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Sample records for montgomery alabama museum

  1. Final Environmental Assessment for Temporary Aircraft Relocation to Maxwell Air Force Base 187th Fighter Wing Montgomery Regional Airport Montgomery, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Alabama. Mims, Donald L. Montgomery County Administrator, Montgomery, Alabama. Mueller, Heinz. Environmental Review Coordinator, U.S. Environmental...Mr. Donald L. Mims Montgomery County Administrator PO Box 1667 Montgomery, AL 36102-1667 Environmental Assessment for Temporary Aircraft...Experimental Study.” J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 82, 479-492. Frericks, R.R., B.L. Beeman , and A.H. Coulson. 1980. “Los Angeles Airport Noise and

  2. Topographic data of selected areas along the Alabama River near Montgomery, Alabama, collected using mobile terrestrial light detection and ranging (T-LiDAR) technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbrow, D.R.

    2014-01-01

    Topographic data at selected areas within the Alabama River flood plain near Montgomery, Alabama, were collected using a truck-mounted mobile terrestrial light detection and ranging system. These data were collected for inclusion in a flood inundation model developed by the National Weather Service in Birmingham, Alabama. Data are presented as ArcGIS point shapefiles with the extension .shp.

  3. Quality assurance for radon exposure chambers at the National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory, Montgomery, Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semler, M.O.; Sensintaffar, E.L. [National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory, Montgomery, AL (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The Office of Radiation and Indoor Air, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), operates six radon exposure chambers in its two laboratories, the National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory (NAREL) in Montgomery, Alabama, and the Las Vegas Facility, Las Vegas, Nevada. These radon exposure chambers are used to calibrate and test portable radon measuring instruments, test commercial suppliers of radon measurement services through the Radon Measurement Proficiency Program, and expose passive measurement devices to known radon concentrations as part of a quality assurance plan for federal and state studies measuring indoor radon concentrations. Both laboratories participate in national and international intercomparisons for the measurement of radon and are presently working with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to receive a certificate of traceability for radon measurements. NAREL has developed an estimate of the total error in its calibration of each chamber`s continuous monitors as part of an internal quality assurance program. This paper discusses the continuous monitors and their calibration for the three chambers located in Montgomery, Alabama, as well as the results of the authors intercomparisons and total error analysis.

  4. Geochemical characterization of shallow ground water in the Eutaw aquifer, Montgomery, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J.L.; Journey, C.A.

    2004-01-01

    Ground water samples were collected from 30 wells located in, or directly down gradient from, recharge areas of the Eutaw aquifer in Montgomery, Alabama. The major ion content of the water evolves from calcium-sodium-chloride- dominated type in the recharge area to calcium-bicarbonate-dominated type in the confined portion of the aquifer. Ground water in the recharge area was undersaturated with respect to aluminosilicate and carbonate minerals. Ground water in the confined portion of the aquifer was at equilibrium levels for calcite and potassium feldspar. Dissolved oxygen and nitrite-plus-nitrate concentrations decreased as ground water age increased; pH, iron, and sulfate concentrations increased as ground water age increased. Aluminum, copper, and zinc concentrations decreased as ground water age and pH increased. These relations indicate that nitrate, aluminum, copper, and zinc are removed from solution as water moves from recharge areas to the confined areas of the Eutaw aquifer. The natural evolution of ground water quality, which typically increases the pH and decreases the dissolved oxygen content, may be an important limiting factor to the migration of nitrogen based compounds and metals.

  5. Final Environmental Assessment For Proposed Family Campground Expansion Maxwell Air Force Base, Montgomery County, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-27

    Agriculture and Industry 1445 Federal Dr Montgomery, AL 36107   Mr. George C. Speake, PE/LS Montgomery County Engineer PO Box 1667 Montgomery...Insecticide, Fungicide , and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA), or the Asbestos National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) under the...organizations and resources are available as well. 1) The US Department of Agriculture Forest Products Laboratory, in partnership with the University of

  6. Occurrence of Selected Pharmaceuticals, Personal-Care Products, Organic Wastewater Compounds, and Pesticides in the Lower Tallapoosa River Watershed near Montgomery, Alabama, 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oblinger, Carolyn J.; Gill, Amy C.; McPherson, Ann K.; Meyer, Michael T.; Furlong, Edward T.

    2007-01-01

    Synthetic and natural organic compounds derived from agricultural operations, residential development, and treated and untreated sanitary and industrial wastewater discharges can contribute contaminants to surface and ground waters. To determine the occurrence of these compounds in the lower Tallapoosa River watershed, Alabama, new laboratory methods were used that can detect human and veterinary antibiotics; pharmaceuticals; and compounds found in personal-care products, food additives, detergents and their metabolites, plasticizers, and other industrial and household products in the environment. Well-established methods for detecting 47 pesticides and 19 pesticide degradates also were used. In all, 186 different compounds were analyzed by using four analytical methods. The lower Tallapoosa River serves as the water-supply source for more than 100,000 customers of the Montgomery Water Works and Sanitary Sewer Board. Source-water protection is a high priority for the Board, which is responsible for providing safe drinking water. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Montgomery Water Works and Sanitary Sewer Board, conducted this study to provide baseline data that could be used to assess the effects of agriculture and residential development on the occurrence of selected organic compounds in the lower Tallapoosa River watershed. Twenty samples were collected at 10 sites on the Tallapoosa River and its tributaries. Ten samples were collected in April 2005 during high base streamflow, and 10 samples were collected in October 2005 when base streamflow was low. Thirty-two of 186 compounds were detected in the lower Tallapoosa River watershed. Thirteen compounds, including atrazine, 2-chloro-4-isopropylamino-6-amino-s-triazine (CIAT), hexazinone, metalaxyl, metolachlor, prometryn, prometon, simazine, azithromycin, oxytetracycline, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, and tylosin, had measurable concentrations above their laboratory reporting levels

  7. HYDROLOGY, MONTGOMERY COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Hydrology data include spatial datasets and data tables necessary for documenting the hydrologic procedures for estimating flood discharges for a flood insurance...

  8. HYDROLOGY, MONTGOMERY COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Hydrology data include spatial datasets and data tables necessary for documenting the hydrologic procedures for estimating flood discharges for a flood insurance...

  9. HYDRAULICS, MONTGOMERY COUNTY, ALABAMA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  10. The Myth of "Rosa Parks the Tired." Teaching about Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Herbert

    1993-01-01

    Retells the story of Rosa Parks and the Montgomery (Alabama) bus boycott to reflect more accurately the cultural and historical background of the boycott and the conscious decision made by Mrs. Parks. Accurate examination of the story actually enhances a child's ability to identify with the issues and the protagonists. (SLD)

  11. Restoran Museum = Museum Restaurant

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2009-01-01

    Tallinnas Vana-Viru 14 asuva restorani Museum sisekujundusest. Sisearhitekt Toomas Korb, tema tähtsamate tööde loetelu. Varem paiknes nendes ruumides tuletõrjemuuseum, endiseid asukaid meenutavad raamitud mustvalged fotod. Ruumi ilmestavad Tom Dixoni loodud kuulvalgustid

  12. Restoran Museum = Museum Restaurant

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2009-01-01

    Tallinnas Vana-Viru 14 asuva restorani Museum sisekujundusest. Sisearhitekt Toomas Korb, tema tähtsamate tööde loetelu. Varem paiknes nendes ruumides tuletõrjemuuseum, endiseid asukaid meenutavad raamitud mustvalged fotod. Ruumi ilmestavad Tom Dixoni loodud kuulvalgustid

  13. Sy Montgomery: Part Indiana Jones and Part Emily Dickinson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Terrell A.

    2008-01-01

    As important as accuracy may be to nonfiction writers, few have taken such risks as Sy Montgomery in gathering information for her articles, books, and films. In this profile article, Young recounts many of the risks and adventures Montgomery has taken for the sake of accurate and impassioned writing. Montgomery says, "I consider my books love…

  14. Sy Montgomery: Part Indiana Jones and Part Emily Dickinson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Terrell A.

    2008-01-01

    As important as accuracy may be to nonfiction writers, few have taken such risks as Sy Montgomery in gathering information for her articles, books, and films. In this profile article, Young recounts many of the risks and adventures Montgomery has taken for the sake of accurate and impassioned writing. Montgomery says, "I consider my books love…

  15. DID FIELD MARSHAL BERNARD MONTGOMERY (MONTGOMERY OF ALAMEIN) HAVE ASPERGER'S SYNDROME?

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzgerald, Michael

    2000-01-01

    In the present paper the evidence for Field Marshal Montgomery having Asperger's syndrome is examined. Biographies of Montgomery were examined to search for evidence that he met criteria for Asperger's syndrome - Gillberg (1991) and Asperger's disorder (APA.1994) and Anankastic personality disorder (WHO,1992). He demonstrates a qualitative impairment in social interaction and restricted repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behaviour, interests and activities. It can be concluded that he met...

  16. Strategic nonviolent conflict: The Montgomery Bus Boycott

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Balcı

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Nonviolent action emerges under the conditions of recognized an unacceptable political oppression and injustice. The people, who find the situation unacceptable, develop three ways of behavior. First, they exit the situation. Second, they engage in everyday forms of resistance. Third, they participate in political action which has two aspects: institutional and non-institutional. Institutional political action comprises of the regular political activities such as voting, taking part in legislative process, and joining political parties. Non-institutional political action, on the contrary, arises as either violent action or nonviolent action. This paper examines the emergence, progress, and spread of the Montgomery Bus Boycott as one of the leading examples of the nonviolent struggles in the last century.

  17. Strategic nonviolent conflict: The Montgomery Bus Boycott

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüdaverdi Balcı

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Nonviolent action emerges under the conditions of recognized an unacceptable political oppression and injustice. The people, who find the situation unacceptable, develop three ways of behavior. First, they exit the situation. Second, they engage in everyday forms of resistance. Third, they participate in political action which has two aspects: institutional and non-institutional. Institutional political action comprises of the regular political activities such as voting, taking part in legislative process, and joining political parties. Non-institutional political action, on the contrary, arises as either violent action or nonviolent action. This paper examines the emergence, progress, and spread of the Montgomery Bus Boycott as one of the leading examples of the nonviolent struggles in the last century

  18. Virtuelt museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Mogens Rostgaard

    2008-01-01

    I april 2008 åbnes dørene til "Virtuelt Museum". Det er et internetmuseum, som alle kan besøge ved at klikke ind på portalen www.vimu.info . På museet er der en præsentation af regionen Slesvig-Holsten - Syddanmarks historie siden 1830. Det har taget tre år at udvikle det virtuelle museum....... Udviklingsarbejdet er sket i et tæt tværfagligt samarbejde mellem danske og tyske forskere - herunder medarbejdere fra Center for Maritime og Regionale Studier i Esbjerg. Når portalen åbnes, vil det være muligt at opleve regionens historie på en ny og anderledes måde. Det skyldes, at internetmediet åbner for en...

  19. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Montgomery County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Montgomery County, IA. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  20. 76 FR 71909 - Television Broadcasting Services; Montgomery, AL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Television Broadcasting Services; Montgomery, AL AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Commission grants a petition for rulemaking filed by Channel...

  1. 76 FR 54188 - Television Broadcasting Services; Montgomery, AL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Television Broadcasting Services; Montgomery, AL AGENCY: Federal Communications... 73 Television, Television broadcasting. Federal Communications Commission. Barbara A. Kreisman,...

  2. The Dangerous Museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Whereas museums shunned controversy in the past, this article argues that as museums embrace the new trend of audience participation some have also opted to introduce "hot topics" into museum exhibitions. Museum professionals who have adopted this particular form of museum practice predict...... that it has the potential to reform museums as we know them and to turn museums into active agents for democratic change in society. In a bid to understand and scrutinize the implications of this development in museums, the article consults critiques raised by art critics writing about a related development...... in contemporary art, i.e. relational and participatory art forms....

  3. 'I can do the child no good': Dr Sims and the enslaved infants of Montgomery, Alabama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Stephen C

    2007-08-01

    This article examines the influence of slavery and race on medical education, practice and research in the American South. Drawing on the published autobiography, case-histories, and correspondence of American slave surgeon and 'pioneer' gynaecologist, James Marion Sims, the contribution highlights a lesser known episode from his early career, namely his surgical treatment of enslaved infants suffering from trismus nascentium (neonatal tetanus). Sims became a highly prestigious figure in his later medical career, but the foundations of his success relied on the use of slave bodies and enslaved patients. These were typically distinctive features of the life of an ambitious medical professional in the slave South, where the profession profited from the institution of slavery, and human experimentation and medical research were advanced specifically through the exploitation of the region's enslaved population.

  4. Environmental Assessment for Proposed Demolition and Consolidation, Maxwell Air Force Base, Montgomery County, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Score/ Date of Scoring Operable Unit DP-001 Electroplating Waste Disposal Area Drums of electroplating waste suspected 1940s-Early 1970s...vary, depending on building size). Recycled Mixed Steel 180 tons Recycled Copper 1.4 tons Recycled Aluminum 1 ton It is reasonable to...by the year 2020. One pillar of this initiative involves consolidating our operations into the ri ght-sized facilities and demolishing those that

  5. Technology Museums in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten Karnøe

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an exhibit review of some of the major technology museums in Denmark. First comes an introduction to the Danish museum ”landscape”. Second a total of six museums and their technology focused exhibits are presented. Among the museums are the Fisheries and Maritime Museum...... in Esbjerg, housing one of the most impressive and representative exhibitions on the technology behind the strong Danish maritime sector. Another museum being mentioned is the Energy Museum, which covers the background for some of the major breakthroughs performed in Denmark within this area; particularly...... within wind power technology. Finally special attention is devoted to the Danish Technological Museum. A museum which is the oldest and most elaborate of all the technology museums. The museum covers virtually every technological breakthrough with any relevance in a Danish section, with a special focus...

  6. Some improvements on RNS Montgomery modular multiplication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajard, Jean-Claude; Didier, Laurent-Stephane; Kornerup, Peter; Rico, Fabien

    2000-11-01

    In Residue Number Systems (RNS), an integer X is represented by its residues {x0,...,xn-1} modulo a base of relatively prime numbers {m0,...,mn-1}. Thus a large number can be represented as a set of small integers. Addition and multiplication can be easily parallelized, there is no carry propagation. The time is reduced to the evaluation of these operations with small numbers. This representation is useful in cryptography and digital signal processing. Furthermore, in these two domains, modular multiplication (A X B mod N) is frequently used. So, in 1998, we have presented in IEEE journal of transactions on computers, a new modular multiplication algorithm in RNS. This algorithm is based on the Montgomery algorithm, using the associated Mixed Radix representation, for the weighted digits. It was the first algorithm of this type. In this paper, we present two remarks. First, if we develop the different expressions due to the algorithm, we obtain some mathematical simplifications that allow us to suppress some Mixed Radix occurrence in the basic iteration simply with a new initialization of our variables. Thus, in this new version, the complexity of each basic iteration, becomes equivalent to two products of small integers instead of three. The second remark is that, most of the time, modular multiplications are done with the same modulo N. We can precompute some values and reduce the complexity of each basic iteration to one multiplication of two small integers. Thus, the basic iteration is three times faster, and the global computation, due to the initialization, is 8/5 time faster than the original version. Sometime after the last basic iteration a Mixed Radix conversion can be needed. Classical parallel methods are linear. We propose an algorithmic parallel algorithm for this translation from RNS to Mixed Radix. For this, we use a result that comes from an RNS division algorithm, we published in Journal of VLSI signal processing systems 1998. We obtain in a

  7. Academic Standards in Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    A+ Education Partnership, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Education policymakers and educators in Alabama are committed to improving the state's public education system to ensure that students gain the knowledge and skills they need to graduate from high school ready for real life. The state is on the path to implementing higher academic standards--the College and Career Ready Standards--which lay a…

  8. The Victorian and Albert Museum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    耿一铭

    2006-01-01

    London is famous for its museums—the British Museum,the Science Museum,and many more.One of the earliest museums in London is the Victorian and Albert Museum, named after Queen Victoria and her husband

  9. Channel Dredging and Geomorphic Response at and Adjacent to Mobile Pass, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Dauphin Island. Spatial and Temporal Trends Sapp et al. (1975) and Hardin et al. (1976) first documented regional changes in shoreline position for...N.C. Kraus, K.J. Gingerich, and D.L. Kriebel ed. New York, NY: American Society of Civil Engineers. pp. 1985-1999. Hardin, J.D., C.D. Sapp , J.L...Change Rates: 1970 – 1993. Final Report for the Coastal Programs Office. Montgomery, AL: Alabama Department of Economic and community Affairs. Sapp , C.D

  10. Montgomery Point Lock and Dam, White River, Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    accurate and economical engineering solutions to coastal and hydraulic problems. This will strengthen and improve design criteria, enhance... Fischer , and J. Mewes. 2011. Montgomery Point Lock and Dam HSR model, White River miles 4.0 – 0.0; Hydraulic sediment response model investigation

  11. Montgomery Community College Profile of Entering Freshmen, Fall 1971.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, Robert L., Comp.

    This is a profile of 2,578 freshmen students at Montgomery College (Maryland), fall 1971. Data are presented in the following areas: (1) academic potentials, including ACT scores and high school grades; (2) goals and aspirations; (3) student personnel needs in the areas of housing, transportation, financial welfare, special programs, and…

  12. Rights of Passage: The Montgomery County Transition Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Thomas J.; Meissner, Margit

    1988-01-01

    A Montgomery County (Maryland) task force was jointly developed by the county executive and the school superintendent to consider the transition from school to work for disabled students. Recommendations were made which resulted in development of a transition planning/coordinating function and a model for planning transition services. (JDD)

  13. Museum Schools: Institutional Partnership and Museum Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Kira S.

    Over the past 10 years, a handful of museums and school districts have joined forces to create an innovation that blends formal and informal learning, the museum school. As yet, there is no commonly accepted definition of the term, but such schools can be described as partnerships that create a curriculum that embeds the district-mandated learning…

  14. The Montgomery College Student; A Profile of the Students Enrolled at Montgomery College During the Fall Semester of 1976.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, Robert L.; And Others

    This document contains a descriptive analysis of the 13,984 students enrolled at Montgomery College for fall 1976, including full- and part-time, credit and non-credit, and day and evening students. Selected biographic and demographic variables were used to describe the student population. Analysis showed: (1) the mean age for all students was…

  15. Evolution, museums and society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFadden, Bruce J

    2008-11-01

    Visitors to natural history museums have an incomplete understanding of evolution. Although they are relatively knowledgeable about fossils and geological time, they have a poor understanding of natural selection. Museums in the 21st century can effectively increase public understanding of evolution through interactive displays, novel content (e.g. genomics), engaging videos and cyberexhibits that communicate to a broad spectrum of society, both within the exhibit halls as well as outside the museum.

  16. The Montgomery College Student; A Profile of the Students Enrolled at Montgomery College During the Fall Semester of 1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, Robert L.; And Others

    Student enrollment for fall 1975 at Montgomery College totalled 13,907. This figure represents a rise of 1,278 from fall 1974, and a 4,372 rise from fall 1971, the first year for which comparative data are provided. This document provides a profile of the student body in terms of age, sex, race, marital status, residence status, country of origin,…

  17. Study Of Museum Institutional Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    - Rohanda

    2016-11-01

    development of information and library science, particularly institution of information in addition to the library. Second, it provides an overview of the governance of the museum in government institutions. Third, the scope of study is limited to institutional management of museums in government institutions, thus there is a need for the development of studies on institutional management of museums for other types of museums, such as museums that are managed by private or personal institutions. Keywords: Gawitra, information institution, management, museum.

  18. Isomorphism and Generation of Montgomery-Form Elliptic Curves Suitable for Cryptosystems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Duo; SONG Tao; DAI Yiqi

    2005-01-01

    Many efficient algorithms of Montgomery-form elliptic curve cryptology have been investigated recently. At present, there are no reported studies of the isomorphic class of the Montgomery-form elliptic curve over a finite field. This paper investigates the isomorphism of Montgomery-form elliptic curves via the isomorphism of Weierstrass-form elliptic curves and gives a table of (nearly) all the forms of Montgomery-form elliptic curves suitable for cryptographic usage. Then, an algorithm for generating a secure elliptic curve with Montgomery-form is presented. The most important advantages of the new algorithm are that it avoids the transformation from an elliptic curve's Weierstrass-form to its Montgomery-form, and that it decreases the probability of collision. So, the proposed algorithem is quicker, simpler, and more efficient than the old ones.

  19. Alabama ESI: HABITATS (Habitat Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) and rare plants in Alabama. Vector polygons in this data set...

  20. Alabama ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine, estuarine, and freshwater fish species in Alabama. Vector polygons in this data set represent...

  1. Alabama ESI: INVERT (Invertebrate Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine and estuarine invertebrate species in Alabama. Vector polygons in this data set represent...

  2. Xiuhua Mountain Museum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    XIUHUA Mountain Museum,a building nestled amongthe hills,is the first private museum of the Tujiaethnicity.Its name is an amalgamation of the names ofthe couple who run it,Gong Daoxiu and her husband ChenChuhua.According to Chen,the reason that he put his wife’s

  3. Museum Insel Hombroich

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiesner, Thomas

    1997-01-01

    Detailed review of all buildings and landscape of Museum Insel Hombroich , near Neuss, Germany. Special emphasis on Light and Body space morphologies;......Detailed review of all buildings and landscape of Museum Insel Hombroich , near Neuss, Germany. Special emphasis on Light and Body space morphologies;...

  4. China Sports Museum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    THE China Sports Museum,inside the National Olympic Sports Center on 3A Anding Road,Andingmenwai, Beijing, is China's First museum dedicated to the nation's sporting history.Its exterior is in the shape of an octagonal spiral, with white

  5. The Herbert Virtual Museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Petridis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, virtual reality and augmented reality have emerged as areas of extreme interest as unique methods for visualising and interacting with digital museum artefacts in a different context, for example, as a virtual museum or exhibition, particularly over the Internet. Modern cultural heritage exhibitions have evolved from static to dynamic exhibitions and challenging explorations. This paper presents two different applications developed for the Herbert Museum and Art Gallery that make the user’s experience more immersive, engaging, and interactive. The first application utilizes mobile phone devices in order to enrich the visitors experience in the museum, and the second application is a serious game for cultural heritage and in particular for museum environments focusing on the younger visitors.

  6. Knight at the Museum: Learning History with Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Alan S.; Levine, Thomas H.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an approach that teachers can use to strengthen students' ability to make sense of the past at museums. Specifically, we propose a photography exercise to help students to learn from museums and to view museums critically, weighing both the objective realities and subjective interpretations offered by museums. To get the most…

  7. The RSA Cryptoprocessor Hardware Implementation Based on Modified Montgomery Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Bo; WANG Xu; RONG Meng-tian

    2005-01-01

    RSA (Rivest-Shamir-Adleman)public-key cryptosystem is widely used in the information security area such as encryption and digital signature. Based on the modified Montgomery modular multiplication algorithm, a new architecture using CSA(carry save adder)was presented to implement modular multiplication. Compared with the popular modular multiplication algorithms using two CSA, the presented algorithm uses only one CSA, so it can improve the time efficiency of RSA cryptoprocessor and save about half of hardware resources for modular multiplication. With the increase of encryption data size n, the clock cycles for the encryption procedure reduce in T(n2) , compared with the modular multiplication algorithms using two CSA.

  8. Virtual Museums as Educational Tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    Virtual Museums as Educational Tool On this web site you will find a collection of resources on virtual museums. The web site is meant to be a knowledge base for people with interest in museums, virtuality and education, and how virtual museums may contribute to adult education and lifelong...

  9. Virtual Museums as Educational Tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    Virtual Museums as Educational Tool On this web site you will find a collection of resources on virtual museums. The web site is meant to be a knowledge base for people with interest in museums, virtuality and education, and how virtual museums may contribute to adult education and lifelong...

  10. Advocacy for Education in Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Museum education finds itself in the midst of significant changes as both the museum and education fields respond to internal and external challenges that require new approaches. Today, museums recognize that the choice is no longer theirs and that they "must" change to adapt to new economic realities. As museums adapt to new economic realities…

  11. Learning science from museums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, John H; Storksdieck, Martin

    2005-01-01

    This article provides an overview of current understandings of the science learning that occurs as a consequence of visiting a free-choice learning setting like a science museum. The best available evidence indicates that if you want to understand learning at the level of individuals within the real world, learning does functionally differ depending upon the conditions, i.e., the context, under which it occurs. Hence, learning in museums is different than learning in any other setting. The contextual model of learning provides a way to organize the myriad specifics and details that give richness and authenticity to the museum learning process while still allowing a holistic picture of visitor learning. The results of a recent research investigation are used to show how this model elucidates the complex nature of science learning from museums. This study demonstrates that learning form museums can be meaningfully analyzed and described. The article concludes by stating that only by appreciating and accounting for the full complexities of the museum experience will a useful understanding of how and what visitors learn from science museums emerge.

  12. Another New Museum?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michels, Christoph; Beyes, Timon; Steyaert, Chris

    2014-01-01

    city is at work in the planning of a new art museum in a medium-sized Swiss city. The analysis shows how the entrepreneurial rationale is contested and re-appropriated through the use of classic and situational modes to organize this cultural institution. The ways of imagining the museum are described...... as the effects of these three modes of ordering – entrepreneurial, classic, and situational – as well as their hybridization. The authors conclude that by attending to the multiple layers of urban life, which unfold in and around museums, we can imagine other ‘new museums’ than those of the entrepreneurial city....

  13. IN THE MUSEUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.J. Ryan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The Museum of Classical Archaeology has on loan from Dr. David Spurrett four arrowheads of varying antiquity, ranging from the late Neolithic to the Hellenistic period. Although small, these artefacts are of significant pedagogical value to a museum whose primary function is teaching. In particular, the Classics Programme at the University of Natal allows senior students, in lieu of a research essay, to submit web projects based on the artefacts in the museum.1 Ancient weaponry and warfare has always been a popular topic for students and these items offer considerable scope for new projects.

  14. Museums teach evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Judy; Evans, E Margaret

    2007-06-01

    Natural history museums play a significant role in educating the general public about evolution. This article describes Explore Evolution, one of the largest evolution education projects funded by the National Science Foundation. A group of regional museums from the Midwestern United States worked with leading evolutionary scientists to create multiple permanent exhibit galleries and a curriculum book for youth. This program invites the public to experience current evolutionary research on organisms that range in size from HIV to whales. Learning research is being conducted on museum visitors to understand how they reason about evolution and to determine what influences the process of conceptual change.

  15. Efficient Reversible Montgomery Multiplier and Its Application to Hardware Cryptography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor M. Nayeem

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem Statement: Arithmetic Logic Unit (ALU of a crypto-processor and microchips leak information through power consumption. Although the cryptographic protocols are secured against mathematical attacks, the attackers can break the encryption by measuring the energy consumption. Approach: To thwart attacks, this study proposed the use of reversible logic for designing the ALU of a crypto-processor. Ideally, reversible circuits do not dissipate any energy. If reversible circuits are used, then the attacker would not be able to analyze the power consumption. In order to design the reversible ALU of a crypto-processor, reversible Carry Save Adder (CSA using Modified TSG (MTSG gates and architecture of Montgomery multiplier were proposed. For reversible implementation of Montgomery multiplier, efficient reversible multiplexers and sequential circuits such as reversible registers and shift registers were presented. Results: This study showed that modified designs perform better than the existing ones in terms of number of gates, number of garbage outputs and quantum cost. Lower bounds of the proposed designs were established by providing relevant theorems and lemmas. Conclusion: The application of reversible circuit is suitable to the field of hardware cryptography.

  16. Buying Renewable Electric Power in Montgomery County, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cember, Richard P.

    2008-08-01

    From mid-August 2007 until mid-August 2008, my home electricity supply was 100% wind-generated. My experience in switching to wind-generated electric power may be of interest to fellow AGU members for three reasons. First, Montgomery County, Md., where I live, is one of the few jurisdictions in the United States that has both an electric power tax and a renewable energy credit. The county is therefore a case study in price-based public policy for greenhouse gas emissions control. Second, I was surprised by the comparatively small price difference (or ``price premium'') between wind-generated and conventionally generated power in the county, and I believe that Eos readers will be similarly surprised. Third, because so many U.S. federal agencies concerned with Earth science are based in the Washington, D. C., area, a high concentration of AGU members live in Montgomery County and may be personally interested in evaluating the price of reducing carbon dioxide emissions from the generation of their own residential electricity.

  17. The effects of the Dutch museum pass on museum visits and museum revenues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werff, S.; Koopmans, C.; Boyer, C.

    2014-01-01

    The Dutch museum pass gives unlimited access for a year to most major Dutch museums and around the half of all Dutch museums for a fixed fee. The fee revenues are distributed among participating museums in proportion to the amount of visits by pass holders and their ticket prices. In this paper, it

  18. 78 FR 4967 - Alabama Disaster #AL-00046

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Alabama Disaster AL-00046 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Mobile; Pike. Contiguous Counties: Alabama:...

  19. Libraries in Alabama: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/alabama.html Libraries in Alabama To use the sharing features on ... JavaScript. Birmingham American Sports Medicine Institute Sports Medicine LIBRARY 833 St. Vincent's Drive Suite 205 Birmingham, AL ...

  20. The Employers. A Survey of Employers Who Have Hired Montgomery College Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, Robert L.; Harkness, Suzanne C.

    This study was undertaken to assess employers' attitudes toward the educational preparation of Montgomery College graduates in their employ. Further, it was an effort to gain information from employers regarding what improvements they felt could be made in Montgomery's curriculum to better prepare students for their future occupations. The data…

  1. Det medialiserede museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudloff, Maja

    2013-01-01

    to a cultural-political and museological focus on digital dissemination, in which user experience, interactivity, and participation are central concepts. The article argues that the different forms of communication, representation, and reception offered by digital media, together with the interactive and social...... possibilities for action they facilitate for their users, contribute to a transformation of the museum as an institution. It is concluded that the relationship between museum, collection, and users has undergone a number of changes caused by the intervention of the media and that the traditional social act...... of museum visiting has been transformed and somewhat adapted to new media-created forms of communication and action. From a more general perspective, the article may be regarded as a contribution to a continuous discussion of the role museums must play in a mediatized society....

  2. Climate Museum and Garden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Jay; Bille, Dorthe

    2017-04-01

    The Climate Museum and Garden is conceived as a cross-disciplinary experience, where the arts and sciences link together to increase understanding of the Earth's climate and its relevance to our fate as a species. This would be a place of inspiration. The Climate Museum and Garden would merge concepts of modern art museums and modern science museums, with exhibitions, live music and theater performances, visitor interaction, unique discoveries and reflection. It would be a place where visitors are immersed in experiences, lingering indoors and out in quiet consideration and gratitude for our planet's atmosphere. The story of climate change is compelling in its own right; theories of the greenhouse effect go back over century and climate policy has stretched back a few decades. Whereas scientific researchers have been contributing to understanding the mechanisms and impacts of climate change for many decades; whereas researchers have participated in climate summits and informed policy makers; whereas researchers have taught classes of gifted students; in all of this, the public has mostly missed out. This public relations gap has been unfortunately filled by those that would seek to politicize and mislead the public, leading to an engagement gap among the general public. Now we stand on a precipice. Therefore we see a ripe opportunity to reach out and inspire the population. We build off of current pedagogic research that shows that experienced-based learning is more impactful when it engages the senses and elicits an emotional response. People understand what they experience, what they feel, and this serves as the basis for personal reflection. In this sense the visitor experience is generative, in that it promotes further personal investigation and interaction. The Climate Museum and Garden would be a start. In the future, we envisage a future network of climate museums in all major cities. It would be a flagship attraction for any city, along with their art

  3. Revisiting Cao Xueqin Museum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    A Dream of Red Mansions is known by all Chinese. Its author Cao Xueqin spent his later years writing the novel at the foot of Fragrant Hills, in a western suburb of Beijing. In 1984, Cao Xueqin Museum was built there, at the site of the Man nationality residential area during the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911 ), adding a cultural scenic spot. I first visited the Cao Xueqin Museum in the spring soon after it opened. At that time, few people knew

  4. Temporal filtering for Montgomery self-imaging under dispersive transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadrado-Laborde, Christian; Costanzo-Caso, Pablo A; Duchowicz, Ricardo; Sicre, Enrique E

    2007-08-01

    We present what we believe is a new method to introduce self-imaging properties under dispersive transmission of single or multiple light pulses with different temporal characteristics. By properly performing a temporal filtering into a given input signal it can produce an output signal having a spectral content satisfying the Montgomery condition, thereby allowing self-imaging of this signal under further dispersive transmission. An array of fiber loops performs the filtering operation on the input signal. We show some numerical simulations with a single light pulse as an input signal to verify the feasibility of the method and demonstrate the effects of the several involved parameters on both the pulse shape and the noise level.

  5. A NEW RSA CRYPTOSYSTEM HARDWARE IMPLEMENTATION BASED ON MONTGOMERY'S ALGORITHM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢君明; 林争辉

    2002-01-01

    RSA public key crypto-system is a relatively safe technology, which is widely used in today's secure electronic communication. In this paper, a new implementation method to optimize a 1 024 bit RSA processor was presented. Basically, a fast modular multiplication architecture based on Montgomery's algorithm was proposed. Modular exponentiation algorithm scans encryption from right to left, so two modular multiplications can be processed parallel. The new architecture is also fit for an effective I/O interface. The time to calculate a modular exponentiation is about n2 clock cycles. The proposed architecture has a data rate of 93.7 kb/s for 1 024 bit work with a 100 MHz clock.

  6. Intraductal papilloma with bloody discharge from Montgomery's areolar tubercle examined by ductoscopy from the areola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Takehiko; Makita, Masujiro; Akiyama, Futoshi; Uehara, Kanou; Kasumi, Fujio; Horii, Rie; Sakamoto, Goi

    2006-01-01

    A patient with intraductal papilloma who had abnormal bloody discharge from Montgomery's areolar tubercle underwent mammary ductography, mammary ductoscopy from the tubercle, and microdochectomy.A 43-year-old woman who was being followed-up for left breast cancer noticed bloody discharge from Montgomery's areolar tubercle of the right breast. Because the discharge continued for 2 months, further examinations were conducted. Mammary ductoscopy of Montgomery's areolar tubercle showed a normal internal duct structure. The presence of yellowish superficial lesions suggested intraductal inflammation or superficial hyperplasia of the duct epithelium. Lavage cytology revealed benign papillary lesions. Since the discharge continued and we could not completely exclude malignancy, microdochectomy was performed. Histologically a lactiferous duct was connected to Montgomery's areolar tubercle and an intraductal papilloma was seen in part and considered to have caused the bloody discharge. Bloody discharge from Montgomery's areola tubercles is extremely rare, the present case was our first experience with ductoscopy of Montgomery's areolar tubercle out of 641 cases of mammary ductoscopy performed on patients with bloody nipple discharge from 1998 to 2004. In our case, Montgomery's areolar tubercles were connected to a lactiferous duct. Although there are a few breast carcinomas that cause bloody discharge and eruption of areola, areolar preservation should be performed with the knowledge that disease may also involve the areola through the lactiferous ducts.

  7. The Educational Museum: Innovations and Technologies Transforming Museum Education. The Benaki Museum, Athens, 17 October 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitra Christidou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main topic of 'The Educational Museum: Innovations and Technologies Transforming Museum Education 'conference, third in a series of conferences organised by the Benaki Museum in partnership with the American Embassy and the British Council in Greece, was the use of technology and social media as means of transforming museum education and, sometimes, funding museum exhibitions and educational programmes. Among others, the conference aimed to discuss the use of digital applications such as Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Kickstarter by museums in order to attract a wider audience, interpret their collections and even fund their programmes.

  8. Mars Museum Visualization Alliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohus, A. M.; Viotti, M. A.; de Jong, E. M.

    2004-11-01

    The Mars Museum Visualization Alliance is a collaborative effort funded by the Mars Public Engagement Office and supported by JPL's Informal Education staff and the Solar System Visualization Project to share the adventure of exploration and make Mars a real place. The effort started in 2002 with a small working group of museum professionals to learn how best to serve museum audiences through informal science educators. By the time the Mars Exploration Rovers landed on Mars in January 2004, over 100 organizations were partners in the Alliance, which has become a focused community of Mars educators. The Alliance provides guaranteed access to images, information, news, and resources for use by the informal science educators with their students, educators, and public audiences. Thousands of people have shared the adventure of exploring Mars and now see it as a real place through the efforts of the Mars Museum Visualization Alliance partners. The Alliance has been lauded for "providing just the right inside track for museums to do what they do best," be that webcasts, live presentations with the latest images and information, high-definition productions, planetarium shows, or hands-on educational activities. The Alliance is extending its mission component with Cassini, Genesis, Deep Impact, and Stardust. The Mars Exploration and Cassini Programs, as well as the Genesis, Deep Impact, and Stardust Projects, are managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California.

  9. Coosa River Storage Annex, Talladega, Alabama Environmental Investigation, Final Management and Resources Utilization Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    will attend a one-day "dry run " El Briefing at Aberdeen; these three individuals will then proceed to Montgomery, Alabama to attend the two-day joint...4 * 44A 4~4 M )*4 0 ON 0~ C, ON. H = ’? H LII N HN ( hiIt I&A H- If0 0 C3 H ~mI I.- MEH i Z I- z0 2c I- NC 00 Q -NZOQ 0WI1.- .a Ii Z -- aa W W W 0...IJ- I.- A .0 ILI WW 5- 1.- i 9 to ui- ’I H in 0SAiU 0L x ITCi(((~l(O.Wi0A0UUu 0 .(ACL co Lu -C (A w- A -’ It Lan run -r 401O N S 4).It _ - at ’N Nut

  10. Det naive og sentimentale museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldbæk, Henning

    2012-01-01

    Uskyldens museum er et eksempel på en realisering af diskursen mellem ordene og tingene som Michel Foucault skrev om i Ordene og Tingene og som Orhan Pamuk omsatte i praksis i Istanbuls nye museum.......Uskyldens museum er et eksempel på en realisering af diskursen mellem ordene og tingene som Michel Foucault skrev om i Ordene og Tingene og som Orhan Pamuk omsatte i praksis i Istanbuls nye museum....

  11. Det naive og sentimentale museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldbæk, Henning

    2012-01-01

    Uskyldens museum er et eksempel på en realisering af diskursen mellem ordene og tingene som Michel Foucault skrev om i Ordene og Tingene og som Orhan Pamuk omsatte i praksis i Istanbuls nye museum.......Uskyldens museum er et eksempel på en realisering af diskursen mellem ordene og tingene som Michel Foucault skrev om i Ordene og Tingene og som Orhan Pamuk omsatte i praksis i Istanbuls nye museum....

  12. [Medicine and its museums].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acerbi Cremades, N

    1998-11-01

    There are described in this article the historical patrimonies belonging to five museums of Cordoba city, Argentina: the Museo de anatomia, which was named after Pedro Ara, notable Spanish Anatomist; the Museo de Anatomia Patologica; the Museo de Historia de la Medicina, created by Prof. Enrique P. Aznarez; the Museo "Obispo Salguero" of the Hospital San Roque; and the Museo Historico del Hospital Nacional de Clinicas, declared national historic monument. All these museums have a rich historic hoard, reflecting one of the important cultural aspects of this province.

  13. IN THE MUSEUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.j. Ryan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Two Egyptian artefacts from the first millennium BC have recently been acquired by the Museum of Classical Archaeology at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, courtesy of a kind donation by Miss Joan Law. At a time when academia in South Africa is placing considerable emphasis on African-oriented scholarship, it is appropriate that the museum has on display a large selection of small Egyptian artefacts dating from as early as the 4th millennium BC. These items are of particular interest for teaching as they reflect a variety of different aspects of Egyptian life.

  14. Det usandsynlige museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Line Hjorth

    2012-01-01

    Med afsæt i Ib Spang Olsens plakat Gå på muSEum (1978), der er optrykt på omslaget af tidsskriftet, fokuserer lederen på de synsmuligheder og bliktyper, museet mobiliserer, og polemiserer over den aktuelle tendens i museerne til ensidigt at vende blikket mod digitale formidlingsformer.......Med afsæt i Ib Spang Olsens plakat Gå på muSEum (1978), der er optrykt på omslaget af tidsskriftet, fokuserer lederen på de synsmuligheder og bliktyper, museet mobiliserer, og polemiserer over den aktuelle tendens i museerne til ensidigt at vende blikket mod digitale formidlingsformer....

  15. Partnership with Montgomery Schools trains teachers in water quality management exercises

    OpenAIRE

    Constantinescu, Ana

    2007-01-01

    High and middle school teachers from four Montgomery County (Va.) public schools will receive training in water quality management for their classroom instruction using the latest field measurement tools and techniques.

  16. Myths, Mummies and Museums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norby, Shirley

    1979-01-01

    Greek mythology, Egyptian mummies, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City are the focus of a one-semester course given at the Sea Girt (New Jersey) Elementary School. It is an interdisciplinary program wherein students (grade 8) study ancient civilizations and do projects related to their studies. (KC)

  17. The Talking Art Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundy, Jacqui

    2009-01-01

    Every year, fourth graders at Sterling Morton Elementary School in Ohio present a talking art museum for the school and community. In this article, the author describes a lesson on art history which culminates in an activity showcasing all the students' finished paintings in gold frames. A student stands behind the painting and pokes his or her…

  18. Museums, Environments, Information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutamanis, A.

    2015-01-01

    Modern digital media already permeate the physical world. The portability of information devices and the ubiquity of networks allow us to access information practically anyplace, creating digital overlays on reality. This also allows us to bring information we routinely archive in museums and collec

  19. Suzhou Silk Museum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    THEIR city’s beautiful gardens and exquisite silk are the pride of the people of Suzhou. The Suzhou Silk Museum has combined the two arts and become one of the biggest local attractions for visitors. Silk culture forms an important part of Suzhou’s history. In 1981 Qian Xiaoping, a female

  20. FOR MUSEUM WORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margherita Sani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of museums in society has expanded significantly in the last decades: from temples of knowledge to forums for debate and discussion, from repositories of objects to people-centred institutions with social responsibilities and functions. This shift reflects an ongoing trend to democratise museums and make them more accessible to wider audiences and responsive to the public’s changing needs, in particular the interests of local communities, whose composition has changed in recent years to include migrants and people of different ethnic backgrounds. With annual migration flows to the EU as a whole projected to increase from about 1 043 000 people in 2010 to 1 332 500 by 2020, the question of how cultural institutions can contribute to effective integration and dialogue has become more relevant than ever. Funders and society at large expect museums to play their part in facilitating the integration and peaceful coexistence of newcomers, with financial resources being made available, also at the EU level, to support them in this effort. Many questions can be raised as to whether it is right and appropriate to charge museums with these responsibilities and whether this would push the boundaries of their work too far and give the social function an exceedingly prominent role over the traditional conservation and educational tasks museums already fulfil. But this discussion seems to be already obsolete in the light of the growing body of evidence on good practices available at the European level. This essay aims to illustrate some of them, as well as to discuss some underpinning theoretical issues and methodological approaches.

  1. Alabama SEP Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, Elizabeth M.

    2014-06-30

    Executive Summary In the fall of 2010, the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs (ADECA) launched the Multi-State Model for Catalyzing the National Home Energy Retrofit Market Project (Multi-State Project). This residential energy efficiency pilot program was a collaborative effort among the states of Alabama, Massachusetts, Virginia, and Washington, and was funded by competitive State Energy Program (SEP) awards through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this project was to catalyze the home energy efficiency retrofit market in select areas within the state of Alabama. To achieve this goal, the project addressed a variety of marketplace elements that did not exist, or were underdeveloped, at the outset of the effort. These included establishing minimum standards and credentials for marketplace suppliers, educating and engaging homeowners on the benefits of energy efficiency and addressing real or perceived financial barriers to investments in whole-home energy efficiency, among others. The anticipated effect of the activities would be increased market demand for retrofits, improved audit to retrofit conversion rates and growth in overall community understanding of energy efficiency. The four-state collaborative was created with the intent of accelerating market transformation by allowing each state to learn from their peers, each of whom possessed different starting points, resources, and strategies for achieving the overall objective. The four partner states engaged the National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) to oversee a project steering committee and to manage the project evaluation for all four states. The steering committee, comprised of key program partners, met on a regular basis to provide overall project coordination, guidance, and progress assessment. While there were variances in program design among the states, there were several common elements: use of the Energy Performance Score (EPS) platform; an

  2. Grecia: Nivel IV. Basado en el curso de estudios sociales de Montgomery County Public Schools. (Greece. Level 6. Based on the Montgomery County Public Schools Social Studies Program).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Marisol

    This curriculum unit, developed by the Montgomery County Public Schools, Maryland, was designed for use in an elementary level foreign language immersion program. It is geared toward the sixth grade social studies classroom. The unit includes instructional and performance objectives, necessary vocabulary lists, optional language structure…

  3. Review of Adlib Museum Lite software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Morrison

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available ADLIB information systems have brought to the UK marketplace a free fully functioning, Spectrum-compliant, database package aimed at museums and private collectors. Adlib Museum Lite is based on 'its bigger cousin' Adlib Museum, used by museums worldwide, ranging from Heritage Centres to National Museums.

  4. Dinosaurs on the Ark: The Creation Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asma, Stephen T.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the Creation Museum, founded by Ken A. Ham and designed as a rebuttal to the evolutionary view taken by other natural history museums. He discusses the socially conservative roots of the museum's exhibits, and presents Ham's answers to questions about the museum. The message of the museum is that the Bible is…

  5. Museums and Libraries: An Investment in Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services, Washington, DC.

    This document briefly highlights how the Institution of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) supports all types of libraries and museums in the United States. Short lists of statistics on library connectivity, patrons, school library funding, and reference librarian services, and on museum visitors, museum services, and museum holdings are provided.…

  6. "Not a Museum Town"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ounanian, Kristen

    ) articulation of quaintness bridge the theoretical and the empirical in this paper. Empirical material from three Danish cases connects the authenticity discourse to a recurring turn of phrase used by respondents, the ‘museum town.’ A‘museum town’ epitomized a place absent of life. In this manner being......This paper centers on the discussion of authenticity in coastal communities. Theoretically, MacCannell’s (1973) insights into the attraction of primitive cultures and modernity’s loss of connection to the workbench, Relph’s (1976) conceptions of placelessness and kitsch, and Stilgoe’s (1994...... authentic required a working fleet, which carried deeper implications for transformation of fishing communities....

  7. Alabama SEP Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, Elizabeth M.

    2014-06-30

    Executive Summary In the fall of 2010, the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs (ADECA) launched the Multi-State Model for Catalyzing the National Home Energy Retrofit Market Project (Multi-State Project). This residential energy efficiency pilot program was a collaborative effort among the states of Alabama, Massachusetts, Virginia, and Washington, and was funded by competitive State Energy Program (SEP) awards through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this project was to catalyze the home energy efficiency retrofit market in select areas within the state of Alabama. To achieve this goal, the project addressed a variety of marketplace elements that did not exist, or were underdeveloped, at the outset of the effort. These included establishing minimum standards and credentials for marketplace suppliers, educating and engaging homeowners on the benefits of energy efficiency and addressing real or perceived financial barriers to investments in whole-home energy efficiency, among others. The anticipated effect of the activities would be increased market demand for retrofits, improved audit to retrofit conversion rates and growth in overall community understanding of energy efficiency. The four-state collaborative was created with the intent of accelerating market transformation by allowing each state to learn from their peers, each of whom possessed different starting points, resources, and strategies for achieving the overall objective. The four partner states engaged the National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) to oversee a project steering committee and to manage the project evaluation for all four states. The steering committee, comprised of key program partners, met on a regular basis to provide overall project coordination, guidance, and progress assessment. While there were variances in program design among the states, there were several common elements: use of the Energy Performance Score (EPS) platform; an

  8. Genomics and museum specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachman, Michael W

    2013-12-01

    Nearly 25 years ago, Allan Wilson and colleagues isolated DNA sequences from museum specimens of kangaroo rats (Dipodomys panamintinus) and compared these sequences with those from freshly collected animals (Thomas et al. 1990). The museum specimens had been collected up to 78 years earlier, so the two samples provided a direct temporal comparison of patterns of genetic variation. This was not the first time DNA sequences had been isolated from preserved material, but it was the first time it had been carried out with a population sample. Population geneticists often try to make inferences about the influence of historical processes such as selection, drift, mutation and migration on patterns of genetic variation in the present. The work of Wilson and colleagues was important in part because it suggested a way in which population geneticists could actually study genetic change in natural populations through time, much the same way that experimentalists can do with artificial populations in the laboratory. Indeed, the work of Thomas et al. (1990) spawned dozens of studies in which museum specimens were used to compare historical and present-day genetic diversity (reviewed in Wandeler et al. 2007). All of these studies, however, were limited by the same fundamental problem: old DNA is degraded into short fragments. As a consequence, these studies mostly involved PCR amplification of short templates, usually short stretches of mitochondrial DNA or microsatellites. In this issue, Bi et al. (2013) report a breakthrough that should open the door to studies of genomic variation in museum specimens. They used target enrichment (exon capture) and next-generation (Illumina) sequencing to compare patterns of genetic variation in historic and present-day population samples of alpine chipmunks (Tamias alpinus) (Fig. 1). The historic samples came from specimens collected in 1915, so the temporal span of this comparison is nearly 100 years.

  9. nsect poisons in museums

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eirik Granqvist

    2015-01-01

    Since natural history museums existed, there have been problems concerning how to protect the collections from damages caused by insects. In 1740s', French Chemist Becoeur started to use arsenic-soap to protect his taxidermy specimens against insects. But in the years of 1770s', it was discovered the terrible strong arsenic poison which was dangerous to human beings. Finally taxidermy specimens leave the use of ar- senic and borax to history and use Eulan in their place.

  10. Sustainability in Modern Art Museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campolmi, Irene

    2013-01-01

    The paper analyzes the concept of sustainability in European governmental museum policies. It takes into consideration great modern art museums, particularly Tate Modern. On the one hand, the issue of sustainability is linked to art museums inasmuch these institutions operate for the sustainable ......) where decisions, narratives, meanings involve practitioners, beholders, curators and trustees since the tenet (archè) of the creation process.......The paper analyzes the concept of sustainability in European governmental museum policies. It takes into consideration great modern art museums, particularly Tate Modern. On the one hand, the issue of sustainability is linked to art museums inasmuch these institutions operate for the sustainable...... common good of the community. On the other hand, it is considered from the so called “three bottom” approach as also corporations and business companies have approached it. In a so called “three bottom” approach, museums’ pursuit for environmental, economic and social sustainability is related...

  11. Can museums survive the postmodern?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Keene

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Although archaeologists regard museums as vital repositories of important research materials, museum professionals take a broader view of their role in not only preserving natural and cultural heritage but also of how they could or should be presented, or interpreted, to the public. In this personal view, issues of what museums should be, or seek to be, in a postmodern world are explored.

  12. Museum metamorphosis à la mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Rikke Haller

    2014-01-01

    museum practices correspond to the logic of fashion. Where Foucault once described museums as heterochronias; places representing an ’other-time’, museums now strive to be both of their time and in time with the Zeitgeist. As a consequence, they must keep up with the speedy cycles of technological...... advancements and cultural change, and not only deliver, but also stoke the desire for, novel experiences. The paper explores the current vogue for fashion exhibitions as a case in point, arguing that this trend serves to promote the museum as fashionably current, but can also support novel formats for cultural...

  13. Museums Universe Data File (MUDF) FY 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services — The Museum Universe Data File (MUDF) contains information about known museums in the United States using data collected and aggregated from a variety of sources.

  14. Private Museums Gain Popularity in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Staff; Wangfeng

    2003-01-01

    "Have you ever been to a private museum?" The question pops upregularly in conversations here,indicating that smaller, specialized museums have become a valued partof Beijing cultural life. The trendstarted with the Beijing Guan Fu Classical Art Museum,

  15. Museums as Spaces for Cultural Citizenship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sattrup, Lise; Lejsgaard Christensen, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Ten museums and cultural institutions in Denmark examine their role as spaces for cultural citizenship. Based on one exhibition case at Thorvaldsen Museum, the paper will discuss how the theoretical framework of the project challenges the museums.......Ten museums and cultural institutions in Denmark examine their role as spaces for cultural citizenship. Based on one exhibition case at Thorvaldsen Museum, the paper will discuss how the theoretical framework of the project challenges the museums....

  16. Final Technical Report. Upgrades to Alabama Power Company Hydroelectric Developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crew, James F. [Southern Company Generation, Birmingham, AL (United States). Hydro Services; Johnson, Herbie N. [Southern Company Generation, Birmingham, AL (United States). Hydro Services

    2015-03-31

    From 2010 to 2014, Alabama Power Company (“Alabama Power”) performed upgrades on four units at three of the hydropower developments it operates in east-central Alabama under licenses issued by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (“FERC”). These three hydropower developments are located on the Coosa River in Coosa, Chilton, and Elmore counties in east-central Alabama.

  17. The Mediated Museum: Computer-Based Technology and Museum Infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterman, Nanette T.; Allen, Brockenbrough S.

    1991-01-01

    Describes the use of computer-based tools and techniques in museums. The integration of realia with media-based advice and interpretation is described, electronic replicas of ancient Greek vases in the J. Paul Getty Museum are explained, examples of mediated exhibits are presented, and the use of hypermedia is discussed. (five references) (LRW)

  18. Medical instruments in museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söderqvist, Thomas; Arnold, Ken

    2011-01-01

    This essay proposes that our understanding of medical instruments might benefit from adding a more forthright concern with their immediate presence to the current historical focus on simply decoding their meanings and context. This approach is applied to the intriguingly tricky question of what...... actually is meant by a "medical instrument." It is suggested that a pragmatic part of the answer might lie simply in reconsidering the holdings of medical museums, where the significance of the physical actuality of instruments comes readily to hand....

  19. A virtual art museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Eduardo Ortíz Triviño

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some indispensable technical aspects for designing an art museum based on virtual reality (YR technology. A YR setting can be produced which is able to submerge users having a basic immersion level in a didactic, entertaining, cultural and artistic experience. Specialised tools, oblect-orientated programming language and low-cost peripheral equipment are suggested so that the YR experience can be developed and executed on reasonably-priced computers. The YR concept, characteristics, components, application and systems are analysed, as is the design for implementing it.

  20. Augmented Reality for Museums

    OpenAIRE

    Hischier, Evelyn; Müller, Henning

    2016-01-01

    2016 nimmt Basel das 500. Jubiläum des Novum Instrumentum (neues Testament) von Erasmus von Rotterdam als Anlass diesen zu feiern. Dazu soll es eine Sonderausstellung in und um das Historische Museum in Basel geben. Verantwortlich für diese Ausstellung ist Marcel Henry, wissenschaftlicher Ausstellungsassistenz. Die Idee von Marcel Henry ist, dass eine App für iOS und Android eine Verbindung von der heutigen Zeit zu der Zeit von Erasmus von Rotterdam zu erstellen. Das moderne Smartphone s...

  1. The Museum of Piano Island

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LURUCAI

    2004-01-01

    GULANGYU, the island of pianos in southeast Xiamen, has more than 500 pianos. In the island's Shuzhuang Garden is the Gulangyu Piano Museum.Spread out over 2,000 square meters of land, the museum has on exhibit more than 70 pianos from the UK, France, Germany and Austria.

  2. Amsterdam Museum Linked Open Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, V. de; Wielemaker, J.; Gent, J. van; O'Connell, J.; Oosterbroek, M; Hildebrand, M.; Isaac, A.; Ossenbruggen, J.R. van; Schreiber, G.

    2013-01-01

    In this document we describe the Amsterdam Museum Linked Open Data set. The dataset is a five-star Linked Data representation and comprises the entire collection of the Amsterdam Museum consisting of more than 70,000 object descriptions. Furthermore, the institution's thesaurus and person authority

  3. Natural history museums and cyberspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wemmer, C.; Erixon-Stanford, M.; Gardner, A.L.

    1996-01-01

    Natural history museums are entering the electronic age as they increasingly use computers to build accessible and shareable databases that support research and education on a world-wide basis. Museums are exploring the Internet and other shared uses of electronic media to enhance their traditional roles in education, training, identifications, technical assistance, and collections management.

  4. Beijing Museum of Traditional Opera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    THE 100th museum to open in Beijing, the Beijing Museum of Traditional Opera is located inside the Beijing Huguang Guildhall Chamber of Cultural Prosperity and Ancestral Hall of the Local Worthy.The museum’s various exhibits have distinctively artistic

  5. Factors Influencing Museum Sustainability and Indicators for Museum Sustainability Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Luiza Pop

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to identify the factors upon which museum sustainability depends and the way in which this can be measured. Methodologically, we applied a qualitative research approach, using semi-structured interviews with experts from the Romanian museum sector, complemented by an in-depth study of the literature in this field. Results indicated that any objective measuring of sustainability must take into account the size of a museum’s collections and its organizational structure. It was also found that museum type can affect sustainability via its competitive advantage. However, the sustainability of a museum is not strictly determined by these factors, but also by the management and marketing strategies applied. Based on analysis of literature- and respondent-based factors influencing sustainability, this article proposes a set of 33 indicators that can be used by museums to measure their sustainability, as well as a model that enables evaluation of the sustainability levels of various museums comparatively, regardless of their type, size or importance (e.g., national, regional and local. The results obtained are useful both from a theoretical point of view, given that there are few writings on this topic, and from a practical point of view, as they provide a basis for a clear, objective model of museum sustainability measurement.

  6. Projections on museum exhibits - engaging visitors in the museum setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basballe, Ditte Amund; Halskov, Kim

    2010-01-01

    Using animation, text, and visual effects as elements of projections on the Danish rune stone, Mejlbystenen (the Mejlby stone), we have explored approaches to engaging museum visitors. The installation positions itself in the field of previous installations and experiments exploring projection...... on physical objects, but is unique in focusing on fusing the projection and the object in an engaging approach to communicating information at a cultural heritage museum. The Mejlby stone installation is now a permanent installation at a cultural and historical museum, and, based on observation as well...

  7. Information seeking behaviour of online museum visitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Mette

    two research projects on online museum visitors. The first case study will illustrate the information seeking and searching characteristics of online museum visitors at the National Museum of Military History in Copenhagen. Participants in this case study are characterised as special interest museum...

  8. Scoping out the International Spy Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radosh, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    The International Spy Museum in Washington, D.C.--a private museum that opened in July 2002 at the cost of $40 million--is rated as one of the most visited and popular tourist destinations in the nation's capital, despite stiff competition from the various public museums that are part of the Smithsonian. The popularity of the Spy Museum has a…

  9. Museum Theatre: Telling Stories through Objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindel, Dorothy Napp

    2002-01-01

    Explains that Museum Theatre's goal is to teach through drama by using experiential interpretive strategies that bypass the lecture format. Outlines a production of Museum Theatre which helped a museum redefine itself. Concludes that Museum Theatre helps shift the focus of programming from simple object display to an emphasis on the human…

  10. National Air and Space Museum Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietropaoli, Frank A.

    1986-01-01

    A branch of Smithsonian Institution Libraries, the National Air and Space Museum Library provides materials and services to support research programs of National Air and Space Museum. Brief histories of museum and its library and summary of museum programs provide background for overview of current library users, resources, and services.…

  11. Private Museums Gain Popularity in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WangFeng

    2003-01-01

    """"Have you ever been to a private museum?"""" The question pops up regularly in conversations here, indicating that smaller, specialized museums have become a valued part of Beijing cultural life, The trend started with the Beijing Guan Fu Classical Art Museum, followed by private museums set up in the city of Jinmen and Zibo,

  12. The Hybrid Museum: Hybrid Economies of Meaning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Vitus

    2013-01-01

    this article shows that there are two different museum mindsets where the second mindset leans towards participatory practices. It is shown how a museum can support a hybrid economy of meaning that builds on both a user generated economy of meaning and an institutional economy of meaning and adds value to both....... Such a museum is referred to as a hybrid museum....

  13. Information Design for Visualizing History Museum Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yulin; Lai, Tingsheng; Yasuda, Takami; Yokoi, Shigeki

    2011-01-01

    In the past few years, museum visualization systems have become a hot topic that attracts many researchers' interests. Several systems provide Web services for browsing museum collections through the Web. In this paper, we proposed an intelligent museum system for history museum artifacts, and described a study in which we enable access to China…

  14. ...Ready, Set, Go to the Art Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herberholz, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    A field trip to an art museum is a very special occasion for students, one they will long remember and that will initiate an association with museums that will endure throughout their lives. When teachers plan ahead and schedule a date and time for their class to attend, the museum will probably provide some pertinent information. Some museums may…

  15. Alabama ESI: HYDRO (Hydrography Lines and Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector lines and polygons representing coastal hydrography used in the creation of the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) for Alabama. The...

  16. Alabama ESI: MGT (Management Area Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive human-use data for designated critical habitats, state parks, wildlife refuges, and wildlife management areas in Alabama. Vector...

  17. Alabama's many endangered aquatic species are unprotected

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Newspaper article on the vulnerability of watercress darter and other fish species in Alabama after a significant fish kill in Roebuck Spring pond in 2008.

  18. Mobile Technologies in Museum Exhibitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Medić

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to be up–to–date and give visitors a memorable and unique experience, museums are including usage of digital technologies in their exhibitions. Even though museums in Serbia are very important part of tourism offer, they still have traditional settings that are poorly interpreted. The majority of them have a scientific and historical review which is unattractive for various target groups of visitors and for museums it’s important to continually try out new ways in interpretation of their settings. Because technology continues to rapidly change the way we communicate, cultural institutions should adapt to new ways of communication with their visitors. This paper examines mobile technologies that can be used in museums to give visitors a different experience and transfer the knowledge innovatively. In that way it will be presented the modern concept of presentation of museum exhibitions, focusing on usage of mobile devices through mobile applications and QR codes. The paper provides the broad understanding of usage mobile technologies in museum exhibitions with its advantages and limitations. The research results can help the museums management to improve interpretation and communication with visitors and enrich the visitor experience.

  19. Innovation, informed consent, health research and the Supreme Court: Montgomery v Lanarkshire - a brave new world?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mchale, Jean V

    2017-10-01

    The Supreme Court decision in Montgomery v Lanarkshire ([2015] UKSC11) has been hailed as a landmark not least because the Court enshrines the doctrine of informed consent formally into English law for the first time in relation to medical treatment. This paper explores the decision in Montgomery. It examines what its implications may be in the future for the consent process in relation to health research and innovative treatment and whether it may prove a watershed moment leading to changing dialogues and expectations in relation to consent. First, the paper explores the concept of 'informed consent' in clinical research as seen through international, Council of Europe and EU instruments. Second, it considers how English law currently governs the provision of information to research participants in the context of clinical research. It questions whether such an approach will be sustainable in the future. Third, it discusses the decision of the UK Supreme Court in Montgomery v Lanarkshire and asks what might be the impact of this Supreme Court decision in the health research context. It asks whether Montgomery may result in new approaches to consent in health research and innovative treatment.

  20. 75 FR 82463 - Yuri I. Montgomery, Respondent; Final Decision and Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-30

    ... product of U.S.-origin technology. Seventh, that Montgomery shall have an opportunity to request that the... involved that are subject to the Regulations are the foreign-produced direct product of U.S.-origin... submitted supported Respondent's assertion that he did not violate the EAR because the country of origin...

  1. The Politics of Children's Literature: The Story of Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Herbert

    1991-01-01

    As commonly told to and read by children, the story of Rosa Parks and the Montgomery bus boycott fails to indicate Mrs. Parks' activist role or the degree of community organization and participation in the boycott. Telling what actually occurred allows children identify with people who make justice happen. (SLD)

  2. Review of Procurement Practices in the Montgomery County Public Schools. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touche Ross and Co., Washington, DC.

    Following a management summary and introduction, chapters 3 and 4 of this report present findings and recommendations related to the Montgomery County, Maryland, Public Schools process of procuring supplies and equipment (food supplies, fuel oil, warehouse supplies, and maintenance parts) and contractual services (data processing maintenance,…

  3. Conceptualizing an Agenda for Social Responsibility and Public Policy at Montgomery College. A Briefing Paper. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Michelle T.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this briefing paper is to conceptualize a social responsibility and public policy agenda for Montgomery College. The briefing paper provides (a) a well researched perspective to embed a College culture to actualize social responsibility and public policy as institutional practices; (b) examines some of the opportunities and…

  4. The Graduates 1975. A Follow-up Study of the Students Who Graduated from Montgomery College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, Robert L.; And Others

    A questionnaire was mailed to all 1,020 students who graduated from Montgomery College during the 1974-75 academic year to determine the employment and educational circumstances of the graduates as well as to gather information regarding the graduates' attitudes toward their college experience. Usable responses were received from 635 (62%)…

  5. A Profile of the Faculty, Staff and Administrators of Montgomery College, Fall 1977.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, Robert L.; Armstrong, David F.

    Faculty, staff, and administrators of the three campuses and central administration of Montgomery College are described in terms of their sex, racial group, residence, and salary levels. In addition, the profile of faculty members includes their years of service, age, rank and sex in each discipline, tenure, length of contract, academic…

  6. A Four Year Follow-Up of Non-Returning Students at Montgomery College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, Robert L.; And Others

    An annual survey of non-returning Montgomery College students from the years 1971 to 1973 was conducted in order to examine reasons for choosing to leave the college, identify trends, determine the status of students at the time of the survey, and assess the impact of their college experience on current activities. The 454 usable responses (20…

  7. Montgomery College Student Follow-up Study: First-Time Students, Fall 1972.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, Robert L.; Armstrong, David F.

    As part of a state-wide longitudinal study of student goal attainment, Montgomery College surveyed 3,975 students in 1976 who had initially enrolled in fall of 1972. Sixty percent responded. Interviews with non-respondents showed that the academically able were more likely to respond, but that questionnaire item responses varied little. Data…

  8. Changes to the law on consent following Montgomery vs Lanarkshire Health Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clearkin, Louis

    2016-06-01

    The Supreme Court's determination on Montgomery (AP) (Appellant) v Lanarkshire Health Board (Respondent) (Scotland) [2015] clarified UK law on consent. It is for the informed patient to determine which intervention, if any, they will undergo. All doctors must meet this standard and may need to reassess their practice to do so.

  9. Unpleasant Nights at The Museum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    A slew of scandals involving the Palace Museum has drawn attention to the plight of China’s public museums The curator of Beijing’s Palace Museum,Zheng Xinmiao,has been a largely low-profile figure,and his name only became known to most average Chinese citizens after the Xinhua News Agency released an interview with him in August,in which Zheng apologized for a string of mishaps in the institution that houses the largest collection of China’s national treasures.

  10. Emerging opportunities: the internet, marketing and museums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richani Evdoxia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The tremendous impact of applying new technologies is obvious when it comes to museums. Internet forms an integral part of museums everyday life and decision making. Websites, online communities, social media, and mobile applications comprise elements of the modern museum’s digital self, which complements the real museum of permanent and temporary exhibitions, storage rooms, visitors’ facilities, laboratories and, most important, museum objects. This environment inevitably affects museum marketing strategies and creates relevant opportunities.

  11. Institutional Knowledge Sharing of Museum Records

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    A comparison of record types from the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County (NHM) museum archives and the registrars, in addition to interviews with archivists, librarians and registrars from NHM and Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) lead to findings that knowledge sharing between museum archives and registrars result in enriched institutional records. This partnership is explored as a mechanism for promoting the services and resources provided by registrars and museum archivist...

  12. MUSEUMS AS CULTURAL TOURISM ATTRACTIONS IN UBUD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Bagus Kade Subhiksu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been a shift in the attributes of several museums in Ubud in order to attract more tourists to visit museums as cultural tourism attractions. Some museums have expanded their collections and add other attributes to complement their main collections, which as the potential to alter the idealism, functions, and roles of museums. Another challenge faced by museum operators is the development of other tourist attractions, such as the addition of tourism destination attributes in Ubud, which was initially known as tourism destinations that offered art and culture such as dance performances and museums, and now have expanded into yoga destination, adventure destination, and so on. Based on these factors, the problem statements in this research are formulated as follows: (1 How are museums as tourist attractions in Ubud area, from the perspective of operators? (2 How are museums as tourist attractions in Ubud area, from the perspective of visitors? (3 How is the relationship between museums and other tourism components when examined from the role of museums as cultural tourism attractions in Ubud area?. This research on museums was conducted in the Ubud area because Ubud has made museums as the cultural tourism attractions in the area, which include the Blanco Museum, Museum Puri Lukisan, Agung Rai Museum of Art (ARMA, the Rudana Museum, and Neka Art Museum. This research is based on the theories of museum management, marketing, and theories on cultural tourism attraction. The research involved the participation of 82 foreign visitors and 79 domestic visitors as respondents, in addition to five museum owners and two museum professionals as informants. The conclusion of this research are as follows: (1 From the perspective of museum operators, museums function as cultural tourism attractions, as sources of historical information, as the media for cultural preservation, and the actualization of the noble objective of the museum

  13. Sustainability in Modern Art Museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campolmi, Irene

    2013-01-01

    common good of the community. On the other hand, it is considered from the so called “three bottom” approach as also corporations and business companies have approached it. In a so called “three bottom” approach, museums’ pursuit for environmental, economic and social sustainability is related...... to their eligibility for funding and it is indeed an economic rather than a cultural issue. Though, modern art museums’ sustainability relies not only in developing economic and environmental strategies but mostly in creating cultural policies that favor art museums in accomplishing same tasks but from different......The paper analyzes the concept of sustainability in European governmental museum policies. It takes into consideration great modern art museums, particularly Tate Modern. On the one hand, the issue of sustainability is linked to art museums inasmuch these institutions operate for the sustainable...

  14. Cultural minorities in Danish museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjørup, Søren

    2009-01-01

    Artikel om den forbløffende mangel på bevidsthed om minoriteter i danske museer, samt en diskussion af Dansk Jødisk Museum, specielt spillet mellem arkitekten Daniel Libeskinds koncept og museets egen meddelelse...

  15. Cultural minorities in Danish museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjørup, Søren

    2009-01-01

    Artikel om den forbløffende mangel på bevidsthed om minoriteter i danske museer, samt en diskussion af Dansk Jødisk Museum, specielt spillet mellem arkitekten Daniel Libeskinds koncept og museets egen meddelelse...

  16. American Museum of Natural History

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Christmas. Accessibility Admissions & Ticketing Coat Check and Photography Dining Directions and Transportation Download Museum Map Plan ... Curriculum Collections Evaluation, Research, and Policy Master of Arts in Teaching Online Courses for Educators Urban Advantage ...

  17. The museum as information space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navarrete, T.; Mackenzie Owen, J.

    2016-01-01

    of an information system related to different methods of reasoning. We will highlight the new possibilities offered by digital technology and the changes brought by the way in which visitors come into contact with objects. Our central claim is that the visitor moved from being onsite within the museum’s information...... as an institutional entity on the Internet, for in this new information space, objects, collections and museums, all function as independent components in a vast universe of data, side by side at everyone’s disposal at anytime. Potentially, users can access cultural heritage anytime, anywhere and anyhow. © The Author......Although museums vary in nature and may have been founded for all sorts of reasons, central to all museum institutions are the collected objects. These objects are information carriers organized in a catalogue system. In this chapter, the museum will be conceived as an information space, consisting...

  18. Motivations and experiences of museum visitors: The case of the Imperial War Museum, United Kingdom

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, Raymond; Kokkranikal, Jithendran

    2015-01-01

    This study explores motivations of visitors to the Imperial War Museum (North and South), United Kingdom, with a view to understanding why people visit museums associated with conflicts. Though museums are part of the education and leisure industry, the distinction between education and leisure is often blurred. There are a number of reasons why people visit museums. Motives of museum visitors can be grouped into intrinsic and extrinsic factors. This study analysed the extent to which museum ...

  19. Sustainable Museums for Sustainable Development

    OpenAIRE

    Pop, Izabela Luiza; Borza, Anca

    2015-01-01

    The sustainable development of a region depends on the sustainability and measures taken by all the public and private organizations in the respective area. Museums stand out among these organizations due to the controversies arising in connection with the role they have to play in this process of sustainable development. This paper seeks to analyze whether and why museums should become sustainable and provide an overview on the Romanian museums’ sustainability. The qualitative research based...

  20. DIGITALISATION IN FINNISH MUSEUMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Laine-Zamojska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available W artykule omówiono generalny obraz digitalizacji w fińskim sektorze muzealnym. Przedstawiono szacunkowe liczby dotyczące digitalizacji dziedzictwa kulturowego na podstawie przeprowadzonych statystycznych badań, oraz zaprezentowano wiele projektów związanych z ucyfrowieniem fińskich muzeów.\tFiński sektor muzealny jest niezwykle zróżnicowany, podobnie jak stopień skatalogowania i zdigitalizowania kolekcji. W projektach rozwojowych aktywnie uczestniczy cały sektor muzealny. W ostatnich latach, dzięki wielu inicjatywom i badaniom udało się uzyskać szczegółowy obraz fińskiego sektora muzealnego. Największą inicjatywą jest projekt utworzenia Narodowej Biblioteki Cyfrowej, podlegający Ministerstwu Edukacji i Kultury. Celem projektu jest połączenie i udostępnienie zasobów z instytucji pamięci (bibliotek, archiwów i muzeów. Towarzyszą mu rozległe projekty digitalizacji.\tW związku z ogromną różnorodnością systemów do zarządzania kolekcją i praktykami katalogowymi w muzeach, w 2011 r. Państwowy Urząd Muzealny (Museovirasto / National Board of Antiquities, Fiński Związek Muzeów (Suomen museoliitto / Finnish Museums Association i Państwowa Galeria Sztuki (Valtion taidemuseo / Finnish National Gallery zainicjowały projekt Muzeum2015 (Museo2015 / Museum2015. Jego głównymi celami są: unifikacja procesów związanych z zarządzaniem kolekcją, stworzenie architektury korporacyjnej dla zarządzania muzealną kolekcją, stworzenie modelu zarządzania dla architektury korporacyjnej, oraz określenie i stworzenie warunków do zakupu i implementacji ogólnofińskiego systemu zarządzania kolekcją.\tRozwój cyfrowych narzędzi dla najmniejszych, prowadzonych przez wolontariuszy, muzeów lokalnych jest jednym z celów projektu badawczego ViMuseo, prowadzonego na Uniwersytecie w Jyväskylä (Jyväskylän yliopisto / University of Jyväskylä.

  1. Alabama ESI: T_MAMMAL (Terrestrial Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for Alabama and Perdido Key beach mice in Alabama. Vector polygons in this data set represent the rare...

  2. Museums Connect: Teaching Public History through Transnational Museum Partnerships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. W. Harker

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Museums Connect is a program funded by the US Department of State and administered by the American Alliance of Museums that sponsors transnational museum partnerships. This program provides one model for teaching public history in a transnational context, and this article analyzes the experiences of two university-museums—the Museum of History and Holocaust Education (MHHE in the United States and the Ben M’sik Community Museum (BMCM in Morocco—during two grants between 2009 and 2012. In exploring the impact of the program on the staff, faculty, and students involved and by analyzing the experiences and reflections of participants, I argue that this program can generate positive pedagogical experiences. However, in addition to the successes of the MHHE and BMCM during their two grants, the participants encountered significant power differentials that manifested themselves in both the processes and products of the grants. It is the conclusion of this article that both partners in a public history project need to address and confront potential power issues at the outset in order to achieve a more balanced, collaborative partnership.

  3. A State of Emergency in Alabama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry Edward Spencer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the Alabama Department of Corrections August 2009 Monthly Statistical Report and Fiscal Year 2008 Annual Report, recent articles to explain the serious public safety issue of prison overcrowding within the state of Alabama, lack of funding and correctional staff, and increasing violence among inmates. It is imperative that the stakeholders take a restorative justice approach to offenders who commit nonviolent crimes or otherwise be prepared to release substantial numbers of violent inmates due to federal court intervention, expanding parole, and other types of early release programs. Violent offenders will pose a greater threat to the community. Correctional workers continue to be exposed daily to the risk of injury or death caused by severe prison overcrowding. The state could experience additional financial hardship to rebuild a destroyed correctional facility in an event of a riot. The excessive use of incarceration for nonviolent offenders is one of the most important issues facing the state of Alabama this decade.

  4. 'Bolam' to 'Montgomery' is result of evolutionary change of medical practice towards 'patient-centred care'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Albert

    2017-01-01

    The Supreme Court judgement in 'Montgomery v Lanarkshire Health Board' has caused a change in the law concerning the duty of doctors on disclosure of information to patients regarding risks. The law now requires a doctor to take reasonable care to ensure that the patient is aware of any material risks involved in any recommended treatment, and of any reasonable alternative or variant treatments. Are doctors totally removed from the protective shield even if the practice is accepted by a reasonable body of medical opinion previously laid down by 'Bolam' with the recent Supreme Court decision in the 'Montgomery' case? This paper questions whether the 'Bolam' principle needs to be discarded or re-interpreted in the modern context of health care. Adopting 'patient-centred' care to unfold the 'significant risks' attached to patients would align with the evolving changes in medical law. It should be the changing context of health care driving the evolving change of law.

  5. Eastern hemlock found in Macon County, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    David B. South; Brian Via; Henri D. Grissino-Mayer; Richard Martin; Richard Shelby; Sandie McCall

    2016-01-01

    Alabama is currently the southern limit of the range of eastern hemlock [Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carriere]. In 2012, several well preserved stumps were excavated from a farm located in Notasulga, Alabama (32 º 33” 6’ N; 85º 40” 22’ W). Even though they were buried in a saturated soil for approximately 1,500 years, the stumps were remarkably well preserved. The low-...

  6. Museums and Virtual Museums in Europe: Reaching expectations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Pescarin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an overview of the domain known as “Virtual Museums”, as it appears after the four year project V-MUST.NET. It aims at describing the shift we are assisting in the museum perception and management, including how virtual museums are and can be integrated in exhibits, highlighting positive and negative elements. Visitors and curators expectations and possible answers are described, also referred to the “Keys To Rome” international exhibit example. It finally proposes new possible researches directions.

  7. Museum libraries: how digitization can enhance the value of the museum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Navarrete, T.; Mackenzie Owen, J.

    2011-01-01

    It is the responsibility of the museum library to enhance the understanding of the museum collection and the role of museum objects as cultural documents. For many reasons, this role is only partially fulfilled, if at all. This is because in practice the library and its museum are insufficiently int

  8. The National Museum of Mexican Art: A New Model for Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafranca-Guzman, Nancy; Tortolero, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    The National Museum of Mexican Art was founded by a group of educators in 1987. Twenty-three years later, as the first and only Latino museum accredited by the American Association of Museums, it presents exhibition programming of the highest quality, and conserves an extensive and inclusive art collection. Unlike many museums, it places…

  9. Supporting Museums--Serving Communities: An Evaluation of the Museums for America Program. Full Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apley, Alice; Frankel, Susan; Goldman, Elizabeth; Streitburger, Kim

    2011-01-01

    The Institute of Museum and Library Services is the primary source of federal support for the nation's museums. Museums for America (MFA) is the largest IMLS grant program for museums; it supports institutions by investing in high-priority, high-value activities that are clearly linked to the institution's strategic plan and enhance its value to…

  10. Presidential Libraries Museum Collection Management Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Archives and Records Administration — MCMD serves as a descriptive catalog for the Presidential Libraries museum collections, and also supports a full range of museum collections management processes...

  11. Should Museums Serve the Visually Handicapped?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toll, Dove

    1975-01-01

    The National Museum of Natural History of the Smithsonian Institution undertook a research project to determine what could be done to enable visually handicapped persons to benefit from the museum's resources. (Author)

  12. Playful Learning Culture in the Museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchetti, Emanuela

    2013-01-01

    not undergone much investigation. This study was conducted in cooperation with two historical museums, these being the Transport Museum in Coventry, England and The Viking Museum in Ribe, Denmark. A new learning platform called MicroCulture has been created, aimed at eliciting a sociocultural understanding...... of history in young visitors. This study indicates that museum learning culture could be enriched by the introduction of mediated play as a resource for conceptual thinking and social interaction....

  13. Museum audio guides as an accessibility enhancer

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, Cláudia Susana Nunes

    2012-01-01

    Accessibility to museums is enhanced by various types of cultural mediation, such as the use of audio guides, which consist of a means for innovative mediation put forth to make the museum visit more autonomous and simultaneously replace the traditional guided visit. Their use is integrated in the tendency for museum democratisation felt in Europe between the 60s and the 80s of the 20th century, especially with the development of educational services at museums and their opening to schools. I...

  14. Portable technologies at the museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svabo, Connie

    2011-01-01

    A topic of interest in contemporary museum studies is how digital technologies contribute to museum visitor experiences. Building on insights from media and technology studies that new media should be understood for how they overlap with old media, the article reports an ethnographic study...... of the intersections between the exhibition at a modern museum of natural history and three portable technologies – one of which is digital. Mobile phone cameras, exercise pamphlets and dress-up costumes link visitors with an exhibition, but they simultaneously shape this relation in their own specific directions....... This is shown by drawing on the concept of mediation as it is developed by philosopher Michel Serres and philosopher of technology Bruno Latour. The article is based on the Ph.D. thesis entitled “Portable Objects at the Museum”, defended at Roskilde University on 22 September 2010....

  15. Italy: An Open Air Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzorusso, Ann

    2016-04-01

    Imagine if you could see the River Styx, bathe in the Fountain of Youth, collect water which enhances fertility, wear a gem that heals bodily ailments, understand how our health is affected by geomagnetic fields, venture close to the flames of Hell on Earth and much, much, more. Know something? These things exist - on Earth - today - in Italy and you can visit them because Italy is an open air museum. Ann C. Pizzorusso, in her recent book, reveals how Italy's geology has affected its art, literature, architecture, religion, medicine and just about everything else. She explores the geologic birth of the land, describing the formation of the Alps and Apennines, romantic bays of Tuscany and Lazio, volcanoes of the south and Caribbean-like beaches of Puglia. But that's not all, from the first pages of this visually stunning book, the reader has the impression of being in an art museum, where one can wander from page to page to satisfy one's curiosity-- guided from time to time by the Etruscan priests, Virgil, Dante, Goethe or Leonardo da Vinci himself. Pizzorusso stitches together widely diverse topics - such as gemology, folk remedies, grottoes, painting, literature, physics and religion - using geology as a thread. Quoting everyone from Pliny the Elder to NASA physicist Friedemann Freund, the work is solidly backed scholarship that reads as easily as a summer novel. Wonderfully illustrated with many photos licensed from Italian museums, HRH Elizabeth II and the Ministero Beni Culturali the book highlights the best works in Italian museums and those outside in the "open air museums." This approach can be used in any other country in the world and can be used for cultural tourism (a tour following the book has been organized for cultural and university groups), an ideal way of linking museums to the surrounding landscape.

  16. MUSEUMS, MARKETING, TOURISM AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT. THE BRITISH MUSEUM – A SUCCESSFUL MODEL FOR ROMANIAN MUSEUMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Răzvan-Andrei CORBOS

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuous growth of cultural influence upon the modern societycombined with the increasing role of tourism in the economic life of cities, ledto the development of the “emblem museums”. The “emblem museum”usually becomes a touristic attraction objective that must be visited bytourists from a city, and by taking the decision of prolonging their staying inthat city, the tourists will increase the amount of money they spend in thatlocation. The “emblem museums” represent a way to develop urban tourism,gain competitive advantage and attract new sources of income for the city`seconomy. A recent study showed that 3 out of 10 tourists visited London forits museums. One of them is the British Museum, which, in 2010 was on the2nd place in the top10 world`s most visited museums. This study aims topresent the British Museum from the mix marketing perspective, from thevisitor’s point of view, and to present some of the good practices this giant isusing to attract more visitors and to maintain its competitive advantage,practices which may be used by Romanian museums in order to increase thevisitors number and to obtain a better position in the economy life ofRomanian cities.

  17. What is Sustainability in Modern Art Museums?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campolmi, Irene

    2013-01-01

    as documentation processes may be effectively constructed through diegetic processes by all the museum workers. Such institutions embody a different museums model that I called ‘archétopy’. Modern art museums may adopt it to open the access of narratives and documentation processes to wider segments...

  18. Museum Personnel's Opinions on Mobile Guidance Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Hirokazu; Sekiguchi, Hiromi; Yabumoto, Yoshitaka

    2007-01-01

    While opinions from the general public are certainly important, opinions from the museum staff are also necessary to improve user service systems. this article introduces two groups of museum staff who have evaluated the usability of mobile guidance systems in Japanese museums. One group is the research team who used the PDA system in the National…

  19. A Unifying Curriculum for Museum-Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povis, Kaleen E.

    2011-01-01

    There are over two dozen schools in the United States with the word "museum" in their names. However, the philosophy and pedagogy that tie these schools together is unclear. A consistent definition, criteria for classification, and a unifying curriculum to guide museum- schools is lacking. Yet, museum-schools continue to open across the country.…

  20. Measuring enjoyment of an interactive museum experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Elisabeth M.A.G.; Lingnau, Andreas; Kockelkorn, Hub

    2012-01-01

    Museums are increasingly being equipped with interactive technology. The main goal of using technology is to improve the museum-going experience of visitors. In this paper, we present the results of a study with an electronic quest through a museum aimed at children in the age of 10-12. We wanted to

  1. Museums and Libraries: Gateways to Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services, Washington, DC.

    This booklet outlines the activities of the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), the primary source of federal funding for libraries and museums. IMLS grants support all types of museums from art and history to science and zoos, and all types of libraries, from public and academic to research and school. IMLS enables libraries and…

  2. Museums in Cultural Tourism in Poland

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the museums, their potential and their significance for cultural tourism in Poland. Its aims are achieved through a presentation of registered national museums, ‘monuments of history’, museum buildings and the cultural activities undertaken by these institutions

  3. Presencing Culture: Ethnology Museums, Objects, and Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudelli, William; Mungur, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Ethnology museums are pedagogical. As educators attempting to make sense of how museums teach about the world, the authors of this article are especially interested in how ethnology museums curate otherness through objects, texts, and spaces, and how these combine to present a narrative of others. Ellsworth has referred to this as the…

  4. A Study of Interactives in Virginia Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Museums have an important role to both educate the public and also to preserve museum objects for the future. These two responsibilities often conflict with one another. Museums continuously struggle in deciding what objects in their collection must be placed in permanent storage as opposed to being on display and being used to educate the public.…

  5. Interfaith Dialogue at Peace Museums in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gachanga, Timothy; Mutisya, Munuve

    2015-01-01

    This paper makes a case for further studies on the contribution of peace museums to interfaith dialogue debate. Based on our experiences as museum curators, teachers and peace researchers and a review of published materials, we argue that there is a lacuna in the study on the contribution of peace museums to the interfaith dialogue debate. The…

  6. China's biggest zoological museum opens in Kunming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The opening ceremony for the Kunming Museum of Zoology was held at the CAS Kunming Institute of Zoology (KIZ) on 31 October, 2006 in the capital of southwest China's Yunnan Province. With nearly10,000 animal specimens that could be put on display,the museum boasts the largest of its kind in China. The Museum opened to the public on 6 November.

  7. Digitization and the Depoliticization of Museum Access The Situation at the National Palace Museum

    OpenAIRE

    Michelle Chaotzu Wang

    2016-01-01

    Ranked tenth amongst museums across the globe, the National Palace Museum (NPM) in Taipei is a significant interpreter of treasures belonging to the entire ethnic Chinese. But, unlike other national museums of monolithic stature in Europe and the Americas that have largely left political concerns of museum identity and authority to the previous century to adopt a freer identity as an institution of the global age, the National Palace Museum remains dilatory in its level of disclosure. This pa...

  8. A Museum for Palle Nielsen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorborg, Christoffer

    2016-01-01

    The present project attempts to articulate architecturally the psychic content in the danish graphic artist and draftsman Palle Nielsen's oeuvre. The museum inscribes itself within the city of Copenhagen as a part of it, but simultaneously establishes a taut vacuum between the city's buildings, t......, thereby setting these existing, surrounding monumental buildings in relief. The interior of the museum manifests itself as a dramatic, labyrinthine course of empty spaces, within which the visitor is deprived of contact with the city, and potentially loses his or her sense of place....

  9. Projections on museum exhibits - engaging visitors in the museum setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basballe, Ditte Amund; Halskov, Kim

    2010-01-01

    Using animation, text, and visual effects as elements of projections on the Danish rune stone, Mejlbystenen (the Mejlby stone), we have explored approaches to engaging museum visitors. The installation positions itself in the field of previous installations and experiments exploring projection...

  10. RCP Local School Projects in Alabama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regional Curriculum Project, Atlanta, GA.

    One of 6 state reports generated by the Regional Curriculum Project (funded under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act), the document describes 4 specific projects implemented through the Alabama State Superintendent's Office beginning in 1966. All 4 projects were designed to improve instructional leadership by defining the role(s) of the…

  11. 76 FR 30008 - Alabama Regulatory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-24

    ... Section 503(a) of the Act permits a State to assume primacy for the regulation of surface coal mining and... amendments to its program under SMCRA (30 U.S.C. 1201 et seq.). Alabama's revised mining regulations are... regulation of surface coal mining and reclamation operations. One of the purposes of SMCRA is to ``establish...

  12. 77 FR 32986 - Notice of Inventory Completion: The University of Alabama Museums, Tuscaloosa, AL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    ... projectile point, 6 pottery sherds, 1 bone awl, and 1 turtle shell. Some objects that appear in the inventory... than 2,032 glass beads, 1 lot of more than 17 shell beads, 1 unidentified bead, 1 gun lock, 1 gun butt... lot of charred nut shells, and 1 lot of unmodified quartz pebbles could not be located in the...

  13. Constructing museum learning at the university level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Line Hjorth

    2011-01-01

    Based on a case study of an educational project related to a Darwin exhibition at the Zoological Museum in Copenhagen (‘Evolution’), the article discusses how to integrate museum-based elements into an academic core curriculum and suggests a university-initiated learning strategy situated...... in a museum environment. How can museums be implemented at the university level and become part of a curriculum that demands high academic standards while at the same time exploiting and benefitting from the complexity and aesthetically determined learning potentials offered by museums? Following George A...

  14. Museums? Evidence from two Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azilah Kasim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides evidence on Young Adults’ motivations for visiting and not visiting museums. Using purposive sampling, self-administered questionnaires were distributed to respondents in Kedah, Malaysia and Eskisehir, Turkey. Both Kedah and Eskisehir share one similarity – they both have many museums. The findings revealed that in both study contexts, young people tended to visit museums for practical reasons such as to help them prepare homework or a project. They also visit for intrinsic reasons such as to satisfy their curiosity. Both samples also illustrate Davies (2001 contention that awareness is an important precursor to potential visits. On the other hand, both samples are different in reasons for not visiting. While young people in Eskisehir cite emotional reasons for deciding not to visit, young people in Kedah offered more practical ones such as lack of time and interest, or more interested in other activities. The study findings are useful for understanding reasons behind the generally low museum visits among youth. Several managerial implications of the study were also proposed.

  15. Unpleasant Nights at The Museum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN YUAN

    2011-01-01

    The curator of Beijing's Palace Museum,Zheng Xinmiao,has been a largely low-profile figure,and his name only became known to most average Chinese citizens after the Xinhua News Agency released an interview with him in August,in which Zheng apologized for a string of mishaps in the institution that houses the largest collection of China's national treasures.

  16. The Materiality of Museum Politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Peter

    on the agency of objects that assert that ‘art objects' (in a wide definition of the concept) are not simply materialisation of culture or identity, but deliberate attempts to change the social world. Furthermore, empirical examples of community ownership, and reinterpretation of museum collections may cause...

  17. A Day at the Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curriculum Review, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Field trips are not just for the school year. End the year right by encouraging parents and caregivers to continue working children's brains throughout the summer months. For example, the National Parent Teacher Association (PTA) recommends taking children of all ages--preschoolers, children, tweens and teens--to museums. Whether it is a two-hour…

  18. Netherlands: archives, libraries and museums

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Ketelaar; F. Huysmans; P. van Mensch

    2010-01-01

    This entry provides an overview of the development and current state of archives, libraries, and museums as institutions, and the related professions and disciplines within the Netherlands. The entry describes social and political issues affecting information institutions from the early nineteenth c

  19. Orientalist Imaginations and Touristification of Museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ooi, Can-Seng

    2005-01-01

    promotion in the city-state. The tourism authorities in Singapore have found that the city destination has become too modern and western for many tourists, and the destination has embarked on a campaign to make Singapore more oriental. The creation of the museums is one strategy to orientalize Singapore......; these museums assert different layers of Singapore's oriental identities. Each museum appropriates the tourist orientalist imagination in different ways. This paper argues that the orientalist imagination can be understood as a set of knowledge resources for the construction of local identities to enhance...... a destination's uniqueness and attractiveness. Besides reviewing Said's orientalism, this paper visits criticisms of the theory, within the context of the orientalization process of museums in Singapore.Keywords: orientalism, Singapore Art Museum, Singapore History Museum, Asian Civilizations Museum, Singapore...

  20. Analisa Minat Wisata Museum Kota Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ani Solihat

    2016-09-01

    ABSTRACT Museum is a collection of historical objects as evidence that should be known by the public, especially the new generation as a study of the history. In Bandung there are a number of museums including the Geology Museum, Asian-African Museum, Mandala Wangsit Siliwangi Museum, Post Museum, Sri Baduga Museum, and Barli Museum. All six of the museum managed by the government and private parties. Until now the interest of tourists who come to the city of Bandung is just shopping, dining and tours of the city, it is not significant to the interests wisatawa education at the museum in the city of Bandung. Since 2014 Bandung many improvements done in various places, such as parks, Square Bandung, street like Braga as one of the attractions of the past, Dago, including the Asian-African region serve as a place Asian-African Conference ke- 50, it is one of the magnets increase the tourists to visit the city of Bandung. Increasing the tourists should have a great potential for the government of Bandung in increasing interest in the visit to the museum as a means of travel and history education. The purpose of this study was to identify how big tourist interest in visiting Bandung museums. The method used in this research is descriptive quantitative method, while respondents in this study is that Bandung tourists, which is in the area of shopping area, culinary tours, and city tours. The results showed that the interest  Bandung tourists is very low in visiting the museum in the Bandung city.  Keyword : Tourism, Consumer Interest, Museum Tours

  1. Enhanced Montgomery Multiplication on DSP Architectures for Embedded Public-Key Cryptosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gastaldo P

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Montgomery's algorithm is a popular technique to speed up modular multiplications in public-key cryptosystems. This paper tackles the efficient support of modular exponentiation on inexpensive circuitry for embedded security services and proposes a variant of the finely integrated product scanning (FIPS algorithm that is targeted to digital signal processors. The general approach improves on the basic FIPS formulation by removing potential inefficiencies and boosts the exploitation of computing resources. The reformulation of the basic FIPS structure results in a general approach that balances computational efficiency and flexibility. Experimental results on commercial DSP platforms confirm both the method's validity and its effectiveness.

  2. 76 FR 27139 - Alabama Disaster Number AL-00036

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-10

    ...): Alabama: Baldwin, Mobile Georgia: Floyd, Polk Mississippi: Clarke, Greene, Wayne, Tennessee: Franklin... Federal Domestic Assistance Numbers 59002 and 59008) James E. Rivera, Associate Administrator for...

  3. Cultural Resources - MUSEUMS_IGS_IN: Museums in Indiana (Indiana Geological Survey, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — MUSEUMS_IGS_IN is a point shapefile showing the locations of 118 museums in Indiana. Using street addresses obtained from Web pages, a shapefile was created using...

  4. Museum professionals meet at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    As part of the World Year of Physics, CERN organised a day of meetings attended by professionals from French and Swiss science museums. The poster for the Einstein exhibition that will open in Bern on 16 June 2005. Around thirty professionals from science museums, as well as representatives of France's Office de Coopération et d'Information Muséographiques (OCIM) and the Suisse Romande Réseau Science et Cité, congregated at CERN on 10th February with the purpose, among other things, of exchanging ideas and information on proposed exhibitions for the World Year of Physics. "We thought that it would be a good idea to start the World Year of Physics with a meeting at CERN that could provide inspiration for future exhibitions", explains Emma Sanders, Head of the Visits Service and Microcosm. Many scientific museums are trying to improve the way they cover contemporary science, and CERN is an ideal place to observe science in the making. Other goals of the meeting were to strengthen links between French and...

  5. The Bay of Pigs: Revisiting Two Museums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Read

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The Museum of Playa Giron (the Bay of Pigs in the region of Cienega De Zapata, Cuba, celebrates the repulse of Brigade 2506 as the first reverse of US imperialism on the American continents. The equivalent Brigade 2506 Museum in Miami, dedicated to and maintained by the members of Brigade 2506, celebrates defeat at the Bay of Pigs as moral victory for the Cuban exiles. The forces were indeed implacable foes. Yet between the museums can be detected some curious similarities. Both present the common theme of the confrontation between forces of good and evil. Both celebrate the philosophy that dying for one’s country is the greatest good a citizen may achieve. Both museums fly the common Cuban flag. Both museums identify a common enemy: the United States of America. This article, by comparing the displays in the two museums, analyses some cultural elements of what, despite decades of separation, in some ways remains a common Cuban culture.

  6. Museum Records and the History of Archaeology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne P. Sullivan

    1991-11-01

    Full Text Available One cannot help but think of museums when contemplating the history of archaeology. For those of us who work in museums, contact with past research and former ways of thinking about and doing archaeology happens on almost a daily basis. Not only do museum collections contain the information and things collected by older colleagues, these materials embody the thoughts, theories, methodologies, and techniques of these individuals and of the discipline's past paradigms. The records associated with museum collections are one major class of records made by archaeologists in the course of their research, and are distinct from scholar's personal papers. Museum records contain invaluable information for understanding not only the work of individual archaeologists, but detailed information on the practice of archaeology. Introspective studies of the discipline using museum records have the potential to significantly broaden our perspectives, especially regarding the conduct of field research, but getting access to these records is often a problem due to poor management.

  7. DASAR-DASAR PERENCANAAN INTERIOR MUSEUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anak Agung Ayu Wulandari

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Old, haunted, dark and poorly maintained are the impressions of Indonesian museums. Unlike foreign museums which are always crowded with visitors, Indonesian museums are always quiet and deserted. The biggest challenge for museums today is recognise that museums are for people and that their future depends on developing themselves to meet the needs of the people. Thus, Indonesian museums need to develop and apply mass communication model combined with the interpersonal communication model where in this type of communication visitors are allowed to participate in the exhibition and become part of the exhibition since this is what nowadays visitors desired to do. With a better planned exhibition interior design, following the basic design principles such as transforming space with harmony, creating room atmosfer, pacing and circulation, suitable lighting design and display as well as using appropriate presetantion technique combined with technology and multimedia, an exhibition will become a more interactive and attractive that will meet visitors expectation

  8. What is Sustainability in Modern Art Museums?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campolmi, Irene

    2013-01-01

    as documentation processes may be effectively constructed through diegetic processes by all the museum workers. Such institutions embody a different museums model that I called ‘archétopy’. Modern art museums may adopt it to open the access of narratives and documentation processes to wider segments......The paper analyzes the challenge of sustainability in modern art museums in the early 21st century society. It positions art museums within the cultural debate about sustainability and identifies missing frameworks in museology that would favor cultural policies based on this value. Though, art...... museums have looked at sustainability inasmuch industries or commercial businesses and have adopted ‘sustainability charts’ as a tool to green-wash their policies and try to provide a different cultural offer. Their approach has been ‘three-bottom’ and has focused on the economic, environmental and social...

  9. Plug: Secrets of the Museum": A pervasive game taking place in a museum

    OpenAIRE

    Simatic, M.; Astic, Isabelle; Aunis, C.; Gentes, A.; Guyot-Mbodji, A.; Jutant, C.; Zaza, E.

    2009-01-01

    International audience; "Plug: Secrets of the Museum" (PSM) is a game played with NFC-enabled mobile phones inside a museum containing dedicated passive RFID tags. During a PSM session, 8 teams exchange virtual cards representing objects located in the museum. These exchanges are done either with RFID tags or with other teams. PSM game design results in an educational and entertaining game which is much more attractive than the plain old treasure hunt proposed by several museums. Thus PSM is ...

  10. Use of the radial forearm fasciocutaneous free flap and montgomery salivary bypass tube for pharyngoesophageal reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varvares, M A; Cheney, M L; Gliklich, R E; Boyd, J M; Goldsmith, T; Lazor, J; Baron, J C; Montgomery, W W

    2000-08-01

    Head and neck reconstructive surgeons involved in pharyngoesophageal reconstruction have several options available to repair the defect after partial or total laryngopharyngectomy. There is no uniform agreement among head and neck surgeons as to which of the most frequently used techniques offers the best results. A retrospective study was performed on 20 consecutive patients who had undergone reconstruction of the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus using a radial forearm free flap with Montgomery salivary bypass tube at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary in Boston, Massachusetts, and St. Louis University, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery between 1992 and 1996. This reconstruction was used for primary reconstruction after total or partial laryngopharyngectomy with cervical esophagectomy, partial pharyngectomy sparing the larynx, and for reconstruction of the stenotic neopharynx after laryngectomy. The overall rate of pharyngocutaneous fistula was 20%, and the rate of postoperative stricture was 10%. Of patients reconstructed with this technique, 85% were able to resume oral alimentation, whereas 15% remained G-tube dependent. Of the 18 patients who did not have their larynges remain intact, 6 were able to develop useful tracheoesophageal speech. The results of this study show that the radial forearm fasciocutaneous free flap in combination with the Montgomery salivary bypass tube is extremely useful for reconstruction of partial and circumferential defects of the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus.

  11. The Art of Playful Mobility in Museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Froes, Isabel Cristina G.; Walker, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Many of us interact with other people in online games and social networks, through multiple digital devices. But harnessing playful and mobile activities for museum learning is mostly undeveloped. In this chapter we explore play as a structure to support visitor learning, drawing from international...... research in museums and interaction design. We argue that play and mobility provide museums with ready-made structures and concepts which help them plan for visitor learning....

  12. Occupational health and safety in medical museums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westhorpe, R N

    2008-07-01

    Medical museum collections provide challenges in occupational health and safety that do not become apparent in many other collections. During the recent development of the Geoffrey Kaye Museum of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists, these challenges were addressed, following the guidelines of the Occupational Health and Safety Regulations of the State of Victoria. This paper details these regulations and their necessary application in this specialist museum.

  13. Airway management using laryngeal mask airway in insertion of the Montgomery tracheal tube for subglottic stenosis -A case report-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung Sun; Kwon, Young-Suk; Lee, Sangseock; Yon, Jun Heum; Kim, Dong Won

    2010-12-01

    The Montgomery tracheal tube (T-tube) is a device used as a combined tracheal stent and airway after laryngotracheoplasty for patients with tracheal stenosis. This device can present various challenges to anesthesiologists during its placement, including the potential for acute loss of the airway, inadequate administration of inhalation agents, and inadequacy of controlled mechanical ventilation. The present case of successful airway management used a laryngeal mask airway under total intravenous anesthesia with propofol and remifentanil in the insertion of a Montgomery T-tube in a tracheal resection and thyrotracheal anastomosis because of severe subglottic stenosis.

  14. 76 FR 54807 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection: IMLS Museum Web Database: MuseumsCount.gov

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-02

    ...Count.gov AGENCY: Institute of Museum and Library Services, National Foundation for the Arts and the... public, policy makers, researchers and the museum field itself with quality data for strategic decision..., Institute of Museum and Library Services, 1800 M St., NW., Washington, DC 20036. Telephone:...

  15. Museums and Health: A Case Study of Research and Practice at the Children's Museum of Manhattan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    This article will discuss how museums may serve as community anchors by catalyzing and helping to sustain significant behavioral and attitudinal changes among the public. When museums integrate research, deep community roots and trust, and a museum and arts-based pedagogy, they are uniquely positioned to effect change. The article will review a…

  16. IN THE MUSEUM: CONTAINING ANTIQUITY AN EXHIBITION IN THE SASOL ART MUSEUM, STELLENBOSCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Masters

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A selection of ancient Classical and Near Eastern artefacts belonging to the Iziko Museums of Cape Town1 is currently on display at the Sasol Art Museum (a Stellenbosch University Museum2 as the remodelled exhibition, Containing Antiquity. The exhibition, though modest in size, features several important and interesting pieces, many of which are known to South African and international scholars.

  17. Montgomery Blair Science, Mathematics and Computer Science Magnet Program: A Successful Model for Meeting the Needs of Highly Able STEM Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, David; Ostrander, Peter; Lee, G. Maie

    2016-01-01

    The Magnet Program at Montgomery Blair High School is an application-based magnet program utilizing a curriculum focused on science, mathematics, and computer science catering to interested, talented, and eager to learn students in Montgomery County, Maryland. This article identifies and discusses some of the unique aspects of the Magnet Program…

  18. A rationale for a museum of health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Yousefi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The museum of health is a place that presents health science and human body and any other subjects that can affect human health. In this museum visitors can learn the mechanisms and functions of human body and learn how to protect and take care of their bodies. They can also learn several diseases and their consequences on human body and how to fight against them. This museum is a big step for improvement of general society health level by increasing society’s health knowledge. In this article structure, departments and also benefits of the health museum are evaluated.

  19. Critical Culture: Environmental Adult Education in Public Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Lorraine; Clover, Darlene E.

    2017-01-01

    This chapter explores how museums, as educational and cultural institutions, can become agents of socioecological transformation. The ideas of critical museum studies and environmental adult education are reviewed, and three examples of environmental adult education in museums are discussed.

  20. Individual and Collaborative Personalization in a Science Museum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Elisabeth M.A.G.; Lingnau, Andreas; Vissers, Geert; Kockelhorn, Hub; Nijholt, Antinus; Nijholt, A.

    Museums increasingly use interactive technologies to make a museum visit more rewarding. In this chapter, we present opportunities that tabletop environments offer for learning, enjoyment, motivation, collaboration and playful interaction in museums. We discuss experiments with a tabletop interface

  1. Museums Universe Data File (MUDF) FY 2014 3rd Quarter

    Data.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services — The Museum Universe Data File (MUDF) contains information about known museums in the United States using data collected and aggregated from a variety of sources.

  2. Rosa Parks @ 100

    OpenAIRE

    Chouard, Géraldine; Crémieux, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Cornell University associate professor Riché Richardson, a native of Montgomery, Alabama, gave a talk at the Rosa Parks Museum in the city on February 4, 2013 entitled “Rosa Parks @100” as part of the national celebration from Montgomery to Detroit. Her art quilt, “Rosa Parks, Whose ‘No’ in 1955 Launched the Montgomery Bus Boycott and Was Heard Around the World,” is among the art that was presented at this historic celebration. Other highlights included National Book Award poet Nikky Finney r...

  3. La Materia. Nivel II. Basado en el curso de estudios de Ciencia de Montgomery County Public Schools. (Matter. Level II. Based on the Montgomery County Public Schools Science Studies Program).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstman, M. Linda

    This curriculum unit is for use in an elementary school foreign language immersion program in Montgomery County, Maryland. The unit is geared toward the second grade science classroom. It includes instructional and performance objectives, vocabulary lists, optional language structure sections, illustrations, activities, evaluation suggestions, and…

  4. Seres Vivos. Nivel I. Basado en el curso de estudios de Ciencia de Montgomery County Public Schools. (Living Beings. Level 1. Based on the Montgomery County Public Schools Science Studies Program).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senger, Graciela

    This curriculum unit, developed by the Montgomery County Public Schools, Maryland, was designed for use in the elementary level foreign language immersion program. It is geared toward the first grade science classroom. The unit includes instructional and performance objectives, necessary vocabulary lists, optional language structure sections,…

  5. 77 FR 60904 - Air Quality Implementation Plans; Alabama; Attainment Plan for the Alabama Portion of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ... October 7, 2009, SIP revision regarding reasonably available control technology (RACT) and reasonably... the mobile source contribution to ambient PM 2.5 levels for the Alabama portion of the Chattanooga... insignificance determination for mobile direct PM 2.5 and NO X emissions for transportation conformity...

  6. A Study of School Size among Alabama's Public High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Ronald A.; Cain, Patrick M., Sr.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the size of Alabama's public high schools, selected school quality and financial indicators, and their students' performance on standardized exams. When the socioeconomic level of the student bodies is held constant, the size of high schools in Alabama has relatively little…

  7. A survey of animal-powered logging in Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher W. Toms; Mark R. Dubois; John C. Bliss; John H. Wilhoit; Robert B. Rummer

    2001-01-01

    In a state with a very large, highly mechanized timber harvesting industry, animal-powered logging still occupies a niche in Alabama as a small-scale harvesting alternative. This article summarizes the results from a study that examined the extent of animal logging in Alabama. We investigated this topic by asking who is logging with animals, where are they working,...

  8. Alabama University Professor's View of the Birmingham Bombing Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Presents the views of Alabama university scholars regarding the historical significance of the 2001 trial of Thomas Blanton for his role in the Ku Klux Klan bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist church in Birmingham, Alabama thet killed four girls. Their discussions note the need to examine the American judicial system, the weak case against Mr.…

  9. How regional museums form a museum cluster and forge its identity: Take7 Shanghai Science & Technology Museum as an example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    At present, there are many cases of museum clusters around the world, such as Smithsonian Insti- tution, the Guggenheim Museums and Foundation, Science Museums Group, National Museum Liverpool and so on. Through the analysis, we found that they form clusters in different ways, but they are for the same pur- pose, which is to provide multiple services for the public from the different cultural environment, and to strengthen the local cultural expression and transmission. Shanghai Science & Technology Museum is a large-scale comprehensive museum which contains three venues: a science and technology museum, a natu- ral history museum and a planetarium. Through learns the experience of the international cases for museum clusters, also explore itself museum cluster road to meet the local cultural environment.

  10. U.S. History and Modern World History Courses for English Speakers of Other Languages in Montgomery County Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huafang; Wade, Julie

    2014-01-01

    The Office of Shared Accountability (OSA) in Montgomery County (Maryland) Public Schools (MCPS) examined academic performance of English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) students in U.S. History and Modern World History courses, as well as the course sequence in ESOL U.S. History and Modern World History. In MCPS, students who are not ESOL…

  11. The Employers II: A Survey of Employers Who Have Hired Career Program Graduates of Montgomery Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, Robert L.; Jones, Robert F.

    As part of a student follow-up system, a survey was conducted of employers of 1973-74 career program graduates of Montgomery College (MC). The survey was divided into three major areas: the value of an associate degree in the working world, an evaluation of the job preparation given to MC graduates, and suggestions for improvements in individual…

  12. The Employers IV: A Survey of Employers Who Have Hired Career Program Graduates of Montgomery Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, Robert L.; Armstrong, David F.

    In a survey of 374 career curriculum graduates of Montgomery Community College in 1976, 280 indicated they were working in jobs related to their college programs. Of these, 225 (80%) gave employer names and addresses and permission to contact them. Questionnaires drew responses of 159 employers to questions about skill levels of students, employee…

  13. The Employers III: A Survey of Employers Who Have Hired Career Program Graduates of Montgomery Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, Robert L.; And Others

    As part of a student follow-up system, a survey was conducted of employers of 1975 career program graduates of Montgomery Community College (MCC). The survey was designed to elicit responses in three major areas: the value of an associate degree in the working world, an evaluation of job preparation given to MCC graduates, and suggestions for…

  14. Follow-up of Students Who Entered Montgomery Community College Fall 1970. A Preliminary Analysis of Student Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, Robert L.

    As part of a statewide followup study of all students who entered a community college in the fall of 1970, a questionnaire was mailed in April 1974 to the 3,615 students who had entered Montgomery Community College in fall 1970. Twenty percent of the questionnaires were nondeliverable; thus, 2,890 students received the questionnaire, and of these,…

  15. A Follow-up Study of Freshmen Who Left Montgomery College After Just One Semester of Attendance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, Robert L.; And Others

    Students' reasons for leaving Montgomery College after one semester, dropout trends, current activities of nonreturnees, and the impact that the one semester had on their careers or course of action were elicited by questionnaires mailed to 389 students. A total of 120 usable questionnaires were returned. The data collected showed that: (1) the…

  16. 76 FR 71125 - Caddo Valley Railroad Company-Abandonment Exemption-in Clark, Pike, and Montgomery Counties, AR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Caddo Valley Railroad Company--Abandonment Exemption--in Clark, Pike, and... distance of 32.2 miles, in Clark, Pike, and Montgomery Counties, Ark. (the line).\\1\\ The line...

  17. A Portrait of School District Crisis Management: Leadership Choices in Montgomery County during the Sniper Shootings of October 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Brian Joseph

    2010-01-01

    The actions of two assailants who shot and killed 10 people and wounded three others, including a student, in the region around Washington, D.C., in October 2002, provides the backdrop for a qualitative study of the emergency response by school district leaders in Montgomery County, Maryland. The study explores and describes the experiences of the…

  18. 2012 Alabama Lunabotics Systems Engineering Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Justin; Ricks, Kenneth; Hull, Bethanne J.

    2012-01-01

    Excavation will hold a key role for future lunar missions. NASA has stated that "advances in lunar regolith mining have the potential to significantly contribute to our nation's space vision and NASA space exploration operations." [1]. The Lunabotics Mining Competition is an event hosted by NASA that is meant to encourage "the development of innovative lunar excavation concepts from universities which may result in clever ideas and solutions which could be applied to an actual lunar excavation device or payload." [2]. Teams entering the competition must "design and build a remote controlled or autonomous excavator, called a lunabot, that can collect and deposit a minimum of 10 kilograms of lunar simulant within 10 minutes." [2]. While excavation will play an important part in lunar missions, there will still be many other tasks that would benefit from robotic assistance. An excavator might not be as well suited for these tasks as other types of robots might be. For example a lightweight rover would do well with reconnaissance, and a mobile gripper arm would be fit for manipulation, while an excavator would be comparatively clumsy and slow in both cases. Even within the realm of excavation it would be beneficial to have different types of excavators for different tasks, as there are on Earth. The Alabama Lunabotics Team at the University of Alabama has made it their goal to not only design and build a robot that could compete in the Lunabotics Mining Competition, but would also be a multipurpose tool for future NASA missions. The 2010-2011 resulting robot was named the Modular Omnidirectional Lunar Excavator (MOLE). Using the Systems Engineering process and building off of two years of Lunabotics experience, the 20ll-2012 Alabama Lunabotics team (Team NASACAR) has improved the MOLE 1.0 design and optimized it for the 2012 Lunabotics Competition rules [I]. A CAD model of MOLE 2.0 can be seen below in Fig. 1.

  19. Soil Sampling Techniques For Alabama Grain Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, A. N.; Shaw, J. N.; Mask, P. L.; Touchton, J. T.; Rickman, D.

    2003-01-01

    Characterizing the spatial variability of nutrients facilitates precision soil sampling. Questions exist regarding the best technique for directed soil sampling based on a priori knowledge of soil and crop patterns. The objective of this study was to evaluate zone delineation techniques for Alabama grain fields to determine which method best minimized the soil test variability. Site one (25.8 ha) and site three (20.0 ha) were located in the Tennessee Valley region, and site two (24.2 ha) was located in the Coastal Plain region of Alabama. Tennessee Valley soils ranged from well drained Rhodic and Typic Paleudults to somewhat poorly drained Aquic Paleudults and Fluventic Dystrudepts. Coastal Plain s o i l s ranged from coarse-loamy Rhodic Kandiudults to loamy Arenic Kandiudults. Soils were sampled by grid soil sampling methods (grid sizes of 0.40 ha and 1 ha) consisting of: 1) twenty composited cores collected randomly throughout each grid (grid-cell sampling) and, 2) six composited cores collected randomly from a -3x3 m area at the center of each grid (grid-point sampling). Zones were established from 1) an Order 1 Soil Survey, 2) corn (Zea mays L.) yield maps, and 3) airborne remote sensing images. All soil properties were moderately to strongly spatially dependent as per semivariogram analyses. Differences in grid-point and grid-cell soil test values suggested grid-point sampling does not accurately represent grid values. Zones created by soil survey, yield data, and remote sensing images displayed lower coefficient of variations (8CV) for soil test values than overall field values, suggesting these techniques group soil test variability. However, few differences were observed between the three zone delineation techniques. Results suggest directed sampling using zone delineation techniques outlined in this paper would result in more efficient soil sampling for these Alabama grain fields.

  20. Drug shortage management in Alabama hospital pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver W. Holmes III, Pharm.D. Candidate 2013

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to identify effective strategies used by Alabama hospitals to manage drug shortages. Moreover, this study aims to determine if there are any relationships among hospital size, utilization of a standard policy for drug shortage management and perceived usefulness of standard procedures for drug shortages.Methods: A paper survey was mailed to 129 hospital pharmacies in Alabama (per the Alabama Hospital Association directory. The survey consisted of 5 demographic questions, questions involving perception of current medication shortages, sources of information about shorted drugs, and frequency of discussion at P&T committee meetings. Most importantly, the survey contained questions about the use of a standard policy for handling drug shortages, the effectiveness of the policy if one is used, and an open-ended question asking the recipient to describe the policy being used.Results: A response rate of 55% was achieved as 71 surveys were completed and returned. Approximately 70% of the survey respondents described the current drug shortage issue as a top priority in their pharmacy department. The pharmacy distributor served as the primary source of information regarding drug shortages for 45% of the facilities. There is a direct relationship between size of hospital and likelihood of utilization of a standard policy or procedure for drug shortage management among the sample. The smaller facilities of the sample perceived their management strategies as effective more frequently than the larger hospitals.Conclusion: Common components of effective management strategies included extensive communication of shortage details and the ability to locate alternative products. The use of portable technology (e.g., Smart phones and tablets along with mobile applications may emerge as popular means for communicating drug product shortage news and updates within a facility or healthcare system.

  1. TREASURES AT THE SHENYANG PALACE MUSEUM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Shenyang Palace Museum was established in 1926,and became a museum of history and art based on the former imperial palace.It houses treasures,palace articles and historical and cultural artifacts originally collected by the Qing Court.These include Ming

  2. Mentorship at the slovenian school museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjetka Balkovec Debevec

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article examines mentorship at the Slovenian School Museum. It argues that museums are places of value, which play an active part in the functioning of society and are incorporated in the processes of lifelong learning. Additionally, it examines how museums were included in the system of practical student training during the reform of university programmes. The general characteristics of mentorship at the Slovenian School Museum are presented under a number of headings, with special focus on the mentorship in practical student training. The characteristics of the latter are examined employing qualitative analysis of mentors’ observations, and students’ reports on practical student training completed between 2009 and 2016. By examining past mentorship experience, the article argues for the practice of collecting reports on student training in museums, for the purpose of further analysis and study. The article draws attention to the importance of work experience in museums, which represents a way for the students to supplement their theoretical knowledge, as well as learn about the functioning of museums and the mission of the curator. Finally, the article highlights the importance of the continuing education of mentors and argues that a shift in the organisation and evaluation of mentoring work in museums is required, with an aim of offering a higher quality work experience to students, and improving the implementation of practical student training programmes.

  3. Collection fund of the Slovak Mining Museum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Labuda, J.

    2004-01-01

    The Slovak Mining Museum in Banská Sˇtiavnica belongs to museums of Slovak field activity and includes several exhibition departments: Natural history – collection of minerals and fossils in Berggericht building with 37,500 pieces. Historical – collections and exhibitions linked to specific

  4. E-Learning im Museum und Archiv

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gruber, Marion

    2009-01-01

    Gruber, M. R. (2009). E-Learning im Museum und Archiv. Vermittlung von Kunst und Kultur im Informationszeitalter. Saarbrücken: VDM Verlag Dr. Müller. Available on http://www.amazon.de/E-Learning-Museum-Archiv-Vermittlung-Informationszeitalter/dp/3639204654/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1258383814&s

  5. Comic Strips to Accompany Science Museum Exhibits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Beom Sun; Park, Eun-mi; Kim, Sang-Hee; Cho, Sook-kyoung; Chung, Min Suk

    2016-01-01

    Science museums make the effort to create exhibits with amusing explanations. However, existing explanation signs with lengthy text are not appealing, and as such, visitors do not pay attention to them. In contrast, conspicuous comic strips composed of simple drawings and humors can attract science museum visitors. This study attempted to reveal…

  6. A history of digitization: Dutch museums

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Navarrete Hernández, T.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past fifty years, a huge amount of labour and funding has been deployed for the introduction of digital technology in museums. In the course of this process, the nature of museums has been transformed. However, little is understood of the processes or the outcome because the history of the

  7. The NMC Horizon Report: 2013 Museum Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L.; Adams Becker, S.; Freeman, A.

    2013-01-01

    The "NMC Horizon Report: 2013 Museum Edition," is a co-production with the Marcus Institute for Digital Education in the Arts (MIDEA), and examines six emerging technologies for their potential impact on and use in education and interpretation within the museum environment: BYOD (Bring Your Own Device), crowdsourcing, electronic…

  8. Personalized Museum Experience: The Rijksmuseum Use Case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Aroyo; R. Brussee; L. Rutledge (Lloyd); P. Gorgels; N. Stash; Y. Wang (Yanjing); J. Trant; D. Bearman

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThis paper describes ongoing work exploring aspects of personalized access to and presentation of virtual museum collections. The project demonstrator illustrates an interactive approach to collecting data about museum visitors in terms of their interests in and preferences about

  9. History of Science and Science Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Cláudia; Guilherme, Elsa; Gaspar, Raquel; Boaventura, Diana

    2015-01-01

    The activities presented in this paper, which are addressed to elementary school, are focused on the pioneering work of the Portuguese King Carlos I in oceanography and involve the exploration of the exhibits belonging to two different science museums, the Aquarium Vasco da Gama and the Maritime Museum. Students were asked to study fish…

  10. What Is Your Museum's Economic Footprint?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainer, Laureen

    2010-01-01

    Across the United States, museums are considered an integral part of the community fabric and an important factor in the quality of life, "Arts and culture helps foster creativity, bridges class divides, retains college graduates, recruits companies, and raises the quality of life." But across the nation, museums contribute far more than just…

  11. Collection fund of the Slovak Mining Museum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Labuda, J.

    2004-01-01

    The Slovak Mining Museum in Banská Sˇtiavnica belongs to museums of Slovak field activity and includes several exhibition departments: Natural history – collection of minerals and fossils in Berggericht building with 37,500 pieces. Historical – collections and exhibitions linked to specific communit

  12. The Museum of Solid Waste and Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Energy Education Development Project, Reston, VA.

    This activity geared for grades 5-9 involves students in creating museum stations on eight solid waste and energy topics. While working in groups, students present their station topic to other students who are conducting a "museum tour." In doing so participants are encouraged to enhance their reading, writing, public speaking, and artistic skills…

  13. Interactive Learning Units on Museum Websites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Cordelia; Smith, Diantha

    2017-01-01

    Though it is well known that museums should embrace digital learning, many museum websites have not fully utilized digital learning resources, especially in interactive ways. In fact, in a survey of 225 websites of selected U.S. cultural institutions that have informal science education at the heart of their operations, we found that just 5% of…

  14. Communicative Functions of the Museum Lobby

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Christian Hviid; Rudloff, Maja; Vestergaard, Vitus

    2014-01-01

    and the last impression that they take home and share with others. This article analyzes museum lobbies as communication spaces in order to identify the different functions afforded by such spaces. In an explorative study of five Danish museum lobbies, we offer a preliminary categorization of these functions...

  15. Personalized Museum Experience: The Rijksmuseum Use Case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Aroyo; R. Brussee; L. Rutledge; P. Gorgels; N. Stash; Y. Wang (Yanjing)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThis paper describes ongoing work exploring aspects of personalized access to and presentation of virtual museum collections. The project demonstrator illustrates an interactive approach to collecting data about museum visitors in terms of their interests in and preferences about artefac

  16. History of Science and Science Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Cláudia; Guilherme, Elsa; Gaspar, Raquel; Boaventura, Diana

    2015-01-01

    The activities presented in this paper, which are addressed to elementary school, are focused on the pioneering work of the Portuguese King Carlos I in oceanography and involve the exploration of the exhibits belonging to two different science museums, the Aquarium Vasco da Gama and the Maritime Museum. Students were asked to study fish…

  17. Museums and Handicapped Students: Guidelines for Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC. National Air And Space Museum.

    Presented are guidelines drawn from surveys of programs and services provided for handicapped persons in U.S. museums. An initial section which reviews literature on museum programs for handicapped visitors focuses on problems and misconceptions regarding blind, deaf, physically handicapped, learning disabled and emotionally disturbed, and…

  18. Looking outside the Frame: "Demythtifying" Museum Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Melinda M.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author presents her list of top 10 museum education myths. In so doing she also hopes to "demythtify" these aspects of the field. While the focus of the list is art museum education, art educators in schools and community sites will likely find that several of the myths resonate with their practice. (Contains 1 endnote.)

  19. Museums and Nationalism in Contemporary China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Edward

    2007-01-01

    This article examines the representation of Chinese identity in museums in the People's Republic of China, comparing this briefly with the portrayal of local and national identities in Hong Kong and Taiwan. In particular, the article looks at the implications for museums of the shift in emphasis within state ideology from socialism to…

  20. DESIGNING A CONTEMPORARY ANATOMY MUSEUM: ANATOMISTS’ PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh. G. Kamath

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: A research study was conducted in sixteen anatomy museums across India. Aim: The aim of the study is to have an integrated approach while designing a museum. Objective: The objective is to stress on the need to have a holistic approach while designing a museum so that that the museum is well planned and organised and has a huge sectional diversity that spans all aspects related to anatomy. Materials and Methods: All the museums were studied using a planned proforma that emphasised on special features of the museum with special emphasis on sectional variety. Observations: The various techniques of specimen preparation, preservation, mounting and display were observed and photographed. The sectional variety was noted. Moreover the various methods of maintaining specimen related information in pictorial and computerised catalogues was observed. Results and Conclusion: A design of a contemporary anatomy museum can now be conceived that incorporates all aspects of anatomy from history, evolution, embryology, cross-sectional anatomy, comparative anatomy, teratology, genetics and clinical anatomy to sections with modern techniques like plastination. Such a museum will certainly have a more holistic approach to anatomy and will be more educative and scientific.

  1. Forces of Form : The Vrolik Museum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2009-01-01

    In de negentiende eeuw was Museum Vrolikianum de privéverzameling van vader Gerard (1775-1859) en zoon Willem Vrolik (1801-1863), een begrip onder artsen en wetenschappers uit binnen- en buitenland. In zijn soort was Museum Vrolikianum de laatste grote privéverzameling die in Nederland werd opgebouw

  2. The Pittsburgh Children's Museum. Study Guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donley, Susan K.; And Others

    These five study guides present ideas for activities based on museum exhibition themes. The learning activities are designed for coordination with museum visits, but may be adapted for independent use. Activities appropriate for preschool and elementary levels are indicated. Exhibition themes include: (1) "Space Exploration," which explores the…

  3. Looking outside the Frame: "Demythtifying" Museum Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Melinda M.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author presents her list of top 10 museum education myths. In so doing she also hopes to "demythtify" these aspects of the field. While the focus of the list is art museum education, art educators in schools and community sites will likely find that several of the myths resonate with their practice. (Contains 1 endnote.)

  4. Museums and Nationalism in Contemporary China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Edward

    2007-01-01

    This article examines the representation of Chinese identity in museums in the People's Republic of China, comparing this briefly with the portrayal of local and national identities in Hong Kong and Taiwan. In particular, the article looks at the implications for museums of the shift in emphasis within state ideology from socialism to…

  5. A history of digitization: Dutch museums

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Navarrete Hernández, T.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past fifty years, a huge amount of labour and funding has been deployed for the introduction of digital technology in museums. In the course of this process, the nature of museums has been transformed. However, little is understood of the processes or the outcome because the history of the

  6. Engaging Experiences in Interactive Museum Exhibitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup Lynggaard, Aviaja; Langballe, Line; Geert Jensen, Birgitte

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to outline possibilities for the development of combined IT and architectural concepts supported by joint engaging experiences for visitors to the room of the museum of the future. Focus is upon a joint experience, as many existing IT-systems designed for museums...

  7. Taiwan museum wants to save Afghan art

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张顺伍

    2002-01-01

    Taipei-Taiwan’s National Palace Museum is willing to buy or accept Afghanistan’s (阿富汗的)Buddhist(佛教徒)statues to save them from being destroyed by the Moslem country’s Taliban(塔利班)rulers.the museum said on Saturday.

  8. Litteraturen og forfatteren på museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Niels Dichov

    2016-01-01

    developments in literary theory, i.e. new book history and the literary studies’ theories of geographic place, but also concepts of materiality, presence, performance and literary scenes, are brought in to explain different connections between literature and the museum and the supposedly dialectic relation......The article discusses the connection between literature and museum and the role of museums for the preservation and engagement with literary heritage. Based on an overview of research in the field and a discussion of definitions, distinctions, typology, and current forms of institutions, new...... to the digital society and virtual representation. The role and strength of the author/writer and the importance of place and space in the mediation of literature are enhanced as distinctive for these kinds of museums. It is concluded that the ongoing growth of literary museums is both a result of and an answer...

  9. An Instant Search Engine For Museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Saranya

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Mobile phone has become a part of the personalized computing. Nowadays everyone has a strong loyalty to use these devices. Personalization helps users to identifying his intentions, and trends about a specific area. In the life-long learning activities, museums have interested to provide information from ancient history to modern ages. This viewpoint emphasizes the importance and role of the museums and their accessibility. By using mobile learning platform and its features, we can share information about the museums not only with audio guides about art objects but also the location of the museums and places located in the Environment. Also, interactive tools can provide interfaces for users to access some art Objects which located in a specific museum by help of the mobile solutions.

  10. [Museums, science, and education: new challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Maria Esther; Cazelli, Sibele; Alves, Fátima

    2005-01-01

    The article discusses how the social role of science museums is shaped by scientific and technological endeavor, society's demands, and educational issues, above all in negotiations with a museum's audiences. The text also analyzes the trajectory taken by Brazil's science museums in their process of consolidation and the changes current society has imposed on these institutes. Communication has become the center of the discussion on museum culture, particularly in that it adjusts the educational aspect according to the conception of social practices, which are deemed fundamental resources. Lastly, the article examines the incorporation of the ideas of 'risk' and 'uncertainty', produced by science, into this new way of thinking about museums, which values the public and the communication processes.

  11. The future of professional hypnosis: comment on kirsch, mazzoni, and montgomery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frischholz, Edward J

    2015-01-01

    I believe the paper by Kirsch, Mazzoni, and Montgomery (this issue) should surprise about 95% of ASCH members (maybe only 93% of SCEH members) because the three facts espoused in their paper speciously seem to be 100% true. To paraphrase from their abstract: 1) nothing that can be produced by hypnotic induction plus suggestion cannot also be produced by suggestion alone; 2) administration of a hypnotic induction does not produce a meaningful increase in response to suggestion relative to suggestion alone; and 3) responsivity to suggestions are highly correlated to responsivity on the same measure when preceded by a hypnotic induction ceremony. In order to persuade that these propositions are true, several objections to them must be addressed. However, just because one's facts are true does not mean that one's interpretation of the facts and their interrelationships are also true. The ramifications of the above facts and their interrelationships for the future of professional hypnosis (experimental, clinical and forensic) are identified and discussed.

  12. Museum Ullen Sentalu dalam Perspektif Seni Budaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doro Daniwati

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Museum merupakan tempat yang sering tidak bisa dilewatkan oleh wisatawan guna memuaskan rasa ingin tahu tentang keunikan dari sebuah kota tujuan wisata. Museum juga sering dikunjungi oleh baik para ilmuwan maupun para akademisi yang melakukan studi/riset/kajian tentang hal-hal yang memiliki nilai-nilai keunikan historis, arkeologis, estetis dan termasuk semua hal yang bernuansa memorabilia dan nostalgia. Ullen Sentalu merupakan museum yang agak unik karena di samping lokasinya yang agak jauh dari hingar bingar kesibukan kota, namun keberadaannya merupakan kebutuhan seni budaya perkotaan. Keunikan dari museum ini terletak pada nilai koleksi artefak-artefaknya yang menghadirkan khusus tentang benda-benda kewanitaan yang bernuansa warisan budaya monarki Mataram Lama yang berbeda dengan koleksi museum lainnya di tanah air.   Museum is a place where tourists are unable to easily neglect for satisfying their curiousity about the uniqueness found in the tourism destination cities.The museum is also commonly visited by artists, academicians, and scientists for their research and studies of variety subjects which discuss the values of historical, archeological, and aesthetic uniqueness, and any subjects that are concerned with those of memorabilia and nostalgic evidence. Ullen Sentalu museum is rather unique when we see the location in the ’remote’ area which is far from the frenetic bustle of the city yet its existence constitutes the needs of urban culture. The uniqueness of this museum lies on the value of artefacts collections which particularly bring the feminine objects nuenced the cultural heritage of the Old Mataram monarchy which are completely different from other museum collections in the country.

  13. 75 FR 23264 - Public Water System Supervision Program Revision for the State of Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-03

    ... AGENCY Public Water System Supervision Program Revision for the State of Alabama AGENCY: Environmental... of Alabama is revising its approved Public Water System Supervision Program. Alabama has adopted the..., EPA is tentatively approving this revision to the State of Alabama's Public Water System...

  14. 77 FR 44238 - Public Water System Supervision Program Revision for the State of Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-27

    ... AGENCY Public Water System Supervision Program Revision for the State of Alabama AGENCY: Environmental... of Alabama is revising its approved Public Water System Supervision Program. Alabama has adopted the... State of Alabama's Public Water System Supervision Program. DATES: Any interested person may request...

  15. 77 FR 124 - Biological Processors of Alabama; Decatur, Morgan County, AL; Notice of Settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-03

    ... AGENCY Biological Processors of Alabama; Decatur, Morgan County, AL; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... Biological Processors of Alabama Superfund Site located in Decatur, Morgan County, Alabama. DATES: The Agency... name Biological Processors of Alabama Superfund Site by one of the following methods:...

  16. iMuseumA: An Agent-Based Context-Aware Intelligent Museum System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada Ayala

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Currently, museums provide their visitors with interactive tour guide applications that can be installed in mobile devices and provide timely tailor-made multimedia information about exhibits on display. In this paper, we argue that mobile devices not only could provide help to visitors, but also to museum staff. Our goal is to integrate, within the same system, multimedia tour guides with the management facilities required by museums. In this paper, we present iMuseumA (intelligent museum with agents, a mobile-based solution to customize visits and perform context-aware management tasks. iMuseumA follows an agent-based approach, which makes it possible to interact easily with the museum environment and make decisions based on its current status. This system is currently deployed in the Museum of Informatics at the Informatics School of the University of Málaga, and its main contributions are: (i a mobile application that provides management facilities to museum staff by means of sensing and processing environmental data; (ii providing an integrated solution for visitors, tour guides and museum staff that allows coordination and communication enrichment among different groups of users; (iii using and benefiting from group communication for heterogeneous groups of users that can be created on demand.

  17. Teaching science in museums: The pedagogy and goals of museum educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Lynn Uyen

    2007-03-01

    Museum educators have a longstanding presence in museums and play a significant role in the institutions' educational agenda. However, research on field trips to science museums has predominantly explored teachers' and students' perspectives with little acknowledgment of the museum educators who develop and implement the educational programs the students experience. This study sought to describe instruction undertaken in, and goals driving, science museums' lessons through observations of museum educators followed by conversations with them immediately afterwards. Findings showed the ways in which educators adapted their preplanned lessons to the students' interests, needs, and understanding by manipulating the sequence and timing. The data revealed that, contrary to depictions in the research literature of teaching in museums as didactic and lecture oriented, there was creativity, complexity, and skills involved in teaching science in museums. Finally, the educators' teaching actions were predominantly influenced by their affective goals to nurture interests in science and learning. Although their lessons were ephemeral experiences, these educators operated from a perspective, which regarded a school field trip to the science museum, not as a one-time event, but as part of a continuum of visiting such institutions well beyond school and childhood. These findings have implications for the pedagogical practices employed by museum educators, and the relationship between teachers and educators during school field trips, which are discussed.

  18. The Expectations of the Visually Impaired University Students from Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyurgan, Serap

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine what the visually impaired students already know about museums, how museums contribute to their learning and what those students expect to gain from their visits to the museums in Turkey and thus, to enable them to have more valuable experiences. For this purpose, a visit to the Museum of Anatolian…

  19. The Onomastic Octopus. Museum Data Bank Research Report No. 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenhall, Robert G.

    Activities and information needs in museums and a project undertaken by the Margaret Woodbury Strong Museum to develop systematic solutions to problems in cataloging museum collections are described. Museum activities are grouped in three categories: (1) initial--acquisition, accession, registration, identification, and restoration; (2)…

  20. Museum Studies: Connecting the Elementary and Secondary Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Kachina; Yoder, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    Museum studies will certainly reinforce students' appreciation of art history and art production. A student's understanding of a museum's function will deepen with each museum visit. Students will recognize that a museum can be organized around materials and kinds of art, periods of art history and cultures, and the works of an individual artist.…

  1. Using Museum Exhibits: An Innovation in Experiential Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Satarupa

    2015-01-01

    Museum exhibits can be a tool in experiential learning. While instructors have documented various methods of experiential learning, they have not sufficiently explored such learning from museum exhibits. Museum researchers, however, have long found a satisfying cognitive component to museum visits. This paper narrates the author's design to…

  2. Using Museum Exhibits: An Innovation in Experiential Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Satarupa

    2015-01-01

    Museum exhibits can be a tool in experiential learning. While instructors have documented various methods of experiential learning, they have not sufficiently explored such learning from museum exhibits. Museum researchers, however, have long found a satisfying cognitive component to museum visits. This paper narrates the author's design to…

  3. Graduate Museum Studies Curricula: Meeting the Needs of the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomar, William Frank

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess how graduate museum studies programs are meeting the current and anticipated future needs of the museum profession. A comprehensive assessment was conducted to determine the knowledge and skills most emphasized in graduate museum studies curricula and those most valued by leading museum practitioners. A total…

  4. United States Holocaust Museums: Pathos, Possession, Patriotism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob Baum

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the role of United States holocaust museums in directing (American knowledge and memory of World War II, and demonstrates how signifiers of race, colour and Jewishness are played out and theatricalised. Erected in two principal U.S. cities of Los Angeles and Washington, D.C., the Holocaust Museum and Museum of Tolerance uphold very different mandates: the first dedicated to revealing European civilian tragedies during WWII; the latter dealing with Jewish persecution and the L.A. Riots of 1991, with references to other cultural catastrophes. While these projects are different, they are not opposed; both museums locate the American perspective of events and their meanings at the forefront. American holocaust museums seem to challenge spaces between memory and its direction, vision and revision. Within the gruesome context of holocaust portrayal, interrogate the valences of memory’s play and expose American holocaust museums as theatres of pornographic memory. The seduction of feeling does not invite change so much as purgation, what Aristotle identified as catharsis — an emotional and physical release, unfortunately replicating the seductive techniques used by Goebbels for the glorification of Hitler. Through manipulation of viewers as automatic audiences, these museums function as centres for pathos I question the policy and polity of presenting genocide as an entertainment leading to catharsis, recognizing that the final act of purgation is all too easily negation.

  5. Creation and typology definition of the museum on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svilicić, Niksa

    2010-06-01

    Through advancing new technology, perspective of museum institution and museum profession is changed. The content analysis and analyze of used terminology by online users will show us which term is the most used between frequently used terms such are: online, electronic, Web, Internet, digital, virtual and cyber museums. This scientific paper suggests that online users don't differ mentioned terms while they search for museums on Web. Using the appropriate 'prefix" in order to better describe the typology of a museum on the Web is the first step in designing the future of the museums and certainly encourages serious approach in to the study of the new museum "entities".

  6. Historical Museums in Israel: Semiotics of Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Mayer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tiny by physical size, the State of Israel retains some of the world’s most important cultural treasures, along with many other great cultural institutions. Archeological treasures have yielded much information as far as biblical history and have been well adapted to a Zionist narrative by both the Jewish press and international news organizations, such as the New York Times whose archives are replete with reports of Jewish history being dug up by the Jewish people. Once the State of Israel gained independence in 1948, the course was set for the development of historical museums whose discourse would reflect the most significant events in Jewish history, most especially the Holocaust and the state of constant warfare that continues to imbue the cultural consciousness of its citizens. In this paper we outline, through categorization, the various historical museums, which are currently operating. Furthermore, this article hopes to shed some light upon the cultural sensibilities conveyed through these institutions. This paper is about Israeli culture, mythology, and collective needs, as formed by and informed through a variety of historical museums. The working assumption is that in a historical museum culture is partially formed and at the same time the culture is influencing the contents and narratives on display inside the museum. It should be clear from the start that the discussion is held about Israeli museums as viewed by a Jewish population and created by and for Jews. Notwithstanding the multifaceted collective of Israeli society, this work is confined to and circumscribed by this demarcation. In the following sections, I intend to provide an explanation for this viewpoint from a historical perspective and also provide a framework of what constitutes a historical museum and justify the methodology of its employ. This will be followed by a discussion of the main categorical types of historical museums present in Israel, and finally a

  7. Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind Biodiesel Project Green

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmiston, Jessica L

    2012-09-28

    Through extensive collaboration, Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind (AIDB) is Alabama's first educational entity to initiate a biodiesel public education, student training and production program, Project Green. With state and national replication potential, Project Green benefits local businesses and city infrastructures within a 120-mile radius; provides alternative education to Alabama school systems and to schools for the deaf and blind in Appalachian States; trains students with sensory and/or multiple disabilities in the acquisition and production of biodiesel; and educates the external public on alternative fuels benefits.

  8. [The personal context of a museum experience: similarities and differences between science and art museums].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Adriana Mortara

    2005-01-01

    The article focuses on the development of research that illuminates not only the socioeconomic profiles of museum visitors and non-visitors but also their cultural habits, general entertainment interests, and their perceptions of art, science, and other topics addressed at these institutes. The more we know about a visitor's personal context, the more we can enhance his or her museum experience, thereby encouraging further museum visits during which his or her expectations, wishes, and needs will be more fully met. The article also focuses on how local culture plays an important part in shaping both personal context as well as each museum experience. Some examples are provided from the literature, above all concerning studies in Brazil and the contributions that research at art museums may have for science museums.

  9. 77 FR 68827 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Museum of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-16

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Museum of New Mexico, Santa Fe, NM AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Museum of New Mexico, in consultation with the appropriate...

  10. 75 FR 63516 - Institute of Museum and Library Services; Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Institute of Museum and Library Services; Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library Services Board AGENCY: Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), NFAH. ACTION... Museum and Library Services Board. This notice also describes the function of the Board. Notice of...

  11. 75 FR 8139 - Institute of Museum and Library Services; Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Institute of Museum and Library Services; Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library Services Board AGENCY: Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), NFAH. ACTION... Museum and Library Services Board. This notice also describes the function of the Board. Notice of...

  12. 75 FR 32818 - Institute of Museum and Library Services; Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-09

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Institute of Museum and Library Services; Sunshine Act Meeting of the National Museum and Library Services Board AGENCY: Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), NFAH. ACTION... Museum and Library Services Board. This notice also describes the function of the Board. Notice of...

  13. Bronze poleaxe from Zlatoust museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei V. Kuzminykh,

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This is the first comprehensive publication of a unique find – a bronze poleaxe from Zlatoust Museum, which was found in mid 1950s near Yuryuzan town, Chelyabinsk Oblast. Such bronze ‘ceremonial’ poleaxes are mainly spread in the north and north-east of Europe, among archaeological cultures of the Ananyino type. The poleaxe from Yuryuzan, although it is morphologically similar with the Ananyino poleaxes, has several distinctive details. The Ural find that we have attributed to the Itkul metallurgic industry is a modification, an imitation of the Ananyino items. Its proportions are more massive and heavy. Every detail of sculpture and decoration of the wax model is elaborated rougher and more carelessly. The wolf’s figure on the Yuryuzan poleaxe looks more realistic; it renders the anatomy of the animal’s head with open mouth, yet without the grin and the lips spirally twisted up and down, which are typical for the Pinega type Ananyino poleaxes; ears are small and straight, unlike in the stylized Ananyino items. Raised and depressed lines in its decoration are longitudinal and continue the ornament on the collar. The poleaxe from the Zlatoust Museum is also distinguished from the Ananyino items by its massive and hardly protruding collar. Still, its main distinction is lack of gryphon’s or eagle’s figure, which would crown collars of the Ananyino poleaxes. The location of the Yuryuzan find seems to suggest that the item had a votive meaning and was ‘buried’ in one of the secret cult places known to the early Iron Age Ural miners and metallurgists.

  14. [First medical museum of Russia (150-anniversary of the Surgical museum of the Imperial Medical-Surgery Academy)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budko, A A; Gribovskaia, G A; Zhuravlev, D A

    2013-03-01

    The opening in 1863 of the Surgical museum of the Imperial Medical-Surgical Academy was the sign of a new age in the development of medical science. It became the first medical museum in our country. It was the period when similar museums appeared in Europe and America. Thus all over the world were formed the first museums that amassed their collections, the later basis of modem medical museums.

  15. 3D VISUALIZATION FOR VIRTUAL MUSEUM DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Skamantzari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The interest in the development of virtual museums is nowadays rising rapidly. During the last decades there have been numerous efforts concerning the 3D digitization of cultural heritage and the development of virtual museums, digital libraries and serious games. The realistic result has always been the main concern and a real challenge when it comes to 3D modelling of monuments, artifacts and especially sculptures. This paper implements, investigates and evaluates the results of the photogrammetric methods and 3D surveys that were used for the development of a virtual museum. Moreover, the decisions, the actions, the methodology and the main elements that this kind of application should include and take into consideration are described and analysed. It is believed that the outcomes of this application will be useful to researchers who are planning to develop and further improve the attempts made on virtual museums and mass production of 3D models.

  16. D Visualization for Virtual Museum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skamantzari, M.; Georgopoulos, A.

    2016-06-01

    The interest in the development of virtual museums is nowadays rising rapidly. During the last decades there have been numerous efforts concerning the 3D digitization of cultural heritage and the development of virtual museums, digital libraries and serious games. The realistic result has always been the main concern and a real challenge when it comes to 3D modelling of monuments, artifacts and especially sculptures. This paper implements, investigates and evaluates the results of the photogrammetric methods and 3D surveys that were used for the development of a virtual museum. Moreover, the decisions, the actions, the methodology and the main elements that this kind of application should include and take into consideration are described and analysed. It is believed that the outcomes of this application will be useful to researchers who are planning to develop and further improve the attempts made on virtual museums and mass production of 3D models.

  17. New Mexico Museums and Cultural Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This dataset provides an initial version of the locations of museums and cultural centers in New Mexico, in point form, with limited attributes, compiled using...

  18. [European medical history museums: preserving our heritage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgórska-Klawe, Z

    2001-01-01

    The article focuses on the Polish medical community's lack of interest in its own material medical legacy. In addition, it furnishes examples of museums, collections and exhibitions devoted to the history of medicine in the countries of Western Europe.

  19. Map showing radon potential of rocks and soils in Montgomery County, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundersen, L.C.; Reimer, G.M.; Wiggs, C.R.; Rice, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes the radon potential of Montgomery County in the context of its geology. Radon is a naturally occurring gas produced by the radioactive decay of uranium. Radon produced by uraniferous rocks and soils may enter a house through porous building materials and through openings in walls and floors. Radon gases has a tendency to move from the higher pressure commonly existing in the soil to the lower pressure commonly existing in the house. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA, 1986a) estimates that elevated levels of indoor radon may be associated with 5,000 to 20,000 of the 130,000 lung cancer deaths per year. They also estimate that 8 to 12 percent of the homes in the United States will have annual average indoor radon levels exceeding 4 picoCuries per liter of air (pCi/L). Above this level, the U.S. EPA recommends homeowners take remedial action. May factors control the amount of radon which may enter a home from the geologic environment. Soil drainage, permeability, and moisture content effect the amount of radon that can be released from rocks and soils (known as the emmanation) and may limit or increase how far it can migrate. Well drained, highly permeable soils facilitate the movement of radon. Soils with water content in the 8 to 15 percent range enhance the emmanation of radon (Lindmark, 1985). Daily and seasonal variations in soil and indoor radon can be caused by meteorologic factors such as barometric pressure, temperature, and wind (Clements and Wilkening, 1974; Schery and other, 1984). Construction practices also inhibit or promote entry of radon into the home (U.S. EPA, 1986b). In general, however, geology controls the source and distribution of radon (Akerblom and Wilson, 1982; Gundersen and others, 1987, 1988; Sextro and others, 1987; U.S. EPA, 1983; Peake, 1988; Peake and Hess, 1988). The following sections describe: 1) the methods used to measure radon and equivalent uranium (eU) in soil; 2) the radon potential

  20. Alabama ESI: M_MAMMAL (Marine Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for dolphins and manatees in Alabama. Vector polygons in this data set represent marine mammal distribution...

  1. A reliable solar-heating system--Huntsville, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Final report on solar-heating demonstration project in Huntsville, Alabama, is rich in technical data, planning considerations, test and maintenance data, and other information. It can be useful reference for those planning similar systems.

  2. Occurrence of the megatoothed sharks (Lamniformes: Otodontidae in Alabama, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana J. Ehret

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The Otodontidae include some of the largest sharks to ever live in the world’s oceans (i.e., Carcharocles megalodon. Here we report on Paleocene and Eocene occurrences of Otodus obliquus and Carcharocles auriculatus from Alabama, USA. Teeth of Otodus are rarely encountered in the Gulf Coastal Plain and this report is one of the first records for Alabama. Carcharocles auriculatus is more common in the Eocene deposits of Alabama, but its occurrence has been largely overlooked in the literature. We also refute the occurrence of the Oligocene Carcharocles angustidens in the state. Raised awareness and increased collecting of under-sampled geologic formations in Alabama will likely increase sample sizes of O. obliquus and C. auriculatus and also might unearth other otodontids, such as C. megalodon and C. chubutensis.

  3. Alabama ESI: ESI (Shoreline Types - Lines and Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector lines and polygons representing the shoreline and coastal habitats for Alabama, classified according to the Environmental Sensitivity...

  4. Alabama ESI: SOCECON (Socioeconomic Resource Points and Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains human-use resource data for airports, archaeological and historic sites, beaches, boat ramps, state borders, bridges, and marinas for Alabama....

  5. VASCULAR FLORA OF FORT MCCLELLAN CALHOUN COUNTY, ALABAMA

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Fort McClellan is a military base located in the mountains of northeast Alabama (see Fig.1). Municipalities and communities surrounding Main Post include the City of...

  6. Occurrence of the megatoothed sharks (Lamniformes: Otodontidae) in Alabama, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehret, Dana J; Ebersole, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The Otodontidae include some of the largest sharks to ever live in the world's oceans (i.e., Carcharocles megalodon). Here we report on Paleocene and Eocene occurrences of Otodus obliquus and Carcharocles auriculatus from Alabama, USA. Teeth of Otodus are rarely encountered in the Gulf Coastal Plain and this report is one of the first records for Alabama. Carcharocles auriculatus is more common in the Eocene deposits of Alabama, but its occurrence has been largely overlooked in the literature. We also refute the occurrence of the Oligocene Carcharocles angustidens in the state. Raised awareness and increased collecting of under-sampled geologic formations in Alabama will likely increase sample sizes of O. obliquus and C. auriculatus and also might unearth other otodontids, such as C. megalodon and C. chubutensis.

  7. The MAFLA (Mississippi, Alabama, Florida) Study, Grain Size Analyses

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The MAFLA (Mississippi, Alabama, Florida) Study was funded by NOAA as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Program. Dr. L.J. Doyle produced grain size analyses in the...

  8. 78 FR 75306 - Television Broadcasting Services; Birmingham, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Television Broadcasting Services; Birmingham, Alabama AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The Commission has before it a petition for...

  9. Role of Montgomery salivary stent placement during pharyngolaryngectomy, to prevent pharyngocutaneous fistula in high-risk patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondi, S; Giordano, L; Limardo, P; Bussi, M

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of pharyngocutaneous fistula after pharyngolaryngectomy with and without a Montgomery salivary stent. Retrospective analysis of patients with factors that predispose to the development of pharyngocutaneous fistula (i.e. disease extending to the supraglottic region, base of the tongue or pyriform sinuses, and/or radiochemotherapy). Between 2002 and 2008, 85 pharyngolaryngectomies were performed in our clinic. Of these patients, 31 were at increased risk of fistula development, of whom 45 per cent developed fistulas post-operatively. This subgroup of 31 patients was compared with a second subgroup of 22 patients at high risk of fistula development, treated between 2009 and 2011 with pharyngolaryngectomy and with a Montgomery salivary stent placed in advance during closure of the neopharynx. Statistical analysis showed a significant reduction in the rate of fistula development, from 45 to 9 per cent (p fistula development.

  10. EMDialog : bringing information visualization into the museum

    OpenAIRE

    Hinrichs, Uta; Schmidt, Holly; Carpendale, Sheelagh

    2008-01-01

    Digital interactive information displays are becoming more common in public spaces such as museums, galleries, and libraries. However, the public nature of these locations requires special considerations concerning the design of information visualization in terms of visual representations and interaction techniques. We discuss the potential for, and challenges of, information visualization in the museum context based on our practical experience with EMDialog, an interactive information presen...

  11. Instruction and Delight: Some Observations for Museums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Margaret J.

    This paper assesses the work of artist-creator Walt Disney as a model for museum educators to draw the public into its work. Disney Land and Disney World are viewed as monuments of U.S. life and imagination, a living museum that attracts 40 million U.S. visitors per year. The paper describes what should be a partnership among the image-making,…

  12. Design research into mobile museum mediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Rikke Haller

    2013-01-01

    Using mobile media, museums may transcend institutional settings to highlight the significance and meanings of cultural heritage: framing art and design in the urban sphere, shedding light on nature in the wild, or bringing historic sites to life. The possibilities are manifold, but not straightf...... describes the project’s problem field, research methodology and process, in order to suggest how this approach could be used by museums confronting similar challenges....

  13. Voices in (and around the Museum: Introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Holt

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The voice already plays an important role in contemporary art. This introductory paper summarises a series of four sessions in which speakers explored the place of the voice in the museum context. It became clear that the voice not only offered richness in interpretation of and response to other museum artefacts but was itself an artefact meriting conservation  and interpretation.

  14. University museums: problems, policy and progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Merriman

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available There are some 400 university museums and collections in the United Kingdom. During the 1990s their often neglected state came under close scrutiny and as a result their future role is now being re-assessed. A member of the Institute's staff has recently been appointed to the new position of Curator of UCL Museums and Collections, and he comments here on the national situation and describes some of the initiatives under way at UCL.

  15. [All-Russian hygienic exhibitions and museums].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzybaeva, M P

    2011-01-01

    The material about the popularization of hygiene and health education in Russia in the second half of the 19th century to early 20th century through exhibition and museum activities has been collected for the first time and analyzed in the paper. The role of scientists and scientific medical societies in this process is noted. The significance of museum and exhibition activities in this area for the development of medical science is defined.

  16. AN "OPEN MUSEUM" OF ACU-MOXIBUSTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄龙祥

    2004-01-01

    @@ Preface to the Illustrated Book on the Historical Development of Chinese Acu-moxibustion Science If this atlas is compared to an "open museum" of acu-moxibustion (acupuncture-moxibustion), it is necessary to set up a sign, at the most eye-catching spot, and the very front of the museum, showing a brief introduction or a tourist map. An attempt of drawing such a map is as follows.

  17. [Theater in Brazilian science museums and centers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Leonardo Maciel; Marandino, Martha

    2015-12-01

    This qualitative research, based on a descriptive and exploratory study, examines how theater is used as a science communication strategy by Brazilian science museums and centers. Data was collected through a survey emailed to 24 Brazilian institutions identified as science museums and centers. Content analysis was performed, using cross-sectional thematic analysis. It was found that respondents' activities could be classified as approaching theater as an educational support.

  18. Modern museum exhibition technology revolution for audience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Today's digital revolution leads to the increasing mobile device usage, which has changed people's life and work. However, the traditional static display and graphic version is unable to meet the requirements of the modern audience, which makes museums face the challenge in the distribution of knowledge. Meanwhile, the information storm produced by big data emerged a variety of new media, such as social media, Natural User Interface, Augmented Reality, and electronic publishing. This dizzying array of tools offered opportunities for museums all over the world to become more vibrant and accessible. Museums around the world have been constant changed and improved its presentation, which provides a valuable experience for us. The new Shanghai Natural History Museum has also applied information technology on exhibition, education, research and collection. But the change does not mean a complete subversion. Because the museum audience are di- verse, such as born in a different era, have different learning habits, museums need to control the change magnitude of display technology to meet the requirements of different audience.

  19. Leisure time and museums - motives of visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medić Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Leisure time, as the time used to engage in a variety of activities, should provide a sense of satisfaction and relaxation. In order to satisfy the needs of the visitors and their desire to experience something new and authentic in tourist destination, it is very important to know what their choices are with regard to leisure activities. The aim of this paper is to determine how museum public usually spends its leisure time, which factors influence the motivation to visit museums, and to try to find a correlation between the two. The paper is based on the results of the study conducted between the end of May and the end of August, 2014 in the museums in Vojvodina Province (northern part of the Republic of Serbia. The main findings of this paper indicate that spending leisure time is primarily related to socialization and education, and that museums are visited mostly due to their educational role. The findings also indicate that there are differences between the choice of leisure activity and motivation for visiting museums and sociodemographic characteristics of the respondents. Significant correlation has been found between the choice of leisure activity and motivation for visiting museums.

  20. The first book museums in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea De Pasquale

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Just before the advent of Fascism, in Turin, in the nearby town of Carmagnola and in Florence were born the first Italian examples of book museums. It was early and exceptional experiments of valorizing of book history and of the ancient techniques of manufacturing manuals in a time of great innovation. The first, called the National Museum of the book, was opened in 1913 as a result of the exhibition of the history of printing held during the Universal Exhibition of 1911; the second, created in 1921, was the result of collecting a notable family that took up the typographic tradition of Carmagnola old more than 4 centuries; the third, said Museum of books and illumination, was the result of the exploitation of the extraordinary collections of the Medici library and of the policy pursued by the Director Guido Biagi. Of such museums, outlining the events that led to their creation, only the museum in Carmagnola has come to this day, while the others for various reasons, were closed and never reconstituted. The contribution also provides an opportunity to reflect on the creation of a new museum of the book in Italy at a time when libraries lack visibility into the organization of the Ministry of cultural heritage, which could be distributed and polycentric in the offices of the State libraries in Rome, with its hub at the National Central Library.

  1. Groundwater environmental tracer data collected from the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers in Montgomery County and adjacent counties, Texas, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oden, Timothy D.

    2011-01-01

    The Gulf Coast aquifer system is the primary water supply for Montgomery County in southeastern Texas, including part of the Houston metropolitan area and the cities of Magnolia, Conroe, and The Woodlands Township, Texas. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Lone Star Groundwater Conservation District, collected environmental tracer data in the Gulf Coast aquifer system, primarily in Montgomery County. Forty existing groundwater wells screened in the Gulf Coast aquifer system were selected for sampling in Montgomery County (38 wells), Waller County (1 well), and Walker County (1 well). Groundwater-quality samples, physicochemical properties, and water-level data were collected once from each of the 40 wells during March-September 2008. Groundwater-quality samples were analyzed for dissolved gases and the environmental tracers sulfur hexafluoride, chlorofluorocarbons, tritium, helium-4, and helium-3/tritium. Water samples were collected and processed onsite using methods designed to minimize changes to the water-sample chemistry or contamination from the atmosphere. Replicate samples for quality assurance and quality control were collected with each environmental sample. Well-construction information and environmental tracer data for March-September 2008 are presented.

  2. MEMORY AS A MUSEUM PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tone Kregar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the current public discourse memory is among the most common words, concepts, and contents of a multiplicity of meanings, connotations and contexts. Besides personal memory, the interpretations of our past and consequently our present often include refer-ences of collective and historical memory. This termi-nology is particularly popular with politicians and pub-licists striving for a more colourful vocabulary, who often use the fore mentioned terms as synonyms. Scien-tific and professional circles are more conscientious at differentiating these terms, as their research focuses on studying the past and, consequently, on the role of memory or on the very process of remembering. Howev-er, within this corpus certain differences in the termi-nology and different views on the types and forms of memory do exist. In this paper, rather than psychologi-cal and sociological theories (by Maurice Halbwachs and others we focus on how we, historians, look on the vari-ous forms of memory, especially those historians who study (still "alive" 20th century. And who in their work, let it be research, teaching, or, like in my case - work in a museum, rely on both, individual memories and collec-tive memory to shape the historical memory of a com-munity or society. Although greater terminological clari-ty in this regard would be more than welcome, it is most important that we correctly identify the different forms and types of memory and its components and that we use them appropriately in our work - that is in research, understanding and interpreting our past or our history. Even more so because they often intertwine with each other, overlap, complement, and transform from one to another, or, sometimes even exclude each other. There-fore it is often difficult to clearly distinguish one from another and to deal with them separately. Historians working in the Museum of Recent History Celje are faced with these issues and problems on a daily basis; many specific

  3. "In and against the Museum": The Contested Spaces of Museum Education for Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grek, Sotiria

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on museum and gallery education for adults in Dundee, Scotland. Dundee has recently experienced a shift from being mainly working class to an educational, cultural and tourist centre. Hence, an interesting field for the examination of the educational policies and practices of the city museums/galleries and the different fashions…

  4. From collection to museum: the development of the Geoffrey Kaye Museum of Anaesthetic History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triarico, E

    2008-07-01

    Located at the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) headquarters in Melbourne, Victoria, this internationally significant collection was founded in 1935 by renowned Australian anaesthetist Dr Geoffrey Kaye (1903 to 1986). Although it has always been referred to as a museum, it lacked the necessary management structure and infrastructure to meet museum standards. In March 2003, the first full-time professionally trained Museum Curator Ms Elizabeth Triarico, was employed by ANZCA to work with the Honorary Curator Dr Rod Westhorpe, and the Honorary Assistant Curator; Dr Christine Ball, to build on past achievements and to develop the collection into an accessible and relevant modern museum. Ms Triarico has extensive museum management experience with emphasis on management of major projects, collection management, strategic planning, marketing, interpretation and exhibition development. This paper outlines the management issues and innovative strategies involved in developing this important collection into a professionally managed museum based on best practice standards. It illustrates the benefits of introducing a clear vision and an agreed longterm management plan based on Museums Australia (Victoria) Museum Accreditation Program guidelines.

  5. Expanding Museum Spaces: Networks of Difficult Knowledge at and beyond the Canadian Museum for Human Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumer, Nadine

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of how histories of violence are represented and received in cultural institutions such as museums and memorials is frequently framed in terms of conflict and hierarchies or competitions of suffering. In this article the author proposes a framework that imagines the broader and interconnected networks in which museum narratives and ideas…

  6. Engaging the d/Deaf Audience in Museums: A Case Study at the Calouste Gulbenkian Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Patrícia Roque

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses ways that museums can strengthen programming for d/Deaf audiences. Through the development and study of a tour for a d/Deaf audience conducted through signing and oral translation at the Calouste Gulbenkian Museum in Lisbon (Portugal), the author examines issues of language, identity and inclusion. She argues that the use of…

  7. Learning Museum: A Meeting Place for Pre-Service Teachers and Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligmann, Tine

    2014-01-01

    Learning Museum 2011-13 is a nationwide multidisciplinary collaboration project involving 26 Danish museums (art, cultural and natural history) along with 13 colleges of education. The project has provided a large group of pre-service teachers with unique opportunities to participate in training courses, academic internships and bachelor's thesis…

  8. (Re)Shaping History in Bosnian and Herzegovinian Museums

    OpenAIRE

    Vanja Lozic

    2015-01-01

    The current article explores how political changes in the past 130 years have shaped and reshaped three major museums in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH). The overall aim is to describe structural processes of national museum building in BiH and the ways the museological representation of history is connected to state and nation making and to political transitions and crises. The analysed museums are the National Museum of BiH, the History Museum of BiH, and the Museum of the Republic of Srpska. ...

  9. Scaffolding the Next Wave of Digital Visitor Interaction in Museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudloff, Maja

    2013-01-01

    that when designing for user interaction and participation, museums must carefully consider the complexities of user participation with new technologies. If the design and conceptual frame becomes too complex, it can actually limit the intended visitor experience with the museum subject matter. By combining...... insights from communication and design theory with conceptual models for scaffolding the museum visitor experience, this paper uses a Danish digital museum case called the WALL created by the Museum of Copenhagen to consider the special implications of designing technology for museum visitor interaction...

  10. What are museums for? - Revisiting “Museums in a Troubled World”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten Karnøe; Janes, Robert

    2012-01-01

    World”, authored by Janes, a discussion between the authors is presented which focuses on the complexities of collaboration between museums and business. Finally a “hands on” section is included, in which different types of possible collaborations are examined. In this section, the topic of value......Focusing on the present situation in the Nordic museum scene, entailing economic pressures and restructuring, this article introduces the thoughts and ideas of Canadian museum expert and author, Robert R. Janes, to put things in perspective. After revisiting the 2009 book “Museums in a Troubled...... creation is also addressed, as it is pointed out which measures might be necessary to rebuild a position of relevancy in society for the Nordic museums....

  11. From interventions to interactions: Science Museum Arts Projects’ history and the challenges of interpreting art in the Science Museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Redler

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Hannah Redler’s paper examines the 13 year history of Science Museum, London’s contemporary art programme and explores how changing cultural conditions and the changing function of museums are making the questions raised by bringing art into the Science Museum context increasingly significant. It looks at how Science Museum Arts Projects started as a quirky, experimental sideline aimed at shaking up the Museum and its visitors’ assumptions, but has now become a fundamental means by which the Science Museum chooses to represent the impact of science, medicine, engineering and technology on peoples’ everyday lives.

  12. The Natural Science Museum goes to School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Scur

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Currently it is proven the need to stimulate actions that modify the behavior of human beings in relation to nature. Schools and non-formal education spaces contribute to citizens to develop values, attitudes and responsibilities facing the environment in which they live. The non-formal educational environments provide teaching resources, teaching and different methodologies that complement the actions of formal education. Expanding its environmental education activities, the Museum of Natural Sciences of the University of Caxias do Sul, since 2013, has been developing the project "The Natural Science Museum Goes to School", in order to awaken the scientific spirit, spreading knowledge aimed at preservation of natural resources, contributing to the enrichment of science education, stimulating the development of educational activities with the support of partner schools in the region. Initially, students and teachers visit the Museum of Natural Sciences and then are developed workshops, lectures and recreational activities in schools, integrating these education spaces. Teachers also develop activities with students, integrating knowledge to partner with those seen in the classroom. Finally, this knowledge is presented through a show of open jobs to the community. During the years 2013 and 2014 the project reached about 1,100 students and by integrating museum and school was provided to these differentiated learning, where knowledge of the interrelationships between natural resources and the living beings was built in an interdisciplinary way, highlighting the museums as important teaching and learning in science sites.

  13. History of Science and Science Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Cláudia; Guilherme, Elsa; Gaspar, Raquel; Boaventura, Diana

    2015-10-01

    The activities presented in this paper, which are addressed to elementary school, are focused on the pioneering work of the Portuguese King Carlos I in oceanography and involve the exploration of the exhibits belonging to two different science museums, the Aquarium Vasco da Gama and the Maritime Museum. Students were asked to study fish adaptations to deep sea, through the exploration of a fictional story, based on historical data and based on the work of the King that served as a guiding script for all the subsequent tasks. In both museums, students had access to: historical collections of organisms, oceanographic biological sampling instruments, fish gears and ships. They could also observe the characteristics and adaptations of diverse fish species characteristic of deep sea. The present study aimed to analyse the impact of these activities on students' scientific knowledge, on their understanding of the nature of science and on the development of transversal skills. All students considered the project very popular. The results obtained suggest that the activity promoted not only the understanding of scientific concepts, but also stimulated the development of knowledge about science itself and the construction of scientific knowledge, stressing the relevance of creating activities informed by the history of science. As a final remark we suggest that the partnership between elementary schools and museums should be seen as an educational project, in which the teacher has to assume a key mediating role between the school and the museums.

  14. Interactive Astronomy Module for Museums and Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, I. A.; Reiff, P. H.; Law, C.; Liang, E. P.; Sumners, C.

    1998-12-01

    To educate visitors about the Earth and Space Sciences, Rice University and the Houston Museum of Natural Sciences have set up interactive computer kiosks in the museum and in other museums across the country. We developed an astronomy module for this that contains recent and archival astronomical images that we download from sites on the World Wide Web. The main kiosk in the museum has an internet connection to our computers at Rice, allowing us to remotely update it on the same day that new results appear on the WWW. Complete but frozen-in-time versions of the whole Earth and Space Sciences project are made on CD ROMs and distributed to schools and museums: the CD works on both PCs and Macs. Captions and credits with WWW addresses are added to each image so that they can be used as the starting point for further learning later. This project was made possible through NASA grants from the Digital Library Technology Project and the Initiative to Develop Education through Astronomy.

  15. The art museum facing the memory challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isabel Rocha Roque

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Museums have emerged as a representative synthesis of a reality, so a question rises about the preservation of the memories inherent to the functional and symbolic objects. In the particular case of art museums, the goal was to build a heritage repository which would contribute to the creation of a cultural identity. So, the objects were mainly evaluated in terms of aesthetic excellence of its parameters, to the detriment of other meanings. On the other hand, also the historiography of art favored formal aspects, establishing authorities and styles. These circumstances determined the decontextualization of the object in the museum. In return, from mid-twentieth century onwards, the studies of the public, as a plural and diversified entity, and the theoretical debates around the meaning of the object, contributed to a redefinition of the museological speech. The museum had to offset losses due to the musealisation through a set of procedures and tools that recontextualize the meanings of the object in their multiple valences. Between the two vectors, decontextualization and recontextualization, the museum challenges our personal and collective memory.

  16. Museum Literacies and Adolescents Using Multiple Forms of Texts "On Their Own"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eakle, A. Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    In this article, museum literacies are examined. Data collected during a qualitative study of adolescents in out-of-school and in-school groups in a museum demonstrate how participants used museum literacies. Resources for teachers' uses of museum literacies are described and provided, including museum podcasts, virtual museum Internet sites, and…

  17. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Zachary T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poehlman, Eric A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Alabama. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2009 IECC base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Alabama.

  18. E3 Success Story - Transforming and Promoting Sustainable Manufacturing in Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabama E3 is expanding to other manufacturing sectors and expanding its scope. Alabama E3 now includes a workforce training and education component and is also developing a new innovation engineering green module that focuses on improving sustainability

  19. Effects of 5-HT1A receptor agonists and L-5-HTP in Montgomery's conflict test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderpalm, B; Hjorth, S; Engel, J A

    1989-01-01

    The effects of the pyrimidinyl-piperazines buspirone, gepirone, ipsapirone and their common metabolite 1-(2-pyrimidinyl)-piperazine (PmP) as well as of 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) and L-5-hydroxytryptophan (L-5-HTP) were investigated in Montgomery's conflict test--an animal anxiety model based on the animal's inborn urge to explore a new environment and its simultaneous fear of elevated, open spaces. Subcutaneous buspirone (32-128 nmol/kg), gepirone (32-128 nmol/kg), ipsapirone (32-512 nmol/kg) and 8-OH-DPAT (50-200 nmol/kg), as well as intraperitoneal L-5-HTP (56 mumol/kg) produced anxiolytic-like effects. However, at higher doses the magnitude of these effects decreased and overall the dose-response curves displayed inverted U-shapes. The highest doses (2048 nmol/kg) of buspirone and of gepirone even decreased responding below control levels, possibly in part due to concomitant sedation/motor impairment. After L-5-HTP (448 mumol/kg) and PmP (512 nmol/kg) anxiogenic-like effects were observed. The results indicate that anxiolytic- and anxiogenic-like effects of drugs affecting central serotonergic neurotransmission can be obtained in a sensitive rat anxiety model which neither involves consummatory behavior nor punishment. The anxiolytic-like effects of these compounds may be due to their 5-HT1A agonistic properties. Moreover, the present data may provide support for a possible reciprocal association of presynaptic 5-HT1A receptors vs. postsynaptic 5-HT1A as well as 5-HT2 receptors with regard to anxiety.

  20. Evaluation of geophysical logs, Phase I, at Willow Grove Naval Air Station, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conger, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    Between April and June 1997, the U.S. Navy contracted Brown and Root Environmental, Inc., to drill 20 monitor wells at the Willow Grove Naval Air Station in Horsham Township, Montgomery County, Pa. The wells were installed to monitor water levels and allow collection of water samples from shallow, intermediate, and deep water-bearing zones. Analysis of the samples will determine the horizontal and vertical distribution of any contaminated ground water migrating from known contaminant sources. Eight wells were drilled near the Fire Training Area (Site 5), five wells near the 9th Street Landfill (Site 3), four wells at the Antenna Field Landfill (Site 2), and three wells near Privet Road Compound (Site 1). Depths range from 73 to 167 feet below land surface. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted borehole-geophysical and borehole-video logging to identify water-bearing zones so that appropriate intervals could be screened in each monitor well. Geophysical logs were run on the 20 monitor wells and 1 existing well. Video logs were run on 16 wells. Caliper and video logs were used to locate fractures, inflections on fluid-temperature and fluid-resistivity logs were used to locate possible water-bearing fractures, and flowmeter measurements verified these locations. Single-point-resistance and natural-gamma logs provided information on stratigraphy. After interpretation of geophysical logs, video logs, and driller's notes, all wells were screened such that water-level fluctuations could be monitored and discrete water samples collected from one or more shallow and intermediate water-bearing zones in each borehole.

  1. appropriate strategies for designing contemporary art museums with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-07-16

    Jul 16, 2016 ... social conditions, visitors' economic situation, the sense of peace ... galleries, libraries, archivesandmosthistoricalmonuments can be museums. ... presented to all people in a society disregarding their age, gender ... controlling human behaviors in behavioral science-related theories. .... Museum definition.

  2. Antiques in the Alley: Guan Fu Classical Art Museum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhangJing

    2003-01-01

    Nestled in an alley off South Chaoyangmen Nei Street in Beijing is Guan Fu Classical Art Museum, China's first privately owned and operated antique museum run by one of the country's most ardent collectors,

  3. Antiques in the Alley:Guan fu Classical Art Museum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhangjing

    2003-01-01

    Nestled in an alley off South chaoyang men nei street in beijing is guan fu classical art museum,china's first privately owned and operated antique museum run by one of the country's most ardent collectors.

  4. Towards an Integrative Approach to Interactive Museum Installations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ray, C.A.; van der Vaart, M.; Addison, A.C.; Guidi, G.; De Luca, L.; Pescarin, S.

    2013-01-01

    Museum visits are quickly becoming more personalized and interactive with the help of technology. However, the introduction of technology could also result in drawing attention away from museum collections towards (technological) interpretation devices. How does the introduction of technology into

  5. Poaching Museum Collections using Digital 3D Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Younan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the creative engagement with digital 3D models of museum artefacts and gives insight into new uses of museum collections enabled by digital scanning, editing and 3D printing technologies. Digital 3D models of museum artefacts are malleable and increasingly easy to use. Additionally, freely available 3D software has made 3D scanning, editing and manufacturing possible for non-specialists. These technologies allow users to create new artworks through the creation and transformation of digital replicas of museum artefacts. Examples of creative works, taken from two case studies that involve the creative use of digital reproductions of museum artefacts are presented in this paper. These projects are illustrative of a larger trend: the digital ‘poaching’ of heritage artefacts. This paper examines how digital 3D technologies can foster creative forms of museum engagement, democratise access to museum collections and engage users with personal forms of museum experience.

  6. Museum Universe Data File FY 2015 Q3

    Data.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services — Browse a list of known museums and related organizations in the United States as of the third quarter of FY 2015. This list contains descriptive information about...

  7. Museum Universe Data File FY 2014 Q3

    Data.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services — Browse a list of known museums and related organizations in the United States as of the third quarter of FY 2014. This list contains descriptive information about...

  8. Geocoding and social marketing in Alabama's cancer prevention programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, Julianna W; White, Arica; Lubenow, Anne E; Palmer, Sally

    2005-11-01

    The Alabama Department of Public Health (ADPH) is collaborating with the National Cancer Institute to develop detailed profiles of underserved Alabama communities most at risk for cancer. These profiles will be combined with geocoded data to create a pilot project, Cancer Prevention for Alabama's Underserved Populations: A Focused Approach. The project's objectives are to provide the ADPH's cancer prevention programs with a more accurate and cost-effective means of planning, implementing, and evaluating its prevention activities in an outcomes-oriented and population-appropriate manner. The project links geocoded data from the Alabama Statewide Cancer Registry with profiles generated by the National Cancer Institute's cancer profiling system, Consumer Health Profiles. These profiles have been successfully applied to market-focused cancer prevention messages across the United States. The ADPH and the National Cancer Institute will evaluate the efficacy of using geocoded data and lifestyle segmentation information in strategy development and program implementation. Alabama is the first state in the nation not only to link geocoded cancer registry data with lifestyle segmentation data but also to use the National Cancer Institute's profiles and methodology in combination with actual state data.

  9. Synthetic Pattern of Fish Diversity in Alabama, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen, X.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The state of Alabama has a rich fish fauna. Analyzing the current distributional patterns of fish diversity by synthesizing information and integrating different spatial and temporal scales is important for understanding the underlying mechanisms of diversity and making strategies for fish conservation. Basing the study on long-term intensive samples (9,244 collections of fish species at 3,716 field stations across Alabama from 1845 to 1994, I analyzed the general pattern of fish diversity in Alabama at the county level. The results indicate that more than half the area of Alabama has high fish diversity, including fish species endemic to the USA. Most of the counties with the highest fish diversity are in southwestern Alabama. Nonnative fish species occurred mainly in the southernmost counties, such as Mobile and Baldwin. Twelve counties have the rare species which has only one occurence location in each country, with Lauderdale County having the most (10 rare species; the counties with the rare species are generally distributed at the four corner areas of the state boundaries, particularly on the northern and southern boundaries. A high positive correlation exists between species diversity and endemic species, but there is no significant correlation between species diversity and diversification. Both Power-law and logarithmic relationships exist between class of species diversity and its frequency; counties with higher fish diversity tend to have low human-population densities, and are located at or nearby the Alluvial-deltaic Plain and Gulf Coast floodplain.

  10. Negotiating nature on display– Discourse and ideology in naturalhistory museums

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Sigurd Solhaug

    2006-01-01

    This thesis considers exhibitions in natural history museums as a process of negotiation between three parties: the museum as an institution, the museum staff, and the visitors. These represent different interests that shape exhibitions relating to nature. The thesis asks the following main question: In what way do discourses play a role in the staff’s work within natural history museums? The empirical sources are based on interviews conducted with staffmembers from eight different natural hi...

  11. Expansion of museums in Central Europe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagodzińska, Katarzyna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents reflections on the specificity of collections and museums of contemporary art in Central Europe and considers a possibility of creating a regional alternative for the West. The analysis is conducted in the context of the expansionist policy of contemporary museums – notably the Louvre, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the Hermitage – whose numerous new development projects gave rise to a number of dilemmas in the museological world. The author discusses global "museum brands" that invest in Central Europe and addresses the possible profits of the expansion of such "concerns" for culture in the region, as well as emphasises the potential of the region itself, which may be used for its development without the avail of the internationally renowned collectors' names.

  12. Teaching methods to explore ceramics museum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于程杨

    2015-01-01

    As early as 8000 years ago the period of primitive society, our ancestors had invented pottery making technology, pottery has been widely used, with the development of The Times, the birth of China greatly improve human quality of life, one by one through the porcelain making porcelain craftsmen sublime skill and wisdom to this, give the modern with the material of inheritance and explore the porcelain making industry. Museum is not only a place full of ideas and wisdom, and knowledge transfer medium, it not only has the cultural relics collection, collection, preservation, display function, but also has guiding, activates the creative role. Modern ceramic in colleges and universities to establish the teaching course of contact is also a museum and museum is a very worth exploring topic.

  13. Air Contamination With Fungals In Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlat, Iuliana; Haiducu, Maria; Stepa, Raluca

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the studies was to determine the level and kind of fungal contamination of air in museum, deposits patrimony, restoration and conservation laboratories and their effects on health of workers. Microbiological air purity was measured with a SAS-100 Surface Air System impactor. The fungal contamination was observed in all 54 rooms where we made determinations. The highest levels of fungal were recorded at rooms with hygroscopic patrimony objects, eg carpets, chairs, upholstered chairs, books etc. The most species identified included under common allergens: Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Mucor. There fungal species belonging to the genus identified in this study, can trigger serious diseases museum workers, such as for example Aspergillus fumigatus, known allergies and toxic effects that may occur. In some places of the museum, occupational exposure limit values to fungi present in the air in the work environment, recommended by the specialized literature, have been overcome.

  14. [BIRTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE ANATOMICAL MUSEUMS OF MODENA BETWEEN XVIII AND XIX CENTURY. THE OBSTETRIC MUSEUM, THE ANATOMICAL MUSEUM, THE ETHNOGRAPHIC ANTHROPOLOGIC MUSEUM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradini, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The interest for the study of Anatomy in Modena was particularly developed since the second half of eighteenth century, when the Duke Francesco III of Este promoted the reformation of the University and Antonio Scarpa was called from Padua to teach Anatomy. Scarpa promoted the building of the Anatomical Theatre, near the Grande Spedale, that was inaugurated in 1776. On the same year, the School of Obstetrics opened and determined the constitution of a first Cabinet or Obstetric Museum in a room next to the Theatre. After the Restoration, between 1817 and 1818, the Archduke Francesco IV of Austria Este promoted the realization of an Anatomical Museum: a big organized room in a new floor built on the Theatre. Two more rooms were added in, 1839 and a fourth one in 1853, under the direction of Paolo Gaddi. Furthermore Gaddi's interest for ethnographic studies determined the opening of the Ethnographic Anthropological Museum in 1866.

  15. Smart SfM: Salinas Archaeological Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inzerillo, L.

    2017-08-01

    In these last years, there has been an increasing use of the Structure from Motion (SfM) techniques applied to Cultural Heritage. The accessibility of SfM software can be especially advantageous to users in non-technical fields or to those with limited resources. Thanks to SfM using, everyone can make with a digital camera a 3D model applied to an object of both Cultural Heritage, and physically Environment, and work arts, etc. One very interesting and useful application can be envisioned into museum collection digitalization. In the last years, a social experiment has been conducted involving young generation to live a social museum using their own camera to take pictures and videos. Students of university of Catania and Palermo were involved into a national event #digitalinvasion (2015-2016 editions) offering their personal contribution: they realized 3D models of the museums collection through the SfM techniques. In particular at the National Archaeological Museum Salinas in Palermo, it has been conducted an organized survey to recognize the most important part of the archaeological collection. It was a success: in both #digitalinvasion National Event 2015 and 2016 the young students of Engineering classes carried out, with Photoscan Agisoft, more than one hundred 3D models some of which realized by phone camera and some other by reflex camera and some other with compact camera too. The director of the museum has been very impressed from these results and now we are going to collaborate at a National project to use the young generation crowdsourcing to realize a semi-automated monitoring system at Salinas Archaeological Museum.

  16. SMART SfM: SALINAS ARCHAEOLOGICAL MUSEUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Inzerillo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In these last years, there has been an increasing use of the Structure from Motion (SfM techniques applied to Cultural Heritage. The accessibility of SfM software can be especially advantageous to users in non-technical fields or to those with limited resources. Thanks to SfM using, everyone can make with a digital camera a 3D model applied to an object of both Cultural Heritage, and physically Environment, and work arts, etc. One very interesting and useful application can be envisioned into museum collection digitalization. In the last years, a social experiment has been conducted involving young generation to live a social museum using their own camera to take pictures and videos. Students of university of Catania and Palermo were involved into a national event #digitalinvasion (2015-2016 editions offering their personal contribution: they realized 3D models of the museums collection through the SfM techniques. In particular at the National Archaeological Museum Salinas in Palermo, it has been conducted an organized survey to recognize the most important part of the archaeological collection. It was a success: in both #digitalinvasion National Event 2015 and 2016 the young students of Engineering classes carried out, with Photoscan Agisoft, more than one hundred 3D models some of which realized by phone camera and some other by reflex camera and some other with compact camera too. The director of the museum has been very impressed from these results and now we are going to collaborate at a National project to use the young generation crowdsourcing to realize a semi-automated monitoring system at Salinas Archaeological Museum.

  17. The British Museum: An Imperial Museum in a Post-Imperial World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Duthie

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the British Museum’s imperialist attitudes towards classical heritage. Despite considerable pressure from foreign governments, the museum has consistently refused to return art and antiquities that it acquired under the aegis of empire. It is the contention of this article that the British Museum remains an imperialist institution. The current debates over the British Museum’s collections raise profound questions about the relationship between museums and modern nation states and their nationalist claims to ancient heritage. The museum’s inflexible response to repatriation claims also encapsulates the challenges inherent in presenting empire and its legacy to contemporary, post-imperial audiences.

  18. Bradbury Science Museum Collections Inventory Photos Disc #5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strohmeyer, Wendy J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-25

    The photos on Bradbury Science Museum Collections Inventory Photos Disc #5 is another in an ongoing effort to catalog all artifacts held by the Museum. Photos will be used as part of the condition report for the artifact, and will become part of the collection record in the collections database for that artifact. The collections database will be publically searchable on the Museum website.

  19. 'Bradbury Science Museum Collections Inventory Photos Disc #4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strohmeyer, Wendy J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-16

    The photos on Bradbury Science Museum Collections Inventory Photos Disc #4 is another in an ongoing effort to catalog all artifacts held by the Museum. Photos will be used as part of the condition report for the artifact, and will become part of the collection record in the collections database for that artifact. The collections database will be publically searchable on the Museum website.

  20. Why Creativity? Articulating and Championing a Museum's Social Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Cindy Meyers

    2014-01-01

    In late 2006, the Columbus Museum of Art adopted a new framework that established creativity as the lens for learning and visitor experiences. When the Columbus Museum of Art committed to creativity as a focus and lens for learning, the work and nature of its education department adapted and changed. What is a museum's responsibility to its…

  1. Museum Education and Art Therapy: Exploring an Innovative Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Karen

    2012-01-01

    This report describes collaborations between the disciplines of museum education and art therapy, which inspired the implementation of a pilot art therapy program at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art in Tennessee (USA). Because relatively limited research has been conducted on this trend, the author reviewed museum exhibits and programming, as well…

  2. The Dermaptera in the Museums at Leiden and Amsterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeseman, M.

    1954-01-01

    The collections of Dermaptera in the Rijksmuseum van Natuurlijke Historie at Leiden and the Zoölogisch Museum at Amsterdam, referred to in the present paper as "Museum Leiden" and "Museum Amsterdam", consist of numerous specimens including many types described by previous authors and a fairly large

  3. Museum Education and Art Therapy: Exploring an Innovative Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Karen

    2012-01-01

    This report describes collaborations between the disciplines of museum education and art therapy, which inspired the implementation of a pilot art therapy program at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art in Tennessee (USA). Because relatively limited research has been conducted on this trend, the author reviewed museum exhibits and programming, as well…

  4. 'Bradbury Science Museum Collections Inventory Photos Disc #4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strohmeyer, Wendy J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-16

    The photos on Bradbury Science Museum Collections Inventory Photos Disc #4 is another in an ongoing effort to catalog all artifacts held by the Museum. Photos will be used as part of the condition report for the artifact, and will become part of the collection record in the collections database for that artifact. The collections database will be publically searchable on the Museum website.

  5. Bradbury Science Museum Collections Inventory Photos Disc #5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strohmeyer, Wendy J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-25

    The photos on Bradbury Science Museum Collections Inventory Photos Disc #5 is another in an ongoing effort to catalog all artifacts held by the Museum. Photos will be used as part of the condition report for the artifact, and will become part of the collection record in the collections database for that artifact. The collections database will be publically searchable on the Museum website.

  6. A Blended Mobile Learning Environment for Museum Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Huei-Tse; Wu, Sheng-Yi; Lin, Peng-Chun; Sung, Yao-Ting; Lin, Jhe-Wei; Chang, Kuo-En

    2014-01-01

    The use of mobile devices for informal learning has gained attention over recent years. Museum learning is also regarded as an important research topic in the field of informal learning. This study explored a blended mobile museum learning environment (BMMLE). Moreover, this study applied three blended museum learning modes: (a) the traditional…

  7. Designerly Learning: Workshops for Schools at the Design Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charman, Helen

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents qualitative research recently undertaken by the Head of Learning at the Design Museum. The research explores how learning in the museum's workshop programme for schools is conceptualised by the museum educators who devise and teach on the programme. The study is framed by an epistemological stance of social constructionism, in…

  8. 45 CFR 1180.2 - Definition of a museum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... public. (b) Museums include, but are not limited to, the following types of institutions, if they... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Definition of a museum. 1180.2 Section 1180.2... HUMANITIES INSTITUTE OF MUSEUM AND LIBRARY SERVICES GRANTS REGULATIONS Definitions and Eligibility §...

  9. True Needs, True Partners: Museums Serving Schools. 2002 Survey Highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services, Washington, DC.

    This report documents the support museums of all types from art, history and children's museums to science centers and zoos provide to the nation's education of K-12 school children for 2000/2001. It is the second systematic survey of the range and scale of educational activities that museums provide in partnership with the nation's K-12 schools.…

  10. Digital Technologies in the Museum: Same Old, Same Old?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalle-den Oudsten, I.; Ioannides, M.; Fink, E.; Moropoulou, A.; Hagedorn-Saupe, M.; Fresa, A.; Liestøl, G.; Rajcic, V.; Grussenmeyer, P.

    2016-01-01

    Digital technologies are often said to be open, democratic, social and participatory. These qualities are also associated with the concept of the post-museum. This paper explores the use of the digital in museums. It is argued that museums often employ new media to perpetuate traditional narratives

  11. Teaching History with Museums: Strategies for K-12 Social Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Alan; Stoddard, Jeremy; Woodward, Walter W.

    2011-01-01

    "Teaching History with Museums" provides an introduction and overview of the rich pedagogical power of museums. In this comprehensive textbook, the authors show how museums offer a sophisticated understanding of the past and develop habits of mind in ways that are not easily duplicated in the classroom. Using engaging cases to illustrate…

  12. The Educational Promise of Public History Museum Exhibits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofanenko, Brenda M.

    2010-01-01

    Public history museums play a critical role in validating a nation's history. The museum's institutional strategies of object display are used to define a particular representation of past events. Museum displays of war are of particular interest not only because they provide evidence of past wars, but also because they serve to advance national…

  13. SSL Adoption by Museums: Survey Results, Analysis, and Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrin, T. E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Druzik, J. R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Miller, N. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-11-01

    DOE Solid-State Lighting GATEWAY report that summarizes the results of a survey of the museum community regarding conversions to SSL in museums. Responses provided real-world insight into how LEDs are being incorporated into museums, and what successes and hurdles have been encountered in the process.

  14. Reculturing Museums: Working toward Diversity in Informal Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Doris; Lombana, Judith

    2013-01-01

    In this article we argue for "reculturing" museums, starting with the ways that museum educators are professionally developed, focusing, in particular, on working with diverse visitors. By "reculturing" we mean shifting the core values and practices of a museum community, starting with its education practices. The aim of…

  15. Progressive Museum Education: Examples from the 1960s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, George E.

    2013-01-01

    The combination of pedagogy and political aims, a constant theme in the progressive school education literature, is reflected as well in the history of museum education. Museum educators, following the lead of John Dewey, advocated for experiential pedagogy, a natural course for museums since they emphasize learning from objects and experiences…

  16. Museum Superheroes: The Role of Play in Young Children's Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakowski, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the role of play in an art museum. Reflecting upon a kindergarten field trip to the Warhol Museum in which children's play was the centerpiece of the museum experience, the author examines what early childhood theorists have written about the value of play in young children's lives. She shows how the Warhol's program for…

  17. How Some Art Museums Can Appeal to Teenagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striepe, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a case study that explores the question of how some art museums can appeal to teenagers. The significance of teenagers as the most underrepresented age demographic to visit museums is relevant to current museum practice where visitor studies have assumed increasing importance. As teenagers mature into adults, the long-term…

  18. Inspiring Leaders: Unique Museum Programs Reinforce Professional Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciardelli, Jennifer; Wasserman, JoAnna

    2011-01-01

    Since 1998, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum has developed educational programs targeting adult audiences. Engaging public service professionals--those charged with serving and protecting our nation's democratic principles--has become a core outreach strategy to achieve the Museum's mission. This article describes the Museum's process…

  19. A Peace Museum as a Center for Peace Education: What Do Japanese Students Think of Peace Museums? Peace Education Miniprints No. 50.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Kazuyo

    This paper discusses present trends and possibilities in the peace museum field. The document is based on a collection of written opinions of Japanese students on peace museums, visits to peace museums in other countries, and a position on a peace museum and center for peace education in Japan. Peace museums throughout the world show that they can…

  20. The Promotion of Peace Education through Guides in Peace Museums. A Case Study of the Kyoto Museum for World Peace, Ritsumeikan University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanigawa, Yoshiko

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on how peace education at a peace museum is promoted by a volunteer guide service for visitors. Peace museums are places where many materials related to war and peace history are on display. To support the learning experience of museum visitors, many peace museums in Japan provide a volunteer guide service. The Kyoto Museum for…

  1. The Promotion of Peace Education through Guides in Peace Museums. A Case Study of the Kyoto Museum for World Peace, Ritsumeikan University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanigawa, Yoshiko

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on how peace education at a peace museum is promoted by a volunteer guide service for visitors. Peace museums are places where many materials related to war and peace history are on display. To support the learning experience of museum visitors, many peace museums in Japan provide a volunteer guide service. The Kyoto Museum for…

  2. 76 FR 72495 - Alabama Metal Coil Securement Act; Petition for Determination of Preemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-23

    ... Administration [Docket No. FMCSA-2011-0318] Alabama Metal Coil Securement Act; Petition for Determination of... that the State of Alabama's Metal Coil Securement Act is preempted by Federal law. FMCSA requests comments on what effect, if any, Alabama's metal coil load securement certification requirements may...

  3. Evaluation of Alabama Public School Wellness Policies and State School Mandate Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, Alisha B.; Lonis-Shumate, Steven R.; Gropper, Sareen S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study evaluated wellness policies created by Alabama public school districts and progress made in the implementation of Alabama State Department of Education (ALSDE) school food and nutrition mandates. Methods: Wellness policies from Alabama public school districts were compared to minimum requirements under the Child Nutrition…

  4. 78 FR 35015 - Alabama Power Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Comments, Motions to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-11

    ... Power Act, 16 U.S.C .791a-825r. h. Applicant Contact: Ms. Amy J. Stewart, PE, Team Leader, Alabama Power... Energy Regulatory Commission Alabama Power Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting...: Alabama Power Company. e. Name of Project: Coosa River Hydroelectric Project. f. Location: Coosa...

  5. Opening the Schoolhouse Doors: Tax Credits and Educational Access in Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Dick M., II.; Erickson, Angela C.

    2014-01-01

    In 2013, Alabama adopted the Alabama Accountability Act, an education reform measure that includes two new school choice programs that extend a lifeline to Alabama students trapped in failing public schools. One program offers a tax credit to help offset the cost of tuition for families who move their children from public schools designated as…

  6. 77 FR 36274 - Public Water System Supervision Program Revision for the State of Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-18

    ...Notice is hereby given that the State of Alabama is revising its approved Public Water System Supervision Program. Alabama has adopted the following rules: Long Term 1 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule, Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule, and Stage 2 Disinfection/Disinfection Byproducts Rule. EPA has determined that Alabama's rules are no less stringent than the......

  7. Portable Tablets in Science Museum Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gronemann, Sigurd Trolle

    2016-01-01

    Despite the increasing use of portable tablets in learning, their impact has received little attention in research. In five different projects, this media-ethnographic and design-based analysis of the use of portable tablets as a learning resource in science museums investigates how young people......’s learning with portable tablets matches the intentions of the museums. By applying media and information literacy (MIL) components as analytical dimensions, a pattern of discrepancies between young people’s expectations, their actual learning and the museums’ approaches to framing such learning...

  8. Deepwater Horizon oil spill impacts on Alabama beaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Hayworth

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available From mid June 2010 to early August 2010, the white sandy beaches along Alabama's Gulf coast were inundated with crude oil discharged from the Deepwater Horizon well. The long-term consequences of this environmental catastrophe are still unfolding. Although BP has attempted to clean up some of these beaches, there still exist many unanswered questions regarding the physical, chemical, and ecological state of the oil contaminated beach system. In this paper, we present our understanding of what is known and known to be unknown with regard to the current state of Alabama's beaches in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon disaster. Motivated by our observations of the evolving distribution of oil in Alabama's beaches and BP's clean-up activities, we offer our thoughts on the lessons learned from this oil spill disaster.

  9. Deepwater Horizon oil spill impacts on Alabama beaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Hayworth

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available From mid June 2010 to early August 2010, the white sandy beaches along Alabama's Gulf coast were inundated with crude oil discharged from the Deepwater Horizon well. The long-term consequences of this environmental catastrophe are still unfolding. Although BP has attempted to clean up some of these beaches, there still exist many unanswered questions regarding the physical, chemical, and ecological state of the oil contaminated beach system. In this paper, we present our understanding of what is known and known to be unknown with regard to the current state of Alabama's beaches in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon disaster. Motivated by our observations of the evolving distribution of oil in Alabama's beaches and BP's clean-up activities, we offer our thoughts on the lessons learned from this oil spill disaster.

  10. ATM Coastal Topography-Alabama 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Yates, Xan; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Klipp, Emily S.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived first surface (FS) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Alabama coastline, acquired October 3-4, 2001. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative scanning Lidar instrument originally developed by NASA, and known as the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), was used during data acquisition. The ATM system is a scanning Lidar system that measures high-resolution topography of the land surface, and incorporates a green-wavelength laser operating at pulse rates of 2 to 10 kilohertz. Measurements from the laser ranging device are coupled with data acquired from inertial navigation system (INS) attitude sensors and differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) receivers to measure topography of the surface at accuracies of +/-15 centimeters. The nominal ATM platform is a Twin Otter or P-3 Orion aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the ATM system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of Lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for pre-survey flight line definition, flight path plotting, Lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS is routinely used to create maps that

  11. Museums and Twitter: An Exploratory Qualitative Study of How Museums Use Twitter for Audience Development and Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterman, Mark; Thirunarayanan, M.; Ferris, Elizabeth C.; Pabon, Lizette C.; Paul, Natalie; Berger, Rhonda

    2012-01-01

    Museums are competing with a vast variety of Internet-based information delivery sites to keep the public interested in their institutions. To keep pace Museums are increasingly turning to the use of Web 2.0 tools to draw in the public and maintain a standing as cultural and educational leaders. Several museums have started using Twitter. This…

  12. Museum security and the Thomas Crown Affair.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaud, E. C. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2010-01-01

    Over the years, I've daydreamed about stealing a Vermeer, a Picasso, or Rembrandt. It tickles me, as much as watching the reboot of The Thomas Crown Affair. Why is it, do you suppose, so much fun to think about stealing a world renowned piece off the wall of a major metropolitan museum? Is it the romantic thoughts of getting away with it, walking past infrared detectors, and pressure sensors ala Indiana Jones with the sack of sand to remove the idol without triggering the security system? Is it the idea of snatching items with such fantastic prices, where the romance of possessing an item of such value is less intoxicating than selling it to a private collector for it to never be seen again? I suspect others share my daydreams as they watch theater or hear of a brazen daylight heist at museums around the world, or from private collections. Though when reality sets in, the mind of the security professional kicks in. How could one do it, why would one do it, what should you do once it's done? The main issue a thief confronts when acquiring unique goods is how to process or fence them. They become very difficult to sell because they are one-of-a-kind, easy to identify, and could lead to the people involved with the theft. The whole issue of museum security takes up an ironic twist when one considers the secretive British street artist 'Banksy'. Banksy has made a name for himself by brazenly putting up interesting pieces of art in broad daylight (though many critics don't consider his work to be art) on building walls, rooftops, or even museums. I bring him up for a interesting take on what may become a trend in museum security. In March of 2005, Banksy snuck a piece of his called 'Vandalized Oil Painting' into the Brooklyn Museum's Great Historical Painting Wing, plus 3 other pieces into major museums in New York. Within several days, 2 paintings had been torn down, but 2 stayed up much longer. In his home country of the UK, a

  13. Integrated Distribution Management System for Alabama Principal Investigator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schatz, Joe

    2013-03-31

    Southern Company Services, under contract with the Department of Energy, along with Alabama Power, Alstom Grid (formerly AREVA T&D) and others moved the work product developed in the first phase of the Integrated Distribution Management System (IDMS) from “Proof of Concept” to true deployment through the activity described in this Final Report. This Project – Integrated Distribution Management Systems in Alabama – advanced earlier developed proof of concept activities into actual implementation and furthermore completed additional requirements to fully realize the benefits of an IDMS. These tasks include development and implementation of a Distribution System based Model that enables data access and enterprise application integration.

  14. Cultural property, museums and Tourism: analysis of the public factor in the Museum of Caceres (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Marcos Arévalo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The present work exposes the interim analysis of the results obtained so far on the ongoing research carried on over the Social Anthropology final Master´s degree project at the University of Extremadura entitled "Analysis of public factor at the Cáceres’ Museum". The research aims to establish a profile of each one of the Caceres Museum Visitors and also to aknowledge the perceptions, representation and the connection the Museum neighborhood residents have towards the institution with the idea of using this previously mentioned gathered information in order to contribute to the planification of activities and to generate links between the Museum and its public. In order to accomplish this objective, Anthropology own data recollection techniques such as the participant observation and surveys have been used at the first instance and in-depth interviews at the later stage.

  15. Slovene Ethnographic Museum Web Collections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miha Špiček

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available EXTENDED ABSTRACT:Are you interested in the night view of Ljubljana or in the view on the Ljubljana skyscraper in the 30- ies of the 20th century? What did Cerknica look like in that time? What did a typical alpine house look like? What beds were used fifty years ago? Are you a sports fan interested in the training of Yugoslav athletic team in 1953? Is it true that Anton Codelli and his colleague Leo Poljanec set up the first wireless telegraph station for the company Telefunken in the West African German colony of Togo? What is a Palm Sunday bundle? Is a duel between a woman of Carinthia and Carniola really painted on a wooden bee hive panel? What on earth is an object called »roš«? What chimneys were built on the roofs of the Artiže village? The answers to these unusual questions can be found on the SEM (Slovene Ethnographic Museum website. The SEM documentation comprises numerous collections of photographs which are of interest to ethnologists as well as to the general public. To facilitate the access to them SEM bought the first scanner and started to scan individual photos in 1997. In 2007 SEM continued with systematic digitisation of the most frequently used collections of photos. In 2009 the activities were continued (partly in cooperation with external partners and we joined the Athena EU project. In order to be promoted the entire collections were published on the SEM website and made accessible to a broad audience. The MINOK software enabling the creation of html catalogues was used. As static catalogues were unsuitable for inclusion on the website, a new application using dynamic html was designed to create the gallery view of museum objects and photos, photo slide show, keyword filter, geolocation filter, display of geolocation on a map, and to offer the possibility of advanced searching. The Galerist software was designed by an external partner. It enables html catalogue import, sorting and editing XML files; it is possible to

  16. [Educational research and the production of knowledge at science museums].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marandino, Martha

    2005-01-01

    The article examines the processes by which scientific knowledge is socialized, based on the concepts of museographical/didactical transposition and recontextualization within the realm of science museums. Ways of producing knowledge in museums are analyzed, alongside a discussion of the potential challenges and possibilities involved when applying these concepts to research on dissemination and education in a museum setting. Some considerations are advanced on how these may contribute to the development of pedagogical practice in museums. The processes by which scientific knowledge is transformed for the purpose of educating and disseminating knowledge do not merely simplify ideas and concepts, since new knowledge is constructed inside the realm of museum culture.

  17. Double the Benefits: Use Museum Collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ory, Norma R.

    1984-01-01

    A project for elementary school children based on a museum's collection of Alexander Calder's art is described. After studying Calder's works of art, students created their own three-dimensional stabiles, molded clay into animals, and made circus figures from cork, fabric, yarn, and colored paper. (RM)

  18. New inscriptions in the Bodrum Museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isager, Signe

    2014-01-01

    This article presents two hitherto unknown Hellenistic inscriptions, both of which are fragmentary. They are inscribed on two sides of a stone which is now in the Museum of Underwater Archaeology in Bodrum (inv. no. 6651) but probably originated from the area of Mylasa. Both inscriptions concern...

  19. Should the National Museum Hold Trademark Shows?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The French luxury brand Louis Vuitton is unveiling its special summer exhibit Voyages.The exhibition will be held in the National Museum of China from May 31 toAugust 30 this year.The exhibition displays almost 200 exhibits designed throughout the brand’s 157 years’history,covering luggage and other items such as clothing.

  20. The Democratic Horizons of the Museum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. Joke Hermes; Peter Dahlgren

    2013-01-01

    This multi-volume reference work provides a state-of-the-art survey of the burgeoning field of museum studies. Showcasing the best of theory, practice, history, controversies, and the ways technology impacts the way we view, think about, and institultionalize objects, The International Handbooks of

  1. A Mobile Music Museum Experience for Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mikkel Helleberg; Knudsen, Aske Sønderby; Wilmot, Thomas Michael

    2015-01-01

    An interactive music instrument museum experience for children of 10-12 years is presented. Equipped with tablet devices, the children are sent on a treasure hunt where participants have to identify musical instruments by listening to samples; when the right instrument is located, a challenge...

  2. Neue Miolispa aus dem Leidener Museum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleine, R.

    1917-01-01

    Gelegentlich einer umfassenden Aufarbeitung der Gattung Miolispa Pascoe hat mir das Leidener Museum in dankenswerter Weise das noch unbestimmte Material zur Verfügung gestellt, unter welchem sich zwei neue Arten vorfanden. Beide stammen aus Neu-Guinea. Trotz des herrschenden Weltkrieges und der

  3. Information seeking behaviour of online museum visitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Mette

    There is a current trend to make museum collections widely accessible by digitising cultural heritage collections for the Internet. At the same time we know very little of how remote access users interact with the collections and their motivations for visiting. This talk will present results from...

  4. A Museum Grows in an Apple Orchard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenning, Mary Ann

    2004-01-01

    The new Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art in Amherst, Massachusetts, is a tribute to the artistry of children's book illustration and a testament to the generous spirit of its founders and main benefactors, Eric Carle and his wife Barbara. Eric Carle is world-known for his boldly illustrated, cleverly designed picture books for children. His…

  5. The Development of a Virtual Dinosaur Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarng, Wernhuar; Liou, Hsin-Hun

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this article is to study the network and virtual reality technologies for developing a virtual dinosaur museum, which provides a Web-learning environment for students of all ages and the general public to know more about dinosaurs. We first investigate the method for building the 3D dynamic models of dinosaurs, and then describe…

  6. A Children's Museum and Art Carnival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Helen Cynthia

    1977-01-01

    For a number of years the Art Department of the Richmond Public Schools has offered an art museum and carnival to children in the elementary grades. The art carnival, which takes art beyond conventional programs, is made up of art games, viewmasters, puzzles, perceptual objects which can be manipulated, nature forms, and kaleidoscopes. (Author)

  7. Recommendations based on semantically enriched museum collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Y.; Stash, N.; Aroyo, L.; Gorgels, P.; Rutledge, L.; Schreiber, G.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the CHIP demonstrator1 for providing personalized access to digital museum collections. It consists of three main components: Art Recommender, Tour Wizard, and Mobile Tour Guide. Based on the semantically enriched Rijksmuseum Amsterdam2 collection, we show how Semantic Web tech

  8. Learning Museum genbesøgt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zipsane, Henrik; Fristrup, Tine; Lundborg, Maria Domeij

    2017-01-01

    forskere tilknyttet NCK: Henrik Zipsane (projektleder), Tine Fristrup (gæsteforsker fra DPU, Aarhus Universitet), Maria Domeij Lundborg og Sara Grut. Undersøgelsens baggrund skal først og fremmest findes i projektet ’Learning Museum’ som i perioden 2011-2013 etablerede et samarbejde mellem læreruddannelser...... og museer i hele Danmark. Det var resultaterne fra dette projekt, som igangsatte nærværende undersøgelse eftersom ændringer af læreruddannelsen (fra LU07 til LU13) i forbindelse med folkeskolereformen i 2013 faldt sammen med afslutningen på Learning Museum projektet. Folkeskolereformen og dermed...... aftaleteksten blev således baggrundstæppe for rapporteringen af erfaringerne fra Learning Museum med henblik på at konceptualisere projektet i Learning Museum-modellen: Learning Museum-modellen er et eksempel på, hvordan man kan imødekomme og styrke tværinstitutionelle samarbejder. Modellen viser, hvordan vi...

  9. Your iPod, Your Art Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jean

    2009-01-01

    The author became involved in a project called "Making Objects Speak: Portable Audio Guides for Teaching with Visual Culture in the Humanities." Faculty members from different disciplines formulated the idea for the project, which aims to make museums more accessible to students at City University of New York's (CUNY's) John Jay College of…

  10. St. Louis Educational Museum: A Centennial Commemoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, James A.

    2005-01-01

    The St. Louis, Missouri Educational Museum has its roots in the 1904 Centennial Exposition, held at Forest Park on the edge of the city. The theme of the exposition was education and technology. Seventy thousand local school children visited the exposition, and at its conclusion an initiative was launched to purchase some of the exhibitions as…

  11. Preservation management for libraries, archives and museums

    CERN Document Server

    Gorman, G E

    2006-01-01

    Memory institutions such as libraries, archives, galleries and museums all share pressing concerns about preserving heritage. This book charts the diversity of preservation management in the contemporary information landscape, and offers guidance on preservation methods for the sustainability of collections from a range of international experts.

  12. The Ethics of Evaluation in Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimlich, Joe E.

    2015-01-01

    Ethics in research and evaluation has a long standing history, one steeped with legal and moral implications. This article addresses the technicalities of ethics in evaluation as well as highlights the importance for museum educators to prioritize adopting such practices. While understanding the myriad of ethical concerns and best practices can be…

  13. Transmedial Museum Experiences: the case of Moesgaard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pajares Tosca, Susana

    2016-01-01

    This article’s aim is to elucidate the uncertain ontological status of the transmedial museum experience, which I define as the aesthetic encounter of a user with the complex object that is the conjunction of historical artefact, informative label and fictional stories on different media platforms...

  14. Prague: The City Is the Museum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meilach, Dona Z.

    2001-01-01

    States that Prague, the capital of the Czech-Republic, is a virtual art museum because of the number of architectural styles and other artworks throughout the city. Explores the various architectural styles that are present in the city from the Gothic monasteries and churches to examples of contemporary styles. (CMK)

  15. Museum makes room for the Big Bang

    CERN Multimedia

    Pinnell, Heather

    2007-01-01

    "Heather Pinnell discovers that a small exhibition about the Large Hadron Collider scored very highly for its impact." The museum has plans to add a spark chamber into the gallery to show that the experiments done at CERM are safe. (2/3 page)

  16. Neue Miolispa aus dem Leidener Museum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleine, R.

    1917-01-01

    Gelegentlich einer umfassenden Aufarbeitung der Gattung Miolispa Pascoe hat mir das Leidener Museum in dankenswerter Weise das noch unbestimmte Material zur Verfügung gestellt, unter welchem sich zwei neue Arten vorfanden. Beide stammen aus Neu-Guinea. Trotz des herrschenden Weltkrieges und der Schw

  17. School and Classroom Museums for Civic Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Rodney F.; Meyer, John R.

    1996-01-01

    Presents low cost ways that elementary teachers can develop classroom and school museums. Using objects and documents to record and display community events and traditions can help foster commitments to civic institutions and positive social values. Recommends creating wall murals, life ropes (personal event chronology), wall newspapers, and…

  18. The Pteropoda of the Leyden Museum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tesch, J.J.

    1908-01-01

    The material of Pteropoda in the collection of the Leydeu Museum is rather poor and consists only of a few species, one of which, however, is new to science, while others are rarely met with. So I think it to be not wholly destitute of importance to enumerate the different forms, as it gives rise to

  19. The Antelopes in the Leyden Museum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jentink, F.A.

    1901-01-01

    The larger in size the animals are the more difficult their comparative study is; 1° as there hardly is any possibility to find all materials together in a given collection, 2° because no Museum in the world is large enough to possess sufficient large series of all known species of a given group, an

  20. Publication List - New York State Museum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Museum, Albany.

    Presented is a list of publications in six areas: (1) Anthropology and Archeology, (2) Botany, (3) Entomology, (4) Zoology, (5) Geology and Paleontology, and (6) Miscellaneous. This list was produced by the New York State Department of Education in cooperation with the New York State Museum. The list includes the publication number, author(s),…

  1. National Arts Museum Gets Complete Makeover

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhuBing

    2003-01-01

    China National Museum of Fine Arts is one of the ten landmark buildings in Beijing built in the 1950s in celebration of the 10th anniversary of the founding of New China. This Chinese gardenstyle structure was built at the proposal of the country's first generation of leaders and integrated many original architectural concepts of the late premier Zhou Enlai.

  2. Hvad skal vi med et naturhistorisk museum?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    I Danmark har vi nationale museer for kunsten, kulturen og naturen. Vi er i fuld gang med at lave et nyt, stort supermuseum for naturhistorien. Hvad skal vi egentlig med det? Efter et år på posten som direktør for Statens Naturhistoriske Museum gør Peter C. Kjærgaard status med en personlig...

  3. Creative Inspiration for Preschoolers from Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönkkö, Marja-Leena; Aerila, Juli-Anna; Grönman, Satu

    2016-01-01

    This research explores the learning outcomes of preschool children produced through visits to an historic house museum environment. The new Finnish preschool curriculum identifies the importance of arts-based approaches for children and that these approaches should be closely aligned to experiential and holistic education. The aim of the research…

  4. John Dewey and Adult Learning in Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, David F.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this article is to investigate learning in museums through the lens of John Dewey's philosophy of education and experiential learning. The influence of Dewey's philosophy of education is widespread and resounding. In this article, I examine the experiential qualities of Dewey's philosophy and compare it with the objectives of the…

  5. Perception of Alabama Science and Career Technology Teachers Concerning Teaching the Alabama Aquaculture Course of Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, David John

    The purpose of this study was to improve teachers' ability to effectively use aquaculture as a tool to teach math and science. The study population included Alabama science and career tech teachers that were certified to teach the Alabama aquaculture course of study. The teachers were electronically surveyed regarding their perceptions of the importance of the aquascience elective and aquaculture science course content standards, their knowledge of those topics and how they perceived the quality of available teaching materials. While all of the content standards were rated above average in importance, aquaculture career awareness and safety concerns were rated the highest by teachers. Teachers were most knowledgeable about career opportunities, categorization of aquaculture species, and the adaptations of aquatic organisms. The average materials ratings were below average for all content standards. The highest rated materials were for career opportunities, categorization of species and safety topics. Using Borich's (1980) model of mean weighted discrepancy scores, the control of diseases and pests in the aquatic environment and concepts associated with health management of aquacrops were identified as top priorities for in-service teacher training. Aquaculture industry infrastructure and the effects of the fishing industry were also identified as priority training topics. Teachers were self-divided into 3 categories those that taught science (SCI), career tech (CTE) and those that taught both (BOTH). They were further divided by their level of experience. A multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) revealed a significant effect between teacher types but there was no significant interaction effect between (a) teacher type and experience level or (b) the two levels of experience. A follow-up analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated that the science teachers thought significantly less of the available materials than either the CTE or BOTH groups.

  6. Increasing the Sustainability of Museums through International Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Luiza POP

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Museums use resources in order to provide public goods and services. The most important sources of income for many museums are budgetary subsidies. Unfortunately, these grants are limited and shrinking. In this context, during the last years the need for sustainable development of museums was stressed. In order to continue to operate, museums were forced to find ways of increasing their own income and keeping their costs under control. Thus museums have begun to use management and marketing strategies similar to those used by private companies. This paper examines the positive effects of international strategy implementation on museums’ sustainability. The first part of the paper explains why it is necessary to reform the traditional management of museums, which its main development directions are, what the sustainable development of museums is and why they should become sustainable. In the second part our research conducted on three museums (Guggenheim, Louvre, Hermitage shows that international expansion helps museums to increase their sustainability. The international strategy enables museums to increase their revenue, through licensing agreements, reduce their storage costs, highlight their heritage, improve their market image and be closer to consumers. Thus, through a strategy applied until recently only in the private sector, museums can improve their sustainability, but also better fulfill their purpose of serving the society.

  7. The museum maze in oral pathology demystified-part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Shankargouda; Rao, Roopa S; Ganavi, B S

    2013-07-01

    Museum technologies provide a wide array of choice of museums to those who wish to exploit technology to attract, excite and ensure an unrivalled visitor experience, as well as capture and sustain share of mind and heart. Museum being a combination of both art and science requires skilled workmanship, meticulous planning and execution to exhibit a specimen to its optimal elegance due to its relatively smaller size and fragile nature. A well established oral pathology museum is rarely seen due to negligence of oral specimens, dearth of knowledge in this field and also available data on it. An insight on oral pathology museum, including its establishment, importance and advanced technologies to make it more simple and accessible are discussed in two parts. Part I emphasizes on basics in oral pathology museum, whereas part II highlights the specialized techniques and recent advances in museum technology. Our effort is to present this article as hands on experience for the pathologists, student population and the technicians.

  8. Agribusiness Education. Alabama Course of Study. Bulletin 1990, No. 60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

    This course of study provides a framework for the content of a program in agribusiness education as part of the Alabama vocational education program. The course of study was designed to assist educators in developing and maintaining high quality vocational programs and to ensure uniformity of vocational programs. Following a description of the…

  9. Training Teachers to Use Technology: The Alabama Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, Anna C.; Johnson, Eddie

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the need for teacher training in media use and describes a plan developed in Alabama consisting of a three-course sequence in technology for teacher education that can be incorporated into a master's degree program. Required primary computer skills and primary instructional design skills are listed. (Contains three references.) (LRW)

  10. Cardboard Houses with Wings: The Architecture of Alabama's Rural Studio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botz-Bornstein, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    The Rural Studio, an outreach program of Auburn University, designs innovative houses for poor people living in Alabama's Hale County by using "junk" such as car windshields, carpet tiles, baled cardboard, and old license plates. The article theorizes this particular architecture in terms of Critical Regionalism, developed by…

  11. Assessment of Loblolly Pine Decline in Central Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan J. Hess; William J. Otrosina; Emily A. Carter; Jim R. Steinman; John P. Jones; Lori G. Eckhardt; Ann M. Weber; Charles H. Walkinshaw

    2002-01-01

    Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) decline has been prevalent on upland sites of central Alabama since the 1960's. The purpose of this study was to compare Forest Health Monitoring (FHM) standards and protocols with root health evaluations relative to crown, stem, and site measurements. Thirty-nine 1/6 acre plots were established on loblolly decline...

  12. Determining soil erosion from roads in coastal plain of Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFero Grace; W.J. Elliot

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports soil losses and observed sediment deposition for 16 randomly selected forest road sections in the National Forests of Alabama. Visible sediment deposition zones were tracked along the stormwater flow path to the most remote location as a means of quantifying soil loss from road sections. Volumes of sediment in deposition zones were determined by...

  13. Parables and Politics: Clergy Attitudes toward Illegal Immigration in Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickersham, Mary Eleanor

    2013-01-01

    The passage of a stringent immigration law in Alabama in 2011 makes relevant the juxtaposition of clergy and congregant attitudes and behaviors toward illegal immigrants as related to Biblical teachings that require charity to aliens. In order to examine the relationship between religious attitudes and illegal immigration, approximately 426…

  14. Smoking, Sociodemographic Determinants, and Stress in the Alabama Black Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuaib, Faisal; Foushee, H. R.; Ehiri, John; Bagchi, Suparna; Baumann, Angela; Kohler, Connie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In the Alabama Black Belt, poverty is high, and the educational level is low. Studies have found increased tobacco use among individuals exposed to high levels of stress. Few studies have been conducted in this region to measure smoking status, its sociodemographic determinants, and how smoking status relates to stressful environmental…

  15. The museum in the palm of your hand: presenting the Israel Museum through ICT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Hazan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available L'Israel Museum è la più grande istituzione culturale dello Stato di Israele ed è considerato uno dei musei d'arte e archeologici più importanti del mondo. Fondato nel 1965, il Museo ospita quasi 500.000 oggetti, distribuiti tra le sue collezioni enciclopediche, che vanno dalla preistoria all'arte contemporanea e comprendono la più ampia raccolta di archeologia biblica e deella Terra Santa nel mondo. Questo contributo presenta il museo visto attraverso la sua impronta elettronica - ovvero il suo sito web bilingue. La versione elettronica del museo non solo riflette la portata e la qualità delle sue collezioni, che comprendono arti visive, archeologia, arte e vita ebraiche; presenta infatti testimonianze della storia della cultura mondiale, da circa un milione di anni fa ad oggi, ma promuove anche i numerosi eventi e le attività culturali ed educative che si svolgono nel campus del museo durante tutto l'anno. The Israel Museum is the largest cultural institution in the State of Israel and is ranked among the leading art and archaeology museums in the world. Founded in 1965, the Museum houses nearly 500,000 objects across its encyclopedic collections, ranging from prehistory through contemporary art and includes the most extensive holdings of Biblical and Holy Land archaeology in the world. This chapter will present the museum as viewed through its electronic footprint - its bi-lingual website. The electronic delivery of the museum not only reflects the sense of the scope and quality of its collections including: fine art, archaeology, and Jewish art and life; presenting the history of world culture from nearly one million years ago to the present day, but also the many events, and cultural and educational activities that go on in the museum campus throughout the year.

  16. The unionid (Bivalvia) fauna of the Sipsey River in northwestern Alabama, an aquatic hotspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullagh, W.H.; Williams, J.D.; McGregor, S.W.; Pierson, J.M.; Lydeard, C.

    2002-01-01

    Recent surveys for unionid bivalves were conducted in the mainstem of the Sipsey River and headwater tributaries (Tombigbee River drainage) during the summer and autumn of 1996-1999. A total of 35 species and 22 genera were found. Museum records from the upper Sipsey, based largely on the efforts of H. H. Smith during 1910-11, raised the total number of recorded unionids in the Sipsey to 42. Smith documented 25 species in the river; however, most of his collections were made in the mid- to upper-Sipsey, which has lower diversity. The three most common recently observed species in descending order of abundance were Quadrula asperata (I. Lea, 1861), Pleurobema decisum (I. Lea, 1831), and Tritogonia verrucosa (Rafinesque, 1820). Federally listed species observed recently include Lampsilis perovalis (Conrad, 1834) (threatened), Medionidus acutissimus (I. Lea, 1831) (threatened), P. decisum (endangered), P. perovatum (Conrad, 1834) (endangered), and Potamilus inflatus (I. Lea, 1831) (threatened). Species not observed recently but recorded in prior surveys include Anodontoides radiatus (Conrad, 1834), Arcidens confragosus (Say, 1829), Plectomerus dombeyanus (Valenciennes, 1827), Q. metanevra (Rafinesque, 1820), Q. stapes (I. Lea, 1831) (federally endangered), P. taitianum (I. Lea, 1834) (federally endangered), and Toxolasma parvus (Barnes, 1823). Many, species are known recently or historically by only five or fewer recorded specimens including: A. radiatus, Elliptio arctata (Conrad, 1834), Ligumia recta (Lamarck, 1819), P. taitianum, P. inflatus, Q. aspera (Lea, 1831), Q. metanevra, Q. stapes, T. parvus, Truncilla donaciformis (I. Lea, 1828), Uniomerus tetralasmus (Say, 1831), Utterbackia imbecillis (Say, 1829), A. confragosus, and P. dombeyanus. Unlike the mussel fauna of most Alabama streams, that of the Sipsey River is still relatively intact in terms of species richness despite impacts from mining, silvicultural, and agricultural activities. A concerted effort

  17. Implementasi Sapta Pesona Pada Museum Mandala Wangsit Siliwangi Kota Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faizal Hamzah

    2016-09-01

    ABSTRACT Museum refers to the building that keeping the treasures of ancient history or past. Museum is important for our place deepen the knowledge of past history. Many of them are less interested to come to the museum. Travelers make the museum as an alternative tourist spot. Visitors who visit the museum itself mostly for their tour schedule or from institutions or schools of the visitors which was scheduled to visit the museum. Establishing a tourist must pay attention to things that are important in the world of tourism, one  of Sapta Pesona. Sapta pesona is a condition that must be realized in order to attract more tourists to visit an area or region in our country. Meanwhile the condition seen at this time there are 7 (seven elements of Sapta Pesona have not been realized to the maximize at the Museum Mandala Wangsit Siliwangi, still there are some elements in Sapta Pesona are not realized by the museum management that influence the tourist attraction until this time. Some elements are not maximized application that is beautiful and memorable. It is necessary to change the management, promotion, and restoration spatial Mandala Museum Wangsit by 7 (seven elements of Sapta Pesona. Implementation of Sapta Pesona is done in order to attract tourists and increase the level of tourist traffic. Keywords: Museum, Implementation, Sapta Pesona.

  18. The role of medical museums in contemporary medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marreez, Yehia M A-H; Willems, Luuk N A; Wells, Michael R

    2010-01-01

    From the early 19th century until the most recent two decades, open-space and satellite museums featuring anatomy and pathology collections (collectively referred to as "medical museums") had leading roles in medical education. However, many factors have caused these roles to diminish dramatically in recent years. Chief among these are the great advances in information technology and web-based learning that are currently at play in every level of medical training. Some medical schools have abandoned their museums while others have gradually given away their museums' contents to devote former museum space to new classrooms, lecture halls, and laboratories. These trends have accelerated as medical school enrollment has increased and as increasing interest in biological and biomedical research activities have caused medical schools to convert museum space into research facilities. A few medical schools, however, have considered the contents of their museums as irreplaceable resources for modern medicine and medical education and the space these occupy as great environments for independent and self-directed learning. Consequently, some medical schools have updated their medical museums and equipped them with new technologies. The Anatomical Museum of Leiden University Medical Center in The Netherlands and the Medical Museum of Kawasaki Medical School in Kurashiki, Okayama, Japan, are two examples of such upgraded museums. Student surveys at Leiden University have indicated that all students (100%) found audio-guided museum tours to be useful for learning and majorities of them found guided tours to be clinically relevant (87%). However, 69% of students felt that museum visits should be optional rather than compulsory within the medical training curriculum.

  19. 77 FR 39269 - Submission for OMB Review, Comment Request, Proposed Collection: IMLS Museum Web Database...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-02

    ... purpose of the information collection is to develop a national database of museums for use by museums... Web Database: MuseumsCount.gov AGENCY: Institute of Museum and Library Services, National Foundation... establish a comprehensive, reliable database about the size, distribution and scope of the museum sector...

  20. "Seeing It For Real?"--Authenticity, Theatre and Learning in Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Anthony; Leahy, Helen Rees

    2005-01-01

    This article reflects on the findings of a nationally-funded research project which investigated the practice and impact of museum theatre at two UK museums: the Imperial War Museum, London, and the People's History Museum, Manchester. The research team tracked the museum experiences of eight groups of primary school children, half of whom…

  1. Adult Museum Programs: Designing Meaningful Experiences. American Association for State and Local History Book Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachatello-Sawyer, Bonnie; Fellenz, Robert A.; Burton, Hanly; Gittings-Carlson, Laura; Lewis-Mahony, Janet; Woolbaugh, Walter

    A three-year national study of adult museum programs used a qualitative research approach and naturalistic inquiry and interviewed 508 museum program participants, 75 instructors, and 143 museum program planners in all types and sizes of museums, including art institutes, natural and cultural historical museums, science centers, historic houses,…

  2. Carving a Strong Identity: Investigating the Life Histories of Museum Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Natasha S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the need for more holistic, narrative-based research into the identities of museum educators. The author explores the increasing demands being placed on museum educators along with the substantial challenges experienced by these professionals amidst the changing climate of museums. Many museum educators feel that their museums'…

  3. Topobathymetric model of Mobile Bay, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Jeffrey J.; Brock, John C.; Howard, Daniel M.; Gesch, Dean B.; Bonisteel-Cormier, Jamie M.; Travers, Laurinda J.

    2013-01-01

    Topobathymetric Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) are a merged rendering of both topography (land elevation) and bathymetry (water depth) that provides a seamless elevation product useful for inundation mapping, as well as for other earth science applications, such as the development of sediment-transport, sea-level rise, and storm-surge models. This 1/9-arc-second (approximately 3 meters) resolution model of Mobile Bay, Alabama was developed using multiple topographic and bathymetric datasets, collected on different dates. The topographic data were obtained primarily from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Elevation Dataset (NED) (http://ned.usgs.gov/) at 1/9-arc-second resolution; USGS Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) data (2 meters) (http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/400/); and topographic lidar data (2 meters) and Compact Hydrographic Airborne Rapid Total Survey (CHARTS) lidar data (2 meters) from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) (http://www.csc.noaa.gov/digitalcoast/data/coastallidar/). Bathymetry was derived from digital soundings obtained from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) (http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/geodas/geodas.html) and from water-penetrating lidar sources, such as EAARL and CHARTS. Mobile Bay is ecologically important as it is the fourth largest estuary in the United States. The Mobile and Tensaw Rivers drain into the bay at the northern end with the bay emptying into the Gulf of Mexico at the southern end. Dauphin Island (a barrier island) and the Fort Morgan Peninsula form the mouth of Mobile Bay. Mobile Bay is 31 miles (50 kilometers) long by a maximum width of 24 miles (39 kilometers) with a total area of 413 square miles (1,070 square kilometers). The vertical datum of the Mobile Bay topobathymetric model is the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD 88). All the topographic datasets were originally referenced to NAVD 88 and no transformations

  4. Building the image of modern art : the rhetoric of two museums and the representation and canonization of modern art (1935-1975) : the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam and the Museum of Modern Art in New York

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leigh, Nana

    2008-01-01

    The Rhetoric of Two Museums and the Representation and Canonization of Modern Art (1935-1975): The Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam and the Museum of Modern Art in New York Museums of modern art have determined the course of modern art history. Their contributions to the representation and

  5. Building the image of modern art : the rhetoric of two museums and the representation and canonization of modern art (1935-1975) : the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam and the Museum of Modern Art in New York

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leigh, Nana

    2008-01-01

    The Rhetoric of Two Museums and the Representation and Canonization of Modern Art (1935-1975): The Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam and the Museum of Modern Art in New York Museums of modern art have determined the course of modern art history. Their contributions to the representation and canoniz

  6. Art Museums in Australia: A Personal Retrospect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Thomas

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A survey of, and reflections on, the growth of art museums in Australia based on personal experience and involvement. It starts with the early art collections and state galleries and their organisation. It looks at changing patterns of leadership and governance. It considers the roles of inter-state competition, the varying patters of organisation and support and the impact of federal institutions. It reflects on factors of race, gender and ethnicity and also the situation of Australian exhibitions and collections in the Global Village. It considers the effects of popularisation, commercialisation and celebrity culture on exhibition practices. It concludes that Australia’s art museums, more perhaps than any others, have become unusually well-suited to a post-European or post-North Atlantic age.

  7. Science literacy and natural history museums

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Antonio G Valdecasas; Ana M Correas

    2010-12-01

    It appears that developed countries, such as the US, the UK and Italy, are losing the race against irrationalism and arbitrary thinking in regard to nature and human interactions. The incidence of misguided beliefs and the detachment from and, in some cases, outright hostility toward science are on the rise. Paradoxically, this is probably the period in the history of advanced countries in which increasing public and personal efforts have been directed toward the dissemination of scientific knowledge to increase public understanding of science. This article vindicates the role of natural history museums in consolidating rational and critical scientific thinking while briefly examining scientific illiteracy in developed countries. It also discusses methods to improve the involvement of natural history museums in the promotion of rational thinking, the only appropriate avenue for objective knowledge.

  8. Hygrothermal optimisation of museum storage spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janssen, Hans; Christensen, Jørgen Erik

    2013-01-01

    Despite the large economic and ecologic costs, museum storage spaces are often equipped with extensive air conditioning, to provide the desired stable interior climate. The new “passive conditioning” paradigm aims at resolving these costs: a high-hygrothermal-inertia building with a high-hygrothermal-resistance...... envelope is to satisfactorily stabilise that interior climate, with no need for mechanical air conditioning hence.This paper first studies the reliability of full passive conditioning for museum storage spaces. It is shown to be an illusion, since it usually results in excessive interior humidities....... Auxiliary dehumidification is thus required to provide good conservation conditions, and it is secondly investigated how the dehumidification load can be diminished. The study reveals the crucial impact of air tightness, while thermal insulation only has a minor influence.To further reduce the economic...

  9. Networked 3D Virtual Museum System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Virtual heritage has become increasingly important in the conservation, preservation, and interpretation of our cultural and natural history. Moreover, rapid advances in digital technologies in recent years offer virtual heritage new direction. This paper introduces our approach toward a networked 3D virtual museum system, especially, how to model, manage, present virtual heritages and furthermore how to use computer network for the share of virtual heritage in the networked virtual environment. This paper first addresses a 3D acquisition and processing technique for virtual heritage modeling and shows some illustrative examples. Then, this paper describes a management of virtual heritage assets that are composed by various rich media. This paper introduces our schemes to present the virtual heritages, which include 3D virtual heritage browser system, CAVE system, and immersive VR theater. Finally, this paper presents the new direction of networked 3D virtual museum of which main idea is remote guide of the virtual heritage using the mixed reality technique.

  10. Robots and Cultural Heritage: New Museum Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Germak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of new technologies to enhance the visiting museum experience is not a novelty. A large variety of interactive systems are nowadays available, including virtual tours, which makes cultural heritage accessible remotely. The theme of increase in accessibility and attractiveness has lately been faced with the employment of the service robotics, covering various types of applications. Regrettably, many of robotics solutions appear less successful in terms of utility and usability. On the basis of this awareness, a design for a new robotic solution for cultural heritage has been proposed. The project, developed at the royal residence of Racconigi Castle, consists of a telepresence robot designed as a tool to explore inaccessible areas of the heritage. The employed robot, called Virgil, was expressly designed for the project. The control of the robot is entrusted to the museum guides in order to enhance their work and enrich the cultural storytelling.

  11. Nondestructive DNA extraction from museum specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofreiter, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Natural history museums around the world hold millions of animal and plant specimens that are potentially amenable to genetic analyses. With more and more populations and species becoming extinct, the importance of these specimens for phylogenetic and phylogeographic analyses is rapidly increasing. However, as most DNA extraction methods damage the specimens, nondestructive extraction methods are useful to balance the demands of molecular biologists, morphologists, and museum curators. Here, I describe a method for nondestructive DNA extraction from bony specimens (i.e., bones and teeth). In this method, the specimens are soaked in extraction buffer, and DNA is then purified from the soaking solution using adsorption to silica. The method reliably yields mitochondrial and often also nuclear DNA. The method has been adapted to DNA extraction from other types of specimens such as arthropods.

  12. Science literacy and natural history museums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdecasas, Antonio G; Correas, Ana M

    2010-12-01

    It appears that developed countries, such as the US, the UK and Italy, are losing the race against irrationalism and arbitrary thinking in regard to nature and human interactions. The incidence of misguided beliefs and the detachment from and, in some cases, outright hostility toward science are on the rise. Paradoxically, this is probably the period in the history of advanced countries in which increasing public and personal efforts have been directed toward the dissemination of scientific knowledge to increase public understanding of science. This article vindicates the role of natural history museums in consolidating rational and critical scientific thinking while briefly examining scientific illiteracy in developed countries. It also discusses methods to improve the involvement of natural history museums in the promotion of rational thinking, the only appropriate avenue for objective knowledge.

  13. [Antique anatomical collections for contemporary museums].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesi, Gabriella; Santi, Raffaella

    2013-01-01

    Anatomy and Pathology Museum collections display a great biological value and offer unique samples for research purposes. Pathological specimens may be investigated by means of modern radiological and molecular biology techniques in order to provide the etiological background of disease, with relevance to present-day knowledge. Meanwhile, historical resources provide epidemiologic data regarding the socio-economic conditions of the resident populations, the more frequently encountered illnesses and dietary habits. These multidisciplinary approaches lead to more accurate diagnoses also allowing new strategies in cataloguing and musealization of anatomical specimens. Further, once these data are gathered, they may constitute the basis of riedited Museum catalogues feasible to be digitalized and displayed via the Web.

  14. What Is Distinctive about Museum Pedagogy and How Can Museums Best Support Learning in Schools? An Action Research Inquiry into the Practice of Three Regional Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman-Peck, Lorraine; Travers, Kate

    2013-01-01

    It seems uncontroversial to claim that museums are unique places of interest with the potential to inspire learners, yet what this means and how it is managed are complex questions. Museum educators' work is currently shaped by accountability requirements typically expressed as visitor targets. Centralised teaching and learning initiatives are…

  15. The Natural Science Museum goes to School

    OpenAIRE

    Luciana Scur; Janete Maria Scopel; Paula Cristina de Oliveira Vons

    2016-01-01

    Currently it is proven the need to stimulate actions that modify the behavior of human beings in relation to nature. Schools and non-formal education spaces contribute to citizens to develop values, attitudes and responsibilities facing the environment in which they live. The non-formal educational environments provide teaching resources, teaching and different methodologies that complement the actions of formal education. Expanding its environmental education activities, the Museum of Natura...

  16. The Boyden Observatories Museum -- Project Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Heerden, H. J.; van Jaarsveldt, D. P.; Hoffman, M. J. H.

    2010-12-01

    The planned museum at Boyden about the history of the observatories in Bloemfontein as well as the Roberts archives and all the most important contributors to astronomy in the region will be discussed. The layout, current progress, future plans, the people involved and all relevant information will be shown. A conclusion about the possible impact and the possible events around the opening will then be made.

  17. Hunterian Museum bicentenary: 1813-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, E; Farrell, M

    2013-07-01

    The Hunterian Museum is celebrating its bicentenary in 2013, an ideal time for reflection of its notable origins and the history behind its fascinating collection of human and animal anatomy that tells the story of surgeons and surgery over the last two centuries. The Odontological Collection is an unparalleled source of dental information, with a vast assortment of teeth and cranial bones, which should not be missed.

  18. Virtual Museums for Landscape Valorization and Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietroni, E.

    2017-08-01

    Research in the domain of landscape virtual reconstructions has been mainly focused on digitization and recording inside GIS systems, or real time visualization, paying a minor attention to the development of a methodological approach for the landscape narration, combing different registers, conceptual, emotional incitements and, thus, able to arouse in the public a feeling of emotional "sensing" and self- identification. The landscape reflects also the human activities in the territory and the communities' cultural patterns, their sense of "belonging". In a virtual museum of landscapes, the multidisciplinary approach, the multiplication of perspectives and voices, storytelling, acquire primary importance. A Virtual Museum of landscapes should integrate both holistic and delimited visions. The holistic vision requires a diachronic approach, including both present and past phases of life. On the other side, delimited, or "monographic", representations are useful to go deeper into specific and exemplar stories, regarding specific groups of people. Beside, the emergence of new social media enhancing cultural interactions among people induce the creation of specific social platforms for Cultural Heritage for the active participation of a large number of stakeholders. Co-creation scenarios and tools can be particularly promising. Aton is an example of front-end VR social platform in the web end, for the efficient streaming of medium/large landscape, their exploration and characterization. The Tiber Valley Virtual Museum is an example of sensorial cultural landscape. Starting from the acquisition of topographical data through integrated technologies, several multi-sensory scenarios have been created, inside which visitors can feel embodied and involved.

  19. The Bibliometric Analysis Of Literature On Museum Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, C. W.; Yang, Y. H.

    2015-08-01

    Museum studies, is the study of museums, museum curation, and how and why museums developed into their institutional role in education and culture through scientific, social, political and other related forces. The purpose of this study is to shed light on the application trends of the international literature related to museum studies on the SCIE, SSCI, and AHCI databases between 1995 and 2014 using a bibliometric technique and citation analysis. The results of this study reveal that influences of the literature related to museum studies on other subject areas continue to expand. Considering the publication of major countries, subject areas, journal and institutions, the results also discussed that the future trend through analysing most cited articles. Moreover, 12 core journal lists are identified by Bradford's law.

  20. The Role of Large Enterprises in Museum Digitization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available By actively promoting museum digitalization, Japan finds an idiosyncratic way to museum digitalization. The mode of collaboration, in which the government plays a leading role while large enterprises’ R&D capabilities and museum’s cultural dynamics are both allowed to give full play, turns these powerful enterprises into the solid backing of museum digitalization, provides a concrete solution to the common financial and technical challenges museums face in the process. In the course of such collaboration, large enterprises succeed in cultivating a number of talents who understand both business world and museum operation. Thanks to their experiences in the business world, compared with museum professionals, they play a more vital role in marketing the potential commercial exploitation of related digital technologies. The benefits large enterprises could possibly gain from such mode of collaboration - realizing social values, enhancing corporate image, for instance - help to motivate their active involvement, thereby forming a positive cycle of sustainable development.

  1. "Scientific peep show": the human body in contemporary science museums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canadelli, Elena

    2011-01-01

    The essay focuses on the discourse about the human body developed by contemporary science museums with educational and instructive purposes directed at the general public. These museums aim mostly at mediating concepts such as health and prevention. The current scenario is linked with two examples of past museums: the popular anatomical museums which emerged during the 19th century and the health museums thrived between 1910 and 1940. On the museological path about the human body self-care we went from the emotionally involving anatomical Venuses to the inexpressive Transparent Man, from anatomical specimens of ill organs and deformed subjects to the mechanical and electronic models of the healthy body. Today the body is made transparent by the new medical diagnostics and by the latest discoveries of endoscopy. The way museums and science centers presently display the human body involves computers, 3D animation, digital technologies, hands-on models of large size human parts.

  2. [New goals for the Sapienza University of Rome Museums].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruta, Alessandro

    2008-01-01

    New technologies allow scientific museums to partecipate in a more general development nowadays characterizing both science and society. New technological devices have been studied to reduce the 'physical distance' between culture and the public and to create innovative patterns of cooperation, useful to traditionally non-related scientific fields. In this perspective, Italian university museums are organizing their work aiming to create a 'system'. Recently, La Sapienza University of Rome build a 'Museological Pole' gathering twenty-one university museums, so to supply a valid example of museological coordination and management to all those who are interested in developing integrated museological systems. Some of these Roman University Museums, such as the Museum of History of Medicine, are involved in a project of renewal and re-arrangement of spaces and contents. "La Sapienza - Museological Pole" could be a first step towards constructing an international integrated system of University Museums.

  3. "Cancer-Related Fatigue: A Systematic and Meta-Analytic Review of Nonpharmacological Therapies for Cancer Patients:" Correction to Kangas, Bovbjerg, and Montgomery (2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangas, Maria; Bovbjerg, Dana H.; Montgomery, Guy H.

    2009-01-01

    Reports an error in "Cancer-related fatigue: A systematic and meta-analytic review of non-pharmacological therapies for cancer patients" by Maria Kangas, Dana H. Bovbjerg and Guy H. Montgomery (Psychological Bulletin, 2008[Sep], Vol 134[5], 700-741). The URL to the Supplemental Materials for the article is listed incorrectly in two places in the…

  4. Grades--Scores--Predictions: A Study of the Efficiency of High School Grades and American College Test Scores in Predicting Academic Achievement at Montgomery College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, Robert L.; Bleil, David F.

    This report analyzes the relationship between high school grades, American College Test (ACT) scores, and first-semester college grades. Based on the Standard Research Service of the ACT program, 1,379 students in the fall 1969 freshman class of Montgomery College (Maryland) were studied. Measures of academic background used ACT scores in English,…

  5. Where Have All the Freshman Gone? A Follow-up Study of Students Who Left Montgomery Community College Prior to Graduation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, Robert L.; Bleil, David F.

    The purpose of this study was to discover what the nonreturning student does when he leaves Montgomery College and why he left prior to earning a degree. This report is the second phase of a total follow-up study conducted by the Office of Institutional Research. The first phase consisted of a study of what the 1970 graduates were doing four…

  6. Tentative Ten-Year Enrollment Projections, Fiscal Years 1978-1987. (A Supplement to the FY 1978 Capital and Operating Budgets of Montgomery Community College)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, Robert L.; Armstrong, David F.

    The number of students expected to enroll in Montgomery College yearly through 1987 is projected on the basis of a model incorporating past trends, population projections, economic indicators, and other factors on which viable assumptions about the future can be based, into a system of linear equations expressed in matrix notation. The model…

  7. Neanderthal underground museum - an energy-optimized project; Neanderthal-Museum unterirdisch - ein energieoptimiertes Wettbewerbsprojekt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heilemann, I. [Energie Kontor Aachen, Ingenieurgesellschaft Technologie Park Herzogenrath (Germany)

    1995-01-01

    This article presents a museum project for a Neanderthal museum advertised in the scope of a competition. The main part of the building is under ground. With the aim of a efficient energy supply, an energy supply concept has been developed based on innovative technology: Gas driven multi-engine dual purpose power plants in parallel network operation, modular structure of the ventilation system, intelligent control technology with central direct digital control plant, constant radiation climate in the basement. This article gives a survey about the plant concept. (HW) [Deutsch] Der vorliegende Beitrag stellt ein im Rahmen eines Wettbewerbs ausgeschriebenes Museumsprojekt fuer ein Neanderthal-Museum vor. Der Hauptteil des Gebaeudes ist dabei unterirdisch angeordnet. Mit dem Ziel der rationellen Energieversorgung wurde ein Energieversorgungskonzept erstellt, das auf innovativer Technologie basiert: Gasbetriebenes Mehrmotoren-BHKW im Netzparallelbetrieb, modularer Aufbau der RLT-Anlage, intelligente Leittechnik mit zentraler DDC-Regelung, gleichmaessiges Strahlungsklima im Untergeschoss. Der vorliegende Beitrag gibt einen Ueberblick ueber das Anlagenkonzept. (HW)

  8. Exploring information seeking behaviour in a digital museum context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Mette; Ingwersen, Peter

    2008-01-01

    information needs, and 2) main characteristics of virtual museum visitors' information seeking behaviour. Both quantitative and qualitative data were gathered from written enquiries to the museum, an online questionnaire and a user study of simulated interest tasks combined with retrospective think......-aloud sessions. The data collected did not show exploratory behaviour to be predominant as expected. Rather analysis of data indicates a broad coverage of different types of needs. Finally, four main characteristics of virtual museum guests' information seeking behaviour were identified....

  9. Quality in museums as a way to increase sustainability

    OpenAIRE

    Izabela Luiza Pop; Anca Borza

    2016-01-01

    Due to the high accent put on sustainable development of communities and on the role played by cultural organisations in this development process, this research starts from the hypothesis that quality may represent a path through which museums can achieve a higher level of sustainability. This hypothesis was tested through semi-structured interviews with experts from museums. The qualitative research showed that museums sustainability has to be measured through quantitative indicators but als...

  10. Bureau of Land Management Museum Collections: Select Status Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Museum of Civilization Mercury Series, Archaeologi- cal Survey of Canada Paper No. 18. Ottawa, Ontario. Table 4.S Tesat kle In addition, Clark supplied...Alaska. Na-University of Alaska Museum, Ftional Museum of Man Mercury Series, Status of Collection Archaeological Survey of Canada Paper No. 78. Ottawa...Repository Assigned Catalog Number:- Interment Type (e.g., cremation [Only if Information is Present]): Age: Adult (18+ years) El Subadult (4-18 years) E

  11. The Museum as a platform for tobacco promotion in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fan; Sun, Shaojing; Yao, Xinyi; Fu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    The China Tobacco Museum in Shanghai is the largest in China, consisting of seven pavilions of tobacco-related exhibits. A focus group and previous survey data revealed that the museum conveys messages that make tobacco use appealing. Of the pavilions, three were found to contain blatant misinformation about tobacco and tobacco consumption. We argue that the China Tobacco Museum is a platform for tobacco promotion, a form of tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship, and thus contravenes the FCTC.

  12. Object Relations in the Museum: A Psychosocial Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This article theorises museum engagement from a psychosocial perspective. With the aid of selected concepts from object relations theory, it explains how the museum visitor can establish a personal relation to museum objects, making use of them as an ‘aesthetic third’ to symbolise experience. Since such objects are at the same time cultural resources, interacting with them helps the individual to feel part of a shared culture. The article elaborates an example drawn from a research project th...

  13. Implementación eficiente de la multiplicación modular de Montgomery sobre hardware reconfigurable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ander Torres López

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Este documento propone implementaciones tanto, software como hardware, sobre un FPGA de Xilinx, del algoritmo de multiplicación de Montgomery utilizando el método de Escaneo de Operandos por Separado (SOS, de sus siglas en inglés, que es una forma eficiente para calcular multiplicaciones modulares. La solución software ha sido desarrollada sobre la plataforma de procesamiento MicroBlaze y la de hardware se realizó utilizando directamente los recursos lógicos y dedicados de la FPGA. Los resultados se presentan con una comparación entre ambos casos en función de su rendimiento y el empleo de recursos.

  14. Estudio de validación de la escala de depresión de Montgomery y Asberg.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Martínez Gallardo

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Derivada del cuestionario psicopatológico C.P.R.S., aparece en 1979 la "Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale" concebida por sus autores como un instrumento altamente sensible para detectar los cambios en la sintomatología depresiva de los pacientes. Validada por sus autores originales en Inglaterra y Suecia, presentamos en este artículo un estudio de validación realizado sobre 147 pacientes franceses hospitalizados y diagnosticados de un trastorno afectivo según el DSM III. Obtuvimos resultados similares a los estudios precedentes que confirman una validez superior (sensibilidad = 94%, especificidad = 75% y mal clasificados = 6%, una más alta fiabilidad interexaminadores (K = 0,41 KW = 0,81 y sobre todo una mayor sensibilidad al cambio (S = 0,64 y 0,59 que las escalas de Hamilton y Beck consideradas hasta ahora como de referencia en su género

  15. Museum Web Search Behaviour of Special Interest Visitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Mette; Ingwersen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    There is a current trend to make museum collections widely accessible by digitising cultural heritage collections for the Internet. The present study takes a user perspective and explores the characteristics of online museum visitors' web search behaviour. A combination of quantitative and qualit......There is a current trend to make museum collections widely accessible by digitising cultural heritage collections for the Internet. The present study takes a user perspective and explores the characteristics of online museum visitors' web search behaviour. A combination of quantitative...

  16. Captives of Narrative Scandinavian Museum Exhibits and Polar Ambitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Houltz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This article compares the histories of two museums of polar exploration, both founded in the 1930s but based on well-known expeditions dating back to the decades around 1900. The first is the Fram Museum in Oslo, centered around the famous Norwegian polar ship, the second is the Andrée Museum in Gränna, com-bining accounts of the ill-fated balloon expedition with a polar centre reflecting more recent polar research activities. The aim of the article is to analyze the relationship between museum and narra-tive. Museums are shapers of narrative but at the same time shaped by the narra-tives they relate. The article explores the symbolic and medialized dimensions of polar research, expressed in museums, as well as the way in which museums in-terrelate with national identities and self-images. What does it mean to be a modern polar nation? And how is such an identity expressed in cultural terms? In which ways can museum institutions and exhibi-tions be used as means for such expressions? And how do “the grand narratives” of Sweden and Norway relate to the epic representations of polar activities, pre-sented by the museums?

  17. Digital technologies in museums: New routes to engagement and participation’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carey Jewitt

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A multimodal semiotic approach is applied in this chapter to three examples to illustrate how the use of digital technology in museums and galleries can re-mediated the visitor experience (Jewitt, 2009; Kress, 2009. The examples are selected to expand upon the themes raised in Chapter X. They each explore different technologies, contexts and purposes and to illustrate the successful use of digital technology in exhibitions, galleries, or interventions: 1. You Tube and Flickr: The Weather Project by Olafur Eliasson at the Tate Modern Museum; 2. Interactive artefacts, virtual tours and Websites: The Winston Churchill Museum; 3. Mobile Technologies: OOLK at the D-Day museum

  18. The museum maze in oral pathology demystifed: part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Shankargouda; Rao, Roopa S; Ganavi, Bs

    2013-09-01

    Museum technology is perpetually changing due to current requirements and added inventions for our comfort and furbished display of specimens. Hence numerous methods of specimen preservation have been put on trial by diverse people in the medical feld as are the inventions. But only few have caught people's interest and are popularized today. This part provides unique insights into specialized custom-made techniques, evolution of recent advances like plastination and virtual museum that have popularized as visual delights. Plastination gives handy, perennial life-like acrylic specimens, whereas virtual museum takes museum feld to the electronic era making use of computers and virtual environment.

  19. Charm of Purple Clay A private museum in Wuxi is devoted to purple-clay art

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Purple-clay art pieces will be on display in a museum opening soon in Wuxi, Jiangsu Province. The museum, named Shuaiyuan Purple Clay Museum, is part of the Shuaiyuan Purple Clay Art Exhibition Center

  20. 77 FR 46120 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-02

    ...-1100-665] Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard... objects in the possession of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University... Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, 11 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA...

  1. 76 FR 28075 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, Beloit, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, Beloit... Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, Beloit, WI. The human remains and associated funerary objects... Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, professional staff in consultation with representatives of...

  2. 78 FR 5202 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Arkansas State University Museum, Jonesboro, AR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-24

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Arkansas State University Museum, Jonesboro, AR AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Arkansas State University Museum... culturally affiliated with the human remains may contact the Arkansas State University Museum....

  3. 77 FR 23501 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Sheboygan County Historical Museum, Sheboygan, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-19

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Sheboygan County Historical Museum, Sheboygan, WI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Sheboygan County Historical Museum... human remains may contact the Sheboygan County Historical Museum. Disposition of the human remains...

  4. 78 FR 5199 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Arkansas State University Museum, Jonesboro, AR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-24

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Arkansas State University Museum, Jonesboro, AR AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Arkansas State University Museum... associated funerary objects may contact the Arkansas State University Museum. Repatriation of the...

  5. Handcrafts: where after museum?: Economuseums: Challenging the (open air museums or “new reality” in cultural heritage protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krstović Nikola

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The presentation and interpretation of handcrafts and trades are some of the most complex and challenging tasks in the open air museums operations. At the same time, considering the hypertextual characteristics of crafts, the integrative protection and holistic approach in representation are profound. Historical, social, cultural and economic backgrounds of handcrafts, not just its tools and products, even know-how, provoke traditional postulates of museums. Actually they provoke museum`s structure and politics almost to the point of complete re-defining. This change is a consequence of accepting contemporary museological thoughts embodied in new types of museums - economuseums. The main goal of this paper is perceiving the possibilities of interaction and permeate between living craft heritage and space/simulacra/ mission of scansens, finally real life itself and open air museums.

  6. Estimated rates of groundwater recharge to the Chicot, Evangeline and Jasper aquifers by using environmental tracers in Montgomery and adjacent counties, Texas, 2008 and 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oden, Timothy D.; Truini, Margot

    2013-01-01

    Montgomery County is in the northern part of the Houston, Texas, metropolitan area, the fourth most populous metropolitan area in the United States. As populations have increased since the 1980s, groundwater has become an important resource for public-water supply and industry in the rapidly growing area of Montgomery County. Groundwater availability from the Gulf Coast aquifer system is a primary concern for water managers and community planners in Montgomery County and requires a better understanding of the rate of recharge to the system. The Gulf Coast aquifer system in Montgomery County consists of the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers, the Burkeville confining unit, and underlying Catahoula confining system. The individual sand and clay sequences of the aquifers composing the Gulf Coast aquifer system are not laterally or vertically continuous on a regional scale; however, on a local scale, individual sand and clay lenses can extend over several miles. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Lone Star Groundwater Conservation District, collected groundwater-quality samples from selected wells within or near Montgomery County in 2008 and analyzed these samples for concentrations of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), tritium (3H), helium-3/tritium (3He/3H), helium-4 (4He), and dissolved gases (DG) that include argon, carbon dioxide, methane, nitrogen and oxygen. Groundwater ages, or apparent age, representing residence times since time of recharge, were determined by using the assumption of a piston-flow transport model. Most of the environmental tracer data indicated the groundwater was recharged prior to the 1950s, limiting the usefulness of CFCs, SF6, and 3H concentrations as tracers. In many cases, no tracer was usable at a well for the purpose of estimating an apparent age. Wells not usable for estimating an apparent age were resampled in 2011 and analyzed for concentrations of major ions and carbon-14 (14C). At six of

  7. Handcrafts: where after museum?: Economuseums: Challenging the (open air) museums or “new reality” in cultural heritage protection

    OpenAIRE

    Krstović Nikola

    2012-01-01

    The presentation and interpretation of handcrafts and trades are some of the most complex and challenging tasks in the open air museums operations. At the same time, considering the hypertextual characteristics of crafts, the integrative protection and holistic approach in representation are profound. Historical, social, cultural and economic backgrounds of handcrafts, not just its tools and products, even know-how, provoke traditional postulates of museums. Actually they provoke museum...

  8. Active Art Education in a University Museum: The Example of the Barber Institute

    OpenAIRE

    Şehnaz Yalçın Wells

    2014-01-01

    Museums provide individuals with access to a variety of artworks at a quality and quantity that is not possible any other way. Museum education is of great importance to get effective benefit from museums. Nowadays museum education starts at an early age, and is simultaneously given in appropriate subjects of different lessons. Turkey has made important progresses in museum education and museum studies in recent years, but clearly there is much more to do when compared t...

  9. Migration, Socially Engaged Museum Theme, and Why Slovenian Museums Successfully Avoid it?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Perko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last year, the refugee crisis has turned into a human tragedy, in many ways resembling that of World War Two. The Mediterranean Sea, the highly praised Mare Nostrum, has become a horrifying collective tomb for countless people. Another consequence of war is also the destruction of historical urban centres, monuments, and other cultural heritage in so-called crisis areas – a destruction which has reached unfathomable proportions. Museums all across the world have actively responded to society’s needs. Their goal has been to encourage an open dialogue in our society, as well as alleviate fear of the unknown, and reduce the tide of hatred before it reaches world-shattering proportions. During the refugee crisis, it has become apparent that an intersocietal dialogue is both a necessity and a definitive imperative; without it, the society of the future cannot possibly be assured. Modern society has given museums the role of being a credible medium with a mission to communicate heritage contents. By using a metaphorical and metonymic language museums have an extraordinary social power and represent a bridge between science and modern society, between societies of the past and present, between the elites and marginal groups. The museum reformers of the second half of the 20th century were of the opinion that, despite many reorganizations, museums cannot serve the needs of modern society. This was the reason a new museology emerged that substantiates museums as a socially responsible institution. It equips that institution with specific theoretical knowledge that enables the conversion of heritage into a socially relevant communication of a nonverbal nature. The article theoretically argues for modern museum concepts and, using them, contemplates social responsibility in the inner workings of Slovenian museums. Contemporary museums or post-museums are institutions that carry out active social tasks. An engaged manner brings along social

  10. Middle Claiborne Aquifer: Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, Mississippi, Tennessee 2006-2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Outcrop and subcrop extent of the Middle Claiborne Aquifer in Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, Mississippi, Tennessee.

  11. Middle Claiborne Aquifer: Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, Mississippi, Tennessee 2006-2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital hydrogeologic surface of the Middle Claiborne Aquifer in Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, Mississippi, Tennessee. The...

  12. Presenting Cultural Artifacts in the Art Museum: A University-Museum Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sheng Kuan

    2009-01-01

    With increasing emphasis on multicultural art education and integrative pedagogy, educators have incorporated community resources, such as cultural artifacts exhibited in art museums, to enrich their programs. Cultural artifacts are human-made objects which generally reveal historic information about cultural values, beliefs, and traditions.…

  13. Museum Heroes All: The Pavia Approach to School-Science Museum Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falomo Bernarduzzi, Lidia; Albanesi, Gabriele; Bevilacqua, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    To improve on the classic school trip to the museum and the traditional distinctions between formal and informal learning, every year we run a project where the schools (first the teachers and then the pupils) are actively involved right from the very first stages of planning. The various projects realised so far involve schools with children of…

  14. The Goals of Science Museums in the Eyes of Museum Pedagogical Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaby, Neta; Ben-Zvi Assaraf, Orit; Tishler, Chagit E.

    2016-01-01

    Today, science is a major part of Western culture. One advantage of informal learning environments is that they are (potentially) open to a wide range of populations with varying levels of interest and knowledge. Because of their informal nature, documenting learning has proven challenging. Studies that assess learning in museums, therefore, must…

  15. Exploring ``Science As Culture'' Through The European Science Museums Astronomy And Museum Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelingou, Dimitra; Varga, Benedek; Czár, Katalin; Sircar, Seema; Paterson, Allan; Lindsay, Lilian; Watson, Andy; Croly, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The Hellenic Physical Society is a scientific association with an intensive action in the field of education, which is governed by the philosophy that the relationship between science and society must be interactive. For this reason the Hellenic Physical Society is a partner of the European Grundtvig Lifelong Learning Project/Learning Partnerships, tilted: Exploring ``Science as Culture'' through the European Science Museums. The program numbered 07-GRCO1-GR04-00025-1 constitutes an educational collaboration between the Semmelweis Museum Library and archives of the History of Medicine of Hungary, which is the co-ordinator of the project, the Hellenic Physical Society (Greece) and the Aberdeen City Council Strategic Leadership of United Kingdom. During the first year that the european project was conducted, the Physics Museum of the greek aegean island of Chios, in collaboration with the Second Chance School of Chios, also took part. During the academic year 2008-2009, the Second Chance School of the Koridallos Prison of Athens is also taking part. The basic ideas, the design axes and the first results of the Grundtvig project will be developed in this presentation. This european partnership creates an educational programme consisting of science-related activities (such as seminars, lectures, presentations and in situ experimental activities), and prepares appropriate educational material for lifelong science learning, using innovative teaching methodologies and the European science museums' exhibits participating in this project, by making them centres of significant cultural contribution to science and society. Using the integrated approach of astronomy teaching as the central design axe in this programme, we highlight the cultural aspects of science education. From our educational intervention we develop educational tools for astronomy suitable for distance learning and making use of new technologies. The partnership is addressed to different age groups: museum

  16. VIRTUAL MUSEUMS FOR LANDSCAPE VALORIZATION AND COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Pietroni

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Research in the domain of landscape virtual reconstructions has been mainly focused on digitization and recording inside GIS systems, or real time visualization, paying a minor attention to the development of a methodological approach for the landscape narration, combing different registers, conceptual, emotional incitements and, thus, able to arouse in the public a feeling of emotional “sensing” and self- identification. The landscape reflects also the human activities in the territory and the communities’ cultural patterns, their sense of “belonging”. In a virtual museum of landscapes, the multidisciplinary approach, the multiplication of perspectives and voices, storytelling, acquire primary importance. A Virtual Museum of landscapes should integrate both holistic and delimited visions. The holistic vision requires a diachronic approach, including both present and past phases of life. On the other side, delimited, or “monographic”, representations are useful to go deeper into specific and exemplar stories, regarding specific groups of people. Beside, the emergence of new social media enhancing cultural interactions among people induce the creation of specific social platforms for Cultural Heritage for the active participation of a large number of stakeholders. Co-creation scenarios and tools can be particularly promising. Aton is an example of front-end VR social platform in the web end, for the efficient streaming of medium/large landscape, their exploration and characterization. The Tiber Valley Virtual Museum is an example of sensorial cultural landscape. Starting from the acquisition of topographical data through integrated technologies, several multi-sensory scenarios have been created, inside which visitors can feel embodied and involved.

  17. Monitoring Of Pollutants In Museum Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria Budu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Art works are affected by environmental factors as light, temperature, humidity. Air pollutants are also implicated in their degradation. The pollution in museums has two sources: the air from outside, which brings usually dust and inorganic particles, and the inside sources – the materials used for casings (sealants, textiles placed on the display cases, varnishes, wood that emanate organic compounds. The dust is composed of particles with a diameter of approximately 2µm or higher, which come from soil (silica or animal and vegetal residues (skin cells, pollen. They facilitate water condensation on objects surface and biologic attack. The inorganic compounds are a result of materials combustion (SO2, NO2, NO and in presence of water they form acidic compounds which affect the museum objects. The organic compounds are usually peroxides, acids, phthalates, formaldehyde. The effects of these pollutants are: soiling, surface discolouration, embrittlement, corrosion. Therefore, conservators are interested in monitoring the pollution degree in the display cases or in the museum air and in analyzing the effects of pollutants on the exhibited objects. They use different methods for pollutants identification, like direct reading devices based on colorimetry, that can be read after few minutes and hours (they interact with the pollutants in atmosphere, or indirect reading samples that require a laboratory. The information gathered is used for the identification of pollution source and to analyze the concentration of pollutants needed to provoke damages on the surfaces of art objects. This paper is a review of pollutants that affect the art objects and of the monitoring systems used for their identification and measuring.

  18. Type specimens in the Port Elizabeth Museum, South Africa, including the historically important Albany Museum collection. Part 1: Amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conradie, Werner; Branch, William R; Watson, Gillian

    2015-03-18

    The Port Elizabeth Museum houses the consolidated herpetological collections of three provincial museums of the Eastern Cape, South Africa: the Port Elizabeth Museum (Port Elizabeth), the Amatole (previously Kaffarian) Museum (King Williams Town), and the Albany Museum (Grahamstown). Under John Hewitt, Albany Museum was the main centre of herpetological research in South Africa from 1910-1940, and he described numerous new species, many based on material in the museum collection. The types and other material from the Albany Museum are now incorporated into the Port Elizabeth Museum Herpetology collection (PEM). Due to the vague typification of much of Hewitt's material, the loss of the original catalogues in a fire and the subsequent deterioration of specimen labels, the identification of this type material is often troublesome. Significant herpetological research has been undertaken at the PEM in the last 35 years, and the collection has grown to be the third largest in Africa. During this period, numerous additional types have been deposited in the PEM collection, generated by active taxonomic research in the museum. As a consequence, 43 different amphibian taxa are represented by 37 primary and 151 secondary type specimens in the collection. This catalogue provides the first documentation of these types. It provides the original name, the original publication date, journal number and pagination, reference to illustrations, current name, museum collection number, type locality, notes on the type status, and photographs of all holotypes and lectotypes. Where necessary to maintain nomenclatural stability, and where confused type series are housed in the PEM collection, lectotypes and paralectotypes are nominated.

  19. Digital preservation for libraries, archives, and museums

    CERN Document Server

    Corrado, Edward M

    2014-01-01

    Digital Preservation for Libraries, Archives, & Museums is designed for all types of information professionals who are interested in digital preservation. This is not a how-to book giving step-by-step processes for certain materials in a given kind of system. Instead, it addresses a broad group of resources that could be housed in any number of digital preservation systems. Finally, this book is about "Things (not technology; not how-to; not theory) I wish I had known before I got started." It is divided into four parts based on the Digital Preservation Triad: Situating Digital Preservation, I

  20. Affordances and distributed cognition in museum exhibitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, Marianne; May, Michael; Marandino, Martha

    2014-01-01

    consistent framework. Here, we invoke the notions of affordance and distributed cognition to explain in a coherent way how visitors interact with exhibits and exhibit spaces and make meaning from those interactions, and we exemplify our points using observations of twelve visitors to exhibits at a natural...... history museum. We show how differences in exhibit characteristics give rise to differences in the interpretive strategies used by visitors in their meaning-making process, and conclude by discussing how the notions of affordance and distributed cognition can be used in an exhibit design perspective....

  1. The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, UCL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Picton

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available University College London houses one of the world’s most important collections of ancient Egyptian material, the majority excavated by Flinders Petrie, his students and his successors in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It is a museum of archaeology that helps to explain the development of a discipline that was in its infancy when Petrie worked in Egypt over a century ago. It is a teaching collection, its densely packed cases entrancing, and sometimes intimidating, visitors who rave about its old-fashioned feel, but it is anything but frozen in time.

  2. The museum's mummies: an inside view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mininberg, D T

    2001-07-01

    We applied medical and scientific methodology in a study of the mummies in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, New York, by computed tomographic scanning and other radiographic methods. These noninvasive procedures allow us to "unwrap" these mummies without unwrapping them. This is, in effect, technology transfer of routine diagnostic techniques used in medicine to Egyptology. After this noninvasive information-gathering procedure, the mummies are preserved intact for possible future investigations that may be more sophisticated and more informative. The data are presented and put into perspective by a review of pertinent literature.

  3. Modern Masters from the Smithsonian American Art Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark M.

    2009-01-01

    A new traveling exhibition and catalogue produced by the Smithsonian's American Art Museum features works by 31 artists from the United States who came to maturity in the mid-20th century. These artists have become the most significant and influential artists over the past 50 years as their works adorn the modern galleries of hundreds of museums.…

  4. The role of the imagination in museum visits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    The imagination plays an important role in museums, today more than ever. Visitors use their repositories of imagination or repertoires to make sense of their encounters with objects and exhibits. In this article, I argue that this initial meaning making, rather than being the end goal of museum ...

  5. Connecting Classroom and Museum Learning with Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Damian

    2015-01-01

    Many schools in industrialized and developing countries are now using mobiles devices. This has the potential to connect learning that occurs in classrooms and museums. This article focuses on the use of iPads by a year 6 class (12 years old) in Sydney Australia, which were used both in the classroom and on a museum excursion. The study uses a…

  6. Towards an Integrative Approach to Interactive Museum Installations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ray, C.A.; van der Vaart, M.; Addison, A.C.; Guidi, G.; De Luca, L.; Pescarin, S.

    2013-01-01

    Museum visits are quickly becoming more personalized and interactive with the help of technology. However, the introduction of technology could also result in drawing attention away from museum collections towards (technological) interpretation devices. How does the introduction of technology into t

  7. The Rural Open Air Museums: Visitors, Community and Place

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawlikowska-Piechotka Anna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary rural museums perform not only the traditional tasks but are also the places where both the visitors and the local community members have chances for entertainment and attractive leisure time. Consequently one can find in museums numerous catering offers such as cafes, bistros, snack bars, restaurants, pubs and wine bars. The material presented is the result of theoretical and field studies carried out in the selected open air museums in Poland and focused on newly introduced commercial activities (as catering. Our research results show that the development of sustainable cultural tourism as a generator of income in the open air rural museums is important in the challenging economic time. Museums having catering services of different character could easier overcome financial struggle. Moreover there is no doubt that the introduction of an interesting and ambitious cuisine in the restaurants located in the rural open air museum is of great importance also in other terms: popularization of the food culture, rural tradition of region, healthy diet and lifestyle, chance to increase the museum attractiveness, important economic support to the museum and the local community and the improvement of living quality.

  8. Finding Order: Curriculum Theory and the Qualities of Museum Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallance, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    Museum education is a field of practice that is guided effectively by traditions of practice addressing museums' purposes and expected audiences, and rarely explicitly refers to the numerous models of curriculum theory that are available to guide educational practice in the school setting. But curriculum models can be useful both for describing…

  9. Housatonic Museum of Art: Enhancing Quality of Community College Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernow, Burt

    1983-01-01

    Describes the Housatonic Museum of Art at Housatonic Community College in terms of its origins; purposes; collection of 20th Century painting, sculpture, and graphics; contributions to the college environment; and safeguards of the art works. Discusses funding barriers to and benefits of replicating the community college museum concept elsewhere.…

  10. Museum Signage as Distributed Mediation to Encourage Family Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyungyoun

    2009-01-01

    Many prior studies conducted in museums have focused primarily on exhibits as the main objects for learning. Less progress has been made in studying signage as another meaning-making tool in museums. The present study was designed to understand the role of signage in family learning by answering the following research questions, "How does signage…

  11. Museum Education and Art Therapy: Promoting Wellness in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, Brooke

    2014-01-01

    By combining museum education with art therapy, museums can make significant contributions to healthcare. The Creative Aging program at The Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C., unites these fields, using artworks and art-making as catalysts to explore feelings, invite self-exploration, and build community. The program fosters an interest in…

  12. The democratic horizons of the museum: Citizenship and culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Dahlgren; J. Hermes

    2015-01-01

    Change is sweeping through the world of museums, technologically, financially, and ideologically, impacting on the sociocultural evolution of their roles and status. We seek to contribute to ongoing reflections by offering a conceptual framework that links museums with democratic theory, to citizens

  13. Museums and cultural institutions as spaces for Cultural Citizenship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernhardt, Nana; Sattrup, Lise

    2014-01-01

    How can museums and cultural institutions make a stronger impact as democratic educational institutions; as places where knowledge is not just something that is presented and put at the disposal of visitors, but actually created through interaction between museums and users? How can active partic...

  14. The Role of Medical Museums in Contemporary Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marreez, Yehia M. A-H.; Willems, Luuk N. A.; Wells, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    From the early 19th century until the most recent two decades, open-space and satellite museums featuring anatomy and pathology collections (collectively referred to as "medical museums") had leading roles in medical education. However, many factors have caused these roles to diminish dramatically in recent years. Chief among these are the great…

  15. Image as Interface : Consequences for Users of Museum Knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rijcke, Sarah; Beaulieu, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Photographs of objects are ubiquitous in the work and presentation of museums, whether in collection-management infrastructure or in Web-based communication. This article examines the use of images in these settings and traces how they function as interfaces and tools in the production of museum kno

  16. Talking about Social Justice in a National Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Deirdre

    2017-01-01

    Museums can provide spaces for both the personal and the political and the past and the present to unite. This case study examines how the National Museum of African American History and Culture has worked to embrace current and historic social justice issues in public programming. The result has strengthened audiences beyond imagining and allowed…

  17. Museum Education and Art Therapy: Promoting Wellness in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, Brooke

    2014-01-01

    By combining museum education with art therapy, museums can make significant contributions to healthcare. The Creative Aging program at The Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C., unites these fields, using artworks and art-making as catalysts to explore feelings, invite self-exploration, and build community. The program fosters an interest in…

  18. The Development of a Virtual Marine Museum for Educational Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarng, Wermhuar; Change, Mei-Yu; Ou, Kuo-Liang; Chang, Ya-Wen; Liou, Hsin-Hun

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this article is to investigate the computer animation and virtual reality technologies for developing a virtual marine museum. The museum consists of three exhibition areas. The first area displays fishes in freshwater, including creeks, rivers, and dams in Taiwan. The second area exhibits marine ecology and creatures of different…

  19. Evaluating the Usability of a Museum Web Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Ilse; Schweibenz, Werner

    This paper presents a research project conducted by the Department of Information Science in cooperation with the Saarland Museum, the art museum of the Federal State of Saarland, Germany. The study had two aims. The first was to evaluate some methods of usability engineering for the Web, and the second was to evaluate the usability of the…

  20. Geology Museum-Based Learning in Soil Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailova, E. A.; Tennant, C. H.; Post, C. J.; Cicimurri, C.; Cicimurri, D.

    2013-01-01

    Museums provide unique learning opportunities in soil science. The Bob Campbell Geology Museum in Clemson, SC, features an exhibit of minerals and rocks common in the state and in its geologic history. We developed a hands-on laboratory exercise utilizing an exhibit that gives college students an opportunity to visualize regional minerals and…