital mortality (OR: 0.41, 95% CI: 0.38-0.44). Among cancer patients, odds of in-hospital mortality was significantly reduced among marijuana users compared with non-users (OR: 0.44, 95% CI: 0.35-0.55). Hospitalized marijuana users were more likely to experience a stroke compared with non-users, but less likely to experience in-hospital mortality. Prospective studies will be needed to better characterize the health effects of marijuana use, especially among older, sicker, and/or hospitalized patients. In the meantime, conversations regarding marijuana use/misuse may be warranted in the clinical setting in order for patients and healthcare providers to adequately weigh the anticipated benefits of marijuana use with potentially significant health risks. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Change in self-reported emotional distress and parenting among parents referred to inpatient child psychiatric family treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimehaug, Tormod; Berg-Nielsen, Turid Suzanne; Wallander, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Rimehaug T, Berg-Nielsen TS, Wallander J. Change in self-reported emotional distress and parenting among parents referred to inpatient child psychiatric family treatment. Nord J Psychiatry 2011;64:1–8. Aims: Our aim was to examine changes in distress symptoms and parenting dimensions among parents in child psychiatry services (clinic parents) (n= 102). Parents were followed from referral and admission to 3-month and 12-month follow-ups of “treatment-as-usual” at inpatient family clinics. These measurements were compared with a sample of community parent (n = 439) standards. Methods: Standardized questionnaires measuring the child's problems, parental anxiety and depression symptoms (distress), and warmth protectiveness and authoritarianism (parenting dimensions), were distributed to parents four times (T0–T1–T2–T3). The family clinics received families whose children had long-term problems and unsatisfactory previous treatment outcomes. Results: Clinic mothers, but not fathers, showed an improvement in distress symptoms at the 3-month (T2) and 12-month (T3) follow-ups relative to at admission (T1). Nevertheless, clinic mothers displayed distress symptoms at all measurement points compared with community parents. Parents of children with learning/developmental problems and attention disorders showed significantly higher warmth scores at the 3-month and 12-month follow-up compared with at admission, although the levels remained lower than those of community parents. In contrast, parents of children with emotional problems showed the same level of warmth as community parents and lower levels of protectiveness, but no change in these parenting dimensions T1–T2. Implications: Parental emotional distress symptoms and parenting characteristics should be addressed systematically in child psychiatry to inform evaluations of the context of the child's problems and the family's treatment needs. Systematic and effective treatment components related to parenting

  15. Petroleum supply monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blends, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

  16. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major U.S. geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  17. COSMIC monthly progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Activities of the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) are summarized for the month of May 1994. Tables showing the current inventory of programs available from COSMIC are presented and program processing and evaluation activities are summarized. Nine articles were prepared for publication in the NASA Tech Brief Journal. These articles (included in this report) describe the following software items: (1) WFI - Windowing System for Test and Simulation; (2) HZETRN - A Free Space Radiation Transport and Shielding Program; (3) COMGEN-BEM - Composite Model Generation-Boundary Element Method; (4) IDDS - Interactive Data Display System; (5) CET93/PC - Chemical Equilibrium with Transport Properties, 1993; (6) SDVIC - Sub-pixel Digital Video Image Correlation; (7) TRASYS - Thermal Radiation Analyzer System (HP9000 Series 700/800 Version without NASADIG); (8) NASADIG - NASA Device Independent Graphics Library, Version 6.0 (VAX VMS Version); and (9) NASADIG - NASA Device Independent Graphics Library, Version 6.0 (UNIX Version). Activities in the areas of marketing, customer service, benefits identification, maintenance and support, and dissemination are also described along with a budget summary.

  18. Proportion of rectal carriage of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in the inpatients of a pediatric tertiary care hospital in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Kisei; Shoji, Yasuhiro; Kasai, Masashi; Ogiso, Yoshifumi; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Kawakami, Yoshiyuki; Saito, Yoshinobu; Kuzumoto, Kei; Kubota, Noriko; Yumoto, Kayoko; Ishii, Kinuko

    2012-01-01

    Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing-Enterobacteriaceae strains were detected in 12% (6 out of 50) of fecal samples collected from the inpatients of a Japanese pediatric hospital. All the ESBLs belonged to the CTX-M-1 group. The proportion of carriage of ESBL producers was higher among patients who had received antibiotics within the past 3 months and among those who had cardiologic diseases.

  19. Hypnotics and the Occurrence of Bone Fractures in Hospitalized Dementia Patients: A Matched Case-Control Study Using a National Inpatient Database

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background Preventing falls and bone fractures in hospital care is an important issue in geriatric medicine. Use of hypnotics is a potential risk factor for falls and bone fractures in older patients. However, data are lacking on the association between use of hypnotics and the occurrence of bone fracture. Methods We used a national inpatient database including 1,057 hospitals in Japan and included dementia patients aged 50 years or older who were hospitalized during a period of 12 months bet...

  20. Inpatient Hospitalization of Oncology Patients: Are We Missing an Opportunity for End-of-Life Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocque, Gabrielle B.; Barnett, Anne E.; Illig, Lisa C.; Eickhoff, Jens C.; Bailey, Howard H.; Campbell, Toby C.; Stewart, James A.; Cleary, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Despite advances in the care of patients with cancer over the last 10 years, cancer remains the second leading cause of death in the United States. Many patients receive aggressive, in-hospital end-of-life care at high cost. There are few data on outcomes after unplanned hospitalization of patients with metastatic cancer. Methods: In 2000 and 2010, data were collected on admissions, interventions, and survival for patients admitted to an academic inpatient medical oncology service. Results: The 2000 survey included 191 admissions of 151 unique patients. The 2010 survey assessed 149 admissions of 119 patients. Lung, GI, and breast cancers were the most common cancer diagnoses. In the 2010 assessment, pain was the most common chief complaint, accounting for 28%. Although symptoms were the dominant reason for admission in 2010, procedures and imaging were common in both surveys. The median survival of patients after discharge was 4.7 months in 2000 and 3.4 months in 2010. Despite poor survival in this patient population, hospice was recommended in only 23% and 24% of patients in 2000 and 2010, respectively. Seventy percent of patients were discharged home without additional services. Conclusion: On the basis of our data, an unscheduled hospitalization for a patient with advanced cancer strongly predicts a median survival of fewer than 6 months. We believe that hospital admission represents an opportunity to commence and/or consolidate appropriate palliative care services and end-of-life care. PMID:23633971

  1. Economic aspects of nursing in inpatient naturopathy: vidence from Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeyke, Tobias; Stummer, Harald

    2013-01-01

    The costs of nursing in Germany are defined in terms of "nursing-relevant secondary diagnoses." However, the further development of the German-DRG system reveals nursing diagnoses play a constantly declining role with regard to increasing severity and revenue assurance. In particular, additional therapeutic nursing services performed, for example, by specially trained, certified nurses in acute hospitals focusing on naturopathy are not adequately defined. In this study, researchers analyzed naturopathic care, especially the nursing costs for inpatient care of multi-morbid cardiac patients, with a particular focus on a holistic, comprehensive treatment. Results indicated the nursing costs in an inpatient acute hospital with a naturopathic focus are significantly higher than nursing costs in hospitals operating exclusively according to conventional medicine. Questions about adequate determination of the costs of DRGs for professional groups such as the nursing service need to be addressed.

  2. Marginal revenue and length of stay in inpatient psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletscher, Mark

    2016-09-01

    This study examines the changes in marginal revenue during psychiatric inpatient stays in a large Swiss psychiatric hospital after the introduction of a mixed reimbursement system with tariff rates that vary over length of stay. A discrete time duration model with a difference-in-difference specification and time-varying coefficients is estimated to assess variations in policy effects over length of stay. Among patients whose costs are fully reimbursed by the mixed scheme, the model demonstrates a significant effect of marginal revenue on length of stay. No significant policy effects are found among patients for whom only health insurance rates are delivered as mixed tariffs and government contributions are made retrospectively. The results indicate that marginal revenue can affect length of stay in inpatient psychiatry facilities, but that the reduction in marginal revenue must be sufficiently large.

  3. Effects of music on major depression in psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wei-Chi; Lai, Hui-Ling

    2004-10-01

    The study was to assess the effectiveness of soft music for treatment of major depressive disorder inpatients in Kaohsiung City, Taiwan. A pretest-posttest with a two-group repeated measures design was used. Patients with major depressive disorder were recruited through referred by the psychiatric physicians. Subjects listened to their choice of music for 2 weeks. Depression was measured with the Zung's Depression Scale before the study and at two weekly posttests. Using repeated measures ANCOVA, music resulted in significantly better depressive scores, as well as significantly better subscores of depression compared with controls. Depression improved weekly, indicating a cumulative dose effect. The findings provide evidence for psychiatric nurses to use soft music as an empirically based intervention for depressed inpatients.

  4. [Management of psychiatric inpatients with advanced cancer: a pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhondali, Wadih; Ledoux, Mathilde; Sahraoui, Fatma; Marotta, Juliette; Sanchez, Vincent; Filbet, Marilène

    2013-09-01

    The prevalence of cancer is not well established and probably underestimated in long-stay psychiatric inpatients. Psychiatric patients do not have the same access for cancer screening and care. Therapeutic decision-making is a real ethical problem. In this context, access to medical care should be provided by the establishment of guidelines and/or recommendations for this specific population. The aim of our study was to assess how cancer was managed among long term psychiatric inpatients. For this pilot study, we used a mixed methodology: a quantitative part with a retrospective chart review of cancer patients in a psychiatric institution and a qualitative part based on semi-structured interviews with psychiatrists with discourse analysis. Delay in cancer diagnosis can be explained by communication and behavior disorders, inadequate screening, and additional tests often refused by patients. Compliance and ethical issues (i.e. obtaining informed consent) are many pitfalls to optimal cancer care that should be explored in further research.

  5. Prevalence of domestic violence in an inpatient female population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, K C; Burns, R B; McCarthy, E P; Freund, K M

    1998-04-01

    Studies have evaluated the prevalence of domestic violence in populations of patients in emergency and primary care settings, but there are little data on patients admitted to hospitals. We undertook a study to evaluate the prevalence of domestic violence among female inpatients. Of 131 consecutive female patients between the ages of 18 and 60 admitted to a nontrauma urban teaching hospital asked to complete a self-administered survey about domestic violence, 101 completed the questionnaire. Twenty-six percent of the respondents reported being in an abusive relationship at one time. Two patients felt that domestic violence contributed to their current reason for admission. No respondents were asked about domestic violence by health care providers. Domestic violence is an uncommon but important precipitant to nontrauma hospital admissions. Physicians should query all female inpatients about domestic assault.

  6. Overcoming treatment resistance in chronic depression: a pilot study on outcome and feasibility of the cognitive behavioral analysis system of psychotherapy as an inpatient treatment program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brakemeier, Eva-Lotta; Radtke, Martina; Engel, Vera; Zimmermann, Johannes; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna; Hautzinger, Martin; Schramm, Elisabeth; Berger, Mathias; Normann, Claus

    2015-01-01

    The Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy (CBASP), initially developed as an outpatient treatment for chronic depression (CD), has been adapted as a multidisciplinary 12-week inpatient program for CD. Seventy inpatients with CD and treatment resistance were included in a noncontrolled trial. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale served as the primary outcome measure. Prospective naturalistic follow-up assessments were conducted 6 and 12 months after discharge. Dropout rate was 7.1%; 90.4% perceived the program as helpful. Pre-post comparisons yielded strong effect sizes; 75.7% of the intention-to-treat sample responded, and 40.0% remitted. Nonremission was associated with experiencing temporary deterioration of symptoms during treatment. After 6 months 75.0% and after 12 months 48.0% of patients sustained response. The CBASP program appears as a feasible acute treatment for treatment-resistant CD inpatients with promising outcome. However, the continuation of treatment after discharge should be optimized especially for patients with subjective deterioration during treatment.

  7. Toxocara infection in psychiatric inpatients: a case control seroprevalence study.

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    Cosme Alvarado-Esquivel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is poor knowledge about the epidemiology of toxocariasis in psychiatric patients. AIMS: Determine the seroepidemiology of Toxocara infection in psychiatric patients. METHODS: Through a case-control seroprevalence study, 128 psychiatric inpatients and 276 control subjects were compared for the presence of anti-Toxocara IgG antibodies in Durango, Mexico. Socio-demographic, clinical, and behavioral characteristics of inpatients associated with toxocariasis were also investigated. RESULTS: Six of the 128 (4.7% psychiatric inpatients, and 3 (1.1% of the 276 controls were positive for anti-Toxocara IgG antibodies (P = 0.03. Stratification by age showed that Toxocara seroprevalence was significantly (P = 0.02 higher in patients aged ≤50 years old (6/90∶6.7% than controls of the same age (2/163∶1.2%. While Toxocara seroprevalence was similar in patients and controls aged >50 years old. Stratification by gender showed that Toxocara seroprevalence was significantly (P = 0.03 higher in female patients (2/37∶5.4% than in female controls (0/166∶0%. No statistically significant associations between Toxocara seropositivity and clinical characteristics were found. In contrast, Toxocara seropositivity was associated with consumption of goat meat and raw sea snail. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report of toxocariasis in psychiatric inpatients in Mexico. Further studies with larger sample sizes are needed to elucidate the association of toxocariasis with psychiatric diseases. The role of the consumption of goat meat and raw sea snail in the transmission of Toxocara deserve further investigation.

  8. Clinical features of psychiatric inpatients with obsessive compulsive disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Gonca Karakus; Lut Tamam

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the clinical and sociodemographic characteristics of the inpatients admitted in a university psychiatry clinic with a diagnosis of obsessive-compulsive disorder in ten years period. Material and Methods: Patients who had been diagnosed with obsessive compulsive disorder according to DSM IV TR and hospitalized in Cukurova University Faculty of Medicine Balcali Hospital Department of Psychiatry between 2006 and 2015 were included. Data were ob...

  9. Higher Inpatient Medical Surgical Bed Occupancy Extends Admitted Patients’ Stay

    OpenAIRE

    Krall, Scott P.; O'Connor, Robert E.; Maercks, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Determine the effect that increased medical surgical (med/surg) bed occupancy has on the time interval from admission order to arrival in the bed for the patients admitted from the emergency department (ED). Methods: This retrospective observational study compares the total hospital bed occupancy rate and the medical surgical inpatient bed occupancy rate to daily averages for the time interval from admission order (patient posting for admission) to the patient’s arrival in...

  10. Cryptographically supported NFC tags in medication for better inpatient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcanhan, Mehmet Hilal; Dalkılıç, Gökhan; Utku, Semih

    2014-08-01

    Reliable sources report that errors in drug administration are increasing the number of harmed or killed inpatients, during healthcare. This development is in contradiction to patient safety norms. A correctly designed hospital-wide ubiquitous system, using advanced inpatient identification and matching techniques, should provide correct medicine and dosage at the right time. Researchers are still making grouping proof protocol proposals based on the EPC Global Class 1 Generation 2 ver. 1.2 standard tags, for drug administration. Analyses show that such protocols make medication unsecure and hence fail to guarantee inpatient safety. Thus, the original goal of patient safety still remains. In this paper, a very recent proposal (EKATE) upgraded by a cryptographic function is shown to fall short of expectations. Then, an alternative proposal IMS-NFC which uses a more suitable and newer technology; namely Near Field Communication (NFC), is described. The proposed protocol has the additional support of stronger security primitives and it is compliant to ISO communication and security standards. Unlike previous works, the proposal is a complete ubiquitous system that guarantees full patient safety; and it is based on off-the-shelf, new technology products available in every corner of the world. To prove the claims the performance, cost, security and scope of IMS-NFC are compared with previous proposals. Evaluation shows that the proposed system has stronger security, increased patient safety and equal efficiency, at little extra cost.

  11. Comparison of Antibiograms Developed for Inpatients and Primary Care Outpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Jessina C.; Bearden, David T.; Townes, John M.; Sharp, Susan E.; Gorman, Paul N.; Elman, Miriam R.; Mori, Motomi; Smith, David H.

    2013-01-01

    To support antimicrobial stewardship, some healthcare systems have begun creating outpatient antibiograms. We developed inpatient and primary care outpatient antibiograms for a regional health maintenance organization (HMO) and academic healthcare system (AHS). Antimicrobial susceptibilities from 16,428 Enterococcus, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultures from 2010 were summarized and compared. Methicillin susceptibility among S. aureus was similar in inpatients and primary care outpatients (HMO: 61.2% vs. 61.9%, p=0.951; AHS: 62.9% vs. 63.3%, p>0.999). E. coli susceptibility to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole was also similar (HMO: 81.8% vs. 83.6%, p=0.328; AHS: 77.2% vs. 80.9%, p=0.192), but ciprofloxacin susceptibility differed (HMO: 88.9% vs. 94.6%, p<0.001; AHS: 81.2% vs. 90.6%, p<0.001). In the HMO, ciprofloxacin-susceptible P. aeruginosa were more frequent in primary care outpatients than inpatients (91.4% vs. 79.0%, p=0.007). Comparison of cumulative susceptibilities across settings yielded no consistent patterns; therefore, outpatient primary care antibiograms may more accurately inform prudent empiric antibiotic prescribing. PMID:23541690

  12. Recognition of Complications After Pancreaticoduodenectomy for Cancer Determines Inpatient Mortality

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    Evan S Glazer

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Context While perioperative mortality after pancreaticoduodenectomy is decreasing, key factors remain to be elucidated. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate inpatient mortality after pancreaticoduodenectomy in the NationwideInpatient Sample (NIS, a representative inpatient database in the USA. Methods Patient discharge data (diagnostic andprocedure codes and hospital characteristics were investigated for years 2009 and 2010. The inclusion criteria were aprocedure code for pancreaticoduodenectomy, elective procedure, and a pancreatic or peripancreatic cancer diagnosis. Chisquare test determined statistical significance. A logistic regression model for mortality was created from significantvariables. Results Two-thousand and 958 patients were identified with an average age of 65±12 years; 53% were male. Themean length of stay was 15±12 days with a mortality of 4% and a complication rate of 57%. Eighty-six percent of pancreaticoduodenectomy occurred in teaching hospitals. Pancreaticoduodenectomy performed in teaching hospitals in thefirst half of the academic year were associated with higher mortality than in the latter half (5.5% vs. 3.4%, P=0.005. Onlogistic regression analysis, non-surgical complications are the largest predictor of death (P

  13. PARENTS’ FEAR AND DISTRESS DURING CHILD INPATIENT CARE

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    Z. S. Meshkani B. Bavarian

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Hospitalization of child is one of the most stressful events of life for parents and children. This fear and stress may affect the process of treatment. Since there is no information available about the source of distress and needs of Iranian parents during the inpatient care of their children, we designed a research in order to discover the main source of worries and fears among parents. In this cross-sectional study 120 parents of 88 children were interviewed by structured questionnaire during the course of events when their child needed inpatient care. Twenty close ended questions were asked in order to assess the major source of worries and distress. Factor analyses were used as a statistical test for data analysis. The rotated factors pattern isolated 7 factors that accounted for 61.60% of variances and their factor loading was above 0.5: 1 environment adjustment, 2 lack of prehospitalization program, 3 lack of communication skills of caregiver, 4 parental skills, 5 hospitalization expenses, 6 lose of independence and 7 lack of information. Other items of questionnaire were eliminated because their loading factors were less than 0.5. This finding suggests parents’ education before and during the child inpatient care as a major need of parents. By parents education there is a chance of reducing their worries and fear and improve their parental skills. Offering prehospitalization programs also provide a good opportunity for parents to ask questions from staff members and may help them to adjust themselves with new environment.

  14. Dissociative disorders among Chinese inpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Junhan; Ross, Colin A; Keyes, Benjamin B; Li, Ying; Dai, Yunfei; Zhang, Tianhong; Wang, Lanlan; Fan, Qing; Xiao, Zeping

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of dissociative disorders in a sample of Chinese psychiatric inpatients. Participants in the study were 569 consecutively admitted inpatients at Shanghai Mental Health Center, China, of whom 84.9% had a clinical diagnosis of schizophrenia based on the Chinese Classification and Diagnostic Criteria of Mental Disorders, Version 3. All participants completed a self-report measure of dissociation (the Dissociative Experiences Scale), and none had a prior diagnosis of a dissociative disorder. A total of 96 randomly selected participants were interviewed with a structured interview (the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule) and a clinical interview. These 96 patients did not differ significantly from the 473 patients who were not interviewed on any demographic measures or who did not complete the self-report dissociation measure. A total of 28 patients (15.3%, after weighting of the data) received a clinical diagnosis of a dissociative disorder based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.) criteria. Dissociative identity disorder was diagnosed in 2 patients (0.53%, after weighting). Compared to the patients without a dissociative disorder, patients with dissociative disorders were significantly more likely to report childhood abuse (57.1% vs. 22.1%), but the 2 groups did not differ significantly on any demographic measures. Dissociative disorders were readily identified in an inpatient psychiatric population in China.

  15. Dissociative disorders in acute psychiatric inpatients in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chui-De; Meg Tseng, Mei-Chih; Chien, Yi-Ling; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Liu, Chih-Min; Yeh, Yei-Yu; Hwu, Hai-Gwo; Ross, Colin A

    2017-04-01

    Dissociative disorders have been documented to be common psychiatric disorders which can be detected reliably with standardized diagnostic instruments in North American and European psychiatric inpatients and outpatients (20.6% and 18.4%, respectively). However, there are concerns about their cross-cultural manifestations as an apparently low prevalence rate has been reported in East Asian inpatients and outpatients (1.7% and 4.9%, respectively). It is unknown whether the clinical profile of dissociative disorders in terms of their core symptomatic clusters, associated comorbid disorders, and environmental risk factors that has emerged in western clinical populations can also be found in non-western clinical populations. A standardized structured interview for DSM-IV dissociative disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder, and a history of interpersonal victimization was administered in a sample of Taiwanese acute psychiatric inpatients. Our results showed that 19.5% of our participants met criteria for a DSM-IV dissociative disorder, mostly dissociative disorder not otherwise specified. More importantly, the western clinical profile of dissociative disorders also characterized our patients, including a poly-symptomatic presentation and a history of interpersonal trauma in both childhood and adulthood. Our results lend support to the conclusion that cross-cultural manifestations of dissociative pathology in East Asia are similar to those in North America and Europe. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Incidence and predicting factors of falls of older inpatients

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    Hellen Cristina de Almeida Abreu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To estimate the incidence and predicting factors associated with falls among older inpatients. METHODS Prospective cohort study conducted in clinical units of three hospitals in Cuiaba, MT, Midwestern Brazil, from March to August 2013. In this study, 221 inpatients aged 60 or over were followed until hospital discharge, death, or fall. The method of incidence density was used to calculate incidence rates. Bivariate analysis was performed by Chi-square test, and multiple analysis was performed by Cox regression. RESULTS The incidence of falls was 12.6 per 1,000 patients/day. Predicting factors for falls during hospitalization were: low educational level (RR = 2.48; 95%CI 1.17;5.25, polypharmacy (RR = 4.42; 95%CI 1.77;11.05, visual impairment (RR = 2.06; 95%CI 1.01;4.23, gait and balance impairment (RR = 2.95; 95%CI 1.22;7.14, urinary incontinence (RR = 5.67; 95%CI 2.58;12.44 and use of laxatives (RR = 4.21; 95%CI 1.15;15.39 and antipsychotics (RR = 4.10; 95%CI 1.38;12.13. CONCLUSIONS The incidence of falls of older inpatients is high. Predicting factors found for falls were low education level, polypharmacy, visual impairment, gait and balance impairment, urinary incontinence and use of laxatives and antipsychotics. Measures to prevent falls in hospitals are needed to reduce the incidence of this event.

  17. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion in hospital inpatients: a descriptive study in a tertiary care centre in South India

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    Mansoor C. Abdulla

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte abnormality among the patients in medical wards as well as in the intensive care unit contributing to substantial morbidity and mortality. The most common cause of hyponatraemia in hospital inpatients is Syndrome of Inappropriate Anti Diuretic Hormone secretion (SIADH. This prospective observational study was designed to assess the clinical profile of SIADH. Aim: To assess the clinical profile of SIADH in medically ill patients. Methods: This was an observational study for 24 months conducted in a tertiary care hospital. Patients were assessed clinically to study the volume status, effects of hyponatremia on nervous system and find out various etiologies for SIADH. All patients underwent routine hemogram, blood biochemistry, serum electrolytes, thyroid function tests, morning serum cortisol estimation, plasma and urinary osmolality determination as well as urinary sodium estimation. Patients were diagnosed to have Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone secretion (SIADH if they satisfied the Bartter and Schwartz criteria. Results: Among the eighty patients with euvolemic, hypoosmolal hyponatremia who were screened for SIADH, seven patients were excluded due to various reasons (hypothyroidism, Sheehan's syndrome, Addison's disease. The mean age of the patients was 64 +/- 13 years. Among 73 patients included there were 33 (45.2% male patients and 40 (54.8% female patients. Severe hyponatremia (Na <110 meq/l was detected in 33 patients (45%. Pulmonary causes were the most common cause of SIADH in this study seen in 25 (34.2%. The other causes were idiopathic in 20 (27.4%, neurological in 17 (23.3%, drug induced in 2 (2.7%, positive pressure ventilation in 5 (6.8% and other infections in 4 (5.5%.The average rate of correction was 5 meq +/- 1.5 in the first 24 hours. The overall mortality was found to be 7%. Conclusion: Hyponatremia due to SIADH is common among elderly patients with

  18. Early intensive hand rehabilitation after spinal cord injury ("Hands On": a protocol for a randomised controlled trial

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    Hsueh Ya-Seng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Loss of hand function is one of the most devastating consequences of spinal cord injury. Intensive hand training provided on an instrumented exercise workstation in conjunction with functional electrical stimulation may enhance neural recovery and hand function. The aim of this trial is to compare usual care with an 8-week program of intensive hand training and functional electrical stimulation. Methods/design A multicentre randomised controlled trial will be undertaken. Seventy-eight participants with recent tetraplegia (C2 to T1 motor complete or incomplete undergoing inpatient rehabilitation will be recruited from seven spinal cord injury units in Australia and New Zealand and will be randomised to a control or experimental group. Control participants will receive usual care. Experimental participants will receive usual care and an 8-week program of intensive unilateral hand training using an instrumented exercise workstation and functional electrical stimulation. Participants will drive the functional electrical stimulation of their target hands via a behind-the-ear bluetooth device, which is sensitive to tooth clicks. The bluetooth device will enable the use of various manipulanda to practice functional activities embedded within computer-based games and activities. Training will be provided for one hour, 5 days per week, during the 8-week intervention period. The primary outcome is the Action Research Arm Test. Secondary outcomes include measurements of strength, sensation, function, quality of life and cost effectiveness. All outcomes will be taken at baseline, 8 weeks, 6 months and 12 months by assessors blinded to group allocation. Recruitment commenced in December 2009. Discussion The results of this trial will determine the effectiveness of an 8-week program of intensive hand training with functional electrical stimulation. Trial registration NCT01086930 (12th March 2010 ACTRN12609000695202 (12th August 2009

  19. The Relationship between Caregiver Capacity and Intensive Community Treatment for Children with a Mental Health Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Richard A.; Jordan, Neil; Rhee, Yong Joo; McClelland, Gary M.; Lyons, John S.

    2009-01-01

    We studied 9,220 children referred to a comprehensive mental health crisis stabilization program to examine the impact of caregiver capacity on crisis worker decisions to refer children for intensive community-based treatment as opposed to inpatient psychiatric hospitalization. Due to the different role of caregivers in the child welfare system,…

  20. Nutritional care of medical inpatients: a health technology assessment

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    Kruse Filip

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inspiration for the present assessment of the nutritional care of medical patients is puzzlement about the divide that exists between the theoretical knowledge about the importance of the diet for ill persons, and the common failure to incorporate nutritional aspects in the treatment and care of the patients. The purpose is to clarify existing problems in the nutritional care of Danish medical inpatients, to elucidate how the nutritional care for these inpatients can be improved, and to analyse the costs of this improvement. Methods Qualitative and quantitative methods are deployed to outline how nutritional care of medical inpatients is performed at three Danish hospitals. The practices observed are compared with official recommendations for nutritional care of inpatients. Factors extraneous and counterproductive to optimal nutritional care are identified from the perspectives of patients and professional staff. A review of the literature illustrates the potential for optimal nutritional care. A health economic analysis is performed to elucidate the savings potential of improved nutritional care. Results The prospects for improvements in nutritional care are ameliorated if hospital management clearly identifies nutritional care as a priority area, and enjoys access to management tools for quality assurance. The prospects are also improved if a committed professional at the ward has the necessary time resources to perform nutritional care in practice, and if the care staff can requisition patient meals rich in nutrients 24 hours a day. At the kitchen production level prospects benefit from a facilitator contact between care and kitchen staff, and if the kitchen staff controls the whole food path from the kitchen to the patient. At the patient level, prospects are improved if patients receive information about the choice of food and drink, and have a better nutrition dialogue with the care staff. Better nutritional care of

  1. Psychotropic Medication Use during Inpatient Rehabilitation for Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Flora M.; Barrett, Ryan S.; Shea, Timothy; Seel, Ronald T.; McAlister, Thomas W.; Kaelin, Darryl; Ryser, David; Corrigan, John D.; Cullen, Nora; Horn, Susan D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe psychotropic medication administration patterns during inpatient rehabilitation for traumatic brain injury (TBI) and their relationship to patient pre-injury and injury characteristics. Design Prospective observational cohort. Setting multiple acute inpatient rehabilitation units or hospitals. Participants 2,130 individuals with TBI (complicated mild, moderate, or severe) admitted for inpatient rehabilitation. Interventions NA Main Outcome Measure(s) NA Results Most frequently administered was narcotic analgesics (72% of sample) followed by antidepressants (67%), anticonvulsants (47%), antianxiolytics (33%), hypnotics (30%), stimulants (28%), antipsychotics (25%), antiparkinson agents (25%), and miscellaneous psychotropics (18%). The psychotropic agents studied were administered to 95% of the sample with 8.5% receiving only 1 and 31.8% receiving 6 or more. Degree of psychotropic medication administration varied widely between sites. Univariate analyses indicated younger patients were more likely to receive anxiolytics, antidepressants, antiparkinson agents, stimulants, antipsychotics, and narcotic analgesics, while those older were more likely to receive anticonvulsants and miscellaneous psychotropics. Men were more likely to receive antipsychotics. All medication classes were less likely administered to Asians, and more likely to those with more severe functional impairment. Use of anticonvulsants was associated with having seizures at some point during acute care or rehabilitation stays. Narcotic analgesics were more likely for those with history of drug abuse, history of anxiety and depression (premorbid or during acute care), and severe pain during rehabilitation. Psychotropic medication administration increased rather than decreased during the course of inpatient rehabilitation in each of the medication categories except for narcotics. This observation was also true for medication administration within admission functional levels (defined

  2. Cognitive and functional outcomes following inpatient rehabilitation in patients with acquired brain injury: A prospective follow-up study

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    Maitreyi Patil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To study the effects of cognitive retraining and inpatient rehabilitation to study the effects of cognitive retraining and inpatient rehabilitation in patients with acquired brain injury (ABI. Design and Setting: This was a prospective follow-up study in a neurological rehabilitation department of quaternary research hospital. Patients and Methods: Thirty patients with ABI, mean age 36.43 years (standard deviation [SD] 12.6, range 18–60, mean duration of illness 77.87 days (SD 91.78, range 21–300 days with cognitive, physical, and motor-sensory deficits underwent inpatient rehabilitation for minimum of 14 sessions over a period of 3 weeks. Nineteen patients (63% reported in the follow-up of minimum 3 months after discharge. Type of ABI, cognitive status (using Montreal Cognitive assessment scale [MoCA] and cognitive Functional Independence Measure [Cog FIM]®, and functional status (motor FIM® were noted at admission, discharge, and follow-up and scores were compared. Results: Patients received inpatient rehabilitation addressing cognitive and functional impairments. Baseline MoCA, motor FIM, and Cog FIM scores were 15.27 (SD = 7.2, range 3–30, 31.57 (SD = 15.6, range 12–63, and 23.47 (SD = 9.7, range 5–35, respectively. All the parameters improved significantly at the time of discharge (MoCA = 19.6 ± 7.4 range 3–30, motor FIM® = 61.33 ± 18.7 range 12–89, Cog FIM® =27.23 ± 8.10 range 9–35. Patients were discharged with home-based programs. Nineteen patients reported in follow-up and observed to have maintained cognition on MoCA (18.8 ± 6.8 range 6–27, significantly improved (P < 0.01 on Cog FIM® (28.0 ± 7.7 range 14–35 and motor FIM® =72.89 ± 16.2 range 40–96 as compare to discharge scores. Conclusions: Cognitive and functional outcomes improve significantly with dedicated and specialized inpatient rehabilitation in ABI patients, which is sustainable over a period.

  3. Downsizing of acute inpatient beds associated with private finance initiative: Scotland's case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunnigan, Matthew G; Pollock, Allyson M

    2003-04-26

    To evaluate whether the projected 24% reduction in acute bed numbers in Lothian hospitals, which formed part of the private finance initiative (PFI) plans for the replacement Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, is being compensated for by improvements in efficiency and greater use of community facilities, and to ascertain whether there is an independent PFI effect by comparing clinical activity and performance in acute specialties in Lothian hospitals with other NHS hospitals in Scotland. Comparison of projected and actual trends in acute bed capacity and inpatient and day case admissions in the first five years (1995-6 to 2000-1) of Lothian Health Board's integrated healthcare plan. Population study of trends in bed rate, hospital activity, length of stay, and throughput in Lothian hospitals compared with the rest of Scotland from 1990-1 to 2000-1. Staffed bed rates, admission rates, mean lengths of stay, occupancy, and throughput in four adult acute specialty groups in 1990-1, 1995-6, and 2000-1. By 2000-1, rates for inpatient admission in all acute, medical, surgical, and intensive therapy specialties in Lothian hospitals were respectively 20%, 6%, 28%, and 38% below those in the rest of Scotland. Day case rates in all acute and acute surgical specialties were 13% and 33% lower. The proportion of delayed discharges in staffed acute and post-acute NHS beds in Lothian hospitals exceeded the Scottish average (15% and 12% respectively; Pbeds and rates of admission in Lothian hospitals compared with the rest of Scotland between 1995-6 and 2000-1.

  4. The effect of additional physiotherapy to hospital inpatients outside of regular business hours: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusco, Natasha K; Paratz, Jennifer

    2006-12-01

    Provision of out of regular business hours (OBH) physiotherapy to hospital inpatients is widespread in the hospital setting. This systematic review evaluated the effect of additional OBH physiotherapy services on patient length of stay (LOS), pulmonary complications, discharge destination, discharge mobility status, quality of life, cost saving, adverse events, and mortality compared with physiotherapy only within regular business hours. A literature search was completed on databases with citation tracking using key words. Two reviewers completed data extraction and quality assessment independently by using modified scales for historical cohorts and case control studies as well as the PEDro scale for randomized controlled trials and quasi-randomised controlled trials. This search identified nine articles of low to medium quality. Four reported a significant reduction in LOS associated with additional OBH physiotherapy, with two articles reporting overall significance and two reporting only for specific subgroups. Two studies reported significant reduction in pulmonary complications for two different patient groups in an intensive care unit (ICU) with additional OBH physiotherapy. Three studies accounted for discharge destination and/or discharge mobility status with no significant difference reported. Quality of life, adverse events, and mortality were not reported in any studies. Cost savings were considered in three studies, with two reporting a cost saving. This systematic review was unable to conclude that the provision of additional OBH physiotherapy made significant improvement to patient outcomes for all subgroups of inpatients. One study in critical care reported that overnight physiotherapy decreased LOS and reduced pulmonary complications of patients in the ICU. However, the studies in the area of orthopaedics, neurology, postcardiac surgery, and rheumatology, which all considered additional daytime weekend physiotherapy intervention, did not provide

  5. Effect of changed organisation of nutritional care of Danish medical inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyholm Ruth

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many patients are undernourished during hospitalisation. The clinical consequences of this include lassitude, an increased risk of complications and prolonged convalescence. The aim of the study is 1 to implement a new organisation with a focus on improving the quality of the nutritional care of medical inpatients at risk of undernutrition, and 2 to investigate the effect of the intervention. Methods Social and healthcare assistants are educated to the higher level of nutritional and healthcare assistants to provide nutritional care in daily practice to undernourished medical inpatients. The effect of the intervention is investigated before and five months after the employment of the nutritional and healthcare assistants. Data are obtained from structured interviews with patients and staff, and the amount of ordered and wasted food is recorded. Results Patients regard the work of the nutritional and healthcare assistant as very important for their recovery and weight gain: the assistant takes care of the individual patient's nutritional requirements and wishes, and she imparts knowledge to the patient about optimum nutrition. Staff members benefit from the knowledge and dedication of the nutritional and healthcare assistant and from her work; the staff is often too busy with other nursing tasks to make it a priority to ensure that patients who are nibblers get sufficient nutrition. The choices of food from the production kitchen are utilised to a higher degree, and more of the food is eaten by the patients. Before the intervention, a 20% increase in ordered food in relation to the food budget is found. During the intervention a 20% decrease in ordered food in relation to the food budget is found, and food wastage decreases from 55% to 18% owing to the intervention. Conclusion The job function of the nutritional and healthcare assistants on the medical wards is of great value to patients, nursing staff members and the

  6. Delirium en ancianos hospitalizados: Seguimiento de 18 meses Delirium in elderly inpatients: An 18 month follow-up

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando J. Vázquez; Javier Benchimol; Diego Giunta; Carlos Cafferata; Antonio Freixas; Marcelo Vallone; Diego Andresik; Javier Pollan; Ana Aprile; Jimena Lorenzo; Gabriel Waisman; Luis Camera

    2010-01-01

    El objetivo de este trabajo fue describir la prevalencia de síndrome confusional agudo en ancianos hospitalizados, la evolución durante la internación y a los 18 meses. Se evaluó en forma prospectiva a pacientes de 70 años de edad o mayores, internados en el Servicio de Clínica Médica de nuestro hospital, entre septiembre de 2005 y mayo de 2006. Se utilizó una versión validada en español del Confussion Assessment Method para diagnosticar delirium. A los 18 meses se evaluó el estado vital, lug...

  7. Impact of dissociation and interpersonal functioning on inpatient treatment for early sexually abused adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen K. K. Jepsen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Little is known about the possible predictors of treatment outcome in early chronically sexually abused adults. The current study aimed to investigate what impact initial levels of dissociation and pre-treatment negative change in interpersonal functioning have on treatment response after 3 months of first-phase trauma inpatient treatment as well as after a period of 1 year the patients returned to their usual lives. Methods: The sample comprised 48 inpatients with childhood sexual abuse histories and mixed trauma-related disorders who were examined at discharge and prospectively followed up for a period of 1 year under naturalistic conditions. Outcome variables were general psychiatric symptoms and interpersonal problems as measured with the Symptom Check List-Revised (SCL-R and the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (IIP Circumplex. Results: The central findings were that pathological dissociation and deterioration in interpersonal functioning prior to admittance predicted general psychiatric symptom levels and interpersonal problems at the end of treatment and at 1-year follow-up. Pathological dissociation, involving memory and identity problems, alone predicted negative outcome at the end of treatment. The findings at 1-year follow-up indicate that it is not pathological dissociation in isolation that affects outcomes, but rather the interaction between dissociation and change in interpersonal functioning prior to treatment. Conclusion: These findings indicate the need of addressing dissociation and interpersonal problems in treatment planning and favor an integrated treatment approach for complex trauma patients. Future research should investigate whether and how this leads to better outcome, including long-term maintenance of gains after the end of treatment.

  8. Eye-tracking computer systems for inpatients with tetraplegia: findings from a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Middendorp, J J; Watkins, F; Park, C; Landymore, H

    2014-12-02

    Study design:A longitudinal, prospective, self-controlled cohort study.Objectives:To determine (1) the preliminary benefits of using eye-tracking computer systems (ETCSs) among inpatients with tetraplegia and (2) the feasibility of carrying out a well-powered randomized controlled trial.Setting:Specialist Spinal Cord Injuries Centre, United Kingdom; 6 months during 2013-2014.Methods:Individuals with tetraplegia who were admitted to the center and enrolled in this study were trained and allowed to use the ETCS (Tobii Eyegaze C15 System) twice a week for a duration of 10 weeks. Standardized training modules were developed and offered to all study participants. Study feasibility indicators as well as the Appraisals of Disability: Primary and Secondary Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Assistive Technology Device Predisposition Assessment questionnaire scores were taken before and after study enrollment.Results:A total of 31 inpatients with tetraplegia were screened. Although 14 patients (45%) met the study eligibility criteria, 6 patients (19%) consented to be enrolled in the study. Three participants did not complete the planned training schedule because of medical, technical and logistic reasons. Although half of the participants agreed that the ETCS under study was easy to use, no substantial improvements were seen in terms of psychological outcomes, appraisals of disability or independence.Conclusions:The conduct of a controlled trial evaluating the benefits of using ETCSs among newly injured patients with tetraplegia comes with considerable feasibility challenges. Until substantial technical improvements of ETCSs have been implemented, future research should initially focus on those individuals with tetraplegia who are living in the community and who have expressed a need to enhance their computer access and communication skills.Spinal Cord advance online publication, 2 December 2014; doi:10.1038/sc.2014.219.

  9. An investigation of factors increasing the risk of aggressive behaviour among schizophrenic inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel eLejoyeux

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the studyThis study tried to identify risk factors of aggressive behavior in a population of schizophrenic inpatients. We tested the association between aggressive behavior and socio-demographic characteristics, addictive disorders, history of suicide attempt and sexual violence, impulsivity and sensation seeking.MethodsAll consecutive schizophrenic inpatients (100 were assessed during six months. Aggressive behavior was quantified with a standardized scale, the Overt Aggression Scale (OAS. We studied socio-demographic characteristics and the history of suicide attempt and sexual violence with a specific standardized questionnaire. Addictive disorders were identified with the Fagerström and CAGE questionnaires and with the DSM-IV-R diagnostic criteria for nicotine, alcohol, cannabis opiates, and cocaine abuse and dependence disorders. Lastly, we studied sensation-seeking with the Zuckerman scale and impulsivity with the Barratt scale. ResultsLinear regression identified four factors associated with aggressive behaviour: male gender (odd ratio =12.8, history of sexual violence (odd ratio = 3.6, Fagerström score (odd ratio= 1.3, number of cigarettes smoked each day (odd ratio=1.16. Patients with nicotine use or dependence had significantly higher levels of OAS scores. This difference was not observed between patients with or without alcohol dependence. OAS scores were correlated to the number of cigarettes smoked each day and to Fagerström scores. Patients with a higher level of sensation seeking and impulsivity also had higher OAS scores. ConclusionA Typical schizophrenic patient at risk of showing aggressive behavior is a man, who smokes and presents a history of sexual violence.

  10. Microbiological profile and clinical outcome of severe foot ulcers of diabetic inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marivaldo Loyola Aragão(

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To describe the microbiological profile and clinical outcomes of diabetic foot ulcers of inpatients of a tertiary university hospital, at Ceara, Brazil. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of medical charts data of all diabetic inpatients of the Endocrine and Diabetes Unit of Walter Cantídio University Hospital (Federal University of Ceará, admitted from January, 2006 to June, 2007 for severe foot ulcers (minimum of grade 2 of Wagner`s classification, which were refractory to ambulatory treatment. Clinical data from each patient were recorded (sex, age, diabetes duration, and comorbidities as well as microbiological characteristics of foot ulcers and surgical (amputations material. Results: We identified 17 diabetic patients, all type 2, aged 58.11 ± 10.8 years and 12.4 ± 8.4 years of disease, 58.8% male. Of ulcers, 41.1% were grade 2; 35.2% grade 3; 11.7% grade 4 and 11.7% grade 5 of Wagner; 64.7% with less than 3 months of evolution. Debridement was performed in 82.3% of patients and amputation in 47%; osteomyelitis was identified in 47% of cases. All patients started empiric antibiotic therapy, where ciprofloxacin/metronidazole was the most used scheme (76.5%. Cultures were negative in 12.5% of the patients. In the positive ones, the most prevalent bacterial pathogens detected in the culture materials were: S. aureus (57.1%; S. viridans (28.7%; P. aeruginosas (28.7%; M. morganii (28.7%. The majority (75% of isolated S. aureus were methicillin-resistant, but were sensitive to vacomicin. Conclusion: We observed the presence of polymicrobial flora with a large number of multiresistant pathogens and high prevalence of osteomyelitis and amputations in diabetic patients with severe ulcers, neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease.

  11. Inpatient rehabilitation following stroke: amount of therapy received and associations with functional recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Norine; McClure, J Andrew; Meyer, Matthew; Salter, Katherine; Bureau, Yves; Teasell, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Canada's Best Practice Recommendations for Stroke Care state that a minimum of one hour per day of each of the relevant core therapies be provided to patients admitted for inpatient rehabilitation. We examined whether this standard was met on a single, specialized stroke rehabilitation unit and if amount of therapy was an independent contributor to functional improvement. One-hundred and twenty-three, consecutive patients admitted to a 30-bed stroke rehabilitation program over a 6-month period with the confirmed diagnosis of stroke, were included. Workload measurement data were used to estimate the amount of therapy that patients received from core therapists during their inpatient stay. A multivariable model to predict Functional Independence Measure (FIM) gains achieved was also developed using variables that were significantly correlated with functional gain on univariate analysis. On average, patients received 37 min of active therapy from both physiotherapists (PT) and occupational therapists (OT) and 13 min from speech-language pathologists per day. Admission FIM, length of stay, total OT and PT therapy time (hrs) were significantly correlated with FIM gain. In the final model, which explained 35% of the variance, admission FIM score and total amount of occupational therapy (OT) emerged as significant predictors of FIM gain. Patients admitted to a specialized rehabilitation unit received an average of 37 min a day engaged in therapeutic activities with both occupational and physical therapists. Although this value did not reach the standard of one hour, total amount of OT time contributed significantly to gains in FIM points during hospital stay.

  12. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aerobic activity: relative intensity and absolute intensity. Relative Intensity The level of effort required by a person to do an activity. When using relative intensity, people pay attention to how physical activity affects ...

  13. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... aerobic activity: relative intensity and absolute intensity. Relative Intensity The level of effort required by a person to do an activity. When using relative intensity, people pay attention to how physical activity affects ...

  14. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Compartir For more help with what counts as aerobic activity, watch this video: Windows Media Player, 4: ... ways to understand and measure the intensity of aerobic activity: relative intensity and absolute intensity. Relative Intensity ...

  15. Electronic Services Monthly MI Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — This electronic services monthly MI report contains monthly MI data for most public facing online online applications such as iClaim, electronic access, Mobile wage...

  16. Descriptive analysis of medication errors reported to the Egyptian national online reporting system during six months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehata, Zahraa Hassan Abdelrahman; Sabri, Nagwa Ali; Elmelegy, Ahmed Abdelsalam

    2016-03-01

    This study analyzes reports to the Egyptian medication error (ME) reporting system from June to December 2014. Fifty hospital pharmacists received training on ME reporting using the national reporting system. All received reports were reviewed and analyzed. The pieces of data analyzed were patient age, gender, clinical setting, stage, type, medication(s), outcome, cause(s), and recommendation(s). Over the course of 6 months, 12,000 valid reports were gathered and included in this analysis. The majority (66%) came from inpatient settings, while 23% came from intensive care units, and 11% came from outpatient departments. Prescribing errors were the most common type of MEs (54%), followed by monitoring (25%) and administration errors (16%). The most frequent error was incorrect dose (20%) followed by drug interactions, incorrect drug, and incorrect frequency. Most reports were potential (25%), prevented (11%), or harmless (51%) errors; only 13% of reported errors lead to patient harm. The top three medication classes involved in reported MEs were antibiotics, drugs acting on the central nervous system, and drugs acting on the cardiovascular system. Causes of MEs were mostly lack of knowledge, environmental factors, lack of drug information sources, and incomplete prescribing. Recommendations for addressing MEs were mainly staff training, local ME reporting, and improving work environment. There are common problems among different healthcare systems, so that sharing experiences on the national level is essential to enable learning from MEs. Internationally, there is a great need for standardizing ME terminology, to facilitate knowledge transfer. Underreporting, inaccurate reporting, and a lack of reporter diversity are some limitations of this study. Egypt now has a national database of MEs that allows researchers and decision makers to assess the problem, identify its root causes, and develop preventive strategies. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University

  17. Your Baby's Growth: 3 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Be Smart About Social Media Your Baby's Growth: 3 Months KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Baby's Growth: 3 Months Print A A A What's in ... months of life are a period of rapid growth. Your baby will gain about 1 to 1½ ...

  18. Monthly energy review, August 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-08-01

    The Monthly Energy Review for the month of August 1997, presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors.

  19. Neonatal intensive care: satisfaction measured from a parent's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, J M; Nelson, E C

    1999-01-01

    Health care systems today are complex, technically proficient, competitive, and market-driven. One outcome of this environment is the recent phenomenon in the health care field of "consumerism." Strong emphasis is placed on customer service, with organized efforts to understand, measure, and meet the needs of customers served. The purpose of this article is to describe the current understanding and measurement of parent needs and expectations with neonatal intensive care services from the time the expectant parents enter the health care system for the birth through the discharge process and follow-up care. Through literature review, 11 dimensions of care were identified as important to parents whose infants received neonatal intensive care: assurance, caring, communication, consistent information, education, environment, follow-up care, pain management, participation, proximity, and support. Five parent satisfaction questionnaires-the Parent Feedback Questionnaire, Neonatal Index of Parent Satisfaction, Inpatient Parent Satisfaction-Children's Hospital Minneapolis, Picker Institute-Inpatient Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Survey, and the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit-Parent Satisfaction Form-are critically reviewed for their ability to measure parent satisfaction within the framework of the neonatal care delivery process. An immense gap was found in our understanding about what matters most and when to parents going through the neonatal intensive care experience. Additional research is required to develop comprehensive parent satisfaction surveys that measure parent perceptions of neonatal care within the framework of the care delivery process.

  20. Multidisciplinary intervention reducing readmissions in medical inpatients: a prospective, non-randomized study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torisson G

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Gustav Torisson,1 Lennart Minthon,1 Lars Stavenow,2 Elisabet Londos1 1Clinical Memory Research Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, 2Department of Internal Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden Background: The purpose of this study was to examine whether a multidisciplinary intervention targeting drug-related problems, cognitive impairment, and discharge miscommunication could reduce readmissions in a general hospital population. Methods: This prospective, non-randomized intervention study was carried out at the department of general internal medicine at a tertiary university hospital. Two hundred medical inpatients living in the community and aged over 60 years were included. Ninety-nine patients received interventions and 101 received standard care. Control/intervention allocation was determined by geographic selection. Interventions consisted of a comprehensive medication review, improved discharge planning, post-discharge telephone follow-up, and liaison with the patient's general practitioner. The main outcome measures recorded were readmissions and hospital nights 12 months after discharge. Separate analyses were made for 12-month survivors and from an intention-to-treat perspective. Comparative analyses were made between groups as well as within groups over time. Results: After 12 months, survivors in the control group had 125 readmissions in total, compared with 58 in the intervention group (Mann–Whitney U test, P = 0.02. For hospital nights, the numbers were 1,228 and 492, respectively (P = 0.009. Yearly admissions had increased from the previous year in the control group from 77 to 125 (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, P = 0.002 and decreased from 75 to 58 in the intervention group (P = 0.25. From the intention-to-treat perspective, the same general pattern was observed but was not significant (1,827 versus 1,008 hospital nights, Mann–Whitney test, P = 0.054. Conclusion: A multidisciplinary approach

  1. Inpatient capacity at children's hospitals during pandemic (H1N1) 2009 outbreak, United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sills, Marion R; Hall, Matthew; Fieldston, Evan S; Hain, Paul D; Simon, Harold K; Brogan, Thomas V; Fagbuyi, Daniel B; Mundorff, Michael B; Shah, Samir S

    2011-09-01

    Quantifying how close hospitals came to exhausting capacity during the outbreak of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 can help the health care system plan for more virulent pandemics. This ecologic analysis used emergency department (ED) and inpatient data from 34 US children's hospitals. For the 11-week pandemic (H1N1) 2009 period during fall 2009, inpatient occupancy reached 95%, which was lower than the 101% occupancy during the 2008-09 seasonal influenza period. Fewer than 1 additional admission per 10 inpatient beds would have caused hospitals to reach 100% occupancy. Using parameters based on historical precedent, we built 5 models projecting inpatient occupancy, varying the ED visit numbers and admission rate for influenza-related ED visits. The 5 scenarios projected median occupancy as high as 132% of capacity. The pandemic did not exhaust inpatient bed capacity, but a more virulent pandemic has the potential to push children's hospitals past their maximum inpatient capacity.

  2. The dream content characteristics of neurosis inpatients%住院神经症患者梦的内容特点

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江琳琳; 李晓驷; 周晓琴; 季益富; 谢雯; 杜晓玮; 金琼; 杨赛花; 王晓玲

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨住院神经症患者梦的内容特点.方法 连续收集符合CCMD-3神经症诊断标准的住院患者所叙述的印象深刻、入院前1月内、住院1~2周、住院3~4周以及出院前等不同阶段的梦,用Hall/van de Castle梦内容分析法对梦的内容进行多维度分析.结果 共收集30例患者不同阶段的梦196个(男110个梦,女86个梦).与Calvin提供的常模相比,患者梦中出现的熟人、亲人较多,友好、性行为少,幸运事件多;男患者较女患者多攻击行为、熟悉场景,性行为;男患者对同性有较高的攻击行为,对异性有较低的友好行为.结论 与Calvin提供的常模相比,住院神经症患者梦的内容有其特点且男女患者的梦有所不同.%Objective To investigate the dream content characteristics of neurosis inpatients. Methods That the continuous dreams reported by the neurosis inpatients which met the CCMD-3 diagnostic criteria of neurosis were collected in different periods, namely impressed, prior to admission in a month, 1 ~2 weeks in hospital, 2 ~4 weeks in hospital and before discharged, then the dream contents were analysis multidimensionally by Hall and Van de Castle's system of content analysis. Results There were totally 196 dreams from 30 inpatients( 110 of male's,86 of female's ). Compared with the Calvin's norm, the neurosis inpatients dreamed more familiarity, family, good fortune, but less friendliness and sex. Male inpatients exhibited more aggression, familiar setting and sex than those in women. Male inpatients dreamed more aggression to the same-sex, but had less friendliness to the opposite sex.Conclusion Compared with the Calvin's norm, neurosis inpatient's dream content has its characteristics and shows differences between male and female.

  3. The implementation and evaluation of cognitive milieu therapy for dual diagnosis inpatients: A pragmatic clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Jørn; Oestrich, I.; Austin, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    milieu therapy (CMT) among a group of dual diagnosis inpatients. CMT is an integrated treatment for both mental illness and substance abuse based on cognitive behavioral principles and carried out within a supportive inpatient environment. A convenience sample of dual diagnosis inpatients (N = 136......Dual diagnosis is chronic psychiatric condition involving serious mental illness and substance abuse. Experts recommend the integration of treatment for concurrent substance abuse and serious psychiatric problems. The following pragmatic trial examined the implementation and outcomes of cognitive...

  4. A qualitative study on nurses' reactions to inpatient suicide in a general hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shujie Wang

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions: Nurses who experienced inpatient suicide became stressed. Effective interventions must be implemented to improve the coping mechanisms of nurses against the negative consequences of inpatient suicide. The findings of this study will allow administrators to gain insight into the impacts of inpatient suicides on nurses in general hospitals. Such information can be used to develop effective strategies and provide individual support and ongoing education. Consequently, nurses will acquire suicide prevention skills and help patients achieve swift recovery.

  5. Improvement in verbal memory performance in depressed in-patients after treatment with electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, S V; Bumb, J M; Demirakca, T; Ende, G; Sartorius, A

    2016-12-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a highly effective and well-tolerated therapy for severe and treatment-resistant depression. Cognitive side-effects are still feared by some patients and clinicians. Importantly, cognitive impairments are among the most disabling symptoms of depression itself. Patients suffering from a severe episode of depression were treated with either ECT or treatment as usual (TAU) in an in-patient setting. Matched healthy participants served as controls (HC). Verbal memory was tested with the California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT) before the specific treatment started (ECT = 15, TAU = 16, HC = 31) and 2 months after the last ECT session or 2 months after discharge respectively. Before the specific treatment started, depressed patients performed substantially worse compared with HC in total, short- and long-delay recall in the CVLT, while the ECT group showed the worst performance. More severely depressed patients showed worse performances in these measures. Intriguingly, verbal memory showed a significant improvement in ECT-treated patients, but not in the other groups. No differences between the groups were found at follow-up. Contrary to the widely feared assumption that ECT has long-term impact on memory functions, we found evidence that ECT is superior to TAU in improving verbal memory in depressed patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Experiencing intensive care: women's voices in Jordan

    OpenAIRE

    Zeilani, Ruqayya Sayed Ali

    2008-01-01

    This study explores women's experiences of critical illness in Jordanian intensive care units. A narrative approach was employed to access Jordanian women's stories of their critical illness and to study how these accounts changed during the period following their discharge from intensive care. The study was conducted in two hospitals in a major Jordanian city. A purposive sample of 16 women who had spent at least 48 hours in intensive care was recruited over a period of six months, with each...

  7. The ED-inpatient dashboard: Uniting emergency and inpatient clinicians to improve the efficiency and quality of care for patients requiring emergency admission to hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staib, Andrew; Sullivan, Clair; Jones, Matt; Griffin, Bronwyn; Bell, Anthony; Scott, Ian

    2017-06-01

    Patients who require emergency admission to hospital require complex care that can be fragmented, occurring in the ED, across the ED-inpatient interface (EDii) and subsequently, in their destination inpatient ward. Our hospital had poor process efficiency with slow transit times for patients requiring emergency care. ED clinicians alone were able to improve the processes and length of stay for the patients discharged directly from the ED. However, improving the efficiency of care for patients requiring emergency admission to true inpatient wards required collaboration with reluctant inpatient clinicians. The inpatient teams were uninterested in improving time-based measures of care in isolation, but they were motivated by improving patient outcomes. We developed a dashboard showing process measures such as 4 h rule compliance rate coupled with clinically important outcome measures such as inpatient mortality. The EDii dashboard helped unite both ED and inpatient teams in clinical redesign to improve both efficiencies of care and patient outcomes. © 2016 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  8. Patients Prefer Boarding in Inpatient Hallways: Correlation with the National Emergency Department Overcrowding Score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Richards

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The boarding of patients in Emergency Department (ED hallways when no inpatient beds are available is a major cause of ED crowding. One solution is to board admitted patients in an inpatient rather than ED hallway. We surveyed patients to determine their preference and correlated their responses to real-time National Emergency Department Overcrowding Score (NEDOCS. Methods. This was a survey of admitted patients in the ED of an urban university level I trauma center serving a community of 5 million about their personal preferences regarding boarding. Real-time NEDOCS was calculated at the time each survey was conducted. Results. 99 total surveys were completed during October 2010, 42 (42% patients preferred to be boarded in an inpatient hallway, 33 (33% preferred the ED hallway, and 24 (24% had no preference. Mean (±SD NEDOCS (range 0–200 was 136±46 for patients preferring inpatient boarding, 112±39 for ED boarding, and 119±43 without preference. Male patients preferred inpatient hallway boarding significantly more than females. Preference for inpatient boarding was associated with a significantly higher NEDOCS. Conclusions. In this survey study, patients prefer inpatient hallway boarding when the hospital is at or above capacity. Males prefer inpatient hallway boarding more than females. The preference for inpatient hallway boarding increases as the ED becomes more crowded.

  9. Analysis of Factors Influencing Inpatient and Outpatient Satisfaction with the Chinese Military Health Service

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lv, Yipeng; Xue, Chen; Ge, Yang; Ye, Feng; Liu, Xu; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Lulu

    2016-01-01

    Relatively few articles have focused on exploring factors influencing soldiers' overall satisfaction and differences between inpatients' and outpatients' satisfaction, particularly in the Chinese army...

  10. Analysis of Factors Influencing Inpatient and Outpatient Satisfaction with the Chinese Military Health Service: e0151234

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yipeng Lv; Chen Xue; Yang Ge; Feng Ye; Xu Liu; Yuan Liu; Lulu Zhang

    2016-01-01

      Background Relatively few articles have focused on exploring factors influencing soldiers' overall satisfaction and differences between inpatients' and outpatients' satisfaction, particularly in the Chinese army...

  11. Physical therapy treatment time during inpatient spinal cord injury rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Schroeder, Sally; LaBarbera, Jacqueline; McDowell, Shari; Zanca, Jeanne M.; Natale, Audrey; Mumma, Sherry; Gassaway, Julie; Backus, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Background/objective To describe the nature and distribution of activities during physical therapy (PT) delivered in inpatient spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation and discuss predictors (patient and injury characteristics) of the amount of time spent in PT for specific treatment activities. Methods Six hundred patients from six inpatient SCI centers were enrolled in the SCIRehab study. Physical therapists documented details, including time spent, of treatment provided during 37 306 PT sessions that occurred during inpatient SCI rehabilitation. Ordinary least squares regression models associated patient and injury characteristics with time spent in specific PT activities. Results SCIRehab patients received a mean total of 55.3 hours of PT over the course of their rehabilitation stay. Significant differences among four neurologic groups were seen in the amount of time spent on most activities, including the most common PT activities of strengthening exercises, stretching, transfer training, wheelchair mobility training, and gait training. Most PT work (77%) was provided in individual therapy sessions; the remaining 23% was done in group settings. Patient and injury characteristics explained only some of the variations seen in time spent on wheelchair mobility, transfer and bed mobility training, and range of motion/stretching. Conclusion Analysis yielded both expected and unexpected trends in SCI rehabilitation. Significant variation was seen in time spent on PT activities within and among injury groups. Providing therapeutic strengthening treatments consumed the greatest proportion of PT time. About one-quarter of all PT services were provided in group settings. Details about services provided, including time spent, will serve as a starting point in detailing the optimal treatment delivery for maximal outcomes. PMID:21675354

  12. Group therapy utilization in inpatient spinal cord injury rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanca, Jeanne M; Dijkers, Marcel P; Hsieh, Ching-Hui; Heinemann, Allen W; Horn, Susan D; Smout, Randall J; Backus, Deborah

    2013-04-01

    To describe group therapy utilization in spinal cord injury (SCI) inpatient rehabilitation. Prospective observational study. Six inpatient rehabilitation facilities. Patients (N=1376) receiving initial rehabilitation after traumatic SCI. Not applicable. Time spent in group versus individual therapy for physical therapy (PT), occupational therapy (OT), therapeutic recreation (TR), and psychology (PSY) therapies. The majority (98%) of patients participated in at least 1 group therapy session, with 83%, 81%, 80%, and 54% of patients receiving group PT, OT, TR, and PSY, respectively. On average, 24% of treatment sessions and 27% of treatment time was provided in group sessions, with TR providing the greatest percent of its time in groups. Group therapy time and time spent in specific activities varied among patient subgroups with different injury characteristics. Group therapy time also varied widely among centers (range, 1.2-6.6h/wk). Across all injury subgroups, individual and group therapy hours per week were negatively correlated for OT and positively correlated for TR. Patient characteristics, clinician experience, and treatment center predicted 32% of variance in group hours per week. PT and OT strengthening/endurance interventions and TR outings were the most common group activities overall. While the majority of inpatient SCI rehabilitation consists of individual sessions, most patients participate in group therapy, which contributes significantly to total therapy time. Patterns of group utilization fit with functional expectations and clinical goals. A trade-off between group and individual therapy may occur in some disciplines. Utilization of group therapy varies widely among centers, and further study is needed to identify optimal patterns of group therapy utilization. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Reducing Psychiatric Inpatient Readmissions Using an Organizational Change Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molfenter, Todd; Connor, Tim; Ford, James H; Hyatt, John; Zimmerman, Dan

    2016-06-01

    Thirty-day hospital readmission rates have become a quality indicator for many regulators and payers, but published accounts of reducing these rates across a patient population are lacking. This article describes and evaluates the Wisconsin Mental Health Readmissions Project, which aimed to reduce psychiatric inpatient 30-day readmission rates in Wisconsin. Nineteen county human services boards representing 23 of Wisconsin's 72 counties and 61% of the state's residential admissions participated in a statewide quality improvement collaborative from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2013. Participants applied a standardized organizational change model, called NIATx, in the context of a multicounty quality improvement collaborative to reduce 30-day readmission rates. Readmission rates were tracked through national and state databases, using 2009 as a baseline, and analyzed using a chi-square analysis to test the proportion of means. The study team compared readmission rates of Wisconsin counties that participated in the statewide collaborative with those that did not. Between 2009 and 2013, the 30-day readmission rates in Wisconsin declined significantly for counties that participated in the project when compared to those that did not (2009-2013) [Χ2(4) = 54.503, P < .001], based on a 2.5% decline for participants vs a 0.7% decline for nonparticipants. Reductions to behavioral health inpatient readmission rates beyond individual case examples have been difficult to document. This analysis evaluates a method that Wisconsin behavioral health providers applied as part of a multicounty program addressing readmission rates. The findings highlight quality improvement program design elements and interventions to consider in reducing inpatient behavioral health readmissions, as well as the need for further research on this complex systems issue.

  14. Etiological features of cirrhosis inpatients in Beijing, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Guang-jun; FENG Bo; RAO Hui-ying; WEI Lai

    2013-01-01

    Background The etiological spectrum of cirrhosis has changed over the years,but our knowledge of it is limited.The present study aimed to investigate the etiological features of cirrhosis inpatients and their variation in the past 18 years in Beijing.Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on all patients with cirrhosis diagnosed for the first time in Peking University People's Hospital from January 1,1993,to October 25,2010.Data were analyzed using SPSS 20.0.Results A total of 2119 cirrhosis inpatients were included in this study:1412 (66.6%) male and 707 (33.4%) female.Chronic hepatitis B accounted for 58.7%; chronic hepatitis C for 7.6%; chronic hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus co-infection for 0.8% (16 cases); alcoholic liver disease for 9.4% (200 cases); and autoimmune diseases for 9.4% (199 cases).In the past 18 years,the percentage of chronic hepatitis B has decreased from 75.2% to 48.7%; alcoholic liver disease has increased from 5.1% to 10.6%; and autoimmune disease has increased from 2.2% to 12.9%.The percentages of chronic hepatitis B and alcoholic liver disease were higher among men,whereas the percentages of chronic hepatitis C,autoimmune diseases and cryptogenic cirrhosis were higher among women.Conclusions Chronic hepatitis B was still the most common etiology of cirrhosis in China,but the percentage has been decreasing.The percentages of alcoholic liver disease and autoimmune diseases have been increasing.The etiological spectrum of cirrhosis inpatients differed significantly according to sex.

  15. A Multicenter Collaborative to Reduce Unnecessary Care in Inpatient Bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston, Shawn L; Garber, Matthew D; Rice-Conboy, Elizabeth; Mussman, Grant M; Shadman, Kristin A; Walley, Susan C; Nichols, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based Guidelines for acute viral bronchiolitis recommend primarily supportive care, but unnecessary care remains well documented. Published quality improvement work has been accomplished in children's hospitals, but little broad dissemination has been reported outside of those settings. We sought to use a voluntary collaborative strategy to disseminate best practices to reduce overuse of unnecessary care in children hospitalized for bronchiolitis in community settings. This project was a quality improvement collaborative consisting of monthly interactive webinars with online data collection and feedback. Data were collected by chart review for 2 bronchiolitis seasons, defined as January, February, and March of 2013 and 2014. Patients aged bronchiolitis and without chronic illness, prematurity, or intensive care use were included. Results were analyzed using run charting, analysis of means, and nonparametric statistics. There were 21 participating hospitals contributing a total of 1869 chart reviews to the project, 995 preintervention and 874 postintervention. Mean use of any bronchodilator declined by 29% (P = .03) and doses per patient decreased 45% (P < .01). Mean use of any steroids declined by 68% (P < .01), and doses per patient decreased 35% (P = .04). Chest radiography use declined by 44% (P = .05). Length of stay decreased 5 hours (P < .01), and readmissions remained unchanged. A voluntary collaborative was effective in reducing unnecessary care among a cohort of primarily community hospitals. Such a strategy may be generalizable to the settings where the majority of children are hospitalized in the United States. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  16. [Inpatient treatment of depression. Should one combine psychotherapy and drugs?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, T J

    2005-03-01

    Antidepressants as well as different psychotherapeutic strategies have been proven efficacious in the treatment of unipolar depression. In the clinical setting both are often combined using psychotherapeutic methods varying from psychoeducation to formal psychotherapy. The present article provides a critical overview of the evidence base for this combination in the inpatient treatment of depression. The current literature is contradictory and difficult to compare. However, combination therapy appears advantageous in therapy-resistant, chronic and severe forms of depressive disorders. Much further research is needed to facilitate well-founded guidelines.

  17. Improving the efficiency of patient throughput via centralized inpatient scheduling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Mark W

    2010-01-01

    Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center implemented a centralized scheduling system in order to increase efficiency and throughput, improve customer satisfaction, improve communication between departments,and create a single schedule (IP/ED/OP) per modality. Most resistance for the change came from technologists, so a formal design team was established for each modality, which included a core information systems (IS) team member,the lead technologist of the modality, and the technologist most able to influence the other technologists who might be resistant to change. Overall,throughput increased by 3.14% post-implementation of the inpatient scheduling software.

  18. Higher Inpatient Medical Surgical Bed Occupancy Extends Admitted Patients’ Stay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krall, Scott P

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Determine the effect that increased medical surgical (med/surg bed occupancy has on the time interval from admission order to arrival in the bed for the patients admitted from the emergency department (ED.METHODS: This retrospective observational study compares the total hospital bed occupancy rate and the medical surgical inpatient bed occupancy rate to daily averages for the time interval from admission order (patient posting for admission to the patient's arrival in the inpatient bed. Medical surgical inpatient bed occupancy of 92% was chosen because beyond that rate we observed more frequent extended daily transfer times. The data is from a single large tertiary care institute with 590 beds and an annual ED census of 80,000.RESULTS: Group 1 includes 38 days with (med/surg inpatient bed occupancy rate of less than 92%, with an average ED daily wait of 2.5 hrs (95% confidence interval 2.23-2.96 for transfer from the ED to the appropriate hospital bed. Group 2 includes 68 days with med/surg census greater than 92% with an average ED daily wait of 4.1 hours (95% confidence interval 3.7-4.5. Minimum daily average for the two groups was 1.2 hrs and 1.3 hrs, respectively. The maximum average was 5.6 hrs for group 1 and 8.6 hrs for group 2. Comparison of group 1 to 2 for wait time to hospital bed yielded p <0.01. Total reported hospital occupied capacity shows a correlation coefficient of 0.16 to transfer time interval, which indicates a weak relationship between total occupancy and transfer time into the hospital. Med/surg occupancy, the beds typically used by ED patients, has a 0.62 correlation coefficient for a moderately strong relationship.CONCLUSIONS: Med/surg bed occupancy has a better correlation to extended transfer times, and occupancy over 92% at 5 AM in our institution corresponds to an increased frequency of extended transfer times from the ED. The process of ED evaluation, hospital admission, and subsequent transfer into the

  19. Higher inpatient medical surgical bed occupancy extends admitted patients' stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krall, Scott; O'Connor, Robert E; Maercks, Lisa

    2009-05-01

    Determine the effect that increased medical surgical (med/surg) bed occupancy has on the time interval from admission order to arrival in the bed for the patients admitted from the emergency department (ED). This retrospective observational study compares the total hospital bed occupancy rate and the medical surgical inpatient bed occupancy rate to daily averages for the time interval from admission order (patient posting for admission) to the patient's arrival in the inpatient bed. Medical surgical inpatient bed occupancy of 92% was chosen because beyond that rate we observed more frequent extended daily transfer times. The data is from a single large tertiary care institute with 590 beds and an annual ED census of 80,000. Group 1 includes 38 days with (med/surg) inpatient bed occupancy rate of less than 92%, with an average ED daily wait of 2.5 hrs (95% confidence interval 2.23-2.96) for transfer from the ED to the appropriate hospital bed. Group 2 includes 68 days with med/surg census greater than 92% with an average ED daily wait of 4.1 hours (95% confidence interval 3.7-4.5). Minimum daily average for the two groups was 1.2 hrs and 1.3 hrs, respectively. The maximum average was 5.6 hrs for group 1 and 8.6 hrs for group 2. Comparison of group 1 to 2 for wait time to hospital bed yielded p occupancy and transfer time into the hospital. Med/surg occupancy, the beds typically used by ED patients, has a 0.62 correlation coefficient for a moderately strong relationship. Med/surg bed occupancy has a better correlation to extended transfer times, and occupancy over 92% at 5 AM in our institution corresponds to an increased frequency of extended transfer times from the ED. The process of ED evaluation, hospital admission, and subsequent transfer into the hospital are all complex processes. This study begins to demonstrate one variable, med/surg occupancy, as one of the intervals that can be followed to evaluate the process of ED admission and hospital flow.

  20. Higher Inpatient Medical Surgical Bed Occupancy Extends Admitted Patients’ Stay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krall, Scott; O’Connor, Robert E.; Maercks, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Determine the effect that increased medical surgical (med/surg) bed occupancy has on the time interval from admission order to arrival in the bed for the patients admitted from the emergency department (ED). Methods: This retrospective observational study compares the total hospital bed occupancy rate and the medical surgical inpatient bed occupancy rate to daily averages for the time interval from admission order (patient posting for admission) to the patient’s arrival in the inpatient bed. Medical surgical inpatient bed occupancy of 92% was chosen because beyond that rate we observed more frequent extended daily transfer times. The data is from a single large tertiary care institute with 590 beds and an annual ED census of 80,000. Results: Group 1 includes 38 days with (med/surg) inpatient bed occupancy rate of less than 92%, with an average ED daily wait of 2.5 hrs (95% confidence interval 2.23–2.96) for transfer from the ED to the appropriate hospital bed. Group 2 includes 68 days with med/surg census greater than 92% with an average ED daily wait of 4.1 hours (95% confidence interval 3.7–4.5). Minimum daily average for the two groups was 1.2 hrs and 1.3 hrs, respectively. The maximum average was 5.6 hrs for group 1 and 8.6 hrs for group 2. Comparison of group 1 to 2 for wait time to hospital bed yielded p occupancy and transfer time into the hospital. Med/surg occupancy, the beds typically used by ED patients, has a 0.62 correlation coefficient for a moderately strong relationship. Conclusions: Med/surg bed occupancy has a better correlation to extended transfer times, and occupancy over 92% at 5 AM in our institution corresponds to an increased frequency of extended transfer times from the ED. The process of ED evaluation, hospital admission, and subsequent transfer into the hospital are all complex processes. This study begins to demonstrate one variable, med/surg occupancy, as one of the intervals that can be followed to evaluate the

  1. Parental opinions regarding an opt-out consent process for inpatient pediatric prospective observational research in the US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Danielle M; Roland, Allison P; Morris, Marilyn C

    2017-01-01

    Objective To explore parental opinions regarding opt-out consent for inpatient pediatric prospective observational research in the US. Study design A series of handouts describing hypothetical observational research studies with opt-out consent were reviewed by parents of hospitalized children. A verbal survey explored parental opinions about the proposed consent process. Results A total of 166 parents reviewed the handout and completed the survey. Only 2/166 parents (1.2%) objected to the study described and another 10 (6.0%) cited concern about the privacy of their child’s medical information. A total of 157 parents were asked “Is it okay to tell you about this kind of research using this handout?” – 116 (74%) responded positively, 19 (12%) responded negatively, and 21 (13%) made an indeterminate or neutral response. When parents were asked to recommend a specific consent approach for observational research, 86 (52%) chose an opt-in approach, 54 (33%) chose opt-out, and 25 (15%) chose “no consent needed”. There were no significant associations between parental preferences and whether the child was admitted to the intensive care unit vs. pediatric ward, and no significant difference found based on type of handout reviewed (generic vs. study-specific). Conclusion Few parents voiced objection to a hypothetical opt-out consent process for inpatient pediatric prospective observational research. When asked to recommend a specific consent approach, though, approximately half chose an opt-in approach. These data suggest that an opt-out consent process for observational inpatient research is likely to be acceptable to parents, but assessment of an opt-out consent process in a real-world setting is needed. PMID:28176926

  2. The High Cost of HIV-Positive Inpatient Care at an Urban Hospital in Johannesburg, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence C Long

    Full Text Available While most HIV care is provided on an outpatient basis, hospitals continue to treat serious HIV-related admissions, which is relatively resource-intensive and expensive. This study reports the primary reasons for HIV-related admission at a regional, urban hospital in Johannesburg, South Africa and estimates the associated lengths of stay and costs.A retrospective cohort study of adult, medical admissions was conducted. Each admission was assigned a reason for admission and an outcome. The length of stay was calculated for all patients (N = 1,041 and for HIV-positive patients (n = 469, actual utilization and associated costs were also estimated. Just under half were known to be HIV-positive admissions. Deaths and transfers were proportionately higher amongst HIV-positive admissions compared to HIV-negative and unknown. The three most common reasons for admission were tuberculosis and other mycobacterial infections (18%, n = 187, cardiovascular disorders (12%, n = 127 and bacterial infections (12%, n = 121. The study sample utilized a total of 7,733 bed days of those, 55% (4,259/7,733 were for HIV-positive patients. The average cost per admission amongst confirmed HIV-positive patients, which was an average of 9.3 days in length, was $1,783 (United States Dollars.Even in the era of large-scale antiretroviral treatment, inpatient facilities in South Africa shoulder a significant HIV burden. The majority of this burden is related to patients not on ART (298/469, 64%, and accounts for more than half of all inpatient resources. Reducing the costs of inpatient care is thus another important benefit of expanding access to ART, promoting earlier ART initiation, and achieving rates of ART retention and adherence.

  3. Factors affecting family satisfaction with inpatient end-of-life care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Sadler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little data exists addressing satisfaction with end-of-life care among hospitalized patients, as they and their family members are systematically excluded from routine satisfaction surveys. It is imperative that we closely examine patient and institution factors associated with quality end-of-life care and determine high-priority target areas for quality improvement. METHODS: Between September 1, 2010 and January 1, 2012 the Canadian Health care Evaluation Project (CANHELP Bereavement Questionnaire was mailed to the next-of-kin of recently deceased inpatients to seek factors associated with satisfaction with end-of-life care. The primary outcome was the global rating of satisfaction. Secondary outcomes included rates of actual versus preferred location of death, associations between demographic factors and global satisfaction, and identification of targets for quality improvement. RESULTS: Response rate was 33% among 275 valid addresses. Overall, 67.4% of respondents were very or completely satisfied with the overall quality of care their relative received. However, 71.4% of respondents who thought their relative did not die in their preferred location favoured an out-of-hospital location of death. A common location of death was the intensive care unit (45.7%; however, this was not the preferred location of death for 47.6% of such patients. Multivariate Poisson regression analysis showed respondents who believed their relative died in their preferred location were 1.7 times more likely to be satisfied with the end-of-life care that was provided (p = 0.001. Items identified as high-priority targets for improvement included: relationships with, and characteristics of health care professionals; illness management; communication; and end-of-life decision-making. INTERPRETATION: Nearly three-quarters of recently deceased inpatients would have preferred an out-of-hospital death. Intensive care units were a common, but not preferred

  4. Natural Gas Monthly, October 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-10

    The (NGM) Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. This month`s feature articles are: US Production of Natural Gas from Tight Reservoirs: and Expanding Rule of Underground Storage.

  5. Natural gas monthly, May 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-25

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The featured articles for this month are: Opportunities with fuel cells, and revisions to monthly natural gas data.

  6. Monthly energy review, January 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    This report presents an overview of recent monthly energy statistics. Major activities covered include production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for fossil fuels, electricity, and nuclear energy.

  7. Natural gas monthly, July 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article this month is entitled ``Intricate puzzle of oil and gas reserves growth.`` A special report is included on revisions to monthly natural gas data. 6 figs., 24 tabs.

  8. Monthly Program Cost Report (MPCR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Monthly Program Cost Report (MPCR) replaces the Cost Distribution Report (CDR). The MPCR provides summary information about Veterans Affairs operational costs,...

  9. Less Intense Postacute Care, Better Outcomes For Enrollees In Medicare Advantage Than Those In Fee-For-Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckfeldt, Peter J; Escarce, José J; Rabideau, Brendan; Karaca-Mandic, Pinar; Sood, Neeraj

    2017-01-01

    Traditional fee-for-service (FFS) Medicare's prospective payment systems for postacute care provide little incentive to coordinate care or control costs. In contrast, Medicare Advantage plans pay for postacute care out of monthly capitated payments and thus have stronger incentives to use it efficiently. We compared the use of postacute care in skilled nursing and inpatient rehabilitation facilities by enrollees in Medicare Advantage and FFS Medicare after hospital discharge for three high-volume conditions: lower extremity joint replacement, stroke, and heart failure. After accounting for differences in patient characteristics at discharge, we found lower intensity of postacute care for Medicare Advantage patients compared to FFS Medicare patients discharged from the same hospital, across all three conditions. Medicare Advantage patients also exhibited better outcomes than their FFS Medicare counterparts, including lower rates of hospital readmission and higher rates of return to the community. These findings suggest that payment reforms such as bundling in FFS Medicare may reduce the intensity of postacute care without adversely affecting patient health.

  10. The role of consulting psychiatrists for obstetric and gynecologic inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huang-Li; Chou, Hung-Hsueh; Liu, Chia-Yih; Hsu, Shi-Chieh; Hsiao, Mei-Chun; Juang, Yeong-Yuh

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the consultation psychiatry service to the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department in a general hospital, focusing on referral patterns and consultation recommendations. A retrospective review of the medical charts and consultation records of obstetric and gynecological patients referred for psychiatric consultation from Dec. 2003 to Nov. 2009 was performed. One hundred and eleven patients were referred during the 6-year period, a psychiatric referral rate of 0.11% among 99,098 obstetric and gynecologic admissions. Obstetric and gynecologic consultations comprised 0.64% of all psychiatric consultations. The most common reasons for referral were depression (52.25%), past psychiatric history (31.53%), insomnia (29.73%) and confusion (24.32%). The most common DSM-IV psychiatric diagnoses were depressive disorder (37.84%), schizophrenia and other psychoses (20.72%), delirium (17.12%) and adjustment disorder (10.81%). The most frequent physical diagnoses of referred patients were neoplasms (72.97%), infectious diseases (42.34%) and complications of pregnancy and puerperium (17.12%). Recommendations included pharmacological intervention (89.19%) and psychological management (72.07%). The psychiatric referral rate of obstetric and gynecological inpatients was relatively low compared with that of other departments. More collaboration and liaison between gynecologists and consultation psychiatrists may provide better care for obstetric and gynecological inpatients.

  11. Pain Control and Parent Mental Health Among Pediatric Inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Andrew; Tollefson, Ashley; Hickey, Patricia; Bares, Jennifer; Zhang, Lei

    2017-03-01

    Pain control remains a problem for hospitalized children, with more than half experiencing ongoing pain. Pain in turn negatively affects child quality of life. To clarify the relationship between inpatient pain control and parent and child psychological factors, we tested the hypotheses that pain control is worse in the context of higher child executive function problems, lower parent mindfulness, and higher parent mental health symptoms. We conducted an observational study of stable pediatric inpatients' (n = 81; mean age = 10.5 [SD 4.7]; 55% male) nurse-recorded pain scores; physical health and executive function; and parental cognitive-affective mindfulness and mental health. Linear mixed models examined associations between these variables and changes in pain scores over time, adjusting for covariates. After adjusting for child age, child gender, and parent educational status, both time (β = -.23, P = .003) and baseline pain (β = .43, P < .001) were related to pain control. After adjusting for demographics, time, and baseline pain, both parental anxiety (β = .11, P < .001) and depression (β = .12, P < .001) were significantly related to pain control. Child pain control worsened with higher parent anxiety and depression. The results highlight the importance of offering mental health resources to distressed parents of hospitalized children in pain. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  12. Aggression on inpatient units: Clinical characteristics and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renwick, Laoise; Stewart, Duncan; Richardson, Michelle; Lavelle, Mary; James, Karen; Hardy, Claire; Price, Owen; Bowers, Len

    2016-08-01

    Aggression and violence are widespread in UK Mental Health Trusts, and are accompanied by negative psychological and physiological consequences for both staff and other patients. Patients who are younger, male, and have a history of substance use and psychosis diagnoses are more likely to display aggression; however, patient factors are not solely responsible for violence, and there are complex circumstances that lead to aggression. Indeed, patient-staff interactions lead to a sizeable portion of aggression and violence on inpatient units, thus they cannot be viewed without considering other forms of conflict and containment that occur before, during, and after the aggressive incident. For this reason, we examined sequences of aggressive incidents in conjunction with other conflict and containment methods used to explore whether there were particular profiles to aggressive incidents. In the present study, 522 adult psychiatric inpatients from 84 acute wards were recruited, and there were 1422 incidents of aggression (verbal, physical against objects, and physical). Cluster analysis revealed that aggressive incident sequences could be classified into four separate groups: solo aggression, aggression-rule breaking, aggression-medication, and aggression-containment. Contrary to our expectations, we did not find physical aggression dominant in the aggression-containment cluster, and while verbal aggression occurred primarily in solo aggression, physical aggression also occurred here. This indicates that the management of aggression is variable, and although some patient factors are linked with different clusters, these do not entirely explain the variation.

  13. Cannabis use and dependence among French schizophrenic inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel eLejoyeux

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: To assess the prevalence of cannabis use and dependence in a population of schizophrenic inpatients and to compare schizophrenics with and without cannabis consumption. Methods: 101 schizophrenic patients were examined during their first week of hospitalization. They answered the PANNS scale of schizophrenia, the CAGE and the Fagerström questionnaire and the DSM-IV-TR criteria for cannabis, alcohol, opiates and nicotine use dependence were checked. We also assessed socio-demographic characteristics, the motive of cannabis consumption and the number of cannabis joints and alcoholic drinks taken.Results: The prevalence of cannabis consumption was 33.6% among schizophrenic inpatients. Schizophrenics consuming cannabis were younger than non-schizophrenics (33.3 vs 44.7 years pConclusion: 33.6 % of the schizophrenic patients hospitalized in psychiatry consume cannabis and most of them are dependent on cannabis and alcohol. Hospitalization in psychiatry may provide an opportunity to systematically identify a dependence disorder and to offer appropriate information and treatment

  14. Inpatient rehabilitation outcomes of patients with apraxia after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Andy J; Burgard, Emily; Radel, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Stroke-induced paresis commands much attention during rehabilitation; other stroke-related consequences receive less consideration. Apraxia is a stroke disorder that may have important implications for rehabilitation and recovery. To investigate association of apraxia with stroke rehabilitation outcomes during inpatient rehabilitation. This cohort study compared patients with and without apraxia after a first left hemispheric stroke. All study patients received standard of care. Clinical measures were the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and the upper extremity section of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) administered upon admission and at discharge. Length of stay was also documented. Florida Apraxia Battery subtests were used to classify patients with apraxia. Fifteen patients were included in this study, 10 of whom had apraxia. Data analysis revealed that patients with apraxia exhibited improvement from admission to discharge in clinical measures; however, admission FIM score was significantly lower compared to patients without apraxia. There was no statistically significant difference between groups on FMA score, length of stay, or amount of change on clinical measures. This study of acute patients found those with apraxia to be significantly less independent upon admission to inpatient rehabilitation compared to patients without apraxia. Although both groups improved a similar amount during rehabilitation, patients with apraxia discharged at a level of independence comparable to patients without apraxia upon admission. Such disparity in independence is of concern, and apraxia as a factor in stroke rehabilitation and recovery deserves further attention.

  15. Reduction in mental distress among substance users receiving inpatient treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friborg Oddgeir

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Substance users being admitted to inpatient treatment experience a high level of mental distress. In this study we explored changes in mental distress during treatment. Methods Mental distress, as measured by the HSCL-10, was registered at admission and at discharge among 164 substance users in inpatient treatment in Northern Norway. Predictors of reduction in mental distress were examined utilizing hierarchical regression analysis. Results We found a significant reduction in mental distress in the sample, but the number of patients scoring above cut-off on the HSCL-10 at discharge was still much higher than in the general population. A more severe use of substances as measured by the AUDIT and the DUDIT, and being female, predicted a higher level of mental distress at admission to treatment as well as greater reduction in mental distress during treatment. Holding no education beyond 10 year compulsory school only predicted a reduction in mental distress. Conclusions The toxic and withdrawal effects of substances, level of education as well as gender, contributed to the differences in change in mental distress during treatment. Regression to the mean may in part explain some of the findings.

  16. Effect of patient-selected intensive insulin therapy on quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantelau, E; Schiffers, T; Schütze, J; Hansen, B

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess quality of life in patients with IDDM in relation to the type of insulin therapy. Two patient cohorts were studied. In cohort A, 77 patients deliberately intensified their traditional insulin injection therapy from up to two daily injections with syringe to multiple daily injections with insulin-pen; in cohort B, 55 patients changed from intensive therapy with pen to insulin pump-treatment (CSII). The therapeutic regimens were changed during a 5-day in-patient treatment and teaching course. The DCCT questionnaire was applied before and up to 6 months after changing of therapy. Treatment satisfaction increased after intensification of insulin therapy in both groups, mainly due to greater flexibility with leisure-time activities, and with the diet. Pump-users reported reduced problems with hypoglycemia (P < 0.02). HbA1c indicating acceptable metabolic control already before the study, remained unchanged. Therapy-associated inconvenience, mainly in association with lifestyle, improved in IDDM patients deliberately intensifying their insulin therapy by pens or pumps (CSII). Pump-treatment, rather than pen-therapy, conferred particular protection from hypoglycaemia.

  17. The acute effects of in-patient physiotherapy program on functional capacity in type II diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdirenç, Mehtap; Koçak, Gülsah; Güntekin, Rifat

    2004-06-01

    This study was planned to evaluate the acute effects of a short-term in-patient physiotherapy program on functional capacity in hospitalised type II diabetic patients. Forty four hospitalised type II diabetic patients in continuing medical care at Dokuz Eylül University Hospital were included in this study. Twenty three of the 44 patients were randomised to an exercise rehabilitation group and 21 to a control group. Patients in the exercise group were assigned to an average 12.0+/-2.4 days low-intensity exercise rehabilitation program during hospitalisation. The control group did not receive any exercise advice. Before and after the exercise rehabilitation program all patients' functional capacity was evaluated by the 6 min walking test. There were no significant differences in the main measured parameters among groups and in the 6 min walking test at baseline. At the end of the rehabilitation program, the resting heart rate (HR) decreased by 4.1% (Prehabilitation. The Borg scale did not change in the control group. Supervised in-patient exercise rehabilitation is a safe and effective intervention in type II diabetic patients, which reduces physical impairment and improves functional ability.

  18. Emotion regulation skills training enhances the efficacy of inpatient cognitive behavioral therapy for major depressive disorder: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berking, Matthias; Ebert, David; Cuijpers, Pim; Hofmann, Stefan G

    2013-01-01

    Deficits in emotion regulation skills are possible factors maintaining major depressive disorder (MDD). Therefore, the aim of the study was to test whether integrating a systematic emotion regulation training (ERT) enhances the efficacy of routine inpatient cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for MDD. In a prospective randomized controlled trial, 432 inpatients meeting criteria for MDD were assigned to receive either routine CBT or CBT enriched with an intense emotion regulation skills training (CBT-ERT). Participants in the CBT-ERT condition demonstrated a significantly greater reduction in depression (response rates - CBT: 75.5%, CBT-ERT: 84.9%; remission rates - CBT: 51.1%, CBT-ERT: 65.1%). Moreover, CBT-ERT participants demonstrated a significantly greater reduction of negative affect, as well as a greater increase of well-being and emotion regulation skills particularly relevant for mental health. Integrating strategies that target emotion regulation skills improves the efficacy of CBT for MDD. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Decaying relevance of clinical data towards future decisions in data-driven inpatient clinical order sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jonathan H; Alagappan, Muthuraman; Goldstein, Mary K; Asch, Steven M; Altman, Russ B

    2017-06-01

    Determine how varying longitudinal historical training data can impact prediction of future clinical decisions. Estimate the "decay rate" of clinical data source relevance. We trained a clinical order recommender system, analogous to Netflix or Amazon's "Customers who bought A also bought B..." product recommenders, based on a tertiary academic hospital's structured electronic health record data. We used this system to predict future (2013) admission orders based on different subsets of historical training data (2009 through 2012), relative to existing human-authored order sets. Predicting future (2013) inpatient orders is more accurate with models trained on just one month of recent (2012) data than with 12 months of older (2009) data (ROC AUC 0.91 vs. 0.88, precision 27% vs. 22%, recall 52% vs. 43%, all P<10(-10)). Algorithmically learned models from even the older (2009) data was still more effective than existing human-authored order sets (ROC AUC 0.81, precision 16% recall 35%). Training with more longitudinal data (2009-2012) was no better than using only the most recent (2012) data, unless applying a decaying weighting scheme with a "half-life" of data relevance about 4 months. Clinical practice patterns (automatically) learned from electronic health record data can vary substantially across years. Gold standards for clinical decision support are elusive moving targets, reinforcing the need for automated methods that can adapt to evolving information. Prioritizing small amounts of recent data is more effective than using larger amounts of older data towards future clinical predictions. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Use and diversion of medical marijuana among adults admitted to inpatient psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussbaum, Abraham M; Thurstone, Christian; McGarry, Laurel; Walker, Brendan; Sabel, Allison L

    2015-03-01

    Marijuana use is associated with anxiety, depressive, psychotic, neurocognitive, and substance use disorders. Many US states are legalizing marijuana for medical uses. To determine the prevalence of medical marijuana use and diversion among psychiatric inpatients in Colorado. Some 623 participants (54.6% male) responded to an anonymous 15-item discharge survey that assessed age, gender, marijuana use, possession of a medical marijuana card, diversion of medical marijuana, perceived substance use problems, and effects of marijuana use. Univariate statistics were used to characterize participants and their responses. Chi-square tests assessed factors associated with medical marijuana registration. Of the total number of respondents, 282 (47.6%) reported using marijuana in the last 12 months and 60 (15.1%) reported having a marijuana card. In comparison to survey respondents who denied having a medical marijuana card, those respondents with a medical marijuana card were more likely to have initiated use before the age of 25, to be male, to have used marijuana in the last 12 months, and to have used at least 20 days in the past month. 133 (24.1%) respondents reported that someone with a medical marijuana card had shared or sold medical marijuana to them; 24 (41.4%) of respondents with a medical marijuana card reported ever having shared or sold their medical marijuana. Medical marijuana use is much more prevalent among adults hospitalized with a psychiatric emergency than in the general population; diversion is common. Further studies which correlate amount, dose, duration, and strain of use with particular psychiatric disorders are needed.

  1. Monthly energy review, November 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 61 tabs.

  2. Natural gas monthly, February 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-02-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  3. Monthly energy review: April 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This monthly report presents an overview of energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. A section is also included on international energy. The feature paper which is included each month is entitled ``Energy equipment choices: Fuel costs and other determinants.`` 37 figs., 59 tabs.

  4. ULTRAPLATE 30 month management report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Dahl

    2003-01-01

    In the period from month 24 to month 30 focus has been on the work-package 3 activities concerning optimisation of the newly developed ULTRAPLATE technology towards specific industrial applications. Three main application areas have been pursued: 1) High- speed plating of lead free solder contact...

  5. Your Baby's Growth: 5 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Be Smart About Social Media Your Baby's Growth: 5 Months KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Baby's Growth: 5 Months Print A A A What's in ... your child's birth, the doctor has been recording growth in weight, length, and head size (circumference) during ...

  6. Monthly energy review, November 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 91 tabs.

  7. Natural gas monthly, November 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  8. Natural gas monthly, January 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-02-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  9. Monthly energy review, October 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 61 tabs.

  10. Monthly energy review, June 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 36 figs., 61 tabs.

  11. Monthly energy review, May 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 61 tabs.

  12. Monthly energy review, January 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-01-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 61 tabs.

  13. Monthly energy review, February 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-02-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 73 tabs.

  14. Monthly energy review, March 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 74 tabs.

  15. Natural gas monthly, December 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  16. Left behind by Birth Month

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solli, Ingeborg Foldøy

    2017-01-01

    Utilizing comprehensive administrative data from Norway I investigate long-term birth month effects. I demonstrate that the oldest children in class have a substantially higher GPA than their younger peers. The birth month differences are larger for low-SES children. Furthermore, I find that the youngest children in class are lagging significantly…

  17. Monthly Energy Review, February 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-26

    This monthly publication presents an overview of EIA`s recent monthly energy statistics, covering the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. Two brief descriptions (`energy plugs`) on two EIA publications are presented at the start.

  18. Haida Months of the Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogo, Robert

    Students are introduced to Haida vocabulary in this booklet which briefly describes the seasons and traditional seasonal activities of Southeastern Alaska Natives. The first section lists the months in English and Haida; e.g., January is "Taan Kungaay," or "Bear Hunting Month." The second section contains seasonal names in…

  19. Monthly energy review, November 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 75 tabs.

  20. Monthly energy review, July 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs. 73 tabs.

  1. Post-Admission Cognitive Therapy: A Brief Intervention for Psychiatric Inpatients Admitted After a Suicide Attempt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahramanlou-Holloway, Marjan; Cox, Daniel W.; Greene, Farrah N.

    2012-01-01

    To date, no empirically based inpatient intervention for individuals who have attempted suicide exists. We present an overview of a novel psychotherapeutic approach, Post-Admission Cognitive Therapy (PACT), currently under development and empirical testing for inpatients who have been admitted for a recent suicide attempt. PACT is adapted from an…

  2. 42 CFR 440.140 - Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility services, and intermediate care facility services...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Definitions § 440.140 Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility services, and intermediate care facility... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility services, and intermediate care facility services for individuals age 65 or older in institutions...

  3. The patient's perspective on "providing structure" in psychiatric inpatient care: an interview study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, L.A.; Goossens, P.J.J.; Nugter, A.; Achterberg, T. van

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To gain insight into the patients' experiences on providing structure (PS) as a nursing intervention during psychiatric inpatient care. DESIGN AND METHOD: Interviews were conducted with patients (n = 17) from two inpatient wards within a mental healthcare organization. For data analysis, a

  4. 5 CFR 890.905 - Limits on inpatient hospital and physician charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limits on inpatient hospital and physician charges. 890.905 Section 890.905 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT... Inpatient Hospital Charges, Physician Charges, and FEHB Benefit Payments § 890.905 Limits on...

  5. Markers for aggression in inpatient treatment facilities for adults with mild to borderline intellectual disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tenneij, N.H.; Didden, H.C.M.; Stolker, J.J.; Koot, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    In high care settings for persons with intellectual disability (ID) aggressive incidents often occur. Still little is known about factors that are associated with an increased risk for aggressive behavior in clients who are admitted to an inpatient treatment facility. In four inpatient facilities, 1

  6. Post-Admission Cognitive Therapy: A Brief Intervention for Psychiatric Inpatients Admitted After a Suicide Attempt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahramanlou-Holloway, Marjan; Cox, Daniel W.; Greene, Farrah N.

    2012-01-01

    To date, no empirically based inpatient intervention for individuals who have attempted suicide exists. We present an overview of a novel psychotherapeutic approach, Post-Admission Cognitive Therapy (PACT), currently under development and empirical testing for inpatients who have been admitted for a recent suicide attempt. PACT is adapted from an…

  7. Demographics, Psychiatric Diagnoses, and Other Characteristics of North American Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Inpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Patricia A.; Glickman, Neil S.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined demographic and clinical data from a specialty deaf inpatient unit so as to better understand characteristics of severely and chronically mentally ill deaf people. The study compares deaf and hearing psychiatric inpatients on demographic variables, psychiatric discharge diagnoses, a language assessment measure, a cognitive…

  8. Inpatient Care or Outplacement: Which Is Better for the Psychiatric Medically Infirm Patient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Charles G.

    1976-01-01

    Geriatric ward patients (N=84) were randomly assigned to groups targeted for outplacement planning or inpatient care. During the following year, the mean Morale Inventory score of the outplacement sample improved while that of the inpatient group remained statis. Results argue for an increased emphasis on outplacement programs among geriatric…

  9. Characterizing Aggressive and Noncompliant Behaviors in a Children's Psychiatric Inpatient Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhodolsky, Denis G.; Cardona, Laurie; Martin, Andres

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate aggression and noncompliance among child psychiatric inpatients in relation to demographic, clinical, and hospitalization characteristics, including the use of restraints and seclusion. Eighty six children (10.8 plus or minus 2.4 years old, 67% male) consecutively admitted to an inpatient psychiatric unit were…

  10. Relationship between inpatient hyperglycemia and insulin treatment after kidney transplantation and future new onset diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakkera, Harini A; Knowler, William C; Devarapalli, Yugandhara; Weil, E Jennifer; Heilman, Raymond L; Dueck, Amylou; Mulligan, David C; Reddy, Kunam S; Moss, Adyr A; Mekeel, Kristin L; Mazur, Marek J; Hamawi, Khaled; Castro, Janna C; Cook, Curtiss B

    2010-09-01

    Approximately two-thirds of kidney transplant recipients with no previous history of diabetes experience inpatient hyperglycemia immediately after kidney transplant surgery; whether inpatient hyperglycemia predicts future new onset diabetes after transplant (NODAT) is not established. A retrospective study was conducted to determine the risk conferred by inpatient hyperglycemia on development of NODAT within 1 year posttransplant. All adult nondiabetic kidney transplant recipients between June 1999 and January 2008 were included. Posttransplant inpatient hyperglycemia was defined as any bedside capillary blood glucose > or = 200 mg/dl or insulin therapy during hospitalization. NODAT was defined as HbA1C > or = 6.5%, fasting venous serum glucose > or = 126 mg/dl, or prescribed diet or medical therapy for diabetes mellitus. The study cohort included 377 patients. NODAT developed in 1 (4%) of the 28 patients without inpatient hyperglycemia, 4 (18%) of the 22 patients with inpatient hyperglycemia but not treated with insulin, and in 98 (30%) of the 327 of the patients who were diagnosed with inpatient hyperglycemia and were treated with insulin. In adjusted analyses, requirement of insulin therapy during hospitalization posttransplant was associated with a 4-fold increase in NODAT (relative risk 4.01; confidence interval, 1.49 to 10.7; P = 0.006). Development of inpatient hyperglycemia after kidney transplantation in nondiabetic patients significantly increased the risk of NODAT. Additionally, we observed a significantly increased risk of cardiovascular events in patients who developed NODAT.

  11. 42 CFR 412.71 - Determination of base-year inpatient operating costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Costs § 412.71 Determination of base-year inpatient operating costs. (a) Base-year costs. (1) For each...) Modifications to base-year costs. Prior to determining the hospital-specific rate, the intermediary will adjust the hospital's estimated base-year inpatient operating costs, as necessary, to include...

  12. Integral resource capacity planning for inpatient care services based on hourly bed census predictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortbeek, N.; Braaksma, A.; Smeenk, H.F.; Bakker, P.J.M.; Boucherie, R.J.

    2012-01-01

    The design and operations of inpatient care facilities are typically largely historically shaped. A better match with the changing environment is often possible, and even inevitable due to the pressure on hospital budgets. Effectively organizing inpatient care requires simultaneous consideration of

  13. Integral resource capacity planning for inpatient care services based on bed census predictions by hour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortbeek, Nikky; Braaksma, Aleida; Smeenk, Ferry H.F.; Bakker, Piet J.M.; Boucherie, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    The design and operations of inpatient care facilities are typically largely historically shaped. A better match with the changing environment is often possible, and even inevitable due to the pressure on hospital budgets. Effectively organizing inpatient care requires simultaneous consideration of

  14. Integral resource capacity planning for inpatient care services based on hourly bed census predictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortbeek, Nikky; Braaksma, Aleida; Smeenk, H.F.; Bakker, P.J.M; Boucherie, Richardus J.

    The design and operations of inpatient care facilities are typically largely historically shaped. A better match with the changing environment is often possible, and even inevitable due to the pressure on hospital budgets. Effectively organizing inpatient care requires simultaneous consideration of

  15. Integral resource capacity planning for inpatient care services based on bed census predictions by hour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortbeek, Nikky; Braaksma, Aleida; Smeenk, Ferry H.F.; Bakker, Piet J.M.; Boucherie, Richardus J.

    2015-01-01

    The design and operations of inpatient care facilities are typically largely historically shaped. A better match with the changing environment is often possible, and even inevitable due to the pressure on hospital budgets. Effectively organizing inpatient care requires simultaneous consideration of

  16. Inpatient Care or Outplacement: Which Is Better for the Psychiatric Medically Infirm Patient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Charles G.

    1976-01-01

    Geriatric ward patients (N=84) were randomly assigned to groups targeted for outplacement planning or inpatient care. During the following year, the mean Morale Inventory score of the outplacement sample improved while that of the inpatient group remained statis. Results argue for an increased emphasis on outplacement programs among geriatric…

  17. Predicting inpatient aggression by self-reported impulsivity in forensic psychiatric patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousardt, A.M.C.; Hoogendoorn, A.W.; Noorthoorn, E.O.; Hummelen, J.W.; Nijman, H.L.I.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Empirical knowledge of 'predictors' of physical inpatient aggression may provide staff with tools to prevent aggression or minimise its consequences. Aim: To test the value of a self-reported measure of impulsivity for predicting inpatient aggression. Methods: Self-report measures of dif

  18. 42 CFR 409.62 - Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lifetime maximum on inpatient psychiatric care. 409.62 Section 409.62 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Scope of Hospital Insurance Benefits § 409.62 Lifetime maximum on inpatient...

  19. 42 CFR 412.428 - Publication of Updates to the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Publication of Updates to the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. 412.428 Section 412.428 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES...

  20. 42 CFR 440.160 - Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals under age 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inpatient psychiatric services for individuals under age 21. 440.160 Section 440.160 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.160 Inpatient...

  1. Who experiences seclusion? An examination of demographics and duration in a public acute inpatient mental health service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavulak, Jacinta; Petrakis, Melissa

    2017-07-01

    Restrictive interventions such as seclusion may occur during an acute mental health crisis. Such interventions are experienced by people as traumatic and counter to recovery. The current study aimed to investigate the use of seclusion and who was secluded amongst patients presenting with psychotic symptomology. All acute inpatient admissions were examined across a 12-month period January-December 2013. Electronic and paper records were accessed and audited for all 655 admissions. There were 91 admissions that included a seclusion and 200 seclusion events. There were 79 unique patients who experienced seclusion. For those experiencing seclusion: two-thirds were male, 49% were either homeless or had no fixed abode, 32% received case management in the community prior to their inpatient stay, and 56% were unemployed or not in the workforce. The median and mode duration of seclusion was 4 h. By understanding seclusion interventions better, changes can be made to enhance practice. This descriptive research into seclusion has clarified the demographics of who is most likely to experience seclusion, for how long, and the implications for reducing restrictive interventions. How the social work role could contribute to reforms to protect and enhance the rights and well-being of marginalized members of our communities, at their most vulnerable, is considered.

  2. Same agency, different teams: perspectives from home and inpatient hospice care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysaght Hurley, Susan; Barg, Frances K; Strumpf, Neville; Ersek, Mary

    2015-07-01

    Tremendous growth in hospice over the past 30 years in the United States has increased the number of terminally ill patients dying at home. Recently, however, more hospice patients are dying at inpatient facilities. To understand the varying perceptions about care in the home and inpatient hospice, we conducted semistructured interviews with 24 interdisciplinary team (IDT) members and analyzed the data using the constant comparative method. Core interdisciplinary tasks, including identifying the focus of energy, tailoring family caregiver involvement, acknowledging who is in charge, and knowing both sides differed in the home and inpatient settings. Despite the overarching umbrella of hospice care, home and inpatient hospice settings create different foci for IDT members, burdens and privileges for family caregivers, and control of the care plan. Key differences between home and inpatient hospice processes of care highlight the complexity of patient-centered end-of-life care in the United States.

  3. The training value of working with armed forces inpatients in psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Burgh, H Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Over the last 10 years, the UK armed forces (UKAF) have been involved in operations worldwide. Mental health in the armed forces (AF) has been the subject of considerable interest in part because of a perceived added risk of psychological distress in this population. Inpatient psychiatric services are provided through partnerships with NHS hospitals. The Cavell Centre, Peterborough's acute inpatient psychiatric unit has up to four beds for service personnel, under the care of a civilian consultant psychiatrist and his AF Foundation Year 2 doctor (F2). This was the only Ministry of Defence (MoD) inpatient unit which had a training post for an AF doctor, but the post ended in August 2014 with the closure of MoD Hospital Unit Peterborough (MDHU(P)). This article outlines the differences in civilian and AF inpatient care and discusses the training value of AF doctors managing service personnel who are psychiatric inpatients.

  4. Fried frailty phenotype assessment components as applied to geriatric inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bieniek J

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Joanna Bieniek, Krzysztof Wilczynski, Jan Szewieczek Department of Geriatrics, School of Health Sciences in Katowice, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland Background: Management of geriatric patients would be simplified if a universally accepted definition of frailty for clinical use was defined. Among definitions of frailty, Fried frailty phenotype criteria constitute a common reference frame for many geriatric studies. However, this reference frame has been tested primarily in elderly patients presenting with relatively good health status. Objective: The aim of this article was to assess the usefulness and limitations of Fried frailty phenotype criteria in geriatric inpatients, characterized by comorbidity and functional impairments, and to estimate the frailty phenotype prevalence in this group. Patients and methods: Five hundred consecutive patients of the university hospital subacute geriatric ward, aged 79.0±8.4 years (67% women and 33% men, participated in this cross-sectional study. Comprehensive geriatric assessment and Fried frailty phenotype component evaluation were performed in all patients. Results: Multimorbidity (6.0±2.8 diseases characterized our study group, with a wide range of clinical conditions and functional states (Barthel Index of Activities of Daily Living 72.2±28.2 and Mini-Mental State Examination 23.6±7.1 scores. All five Fried frailty components were assessed in 65% of patients (95% confidence interval [CI] =60.8–69.2 (diagnostic group. One or more components were not feasible to be assessed in 35% of the remaining patients (nondiagnostic group because of lack of past patient’s body mass control and/or cognitive or physical impairment. Patients from the nondiagnostic group, as compared to patients from the diagnostic group, presented with more advanced age, higher prevalence of dementia, lower prevalence of hypertension, lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure, body mass index, Mini

  5. High rates of relapse in adolescents crack users after inpatient clinic discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemeri Siqueira Pedroso

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective The objective of the present study was to evaluate 88 adolescent crack users referred to hospitalization and to follow them up after discharge to investigate relapse and factors associated with treatment. Methods Cohort (30 and 90 days after discharge from a psychiatric hospital and a rehab clinic for treatment for chemical dependency in Porto Alegre between 2011 and 2012. Instruments: Semi-structured interview, conducted to evaluate the sociodemographic profile of the sample and describe the pattern of psychoactive substance use; Crack Use Relapse Scale/CURS; Questionnaire Tracking Users to Crack/QTUC; K-SADS-PL. Results In the first follow-up period (30 days after discharge, 65.9% of participants had relapsed. In the second follow-up period (90 days after discharge, 86.4% of participants had relapsed. Conclusion This is one of the first studies that show the extremely high prevalence of early relapse in adolescent crack users after discharge, questioning the cost/benefit of inpatient treatment for this population. Moreover, these results corroborate studies which suggested, young psychostimulants users might need tailored intensive outpatient treatment with contingency management and other behavioral strategies, in order to increase compliance and reduce drug or crime relapse, but this specific therapeutic modality is still scarce and must be developed in Brazil.

  6. Natural gas monthly, May 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article this month is ``Restructuring energy industries: Lessons from natural gas.`` 6 figs., 26 tabs.

  7. Natural gas monthly, June 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article this month is the executive summary from Natural Gas 1994: Issues and Trends. 6 figs., 31 tabs.

  8. Natural gas monthly, January 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The featured article for this month is on US coalbed methane production.

  9. Natural gas monthly, December 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The article this month is entitled ``Recent Trends in Natural Gas Spot Prices.`` 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  10. [Differences between patients in consultation psychiatry and psychiatric inpatients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unterecker, Stefan; Maloney, Julia; Pfuhlmann, Bruno; Deckert, Jürgen; Warrings, Bodo

    2014-05-01

    To optimize psychiatric consultation service epidemiological information is needed. We compared data on gender, age and diagnoses of patients in the consultation service to psychiatric inpatients. In psychiatric consultation service patients are older (56.6 vs. 44.9 years, p < 0.05) and males are older than females (58.8 vs. 54.4 years, p < 0.05). For male patients, the psychiatric consultation service is contacted more often in cases of organic disorders, for females in adjustment disorders (p < 0.05). The diagnostic spectrum in psychiatric consultation service is different for males and females with relevance for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Inpatient Management of Guillain-Barré Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is the most common cause of acute flaccid paralysis in the developed world. Guillain-Barré syndrome typically presents with ascending paralysis and is usually severe enough to warrant hospital admission for management. In the United States alone, GBS results in more than 6000 hospitalizations each year. Although GBS patients were historically cared for at tertiary referral centers, changing treatment practices have broadened the number of neurologists who care for the disease. This article provides a review of key issues in the inpatient management of GBS. A survey of the evidence base for treatment with plasma exchange or intravenous immunoglobulins is presented. Although either of these treatments can limit the severity of GBS, patients are still at risk for a broad range of complications, including respiratory failure, autonomic dysfunction, thromboembolic disease, pain, and psychiatric disorders. Awareness of these complications, their detection and management, may help limit the morbidity of GBS. PMID:23983841

  12. A Thorn in the Flesh? Forensic Inpatients in General Psychiatry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllerhøj, Jette; Stølan, Liv Os; Brandt-Christensen, Anne Mette

    2016-01-01

    of staff identify the care of mentally disordered offenders in general psychiatric units as either "a parking space" or a very difficult or frightening course, where staff members tend to behave like pleasers in order to avoid risks of conflict or physical violence. Either way, it seems hard to provide......PURPOSE: To illuminate whether and how taking care of forensic inpatients is experienced as a burden among staff and managers in general psychiatry. DESIGN AND METHODS: Qualitative analytical strategies based on interviews and questionnaires. FINDINGS: The interplay between physical environment...... sufficient mental health care. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Nationwide training and teaching as well as knowledge exchange between specialized forensic psychiatry and general psychiatry are recommended. Further exploration is needed on patient perspectives and on avenues to increase efficiency and decrease...

  13. Alternative comorbidity adjustors for the Medicare inpatient psychiatric facility PPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozd, Edward M; Maier, Jan; Hales, Jan F; Thomas, Frederick G

    2008-01-01

    The inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system (IPF-PPS), provides per diem payments for psychiatric hospitals and units, including 17 comorbid condition payment adjustors that cover 11 percent of patients. This study identifies an alternative set of 16 adjustors identifying three times as many high-cost patients and evaluates the improved predictive power in log per diem cost regression models. A model using the IPF-PPS adjustors achieved 8.8 percent of the feasible improvement from a no-adjustor baseline, while the alternative adjustors achieved 22.1 percent of the feasible improvement. The current adjustors may therefore be too restrictive, resulting in systematic over- or underpayment for many patients.

  14. Nursing Actions in practicing inpatient advocacy in a Burn Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Carniato Dalle Nogario

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVEUnderstanding nursing actions in the practice of inpatient advocacy in a burn unit.METHODA single and descriptive case study, carried out with nurses working in a referral burn center in southern Brazil. Data were collected through focus group technique, between February and March 2014, in three meetings. Data was analysed through discursive textual analysis.RESULTSThree emerging categories were identified, namely: (1 instructing the patient; (2 protecting the patient; and (3 ensuring the quality of care.CONCLUSIONSThis study identified that the nurses investigated exercised patient advocacy and that the recognition of their actions is an advance for the profession, contributing to the autonomy of nurses and the effectiveness of patients' rights and social justice.

  15. Group asthma education in a pediatric inpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolomeo, Concettina

    2009-12-01

    Asthma education is an important component of asthma care and management. Children and parents often do not receive asthma education, and frequently, education programs are time consuming. The purpose of this medical record review was to retrospectively determine the impact of a short, group-based, inpatient asthma self-management program on the number of children/parents who received complete asthma education before discharge. The self-management program was instituted in 2006. Participants consisted of all children admitted to a New England children's hospital from January 1, 2005, through December 31, 2006, with a primary diagnosis of asthma. Findings revealed that significantly more (p asthma education before discharge in 2006 versus 2005.

  16. 'Welcoming the Other': psychodrama in an acute inpatient unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Lorraine

    2016-02-01

    In this article, the author uses the leitmotifs inherent in a critically acclaimed film and in the philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas as a backdrop for discussion around how we encounter the humanity in the Other and its particular relevance for psychiatry. She proceeds to describe the existential underpinnings of psychodrama and demonstrates how she has been directing a psychodrama group, 'Theatre of Life', which has been operating for well over a decade within a public mental health system, acute inpatient unit. Through the ensuing discussion, she illustrates how the humanistic ethic of 'welcoming the Other' is actualised in the 'here-and now' of the psychodrama group psychotherapy process. A thematic analysis derived from group-members' evaluation of each session illuminates their felt sense depicting the ethic in action. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  17. Teaching Nursing Leadership: Comparison of Simulation versus Traditional Inpatient Clinical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Teresa N; Johnson, Tanya Looney; Wang, Chih-hsuan

    2015-04-30

    Nurse educators claim accountability to ensure their students are prepared to assume leadership responsibilities upon graduation. Although front-line nurse leaders and nurse executives feel new graduates are not adequately prepared to take on basic leadership roles, professional nursing organizations such as the American Nurses Association (ANA) and the Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) deem leadership skills are core competencies of new graduate nurses. This study includes comparison of a leadership-focused multi-patient simulation and the traditional leadership clinical experiences in a baccalaureate nursing leadership course. The results of this research show both environments contribute to student learning. There was no statistical difference in the overall score. Students perceived a statistically significant difference in communication with patients in the traditional inpatient environment. However, the students perceived a statistical significant difference in teaching-learning dyad toward simulation.

  18. Inpatient group therapeutic interventions for patients with intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Vilash

    2015-03-01

    Group therapy can be an effective mode of therapy, used on an inpatient unit, as it can allow patients to become allies in their journey to understand and overcome their mental health needs. The therapeutic principles discussed by Dr Irvin Yalom illustrate the significance and importance of group therapy, which was strongly incorporated into interactive behavior therapy (IBT) developed by Dr Daniel J Tomasulo. IBT is a type of group therapy, more action oriented, created to allow patients with intellectual disabilities (IDs) to better comprehend discussed topics, by designing and tailoring activities to meet their cognitive and linguistic capabilities. Additional details found in this article will illustrate the methods by which IBT is capable of meeting the needs of patients with ID. Such adjustments include shorter duration of activities to maximize concentration, proactive role-playing involving the synergistic effort of all members of the group, and limiting the authoritative role of the therapist in a group environment.

  19. CMS proposes to OK one-midnight inpatient stays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has proposed that stays shorter than two midnights be reimbursed as inpatient stays if the documentation in the medical record supports it. CMS made the proposal in the Outpatient Prospective Payment System proposed rule for 2016 and left the policy unchanged for stays of two midnights or longer. CMS also announced that the two Beneficiary and Family Centered Care Quality Improvement Organizations (QIOs), Livanta and KEPRO, will take over the responsibility of Probe and Educate and will review cases for medical necessity when patient stays are one midnight or less, referring hospitals with high denial rates to the Recovery Auditors. Case managers should continue to assist physicians in determining patient status and to make sure that the documentation is complete, accurate, and specifies the severity of illness.

  20. Exploring learning potential in schizophrenic inpatients in different psychopathological conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David González Pando

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to explore empirically the learning potential of people with schizophrenia in opposite conditions of psychopathological stability. For this purpose, a general procedure of conditional discrimination learning was introduced by conducting a study on the formation of equivalence classes. The sample consisted of 8 inpatient adults included in the program of Severe Mental Disorders, aged between 20 and 53 years. Because of dropouts, the initial procedure was modified in order to reduce the duration and attentional effort of the task. The results showed that people with schizophrenia can acquire stimulus equivalence with standard procedure both in terms of stability and psychopathological decompensation, in the presence of strong positive symptoms. This finding is relevant both for therapy, conceived in terms of learning, and for designing programs in the context of rehabilitation and recovery in schizophrenia.

  1. US Monthly Pilot Balloon Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monthly winds aloft summary forms summarizing Pilot Balloon observational data for the United States. Generally labeled as Form 1114, and then transitioning to Form...

  2. Monthly energy review, August 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-26

    This publication presents information for the month of August, 1993 on the following: Energy overview; energy consumption; petroleum; natural gas; oil and gas resource development; coal; electricity; nuclear energy; energy prices, and international energy.

  3. Monthly Energy Review, July 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1992-07-27

    The Monthly Energy Review is prepared by the Energy Information Administration. Topics discussed include: Energy Overview, Energy Consumption, Petroleum, Natural Gas, Oil and Gas Resource Development, Coal, Electricity, Nuclear Energy, Energy Prices, International Energy. (VC)

  4. Monthly energy review, July 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    This document presents an overview of recent monthly energy statistics. Activities covered include: U.S. production, consumption, trade, stock, and prices for petroleum, coal, natural gas, electricity, and nuclear energy.

  5. Monthly energy review, August 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    This report presents an overview of recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, coal, natural gas, electricity, and nuclear energy.

  6. Monthly energy review, August 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-26

    This publication presents information for the month of August, 1993 on the following: Energy overview; energy consumption; petroleum; natural gas; oil and gas resource development; coal; electricity; nuclear energy; energy prices, and international energy.

  7. Your Child's Development: 15 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Child Too Busy? Helping Your Child Adjust to Preschool School Lunches Kids and Food: 10 Tips for Parents Healthy Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Your Child's Development: 15 Months KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Development: ...

  8. Your Child's Development: 6 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Child Too Busy? Helping Your Child Adjust to Preschool School Lunches Kids and Food: 10 Tips for Parents Healthy Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Your Child's Development: 6 Months KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Development: ...

  9. Your Child's Development: 2 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Child Too Busy? Helping Your Child Adjust to Preschool School Lunches Kids and Food: 10 Tips for Parents Healthy Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Your Child's Development: 2 Months KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Development: ...

  10. Generic and disease-specific quality of life and its predictors among Chinese inpatients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yingchun; Zhou, Ying; Lin, Jiankui; Zhou, Yuqiu; Yu, Jianying

    2015-08-30

    This study aims to describe generic and disease-specific quality of life (QOL) and its predictors among Chinese inpatients with schizophrenia. A total of 209 subjects participated in this study: 121 men and 88 women. Their ages ranged from 18 to 64, with a mean age of 33.85 (S.D.=10.84). The total scores of generic and disease-specific QOL were statistically significant, correlated with patients׳ total symptom severity scores and social support scores (all P values less than 0.01). Multiple regression analysis revealed that monthly household income and subjective social support were statistically significant predictors of generic and disease-specific QOL. Duration of hospitalization, support use degree, negative and general psychopathology symptoms were additional significant predictors of disease-specific QOL. This study suggests the importance of improving subjective social support in order to promote generic and disease-specific QOL. Controlling negative and general psychopathology symptoms and improving support use degree could additionally enhance the disease-specific QOL in patients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Frequency of Djinnati Syndrome among Inpatient Admissions at Baharan Psychiatric Hospital in Zahedan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaz Ghasemi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: A culture-bound syndrome common in Baluchistan is Djinnati that is classified as trance and possession state, a sub-class of dissociative disorders NOS, in DSM IV-TR. The present study aims to determine the frequency of Djinnati syndrome among in-patients at Baharan psychiatric hospital in Zahedan, Iran. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study, the statistical community includes all patients (N=773 who were admitted in Baharan psychiatric hospital during a 6 months period. After considering the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 150 subjects (61 males and 89 females were selected. Semi-structural interview and Dissociative Experience Scale (DES questionnaire were performed for them. Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient, χ2, and t-tests were employed for analysis of data in SPSS-18. Results: Frequency of Djinnati syndrome among patients admitted in this referral psychiatric hospital was 4.1% and this syndrome showed a significant dominance in female sex (M/F=1/3. There was also a positive and significant correlation between child abuse and dissociative experiences including Djinnati. Conclusion: The study has shown that dissociative disorders NOS, in the form of trance and possession states (such as Djinnati, are not rare especially in the eastern parts of Iran and among poor and young women. It is important to define Djinnati syndrome in this region and prepare medical students and psychiatric residents for diagnosing and managing this condition. Its relationship with child abuse should be considered in preventive medicine.

  12. Motivational interviewing group at inpatient detoxification, its influence in maintaining abstinence and treatment retention after discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachiller, Diana; Grau-López, Lara; Barral, Carmen; Daigre, Constanza; Alberich, Cristina; Rodríguez-Cintas, Laia; Valero, Sergi; Casas, Miquel; Roncero, Carlos

    2015-06-17

    The relapse rate after discharge from inpatient detoxification is high. The objective of this pilot study is to assess the sociodemographic, clinical and therapeutic factors associated with maintaining abstinence in patients who participated in a brief motivational interviewing group during admission for detoxification. A total of 46 patients, diagnosed substance dependent according to DSM -IV, and admitted to the Hospital Detoxification Unit, participated in a brief motivational interviewing group. Sociodemographic, clinical, motivation to change (University of Rhode Island Change Assessment, URICA) and satisfaction with the treatment group (Treatment Perceptions Questionnaire, CPT) data were collected. Abstinence and treatment retention two months after discharge were assessed by weekly telephone calls. A survival analysis was performed. Being male, having more cognitions of the maintenance stage of change at discharge, being satisfied with group therapy and therapist during hospitalization are associated with longer abstinence after discharge. The brief motivational interviewing group approach with patients admitted for detoxification is related to greater likelihood of maintaining abstinence and subsequent treatment retention.

  13. A guest in the house: nursing instructors' experiences of the moral distress felt by students during inpatient psychiatric clinical rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtowicz, Bernadine; Hagen, Brad

    2014-01-01

    Significant research has been done on the impact of moral distress among nurses, particularly in acute and intensive care settings. However, little research to date has investigated the experiences that nursing students have with moral distress. Additionally, there is a dearth of research on the role of nursing instructors' perceptions of their responsibilities to their students when encountering morally distressing situations. This manuscript describes a qualitative study conducted with eight mental health nursing instructors who acknowledged a responsibility for helping students deal with moral distress and ethical issues, but who also struggled with ways to do so. Additionally, instructors expressed frustration with their "guest" status on inpatient psychiatric units and their powerlessness to effect moral change in a medical model of psychiatric care.

  14. Monthly energy review, August 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-08-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. The MER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public. 37 figs., 73 tabs.

  15. Natural gas monthly, July 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 25 tabs.

  16. Natural gas monthly, June 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-06-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 25 tabs.

  17. Natural gas monthly, August 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-24

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  18. Natural gas monthly, June 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  19. Natural gas monthly, April 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-26

    The National Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  20. Natural gas monthly, September 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    The National Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  1. Natural gas monthly, June 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 24 tabs.

  2. Natural gas monthly, October 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  3. Monthly energy review, April 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    This report presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy data. A brief summary of the monthly and historical comparison data is provided in Section 1 of the report. A highlight section of the report provides an assessment of summer 1997 motor gasoline price increases.

  4. Monthly energy review, April 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-04-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. The MER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public.

  5. Natural gas monthly, May 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  6. Natural gas monthly: December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. Articles are included which are designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  7. Natural gas monthly, July 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 25 tabs.

  8. Natural Gas Monthly, March 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-25

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  9. Natural gas monthly, July 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-20

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  10. Natural gas monthly, November 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-29

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground state data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  11. Natural gas monthly, October 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-23

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. A glossary of the terms used in this report is provided to assist readers in understanding the data presented in this publication. 6 figs., 30 tabs.

  12. Drug Administration Errors in Hospital Inpatients: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdot, Sarah; Gillaizeau, Florence; Caruba, Thibaut; Prognon, Patrice; Durieux, Pierre; Sabatier, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Context Drug administration in the hospital setting is the last barrier before a possible error reaches the patient. Objectives We aimed to analyze the prevalence and nature of administration error rate detected by the observation method. Data Sources Embase, MEDLINE, Cochrane Library from 1966 to December 2011 and reference lists of included studies. Study Selection Observational studies, cross-sectional studies, before-and-after studies, and randomized controlled trials that measured the rate of administration errors in inpatients were included. Data Extraction Two reviewers (senior pharmacists) independently identified studies for inclusion. One reviewer extracted the data; the second reviewer checked the data. The main outcome was the error rate calculated as being the number of errors without wrong time errors divided by the Total Opportunity for Errors (TOE, sum of the total number of doses ordered plus the unordered doses given), and multiplied by 100. For studies that reported it, clinical impact was reclassified into four categories from fatal to minor or no impact. Due to a large heterogeneity, results were expressed as median values (interquartile range, IQR), according to their study design. Results Among 2088 studies, a total of 52 reported TOE. Most of the studies were cross-sectional studies (N=46). The median error rate without wrong time errors for the cross-sectional studies using TOE was 10.5% [IQR: 7.3%-21.7%]. No fatal error was observed and most errors were classified as minor in the 18 studies in which clinical impact was analyzed. We did not find any evidence of publication bias. Conclusions Administration errors are frequent among inpatients. The median error rate without wrong time errors for the cross-sectional studies using TOE was about 10%. A standardization of administration error rate using the same denominator (TOE), numerator and types of errors is essential for further publications. PMID:23818992

  13. Computerized Tomography Contrast Induced Nephropathy (CIN among adult inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Passamani Diogo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Contrast induced nephropathy (CIN is one of the complications of the use of intravascular contrast agents, being defined as a reduction of the glomerular filtration rate caused by the iodinated contrast. Most CIN data derive from the cardiovascular literature, which identified as the most consistent risk factors pre-existing chronic renal insufficiency and diabetes mellitus. However, these studies limit their conclusions to a more specific patient population. Computerized tomography as a cause of CIN has been studied less often. Objective: To report on the incidence of computerized tomography contrast induced nephropathy (CIN in an inpatient population of a tertiary general hospital, identifying potentially avoidable risk factors. Methods: We performed a prospective cohort study with inpatients admitted at a tertiary hospital requiring contrast-induced CT. The primary outcome was the development of CIN, measure by the alteration of serum creatinine or glomerular filtration rate in 48 or 72 hours. Through clinical interview, we verified possible risk factors and preventive measures instituted by the medical team and their association with development of CIN. Results: Of a total of 410 patients, 35 (8.5% developed CIN. There was a positive correlation between CIN and the presence of diabetes mellitus (OR = 2.15; 95%CI 1.35-4.06; p = 0.02, heart failure (OR = 2.23; 95%CI 1.18-8.8; p = 0.022, and renal failure (OR = 3.36; 95%CI 1.57- 7.17; p = 0.002 Conclusion: Incidence of CIN varies according to the population. Diabetes mellitus, heart failure and renal failure were independent risk factors for the development of CT-associated CIN. Further studies are needed to better understand and treat CT-associated CIN.

  14. [Dual diagnosis in psychiatric inpatients: prevalence and general characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Jiménez, Roberto; Aragüés, María; Jiménez-Arriero, Miguel Angel; Ponce, Guillermo; Muñoz, Antonio; Bagney, Alexandra; Hoenicka, Janet; Palomo, Tomás

    2008-06-01

    Comorbidity between a substance use disorder (SUD) and another psychiatric disorder is known as dual diagnosis. It is of great relevance due to its important clinical consequences and costs of care. There are practically no published studies on dual diagnosis prevalence in patients admitted to psychiatric hospitalization units in general hospitals (PHUGH) in our country. The objectives were to estimate the prevalence of dual diagnosis in psychiatric inpatients admitted consecutively to a Psychiatric Hospitalization Unit (Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain) in one year, to compare clinical and sociodemographic variables between the dual diagnosis group (DD group) and the group with a psychiatric disorder but no SUD (PD group), and to study the types of substances used. This is a retrospective study, based on the review of the clinical charts of the 257 patients admitted to this PHUGH in one year. The results showed that, excluding nicotine dependence, 24.9% of our inpatients had a SUD as well as another psychiatric disorder. A statistically significant predominance of men was found in the DD group, as well as a younger age at the time of the study, at the beginning of their psychiatric attention and on their first psychiatric admission, and they had received diagnoses of schizophrenia or related psychoses more often than the PD group, who had mostly affective disorders. The substances most frequently used in the DD group were alcohol (78.1%), cannabis (62.5%), and cocaine (51.6%). Due to the high prevalence and repercussions of dual diagnosis, it would be advisable to have specialized therapeutic programs for its treatment.

  15. Effects of antipsychotics on bone mineral density and prolactin levels \\ud in patients with schizophrenia: a 12-month prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Effects of conventional and atypical antipsychotics on bone mineral density (BMD) and serum prolactin levels (PRL) were examined in patients with schizophrenia.\\ud \\ud Methods: One hundred and sixty-three first-episode inpatients with schizophrenia were recruited, to whom one of three conventional antipsychotics (perphenazine, sulpiride, and chlorpromazine) or one of three atypical antipsychotics (clozapine, quetiapine, and aripiprazole)\\ud was prescribed for 12 months as appropria...

  16. Impact of inpatient caseload, emergency department duties, and online learning resource on General Medicine In-Training Examination scores in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Kensuke; Tsugawa, Yusuke; Shimizu, Taro; Tanoue, Yusuke; Konishi, Ryota; Nishizaki, Yuji; Shiojiri, Toshiaki; Tokuda, Yasuharu

    2015-01-01

    Both clinical workload and access to learning resource are important components of educational environment and may have effects on clinical knowledge of residents. We conducted a survey with a clinical knowledge evaluation involving postgraduate year (PGY)-1 and -2 resident physicians at teaching hospitals offering 2-year postgraduate training programs required for residents in Japan, using the General Medicine In-Training Examination (GM-ITE). An individual-level analysis was conducted to examine the impact of the number of assigned patients and emergency department (ED) duty on the residents' GM-ITE scores by fitting a multivariable generalized estimating equations. In hospital-level analysis, we evaluated the relationship between for the number of UpToDate reviews for each hospital and for the hospitals' mean GM-ITE score. A total of 431 PGY-1 and 618 PGY-2 residents participated. Residents with four or five times per month of the ED duties exhibited the highest mean scores compared to those with greater or fewer ED duties. Those with largest number of inpatients in charge exhibited the highest mean scores compared to the residents with fewer inpatients in charge. Hospitals with the greater UpToDate topic viewing showed significantly greater mean score. Appropriate ED workload and inpatient caseload, as well as use of evidence-based electronic resources, were associated with greater clinical knowledge of residents.

  17. Treating burn-associated joint contracture: results of an inpatient rehabilitation stretching protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godleski, Matthew; Oeffling, Amy; Bruflat, Angela K; Craig, Emily; Weitzenkamp, David; Lindberg, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    The prevention and treatment of scar contracture is critical after significant burn injuries to avoid functional impairment. However, descriptions of specific contracture treatment interventions and outcomes are limited. Our objective is to provide detailed information and range of motion outcomes regarding the use of an intensive stretching protocol for burn-associated contracture. As part of a quality improvement measure, all patients admitted to inpatient rehabilitation with burn injury were treated with at least 1 hour of daily stretching by experienced therapists and were tracked with standardized range of motion measurements. Eighty-eight joint contractures were treated across nine patients for up to 4 weeks. The average weekly improvement in range of motion was 8.2 degrees (95% confidence interval [CI], 6.5-9.9). The largest gains were seen in the first week of treatment with an average improvement of 11.2 degrees (95% CI, 8.7-13.6). Eighteen digit contractures were treated across four patients. The average weekly improvement in flexion was 7.2 mm (95% CI, 5.2-9.1) again with larger gains in the first week of treatment-12.8 mm (95% CI, 10.3-15.4). Thumb opposition improved across five patients in the first week with an average improvement of 1.4 on the opposition scale (95% CI, 0.4-2.5). Intensive stretching by experienced therapists yielded significant improvements in joint range of motion for patients with burn-associated joint contracture. Defining specific burn contracture interventions remains a key goal in advancing burn rehabilitation in the future.

  18. Deliberate self-injury functions and their clinical correlates among adolescent psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radziwiłłowicz, Wioletta; Lewandowska, Magdalena

    2017-04-30

    The aim of the study was to analyze the relationships between clinical variables (the severity of depression symptoms, feelings towards the body, dissociation, number and type of traumatic events) and deliberate self-injury functions. Moreover, we investigated whether the of group self-mutilating adolescents is internally diverse in terms of how important individual functions of self-mutilation are, and whether the subgroups singled out by these functions differ between each other in terms of clinical variables. The Inventory of Statements about Self-Injury was used. Characterizations of examined individuals and other research tools are included in our previous article (year, issue, pages). Associated with negative feelings towards the body are the functions of self-injuries (anti-dissociation, self-punishment) that can be described as interpersonal. High levels of depression symptoms (self-depreciation included) are mainly associated with the self-injury functions: self-punishment, anti-dissociation, establishing interpersonal boundaries. Affect regulation becomes more important as a function of self-inflicted injuries in cases of biological dysregulation and intense dissociative symptoms. The adolescents psychiatric inpatients are internally diverse in terms of dominant functions of self-injuries, which can be categorized into intra- and interpersonal. Intrapersonal functions dominate when an individual experiences severe depression, dissociative symptoms, and negative feelings towards the body. In cases of moderate intensity of depression, dissociative symptoms and negative feelings towards the body, both intrapersonal and interpersonal functions of self-mutilation are similarly important. Further research is required to explain the lowest severity of depression symptoms, dissociative symptoms and negative feelings towards the body co-occurs with no awareness of self-injuries functions.

  19. Summary of prospective quantification of reimbursement recovery from inpatient acute care outliers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, Gerald S; Paulson, Albert S

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify and quantify inpatient acute care hospital cases that are eligible for additional financial reimbursement. Acute care hospitals are reimbursed by third-party payers on behalf of their patients. Reimbursement is a fixed amount dependent primarily upon the diagnostic related group (DRG) of the case and the service intensity weight of the individual hospital. This method is used by nearly all third-party payers. For a given case, reimbursement is fixed (all else being equal) until a certain threshold level of charges, the cost outlier threshold, is reached. Above this amount the hospital is partially reimbursed for additional charges above the cost outlier threshold. Hospital discharge information has been described as having an error rate of between 7 and 22 percent in attribution of basic case characteristics. It can be expected that there is a significant error rate in the attribution of charges as well. This could be due to miscategorization of the case, misapplication of charges, or other causes. Identification of likely cases eligible for additional reimbursement would alleviate financial pressure where hospitals would have to absorb high expenses for outlier cases. Determining predicted values for total charges for each case was accomplished by exploring associative relationships between charges and case-specific variables. These variables were clinical, demographic, and administrative. Year-by-year comparisons show that these relationships appear stable throughout the five-year period under study. Beta coefficients developed in Year 1 are applied to develop predictions for Year 3 cases. This was also done for year pairs 2 and 4, and 3 and 5. Based on the predicted and actual value of charges, recovery amounts were calculated for each case in the second year of the year pairs. The year gap is necessary to allow for collection and analysis of the data of the first year of each pair. The analysis was performed in two parts

  20. Ideal timing to transfer from an acute care hospital to an interdisciplinary inpatient rehabilitation program following a stroke: an exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadeau Sylvie

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Timely accessibility to organized inpatient stroke rehabilitation services may become compromised since the demand for rehabilitation services following stroke is rapidly growing with no promise of additional resources. This often leads to prolonged lengths of stays in acute care facilities for individuals surviving a stroke. It is believed that this delay spent in acute care facilities may inhibit the crucial motor recovery process taking place shortly after a stroke. It is important to document the ideal timing to initiate intensive inpatient stroke rehabilitation after the neurological event. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine the specific influence of short, moderate and long onset-admission intervals (OAI on rehabilitation outcomes across homogeneous subgroups of patients who were admitted to a standardized interdisciplinary inpatient stroke rehabilitation program. Methods A total of 418 patients discharged from the inpatient neurological rehabilitation program at the Montreal Rehabilitation Hospital Network after a first stroke (79% of all cases reviewed were included in this retrospective study. After conducting a matching procedure across these patients based on the degree of disability, gender, and age, a total of 40 homogeneous triads (n = 120 were formed according to the three OAI subgroups: short (less than 20 days, moderate (between 20 and 40 days or long (over 40 days; maximum of 70 days OAI subgroups. The rehabilitation outcomes (admission and discharge Functional Independence Measure scores (FIM, absolute and relative FIM gain scores, rehabilitation length of stay, efficiency scores were evaluated to test for differences between the three OAI subgroups. Results Analysis revealed that the three OAI subgroups were comparable for all rehabilitation outcomes studied. No statistical difference was found for admission (P = 0.305–0.972 and discharge (P = 0.083–0.367 FIM scores, absolute (P = 0

  1. Liaison neurologists facilitate accurate neurological diagnosis and management, resulting in substantial savings in the cost of inpatient care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Costelloe, L

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite understaffing of neurology services in Ireland, the demand for liaison neurologist input into the care of hospital inpatients is increasing. This aspect of the workload of the neurologist is often under recognised. AIMS\\/METHODS: We prospectively recorded data on referral and service delivery patterns to a liaison neurology service, the neurological conditions encountered, and the impact of neurology input on patient care. RESULTS: Over a 13-month period, 669 consults were audited. Of these, 79% of patients were seen within 48 h and 86% of patients were assessed by a consultant neurologist before discharge. Management was changed in 69% cases, and discharge from hospital expedited in 50%. If adequate resources for neurological assessment had been available, 28% could have been seen as outpatients, with projected savings of 857 bed days. CONCLUSIONS: Investment in neurology services would facilitate early accurate diagnosis, efficient patient and bed management, with substantial savings.

  2. [The effectiveness of care bundles in maintaining the skin integrity and reducing the incidence density of pressure ulcers in lung cancer inpatients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen-Ling; Tseng, Chien-Hua; Chung, Yi-Jen; Chuang, Hsin-Chu; Lin, Yun-Lan; Chang, Pi-Hua

    2014-04-01

    Pressure ulcers are tissue defects that form on the skin as a result of progressive skin damage. Pressure ulcers are a skin-integrity-related care issue and an important clinical indicator of care quality, especially for lung cancer inpatients who face rapidly deteriorating health conditions due to multiple symptoms and the side effects of treatment. Treating severe pressure ulcers may consume considerable manpower, time, and medical resources. Pressure ulcers may be avoided or effectively treated when nurses conduct proper skin assessments and care for wounds properly. This project evaluates the efficacy of skin care bundles in terms of reducing the incidence density of pressure ulcers in lung cancer inpatients. Data gathered between January 2010 and March 2011 showed unstable incidence density for pressure ulcers. The average pressure-ulcer incidence density in lung cancer inpatients was 2.09%, which was 8-times higher than the average for all patients. Using evidence-based care bundles for pressure ulcer prevention, we trained nurse staffs to incorporate these bundles into their clinical daily care of lung cancer patients in our hospital. During the study period between November 2011 and January 2012, the pressure-ulcer incidence density gradually fell to 0.55%. The incidence density continued to fall to 0.33% over the subsequent 8 months. We used the concept of "care bundles" to establish a standard skin-care protocol for advanced lung cancer inpatients. This protocol improved the clinical ability of nursing staffs and effectively maintained skin care quality in lung cancer patients.

  3. Randomized trial of a robotic assistive device for the upper extremity during early inpatient stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiero, Stefano; Armani, Mario; Ferlini, Gregorio; Rosati, Giulio; Rossi, Aldo

    2014-05-01

    A recent Cochrane Review showed that early robotic training of the upper limb in stroke survivors can be more effective than other interventions when improving activities of daily living involving the arm function is the aim of therapy. We tested for efficacy of the study a protocol which involved the use of the NeReBot therapy in partial substitution of standard upper limb rehabilitation in post-acute stroke patients. In this dose-matched, randomized controlled clinical trial, 34 hemiparetic participants with movement against gravity in shoulder, elbow, and wrist muscle groups were enrolled within 15 days of the onset of stroke. All participants received a total daily rehabilitation treatment for 120 minutes, 5 days per week for 5 weeks. The control group received standard therapy for the upper limb. The experimental group received standard therapy (65% of exercise time) associated with robotic training (35% of exercise time). Muscle tone (Modified Ashworth Scale), strength (Medical Research Council), and synergism (Fugl-Meyer motor scores) were measured at impairment level, whereas dexterity (Box and Block Test and Frenchay Arm Test) and activities of daily living (Functional Independence Measure) were measured at activity level. All assessments were performed at baseline, at the end of therapy (time T1), at 3 months (time T2), and at 7 months (time T3) after entry. All between-group analyses were tested using nonparametric test with Bonferroni's adjustments for multiple testing. No significant between-group differences were found with respect to demographic characteristics, motor, dexterity, and ADLs at baseline, postintervention (T1) and at follow-up (T2 and T3). The robot therapy by NeReBot did not lead to better outcomes compared with conventional inpatient rehabilitation.

  4. Treatment Progress and Behavior Following 2 Years of Inpatient Sex Offender Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, Jill D; Becker, Judith V; McVay, Lee Ann

    2017-02-01

    Emerging research highlights the role of self-regulation in the treatment of sexual offenders. Safe Offender Strategies (SOS) is a manualized sex offender treatment program that emphasizes the role of self-regulation and self-regulatory skills development in sex offender treatment, particularly for offenders with serious mental illness and intellectual/developmental disabilities. The current study involves 156 adult male sexual offenders in an inpatient psychiatric setting who received SOS treatment for a period ranging from 6 months to 1 year. Participants' baseline and treatment data were obtained from archival medical records describing 1 year pre-treatment and up to 2 years of treatment participation. Dependent variables included monthly count rates of verbal and physical aggression and contact and noncontact sexual offending, as well as sexual deviancy attitudes, self-regulatory ability, and cooperation with treatment and supervision, as measured by the Sex Offender Treatment Intervention and Progress Scale (SOTIPS). Data were examined via paired-samples t tests, regression, and multilevel modeling, examining the impact of overall percentage of SOS groups attended over time, comparing participants' baseline measures to data from 2 years of treatment. The impact of predicted risk was also evaluated. Significant treatment dose effects were identified for improvements in aggression, sexual offending, and indicators of treatment compliance and change. These findings suggest that the skills-based, self-regulation approach utilized in SOS may be effective in improving clients' aggressive and sexual behaviors, attitudes toward their offenses and treatment, and self-regulatory ability over time. Implications for further research and treatment generalizability are discussed.

  5. Protective and risk factors for inpatient suicides: a nested case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shi-Kwang; Hung, Tsui-Mei; Liao, Ya-Tang; Lee, Wen-Chung; Tsai, Shang-Ying; Chen, Chiao-Chicy; Kuo, Chian-Jue

    2014-06-30

    This study aimed at estimating the protective effect of suicide precautions and clinical risk factors for inpatient suicides. A standardized precaution system was implemented in a large psychiatric center on January 1, 1996. A consecutive series of 33,121 admissions from 1998 to 2008 constituted the post-implementation cohort and 13,515 admissions from 1985 to 1995 constituted the pre-implementation cohort as comparison group. Inpatient suicides were identified via record linkage with national mortality database. For each of 41 inpatient suicides, four controls were randomly selected based on a nested case-control study. A standardized chart review process was employed to collate clinical information for each study subject. Risk and protective factors for inpatient suicides was estimated by conditional logistic regression. The findings showed that, among subjects with shorter lengths of stay, those admitted in post-implementation era had a significantly lower adjusted risk ratio (0.157, p=0.048) for inpatient suicides. Three depression-related symptoms elevated the risk for inpatient suicides: depressed mood (adjusted risk ratio=2.11, P=0.002), loss of energy (adjusted risk ratio=1.99, P=0.018), and psychomotor retardation (adjusted risk ratio=1.67, P=0.066; with marginal statistical significance). Suicide precautions have protective effect against inpatient suicides. A better assessment and prevention efforts is needed, particularly for those with depression-related symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Dialectical behaviour therapy-informed skills training for deliberate self-harm: a controlled trial with 3-month follow-up data.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gibson, Jennifer

    2014-09-01

    Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT) has been shown to be an effective treatment for deliberate self-harm (DSH) and emerging evidence suggests DBT skills training alone may be a useful adaptation of the treatment. DBT skills are presumed to reduce maladaptive efforts to regulate emotional distress, such as DSH, by teaching adaptive methods of emotion regulation. However, the impact of DBT skills training on DSH and emotion regulation remains unclear. This study examined the Living Through Distress (LTD) programme, a DBT-informed skills group provided in an inpatient setting. Eighty-two adults presenting with DSH or Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) were offered places in LTD, in addition to their usual care. A further 21 clients on the waiting list for LTD were recruited as a treatment-as-usual (TAU) group. DSH, anxiety, depression, and emotion regulation were assessed at baseline and either post-intervention or 6 week follow-up. Greater reductions in the frequency of DSH and improvements in some aspects of emotion regulation were associated with completion of LTD, as compared with TAU. Improvements in DSH were maintained at 3 month follow-up. This suggests providing a brief intensive DBT-informed skills group may be a useful intervention for DSH.

  7. Association of postdischarge rehabilitation with mortality in intensive care unit survivors of sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Pei-wen; Shih, Chia-Jen; Lee, Yi-Jung; Tseng, Ching-Min; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Shih, Yu-Ning; Chou, Kun-Ta; Tarng, Der-Cherng; Li, Szu-Yuan; Ou, Shuo-Ming; Chen, Yung-Tai

    2014-11-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired weakness is a common issue for sepsis survivors that is characterized by impaired muscle strength and causes functional disability. Although inpatient rehabilitation has not been found to reduce in-hospital mortality, the impact of postdischarge rehabilitation on sepsis survivors is uncertain. To investigate the benefit of postdischarge rehabilitation to long-term mortality in sepsis survivors. We conducted a nationwide, population-based, high-dimensional propensity score-matched cohort study using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. The rehabilitation cohort comprised 15,535 ICU patients who survived sepsis and received rehabilitation within 3 months after discharge between 2000 and 2010. The control cohort consisted of 15,535 high-dimensional propensity score-matched subjects who did not receive rehabilitation within 3 months after discharge. The endpoint was mortality during the 10-year follow-up period. Compared with the control cohort, the rehabilitation cohort had a significantly lower risk of 10-year mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.94; 95% confidence interval, 0.92-0.97; P rehabilitation was inversely associated with 10-year mortality (≥3 vs. 1 course: adjusted hazard ratio, 0.82; P rehabilitation cohort among ill patients who had more comorbidities, required more prolonged mechanical ventilation, and had longer ICU or hospital stays, but not among those with the opposite conditions (i.e., less ill patients). Postdischarge rehabilitation may be associated with a reduced risk of 10-year mortality in the subset of patients with particularly long ICU courses.

  8. Electric power monthly, May 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Statistics by company and plant are published on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

  9. Electric power monthly, August 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-13

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  10. Natural gas monthly, April 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    This issue of the Natural Gas Monthly presents the most recent estimates of natural gas data from the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Estimates extend through April 1998 for many data series. The report highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, feature articles are presented designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. This issue contains the special report, ``Natural Gas 1997: A Preliminary Summary.`` This report provides information on natural gas supply and disposition for the year 1997, based on monthly data through December from EIA surveys. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  11. Electric power monthly, April 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the U.S., Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. This April 1994 issue contains 1993 year-end data and data through January 1994.

  12. Electric power monthly, September 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-17

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  13. Predictors of psychiatric inpatient suicide: a national prospective register-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Trine; Agerbo, Esben; Mortensen, Preben B;

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the incidence and risk factors of psychiatric inpatient suicide within a national cohort representing all psychiatric hospital admissions. METHOD: This national prospective register-based study followed all psychiatric hospital admissions in Denmark from the date of patient...... admission until patient discharge or inpatient suicide over a 10-year study period from 1997 through 2006. By using survival analysis techniques, this study was the first to take the inpatient time at risk into account in the estimation of the suicide rate and the predictors of suicide among hospital...

  14. Elevated C-reactive protein levels in schizophrenia inpatients is associated with aggressive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzilay, R; Lobel, T; Krivoy, A; Shlosberg, D; Weizman, A; Katz, N

    2016-01-01

    An association between inflammation and behavioral domains of mental disorders is of growing interest. Recent studies reported an association between aggression and inflammation. In this study, we investigated the association between aggressive behavior and inflammatory markers in schizophrenia inpatients. Adult schizophrenia inpatients without affective symptoms (n=213) were retrospectively identified and categorized according to their C-reactive protein measurement at admission as either elevated (CRP>1 mg/dL; n=57) or normal (CRPinflammation including leukocyte count and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (r=0.387, Pinflammation) of a specific behavioral endophenotype (aggression) in schizophrenia inpatients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. The Decline of Inpatient Penile Prosthesis over the 10‐Year Period, 2000–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amjad Alwaal, MD, MSc, FRCSC

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: The number of PP procedures performed in the inpatient setting declined between 2000 and 2010, likely reflecting a shift toward increasing outpatient procedures. Our data also suggest a better outcome for patients having the procedure done at a high‐volume center in terms of inpatient complications. Alwaal A, Harris CR, Hussein AA, Sanford TH, McCulloch CE, Shindel AW, and Breyer BN. The decline of inpatient penile prosthesis over the 10‐year period, 2000–2010. Sex Med 2015;3:280–286.

  16. The implementation and evaluation of cognitive milieu therapy for dual diagnosis inpatients: A pragmatic clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Jørn; Oestrich, Irene; Austin, Stephen;

    2010-01-01

    Dual diagnosis is chronic psychiatric condition involving serious mental illness and substance abuse. Experts recommend the integration of treatment for concurrent substance abuse and serious psychiatric problems. The following pragmatic trial examined the implementation and outcomes of cognitive...... milieu therapy (CMT) among a group of dual diagnosis inpatients. CMT is an integrated treatment for both mental illness and substance abuse based on cognitive behavioral principles and carried out within a supportive inpatient environment. A convenience sample of dual diagnosis inpatients (N = 136...... reported significant reductions in levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms (p dual diagnosis populations and warrants further...

  17. Towards an inpatient diabetes curriculum: medical student-generated aims, objectives and methods for ward-based learning of non-critical, non-perioperative inpatient diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, C G; Atherley, A; Murphy, M M

    2016-06-01

    To create a summative document containing aims, objectives and methods that can be used for the training of healthcare professionals in inpatient diabetes care. A four-stage approach was introduced for the ward-based teaching of inpatient diabetes care at the University of the West Indies, Cave Hill over the 2014-2015 academic year. Within this approach, 55 students (100%) submitted aims, objectives and methods to support two 2-h, ward-based sessions. This was guided by brief instructions and access to a copy of the Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline on the management of non-critical, non-perioperative inpatient diabetes. Conceptual content analysis was used to convert submissions into a unifying document. Six themes emerged from students' submissions: diagnosis; assessment and investigation of diabetes and its complications; planning individualized care and pharmacological management; hypoglycaemia management, including severe hypoglycaemia; patient education; discharge planning; and multidisciplinary teamwork. Students were primarily interested in patient management and treatment using higher-level objectives and active learning methods. This study produced comprehensive, student-generated, and hence student-centred, aims, objectives and methods for inpatient diabetes care with objectives appropriately set for higher cognitive levels of learning. This material can be used to guide teaching or for further development into a curriculum. This is the first known publication of content that could be used in a ward-based inpatient diabetes curriculum. © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  18. Electric power monthly, April 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-07

    The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  19. Natural gas monthly, August 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-25

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The NGM highhghts activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  20. Natural gas monthly, March 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article is entitled ``Natural gas analysis and geographic information systems.`` 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  1. Natural gas monthly, October 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  2. Natural gas monthly, April 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-06

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. There are two feature articles in this issue: Natural gas 1998: Issues and trends, Executive summary; and Special report: Natural gas 1998: A preliminary summary. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  3. Electric power monthly, June 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  4. Monthly energy review, June 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-06-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. The MER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public. EIA welcomes suggestions from readers regarding data series in the MER and in other EIA publications. 37 figs., 61 tabs.

  5. Natural gas monthly, April 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are present3ed each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article is entitled ``Natural gas pipeline and system expansions.`` 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  6. ULTRAPLATE 30 month management report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Dahl

    2003-01-01

    In the period from month 24 to month 30 focus has been on the work-package 3 activities concerning optimisation of the newly developed ULTRAPLATE technology towards specific industrial applications. Three main application areas have been pursued: 1) High- speed plating of lead free solder contacts......, 2) electroforming of tools for moulding of low-cost precision polymer devices and 3) deposition of magnetic alloys to be used in new planar micro-devices. Within each of the three studied application areas, the targeted output is a finished demonstrator to show the potential of the new ULTRAPLATE...

  7. Monthly energy review, July 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. The MER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public. EIA welcomes suggestions from readers regarding data series in the MER and in other EIA publications. 37 figs., 75 tabs.

  8. Electric power monthly, August 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-24

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  9. Electric power monthly, May 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-25

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  10. Electric power monthly, July 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-29

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  11. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 16, Number 01, January 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Eating Disorders *One inpatient or two or more outpatient encounters of ICD-9-CM: 307.1 Anorexia nervosa 307.51 Bulimia nervosa 307.50 Eating disorder...surveillance interest, U.S. Armed Forces, by month and service, January 2003 - December 2008 Traumatic brain injury, hospitalizations (ICD-9: 310.2, 800-801...803-804, 850-854, 950.1-950.3, 959.01, V15.5_1-9, V15.5_A-F)* Reference: Army Medical Surveillance Activity. Traumatic brain injury among members of

  12. Nine Months of Multicomponent Behavioral Treatment for ADHD and Effectiveness of MTA Fading Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, L. Eugene; Chuang, Shirley; Davies, Mark; Abikoff, Howard B.; Conners, C. Keith; Elliott, Glen R.; Greenhill, Laurence L.; Hechtman, Lily; Hinshaw, Stephen P.; Hoza, Betsy; Jensen, Peter S.; Kraemer, Helena C.; Langworthy-Lam, Kristen S.; March, John S.; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.; Pelham, William E.; Severe, Joanne B.; Swanson, James M.; Vitiello, Benedetto; Wells, Karen C.; Wigal, Timothy

    2004-01-01

    We examined 9-month data from the 14-month NIMH Multimodal Treatment Study of Children with ADHD (the MTA) as a further check on the relative effect of medication (MedMgt) and behavioral treatment (Beh) for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) while Beh was still being delivered at greater intensity than at 14-month endpoint, and…

  13. Evaluation and comparison of the nutrition care process for persons with diabetes among inpatient and outpatient dietitians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, G R; Gates, G E

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the problem-solving skills used by dietitians when planning care for inpatient and outpatient persons with type II diabetes. Telephone interviews were conducted with 44 inpatient dietitians and 45 outpatient dietitians. Inpatient dietitians used more information from the medical record to make clinical judgments than outpatient dietitians. Inpatient dietitians reported condensing their assessment more frequently due to time pressure than outpatient dietitians. Inpatient dietitians were more likely to identify nutrition-related problems via information from the medical record while outpatient dietitians reported using diet history information. Outpatient dietitians more frequently identified specific behavioral goals whereas inpatient dietitians recommended general goals. The increased availability of objective, detailed information necessary for a thorough nutritional assessment is an advantage of inpatient care planning. However, outpatient diabetes education may be a preferred setting because of more time available for education and better learning effectiveness.

  14. Natural gas monthly, August 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-11-05

    This report highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector oganizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 33 tabs.

  15. Monthly energy review, January 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    This document presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum,natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal metric conversion factors.

  16. Monthly energy review, July 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    This document presents an overview of the recent monthly energy statistics from the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Statistical data covers activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for fossil fuels , nuclear energy, and electricity. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors.

  17. Monthly energy review, November 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-24

    The Monthly Energy Review gives information on production, distribution, and consumption for various energy sources, e.g. petroleum, natural gas, oil, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Some data is also included on international energy sources and supplies, the import of petroleum products into the US and pricing and reserves data (as applicable) for the various sources of energy listed above.

  18. Monthly energy review, November 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    This document presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. International energy and thermal and metric conversion factors are included.

  19. Monthly energy review, April 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    This report presents an overview of monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. International energy and thermal metric conversion factors are included.

  20. Monthly energy review, October 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-26

    The Monthly Energy Review gives information on production, distribution, and consumption for various energy sources, e.g. petroleum, natural gas, oil, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Some data is also included on international energy sources and supplies, the import of petroleum products into the US and pricing and reserves data (as applicable) for the various sources of energy listed above.