WorldWideScience

Sample records for monsoon water cycle

  1. Glacial-interglacial water cycle, global monsoon and atmospheric methane changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Zhengtang; Wu, Haibin [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Key Laboratory of Cenozoic Geology and Environment, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Beijing (China); Zhou, Xin [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Key Laboratory of Cenozoic Geology and Environment, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Beijing (China); University of Science and Technology of China, School of Earth and Space Sciences and Institute of Polar Environment, Hefei (China)

    2012-09-15

    The causes of atmospheric methane (CH{sub 4}) changes are still a major contention, in particular with regards to the relative contributions of glacial-interglacial cycles, monsoons in both hemispheres and the late Holocene human intervention. Here, we explore the CH{sub 4} signals in the Antarctic EPICA Dome C and Vostok ice records using the methods of timeseries analyses and correlate them with insolation and geological records to address these issues. The results parse out three distinct groups of CH{sub 4} signals attributable to different drivers. The first group ({proportional_to}80% variance), well tracking the marine {delta}{sup 18}O record, is attributable to glacial-interglacial modulation on the global water cycle with the effects shared by wetlands at all latitudes, from monsoonal and non-monsoonal regions in both hemispheres. The second group ({proportional_to}15% variance), centered at the {proportional_to}10-kyr semi-precession frequency, is linkable with insolation-driven tropical monsoon changes in both hemispheres. The third group ({proportional_to}5% variance), marked by millennial frequencies, is seemingly related with the combined effect of ice-volume and bi-hemispheric insolation changes at the precession bands. These results indicate that bi-hemispheric monsoon changes have been a constant driver of atmospheric CH{sub 4}. This mechanism also partially explains the Holocene CH{sub 4} reversal since {proportional_to}5 kyr BP besides the human intervention. In the light of these results, we propose that global monsoon can be regarded as a system consisting of two main integrated components, one primarily driven by the oscillations of Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) in response to the low-latitude summer insolation changes, anti-phase between the two hemispheres (i.e. the ITCZ monsoon component); and another modulated by the glacial-interglacial cycles, mostly synchronous at the global scale (i.e. the glacial-interglacial monsoon

  2. Aerosol-Water Cycle Interaction: A New Challenge in Monsoon Climate Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, William K. M.

    2006-01-01

    Long recognized as a major environmental hazard, aerosol is now known to have strong impacts on both regional and global climate. It has been estimated that aerosol may reduce by up to 10% of the seasonal mean solar radiation reaching the earth surface, producing a global cooling effect that opposes global warming (Climate Change 2001). This means that the potential perils that humans have committed to global warming may be far greater than what we can detect at the present. As a key component of the Earth climate system, the water cycle is profoundly affected by the presence of aerosols in the atmosphere. Through the so-called "direct effect", aerosol scatters and/or absorbs solar radiation, thus cooling the earth surface and changing the horizontal and vertical radiational heating contrast in the atmosphere. The heating contrast drives anomalous atmospheric circulation, resulting in changes in convection, clouds, and rainfall. Another way aerosol can affect the water cycle is through the so-called "indirect effects", whereby aerosol increases the number of cloud condensation nuclei, prolongs life time of clouds, and inhibits the growth of cloud drops to raindrops. This leads to more clouds, and increased reflection of solar radiation, and further cooling at the earth surface. In monsoon regions, the response of the water cycle to aerosol forcing is especially complex, not only because of presence of diverse mix of aerosol species with vastly different radiative properties, but also because the monsoon is strongly influenced by ocean and land surface processes, land use, land change, as well as regional and global greenhouse warming effects. Thus, sorting out the impacts of aerosol forcing, and interaction with the monsoon water cycle is a very challenging problem. In this talk, I will offer some insights into how aerosols may impact the Asian monsoon based on preliminary results from satellite observations and climate model experiments. Specifically, I will

  3. Indian monsoon cycles through the last twelve million years

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gupta, S.M.

    stream_size 98222 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Earth_Sci_India_3_248.pdf.txt stream_source_info Earth_Sci_India_3_248.pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Open access e...) and ~21st December (longest night), respectively. Twice crossing over of equator by Sun heats up the tropical ocean, evaporates surface waters, makes clouds, which get transported by the monsoonal winds blowing towards India and resulting into rains...

  4. Stable isotopes in monsoon precipitation and water vapour in Nagqu, Tibet, and their implications for monsoon moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Siyuan; Richards, Keith

    2016-09-01

    Understanding climate variations over the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau has become essential because the high plateau sustains various ecosystems and water sources, and impacts on the Asian monsoon system. This paper provides new information from isotopic signals in meteoric water and atmospheric water vapour on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau using high frequency observation data over a relatively short period. The aim is to explore temporal moisture changes and annual variations at the onset and during the summer monsoon season at a transitional site with respect to the monsoon influence. Data show that high frequency and short period observations can reveal typical moisture changes from the pre-monsoon to the monsoon seasons (2010), and the large variation in isotopic signals in different years with respect to active/inactive periods during a mature phase of the monsoon (2011), especially inferring from the temporal changes in the d-excess of precipitation and its relationship with δ18O values, when higher d-excess is found in the pre-monsoon precipitation. In this transition zone on a daily basis, δ18O values in precipitation are controlled mainly by the amount of rainfall during the monsoon season, while temperature seems more important before the onset of monsoon. Furthermore, the "amount effect" is significant for night-time rain events. From comparison of signals in both the precipitation and water vapour, an inconsistent relationship between d-excess values suggests various moisture fluxes are active in a short period. The temporal pattern of isotopic signal change from the onset of the monsoon to the mature monsoon phase provides information about the larger circulation dynamics of the Asian monsoon.

  5. Role of aerosols in modulating cloud properties during active-break cycle of Indian summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, A.; Chakraborty, A.; Venugopal, V.

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the weather research and forecast model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem), is used to understand the impact of aerosol-cloud interaction during the active-break cycles of the Indian summer monsoon. Two sets of simulations are performed, one with a fixed aerosol concentration (ConstantAero) and the other with an observation-based prescription of the rate of change of aerosol concentration as a function of precipitation (VaryingAero). This prescription is derived based on satellite-retrieved daily rainrate and concurrent observations of aerosol optical depth from aerosol robotic network. The proposed modification is necessitated by the lack of realistic emission estimates over the Indian region as well as the presence of inherent biases in monsoon simulation in WRF-Chem. In the VaryingAero simulation, unlike in the ConstantAero run, we find that the break-to-active monsoon phase has more cloud liquid water (CLW) and less rain efficiency than in the active-to-break phase. This is primarily due to the indirect effect of increased aerosol loading in the break phase. This result is in accordance with the observed behaviour of CLW estimtes from microwave imager (TRMM 2A12) and radar reflectivity (TRMM precipitation radar). We also find that the proposed interactive aerosol loading results in higher spatial variability in CLW and enhances the likelihood of increased cloud cover via formation of larger clouds. The modification also alters the diurnal cycle of clouds in break and break-to-active phases as compared to other phases due to aerosol loading, with a stronger diurnal cycle of upper level clouds in these phases in the VaryingAero model as compared to ConstantAero model.

  6. Role of aerosols in modulating cloud properties during active-break cycle of Indian summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, A.; Chakraborty, A.; Venugopal, V.

    2017-09-01

    In this study, the weather research and forecast model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem), is used to understand the impact of aerosol-cloud interaction during the active-break cycles of the Indian summer monsoon. Two sets of simulations are performed, one with a fixed aerosol concentration ( ConstantAero) and the other with an observation-based prescription of the rate of change of aerosol concentration as a function of precipitation ( VaryingAero). This prescription is derived based on satellite-retrieved daily rainrate and concurrent observations of aerosol optical depth from aerosol robotic network. The proposed modification is necessitated by the lack of realistic emission estimates over the Indian region as well as the presence of inherent biases in monsoon simulation in WRF-Chem. In the VaryingAero simulation, unlike in the ConstantAero run, we find that the break-to-active monsoon phase has more cloud liquid water (CLW) and less rain efficiency than in the active-to-break phase. This is primarily due to the indirect effect of increased aerosol loading in the break phase. This result is in accordance with the observed behaviour of CLW estimtes from microwave imager (TRMM 2A12) and radar reflectivity (TRMM precipitation radar). We also find that the proposed interactive aerosol loading results in higher spatial variability in CLW and enhances the likelihood of increased cloud cover via formation of larger clouds. The modification also alters the diurnal cycle of clouds in break and break-to-active phases as compared to other phases due to aerosol loading, with a stronger diurnal cycle of upper level clouds in these phases in the VaryingAero model as compared to ConstantAero model.

  7. Monsoon related changes in sea surface productivity and water column denitrification in the Eastern Arabian Sea during the last glacial cycle

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banakar, V.K.; Oba, T.; Chodankar, A; Kuramoto, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Minagawa, M.

    indicates, however, diminished water column denitrification in spite of increased productivity. The distinct decoupling of denitrification from productivity during the LGM can be explained by vigorous ventilation of the thermocline as a result...

  8. Water characteristics, mixing and circulation in the Bay of Bengal during southwest monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, V.S.N.; Sarma, Y.V.B.; Rao, D.P.; Murty, C.S.

    Influence of the freshwater influx, the wind forcing and the Indian Ocean monsoon drift current on the property distributions and the circulation in the Bay of Bengal during southwest monsoon has been quantified. At the head of the Bay, waters...

  9. Earth as diode: monsoon source of the orbital ~100 ka climate cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Y. Anderson

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A potential source for Earth's enigmatic ~100 ka climate cycle, which is found in many ancient geological records at low latitudes and also in the pacing of glaciation during the late Pleistocene, is traced to a climatic rectifying process inherent in the monsoon. Seasonal information needed to identify the rectifying mechanism is preserved within varves of a continuous, 200 ka recording of annual maximum surface temperature (Tmax from the equator of Western Pangea. Specific seasonal reactions recorded in varves show how the monsoon reacted to seasonal differences in insolation at equinox to produce a 11.7 ka semi-precession cycle in Tmax. At solstice, anti-phasing of insolation in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, intensified and focused by a highly asymmetric Pangea relative to the equator, produced a strong equatorial maritime monsoon that performed a nonlinear rectifying function similar to that of a simple rectifying diode. Expressed in the resulting varve series are substantial cycles in Tmax of 100 ka, 23.4 ka, and 11.7 ka. Importantly, any external or internal forcing of the tropical (monsoon climate system at higher-than-orbital frequencies (e.g. solar, ENSO should also be amplified at Milankovitch frequencies by the monsoon.

  10. The global water cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, Taikan; Entekhabi, Dara; Harrold, Timothy Ives

    The global water cycle consists of the oceans, water in the atmosphere, and water in the landscape. The cycle is closed by the fluxes between these reservoirs. Although the amounts of water in the atmosphere and river channels are relatively small, the fluxes are high, and this water plays a critical role in society, which is dependent on water as a renewable resource. On a global scale, the meridional component of river runoff is shown to be about 10% of the corresponding atmospheric and oceanic meridional fluxes. Artificial storages and water withdrawals for irrigation have significant impacts on river runoff and hence on the overall global water cycle. Fully coupled atmosphere-land-river-ocean models of the world's climate are essential to assess the future water resources and scarcities in relation to climate change. An assessment of future water scarcity suggests that water shortages will worsen, with a very significant increase in water stress in Africa. The impact of population growth on water stress is shown to be higher than that of climate change. The virtual water trade, which should be taken into account when discussing the global water cycle and water scarcity, is also considered. The movement of virtual water from North America, Oceania, and Europe to the Middle East, North West Africa, and East Asia represents significant global savings of water. The anticipated world water crisis widens the opportunities for the study of the global water cycle to contribute to the development of sustainability within society and to the solution of practical social problems.

  11. Slow and fast annual cycles of the Asian summer monsoon in the NCEP CFSv2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Chul-Su; Huang, Bohua

    2016-07-01

    The climatological Asian summer monsoon (ASM) is decomposed into the slow and fast annual cycles (SAC and FAC). The FAC represents the abrupt onset and breaks phase-locked to the ASM seasonal progression. This study evaluates how well the NCEP Climate Forecast System version 2 (CFSv2) simulates the SAC and FAC over the Indian and East Asia monsoon regions (IMR and EAMR). The simulated SACs are in good agreement with observations in both regions. The FAC also represents the northward propagation in both observations and CFSv2. It is further demonstrated that the FAC is associated with a thermodynamic air-sea interaction. In particular, the different roles played by the wind-evaporation-SST (WES) feedback may account for the faster propagation in the IMR than the EAMR. However, compared with observations, the simulated FAC shows earlier monsoon onset and long-lasting stronger dry and wet phases in the IMR but delayed monsoon onset with weaker and less organized FAC in the EAMR. These reversed behaviors may originate from a warm (cold) SST bias in the IMR (EAMR) in boreal spring and enhanced by an overly sensitive surface evaporation to wind changes in the CFSv2. As a result, the warm spring SST bias in the IMR initiates a strong WES feedback and changes of solar insolation during boreal summer, which leads to a cold SST bias in early fall. On the other hand, the cold spring SST bias in the EAMR accounts for a weaker air-sea coupling, which in turn results in a warm SST bias after the withdrawal of the monsoon.

  12. Forests and water cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iovino F

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on a comprehensive literature analysis, a review on factors that control water cycle and water use in Mediterranean forest ecosystems is presented, including environmental variables and silvicultural treatments. This important issue is considered in the perspective of sustainable forest management of Mediterranean forests, with special regard to crucial environmental hazards such as forest fires and desertification risks related to climate change.

  13. Characteristics of coastal waters of the western Bay of Bengal during different monsoon seasons

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suryanarayana, A.; Murty, C.S.; Rao, D.P.

    Physical characteristics of waters along the eastern coast of India up to offshore distances of 400 km have been investigated during the seasons of the north-easterly and south-westerly monsoons in light of relevant observed meteorological forcings...

  14. Transitions in the surface energy balance during the life cycle of a monsoon season

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T N Krishnamurti; Mrinal K Biswas

    2006-04-01

    In this observational/diagnostic study,we illustrate the time history of some important parameters of the surface energy balance during the life cycle of a single monsoon season.This chronology of the surface energy balance portrays the differential equilibrium state from the preonset phase to the withdrawal phase.This includes an analysis of the time history of base variables such as soil moisture,ground temperature,cloud cover,precipitation and humidity.This is followed by an analysis of the components of the surface energy balance where we note subtle changes in the overall balances as we proceed from one epoch of the monsoon to the next.Of interest here is the transition sequence:preonset,onset,break,revival,break,revival and withdrawal during the year 2001.Computations are all illustrated for a box over central India where the coastal effects were small,data coverage was not sparse and where the semi-arid land mass changes drastically to a lush green area.This region exhibited large changes in the components of surface energy balance.The principal results pertain to what balances the difference among the incoming short wave radiation (at the earth ’s surface)and the long wave radiation exhibited by the ground.That difference is balanced by a dominant sensible heat flux and the reflected short wave radiation in the preonset stage.A sudden change in the Bowen ratio going from < 1to > 1 is noted soon after the onset of monsoon.Thereafter the latent heat flux from the land surface takes an important role and the sensible heat flux acquires a diminishing role.We also examine the subtle changes that occur in the components of surface energy balance between the break and the active phases.The break phases are seen to be quite different from the preonset phases.This study is aimed to illustrate the major importance of moisture and clouds in the radiative transfer computations that are central to the surface energy balance during each epoch.These sensitivities

  15. Sensitivity studies on the impacts of Tibetan Plateau snowpack pollution on the Asian hydrological cycle and monsoon climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Qian

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The Tibetan Plateau (TP, the highest and largest plateau in the world, has long been identified to be critical in regulating the Asian monsoon climate and hydrological cycle. The snowpack and glaciers over the TP provide fresh water to billions of people in Asian countries, but the TP glaciers have been retreating faster than those anywhere else in the world. In this modeling study a series of numerical experiments with a global climate model are designed to simulate radiative forcing of black carbon (BC and dust in snow, and to assess the relative impacts of anthropogenic CO2 and carbonaceous particles in the atmosphere and snow on the snowpack over the TP and subsequent impacts on the Asian monsoon climate and hydrological cycle. Simulations results show a large BC content in snow over the TP, especially the southern slope, with concentration larger than 100 μg/kg. Because of the high aerosol content in snow and large incident solar radiation in the low latitude and high elevation, the TP exhibits the largest surface radiative forcing induced by aerosols (e.g. BC, Dust in snow compared to other snow-covered regions in the world.

    Simulation results show that the aerosol-induced snow albedo perturbations generate surface radiative forcing of 5–25 W m−2 during spring, with a maximum in April or May. BC-in-snow increases the surface air temperature by around 1.0 °C averaged over the TP and reduces spring snowpack over the TP more than pre-industrial to present CO2 increase and carbonaceous particles in the atmosphere. As a result, runoff increases during late winter and early spring but decreases during late spring and early summer (i.e. a trend toward earlier melt dates. The snowmelt efficacy, defined as the snowpack reduction per unit degree of warming induced by the forcing agent, is 1–4 times larger for BC-in-snow than CO2 increase during April–July, indicating that BC-in-snow more

  16. The Indian summer monsoon and the waters around India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shetye, S.R.

    the surface salinity. We shall see in the next two sections that there exists, at least in part, a positive feedback between the strength of the monsoon activity over the Bay and the low salinities there. 4. The ET and the seas around India The first clue... this talk with a diagram (Fig. 6) that summarizes the many elements that cooperate to make the ISM happen. An interesting feature of the series of processes we have examined is positive feedback. Over the Bay of Bengal it acts as follows. A warm Bay sustains...

  17. Apparent relationship between thermal regime in Antarctic waters and Indian summer monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Menon, H.B.; RameshBabu, V.; Sastry, J.S.

    ) charts for the Indian Ocean sector of the Southern Ocean during 2 contrasting years (1977 and 1979) of summer monsoon over India. The results suggest an apparent relationship between the thermal regimes in the Antarctic waters of the Indian Ocean sector...

  18. Impacts of Global Warming on Hydrological Cycles in the Asian Monsoon Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Koji DAIRAKU; Seita EMORI; Toru NOZAWA

    2008-01-01

    The hydrologic changes and the impact of these changes constitute a fundamental global-warmingrelated concern. Faced with threats to human life and natural ecosystems, such as droughts, floods, and soil erosion, water resource planners must increasingly make future risk assessments. Though hydrological predictions associated with the global climate change are already being performed, mainly through the use of GCMs, coarse spatial resolutions and uncertain physical processes limit the representation of terrestrial water/energy interactions and the variability in such systems as the Asian monsoon. Despite numerous studies, the regional responses of hydrologic changes resulting from climate change remains inconclusive. In this paper, an attempt at dynamical downscaling of future hydrologic projection under global climate change in Asia is addressed. The authors conducted present and future Asian regional climate simulations which were nested in the results of Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM) experiments. The regional climate model could capture the general simulated features of the AGCM. Also, some regional phenomena such as orographic precipitation, which did not appear in the outcome of the AGCM simulation, were successfully produced. Under global warming, the increase of water vapor associated with the warmed air temperature was projected. It was projected to bring more abundant water vapor to the southern portions of India and the Bay of Bengal, and to enhance precipitation especially over the mountainous regions, the western part of India and the southern edge of the Tibetan Plateau. As a result of the changes in the synoptic flow patterns and precipitation under global warming, the increases of annual mean precipitation and surface runoff were projected in many regions of Asia. However, both the positive and negative changes of seasonal surface runoff were projected in some regions which will increase the flood risk and cause a mismatch between water

  19. The NEWS Water Cycle Climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodell, Matthew; Beaudoing, Hiroko Kato; L'Ecuyer, Tristan; William, Olson

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Energy and Water Cycle Study (NEWS) program fosters collaborative research towards improved quantification and prediction of water and energy cycle consequences of climate change. In order to measure change, it is first necessary to describe current conditions. The goal of the first phase of the NEWS Water and Energy Cycle Climatology project was to develop "state of the global water cycle" and "state of the global energy cycle" assessments based on data from modern ground and space based observing systems and data integrating models. The project was a multi-institutional collaboration with more than 20 active contributors. This presentation will describe the results of the water cycle component of the first phase of the project, which include seasonal (monthly) climatologies of water fluxes over land, ocean, and atmosphere at continental and ocean basin scales. The requirement of closure of the water budget (i.e., mass conservation) at various scales was exploited to constrain the flux estimates via an optimization approach that will also be described. Further, error assessments were included with the input datasets, and we examine these in relation to inferred uncertainty in the optimized flux estimates in order to gauge our current ability to close the water budget within an expected uncertainty range.

  20. The Water Cycle Solutions Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser, P.; Belvedere, D.; Imam, B.; Schiffer, R.; Schlosser, C.; Gupta, H.; Welty, C.; Vörösmarty, C.; Matthews, D.; Lawford, R.

    2006-12-01

    The goal of the Water cycle Solutions Network is to improve and optimize the sustained ability of water cycle researchers, stakeholders, organizations and networks to interact, identify, harness, and extend research results to augment decision support tools and meet national needs. WaterNet will engage relevant NASA water cycle research resources and community-of-practice organizations, to develop what we term an "actionable database" that can be used to communicate and connect water cycle research results (WCRs) towards the improvement of water-related Decision Support Tools (DSTs). An actionable database includes enough sufficient knowledge about its nodes and their heritage so that connections between these nodes are identifiable and robust. Recognizing the many existing highly valuable water-related science and application networks, we will focus the balance of our efforts on enabling their interoperability in a solutions network context. We will initially focus on identification, collection, and analysis of the two end points, these being the WCRs and water related DSTs. We will then develop strategies to connect these two end points via innovative communication strategies, improved user access to NASA resources, improved water cycle research community appreciation for DST requirements, improved policymaker, management and stakeholder knowledge of NASA research and application products, and improved identification of pathways for progress. Finally, we will develop relevant benchmarking and metrics, to understand the network's characteristics, to optimize its performance, and to establish sustainability. The WaterNet will deliver numerous pre-evaluation reports that will identify the pathways for improving the collective ability of the water cycle community to routinely harness WCRs that address crosscutting water cycle challenges.

  1. Gulf of California Sediment and Proxy SST Records Suggest a Post 6 ka Development of the Arizona Monsoon and Solar Forcing of Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, J. A.; Bukry, D.

    2007-12-01

    Summer monsoonal rains in Arizona and adjacent areas are mainly due to pulses of moisture traveling northward up the Gulf of California (GOC). Modern studies reveal that northern GOC SSTs must exceed 26 deg. C before monsoonal rainfall develops in Arizona and western New Mexico, and over 80 percent of the rainfall in this region occurs after northern GOC SSTs exceed 28.5 deg. C. Warming of GOC occurs progressively from south to north in the late spring, as northwest winds, which dominate in the late fall to early spring, decrease in strength, and tropical waters penetrate northward along the western coast of the GOC. Sediment (CaCO3 and opal) and microfossil (diatom and silicoflagellate) proxies spanning the past 15,000 years from cores in the central GOC suggest that waters of the northern GOC were too cold between ca. 11 and 6 ka to allow development of monsoonal rains in Arizona. Evidence for a post 6 ka intensification of monsoonal rains in Arizona and adjacent areas includes: 1) increased frequency of arroyo cutting in Arizona after ca. 5 ka, 2) increased evidence of paleofloods in Arizona and SW Utah after ca. 6 ka, and 3) the renewal of aggradation of alluvial fans in the Mojave Dessert at ca. 6 ka after a lull in their formation between ca. 11 and 6 ka. Supportive pollen evidence includes : 1) the late Holocene appearance of summer flowering annuals and C-{4} grasses in SE Arizona, and 2) the post 6 ka appearance of a warm, mixed biome in the highlands of northwest Mexico. Other pollen evidence and the scarcity of early and middle Holocene packrat middens in the American southwest, however, have been cited as evidence of increased monsoonal rains during the early and middle parts of the Holocene It is likely that the Gulf of Mexico was the main source of monsoonal moisture in the American southwest prior to ca. 6 ka, especially in the regions east of Arizona. A northward displacement of the Intertropical Convergence Zone in the Caribbean prior to ca. 5.4 ka

  2. On the diurnal cycle of surface energy fluxes in the North American monsoon region using the WRF-Hydro modeling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Tiantian; Vivoni, Enrique R.; Gochis, David J.; Mascaro, Giuseppe

    2017-09-01

    The diurnal cycles of surface energy fluxes are important drivers of atmospheric boundary layer development and convective precipitation, particularly in regions with heterogeneous land surface conditions such as those under the influence of the North American monsoon (NAM). Characterization of diurnal surface fluxes and their controls has not been well constrained due to the paucity of observations in the NAM region. In this study, we evaluate the performance of the uncoupled WRF-Hydro modeling system in its ability to represent soil moisture, turbulent heat fluxes, and surface temperature observations and compare these to operational analyses from other commonly used land surface models (LSMs). After a rigorous model evaluation, we quantify how the diurnal cycles of surface energy fluxes vary during the warm season for the major ecosystems in a regional basin. We find that the diurnal cycle of latent heat flux is more sensitive to ecosystem type than sensible heat flux due to the response of plant transpiration to variations in soil water content. Furthermore, the peak timing of precipitation affects the shape and magnitude of the diurnal cycle of plant transpiration in water-stressed ecosystems, inducing mesoscale heterogeneity in land surface conditions between the major ecosystems within the basin. Comparisons to other LSMs indicate that ecosystem differences in the diurnal cycle of turbulent fluxes are underestimated in these products. While this study shows how land surface heterogeneity affects the simulated diurnal cycle of turbulent fluxes, additional coupled modeling efforts are needed to identify the potential impacts of these spatial differences on convective precipitation.

  3. Diurnal Cycle of the North American Monsoon in a Mesoscale Model Simulation: Evolution of Key Parameters in Relation to Precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weizhong Zheng

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The diurnal cycle of the North American monsoon is analyzed based on the output from a mesoscale model simulation. Statistically significant diurnal cycle in precipitation is identified, with heavy precipitation—essentially convective—dominating in local afternoons. Temporal evolution of key parameters in relation to precipitation is investigated, based on which a sequence of the dynamic/thermodynamic processes underlying precipitation development is proposed. Particularly, the afternoon peak in precipitation is found preceded by enhanced static instability and low-level convergence.

  4. Diurnal variability of heat fluxes over the coastal waters off Visakhapatnam during post-monsoon and winter seasons

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramu, Ch V.; Bharathi, G.; Sadhuram, Y.; Prasad, K.V.S.R.

    Diurnal variability of heat fluxes in the coastal waters of Visakhapatnam has been studied during post-monsoon (Oct, 2006) and winter (Jan-Feb, 2007) seasons utilizing the surface meteorological data and radiation measurements on-board CRV Sagar...

  5. Monsoon variability, crop water requirement, and crop planning for kharif rice in Sagar Island, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, S.; Choudhury, B. U.; Satpati, L. N.

    2015-12-01

    In the Sagar Island of Bay of Bengal, rainfed lowland rice is the major crop, grown solely depending on erratic distribution of southwest monsoon (SM) rainfall. Lack of information on SM rainfall variability and absence of crop scheduling accordingly results in frequent occurrence of intermittent water stress and occasional crop failure. In the present study, we analyzed long period (1982-2010) SM rainfall behavior (onset, withdrawal, rainfall and wetness indices, dry and wet spells), crop water requirement (CWR, by Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) 56), and probability of weekly rainfall occurrence (by two-parameter gamma distribution) to assess the variability and impact on water availability, CWR, and rice productivity. Finally, crop planning was suggested to overcome monsoon uncertainties on water availability and rice productivity. Study revealed that the normal onset and withdrawal weeks for SM rainfall were 22nd ± 1 and 43rd ± 2 meteorological weeks (MW), respectively. However, effective monsoon rainfall started at 24th MW (rainfall 92.7 mm, p > 56.7 % for 50 mm rainfall) and was terminated by the end of 40th MW (rainfall 90.7 mm, p spell frequency during panicle initiation and heading stage was computed as 40 of which 6 dry spells were >7 days in duration and reflected a significant ( p < 0.05) increasing trend (at 0.22 days year-1) over the years (1982-2010). The present study highlights the adaptive capacity of crop planning including abiotic stress-tolerant cultivars to monsoon rainfall variability for sustaining rainfed rice production vis-à-vis food and livelihood security in vulnerable islands of coastal ecosystem.

  6. Impact of geographic variations of the convective and dehydration center on stratospheric water vapor over the Asian monsoon region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Fu, Rong; Wang, Tao; Liu, Yimin

    2016-06-01

    The Asian monsoon region is the most prominent moisture center of water vapor in the lower stratosphere (LS) during boreal summer. Previous studies have suggested that the transport of water vapor to the Asian monsoon LS is controlled by dehydration temperatures and convection mainly over the Bay of Bengal and Southeast Asia. However, there is a clear geographic variation of convection associated with the seasonal and intra-seasonal variations of the Asian monsoon circulation, and the relative influence of such a geographic variation of convection vs. the variation of local dehydration temperatures on water vapor transport is still not clear. Using satellite observations from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and a domain-filling forward trajectory model, we show that almost half of the seasonal water vapor increase in the Asian monsoon LS are attributable to geographic variations of convection and resultant variations of the dehydration center, of which the influence is comparable to the influence of the local dehydration temperature increase. In particular, dehydration temperatures are coldest over the southeast and warmest over the northwest Asian monsoon region. Although the convective center is located over Southeast Asia, an anomalous increase of convection over the northwest Asia monsoon region increases local diabatic heating in the tropopause layer and air masses entering the LS are dehydrated at relatively warmer temperatures. Due to warmer dehydration temperatures, anomalously moist air enters the LS and moves eastward along the northern flank of the monsoon anticyclonic flow, leading to wet anomalies in the LS over the Asian monsoon region. Likewise, when convection increases over the Southeast Asia monsoon region, dry anomalies appear in the LS. On a seasonal scale, this feature is associated with the monsoon circulation, convection and diabatic heating marching towards the northwest Asia monsoon region from June to August. The march of convection

  7. The First Pan-WCRP Workshop on Monsoon Climate Systems: Toward Better Prediction of the Monsoons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sperber, K R; Yasunari, T

    2005-07-27

    In 2004 the Joint Scientific Committee (JSC) that provides scientific guidance to the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) requested an assessment of (1) WCRP monsoon related activities and (2) the range of available observations and analyses in monsoon regions. The purpose of the assessment was to (a) define the essential elements of a pan-WCRP monsoon modeling strategy, (b) identify the procedures for producing this strategy, and (c) promote improvements in monsoon observations and analyses with a view toward their adequacy, and addressing any undue redundancy or duplication. As such, the WCRP sponsored the ''1st Pan-WCRP Workshop on Monsoon Climate Systems: Toward Better Prediction of the Monsoons'' at the University of California, Irvine, CA, USA from 15-17 June 2005. Experts from the two WCRP programs directly relevant to monsoon studies, the Climate Variability and Predictability Programme (CLIVAR) and the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX), gathered to assess the current understanding of the fundamental physical processes governing monsoon variability and to highlight outstanding problems in simulating the monsoon that can be tackled through enhanced cooperation between CLIVAR and GEWEX. The agenda with links to the presentations can be found at: http://www.clivar.org/organization/aamon/WCRPmonsoonWS/agenda.htm. Scientific motivation for a joint CLIVAR-GEWEX approach to investigating monsoons includes the potential for improved medium-range to seasonal prediction through better simulation of intraseasonal (30-60 day) oscillations (ISO's). ISO's are important for the onset of monsoons, as well as the development of active and break periods of rainfall during the monsoon season. Foreknowledge of the active and break phases of the monsoon is important for crop selection, the determination of planting times and mitigation of potential flooding and short-term drought. With a few exceptions simulations of ISO are

  8. Round and Round the Water Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Barbara A.

    2017-01-01

    Children enjoy water play, and kindergarten children can learn about the water cycle. Teachers are already introducing elements of the water cycle when discussing weather and bodies of water. The water cycle also can be a springboard for teaching children about plants and animals and the importance of water for sustaining life and shaping our…

  9. Relationship between East Asian winter monsoon, warm pool situation and ENSO cycle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Based on the observational data analyses and numerical simulations with the air-sea coupled model (CGCM), a new perspective on the occurrence mechanism of ENSO is advanced in this paper. The continuous strong (weak) East Asian winter monsoon will lead to continuous westerly (easterly) wind anomalies over the equatorial western Pacific region. The anomalous equatorial westerly (easterly) winds can cause eastward propagation of the subsurface ocean temperature anomalies (SOTA) in the warm pool region, the positive (negative) SOTA have been in the warm pool region for quite a long time. The eastward propagating of positive (negative) SOTA along the thermocline will lead to positive (negative) SSTA in the equatorial eastern Pacific and the occurrence of El Ni(n)o (La Ni(n)a) event. After the occurrence of ENSO, the winter monsoon in East Asia will be weak (strong) due to the influence of El Ni(n)o (La Ni(n)a).

  10. The Joint Aerosol-Monsoon Experiment: A New Challenge to Monsoon Climate Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, William K. M.

    2008-01-01

    Aerosol and monsoon related droughts and floods are two of the most serious environmental hazards confronting more than 60% of the population of the world living in the Asian monsoon countries. In recent years, thanks to improved satellite and in-situ observations, and better models, great strides have been made in aerosol, and monsoon research respectively. There is now a growing body of evidence suggesting that interaction of aerosol forcing with water cycle dynamics in monsoon regions may substantially alter the redistribution of energy at the earth surface and in the atmosphere, and therefore significantly impact monsoon rainfall variability and long term trends. In this talk, I will describe issues related to societal needs, scientific background, and challenges in studies of aerosol-water cycle interaction in Asian monsoon regions. As a first step towards addressing these issues, the authors call for an integrated observation and modeling research approach aimed at the interactions between aerosol chemistry and radiative effects and monsoon dynamics of the coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system. A Joint Aerosol-Monsoon Experiment (JAMEX) is proposed for 2007-2011, with an enhanced observation period during 2008-09, encompassing diverse arrays of observations from surface, aircraft, unmanned aerial vehicles, and satellites of physical and chemical properties of aerosols, long range aerosol transport as well as meteorological and oceanographic parameters in the Indo-Pacific Asian monsoon region. JAMEX will leverage on coordination among many ongoing and planned national programs on aerosols and monsoon research in China, India, Japan, Nepal, Italy, US, as well as international research programs of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

  11. Climatic Features of Cloud Water Distribution and Cycle over China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xingyu; GUO Xueliang; ZHU Jiang

    2008-01-01

    Analyses of cloud water path (CWP) data over China available from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) are performed for the period 1984-2004. Combined with GPCP precipitation data, cloud water cycle index (CWCI) is also calculated. The climatic distributions of CWP are found to be dependent on large-scale circulation, topographical features, water vapor transport and similar distribution features which are found in CWCI except in the Sichuan Basin. Influenced by the Asia monsoon, CWP over China exhibits very large seasonal variations in different regions. The seasonal cycles of CWCI in different regions are consistent and the largest CWCI occurs in July. The long-term trends of CWP and CWCI are investigated, too. Increasing trends of CWP are found during the period with the largest increase found in winter. The decreasing trends of CWCI dominate most regions of China. The differences in long-term trends between CWP and CWCI suggest that CWP only can influence the variation of CWCI to a certain extent and that other factors need to be involved in cloud water cycle researches. This phenomenon reveals the complexity of the hydrological cycle related to cloud water.

  12. Earth's eccentricity cycles and Indian Summer Monsoon variability over the past 2 million years: Evidence from deep-sea benthic foraminifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anil K.; Dhingra, Hitesh; Mélice, Jean-Luc; Anderson, David M.

    Spectral analysis of a Uvigerina proboscidea time series from DSDP Site 214 using the Lomb-Scargle method for unevenly sampled data, exhibits two dominant power peaks at 412 and 94 kyrs over the last 2 million years, which correspond to the Earth's eccentricity cycles. The results indicate that the SW monsoon varied at about 100 kyr and 400 kyr periodicities within Earth's eccentricity domain (Milankovitch range) over the past 2 million years. Wavelet transform analysis reveals the non-stationary nature of monsoon upwelling over this interval. The amplitude of the 400 kyr cycle in the U. proboscidea time series began to increase at ∼900 kyrs as has also been observed in few recent studies. We do not see a strong relation between eccentricity highs and intense summer monsoons over the studied interval.

  13. Comparative Hydrology Over Monsoonal Regions Using Seasonal Distributions of Stable Water Isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, D. P.; Worden, J.; Noone, D. C.

    2007-12-01

    The hydrologic regimes of monsoonal regions contain complex balances of large-scale advective supply of water, surface exchange and atmospheric condensation, which are important for the regional energy balance and climate. Stable water isotopes are powerful tools for studying such processes, as isotopic fractionations occurring during evaporation and condensation give rise to measurable variations in the isotopic composition that reflects the history of moist processes for each observed air parcel. The HDO/H2O data set from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) on NASA's Aura spacecraft offers a unique global view of the isotopic composition of water vapor. The TES data set, and the analysis here, is complimentary to previous work using isotopic ratios in precipitation; however it need not be that the simple relationships found in the precipitation data hold for the atmospheric vapor case because of the variability induced by atmospheric mixing and convection. Over tropical continents, the intensity of water vapor recycling, precipitation rates and circulation patterns are thought to dominate the seasonal isotopic composition of water vapor and rainfall. By examining and contrasting the isotopic budgets of the Amazon, north Australia, and Asian monsoon regions, we gain insight into these hydrological processes, show which processes are regionally robust, and expose those processes that are regionally unique. To establish the importance of local processes on the regional isotopic composition, we first examine the relationship between the measured isotopic composition and meteorological parameters that capture the strength of the local processes. Secondly, we use the history of condensation, evaporation and air mass mixing during transport from five-day origin locations to the local TES observations, and the isotopic ratios of vapor at both locations, to examine isotopic changes that occur upstream. Using this information, as well as a simple isotopic exchange

  14. Densified GPS Estimates of Integrated Precipitable Water Vapor Improve Weather Forecasting during the North American Monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, A. W.; Small, I.; Gutman, S. I.; Bock, Y.; Dumas, J.; Haase, J. S.; Laber, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    Continuous GPS (CGPS) stations for observing crustal motion in the western U.S. now number more than 1200, with over 500 of them operating in real time. Tropospheric wet delay from real-time processing of the GPS data, along with co-located or nearby surface and temperature measurements, are being operationally converted to Integrated Precipitable Water Vapor (IPW) for evaluation as a forecasting tool (Gutman, 2011). The available density of real-time GPS in southern California now allows us to explore usage of densified GPS IPW in operational weather forecasting during weather conditions involving moisture extremes. Under a NASA Advanced Information Systems Technology (AIST) project, 27 southern California stations have been added to the NOAA GPS-Met observing network providing 30-minute estimates of IPW for ingestion into operational NOAA weather models, as well as for direct use by National Weather Service forecasters in monitoring developing weather conditions. The densified network proved advantageous in the 2013 North American Monsoon season, allowing forecasters to visualize rapid moisture increases at intervals between model runs and radiosonde observations and assisting in flood watch/warning decisions. We discuss the observed relationship between IPW and onset of precipitation in monsoon events in southern California and possibilities for additional decision support tools for forecasters.

  15. Carbon dioxide and water vapour characteristics on the west coast of Arabian Sea during Indian summer monsoon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Dharmaraj; M N Patil; R T Waghmare; P Ernest Raj

    2012-08-01

    Carbon dioxide, water vapour, air temperature and wind measurements at 10 Hz sampling rate were carried out over the coast of Arabian Sea, Goa (15°21′N, 73° 51′E) in India. These observations were collected, in association with the surface layer turbulent parameters for the Arabian Sea Monsoon Experiment (ARMEX). In the summer monsoon period, concentration of CO2 was in the range of 550–790 mg m−3 whereas the water vapour was in the range of 17.5–24.5 g m−3. The Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis has been performed on these observations to investigate the spectral behaviour of CO2 and water vapour. The relation between CO2 and water vapour on various atmospheric scales has been proposed. CO2 and water vapour observations confirmed the existence of periodicities of large (11, 8 days), meso (5 days) and micrometeorological (20 min) scales.

  16. Exploring the Modifiable Areal Unit Problem in Spatial Water Assessments: A Case of Water Shortage in Monsoon Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aura Salmivaara

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Water shortage (availability per capita is a key indicator of vulnerability to water scarcity. Spatial datasets enable the assessment of water shortage on multiple scales. The use of river basins and subbasins as analysis and management units is currently commonplace. An important but less acknowledged fact is that spatial assessments are strongly influenced by the choice of the unit of analysis due to the Modifiable Areal Unit Problem (MAUP. Climate conditions, agricultural activities, and access to groundwater also influence water availability and demand. In this study, a total of 21 different criteria were used to define areal units of analysis, i.e., zonings, for which water shortage was calculated. Focusing on Monsoon Asia, where water scarcity is a pressing problem, we found that zoning had a considerable impact, resulting in up to three-fold differences in the population under high water shortage (<1000 m3/cap/year, ranging from 782 million to 2.11 billion. In most zonings, however, the Indus and Yellow River Basins and northwest parts of India and China are under high water shortage. The study indicates that a multizonal and multiscale analysis is needed to minimize skewed or even misleading information that might be produced when using only one zoning.

  17. Reply to the comment on 'Monsoon related changes in sea surface productivity and water column denitrification in the Eastern Arabian Sea during the last glacial cycle' by V.K. Banakar, T. Oba, A.R. Chodankar, T. Kuramoto, M. Yamamoto, M. Minagawa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banakar, V.K.; Oba, T.; Chodankar, A.R.; Kuramoto, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Minagawa, M.

    proxies utilized in our study have not been greatly affected by preservation problems. 3 RT proposes diagenesis as an alternative explanation for C/N ratio variation recorded by our study. Although diagenesis cannot be ruled out, we think it is very... productivity and water column denitrification in the Eastern Arabian Sea during the last glacial cycle. Mar. Geol., 219: 99-108. Bassinot, F. C., Labeyrie, L. D., Vincent, E., Quidelleur, X., Shackleton, N. J. and Lancelot, Y., 1994. The astronomical theory...

  18. Influence of seasonal monsoons on net community production and CO2 in subtropical Hong Kong coastal waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Xu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Data from seven cruises in three different environments including the Pearl River estuary, sewage discharge outfall, and eastern coastal/shelf waters were used to examine the seasonal variations in net community production (NCP and the biologically active gases O2 and CO2. In the winter dry season, when monsoon-induced downwelling was dominant, NCP was negative (−84 ± 50 mmol C m−2 d−1 in all three regions. The negative NCP corresponded to O2 influxes of 100 ± 50 mmol O2 m−2 d−1 and CO2 effluxes of 24 ± 10 mmol C m−2 d−1. In the summer wet season, when upwelling brought the deep oceanic waters to the coast due to the southwest monsoonal winds, there was a 2 to 15-fold increase in integrated primary production (IPP compared to winter. The increase in IPP was likely due to the favorable conditions such as stratification and the nutrient inputs from upwelled waters and the Pearl River estuary. NCP in the mixed layer reached up to 110 ± 48 mmol C m−2 d−1 in the wet season. However, accompanying the high positive NCP, we observed an O2 influx of 100 ± 60 mmol O2 m−2 d−1 and CO2 efflux of 21 ± 15 mmol C m−2 d−1. The contradictory observation of positive NCP and CO2 release and O2 uptake in the mixed layer could be explained by the influence of the southwest monsoon-induced upwelling along with the influence of the Pearl River, as the upwelling brought cold, low dissolved oxygen (DO, 160 ± 30 μM and high dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC, 1960 ± 100 μatm water to the surface in the wet season. Hence, the subtropical Hong Kong coastal waters are generally a CO2 source due to the monsoonal influence during both the dry-heterotrophic and wet-autotrophic seasons.

  19. Water Cycle Missions for the Next Decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser, P. R.

    2013-12-01

    The global water cycle describes the circulation of water as a vital and dynamic substance in its liquid, solid, and vapor phases as it moves through the atmosphere, oceans and land. Life in its many forms exists because of water, and modern civilization depends on learning how to live within the constraints imposed by the availability of water. The scientific challenge posed by the need to observe the global water cycle is to integrate in situ and space-borne observations to quantify the key water-cycle state variables and fluxes. The vision to address that challenge is a series of Earth observation missions that will measure the states, stocks, flows, and residence times of water on regional to global scales followed by a series of coordinated missions that will address the processes, on a global scale, that underlie variability and changes in water in all its three phases. The accompanying societal challenge is to foster the improved use of water data and information as a basis for enlightened management of water resources, to protect life and property from effects of extremes in the water cycle. A major change in thinking about water science that goes beyond its physics to include its role in ecosystems and society is also required. Better water-cycle observations, especially on the continental and global scales, will be essential. Water-cycle predictions need to be readily available globally to reduce loss of life and property caused by water-related natural hazards. Building on the 2007 Earth Science Decadal Survey, NASA's Plan for a Climate-Centric Architecture for Earth Observations and Applications from Space , and the 2012 Chapman Conference on Remote Sensing of the Terrestrial Water Cycle, a workshop was held in April 2013 to gather wisdom and determine how to prepare for the next generation of water cycle missions in support of the second Earth Science Decadal Survey. This talk will present the outcomes of the workshop including the intersection between

  20. Carbon cycling in the northern Arabian Sea during the northeast monsoon: Significance of salps

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.; Sarma, V.V.S.S.; Jayakumar, D.A.

    Winter cooling and mixing brings nutrients (nitrate and phosphate) to the surface waters over large parts of the northern Arabian Sea, but the rates of primary production as well as carbon export from the euphotic zone are not especially high during...

  1. The Diurnal Cycle of the Boundary Layer, Convection, Clouds, and Surface Radiation in a Coastal Monsoon Environment (Darwin Australia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Peter T.; Long, Charles N.; Protat, Alain

    2012-08-01

    The diurnal variation of convection and associated cloud and radiative properties remains a significant issue in global NWP and climate models. This study analyzes observed diurnal variability of convection in a coastal monsoonal environment examining the interaction of convective rain clouds, their associated cloud properties, and the impact on the surface radiation and corresponding boundary layer structure during periods where convection is suppressed or active on the large scale. The analysis uses data from the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) as well as routine measurements from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology and the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. Both active monsoonal and large-scale suppressed (buildup and break) conditions are examined and demonstrate that the diurnal variation of rainfall is much larger during the break periods and the spatial distribution of rainfall is very different between the monsoon and break regimes. During the active monsoon the total net radiative input to the surface is decreased by more than 3 times the amount than during the break regime - this total radiative cloud forcing is found to be dominated by the shortwave (SW) cloud effects because of the much larger optical thicknesses and persistence of long-lasting anvils and cirrus cloud decks associated with the monsoon regime. These differences in monsoon versus break surface radiative energy contribute to low-level air temperature differences in the boundary layer over the land surfaces.

  2. Forcing mechanism of the Pleistocene east Asian monsoon variations in a phase perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN; Jun; WANG; Pinxian; CHENG; Xinrong; WANG; Rujian; SU

    2005-01-01

    The deep sea records from the ODP Sites 1143 and 1144 in the northern and southern South China Sea (SCS), including foraminiferal δ18O and δ13C, Opal% and pollen percentage, reveal that the variations of the east Asian monsoon have been closely correlated with the variations of the Earth's orbital parameters (eccentricity, obliquity and precession) and the global ice volume on orbital scale. All the monsoonal proxies show strong 100 ka, 41 ka and 23 ka cycles. Although G. ruber δ13C of Site 1143 is coherent with the ETP (ETP= normalized (eccentricity + obliquity-precession) at eccentricity, obliquity and precession bands, most of the coherent relationship focuses on the precession band, and the other monsoonal proxies are coherent with the ETP only at the precession band, which indicate that precession dominates the Pleistocene tropical climate changes. The phase relationship of the monsoonal proxies with the foraminiferal δ18O implies that the global ice volume changes have played a significant role in modulating the east Asian monsoon climate, at least dominating the winter monsoon. This forcing mechanism of the east Asian monsoon is apparently different from that of the Indian ocean monsoon. The variations of the east Asian monsoon at the precession band, at least that of the winter monsoon, have been controlled not only by the sensible heating but also by the latent heating of the surface water in the South China Sea.

  3. Isotopic composition of atmospheric water vapor before and after the monsoon's end in the Nagqu River Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Wusheng; YAO Tandong; TIAN Lide; WANG Yu; YIN Changliang

    2005-01-01

    Atmospheric water vapor samples were collected in the Nagqu River Basin in the middle of Tibetan Plateau between August and October in 2004. Results show that there exist some fluctuations of the δ18O of atmospheric water vapor, especially before and after the monsoon's end. Moreover, the variety trend of the δ 18O of atmospheric water vapor inverse correlates with that of dew point. Precipitation events make an important effect upon the variation of δ18O of atmospheric water vapor. During the whole sampling period, the δ18O values of atmospheric water vapor are low while precipitation events occurred. The moisture origins also contribute to the variation of δ18O of atmospheric water vapor. The oceanic moisture transported by the southwest monsoon results in lower δ18O of atmospheric water vapor in the Nagqu River Basin. Compared with the influence of the oceanic moisture, the δ18O values, however, appear high resulting from the effect of the continental air mass in this region.

  4. South Asian summer monsoon variability during the last ~54 kyrs inferred from surface water salinity and river run off proxies

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gebregiorgis, D.; Hathorne, E.C.; Sijinkumar, A.V; Nath, B.N.; Nurnberg, D.; Frank, M.

    : Quat. Sci. Rev., vol.138; 2016; 6-15 South Asian Summer Monsoon variability during the last ~54 kyrs inferred from surface water salinity and river run off proxies D. Gebregiorgis1, E.C. Hathorne1, A.V. Sijinkumar2, B. Nagender Nath3, D. Nürnberg... leach with 100 μL 0.001 M HNO3 was applied and followed by two rinses with distilled water. Samples were dissolved in 0.075 M nitric acid (HNO3) (500 μL) assisted by sonication for 25 mins.   6 Finally samples were centrifuged for 4 mins at 13400 rpm...

  5. Monsoonal variability in abiotic parameters in coastal waters off Trivandrum evokes press and pulse response in biotic variables

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Subina, N.S.; Bhosle, S.; Nair, S.; Lokabharathi, P.A.

    . The lesser supply of nutrients in post monsoon is attributed to the relaxation in wind field which reduces the Ekman pumping of deep water to surface of coastal waters (Habeebrehman et. al., 2008). Though 99.1 % variation was due to nitrate, nitrite.... 2000. Seasonal controls on surface pCO in the central and eastern Arabian Sea. 2 Proceedings of the Indian Academy of Science. 109. pp. 471-479. Smith, S. L. 1984. Biological indications of active upwelling in the northwestern Indian Ocean in 1964...

  6. Water vapor increase in the northern hemispheric lower stratosphere by the Asian monsoon anticyclone observed during TACTS campaign in 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolf, Christian; Vogel, Bärbel; Hoor, Peter; Günther, Gebhard; Krämer, Martina; Müller, Rolf; Müller, Stephan; Riese, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Water vapor plays a key role in determining the radiative balance in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) and thus the climate of the Earth (Forster and Shine, 2002; Riese et al., 2012). Therefore a detailed knowledge about transport pathways and exchange processes between troposphere and stratosphere is required to understand the variability of water vapor in this region. The Asian monsoon anticyclone caused by deep convection over and India and east Asia is able to transport air masses from the troposphere into the nothern extra-tropical stratosphere (Müller et al. 2016, Vogel et al. 2016). These air masses contain pollution but also higher amounts of water vapor. An increase in water vapor of about 0.5 ppmv in the extra-tropical stratosphere above a potential temperature of 380 K was detected between August and September 2012 by in-situ instrumentation above the European northern hemisphere during the HALO aircraft mission TACTS. Here, we investigated the origin of this water vapor increase with the help of the 3D Lagrangian chemistry transport model CLaMS (McKenna et al., 2002). We can assign an origin of the moist air masses in the Asian region (North and South India and East China) with the help of model origin tracers. Additionally, back trajectories of these air masses with enriched water vapor are used to differentiate between transport from the Asia monsoon anticyclone and the upwelling of moister air in the tropics particularly from the Pacific and Southeast Asia.

  7. Global water cycle and solar activity variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Tameemi, Muthanna A.; Chukin, Vladimir V.

    2016-05-01

    The water cycle is the most active and most important component in the circulation of global mass and energy in the Earth system. Furthermore, water cycle parameters such as evaporation, precipitation, and precipitable water vapour play a major role in global climate change. In this work, we attempt to determine the impact of solar activity on the global water cycle by analyzing the global monthly values of precipitable water vapour, precipitation, and the Solar Modulation Potential in 1983-2008. The first object of this study was to calculate global evaporation for the period 1983-2008. For this purpose, we determined the water cycle rate from satellite data, and precipitation/evaporation relationship from 10 years of Planet Simulator model data. The second object of our study was to investigate the relationship between the Solar Modulation Potential (solar activity index) and the evaporation for the period 1983-2008. The results showed that there is a relationship between the solar modulation potential and the evaporation values for the period of study. Therefore, we can assume that the solar activity has an impact on the global water cycle.

  8. Controlling factors of rainwater and water vapor isotopes at Bangalore, India: Constraints from observations in 2013 Indian monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahul, P.; Ghosh, Prosenjit; Bhattacharya, S. K.; Yoshimura, Kei

    2016-12-01

    Isotopic ratios of rainwaters are believed to decrease with the amount of rainfall. However, analyses of the isotopic composition of rainwater and water vapor samples collected from Bangalore during the monsoon period of 2013 fail to show any simple relationship with the local meteorological parameters whereas show good correlation with the regional integrated convective activity. The correlation is particularly high when the averaging is done over the preceding 8 to 15 days, showing the influence of mixing or residence time scale of atmospheric moisture. This observation emphasizes the role of regional atmospheric circulation driving the isotopic values. A comparison between observed isotope ratios in water vapor and rainwater with Isotope-enabled Global Spectral Model shows discrepancies between the two. The observed values are relatively enriched, indicating a systematic bias in the model values. The higher observed values suggest underestimation of the evaporation in the model, which we estimate to be about 28 ± 15% on average. Simultaneous analyses of rainwater and water vapor isotopic composition again show definitive presence of raindrop evaporation (31 ± 14%). We also documented a distinct pattern of isotopic variation in six samples collected at Bangalore due to mixing of vapor from a cyclonic system in close proximity that originated from the Bay of Bengal. It seems that large-scale isotopic depletion occurs during cyclones caused by Rayleigh fractionation due to massive rainout. These results demonstrate the power of rainwater and water vapor isotope monitoring to elucidate the genesis and dynamics of water recycling within synoptic-scale monsoon systems.

  9. Hydrographic characteristics of central Bay of Bengal waters during southwest monsoon of 1983

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Somayajulu, Y.K.; Murty, T.V.R.; PrasannaKumar, S.; Sastry, J.S.

    to postmonsoon. The loss of energy from the sea surface to the atmosphere by evaporational cooling due to strong monsoonal winds and reduction in the incoming solar radiation by clouds may result in a net loss of energy (cooling). During premonsoon the isotherms...

  10. Responses to water depth and clipping of twenty−three plant species in an Indian monsoonal wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Beth A.; van der Valk, Arnold; Davis, Craig B.

    2015-01-01

    Responses of species to disturbances give insights into how species might respond to future wetland changes. In this study, species of monsoonal wetlands belonging to various functional types (graminoid and non−graminoid emergents, submersed aquatic, floating−leaved aquatic) varied in their growth responses to water depth and harvesting. We tested the effects of water depth (moist soil, flooded) and clipping (unclipped, and clipped) on the biomass and longevity of twenty−three dominant plant species of monsoonal wetlands in the Keoladeo National Park, India in a controlled experiment. With respect to total biomass and survival, six species responded positively to flooding and twelve species responded negatively to clipping. Responses to flooding and clipping, however, sometimes interacted. Individualistic responses of species to water levels and clipping regimes were apparent; species within a functional group did not always respond similarly. Therefore, detailed information on the individualistic responses of species may be needed to predict the vegetation composition of post−disturbance wetlands. In particular, as demands for fresh water increase around the world, studies of life history constraints and responses to hydrological changes will aid wetland managers in developing strategies to conserve biodiversity.

  11. Modern Estimates of Global Water Cycle Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodell, M.; Beaudoing, H. K.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.; Olson, W. S.

    2014-12-01

    The goal of the first phase of the NASA Energy and Water Cycle Study (NEWS) Water and Energy Cycle Climatology project was to develop "state of the global water cycle" and "state of the global energy cycle" assessments based on data from modern ground and space based observing systems and data integrating models. Here we describe results of the water cycle assessment, including mean annual and monthly fluxes over continents and ocean basins during the first decade of the millennium. To the extent possible, the water flux estimates are based on (1) satellite measurements and (2) data-integrating models. A careful accounting of uncertainty in each flux was applied within a routine that enforced multiple water and energy budget constraints simultaneously in a variational framework, in order to produce objectively-determined, optimized estimates. Simultaneous closure of the water and energy budgets caused the ocean evaporation and precipitation terms to increase by about 10% and 5% relative to the original estimates, mainly because the energy budget required turbulent heat fluxes to be substantially larger in order to balance net radiation. In the majority of cases, the observed annual, surface and atmospheric water budgets over the continents and oceans close with much less than 10% residual. Observed residuals and optimized uncertainty estimates are considerably larger for monthly surface and atmospheric water budget closure, often nearing or exceeding 20% in North America, Eurasia, Australia and neighboring islands, and the Arctic and South Atlantic Oceans. The residuals in South America and Africa tend to be smaller, possibly because cold land processes are a non-issue. Fluxes are poorly observed over the Arctic Ocean, certain seas, Antarctica, and the Australasian and Indonesian Islands, leading to reliance on atmospheric analysis estimates. Other details of the study and future directions will be discussed.

  12. Water vapour flux divergence over the Arabian Sea during 1987 summer monsoon using satellite data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vinayachandran, P.N.; RameshKumar, M.R.

    monsoon year. 2. Data and Methodology The Indian national satellite, INSAT-lB, has a VHRR sensor which operates in the infrared channel 10.5-12.5 pm. This is the channel used for deriving the precipitation over the ocean. The methodology adopted... otherwise remained the same. Though data on precipitation over AS for different years have been presented by different authors, the diversity in methodology for precipitation estimates makes the comparison difficult and hence we have not attempted it...

  13. Multi-scale field investigation of water flow pathways and residence times in mountainous catchments during monsoon rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troch, P. A.; Lyon, S. W.; Desilets, S.

    2007-05-01

    The "sky islands" of Arizona and New Mexico in the southwestern United States form a unique complex of about 27 mountain ranges whose ecosystems support many perennial and ephemeral streams in an arid climate. Among these sky islands are the Santa Catalina Mountains near Tucson, AZ, with a peak elevation of 9157 ft at Mt. Lemmon. Sabino Canyon Creek is the main stream which runs on the south face of the mountain range. It usually flows from July through April with an average daily flow of approximately 0.28 m3/s (10 cfs). However, flash floods are common both during summer as a result of intense monsoon rains and during spring because of rapid snowmelt. During these events, flow increases drastically, reaching peak flows up to 480 m3/s (15,984 cfs, July 2006). Characterizing water flow pathways and residence times in these complex catchments is important for improving flash flood warning systems, estimating mountain front recharge, managing forest and wild fires, and understanding ecosystem functions. In the summer of 2006, we set up an extensive hydrometrical and hydro- chemical monitoring network in Sabino Canyon Creek, comprising 40 tipping bucket rain gauges (two of which were equipped to automatically collect rainwater samples), 5 automatic surface water level stations (three of which were equipped with auto samplers), and 8 manual soil lysimeters. In addition, several rain and stream water grab samples were collected manually during intensive rain events. Water samples are analyzed for major ions and liquid water isotopic concentration (2H and 18O) in rain, soil, ground and surface water. The data allows for a detailed reconstruction of water flow pathways and residence times at 3 different catchment scales (2 km2, 8 km2, and 91 km2) during the recorded flow events, including the highest monsoon rainfall-runoff event ever recorded in these mountains.

  14. Study on the association of green house gas (CO2) with monsoon rainfall using AIRS and TRMM satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R. B.; Janmaijaya, M.; Dhaka, S. K.; Kumar, V.

    Monsoon water cycle is the lifeline to over 60 per cent of the world's population. Throughout history, the monsoon-related calamities of droughts and floods have determined the life pattern of people. The association of Green House Gases (GHGs) particularly Carbon dioxide (CO2) with monsoon has been greatly debated amongst the scientific community in the past. The effect of CO2 on the monsoon rainfall over the Indian-Indonesian region (8-30°N, 65°-100°E) is being investigated using satellite data. The correlation coefficient (Rxy) between CO2 and monsoon is analysed. The Rxy is not significantly positive over a greater part of the study region, except a few regions. The inter-annual anomalies of CO2 is identified for playing a secondary role to influencing monsoon while other phenomenon like ENSO might be exerting a much greater influence.

  15. Evaluation method for regional water cycle health based on nature-society water cycle theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shanghong; Fan, Weiwei; Yi, Yujun; Zhao, Yong; Liu, Jiahong

    2017-08-01

    Regional water cycles increasingly reflect the dual influences of natural and social processes, and are affected by global climate change and expanding human activities. Understanding how to maintain a healthy state of the water cycle has become an important proposition for sustainable development of human society. In this paper, natural-social attributes of the water cycle are synthesized and 19 evaluation indices are selected from four dimensions, i.e., water-based ecosystem integrity, water quality, water resource abundance and water resource use. A hierarchical water-cycle health evaluation system is established. An analytic hierarchy process is used to set the weight of the criteria layer and index layer, and the health threshold for each index is defined. Finally, a water-cycle health composite-index assessment model and fuzzy recognition model are constructed based on the comprehensive index method and fuzzy mathematics theory. The model is used to evaluate the state of health of the water cycle in Beijing during 2010-2014 and in the planning year (late 2014), considering the transfer of 1 billion m3 of water by the South-to-North Water Diversion Project (SNWDP). The results show health scores for Beijing of 2.87, 3.10, 3.38, 3.11 and 3.02 during 2010-2014. The results of fuzzy recognition show that the sub-healthy grade accounted for 54%, 49%, 61% and 49% of the total score, and all years had a sub-healthy state. Results of the criteria layer analysis show that water ecosystem function, water quality and water use were all at the sub-healthy level and that water abundance was at the lowest, or sick, level. With the water transfer from the SNWDP, the health score of the water cycle in Beijing reached 4.04. The healthy grade accounted for 60% of the total score, and the water cycle system was generally in a healthy state. Beijing's water cycle health level is expected to further improve with increasing water diversion from the SNWDP and industrial

  16. WaterNet: The NASA Water Cycle Solutions Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belvedere, D. R.; Houser, P. R.; Imam, B.; Schiffer, R.; Schlosser, C. A.; Gupta, H. V.; Welty, C.; Vorosmarty, C.; Matthews, D.; Lawford, R.

    2006-05-01

    The water cycle is continuously being transformed by climate change, erosion, pollution, salinization, and engineering practices, and is central to drought, flood, and disease hazards. Therefore, it is a national priority is to use advancements in scientific observations and knowledge to develop solutions to society's water challenges. NASA's unique role in this national priority is to exploit its unique view from space to improve water and energy cycle monitoring and prediction. As such, NASA's Earth science programs have collected substantial water cycle information and knowledge that must be integrated and shared to develop solutions in all twelve national priority application areas. However, NASA alone cannot achieve the ultimate goal of improved operational environmental assessments, predictions and applications and therefore must establish collaborations and interoperability with existing networks and nodes of research organizations, operational agencies, the scientific community, and private industry. Therefore, we propose to develop WaterNet: The NASA Water Cycle Solutions Network whose goal is to improve and optimize the sustained ability of water cycle researchers, stakeholders, organizations and networks to interact, identify, harness, and extend NASA research results to augment decision support tools and meet national needs. We will develop WaterNet by engaging relevant NASA water and energy cycle resources and community-of-practice organizations to develop what we term an "actionable database" that can be used to communicate and connect NASA Water and energy cycle focus area research Results (NWRs) towards the improvement of water-related Decision Support Tools (DSTs). Recognizing the many existing highly valuable water-related science and application networks, we will focus a balance of our efforts to enable their interoperability in a solutions network context. We will initially focus on identifying, collecting information about, and analyzing the

  17. The Aerosol-Monsoon Climate System of Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kyu-Myong, Kim

    2012-01-01

    absorbing aerosols (dust and black carbon) may interact with monsoon dynamics to produce feedback effects on the atmospheric water cycle, leading to in accelerated melting of snowpacks over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau, and subsequent changes in evolution of the pre-monsoon and peak monsoon rainfall, moisture and wind distributions in South Asia and East Asia.

  18. Following the Water Cycle to Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, T. M.

    2012-12-01

    systems learning model based on feedback and limits to perception. I focus on a part of the course that builds on connections that start in the hydrosphere and that includes some basic experiential learning about the water cycle and students' reliance on it. We measure and visualize aspects of the water cycle in nearby areas of campus (designated as an outdoor classroom and demonstration garden). The evapotranspiration flow is used to introduce notions of what can happen when flows are not sensed (e.g., invisible to us). Students use an online water footprint calculator to discover how large their water reliance is, particularly through energy generation, food consumption and food waste; and how far their water reach extends (virtual water trade). They consider the ethical implications of their water use in a world in which it is becoming a more rare resource and in some cases a valued commodity. They learn about non-utilitarian values of water based on an activity on the values of nature. They look at local, community-based efforts to improve water quality and to re-localize water dependence. A reading from Aldo Leopold puts the water cycle in a historical and cultural perspective. The water cycle is strongly interwoven with natural and human energy systems, the climate system, the carbon cycle, nutrient cycles, the rock cycle, and serves as a starting point to reach many other topics.

  19. The artificial water cycle: emergy analysis of waste water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastianoni, Simone; Fugaro, Laura; Principi, Ilaria; Rosini, Marco

    2003-04-01

    The artificial water cycle can be divided into the phases of water capture from the environment, potabilisation, distribution, waste water collection, waste water treatment and discharge back into the environment. The terminal phase of this cycle, from waste water collection to discharge into the environment, was assessed by emergy analysis. Emergy is the quantity of solar energy needed directly or indirectly to provide a product or energy flow in a given process. The emergy flow attributed to a process is therefore an index of the past and present environmental cost to support it. Six municipalities on the western side of the province of Bologna were analysed. Waste water collection is managed by the municipal councils and treatment is carried out in plants managed by a service company. Waste water collection was analysed by compiling a mass balance of the sewer system serving the six municipalities, including construction materials and sand for laying the pipelines. Emergy analysis of the water treatment plants was also carried out. The results show that the great quantity of emergy required to treat a gram of water is largely due to input of non renewable fossil fuels. As found in our previous analysis of the first part of the cycle, treatment is likewise characterised by high expenditure of non renewable resources, indicating a correlation with energy flows.

  20. The DOE Water Cycle Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, N.L.; King, A.W.; Miller, M.A.; Springer, E.P.; Wesely, M.L.; Bashford, K.E.; Conrad, M.E.; Costigan, K.; Foster, P.N.; Gibbs, H.K.; Jin, J.; Klazura, J.; Lesht, B.M.; Machavaram, M.V.; Pan, F.; Song, J.; Troyan, D.; Washington-Allen, R.A.

    2003-09-20

    A Department of Energy (DOE) multi-laboratory Water Cycle Pilot Study (WCPS) investigated components of the local water budget at the Walnut River Watershed in Kansas to study the relative importance of various processes and to determine the feasibility of observational water budget closure. An extensive database of local meteorological time series and land surface characteristics was compiled. Numerical simulations of water budget components were generated and, to the extent possible, validated for three nested domains within the Southern Great Plains; the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement/Cloud Atmospheric Radiation Testbed (ARM/CART), the Walnut River Watershed (WRW), and the Whitewater Watershed (WW), Kansas A 2-month Intensive Observation Period (IOP) was conducted to gather detailed observations relevant to specific details of the water budget, including fine-scale precipitation, streamflow, and soil moisture measurements not made routinely by other programs. Event and season al water isotope (delta 18O, delta D) sampling in rainwater, streams, soils, lakes, and wells provided a means of tracing sources and sinks within and external to the WW, WRW, and the ARM/CART domains. The WCPS measured changes in leaf area index for several vegetation types, deep groundwater variations at two wells, and meteorological variables at a number of sites in the WRW. Additional activities of the WCPS include code development toward a regional climate model with water isotope processes, soil moisture transect measurements, and water level measurements in ground water wells.

  1. Chemical characteristics of aerosol and rain water during an El Niño and PDO influenced Indian summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeev, Pradhi; Rajput, Prashant; Gupta, Tarun

    2016-11-01

    According to the meteorological long-term variability pattern, year 2015 was influenced by El Niño and PDO (Pacific Decadal Oscillation; causes weakening of Indian Summer Monsoon). These conditions facilitate the assessment of chemical characteristics of fine-mode ambient aerosols (PM2.5; n = 48) and individual rain waters (pH: 6.4-7.6; n = 15) during the South-west monsoon (July-September 2015) in the central Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP; Kanpur). Water-soluble ionic species (WSIS) have been measured to assess the undergoing processes (neutralization, formation and below-cloud scavenging) and estimate their dry and wet deposition fluxes. The ∑WSIS varies from 4 to 32 μg/m3 in PM2.5, whereas it ranges from 32 to 102 mg/L in rain waters. The NH4+ and SO42- are found to be predominant in PM2.5 (16-120 μg/m3), whereas HCO3- and Ca2+ are predominant in rain water samples. The difference in chemical composition of PM2.5 and rain water is largely attributed to additional contribution of coarse-mode mineral dust in rain water. The Ca2+ and Mg2+ in both aerosols and rain water samples are associated with HCO3-. The NO3- and SO42- are neutralized predominantly by NH4+ and ∑-/∑+ ratio is ≈ 1 in both aerosols and rain waters. Furthermore, co-variability of NO3- with nss-Ca2+ in PM2.5 indicates role of fine-mode mineral dust surface in the formation of ammonium nitrate. Characteristic mass ratios (HCO3-/Ca2+ and SO42-/NH4+) in rain water look quite similar to those in aerosols (PM2.5). This suggests that below-cloud scavenging is predominant mechanism of aerosols wash-out. Dry deposition fluxes of Mg2+, NH4+ and SO42- are ∼13% of their wet deposition fluxes, whereas for K+, Ca2+ and NO3- it is <6%.

  2. Water cycle investigations in Hungarian forest ecosystems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Judit Sitkey

    2006-01-01

    From the biological point of view the value of autotrophy plant association is determined by the carbon fixation and the carbon cycle. Among the plant associations of Hungary, forest has the largest biological carbon fixation and carbon cycle. In general,the annual water cycle is the key factor in the organic material production of the Hungarian forests. The most intensive water consumption and organic material production take place from May till July, which period is named main water consumption and respectively main growing period. In Hungary the categories of the forest climate are characterized by main tree species and based on the forest climate covers 8% of the forest area, hornbeam-oak forest climate covers 22%, sessile oak-Turkey oak forest climate covers48% and forest steppe climate covers 22%. Partly in the frame of ICP-Forests, the Department of Ecology in the Forest Research Institute carries out long term, complex ecophysiological investigations on several sample plots (so-called basic plots) throughout the whole country. The organic material production (growth), the nutrient and water cycle, the measurements of air pollutants and meteorological parameters, as well as chemical analyses are all part of the investigations. As a comparison the figure of two basic plotsforest steppe climate in the hydrological year of 2001-2002. In the Hungarian forest 60%-70% of the precipitation is used for interception, evaporation, and in the vegetation season, for the transpiration both in beech and forest steppe climate. From other point of view, only 30%-40% of the open air precipitation infiltrates into the soil and can be utilized by the forest.

  3. Comparative Study of Monsoon Rainfall Variability over India and the Odisha State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K C Gouda

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Indian summer monsoon (ISM plays an important role in the weather and climate system over India. The rainfall during monsoon season controls many sectors from agriculture, food, energy, and water, to the management of disasters. Being a coastal province on the eastern side of India, Odisha is one of the most important states affected by the monsoon rainfall and associated hydro-meteorological systems. The variability of monsoon rainfall is highly unpredictable at multiple scales both in space and time. In this study, the monsoon variability over the state of Odisha is studied using the daily gridded rainfall data from India Meteorological Department (IMD. A comparative analysis of the behaviour of monsoon rainfall at a larger scale (India, regional scale (Odisha, and sub-regional scale (zones of Odisha is carried out in terms of the seasonal cycle of monsoon rainfall and its interannual variability. It is seen that there is no synchronization in the seasonal monsoon category (normal/excess/deficit when analysed over large (India and regional (Odisha scales. The impact of El Niño, La Niña, and the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD on the monsoon rainfall at both scales (large scale and regional scale is analysed and compared. The results show that the impact is much more for rainfall over India, but it has no such relation with the rainfall over Odisha. It is also observed that there is a positive (negative relation of the IOD with the seasonal monsoon rainfall variability over Odisha (India. The correlation between the IAV of monsoon rainfall between the large scale and regional scale was found to be 0.46 with a phase synchronization of 63%. IAV on a sub-regional scale is also presented.

  4. Hydrochemistry of the Bay of Bengal: Possible reasons for a different water-column cycling of carbon and nitrogen from the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, C.K.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; DileepKumar, M.; Varaprasad, S.J.D; Jayakumar, D; George, M.D; Singbal, S.Y.S.

    A study on biogeochemical cycling in the western Bay of Bengal was undertaken during two seasons (pre-southwest monsoon and northeast monsoon of 1991). Relationships of the conservative tracers NO and PO with potential temperature (~f) are used...

  5. Low-high latitude interaction forcing on the evolution of the 400 kyr cycle in East Asian winter monsoon records during the last 2.8 Myr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dawei; Zhao, Meixun; Tian, Jun

    2017-09-01

    Variability of the East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM), stronger during glacials and weaker during interglacials, has been tightly linked to the wax and wane of the Northern Hemisphere ice sheets (NHIS) via the Siberian High over the last 2.8 million years (Myr). However, the long eccentricity cycle (ca. 400 kyr) in the EAWM record from the late Pliocene to early-Pleistocene (2.8-1.2 Ma) could not be linked to NHIS changes, which lacked the long eccentricity cycle in the Pleistocene. Here, we present the first low latitude EAWM record of the last 2.8 Myr using surface and subsurface temperature difference from the northern South China Sea to evaluate interactions between tropical ocean and EAWM changes. The results show that the EAWM variability displayed significant 400 kyr cycle between 2.8 Ma and 1.2 Ma, with weak (strong) EAWM during high (low) earth orbital eccentricity state. A super El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) proxy record, calculated using west-east equatorial Pacific sea surface temperature differences, revealed 400 kyr cycles throughout the last 2.8 Myr with warm phase during high eccentricity state. Thus, we propose that super ENSO mean state strongly modulated the EAWM strength through remote forcing to generate the 400 kyr cycle between 2.8 Ma and 1.2 Ma, while low NHIS volume was not sufficient to dominate the EAWM variation as it did over the last 0.9 Myr with 100 kyr cycles in dominance.

  6. Monsoon Country

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Heavy rains have battered areas of south China this year,causing death and destruction For most areas south of the Yangtze River,this year’s monsoon season has come early, with heavy rains triggering floods,damaging crops,threatening reservoirs and causing deaths.

  7. Martian north polar cap summer water cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Adrian J; Becerra, Patricio; Byrne, Shane

    2016-01-01

    A key outstanding question in Martian science is 'are the polar caps gaining or losing mass and what are the implications for past, current and future climate?' To address this question, we use observations from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) of the north polar cap during late summer for multiple Martian years, to monitor the summertime water cycle in order to place quantitative limits on the amount of water ice deposited and sublimed in late summer. We establish here for the first time the summer cycle of water ice absorption band signatures on the north polar cap. We show that in a key region in the interior of the north polar cap, the absorption band depths grow until Ls=120, when they begin to shrink, until they are obscured at the end of summer by the north polar hood. This behavior is transferable over the entire north polar cap, where in late summer regions 'flip' from being net sublimating into net condensation mode. This transition or 'mode flip' happens earlier for ...

  8. Water Cycle Multimission Observation Strategy (WACMOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Z.

    2009-04-01

    To understand the role of the terrestrial hydrosphere-biosphere in Earth's climate system it is essential to be able to measure from space hydroclimatic variables, such as radiation, precipitation, evapotranspiration, soil moisture, clouds, water vapour, surface water and runoff, vegetation state, albedo and surface temperature, etc. Such measurements are required to further increase our understanding of the global climate and its variability, both spatially and temporally. Additionally, such observations advance our understanding of the coupling between terrestrial and atmospheric branches of the water cycle, and how this coupling may influence climate variability and predictability. To enhance the prediction of variations in the global water cycle, based on improved understanding of hydrological processes and its close linkage with the energy cycle and its sustained monitoring capability, is a key contribution to mitigation of water-related damages and sustainable human development. In many cases, the combination of space-based and high-resolution in situ data provides the essential information for effectively addressing water management issues (GEOSS 10-Year Implementation Plan - REFERENCE DOCUMENT, GEO 203-1). Recently the European Space Agency (ESA) has initiated, in its Support to Science Element programme, the Water Cycle Multimission Observation Strategy (WACMOS). WACMOS contributes to above described international efforts by supporting scientists in ESA member countries to develop and validate novel and improved multi-mission based products, and to enhance currently available global water datasets, so as to maximize the use of ESA data. In this context, the short term objectives of the project include: • Develop and validate a Product Portfolio of novel and/or improved multi-mission based geoinformation datasets at global and regional scales contributing to the objectives of the GEWEX program. WACMOS is focused on four Thematic Priorities described below

  9. Isotopes in the Arctic atmospheric water cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonne, Jean-Louis; Werner, Martin; Meyer, Hanno; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Rabe, Benjamin; Behrens, Melanie; Schönicke, Lutz; Steen Larsen, Hans Christian; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie

    2016-04-01

    The ISO-ARC project aims at documenting the Arctic atmospheric hydrological cycle, by assessing the imprint of the marine boundary conditions (e.g. temperature variations, circulation changes, or meltwater input) to the isotopic composition of the atmospheric water cycle (H218O and HDO) with a focus on North Atlantic and Arctic oceans. For this purpose, two continuous monitoring water vapour stable isotopes cavity ring-down spectrometers have been installed in July 2015: on-board the Polarstern research vessel and in the Siberian Lena delta Samoylov research station (N 72° 22', E 126° 29'). The Polarstern measurements cover the summer 2015 Arctic campaign from July to mid-October, including six weeks in the Fram Strait region in July- August, followed by a campaign reaching the North Pole and a transect from the Norwegian Sea to the North Sea. These vapour observations are completed by water isotopic measurements in samples from the surface ocean water for Polarstern and from precipitation in Samoylov and Tiksi (120 km south-east of the station). A custom-made designed automatic calibration system has been implemented in a comparable manner for both vapour instruments, based on the injection of different liquid water standards, which are completely vaporised in dry air at high temperature. Subsequent humidity level can be adjusted from 2000 to at least 30000 ppm. For a better resilience, an independent calibration system has been added on the Samoylov instrument, allowing measurements of one standard at humidity levels ranging from 2000 to 15000 ppm: dry air is introduced in a tank containing a large amount of liquid water standard, undergoing evaporation under a controlled environment. The measurement protocol includes an automatic calibration every 25 hours. First instrument characterisation experiments depict a significant isotope-humidity effect at low humidity, dependant on the isotopic composition of the standard. For ambient air, our first isotope

  10. Martian north polar cap summer water cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Adrian J.; Calvin, Wendy M.; Becerra, Patricio; Byrne, Shane

    2016-10-01

    A key outstanding question in Martian science is "are the polar caps gaining or losing mass and what are the implications for past, current and future climate?" To address this question, we use observations from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) of the north polar cap during late summer for multiple Martian years, to monitor the summertime water cycle in order to place quantitative limits on the amount of water ice deposited and sublimed in late summer. We establish here for the first time the summer cycle of water ice absorption band signatures on the north polar cap. We show that in a key region in the interior of the north polar cap, the absorption band depths grow until Ls = 120, when they begin to shrink, until they are obscured at the end of summer by the north polar hood. This behavior is transferable over the entire north polar cap, where in late summer regions 'flip' from being net sublimating into net condensation mode. This transition or 'mode flip' happens earlier for regions closer to the pole, and later for regions close to the periphery of the cap. The observations and calculations presented herein estimate that on average a water ice layer ∼70 microns thick is deposited during the Ls = 135-164 period. This is far larger than the results of deposition on the south pole during summer, where an average layer 0.6-6 microns deep has been estimated by Brown et al. (2014) Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 406, 102-109.

  11. Rooting depths regulate the global water cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguez-Macho, Gonzalo; Fan, Ying

    2017-04-01

    Ecosystem productivity and evapotranspiration fluxes are fundamental regulators of the global carbon and water cycles. Where and how much plants grow is largely determined by atmospheric conditions and soil water availability. It is the reliance of ecosystems on soil water that links their fate tightly to precipitation and groundwater reach. Here, we explore the controls on plant root uptake imposed by climate at the large scale and by groundwater accessibility at the local drainage scale, aiming to untangle the spatial and temporal global patterns of rain-fed and groundwater-fed ecosystems. To this end, we use observed atmospheric and productivity conditions to model the seasonal evolution of root uptake and soil moisture profiles and their coupling to the water table, with a global groundwater-soil-vegetation framework at the 1km resolution. Results indicate highly variable uptake-depth across seasonal and local hydrologic gradients, and a far more common occurrence of deep (>5m) uptake than previous thought. Implications to future environmental change are briefly discussed.

  12. Using stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopes to reveal monsoonal and related hydrological effects on meteoric water in the Western Pacific monsoon region: A case study of the Ilan region, northeastern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Tsung-Ren; Huang, Chun-Chun; Chen, Chi-Tsun; Chen, Jui-Er; Liang, Wen-Jui

    2016-10-01

    This study analyzes the isotopic compositions (δ2H and δ18O) of meteoric waters, including precipitation and stream water, to reveal what major hydrological processes affect the hydrological regime of the Ilan region, northeastern Taiwan. The isotopic results indicate monsoonal flows as the fundamental factors affecting studied precipitation and stream water. Summer precipitation sourced from southerly air mass exhibits lower δ and deuterium-excess (dE) values than winter precipitation sourced from northerly air masses. The δ18O and dE values are respectively -7.7‰ and 8‰ for summer precipitation and -3.3‰ and 24‰ for winter precipitation. Furthermore, semi-quantitative estimations using dE evidence indicate that summertime southerly air masses generally contribute more to stream water than wintertime northerly air-mass flows (approximately 54% vs. 46%). However, the contribution fractions are controlled by the orientation of catchments to the windward side of respective monsoonal flows. Northern catchments, located on the windward side of southerly air masses, receive about 60% of their water from precipitation condensed from the southerly air masses, and 40% from the northerly air masses. By comparison, southern catchments, located on the windward side of northerly air masses, receive about 59% of their water from northerly air masses and 41% from southerly air masses. Additionally, catchment effect, induced from δ value, is notable in stream basins with high elevations but this is not related to catchment sizes. Besides this, altitude effect, which is determined in terms of δ18O values, was derived using data from four precipitation stations of northern Taiwan. It ranges from -2.5 to -3.0‰ per 100 m depending on the season; moreover, based on the dE evidence, secondary evaporation effects are apparent with moisture recycling influencing inland summer precipitation and raindrop evaporation influencing inland winter precipitation.

  13. The vertical structure of ozone and water vapor profiles in Lhasa within Asia summer monsoon anticyclone during the stratospheric intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Vogel, Bärbel; Bian, Jianchun; Müller, Rolf; Günther, Gebhard; Bai, Zhixuan; Li, Qian; Fan, Qiujun; Zhang, Jinqiang

    2017-04-01

    A stratospheric intrusion process occurred over the southeastern side of the Asia summer monsoon (ASM) region is investigated using the balloon-borne measurements of ozone and water vapor during 18-20 August 2013. Data from Lhasa (29.66° N, 91.14° E, above sea level (asl.) 3,650 m) show that the positive relative change of the ozone mixing ratios in the tropopause layer attained to 90 % on 19 and 20 August. The backward trajectory calculation from CLaMS model and the satellite data from the ozone monitoring instrument (OMI) and the atmospheric infrared sounder (AIRS) indicate that the (stratospheric) air parcels intruded (originated) from the Northeast Asia to the southeastern edge of the ASM anticyclone. Meanwhile, typhoon Utor occurred over the sourtheastern edge of the ASM and lasted from 8 to 18 August 2013. The convection associated with Utor uplifted air with low ozone from the Western Pacific to the middle/upper troposphere. Air parcels with high ozone from the high latitude and with low ozone from the Western Pacific met at the sourtheastern side of the ASM and then transported westward to Lhasa over long-distances (˜2,000 km). In addition, the laminated identification method is used to identify the laminae structure of the ozone and water vapor profiles from the middle troposphere to the lower stratosphere in Lhasa, confirming the role of the dynamic disturbance (e.g., Rossby and gravity wave)

  14. Global monsoon in a geological perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG PinXian

    2009-01-01

    Monsoon is now considered as a global system rather than regional phenomena only. For over 300 years, monsoon has been viewed as a gigantic land-sea breeze, but now satellite and conventional observations support an alternative hypothesis which considers monsoon as a manifestation of sea-sonal migration of the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) and, hence, a climate system of the global scale. As a low-latitude climate system, monsoon exists over all continents but Antarctica, and through all the geological history at least since the Phenorozoic. The time is ripe for systematical studies of monsoon variations in space and time.As evidenced by the geological records, the global monsoon is controlled by the Wilson cycle on the tectonic time scale (106-108a). A "Mega-continent" produces "Mega-monsoon", and its breakdown leads to weakening of the monsoon Intensity. On the time scales of 104-105 a, the global monsoon displays the precessional cycles of~20 ka and eccentricity cycles of 100- and 400-ka, i.e. the orbital cycles. On the time scales of 103 a and below, the global monsoon intensity is modulated by solar cy-cles and other factors. The cyclicity of global monsoon represents one of the fundamental factors re-sponsible for variations in the Earth surface system as well as for the environmental changes of the human society. The 400-ka long eccentricity cycles of the global monsoon is likened to "heartbeat" of the Earth system, and the precession cycle of the global monsoon was responsible for the collapse of several Asian and African ancient cultures at~4000 years ago, whereas the Solar cycles led to the de-mise of the Maya civilization about a thousand years ago. Therefore, paleoclimatology should be fo-cused not only on the high-latitude processes centered at ice cap variations, but also on the low-latitude processes such as monsoons, as the latter are much more common in the geological history compared to the glaciations.

  15. Monsoon signatures in recent corals from the Laccadive Islands

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.A.S.

    have reduced water transparency, thereby curtailing the growth rates. Scanning electron microscopy clearly showed the presence of lithogenic and biogenic material in the monsoonal bands and their absence in the non-monsoonal bands. This indicates...

  16. Asian Summer Monsoon and its Associated Rainfall Variability in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsamon Limsakul

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The Asian monsoon is an important component of the Earth's climate. Its associated rainfall variability is a crucial fac¬tor for Thailand's socio-economic development, water resources and agricultural management. An analysis shows that the Thailand rainfall annual cycle is in phase with the Indian summer monsoon (ISM and the western North Pacific summer monsoon (WNPSM. On the basis of the Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF analysis, the dominant spatial-temporal interannual variability in summer monsoon rainfall (Jun.-Sep. during 1975-2006 could be explained by the first two EOF modes, accounting for 34% of the total variance. The EOF1 was spatially dominated by strong positive signals in the central and east, whereas the EOF2 exhibited dipole variability. The coefficient time series of EOF1 significantly correlated posi¬tively with ISM index, but negatively with WNPSM index. The results suggest that summer monsoon rainfall in Thailand is higher (lower than normal during the strengthening (weakening of ISM. In contrast, rainfall in the north-east (central is surplus (deficit during the strengthening (weakening of WNPSM. These findings imply that, on an interannual time scale, ISM and WNPSM exert their influence to a different extent on summer monsoon rainfall in Thailand. A clear picture of linking mechanisms and interactions with another climate mode in the Indo-Pacific sector needs to be understood. This knowledge is essential for effectively adapting to climate-related hazards and rainfall extremes and for better management of water resource and agriculture in Thailand, especially under current/future warming conditions.

  17. Large-scale overview of the summer monsoon over West Africa during the AMMA field experiment in 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Janicot

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The AMMA (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis program is dedicated to providing a better understanding of the West African monsoon and its influence on the physical, chemical and biological environment regionally and globally, as well as relating variability of this monsoon system to issues of health, water resources, food security and demography for West African nations. Within this framework, an intensive field campaign took place during the summer of 2006 to better document specific processes and weather systems at various key stages of this monsoon season. This campaign was embedded within a longer observation period that documented the annual cycle of surface and atmospheric conditions between 2005 and 2007. The present paper provides a large and regional scale overview of the 2006 summer monsoon season, that includes consideration of of the convective activity, mean atmospheric circulation and synoptic/intraseasonal weather systems, oceanic and land surface conditions, continental hydrology, dust concentration and ozone distribution. The 2006 African summer monsoon was a near-normal rainy season except for a large-scale rainfall excess north of 15° N. This monsoon season was also characterized by a 10-day delayed onset compared to climatology, with convection becoming developed only after 10 July. This onset delay impacted the continental hydrology, soil moisture and vegetation dynamics as well as dust emission. More details of some less-well-known atmospheric features in the African monsoon at intraseasonal and synoptic scales are provided in order to promote future research in these areas.

  18. Large-scale overview of the summer monsoon over West Africa during the AMMA field experiment in 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicot, S.; Thorncroft, C. D.; Ali, A.; Asencio, N.; Berry, G.; Bock, O.; Bourles, B.; Caniaux, G.; Chauvin, F.; Deme, A.; Kergoat, L.; Lafore, J.-P.; Lavaysse, C.; Lebel, T.; Marticorena, B.; Mounier, F.; Nedelec, P.; Redelsperger, J.-L.; Ravegnani, F.; Reeves, C. E.; Roca, R.; de Rosnay, P.; Schlager, H.; Sultan, B.; Tomasini, M.; Ulanovsky, A.; Acmad Forecasters Team

    2008-09-01

    The AMMA (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis) program is dedicated to providing a better understanding of the West African monsoon and its influence on the physical, chemical and biological environment regionally and globally, as well as relating variability of this monsoon system to issues of health, water resources, food security and demography for West African nations. Within this framework, an intensive field campaign took place during the summer of 2006 to better document specific processes and weather systems at various key stages of this monsoon season. This campaign was embedded within a longer observation period that documented the annual cycle of surface and atmospheric conditions between 2005 and 2007. The present paper provides a large and regional scale overview of the 2006 summer monsoon season, that includes consideration of of the convective activity, mean atmospheric circulation and synoptic/intraseasonal weather systems, oceanic and land surface conditions, continental hydrology, dust concentration and ozone distribution. The 2006 African summer monsoon was a near-normal rainy season except for a large-scale rainfall excess north of 15° N. This monsoon season was also characterized by a 10-day delayed onset compared to climatology, with convection becoming developed only after 10 July. This onset delay impacted the continental hydrology, soil moisture and vegetation dynamics as well as dust emission. More details of some less-well-known atmospheric features in the African monsoon at intraseasonal and synoptic scales are provided in order to promote future research in these areas.

  19. Development of the TLALOCNet GPS-Met Network in Northwestern Mexico: Supporting Continuous Water Vapor Observations of the North American Monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galetzka, J.; Feaux, K.; Cabral, E.; Salazar-Tlaczani, L.; Adams, D. K.; Serra, Y. L.; Mattioli, G. S.; Miller, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    TLALOCNet is a combined atmospheric and tectonic cGPS-Met network in Mexico designed for the investigation of climate, atmospheric processes, the earthquake cycle, and tectonics. While EarthScope-Plate Boundary Observatory (conterminous US, Alaska, Puerto Rico) is among the networks poised to become a nucleus for hemisphere-scale GPS observations, the completion of TLALOCNet at the end of 2015 will close a gap between PBO and other Latin American GPS networks that include COCONet (Central America, Caribbean, and Northern South America), CAnTO, CAP, and IGS extending from Alaska to Patagonia. The National Science Foundation funded the construction and operation of TLALOCNet, with significant matching funds and resources provided by the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM). The project will involve the construction or refurbishment of 38 cGPS-Met stations in Mexico built to PBO standards. The first three TLALOCNet stations were installed in the northern Mexican states of Sonora and Chihuahua in July 2014, following the North American Monsoon GPS Transect Experiment 2013. Together these observations better characterize critical components of water transport in the region. Data from these stations are now available through the UNAVCO data archive and can be downloaded from http://facility.unavco.org/data/dai2/app/dai2.html#. By the end of 2014, TLALOCNet data, together with complementary data from other regional cGPS networks in Mexico, will also be openly available through a Mexico-based data center. We will present the status of the project to date, including an overview of the station hardware, data communications, data flow, construction schedule, and science objectives. We will also present some of the challenges encountered, including regional logistics, shipping and importation, site security, and other issues associated with the construction and operation of a large continuous GPS network.

  20. Waves in the nearshore waters of northern Arabian Sea during the summer monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Singh, J.; Pednekar, P.S.; Gowthaman, R.

    % of the wave height at the measurement location is due to the swells arriving from the south-west and the remaining is due to the seas from south-west to north-west. Wave age of the measured data indicates that the waves in the nearshore waters of northern...

  1. South Asian summer monsoon variability during the last ˜54 kyrs inferred from surface water salinity and river runoff proxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebregiorgis, D.; Hathorne, E. C.; Sijinkumar, A. V.; Nath, B. Nagender; Nürnberg, D.; Frank, M.

    2016-04-01

    The past variability of the South Asian Monsoon is mostly known from records of wind strength over the Arabian Sea while high-resolution paleorecords from regions of strong monsoon precipitation are still lacking. Here, we present records of past monsoon variability obtained from sediment core SK 168/GC-1, which was collected at the Alcock Seamount complex in the Andaman Sea. We utilize the ecological habitats of different planktic foraminiferal species to reconstruct freshwater-induced stratification based on paired Mg/Ca and δ18O analyses and to estimate seawater δ18O (δ18Osw). The difference between surface and thermocline temperatures (ΔT) and δ18Osw (Δδ18Osw) is used to investigate changes in upper ocean stratification. Additionally, Ba/Ca in G. sacculifer tests is used as a direct proxy for riverine runoff and sea surface salinity (SSS) changes related to monsoon precipitation on land. Our Δδ18Osw time series reveals that upper ocean salinity stratification did not change significantly throughout the last glacial suggesting little influence of NH insolation changes. The strongest increase in temperature gradients between the mixed layer and the thermocline is recorded for the mid-Holocene and indicate the presence of a significantly shallower thermocline. In line with previous work, the δ18Osw and Ba/Ca records demonstrate that monsoon climate during the LGM was characterized by a significantly weaker southwest monsoon circulation and strongly reduced runoff. Based on our data the South Asian Summer Monsoon (SAM) over the Irrawaddyy strengthened gradually after the LGM beginning at ∼18 ka. This is some 3 kyrs before an increase of the Ba/Ca record from the Arabian Sea and indicates that South Asian Monsoon climate dynamics are more complex than the simple N-S displacement of the ITCZ as generally described for other regions. Minimum δ18Osw values recorded during the mid-Holocene are in phase with Ba/Ca marking a stronger monsoon precipitation

  2. The turbulence underside of the West African Monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lothon, M.; Lohou, F.; Saïd, F.; Campistron, B.; Canut, G.; Couvreux, F.; Durand, P.; Kalapureddy, M. C.; Lee, Y.; Madougou, S.; Serça, D.

    2009-09-01

    We present an experimental analysis of the sahelian Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) processes in the context of the AMMA (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis) program and its extensive observational deployment in 2006. From May to October, two opposite flows are interacting in the first 5 thousands m over surface in Sahel: the moist southerly monsoon flow and the overlying northeasterly Saharan Air Layer (SAL) in which the African Easterly Jet (AEJ) is developing, generated by the contrast of surface moisture and temperature between Sahara and the Gulf of Guinea. Until the monsoon onset in mid-July, the low troposphere is slowly moistening through advection from the Guinea Gulf by the monsoon flow, especially during the night. During the day, the dry convection occurring within the PBL vertically redistributes part of the water vapour. After the onset, deep convection occurs much more frequently and the role played by the PBL completely changes. The relative position of the interface between monsoon and SAL and the PBL top inversion is crucial for the nature of the interaction and its impact on scalars, especially water vapour. We consider the role of the PBL processes in this context, and focus on four main aspects: (1) the diurnal cycle of the low troposphere, (2) the interaction between the PBL and the AEJ, (3) the entrainment at the PBL top (4) the impact of the PBL processes at surface. We base our analysis on long term profilers, radiosondes, and surface flux data, short term aircraft turbulence measurements made during the Special Observing Periods and Large Eddy Simulation. The network of wind profilers enables us to study the large scale circulation and highlight the consistence and extent of the nocturnal jet, and the importance of the diurnal cycle of the low troposphere for the West African Monsoon. During daytime, both the wind within the monsoon flow and the AEJ windspeed in the overlying SAL decrease, due to turbulent mixing within the PBL and

  3. Water Cycle in the Atmosphere and Shallow Subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokano, Tetsuya

    The global water cycle on Earth constitutes one of the most relevant components of the terrestrial ecosystem. While the vast majority of terrestrial water is stored in the world oceans, the perpetual cycle of water between ocean, atmosphere and land in all three phases is recognised as one basic feature that characterises the Earth, and is contrasted to the rest of the Solar System. On the other hand, Mars is devoid of a liquid hydrological cycle in the atmosphere and on the surface in the form of rainfall, rivers or oceans, which favour life on Earth's surface. However, a subtle water cycle does exist on present Mars and elucidating the details of the water cycle is crucial in understanding the global water inventory.

  4. Response of the cold water mass in the western South China Sea to the wind stress curl associated with the summer monsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUANG Wei; WANG Dongxiao; HU Jianyu; NI Wensheng

    2006-01-01

    Analysis of climatological observation temperature data reveals that during the southwesterly monsoon, there exists a low temperature zone east of Vietnam. It cools down from June to August and warms up in September. Meanwhile, during this period, the cold water mass spreads eastward to the deep basin. Numerical experiments validate the results of data analysis and further verify that there are two basic factors that induce the Vietnam cold water. The major one is the strong local positive wind stress curl, which leads to the divergence of sea surface water and the upward supplement of lower layer water in the deep basin. Another minor one is the alongshore component of southwesterly monsoon, which drives the offshore Ekman transport and coastal upwelling in the shallow region along the Vietnam coast. In addition, the negative wind stress curl in the southern South China Sea inputs negative vorticity to the ocean and drives a strong anticyclonic gyre, which affects the spatial distribution of the cold water evidently.

  5. Orbitally-paced variations of water availability in the SE Asian Monsoon region following the Miocene Climate Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitmann, Emma O.; Ji, Shunchuan; Nie, Junsheng; Breecker, Daniel O.

    2017-09-01

    Middle Miocene Earth had several boundary conditions similar to those predicted for future Earth including similar atmospheric pCO2 and substantial Antarctic ice cover but no northern hemisphere ice sheets. We describe a 12 m outcrop of the terrestrial Yanwan Section in the Tianshui Basin, Gansu, China, following the Miocene Climate Transition (13.9-13.7 Ma). It consists of ∼25 cm thick CaCO3-cemented horizons that overprint siltstones every ∼1 m. We suggest that stacked soils developed in siltstones under a seasonal climate with a fluctuating water table, evidenced by roots, clay films, mottling, presence of CaCO3 nodules, and stacked carbonate nodule δ13 C and δ18 O profiles that mimic modern soils. We suggest that the CaCO3-cemented horizons are capillary-fringe carbonates that formed in an arid climate with a steady water table and high potential evapotranspiration rates (PET), evidenced by sharp upper and basal contacts, micrite, sparite, and root-pore cements. The CaCO3 of the cemented horizons and the carbonate nodules have similar mean δ18 O and δ13 C values but the cements have significantly smaller variance in δ13 C and δ18 O values and a different δ18 O versus δ13 C slope, supporting the conclusion that these carbonates are from different populations. The magneto-stratigraphic age model indicates obliquity pacing of the arid conditions required to form the CaCO3-cemented horizons suggesting an orbital control on water availability. We suggest two possible drivers for the obliquity pacing of arid conditions: 1) variability in the cross-equatorial pressure gradient that controls summer monsoon (ASM) strength and is influenced by obliquity-paced variations of Antarctic ice volume and 2) variability in Western Pacific Ocean-East Asian continent pressure gradient controlled by the 25-45°N meridional insolation gradient. We also suggest that variations in aridity were influenced by variations in PET and sensible heating of the regional land

  6. The transfer of seasonal isotopic variability between precipitation and drip water at eight caves in the monsoon regions of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Wuhui; Ruan, Jiaoyang; Luo, Weijun; Li, Tingyong; Tian, Lijun; Zeng, Guangneng; Zhang, Dezhong; Bai, Yijun; Li, Jilong; Tao, Tao; Zhang, Pingzhong; Baker, Andy; Tan, Ming

    2016-06-01

    This study presents new stable isotope data for precipitation (δ18Op) and drip water (δ18Od) from eight cave sites in the monsoon regions of China (MRC), with monthly to bi-monthly sampling intervals from May-2011 to April-2014, to investigate the regional-scale climate forcing on δ18Op and how the isotopic signals are transmitted to various drip sites. The monthly δ18Op values show negative correlation with surface air temperature at all the cave sites except Shihua Cave, which is opposite to that expected from the temperature effect. In addition, although the monthly δ18Op values are negatively correlated with precipitation at all the cave sites, only three sites are significant at the 95% level. These indicate that, due to the various vapor sources, a large portion of variability in δ18Op in the MRC cannot be explained simply by either temperature or precipitation alone. All the thirty-four drip sites are classified into three types based on the δ18Od variability. About 82% of them are static drips with little discernable variation in δ18Od through the whole study period, but the drip rates of these drips are not necessary constant. Their discharge modes are site-specific and the oxygen isotopic composition of the stalagmites growing from them may record the average of multi-year climatic signals, which are modulated by the seasonality of recharge and potential effects of evaporation, and in some cases infiltration from large rainfall events. About 12% of the thirty-four drip sites are seasonal drips, although the amplitude of δ18Od is narrower than that of δ18Op, the monthly response of δ18Od to coeval precipitation is not completely damped, and some of them follow the seasonal trend of δ18Op very well. These drips may be mainly recharged by present-day precipitation, mixing with some stored water. Thus, the stalagmites growing under them may record portions of the seasonal climatic signals embedded in δ18Op. About 6% of the thirty-four drip sites

  7. Vertical structure of aerosols and water vapor over West Africa during the African monsoon dry season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-W. Kim

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We present observations of tropospheric aerosol and water vapor transport over West Africa and the associated meteorological conditions during the AMMA SOP-0 dry season experiment, which was conducted in West Africa in January–February 2006. This study combines data from ultra-light aircraft (ULA-based lidar, airborne in-situ aerosol and gas measurements, standard meteorological measurements, satellite-based aerosol measurements, airmass trajectories, and radiosonde measurements. At Niamey (13.5° N, 2.2° E the prevailing surface wind (i.e. Harmattan was from the northeast bringing dry dusty air from the Sahara desert. High concentrations of mineral dust aerosol were typically observed from the surface to 1.5 or 2 km associated with the Saharan airmasses. At higher altitudes the prevailing wind veered to the south or southeast bringing relatively warm and humid airmasses from the biomass burning regions to the Sahel (<10° N. These elevated layers had high concentrations of biomass burning aerosol and were typically observed between altitudes of 2–5 km. Meteorological analyses show these airmasses were advected upwards over the biomass burning regions through ascent in Inter-Tropical Discontinuity (ITD zone. Aerosol vertical profiles obtained from the space-based lidar CALIOP onboard CALIPSO during January 2007 also showed the presence of dust particles (particle depolarization (δ~30%, lidar Ångström exponent (LAE<0, aerosol backscatter to extinction ratio (BER: 0.026~0.028 sr−1 at low levels (<1.5 km and biomass burning smoke aerosol (δ<10%, LAE: 0.6~1.1, BER: 0.015~0.018 sr−1 between 2 and 5 km. CALIOP data indicated that these distinct continental dust and biomass burning aerosol layers likely mixed as they advected further south over the tropical Atlantic Ocean, as indicated an intermediate values of δ (10~17%, LAE (0.16~0.18 and BER (0.0021~0.0022 sr−1.

  8. A new criterion for identifying breaks in monsoon conditions over the Indian subcontinent

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshKumar, M.R.; Dessai, U.R.P.

    of July. The quantum of monsoon rainfall also varies from year to year. The monsoon rainfall is not continuous within the life cycle of a monsoon; there are several spells of active, weak and break in monsoon conditions. The summer monsoon months...? to refer different features such as convection and circulation etc. over different regions. Further, the authors have used different durations to refer the break as well as looked them in different months. [4] By analyzing 80 years (1888...

  9. Research progress of socio-economic water cycle in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    China has made great progress in the study of socio-economic water cycle. She has completed national water resources appraisement and medium to long-term water supply planning. She has been engaging in study on water-deficient regions in North China and Northwest China for about half a century. For solving water shortage problem in northern China, she has put forward the famous South-to-North Water Transferring Projects, which has been set as one of the four biggest national projects in the Tenth Five-Year-Plan period although there are still debates. For promoting water use efficiency, China has been reforming her water management system, including water right system and water price system. There has already been a case of water right purchase. China has also done a lot of research on the interaction between human activity, water and ecosystem. For meeting the need of sustainability and coordinating water resources development and environmental protection, the study of ecological water requirement became very hot in recent years. There are three focuses of socio-economic water cycle study now in China: water transfer projects from the south to the north, water resources management and ecological water requirement.

  10. Drivers and Effects of Virtual Water Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Odorico, P.

    2016-12-01

    The increasing global demand for farmland products by the growing and increasingly burgeoning human population is placing unprecedented pressure on the global agricultural system and its water resources. Many regions of the world that are not self-sufficient because of their chronic water scarcity or lack of suitable agricultural land strongly depend on the importation of agricultural commodities and associated embodied (or "virtual") water. International trade, however, may become unreliable when the supplies in the international food market are scarce. As a result, transboundary investments in agricultural land have become a priority for a number of governments and corporations that are trying to expand their agricultural production while securing good profits. This global "land rush" is often driven by the need for a secure access to water resources for agriculture. The globalization of water and land through trade and foreign land acquisitions is leading to a displacement of land use and a disconnection between human populations and the water resources they rely on. Despite the recognized importance of these phenomena in reshaping the patterns of water dependency through teleconnections between consumer behavior and production areas, their effect on global and regional food security, remains poorly quantified. New teleconnections are also emerging from the increasing water use for energy production. Competition in water use for food and energy security constitutes the core of an emerging debate that is generating new questions on the environmental, ethical, economic, and policy implications of human appropriation of water resources. This lecture will examine the ways societies virtually modify their access to water through trade and foreign land acquisitions to meet their growing food and energy needs.

  11. Monsoon-induced changes in the size-fractionated phytoplankton biomass and production rate in the estuarine and coastal waters of southwest coast of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhu, N V; Jyothibabu, R; Balachandran, K K

    2010-07-01

    Changes in the autotrophic pico- (0.2-2 microm), nano- (2-20 microm), and microplankton (>20 microm) biomass (chlorophyll a) and primary production were measured in the estuarine and coastal waters off Cochin, southwest coast of India during the onset and establishment of a monsoon. During this period, the estuary was dominated by nutrient-rich freshwater, whereas the coastal waters were characterized with higher salinity values (>30 psu) and less nutrients. The average surface chlorophyll a concentrations and primary production rates were higher in the estuary (average 13.7 mg m(-3) and 432 mgC m(-3) day(-1)) as compared to the coastal waters (5.3 mg m(-3) and 224 mgC m(-3) day(-1)). The nanoplankton community formed the major fraction of chlorophyll a and primary production, both in the estuary (average 85 +/- SD 8.3% and 81.2 +/- SD 3.2%) and the coastal waters (average 73.2 +/- SD 17.2% and 81.9 +/- 15.7%). Nanoplankton had the maximum photosynthetic efficiency in the coastal waters (average 4.8 +/- SD 3.9 mgC mgChl a m(-3) h(-1)), whereas in the estuary, the microplankton had higher photosynthetic efficiency (average 7.4 +/- 7 mgC mgChl a m(-3) h(-1)). The heavy cloud cover and increased water column turbidity not only limit the growth of large-sized phytoplankton in the Cochin estuary and coastal waters but also support the proliferation of nanoplankton community during the monsoon season, even though large variation in nanoplankton chlorophyll a and production exists between these two areas.

  12. Water Cycling under Climate Change. Interactions between the water cycle, vegetation and a changing (sub)tropical climate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    The water cycle is an essential component of the climate system because the physical properties of water in its liquid, solid and gaseous phases allow for the redistribution of energy in the oceans and atmosphere. At the scale of individual organisms, water and energy are also essential for the bioc

  13. Collaboration essential for an energy neutral urban water cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frijns, Jos; Mulder, Mirabella; Roorda, Jelle; Schepman, Hans; Voskamp, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Two Dutch water boards prepared a Master Plan with measures to substantially reduce their energy use by 2027. In total, more than 100 measures were identified such as bubble aeration and heat recovery from effluent. Together these measures result in a 90-95% reduction in energy use at the water boards. However, for the whole urban water cycle, thus including the energy required for warm water use in households, the total energy reduction from these measures at the water boards is only 5-6%. To attain the objective to have an energy neutral urban water cycle, collaboration with other sectors such as housing, energy, agriculture and industry will be essential. Active collaboration of the water boards through the incorporation of energy efficient water measures as part of the carbon neutral effort of cities is recognized to be a promising strategy.

  14. Earth observation Water Cycle Multi-Mission Observation Strategy (WACMOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Su

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Observing and monitoring the different components of the global water cycle and their dynamics are essential steps to understand the climate of the Earth, forecast the weather, predict natural disasters like floods and droughts, and improve water resources management. Earth observation technology is a unique tool to provide a global understanding of many of the essential variables governing the water cycle and monitor their evolution over time from global to basin scales. In the coming years an increasing number of Earth observation missions will provide an unprecedented capacity to quantify several of these variables on a routine basis. In this context, the European Space Agency (ESA, in collaboration with the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP, launched the Water Cycle Multi-Mission Observation Strategy (WACMOS project in 2009. The project aims at developing and validating a novel set of geo-information products relevant to the water cycle covering the following thematic areas: evapotranspiration, soil moisture, cloud characterization and water vapour. The generation of these products is based on a number of innovative techniques and methods aiming at exploiting the synergies of different types of Earth observation data available today to the science community. This paper provides an overview of the major findings of the project with the ultimate goal of demonstrating the potential of innovative multi-mission based strategies to improve current observations by maximizing the synergistic use of the different types of information provided by the currently available observation systems.

  15. Evolution of Surface Water Conditions in the Gulf of California During the Past 2000 years: Implications for the North American Monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, J. A.; Bukry, D.; Addison, J. A.; McGann, M.; Schwartz, V.; McGeehin, J. P.; McClymont, E.

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution analyses of diatoms, silicoflagellates, biogenic silica, and alkenones in laminated sediment cores from the Guaymas Basin (central Gulf of California) reveal pronounced changes in surface water conditions over the past 2000 years. Prior to ~AD 1200, surface waters in the western Guaymas Basin (boxcore MD02-2517c2 at 27.4850° N, 112.0743°W, water depth 887 m) were characterized by high biologic productivity with alternating assemblages of productive diatoms (Thalassionema nitzschioides, Fragilariopsis doliolus) and silicoflagellates (Octactis pulchra, Dictyocha stapedia). Beginning at ~ AD 1200 productivity declined abruptly in two steps (at ~AD 1200 and ~1500) that were marked by increases in the relative abundance of tropical diatoms and silicoflagellates. In contrast, eastern Guaymas Basin Kasten Core BAM80 E-17 (27.920° N, 111.610°W, 620 m of water depth), was dominated by high biosiliceous productivity during the past 2000 years with increases corresponding to solar minima, arguing that an intensification of winter northwest winds drove coastal upwelling. In both Guaymas Basin records silicoflagellate assemblages suggest surface-water cooling during Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA; ~AD 800-1200) relative to the intervals before and after. Together, these records support a cooler La Niña-like MCA followed by a warmer El Niño-like Little Ice Age, similar to results obtained from the Santa Barbara Basin to the north. During La Niñas, the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) occupies a more northerly position in the eastern tropical Pacific, facilitating summertime surges of Pacific tropical moisture up the Gulf and higher monsoonal precipitation in the southwestern US. A modeling study by Song Feng et al. (2008, JGR) of the broader MCA (AD 800-1300) utilizes La Niña-like Pacific sea surface temperatures to argues for an intensified North American Monsoon during the MCA. Limited terrestrial proxy records from Arizona and New Mexico are

  16. Cycle Simulation of HotWater Fired Absorption Chiller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esaki, Shuji; Iramina, Kazuyasu; Kobayashi, Takahiro; Ohnou, Masayuki; Kaneko, Toshiyuki; Soga, Takashi

    The design limits were examined to determine the lowest temperature for hot water that can be used as a heat source to drive a hot water fired absorption chiller. Advantage was taken of the fact that the cycle calculation method using the minimum temperature difference is quite effective. This minimum temperature difference was the lower of the two temperature differences used to get the logarithmic mean temperature difference that need to design the evaporator, absorber, condenser and generator in an absorption refrigerator. This report proposes a new solution algorithm employing this minimum temperature difference to make a cycle simulation of the hot water fired absorption chiller. It shows the lowest usable temperature for hot water and makes clear the chilled water and cooling water temperature conditions that can provide the lowest temperature.

  17. Modeling and remote sensing of human induced water cycle change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, Yadu N.

    2016-04-01

    The global water cycle has been profoundly affected by human land-water management especially during the last century. Since the changes in water cycle can affect the functioning of a wide range of biophysical and biogeochemical processes of the Earth system, it is essential to account for human land-water management in land surface models (LSMs) which are used for water resources assessment and to simulate the land surface hydrologic processes within Earth system models (ESMs). During the last two decades, noteworthy progress has been made in modeling human impacts on the water cycle but sufficient advancements have not yet been made, especially in representing human factors in large-scale LSMs toward integrating them into ESMs. In this study, an integrated modeling framework of continental-scale water cycle, with explicit representation of climate and human induced forces (e.g., irrigation, groundwater pumping) is developed and used to reconstruct the observed water cycle changes in the past and to attribute the observed changes to climatic and human factors. The new model builds upon two different previously developed models: a global LSM called the Human Impacts and GroundWater in the MATSIRO (HiGW-MAT) and a high-resolution regional groundwater model called the LEAF-Hydro-Flood. The model is used to retro-simulate the hydrologic stores and fluxes in close dialogue with in-situ and GRACE satellite based observations at a wide range of river basin scales around the world, with a particular focus on the changes in groundwater dynamics in northwest India, Pakistan, and the High Plains and Central Valley aquifers in the US.

  18. [Chemical composition and daily variation of melt water during ablation season in monsoonal temperate Glacier region: a case study of Baishui Glacier No. 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guo-Feng; Pu, Tao; He, Yuan-Qing; Wang, Pei-Zhen; Kong, Jian-Long; Zhang, Ning-Ning; Xin, Hui-Juan

    2012-12-01

    Melt water samples collected continuously from 29 August to 3 September 2009 in the Baishui Glacier No. 1 at elevation of 4750 m were analyzed for pH, conductivity, delta18O and inorganic ions. The results showed that the pH had obvious diurnal variations and was increased slightly by the influence of precipitation. The dissolution of alkaline soluble salts in the dust was the main reason for the increase of melt water conductivity; the value of delta18O was relatively low in strong ablation period and high in slight ablation period. Different from other research areas, the concentrations of Na+, K+, which were influenced by lithological and marine water vapor, were higher than that of Mg2+ in the study area; HCO3- and Ca2+ accounted for more than 80% of total ions in snow and ice melt water, indicating that the ions mainly came from limestone and the melt water was a typical carbonate solution; The content of melt water had an obvious daily change with temperature change, but the response amplitudes were different; Monsoon transport, local rock lithology, human industrial and agricultural activities were the main sources of inorganic ions and the deciding factors of the ion composition in the Baishui Glacier No. 1.

  19. Power cycles with ammonia-water mixtures as working fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorin, Eva

    2000-05-01

    It is of great interest to improve the efficiency of power generating processes, i.e. to convert more of the energy in the heat source to power. This is favorable from an environmental point of view and can also be an economic advantage. To use an ammonia-water mixture instead of water as working fluid is a possible way to improve the efficiency of steam turbine processes. This thesis includes studies of power cycles with ammonia-water mixtures as working fluid utilizing different kinds of heat sources for power and heat generation. The thermophysical properties of the mixture are also studied. They play an important role in the calculations of the process performance and for the design of its components, such as heat exchangers. The studies concern thermodynamic simulations of processes in applications suitable for Swedish conditions. Available correlations for the thermophysical properties are compared and their influence on simulations and heat exchanger area predictions is investigated. Measurements of ammonia-water mixture viscosities using a vibrating wire viscometer are also described. The studies performed show that power cycles with ammonia-water mixtures as the working fluid are well suited for utilization of waste heat from industry and from gas engines. The ammonia-water power cycles can give up to 32 % more power in the industrial waste heat application and up to 54 % more power in the gas engine bottoming cycle application compared to a conventional Rankine steam cycle. However, ammonia-water power cycles in small direct-fired biomass-fueled cogeneration plants do not show better performance than a conventional Rankine steam cycle. When different correlations for the thermodynamic properties are used in simulations of a simple ammonia-water power cycle the difference in efficiency is not larger than 4 %, corresponding to about 1.3 percentage points. The differences in saturation properties between the correlations are, however, considerable at high

  20. Pasture degradation modifies the water and carbon cycles of the Tibetan highlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Babel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Tibetan Plateau has a significant role with regard to atmospheric circulation and the monsoon in particular. Changes between a closed plant cover and open bare soil are one of the striking effects of land use degradation observed with unsustainable range management or climate change, but experiments coupling changes of surface properties and processes with atmospheric feedbacks are rare and have not been undertaken in the world's two largest alpine ecosystems, the alpine steppe and the Kobresia pygmaea pastures of the Tibetan plateau. We coupled measurements of micro-lysimeter, chamber, 13C labeling, and eddy-covariance and combined the observations with land surface and atmospheric models, adapted to the highland conditions. This allowed us to analyze how three degradation stages affect the water and carbon cycle of pastures on the landscape scale within the core region of the Kobresia pygmaea ecosystem. The study revealed that increasing degradation of the Kobresia turf affects carbon allocation and strongly reduces the carbon uptake, compromising the function of Kobresia pastures as a carbon sink. Pasture degradation leads to a shift from transpiration to evaporation while the total sum of evapotranspiration remains unaffected. The results show an earlier onset of convection and cloud generation, likely triggered by enhanced evaporation. Consequently, precipitation starts earlier and clouds decrease the incoming solar radiation. In summary, the changes in surface properties by pasture degradation found on the highland have a~significant influence on larger scales.

  1. Pasture degradation modifies the water and carbon cycles of the Tibetan highlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Babel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Tibetan Plateau has a significant role with regard to atmospheric circulation and the monsoon in particular. Changes between a closed plant cover and open bare soil are one of the striking effects of land use degradation observed with unsustainable range management or climate change, but experiments investigating changes of surface properties and processes together with atmospheric feedbacks are rare and have not been undertaken in the world's two largest alpine ecosystems, the alpine steppe and the Kobresia pygmaea pastures of the Tibetan Plateau. We connected measurements of micro-lysimeter, chamber, 13C labelling, and eddy covariance and combined the observations with land surface and atmospheric models, adapted to the highland conditions. This allowed us to analyse how three degradation stages affect the water and carbon cycle of pastures on the landscape scale within the core region of the Kobresia pygmaea ecosystem. The study revealed that increasing degradation of the Kobresia turf affects carbon allocation and strongly reduces the carbon uptake, compromising the function of Kobresia pastures as a carbon sink. Pasture degradation leads to a shift from transpiration to evaporation while a change in the sum of evapotranspiration over a longer period cannot be confirmed. The results show an earlier onset of convection and cloud generation, likely triggered by a shift in evapotranspiration timing when dominated by evaporation. Consequently, precipitation starts earlier and clouds decrease the incoming solar radiation. In summary, the changes in surface properties by pasture degradation found on the highland have a significant influence on larger scales.

  2. Coupling Between The North Indian Ocean And The Monsoons: A Model Based Study Of The Thermal Structure Cycling In The Central Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nayak, R.K.

    on the S2c simulation in section 4.2.1.1 by assigning zero uxes to the Fischer-based horizontal advective heat uxes within the ML during the early NE monsoon (20 October to mid?November). S3b is similar to S3c, excepted that the SODA vertical velocity... analysis based on S3b (SODA-based) simulation are almost similar to the results of the analysis based on S3c simulations. In most of the cases, the above heat budget analyses for S2c and S3c simulations lead to different inferences. This is because...

  3. Time-dependence of salinity in monsoonal estuaries

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vijith, V.; Sundar, D.; Shetye, S.R.

    and come under the influence of the Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) is never in a steady state. We refer to such estuaries as "monsoonal estuaries", an example of which is the Mandovi estuary located on the west coast of India. We describe the annual cycle...

  4. Water Vapor Transport and Cross-Equatorial Flow over the Asian-Australia Monsoon Region Simulated by CMIP5 Climate Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Yajuan; QIAO Fangli; SONG Zhenya; JIANG Chunfei

    2013-01-01

    The summer mean water vapor transport (WVT) and cross-equatorial flow (CEF) over the AsianAustralian monsoon region simulated by 22 coupled atmospheric-oceanic general circulation models (AOGCMs)from the World Climate Research Programme's Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5)were evaluated.Based on climatology of the twentieth-century simulations,most of models have a reasonably realistic representation of summer monsoon WVT characterized by southeast water vapor conveyor belt over the South Indian Ocean and southwest belt from the Arabian Sea to the East Asian.The correlation coefficients between NCEP reanalysis and simulations of BCC-CSM1-1,BNU-ESM,CanESM2,FGOALS-s2,MIROC4h and MPI-ESM-LR are up to 0.8.The simulated CEF depicted by the meridional wind along the equator includes the Somali jet and eastern CEF in low atmosphere and the reverse circulation in upper atmosphere,which were generally consistent with NCEP reanalysis.Multi-model ensemble means (MME) can reproduce more reasonable climatological features in spatial distribution both of WVT and CEF.Ten models with more reasonable WVT simulations were selected for future projection studies,including BCCCSM1-1,BNU-ESM,CanESM2,CCSM4,FGOALS-s2,FIO-ESM,GFDL-ESM2G,MRIOC5,MPI-ESM-LR and NorESM-1M.Analysis based on the future projection experiments in RCP (Representative Concentration Pathway) 2.6,RCP4.5,RCP6 and RCP8.5 show that the global warming forced by different RCP scenarios will results in enhanced WVT over the Indian area and the west Pacific and weaken WVT in the low latitudes of tropical Indian Ocean.

  5. Tracer Cycles and Water Ages in Heterogeneous Catchments and Aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, J. W.; Jasechko, S.

    2015-12-01

    Estimates of catchment mean transit times are often based on seasonal cycles of stable isotope tracers in precipitation and streamflow. In many cases these transit time estimates are derived directly from sine-wave fitting to the observed seasonal isotope cycles. Broadly similar results are also obtained from time-domain convolutions or explicit tracer modeling, because here too the dominant tracer signal that these techniques seek to match is the seasonal isotopic cycle. Here I use simple benchmark tests to show that estimates of mean transit times based on seasonal tracer cycles will typically be wrong by several hundred percent, when applied to catchments with realistic degrees of spatial heterogeneity. This aggregation bias arises from the strong nonlinearity in the relationship between tracer cycle amplitude and mean travel time. A similar bias arises in estimates of mean transit times in nonstationary catchments. Since typical real-world catchments are both spatially heterogeneous and nonstationary, this analysis poses a fundamental challenge to tracer-based estimates of mean transit times. I propose an alternative storage metric, the fraction of "young water" in streamflow, defined as the fraction of runoff with transit times of less than roughly 0.2 years. I show that young water fractions are virtually free of aggregation bias; that is, they can be accurately estimated from tracer cycles in highly heterogeneous mixtures of subcatchments with strongly contrasting transit time distributions. They can also be reliably estimated in strongly nonstationary catchments. Young water fractions can be estimated separately for individual flow regimes, allowing direct determination of how shifts in hydraulic regime alter the fraction of water reaching the stream by fast flowpaths. One can also estimate the chemical composition of idealized "young water" and "old water" end-members, using relationships between young water fractions and solute concentrations across

  6. A Seamless Framework for Global Water Cycle Monitoring and Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, J.; Wood, E. F.; Chaney, N.; Fisher, C. K.; Caylor, K. K.

    2013-12-01

    The Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) Water Strategy ('From Observations to Decisions') recognizes that 'water is essential for ensuring food and energy security, for facilitating poverty reduction and health security, and for the maintenance of ecosystems and biodiversity', and that water cycle data and observations are critical for improved water management and water security - especially in less developed regions. The GEOSS Water Strategy has articulated a number of goals for improved water management, including flood and drought preparedness, that include: (i) facilitating the use of Earth Observations for water cycle observations; (ii) facilitating the acquisition, processing, and distribution of data products needed for effective management; (iii) providing expertise, information systems, and datasets to the global, regional, and national water communities. There are several challenges that must be met to advance our capability to provide near real-time water cycle monitoring, early warning of hydrological hazards (floods and droughts) and risk assessment under climate change, regionally and globally. Current approaches to monitoring and predicting hydrological hazards are limited in many parts of the world, and especially in developing countries where national capacity is limited and monitoring networks are inadequate. This presentation describes the development of a seamless monitoring and prediction framework at all time scales that allows for consistent assessment of water variability from historic to current conditions, and from seasonal and decadal predictions to climate change projections. At the center of the framework is an experimental, global water cycle monitoring and seasonal forecast system that has evolved out of regional and continental systems for the US and Africa. The system is based on land surface hydrological modeling that is driven by satellite remote sensing precipitation to predict current hydrological conditions

  7. Solar High Temperature Water-Splitting Cycle with Quantum Boost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Robin [SAIC; Davenport, Roger [SAIC; Talbot, Jan [UCSD; Herz, Richard [UCSD; Genders, David [Electrosynthesis Co.; Symons, Peter [Electrosynthesis Co.; Brown, Lloyd [TChemE

    2014-04-25

    A sulfur family chemical cycle having ammonia as the working fluid and reagent was developed as a cost-effective and efficient hydrogen production technology based on a solar thermochemical water-splitting cycle. The sulfur ammonia (SA) cycle is a renewable and sustainable process that is unique in that it is an all-fluid cycle (i.e., with no solids handling). It uses a moderate temperature solar plant with the solar receiver operating at 800°C. All electricity needed is generated internally from recovered heat. The plant would operate continuously with low cost storage and it is a good potential solar thermochemical hydrogen production cycle for reaching the DOE cost goals. Two approaches were considered for the hydrogen production step of the SA cycle: (1) photocatalytic, and (2) electrolytic oxidation of ammonium sulfite to ammonium sulfate in aqueous solutions. Also, two sub-cycles were evaluated for the oxygen evolution side of the SA cycle: (1) zinc sulfate/zinc oxide, and (2) potassium sulfate/potassium pyrosulfate. The laboratory testing and optimization of all the process steps for each version of the SA cycle were proven in the laboratory or have been fully demonstrated by others, but further optimization is still possible and needed. The solar configuration evolved to a 50 MW(thermal) central receiver system with a North heliostat field, a cavity receiver, and NaCl molten salt storage to allow continuous operation. The H2A economic model was used to optimize and trade-off SA cycle configurations. Parametric studies of chemical plant performance have indicated process efficiencies of ~20%. Although the current process efficiency is technically acceptable, an increased efficiency is needed if the DOE cost targets are to be reached. There are two interrelated areas in which there is the potential for significant efficiency improvements: electrolysis cell voltage and excessive water vaporization. Methods to significantly reduce water evaporation are

  8. Proton cycling, buffering, and reaction stoichiometry in natural waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmann, A.F.; Middelburg, J.J.; Soetaert, K.; Wolf-Gladrow, D.A.; Meysman, F.J.R.

    2010-01-01

    Ongoing acidification of the global ocean necessitates a solid understanding of how biogeochemical processes are driving proton cycling and observed pH changes in natural waters. The standard way of calculating the pH evolution of an aquatic system is to specify first how biogeochemical processes af

  9. Impact of typhoons on the UTLS ozone and water vapor distribution within the Asian summer monsoon anticyclone during the SWOP campaign in Lhasa 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Vogel, Bärbel; Bian, Jianchun; Müller, Rolf

    2016-04-01

    During the sounding water vapor, ozone, and particle (SWOP) campaign during the Asian Summer Monsoon (ASM) organized by the Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, ozone and water vapor profiles were measured by balloon-borne sensors in Lhasa (29.66°N, 91.14°E, elevation 3,650 m), China in August 2013. Totally, 23 soundings were launched, half of which show some deviations from the typical relationship between ozone and water vapor in the tracer-tracer correlation in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS). 20-day backward trajectories of each sounding were calculated using the trajectory module of the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS) to analyse these deviations. Our results demonstrate that during this period three typhoons (Jebi, Utor, and Trami) occurred over the Northwest Pacific Ocean, which have impacts on the vertical structure of ozone and water vapor by transporting the maritime airmasses from the boundary layer. These airmasses with poor ozone were transported to the UTLS by the strong uplift associated with the typhoons, and then entered the ASM anticyclone. Thereafter, air parcels arrived at the observation site through two main pathways: first rotational subsidence, during which air parcels decend slowly along a circle following the anticyclone flow with a timescale of one week, and second direct horizontal transport from the location of the typhoon to the station, where air parcels are transported directly towards the station within approximately three days.

  10. Monsoons, history of

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Niitsuma, N.; Naidu, P.D.

    The evolution of the Asian monsoon started at around 9.5 Ma, in response to the uplift of the Himalayas. The monsoonal intensity reached its maximum at around 5 Ma, and from that time the associated easterly trade winds caused intense upwelling...

  11. Transport and potential vorticity in the Bay of Bengal during the southwest monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, V.S.N.; Murty, C.S.; Sarma, Y.V.B.; Rao, D.P.; Sastry, J.S.; Rao, G.R.L.

    In the Bay of Bengal, the water transport and potential vorticity (PV) during the southwest monsoon are examined through the prevailing thermohaline and wind-driven circulation. The Indian Monsoon Current (IMC) and the north flowing Eastern Boundary...

  12. Life cycle assessment of advanced waste water treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Henrik Fred; Hansen, Peter Augusto

    .g. pharmaceuticals, heavy metals and endocrine disrupters). As part of this work a holistic based prioritisation among technologies and optimisations is to be done. Tools for this prioritisation include life cycle assessment (LCA) and cost/efficiency. The LCA is performed as a comparative LCA and the concept...... of induced impacts as compared to avoided impacts is introduced in the life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) part. Furthermore, as novel approaches, potential ecotoxicity impact from a high number of micropollutants and the potential impact from pathogens (and whole effluent toxicity) are to be included......The EU FP6 NEPTUNE project is related to the EU Water Framework Directive and the main goal is to develop new and optimize existing waste water treatment technologies (WWTT) and sludge handling methods for municipal waste water. Besides nutrients, a special focus area is micropollutants (e...

  13. Role of Anomalous States of Upper Tropospheric Circulation on Extremely Dry and Wet Summer Monsoon Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S.; Koike, T.; Nishii, K.; Shrestha, M.

    2011-12-01

    Seasonal changes in wind pattern, monsoon, sometimes result in severe droughts and intense flooding in many parts of the world including South Asian countries like Pakistan. The livelihood of a vast population in Pakistan depends on agriculture and land use is strongly influenced by water-based ecosystems that depend on the monsoon rains. Furthermore, climate change studies undertaken so far reveal that action is essential in order to prevent long term damage to water cycle and thus of great concern to the community and stakeholders. Pakistan Summer Monsoon (PSM) is affected by both the disturbances from the tropical and the extratropical regions; however there is lack of understanding of physical mechanisms of PSM compared to other regional studies i.e. Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) and South-East Asian Monsoon (SEAM). In our study, we applied heat and vorticity budgets, and wave train analysis to reveal the mechanisms of the extremely dry and wet PSM events associated with the anomalous upper tropospheric conditions. We found that the extremely dry (wet) PSM events were closely related with the anomalous cyclonic (anticyclonic) upper-tropospheric circulation around northwest of Pakistan, and mid-upper tropospheric cooling (warming) anomaly around Pakistan and to its north/northwest. We also found in addition to Rossby wave response due to the suppressed (enhanced) convective activities around monsoon regions, the midlatitude wave energy propagation emanating around cyclonic/anticyclonic anomaly around northwestern Atlantic, northeastern Atlantic, Europe or Mediterranean regions induced/reinforced/maintained the anomalous upper tropospheric cyclonic (anticyclonic) circulation around northwest of Pakistan during extremely dry (wet) PSM events. Therefore, devastating drought (flood) events over the PSM region resulting from weak (strong) convection anomalies are induced by both the tropical and extratropical processes.

  14. Water Cycle Management: A New Paradigm of Wastewater Reuse and Safety Control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Xiaochang C; Zhang, Chongmiao; Ma, Xiaoyan; Luo, Li

    2015-01-01

    .... It introduces a new water cycle management concept for designing water systems that mimic the hydrological cycle, where reclaimed water is produced, stored/regulated, supplied and used in a semi...

  15. Increasing water cycle extremes in California and in relation to ENSO cycle under global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jin-Ho; Wang, S-Y Simon; Gillies, Robert R; Kravitz, Ben; Hipps, Lawrence; Rasch, Philip J

    2015-10-21

    Since the winter of 2013-2014, California has experienced its most severe drought in recorded history, causing statewide water stress, severe economic loss and an extraordinary increase in wildfires. Identifying the effects of global warming on regional water cycle extremes, such as the ongoing drought in California, remains a challenge. Here we analyse large-ensemble and multi-model simulations that project the future of water cycle extremes in California as well as to understand those associations that pertain to changing climate oscillations under global warming. Both intense drought and excessive flooding are projected to increase by at least 50% towards the end of the twenty-first century; this projected increase in water cycle extremes is associated with a strengthened relation to El Niño and the Southern Oscillation (ENSO)--in particular, extreme El Niño and La Niña events that modulate California's climate not only through its warm and cold phases but also its precursor patterns.

  16. Past dynamics of the Australian monsoon: precession, phase and links to the global monsoon concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufort, L.; van der Kaars, S.; Bassinot, F. C.; Moron, V.

    2010-10-01

    Past variations in the dynamics of the Australian monsoon have been estimated from multi-proxy analysis of a core retrieved in the Eastern Banda Sea. Records of coccolith and pollen assemblages, spanning the last 150 000 years, allow reconstruction of past primary production in the Banda Sea, summer moisture availability, and the length of the dry season in northern Australia and southeastern Indonesia. The amount of moisture available during the summer monsoon follows typical glacial/interglacial dynamics with a broad asymmetrical 100-kyr cycle. Primary production and length of the dry season appear to be closely related, given that they follow the precessional cycle with the same phase. This indicates their independence from ice-volume variations. The present inter-annual variability of both parameters is related to El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), which modulates the Australian Winter Monsoon (AWM). The precessional pattern observed in the past dynamics of the AWM is found in ENSO and monsoon records of other regions. A marked shift in the monsoon intensity occurring during the mid Holocene during a period of constant ice volume, suggests that low latitude climatic variation precedes increases in global ice volume. This precessional pattern suggests that a common forcing mechanism underlies low latitude climate dynamics, acting specifically and synchronously on the different monsoon systems.

  17. Past dynamics of the Australian monsoon: precession, phase and links to the global monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufort, L.; van der Kaars, S.; Bassinot, F. C.; Moron, V.

    2010-06-01

    Past variations in the dynamics of the Australian monsoon have been estimated from multi-proxy analysis of a core retrieved in the Eastern Banda Sea. Records of coccolith and pollen assemblages, spanning the last 150,000 years, allow reconstruction of past primary production in the Banda Sea, summer moisture availability, and the length of the dry season in Northern Australia and Southeastern Indonesia. The amount of moisture available during the summer monsoon follows typical glacial/interglacial dynamics with a broad asymmetrical 100-kyr cycle. Primary production and length of the dry season appear to be closely related, given that they follow the precessional cycle with the same phase (August insolation). This indicates their independence from ice-volume variations. The present inter-annual variability of both parameters is related to El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), which modulates the Australian Winter Monsoon (AWM). The precessional pattern observed in the past dynamics of the AWM is found in ENSO and monsoon records of other regions. A marked shift in the monsoon intensity occurring during the mid Holocene during a period of constant ice volume, suggest that low latitude climatic variation precedes global ice volume. This precessional pattern suggests that a common forcing mechanism underlies low latitude climate dynamics, acting specifically and synchronically on the different monsoon systems.

  18. Water pulses and biogeochemical cycles in arid and semiarid ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Amy T; Yahdjian, Laura; Stark, John M; Belnap, Jayne; Porporato, Amilcare; Norton, Urszula; Ravetta, Damián A; Schaeffer, Sean M

    2004-10-01

    The episodic nature of water availability in arid and semiarid ecosystems has significant consequences on belowground carbon and nutrient cycling. Pulsed water events directly control belowground processes through soil wet-dry cycles. Rapid soil microbial response to incident moisture availability often results in almost instantaneous C and N mineralization, followed by shifts in C/N of microbially available substrate, and an offset in the balance between nutrient immobilization and mineralization. Nitrogen inputs from biological soil crusts are also highly sensitive to pulsed rain events, and nitrogen losses, particularly gaseous losses due to denitrification and nitrate leaching, are tightly linked to pulses of water availability. The magnitude of the effect of water pulses on carbon and nutrient pools, however, depends on the distribution of resource availability and soil organisms, both of which are strongly affected by the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of vegetation cover, topographic position and soil texture. The 'inverse texture hypothesis' for net primary production in water-limited ecosystems suggests that coarse-textured soils have higher NPP than fine-textured soils in very arid zones due to reduced evaporative losses, while NPP is greater in fine-textured soils in higher rainfall ecosystems due to increased water-holding capacity. With respect to belowground processes, fine-textured soils tend to have higher water-holding capacity and labile C and N pools than coarse-textured soils, and often show a much greater flush of N mineralization. The result of the interaction of texture and pulsed rainfall events suggests a corollary hypothesis for nutrient turnover in arid and semiarid ecosystems with a linear increase of N mineralization in coarse-textured soils, but a saturating response for fine-textured soils due to the importance of soil C and N pools. Seasonal distribution of water pulses can lead to the accumulation of mineral N in the dry season

  19. Teaching Systems Thinking in the Context of the Water Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tammy D.; Gail Jones, M.; Chesnutt, Katherine

    2017-06-01

    Complex systems affect every part of our lives from the ecosystems that we inhabit and share with other living organisms to the systems that supply our water (i.e., water cycle). Evaluating events, entities, problems, and systems from multiple perspectives is known as a systems thinking approach. New curriculum standards have made explicit the call for teaching with a systems thinking approach in our science classrooms. However, little is known about how elementary in-service or pre-service teachers understand complex systems especially in terms of systems thinking. This mixed methods study investigated 67 elementary in-service teachers' and 69 pre-service teachers' knowledge of a complex system (e.g., water cycle) and their knowledge of systems thinking. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a sub-sample of participants. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of content assessment data and questionnaires were conducted. Results from this study showed elementary in-service and pre-service teachers applied different levels of systems thinking from novice to intermediate. Common barriers to complete systems thinking were identified with both in-service and pre-service teachers and included identifying components and processes, recognizing multiple interactions and relationships between subsystems and hidden dimensions, and difficulty understanding the human impact on the water cycle system.

  20. Changes in continental Europe water cycle in a changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouholahnejad, Elham; Schirmer, Mario; Abbaspour, Karim

    2015-04-01

    Changes in atmospheric water vapor content provide strong evidence that the water cycle is already responding to a warming climate. According to IPCC's last report on Climate Change (AR5), the water cycle is expected to intensify in a warmer climate as the atmosphere can hold more water vapor. This changes the frequency of precipitation extremes, increases evaporation and dry periods, and effects the water redistribution in land. This process is represented by most global climate models (GCMs) by increased summer dryness and winter wetness over large areas of continental mid to high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere, associated with a reduction in water availability at continental scale. Observing changes in precipitation and evaporation directly and at continental scale is difficult, because most of the exchange of fresh water between the atmosphere and the surface happens the oceans. Long term precipitation records are available only from over the land and there are no measurement of evaporation or redistribution of precipitation over the land area. On the other hand, understanding the extent of climate change effects on various components of the water cycle is of strategic importance for public, private sectors, and policy makers when it comes to fresh water management. In order to better understand the extent of climate change impacts on water resources of continental Europe, we developed a distributed hydrological model of Europe at high spatial and temporal resolution using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The hydrological model was calibrated for 1970 to 2006 using daily observation of streamflow and nitrate loads from 360 gauging stations across Europe. A vegetation growth routine was added to the model to better simulate evapotranspiration. The model results were calibrated with available agricultural crop yield data from other sources. As of future climate scenarios, we used the ISI-MIP project results which provides bias-corrected climate

  1. IS BLOOD LACTATE REMOVAL DURING WATER IMMERSED CYCLING FASTER THAN DURING CYCLING ON LAND?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrízio Di Masi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to compare lactate removal during active recovery performed during cycling in water immersion (CW and during cycling on land (CL, after a similar exercise bout in male adults. Eleven healthy and physically active men, aged between 20 and 26 years old participated in the experiment. Before the experimental tests, the ventilatory threshold of the subjects was determined. Each subject completed the experimental tests twice, with one week separating the two periods of experiment. The subjects exercised on the treadmill during 6 min at a speed 10% above the speed corresponding to their ventilatory threshold. Subsequently, the subjects recovered from the exercise bout either on a stationary bike (CL or on a aquatic-specific bike (CW. On the subsequent week the subjects performed the same protocol but with a different recovery condition. Recovery condition assignment for the first test was counterbalanced (six subjects started with one condition and five with the other. Capillary blood samples were collected after each test and during the recovery period (at 3, 6, 9 and 15 minutes and blood lactate was measured. The blood lactate values during CW were lower than during CL and significant differences were observed at the 6th minute (p < 0.05 and at the 15th minute of recovery (p < 0.05. Therefore, we may conclude that active recovery using cycling in water immersion may be more efficient than cycling on land for blood lactate removal.

  2. Enhancing water cycle measurements for future hydrologic research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loescher, H.W.; Jacobs, J.M.; Wendroth, O.; Robinson, D.A.; Poulos, G.S.; McGuire, K.; Reed, P.; Mohanty, B.P.; Shanley, J.B.; Krajewski, W.

    2007-01-01

    The Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Sciences, Inc., established the Hydrologic Measurement Facility to transform watershed-scale hydrologic research by facilitating access to advanced instrumentation and expertise that would not otherwise be available to individual investigators. We outline a committee-based process that determined which suites of instrumentation best fit the needs of the hydrological science community and a proposed mechanism for the governance and distribution of these sensors. Here, we also focus on how these proposed suites of instrumentation can be used to address key scientific challenges, including scaling water cycle science in time and space, broadening the scope of individual subdisciplines of water cycle science, and developing mechanistic linkages among these subdisciplines and spatio-temporal scales. ?? 2007 American Meteorological Society.

  3. Water cycles in closed ecological systems: effects of atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rygalov, Vadim Y.; Fowler, Philip A.; Metz, Joannah M.; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Bucklin, Ray A.; Sager, J. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    In bioregenerative life support systems that use plants to generate food and oxygen, the largest mass flux between the plants and their surrounding environment will be water. This water cycle is a consequence of the continuous change of state (evaporation-condensation) from liquid to gas through the process of transpiration and the need to transfer heat (cool) and dehumidify the plant growth chamber. Evapotranspiration rates for full plant canopies can range from 1 to 10 L m-2 d-1 (1 to 10 mm m-2 d-1), with the rates depending primarily on the vapor pressure deficit (VPD) between the leaves and the air inside the plant growth chamber. VPD in turn is dependent on the air temperature, leaf temperature, and current value of relative humidity (RH). Concepts for developing closed plant growth systems, such as greenhouses for Mars, have been discussed for many years and the feasibility of such systems will depend on the overall system costs and reliability. One approach for reducing system costs would be to reduce the operating pressure within the greenhouse to reduce structural mass and gas leakage. But managing plant growth environments at low pressures (e.g., controlling humidity and heat exchange) may be difficult, and the effects of low-pressure environments on plant growth and system water cycling need further study. We present experimental evidence to show that water saturation pressures in air under isothermal conditions are only slightly affected by total pressure, but the overall water flux from evaporating surfaces can increase as pressure decreases. Mathematical models describing these observations are presented, along with discussion of the importance for considering "water cycles" in closed bioregenerative life support systems.

  4. Terrestrial water cycle and the impact of climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Fulu; Yokozawa, Masayuki; Hayashi, Yousay; Lin, Erda

    2003-06-01

    The terrestrial water cycle and the impact of climate change are critical for agricultural and natural ecosystems. In this paper, we assess both by running a macro-scale water balance model under a baseline condition and 2 General Circulation Model (GCM)-based climate change scenarios. The results show that in 2021-2030, water demand will increase worldwide due to climate change. Water shortage is expected to worsen in western Asia, the Arabian Peninsula, northern and southern Africa, northeastern Australia, southwestern North America, and central South America. A significant increase in surface runoff is expected in southern Asia and a significant decrease is expected in northern South America. These changes will have implications for regional environment and socioeconomics.

  5. Terrestrial Water Cycle and the Impact of Climate Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulu Tao; Erda Lin [Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing (China). Agrometeorology Inst.; Yokozawa, Masayuki; Hayashi, Yousay [National Inst. for Agro-Environmental Sciences, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2003-06-01

    The terrestrial water cycle and the impact of climate change are critical for agricultural and natural ecosystems. In this paper, we assess both by running a macro-scale water balance model under a baseline condition and 2 General Circulation Model (GCM)-based climate change scenarios. The results show that in 2021-2030, water demand will increase worldwide due to climate change. Water shortage is expected to worsen in western Asia, the Arabian Peninsula, northern and southern Africa, northeastern Australia, southwestern North America, and central South America. A significant increase in surface runoff is expected in southern Asia and a significant decrease is expected in northern South America. These changes will have implications for regional environment and socio-economics.

  6. Climate change and the water cycle in newly irrigated areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahão, Raphael; García-Garizábal, Iker; Merchán, Daniel; Causapé, Jesús

    2015-02-01

    Climate change is affecting agriculture doubly: evapotranspiration is increasing due to increments in temperature while the availability of water resources is decreasing. Furthermore, irrigated areas are expanding worldwide. In this study, the dynamics of climate change impacts on the water cycle of a newly irrigated watershed are studied through the calculation of soil water balances. The study area was a 752-ha watershed located on the left side of the Ebro river valley, in Northeast Spain. The soil water balance procedures were carried out throughout 1827 consecutive days (5 years) of hydrological and agronomical monitoring in the study area. Daily data from two agroclimatic stations were used as well. Evaluation of the impact of climate change on the water cycle considered the creation of two future climate scenarios for comparison: 2070 decade with climate change and 2070 decade without climate change. The main indicators studied were precipitation, irrigation, reference evapotranspiration, actual evapotranspiration, drainage from the watershed, and irrigation losses. The aridity index was also applied. The results represent a baseline scenario in which adaptation measures may be included and tested to reduce the impacts of climate change in the studied area and other similar areas.

  7. Monsoon regime in the Indian Ocean and zooplankton variability

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, V.R.

    The monsoonal effects on zooplankton lead to characteristic zoogeographic patterns in the open ocean and coastal waters. The evaluation of zooplankton variability in the Indian Ocean is presented in three sections: the open ocean, coastal waters...

  8. WaterNet: The NASA water cycle solutions network - Danubian regional applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Dave; Brilly, Mitja; Kobold, Mira; Zagar, Mark; Houser, Paul

    2008-11-01

    WaterNet is a new international network of researchers, stakeholders, and end-users of remote sensing tools that will benefit the water resources management community. This paper provides an overview and it discusses the concept of solutions networks focusing on the WaterNet. It invites Danubian research and applications teams to join our WaterNet network. The NASA Water cycle Solutions Network's goal is to improve and optimize the sustained ability of water cycle researchers, stakeholders, organizations and networks to interact, identify, harness, and extend NASA research results to augment decision support tools and meet national needs. Our team will develop WaterNet by engaging relevant NASA water cycle research resources and community-of-practice organizations, to develop what we term an "actionable database" that can be used to communicate and connect NASA Water cycle research Results (NWRs) towards the improvement of water-related Decision Support Tools (DSTs). Recognizing that the European Commission and European Space Agency have also developed many related Water Research products (EWRs), we seek to learn about these and network with the EU teams to include their information in the WaterNet actionable data base and Community of Practice. WaterNet will then develop strategies to connect researchers and decision-makers via innovative communication strategies, improved user access to NASA and EU - Danubian resources, improved water cycle research community appreciation for user requirements, improved policymaker, management and stakeholder knowledge of research and application products, and improved identification of pathways for progress. Finally, WaterNet will develop relevant benchmarking and metrics, to understand the network's characteristics, to optimize its performance, and to establish sustainability. This paper provides examples of several NASA products based on remote sensing and land data assimilation systems that integrate remotely sensed and in

  9. WaterNet: The NASA water cycle solutions network - Danubian regional applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Dave [Hydromet DSS, LLC, Silverthorne, CO 80498-1848 (United States); Brilly, Mitja [FGG University of Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kobold, Mira; Zagar, Mark [Environmental Agency of the Republic of Slovenia, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Houser, Paul [Center for Research on Environment and Water and George Mason University, Calverton, MD 20705 (United States)], E-mail: hydrometdss@comcast.net

    2008-11-01

    WaterNet is a new international network of researchers, stakeholders, and end-users of remote sensing tools that will benefit the water resources management community. This paper provides an overview and it discusses the concept of solutions networks focusing on the WaterNet. It invites Danubian research and applications teams to join our WaterNet network. The NASA Water cycle Solutions Network's goal is to improve and optimize the sustained ability of water cycle researchers, stakeholders, organizations and networks to interact, identify, harness, and extend NASA research results to augment decision support tools and meet national needs. Our team will develop WaterNet by engaging relevant NASA water cycle research resources and community-of-practice organizations, to develop what we term an 'actionable database' that can be used to communicate and connect NASA Water cycle research Results (NWRs) towards the improvement of water-related Decision Support Tools (DSTs). Recognizing that the European Commission and European Space Agency have also developed many related Water Research products (EWRs), we seek to learn about these and network with the EU teams to include their information in the WaterNet actionable data base and Community of Practice. WaterNet will then develop strategies to connect researchers and decision-makers via innovative communication strategies, improved user access to NASA and EU - Danubian resources, improved water cycle research community appreciation for user requirements, improved policymaker, management and stakeholder knowledge of research and application products, and improved identification of pathways for progress. Finally, WaterNet will develop relevant benchmarking and metrics, to understand the network's characteristics, to optimize its performance, and to establish sustainability. This paper provides examples of several NASA products based on remote sensing and land data assimilation systems that integrate

  10. Physico-chemical characteristics of the ground water table after monsoon: a case study at central Travancore in Kerala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankar S Vishnu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Water quality plays an important role in maintaining plant and animal life. Lack of good quality drinking water and water for sanitation cause health problems. Water quality characteristics arise from a group of physical, chemical and biological factors. The dynamic balance of the aquatic system can be destroyed by human activities resulting in water pollution.Well water has traditionally considered as a safe resource of water for consumption without treatment and extensively used for individual water supply in rural and many urban areas.In this paper a preliminary analysis is done to explore the water quality of selected wells in order to correlate the effect of pollution on water quality at these locations. Water samples are collected from different regions of Vazhappally area located on central travancore of Kerala. These sites are important because people depend only on well water for drinking purpose. The samples are collected from ten locations and analyzed for chemical parameters such as pH, conductivity, salinity, turbidity, acidity, alkainity, hardness, total phosphates, dissolved oxygen, biological oxygen demand, total dissolved solids and Iron content. Samples are also analysed for coliform bacteria which cause pathogenic diseases. Remarkable differences are observed mainly in biological oxygen demand, acidity and hardness. Finally, an attempt has been done to correlate the observed chemical parameters and the waterquality standards. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/ije.v3i2.10501 International Journal of the Environment Vol.3(2 2014: 20-27

  11. Measuring the monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaswamy, V.; Nair, R.R.

    of the monsoons, there are also fluctuations arising from human activities. Most scientists believe that large-scale deforestation and burning of fossil fuels will alter global climatic patterns significantly. For the sake of those people whose lives...

  12. The governance of major innovation in the water cycle : Examining three prominent technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lulofs, Kristiaan R.D.; Bressers, Johannes T.A.

    The growing absolute and relative water scarcity requires drastic change in the water cycle in order to target an efficient and robust water supply. The water cycle consists of the production of water, water use, collection of wastewater and its treatment. This article addresses whether the market

  13. The governance of major innovation in the water cycle : Examining three prominent technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lulofs, Kristiaan R.D.; Bressers, Johannes T.A.

    2017-01-01

    The growing absolute and relative water scarcity requires drastic change in the water cycle in order to target an efficient and robust water supply. The water cycle consists of the production of water, water use, collection of wastewater and its treatment. This article addresses whether the market i

  14. Raman Spectroscopy Applied to Mars Water Cycle Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolakakos, G.; Whiteway, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    One of the key findings during the Phoenix and Mars Science Laboratory landed Mars missions has been the detection of perchlorate, a highly deliquescent salt. Perchlorates are of great interest on Mars due to their high affinity for water vapour as well as their ability to greatly depress the freezing point of water when in solution. This has intriguing biological implications as resulting brines could potentially provide a habitable environment for living organisms. Additionally, it has been speculated that these salts may play a significant role in influencing the hydrological cycle on Mars. In order to experimentally study brine formation on Mars and assess the feasibility of a future landed detection tool, a stand-off Raman spectroscopy instrument and environmental simulation chamber have been developed at York University. A sample of magnesium perchlorate has been subjected to the water vapour pressure, background pressure and temperatures found at polar Martian latitudes. Results indicate that at a water vapour pressure of ~20 Pa, Raman spectroscopy is able to detect the onset of brine formation and provide an estimate of the quantity of water taken up by the sample. At the lower water vapour pressures typically found on Mars ( ~1 Pa), it appears that slower dynamics inhibit the onset of water uptake over relevant time scales. The experimental setup and current results will be presented.

  15. The NASA Energy and Water Cycle Extreme (NEWSE) Integration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, P. R.; Lapenta, W.; Schiffer, R.

    2008-01-01

    Skillful predictions of water and energy cycle extremes (flood and drought) are elusive. To better understand the mechanisms responsible for water and energy extremes, and to make decisive progress in predicting these extremes, the collaborative NASA Energy and Water cycle Extremes (NEWSE) Integration Project, is studying these extremes in the U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP) during 2006-2007, including their relationships with continental and global scale processes, and assessment of their predictability on multiple space and time scales. It is our hypothesis that an integrative analysis of observed extremes which reflects the current understanding of the role of SST and soil moisture variability influences on atmospheric heating and forcing of planetary waves, incorporating recently available global and regional hydro- meteorological datasets (i.e., precipitation, water vapor, clouds, etc.) in conjunction with advances in data assimilation, can lead to new insights into the factors that lead to persistent drought and flooding. We will show initial results of this project, whose goals are to provide an improved definition, attribution and prediction on sub-seasonal to interannual time scales, improved understanding of the mechanisms of decadal drought and its predictability, including the impacts of SST variability and deep soil moisture variability, and improved monitoring/attributions, with transition to applications; a bridging of the gap between hydrological forecasts and stakeholders (utilization of probabilistic forecasts, education, forecast interpretation for different sectors, assessment of uncertainties for different sectors, etc.).

  16. Southwest monsoon influences the water quality and waste assimilative capacity in the Mandovi estuary (Goa state, India)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    VishnuRadhan, R.; Sagayadoss, J.; Seelan, E.; Vethamony, P.; Shirodkar, P.V.; Zainudin, Z.; Shirodkar, S.

    the assimilative capacity in an environmental management perspective. The natural ability of a water body to withstand or assimilate certain amount of pollutants is termed as the Waste Assimilative Capacity (WAC)/assimilative capacity/carrying capacity/ Self... indicate low assimilative capacity and low trophic state indicates high assimilative capacity of a water body. 3. Results and Discussion The assimilative capacity of a water body primarily depends on the DO concentration. As the DO is utilized...

  17. eWaterCycle: A global operational hydrological forecasting model

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Giesen, Nick; Bierkens, Marc; Donchyts, Gennadii; Drost, Niels; Hut, Rolf; Sutanudjaja, Edwin

    2015-04-01

    Development of an operational hyper-resolution hydrological global model is a central goal of the eWaterCycle project (www.ewatercycle.org). This operational model includes ensemble forecasts (14 days) to predict water related stress around the globe. Assimilation of near-real time satellite data is part of the intended product that will be launched at EGU 2015. The challenges come from several directions. First, there are challenges that are mainly computer science oriented but have direct practical hydrological implications. For example, we aim to make use as much as possible of existing standards and open-source software. For example, different parts of our system are coupled through the Basic Model Interface (BMI) developed in the framework of the Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System (CSDMS). The PCR-GLOBWB model, built by Utrecht University, is the basic hydrological model that is the engine of the eWaterCycle project. Re-engineering of parts of the software was needed for it to run efficiently in a High Performance Computing (HPC) environment, and to be able to interface using BMI, and run on multiple compute nodes in parallel. The final aim is to have a spatial resolution of 1km x 1km, which is currently 10 x 10km. This high resolution is computationally not too demanding but very memory intensive. The memory bottleneck becomes especially apparent for data assimilation, for which we use OpenDA. OpenDa allows for different data assimilation techniques without the need to build these from scratch. We have developed a BMI adaptor for OpenDA, allowing OpenDA to use any BMI compatible model. To circumvent memory shortages which would result from standard applications of the Ensemble Kalman Filter, we have developed a variant that does not need to keep all ensemble members in working memory. At EGU, we will present this variant and how it fits well in HPC environments. An important step in the eWaterCycle project was the coupling between the hydrological and

  18. Asian monsoons in a late Eocene greenhouse world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licht, A.; van Cappelle, M.; Abels, H. A.; Ladant, J.-B.; Trabucho-Alexandre, J.; France-Lanord, C.; Donnadieu, Y.; Vandenberghe, J.; Rigaudier, T.; Lécuyer, C.; Terry, D., Jr.; Adriaens, R.; Boura, A.; Guo, Z.; Soe, Aung Naing; Quade, J.; Dupont-Nivet, G.; Jaeger, J.-J.

    2014-09-01

    The strong present-day Asian monsoons are thought to have originated between 25 and 22 million years (Myr) ago, driven by Tibetan-Himalayan uplift. However, the existence of older Asian monsoons and their response to enhanced greenhouse conditions such as those in the Eocene period (55-34 Myr ago) are unknown because of the paucity of well-dated records. Here we show late Eocene climate records revealing marked monsoon-like patterns in rainfall and wind south and north of the Tibetan-Himalayan orogen. This is indicated by low oxygen isotope values with strong seasonality in gastropod shells and mammal teeth from Myanmar, and by aeolian dust deposition in northwest China. Our climate simulations support modern-like Eocene monsoonal rainfall and show that a reinforced hydrological cycle responding to enhanced greenhouse conditions counterbalanced the negative effect of lower Tibetan relief on precipitation. These strong monsoons later weakened with the global shift to icehouse conditions 34 Myr ago.

  19. Tracking evolution of urban biogeochemical cycles: salinization of fresh water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, S.; McDowell, W. H.; Wollheim, W. M.; Duan, S.; Gorman, J. K.; Haq, S.; Hohman, S.; Smith, R. M.; Mayer, P. M.

    2014-12-01

    The built environment often changes quickly in response to human activities, thus contributing to an evolution of stream chemistry over time. Depending upon development and management strategies, these changes can result in pulses and/or long-term trends. Here, we explore patterns of evolving salinization of fresh water over time, and we evaluate the potential water quality implications of fresh water salinization. We show that there has been global salinization of freshwater across urbanizing landscapes over a century. We also show that human-accelerated weathering in watersheds and river alkalinization can further influence regional rates of salinization (in addition to anthropogenic sources such as road salts, sewage leaks, etc.). Finally, we investigate how salinization of fresh water can impact stream sediment fluxes of carbon, nutrients, and sulfate in watersheds across a land use gradient at the Baltimore Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site. The impacts of salinization on mobilization and uptake of carbon, nutrients, and sulfate in streams warrant further consideration in water quality management strategies. Overall, we propose that salinization can be a "universal tracer" of watershed urbanization globally with major regional consequences for drinking water and evolution of biogeochemical cycles in freshwater ecosystems.

  20. Reappraisal of Asian Summer Monsoon Indices and the Long-Term Variation of Monsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The Webster and Yang monsoon index (WYI)-the zonal wind shear between 850 and 200 hPa was calculated and modified on the basis of NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data. After analyzing the circulation and divergence fields of 150-100 and 200 hPa, however, we found that the 200-hPa level could not reflect the real change of the upper-tropospheric circulation of Asian summer monsoon, especially the characteristics and variation of the tropical easterly jet which is the most important feature of the upper-tropospheric circulation. The zonal wind shear U850-U(150+100) is much larger than U850-U200, and thus it can reflect the strength of monsoon more appropriately. In addition, divergence is the largest at 150 hPa rather than 200 hPa, so 150 hPa in the upper-troposphere can reflect the coupling of the monsoon system. Therefore,WYI is redefined as DHI, i.e., IDH=U*850 - U*(150+100), which is able to characterize the variability of not only the intensity of the center of zonal wind shear in Asia, but also the monsoon system in the upper and lower troposphere. DHI is superior to WYI in featuring the long-term variation of Asian summer monsoon as it indicates there is obvious interdecadal variation in the Asian summer monsoon and the climate abrupt change occurred in 1980. The Asian summer monsoon was stronger before 1980 and it weakened after then due to the weakening of the easterly in the layer of 150-100 hPa, while easterly at 200 hPa did not weaken significantly. After the climate jump year in general, easterly in the upper troposphere weakened in Asia, indicating the weakening of summer monsoon; the land-sea pressure difference and thermal difference reduced, resulting in the weakening of monsoon; the corresponding upper divergence as well as the water vapor transport decreased in Indian Peninsula, central Indo-China Peninsula, North China, and Northeast China, indicating the weakening of summer monsoon as well. The difference between NCEP/NCAR and ERA-40 reanalysis data in

  1. Supercritical Water Reactor Cycle for Medium Power Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BD Middleton; J Buongiorno

    2007-04-25

    Scoping studies for a power conversion system based on a direct-cycle supercritical water reactor have been conducted. The electric power range of interest is 5-30 MWe with a design point of 20 MWe. The overall design objective is to develop a system that has minimized physical size and performs satisfactorily over a broad range of operating conditions. The design constraints are as follows: Net cycle thermal efficiency {ge}20%; Steam turbine outlet quality {ge}90%; and Pumping power {le}2500 kW (at nominal conditions). Three basic cycle configurations were analyzed. Listed in order of increased plant complexity, they are: (1) Simple supercritical Rankine cycle; (2) All-supercritical Brayton cycle; and (3) Supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating. The sensitivity of these three configurations to various parameters, such as reactor exit temperature, reactor pressure, condenser pressure, etc., was assessed. The Thermoflex software package was used for this task. The results are as follows: (a) The simple supercritical Rankine cycle offers the greatest hardware simplification, but its high reactor temperature rise and reactor outlet temperature may pose serious problems from the viewpoint of thermal stresses, stability and materials in the core. (b) The all-supercritical Brayton cycle is not a contender, due to its poor thermal efficiency. (c) The supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating affords acceptable thermal efficiency with lower reactor temperature rise and outlet temperature. (d) The use of a moisture separator improves the performance of the supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating and allows for a further reduction of the reactor outlet temperature, thus it was selected for the next step. Preliminary engineering design of the supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating and moisture separation was performed. All major components including the turbine, feedwater heater, feedwater pump, condenser, condenser pump

  2. Diurnal cycles in water quality across the periodic table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, James

    2014-05-01

    Diurnal cycles in water quality can provide important clues to the processes that regulate aquatic chemistry, but they often are masked by longer-term, larger-amplitude variability, making their detection and quantification difficult. Here I outline methods that can detect diurnal cycles even when they are massively obscured by statistically ill-behaved noise. I demonstrate these methods using high-frequency water quality data from the Plylimon catchment in mid-Wales (Neal et al., 2013; Kirchner and Neal, 2013). Several aspects combine to make the Plynlimon data set unique worldwide. Collected at 7-hour intervals, the Plynlimon data set is much more densely sampled than typical long-term weekly or monthly water quality data. This 7-hour sampling was also continued for two years, much longer than typical intensive sampling campaigns, and the resulting time series encompass a wide range of climatic and hydrological conditions. Furthermore, each sample was analyzed for a wide range of solutes with diverse sources in the natural environment. However, the 7-hour sampling frequency is both coarse and irregular in comparison to diurnal cycles, making their detection and quantification difficult. Nonetheless, the methods outlined here enable detection of statistically significant diurnal cycles in over 30 solutes at Plynlimon, including alkali metals (Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs), alkaline earths (Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba), transition metals (Al, Ti, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, Mo, Cd, and Pb), nonmetals (B, NO3, Si, As, and Se), lanthanides and actinides (La, Ce, Pr, and U), as well as total dissolved nitrogen (TDN), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), Gran alkalinity, pH, and electrical conductivity. These solutes span every row of the periodic table, and more than six orders of magnitude in concentration. Many of these diurnal cycles are subtle, representing only a few percent, at most, of the total variance in the concentration time series. Nonetheless they are diagnostically useful

  3. Change in Water Cycle- Important Issue on Climate Earth System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pratik

    Change in Water Cycle- Important Issue on Climate Earth System PRATIK KUMAR SINGH1 1BALDEVRAM MIRDHA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY,JAIPUR (RAJASTHAN) ,INDIA Water is everywhere on Earth and is the only known substance that can naturally exist as a gas, liquid, and solid within the relatively small range of air temperatures and pressures found at the Earth's surface.Changes in the hydrological cycle as a consequence of climate and land use drivers are expected to play a central role in governing a vast range of environmental impacts.Earth's climate will undergo changes in response to natural variability, including solar variability, and to increasing concentrations of green house gases and aerosols.Further more, agreement is widespread that these changes may profoundly affect atmospheric water vapor concentrations, clouds and precipitation patterns.As we know that ,a warmer climate, directly leading to increased evaporation, may well accelerate the hydrological cycle, resulting in an increase in the amount of moisture circulating through the atmosphere.The Changing Water Cycle programmer will develop an integrated, quantitative understanding of the changes taking place in the global water cycle, involving all components of the earth system, improving predictions for the next few decades of regional precipitation, evapotranspiration, soil moisture, hydrological storage and fluxes.The hydrological cycle involves evaporation, transpiration, condensation, precipitation, and runoff. NASA's Aqua satellite will monitor many aspects of the role of water in the Earth's systems, and will do so at spatial and temporal scales appropriate to foster a more detailed understanding of each of the processes that contribute to the hydrological cycle. These data and the analyses of them will nurture the development and refinement of hydrological process models and a corresponding improvement in regional and global climate models, with a direct anticipated benefit of more accurate weather and

  4. Intrusion of the Bay of Bengal water into the Arabian Sea during winter monsoon and associated chemical and biological response

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrasannaKumar, S.; Narvekar, J.; Kumar, A.; Shaji, C.; Anand, P.; Sabu, P.; Rijomon, G.; Josia, J.; Jayaraj, K.A.; Radhika, A.; Nair, K.K.C.

    Coastal Current carrying low salinity waters from the northern Bay feeds into the West India Coastal Current flowing north along the shelf in the Arabian Sea. Advection of nutrients by this intrusion triggers enhanced levels of chlorophyll near...

  5. Monsoon response to changes in Earth's orbital parameters: comparisons between simulations of the Eemian and of the Holocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Braconnot

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Monsoon is the major manifestation of the seasonal cycle in the tropical regions, and there is a wide range of evidence from marine and terrestrial data that monsoon characteristics are affected by changes in the Earth's orbital parameters. We consider 3 periods in the Eemian and in the Holocene that present some analogy in the Earth's orbital configuration in terms of obliquity and precession. Simulations with the IPSL_CM4 ocean-atmosphere coupled model allow us to discuss the response of the Indian and African monsoon in terms of amplitude and response to the insolation forcing. Results show that precession plays a large role in shaping the seasonal timing of the monsoon system. Differences are found in the response of the two sub-systems. They result from the phase relationship between the insolation forcing and the seasonal characteristics of each sub-system. Also the response of the Indian Ocean is very different in terms of temperature and salinity when the change in insolation occurs at the summer solstice or later in the year. Monsoon has a large contribution to heat and water transports. It is shown that the relative importance of monsoon on the change in the energetic of the tropical regions also vary with precession.

  6. Monsoon response to changes in Earth's orbital parameters: comparisons between simulations of the Eemian and of the Holocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Braconnot

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Monsoon is the major manifestation of the seasonal cycle in the tropical regions, and there is a wide range of evidence from marine and terrestrial data that monsoon characteristics are affected by changes in the Earth's orbital parameters. We consider 3 periods in the Eemian and 3 in the Holocene that present some analogy in the Earth's orbital configuration in terms of obliquity and precession. Simulations with the IPSL_CM4 ocean-atmosphere coupled model allow us to discuss the response of the Indian and African monsoon in terms of amplitude and response to the insolation forcing. Results show that precession plays a large role in shaping the seasonal timing of the monsoon system. Differences are found in the response of the two sub-systems. They result from the phase relationship between the insolation forcing and the seasonal characteristics of each sub-system. Also the response of the Indian Ocean is very different in terms of temperature and salinity when the change in insolation occurs at the summer solstice or later in the year. Monsoon has a large contribution to heat and water transports. It is shown that the relative importance of monsoon on the change in the energetic of the tropical regions also vary with precession.

  7. A learning process of water cycle as complex system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schertzer, D.; Deroubaix, J. F.; Tchiguirinskaia, I.; Tassin, B.; Thevenot, D.

    2009-04-01

    Water cycle is a very good example of a complex geosystem which has many societal impacts and drivers. A permanent and ubiquitous question is how to increase public awareness and understanding of its extreme behaviours, as well as of the related uncertainties. For instance, CEREVE is highly solicited to help the general public, particularly the youth, and the local politicians to get better acquainted with the new water culture in general and with flood risks in particular, in the nearby county Val-de-Marne. Since 2001, May is the month of the "Festival de l'Oh"(which sounds like "Festival de l'Eau", i.e. the water festival co-organized by the county council and city of Paris. "Oh » at the same time partly displays the chemical composition of water and is an exclamation for atonishment). This festival starts with the Scientific Days of Environment that involve researchers and students of the county, as well as collaborators of all around the world. This conference is open to the public who can be informed from the latest research developments, in particular with the help of some general synthesis and panel discussions. On the other hand, (young) researchers can present their own works to a large public. This conference is followed by a Professional Forum where students, heads of water public services or private operators can meet. In the framework of the water festival preparation, there are several water forums for the secondary schools. All along the year, there are regular pedagogical activities for secondary schools, in particular in the framework of Water Houses scattered across the county. We will discuss the importance to better evaluate the effective impact of these pedagogical events on the public awareness and understanding, and to make the learning process more adaptive and interactive, as well as to better address the underlying fundamental problems, e.g. the present limitations of current modelling and data processing.

  8. The timing of Mediterranean sapropel deposition relative to insolation, sea-level and African monsoon changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, K. M.; Grimm, R.; Mikolajewicz, U.; Marino, G.; Ziegler, M.; Rohling, E. J.

    2016-05-01

    The Mediterranean basin is sensitive to global sea-level changes and African monsoon variability on orbital timescales. Both of these processes are thought to be important to the deposition of organic-rich sediment layers or 'sapropels' throughout the eastern Mediterranean, yet their relative influences remain ambiguous. A related issue is that an assumed 3-kyr lag between boreal insolation maxima and sapropel mid-points remains to be tested. Here we present new geochemical and ice-volume-corrected planktonic foraminiferal stable isotope records for sapropels S1 (Holocene), S3, S4, and S5 (Marine Isotope Stage 5) in core LC21 from the southern Aegean Sea. The records have a radiometrically constrained chronology that has already been synchronised with the Red Sea relative sea-level record, and this allows detailed examination of the timing of sapropel deposition relative to insolation, sea-level, and African monsoon changes. We find that sapropel onset was near-synchronous with monsoon run-off into the eastern Mediterranean, but that insolation-sapropel/monsoon phasings were not systematic through the last glacial cycle. These latter phasings instead appear to relate to sea-level changes. We propose that persistent meltwater discharges into the North Atlantic (e.g., at glacial terminations) modified the timing of sapropel deposition by delaying the timing of peak African monsoon run-off. These observations may reconcile apparent model-data offsets with respect to the orbital pacing of the African monsoon. Our observations also imply that the previous assumption of a systematic 3-kyr lag between insolation maxima and sapropel midpoints may lead to overestimated insolation-sapropel phasings. Finally, we surmise that both sea-level rise and monsoon run-off contributed to surface-water buoyancy changes at times of sapropel deposition, and their relative influences differed per sapropel case, depending on their magnitudes. Sea-level rise was clearly important for

  9. Life Cycle Assessment of Waste Water Treatment Plants in Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Mcnamara

    2016-09-01

      The Urban Wastewater Treatment Directive 91/271/EEC introduced a series of measures for the purpose of protecting the environment from the adverse effects of effluent discharge from wastewater treatment plants.  There are environmental costs associated with attaining the required level of water quality set out in the directive such as greenhouse gas emissions due to energy production, and ecotoxicity from sludge application to land.  The goal of this study is to assess the environmental costs in an Irish context, focusing specifically on the effects of variation in scale and discharge limitation. Life cycle assessment is the analytical tool used to evaluate the environmental impact.  The life cycle impact assessment methodology developed by the Centre of Environmental Science, Leiden University (2010 has been adopted and implemented using GaBi 6.0 life cycle assessment software.  Two plants of varying size and location were chosen for the study. The study found that energy consumption and sludge application to land are the largest contributors to the overall environmental impact associated with the treatment process at both plants.  Economies of scale were observed in energy usage during secondary aeration.   

  10. Life cycle assessment for sustainable metropolitan water systems planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundie, Sven; Peters, Gregory M; Beavis, Paul C

    2004-07-01

    Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is useful as an information tool for the examination of alternative future scenarios for strategic planning. Developing a life cycle assessment for a large water and wastewater system involves making methodological decisions about the level of detail which is retained through different stages of the process. In this article we discuss a methodology tailored to strategic planning needs which retains a high degree of model segmentation in order to enhance modeling of a large, complex system. This is illustrated by a case study of Sydney Water, which is Australia's largest water service provider. A prospective LCA was carried out to examine the potential environmental impacts of Sydney Water's total operations in the year 2021. To our knowledge this is the first study to create an LCA model of an integrated water and wastewater system with this degree of complexity. A "base case" system model was constructed to represent current operating assets as augmented and upgraded to 2021. The base case results provided a basis for the comparison of alternative future scenarios and for conclusions to be drawn regarding potential environmental improvements. The scenarios can be roughly classified in two categories: (1) options which improve the environmental performance across all impact categories and (2) options which improve one indicator and worsen others. Overall environmental improvements are achieved in all categories by the scenarios examining increased demand management, energy efficiency, energy generation, and additional energy recovery from biosolids. The scenarios which examined desalination of seawater and the upgrades of major coastal sewage treatment plants to secondary and tertiary treatment produced an improvement in one environmental indicator but deteriorations in all the other impact categories, indicating the environmental tradeoffs within the system. The desalination scenario produced a significant increase in greenhouse gas

  11. Parameter Estimation of Induction Motors Using Water Cycle Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yazdani-Asrami

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the application of recently introduced water cycle algorithm (WCA to optimize the parameters of exact and approximate induction motor from the nameplate data. Considering that induction motors are widely used in industrial applications, these parameters have a significant effect on the accuracy and efficiency of the motors and, ultimately, the overall system performance. Therefore, it is essential to develop algorithms for the parameter estimation of the induction motor. The fundamental concepts and ideas which underlie the proposed method is inspired from nature and based on the observation of water cycle process and how rivers and streams flow to the sea in the real world. The objective function is defined as the minimization of the real values of the relative error between the measured and estimated torques of the machine in different slip points. The proposed WCA approach has been applied on two different sample motors. Results of the proposed method have been compared with other previously applied Meta heuristic methods on the problem, which show the feasibility and the fast convergence of the proposed approach.

  12. Community of Practice Applications from WaterNet: The NASA Water Cycle Solutions Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, D.; Brilly, M.; Gregoric, G.; Polajnar, J.; Houser, P.; Rodell, M.; Lehning, M.

    2009-04-01

    WaterNet is a new international network of researchers, stakeholders, and end-users of remote sensing tools that will benefit the water resources management community. It addresses a means for enhancing the social and economic developments of nations by increased use of practical research products from the terrestrial water cycle for making informed decisions. This paper provides a summary of the Water Cycle Community of Practice (CoP) plans and examples of Land Surface Model (LSM) applications for extreme events - floods, droughts, and heavy snowstorms in Europe. It discusses the concept of NASA's solutions networks focusing on the WaterNet. It invites EGU teams to join our WaterNet network. The NASA Water cycle Solutions Network's goal is to improve and optimize the sustained ability of water cycle researchers, stakeholders, organizations and networks to interact, identify, harness, and extend NASA research results to augment decision support tools and meet national needs. Our team is developing WaterNet by engaging relevant NASA water cycle research and community-of-practice organizations, to develop what we term an "actionable database" that can be used to communicate and connect NASA Water cycle research Results (NWRs) towards the improvement of water-related Decision Support Tools (DSTs). Recognizing that the European Commission and European Space Agency have also developed many related research products (EWRs), we seek to learn about these and network with the EU teams to include their information in the WaterNet actionable data base. Recognizing the many existing highly valuable water-related science and application networks in the US and EU, we focus the balance of our efforts on enabling their interoperability - facilitating access and communications among decision-makers and scientists. We present results of our initial focus on identification, collection, and analysis of the two end points, these being the NWRs and EWRs and water related DSTs. We

  13. The Urban Water Cycle and how it Modulates the Microclimate and the Energy Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou-Zeid, E.; Wang, Z.; Ramamurthy, P.; Li, D.; Sun, T.; Smith, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Urbanization is the land-use modification with the largest and most manifest impacts on hydrologic storage and fluxes. This perturbation of the water cycle also has considerable ramifications on the surface energy budget and the microclimatology in built terrain: reducing the potential for water storage and subsequent evaporation reduces the fraction of incoming radiative energy dissipated through surface evaporation, and consequently increases the sensible heating of the urban atmosphere and solid surfaces (buildings, roads, …). However, the complexity of the involved physical processes and their interactions have so far been oversimplified, leading to considerable biases in model output when compared to observations. Using novel sensing techniques that include wireless sensor networks, this study seeks to build a better understanding of the Urban Water Cycle. Our findings indicate that "impervious surfaces" in urban area are not really impervious and not always dry. The role of evaporation from gravel-covered roofs and from concrete, brick, stone and asphalt surfaces can be considerable, leading to lower sensible heating. In addition, the different thermal properties of the various urban materials lead to extreme spatial heterogeneity in surface conditions that is much higher than over natural terrain. Building on this understanding, an improved urban canopy model is developed that includes much better representation of surface heterogeneity and of hydrological and thermal storage and transport processes, including analytical solutions of the heat equation and numerical solutions of the Richards equation in the urban surface. The model development will be detailed and applications focusing on the role of evaporation in mitigating summer building cooling needs and urban heat island effects will be presented.

  14. Life cycle energy analysis of reclaimed water reuse projects in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yupeng; Guo, Erhui; Zhai, Yuanzheng; C Chang, Andrew; Qiao, Qi; Kang, Peng

    2017-05-01

    To illustrate the benefits of water reuse project, the process-based life cycle analysis (LCA) could be combined with input-output life cycle analysis to evaluate the water reuse project. Energy is the only evaluation parameter used in this study. Life cycle assessment of all energy inputs (LCEA) is completed mainly by the life cycle inventory (LCI), taking into account the full life cycle including the construction, the operation, and the demolition phase of the project. Assessment of benefit from water reuse during the life cycle should focus on sewage discharge reduction and water-saving benefits. The results of LCEA of Beijing water reuse project built in 2014 in a comprehensive way shows that the benefits obtained from the reclaimed water reuse far exceed the life cycle energy consumption. In this paper, we apply the LCEA model to estimate the benefits of reclaimed water reuse projects quantitatively.

  15. Inland Waters and the North American Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butman, D. E.; Striegl, R. G.; Stackpoole, S. M.; del Giorgio, P.; Prairie, Y.; Pilcher, D.; Raymond, P. A.; Alcocer, J.; Paz, F.

    2016-12-01

    Inland aquatic ecosystems process, store, and release carbon to the atmosphere and coastal margins. The form of this carbon is a function of terrestrial and aquatic primary and secondary production, the weathering of materials in soils and subsurface environments, the hydrologic controls on the movement of carbon from land to inland waters, and the connectivity between streams, rivers, lakes, reservoirs and groundwater. The 2007 1st State of the Carbon Cycle reported fluxes for the continental United States (CONUS) only. Streams and rivers exported 30-40 Tg C yr-1 to coastal environments, and 17-25 Tg C yr-1 were buried in lake and reservoir sediments. Remarkably, the 2007 report did not quantify gas emissions, which represent over half of the total carbon fluxes through inland water in the US. Current research has shown that 71-149 Tg C yr-1 exits freshwater systems either through atmospheric emissions of carbon dioxide or as inorganic and organic carbon fluxes to the coast from the CONUS. These estimates did not include the Laurentian Great Lakes. Variation in the magnitude of these fluxes across regions of the CONUS has been linked to differences in precipitation and terrestrial net ecosystem production. Similar comprehensive assessments have not been done for Canada or Mexico. Here we provide, as part of the 2nd State of the Carbon Cycle report, estimates for the river coastal export and vertical emissions of carbon from inland waters of North America, and report major data gaps, and weaknesses in methodologies. These findings stress that strong international partnerships are needed to improve assessment, monitoring, and modeling of human impacts on the magnitude and timing of aquatic fluxes in the future.

  16. Coverage-dependent amplifiers of vegetation change on global water cycle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Huihui; Zou, Bin; Luo, Juhua

    2017-07-01

    The terrestrial water cycle describes the circulation of water worldwide from one store to another via repeated evapotranspiration (E) from land and precipitation (P) back to the surface. The cycle presents significant spatial variability, which is strongly affected by natural climate and anthropogenic influences. As one of the major anthropogenic influences, vegetation change unavoidably alters surface property and subsequent the terrestrial water cycle, while its contribution is yet difficult to isolate from the mixed influences. Here, we use satellite and in-situ datasets to identify the terrestrial water cycle dynamics in spatial detail and to evaluate the impact of vegetation change. Methodologically, the water cycle is identified by the indicator of difference between evapotranspiration and precipitation (E-P). Then the scalar form of the indicator's trend (ΔE + ΔP) is used for evaluating the dynamics of water cycle, with the positive value means acceleration and negative means deceleration. Then, the contributions of climate and vegetation change are isolated by the trajectory-based method. Our results indicate that 4 accelerating and 4 decelerating water cycles can be identified, affecting 42.11% of global land. The major water cycle type is characterized by non-changing precipitation and increasing evapotranspiration (PNO-EIN), which covers 20.88% of globally land. Vegetation change amplifies both accelerating and decelerating water cycles. It tends to intensify the trend of the decelerating water cycles, while climate change weakens the trend. In the accelerating water cycles, both vegetation and climate change present positive effect to intensify the trend. The effect of plant cover change varies with the coverage. In particular, vegetation change intensifies the water cycle in moderately vegetated regions (0.1 0.85), the water cycle is accelerated because of the significant increase of precipitation. We conclude that vegetation change acts as an

  17. Early forecasting of Indian Summer Monsoon: case study 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surovyatkina, Elena; Stolbova, Veronika; Kurths, Jurgen

    2017-04-01

    The prior knowledge of dates of onset and withdrawal of monsoon is of vital importance for the population of the Indian subcontinent. In May 2016 before monsoon season, India recorded its highest-ever temperature of 51C. Hot waves have decimated crops, killed livestock and left 330 million people without enough water. At the end of monsoon season the floods in Indian this year have also broken previous records. Severe and devastating rainfall poured down, triggering dams spilling and floods. Such extreme conditions pose the vital questions such as: When will the monsoon come? When will the monsoon withdraw? More lead time in monsoon forecast warning is crucial for taking appropriate decisions at various levels - from the farmer's field (e.g. plowing day, seeding) to the central government (e.g. managing water and energy resources, food procurement policies). The Indian Meteorological Department issues forecasts of onset of monsoon for Kerala state in South India on May 15-th. It does not give such predictions for the other 28 states of the country. Our study concerns the central part of India. We made the monsoon forecast using our recently developed method which focuses on Tipping elements of the Indian monsoon [1]. Our prediction relies on observations of near-surface air temperature and relative humidity from both the ERA-40 and NCEP/NCAR reanalyses. We performed both of our forecasts for the onset and withdrawal of monsoon for the central part of India, the Eastern Ghats (20N,80E). We predicted the monsoon arrival to the Eastern Ghats (20N,80E) on the 13th of June with a deviation of +/-4 days. The prediction was made on May 6-th, 2016 [2], that is 40 days in advance of the date of the forecast. The actual monsoon arrival was June 17-th. In this day near-surface air temperature and relative humidity overcame the critical values and the monsoon season started, that was confirmed by observations of meteorological stations located around the EG-region. We

  18. Reservoir in Global Water Cycle: Macro Scale Hydrologic Modeling for Water Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, T.; Nijssen, B.; Haddeland, I.; Gao, H.; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2014-12-01

    Man-made reservoirs play a key role in the terrestrial water system. They support purposes, such as irrigation, hydropower generation, and flood control, which can substantially change water fluxes at the land surface and redistribute the storage of surface water in space and time. Although most developed countries have sophisticated observing systems for many variables in the natural surface water cycle, long-term and consistent records that focus on water management and human impacts on the global water cycle are much more limited, and most land surface models ignore water management activities. We describe a continental-scale model of reservoir storage, which is combined with a soil moisture deficit-based irrigation scheme within the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) macro-scale hydrological model to simulate the effects of water management in the major river basins of the world. The model is forced with merged NCEP/NCAR and satellite meteorological data at a spatial resolution of 0.25 degrees latitude-longitude, for the period 1948 to 2010. A total of 167 of the largest reservoirs in the world with a total storage capacity around 3900 km3 (nearly 60% of the global total reservoir storage) are simulated. We successfully predict the monthly reservoir storage time series for most of a set of 23 global reservoirs for which observed storage is available either via in situ or satellite remote sensing measurements. We evaluate, on a continental and global basis, the magnitude of inter-seasonal and inter-annual reservoir storage variations in comparison with other terms in the land surface water cycle, including Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) and soil moisture.

  19. Impacts of intraseasonal oscillation on the onset and interannual variation of the Indian summer monsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI YanJun; ZHANG RenHe; LI Tim; WEN Min

    2009-01-01

    The role of the intraseasonal oscillation (ISO) on the seasonal and interannual variations of the Indian summer monsoon is investigated based on the analysis of observational data. It is shown that the ISO significantly contributes to the establishment of low-level westerlies during the monsoon onset and developing periods. The effect of the ISO on the annual cycle of the monsoon is through nonlinear eddy momentum transport. On the interannual timescale, the Indian summer monsoon rainfall exhibits a significant out-of-phase relationship with the ISO intensity over the Indian monsoon region. In strong ISO years it appears the weak monsoon when there is an abnormal high over the India subcontinent in the lower troposphere. In weak ISO years there exists an abnormal low and the strong monsoon ap-pears.

  20. Conceptual model for simulating the water cycle of the Copenhagen area, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Jan; Christensen, Steen; Ladekarl, Ulla Lyngs

    2008-01-01

    A complete water cycle model has been constructed for the Copenhagen area (966 km2) in order to study the development of the water cycle during the period 1850-2003. The urban water cycle is quantified in terms of root zone water balance, water supply, waste water, storm water, groundwater flow......, and the interactions between these systems. The water cycle is simulated by combining a root-zone model, a grid distribution tool, and a modified Modflow-2000 model using existing flow packages and a new sewer package that simulates the interactions between ground water and sewers (or rain drains). Long time series...... cycle. It is also the hope that the model will provide a better and more complete overview of the consequences of different water management scenarios. The model concept and selected simulation results is presented....

  1. Adsorption characteristics of water vapor on ferroaluminophosphate for desalination cycle

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Youngdeuk

    2014-07-01

    The adsorption characteristics of microporous ferroaluminophosphate adsorbent (FAM-Z01, Mitsubishi Plastics) are evaluated for possible application in adsorption desalination and cooling (AD) cycles. A particular interest is its water vapor uptake behavior at assorted adsorption temperatures and pressures whilst comparing them to the commercial silica gels of AD plants. The surface characteristics are first carried out using N2 gas adsorption followed by the water vapor uptake analysis for temperature ranging from 20°C to 80°C. We propose a hybrid isotherm model, composing of the Henry and the Sips isotherms, which can be integrated to satisfactorily fit the experimental data of water adsorption on the FAM-Z01. The hybrid model is selected to fit the unusual isotherm shapes, that is, a low adsorption in the initial section and followed by a rapid vapor uptake leading to a likely micropore volume filling by hydrogen bonding and cooperative interaction in micropores. It is shown that the equilibrium adsorption capacity of FAM-Z01 can be up to 5 folds higher than that of conventional silica gels. Owing to the quantum increase in the adsorbate uptake, the FAM-Z01 has the potential to significantly reduce the footprint of an existing AD plant for the same output capacity. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Life Cycle Assessment and Cost Analysis of Water and ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    changes in drinking and wastewater infrastructure need to incorporate a holistic view of the water service sustainability tradeoffs and potential benefits when considering shifts towards new treatment technology, decentralized systems, energy recovery and reuse of treated wastewater. The main goal of this study is to determine the influence of scale on the energy and cost performance of different transitional membrane bioreactors (MBR) in decentralized wastewater treatment (WWT) systems by performing a life cycle assessment (LCA) and cost analysis. LCA is a tool used to quantify sustainability-related metrics from a systems perspective. The study calculates the environmental and cost profiles of both aerobic MBRs (AeMBR) and anaerobic MBRs (AnMBR), which not only recover energy from waste, but also produce recycled water that can displace potable water for uses such as irrigation and toilet flushing. MBRs represent an intriguing technology to provide decentralized WWT services while maximizing resource recovery. A number of scenarios for these WWT technologies are investigated for different scale systems serving various population density and land area combinations to explore the ideal application potentials. MBR systems are examined from 0.05 million gallons per day (MGD) to 10 MGD and serve land use types from high density urban (100,000 people per square mile) to semi-rural single family (2,000 people per square mile). The LCA and cost model was built with ex

  3. Biomass burning and its relationship with water cycle dynamics of the Chari-Logone catchment of Lake Chad Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, F. W.; Lee, J.; Ellison, L.; Gupta, M.; Bolten, J. D.; Gatebe, C. K.; Ichoku, C. M.

    2016-12-01

    The cause of shrinkage of Lake Chad has been of great interest for issues of global warming and climate change. The present study investigates the effect of biomass burning on the water cycle dynamics of Lake Chad Basin in the Northern Sub-Saharan Africa. Burning activities increase from November to April when monsoonal precipitation is at its lowest and decreases dramatically from May to October when precipitation peaks. To circumvent weather station scarcity in the region, a variety of satellite products were used as input into a water balance model. The datasets include TRMM 3B31 for precipitation, SRTM for elevation, and MODIS: MOD11C3 for temperature, MOD12Q1 for land cover, and MOD14A for fire count. Non-satellite based data sources include soil maps from the Harmonized World Soil Database and wind speed from NOAA NCDC stations. The Chari-Logone catchment of the Lake Chad Basin was selected since it supplies over 90% of the water input to the Lake. Fire count data from MOD14A were integrated with land cover albedo changes to determine monthly potential evapotranspiration (PET) using a Penman equation. The resolution of the model is 2 km x 2 km which allows for delineation of physical features such as lakes and other water bodies. Fire counts, also at a resolution of 2 km x 2 km, vary dramatically depending on the season. A separate land cover dataset was created to account for the effect of burning of different vegetative land types, which affects vegetative area, bare area, leaf area index, vegetation height, Manning coefficient, and aerodynamic resistance. Two water balance simulations, one considering burning and one without, were compared from the years 2005 to 2010. Results indicate biomass burning contribute to an increase in average monthly runoff and a decrease in groundwater recharge. Actual evapotranspiration shows variation depending on the month.

  4. Life Cycle Assesment of Daugavgriva Waste Water Treatment Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romagnoli, F.; Sampaio, F.; Blumberga, D.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the assessment of the environmental impacts caused by the treatment of Riga's waste water in the Daugavgriva plant with biogas energy cogeneration through the life cycle assessment (LCA). The LCA seems to be a good tool to assess and evaluate the most serious environmental impacts of a facility The results showed clearly that the impact category contributing the most to the total impact -eutrophicationcomes from the wastewater treatment stage. Climate change also seems to be a relevant impact coming from the wastewater treatment stage and the main contributor to the Climate change is N2O. The main environmental benefits, in terms of the percentages of the total impact, associated to the use of biogas instead of any other fossil fuel in the cogeneration plant are equal to: 3,11% for abiotic depletation, 1,48% for climate change, 0,51% for acidification and 0,12% for eutrophication.

  5. Our Environment in Hot Water: Comparing Water Heaters, A Life Cycle Approach Comparing Tank and Tankless Water Heaters in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Alison; McMahon, James; Masanet, Eric; Lutz, Jim

    2008-08-13

    Residential water heating is a large source of energy use in California homes. This project took a life cycle approach to comparing tank and tankless water heaters in Northern and Southern California. Information about the life cycle phases was calculated using the European Union's Methodology study for EcoDesign of Energy-using Products (MEEUP) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Life Cycle Inventory (NREL LCI) database. In a unit-to-unit comparison, it was found that tankless water heaters would lessen impacts of water heating by reducing annual energy use by 2800 MJ/year (16% compared to tank), and reducing global warming emissions by 175 kg CO2 eqv./year (18% reduction). Overall, the production and combustion of natural gas in the use phase had the largest impact. Total waste, VOCs, PAHs, particulate matter, and heavy-metals-to-air categories were also affected relatively strongly by manufacturing processes. It was estimated that tankless water heater users would have to use 10 more gallons of hot water a day (an increased usage of approximately 20%) to have the same impact as tank water heaters. The project results suggest that if a higher percentage of Californians used tankless water heaters, environmental impacts caused by water heating would be smaller.

  6. Evaluating the hydrological consistency of satellite based water cycle components

    KAUST Repository

    Lopez Valencia, Oliver M.

    2016-06-15

    Advances in multi-satellite based observations of the earth system have provided the capacity to retrieve information across a wide-range of land surface hydrological components and provided an opportunity to characterize terrestrial processes from a completely new perspective. Given the spatial advantage that space-based observations offer, several regional-to-global scale products have been developed, offering insights into the multi-scale behaviour and variability of hydrological states and fluxes. However, one of the key challenges in the use of satellite-based products is characterizing the degree to which they provide realistic and representative estimates of the underlying retrieval: that is, how accurate are the hydrological components derived from satellite observations? The challenge is intrinsically linked to issues of scale, since the availability of high-quality in-situ data is limited, and even where it does exist, is generally not commensurate to the resolution of the satellite observation. Basin-scale studies have shown considerable variability in achieving water budget closure with any degree of accuracy using satellite estimates of the water cycle. In order to assess the suitability of this type of approach for evaluating hydrological observations, it makes sense to first test it over environments with restricted hydrological inputs, before applying it to more hydrological complex basins. Here we explore the concept of hydrological consistency, i.e. the physical considerations that the water budget impose on the hydrologic fluxes and states to be temporally and spatially linked, to evaluate the reproduction of a set of large-scale evaporation (E) products by using a combination of satellite rainfall (P) and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) observations of storage change, focusing on arid and semi-arid environments, where the hydrological flows can be more realistically described. Our results indicate no persistent hydrological

  7. The NASA Energy and Water cycle Extreme (NEWSE) Integration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser, P. R.; Lapenta, W.; Schiffer, R.

    2008-05-01

    Skillful predictions of water and energy cycle extremes (flood and drought) are elusive. To better understand the mechanisms responsible for water and energy extremes, and to make decisive progress in predicting these extremes, the collaborative NASA Energy and Water cycle Extremes (NEWSE) Integration Project, is studying these extremes in the U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP) during 2006-2007, including their relationships with continental and global scale processes, and assessment of their predictability on multiple space and time scales. It is our hypothesis that an integrative analysis of observed extremes which reflects the current understanding of the role of SST and soil moisture variability influences on atmospheric heating and forcing of planetary waves, incorporating recently available global and regional hydro- meteorological datasets (i.e., precipitation, water vapor, clouds, etc.) in conjunction with advances in data assimilation, can lead to new insights into the factors that lead to persistent drought and flooding. We will show initial results of this project, whose goals are toprovide an improved definition, attribution and prediction on sub-seasonal to interannual time scales, improved understanding of the mechanisms of decadal drought and its predictability, including the impacts of SST variability and deep soil moisture variability, and improved monitoring/attributions, with transition to applications; a bridging of the gap between hydrological forecasts and stakeholders (utilization of probabilistic forecasts, education, forecast interpretation for different sectors, assessment of uncertainties for different sectors, etc.). *The NEWSE Team is: Romanou, Anastasiam, Columbia U.; Brian Soden, U. Miami; William Lapenta, NASA- MSFC; Megan Larko, CREW; Bing Lin, NASA-LaRC; Christa Peters-Lidard, NASA-GSFC; Xiquan Dong, U. North Dakota; Debbie Belvedere, CREW; Mathew Sapiano, U. Maryland; Duane Waliser, NASA-JPL; Eni Njoku, NASA/JPL; Eric Fetzer, NASA

  8. Zooplankton abundance in subtropical waters: is there a lunar cycle?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Hernández-León

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on historical data of abundance, we report evidence of changes in zooplankton abundance in the 0-200 m layer related to the moon cycle confirming that this phenomenon is produced in the marine environment, similarly to the one described for freshwater ecosystems. A clear decrease in the abundance of copepodites plus copepods was observed from the second to the fourth quarter of the moon when the seasonal variability was suppressed. During the full moon phase the large zooplankton and micronekton of the deep scattering layers (DSL would not reach the upper mixed layer in order to avoid predation because of the relatively high level of illumination. Thus epipelagic zooplankton abundance increases as the effect of a lower predatory pressure. Conversely, during the new moon phase the diel migrants reach the surface waters and epiplankton abundance considerably decreases. Recent oceanic sediment trap data in subtropical waters indicate that the particle flux increases at about 30 days period. Thus, the effect of diel vertical migrants could promote not only the variability in their resources and the intensity of the active flux, but could also drive the variability in the gravitational flux.

  9. Global operational hydrological forecasts through eWaterCycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Giesen, Nick; Bierkens, Marc; Donchyts, Gennadii; Drost, Niels; Hut, Rolf; Sutanudjaja, Edwin

    2015-04-01

    Central goal of the eWaterCycle project (www.ewatercycle.org) is the development of an operational hyper-resolution hydrological global model. This model is able to produce 14 day ensemble forecasts based on a hydrological model and operational weather data (presently NOAA's Global Ensemble Forecast System). Special attention is paid to prediction of situations in which water related issues are relevant, such as floods, droughts, navigation, hydropower generation, and irrigation stress. Near-real time satellite data will be assimilated in the hydrological simulations, which is a feature that will be presented for the first time at EGU 2015. First, we address challenges that are mainly computer science oriented but have direct practical hydrological implications. An important feature in this is the use of existing standards and open-source software to the maximum extent possible. For example, we use the Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System (CSDMS) approach to coupling models (Basic Model Interface (BMI)). The hydrological model underlying the project is PCR-GLOBWB, built by Utrecht University. This is the motor behind the predictions and state estimations. Parts of PCR-GLOBWB have been re-engineered to facilitate running it in a High Performance Computing (HPC) environment, run parallel on multiple nodes, as well as to use BMI. Hydrological models are not very CPU intensive compared to, say, atmospheric models. They are, however, memory hungry due to the localized processes and associated effective parameters. To accommodate this memory need, especially in an ensemble setting, a variation on the traditional Ensemble Kalman Filter was developed that needs much less on-chip memory. Due to the operational nature, the coupling of the hydrological model with hydraulic models is very important. The idea is not to run detailed hydraulic routing schemes over the complete globe but to have on-demand simulation prepared off-line with respect to topography and

  10. Water cycle at Gale crater through MSL/REMS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harri, Ari-Matti; Genzer, Maria; Kemppinen, Osku; Gomez-Elvira, Javier; Savijärvi, Hannu; McConnochie, Tim; De la Torre, Manuel; Haberle, Robert; Polkko, Jouni; Paton, Mark; Richardson, Mark I.; Newman, Claire E.; Siili, Tero; Makinen, Terhi

    2016-10-01

    The Mars Science laboratory (MSL) has been successfully operating at the Gale crater since early August 2012 and has provided a wealth of extremely valuable data. That includes atmospheric observations by the REMS instrument performing atmospheric pressure, temperature of the air, ground temperature, wind speed and direction, relative humidity (REMS-H), and UV measurements.The REMS-H relative humidity device is based on polymeric capacitive humidity sensors developed by Vaisala Inc. and it makes use of three (3) humidity sensor heads. The humidity device is mounted on the REMS boom providing ventilation with the ambient atmosphere through a filter protecting the device from airborne dust.The REMS-H humidity instrument has created an unprecedented data record of more than two full Martian. REMS-H measured the relative humidity and temperature at 1.6 m height for a period of 5 minutes every hour as part of the MSL/REMS instrument package. We focus on describing the annual in situ water cycle with the new REMS-H instrument calibration for the period of two Martian years. The results will be constrained through comparison with independent indirect observations and through modeling efforts.We inferred the hourly atmospheric VMR from the REMS-H observations and compared these VMR measurements with predictions of VMR from our 1D column Martian atmospheric model and regolith to investigate the local water cycle, exchange processes and the local climate in Gale Crater. The strong diurnal variation suggests there are surface-atmosphere exchange processes at Gale Crater during all seasons, which depletes moisture to the ground in the evening and nighttime and release the moisture back to the atmosphere during the daytime. On the other hand, these processes do not result in significant water deposition on the ground, because frost has not been detected in Gale Crater by any of the MSL observations. Hence, our modelling results presumably indicate that adsorption processes take

  11. On breaks of the Indian monsoon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sulochana Gadgil; P V Joseph

    2003-12-01

    , there are three or four active-break cycles in a season according to Webster et al (1998) which implies a time scale of about 40 days for which Goswami and Mohan (2000), and Annamalai and Slingo (2001) have studied breaks and active minus break fluctuations. On the other hand, neither the traditional breaks (Ramamurthy 1969; and De et al 1998) nor the rainbreaks occur every year. This suggests that the `breaks' in these studies are weak spells of the intraseasonal variation of the monsoon, which occur every year. We have derived the OLR and circulation patterns associated with rainbreaks and active spells and compared them with the patterns associated with breaks/active minus break spells from these studies. Inspite of differences in the patterns over the Indian region, there is one feature which is seen in the OLR anomaly patterns of breaks identified on the basis of different criteria as well as the rainbreaks identified in this paper viz., a quadrapole over the Asia-west Pacific region arising from anomalies opposite (same) in sign to those over the Indian region occurring over the equatorial Indian Ocean and northern tropical (equatorial) parts of the west Pacific. Thus it appears that this quadrapole is a basic feature of weak spells of the intraseasonal variation over the Asia-west Pacific region. Since the rainbreaks are intense weak spells, this basic feature is also seen in the composite patterns of these breaks. We find that rainbreaks (active spells) are also associated with negative (positive) anomalies over a part of the east Pacific suggesting that the convection over the Indian region is linked to that over the east Pacific not only on the interannual scale (as evinced by the link between the Indian summer monsoon rainfall and ENSO) but on the intraseasonal scale as well.

  12. Maintenance and broadening of the ocean’s salinity distribution by the water cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Zika, Jan D.; Skliris, Nikolaos; Nurser, A. J. George; Josey, Simon A; Mudryk, Lawrence; Laliberté, Frédéric; Marsh, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The global water cycle leaves an imprint on ocean salinity through evaporation and precipitation. It has been proposed that observed changes in salinity can be used to infer changes in the water cycle. Here salinity is characterized by the distribution of water masses in salinity coordinates. Only mixing and sources and sinks of freshwater and salt can modify this distribution. Mixing acts to collapse the distribution, making saline waters fresher and fresh waters more saline. Hence, in stead...

  13. The ICTP Regional System Model (RESM) to simulate the monsoon in the South Asia CORDEX domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sante, Fabio; Coppola, Erika; Farneti, Riccardo; Giorgi, Filippo

    2016-04-01

    South Asian climate is characterized mainly by the wet and dry dipole that divides the annual cycle in two seasons: the monsoon season and the dry season. The life and the economy of those regions is very much influenced by the climate variability and the monsoon variability therefore is crucial to understand the physical mechanism associated with them. The spatial and temporal representation of the monsoons over the South Asian region is one of the main challenge of global and regional climate models principally because they fail to represent the SST (sea surface temperature) induced rainfall when forced with observed SST resulting in a poor representation of the monsoon cycle (Fu et al. 2002). The coupling with the ocean is essential to be able to simulate the correct air-sea interaction; the results are in general much improved and the monsoon patterns and the time representation (like the onset for example) are closer to the observations (Fu et al. 2002; Fu et al. 2007; Ratnam et Al. 2008; Seo et Al. 2009). Here we present a Regional Earth System Model (RESM) composed by a regional climate model RegCM4 (Giorgi et al, 2012) coupled with the regional oceanic model MITgcm (Marshall et al, 1997) and two hydrological model: ChyM (Cetemps Hydrological Model, Coppola et al, 2007) and HD model (Max-Planck's HD model; Hagemann and Dümenil, 1998). We simulate the Southern Asian Climate taking into account the whole hydrological cycle. Wind stress, water fluxes and heat fluxes are exchanged from the atmosphere to the ocean, SST are exchanged from ocean to the atmosphere and in order to conserve mass, the river discharge is calculated from the Hydrological model and sent to the ocean. The main goal of this work is to evaluate the impacts of local air-sea interaction in the simulation of the interannual variability, over the Indian CORDEX (Giorgi et al, 2009) domain through regionally ocean-atmosphere-river coupled and uncoupled simulations, with a focus on monsoon season

  14. Life cycle assessment of three water systems in Copenhagen-a management tool of the future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godskesen, Berit; Zambrano, K C; Trautner, A.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental life-cycle assessment (LCA) was applied to evaluate three different water systems of the water sector in Copenhagen, Denmark, including technologies within water supply, facilities recycling water and treatment of sewer overflow. In these three water systems LCA was used to evaluate...

  15. Radiolarian artificial neural network based paleo sea surface water temperature and salinity changes during the last glacial cycle in the Timor Sea, Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S. M.; Malmgren, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    The western Pacific water enters into the Timor Sea (tropical Indian Ocean) by the thermohaline conveyor belt, and this region is under the influence of the SW monsoon. The higher precipitation during the monsoon rains lower the surface salinity in the north-eastern Indian Ocean towards the Bay of Bengal; whereas, the Arabian Sea remains highly saline due to higher evaporation in the region surrounding Arabian deserts. The salinity contrast in the northern Indian Ocean is very unique, and the radiolarian micro-zooplanktons living in the surface water serve a very good proxy for the monsoonal changes in the surface sea-water temperature (SST) and salinity in the geological past. We studied radiolarian faunal variation in the core MD01-2378, located at ~13oS and ~121oE (1783 m water depth), at the inlet of the thermohaline circulation into the Timor Sea. We applied the modern radiolarian based artificial neural networks (ANNs) (Gupta and Malmgren, 2009) to derive the SST and salinity during August-October for the last 140 ka (the full last glacial cycle). Based on the mean estimates of the 10 ANNs, the root mean square error in prediction (RMSEP) for SST is ~1.4oC with correlation between observed and estimated values r=0.98 (Gupta and Malmgren, 2009). Similarly, the RMSEP is 0.3 psu (r=0.94) for the salinity estimates. We derived paleo-SSTs and salinity values using modern radiolarian ANNs and the fossil radiolarian data generated from the core for the last 140-ka (Fig.1). The age model of the core is based on δ18O benthic oxygen isotope stratigraphy and 21 AMS 14C ages up to ~30-ka (Holbourn et al., 2005). Paleo SST-summer varied between 22-28.5oC, and it is in very good agreement with the δ18O benthic record of Holbourn et al. (2005) defining the Last Glacial Maximum (~24 ka) and the Eemian (~125 ka) stages. The salinity fluctuated between 34-35 psu, and compared well with oxygen isotope record representing the LGM and Eemian periods. We gratefully acknowledge

  16. HyMeX, a 10-year multidisciplinary program on the Mediterranean water cycle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    binski, P; Ducrocq, V.P; Alpert, P; Anagnostou, A; Béranger, K; Borga, M; Braud, I; Chanzy, A; Davolio, S; Delrieu, G; Estournel, C; Filali Boubrahmi, N; Uijlenhoet, R; Font, J; Grubisic, V; Gualdi, S; Homar, V; Ivancan-Picek, B; Kottmeier, C; Kotroni, V; Lagouvardos, K; Lionello, P; Llasat, M.C; Ludwig, W; Lutoff, C; Mariotti, A; Richard, E; Romero, R; Rotunno, R; Roussot, O; Ruin, I; Somot, S; Taupier-Letage, L; Tintore, J; Wernli, H

    2014-01-01

    The Mediterranean countries are experiencing important challenges related to the water cycle, including water shortages and floods, extreme winds, and ice/snow storms, that impact critically the socio...

  17. SHORTER MENSTRUAL CYCLES ASSOCIATED WITH CHLORINATION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorter Menstrual Cycles Associated with Chlorination by-Products in Drinking Water. Gayle Windham, Kirsten Waller, Meredith Anderson, Laura Fenster, Pauline Mendola, Shanna Swan. California Department of Health Services.In previous studies of tap water consumption we...

  18. SHORTER MENSTRUAL CYCLES ASSOCIATED WITH CHLORINATION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorter Menstrual Cycles Associated with Chlorination by-Products in Drinking Water. Gayle Windham, Kirsten Waller, Meredith Anderson, Laura Fenster, Pauline Mendola, Shanna Swan. California Department of Health Services.In previous studies of tap water consumption we...

  19. The Use of Water Vapor as a Refrigerant: Impact of Cycle Modifications on Commercial Viability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandon F. Lachner, Jr.; Gregory F. Nellis; Douglas T. Reindl

    2004-08-30

    This project investigated the economic viability of using water as the refrigerant in a 1000-ton chiller application. The most attractive water cycle configuration was found to be a flash-intercooled, two-stage cycle using centrifugal compressors and direct contact heat exchangers. Component level models were developed that could be used to predict the size and performance of the compressors and heat exchangers in this cycle as well as in a baseline, R-134a refrigeration cycle consistent with chillers in use today. A survey of several chiller manufacturers provided information that was used to validate and refine these component models. The component models were integrated into cycle models that were subsequently used to investigate the life-cycle costs of both an R-134a and water refrigeration cycle. It was found that the first cost associated with the water as a refrigerant cycle greatly exceeded the savings in operating costs associated with its somewhat higher COP. Therefore, the water refrigeration cycle is not an economically attractive option to today's R-134a refrigeration system. There are a number of other issues, most notably the requirements associated with purging non-condensable gases that accumulate in a direct contact heat exchanger, which will further reduce the economic viability of the water cycle.

  20. Mediterranean proto-sapropels in the Middle Miocene: implications for the strength of the African monsoon and link to Miocene glaciations

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, C. M.; Mutti, M.; Adatte, T.; Laskar, J.

    2003-04-01

    The strength of the African monsoon is known to have played a major role in determining sedimentation patterns in the Mediterranean during the Plio-Pleistocene. Increased meteoric water input by strong monsoons reduced surface water salinity, and the resulting slower water-mixing rate triggered the deposition of organic-rich layers called "sapropels". Here we present some proxy data coming from a mixed siliciclastic-carbonate section outcropping on the Maltese Islands that suggests that sapropels deposits already existed in the Middle Miocene. This implies that an enhanced monsoonal climate was likely active at that time. Our primary evidences for the existence of "proto-sapropels" are runoff proxies (clay mineral assemblages and abundance) coupled with oxygen isotopes. These indicate that a direct link existed between increased runoff regarded here as a proxy for the strength of the Monsoon- and Miocene global climate (Antarctic glaciation). Each Miocene phase of glaciation is reflected in the section as an increased flux of continental-derived material. Moreover, stable isotopes of carbon and Corg:Norg ratio analyses of organic matter revealed a higher mixing rate of terrigenous and marine organic matters during times of increased sedimentation. This is in good agreement with a monsoon model where increased sedimentation is linked to increased continental runoff. Spectral analysis of the section revealed the presence of Milankovitch-scaled cycles with a strong 100 k.y. frequency. Astronomically calibrated age model for the section shows that the African monsoon has probably initiated around 16.7 Ma and underwent a major strengthening around 13.8 Ma, a time corresponding to enhanced siliciclastic deposition on the Malta-Ragusa platform and to the global cooling phase of the Mi3 Antarctic ice-buildup phase. We argue that the strong coherence between Miocene glaciation phases and increased runoff into the Mediterranean is due to a link between Antarctic cooling

  1. Developing and Testing Water Cycle Intensification Indicator (WCI) over the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, X.; Houser, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Is the water cycle intensifying in response to global warming due to temperature-driven changes in atmospheric water holding capacity? To address this question, we are developing and testing Water Cycle Intensification Indicator (WCI) to quantify the current and future change in the strength of the water cycle across the conterminous U.S. in support of the National Climate Assessment (NCA). The WCI consists of a suite of primary water cycle trend and extreme composites that are spatially- and temporally-scalable for summarizing how the climate changes results in stronger or more extreme water cycling over the nation. We calculated trend and extreme in water cycle components using NASA-produced data and modeling products. Six water cycle variables are chosen, including precipitation, evaporation, runoff, moisture convergence flux, terrestrial storage and water vapor. Our preliminary results showed that the strength of water cycle depends on specific regions and variables, even different datasets. For instance, precipitation from MERRA-Land offline simulation is consistent with the CPC unified precipitation dataset in showing positive trend over the northeastern, northwestern and west north central, but negative trend over the western and central regions. However, negative trends are observed in MERRA-land over the southern Texas and some parts of the southern coast, contrary to the positive trend revealed by the unified dataset in the same area. Next, we are going to integrate and combine the trends and extremes of these water cycle components to develop a suite of climate indicators to monitor the changes of water cycle as result of climate change. These indicators will be implemented and tested over the nation for further optimization. Moreover, we will also be developing innovative WCI visualization, documentation and distribution methods to disseminate WCI products to the public and stakeholders.

  2. Dynamics of Projected Changes in South Asian Summer Monsoon Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, A.; Sabade, S.; Kripalani, R.

    2011-12-01

    South Asian summer monsoon (June through September) rainfall simulation and its potential future changes are evaluated in a multi-model ensemble of global coupled climate models outputs under World Climate Research Program Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (WCRP CMIP3) data set. The response of South Asian summer monsoon to a transient increase in future anthropogenic radiative forcing is investigated for two time slices , middle (2031-2050) and end of the 21st century (2081-2100) in the non-mitigated Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES) B1, A1B and A2 .There is large inter-model variability in simulation of spatial characteristics of seasonal monsoon precipitation. Ten out of 25 models are able to simulate space-time characteristics of South Asian monsoon precipitation reasonably well. The response of these selected 10 models have been examined for projected changes in seasonal monsoon rainfall. The multi-model ensemble of these 10 models project significant increase in monsoon precipitation with global warming. The substantial increase in precipitation is observed over western equatorial Indian Ocean and southern parts of India. However the monsoon circulation weakens significantly under all the three climate change experiments. Possible mechanisms for projected increase in precipitation and for precipitation-wind paradox have been discussed. The surface temperature over Asian landmass increases in pre-monsoon months due to global warming and heat low over north-west India intensifies. The dipole snow configuration over Eurasian continent strengthens in warmer atmosphere which is conducive for enhancement in precipitation over Indian landmass. The increase in precipitation is mainly contributed by the substantial increase in water vapor content in the atmosphere. No notable changes have been projected in the El Nino-Monsoon relationship.

  3. Life-cycle assessments in the South African water sector: A review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: life cycle assessments, water footprinting, urban water systems. Introduction. A life-cycle ... Commission (WRC) had an important role in supporting most ... ered by the LCA methodology) was the operational stage and that the main ..... tems but also as a 'comparative' tool to direct decision-making for future ...

  4. Influence of Soil Water Retention Properties on Hydrological Cycle and Water Budgeting Module Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Čustović

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of water budgeting module as shown in this paper is represented in phases. By experimental measurement of precipitation and lysimetric measurement of percolation runoff the fi rst phase establishes monthly and annual soil-water budgets of skeletal and clayey soils, and hence the influence of soil water-retention potential on hydrologic cycle and water budget over a four year period in the area of Mostar. Then, a soil-water budget model is simulated in a simplified procedure in order to determine the corresponding soil productive water reserve (R for given soils.In this way, depending on R values, the output parameters of the simulated model may produce different results in: calculated surplus or percolation runoff, real evapotranspiration (RET and water deficit.The lysimetric measuring of the water input and output in skeletal and clayey soils determined significant differences in the water budgets of these, by physical properties, divergent soils. Such correlations indicate that there is a realistic possibility of computing new, relatively reliable and pragmatically significant agro-hydrological parameters using measured precipitation and calculated PET.Also, this paper addresses a correlative analysis between the apple and maize ET on one side, and evaporation measured by Piche and by Class A, as well as PET calculated by Thornthwaite, Turc and Penman, on the other side. The results show a reliable reaction between ET of apple and maize with E by Piche, while the same relation is even more reliable with Class A. Other methods in this correlative analysis are less reliable.

  5. Early warnings and missed alarms for abrupt monsoon transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Z. A.; Kwasniok, F.; Boulton, C. A.; Cox, P. M.; Jones, R. T.; Lenton, T. M.; Turney, C. S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Palaeo-records from China demonstrate that the East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM) is dominated by abrupt and large magnitude monsoon shifts on millennial timescales, switching between periods of high and weak monsoon rains. It has been hypothesized that over these timescales, the EASM exhibits two stable states with bifurcation-type tipping points between them. Here we test this hypothesis by looking for early warning signals of past bifurcations in speleothem δ18O records from Sanbao Cave and Hulu Cave, China, spanning the penultimate glacial cycle. We find that although there are increases in both autocorrelation and variance preceding some of the monsoon transitions during this period, it is only immediately prior to the abrupt monsoon shift at the penultimate deglaciation (Termination II) that statistically significant increases are detected. To supplement our data analysis, we produce and analyse multiple model simulations that we derive from these data. We find hysteresis behaviour in our model simulations with transitions directly forced by solar insolation. However, signals of critical slowing down, which occur on the approach to a bifurcation, are only detectable in the model simulations when the change in system stability is sufficiently slow to be detected by the sampling resolution of the data set. This raises the possibility that the early warning "alarms" were missed in the speleothem data over the period 224-150 kyr and it was only at the monsoon termination that the change in the system stability was sufficiently slow to detect early warning signals.

  6. Redox cycling for electrolysis of pure water in a thin layer cell

    OpenAIRE

    李, 春艳

    2013-01-01

    The redox cycling can achieve in thin layer cell because products of electrode reactions diffuse in opposite directions across the thin layer to the electrodes where they can react again. This redox cycling can enhance the current, and hence improve the sensitivity and selectivity. The redox cycling can make the current be under steady state in thin layer electrolysis. The aim of this thesis is to get controlling factors of redox cycling in electrolysis of water. the factors include not only ...

  7. Patterns, structures and regulations of domestic water cycle systems in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Junying; Wang, Hao; Wang, Jianhua; Qin, Dayong

    2010-05-01

    Domestic water cycle systems serving as one critical component of artificial water cycle at the catchment's scale, is so closely related to public healthy, human rights and social-economic development, and has gained the highest priority in strategic water resource and municipal infrastructure planning. In this paper, three basic patterns of domestic water cycle systems are identified and analyzed, including rural domestic water system (i.e. primary level), urban domestic water system (i.e. intermediate level) and metropolitan domestic water system (i.e. senior level), with different "abstract-transport-consume-discharge" mechanisms and micro-components of water consumption (such as drinking, cooking, toilet flushing, showering or cleaning). The rural domestic water system is general simple with three basic "abstract-consume-discharge" mechanisms and micro-components of basic water consumption such as drinking, cooking, washing and sanitation. The urban domestic water system has relative complex mechanisms of "abstract-supply-consume-treatment-discharge" and more micro-components of water consumption such as bath, dishwashing or car washing. The metropolitan domestic water system (i.e. senior level) has the most complex mechanisms by considering internal water reuse, external wastewater reclamation, and nutrient recycling processes. The detailed structures for different water cycle pattern are presented from the aspects of water quantity, wastewater quality and nutrients flow. With the speed up of urbanization and development of social-economy in China, those three basic patterns are interacting, transforming and upgrading. According to the past experiences and current situations, urban domestic water system (i.e. intermediate level) is the dominant pattern based on indicator of system number or system scale. The metropolitan domestic water system (i.e. senior level) is the idealized model for the future development and management. Current domestic water system

  8. Tidal Influence on the Diel Vertical Migration Pattern of Zooplankton in a Tropical Monsoonal Estuary

    KAUST Repository

    Vineetha, G.

    2015-04-03

    Monsoonal estuaries, located along the coastline of the Indian subcontinent, differ from other estuaries by their time dependence on the salinity characteristics. Effective sustenance and retention of the mesozooplankton community in the estuarine habitats is often determined by their dominant behavioral patterns: diel vertical migration (DVM) and tidal vertical migration (TVM). The modes of these endogenous rhythms often vary among estuaries based on the river runoff and tidal characteristics. The present study is a pioneering attempt to depict the vertical migration pattern of zooplankton along a diel and tidal scale in a tropical, microtidal, monsoonal estuary. We observed that in spite of the prominent asymmetry in the magnitude of the river runoff between the seasons, most of the zooplankton groups exhibited strong DVM, with a clear increase in biomass and abundance in surface waters during night. The peak increase in biomass and abundance at night always synchronized with the slack periods in the tidal cycles, which differed from the general concepts of downward migration during ebb tide and upward migration during flood tide in estuarine systems. The weak currents during the slack period might have favored the effective vertical migration of the mesozooplankton community in this monsoonal estuarine system. © 2015 Society of Wetland Scientists

  9. Recent change of the global monsoon precipitation (1979-2008)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bin [University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Meteorology, Honolulu, HI (United States); University of Hawaii at Manoa, International Pacific Research Center, Honolulu, HI (United States); Liu, Jian [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Lake Science and Environment, Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, Nanjing (China); Kim, Hyung-Jin [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Research Institute for Global Change, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Webster, Peter J. [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Atlanta, GA (United States); Yim, So-Young [University of Hawaii at Manoa, International Pacific Research Center, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2012-09-15

    The global monsoon (GM) is a defining feature of the annual variation of Earth's climate system. Quantifying and understanding the present-day monsoon precipitation change are crucial for prediction of its future and reflection of its past. Here we show that regional monsoons are coordinated not only by external solar forcing but also by internal feedback processes such as El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). From one monsoon year (May to the next April) to the next, most continental monsoon regions, separated by vast areas of arid trade winds and deserts, vary in a cohesive manner driven by ENSO. The ENSO has tighter regulation on the northern hemisphere summer monsoon (NHSM) than on the southern hemisphere summer monsoon (SHSM). More notably, the GM precipitation (GMP) has intensified over the past three decades mainly due to the significant upward trend in NHSM. The intensification of the GMP originates primarily from an enhanced east-west thermal contrast in the Pacific Ocean, which is coupled with a rising pressure in the subtropical eastern Pacific and decreasing pressure over the Indo-Pacific warm pool. While this mechanism tends to amplify both the NHSM and SHSM, the stronger (weaker) warming trend in the NH (SH) creates a hemispheric thermal contrast, which favors intensification of the NHSM but weakens the SHSM. The enhanced Pacific zonal thermal contrast is largely a result of natural variability, whilst the enhanced hemispherical thermal contrast is likely due to anthropogenic forcing. We found that the enhanced global summer monsoon not only amplifies the annual cycle of tropical climate but also promotes directly a ''wet-gets-wetter'' trend pattern and indirectly a ''dry-gets-drier'' trend pattern through coupling with deserts and trade winds. The mechanisms recognized in this study suggest a way forward for understanding past and future changes of the GM in terms of its driven mechanisms. (orig.)

  10. Intensification and deepening of the Arabian Sea Oxygen Minimum Zone in response to increase in Indian monsoon wind intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachkar, Zouhair; Smith, Shafer; Levy, Marina

    2017-04-01

    The decline in oxygen supply to the ocean associated with global warming of sea-surface temperatures is expected to expand the oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). This global trend can be attenuated or amplified by regional processes. In the Arabian Sea, the World's thickest OMZ is highly vulnerable to changes in the Indian monsoon wind. Evidence from paleo records and future climate projections indicate strong variations of the Indian monsoon wind intensity over climatic timescales. Yet, the response of the OMZ to these wind changes remains poorly understood and its amplitude and timescale unexplored. Here, we investigate the impacts of perturbations in Indian monsoon wind intensity (from -50% to +50%) on the size and intensity of the Arabian Sea OMZ, and examine the biogeochemical and ecological implications of these changes. To this end, we conducted a series of eddy-resolving simulations of the Arabian Sea using the Regional Oceanic Modeling System (ROMS) coupled to a nitrogen based Nutrient-Phytoplankton-Zooplankton-Detritus (NPZD) ecosystem model that includes a representation of the O2 cycle. We show that the Arabian Sea productivity increases and its OMZ expands and deepens in response to monsoon wind intensification. These responses are dominated by the perturbation of the summer monsoon wind, whereas the changes in the winter monsoon wind play a secondary role. While the productivity responds quickly and nearly linearly to wind increase (i.e., on a timescale of years), the OMZ response is much slower (i.e., a timescale of decades). Our analysis reveals that the OMZ expansion at depth is driven by increased oxygen biological consumption, whereas its surface weakening is induced by increased lateral ventilation. The enhanced lateral ventilation favors episodic intrusions of oxic waters in the lower epipelagic zone (100-200m) of the western and central Arabian Sea, leading to intermittent expansions of habitats and a more frequent alternation of hypoxic and oxic

  11. Global Climate Modeling of the Martian water cycle with improved microphysics and radiatively active water ice clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Navarro, Thomas; Forget, François; Spiga, Aymeric; Millour, Ehouarn; Montmessin, Franck

    2013-01-01

    Radiative effects of water ice clouds have noteworthy consequences on the Martian atmosphere, its thermal structure and circulation. Accordingly, the inclusion of such effects in the LMD Mars Global Climate Model (GCM) greatly modifies the simulated Martian water cycle. The intent of this paper is to address the impact of radiatively active clouds on atmospheric water vapor and ice in the GCM and improve its representation. We propose a new enhanced modeling of the water cycle, consisting of detailed cloud microphysics with dynamic condensation nuclei and a better implementation of perennial surface water ice. This physical modeling is based on tunable parameters. This new version of the GCM is compared to the Thermal Emission Spectrometer observations of the water cycle. Satisfying results are reached for both vapor and cloud opacities. However, simulations yield a lack of water vapor in the tropics after Ls=180{\\deg} which is persistent in simulations compared to observations, as a consequence of aphelion c...

  12. A Study on Extremely Dry and Wet Summer Monsoon in Pakistan by Focusing on the Anomalous States of the Upper Troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S.; Koike, T.; Nishii, K.

    2012-04-01

    Seasonally-changes in wind pattern, monsoon, sometimes results in severe droughts and intense flooding in many parts of the world including South Asian countries like Pakistan. The livelihood of a vast population in Pakistan depends on agriculture and land use is strongly influenced by water-based ecosystems that depend on the monsoon rains. Furthermore, climate change studies undertaken so far reveal that action is essential in order to prevent long term damage to water cycle and thus of great concern to the community and stakeholders. Pakistan Summer Monsoon (PSM) is generally affected by both the disturbances from the tropical and the extratropical regions; however there is lack of understanding of physical mechanisms of PSM compared to other regional studies i.e. Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) and South-East Asian Monsoon (SEAM). In our study, we applied heat and vorticity budgets and wave train analysis to reveal the mechanisms of the extremely dry and wet PSM events associated with the anomalous upper tropospheric circulation. We found that the extremely dry (wet) PSM events are closely related with the strengthening(weakening) of the upper-tropospheric central Asian high. We also found that in addition to Rossby-wave (Matsuno-Gill) type atmospheric response, the Rossby wave train along the Asian Jet originating from northwestern Europe or North Atlantic Ocean strengthened(weakened) the upper-tropospheric central Asian high. Therefore strong convection anomalies resulting in severe flooding (drought) events over the PSM region are induced by both the tropical and extratropical processes. Key Words: Pakistan, Extremes Monsoon Events, Physical Processes, Heat Budget, Vorticity, Wave Train

  13. Mapping of optimum operating condition for LiBr–water refrigeration cycles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    NILESH A MALI; SUNIL S BHAGWAT

    2017-02-01

    In this work, optimum operating condition maps are generated covering wide ranges of refrigeration and sink temperatures for single- and double-effect LiBr–water vapour absorption refrigeration cycle. These optimum condition maps will be useful to choose optimum operating conditions while designing LiBr–water cycle for desired applications. Methodology for generating such maps is discussed in detail, which can also beused for other absorption refrigeration cycles with various working fluids. Three configurations of LiBr–water absorption refrigeration cycles, single effect, double-effect series flow and double-effect parallel flow, are analysed with the most accurate thermodynamic property correlation available in the literature. Sensitivity of cycle performance to various operating variables such as generator, absorber and condenser temperatures is determined. Second law analysis shows that when a higher temperature heat source is available, double-effect cycles are more effective over single effect as they have higher coefficient of performance.

  14. Measuring of carbon dioxide in water/steam cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daucik, Karol

    2004-12-01

    Prevention of corrosion of the water/steam cycle caused by anionic contamination is based on control of acid conductivity. The contribution of carbon dioxide to the corrosion is very limited and yet it contributes considerably to the acid conductivity as one of the most common contaminants. Monitoring of the dangerous anionic contamination has therefore been on the agenda for many years. Commercial monitors for this purpose are based on separation of carbon dioxide from stronger acids due to its high volatility. A systematic error in these monitors comes from high volatility of other anionic contaminants, e.g. formic and acetic acid. The aim of this investigation was to show that the separation could be made on a weak base anion exchanger working on the basis of differences in the strength of acids. This simple method was expected to give reliable results with low investment and low operating costs. The results showed that the separation is indeed effective. However, reliable data are received only if the anion exchange resin is in equilibrium with the actual concentration of carbon dioxide in the sample. It may take several hours to reach this equilibrium by natural flow of the sample through the anion exchange column. Changes in the concentration of carbon dioxide in the sample will therefore temporarily give false results until a new equilibrium is achieved. The simple monitoring method can be used only in places, where verification of carbon dioxide contamination is required by long-term operation with elevated and stable acid conductivity in the steam. For future design it is suggested to install a forced achievement of the new equilibrium by conditioning of the resin by means of short-lived additions of carbon dioxide or sodium hydroxide to the sample. In these periods the output from the monitor will be suspended. Output close to the equilibrium is expected to be reached within 10 minutes. This new suggested procedure will complicate the monitoring to such a

  15. eWaterCycle: A high resolution global hydrological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Giesen, Nick; Bierkens, Marc; Drost, Niels; Hut, Rolf; Sutanudjaja, Edwin

    2014-05-01

    In 2013, the eWaterCycle project was started, which has the ambitious goal to run a high resolution global hydrological model. Starting point was the PCR-GLOBWB built by Utrecht University. The software behind this model will partially be re-engineered in order to enable to run it in a High Performance Computing (HPC) environment. The aim is to have a spatial resolution of 1km x 1km. The idea is also to run the model in real-time and forecasting mode, using data assimilation. An on-demand hydraulic model will be available for detailed flow and flood forecasting in support of navigation and disaster management. The project faces a set of scientific challenges. First, to enable the model to run in a HPC environment, model runs were analyzed to examine on which parts of the program most CPU time was spent. These parts were re-coded in Open MPI to allow for parallel processing. Different parallelization strategies are thinkable. In our case, it was decided to use watershed logic as a first step to distribute the analysis. There is rather limited recent experience with HPC in hydrology and there is much to be learned and adjusted, both on the hydrological modeling side and the computer science side. For example, an interesting early observation was that hydrological models are, due to their localized parameterization, much more memory intensive than models of sister-disciplines such as meteorology and oceanography. Because it would be deadly to have to swap information between CPU and hard drive, memory management becomes crucial. A standard Ensemble Kalman Filter (enKF) would, for example, have excessive memory demands. To circumvent these problems, an alternative to the enKF was developed that produces equivalent results. This presentation shows the most recent results from the model, including a 5km x 5km simulation and a proof of concept for the new data assimilation approach. Finally, some early ideas about financial sustainability of an operational global

  16. Water Footprint Assessment in Waste Water Treatment Plant: Indicator of the sustainability of urban water cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Llanos, Eva; Durán Barroso, Pablo; Matías Sánchez, Agustín; Fernández Rodríguez, Santiago; Guzmán Caballero, Raúl

    2017-04-01

    The seventeen Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) represent a challenge for citizens and countries around the world by working together to reduce social inequality, to fight poverty and climate change. The Goal six water and sanitation aims for ensuring, among others, the protection and restoration of water-related ecosystem (target 6.6) and encouraging the water use efficiency (target 6.3). The commitment to this goal is not only the development of sanitation infrastructure, but also incorporates the necessity of a sustainable and efficient management from ecological and economic perspectives. Following this approach, we propose a framework for assessing the waste water treatment plant (WWTP) management based on the Water Footprint (WF) principles. The WF as indicator is able to highlight the beneficial role of WWTPs within the environment and provide a complementary information to evaluate the impact of a WWTP regarding to the use of freshwater and energy. Therefore, the footprint family provides an opportunity to relate the reduction of pollutant load in a WWTP and the associated consumptions in terms of electricity and chemical products. As a consequence, the new methodology allows a better understanding of the interactions among water and energy resources, economic requirements and environmental risks. Because of this, the current technologies can be improved and innovative solutions for monitoring and management of urban water use can be integrated. The WF was calculated in four different WWTP located in the North East of Extremadura (SW Spain) which have activated sludge process as secondary treatment. This zone is characterized by low population density but an incipient tourism development. The WF estimation and its relationship with the electricity consumption examines the efficiency of each WWTP and identifies the weak points in the management in terms of the sustainability. Consequently, the WF establishes a benchmark for multidisciplinary decision

  17. Life Cycle Water Consumption and Wastewater Generation Impacts of a Marcellus Shale Gas Well

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Mohan; Hendrickson, Chris T.; VanBriesen, Jeanne M.

    2013-01-01

    This study estimates the life cycle water consumption and wastewater generation impacts of a Marcellus shale gas well from its construction to end of life. Direct water consumption at the well site was assessed by analysis of data from approximately 500 individual well completion reports collected in 2010 by the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. Indirect water consumption for supply chain production at each life cycle stage of the well was estimated using the econ...

  18. Connecting the Water and Carbon Cycles for the Generation of Food Security and Ecosystem Services

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Shivaan M.; Poncé-Hernandez, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Water scarcity and food insecurity are pervasive issues in the developing world and are also intrinsically linked to one another. Through the connection of the water cycle and the carbon cycle this study illustrates that synergistic benefits can be realized by small scale farmers through the implementation of waste water irrigated agroforestry. The WaNuLCAS model is employed using La Huerta agroforestry site in Texcoco, South Central Mexico, as the basis for parameterization. The results of m...

  19. Decadal record of monsoon dynamics across the Himalayas using tree ring data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunello, Camilla Francesca; Andermann, Christoff; Helle, Gerhard; Comiti, Francesco; Tonon, Giustino; Ventura, Maurizio; Hovius, Niels

    2017-04-01

    The temporal variability of the Indian monsoon penetrating through the Himalayan range and into the southern Tibetan Plateau is poorly understood. Intermittent ingress of wet monsoon air masses into the otherwise arid and deserted landscapes beyond the orographic barrier can have consequences for erosion and flooding, as well as for water availability. Furthermore, the latitudinal rainfall distribution across the mountain range is crucial to better understand the hydrological cycles of rivers originating there. Because instrumental measurements are rare in the High Himalayas and on the Plateau, hydro-climatic sensitive proxies, such as oxygen stable isotope ratios in cellulose of tree-rings, are a valuable source of data covering decades to centuries. Here we present new findings on how often and how far the Indian monsoon penetrated into trans-Himalayan region over the last century. To cope with the lack of direct measurements, we strive to reconstruct a record of intense monsoon years based on tree-ring width chronologies along a latitudinal gradient. Thus, we need to answer whether water availability is the main driver of tree growth in the trans-Himalayan region and how dendro-isotopic data relate to seasonal precipitation inputs and sources. In order to study the monsoon dynamics, we selected four sites along the Kali Gandaki River valley in the central Himalayas (Nepal). This valley connects the very wet, monsoon dominated south Himalayan front with the arid trans-Himalayan region and the southern Tibetan Plateau. Our study area covers the sensitive northern end of the precipitation gradient, located in the upper part of the catchment. Water availability, which drastically varies at each site, was explored by using the climate signal- and isotope-transfer within arboreal systems composed of Juniperus sp., Cupressus sp. and Pinus sp. Results from continuous dendrometer measurements for the entire growing season (Mar-Oct) allowed us to assess the link between

  20. Possible role of pre-monsoon sea surface warming in driving the summer monsoon onset over the Bay of Bengal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kuiping; Liu, Yanliang; Yang, Yang; Li, Zhi; Liu, Baochao; Xue, Liang; Yu, Weidong

    2016-08-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) reaches its annual maximum just before the summer monsoon onset and collapses soon after in the central areas of the Bay of Bengal (BoB). Here, the impact of the peak in the pre-monsoon SST on triggering the earliest monsoon onset in the BoB is investigated, with a focus on the role they play in driving the first-branch northward-propagating intra-seasonal oscillations (FNISOs) over the equatorial Eastern Indian Ocean (EIO). During the calm pre-monsoon period, sea surface warming in the BoB could increase the surface equivalent potential temperature (θe) in several ways. Firstly, warming of the sea surface heats the surface air through sensible heating, which forces the air temperature to follow the SST. The elevated air surface temperature accounts for 30 % of the surface θe growth. Furthermore, the elevated air temperature raises the water vapor capacity of the surface air to accommodate more water vapor. Constrained by the observation that the surface relative humidity is maintained nearly constant during the monsoon transition period, the surface specific humidity exhibits a significant increase, according to the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship. Budget analysis indicates that the additional moisture is primarily obtained from sea surface evaporation, which also exhibits a weak increasing trend due to the sea surface warming. In this way, it contributes about 70 % to the surface θe growth. The rapid SST increase during the pre-monsoon period preconditions the summer monsoon onset over the BoB through its contributions to significantly increase the surface θe, which eventually establishes the meridional asymmetry of the atmospheric convective instability in the EIO. The pre-established greater convective instability leads to the FNISO convections, and the summer monsoon is triggered in the BoB region.

  1. Viral-Induced Mortality of Prokaryotes in a Tropical Monsoonal Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasna, Vijayan; Parvathi, Ammini; Pradeep Ram, Angia Sriram; Balachandran, Kizhekkapat K.; Madhu, Nikathil V.; Nair, Maheswari; Jyothibabu, Retnamma; Jayalakshmy, K. Veeraraghava; Revichandran, Chenicherry; Sime-Ngando, Télesphore

    2017-01-01

    Viruses are recognized as the most abundant and dynamic biological entities in the marine and estuarine environment. However, studies on the dynamics and activity of viruses in transient estuarine systems are limited. This study examines temporal and spatial variations in viral abundance (VA) and viral activity across the salinity gradient in a monsoon-driven tropical estuarine system (Cochin estuary, CE) along the southwest coast of India. Water samples were collected from five stations (with different hydrological settings) every 3 h for 24 h period during two distinct seasons, namely pre-monsoon (PRM, dry season) and monsoon (MON, wet season). Time series measurements were made for a spring and neap tidal cycle for each season at all the stations. The results showed marked spatial and seasonal variability with relatively low diel and tidal variations in VA and lytic activity. Viral activity was found to be distinct in five stations studied with the maximum activity in the mesohaline regions (salinity <20) of the estuary. This region was characterized by high VA, lytic infection and viral production, accompanied by low (BGE) and high bacterial respiration. Based on viral lytic production, lytic viruses were found to be responsible for the release of ca. 72.9 ± 58.5 μg C L−1d−1 of bacterial carbon. The contribution of the viral shunt to the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool was higher during the dry season (PRM) than MON. Statistical analysis confirmed a significant association of viruses with the host availability and salinity. This work demonstrates the spatiotemporal distribution of viruses in a tropical estuarine ecosystem and highlights their role in microbial mortality across different salinity gradients. This study forms the first report on viral processes from a monsoon-driven tropical estuarine ecosystem. PMID:28588564

  2. A cryptic sulfur cycle in oxygen-minimum-zone waters off the Chilean coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Don E; Stewart, Frank J; Thamdrup, Bo; De Brabandere, Loreto; Dalsgaard, Tage; Delong, Edward F; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Ulloa, Osvaldo

    2010-12-03

    Nitrogen cycling is normally thought to dominate the biogeochemistry and microbial ecology of oxygen-minimum zones in marine environments. Through a combination of molecular techniques and process rate measurements, we showed that both sulfate reduction and sulfide oxidation contribute to energy flux and elemental cycling in oxygen-free waters off the coast of northern Chile. These processes may have been overlooked because in nature, the sulfide produced by sulfate reduction immediately oxidizes back to sulfate. This cryptic sulfur cycle is linked to anammox and other nitrogen cycling processes, suggesting that it may influence biogeochemical cycling in the global ocean.

  3. Global water cycle amplifying at less than the Clausius-Clapeyron rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skliris, Nikolaos; Zika, Jan D.; Nurser, George; Josey, Simon A.; Marsh, Robert

    2016-12-01

    A change in the cycle of water from dry to wet regions of the globe would have far reaching impact on humanity. As air warms, its capacity to hold water increases at the Clausius-Clapeyron rate (CC, approximately 7% °C‑1). Surface ocean salinity observations have suggested the water cycle has amplified at close to CC following recent global warming, a result that was found to be at odds with state-of the art climate models. Here we employ a method based on water mass transformation theory for inferring changes in the water cycle from changes in three-dimensional salinity. Using full depth salinity observations we infer a water cycle amplification of 3.0 ± 1.6% °C‑1 over 1950–2010. Climate models agree with observations in terms of a water cycle amplification (4.3 ± 2.0% °C‑1) substantially less than CC adding confidence to projections of total water cycle change under greenhouse gas emission scenarios.

  4. Hydrography of the Wadge bank - premonsoon and monsoon seasons

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RamaRaju, V.S.; Rao, T.V.N.; RameshBabu, V.; Anto, A.F.

    and central parts of the region during pre-monsoon. The low saline Bay of Bengal waters are present in the southeastern part of the Wadge Bank and high saline waters of Arabian Sea intrude from northwest indicating the withdrawal of the North Equatorial...

  5. Life cycle assessment of advanced waste water treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Henrik Fred; Hansen, Peter Augusto

    . In total more that 20 different waste water and sludge treatment technologies are to be assessed. This paper will present the preliminary LCA results from running the induced versus avoided impact approach (mainly based on existing LCIA methodology) on one of the advanced treatment technologies, i......The EU FP6 NEPTUNE project is related to the EU Water Framework Directive and the main goal is to develop new and optimize existing waste water treatment technologies (WWTT) and sludge handling methods for municipal waste water. Besides nutrients, a special focus area is micropollutants (e...

  6. Water quality assessment of solar-assisted adsorption desalination cycle

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Youngdeuk

    2014-07-01

    This study focuses on the water quality assessment (feed, product and brine) of the pilot adsorption desalination (AD) plant. Seawater from the Red Sea is used as feed to the AD plant. Water quality tests are evaluated by complying the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards with major primary and secondary inorganic drinking water pollutants and other commonly tested water quality parameters. Chemical testing of desalinated water at the post desalination stage confirms the high quality of produced fresh water. Test results have shown that the adsorption desalination process is very effective in eliminating all forms of salts, as evidenced by the significant reduction of the TDS levels from approximately 40,000. ppm in feed seawater to less than 10. ppm. Test results exhibit extremely low levels of parameters which are generally abundant in feed seawater. The compositions of seawater and process related parameters such as chloride, sodium, bromide, sulfate, calcium, magnesium, and silicate in desalinated water exhibit values of less than 0.1. ppm. Reported conductivity measurements of desalinated water are comparable to distilled water conductivity levels and ranged between 2 and 6. μS/cm while TOC and TIC levels are also extremely low and its value is less than 0.5. ppm. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  7. Stable isotopes in atmospheric water vapor and applications to the hydrologic cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galewsky, Joseph; Steen-Larsen, Hans Christian; Field, Robert D.; Worden, John; Risi, Camille; Schneider, Matthias

    2016-12-01

    The measurement and simulation of water vapor isotopic composition has matured rapidly over the last decade, with long-term data sets and comprehensive modeling capabilities now available. Theories for water vapor isotopic composition have been developed by extending the theories that have been used for the isotopic composition of precipitation to include a more nuanced understanding of evaporation, large-scale mixing, deep convection, and kinetic fractionation. The technologies for in situ and remote sensing measurements of water vapor isotopic composition have developed especially rapidly over the last decade, with discrete water vapor sampling methods, based on mass spectroscopy, giving way to laser spectroscopic methods and satellite- and ground-based infrared absorption techniques. The simulation of water vapor isotopic composition has evolved from General Circulation Model (GCM) methods for simulating precipitation isotopic composition to sophisticated isotope-enabled microphysics schemes using higher-order moments for water and ice size distributions. The incorporation of isotopes into GCMs has enabled more detailed diagnostics of the water cycle and has led to improvements in its simulation. The combination of improved measurement and modeling of water vapor isotopic composition opens the door to new advances in our understanding of the atmospheric water cycle, in processes ranging from the marine boundary layer, through deep convection and tropospheric mixing, and into the water cycle of the stratosphere. Finally, studies of the processes governing modern water vapor isotopic composition provide an improved framework for the interpretation of paleoclimate proxy records of the hydrological cycle.

  8. The urban harvest approach as framework and planning tool for improved water and resource cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leusbrock, I; Nanninga, T A; Lieberg, K; Agudelo-Vera, C M; Keesman, K J; Zeeman, G; Rijnaarts, H H M

    2015-01-01

    Water and resource availability in sufficient quantity and quality for anthropogenic needs represents one of the main challenges in the coming decades. To prepare for upcoming challenges such as increased urbanization and climate change related consequences, innovative and improved resource management concepts are indispensable. In recent years we have developed and applied the urban harvest approach (UHA). The UHA aims to model and quantify the urban water cycle on different temporal and spatial scales. This approach allowed us to quantify the impact of the implementation of water saving measures and new water treatment concepts in cities. In this paper we will introduce the UHA and its application for urban water cycles. Furthermore, we will show first results for an extension to energy cycles and highlight future research items (e.g. nutrients, water-energy-nexus).

  9. The Global Enery and Water Cycle Experiment Science Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahine, M. T.

    1997-01-01

    The distribution of water in the atmosphere and at the surface of the Earth is the most influential factor regulating our environment, not only because water is essential for life but also because through phase transitions it is the main energy source that control clouds and radiation and drives the global circulation of the atmosphere.

  10. An Overview of the NASA Energy and Water cycle Study (NEWS) and the North American Water Program (NAWP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    NEWS: 10 years ago, NASA established the NASA Energy and Water-cycle Study (NEWS), whose long-term grand challenge is to document and enable improved, observationally based, predictions of water and energy cycle consequences of Earth system variability and change. The NEWS program builds upon existing NASA-supported basic research in atmospheric physics and dynamics, radiation, climate modeling, and terrestrial hydrology. While these NASA programs fund research activities that address individual aspects of the global energy and water cycles, they are not specifically designed to generate a coordinated result. NEWS developed the first coordinated attempt to describe the complete global energy and water cycle using existing and forthcoming satellite and ground based observations, and laying the foundation for essential NEWS developments in model representations of atmospheric energy and water exchange processes. This comprehensive energy and water data analysis program exploited crucial datasets, some requiring complete re-processing, and new satellite measurements. NAWP: Dramatically changing climates has had an indelible impact on North America's water crisis. To decisively address these challenges, we recommend that NAWP coalesce an interdisciplinary, international and interagency effort to make significant contributions to continental- to decision-scale hydroclimate science and solutions. By entraining, integrating and coordinating the vast array of interdisciplinary observational and prediction resources available, NAWP will significantly advance skill in predicting, assessing and managing variability and changes in North American water resources. We adopt three challenges to organize NAWP efforts. The first deals with developing a scientific basis and tools for mitigating and adapting to changes in the water supply-demand balance. The second challenge is benchmarking; to use incomplete and uncertain observations to assess water storage and quality dynamics, and

  11. Advances in understanding phosphorus cycling in inland waters - Their significance for South African limnology

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Twinch, AJ

    1980-02-01

    Full Text Available oxygen and other chemical constituents in the water and by the nature of the sediments and sedimentation processes. The influence of external loading on phosphorus cycling and its significance in the prediction of algal growth is discussed...

  12. Improvement of Taihu water quality by the technology of immobilized nitrogen cycle bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Experimental studies were carried out on the purification of eutrophicTaihu Lake water by dynamic experiment using immobilized nitrogen cycle bacteria(INCB). The results showed that the eutrophic water of Taihu Lake can be purifiedeffectively as it passes through the experimental reactor into which some immobilizednitrogen cycle bacteria were put. The removal efficiencies for Total N (TN), NH4+-Nwith immobilized nitrogen cycle bacteria were 72.4% and 85.6%, respectively. It wasfound that the immobilized nitrogen cycle bacteria also have purificatory effect oneutrophic water of Taihu Lake at winter temperature (7°C), and that the removalmefficiencies for Total N (TN), NH4+-N were 55.6%, and 58.9%, respectively. Theremoval efficiencies for TN and NH4+-N depend on the time the water stays in theexperimental reactor.``

  13. Life cycle assessment of three water systems in Copenhagen - A management tool of the future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godskesen, Berit; Zambrano, K.C.; Trautner, A.

    2010-01-01

    Environmental life-cycle assessment (LCA) was applied to evaluate three different water systems of the water sector in Copenhagen, Denmark, including technologies within water supply, facilities recycling water and treatment of sewer overflow. In these three water systems LCA was used to evaluate...... the environmental impacts of each of the processes involved. The overall conclusion was that LCA is suitable as a decision support tool in the water sector as it provides a holistic evaluation platform of the considered alternatives categorized in environmental impact categories. The use of LCA in the water sector...

  14. Research framework of integrated simulation on bilateral interaction between water cycle and socio-economic development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, C. F.; Yang, X. L.; Niu, C. W.; Jia, Y. W.

    2016-08-01

    The mechanism of bilateral interaction between natural water cycle evolution and socio-economic development has been obscured in current research due to the complexity of the hydrological process and the socio-economic system. The coupling of economic model CGE (Computable General Equilibrium) and distributed hydrological model WEP (Water and Energy transfer Processes) provides a model-based tool for research on response and feedback of water cycle and social development, as well as economic prospects under the constraint of water resources. On one hand, water policies, such as water use limitation and water price adjustment under different levels of socio-economic development, are to be evaluated by CGE model as assumed conditions and corresponding results of water demand could be put into WEP model to simulate corresponding response during the whole process of water cycle. On the other hand, variation of available water resources quantity under different scenarios simulated by WEP model may provide proper limitation for water demand in CGE model, and corresponding change of economic factors could indicate the influence of water resources constraints on socio-economic development. The research is believed to be helpful for better understanding of bilateral interaction between water and society.

  15. Global water cycle and the coevolution of the Earth's interior and surface environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenaga, Jun; Planavsky, Noah J.; Evans, David A. D.

    2017-04-01

    The bulk Earth composition contains probably less than 0.3% of water, but this trace amount of water can affect the long-term evolution of the Earth in a number of different ways. The foremost issue is the occurrence of plate tectonics, which governs almost all aspects of the Earth system, and the presence of water could either promote or hinder the operation of plate tectonics, depending on where water resides. The global water cycle, which circulates surface water into the deep mantle and back to the surface again, could thus have played a critical role in the Earth's history. In this contribution, we first review the present-day water cycle and discuss its uncertainty as well as its secular variation. If the continental freeboard has been roughly constant since the Early Proterozoic, model results suggest long-term net water influx from the surface to the mantle, which is estimated to be 3-4.5×1014 g yr-1 on the billion years time scale. We survey geological and geochemical observations relevant to the emergence of continents above the sea level as well as the nature of Precambrian plate tectonics. The global water cycle is suggested to have been dominated by regassing, and its implications for geochemical cycles and atmospheric evolution are also discussed. This article is part of the themed issue 'The origin, history and role of water in the evolution of the inner Solar System'.

  16. Global water cycle and the coevolution of the Earth's interior and surface environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenaga, Jun; Planavsky, Noah J; Evans, David A D

    2017-05-28

    The bulk Earth composition contains probably less than 0.3% of water, but this trace amount of water can affect the long-term evolution of the Earth in a number of different ways. The foremost issue is the occurrence of plate tectonics, which governs almost all aspects of the Earth system, and the presence of water could either promote or hinder the operation of plate tectonics, depending on where water resides. The global water cycle, which circulates surface water into the deep mantle and back to the surface again, could thus have played a critical role in the Earth's history. In this contribution, we first review the present-day water cycle and discuss its uncertainty as well as its secular variation. If the continental freeboard has been roughly constant since the Early Proterozoic, model results suggest long-term net water influx from the surface to the mantle, which is estimated to be 3-4.5×10(14) g yr(-1) on the billion years time scale. We survey geological and geochemical observations relevant to the emergence of continents above the sea level as well as the nature of Precambrian plate tectonics. The global water cycle is suggested to have been dominated by regassing, and its implications for geochemical cycles and atmospheric evolution are also discussed.This article is part of the themed issue 'The origin, history and role of water in the evolution of the inner Solar System'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  17. A comparative life cycle assessment of process water treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-07-29

    Jul 29, 2011 ... Two different raw water desalination technologies, an existing ion exchange plant .... tect membranes from attack by residual free chlorine. The ecoInvent ..... SON F (1999) Treatment of industrial wastewater for reuse. Desali.

  18. Synthesis and review: African environmental processes and water-cycle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichoku, Charles; Adegoke, Jimmy

    2016-12-01

    Africa’s vast landmass harbors a variety of physical processes that affect the environment and the water cycle. This focus issue on ‘African Environmental Processes and Water-Cycle Dynamics’ contains eight articles that address these phenomena from different but complementary perspectives. Fires used for agricultural and related purposes play a major role in land-cover change, surface albedo modifications, and smoke emission; all of which affect the environment and the water cycle in different ways. However, emissions of aerosols and trace gases are not restricted to fires, but also emanate from other natural and human activities. The African water cycle undergoes significant perturbations that are attributable to several factors, including the aforesaid environmental processes. These changes in the water cycle have produced severe drought and flooding events in recent decades that affect societal wellbeing across sub-Saharan Africa. The combined effects of the environmental processes and water-cycle dynamics affect and are affected by climate variability and can be propagated beyond the continent. Future studies should utilize the wealth of observations and modeling tools that are constantly improving to clearly elucidate the interrelationships between all of these phenomena for the benefit of society.

  19. The cycle of stable isotopes and tritium in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunziker, J.C. [Inst. de Mineralogie, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1998-12-31

    In hydrology, meteorology, climatology and environmental research natural hydrogen and oxygen isotopes of water increasingly replace radioactive or chemical tracers used in the past to track fluid paths through nature. This evolution has made possible through the network of precipitation data established since 1961 by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna, that provides the necessary data base for the stable isotope interpretations. Evaporation and condensation and, at higher temperatures, water-rock interaction are the main mechanisms responsible for changing the isotopic ratio of water. These data provide insight into mean residence time of a water body and/or mean altitude of a catchment area. They also yield climatological information and allow the mass transfer quantification because of the temperature dependence of equilibrium fractionation. As the acquired isotopic ratio of a water is generally conserved during flow and percolation through geologic bodies, admixing of water showing different histories can easily be monitored, and when the end members are known or can be measured, mixtures can be calculated. Including isotopic measurements of certain anions, often dissolved in remarkable quantities in groundwaters e.g. nitrates, sulfates or phosphates, increases the reliability and the possibility to trace fluid paths through geologic bodies. In addition in environmental studies, oxygen, nitrogen and sulfur isotopes allow for source determination studies, again providing a possibility of quantification, which can not be obtained by any other method. Recent advances in the specific determination of organic molecules by means of GC-IRMS (gas-chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry) has considerably enlarged our possibilities in detection and quantification of organic water pollution. These organic compounds (debris of macromolecules) increasingly deteriorate the quality of our drinking water; unfortunately they are normally not

  20. The Water Cycle from Space: Use of Satellite Data in Land Surface Hydrology and Water Resource Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laymon, Charles; Blankenship, Clay; Khan, Maudood; Limaye, Ashutosh; Hornbuckle, Brian; Rowlandson, Tracy

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews how our understanding of the water cycle is enhanced by our use of satellite data, and how this informs land surface hydrology and water resource management. It reviews how NASA's current and future satellite missions will provide Earth system data of unprecedented breadth, accuracy and utility for hydrologic analysis.

  1. The persistence of oceans on Earth-like planets: insights from the deep-water cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer, Laura

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a series of models for the deep water cycle on super-Earths experiencing plate tectonics. The deep water cycle can be modeled through parameterized convection models coupled with a volatile recycling model. The convection of the silicate mantle is linked to the volatile cycle through the water-dependent viscosity. Important differences in surface water content are found for different parameterizations of convection. Surface oceans are smaller and more persistent for single layer convection, rather than convection by boundary layer instability. Smaller planets have initially larger oceans but also return that water to the mantle more rapidly than larger planets. Super-Earths may therefore be less habitable in their early years than smaller planets, but their habitability (assuming stable surface conditions), will persist much longer.

  2. Technology of the light water reactor fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wymer, R. G.

    1979-01-01

    This essay presents elements of the processes used in the fuel cycle steps and gives an indication of the types of equipment used. The amounts of radioactivity released in normal operation of the processes are indicated and related to radiation doses. Types and costs of equipment or processes required to lower these radioactivity releases are in some cases suggested. Mining and milling, conversion of uranium concentrate to UF/sub 6/, uranium isotope separation, LWR fuel fabrication, fuel reprocessing, transportation, and waste management are covered in this essay. 40 figures, 34 tables. (DLC)

  3. Anthropogenic impacts on the global water cycle - a multi model approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, F.; haddeland, I.; Biemans, H.; Clark, D.; Fransen, W.; Voss, F.; Floerke, M.; Heinke, J.; Hagemann, S.; Hanasakki, N.; Gerten, D.; Kabat, P.

    2012-04-01

    Humans activities have a large impact on the global water cycle. Through the building of dams and irrigation schemes large amounts of water are diverted from river systems. Through the emission of greenhouse gases causing global warming, also the rainfall and evaporation patterns are changed across the globe. It is, however, still difficult to quantify current and future impacts on the global water cycle due to limited data availability, model imperfections and large uncertainties in climate change projections. To partly overcome these limitations we used a multi-model approach to study anthropogenic impacts on the global water cycle. Four different global hydrological models (H08, VIC, WaterGAP and LPJml) were forced with an historical climate dataset (Watch Forcing Data) and bias corrected output of three different global climate models (Echam, IPSL and CNRM) using two emission scenarios (A2 and B1). In addition the LPJml model was also run with two different land use change scenarios. Combining the water availability simulations with the water demand scenarios developed within the Watch project we also analyzed current and future water scarcity. The analyses show that current human impacts and on the water cycle are especially high in Central Asia, parts of Europe, the Southwestern US and the Murray-Darling Basin in Australia. The model comparison of agricultural water use and demand showed that the differences in total global agricultural demand and water use were relatively smaller than the differences in simulated water availability. All models showed agricultural water extractions are high in South and East Asia in particular in Northern India and Pakistan and in Northeast China. The most important spatial differences between the different models was observed for Northern China where H08 showed much higher water demands than VIC. Future analyses showed that climate change impacts on the global water cycle are potentially high especially in the semi

  4. Behavior of High Water-cement Ratio Concrete under Biaxial Compression after Freeze-thaw Cycles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANG Huaishuai; SONG Yupu; OU Jinping

    2008-01-01

    The high water-cement ratio concrete specimens under biaxial compression that completed in a triaxial testing machine were experimentally studied.Strength and deformations of plain concrete specimens after 0,25,50 cycles of freeze-thaw.Influences of freeze-thaw cycles and stress ratio on the peak stress and deformation of this point were analyzed aecording to the experimental results.Based on the test data,the failure criterion expressed in terms of principal stress after difierent cycles of freeze-thaw,and the failure criterion with consideration of the influence of freeze-thaw cycle and sffess ratio were proposed respectively.

  5. Development of a Life Cycle Inventory of Water Consumption Associated with the Production of Transportation Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampert, David J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cai, Hao [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wang, Zhichao [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Keisman, Jennifer [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wu, May [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Han, Jeongwoo [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dunn, Jennifer [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sullivan, John L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Elgowainy, Amgad [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wang, Michael [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Keisman, Jennifer [American Association for the Advancemetn of Science (AAAS), Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The production of all forms of energy consumes water. To meet increased energy demands, it is essential to quantify the amount of water consumed in the production of different forms of energy. By analyzing the water consumed in different technologies, it is possible to identify areas for improvement in water conservation and reduce water stress in energy-producing regions. The transportation sector is a major consumer of energy in the United States. Because of the relationships between water and energy, the sustainability of transportation is tied to management of water resources. Assessment of water consumption throughout the life cycle of a fuel is necessary to understand its water resource implications. To perform a comparative life cycle assessment of transportation fuels, it is necessary first to develop an inventory of the water consumed in each process in each production supply chain. The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model is an analytical tool that can used to estimate the full life-cycle environmental impacts of various transportation fuel pathways from wells to wheels. GREET is currently being expanded to include water consumption as a sustainability metric. The purpose of this report was to document data sources and methodologies to estimate water consumption factors (WCF) for the various transportation fuel pathways in GREET. WCFs reflect the quantity of freshwater directly consumed per unit production for various production processes in GREET. These factors do not include consumption of precipitation or low-quality water (e.g., seawater) and reflect only water that is consumed (i.e., not returned to the source from which it was withdrawn). The data in the report can be combined with GREET to compare the life cycle water consumption for different transportation fuels.

  6. Assessment of the environmental impacts deriving from the life cycle of a typical solar water heater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gaidajis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to life cycle thinking, the environmental burden deriving from different life cycle stages of a product or a system, such as manufacturing, transportation, maintenance and landfilling should be taken into consideration while assessing its environmental performance. In that aspect, the environmental impacts deriving from the life cycle of a typical solar water heater (SWH in Greece are analyzed and assessed with the application of relative life cycle assessment (LCA software in this study. In order to examine various impact categories such as global warming, ozone layer depletion, ecotoxicity and so forth, the IMPACT2002+ method is applied. The aim of this study is to examine the life cycle stages, processes and materials that significantly affect the system under examination and to provide a discussion regarding the environmental friendliness of solar water heaters.

  7. Dynamics of the Asian Summer Monsoon Onset and the Tibetan Plateau Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yimin, Liu; Guoxiong, Wu; Boqi, Liu; Suling, Ren; Yue, Guan

    2015-04-01

    The formation and development of the South Asian High (SAH) in early spring over South China Sea (SCS) provides upper tropospheric pumping over the Southeast Bay of Bengal (BOB) and leads to the BOB monsoon onset. The strong latent heat release of the BOB monsoon results in the northeastward unstable development of the SAH which contributes to the SCS monsoon onset. The zonal asymmetric unstable development of the SAH after the SCS monsoon onset leads to the Indian summer monsoon onset. In spring over South BOB, usually there is vortex development preceding the Asian summer monsoon onset. The rapid development of the BOB monsoon onset vortex is due to the local strong air-sea interaction, which is modulated by the Tibetan Plateau (TP) forcing and the land-sea thermal contrast across South Asia. Strong heating from BOB monsoon generates stationary Rossby-wave in lower troposphere, producing weak cold advection and convection over North SCS. Development of surface BOB cyclone provides Northeastward water vapor transport towards North SCS where convection develops. Before the Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) onset, the North- South land- sea thermal contrast increases eastward remarkably on the southeast of Arabian Sea. Air traveling eastward along the near- surface tropical westerly jet gets northward accelerated, forcing a lower tropospheric convergence near and to the north of the jet stream. Such a forced convection development occurs intensively over the southeastern Arabian Sea and southwestern India, contributing to the ISM onset.

  8. Proper depiction of monsoon depression through IRS-P4 MSMR

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P N Mahajan; R M Khaladkar; S G Narkhedkar; Sathy Nair; P C Joshi; P K Pal

    2004-06-01

    In this paper, daily variations of satellite-derived geophysical parameters such as integrated water vapour (IWV), cloud liquid water content (CLW), sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface wind speed (SSW) have been studied for a case of monsoon depression that formed over the Bay of Bengal during 19th-24th August 2000. For this purpose, IRS P4 MSMR satellite data have been utilized over the domain equator- 25°N and 40°-100°E. An integrated approach of satellite data obtained from IRS-P4, METEOSAT-5 and INSAT was made for getting a signal for the development of monsoon depression over the Indian region. Variations in deep convective activity obtained through visible, infrared and OLR data at 06UTC was thoroughly analyzed for the complete life cycle of monsoon depression. Geophysical parameters obtained through IRS-P4 satellite data were compared with vorticity, convergence and divergence at 850 and 200 hPa levels generated through cloud motion vectors (CMVs) and water vapour wind vectors (WVWVs) obtained from METEOSAT-5 satellite. This comparison was made for finding proper consistency of geophysical parameters with dynamical aspects of major convective activity of the depression. From the results of this study it is revealed that there was strengthening of sea surface winds to the south of low-pressure area prior to the formation of depression. This indicated the possibility of increase in cyclonic vorticity in the lower troposphere. Hence, wind field at 850 hPa with satellite input of CMVs in objective analysis of wind field using optimum interpolation (OI) scheme was computed. Maximum cyclonic vorticity field at 850 hPa was obtained in the region of depression just one day before its formation. Similarly, with the same procedure maximum anticyclonic vorticity was observed at 200 hPa with WVWVs input. Consistent convergence and divergence at 850 and 200 hPa was noticed with respect to these vorticities. In association with these developments, we could

  9. DESIGN OF HYBRID POWER GENERATION CYCLES EMPLOYING AMMONIA-WATER-CARBON DIOXIDE MIXTURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashish Gupta

    2002-06-01

    A power cycle generates electricity from the heat of combustion of fossil fuels. Its efficiency is governed by the cycle configuration, the operating parameters, and the working fluid. Typical. designs use pure water as the fluid. in the last two decades, hybrid cycles based on ammonia-water, and carbon-dioxide mixtures as the working fluid have been proposed. These cycles may improve the power generation efficiency of Rankine cycles by 15%. Improved efficiency is important for two reasons: it lowers the cost of electricity being produced, and by reducing the consumption of fossil fuels per unit power, it reduces the generation of environmental pollutants. The goal of this project is to develop a computational optimization-based method for the design and analysis of hybrid bottoming power cycles to minimize the usage of fossil fuels. The development of this methodology has been achieved by formulating this task as that of selecting the least cost power cycle design from all possible configurations. They employ a detailed thermodynamic property prediction package they have developed under a DOE-FETC grant to model working fluid mixtures. Preliminary results from this work suggest that a pure NH{sub 3} cycle outperforms steam or the expensive Kalina cycle.

  10. Closing the water and nutrient cycles in soilless cultivation systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerling, E.A.M.; Blok, C.; Maas, van der A.A.; Os, van E.A.

    2014-01-01

    Soilless cultivation systems are common in Dutch greenhouse horticulture, i.e., less than 20% of the greenhouse area is still soil grown. For long, it was assumed that in these so-called closed systems the emission of nutrients and plant protection products (PPPs) was close to zero. However, Water

  11. Low impact urban design by closing the urban water cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agudelo Vera, C.M.; Mels, A.R.; Keesman, K.J.; Rijnaarts, H.H.M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Current fast urbanization and increasing quality of life result in increments on resources’ demand. Increasing resources demand implies as well increments on waste production. However, limited availability of resources such us: oil, fresh water, phosphorus, metals (Boyle et al., 2010,

  12. Nitrogen cycling in the suboxic waters of the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Devol, A.H.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Codispoti, L.A.

    due to nitrogen fixation either in the Arabian Sea or in the ODZ source waters, anammox, or sedimentary denitrification. Nitrate deficit based estimates of overall denitrification rate are about 40 Tg N a sup(-1), but if the larger excess nitrogen gas...

  13. Monsoon influence on planktic δ18O records from the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pinxian; Li, Qianyu; Tian, Jun; He, Juan; Jian, Zhimin; Ma, Wentao; Dang, Haowen

    2016-06-01

    While the benthic δ18O records from many South China Sea sites mimic the SPECMAP/LR04 standard, their paired planktic δ18O curves differ by comparable values at negative peaks corresponding to interstadials, especially between MIS 5.1, 5.3, 5.5, 6.5, and 7.3. Similar planktic δ18O records also occur in some other low-latitude oceans under monsoon influence. Because neither temperature nor salinity effects can fully account for the variations of such δ18O records after derivation from the SPECMAP/LR04 standard, variations in the rain water δ18O affected by regional hydroclimate changes are considered to have played an important role. In contrast to the SPECMAP/LR04 standard δ18O curve prevailed by 100-kyr cycles, these regional planktic δ18O curves are distinguished by 20-kyr precession signal, showing partial similarity to the δ18O records of atmospheric oxygen in polar ice-core bubbles and in stalagmite calcite. We speculate that the common features of these three independent δ18O records are indicative of the effect of evolving hydrological cycling driven by monsoon circulation in low latitudes.

  14. Carbon and Water Cycles in a New Zealand Peat Bog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, D.; Smith, J.

    2001-12-01

    Peat soils represent globally significant stores of carbon and an understanding of carbon exchange processes between peat wetland ecosystems and the atmosphere is important for understanding the effects of, and impacts upon, global climate change. Eddy covariance measurements of CO2, water vapour and energy fluxes were made during 1999 and 2000 at a remnant oligotrophic raised peat bog in North Island, New Zealand. The bog's hydrology has been modified by drainage of surrounding agricultural land, so that the water table is relatively deep compared to that of unmodified bogs in the region. Vegetation is dominated by two indigenous species of rush-like vascular plants belonging to the Southern hemisphere family Restionaceae. Maximum daytime CO2 fluxes were commonly -9 {μ }mol m-2 s-1 and averaged -1.3 {μ }mol m-2 s-1 over the 24-hour period in summertime. The ecosystem was a sink of atmospheric carbon for most of the year, with wintertime characterised by 12--15 weeks of carbon neutrality or slight carbon loss. Average carbon uptake by the ecosystem was 196 gC m-2 yr-1 for the two-year period. Modelling suggests that the key factor determining inter-annual variability of the carbon budget is seasonal soil temperature, whereas ecosystem respiration is relatively insensitive to the position of the lowered water table. The bog vegetation acts as a major control over water vapour loss and energy partitioning favors sensible heat production with mean summertime Bowen ratios of approximately 2.0. Water use efficiency was highest in the morning, indicating that the vegetation maximizes CO2 assimilation while the saturation vapour pressure deficit and transpiration rates are low. The dense canopy structure also restricts penetration of solar radiation to the peat surface, which minimizes evaporation and soil respiration.

  15. Development of a common priority list of pharmaceuticals relevant for the water cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Voogt, P.; Janex-Habibi, M.-L.; Sacher, F.; Puijker, L.; Mons, M.

    2009-01-01

    Pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs), including prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, drugs used in hospitals and veterinary drugs, have been found throughout the water cycle. A desk study was initiated by the Global Water Research Coalition to consolidate a uniform selection of

  16. First results of the earth observation water cycle multi-mission observation strategy (WACMOS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, Zhongbo; Fernadez-Prieto, D.; Timmermans, J.; Chen, Xuelong; Hungershoefer, K.; Schröder, M.; Schulz, J.; Stammes, P.; Wang, Peng; Wolters, e.

    2014-01-01

    Observing and monitoring the different components of the global water cycle and their dynamics are essential steps to understand the climate of the Earth, forecast the weather, predict natural disasters like floods and droughts, and improve water resources management. Earth observation technology is

  17. Economic Input-Output Life Cycle Assessment of Water Reuse Strategies in Residential Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper evaluates the environmental sustainability and economic feasibility of four water reuse designs through economic input-output life cycle assessments (EIO-LCA) and benefit/cost analyses. The water reuse designs include: 1. Simple Greywater Reuse System for Landscape Ir...

  18. New progress of research on water cycle in atmosphere in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    New progresses are introduced briefly about the water cycle study on atmosphere of China made in recent years. The introduction includes eight aspects as follows: 1) precipitation characteristics, 2) stability of climatic system, 3) precipitation sensitive region, 4) regional evaporation and evapotranspiration, 5) water surface evaporation, 6) vegetation transpiration, 7) cloud physics, and 8) vapor source.

  19. Thermochemical hydrogen production via a cycle using barium and sulfur - Reaction between barium sulfide and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, K.; Conger, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The reaction between barium sulfide and water, a reaction found in several sulfur based thermochemical cycles, was investigated kinetically at 653-866 C. Gaseous products were hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide. The rate determining step for hydrogen formation was a surface reaction between barium sulfide and water. An expression was derived for the rate of hydrogen formation.

  20. Human alterations of the terrestrial water cycle through land management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rost

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This study quantifies current and potential future changes in transpiration, evaporation, interception loss and river discharge in response to land use change, irrigation and climate change, by performing several distinct simulations within the consistent hydrology and biosphere modeling framework LPJmL (Lund-Potsdam-Jena managed Land. We distinguished two irrigation simulations: a water limited one in which irrigation was restricted by local renewable water resources (ILIM, and a potential one in which no such limitation was assumed but withdrawals from deep groundwater or remote rivers allowed (IPOT. We found that the effect of historical land use change as compared to potential natural vegetation was pronounced, including a reduction in interception loss and transpiration by 25.9% and 10.6%, respectively, whereas river discharge increased by 6.6% (climate conditions of 1991–2000. Furthermore, we estimated that about 1170 km3yr−1 of irrigation water could be withdrawn from local renewable water resources (in ILIM, which resulted in a reduction of river discharge by 1.5%. However, up to 1660 km3yr−1 of water withdrawals were required in addition under the assumption that optimal growth of irrigated crops was sustained (IPOT, which resulted in a slight net increase in global river discharge by 2.0% due to return flows. Under the HadCM3 A2 climate and emission scenario, climate change alone will decrease total evapotranspiration by 1.5% and river discharge by 0.9% in 2046–2055 compared to 1991–2000 average due to changes in precipitation patterns, a decrease in global precipitation amount, and the net effect of CO2 fertilization. A doubling of agricultural land in 2046–2055 compared to 1991–2000 average as proposed by the IMAGE land use change scenario will result in a decrease in total evapotranspiration by 2.5% and in an increase in river discharge by 3.9%. That is, the

  1. Low-Frequency Vortex Pair over the Tropical Eastern Indian Ocean and the South China Sea Summer Monsoon Onset

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Jing; LI Chong-Yin

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the relationship between a pair of low-frequency vortexes over the equatorial Indian Ocean and the South China Sea (SCS) summer monsoon onset is studied based on a multi-year (1980-2003) analysis. A pair of vortexes symmetric about the equator is an important feature prior to the SCS summer monsoon onset. A composite analysis shows that the life cycle of the pair of vortexes is closely associated with the SCS summer monsoon onset. The westerly between the twin cyclones is an important factor to the SCS summer monsoon onset process.

  2. Life cycle assessments of urban water systems: a comparative analysis of selected peer-reviewed literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loubet, Philippe; Roux, Philippe; Loiseau, Eleonore; Bellon-Maurel, Veronique

    2014-12-15

    Water is a growing concern in cities, and its sustainable management is very complex. Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been increasingly used to assess the environmental impacts of water technologies during the last 20 years. This review aims at compiling all LCA papers related to water technologies, out of which 18 LCA studies deals with whole urban water systems (UWS). A focus is carried out on these 18 case studies which are analyzed according to criteria derived from the four phases of LCA international standards. The results show that whereas the case studies share a common goal, i.e., providing quantitative information to policy makers on the environmental impacts of urban water systems and their forecasting scenarios, they are based on different scopes, resulting in the selection of different functional units and system boundaries. A quantitative comparison of life cycle inventory and life cycle impact assessment data is provided, and the results are discussed. It shows the superiority of information offered by multi-criteria approaches for decision making compared to that derived from mono-criterion. From this review, recommendations on the way to conduct the environmental assessment of urban water systems are given, e.g., the need to provide consistent mass balances in terms of emissions and water flows. Remaining challenges for urban water system LCAs are identified, such as a better consideration of water users and resources and the inclusion of recent LCA developments (territorial approaches and water-related impacts).

  3. Updates on Modeling the Water Cycle with the NASA Ames Mars Global Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahre, M. A.; Haberle, R. M.; Hollingsworth, J. L.; Montmessin, F.; Brecht, A. S.; Urata, R.; Klassen, D. R.; Wolff, M. J.

    2017-01-01

    Global Circulation Models (GCMs) have made steady progress in simulating the current Mars water cycle. It is now widely recognized that clouds are a critical component that can significantly affect the nature of the simulated water cycle. Two processes in particular are key to implementing clouds in a GCM: the microphysical processes of formation and dissipation, and their radiative effects on heating/ cooling rates. Together, these processes alter the thermal structure, change the dynamics, and regulate inter-hemispheric transport. We have made considerable progress representing these processes in the NASA Ames GCM, particularly in the presence of radiatively active water ice clouds. We present the current state of our group's water cycle modeling efforts, show results from selected simulations, highlight some of the issues, and discuss avenues for further investigation.­

  4. Life cycle water use of energy production and its environmental impacts in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Anadon, Laura Diaz

    2013-12-17

    The energy sector is a major user of fresh water resources in China. We investigate the life cycle water withdrawals, consumptive water use, and wastewater discharge of China's energy sectors and their water-consumption-related environmental impacts, using a mixed-unit multiregional input-output (MRIO) model and life cycle impact assessment method (LCIA) based on the Eco-indicator 99 framework. Energy production is responsible for 61.4 billion m(3) water withdrawals, 10.8 billion m(3) water consumption, and 5.0 billion m(3) wastewater discharges in China, which are equivalent to 12.3%, 4.1% and 8.3% of the national totals, respectively. The most important feature of the energy-water nexus in China is the significantly uneven spatial distribution of consumptive water use and its corresponding environmental impacts caused by the geological discrepancy among fossil fuel resources, fresh water resources, and energy demand. More than half of energy-related water withdrawals occur in the east and south coastal regions. However, the arid north and northwest regions have much larger water consumption than the water abundant south region, and bear almost all environmental damages caused by consumptive water use.

  5. Solar Hydrogen Production via a Samarium Oxide-Based Thermochemical Water Splitting Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Bhosale

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The computational thermodynamic analysis of a samarium oxide-based two-step solar thermochemical water splitting cycle is reported. The analysis is performed using HSC chemistry software and databases. The first (solar-based step drives the thermal reduction of Sm2O3 into Sm and O2. The second (non-solar step corresponds to the production of H2 via a water splitting reaction and the oxidation of Sm to Sm2O3. The equilibrium thermodynamic compositions related to the thermal reduction and water splitting steps are determined. The effect of oxygen partial pressure in the inert flushing gas on the thermal reduction temperature (TH is examined. An analysis based on the second law of thermodynamics is performed to determine the cycle efficiency (ηcycle and solar-to-fuel energy conversion efficiency (ηsolar−to−fuel attainable with and without heat recuperation. The results indicate that ηcycle and ηsolar−to−fuel both increase with decreasing TH, due to the reduction in oxygen partial pressure in the inert flushing gas. Furthermore, the recuperation of heat for the operation of the cycle significantly improves the solar reactor efficiency. For instance, in the case where TH = 2280 K, ηcycle = 24.4% and ηsolar−to−fuel = 29.5% (without heat recuperation, while ηcycle = 31.3% and ηsolar−to−fuel = 37.8% (with 40% heat recuperation.

  6. A Holistic View of the Coupled Monsoon System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, P. J.

    2008-12-01

    The basic dynamical constraint on both the atmospheric and oceanic components of the monsoon is the strong cross-equatorial pressure gradient (CEPG). The CEPG is positive and strongest in the lower troposphere during the boreal summer and weakest and negative in the boreal winter. Counter gradients exist at higher elevations. The CEPG is a slowly varying field set up by land-sea differences, convective heating and the seasonal cycle of sea-surface temperature. The dynamic response to this evolving CEPG creates the seasonal structure of the ocean and the atmosphere and determines how the monsoon system will respond to forcing from outside the system. It determines the mode of interannual variability of the system. The CEPG drives a cross-equatorial flow that gains moisture through evaporation. Strong latent heat release occurs in littoral seas and land areas during the summer and to the south of the equator during winter creating net cross-equatorial heat fluxes from the winter to summer hemispheres. However, the cross- equatorial wind fields, so generated, cause an Ekman heat transport from the winter to the summer hemisphere. The net flux is large with a seasonal amplitude of about 2 PW. This almost matches the net atmospheric heat transport, but with reversed sign. For example, the oceanic heat flux is sufficient to reduce the north Indian Ocean upper temperature by 1-2C during summer and warm it by a comparable amount during winter. The net effect is to reduce the vigor of the atmospheric monsoon. To a large degree, the couple ocean-atmosphere system is self-regulated and closed system. Occasional outside influences (ENSO, anomalous springtime snow cover etc.) influence the monsoon. For example there is evidence that El Nino (La Nina) is associated with a weak (strong) monsoon. But a strong (weak) monsoon creates a stronger (weaker) cross-equatorial flow and an enhanced (reduced) oceanic heat flux to the winter hemisphere. In this manner, the system returns to

  7. Response of the water-water cycle to the change in photorespiration in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Yang, Ying-Jie; Hu, Hong; Zhang, Shi-Bao

    2016-04-01

    Photosynthetic electron transport produces ATP and NADPH, which are used by the primary metabolism. The production and consumption of ATP and NADPH must be balanced to maintain steady-state rates of CO2 assimilation and photorespiration. It has been indicated that the water-water cycle (WWC) is indispensable for driving photosynthesis via increasing ATP/NADPH production. However, the relationship between the WWC and photorespiration is little known. We tested the hypothesis that the WWC responds to change in photorespiration by balancing ATP/NADPH ratio. Measurements of gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence were conducted in tobacco plants supplied with high (HN-plants) or low nitrogen concentration (LN-plants). The WWC was activated under high light but not low light in both HN-plants and LN-plants. HN-plants had significantly higher capacities of the WWC and photorespiration than LN-plants. Under high light, the relative high WWC activation in HN-plants was accompanied with relative low levels of NPQ compared LN-plants, suggesting that the main role of the WWC under high light was to favor ATP synthesis but not to activate NPQ. Interestingly, the activation of WWC was positively correlated to the electron flow devoted to RuBP oxygenation, indicating that the WWC plays an important role in energy balancing when photorespiration is high. We conclude that the WWC is an important flexible mechanism to optimize the stoichiometry of the ATP/NADPH ratio responding to change in photorespiration. Furthermore, HN-plants enhance the WWC activity to maintain higher rates of CO2 assimilation and photorespiration.

  8. Conventional and Advanced Silicagel-water Adsorption Cycles Driven by Near - environmental Temperature Heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelman, Elisa; B. Saha, Bidyut; Tanaka, Aiharu; Kashiwagi, Takao

    This work aims at clarifying the possible operating temperature ranges for silica gel-water adsorption refrigeration cycles driven by near-environmental temperature heat sources (between 50°C and 85°C), with relatively small regenerating temperature lifts (10 K to 65 K). A newly developed three stage advanced silica gel-water cycle, which is operational with 50°C driving heat source and 30°C cooling source is introduced and compared with a conventional single stage cycle. The cycles are evaluated in terms of cooling capacity, COP and the viability of operation with near-environmental temperature driving heat sources. The analysis is based on experimental and cycle simulation work. The results showed the advanced three stage cycle to be particularly suited for operation with low grade waste heat driving sources, since it worked with small regenerating temperature lifts (ΔTregen)of 10K to 30K. Another significant advantage of operation with small ΔTregen is the possibility to reduce irreversible heat losses from batched cycle operation. Experiments carried out on full-size machine suggested that, even with smallΔTregen, adsorber /desorber heat exchanger improvements such as higher thermal conductance and smaller heat capacitance can contribute to reduce heat losses while improving cycle performance in terms of cooling capacity and COP.

  9. Water Cycle Dynamics in the Snake River Basin, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busey, R.; Hinzman, L. D.

    2009-12-01

    Alaska’s Seward Peninsula is underlain in the south by areas of near-freezing, continuous and discontinuous permafrost. These conditions make it susceptible to changing climatic conditions such as acceleration of the hydrologic cycle or general atmospheric warming. This study looks at the hydrologic record of the Snake River over the mid-twentieth century through present. The Snake River basin drains an area of about 22 square kilometers into Norton Sound near the Bering Strait, off the western coast of Alaska. Climate for this area is maritime in summer and somewhat continental in winter once the sea ice forms. Hydrometeorological parameters have been measured locally for more than fifty years with temperature being measured regularly over the last 100 years. Discharge has been measured in the Snake River intermittently over that time period as well. This study looks closely at drivers of inter-annual variations in soil moisture in the basin over the observational record using a physically based numerical hydrological model. Unlike many areas of Alaska, the meteorological record at Nome, located at the mouth of the watershed, shows no statistically significant increase in precipitation over either the last 30 years or the last 100 years. However, there has been a small increase in temperature over the 100 year time period.

  10. Revisiting Asian monsoon formation and change associated with Tibetan Plateau forcing: I. Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Guoxiong; Liu, Yimin; Duan, Anmin; Bao, Qing [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Beijing (China); Dong, Buwen [University of Reading, Department of Meteorology, National Centre for Atmospheric Science, Reading (United Kingdom); Liang, Xiaoyun [China Meteorological Administration, National Climate Center, Beijing (China); Yu, Jingjing [China Meteorological Administration, National Meteorological Information Center, Beijing (China)

    2012-09-15

    Numerical experiments with different idealized land and mountain distributions are carried out to study the formation of the Asian monsoon and related coupling processes. Results demonstrate that when there is only extratropical continent located between 0 and 120 E and between 20/30 N and the North Pole, a rather weak monsoon rainband appears along the southern border of the continent, coexisting with an intense intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ). The continuous ITCZ surrounds the whole globe, prohibits the development of near-surface cross-equatorial flow, and collects water vapor from tropical oceans, resulting in very weak monsoon rainfall. When tropical lands are integrated, the ITCZ over the longitude domain where the extratropical continent exists disappears as a consequence of the development of a strong surface cross-equatorial flow from the winter hemisphere to the summer hemisphere. In addition, an intense interaction between the two hemispheres develops, tropical water vapor is transported to the subtropics by the enhanced poleward flow, and a prototype of the Asian monsoon appears. The Tibetan Plateau acts to enhance the coupling between the lower and upper tropospheric circulations and between the subtropical and tropical monsoon circulations, resulting in an intensification of the East Asian summer monsoon and a weakening of the South Asian summer monsoon. Linking the Iranian Plateau to the Tibetan Plateau substantially reduces the precipitation over Africa and increases the precipitation over the Arabian Sea and the northern Indian subcontinent, effectively contributing to the development of the South Asian summer monsoon. (orig.)

  11. ESA's STSE WACMOS Project: Towards a Water Cycle Multimission Observation Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Prieto, Diego; Su, Bob

    2010-05-01

    Understanding the role of the global water cycle in the Earth system it is essential to be able to measure from space hydro-climatic variables, such as radiation, precipitation, evapotranspiration, soil moisture, clouds, water vapour, surface water and runoff, vegetation state, albedo and surface temperature, etc. Such measurements are required to further increase not only our understanding of the different components of the water cycle and its variability, both spatially and temporally, but also to characterise the processes and interactions between the terrestrial and atmospheric branches of the water cycle, and how this coupling may influence climate variability and predictability. Moreover, enhancing the observational capacity and the model capabilities to predict in a reliable manner the variations in the global water cycle will be a key contribution to the improvement of water governance, the mitigation of water-related damages and the sustainable human development. In the last few years, EO has demonstrated the capacity to provide reliable measurements over oceans, land and atmosphere representing an unique tool for scientist to observe and monitor the earth system. Now, the earth observation panorama is getting into a new era where the increasing number of missions and sensors available for scientific and operational applications, besides the advances in computer science, modelling and data assimilation, open unprecedented opportunities to enhance human capacities to observe, understand and predict the water cycle and its variability in time. However, in order to fully exploit this increasing potential and bring this newly available capacity to practical operational levels, significant scientific efforts are required in order to: • Develop novel and enhanced geo-physical products exploiting available synergies among different observational system; • Consolidate the development of consistent long-term data sets integrating different EO systems in a

  12. Integrated water cycle planning for towns in New South Wales, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, P; Davison, A; Langdon, A; Freeman, G; Essery, C; Beatty, R; Toop, P

    2003-01-01

    Integration means different things to different people and as a consequence appears to only partially deliver on promised outcomes. For effective integrated water cycle management these outcomes should include improved water use efficiency, less waste, environmental sustainability, and provide secure and reliable supply to meet social and economic needs. The objective of integration is the management and combination of all these outcomes as part of a whole, so as to provide better outcomes than would be expected by managing the parts independently. Integration is also a consequence of the Water Reforms embarked on by the NSW State Government in 1995. The key goals of the reforms are clean and healthy rivers and groundwaters, and the establishment of more secure water entitlements for users. They are also essential for meeting the Council of Australian Government (COAG) water management strategies. The policies and guidelines that formed the NSW Water Reforms were the basis of the Water Management Act 2000 (NSW) (WMA) which is the legislative framework for water management in NSW. The NSW Department of Land and Water Conservation has developed an approach to integrated water cycle management for rural centres in NSW based on a catchment and policy context. This approach includes consideration of catchment wide needs and issues, environmental sustainability, government policy and community objectives in the development of an integrated water cycle plan. The approach provides for a transparent assessment of priorities and how to deal with them, and while specific to urban centres, could easily be expanded for use in the management of the whole of the catchment water cycle. Integration of the water cycle is expected to offer benefits to the local environment, community and economy. For instance, any unused proportion of an urban centre's water entitlement, or an offset against this entitlement created through returned flows (such as via good quality sewage effluent

  13. Role of low level flow on the summer monsoon rainfall over the Indian subcontinent during two contrasting monsoon years

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Swapna, P.; RameshKumar, M.R.

    The summer monsoon rainfall over the Indian subcontinent shows 1 large inter-annual variability in three important aspects, namely, the onset date, quantum of monsoon rainfall and the monsoon activity within the monsoon (June - September) period...

  14. The footprint of Asian monsoon dynamics in the mass and energy balance of a Tibetan glacier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Mölg

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Determinations of glacier-wide mass and energy balance are still scarce for the remote mountains of the Tibetan Plateau, where field measurements are challenging. Here we run and evaluate a physical, distributed mass balance model for Zhadang glacier (central Tibet, 30° N, based on in-situ measurements over 2009–2011 and an uncertainty estimate by Monte Carlo and ensemble strategies. The model application aims to provide the first quantification of how the Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM impacts an entire glacier over the various stages of the monsoon's annual cycle. We find a strong and systematic ISM footprint on the interannual scale. Early (late monsoon onset causes higher (lower accumulation, and reduces (increases the available energy for ablation primarily through changes in absorbed shortwave radiation. By contrast, only a weak footprint exists in the ISM cessation phase. Most striking though is the core monsoon season: local mass and energy balance variability is fully decoupled from the active/break cycle that defines large-scale atmospheric variability during the ISM. Our results demonstrate quantitatively that monsoon onset strongly affects the ablation season of glaciers in Tibet. However, we find no direct ISM impact on the glacier in the main monsoon season, which has not been acknowledged so far. This result also adds cryospheric evidence that regional modification of the large-scale monsoon flow prevails on the Tibetan Plateau in summer.

  15. The footprint of Asian monsoon dynamics in the mass and energy balance of a Tibetan glacier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Mölg

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Determinations of glacier-wide mass and energy balance are still scarce for the remote mountains of the Tibetan Plateau, where field measurements are challenging. Here we run and evaluate a physical, distributed mass balance model for Zhadang Glacier (central Tibet, 30° N based on in-situ measurements over 2009–2011 and an uncertainty estimate by Monte Carlo and ensemble strategies. The model application aims to provide the first quantification of how the Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM impacts an entire glacier over the various stages of the monsoon's annual cycle. We find a strong and systematic ISM footprint on the interannual scale. Early (late monsoon onset causes higher (lower accumulation, and reduces (increases the available energy for ablation primarily through changes in absorbed shortwave radiation. By contrast, only a weak footprint exists in the ISM cessation phase. Most striking though is the core monsoon season: local mass and energy balance variability is fully decoupled from the active/break cycle that defines large-scale atmospheric variability during the ISM. Our results demonstrate quantitatively that monsoon onset strongly affects the ablation season of glaciers in Tibet. However, we find no direct ISM impact on the glacier in the main monsoon season, which has not been acknowledged so far. This result also adds cryospheric evidence that, once the monsoon is in full swing, regional atmospheric variability prevails on the Tibetan Plateau in summer.

  16. The footprint of Asian monsoon dynamics in the mass and energy balance of a Tibetan glacier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölg, T.; Maussion, F.; Yang, W.; Scherer, D.

    2012-12-01

    Determinations of glacier-wide mass and energy balance are still scarce for the remote mountains of the Tibetan Plateau, where field measurements are challenging. Here we run and evaluate a physical, distributed mass balance model for Zhadang Glacier (central Tibet, 30° N) based on in-situ measurements over 2009-2011 and an uncertainty estimate by Monte Carlo and ensemble strategies. The model application aims to provide the first quantification of how the Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) impacts an entire glacier over the various stages of the monsoon's annual cycle. We find a strong and systematic ISM footprint on the interannual scale. Early (late) monsoon onset causes higher (lower) accumulation, and reduces (increases) the available energy for ablation primarily through changes in absorbed shortwave radiation. By contrast, only a weak footprint exists in the ISM cessation phase. Most striking though is the core monsoon season: local mass and energy balance variability is fully decoupled from the active/break cycle that defines large-scale atmospheric variability during the ISM. Our results demonstrate quantitatively that monsoon onset strongly affects the ablation season of glaciers in Tibet. However, we find no direct ISM impact on the glacier in the main monsoon season, which has not been acknowledged so far. This result also adds cryospheric evidence that, once the monsoon is in full swing, regional atmospheric variability prevails on the Tibetan Plateau in summer.

  17. Accounting for water formation from hydrocarbon fuel combustion in life cycle analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmont, E. L.; Davidson, F. T.; Glazer, Y. R.; Beagle, E. A.; Webber, M. E.

    2017-09-01

    Hydrocarbon fuel production and utilization are considered water intensive processes due to the high volumes of water used in source development and fuel processing. At the same time, there is significant water formed during combustion. However, this water is not currently widely harvested at the site of production. Instead, it is added to the hydrologic cycle, often in a different location from the fuel production site. This study quantifies the water formed from combustion of these fuels and analyzes the magnitudes of formation in the context of other hydrologic sources and sinks in order to facilitate future assessments of water harvesting technology and/or atmospheric impacts of combustion. Annual water formation from stoichiometric combustion of hydrocarbon fuels, including natural gas, oil- and natural gas liquid-derived products, and coal, in the United States and worldwide are presented and compared with quantities of water sequestered, evaporated, and stored in the atmosphere. Water production factors in terms of mass and energy of fuel consumed, WPFm and WPFe, respectively, are defined for the comparison of fuels and incorporation into future life cycle analyses (LCAs). Results show that water formation from combustion has increased worldwide from 2005 to 2015, with the largest increase coming from growth in combustion of natural gas. Water formation from combustion of hydrocarbon fuels equals or exceeds water sequestered from the hydrologic cycle through deep well injection in the US annually. Overall, water formation is deemed significant enough to warrant consideration by LCAs of water intensity in fuel production and use, and should be included in future analyses.

  18. Cavitation and water fluxes driven by ice water potential in Juglans regia during freeze-thaw cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charra-Vaskou, Katline; Badel, Eric; Charrier, Guillaume; Ponomarenko, Alexandre; Bonhomme, Marc; Foucat, Loïc; Mayr, Stefan; Améglio, Thierry

    2016-02-01

    Freeze-thaw cycles induce major hydraulic changes due to liquid-to-ice transition within tree stems. The very low water potential at the ice-liquid interface is crucial as it may cause lysis of living cells as well as water fluxes and embolism in sap conduits, which impacts whole tree-water relations. We investigated water fluxes induced by ice formation during freeze-thaw cycles in Juglans regia L. stems using four non-invasive and complementary approaches: a microdendrometer, magnetic resonance imaging, X-ray microtomography, and ultrasonic acoustic emissions analysis. When the temperature dropped, ice nucleation occurred, probably in the cambium or pith areas, inducing high water potential gradients within the stem. The water was therefore redistributed within the stem toward the ice front. We could thus observe dehydration of the bark's living cells leading to drastic shrinkage of this tissue, as well as high tension within wood conduits reaching the cavitation threshold in sap vessels. Ultrasonic emissions, which were strictly emitted only during freezing, indicated cavitation events (i.e. bubble formation) following ice formation in the xylem sap. However, embolism formation (i.e. bubble expansion) in stems was observed only on thawing via X-ray microtomography for the first time on the same sample. Ultrasonic emissions were detected during freezing and were not directly related to embolism formation. These results provide new insights into the complex process and dynamics of water movements and ice formation during freeze-thaw cycles in tree stems.

  19. Static Analysis of Double Effect Adsorption Refrigeration Cycle Using Silica gel/Water Pair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlinda; Miyazaki, Takahiko; Ueda, Yuki; Akisawa, Atsushi

    In this paper,a static analysis of double effect adsorption refrigeration cycle utilizing condensation heat is discussed. Double effect adsorption refrigeration cycle consists of two cycles, High Temperature Cycle (HTC) which is driven from external heat sources, and Low Temperature Cycle (LTC) which is driven by condensation heat from HTC. Both of HTC and LTC are using silica gel and water as working pairs. The effect of heat source temperature on cycle performance was investigated in terms of coefficient of performance (COP) and specific cooling energy (SCE). Results showed that double effect cycle would produce higher COP than single effect cycle for driving temperature observed between 80-150°C with the same operating condition. However, the value of SCE is lower than single effect, despite that the SCE of double effect cycle is improved with heat source temperature higher than 100°C. Further, it was also observed that adsorbent mass ratio of HTC and LTC affected performance of chiller. When adsorbent mass ratio of HTC and LTC was unity, it was found that SCE and COP took the maximum.

  20. Water cycle meets media cycle: Hydrology engagement and social media in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, D. B.; Woods, R. A.

    2012-12-01

    The dispersal of scientific knowledge is an on-going challenge for the research community, particularly for the more applied disciplines such as hydrology. To a large degree this arises because key stakeholders do not readily follow the peer-reviewed scientific literature. Even publicly accessible technical reports may be out of sight from many in both the research and stakeholder communities. The challenge to science communication is further compounded by an increasing pressure to raise the hydrological literacy of the public, as water resource management decisions become increasingly collaborative. In these situations, the diversification of communication channels and more rapid interactions between stakeholders and scientists can be of great value. The use of social media in the communication and advancement of hydrological science in New Zealand is a case in point. Two such initiatives are described here: a hydrology blog and a crowd-sourcing data collection campaign using Facebook. The hydrology blog, Waiology (a variant of "hydrology" with the Greek prefix for water replaced by its Maori equivalent), was set up with two main goals in mind: to foster greater understanding and appreciation of hydrology among the New Zealand public, and to more rapidly share new hydrological knowledge within the New Zealand hydrological community. In part, it has also been an experiment to test whether this mode of engagement is worthwhile. Measuring the success of the initiative has proven difficult, but has led to a suite of metrics that collectively gauge popular and professional interest and use of the material. To name a few, this includes visit statistics (taking note of the institution of the visitor), subscriptions, and non-internet citations. Results indicate that, since the blog's inception in mid-2011, it has become a valued resource for the NZ hydrological community and an interesting website for the general public. The second example centered on the use of Facebook

  1. Assessing how seasonal hydrological balance has changed during the warming 20th century in the montane forests of Southeast Asian monsoon region using a stable isotope dendroclimatology approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, M.; Stott, L. D.

    2010-12-01

    Tropical montane forests act as water catchment and host of biodiversity in the Southeast Asian monsoon region, and understanding how their hydrological conditions change with global warming is vitally important. Global climate model simulations project enhanced moisture cycle in the tropics, which would cause stronger summer monsoon precipitations, but on the other hand the adiabatic lapse rate would be shifted towards a moister condition (amplification of warming at high elevation), inhibiting dry season orographic lifting cloud/fog formation (lifting cloud base hypothesis), enhancing evapo-transpiration, and leading to a net moisture loss during winter dry season. In this study, we have attempted to investigate how the seasonal moisture balance in Southeast Asia has evolved in response to these influences through the 20th century using the oxygen isotopic composition (δ18O) of subannual tree cellulose samples extracted from the annual rings of pine trees that grow in Doi Chiang Dao, a limestone mountain in northern Thailand. At this location the δ18O of cellulose exhibits distinctive annual cycles of up to 12‰, which is primarily a reflection of both the so-called ‘isotope amount effect’ that is associated with the strong monsoon precipitation during summer wet season and the moisture availability from different sources during winter dry season. We have demonstrated that tree cellulose δ18O could be used as a proxy for regional monsoon strength by showing that the annual mean cellulose δ18O correlate significantly with All India Rainfall, Webster-Yang monsoon index, as well as with both local and regional monsoon precipitation. ENSO is the dominant influence on interannual rainfall variability and this is well expressed in the interannual cellulose δ18O record. Using a 21-year moving window correlation analysis we find a weakening of ENSO influence after 1980, coinciding with the most rapid atmospheric warming. We expect to analyze older trees to

  2. Environmental status of groundwater affected by chromite ore processing residue (COPR) dumpsites during pre-monsoon and monsoon seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matern, Katrin; Weigand, Harald; Singh, Abhas; Mansfeldt, Tim

    2017-02-01

    Chromite ore processing residue (COPR) is generated by the roasting of chromite ores for the extraction of chromium. Leaching of carcinogenic hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) from COPR dumpsites and contamination of groundwater is a key environmental risk. The objective of the study was to evaluate Cr(VI) contamination in groundwater in the vicinity of three COPR disposal sites in Uttar Pradesh, India, in the pre-monsoon and monsoon seasons. Groundwater samples (n = 57 pre-monsoon, n = 70 monsoon) were taken in 2014 and analyzed for Cr(VI) and relevant hydrochemical parameters. The site-specific ranges of Cr(VI) concentrations in groundwater were <0.005 to 34.8 mg L(-1) (Rania), <0.005 to 115 mg L(-1) (Chhiwali), and <0.005 to 2.0 mg L(-1) (Godhrauli). Maximum levels of Cr(VI) were found close to the COPR dumpsites and significantly exceeded safe drinking water limits (0.05 mg L(-1)). No significant dependence of Cr(VI) concentration on monsoons was observed.

  3. Optimal design of solid oxide fuel cell, ammonia-water single effect absorption cycle and Rankine steam cycle hybrid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrpooya, Mehdi; Dehghani, Hossein; Ali Moosavian, S. M.

    2016-02-01

    A combined system containing solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine power plant, Rankine steam cycle and ammonia-water absorption refrigeration system is introduced and analyzed. In this process, power, heat and cooling are produced. Energy and exergy analyses along with the economic factors are used to distinguish optimum operating point of the system. The developed electrochemical model of the fuel cell is validated with experimental results. Thermodynamic package and main parameters of the absorption refrigeration system are validated. The power output of the system is 500 kW. An optimization problem is defined in order to finding the optimal operating point. Decision variables are current density, temperature of the exhaust gases from the boiler, steam turbine pressure (high and medium), generator temperature and consumed cooling water. Results indicate that electrical efficiency of the combined system is 62.4% (LHV). Produced refrigeration (at -10 °C) and heat recovery are 101 kW and 22.1 kW respectively. Investment cost for the combined system (without absorption cycle) is about 2917 kW-1.

  4. Implications of changing water cycle for the performance and yield characteristics of the multi-purpose Beas Reservoir in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeloye, A. J.; Ojha, C. S.; Soundharajan, B.; Remesan, R.

    2013-12-01

    There is considerable change in both the spatial and temporal patterns of monsoon rainfall in India, with implications for water resources availability and security. 'Mitigating the Impacts of Climate Change on India Agriculture' (MICCI) is one of five on-going scientific efforts being sponsored as part of the UK-NERC/India-MOES Changing Water Cycle (South Asia) initiative to further the understanding of the problem and proffer solutions that are robust and effective. This paper focuses on assessing the implications of projected climate change on the yield and performance characteristics of the Pong Reservoir on the Beas River, Himachal Pradesh, India. The Pong serves both hydropower and irrigation needs and is therefore strategic for the socio-economic well-being of the region as well as sustaining the livelihoods of millions of farmers that rely on it for irrigation. Simulated baseline and climate-change perturbed hydro-climate scenarios developed as part of a companion Work Package of MICCI formed the basis of the analysis. For both of these scenarios, reservoir analyses were carried out using the Sequent Peak Algorithm (SPA) and Pong's existing level of releases to derive rule curves for the reservoir. These rule curves then formed the basis of further reservoir behaviour simulations in WEAP and the resulting performance of the reservoir was summarised in terms of reliability, resilience, vulnerability and sustainability. The whole exercise was implemented within a Monte Carlo framework for the benefit of characterising the variability in the assessments. The results show that the rule curves developed using future hydro-climate are significantly changed from the baseline in that higher storages will be required to be maintained in the Pong in the future to achieve reliable performance. As far as the overall performance of the reservoir is concerned, future reliability (both time-based and volume-based) is not significantly different from the baseline, provided

  5. Disturbances in closed water cycle papermaking; Vaehaevetisen paperinvalmistuksen haeirioetekijaet - MPKY 01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyblom, I.; Asikainen, J.; Salerma, M.; Schlupp, K. [Finnish Pulp and Paper Research Institute, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    There are fears that reducing water consumption at paper mills will make the papermaking process more susceptible to disturbances. Substances accumulating in the circulating water will give rise to fouling and precipitates as well as flaws in the paper web. A wet end simulator, to be built at KCL (The Finnish Pulp and Paper Research Institute) this year, will be used to test water cycle closure equivalent to a specific water consumption of 3-4 m{sup 3}/t of pulp. The first part of the investigation will examine fouling and precipitate formation due to temperature and pH disturbances. In the second part, tests will be made on the use of on-line measuring instruments in contaminated water cycles. (orig.)

  6. Climate change mitigation by recovery of energy from the water cycle: a new challenge for water management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Hoek, J P

    2012-01-01

    Waternet is responsible for drinking water treatment and distribution, wastewater collection and treatment, and surface water management and control (quality and quantity) in and around Amsterdam. Waternet has the ambition to operate climate neutral in 2020. To realise this ambition, measures are required to compensate for the emission of 53,000 ton CO(2)-eq/year. Energy recovery from the water cycle looks very promising. First, calculations reveal that energy recovery from the water cycle in and around Amsterdam may contribute to a total reduction in greenhouse gas emissions up to 148,000 ton CO(2)-eq/year. The challenge for the coming years is to choose combinations of all the possibilities to fulfil the energy demand as much as possible. Only then the use of fossil fuel can be minimized and inevitable greenhouse gas emissions can be compensated, supporting the target to operate climate neutral in 2020.

  7. Effects of increased CO{sub 2} levels on monsoons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherchi, Annalisa; Masina, Simona; Navarra, Antonio [Centro Euro-Mediterraneo per i Cambiamenti Climatici and Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Bologna (Italy); Alessandri, Andrea [Centro Euro-Mediterraneo per i Cambiamenti Climatici, Bologna (Italy)

    2011-07-15

    Increased atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration provided warmer atmospheric temperature and higher atmospheric water vapor content, but not necessarily more precipitation. A set of experiments performed with a state-of-the-art coupled general circulation model forced with increased atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration (2, 4 and 16 times the present-day mean value) were analyzed and compared with a control experiment to evaluate the effect of increased CO{sub 2} levels on monsoons. Generally, the monsoon precipitation responses to CO{sub 2} forcing are largest if extreme concentrations of carbon dioxide are used, but they are not necessarily proportional to the forcing applied. In fact, despite a common response in terms of an atmospheric water vapor increase to the atmospheric warming, two out of the six monsoons studied simulate less or equal summer mean precipitation in the 16 x CO{sub 2} experiment compared to the intermediate sensitivity experiments. The precipitation differences between CO{sub 2} sensitivity experiments and CTRL have been investigated specifying the contribution of thermodynamic and purely dynamic processes. As a general rule, the differences depending on the atmospheric moisture content changes (thermodynamic component) are large and positive, and they tend to be damped by the dynamic component associated with the changes in the vertical velocity. However, differences are observed among monsoons in terms of the role played by other terms (like moisture advection and evaporation) in shaping the precipitation changes in warmer climates. The precipitation increase, even if weak, occurs despite a weakening of the mean circulation in the monsoon regions (''precipitation-wind paradox''). In particular, the tropical east-west Walker circulation is reduced, as found from velocity potential analysis. The meridional component of the monsoon circulation is changed as well, with larger (smaller) meridional (vertical) scales. (orig.)

  8. Comparative assessment of nuclear fuel cycles. Light-water reactor once-through, classical fast breeder reactor, and symbiotic fast breeder reactor cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardie, R.W.; Barrett, R.J.; Freiwald, J.G.

    1980-06-01

    The object of the Alternative Nuclear Fuel Cycle Study is to perform comparative assessments of nuclear power systems. There are two important features of this study. First, this evaluation attempts to encompass the complete, integrated fuel cycle from mining of uranium ore to disposal of waste rather than isolated components. Second, it compares several aspects of each cycle - energy use, economics, technological status, proliferation, public safety, and commercial potential - instead of concentrating on one or two assessment areas. This report presents assessment results for three fuel cycles. These are the light-water reactor once-through cycle, the fast breeder reactor on the classical plutonium cycle, and the fast breeder reactor on a symbiotic cycle using plutonium and /sup 233/U as fissile fuels. The report also contains a description of the methodology used in this assessment. Subsequent reports will present results for additional fuel cycles.

  9. Possible Influences of Air Pollution, Dust and Sandstorms on the Indian Monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Hsu, Christina N.; Holben, Brent N.

    2010-01-01

    reduced precipitation. However, in the presence of increasing moist and warm air, the reduced coalescence/collision may lead to supercooled drops at higher altitudes where ice precipitation falls and melts. The latent heat release from freezing aloft and melting below implies greater upward heat transport in polluted clouds and invigorate deep convection. In this way, aerosols may lead to increased local convection. Hence, depending on the ambient large-scale conditions and dynamical feedback processes, aerosols' effect on precipitation can be positive, negative or mixed. In the Asian monsoon and adjacent regions, the aerosol forcing and responses of the water cycle are even more complex, Both direct and indirect effects may take place locally and simultaneously, interacting with each other. in addition to local effects, monsoon rainfall may be affected by aerosols transported from other regions and intensified through large-scale circulation and moisture feedback. Thus, dust transported by the large-scale circulation from the adjacent deserts to northern India may affect rainfall over the Bay of Bengal; sulphate and black carbon front industrial pollution in central, southern China and northern India may affect the rainfall regime over the Korean peninsula and Japan; organic and black carbon front biomass burning from Indo-China may modulate the pre-monsoon rainfall regime over southern China and coastal regions, contributing to variability in differential heating and cooling of the atmosphere and to the land-sea thermal contrast. During the pre-monsoon season and monsoon breaks, it has been suggested that radiative forcing by absorbing aerosols have nearly the same order of magnitude as the forcing due to latent heating from convection and surface fluxes. The magnitude of the total aerosol radiative cooling due to sulphates and soot is of the order of 20-40 W/m2 over the Asian monsoon land region in the pre-monsoon season, compared to about 1-2 W/m2 for global warng

  10. Coupling Mars' Dust and Water Cycles: Effects on Dust Lifting Vigor, Spatial Extent and Seasonality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahre, M. A.; Hollingsworth, J. L.; Haberle, R. M.; Montmessin, F.

    2012-01-01

    The dust cycle is an important component of Mars' current climate system. Airborne dust affects the radiative balance of the atmosphere, thus greatly influencing the thermal and dynamical state of the atmosphere. Dust raising events on Mars occur at spatial scales ranging from meters to planet-wide. Although the occurrence and season of large regional and global dust storms are highly variable from one year to the next, there are many features of the dust cycle that occur year after year. Generally, a low-level dust haze is maintained during northern spring and summer, while elevated levels of atmospheric dust occur during northern autumn and winter. During years without global-scale dust storms, two peaks in total dust loading were observed by MGS/TES: one peak occurred before northern winter solstice at Ls 200-240, and one peak occurred after northern winter solstice at L(sub s) 305-340. These maxima in dust loading are thought to be associated with transient eddy activity in the northern hemisphere, which has been observed to maximize pre- and post-solstice. Interactive dust cycle studies with Mars General Circulation Models (MGCMs) have included the lifting, transport, and sedimentation of radiatively active dust. Although the predicted global dust loadings from these simulations capture some aspects of the observed dust cycle, there are marked differences between the simulated and observed dust cycles. Most notably, the maximum dust loading is robustly predicted by models to occur near northern winter solstice and is due to dust lifting associated with down slope flows on the flanks of the Hellas basin. Thus far, models have had difficulty simulating the observed pre- and post- solstice peaks in dust loading. Interactive dust cycle studies typically have not included the formation of water ice clouds or their radiative effects. Water ice clouds can influence the dust cycle by scavenging dust from atmosphere and by interacting with solar and infrared radiation

  11. Propagation and effects of monsoonal seasonally intense rainfall signal in river strata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plink-Bjorklund, P.

    2014-12-01

    Climatic forcing signals in river systems tend to be modified on different temporal and spatial scales due to inherent signal buffering, re-routing, and a complex mixing of multiple autogenic and allogenic signals. Thus climate forcing response is generally assumed inherently non-linear with significant hysteresis effects. This paper explores propagation and effects of monsoonal, seasonally intense rainfall signal in river strata in the monsoonal and bordering subtropical domains. Some such rivers occur completely within the monsoon climate zone. Others have parts of their drainages in temperate climate zones, or on high elevations and receive some of their water discharge from other sources. Yet others, have their upstream drainages in the tropical monsoon climates, but flow through bordering subtropical drylands. Yet, all these rivers characteristically experience seasonal high magnitude floods as the effect of intense monsoon precipitation. Many rivers in the bordering subtropical zone receive monsoon rain and transmit discharge only during abnormal or strengthened monsoon seasons and associated cyclonic flow. Field datasets, comparison to modern river deposits and a literature review of monsoonal and bordering subtropical domain rivers reveal that the effects of the intense seasonal monsoon rain and the resultant flooding are readily recognizable in modern and ancient fluvial strata. This paper argues that this distinct and dominant climate signal propagation occurs because it is the monsoon discharge that is commonly responsible for up to 100% of sediment erosion, transport and deposition, creating a system wide flushing or splash effect on a single season to multi-million year time scale. The distinct monsoon flood deposits are interbedded with other types of fluvial strata in systems where significant deposition also occurs from low-magnitude flood or non-flood discharges.

  12. [Comment on “GEWEX: The Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment”] More global water balance uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodda, John C.

    I concur strongly with Chahine's January 14, 1992, Eos article on GEWEX and support his response to Dincer's letter (Eos, June 16, 1992) emphasizing that “our quantitative knowledge of the hydrological cycle remains surprisingly poor.” This is despite the magnificent report on the world water balance to which Dincer refers and his allusion that the existence of a low residual in closing the water balance indicates low errors of measurement of the global budget components.

  13. Menstrual cycle characteristics and reproductive hormone levels in women exposed to atrazine in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cragin, Lori A; Kesner, James S; Bachand, Annette M; Barr, Dana Boyd; Meadows, Juliana W; Krieg, Edward F; Reif, John S

    2011-11-01

    Atrazine is the most commonly used herbicide in the U.S. and a wide-spread groundwater contaminant. Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence exists that atrazine disrupts reproductive health and hormone secretion. We examined the relationship between exposure to atrazine in drinking water and menstrual cycle function including reproductive hormone levels. Women 18-40 years old residing in agricultural communities where atrazine is used extensively (Illinois) and sparingly (Vermont) answered a questionnaire (n=102), maintained menstrual cycle diaries (n=67), and provided daily urine samples for analyses of luteinizing hormone (LH), and estradiol and progesterone metabolites (n=35). Markers of exposures included state of residence, atrazine and chlorotriazine concentrations in tap water, municipal water and urine, and estimated dose from water consumption. Women who lived in Illinois were more likely to report menstrual cycle length irregularity (odds ratio (OR)=4.69; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.58-13.95) and more than 6 weeks between periods (OR=6.16; 95% CI: 1.29-29.38) than those who lived in Vermont. Consumption of >2 cups of unfiltered Illinois water daily was associated with increased risk of irregular periods (OR=5.73; 95% CI: 1.58-20.77). Estimated "dose" of atrazine and chlorotriazine from tap water was inversely related to mean mid-luteal estradiol metabolite. Atrazine "dose" from municipal concentrations was directly related to follicular phase length and inversely related to mean mid-luteal progesterone metabolite levels. We present preliminary evidence that atrazine exposure, at levels below the US EPA MCL, is associated with increased menstrual cycle irregularity, longer follicular phases, and decreased levels of menstrual cycle endocrine biomarkers of infertile ovulatory cycles. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Estimation of Soil-Water Characteristic Curves in Multiple-Cycles Using Membrane and TDR System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Taek Hong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to estimate multiple-cycles of the soil-water characteristic curve (SWCC using an innovative volumetric pressure plate extractor (VPPE, which is incorporated with a membrane and time domain reflectometry (TDR. The pressure cell includes the membrane to reduce the experimental time and the TDR probe to automatically estimate the volumetric water content. For the estimation of SWCC using the VPPE system, four specimens with different grain size and void ratio are prepared. The volumetric water contents of the specimens according to the matric suction are measured by the burette system and are estimated in the TDR system during five cycles of SWCC tests. The volumetric water contents estimated by the TDR system are almost identical to those determined by the burette system. The experimental time significantly decreases with the new VPPE. The hysteresis in the SWCC is largest in the first cycle and is nearly identical after 1.5 cycles. As the initial void ratio decreases, the air entry value increases. This study suggests that the new VPPE may effectively estimate multiple-cycles of the SWCC of unsaturated soils.

  15. Meteorological results of monsoon-88 Expedition (pre-monsoon period)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sadhuram, Y.; Krishnamurthy, L.; Babu, M.T.

    Mean atmospheric circulation, moisture budget and net heat exchange were studied during a pre-monsoon period (18th March to 3rd May, 1988), making use of the data collected on board "Akademik Korolev" in the central equatorial and southern Arabian...

  16. Life cycle water consumption and wastewater generation impacts of a Marcellus shale gas well.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Mohan; Hendrickson, Chris T; VanBriesen, Jeanne M

    2014-01-01

    This study estimates the life cycle water consumption and wastewater generation impacts of a Marcellus shale gas well from its construction to end of life. Direct water consumption at the well site was assessed by analysis of data from approximately 500 individual well completion reports collected in 2010 by the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. Indirect water consumption for supply chain production at each life cycle stage of the well was estimated using the economic input-output life cycle assessment (EIO-LCA) method. Life cycle direct and indirect water quality pollution impacts were assessed and compared using the tool for the reduction and assessment of chemical and other environmental impacts (TRACI). Wastewater treatment cost was proposed as an additional indicator for water quality pollution impacts from shale gas well wastewater. Four water management scenarios for Marcellus shale well wastewater were assessed: current conditions in Pennsylvania; complete discharge; direct reuse and desalination; and complete desalination. The results show that under the current conditions, an average Marcellus shale gas well consumes 20,000 m(3) (with a range from 6700 to 33,000 m(3)) of freshwater per well over its life cycle excluding final gas utilization, with 65% direct water consumption at the well site and 35% indirect water consumption across the supply chain production. If all flowback and produced water is released into the environment without treatment, direct wastewater from a Marcellus shale gas well is estimated to have 300-3000 kg N-eq eutrophication potential, 900-23,000 kg 2,4D-eq freshwater ecotoxicity potential, 0-370 kg benzene-eq carcinogenic potential, and 2800-71,000 MT toluene-eq noncarcinogenic potential. The potential toxicity of the chemicals in the wastewater from the well site exceeds those associated with supply chain production, except for carcinogenic effects. If all the Marcellus shale well wastewater is

  17. Life Cycle Water Consumption and Wastewater Generation Impacts of a Marcellus Shale Gas Well

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This study estimates the life cycle water consumption and wastewater generation impacts of a Marcellus shale gas well from its construction to end of life. Direct water consumption at the well site was assessed by analysis of data from approximately 500 individual well completion reports collected in 2010 by the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. Indirect water consumption for supply chain production at each life cycle stage of the well was estimated using the economic input–output life cycle assessment (EIO-LCA) method. Life cycle direct and indirect water quality pollution impacts were assessed and compared using the tool for the reduction and assessment of chemical and other environmental impacts (TRACI). Wastewater treatment cost was proposed as an additional indicator for water quality pollution impacts from shale gas well wastewater. Four water management scenarios for Marcellus shale well wastewater were assessed: current conditions in Pennsylvania; complete discharge; direct reuse and desalination; and complete desalination. The results show that under the current conditions, an average Marcellus shale gas well consumes 20 000 m3 (with a range from 6700 to 33 000 m3) of freshwater per well over its life cycle excluding final gas utilization, with 65% direct water consumption at the well site and 35% indirect water consumption across the supply chain production. If all flowback and produced water is released into the environment without treatment, direct wastewater from a Marcellus shale gas well is estimated to have 300–3000 kg N-eq eutrophication potential, 900–23 000 kg 2,4D-eq freshwater ecotoxicity potential, 0–370 kg benzene-eq carcinogenic potential, and 2800–71 000 MT toluene-eq noncarcinogenic potential. The potential toxicity of the chemicals in the wastewater from the well site exceeds those associated with supply chain production, except for carcinogenic effects. If all the Marcellus shale well

  18. Life cycle-based water assessment of a hand dishwashing product: opportunities and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoof, Gert; Buyle, Bea; Kounina, Anna; Humbert, Sebastien

    2013-10-01

    It is only recently that life cycle-based indicators have been used to evaluate products from a water use impact perspective. The applicability of some of these methods has been primarily demonstrated on agricultural materials or products, because irrigation requirements in food production can be water-intensive. In view of an increasing interest on life cycle-based water indicators from different products, we ran a study on a hand dishwashing product. A number of water assessment methods were applied with the purpose of identifying both product improvement opportunities, as well as understanding the potential for underlying database and methodological improvements. The study covered the entire life cycle of the product and focused on environmental issues related to water use, looking in-depth at inventory, midpoint, and endpoint methods. "Traditional" water emission driven methods, such as freshwater eutrophication, were excluded from the analysis. The use of a single formula with the same global supply chain, manufactured in 1 location was evaluated in 2 countries with different water scarcity conditions. The study shows differences ranging up to 4 orders in magnitude for indicators with similar units associated with different water use types (inventory methods) and different cause-effect chain models (midpoint and endpoint impact categories). No uncertainty information was available on the impact assessment methods, whereas uncertainty from stochastic variability was not available at the time of study. For the majority of the indicators studied, the contribution from the consumer use stage is the most important (>90%), driven by both direct water use (dishwashing process) as well as indirect water use (electricity generation to heat the water). Creating consumer awareness on how the product is used, particularly in water-scarce areas, is the largest improvement opportunity for a hand dishwashing product. However, spatial differentiation in the inventory and

  19. Environmental flow for Monsoon Rivers in India: The Yamuna River as a case study

    CERN Document Server

    Soni, Vikram; Singh, Diwan

    2013-01-01

    We consider the flows of Monsoon Rivers in India that will permit the river to perform all its natural functions. About 80% of the total flow for Indian rivers is during the monsoon and the remaining 20% is during the non monsoon period. By carrying out a case study of the river Yamuna in Delhi we find that at least 50% of the virgin monsoon (July to September) flow is required for the transport of the full spectrum of soil particles in the river sediment. A similar flow is needed for adequate recharge of the floodplain aquifers along river. For the non monsoon period (October to June) about 60% of the virgin flow is necessary to avoid the growth of still water algae and to support river biodiversity.

  20. Particulate iron dynamics during FeCycle in subantarctic waters southeast of New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    Frew, Russell D.; Hutchins, David A.; Nodder, Scott D.; Sañudo-Wilhelmy, Sergio A.; Tovar-Sánchez, Antonio; Leblanc, Karine; Hare, Clinton E.; Boyd, Philip W.

    2006-01-01

    The FeCycle experiment provided an SF6 labeled mesoscale patch of high-nitrate low-chlorophyll (HNLC) water in austral summer 2003. These labeled waters enabled a comparison of the inventory of particulate iron (PFe) in the 45-m-deep surface mixed layer with the concurrent downward export flux of PFe at depths of 80 and 120 m. The partitioning of PFe between four size fractions (0.2-2, 2-5, 5-20, and >20 μm) was assessed, and PFe was mainly found in the >20-μm size fraction throughout FeCycle...

  1. Particulate iron dynamics during FeCycle in subantarctic waters southeast of New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    Frew, Russell D.; Hutchins, David A.; Nodder, Scott D.; Sañudo-Wilhelmy, Sergio A; Tovar-Sánchez, Antonio; Leblanc, Karine; Clinton E. Hare; Boyd, Philip W.

    2006-01-01

    The FeCycle experiment provided an SF6 labeled mesoscale patch of high-nitrate low-chlorophyll (HNLC) water in austral summer 2003. These labeled waters enabled a comparison of the inventory of particulate iron (PFe) in the 45-m-deep surface mixed layer with the concurrent downward export flux of PFe at depths of 80 and 120 m. The partitioning of PFe between four size fractions (0.2-2, 2-5, 5-20, and >20 μm) was assessed, and PFe was mainly found in the >20-μm size fraction throughout FeCycle...

  2. Observed variability of sea surface salinity and thermal inversions in the Lakshadweep Sea during contrast monsoons

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Johnson, Z.; Salgaonkar, G.; Nisha, K.; Rajan, C.K.; Rao, R.R.

    The sea surface salinity (SSS) of the Lakshadweep Sea (LS) shows large seasonal variability due to horizontal advection of low (high) salinity waters from south (north) during winter (summer) monsoon. The measurements made in the LS during...

  3. Driving forces of Indian summer monsoon on Milankovitch and sub-Milankovitch time scales: A review

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.

    and deep water circulation changes drive the variability of southwest (SW) monsoon in the Indian subcontinent. Different forcing factors act on different time scales. Arabian Sea sediments consist of distinct fauna that are endemic to areas of upwelling...

  4. Influence of eastern Arabian Sea on summer monsoon rainfall over west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshBabu, V.; Rao, M.S.; Rao, M.V.

    anomaly field in the eastern Arabian Sea where larger atmospheric convection as compared to that over other parts of the water body normally takes place during the summer monsoon season. The present results based on observations during ten years' period...

  5. Vertical distribution of mesozooplankton in the central and eastern Arabian Sea during the winter monsoons

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Padmavati, G.; Haridas, P.; Nair, K.K.C.; Gopalakrishnan, T.C.; Shiney, P.; Madhupratap, M.

    The vertical distribution of mesozooplankton in the central and eastern Arabian Sea was investigated during the winter monsoon in 1995. Samples were analysed from discrete depth zones defined according to oxygen and temperature profiles of the water...

  6. Culturable heterotrophic bacteria from the euphotic zone of the Indian Ocean ocean during the summer monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, S.; LokaBharathi, P.A.; Chandramohan, D.

    Cuturable heterotrophic bacterial counts (viable counts: VC) by surface plating on ZoBell medium and total bacterial counts (TC) by epifuorenscence microscopy were carried out in sea water off the southwest coast of India during the monsoon. TC were...

  7. What drives the global summer monsoon over the past millennium?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jian [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Lake Science and Environment, Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, Nanjing (China); Wang, Bin [University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Meteorology, Honolulu, HI (United States); University of Hawaii at Manoa, International Pacific Research Center, Honolulu, HI (United States); Yim, So-Young; Lee, June-Yi [University of Hawaii at Manoa, International Pacific Research Center, Honolulu, HI (United States); Jhun, Jong-Ghap [Seoul National University, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences/Research Institute of Oceanography, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Kyung-Ja [Pusan National University, Division of Earth Environmental System, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    The global summer monsoon precipitation (GSMP) provides a fundamental measure for changes in the annual cycle of the climate system and hydroclimate. We investigate mechanisms governing decadal-centennial variations of the GSMP over the past millennium with a coupled climate model's (ECHO-G) simulation forced by solar-volcanic (SV) radiative forcing and greenhouse gases (GHG) forcing. We show that the leading mode of GSMP is a forced response to external forcing on centennial time scale with a globally uniform change of precipitation across all monsoon regions, whereas the second mode represents internal variability on multi-decadal time scale with regional characteristics. The total amount of GSMP varies in phase with the global mean temperature, indicating that global warming is accompanied by amplification of the annual cycle of the climate system. The northern hemisphere summer monsoon precipitation (NHSMP) responds to GHG forcing more sensitively, while the southern hemisphere summer monsoon precipitation (SHSMP) responds to the SV radiative forcing more sensitively. The NHSMP is enhanced by increased NH land-ocean thermal contrast and NH-minus-SH thermal contrast. On the other hand, the SHSMP is strengthened by enhanced SH subtropical highs and the east-west mass contrast between Southeast Pacific and tropical Indian Ocean. The strength of the GSMP is determined by the factors controlling both the NHSMP and SHSMP. Intensification of GSMP is associated with (a) increased global land-ocean thermal contrast, (b) reinforced east-west mass contrast between Southeast Pacific and tropical Indian Ocean, and (c) enhanced circumglobal SH subtropical highs. The physical mechanisms revealed here will add understanding of future change of the global monsoon. (orig.)

  8. Towards a climate-neutral water cycle; Op weg naar een klimaatneutrale waterketen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frijns, J. [KWR Watercycle Research Institute, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Mulder, M.; Roorda, J. [Grontmij, De Bilt (Netherlands)

    2008-07-01

    Insight is offered in the climate footprint of the domestic water cycle. Moreover options are provided with which the water sector can reduce its own negative impact on the climate. To realize this, the sectors drinking water, sewage and waste water can separately take a large number of (energy) measures [Dutch] Inzicht wordt gegeven in de klimaatvoetafdruk van de huishoudelijke waterketen. Tevens worden mogelijkheden aangedragen om als watersector de eigen negatieve impact op het klimaat te verkleinen. Daarvoor kunnen de sectoren drinkwater, riolering en afvalwater separaat een groot aantal (energie)maatregelen nemen.

  9. The water cycle in a bottle: simulation of a hydrogeological basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebot Castelló, M. R.; Leiva Hevia, S.

    2012-04-01

    THE WATER CYCLE IN A BOTTLE: simulation of a hydrogeological basin Author: Mª Roser Nebot (Institut Manuel Blancafort, La Garriga, Barcelona, Spain) Co-author: Sílvia Leiva Hevia (Institut Llicà d'Amunt, Lliça d'Amunt, Barcelona, Spain) The activity can be implemented in a great range of ages, because it has many different levels of depth. It is based on the construction of an analogical model of a hydrogeological basin using a 5L or 8L empty bottle. There are also other hands-on experiences that can be done in relation to the central one, such as creating a fountain, making a cloud, fog, a breeze… The use of a model that the students have to build and interact with enhances the possibility of cooperative and dialogic learning. The set of activities begins with an introduction to see what the students know about the water cycle and to focus on what they are going to work on. It also makes them think about underground water, which is frequently forgotten when drawing and studying the water cycle. Then, the building of the water cycle simulation from an empty bottle is presented, see http://www.xtec.cat/cirel/pla_le/nottingham/roser_nebot/index.htm (Unit 5). You will also find other activities related to the water cycle at the site. The students build the model, water the soil, and observe infiltration and the formation of a lake. Using a syringe they overexploit the well and dry the lake. By making the students label the underground water level and observe how water percolates through the holes in the aquifer we are making them aware that underground water doesn't circulate in rivers inside underground tunnels, but through the interconnected holes and crevices. Inside the bottle there is a little plant to observe evapotranspiration but, because it is very difficult to see the water droplets in the small plant that is inside the set-up, it is advisable to do a parallel experiment using bigger plants in a pot, covering them with a plastic bag tied around the

  10. Constraints on water cycling in a deep mountain valley from stable water isotope and sap flux measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorella, R.; Poulsen, C. J.; Matheny, A. M.; Bohrer, G.

    2015-12-01

    The stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen in water are unequally partitioned during phase changes, with environmental conditions controlling the degree of partitioning. As a result, the isotopic composition of water reflects the thermodynamic history of water parcels in the water cycle. Recent advances in cavity ringdown spectrometry allow for the continuous measurement of water vapor isotope compositions, and provide insight into the processes influencing the concentration of near-surface water vapor at high resolution. We used stable water isotopes to investigate the processes controlling water vapor cycling in a deep mountain valley in northwestern Wyoming. A Picarro L2120-i Cavity Ring-Down spectrometer was deployed to measure the isotopic composition of atmospheric water vapor at the University of Michigan Camp Davis Field Station near Jackson, WY for three consecutive summers (2012-2014) and during winter 2013. We also constructed a network of Granier-style sap flux probes to estimate the local transpiration flux from regionally dominant tree species in July 2014. A prominent diurnal cycle was observed during the summer that was mostly absent in the winter. Summer specific humidity, δD, δ18O, and sap flux all reach daily maximum values in the mid-to-late morning that we associate with the onset of transpiration. The mountain valley is capped by an inversion, which limits atmospheric mixing during the morning. After the breakup of the inversion, the atmospheric boundary layer develops quickly and results in decreases in near-surface specific humidity and δ18O. δD appears to be less affected following the inversion breakup, resulting in a strong diurnal cycle in d-excess. Specific humidity, δD, and δ18O all return to their morning values rapidly near sunset, marking the cessation of mixing and atmospheric stratification. This absence of this diurnal cycle in the winter is consistent with reduced transpiration and atmospheric mixing anticipated for the

  11. Water Footprint and Life Cycle Assessment as approaches to assess potential impacts of products on water consumption: Key learning points from pilot studies on tea and margarine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jefferies, D.; Muñoz, I.; Hodges, J.; King, V.J.; Martinez-Aldaya, Maite; Ercin, Ertug; Milá i Canals, L.; Hoekstra, Arjen Ysbert

    2012-01-01

    Water accounting and environmental impact assessment across the product's life cycle is gaining prominence. This paper presents two case studies of applying the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) and Water Footprint (WF) approaches to tea and margarine. The WF, excluding grey water, of a carton of 50 g tea

  12. Water Footprint and Life Cycle Assessment as approaches to assess potential impacts of products on water consumption: Key learning points from pilot studies on tea and margarine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jefferies, D.; Muñoz, I.; Hodges, J.; King, V.J.; Aldaya, M.M.; Ercin, A.E.; Milá i Canals, L.; Hoekstra, A.Y.

    2012-01-01

    Water accounting and environmental impact assessment across the product's life cycle is gaining prominence. This paper presents two case studies of applying the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) and Water Footprint (WF) approaches to tea and margarine. The WF, excluding grey water, of a carton of 50 g tea

  13. Global Water Cycle Agreement in the Climate Models Assessed in the IPCC AR4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waliser, D.; Seo, K. -W.; Schubert, S.; Njoku, E.

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the fidelity of the global water cycle in the climate model simulations assessed in the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report. The results demonstrate good model agreement in quantities that have had a robust global observational basis and that are physically unambiguous. The worst agreement occurs for quantities that have both poor observational constraints and whose model representations can be physically ambiguous. In addition, components involving water vapor (frozen water) typically exhibit the best (worst) agreement, and fluxes typically exhibit better agreement than reservoirs. These results are discussed in relation to the importance of obtaining accurate model representation of the water cycle and its role in climate change. Recommendations are also given for facilitating the needed model improvements.

  14. Evaluation of MODIS Vegetation Products in Regions of Complex Terrain and Monsoon Climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebremichael, M.; Barros, A. P.

    2004-12-01

    An evaluation of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) vegetation products through comparison against independent surface observations is essential to establish quantitative measures of uncertainty and the confidence level of these satellite-based products for use in land-data assimilation models, for land-use change detection and attribution studies, and for process oriented research. Here, we focus specifically on Photosynthesis and Primary Productivity, Leaf Area Index (LAI) and Fraction of Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FPAR), Land Surface Temperature and Emissivity, and Evapotranspiration data sets. Our objective is to perform extensive quantitative assessment of the accuracy and statistical properties of these products against independent estimates in tropical mountainous regions at two climatologically distinct sites. The first site, the Sonora river basin in northern Mexico, is a semi-arid region characterized by complex topography and highly heterogeneous vegetation cover, which exhibits dramatic and fast response to rainfall forcing at the onset of the North-American Monsoon. The second site, the Marsyandi river basin in central Nepal, is a humid region characterized by strong ecohydrological gradients on steep orography, which remain generally stable subsequent to the onset of the Indian Monsoon. Atmospheric soundings, flux tower measurements, and raingauge observations are available for both sites. We evaluate the MODIS products in two ways: 1) comparison with tower-based observations, and 2) evaluation of hydrological response and diurnal cycles of surface water and energy budgets prior, during and post monsoon onset as simulated by a 3D hydroecological model with assimilation of MODIS data. Statistical analysis of the scaling behavior of the variables, both in space and time, is also performed to address the scale discrepancy between flux tower observations and the resolution of MODIS data.

  15. Life cycle assessment of water reuse systems in an industrial park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Le; Liu, Xin; Liu, Xuewei; Yuan, Zengwei; Zhang, Qiong

    2013-11-15

    The rapid development of industrial parks in China has resulted in large resource consumption and pollutant emissions, especially freshwater use and wastewater discharge. Water reuse has attracted much attention from governments because of its potential to conserve freshwater and reduce pollutant emissions. However, water reuse usually means adding advanced treatment which consumes chemicals, materials and energy. Is the water reuse beneficial for the environment from a life cycle perspective? To answer this question, we quantified the environmental impacts of reusing treated wastewater at industrial parks under different scenarios through a comparative life-cycle assessment (LCA). Four scenarios are assessed: wastewater is treated and discharged, 20% and 99% of wastewater is treated and reused as industrial process water, and treated wastewater is used for horticulture. Inventory data were mainly obtained from a facility which manages the wastewater treatment and reuse system of an industrial park in Jiangsu Province. Environmental impacts were evaluated using the CML2001 method built into the GaBi version 4.3 database. The results show the water reuse is beneficial and the reuse rate significantly affects environmental performance of the system. It is also found that using the reclaimed water for higher value applications results in larger environmental credit. Decision makers in water management should consider both water quantity and quality and associated environmental impacts for different water reuse applications.

  16. Halogenated methanesulfonic acids: A new class of organic micropollutants in the water cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahn, Daniel; Frömel, Tobias; Knepper, Thomas P

    2016-09-15

    Mobile and persistent organic micropollutants may impact raw and drinking waters and are thus of concern for human health. To identify such possible substances of concern nineteen water samples from five European countries (France, Switzerland, The Netherlands, Spain and Germany) and different compartments of the water cycle (urban effluent, surface water, ground water and drinking water) were enriched with mixed-mode solid phase extraction. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography - high resolution mass spectrometry non-target screening of these samples led to the detection and structural elucidation of seven novel organic micropollutants. One structure could already be confirmed by a reference standard (trifluoromethanesulfonic acid) and six were tentatively identified based on experimental evidence (chloromethanesulfonic acid, dichloromethanesulfonic acid, trichloromethanesulfonic acid, bromomethanesulfonic acid, dibromomethanesulfonic acid and bromochloromethanesulfonic acid). Approximated concentrations for these substances show that trifluoromethanesulfonic acid, a chemical registered under the European Union regulation REACH with a production volume of more than 100 t/a, is able to spread along the water cycle and may be present in concentrations up to the μg/L range. Chlorinated and brominated methanesulfonic acids were predominantly detected together which indicates a common source and first experimental evidence points towards water disinfection as a potential origin. Halogenated methanesulfonic acids were detected in drinking waters and thus may be new substances of concern.

  17. Early warnings and missed alarms for abrupt monsoon transitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. A. Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Palaeo-records from China (Cheng et al., 2009; Wang et al., 2008, 2001 demonstrate the East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM is dominated by abrupt and large magnitude monsoon shifts on millennial timescales, switching between periods of high and weak monsoon rains. It has been hypothesised that over these timescales, the EASM exhibits two stable states with bifurcation-type tipping points between them (Schewe et al., 2012. Here we test this hypothesis by looking for early warning signals of past bifurcations in speleothem records from Sanbao Cave and Hulu Cave, China (Wang et al., 2008, 2001, spanning the penultimate glacial cycle, and in multiple model simulations derived from the data. We find hysteresis behaviour in our model simulations with transitions directly forced by solar insolation. We detect critical slowing down prior to an abrupt monsoon shift during the penultimate deglaciation consistent with long-term orbital forcing. However, such signals are only detectable when the change in system stability is sufficiently slow to be detected by the sampling resolution of the dataset, raising the possibility that the alarm was missed and a similar forcing drove earlier EASM shifts.

  18. Life Cycle Assessment of Slop Water Management in Challenging Offshore Drilling Operations

    OpenAIRE

    Okiemute, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Offshore oil and gas drilling operations generates slop water, which are formed when wastewater originating from multiple sources becomes contaminated with drilling fluid components and have to be disposed or treated prior to discharge in compliance with local discharge regulations. The logistics and treatment of slop water have been suggested to represent a significant part of the life-cycle environmental footprint of offshore drilling operations but poorly understood due to lac...

  19. Ocean water cycle: its recent amplification and impact on ocean circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradova, Nadya

    2016-04-01

    Oceans are the largest reservoir of the world's water supply, accounting for 97% of the Earth's water and supplying more than 75% of the evaporated and precipitated water in the global water cycle. Therefore, in order to predict the future of the global hydrological cycle, it is essential to understand the changes in its largest component, which is the flux of freshwater over the oceans. Here we examine the change in the ocean water cycle and the ocean's response to such changes that were happening during the last two decades. The analysis is based on a data-constrained ocean state estimate that synthesizes all of the information available in the surface fluxes, winds, observations of sea level, temperature, salinity, geoid, etc., as well as in the physical constraints, dynamics, and conservation statements that are embedded in the equations of the MIT general circulation model. Closeness to observations and dynamical consistency of the solution ensures a physically realistic correspondence between the atmospheric forcing and oceanic fluxes, including the ocean's response to freshwater input. The results show a robust pattern of change in the ocean water cycle in the last twenty years. The pattern of changes indicates a general tendency of drying of the subtropics, and wetting in the tropics and mid-to-high latitudes, following the "rich get richer and the poor get poorer" paradigm in many ocean regions. Using a closed property budget analysis, we then investigate the changes in the oceanic state (salinity, temperature, sea level) during the same twenty-year period. The results are discussed in terms of the origin of surface signatures, and differentiated between those that are attributed to short-term natural variability and those that result from an intensified hydrological cycle due to warming climate.

  20. Monsoon dynamics over the past millennium on the southern-central Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlborn, Marieke; Haberzettl, Torsten; Kasper, Thomas; Henkel, Karoline; Doberschütz, Stefan; Daut, Gerhard; Reinwarth, Bastian; Ju, Jianting; Wang, Junbo; Zhu, Liping; Mäusbacher, Roland

    2013-04-01

    The Tibetan Plateau has experienced abrupt climate change superimposed by a gradual weakening of the summer monsoon systems during the Holocene. Although lake sediment records from the Tibetan Plateau are considered to be particularly sensitive to climate variations a holistic picture of the spatial and temporal monsoon evolution is still lacking due to the interplay of different moisture-transporting wind systems (Indian summer monsoon, East Asian summer monsoon, Westerlies). Closing this data gap is important since the Tibetan Plateau is a key area for understanding the climate evolution and its impact on the availability of current and future water resources in Central Asia. Hence, well-dated and high-resolution records are essential to improve the understanding of the spatial and temporal monsoonal evolution. To investigate the hydrological cycle indicating past monsoon variability on the southern-central Tibetan Plateau, records of several lakes were studied along an E-W-transect including Nam Co, Tangra Yumco, Taro Co and a small lake named TT Lake. In this study, a high-resolution sediment record from TT Lake (31.10° N, 86.57° E; 4,745 m asl) was investigated to reveal monsoonal dynamics and northern hemispheric climate oscillations over the past millennium. The 9 m deep TT Lake has a surface area of ~14,500 sqm and is located ~1,500 m west and 205 m above the recent western shoreline of Tangra Yumco. Terraces of former lake level highstands indicate that the TT Lake was part of the Tangra Yumco, but the timing remains unknown. Three sediment gravity cores, obtained in 2011 and 2012, were investigated with geochemical and sedimentological methods. By now a sedimentological core description, magnetic susceptibility data, radiocarbon age determinations, XRF scanning data, and grain size data are available. Further bio-geochemical as well as magnetostratigraphic analyses are in progress. The sedimentological description of the 50 to 89 cm long cores revealed

  1. Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. E. Shropshire

    2009-01-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Program’s understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear power’s cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-iradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

  2. A hybrid water-splitting cycle using copper sulfate and mixed copper oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, J. D.; Remick, R. J.; Foh, S. E.; Mazumder, M. M.

    1980-01-01

    The Institute of Gas Technology has derived and developed a hybrid thermochemical water-splitting cycle based on mixed copper oxides and copper sulfate. Similar to other metal oxide-metal sulfate cycles that use a metal oxide to 'concentrate' electrolytically produced sulfuric acid, this cycle offers the advantage of producing oxygen (to be vented) and sulfur dioxide (to be recycled) in separate steps, thereby eliminating the need of another step to separate these gases. The conceptual process flow-sheet efficiency of the cycle promises to exceed 50%. It has been completely demonstrated in the laboratory with recycled materials. Research in the electrochemical oxidation of sulfur dioxide to produce sulfuric acid and hydrogen performed at IGT indicates that the cell performance goals of 200 mA/sq cm at 0.5 V will be attainable using relatively inexpensive electrode materials.

  3. Life cycle assessment of water supply alternatives in water-receiving areas of the South-to-North Water Diversion Project in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Xiong, Wei; Zhang, Wenlong; Wang, Chao; Wang, Peifang

    2016-02-01

    To alleviate the water shortage in northern China, the Chinese government launched the world's largest water diversion project, the South-to-North Water Diversion Project (SNWDP), which delivers water from water-sufficient southern China to water-deficient northern China. However, an up-to-date study has not been conducted to determine whether the project is a favorable option to augment the water supply from an environmental perspective. The life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology integrated with a freshwater withdrawal category (FWI) was adopted to compare water supply alternatives in the water-receiving areas of the SNWDP, i.e., water diversion, wastewater reclamation and seawater desalination. Beijing, Tianjin, Jinan and Qingdao were studied as representative cities because they are the primary water-receiving areas of the SNWDP. The results revealed that the operation phase played the dominant role in all but one of the life cycle impact categories considered and contributed to more than 70% of their scores. For Beijing and Tianjin, receiving water through the SNWDP is the most sustainable option to augment the water supply. The result can be drawn in all of the water-receiving areas of the middle route of the SNWDP. For Jinan and Qingdao, the most sustainable option is the wastewater reclamation system. The seawater desalination system obtains the highest score of the standard impact indicators in all of the study areas, whereas it is the most favorable water supply option when considering the freshwater withdrawal impact. Although the most sustainable water supply alternative was recommended through an LCA analysis, multi-water resources should be integrated into the region's water supply from the perspective of water sustainability. The results of this study provide a useful recommendation on the management of water resources for China.

  4. Introduction of Huaihe River Basin Energy and Water Cycle Experiment and Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou X.G.; Luo Y.F.

    2004-01-01

    @@ Huaihe River Basin Energy and Water Cycle Experiment and Research (HUBEX), as one of the Ninth Five-Year Plan (1996-2000) Major Programs supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC), successfully passed the check-up and won high appraisement from the experts.

  5. Introduction of Huaihe River Basin Energy and Water Cycle Experiment and Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou; X.G.; Luo; Y.F.

    2004-01-01

      Huaihe River Basin Energy and Water Cycle Experiment and Research (HUBEX), as one of the Ninth Five-Year Plan (1996-2000) Major Programs supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC), successfully passed the check-up and won high appraisement from the experts.……

  6. Energy and water cycle over the Tibetan plateau : surface energy balance and turbulent heat fluxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, Zhongbo; Zhang, Ting; Ma, Yaoming; Jia, Li; Wen, Jun

    2006-01-01

    This contribution presents an overview and an outlook of studies on energy and water cycle over the Tibetan plateau with focuses on the estimation of energy balance terms and turbulent heat fluxes. On the basis of the surface energy balance calculations, we show that the phenomena of the energy imba

  7. Energy and water cycle over the Tibetan Plateau: surface energy balance and turbulent heat fluxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, Z.; Zhang, T.; Ma, Y.; Jia, L.; Wen, J.

    2006-01-01

    This contribution presents an overview and an outlook of studies on energy and water cycle over the Tibetan plateau with focuses on the estimation of energy balance terms and turbulent heat fluxes. On the basis of the surface energy balance calculations, we show that the phenomena of the energy imba

  8. Economic comparison of hydrogen production using sulfuric acid electrolysis and sulfur cycle water decomposition. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farbman, G.H.; Krasicki, B.R.; Hardman, C.C.; Lin, S.S.; Parker, G.H.

    1978-06-01

    An evaluation of the relative economics of hydrogen production using two advanced techniques was performed. The hydrogen production systems considered were the Westinghouse Sulfur Cycle Water Decomposition System and a water electrolysis system employing a sulfuric acid electrolyte. The former is a hybrid system in which hydrogen is produced in an electrolyzer which uses sulfur dioxide to depolarize the anode. The electrolyte is sulfuric acid. Development and demonstration efforts have shown that extremely low cell voltages can be achieved. The second system uses a similar sulfuric acid electrolyte technology in water electrolysis cells. The comparative technoeconomics of hydrogen produced by the hybrid Sulfur Cycle and by water electrolysis using a sulfuric acid electrolyte were determined by assessing the performance and economics of 380 million SCFD plants, each energized by a very high temperature nuclear reactor (VHTR). The evaluation concluded that the overall efficiencies of hydrogen production, for operating parameters that appear reasonable for both systems, are approximately 41% for the sulfuric acid electrolysis and 47% for the hybrid Sulfur Cycle. The economic evaluation of hydrogen production, based on a 1976 cost basis and assuming a developed technology for both hydrogen production systems and the VHTRs, indicated that the hybrid Sulfur Cycle could generate hydrogen for a total cost approximately 6 to 7% less than the cost from the sulfuric acid electrolysis plant.

  9. CHLORINATION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER AND MENSTRUAL CYCLE FUNCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlorination by-Products in Drinking Water and Menstrual Cycle FunctionGayle C. Windham1, Kirsten Waller2, Meredith Anderson2, Laura Fenster1, Pauline Mendola3, Shanna Swan41California Department of Health Services, Division of Environmental and Occupational Disea...

  10. CHLORINATION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER AND MENSTRUAL CYCLE FUNCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlorination by-Products in Drinking Water and Menstrual Cycle FunctionGayle C. Windham1, Kirsten Waller2, Meredith Anderson2, Laura Fenster1, Pauline Mendola3, Shanna Swan41California Department of Health Services, Division of Environmental and Occupational Disea...

  11. Modeling the historical water cycle of the Copenhagen Area 1850-2003

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Jan; Christensen, Steen; Ladekarl, Ulla Lyngs

    2011-01-01

    , and the interactions between these subsystems. The utilities are used to simulate the water cycle in the Copenhagen area (976 km2) during the period 1850–2003. Long-term time series of hydraulic head, streamflow, and inflow to sewage works have been used to manually calibrate the model parameters. We used a step...

  12. Cultural politics and the hydrosocial cycle: Water, power and identity in the Andean highlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelens, R.A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores interactions among water, power and cultural politics in the Andes. It analyzes the hydrosocial cycle as the political–ecological production of a time- and place-specific socionature, enrolling and co-patterning the social, the natural and the supernatural to reflect dominant int

  13. Orbital pacing and ocean circulation-induced collapses of the Mesoamerican monsoon over the past 22,000 y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachniet, Matthew S; Asmerom, Yemane; Bernal, Juan Pablo; Polyak, Victor J; Vazquez-Selem, Lorenzo

    2013-06-04

    The dominant controls on global paleomonsoon strength include summer insolation driven by precession cycles, ocean circulation through its influence on atmospheric circulation, and sea-surface temperatures. However, few records from the summer North American Monsoon system are available to test for a synchronous response with other global monsoons to shared forcings. In particular, the monsoon response to widespread atmospheric reorganizations associated with disruptions of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) during the deglacial period remains unconstrained. Here, we present a high-resolution and radiometrically dated monsoon rainfall reconstruction over the past 22,000 y from speleothems of tropical southwestern Mexico. The data document an active Last Glacial Maximum (18-24 cal ka B.P.) monsoon with similar δ(18)O values to the modern, and that the monsoon collapsed during periods of weakened AMOC during Heinrich stadial 1 (ca. 17 ka) and the Younger Dryas (12.9-11.5 ka). The Holocene was marked by a trend to a weaker monsoon that was paced by orbital insolation. We conclude that the Mesoamerican monsoon responded in concert with other global monsoon regions, and that monsoon strength was driven by variations in the strength and latitudinal position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone, which was forced by AMOC variations in the North Atlantic Ocean. The surprising observation of an active Last Glacial Maximum monsoon is attributed to an active but shallow AMOC and proximity to the Intertropical Convergence Zone. The emergence of agriculture in southwestern Mexico was likely only possible after monsoon strengthening in the Early Holocene at ca. 11 ka.

  14. INTENSITY INDEX OF SOUTH CHINA SEA MONSOON AND ITS VARIATION CHARACTERISTICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴尚森; 梁建茵

    2002-01-01

    According to the basic characteristics of the activities of summer monsoon in the South China Sea,a standardized index,, has been designed that integrates a dynamic factor (southwesterly component) and a thermodynamic factor (OLR) for the indication of summer monsoon in the South China Sea.With the index determined for individual months of June,July and August and the entire summertime from 1975 to 1999,specific months and years are indicated that are either strong or weak in monsoon intensity.The variation is studied for the patterns and 's relationship is revealed with the onset of summer monsoon and the precipitation in Guangdong province and China.The results show that there are quasi-10 and quasi-3-4 year cycles in the interannual variation of the monsoon over the past 25 years.When it has an early (late) onset,the summer monsoon is usually strong (weak).In the strong (weak) monsoon years,precipitation tends to be more (less) in the first raining season of the year but normal or less (normal) in the second,in the province,but it would be more (less) in northeastern China and most parts of the northern China and south of the lower reaches of the Changjiang River and less (more) in the middle and lower reaches of the river,western part of northern China and western China.

  15. Evaluation of fuel fabrication and the back end of the fuel cycle for light-water- and heavy-water-cooled nuclear power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, W.L.; Olsen, A.R.

    1979-06-01

    The classification of water-cooled nuclear reactors offers a number of fuel cycles that present inherently low risk of weapons proliferation while making power available to the international community. Eight fuel cycles in light water reactor (LWR), heavy water reactor (HWR), and the spectral shift controlled reactor (SSCR) systems have been proposed to promote these objectives in the International Fuel Cycle Evaluation (INFCE) program. Each was examined in an effort to provide technical and economic data to INFCE on fuel fabrication, refabrication, and reprocessing for an initial comparison of alternate cycles. The fuel cycles include three once-through cycles that require only fresh fuel fabrication, shipping, and spent fuel storage; four cycles that utilize denatured uranium--thorium and require all recycle operations; and one cycle that considers the LWR--HWR tandem operation requiring refabrication but no reprocessing.

  16. Application of solar hot water and geothermal principles to closed-cycle aquaculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanzito, R. A.

    1981-04-01

    The design of an underground silo where warm water food fish could be raised to market size under controlled conditions. The building and solar concept analysis for the closed cycle aquaculture system are described. Energy conservation features of the design include Earth berming and insulation of the production silo and enclosure, a waste water reclaim system and a solar heating system. Much of the water surface area is covered with removable plants to minimize evaporative heat losses. An energy conservation analysis is also reported and the F-Chart computer program is described. The system chosen utilizes single glazed flat plate collectors in a closed loop antifreeze system. Makeup water is introduced during an 8 hour period each day. Solar energy is transferred from the antifreeze solution to the makeup water after it leaves the waste water heat exchanger.

  17. Life-cycle Energy Consumption of Urban Water System in Shenzhen, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W.; Liu, H.

    2015-12-01

    Within rapid urbanization and industrialization, Shenzhen, the first special economic zone in China, has been facing serious water shortage. More than 80% of water demand in Shenzhen, i.e., about 1.6 billion m3/yr, is satisfied by water diversion projects. A lot of energy has been used to extract, clean, store and transmit these water. In this paper, energy consumption of urban water system in Shenzhen, China was investigated from a life cycle perspective, and the water system can be divided into five subsystems, i.e., water diversion, water production & supply, household water use, sewage treatment and water reuse. Industrial water use was not considered here, because industrial production processes were so varied. The results showed that water diversion subsystem in Shenzhen consumed electricity of about 0.839 billion kWh/yr (0.53 kWh/m3), water production & supply subsystem about 1.241 billion kWh/yr (0.64 kWh/m3), household water use subsystem about 6.57 billion kWh/yr (9.65 kWh/m3) sewage treatment subsystem about 0.449 billion kWh/yr (0.29 kWh/m3) and water reuse treatment subsystem about 0.013 billion kWh/yr (0.33kWh/m3). So the human-related water system in Shenzhen consumes electricity of about 9.113 billion kWh/yr in total, accounting for about 11.0% of all the electricity use in Shenzhen. Among this, household water use subsystem consumed up to 72.1% of all electricity used in urban water system, followed by water production & supply subsystem (13.6%), water diversion subsystem (9.2%) and sewage treatment and reuse subsystem (5.1%). Unit energy consumption of sewage treatment and reuse subsystem was much less than that of water diversion subsystem, indicating local sewage resource development was advantageous on saving energy to water diversion from a long distance. Further, it implied that the best way to save energy in urban water system is to save portable water, since both water production and household use require to consume much energy.

  18. Determination of summer monsoon onset and its related large-scale circulation characteristics over Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, M.; Syed, F. S.

    2016-08-01

    The onset of summer monsoon over the Core Monsoon Region of Pakistan (CMRP) has been investigated in this study using observational daily rainfall and Precipitable Water (PW) data sets. An objective criterion is proposed to define monsoon onset dates by employing Precipitation Index and Normalized Precipitable Water Index techniques. The climatological mean summer monsoon onset dates over CMRP based on daily rainfall data sets are observed to be 1 July and 30 June in the station and gridded data sets, respectively. Whereas the daily PW-based climatological mean onset date is 30 June. The year-wise onset dates determined through station and gridded rainfall data sets are very similar but these dates differ in case of PW-based onsets. The evolution of large-scale circulation anomalies and thermodynamic structure leading monsoon onset over Pakistan shows that a strong positive temperature and geopotential height anomalies appear over the northwestern part of the core region in the upper atmosphere. This warm geopotential height anomaly gets strengthen as the monsoon onset approaches. The temperature anomalies are barotropic whereas the geopotential height anomalies are baroclinic with the presence of low level anticyclone over the Tibetan Plateau. A moisture convergence zone along the foothill of Himalayas and low level moisture convergence zone over the north Arabian Sea set the stage for the moisture carrying monsoon winds to blow inland towards CMRP. The moisture is mainly supplied from the Arabian Sea, as the low pressure system approaches CMRP from the Bay of Bengal.

  19. Effect of cold water immersion on repeated 1-km cycling performance in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiffer, Jeremiah J; Abbiss, Chris R; Watson, Greig; Nosaka, Kazunori; Laursen, Paul B

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effect of a short cold water immersion (CWI) intervention on rectal and muscle temperature, isokinetic strength and 1-km cycling time trial performance in the heat. Ten male cyclists performed a 1-km time trial at 35.0+/-0.3 degrees C and 40.0+/-3.0% relative humidity, followed by 20 min recovery sitting in either cold water (14 degrees C) for 5 min or in 35 degrees C air (control); a second 1-km time trial immediately followed. Peak and mean cycling power output were recorded for both time trials. Rectal and muscle temperature, and maximal isokinetic concentric torque of the knee extensors were measured before and immediately after the first and second time trials. Rectal temperature was not different between cold water immersion and control conditions at any time points. After the second time trial, however, muscle temperature was significantly lower (-1.3+/-0.7 degrees C) in cold water immersion compared with the control trial. While peak and mean power decreased from the first to second time trial in both conditions (-86+/-54 W and -24+/-16 W, respectively), maximal isokinetic concentric torque was similar between conditions at all time points. The 5 min cold water immersion intervention lowered muscle temperature but did not affect isokinetic strength or 1-km cycling performance. Copyright (c) 2008 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Importance of Rain Evaporation and Continental Convection in the Tropical Water Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worden, John; Noone, David; Bowman, Kevin; Beer, R.; Eldering, A.; Fisher, B.; Gunson, M.; Goldman, Aaron; Kulawik, S. S.; Lampel, Michael; Osterman, Gregory; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Rogders, Clive; Sander, Stanley; Shepard, Mark; Webster, Christopher R.; Worden, H. M.

    2007-01-01

    Atmospheric moisture cycling is an important aspect of the Earth's climate system, yet the processes determining atmospheric humidity are poorly understood. For example, direct evaporation of rain contributes significantly to the heat and moisture budgets of clouds, but few observations of these processes are available. Similarly, the relative contributions to atmospheric moisture over land from local evaporation and humidity from oceanic sources are uncertain. Lighter isotopes of water vapour preferentially evaporate whereas heavier isotopes preferentially condense and the isotopic composition of ocean water is known. Here we use this information combined with global measurements of the isotopic composition of tropospheric water vapour from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) aboard the Aura spacecraft, to investigate aspects of the atmospheric hydrological cycle that are not well constrained by observations of precipitation or atmospheric vapour content. Our measurements of the isotopic composition of water vapour near tropical clouds suggest that rainfall evaporation contributes significantly to lower troposphere humidity, with typically 20% and up to 50% of rainfall evaporating near convective clouds. Over the tropical continents the isotopic signature of tropospheric water vapour differs significantly from that of precipitation, suggesting that convection of vapour from both oceanic sources and evapotranspiration are the dominant moisture sources. Our measurements allow an assessment of the intensity of the present hydrological cycle and will help identify any future changes as they occur.

  1. Exploring water cycle dynamics by sampling multiple stable water isotope pools in a developed landscape in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlowski, Natalie; Kraft, Philipp; Pferdmenges, Jakob; Breuer, Lutz

    2016-09-01

    A dual stable water isotope (δ2H and δ18O) study was conducted in the developed (managed) landscape of the Schwingbach catchment (Germany). The 2-year weekly to biweekly measurements of precipitation, stream, and groundwater isotopes revealed that surface and groundwater are isotopically disconnected from the annual precipitation cycle but showed bidirectional interactions between each other. Apparently, snowmelt played a fundamental role for groundwater recharge explaining the observed differences to precipitation δ values. A spatially distributed snapshot sampling of soil water isotopes at two soil depths at 52 sampling points across different land uses (arable land, forest, and grassland) revealed that topsoil isotopic signatures were similar to the precipitation input signal. Preferential water flow paths occurred under forested soils, explaining the isotopic similarities between top- and subsoil isotopic signatures. Due to human-impacted agricultural land use (tilling and compression) of arable and grassland soils, water delivery to the deeper soil layers was reduced, resulting in significant different isotopic signatures. However, the land use influence became less pronounced with depth and soil water approached groundwater δ values. Seasonally tracing stable water isotopes through soil profiles showed that the influence of new percolating soil water decreased with depth as no remarkable seasonality in soil isotopic signatures was obvious at depths > 0.9 m and constant values were observed through space and time. Since classic isotope evaluation methods such as transfer-function-based mean transit time calculations did not provide a good fit between the observed and calculated data, we established a hydrological model to estimate spatially distributed groundwater ages and flow directions within the Vollnkirchener Bach subcatchment. Our model revealed that complex age dynamics exist within the subcatchment and that much of the runoff must has been stored

  2. The Martian hydrologic cycle - Effects of CO2 mass flux on global water distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, P. B.

    1985-01-01

    The Martian CO2 cycle, which includes the seasonal condensation and subsequent sublimation of up to 30 percent of the planet's atmosphere, produces meridional winds due to the consequent mass flux of CO2. These winds currently display strong seasonal and hemispheric asymmetries due to the large asymmetries in the distribution of insolation on Mars. It is proposed that asymmetric meridional advection of water vapor on the planet due to these CO2 condensation winds is capable of explaining the observed dessication of Mars' south polar region at the current time. A simple model for water vapor transport is used to verify this hypothesis and to speculate on the effects of changes in orbital parameters on the seasonal water cycle.

  3. The Conceptual Design of an Integrated Nuclearhydrogen Production Plant Using the Sulfur Cycle Water Decomposition System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farbman, G. H.

    1976-01-01

    A hydrogen production plant was designed based on a hybrid electrolytic-thermochemical process for decomposing water. The sulfur cycle water decomposition system is driven by a very high temperature nuclear reactor that provides 1,283 K helium working gas. The plant is sized to approximately ten million standard cubic meters per day of electrolytically pure hydrogen and has an overall thermal efficiently of 45.2 percent. The economics of the plant were evaluated using ground rules which include a 1974 cost basis without escalation, financing structure and other economic factors. Taking into account capital, operation, maintenance and nuclear fuel cycle costs, the cost of product hydrogen was calculated at $5.96/std cu m for utility financing. These values are significantly lower than hydrogen costs from conventional water electrolysis plants and competitive with hydrogen from coal gasification plants.

  4. Linking carbon and water cycles using stable isotopes across scales: progress and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Werner

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Stable isotope analysis is a powerful tool for tracing biogeochemical processes in the carbon and water cycles. One particularly powerful approach is to employ multiple isotopes where the simultaneous assessment of the D/H,18O/16O and/or 13C/12C in different compounds provide a unique means to investigate the coupling of water and carbon fluxes at various temporal and spatial scales. Here, we present a research update on recent advances in our process-based understanding of the utilization of carbon, oxygen and hydrogen isotopes to lend insight into carbon and water cycling. We highlight recent technological developments and approaches, their strengths and methodological precautions with examples covering scales from minutes to centuries and from the leaf to the globe.

  5. The Seasonal Cycle of Water Vapour on Mars from Assimilation of Thermal Emission Spectrometer Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Liam J.; Lewis, Stephen R.; Patel, Manish R.; Montmessin, Franck; Forget, Francois; Smith, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    We present for the first time an assimilation of Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) water vapour column data into a Mars global climate model (MGCM). We discuss the seasonal cycle of water vapour, the processes responsible for the observed water vapour distribution, and the cross-hemispheric water transport. The assimilation scheme is shown to be robust in producing consistent reanalyses, and the global water vapour column error is reduced to around 2-4 pr micron depending on season. Wave activity is shown to play an important role in the water vapour distribution, with topographically steered flows around the Hellas and Argyre basins acting to increase transport in these regions in all seasons. At high northern latitudes, zonal wavenumber 1 and 2 stationary waves during northern summer are responsible for spreading the sublimed water vapour away from the pole. Transport by the zonal wavenumber 2 waves occurs primarily to the west of Tharsis and Arabia Terra and, combined with the effects of western boundary currents, this leads to peak water vapour column abundances here as observed by numerous spacecraft. A net transport of water to the northern hemisphere over the course of one Mars year is calculated, primarily because of the large northwards flux of water vapour which occurs during the local dust storm around L(sub S) = 240-260deg. Finally, outlying frost deposits that surround the north polar cap are shown to be important in creating the peak water vapour column abundances observed during northern summer.

  6. Relationship Between East Asian Winter Monsoon and Summer Monsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Hongming; YANG Hui; YUAN Yuan; LI Chongyin

    2011-01-01

    Using National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Centre for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalysis data and monthly Hadley Center sea surface temperature (SST) data,and selecting a representative East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM) index,this study investigated the relationship between EAWM and East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) using statistical analyses and numerical simulations.Some possible mechanisms regarding this relationship were also explored.Results indicate a close relationship between EAWM and EASM:a strong EAWM led to a strong EASM in the following summer,and a weak EAWM led to a weak EASM in the following summer.Anomalous EAWM has persistent impacts on the variation of SST in the tropical Indian Ocean and the South China Sea,and on the equatorial atmospheric thermal anomalies at both lower and upper levels.Through these impacts,the EAWM influences the land-sea thermal contrast in summer and the low-level atmospheric divergence and convergence over the Indo-Pacific region.It further affects the meridional monsoon circulation and other features of the EASM.Numerical simulations support the results of diagnostic analysis.The study provides useful information for predicting the EASM by analyzing the variations of preceding EAWM and tropical SST.

  7. Quantitative stability analyses of multiwall carbon nanotube nanofluids following water/ice phase change cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivall, Jason; Langlois-Rahme, Gabriel; Coulombe, Sylvain; Servio, Phillip

    2017-02-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotube nanofluids are regularly investigated for phase change enhancement between liquid and solid states owing to their improved heat transfer properties. The potential applications are numerous, the most notable being latent heat thermal energy storage, but the success of all nanofluid-assisted technologies hinges greatly on the ability of nanoparticles to remain stably dispersed after repeated phase change cycles. In this report, the stability of aqueous nanofluids made from oxygen-functionalized multiwall carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs) was profiled over the course of 20 freeze/thaw cycles. Sonication was used after each cycle to re-disperse clusters formed from the crystallization process. This study offers a quantitative evaluation of f-MWCNT-nanofluid stability as a result of phase change through optical characterization of concentration and particle size. It also provides insight into the integrity of the surface functionalities through zeta potential and XPS analyses. Concentration and particle size measurements showed moderate and consistent recoverability of f-MWCNT dispersion following ultrasonication. XPS measurements of solid-state MWCNTs exposed to freeze/thaw cycling in water, and zeta potential analyses of the nanofluids indicate that the surface oxygen content is preserved throughout phase change and over repeated cycles. These results suggest a resilience of oxygen-functionalized MWCNTs to the freezing and thawing of water, which is ideal for their utilization as phase change enhancers.

  8. Soil Salinity Controls on Water and Carbon Cycling by Sunflower Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runkle, B.; Liang, X.; Dracup, J.; Hao, F.; Zeng, A.; Zhang, J.; He, B.; Oki, T.

    2007-12-01

    Agricultural effects on water cycling are of great importance for regional water resources management. These effects vary based on local soil and climate conditions, and are particularly modulated by high soil salinity levels, which stress plant growth and change their water use efficiency. Increasing salinization is predicted under hotter, drier conditions resulting from global climate change and from increased societal pressure on agricultural lands. This increased ionic presence creates a higher soil osmotic pressure that increases the resistance to water flow through the plant. This change also impacts the assimilation of carbon dioxide through the stomatal opening, and so affects rates of both photosynthesis and transpiration. Current agricultural and land-surface models that account for salinity do so in an overly empirical manner that cannot account for changes at different time scales in meteorological conditions. They tend to be ill equipped to examine how changing carbon dioxide levels may modify a plant's response to soil salinity. As a result, we present a new model of soil-vegetation- atmosphere water transfer that explicitly incorporates the role of soil salinity in changing this system's behavior. This model will allow for much greater flexibility in examining how vegetation may change the local water cycle under the joint impacts of both salinity and climate change. This model is supported by field research on the effects of salinity on sunflower plants in a large irrigation district in Inner Mongolia, China. Results presented include the role of salinity in changing stomatal regulation of water use efficiency, sub-canopy changes in leaf pressure, and changes in root activity. Modeling at sub-hourly time scales allows for a more precise understanding of how soil salinity changes the diurnal cycle of plant water use.

  9. The water cycle in the general circulation model of the martian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaposhnikov, D. S.; Rodin, A. V.; Medvedev, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    Within the numerical general-circulation model of the Martian atmosphere MAOAM (Martian Atmosphere: Observation and Modeling), we have developed the water cycle block, which is an essential component of modern general circulation models of the Martian atmosphere. The MAOAM model has a spectral dynamic core and successfully predicts the temperature regime on Mars through the use of physical parameterizations typical of both terrestrial and Martian models. We have achieved stable computation for three Martian years, while maintaining a conservative advection scheme taking into account the water-ice phase transitions, water exchange between the atmosphere and surface, and corrections for the vertical velocities of ice particles due to sedimentation. The studies show a strong dependence of the amount of water that is actively involved in the water cycle on the initial data, model temperatures, and the mechanism of water exchange between the atmosphere and the surface. The general pattern and seasonal asymmetry of the water cycle depends on the size of ice particles, the albedo, and the thermal inertia of the planet's surface. One of the modeling tasks, which results from a comparison of the model data with those of the TES experiment on board Mars Global Surveyor, is the increase in the total mass of water vapor in the model in the aphelion season and decrease in the mass of water ice clouds at the poles. The surface evaporation scheme, which takes into account the turbulent rise of water vapor, on the one hand, leads to the most complete evaporation of ice from the surface in the summer season in the northern hemisphere and, on the other hand, supersaturates the atmosphere with ice due to the vigorous evaporation, which leads to worse consistency between the amount of the precipitated atmospheric ice and the experimental data. The full evaporation of ice from the surface increases the model sensitivity to the size of the polar cap; therefore, the increase in the

  10. A study of implementing In-Cycle-Shuffle strategy to a decommissioning boiling water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chung-Yuan, E-mail: tuckjason@iner.gov.tw; Tung, Wu-Hsiung; Yaur, Shyun-Jung

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • A loading pattern strategy ICS (In-Cycle-Shuffle) was implemented to the last cycle of the boiling water reactor. • The best power sharing distribution and ICS timing was found. • A new parameter “Burnup sharing” is presented to evaluate ICS strategy. - Abstract: In this paper, a loading pattern strategy In-Cycle-Shuffle (ICS) is implemented to the last cycle of the boiling water reactor (BWR) before decommissioning to save the fuel cycle cost. This method needs a core shutdown during the operation of a cycle to change the loading pattern to gain more reactivity. The reactivity model is used to model the ICS strategy in order to find out the best ICS timing and the optimum power sharing distribution before ICS and after ICS. Several parameters of reactivity model are modified and the effect of burnable poison, gadolinium (Gd), is considered in this research. Three cases are presented and it is found that the best ICS timing is at about two-thirds of total cycle length no matter the poisoning effect of Gd is considered or not. According to the optimum power sharing distribution result, it is suggested to decrease the once burnt power and increase the thrice burnt fuel power as much as possible before ICS. After ICS, it is suggested to increase the positive reactivity fuel power and decrease the thrice burnt fuel power as much as possible. A new parameter “Burnup sharing” is presented to evaluate the special case whose EOC power weighting factor and the burnup accumulation factor in the reactivity model are quite different.

  11. Life Cycle Assessment of Ultra-clean Micronized Coal Oil Water Slurry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Ming; Xu Jing

    2009-01-01

    Life cycle assessment is applied to assess the ultra-clean micronized coal oil water slurry (UCMCOWS) with Si-maPro and the environmental impact of UCMCOWS on its whole life cycle is also analyzed. The result shows that the consumption of energy and products are increasing along with the deepening of UCMCOWS processing, UCMCOWS making and combustion arc the two periods which have a bigger impact on eco-system and hu-man health. As a new substitute of fuel, UCMCOWS merits to be utilized more efficiently and reasonably.

  12. Toward a 530,000-year Hydroclimate History for the Southern Half of the Australasian Monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagan, M. K.; Scroxton, N. G.; Kimbrough, A. K.; Krause, C.; Hantoro, W. S.; Ayliffe, L. K.; Dunbar, G. B.; Cheng, H.; Edwards, R. L.; Hellstrom, J. C.; Shen, C. C.; Scott-Gagan, H.; Suwargadi, B. W.; Rifai, H.

    2015-12-01

    Speleothem 18O/16O records have revealed key aspects of past hydroclimates in the northern Australasian monsoon domain on orbital to millennial scales, but much less is known about the southern half of the monsoon system. We aim to develop a hydroclimate history for the southern Australasian monsoon based on speleothems from southwest Sulawesi and Flores, Indonesia (latitudes 5-9oS), which extend back to ~530 kyr BP and 90 kyr BP, respectively. To date, the 18O/16O record for Sulawesi covers glacial terminations TIV (~340 kyr BP), TIII (~245 kyr BP) and TI (~18 kyr BP). The details of each termination are different, however two important hydroclimate patterns are emerging. First, the 18O/16O record shows sharp weakening of the monsoon immediately before each termination. This surprisingly robust pattern marks a southern extension of the northern 'weak monsoon interval', and reinforces the idea that southward monsoon displacement is a fundamental feature of terminations. Second, monsoon intensification around Sulawesi lags the rise in atmospheric CO2 and Antarctic temperature by several thousand years, but parallels the 18O/16O decrease in atmospheric O2. Our finding extends that of Wang et al. (2008) and Cheng et al. (2009) who noted the influence of the low-latitude hydrological cycle on the 18O/16O of tropical transpiration, and its potential for correlating ice core and paleomonsoon records. Further south, the 90-kyr 18O/16O record for Flores shows clear precession-scale antiphasing with China, and southerly positioning of the summer monsoon rainfall belt during Heinrich stadials. Heinrich stadials 5, 4, 2 and 1 occur during wetter intervals in Flores that accompanied relatively high southern summer insolation. Intriguingly, these events are associated with abrupt atmospheric CH4 signals that may be due to increased Southern Hemisphere CH4 production related to intensification of monsoon rainfall over southern tropical land areas (Rhodes et al., 2014).

  13. Water Cycling Between Ocean and Mantle: Super-Earths Need Not be Waterworlds

    CERN Document Server

    Cowan, Nicolas B

    2014-01-01

    Large terrestrial planets are expected to have muted topography and deep oceans, implying that most super-Earths should be entirely covered in water, so-called waterworlds. This is important because waterworlds lack a silicate weathering thermostat so their climate is predicted to be less stable than that of planets with exposed continents. In other words, the continuously habitable zone for waterworlds is much narrower than for Earth-like planets. A planet's water is partitioned, however, between a surface reservoir, the ocean, and an interior reservoir, the mantle. Plate tectonics transports water between these reservoirs on geological timescales. Degassing of melt at mid-ocean ridges and serpentinization of oceanic crust depend negatively and positively on seafloor pressure, respectively, providing a stabilizing feedback on long-term ocean volume. Motivated by Earth's approximately steady-state deep water cycle, we develop a two-box model of the hydrosphere and derive steady-state solutions to the water pa...

  14. The influence of start/stop operation on the water/steam cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soons, Jan; Vos, Frank de; Deelen-Bremer, Marga van [DNV KEMA, Arnhem (Netherlands)

    2013-04-01

    More and more power plants operate as start/stop units. Some units are even started-up almost every day. These frequent start-ups will influence the water/steam chemistry and therefore the integrity of the systems. During start-up, for most plants not the water chemistry but the temperature will be the guiding parameter. As a consequence, water quality is lacking when systems are started-up and it has to be assured that this period when the water quality is off specification is as short as possible in order to prevent negative effects on the system. It was found that in practice no direct evidence was discovered that start/stop operation has a direct negative effect on the systems. However, the possible effects on the water/steam cycle have not been investigated yet. (orig.)

  15. A Novel Absorption Cycle for Combined Water Heating, Dehumidification, and Evaporative Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHUGH, Devesh [University of Florida, Gainesville; Gluesenkamp, Kyle R [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Moghaddam, Saeed [University of Florida, Gainesville

    2014-01-01

    In this study, development of a novel system for combined water heating, dehumidification, and space evaporative cooling is discussed. Ambient water vapor is used as a working fluid in an open system. First, water vapor is absorbed from an air stream into an absorbent solution. The latent heat of absorption is transferred into the process water that cools the absorber. The solution is then regenerated in the desorber, where it is heated by a heating fluid. The water vapor generated in the desorber is condensed and its heat of phase change is transferred to the process water in the condenser. The condensed water can then be used in an evaporative cooling process to cool the dehumidified air exiting the absorber, or it can be drained if primarily dehumidification is desired. Essentially, this open absorption cycle collects space heat and transfers it to process water. This technology is enabled by a membrane-based absorption/desorption process in which the absorbent is constrained by hydrophobic vapor-permeable membranes. Constraining the absorbent film has enabled fabrication of the absorber and desorber in a plate-and-frame configuration. An air stream can flow against the membrane at high speed without entraining the absorbent, which is a challenge in conventional dehumidifiers. Furthermore, the absorption and desorption rates of an absorbent constrained by a membrane are greatly enhanced. Isfahani and Moghaddam (Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 2013) demonstrated absorption rates of up to 0.008 kg/m2s in a membrane-based absorber and Isfahani et al. (Int. J. Multiphase Flow, 2013) have reported a desorption rate of 0.01 kg/m2s in a membrane-based desorber. The membrane-based architecture also enables economical small-scale systems, novel cycle configurations, and high efficiencies. The absorber, solution heat exchanger, and desorber are fabricated on a single metal sheet. In addition to the open arrangement and membrane-based architecture, another novel feature of the

  16. Organic Contaminants and Treatment Chemicals in Steam-Water Cycles: Thermal stability, decomposition products and flow-accelerated corrosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moed, D.H.

    2015-01-01

    Boiler feedwater and steam have to be of high purity, because of the susceptibility of the steam-water cycle to corrosion. Organic contaminants break down in boilers by hydrothermolysis, leading to the formation of organic acid anions, which are suspected to cause corrosion of steam-water cycle

  17. Organic Contaminants and Treatment Chemicals in Steam-Water Cycles: Thermal stability, decomposition products and flow-accelerated corrosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moed, D.H.

    2015-01-01

    Boiler feedwater and steam have to be of high purity, because of the susceptibility of the steam-water cycle to corrosion. Organic contaminants break down in boilers by hydrothermolysis, leading to the formation of organic acid anions, which are suspected to cause corrosion of steam-water cycle comp

  18. Geomorphological control of water tables in a blanket peat landscape: implications for carbon cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allott, Tim; Evans, Martin; Lindsay, John; Agnew, Clive; Freer, Jim

    2010-05-01

    Water tables are an important control on carbon cycling and rates of carbon sequestration in peatland systems, and water table depth is therefore a key parameter in carbon models for blanket peat systems. Although there is a wide literature on blanket peat hydrology, including studies which specifically evaluate water table conditions, detailed data on water table behaviour and variability at the landscape scale are sparse. In particular, many British blanket peats are affected by gully erosion and this has been generally assumed to influence water table conditions. However, there has been limited evaluation of this geomomorphological control on peatland water tables. This paper presents results from a project which evaluated water table conditions in the blanket peatlands of the Peak District National Park, UK. A key aim was to quantify the impact of gully erosion on peatland water tables. A detailed programme of water table monitoring was undertaken during 2008/09, involving regular measurements of water table depth in over 530 dipwells at 19 sites across the 47 km2 peatland landscape of the Kinder Scout / Bleaklow area. This included a campaign of regular, simultaneous water table measurements from clusters of dipwells at the main sites, supplemented by continuous (hourly) water table monitoring in selected dipwells. It also included studies to evaluate within-site variation in water table conditions and local water table drawdown effects associated with gully erosion. Results indicate that gully erosion causes water table drawdown through two distinct processes. The first is local water table drawdown immediately adjacent to erosion gullies. This effect is restricted to a zone within 2 m of gully edges, and water tables within the gully edge drawdown zone are approximately 200 mm lower than in the adjacent peatland. The second effect is a more general water table lowering at eroded sites, with median water table depths at heavily eroded sites up to 300 mm lower

  19. Domestic water uses: characterization of daily cycles in the north region of Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Cristina; Teixeira, Carlos A; Duarte, A A L S; Bentes, I

    2013-08-01

    Nowadays, there is an increasing discussion among specialists about water use efficiency and the best measures to improve it. In Portugal, there have been a few attempts to expand the implementation of in situ water reuse projects. However, there is a lack of information about indoor water uses and how they are influenced by sociodemographic characteristics. There are several studies that investigate per capita global water usage, but the partitioning of this volume per domestic device and daily cycles is yet unknown. Identified as one of the key questions in sustainable building design, the water end-use is of primary importance to the design of hydraulic networks in buildings. In order to overcome this lack, a quantitative characterization of daily water uses for each domestic device was performed, based on a weekly monitoring program in fifty-two different dwellings in the northern region of Portugal (Vila Real, Valpaços and Oporto). For forty of them, each water usage of different domestic devices of each dwelling was recorded. At the same time, the remaining twelve dwellings were also monitored in order to register the volume of water consumed in each utilization of each domestic device. This paper presents the results of this complete monitoring program, using collected data to establish indoor water use patterns for each domestic device, aiming to support a more realistic approach to residential water use. The daily cycles in the different cities, where the monitoring program was performed, are also presented, in order to evaluate possible influences of sociodemographic characteristics.

  20. [Effect of water temperature, stocking density and feeding cycle on growth of juvenile Poecilobdella manillensis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bo-xing; Liu, Fei; Guo, Qiao-sheng; Shi, Hong-zhuan; Li, Meng-meng; Lu, Yu-xi

    2015-03-01

    The effect of water temperature, stocking density and feeding cycle on the growth of Poecilobdella manillensis juvenile was conducted P. manillensis was conducted respectively under different conditions: water temperatures(18, 22, 26, 30,34, 38 degrees C and CT), stocking density (75, 125, 200, 275, 350 individual/L) and feeding cycle(2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16 d). After 30 days, survival rate, weight gain rate, specific growth rate were measured. There was a significant correlation between water temperature and specific growth rate (γ = -0.066x2 + 3.543 1x -38.09, R2 = 0.837 9). Based on the regression equation, the specific growth rate of P. manillensis achieved the maximum (9.461 4) at 26.84 degrees C. And the most optimal water temperature was 26-30 degrees C. Meanwhile, the survival rates of P. manillensis was 0 at 38 degrees C in 3 d. There was significant negative correlation between density and specific growth rate (γ = -0.005 7x + 9.197 3, R2 = 0.998 3) and between feeding cycle and specific growth rate (γ = -0.468 2x + 10.574, R2 = 0.998 8).

  1. Spinel Metal Oxide-Alkali Carbonate-Based, Low-Temperature Thermochemical Cycles for Water Splitting and CO_2 Reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Bingjun; Bhawe, Yashodhan; Davis, Mark E.

    2013-01-01

    A manganese oxide-based, thermochemical cycle for water splitting below 1000 °C has recently been reported. The cycle involves the shuttling of Na+ into and out of manganese oxides via the consumption and formation of sodium carbonate, respectively. Here, we explore the combinations of three spinel metal oxides and three alkali carbonates in thermochemical cycles for water splitting and CO_2 reduction. Hydrogen evolution and CO_2 reduction reactions of metal oxides with a given alkali carbona...

  2. Connection between the Eastern Subtropical Mode Water in the South Pacific Ocean and the ENSO cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z.

    2012-12-01

    Water subducted in the subtropics is intimately linked to the circulation in the Tropics through the interior mass communication and/or the western boundary, and could potentially affect climate variability on interannual and decadal time scales (Gu and Philander, 1997). The interior mass communication rate between the subtropical and equatorial ocean can be quantified in different ways. For example, Huang and Wang (2001) proposed a method of using the Sverdrup function to quantify the communication rate. Their method is used here to compute the meridional transport function below the Ekman layer in order to investigate the direct communication from the eastern STMW to the equatorial Pacific, and study the connection between the eastern STMW and the ENSO cycle. The western subtropical mode water, however, is less likely to directly participate in the subtropical-tropical exchange because they are mainly formed and confined to the recirculation region of the western subtropical gyre (Ladd and Thompson, 2000). The variability of the Subtropical Mode Water (STMW) formation in the South Pacific Ocean from 1980 to 2004 is investigated in this study, using a high-resolution numerical model and a 3D Lagrangian trajectory model. Variations of subduction rate in the mode waters are closely linked to the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) cycle. The eastern STMW could potentially affect the ENSO cycle through the interior communication window that was identified from the virtual streamfunction. Its location and width closely related to the ENSO cycle. The deep westward penetration of the western edge of the window at the equatorial Pacific is evident during the 1998 La Niña event.; Zonal location of the interior communication window for eastern STMW, when the subducted water parcels reach the equatorial Pacific at 10oS. Solid gray (black) line represents the western (eastern) edge of the window.

  3. Unraveling the martian water cycle with high-resolution global climate simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottier, Alizée; Forget, François; Montmessin, Franck; Navarro, Thomas; Spiga, Aymeric; Millour, Ehouarn; Szantai, André; Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste

    2017-07-01

    Global climate modeling of the Mars water cycle is usually performed at relatively coarse resolution (200 - 300km), which may not be sufficient to properly represent the impact of waves, fronts, topography effects on the detailed structure of clouds and surface ice deposits. Here, we present new numerical simulations of the annual water cycle performed at a resolution of 1° × 1° (∼ 60 km in latitude). The model includes the radiative effects of clouds, whose influence on the thermal structure and atmospheric dynamics is significant, thus we also examine simulations with inactive clouds to distinguish the direct impact of resolution on circulation and winds from the indirect impact of resolution via water ice clouds. To first order, we find that the high resolution does not dramatically change the behavior of the system, and that simulations performed at ∼ 200 km resolution capture well the behavior of the simulated water cycle and Mars climate. Nevertheless, a detailed comparison between high and low resolution simulations, with reference to observations, reveal several significant changes that impact our understanding of the water cycle active today on Mars. The key northern cap edge dynamics are affected by an increase in baroclinic wave strength, with a complication of northern summer dynamics. South polar frost deposition is modified, with a westward longitudinal shift, since southern dynamics are also influenced. Baroclinic wave mode transitions are observed. New transient phenomena appear, like spiral and streak clouds, already documented in the observations. Atmospheric circulation cells in the polar region exhibit a large variability and are fine structured, with slope winds. Most modeled phenomena affected by high resolution give a picture of a more turbulent planet, inducing further variability. This is challenging for long-period climate studies.

  4. Closing the water cycle - the key role of water and wastewater management in a circular economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlenbrook, Stefan; Connor, Rick; Koncagul, Engin; Ortigara, Angela

    2017-04-01

    Planetary water boundaries are exceeded locally and regionally as water demand and use are escalating and per capita water availability is decreasing. However, wastewater represents an alternative yet reliable source containing for instance, nutrients (for use as fertilizer) and metals that can be extracted, and can be a source of energy. These characteristics mean that water and wastewater are set to play a key role in the circular economy. Furthermore, wastewater use can generate business opportunities and enhance water, food and energy security, therefore helping to alleviate poverty. However, to increase the collection, treatment and use of wastewater, investments in infrastructure and appropriate (low cost) technologies are needed. Ensuring the development of human and institutional capacity is also essential for proper wastewater management. The UN World Water Assessment Programme (WWAP) produces together with several UN-Water Members and Partners the annual World Water Development Report (WWDR). Its 2017 edition "Wastewater: The Untapped Resource" focuses on the critical role of wastewater management for vibrant economies, resilient societies and the maintenance of a healthy environment. Wastewater issues play also a central role in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, most notably through Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) target 6.3 that aims to improve water quality by reducing the proportion of untreated wastewater released to the environment and increasing its recycling and safe reuse globally. This target is interlinked with several other targets of SDG 6 ('the water goal') as well as to several other SDGs that relate to, poverty reduction, health, energy and food security, among others. The main policy-relevant messages of the WWDR 2017 will be introduced and linked to socio-hydrological approaches. These messages are an important input to the implementation of the water research agenda of the Panta Rhei initiative of IAHS.

  5. Dynamics of Proton Transfer to Internal Water during the Photosynthetic Oxygen-Evolving Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmachari, Udita; Barry, Bridgette A

    2016-11-10

    In photosynthesis, the light-driven oxidation of water is a sustainable process, which converts solar to chemical energy and produces protons and oxygen. To enable biomimetic strategies, the mechanism of photosynthetic oxygen evolution must be elucidated. Here, we provide information concerning a critical step in the oxygen-evolving, or S-state, cycle. During this S3-to-S0 transition, oxygen is produced, and substrate water binds to the manganese-calcium catalytic site. Our spectroscopic and H2(18)O labeling experiments show that this S3-to-S0 step is associated with the protonation of an internal water cluster in a hydrogen-bonding network, which contains calcium. When compared to the protonated water cluster, formed during a preceding step, the S1-to-S2 transition, the S3-to-S0 hydronium ion is likely to be coordinated by additional water molecules. This evidence shows that internal water and the hydrogen bonding network act as a transient proton acceptor at multiple points in the oxygen-evolving cycle.

  6. Life cycle water consumption for shale gas and conventional natural gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Corrie E; Horner, Robert M; Harto, Christopher B

    2013-10-15

    Shale gas production represents a large potential source of natural gas for the nation. The scale and rapid growth in shale gas development underscore the need to better understand its environmental implications, including water consumption. This study estimates the water consumed over the life cycle of conventional and shale gas production, accounting for the different stages of production and for flowback water reuse (in the case of shale gas). This study finds that shale gas consumes more water over its life cycle (13-37 L/GJ) than conventional natural gas consumes (9.3-9.6 L/GJ). However, when used as a transportation fuel, shale gas consumes significantly less water than other transportation fuels. When used for electricity generation, the combustion of shale gas adds incrementally to the overall water consumption compared to conventional natural gas. The impact of fuel production, however, is small relative to that of power plant operations. The type of power plant where the natural gas is utilized is far more important than the source of the natural gas.

  7. Biofouling on Coated Carbon Steel in Cooling Water Cycles Using Brackish Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauliina Rajala

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Water cooling utilizing natural waters is typically used for cooling large industrial facilities such as power plants. The cooling water cycles are susceptible to biofouling and scaling, which may reduce heat transfer capacity and enhance corrosion. The performance of two fouling-release coatings combined with hypochlorite treatment were studied in a power plant utilizing brackish sea water from the Baltic Sea for cooling. The effect of hypochlorite as an antifouling biocide on material performance and species composition of microfouling formed on coated surfaces was studied during the summer and autumn. Microfouling on surfaces of the studied fouling-release coatings was intensive in the cooling water cycle during the warm summer months. As in most cases in a natural water environment the fouling consisted of both inorganic fouling and biofouling. Chlorination decreased the bacterial number on the surfaces by 10–1000 fold, but the efficacy depended on the coating. In addition to decreasing the bacterial number, the chlorination also changed the microbial species composition, forming the biofilm on the surfaces of two fouling-release coatings. TeknoTar coating was proven to be more efficient in combination with the hypochlorite treatment against microfouling under these experimental conditions.

  8. Where Carbon Goes When Water Flows: Carbon Cycling across the Aquatic Continuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Nicholas D.; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Medeiros, Patricia M.; Seidel, Michael; Richey, Jeffrey E.; Keil, Richard G.; Sawakuchi, Henrique O.

    2017-01-31

    The purpose of this review is to highlight progress in unraveling carbon cycling dynamics across the continuum of landscapes, inland waters, coastal oceans, and the atmosphere. Earth systems are intimately interconnected, yet most biogeochemical studies focus on specific components in isolation. The movement of water drives the carbon cycle, and, as such, inland waters provide a critical intersection between terrestrial and marine biospheres. Inland, estuarine, and coastal waters are well studied in regions near centers of human population in the Northern hemisphere. However, many of the world’s large river systems and their marine receiving waters remain poorly characterized, particularly in the tropics, which contribute to a disproportionately large fraction of the transformation of terrestrial organic matter to carbon dioxide, and the Arctic, where positive feedback mechanisms are likely to amplify global climate change. There are large gaps in current coverage of environmental observations along the aquatic continuum. For example, tidally-influenced reaches of major rivers and near-shore coastal regions around river plumes are often left out of carbon budgets due to a combination of methodological constraints and poor data coverage. We suggest that closing these gaps could potentially alter global estimates of CO2 outgassing from surface waters to the atmosphere by several-fold. Finally, in order to identify and constrain/embrace uncertainties in global carbon budget estimations it is important that we further adopt statistical and modeling approaches that have become well-established in the fields of oceanography and paleoclimatology, for example.

  9. Water cycling between ocean and mantle: Super-earths need not be waterworlds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan, Nicolas B. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA), Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Abbot, Dorian S., E-mail: n-cowan@northwestern.edu [Department of the Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, 5734 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2014-01-20

    Large terrestrial planets are expected to have muted topography and deep oceans, implying that most super-Earths should be entirely covered in water, so-called waterworlds. This is important because waterworlds lack a silicate weathering thermostat so their climate is predicted to be less stable than that of planets with exposed continents. In other words, the continuously habitable zone for waterworlds is much narrower than for Earth-like planets. A planet's water is partitioned, however, between a surface reservoir, the ocean, and an interior reservoir, the mantle. Plate tectonics transports water between these reservoirs on geological timescales. Degassing of melt at mid-ocean ridges and serpentinization of oceanic crust depend negatively and positively on seafloor pressure, respectively, providing a stabilizing feedback on long-term ocean volume. Motivated by Earth's approximately steady-state deep water cycle, we develop a two-box model of the hydrosphere and derive steady-state solutions to the water partitioning on terrestrial planets. Critically, hydrostatic seafloor pressure is proportional to surface gravity, so super-Earths with a deep water cycle will tend to store more water in the mantle. We conclude that a tectonically active terrestrial planet of any mass can maintain exposed continents if its water mass fraction is less than ∼0.2%, dramatically increasing the odds that super-Earths are habitable. The greatest source of uncertainty in our study is Earth's current mantle water inventory: the greater its value, the more robust planets are to inundation. Lastly, we discuss how future missions can test our hypothesis by mapping the oceans and continents of massive terrestrial planets.

  10. Impact of climate change on the water cycle of agricultural landscapes in Southwest Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Irene; Ingwersen, Joachim; Gayler, Sebastian; Streck, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    For agricultural production and life in general, water is a necessity. To ensure food and drinking water security in the future an understanding of the impact of climate change on the water cycle is indispensable. The objective of this PhD research is to assess how higher temperatures, higher atmospheric CO2 concentration and changing precipitation patterns will alter the water cycle of agricultural landscapes in Southwest Germany. As representative key characteristics data evaluation will focus on water use efficiency (WUE) and groundwater recharge. The main research question is whether the positive effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 on WUE will be overcompensated by a decrease in net primary production due to warming and to altered seasonal water availability caused by higher rainfall variability. Elevated atmospheric CO2 stimulates plant growth and improves WUE, whereas higher temperatures are expected to reduce net primary production and groundwater recharge. Another research question referring to groundwater recharge is whether groundwater recharge will increase in winter and decrease in summer in Southwest Germany. Changed groundwater recharge directly affects drinking water supply and is an indicator for possible temporary water shortages in agricultural production. A multi-model ensemble composed of 16 combinations of four crop growth models, two water regime models and two nitrogen models will be calibrated and validated against sets of field data. Field data will be provided by FOR 1965 from 2009-2015 for the Kraichgau region and the Swabian Alb, two contrasting areas with regard to climate and agricultural intensity. By using a multi model ensemble uncertainties in predictions due to different model structures (epistemic uncertainty) can be quantified. The uncertainty related to the randomness of inputs and parameters, the so-called aleatory uncertainty, will be additionally assessed for each of the 16 models. Hence, a more reliable range of future

  11. Solar Metal Sulfate-Ammonia Based Thermochemical Water Splitting Cycle for Hydrogen Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cunping (Inventor); T-Raissi, Ali (Inventor); Muradov, Nazim (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Two classes of hybrid/thermochemical water splitting processes for the production of hydrogen and oxygen have been proposed based on (1) metal sulfate-ammonia cycles (2) metal pyrosulfate-ammonia cycles. Methods and systems for a metal sulfate MSO.sub.4--NH3 cycle for producing H2 and O2 from a closed system including feeding an aqueous (NH3)(4)SO3 solution into a photoctalytic reactor to oxidize the aqueous (NH3)(4)SO3 into aqueous (NH3)(2)SO4 and reduce water to hydrogen, mixing the resulting aqueous (NH3)(2)SO4 with metal oxide (e.g. ZnO) to form a slurry, heating the slurry of aqueous (NH4)(2)SO4 and ZnO(s) in the low temperature reactor to produce a gaseous mixture of NH3 and H2O and solid ZnSO4(s), heating solid ZnSO4 at a high temperature reactor to produce a gaseous mixture of SO2 and O2 and solid product ZnO, mixing the gaseous mixture of SO2 and O2 with an NH3 and H2O stream in an absorber to form aqueous (NH4)(2)SO3 solution and separate O2 for aqueous solution, recycling the resultant solution back to the photoreactor and sending ZnO to mix with aqueous (NH4)(2)SO4 solution to close the water splitting cycle wherein gaseous H2 and O2 are the only products output from the closed ZnSO4--NH3 cycle.

  12. Interconnections between the Asian monsoon, ENSO, and high northern latitude climate during the Holocene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HONG Bing; LIN Qinghua; HONG Yetang

    2006-01-01

    The article emphatically reviews the research progress in interconnections between the East Asian and Indian Ocean summer monsoons, between the Asian monsoon and the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) activity, and between the monsoon, ENSO and the changing of the North Atlantic climate during the Holocene. According to the studies of recent years, it is found that the intensity variations of the East Asian and Indian Ocean summer monsoons show an opposite relationship, which may be closely related to the phenomena of ENSO in the equatorial Pacific Ocean and the variation of the deep-water formation of the North Atlantic Ocean on the interannual to orbital time scales. The 4k and 8k events occurring at around 4200 and 8200 a BP, respectively, might be the two in a series of severe paleo-El Nino events during the Holocene, strongly reflecting the interactions and influences of the monsoons, ENSO and the North Atlantic climate. In order to better understand the relationships between these paleoclimatic phenomena, scientists need to strengthen the research work on the Asian monsoon division and the comparison between monsoon proxy records, and the study on the proxy record of sea surface temperature with high time-resolution in the equatorial Pacific Ocean and the simulation research of paleoclimate condition.

  13. Deciphering the desiccation trend of the South Asian monsoon hydroclimate in a warming world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, R.; Sabin, T. P.; Vellore, R.; Mujumdar, M.; Sanjay, J.; Goswami, B. N.; Hourdin, F.; Dufresne, J.-L.; Terray, P.

    2016-08-01

    Rising propensity of precipitation extremes and concomitant decline of summer-monsoon rains are amongst the most distinctive hydroclimatic signals that have emerged over South Asia since 1950s. A clear understanding of the underlying causes driving these monsoon hydroclimatic signals has remained elusive. Using a state-of-the-art global climate model with high-resolution zooming over South Asia, we demonstrate that a juxtaposition of regional land-use changes, anthropogenic-aerosol forcing and the rapid warming signal of the equatorial Indian Ocean is crucial to produce the observed monsoon weakening in recent decades. Our findings also show that this monsoonal weakening significantly enhances occurrence of localized intense precipitation events, as compared to the global-warming response. A 21st century climate projection using the same high-resolution model indicates persistent decrease of monsoonal rains and prolongation of soil drying. Critical value-additions from this study include (1) realistic simulation of the mean and long-term historical trends in the Indian monsoon rainfall (2) robust attributions of changes in moderate and heavy precipitation events over Central India (3) a 21st century projection of drying trend of the South Asian monsoon. The present findings have profound bearing on the regional water-security, which is already under severe hydrological-stress.

  14. Entropy Analysis of Solar Two-Step Thermochemical Cycles for Water and Carbon Dioxide Splitting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Lange

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study provides a thermodynamic analysis of solar thermochemical cycles for splitting of H2O or CO2. Such cycles, powered by concentrated solar energy, have the potential to produce fuels in a sustainable way. We extend a previous study on the thermodynamics of water splitting by also taking into account CO2 splitting and the influence of the solar absorption efficiency. Based on this purely thermodynamic approach, efficiency trends are discussed. The comprehensive and vivid representation in T-S diagrams provides researchers in this field with the required theoretical background to improve process development. Furthermore, results about the required entropy change in the used redox materials can be used as a guideline for material developers. The results show that CO2 splitting is advantageous at higher temperature levels, while water splitting is more feasible at lower temperature levels, as it benefits from a great entropy change during the splitting step.

  15. Hydrogen production by water decomposition using a combined electrolytic-thermochemical cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farbman, G. H.; Brecher, L. E.

    1976-01-01

    A proposed dual-purpose power plant generating nuclear power to provide energy for driving a water decomposition system is described. The entire system, dubbed Sulfur Cycle Water Decomposition System, works on sulfur compounds (sulfuric acid feedstock, sulfur oxides) in a hybrid electrolytic-thermochemical cycle; performance superior to either all-electrolysis systems or presently known all-thermochemical systems is claimed. The 3345 MW(th) graphite-moderated helium-cooled reactor (VHTR - Very High Temperature Reactor) generates both high-temperature heat and electric power for the process; the gas stream at core exit is heated to 1850 F. Reactor operation is described and reactor innards are illustrated. A cost assessment for on-stream performance in the 1990's is optimistic.

  16. Nitrogen restrictions buffer modeled interactions of water with the carbon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuanyuan; Gerber, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial carbon and water cycles are coupled at multiple spatiotemporal scales and are crucial to carbon sequestration. Water related climate extremes, such as drought and intense precipitation, can substantially affect the carbon cycle. Meanwhile, nitrogen is a limiting resource to plant and has therefore the potential to alter the coupling of water and carbon cycles on land. Here we assess the effect of nitrogen limitation on the response of the terrestrial carbon cycle to moisture anomalies using Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory's land surface model LM3V-N. We analyzed the response of three central carbon fluxes: net primary productivity (NPP), heterotrophic respiration (Rh), and net ecosystem productivity (NEP, the difference between NPP and Rh) and how these fluxes were altered under anomalies of the standardized precipitation and evapotranspiration index (SPEI). We found that globally, the correlations between each of the carbon flux and SPEI depended on the timescale and a strong legacy effect of SPEI anomalies on Rh. Consideration of nitrogen constraints reduced anomalies in carbon fluxes in response to extreme dry/wet events. This nitrogen-induced buffer constrained the growth of plants under wet extremes and allowed for enhanced growth during droughts. Extra gain of soil moisture from the downregulation of canopy transpiration by nitrogen limitation and shifts in the relative importance of water and nitrogen limitation during dry/wet extreme events are possible mechanisms contributing to the buffering of modeled NPP and NEP. Responses of Rh to moisture anomalies were much weaker compared to NPP, and N buffering effects were less evident.

  17. Monitoring of the water/steam cycle. Transforming data into information for action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vos, Frank G. de; Heijboer, Rob; Deelen-Bremer, Marga H. van [KEMA Power Generation and Renewables, Arnheim (Netherlands)

    2011-07-01

    It is common practice to comprehensively monitor the water-steam cycle to ensure the required chemical mode of operation and to avoid plant damage. This does not only involve information measured data and installations but also the reliability of the measurements made and the transfer of the data into information. Several case studies will be presented to support the importance of transforming data into information to take the proper action. (orig.)

  18. Thermochemical hydrogen production via a cycle using barium and sulfur: reaction between barium sulfide and water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ota, K.; Conger, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    The reaction between barium sulfide and water, a reaction found in several sulfur based thermochemical cycles, was investigated kinetically at 653 to 866/sup 0/C. Gaseous products were hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide. The rate determining step for hydrogen formation was a surface reaction between barium sulfide and water. The rate of formation of hydrogen can be expressed as: RH2 = 1.07 x 10/sup -2/ exp (-3180/RT) (mol H/sub 2//mol BaS s). Hydrogen sulfide was produced during the initial period of reaction and the quantity of hydrogen sulfide formed during this period decreased as the temperature of reaction was increased.

  19. Solar Hydrogen Production via a Samarium Oxide-Based Thermochemical Water Splitting Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Rahul Bhosale; Anand Kumar; Fares AlMomani; Ujjal Ghosh; Mohammad Saad Anis; Konstantinos Kakosimos; Rajesh Shende; Marc A. Rosen

    2016-01-01

    The computational thermodynamic analysis of a samarium oxide-based two-step solar thermochemical water splitting cycle is reported. The analysis is performed using HSC chemistry software and databases. The first (solar-based) step drives the thermal reduction of Sm2O3 into Sm and O2. The second (non-solar) step corresponds to the production of H2 via a water splitting reaction and the oxidation of Sm to Sm2O3. The equilibrium thermodynamic compositions related to the thermal reduction and wat...

  20. Life cycle assessment of central softening of very hard drinking water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godskesen, Berit; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; Rygaard, Martin;

    2012-01-01

    Many consumers prefer softened water due to convenience issues such as avoidance of removing limescale deposits from household appliances and surfaces, and to reduce consumption of cleaning agents and laundry detergents leading to lower household expenses. Even though central softening of drinking...... water from the initial hardness of the region of study (Copenhagen, Denmark) which is 362 mg/L as CaCO(3) to a final hardness as CaCO(3) of 254 (a softening depth of 108) mg/L or 145 (a softening depth of 217) mg/L. Our study showed that the consumer preference can be met together with reducing...... Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to quantify the environmental impacts of central softening of drinking water considering both the negative effects at the waterworks and the positive effects imposed by the changed water quality in the households. The LCA modeling considered central softening of drinking...

  1. An Assessment of Monsoon Triggered Landslides in Western Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudan Acharya, Madhu

    2010-05-01

    Due to heavy monsoon rain, rugged topography and very young mountains, frequent slope failures and soil erosion are very common in Nepal but in most of cases the natural slopes are disturbed by men to construct a road through it and the situation further aggravated by the Monsoon rain. Summer usually tests the disaster response capacity of Nepal, when the monsoons trigger water induced disasters. This year Nepal's Western regions were most severely affected by floods and landslides. Every year, sadly, it is the same story of mostly poor people living in remote villages succumbing to landslides and flooding and those who survive facing hardships brought on by the disaster. The tail end of the monsoon in October has triggered flood and landslides in Nepal which affected a total of 14 districts in the mid and far-west regions, of which Kailali, Bardiya, Banke, Dadeldhura, Accham and Kanchapur district are most affected. The affected areas are geographically scattered and remote, and are therefore difficult to access. In this year (2009), flood and landslides have claimed 62 lives, affecting more than 152,000 individuals from 27,000 families. More than 4,000 families are displaced and are taking shelter in schools, open space and forest areas with no protection from the external elements. In the above context the prevention and mitigation measures for landslides is a great challenge for Nepal. Nepal has been investing its huge amount of resources to stabilize landslides and roadside slope failures, still then it has become unmanageable during Monsoon time. Considering the above facts, an assessment of landslides which were occurred during the Monsoon (July-October 2009), along Khodpe - Jhota - Chainpur road in far western region of Nepal has been carried out based on the field observation of various landslides. The paper presents the causes and mechanisms of failures of different landslides which are mostly triggered by Monsoon rain. It also suggests some low cost

  2. Nuclear Systems Enhanced Performance Program, Maintenance Cycle Extension in Advanced Light Water Reactor Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Professor Neill Todreas

    2001-10-01

    A renewed interest in new nuclear power generation in the US has spurred interest in developing advanced reactors with features which will address the public's concerns regarding nuclear generation. However, it is economic performance which will dictate whether any new orders for these plants will materialize. Economic performance is, to a great extent, improved by maximizing the time that the plant is on-line generating electricity relative to the time spent off-line conducting maintenance and refueling. Indeed, the strategy for the advanced light water reactor plant IRIS (International Reactor, Innovative and Secure) is to utilize an eight year operating cycle. This report describes a formalized strategy to address, during the design phase, the maintenance-related barriers to an extended operating cycle. The top-level objective of this investigation was to develop a methodology for injecting component and system maintainability issues into the reactor plant design process to overcome these barriers. A primary goal was to demonstrate the applicability and utility of the methodology in the context of the IRIS design. The first step in meeting the top-level objective was to determine the types of operating cycle length barriers that the IRIS design team is likely to face. Evaluation of previously identified regulatory and investment protection surveillance program barriers preventing a candidate operating PWR from achieving an extended (48 month) cycle was conducted in the context of the IRIS design. From this analysis, 54 known IRIS operating cycle length barriers were identified. The resolution methodology was applied to each of these barriers to generate design solution alternatives for consideration in the IRIS design. The methodology developed has been demonstrated to narrow the design space to feasible design solutions which enable a desired operating cycle length, yet is general enough to have broad applicability. Feedback from the IRIS design team

  3. Workshop on Monsoon Climate Systems: Toward Better Prediction of the Monsoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sperber, K R; Yasunari, T

    2005-12-20

    The Earth's monsoon systems are the life-blood of more than two-thirds of the world's population through the rainfall they provide to the mainly agrarian societies they influence. More than 60 experts gathered to assess the current understanding of monsoon variability and to highlight outstanding problems simulating the monsoon.

  4. Monsoon-induced changes in the size-fractionated phytoplankton biomass and production rate in the estuarine and coastal waters of southwest coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Madhu, N.V.; Jyothibabu, R.; Balachandran, K.K.

    . R, Balachandran. K. K National Institute of Oceanography, Regional Centre, Kochi -18, India Abstract Changes in the autotrophic pico- (0.2-2µm), nano- (2-20µm) and micro- (>20µm) plankton biomass (chlorophyll a) and primary production were... in the pico- (0.2 - 2µm), nano- (2 - 20µm) and micro- (>20µm) fractions showed significant variations in the estuarine and coastal waters (Fig. 4). The total chl a was higher in the estuary, both in the surface (av. 13.7 ± 8 mgm -3 ) and bottom (av. 9.6 ± 4...

  5. Adaptive Management of the Water Cycle on the Urban Fringe: Three Australian Case Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair Gilmour

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Our group at Macquarie University has run three adaptive management projects in New South Wales, Australia. Their objectives were: (1 to evaluate water cycle management strategies to minimize impacts of urban development on water quality in the Hawkesbury-Nepean basin; (2 to evaluate development planning policies to minimize water quality impacts on a series of coastal lakes; and (3 to carry out a preliminary assessment of the potential impacts of greater recreational use of Sydney water catchments. These projects are examined to evaluate the contribution of the adaptive management approach to water cycle management on the urban fringe in New South Wales. The role of the adaptive management approach in education, as a negotiation process, and in policy formulation and evaluation, is presented. The importance of community participation, the role of an "institutional champion," and the need to manage the lead-up phase and the postworkshop phase with as much attention to detail as the workshop phase is underlined. Proposed prerequisites for a successful adaptive management project are developed along these lines.

  6. Inlfuence of Freeze-thaw Cycles on Properties of Integral Water Repellent Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Zhiming; WITTMANN Folker H; XIAO Jianzhuang; ZHAO Tiejun

    2016-01-01

    Service life of reinforced concrete structures usually was designed on the basis of one selected deteriorating mechanism as for instance carbonation, chloride penetration, and frost action. It could be shown in the meantime by numerous authors, however, that combined actions such as chloride penetration under mechanical load or chloride penetration in combination with freeze-thaw cycles may shorten the service life of reinforced concrete structures more than individual processes acting alone. We have found that chloride penetration is accelerated significantly by freeze-thaw cycles. Frost damage not only reduces mechanical strength and elastic modulus but migration of chloride is facilitated in the damaged pore structure. Chloride penetration can be retarded by the addition of silane emulsion to the fresh concrete. In this way Integral Water Repellent Concrete (IWRC) can be produced. Migration of water and ions dissolved in water can not be prevented by integral water repellent treatment but it is slowed down. The combination of damage mechanisms and the protective measures by integral water repellent treatment have to be taken into consideration in realistic service life prediction and design.

  7. Role of canopy interception on water and nutrient cycling in Chinese fir plantation ecosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Wenxing; DENG Xiangwen; ZHAO Zhonghui

    2007-01-01

    The role of canopy interception on nutrient cycling in Chinese fir plantation ecosystem was studied on the basis of the position data during four years.Results indicate that the average canopy interception amount was 267.0 mm/year.Canopy interception play a significant role in water cycle and nutrient cycle processes in ecosystem,and was an important part of evaporation from the Chinese fir plantation ecosystem,being up to 27.2%.The evaporation from the canopy interception was an important way of water output from ecosystem,up to 19.9%.The flush-eluviation of branches and leaves caused by canopy interception brought nutrient input of 143.629 kg/(hm2·year),which was 117.2% of the input 63.924kg/(hm2·year)from the atmospheric precipitation.The decreased amount of 80.1 mm precipitation input caused by canopy interception reduced the amount of rainfall into the stand surface and infiltration into the soil,reduced the output with runoff and drainage,and decreased nutrient loss through output water.Therefore,the additional preserve of nutrient by canopy interception was 8.664 kg/(hm2·year).

  8. Life cycle cost analysis of new FRP based solar parabolic trough collector hot water generation system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. VALAN ARASU; T. SORNAKUMAR

    2008-01-01

    Parabolic trough collectors (PTCs) are employed for a variety of applications including steam generation and hot water generation. This paper deals with the experimental results and an economic analysis of a new fibre reinforced plastic (FRP) based solar PTC with an embedded electronic controlled tracking system designed and developed for hot water generation in a restaurant in Madurai, India. The new collector performance has been tested according to ASHRAE Standard 93 (1986). The performance of a new PTC hot water generation system with a well mixed hot water storage tank is investigated by a series of extensive tests over ten months period. The average maximum storage tank water temperature observed was 74.91 ℃, when no energy is withdrawn from the tank to the load during the collection period. The total cost of the new economic FRP based solar PTC for hot water generation with an embedded electronic controlled tracking system is Rs. 25000 (US$ 573) only. In the present work, life cycle savings (LCS) method is employed for a detailed economic analysis of the PTC system. A computer program is used as a tool for the economic analysis. The present worth of life cycle solar savings is evaluated for the new solar PTC hot water generation system that replaces an existing electric water heating system in the restaurant and attains a value of Rs. 23171.66 after 15 years, which is a significant saving. The LCS method and the MATLAB computer simulation program presented in this paper can be used to estimate the LCS of other renewable energy systems.

  9. Applicability study of deuterium excess in bottled water life cycle analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihael Brenčič

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Paper explores the possible use of d‑excess in the investigation of bottled water. Based on the data set from Brencic and Vreca’s paper (2006. Identification of sources and production processes of bottled waters by stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios, d‑excess values were statistically analysed and compared among different bottled water groups and different bottlers. The bottled water life cycle in relation to d‑excess values was also theoretically identified. Descriptive statistics and one-way ANOVA showed no significant differences among the groups. Differences were detected in the shape of empirical distributions. Groups of still and flavoured waters have similar shapes, but sparkling waters differed to the others. Two distinctive groups of bottlers could be discerned. The first group is represented by bottlers with a high range of d‑excess (from 7.7 ‰ to 18.6 ‰ with average of 12.0 ‰ exploring waters originating from the aquifers rich in highly mineralised groundwater and relatively high concentrations of CO2 gas. The second group is represented by bottlers using groundwater from relatively shallow aquifers. Their d‑excess values have characteristics similar to the local precipitation (from 7.8 ‰ to 14.3 ‰ with average of 10.3 ‰. More frequent sampling and better knowledge of production phases are needed to improve usage of isotope fingerprint for authentication of bottled waters.

  10. Interannual Variability of the Tropical Water Cycle: Capabilities in the TRMM Era and Challenges for GPM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Franklin R.

    2003-01-01

    Considerable uncertainty surrounds the issue of whether precipitation over the tropical oceans (30" NE) systematically changes with interannual sea-surface temperature (SST) anomalies that accompany El Nino (warm) and La Nina (cold) events. Although it is well documented that El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events with marked SST changes over the tropical oceans, produce significant regional changes in precipitation, water vapor, and radiative fluxes in the tropics, we still cannot yet adequately quantify the associated net integrated changes to water and heat balance over the entire tropical oceanic or land sectors. Robertson et al., [2001 GRL] for example, showed that substantial disagreement exists among contemporary satellite estimates of interannual variations in tropical rainfall that are associated with SST changes. Berg et al., [2002 J. Climate] have documented the distinct differences between precipitation structure over the eastern and western Pacific ITCZ and noted how various satellite precipitation algorithms may respond quite differently to ENSO modulations of these precipitation regimes. Resolving this uncertainty is important since precipitation and latent heat release variations over land and ocean sectors are key components of the tropical heat balance in its most aggregated form. Rainfall estimates from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR) averaged over the tropical oceans have not solved this issue and, in fact, show marked differences with estimates from two TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) passive microwave algorithms. In this paper we will focus on findings that uncertainties in microphysical assumptions necessitated by the single-frequency PR measurement pose difficulties for detecting climate-related precipitation signals. Recent work has shown that path-integrated attenuation derived from the effects of precipitation on the radar return from the ocean surface exhibits interannual variability that agrees

  11. Adsorption Characteristics of Water and Silica Gel System for Desalination Cycle

    KAUST Repository

    Cevallos, Oscar R.

    2012-07-01

    An adsorbent suitable for adsorption desalination cycles is essentially characterized by a hydrophilic and porous structure with high surface area where water molecules are adsorbed via hydrogen bonding mechanism. Silica gel type A++ possesses the highest surface area and exhibits the highest equilibrium uptake from all the silica gels available in the market, therefore being suitable for water desalination cycles; where adsorbent’s adsorption characteristics and water vapor uptake capacity are key parameters in the compactness of the system; translated as feasibility of water desalination through adsorption technologies. The adsorption characteristics of water vapor onto silica gel type A++ over a temperature range of 30 oC to 60 oC are investigated in this research. This is done using water vapor adsorption analyzer utilizing a constant volume and variable pressure method, namely the Hydrosorb-1000 instrument by Quantachrome. The experimental uptake data is studied using numerous isotherm models, i. e. the Langmuir, Tóth, generalized Dubinin-Astakhov (D-A), Dubinin-Astakhov based on pore size distribution (PSD) and Dubinin-Serpinski (D-Se) isotherm for the whole pressure range, and for a pressure range below 10 kPa, proper for desalination cycles; isotherms type V of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) classification were exhibited. It is observed that the D-A based on PSD and the D-Se isotherm models describe the best fitting of the experimental uptake data for desalination cycles within a regression error of 2% and 6% respectively. All isotherm models, except the D-A based on PSD, have failed to describe the obtained experimental uptake data; an empirical isotherm model is proposed by observing the behavior of Tóth and D-A isotherm models. The new empirical model describes the water adsorption onto silica gel type A++ within a regression error of 3%. This will aid to describe the advantages of silica gel type A++ for the design of

  12. The Dynamic Plateau Monsoon Index and Its Association with General Circulation Anomalies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUN Xueyi; HU Zeyong; MA Yaoming

    2012-01-01

    Based on monthly ECMWF reanalysis-Interim (ERA-Interim) reanalysis data,along with monthly precipitation and temperature data,the Dynamic Plateau Monsoon Index (DPMI) is defined.The results of a contrast analysis of the DPMI versus the Traditional Plateau Monsoon Index (TPMI) are described.The response of general circulation to northern Qinghai-Xizang Plateau summer monsoon anomalies and the correlation of the DPMI with general circulation anomalies are investigated.The results show that,the DPMI reflected meteorological elements better and depicted climate variation more accurately than the TPMI.In years when the plateau summer monsoon is strong,the low over the plateau and the trough near the eastern coast of Asia are deeper and higher than normal over South China.This correlation corresponds to two anomalous cyclones over the plateau and the eastern coast of Asia and an anomalous anticyclone in South China.The plateau and its adjacent regions are affected by anomalous southwesterly winds that transport more moisture to South China and cause more precipitation.The lower reaches of the Yangtze River appear to receive more precipitation by means of the strong westerly water vapor flow transported from the "large triangle affecting the region".In years when the plateau summer monsoon is weak,these are opposite.The plateau monsoon is closely related to the intensity and position of the South Asian high,and the existence of a teleconnection pattern in the mid-upper levels suggests a possible linl~ge of the East Asian monsoon and the Indian monsoon to the plateau summer monsoon.

  13. The effects of monsoons and climate teleconnections on the Niangziguan Karst Spring discharge in North China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juan; Hao, Yonghong; Hu, Bill X.; Huo, Xueli; Hao, Pengmei; Liu, Zhongfang

    2017-01-01

    Karst aquifers supply drinking water for 25 % of the world's population, and they are, however, vulnerable to climate change. This study is aimed to investigate the effects of various monsoons and teleconnection patterns on Niangziguan Karst Spring (NKS) discharge in North China for sustainable exploration of the karst groundwater resources. The monsoons studied include the Indian Summer Monsoon, the West North Pacific Monsoon and the East Asian Summer Monsoon. The climate teleconnection patterns explored include the Indian Ocean Dipole, E1 Niño Southern Oscillation, and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. The wavelet transform and wavelet coherence methods are used to analyze the karst hydrological processes in the NKS Basin, and reveal the relations between the climate indices with precipitation and the spring discharge. The study results indicate that both the monsoons and the climate teleconnections significantly affect precipitation in the NKS Basin. The time scales that the monsoons resonate with precipitation are strongly concentrated on the time scales of 0.5-, 1-, 2.5- and 3.5-year, and that climate teleconnections resonate with precipitation are relatively weak and diverged from 0.5-, 1-, 2-, 2.5-, to 8-year time scales, respectively. Because the climate signals have to overcome the resistance of heterogeneous aquifers before reaching spring discharge, with high energy, the strong climate signals (e.g. monsoons) are able to penetrate through aquifers and act on spring discharge. So the spring discharge is more strongly affected by monsoons than the climate teleconnections. During the groundwater flow process, the precipitation signals will be attenuated, delayed, merged, and changed by karst aquifers. Therefore, the coherence coefficients between the spring discharge and climate indices are smaller than those between precipitation and climate indices. Further, the fluctuation of the spring discharge is not coincident with that of precipitation in most

  14. Groundwater flow cycling between a submarine spring and an inland fresh water spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J. Hal; Verdi, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Spring Creek Springs and Wakulla Springs are large first magnitude springs that derive water from the Upper Floridan Aquifer. The submarine Spring Creek Springs are located in a marine estuary and Wakulla Springs are located 18 km inland. Wakulla Springs has had a consistent increase in flow from the 1930s to the present. This increase is probably due to the rising sea level, which puts additional pressure head on the submarine Spring Creek Springs, reducing its fresh water flow and increasing flows in Wakulla Springs. To improve understanding of the complex relations between these springs, flow and salinity data were collected from June 25, 2007 to June 30, 2010. The flow in Spring Creek Springs was most sensitive to rainfall and salt water intrusion, and the flow in Wakulla Springs was most sensitive to rainfall and the flow in Spring Creek Springs. Flows from the springs were found to be connected, and composed of three repeating phases in a karst spring flow cycle: Phase 1 occurred during low rainfall periods and was characterized by salt water backflow into the Spring Creek Springs caves. The higher density salt water blocked fresh water flow and resulted in a higher equivalent fresh water head in Spring Creek Springs than in Wakulla Springs. The blocked fresh water was diverted to Wakulla Springs, approximately doubling its flow. Phase 2 occurred when heavy rainfall resulted in temporarily high creek flows to nearby sinkholes that purged the salt water from the Spring Creek Springs caves. Phase 3 occurred after streams returned to base flow. The Spring Creek Springs caves retained a lower equivalent fresh water head than Wakulla Springs, causing them to flow large amounts of fresh water while Wakulla Springs flow was reduced by about half.

  15. Groundwater flow cycling between a submarine spring and an inland fresh water spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J Hal; Verdi, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Spring Creek Springs and Wakulla Springs are large first magnitude springs that derive water from the Upper Floridan Aquifer. The submarine Spring Creek Springs are located in a marine estuary and Wakulla Springs are located 18 km inland. Wakulla Springs has had a consistent increase in flow from the 1930s to the present. This increase is probably due to the rising sea level, which puts additional pressure head on the submarine Spring Creek Springs, reducing its fresh water flow and increasing flows in Wakulla Springs. To improve understanding of the complex relations between these springs, flow and salinity data were collected from June 25, 2007 to June 30, 2010. The flow in Spring Creek Springs was most sensitive to rainfall and salt water intrusion, and the flow in Wakulla Springs was most sensitive to rainfall and the flow in Spring Creek Springs. Flows from the springs were found to be connected, and composed of three repeating phases in a karst spring flow cycle: Phase 1 occurred during low rainfall periods and was characterized by salt water backflow into the Spring Creek Springs caves. The higher density salt water blocked fresh water flow and resulted in a higher equivalent fresh water head in Spring Creek Springs than in Wakulla Springs. The blocked fresh water was diverted to Wakulla Springs, approximately doubling its flow. Phase 2 occurred when heavy rainfall resulted in temporarily high creek flows to nearby sinkholes that purged the salt water from the Spring Creek Springs caves. Phase 3 occurred after streams returned to base flow. The Spring Creek Springs caves retained a lower equivalent fresh water head than Wakulla Springs, causing them to flow large amounts of fresh water while Wakulla Springs flow was reduced by about half. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  16. Progress on Developing Consistent Earth System Data Records for the Global Terrestrial Water Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, E. F.; Lettenmaier, D. P.; Houser, P.; Pinker, R. T.; Kummerow, C. D.; Pan, M.; Gao, H.; Sahoo, A. K.

    2009-12-01

    Consistent, long-term Earth System Data Records (ESDRs) for the terrestrial water cycle are needed to provide a basis for estimating the mean state and variability of the land surface water cycle for the major global river basins and the global terrestrial hydrosphere. For consistency, the ESDRs for each component must be done within a framework that assures such consistency. In this project that started one year ago, five institutions are collaborating to jointly develop the terrestrial water cycle ESRDs, with the goal of producing ESDRs at a spatial resolution of 0.5 degrees (latitude-longitude) for the period 1950 to near-present. The strategy for the ESDRs is to (i) retrieve through state-of-the-art remote sensing algorithms surface radiation and water cycle variables applied to the satellite records that extend as far back as possible, which in most cases is the early 1980’s; (ii) estimate water cycle components through off-line land surface model integrations that will extend back to 1950; and (iii) to merge the remote sensing estimates with the land surface estimates using advanced data assimilation techniques. Over the last year the project has completed the Algorithm Theoretical Basis Documents (ATBDs), which provide documentation for all algorithms that will generate the data products. The production of the ESDRs also started for (1) surface meteorology (precipitation, air temperature, humidity and wind), (2) surface downward radiation (solar and longwave) and (3) derived and/or assimilated fluxes and storages such as surface soil moisture storage, total basin water storage, snow water equivalent, storage in large lakes, reservoirs, and wetlands, evapotranspiration, and surface runoff. Where our products overlap other Measures ESDR products (e.g. snow extent), we plan to work with those project to assure overall consistency. On the modeling part, a global surface meteorology data set that covers 1900-2006 has been established by merging satellite, in

  17. Pleistocene Indian Monsoon rainfall variability dominated by obliquity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebregiorgis, D.; Hathorne, E. C.; Giosan, L.; Collett, T. S.; Nuernberg, D.; Frank, M.

    2015-12-01

    The past variability of the Indian Monsoon is mostly known from records of wind strength over the Arabian Sea while Quaternary proxy records of Indian monsoon precipitation are still lacking. Here we utilize scanning x-ray fluorescence (XRF) data from a sediment core obtained by the IODP vessel JOIDES Resolution in the Andaman Sea (Site 17) to investigate changes in sediment supply from the peak monsoon precipitation regions to the core site. We use Ti/Ca and K/Rb ratios to trace changes in terrigenous flux and weathering regime, respectively, while Zr/Rb ratios suggest grain size variations. The age model of Site 17 is based on correlation of benthic C. wuellerstorfi/C. mundulus δ18O data to the LR04 global benthic δ18O stack at a resolution of ~3 kyr (Lisiecki and Raymo, 2005) for the last 2 Myrs. In its youngest part the age model is supported by five 14C ages on planktic foraminifera and the youngest Toba ash layer (Ali et al., 2015) resulting in a nearly constant sedimentation rate of ~6.5 cm/kyr. Frequency analysis of the 4 mm resolution Ti/Ca, K/Rb, and Zr/Rb time series using the REDFIT program (Schulz and Mudelsee, 2002), reveals the three main Milankovitch orbital cycles above the 90% confidence level. Depth domain spectral analysis reveals the presence of significant cyclicity at wavelengths of 28.5 and 2.8 m corresponding to the ~400 kyr and ~41 kyr cycles, respectively, during the last 2 Myr. These records suggest that Indian monsoon variability has varied in the obliquity and eccentricity bands, the latter in particular after the mid Pleistocene transition (MPT), while strong precession forcing is lacking in this super-high resolution record. Northern summer insolation and Southern Hemisphere latent heat export are out of phase during precessional cycles, but in phase in the obliquity band, which indicates that Indian monsoon precipitation has likely been more sensitive to both NH pull and SH push mechanisms (Clemens and Prell, 2003). References Ali

  18. Development of a Water Based, Critical Flow, Non-Vapor Compression cooling Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosni, Mohammad H.

    2014-03-30

    Expansion of a high-pressure liquid refrigerant through the use of a thermostatic expansion valve or other device is commonplace in vapor-compression cycles to regulate the quality and flow rate of the refrigerant entering the evaporator. In vapor-compression systems, as the condensed refrigerant undergoes this expansion, its pressure and temperature drop, and part of the liquid evaporates. We (researchers at Kansas State University) are developing a cooling cycle that instead pumps a high-pressure refrigerant through a supersonic converging-diverging nozzle. As the liquid refrigerant passes through the nozzle, its velocity reaches supersonic (or critical-flow) conditions, substantially decreasing the refrigerant’s pressure. This sharp pressure change vaporizes some of the refrigerant and absorbs heat from the surrounding conditions during this phase change. Due to the design of the nozzle, a shockwave trips the supersonic two-phase refrigerant back to the starting conditions, condensing the remaining vapor. The critical-flow refrigeration cycle would provide space cooling, similar to a chiller, by running a secondary fluid such as water or glycol over one or more nozzles. Rather than utilizing a compressor to raise the pressure of the refrigerant, as in a vapor-cycle system, the critical-flow cycle utilizes a high-pressure pump to drive refrigerant liquid through the cooling cycle. Additionally, the design of the nozzle can be tailored for a given refrigerant, such that environmentally benign substances can act as the working fluid. This refrigeration cycle is still in early-stage development with prototype development several years away. The complex multi-phase flow at supersonic conditions presents numerous challenges to fully understanding and modeling the cycle. With the support of DOE and venture-capital investors, initial research was conducted at PAX Streamline, and later, at Caitin. We (researchers at Kansas State University) have continued development

  19. The Role of Shallow Waters in the Life Cycle of the Bahrain Penaeid Shrimps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulqader, E. A. A.

    1999-08-01

    Tubli Bay and shallow areas south of 'Fasht Al-Adhom' are known for their importance to Bahrain penaeid shrimps. The role of these shallow waters in the Bahrain penaeid shrimp life cycle was studied in Tubli Bay. Plankton, beam and otter trawl samples were collected on a biweekly basis from May 1991 to June 1992. Otter trawl sampling was extended to June 1993. Four penaeid species were found in the area. Ranked by decreasing abundance, these species are Penaeus semisulcatus De Haan 1844, Metapenaeus stebbingi Nobili 1904, M. kutchensisGeorge, George & Rao, 1963, and P. latisulcatus Kishinouye 1896. The presence of two egg types in the plankton collection, and mature females of both M. stebbingi and M. kutchensis indicate that both species spawned in these shallow waters. Tubli Bay is an important nursery ground for both P. semisulcatus and M. stebbingi. However, this bay does not support the entire stock of P. semisulcatus. Post-spawning return migration to shallow waters is noted for P. semisulcatus. Tubli Bay is of minor importance as a nursery ground for both P. latisulcatus and M. kutchensis. Other penaeid species found in Bahrain waters are not dependent on Tubli Bay during their life cycles. These species include, Trachypenaeus curvirostris Stimpson (1860), Metapenaeopsis stridulans Alcock (1905), and M. mogiensis Rathbun (1902).

  20. A possible important CO2 sink by the global water cycle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU ZaiHua; Wolfgang DREYBRODT; WANG HaiJing

    2008-01-01

    The locations, magnitudes, variations and mechanisms responsible for the global CO2 sink are uncer-tain and under debate. Here, we show, based on theoretical calculations and evidences from field monitoring results, that there is a possible important CO2 sink (as DIC-dissolved inorganic carbon) by the global water cycle. The sink constitutes up to 0.8013 Pg C/a (or 10.1% of the total anthropogenic CO2 emission, or 28.6% of the missing CO2 sink), and is formed by the CO2 absorption of water and subsequent enhanced consumption by carbonate dissolution and aquatic plant photosynthesis. Of the sink, 0.5188 Pg C/a goes to sea via precipitation over sea (0.2748 Pg C/a) and continental rivers (0.244 Pg C/a), 0.158 Pg C/a is released to the atmosphere again, and 0.1245 Pg C/a is stored in the continental aquatic ecosystem. Therefore, the net sink could be 0.6433 Pg C/a. This sink may increase with the global-warming-intensified global water cycle, the increase in CO2 and carbonate dust in atmosphere, and reforestation/afforestation, the latter increasing soil CO2, and thus the concentration of the DIC in water.

  1. INTENSITY INDEX OF SOUTH CHINA SEA MONSOON AND ITS VARIATION CHARACTERISTICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴尚森; 梁建茵

    2002-01-01

    According to the basic characteristics of the activities of summer monsoon in the South China Sea,Standardized index,Is,has been designed that integrates a dynamic factor(southwesterly component) and a thermodynamic factor(OLR) for the indication of summer monsoon in the South China Sea,With the index determined for individual months of June,July and August and the entire summertime from 1975 to 1999,specific months and years are indicated that are either strong or weak in monsoon intensity,The variation is studied for the patterns and Is's relationship is revealed with the onset of summer monsoon and the precipitation in Guang-dong province and China.The results show that there are quasi-10 and quasi-3-4 year cycles in the interannual variation of the monsooon over the past 25 years.When it has an early(late)onset,the summer monsoon is usually strong (weak),In the strong(weak)monsoon,years,precipitation tends to be more(less)in the first raining season of the year but normal or less(normal)in the second,in the province,but it would be more(less) in northeastern China and most parts of the northern china and south of the lower reaches of the Changjiang River and less(more)in the middle and lower reaches of the river,western part of northern China and western China.

  2. Spatiotemporal characteristics and water budget of water cycle elements in different seasons in northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周杰; 赵俊虎; 何文平; 龚志强

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study the spatiotemporal characteristics of precipitable water, precipitation, evaporation, and water–vapor flux divergence in different seasons over northeast China and the water balance of that area. The data used in this paper is provided by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). The results show that the spatial distributions of precipitable water, precipitation, and evaporation feature that the values of elements above in the southeastern area are larger than those in the northwestern area;in summer, much precipitation and evaporation occur in the Changbai Mountain region as a strong moisture convergence region;in spring and autumn, moisture divergence dominates the northeast of China;in winter, the moisture divergence and convergence are weak in this area. From 1979 to 2010, the total precipitation of summer and autumn in northeast China decreased significantly; especially from 1999 to 2010, the summer precipitation always demonstrated negative anomaly. Additionally, other elements in different seasons changed in a truly imperceptible way. In spring, the evaporation exceeded the precipitation in northeast China; in summer, the precipitation was more prominent;in autumn and winter, precipitation played a more dominating role than the evaporation in the northern part of northeast China, while the evaporation exceeded the precipitation in the southern part. The Interim ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA-Interim) data have properly described the water balance of different seasons in northeast China. Based on ERA-Interim data, the moisture sinks computed through moisture convergence and moisture local variation are quite consistent with those computed through precipitation and evaporation, which proves that ERA-Interim data can be used in the research of water balance in northeast China. On a seasonal scale, the moisture convergence has a greater influence than the local moisture variation on a moisture sink, and the latter is

  3. Modelling the impact of Water Sensitive Urban Design technologies on the urban water cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Locatelli, Luca

    . WSUD structures (WSUDs) are typically small, decentralized systems for managing stormwater runoff near the source. These systems interact with the urban hydrological cycle, modifying the evapotranspiration, runoff and groundwater recharge fluxes. It is challenging to quantify these hydrological changes...... because of the cost and complexity of modelling multiple WSUD systems in larger scale urban catchments. For this reason, new modelling tools are needed. These tools must be simple enough to be computationally efficient, while still describing the observed hydrological responses of urban catchments...... observed data describing the performance of single WSUD units, and the performance of multiple systems at a catchment scale. To address these aims, new models of green roofs and soakaways are developed and tested using observations from several urban catchments. The models are used to quantify...

  4. Amount of water needed to save 1 m3 of water: life cycle assessment of a flow regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Markus; Söchtig, Michael; Weis, Christoph; Finkbeiner, Matthias

    2017-06-01

    Water saving devices in the sanitary equipment, such as flow regulators, are assumed to be environmentally advantageous even though their environmental benefit has never been compared to the environmental burden caused during their production und disposal. Therefore, a life cycle assessment according to ISO 14044 has been conducted to identify and quantify the environmental effects throughout the lifespan of a flow regulator. The analysis comprises the production of materials, manufacturing of components at suppliers, the assembly at NEOPERL®, all transports, savings of water and thermal energy during use as well as waste incineration including energy recovery in the end-of-life stage. Results show that the production of one flow regulator causes 0.12 MJ primary energy demand, a global warming potential of 5.9 g CO2-equivalent, and a water consumption of 30.3 ml. On the other hand, during a use of 10 years, it saves 19,231 MJ primary energy, 1223 kg CO2-equivalent, and avoids a water consumption of 790 l (166,200 l water use). Since local impacts of water consumption are more relevant than volumes, consequences of water consumption have been analyzed using recently developed impact assessment models. Accordingly, the production of a flow regulator causes 8.5 ml freshwater depletion, 1.4 × 10-13 disability adjusted life years, and 4.8 × 10-6 potentially disappeared fractions of species m2 a. Even though avoided environmental impacts resulting from water savings highly depend on the region where the flow regulator is used, the analysis has shown that environmental benefits are at least 15,000 times higher than impacts caused during the production.

  5. Every apple has a voice: using stable isotopes to teach about food sourcing and the water cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oerter, Erik; Malone, Molly; Putman, Annie; Drits-Esser, Dina; Stark, Louisa; Bowen, Gabriel

    2017-07-01

    Agricultural crops such as fruits take up irrigation and meteoric water and incorporate it into their tissue (fruit water) during growth, and the geographic origin of a fruit may be traced by comparing the H and O stable isotope composition (δ2H and δ18O values) of fruit water to the global geospatial distribution of H and O stable isotopes in precipitation. This connection between common fruits and the global water cycle provides an access point to connect with a variety of demographic groups to educate about isotope hydrology and the water cycle. Within the context of a 1-day outreach activity designed for a wide spectrum of participants (high school students, undergraduate students, high school science teachers) we developed introductory lecture materials, in-class participatory demonstrations of fruit water isotopic measurement in real time, and a computer lab exercise to couple actual fruit water isotope data with open-source online geospatial analysis software. We assessed learning outcomes with pre- and post-tests tied to learning objectives, as well as participant feedback surveys. Results indicate that this outreach activity provided effective lessons on the basics of stable isotope hydrology and the water cycle. However, the computer lab exercise needs to be more specifically tailored to the abilities of each participant group. This pilot study provides a foundation for further development of outreach materials that can effectively engage a range of participant groups in learning about the water cycle and the ways in which humans modify the water cycle through agricultural activity.

  6. Impact of monsoon rainfall on the total food grain yield over India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Prasanna

    2014-07-01

    The study focuses on understanding the variations of precipitation during summer monsoon season and its impact on Kharif and Rabi foodgrain yield over India. Total foodgrain yield over India during Kharif (summer) season is directly affected by variations in the summer monsoon precipitation (June–September). An increase (decrease) in rainfall is generally associated with an increase (decrease) in foodgrain yield. A similar correspondence during the Rabi (winter) foodgrain yield is not evident. The Rabi crop is not directly affected by variations in the post-monsoon precipitation (October–December) alone, also the summer season precipitation influences the Rabi crop through water and soil moisture availability over many parts of India. Though the reduction of rainfall activity during the entire summer monsoon season leads to reduction in crop yields, the occurrence of prolonged rainfall breaks also causes adverse effect on the crop growth resulting in reduced crop yields.

  7. Life cycle assessment of nuclear-based hydrogen production via thermochemical water splitting using a copper-chlorine (Cu-Cl) cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbilen, Ahmet Ziyaettin

    The energy carrier hydrogen is expected to solve some energy challenges. Since its oxidation does not emit greenhouse gases (GHGs), its use does not contribute to climate change, provided that it is derived from clean energy sources. Thermochemical water splitting using a Cu-Cl cycle, linked with a nuclear super-critical water cooled reactor (SCWR), which is being considered as a Generation IV nuclear reactor, is a promising option for hydrogen production. In this thesis, a comparative environmental study is reported of the three-, four- and five-step Cu-Cl thermochemical water splitting cycles with various other hydrogen production methods. The investigation uses life cycle assessment (LCA), which is an analytical tool to identify and quantify environmentally critical phases during the life cycle of a system or a product and/or to evaluate and decrease the overall environmental impact of the system or product. The LCA results for the hydrogen production processes indicate that the four-step Cu-Cl cycle has lower environmental impacts than the three- and five-step Cu-Cl cycles due to its lower thermal energy requirement. Parametric studies show that acidification potentials (APs) and global warming potentials (GWPs) for the four-step Cu-Cl cycle can be reduced from 0.0031 to 0.0028 kg SO2-eq and from 0.63 to 0.55 kg CO2-eq, respectively, if the lifetime of the system increases from 10 to 100 years. Moreover, the comparative study shows that the nuclear-based S-I and the four-step Cu-Cl cycles are the most environmentally benign hydrogen production methods in terms of AP and GWP. GWPs of the S-I and the four-step Cu-Cl cycles are 0.412 and 0.559 kg CO2-eq for reference case which has a lifetime of 60 years. Also, the corresponding APs of these cycles are 0.00241 and 0.00284 kg SO2-eq. It is also found that an increase in hydrogen plant efficiency from 0.36 to 0.65 decreases the GWP from 0.902 to 0.412 kg CO 2-eq and the AP from 0.00459 to 0.00209 kg SO2-eq for the

  8. Effects of the light--dark cycle on a water tank social interaction test in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejdi, A; Guastavino, J M; Lalonde, R

    1996-01-01

    Mice were exposed to a water tank interaction test in which food could be obtained either by wading in the water or by attacking littermates. A tank with progressively rising water levels caused mice in groups of four to differentiate into those willing to wade (carrier mice) from those unwilling to wade (noncarrier mice). Noncarrier mice could only obtain food by stealing it from carrier mice or from other noncarrier mice. It was found that mice during the dark period of the light--dark cycle were more willing to wade in the search for food rather than attempt to steal food from other mice. Because mice are generally more active during the dark period, this result suggests that higher activity levels increase the willingness to share the work load, a form of altruism, rather than promote parasitic behavior and aggression.

  9. A mechanism for land-ocean contrasts in global monsoon trends in a warming climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fasullo, J. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, CAS/NCAR, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2012-09-15

    A central paradox of the global monsoon record involves reported decreases in rainfall over land during an era in which the global hydrologic cycle is both expected and observed to intensify. It is within this context that this work develops a physical basis for both interpreting the observed record and anticipating changes in the monsoons in a warming climate while bolstering the concept of the global monsoon in the context of shared feedbacks. The global-land monsoon record across multiple reanalyses is first assessed. Trends that in other studies have been taken as real are shown to likely be spurious as a result of changes in the assimilated data streams both prior to and during the satellite era. Nonetheless, based on satellite estimates, robust increases in monsoon rainfall over ocean do exist and a physical basis for this land-ocean contrast remains lacking. To address the contrast's causes, simulated trends are therefore assessed. While projections of total rainfall are inconsistent across models, the robust land-ocean contrast identified in observations is confirmed. A feedback mechanism is proposed rooted in the facts that land areas warm disproportionately relative to ocean, and onshore flow is the chief source of monsoonal moisture. Reductions in lower tropospheric relative humidity over land domains are therefore inevitable and these have direct consequences for the monsoonal convective environment including an increase in the lifting condensation level and a shift in the distribution of convection generally towards less frequent and potentially more intense events. The mechanism is interpreted as an important modulating influence on the ''rich-get-richer'' mechanism. Caveats for regional monsoons exist and are discussed. (orig.)

  10. Observational evidence for volcanic impact on sea level and the global water cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinsted, A; Moore, J C; Jevrejeva, S

    2007-12-11

    It has previously been noted that there are drops in global sea level (GSL) after some major volcanic eruptions. However, observational evidence has not been convincing because there is substantial variability in the global sea level record over periods similar to those at which we expect volcanoes to have an impact. To quantify the impact of volcanic eruptions we average monthly GSL data from 830 tide gauge records around five major volcanic eruptions. Surprisingly, we find that the initial response to a volcanic eruption is a significant rise in sea level of 9 +/- 3 mm in the first year after the eruption. This rise is followed by a drop of 7 +/- 3 mm in the period 2-3 years after the eruption relative to preeruption sea level. These results are statistically robust and no particular volcanic eruption or ocean region dominates the signature we find. Neither the drop nor especially the rise in GSL can be explained by models of lower oceanic heat content. We suggest that the mechanism is a transient disturbance of the water cycle with a delayed response of land river runoff relative to ocean evaporation and global precipitation that affects global sea level. The volcanic impact on the water cycle and sea levels is comparable in magnitude to that of a large El Niño-La Niña cycle, amounting to approximately 5% of global land precipitation.

  11. Impacts of urbanisation on urban-rural water cycle: a China case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingna; Singh, Shailesh Kumar; Zhang, Jun-e.; Khu, Soon Thiam

    2016-04-01

    Urbanization, which essentially create more impervious surface, is an inevitable part of modern societal development throughout the world. It produces several changes in the natural hydrological cycle by adding several processes. A better understanding of the impacts of urbanization, will allow policy makers to balance development and environment sustainability needs. It also helps underdeveloped countries make strategic decisions in their development process. The objective of this study is to understand and quantify the sensitivity of the urban-rural water cycle to urbanisation. A coupled hydrological model, MODCYCLE, was set up to simulate the effect of changes in landuse on daily streamflow and groundwater and applied to the Tianjin municipality, a rapidly urbanising mega-city on the east coast of China. The model uses landuse, land cover, soil, meteorological and climatic data to represent important parameters in the catchment. The fraction of impervious surface was used as a surrogate to quantify the degree of landuse change. In this work, we analysed the water cycle process under current urbanization situation in Tianjin. A number of different future development scenarios on based on increasing urbanisation intensity is explored. The results show that the expansion of urban areas had a great influence on generation of flow process and on ET, and the surface runoff was most sensitive to urbanisation. The results of these scenarios-based study about future urbanisation on hydrological system will help planners and managers in taking proper decisions regarding sustainable development.

  12. Tropical stratospheric circulation and monsoon rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikder, A. B.; Patwardhan, S. K.; Bhalme, H. N.

    1993-09-01

    Interannual variability of both SW monsoon (June September) and NE monsoon (October December) rainfall over subdivisions of Coastal Andhra Pradesh, Rayalaseema and Tamil Nadu have been examined in relation to monthly zonal wind anomaly for 10 hPa, 30 hPa and 50 hPa at Balboa (9°N, 80°W) for the 29 year period (1958 1986). Correlations of zonal wind anomalies to SW monsoon rainfall ( r=0.57, significant at 1% level) is highest with the longer lead time (August of the previous year) at 10 hPa level suggesting some predictive value for Coastal Andhra Pradesh. The probabilities estimated from the contingency table reveal non-occurrence of flood during easterly wind anomalies and near non-occurrence of drought during westerly anomalies for August of the previous year at 10 hPa which provides information for forecasting of performance of SW monsoon over Coastal Andhra Pradesh. However, NE monsoon has a weak relationship with zonal wind anomalies of 10 hPa, 30 hPa and 50 hPa for Coastal Andhra Pradesh, Rayalaseema and Tamil Nadu. Tracks of the SW monsoon storms and depressions in association with the stratospheric wind were also examined to couple with the fluctuations in SW monsoon rainfall. It is noted that easterly / westerly wind at 10 hPa, in some manner, suppresses / enhances monsoon storms and depressions activity affecting their tracks.

  13. Last Glacial to Holocene history of the Indian Monsoon recorded in Andaman Sea sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathorne, E. C.; Yirgaw, D. G.; Ali, S.; Giosan, L.; Collett, T. S.; Nath, B.; Frank, M.

    2013-12-01

    Over 3 billion people live in the area influenced by the Asian monsoon, the rains of which provide vital water resources while posing a risk to human life through flooding. Despite the importance to so many the monsoon is difficult to predict and model, making its future development in a changing global climate uncertain. To help improve models and predictions, histories of monsoon variability beyond the instrumental record are required. The past variability of the Indian Monsoon is mostly known from records of monsoon wind strength over the Arabian Sea. This study uses a unique long sediment core obtained by the drill ship JOIDES Resolution in the Andaman Sea to examine the past variability of Indian Monsoon precipitation on the Indian sub-continent and directly over the ocean. Here we present multi-proxy data examining variations during the last glacial and deglaciation. The radiogenic Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic composition of the clay fraction (fresh water. References: Antonov, J. I., D. Seidov, T. P. Boyer, R. A. Locarnini, A. V. Mishonov, and H. E. Garcia (2010). World Ocean Atlas 2009 Volume 2: Salinity. S. Levitus, Ed., NOAA Atlas NESDIS 69, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 184 pp.

  14. Performance Analysis of a Double-effect Adsorption Refrigeration Cycle with a Silica Gel/Water Working Pair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Akisawa

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A numerical investigation of the double-effect adsorption refrigeration cycle is examined in this manuscript. The proposed cycle is based on the cascading adsorption cycle, where condensation heat that is produced in the top cycle is utilized as the driving heat source for the bottom cycle. The results show that the double-effect cycle produces a higher coefficient of performance (COP as compared to that of the conventional single-stage cycle for driving temperatures between 100 °C and 150 °C in which the average cycle chilled water temperature is fixed at 9 °C. Moreover, the COP of the double-effect cycle is more than twice that of the single-stage cycle when the temperature reaches 130 °C. It is also observed that the adsorbent mass ratio of the high temperature cycle (HTC to the low temperature cycle (LTC affects the performance of the double-effect adsorption refrigeration cycle.

  15. A Study of the Teleconnections in the Asian-Pacific Monsoon Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Yihui; LIU Yunyun

    2008-01-01

    The interactions among the Asian-Pacific monsoon subsystems have significant impacts on the climatic regimes in the monsoon region and even the whole world. Based on the domestic and foreign related research, an analysis is made of four different teleconnection modes found in the Asian-Pacific monsoon region, which reveal clearly the interactions among the Indian summer monsoon (ISM), the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM), and the western North Pacific summer monsoon (WNPSM). The results show that: (1) In the period of the Asian monsoon onset, the date of ISM onset is two weeks earlier than the beginning of the Meiyu over the Yangtze River Basin, and a teleconnection mode is set up from the southwestern India via the Bay of Bengal (BOB) to the Yangtze River Basin and southern Japan, I.e., the "southern" teleconnection of the Asian summer monsoon. (2) In the Asian monsoon culmination period, the precipitation of the Yangtze River Basin is influenced significantly by the WNPSM through their teleconnection relationship, and is negatively related to the WNPSM rainfall, that is, when the WNPSM is weaker than normal, the precipitation of the Yangtze River Basin is too.re than normal. (3) In contrast to the rainfall over the Yangtze River Basin, the precipitation of northern China (from the 4th pentad of July to the 3rd pentad of August) is positively related to the WNPSM. When the WNPSM is stronger than normal, the position of the western Pacific subtropical high (WPSH) becomes farther northeast than normal, the anomalous northeastward water vapor transport along the southwestern flank of WPSH is converged over northern China, providing adequate moisture for more rainfalls than normal there. (4) The summer rainfall in northern China has also a positive correlation with the ISM. During the peak period of ISM, a teleconnection pattern is formed from Northwest India via the Tibetan Plateau to northern China, I.e., the "northern" teleconnection of the Asian summer monsoon

  16. Adaptability of Irrigation to a Changing Monsoon in India: How far can we go?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaveri, E.; Grogan, D. S.; Fisher-Vanden, K.; Frolking, S. E.; Wrenn, D. H.; Nicholas, R.

    2014-12-01

    Agriculture and the monsoon are inextricably linked in India. A large part of the steady rise in agricultural production since the onset of the Green Revolution in the 1960's has been attributed to irrigation. Irrigation is used to supplement and buffer crops against precipitation shocks, but water availability for such use is itself sensitive to the erratic, seasonal and spatially heterogeneous nature of the monsoon. We provide new evidence on the relationship between monsoon changes, irrigation variability and water availability by linking a process based hydrology model with an econometric model for one of the world's most water stressed countries. India uses more groundwater for irrigation than any other country, and there is substantial evidence that this has led to depletion of groundwater aquifers. First, we build an econometric model of historical irrigation decisions using detailed agriculture and weather data spanning 35 years. Multivariate regression models reveal that for crops grown in the wet season, irrigation is sensitive to distribution and total monsoon rainfall but not to ground or surface water availability. For crops grown in the dry season, total monsoon rainfall matters most, and its effect is sensitive to groundwater availability. The historical estimates from the econometric model are used to calculate future irrigated areas under three different climate model predictions of monsoon climate for the years 2010 - 2050. These projections are then used as input to a physical hydrology model, which quantifies supply of irrigation water from sustainable sources such as rechargeable shallow groundwater, rivers and reservoirs, to unsustainable sources such as non- rechargeable groundwater. We find that the significant variation in monsoon projections lead to very different results. Crops grown in the dry season show particularly divergent trends between model projections, leading to very different groundwater resource requirements.

  17. Aerosol and monsoon climate interactions over Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhanqing; Lau, W. K.-M.; Ramanathan, V.; Wu, G.; Ding, Y.; Manoj, M. G.; Liu, J.; Qian, Y.; Li, J.; Zhou, T.; Fan, J.; Rosenfeld, D.; Ming, Y.; Wang, Y.; Huang, J.; Wang, B.; Xu, X.; Lee, S.-S.; Cribb, M.; Zhang, F.; Yang, X.; Zhao, C.; Takemura, T.; Wang, K.; Xia, X.; Yin, Y.; Zhang, H.; Guo, J.; Zhai, P. M.; Sugimoto, N.; Babu, S. S.; Brasseur, G. P.

    2016-12-01

    The increasing severity of droughts/floods and worsening air quality from increasing aerosols in Asia monsoon regions are the two gravest threats facing over 60% of the world population living in Asian monsoon regions. These dual threats have fueled a large body of research in the last decade on the roles of aerosols in impacting Asian monsoon weather and climate. This paper provides a comprehensive review of studies on Asian aerosols, monsoons, and their interactions. The Asian monsoon region is a primary source of emissions of diverse species of aerosols from both anthropogenic and natural origins. The distributions of aerosol loading are strongly influenced by distinct weather and climatic regimes, which are, in turn, modulated by aerosol effects. On a continental scale, aerosols reduce surface insolation and weaken the land-ocean thermal contrast, thus inhibiting the development of monsoons. Locally, aerosol radiative effects alter the thermodynamic stability and convective potential of the lower atmosphere leading to reduced temperatures, increased atmospheric stability, and weakened wind and atmospheric circulations. The atmospheric thermodynamic state, which determines the formation of clouds, convection, and precipitation, may also be altered by aerosols serving as cloud condensation nuclei or ice nuclei. Absorbing aerosols such as black carbon and desert dust in Asian monsoon regions may also induce dynamical feedback processes, leading to a strengthening of the early monsoon and affecting the subsequent evolution of the monsoon. Many mechanisms have been put forth regarding how aerosols modulate the amplitude, frequency, intensity, and phase of different monsoon climate variables. A wide range of theoretical, observational, and modeling findings on the Asian monsoon, aerosols, and their interactions are synthesized. A new paradigm is proposed on investigating aerosol-monsoon interactions, in which natural aerosols such as desert dust, black carbon from

  18. Three-dimensional mapping of the water cycle and D/H on Mars with ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Geronimo Luis; Mumma, Michael J.; Novak, Robert E.; Gurwell, Mark A.; Clarke, John T.; Tokunaga, Alan T.; Khayat, Alain; Hecht, Michael; Fisher, David Andrew

    2016-10-01

    Using ALMA, we mapped the vertical distribution of the water D/H across a broad range of terrains and times of days and local seasons on Mars. The observations were done in March/2016 and targeted four lines of isotopic water (H2O, HDO, H218O, H217O), and one line of isotopic carbon monoxide (C17O) used for establishing the thermal structure. The observations allowed us to investigate and separate how the D/H evolves on the planet, since fractionation processes induced by cloud formation would lead to notable variations of D/H along the column.Isotopic measurements are per-se excellent tracers of water loss/evolution on Mars (Villanueva et al. 2015), yet some of the recently observed variations are striking and reveal a far more complex scenario for the processes acting on the Martian water cycle. They are perhaps indicative of sub-surface water reservoirs interacting with the atmosphere, but the IR measurements did not resolve the vertical structure, limiting the untangling of climatological effects (e.g., cloud formation, Rayleigh distillation).We will present 3D maps of water and D/H and will discuss possible scenarios to explain the observations, in particular, in the context of the upper-atmosphere D/H MAVEN measurements.Villanueva, G. L., Mumma, M. J., Novak, R. E., et al. 2015, Science, 348, 218

  19. The Life Cycle CO2 (LCCO2 Evaluation of Retrofits for Water-Saving Fittings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasutoshi Shimizu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available As part of measures being taken against global warming, the reduction of CO2 emissions by retrofitting for water-saving fittings in homes is spreading throughout the world. However, although this retrofitting reduces the environmental impact at the use stage, it generates new impacts at the production and disposal stages. In addition, there has been little research that discusses the reduction in environmental impact obtained by retrofitting from the viewpoint of the overall life cycle of such fittings. In this paper, an evaluation of the environmental impact of retrofitting in terms of the entire life cycle was carried out for toilet bowls and showerheads. The findings show that even for a toilet bowl that generates a large environmental load at the production stage, there is no overall increase in the environmental impact by retrofitting for the average usable life of 20 years.

  20. Spacebased Observations of the Oceanic Responses to Monsoons in South China Sea and Arabian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiao-Su; Liu, W. Timothy

    2000-01-01

    A large percentage of the world's population and their agrarian economy must endure the vagaries of the monsoons over the tropical oceans between Africa and the Philippines. We know very little about the oceanic responses to changes of the monsoon in the South China Sea (SCS), which is under the influence of the East Asian Monsoon System, and the Arabian Sea (AS), which is dominated by the Indian Monsoon System; oceanic observations are sparse in both regions. Data from spaceborne microwave scatterometers and radiometers have been used to estimate the two major atmospheric forcing, momentum flux and latent heat flux (LHF), which change with the monsoon winds. Spaceborne sensors also observed the surface signatures of the oceanic response: SST and sea level changes (SLC. Sufficient durations of these data have recently become available to allow the meaningful studies of the annual cycles and interannual anomalies. In SCS, the winter monsoon is strong and steady but the summer monsoon is weak and has large intraseasonal fluctuations. In AS, the summer monsoon is much stronger than the winter monsoon. Significant correlations between LHF and SST tendency, and between curl of wind stress and SLC are found in both oceans. In the north SCS, winds are strong and dry, LHF is high, and ocean cooling is also large in fall; LHF is low and the ocean warms up in spring. In AS, LHF and SST tendency have a semi annual period; LHF is high in summer when the wind is strong and in winter when the wind is dry. Along the coast of Oman, the strong summer southwest monsoon causes intense upwelling, low SST and LHF in summer; such wind-driven SST changes is not as obvious along the Vietnam coast because of the weaker summer monsoon. The negative correlation between curl of wind stress and SLC found in the central basins of both SCS and AS agrees with a simple Ekman pumping scenario. Cyclonic winds drive surface divergence and upwelling in the ocean; the rise of the thermocline causes

  1. Sensitivity of the water cycle over the Indian Ocean and Maritime Continent to parameterized physics in a regional model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulate, Marcela; Dudhia, Jimy; Zhang, Chidong

    2014-12-01

    A regional model was used to simulate the water cycle over the Indian Ocean (IO) and Maritime Continent (MC). Sixteen 92 day simulations were performed using different combinations of eight cumulus parameterization schemes and three planetary boundary-layer (PBL) parameterization schemes. The strength of the water cycle in the IO and MC, measured by its domain mean precipitation and precipitable water, differs substantially among the simulations. The large spread of water cycle strength is mainly toward dry biases in comparison to global data assimilation products. The simulated water cycle, its spread, and biases differ between the IO and MC. Influences of PBL schemes can penetrate into the upper troposphere and those by cumulus schemes into the boundary layer. Dry biases in the simulations are produced mainly because of feedbacks among erroneously low diabatic heating peaks, shallow moisture convergence layers, dry lower troposphere, and weak surface evaporation. There is no single type of parameterization scheme that can be identified to be the main sources of the dry biases. It is the combination of errors from three types of parameterization schemes, namely, cumulus, PBL, and microphysics, that makes the simulated water cycle unrealistic. The lesson learned is that the tropical water cycle can be better simulated only by improving parameterization schemes of different processes all together as a package.

  2. Overview of the effects of the coal fuel cycle on hydrology, water quality and use, and aquatic ecology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, R.M.; Gough, S.B.; Moran, M.S.

    1980-05-01

    Literature is summarized for the effects of the coal fuel cycle (mining, mine-site processing, transportation, storage, onsite processing, combustion, and waste collection and disposal) on water resources. Aspects considered include surface- and ground-water hydrology, water quality and use, and aquatic ecology. Water use is discussed with regard to both availability and water quality constraints on use. Requirements of the recently enacted Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act are introduced where appropriate. For the combustion step in the fuel cycle, only those effects which are specific to coal as a fuel are addressed. Effects not specific to coal use (such as thermal effects, impingement, and entrainment resulting from cooling water withdrawal and use) are not considered. Reference is made to more exhaustive studies of the topics reviewed. A summary of the major environmental effects of the coal fuel cycle is given below.

  3. Modeling spatially- and temporally-explicit water stress indices for use in life cycle assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, L.; Venkatesh, A.; Karuppiah, R.; Usadi, A.; Pfister, S.; Hellweg, S.

    2013-12-01

    Water scarcity is a regional issue in many areas across the world, and can affect human health and ecosystems locally. Water stress indices (WSIs) have been developed as quantitative indicators of such scarcities - examples include the Falkenmark indicator, Social Water Stress Index, and the Water Supply Stress Index1. Application of these indices helps us understand water supply and demand risks for multiple users, including those in the agricultural, industrial, residential and commercial sectors. Pfister et al.2 developed a method to calculate WSIs that were used to estimate characterization factors (CFs) in order to quantify environmental impacts of freshwater consumption within a life cycle assessment (LCA) framework. Global WSIs were based on data from the WaterGAP model3, and presented as annual averages for watersheds. Since water supply and demand varies regionally and temporally, the resolution used in Pfister et al. does not effectively differentiate between seasonal and permanent water scarcity. This study aims to improve the temporal and spatial resolution of the water scarcity calculations used to estimate WSIs and CFs. We used the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT)4 hydrological model to properly simulate water supply in different world regions with high spatial and temporal resolution, and coupled it with water use data from WaterGAP3 and Pfister et al.5. Input data to SWAT included weather, land use, soil characteristics and a digital elevation model (DEM), all from publicly available global data sets. Potential evapotranspiration, which affects water supply, was determined using an improved Priestley-Taylor approach. In contrast to most other hydrological studies, large reservoirs, water consumption and major water transfers were simulated. The model was calibrated against observed monthly discharge, actual evapotranspiration, and snow water equivalents wherever appropriate. Based on these simulations, monthly WSIs were calculated for a few

  4. Monsoon oscillations regulate fertility of the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Raitsos, Dionysios E.

    2015-02-16

    Tropical ocean ecosystems are predicted to become warmer, more saline, and less fertile in a future Earth. The Red Sea, one of the warmest and most saline environments in the world, may afford insights into the function of the tropical ocean ecosystem in a changing planet. We show that the concentration of chlorophyll and the duration of the phytoplankton growing season in the Red Sea are controlled by the strength of the winter Arabian monsoon (through horizontal advection of fertile waters from the Indian Ocean). Furthermore, and contrary to expectation, in the last decade (1998-2010) the winter Red Sea phytoplankton biomass has increased by 75% during prolonged positive phases of the Multivariate El Niño-Southern Oscillation Index. A new mechanism is reported, revealing the synergy of monsoon and climate in regulating Red Sea greenness. © 2015 The Authors.

  5. Strengthening of the hydrological cycle in future scenarios: atmospheric energy and water balance perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Alessandri

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Future climate scenarios experiencing global warming are expected to strengthen hydrological cycle during 21st century by comparison with the last decades of 20th century. We analyze strengthening of the global-scale increase in precipitation from the perspective of changes in whole atmospheric water and energy balances. Furthermore, by combining energy and water equations for the whole atmosphere we profitably obtain constraints for the changes in surface fluxes and for the partitioning at the surface between sensible and latent components.

    Above approach is applied to investigate difference in strengthening of hydrological cycle in two scenario centennial simulations performed with an Earth System model forced with specified atmospheric concentration pathways. Alongside the medium-high non-mitigation scenario SRES A1B, we considered a new aggressive-mitigation scenario (E1 with reduced fossil fuel use for energy production aimed at stabilizing global warming below 2 K. Quite unexpectedly, mitigation scenario is shown to strengthen hydrological cycle more than SRES A1B till around 2070. Our analysis shows that this is mostly a consequence of the larger increase in the negative radiative imbalance of atmosphere in E1 compared to A1B. This appears to be primarily related to the abated aerosol concentration in E1, which considerably reduces atmospheric absorption of solar radiation compared to A1B.

    In contrast, last decades of 21st century (21C show marked increase of global precipitation in A1B compared to E1, despite the fact that the two scenarios display almost same overall increase of radiative imbalance with respect to 20th century. Our results show that radiative cooling is weakly effective in A1B throughout all 21C, so that two distinct mechanisms characterize the diverse strengthening of hydrological cycle in mid and end 21C. It is only through a very large perturbation of surface fluxes that A1B achieves larger increase

  6. Indirect water management through Life Cycle Assessment: Fostering sustainable production in developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, S.; Bayer, P.; Koehler, A.; Hellweg, S.

    2009-04-01

    Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) represents a methodological framework for analyzing the total environmental impact of any product or service of our daily life. After tracking all associated emissions and the consumption of resources, this impact is expressed with respect to a few common impact categories. These are supposed to reflect major societal and environmental priorities. However, despite their central role in environmental processes, to date hydrological as well as hydrogeological aspects are only rarely considered in LCA. Compared with standard impact categories within LCA, water is special. In contrast to other abiotic resources such as crude oil, it can be replenished. Total freshwater resources are immense, but not evenly distributed and often scarce in regions of high demand. Consequently, threads to natural water bodies have immense spatial dependency. Setting up functional relationships in order to derive a generally valid and practicable evaluation is tedious due to the complex, insufficiently understood, and uncertain natural processes involved. LCA that includes the environmental effects of water consumption means global indirect water resource management. It supports goal-directed consumer behaviour that aims to reduce pressure on natural water systems. By developing a hydrologically-based assessment of potential impacts from human interaction with natural water bodies, "greener" products can be prioritised. More sustainable and environmentally friendly water management is the result. The proposed contribution presents an operational assessment method of global surface water consumption for impacts on human health and ecosystem quality within a LCA framework. A major focus is the issue of how such global assessment helps to quantify potential impacts from water-intensive production in developing countries, where the means for proper water management are often limited. We depict a compensation scheme for impacts related to water consumption that

  7. Fluoride release of six restorative materials in water and pH-cycling solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Maria Viana de Bragança Garcez

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The fluoride release of restorative materials in deionized water has been the subject of many studies, but the behavior of these materials under conditions of acid challenge that simulates the oral cavity, needs to be further explored. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the fluoride release of restorative materials in two storage protocols: deionized water and pH-cycling system (demineralizing solution-pH 4.3 and remineralizing solution-pH 7.0 for 15 days. Eight disks of each material (Vitremer™-positive control, Dyract AP, Ariston pHc, Definite®, Tetric®Ceram and Z100-negative control were prepared (11.0 mm x 1.5 mm and suspended individually in 4.0 mL of each solution, which were daily changed. Daily fluoride release was analyzed with an ion specific electrode (Orion 9609 by the direct method or after HMDS-facilitated diffusion, following 1, 7 and 15 days. The values obtained were converted into µgF/mm² and the data analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (p< 0.05. The results showed that all materials released more fluoride in the pH-cycling system, except for Ariston pHc which maintained a constant release during the experiment. The highest fluoride release was presented by the positive control, Vitremer™ in pH-cycling and by Ariston pHc, in deionized water. The negative control Z100 and the resins Definite® and Tetric®Ceram did not present statistically significant differences.

  8. eWaterCycle: Live Demonstration of an Operational Hyper Resolution Global Hydrological Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drost, N.; Sutanudjaja, E.; Hut, R.; van Meersbergen, M.; Donchyts, G.; Bierkens, M. F.; Van De Giesen, N.

    2014-12-01

    The eWaterCycle project works towards running an operational hyper-resolution hydrological global model, assimilating incoming satellite data in real time, and making 14 day predictions of floods and droughts.In our approach, we aim to re-use existing models and techniques as much as possible, and make use of standards and open source software wherever we can. To couple the different parts of our system we use the Basic Model Interface (BMI) as developped in the CSDMS community.Starting point of the eWaterCycle project was the PCR-GLOBWB model built by Utrecht University. The software behind this model has been partially re-engineered in order to enable it to run in a High Performance Computing (HPC) environment, and to be able to interface using BMI, and run on multiple compute nodes in parallel. The final aim is to have a spatial resolution of 1km x 1km, (currently 10 x 10km).For the data assimilation we make heavy use of the OpenDA system. This allows us to make use of different data assimilation techniques without the need to implement these from scratch. We have developped a BMI adaptor for OpenDA, allowing OpenDA to use any BMI compatible model. As a data assimilation technique we currently use an Ensemble Kalman Filter, and are working on a variant of this technique optimized for HPC environments.One of the next steps in the eWaterCycle project is to couple the model with a hydrodynamic model. Our system will start a localized simulation on demand based on triggers in the global model, giving detailed flow and flood forecasting in support of navigation and disaster management.We will show a live demo of our system, including real-time integration of satellite data.

  9. Water-cooled hard-soldered kilowatt laser diode arrays operating at high duty cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumel, Genady; Karni, Yoram; Oppenhaim, Jacob; Berk, Yuri; Shamay, Moshe; Tessler, Renana; Cohen, Shalom; Risemberg, Shlomo

    2010-04-01

    High brightness laser diode arrays are increasingly found in defense applications either as efficient optical pumps or as direct energy sources. In many instances, duty cycles of 10- 20 % are required, together with precise optical collimation. System requirements are not always compatible with the use of microchannel based cooling, notwithstanding their remarkable efficiency. Simpler but effective solutions, which will not involve high fluid pressure drops as well as deionized water, are needed. The designer is faced with a number of challenges: effective heat removal, minimization of the built- in and operational stresses as well as precise and accurate fast axis collimation. In this article, we report on a novel laser diode array which includes an integral tap water cooling system. Robustness is achieved by all around hard solder bonding of passivated 940nm laser bars. Far field mapping of the beam, after accurate fast axis collimation will be presented. It will be shown that the design of water cooling channels , proper selection of package materials, careful design of fatigue sensitive parts and active collimation technique allow for long life time and reliability, while not compromising the laser diode array efficiency, optical power density ,brightness and compactness. Main performance characteristics are 150W/bar peak optical power, 10% duty cycle and more than 50% wall plug efficiency with less than 1° fast axis divergence. Lifetime of 0.5 Gshots with less than 10% power degradation has been proved. Additionally, the devices have successfully survived harsh environmental conditions such as thermal cycling of the coolant temperature and mechanical shocks.

  10. The water cycle in closed ecological systems: Perspectives from the Biosphere 2 and Laboratory Biosphere systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Mark; Dempster, W. F.; Allen, J. P.

    2009-12-01

    To achieve sustainable, healthy closed ecological systems requires solutions to challenges of closing the water cycle - recycling wastewater/irrigation water/soil medium leachate and evaporated water and supplying water of required quality as needed for different needs within the facility. Engineering Biosphere 2, the first multi-biome closed ecological system within a total airtight footprint of 12,700 m 2 with a combined volume of 200,000 m 3 with a total water capacity of some 6 × 10 6 L of water was especially challenging because it included human inhabitants, their agricultural and technical systems, as well as five analogue ecosystems ranging from rainforest to desert, freshwater ecologies to saltwater systems like mangrove and mini-ocean coral reef ecosystems. By contrast, the Laboratory Biosphere - a small (40 m 3 volume) soil-based plant growth facility with a footprint of 15 m 2 - is a very simplified system, but with similar challenges re salinity management and provision of water quality suitable for plant growth. In Biosphere 2, water needs included supplying potable water for people and domestic animals, irrigation water for a wide variety of food crops, and recycling and recovering soil nutrients from wastewater. In the wilderness biomes, providing adequately low salinity freshwater terrestrial ecosystems and maintaining appropriate salinity and pH in aquatic/marine ecosystems were challenges. The largest reservoirs in Biosphere 2 were the ocean/marsh with some 4 × 10 6 L, soil with 1 to 2 × 10 6 l, primary storage tank with 0 to 8 × 10 5 L and storage tanks for condensate and soil leachate collection and mixing tanks with a capacity of 1.6 × 10 5 L to supply irrigation for farm and wilderness ecosystems. Other reservoirs were far smaller - humidity in the atmosphere (2 × 10 3 L), streams in the rainforest and savannah, and seasonal pools in the desert were orders of magnitude smaller (8 × 10 4 L). Key technologies included condensation from

  11. New Methodology in Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) of waste water treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Henrik Fred; Wenzel, Henrik; Hauschild, Michael

    chose among different waste water treatments? Which ones are most beneficial in a holistic perspective? Here, the life cycle assessment (LCA) approach as a decision supporting tool may help because its goal is to allow quantification and direct comparison of characteristics as diverse as energy...... EU research project "NEPTUNE" focusing on nutrient recycling, micro-pollutants and ecotoxicity removal, energy production, and reuse of sludge and of its resources, this paper will present the first results of the development of a new methodology for assessing advances in wastewater treatment...

  12. HYDRGN - a computerized technique for the analysis of thermochemical water-splitting cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carty, R. H.; Conger, W. L.; Funk, J. E.; Barker, R.

    1977-06-01

    The HYDRGN computer program was designed to analyze closed thermochemical cycles for the production of hydrogen from water. This report includes the basic theory, assumptions, and methods of calculation used in this analysis along with a description of the program and its use. The source program and necessary data bank are available from the University of Kentucky. These may be obtained by sending a magnetic tape (minimum length 1200 ft) and a written request specifying the type of computer and recording characteristics of the tape. A small fee is charged for the recording and handling of the tape.

  13. Vapor compression CuCl heat pump integrated with a thermochemical water splitting cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamfirescu, C., E-mail: Calin.Zamfirescu@uoit.ca [Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT), 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, ON, Canada L1H 74K (Canada); Naterer, G.F., E-mail: Greg.Naterer@uoit.ca [Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT), 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, ON, Canada L1H 74K (Canada); Dincer, I., E-mail: Ibrahim.Dincer@uoit.ca [Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT), 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, ON, Canada L1H 74K (Canada)

    2011-01-10

    In this paper, the feasibility of using cuprous chloride (CuCl) as a working fluid in a new high temperature heat pump with vapor compression is analyzed. The heat pump is integrated with a copper-chlorine (Cu-Cl) thermochemical water splitting cycle for internal heat recovery, temperature upgrades and hydrogen production. The minimum temperature of heat supply necessary for driving the water splitting cycle can be lowered because the heat pump increases the working fluid temperature from 755 K up to {approx}950 K, at a high COP of {approx}6.5. Based on measured data available in past literature, the authors have determined the T-s diagram of CuCl, which is then used for the thermodynamic modeling of the cycle. In the heat pump cycle, molten CuCl is flashed in a vacuum where the vapor quality reaches {approx}2.5%, and then it is boiled to produce saturated vapor. The vapor is then compressed in stages (with inter-cooling and heat recovery), and condensed in a direct contact heat exchanger to transfer heat at a higher temperature. The heat pump is then integrated with a copper-chlorine water splitting plant. The heat pump evaporator is connected thermally with the hydrogen production reactor of the water splitting plant, which performs an exothermic reaction that generates heat at 760 K. Additional source heat is obtained from heat recovery from the hot reaction products of the oxy-decomposer. The heat pump transfers heat at {approx}950 K to the oxy-decomposer to drive its endothermic chemical reaction. It is shown that the heat required at the heat pump source can be obtained completely from internal heat recovery within the plant. First and second law analyses and a parametric study are performed for the proposed system to study the influence of the compressor's isentropic efficiency and temperature levels on the heat pump's COP. Two new indicators are presented: one represents the heat recovery ratio (the ratio between the thermal energy obtained by

  14. Variability of Moisture Sources and Moisture Transport in the East Asian Monsoon System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fremme, Astrid; Sodemann, Harald

    2016-04-01

    The rainfall of the East Asian Monsoon is of key importance for livelihoods in the densely populated area of China, Japan and Korea. The interplay of many factors, including land surface processes, makes monsoon precipitation difficult to predict. To contribute to improved precipitation prediction we investigate the atmospheric mechanisms importing moisture to the region. In previous studies moisture transport has mainly been analysed by examining a combination of temperature, pressure, winds and water vapour content. However this has been done without linking precipitation to its moisture sources directly. In this project we use the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART and the diagnostic tool WaterSip to analyse ERA Interim reanalysis data to obtain a link between precipitation and its moisture sources. The total atmospheric mass is subdivided into millions air parcels, which are traced backwards for 20 days for each rainfall event in the 34 year ERA-Interim period. Specific humidity changes are interpreted as evaporation and precipitation in the area beneath the parcel with the help of a sophisticated accounting method related to target precipitation. Results on the relationship between source and sink areas reflect changes in the conditions of the source regions and in moisture transport. We investigate the moisture transport mechanisms for both seasonal and inter-annual variations during the study period 1979-2013. Preliminary results show that the sources for precipitation in the Yangtze River Valley (YRV) in China have a clear seasonal cycle in terms of location and evaporation conditions. Land areas outside the YRV Region contribute most of the moisture. The second largest source is inside the YRV region itself. For monthly means the sum of all direct oceanic sources rarely exceeds 20%. Recycling of moisture from land surfaces outside the target regions therefore seems to play a pivotal role in the East Asian Monsoon's moisture budget. Contrasting

  15. The application of a Web-geographic information system for improving urban water cycle modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, M; Mikovits, C; Sengthaler, M; Schöpf, M; Kinzel, H; Urich, C; Kleidorfer, M; Sitzenfrei, R; Rauch, W

    2014-01-01

    Research in urban water management has experienced a transition from traditional model applications to modelling water cycles as an integrated part of urban areas. This includes the interlinking of models of many research areas (e.g. urban development, socio-economy, urban water management). The integration and simulation is realized in newly developed frameworks (e.g. DynaMind and OpenMI) and often assumes a high knowledge in programming. This work presents a Web based urban water management modelling platform which simplifies the setup and usage of complex integrated models. The platform is demonstrated with a small application example on a case study within the Alpine region. The used model is a DynaMind model benchmarking the impact of newly connected catchments on the flooding behaviour of an existing combined sewer system. As a result the workflow of the user within a Web browser is demonstrated and benchmark results are shown. The presented platform hides implementation specific aspects behind Web services based technologies such that the user can focus on his main aim, which is urban water management modelling and benchmarking. Moreover, this platform offers a centralized data management, automatic software updates and access to high performance computers accessible with desktop computers and mobile devices.

  16. Air Evaporation closed cycle water recovery technology - Advanced energy saving designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morasko, Gwyndolyn; Putnam, David F.; Bagdigian, Robert

    1986-01-01

    The Air Evaporation water recovery system is a visible candidate for Space Station application. A four-man Air Evaporation open cycle system has been successfully demonstrated for waste water recovery in manned chamber tests. The design improvements described in this paper greatly enhance the system operation and energy efficiency of the air evaporation process. A state-of-the-art wick feed design which results in reduced logistics requirements is presented. In addition, several design concepts that incorporate regenerative features to minimize the energy input to the system are discussed. These include a recuperative heat exchanger, a heat pump for energy transfer to the air heater, and solar collectors for evaporative heat. The addition of the energy recovery devices will result in an energy reduction of more than 80 percent over the systems used in earlier manned chamber tests.

  17. Mixed-layer water oscillations in tropical Pacific for ENSO cycle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The main modes of interannal variabilities of thermocline and sea surface wind stress in the tropical Pacific and their interactions are investigated, which show the following results. (1) The thermocline anomalies in the tropical Pacific have a zonal dipole pattern with 160°W as its axis and a meridional seesaw pattern with 6-8°N as its transverse axis. The meridional oscillation has a phase lag of about 90° to the zonal oscillation, both oscillations get together to form the El Ni(n)o/La Ni(n)a cycle, which behaves as a mixed layer water oscillates anticlockwise within the tropical Pacific basin between equator and 12°N. (2) There are two main patterns of wind stress anomalies in the tropical Pacific, of which the first component caused by trade wind anomaly is characterized by the zonal wind stress anomalies and its corresponding divergences field in the equatorial Pacific, and the abnormal cross-equatorial flow wind stress and its corresponding divergence field, which has a sign opposite to that of the equatorial region, in the off-equator of the tropical North Pacific, and the second component represents the wind stress anomalies and corresponding divergences caused by the ITCZ anomaly. (3) The trade winds anomaly plays a decisive role in the strength and phase transition of the ENSO cycle, which results in the sea level tilting, provides an initial potential energy to the mixed layer water oscillation, and causes the opposite thermocline displacement between the west side and east side of the equator and also between the equator and 12°N of the North Pacific basin, therefore determines the amplitude and route for ENSO cycle. The ITCZ anomaly has some effects on the phase transition. (4) The thermal anomaly of the tropical western Pacific causes the wind stress anomaly and extends eastward along the equator accompanied with the mixed layer water oscillation in the equatorial Pacific, which causes the trade winds anomaly and produces the anomalous wind

  18. The effect of the Asian Monsoon to the atmospheric boundary layer over the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Maoshan; Su, Zhongbo; Chen, Xuelong; Zheng, Donghai; Sun, Fanglin; Ma, Yaoming; Hu, Zeyong

    2016-04-01

    Modulation of the diurnal variations in the convective activities associated with day-by-day changes of surface flux and soil moisture was observed in the beginning of the monsoon season on the central Tibetan plateau (Sugimoto et al., 2008) which indicates the importance of land-atmosphere interactions in determining convective activities over the Tibetan plateau. Detailed interaction processes need to be studied by experiments designed to evaluate a set of hypotheses on mechanisms and linkages of these interactions. A possible function of vegetation to increase precipitation in cases of Tibetan High type was suggested by Yamada and Uyeda (2006). Use of satellite derived plateau scale soil moisture (Wen et al., 2003) enables the verification of these hypotheses (e.g. Trier et al. 2004). To evaluate these feedbacks, the mesoscale WRF model will be used because several numerical experiments are being conducted to improve the soil physical parameterization in the Noah land surface scheme in WRF so that the extreme conditions on the Tibetan plateau could be adequately represented (Van der Velde et al., 2009) such that the impacts on the structure of the atmospheric boundary layer can be assessed and improved. The Tibetan Observational Research Platform (TORP) operated by the Institute of Tibetan Plateau (Ma et al., 2008) will be fully utilized to study the characteristics of the plateau climate and different aspects of the WRF model will be evaluated using this extensive observation platform (e.g. Su et al., 2012). Recently, advanced studies on energy budget have been done by combining field and satellite measurements over the Tibetan Plateau (e.g. Ma et al., 2005). Such studies, however, were based on a single satellite observation and for a few days over an annual cycle, which are insufficient to reveal the relation between the land surface energy budget and the Asian monsoon over the Tibetan plateau. Time series analysis of satellite observations will provide the

  19. Stand-Alone Solar Organic Rankine Cycle Water Pumping System and Its Economic Viability in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Baral

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The current study presents the concept of a stand-alone solar organic Rankine cycle (ORC water pumping system for rural Nepalese areas. Experimental results for this technology are presented based on a prototype. The economic viability of the system was assessed based on solar radiation data of different Nepalese geographic locations. The mechanical power produced by the solar ORC is coupled with a water pumping system for various applications, such as drinking and irrigation. The thermal efficiency of the system was found to be 8% with an operating temperature of 120 °C. The hot water produced by the unit has a temperature of 40 °C. Economic assessment was done for 1-kW and 5-kW solar ORC water pumping systems. These systems use different types of solar collectors: a parabolic trough collector (PTC and an evacuated tube collector (ETC. The economic analysis showed that the costs of water are $2.47/m3 (highest and $1.86/m3 (lowest for the 1-kW system and a 150-m pumping head. In addition, the cost of water is reduced when the size of the system is increased and the pumping head is reduced. The minimum volumes of water pumped are 2190 m3 and 11,100 m3 yearly for 1 kW and 5 kW, respectively. The payback period is eight years with a profitability index of 1.6. The system is highly feasible and promising in the context of Nepal.

  20. Sustainable Application of a Novel Water Cycle Using Seawater for Toilet Flushing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Global water security is a severe issue that threatens human health and well-being. Finding sustainable alternative water resources has become a matter of great urgency. For coastal urban areas, desalinated seawater could serve as a freshwater supply. However, since 20%–30% of the water supply is used for flushing waste from the city, seawater with simple treatment could also partly replace the use of freshwater. In this work, the freshwater saving potential and environmental impacts of the urban water system (water-wastewater closed loop adopting seawater desalination, seawater for toilet flushing (SWTF, or reclaimed water for toilet flushing (RWTF are compared with those of a conventional freshwater system, through a life-cycle assessment and sensitivity analysis. The potential applications of these processes are also assessed. The results support the environmental sustainability of the SWTF approach, but its potential application depends on the coastal distance and effective population density of a city. Developed coastal cities with an effective population density exceeding 3000 persons·km−2 and located less than 30 km from the seashore (for the main pipe supplying seawater to the city would benefit from applying SWTF, regardless of other impact parameters. By further applying the sulfate reduction, autotrophic denitrification, and nitrification integrated (SANI process for wastewater treatment, the maximum distance from the seashore can be extended to 60 km. Considering that most modern urbanized cities fulfill these criteria, the next generation of water supply systems could consist of a freshwater supply coupled with a seawater supply for sustainable urban development.

  1. Life cycle assessment of central softening of very hard drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godskesen, B; Hauschild, M; Rygaard, M; Zambrano, K; Albrechtsen, H-J

    2012-08-30

    Many consumers prefer softened water due to convenience issues such as avoidance of removing limescale deposits from household appliances and surfaces, and to reduce consumption of cleaning agents and laundry detergents leading to lower household expenses. Even though central softening of drinking water entailed an increased use of energy, sand and chemicals at the waterworks, the distributed and softened drinking water supported a decrease in consumption of energy and chemical agents in the households along with a prolonged service life of household appliances which heat water. This study used Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to quantify the environmental impacts of central softening of drinking water considering both the negative effects at the waterworks and the positive effects imposed by the changed water quality in the households. The LCA modeling considered central softening of drinking water from the initial hardness of the region of study (Copenhagen, Denmark) which is 362 mg/L as CaCO(3) to a final hardness as CaCO(3) of 254 (a softening depth of 108) mg/L or 145 (a softening depth of 217) mg/L. Our study showed that the consumer preference can be met together with reducing the impact on the environment and the resource consumption. Environmental impacts decreased by up to 3 mPET (milli Personal Equivalent Targeted) and the break-even point from where central softening becomes environmentally beneficial was reached at a softening depth of only 22 mg/L as CaCO(3). Both energy-related and chemically related environmental impacts were reduced as well as the consumption of resources. Based on scarcity criteria, nickel was identified as the most problematic non-renewable resource in the system, and savings of up to 8 mPR (milli Person Reserve) were found.

  2. TIGERZ I: Aerosols, Monsoon and Synergism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holben, B. N.; Tripathi, S. N.; Schafer, J. S.; Giles, D. M.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Smirnov, A.; Krishnmoorthy, K.; Sorokin, M. G.; Newcomb, W. W.; Tran, A. K.; Sikka, D. R.; Goloub, P.; O'Neill, N. T.; Abboud, I.; Randles, C.; Niranjan, K.; Dumka, U. C.; Tiwari, S.; Devara, P. C.; Kumar, S.; Remer, L. A.; Kleidman, R.; Martins, J. V.; Kahn, R.

    2008-12-01

    The Indo-Gangetic Plain of northern India encompasses a vast complex of urban and rural landscapes, cultures that serve as anthropogenic sources of fine mode aerosols mixed with coarse mode particles transported from SW Asia. The summer monsoon and fall Himalayan snowmelt provide the agricultural productivity to sustain an extremely high population density whose affluence is increasing. Variations in the annual monsoon precipitation of 10% define drought, normal and a wet season; the net effects on the ecosystems and quality of life can be dramatic. Clearly investigation of anthropogenic and natural aerosol impacts on the monsoon, either through the onset, monsoon breaks or end points are a great concern to understand and ultimately mitigate. Many national and international field campaigns are being planned and conducted to study various aspects of the Asian monsoon and some coordinated under the Asian Monsoon Years (AMY) umbrella. A small program called TIGERZ conducted during the pre-monsoon of 2008 in North Central India can serve as a model for contributing significant resources to existing field programs while meeting immediate project goals. This poster will discuss preliminary results of the TIGERZ effort including ground-based measurements of aerosol properties in the I-G from AERONET and synergism with various Indian programs, satellite observations and aerosol modeling efforts.

  3. Effects of cell cycle on the uptake of water soluble quantum dots by cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shen; Chen, Ji-Yao; Wang, Jun-Yong; Zhou, Lu-Wei; Peng, Qian

    2011-12-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) with excellent optical properties have become powerful candidates for cell imaging. Although numerous reports have studied the uptake of QDs by cells, little information exists on the effects of cell cycle on the cellular QD uptake. In this report, the effects of cell cycle on the uptake of water soluble thiol-capped CdTe QDs by the human cervical carcinoma Hela cell line, human hepatocellular carcinoma QGY7701 cell line, and human embryonic kidney 293T cell line were studied by means of laser scanning confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. All three cell lines show to take up CdTe QDs via endocytosis. After arresting cells at specific phases with pharmacological agents, the cells in G2/M phase take up the most CdTe QDs, probably due to an increased membrane expansion during mitosis; whereas the cells in G1 phase do the least. A mathematical physics model was built to calculate the relative uptake rates of CdTe QDs by cells in different phases of the cell cycle, with the result as the uptake rate in G2/M phase is 2-4 times higher than that in G1 phase for these three cell lines. The results obtained from this study may provide the information useful for intracellular delivery of QDs.

  4. Life cycle assessment of four potable water treatment plants in northeastern Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Orlando Ortiz Rodriguez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available There is currently great concern about the processes that directly or indirectly contribute to the potential for global warming, such as stratospheric ozone depletion or acidification. In this context, and provided that treated water is a basic public utility in urban centers around the world as well as in some rural areas, its impact on the environment is of great interest. Therefore, this study applied the environmental methodology of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA to evaluate the environmental loads of four potable water treatment plants (PWTPs located in northeastern Colombia following the international guidelines delineated in ISO 14040. The different stages of the drinking water process were thoroughly assessed, from the catchment point through pumping to the distribution network. The functional unit was defined as 1 m3 of drinking water produced at the plant. The data were analyzed through the database Ecoinvent v.3.01, and modeled and processed in the software LCA-Data Manager. The results showed that in plants PLA-CA and PLA-PO, the flocculation process has the highest environmental load, which is mostly attributable to the coagulant agent, with a range between 47-73% of the total impact. In plants PLA-TON and PLA-BOS, electricity consumption was identified as the greatest impact source, with percentages ranging from 67 to 85%. Treatment processes and techniques, bioclimatic conditions and culturally driven consumption behavior varied from region to region. Furthermore, changes in treatment processes and techniques are likely to affect the environment during all stages of a plant’s operational cycle.

  5. Water masses as a unifying framework for understanding the Southern Ocean Carbon Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Iudicone

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The scientific motivation for this study is to understand the processes in the ocean interior controlling carbon transfer across 30° S. To address this, we have developed a unified framework for understanding the interplay between physical drivers such as buoyancy fluxes and ocean mixing, and carbon-specific processes such as biology, gas exchange and carbon mixing. Given the importance of density in determining the ocean interior structure and circulation, the framework is one that is organized by density and water masses, and it makes combined use of Eulerian and Lagrangian diagnostics. This is achieved through application to a global ice-ocean circulation model and an ocean biogeochemistry model, with both components being part of the widely-used IPSL coupled ocean/atmosphere/carbon cycle model.

    Our main new result is the dominance of the overturning circulation (identified by water masses in setting the vertical distribution of carbon transport from the Southern Ocean towards the global ocean. A net contrast emerges between the role of Subantarctic Mode Water (SAMW, associated with large northward transport and ingassing, and Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW, associated with a much smaller export and outgassing. The differences in their export rate reflects differences in their water mass formation processes. For SAMW, two-thirds of the surface waters are provided as a result of the densification of thermocline water (TW, and upon densification this water carries with it a substantial diapycnal flux of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC. For AAIW, principal formatin processes include buoyancy forcing and mixing, with these serving to lighten CDW. An additional important formation pathway of AAIW is through the effect of interior processing (mixing, including cabelling that serve to densify SAMW.

    A quantitative evaluation of the contribution of mixing, biology and gas exchange to the DIC evolution per water mass reveals that

  6. The Cooperative Study on Energy and Water Cycle over the Tibetan Plateau%青藏高原能量与水循环国际合作研究的进展与展望

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马耀明; 姚檀栋; 胡泽勇; 王介民

    2009-01-01

    The processes of energy and water cycle over the Tibetan Plateau have shown that the giant prominence exerts thermal effects on the atmosphere, thus greatly influencing atmospheric circulations over China, Asia and even the globle. Focusing on this issue, the intensive observation period (IOP) and long-term observation of the GEWEX (Global Energy and Water cycle Experiment) Asian Monsoon Experiment on the Tibetan Plateau ( GAME/Tibet ) and CEOP (Coordinated Enhanced Observing Period) Asia Australia Monsoon Project (CAMP) on the Tibetan Plateau (CAMP/ Tibet ) have been carried out successfully from the beginning of 1996 under the support of National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) , the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) , the China Meteorological Administration (CMA) and the Japanese government etc. A large number of data has been collected, which is the best data set so far for the study of energy and water cycle over the Tibetan Plateau. Great progress has been made in the study of energy and water cycle over the Tibetan Plateau through the in-situ data analysis, satellite remote sensing parameterization and the numerical modeling, etc. The progresses of the study of energy and water cycle over the Tibetan Plateau and the role of the international cooperation in the projects will be introduced in detail. The role of the international cooperation in getting the research found from abroad and in training young scientists and students is also mentioned. The existing problems in the international cooperation and the solving ways are presented in the paper at the same time.%青藏高原能量与水循环过程对我国、东亚乃至全球的天气和气候系统都有着非常重要的作用.1996年以来,在国家自然科学基金委员会、中国科学院、中国气象局等相关部门和日本政府的大力支持下,我们针对青藏高原能量和水循环过程的重要性,成功地开展了青藏高原尺度和藏北地区中尺度的"全球能

  7. Cyclone trends constrain monsoon variability during Late Oligocene sea level highstands (Kachchh Basin, NW India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Reuter

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Important concerns about the consequences of climate change for India are the potential impact on tropical cyclones and the monsoon. Herein we present a sequence of fossil shell beds from the shallow-marine Maniyara Fort Formation (Kachcch Basin as an indicator of tropical cyclone activity along the NW Indian coast during the Late Oligocene warming period (~27–24 Ma. Direct proxies providing information about the atmospheric circulation dynamics over the Indian subcontinent at this time are important since it corresponds to a major climate reorganization in Asia that ends up with the establishment of the modern Asian monsoon system in the Early Miocene. The vast shell concentrations comprise a mixture of parautochthonous and allochthonous assemblages indicating storm-generated sediment transport from deep to shallow water during third-order sea level highstands. Three distinct skeletal assemblages were distinguished each recording a relative storm wave base depth. (1 A shallow storm wave base is shown by nearshore mollusks, corals and Clypeaster echinoids; (2 an intermediate storm wave base depth is indicated by lepidocyclind foraminifers, Eupatagus echinoids and corallinaceans; and (3 a deep storm wave base is represented by an Amussiopecten–Schizaster echinoid assemblage. Vertical changes in these skeletal associations give evidence of gradually increasing tropical cyclone intensity in line with third-order sea level rise. The intensity of cyclones over the Arabian Sea is primarily linked to the strength of the Indian monsoon. Therefore and since the topographic boundary conditions for the Indian monsoon already existed in the Late Oligocene, the longer-term cyclone trends were interpreted to reflect monsoon variability during the initiation of the Asian monsoon system. Our results imply an active monsoon over the Eastern Tethys at ~26 Ma followed by a period of monsoon weakening during the peak of the Late Oligocene

  8. Cyclone trends constrain monsoon variability during late Oligocene sea level highstands (Kachchh Basin, NW India)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, M.; Piller, W. E.; Harzhauser, M.; Kroh, A.

    2013-09-01

    Climate change has an unknown impact on tropical cyclones and the Asian monsoon. Herein we present a sequence of fossil shell beds from the shallow-marine Maniyara Fort Formation (Kachcch Basin) as a recorder of tropical cyclone activity along the NW Indian coast during the late Oligocene warming period (~ 27-24 Ma). Proxy data providing information about the atmospheric circulation dynamics over the Indian subcontinent at this time are important since it corresponds to a major climate reorganization in Asia that ends up with the establishment of the modern Asian monsoon system at the Oligocene-Miocene boundary. The vast shell concentrations are comprised of a mixture of parautochthonous and allochthonous assemblages indicating storm-generated sediment transport from deeper to shallow water during third-order sea level highstands. Three distinct skeletal assemblages were distinguished, each recording a relative storm wave base. (1) A shallow storm wave base is shown by nearshore molluscs, reef corals and Clypeaster echinoids; (2) an intermediate storm wave base depth is indicated by lepidocyclinid foraminifers, Eupatagus echinoids and corallinacean algae; and (3) a deep storm wave base is represented by an Amussiopecten bivalve-Schizaster echinoid assemblage. These wave base depth estimates were used for the reconstruction of long-term tropical storm intensity during the late Oligocene. The development and intensification of cyclones over the recent Arabian Sea is primarily limited by the atmospheric monsoon circulation and strength of the associated vertical wind shear. Therefore, since the topographic boundary conditions for the Indian monsoon already existed in the late Oligocene, the reconstructed long-term cyclone trends were interpreted to reflect monsoon variability during the initiation of the Asian monsoon system. Our results imply an active monsoon over the Eastern Tethys at ~ 26 Ma followed by a period of monsoon weakening during the peak of the late

  9. Cyclone trends constrain monsoon variability during late Oligocene sea level highstands (Kachchh Basin, NW India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Reuter

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Climate change has an unknown impact on tropical cyclones and the Asian monsoon. Herein we present a sequence of fossil shell beds from the shallow-marine Maniyara Fort Formation (Kachcch Basin as a recorder of tropical cyclone activity along the NW Indian coast during the late Oligocene warming period (~ 27–24 Ma. Proxy data providing information about the atmospheric circulation dynamics over the Indian subcontinent at this time are important since it corresponds to a major climate reorganization in Asia that ends up with the establishment of the modern Asian monsoon system at the Oligocene–Miocene boundary. The vast shell concentrations are comprised of a mixture of parautochthonous and allochthonous assemblages indicating storm-generated sediment transport from deeper to shallow water during third-order sea level highstands. Three distinct skeletal assemblages were distinguished, each recording a relative storm wave base. (1 A shallow storm wave base is shown by nearshore molluscs, reef corals and Clypeaster echinoids; (2 an intermediate storm wave base depth is indicated by lepidocyclinid foraminifers, Eupatagus echinoids and corallinacean algae; and (3 a deep storm wave base is represented by an Amussiopecten bivalve-Schizaster echinoid assemblage. These wave base depth estimates were used for the reconstruction of long-term tropical storm intensity during the late Oligocene. The development and intensification of cyclones over the recent Arabian Sea is primarily limited by the atmospheric monsoon circulation and strength of the associated vertical wind shear. Therefore, since the topographic boundary conditions for the Indian monsoon already existed in the late Oligocene, the reconstructed long-term cyclone trends were interpreted to reflect monsoon variability during the initiation of the Asian monsoon system. Our results imply an active monsoon over the Eastern Tethys at ~ 26 Ma followed by a period of monsoon weakening during the

  10. Evaluation of CFSV2 Forecast Skill for Indian Summer Monsoon Sub-Seasonal Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    S, S. A.; Ghosh, S.

    2015-12-01

    Prediction of sub seasonal monsoon characteristics of Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) is highly crucial for agricultural planning and water resource management. The Climate forecast System version 2 (CFS V2), the state of the art coupled climate model developed by NCEP, is currently being employed for the seasonal and extended range forecasts of ISM. Even though CFSV2 is a fully coupled ocean- atmosphere- land model with advanced physics, increased resolution and refined initialisation, its ISM forecasts, in terms of seasonal mean and variability needs improvement. Numerous works have been done for verifying the CFSV2 forecasts in terms of the seasonal mean, its mean and variability, active and break spells, and El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) - monsoon interactions. Most of these works are based on either rain fall strength or rainfall based indices. Here we evaluate the skill of CFS v2 model in forecasting the various sub seasonal features of ISM, viz., the onset and withdrawal days of monsoon that are determined using circulation based indices, the Monsoon Intra Seasonal Oscillations (MISO), and Indian Ocean and Pacific Ocean sea surface temperatures. The MISO index, we use here, is based on zonal wind at 850 hPa and Outgoing Long wave Radiation (OLR) anomalies. With this work, we aim at assessing the skill of the model in simulating the large scale circulation patterns and their variabilities within the monsoon season. Variabilities in these large scale circulation patterns are primarily responsible for the variabilities in the seasonal monsoon strength and its temporal distribution across the season. We find that the model can better forecast the large scale circulation and than the actual precipitation. Hence we suggest that seasonal rainfall forecasts can be improved by the statistical downscaling of CFSV2 forecasts by incorporating the established relationships between the well forecasted large scale variables and monsoon precipitation.

  11. Leveraging this Golden Age of Remote Sensing and Modeling of Terrestrial Hydrology to Understand Water Cycling in the Water Availability Grand Challenge for North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, T. H.; Famiglietti, J. S.; Stephens, G. L.

    2016-12-01

    We live in a time of increasing strains on our global fresh water availability due to increasing population, warming climate, changes in precipitation, and extensive depletion of groundwater supplies. At the same time, we have seen enormous growth in capabilities to remotely sense the regional to global water cycle and model complex systems with physically based frameworks. The GEWEX Water Availability Grand Challenge for North America is poised to leverage this convergence of remote sensing and modeling capabilities to answer fundamental questions on the water cycle. In particular, we envision an experiment that targets the complex and resource-critical Western US from California to just into the Great Plains, constraining physically-based hydrologic modeling with the US and international remote sensing capabilities. In particular, the last decade has seen the implementation or soon-to-be launch of water cycle missions such as GRACE and GRACE-FO for groundwater, SMAP for soil moisture, GPM for precipitation, SWOT for terrestrial surface water, and the Airborne Snow Observatory for snowpack. With the advent of convection-resolving mesoscale climate and water cycle modeling (e.g. WRF, WRF-Hydro) and mesoscale models capable of quantitative assimilation of remotely sensed data (e.g. the JPL Western States Water Mission), we can now begin to test hypotheses on the nature and changes in the water cycle of the Western US from a physical standpoint. In turn, by fusing water cycle science, water management, and ecosystem management while addressing these hypotheses, this golden age of remote sensing and modeling can bring all fields into a markedly less uncertain state of present knowledge and decadal scale forecasts.

  12. Life Cycle Water Consumption and Water Resource Assessment for Utility-Scale Geothermal Systems: An In-Depth Analysis of Historical and Forthcoming EGS Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Corrie E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Harto, Christopher B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Schroeder, Jenna N. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Martino, Louis E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Horner, Robert M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2013-08-01

    This report is the third in a series of reports sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Program in which a range of water-related issues surrounding geothermal power production are evaluated. The first report made an initial attempt at quantifying the life cycle fresh water requirements of geothermal power-generating systems and explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids. The initial analysis of life cycle fresh water consumption of geothermal power-generating systems identified that operational water requirements consumed the vast majority of water across the life cycle. However, it relied upon limited operational water consumption data and did not account for belowground operational losses for enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs). A second report presented an initial assessment of fresh water demand for future growth in utility-scale geothermal power generation. The current analysis builds upon this work to improve life cycle fresh water consumption estimates and incorporates regional water availability into the resource assessment to improve the identification of areas where future growth in geothermal electricity generation may encounter water challenges. This report is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 gives the background of the project and its purpose, which is to assess the water consumption of geothermal technologies and identify areas where water availability may present a challenge to utility-scale geothermal development. Water consumption refers to the water that is withdrawn from a resource such as a river, lake, or nongeothermal aquifer that is not returned to that resource. The geothermal electricity generation technologies evaluated in this study include conventional hydrothermal flash and binary systems, as well as EGSs that rely on engineering a productive reservoir where heat exists, but where water availability or permeability may be limited. Chapter 2

  13. Life Cycle Water Consumption and Water Resource Assessment for Utility-Scale Geothermal Systems: An In-Depth Analysis of Historical and Forthcoming EGS Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Corrie E. [Environmental Science Division; Harto, Christopher B. [Environmental Science Division; Schroeder, Jenna N. [Environmental Science Division; Martino, Louis E. [Environmental Science Division; Horner, Robert M. [Environmental Science Division

    2013-11-05

    This report is the third in a series of reports sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Program in which a range of water-related issues surrounding geothermal power production are evaluated. The first report made an initial attempt at quantifying the life cycle fresh water requirements of geothermal power-generating systems and explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids. The initial analysis of life cycle fresh water consumption of geothermal power-generating systems identified that operational water requirements consumed the vast majority of water across the life cycle. However, it relied upon limited operational water consumption data and did not account for belowground operational losses for enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs). A second report presented an initial assessment of fresh water demand for future growth in utility-scale geothermal power generation. The current analysis builds upon this work to improve life cycle fresh water consumption estimates and incorporates regional water availability into the resource assessment to improve the identification of areas where future growth in geothermal electricity generation may encounter water challenges. This report is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 gives the background of the project and its purpose, which is to assess the water consumption of geothermal technologies and identify areas where water availability may present a challenge to utility-scale geothermal development. Water consumption refers to the water that is withdrawn from a resource such as a river, lake, or nongeothermal aquifer that is not returned to that resource. The geothermal electricity generation technologies evaluated in this study include conventional hydrothermal flash and binary systems, as well as EGSs that rely on engineering a productive reservoir where heat exists, but where water availability or permeability may be limited. Chapter 2

  14. Wet-dry cycles effect on ash water repellency. A laboratory experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Cerdà, Artemi; Oliva, Marc; Mataix, Jorge; Jordán, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    In the immediate period after the fire, the ash layer has a strong influence on soil hydrological processes, as runoff, infiltration and erosion. Ash is very dynamic in the space and time. Until the first rainfall periods, ash is (re)distributed by the wind. After it can cover the soil surface, infiltrate or transported to other areas by water transport (Pereira et al., 2013a, b). This will have strong implications on nutrient redistribution and vegetation recovery. Ash layer may affect soil water repellency in different ways, depending on fire severity, soil properties and vegetation. Ash produced at low temperatures after low-severity burning is usually hydrophobic (Bodi et al., 2011, 2012). Wet-dry cycles have implications on ash physical and chemical properties, changing their effects in space and time. The aim of this study is to analyse the effects of fire temperature and severity on ash water repellency. Pinus sylvestris needles were collected in a Lithuania forest in Dzukija National Park (53º 54' N and 24º 22' E), transported to laboratory and washed with deionized water to remove soil particles and other residues. Needle samples were dried during 24 hours and exposed to different temperatures: 200, 300, 400 and 500 ºC, during 2 hours. Ash colour was analysed according to the Munsell Soil Color charts. Ash was black (10 YR 2/1) at 200 ºC, very dark grey (10YR 3/1) at 300 ºC, gray (10YR 5/1) at 400 ºC and light gray (10YR 7/1) at 500 ºC. Ten samples of ash released after each treatment were placed in plastic dishes (50 mm in diameter) in an amount enough to form a 5 mm thick layer, and ash water repellency was measured according to the Water Drop Penetration Test. Later, ash was carefully wetted with 15 ml of deionized water and placed in an oven during 4 days (96 hours), as in Bodí et al. (2012). This procedure was repeated 5 times in order to observe the effects of wet-dry cycles in ash water repellency. The results showed significant differences

  15. Optimal Access to NASA Water Cycle Data for Water Resources Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, W. L.; Arctur, D. K.; Espinoza, G. E.; Rui, H.; Strub, R. F.; Vollmer, B.

    2016-12-01

    A "Digital Divide" in data representation exists between the preferred way of data access by the hydrology community (i.e., as time series of discrete spatial objects) and the common way of data archival by earth science data centers (i.e., as continuous spatial fields, one file per time step). This Divide has been an obstacle, specifically, between the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Inc. Hydrologic Information System (CUAHSI HIS) and NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC). An optimal approach to bridging the Divide, developed by the GES DISC, is to reorganize data from the way they are archived to some way that is optimal for the desired method of data access. Specifically for CUAHSI HIS, selected data sets were reorganized into time series files, one per geographical "point." These time series files, termed "data rods," are pre-generated or virtual (generated on-the-fly). Data sets available as data rods include North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS), Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS), TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA), Land Parameter Retrieval Model (LPRM), Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA)-Land, and Groundwater and Soil Moisture Conditions from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) Data Assimilation drought indicators for North America Drought Monitor (GRACE-DA-DM). In order to easily avail the operational water resources community the benefits of optimally reorganized data, we have developed multiple methods of making these data more easily accessible and usable. These include direct access via RESTful Web services, a browser-based Web map and statistical tool for selected NLDAS variables for the U.S. (CONUS), a HydroShare app (Data Rods Explorer, under development) on the Tethys Platform, and access via the GEOSS Portal. Examples of drought-related applications of these data and data access

  16. The Global Water Cycle Drives Volcanism on Seasonal to Millennial Timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, D. M.; Mason, B. G.; Jupp, T. E.; Dade, W. B.

    2005-05-01

    Global rates of occurrence of volcanic eruptions show periodic behaviour on timescales ranging from 106 years. At long timescales (>106 to 107 years), rates of eruption are controlled by plate tectonics. At shorter timescales, the periodic nature of volcanism is forced by the global water cycle. Historical records of the rates of onset of eruption for the past 300 years are dominated by small-scale activity at a number of persistently, or repeatedly, active volcanoes around the world. This record shows statistically significant evidence for `seasonality': globally, rates of eruption are about 18% higher during northern hemisphere winter than northern hemisphere summer. This pattern of seasonality is strong for volcanoes at high northern latitudes; but also exists for volcanic regions in the southern hemisphere (e.g. Chile) and at specific volcanoes (e.g. Sakurajima, Japan). Seasonality is weak at certain ocean-island volcanoes (e.g. Hawaii), and certain volcanic regions (e.g. Mediterranean). The only external parameters that account for the periodic nature of small-scale volcanism (i.e. the observation that eruption rates peak between November and March in both hemispheres) are those related to the global water cycle. Movement of water (including atmospheric vapour; soil moisture; snow and ice) between the northern-hemisphere continents and the world's oceans is responsible for an annual deformation of Earth's surface that is weakly defined in equatorial regions, and stronger at higher latitudes. This external modulation of the Earth's surface has an amplitude of the order of centimetres, and an associated (vertical) strain rate of ~ 10-16 s-1. This deformation is slow enough to be felt by the Earth's interior, and is of the same order of magnitude as the (horizontal) strain rates experienced in tectonically active continental regions. This modulation effectively applies a time-dependence to the `threshold' point at which a volcano will begin to erupt. In this way

  17. System Life Cycle Evaluation(SM) (SLiCE): harmonizing water treatment systems with implementers' needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Joseph; Caravati, Kevin; Foote, Andrew; Nelson, Molly; Woods, Emily

    2013-06-01

    One of the methods proposed to improve access to clean drinking water is the mobile packaged water treatment system (MPWTS). The lack of published system performance comparisons combined with the diversity of technology available and intended operating conditions make it difficult for stakeholders to choose the system best suited for their application. MPWTS are often deployed in emergency situations, making selection of the appropriate system crucial to avoiding wasted resources and loss of life. Measurable critical-to-quality characteristics (CTQs) and a system selection tool for MPWTS were developed by utilizing relevant literature, including field studies, and implementing and comparing seven different MPWTS. The proposed System Life Cycle Evaluation (SLiCE) method uses these CTQs to evaluate the diversity in system performance and harmonize relevant performance with stakeholder preference via a selection tool. Agencies and field workers can use SLiCE results to inform and drive decision-making. The evaluation and selection tool also serves as a catalyst for communicating system performance, common design flaws, and stakeholder needs to system manufacturers. The SLiCE framework can be adopted into other emerging system technologies to communicate system performance over the life cycle of use.

  18. Ingestion of sodium plus water improves cardiovascular function and performance during dehydrating cycling in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamouti, N; Fernández-Elías, V E; Ortega, J F; Mora-Rodriguez, R

    2014-06-01

    We studied if salt and water ingestion alleviates the physiological strain caused by dehydrating exercise in the heat. Ten trained male cyclists (VO2max : 60 ± 7 mL/kg/min) completed three randomized trials in a hot-dry environment (33 °C, 30% rh, 2.5 m/s airflow). Ninety minutes before the exercise, participants ingested 10 mL of water/kg body mass either alone (CON trial) or with salt to result in concentrations of 82 or 164 mM Na(+) (ModNa(+) or HighNa(+) trial, respectively). Then, participants cycled at 63% of VO2 m ⁢ a x for 120 min immediately followed by a time-trial. After 120 min of exercise, the reduction in plasma volume was lessened with ModNa(+) and HighNa(+) trials (-11.9 ± 2.1 and -9.8 ± 4.2%) in comparison with CON (-16.4 ± 3.2%; P performance by 7.4% above CON (∼ 289 ± 42 vs 269 ± 50 W, respectively; P dehydrating exercise in the heat without thermoregulatory effects. However, it maintains cardiovascular function and improves cycling performance.

  19. Application of Data Cubes for Improving Detection of Water Cycle Extreme Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albayrak, Arif; Teng, William

    2015-01-01

    As part of an ongoing NASA-funded project to remove a longstanding barrier to accessing NASA data (i.e., accessing archived time-step array data as point-time series), for the hydrology and other point-time series-oriented communities, "data cubes" are created from which time series files (aka "data rods") are generated on-the-fly and made available as Web services from the Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC). Data cubes are data as archived rearranged into spatio-temporal matrices, which allow for easy access to the data, both spatially and temporally. A data cube is a specific case of the general optimal strategy of reorganizing data to match the desired means of access. The gain from such reorganization is greater the larger the data set. As a use case of our project, we are leveraging existing software to explore the application of the data cubes concept to machine learning, for the purpose of detecting water cycle extreme events, a specific case of anomaly detection, requiring time series data. We investigate the use of support vector machines (SVM) for anomaly classification. We show an example of detection of water cycle extreme events, using data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM).

  20. Plumbing the global carbon cycle: Integrating inland waters into the terrestrial carbon budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, J.J.; Prairie, Y.T.; Caraco, N.F.; McDowell, W.H.; Tranvik, L.J.; Striegl, R.G.; Duarte, C.M.; Kortelainen, Pirkko; Downing, J.A.; Middelburg, J.J.; Melack, J.

    2007-01-01

    Because freshwater covers such a small fraction of the Earth's surface area, inland freshwater ecosystems (particularly lakes, rivers, and reservoirs) have rarely been considered as potentially important quantitative components of the carbon cycle at either global or regional scales. By taking published estimates of gas exchange, sediment accumulation, and carbon transport for a variety of aquatic systems, we have constructed a budget for the role of inland water ecosystems in the global carbon cycle. Our analysis conservatively estimates that inland waters annually receive, from a combination of background and anthropogenically altered sources, on the order of 1.9 Pg C y-1 from the terrestrial landscape, of which about 0.2 is buried in aquatic sediments, at least 0.8 (possibly much more) is returned to the atmosphere as gas exchange while the remaining 0.9 Pg y-1 is delivered to the oceans, roughly equally as inorganic and organic carbon. Thus, roughly twice as much C enters inland aquatic systems from land as is exported from land to the sea. Over prolonged time net carbon fluxes in aquatic systems tend to be greater per unit area than in much of the surrounding land. Although their area is small, these freshwater aquatic systems can affect regional C balances. Further, the inclusion of inland, freshwater ecosystems provides useful insight about the storage, oxidation and transport of terrestrial C, and may warrant a revision of how the modern net C sink on land is described. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  1. Humans Transforming the Water Cycle: Community-Based Activities in Hydrologic Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorosmarty, C. J.; Frolking, S.; Green, M.

    2007-12-01

    This paper describes a newly convened effort to design and execute synthesis studies in hydrology. We focus on an emerging view that human activities are affecting strongly the basic character of the water cycle, through a myriad of processes including water abstraction and flow diversion, land cover change, pollution, destruction of aquatic biodiversity, and climate change. A major scientific challenge is to understand how these changes manifest themselves and if they generate synergistic impacts across the different scales. Our primary synthesis goal is to quantify widespread alteration of hydrologic systems over local-to-regional domains focusing on the Northeast corridor of the United States over a 500-yr period (1600 to 2100). This is a region bearing sharp gradients in climate, land and water management and emblematic of pressures on water resources across the nation. This science agenda will be advanced through the activities of a consolidated Working Group (WG), which will study Regional Watersheds, Hydromorphology, and Continental Processes. The effort expands activities first consolidated under CUAHSI, and welcomes several new members who have led major CUAHSI, NSF, National Academy, regional, national, and international community activities. Our WG maintains cross-linked sub-groups framework to provide focus and unity of purpose. A project implementation design will be presented, including research, education, and outreach efforts.

  2. Consistency analysis of the water cycle from recently derived satellite products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbery, E. H.; Hain, C.; Anderson, M. C.; Zhan, X.; Liu, J.; Ferraro, R. R.; Adler, R. F.; Wu, H.

    2015-12-01

    NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) develops environmental data from satellites and other sources that is a critical resource for the management of energy, water, and food supplies. Variables related to the water cycle are routinely computed from satellite remote sensing from several space agencies, and the products are used at NOAA in operational or experimental modes. This study seeks to investigate to what extent there is consistency among the diverse products, and how they represent the water cycle at different scales. Remote sensing of land surface temperature and radiation is used to estimate surface energy fluxes by means of the Atmosphere Land Exchange Inverse (ALEXI) model. An Evaporative Stress Index representing anomalies in the ratio of actual-to-potential is a reliable indicator of drought also obtained from the ALEXI model. Observations from all currently available microwave satellite sensors are processed and merged to obtain the best possible estimates of soil moisture. The Global Soil Moisture Operational Product System (SMOPS) may also ingest brightness temperature observations applying a single channel algorithm to retrieve soil moisture. All satellite retrievals in SMOPS are merged into a soil moisture product that includes proxies of the errors. The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) monthly precipitation data set (a current NOAA CDR project) uses satellite precipitation data sets over ocean and satellite plus gauge-based analyses over land. For operational needs, NESDIS's Hydro-Estimator (H-E) uses infrared data from GOES to estimate higher temporal resolution (sub-daily) rainfall rates. Streamflow at all the river mouths is estimated by the Dominant river tracing-Routing Integrated with VIC Environment model using precipitation input and other forcing data. Evapotranspiration, soil moisture, precipitation, streamflow and groundwater are derived at different resolutions, time scales and

  3. Developing a Domain Ontology: the Case of Water Cycle and Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, H.; Pozzi, W.; Piasecki, M.; Imam, B.; Houser, P.; Raskin, R.; Ramachandran, R.; Martinez Baquero, G.

    2008-12-01

    A semantic web ontology enables semantic data integration and semantic smart searching. Several organizations have attempted to implement smart registration and integration or searching using ontologies. These are the NOESIS (NSF project: LEAD) and HydroSeek (NSF project: CUAHS HIS) data discovery engines and the NSF project GEON. All three applications use ontologies to discover data from multiple sources and projects. The NASA WaterNet project was established to identify creative, innovative ways to bridge NASA research results to real world applications, linking decision support needs to available data, observations, and modeling capability. WaterNet (NASA project) utilized the smart query tool Noesis as a testbed to test whether different ontologies (and different catalog searches) could be combined to match resources with user needs. NOESIS contains the upper level SWEET ontology that accepts plug in domain ontologies to refine user search queries, reducing the burden of multiple keyword searches. Another smart search interface was that developed for CUAHSI, HydroSeek, that uses a multi-layered concept search ontology, tagging variables names from any number of data sources to specific leaf and higher level concepts on which the search is executed. This approach has proven to be quite successful in mitigating semantic heterogeneity as the user does not need to know the semantic specifics of each data source system but just uses a set of common keywords to discover the data for a specific temporal and geospatial domain. This presentation will show tests with Noesis and Hydroseek lead to the conclusion that the construction of a complex, and highly heterogeneous water cycle ontology requires multiple ontology modules. To illustrate the complexity and heterogeneity of a water cycle ontology, Hydroseek successfully utilizes WaterOneFlow to integrate data across multiple different data collections, such as USGS NWIS. However,different methodologies are employed by

  4. Differences and links between the East Asian and South Asian summer monsoon systems: Characteristics and Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ronghui; Liu, Yong; Du, Zhencai; Chen, Jilong; Huangfu, Jingliang

    2017-10-01

    This paper analyzes the differences in the characteristics and spatio-temporal variabilities of summertime rainfall and water vapor transport between the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) and South Asian summer monsoon (SASM) systems. The results show obvious differences in summertime rainfall characteristics between these two monsoon systems. The summertime rainfall cloud systems of the EASM show a mixed stratiform and cumulus cloud system, while cumulus cloud dominates the SASM. These differences may be caused by differences in the vertical shear of zonal and meridional circulations and the convergence of water vapor transport fluxes. Moreover, the leading modes of the two systems' summertime rainfall anomalies also differ in terms of their spatiotemporal features on the interannual and interdecadal timescales. Nevertheless, several close links with respect to the spatiotemporal variabilities of summertime rainfall and water vapor transport exist between the two monsoon systems. The first modes of summertime rainfall in the SASM and EASM regions reveal a significant negative correlation on the interannual and the interdecadal timescales. This close relationship may be