WorldWideScience

Sample records for monsoon experiment summer

  1. Projected changes in South Asian summer monsoon by multi-model global warming experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabade, S. S.; Kulkarni, Ashwini; Kripalani, R. H.

    2011-03-01

    South Asian summer monsoon (June through September) rainfall simulation and its potential future changes are evaluated in a multi-model ensemble of global coupled climate models outputs under World Climate Research Program Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (WCRP CMIP3) dataset. The response of South Asian summer monsoon to a transient increase in future anthropogenic radiative forcing is investigated for two time slices, middle (2031-2050) and end of the twenty-first century (2081-2100), in the non-mitigated Special Report on Emission Scenarios B1, A1B and A2 .There is large inter-model variability in the simulation of spatial characteristics of seasonal monsoon precipitation. Ten out of the 25 models are able to simulate space-time characteristics of the South Asian monsoon precipitation reasonably well. The response of these selected ten models has been examined for projected changes in seasonal monsoon rainfall. The multi-model ensemble of these ten models projects a significant increase in monsoon precipitation with global warming. The substantial increase in precipitation is observed over western equatorial Indian Ocean and southern parts of India. However, the monsoon circulation weakens significantly under all the three climate change experiments. Possible mechanisms for the projected increase in precipitation and for precipitation-wind paradox have been discussed. The surface temperature over Asian landmass increases in pre-monsoon months due to global warming and heat low over northwest India intensifies. The dipole snow configuration over Eurasian continent strengthens in warmer atmosphere, which is conducive for the enhancement in precipitation over Indian landmass. No notable changes have been projected in the El Niño-Monsoon relationship, which is useful for predicting interannual variations of the monsoon.

  2. Analysis and evaluation of Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) forecast data for Indian summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Medha; Mukhopadhyay, P.; Masutani, Michiko; Ma, Zaizhong; Riishojgaard, Lars Peter; Hardesty, Michael; Emmitt, Dave; Krishnamurti, T. N.; Goswami, B. N.

    2016-05-01

    An attempt is made here to evaluate the skill of forecast during boreal summer monsoon regime over the Indian region using the Observation Simulation System Experiment (OSSE) with Doppler Wind LIDAR (DWL) onboard International Space Station (ISS), assimilated in the initial condition. Through various techniques such as pattern correlation, root mean square error etc, we found that there is some positive impact of assimilating the DWL data on the forecast particularly at the lower tropospheric level. Impact on lowering the RMSE is seen for wind fields in the 850 and 500 hPa over Indian domain but not much impact is seen over larger domain. The moisture field and cloud also show marginal impact due to assimilation of DWL. This indicates that possibly due to lower spatial resolution of DWL data and more data gap over Indian and surrounding oceanic region, the impact on forecast is less. However, it shows the promise that monsoon being a convectively coupled system; increase in spatial data by DWL may better resolve the low level wind and subsequently the low level shear which is important for convection trigger in boundary layer.

  3. Sensitivity of the Asian summer monsoon to the horizontal resolution: differences between AMIP-type and coupled model experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherchi, Annalisa; Navarra, Antonio [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Bologna (Italy)

    2007-02-15

    A set of experiments forced with observed SST has been performed with the Echam4 atmospheric GCM at three different horizontal resolutions (T30, T42 and T106). These experiments have been used to study the sensitivity of the simulated Asian summer monsoon (ASM) to the horizontal resolution. The ASM is reasonably well simulated by the Echam4 model at all resolutions. In particular, the low-level westerly flow, that is the dominant manifestation of the Asian summer monsoon, is well captured by the model, and the precipitation is reasonably simulated in intensity and space appearance. The main improvements due to an higher resolution model are associated to regional aspects of the precipitation, for example the Western Ghats precipitation is better reproduced. The interannual variability of precipitation and wind fields in the Asian monsoon region appears to be less affected by an increase in the horizontal resolution than the mean climatology is. A possible reason is that the former is mainly SST-forced. Besides, the availability of experiments at different horizontal resolution realized with the Echam4 model coupled to a global oceanic model allows the possibility to compare these simulations with the experiments previously described. This analysis showed that the coupled model is able to reproduce a realistic monsoon, as the basic dynamics of the phenomenon is captured. The increase of the horizontal resolution of the atmospheric component influences the simulated monsoon with the same characteristics of the forced experiments. Some basic features of the Asian summer monsoon, as the interannual variability and the connection with ENSO, are further investigated. (orig.)

  4. Predictability experiments for the Asian summer monsoon impact of SST anomalies on interannual and intraseasonal variability

    CERN Document Server

    Molteni, F; Ferranti, L; Slingo, J M

    2003-01-01

    The effects of SST anomalies on the interannual and intraseasonal variability of the Asian summer monsoon have been studied by multivariate statistical analyses of 850-hPa wind and rainfall fields simulated in a set of ensemble integrations of the ECMWF atmospheric GCM, referred to as the PRISM experiments. The simulations used observed SSTs (PRISM-O), covering 9 years characterised by large variations of the ENSO phenomenon in the 1980's and the early 1990's. A parallel set of simulations was also performed with climatological SSTs (PRISM-C), thus enabling the influence of SST forcing on the modes of interannual and intraseasonal variability to be investigated. As in observations, the model's interannual variability is dominated by a zonally-oriented mode which describes the north-south movement of the tropical convergence zone (TCZ). This mode appears to be independent of SST forcing and its robustness between the PRISM-O and PRISM-C simulations suggests that it is driven by internal atmospheric dynamics. O...

  5. Large-scale overview of the summer monsoon over West Africa during the AMMA field experiment in 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Janicot

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The AMMA (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis program is dedicated to providing a better understanding of the West African monsoon and its influence on the physical, chemical and biological environment regionally and globally, as well as relating variability of this monsoon system to issues of health, water resources, food security and demography for West African nations. Within this framework, an intensive field campaign took place during the summer of 2006 to better document specific processes and weather systems at various key stages of this monsoon season. This campaign was embedded within a longer observation period that documented the annual cycle of surface and atmospheric conditions between 2005 and 2007. The present paper provides a large and regional scale overview of the 2006 summer monsoon season, that includes consideration of of the convective activity, mean atmospheric circulation and synoptic/intraseasonal weather systems, oceanic and land surface conditions, continental hydrology, dust concentration and ozone distribution. The 2006 African summer monsoon was a near-normal rainy season except for a large-scale rainfall excess north of 15° N. This monsoon season was also characterized by a 10-day delayed onset compared to climatology, with convection becoming developed only after 10 July. This onset delay impacted the continental hydrology, soil moisture and vegetation dynamics as well as dust emission. More details of some less-well-known atmospheric features in the African monsoon at intraseasonal and synoptic scales are provided in order to promote future research in these areas.

  6. Large-scale overview of the summer monsoon over West Africa during the AMMA field experiment in 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicot, S.; Thorncroft, C. D.; Ali, A.; Asencio, N.; Berry, G.; Bock, O.; Bourles, B.; Caniaux, G.; Chauvin, F.; Deme, A.; Kergoat, L.; Lafore, J.-P.; Lavaysse, C.; Lebel, T.; Marticorena, B.; Mounier, F.; Nedelec, P.; Redelsperger, J.-L.; Ravegnani, F.; Reeves, C. E.; Roca, R.; de Rosnay, P.; Schlager, H.; Sultan, B.; Tomasini, M.; Ulanovsky, A.; Acmad Forecasters Team

    2008-09-01

    The AMMA (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis) program is dedicated to providing a better understanding of the West African monsoon and its influence on the physical, chemical and biological environment regionally and globally, as well as relating variability of this monsoon system to issues of health, water resources, food security and demography for West African nations. Within this framework, an intensive field campaign took place during the summer of 2006 to better document specific processes and weather systems at various key stages of this monsoon season. This campaign was embedded within a longer observation period that documented the annual cycle of surface and atmospheric conditions between 2005 and 2007. The present paper provides a large and regional scale overview of the 2006 summer monsoon season, that includes consideration of of the convective activity, mean atmospheric circulation and synoptic/intraseasonal weather systems, oceanic and land surface conditions, continental hydrology, dust concentration and ozone distribution. The 2006 African summer monsoon was a near-normal rainy season except for a large-scale rainfall excess north of 15° N. This monsoon season was also characterized by a 10-day delayed onset compared to climatology, with convection becoming developed only after 10 July. This onset delay impacted the continental hydrology, soil moisture and vegetation dynamics as well as dust emission. More details of some less-well-known atmospheric features in the African monsoon at intraseasonal and synoptic scales are provided in order to promote future research in these areas.

  7. Relationship Between East Asian Winter Monsoon and Summer Monsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Hongming; YANG Hui; YUAN Yuan; LI Chongyin

    2011-01-01

    Using National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Centre for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalysis data and monthly Hadley Center sea surface temperature (SST) data,and selecting a representative East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM) index,this study investigated the relationship between EAWM and East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) using statistical analyses and numerical simulations.Some possible mechanisms regarding this relationship were also explored.Results indicate a close relationship between EAWM and EASM:a strong EAWM led to a strong EASM in the following summer,and a weak EAWM led to a weak EASM in the following summer.Anomalous EAWM has persistent impacts on the variation of SST in the tropical Indian Ocean and the South China Sea,and on the equatorial atmospheric thermal anomalies at both lower and upper levels.Through these impacts,the EAWM influences the land-sea thermal contrast in summer and the low-level atmospheric divergence and convergence over the Indo-Pacific region.It further affects the meridional monsoon circulation and other features of the EASM.Numerical simulations support the results of diagnostic analysis.The study provides useful information for predicting the EASM by analyzing the variations of preceding EAWM and tropical SST.

  8. Dynamics of Projected Changes in South Asian Summer Monsoon Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, A.; Sabade, S.; Kripalani, R.

    2011-12-01

    South Asian summer monsoon (June through September) rainfall simulation and its potential future changes are evaluated in a multi-model ensemble of global coupled climate models outputs under World Climate Research Program Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (WCRP CMIP3) data set. The response of South Asian summer monsoon to a transient increase in future anthropogenic radiative forcing is investigated for two time slices , middle (2031-2050) and end of the 21st century (2081-2100) in the non-mitigated Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES) B1, A1B and A2 .There is large inter-model variability in simulation of spatial characteristics of seasonal monsoon precipitation. Ten out of 25 models are able to simulate space-time characteristics of South Asian monsoon precipitation reasonably well. The response of these selected 10 models have been examined for projected changes in seasonal monsoon rainfall. The multi-model ensemble of these 10 models project significant increase in monsoon precipitation with global warming. The substantial increase in precipitation is observed over western equatorial Indian Ocean and southern parts of India. However the monsoon circulation weakens significantly under all the three climate change experiments. Possible mechanisms for projected increase in precipitation and for precipitation-wind paradox have been discussed. The surface temperature over Asian landmass increases in pre-monsoon months due to global warming and heat low over north-west India intensifies. The dipole snow configuration over Eurasian continent strengthens in warmer atmosphere which is conducive for enhancement in precipitation over Indian landmass. The increase in precipitation is mainly contributed by the substantial increase in water vapor content in the atmosphere. No notable changes have been projected in the El Nino-Monsoon relationship.

  9. Role of low level flow on the summer monsoon rainfall over the Indian subcontinent during two contrasting monsoon years

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Swapna, P.; RameshKumar, M.R.

    The summer monsoon rainfall over the Indian subcontinent shows 1 large inter-annual variability in three important aspects, namely, the onset date, quantum of monsoon rainfall and the monsoon activity within the monsoon (June - September) period...

  10. Weakening of Indian Summer Monsoon in Recent Decades

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Bingyi

    2005-01-01

    The analysis of 43 years of NCEP-NCAR reanalysis data and station observations reveals the connections between tropospheric temperature variations and the weakening of the Indian summer monsoon circulation. The Indian summer monsoon variation is strongly linked to tropospheric temperature over East Asia, showing significant positive correlations of mean tropospheric temperature with all-Indian summer rainfall and the monsoon circulation intensity. The result shows that Indian summer monsoon circulation underwent two weakening processes in recent decades. The first occurred in circa the mid-1960s, and the other occurred in circa the late 1970s. The finding indicates that the mean tropospheric temperature may play a crucial role in the weakening of the Indian summer monsoon intensity via changing land-sea thermal contrast. The role of the tropospheric temperature contrast between East Asia and the tropical area from the eastern Indian Ocean to the tropical western Pacific is to weaken the Indian summer monsoon circulation.

  11. Identifying the northernmost summer monsoon location in East Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Haoran; Qian Weihong

    2007-01-01

    An integrated index which can be used to indicate the advance of subtropical summer monsoon in East Asia has been proposed in this paper. The index was combined by three variables including precipitation, wind and pseudo-equivalent potential temperature. The northernmost summer monsoon location (NSML) was identified by using this index annually. It was found that the NSML experienced an interdecadal shift in the period 1977-1979 based on the annual index analysis from 1961 to 2001. A comparison of the NSML with other four summer monsoon indices has also been made. The result showed that the NSML could well represent the interannual and interdecadal variability of summer monsoon precipitation in North China (beyond 35°N), while other four indices could well indicate the precipitation anomalies of East Asian summer monsoon along the Yangtze River valley (around 30°N).

  12. Strengthened African summer monsoon in the mid-Piacenzian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ran; Zhang, Zhongshi; Jiang, Dabang; Yan, Qing; Zhou, Xin; Cheng, Zhigang

    2016-09-01

    Using model results from the first phase of the Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project (PlioMIP) and four experiments with CAM4, the intensified African summer monsoon (ASM) in the mid-Piacenzian and corresponding mechanisms are analyzed. The results from PlioMIP show that the ASM intensified and summer precipitation increased in North Africa during the mid-Piacenzian, which can be explained by the increased net energy in the atmospheric column above North Africa. Further experiments with CAM4 indicated that the combined changes in the mid-Piacenzian of atmospheric CO2 concentration and SST, as well as the vegetation change, could have substantially increased the net energy in the atmospheric column over North Africa and further intensified the ASM. The experiments also demonstrated that topography change had a weak effect. Overall, the combined changes of atmospheric CO2 concentration and SST were the most important factor that brought about the intensified ASM in the mid-Piacenzian.

  13. Summer monsoon rainfall prediction for India - Some new ideas

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varkey, M.J.

    Present methods of forecasting of mean Indian rainfall for summer monsoon season are critically examined. Considering the wide variations in mean seasonal rainfalls (more than 5 to less than 400 cm) and crops in various regions of India...

  14. The Indian summer monsoon as revealed by NCMRWF system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P L S Rao; U C Mohanty; P V S Raju; Gopal Iyengar

    2003-03-01

    In this study, we present the mean seasonal features of the Indian summer monsoon circulation in the National Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (NCMRWF) global data assimilation and forecast system. The large-scale budgets of heat and moisture are examined in the analyzed and model atmosphere. The daily operational analyses and forecasts (day 1 through day 5) produced for the summer seasons comprising June, July and August of 1995 and 1993 have been considered for the purpose. The principal aim of the study is two-fold. Primarily, to comprehend the influence of the systematic errors over the Indian summer monsoon, secondarily, to analyze the performance of the model in capturing the interseasonal variability. The heat and moisture balances show reduction in the influx of heat and moisture in the model forecasts compared to the analyzed atmosphere over the monsoon domain. Consequently, the diabatic heating also indicates reducing trend with increase in the forecast period. In effect, the strength of Indian summer monsoon, which essentially depends on these parameters, weakens considerably in the model forecasts. Despite producing feeble monsoon circulation, the model captures interseasonal variability realistically. Although, 1995 and 1993 are fairly normal monsoon seasons, the former received more rainfall compared to the latter in certain pockets of the monsoon domain. This is clearly indicated by the analyzed and model atmosphere in terms of energetics.

  15. A new index to describe the tropical Asian summer monsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU ZhongFeng; FU CongBin; QIAN YongFu

    2009-01-01

    We define a new monsoon index (MV) as the product of relative vorticity and equivalent potential tem-perature using the long-term NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data.The MV index provides new insights into the intraseasonal and interannual variabilities of the broad-scale tropical Asian summer monsoon (TASM),including the South Asian summer monsoon (SASM) and the South China Sea summer monsoon (SCSSM).On the intraseasonal timescale,the pentad-to-pentad MV index bears a close relationship to the broad-scale rainfall in the TASM regions.Among 29 summers from 1979 to 2007,in 23/27 summers the correlation coefficients are higher than 0.7 in the SASM/SCSSM region.However,in fewer than 9 summers,the correlations between the broad-scale rainfall and the existing circulation indices are higher than 0.7.On the interannual timescale,various existing SASM circulation indices are moderately or well correlated with all-India summer monsoon rainfall,whereas their correlations with broad-scale SASM rainfall are weak.In contrast,the summer mean MV index correlates well with the broad-scale SASM rainfall and all-India summer monsoon rainfall (correlation of 0.73 and 0.65,respectively).In the SCSSM region,the summer mean MV index also bears a close relationship to the SCSSM rainfall,al-though some discrepancies exist during certain years.The composite strong TASM shows a stronger low-tropospheric low pressure in association with the enhanced westerly winds and moisture transfer,stronger convection,and upper-tropospheric easterly winds,which indicate that the MV index can well capture the features of TASM.

  16. A new index to describe the tropical Asian summer monsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    We define a new monsoon index (MV) as the product of relative vorticity and equivalent potential temperature using the long-term NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data. The MV index provides new insights into the intraseasonal and interannual variabilities of the broad-scale tropical Asian summer monsoon (TASM), including the South Asian summer monsoon (SASM) and the South China Sea summer monsoon (SCSSM). On the intraseasonal timescale, the pentad-to-pentad MV index bears a close relationship to the broad-scale rainfall in the TASM regions. Among 29 summers from 1979 to 2007, in 23/27 summers the correlation coefficients are higher than 0.7 in the SASM/SCSSM region. However, in fewer than 9 summers, the correlations between the broad-scale rainfall and the existing circulation indices are higher than 0.7. On the interannual timescale, various existing SASM circulation indices are moderately or well correlated with all-India summer monsoon rainfall, whereas their correlations with broad-scale SASM rainfall are weak. In contrast, the summer mean MV index correlates well with the broad-scale SASM rainfall and all-India summer monsoon rainfall (correlation of 0.73 and 0.65, respectively). In the SCSSM region, the summer mean MV index also bears a close relationship to the SCSSM rainfall, although some discrepancies exist during certain years. The composite strong TASM shows a stronger low-tropospheric low pressure in association with the enhanced westerly winds and moisture transfer, stronger convection, and upper-tropospheric easterly winds, which indicate that the MV index can well capture the features of TASM.

  17. Simulation of the variability and extremes of daily rainfall during the Indian summer monsoon for present and future times in a global time-slice experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, W. [Danish Meteorological Institute, Lyngbyvej 100, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2004-03-01

    In this study the simulation of the variability and extremes of daily rainfall during the Indian summer monsoon for the present-day and the future climate is investigated. This is done on the basis of a global time-slice experiment (TSL) with the ECHAM4 atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) at a high horizontal resolution of T106. The first time-slice (period: 1970-1999) represents the present-day climate and the second (2060-2089) the future climate. Moreover, observational rainfall data from the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP, 1997-2002) and rainfall data from the ECMWF re-analysis (ERA, 1958-2001) are considered. ERA reveals serious deficiencies in its representation of the variability and extremes of daily rainfall during the Indian summer monsoon. These are mainly a severe overestimation of the frequency of wet days over the oceans and in the Himalayas, where also the rainfall intensity is overestimated. Further, ERA shows unrealistically heavy rainfall events over the tropical Indian Ocean. The ECHAM4 atmospheric GCM at a horizontal resolution of T106, on the other hand, simulates the variability and extremes of daily rainfall in good agreement with the observations. The only marked deficiencies are an underestimation of the rainfall intensity on the west coast of the Indian peninsula and in Bangladesh, an overestimation over the tropical Indian Ocean, due to an erroneous northwestward extension of the tropical convergence zone, and an overestimation of the frequency of wet days in Tibet. Further, heavy rainfall events are relatively strong in the centre of the Indian peninsula. For the future, TSL predicts large increases in the rainfall intensity over the tropical Indian Ocean as well as in northern Pakistan and northwest India, but decreases in southern Pakistan, in the centre of the Indian peninsula, and over the western part of the Bay of Bengal. The frequency of wet days is markedly increased over the tropical Indian Ocean and

  18. Surface temperature pattern of the Indian Ocean before summer monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gopinathan, C.K.; Rao, D.P.

    , suggests that the position of the warmer areas in the Bay of Bengal in May is an indicator of the subsequent summer rainfall over India. The statistical method adopted for the long range forcasting of the Indian summer monsoon gives very little...

  19. Reappraisal of Asian Summer Monsoon Indices and the Long-Term Variation of Monsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The Webster and Yang monsoon index (WYI)-the zonal wind shear between 850 and 200 hPa was calculated and modified on the basis of NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data. After analyzing the circulation and divergence fields of 150-100 and 200 hPa, however, we found that the 200-hPa level could not reflect the real change of the upper-tropospheric circulation of Asian summer monsoon, especially the characteristics and variation of the tropical easterly jet which is the most important feature of the upper-tropospheric circulation. The zonal wind shear U850-U(150+100) is much larger than U850-U200, and thus it can reflect the strength of monsoon more appropriately. In addition, divergence is the largest at 150 hPa rather than 200 hPa, so 150 hPa in the upper-troposphere can reflect the coupling of the monsoon system. Therefore,WYI is redefined as DHI, i.e., IDH=U*850 - U*(150+100), which is able to characterize the variability of not only the intensity of the center of zonal wind shear in Asia, but also the monsoon system in the upper and lower troposphere. DHI is superior to WYI in featuring the long-term variation of Asian summer monsoon as it indicates there is obvious interdecadal variation in the Asian summer monsoon and the climate abrupt change occurred in 1980. The Asian summer monsoon was stronger before 1980 and it weakened after then due to the weakening of the easterly in the layer of 150-100 hPa, while easterly at 200 hPa did not weaken significantly. After the climate jump year in general, easterly in the upper troposphere weakened in Asia, indicating the weakening of summer monsoon; the land-sea pressure difference and thermal difference reduced, resulting in the weakening of monsoon; the corresponding upper divergence as well as the water vapor transport decreased in Indian Peninsula, central Indo-China Peninsula, North China, and Northeast China, indicating the weakening of summer monsoon as well. The difference between NCEP/NCAR and ERA-40 reanalysis data in

  20. Seasonal prediction of Indian summer monsoon: Sensitivity to persistent SST

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sukanta Kumar Das; Sanjib Kumar Deb; C M Kishtawal; Pradip Kumar Pal

    2013-10-01

    In the present study, the assessment of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) developed at National Centre for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) for seasonal forecasting of Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) with different persistent SST is reported. Towards achieving the objective, 30-year model climatology has been generated using observed SST. Upon successful simulation of climatological features of ISM, the model is tested for the simulation of ISM 2011 in forecast mode. Experiments have been conducted in three different time-phases, viz., April, May and June; using different sets of initial conditions (ICs) and the persistent SSTs of the previous months of the time-phases. The spatial as well as temporal distribution of model simulated rainfall suggest a below normal monsoon condition throughout the season in all the experiments. However, the rainfall anomaly shows some positive signature over north-east part of India in the month of June and August whereas the central Indian landmass had positive anomaly during August and September. The monthly accumulated All-India rainfall (AIR) over land for June to September 2011 are predicted to be 101% (17.6 cm), 86% (24.3 cm), 83% (21.0 cm) and 95% (15.5 cm) of normal AIR, respectively. This makes the seasonal accumulated AIR 78.4 cm which is 11% below the normal rainfall of 87.6 cm. The model prediction for the months of June and July is comparable with the observation; however, the simulation would not be able to capture the high rainfall during August and September. The intention behind this work is to assess the shortcomings in the CAM model prediction, which can later be improved for future monsoon forecast experiments.

  1. Anomalous behaviour of the Indian summer monsoon 2009

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Preethi; J V Revadekar; R H Kripalani

    2011-10-01

    The Indian subcontinent witnessed a severe monsoon drought in the year 2009. India as a whole received 77% of its long period average during summer monsoon season (1 June to 30 September) of 2009, which is the third highest deficient all India monsoon season rainfall year during the period 1901–2009. Therefore, an attempt is made in this paper to study the characteristic features of summer monsoon rainfall of 2009 over the country and to investigate some of the possible causes behind the anomalous behaviour of the monsoon. Presence of El Niño like conditions in the Pacific and warming over the equatorial Indian Ocean altered the circulation patterns and produced an anomalous low level convergence and ascending motion over the Indian Ocean region and large scale subsidence over the Indian landmass. Furthermore, the crossequatorial flow was weak, the monsoon was dominated by the slower 30–60 day mode, and the synoptic systems, which formed over the Bay of Bengal and the Arabian Sea, did not move inland. All the above features resulted in less moisture supply over the Indian landmass, resulting in subdued rainfall activity leading to a severe monsoon drought during 2009.

  2. Investigation of summer monsoon rainfall variability in Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Mian Sabir; Lee, Seungho

    2016-08-01

    This study analyzes the inter-annual and intra-seasonal rainfall variability in Pakistan using daily rainfall data during the summer monsoon season (June to September) recorded from 1980 to 2014. The variability in inter-annual monsoon rainfall ranges from 20 % in northeastern regions to 65 % in southwestern regions of Pakistan. The analysis reveals that the transition of the negative and positive anomalies was not uniform in the investigated dataset. In order to acquire broad observations of the intra-seasonal variability, an objective criterion, the pre-active period, active period and post-active periods of the summer monsoon rainfall have demarcated. The analysis also reveals that the rainfall in June has no significant contribution to the increase in intra-seasonal rainfall in Pakistan. The rainfall has, however, been enhanced in the summer monsoon in August. The rainfall of September demonstrates a sharp decrease, resulting in a high variability in the summer monsoon season. A detailed examination of the intra-seasonal rainfall also reveals frequent amplitude from late July to early August. The daily normal rainfall fluctuates significantly with its maximum in the Murree hills and its minimum in the northwestern Baluchistan.

  3. Hydrography of the eastern Arabian Sea during summer monsoon 2002

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shankar, D.; Shenoi, S.S.C.; Nayak, R.K.; Vinayachandran, P.N.; Nampoothiri, G.S.; Almeida, A.M.; Michael, G.S.; RameshKumar, M.R.; Sundar, D.; Sreejith, O.P.

    (figure 10), unlike in the Lakshadweep Sea before the onset of the summer monsoon (Durand et al 2004; Shenoi et al 2004, 2005a; Shankar et al 2004). The 10 cm rain event during SK-179 caused but a 0.2openbulletCfallintemper- ature, comparable... in the Lakshadweep Sea before the onset of the summer monsoon (Durand et al 2004; Shenoi et al 2004, 2005a). Variability in the salinity field was not confined to the surface layers, but was evident throughout the depth range of the observations. The high- salinity...

  4. ON THE PROCESS OF SUMMER MONSOON ONSET OVER EAST ASIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈隆勋; 李薇; 赵平; 陶诗言

    2001-01-01

    Using daily observational rainfall data covered 194 stations of China from 1961 to 1995 and NCEP model analyzed pentad precipitation data of global grid point from 1979 to 1997, the distribution of onset date of rainy season over Asian area from spring to summer is studied in this paper. The analyzed results show that there exist two stages of rainy season onset over East Asian region from spring to summer rainy season onset accompanying subtropical monsoon and tropical monsoon respectively. The former rain belt is mainly formed by the convergence of cold air and the recurved southwesterly flow from western part of subtropical high and westerly flow from the so-called western trough of subtropical region occurring during winter to spring over South Asia. The latter is formed in the process of subtropical monsoon rain belt over inshore regions of South China Sea originally coming from south of Changjiang (Yangtze) River Basin advancing with northward shift of subtropical high after the onset of tropical monsoon over South China Sea. The pre-flood rainy season over South China region then came into mature period and the second peak of rainfall appeared. Meiyu, the rainy season over Changjiang-Huaihe River Basin and North China then formed consequently. The process of summer tropical monsoon onset over South China Sea in 1998 is also discussed in this paper. It indicated that the monsoon during summer tropical monsoon onset over South China Sea is the result of the westerly flow over middle part of South China Sea,which is from the new generated cyclone formed in north subtropical high entering into South China Sea, converged with the tropical southwesterly flow recurved by the intensified cross-equatorial flow.

  5. Response of Asian Summer Monsoon to CO2 Doubling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Jian; LIU Qinyu; HUANG Fei

    2011-01-01

    Based on simulations of the IPCC 20C3M and SRES A1B experiments in ten coupled models,the Asian summer monsoon (ASM) response to CO2 doubling and the different responses among models are examined.Nine models show the similar results that the weakening of land-ocean thermal contrast caused by the CO2 doubling contributes to a weaker large-scale ASM circulation.Further analysis in this study also shows that the major ASM components,such as the Somali cross-equatorial flow,the low level India-South China Sea monsoon trough,and the upper level tropical easterly jet stream,weaken as CO2 doubles.However,the ASM rainfall increases as a result of the increased moisture from the warmer Indian Ocean and the South China Sea,and the enhanced northward moisture transport over the ASM region.For the response of enhanced northward moisture transport over South Asia,the positive contribution of moisture content increase in the Indian Ocean is dominant and the negative contribution of the weaker monsoon circulation is secondary at 850 hPa,but both have positive contribution to the total moisture transport along the East China coast.The paradox of the weaker ASM circulation and the increasing precipitation in CO2 doubling is confirmed.It is found that strengthening of northward moisture transport could intensify the precipitation and atmospheric heat source over the north Arabian Sea and East China,and result in enhanced southwesterly at 850hPa as global warming occurs.All ten models show significant enhanced southwesterly response over the north Arabian Sea,and six of them show enhanced southwesterly response along the East China coast.

  6. Hydrography of the eastern Arabian Sea during summer monsoon 2002

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Shankar; S S C Shenoi; R K Nayak; P N Vinayachandran; G Nampoothiri; A M Almeida; G S Michael; M R Ramesh Kumar; D Sundar; O P Sreejith

    2005-10-01

    Hydrographic observations in the eastern Arabian Sea (EAS)during summer monsoon 2002 (during the first phase of the Arabian Sea Monsoon Experiment (ARMEX))include two approximately fortnight-long CTD time series.A barrier layer was observed occasionally during the two time series. These ephemeral barrier layers were caused by in situ rainfall,and by advection of low-salinity (high-salinity)waters at the surface (below the surface mixed layer).These barrier layers were advected away from the source region by the West India Coastal Current and had no discernible effect on the sea surface temperature.The three high-salinity water masses,the Arabian Sea High Salinity Water (ASHSW),Persian Gulf Water (PGW),and Red Sea Water (RSW),and the Arabian Sea Salinity Minimum also exhibited intermittency:they appeared and disappeared during the time series.The concentration of the ASHSW,PGW,and RSWdecreased equatorward,and that of the RSW also decreased offshore.The observations suggest that the RSW is advected equatorward along the continental slope off the Indian west coast.

  7. Asian Summer Monsoon and its Associated Rainfall Variability in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsamon Limsakul

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The Asian monsoon is an important component of the Earth's climate. Its associated rainfall variability is a crucial fac¬tor for Thailand's socio-economic development, water resources and agricultural management. An analysis shows that the Thailand rainfall annual cycle is in phase with the Indian summer monsoon (ISM and the western North Pacific summer monsoon (WNPSM. On the basis of the Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF analysis, the dominant spatial-temporal interannual variability in summer monsoon rainfall (Jun.-Sep. during 1975-2006 could be explained by the first two EOF modes, accounting for 34% of the total variance. The EOF1 was spatially dominated by strong positive signals in the central and east, whereas the EOF2 exhibited dipole variability. The coefficient time series of EOF1 significantly correlated posi¬tively with ISM index, but negatively with WNPSM index. The results suggest that summer monsoon rainfall in Thailand is higher (lower than normal during the strengthening (weakening of ISM. In contrast, rainfall in the north-east (central is surplus (deficit during the strengthening (weakening of WNPSM. These findings imply that, on an interannual time scale, ISM and WNPSM exert their influence to a different extent on summer monsoon rainfall in Thailand. A clear picture of linking mechanisms and interactions with another climate mode in the Indo-Pacific sector needs to be understood. This knowledge is essential for effectively adapting to climate-related hazards and rainfall extremes and for better management of water resource and agriculture in Thailand, especially under current/future warming conditions.

  8. Onset of Indian Summer Monsoon: a retrospective analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sruthi, S.; Mrudula, G.

    2016-05-01

    The monsoon onset over Kerala is considered as the beginning of rain fall over India and it is the end of hot summer. Different criteria have been used to define the monsoon onset over Kerala, with the one given by India Meteorological Department taken as the standard criteria. The analysis of the past 20 years of observations shows that the variables during the monsoon onset do not behave in the same way always. The purpose of this paper is to analyses the monsoon onset phases and to find possible reasons behind the variable nature of the monsoon onset. Different meteorological parameters like precipitation, outgoing long wave radiation (OLR), winds, air temperature, and specific humidity at different levels are analyzed for the same. Research has been done on various distinct features of monsoon such as Low Level Jet (LLJ), Tropical Easterly Jet (TEJ), monsoon trough, and depressions etc., during the onset phase. The analysis showed that in some years the strength of LLJ is lesser compared to the normal years. It is also seen that in some years the wind flow pattern is different from that observed during a standard onset year. The results of these analyses will be presented in detail in the paper.

  9. Development of summer monsoon and onset of continuous rains over central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varkey, M.J.

    rains happening during the last phase of monsoon development as a consequence of and after (2-5 weeks) the establishment of monsoon circulation or monsoon front. Summer monsoon front, as the term 'monsoon' originally meant, is to be delineated from...

  10. Quantifying the sectoral contribution of pollution transport from South Asia during summer and winter monsoon seasons in support of HTAP-2 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surendran, Divya E.; Ghude, Sachin D.; Beig, G.; Jena, Chinmay; Chate, D. M.

    2016-11-01

    This study examines the contribution of 20% reduction in anthropogenic emissions from the energy, industry and transport sectors in South Asia to global distribution of ozone (O3) during summer and winter monsoon seasons. We used Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers (MOZART-4) and Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution version-2 (HTAP-v2) emission inventory to simulate global O3 for five different sensitivity simulations. Contribution from different emission sectors is identified on the basis of the differences between model calculations with unperturbed emissions (Base-case) and the emissions reduced by 20% by different sectors over South Asia. During the summer season, 20% reduction in emissions from transportation sector contributes maximum decrease in O3 of the order of 0.8 ppb in the center of Asian Summer Monsoons (ASM) anticyclone at 200 hPa. Response to Extra Regional Emission Reduction (RERER) is found to vary between 0.4 and 0.7 inside the ASM, indicating that 40-70% of O3 trapped inside the anticyclone is influenced by the emission from non-Asian emissions, and the remaining O3 is influenced by South-Asian emissions. During winter, 20% reduction in emissions from transport sector contributes decrease in O3 at surface up to 0.5 ppb over South Asia and outflow region (the Arabian Sea and the Bay of Bengal). RERER values vary between 0 and 0.2 over South Asia indicating the predominant impact of local emissions reduction on surface O3 concentration than reduction in foreign emissions. We have also examined the health benefits of reduction in regional, global and sectoral emissions in terms of decrease in excess number of COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) cases due to O3 exposure. We find that more health benefits can be achieved if global emissions are decreased by 20%.

  11. Trace gas transport out of the Indian Summer Monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsche, Laura; Pozzer, Andrea; Zimmermann, Peter; Parchatka, Uwe; Fischer, Horst

    2016-04-01

    The trace gas transport out of the Indian summer monsoon was investigated during the aircraft campaign OMO (Oxidation Mechanism Observations) with the German research aircraft HALO (High Altitude and Long Range Research Aircraft) in July/August 2015. HALO was based at Paphos/Cyprus and also on Gan/Maledives. Flights took place over the Mediterranean Sea, the Arabian Peninsula and the Arabian Sea. In this work the focus is on the distribution of carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH4) in the upper troposphere. They were measured with the laser absorption spectrometer TRISTAR on board of HALO. During the Indian summer monsoon strong convection takes place over India and the Bay of Bengal. In this area the population is high accompanied by many emission sources e.g. wetlands and cultivation of rice. Consequently the boundary layer is polluted containing high concentrations of trace gases like methane and carbon monoxide. Due to vertical transport these polluted air masses are lifted to the upper troposphere. Here they circulate with the so called Asian monsoon anticyclone. In the upper troposphere polluted air masses lead to a change in the chemical composition thus influence the chemical processes. Furthermore the anticyclone spreads the polluted air masses over a larger area. Thus the outflow of the anticyclone in the upper troposphere leads to higher concentrations of trace gases over the Arabian Sea, the Arabian Peninsula and also over the eastern part of North Africa and the eastern part of the Mediterranean Sea. During OMO higher concentrations of methane and carbon monoxide were detected at altitudes between 11km and 15km. The highest measured concentrations of carbon monoxide and methane were observed over Oman. The CO concentration in the outflow of the monsoon exceeds background levels by 10-15ppb. However the enhancement in the concentration is not obviously connected to the monsoon due to the natural variability in the troposphere. The enhancement in the

  12. What drives the global summer monsoon over the past millennium?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jian [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Lake Science and Environment, Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, Nanjing (China); Wang, Bin [University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Meteorology, Honolulu, HI (United States); University of Hawaii at Manoa, International Pacific Research Center, Honolulu, HI (United States); Yim, So-Young; Lee, June-Yi [University of Hawaii at Manoa, International Pacific Research Center, Honolulu, HI (United States); Jhun, Jong-Ghap [Seoul National University, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences/Research Institute of Oceanography, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Kyung-Ja [Pusan National University, Division of Earth Environmental System, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    The global summer monsoon precipitation (GSMP) provides a fundamental measure for changes in the annual cycle of the climate system and hydroclimate. We investigate mechanisms governing decadal-centennial variations of the GSMP over the past millennium with a coupled climate model's (ECHO-G) simulation forced by solar-volcanic (SV) radiative forcing and greenhouse gases (GHG) forcing. We show that the leading mode of GSMP is a forced response to external forcing on centennial time scale with a globally uniform change of precipitation across all monsoon regions, whereas the second mode represents internal variability on multi-decadal time scale with regional characteristics. The total amount of GSMP varies in phase with the global mean temperature, indicating that global warming is accompanied by amplification of the annual cycle of the climate system. The northern hemisphere summer monsoon precipitation (NHSMP) responds to GHG forcing more sensitively, while the southern hemisphere summer monsoon precipitation (SHSMP) responds to the SV radiative forcing more sensitively. The NHSMP is enhanced by increased NH land-ocean thermal contrast and NH-minus-SH thermal contrast. On the other hand, the SHSMP is strengthened by enhanced SH subtropical highs and the east-west mass contrast between Southeast Pacific and tropical Indian Ocean. The strength of the GSMP is determined by the factors controlling both the NHSMP and SHSMP. Intensification of GSMP is associated with (a) increased global land-ocean thermal contrast, (b) reinforced east-west mass contrast between Southeast Pacific and tropical Indian Ocean, and (c) enhanced circumglobal SH subtropical highs. The physical mechanisms revealed here will add understanding of future change of the global monsoon. (orig.)

  13. The vorticity and angular momentum budgets of Asian summer monsoon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P L S Rao; U C Mohanty; P V S Raju; M A Arain

    2004-09-01

    The study delineates the vorticity and angular momentum balances of Asian summer monsoon during the evolution and established phases. It also elucidates the differences between these balances in the National Centre for Environmental Prediction/National Centre for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalysis and the National Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (NCM- RWF) analysis fields. The NCEP/NCAR reanalysis for a 40 year period (1958-97) and the NCM- RWF analysis for a three year (1994-96) period are made use of for the purpose. The time mean summer monsoon circulation is bifurcated into stable mean and transient eddy components and the mean component is elucidated. The generation of vorticity due to stretching of isobars balances most of the vorticity transported out of the monsoon domain during the evolution period. However, during the established period, the transportation by the relative and planetary vorticity components exceeds the generation due to stretching. The effective balancing mechanism is provided by vorticity generation due to sub-grid scale processes. The flux convergence of omega and relative momenta over the monsoon domain is effectively balanced by pressure torque during the evolution and established phases. Nevertheless, the balance is stronger during the established period due to the increase in the strength of circulation. Both the NCMRWF and NCEP fields indicate the mean features related to vorticity and angular momentum budgets realistically. Apart from the oceanic bias (strong circulation over oceans rather than continents), the summer monsoon circulation indicated by the NCEP is feeble compared to NCMRWF. The significant terms in the large-scale budgets of vorticity and angular momentum enunciate this aspect.

  14. The East Asian subtropical summer monsoon: Recent progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jinhai; Liu, Boqi

    2016-04-01

    The East Asian subtropical summer monsoon (EASSM) is one component of the East Asian summer monsoon system, and its evolution determines the weather and climate over East China. In the present paper, we firstly demonstrate the formation and advancement of the EASSM rainbelt and its associated circulation and precipitation patterns through reviewing recent studies and our own analysis based on JRA-55 (Japanese 55-yr Reanalysis) data and CMAP (CPC Merged Analysis of Precipitation), GPCP (Global Precipitation Climatology Project), and TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) precipitation data. The results show that the rainy season of the EASSM starts over the region to the south of the Yangtze River in early April, with the establishment of strong southerly wind in situ. The EASSM rainfall, which is composed of dominant convective and minor stratiform precipitation, is always accompanied by a frontal system and separated from the tropical summer monsoon system. It moves northward following the onset of the South China Sea summer monsoon. Moreover, the role of the land-sea thermal contrast in the formation and maintenance of the EASSM is illustrated, including in particular the effect of the seasonal transition of the zonal land-sea thermal contrast and the influences from the Tibetan Plateau and midlatitudes. In addition, we reveal a possible reason for the subtropical climate difference between East Asia and East America. Finally, the multi-scale variability of the EASSM and its influential factors are summarized to uncover possible reasons for the intraseasonal, interannual, and interdecadal variability of the EASSM and their importance in climate prediction.

  15. Inter-decadal variations,causes and future projection of the Asian summer monsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ding Yihui; Si Dong; Sun Ying; Liu Yanju; Song Yafang

    2014-01-01

    The present paper presents a concise summary of our recent studies on the Asian summer monsoon, with highting decadal and inter-decadal scales. The studies on the long-term variations of the Asian summer monsoon and its impacts on the change in the summer precipitation in China are reviewed. Moreover,recent changes in the Asian summer monsoon and summer precipitation in East Asia (including Meiyu precipitation) are discussed. Finally,the future changes of the Asian summer monsoon are also pointed out in this paper.

  16. 南海夏季风爆发的数值预报试验%A Numerical Forecast Experiment on the Onset ofthe Summer Monsoon over the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    骆美霞; 杨辉

    2001-01-01

    The characteristics of atmospheric circulation change of the South China Sea summer monsoon onset in 1986 are analyzed. The cross section of the νcomponent of the wind vector in the lower troposphere shows that the south wind is intensified quickly first over the Indo-China Peninsula,then progressed to the South China Sea. The onset of the summer monsoon over the South China Sea may be closely related to the intensifying of low-pressure located in the Bay of Bengal. Based on the results of various sensitive numerical forecast experiments, it is show that the dynamic effects of the topography and the effects of condensation latent heat are both very important to the onset of the summer monsoon over the South China Sea. The major change processes of the onset of the summer monsoon over the South China Sea are well predicted when the effects of the topography and the diabatic heating are both included in the control experiment, but could not be predicted only by the dynamic effects of the topography or by the diabatic heating effects.%分析了1986年南海夏季风爆发的环流演变特征,由经向风速剖面图看出,南风首先在中南半岛迅速加强,然后向南海发展,南海夏季风爆发同孟加拉湾低压的发展密切相关。通过地形和非绝热单因子敏感性数值预报试验表明,地形作用和凝结潜热等非绝热作用对南海夏季风的爆发都是很重要的,包含有这两种作用在内的控制试验成功地预报出了南海夏季风爆发的中期演变过程,单独的地形作用或非绝热作用都不能预报出南海夏季风的爆发。

  17. Impact of Ocean-Continent Distribution over Southern Asia on the Formation of Summer Monsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Qihua; HE Jinhai; CHEN Longxun; ZHU Congwen

    2006-01-01

    Using the CCM3/NCAR, a series of numerical experiments are designed to explore the effect of ocean-land interlaced distributions of Africa-Arabian Sea-India Peninsula-Bay of Bengal (BOB)-Indo-China PeninsulaSouth China Sea on the formation of the Asian summer monsoon circulation (ASMC). The results show that the thermal difference between African or Indian Subcontinent and nearby areas including the Indian Ocean,Arabian Sea, and part of BOB is the primary mechanism that maintains the Indian monsoon circulation.In the experiment getting rid of these two continents, the Indian monsoon system (IMS) members, i.e., the Somali cross-equatorial jet (40°E) and the southwesterly monsoon over the Arabian Sea and BOB, almost disappear. Moreover, the Hadley circulation weakens dominantly. It also proves that Africa has greater effect than Indian Subcontinent on the IMS.However, the existence of Indo-China Peninsula and Australia strengthens the East Asian monsoon system (EAMS). The thermal contrast between Indo-China Peninsula and SCS, Australia and western Pacific Ocean plays an important role in the formation of the tropical monsoon to the south of the EAMS. When the Indo-China Peninsula is masked in the experiment, the cross-equatorial flow (105°E and 125°E) vanishes,so does the southwesterly monsoon usually found over East Asia, and EAMS is enfeebled significantly. In addition, the impacts of these thermal contrasts on the distribution of the summer precipitation and surface temperature are investigated.

  18. Shift in Indian summer monsoon onset during 1976/1977

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahana, A. S.; Ghosh, Subimal; Ganguly, Auroop; Murtugudde, Raghu

    2015-05-01

    The Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR) contributes nearly 80% of the annual rainfall over India and has a significant influence on the country’s gross domestic product through the agricultural sector. Onset of the ISMR displays substantial interannual variability and controls the crop calendar and hence the agricultural output. This variability is traditionally linked to sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies over the tropical Pacific Ocean. The tropical Pacific SST underwent a regime shift during 1976/77. We report a prominent delay in the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) onset following the regime shift. The onset dates are computed with the Hydrologic Onset and Withdrawal Index, based on vertically integrated moisture transport over the Arabian Sea (AS). The shift in onset is found to be due to the change in moisture availability over the AS. A delay in the development of easterly vertical shear reduces northward-propagating intraseasonal variability during May-June, limiting the moisture supply from the equatorial Indian Ocean (IO) to the AS. This, along with enhanced precipitation over the IO during the pre-monsoon, drives a reduction in moisture availability over the AS region from pre- to post-1976/77, delaying the ISM onset in recent decades. Our findings highlight the need for the re-assessment of the crop calendar in India, which is now based on the mean onset date computed from long-term data, without considering the regime shift or trends in onset.

  19. Potential modulations of pre-monsoon aerosols during El Niño: impact on Indian summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadnavis, S.; Roy, Chaitri; Sabin, T. P.; Ayantika, D. C.; Ashok, K.

    2016-11-01

    The potential role of aerosol loading on the Indian summer monsoon rainfall during the El Niño years are examined using satellite-derived observations and a state of the art fully interactive aerosol-chemistry-climate model. The Aerosol Index (AI) from TOMS (1978-2005) and Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) from MISR spectroradiometer (2000-2010) indicate a higher-than-normal aerosol loading over the Indo-Gangetic plain (IGP) during the pre-monsoon season with a concurrent El Niño. Sensitivity experiments using ECHAM5-HAMMOZ climate model suggests that this enhanced loading of pre-monsoon absorbing aerosols over the Indo-Gangetic plain can reduce the drought during El Niño years by invoking the `Elevated-Heat-Pump' mechanism through an anomalous aerosol-induced warm core in the atmospheric column. This anomalous heating upshot the relative strengthening of the cross-equatorial moisture inflow associated with the monsoon and eventually reduces the severity of drought during El Niño years. The findings are subject to the usual limitations such as the uncertainties in observations, and limited number of El Niño years (during the study period).

  20. Validation of Seasonal Forecast of Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sukanta Kumar; Deb, Sanjib Kumar; Kishtawal, C. M.; Pal, Pradip Kumar

    2015-06-01

    The experimental seasonal forecast of Indian summer monsoon (ISM) rainfall during June through September using Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) version 3 has been carried out at the Space Applications Centre Ahmedabad since 2009. The forecasts, based on a number of ensemble members (ten minimum) of CAM, are generated in several phases and updated on regular basis. On completion of 5 years of experimental seasonal forecasts in operational mode, it is required that the overall validation or correctness of the forecast system is quantified and that the scope is assessed for further improvements of the forecast over time, if any. The ensemble model climatology generated by a set of 20 identical CAM simulations is considered as the model control simulation. The performance of the forecast has been evaluated by assuming the control simulation as the model reference. The forecast improvement factor shows positive improvements, with higher values for the recent forecasted years as compared to the control experiment over the Indian landmass. The Taylor diagram representation of the Pearson correlation coefficient (PCC), standard deviation and centered root mean square difference has been used to demonstrate the best PCC, in the order of 0.74-0.79, recorded for the seasonal forecast made during 2013. Further, the bias score of different phases of experiment revealed the fact that the ISM rainfall forecast is affected by overestimation in predicting the low rain-rate (less than 7 mm/day), but by underestimation in the medium and high rain-rate (higher than 11 mm/day). Overall, the analysis shows significant improvement of the ISM forecast over the last 5 years, viz. 2009-2013, due to several important modifications that have been implemented in the forecast system. The validation exercise has also pointed out a number of shortcomings in the forecast system; these will be addressed in the upcoming years of experiments to improve the quality of the ISM prediction.

  1. The onset and advance of the Asian summer monsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Based on the daily outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) data from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellites, the Climate Prediction Center's merged analysis of precipitation (CMAP) data and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalysis dataset, the mean intraseasonal variability of the Asian summer monsoon (ASM) is investigated by using power spectrum analysis, band-pass filter, and diagnostic analyses. The processes of the onset and advance of monsoon over the southern part of Indochina Peninsula, the east coast of Bay of Bengal, the South China Sea and the Indian subcontinent are explored. It is found that there is an abrupt change in OLR, precipitation and zonal wind during the onset and advance of the ASM. It is also indicated that the southern part of Indochina Peninsula and the adjacent Andaman Sea is the region where the earliest onset of the ASM occurs in the 2nd pentad of May.

  2. Reduction of uncertainty associated with future changes in Indian summer monsoon projected by climate models and assessment of monsoon teleconnections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Kavirajan; Surendran, Sajani; Kitoh, Akio; Varghese, Stella Jes

    2016-05-01

    Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) coupled global climate model (CGCM) Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) simulations project clear future temperature increase but diverse changes in Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR) with substantial inter-model spread. Robust signals of projected changes are derived based on objective criteria and the physically consistent simulations with the highest reliability suggest future reduction in the frequency of light rainfall but increase in high to extreme rainfall. The role of equatorial Indian and Pacific Oceans on the projected changes in monsoon rainfall is investigated. The results of coupled model projections are also compared with the corresponding projections from high resolution AGCM time-slice, multi-physics and multi-forcing ensemble experiments.

  3. Eastward propagating MJO during boreal summer and Indian monsoon droughts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, Susmitha; Sahai, A.K.; Goswami, B.N. [Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Climate and Global Modeling Division, Pune (India)

    2009-06-15

    Improved understanding of underlying mechanism responsible for Indian summer monsoon (ISM) droughts is important due to their profound socio-economic impact over the region. While some droughts are associated with 'external forcing' such as the El-Nino and Southern Oscillation (ENSO), many ISM droughts are not related to any known 'external forcing'. Here, we unravel a fundamental dynamic process responsible for droughts arising not only from external forcing but also those associated with internal dynamics. We show that most ISM droughts are associated with at least one very long break (VLB; breaks with duration of more than 10 days) and that the processes responsible for VLBs may also be the mechanism responsible for ISM droughts. Our analysis also reveals that all extended monsoon breaks (whether co-occurred with El-Nino or not) are associated with an eastward propagating Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) in the equatorial Indian Ocean and western Pacific extending to the dateline and westward propagating Rossby waves between 10 and 25 N. The divergent Rossby wave associated with the dry phase of equatorial convection propagates westward towards Indian land, couple with the northward propagating dry phase and leads to the sustenance of breaks. Thus, the propensity of eastward propagating MJO during boreal summer is largely the cause of monsoon droughts. While short breaks are not accompanied by westerly wind events (WWE) over equatorial western Pacific favorable for initiating air-sea interaction, all VLBs are accompanied by sustained WWE. The WWEs associated with all VLB during 1975-2005 initiate air-sea interaction on intraseasonal time scale, extend the warm pool eastward allowing the convectively coupled MJO to propagate further eastward and thereby sustaining the divergent circulation over India and the monsoon break. The ocean-atmosphere coupling on interannual time scale (such as El-Nino) can also produce VLB, but not necessary. (orig.)

  4. Eastward propagating MJO during boreal summer and Indian monsoon droughts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Susmitha; Sahai, A. K.; Goswami, B. N.

    2009-06-01

    Improved understanding of underlying mechanism responsible for Indian summer monsoon (ISM) droughts is important due to their profound socio-economic impact over the region. While some droughts are associated with ‘external forcing’ such as the El-Niño and Southern Oscillation (ENSO), many ISM droughts are not related to any known ‘external forcing’. Here, we unravel a fundamental dynamic process responsible for droughts arising not only from external forcing but also those associated with internal dynamics. We show that most ISM droughts are associated with at least one very long break (VLB; breaks with duration of more than 10 days) and that the processes responsible for VLBs may also be the mechanism responsible for ISM droughts. Our analysis also reveals that all extended monsoon breaks (whether co-occurred with El-Niño or not) are associated with an eastward propagating Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) in the equatorial Indian Ocean and western Pacific extending to the dateline and westward propagating Rossby waves between 10° and 25°N. The divergent Rossby wave associated with the dry phase of equatorial convection propagates westward towards Indian land, couple with the northward propagating dry phase and leads to the sustenance of breaks. Thus, the propensity of eastward propagating MJO during boreal summer is largely the cause of monsoon droughts. While short breaks are not accompanied by westerly wind events (WWE) over equatorial western Pacific favorable for initiating air-sea interaction, all VLBs are accompanied by sustained WWE. The WWEs associated with all VLB during 1975-2005 initiate air-sea interaction on intraseasonal time scale, extend the warm pool eastward allowing the convectively coupled MJO to propagate further eastward and thereby sustaining the divergent circulation over India and the monsoon break. The ocean-atmosphere coupling on interannual time scale (such as El-Niño) can also produce VLB, but not necessary.

  5. Active and break spells of the Indian summer monsoon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Rajeevan; Sulochana Gadgil; Jyoti Bhate

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, we suggest criteria for the identification of active and break events of the Indian summer monsoon on the basis of recently derived high resolution daily gridded rainfall dataset over India (1951–2007). Active and break events are defined as periods during the peak monsoon months of July and August, in which the normalized anomaly of the rainfall over a critical area, called the monsoon core zone exceeds 1 or is less than −1.0 respectively, provided the criterion is satisfied for at least three consecutive days. We elucidate the major features of these events. We consider very briefly the relationship of the intraseasonal fluctuations between these events and the interannual variation of the summer monsoon rainfall. We find that breaks tend to have a longer life-span than active spells. While, almost 80% of the active spells lasted 3–4 days, only 40% of the break spells were of such short duration. A small fraction (9%) of active spells and 32% of break spells lasted for a week or longer. While active events occurred almost every year, not a single break occurred in 26% of the years considered. On an average, there are 7 days of active and break events from July through August. There are no significant trends in either the days of active or break events. We have shown that there is a major difference between weak spells and long intense breaks. While weak spells are characterized by weak moist convective regimes, long intense break events have a heat trough type circulation which is similar to the circulation over the Indian subcontinent before the onset of the monsoon. The space-time evolution of the rainfall composite patterns suggests that the revival from breaks occurs primarily from northward propagations of the convective cloud zone. There are important differences between the spatial patterns of the active/break spells and those characteristic of interannual variation, particularly those associated with the link to ENSO. Hence, the

  6. Searching for a fingerprint of global warming in the Asian summer monsoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephenson, D.B.; Douville, H.; Kumar, K.R. [University of Reading, Reading (United Kingdom). Dept. of Meteorology

    2001-07-01

    This study investigates possible trends in several large-scale indices that describe the Asian summer monsoon. Results from recent atmospheric general circulating experiments are used to provide clues as to how the monsoon might be changing due to the effects of global warming. Interestingly, this study has found that the large-scale wind shear monsoon indices have been decreasing at a rate of 0.1-0.3% per year (based on NCEP/NCAR (National Centre for Atmospheric Research) analyses 1958-98) in quantitative agreement with recent results from doubled CO{sub 2} simulations made using several state-of-the-art climate models. Nevertheless, despite the weakening of the monsoon circulation, all-India rainfall shows no clear trend in either the model results or in the observation re-analyses from 1958-98. Multiple regression is used to separte out the dynamical contribution from the observed all-India rainfall index, and a clear increasing trend then emerges in the non-dynamical residual. A simple dimensionless multivariate monsoon index is proposed that could be of use in monitoring global warming changes in the monsoon. 31 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. A composite study of onset of the Australian summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendon, Harry H.; Liebmann, Brant

    1990-01-01

    The circulation changes that accompany an onset (defined as the first occurrence of wet 850-mb westerly winds at Darwin, Australia) of the Australian summer monsoon are documented by a composite study for the years 1957-1987. Composites of atmospheric fields at stations in and about the Australian tropics are constructed relative to the onset data at Darwin. It is shown that the composite onset is dominated by a slow eastward migration of a deep-baroclinic convective circulation displaced south of the equator. This propagating anomaly exhibited many features of the so-called 40-50 day oscillation, including an upper level anticyclone that accompanies the convective anomaly.

  8. Significant influence of the boreal summer monsoon flow on the Indian Ocean response during dipole events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Krishnan; Panickal, Swapna

    2010-05-01

    A majority of positive Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) events in the last 50-years were accompanied by enhanced summer-monsoon circulation and above-normal precipitation over central-north India. Given that IODs peak during boreal-autumn following the summer-monsoon season, this study examines the role of the summer-monsoon flow on the Indian Ocean (IO) response using a suite of ocean model experiments and supplementary data-diagnostics. The present results indicate that if the summer-monsoon Hadley-type circulation strengthens during positive-IOD events, then the strong off-equatorial south-easterly winds over the northern flanks of the intensified Australian High can effectively promote upwelling in the south-eastern tropical Indian Ocean and amplify the zonal-gradient of the IO heat-content response. While it is noted that a strong-monsoon cross-equatorial flow by itself may not generate a dipole-like response, a strengthening (weakening) of monsoon easterlies to the south-of-equator during positive-IOD events tends to reinforce (hinder) the zonal-gradient of the upper-ocean heat-content response. The findings show that an intensification of monsoonal-winds during positive-IOD periods produces nonlinear amplification of easterly wind-stress anomalies to the south-of-equator due to the nonlinear dependence of wind-stress on wind-speed. It is noted that such an off-equatorial intensification of easterlies over SH enhances upwelling in the eastern IO off Sumatra-Java; and the thermocline shoaling provides a zonal pressure-gradient which drives anomalous eastward equatorial under-currents (EUC) in the sub-surface. Furthermore, the combination of positive-IOD and stronger-than-normal monsoonal flow favors intensification of shallow transient meridional-overturning circulation in the eastern IO; and enhances the feed of cold subsurface off-equatorial waters to the EUC. References: P. Swapna and R. Krishnan 2008: Geophy. Res. Lett. 35, L14S04, doi: 10.1029/ 2008GL033430 R

  9. Indian summer monsoon forcing on the deglacial polar cold reversals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Virupaxa K Banakar; Sweta Baidya; Alexander M Piotrowski; D Shankar

    2017-08-01

    The deglacial transition from the last glacial maximum at $\\sim$20 kiloyears before present (ka) to the Holocene (11.7 ka to Present) was interrupted by millennial-scale cold reversals, viz., Antarctic Cold Reversal ($\\sim$14.5–12.8 ka) and Greenland Younger Dryas ($\\sim$12.8–11.8 ka) which had different timings and extent of cooling in each hemisphere. The cause of this synchronously initiated, but different hemispheric cooling during these cold reversals (Antarctic Cold Reversal $\\sim$3∘C and Younger Dryas $\\sim$10∘C) is elusive because CO2, the fundamental forcing for deglaciation, and Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, the driver of antiphased bipolar climate response, both fail to explain this asymmetry. We use centennial-resolution records of the local surface water $\\delta ^{18}\\hbox {O}$ of the Eastern Arabian Sea, which constitutes a proxy for the precipitation associated with the Indian Summer Monsoon, and other tropical precipitation records to deduce the role of tropical forcing in the polar cold reversals. We hypothesize a mechanism for tropical forcing, via the Indian Summer Monsoons, of the polar cold reversals by migration of the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone and the associated cross-equatorial heat transport.

  10. COMPOSITE ANALYSIS OF SUMMER MONSOON ONSET PROCESS OVER SOUTH CHINA SEA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐海明; 何金海; 周兵

    2001-01-01

    Based on the method of composite analysis, the onset process and preceding signs of summer monsoon over the South China Sea (SCS) is investigated. The result indicates that convection activities appear first over the Indo-China Peninsula prior to the onset of the monsoon, then around the Philippines just at the point of onset, implying that the convection activities around the Philippines serve as one of the reasons leading to the SCS monsoon onset. Before the SCS monsoon onset, the equatorial westerly over the Indian Ocean (75°E ~ 95°E ) experiences noticeable enhancement and plays an important role on the SCS monsoon onset. It propagates eastward rapidly and causes the establishment and strengthening of equatorial westerly in the southern SCS, on the one hand, it results in the migration southward of the westerly on south side of the south-China stationary front by means of shift northeastward of the westerly and convection over the Bay of Bengal, on the other. Further study also shows that the intensification of equatorial westerly in the Indian Ocean (75°E ~ 95°E) and the southern SCS is closely related to the reinforcement of the Southern-Hemisphere Mascarene high and Australian high, and cross-equatorial flow northward around Somali, at 85°E and 105°E, respectively.

  11. Impacts of Urbanization on Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastri, H. K.; Ghosh, S.; Karmakar, S.

    2013-12-01

    Rapid urbanisation all around the world is a matter of concern to the scientific community. The fast growing urban areas carries out huge anthropogenic activities that burdens natural environment and its resources like air-water quality and space, thus have different climatology to their rural surroundings. World Urbanization Prospects 2005 annual report described 20th century as witnessing a rapid urbanization of the world's population. Though urbanization is a worldwide phenomenon, it is especially prevalent in India, where urban areas have experienced an unprecedented rate of growth with level of urbanization increased from 17.23 % to 31.16% in year 1951 to 2011and the number of cities with population more than one million has grown from 5 to 53 over the same time. We take up an observational study to understand influence of urbanisation on mesoscale circulations and resulting convection, thus nature of precipitation around urban areas. The spatially distributed analysis of gridded daily precipitation data over the country is carried out to identify nature of trends in selected statistics of Indian summer monsoon precipitation and examine its association with urban land cover to have an impact on precipitation statistics. We evaluate explicit changes around urban land use in context of 40 large Indian urban areas. Further we assess local-urban climatic signals in the point level rainfall observations with model based analysis of two nearby locations under similar climatic conditions but differing largely in terms of urbanisation. The results of gridded data analysis indicate an overall tendency towards decrease in mean precipitation however, rainfall activities are enhanced around urban areas across different climate zones of the country. Though trends observed in selected climatic parameters revealed great degree of spatial inter variability in selected precipitation statistics over the country, they accounts a greater degree of inclination for occurrence under

  12. Why is Bay of Bengal warmer than Arabian Sea during the summer monsoon?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shenoi, S.S.C.; Shankar, D.; Shetye, S.R.

    the summer monsoon. In the Arabian Sea, the winds associated with the summer monsoon are stronger and favour the transfer of heat to deeper layers owing to overturning and turbulent mixing. In contrast, the weaker winds over the bay force a relatively...

  13. The contrasting features of Asian summer monsoon during surplus and deficient rainfall over India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, P. V. S.; Mohanty, U. C.; Rao, P. L. S.; Bhatla, R.

    2002-12-01

    An endeavour is made to distinguish the mean summer monsoon features during surplus and deficient monsoon seasons. Based on all-India summer monsoon rainfall, over 42 years (1958-99), seven surplus and ten deficient monsoon seasons are identified. Making use of daily averaged (00 Z and 12 Z) reanalysis data sets from the National Center for Environmental Prediction-National Center for Atmospheric Research for the corresponding surplus and deficient monsoon seasons, the mean circulation characteristics and large-scale energetics are examined.The circulation features denote that the cross equatorial flow, low-level jet and tropical easterly jet are stronger during a surplus monsoon. Further, strong Tibetan anticyclonic flow characterizes a surplus monsoon. The large-scale balances of kinetic energy, heat and moisture show a significantly large quantity of diabatic heating, adiabatic generation of kinetic energy, and horizontal convergence of heat and moisture during the surplus monsoon season compared with the deficient state. The regions with statistically significant difference between surplus and deficient monsoon seasons are delineated by a Student's t-test at the 95% confidence level. The remarkable aspect noticed in this study is that the Arabian Sea branch of the monsoon circulation is more vigorous during a surplus monsoon season, whereas the eastern Bay of Bengal branch is stronger during a deficient monsoon. The various large-scale budget terms of kinetic energy, heat and moisture are found to be consistent and in agreement with the seasonal monsoon activity over India.

  14. South American Summer Monsoon history recorded in Brazilian speleothems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Auler, A. S.; Edwards, R. L.; Cheng, H.

    2008-12-01

    We have obtained three high-resolution oxygen isotopic records of cave calcites from Caverna Botuverá, southern Brazil, Gruta do Padre, central Brazil, and Caverna Paraíso, Amazonian Brazil. All three records have chronologies determined by U-Th dates and span the last 90, 20 and 50 thousand years, respectively. Tests for equilibrium conditions show that their oxygen isotopic variations are primarily caused by climate change. The three records thus can provide information about precipitation history and fluctuations of the South American Summer Monsoon along a latitudinal transect from 28° S to 4° S. During the last glacial period, the three oxygen isotopic profiles show abrupt millennial-scale variations, which are anti- correlated with the Chinese speleothem monsoon records and northern high-latitude ice core records. This is likely related to the displacement of the mean position of the intertropical convergence zone and associated asymmetry of Hadley cells, consistent with an oceanic meridional overturning circulation mechanism for driving the abrupt climate events. However, the three records show distinct isotopic patterns in Holocene epoch. The δ18O values in the Botuvera record decrease steadily throughout Holocene, while in the Padre record, the δ18O drops slightly until ~6-7 thousand years ago and then gradually increases until the present. The Paraiso Holocene record is similar to the Padre one, but with a much greater amplitude. Together with Andean ice core and lake records, our observations suggest asynchronous changes in Holocene monsoonal precipitation in South America, possibly related to strengthened zonal tropical air-sea interactions after the melting of the large northern ice sheets.

  15. THE CLIMATIC CHARACTERISTICS OF SUMMER MONSOON ONSET OVER THE SOUTH CHINA SEA I.40-YEAR AVERAGE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯瑞权; 王安宇; 吴池胜; 林建恒; 古志明; 林文实; 谭志文

    2002-01-01

    By using 40-year NCEP reanalysis daily data (1958-1997),we have analyzed the climatic characteristics of summer monsoon onset in the South China Sea (105(E ~120(E,5(N~20(N,to be simplified as SCS in the text followed) pentad by pentad (5 days).According to our new definition,in the monsoon area of the SCS two of the following conditions should be satisfied:1) At 850hPa,the southwest winds should be greater than 2m/s.2) At 850 hPa,should be greater than 335(K.The new definition means that the summer monsoon is the southwest winds with high temperature and high moisture.The onset of the SCS summer monsoon is defined to start when one half of the SCS area (105(E~120(E,5(N~20(N) is controlled by the summer monsoon.The analyzed results revealed the following:1) The summer monsoon in the SCS starts to build up abruptly in the 4th pentad in May.2) The summer monsoon onset in the SCS is resulted from the development and intensification of southwesterly monsoon in the Bay of Bengal.3) The onset of the summer monsoon and establishment of the summer monsoon rainfall season in the SCS occur simultaneously.4) During the summer monsoon onset in the SCS,troughs deepen and widen quickly in the lower troposphere of the India;the subtropical high in the Western Pacific moves eastward off the SCS in the middle troposphere;the easterly advances northward over the SCS in the upper troposphere.

  16. Meteorological fields variability over the Indian seas in pre and summer monsoon months during extreme monsoon seasons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    U C Mohanty; R Bhatla; P V S Raju; O P Madan; A Sarkar

    2002-09-01

    In this study, the possible linkage between summer monsoon rainfall over India and surface meteorological fields (basic fields and heat budget components) over monsoon region (30° E-120°E, 30°S-30°N) during the pre-monsoon month of May and summer monsoon season (June to September) are examined. For this purpose, monthly surface meteorological fields anomaly are analyzed for 42 years (1958-1999) using reanalysis data of NCEP/NCAR (National Center for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research). The statistical significance of the anomaly (difference) between the surplus and deficient monsoon years in the surface meteorological fields are also examined by Student's t-test at 95% confidence level. Significant negative anomalies of mean sea level pressure are observed over India, Arabian Sea and Arabian Peninsular in the pre-monsoon month of May and monsoon season. Significant positive anomalies in the zonal and meridional wind (at 2m) in the month of May are observed in the west Arabian Sea off Somali coast and for monsoon season it is in the central Arabian Sea that extends up to Somalia. Significant positive anomalies of the surface temperature and air temperature (at 2m) in the month of May are observed over north India and adjoining Pakistan and Afghanistan region. During monsoon season this region is replaced by significant negative anomalies. In the month of May, significant positive anomalies of cloud amount are observed over Somali coast, north Bay of Bengal and adjoining West Bengal and Bangladesh. During monsoon season, cloud amount shows positive anomalies over NW India and north Arabian Sea. There is overall reduction in the incoming shortwave radiation flux during surplus monsoon years. A higher magnitude of latent heat flux is also found in surplus monsoon years for the month of May as well as the monsoon season. The significant positive anomaly of latent heat flux in May, observed over southwest Arabian Sea, may be considered

  17. CSSP MESETA : Simulation of the East Asian Summer Monsoon with idealized Tibetan Plateau orography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, K. C.; Curio, J.; Turner, A. G.; Schiemann, R.

    2016-12-01

    Contrary to the traditional view on monsoon dynamics, recent studies have showed that the Asian summer monsoon can be reproduced in idealized simulations in which the Tibetan Plateau (TP) is removed, leaving only the Himalayan ranges. This suggests mechanical blocking by the Himalayas is perhaps more important than the elevated sensible heating from TP in maintaining the summer circulation. The CSSP MESETA project aims to further investigate the impact of TP on the East and South Asian monsoons, in particular the relative importance of thermal and mechanical forcing, on the regional and downstream climate. The state-of-the-art HadGEM3 atmospheric general circulation model of the UK Met Office was used to perform experiments with various idealized orography settings designed to assess the mechanical and thermal forcing exerted by the TP. Results from the idealized simulations show that the TP has a remarkable influence on the East Asian Summer Monsoon in terms of its intensity and onset. The summer moisture flux into the South China Sea and precipitation over southern China, in particular, reduced significantly when most of the TP was removed from the model domain leaving only the Himalayan ranges. Upper-tropospheric circulation such as the strength and position of the sub-tropical jet also showed variation under different orography settings which affected the climate of downstream regions in the western north Pacific. Therefore, it is clear that the TP plays a vital role in shaping the climate over East Asia. We also examine the impact of orographic perturbations of the Tibetan Plateau region on Rossby wave source terms and thereby on remote teleconnections to elsewhere on the planet. This has implications for our understanding of the impact of systematic model biases in terms of orographic effects on regional and global circulation.

  18. Impact of irrigation on the South Asian summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Fahad; Hagemann, Stefan; Jacob, Daniela

    2009-10-01

    The Indian subcontinent is one of the most intensely irrigated regions of the world and state of the art climate models do not account for the representation of irrigation. Sensitivity studies with the regional climate model REMO show distinct feedbacks between the simulation of the monsoon circulation with and without irrigation processes. We find that the temperature and mean sea level pressure, where the standard REMO version without irrigation shows a significant bias over the areas of Indus basin, is highly sensitive to the water used for irrigation. In our sensitivity test we find that removal of this bias has caused less differential heating between land and sea masses. This in turns reduces the westerlies entering into land from Arabian Sea, hence creating conditions favorable for currents from Bay of Bengal to intrude deep into western India and Pakistan that have been unrealistically suppressed before. We conclude that the representation of irrigated water is unavoidable for realistic simulation of south Asian summer monsoon and its response under global warming.

  19. An Indian Ocean precursor for Indian summer monsoon rainfall variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreejith, O. P.; Panickal, S.; Pai, S.; Rajeevan, M.

    2015-11-01

    The Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR) depicts large interannual variability strongly linked with El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). However, many of the El Niño years were not accompanied by deficient ISMR. The results from the study reveal the significant role of coupled air-sea interaction over the tropical Indian Ocean (IO) in modifying the ENSO-ISMR association. The IO warm water volume (WWV), a measure of heat content variations in the equatorial IO has strong influence on ISMR. A deepening (shoaling) of thermocline in the eastern equatorial IO (EEIO) during late boreal spring (April-May) accompanied by increase (decrease) in WWV anomalies weaken (enhance) the ISMR by enhancing (suppressing) the convection over EEIO resulting in the below (above) normal ISMR. Thus, the changes in the WWV anomalies in the EEIO along with ENSO conditions during boreal spring can be considered as a precursor for the performance of subsequent ISMR.

  20. Long range prediction of Indian summer monsoon rainfall

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A A Munot; K Krishna Kumar

    2007-02-01

    The search for new parameters for predicting the all India summer monsoon rainfall (AISMR) has been an important aspect of long range prediction of AISMR. In recent years NCEP/NCAR reanalysis has improved the geographical coverage and availability of the data and this can be easily updated. In this study using NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data on temperature, zonal and meridional wind at different pressure levels, few predictors are identified and a prediction scheme is developed for predicting AISMR. The regression coeffcients are computed by stepwise multiple regression procedure. The final equation explained 87% of the variance with multiple correlation coeffcient (MCC), 0.934. The estimated rainfall in the El-Nino year of 1997 was -1.7% as against actual of 4.4%. The estimated rainfall deficiency in both the recent deficient years of 2002 and 2004 were -19.5% and -8.5% as against observed -20.4% and -11.5% respectively.

  1. Teleconnections associated with Northern Hemisphere summer monsoon intraseasonal oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Ja-Yeon; Wang, Bin; Ha, Kyung-Ja; Lee, June-Yi

    2013-06-01

    The boreal summer intraseasonal oscillation (BSISO) has strong convective activity centers in Indian (I), Western North Pacific (WNP), and North American (NA) summer monsoon (SM) regions. The present study attempts to reveal BSISO teleconnection patterns associated with these dominant intraseasonal variability centers. During the active phase of ISM, a zonally elongated band of enhanced convection extends from India via the Bay of Bengal and Philippine Sea to tropical central Pacific with suppressed convection over the eastern Pacific near Mexico. The corresponding extratropical circulation anomalies occur along the waveguides generated by the North African-Asian jet and North Atlantic-North European jet. When the tropical convection strengthens over the WNPSM sector, a distinct great circle-like Rossby wave train emanates from the WNP to the western coast of United States (US) with an eastward shift of enhanced meridional circulation. In the active phase of NASM, large anticyclonic anomalies anchor over the western coast of US and eastern Canada and the global teleconnection pattern is similar to that during a break phase of the ISM. Examination of the evolution of the BSISO teleconnection reveals quasi-stationary patterns with preferred centers of teleconnection located at Europe, Russia, central Asia, East Asia, western US, and eastern US and Canada, respectively. Most centers are embedded in the waveguide along the westerly jet stream, but the centers at Europe and Russia occur to the north of the jet-induced waveguide. Eastward propagation of the ISO teleconnection is evident over the Pacific-North America sector. The rainfall anomalies over the elongated band near the monsoon domain over the Indo-western Pacific sector have an opposite tendency with that over the central and southern China, Mexico and southern US, providing a source of intraseasonal predictability to extratropical regions. The BSISO teleconnection along and to the north of the subtropical jet

  2. Extended Range Prediction of Indian Summer Monsoon: Current status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, A. K.; Abhilash, S.; Borah, N.; Joseph, S.; Chattopadhyay, R.; S, S.; Rajeevan, M.; Mandal, R.; Dey, A.

    2014-12-01

    The main focus of this study is to develop forecast consensus in the extended range prediction (ERP) of monsoon Intraseasonal oscillations using a suit of different variants of Climate Forecast system (CFS) model. In this CFS based Grand MME prediction system (CGMME), the ensemble members are generated by perturbing the initial condition and using different configurations of CFSv2. This is to address the role of different physical mechanisms known to have control on the error growth in the ERP in the 15-20 day time scale. The final formulation of CGMME is based on 21 ensembles of the standalone Global Forecast System (GFS) forced with bias corrected forecasted SST from CFS, 11 low resolution CFST126 and 11 high resolution CFST382. Thus, we develop the multi-model consensus forecast for the ERP of Indian summer monsoon (ISM) using a suite of different variants of CFS model. This coordinated international effort lead towards the development of specific tailor made regional forecast products over Indian region. Skill of deterministic and probabilistic categorical rainfall forecast as well the verification of large-scale low frequency monsoon intraseasonal oscillations has been carried out using hindcast from 2001-2012 during the monsoon season in which all models are initialized at every five days starting from 16May to 28 September. The skill of deterministic forecast from CGMME is better than the best participating single model ensemble configuration (SME). The CGMME approach is believed to quantify the uncertainty in both initial conditions and model formulation. Main improvement is attained in probabilistic forecast which is because of an increase in the ensemble spread, thereby reducing the error due to over-confident ensembles in a single model configuration. For probabilistic forecast, three tercile ranges are determined by ranking method based on the percentage of ensemble members from all the participating models falls in those three categories. CGMME further

  3. Impacts of intraseasonal oscillation on the onset and interannual variation of the Indian summer monsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI YanJun; ZHANG RenHe; LI Tim; WEN Min

    2009-01-01

    The role of the intraseasonal oscillation (ISO) on the seasonal and interannual variations of the Indian summer monsoon is investigated based on the analysis of observational data. It is shown that the ISO significantly contributes to the establishment of low-level westerlies during the monsoon onset and developing periods. The effect of the ISO on the annual cycle of the monsoon is through nonlinear eddy momentum transport. On the interannual timescale, the Indian summer monsoon rainfall exhibits a significant out-of-phase relationship with the ISO intensity over the Indian monsoon region. In strong ISO years it appears the weak monsoon when there is an abnormal high over the India subcontinent in the lower troposphere. In weak ISO years there exists an abnormal low and the strong monsoon ap-pears.

  4. Arabian Peninsula-North Pacific Oscillation and its association with the Asian summer monsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Using correlation and EOF analyses on sea level pressure from 57-year NCEP-NCAR reanalysis data, the Arabian Peninsula-North Pacific Oscillation (APNPO) is identified. The APNPO reflects the co-variability between the North Pacific high and South Asian summer monsoon low. This teleconnec- tion pattern is closely related to the Asian summer monsoon. On interannual timescale, it co-varies with both the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) and South Asian summer monsoon (SASM); on decadal timescale, it co-varies with the EASM: both exhibit two abrupt climate changes in the middle 1960s and the late 1970s respectively. The possible physical process for the connections between the APNPO and Asian summer monsoon is then explored by analyzing the APNPO-related atmospheric circulations. The results show that with a strong APNPO, the Somali Jet, SASM flow, EASM flow, and South Asian high are all enhanced, and an anomalous anticyclone is produced at the upper level over northeast China via a zonal wave train. Meanwhile, the moisture transportation to the Asian monsoon regions is also strengthened in a strong APNPO year, leading to a strong moisture convergence over India and northern China. All these changes of circulations and moisture conditions finally result in an anoma- lous Asian summer monsoon and monsoon rainfall over India and northern China. In addition, the APNPO has a good persistence from spring to summer. The spring APNPO is also significantly corre- lated with Asian summer monsoon variability. The spring APNPO might therefore provide valuable in- formation for the prediction of Asian summer monsoon.

  5. AN EAST ASIAN SUBTROPICAL SUMMER MONSOON INDEX DEFINED BY MOISTURE TRANSPORT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Ping; TANG Xu; HE Jin-hai; CHEN Long-xun

    2008-01-01

    Using daily NCEP/NCAR reanalysis dataset and observation rainfall data in China for the 1971- 2000 period, a subtropical summer monsoon index has been defined by meridional moisture transport of the total atmosphere column. Results show that the subtropical summer monsoon index defined by the difference of meridional moisture transport between South China and North China can be used to describe the intensity of the subtropical summer monsoon. High (low) index is corresponding to strong (weak) subtropical summer monsoon. And the new index is well related to the summer rainfall over the middle and lower reaches of Yangtze River. In addition, the convergence of moisture transport from the west Pacific via the South China Sea and that from the North China may be responsible for the anomalously excessive summer rainfall over the middle and lower reaches of Yangtze River.

  6. GENERAL SITUATION ABOUT ACTIVITY OF SUMMER MONSOON OVER SOUTH CHINA SEA IN 2004 ASIAN SUMMER MONSOON INDEX

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chun-hui; LIANG Jian-yin

    2006-01-01

    Based on daily NCEP reanalysis data, OLR and satellite rainfall data, the characteristic of the activities of South China Sea summer monsoon(SCSSM) in 2004 were analyzed. The results showed that the establishment of SCSSM was little later than normal and the intensity was stronger than normal. Influenced by the location of the northwest Pacific subtropical high, which was much northward and westward than normal,SCSSM was active mainly in the South China Sea areas. There existed obvious intraseasonal oscillation and two significant periods of SCSSM, one was about 20-30 days and the other about 40-50 days. The transportation of moisture was concentrated on the South China Sea and the northwest Pacific regions, reducing the northward transportation and resulting in drought in southern China.

  7. An East Asian Subtropical Summer Monsoon Index and Its Relationship to Summer Rainfall in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ping; ZHOU Zijiang

    2009-01-01

    Using the monthly mean NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data and the monthly rainfall observations at 160 rain gauge stations of China during 1961-1999, and based on major characteristics of the atmospheric circulation over East Asia and the western Pacific, a simple index for the East Asian subtropical summer monsoon (EASSM) is defined. The relationship between this index and summer rainfall in China and associated circulation features are examined. A comparison is made between this index and other monsoon indices. The results indicate that the index defined herein is reflective of variations of both the thermal low pressure centered in Siberia and the subtropical ridge over the western Pacific. It epitomizes the intensity of the EASSM and the variability of summer rainfall along the Yangtze River. Analysis shows that the Siberian low has a greater effect on the rainfall than the subtropical ridge, suggesting that the summer rainfall variability over the eastern parts of China is to a large extent affected by anomalies of the atmospheric circulation and cold air development in the midlatitudes. Taking into account of the effects of both the Siberian low and the subtropical ridge can better capture the summer rainfall anomalies of China. The index exhibits interannual and decadai variabilities, with high-index values occurring mainly in the 1960s and 1970s and low-index values in the 1980s and 1990s. When the EASSM index is low, the Siberian low and the subtropical ridge are weaker, and northerly wind anomalies appear at low levels over the midlatitudes and subtropics of East Asia, whereas southwesterly wind anomalies dominate in the upper troposphere over the tropics and subtropics of Asia and the western Pacific. The northerly wind anomalies bring about frequent cold air disturbances from the midlatitudes of East Asia, strengthening the convergence and ascending motions along the Meiyu front, and result in an increase of summer rainfall over the Yangtze River.

  8. Impacts of Land Process on the Onset and Evolution of Asian Summer Monsoon in the NCEP Climate Forecast System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song YANG; WEN Min; Rongqian YANG; Wayne HIGGINS; ZHANG Renhe

    2011-01-01

    Impacts of land models and initial land conditions (ICs) on the Asian summer monsoon,especially its onset,were investigated using the NCEP Climate Forecast System (CFS).Two land models,the Oregon State University (OSU) land model and the NCEP,OSU,Air Force,and Hydrologic Research Laboratory (Noah) land model,were used to get parallel experiments.The experiments also used land ICs from the NCEP/Department of Energy (DOE) Global Reanalysis 2 (GR2) and the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS).Previous studies have demonstrated that,a systematic weak bias appears in the modeled monsoon,and this bias may be related to a cold bias over the Asian land mass.Results of the current study show that replacement of the OSU land model by the Noah land model improved the model's cold bias and produced improved monsoon precipitation and circulation patterns.The CFS predicted monsoon with greater proficiency in El Ni(n)o years,compared to La Ni(n)a years,and the Noah model performed better than the OSU model in monsoon predictions for individual years.These improvements occurred not only in relation to monsoon onset in late spring but also to monsoon intensity in summer.Our analysis of the monsoon features over the India peninsula,the Indo-China peninsula,and the South Chinese Sea indicates different degrees of improvement.Furthermore,a change in the land models led to more remarkable improvement in monsoon prediction than did a change from the GR2 land ICs to the GLDAS land ICs.

  9. Sensitivity of convective precipitation to soil moisture and vegetation during break spell of Indian summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutty, Govindan; Sandeep, S.; Vinodkumar; Nhaloor, Sreejith

    2017-07-01

    Indian summer monsoon rainfall is characterized by large intra-seasonal fluctuations in the form of active and break spells in rainfall. This study investigates the role of soil moisture and vegetation on 30-h precipitation forecasts during the break monsoon period using Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model. The working hypothesis is that reduced rainfall, clear skies, and wet soil condition during the break monsoon period enhance land-atmosphere coupling over central India. Sensitivity experiments are conducted with modified initial soil moisture and vegetation. The results suggest that an increase in antecedent soil moisture would lead to an increase in precipitation, in general. The precipitation over the core monsoon region has increased by enhancing forest cover in the model simulations. Parameters such as Lifting Condensation Level, Level of Free Convection, and Convective Available Potential Energy indicate favorable atmospheric conditions for convection over forests, when wet soil conditions prevail. On spatial scales, the precipitation is more sensitive to soil moisture conditions over northeastern parts of India. Strong horizontal gradient in soil moisture and orographic uplift along the upslopes of Himalaya enhanced rainfall over the east of Indian subcontinent.

  10. Possible role of pre-monsoon sea surface warming in driving the summer monsoon onset over the Bay of Bengal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kuiping; Liu, Yanliang; Yang, Yang; Li, Zhi; Liu, Baochao; Xue, Liang; Yu, Weidong

    2016-08-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) reaches its annual maximum just before the summer monsoon onset and collapses soon after in the central areas of the Bay of Bengal (BoB). Here, the impact of the peak in the pre-monsoon SST on triggering the earliest monsoon onset in the BoB is investigated, with a focus on the role they play in driving the first-branch northward-propagating intra-seasonal oscillations (FNISOs) over the equatorial Eastern Indian Ocean (EIO). During the calm pre-monsoon period, sea surface warming in the BoB could increase the surface equivalent potential temperature (θe) in several ways. Firstly, warming of the sea surface heats the surface air through sensible heating, which forces the air temperature to follow the SST. The elevated air surface temperature accounts for 30 % of the surface θe growth. Furthermore, the elevated air temperature raises the water vapor capacity of the surface air to accommodate more water vapor. Constrained by the observation that the surface relative humidity is maintained nearly constant during the monsoon transition period, the surface specific humidity exhibits a significant increase, according to the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship. Budget analysis indicates that the additional moisture is primarily obtained from sea surface evaporation, which also exhibits a weak increasing trend due to the sea surface warming. In this way, it contributes about 70 % to the surface θe growth. The rapid SST increase during the pre-monsoon period preconditions the summer monsoon onset over the BoB through its contributions to significantly increase the surface θe, which eventually establishes the meridional asymmetry of the atmospheric convective instability in the EIO. The pre-established greater convective instability leads to the FNISO convections, and the summer monsoon is triggered in the BoB region.

  11. Imprint of Historical Anthropogenic Emissions on the Subseasonal Variability of the Indian Summer Monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, D.; Bollasina, M. A.; Diffenbaugh, N. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Indian Summer Monsoon system affects the lives of over a billion people, the majority of whom who depend on agricultural activities for their livelihood. During the monsoon season, the region experiences wet and dry spells associated with multiple modes of intraseasonal variability. Such subseasonal hydroclimatic extremes have important socio-economic implications. Based on 60 years of observational data, we will present evidence to show that the characteristics of these wet and dry spells have changed significantly over the historical period. We use targeted single forcing experiments with the NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory CM3 coupled model to investigate the separate effect of aerosols and greenhouse gases on the observed long-term trends. The simulations consist of three-member ensemble experiments forced only by time-evolving anthropogenic aerosols, greenhouse gases, and natural forcings, and a five-member experiment with all forcings (natural and anthropogenic). Using these simulations, we show that anthropogenic aerosols and greenhouse gases have had a substantial effect on total rainfall and subseasonal variability during the peak monsoon season, respectively. We will also discuss how increasing aerosols and greenhouse gas concentrations have influenced the wet and dry spell characteristics, and explain the physical mechanisms responsible for such changes.

  12. Himalayan River Terraces as A Landscape Response to Quaternary Summer Monsoon Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonell, T. N.; Clift, P. D.

    2013-12-01

    In order to interpret marine sedimentary archives as records of the erosional response to Asian monsoon variability, we must first recognize how transport processes affect the storage and release of sediment to the ocean. River terraces, such as found in the Greater Himalaya, provide a pivotal role in the source-to-sink story, because this is where sediment storage occurs and is likely modulated. We investigate the role that climate plays in controlling erosion and sediment flux to the Indus delta and fan by looking at the Indus River system, which is dominated by the strong forcing of the Asian monsoon, as well as winter Westerly winds. Paleoceanographic, speleothem, and lacustrine records indicate that summer monsoon intensity was strong from 29 to 37 ka, decreased after that time until ~16 ka, reached maximum intensity from 8 to 10 ka, and then weakened until ~3 ka. Some lacustrine records, however, indicate a more complex pattern of monsoon variability in the Greater Himalaya, which contrasts with monsoonal forcing in central India. This disagreement suggests that floodplains of major river systems may not experience the same climatic conditions as their mountain sources, resulting in contrasting landscape responses to climate change. High altitude river valleys, at least north ofthe Greater Himalaya, appear to be sensitive to monsoon strength because they lie on the periphery of the present rainfall maximum, in the Himalayan rain shadow. These steep river valleys may be affected by landslide damming during periods of increase moisture transport and strong monsoonal precipitation, where damming provides sediment storage through valley-filling and later sediment release through gradual incision or dam-bursting. The Zanskar River, a major tributary to the upper Indus River, provides a record of the erosional response of mountain river valleys to these extreme phases through river terracing. New OSL ages from alluvial terraces indicate reworking of sediment and

  13. Response of the North African summer monsoon to precession and obliquity forcings in the EC-Earth GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosmans, J. H. C.; Drijfhout, S. S.; Tuenter, E.; Hilgen, F. J.; Lourens, L. J.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate, for the first time, the response of the North African summer monsoon to separate precession and obliquity forcings using a high-resolution state-of-the-art coupled general circulation model, EC-Earth. Our aim is to better understand the mechanisms underlying the astronomical forcing of this low-latitude climate system in detail. The North African monsoon is strengthened when northern hemisphere summer insolation is higher, as is the case in the minimum precession and maximum obliquity experiments. In these experiments, the low surface pressure areas over the Sahara are intensified and located farther north, and the meridional pressure gradient is further enhanced by a stronger South Atlantic high pressure area. As a result, the southwesterly monsoon winds are stronger and bring more moisture into the monsoon region from both the northern and southern tropical Atlantic. The monsoon winds, precipitation and convection also extend farther north into North Africa. The precession-induced changes are much larger than those induced by obliquity, but the latter are remarkable because obliquity-induced changes in summer insolation over the tropics are nearly zero. Our results provide a different explanation than previously proposed for mechanisms underlying the precession- and, especially, obliquity-related signals in paleoclimate proxy records of the North African monsoon. The EC-Earth experiments reveal that, instead of higher latitude mechanisms, increased moisture transport from both the northern and southern tropical Atlantic is responsible for the precession and obliquity signals in the North African monsoon. This increased moisture transport results from both increased insolation and an increased tropical insolation gradient.

  14. Dynamics of the Asian Summer Monsoon Onset and the Tibetan Plateau Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yimin, Liu; Guoxiong, Wu; Boqi, Liu; Suling, Ren; Yue, Guan

    2015-04-01

    The formation and development of the South Asian High (SAH) in early spring over South China Sea (SCS) provides upper tropospheric pumping over the Southeast Bay of Bengal (BOB) and leads to the BOB monsoon onset. The strong latent heat release of the BOB monsoon results in the northeastward unstable development of the SAH which contributes to the SCS monsoon onset. The zonal asymmetric unstable development of the SAH after the SCS monsoon onset leads to the Indian summer monsoon onset. In spring over South BOB, usually there is vortex development preceding the Asian summer monsoon onset. The rapid development of the BOB monsoon onset vortex is due to the local strong air-sea interaction, which is modulated by the Tibetan Plateau (TP) forcing and the land-sea thermal contrast across South Asia. Strong heating from BOB monsoon generates stationary Rossby-wave in lower troposphere, producing weak cold advection and convection over North SCS. Development of surface BOB cyclone provides Northeastward water vapor transport towards North SCS where convection develops. Before the Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) onset, the North- South land- sea thermal contrast increases eastward remarkably on the southeast of Arabian Sea. Air traveling eastward along the near- surface tropical westerly jet gets northward accelerated, forcing a lower tropospheric convergence near and to the north of the jet stream. Such a forced convection development occurs intensively over the southeastern Arabian Sea and southwestern India, contributing to the ISM onset.

  15. Predictor-Year Subspace Clustering Based Ensemble Prediction of Indian Summer Monsoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moumita Saha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Forecasting the Indian summer monsoon is a challenging task due to its complex and nonlinear behavior. A large number of global climatic variables with varying interaction patterns over years influence monsoon. Various statistical and neural prediction models have been proposed for forecasting monsoon, but many of them fail to capture variability over years. The skill of predictor variables of monsoon also evolves over time. In this article, we propose a joint-clustering of monsoon years and predictors for understanding and predicting the monsoon. This is achieved by subspace clustering algorithm. It groups the years based on prevailing global climatic condition using statistical clustering technique and subsequently for each such group it identifies significant climatic predictor variables which assist in better prediction. Prediction model is designed to frame individual cluster using random forest of regression tree. Prediction of aggregate and regional monsoon is attempted. Mean absolute error of 5.2% is obtained for forecasting aggregate Indian summer monsoon. Errors in predicting the regional monsoons are also comparable in comparison to the high variation of regional precipitation. Proposed joint-clustering based ensemble model is observed to be superior to existing monsoon prediction models and it also surpasses general nonclustering based prediction models.

  16. See-saw relationship of the Holocene East Asian-Australian summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eroglu, Deniz; McRobie, Fiona H.; Ozken, Ibrahim; Stemler, Thomas; Wyrwoll, Karl-Heinz; Breitenbach, Sebastian F. M.; Marwan, Norbert; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    The East Asian-Indonesian-Australian summer monsoon (EAIASM) links the Earth's hemispheres and provides a heat source that drives global circulation. At seasonal and inter-seasonal timescales, the summer monsoon of one hemisphere is linked via outflows from the winter monsoon of the opposing hemisphere. Long-term phase relationships between the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) and the Indonesian-Australian summer monsoon (IASM) are poorly understood, raising questions of long-term adjustments to future greenhouse-triggered climate change and whether these changes could `lock in' possible IASM and EASM phase relationships in a region dependent on monsoonal rainfall. Here we show that a newly developed nonlinear time series analysis technique allows confident identification of strong versus weak monsoon phases at millennial to sub-centennial timescales. We find a see-saw relationship over the last 9,000 years--with strong and weak monsoons opposingly phased and triggered by solar variations. Our results provide insights into centennial- to millennial-scale relationships within the wider EAIASM regime.

  17. See–saw relationship of the Holocene East Asian–Australian summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eroglu, Deniz; McRobie, Fiona H.; Ozken, Ibrahim; Stemler, Thomas; Wyrwoll, Karl-Heinz; Breitenbach, Sebastian F. M.; Marwan, Norbert; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The East Asian–Indonesian–Australian summer monsoon (EAIASM) links the Earth's hemispheres and provides a heat source that drives global circulation. At seasonal and inter-seasonal timescales, the summer monsoon of one hemisphere is linked via outflows from the winter monsoon of the opposing hemisphere. Long-term phase relationships between the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) and the Indonesian–Australian summer monsoon (IASM) are poorly understood, raising questions of long-term adjustments to future greenhouse-triggered climate change and whether these changes could ‘lock in' possible IASM and EASM phase relationships in a region dependent on monsoonal rainfall. Here we show that a newly developed nonlinear time series analysis technique allows confident identification of strong versus weak monsoon phases at millennial to sub-centennial timescales. We find a see–saw relationship over the last 9,000 years—with strong and weak monsoons opposingly phased and triggered by solar variations. Our results provide insights into centennial- to millennial-scale relationships within the wider EAIASM regime. PMID:27666662

  18. See-saw relationship of the Holocene East Asian-Australian summer monsoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eroglu, Deniz; McRobie, Fiona H; Ozken, Ibrahim; Stemler, Thomas; Wyrwoll, Karl-Heinz; Breitenbach, Sebastian F M; Marwan, Norbert; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-09-26

    The East Asian-Indonesian-Australian summer monsoon (EAIASM) links the Earth's hemispheres and provides a heat source that drives global circulation. At seasonal and inter-seasonal timescales, the summer monsoon of one hemisphere is linked via outflows from the winter monsoon of the opposing hemisphere. Long-term phase relationships between the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) and the Indonesian-Australian summer monsoon (IASM) are poorly understood, raising questions of long-term adjustments to future greenhouse-triggered climate change and whether these changes could 'lock in' possible IASM and EASM phase relationships in a region dependent on monsoonal rainfall. Here we show that a newly developed nonlinear time series analysis technique allows confident identification of strong versus weak monsoon phases at millennial to sub-centennial timescales. We find a see-saw relationship over the last 9,000 years-with strong and weak monsoons opposingly phased and triggered by solar variations. Our results provide insights into centennial- to millennial-scale relationships within the wider EAIASM regime.

  19. Coastal processes at the southern tip of India during summer monsoon 2005

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Smitha, B.R.; VimalKumar, K.G.; Sanjeevan, V.N.

    In situ temperature and wind data, during summer monsoon 2005, bring out some interesting features like, the existence of a purely wind driven upweiling system at the southern tip (ST), very adjacent to another remotely forced upweiling system...

  20. Influence of eastern Arabian Sea on summer monsoon rainfall over west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshBabu, V.; Rao, M.S.; Rao, M.V.

    anomaly field in the eastern Arabian Sea where larger atmospheric convection as compared to that over other parts of the water body normally takes place during the summer monsoon season. The present results based on observations during ten years' period...

  1. Relationships between Indian summer monsoon rainfall and ice cover over selected oceanic regions

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gopinathan, C.K.

    The variations in oceanic ice cover at selected polar regions during 1973 to 1987 have been analysed in relation to the seasonal Indian summer monsoon rainfall. The ice cover over the Arctic regions in June has negative relationship (correlation...

  2. Land-sea heating contrast in an idealized Asian summer monsoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, C. [Environmental Change Research Project, Institute of Earth Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, 115 (Taiwan)

    2003-07-01

    Mechanisms determining the tropospheric temperature gradient that is related to the intensity of the Asian summer monsoon are examined in an intermediate atmospheric model coupled with a mixed-layer ocean and a simple land surface model with an idealized Afro-Eurasian continent and no physical topography. These include processes involving in the influence of the Eurasian continent, thermal effects of the Tibetan Plateau and effects of sea surface temperature. The mechanical effect on the large-scale flow induced by the Plateau is not included in this study. The idealized land-sea geometry without topography induces a positive meridional tropospheric temperature gradient thus a weak Asian summer monsoon circulation. Higher prescribed heating and weaker surface albedo over Eurasia and the Tibetan Plateau, which mimic effects of different land surface processes and the thermal effect of the uplift of the Tibetan Plateau, strengthens the meridional temperature gradient, and so as cold tropical SST anomalies. The strengthened meridional temperature gradient enhances the Asian summer monsoon circulation and favors the strong convection. The corresponding monsoon rainbelt extends northward and northeastward and creates variations of the monsoon rainfall anomalies in different subregions. The surface albedo over the Tibetan Plateau has a relatively weak inverse relation with the intensity of the Asian summer monsoon. The longitudinal gradient of ENSO-like SST anomalies induces a more complicated pattern of the tropospheric temperature anomalies. First, the positive (negative) longitudinal gradient induced by the El Nino (La Nina)-like SST anomalies weakens (strengthens) the Walker circulation and the circulation between South Asia and northern Africa and therefore the intensity of the Asian summer monsoon, while the corresponding monsoon rainbelt extends northward (southward). The El Nino (La Nina)-like SST anomalies also induces colder (warmer) tropospheric temperature

  3. Sensitivity of Asian Summer Monsoon precipitation to tropical sea surface temperature anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lei; Shin, Sang-Ik; Liu, Zhengyu; Liu, Qinyu

    2016-10-01

    Sensitivity of Asian Summer Monsoon (ASM) precipitation to tropical sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies was estimated from ensemble simulations of two atmospheric general circulation models (GCMs) with an array of idealized SST anomaly patch prescriptions. Consistent sensitivity patterns were obtained in both models. Sensitivity of Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) precipitation to cooling in the East Pacific was much weaker than to that of the same magnitude in the local Indian-western Pacific, over which a meridional pattern of warm north and cold south was most instrumental in increasing ISM precipitation. This indicates that the strength of the ENSO-ISM relationship is due to the large-amplitude East Pacific SST anomaly rather than its sensitivity value. Sensitivity of the East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM), represented by the Yangtze-Huai River Valley (YHRV, also known as the meiyu-baiu front) precipitation, is non-uniform across the Indian Ocean basin. YHRV precipitation was most sensitive to warm SST anomalies over the northern Indian Ocean and the South China Sea, whereas the southern Indian Ocean had the opposite effect. This implies that the strengthened EASM in the post-Niño year is attributable mainly to warming of the northern Indian Ocean. The corresponding physical links between these SST anomaly patterns and ASM precipitation were also discussed. The relevance of sensitivity maps was justified by the high correlation between sensitivity-map-based reconstructed time series using observed SST anomaly patterns and actual precipitation series derived from ensemble-mean atmospheric GCM runs with time-varying global SST prescriptions during the same period. The correlation results indicated that sensitivity maps derived from patch experiments were far superior to those based on regression methods.

  4. Early forecasting of Indian Summer Monsoon: case study 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surovyatkina, Elena; Stolbova, Veronika; Kurths, Jurgen

    2017-04-01

    The prior knowledge of dates of onset and withdrawal of monsoon is of vital importance for the population of the Indian subcontinent. In May 2016 before monsoon season, India recorded its highest-ever temperature of 51C. Hot waves have decimated crops, killed livestock and left 330 million people without enough water. At the end of monsoon season the floods in Indian this year have also broken previous records. Severe and devastating rainfall poured down, triggering dams spilling and floods. Such extreme conditions pose the vital questions such as: When will the monsoon come? When will the monsoon withdraw? More lead time in monsoon forecast warning is crucial for taking appropriate decisions at various levels - from the farmer's field (e.g. plowing day, seeding) to the central government (e.g. managing water and energy resources, food procurement policies). The Indian Meteorological Department issues forecasts of onset of monsoon for Kerala state in South India on May 15-th. It does not give such predictions for the other 28 states of the country. Our study concerns the central part of India. We made the monsoon forecast using our recently developed method which focuses on Tipping elements of the Indian monsoon [1]. Our prediction relies on observations of near-surface air temperature and relative humidity from both the ERA-40 and NCEP/NCAR reanalyses. We performed both of our forecasts for the onset and withdrawal of monsoon for the central part of India, the Eastern Ghats (20N,80E). We predicted the monsoon arrival to the Eastern Ghats (20N,80E) on the 13th of June with a deviation of +/-4 days. The prediction was made on May 6-th, 2016 [2], that is 40 days in advance of the date of the forecast. The actual monsoon arrival was June 17-th. In this day near-surface air temperature and relative humidity overcame the critical values and the monsoon season started, that was confirmed by observations of meteorological stations located around the EG-region. We

  5. THE EAST ASIAN SUBTROPICAL SUMMER MONSOON INDEX AND ITS RELATION WITH THE CLIMATE ANOMALIES IN CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xuan-fei; WANG-Jing

    2007-01-01

    A new East Asian subtropical summer monsoon circulation index is defined, where the barotropic and baroclinic components of circulation are included. Results show that this index can well indicate the interannual variability of summer precipitation and temperature anomalies in China. A strong monsoon is characterized by more rainfall in the Yellow River basin and northern China, less rainfall in the Yangtze River basin, and more rainfall in south and southeast China, in association with higher temperature in most areas of China. Furthermore, comparison is made between the index proposed in this paper and other monsoon indexes in representing climate anomalies in China.

  6. Baseline predictability of daily east Asian summer monsoon circulation indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Shucong; Chen, Quanliang; Li, Jianping; Ding, Ruiqiang; Zhong, Quanjia

    2017-05-01

    The nonlinear local Lyapunov exponent (NLLE) method is adopted to quantitatively determine the predictability limit of East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) intensity indices on a synoptic timescale. The predictability limit of EASM indices varies widely according to the definitions of indices. EASM indices defined by zonal shear have a limit of around 7 days, which is higher than the predictability limit of EASM indices defined by sea level pressure (SLP) difference and meridional wind shear (about 5 days). The initial error of EASM indices defined by SLP difference and meridional wind shear shows a faster growth than indices defined by zonal wind shear. Furthermore, the indices defined by zonal wind shear appear to fluctuate at lower frequencies, whereas the indices defined by SLP difference and meridional wind shear generally fluctuate at higher frequencies. This result may explain why the daily variability of the EASM indices defined by zonal wind shear tends be more predictable than those defined by SLP difference and meridional wind shear. Analysis of the temporal correlation coefficient (TCC) skill for EASM indices obtained from observations and from NCEP's Global Ensemble Forecasting System (GEFS) historical weather forecast dataset shows that GEFS has a higher forecast skill for the EASM indices defined by zonal wind shear than for indices defined by SLP difference and meridional wind shear. The predictability limit estimated by the NLLE method is shorter than that in GEFS. In addition, the June-September average TCC skill for different daily EASM indices shows significant interannual variations from 1985 to 2015 in GEFS. However, the TCC for different types of EASM indices does not show coherent interannual fluctuations.

  7. Summer monsoon onset over Kerala: New definition and prediction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D S Pai; Rajeevan M Nair

    2009-04-01

    The summer monsoon onset over Kerala (MOK)marks the beginning of the rainy season for the country.Associated with the MOK,significant transitions of large scale atmospheric and oceanic circulation patterns are observed over the Asia –Pacific region.In this study,a new method for the objective identification of MOK,based on large scale circulation features and rainfall over Kerala,is discussed.Further,a set of empirical models based on the principal component regression (PCR)technique was developed for the prediction of the date of MOK by keeping in mind the IMD ’s operational forecasting service requirements.Predictors for the models were derived using correlation analysis from the thermal,convective and circulation patterns.Only five predictors pertaining to the second half of April were used in the first model (Model-1)so that the prediction of MOK can be prepared by the end of April itself.The second model (Model-2)used four additional predictors pertaining up to the first half of May along with two predictors used in the Model-1 for update prediction at the end of the first half of May.To develop each of the PCR models, Principal Components Analysis (PCA)of the respective predictor data was carried out followed by regression analysis of first two principal components (PCs)with the date of MOK.Both these models showed good skill in predicting the date of MOK during the independent test period of 1997 –2007.The root mean square error (RMSE)of the predictions from both the models during the independent test period was about four days which was nearly half the RMSE of the predictions based on climatology.

  8. Intraseasonal Variability of the Summer Monsoon over the North Indian Ocean as Revealed by the BOBMEX and ARMEX Field Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, P. Sanjeeva; Sikka, D. R.

    2005-08-01

    During the summer monsoon season over India a range of intraseasonal modulations of the monsoon rains occur due to genesis of weather disturbances over the Bay of Bengal (BOB) and the east Arabian Sea. The amplitudes of the fluctuations in the surface state of the ocean (sea-surface temperature and salinity) and atmosphere are quite large due to these monsoonal modulations on the intraseasonal scale as shown by the data collected during the field programs under Bay of Bengal Monsoon Experiment (BOBMEX) and Arabian Sea Monsoon Experiments (ARMEX). The focus of BOBMEX was to understand the role of ocean-atmospheric processes in organizing convection over the BOB on intra-seasonal scale. ARMEX-I was aimed at understanding the coupled processes in the development of deep convection off the West Coast of India. ARMEX-II was focused on the formation of the mini-warm pool across the southeast Arabian Sea in April-May and its role in the abrupt onset of the monsoon along the Southwest Coast of India and its further progress along the West Coast of India. The paper attempts to integrate the results of the observational studies and brings out an important finding that atmospheric instability is prominently responsible for convective organization whereas the upper ocean parameters regulate the episodes of the intraseasonal oscillations.

  9. A projection of future changes in summer precipitation and monsoon in East Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The future potential changes in precipitation and monsoon circulation in the summer in East Asia are projected using the latest generation of coupled climate models under Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES) A1B scenario (a medium emission scenario).The multi-model ensemble means show that during the period of 2010-2099,the summer precipitation in East Asia will increase and experience a prominent change around the 2040s,with a small increase (~1%) before the end of the 2040s and a large increase (~9%) afterward.This kind of two-stage evolution characteristic of precipitation change can be seen most clearly in North China,and then in South China and in the mid and lower Yangtze River Valley.In 2010-2099,the projected precipitation pattern will be dominated by a pattern of "wet East China" that explains 33.6% of EOF total variance.The corresponded time coefficient will markedly increase after the 2040s,indicating a great contribution from this mode to the enhanced precipitation across all East China.Other precipitation patterns that prevail in the current climate only contribute a small proportion to the total variance,with no prominent liner trend in the future.By the late 21st century,the monsoon circulation will be stronger in East Asia.At low level,this is due to the intensification of southwesterly airflow north of the anticyclone over the western Pacific and the SCS,and at high level,it is caused by the increased northeasterly airflow east of the anticyclone over South Asia.The enhanced monsoon circulation will also experience a two-stage evolution in 2010-2099,with a prominent increase (by ~0.6 m s-1) after the 2040s.The atmospheric water vapor content over East Asia will greatly increase (by ~9%) at the end of 21st century.The water vapor transported northward into East China will be intensified and display a prominent increase around the 2040s similar to other examined variables.These indicate

  10. Eurasian Snow Conditions and Summer Monsoon Rainfall over South and Southeast Asia:Assessment and Comparison

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    This study reveals the complex nature of the connection between Eurasian snow and the following summer season's monsoon rainfall by using four different indicators of snow conditions and correlating each of them to summer monsoon rainfall. Using 46 years of historical records of mean winter snow depth,maximum snow depth, and snow starting dates, and 27 years of snow area coverage from remote sensing observations over Eurasia, the authors found diverse correlation patterns between snow conditions and the following warm season's rainfall over South and Southeast Asia. Some of the results contradict the well-known inverse relationships between snow and the summer monsoon. This study provides an easy comparison of results in that it shows the connections between Eurasian snow and monsoon rainfall by using different Eurasian snow indicators based on the best available historical records without discrimination of regional variations in snow conditions.

  11. Shifting covariability of North American summer monsoon precipitation with antecedent winter precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, G.J.; Clark, M.P.

    2006-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that a general inverse relation exists between winter precipitation in the southwestern United states (US) and summer monsoon precipitation. In addition, it has been suggested that this inverse relation between winter precipitation and the magnitude of the southwestern US monsoon breaks down under certain climatic conditions that override the regional winter/monsoon precipitation relations. Results from this new study indicate that the winter/monsoon precipitation relations do not break down, but rather shift location through time. The strength of winter/monsoon precipitation relations, as indexed by 20-year moving correlations between winter precipitation and monsoon precipitation, decreased in Arizona after about 1970, but increased in New Mexico. The changes in these correlations appear to be related to an eastward shift in the location of monsoon precipitation in the southwestern US. This eastward shift in monsoon precipitation and the changes in correlations with winter precipitation also appear to be related to an eastward shift in July/August atmospheric circulation over the southwestern US that resulted in increased monsoon precipitation in New Mexico. Results also indicate that decreases in sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) in the central North Pacific Ocean also may be associated with th changes in correlations between winter and monsoon precipitation. Copyright ?? 2006 Royal Meteorological Society.

  12. An improved south Asian summer monsoon index with Monte Carlo test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Neng; Gu Jun-Qiang; Yi Yan-Ming; Lin Zhen-Min

    2005-01-01

    The Indian monsoon intensity index suggested by Webster and Yang (WY index) is optimized and improved in this paper. At first, the area (40°E-110°E, 0°-20°N) for calculating the zonal wind-shear between 850hPa and 200hPa in the WY index is optimized and adjusted according to the significance test of differences of wind fields. Then the regionally averaged zonal wind is computed over the optimized area. Finally, the optimal linear combination of the zonal winds at the two levels is performed using the regression method, thus defining a new broad-scale circulation index for the interannual variability of the south Asian summer monsoon, i.e. the improved south Asian summer monsoon index. Results indicate that the improved south Asian summer monsoon index has two advantages: its correlation with the All Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall index is higher than that of WY index, and its computational domain of circulation is also larger than that of WY index. The computational results based on the 1948-98 NCAR/NCEP wind data indicate that the correlation of the improved SASM index with the All Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall index is higher than that of WY index by 0.27.

  13. Air sea interaction during summer monsoon period of 1979

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshKumar, M.R.

    The present study highlights the utility of satellite derived parameters like SST, precipitation, CMV winds in the lower troposphere etc. in supplementing the in-situ observations. This information can lead to a better understanding of the monsoon...

  14. Subseasonal features of the Asian summer monsoon in the NCEP climate forecast system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song YANG; WEN Min; R Wayne HIGGINS

    2008-01-01

    The operational climate forecast system (CFS) of the US National Centers for Environmental Prediction provides climate predic-tions over the world, and CFS products are becoming an important source of information for regional climate predictions in many Asian countries where monsoon climate dominates. Recent studies have shown that, on monthly-to-seasonal time-scales, the CFS is highly skillful in simulating and predicting the variability of the Asian monsoon. The higher-frequency variability of the Asian summer monsoon in the CFS is analyzed, using output from a version with a spectral triangular truncation of 126 waves in horizon-tal and 64 sigma layers in vertical, focusing on synoptic, quasi-biweekly, and intraseasonal time-scales. The onset processes of different regional monsoon components were investigated within Asia. Although the CFS generally overestimates variability of mon-soon on these time-scales, it successfully captures many major features of the variance patterns, especially for the synoptic time-scale. The CFS also captures the timing of summer monsoon onsets over India and the Indo-China Peninsula. However, it encoun-ters difficulties in simulating the onset of the South China Sea monsoon. The success and failure of the CFS in simulating the onset of monsoon precipitation can also be seen from the associated features of simulated atmospheric circulation processes. Overall, the CFS is capable of simulating the synoptic-to-intraseasonal variability of the Asian summer monsoon with skills. As for seasonal-to-interannual time-scales shown previously, the model is expected to possess a potential for skillful predictions of the high-frequencyvariability of the Asian monsoon.

  15. Predicting onset and withdrawal of Indian Summer Monsoon in 2016: results of Tipping elements approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surovyatkina, Elena; Stolbova, Veronika; Kurths, Jurgen

    2017-04-01

    The monsoon is the season of rain caused by a global seasonal reverse in winds direction and a change in pressure distribution. The Southwest winds bring summer monsoon to India. The economy of India is able to maintain its GDP in the wake of a good monsoon. However, if monsoon gets delayed by even two weeks, it can spell disaster because the high population depending on agriculture - 70% of its people directly related to farming. Agriculture, in turn, is dependent on the monsoon. Although the rainy season happens annually between June and September, the time of monsoon season's onset and withdrawal varies within a month from year to year. The important feature of the monsoon is that it starts and ends suddenly. Hence, despite enormous progress having been made in predicting monsoon since 1886, it remains a significant scientific challenge. To make predictions of monsoon timing in 2016, we applied our recently developed method [1]. Our approach is based on a teleconnection between the Eastern Ghats (EG) and North Pakistan (NP) - Tipping Elements of Indian Summer Monsoon. Both our predictions - for monsoon onset and withdrawal - were made for the Eastern Ghats region (EG-20N,80E) in the central part of India, while the Indian Meteorological Department forecasts monsoon over Kerala - a state at the southern tip of the Indian subcontinent. Our prediction for monsoon onset was published on May 6-th, 2016 [2]. We predicted the monsoon arrival to the EG on the 13th of June with a deviation of +/-4 days. In fact, monsoon onset was on June 17-th, that was confirmed by information from meteorological stations located around the EG-region. Hence, our prediction of monsoon onset (made 40 days in advance) was correct. We delivered the prediction of monsoon withdrawal on July 27, 2016 [3], announcing the monsoon withdrawal from the EG on October 5-th with a deviation of +/-5 days. The actual monsoon withdrawal started on October 10-th when the relative humidity in the region

  16. Dominating Controls for Wetter South Asian Summer Monsoon in the Twenty-First Century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, Rui; Ashfaq, Moetasim; Rastogi, Deeksha; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Dominguez, Francina

    2015-04-01

    We analyze a suite of Global Climate Models from the 5th Phase of Coupled Models Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) archives to understand the mechanisms behind a net increase in the South Asian summer monsoon precipitation in response to enhanced radiative forcing during the 21st century despite a robust weakening of dynamics governing the monsoon circulation. Combining the future changes in the contributions from various sources, which contribute to the moisture supply over South Asia, with those in monsoon dynamics and atmospheric moisture content, we establish a pathway of understanding that partly explains these counteracting responses to increase in radiative forcing. Our analysis suggests that both regional (local recycling, Arabian Sea, Bay of Bengal) and remote (mainly Indian Ocean) sources contribute to the moisture supply for precipitation over South Asia during the summer season that is facilitated by the monsoon dynamics. Increase in radiative forcing fuels an increase in the atmospheric moisture content through warmer temperatures. For regional moisture sources, the effect of excessive atmospheric moisture is offset by weaker monsoon circulation and uncertainty in the response of the evapotranspiration over land, so anomalies in their contribution to the total moisture supply are either mixed or muted. In contrast, weakening of the monsoon dynamics has less influence on the moisture supply from remote sources that not only is a dominant moisture contributor in the historical period, but is also the net driver of the positive summer monsoon precipitation response in the 21st century. Our results also indicate that historic measures of the monsoon dynamics may not be well suited to predict the non-stationary moisture driven South Asian summer monsoon precipitation response in the 21st century.

  17. Some characteristics of very heavy rainfall over Orissa during summer monsoon season

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Mohapatra; U C Mohanty

    2005-02-01

    Orissa is one of the most flood prone states of India. The floods in Orissa mostly occur during monsoon season due to very heavy rainfall caused by synoptic scale monsoon disturbances. Hence a study is undertaken to find out the characteristic features of very heavy rainfall (24 hours rainfall ≥ 125mm) over Orissa during summer monsoon season (June-September) by analysing 20 years (1980-1999) daily rainfall data of different stations in Orissa. The principal objective of this study is to find out the role of synoptic scale monsoon disturbances in spatial and temporal variability of very heavy rainfall over Orissa. Most of the very heavy rainfall events occur in July and August. The region, extending from central part of coastal Orissa in the southeast towards Sambalpur district in the northwest, experiences higher frequency and higher intensity of very heavy rainfall with less interannual variability. It is due to the fact that most of the causative synoptic disturbances like low pressure systems (LPS) develop over northwest (NW) Bay of Bengal with minimum interannual variation and the monsoon trough extends in west-northwesterly direction from the centre of the system. The very heavy rainfall occurs more frequently with less interannual variability on the western side of Eastern Ghat during all the months and the season except September. It occurs more frequently with less interannual variability on the eastern side of Eastern Ghat during September. The NW Bay followed by Gangetic West Bengal/Orissa is the most favourable region of LPS to cause very heavy rainfall over different parts of Orissa except eastern side of Eastern Ghat. The NW Bay and west central (WC) Bay are equally favourable regions of LPS to cause very heavy rainfall over eastern side of Eastern Ghat. The frequency of very heavy rain-fall does not show any significant trend in recent years over Orissa except some places in north-east Orissa which exhibit significant rising trend in all the

  18. Low-Frequency Vortex Pair over the Tropical Eastern Indian Ocean and the South China Sea Summer Monsoon Onset

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Jing; LI Chong-Yin

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the relationship between a pair of low-frequency vortexes over the equatorial Indian Ocean and the South China Sea (SCS) summer monsoon onset is studied based on a multi-year (1980-2003) analysis. A pair of vortexes symmetric about the equator is an important feature prior to the SCS summer monsoon onset. A composite analysis shows that the life cycle of the pair of vortexes is closely associated with the SCS summer monsoon onset. The westerly between the twin cyclones is an important factor to the SCS summer monsoon onset process.

  19. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN AUTUMN INDIAN OCEAN DIPOLE MODE AND THE STRENGTH OF SCS SUMMER MONSOON

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Dong-hui; ZHANG Gui; ZHU Yi-min; TAN Yan-ke; WANG Xue-zhong

    2007-01-01

    Based on 1948 - 2004 monthly Reynolds Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and NCEP/NCAR atmospheric reanalysis data, the relationships between autumn Indian Ocean Dipole Mode (IODM) and the strength of South China Sea (SCS) Summer Monsoon are investigated through the EOF and smooth correlation methods. The results are as the following. (1) There are two dominant modes of autumn SSTA over the tropical Indian Ocean. They are the uniformly signed basin-wide mode (USBM) and Indian Ocean dipole mode (IODM), respectively. The SSTA associated with USBM are prevailing decadal to interdecadal variability characterized by a unanimous pattern, while the IODM mainly represents interannual variability of SSTA. (2) When positive (negative) IODM exists over the tropical Indian Ocean during the preceding fall,the SCS summer monsoon will be weak (strong). The negative correlation between the interannual variability of IODM and that of SCS summer monsoon is significant during the warm phase of long-term trend but insignificant during the cool phase. (3) When the SCS summer monsoon is strong (weak), the IODM will be in its positive (negative) phase during the following fall season. The positive correlation between the interannual variability of SCS summer monsoon and that of IODM is significant during both the warm and cool phase of the long-term trend, but insignificant during the transition between the two phases.

  20. An Index Measuring the Interannual Variation of the East Asian Summer Monsoon--The EAP Index

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄刚

    2004-01-01

    Based on the EAP (East Asia/Pacific) teleconnection in the summer circulation anomalies over the Northern Hemisphere,an index measuring the strength of the East Asian summer monsoon,i.e.,the socalled EAP index,is defined in this paper.From the analyses of observed data,it is clearly shown that the EAP index defined in this study can well describe the interannual variability of summer rainfall and surfaceair temperature in East Asia,especially in the Yangtze River valley and the Hualhe River valley,Korea,and Japan.Moreover,this index can also reflect the interannual variability of the East Asian summer monsoon system including the monsoon horizontal circulation and the vertical-merldional circulation cell over East Asia.From the composite analyses of climate and monsoon circulation anomalies for high EAP index and for low EAP index,respectively,it is well demonstrated that the EAP index proposed in this study can well measure the strength of the East Asian summer monsoon.

  1. Assessment of seasonal prediction skill of East Asian summer monsoon in CMIP5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bo; Kadow, Christopher; Cubasch, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    The East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) is a strong monsoon system with a complicated internal variation. Its seasonal predictability is a long-standing issue in climate science. We analysed the seasonal prediction skill of EASM and the correlation between EASM and El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Our study is based on historical and decadal experiments of six prediction systems (i.e., BCC-CMS1.1, CanCM4, GFDL-CM2p1, HadCM3, MIROC5 and MPI-ESM-LR) from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) in 1979-2005. We find that initialised simulations improve the prediction skill of EASM in CanCM4 and GFDL-CM2p1 model experiments, but lower it in the HadCM3 simulation, especially after the anomaly initialisation. The better predictability of EASM in the CanCM4 and GFDL-CM2p1 simulations due to their good performance in capturing the coupled ENSO-EASM mode, which is better than in the HadCM3 experiments. In predicting EASM, the coupled Southern Oscillation-EASM mode plays a more important role than the coupled El Niño-EASM mode.

  2. Numerical Modeling of Topography-Modulated Dust Aerosol Distribution and Its Influence on the Onset of East Asian Summer Monsoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A regional climate model coupled with a dust module was used to simulate dust aerosol distribution and its effects on the atmospheric heat source over the TP, East Asian summer monsoon onset, and precipitation in East Asia modulated by the uplift of the northern TP. We carried out four experiments, including a modern (i.e., high-mountain experiment with (HMD and without (HM the major deserts in Northwest China and a low-mountain experiment with (LMD and without (LM the deserts. The results show that dust greatly increases in the Taklamakan Desert accompanied with the uplift of the northern TP, and the increase exceeds 150 µg kg−1 in spring. A strong cyclone in the Tarim Basin produced by the uplifted northern TP enhances dust emissions in the Taklamakan Desert in summer. Meanwhile, the dust loading over the TP also increases induced by the uplift of the northern TP, causing the heat source over the TP decreased. Under the condition of the northern TP uplift to present altitude, dust delays the East Asia summer monsoon onset by two pentads and one pentad, respectively, in the southern and northern monsoon regions and greatly suppresses precipitation in East Asia compared with results in the low terrain experiments.

  3. Determination of summer monsoon onset and its related large-scale circulation characteristics over Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, M.; Syed, F. S.

    2016-08-01

    The onset of summer monsoon over the Core Monsoon Region of Pakistan (CMRP) has been investigated in this study using observational daily rainfall and Precipitable Water (PW) data sets. An objective criterion is proposed to define monsoon onset dates by employing Precipitation Index and Normalized Precipitable Water Index techniques. The climatological mean summer monsoon onset dates over CMRP based on daily rainfall data sets are observed to be 1 July and 30 June in the station and gridded data sets, respectively. Whereas the daily PW-based climatological mean onset date is 30 June. The year-wise onset dates determined through station and gridded rainfall data sets are very similar but these dates differ in case of PW-based onsets. The evolution of large-scale circulation anomalies and thermodynamic structure leading monsoon onset over Pakistan shows that a strong positive temperature and geopotential height anomalies appear over the northwestern part of the core region in the upper atmosphere. This warm geopotential height anomaly gets strengthen as the monsoon onset approaches. The temperature anomalies are barotropic whereas the geopotential height anomalies are baroclinic with the presence of low level anticyclone over the Tibetan Plateau. A moisture convergence zone along the foothill of Himalayas and low level moisture convergence zone over the north Arabian Sea set the stage for the moisture carrying monsoon winds to blow inland towards CMRP. The moisture is mainly supplied from the Arabian Sea, as the low pressure system approaches CMRP from the Bay of Bengal.

  4. Changes in the in-phase relationship between the Indian and subsequent Australian summer monsoons during the past five decades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-Y. Yu

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the decadal changes in the in-phase relationship between Indian summer monsoon and the subsequent Australian summer monsoon using observational data from 1950–2005. The in-phase relationship is the tendency for a strong Indian summer monsoon to be followed by a strong Australian summer monsoon and vice versa. It is found that the in-phase relationship was weak during the late 1950s and early 1960s, strengthened to a maximum in the early 1970s just before the 1976/77 Pacific climate shift, then declined until the late 1990s. Pacific SST anomalies are noticed to have strong persistence from boreal to austral summer, providing the memory to connect the Indian and subsequent Australian summer monsoon. The simultaneous correlation between the Pacific SST anomalies and the Indian summer monsoon is always strong. It is the weakening and strengthening of the simultaneous correlation between the Australian summer monsoon and the Pacific SST anomalies that contributes to the decadal variations of the in-phase monsoon relation. This study suggests that the interaction between the Australian monsoon and the Pacific Ocean is crucial to tropical climate variability and has experienced significant changes over the past five decades.

  5. Evolution and variability of the Indian Ocean summer monsoon: Evidence from the western Arabian sea drilling program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prell, Warren L.; Murray, David W.; Clemens, Steven C.; Anderson, David M.

    A number of forcing factors, including the tectonic evolution of Himalaya-Tibet and orbitally-induced changes in seasonal radiation, combine to cause the initiation, evolution, and variability of the Indian Ocean monsoon. Although climate model experiments can be used to estimate the variability attributed to each forcing factor, the only record of past monsoonal variation lies in the sediments of the northern Indian Ocean and the adjacent continents. A major goal of the regional survey cruise (RC27-04) and ODP Leg 117 was to recover the marine geologic record necessary to understand the history of the initiation, evolution and variability of the Indian Ocean summer monsoon and to provide an observational data set for comparison with model simulations of monsoon circulation. General Circulation Model (GCM) experiments show that orbitally-induced increases in solar radiation significantly strengthen the monsoon winds and precipitation over southern Asia, but that surface boundary conditions (including sea surface temperature, albedo) associated with glacial phases weaken monsoon winds and precipitation. Experiments with full (modem elevations) and reduced plateau-mountain elevations reveal stronger winds and higher precipitation as mountain elevation increases. These results indicate that monsoon strength is equally sensitive to changes in solar radiation (on orbital time scales) and orographic changes (on longer time scales). They also indicate that global cooling cannot intensify the monsoon, so that the onset of the monsoon is most likely related to increased mountain elevation. Sediments in the northwest Arabian Sea exhibit characteristic fauna (radiolarians and foraminifers) that are endemic to areas of strong upwelling. In the Arabian Sea, intense seasonal upwelling is induced by the southwesterly monsoon winds. Miocene to Recent sediments from the northwest Arabian Sea show distinct geochemical and biological changes which suggest that monsoonal upwelling

  6. Lag influences of winter circulation conditions in the tropical western Pacific on South Asian summer monsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    By means of monthly mean NCEP/NCAR data analyses, this note investigates the lag influences of winter circulation conditions in the tropical western Pacific on South Asian summer monsoon through the methods of composite, correlation and statistical confident test. The results indicate clearly that winter climate variations in the equatorial western Pacific would produce significant influences on the following South Asian summer monsoon, and with the lapse of time the lag influences show clearly moving northward and extending westward features. When winter positive (negative) sea level pressure anomalies occupy the equatorial western Pacific, there is an anticyclonic (cyclonic) circulation anomaly appearing in the northwestern Pacific. With the lapse of time, the anticyclonic (cyclonic) circulation anomaly gradually moves to northeast, and its axis in the west-east directions also stretches, therefore, easterly (westerly) anomalies in the south part of the anticyclonic (cyclonic) circulation anomaly continuously expand westward to the peninsula of India. Undoubtedly, the South Asian summer monsoon is weak (strong)

  7. Moisture source for summer monsoon rainfall over India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sadhuram, Y.; Rao, D.P.

    Southwest monsoon plays a vital role in India's economy as the major income comes from agriculture. What could be the moisture source for this copious amount of rainfall over the Indian sub-continent?. This has been studied in detail and noticed...

  8. Performance evaluation of regional climate model to simulate sub-seasonal variability of Indian Summer Monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umakanth, U.; Kesarkar, Amit P.

    2017-07-01

    The study aims to evaluate the regional climate model (RegCM) over South Asian (SA) CORDEX domain to represent seasonal and sub-seasonal variability of Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM). The model's ability is evaluated by conducting two sets of experiments using one-tier approach of coupling the RegCM with a simple mixed-layer slab ocean model (SOM) and the two-tier approach of prescribing sea surface temperature (SST) to RegCM. Two model experiments are initialized at 1st January 2000 for a period of 13 year continuous simulation at a spatial resolution of 50 km. It is found that, one-tier approach realistically represents the spatial distribution of precipitation with significant improvement noticed over central India (CI) and head Bay of Bengal (BoB) regions. In addition, it also fairly reproduced the observed mean meridional circulation response to the diabatic heating produced during ISM. Most importantly, in one-tier approach the model could able to represent the observed SST and precipitation (P) relationship with significant improvement in correlation and model response time. An important result is the representation of northwest-southeast tilt of precipitation anomalies during active/break phase of monsoon. Additionally, the lagged response of vertical profiles of specific humidity, omega, vorticity and divergence over CI with respect to peak rainfall anomaly (active phase) are relatively better represented in one-tier approach. In brief, coupling improves the performance of RegCM in simulating the space-time characteristics of monsoon ISO mode.

  9. Seasonal forecasting of Bangladesh summer monsoon rainfall using simple multiple regression model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Md Mizanur Rahman; M Rafiuddin; Md Mahbub Alam

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, the development of a statistical forecasting method for summer monsoon rainfall over Bangladesh is described. Predictors for Bangladesh summer monsoon (June–September) rainfall were identified from the large scale ocean–atmospheric circulation variables (i.e., sea-surface temperature, surface air temperature and sea level pressure). The predictors exhibited a significant relationship with Bangladesh summer monsoon rainfall during the period 1961–2007. After carrying out a detailed analysis of various global climate datasets; three predictors were selected. The model performance was evaluated during the period 1977–2007. The model showed better performance in their hindcast seasonal monsoon rainfall over Bangladesh. The RMSE and Heidke skill score for 31 years was 8.13 and 0.37, respectively, and the correlation between the predicted and observed rainfall was 0.74. The BIAS of the forecasts (% of long period average, LPA) was −0.85 and Hit score was 58%. The experimental forecasts for the year 2008 summer monsoon rainfall based on the model were also found to be in good agreement with the observation.

  10. THE INFLUENCE OF SOUTH CHINA SEA SUMMER MONSOON ON THE RAINSTORM ASSOCIATED WITH THE LANDFALLING STRONG TROPICAL STORM BILIS (0604)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chun-xia; JIANG Xiao-ping; FEI Zhi-bin; ZHAO Si-nan; LUO Wan-jun

    2008-01-01

    Bilis (0604) is a strong tropical storm that sustained over land for a long time, bringing torrential rain. With conventional observation data, radar data and infrared satellite imagery, Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs) are found to form and develop successively, which cause torrential rain. Then numerical simulation is conducted using MM5 to simulate a 66-h post-landfall process. The simulated distribution and intensity of precipitation match the observation well. With the simulated result, the characteristics and process of MCS development are analyzed with the finding that the convergence of the tropical depression and South China Sea (SCS) summer monsoon over The south of China causes the formation of a mesoscale vortex, mesoscale convergence center and mesoscale convergence line, which are favorable to the development and sustaining of the MCSs. A sensitivity experiment indicates that the SCS summer monsoon transports unstable energy and water vapor continuously, which is of vital importance to rainstorms.

  11. Impact of East Asian summer monsoon circulation on the regional aerosol distribution in observations and models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongli; Xie, Xiaoning; Yan, Libin; Liu, Xiaodong

    2017-06-01

    The East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) can change the spatio-temporal distribution of aerosols by influencing the aerosol horizontal and vertical transports and the wet deposition of aerosols over East Asia. In this paper, we examined the aerosol optical depth (AOD) during summer together with the intensity of the EASM based on moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer products on board the Terra satellite and the modeling results from the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model 5.1 in the mid-latitude monsoonal East Asia (20-45° N, 105-130° E). Our results from both observations and simulations show positive correlations of AOD with the monsoon intensity over the Northeast Asia sub-region (32.5-45° N, 105-130° E), and negative correlations with that over the southeast Asia sub-region (20-32.5° N, 105-130° E). The observed and simulated AODs were much larger over the northern sub-region and much smaller over the southern sub-region in the strongest monsoon years compared with those in the weakest monsoon years. The model results suggest that the mechanism responsible for the north-south difference in the aerosol distribution was mainly caused by lower-tropospheric meridional wind anomalies related to EASM. Compared with the weakest monsoon years, the strongest monsoon years experienced southerly wind anomalies, which enabled more aerosols to be transported northward and resulted in a convergence of aerosols over the northern sub-region. In addition, the wet deposition of aerosols reduced (enhanced) the aerosol concentrations in the northern (southern) sub-region during the strongest monsoon years compared with the weakest monsoon years, which partly offset the impact of the lower southerly winds on the aerosol distribution over East Asia.

  12. High sensitivity of Indian summer monsoon to Middle East dust absorptive properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Qinjian; Yang, Zong-Liang; Wei, Jiangfeng

    2016-07-01

    The absorptive properties of dust aerosols largely determine the magnitude of their radiative impacts on the climate system. Currently, climate models use globally constant values of dust imaginary refractive index (IRI), a parameter describing the dust absorption efficiency of solar radiation, although it is highly variable. Here we show with model experiments that the dust-induced Indian summer monsoon (ISM) rainfall differences (with dust minus without dust) change from -9% to 23% of long-term climatology as the dust IRI is changed from zero to the highest values used in the current literature. A comparison of the model results with surface observations, satellite retrievals, and reanalysis data sets indicates that the dust IRI values used in most current climate models are too low, tending to significantly underestimate dust radiative impacts on the ISM system. This study highlights the necessity for developing a parameterization of dust IRI for climate studies.

  13. The link between interannual variation of the South China Sea summer monsoon onset and summer precipitation in Shandong Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Relationship between the onset date of South China Sea (SCS) summer monsoon and the summer rainfall in Shandong Province was examined by comprehensive analysis to establish a conceptual model of the link. If the summer monsoon occurs earlier, the 500 hPa level would induce the teleconnection of Eurasian pattern in the summer (June-August), which indicates that the western Pacific subtropical high is displaced northward further than usual, the Siberian high is intensified and the Okhotsk low is deepened. Under such circumstance, Shandong, located in the west side of the subtropical high and in front of the mid-Siberia high, would be expected to have a wet summer because it is quite possible for cold and warm air to meet and interact with each other in Shandong. Statistical analysis revealed that the 500 hPa anomalies over Korea and Japan were sensitive to the SCS monsoon onset date and very important to precipitation in Shandong, and that the convective activities over the deep water basin in the SCS in 24-26 pentads significantly influenced the position of the ridge lineof the western Pacific subtropical high. These findings yielded better understanding of the causative mechanisms involved in the precipitation generation, so that the knowledge gained can possibly be applied for long-lead forecast.

  14. Assessment of two versions of regional climate model in simulating the Indian Summer Monsoon over South Asia CORDEX domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattnayak, K. C.; Panda, S. K.; Saraswat, Vaishali; Dash, S. K.

    2017-07-01

    This study assess the performance of two versions of Regional Climate Model (RegCM) in simulating the Indian summer monsoon over South Asia for the period 1998 to 2003 with an aim of conducting future climate change simulations. Two sets of experiments were carried out with two different versions of RegCM (viz. RegCM4.2 and RegCM4.3) with the lateral boundary forcings provided from European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecast Reanalysis (ERA-interim) at 50 km horizontal resolution. The major updates in RegCM4.3 in comparison to the older version RegCM4.2 are the inclusion of measured solar irradiance in place of hardcoded solar constant and additional layers in the stratosphere. The analysis shows that the Indian summer monsoon rainfall, moisture flux and surface net downward shortwave flux are better represented in RegCM4.3 than that in the RegCM4.2 simulations. Excessive moisture flux in the RegCM4.2 simulation over the northern Arabian Sea and Peninsular India resulted in an overestimation of rainfall over the Western Ghats, Peninsular region as a result of which the all India rainfall has been overestimated. RegCM4.3 has performed well over India as a whole as well as its four rainfall homogenous zones in reproducing the mean monsoon rainfall and inter-annual variation of rainfall. Further, the monsoon onset, low-level Somali Jet and the upper level tropical easterly jet are better represented in the RegCM4.3 than RegCM4.2. Thus, RegCM4.3 has performed better in simulating the mean summer monsoon circulation over the South Asia. Hence, RegCM4.3 may be used to study the future climate change over the South Asia.

  15. Linkages between the South and East Asian summer monsoons: a review and revisit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Kyung-Ja; Seo, Ye-Won; Lee, June-Yi; Kripalani, R. H.; Yun, Kyung-Sook

    2017-07-01

    The relationship between the South Asia monsoon (SAM) and the East Asia monsoon (EAM) possibly modulated by both external forcings and internal dynamics has been a long-standing and controversial issue in climate sciences. This study reviews their linkages as revealed in modern records and model simulations during the past, present and future, and provides a comprehensive explanation of the key mechanisms controlling the diversity of the SAM-EAM relationship. Particular attention is paid to several external forcings that modulate the relationship, including El Niño and Southern Oscillation, Indian Ocean Dipole mode (IODM), boreal summer teleconnections, and Eurasian snow extent on intraseasonal to interdecadal timescales. The major focus is placed on two integral views of the inter-connection between the two monsoon systems: one is the positive inter-correlation, which is associated with decaying El Niño and developing Indian Ocean sea surface temperature (SST) warming anomalies; the other is the negative inter-correlation, resulting from developing El Niño and western Pacific SST cooling. The IODM mode also has a delayed impact on the negative connection by modulating Eurasian snow cover. The observed evidence reveals that the recent intensification of the negative relationship is attributable to the strengthening of the zonal SST gradient along the Indian Ocean, western Pacific, and eastern Pacific. Analysis of experiments in the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project further indicates a possibility for the negative linkage to be further enhanced under anthropogenic global warming with considerable interdecadal modulation in mid and late twenty-first century.

  16. Pipeline geo-hazard prediction and early warning during summer monsoon based on GIS technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Shaohui [PetroChina Pipeline RandD Center, Langfang, Hebei (China)

    2010-07-01

    PetroChina Pipeline Company operates over 12 000 kilometers of pipelines with crude oil, gas, and refined oil. The pipelines have been in operation for over 40 years. Geo-hazard is a serious threat for pipeline operators, especially during summer monsoon; monsoon geo-hazards account for 70% to 80% of the annual incidents and financial losses. There is an urgent need of prediction and early warning systems. GIS technology provides an advanced tool for such analysis. Many years of research and experience with PetroChina's prediction model finally established an important link between geo-hazard and rainfall. Spatial analysis is performed with GIS technology, using the predicted rainfall data for the next 24 hours and the data of pipeline geo-hazard susceptibility. Then the severity of pipeline damage expected is predicted. Researchers, while they try to forecast rainfall, try to forecast debris flow at the same time to minimize human casualties and property losses caused by geo-hazards.

  17. Significance of High Resolution GHRSST on prediction of Indian Summer Monsoon

    KAUST Repository

    Jangid, Buddhi Prakash

    2017-02-24

    In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model was used to assess the importance of very high resolution sea surface temperature (SST) on seasonal rainfall prediction. Two different SST datasets available from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) global model analysis and merged satellite product from Group for High Resolution SST (GHRSST) are used as a lower boundary condition in the WRF model for the Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) 2010. Before using NCEP SST and GHRSST for model simulation, an initial verification of NCEP SST and GHRSST are performed with buoy measurements. It is found that approximately 0.4 K root mean square difference (RMSD) in GHRSST and NCEP SST when compared with buoy observations available over the Indian Ocean during 01 May to 30 September 2010. Our analyses suggest that use of GHRSST as lower boundary conditions in the WRF model improve the low level temperature, moisture, wind speed and rainfall prediction over ISM region. Moreover, temporal evolution of surface parameters such as temperature, moisture and wind speed forecasts associated with monsoon is also improved with GHRSST forcing as a lower boundary condition. Interestingly, rainfall prediction is improved with the use of GHRSST over the Western Ghats, which mostly not simulated in the NCEP SST based experiment.

  18. Vertical Structures of Atmospheric Properties in Southeast Tibet during the South Asian Summer Monsoon in 2013

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周立波; 李斐; 朱金焕; 邹捍; 马舒坡; 李鹏

    2016-01-01

    In June 2013, a field experiment was conducted in Southeast Tibet in which the air temperature, moisture, and wind were measured by using a GPS sounding system. In the present study, based on these observations and ERA-Interim reanalysis data, the vertical structures of these atmospheric properties and the possible influence of the South Asian summer monsoon (SASM) were investigated. On average, the temperature had a lapse rate of 6.8℃ km−1 below the tropopause of 18.0 km. A strong moisture inversion occurred at the near-surface, with a strength of 1.7 g kg−1 (100 m)−1 for specific humidity. During the observation period, the SASM experienced a south phase and a north phase in the middle and by the end of June, respectively. The monsoon’s evolution led to large changes in convection and circulation over Southeast Tibet, which further affected the local thermal, moisture, and circulation conditions. The strong convection resulted in an elevated tropopause height over Southeast Tibet during the north phase of the SASM, and the large-scale warm and wet air masses delivered by the monsoon caused high local temperature and moisture conditions.

  19. Evaluation of NCEP TIGGE short-range forecast for Indian summer monsoon intraseasonal oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirkey, Snehlata; Mukhopadhyay, P.

    2017-08-01

    This study focuses on the short-range prediction of Monsoon Intraseasonal Oscillations (MISOs) using the National Centers for Environmental Prediction(NCEP) Ensemble Prediction System (EPS) data from The Observing System Research and Predictability Experiment (THORPEX) Interactive Grand Global Ensemble (TIGGE) archive. The Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall (ISMR), which plays an important role in the socio-economic growth of the country, is highly variable and is mostly governed by the MISOs. In addition to this, deterministic forecasts of ISMR are not very reliable. Hence, a probabilistic approach at daily scale is required. Keeping this in mind, the present analysis is done by using daily forecast data for up to 7-day lead time and compared with observations. The analysis shows that the ensemble forecast well captures the variability as compared to observations even up to 7 days. The spatial characteristics and the northward propagation of MISO are observed thoroughly in the EPS. The evolution of dynamical and thermodynamical parameters such as specific humidity, moist static energy, moisture divergence, and vorticity is also captured well but show deviation from the observation from 96 h lead time onwards. The tropospheric temperature forecast captures the observed gradient but with certain bias in magnitude whereas the wind shear is simulated quite well both in pattern and magnitude. These analyses bring out the biases in TIGGE EPS forecast and also point out the possible moist processes which needs to be improved.

  20. Inverse correlation between ancient winter and summer monsoons in East Asia?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU BoTao; ZHAO Ping

    2009-01-01

    There is a scientific debate on the relationship between ancient winter and summer monsoons in East Asia. Some scholars think that East Asian winter and summer monsoons are anti-correlated, and oth-ers think not. For this reason, this study is motivated to assess their linkage from the paleoclimate simulation perspective, through analyzing the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and mid-Holocene (MH) climate simulated by CCSM3 model. Compared to the present climate, the Aleutian low is found to be deepened and the East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM) is stronger during the LGM winter. The Pacific high in summer is noticed to be weakened and the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) is weaker at the LGM. During the MH, the Aleutian low and the Asian high in winter are intensified, and the Asian low and the Pacific high in summer are enhanced, indicating that the EAWM and EASM are both stronger than today. Therefore, the EAWM is not always negatively correlated to the EASM. Their relationship may be different at different geological stages. It can be obtained at least from the numerical simulation results that the EAWM and the EASM is negatively correlated during the cooling period, while positively correlated during the warming period.

  1. Impact of El Nino on Large-scale Circulation of Southeast Asian Summer Monsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白学志; 吴爱明

    2003-01-01

    Multi year SST and NCEP/NCAR reanalyzed wind data were employed to study the impacts of El Nino on the Southeast Asian summer monsoon (SEASM). It was found that the impacts of El Nino on the SEASM differed distinctly from those on the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) and the Indian summer monsoon (ISM). Composite analysis indicated that the "gear point" of coupling between the Indo monsoon circulation and the Pacific Walker circulation was located in the western margins of Southeast Asia when the developing stage of El Nino events covered the boreal summer. The anomalous circulations in the lower and upper troposphere and divergent circulation are all favorable for the strengthening of the SEASM during this period. Following the evolution of El Nino, the "gear point" of the two cells shifted eastward tothe central Pacific when the mature or decaying period of El Nino events covered the boreal summer. The anomalous circulations are favorable for the weakening of the SEASM. The anomalous indexes of intensity of SEASM accord well withthe above results. Additionally, the difference of SSTA patterns in the tropical Indo Pacific Ocean between the two stages of the El Nino may play an important role.

  2. Zonal propagation of kinetic energy and convection in the South China Sea and Indian monsoon regions in boreal summer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Longxun; GAO Hui; HE Jinhai; TAO Shiyan; JIN Zuhui

    2004-01-01

    Zonal propagation of kinetic energy (KE) and convection in the South China Sea (SCS) and Indian summer monsoon areas are examined in present study. Results suggest that the SCS and Indian summer monsoon prevailed regions (5-15°N) are dominated by the southwesterly wind, however, the disturbances of KE at 850 hPa and convection are observed mainly coming from the western Pacific Ocean (140-150°E), after passing through the SCS, and westward propagated into the Bay of Bengal (90-100°E). In the Indian summer monsoon domain, where the disturbances of KE are found mainly coming from the Arabian Sea (AS) and eastward propagated into the Bay of Bengal. Therefore, the SCS and the Indian summer monsoon are quite different in zonal propagation of KE and convection. The SCS summer monsoon is mainly affected by the KE and convection coming from the tropical western Pacific. The Indian summer monsoon, however, can be partly influenced by the AS and the SCS summer monsoon. The analysis also suggests that the interaction region between the SCS and the Indian summer monsoon is around 90-95°E, rather than 105°E as proposed by earlier studies.

  3. Differences in heat budgets of the near-surface Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal: Implications for the summer monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shenoi, S.S.C.; Shankar, D.; Shetye, S.R.

    An analysis of the heat budgets of the near-surface Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal shows significant differences between them during the summer monsoon (June-September). In the Arabian Sea the winds associated with the summer monsoon are stronger...

  4. Relationship between summer monsoon rainfall and cyclogenesis over Bay of Bengal during post-monsoon (October–December) season

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Y Sadhuram; K Maneesha

    2016-10-01

    In this study, an attempt has been made to examine the relationship between summer monsoon rainfall (June–September) and the total number of depressions, cyclones and severe cyclones (TNDC) over Bay of Bengal during the post-monsoon (October–December) season. The seasonal rainfall of the subdivisions (located in south India) (referred as rainfall index – RI), is positively and significantly correlated(r = 0.59; significant at >99% level) with the TNDC during the period, 1984–2013. By using the first differences (current season minus previous season), the correlations are enhanced and a remarkably high correlation of 0.87 is observed between TNDC and RI for the recent period, 1993–2013. The average seasonalgenesis potential parameter (GPP) showed a very high correlation of 0.84 with the TNDC. A very high correlation of 0.83 is observed between GPP and RI for the period, 1993–2013. The relative vorticity and mid-tropospheric relative humidity are found to be the dominant terms in GPP. The GPP was 3.5 times higher in above (below) normal RI in which TNDC was 4 (2). It is inferred that RI is playing a keyrole in TNDC by modulating the environmental conditions (low level vorticity and relative humidity) over Bay of Bengal during post-monsoon season which could be seen from the very high correlation of 0.87 (which explains 76% variability in TNDC). For the first time, we show that RI is a precursor for the TNDC over Bay of Bengal during post-monsoon season. Strong westerlies after the SW monsoon seasontransport moisture over the subdivisions towards Bay of Bengal due to cyclonic circulation. This circulation favours upward motion and hence transport moisture vertically to mid-troposphere which causes convective instability and this in turn favour more number of TNDC, under above-normal RI year.

  5. Relationship between summer monsoon rainfall and cyclogenesis over Bay of Bengal during post-monsoon (October-December) season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhuram, Y.; Maneesha, K.

    2016-10-01

    In this study, an attempt has been made to examine the relationship between summer monsoon rainfall (June-September) and the total number of depressions, cyclones and severe cyclones (TNDC) over Bay of Bengal during the post-monsoon (October-December) season. The seasonal rainfall of the subdivisions (located in south India) (referred as rainfall index - RI), is positively and significantly correlated ( r=0.59; significant at >99% level) with the TNDC during the period, 1984-2013. By using the first differences (current season minus previous season), the correlations are enhanced and a remarkably high correlation of 0.87 is observed between TNDC and RI for the recent period, 1993-2013. The average seasonal genesis potential parameter (GPP) showed a very high correlation of 0.84 with the TNDC. A very high correlation of 0.83 is observed between GPP and RI for the period, 1993-2013. The relative vorticity and mid-tropospheric relative humidity are found to be the dominant terms in GPP. The GPP was 3.5 times higher in above (below) normal RI in which TNDC was 4 (2). It is inferred that RI is playing a key role in TNDC by modulating the environmental conditions (low level vorticity and relative humidity) over Bay of Bengal during post-monsoon season which could be seen from the very high correlation of 0.87 (which explains 76% variability in TNDC). For the first time, we show that RI is a precursor for the TNDC over Bay of Bengal during post-monsoon season. Strong westerlies after the SW monsoon season transport moisture over the subdivisions towards Bay of Bengal due to cyclonic circulation. This circulation favours upward motion and hence transport moisture vertically to mid-troposphere which causes convective instability and this in turn favour more number of TNDC, under above-normal RI year.

  6. Relationship between summer monsoon rainfall and cyclogenesis over Bay of Bengal during post-monsoon (October-December) season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhuram, Y.; Maneesha, K.

    2016-09-01

    In this study, an attempt has been made to examine the relationship between summer monsoon rainfall (June-September) and the total number of depressions, cyclones and severe cyclones (TNDC) over Bay of Bengal during the post-monsoon (October-December) season. The seasonal rainfall of the subdivisions (located in south India) (referred as rainfall index - RI), is positively and significantly correlated (r=0.59; significant at >99% level) with the TNDC during the period, 1984-2013. By using the first differences (current season minus previous season), the correlations are enhanced and a remarkably high correlation of 0.87 is observed between TNDC and RI for the recent period, 1993-2013. The average seasonal genesis potential parameter (GPP) showed a very high correlation of 0.84 with the TNDC. A very high correlation of 0.83 is observed between GPP and RI for the period, 1993-2013. The relative vorticity and mid-tropospheric relative humidity are found to be the dominant terms in GPP. The GPP was 3.5 times higher in above (below) normal RI in which TNDC was 4 (2). It is inferred that RI is playing a key role in TNDC by modulating the environmental conditions (low level vorticity and relative humidity) over Bay of Bengal during post-monsoon season which could be seen from the very high correlation of 0.87 (which explains 76% variability in TNDC). For the first time, we show that RI is a precursor for the TNDC over Bay of Bengal during post-monsoon season. Strong westerlies after the SW monsoon season transport moisture over the subdivisions towards Bay of Bengal due to cyclonic circulation. This circulation favours upward motion and hence transport moisture vertically to mid-troposphere which causes convective instability and this in turn favour more number of TNDC, under above-normal RI year.

  7. Differences and links between the East Asian and South Asian summer monsoon systems: Characteristics and Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ronghui; Liu, Yong; Du, Zhencai; Chen, Jilong; Huangfu, Jingliang

    2017-10-01

    This paper analyzes the differences in the characteristics and spatio-temporal variabilities of summertime rainfall and water vapor transport between the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) and South Asian summer monsoon (SASM) systems. The results show obvious differences in summertime rainfall characteristics between these two monsoon systems. The summertime rainfall cloud systems of the EASM show a mixed stratiform and cumulus cloud system, while cumulus cloud dominates the SASM. These differences may be caused by differences in the vertical shear of zonal and meridional circulations and the convergence of water vapor transport fluxes. Moreover, the leading modes of the two systems' summertime rainfall anomalies also differ in terms of their spatiotemporal features on the interannual and interdecadal timescales. Nevertheless, several close links with respect to the spatiotemporal variabilities of summertime rainfall and water vapor transport exist between the two monsoon systems. The first modes of summertime rainfall in the SASM and EASM regions reveal a significant negative correlation on the interannual and the interdecadal timescales. This close relationship may be linked by a meridional teleconnection in the regressed summertime rainfall anomalies from India to North China through the southeastern part over the Tibetan Plateau, which we refer to as the South Asia/East Asia teleconnection pattern of Asian summer monsoon rainfall. The authors wish to dedicate this paper to Prof. Duzheng YE, and commemorate his 100th anniversary and his great contributions to the development of atmospheric dynamics.

  8. Astronomical and Hydrological Perspective of Mountain Impacts on the Asian Summer Monsoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bian; Wu, Guoxiong; Liu, Yimin; Bao, Qing

    2015-12-01

    The Asian summer monsoon has great socioeconomic impacts. Understanding how the huge Tibetan and Iranian Plateaus affect the Asian summer monsoon is of great scientific value and has far-reaching significance for sustainable global development. One hypothesis considers the plateaus to be a shield for monsoon development in India by blocking cold-dry northerly intrusion into the tropics. Based on astronomical radiation analysis and numerical modeling, here we show that in winter the plateaus cannot block such a northerly intrusion; while in summer the daily solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface, and the surface potential temperature to the north of the Tibetan Plateau, are higher than their counterparts to its south, and such plateau shielding is not needed. By virtue of hydrological analysis, we show that the high energy near the surface required for continental monsoon development is maintained mainly by high water vapor content. Results based on potential vorticity-potential temperature diagnosis further demonstrate that it is the pumping of water vapor from sea to land due to the thermal effects of the plateaus that breeds the Asian continental monsoon.

  9. Effect of precession on the Asian summer monsoon evolution: A systematic review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU XiaoDong; SHI ZhengGuo

    2009-01-01

    Geological climatic records and model simulations on the Asian summer monsoon climate change induced by insolation forcing of the Earth's precession are systematically reviewed in this paper. The presentation of the questions on the mechanism of the Asian monsoon evolution at the precession band, currently existing debates and future research directions are discussed. Since the early 1980s, more and more observed evidence and simulated results, especially the absolute-dated stalagmite re-cords and orbital-scale transient model runs in the last few years, have indicated that the quasi-20ka period in the Quaternary monsoon climate change is caused by precession. However, debates still exist on the dynamic mechanism how precession affects the Asian monsoon. The "zero phase" hypothesis says that the Asian monsoon is merely controlled by summer insolation in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) while the "latent heat" hypothesis emphasizes the dominant effect of latent heat transport from the Southern Hemisphere (SH) besides the role of the northern insolation. The two hypotheses have separately been supported by some evidence. Although we are cognizant of the importance of northern solar radiation and the remote effect of southern insolation, it has still a long way to go before com-prehensively understanding the evolutionary mechanism of the Asian monsoon. In view of the prob-lems existing in present researches of monsoon-dominated climate change at the precession scale, we propose that studies on the environmental significance of geological monsoon proxies, feedback processes in the long-term transient simulations and intercomparisons between observations and modeling results should be strengthened in the future.

  10. The Eurasian ice sheet reinforces the East Asian summer monsoon during the interglacial 500 000 years ago

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuzhen Yin

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea and ice-core records show that interglacial periods were overall less "warm" before about 420 000 years ago than after, with relatively higher ice volume and lower greenhouse gases concentration. This is particularly the case for the interglacial Marine Isotope Stage 13 which occurred about 500 000 years ago. However, by contrast, the loess and other proxy records from China suggest an exceptionally active East Asian summer monsoon during this interglacial. A three-dimension Earth system Model of Intermediate complexity was used to understand this seeming paradox. The astronomical forcing and the remnant ice sheets present in Eurasia and North America were taken into account in a series of sensitivity experiments. Expectedly, the seasonal contrast is larger and the East Asian summer monsoon is reinforced compared to Pre-Industrial time when Northern Hemisphere summer is at perihelion. Surprisingly, the presence of the Eurasian ice sheet was found to reinforce monsoon, too, through a south-eastwards perturbation planetary wave. The trajectory of this wave is influenced by the Tibetan plateau.

  11. The link between Tibetan Plateau monsoon and Indian summer precipitation: a linear diagnostic perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Fei; Sielmann, Frank; Zhu, Xiuhua; Fraedrich, Klaus; Zhi, Xiefei; Peng, Ting; Wang, Lei

    2017-03-01

    The thermal forcing of the Tibetan Plateau (TP) is analyzed to investigate the formation and variability of Tibetan Plateau Summer Monsoon (TPSM), which affects the climates of the surrounding regions, in particular the Indian summer monsoon precipitation. Dynamic composites and statistical analyses indicate that the Indian summer monsoon precipitation is less/greater than normal during the strong/weak TPSM. Strong (weak) TPSM is associated with an anomalous near surface cyclone (anticyclone) over the western part of the Tibetan Plateau, enhancing (reducing) the westerly flow along its southern flank, suppressing (favoring) the meridional flow of warm and moist air from the Indian ocean and thus cutting (providing) moisture supply for the northern part of India and its monsoonal rainfall. These results are complemented by a dynamic and thermodynamic analysis: (i) A linear thermal vorticity forcing primarily describes the influence of the asymmetric heating of TP generating an anomalous stationary wave flux. Composite analysis of anomalous stationary wave flux activity (after Plumb in J Atmos Sci 42:217-229, 1985) strongly indicate that non-orographic effects (diabatic heating and/or interaction with transient eddies) of the Tibetan Plateau contribute to the generation of an anomalous cyclone (anti-cyclone) over the western TP. (ii) Anomalous TPSM generation shows that strong TPSM years are related to the positive surface sensible heating anomalies over the eastern TP favoring the strong diabatic heating in summer. While negative TPSM years are associated with the atmospheric circulation anomalies during the preceding spring, enhancing northerly dry-cold air intrusions into TP, which may weaken the condensational heat release in the middle and upper troposphere, leading to a weaker than normal summer monsoon over the TP in summer.

  12. Interdecadal variation of the West African summer monsoon during 1979-2010 and associated variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Huanlian [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nansen-Zhu International Research Centre, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Beijing (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Climate Change Research Center, Beijing (China); Wang, Huijun [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nansen-Zhu International Research Centre, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Beijing (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Climate Change Research Center, Beijing (China); Yin, Yizhou [Tsinghua University, Center for Earth System Science, Beijing (China)

    2012-12-15

    This paper addresses the interdecadal variation of the West African summer monsoon (WASM) along with its background of atmospheric circulation and possible physical mechanism over the past 32 years (1979-2010). It is indicated that the WASM starts to strengthen from 1998 as the rainfall begins to increase over western West Africa on the whole, which shows a new interdecadal variation. In this interdecadal variation, the strengthened ascending motion corresponding to enhanced divergence (convergence) movement on the upper (lower) troposphere is prone to develop the local circulation of the monsoon. Moreover, the strengthened southwestern (eastern) wind on the lower (upper) level leads to more moisture from the Atlantic and the Gulf of Guinea transported to the West African continent. In addition, the summer subtropical high over the north Atlantic and western West Africa is strong and northward, and the tropical east wind is also strong. Statistically, the weaker (stronger) the spring North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) is, the stronger (weaker) the tropical easterly is, and then the WASM is also stronger. But the effect of the NAO on the decadal variation of the WASM is not so significant from the north Atlantic anomaly sensitivity simulation with a single model. This is also an indication that the relationship between the WASM and NAO is complicated in an interdecadal time scale and is needed further study. In terms of sea surface temperature (SST) variation, the tendency is toward warming in the subtropical north Pacific, the south Pacific and north Atlantic. Numerical simulation experiments and data analysis show that the SST variation in the north Pacific plays an important role in the latest interdecadal strengthening of the WASM during the past 32 years, while the influences of the south Pacific and the north Atlantic SST anomalies are not so significant to the associated atmospheric circulation changes. (orig.)

  13. The Influence of Regional SSTs on the Interdecadal Shift of the East Asian Summer Monsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Jianjian; LI Shuanglin

    2013-01-01

    East Asia has experienced a significant interdecadal climate shift since the late 1970s.This shift was accompanied by a decadal change of global SST.Previous studies have suggested that the decadal shift of global SST background status played a substantial role in such a climatic shift.However,the individual roles of different regional SSTs remain unclear.In this study,we investigated these roles using ensemble experiments of an atmospheric general circulation model,GFDL (Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory) AM2.Two kinds of ensembles were performed.The first was a control ensemble in which the model was driven with the observed climatological SSTs.The second was an experimental ensemble in which the model was driven with the observed climatological SSTs plus interdecadal SST background shifts in separate ocean regions.The results suggest that the SST shift in the tropics exerted more important influence than those in the extratropics,although the latter contribute to the shift modestly.The variations of summer monsoonal circulation systems,including the South Asian High,the West Pacific Subtropical High,and the lower-level air flow,were analyzed.The results show that,in comparison with those induced by extratropical SSTs,the shifts induced by tropical SSTs bear more similarity to the observations and to the simulations with global SSTs prescribed.In particular,the observed SST shift in the tropical Pacific Ocean,rather than the Indian Ocean,contributed significantly to the shift of East Asian summer monsoon since the 1970s.

  14. The Indian summer monsoon and the waters around India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shetye, S.R.

    the surface salinity. We shall see in the next two sections that there exists, at least in part, a positive feedback between the strength of the monsoon activity over the Bay and the low salinities there. 4. The ET and the seas around India The first clue... this talk with a diagram (Fig. 6) that summarizes the many elements that cooperate to make the ISM happen. An interesting feature of the series of processes we have examined is positive feedback. Over the Bay of Bengal it acts as follows. A warm Bay sustains...

  15. Long range forecasting of summer monsoon rainfall from SST in the central equatorial Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sadhuram, Y.; Murthy, T.V.R.

    relationshipbetweenEasternEquatorialPacificSea surface temperature and rainfall over India and Sri Lanka', Mon. Wea.Rev., Vol. 111, pp.517-528. 7. Goswami, B.N., 1998, 'Interannual variations of Indian summer monsoon in GCM: External Conditionsversus InternalFeedbacks...

  16. Apparent relationship between thermal regime in Antarctic waters and Indian summer monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Menon, H.B.; RameshBabu, V.; Sastry, J.S.

    ) charts for the Indian Ocean sector of the Southern Ocean during 2 contrasting years (1977 and 1979) of summer monsoon over India. The results suggest an apparent relationship between the thermal regimes in the Antarctic waters of the Indian Ocean sector...

  17. The heat and moisture budgets of the atmosphere over central equatorial Indian Ocean during summer monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sadhuram, Y.; Gopalakrishna, V.V.; RameshBabu, V.; Sastry, J.S.

    on board four Russian ships during summer monsoon days (25 to 31 July 1977). The time mean net flux divergences of latent heat and dry static energy are found to be about - 0.366 and -0,471 x 1013 cal/sec respectively in the study area. Contributions from...

  18. Large-scale urbanization effects on eastern Asian summer monsoon circulation and climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haishan; Zhang, Ye; Yu, Miao; Hua, Wenjian; Sun, Shanlei; Li, Xing; Gao, Chujie

    2016-07-01

    Impacts of large-scale urbanization over eastern China on East Asian summer monsoon circulation and climate are investigated by comparing three 25-year climate simulations with and without incorporating modified land cover maps reflecting two different idealized large-scale urbanization scenarios. The global atmospheric general circulation model CAM4.0 that includes an urban canopy parameterization scheme is employed in this study. The large-scale urbanization over eastern China leads to a significant warming over most of the expanded urban areas, characterized by an increase of 3 K for surface skin temperature, 2.25 K for surface air temperature, significant warming of both daily minimum and daily maximum air temperatures, and 0.4 K for the averaged urban-rural temperature difference. The urbanization is also accompanied by an increase in surface sensible heat flux, a decrease of the net surface shortwave and long-wave radiation, and an enhanced surface thermal heating to the atmosphere in most Eastern Asia areas. It is noted that the responses of the East Asian summer monsoon circulation exhibits an evident month-to-month variation. Across eastern China, the summer monsoon in early summer is strengthened by the large-scale urbanization, but weakened (intensified) over southern (northern) part of East Asia in late summer. Meanwhile, early summer precipitation is intensified in northern and northeastern China and suppressed in south of ~35°N, but late summer precipitation is evidently suppressed over northeast China, the Korean Peninsula and Japan with enhancements in southern China, the South China Sea, and the oceanic region south and southeast of the Taiwan Island. This study highlights the evidently distinct month-to-month responses of the monsoon system to the large-scale urbanization, which might be attributed to different basic states, internal feedbacks (cloud, rainfall) as well as a dynamic adjustment of the atmosphere. Further investigation is required

  19. Contribution of Monthly and Regional Rainfall to the Strength of Indian Summer Monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y.; Ali, M.; Bourassa, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall (ISMR: June-September) has both temporal and spatial variability causing floods/droughts in different seasons/locations leading to a strong or weak monsoon. Here, we present the contribution of all-India monthly, seasonal and regional rainfall to the ISMR, with special reference to the strong and weak monsoons. For this purpose, rainfall data provided by the India Meteorological Department (IMD: http://www.imd.gov.in/section/nhac/dynamic/Monsoon_frame.htm) for 1901-2013 have been used. The IMD divided the Indian sub-continent into four homogeneous regions of northwest India (NWI), northeast India (NEI), central India (CI), and south peninsula India (SPIN). Rainfall during July-August contributes the most to the total seasonal rainfall, whether it is a strong or weak monsoon. Although the NEI has the maximum area-weighted rainfall, its contribution is the least toward a strong or weak monsoon. The rainfall in the remaining three regions (NWI, CI, and SPIN) controls whether an ISMR is strong or weak. Compared to the monthly rainfall, the regional rainfall dominates the strong or weak rainfall periods.

  20. Interactive Aspects of the Indian and the African Summer Monsoon Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjeeva Rao, P.; Sikka, D. R.

    2007-09-01

    This study addresses an understanding of the possible mutual interactions of sub-seasonal variability of the two neighboring regional monsoon systems through data analysis. The NCEP/NCAR re-analysis and OLR data for three years was used to reveal the large-scale organization of convective episodes on synoptic (~5 days) and low frequency (15 50 day) scales. It is found that synoptic scale organization over both the sectors is influenced by the eastward migration of large-scale convective episodes associated with the Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) on the low frequency scale. The organization of convection associated with the African monsoon on the synoptic scale is influenced by the pulsatory character of lower mid-troposphere and upper troposphere wind regimes moving westward over the African sector. Over the Indian region formation of low pressure areas and depressions in the monsoon trough occur in an overlapping manner under an envelope of low frequency seasonal oscillation. We have also found some correspondence between the summer monsoon rainfall over tropical North Africa and India on a decadal basis, which would suggest a common mode of multi-decadal variability in the two monsoon systems. The study points out the need to organize simultaneous field campaigns over the Indian and the African monsoon regions so as to bring out observational features of possible interactions between the two neighboring systems, which could then be validated through modeling studies.

  1. Analysis of Basic Features of the Onset of the Asian Summer Monsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a relatively systematic climatological research on the onset of the Asian tropical summer monsoon (ATSM) was carried out. Based on a unified index of the ATSM onset, the advance of the whole ATSM was newly made and then the view that the ATSM firstly breaks out over the tropical eastern Indian Ocean and the middle and southern Indo-China Peninsula was further documented, which was in the 26th pentad (about May 10), then over the South China Sea (SCS) in the 28th pentad. It seems that the ATSM onset over the two regions belongs to the different stages of the same monsoon system. Then, the onset mechanism of ATSM was further investigated by the comprehensive analysis on the land-sea thermodynamic contrast, intraseasonal oscillation, and so on, and the several key factors which influence the ATSM onset were put forward. Based on these results, a possible climatological schematic map that the ATSM firstly breaks out over the tropical eastern Indian Ocean, the Indo-China Peninsula, and the SCS was also presented, namely seasonal evolution of the atmospheric circulation was the background of the monsoon onset; the enhancement and northward advance of the convections, the sensible heating and latent heating over the Indo-China Peninsula and its neighboring areas, the dramatic deepening of the India-Burma trough, and the westerly warm advection over the eastern Tibetan Plateau were the major driving forces of the summer monsoon onset, which made the meridional gradient of the temperature firstly reverse over this region and ascending motion develop. Then the tropical monsoon and precipitation rapidly developed and enhanced. The phase-lock of the 30-60-day and 10-20-day low frequency oscillations originated from different sources was another triggering factor for the summer monsoon onset. It was just the common effect of these factors that induced the ATSM earliest onset over this region.

  2. Reanalysis of the Indian summer monsoon: four dimensional data assimilation of AIRS retrievals in a regional data assimilation and modeling framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attada, Raju; Parekh, Anant; Chowdary, J. S.; Gnanaseelan, C.

    2017-07-01

    This work is the first attempt to produce a multi-year downscaled regional reanalysis of the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) using the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) operational analyses and Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) version 5 temperature and moisture retrievals in a regional model. Reanalysis of nine monsoon seasons (2003-2011) are produced in two parallel setups. The first set of experiments simply downscale the original NCEP operational analyses, whilst the second one assimilates the AIRS temperature and moisture profiles. The results show better representation of the key monsoon features such as low level jet, tropical easterly jet, subtropical westerly jet, monsoon trough and the spatial pattern of precipitation when AIRS profiles are assimilated (compared to those without AIRS data assimilation). The distribution of temperature, moisture and meridional gradients of dynamical and thermodynamical fields over the monsoon region are better represented in the reanalysis that assimilates AIRS profiles. The change induced by AIRS data on the moist and thermodynamic conditions results in more realistic rendering of the vertical shear associated with the monsoon, which in turn leads to a proper moisture transport and the moist convective feedback. This feedback benefits the representation of the regional monsoon characteristics, the monsoon dynamics and the moist convective processes on the seasonal time scale. This study emphasizes the use of AIRS soundings for downscaling of ISM representation in a regional reanalysis.

  3. Reanalysis of the Indian summer monsoon: four dimensional data assimilation of AIRS retrievals in a regional data assimilation and modeling framework

    KAUST Repository

    Attada, Raju

    2017-07-04

    This work is the first attempt to produce a multi-year downscaled regional reanalysis of the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) using the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) operational analyses and Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) version 5 temperature and moisture retrievals in a regional model. Reanalysis of nine monsoon seasons (2003–2011) are produced in two parallel setups. The first set of experiments simply downscale the original NCEP operational analyses, whilst the second one assimilates the AIRS temperature and moisture profiles. The results show better representation of the key monsoon features such as low level jet, tropical easterly jet, subtropical westerly jet, monsoon trough and the spatial pattern of precipitation when AIRS profiles are assimilated (compared to those without AIRS data assimilation). The distribution of temperature, moisture and meridional gradients of dynamical and thermodynamical fields over the monsoon region are better represented in the reanalysis that assimilates AIRS profiles. The change induced by AIRS data on the moist and thermodynamic conditions results in more realistic rendering of the vertical shear associated with the monsoon, which in turn leads to a proper moisture transport and the moist convective feedback. This feedback benefits the representation of the regional monsoon characteristics, the monsoon dynamics and the moist convective processes on the seasonal time scale. This study emphasizes the use of AIRS soundings for downscaling of ISM representation in a regional reanalysis.

  4. The Joint Aerosol-Monsoon Experiment: A New Challenge to Monsoon Climate Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, William K. M.

    2008-01-01

    Aerosol and monsoon related droughts and floods are two of the most serious environmental hazards confronting more than 60% of the population of the world living in the Asian monsoon countries. In recent years, thanks to improved satellite and in-situ observations, and better models, great strides have been made in aerosol, and monsoon research respectively. There is now a growing body of evidence suggesting that interaction of aerosol forcing with water cycle dynamics in monsoon regions may substantially alter the redistribution of energy at the earth surface and in the atmosphere, and therefore significantly impact monsoon rainfall variability and long term trends. In this talk, I will describe issues related to societal needs, scientific background, and challenges in studies of aerosol-water cycle interaction in Asian monsoon regions. As a first step towards addressing these issues, the authors call for an integrated observation and modeling research approach aimed at the interactions between aerosol chemistry and radiative effects and monsoon dynamics of the coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system. A Joint Aerosol-Monsoon Experiment (JAMEX) is proposed for 2007-2011, with an enhanced observation period during 2008-09, encompassing diverse arrays of observations from surface, aircraft, unmanned aerial vehicles, and satellites of physical and chemical properties of aerosols, long range aerosol transport as well as meteorological and oceanographic parameters in the Indo-Pacific Asian monsoon region. JAMEX will leverage on coordination among many ongoing and planned national programs on aerosols and monsoon research in China, India, Japan, Nepal, Italy, US, as well as international research programs of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

  5. Multiscale characteristics of the rainy season rainfall and interdecadal decaying of summer monsoon in North China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Xingang; WANG Ping; CHOU Jifan

    2003-01-01

    This paper focuses on the rainfall spectrum and its evolution of North China in rainy season with summer monsoon decaying in interdecadal time scale. The interannual component of the rainfall is the dominant part, accounting for 85% of the total variance, and has been changed significantly during the last 30 years. According to wavelet analysis its 5a periodic spectrum suddenly disappeared in the late 1960s, and its biennial oscillation gradually become weaker and weaker since 1970, accompanied by the summer monsoon decaying. Contrarily, the interdecadal component is principal in the summer monsoon over North China and is very similar to the counterpart of the rainfall. Their interdecadal parts are significantly correlated, and the correlation coefficient is nearly equal to the one of the original sequences. Besides, the dry and wet climate alternated with the monsoon abrupt changes in the 1960s and the 1970s over East Asia, apart from North China, climate drifted from a light drought to a severe drought during the past 30 years.

  6. The East Asian summer monsoon at mid-Holocene: results from PMIP3 simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Zheng

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Ten Coupled General Circulation Models (CGCMs participating the third phase of Paleoclimate Modeling Intercomparison project (PMIP3 are assessed for the simulations of East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM at both the present climate and mid-Holocene. Results show that the PMIP3 model median well captures the characteristics of the EASM, including the two distinct features of the Meiyu Front and the stepwise meridional displacement of the monsoon rainbelt. At mid-Holocene, the enhanced EASM is simulated by the PMIP3 models. The model median shows that the changes of surface air temperature and precipitation are within the range as indicated by the proxy data over the eastern China. Both the changes of monsoonal circulation and the water vapor content favor the increasing of summer precipitation. Regional features can be identified between models because of their different simulations of the above changes. The model spread for the surface air temperature (TAS is relatively smaller when compared with that of PMIP2 models in both the Northern Hemisphere and the eastern China. However, the model spread of summer precipitation is larger among PMIP3 models, particularly in the lower reaches of Yangzi River. The TAS over Tibetan Plateau has a positive relationship with the precipitation in the lower reaches of Yangzi River, yet this relationship does not apply for those PMIP3 models in which the monsoonal precipitation is more sensitive to the changes of large-scale circulation.

  7. Response of the Asian Summer Monsoon to Weakening of Atlantic Thermohaline Circulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Riyu; Buwen DONG

    2008-01-01

    Various paleocllimate records have shown that the Asian monsoon was punctuated by numerous sub-orbital time-scale events,,and these events were coeval with those that happened in the North Atlantic..This study investigates the Asian summer monsoon responses to the Atlantic 0cean forcing by applying an additional freshwater flux into the North Atlantic.The simulated results indicate that the cold North Atlantic and warm South Atlantic induced by the weakened Atlantic thermohaline circulation(THC)due to the freshwater flux lead to significantly suppressed Asian summer monsoon.The authors analyzed the detailed processes of the Atlantic Ocean forcing on the Asian summer monsoon,and found that the atmospheric teleconnection in the eastern and central North Pacific and the atmosphere-ocean interaction in the tropical North Pacific play the most crucial role.Enhanced precipitation in the subtropical North Pacific extends the effects of Atlantic Ocean forcing from the eastern Pacific into the western Pacific,and the atmosphere-ocean jinteraction in the tropical Pacific and Indian 0pcean intensifies the circulation and precipitation anomalies in the Pacific and East Asia.

  8. A possible impact of the North Atlantic Oscillation on the east Asian summer monsoon precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Mi-Kyung; Kwon, Won-Tae; Baek, Hee-Jeong; Boo, Kyung-On; Lim, Gyu-Ho; Kug, Jong-Seong

    2006-11-01

    This letter reports on a possible delayed impact of the winter North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) on the following east Asian summer monsoon precipitation. An analysis of weather station data shows significant correlations between the December NAO index and precipitation over Korea and China in the subsequent summer. It appears that the correlation may be related to a wave train pattern which originates from the North Atlantic. The east Asian branch of this wave train can affect large-scale circulation and the precipitation over east Asia in early summer. We also found a significant interdecadal change of this relationship, which is possibly linked to a climatological change of the east Asian jet stream.

  9. THE CLIMATIC CHARACTERISTICS OF SUMMER MONSOON ONSET OVER THE SOUTH CHINA SEA Ⅰ40—YEAR AVERAGE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯瑞权; 林建恒

    2002-01-01

    By using 40-year NCEP reanalysis daily data91958-1997),we have analyzed the climatic characteristics of summer monsoon onset in the South China Sea(1050°E-120°E,5°N-20°N,to be simplified as SCS in the text followed) pentad y pentad(5 days),According to our new definition,in the monsoon area of the SCS two of the following conditions should be satistied:1)At 850hPa,the southwest winds should be greater than 2m/s.2)At 850 hPa.θse should e greater than 335°K.The new definition means that the summermonsoon is the southwest winds high temperature and high moisture.The onset of the SCS summer monsoon is defined to start when one half of the SCS area(105°E-120°E,5°N-20°N)is controlled by the summer monsoon.The analyzed results revealed the following:1) The summer monsoon in the SCS starts to build up abruptly in the 4th pentad in May.2) The summer monsoon onset in the SCS is resulted from the development and intensification of southwesterly monsoon in the Bay of Bengal.3) The onset of the summer monsoon and establishment of the summer monsoon rainfall season in the SCS occur simultaneously.4) During the summer monsoon onset in the SCS,troughs deepen and widen quickly in the lower troposphere of the India:the subtropical high in the Western pacific moves eastward off the SCS in the middle troposphere:the easterly advances northward over the SCS in the upper troposphere.

  10. Evaluation of CFSV2 Forecast Skill for Indian Summer Monsoon Sub-Seasonal Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    S, S. A.; Ghosh, S.

    2015-12-01

    Prediction of sub seasonal monsoon characteristics of Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) is highly crucial for agricultural planning and water resource management. The Climate forecast System version 2 (CFS V2), the state of the art coupled climate model developed by NCEP, is currently being employed for the seasonal and extended range forecasts of ISM. Even though CFSV2 is a fully coupled ocean- atmosphere- land model with advanced physics, increased resolution and refined initialisation, its ISM forecasts, in terms of seasonal mean and variability needs improvement. Numerous works have been done for verifying the CFSV2 forecasts in terms of the seasonal mean, its mean and variability, active and break spells, and El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) - monsoon interactions. Most of these works are based on either rain fall strength or rainfall based indices. Here we evaluate the skill of CFS v2 model in forecasting the various sub seasonal features of ISM, viz., the onset and withdrawal days of monsoon that are determined using circulation based indices, the Monsoon Intra Seasonal Oscillations (MISO), and Indian Ocean and Pacific Ocean sea surface temperatures. The MISO index, we use here, is based on zonal wind at 850 hPa and Outgoing Long wave Radiation (OLR) anomalies. With this work, we aim at assessing the skill of the model in simulating the large scale circulation patterns and their variabilities within the monsoon season. Variabilities in these large scale circulation patterns are primarily responsible for the variabilities in the seasonal monsoon strength and its temporal distribution across the season. We find that the model can better forecast the large scale circulation and than the actual precipitation. Hence we suggest that seasonal rainfall forecasts can be improved by the statistical downscaling of CFSV2 forecasts by incorporating the established relationships between the well forecasted large scale variables and monsoon precipitation.

  11. An Analysis of Interdecadal Variations of the Asian-African Summer Monsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Yan; JI Jinjun; SUN Xia

    2008-01-01

    The response of the Asian-African summer monsoon(AASM)to the fast global warming in the 1980s is studied based on several datasets,which span a long time period of nearly 100 yr,with two special periods 1980-1985 and 1990-1995 being focused on.Wavelet analyses are employed to explore the interdecadal variations of the AASM.It is found that after the mid-1980s.the global annual mean surface temperature rises more significantly and extensively over most parts of the African Continent,north of the Indian Ocean,and the Eurasian Continent excluding the Tibetan Plateau.Correspondingly,the global precipitation pattern alters with increased rainfall seen over the Sahel and North China in 1990-1995,though it is not recovered to the level of the rainy period before the mid-1960s.Changes of monsoonal circulations between the pre-and post-1980s periods display that,after the fast global warming of the 1980s,the African summer monsoon intensifies distinctly,the Indian summer monsoon weakens a little bit,and the East Asian summer monsoon remains almost unchanged.The summer precipitation over the Asian-African Monsoon Belt(AAMB)does not change in phase coherently with the variations of the monsoonal circulations.Wavelet analyses of the land-sea thermal contrast and precipitation over North China and the Sahel indicate that interdecadal signals are dominant and in positive phases in the 1960s.1eading to an overall enhanced interdecadal variation of the AASM,although the 1960s witnesses a global cooling.In the 1980s,however,in the context of a fast global warming,interdecadal signals are in opposite phases,and they counteract with each other.1cading to a weakened interdecadal variation of the AASM.After the mid-1960s.the AASM weakened remarkably,whereas after the mid-1980s,the AASM as a whole did not strengthen uniformly and synchronously,because it is found that the interannual variations of the AASM in the 1980s are stronger than those in the 1960s,and they superimposed on the

  12. Carbon dioxide and water vapour characteristics on the west coast of Arabian Sea during Indian summer monsoon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Dharmaraj; M N Patil; R T Waghmare; P Ernest Raj

    2012-08-01

    Carbon dioxide, water vapour, air temperature and wind measurements at 10 Hz sampling rate were carried out over the coast of Arabian Sea, Goa (15°21′N, 73° 51′E) in India. These observations were collected, in association with the surface layer turbulent parameters for the Arabian Sea Monsoon Experiment (ARMEX). In the summer monsoon period, concentration of CO2 was in the range of 550–790 mg m−3 whereas the water vapour was in the range of 17.5–24.5 g m−3. The Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis has been performed on these observations to investigate the spectral behaviour of CO2 and water vapour. The relation between CO2 and water vapour on various atmospheric scales has been proposed. CO2 and water vapour observations confirmed the existence of periodicities of large (11, 8 days), meso (5 days) and micrometeorological (20 min) scales.

  13. Impact of Anthropogenic Climate Change on the East Asian Summer Monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Claire; Stott, Peter

    2017-07-01

    The East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) is important for bringing rainfall to large areas of China. Historically, variations in the EASM have had major impacts including flooding and drought. We present an analysis of the impact of anthropogenic climate change on EASM rainfall in Eastern China using a newly updated attribution system. Our results suggest that anthropogenic climate change has led to an overall decrease in total monsoon rainfall over the past 65 years, and an increased number of dry days. However the model also predicts that anthropogenic forcings have caused the most extreme heavy rainfall events to become shorter in duration and more intense. With the potential for future changes in aerosol and greenhouse gas emissions, historical trends in monsoon rainfall may not be indicative of future changes, although extreme rainfall is projected to increase over East Asia with continued warming in the region.

  14. INTERDECADAL VARIATIONS OF INTERACTION BETWEEN NORTH PACIFIC SSTA AND EAST ASIAN SUMMER MONSOON

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李峰; 何金海

    2001-01-01

    Identification of key SST zones is essential in predicting the weather / climate systems in East Asia. With the SST data by the U.K. Meteorological Office and 40-year geopotential height and wind fields by NCAR / NCEP, the relationship between the East Asian summer monsoon and north Pacific SSTA is studied, which reveals their interactions are of interdecadal variation. Before mid-1970's, the north Pacific SSTA acts upon the summer monsoon in East Asia through a great circle wavetrain and results in more rainfall in the summer of the northern part of China. After 1976, the SSTA weakens the wavetrain and no longer influences the precipitation in North China due to loosened links with the East Asian summer monsoon. It can be drawn that the key SST zones having potential effects on the weather / climate systems in East Asia do not stay in one particular area of the ocean but rather shift elsewhere as governed by the interdecadal variations of the air-sea interactions. It is hoped that the study would help shed light on the prediction of drought / flood spans in China.

  15. Characteristics of Thermal and Geopotential Height Differences Between Continent and Ocean and Its Role in the Strength of the Asian Summer Monsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrea Silverman; SUN Jilin

    2005-01-01

    The interdecadal factors affecting the summer monsoon winds over Somalia and the South China Sea were studied. Global geopotential heights and wind velocity fields of the 850-hPa and 200-hPa pressure levels, as well as sea surface temperature anomaly data and correlation coefficients were analyzed. The monsoons over Somalia and the South China Sea were found to be two different monsoon systems, operating on different mechanisms and being affected by different oceanatmosphere interactions. The intensity of the Asian subtropical summer monsoon is influenced by the intensity of the summer monsoon over Somalia in the month of June and by the intensity of the summer monsoon over the South China Sea in the months of June and July. The summer monsoon wind strength over Somalia is affected by regional factors, such as the heating of the Tibetan plateau, and by global mechanisms, such as the subtropical heat exchange with Antarctica. The summer monsoon over the South China Sea is affected by different ocean-atmosphere interactions. The Somalia and subtropical summer monsoons have wind blowing down the pressure gradient from area over ocean to that over land, like typical summer monsoons. The South China Sea summer monsoon has winds that blow down the pressure gradient from area over land to that over ocean. The South China Sea summer monsoon is affected by the Kuroshio Current off the east coast of Japan.

  16. Clay mineralogical and geochemical proxies of the East Asian summer monsoon evolution in the South China Sea during Late Quaternary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Quan; Liu, Zhifei; Kissel, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    The East Asian summer monsoon controls the climatic regime of an extended region through temperature and precipitation changes. As the East Asian summer monsoon is primarily driven by the northern hemisphere summer insolation, such meteorological variables are expected to significantly change on the orbital timescale, influencing the composition of terrestrial sediments in terms of both mineralogy and geochemistry. Here we present clay mineralogy and major element composition of Core MD12-3432 retrieved from the northern South China Sea, and we investigate their relationship with the East Asian summer monsoon evolution over the last 400 ka. The variability of smectite/(illite + chlorite) ratio presents a predominant precession periodicity, synchronous with the northern hemisphere summer insolation changes and therefore with that of the East Asian summer monsoon. Variations in K2O/Al2O3 are characterized by eccentricity cycles, increasing during interglacials when the East Asian summer monsoon is enhanced. Based on the knowledge of sediment provenances, we suggest that these two proxies in the South China Sea are linked to the East Asian summer monsoon evolution with different mechanisms, which are (1) contemporaneous chemical weathering intensity in Luzon for smectite/(illite + chlorite) ratio and (2) river denudation intensity for K2O/Al2O3 ratio of bulk sediment. PMID:28176842

  17. Clay mineralogical and geochemical proxies of the East Asian summer monsoon evolution in the South China Sea during Late Quaternary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Quan; Liu, Zhifei; Kissel, Catherine

    2017-02-08

    The East Asian summer monsoon controls the climatic regime of an extended region through temperature and precipitation changes. As the East Asian summer monsoon is primarily driven by the northern hemisphere summer insolation, such meteorological variables are expected to significantly change on the orbital timescale, influencing the composition of terrestrial sediments in terms of both mineralogy and geochemistry. Here we present clay mineralogy and major element composition of Core MD12-3432 retrieved from the northern South China Sea, and we investigate their relationship with the East Asian summer monsoon evolution over the last 400 ka. The variability of smectite/(illite + chlorite) ratio presents a predominant precession periodicity, synchronous with the northern hemisphere summer insolation changes and therefore with that of the East Asian summer monsoon. Variations in K2O/Al2O3 are characterized by eccentricity cycles, increasing during interglacials when the East Asian summer monsoon is enhanced. Based on the knowledge of sediment provenances, we suggest that these two proxies in the South China Sea are linked to the East Asian summer monsoon evolution with different mechanisms, which are (1) contemporaneous chemical weathering intensity in Luzon for smectite/(illite + chlorite) ratio and (2) river denudation intensity for K2O/Al2O3 ratio of bulk sediment.

  18. A comparative study of the Indian summer monsoon hydroclimate and its variations in three reanalyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, Vasubandhu [Florida State University, Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Florida State University, Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Pantina, P. [Science Systems and Application, Inc., Lanham, MD (United States); NASA/GSFC, Cloud and Radiation Laboratory, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Chan, S.C. [Newcastle University, School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Met Office Hadley Center, Exeter (United Kingdom); DiNapoli, S. [Florida State University, Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies, Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2012-09-15

    This study examines the Indian summer monsoon hydroclimate in the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)-Department of Energy (DOE) Reanalysis (R2), the Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR), and the Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA). The three reanalyses show significant differences in the climatology of evaporation, low-level winds, and precipitable water fields over India. For example, the continental evaporation is significantly less in CFSR compared to R2 and MERRA. Likewise the mean boreal summer 925 hPa westerly winds in the northern Indian Ocean are stronger in R2. Similarly the continental precipitable water in R2 is much less while it is higher and comparable in MERRA and CFSR. Despite these climatological differences between the reanalyses, the climatological evaporative sources for rain events over central India show some qualitative similarities. Major differences however appear when interannual variations of the Indian summer monsoon are analyzed. The anomalous oceanic sources of moisture from the adjacent Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea play a significant role in determining the wet or dry year of the Indian monsoon in CFSR. However in R2 the local evaporative sources from the continental region play a more significant role. We also find that the interannual variability of the evaporative sources in the break spells of the intraseasonal variations of the Indian monsoon is stronger than in the wet spells. We therefore claim that instead of rainfall, evaporative sources may be a more appropriate metric to observe the relationship between the seasonal monsoon strength and intraseasonal activity. These findings are consistent across the reanalyses and provide a basis to improve the predictability of intraseasonal variability of the Indian monsoon. This study also has a bearing on improving weather prediction for tropical cyclones in that we suggest targeting enhanced observations in the Bay of Bengal

  19. Role of Anomalous States of Upper Tropospheric Circulation on Extremely Dry and Wet Summer Monsoon Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S.; Koike, T.; Nishii, K.; Shrestha, M.

    2011-12-01

    Seasonal changes in wind pattern, monsoon, sometimes result in severe droughts and intense flooding in many parts of the world including South Asian countries like Pakistan. The livelihood of a vast population in Pakistan depends on agriculture and land use is strongly influenced by water-based ecosystems that depend on the monsoon rains. Furthermore, climate change studies undertaken so far reveal that action is essential in order to prevent long term damage to water cycle and thus of great concern to the community and stakeholders. Pakistan Summer Monsoon (PSM) is affected by both the disturbances from the tropical and the extratropical regions; however there is lack of understanding of physical mechanisms of PSM compared to other regional studies i.e. Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) and South-East Asian Monsoon (SEAM). In our study, we applied heat and vorticity budgets, and wave train analysis to reveal the mechanisms of the extremely dry and wet PSM events associated with the anomalous upper tropospheric conditions. We found that the extremely dry (wet) PSM events were closely related with the anomalous cyclonic (anticyclonic) upper-tropospheric circulation around northwest of Pakistan, and mid-upper tropospheric cooling (warming) anomaly around Pakistan and to its north/northwest. We also found in addition to Rossby wave response due to the suppressed (enhanced) convective activities around monsoon regions, the midlatitude wave energy propagation emanating around cyclonic/anticyclonic anomaly around northwestern Atlantic, northeastern Atlantic, Europe or Mediterranean regions induced/reinforced/maintained the anomalous upper tropospheric cyclonic (anticyclonic) circulation around northwest of Pakistan during extremely dry (wet) PSM events. Therefore, devastating drought (flood) events over the PSM region resulting from weak (strong) convection anomalies are induced by both the tropical and extratropical processes.

  20. A Coupled Model Study on the Intensification of the Asian Summer Monsoon in IPCC SRES Scenarios

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The Asian summer monsoon is an important part of the climate system. Investigating the response of the Asian summer monsoon to changing concentrations of greenhouse gases and aerosols will be meaningful to understand and predict climate variability and climate change not only in Asia but also globally. In order to diagnose the impacts of future anthropogenic emissions on monsoon climates, a coupled general circulation model of the atmosphere and the ocean has been used at the Max-Planck-Institute for Meteorology. In addition to carbon dioxide, the major well mixed greenhouse gases such as methane, nitrous oxide, several chlorofluorocarbons, and CFC substitute gases are prescribed as a function of time. The sulfur cycle is simulated interactively, and both the direct aerosol effect and the indirect cloud albedo effect are considered.Furthermore, changes in tropospheric ozone have been pre-calculated with a chemical transport model and prescribed as a function of time and space in the climate simulations. Concentrations of greenhouse gases and anthropogenic emissions of sulfur dioxide are prescribed according to observations (1860-1990) and projected into the future (1990-2100) according to the Scenarios A2 and B2 in Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES, Nakicenovic et al., 2000) developed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). It is found that the Indian summer monsoon is enhanced in the scenarios in terms of both mean precipitation and interannual variability. An increase in precipitation is simulated for northern China but a decrease for the southern part. Furthermore, the simulated future increase in monsoon variability seems to be linked to enhanced ENSO variability towards the end of the scenario integrations.

  1. Coupling of Community Land Model with RegCM4 for Indian Summer Monsoon Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, R. K. S.; Sinha, P.; Mohanty, M. R.; Mohanty, U. C.

    2017-08-01

    Three land surface schemes available in the regional climate model RegCM4 have been examined to understand the coupling between land and atmosphere for simulation of the Indian summer monsoon rainfall. The RegCM4 is coupled with biosphere-atmosphere transfer scheme (BATS) and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Land Model versions 3.5, and 4.5 (CLM3.5 and CLM4.5, respectively) and model performance is evaluated for recent drought (2009) and normal (2011) monsoon years. The CLM4.5 has a more distinct category of surface and it is capable of representing better the land surface characteristics. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) and Department of Energy (DOE) reanalysis version 2 (NNRP2) datasets are considered as driving force to conduct the experiments for the Indian monsoon region (30°E-120°E; 30°S-50°N). The NNRP2 and India Meteorological Department (IMD) gridded precipitation data are used for verification analysis. The results indicate that RegCM4 simulations with CLM4.5 (RegCM4-CLM4.5) and CLM3.5 (RegCM4-CLM3.5) surface temperature (at 2 ms) have very low warm biases ( 1 °C), while with BATS (RegCM4-BATS) has a cold bias of about 1-3 °C in peninsular India and some parts of central India. Warm bias in the RegCM4-BATS is observed over the Indo-Gangetic plain and northwest India and the bias is more for the deficit year as compared to the normal year. However, the warm (cold) bias is less in RegCM4-CLM4.5 than other schemes for both the deficit and normal years. The model-simulated maximum (minimum) surface temperature and sensible heat flux at the surface are positively (negatively) biased in all the schemes; however, the bias is higher in RegCM4-BATS and lower in RegCM4-CLM4.5 over India. All the land surface schemes overestimated the precipitation in peninsular India and underestimated in central parts of India for both the years; however, the biases are less in RegCM4-CLM4.5 and more in RegCM4-CLM3.5 and Reg

  2. Competing influences of greenhouse warming and aerosols on Asian summer monsoon circulation and rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, William Ka-Ming; Kim, Kyu-Myong

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we have compared and contrasted competing influences of greenhouse gases (GHG) warming and aerosol forcing on Asian summer monsoon circulation and rainfall based on CMIP5 historical simulations. Under GHG-only forcing, the land warms much faster than the ocean, magnifying the pre-industrial climatological land-ocean thermal contrast and hemispheric asymmetry, i.e., warmer northern than southern hemisphere. A steady increasing warm-ocean-warmer-land (WOWL) trend has been in effect since the 1950's substantially increasing moisture transport from adjacent oceans, and enhancing rainfall over the Asian monsoon regions. However, under GHG warming, increased atmospheric stability due to strong reduction in mid-tropospheric and near surface relative humidity coupled to an expanding subsidence areas, associated with the Deep Tropical Squeeze (DTS, Lau and Kim, 2015b) strongly suppress monsoon convection and rainfall over subtropical and extratropical land, leading to a weakening of the Asian monsoon meridional circulation. Increased anthropogenic aerosol emission strongly masks WOWL, by over 60% over the northern hemisphere, negating to a large extent the rainfall increase due to GHG warming, and leading to a further weakening of the monsoon circulation, through increasing atmospheric stability, most likely associated with aerosol solar dimming and semi-direct effects. Overall, we find that GHG exerts stronger positive rainfall sensitivity, but less negative circulation sensitivity in SASM compared to EASM. In contrast, aerosols exert stronger negative impacts on rainfall, but less negative impacts on circulation in EASM compared to SASM.

  3. Role of west Asian surface pressure in summer monsoon onset over central India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Arindam; Agrawal, Shubhi

    2017-07-01

    Using rain-gauge measurements and reanalysis data sets for 1948-2015, we propose a mechanism that controls the interannual variation of summer monsoon onset over central India. In May, about a month before the onset, the low level jet over the Arabian Sea is about 40% stronger and about 2.5 degrees northward during years of early onset as compared to years of late onset. A stronger and northward shifted low level jet carries about 50% more moisture in early onset years, which increases low level moist static energy over central India in the pre-monsoon season. The increase in low level moist static energy decreases the stability of the atmosphere and makes it conducive for convection. The strength and position of the low level jet are determined by surface pressure gradient between western Asia and the west-equatorial Indian Ocean. Thus, an anomalous surface pressure low over western Asia in the pre-monsoon season increases this gradient and strengthens the jet. Moreover, a stronger low level jet increases the meridional shear of zonal wind and supports the formation of an onset vortex in a stronger baroclinic atmosphere. These developments are favourable for an early onset of the monsoon over the central Indian region. Our study postulates a new physical mechanism for the interannual variation of onset over central India, the core of the Indian monsoon region and relevant to Indian agriculture, and could be tested for real-time prediction.

  4. The role of potential vorticity anomalies in the Somali Jet on Indian Summer Monsoon Intraseasonal Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, P.; Joshi, M.; Dimri, A. P.; Turner, A. G.

    2017-08-01

    The climate of the Indian subcontinent is dominated by rainfall arising from the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) during June to September. Intraseasonal variability during the monsoon is characterized by periods of heavy rainfall interspersed by drier periods, known as active and break events respectively. Understanding and predicting such events is of vital importance for forecasting human impacts such as water resources. The Somali Jet is a key regional feature of the monsoon circulation. In the present study, we find that the spatial structure of Somali Jet potential vorticity (PV) anomalies varies considerably during active and break periods. Analysis of these anomalies shows a mechanism whereby sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies propagate north/northwestwards through the Arabian Sea, caused by a positive feedback loop joining anomalies in SST, convection, modification of PV by diabatic heating and mixing in the atmospheric boundary layer, wind-stress curl, and ocean upwelling processes. The feedback mechanism is consistent with observed variability in the coupled ocean-atmosphere system on timescales of approximately 20 days. This research suggests that better understanding and prediction of monsoon intraseasonal variability in the South Asian monsoon may be gained by analysis of the day-to-day dynamical evolution of PV in the Somali Jet.

  5. Evaluating the influence of summer monsoon intensity on the runoff of the middle Yellow River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, D.; Lv, M.

    2012-12-01

    Continental monsoon climate controls the runoff in Central and Southeastern China, especially the drainage between Lanzhou and Huanyuankou, i.e. the middle Yellow River Basin. To analyze the influence of summer monsoon intensity on the runoff of the region, this paper evaluates the temporal variation and power spectrum of summer monsoon indices (Ism) of 139 years (1873-2011) and natural runoff of the middle Yellow River Basin of 93 years (1919-2011) by using continuous wavelet transform (CWT). The CWT of Ism indicates that ~80a and ~40a periodicities persist over the whole period, while the higher frequency oscillation (i.e. 2-8a) decreases after 1970 during which both the ENSO influence and continental monsoon intensity are being weak. The attenuating of 2-8a oscillation is also found in the CWT of natural runoff in the drainage area between Hekouzhen and Longmen, which might lead to a good correlation between Ism and natural runoff in the region. However, the 2-8a oscillation in the CWT of natural runoff is more consistent over the whole period of 1919-2000 in downstream areas, i.e. drainage area between Longmen and Huangyuankou, which indicates strong influence from other climatic factors such as ENSO.

  6. Simulation of Indian summer monsoon using the Japan Meteorological Agency’s seasonal ensemble prediction system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kailas Sonawane; O P Sreejith; D R Pattanaik; Mahendra Benke; Nitin Patil; D S Pai

    2015-03-01

    The performance of a dynamical seasonal forecast system is evaluated for the prediction of summer monsoon rainfall over the Indian region during June–September (JJAS) by using hindcast of the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) seasonal ensemble prediction system (EPS) model, based on five ensembles of March, April and May initial states for a period of 32 years (1979–2010). The hindcast climatology during JJAS simulates the mean monsoon circulation at lower and upper tropospheres very well in JMA model using March, April and May ensembles with a more realistic simulation of Webster and Yang’s broad scale monsoon circulation index. The JMA hindcast climatology during JJAS simulates the rainfall maxima over the west-coast of India and the head Bay of Bengal reasonably well, although, the latter is slightly shifted southwestward. Associated with better forecast skills of El Nino in the JMA model, the interannual variability of All India Summer Monsoon Rainfall (AISMR) during the 32-year period has also been very well simulated with a high significant (99% level) correlation in April ensemble followed by that of March and May ensembles. Thus, the present analysis indicates that the JMA seasonal forecast model can prove to be a useful tool for the dynamical seasonal forecast of AISMR.

  7. EVOLUTION OF TROPOSPHERIC TEMPERATURE FIELDS AND CORRESPONDING THERMAL MECHANISMS BEFORE/AFTER ONSET PERIODS OF ASIAN SUMMER MONSOON

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The evolution of the tropospheric temperature fields over Indian and South China Sea monsoon areas and their thermal mechanisms are compared and analyzed during the period from March to June, 1996. The results show that the onsets of the Indian and South China Sea summer monsoons are closely associated with the seasonal warming in the troposphere over the zonal belt of 10° N ~ 30° N in these areas, which leads to the inversion of meridional temperature gradient. During the pre-onset period, the warming over the South China Sea monsoon region is mainly due to the warm horizontal advection and diabatic (latent) heating processes. Meanwhile, the warming is suppressed by the vertical adiabatic process (cooling). In spring over the Indian monsoon region, the significant adiabatic heating due to the subsidence motion, which compensates the cooling due to the strong cold advection and diabatic cooling processes, results in a larger warming rate than over the South China Sea monsoon region. However, the meridional temperature gradient over the Indian monsoon region is so large during the late winter and early spring that it takes longer time to warm the troposphere to have the reversion of meridional temperature gradient than it does over the South China Sea monsoon region. It results in the phenomenon that the South China Sea summer monsoon generally breaks out earlier than the Indian summer monsoon.

  8. Aggregation of Euphausia sibogae during Summer Monsoon along the Southwest Coast of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. J. Jayalakshmi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of environmental parameters on the spawning aggregation of Euphausia sibogae was investigated along the southwest coast of India during the peak phase of summer monsoon 2005. The prevailing ecological conditions between the aggregation period (peak phase and non-aggregation period (early phase were also compared. The aggregation was observed at station 1 (8∘N; 76.5∘E, 480 ind⋅m-3 and 6 (10∘N; 75.5∘E, 839 ind.m-3 during the peak phase of the summer monsoon. Eggs (14769 eggs m-3 and different developmental stages were observed in higher abundance at station 6. The physicochemical conditions indicated that the aggregation coincided with the upwelling. The nutrient enrichment due to the upwelling triggered phytoplankton blooms, and this appeared to provide a conducive environment for spawning and development of E. sibogae.

  9. Summer cooling in the east central Arabian Sea - a process of dynamic response to the southwest monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshBabu, V.; Sastry, J.S.

    The cooling of the east central Arabian Sea during summer monsoon season is examined using data sets of MONEX '79 and MONSOON '77 programmes. These studies have revealed that downward transfer of heat due to the mixing of warm surface and cold sub...

  10. Characteristics of the Onset of the Asian Summer Monsoon and the Importance of Asian-Australian "Land Bridge"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Based on summarizing previous achievements and using data as long and new as possible, the onset characteristics of Asian summer monsoon and the role of Asian-Australian "land bridge" in the onset of summer monsoon are further discussed. In particular, the earliest onset area of Asian summer monsoon is comparatively analyzed, and the sudden and progressive characteristics of the onset of summer monsoon in different regions are discussed. Furthermore, the relationships among such critical events during the onset of Asian summer monsoon as the splitting of subtropical high belt over the Bay of Bengal (BOB), the initiation of convection over Indo-China Peninsula, the westward advance, reestablishment of South Asian High, and the rapid northward progression of convection originated from Sumatra in early summer are studied. The important impact of the proper collocation of the latent heating over Indo-China Peninsula and the sensible heating over Indian Peninsula on the splitting of the subtropical high belt, the deepening of BOB trough, the activating of Sri Lanka vortex (twin vortexes in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres),and the subsequent onset of South China Sea summer monsoon are emphasized.

  11. Transport pathways of carbon monoxide in the Asian summer monsoon diagnosed from Model of Ozone and Related Tracers (MOZART)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mijeong; Randel, William J.; Emmons, Louisa K.; Livesey, Nathaniel J.

    2009-04-01

    Satellite observations of tropospheric chemical constituents (such as carbon monoxide, CO) reveal a persistent maximum in the upper troposphere-lower stratosphere (UTLS) associated with the Asian summer monsoon anticyclone. Diagnostic studies suggest that the strong anticyclonic circulation acts to confine air masses, but the sources of pollution and transport pathways to altitudes near the tropopause are the subject of debate. Here we use the Model for Ozone and Related Tracers 4 (MOZART-4) global chemistry transport model, driven by analyzed meteorological fields, to study the source and transport of CO in the Asian monsoon circulation. A MOZART-4 simulation for one summer is performed, and results are compared with satellite observations of CO from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder and the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer. Overall, good agreement is found between the modeled and observed CO in the UTLS, promoting confidence in the model simulation. The model results are then analyzed to understand the sources and transport pathways of CO in the Asian monsoon region, and within the anticyclone in particular. The results show that CO is transported upward by monsoon deep convection, with the main surface sources from India and Southeast Asia. The uppermost altitude of the convective transport is ˜12 km, near the level of main deep convective outflow, and much of the CO is then advected in the upper troposphere northeastward across the Pacific Ocean and southwestward with the cross-equatorial Hadley flow. However, some of the CO is also advected vertically to altitudes near the tropopause (˜16 km) by the large-scale upward circulation on the eastern side of the anticyclone, and this air then becomes trapped within the anticyclone (to the west of the convection, extending to the Middle East). Within the anticyclone, the modeled CO shows a relative maximum near 15 km, in good agreement with observations.

  12. Surface circulation off Somalia and western equatorial Indian Ocean during summer monsoon of 1988 from Geosat altimeter data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Subrahmanyam, B.; RameshBabu, V.; Murty, V.S.N.; Rao, L.V.G.

    The sea level variability derived from repeating tracks of the Geosat altimeter data during the late phase (August-September) of the summer monsoon of 1988 revealed the presence of multiple meso-scale eddy features with clockwise and anti...

  13. Abundance and relationship of bacteria with transparent exopolymer particles during the 1996 summer monsoon in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, N.; Sarma, V.V.S.S.; Gauns, M.; DileepKumar, M.; Madhupratap, M.

    Bacterial abundance and production, numbers, sizes and concentrations of transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) and total organic carbon (TOC) were measured during the 1996 summer monsoon to understand the relationship between TEP, the most labile...

  14. Long-range forecast of monthly rainfall over India during summer monsoon season using SST in the north Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sadhuram, Y.

    Long-range forecasting of summer monsoon rainfall was reported through linear models by Delsole and Shukla3. They showed that minimum number of predictors are sufficient for accurate forecasts. Recent studies4,5 reported long-range prediction...

  15. Variability of mixed layer depth in the northern Indian Ocean during 1977 and 1979 summer monsoon seasons

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Sadhuram, Y.; RameshBabu, V.

    Influences of wind stress (tau) and wind stress curl (Grad Gamma) on the short term variability of the mixed layer depth at different locations in the northern Indian Ocean during different phases of summer monsoon activity were examined...

  16. Impacts of Himalayas on black carbon over the Tibetan Plateau during summer monsoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shuyu; Tie, Xuexi; Long, Xin; Cao, Junji

    2017-11-15

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) plays important roles in global climate and environment. This study combines in-situ BC measurements in the Himalayas and the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) with a regional dynamical and chemical model (WRF-Chem model) to investigate the effect of the trans-Himalayas on black carbon (BC) from the IGP to the TP during Indian summer monsoon. To determine topographic effects of the trans-Himalayas on BC concentrations over the TP, sensitive experiments were conducted by applying the WRF-Chem model. The results showed that the reduction of the altitude of the Himalayas had an important effect on the trans-Himalayas transport of BC. There was an obvious increase in BC concentration over the trans-Himalayas region, but no significant increase over the TP because the TP (a.m.s.l ~4km) always acted as a wall to prevent BC transport from the IGP to the TP. The trans-Himalayas transport of BC was strongly dependent upon meteorological conditions over the IGP. During summer monsoon, there were three types of cyclones at different locations and one kind of convergent circulation in the IGP. Under the condition of convergent airflows, a strong northeastward wind produced the trans-Himalayas transport of BC. As a result, BC concentrations in the southeastern TP significantly increased to 0.6-0.8μgm(-3). When the cyclone located in the eastern IGP, high BC concentrations over the IGP were transported along the foothill of the Himalayas, resulting in a significant reduction of the trans-Himalayas transport. When the cyclone moved to the west, the dynamical perturbations for the trans-Himalayas transport were weaker than the eastern cyclone, and the trans-Himalayas transport were enhanced in the middle and eastern Himalayas. This study will be helpful to assess the impacts of BC particles emitted from South Asia on regional climate change and ecological environment over the TP in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Generation of near-inertial oscillations by summer monsoon onset over the South China Sea in 1998 and 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Yeqiang; Pan, Jiayi; Wang, Dongxiao; Chen, Gengxin; Sun, Lu; Yao, Jinglong

    2016-12-01

    The summer monsoon onset over the South China Sea (SCS) is an abrupt event in May or early June every year. After the summer monsoon onset in 1998 and 1999, strong near-inertial oscillations (NIOs) in the central SCS were observed with Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP) mooring data. The near-inertial current speed reached 0.25 ms-1, comparable to that induced by tropical storms (TS) in the same area, although the wind speed ( 10 ms-1) of the monsoon onset was much lower than what is typical of TSs. Further analyses suggest that the shallow mixed-layer (speed and direction resulting from the summer monsoon onset were responsible for developing the near-inertial current. The generated NIOs could be enhanced by a warm eddy appearing during the monsoon onset in the central SCS. The strong NIOs appeared in the middle of the SCS in May when the SCS summer monsoon starts to prevail, which implies that the beginning of the SCS summer monsoon may be a vital factor for generation of the strong NIOs in May.

  18. Vertical extension of the Tibetan high of the Asian summer monsoon

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnamurti, T. N.; Biswas, Mrinal K.; Bhaskar Rao, D. V.

    2008-01-01

    We illustrate the vast expanse and the connection of anticyclonic flows of the Tibetan high (at the 200 hPa level) to the pole centred hemispheric North Polar anticyclone at the 10 hPa level during 1988. This feature of clockwise flows appears in the form of a tilted cone that appears to connect the Asian summer monsoon to the 10 hPa high. The anticyclonic flow tapers down to the vortex of the cone near the 400 hPa level. The tropical easterly jet of the Asian summer season is found near 10°N...

  19. The effect of regional changes in anthropogenic aerosols on rainfall of the East Asian Summer Monsoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Guo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The response of East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM precipitation to long term changes in regional anthropogenic aerosols (sulphate and black carbon is explored in an atmospheric general circulation model, the atmospheric component of the UK High-Resolution Global Environment Model v1.2 (HiGAM. Separately, sulphur dioxide (SO2 and black carbon (BC emissions in 1950 and 2000 over East Asia are used to drive model simulations, while emissions are kept constant at year 2000 level outside this region. The response of the EASM is examined by comparing simulations driven by aerosol emissions representative of 1950 and 2000. The aerosol radiative effects are also determined using an off-line radiative transfer model. During June, July and August, the EASM was not significantly changed as either SO2 or BC emissions increased from 1950 to 2000 levels. However, in September, precipitation is significantly decreased by 26.4% for sulphate aerosol and 14.6% for black carbon when emissions are at the 2000 level. Over 80% of the decrease is attributed to changes in convective precipitation. The cooler land surface temperature over China in September (0.8 °C for sulphate and 0.5 °C for black carbon due to increased aerosols reduces the surface thermal contrast that supports the EASM circulation. However, mechanisms causing the surface temperature decrease in September are different between sulphate and BC experiments. In the sulphate experiment, the sulphate direct and the 1st indirect radiative effects contribute to the surface cooling. In the BC experiment, the BC direct effect is the main driver of the surface cooling, however, a decrease in low cloud cover due to the increased heating by BC absorption partially counteracts the direct effect. This results in a weaker land surface temperature response to BC changes than to sulphate changes. The resulting precipitation response is also weaker, and the responses of the monsoon circulation

  20. Detecting human impacts on the flora, fauna, and summer monsoon of Pleistocene Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. H. Miller

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The moisture balance across northern and central Australia is dominated by changes in the strength of the Australian Summer Monsoon. Lake-level records that record changes in monsoon strength on orbital timescales are most consistent with a Northern Hemisphere insolation control on monsoon strength, a result consistent with recent modeling studies. A weak Holocene monsoon relative to monsoon strength 65–60 ka, despite stronger forcing, suggests a changed monsoon regime after 60 ka. Shortly after 60 ka humans colonized Australia and all of Australia's largest mammals became extinct. Between 60 and 40 ka Australian climate was similar to present and not changing rapidly. Consequently, attention has turned toward plausible human mechanisms for the extinction, with proponents for over-hunting, ecosystem change, and introduced disease. To differentiate between these options we utilize isotopic tracers of diet preserved in eggshells of two large, flightless birds to track the status of ecosystems before and after human colonization. More than 800 dated eggshells of the Australian emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae, an opportunistic, dominantly herbivorous feeder, provide a 140-kyr dietary reconstruction that reveals unprecedented reduction in the bird's food resources about 50 ka, coeval in three distant regions. These data suggest a tree/shrub savannah with occasionally rich grasslands was converted abruptly to the modern desert scrub. The diet of the heavier, extinct Genyornis newtoni, derived from >550 dated eggshells, was more restricted than in co-existing Dromaius, implying a more specialized feeding strategy. We suggest that generalist feeders, such as Dromaius, were able to adapt to a changed vegetation regime, whereas more specialized feeders, such as Genyornis, became extinct. We speculate that ecosystem collapse across arid and semi-arid zones was a consequence of systematic burning by early humans

  1. Detecting human impacts on the flora, fauna, and summer monsoon of Pleistocene Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, G. H.; Magee, J. W.; Fogel, M. L.; Gagan, M. K.

    2007-08-01

    The moisture balance across northern and central Australia is dominated by changes in the strength of the Australian Summer Monsoon. Lake-level records that record changes in monsoon strength on orbital timescales are most consistent with a Northern Hemisphere insolation control on monsoon strength, a result consistent with recent modeling studies. A weak Holocene monsoon relative to monsoon strength 65-60 ka, despite stronger forcing, suggests a changed monsoon regime after 60 ka. Shortly after 60 ka humans colonized Australia and all of Australia's largest mammals became extinct. Between 60 and 40 ka Australian climate was similar to present and not changing rapidly. Consequently, attention has turned toward plausible human mechanisms for the extinction, with proponents for over-hunting, ecosystem change, and introduced disease. To differentiate between these options we utilize isotopic tracers of diet preserved in eggshells of two large, flightless birds to track the status of ecosystems before and after human colonization. More than 800 dated eggshells of the Australian emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae), an opportunistic, dominantly herbivorous feeder, provide a 140-kyr dietary reconstruction that reveals unprecedented reduction in the bird's food resources about 50 ka, coeval in three distant regions. These data suggest a tree/shrub savannah with occasionally rich grasslands was converted abruptly to the modern desert scrub. The diet of the heavier, extinct Genyornis newtoni, derived from >550 dated eggshells, was more restricted than in co-existing Dromaius, implying a more specialized feeding strategy. We suggest that generalist feeders, such as Dromaius, were able to adapt to a changed vegetation regime, whereas more specialized feeders, such as Genyornis, became extinct. We speculate that ecosystem collapse across arid and semi-arid zones was a consequence of systematic burning by early humans. We also suggest that altered climate feedbacks linked to changes

  2. Slow and fast annual cycles of the Asian summer monsoon in the NCEP CFSv2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Chul-Su; Huang, Bohua

    2016-07-01

    The climatological Asian summer monsoon (ASM) is decomposed into the slow and fast annual cycles (SAC and FAC). The FAC represents the abrupt onset and breaks phase-locked to the ASM seasonal progression. This study evaluates how well the NCEP Climate Forecast System version 2 (CFSv2) simulates the SAC and FAC over the Indian and East Asia monsoon regions (IMR and EAMR). The simulated SACs are in good agreement with observations in both regions. The FAC also represents the northward propagation in both observations and CFSv2. It is further demonstrated that the FAC is associated with a thermodynamic air-sea interaction. In particular, the different roles played by the wind-evaporation-SST (WES) feedback may account for the faster propagation in the IMR than the EAMR. However, compared with observations, the simulated FAC shows earlier monsoon onset and long-lasting stronger dry and wet phases in the IMR but delayed monsoon onset with weaker and less organized FAC in the EAMR. These reversed behaviors may originate from a warm (cold) SST bias in the IMR (EAMR) in boreal spring and enhanced by an overly sensitive surface evaporation to wind changes in the CFSv2. As a result, the warm spring SST bias in the IMR initiates a strong WES feedback and changes of solar insolation during boreal summer, which leads to a cold SST bias in early fall. On the other hand, the cold spring SST bias in the EAMR accounts for a weaker air-sea coupling, which in turn results in a warm SST bias after the withdrawal of the monsoon.

  3. Speleothem Evidence for Temporal-Spatial Variation in East Asian Summer Monsoon since Medieval Warm Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.-C.; Chu, P. C.; Fan, C. W.

    2012-04-01

    Published annual-to-decadal resolution stalagmite δ18O records since AD 900 from six caves (Dongge, Furong, Heshang, Buddha, Shihua and Wanxiang) in China were analyzed to detect temporal and spatial variability of the East Asian Summer Monsoon strength which strongly affects wet/dry conditions in eastern China. The empirical mode decomposition method (Huang et al., 1998) was used to obtain trends of the six cave records. After the base trend was determined, δ18O anomalies of each record were computed by subtracting the base trend. Mean δ18O anomaly values of the detrended time series for each cave record were calculated for four periods: (1) medieval warm period (MWD, AD 900 - 1250), (2) little ice age phase-1 (LIA-1, AD 1250 -1550), (3) little ice age phase-2 (LIA-2, AD 1550 - 1850), and (4) modern period (MD-1, AD 1850 - 2000). From these anomalies, the temporal and spatial variability of wet/dry conditions has been identified. Positive values of the mean δ18O anomalies indicating drier conditions appeared in lower Yangtze River Drainage Area and Southeast Coast Area during MD-1, LIA-1 and MWD, whereas negative values existed in North, South and Yangtze areas of the eastern China. The results agree with Dryness/Wetness index reconstructed by Chinese historic records in general. These results illustrate that wet and dry conditions in different regions of the eastern China could be opposite under the monsoon influence, so that no single speleothem δ18O record could represent monsoonal climate in this vast region. The climatic patterns in the monsoonal region can either warm/wet (cold/dry) or cold/wet (warm/dry) on annual-to-centennial scales. A 128-yr periodic cycle exists in all six cave records, whereas 64-yr and 42-yr periodicities appear in the Shihua, Heshang and Dongge records. These cycles may reflect the influence of the solar activity on the East Asian Summer Monsoon.

  4. Effects of sulfate aerosol forcing on East Asian summer monsoon for 1985-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minjoong J.; Yeh, Sang-Wook; Park, Rokjin J.

    2016-02-01

    We examine the effect of anthropogenic aerosol forcing on the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) using the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1.1. One control and two sensitivity model experiments were conducted in order to diagnose the separate roles played by sea surface temperature (SST) variations and anthropogenic sulfate aerosol forcing changes in East Asia. We find that the SST variation has been a major driver for the observed weakening of the EASM, whereas the effect of the anthropogenic aerosol forcing has been opposite and has slightly intensified the EASM over the recent decades. The reinforcement of the EASM results from radiative cooling by the sulfate aerosol forcing, which decelerates the jet stream around the jet's exit region. Subsequently, the secondary circulation induced by such a change in the jet stream leads to the increase in precipitation around 18-23°N. This result indicates that the increase in anthropogenic emissions over East Asia may play a role in compensating for the weakening of the EASM caused by the SST forcing.

  5. A prominent pattern of year-to-year variability in Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Vimal; Smoliak, Brian V; Lettenmaier, Dennis P; Wallace, John M

    2012-05-08

    The dominant patterns of Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall (ISMR) and their relationships with the sea surface temperature and 850-hPa wind fields are examined using gridded datasets from 1900 on. The two leading empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) of ISMR over India are used as basis functions for elucidating these relationships. EOF1 is highly correlated with all India rainfall and El Niño-Southern Oscillation indices. EOF2 involves rainfall anomalies of opposing polarity over the Gangetic Plain and peninsular India. The spatial pattern of the trends in ISMR from 1950 on shows drying over the Gangetic Plain projects onto EOF2, with an expansion coefficient that exhibits a pronounced trend during this period. EOF2 is coupled with the dominant pattern of sea surface temperature variability over the Indian Ocean sector, which involves in-phase fluctuations over the Arabian Sea, the Bay of Bengal, and the South China Sea, and it is correlated with the previous winter's El Niño-Southern Oscillation indices. The circulation anomalies observed in association with fluctuations in the time-varying indices of EOF1 and EOF2 both involve distortions of the low-level monsoon flow. EOF1 in its positive polarity represents a southward deflection of moist, westerly monsoon flow from the Arabian Sea across India, resulting in a smaller flux of moisture to the Himalayas. EOF2 in its positive polarity represents a weakening of the monsoon trough over northeastern India and the westerly monsoon flow across southern India, reminiscent of the circulation anomalies observed during break periods within the monsoon season.

  6. Urban heat mitigation by roof surface materials during the East Asian summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungjoon; Ryu, Youngryel; Jiang, Chongya

    2015-12-01

    Roof surface materials, such as green and white roofs, have attracted attention in their role in urban heat mitigation, and various studies have assessed the cooling performance of roof surface materials during hot and sunny summer seasons. However, summers in the East Asian monsoon climate region are characterized by significant fluctuations in weather events, such as dry periods, heatwaves, and rainy and cloudy days. This study investigated the efficacy of different roof surface materials for heat mitigation, considering the temperatures both at and beneath the surface of the roof covering materials during a summer monsoon in Seoul, Korea. We performed continuous observations of temperature at and beneath the surface of the roof covering materials, and manual observation of albedo and the normalized difference vegetation index for a white roof, two green roofs (grass (Poa pratensis) and sedum (Sedum sarmentosum)), and a reference surface. Overall, the surface temperature of the white roof was significantly lower than that of the grass and sedum roofs (1.1 °C and 1.3 °C), whereas the temperature beneath the surface of the white roof did not differ significantly from that of the grass and sedum roofs during the summer. The degree of cloudiness significantly modified the surface temperature of the white roof compared with that of the grass and sedum roofs, which depended on plant metabolisms. It was difficult for the grass to maintain its cooling ability without adequate watering management. After considering the cooling performance and maintenance efforts for different environmental conditions, we concluded that white roof performed better in urban heat mitigation than grass and sedum during the East Asian summer monsoon. Our findings will be useful in urban heat mitigation in the region.

  7. Transport pathways of peroxyacetyl nitrate in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere from different monsoon systems during the summer monsoon season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fadnavis

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Asian summer monsoon involves complex transport patterns with large scale redistribution of trace gases in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS. We employ the global chemistry–climate model ECHAM5-HAMMOZ in order to evaluate the transport pathways and the contributions of nitrogen oxide reservoir species PAN, NOx, and HNO3 from various monsoon regions, to the UTLS over Southern Asia and vice versa. The model is evaluated with trace gas retrievals from the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS-E and aircraft campaigns during the monsoon season (June–September. There are three regions which contribute substantial pollution to the UTLS during the monsoon: the Asian summer monsoon (ASM, the North American Monsoon (NAM and the West African monsoon (WAM. However, penetration due to ASM convection is deeper into the UTLS as compared to NAM and WAM outflow. The circulation in these monsoon regions distributes PAN into the tropical latitude belt in the upper troposphere. Remote transport also occurs in the extratropical upper troposphere where westerly winds drive North American and European pollutants eastward to partly merge with the ASM plume. Strong ASM convection transports these remote and regional pollutants into the lower stratosphere. In the lower stratosphere the injected pollutants are transported westward by easterly winds. The intense convective activity in the monsoon regions is associated with lightning generation and thereby the emission of NOy species. This will affect the distribution of PAN in the UTLS. The estimates of lightning produced PAN, HNO3, NOx and ozone obtained from control and lightning-off simulations shows high percentage changes over the regions of convective transport especially equatorial Africa and America and comparatively less over the ASM. This indicates higher anthropogenic pollution transport from the ASM region into the UTLS.

  8. Asian summer monsoon anomalies induced by aerosol direct forcing: the role of the Tibetan Plateau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, K.M. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Laboratory for Atmospheres, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Kim, M.K. [Kongju National University, Department of Atmospheric Science, Gongju (Korea); Kim, K.M. [Science Systems and Applications, Inc, Lanham, MD (United States)

    2006-06-15

    In this paper we present results of a numerical study using the NASA finite-volume GCM to elucidate a plausible mechanism for aerosol impact on the Asian summer monsoon involving interaction with physical processes over the Tibetan Plateau (TP). During the pre-monsoon season of March-April, dusts from the deserts of western China, Afghanistan/Pakistan, and the Middle East are transported into and stacked up against the northern and southern slopes of the TP. The absorption of solar radiation by dust heats up the elevated surface air over the slopes. On the southern slopes, the atmospheric heating is reinforced by black carbon from local emission. The heated air rises via dry convection, creating a positive temperature anomaly in the mid-to-upper troposphere over the TP relative to the region to the south. In May through early June in a manner akin to an ''elevated heat pump'', the rising hot air forced by the increasing heating in the upper troposphere, draws in warm and moist air over the Indian subcontinent, setting the stage for the onset of the South Asia summer monsoon. Our results suggest that increased dust loading coupled with black carbon emission from local sources in northern India during late spring may lead to an advance of the rainy periods and subsequently an intensification of the Indian summer monsoon. The enhanced rainfall over India is associated with the development of an aerosol-induced large-scale sea level pressure anomaly pattern, which causes the East Asia (Mei-yu) rain belt to shift northwestward, suppressing rainfall over East Asia and the adjacent oceanic regions. (orig.)

  9. Spatio-temporal variability of summer monsoon rainfall over Orissa in relation to low pressure systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Mohapatra; U C Mohanty

    2006-04-01

    The summer monsoon rainfall over Orissa occurs mostly due to low pressure systems (LPS)developing over the Bay of Bengal and moving along the monsoon trough.A study is hence undertaken to find out characteristic features of the relationship between LPS over different regions and rainfall over Orissa during the summer monsoon season (June-September).For this purpose,rainfall and rainy days over 31 selected stations in Orissa and LPS days over Orissa and adjoining land and sea regions during different monsoon months and the season as a whole over a period of 20 years (1980-1999)are analysed.The principal objective of this study is to find out the role of LPS on spatial and temporal variability of summer monsoon rainfall over Orissa. The rainfall has been significantly less than normal over most parts of Orissa except the eastern side of Eastern Ghats during July and hence during the season as a whole due to a significantly less number of LPS days over northwest Bay in July over the period of 1980-1999.The seasonal rainfall shows higher interannual variation (increase in coefficient of variation by about 5%)during 1980-1999 than that during 1901-1990 over most parts of Orissa except northeast Orissa.Most parts of Orissa,especially the region extending from central part of coastal Orissa to western Orissa (central zone)and western side of the Eastern Ghats get more seasonal monsoon rainfall with the development and persistence of LPS over northwest Bay and their subsequent movement and persistence over Orissa.The north Orissa adjoining central zone also gets more seasonal rainfall with development and persistence of LPS over northwest Bay.While the seasonal rainfall over the western side of the Eastern Ghats is adversely affected due to increase in LPS days over west central Bay,Jharkhand and Bangladesh,that over the eastern side of the Eastern Ghats is adversely affected due to increase in LPS days over all the regions to the north of Orissa.There are signi

  10. The Indian summer monsoon rainfall: interplay of coupled dynamics, radiation and cloud microphysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Patra

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR, which has a strong connection to agricultural food production, has been less predictable by conventional models in recent times. Two distinct years 2002 and 2003 with lower and higher July rainfall, respectively, are selected to help understand the natural and anthropogenic influences on ISMR. We show that heating gradients along the meridional monsoon circulation are reduced due to aerosol radiative forcing and the Indian Ocean Dipole in 2002. An increase in the dust and biomass-burning component of the aerosols through the zonal monsoon circulation resulted in reduction of cloud droplet growth in July 2002. These conditions were opposite to those in July 2003 which led to an above average ISMR. In this study, we have utilized NCEP/NCAR reanalyses for meteorological data (e.g. sea-surface temperature, horizontal winds, and precipitable water, NOAA interpolated outgoing long-wave radiation, IITM constructed all-India rainfall amounts, aerosol parameters as observed from the TOMS and MODIS satellites, and ATSR fire count maps. Based on this analysis, we suggest that monsoon rainfall prediction models should include synoptic as well as interannual variability in both atmospheric dynamics and chemical composition.

  11. The Indian summer monsoon rainfall: interplay of coupled dynamics, radiation and cloud microphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, P. K.; Behera, S. K.; Herman, J. R.; Maksyutov, S.; Akimoto, H.; Yamagata, Y.

    2005-08-01

    The Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR), which has a strong connection to agricultural food production, has been less predictable by conventional models in recent times. Two distinct years 2002 and 2003 with lower and higher July rainfall, respectively, are selected to help understand the natural and anthropogenic influences on ISMR. We show that heating gradients along the meridional monsoon circulation are reduced due to aerosol radiative forcing and the Indian Ocean Dipole in 2002. An increase in the dust and biomass-burning component of the aerosols through the zonal monsoon circulation resulted in reduction of cloud droplet growth in July 2002. These conditions were opposite to those in July 2003 which led to an above average ISMR. In this study, we have utilized NCEP/NCAR reanalyses for meteorological data (e.g. sea-surface temperature, horizontal winds, and precipitable water), NOAA interpolated outgoing long-wave radiation, IITM constructed all-India rainfall amounts, aerosol parameters as observed from the TOMS and MODIS satellites, and ATSR fire count maps. Based on this analysis, we suggest that monsoon rainfall prediction models should include synoptic as well as interannual variability in both atmospheric dynamics and chemical composition.

  12. All India summer monsoon rainfall prediction using an artificial neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahai, A.K.; Soman, M.K.; Satyan, V. [Indian Inst. of Tropical Meteorol., Pune (India). Climate and Global Modelling Div.

    2000-04-01

    The prediction of Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR) on a seasonal time scales has been attempted by various research groups using different techniques including artificial neural networks. The prediction of ISMR on monthly and seasonal time scales is not only scientifically challenging but is also important for planning and devising agricultural strategies. This article describes the artificial neural network (ANN) technique with error- back-propagation algorithm to provide prediction (hindcast) of ISMR on monthly and seasonal time scales. The ANN technique is applied to the five time series of June, July, August, September monthly means and seasonal mean (June+July+August+September) rainfall from 1871 to 1994 based on Parthasarathy data set. The previous five years values from all the five time-series were used to train the ANN to predict for the next year. The details of the models used are discussed. Various statistics are calculated to examine the performance of the models and it is found that the models could be used as a forecasting tool on seasonal and monthly time scales. It is observed by various researchers that with the passage of time the relationships between various predictors and Indian monsoon are changing, leading to changes in monsoon predictability. This issue is discussed and it is found that the monsoon system inherently has a decadal scale variation in predictability. (orig.)

  13. Observed changes in extreme wet and dry spells during the South Asian summer monsoon season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Deepti; Tsiang, Michael; Rajaratnam, Bala; Diffenbaugh, Noah S.

    2014-06-01

    The South Asian summer monsoon directly affects the lives of more than 1/6th of the world's population. There is substantial variability within the monsoon season, including fluctuations between periods of heavy rainfall (wet spells) and low rainfall (dry spells). These fluctuations can cause extreme wet and dry regional conditions that adversely impact agricultural yields, water resources, infrastructure and human systems. Through a comprehensive statistical analysis of precipitation observations (1951-2011), we show that statistically significant decreases in peak-season precipitation over the core-monsoon region have co-occurred with statistically significant increases in daily-scale precipitation variability. Further, we find statistically significant increases in the frequency of dry spells and intensity of wet spells, and statistically significant decreases in the intensity of dry spells. These changes in extreme wet and dry spell characteristics are supported by increases in convective available potential energy and low-level moisture convergence, along with changes to the large-scale circulation aloft in the atmosphere. The observed changes in wet and dry extremes during the monsoon season are relevant for managing climate-related risks, with particular relevance for water resources, agriculture, disaster preparedness and infrastructure planning.

  14. Future projection of mean and variability of the Asian Summer Monsoon and Indian Ocean Climate systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annamalai, H [IPRC, University of Hawaii

    2014-09-15

    The overall goal of this project is to assess the ability of the CMIP3/5 models to simulate the Indian-Ocean monsoon systems. The PI along with post-docs investigated research issues ranging from synoptic systems to long-term trends over the Asian monsoon region. The PI applied diagnostic tools such as moist static energy (MSE) to isolate: the moist and radiative processes responsible for extended monsoon breaks over South Asia, precursors in the ENSO-monsoon association, reasons for the drying tendency over South Asia and the possible effect on tropical Indian Ocean climate anomalies influencing certain aspects of ENSO characteristics. By diagnosing various observations and coupled model simulations, we developed working hypothesis and tested them by carrying out sensitivity experiments with both linear and nonlinear models. Possible physical and dynamical reasons for model sensitivities were deduced. On the teleconnection front, the ability of CMIP5 models in representing the monsoon-desert mechanism was examined recently. Further more, we have applied a suite of diagnostics and have performed an in depth analysis on CMIP5 integrations to isolate the possible reasons for the ENSO-monsoon linkage or lack thereof. The PI has collaborated with Dr. K.R. Sperber of PCMDI and other CLIVAR Asian-Australian monsoon panel members in understanding the ability of CMIP3/5 models in capturing monsoon and its spectrum of variability. The objective and process-based diagnostics aided in selecting models that best represent the present-day monsoon and its variability that are then employed for future projections. Two major highlights were an invitation to write a review on present understanding monsoons in a changing climate in Nature Climate Change, and identification of an east-west shift in observed monsoon rainfall (more rainfall over tropical western Pacific and drying tendency over South Asia) in the last six decades and attributing that shift to SST rise over the tropical

  15. A STUDY ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SPRING SOIL MOISTURE OVER CHINA AND EAST ASIA SUMMER MONSOON

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LE Yi-long; LUO Yong; GUO Pin-wen

    2008-01-01

    The correlation analysis has been used to study the relationship between spring soil moisture over China and East Asian summer monsoon (EASM). It is shown that EASM has a strong positive correlation with spring soil moisture over southwest China and the Great Bend region of the Yellow River. A standard soil moisture index (SMI) has been defined using the observed soil moisture of the two regions. The results show that SMI has a strong correlation with EASM. The years of strong (weak) SMI are associated with stronger (weaker) summer monsoon circulation. In the years of strong SMI, the west Pacific subtropical high is much northward in position and weaker in intensity; the westerlies zone is also more to the north. All of these make EASM circulation move northward and cause the rainfall belt to relocate to North China and Northeast China. SMI can reflect the variation of the summer rainfall anomaly over eastern China. In the years of strong SMI, the rainfall belt is mainly located over the northem part of China.However, during the weak years, the summer rainfall belt is largely located over the mid- and lower- reaches of the Yangtze River. Additionally, the SMI has obvious oscillations of quasi 4-6 years and quasi 2 years. Moreover, negative SMI predicts EASM better than positive SMI.

  16. Wetting and greening Tibetan Plateau in early summer since the late 1970s due to advanced Asian summer monsoon onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenxia; Zhou, Tianjun; Zhang, Lixia

    2016-04-01

    Known as the "the world water tower", the Tibetan Plateau (TP) is the origin of the ten largest rivers in Asia, breeding more than 1.4 billion people, and exerts substantial influences on water resources, agriculture, and ecosystems in downstream countries. This region is one of the most susceptible areas around the world to changing climate due to the high elevation. Observed evidence have shown significant climate changes over the TP, including surface air warming and moistening, glaciers shrinking, winds stilling, solar dimming, and atmospheric heat source weakening. However, as an essential part of the hydrological cycle, precipitation changes on the TP remain an ambiguous picture. Changes in precipitation vary largely with different seasons, time periods and climate zones considered. This study shows a robust increase in precipitation amount over the TP in May, when the rainy season starts, over the period 1979-2014 (31% relative to the climatology). The wetting trend is spatially consistent over the south-eastern TP, to which both precipitation frequency and intensity contribute. Circulation trends show that the wetting TP in May is resulted from the advanced onset of Asian summer monsoon, which onsets 1~2 pentads earlier since 1979. It intensified water vapor transport from the Bay of Bengal (BOB) to south of the TP in May and local anomalous convection. This relationship is further validated by the significant correlation coefficient (0.47) between the onset dates of Asian summer monsoon (particularly the BOB summer monsoon, 0.68) and precipitation over the south-eastern TP in May. The wetting TP in May has further exerted profound impacts on the hydrological cycle and ecosystem, such as moistening the soil and animating vegetation activities throughout early summer. Both decadal variations of soil moisture (from May to June) and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) (from May to July) coincide well with that of precipitation over the south

  17. Investigating the Dominant Source for the Generation of Gravity Waves during Indian Summer Monsoon Using Ground-based Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Debashis NATH; CHEN Wen

    2013-01-01

    Over the tropics,convection,wind shear (i.e.,vertical and horizontal shear of wind and/or geostrophic adjustment comprising spontaneous imbalance in jet streams) and topography are the major sources for the generation of gravity waves.During the summer monsoon season (June-August) over the Indian subcontinent,convection and wind shear coexist.To determine the dominant source of gravity waves during monsoon season,an experiment was conducted using mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radar situated at Gadanki (13.5°N,79.2°E),a tropical observatory in the southern part of the Indian subcontinent.MST radar was operated continuously for 72 h to capture high-frequency gravity waves.During this time,a radiosonde was released every 6 h in addition to the regular launch (once daily to study low-frequency gravity waves) throughout the season.These two data sets were utilized effectively to characterize the jet stream and the associated gravity waves.Data available from collocated instruments along with satellite-based brightness temperature (TBB) data were utilized to characterize the convection in and around Gadanki,Despite the presence of two major sources of gravity wave generation (i.e.,convection and wind shear) during the monsoon season,wind shear (both vertical shear and geostrophic adjustment) contributed the most to the generation of gravity waves on various scales.

  18. Impact of GCM boundary forcing on regional climate modeling of West African summer monsoon precipitation and circulation features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebe, Ibourahima; Sylla, Mouhamadou Bamba; Omotosho, Jerome Adebayo; Nikiema, Pinghouinde Michel; Gibba, Peter; Giorgi, Filippo

    2017-03-01

    In this study, the latest version of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics Regional Climate Model (RegCM4) driven by three CMIP5 Global Climate Models (GCMs) is used at 25 km grid spacing over West Africa to investigate the impact of lateral boundary forcings on the simulation of monsoon precipitation and its relationship with regional circulation features. We find that the RegCM4 experiments along with their multimodel ensemble generally reproduce the location of the main precipitation characteristics over the region and improve upon the corresponding driving GCMs. However, the provision of different forcing boundary conditions leads to substantially different precipitation magnitudes and spatial patterns. For instance, while RegCM4 nested within GFDL-ESM-2M and HadGEM2-ES exhibits some underestimations of precipitation and an excessively narrow Intertropical Convergence Zone, the MPI-ESM-MR driven run produces precipitation spatial distribution and magnitudes more similar to observations. Such a superior performance originates from a much better simulation of the interactions between baroclinicity, temperature gradient and African Easterly Jet along with an improved connection between the Isentropic Potential Vorticity, its gradient and the African Easterly Waves dynamics. We conclude that a good performing GCM in terms of monsoon dynamical features (in this case MPI-ESM-MR) is needed to drive RCMs in order to achieve a better representation of the West Africa summer monsoon precipitation.

  19. Has influence of extratropical waves in modulating Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR) increased?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Srivastava; Somenath Dutta; S R Kshirsagar; Kavita Srivastava

    2014-04-01

    In the paper, influence of extratropical circulation features on Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall (ISMR) is examined. Energetics of extra tropics, north of Indian subcontinent for deficient and nondeficient ISMR years, during two periods 1951–1978 and 1979–2005, are calculated and critically analyzed. It is observed that for the period 1951–1978, only two out of the 10 energetic parameters, viz., the zonal available potential energy (high) and conversion of zonal available potential with kinetic energy to eddy kinetic energy (low) differed significantly in JJA months of the deficient years from that of the nondeficient years. However, during the 1979–2005 period, as many as six out of the 10 energetic parameters, viz., eddy available potential energy, zonal available potential energy, eddy kinetic energy, generation of zonal available potential energy, conversion of zonal available potential energy to zonal kinetic energy and conversion of zonal kinetic energy to eddy kinetic energy differed significantly in JJA months of the deficient years from that of the nondeficient years. These results confirm growing influence of the transient stationary waves in deficient years after the climate shift year, 1979. Analysis of energetic parameters of the pre-monsoon season of the two periods also reveals similar results. This suggests that forcings apparently responsible for energetics in JJA months of the deficient years of the later period were present even before the advent of Indian summer monsoon season.

  20. Upper tropospheric CH4 and CO affected by the Indian summer monsoon during OMO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsche, Laura; Pozzer, Andrea; Zimmermann, Peter; Parchatka, Uwe; Lelieveld, Jos; Fischer, Horst

    2017-04-01

    The trace gas transport through the Indian summer monsoon convection was investigated as part of the aircraft campaign OMO (Oxidation Mechanism Observations) using the German research aircraft HALO (High Altitude and Long Range Research Aircraft) in July/August 2015. HALO was operated alternatively from Cyprus and the Maldives. Flights took place over the Mediterranean Sea, the Arabian Peninsula and the Arabian Sea. Here we investigate the distribution of carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH4) in the upper troposphere, measured in-situ with the IR-laser absorption spectrometer TRISTAR. During OMO enhanced concentrations of CH4 and CO were detected in the Asian Summer monsoon anticyclone at altitudes between 11 km and 15 km. Mixing ratios exceeded background levels for CO and CH4 by 10-15 ppb and 30-40 ppb, respectively. The enhancement in the CO concentration appears to be within the range of tropospheric variability, while the methane enhancement is much higher than its natural variability. Therefore CH4 is found to be a very good tracer for air masses influenced by the monsoon. This is confirmed by back trajectory calculations with FLEXPART, indicating convective transport from India approximately 10 days before the observations. A comparison of observations with EMAC atmospheric chemistry - climate model simulations generally agree within ± 10% and ± 0.5% for CO and CH4, respectively.

  1. Influence of air-sea fluxes on atmospheric aerosols during summer monsoon in the Indian Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavarsky, Alex; Booge, Dennis; Fiehn, Alina; Krüger, Kirstin; Atlas, Elliot; Marandino, Christa

    2017-04-01

    The local influence of air-sea trace gas fluxes on atmospheric aerosols in the remote marine boundary layer (MBL) is still heavily disputed. During summer monsoon, the western tropical Indian Ocean is predicted to be a hotspot for dimethylsulfide (DMS) emissions, the major marine sulfur source to the atmosphere and an important aerosol precursor. Other aerosol relevant fluxes, such as isoprene and sea salt fluxes, should also be enhanced, due to the steady strong winds during the monsoon. In addition, maritime air masses dominate the area during the summer monsoon, excluding the influence of continentally derived pollutants. During the 234-2/235 cruise in the western tropical Indian Ocean from July-August, 2014, directly measured eddy covariance DMS fluxes confirm that the area is a large source of sulfur to the atmosphere (8.4 μmolm-2d-1). The directly measured fluxes, as well as computed isoprene and sea salt fluxes, were combined with FLEXPART back- and forward trajectories to track the emissions in space and time. The fluxes correlate with satellite aerosol products from MODIS-TERRA and Suomi-NPP, showing significant values from 0.42 to 0.62. The maximum correlations were found between 3 and 10 hours after emission, reflecting reasonable timing for atmospheric transformations and indicating a local influence of marine emissions on atmospheric aerosol properties.

  2. EAST ASIA SUMMER MONSOON ONSET DATE CALCULATED FROM OBSERVED, REANALYZED AND COMBINED DAILY RAINFALL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, the East Asia summer monsoon onset date lines in East China are calculated by the definition similar to the traditional one, with the ECMWF reanalyzed 850 hPa daily wind and observed, reanalyzed and combined daily rainfall during 1980 ~ 1993. To make the onset date line as close as possible to the previous work, the earliest onset date limits have to be applied for the regions with different latitude and the daily mean datasets have to be smoothed by space before calculation, therefore their space-resolution is reduced to about 3° longitude ×1° latitude. The results show that the multiyear mean summer monsoon onset date lines are quite similar to each other. Compared with the one from the reanalysis, the 14-year average onset date line form combination is obviously improved in the southern Sichuan Basin and the correlation between observed and combined onset date is also slightly higher over the Huaihe valley and Northeast China. Since daily rainfall combination also improved the long term daily mean and standard deviation through the pentad CMAP, if no better daily dataset is available, such a kind of daily rainfall combination can be used to get reasonable result in the Indian monsoon region without sufficient observatories or over the North Pacific without any ground observation at all in future study.

  3. Summer monsoon intraseasonal oscillation over eastern Arabian Sea – as revealed by TRMM microwave imager products

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S H Rahman; B Simon

    2006-10-01

    The time evolution of atmospheric parameters on intraseasonal time scale in the eastern Arabian Sea (EAS) is studied during the summer monsoon seasons of 1998–2003 using Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Microwave Imager (TMI) data. This is done using the spectral and wavelet analysis. Analysis shows that over EAS, total precipitable water vapour (TWV) and sea surface wind speed (SWS) have a periodicity of 8–15 days, 15–30 days and 30–60 days during the monsoon season. Significant power is seen in the 8–15-day time scale in TWV during onset and retreat of the summer monsoon. Analysis indicates that the timings of the intensification of 8–15, 15–30, and 30–60 days oscillations have a profound effect on the evolution of the daily rainfall over west coast of India. The positive and negative phases of these oscillations are directly related to the active and dry spells of rainfall along the west coast of India. The spectral analysis shows interannual variation of TWV and SWS. Heavy rainfall events generally occur over the west coast of India when positive phases of both 30–60 days and 15–30 days modes of TWV and SWS are simultaneously present.

  4. Drought variability at the northern fringe of the Asian summer monsoon region over the past millennia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bao; Kang, Shuyuan; Ljungqvist, Fredrik Charpentier; He, Minhui; Zhao, Yan; Qin, Chun

    2014-08-01

    The northern fringe of the Asian summer monsoon region (NASM) in China refers to the most northwestern extent of the Asian summer monsoon. Understanding the characteristics and underlying mechanisms of drought variability at long and short time-scales in the NASM region is of great importance, because present and future water shortages are of great concern. Here, we used newly developed and existing tree-ring, historical documentary and instrumental data available for the region to identify spatial and temporal patterns, and possible mechanisms of drought variability, over the past two millennia. We found that drought variations were roughly consistent in the western (the Qilian Mountains and Hexi Corridor) and eastern (the Great Bend of the Yellow River, referred to as GBYR) parts of the NASM on decadal to centennial timescales. We also identified the spatial extent of typical multi-decadal GBYR drought events based on historical dryness/wetness data and the Monsoon Asia Drought Atlas. It was found that the two periods of drought, in AD 1625-1644 and 1975-1999, exhibited similar patterns: specifically, a wet west and a dry east in the NASM. Spatial characteristics of wetness and dryness were also broadly similar over these two periods, such that when drought occurred in the Karakoram Mountains, western Tianshan Mountains, the Pamirs, Mongolia, most of East Asia, the eastern Himalayas and Southeast Asia, a wet climate dominated in most parts of the Indian subcontinent. We suggest that the warm temperature anomalies in the tropical Pacific might have been mainly responsible for the recent 1975-1999 drought. Possible causes of the drought of 1625-1644 were the combined effects of the weakened Asian summer monsoon and an associated southward shift of the Pacific Intertropical Convergence Zone. These changes occurred due to a combination of Tibetan Plateau cooling together with more general Northern Hemisphere cooling, rather than being solely due to changes in the sea

  5. South Asian Summer Monsoon and Its Relationship with ENSO in the IPCC AR4 Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annamalai, H; Hamilton, K; Sperber, K R

    2005-09-07

    In this paper we use the extensive integrations produced for the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) to examine the relationship between ENSO and the monsoon at interannual and decadal timescales. We begin with an analysis of the monsoon simulation in the 20th century integrations. Six of the 18 models were found to have a reasonably realistic representation of monsoon precipitation climatology. For each of these six models SST and anomalous precipitation evolution along the equatorial Pacific during El Nino events display considerable differences when compared to observations. Out of these six models only four (GFDL{_}CM{_}2.0, GFDL{_}CM{_}2.1, MRI, and MPI{_}ECHAM5) exhibit a robust ENSO-monsoon contemporaneous teleconnection, including the known inverse relationship between ENSO and rainfall variations over India. Lagged correlations between the all-India rainfall (AIR) index and Nino3.4 SST reveal that three models represent the timing of the teleconnection, including the spring predictability barrier which is manifested as the transition from positive to negative correlations prior to the monsoon onset. Furthermore, only one of these three models (GFDL{_}CM{_}2.1) captures the observed phase lag with the strongest anticorrelation of SST peaking 2-3 months after the summer monsoon, which is partially attributable to the intensity of simulated El Nino itself. We find that the models that best capture the ENSO-monsoon teleconnection are those that correctly simulate the timing and location of SST and diabatic heating anomalies in the equatorial Pacific, and the associated changes to the equatorial Walker Circulation during El Nino events. The strength of the AIR-Nino3.4 SST correlation in the model runs waxes and wanes to some degree on decadal timescales. The overall magnitude and timescale for this decadal modulation in most of the models is similar to that seen in observations. However, there is little consistency in the phase among the realizations

  6. Theoretical aspects of the onset of Indian Summer Monsoon from perturbed orography simulations in a GCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, A. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Meteorology; Nanjundiah, R.S.; Srinivasan, J. [Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (India). Centre for Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

    2006-07-01

    A theory is proposed to determine the onset of the Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) in an Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM). The onset of ISM is delayed substantially in the absence of global orography. The impact of orography over different parts of the Earth on the onset of ISM has also been investigated using five additional perturbed simulations. The large difference in the date of onset of ISM in these simulations has been explained by a new theory based on the Surface Moist Static Energy (SMSE) and vertical velocity at the mid-troposphere. It is found that onset occurs only after SMSE crosses a threshold value and the large-scale vertical motion in the middle troposphere becomes upward. This study shows that both dynamics and thermodynamics play profound roles in the onset of the monsoon. (orig.)

  7. Prediction model for peninsular Indian summer monsoon rainfall using data mining and statistical approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vathsala, H.; Koolagudi, Shashidhar G.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a data mining application for predicting peninsular Indian summer monsoon rainfall, and propose an algorithm that combine data mining and statistical techniques. We select likely predictors based on association rules that have the highest confidence levels. We then cluster the selected predictors to reduce their dimensions and use cluster membership values for classification. We derive the predictors from local conditions in southern India, including mean sea level pressure, wind speed, and maximum and minimum temperatures. The global condition variables include southern oscillation and Indian Ocean dipole conditions. The algorithm predicts rainfall in five categories: Flood, Excess, Normal, Deficit and Drought. We use closed itemset mining, cluster membership calculations and a multilayer perceptron function in the algorithm to predict monsoon rainfall in peninsular India. Using Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology data, we found the prediction accuracy of our proposed approach to be exceptionally good.

  8. Transport pathways of peroxyacetyl nitrate in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere from different monsoon systems during the summer monsoon season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fadnavis

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Asian summer monsoon involves complex transport patterns with large scale redistribution of trace gases in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS. We employ the global chemistry-climate model ECHAM5-HAMMOZ in order to evaluate the transport pathways and the contributions of nitrogen oxide species PAN, NOx, and HNO3 from various monsoon regions, to the UTLS over Southern Asia and vice versa. Simulated long term seasonal mean mixing ratios are compared with trace gas retrievals from the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding aboard ENVISAT(MIPAS-E and aircraft campaigns during the monsoon season (June–September in order to evaluate the model's ability to reproduce these transport patterns. The model simulations show that there are three regions which contribute substantial pollution to the South Asian UTLS: the Asian summer monsoon (ASM, the North American Monsoon (NAM and the West African monsoon (WAM. However, penetration due to ASM convection reaches deeper into the UTLS as compared to NAM and WAM outflow. The circulation in all three monsoon regions distributes PAN into the tropical latitude belt in the upper troposphere. Remote transport also occurs in the extratropical upper troposphere where westerly winds drive North American and European pollutants eastward where they can become part of the ASM convection and be lifted into the lower stratosphere. In the lower stratosphere the injected pollutants are transported westward by easterly winds. The intense convective activity in the monsoon regions is associated with lightning and thereby the formation of additional NOx. This also affects the distribution of PAN in the UTLS. According to sensitivity simulations with and without lightning, increase in concentrations of PAN (~ 40%, HNO3 (75%, NOx (70% and ozone (30% over the regions of convective transport, especially over equatorial Africa and America and comparatively less over the ASM. This indicates that

  9. Consistent response of Indian summer monsoon to Middle East dust in observations and simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Q.

    2015-09-02

    © Author(s) 2015. The response of the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) circulation and precipitation to Middle East dust aerosols on sub-seasonal timescales is studied using observations and the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with online chemistry (WRF-Chem). Satellite data show that the ISM rainfall in coastal southwest India, central and northern India, and Pakistan is closely associated with the Middle East dust aerosols. The physical mechanism behind this dust-ISM rainfall connection is examined through ensemble simulations with and without dust emissions. Each ensemble includes 16 members with various physical and chemical schemes to consider the model uncertainties in parameterizing short-wave radiation, the planetary boundary layer, and aerosol chemical mixing rules. Experiments show that dust aerosols increase rainfall by about 0.44 mm day-1 (∼10 % of the climatology) in coastal southwest India, central and northern India, and north Pakistan, a pattern consistent with the observed relationship. The ensemble mean rainfall response over India shows a much stronger spatial correlation with the observed rainfall response than any other ensemble members. The largest modeling uncertainties are from the boundary layer schemes, followed by short-wave radiation schemes. In WRF-Chem, the dust aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the Middle East shows the strongest correlation with the ISM rainfall response when dust AOD leads rainfall response by about 11 days. Further analyses show that increased ISM rainfall is related to enhanced southwesterly monsoon flow and moisture transport from the Arabian Sea to the Indian subcontinent, which are associated with the development of an anomalous low-pressure system over the Arabian Sea, the southern Arabian Peninsula, and the Iranian Plateau due to dust-induced heating in the troposphere. The dust-induced heating in the mid-upper troposphere is mainly located in the Iranian Plateau rather than the Tibetan

  10. Consistent response of Indian summer monsoon to Middle East dust in observations and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Q.; Wei, J.; Yang, Z.-L.; Pu, B.; Huang, J.

    2015-09-01

    The response of the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) circulation and precipitation to Middle East dust aerosols on sub-seasonal timescales is studied using observations and the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with online chemistry (WRF-Chem). Satellite data show that the ISM rainfall in coastal southwest India, central and northern India, and Pakistan is closely associated with the Middle East dust aerosols. The physical mechanism behind this dust-ISM rainfall connection is examined through ensemble simulations with and without dust emissions. Each ensemble includes 16 members with various physical and chemical schemes to consider the model uncertainties in parameterizing short-wave radiation, the planetary boundary layer, and aerosol chemical mixing rules. Experiments show that dust aerosols increase rainfall by about 0.44 mm day-1 (~10 % of the climatology) in coastal southwest India, central and northern India, and north Pakistan, a pattern consistent with the observed relationship. The ensemble mean rainfall response over India shows a much stronger spatial correlation with the observed rainfall response than any other ensemble members. The largest modeling uncertainties are from the boundary layer schemes, followed by short-wave radiation schemes. In WRF-Chem, the dust aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the Middle East shows the strongest correlation with the ISM rainfall response when dust AOD leads rainfall response by about 11 days. Further analyses show that increased ISM rainfall is related to enhanced southwesterly monsoon flow and moisture transport from the Arabian Sea to the Indian subcontinent, which are associated with the development of an anomalous low-pressure system over the Arabian Sea, the southern Arabian Peninsula, and the Iranian Plateau due to dust-induced heating in the troposphere. The dust-induced heating in the mid-upper troposphere is mainly located in the Iranian Plateau rather than the Tibetan Plateau. This study

  11. Consistent response of Indian summer monsoon to Middle East dust in observations and simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Q.

    2015-06-11

    The response of the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) circulation and precipitation to Middle East dust aerosols on sub-seasonal timescales is studied using observations and the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with online chemistry (WRF-Chem). Satellite data show that the ISM rainfall in coastal southwest India, central and northern India, and Pakistan is closely associated with the Middle East dust aerosols. The physical mechanism behind this dust–ISM rainfall connection is examined through ensemble simulations with and without dust emissions. Each ensemble includes 16 members with various physical and chemical schemes to consider the model uncertainties in parameterizing short-wave radiation, the planetary boundary layer, and aerosol chemical mixing rules. Experiments show that dust aerosols increase rainfall by about 0.44mmday1 ( 10% of the climatology) in coastal southwest India, central and northern India, and north Pakistan, a pattern consistent with the observed relationship. The ensemble mean rainfall response over India shows a much stronger spatial correlation with the observed rainfall response than any other ensemble members. The largest modeling uncertainties are from the boundary layer schemes, followed by short-wave radiation schemes. In WRF-Chem, the dust aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the Middle East shows the strongest correlation with the ISM rainfall response when dust AOD leads rainfall response by about 11 days. Further analyses show that increased ISM rainfall is related to enhanced southwesterly monsoon flow and moisture transport from the Arabian Sea to the Indian subcontinent, which are associated with the development of an anomalous low-pressure system over the Arabian Sea, the southern Arabian Peninsula, and the Iranian Plateau due to dust-induced heating in the troposphere. The dust-induced heating in the mid-upper troposphere is mainly located in the Iranian Plateau rather than the Tibetan Plateau. This study demonstrates

  12. Impact of the Desert dust on the summer monsoon system over Southwestern North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Zhao

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The radiative forcing of dust emitted from the Southwest United States (US deserts and its impact on monsoon circulation and precipitation over the North America monsoon (NAM region are simulated using a coupled meteorology and aerosol/chemistry model (WRF-Chem for 15 years (1995–2009. During the monsoon season, dust has a cooling effect (−0.90 W m−2 at the surface, a warming effect (0.40 W m−2 in the atmosphere, and a negative top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA forcing (−0.50 W m−2 over the deserts on 24-h average. Most of the dust emitted from the deserts concentrates below 800 hPa and accumulates over the western slope of the Rocky Mountains and Mexican Plateau. The absorption of shortwave radiation by dust heats the lower atmosphere by up to 0.5 K day−1 over the western slope of the Mountains. Model sensitivity simulations with and without dust for 15 summers (June-July-August show that dust heating of the lower atmosphere over the deserts strengthens the low-level southerly moisture fluxes on both sides of the Sierra Madre Occidental. It also results in an eastward migration of NAM-driven moisture convergence over the western slope of the Mountains. These monsoonal circulation changes lead to a statistically significant increase of precipitation by up to ~40 % over the eastern slope of the Mountains (Arizona-New~Mexico-Texas regions. This study highlights the interaction between dust and the NAM system and motivates further investigation of possible dust feedback on monsoon precipitation under climate change and the mega-drought conditions projected for the future.

  13. The East Asian Summer Monsoon at mid-Holocene: results from PMIP3 simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Zheng

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Ten Coupled General Circulation Models (CGCMs participated in the third phase of Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project (PMIP3 are assessed for the East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM in both the pre-Industrial (PI, 0 ka and mid-Holocene (MH, 6 ka simulations. Results show that the PMIP3 model median captures well the large-scale characteristics of the EASM, including the two distinct features of the Meiyu rainbelt and the stepwise meridional displacement of the monsoonal rainbelt. At mid-Holocene, the PMIP3 model median shows significant warming (cooling during boreal summer (winter over Eurasia continent that are dominated by the changes of insolation. However, the PMIP3 models fail to simulate a warmer annual mean and winter surface air temperature (TAS over eastern China as derived from proxy records. The EASM at MH are featured by the changes of large-scale circulation over Eastern China while the changes of precipitation are not significant over its sub-domains of the Southern China and the lower reaches of Yangzi River. The inter-model differences for the monsoon precipitation can be associated with different configurations of the changes in large-scale circulation and the water vapour content, of which the former determines the sign of precipitation changes. The large model spread for the TAS over Tibetan Plateau has a positive relationship with the precipitation in the lower reaches of Yangzi River, yet this relationship does not apply to those PMIP3 models in which the monsoonal precipitation is more sensitive to the changes of large-scale circulation. Except that the PMIP3 model median captured the warming of annual mean TAS over Tibetan Plateau, no significant improvements can be concluded when compared with the PMIP2 models results.

  14. Amplification of ENSO effects on Indian summer monsoon by absorbing aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Maeng-Ki; Lau, William K. M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Sang, Jeong; Kim, Yeon-Hee; Lee, Woo-Seop

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we present observational evidence, based on satellite aerosol measurements and MERRA reanalysis data for the period 1979-2011, indicating that absorbing aerosols can have strong influence on seasonal-to-interannual variability of the Indian summer monsoon rainfall, including amplification of ENSO effects. We find a significant correlation between ENSO (El Nino Southern Oscillation) and aerosol loading in April-May, with La Nina (El Nino) conditions favoring increased (decreased) aerosol accumulation over northern India, with maximum aerosol optical depth over the Arabian Sea and Northwestern India, indicative of strong concentration of dust aerosols transported from West Asia and Middle East deserts. Composite analyses based on a normalized aerosol index (NAI) show that high concentration of aerosol over northern India in April-May is associated with increased moisture transport, enhanced dynamically induced warming of the upper troposphere over the Tibetan Plateau, and enhanced rainfall over northern India and the Himalayan foothills during May-June, followed by a subsequent suppressed monsoon rainfall over all India, consistent with the elevated heat pump (EHP) hypothesis (Lau et al. in Clim Dyn 26:855-864, 2006. doi: 10.1007/s00382-006-0114-z). Further analyses from sub-sampling of ENSO years, with normal (1-σ) NAI over northern India respectively show that the EHP may lead to an amplification of the Indian summer monsoon response to ENSO forcing, particularly with respect to the increased rainfall over the Himalayan foothills, and the warming of the upper troposphere over the Tibetan Plateau. Our results suggest that absorbing aerosol, particular desert dusts can strongly modulate ENSO influence, and possibly play important roles as a feedback agent in climate change in Asian monsoon regions.

  15. Detailed Analysis of Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall Processes with Modern/High-Quality Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Eric A.; Kuo, Kwo-Sen; Mehta, Amita V.; Yang, Song

    2007-01-01

    We examine, in detail, Indian Summer Monsoon rainfall processes using modernhigh quality satellite precipitation measurements. The focus here is on measurements derived from three NASA cloud and precipitation satellite missionslinstruments (TRMM/PR&TMI, AQUNAMSRE, and CLOUDSATICPR), and a fourth TRMM Project-generated multi-satellite precipitation measurement dataset (viz., TRMM standard algorithm 3b42) -- all from a period beginning in 1998 up to the present. It is emphasized that the 3b42 algorithm blends passive microwave (PMW) radiometer-based precipitation estimates from LEO satellites with infi-ared (IR) precipitation estimates from a world network of CEO satellites (representing -15% of the complete space-time coverage) All of these observations are first cross-calibrated to precipitation estimates taken from standard TRMM combined PR-TMI algorithm 2b31, and second adjusted at the large scale based on monthly-averaged rain-gage measurements. The blended approach takes advantage of direct estimates of precipitation from the PMW radiometerequipped LEO satellites -- but which suffer fi-om sampling limitations -- in combination with less accurate IR estimates from the optical-infrared imaging cameras on GEO satellites -- but which provide continuous diurnal sampling. The advantages of the current technologies are evident in the continuity and coverage properties inherent to the resultant precipitation datasets that have been an outgrowth of these stable measuring and retrieval technologies. There is a wealth of information contained in the current satellite measurements of precipitation regarding the salient precipitation properties of the Indian Summer Monsoon. Using different datasets obtained from the measuring systems noted above, we have analyzed the observations cast in the form of: (1) spatially distributed means and variances over the hierarchy of relevant time scales (hourly I diurnally, daily, monthly, seasonally I intra-seasonally, and inter

  16. Mountain Heavy Rainfall Measurement Experiments in a Subtropical Monsoon Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong-Dao Jou, Ben; Chi-June Jung, Ultimate; Lai, Hsiao-Wei; Feng, Lei

    2014-05-01

    Quantitative rainfall measurement experiments have been conducted in Taiwan area for the past 5 years (since 2008), especially over the complex terrain region. In this paper, results from these experiments will be analyzed and discussed, especially those associated with heavy rain events in the summer monsoon season. Observations from s-band polarimetric radar (SPOL of NCAR) and also x-band vertically-pointing radar are analyzed to reveal the high resolution temporal and spatial variation of precipitation structure. May and June, the Meiyu season in the area, are months with subtropical frontal rainfall events. Mesoscale convective systems, i.e., pre-frontal squall lines and frontal convective rainbands, are very active and frequently produce heavy rain events over mountain areas. Accurate quantitative precipitation measurements are needed in order to meet the requirement for landslide and flood early warning purpose. Using ground-based disdrometers and vertically-pointing radar, we have been trying to modify the quantitative precipitation estimation in the mountain region by using coastal operational radar. In this paper, the methodology applied will be presented and the potential of its application will be discussed. *corresponding author: Ben Jong-Dao Jou, jouben43@gmail.com

  17. Forced and internal modes of variability of the East Asian summer monsoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Liu

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The modern instrumental record (1979–2006 is analyzed in an attempt to reveal the dynamical structure and origins of the major modes of interannual variability of East Asian summer monsoon (EASM and to elucidate their fundamental differences with the major modes of seasonal variability. These differences are instrumental in understanding of the forced (say orbital and internal (say interannual modes of variability in EASM. We show that the leading mode of interannual variation, which accounts for about 39% of the total variance, is primarily associated with decaying phases of major El Nino, whereas the second mode, which accounts for 11.3% of the total variance, is associated with the developing phase of El Nino/La Nina. The EASM responds to ENSO in a nonlinear fashion with regard to the developing and decay phases of El Nino. The two modes are determined by El Nino/La Nina forcing and monsoon-warm ocean interaction, or essentially driven by internal feedback processes within the coupled climate system. For this internal mode, the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ and subtropical EASM precipitations exhibit an out-of-phase variations; further, the Meiyu in Yangtze River Valley is also out-of-phase with the precipitation in the central North China.

    In contrast, the slow and fast annual cycles forced by the solar radiation show an in-phase correlation between the ITCZ and subtropical EASM precipitation. Further, the seasonal march of precipitation displays a continental-scale northward advance of a rain band (that tilts in a southwest-northeastward direction over the entire Indian and East Asian summer monsoon from mid-May toward the end of July. This uniformity in seasonal advance suggests that the position of the northern edge of the summer monsoon or the precipitation over the central North China may be an adequate measure of the monsoon intensity for the forced mode, while the intensity of the internal mode of EASM variability

  18. Variations in temperature and precipitation during Indian summer monsoon simulated by RegCM3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, S. K.; Mamgain, A.; Pattnayak, K. C.; Giorgi, F.

    2012-04-01

    Variations in temperature and precipitation due to global changes have large societal impact in sectors such as agriculture and health. It is therefore very important to examine their temporal and spatial variations at the regional level in order to access the impact of climate change. In India, the most important quasi-periodic system to affect the weather and climate is the Indian summer monsoon. The local changes in the temperature and precipitation can be well examined by a regional model. RegCM3 is one such model best suited for the Indian region. This model has been integrated in the ensemble mode at 55km resolution over India for the summer monsoon season during the years 1982-2009. The model simulations are compared with observed values in detail. Comparison with observations shows that RegCM3 has slightly underestimated summer monsoon precipitation over the Central and Northeast India. Nevertheless, over these regions, RegCM3 simulated rainfall is closer to the observations when compared to other regions where rainfall is highly overestimated. The model simulated mid-tropospheric temperature shows a warm bias over the Himalayan and Tibetan regions that gives leads to the low pressure in the region. Thus the position of the monsoon trough as simulated by the model lies to the north of its original position. This is similar to the usual monsoon break condition leading to less rainfall over Central India. RegCM3 simulated surface maximum temperature shows large negative bias over the country while the surface minimum temperature is close to the observation. Nevertheless, there is a strong correlation between the all India weighted average surface temperature simulated by RegCM3 and IMD observations. At the regional level, in the Central India, both rainfall and temperature show the best correlation with the respective observed values. While examining the extreme condition in Central India, it is found that RegCM3 simulated frequencies of very wet and

  19. On Winning the Race for Predicting the Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Bhupendra

    2013-03-01

    Skillful prediction of Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR) one season in advance remains a ``grand challenge'' for the climate science community even though such forecasts have tremendous socio-economic implications over the region. Continued poor skill of the ocean-atmosphere coupled models in predicting ISMR is an enigma in the backdrop when these models have high skill in predicting seasonal mean rainfall over the rest of the Tropics. Here, I provide an overview of the fundamental processes responsible for limited skill of climate models and outline a framework for achieving the limit on potential predictability within a reasonable time frame. I also show that monsoon intra-seasonal oscillations (MISO) act as building blocks of the Asian monsoon and provide a bridge between the two problems, the potential predictability limit and the simulation of seasonal mean climate. The correlation between observed ISMR and ensemble mean of predicted ISMR (R) can still be used as a metric for forecast verification. Estimate of potential limit of predictability of Asian monsoon indicates that the highest achievable R is about 0.75. Improvements in climate models and data assimilation over the past one decade has slowly improved R from near zero a decade ago to about 0.4 currently. The race for achieving useful prediction can be won, if we can push this skill up to about 0.7. It requires focused research in improving simulations of MISO, monsoon seasonal cycle and ENSO-monsoon relationship by the climate models. In order to achieve this goal by 2015-16 timeframe, IITM is leading a Program called Monsoon Mission supported by the Ministry of Earth Sciences, Govt. of India (MoES). As improvement in skill of forecasts can come only if R & D is carried out on an operational modeling system, the Climate Forecast System of National Centre for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) of NOAA, U.S.A has been selected as our base system. The Mission envisages building partnership between

  20. Predicting Indian Summer Monsoon onset through variations of surface air temperature and relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolbova, Veronika; Surovyatkina, Elena; Kurths, Jurgen

    2015-04-01

    Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) rainfall has an enormous effect on Indian agriculture, economy, and, as a consequence, life and prosperity of more than one billion people. Variability of the monsoonal rainfall and its onset have a huge influence on food production, agricultural planning and GDP of the country, which on 22% is determined by agriculture. Consequently, successful forecasting of the ISM onset is a big challenge and large efforts are being put into it. Here, we propose a novel approach for predictability of the ISM onset, based on critical transition theory. The ISM onset is defined as an abrupt transition from sporadious rainfall to spatially organized and temporally sustained rainfall. Taking this into account, we consider the ISM onset as is a critical transition from pre-monsoon to monsoon, which take place in time and also in space. It allows us to suggest that before the onset of ISM on the Indian subcontinent should be areas of critical behavior where indicators of the critical transitions can be detected through an analysis of observational data. First, we identify areas with such critical behavior. Second, we use detected areas as reference points for observation locations for the ISM onset prediction. Third, we derive a precursor for the ISM onset based on the analysis of surface air temperature and relative humidity variations in these reference points. Finally, we demonstrate the performance of this precursor on two observational data sets. The proposed approach allows to determine ISM onset in advance in 67% of all considered years. Our proposed approach is less effective during the anomalous years, which are associated with weak/strong monsoons, e.g. El-Nino, La-Nina or positive Indian Ocean Dipole events. The ISM onset is predicted for 23 out of 27 normal monsoon years (85%) during the past 6 decades. In the anomalous years, we show that time series analysis in both areas during the pre-monsoon period reveals indicators whether the

  1. Regional integrated environmental model system and its simulation of East Asia summer monsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Zhe; FU CongBin; YAN XiaoDong

    2009-01-01

    A continuous 22-year simulation in Asia for the period of 1 January 1979 to 31 December 2000 was conducted using the Regional Integrated Environmental Model System (RIEMS 2.0) with NCEP Reanalysis Ⅱ data as the driving fields.The model processes include surface physics state package (BATS le),a Grell cumulus parameterization,and a modified radiation package (CCM3) with the focus on the ability of the model to simulate the summer monsoon over East Asia.The analysis results show that (1)RIEMS reproduces well the spatial pattern and the seasonal cycle of surface temperature.When regionally averaged,the summer mean temperature biases are within 1-2℃.(2) For precipitation,the model reproduces well the spatial pattern,and temporal evolution of the East Asia summer monsoon rain belt,with steady phases separated by more rapid transitions,is reproduced.The rain belt simulated by RIEMS 2.0 is closer to observation than by RIEMS 1.0.(3) RIEMS 2.0 can reasonably reproduce the large-scale circulation.

  2. Revisiting the Indian summer monsoon-ENSO links in the IPCC AR4 projections: A cautionary outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxy, Mathew; Patil, Nitin; Aparna, K.; Ashok, Karumuri

    2013-05-01

    The climate change experiments under the fourth Assessment Report (AR4) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), namely the twentieth century simulations (20C3M) and Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) A1B, are revisited to study whether these models can reproduce the ENSO and ENSO Modoki patterns as the two important modes from statistical linear analysis as observed. The capability of the models in simulating realistic ENSO/ENSO Modoki teleconnections with the Indian summer monsoon, and also the implications for the future are also explored. Results from the study indicate that only ~ 1/4th of the models from 20C3M capture either ENSO or ENSO Modoki pattern in JJAS. Of this 1/4th, only two models simulate both ENSO and ENSO Modoki as important modes. Again, out of these two, only one model simulates both ENSO and ENSO Modoki as important modes during both summer and winter. It is also shown that the two models that demonstrate ENSO Modoki as well as ENSO associated variance in both 20C3M and SRESA1B represent the links of the ISMR with ENSO reasonably in 20C3M, but indicate opposite type of impacts in SREA1B. With the limited skills of the models in reproducing the monsoon, the ENSO and ENSO Modoki, it is difficult to reconcile that the teleconnections of a tropical driver can change like that. All these indicate the challenges associated with the limitations of the models in reproducing the variability of the monsoons and ENSO flavors, not to speak of failing in capturing the potential impacts of global warming as they are expected to. More research in improving the current day simulations, improving model capacity to simulate better by improving the Green House Gases (GHG) and aerosols in the models are some of the important and immediate steps that are necessary.

  3. A regional ocean-atmosphere coupled model developed for CORDEX East Asia: assessment of Asian summer monsoon simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Liwei; Zhou, Tianjun

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a developed regional ocean-atmosphere coupled model FROALS was applied to the CORDEX East Asia domain. The performance of FROALS in the simulation of Asian summer monsoon during 1989-2010 was assessed using the metrics developed by the CLIVAR Asian-Australian Monsoon Panel Diagnostics Task Team. The results indicated that FROALS exhibited good performance in simulating Asian summer monsoon climatology. The simulated JJA mean SST biases were weaker than those of the CMIP5 multi-model ensemble mean (MMEM). The skill of FROALS approached that of CMIP5 MMEM in terms of the annual cycle of Asian summer monsoon. The simulated monsoon duration matched the observed counterpart well (with a spatial pattern correlation coefficient of 0.59). Some biases of CMIP5 MMEM were also found in FROALS, highlighting the importance of local forcing and model physics within the Asian monsoon domain. Corresponding to a strong East Asian summer monsoon, an anomalous anticyclone was found over western North Pacific in both observation and simulation. However, the simulated strength was weaker than the observed due to the responses to incorrect sea surface anomalies over the key regions. The model also accurately captured the spatial pattern of the intraseasonal variability variance and the extreme climate indices of Asian summer monsoons, although with larger amplitude. The results suggest that FROALS could be used as a dynamical downscaling tool nested within the global climate model with coarse resolution to develop high-resolution regional climate change projections over the CORDEX East Asia domain.

  4. Response of the South China Sea summer monsoon onset to air-sea heat fluxes over the Indian Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jinnian; ZUO Tao; WANG Hongna

    2012-01-01

    We objectively define the onset date of the South China Sea (SCS) summer monsoon,after having evaluated previous studies and considered various factors.Then,interannual and interdecadal characteristics of the SCS summer monsoon onset are analyzed.In addition,we calculate air-sea heat fluxes over the Indian Ocean using the advanced method of CORARE3.0,based on satellite remote sensing data.The onset variation cycle has remarkable interdecadal variability with cycles of 16 a and 28 a.Correlation analysis between air-sea heat fluxes in the Indian Ocean and the SCS summer monsoon indicates that there is a remarkable lag correlation between them.This result has important implications for prediction of the SCS summer monsoon,and provides a scientific basis for further study of the onset process of this monsoon and its prediction.Based on these results,a linear regression equation is obtained to predict the onset date of the monsoon in 2011 and 2012.The forecast is that the onset date of 2011 will be normal or 1 pentad earlier than the normal year,while the onset date in 2012 will be 1-2 pentads later.

  5. Using idealized snow forcing to test teleconnections with the Indian summer monsoon in the Hadley Centre GCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, A.G. [University of Reading, NCAS-Climate, Walker Institute for Climate System Research, Department of Meteorology, Reading (United Kingdom); Slingo, J.M. [University of Reading, NCAS-Climate, Walker Institute for Climate System Research, Department of Meteorology, Reading (United Kingdom); Met Office, Exeter (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-15

    Anomalous heavy snow during winter or spring has long been regarded as a possible precursor of deficient Indian monsoon rainfall during the subsequent summer. However previous work in this field is inconclusive, in terms of the mechanism that communicates snow anomalies to the monsoon summer, and even the region from which snow has the most impact. In this study we explore these issues in coupled and atmosphere-only versions of the Hadley Centre model. A 1050-year control integration of the HadCM3 coupled model, which well represents the seasonal cycle of snow cover over the Eurasian continent, is analysed and shows evidence for weakened monsoons being preceded by strong snow forcing (in the absence of ENSO) over either the Himalaya/Tibetan Plateau or north/west Eurasia regions. However, empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis of springtime interannual variability in snow depth shows the leading mode to have opposite signs between these two regions, suggesting that competing mechanisms may be possible. To determine the dominant region, ensemble integrations are carried out using HadAM3, the atmospheric component of HadCM3, and a variety of anomalous snow forcing initial conditions obtained from the control integration of the coupled model. Forcings are applied during spring in separate experiments over the Himalaya/Tibetan Plateau and north/west Eurasia regions, in conjunction with climatological SSTs in order to avoid the direct effects of ENSO. With the aid of idealized forcing conditions in sensitivity tests, we demonstrate that forcing from the Himalaya region is dominant in this model via a Blanford-type mechanism involving reduced surface sensible heat and longwave fluxes, reduced heating of the troposphere over the Tibetan Plateau and consequently a reduced meridional tropospheric temperature gradient which weakens the monsoon during early summer. Snow albedo is shown to be key to the mechanism, explaining around 50% of the perturbation in sensible

  6. Prediction of seasonal summer monsoon rainfall over homogenous regions of India using dynamical prediction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramu, Dandi A.; Rao, Suryachadra A.; Pillai, Prasanth A.; Pradhan, M.; George, G.; Rao, D. Nagarguna; Mahapatra, S.; Pai, D. S.; Rajeevan, M.

    2017-03-01

    Seasonal prediction of Indian summer monsoon rainfall is a challenging task for the modeling community and predicting seasonal mean rainfall at smaller regional scale is much more difficult than predicting all India averaged seasonal mean rainfall. The regional scale prediction of summer monsoon mean rainfall at longer lead time (e.g., predicting 3-4 months in advance) can play a vital role in planning of hydrological and agriculture aspects of the society. Previous attempts for predicting seasonal mean rainfall at regional level (over 5 Homogeneous regions) have resulted with limited success (anomaly correlation coefficient is low, ACC ≈ 0.1-0.4, even at a short lead time of one month). The high resolution Climate Forecast System, version 2 (CFSv2) model, with spectral resolution of T382 (∼38 km), can predict the Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR) at lead time of 3-4 months, with a reasonably good prediction skill (ACC ≈ 0.55). In the present study, we have investigated whether the seasonal mean rainfall over different homogenous regions is predictable using the same model, at 3-4 months lead time? Out of five homogeneous regions of India three regions have shown moderate prediction skill, even at 3 months lead time. Compared to lower resolution model, high resolution model has good skill for all the regions except south peninsular India. High resolution model is able to capture the extreme events and also the teleconnections associated with large scale features at four months lead time and hence shows better skill (ACC ≈ 0.45) in predicting the seasonal mean rainfall over homogeneous regions.

  7. Variations in swells along Eastern Arabian Sea during the summer monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Johnson, G.; SanilKumar, V.; Sanjiv, P.C.; Singh; Pednekar, P.S.; AshokKumar, K.; Dora, G.U.; Gowthaman, R.

    Singh, Premanand Pednekar, K. Ashok Kumar, G. Udhaba Dora, Rajamanickam Gowthaman Ocean Engineering, National Institute of Oceanography (Council of Scientific & Industrial Research), Dona Paula, India Email: sanil@nio.org Received November 26... and T. N. B. Nair, “Waves in Shal- low Water off West Coast of India during the Onset of Summer Monsoon,” Annales Geophysicae, Vol. 28, 2010, pp. 817-824. doi:10.5194/angeo-28-817-2010 [3] V. S. Kumar, J. Singh, P. Pednekar and R. Gowthaman, “Waves...

  8. Long-range prediction of Indian summer monsoon rainfall using data mining and statistical approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    H, Vathsala; Koolagudi, Shashidhar G.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a hybrid model to better predict Indian summer monsoon rainfall. The algorithm considers suitable techniques for processing dense datasets. The proposed three-step algorithm comprises closed itemset generation-based association rule mining for feature selection, cluster membership for dimensionality reduction, and simple logistic function for prediction. The application of predicting rainfall into flood, excess, normal, deficit, and drought based on 36 predictors consisting of land and ocean variables is presented. Results show good accuracy in the considered study period of 37years (1969-2005).

  9. The possible influence of solar activity on Indian summer monsoon rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lihua, Ma; Yanben, Han; Zhiqiang, Yin

    2007-09-01

    The Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR) plays an important role in the climate system of South Asia. Recently, studies about ISMR variations have been going into more depth. In this present paper, we mainly use the Scargle periodogram and wavelet transform methods to study the periodicity of ISMR changes between 1871 and 2004 and review the possible influence of solar activity on the rainfall. Analysis results show complicated ISMR variations have periodicities with remarkable time-variable characteristics. Investigating a possible connection between the rainfall and solar variations, we believe that solar activity affects the ISMR variations to some extent.

  10. Fingerprinting the Impacts of Aerosols on Long-Term Trends of the Indian Summer Monsoon Regional Rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laul, K. M.; Kim, K. M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present corroborative observational evidences from satellites, in-situ observations, and re-analysis data showing possible impacts of absorbing aerosols (black carbon and dust) on subseasonal and regional summer monsoon rainfall over India. We find that increased absorbing aerosols in the Indo-Gangetic Plain in recent decades may have lead to long-term warming of the upper troposphere over northern India and the Tibetan Plateau, enhanced rainfall in northern India and the Himalayas foothill regions in the early part (may-June) of the monsoon season, followed by diminished rainfall over central and southern India in the latter part (July-August) of the monsoon season. These signals which are consistent with current theories of atmospheric heating and solar dimming by aerosol and induced cloudiness in modulating the Indian monsoon, would have been masked by conventional method of using al-India rainfall averaged over the entire monsoon season.

  11. Momentum transport of wave zero during March: A possible predictor for the Indian summer monsoon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S M Bawiskar; V R Mujumdar; S S Singh

    2002-06-01

    Analysis of monthly momentum transport of zonal waves at 850 hPa for the period 1979 to 1993, between 30°S and 30°N for January to April, using zonal () and meridional () components of wind taken from the ECMWF reanalysis field, shows a positive correlation (.1% level of significance) between the Indian summer monsoon rainfall (June through September) and the momentum transport of wave zero TM(0) over latitudinal belt between 25°S and 5°N (LB) during March. Northward (Southward) TM(0) observed in March over LB subsequently leads to a good (drought) monsoon season over India which is found to be true even when the year is marked with the El- Nino event. Similarly a strong westerly zone in the Indian Ocean during March, indicates a good monsoon season for the country, even if the year is marked with El-Nino. The study thus suggests two predictors, TM(0) over LB and the strength of westerly zone in the Indian Ocean during March.

  12. Boreal summer intraseasonal oscillations and seasonal Indian monsoon prediction in DEMETER coupled models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, Susmitha; Sahai, A.K.; Goswami, B.N. [Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Climate and Global Modeling Division, Pune (India)

    2010-09-15

    Even though multi-model prediction systems may have better skill in predicting the interannual variability (IAV) of Indian summer monsoon (ISM), the overall performance of the system is limited by the skill of individual models (single model ensembles). The DEMETER project aimed at seasonal-to-interannual prediction is not an exception to this case. The reasons for the poor skill of the DEMETER individual models in predicting the IAV of monsoon is examined in the context of the influence of external and internal components and the interaction between intraseasonal variability (ISV) and IAV. Recently it has been shown that the ISV influences the IAV through very long breaks (VLBs; breaks with duration of more than 10 days) by generating droughts. Further, all VLBs are associated with an eastward propagating Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) in the equatorial region, facilitated by air-sea interaction on intraseasonal timescales. This VLB-drought-MJO relationship is analyzed here in detail in the DEMETER models. Analyses indicate that the VLB-drought relationship is poorly captured by almost all the models. VLBs in observations are generated through air-sea interaction on intraseasonal time scale and the models' inability to simulate VLB-drought relationship is shown to be linked to the models' inability to represent the air-sea interaction on intraseasonal time scale. Identification of this particular deficiency of the models provides a direction for improvement of the model for monsoon prediction. (orig.)

  13. Impact of Climate Change on the Characteristics of Indian Summer Monsoon Onset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savita Patwardhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A high resolution regional climate modeling system, known as PRECIS (Providing REgional Climate for Impact Studies, developed by Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, UK, is applied for Indian subcontinent to assess the impact of climate change on the summer monsoon onset characteristics. The present day simulation (1961–1990 with PRECIS is evaluated for the characteristics of onset over Kerala, southernmost part of India, where the monsoon sets in over Indian landmass. The meteorological parameters like precipitation, outgoing long wave radiation (OLR, and low level winds are analysed to study the monsoon onset over Kerala. The model is able to capture the sudden and sharp increase of rainfall associated with the onset. The rapid built-up of convective activity over the southeastern Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal is well represented by the model. PRECIS simulations, under scenarios of increasing greenhouse gas concentrations and sulphate aerosols, are analysed to study the likely changes in the onset characteristics in future, towards the end of present century (2071–2100. The analysis does not indicate significant difference in the mean onset dates in A2 and B2 scenarios. However, the variability of onset date is likely to be more towards the end of the 21st century especially in A2 scenario.

  14. Southern Indian Ocean SST as a modulator for the progression of Indian summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, Namendra Kumar; Rai, Shailendra; Mishra, Nishant

    2016-11-01

    This study explores the possibility of southern Indian Ocean (SIO) sea surface temperature (SST) as a modulator for the early phase of Indian summer monsoon and its possible physical mechanism. A dipole-like structure is obtained from the empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis which is similar to an Indian Ocean subtropical dipole (IOSD) found earlier. A subtropical dipole index (SDI) is defined based on the SST anomaly over the positive and negative poles. The regression map of rainfall over India in the month of June corresponding to the SDI during 1983-2013 shows negative patterns along the Western Ghats and Central India. However, the regression pattern is insignificant during 1952-1982. The multiple linear regression models and partial correlation analysis also indicate that the SDI acts as a dominant factor to influence the rainfall over India in the month of June during 1983-2013. The similar result is also obtained with the help of composite rainfall over the land points of India in the month of June for positive (negative) SDI events. It is also observed that the positive (negative) SDI delays (early) the onset dates of Indian monsoon over Kerala during the time domain of our study. The study is further extended to identify the physical mechanism of this impact, and it is found that the heating (cooling) in the region covering SDI changes the circulation pattern in the SIO and hence impacts the progression of monsoon in India.

  15. A study on the characteristics of temperature inversions in active and break phases of Indian summer monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Muraleedharan, P.M.; Mohankumar, K.; Sivakumar, K.U.

    summer monsoon (Yasunari, 1980; Sikka and Gadgil, 1980; Krishnamurti and Subramanyam, 1982). Webster et al. (1998) mentioned that the individual active and break spells and the transition between the spells are far more complex to understand. Rao et.... Tomas, M. Yanai and T. Yasunari (1998). Monsoons: Processes, predictability and the prospects for prediction. J. Geophys. Res., 103 (C7), 14,451-14,510. Yasunari, T (1980). A quasi stationary appearance of the 30-40 day period in the cloudiness...

  16. Three exceptionally strong East-Asian summer monsoon events during glacial conditions in the past 470 kyr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.-D. Rousseau

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Chinese loess sequences are interpreted as a reliable record of the past variation of the East Asian monsoon regime through the alternation of loess and paleosols units, dominated by the winter and summer monsoon, respectively. Different proxies have been used to describe this system, mostly geophysical, geochemical or sedimentological. Terrestrial mollusks are also a reliable proxy of past environmental conditions and are often preserved in large numbers in loess deposits. The analysis of the mollusk remains in the Luochuan sequence, comprising L5 loess to S0 soil, i.e. the last 500 ka, shows that for almost all identified species, the abundance is higher at the base of the interval (L5 to L4 than in the younger deposits. Using the present ecological requirements of the identified mollusk species in the Luochuan sequence allows the definition of two main mollusk groups varying during the last 500 kyr. The cold-aridiphilous individuals indicate the so-called Asian winter monsoon regime and predominantly occur during glacials, when dust is deposited. The thermal-humidiphilous mollusks are prevalent during interglacial or interstadial conditions of the Asian summer monsoon, when soil formation takes place. In the sequence, three events with exceptionally high abundance of the Asian summer monsoon indicators are recorded during the L5, L4 and L2 glacial intervals, i.e., at about 470, 360 and 170 kyr, respectively. The L5 and L4 events appear to be the strongest (high counts. Similar variations have also been identified in the Xifeng sequence, distant enough from Luochuan, but also in Lake Baikal further North, to suggest that this phenomenon is regional rather than local. The indicators of the summer monsoon within the glacial intervals imply a strengthened East-Asian monsoon interpreted as corresponding to marine isotope stages 6, 10 and 12, respectively. The L5 and L2 summer monsoons are coeval with Mediterranean sapropels S12 and S6, which

  17. Three exceptionally strong East-Asian summer monsoon events during glacial times in the past 470 kyr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.-D. Rousseau

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Chinese loess sequences are interpreted as a reliable record of the past variation of the East Asian monsoon regime through the alternation of loess and paleosols units, dominated by the winter and summer monsoon, respectively. Different proxies have been used to describe this system, mostly geophysical, geochemical or sedimentological. Terrestrial mollusks are also a reliable proxy of past environmental conditions and are often preserved in large numbers in loess deposits. The analysis of the mollusk remains in the Luochuan sequence, comprising L5 loess to S0 soil, i.e. the last 500 ka, shows that for almost all identified species, the abundance is higher at the base of the interval (L5 to L4 than in the younger deposits. Using the present ecological requirements of the identified mollusk species in the Luochuan sequence allows the definition of two main mollusk groups varying during the last 500 kyr. The cold-aridiphilous individuals indicate the so-called Asian winter monsoon regime and predominantly occur during glacials, when dust is deposited. The thermal-humidiphilous mollusks are prevalent during interglacial or interstadial conditions of the Asian summer monsoon, when soil formation takes place. In the sequence, three events with exceptionally high abundance of the Asian summer monsoon indicators are recorded during the L5, L4 and L2 glacial intervals, i.e., at about 470, 360 and 170 kyr, respectively. The L5 and L4 events appear to be the strongest (high counts. Similar variations have also been identified in the Xifeng sequence, distant enough from Luochuan, but also in Lake Baikal further North, to suggest that this phenomenon is regional rather than local. The indicators of the summer monsoon within the glacial intervals imply a strengthened East-Asian monsoon interpreted as corresponding to marine isotope stages 12, 10 and 6, respectively. The L5 and L2 summer monsoons are coeval with Mediterranean sapropels S12 and S6, which

  18. The Coupled Model Predictability of the Western North Pacific Summer Monsoon with Different Leading Times

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Ri-Yu; LI Chao-Fan; Se-Hwan YANG; Buwen DONG

    2012-01-01

    Leading time length is an important issue for modeling seasonal forecasts. In this study, a comparison of the interannual predictability of the Western North Pacific (WNP) summer monsoon between different leading months was performed by using one-, four-, and sevenmonth lead retrospective forecasts (hindcasts) of four coupled models from Ensembles-Based Predictions of Climate Changes and Their Impacts (ENSEMBLES) for the period of 1960 2005. It is found that the WNP summer anomalies, including lower-tropospheric circulation and precipitation anomalies, can be well predicted for all these leading months. The accuracy of the four-month lead prediction is only slightly weaker than that of the one-month lead prediction, although the skill decreases with the increase of leading months.

  19. Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall: Implications of Contrasting Trends in the Spatial Variability of Means and Extremes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subimal Ghosh

    Full Text Available India's agricultural output, economy, and societal well-being are strappingly dependent on the stability of summer monsoon rainfall, its variability and extremes. Spatial aggregate of intensity and frequency of extreme rainfall events over Central India are significantly increasing, while at local scale they are spatially non-uniform with increasing spatial variability. The reasons behind such increase in spatial variability of extremes are poorly understood and the trends in mean monsoon rainfall have been greatly overlooked. Here, by using multi-decadal gridded daily rainfall data over entire India, we show that the trend in spatial variability of mean monsoon rainfall is decreasing as exactly opposite to that of extremes. The spatial variability of extremes is attributed to the spatial variability of the convective rainfall component. Contrarily, the decrease in spatial variability of the mean rainfall over India poses a pertinent research question on the applicability of large scale inter-basin water transfer by river inter-linking to address the spatial variability of available water in India. We found a significant decrease in the monsoon rainfall over major water surplus river basins in India. Hydrological simulations using a Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC model also revealed that the water yield in surplus river basins is decreasing but it is increasing in deficit basins. These findings contradict the traditional notion of dry areas becoming drier and wet areas becoming wetter in response to climate change in India. This result also calls for a re-evaluation of planning for river inter-linking to supply water from surplus to deficit river basins.

  20. Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall: Implications of Contrasting Trends in the Spatial Variability of Means and Extremes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Subimal; Vittal, H; Sharma, Tarul; Karmakar, Subhankar; Kasiviswanathan, K S; Dhanesh, Y; Sudheer, K P; Gunthe, S S

    2016-01-01

    India's agricultural output, economy, and societal well-being are strappingly dependent on the stability of summer monsoon rainfall, its variability and extremes. Spatial aggregate of intensity and frequency of extreme rainfall events over Central India are significantly increasing, while at local scale they are spatially non-uniform with increasing spatial variability. The reasons behind such increase in spatial variability of extremes are poorly understood and the trends in mean monsoon rainfall have been greatly overlooked. Here, by using multi-decadal gridded daily rainfall data over entire India, we show that the trend in spatial variability of mean monsoon rainfall is decreasing as exactly opposite to that of extremes. The spatial variability of extremes is attributed to the spatial variability of the convective rainfall component. Contrarily, the decrease in spatial variability of the mean rainfall over India poses a pertinent research question on the applicability of large scale inter-basin water transfer by river inter-linking to address the spatial variability of available water in India. We found a significant decrease in the monsoon rainfall over major water surplus river basins in India. Hydrological simulations using a Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model also revealed that the water yield in surplus river basins is decreasing but it is increasing in deficit basins. These findings contradict the traditional notion of dry areas becoming drier and wet areas becoming wetter in response to climate change in India. This result also calls for a re-evaluation of planning for river inter-linking to supply water from surplus to deficit river basins.

  1. The Leading Mode of Indian Ocean SST and Its Impacts on Asian Summer Monsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Mingzhu; DING Yihui; LI Weijing; MAO Hengqing; HUANG Changxing

    2008-01-01

    The Indian Ocean (IO) sea surface temperature (SST) was analyzed by using empirical orthogonal function (EOF), and the leading mode of Indian Ocean (LMIO) SST was extracted. The major spatial and temporal characters of LMIO were discussed, and the relationships between LMIO with Indian summer monsoon (ISM) and with China summer rainfalls (CSR) were investigated, then the impacts of LMIO on Asian summer monsoon (ASM) circulation were explored. Some notable results are obtained: The significant evolutional characters of LMIO are the consistent warming trend of almost the whole IO basin,the distinctive quasi-3- and quasi-ll-yr oscillations and remarkably interdecadal warming in 1976/1977 and1997/1998, respectively. The LMIO impaired the lower level circulation of ISM and was closely related with the climate trend of CSR. It was associated with the weakening of South Asian high, the easterly winds south of the Tibetan Plateau, and the cross-equatorial flows over 10°-20°N, 40°-110°E at the upper level; with the strengthening of Somali cross-equatorial jet but the weakening of the circulation of ISM in the sector of India, the strengthening of south wind over the middle and lower reaches of Yangtze River and South China but the weakening of southwesterly winds over North China at lower level and with the increasing of surface pressure over the Asian Continent. Changes in the moisture flux transports integrated vertically over the whole troposphere associated with LMIO are similar to those in the lower level circulation. To sum up, the significant SST increasing trend of IO basin was one of the important causes for weakening of the ASM circulation and the southwards shifting of China summer rainband.

  2. Intraseasonal Variability of the Indian Summer Monsoon in the Regional Climate Model COSMO-CLM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Befort, Daniel J.; Leckebusch, Gregor C.; Cubasch, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    The regional climate model COSMO-CLM driven by ERA-Interim reanalysis data with a spatial resolution of 55km is used to simulate observed features of the intraseasonal variability of the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) during the period 1979 until 2011. One of these features is the northward propagation of the monsoon intraseasonal oscillations. We find, that the temporal evolution of this oscillation between model and observation is in good agreement, but the strength is less well simulated. Additionally, the models capability to simulate observed dry and wet events on a weekly time scale is investigated using the standardized precipitation index. In general, the model is capable to simulate these events with a similar magnitude at the same time, but we find a higher ability for dry compared to wet events. We hypothesize this is related to differences in the atmospheric circulation during dry and wet events. Analyses show, that dry events are characterized by a cyclonic vortex over India as well as an anti-cyclonic vortex over Pakistan region in 500hPa, whereas wet events are characterized by an anti-cyclonic vortex over India, only. It is found that COSMO-CLM has a higher ability to simulate the observed anomalous circulation over Pakistan region compared to observed anomalous circulation patterns over India. Overall, this study shows that the current configuration of COSMO-CLM is able to simulate key features of the intraseasonal variability of the Indian summer monsoon. Thus, under consideration of its limitations, COSMO-CLM is suitable to investigate possible changes of the intraseasonal variability of ISM under changed climate conditions.

  3. Millennial-scale Asian summer monsoon variations in South China since the last deglaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xisheng; Chu, Guoqiang; Sheng, Mei; Zhang, Shuqin; Li, Jinhua; Chen, Yun; Tang, Ling; Su, Youliang; Pei, Junling; Yang, Zhenyu

    2016-10-01

    Characterizing spatiotemporal variability of the Asian summer monsoon (ASM) is critical for full understanding of its behavior, dynamics, and future impacts. The present knowledge about ASM variations since the last glaciation in South China largely relies on several precisely-dated speleothem stable oxygen isotope (δ18 O) records. Although these speleothem δ18 O signals provide useful evidence for regional past environmental changes, their validity for denoting ASM intensity remains a great controversy. The Huguangyan Maar Lake (HML) provides one of the most complete archives of environmental and climatic changes in the tropical-subtropical South and East Asia since the last glaciation. Here we document a continuous centennial- to millennial-scale ASM record over the past 16 ky BP from the high-sedimentation-rate HML sediments. In contrast with the low-amplitude variations of Chinese speleothem-derived δ18 O signals and the Chinese loess-based monsoon precipitation proxy indexes, our multi-proxy records reveal a pattern of high-amplitude regional climatic fluctuations, including fine-scale oscillations during the Bølling-Allerød warming, the 8.2 ka cooling event, and an abrupt climate shift from 6.5-5.9 ka. The existence of Bond-like cold/dry events indicates a distinct influence of the North Atlantic circulation on low-latitude monsoon changes. The broad comparability between the HML paleo-proxies, Chinese speleothem δ18 O records, and the northern hemisphere summer insolation throughout the Holocene, suggests that solar insolation exerts a profound influence on ASM changes. These findings reinforce a model of combined insolation and glacial forcing of the ASM.

  4. Increased chemical weathering during the deglacial to mid-Holocene summer monsoon intensification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miriyala, Pavan; Sukumaran, N. P.; Nath, B. Nagender; Ramamurty, P. B.; Sijinkumar, A. V.; Vijayagopal, B.; Ramaswamy, V.; Sebastian, Tyson

    2017-01-01

    Chemical weathering and the ensuing atmospheric carbon dioxide consumption has long been considered to work on geological time periods until recently when some modelling and natural records have shown that the weathering-related CO2 consumption can change at century to glacial-interglacial time scale. Last glacial to interglacial transition period is a best test case to understand the interplay between Pco2-temperature-chemical weathering when a pulse of rapid chemical weathering was initiated. Here we show, from a high resolution 54 ka record from the Andaman Sea in the northern Indian Ocean, that the chemical weathering responds to deglacial to mid-Holocene summer monsoon intensification in the Myanmar watersheds. The multi-proxy data (Al/K, CIA, Rb/Sr, 87Sr/86Sr for degree of weathering and 143Nd/144Nd for provenance) reveal an increase in silicate weathering with initiation of interglacial warm climate at ~17.7 ka followed by a major change at 15.5 ka. Inferred changes in chemical weathering have varied in tandem with the regional monsoonal proxies (δ18Osw-salinity changes of Northern Indian Ocean, effective Asian moisture content and δ18O records of Chinese caves) and are synchronous with changes in summer insolation at 30°N and δ18O of GISP2 implying that chemical weathering was not a later amplifier but worked in tandem with global climate change. PMID:28303943

  5. Increased chemical weathering during the deglacial to mid-Holocene summer monsoon intensification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miriyala, Pavan; Sukumaran, N. P.; Nath, B. Nagender; Ramamurty, P. B.; Sijinkumar, A. V.; Vijayagopal, B.; Ramaswamy, V.; Sebastian, Tyson

    2017-03-01

    Chemical weathering and the ensuing atmospheric carbon dioxide consumption has long been considered to work on geological time periods until recently when some modelling and natural records have shown that the weathering-related CO2 consumption can change at century to glacial-interglacial time scale. Last glacial to interglacial transition period is a best test case to understand the interplay between Pco2-temperature-chemical weathering when a pulse of rapid chemical weathering was initiated. Here we show, from a high resolution 54 ka record from the Andaman Sea in the northern Indian Ocean, that the chemical weathering responds to deglacial to mid-Holocene summer monsoon intensification in the Myanmar watersheds. The multi-proxy data (Al/K, CIA, Rb/Sr, 87Sr/86Sr for degree of weathering and 143Nd/144Nd for provenance) reveal an increase in silicate weathering with initiation of interglacial warm climate at ~17.7 ka followed by a major change at 15.5 ka. Inferred changes in chemical weathering have varied in tandem with the regional monsoonal proxies (δ18Osw-salinity changes of Northern Indian Ocean, effective Asian moisture content and δ18O records of Chinese caves) and are synchronous with changes in summer insolation at 30°N and δ18O of GISP2 implying that chemical weathering was not a later amplifier but worked in tandem with global climate change.

  6. Efficient transport of tropospheric aerosol into the stratosphere via the Asian summer monsoon anticyclone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Pengfei; Rosenlof, Karen H.; Liu, Shang; Telg, Hagen; Thornberry, Troy D.; Rollins, Andrew W.; Portmann, Robert W.; Bai, Zhixuan; Ray, Eric A.; Duan, Yunjun; Pan, Laura L.; Toon, Owen B.; Bian, Jianchun; Gao, Ru-Shan

    2017-07-01

    An enhanced aerosol layer near the tropopause over Asia during the June-September period of the Asian summer monsoon (ASM) was recently identified using satellite observations. Its sources and climate impact are presently not well-characterized. To improve understanding of this phenomenon, we made in situ aerosol measurements during summer 2015 from Kunming, China, then followed with a modeling study to assess the global significance. The in situ measurements revealed a robust enhancement in aerosol concentration that extended up to 2 km above the tropopause. A climate model simulation demonstrates that the abundant anthropogenic aerosol precursor emissions from Asia coupled with rapid vertical transport associated with monsoon convection leads to significant particle formation in the upper troposphere within the ASM anticyclone. These particles subsequently spread throughout the entire Northern Hemispheric (NH) lower stratosphere and contribute significantly (˜15%) to the NH stratospheric column aerosol surface area on an annual basis. This contribution is comparable to that from the sum of small volcanic eruptions in the period between 2000 and 2015. Although the ASM contribution is smaller than that from tropical upwelling (˜35%), we find that this region is about three times as efficient per unit area and time in populating the NH stratosphere with aerosol. With a substantial amount of organic and sulfur emissions in Asia, the ASM anticyclone serves as an efficient smokestack venting aerosols to the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. As economic growth continues in Asia, the relative importance of Asian emissions to stratospheric aerosol is likely to increase.

  7. Local and remote impacts of aerosol species on Indian summer monsoon rainfall in a GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Liang; Turner, Andrew; Highwood, Eleanor

    2016-04-01

    The HadGEM2 AGCM is used to determine the most important anthropogenic aerosols in the Indian monsoon using experiments in which observed trends in individual aerosol species are imposed. Sulphur dioxide (SD) emissions are shown to impact rainfall more strongly than black carbon (BC) aerosols, causing reduced rainfall especially over northern India. Significant perturbations due to BC are not noted until its emissions are scaled up in a sensitivity test, in which rainfall increases over northern India as a result of the Elevated Heat Pump mechanism, enhancing convection during the pre-monsoon and bringing forward the monsoon onset. Secondly, the impact of anthropogenic aerosols is compared to that of increasing greenhouse-gas concentrations and observed sea-surface temperature (SST) warming. The tropospheric temperature gradient driving the monsoon shows weakening when forced by either SD or imposed SST trends. However the observed SST trend is dominated by warming in the deep tropics; when the component of SST trend related to aerosol emissions is removed, further warming is found in the extratropical northern hemisphere that tends to offset monsoon weakening. This suggests caution is needed when using SST forcing as a proxy for greenhouse warming. Finally, aerosol emissions are decomposed into those from the Indian region and those elsewhere, in pairs of experiments with SD and BC. Both local and remote aerosol emissions are found to lead to rainfall changes over India; for SD, remote aerosols contribute around 75% of the rainfall decrease over India, while for BC the remote forcing is even more dominant.

  8. Transport of aerosol pollution in the UTLS during Asian summer monsoon as simulated by ECHAM5-HAMMOZ model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fadnavis

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available An eight member ensemble of ECHAM5-HAMMOZ simulations for the year 2003 is analyzed to study the transport of aerosols in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere (UTLS during the Asian Summer Monsoon (ASM. Simulations show persistent maxima in black carbon, organic carbon, sulfate, and mineral dust aerosols within the anticyclone in the UTLS throughout the ASM (period from July to September when convective activity over the Indian subcontinent is highest. Model simulations indicate boundary layer aerosol pollution as the source of this UTLS aerosol layer and identify ASM convection as the dominant transport process. Evidence of ASM transport of aerosols into the stratosphere is observed in HALogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE and Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II aerosol extinction. The impact of aerosols in the UTLS region is analyzed by evaluating the differences between simulations with (CTRL and without aerosol (HAM-off loading. The transport of anthropogenic aerosols in the UTLS increases cloud ice, water vapour and temperature, indicating that aerosols play an important role in enhancement of cloud ice in the Upper-Troposphere (UT. Aerosol induced circulation changes include a weakening of the main branch of the Hadley circulation and increased vertical transport around the southern flank of the Himalayas and reduction in monsoon precipitation over the India region.

  9. An 8.1Ma calcite record of Asian summer monsoon evolution on the Chinese central Loess Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN XiuLing; FANG XiaoMin; AN ZhiSheng; HAN WenXia; WANG Xin; BAI Yan; HONG Ye

    2007-01-01

    Carbonates in loess-red clay sequences consist mainly of calcite and dolomite.The EDTA analysis of carbonates in different size fractions and magnetic susceptibility reveal that calcite is a sensitive index of summer monsoon.The chemical analysis of carbonates and calcite from an 8.1 Ma loess-red clay sequence at Chaona on the Chinese central Loess Plateau shows that the evolution of the Asian summer monsoon experienced four stages,namely 8.1-5.5 Ma,5.5-2.8 Ma,2.8-1.5 Ma and 1.5-0 Ma,with increasing intensification and fluctuation,suggesting a possible combining impacts of uplift of the Tibetan Plateau and global changes on the Asian summer monsoon.

  10. An 8.1Ma calcite record of Asian summer monsoon evolution on the Chinese central Loess Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Carbonates in loess-red clay sequences consist mainly of calcite and dolomite. The EDTA analysis of carbonates in different size fractions and magnetic susceptibility reveal that calcite is a sensitive index of summer monsoon. The chemical analysis of carbonates and calcite from an 8.1 Ma loess-red clay sequence at Chaona on the Chinese central Loess Plateau shows that the evolution of the Asian summer monsoon experienced four stages, namely 8.1―5.5 Ma, 5.5―2.8 Ma, 2.8―1.5 Ma and 1.5―0 Ma, with increasing intensification and fluctuation, suggesting a possible combining impacts of uplift of the Tibetan Plateau and global changes on the Asian summer monsoon.

  11. Interdecadal variation of East Asian summer monsoon and drought/flood distribution over eastern China in the last 159 years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qian; WEI Fengying; LI Dongliang

    2011-01-01

    Based on the drought/flood grades of 90 meterological stations over eastern China and summer average sea-level pressure (SLP) during 1850-2008 and BPCCA statistical methods,the coupling relationship between the drought/flood grades and the East Asian summer SLP is analyzed.The East Asian summer monsoon index which is closely related with interdecadal variation of drought/flood distribution over eastern China is defined by using the key areas of SLP.The impact of the interdecadal variation of the East Asian summer monsoon on the distribution of drought/flood over eastern China in the last 159 years is researched.The results show that there are four typical drought and flood spatial distribution patterns in eastern China,i.e.the distribution of drought/flood in southern China is contrary to the other regions,the distribution of drought/flood along the Huanghe River-Huaihe River Valley is contrary to the Yangtze River Valley and regions south of it,the distribution of drought/flood along the Yangtze River Valley and Huaihe River Valley is contrary to the other regions,the distribution of drought/flood in eastern China is contrary to the western.The main distribution pattern of SLP in summer is that the strength of SLP is opposite in Asian continent and West Pacific.It has close relationship between the interdecadal variation of drought/flood distribution patterns over eastern China and the interdecadal variation of the East Asian summer monsoon which was defined in this paper,but the correlation is not stable and it has a significant difference in changes of interdecadal phase.When the East Asian summer monsoon was stronger (weaker),regions north of the Yangtze River Valley was more susceptible to drought (flood),the Yangtze River Valley and regions south of it were more susceptible to flood (drought) before the 1920s; when the East Asian summer monsoon was stronger (weaker),the regions north of the Yangtze River Valley was prone to flood (drought),the Yangtze River

  12. Inverse relation between summer and winter monsoon strength during late Holocene: continental molecular isotopic record from the Indian subcontinent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, P.; Basu, S.; Pillai, A.; Singh, P.; Ratnam, J.; Sankaran, M.; Amibili, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Indian monsoon shapes the livelihood of ca. 40% of world's population. Despite dedicated efforts, comprehensive picture of monsoon variability has proved elusive largely due to the absence of long-term qualitative high-resolution record from key climatic zones and variability of monsoon with respect to various forcing mechanisms (e.g., solar insolation) and teleconnections (e.g., El Niño-Southern Oscillation, Indian Ocean Dipole). In this study, high-resolution molecular (n-alkane) isotopic (δD and δ13C ratios) reconstruction of mid-late Holocene (~5.0 cal ka) climate has been undertaken using lacustrine sediments from two climatically sensitive regions; (i) Arid Banni grasslands, western India with dominant moisture source derived from Indian summer monsoon (June-September) and (ii) Semi-arid Ennamangalam lake, south India with significant fraction of rainfall received during winter period (October to December) from Northeast (NE) monsoon. The climate reconstruction from western India based on δDn-alkane values shows prevalence of intensified monsoon until ca. 3 cal ka followed by gradual decrease in the precipitation. In contrast, climate reconstruction from south India is characterized by more negative δDn-alkane (intensified precipitation) values during late Holocene (~2.5 cal ka). The compilation of paleoclimate records shows that the precipitation pattern in Banni region responded linearly to gradually changing insolation and additionally amplified by climate systems like ENSO. However, intensified monsoon in South India shows strengthened NE monsoonal precipitation during late Holocene. The spatial inhomogeneity in the palaeohydrological record can be attributed to the persistence of inverse relationship between summer and winter monsoon. In addition, strong positive correlation between δDn-alkane and δ13Cn-alkane values from both region shows that the relative abundance of C3-C4 plants in the contemporary ecosystems are governed by rainfall

  13. Impact of MJO on the intraseasonal variation of summer monsoon rainfall over India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, D. S.; Bhate, Jyoti; Sreejith, O. P.; Hatwar, H. R.

    2011-01-01

    The summer monsoon rainfall over India exhibits strong intraseasonal variability. Earlier studies have identified Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) as one of the most influencing factors of the intraseasonal variability of the monsoon rainfall. In this study, using India Meteorological Department (IMD) high resolution daily gridded rainfall data and Wheeler-Hendon MJO indices, the intra-seasonal variation of daily rainfall distribution over India associated with various Phases of eastward propagating MJO life cycle was examined to understand the mechanism linking the MJO to the intraseasonal variability. During MJO Phases of 1 and 2, formation of MJO associated positive convective anomaly over the equatorial Indian Ocean activated the oceanic tropical convergence zone (OTCZ) and the resultant changes in the monsoon circulation caused break monsoon type rainfall distribution. Associated with this, negative convective anomalies over monsoon trough zone region extended eastwards to date line indicating weaker than normal northern hemisphere inter tropical convergence zone (ITCZ). The positive convective anomalies over OTCZ and negative convective anomalies over ITCZ formed a dipole like pattern. Subsequently, as the MJO propagated eastwards to west equatorial Pacific through the maritime continent, a gradual northward shift of the OTCZ was observed and negative convective anomalies started appearing over equatorial Indian Ocean. During Phase 4, while the eastwards propagating MJO linked positive convective anomalies activated the eastern part of the ITCZ, the northward propagating OTCZ merged with monsoon trough (western part of the ITCZ) and induced positive convective anomalies over the region. During Phases 5 and 6, the dipole pattern in convective anomalies was reversed compared to that during Phases 1 and 2. This resulted active monsoon type rainfall distribution over India. During the subsequent Phases (7 and 8), the convective and lower tropospheric anomaly

  14. Impact of MJO on the intraseasonal variation of summer monsoon rainfall over India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pai, D.S.; Sreejith, O.P.; Hatwar, H.R. [India Meteorological Department, Pune (India); Bhate, Jyoti [National Atmospheric Research Laboratory, Gadnki (India)

    2011-01-15

    The summer monsoon rainfall over India exhibits strong intraseasonal variability. Earlier studies have identified Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) as one of the most influencing factors of the intraseasonal variability of the monsoon rainfall. In this study, using India Meteorological Department (IMD) high resolution daily gridded rainfall data and Wheeler-Hendon MJO indices, the intra-seasonal variation of daily rainfall distribution over India associated with various Phases of eastward propagating MJO life cycle was examined to understand the mechanism linking the MJO to the intraseasonal variability. During MJO Phases of 1 and 2, formation of MJO associated positive convective anomaly over the equatorial Indian Ocean activated the oceanic tropical convergence zone (OTCZ) and the resultant changes in the monsoon circulation caused break monsoon type rainfall distribution. Associated with this, negative convective anomalies over monsoon trough zone region extended eastwards to date line indicating weaker than normal northern hemisphere inter tropical convergence zone (ITCZ). The positive convective anomalies over OTCZ and negative convective anomalies over ITCZ formed a dipole like pattern. Subsequently, as the MJO propagated eastwards to west equatorial Pacific through the maritime continent, a gradual northward shift of the OTCZ was observed and negative convective anomalies started appearing over equatorial Indian Ocean. During Phase 4, while the eastwards propagating MJO linked positive convective anomalies activated the eastern part of the ITCZ, the northward propagating OTCZ merged with monsoon trough (western part of the ITCZ) and induced positive convective anomalies over the region. During Phases 5 and 6, the dipole pattern in convective anomalies was reversed compared to that during Phases 1 and 2. This resulted active monsoon type rainfall distribution over India. During the subsequent Phases (7 and 8), the convective and lower tropospheric anomaly

  15. The Indian Summer Monsoon onset revisited: new approach based on the analysis of historical wind observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordoñez, Paulina; Gallego, David; Ribera, Pedro; Peña-Ortiz, Cristina; Garcia-Herrera, Ricardo; Vega, Inmaculada; Gómez, Francisco de Paula

    2016-04-01

    The Indian Summer Monsoon onset is one of the meteorological events most anticipated in the world. Due to its relevance for the population, the India Meteorological Department has dated the onset over the southern tip of the Indian Peninsula (Kerala) since 1901. The traditional method to date the onset was based in the judgment of skilled meteorologist and because of this, the method was considered subjective and not adequate for the study of long-term changes in the onset. A new method for determining the monsoon onset based solely on objective criteria has been in use since 2006. Unfortunately, the new method relies -among other variables- on OLR measurements. This requirement impedes the construction of an objective onset series before the satellite era. An alternative approach to establish the onset by objective methods is the use of the wind field. During the last decade, some works have demonstrated that the changes in the wind direction in some areas of the Indian Ocean can be used to determine the monsoon onset rather precisely. However, this method requires precise wind observations over a large oceanic area which has limited the periods covered for such kind of indices to those of the reanalysis products. In this work we present a new approach to track the Indian monsoon onset based solely on historical wind direction measurements taken onboard ships. Our new series provides an objective record of the onset since the last decade of the 19th century and perhaps more importantly, it can incorporate any new historical wind record not yet known in order to extend the series length. The new series captures quite precisely the rapid precipitation increase associated to the monsoon onset, correlates well with previous approaches and it is robust against anomalous (bogus) onsets. Although no significant trends in the onset date were detected, a tendency to later than average onsets during the 1900-1925 and 1970-1990 periods and earlier than average onsets between

  16. Effects of Intraseasonal Oscillation on the Anomalous East Asian Summer Monsoon During 1999

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Ying; DING Yihui

    2008-01-01

    The 1999 East Asian summer monsoon was very unusual for its weak northward advance and remarkably anomalous climate conditions.The monsoonal southwesterly airflow and related rain belt in East Asia were blocked south of the Yangtze River Valley.The monsoonal airflow and major moisture transport conduct shifted eastward and turned northward to Japan from the tropical western Pacific rather than to East China from the South China Sea(SCS)as in normal years.Severe and prolonged drought occurred over extensive areas of North China and heavy precipitation in South China and Japan.The investigation on the possible intrinsic mechanisms related to such an anomalous monsoon year has shown that the unique behavior of intraseasonal oscillation may play an essential role during this process.During this year,the northward propagation of 30-60-day anomalous low-level cyclone/anticyclone collapsed in the region around 20℃N and did not extend beyond the latitudes of the Yangtze River basin due to the barrier of strong cold air intrusion from the mid-latitudes.The southwesterly moisture flux on the northwestern flank of the anticyclonic moisture transport system in the western North Pacific,which was regulated by the northward shift of 30-60-day cyclonic/anticyclonic moisture transport.also did not reach the region north of 30℃N as well.Under this circumstance,the weak northward advance of the monsoon westerlies and associated northward moisture transport could not arrive in North China and led to the severe droughts there in 1999.The SCS and South China were mostly affected by the alrflow in the southern and northern flanks of the same 30-60-day cyclones or anticyclones.respectively,and thus controlled by the nearly reverse zonal wind and moisture convergent/divergent conditions.The rainfall in the SCS and South China showed out-of-phase oscillation through the transient local Hadley circulation.with the rainfall maximum occurring in the SCS (South China)when the 30-60-day

  17. Meso-scale distribution of summer monsoon rainfall near the Western Ghats (India)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, S. K.; Asnani, G. C.

    2000-04-01

    The spatial distribution of southwest monsoon rainfall is studied over Maharashtra State (India), which includes part of the well-known Western Ghats mountain range, near its western boundary, running almost from north to south, perpendicular to the summer monsoon current in the lower troposphere. Meso-scale analysis of daily rainfall is performed for Maharashtra State, including the Western Ghats, for the two mid-monsoon months of July and August, during the 10-year period of 1971-1980. Strong and weak monsoon days were identified for the 5-year period of 1976-1980. The meso-scale pattern of average daily rainfall is obtained separately for strong and for weak monsoon conditions.All these average patterns show the following features: (i) the rainfall increases rapidly from the Arabian Sea coast close to the line of maximum height of the Western Ghats; (ii) there are two rainfall maxima corresponding to the two mountain peaks parallel to the coast line; (iii) between the two mountain peaks, there is a valley which is narrow at the western end (upwind end), broadening towards the east (on the downwind side). Ground contour height of the valley rises eastwards and ends as a part of the Deccan Plateau east of the Ghats. Here the valley opens out like a funnel with higher mountains flanking its two sides. In the valley, the rainfall increases from the coast up to the line of maximum height of the Ghats, and then decreases eastwards towards the plateau. The rainfall isopleths also take a funnel-shaped configuration. An interesting feature is that near the wider section of the valley funnel, there is a rainfall minimum and then the rainfall increases further eastwards on the downwind side. This feature of rainfall minimum is somewhat similar to the rainfall minimum reported by Asnani and Kinuthia (personal communication); Asnani (Asnani GC. 1993. Tropical Meteorology, Vol. I. Prof. G.C. Asnani: Pune, India; 603) attributed the rainfall minimum to the Bernoulli effect. A

  18. Teleconnection between the Indian summer monsoon onset and the Meiyu over the Yangtze River Valley

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU YunYun; DING YiHui

    2008-01-01

    Based on the Indian and Chinese precipitation data and the NCEP-NCAR reanalysis circulation data,the relationship between the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) onset and the Meiyu over the Yangtze River Valley has been discussed by the methods of correlation analysis and composite analysis. The results show that the date of ISM onset over Kerala in the southwestern coast of the Indian Peninsula is about two weeks earlier than the beginning of the Meiyu over the Yangtze River Valley. After the outbreak of ISM,the teleconnection mode sets up from the western coast of India via the Bay of Bengal (BOB) to the Yangtze River Valley and southern Japan. It is different both in time and space from the teleconnection mode which is from the northwest of India via the Tibetan Plateau to northern China. The former mode is defined as the "south" teleconnection of the Asian summer monsoon,forming in the period of ISM onset; while the latter mode is called the "north" teleconnection,mainly occurring in the Asian monsoon culminant period. During the process of the "south" teleconnection's formation,the Asian monsoon circulation has experienced a series of important changes: ISM onset,the northward movement of the south Asia high (SAH),the onset vortex occurrence,the eastward extension of the stronger tropical westerly belt,and the northeastward jump of the western Pacific subtropical high(WPSH),etc. Consequently,since ISM sets up over Kerala,the whole Asian continent is covered by the upper SAH after about two weeks,while in the mid- and lower troposphere,a strong wind belt forms from the Arabian Sea via the southern India,BOB and the South China Sea (SCS),then along the western flank of WPSH,to the Yangtze River Valley and southern Japan. With the northward moving of the subtropical jet streams,the upper westerly jet stream and the low level jet have been coupled vertically over east Asia,while the Yangtze River Valley happens to locate in the ascending motion area between the upper jet

  19. Teleconnection between the Indian summer monsoon onset and the Meiyu over the Yangtze River Valley

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Based on the Indian and Chinese precipitation data and the NCEP-NCAR reanalysis circulation data, the relationship between the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) onset and the Meiyu over the Yangtze River Valley has been discussed by the methods of correlation analysis and composite analysis. The results show that the date of ISM onset over Kerala in the southwestern coast of the Indian Peninsula is about two weeks earlier than the beginning of the Meiyu over the Yangtze River Valley. After the outbreak of ISM, the teleconnection mode sets up from the western coast of India via the Bay of Bengal (BOB) to the Yangtze River Valley and southern Japan. It is different both in time and space from the telecon- nection mode which is from the northwest of India via the Tibetan Plateau to northern China. The for- mer mode is defined as the "south" teleconnection of the Asian summer monsoon, forming in the pe- riod of ISM onset; while the latter mode is called the "north" teleconnection, mainly occurring in the Asian monsoon culminant period. During the process of the "south" teleconnection’s formation, the Asian monsoon circulation has experienced a series of important changes: ISM onset, the northward movement of the south Asia high (SAH), the onset vortex occurrence, the eastward extension of the stronger tropical westerly belt, and the northeastward jump of the western Pacific subtropical high (WPSH), etc. Consequently, since ISM sets up over Kerala, the whole Asian continent is covered by the upper SAH after about two weeks, while in the mid- and lower troposphere, a strong wind belt forms from the Arabian Sea via the southern India, BOB and the South China Sea (SCS), then along the western flank of WPSH, to the Yangtze River Valley and southern Japan. With the northward moving of the subtropical jet streams, the upper westerly jet stream and the low level jet have been coupled ver- tically over east Asia, while the Yangtze River Valley happens to locate in the ascending

  20. Interdecadal Variability of the East Asian Summer Monsoon and Associated Atmospheric Circulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Gang; SUN Zhaobo; Wei-Chyung WANG; MIN Jinzhong

    2007-01-01

    Based on the National Centers for Environmental Prediction and National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalysis data from 1950-1999, interdecadal variability of the East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM) and its associated atmospheric circulations are investigated. The EASM exhibits a distinct interdecadal variation, with stronger (weaker) summer monsoon maintained from 1950-1964 (1976-1997).In the former case, there is an enhanced Walker cell in the eastern Pacific and an anti-Walker cell in the western Pacific. The associated ascending motion resides in the central Pacific, which flows eastward and westward in the upper troposphere, descending in the eastern and western ends of the Pacific basin. At the same time, an anomalous East Asian Hadley Cell (EAHC) is found to connect the low-latitude and mid-latitude systems in East Asia, which strengthens the EASM. The descending branch of the EAHC lies in the west part of the anti-Walker cell, flowing northward in the lower troposphere and then ascending at the south of Lake Baikal (40°-50°N, 95°-115°E) before returning to low latitudes in the upper troposphere,thus strengthening the EASM.The relationship between the EASM and SST in the eastern tropical Pacific is also discussed. A possible mechanism is proposed to link interdecadal variation of the EASM with the eastern tropical Pacific SST. A warmer sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTA) therein induces anomalous ascending motion in the eastern Pacific, resulting in a weaker Walker cell, and at the same time inducing an anomalous Walker cell in the western Pacific and an enhanced EAHC, leading to a weaker EASM. Furthermore, the interdecadal variation of summer precipitation over North China is found to be strongly regulated by the velocity potential over the south of Lake Baikal through enhancing and reducing the regional vertical motions.

  1. Evaluation of Forecast Performance on Asian Summer Monsoon Low Level Wind Using TIGGE Dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoyun, Niu

    2016-04-01

    The forecast performance of EASM (East Asia summer monsoon) and SASM (South Asia summer monsoon) for six TIGGE (the THORPEX Interactive Grand Global Ensemble) centers in the summers of 2008-2013 are evaluated to reflect the current predictability of the state-of-the-art numerical weather prediction. The results show that EASM is overestimated by all the TIGGE centers (except the Canadian Meteorological Center, CMC). SASM is also over-predicted by ECMWF (the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts), CMA (the China Meteorological Administration) and CMC but conversely under-predicted by JMA (the Japan Meteorological Agency), Additionally, SASM is overestimated for the early lead times and underestimated for the longer lead times by NCEP (the National Centers for Environmental Prediction) and UKMO (the United Kingdom Meteorological Office (UKMO). Further analysis suggests such biases are likely to the associated with those in the related land-sea thermal contrasts. EASM surge is basically overestimated by NCEP and CMA and mainly underestimated by the others. The bias predictabilities for SASM surge are similar to that of SASM. The peaks of SASM and EASM including their surges are mainly underestimated while the valleys are mostly overestimated. By comparison, ECMWF and UKMO have overall the highest forecast skills in predicting SASM and EASM and both have respective advantages. All the TIGGE centers generally show higher skills in predicting SASM than EASM. The forecast skills of SASM and EASM are superior to that of their respective surges. Moreover, the bias-correction forecast skills tend to be improved with higher correlation coefficients in raw forecast verification.

  2. Parametric Sensitivity Analysis for the Asian Summer Monsoon Precipitation Simulation in the Beijing Climate Center AGCM Version 2.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ben; Zhang, Yaocun; Qian, Yun; Wu, Tongwen; Huang, Anning; Fang, Yongjie

    2015-07-15

    In this study, we apply an efficient sampling approach and conduct a large number of simulations to explore the sensitivity of the simulated Asian summer monsoon (ASM) precipitation, including the climatological state and interannual variability, to eight parameters related to the cloud and precipitation processes in the Beijing Climate Center AGCM version 2.1 (BCC_AGCM2.1). Our results show that BCC_AGCM2.1 has large biases in simulating the ASM precipitation. The precipitation efficiency and evaporation coefficient for deep convection are the most sensitive parameters in simulating the ASM precipitation. With optimal parameter values, the simulated precipitation climatology could be remarkably improved, e.g. increased precipitation over the equator Indian Ocean, suppressed precipitation over the Philippine Sea, and more realistic Meiyu distribution over Eastern China. The ASM precipitation interannual variability is further analyzed, with a focus on the ENSO impacts. It shows the simulations with better ASM precipitation climatology can also produce more realistic precipitation anomalies during El Niño decaying summer. In the low-skill experiments for precipitation climatology, the ENSO-induced precipitation anomalies are most significant over continents (vs. over ocean in observation) in the South Asian monsoon region. More realistic results are derived from the higher-skill experiments with stronger anomalies over the Indian Ocean and weaker anomalies over India and the western Pacific, favoring more evident easterly anomalies forced by the tropical Indian Ocean warming and stronger Indian Ocean-western Pacific tele-connection as observed. Our model results reveal a strong connection between the simulated ASM precipitation climatological state and interannual variability in BCC_AGCM2.1 when key parameters are perturbed.

  3. Possible Impacts of the Arctic Oscillation on the Interdecadal Variation of Summer Monsoon Rainfall in East Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JU Jianhua; L(U) Junmei; CAO Jie; REN Juzhang

    2005-01-01

    The influences of the wintertime AO (Arctic Oscillation) on the interdecadal variation of summer monsoon rainfall in East Asia were examined. An interdecadal abrupt change was found by the end of the 1970s in the variation of the AO index and the leading principal component time series of the summer rainfall in East Asia. The rainfall anomaly changed from below normal to above normal in central China, the southern part of northeastern China and the Korean peninsula around 1978. However,the opposite interdecadal variation was found in the rainfall anomaly in North China and South China.The interdecadal variation of summer rainfall is associated with the weakening of the East Asia summer monsoon circulation. It is indicated that the interdecadal variation of the AO exerts an influence on the weakening of the monsoon circulation. The recent trend in the AO toward its high-index polarity during the past two decades plays important roles in the land-sea contrast anomalies and wintertime precipitation anomaly. The mid- and high-latitude regions of the Asian continent are warming, while the low-latitude regions are cooling in winter and spring along with the AO entering its high-index polarity after the late 1970s. In the meantime, the precipitation over the Tibetan Plateau and South China is excessive, implying an increase of soil moisture. The cooling tendency of the land in the southern part of Asia will persist until summer because of the memory of soil moisture. So the warming of the Asian continent is relatively slow in summer. Moreover, the Indian Ocean and Pacific Ocean, which are located southward and eastward of the Asian land, are warming from winter to summer. This suggests that the contrast between the land and sea is decreased in summer. The interdecadal decrease of the land-sea heat contrast finally leads to the weakening of the East Asia summer monsoon circulation.

  4. Factors affecting the inter-annual to centennial timescale variability of Indian summer monsoon rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Abdul; Brönnimann, Stefan

    2017-09-01

    The Modes of Ocean Variability (MOV) namely Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), and El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) can have significant impacts on Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall (ISMR) on different timescales. The timescales at which these MOV interacts with ISMR and the factors which may perturb their relationship with ISMR need to be investigated. We employ De-trended Cross-Correlation Analysis (DCCA), and De-trended Partial-Cross-Correlation Analysis (DPCCA) to study the timescales of interaction of ISMR with AMO, PDO, and ENSO using observational dataset (AD 1854-1999), and atmosphere-ocean-chemistry climate model simulations with SOCOL-MPIOM (AD 1600-1999). Further, this study uses De-trended Semi-Partial Cross-Correlation Analysis (DSPCCA) to address the relation between solar variability and the ISMR. We find statistically significant evidence of intrinsic correlations of ISMR with AMO, PDO, and ENSO on different timescales, consistent between model simulations and observations. However, the model fails to capture modulation in intrinsic relationship between ISRM and MOV due to external signals. Our analysis indicates that AMO is a potential source of non-stationary relationship between ISMR and ENSO. Furthermore, the pattern of correlation between ISMR and Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) is inconsistent between observations and model simulations. The observational dataset indicates statistically insignificant negative intrinsic correlation between ISMR and TSI on decadal-to-centennial timescales. This statistically insignificant negative intrinsic correlation is transformed to statistically significant positive extrinsic by AMO on 61-86-year timescale. We propose a new mechanism for Sun-monsoon connection which operates through AMO by changes in summer (June-September; JJAS) meridional gradient of tropospheric temperatures (ΔTTJJAS). There is a negative (positive) intrinsic correlation between ΔTTJJAS (AMO) and

  5. Impact of high resolution land surface initialization in Indian summer monsoon simulation using a regional climate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnikrishnan, C. K.; Rajeevan, M.; Rao, S. Vijaya Bhaskara

    2016-06-01

    The direct impact of high resolution land surface initialization on the forecast bias in a regional climate model in recent years over Indian summer monsoon region is investigated. Two sets of regional climate model simulations are performed, one with a coarse resolution land surface initial conditions and second one used a high resolution land surface data for initial condition. The results show that all monsoon years respond differently to the high resolution land surface initialization. The drought monsoon year 2009 and extended break periods were more sensitive to the high resolution land surface initialization. These results suggest that the drought monsoon year predictions can be improved with high resolution land surface initialization. Result also shows that there are differences in the response to the land surface initialization within the monsoon season. Case studies of heat wave and a monsoon depression simulation show that, the model biases were also improved with high resolution land surface initialization. These results show the need for a better land surface initialization strategy in high resolution regional models for monsoon forecasting.

  6. Characterization of non-methane hydrocarbons in Asian summer monsoon outflow observed by the CARIBIC aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Baker

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Between April and December 2008 the CARIBIC commercial aircraft conducted monthly measurement flights between Frankfurt, Germany and Chennai, India. These flights covered the period of the Asian summer monsoon (June–September, during which enhancements in a number of atmospheric species were observed in monsoon outflow. In addition to in situ measurements of trace gases and aerosols, whole air samples were collected during the flights, and these were subsequently analyzed for a suite of trace gases that included the non-methane hydrocarbons. Non-methane hydrocarbons are relatively short-lived compounds and the large enhancements in their mixing ratios in the upper troposphere over Southwest Asia between June and September, sometimes more than double their spring and fall means, provides qualitative evidence for the influence of convectively uplifted boundary layer air. The particularly large enhancements of the combustion tracers benzene and ethyne, along with the similarity of their ratios to carbon monoxide and emission ratios from the burning of household biofuels, indicate a strong influence of biofuel burning to NMHC emissions in this region. Conversely, the ratios of ethane and propane to carbon monoxide, along with the ratio between i-butane and n-butane, indicate a significant source of these compounds from the use of LPG and natural gas, and comparison to previous campaigns suggests that this source could be increasing. Photochemical aging patterns of NMHCs showed that the CARIBIC samples were collected in two distinctly different regions of the monsoon circulation: a southern region where air masses had been recently influenced by low level contact and a northern region, where air parcels had spent substantial time in transit in the upper troposphere before being probed. Estimates of age using ratios of individual NMHCs have ranges of 3–6 d in the south and 9–12 d in the north.

  7. Mean state and interannual variability of the Indian summer monsoon simulation by NCEP CFSv2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Ravi P.; Huang, Bohua

    2016-06-01

    The capability of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction climate forecast system version 2 (CFSv2) in simulating the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) is evaluated in the context of the global monsoon in the Indo-Pacific domain and its variability. Although the CFSv2 captures the ISM spatial structure qualitatively, it demonstrates a severe dry bias over the Indian subcontinent. The weaker model monsoon may be related to an excessive surface convergence over the equatorial Indian Ocean, which reduces the moisture transport toward the Indian subcontinent. The excessively low equatorial pressure is in turn a part of a tropical-wise bias with the largest errors in the central and eastern equatorial Pacific associated with the cold sea surface temperature bias and an overly strong inter-tropical convergence zone. In this sense, the model bias in the tropical Pacific influences those in the Indian Ocean-ISM region substantially. The leading mode of the June-September averaged CFSv2 rainfall anomalies covering the ISM and its adjacent oceanic regions is qualitatively similar to that of the observations, characterized by a spatial pattern of strong anomalies over either side of the Indian peninsula as well as center of opposite sign over Myanmar. However, the model fails to reproduce the northward expansion of rainfall anomalies from Myanmar, leading to opposite anomalies over northeast India and Himalayas region. A substantial amount of the anomalous fluctuation is attributed to the El Niño and the Southern Oscillation (ENSO), although the model variability depends more strongly on ENSO. The active regional influences in the observations may contribute to its baroclinic vertical structure of the geopotential height anomalies in the ISM region, compared with the predominantly barotropic one in CFSv2. Model ENSO deficiencies also affects its ISM simulation significantly.

  8. Role of aerosols in modulating cloud properties during active-break cycle of Indian summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, A.; Chakraborty, A.; Venugopal, V.

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the weather research and forecast model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem), is used to understand the impact of aerosol-cloud interaction during the active-break cycles of the Indian summer monsoon. Two sets of simulations are performed, one with a fixed aerosol concentration (ConstantAero) and the other with an observation-based prescription of the rate of change of aerosol concentration as a function of precipitation (VaryingAero). This prescription is derived based on satellite-retrieved daily rainrate and concurrent observations of aerosol optical depth from aerosol robotic network. The proposed modification is necessitated by the lack of realistic emission estimates over the Indian region as well as the presence of inherent biases in monsoon simulation in WRF-Chem. In the VaryingAero simulation, unlike in the ConstantAero run, we find that the break-to-active monsoon phase has more cloud liquid water (CLW) and less rain efficiency than in the active-to-break phase. This is primarily due to the indirect effect of increased aerosol loading in the break phase. This result is in accordance with the observed behaviour of CLW estimtes from microwave imager (TRMM 2A12) and radar reflectivity (TRMM precipitation radar). We also find that the proposed interactive aerosol loading results in higher spatial variability in CLW and enhances the likelihood of increased cloud cover via formation of larger clouds. The modification also alters the diurnal cycle of clouds in break and break-to-active phases as compared to other phases due to aerosol loading, with a stronger diurnal cycle of upper level clouds in these phases in the VaryingAero model as compared to ConstantAero model.

  9. Role of aerosols in modulating cloud properties during active-break cycle of Indian summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, A.; Chakraborty, A.; Venugopal, V.

    2017-09-01

    In this study, the weather research and forecast model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem), is used to understand the impact of aerosol-cloud interaction during the active-break cycles of the Indian summer monsoon. Two sets of simulations are performed, one with a fixed aerosol concentration ( ConstantAero) and the other with an observation-based prescription of the rate of change of aerosol concentration as a function of precipitation ( VaryingAero). This prescription is derived based on satellite-retrieved daily rainrate and concurrent observations of aerosol optical depth from aerosol robotic network. The proposed modification is necessitated by the lack of realistic emission estimates over the Indian region as well as the presence of inherent biases in monsoon simulation in WRF-Chem. In the VaryingAero simulation, unlike in the ConstantAero run, we find that the break-to-active monsoon phase has more cloud liquid water (CLW) and less rain efficiency than in the active-to-break phase. This is primarily due to the indirect effect of increased aerosol loading in the break phase. This result is in accordance with the observed behaviour of CLW estimtes from microwave imager (TRMM 2A12) and radar reflectivity (TRMM precipitation radar). We also find that the proposed interactive aerosol loading results in higher spatial variability in CLW and enhances the likelihood of increased cloud cover via formation of larger clouds. The modification also alters the diurnal cycle of clouds in break and break-to-active phases as compared to other phases due to aerosol loading, with a stronger diurnal cycle of upper level clouds in these phases in the VaryingAero model as compared to ConstantAero model.

  10. Impact of the North Atlantic Sea Surface Temperature Tripole on the East Asian Summer Monsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZUO Jinqing; LI Weijing; SUN Chenghu; XU Li; REN Hong-Li

    2013-01-01

    A strong (weak) East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) is usually concurrent with the tripole pattern of North Atlantic SST anomalies on the interannual timescale during summer,which has positive (negative)SST anomalies in the northwestern North Atlantic and negative (positive) SST anomalies in the subpolar and tropical ocean.The mechanisms responsible for this linkage are diagnosed in the present study.It is shown that a barotropic wave-train pattern occurring over the Atlantic-Eurasia region likely acts as a link between the EASM and the SST tripole during summer.This wave-train pattern is concurrent with geopotential height anomalies over the Ural Mountains,which has a substantial effect on the EASM.Diagnosis based on observations and linear dynamical model results reveals that the mechanism for maintaining the wave-train pattern involves both the anomalous diabatic heating and synoptic eddy-vorticity forcing.Since the North Atlantic SST tripole is closely coupled with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO),the relationships between these two factors and the EASM are also examined.It is found that the connection of the EASM with the summer SST tripole is sensitive to the meridional location of the tripole,which is characterized by large seasonal variations due to the north-south movement of the activity centers of the NAO.The SST tripole that has a strong relationship with the EASM appears to be closely coupled with the NAO in the previous spring rather than in the simultaneous summer.

  11. Towards Understanding Planetary Boundary Layer Regimes in Relation to Indian Summer Monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyanadh, A.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric boundary layer processes play crucial role in modulating weather and climate of the earth. Information on the planetary boundary layer characteristics are important in various aspects. Analyses presented in the study are mainly carried out using Modern Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis data products. Hourly values of PBL height, soil moisture, fluxes, cloud cover, and atmospheric stability in the region 5-38° N, 60 - 100o E are used. The MERRA PBL heights are validated with PBL heights calculated using GPS RO atmospheric profiles during 2007-09 and radiosonde observations in order to assess the suitability of MERRA data for the PBL analysis. The radiosonde data used are from two sources: (i) routine radiosonde observations conducted by India Meteorological Department over the Indian subcontinent and (ii) additional radiosonde observations conducted by the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology as a part of the Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment during theSW monsoon, 2009. Spatio-temporal variations of PBL height in relation to different phases of monsoon and intra-seasonal variations are investigated in detail. Seasonal variations show a deeper premonsoon boundary layer and a shallower monsoon boundary layer, with large spatial variations. The PBLH variations over inland locations are found to be in good agreement with onset and progress of monsoon rainfall and associated soil moisture variations. The active and break spell monsoon PBL heights analyzed using 20-year PBL data showed deeper PBLHs during break periods compared to active period. Based on the maximum PBLH and growth characteristics, different regimes are identified which are mainly controlled by soil moisture/ evaporative fraction, but further influenced by stability of the surface, cloudiness, wind shear, etc. resulting in complex PBL regimes in relation to monsoon. The maximum PBLH, growth rate, time of occurrence

  12. Intra-seasonal variability of atmospheric CO2 concentrations over India during summer monsoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi Kumar, K.; Valsala, Vinu; Tiwari, Yogesh K.; Revadekar, J. V.; Pillai, Prasanth; Chakraborty, Supriyo; Murtugudde, Raghu

    2016-10-01

    In a study based on a data assimilation product of the terrestrial biospheric fluxes of CO2 over India, the subcontinent was hypothesized to be an anomalous source (sink) of CO2 during the active (break) spells of rain in the summer monsoon from June to September (Valsala et al., 2013). We test this hypothesis here by investigating intraseasonal variability in the atmospheric CO2 concentrations over India by utilizing a combination of ground-based and satellite observations and model outputs. The results show that the atmospheric CO2 concentration also varies in synchrony with the active and break spells of rainfall with amplitude of ±2 ppm which is above the instrumental uncertainty of the present day techniques of atmospheric CO2 measurements. The result is also consistent with the signs of the Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) flux anomalies estimated in our earlier work. The study thus offers the first observational affirmation of the above hypothesis although the data gap in the satellite measurements during monsoon season and the limited ground-based stations over India still leaves some uncertainty in the robust assertion of the hypothesis. The study highlights the need to capture these subtle variabilities and their responses to climate variability and change since it has implications for inverse estimates of terrestrial CO2 fluxes.

  13. Lack of Dependence of Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall Extremes on Temperature: An Observational Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittal, H.; Ghosh, Subimal; Karmakar, Subhankar; Pathak, Amey; Murtugudde, Raghu

    2016-08-01

    The intensification of precipitation extremes in a warming world has been reported on a global scale and is traditionally explained with the Clausius-Clapeyron (C-C) relation. The relationship is observed to be valid in mid-latitudes; however, the debate persists in tropical monsoon regions, with the extremes of the Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall (ISMR) being a prime example. Here, we present a comprehensive study on the dependence of ISMR extremes on both the 2 m surface air temperature over India and on the sea surface temperature over the tropical Indian Ocean. Remarkably, the ISMR extremes exhibit no significant association with temperature at either spatial scale: neither aggregated over the entire India/Tropical Indian Ocean area nor at the grid levels. We find that the theoretical C-C relation overestimates the positive changes in precipitation extremes, which is also reflected in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) simulations. We emphasize that the changing patterns of extremes over the Indian subcontinent need a scientific re-evaluation, which is possible due to availability of the unique long-term in-situ data. This can aid bias correction of model projections of extremes whose value for climate adaptation can hardly be overemphasized, especially for the developing tropical countries.

  14. Weakening of Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall due to Changes in Land Use Land Cover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Supantha; Ghosh, Subimal; Oglesby, Robert; Pathak, Amey; Chandrasekharan, Anita; Ramsankaran, Raaj

    2016-08-24

    Weakening of Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR) is traditionally linked with large-scale perturbations and circulations. However, the impacts of local changes in land use and land cover (LULC) on ISMR have yet to be explored. Here, we analyzed this topic using the regional Weather Research and Forecasting model with European Center for Medium range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) reanalysis data for the years 2000-2010 as a boundary condition and with LULC data from 1987 and 2005. The differences in LULC between 1987 and 2005 showed deforestation with conversion of forest land to crop land, though the magnitude of such conversion is uncertain because of the coarse resolution of satellite images and use of differential sources and methods for data extraction. We performed a sensitivity analysis to understand the impacts of large-scale deforestation in India on monsoon precipitation and found such impacts are similar to the observed changes in terms of spatial patterns and magnitude. We found that deforestation results in weakening of the ISMR because of the decrease in evapotranspiration and subsequent decrease in the recycled component of precipitation.

  15. Weakening of Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall due to Changes in Land Use Land Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Supantha; Ghosh, Subimal; Oglesby, Robert; Pathak, Amey; Chandrasekharan, Anita; Ramsankaran, Raaj

    2016-08-01

    Weakening of Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR) is traditionally linked with large-scale perturbations and circulations. However, the impacts of local changes in land use and land cover (LULC) on ISMR have yet to be explored. Here, we analyzed this topic using the regional Weather Research and Forecasting model with European Center for Medium range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) reanalysis data for the years 2000–2010 as a boundary condition and with LULC data from 1987 and 2005. The differences in LULC between 1987 and 2005 showed deforestation with conversion of forest land to crop land, though the magnitude of such conversion is uncertain because of the coarse resolution of satellite images and use of differential sources and methods for data extraction. We performed a sensitivity analysis to understand the impacts of large-scale deforestation in India on monsoon precipitation and found such impacts are similar to the observed changes in terms of spatial patterns and magnitude. We found that deforestation results in weakening of the ISMR because of the decrease in evapotranspiration and subsequent decrease in the recycled component of precipitation.

  16. Interdecadal Variability of the East Asian Summer Monsoon in an AGCM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Jinping; WANG Huijun

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that significant interdecadal variation of the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM)occurred around the end of the 1970s. Whether these variations can be attributed to the evolution of global sea surface temperature (SST) and sea ice concentration distribution is investigated with an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM). The model is forced with observed monthly global SST and sea ice evolution through 1958-1999. A total of four integrations starting from different initial conditions are carried out. It is found that only one of these reproduces the observed interdecadal changes of the EASM after the 1970s, including weakened low-level meridional wind, decreased surface air temperature and increased sea level pressure in central China, as well as the southwestward shift of the western Pacific subtropical high ridge and the strengthened 200-hPa westerlies. This discrepancy among these simulated results suggests that the interdecadal variation of the EASM cannot be accounted for by historical global SST and sea ice evolution. Thus, the possibility that the interdecadal timescale change of monsoon is a natural variability of the coupled climate system evolution cannot be excluded.

  17. Prediction of Monthly Summer Monsoon Rainfall Using Global Climate Models Through Artificial Neural Network Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Archana; Singh, Gurjeet; Mohanty, U. C.

    2017-08-01

    The monthly prediction of summer monsoon rainfall is very challenging because of its complex and chaotic nature. In this study, a non-linear technique known as Artificial Neural Network (ANN) has been employed on the outputs of Global Climate Models (GCMs) to bring out the vagaries inherent in monthly rainfall prediction. The GCMs that are considered in the study are from the International Research Institute (IRI) (2-tier CCM3v6) and the National Centre for Environmental Prediction (Coupled-CFSv2). The ANN technique is applied on different ensemble members of the individual GCMs to obtain monthly scale prediction over India as a whole and over its spatial grid points. In the present study, a double-cross-validation and simple randomization technique was used to avoid the over-fitting during training process of the ANN model. The performance of the ANN-predicted rainfall from GCMs is judged by analysing the absolute error, box plots, percentile and difference in linear error in probability space. Results suggest that there is significant improvement in prediction skill of these GCMs after applying the ANN technique. The performance analysis reveals that the ANN model is able to capture the year to year variations in monsoon months with fairly good accuracy in extreme years as well. ANN model is also able to simulate the correct signs of rainfall anomalies over different spatial points of the Indian domain.

  18. Decreasing Asian summer monsoon intensity after 1860 AD in the global warming epoch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Hai [Institute of Earth Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Loess and Quaternary Geology, Xi' an, Shaanxi Province (China); Hong, Yetang; Hong, Bin [Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Guiyang (China)

    2012-10-15

    The trend of the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) intensity and its nature during the past 100 and 200 years still remain unclear. In this study we reconstructed the ISM intensity during the past 270 years from tree ring {delta}{sup 18}O at Hongyuan, eastern edge of the Tibet Plateau. The monsoon failures inferred from {delta}{sup 18}O{sub tree} {sub ring} correlate well with those recorded in ice cores, speleothem, and historical literature sources. 22.6, 59.0, and 110.9-years frequency components in the Hongyuan {delta}{sup 18}O{sub tree} {sub ring} series, which may be the responses to solar activities, synchronize well with those recorded in other ISM indices. A notable feature of the reconstructed ISM intensity is the gradually decreasing trend from about 1860 to the present, which is inversely related to the increasing temperature trend contemporaneously. Such ''decreasing ISM intensity-increasing temperature'' tendency can also be supported by ice core records and meteorological records over a wide geographic extension. The decrease in sea surface temperature gradient between tropical and north Indian Ocean, and the decrease in land-sea thermal contrast between tropical Indian Ocean and ''Indian sub-continent-western Himalaya'' are possibly responsible for the observed decreasing ISM trend. (orig.)

  19. Interhemispheric atmospheric mass oscillation and its relation to interannual variations of the Asian monsoon in boreal summer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Using NCEP/NCAR reanalysis and precipitation records of Chinese stations, we have investigated the relationship of interhemispheric oscillation of air mass (IHO) with global lower-level circulation and monsoon anomalies in boreal summer. Our results show that the summer IHO explains a greater portion of variance in the abnormal distribution of atmospheric mass over 30°S-60°N as well as the Antarctic. The IHO strongly correlates to the variations of sea level pressure (SLP) in these regions. It is shown that IHO has some influences on both atmospheric mass transports and water vapor fluxes over 30°S-60°N in association with three anomalous cyclonic circulations over land areas of the eastern hemisphere, which is in close relation to the changes in summer monsoon intensity in eastern Asia and western Africa. Composites of summer rainfall anomalies in China for high and low IHO-index years indicate that the eastern Asian summer monsoon is more intense, with positive precipitation anomaly centers in northern and northeastern parts of China, as opposed to the negative center over the mid-lower reaches of the Yangtze River (MLRYR) in stronger IHO years. In weak IHO years, a feeble summer monsoon appears in eastern Asia, leading to positive center of precipitation anomalies displaced into the MLRYR. Furthermore, a teleconnection in wind fields between the western African and eastern Asian monsoon regions was observed in the middle and higher troposphere in the scenario of IHO. The anomalous cyclonic (anticyclonic) circulations along the path of this Africa-East Asia teleconnection were found to be just over the diabatic heating (cooling) centers, suggesting that diabatic forcings are responsible for the formation of this Africa-East Asia teleconnection.

  20. Enhancement and depletion of lower/middle tropospheric ozone in Senegal during pre-monsoon and monsoon periods of summer 2008: observations and model results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. S. Jenkins

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available During the summer (8 June through 3 September of 2008, 9 ozonesondes are launched from Dakar, Senegal (14.75° N, 17.49° W to investigate ozone (O3 variability in the lower/middle troposphere during the pre-monsoon and monsoon periods. Results during June 2008 (pre-monsoon period show a reduction in O3 concentrations, especially in the 850–700 hPa layer with Saharan Air Layer (SAL events. However, O3 concentrations are increased in the 950–900 hPa layer where the peak of the inversion is found and presumably the highest dust concentrations. We also use the WRF-CHEM model to gain greater insights for observations of elevated/reduced O3 concentrations during the pre-monsoon/monsoon periods. In the transition period between 26 June and 2 July in the lower troposphere (925–600 hPa, a significant increase in O3 concentrations occur which we suggest is caused by enhanced biogenic NOx emissions from Sahelian soils following rain events on 28 June and 1 July. During July and August 2008 (monsoon period, with the exception of one SAL outbreak, vertical profiles of O3 are well mixed with concentrations not exceeding 55 ppb between the surface and 550 hPa. The results suggest that during the pre-monsoon period ozone concentrations in the lower troposphere are controlled by the SAL, which destroys ozone through heterogeneous processes. At the base of the SAL we also find elevated levels of ozone, which we attribute to biogenic sources of NOx from Saharan dust that are released in the presence of moist conditions. Once the monsoon period commences, wet and dry deposition become important sinks of ozone in the Sahel with episodes of ozone poor air that is horizontally transported from low latitudes into the Sahel. These results support aircraft chemical measurements and chemical modeling results from the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA field

  1. Dynamical mechanism of the stratospheric quasibiennial oscillation impact on the South China Sea Summer Monsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The National Center for the Atmospheric Research (NCAR) middle atmospheric model is used to study the effects of the quasi-biennial oscillation in the stratosphere (QBO) on the tropopause and upper troposphere, and the relationship between the QBO and South China Sea Summer Monsoon (SCSSM) is explored through NCEP (the National Centers for Environmental Prediction)/NCAR, ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) monthly mean wind data and in situ sounding data. The simulations show that the QBO-induced residual circulations propagate downwards, and affect the tropopause and upper troposphere during the periods of mid-late QBO phase and phase transition. Meanwhile, diagnostic analyses indicate that anomalous circulation similar to SCSSM circulation is generated to strengthen the SCSSM during the easterly phase and anomalous Hadley-like circulation weakens the SCSSM during the westerly. Though the QBO has effects on the SCSSM by meridional circulation, it is not a sole mechanism on the SCSSM TBO mode.

  2. Seasonal prediction of summer monsoon rainfall over cluster regions of India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S B Kakade; Ashwini Kulkarni

    2017-04-01

    Shared nearest neighbour (SNN) cluster algorithm has been applied to seasonal (June–September) rainfall departures over 30 sub-divisions of India to identify the contiguous homogeneous cluster regions over India. Five cluster regions are identified. Rainfall departure series for these cluster regions are prepared by area weighted average rainfall departures over respective sub-divisions in each cluster. The interannual and decadal variability in rainfall departures over five cluster regions is discussed. In order to consider the combined effect of North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and Southern Oscillation (SO), an index called effective strength index (ESI) has been defined. It has been observed that the circulation is drastically different in positive and negative phases of ESI-tendency from January to April. Hence, for each phaseof ESI-tendency (positive and negative), separate prediction models have been developed for predicting summer monsoon rainfall over identified clusters. The performance of these models have been tested and found to be encouraging.

  3. Statistically related coupled modes of South Asian summer monsoon interannual variability in the tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Faisal S.; Kucharski, Fred

    2016-04-01

    Statistically coupled patterns of South Asian Summer Monsoon (SASM) interannual variability in the tropical oceans have been explored.Maximum covariance analysis (MCA) performed between global tropical sea surface temperature (SST) and SASM precipitation shows that El-Nino southern oscillation (ENSO) is the leading mode in the tropics, whereas the eastern pole of the Indian Ocean Dipole contributes to the second global mode and is the leading mode in the Indian Ocean. South tropical Atlantic SST variability is contributing to the second and third mode in the tropics and is the leading mode in the tropical Atlantic MCA coupled with SASM. The physical mechamism of the south tropical Atlantic-SASM teleconnection is analysed in more details.

  4. SUNYA Regional Climate Model Simulations of East Asia Summer Monsoon: Effects of Cloud Vertical Structure on the Surface Energy Balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Gong Wei-Chyung Wang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We used the State University of New York at Albany (SUNYA regional climate model to study the effect of cloud vertical distribution in affecting the surface energy balance of the East Asia summer monsoon (EASM. Simulations were conducted for the summers of 1988 and 1989, during which large contrast in the intra-seasonal cloud radiative forcing (CRF was observed at the top of the atmosphere.

  5. Potential impact of the May Southern Hemisphere annular mode on the Indian summer monsoon rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Juan; Wu, Zhiwei; Zhou, Yefan

    2016-10-01

    El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is probably a most important external forcing to Indian summer monsoon (ISM) rainfall (ISMR), yet the observed ENSO-ISMR relationship has become weak in recent years. It's essential to explore other predominant modes of variability which can contribute to the ISMR. As the leading mode of the variability in Southern Hemisphere (SH) extratropical atmospheric circulation, the SH annular mode (SAM) has potential influence both on the northern and southern hemispheric climate. The present study investigates the relationship between the SAM and ISMR. It is found that the May SAM exhibits a significant positive correlation with the monsoon precipitation over the Indian sub-continent and the adjacent areas in June-July (JJ). Observational and numerical evidences indicate that the May SAM anomaly can trigger a South Indian Ocean dipole (SIOD) sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTA) through air-sea interactions. The SIOD SSTA persisting into the following months of JJ excites abnormal meridional circulation and modulates the low-level cross-equatorial flow. Accordingly, the ascending (or descending) motion and water vapor transportation are enhanced (or suppressed), which favors more (or less) precipitation over the Indian sub-continent and the adjacent areas. In fact, the SIOD SSTA plays an "ocean bridge" role to "prolong" the influence of the May SAM to the subsequent season and in turn impacts on the ISMR. Moreover, an empirical model is established to forecast the JJ ISMR strength based on the ENSO, Indian Ocean Dipole and May SAM. The hindcast is carried out for the period 1979-2014, and performs better than the multimodel ensemble mean (MME) obtained from the Development of a European MME system for seasonal to interannual prediction (DEMETER) project. Since all these predictors can be monitored in real time before the early boreal summer, the empirical model might provide a practical real-time forecast tool for predicting ISMR

  6. Impact of the Asian Summer Monsoon on the Lower Stratosphere: Results from TACTS/ESMVal 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoor, Peter; Müller, Stefan; Vogel, Bärbel; Bozem, Heiko; Fischer, Horst; Bönisch, Harald; Engel, Andreas; Keber, Timo; Krämer, Martina; Riese, Martin; Gute, Ellen; Schlager, Hans; Ziereis, Helmut; Zahn, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    We present results from the German research aircraft HALO during the TACTS/ESMVal project (Transport and Composition in the UTLS and Earth System Model Validation). We focus on the distribution of CO, N2O and ozone as well as water vapour. The measurements took place in the extratropical UTLS (upper troposphere/lower stratosphere) region over Europe from August to September 2012. Here, we focus on the northern hemispheric trace gas composition above potential temperatures of 370 K. In this region we could for the first time identify mixing lines, which indicate mixing between stratospheric air masses of different origin. Introducing a new pair of correlation species (N2O-CO) we could identify air masses, which do not involve mixing directly at the tropopause. Based on a case study we show, that the atmospheric region between the extratropical tropopause and potential temperatures up to Θ = 405 K is affected by mixing of 'young' stratospheric air from the monsoon region with aged stratospheric air. Based on the distribution of CO and N2O we show that the lower stratosphere over Europe becomes more tropospheric from August to September with enhanced CO, N2O and water vapour as well as decreasing ozone. Using comprehensive trajectory calculations our results particularly indicate that the Asian summer monoon is the main contributor to this composition change and that mixing from the tropical tropopause layer becomes weaker over time. Therefore we conclude that the monsoon significantly contributes to the flushing of the extratropical UTLS during summer and autumn.

  7. Intraseasonal variability of the Indian summer monsoon: wet and dry events in COSMO-CLM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Befort, Daniel J.; Leckebusch, G. C.; Cubasch, U.

    2016-10-01

    This study aims to validate the widely used regional climate model COSMO-CLM driven by ERA-Interim reanalysis data with a spatial resolution of 55 km with respect to observed features of the intraseasonal variability of the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) during the period 1979 until 2011. One of these features is the northward propagation of the ISM intraseasonal oscillations. We find, that the temporal evolution between model and observation is in good agreement, while less agreement with respect to the strength is found. Furthermore, the model's capability to simulate observed dry and wet events on a weekly time-scale is investigated using the standardized precipitation index. In general, the model is capable to simulate these events with a similar magnitude at the same time. Observational based analyses show, that the coupling between atmospheric circulation anomalies and rainfall anomalies over India on the intraseasonal time scale is well represented by the model. The most important circulation anomalies for dry events are a lower tropospheric anti-cyclonic vortex over India and partly an upper tropospheric cyclonic vortex over the Pakistan region and vice versa for wet events. The model shows a slightly higher ability to simulate dry compared to wet events. Overall, this study shows that the current configuration of COSMO-CLM is able to simulate the key features of the intraseasonal variability of the Indian summer monsoon. Being aware of its limitation, COSMO-CLM is suitable to investigate possible changes of the intraseasonal variability of ISM under changed climate conditions in the past or in the future.

  8. Potential impact of the May Southern Hemisphere annular mode on the Indian summer monsoon rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Juan; Wu, Zhiwei; Zhou, Yefan

    2017-08-01

    El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is probably a most important external forcing to Indian summer monsoon (ISM) rainfall (ISMR), yet the observed ENSO-ISMR relationship has become weak in recent years. It's essential to explore other predominant modes of variability which can contribute to the ISMR. As the leading mode of the variability in Southern Hemisphere (SH) extratropical atmospheric circulation, the SH annular mode (SAM) has potential influence both on the northern and southern hemispheric climate. The present study investigates the relationship between the SAM and ISMR. It is found that the May SAM exhibits a significant positive correlation with the monsoon precipitation over the Indian sub-continent and the adjacent areas in June-July (JJ). Observational and numerical evidences indicate that the May SAM anomaly can trigger a South Indian Ocean dipole (SIOD) sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTA) through air-sea interactions. The SIOD SSTA persisting into the following months of JJ excites abnormal meridional circulation and modulates the low-level cross-equatorial flow. Accordingly, the ascending (or descending) motion and water vapor transportation are enhanced (or suppressed), which favors more (or less) precipitation over the Indian sub-continent and the adjacent areas. In fact, the SIOD SSTA plays an "ocean bridge" role to "prolong" the influence of the May SAM to the subsequent season and in turn impacts on the ISMR. Moreover, an empirical model is established to forecast the JJ ISMR strength based on the ENSO, Indian Ocean Dipole and May SAM. The hindcast is carried out for the period 1979-2014, and performs better than the multimodel ensemble mean (MME) obtained from the Development of a European MME system for seasonal to interannual prediction (DEMETER) project. Since all these predictors can be monitored in real time before the early boreal summer, the empirical model might provide a practical real-time forecast tool for predicting ISMR

  9. The impacts of summer monsoons on the ozone budget of the atmospheric boundary layer of the Asia-Pacific region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xuewei; Zhu, Bin; Fei, Dongdong; Wang, Dongdong

    2015-01-01

    The seasonal and inter-annual variations of ozone (O3) in the atmospheric boundary layer of the Asia-Pacific Ocean were investigated using model simulations (2001-2007) from the Model of Ozone and Related chemical Tracers, version 4 (MOZART-4). The simulated O3 and diagnostic precipitation are in good agreement with the observations. Model results suggest that the Asia-Pacific monsoon significantly influences the seasonal and inter-annual variations of ozone. The differences of anthropogenic emissions and zonal winds in meridional directions cause a pollutants' transition zone at approximately 20°-30°N. The onset of summer monsoons with a northward migration of the rain belt leads the transition zone to drift north, eventually causing a summer minimum of ozone to the north of 30°N. In years with an early onset of summer monsoons, strong inflows of clean oceanic air lead to low ozone at polluted oceanic sites near the continent, while strong outflows from the continent exist, resulting in high levels of O3 over remote portions of the Asia-Pacific Ocean. The reverse is true in years when the summer monsoon onset is late.

  10. Response of the North African summer monsoon to precession and obliquity forcings in the EC-Earth GCM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosmans, J.H.C.; Drijfhout, S.S.; Tuenter, E.; Hilgen, F.J.; Lourens, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate, for the first time, the response of the North African summer monsoon to separate precession and obliquity forcings using a high-resolution state-of-the-art coupled general circulation model, EC-Earth. Our aim is to better understand the mechanisms underlying the astronomical forcing

  11. Quaternary ecological responses and impacts of the Indian Ocean Summer Monsoon at Nam Co, Southern Tibetan Plateau

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Günther, F.; Witt, R.; Schouten, Stefan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/137124929; Mausbacher, R.; Daut, G.; Zhu, Liping; Xu, B.; Yao, T.; Gleixner, G.

    2015-01-01

    The transition from the Last Glacial to the current Interglacial, the Holocene, represents an important period with climatic and environmental changes impacting ecosystems. In this study, we examined the interplay between the Indian Ocean Summer Monsoon (IOSM) and the Westerlies at lake Nam Co, sout

  12. Quaternary ecological responses and impacts of the Indian Ocean Summer Monsoon at Nam Co, Southern Tibetan Plateau

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Günther, F.; Witt, R.; Schouten, S.; Mausbacher, R.; Daut, G.; Zhu, L.; Xu, B.Q.; Yao, T.; Gleixner, G.

    2015-01-01

    The transition from the Last Glacial to the current Interglacial, the Holocene, represents an important period with climatic and environmental changes impacting ecosystems. In this study, we examined the interplay between the Indian Ocean Summer Monsoon (IOSM) and the Westerlies at lake Nam Co,

  13. Quaternary ecological responses and impacts of the Indian Ocean Summer Monsoon at Nam Co, Southern Tibetan Plateau

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Günther, F.; Witt, R.; Schouten, Stefan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/137124929; Mausbacher, R.; Daut, G.; Zhu, Liping; Xu, B.; Yao, T.; Gleixner, G.

    The transition from the Last Glacial to the current Interglacial, the Holocene, represents an important period with climatic and environmental changes impacting ecosystems. In this study, we examined the interplay between the Indian Ocean Summer Monsoon (IOSM) and the Westerlies at lake Nam Co,

  14. Tracing the boundary layer sources of carbon monoxide in the Asian summer monsoon anticyclone using WRF-Chem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Renchang; Bian, Jianchun

    2015-07-01

    The Asian summer monsoon (ASM) anticyclone is a dominant feature of the circulation in the upper troposphere-lower stratosphere (UTLS) during boreal summer, which is found to have persistent maxima in carbon monoxide (CO). This enhancement is due to the upward transport of air with high CO from the planetary boundary layer (PBL), and confinement within the anticyclonic circulation. With rapid urbanization and industrialization, CO surface emissions are relatively high in the ASM region, especially in India and East China. To reveal the transport pathway of CO surface emissions over these two regions, and investigate the contribution of these to the CO distribution within the ASM anticyclone, a source sensitivity experiment was performed using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) with chemistry model (WRF-Chem). According to the experiment results, the CO within the ASM anticyclone mostly comes from India, while the contribution from East China is insignificant. The result ismainly caused by the different transportation mechanisms. In India, CO transportation is primarily affected by convection. The surface air with high CO over India is directly transported to the upper troposphere, and then confined within the ASM anticyclone, leading to a maximum value in the UTLS region. The CO transportation over East China is affected by deep convection and large-scale circulation, resulting mainly in transportation to Korea, Japan, and the North Pacific Ocean, with little upward transport to the anticyclone, leading to a high CO value at 215 hPa over these regions.

  15. Long-lead prediction of Indian summer monsoon rainfall from global SST evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahai, A.K.; Grimm, A.M. [Dept. de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Parana, Centro Politecnico, Jardim das Americas, Caixa Postal 19044, CEP 81531-990, Curitiba-PR (Brazil); Satyan, V.; Pant, G.B. [Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Pune (India)

    2003-05-01

    Heading Abstract. A methodology is presented for making optimum use of the global sea surface temperature (SST) field for long lead prediction of the Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR). To avoid the node phase of the biennial oscillation of El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO)-monsoon system and also to include the multiyear ENSO variability, the ISMR-SST relationship was examined from three seasons lag prior to the start of the monsoon season up to four years lag. First, a correlation analysis is used to identify the regions and seasonal lags for which SST is highly correlated with ISMR. The correlation patterns show a slow and consistent temporal evolution, suggesting the existence of SST oscillations that produce significant correlation even when no direct physical relationship between SST and ISMR, at such long lags, is plausible. As a second step, a strategy for selecting the best 14 predictors (hot spots of the global oceans) is investigated. An experimental prediction of ISMR is made using the SST anomalies in these 14 hot spots. The prediction is consistent for the 105 years (1875 to 1979) of the model development and the 22 years (1980 to 2001) of the model verification period (these last years were not included in the correlation analysis or in the computation of the regression model). The predicted values explain about 80% of the observed variance of ISMR in the model verification period. It is shown that, to a large extent, the behavior of the ensuing ISMR can be determined nine months in advance using SST only. The consistent and skillful prediction for more than a century is not a product of chance. Thus the anomalously strong and weak monsoon seasons are parts of longer period and broader scale circulation patterns, which result from interactions in the ocean-atmosphere coupled system over many seasons in the past. It is argued that despite the weakening of the ENSO-ISMR relationship in recent years, most of the variability of ISMR can still be

  16. Seasonal Transitions and the Westerly Jet in the Holocene East Asian Summer Monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, W.; Chiang, J. C. H.

    2015-12-01

    The Holocene East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM) was characterized by a trend to weaker monsoon intensity paced by orbital insolation. Here, we attribute the stronger EASM intensity in the early-mid Holocene to changes in the timing of the transition between the EASM seasonal stages - Spring, pre Mei- Yu, Mei-Yu, and Summer - during that time. Following the recent 'jet transition hypothesis' (Chiang et al., 2015), we explore the role of north-south displacement of the westerlies relative to the Tibetan Plateau that is hypothesized to control the downstream EASM seasonality changes across the Holocene. To this end, we analyze model simulations of the Holocene EASM, compare the simulated Holocene climate with the paleodata observations, and examine the role of atmospheric circulation and specifically the westerlies in modulating the East Asia summer climate. The PMIP3 climate model simulations suggest that, compared to the pre-industrial, the Mei-Yu onset and the transition from Mei-Yu to Summer rainfall occur earlier in the mid-Holocene. The advanced seasonal rainfall transition is accompanied by the weakened and northward-shifted upstream westerlies. In our atmospheric general circulation model (coupled to a slab ocean) simulations of various time periods across the Holocene (9ka, 6ka, 3ka, and pre-industrial), we quantitatively show that the timing and the length of each rainfall stage are closely related to the jet position over East Asia. We also show that the simulated changes in the maximum annual rainfall band and dust emission over East Asia largely agree with the paleo-proxy observations. In addition, we find that changes to the seasonal rainfall transitions, latitudinal westerly position, and stationary eddy activity over East Asia co-vary across the Holocene. In particular, we argue that the changes in the rainfall seasonal transitions are tied to an altered stationary wave pattern, resembling today's the so-called 'Silk Road Pattern', riding along the

  17. Simulation skill of APCC set of global climate models for Asian summer monsoon rainfall variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, U. K.; Singh, G. P.; Singh, Vikas

    2015-04-01

    The performance of 11 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Climate Center (APCC) global climate models (coupled and uncoupled both) in simulating the seasonal summer (June-August) monsoon rainfall variability over Asia (especially over India and East Asia) has been evaluated in detail using hind-cast data (3 months advance) generated from APCC which provides the regional climate information product services based on multi-model ensemble dynamical seasonal prediction systems. The skill of each global climate model over Asia was tested separately in detail for the period of 21 years (1983-2003), and simulated Asian summer monsoon rainfall (ASMR) has been verified using various statistical measures for Indian and East Asian land masses separately. The analysis found a large variation in spatial ASMR simulated with uncoupled model compared to coupled models (like Predictive Ocean Atmosphere Model for Australia, National Centers for Environmental Prediction and Japan Meteorological Agency). The simulated ASMR in coupled model was closer to Climate Prediction Centre Merged Analysis of Precipitation (CMAP) compared to uncoupled models although the amount of ASMR was underestimated in both models. Analysis also found a high spread in simulated ASMR among the ensemble members (suggesting that the model's performance is highly dependent on its initial conditions). The correlation analysis between sea surface temperature (SST) and ASMR shows that that the coupled models are strongly associated with ASMR compared to the uncoupled models (suggesting that air-sea interaction is well cared in coupled models). The analysis of rainfall using various statistical measures suggests that the multi-model ensemble (MME) performed better compared to individual model and also separate study indicate that Indian and East Asian land masses are more useful compared to Asia monsoon rainfall as a whole. The results of various statistical measures like skill of multi-model ensemble, large spread

  18. Widespread Lake Highstands in the Southernmost Andean Altiplano during Heinrich Event 1: Implications for the South American Summer Monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. Y.; McGee, D.; Quade, J.

    2014-12-01

    Speleothem-based oxygen isotope records provide strong evidence of anti-phased behavior of the northern and southern hemisphere summer monsoons during Heinrich events, but we lack rigorous constraints on the amount of wetting or drying occurring in monsoon regions. Studies centered on shoreline deposits of closed-basin lakes are well suited for establishing such quantitative controls on water balance changes by providing unequivocal evidence of lake volume variations. Here we present new dating constraints on the highstands of several high-altitude (3800-4350 m) paleolakes in the southern Andean Altiplano, an outlying arid region of the Atacama Desert stretching across the Chilean-Bolivian-Argentinian border east of the Andes (20-25°S). These lakes once occupied the closed basins where only phreatic playas, dry salars, and shallow ponds exist today. Initial U-Th dating of massive shoreline tufas reveals that these deposits are dateable to within ±150 to 300 yrs due to high U concentrations and low initial Th content (as indicated by high 230Th/232Th). Our U-Th and 14C dates show that lake highstands predominantly occur between 18.5 and 14.5 kyrs BP, coinciding with Heinrich Event 1 (HE1) and the expansion of other nearby lakes, such as Lake Titicaca. Because of their (1) location at the modern-day southwestern edge of the summer monsoon, (2) intact shoreline preservation, and (3) precise age control, these lakes may uniquely enable us to reconstruct the evolution of water balance (P-E) changes associated with HE1. Hydrologic modeling constrained by temperature estimates provided by local glacial records is used to provide bounds for past precipitation changes. We also examine North Atlantic cooling as the mechanism for these changes by comparing a compilation of S. American lake level records with various hosing experiments and transient climate simulations at HE1. Our results lend us confidence in expanding our U-Th work to other shoreline tufas in the

  19. The influences of East Asian Monsoon on summer precipitation in Northeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li; Shen, Baizhu; Sui, Bo; Huang, Bohua

    2017-03-01

    A unique dataset of 53-year (1961-2013) rainfall measurements from 104 stations uniformly distributed in the Northeast China, combined with the observation-based NCEP/NCAR atmospheric reanalysis, is used to analyze the precipitation anomalies in Northeast China during late boreal summer (July-August) and their relationship with the anomalous moisture transport associated with the fluctuations of the East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM) circulation. Based on this analysis, a new EASM influence index ( I EASM ) is proposed to quantify the EASM effects on the Northeast China summer precipitation. The relationship between the IEASM variations and patterns of the anomalous regional atmospheric circulation is demonstrated. The characteristics of several precursors that lead to the major fluctuations of the I EASM index are also explored. The results show that the EASM influence index is closely linked to the anomalous rainfall in Northeast China and can be used as a major factor to measure the physical processes that affect the regional dry and wet conditions. The I EASM index responds to the large-scale anomalies of the atmospheric circulation sensitively. Specifically, the high I EASM values are associated with the intensified Mongolia cyclone, blocking developing near the Ural Mountains and a northwestward shift of subtropical high over the western Pacific. The low I EASM values are associated with a reversed pattern of these features. The I EASM anomalous fluctuation has some precursors. A major high (low) index during the summer is likely preceded with the pattern of the sea surface temperature anomalies of an El Niño (La Niña) event in the Pacific from the previous early fall to early winter.

  20. Simulation of Indian summer monsoon onset with different parameterization convection schemes of RegCM-4.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatla, R.; Ghosh, S.; Mandal, B.; Mall, R. K.; Sharma, Kuldeep

    2016-07-01

    Simulation of Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) onset over South Asia Coordinated Regional Climate Downscaling Experiment (CORDEX) domain in pentad composite pattern is considered for this study. The latest version of the International Center for Theoretical Physics' (ICTP's) Regional Climate Model version 4.3 (RegCM-4.3) is used for the simulation of a pentad composite onset for three time period: Pre-onset, Onset and Post-onset periods of ISM. Each pentad composite is average of five consecutive days. 10 years (2001-2010) worth of pentad composites of rainfall, mean sea level pressure (MSLP), outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), wind at 850 hPa and 925 hPa levels till 7 days prior to the date of onset of monsoon and 7 days after the onset are analyzed to find out the predictive skill. Six Parameterization convection schemes (PCSs) viz. Kuo, Mix98, Mix99, Tiedtke, Emanuel and Grell are used in sensitivity experiment and estimation of their performance has been done. From the experiment, some modulation is found in the OLR field (≤ 200 Wm- 2) within the region 5°N-10°N and 70°N-75°E. Yearly analysis has shown the strength of wind at 925 hPa over the region 5°N-10°N and 70°E-80°E on pentad composite onset of ISM. Yearly analysis is conducted for finding the best fitted PCS which has provided the precursor for simulating the onset.

  1. Trends in Peroxyacetyl Nitrate (PAN in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere over Southern Asia during the summer monsoon season: regional impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fadnavis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We analyze temporal trends of Peroxyacetyl Nitrate (PAN retrievals from the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS during 2002–2011 in the altitude range 8–23 km over the Asian summer monsoon (ASM region. The greatest enhancements of PAN mixing ratios in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS are seen during the summer monsoon season from June to September. During the monsoon season, the mole fractions of PAN show statistically significant (at 2 sigma level positive trends from 0.2 ± 0.05 to 4.6 ± 3.1 ppt year−1 (except between 12–14 km which is higher than the annual mean trends of 0.1 ± 0.05 to 2.7 ± 0.8 ppt year−1. These rising concentrations point to increasing NOx (=NO+NO2 and volatile organic compound (VOC emissions from developing nations in Asia, notably India and China. We analyze the influence of monsoon convection on the distribution of PAN in UTLS with simulations using the global chemistry-climate model ECHAM5-HAMMOZ. During the monsoon, transport into the UTLS over the Asian region primarily occurs from two convective zones, one extending from the Bay of Bengal to the South China Sea and the other over the southern flank of the Himalayas. India and China are NOx limited regions, and thus we use the model to evaluate the contributions from enhanced NOx emissions to the changes in PAN, HNO3 and O3 concentrations in the UTLS. From a set of sensitivity experiments with emission changes in particular regions it can be concluded that Chinese emissions have a greater impact on the concentrations of these species than Indian emissions. NOx emissions increases over India are about half of those over China.

  2. Amplification of the solar signal in the summer monsoon rainband in China by synergistic actions of different dynamical responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liang; Wang, Jingsong; Liu, Haiwen; Xiao, Ziniu

    2017-02-01

    A rainband meridional shift index (RMSI) is defined and used to statistically prove that the East Asian summer monsoon rainband is usually significantly more northward in the early summer of solar maximum years than that of solar minimum years. By applying continuous wavelet transform, cross wavelet transform, and wavelet coherence, it is found that throughout most of the 20th century, the significant decadal oscillations of sunspot number (SSN) and the RMSI are phase-locked and since the 1960s, the SSN has led the RMSI slightly by approximately 1.4 yr. Wind and Eliassen-Palm (EP) flux analysis shows that the decadal meridional oscillation of the June rainband likely results from both a stronger or earlier onset of the tropical monsoon and poleward shift of the subtropical westerly jet in high-solar months of May and June. The dynamical responses of the lower tropical monsoon and the upper subtropical westerly jet to the 11-yr solar cycle transmit bottom-up and top-down solar signals, respectively, and the synergistic actions between the monsoon and the jet likely amplify the solar signal at the northern boundary of the monsoon to some extent.

  3. Atmospheric Moisture Distribution and Transport over the Tibetan Plateau and the Impacts of the South Asian Summer Monsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周立波; 朱金焕; 邹捍; 马舒坡; 李鹏; 张宇; 霍翠萍

    2013-01-01

    In this study, by using the ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalysis data from 1979 to 2010, the spatial distribu-tion and transport of total atmospheric moisture over the Tibetan Plateau (TP) are analyzed, together with the associated impacts of the South Asian summer monsoon (SASM). Acting as a moisture sink in summer, the TP has a net moisture flux of 2.59×107 kg s-1 during 1979-2010, with moisture supplies mainly from the southern boundary along the latitude belts over the Bay of Bengal and the Arabian Sea. The total atmospheric moisture over the TP exhibits significant differences in both spatial distribution and transport between the monsoon active and break periods and between strong and weak monsoon years. Large positive (negative) moisture anomalies occur over the southwest edge of the TP and the Arabian Sea, mainly due to transport of easterly (westerly) anomalies during the monsoon active (break) period. For the whole TP region, the total moisture supply is more strengthened than the climatological mean during the monsoon active period, which is mainly contributed by the transport of moisture from the south edge of the TP. During the monsoon break period, however, the total moisture supply to the TP is slightly weakened. In addition, the TP moisture sink is also strengthened (weakened) in the strong (weak) monsoon years, mainly attributed by the moisture transport in the west-east directions. Our results suggest that the SASM has exerted great impacts on the total atmospheric moisture and its transport over the TP through adjusting the moisture spatial distribution.

  4. Impact of high resolution land surface initialization in Indian summer monsoon simulation using a regional climate model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C K Unnikrishnan; M Rajeevan; S Vijaya Bhaskara Rao

    2016-06-01

    The direct impact of high resolution land surface initialization on the forecast bias in a regional climatemodel in recent years over Indian summer monsoon region is investigated. Two sets of regional climatemodel simulations are performed, one with a coarse resolution land surface initial conditions and secondone used a high resolution land surface data for initial condition. The results show that all monsoonyears respond differently to the high resolution land surface initialization. The drought monsoon year2009 and extended break periods were more sensitive to the high resolution land surface initialization.These results suggest that the drought monsoon year predictions can be improved with high resolutionland surface initialization. Result also shows that there are differences in the response to the land surfaceinitialization within the monsoon season. Case studies of heat wave and a monsoon depression simulationshow that, the model biases were also improved with high resolution land surface initialization. Theseresults show the need for a better land surface initialization strategy in high resolution regional modelsfor monsoon forecasting.

  5. Northern Hemisphere winter warming and summer monsoon reduction after volcanic eruptions over the last millennium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambri, Brian; LeGrande, Allegra N.; Robock, Alan; Slawinska, Joanna

    2017-08-01

    Observations show that all recent large tropical volcanic eruptions (1850 to Present) were followed by surface winter warming in the first Northern Hemisphere (NH) winter after the eruption. Recent studies show that climate models produce a surface winter warming response in the first winter after the largest eruptions but require a large ensemble of simulations to see significant changes. It is also generally required that the eruption be very large, and only two such eruptions occurred in the historical period: Krakatau in 1883 and Pinatubo in 1991. Here we examine surface winter warming patterns after the 10 largest volcanic eruptions between 850 and 1850 in the Paleoclimate Modeling Intercomparison Project 3 last millennium simulations and in the Community Earth System Model Last Millennium Ensemble. These eruptions were all larger than those since 1850. Though the results depend on both the individual models and the forcing data set used, we have found that models produce a surface winter warming signal in the first winter after large volcanic eruptions, with higher temperatures over NH continents and a stronger polar vortex in the lower stratosphere. We also examined NH summer precipitation responses in the first year after the eruptions and find clear reductions of summer Asian and African monsoon rainfall.

  6. C4 plant expansion since the late Miocene and the evolution of Asian summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H.; Guo, Z.; Guiot, J.; Yu, Y.; Ge, J.; Zhang, Y.; Peng, S.

    2015-12-01

    A dramatic expansion of C4 plant distribution occurred in the South Asia during the late Miocene and in the East Asia during the Pliocene period, with broad spatial and temporal variations. Although the event is well documented, whether subsequent expansions were caused by a decreased atmospheric CO2 concentration or climate change is a contentious issue. In this study, we used an improved inverse vegetation modeling approach that accounts for the physiological responses of C3 and C4 plants to quantitatively reconstruct the paleoclimate in the Siwalik of South Asia and in the Loess Plateau of East Asia, based on pollen and carbon isotope data. We also studied the sensitivity of the C3 and C4 plants to changes in the climate and the atmospheric CO2 concentration. We suggest that the expansion of the C4 plant distribution since the late Miocene was unlikely caused by reduced CO2 levels alone. The expansion may have been primarily triggered by regional aridification, and seasonal analysis revealed that this climate shift mainly attributed to the summer rainfall decrease. Our findings suggest that this abrupt ecological shift mainly resulted from the weakening of the Asian summer monsoon, which may related to the decrease of SST in the tropic since the late Miocene.

  7. Summer Monsoon and Annual Variability of Sea Surface Slope and Their Effects on Alongshore Current near Qingdao

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒲书箴; 程军; 张义钧; 石强; 骆敬新; 范文静

    2004-01-01

    Based on the monthly mean sea level data obtained from 3 years′ (1999-2001) tide-gauge measurements, the annual variability of the sea level near Qingdao and Jiaozhou Bay is studied and discussed in this paper. Results show that the sea surface height at all the tide gauges becomes higher in summer than that in winter,with an obvious seasonal variability.Furthermore the sea surface height measured at a short distance outside the bay is lower than that in thebay, showing a sea surface slope downward from north to south. The reasons for the formation of the slope are explained as well, The dynamic action ofthe summer monsoon and the sea surface slope, and their effects on the monthly mean current are studied by means of dynamics principles. The importance of the summer monsoon and the pressure gradient generated by the sea surface slope, with their effects on the alongshore current, is pointed out and emphasized in this paper.

  8. Summer Asian-Pacific Oscillation and Its Relationship with Atmospheric Circulation and Monsoon Rainfall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ping; CHEN Junming; XIAO Dong; NAN Sulan; ZOU Yan; ZHOU Botao

    2008-01-01

    Using the ERA-40 data and numerical simulations, this study investigated the teleconnection over the extratropical Asian-Pacific region and its relationship with the Asian monsoon rainfall and the climatological characteristics of tropical cyclones over the western North Pacific, and analyzed impacts of the Tibetan Plateau (TP) heating and Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) on the teleconnection. The Asian-Pacific oscillation (APO) is defined as a zonal seesaw of the tropospheric temperature in the midlatitudes of the Asian-Pacific region. When the troposphere is cooling in the midlatitudes of the Asian continent, it is warming in the midlatitudes of the central and eastern North Pacific; and vice versa. The APO also appears in the stratosphere, but with a reversed phase. Used as an index of the thermal contrast between Asia and the North Pacific, it provides a new way to explore interactions between the Asian and Pacific atmospheric circulations. The APO index exhibits the interannual and interdecadal variability. It shows a downward trend during 1958-2001, indicating a weakening of the thermal contrast, and shows a 5.5-yr oscillation period. The formation of the APO is associated with the zonal vertical circulation caused by a difference in the solar radiative heating between the Asian continent and the North Pacific. The numerical simulations further reveal that the summer TP heating enhances the local tropospheric temperature and upward motion, and then strengthens downward motion and decreases the tropospheric temperature over the central and eastern North Pacific. This leads to the formation of the APO. The Pacific decadal oscillation and El Nino/La Nina over the tropical eastern Pacific do not exert strong influences on the APO. When there is an anomaly in the summer APO, the South Asian high, the westerly jet over Eurasia, the tropical easterly jet over South Asia, and the subtropical high over the North Pacific change significantly, with anomalous Asian

  9. Multidecadal changes in the Etesians-Indian Summer Monsoon teleconnection along the 20th Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Delgado, F. de Paula; Vega, Inmaculada; Gallego, David; Peña-Ortiz, Cristina; Ribera, Pedro; García-Herrera, Ricardo

    2017-04-01

    In this work we made use of historical winds record taken aboard ships to reconstruct a series of the prevalent summer northerly winds (Etesian winds) over the Eastern Mediterranean for the entire 20th century. Previous studies have shown a significant link between the frequency and strength of these winds and the strength of the Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM), but this relationship had only been studied in detail for the second half of the 20th century due to the absence of long and continous series of observed wind in the Eastern Mediterranean for previous periods. In this work, a new climatic index, the so-called " Etesian Wind Index " (EWI), is defined as the percentage of days with prevalent northerly wind (wind blowing from 305° to 35°) in a fixed region [20E-30E, 32N-37N]. By using historical wind observations, we have been able to compute this index for the summer (JJAS) since 1880 and analyze the long term variability of the Etesians, as well as to research into its relation with the ISM at an unprecedent temporal coverage. A running coverage analysis revealed a strong and significant positive correlation between the EWI and the strength of the ISM for the period 1960-1980, more markedly in July and August. This result is in accordance with other recent studies. However, we have found that the correalation fades out in the first half of the 20th century (1900-1950) and in the period 1980-2012, even showing significant negative values around the subperiod 1920-1950. Similar indices to the EWI were computed using two different 20th century reanalysis datasets (ERA20C and 20CR-V2C). Despite the fact that both indices show some discrepancies with the EWI before 1950, the correlation analysis with the ISM revealed similar results, pointing out a strong loss of the EWI-ISM correlation in the first half of the 20th century and from 1980 onwards, as well as a marked positive correlated period between 1960 and 1980, specially in August. In this study, we show that

  10. The interactions between anthropogenic aerosols and the East Asian summer monsoon using RegCCMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T. J.; Zhuang, B. L.; Li, S.; Liu, J.; Xie, M.; Yin, C. Q.; Zhang, Y.; Yuan, C.; Zhu, J. L.; Ji, L. Q.; Han, Y.

    2015-06-01

    An online coupled regional climate-chemistry model called RegCCMS is used to investigate the interactions between anthropogenic aerosols and the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) over East Asia. The simulation results show that the mean aerosol loading and optical depth over the region are 17.87 mg/m2 and 0.25, respectively. Sulfate and black carbon (BC) account for approximately 61.2% and 7.8% of the total aerosols, respectively. The regional mean radiative forcing (RF) is approximately -3.64, -0.55, and +0.88 W/m2 at the top of the atmosphere for the total aerosol effect, the total aerosol direct effect, and the BC direct effect, respectively. The surface direct RF of BC accounts for approximately 31% of the total RF of all aerosols. Because of the total aerosol effect, both the energy budgets and air temperature are considerably reduced in the region with high aerosol loadings, leading to decreases in the land-ocean air temperature gradient in summer. The total column-absorbed solar radiation and surface air temperature decrease by 8.4 W/m2 and 0.31 K, respectively. This cooling effect weakens horizontal and vertical atmospheric circulations over East Asia. The wind speed at 850 hPa decreases by 0.18 m/s, and the precipitation decreases by 0.29 mm/d. The small responses of solar radiation, air temperature, and atmospheric circulations to the BC warming effect are opposite to those of the total aerosol effect. The BC-induced enhancement of atmospheric circulation can increase local floods in south China, while droughts in north China may worsen in response to the BC semidirect effect. The total aerosol effect is much more significant than the BC direct effect. The East Asian summer monsoon becomes weaker due to the total aerosol effect. However, this weakness could be partially offset by the BC warming effect. Sensitivity analyses further indicate that the influence of aerosols on the EASM might be more substantial in years when the southerlies or southwesterlies

  11. CMIP5 model-simulated onset, duration and intensity of the Asian summer monsoon in current and future climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Guangtao; Zhang, H.; Moise, A.; Hanson, L.; Liang, P.; Ye, H.

    2016-01-01

    A number of significant weaknesses existed in our previous analysis of the changes in the Asian monsoon onset/retreat from coupled model intercomparison project phase 3 (CMIP3) models, including a lack of statistical significance tests, a small number of models analysed, and limited understanding of the causes of model uncertainties. Yet, the latest IPCC report acknowledges limited confidence for projected changes in monsoon onset/retreat. In this study we revisit the topic by expanding the analysis to a large number of CMIP5 models over much longer period and with more diagnoses. Daily 850 hPa wind, volumetric atmospheric precipitable water and rainfall data from 26 CMIP5 models over two sets of 50-year periods are used in this study. The overall model skill in reproducing the temporal and spatial patterns of the monsoon development is similar between CMIP3 and CMIP5 models. They are able to show distinct regional characteristics in the evolutions of Indian summer monsoon (ISM), East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) and West North Pacific summer monsoon (WNPSM). Nevertheless, the averaged onset dates vary significantly among the models. Large uncertainty exists in model-simulated changes in onset/retreat dates and the extent of uncertainty is comparable to that in CMIP3 models. Under global warming, a majority of the models tend to suggest delayed onset for the south Asian monsoon in the eastern part of tropical Indian Ocean and Indochina Peninsula and nearby region, primarily due to weakened tropical circulations and eastward shift of the Walker circulation. The earlier onset over the Arabian Sea and part of the Indian subcontinent in a number of the models are related to an enhanced southwesterly flow in the region. Weak changes in other domains are due to the offsetting results among the models, with some models showing earlier onsets but others showing delayed onsets. Different from the analysis of CMIP3 model results, this analysis highlights the importance of SST

  12. Influence of Summer Monsoon on Asymmetric Bimodal Pattern of Tropical Cyclogenesis Frequency over the Bay of Bengal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING Wen; HUANG Fei

    2013-01-01

    influence of summer monsoon on tropical cyclone (TC) genesis over the Bay of Bengal (BoB) is explored using an empirical genesis potential (GP) index.The annual cycle of cyclogenesis frequency over the BoB shows an asymmetric bimodal pattern with the maximum genesis number appearing in late October and the second largest in early May.The two peaks correspond to the withdrawal and onset of the BoB summer monsoon,respectively.The semimonthly GP index calculated without TC days over the BoB is consistent with TC genesis frequency,indicating that the index captures the monsoon-induced changes in the environment that are responsible for the seasonal variation of TC genesis frequency.Of the four environmental variables (i.e.,low-level vorticity,mid-level relative humidity,potential intensity,and vertical wind shear) that enter into the GP index,the potential intensity makes the largest contribution to the bimodal distribution,followed by vertical wind shear due to small wind speed during the summer monsoon onset and withdrawal.The difference in TC genesis frequency between autumn and late spring is mainly owing to the relative humidity difference because a divergence (convergence) of horizontal moisture flux associated with cold dry northerlies (warm wet westerlies) dominates the BoB in late spring (autumn).

  13. Emission sources contributing to tropospheric ozone over equatorial Africa during the summer monsoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Bouarar

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A global chemistry-climate model LMDz_INCA is used to investigate the contribution of African and Asian emissions to tropospheric ozone over central and West Africa during the summer monsoon. The model results show that ozone in this region is most sensitive to lightning NOx and to central African biomass burning emissions. However, other emission categories also contribute significantly to regional ozone. The maximum ozone changes due to lightning NOx occur in the upper troposphere between 400 hPa and 200 hPa over West Africa and downwind over the Atlantic Ocean. Biomass burning emissions mainly influence ozone in the lower and middle troposphere over central Africa, and downwind due to westward transport. Biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds, which can be uplifted from the lower troposphere into higher altitudes by the deep convection that occurs over West Africa during the monsoon season, dominate the ozone changes in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere region. Convective uplift of soil NOx emissions over the Sahel region also makes a significant contribution to ozone in the upper troposphere. Concerning African anthropogenic emissions, they make a lower contribution to ozone compared to the other emission categories. The model results indicate that most ozone changes due to African emissions occur downwind, especially over the Atlantic Ocean, far from the emission regions. The influence of Asian emissions should also be taken into account in studies of the ozone budget over Africa since they make a considerable contribution to ozone concentrations above 150 hPa. Using IPCC AR5 (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change; Fifth Assessment Report estimates of anthropogenic emissions for 2030 over Africa and Asia, the model calculations suggest largest changes in ozone due to the growth of emissions over Asia than over Africa over the next 20 years.

  14. Emission sources contributing to tropospheric ozone over Equatorial Africa during the summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouarar, I.; Law, K. S.; Pham, M.; Liousse, C.; Schlager, H.; Hamburger, T.; Reeves, C. E.; Cammas, J.-P.; Nédéléc, P.; Szopa, S.; Ravegnani, F.; Viciani, S.; D'Amato, F.; Ulanovsky, A.; Richter, A.

    2011-12-01

    A global chemistry-climate model LMDz_INCA is used to investigate the contribution of African and Asian emissions to tropospheric ozone over Central and West Africa during the summer monsoon. The model results show that ozone in this region is most sensitive to lightning NOx and to Central African biomass burning emissions. However, other emission categories also contribute significantly to regional ozone. The maximum ozone changes due to lightning NOx occur in the upper troposphere between 400 hPa and 200 hPa over West Africa and downwind over the Atlantic Ocean. Biomass burning emissions mainly influence ozone in the lower and middle troposphere over Central Africa, and downwind due to westward transport. Biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds, which can be uplifted from the lower troposphere to higher altitudes by the deep convection that occurs over West Africa during the monsoon season, lead to maximum ozone changes in the lower stratosphere region. Soil NOx emissions over the Sahel region make a significant contribution to ozone in the lower troposphere. In addition, convective uplift of these emissions and subsequent ozone production are also an important source of ozone in the upper troposphere over West Africa. Concerning African anthropogenic emissions, they only make a small contribution to ozone compared to the other emission categories. The model results indicate that most ozone changes due to African emissions occur downwind, especially over the Atlantic Ocean, far from the emission regions. The import of Asian emissions also makes a considerable contribution to ozone concentrations above 150 hPa and has to be taken into account in studies of the ozone budget over Africa. Using IPCC AR5 (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change; Fifth Assessment Report) estimates of anthropogenic emissions for 2030 over Africa and Asia, model calculations show larger changes in ozone over Africa due to growth in Asian emissions compared to African emissions

  15. Upper-tropospheric CO and O3 budget during the Asian summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Brice; Sauvage, Bastien; Bennouna, Yasmine; Le Flochmoen, Eric

    2016-07-01

    During the Asian summer monsoon, the circulation in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS) is dominated by the Asian monsoon anticyclone (AMA). Pollutants convectively uplifted to the upper troposphere are trapped within this anticyclonic circulation that extends from the Pacific Ocean to the Eastern Mediterranean basin. Among the uplifted pollutants are ozone (O3) and its precursors, such as carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrogen oxides (NOx). Many studies based on global modeling and satellite data have documented the source regions and transport pathways of primary pollutants (CO, HCN) into the AMA. Here, we aim to quantify the O3 budget by taking into consideration anthropogenic and natural sources. We first use CO and O3 data from the MetOp-A/IASI sensor to document their tropospheric distributions over Asia, taking advantage of the useful information they provide on the vertical dimension. These satellite data are used together with MOZAIC tropospheric profiles recorded in India to validate the distributions simulated by the global GEOS-Chem chemistry transport model. Over the Asian region, UTLS monthly CO and O3 distributions from IASI and GEOS-Chem display the same large-scale features. UTLS CO columns from GEOS-Chem are in agreement with IASI, with a low bias of 11 ± 9 % and a correlation coefficient of 0.70. For O3, the model underestimates IASI UTLS columns over Asia by 14 ± 26 % but the correlation between both is high (0.94). GEOS-Chem is further used to quantify the CO and O3 budget through sensitivity simulations. For CO, these simulations confirm that South Asian anthropogenic emissions have a more important impact on enhanced concentrations within the AMA (˜ 25 ppbv) than East Asian emissions (˜ 10 ppbv). The correlation between enhanced emissions over the Indo-Gangetic Plain and monsoon deep convection is responsible for this larger impact. Consistently, South Asian anthropogenic NOx emissions also play a larger role in producing O3 within

  16. An Objective Approach for Prediction of Daily Summer Monsoon Rainfall over Orissa (India) due to Interaction of Mesoscale and Large-scale Synoptic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, M.; Mohanty, U. C.

    2007-09-01

    Orissa State, a meteorological subdivision of India, lies on the east coast of India close to north Bay of Bengal and to the south of the normal position of the monsoon trough. The monsoon disturbances such as depressions and cyclonic storms mostly develop to the north of 15° N over the Bay of Bengal and move along the monsoon trough. As Orissa lies in the southwest sector of such disturbances, it experiences very heavy rainfall due to the interaction of these systems with mesoscale convection sometimes leading to flood. The orography due to the Eastern Ghat and other hill peaks in Orissa and environs play a significant role in this interaction. The objective of this study is to develop an objective statistical model to predict the occurrence and quantity of precipitation during the next 24 hours over specific locations of Orissa, due to monsoon disturbances over north Bay and adjoining west central Bay of Bengal based on observations to up 0300 UTC of the day. A probability of precipitation (PoP) model has been developed by applying forward stepwise regression with available surface and upper air meteorological parameters observed in and around Orissa in association with monsoon disturbances during the summer monsoon season (June-September). The PoP forecast has been converted into the deterministic occurrence/non-occurrence of precipitation forecast using the critical value of PoP. The parameters selected through stepwise regression have been considered to develop quantitative precipitation forecast (QPF) model using multiple discriminant analysis (MDA) for categorical prediction of precipitation in different ranges such as 0.1 10, 11 25, 26 50, 51 100 and >100 mm if the occurrence of precipitation is predicted by PoP model. All the above models have been developed based on data of summer monsoon seasons of 1980 1994, and data during 1995 1998 have been used for testing the skill of the models. Considering six representative stations for six homogeneous regions

  17. The influence of dynamic vegetation on the present-day simulation and future projections of the South Asian summer monsoon in the HadGEM2 family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, G. M.; Levine, R. C.

    2012-11-01

    Various studies have shown the importance of Earth System feedbacks in the climate system and the necessity of including these in models used for making climate change projections. The HadGEM2 family of Met Office Unified Model configurations combines model components which facilitate the representation of many different processes within the climate system, including atmosphere, ocean and sea ice, and Earth System components including the terrestrial and oceanic carbon cycle and tropospheric chemistry. We examine the climatology of the Asian summer monsoon in present-day simulations and in idealised climate change experiments. Members of the HadGEM2 family are used, with a common physical framework (one of which includes tropospheric chemistry and an interactive terrestrial and oceanic carbon cycle), to investigate whether such components affect the way in which the monsoon changes. We focus particularly on the role of interactive vegetation in the simulations from these model configurations. Using an atmosphere-only HadGEM2 configuration, we investigate how the changes in land cover which result from the interaction between the dynamic vegetation and the model systematic rainfall biases affect the Asian summer monsoon, both in the present-day and in future climate projections. We demonstrate that the response of the dynamic vegetation to biases in regional climate, such as lack of rainfall over tropical dust-producing regions, can affect both the present-day simulation and the response to climate change forcing scenarios.

  18. Ocean-atmosphere processes driving Indian summer monsoon biases in CFSv2 hindcasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narapusetty, Balachandrudu; Murtugudde, Raghu; Wang, Hui; Kumar, Arun

    2016-09-01

    This paper analyzes the role of the Indian Ocean (IO) and the atmosphere biases in generating and sustaining large-scale precipitation biases over Central India (CI) during the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) in the climate forecast system version 2 (CFSv2) hindcasts that are produced by initializing the system each month from January 1982 to March 2011. The CFSv2 hindcasts are characterized by a systematic dry monsoon bias over CI that deteriorate with forecast lead-times and coexist with a wet bias in the tropical IO suggesting a large-scale interplay between coupled ocean-atmosphere and land biases. The biases evolving from spring-initialized forecasts are analyzed in detail to understand the evolution of summer biases. The northward migration of the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) that typically crosses the equator in the IO sector during April in nature is delayed in the hindcasts when the forecast system is initialized in early spring. Our analyses show that the delay in the ITCZ coexists with wind and SST biases and the associated processes project onto the seasonal evolution of the coupled ocean-atmosphere features. This delay in conjunction with the SST and the wind biases during late spring and early summer contributes to excessive precipitation over the ocean and leading to a deficit in rainfall over CI throughout the summer. Attribution of bias to a specific component in a coupled forecast system is particularly challenging as seemingly independent biases from one component affect the other components or are affected by their feedbacks. In the spring-initialized forecasts, the buildup of deeper thermocline in association with warmer SSTs due to the enhanced Ekman pumping in the southwest IO inhibits the otherwise typical northward propagation of ITCZ in the month of April. Beyond this deficiency in the forecasts, two key ocean-atmosphere coupled mechanisms are identified; one in the Arabian Sea, where a positive windstress curl bias in conjunction

  19. Effects of the Indo-China Peninsula Heat Fluxes on the 1998 South China Sea Summer Monsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Xueli; Johnny C. L. CHAN; K. C. CHOW; DING Yihui

    2005-01-01

    Sensitivity experiments to investigate the role and importance of the Indo-China Peninsula (ICP) heat fluxes (sensible and latent heat fluxes) on the South China Sea summer monsoon (SCSSM) onset and its subsequent evolution have been carried out using a regional climate model. Two sensitivity experiments have been conducted: cutting off the sensible heat flux (noted as IChfx) and latent heat flux (noted as ICqfx).Results show that by cutting off the underlying heat flux of the ICP, the precipitation decreases and low-level geopotential height increases over the local regions as well as the remote regions of the East China Sea, southern Japan, and western North Pacific. The westerly (easterly) zonal winds at 850 hPa (200 hPa)are generally weakened in May and June, especially before and during the onset of the SCSSM towards the end of May.It is worth noting that although the observed sensible heat flux is only about 1/3 of the latent heat flux,the differences between the control run and each of the two sensitivity experiments are comparable.

  20. BOBMEX: The Bay of Bengal Monsoon Experiment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhat, G.S.; Gadgil, S.; Kumar, P.V.H.; Kalsi, S.R.; Madhusoodanan, P.; Murty, V.S.N.; Rao, C.V.K.P.; RameshBabu, V.; Rao, L.V.G.; Rao, R.R.; Ravichandran, M.; Reddy, K.G.; Rao, P.Sanjeeva; Sengupta, D.; Sikka, D.R.; Swain, J.; Vinayachandran, P.N.

    fresh water, with a barrier layer beneath, appears intermit- tently (Godfrey and Lindstrom 1989; Lukas and Lindstrom 1991). Further, the salinity gradient be- tween the surface layer of the west Pacific and the ocean below is much smaller than that over... Boundary Layer Experiment (MONTBLEX-90) car- ried out over the northern plains of the Indian subcon- tinent (Goel and Srivastava 1990). The differences in the horizontal wind fields, ver- tical velocity, and large-scale heat and moisture bud- gets between...

  1. Future projection of Indian summer monsoon variability under climate change scenario: An assessment from CMIP5 climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharmila, S.; Joseph, S.; Sahai, A. K.; Abhilash, S.; Chattopadhyay, R.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the impact of enhanced anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions on the possible future changes in different aspects of daily-to-interannual variability of Indian summer monsoon (ISM) is systematically assessed using 20 coupled models participated in the Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project Phase 5. The historical (1951-1999) and future (2051-2099) simulations under the strongest Representative Concentration Pathway have been analyzed for this purpose. A few reliable models are selected based on their competence in simulating the basic features of present-climate ISM variability. The robust and consistent projections across the selected models suggest substantial changes in the ISM variability by the end of 21st century indicating strong sensitivity of ISM to global warming. On the seasonal scale, the all-India summer monsoon mean rainfall is likely to increase moderately in future, primarily governed by enhanced thermodynamic conditions due to atmospheric warming, but slightly offset by weakened large scale monsoon circulation. It is projected that the rainfall magnitude will increase over core monsoon zone in future climate, along with lengthening of the season due to late withdrawal. On interannual timescales, it is speculated that severity and frequency of both strong monsoon (SM) and weak monsoon (WM) might increase noticeably in future climate. Substantial changes in the daily variability of ISM are also projected, which are largely associated with the increase in heavy rainfall events and decrease in both low rain-rate and number of wet days during future monsoon. On the subseasonal scale, the model projections depict considerable amplification of higher frequency (below 30 day mode) components; although the dominant northward propagating 30-70 day mode of monsoon intraseasonal oscillations may not change appreciably in a warmer climate. It is speculated that the enhanced high frequency mode of monsoon ISOs due to increased GHG induced warming

  2. Understanding the Dynamic and Thermodynamic Causes of Historical Trends in the Intraseasonal Variability of the South Asian Summer Monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, D.; Horton, D. E.; Diffenbaugh, N. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Indian Summer Monsoon directly affects the lives of over 1/6th of the world's population, being critical for agriculture (>50% of the agricultural lands are still rainfed) and water availability in the subcontinent. The summer monsoon is characterized by a dominant 30-60 day mode of intraseasonal variability causing the occurrence of wet and dry spells over a substantial portion of India during the peak-monsoon months (July-August). We use a 1°x1° gridded rainfall dataset (1951-2011) from the Indian Meteorological Department to quantify changes in the mean and intraseasonal variability of daily summer monsoon rainfall across India. Using a non-parametric statistical methodology to account for temporal correlation in the time-series, we find a statistically significant decreasing trend in rainfall and increasing trend in variability in many regions, and changes in the characteristics of wet and dry spells.Using geopotential heights from the NCEP reanalysis dataset, we apply the Self-Organizing Maps (SOMs) approach (cluster analysis) to define typical upper (200mb) and lower-level (850mb) atmospheric patterns associated with extreme wet and dry conditions in the different sub-regions within India. We identify the extreme wet and dry spell patterns from the precipitation composites associated with the SOM patterns. Next, we link the contribution of the changing frequency of occurrence of the associated atmospheric patterns and increasing moisture availability in response to atmospheric warming to observed trends in these extremes. Lastly, we compare the changes in the frequency of occurrence of these atmospheric patterns in the historical and pre-industrial simulations from a single GCM to examine the influence of global warming on these extremes. Understanding the causes of these observed changes in wet and dry extremes during the monsoon season and responses to increasing global warming are relevant for managing climate-related risks, with particular relevance

  3. Twenty-first century projected summer mean climate in the Mediterranean interpreted through the monsoon-desert mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherchi, Annalisa; Annamalai, H.; Masina, Simona; Navarra, Antonio; Alessandri, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    The term "monsoon-desert mechanism" indicates the relationship between the diabatic heating associated with the South Asian summer monsoon rainfall and the remote response in the western sub-tropics where long Rossby waves anchor strong descent with high subsidence. In CMIP5 twenty-first century climate scenarios, the precipitation over South Asia is projected to increase. This study investigates how this change could affect the summer climate projections in the Mediterranean region. In a linear framework the monsoon-desert mechanism in the context of climate change would imply that the change in subsidence over the Mediterranean should be strongly linked with the changes in South Asian monsoon precipitation. The steady-state solution from a linear model forced with CMIP5 model projected precipitation change over South Asia shows a broad region of descent in the Mediterranean, while the results from CMIP5 projections differ having increased descent mostly in the western sector but also decreased descent in parts of the eastern sector. Local changes in circulation, particularly the meridional wind, promote cold air advection that anchors the descent but the barotropic Rossby wave nature of the wind anomalies consisting of alternating northerlies/southerlies favors alternating descent/ascent locations. In fact, the local mid-tropospheric meridional wind changes have the strongest correlation with the regions where the difference in subsidence is largest. There decreased rainfall is mostly balanced by changes in moisture, omega and in the horizontal advection of moisture.

  4. Projected seasonal mean summer monsoon over India and adjoining regions for the twenty-first century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Sushil K.; Mishra, Saroj K.; Pattnayak, Kanhu C.; Mamgain, Ashu; Mariotti, Laura; Coppola, Erika; Giorgi, Filippo; Giuliani, Graziano

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we present the projected seasonal mean summer monsoon over India and adjoining regions for the twenty-first century under the representative concentration pathway (RCP) 4.5 and RCP 8.5 scenarios using the regional model RegCM4 driven by the global model GFDL-ESM2M. RegCM4 is integrated from 1970 to 2099 at 50 km horizontal resolution over the South Asia CORDEX domain. The simulated mean summer monsoon circulation and associated rainfall by RegCM4 are validated against observations in the reference period 1975 to 2004 based on the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) and India Meteorological Department (IMD) data sets. Regional model results are also compared with those of the global model GFDL which forces the RegCM4, showing that the regional model in particular improves the simulation of precipitation trends during the reference period. Future projections are categorized as near future (2010-2039), mid future (2040-2069), and far future (2070-2099). Comparison of projected seasonal (June-September) mean rainfall from the different time slices indicate a gradual increase in the intensity of changes over some of the regions under both the RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 scenarios. RegCM4 projected rainfall decreases over most of the Indian land mass and the equatorial and northern Indian Ocean, while it increases over the Arabian Sea, northern Bay of Bengal, and the Himalayas. Results show that the monsoon circulation may become weaker in the future associated with a decrease in rainfall over Indian land points. The RegCM4 projected decrease in June, July, August, September (JJAS) rainfall under the RCP8.5 scenario over the central, eastern, and peninsular India by the end of the century is in the range of 25-40 % of their mean reference period values; it is significant at the 95 % confidence level and it is broadly in line with patterns of observed change in recent decades. Surface evaporation is projected to increase over the Indian Ocean, thereby

  5. An interdecadal change in the relationship between the western North Pacific Ocean and the East Asian summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peilong; Zhang, Lifeng; Zhong, Quanjia

    2016-09-01

    This study reveals that the relationship between the western North Pacific Ocean (WNPO; 0-55°N, 100-165°E) and the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) experiences a well-defined interdecadal change in the late 1980s and early 1990s. The EASM-related WNPO sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTA) pattern changes from the dipole pattern [WNPO dipole (WNPOD)] that develops over the period between 1968 and 1987 (P1) to a tripole pattern [WNPO tripole (WNPOT)] between 1991 and 2010 (P2). The positive (negative) phase of the WNPOD is characterized by warm (cold) SSTAs in the Japan Sea and Kuroshio-Oyashio Extension region, and cold (warm) SSTAs in the subtropical WNPO, whereas the positive (negative) phase of the WNPOT shows warming (cooling) in the Kuroshio Extension region (KER), and cooling (warming) in the south of Kamchatka Peninsula (SKP) and Philippine Sea (PS). During P1 (P2), the WNPOD (WNPOT) can be regarded as the first (second) leading mode of summer WNPO SST variability, and its positive phase is associated with a weakened WNPO subtropical high and thereby the deficient summer rainfall in the Yangtze River valley, together with a strong EASM, and vice versa. The change in the WNPO-EASM relationship may be caused by interdecadal changes in the relationship of the equatorial central Pacific (ECP) with the WNPO and EASM, and an increase in summer KER SST variability. During P2, because the ECP warming-induced cyclonic anomalies move northwestwards and intensify, summertime ECP warming is able to generate a strong EASM and significant cooling over the two poles of the WNPOT (SKP and PS). These strengthened impacts of the ECP on the WNPOT and EASM contribute to the strengthened WNPOT-EASM relationship during P2. In addition, summer KER SST variability increases between 1991 and 2010, and this may have enhanced the impact of the KER on the EASM during P2. These two factors probably cause the EASM-related WNPO SSTA pattern to change from the WNPOD in P1 to the WNPOT in

  6. Analysis and Numerical Simulations of the Teleconnection Between Indian Summer Monsoon and Precipitation in North China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yunyun; DING Yihui

    2008-01-01

    In the early 1980s, Chinese meteorologists discovered the positive correlation in summer rainfall be-tween India and North China and the correlation was later confirmed by some researches in and outside China. Based on a variety of meteorological data from 1951 to 2005 and numerical simulations, the present study investigates such a correlation between Indian summer monsoon (ISM) and precipitation in North China. Furthermore, we discuss the intrinsic relations of the positive (Northwest India)-negative (the Ti-betan Plateau)-positive (North China) precipitation anomaly teleconnection pattern from two aspects of thermal and dynamical factors, which not only confirms the precipitation teleconnection previously discov-ered again, but also reveals the influence mechanism of the ISM on the rainfall in North China. The results show that: (1) When the ISM is strong (weak), the precipitation in North China tends to be more (less) than normal; however, when the rainfall in North China is more (less) than normal, the probability of the strengthening (weakening) of the ISM is relatively lower. This implies that the ISM anomaly has more impact on the rainfall in North China. (2) The Indian low usually dominantly impacts the intensity of the ISM. When the Indian low deepens, the low troughs in mid-high latitudes are frequently strengthened, and the ridge of the western Pacific subtropical high (WPSH) extends westward. The southwesterly water vapor transport originated from low-latitudes and the southeasterly water vapor transport along the southwestern flank of the WPSH converge in North China, which is favorable for more rainfall there than normal, and vice versa. (3) The simulations from the regional climate model developed by National Climate Center (ReGCM_NCC) capture the salient feature of the precipitation teleconnection between India and North China. The simulated anomalous atmospheric circulations are close to observations, which confirms the existence of such a

  7. Uncertainties in the regional climate models simulations of South-Asian summer monsoon and climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, F. S.; Iqbal, Waheed; Syed, Ahsan Ali Bukhari; Rasul, G.

    2014-04-01

    The uncertainties in the regional climate models (RCMs) are evaluated by analyzing the driving global data of ERA40 reanalysis and ECHAM5 general circulation models, and the downscaled data of two RCMs (RegCM4 and PRECIS) over South-Asia for the present day simulation (1971-2000) of South-Asian summer monsoon. The differences between the observational datasets over South-Asia are also analyzed. The spatial and the quantitative analysis over the selected climatic regions of South-Asia for the mean climate and the inter-annual variability of temperature, precipitation and circulation show that the RCMs have systematic biases which are independent from different driving datasets and seems to come from the physics parameterization of the RCMs. The spatial gradients and topographically-induced structure of climate are generally captured and simulated values are within a few degrees of the observed values. The biases in the RCMs are not consistent with the biases in the driving fields and the models show similar spatial patterns after downscaling different global datasets. The annual cycle of temperature and rainfall is well simulated by the RCMs, however the RCMs are not able to capture the inter-annual variability. ECHAM5 is also downscaled for the future (2071-2100) climate under A1B emission scenario. The climate change signal is consistent between ECHAM5 and RCMs. There is warming over all the regions of South-Asia associated with increasing greenhouse gas concentrations and the increase in summer mean surface air temperature by the end of the century ranges from 2.5 to 5 °C, with maximum warming over north western parts of the domain and 30 % increase in rainfall over north eastern India, Bangladesh and Myanmar.

  8. Natural interdecadal weak-ening of East Asian summer monsoon in the late 20th century

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Dabang; WANG Huijun

    2005-01-01

    Based on the reanalysis data throughout 1948―2002 as derived from the United States National Centers for Environmental Prediction and National Center for Atmospheric Research, it is revealed that East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) intensity weakens on an interdecadal timescale since the mid-1960s, and twice interdecadal jumps are recorded in the EASM intensity index series in the late 20th century, respectively occurring in the mid-1960s and mid- to late 1970s. Six globally coupled atmosphere-ocean models' outputs under the SRES A2 greenhouse gas and aerosol emission scenario, provided by the IPCC Data Distribution Center and the Hadley Center for Climate Prediction and Research, are then systematically examined. It follows that the above EASM weakening is not closely related to synchronizing anthropogenic global warming, and, therefore, it should be qualitatively natural change process. Over the 21st century, the EASM intensity is likely increased slightly by continually intensified greenhouse effect relative to the late 20th century.

  9. Influences of volcano eruptions on Asian Summer Monsoon over the last 110 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Liang; Liu, Jian; Sun, Weiyi

    2017-02-01

    Asian summer monsoon (ASM) precipitation is the primary water resource for agriculture in many Asian countries that have experienced rapid economic growth in recent decades, thus implying the necessity for further investigations on both the internal variability of the ASM and the influence of external factors on the ASM. Using long-term high-resolution (0.5° × 0.5°) observed precipitation data, contrary to previous studies on inter-annual timescale, we showed that over the last 110 years, volcanic eruptions have influenced ASM variations on an inter-decadal timescale via teleconnections with the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation (AMO). This relationship was also confirmed by Coupled Model Intercomparison Program Phase 5 (CMIP5) model simulations. During the active volcanic eruption periods (1901–1935 and 1963–1993), significantly lower ASM precipitation was observed compared with that during the inactive volcanic eruption period (1936–1962). We found that during active volcanic eruption periods, which correspond to a negative AMO state, there is an anomalously weakened Walker circulation over the tropical Pacific that transports less moisture to the ASM region and subsequently reduces ASM precipitation. This new finding may help improve decadal predictions of future changes in the ASM.

  10. The response of East Asian Summer Monsoon to a Global Warming Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan, C.; Jin, Y.

    2016-12-01

    The response of East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM) to the abrupt quadrupling of atmospheric CO2 concentration is investigated using the Super-Parameterized Community Climate Model, version 4 (SP-CCSM4). The EASM precipitation and circulation intensify in response to global warming and these changes are related to the westward extension of the Western North Pacific Subtropical High (WNPSH). The displacement of WNPSH is caused by two mechanisms: i) the increase of sea surface temperature and ii) the reduction of latent heat flux over the South China Sea and adjacent western Pacific Ocean. The changes in the surface fluxes over the tropics induce a Gill-type anti-cyclonic circulation to the north of the heating anomaly and a Rossy wave train from the tropics into the midlatitude Pacific Ocean. The westerly anomalies on the northern side of the anticyclone strengthen the southwesterly flow on the western edge of WNPSH. This flow further affects the wind anomalies and moisture transport over East Asia.

  11. Hydrological Response of East China to the Variation of East Asian Summer Monsoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuxing Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of hydrologic variables in East China, that is, runoff, precipitation, evapotranspiration, and soil moisture to the fluctuation of East Asian summer monsoon (EASM, is evaluated by the Mann-Kendall correlation analysis on a spatial resolution of 1/4° in the period of 1952–2012. The results indicate remarkable spatial disparities in the correlation between the hydrologic variables and EASM. The regions in East China susceptible to hydrological change due to EASM fluctuation are identified. When the standardized anomaly of intensity index of EASM (EASMI is above 1.00, the runoff of Haihe basin has increased by 49% on average, especially in the suburb of Beijing and Hebei province where the runoff has increased up to 105%. In contrast, the runoff in the basins of Haihe and Yellow River has decreased by about 27% and 17%, respectively, when the standardized anomaly of EASMI is below −1.00, which has brought severe drought to the areas since mid-1970s. The study can be beneficial for national or watershed agencies developing adaptive water management strategies in the face of global climate change.

  12. Has the prediction of the South China Sea summer monsoon improved since the late 1970s?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yi; Fan, Ke; Tian, Baoqiang

    2016-12-01

    Based on the evaluation of state-of-the-art coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation models (CGCMs) from the ENSEMBLES (Ensemble-based Predictions of Climate Changes and Their Impacts) and DEMETER (Development of a European Multimodel Ensemble System for Seasonal to Interannual Prediction) projects, it is found that the prediction of the South China Sea summer monsoon (SCSSM) has improved since the late 1970s. These CGCMs show better skills in prediction of the atmospheric circulation and precipitation within the SCSSM domain during 1979-2005 than that during 1960-1978. Possible reasons for this improvement are investigated. First, the relationship between the SSTs over the tropical Pacific, North Pacific and tropical Indian Ocean, and SCSSM has intensified since the late 1970s. Meanwhile, the SCSSM-related SSTs, with their larger amplitude of interannual variability, have been better predicted. Moreover, the larger amplitude of the interannual variability of the SCSSM and improved initializations for CGCMs after the late 1970s contribute to the better prediction of the SCSSM. In addition, considering that the CGCMs have certain limitations in SCSSM rainfall prediction, we applied the year-to-year increment approach to these CGCMs from the DEMETER and ENSEMBLES projects to improve the prediction of SCSSM rainfall before and after the late 1970s.

  13. Influences of volcano eruptions on Asian Summer Monsoon over the last 110 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Liang; Liu, Jian; Sun, Weiyi

    2017-02-16

    Asian summer monsoon (ASM) precipitation is the primary water resource for agriculture in many Asian countries that have experienced rapid economic growth in recent decades, thus implying the necessity for further investigations on both the internal variability of the ASM and the influence of external factors on the ASM. Using long-term high-resolution (0.5° × 0.5°) observed precipitation data, contrary to previous studies on inter-annual timescale, we showed that over the last 110 years, volcanic eruptions have influenced ASM variations on an inter-decadal timescale via teleconnections with the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation (AMO). This relationship was also confirmed by Coupled Model Intercomparison Program Phase 5 (CMIP5) model simulations. During the active volcanic eruption periods (1901-1935 and 1963-1993), significantly lower ASM precipitation was observed compared with that during the inactive volcanic eruption period (1936-1962). We found that during active volcanic eruption periods, which correspond to a negative AMO state, there is an anomalously weakened Walker circulation over the tropical Pacific that transports less moisture to the ASM region and subsequently reduces ASM precipitation. This new finding may help improve decadal predictions of future changes in the ASM.

  14. Intra-seasonal oscillations associated with Indian Ocean warm pool and summer monsoon rainfall and their inter-annual variability

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Muraleedharan, P.M.; Nisha, P.G.; Sathe, P.V.; Sivakumar, K.U.

    is found to be propagating northward and their link to the Indian summer monsoon rainfall has been well documented (Yasunari, 1979; Krishnamurti and Subramanium, 1982; Gautier and Di Julio, 1990) Western equatorial Pacific and eastern equatorial Indian... been reported by Yasunary (1979, 1980) using satellite mosaic pictures of cloudiness over South Asia. Krishnamurty and Subramanium (1982) documented meridional propagation of a train of troughs and ridges from the equator to about 30 N over the Indian...

  15. Biogeochemistry of the Bay of Bengal: Physical, chemical and primary productivity characteristics of the central and western Bay of Bengal during summer monsoon 2001

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Madhupratap, M.; Gauns, M.; Ramaiah, N.; PrasannaKumar, S.; Muraleedharan, P.M.; DeSousa, S.N.; Sardessai, S.; Muraleedharan, U.D.

    Reliable data on biological characteristics from the Bay of Bengal are elusive. In this paper, we present results on physics, chemistry and biology simultaneously measured during the summer monsoon, 2001 from open ocean and coastal areas...

  16. Evaluation of cloud properties in the NCEP CFSv2 model and its linkage with Indian summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazra, Anupam; Chaudhari, Hemantkumar S.; Dhakate, Ashish

    2016-04-01

    Cloud fraction, which varies greatly among general circulation models, plays a crucial role in simulation of Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR). The NCEP Climate Forecast System version 2 (CFSv2) model is evaluated in terms of its simulation of cloud fraction, cloud condensate, outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), and tropospheric temperature (TT). Biases in these simulated quantities are computed using observations from CALIPSO and reanalysis data from MERRA. It is shown that CFSv2 underestimates (overestimates) high- (mid-) level clouds. The cloud condensate is also examined to see its impact on different types of clouds. The upper-level cloud condensate is underestimated, particularly during the summer monsoon period, which leads to a cold TT and a dry precipitation bias. The unrealistically weak TT gradient between ocean and land is responsible for the underestimation of ISMR. The model-simulated OLR is overestimated which depicts the weaker convective activity. A large underestimate of precipitable water is also seen along the cross-equatorial flow and particularly over the Indian land region collocated with a dry precipitation bias. The linkages among cloud microphysical, thermodynamical, and dynamical processes are identified here. Thus, this study highlights the importance of cloud properties, a major cause of uncertainty in CFSv2, and also proposes a pathway for improvements in its simulation of the Indian summer monsoon.

  17. A Continuous Record of Indian Summer Monsoon Variability through the Holocene from Lake Sediments in Yunnan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, A. L.; Abbott, M. B.; Yu, J.

    2015-12-01

    Continuous terrestrial archives of the Indian Summer Monsoon through the Holocene are lacking, yet critical to providing a long-term perspective of hydroclimate variability. Here we present an 8,000 year sediment record from Xing Yun Lake in Yunnan, China that provides a semi-quantitative estimate of lake level change using stable isotopes of authigenic calcite as well as within-lake productivity using stable isotopes of organic matter. Substantial drops in lake level occur at 6,600 years BP, consistent with previous studies of a weaker monsoon system in the mid-Holocene due to declining summer insolation. Lake levels stabilize at 4,700 years BP and remain steady due to the topography surrounding the lake. From 5,600 to 5,100 and from 4,600 to 4,000 years BP, primary productivity decreases and is coincident with significant regional aridity as well as cooler Western Tropical Pacific sea surface temperatures. Variability in the stable isotopes of both calcite and organic matter after 1,500 years BP is primarily controlled by human activities. This study shows broad agreement with previous work on the Tibetan Plateau and provides one of the first continuous records of lake hydrologic balance from a crucial region affected by the Indian Summer Monsoon.

  18. Unraveling El Niño's impact on the East Asian Monsoon and Yangtze River summer flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjun; Jin, Fei-Fei; Stuecker, Malte F.; Wittenberg, Andrew T.; Timmermann, Axel; Ren, Hong-Li; Kug, Jong-Seong; Cai, Wenju; Cane, Mark

    2016-11-01

    Strong El Niño events are followed by massive summer monsoon flooding over the Yangtze River basin (YRB), home to about a third of the population in China. Although the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) provides the main source of seasonal climate predictability for many parts of the Earth, the mechanisms of its connection to the East Asian monsoon remain largely elusive. For instance, the traditional Niño3.4 ENSO index only captures precipitation anomalies over East Asia in boreal winter but not during the summer. Here we show that there exists a robust year-round and predictable relationship between ENSO and the Asian monsoon. This connection is revealed by combining equatorial (Niño3.4) and off-equatorial Pacific sea surface temperature anomalies (Niño-A index) into a new metric that captures ENSO's various aspects, such as its interaction with the annual cycle and its different flavors. This extended view of ENSO complexity improves predictability of YRB summer flooding events.

  19. Investigation of the aerosol-cloud-rainfall association over the Indian summer monsoon region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangi, Chandan; Nand Tripathi, Sachchida; Kanawade, Vijay P.; Koren, Ilan; Sivanand Pai, D.

    2017-04-01

    Monsoonal rainfall is the primary source of surface water in India. Using 12 years of in situ and satellite observations, we examined the association of aerosol loading with cloud fraction, cloud top pressure, cloud top temperature, and daily surface rainfall over the Indian summer monsoon region (ISMR). Our results showed positive correlations between aerosol loading and cloud properties as well as rainfall. A decrease in outgoing longwave radiation and an increase in reflected shortwave radiation at the top of the atmosphere with an increase in aerosol loading further indicates a possible seminal role of aerosols in the deepening of cloud systems. Significant perturbation in liquid- and ice-phase microphysics was also evident over the ISMR. For the polluted cases, delay in the onset of collision-coalescence processes and an enhancement in the condensation efficiency allows for more condensate mass to be lifted up to the mixed colder phases. This results in the higher mass concentration of larger-sized ice-phase hydrometeors and, therefore, implies that the delayed rain processes eventually lead to more surface rainfall. A numerical simulation of a typical rainfall event case over the ISMR using a spectral bin microphysical scheme coupled with the Weather Research Forecasting (WRF-SBM) model was also performed. Simulated microphysics also illustrated that the initial suppression of warm rain coupled with an increase in updraft velocity under high aerosol loading leads to enhanced super-cooled liquid droplets above freezing level and ice-phase hydrometeors, resulting in increased accumulated surface rainfall. Thus, both observational and numerical analysis suggest that high aerosol loading may induce cloud invigoration, thereby increasing surface rainfall over the ISMR. While the meteorological variability influences the strength of the observed positive association, our results suggest that the persistent aerosol-associated deepening of cloud systems and an

  20. Emission sources contributing to tropospheric ozone over Equatorial Africa during the summer monsoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Bouarar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A global chemistry-climate model LMDz_INCA is used to investigate the contribution of African and Asian emissions to tropospheric ozone over Central and West Africa during the summer monsoon. The model results show that ozone in this region is most sensitive to lightning NOx and to Central African biomass burning emissions. However, other emission categories also contribute significantly to regional ozone. The maximum ozone changes due to lightning NOx occur in the upper troposphere between 400 hPa and 200 hPa over West Africa and downwind over the Atlantic Ocean. Biomass burning emissions mainly influence ozone in the lower and middle troposphere over Central Africa, and downwind due to westward transport. Biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds, which can be uplifted from the lower troposphere to higher altitudes by the deep convection that occurs over West Africa during the monsoon season, lead to maximum ozone changes in the lower stratosphere region. Soil NOx emissions over the Sahel region make a significant contribution to ozone in the lower troposphere. In addition, convective uplift of these emissions and subsequent ozone production are also an important source of ozone in the upper troposphere over West Africa. Concerning African anthropogenic emissions, they only make a small contribution to ozone compared to the other emission categories. The model results indicate that most ozone changes due to African emissions occur downwind, especially over the Atlantic Ocean, far from the emission regions. The import of Asian emissions also makes a considerable contribution to ozone concentrations above 150 hPa and has to be taken into account in studies of the ozone budget over Africa. Using IPCC AR5 (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change; Fifth Assessment Report estimates of anthropogenic emissions for 2030 over Africa and Asia, model calculations show larger changes in ozone over Africa due to

  1. Spatio-temporal variability and predictability of summer monsoon onset over the Philippines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moron, V. [Universite d' Aix-Marseille I, UFR des Sciences Geographiques et de l' Amenagement, Aix en Provence (France); CEREGE, UMR 6635 CNRS, Europole Mediterraneen de l' Arbois, BP 80, Aix en Provence (France); Institut Universitaire de France, Paris (France); Columbia University, International Research Institute for Climate and Society, New York, NY (United States); Lucero, A.; Hilario, F. [Philippine Atmospheric Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration, Manila (Philippines); Lyon, B.; Robertson, A.W.; DeWitt, D. [Columbia University, International Research Institute for Climate and Society, New York, NY (United States)

    2009-12-15

    The spatio-temporal variability of boreal summer monsoon onset over the Philippines is studied through the analysis of daily rainfall data across a network of 76 gauges for the period 1977 to 2004 and the pentad Merged Analysis of Precipitation from the US Climate Prediction Center from 1979 to 2006. The onset date is defined using a local agronomic definition, namely the first wet day of a 5-day period receiving at least 40 mm without any 15-day dry spell receiving <5 mm in the 30 days following the start of that period. The onset is found to occur rather abruptly across the western Philippines around mid-May on average and is associated with the set-up of a ''classical'' monsoonal circulation with low-level easterlies subsequently veering to southerly, and then southwesterly. The onset manifests itself merely as a seasonal increase of rainfall over the eastern Philippines, where rainfall occurs throughout most of the year. Interannual variability of the onset date is shown to consist of a spatially coherent large-scale component, rather similar over the western and eastern Philippines, with a moderate to high amount of local-scale (i.e. station scale) noise. In consequence, the large-scale signal can be easily retrieved from any sample of at least 5-6 stations across the network although the local-scale coherence and fingerprint of the large-scale signal of the onset date are found to be stronger over the central Philippines, roughly from Southern Luzon to Northern Mindanao. The seasonal predictability of local onset is analyzed through a cross-validated canonical correlation analysis using tropical Pacific and Indian Ocean sea surface temperature in March and the 850 hPa May wind field from dynamical forecast models as predictors. The regional-scale onset, defined as the average of standardized local-scale anomalies in onset date, shows good predictive skill (r {approx} 0.8). Moreover, most of the stations show weak to moderate skill (median

  2. Late Pleistocene-Holocene vegetation and Indian summer monsoon record from the Lahaul, Northwest Himalaya, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Suman; Gupta, Anil K.; Sangode, S. J.; Srivastava, Priyeshu; Nainwal, H. C.

    2015-04-01

    The high resolution Holocene paleomonsoon records from Northwest (NW) Himalaya are limited. The carbon isotope (δ13C), Total organic carbon (TOC) and pollen analysis were therefore carried out from a peat-lake sediment sequence developed in alpine meadows of the Chandra valley, Lahaul, NW Himalaya, in order to reconstruct centennial to millennial scale vegetational changes and Indian summer monsoon (ISM) variability during the Holocene. The chronology of peat-lake sediments is constrained with 9 AMS 14C dates. The recovered non-arboreal pollen (NAP) suggested that during Holocene alpine desert-steppe, meadows and shrubs growing along the stream had developed in the Lahaul valley whereas arboreal pollens (AP) e.g. Pinus, Quercus, Cedrus and Ulmus presently growing in the southern hill slopes of Pir Panjal range indicated moisture carrying monsoonal air flow from the South. The increased δ13C and low TOC values between ∼12,880 and 11,640 calibrated years before present (cal yr BP) suggested weakening of ISM and low organic carbon production corresponding to the Younger Dryas (YD) cold event. The gradual depletion in carbon isotope ratio from ∼11,640 to 8810 cal yr BP indicated enhanced precipitation in the Chandra valley in response of increased ISM strength in early Holocene. The short spell of cold and dry climate with gradual decrease in ISM intensity between ca 10,398 and 9778 cal yr BP is closely linked with Bond event-7. The other prominent cold-dry events recorded in present study are (i) ∼8810 to 8117 cal yr BP roughly corresponding to global 8.2 ka cold event, (ii) ∼4808 to 4327 cal yr BP closely preceding the global 4.2 ka cold-arid period, and (iii) ∼1303 to 1609 cal AD corresponding to Little Ice Age (LIA) event. The expansion of thermophillous broad leaved taxa viz. Betula utilis, Alnus nepalensis, Quercus semicarpifolia and Juglans regia and effective growth of meadow vegetation such as grasses, Caryophyllaceae and Artemisia along with

  3. Simulation of the Indian summer monsoon onset-phase rainfall using a regional model

    KAUST Repository

    Srinivas, C. V.

    2015-09-11

    This study examines the ability of the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) regional model to simulate Indian summer monsoon (ISM) rainfall climatology in different climate zones during the monsoon onset phase in the decade 2000–2009. The initial and boundary conditions for ARW are provided from the NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis Project (NNRP) global reanalysis. Seasonal onset-phase rainfall is compared with corresponding values from 0.25° IMD (India Meteorological Department) rainfall and NNRP precipitation data over seven climate zones (perhumid, humid, dry/moist, subhumid, dry/moist, semiarid and arid) of India to see whether dynamical downscaling using a regional model yields advantages over just using large-scale model predictions. Results show that the model could simulate the onset phase in terms of progression and distribution of rainfall in most zones (except over the northeast) with good correlations and low error metrics. The observed mean onset dates and their variability over different zones are well reproduced by the regional model over most climate zones. It has been found that the ARW performed similarly to the reanalysis in most zones and improves the onset time by 1 to 3 days in zones 4 and 7, in which the NNRP shows a delayed onset compared to the actual IMD onset times. The variations in the onset-phase rainfall during the below-normal onset (June negative) and above-normal onset (June positive) phases are well simulated. The slight underestimation of onset-phase rainfall in the northeast zone could be due to failure in resolving the wide extent of topographic variations and the associated multiscale interactions in that zone. Spatial comparisons showed improvement of pentad rainfall in both space and quantity in ARW simulations over NNRP data, as evident from a wider eastward distribution of pentad rainfall over the Western Ghats, central and eastern India, as in IMD observations. While NNRP under-represented the high pentad rainfall over northeast, east and

  4. South Asian summer monsoon variability during the last ˜54 kyrs inferred from surface water salinity and river runoff proxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebregiorgis, D.; Hathorne, E. C.; Sijinkumar, A. V.; Nath, B. Nagender; Nürnberg, D.; Frank, M.

    2016-04-01

    The past variability of the South Asian Monsoon is mostly known from records of wind strength over the Arabian Sea while high-resolution paleorecords from regions of strong monsoon precipitation are still lacking. Here, we present records of past monsoon variability obtained from sediment core SK 168/GC-1, which was collected at the Alcock Seamount complex in the Andaman Sea. We utilize the ecological habitats of different planktic foraminiferal species to reconstruct freshwater-induced stratification based on paired Mg/Ca and δ18O analyses and to estimate seawater δ18O (δ18Osw). The difference between surface and thermocline temperatures (ΔT) and δ18Osw (Δδ18Osw) is used to investigate changes in upper ocean stratification. Additionally, Ba/Ca in G. sacculifer tests is used as a direct proxy for riverine runoff and sea surface salinity (SSS) changes related to monsoon precipitation on land. Our Δδ18Osw time series reveals that upper ocean salinity stratification did not change significantly throughout the last glacial suggesting little influence of NH insolation changes. The strongest increase in temperature gradients between the mixed layer and the thermocline is recorded for the mid-Holocene and indicate the presence of a significantly shallower thermocline. In line with previous work, the δ18Osw and Ba/Ca records demonstrate that monsoon climate during the LGM was characterized by a significantly weaker southwest monsoon circulation and strongly reduced runoff. Based on our data the South Asian Summer Monsoon (SAM) over the Irrawaddyy strengthened gradually after the LGM beginning at ∼18 ka. This is some 3 kyrs before an increase of the Ba/Ca record from the Arabian Sea and indicates that South Asian Monsoon climate dynamics are more complex than the simple N-S displacement of the ITCZ as generally described for other regions. Minimum δ18Osw values recorded during the mid-Holocene are in phase with Ba/Ca marking a stronger monsoon precipitation

  5. A dipole pattern in the Indian and Pacific oceans and its relationship with the East Asian summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jiayu; Li, Jianping; Feng, Juan

    2014-07-01

    This study demonstrates a robust relationship between the Indo-Pacific warm pool (IPWP) and North Pacific Ocean dipole (IPOD) and the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) using observational datasets and sensitivity tests from the Community Atmosphere Model version 3.1 of the National Center for Atmospheric Research. The IPOD, which is a significant pattern of boreal summer SSTA in the Indian and Pacific oceans characterized by positive (negative) sea-surface temperature anomalies (SSTA) in the North Pacific and negative (positive) SSTA in the IPWP, appears around May, intensifies in the following months, and weakens in September. In summers with a positive IPOD phase, the western Pacific subtropical high (WPSH) weakens and shrinks with the axis of the WPSH ridge moving northwards, which favours an intensified EASM and a decrease in summer rainfall in the Yangtze River valley, and vice versa.

  6. Delivery of halogenated very short-lived substances from the west Indian Ocean to the stratosphere during the Asian summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiehn, Alina; Quack, Birgit; Hepach, Helmke; Fuhlbrügge, Steffen; Tegtmeier, Susann; Toohey, Matthew; Atlas, Elliot; Krüger, Kirstin

    2017-06-01

    Halogenated very short-lived substances (VSLSs) are naturally produced in the ocean and emitted to the atmosphere. When transported to the stratosphere, these compounds can have a significant influence on the ozone layer and climate. During a research cruise on RV Sonne in the subtropical and tropical west Indian Ocean in July and August 2014, we measured the VSLSs, methyl iodide (CH3I) and for the first time bromoform (CHBr3) and dibromomethane (CH2Br2), in surface seawater and the marine atmosphere to derive their emission strengths. Using the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART with ERA-Interim meteorological fields, we calculated the direct contribution of observed VSLS emissions to the stratospheric halogen burden during the Asian summer monsoon. Furthermore, we compare the in situ calculations with the interannual variability of transport from a larger area of the west Indian Ocean surface to the stratosphere for July 2000-2015. We found that the west Indian Ocean is a strong source for CHBr3 (910 pmol m-2 h-1), very strong source for CH2Br2 (930 pmol m-2 h-1), and an average source for CH3I (460 pmol m-2 h-1). The atmospheric transport from the tropical west Indian Ocean surface to the stratosphere experiences two main pathways. On very short timescales, especially relevant for the shortest-lived compound CH3I (3.5 days lifetime), convection above the Indian Ocean lifts oceanic air masses and VSLSs towards the tropopause. On a longer timescale, the Asian summer monsoon circulation transports oceanic VSLSs towards India and the Bay of Bengal, where they are lifted with the monsoon convection and reach stratospheric levels in the southeastern part of the Asian monsoon anticyclone. This transport pathway is more important for the longer-lived brominated compounds (17 and 150 days lifetime for CHBr3 and CH2Br2). The entrainment of CHBr3 and CH3I from the west Indian Ocean to the stratosphere during the Asian summer monsoon is lower than from previous

  7. Delivery of halogenated very short-lived substances from the west Indian Ocean to the stratosphere during the Asian summer monsoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fiehn

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Halogenated very short-lived substances (VSLSs are naturally produced in the ocean and emitted to the atmosphere. When transported to the stratosphere, these compounds can have a significant influence on the ozone layer and climate. During a research cruise on RV Sonne in the subtropical and tropical west Indian Ocean in July and August 2014, we measured the VSLSs, methyl iodide (CH3I and for the first time bromoform (CHBr3 and dibromomethane (CH2Br2, in surface seawater and the marine atmosphere to derive their emission strengths. Using the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART with ERA-Interim meteorological fields, we calculated the direct contribution of observed VSLS emissions to the stratospheric halogen burden during the Asian summer monsoon. Furthermore, we compare the in situ calculations with the interannual variability of transport from a larger area of the west Indian Ocean surface to the stratosphere for July 2000–2015. We found that the west Indian Ocean is a strong source for CHBr3 (910 pmol m−2 h−1, very strong source for CH2Br2 (930 pmol m−2 h−1, and an average source for CH3I (460 pmol m−2 h−1. The atmospheric transport from the tropical west Indian Ocean surface to the stratosphere experiences two main pathways. On very short timescales, especially relevant for the shortest-lived compound CH3I (3.5 days lifetime, convection above the Indian Ocean lifts oceanic air masses and VSLSs towards the tropopause. On a longer timescale, the Asian summer monsoon circulation transports oceanic VSLSs towards India and the Bay of Bengal, where they are lifted with the monsoon convection and reach stratospheric levels in the southeastern part of the Asian monsoon anticyclone. This transport pathway is more important for the longer-lived brominated compounds (17 and 150 days lifetime for CHBr3 and CH2Br2. The entrainment of CHBr3 and CH3I from the west Indian Ocean to the stratosphere during the

  8. Examining Impact of Global warming on the summer monsoon system using regional Climate Model (PRECIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, S. K.; Kundeti, K.; Krishna Kumar, K.

    2011-12-01

    Every year, southwest monsoon arrives over Indian region with remarkable regularity. It hits the southern state of Kerala first by the end of May or the early June. More than 70% of the annual precipitation is received during the four monsoon months viz. June to September. This monsoon rainfall is vital for the agriculture as well as for the yearly needs of Indian population. The performance of the monsoon depends on the timely onset over southern tip of India and its progress along the entire country. This northward progression of monsoon to cover the entire Indian landmass, many times, is associated with the formation of synoptic scale system in the Bay of Bengal region and their movement along the monsoon trough region. The analysis of the observed cyclonic disturbances show that their frequency has reduced in recent decades. It is, therefore, necessary to assess the effect of global warming on the monsoon climate of India. A state-of-art regional climate modelling system, known as PRECIS (Providing REgional Climates for Impacts Studies) developed by the Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, U.K. is applied over the South Asian domain to investigate the impact of global warming on the cyclonic disturbances. The PRECIS simulations at 50 km x 50 km horizontal resolution are made for two time slices, present (1961-1990) and the future (2071-2100), for two socio-economic scenarios A2 and B2. The model skills are evaluated using observed precipitation and surface air temperature. The model has shown reasonably good skill in simulating seasonal monsoon rainfall, whereas cold bias is seen in surface air temperature especially in post-monsoon months. The typical monsoon features like monsoon trough, precipitation maxima over west coast and northeast India are well simulated by the model. The model simulations under the scenarios of increasing greenhouse gas concentrations and sulphate aerosols are analysed to study the likely changes in the quasi

  9. Possible role of warm SST bias in the simulation of boreal summer monsoon in SINTEX-F2 coupled model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, Susmitha; Sahai, A.K.; Goswami, B.N. [Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Pune (India); Terray, Pascal; Masson, Sebastian [LOCEAN, Paris (France); Luo, J.J. [RIGC, Yokohama (Japan)

    2012-04-15

    Reasonably realistic climatology of atmospheric and oceanic parameters over the Asian monsoon region is a pre-requisite for models used for monsoon studies. The biases in representing these features lead to problems in representing the strength and variability of Indian summer monsoon (ISM). This study attempts to unravel the ability of a state-of-the-art coupled model, SINTEX-F2, in simulating these characteristics of ISM. The coupled model reproduces the precipitation and circulation climatology reasonably well. However, the mean ISM is weaker than observed, as evident from various monsoon indices. A wavenumber-frequency spectrum analysis reveals that the model intraseasonal oscillations are also weaker-than-observed. One possible reason for the weaker-than-observed ISM arises from the warm bias, over the tropical oceans, especially over the equatorial western Indian Ocean, inherent in the model. This warm bias is not only confined to the surface layers, but also extends through most of the troposphere. As a result of this warm bias, the coupled model has too weak meridional tropospheric temperature gradient to drive a realistic monsoon circulation. This in turn leads to a weakening of the moisture gradient as well as the vertical shear of easterlies required for sustained northward propagation of rain band, resulting in weak monsoon circulation. It is also noted that the recently documented interaction between the interannual and intraseasonal variabilities of ISM through very long breaks (VLBs) is poor in the model. This seems to be related to the inability of the model in simulating the eastward propagating Madden-Julian oscillation during VLBs. (orig.)

  10. Role of Atmospheric Circulation and Westerly Jet Changes in the mid-Holocene East Asian Summer Monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, W.; Chiang, J. C. H.

    2014-12-01

    The East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM) varies on inter-decadal to interglacial-glacial timescales. The EASM is stronger in the mid-Holocene than today, and these changes can be readily explained by orbitally-driven insolation increase during the boreal summer. However, a detailed understanding of the altered seasonal evolution of the EASM during this time is still lacking. In particular, previous work has suggested a close link between seasonal migration of the EASM and that of the mid-latitude westerlies impinging on the Tibetan Plateau. In this study, we explore, this problem in PMIP3 climate model simulations of the mid-Holocene, focusing on the role of atmospheric circulation and in particular how the westerly jet modulates the East Asia summer climate on paleoclimate timescales. Analysis of the model simulations suggests that, compared to the preindustrial simulations, the transition from Mei-Yu to deep summer rainfall occurs earlier in the mid-Holocene. This is accompanied by an earlier weakening and northward shift of westerly jet away from the Tibetan Plateau. The variation in the strength and the 3-D structure of the westerly jet in the mid-Holocene is summarized. We find that changes to the monsoonal rainfall, westerly jet and meridional circulation covary on paleoclimate timescales. Meridional wind changes in particular are tied to an altered stationary wave pattern, resembling today's the so-called 'Silk Road' teleconnection pattern, riding along the westerly jet. Diagnostic analysis also reveals changes in moist static energy and eddy energy fluxes associated with the earlier seasonal transition of the EASM. Our analyses suggest that the westerly jet is critical to the altered dynamics of the East Asian summer monsoon during the mid-Holocene.

  11. Active and break events of Indian summer monsoon during 1901-2014

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pai, D.S.; Sridhar, L.; RameshKumar, M.R.

    The study lists active and break monsoon events over India over a very long period (1901-2014) identified using criteria based on a rainfall index derived over a critical high rainfall region called core monsoon zone. The break and active spells...

  12. The value of C sub(e) for the Arabian Sea during summer monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, A.S.; Sadhuram, Y.; Krishna, V.V.G.

    We estimate, from the moisture budget the bulk aerodynamic coefficient for latent heat flux (C sub(e)) during the monsoon season over the central Arabian Sea. The average value of C sub(e) under active monsoon conditions was found to be 2.25 x 10...

  13. Late Cenozoic genus Fupingopollenites development and its implications for the Asian summer monsoon (ASM) evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Y.; Song, C.; Fang, X.; Meng, Q.; Zhang, P.; Wu, F.; Yan, X.

    2015-12-01

    An extinct palynomorph, Fupingopollenites, was used as the basis for a discussion of the late Cenozoic Asian summer monsoon (ASM) evolution and its possible driving forces. Based on the spatial and temporal variations in its percentages across Inner and East Asia, we found that Fupingopollenites mainly occurred in East Asia, with boundaries to the NE of ca. 42°N, 135°E and NW of ca. 36°N, 103°E during the Early Miocene (ca. 23-17 Ma). This region enlarged westwards, reaching the eastern Qaidam Basin (ca. 36°N, 97.5°E) during the Middle Miocene (ca. 17-11 Ma), before noticeably retreating to a region bounded to the NW at ca. 33°N, 105°E during ca. 11-5.3 Ma. The region then shrank further in the Pliocene, with the NE boundary shrinking southwards to about 35°N, 120°E; the area then almost disappeared during the Pleistocene (2.6-0 Ma). The flourishing and subsequent extinction of Fupingopollenites is indicative of a narrow ecological amplitude with a critical dependence on habitat humidity and temperature (most likely mean annual precipitation (MAP) >1000 mm and mean annual temperature (MAT) >10°C). Therefore, the Fupingopollenites geographic distribution can indicate the humid ASM evolution during the late Cenozoic, revealing that the strongest ASM period occurred during the Middle Miocene Climate Optimum (MMCO, ~17-14 Ma), after which the ASM weakened coincident with global cooling. We argue that the global cooling played a critical role in the ASM evolution, while the Tibetan Plateau uplifts made a relatively small contribution. This result was supported by a Miocene pollen record at the Qaidam Basin, inner Asia and the contemporaneously compiled pollen records across the Eurasia.

  14. Precisely dated multidecadally resolved Asian summer monsoon dynamics 113.5-86.6 thousand years ago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiuyang; Wang, Xiaoyan; He, Yaoqi; Hu, Hsun-Ming; Li, Zhizhong; Spötl, Christoph; Shen, Chuan-Chou

    2016-07-01

    We present a new 230Th-dated absolute chronology of Asian summer monsoon (ASM) variability from 113.5 to 86.6 kyr BP (before 1950 AD). This integrated multidecadally resolved record, based on 1435 oxygen isotope data and 46 230Th dates with 2-sigma errors as low as ±0.3 kyr from three stalagmites collected in Sanxing Cave, southwestern China, can be a new reference for calibrating paleoclimate proxy sequences. The Sanxing δ18O record follows the 23 kyr precessional cycle of insolation and is punctuated by prominent millennial-scale oscillations of the Chinese Interstadials (CIS) 25 to 22, corresponding to Greenland Interstadials (GIS) 25 to 22. The onset of CIS 25, 24, 23 and 22 is dated to 113.1 ± 0.4, 108.1 ± 0.3, 103.7 ± 0.3 and 91.4 ± 0.6 kyr BP in the Sanxing record, respectively. The end of CIS 24 and CIS 22 is constrained to 105.5 ± 0.4 and 87.7 ± 0.3 kyr BP, respectively. A centennial-scale precursor event at 104.1 ± 0.3 kyr BP preceding CIS 23 is clearly registered. These events in the Sanxing record are synchronous with those identified in stalagmites from the European Alps (NALPS), except for the onset of GIS 25 and the end of GIS 22, and differ by up to 2.3 kyr from the corresponding ones in Greenland ice core records. The high degree of similarity of the δ18O records between Sanxing Cave and Greenland supports a Northern Hemisphere forcing of the ASM. The anti-phase relationship of δ18O records between Sanxing stalagmites and Antarctic ice cores suggests an additional ASM linkage to the Southern Hemisphere.

  15. Empirical prediction of the onset dates of South China Sea summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhiwei; Li, Tim

    2017-03-01

    The onset of South China Sea summer monsoon (SCSSM) signifies the commencement of the wet season over East Asia. Predicting the SCSSM onset date is of significant importance. In this study, we establish two different statistical models, namely the physical-empirical model (PEM) and the spatial-temporal projection model (STPM) to predict the SCSSM onset. The PEM is constructed from the seasonal prediction perspective. Observational diagnoses reveal that the early onset of the SCSSM is preceded by (a) a warming tendency in middle and lower troposphere (850-500 hPa) over central Siberia from January to March, (b) a La Niña-like zonal dipole sea surface temperature pattern over the tropical Pacific in March, and (c) a dipole sea level pressure pattern with negative center in subtropics and positive center over high latitude of Southern Hemisphere in January. The PEM built on these predictors achieves a cross-validated reforecast temporal correlation coefficient (TCC) skill of 0.84 for the period of 1979-2004, and an independent forecast TCC skill of 0.72 for the period 2005-2014. The STPM is built on the extended-range forecast perspective. Pentad data are used to predict a zonal wind index over the South China Sea region. Similar to PEM, the STPM is constructed using 1979-2004 data. Based on the forecasted zonal wind index, the independent forecast of the SCSSM onset dates achieves a TCC skill of 0.90 for 2005-2014. The STPM provides more detailed information for the intraseasonal evolution during the period of the SCSSM onset (pentad 25-35). The two models proposed herein are expected to facilitate the real-time prediction of the SCSSM onset.

  16. Observations of PAN and its confinement in the Asian summer monsoon anticyclone in high spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungermann, Jörn; Ern, Mandfred; Kaufmann, Martin; Müller, Rolf; Spang, Reinhold; Ploeger, Felix; Vogel, Bärbel; Riese, Martin

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents an analysis of trace gases in the Asian summer monsoon (ASM) region on the basis of observations by the CRISTA infrared limb sounder taken in low-earth orbit in August 1997. The spatially highly resolved measurements of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and O3 allow a detailed analysis of an eddy-shedding event of the ASM anticyclone. We identify enhanced PAN volume mixing ratios (VMRs) within the main anticyclone and within the eddy, which are suitable as a tracer for polluted air originating in India and China. Plotting the retrieved PAN VMRs against potential vorticity (PV) and potential temperature reveals that the PV value at which the PAN VMRs exhibit the strongest decrease with respect to PV increases with potential temperature. These PV values might be used to identify the extent of the ASM. Using temperature values also derived from CRISTA measurements, we also computed the location of the thermal tropopause according to the WMO criterion and find that it confines the PAN anomaly vertically within the main ASM anticyclone. In contrast, the shed eddy exhibits enhanced PAN VMRs for 1 to 2 km above the thermal tropopause. Using the relationship between PAN as a tropospheric tracer and O3 as a stratospheric tracer to identify mixed air parcels, we further found the anticyclone to contain few such air parcels, whereas the region between the anticyclone and the eddy as well as the eddy itself contains many mixed air parcels. In combination, this implies that while the anticyclone confines polluted air masses well, eddy shedding provides a very rapid horizontal transport pathway of Asian pollution into the extratropical lowermost stratosphere with a timescale of only a few days.

  17. Current status of multimodel superensemble and operational NWP forecast of the Indian summer monsoon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Akhilesh Kumar Mishra; T N Krishnamurti

    2007-10-01

    In the last thirty years great strides have been made by large-scale operational numerical weather prediction models towards improving skills for the medium range time-scale of 7 days.This paper illustrates the use of these current forecasts towards the construction of a consensus multimodel forecast product called the superensemble.This procedure utilizes 120 of the recent-past forecasts from these models to arrive at the training phase statistics. These statistics are described by roughly 107 weights.Use of these weights provides the possibility for real-time medium range forecasts with the superensemble.We show the recent status of this procedure towards real-time forecasts for the Asian summer monsoon.The member models of our suite include ECMWF,NCEP/EMC, JMA,NOGAPS (US Navy),BMRC,RPN (Canada)and an FSU global spectral forecast model. We show in this paper the skill scores for day 1 through day 6 of forecasts from standard variables such as winds,temperature,500 hPa geopotential height,sea level pressure and precipitation.In all cases we noted that the superensemble carries a higher skill compared to each of the member models and their ensemble mean.The skill matrices we use include the RMS errors,the anomaly correlations and equitable threat scores.For many of these forecasts the improvements of skill for the superensemble over the best model was found to be quite substantial.This real-time product is being provided to many interested research groups.The FSU multimodel superensemble,in real- time,stands out for providing the least errors among all of the operational large scale models.

  18. Empirical prediction of the onset dates of South China Sea summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhiwei; Li, Tim

    2016-05-01

    The onset of South China Sea summer monsoon (SCSSM) signifies the commencement of the wet season over East Asia. Predicting the SCSSM onset date is of significant importance. In this study, we establish two different statistical models, namely the physical-empirical model (PEM) and the spatial-temporal projection model (STPM) to predict the SCSSM onset. The PEM is constructed from the seasonal prediction perspective. Observational diagnoses reveal that the early onset of the SCSSM is preceded by (a) a warming tendency in middle and lower troposphere (850-500 hPa) over central Siberia from January to March, (b) a La Niña-like zonal dipole sea surface temperature pattern over the tropical Pacific in March, and (c) a dipole sea level pressure pattern with negative center in subtropics and positive center over high latitude of Southern Hemisphere in January. The PEM built on these predictors achieves a cross-validated reforecast temporal correlation coefficient (TCC) skill of 0.84 for the period of 1979-2004, and an independent forecast TCC skill of 0.72 for the period 2005-2014. The STPM is built on the extended-range forecast perspective. Pentad data are used to predict a zonal wind index over the South China Sea region. Similar to PEM, the STPM is constructed using 1979-2004 data. Based on the forecasted zonal wind index, the independent forecast of the SCSSM onset dates achieves a TCC skill of 0.90 for 2005-2014. The STPM provides more detailed information for the intraseasonal evolution during the period of the SCSSM onset (pentad 25-35). The two models proposed herein are expected to facilitate the real-time prediction of the SCSSM onset.

  19. CloudSat observations of cloud-type distribution over the Indian summer monsoon region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Subrahmanyam

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The three-dimensional distribution of various cloud types over the Indian summer monsoon (ISM region using five years (2006–2010 of CloudSat observations during June-July-August-September months is discussed for the first time. As the radiative properties, latent heat released and microphysical properties of clouds differ largely depending on the cloud type, it becomes important to know what types of clouds occur over which region. In this regard, the present analysis establishes the three-dimensional distribution of frequency of occurrence of stratus (St, stratocumulus (Sc, nimbostratus (Ns, cumulus (Cu, altocumulus (Ac, altostratus (As, cirrus (Ci and deep convective (DC clouds over the ISM region. The results show that the various cloud types preferentially occur over some regions of the ISM, which are consistent during all the years of observations. It is found that the DC clouds frequently occur over northeast of Bay of Bengal (BoB, Ci clouds over a wide region of south BoB–Indian peninsula–equatorial Indian Ocean, and Sc clouds over the north Arabian Sea. Ac clouds preferentially occur over land, and a large amount of As clouds are found over BoB. The occurrence of both St and Ns clouds over the study region is much lower than all other cloud types.The interannual variability of all these clouds including their vertical distribution is discussed. It is envisaged that the present study opens up possibilities to quantify the feedback of individual cloud type in the maintenance of the ISM through radiative forcing and latent heat release.

  20. Competing Atmospheric and Surface-Driven Impacts of Absorbing Aerosols on the East Asian Summer Monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persad, G.; Paynter, D.; Ming, Y.; Ramaswamy, V.

    2015-12-01

    Absorbing aerosols, by attenuating shortwave radiation within the atmosphere and reemitting it as longwave radiation, redistribute energy both vertically within the surface-atmosphere column and horizontally between polluted and unpolluted regions. East Asia has the largest concentrations of anthropogenic absorbing aerosols globally, and these, along with the region's scattering aerosols, have both reduced the amount of solar radiation reaching the Earth's surface regionally ("solar dimming") and increased shortwave absorption within the atmosphere, particularly during the peak months of the East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM). We here analyze how atmospheric absorption and surface solar dimming compete in driving the response of EASM circulation to anthropogenic absorbing aerosols, which dominates, and why—issues of particular importance for predicting how the EASM will respond to projected changes in absorbing and scattering aerosol emissions in the future. We probe these questions in a state-of-the-art general circulation model (GCM) using a combination of realistic and idealized aerosol perturbations that allow us to analyze the relative influence of absorbing aerosols' atmospheric and surface-driven impacts on EASM circulation. In combination, our results make clear that, although absorption-driven dimming has a less detrimental effect on EASM circulation than purely scattering-driven dimming, aerosol absorption is still a net impairment to EASM strength when both its atmospheric and surface effects are considered. Because atmospheric heating is not efficiently conveyed to the surface, the surface dimming and associated cooling from even a pure absorber is sufficient to counteract its atmospheric heating, resulting in a net reduction in EASM strength. These findings elevate the current understanding of the impacts of aerosol absorption on the EASM, improving our ability to diagnose EASM responses to current and future regional changes in aerosol emissions.

  1. Multi-Decadal Modulations in the Variability of the East Asian Summer Monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, H.; Machimura, T.; Ogawa, S.; Kosaka, Y.; Nishii, K.; Miyasaka, T.

    2015-12-01

    The East Asian summer monsoon fluctuates from its climatological activity on monthly and interannual time scales, and the most dominant pattern of the variability is known as the Pacific-Japan (PJ) pattern. Characterized by a meridional teleconnection in anomalous activity of the Meiyu/Baiu rainband, tropical storms and a surface subtropical anticyclone (the Bonin High) in between, the PJ pattern exerts substantial influence on summertime climatic conditions over East Asia and the western North Pacific. Despite the recent warming trend observed in its background state, no assessment thus far has been made on how substantially the PJ has undergone, if any, multi-decadal modulations in its structure and/or dominance. Through an EOF analysis applied to a new dataset of global atmospheric reanalysis (JRA-55), the predominance of the PJ pattern is confirmed as being extracted in the leading EOF of lower-tropospheric monthly vorticity anomalies over 55 recent years. Both efficient barotropic/baroclinic energy conversion from the climatological-mean state and efficient generation of available potential energy through anomalous convective activity over the tropical western Pacific are shown to be essential for the maintenance of the monthly atmospheric anomalies of the PJ pattern over the entire 55-year period. At the same time, however, the same EOF analysis as above but applied separately to each of the sub-periods reveals a distinct signature of long-term modulations in amplitude and thus the dominance of the PJ pattern. While being extracted in the first EOF up to the 1980s, the PJ pattern is extracted in the second EOF in the period since the 1990s with marked reductions in both the variance fraction explained and the efficiency of energy conversion/generation. The resultant modulations of the summertime meridional teleconnection are also discussed with implications for future changes.

  2. Orbital-scale nonlinear response of East Asian summer monsoon to its potential driving forces in the late Quaternary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Liang; Shi, Zhengguo; Tan, Liangcheng; Deng, Chenglong

    2017-06-01

    We conducted a statistical study to characterize the nonlinear response of the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) to its potential forcing factors over the last 260 ka on orbital timescales. We find that both variation in solar insolation and global ice volume were responsible for the nonlinear forcing of orbital-scale monsoonal variations, accounting for 80% of the total variance. Specifically, EASM records with dominated precession variance exhibit a more sensitive response to changes in solar insolation during intervals of enhanced monsoon strength, but are less sensitive during intervals of reduced monsoon strength. In the case of global ice volume with 100-ka variance, this difference is not one of sensitivity but rather a difference in baseline conditions, such as the relative areas of land and sea which affected the land-sea thermal gradient. We therefore suggest that EASM records with dominated precession variance recorded the signal of a shift in the location of the Inter-tropical Convergence Zone, and the associated changes in the incidence of torrential rainfall; while for proxies with dominated 100-ka variance, it recorded changes in the land-sea thermal gradient via its effects on non-torrential precipitation.

  3. The role of low-frequency intraseasonal oscillations in the anomalous Indian summer monsoon rainfall of 2002

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Sajani; S Naseema Beegum; K Krishna Moorthy

    2007-04-01

    We analyze the dynamical features and responsible factors of the low-frequency intraseasonal time scales which influenced the nature of onset, intensity and duration of active/break phases and withdrawal of the monsoon during the anomalous Indian summer monsoon of 2002 – the most severe drought recorded in recent times. During that season, persistent warm sea surface temperature anomalies over the equatorial Indian Ocean played a significant role in modulating the strength of the monsoon Hadley circulation. This in turn affected the onset and intense break spells especially the long break during the peak monsoon month of July. Strong low-frequency intraseasonal modulations with significant impact on the onset and active/break phases occurred in 2002 which were manifested as a good association between low-frequency intraseasonal oscillations and the onset and active/break spells. Further, SST anomalies over the equatorial Indo-Pacific region on low-frequency intraseasonal time scales were found to affect the equatorial eastward and thereby off-equatorial northward propagations of enhanced convection over the Indian region. These propagations in turn modulated the active/break cycle deciding the consequent severity of the 2002 drought.

  4. Winter AO/NAO modifies summer ocean heat content and monsoonal circulation over the western Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Dao-Yi; Guo, Dong; Li, Sang; Kim, Seong-Joong

    2017-02-01

    This paper analyzes the possible influence of boreal winter Arctic Oscillation/North Atlantic Oscillation (AO/ NAO) on the Indian Ocean upper ocean heat content in summer as well as the summer monsoonal circulation. The strong interannual co-variation between winter 1000-hPa geopotential height in the Northern Hemisphere and summer ocean heat content in the uppermost 120 m over the tropical Indian Ocean was investigated by a singular decomposition analysis for the period 1979-2014. The second paired-modes explain 23.8% of the squared covariance, and reveal an AO/NAO pattern over the North Atlantic and a warming upper ocean in the western tropical Indian Ocean. The positive upper ocean heat content enhances evaporation and convection, and results in an anomalous meridional circulation with ascending motion over 5°S-5°N and descending over 15°-25°N. Correspondingly, in the lower troposphere, significantly anomalous northerly winds appear over the western Indian Ocean north of the equator, implying a weaker summer monsoon circulation. The off-equator oceanic Rossby wave plays a key role in linking the AO/NAO and the summer heat content anomalies. In boreal winter, a positive AO/NAO triggers a down-welling Rossby wave in the central tropical Indian Ocean through the atmospheric teleconnection. As the Rossby wave arrives in the western Indian Ocean in summer, it results in anomalous upper ocean heating near the equator mainly through the meridional advection. The AO/NAO-forced Rossby wave and the resultant upper ocean warming are well reproduced by an ocean circulation model. The winter AO/NAO could be a potential season-lead driver of the summer atmospheric circulation over the northwestern Indian Ocean.

  5. Impact of springtime Himalayan-Tibetan Plateau snowpack on the onset of the Indian summer monsoon in coupled seasonal forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senan, Retish; Orsolini, Yvan J.; Weisheimer, Antje; Vitart, Frédéric; Balsamo, Gianpaolo; Stockdale, Timothy N.; Dutra, Emanuel; Doblas-Reyes, Francisco J.; Basang, Droma

    2016-11-01

    The springtime snowpack over the Himalayan-Tibetan Plateau (HTP) region and Eurasia has long been suggested to be an influential factor on the onset of the Indian summer monsoon. To assess the impact of realistic initialization of springtime snow over HTP on the onset of the Indian summer monsoon, we examine a suite of coupled ocean-atmosphere 4-month ensemble reforecasts made at the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, using their Seasonal Forecasting System 4. The reforecasts were initialized on 1 April every year for the period 1981-2010. In these seasonal reforecasts, the snow is initialized "realistically" with ERA-Interim/Land Reanalysis. In addition, we carried out an additional set of forecasts, identical in all aspects except that initial conditions for snow-related land surface variables over the HTP region are randomized. We show that high snow depth over HTP influences the meridional tropospheric temperature gradient reversal that marks the monsoon onset. Composite difference based on a normalized HTP snow index reveal that, in high snow years, (1) the onset is delayed by about 8 days, and (2) negative precipitation anomalies and warm surface conditions prevail over India. We show that about half of this delay can be attributed to the realistic initialization of snow over the HTP region. We further demonstrate that high April snow depths over HTP are not uniquely influenced by El Nino-Southern Oscillation, the Indian Ocean Dipole or the North Atlantic Oscillation.

  6. Contrasting effects of winter and summer climate on alpine timberline evolution in monsoon-dominated East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ying; Liu, Hongyan; Wang, Hongya; Piao, Shilong; Yin, Yi; Ciais, Philippe; Wu, Xiuchen; Luo, Yao; Zhang, Caina; Song, Yaqiong; Gao, Yishen; Qiu, Anan

    2017-08-01

    Alpine timberline is particularly sensitive to global climate change, with the danger of losing essential ecosystem services in high elevational regions. Its evolution is generally linked to annual average thermal regimes, and is regarded as an indicator of climate warming. However, the effect of uneven seasonal climate change stressed by the Hijioka et al. (2014) on alpine timberline dynamics in terms of both position migration and species composition remains unclear. Here, we documented approximately 6000 years of postglacial alpine timberline evolution on Mt. Tabai in the monsoon-dominated East Asian subtropical-temperate transition. We analyzed three high-resolution lacustrine sediment sequences located below, within, and above the current alpine timberline, an ecotone between the forest line and treeline, respectively. The timberline position appears to have varied coincidently with the temperature effect of cold East Asian Winter Monsoon (EAWM), implying that enhanced EAWM shortened the duration of the growing season and reduced forest survival at the alpine timberline. Unlike position migration, however, timberline species composition depends on summer precipitation. We found that drought-tolerant herb and shrub species were much more sensitive to variations in the water-bearing East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM) than mesophytic trees at the alpine timberline. Our results suggest that prediction of future timberline dynamics should consider uneven seasonal climate changes.

  7. Change in the tilting of the ridgeline surface of the subtropical anticyclone and the predictability of the onset of the Asian summer monsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Jiangyu; DUAN Anmin; LIU Yimin; WU Guoxiong

    2003-01-01

    The NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data are used to study the relationships among the change in the tilting of the ridgeline surface of the subtropical anticyclone, the establishment of the so-called "seasonal transition axis (STA)" and the onset of the Asian summer monsoon. It is shown that the monsoon onset is characterized by the overturning of the meridional temperature gradient (MTG) in the vicinity of the ridgeline surface. A MTG index is then constructed to investigate the predictability of the Asian summer monsoon onset conceptually. Data diagnoses show that if the initial MTG is known and the meridional gradient across the ridgeline surface of the local temperature tendency can be estimated, a late or early onset of the summer monsoon can be qualitatively predicted in advance.

  8. A study on the decreasing trend in tropical easterly jet stream (TEJ) and its impact on Indian summer monsoon rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreekala, P. P.; Bhaskara Rao, S. V.; Arunachalam, M. S.; Harikiran, C.

    2014-10-01

    Using the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis wind and temperature data (1948-2011) and India Meteorological Department (IMD) rainfall data, a long-term trend in the tropical easterly jet stream and its effect on Indian summer monsoon rainfall has been explained in the present study. A decreasing trend in zonal wind speed at 100 mb (maximum decrease), 150 mb, and 200 mb (minimum) is observed. The upper-level (100, 150, and 200 mb) zonal wind speed has been correlated with the surface air temperature anomaly index (ATAI) in the month of May, which is taken as the difference in temperature anomaly over land (22.5°N-27.5°N, 80°E-90°E) and Ocean (5°S-0°S, 75°E-85°E). Significant high correlation is observed between May ATAI and tropical easterly jet stream (TEJ) which suggests that the decreasing land-sea temperature contrast could be one major reason behind the decreasing trend in TEJ. The analysis of spatial distribution of rainfall over India shows a decreasing trend in rainfall over Jammu and Kashmir, Arunachal Pradesh, central Indian region, and western coast of India. Increasing trend in rainfall is observed over south peninsular and northeastern part of India. From the spatial correlation analysis of zonal wind with gridded rainfall, it is observed that the correlation of rainfall is found to be high with the TEJ speed over the regions where the decreasing trend in rainfall is observed. Similarly, from the analysis of spatial correlation between rainfall and May ATAI, positive spatial correlation is observed between May ATAI and summer monsoon rainfall over the regions such as south peninsular India where the rainfall trend is positive, and negative correlation is observed over the places such as Jammu and Kashmir where negative rainfall trend is observed. The decreased land-sea temperature contrast in the pre-monsoon month could be one major reason behind the decreased trend in TEJ as well as the observed spatial variation in the summer monsoon rainfall trend. Thus

  9. A Modeling Study of the Effects of Anomalous Snow Cover over the Tibetan Plateau upon the South Asian Summer Monsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘华强; 孙照渤; 王举; 闵锦忠

    2004-01-01

    The effect of anomalous snow cover over the Tibetan Plateau upon the South Asian summer monsoon is investigated by numerical simulations using the NCAR regional climate model (RegCM2) into which gravity wave drag has been introduced. The simulations adopt relatively realistic snow mass forcings based on Scanning Multi-channel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) pentad snow depth data. The physical mechanism and spatial structure of the sensitivity of the South Asian early summer monsoon to snow cover anomaly over the Tibetan Plateau are revealed. The main results are summarized as follows. The heavier than normal snow cover over the Plateau can obviously reduce the shortwave radiation absorbed by surface through the albedo effect, which is compensated by weaker upward sensible heat flux associated with colder surface temperature, whereas the effects of snow melting and evaporation are relatively smaller.The anomalies of surface heat fluxes can last until June and become unobvions in July. The decrease of the Plateau surface temperature caused by heavier snow cover reaches its maximum value from late April to early May. The atmospheric cooling in the mid-upper troposphere over the Plateau and its surrounding areas is most obvious in May and can keep a fairly strong intensity in June. In contrast, there is warming to the south of the Plateau in the mid-lower troposphere from April to June with a maximum value in May.The heavier snow cover over the Plateau can reduce the intensity of the South Asian summer monsoon and rainfall to some extent, but this influence is only obvious in early summer and almost disappears in later stages.

  10. Enhancement and depletion of lower/middle tropospheric ozone in Senegal during pre-monsoon and monsoon periods of summer 2008: observations and model results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. S. Jenkins

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available During the summer (8 June through 3 September of 2008, nine ozonesondes are launched from Dakar, Senegal (14.75° N, 17.49° W to investigate the impact of the Saharan Dust Layer (SAL on ozone (O3 concentrations in the lower troposphere. Results during June (pre-monsoon period show a reduction in O3, especially in the 850–700 hPa layer with SAL events. However, O3 concentrations are increased in the 950–900 hPa layer where the peak of the inversion is found and presumably the highest dust concentrations. We use the WRF-CHEM model to explore the causes of elevated O3 concentrations that appear to have a stratospheric contribution. During July and August (monsoon period, with the exception of one SAL outbreak, vertical profiles of O3 are well mixed with concentrations not exceeding 55 ppb between the surface and 550 hPa. In the transition period between 26 June and 2 July lower tropospheric (925–600 hPa O3 concentrations are likely enhanced by enhanced biogenic NOx emissions from the Saharan desert and Sahelian soils following several rain events on 28 June and 1 July.

  11. Predictability during active break phases of Indian summer monsoon in an ensemble prediction system using climate forecast system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhilash, S.; Sahai, A. K.; Pattnaik, S.; De, S.

    2013-08-01

    This study examines the phase dependant temporal and spatial error evolution and prediction of active break spells of Indian summer monsoon rainfall in an ensemble prediction system (EPS) on a pentad time scale using climate forecast system (CFS). The EPS system shows systematic wet bias (overestimation) over west coast over the Arabian Sea and Myanmar coast and dry bias (underestimation) over Indian land mass even at pentad 1 lead and these biases consistently increase up to 4 pentad lead and saturate thereafter. Irrespective of the phases of the monsoon, the lower bound of predictability is 2 pentads, while upper bound of predictability for initial conditions starting from active phase saturates at 3 pentads and for break and transition phases predictability error saturates at a later stage at about 5 pentad. Initial conditions started from transition phase shows higher potential predictability followed by break phase and then active phase.

  12. The Response of the South Asian Summer Monsoon Circulation to Intensified Irrigation in Global Climate Model Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Sonali P.; Puma, Michael J.; Cook, Benjamin I.

    2013-01-01

    Agricultural intensification in South Asia has resulted in the expansion and intensification of surface irrigation over the twentieth century. The resulting changes to the surface energy balance could affect the temperature contrasts between the South Asian land surface and the equatorial Indian Ocean, potentially altering the South Asian Summer Monsoon (SASM) circulation. Prior studies have noted apparent declines in the monsoon intensity over the twentieth century and have focused on how altered surface energy balances impact the SASM rainfall distribution. Here, we use the coupled Goddard Institute for Space Studies ModelE-R general circulation model to investigate the impact of intensifying irrigation on the large-scale SASM circulation over the twentieth century, including how the effect of irrigation compares to the impact of increasing greenhouse gas (GHG) forcing. We force our simulations with time-varying, historical estimates of irrigation, both alone and with twentieth century GHGs and other forcings. In the irrigation only experiment, irrigation rates correlate strongly with lower and upper level temperature contrasts between the Indian sub-continent and the Indian Ocean (Pearson's r = -0.66 and r = -0.46, respectively), important quantities that control the strength of the SASM circulation. When GHG forcing is included, these correlations strengthen: r = -0.72 and r = -0.47 for lower and upper level temperature contrasts, respectively. Under irrigated conditions, the mean SASM intensity in the model decreases only slightly and insignificantly. However, in the simulation with irrigation and GHG forcing, inter-annual variability of the SASM circulation decreases by *40 %, consistent with trends in the reanalysis products. This suggests that the inclusion of irrigation may be necessary to accurately simulate the historical trends and variability of the SASM system over the last 50 years. These findings suggest that intensifying irrigation, in concert with

  13. Circumglobal wave train and the summer monsoon over northwestern India and Pakistan: the explicit role of the surface heat low

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Sajjad; Müller, Wolfgang A.; Hagemann, Stefan; Jacob, Daniela

    2011-09-01

    This study examines the influence of the mid-latitude circulation on the surface heat low (HL) and associated monsoon rainfall over northwestern India and Pakistan using the ERA40 data and high resolution (T106L31) climate model ECHAM5 simulation. Special emphasis is given to the surface HL which forms over Pakistan and adjoining areas of India, Iran and Afghanistan during the summer season. A heat low index (HLI) is defined to depict the surface HL. The HLI displays significant correlations with the upper level mid-latitude circulation over western central Asia and low level monsoon circulation over Arabian Sea and acts as a bridge connecting the mid-latitude wave train to the Indian summer monsoon. A time-lagged singular value decomposition analysis reveals that the eastward propagation of the mid-latitude circumglobal wave train (CGT) influences the surface pressure anomalies over the Indian domain. The largest low (negative) pressure anomalies over the western parts of the HL region (i.e., Iran and Afghanistan) occur in conjunction with the upper level anomalous high that develops over western-central Asia during the positive phase of the CGT. The composite analysis also reveals a significant increase in the low pressure anomalies over Iran and Afghanistan during the positive phase of CGT. The westward increasing low pressure anomalies with its north-south orientation provokes enormous north-south pressure gradient (lower pressure over land than over sea). This in turn enables the moist southerly flow from the Arabian Sea to penetrate farther northward over northwestern India and Pakistan. A monsoon trough like conditions develops over northwestern India and Pakistan where the moist southwesterly flow from the Arabian Sea and the Persian Gulf converge. The convergence in association with the orographic uplifting expedites convection and associated precipitation over northwestern India and Pakistan. The high resolution climate model ECHAM5 simulation also

  14. Circumglobal wave train and the summer monsoon over northwestern India and Pakistan: the explicit role of the surface heat low

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeed, Sajjad [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg (Germany); International Max Planck Research School on Earth System Modeling, Hamburg (Germany); Pakistan Meteorological Department, Islamabad (Pakistan); Mueller, Wolfgang A.; Hagemann, Stefan; Jacob, Daniela [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    This study examines the influence of the mid-latitude circulation on the surface heat low (HL) and associated monsoon rainfall over northwestern India and Pakistan using the ERA40 data and high resolution (T106L31) climate model ECHAM5 simulation. Special emphasis is given to the surface HL which forms over Pakistan and adjoining areas of India, Iran and Afghanistan during the summer season. A heat low index (HLI) is defined to depict the surface HL. The HLI displays significant correlations with the upper level mid-latitude circulation over western central Asia and low level monsoon circulation over Arabian Sea and acts as a bridge connecting the mid-latitude wave train to the Indian summer monsoon. A time-lagged singular value decomposition analysis reveals that the eastward propagation of the mid-latitude circumglobal wave train (CGT) influences the surface pressure anomalies over the Indian domain. The largest low (negative) pressure anomalies over the western parts of the HL region (i.e., Iran and Afghanistan) occur in conjunction with the upper level anomalous high that develops over western-central Asia during the positive phase of the CGT. The composite analysis also reveals a significant increase in the low pressure anomalies over Iran and Afghanistan during the positive phase of CGT. The westward increasing low pressure anomalies with its north-south orientation provokes enormous north-south pressure gradient (lower pressure over land than over sea). This in turn enables the moist southerly flow from the Arabian Sea to penetrate farther northward over northwestern India and Pakistan. A monsoon trough like conditions develops over northwestern India and Pakistan where the moist southwesterly flow from the Arabian Sea and the Persian Gulf converge. The convergence in association with the orographic uplifting expedites convection and associated precipitation over northwestern India and Pakistan. The high resolution climate model ECHAM5 simulation also

  15. East China Sea δ18O Record Detects Millennial-Scale Changes in the East Asian Summer Monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeman, E.; Clemens, S. C.; Lawman, A. E.; Kubota, Y.; Holbourn, A. E.; Martin, A.

    2015-12-01

    The East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM) brings heavy summer rainfall to some of Asia's most densely-populated areas, impacting agricultural production and water resources. Sediment cores were recovered from International Ocean Drilling Program Site U1429 in the East China Sea (31° 37.04' N, 128° 59.50' E, 732 mbsl). This location receives runoff from the Yangtze River, which serves as a major drainage system for monsoon-induced precipitation. Hence, the δ18O record of planktonic foraminifera at Site U1429 reflects changes in regional, monsoon-driven salinity. The top 100 meters of core at Site U1429 were sampled at a preliminary resolution of 15 cm and processed to isolate the planktonic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber for δ18O mass spectrometry analyses. Abrupt, millennial-scale regional climate variability in the EASM and its linkage to orbital forcings have been reconstructed using stratigraphic analysis of δ18O. The sub-orbital scale structure of the δ18O record over the past 400 kyr matches the structures of both the composite speleothem δ18O from eastern China (Sanbao and Hulu caves) and the planktonic δ18O record from northern South China Sea Site 1146. The similarities between these δ18O records indicate a strong regional response to monsoon forcing. Removal of the temperature component of the δ18O signal by using Mg/Ca (G. ruber) paleothermometry will provide a record of changes in the δ18O composition of seawater in response to Yangtze River runoff.

  16. Driving forces of Indian summer monsoon on Milankovitch and sub-Milankovitch time scales: A review

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.

    and deep water circulation changes drive the variability of southwest (SW) monsoon in the Indian subcontinent. Different forcing factors act on different time scales. Arabian Sea sediments consist of distinct fauna that are endemic to areas of upwelling...

  17. Impact of convection over the equatorial trough on the summer monsoon activity over India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshKumar, M.R.; Shenoi, S.S.C.; Schulz, J.

    Project (GPCP). Most (about 73%) of the break in monsoon (BM) events were associated with the convective activity (rainfall more than 30 mm/pentad) over the equatorial trough (ET) region. The association between these events and the convective activity...

  18. Culturable heterotrophic bacteria from the euphotic zone of the Indian Ocean ocean during the summer monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, S.; LokaBharathi, P.A.; Chandramohan, D.

    Cuturable heterotrophic bacterial counts (viable counts: VC) by surface plating on ZoBell medium and total bacterial counts (TC) by epifuorenscence microscopy were carried out in sea water off the southwest coast of India during the monsoon. TC were...

  19. On the dominant intra-seasonal modes over the East Asia-western North Pacific summer monsoon region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Kyung-Ja; Oh, Hyoeun

    2017-04-01

    Intra-seasonal monsoon prediction is the most imperative task due to high impact on 2/3 of world populations' daily life, but there remains an enduring challenge in climate science. The present study aims to provide a physical understanding of the sources for prediction of dominant intra-seasonal modes in the East Asian-western North Pacific summer monsoon (EA-WNPSM): preMeiyu&Baiu, Changma&Meiyu, WNPSM, and monsoon gyre modes classified by the self-organizing map analysis. The major modes tend to be dominated by the moisture convergence of the moisture budget equation along the rain-band. The preMeiyu-Baiu mode is strongly linked to both the anomalous low-level convergence and vertical wind shear through baroclinic instability, and the Changma&Meiyu mode has a strengthened tropic-subtropics connection along the western north Pacific subtropical high, which induces vertical destabilization and strong convective instability. The WNPSM and monsoon gyre modes are characterized by anomalous southeasterly flow of warm and moist air from western north Pacific monsoon, and low-level easterly flow, respectively. Prominent difference in response to the ENSO leads to different effects of the Indian Ocean and western Pacific thermal state, and consequently, the distinct moisture supply and instability variations for the EASM intra-seasonal modes. We discuss the major driving forces of sub-seasonal variability over EA-WNPSM regions. Lastly we attempted to determine the predictability sources for the four modes in the EA-WNPSM. The selected predictors are based on the persistent and tendency signals of the SST/2m air temperature and sea level pressure fields, which reflect the asymmetric response to the ENSO and the ocean and land surface anomalous conditions. For the preMeiyu&Baiu mode, the SST cooling tendency over the WNP, which persists into summer, is the distinguishing contributor that results in strong baroclinic instability. A major precursor for the Changma&Meiyu mode

  20. Response of Asian summer monsoon duration to orbital forcing under glacial and interglacial conditions: Implication for precipitation variability in geological records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhengguo

    2016-05-01

    The responses of Asian summer monsoon and associated precipitation to orbital forcing have been intensively explored during the past 30 years, but debate still exists regarding whether or not the Asian monsoon is controlled by northern or southern summer insolation on the precessional timescale. Various modeling studies have been conducted that support the potential roles played by the insolation in both hemispheres. Among these previous studies, however, the main emphasis has been on the Asian monsoon intensity, with the response of monsoon duration having received little consideration. In the present study, the response of the rainy season duration over different monsoon areas to orbital forcing and its contribution to total annual precipitation are evaluated using an atmospheric general circulation model. The results show that the durations of the rainy seasons, especially their withdrawal, in northern East Asia and the India-Bay of Bengal region, are sensitive to precession change under interglacial-like conditions. Compared to those during stronger boreal summer insolation, the Asian monsoon-associated rainy seasons at weaker insolation last longer, although the peak intensity is smaller. This longer duration of rainfall, which results from the change in land-ocean thermal contrast associated with atmospheric diabatic heating, can counterbalance the weakened intensity in certain places and induce an opposite response of total annual precipitation. However, the duration effect of Asian monsoon is limited under glacial-like conditions. Nevertheless, monsoon duration is a factor that can dominate the orbital-scale variability of Asian monsoon, alongside the intensity, and it should therefore receive greater attention when attempting to explain orbital-scale monsoon change.

  1. Circumglobal wave train and the summer monsoon over South Asia: The explicit role of the surface heat low

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Sajjad; Müller, Wolfgang A.; Hagemann, Stefan; Jacob, Daniela

    2010-05-01

    This study examines the influence of mid-latitude circulation on the surface heat low and associated monsoon rainfall over South Asia using the ERA40 data. A heat low index is defined to depict the surface heat low which forms over Pakistan and adjoining areas of India, Iran and Afghanistan during the summer season. The heat low divulges significant correlations with the upper level 200 hPa geopotential height anomalies over western central Asia and East Asian region and acts as a bridge connecting the mid-latitude wave train to the Indian summer monsoon. During the positive phase of the mid-latitude circumglobal wave train, anomalous upper level high pressure develops over western central Asia. The subsidence associated with the anomalous high reduces the surface pressure in the heat low by raising the mean air temperature and anomalous uplift in the middle and lower troposphere. The increasing middle tropospheric temperature creates an inversion between the lower and upper troposphere which consequently restricts the middle and low level cloud formation above the heat low. Further, the upper level subsidence also minimizes the high cloud cover above the heat low region and hence favors more solar radiation to this area. The accruing surface heating reduces the surface pressure, resulting in further intensification of the heat low and associated monsoon circulation. Moreover, the westward accruing surface air temperature shifts the anomalous core of the heat low to the West over Iran. The westward shift in the anomalous core of the intensified heat low with its north-south orientation provokes enormous north-south pressure gradient (lower pressure over land than over sea). This in turn enables the moist southerly flow from the Arabian Sea to penetrate farther northward over northwestern India and Pakistan, where convective heating and orographic lifting expedites the convection and hence the precipitation. Composite analysis reveals a dipole teleconnection pattern

  2. Bifurcations in a Nonlinear Dynamical Model between Western Pacific Subtropical High Ridge Line Index and Its Summer Monsoon Impact Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Hong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The western Pacific subtropical high (WPSH is closely related to Asian climate. Previous studies have shown that a precise dynamical model focusing on the interaction between WPSH and other summer monsoon factors has not been developed. Based on the concept of dynamical model reconstruction, this paper reconstructs a nonlinear dynamical model of subtropical high ridge line (SHRL and summer monsoon factors from recent 20 years data. Then, using genetic algorithm (GA, model inversion and model parameter optimization are carried out. Based on the reconstructed dynamical model, dynamical characteristics of SHRL are analyzed and an aberrance mechanism is developed, in which the external forcings resulting in the WPSH anomalies are explored. Results show that the configuration and diversification of the SHRL equilibriums have better represented the abnormal activities of the SHRL in short and medium term. Change of SHRL brought by the combination of equilibriums is more complex than that brought by mutation. The mutation behavior from high-value to low-value equilibriums of the SHRL in summer corresponds with the southward drop of the SHRL. The combination behavior of the two steady equilibriums corresponds with disappearance of the “double-ridge” phenomenon of WPSH. Dynamical mechanisms of these phenomena are explained.

  3. Effect of cloud microphysics on Indian summer monsoon precipitating clouds: A coupled climate modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazra, Anupam; Chaudhari, Hemantkumar S.; Saha, Subodh K.; Pokhrel, Samir

    2017-04-01

    The quest for one of the most dominant processes controlling the large-scale circulations in the tropics is unraveled. The impact of cloud microphysical processes is known to have effects on rainfall and local atmospheric thermodynamics; however, its effect on the prevailing mean circulations is not yet studied. Two sets of coupled global climate model experiments (ICE and NO ICE microphysics) reveal that ice microphysics improves the strength of the Hadley circulation with respect to observation. Results pinpoint that ICE simulation enhances high cloud fraction (global tropics: 59%, India: 51%) and stratiform rain (global tropics: 5%, India: 15%) contribution. ICE and NO ICE cloud microphysics impacts differently on the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), tropospheric temperature, and surface shortwave and longwave radiation. The effect of ice microphysics reduces OLR, which signifies deeper convection in the ICE run. The global annual average of the net radiation flux (shortwave and longwave) at the surface in ICE run (108.1 W/m2) is close to the observation (106 W/m2), which is overestimated in NO ICE run (112 W/m2). The result of apparent heat source term over the land and ocean surface eventually modifies regional Hadley circulation. Thus, the effect of ice microphysics in the global coupled model is important not only because of microphysics but also due to the radiation feedbacks. Therefore, better ice-phase microphysics is required in the new generation of climate forecast model, which may lead to improvements in the simulation of monsoon.

  4. A simple method to forecast the frequency of depressions and cyclones over Bay of Bengal during summer monsoon season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhuram, Y.; Maneesha, K.; Suneeta, P.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, an attempt has been made to develop a simple multiple regression model to forecast the total number of depressions and cyclones (TNDC) over Bay of Bengal during summer monsoon (June-September) season using the data for the period, 1995-2016. Four potential predictors (zonal wind speed at 850 hPa in May and April SST in the North Australia-Indonesia region, 05°S-15°S; 120°E-160°E; March NINO 3.4 SST and geopotential height at 200 hPa in the region, 0°N-10°N; 80°E-100°E) have been identified to forecast TNDC. A remarkably high multiple correlation coefficient of 0.92 has been observed with the TNDC which explains 85% variability. The methodology has been tested for the recent 5 years (2012-2016) and found a good agreement between the observed and forecast values of TNDC except in 2015 in which the observed and predicted TNDC were 2 and 0, respectively. It is interesting to see high and significant correlations between the above predictors and the genesis potential parameter (GPP) during summer monsoon season. This GPP depends on the relative vorticity at 850 hPa, mid troposphere relative humidity, thermal instability between 850 and 500 hPa, and vertical wind shear between 200 and 850 hPa. It is inferred that the above predictors are influencing the environmental conditions over Bay of Bengal which, in turn, influencing the genesis of cyclones during summer monsoon season. The impact of ENSO (El-Nino-Southern Oscillation) and La-Nina in TNDC is examined and found that the vertical wind shear and relative vorticity are high and the GPP was almost double in ENSO compared with that in La-Nina which favoured high (low) TNDC under ENSO (La-Nina).

  5. Interactions between trophic levels in upwelling and non-upwelling regions during summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, A.; Fernandes, C. E. G.; Gonsalves, M.-J. B. D.; Subina, N. S.; Mamatha, S. S.; Krishna, K.; Varik, S.; Kumari, R.; Gauns, M.; Cejoice, R. P.; Pandey, S. S.; Jineesh, V. K.; Kamaleson, A. S.; Vijayan, V.; Mukherjee, I.; Subramanyan, S.; Nair, S.; Ingole, B.; LokaBharathi, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Coastal upwelling is a regular phenomenon occurring along the southwest coast of India during summer monsoon (May-September). We hypothesize that there could be a shift in environmental parameters along with changes in the network of interactions between bacteria, phytoplankton, and zooplankton in upwelling and non-upwelling regions. During cruise # 267 on FORV Sagar Sampada, water samples were analysed for environmental and biological parameters from two transects, one upwelling region off Trivandrum (TVM) (8°26‧N, 76°20‧E-8°30‧N, 76°50‧E), and the other non-upwelling region off Calicut (CLT) (11°11‧N, 75°30‧E-11°14‧N,74°54‧E), about 230 nmi to the north. Meteorological, hydrological, and nutrient profiles confirmed upwelling off TVM. Bacteria, phytoplankton and zooplankton significantly responded. Primary and bacterial productivity enhanced together with increase in the percentage of viable bacteria (TVC). Pearson's correlation analysis pointed out the differences in bacterial interactions with other trophic levels at both transects. TVC played a prominent role in trophic interactions off TVM by depending on phytoplankton for substrate (r = 0.754). This contrasted with CLT where total counts (TC) played an important role. However, most interrelationships were less pronounced. Principal component analysis (PCA) confirmed the correlation analysis and further showed that the factor loadings of the biotic and abiotic parameters differed in strength and direction in the two regions. More importantly, the processes of mineralization by bacteria and uptake by phytoplankton are obviously more coupled off TVM as evidenced by the clustering of the related parameters in the PCA biplot. Canonical correspondence analysis also complements these findings and demonstrated that the abiotic factors influenced phytoplankton and bacteria similarly at TVM but differently at CLT. The impact on the trophic interrelationships is evident by the close association

  6. South Asian summer monsoon variability during the last ~54 kyrs inferred from surface water salinity and river run off proxies

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gebregiorgis, D.; Hathorne, E.C.; Sijinkumar, A.V; Nath, B.N.; Nurnberg, D.; Frank, M.

    : Quat. Sci. Rev., vol.138; 2016; 6-15 South Asian Summer Monsoon variability during the last ~54 kyrs inferred from surface water salinity and river run off proxies D. Gebregiorgis1, E.C. Hathorne1, A.V. Sijinkumar2, B. Nagender Nath3, D. Nürnberg... leach with 100 μL 0.001 M HNO3 was applied and followed by two rinses with distilled water. Samples were dissolved in 0.075 M nitric acid (HNO3) (500 μL) assisted by sonication for 25 mins.   6 Finally samples were centrifuged for 4 mins at 13400 rpm...

  7. Revised cloud processes to improve the mean and intraseasonal variability of Indian summer monsoon in climate forecast system: Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhik, S.; Krishna, R. P. M.; Mahakur, M.; Ganai, Malay; Mukhopadhyay, P.; Dudhia, J.

    2017-06-01

    The National Centre for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Climate Forecast System (CFS) is being used for operational monsoon prediction over the Indian region. Recent studies indicate that the moist convective process in CFS is one of the major sources of uncertainty in monsoon predictions. In this study, the existing simple cloud microphysics of CFS is replaced by the six-class Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) single moment (WSM6) microphysical scheme. Additionally, a revised convective parameterization is employed to improve the performance of the model in simulating the boreal summer mean climate and intraseasonal variability over the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) region. The revised version of the model (CFSCR) exhibits a potential to improve shortcomings in the seasonal mean precipitation distribution relative to the standard CFS (CTRL), especially over the ISM region. Consistently, notable improvements are also evident in other observed ISM characteristics. These improvements are found to be associated with a better simulation of spatial and vertical distributions of cloud hydrometeors in CFSCR. A reasonable representation of the subgrid-scale convective parameterization along with cloud hydrometeors helps to improve the convective and large-scale precipitation distribution in the model. As a consequence, the simulated low-frequency boreal summer intraseasonal oscillation (BSISO) exhibits realistic propagation and the observed northwest-southeast rainband is well reproduced in CFSCR. Additionally, both the high and low-frequency BSISOs are better captured in CFSCR. The improvement of low and high-frequency BSISOs in CFSCR is shown to be related to a realistic phase relationship of clouds.type="synopsis">type="main">Plain Language SummaryThis study attempts to demonstrate the impact of better representation of cloud processes on simulating the mean and intraseasonal variability of Indian summer monsoon in a revised version of CFSv2 called CFSCR. The CFSCR shows

  8. Elucidating the role of topological pattern discovery and support vector machine in generating predictive models for Indian summer monsoon rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Manojit; Chattopadhyay, Surajit

    2016-10-01

    The present paper reports a study, where growing hierarchical self-organising map (GHSOM) has been applied to achieve a visual cluster analysis to the Indian rainfall dataset consisting of 142 years of Indian rainfall data so that the yearly rainfall can be segregated into small groups to visualise the pattern of clustering behaviour of yearly rainfall due to changes in monthly rainfall for each year. Also, through support vector machine (SVM), it has been observed that generation of clusters impacts positively on the prediction of the Indian summer monsoon rainfall. Results have been presented through statistical and graphical analyses.

  9. Projected response of East Asian summer monsoon system to future reductions in emissions of anthropogenic aerosols and their precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Xiaoye

    2016-09-01

    The response of the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) system to reductions in emissions of anthropogenic aerosols and their precursors at the end of the twenty-first century projected by Representative Concentration Pathway 4.5 is studied using an aerosol-climate model with aerosol direct, semi-direct, and indirect effects included. Our results show that the global annual mean aerosol effective radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) is +1.45 W m-2 from 2000 to 2100. The summer mean net all-sky shortwave fluxes averaged over the East Asian monsoon region (EAMR) at the TOA and surface increased by +3.9 and +4.0 W m-2, respectively, due to the reductions of aerosols in 2100 relative to 2000. Changes in radiations affect local thermodynamic and dynamic processes and the hydrological cycle. The summer mean surface temperature and pressure averaged over the EAMR are shown to increase by 1.7 K and decreased by 0.3 hPa, respectively, due to the reduced aerosols. The magnitudes of these changes are larger over land than ocean, causing a marked increase in the contrast of land-sea surface temperature and pressure in the EAMR, thus strengthening the EASM. The summer mean southwest and south winds at 850 hPa are enhanced over eastern and southern China and the surrounding oceans, and the East Asian subtropical jet shifted northward due to the decreases of aerosols. These factors also indicate enhanced EASM circulation, which in turn causes a 10 % increase in summer mean precipitation averaged over the EAMR.

  10. High Resolution Projections of Indian Summer Monsoon Synoptic Activity in a Warming Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukumaran, Sandeep; Ravindran, Ajayamohan; Thazhe Purayil, Sabin; Veluthedathekuzhiyil, Praveen

    2016-04-01

    The cyclonic systems of varying intensity, collectively known as Low Pressure Systems (LPS) are responsible more than 50% of the precipitation over Central India. Despite its importance, the future variability of LPS is poorly understood mainly due to the inadequate representation of these systems in global climate models. Insufficient spatial resolution of the current generation coupled models is a hindrance to resolve these storms properly. In order to overcome this problem, we use the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory's (GFDL) High Resolution Atmospheric Model (HiRAM) to simulate current and future climate, with a model grid spacing of ~50km. The time slice experiments for current (1981 - 2005) and future (2071 - 2095) climate are forced with bias-corrected SSTs from Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project (CMIP5) historical and RCP8.5 simulations respectively. Four ensembles of the experiments are conducted with SST forcing taken from four different CMIP5 models. A benchmark simulation of the HiRAM model with observed SSTs shows that the model is capable of simulating the life cycle of the observed LPS reasonably well. In addition, HiRAM realistically simulates the observed LPS track density. Further, the track density in the historical ensemble is comparable with both observations and benchmark simulation. In the RCP8.5 simulations, an overall decline in the LPS activity is seen which is found to be related to the decrease in the high intensity systems in a warming environment. Consistent with the decrease in LPS activity, the seasonal mean monsoon precipitation is also declining in RCP8.5 simulations.

  11. Assessment of the Impact of The East Asian Summer Monsoon on the Air Quality Over China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Nan; Ding, Aijun; Safieddine, Sarah; Valks, Pieter; Clerbaux, Cathy; Trautmann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Air pollution is one of the most important environmental problems in developing Asian countries like China. In this region, studies showed that the East Asian monsoon plays a significant role in characterizing the temporal variation and spatial patterns of air pollution, since monsoon is a major atmospheric system affecting air mass transport, convection, and precipitation. Knowledge gaps still exist in the understanding of Asian monsoon impact on the air quality in China under the background of global climate change. For the first time satellite observations of tropospheric ozone and its precursors will be integrated with the ground-based, aircraft measurements of air pollutants and model simulations to study the impact of the East Asian monsoon on air quality in China. We apply multi-platform satellite observations by the GOME-2, IASI, and MOPITT instruments to analyze tropospheric ozone and CO, precursors of ozone (NO2, HCHO and CHOCHO) and other related trace gases over China. Two years measurements of air pollutants including NO2, HONO, SO2, HCHO and CHOCHO at a regional back-ground site in the western part of the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) in eastern China will be presented. The potential of using the current generation of satellite instruments, ground-based instruments and aircraft to monitor air quality changes caused by the East Asian monsoon circulation will be presented. Preliminary comparison results between satellite measurement and limited but valuable ground-based and aircraft measurements will also be showed.

  12. Impact of the quasi-biweekly oscillation over the western North Pacific on East Asian subtropical monsoon during early summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiaolong; Yang, Song

    2013-05-01

    The impact of quasi-biweekly oscillation (QBWO) over the western North Pacific on East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) is investigated. The life cycle of QBWO is divided into eight phases defined by the two leading principal components (PC1 and PC2) of an empirical orthogonal function analysis. Subtropical rainfall shows significant changes, with a northwestward propagation of convection from equatorial regions to the South China Sea (SCS). The most significant variations occur in QBWO phases 3 and 4 (enhanced convection over SCS) and phases 7 and 8 (reduced convection over SCS). The East Asia Mei-yu significantly decreases in QBWO phases 3 and 4 but increases in phases 7 and 8. The QBWO influences EASM through modulating the subtropical monsoon flow and extratropical circulation. The response of lower tropospheric atmosphere to QBWO shows a northwestward propagation and a downstream wave train that extends northward into the western North Pacific, modulating the SCS monsoon trough and the EASM flow associated with moisture transportation. The mid-tropospheric extratropical circulation and the western Pacific subtropical high also show obvious changes accompanying QBWO evolution, resulting in circulation patterns associated with cold air activity. Moreover, changes with QBWO are found in the upper tropospheric East Asian westerly jet stream and the South Asian high, and these changes contribute to upper level divergence over subtropical East Asia.

  13. Stable Carbon Isotope Ratios in Atmospheric VOC across the Asian Summer Monsoon Anticyclone obtained during the OMO-ASIA campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebsbach, Marc; Koppmann, Ralf; Meisehen, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    The automated high volume air sampling system (MIRAH) has been deployed during the atmospheric measurement campaign OMO-ASIA (Oxidation Mechanism Observations) with the German High Altitude - Long-range research aircraft (HALO) in July and August 2015. The intensive measurement period with base stations in Paphos (Cyprus) and Gan (Maldives) focussed on oxidation processes and air pollution chemistry downwind of the South Asia summer monsoon anticyclone, a pivot area critical for air quality and climate change, both regionally and worldwide. The measurement region covered the Eastern Mediterranean region, the Arabian Peninsula, Egypt, and the Arabian Sea. In total 194 air samples were collected on 17 flights in a height region from 3 km up to 15 km. The air samples were analysed for stable carbon isotope ratios in VOC with GC-C-IRMS in the laboratory afterwards. We determined stable carbon isotope ratios and mixing ratios of several aldehydes, ketones, alcohols, and aromatics. The large extent of the investigated area allowed for encountering air masses with different origin, characteristic, and atmospheric processing, e.g. Mediterranean air masses, crossing of polluted filaments and remnants of the Asian monsoon outflow, split of the Asian monsoon anticyclone. In this presentation we will show first results and interpretations supported by HYSPLIT backward trajectories.

  14. Antarctic link with East Asian summer monsoon variability during the Heinrich Stadial-Bølling interstadial transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongbin; Griffiths, Michael L.; Huang, Junhua; Cai, Yanjun; Wang, Canfa; Zhang, Fan; Cheng, Hai; Ning, Youfeng; Hu, Chaoyong; Xie, Shucheng

    2016-11-01

    Previous research has shown a strong persistence for direct teleconnections between the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) and high northern latitude climate variability during the last glacial and deglaciation, in particular between monsoon weakening and a reduced Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). However, less attention has been paid to EASM strengthening as the AMOC was reinvigorated following peak Northern Hemisphere (NH) cooling. Moreover, climate model simulations have suggested a strong role for Antarctic meltwater discharge in modulating northward heat transport and hence NH warming, yet the degree to which Southern Hemisphere (SH) climate anomalies impacted the Asian monsoon region is still unclear. Here we present a new stalagmite oxygen-isotope record from the EASM affected region of central China, which documents two prominent stages of increased 18O-depleted moisture delivery to the region through the transition from Heinrich Stadial 1 (HS1) to the Bølling-Allerød (B-A) interstadial; this is in general agreement with the other monsoonal records from both NH and SH mid to low latitudes. Through novel comparisons with a recent iceberg-rafted debris (IRD) record from the Southern Ocean, we propose that the two-stage EASM intensification observed in our speleothem records were linked with two massive Antarctic icesheet discharge (AID) events at ∼16.0 ka and ∼14.7 ka, immediately following the peak HS1 stadial event. Notably, the large increase in EASM intensity at the beginning of the HS1/B-A transition (∼16 ka) is relatively muted in the NH higher latitudes, and better aligns with the changes observed in the SH, indicating the Antarctic and Southern Ocean perturbations could have an active role in driving the initial EASM strengthening at this time. Indeed, Antarctic freshwater input to the Southern Ocean during these AID events would have cooled the surrounding surface waters and caused an expansion of sea ice, restricting the

  15. Does the modification in "critical relative humidity" of NCEP CFSv2 dictate Indian mean summer monsoon forecast? Evaluation through thermodynamical and dynamical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, S.; Hazra, Anupam; Chaudhari, Hemantkumar S.

    2016-02-01

    An accurate seasonal prediction of Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR) is intriguing as well as the most challenging job for monsoon meteorologists. As there is a cause and effect relationship between clouds and precipitation, the modulation of cloud formation in a dynamical model affects profoundly on ISMR. It has already been established that the critical relative humidity (CRH) plays a crucial role on the realistic cloud formation in a general circulation model. Hence, it may be hypothesized that the proper choice of CRH can be instrumental in driving the large scale Indian monsoon by modulating the cloud formation in a global climate model. An endeavor has been made for the first time to test the above hypothesis on the NCEP-CFSv2 model in the perspective of seasonal prediction of ISMR by modifying the CRH profile. The model sensitivity experiments have been carried out for two different CRH profiles along with the existing profile during the normal (2003) and deficient (2009) monsoon years. First profile is the constant CRH following the existing one but with increased magnitude and the second one is the variable CRH at different cloud levels based on the observations and MERRA reanalysis. The ensemble mean of model runs for four initial conditions of each year has revealed that the variable CRH profile in CFSv2 represents seasonal ISMR and its variability best among the three CRH experiments linking with the thermodynamical and dynamical parameters like precipitable water, tropospheric temperature and its gradient, cloud structure and radiation, water vapour flux, systematic error energy with its nonlinear error growth and the length of the rainy seasons during the contrasting years. It has also been shown that the improved depiction of seasonal ISMR has been achieved without disturbing much the forecast biases at other global tropical regions. The indigenous part of this paper is that the CRH modification can play a seminal role in modulating the large

  16. Chemical isolation in the Asian monsoon anticyclone observed in Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE-FTS data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Park

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Evidence of chemical isolation in the Asian monsoon anticyclone is presented using chemical constituents obtained from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer instrument during summer (June–August of 2004–2006. Carbon monoxide (CO shows a broad maximum over the monsoon anticyclone region in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS; these enhanced CO values are associated with air pollution transported upward by convection, and confined by the strong anticyclonic circulation. Profiles inside the anticyclone show enhancement of tropospheric tracers CO, HCN, C2H6, and C2H2 between ~12 to 20 km, with maxima near 13–15 km. Strong correlations are observed among constituents, consistent with sources from near-surface pollution and biomass burning. Stratospheric tracers (O3, HNO3 and HCl exhibit decreased values inside the anticyclone between ~12–20 km. These observations are further evidence of transport of lower tropospheric air into the UTLS region, and isolation of air within the anticyclone. The relative enhancements of tropospheric species inside the anticyclone are closely related to the photochemical lifetime of the species, with strongest enhancement for shorter lived species. Vertical profiles of the ratio of C2H2/CO (used to measure the relative age of air suggest relatively rapid transport of fresh emissions up to the tropopause level inside the anticyclone.

  17. Chemical Isolation in the Asian monsoon anticyclone observed in Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE-FTS data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Park

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Evidence of chemical isolation in the Asian monsoon anticyclone is presented using chemical constituents obtained from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer instrument during summer (June–August of 2004–2006. Carbon monoxide (CO shows a broad maximum over the monsoon anticyclone region in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS; these enhanced CO values are associated with air pollution transported upward by convection, and confined by the strong anticyclonic circulation. Profiles inside the anticyclone show enhancement of tropospheric tracers CO, HCN, C2H6, and C2H2 between ~12 to 20 km, with maxima near 13–15 km. Strong correlations are observed among constituents, consistent with sources from near-surface pollution and biomass burning. Stratospheric tracers (O3, HNO3 and HCl exhibit decreased values inside the anticyclone between ~12–20 km. These observations are further evidence of transport of lower tropospheric air into the UTLS region, and isolation of air within the anticyclone. The relative enhancements of tropospheric species inside the anticyclone are closely related to the photochemical lifetime of the species, with strongest enhancement for shorter lived species. Vertical profiles of the ratio of C2H2/CO (used to measure the relative age of air suggest relatively rapid transport of fresh emissions up to tropopause level inside the anticyclone.

  18. Summer monsoon circulation and precipitation over the tropical Indian Ocean during ENSO in the NCEP climate forecast system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdary, J. S.; Chaudhari, H. S.; Gnanaseelan, C.; Parekh, Anant; Suryachandra Rao, A.; Sreenivas, P.; Pokhrel, S.; Singh, P.

    2014-04-01

    This study investigates the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) teleconnections to tropical Indian Ocean (TIO) and their relationship with the Indian summer monsoon in the coupled general circulation model climate forecast system (CFS). The model shows good skill in simulating the impact of El Niño over the Indian Oceanic rim during its decay phase (the summer following peak phase of El Niño). Summer surface circulation patterns during the developing phase of El Niño are more influenced by local Sea Surface Temperature (SST) anomalies in the model unlike in observations. Eastern TIO cooling similar to that of Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) is a dominant model feature in summer. This anomalous SST pattern therefore is attributed to the tendency of the model to simulate more frequent IOD events. On the other hand, in the model baroclinic response to the diabatic heating anomalies induced by the El Niño related warm SSTs is weak, resulting in reduced zonal extension of the Rossby wave response. This is mostly due to weak eastern Pacific summer time SST anomalies in the model during the developing phase of El Niño as compared to observations. Both eastern TIO cooling and weak SST warming in El Niño region combined together undermine the ENSO teleconnections to the TIO and south Asia regions. The model is able to capture the spatial patterns of SST, circulation and precipitation well during the decay phase of El Niño over the Indo-western Pacific including the typical spring asymmetric mode and summer basin-wide warming in TIO. The model simulated El Niño decay one or two seasons later, resulting long persistent warm SST and circulation anomalies mainly over the southwest TIO. In response to the late decay of El Niño, Ekman pumping shows two maxima over the southern TIO. In conjunction with this unrealistic Ekman pumping, westward propagating Rossby waves display two peaks, which play key role in the long-persistence of the TIO warming in the model (for more than a

  19. Indian summer monsoon rainfall variability in response to differences in the decay phase of El Niño

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdary, Jasti S.; Harsha, H. S.; Gnanaseelan, C.; Srinivas, G.; Parekh, Anant; Pillai, Prasanth; Naidu, C. V.

    2016-06-01

    In general the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) rainfall is near normal or excess during the El Niño decay phase. Nevertheless the impact of large variations in decaying El Niño on the ISM rainfall and circulation is not systematically examined. Based on the timing of El Niño decay with respect to boreal summer season, El Niño decay phases are classified into three types in this study using 142 years of sea surface temperature (SST) data, which are as follows: (1) early-decay (ED; decay during spring), (2) mid-summer decay (MD; decay by mid-summer) and (3) no-decay (ND; no decay in summer). It is observed that ISM rainfall is above normal/excess during ED years, normal during MD years and below normal/deficit in ND years, suggesting that the differences in El Niño decay phase display profound impact on the ISM rainfall. Tropical Indian Ocean (TIO) SST warming, induced by El Niño, decays rapidly before the second half of the monsoon season (August and September) in ED years, but persists up to the end of the season in MD years, whereas TIO warming maintained up to winter in ND case. Analysis reveals the existence of strong sub-seasonal ISM rainfall variations in the summer following El Niño years. During ED years, strong negative SST anomalies develop over the equatorial central-eastern Pacific by June and are apparent throughout the summer season accompanied by anomalous moisture divergence and high sea level pressure (SLP). The associated moisture convergence and low SLP over ISM region favour excess rainfall (mainly from July onwards). This circulation and rainfall anomalies are highly influenced by warm TIO SST and Pacific La Niña conditions in ED years. Convergence of southwesterlies from Arabian Sea and northeasterlies from Bay of Bengal leads to positive rainfall over most part of the Indian subcontinent from August onwards in MD years. ND years are characterized by negative rainfall anomaly spatial pattern and weaker circulation over India throughout the

  20. The Effects of Rainfall Pulses on Soil Nitrogen Availability in a Chihuahuan Desert Grassland During the Summer Monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R. F.; Collins, S. L.; White, C. S.; Sinsabaugh, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) is an essential but limiting nutrient in most terrestrial environments. While numerous studies have demonstrated a tight coupling between soil N availability and soil volumetric water content, this relationship is not well understood in desert ecosystems where rain events create pulses of biological activity, such as microbial secretion of extracellular enzymes that enable nutrient acquisition. Moreover, climate models are projecting shifts in the size and frequency of rain events across semi-arid ecosystems as a result of anthropogenic activities; therefore these changes are expected to have consequences for soil N availability in these regions. The goals of this study were to determine (1) if soil N availability pulses in response to monsoon rain events of differing size and frequency, and (2) how soil N availability varies over the course of a monsoon season in a semi-arid grassland. To answer these questions, we analyzed soils collected from a northern Chihuahuan Desert grassland during the 2014 summer monsoon. Soils were collected monthly over a period of eight days in conjunction with experimentally manipulated irrigation treatments that varied in both size (small=5mm and large=20mm) and frequency (small=weekly (n=12) and large=monthly (n=3)). Using KCl extraction, soils were processed for their inorganic plant-available nitrogen content (NH4+-N and NO3--N). We found that while soil N availability increased over the monsoon season across all treatment types, large events appeared to saturate soils, creating anaerobic conditions that stimulated nitrogen loss most likely through the denitrification pathway. Soils were also assayed for nitrogen specific extracellular enzyme activities, specifically leucine aminopeptidase (LAP), which breaks down the bond in leucine amino acids to mobilize nitrogen, and N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAG), which breaks down amino sugars in microbial cell walls. Preliminary results suggest that by mid-monsoon, LAP activity

  1. Role of distinct flavours of IOD events on Indian summer monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anil, N.; RameshKumar, M.R.; Sajeev, R.; Saji, P.K.

    -monsoon months of July and August together con- tribute to about 61 % of the mean seasonal rainfall (Ramesh Kumar and Uma 2004). A prolonged break in these 2 months is critical for the quantum of ISMR. Though studies indicate a clear link between IOD and ISMR...:1317–1326 1321 123 3.5 ISMR It is well known that El Nino is associated deficit (drought) monsoon conditions over India. The Oceanic Nino Index (ONI) has been used for identifying the El Nino events in the tropical Pacific. It is the 3-month mean SST anomaly...

  2. Indian summer monsoon rainfall variability during 2014 and 2015 and associated Indo-Pacific upper ocean temperature patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakatkar, Rashmi; Gnanaseelan, C.; Chowdary, J. S.; Parekh, Anant; Deepa, J. S.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, factors responsible for the deficit Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) rainfall in 2014 and 2015 and the ability of Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology-Global Ocean Data Assimilation System (IITM-GODAS) in representing the oceanic features are examined. IITM-GODAS has been used to provide initial conditions for seasonal forecast in India during 2014 and 2015. The years 2014 and 2015 witnessed deficit ISM rainfall but were evolved from two entirely different preconditions over Pacific. This raises concern over the present understanding of the role of Pacific Ocean on ISM variability. Analysis reveals that the mechanisms associated with the rainfall deficit over the Indian Subcontinent are different in the two years. It is found that remote forcing in summer of 2015 due to El Niño is mostly responsible for the deficit monsoon rainfall through changes in Walker circulation and large-scale subsidence. In the case of the summer of 2014, both local circulation with anomalous anticyclone over central India and intrusion of mid-latitude dry winds from north have contributed for the deficit rainfall. In addition to the above, Tropical Indian Ocean (TIO) sea surface temperature (SST) and remote forcing from Pacific Ocean also modulated the ISM rainfall. It is observed that Pacific SST warming has extended westward in 2014, making it a basin scale warming unlike the strong El Niño year 2015. The eastern equatorial Indian Ocean is anomalously warmer than west in summer of 2014, and vice versa in 2015. These differences in SST in both tropical Pacific and TIO have considerable impact on ISM rainfall in 2014 and 2015. The study reveals that initializing coupled forecast models with proper upper ocean temperature over the Indo-Pacific is therefore essential for improved model forecast. It is important to note that the IITM-GODAS which assimilates only array for real-time geostrophic oceanography (ARGO) temperature and salinity profiles could capture most of the

  3. Tropospheric ozone variability during the East Asian summer monsoon as observed by satellite (IASI), aircraft (MOZAIC) and ground stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safieddine, Sarah; Boynard, Anne; Hao, Nan; Huang, Fuxiang; Wang, Lili; Ji, Dongsheng; Barret, Brice; Ghude, Sachin D.; Coheur, Pierre-François; Hurtmans, Daniel; Clerbaux, Cathy

    2016-08-01

    Satellite measurements from the thermal Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), aircraft data from the MOZAIC/IAGOS project, as well as observations from ground-based stations, are used to assess the tropospheric ozone (O3) variability during the East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM). Six years 2008-2013 of IASI data analysis reveals the ability of the instrument to detect the onset and the progression of the monsoon seen by a decrease in the tropospheric 0-6 km O3 column due to the EASM, and to reproduce this decrease from one year to the other. The year-to-year variability is found to be mainly dependent on meteorology. Focusing on the period of May-August 2011, taken as an example year, IASI data show clear inverse relationship between tropospheric 0-6 km O3 on one hand and meteorological parameters such as cloud cover, relative humidity and wind speed, on the other hand. Aircraft data from the MOZAIC/IAGOS project for the EASM of 2008-2013 are used to validate the IASI data and to assess the effect of the monsoon on the vertical distribution of the tropospheric O3 at different locations. Results show good agreement with a correlation coefficient of 0.73 (12 %) between the 0-6 km O3 column derived from IASI and aircraft data. IASI captures very well the inter-annual variation of tropospheric O3 observed by the aircraft data over the studied domain. Analysis of vertical profiles of the aircraft data shows a decrease in the tropospheric O3 that is more important in the free troposphere than in the boundary layer and at 10-20° N than elsewhere. Ground station data at different locations in India and China show a spatiotemporal dependence on meteorology during the monsoon, with a decrease up to 22 ppbv in Hyderabad, and up to 5 ppbv in the North China Plain.

  4. Intraseasonal to interannual variability of summer monsoon rainfall and its influence on the Agricultural corps in mountainous Kashmir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Z.; Saeed, S.

    2012-04-01

    By using high resolution APHRODITE precipitation and meteorological station data (1961-2007) the present study examines the intraseasonal to interannual variability of the monsoon rainfall over mountainous Kashmir and its influence on the agricultural crops such as Maiz and Wheat. It is found that an intraseasonal to interannual variability of the monsoon rainfall can severely affect the crop production in the hilly areas of Kashmir. We found an increasing trend in the extreme precipitation events over Kashmir and adjacent areas in the recent years. The associated crop production shows significant decreasing trend especially over the hilly areas in Kashmir. The enhanced rainfall can result in the soil erosion that impose a major threat to sustainable agriculture in the mountainous areas of Kashmir. The heavy rainfall associated with the orographic uplifitng removes the uppermost fertile layer of soil, depleting fertility and leaving the soil in poor physical condition. This further causes severe deficiency of most important nutrients required for plant growth and crop yield. We further analysed the IPCC AR4 ECHAM5/MPIOM climate model simulations to examine the future interannual variability of monsoon rainfall over Kashmir and adjoining areas. In the following we analysed the transient run with a 1% per year increase in CO2 until reaching double concentrations and held constant thereafter. We found enhanced interannual variability of the summer monsoon rainfall (July-August) with increasing drought like conditions over Kashmir and adjoining northern parts of Pakistan in future climate. The enhanced interannual variability of precipitation in future could further affect severely growth of various agricultural crops in mountainous parts of Kashmir.

  5. The 9.2 ka event in Asian summer monsoon area: the strongest millennial scale collapse of the monsoon during the Holocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenchao; Yan, Hong; Dodson, John; Cheng, Peng; Liu, Chengcheng; Li, Jianyong; Lu, Fengyan; Zhou, Weijian; An, Zhisheng

    2017-06-01

    Numerous Holocene paleo-proxy records exhibit a series of centennial-millennial scale rapid climatic events. Unlike the widely acknowledged 8.2 ka climate anomaly, the likelihood of a significant climate excursion at around 9.2 cal ka BP, which has been notably recognized in some studies, remains to be fully clarified in terms of its magnitude and intensity, as well as its characteristics and spatial distributions in a range of paleoclimatic records. In this study, a peat sediment profile from the Dajiuhu Basin in central China was collected with several geochemical proxies and a pollen analysis carried out to help improve understanding of the climate changes around 9.2 cal ka BP. The results show that the peat development was interrupted abruptly at around 9.2 cal ka BP, when the chemical weathering strength decreased and the tree-pollen declined. This suggests that a strong drier regional climatic event occurred at around 9.2 cal ka BP in central China, which was, in turn, probably connected to the rapid 9.2 ka climate event co-developing worldwide. In addition, based on the synthesis of our peat records and the other Holocene hydrological records from Asian summer monsoon (ASM) region, we further found that the 9.2 ka event probably constituted the strongest abrupt collapse of the Asian monsoon system during the full Holocene interval. The correlations between ASM and the atmospheric 14C production rate, the North Atlantic drift ice records and Greenland temperature indicated that the weakened ASM event at around 9.2 cal ka BP could be interpreted by the co-influence of external and internal factors, related to the changes of the solar activity and the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC).

  6. Seminal role of stratiform clouds in large-scale aggregation of tropical rain in boreal summer monsoon intraseasonal oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Siddharth; Arora, Anika; Chattopadhyay, R.; Hazra, Anupam; Rao, Suryachandra A.; Goswami, B. N.

    2017-02-01

    Modification of the vertical structure of non-adiabatic heating by significant abundance of the stratiform rain in the tropics has been known to influence the large-scale circulation. However, the role of the stratiform rain on the space-time evolution of the observed Boreal summer monsoon intraseasonal oscillations (MISO) has so far been ignored. In the present study, we unravel a feedback mechanism through which the stratiform component of the rain leads to aggregation (organization) of rain on the MISO scale, making it an indispensable component of the MISO evolution dynamics. Using TRMM 3A25 monthly mean data (between 1998 and 2013), the ratio between convective and stratiform rain (RCS) is shown to be strongly related to the total rainfall. Further, composites of rainfall and circulation anomalies corresponding to high (low) values of RCS over the Central India or over the Equatorial Indian Ocean show spatial structures remarkably similar to that associated with the MISOs. Analyzing lead-lag relationship between the convective rain, the stratiform rain and the large scale moisture convergence with respect to peak active (break) spells from daily modern era retrospective-analysis for research and applications data, we unravel that the initial isolated convective elements spawn the stratiform rain which in turn modifies the vertical distribution of heating and leads to stronger large scale moisture convergence thereby producing more convective elements and more stratiform rain ultimately leading to aggregation of rain on the MISO scale. Our finding indicates that large and persisting systematic biases in simulating the summer monsoon rainfall over the Asian monsoon region by climate models are likely to be related to the systematic biases in simulating the MISOs which in turn are related to the serious underestimation of stratiform rain in most climate models.

  7. A THEORETICAL STUDY ON THE MULTIPLE EQUILIBRIA OF TROPICAL ATMOSPHERE AND THEIR RELATION TO THE ONSET OF THE SUMMER MONSOON

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Nan; DING Yi-hui; Masaaki Takahashi; SHEN Xin-yong

    2006-01-01

    Multiple equilibria and their stability in tropical atmosphere are investigated through β -plane barotropic models with consideration of heating and dissipation. We have derived the solutions of the model equations corresponding to the multiple equilibria or the steady flows first, and then establish the criteria for the stability of steady flow by use of the Liapunov direct Method. When these criteria are applied to the solutions of equilibria obtained, stable flows, which are closely related to the different patterns of quasi-stationary circulation in the tropical region, are found. The configurations of these stable flows and the shift between two of them as season changes provide quite reasonable explanations to many fundamental problems of tropical circulation features such as the catastrophe mechanism of the onset and the break-active cycle of the Asian summer monsoon. It follows that the onset or the abrupt transition of the Asian summer monsoon could be attributed to the multiple equilibrium property of the tropical circulation resulted from the advective nonlinearity, which provide another explanation among others.

  8. Diversity of planktonic Ostracods (Crustacea: Ostracoda in the mixed layer of northeastern Arabian Sea during the summer monsoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine Purushothaman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Planktonic ostracods contribute significantly to the biomass of zooplankton in the Arabian Sea with an unusually high density due to swarming.  However, due to the small size, their abundance is often underestimated.  In this paper, the diversity of planktonic ostracods in the mixed layer depth of the northeastern Arabian Sea in relation to environmental parameters during the summer monsoon is presented.  The mean abundance in the mixed layer depth was very high.  About 26 species belonging to 17 genera representing two families were recognized.  Out of this, 25 species belonged to (3 sub families, 16 genera the order Myodocopa and one to the order Myodocopida.  The dominant species were Cypridina dentata, Euconchoecia aculeata, Conchoecia subarcuata and Orthoconchoecia atlantica.  Cypridina dentata and Euconchoecia aculeata contributed to about 89% of the total abundance.  The results suggest that the distribution and diversity of ostracods were very much influenced by the hydrographic conditions of the Arabian Sea during the summer monsoon

  9. Impact of anthropogenic aerosols from global, East Asian, and non-East Asian sources on East Asian summer monsoon system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiuyan; Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Hua

    2017-01-01

    The impact of the total effects due to anthropogenic aerosols from global, East Asian, and non-East Asian sources on East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) system is studied using an aerosol-climate online model BCC_AGCM2.0.1_CUACE/Aero. The results show that the summer mean net all-sky shortwave fluxes averaged over East Asian monsoon region (EAMR) at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and surface reduce by 4.8 and 5.0 W m- 2, respectively, due to the increases of global aerosol emissions in 2000 relative to 1850. Changes in radiations and their resulting changes in heat and water transport and cloud fraction contribute together to the surface cooling over EAMR in summer. The increases in global anthropogenic aerosols lead to a decrease of 2.1 K in summer mean surface temperature and an increase of 0.4 hPa in summer mean surface pressure averaged over EAMR, respectively. It is shown that the changes in surface temperature and pressure are significantly larger over land than ocean, thus decreasing the contrast of land-sea surface temperature and pressure. This results in the marked anomalies of north and northeast winds over eastern and southern China and the surrounding oceans in summer, thereby weakening the EASM. The summer mean precipitation averaged over the EAMR reduces by 12%. The changes in non-East Asian aerosol emissions play a more important role in inducing the changes of local temperature and pressure, and thus significantly exacerbate the weakness of the EASM circulation due to local aerosol changes. The weakening of circulation due to both is comparable, and even the effect of non-local aerosols is larger in individual regions. The changes of local and non-local aerosols contribute comparably to the reductions in precipitation over oceans, whereas cause opposite changes over eastern China. Our results highlight the importance of aerosol changes outside East Asia in the impact of the changes of anthropogenic aerosols on EASM.

  10. Air mass origins influencing TTL chemical composition over West Africa during 2006 summer monsoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Law

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Trace gas and aerosol data collected in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL between 12–18.5 km by the M55 Geophysica aircraft as part of the SCOUT-AMMA campaign over West Africa during the summer monsoon in August 2006 have been analysed in terms of their air mass origins. Analysis of domain filling back trajectories arriving over West Africa, and in the specific region of the flights, showed that the M55 flights were generally representative of air masses arriving over West Africa during the first 2 weeks of August, 2006. Air originating from the mid-latitude lower stratosphere was under-sampled (in the mid-upper TTL whilst air masses uplifted from central Africa (into the lower TTL were over-sampled in the latter part of the campaign. Signatures of recent (previous 10 days origins were superimposed on the large-scale westerly flow over West Africa. In the lower TTL, air masses were impacted by recent local deep convection over Africa at the level of main convective outflow (350 K, 200 hPa and on certain days up to 370 K (100 hPa. Estimates of the fraction of air masses influenced by local convection vary from 10 to 50% depending on the method applied and from day to day during the campaign. The analysis shows that flights on 7, 8 and 11 August were more influenced by local convection than on 4 and 13 August allowing separation of trace gas and aerosol measurements into ''convective'' and ''non-convective'' flights. Strong signatures, particularly in short-lived species like CO, NO and fine-mode aerosols were seen during flights most influenced by convection up to 350–365 K. Observed profiles were also constantly perturbed by uplift (as high as 39% of air masses from the mid to lower troposphere over Asia, India, and oceanic regions resulting in import of clean oceanic (e.g., O3-poor or polluted air masses from Asia (high O3, CO, CO2 into West Africa. Thus, recent uplift of CO2 over Asia may

  11. Air mass origins influencing TTL chemical composition over West Africa during 2006 summer monsoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Law

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Trace gas and aerosol data collected in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL between 12–18.5 km by the M55 Geophysica aircraft as part of the SCOUT-AMMA campaign over West Africa during the summer monsoon in August 2006 have been analysed in terms of their air mass origins. Analysis of domain filling back trajectories arriving over West Africa, and in the specific region of the flights, showed that the M55 flights were generally representative of air masses arriving over West Africa during the first 2 weeks of August, 2006. Air originating from the mid-latitude lower stratosphere was under-sampled (in the mid-upper TTL whilst air masses uplifted from central Africa (into the lower TTL were over-sampled in the latter part of the campaign. Signatures of recent (previous 10 days origins were superimposed on the large-scale westward flow over West Africa. In the lower TTL, air masses were impacted by recent local deep convection over Africa at the level of main convective outflow (350 K, 200 hPa and on certain days up to 370 K (100 hPa. Estimates of the fraction of air masses influenced by local convection vary from 10 to 50% depending on the method applied and from day to day during the campaign. The analysis shows that flights on 7, 8 and 11 August were more influenced by local convection than on 4 and 13 August allowing separation of trace gas and aerosol measurements into "convective" and "non-convective" flights. Strong signatures, particularly in species with short lifetimes (relative to CO2 like CO, NO and fine-mode aerosols were seen during flights most influenced by convection up to 350–365 K. Observed profiles were also constantly perturbed by uplift (as high as 39% of air masses from the mid to lower troposphere over Asia, India, and oceanic regions resulting in import of clean oceanic (e.g. O3-poor or polluted air masses from Asia (high O3, CO, CO2 into West Africa. Thus, recent uplift of CO

  12. Air mass origins influencing TTL chemical composition over West Africa during 2006 summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, K. S.; Fierli, F.; Cairo, F.; Schlager, H.; Borrmann, S.; Streibel, M.; Real, E.; Kunkel, D.; Schiller, C.; Ravegnani, F.; Ulanovsky, A.; D'Amato, F.; Viciani, S.; Volk, C. M.

    2010-11-01

    Trace gas and aerosol data collected in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) between 12-18.5 km by the M55 Geophysica aircraft as part of the SCOUT-AMMA campaign over West Africa during the summer monsoon in August 2006 have been analysed in terms of their air mass origins. Analysis of domain filling back trajectories arriving over West Africa, and in the specific region of the flights, showed that the M55 flights were generally representative of air masses arriving over West Africa during the first 2 weeks of August, 2006. Air originating from the mid-latitude lower stratosphere was under-sampled (in the mid-upper TTL) whilst air masses uplifted from central Africa (into the lower TTL) were over-sampled in the latter part of the campaign. Signatures of recent (previous 10 days) origins were superimposed on the large-scale westward flow over West Africa. In the lower TTL, air masses were impacted by recent local deep convection over Africa at the level of main convective outflow (350 K, 200 hPa) and on certain days up to 370 K (100 hPa). Estimates of the fraction of air masses influenced by local convection vary from 10 to 50% depending on the method applied and from day to day during the campaign. The analysis shows that flights on 7, 8 and 11 August were more influenced by local convection than on 4 and 13 August allowing separation of trace gas and aerosol measurements into "convective" and "non-convective" flights. Strong signatures, particularly in species with short lifetimes (relative to CO2) like CO, NO and fine-mode aerosols were seen during flights most influenced by convection up to 350-365 K. Observed profiles were also constantly perturbed by uplift (as high as 39%) of air masses from the mid to lower troposphere over Asia, India, and oceanic regions resulting in import of clean oceanic (e.g. O3-poor) or polluted air masses from Asia (high O3, CO, CO2) into West Africa. Thus, recent uplift of CO2 over Asia may contribute to the observed positive CO2

  13. On the relationship between convection intensity of South China Sea summer monsoon and air-sea temperature difference in the tropical oceans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Ailan; LIANG Jianyin; GU Dejun; WANG Dongxiao

    2004-01-01

    The annual, interannual and inter-decadal variability of convection intensity of South China Sea (SCS) summer monsoon and air-sea temperature difference in the tropical ocean is analyzed, and their relationship is discussed using two data sets of 48-a SODA (simple ocean data assimilation) and NCEP/NCAR. Analyses show that in wintertime Indian Ocean (WIO), springtime central tropical Pacific (SCTP) and summertime South China Sea-West Pacific (SSCSWP), air-sea temperature difference is significantly associated with the convection intensity of South China Sea summer monsoon. Correlation of the inter-decadal time scale (above 10 a) is higher and more stable. There is interdecadal variability of correlation in scales less than 10 a and it is related with the air-sea temperature difference itself for corresponding waters. The inter-decadal variability of the convection intensity during the South China Sea summer monsoon is closely related to the inter-decadal variability of the general circulation of the atmosphere. Since the late period of the 1970s, in the lower troposphere, the cross-equatorial flow from the Southern Hemisphere has intensified. At the upper troposphere layer, the South Asian high and cross-equatorial flow from the Northern Hemisphere has intensified at the same time. Then the monsoon cell has also strengthened and resulted in the reinforcing of the convection of South China Sea summer monsoon.

  14. Multi-year model simulations of mineral dust distribution and transport over the Indian subcontinent during summer monsoon seasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sijikumar, S.; Aneesh, S.; Rajeev, K.

    2016-08-01

    Aerosol distribution over the Arabian Sea and the Indian subcontinent during the northern hemispheric summer is dominated by mineral dust transport from the West Asian desert regions. The radiative impact of these dust plumes is expected to have a prominent role in regulating the Asian Summer Monsoon circulation. While satellite observations have provided information in the spatial distribution of aerosols over the oceanic regions during the season, their utility over the land is rather limited. This study examines the transport of mineral dust over the West Asian desert, the Indian subcontinent and the surrounding oceanic regions during the summer monsoon season with the help of a regional scale model, WRF-Chem. Geographical locations of prominent dust sources, altitude ranges of mineral dust transport and their inter-annual variations are examined in detail. Multi-year model simulations were carried out during 2007 to 2012 with a model integration from 15 May to 31 August of each year. Six-year seasonal mean (June to August) vertically integrated dust amount from 1000 to 300 hPa level shows prominent dust loading over the eastern parts of Arabian desert and the northwestern part of India which are identified as two major sources of dust production. Large latitudinal gradient in dust amount is observed over the Arabian Sea with the largest dust concentration over the northwestern part and is primarily caused by the prevailing northwesterly wind at 925 hPa level from the Arabian desert. The model simulations clearly show that most of the dust distributed over the Indo-Gangetic plane originates from the Rajasthan desert located in the northwestern part of India, whereas dust observed over the central and south peninsular India and over the Arabian Sea are mainly transported from the Arabian desert. Abnormal dust loading is observed over the north Arabian Sea during June 2008. This has been produced as a result of the low pressure system (associated with the onset of

  15. The impacts of the summer plateau monsoon over the Tibetan Plateau on the rainfall in the Tarim Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong; Huang, Anning; Zhou, Yang; Yang, Qing

    2016-10-01

    The impacts of the summer plateau monsoon (PM) over the Tibetan Plateau on summer rainfall over the Tarim Basin in northwest China are investigated, based on the observed rainfall data at 34 stations and the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data during 1961 to 2007. Results showed that the PM is well correlated to the summer rainfall over the Tarim Basin. Process analysis shows that strong PM corresponds to an anomalous cyclone over the Tibetan Plateau in the middle troposphere and an anomalous anticyclone in the upper troposphere over northwest part of Tibetan Plateau. They result in cold air moving from high latitudes into Central Asia over the western part of Tibetan Plateau. The concurrences of the cooling in the middle-upper troposphere over Central Asia leads to an anomalous cyclone over Central Asia at 500 hPa and the anomalous descending motions prevailing over the cooling region. Associated with this anomaly, there are enhanced southerly winds and corresponding ascending motion over the Tarim Basin located in the east of the cooling region. These processes lead to more summer rainfall over the Tarim Basin.

  16. Spatial and Temporal Variations in Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall and Temperature: An Analysis Based on RegCM3 Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, S. K.; Mamgain, Ashu; Pattnayak, K. C.; Giorgi, F.

    2013-04-01

    Regional climate models are important tools to examine the spatial and temporal characteristics of rainfall and temperature at high resolutions. Such information has potential applications in sectors like agriculture and health. In this study, the Regional Climate Model Version 3 (RegCM3) has been integrated in the ensemble mode at 55 km resolution over India for the summer monsoon season during the years 1982-2009. Emphasis has been given on the validation of the model simulation at the regional level. In Central India, both rainfall and temperature show the best correlations with respective observed values. The model gives rise to large wet biases over Northwest and Peninsular India. RegCM3 slightly underestimates the summer monsoon precipitation over the Central and Northeast India. Nevertheless, over these regions, RegCM3 simulated rainfall is closer to the observations when compared to the other regions where rainfall is overestimated. The position of the monsoon trough simulated by the model lies to the north of its original observed position. This is similar to the usual monsoon break conditions leading to less rainfall over Central India. RegCM3 simulated surface maximum temperature shows a large negative bias over the country while the surface minimum temperature is close to the observation. Nevertheless, there is a strong correlation between the all India weighted average surface temperature simulated by RegCM3 and IMD observed values. While examining the extreme weather conditions in Central India, it is found that RegCM3 simulated frequencies of occurrence of very wet days, extremely wet days, warm days and warm nights more often as compared to those in IMD observed values. However, these are systematic biases. The model biases in the frequencies of distribution of rainfall extremes explain the wet and dry biases in different regions in the country. Overall, the inter-annual characteristics of both the rainfall and temperature extremes simulated by Reg

  17. Evaluation of mean and intraseasonal variability of Indian summer monsoon simulation in ECHAM5: identification of possible source of bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhik, S.; Mukhopadhyay, P.; Goswami, B. N.

    2014-07-01

    The performance of ECHAM5 atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) is evaluated to simulate the seasonal mean and intraseasonal variability of Indian summer monsoon (ISM). The model is simulated at two different vertical resolutions, with 19 and 31 levels (L19 and L31, respectively), using observed monthly mean sea surface temperature and compared with the observation. The analyses examine the biases present in the internal dynamics of the model in simulating the mean monsoon and the evolution of the boreal summer intraseasonal oscillation (BSISO) and attempts to unveil the reason behind them. The model reasonably simulates the seasonal mean-state of the atmosphere during ISM. However, some notable discrepancies are found in the simulated summer mean moisture and rainfall distribution. Both the vertical resolutions, overestimate the seasonal mean precipitation over the oceanic regions, but underestimate the precipitation over the Indian landmass. The performance of the model improves with the increment of the vertical resolution. The AGCM reasonably simulates some salient features of BSISO, but fails to show the eastward propagation of the convection across the Maritime Continent in L19 simulation. The propagation across the Maritime Continent and tilted rainband structure improve as one moves from L19 to L31. The model unlikely shows prominent westward propagation that originates over the tropical western Pacific region. L31 also produces some of the observed characteristics of the northward propagating BSISOs. However, the northward propagating convection becomes stationary in phase 5-7. The simulation of shallow diabatic heating structure and the heavy rainfall activity over the Bay of Bengal indicate the abundance of the premature convection-generated precipitation events in the model. It is found that the moist physics is responsible for the poor simulation of the northward propagating convection anomalies.

  18. Indian Ocean SST, evaporation, and precipitation during the South Asian summer monsoon in IPCC-AR4 coupled simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollasina, Massimo; Nigam, Sumant [University of Maryland, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science, College Park, MD (United States)

    2009-12-15

    The veracity of modeled air-sea interactions in the Indian Ocean during the South Asian summer monsoon is examined. Representative simulations of the twentieth century climate, produced by coupled general circulation models as part of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report, are the analysis targets along with observational data. The analysis shows the presence of large systematic biases in coupled simulations of boreal summer precipitation, evaporation, and sea surface temperature (SST) in the Indian Ocean, often exceeding 50% of the climatological values. Many of the biases are pervasive, being common to most simulations. The representation of air-sea interactions is also compromised. Coupled models tend to emphasize local forcing in the Indian Ocean as reflected by their large precipitation-SST correlations, at odds with the weak links in observations which suggest the importance of non-local controls. The evaporation-SST correlations are also differently represented, indicating atmospheric control on SST in some models and SST control on evaporation in others. The Indian monsoon rainfall-SST links are also misrepresented: the former is essentially uncorrelated with antecedent and contemporaneous Indian Ocean SSTs in nature, but not so in most of the simulations. Overall, coupled models are found deficient in portraying local and non-local air-sea interactions in the Indian Ocean during boreal summer. In our opinion, current models cannot provide durable insights on regional climate feedbacks nor credible projections of regional hydroclimate variability and change, should these involve ocean-atmosphere interactions in the Indian basin. (orig.)

  19. Mapping South American Summer Monsoon Changes during Heinrich Event 1 and the LGM: Insights from New Paleolake Records from the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. Y.; McGee, D.; Quade, J.

    2015-12-01

    Cave stalagmite records show strong evidence of abrupt changes in summer monsoons during Heinrich events, but we lack rigorous constraints on the amount of wetting or drying occurring in monsoon regions. Studies on shoreline deposits of closed-basin lakes can establish quantitative bounds on water balance changes through mapping-based estimates of lake volume variations. We present new dating constraints on lake level variations in Agua Caliente I and Laguna Loyoques, two closed-basin, high-altitude paleolakes on the Altiplano-Puna plateau of the Central Andes (23.1°S, 67.4°W, 4250 masl). Because this area receives >70% of its total annual precipitation during austral summer, the region is ideally suited to capture a pure response to changes in the South American summer monsoon (SASM). The plateau is home to several small (<40 km2) lakes surrounded by well-preserved paleoshorelines that indicate past wetter conditions. Agua Caliente I is unique, having multiple shorelines encrusted with biologically-mediated calcium carbonate "tufa" deposits. Initial U-Th dating of these massive shoreline tufas reveals that these deposits are dateable to within ±50 to 300 years due to high U concentrations and low initial Th content (as indicated by high 230Th/232Th). Our U-Th dates show that Agua Caliente I was greater in lake surface area during two periods: 17.5-14.5 kyrs BP, coincident with Heinrich Event 1 (HE1), and 24-23 kyrs BP, roughly coincident with the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). At these times, Agua Caliente I also overflowed into a neighboring lake basin (Loyoques) through an 8-km long southeast-trending stream channel. Thus, during HE1 and the LGM, the lake was ~9 times larger in surface area relative to modern. Hydrologic modeling constrained by paleotemperature estimates is used to provide bounds for these past precipitation changes. We also tentatively explore physical mechanisms linking Heinrich events and the regional hydroclimate by comparing freshwater

  20. Water vapour flux divergence over the Arabian Sea during 1987 summer monsoon using satellite data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vinayachandran, P.N.; RameshKumar, M.R.

    monsoon year. 2. Data and Methodology The Indian national satellite, INSAT-lB, has a VHRR sensor which operates in the infrared channel 10.5-12.5 pm. This is the channel used for deriving the precipitation over the ocean. The methodology adopted... otherwise remained the same. Though data on precipitation over AS for different years have been presented by different authors, the diversity in methodology for precipitation estimates makes the comparison difficult and hence we have not attempted it...

  1. Effect of the summer monsoon on aerosols at two measurement stations in Northern India – Part 1: PM and BC concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.-P. Hyvärinen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Particulate matter (PM and black carbon (BC concentrations were measured at two locations in Northern India during 2006–2010. The first measurement station is a background site in Mukteshwar, about 350 km northeast of New Delhi, in the foothills of the Indian Himalayas. The second measurement site was located in Gual Pahari, about 25 km south of New Delhi. Here we focused on resolving the effects of the Indian summer monsoon on the particulate matter and black carbon concentrations at the two stations. The average monsoon time concentrations were decreased by 55–70% compared to the pre-monsoon average concentrations at both stations, having a linear relationship with the total local rainfall during the monsoon season. In Mukteshwar during the monsoon, the 24 h PM2.5 concentrations were always below the Indian National Air Quality Standard of 60 μgm−3. In Gual Pahari, 13% of days exceeded this level during the monsoon season. However, the 24 h guideline of 25 μgm−3 given by the World Health Organization was more difficult to meet. In addition to loss processes, aerosol concentrations during the early monsoon were found to be affected by primary emissions, most likely dust event from the Thar Desert. This resulted in elevated fractions of the coarse mode, PM2.5−10 at both stations. In Mukteshwar, additional dust contribution came from the arid regions on the southern slopes of Himalayas. We also determined the characteristic transition times between the pre-monsoon, monsoon and post-monsoon. The onset and withdrawal transitions occurred faster in Mukteshwar than in Gual Pahari, both being typically less than 10 days. Transition periods in Gual Pahari took between 17 and 31 days. The shorter transition times in Mukteshwar were probably related to the more intense rains due to the mountain location.

  2. Intraseasonal Variability of Summer Monsoon Rainfall and Droughts over Central India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Sourabh; Kar, Sarat C.; Sharma, Anu Rani

    2017-02-01

    Rainfall over Madhya Pradesh (MP) in central India has large intra-seasonal variability causing droughts and floods in many years. In this study, rainfall variability in daily and monthly scale over central India has been examined using observed data. Consistency among various datasets such as rainfall, surface temperature, soil moisture and evapotranspiration has been examined. These parameters are from various different sources and critical for drought monitoring and prediction. It is found that during weak phases of monsoon, central India receives deficit rainfall with weaker monsoon circulation. This phase is characterized by an anticyclonic circulation at 850 hPa centered on MP. The EOF analysis of daily rainfall suggests that the two leading modes explain about 23-24% of rainfall variability in intraseasonal timescale. These two modes represent drought/flood conditions over MP. Relationship of weak phases of rainfall over central India with real-time multivariate (RMM) indices of Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) has been examined. It is found that RMM-6, RMM-7, RMM-1 and RMM-2 describe the weak monsoon conditions over central India. However, frequency of drought occurrence over MP is more during RMM-7 phase. Surface temperature increases by about 0.5°-1° during weak phases of rainfall over this region. Soil moisture and evapotranspiration gradually reduce when rainfall reduces over the study region. Soil moisture and evapotranspiration anomalies have positive pattern during good rainfall events over central India and gradually reduce and become negative anomalies during weak phases.

  3. Meta-heuristic ant colony optimization technique to forecast the amount of summer monsoon rainfall: skill comparison with Markov chain model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Sutapa; Goswami, Sayantika; Das, Debanjana; Middey, Anirban

    2014-05-01

    Forecasting summer monsoon rainfall with precision becomes crucial for the farmers to plan for harvesting in a country like India where the national economy is mostly based on regional agriculture. The forecast of monsoon rainfall based on artificial neural network is a well-researched problem. In the present study, the meta-heuristic ant colony optimization (ACO) technique is implemented to forecast the amount of summer monsoon rainfall for the next day over Kolkata (22.6°N, 88.4°E), India. The ACO technique belongs to swarm intelligence and simulates the decision-making processes of ant colony similar to other adaptive learning techniques. ACO technique takes inspiration from the foraging behaviour of some ant species. The ants deposit pheromone on the ground in order to mark a favourable path that should be followed by other members of the colony. A range of rainfall amount replicating the pheromone concentration is evaluated during the summer monsoon season. The maximum amount of rainfall during summer monsoon season (June—September) is observed to be within the range of 7.5-35 mm during the period from 1998 to 2007, which is in the range 4 category set by the India Meteorological Department (IMD). The result reveals that the accuracy in forecasting the amount of rainfall for the next day during the summer monsoon season using ACO technique is 95 % where as the forecast accuracy is 83 % with Markov chain model (MCM). The forecast through ACO and MCM are compared with other existing models and validated with IMD observations from 2008 to 2012.

  4. The sharp decline of East Asian summer monsoon at mid-Holocene indicated by the lake-wetland transition in the Sanjiang Plain, northeastern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Q. Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The timing of the waxing and wining of the East Asian summer monsoon during the Holocene is still under debate. In present study, we present the high-resolution grain-size and LOI records from a well-dated mud/peat profile to reveal the lake-wetland transition in the Sanjiang Plain and discuss its significance to Holocene monsoon evolutions. The results show that the shallow-water lakes have developed in low-lying areas of the plain before 4600 yr BP, corresponding to the Holocene monsoon maximum. Thereafter, the wetlands began to initiate with the extinction of the paleolakes, marking a lake-shrinking stage with the relative dry climate. Considering the prevalent monsoon climate in the Sanjiang Plain, we suggest the lake-wetland transition at 4600 yr BP indicate a sharp decline of the summer monsoon rather than the basin infilling process. Such a remarkable monsoon weakening event has been widely documented in northern China, and we associated it with the ocean–atmosphere interacting processes in low-latitude regions.

  5. Sensitivity of a regional climate model to land surface parameterization schemes for East Asian summer monsoon simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenkai; Guo, Weidong; Xue, Yongkang; Fu, Congbin; Qiu, Bo

    2016-10-01

    Land surface processes play an important role in the East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM) system. Parameterization schemes of land surface processes may cause uncertainties in regional climate model (RCM) studies for the EASM. In this paper, we investigate the sensitivity of a RCM to land surface parameterization (LSP) schemes for long-term simulation of the EASM. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model coupled with four different LSP schemes (Noah-MP, CLM4, Pleim-Xiu and SSiB), hereafter referred to as Sim-Noah, Sim-CLM, Sim-PX and Sim-SSiB respectively, have been applied for 22-summer EASM simulations. The 22-summer averaged spatial distributions and strengths of downscaled large-scale circulation, 2-m temperature and precipitation are comprehensively compared with ERA-Interim reanalysis and dense station observations in China. Results show that the downscaling ability of RCM for the EASM is sensitive to LSP schemes. Furthermore, this study confirms that RCM does add more information to the EASM compared to reanalysis that imposes the lateral boundary conditions (LBC) because it provides 2-m temperature and precipitation that are with higher resolution and more realistic compared to LBC. For 2-m temperature and monsoon precipitation, Sim-PX and Sim-SSiB simulations are more consistent with observation than simulations of Sim-Noah and Sim-CLM. To further explore the physical and dynamic mechanisms behind the RCM sensitivity to LSP schemes, differences in the surface energy budget between simulations of Ens-Noah-CLM (ensemble mean averaging Sim-Noah and Sim-CLM) and Ens-PX-SSiB (ensemble mean averaging Sim-PX and Sim-SSiB) are investigated and their subsequent impacts on the atmospheric circulation are analyzed. It is found that the intensity of simulated sensible heat flux over Asian continent in Ens-Noah-CLM is stronger than that in Ens-PX-SSiB, which induces a higher tropospheric temperature in Ens-Noah-CLM than in Ens-PX-SSiB over land. The adaptive

  6. Active and break events of Indian summer monsoon during 1901-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, D. S.; Sridhar, Latha; Ramesh Kumar, M. R.

    2016-06-01

    The study lists active and break monsoon events over India over a very long period (1901-2014) identified using criteria based on a rainfall index derived over a critical high rainfall region called core monsoon zone. The break and active spells identified in this study were mostly comparable with that identified in the earlier studies based on similar rainfall criteria during the common data period (1951-2007). However, some noticeable differences were observed in the rainfall anomaly pattern associated with the break monsoon spells identified in this study and that identified based on the synoptic criteria in the earlier studies. The stringent rainfall criteria used in this study seems to be better criteria for identifying the breaks. During the study period, both the active and break spells of short duration were more frequent than the long duration with about 63.4 % of the break spells and 94.3 % of the active spells falling in the range of 3-6 days. There were no active spells of duration ≥13 days. Whereas, about 8 % of the break spells were of duration ≥13 days. During both the halves of the data period (1901-1957 and 1958-2014), there was no change in the distribution of the break events. However, the number of active spells showed an increase of about 12 % in the in the second half, which was mainly in the short duration (3-6 days) spells. During the data period, decadal variations of break days showed an out phase of relationship with the number of days of monsoon depression (MD). Relatively stronger in phase relationship was observed between the decadal variation of MD days and that of the active days till around early 1980s which reversed later due to sudden decrease in the MD days. During the same period, both the active and break days were in the increasing phase. This was also coincided with the sudden and significant increase in the number of days of monsoon lows (LOW). The LOWs, which generally have short life helped in the occurrence of active

  7. Chemical composition and characteristics of ambient aerosols and rainwater residues during Indian summer monsoon: Insight from aerosol mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Abhishek; Gupta, Tarun; Tripathi, Sachchida N.

    2016-07-01

    Real time composition of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) is measured via Aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) for the first time during Indian summer monsoon at Kanpur, a polluted urban location located at the heart of Indo Gangetic Plain (IGP). Submicron aerosols are found to be dominated by organics followed by nitrate. Source apportionment of organic aerosols (OA) via positive matrix factorization (PMF) revealed several types of secondary/oxidized and primary organic aerosols. On average, OA are completely dominated by oxidized OA with a very little contribution from biomass burning OA. During rain events, PM1 concentration is decreased almost by 60%, but its composition remains nearly the same. Oxidized OA showed slightly more decrease than primary OAs, probably due to their higher hygroscopicity. The presence of organo nitrates (ON) is also detected in ambient aerosols. Apart from real-time sampling, collected fog and rainwater samples were also analyzed via AMS in offline mode and in the ICP-OES (Inductively coupled plasma - Optical emission spectrometry) for elements. The presence of sea salt, organo nitrates and sulfates has been observed. Rainwater residues are also dominated by organics but their O/C ratios are 15-20% lower than the observed values for ambient OA. Alkali metals such as Ca, Na, K are found to be most abundant in the rainwater followed by Zn. Rainwater residues are also found to be much less oxidized than the aerosols present inside the fog water, indicating presence of less oxidized organics. These findings indicate that rain can act as an effective scavenger of different types of pollutants even for submicron particle range. Rainwater residues also contain organo sulfates which indicate that some portion of the dissolved aerosols has undergone aqueous processing, possibly inside the cloud. Highly oxidized and possibly hygroscopic OA during monsoon period compared to other seasons (winter, post monsoon), indicates that they can act

  8. Regional climate model experiments