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Sample records for monotreme ornithorhynchus anatinus

  1. Characterisation of monotreme caseins reveals lineage-specific expansion of an ancestral casein locus in mammals.

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    Lefèvre, Christophe M; Sharp, Julie A; Nicholas, Kevin R

    2009-01-01

    Using a milk-cell cDNA sequencing approach we characterised milk-protein sequences from two monotreme species, platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) and echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus) and found a full set of caseins and casein variants. The genomic organisation of the platypus casein locus is compared with other mammalian genomes, including the marsupial opossum and several eutherians. Physical linkage of casein genes has been seen in the casein loci of all mammalian genomes examined and we confirm that this is also observed in platypus. However, we show that a recent duplication of beta-casein occurred in the monotreme lineage, as opposed to more ancient duplications of alpha-casein in the eutherian lineage, while marsupials possess only single copies of alpha- and beta-caseins. Despite this variability, the close proximity of the main alpha- and beta-casein genes in an inverted tail-tail orientation and the relative orientation of the more distant kappa-casein genes are similar in all mammalian genome sequences so far available. Overall, the conservation of the genomic organisation of the caseins indicates the early, pre-monotreme development of the fundamental role of caseins during lactation. In contrast, the lineage-specific gene duplications that have occurred within the casein locus of monotremes and eutherians but not marsupials, which may have lost part of the ancestral casein locus, emphasises the independent selection on milk provision strategies to the young, most likely linked to different developmental strategies. The monotremes therefore provide insight into the ancestral drivers for lactation and how these have adapted in different lineages.

  2. Energy Homeostasis in Monotremes

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart C. Nicol

    2017-01-01

    In 1803, the French anatomist ?tienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire decided that the newly described echidna and platypus should be placed in a separate order, the monotremes, intermediate between reptiles and mammals. The first physiological observations showed monotremes had low body temperatures and metabolic rates, and the consensus was that they were at a stage of physiological development intermediate between ?higher mammals? and ?lower vertebrates.? Subsequent studies demonstrated that platyp...

  3. Energy Homeostasis in Monotremes

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    Stewart C. Nicol

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In 1803, the French anatomist Étienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire decided that the newly described echidna and platypus should be placed in a separate order, the monotremes, intermediate between reptiles and mammals. The first physiological observations showed monotremes had low body temperatures and metabolic rates, and the consensus was that they were at a stage of physiological development intermediate between “higher mammals” and “lower vertebrates.” Subsequent studies demonstrated that platypuses and echidnas are capable of close thermoregulation in the cold although less so under hot conditions. Because the short-beaked echidna Tachyglossus aculeatus, may show very large daily variations in body temperature, as well as seasonal hibernation, it has been suggested that it may provide a useful model of protoendotherm physiology. Such analysis is complicated by the very significant differences in thermal relations between echidnas from different climates. In all areas female echidnas regulate Tb within 1°C during egg incubation. The lactation period is considered to be the most energetically expensive time for most female mammals but lactating echidnas showed no measurable difference in field metabolic rate from non-lactating females, while the lactation period is more than 200 days for Kangaroo Island echidnas but only 150 days in Tasmania. In areas with mild winters echidnas show reduced activity and shallow torpor in autumn and early winter, but in areas with cold winters echidnas enter true hibernation with Tb falling as low as 4.5°C. Monotremes do not possess brown adipose tissue and maximum rates of rewarming from hibernation in echidnas were only half those of marmots of the same mass. Although echidnas show very large seasonal variations in fat stores associated with hibernation there is no relationship between plasma leptin and adiposity. Leptin levels are lowest during post-reproductive fattening, supporting suggestions that in

  4. Tracing Monotreme Venom Evolution in the Genomics Era

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    Camilla M. Whittington

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The monotremes (platypuses and echidnas represent one of only four extant venomous mammalian lineages. Until recently, monotreme venom was poorly understood. However, the availability of the platypus genome and increasingly sophisticated genomic tools has allowed us to characterize platypus toxins, and provides a means of reconstructing the evolutionary history of monotreme venom. Here we review the physiology of platypus and echidna crural (venom systems as well as pharmacological and genomic studies of monotreme toxins. Further, we synthesize current ideas about the evolution of the venom system, which in the platypus is likely to have been retained from a venomous ancestor, whilst being lost in the echidnas. We also outline several research directions and outstanding questions that would be productive to address in future research. An improved characterization of mammalian venoms will not only yield new toxins with potential therapeutic uses, but will also aid in our understanding of the way that this unusual trait evolves.

  5. Tracing monotreme venom evolution in the genomics era.

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    Whittington, Camilla M; Belov, Katherine

    2014-04-02

    The monotremes (platypuses and echidnas) represent one of only four extant venomous mammalian lineages. Until recently, monotreme venom was poorly understood. However, the availability of the platypus genome and increasingly sophisticated genomic tools has allowed us to characterize platypus toxins, and provides a means of reconstructing the evolutionary history of monotreme venom. Here we review the physiology of platypus and echidna crural (venom) systems as well as pharmacological and genomic studies of monotreme toxins. Further, we synthesize current ideas about the evolution of the venom system, which in the platypus is likely to have been retained from a venomous ancestor, whilst being lost in the echidnas. We also outline several research directions and outstanding questions that would be productive to address in future research. An improved characterization of mammalian venoms will not only yield new toxins with potential therapeutic uses, but will also aid in our understanding of the way that this unusual trait evolves.

  6. Identification and functional characterization of a novel monotreme- specific antibacterial protein expressed during lactation.

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    Swathi Bisana

    Full Text Available Monotremes are the only oviparous mammals and exhibit a fascinating combination of reptilian and mammalian characters. They represent a component of synapsidal reproduction by laying shelled eggs which are incubated outside the mother's body. This is accompanied by a prototherian lactation process, marking them as representatives of early mammals. The only extant monotremes are the platypus, and the short- and long- beaked echidnas, and their distributions are limited to Australia and New Guinea. Apart for a short weaning period, milk is the sole source of nutrition and protection for the hatchlings which are altricial and immunologically naive. The duration of lactation in these mammals is prolonged relative to the gestational length and period of incubation of eggs. Much of the development of monotreme young occurs in the non-sterile ex-utero environment. Therefore the role of milk in the growth, development and disease protection of the young is of significant interest. By sequencing the cDNA of cells harvested from monotreme milk, we have identified a novel monotreme- specific transcript, and the corresponding gene was designated as the EchAMP. The expression profile of this gene in various tissues revealed that it is highly expressed in milk cells. The peptides corresponding to the EchAMP protein have been identified in a sample of echidna milk In silico analysis indicated putative antimicrobial potential for the cognate protein of EchAMP. This was further confirmed by in vitro assays using a host of bacteria. Interestingly, EchAMP did not display any activity against a commensal gut floral species. These results support the hypothesis of enhancement of survival of the young by antimicrobial bioactives of mammary gland origin and thus emphasize the protective, non- nutritional role of milk in mammals.

  7. Male Mutation Bias Is the Main Force Shaping Chromosomal Substitution Rates in Monotreme Mammals.

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    Link, Vivian; Aguilar-Gómez, Diana; Ramírez-Suástegui, Ciro; Hurst, Laurence D; Cortez, Diego

    2017-09-01

    In many species, spermatogenesis involves more cell divisions than oogenesis, and the male germline, therefore, accumulates more DNA replication errors, a phenomenon known as male mutation bias. The extent of male mutation bias (α) is estimated by comparing substitution rates of the X, Y, and autosomal chromosomes, as these chromosomes spend different proportions of their time in the germlines of the two sexes. Male mutation bias has been characterized in placental and marsupial mammals as well as birds, but analyses in monotremes failed to detect any such bias. Monotremes are an ancient lineage of egg-laying mammals with distinct biological properties, which include unique germline features. Here, we sought to assess the presence and potential characteristics of male mutation bias in platypus and the short-beaked echidna based on substitution rate analyses of X, Y, and autosomes. We established the presence of moderate male mutation bias in monotremes, corresponding to an α value of 2.12-3.69. Given that it has been unclear what proportion of the variation in substitution rates on the different chromosomal classes is really due to differential number of replications, we analyzed the influence of other confounding forces (selection, replication-timing, etc.) and found that male mutation bias is the main force explaining the between-chromosome classes differences in substitution rates. Finally, we estimated the proportion of variation at the gene level in substitution rates that is owing to replication effects and found that this phenomenon can explain >68% of these variations in monotremes, and in control species, rodents, and primates. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  8. Gene : CBRC-OANA-01-1685 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available | PREDICTED: similar to vomeronasal V1r-type receptor V1rg7 [Ornithorhynchus anatinus] 1e-148 100% gnl|UG|Oa...LSIFQAITISPSTSWWAGRKTKLPKCILPSFVIFWILNMLIDFHTLIVVTGPHNARIHQDMKYCSLGNASARATLIFSVVLSLRDLFFVGLMSVASVYMVFVLYSHHR

  9. Morbidity and mortality of monotremes admitted to the Australian Wildlife Health Centre, Healesville Sanctuary, Australia, 2000-2014.

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    Scheelings, T F

    2016-04-01

    The medical records of individual monotremes admitted to the Australian Wildlife Health Centre from 2000 to 2014 were reviewed to determine the causes of morbidity and mortality. During this period, a total of 38 platypus (Ornithorhyncus anatanus) and 273 short-beaked echidnas (Tachyglossus aculeatus) were examined. Trauma was the most significant reason for monotreme admissions, accounting for 73.7% of platypus cases and 90.1% of short-beaked echidna cases. Within the category of trauma, entanglement (28.6%) and unknown trauma (28.6%) were most significant for platypus, while impact with motor vehicle (73.2%) and domestic dog attack (14.2%) were the most significant subcategories for short-beaked echidnas. Indirect anthropogenic factors are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality of monotremes in Victoria, Australia. © 2016 Australian Veterinary Association.

  10. Diversity in parasitic helminths of Australasian marsupials and monotremes: a molecular perspective.

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    Beveridge, Ian; Gasser, Robin B

    2014-10-15

    Marsupials and monotremes are a prominent part of the mammalian fauna in Australia, and harbour an extremely diverse and highly distinctive array of helminth parasites. Their study has been relatively neglected, likely because they have no direct, adverse socioeconomic impact. As the body plans of helminths generally are very simple and morphological characterisation likely underestimates true diversity, molecular tools have been employed to assess genetic diversity. Using biochemical and/or molecular methods, recent studies show extensive diversity in helminths of marsupials, with cryptic species being commonly encountered. The purpose of this article is to review current knowledge about the diversity of parasitic helminths of marsupials and monotremes, to raise questions as to whether current molecular data can be used to estimate diversity, what mechanisms lead to such diversity, to critically appraise the molecular tools that have been employed thus far to explore diversity and to discuss the directions which might be taken in the future employing improved techniques. Copyright © 2014 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Echidna venom gland transcriptome provides insights into the evolution of monotreme venom.

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    Emily S W Wong

    Full Text Available Monotremes (echidna and platypus are egg-laying mammals. One of their most unique characteristic is that males have venom/crural glands that are seasonally active. Male platypuses produce venom during the breeding season, delivered via spurs, to aid in competition against other males. Echidnas are not able to erect their spurs, but a milky secretion is produced by the gland during the breeding season. The function and molecular composition of echidna venom is as yet unknown. Hence, we compared the deeply sequenced transcriptome of an in-season echidna crural gland to that of a platypus and searched for putative venom genes to provide clues into the function of echidna venom and the evolutionary history of monotreme venom. We found that the echidna venom gland transcriptome was markedly different from the platypus with no correlation between the top 50 most highly expressed genes. Four peptides found in the venom of the platypus were detected in the echidna transcriptome. However, these genes were not highly expressed in echidna, suggesting that they are the remnants of the evolutionary history of the ancestral venom gland. Gene ontology terms associated with the top 100 most highly expressed genes in echidna, showed functional terms associated with steroidal and fatty acid production, suggesting that echidna "venom" may play a role in scent communication during the breeding season. The loss of the ability to erect the spur and other unknown evolutionary forces acting in the echidna lineage resulted in the gradual decay of venom components and the evolution of a new role for the crural gland.

  12. Cyto- and chemoarchitecture of the dorsal thalamus of the monotreme Tachyglossus aculeatus, the short beaked echidna.

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    Ashwell, Ken W S; Paxinos, George

    2005-12-01

    We have examined the cyto- and chemoarchitecture of the dorsal thalamus of the short beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus), using Nissl and myelin staining, immunoreactivity for parvalbumin, calbindin, calretinin and non-phosphorylated neurofilament protein (SMI-32 antibody), and histochemistry for acetylcholinesterase and NADPH diaphorase. Immunohistochemical methods revealed many nuclear boundaries, which were difficult to discern with Nissl staining. Parvalbumin immunoreactive somata were concentrated in the ventral posterior, reticular, posterior, lateral and medial geniculate nuclei, while parvalbumin immunoreactivity of the neuropil was present throughout all but the midline nuclei. Large numbers of calbindin immunoreactive somata were also found within the midline thalamic nuclei, and thalamic sensory relay nuclei. Immunoreactivity for calretinin was found in many small somata within the lateral geniculate "a" nucleus, with other labelled somata found in the lateral geniculate "b" nucleus, ventral posterior medial and ventral posterior lateral nuclei. Immunoreactivity with the SMI-32 antibody was largely confined to somata and neuropil within the thalamocortical relay nuclei (ventral posterior medial and lateral nuclei, lateral and medial geniculate nuclei and the posterior thalamic nucleus). In broad terms there were many similarities between the thalamus of this monotreme and that of eutheria (e.g. disposition of somatosensory thalamus, complementarity of parvalbumin and calbindin immunoreactive structures), but there were some unique features of the thalamus of the echidna. These include the relatively small size of the thalamic reticular nucleus and the preponderance of calbindin immunoreactive neurons over parvalbumin immunoreactive neurons in the ventral posterior nucleus.

  13. Identification and characterization of amelogenin genes in monotremes, reptiles, and amphibians

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    Toyosawa, Satoru; O’hUigin, Colm; Figueroa, Felipe; Tichy, Herbert; Klein, Jan

    1998-01-01

    Two features make the tooth an excellent model in the study of evolutionary innovations: the relative simplicity of its structure and the fact that the major tooth-forming genes have been identified in eutherian mammals. To understand the nature of the innovation at the molecular level, it is necessary to identify the homologs of tooth-forming genes in other vertebrates. As a first step toward this goal, homologs of the eutherian amelogenin gene have been cloned and characterized in selected species of monotremes (platypus and echidna), reptiles (caiman), and amphibians (African clawed toad). Comparisons of the homologs reveal that the amelogenin gene evolves quickly in the repeat region, in which numerous insertions and deletions have obliterated any similarity among the genes, and slowly in other regions. The gene organization, the distribution of hydrophobic and hydrophilic segments in the encoded protein, and several other features have been conserved throughout the evolution of the tetrapod amelogenin gene. Clones corresponding to one locus only were found in caiman, whereas the clawed toad possesses at least two amelogenin-encoding loci. PMID:9789040

  14. Topography and chemoarchitecture of the striatum and pallidum in a monotreme, the short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus).

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    Ashwell, K W S

    2008-09-01

    The topography and chemoarchitecture of the striatum and pallidum in a monotreme, the short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus) have been studied using Nissl staining in conjunction with myelin staining, enzyme reactivity to acetylcholinesterase and NADPH diaphorase, and immunoreactivity to parvalbumin, calbindin, calretinin, tyrosine hydroxylase, neuropeptide Y, and neurofilament protein (SMI-32 antibody). All those components of the striatum and pallidum found in eutherian mammals could also be identified in the echidna's brain, with broad chemoarchitectural similarities to those regions in eutherian brains also apparent. There was a clear chemoarchitectural gradient visible with parvalbumin immunoreactivity of neurons and fibers, suggesting a subdivision of the echidna caudatoputamen into weakly reactive rostrodorsomedial and strongly reactive caudoventrolateral components. This may, in turn, relate to subdivision into associative versus sensorimotor CPu and reflect homology to the caudate and putamen of primates. Moreover, the chemoarchitecture of the echidna striatum suggested the presence of striosome-matrix architecture. The morphology of identified neuronal groups (i.e., parvalbumin, calbindin, and neuropeptide Y immunoreactive) in the echidna striatum and pallidum showed many similarities to those seen in eutherians, although the pattern of distribution of calbindin immunoreactive neurons was more uniform in the caudatoputamen of the echidna than in therians. These observations indicate that the same broad features of striatal and pallidal organization apply across all mammals and suggest that these common features may have arisen before the divergence of the monotreme and therian lineages.

  15. The evolution of imprinting: chromosomal mapping of orthologues of mammalian imprinted domains in monotreme and marsupial mammals

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    Dunham Ian

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evolution of genomic imprinting, the parental-origin specific expression of genes, is the subject of much debate. There are several theories to account for how the mechanism evolved including the hypothesis that it was driven by the evolution of X-inactivation, or that it arose from an ancestrally imprinted chromosome. Results Here we demonstrate that mammalian orthologues of imprinted genes are dispersed amongst autosomes in both monotreme and marsupial karyotypes. Conclusion These data, along with the similar distribution seen in birds, suggest that imprinted genes were not located on an ancestrally imprinted chromosome or associated with a sex chromosome. Our results suggest imprinting evolution was a stepwise, adaptive process, with each gene/cluster independently becoming imprinted as the need arose.

  16. Gene : CBRC-OANA-01-1559 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available |Oan#S38831641 PREDICTED: Ornithorhynchus anatinus similar to serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade G (C1 inhibitor), member 1, (angioede...ma, hereditary), (LOC100079402), partial mRNA /cds=p(1,9

  17. Gene : CBRC-OANA-01-0477 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available |Oan#S38831641 PREDICTED: Ornithorhynchus anatinus similar to serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade G (C1 inhibitor), member 1, (angioede...ma, hereditary), (LOC100079402), partial mRNA /cds=p(1,9

  18. Deep-sequencing to resolve complex diversity of apicomplexan parasites in platypuses and echidnas: Proof of principle for wildlife disease investigation.

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    Šlapeta, Jan; Saverimuttu, Stefan; Vogelnest, Larry; Sangster, Cheryl; Hulst, Frances; Rose, Karrie; Thompson, Paul; Whittington, Richard

    2017-11-01

    The short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus) and the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) are iconic egg-laying monotremes (Mammalia: Monotremata) from Australasia. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the utility of diversity profiles in disease investigations of monotremes. Using small subunit (18S) rDNA amplicon deep-sequencing we demonstrated the presence of apicomplexan parasites and confirmed by direct and cloned amplicon gene sequencing Theileria ornithorhynchi, Theileria tachyglossi, Eimeria echidnae and Cryptosporidium fayeri. Using a combination of samples from healthy and diseased animals, we show a close evolutionary relationship between species of coccidia (Eimeria) and piroplasms (Theileria) from the echidna and platypus. The presence of E. echidnae was demonstrated in faeces and tissues affected by disseminated coccidiosis. Moreover, the presence of E. echidnae DNA in the blood of echidnas was associated with atoxoplasma-like stages in white blood cells, suggesting Hepatozoon tachyglossi blood stages are disseminated E. echidnae stages. These next-generation DNA sequencing technologies are suited to material and organisms that have not been previously characterised and for which the material is scarce. The deep sequencing approach supports traditional diagnostic methods, including microscopy, clinical pathology and histopathology, to better define the status quo. This approach is particularly suitable for wildlife disease investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The private life of echidnas: using accelerometry and GPS to examine field biomechanics and assess the ecological impact of a widespread, semi-fossorial monotreme.

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    Clemente, Christofer J; Cooper, Christine E; Withers, Philip C; Freakley, Craig; Singh, Surya; Terrill, Philip

    2016-10-15

    The short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus) is a monotreme and therefore provides a unique combination of phylogenetic history, morphological differentiation and ecological specialisation for a mammal. The echidna has a unique appendicular skeleton, a highly specialised myrmecophagous lifestyle and a mode of locomotion that is neither typically mammalian nor reptilian, but has aspects of both lineages. We therefore were interested in the interactions of locomotor biomechanics, ecology and movements for wild, free-living short-beaked echidnas. To assess locomotion in its complex natural environment, we attached both GPS and accelerometer loggers to the back of echidnas in both spring and summer. We found that the locomotor biomechanics of echidnas is unique, with lower stride length and stride frequency than reported for similar-sized mammals. Speed modulation is primarily accomplished through changes in stride frequency, with a mean of 1.39 Hz and a maximum of 2.31 Hz. Daily activity period was linked to ambient air temperature, which restricted daytime activity during the hotter summer months. Echidnas had longer activity periods and longer digging bouts in spring compared with summer. In summer, echidnas had higher walking speeds than in spring, perhaps because of the shorter time suitable for activity. Echidnas spent, on average, 12% of their time digging, which indicates their potential to excavate up to 204 m 3 of soil a year. This information highlights the important contribution towards ecosystem health, via bioturbation, of this widespread Australian monotreme. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. The Expansion and Functional Diversification of the Mammalian Ribonuclease A Superfamily Epitomizes the Efficiency of Multigene Families at Generating Biological Novelty

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    Goo, Stephen M.; Cho, Soochin

    2013-01-01

    The ribonuclease (RNase) A superfamily is a vertebrate-specific gene family. Because of a massive expansion that occurred during the early mammalian evolution, extant mammals in general have much more RNase genes than nonmammalian vertebrates. Mammalian RNases have been associated with diverse physiological functions including digestion, cytotoxicity, angiogenesis, male reproduction, and host defense. However, it is still uncertain when their expansion occurred and how a wide array of functions arose during their evolution. To answer these questions, we generate a compendium of all RNase genes identified in 20 complete mammalian genomes including the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus. Using this, we delineate 13 ancient RNase gene lineages that arose before the divergence between the monotreme and the other mammals (∼220 Ma). These 13 ancient gene lineages are differentially retained in the 20 mammals, and the rate of protein sequence evolution is highly variable among them, which suggest that they have undergone extensive functional diversification. In addition, we identify 22 episodes of recent expansion of RNase genes, many of which have signatures of adaptive functional differentiation. Exemplifying this, bursts of gene duplication occurred for the RNase1, RNase4, and RNase5 genes of the little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus), which might have contributed to the species’ effective defense against heavier pathogen loads caused by its communal roosting behavior. Our study illustrates how host-defense systems can generate new functions efficiently by employing a multigene family, which is crucial for a host organism to adapt to its ever-changing pathogen environment. PMID:24162010

  1. Molecular evolution of the neurohypophysial hormone precursors in mammals: Comparative genomics reveals novel mammalian oxytocin and vasopressin analogues.

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    Wallis, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Among vertebrates the neurohypophysial hormones show considerable variation. However, in eutherian mammals they have been considered rather conserved, with arginine vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin (OT) in all species except pig and some relatives, where lysine vasopressin replaces AVP. The availability of genomic data for a wide range of mammals makes it possible to assess whether these peptides and their precursors may be more variable in Eutheria than previously suspected. A survey of these data confirms that AVP and OT occur in most eutherians, but with exceptions. In a New-World monkey (marmoset, Callithrix jacchus) and in tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri), Pro(8)OT replaces OT, confirming a recent report for these species. In armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus) Leu(3)OT replaces OT, while in tenrec (Echinops telfairi) Thr(4)AVP replaces AVP. In these two species there is also evidence for additional genes/pseudogenes, encoding much-modified forms of AVP, but in most other eutherian species there is no evidence for additional neurohypophysial hormone genes. Evolutionary analysis shows that sequences of eutherian neurohypophysial hormone precursors are generally strongly conserved, particularly those regions encoding active peptide and neurophysin. The close association between OT and VP genes has led to frequent gene conversion of sequences encoding neurophysins. A monotreme, platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) has genes for OT and AVP, organized tail-to-tail as in eutherians, but in marsupials 3-4 genes are present for neurohypophysial hormones, organized tail-to-head as in lower vertebrates. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-0213 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OANA-01-0213 ref|XP_001519860.1| PREDICTED: similar to putative G-protein-coupled receptor; Method: con...ceptual translation supplied by author [Ornithorhynchus anatinus] XP_001519860.1 0.0 100% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-0608 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-0608 ref|XP_001519860.1| PREDICTED: similar to putative G-protein-coupled receptor; Method: con...ceptual translation supplied by author [Ornithorhynchus anatinus] XP_001519860.1 1e-07 31% ...

  4. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-0960 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 0.46 51% ...

  5. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-1936 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 0.002 58% ...

  6. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-0549 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 3e-08 75% ...

  7. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-0647 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 0.002 58% ...

  8. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-0028 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 0.016 60% ...

  9. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-1804 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 0.095 92% ...

  10. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-0223 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 0.001 36% ...

  11. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-1479 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 0.21 86% ...

  12. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-0659 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 2.3 66% ...

  13. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-1908 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 0.011 60% ...

  14. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-0589 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 4.1 73% ...

  15. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-1022 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 0.023 61% ...

  16. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-1841 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 0.001 50% ...

  17. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-1244 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 2e-04 85% ...

  18. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-0600 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 8e-07 77% ...

  19. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-2064 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 0.023 75% ...

  20. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-1611 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 2.4 35% ...

  1. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-1036 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 4.9 57% ...

  2. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-0526 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 5e-05 70% ...

  3. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-0189 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 0.002 60% ...

  4. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-0741 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 1e-04 58% ...

  5. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-1451 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 0.82 40% ...

  6. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-2183 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 8.1 29% ...

  7. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-1282 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 0.078 56% ...

  8. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-2061 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 2e-07 54% ...

  9. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-0687 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 0.046 66% ...

  10. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-0778 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 6.2 81% ...

  11. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-0704 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 0.23 50% ...

  12. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-1002 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 0.23 50% ...

  13. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-1628 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 0.001 68% ...

  14. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-2049 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 0.81 45% ...

  15. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-1887 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 1.0 91% ...

  16. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-0037 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 0.018 75% ...

  17. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-0361 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 0.022 40% ...

  18. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-1584 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 2e-05 56% ...

  19. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-0067 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 3e-05 76% ...

  20. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-0376 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 3.4 41% ...

  1. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-2204 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 8e-08 62% ...

  2. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-1901 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 1e-06 75% ...

  3. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-1731 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 0.83 35% ...

  4. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-2210 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 3e-11 90% ...

  5. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-0889 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 5.4 58% ...

  6. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-0287 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 2e-09 80% ...

  7. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-0232 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 3e-05 64% ...

  8. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-1313 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 0.006 41% ...

  9. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-1434 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 0.039 55% ...

  10. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-0030 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 3e-05 49% ...

  11. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-0921 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 1.2 76% ...

  12. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-1227 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 0.005 33% ...

  13. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-0688 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4.0kb Ornithorhynchus anatinus cDNA similar to ref|NP_444392.1| mitochondrial ribosomal protein L34; DNA seg...ment, Chr 8, Brigham & Women's Genetics 1484 expressed [Mus musculus] sp|Q99N91|RM34_MOUSE 60S ribos> /gb=EH000574 /gi=118077003 /ug=Oan.4473 /len=654 2e-07 66% ...

  14. "Ornithorhynchus Paradoxus": The Reception of Arthur Schopenhauer between 1818 and 1848

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor del Estal Sánchez

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This essay intends to examine the reception of Arthur Schopenhauer’s philosophy in the period betweeen 1818 and 1848, thereby contributing to a demythologization of the luck of the philosopher’s thought on these three decades prior to the beginning of his fame. In order to achieve this, after showing a general picture of the personal myth that has characterised a great part of the historiographic tradition according to which his philosophy would have been ignored or silenced (1, we will present the four key lines of his reception, through the analysis of the news that his contemporaries gave of his philosophy in reviews, manuals of history of philosophy, or encyclopedias. Those four key lines are: a reading of Schopenhauer’s philosophy that stressed on its oriental features (2, an interpretation in an idealistic key which placed a lack of originality in Schopenhauer’s philosophy (3, an academic community that placed it against “the spirit of the times” due to the secondary place of Reason against the Will (4 and finally, the emergence of the first followers of Schopenhauer’s philosophy (5.

  15. The phylogenetic relationships of endemic Australasian trichostrongylin families (Nematoda: Strongylida) parasitic in marsupials and monotremes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilton, Neil B; Huby-Chilton, Florence; Koehler, Anson V; Gasser, Robin B; Beveridge, Ian

    2015-10-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of the endemic (or largely endemic) Australasian trichostrongylin nematode families Herpetostrongylidae, Mackerrastrongylidae and Nicollinidae as well as endemic trichostrongylin nematodes currently placed in the families Trichostrongylidae and Molineidae were examined using the complete large subunit (28S) ribosomal RNA gene. The Herpetostrongylinae proved to be monophyletic. However, representatives of the Nicollinidae nested with the Herpetostrongylinae. The Mackerrastrongylidae was also a monophyletic group and included Peramelistrongylus, currently classified within the Trichostrongylidae. The Globocephaloidinae, currently considered to be a subfamily of the Herpetostrongylidae, was excluded from the family in the current analysis. Ollulanus and Libyostrongylus, included for the first time in a molecular phylogenetic analysis, were placed within the Trichostrongylidae. This study provided strong support for the Herpetostrongylidae (including within it the Nicollinidae, but excluding the Globocephaloidinae) and the Mackerrastrongylidae as monophyletic assemblages. Additional studies are required to resolve the relationships of the remaining endemic Australasian trichostrongylin genera.

  16. A Spur to Atavism: Placing Platypus Poison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbins, Peter

    2015-11-01

    For over two centuries, the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) has been constructed and categorized in multiple ways. An unprecedented mélange of anatomical features and physiological functions, it long remained a systematic quandary. Nevertheless, since 1797, naturalists and biologists have pursued two recurring obsessions. Investigations into platypus reproduction and lactation have focused attention largely upon females of the species. Despite its apparent admixture of avian, reptilian and mammalian characters, the platypus was soon placed as a rudimentary mammal--primitive, naïve and harmless. This article pursues a different taxonomic trajectory, concentrating on a specifically male anatomical development: the crural spur and venom gland on the hind legs. Once the defining characteristic of both the platypus and echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus), by 1830 this sexed spur had been largely dismissed as inactive and irrelevant. For a creature regularly depicted as a biological outlier, the systematic and evolutionary implications of platypus poison have remained largely overlooked. In Australia, however, sporadic cases of 'spiking' led to consistent homologies being remarked between the platypus crural system and the venom glands of snakes. As with its reproductive reliance upon eggs, possession of an endogenous poison suggested significant reptilian affinities, yet the platypus has rarely been classed as an advanced reptile. Indeed, ongoing uncertainty regarding the biological purpose of the male's spur has ostensibly posed a directional puzzle. As with so many of its traits, however, platypus poison has been consistently described as a redundant remnant, rather than an emergent feature indicating evolutionary advance.

  17. Retrotransposon silencing by DNA methylation can drive mammalian genomic imprinting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Suzuki

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Among mammals, only eutherians and marsupials are viviparous and have genomic imprinting that leads to parent-of-origin-specific differential gene expression. We used comparative analysis to investigate the origin of genomic imprinting in mammals. PEG10 (paternally expressed 10 is a retrotransposon-derived imprinted gene that has an essential role for the formation of the placenta of the mouse. Here, we show that an orthologue of PEG10 exists in another therian mammal, the marsupial tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii, but not in a prototherian mammal, the egg-laying platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus, suggesting its close relationship to the origin of placentation in therian mammals. We have discovered a hitherto missing link of the imprinting mechanism between eutherians and marsupials because tammar PEG10 is the first example of a differentially methylated region (DMR associated with genomic imprinting in marsupials. Surprisingly, the marsupial DMR was strictly limited to the 5' region of PEG10, unlike the eutherian DMR, which covers the promoter regions of both PEG10 and the adjacent imprinted gene SGCE. These results not only demonstrate a common origin of the DMR-associated imprinting mechanism in therian mammals but provide the first demonstration that DMR-associated genomic imprinting in eutherians can originate from the repression of exogenous DNA sequences and/or retrotransposons by DNA methylation.

  18. Survey of microsatellite clustering in eight fully sequenced species sheds light on the origin of compound microsatellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lelley Tamas

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compound microsatellites are a special variation of microsatellites in which two or more individual microsatellites are found directly adjacent to each other. Until now, such composite microsatellites have not been investigated in a comprehensive manner. Results Our in silico survey of microsatellite clustering in genomes of Homo sapiens, Maccaca mulatta, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus, Gallus gallus, Danio rerio and Drosophila melanogaster revealed an unexpected high abundance of compound microsatellites. About 4 – 25% of all microsatellites could be categorized as compound microsatellites. Compound microsatellites are approximately 15 times more frequent than expected under the assumption of a random distribution of microsatellites. Interestingly, microsatellites do not only tend to cluster but the adjacent repeat types of compound microsatellites have very similar motifs: in most cases (>90% these motifs differ only by a single mutation (base substitution or indel. We propose that the majority of the compound microsatellites originates by duplication of imperfections in a microsatellite tract. This process occurs mostly at the end of a microsatellite, leading to a new repeat type and a potential microsatellite repeat track. Conclusion Our findings suggest a more dynamic picture of microsatellite evolution than previously believed. Imperfections within microsatellites might not only cause the "death" of microsatellites they might also result in their "birth".

  19. A Comparative Genomic Survey Provides Novel Insights into Molecular Evolution of l-Aromatic Amino Acid Decarboxylase in Vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanping Li

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is a pleiotropic molecule with various important physiological roles in vertebrates. l-aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AAAD is the second enzyme for melatonin synthesis. By far, a clear-cut gene function of AAAD in the biosynthesis of melatonin has been unclear in vertebrates. Here, we provide novel insights into the evolution of AAAD based on 77 vertebrate genomes. According to our genome-wide alignments, we extracted a total of 151 aaad nucleotide sequences. A phylogenetic tree was constructed on the basis of these sequences and corresponding protein alignments, indicating that tetrapods and diploid bony fish genomes contained one aaad gene and a new aaad-like gene, which formed a novel AAAD family. However, in tetraploid teleosts, there were two copies of the aaad gene due to whole genome duplication. A subsequent synteny analysis investigated 81 aaad sequences and revealed their collinearity and systematic evolution. Interestingly, we discovered that platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus, Atlantic cod (Guadus morhua, Mexican tetra (Astyanax mexicanus, and a Sinocyclocheilus cavefish (S. anshuiensis have long evolutionary branches in the phylogenetic topology. We also performed pseudogene identification and selection pressure analysis; however, the results revealed a deletion of 37 amino acids in Atlantic cod and premature stop codons in the cave-restricted S. anshuiensis and A. mexicanus, suggesting weakening or disappearing rhythms in these cavefishes. Selective pressure analysis of aaad between platypus and other tetrapods showed that rates of nonsynonymous (Ka and synonymous (Ks substitutions were higher when comparing the platypus to other representative tetrapods, indicating that, in this semiaquatic mammal, the aaad gene experienced selection during the process of evolution. In summary, our current work provides novel insights into aaad genes in vertebrates from a genome-wide view.

  20. Genotypic analysis of Mucor from the platypus in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, J H; Stodart, B J; Ash, G J

    2010-01-01

    Mucor amphibiorum is the only pathogen known to cause significant morbidity and mortality in the free-living platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) in Tasmania. Infection has also been reported in free-ranging cane toads (Bufo marinus) and green tree frogs (Litoria caerulea) from mainland Australia but has not been confirmed in platypuses from the mainland. To date, there has been little genotyping specifically conducted on M. amphibiorum. A collection of 21 Mucor isolates representing isolates from the platypus, frogs and toads, and environmental samples were obtained for genotypic analysis. Internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region sequencing and GenBank comparison confirmed the identity of most of the isolates. Representative isolates from infected platypuses formed a clade containing the reference isolates of M. amphibiorum from the Centraal Bureau voor Schimmelcultures repository. The M. amphibiorum isolates showed a close sequence identity with Mucor indicus and consisted of two haplotypes, differentiated by single nucleotide polymorphisms within the ITS1 and ITS2 regions. With the exception of isolate 96-4049, all isolates from platypuses were in one haplotype. Multilocus fingerprinting via the use of intersimple sequence repeats polymerase chain reaction identified 19 genotypes. Two major clusters were evident: 1) M. amphibiorum and Mucor racemosus; and 2) Mucor circinelloides, Mucor ramosissimus, and Mucor fragilis. Seven M. amphibiorum isolates from platypuses were present in two subclusters, with isolate 96-4053 appearing genetically distinct from all other isolates. Isolates classified as M. circinelloides by sequence analysis formed a separate subcluster, distinct from other Mucor spp. The combination of sequencing and multilocus fingerprinting has the potential to provide the tools for rapid identification of M. amphibiorum. Data presented on the diversity of the pathogen and further work in linking genetic diversity to functional diversity will provide

  1. Cloning, expression analysis, and antibacterial propertiesof three serum amyloid A in common carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Juhua; Tang, Yongkai; Li, Jianlin; Li, Hongxia; Yu, Fan; Yu, Wenjuan; He, Feng; Fu, Chunjie; Mao, Shuntao

    2017-06-01

    Three serum amyloid A (SAA) genes were identified from the common carp (Cyprinus carpio) by PCR and RT-PCR. Considering both direction and sequence similarity with mammal's orthologs, they were named CcSAA3a, CcSAA3b and CcSAA1. CcSAA3b and CcSAA1 are adjacent on contig LHQP01017858, suggesting that the prototype of or the simplest SAA multigene family have occurred in common carp. A phylogenetic analysis of the SAAs indicated that the fish SAAs were closer to those of invertebrates and Ornithorhynchus anatinus, a primitive mammal, than to mammalian SAAs. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR results displayed different expression profiles of three CcSAAs. The CcSAA3a was detected in all tested tissues, and was most abundant in the muscle; CcSAA3b was predominately expressed in the intestine and liver, and CcSAA1 in the skin. The expression level of CcSAA3a was higher than that of CcSAA3b and CcSAA1 in most tissues. Stimulation with Aeromonas hydrophila dramatically induced the expression of the three CcSAAs in all examined tissues, especially in the liver. Like Epinephelus coioides SAA, all of three rCcSAA fusion proteins could bind to both Gram-negative bacteria (A. hydrophila and E. coli) and Gram-positive bacterium (S. aureus), playing a role in the identification of bacteria. However, only rCcSAA3a showed significantly anti-A. hydrophila and anti-E. coli in vitro antibacterial activity assays. These results suggested that the three CcSAAs were in functional differentiation and play significant roles in the innate immunity of common carp. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Molecules, morphology, and ecology indicate a recent, amphibious ancestry for echidnas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Matthew J; Bennett, Thomas H; Lee, Michael S Y

    2009-10-06

    The semiaquatic platypus and terrestrial echidnas (spiny anteaters) are the only living egg-laying mammals (monotremes). The fossil record has provided few clues as to their origins and the evolution of their ecological specializations; however, recent reassignment of the Early Cretaceous Teinolophos and Steropodon to the platypus lineage implies that platypuses and echidnas diverged >112.5 million years ago, reinforcing the notion of monotremes as living fossils. This placement is based primarily on characters related to a single feature, the enlarged mandibular canal, which supplies blood vessels and dense electrosensory receptors to the platypus bill. Our reevaluation of the morphological data instead groups platypus and echidnas to the exclusion of Teinolophos and Steropodon and suggests that an enlarged mandibular canal is ancestral for monotremes (partly reversed in echidnas, in association with general mandibular reduction). A multigene evaluation of the echidna-platypus divergence using both a relaxed molecular clock and direct fossil calibrations reveals a recent split of 19-48 million years ago. Platypus-like monotremes (Monotrematum) predate this divergence, indicating that echidnas had aquatically foraging ancestors that reinvaded terrestrial ecosystems. This ecological shift and the associated radiation of echidnas represent a recent expansion of niche space despite potential competition from marsupials. Monotremes might have survived the invasion of marsupials into Australasia by exploiting ecological niches in which marsupials are restricted by their reproductive mode. Morphology, ecology, and molecular biology together indicate that Teinolophos and Steropodon are basal monotremes rather than platypus relatives, and that living monotremes are a relatively recent radiation.

  3. Mammalian diversity: gametes, embryos and reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behringer, Richard R; Eakin, Guy S; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2006-01-01

    The class Mammalia is composed of approximately 4800 extant species. These mammalian species are divided into three subclasses that include the monotremes, marsupials and eutherians. Monotremes are remarkable because these mammals are born from eggs laid outside of the mother's body. Marsupial mammals have relatively short gestation periods and give birth to highly altricial young that continue a significant amount of 'fetal' development after birth, supported by a highly sophisticated lactation. Less than 10% of mammalian species are monotremes or marsupials, so the great majority of mammals are grouped into the subclass Eutheria, including mouse and human. Mammals exhibit great variety in morphology, physiology and reproduction. In the present article, we highlight some of this remarkable diversity relative to the mouse, one of the most widely used mammalian model organisms, and human. This diversity creates challenges and opportunities for gamete and embryo collection, culture and transfer technologies.

  4. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 37; Issue 4. Commentary: Monotremes and marsupials: Comparative models to better understand the function of milk. Sanjana Kuruppath Swathi Bisana Julie A Sharp Christophe Lefevre Satish Kumar Kevin R Nicholas. Volume 37 Issue 4 September 2012 pp 581-588 ...

  5. Internally Coupled Ears in Living Mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Mason, Matthew James

    2015-01-01

    It is generally held that the right and left middle ears of mammals are acoustically isolated from each other, such that mammals must rely on neural computation to derive sound localisation cues. There are, however, some unusual species in which the middle ear cavities intercommunicate, in which case each ear might be able to act as a pressure-difference receiver. This could improve sound localisation at lower frequencies. The platypus Ornithorhynchus is apparently unique among mammals in tha...

  6. The evolution of gene expression levels in mammalian organs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brawand, David; Soumillon, Magali; Necsulea, Anamaria

    2011-01-01

    and chromosomes, owing to differences in selective pressures: transcriptome change was slow in nervous tissues and rapid in testes, slower in rodents than in apes and monotremes, and rapid for the X chromosome right after its formation. Although gene expression evolution in mammals was strongly shaped......Changes in gene expression are thought to underlie many of the phenotypic differences between species. However, large-scale analyses of gene expression evolution were until recently prevented by technological limitations. Here we report the sequencing of polyadenylated RNA from six organs across...... ten species that represent all major mammalian lineages (placentals, marsupials and monotremes) and birds (the evolutionary outgroup), with the goal of understanding the dynamics of mammalian transcriptome evolution. We show that the rate of gene expression evolution varies among organs, lineages...

  7. [Evolution of genomic imprinting in mammals: what a zoo!].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proudhon, Charlotte; Bourc'his, Déborah

    2010-05-01

    Genomic imprinting imposes an obligate mode of biparental reproduction in mammals. This phenomenon results from the monoparental expression of a subset of genes. This specific gene regulation mechanism affects viviparous mammals, especially eutherians, but also marsupials to a lesser extent. Oviparous mammals, or monotremes, do not seem to demonstrate monoparental allele expression. This phylogenic confinement suggests that the evolution of the placenta imposed a selective pressure for the emergence of genomic imprinting. This physiological argument is now complemented by recent genomic evidence facilitated by the sequencing of the platypus genome, a rare modern day case of a monotreme. Analysis of the platypus genome in comparison to eutherian genomes shows a chronological and functional coincidence between the appearance of genomic imprinting and transposable element accumulation. The systematic comparative analyses of genomic sequences in different species is essential for the further understanding of genomic imprinting emergence and divergent evolution along mammalian speciation.

  8. The Genome Sequence of Taurine Cattle: A Window to Ruminant Biology and Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Elsik, Christine G.; Tellam, Ross L.; Worley, Kim C.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Abatepaulo, Antonio R. R.; Abbey, Colette A.; Adelson, David L.; Aerts, Jan; Ahola, Virpi; Alexander, Lee; Alioto, Tyler; Almeida, Iassudara G.; Amadio, Ariel F.; Anatriello, Elen; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.

    2009-01-01

    To understand the biology and evolution of ruminants, the cattle genome was sequenced to about sevenfold coverage. The cattle genome contains a minimum of 22,000 genes, with a core set of 14,345 orthologs shared among seven mammalian species of which 1217 are absent or undetected in noneutherian (marsupial or monotreme) genomes. Cattle-specific evolutionary breakpoint regions in chromosomes have a higher density of segmental duplications, enrichment of repetitive elements, and species-specifi...

  9. The evolutionary emergence and refinement of the mammalian pattern of foot architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, O J

    1983-08-01

    It is shown that in form and function the articular complexes of the monotreme foot are pre-adaptive to the therian condition, but the echidna differs by having a tuber calcaneus which is directed downward and distally. The cynodont foot (TR. 8) and that of the Triassic mammal Eozostrodon seem to possess the essential articular features present in monotremes, but they are assembled rather differently. In both, tuber calcaneus was apparently directed downwards. It follows that monotremes were probably derived from some way along the lineage usually, but inappropriately, termed "Theria'. A calcaneofibular articulation is present in kangaroos, certain shrews, elephant shrews, rabbits and artiodactyls. In all of them it is an apomorphic condition involving annexation of part of the posterior talar facet on the calcaneus by the fibula, which invariably shows some degree of amalgamation with the tibia. It is shown that the trochlear process of the mammalian calcaneus has the dual function of providing origin for the m. flexor accessorius and acting as a supporting shelf for the bundle of peroneal tendons. It is almost certainly a derivative of the lateral flange on the cynodont calcaneus, which presumably had a comparable function. In man, the process is fragmented, one of its derivatives being the lateral process of the calcaneal tuber which shows varying degrees of migration towards the medial process and amalgamation with it. The importance of these morphological features is discussed in relation to their use in cladistic analysis and their relevance to theories of the early evolution of the mammals.

  10. From fish to modern humans--comparative anatomy, homologies and evolution of the pectoral and forelimb musculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diogo, R; Abdala, V; Aziz, M A; Lonergan, N; Wood, B A

    2009-05-01

    In a recent study Diogo & Abdala [(2007) J Morphol 268, 504-517] reported the results of the first part of a research project on the comparative anatomy, homologies and evolution of the pectoral muscles of osteichthyans (bony fish and tetrapods). That report mainly focused on actinopterygian fish but also compared these fish with certain non-mammalian sarcopterygians. This study, which reports the second part of the research project, focuses mainly on sarcopterygians and particularly on how the pectoral and forelimb muscles have evolved during the transitions from sarcopterygian fish and non-mammalian tetrapods to monotreme and therian mammals and humans. The data obtained by our own dissections of all the pectoral and forelimb muscles of representative members of groups as diverse as sarcopterygian fish, amphibians, reptiles, monotremes and therian mammals such as rodents, tree-shrews, colugos and primates, including humans, are compared with the information available in the literature. Our observations and comparisons clearly stress that, with regard to the number of pectoral and forelimb muscles, the most striking transition within sarcopterygian evolutionary history was that leading to the origin of tetrapods. Whereas extant sarcopterygian fish have an abductor and adductor of the fin and a largely undifferentiated hypaxial and epaxial musculature, extant salamanders such as Ambystoma have more than 40 pectoral and forelimb muscles. There is no clear increase in the number of pectoral and forelimb muscles within the evolutionary transition that led to the origin of mammals and surely not to that leading to the origin of primates and humans.

  11. Evolution of the turtle bauplan: the topological relationship of the scapula relative to the ribcage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyson, Tyler R; Joyce, Walter G

    2012-12-23

    The turtle shell and the relationship of the shoulder girdle inside or 'deep' to the ribcage have puzzled neontologists and developmental biologists for more than a century. Recent developmental and fossil data indicate that the shoulder girdle indeed lies inside the shell, but anterior to the ribcage. Developmental biologists compare this orientation to that found in the model organisms mice and chickens, whose scapula lies laterally on top of the ribcage. We analyse the topological relationship of the shoulder girdle relative to the ribcage within a broader phylogenetic context and determine that the condition found in turtles is also found in amphibians, monotreme mammals and lepidosaurs. A vertical scapula anterior to the thoracic ribcage is therefore inferred to be the basal amniote condition and indicates that the condition found in therian mammals and archosaurs (which includes both developmental model organisms: chickens and mice) is derived and not appropriate for studying the developmental origin of the turtle shell. Instead, among amniotes, either monotreme mammals or lepidosaurs should be used.

  12. From fish to modern humans--comparative anatomy, homologies and evolution of the head and neck musculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diogo, R; Abdala, V; Lonergan, N; Wood, B A

    2008-10-01

    In a recent paper Diogo (2008) reported the results of the first part of an investigation of the comparative anatomy, homologies and evolution of the head and neck muscles of osteichthyans (bony fish + tetrapods). That report mainly focused on actinopterygian fish, but also compared these fish with certain non-mammalian sarcopterygians. The present paper focuses mainly on sarcopterygians, and particularly on how the head and neck muscles have evolved during the transitions from sarcopterygian fish and non-mammalian tetrapods to monotreme and therian mammals, including modern humans. The data obtained from our dissections of the head and neck muscles of representative members of sarcopterygian fish, amphibians, reptiles, monotremes and therian mammals, such as rodents, tree-shrews, colugos and primates, including modern humans, are compared with the information available in the literature. Our observations and comparisons indicate that the number of mandibular and true branchial muscles (sensu this work) present in modern humans is smaller than that found in mammals such as tree-shrews, rats and monotremes, as well as in reptiles such as lizards. Regarding the pharyngeal musculature, there is an increase in the number of muscles at the time of the evolutionary transition leading to therian mammals, but there was no significant increase during the transition leading to the emergence of higher primates and modern humans. The number of hypobranchial muscles is relatively constant within the therian mammals we examined, although in this case modern humans have more muscles than other mammals. The number of laryngeal and facial muscles in modern humans is greater than that found in most other therian taxa. Interestingly, modern humans possess peculiar laryngeal and facial muscles that are not present in the majority of the other mammalian taxa; this seems to corroborate the crucial role played by vocal communication and by facial expressions in primate and especially in

  13. Metabolism of dinosaurs as determined from their growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Scott A.

    2015-09-01

    A model based on cellular properties is used to analyze the mass growth curves of 20 dinosaurs. This analysis yields the first measurement of the average cellular metabolism of dinosaurs. The organismal metabolism is also determined. The cellular metabolism of dinosaurs is found to decrease with mass at a slower rate than is observed in extant animals. The organismal metabolism increases with the mass of the dinosaur. These results come from both the Saurischia and Ornithischia branches of Dinosauria, suggesting that the observed metabolic features were common to all dinosaurs. The results from dinosaurs are compared to data from extant placental and marsupial mammals, a monotreme, and altricial and precocial birds, reptiles, and fish. Dinosaurs had cellular and organismal metabolisms in the range observed in extant mesotherms.

  14. Metabolism of dinosaurs as determined from their growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Scott A

    2015-09-01

    A model based on cellular properties is used to analyze the mass growth curves of 20 dinosaurs. This analysis yields the first measurement of the average cellular metabolism of dinosaurs. The organismal metabolism is also determined. The cellular metabolism of dinosaurs is found to decrease with mass at a slower rate than is observed in extant animals. The organismal metabolism increases with the mass of the dinosaur. These results come from both the Saurischia and Ornithischia branches of Dinosauria, suggesting that the observed metabolic features were common to all dinosaurs. The results from dinosaurs are compared to data from extant placental and marsupial mammals, a monotreme, and altricial and precocial birds, reptiles, and fish. Dinosaurs had cellular and organismal metabolisms in the range observed in extant mesotherms.

  15. Ostriches sleep like platypuses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Lesku

    Full Text Available Mammals and birds engage in two distinct states of sleep, slow wave sleep (SWS and rapid eye movement (REM sleep. SWS is characterized by slow, high amplitude brain waves, while REM sleep is characterized by fast, low amplitude waves, known as activation, occurring with rapid eye movements and reduced muscle tone. However, monotremes (platypuses and echidnas, the most basal (or 'ancient' group of living mammals, show only a single sleep state that combines elements of SWS and REM sleep, suggesting that these states became temporally segregated in the common ancestor to marsupial and eutherian mammals. Whether sleep in basal birds resembles that of monotremes or other mammals and birds is unknown. Here, we provide the first description of brain activity during sleep in ostriches (Struthio camelus, a member of the most basal group of living birds. We found that the brain activity of sleeping ostriches is unique. Episodes of REM sleep were delineated by rapid eye movements, reduced muscle tone, and head movements, similar to those observed in other birds and mammals engaged in REM sleep; however, during REM sleep in ostriches, forebrain activity would flip between REM sleep-like activation and SWS-like slow waves, the latter reminiscent of sleep in the platypus. Moreover, the amount of REM sleep in ostriches is greater than in any other bird, just as in platypuses, which have more REM sleep than other mammals. These findings reveal a recurring sequence of steps in the evolution of sleep in which SWS and REM sleep arose from a single heterogeneous state that became temporally segregated into two distinct states. This common trajectory suggests that forebrain activation during REM sleep is an evolutionarily new feature, presumably involved in performing new sleep functions not found in more basal animals.

  16. From fish to modern humans – comparative anatomy, homologies and evolution of the pectoral and forelimb musculature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diogo, R; Abdala, V; Aziz, M A; Lonergan, N; Wood, B A

    2009-01-01

    In a recent study Diogo & Abdala [(2007) JMorphol268, 504–517] reported the results of the first part of a research project on the comparative anatomy, homologies and evolution of the pectoral muscles of osteichthyans (bony fish and tetrapods). That report mainly focused on actinopterygian fish but also compared these fish with certain non-mammalian sarcopterygians. This study, which reports the second part of the research project, focuses mainly on sarcopterygians and particularly on how the pectoral and forelimb muscles have evolved during the transitions from sarcopterygian fish and non-mammalian tetrapods to monotreme and therian mammals and humans. The data obtained by our own dissections of all the pectoral and forelimb muscles of representative members of groups as diverse as sarcopterygian fish, amphibians, reptiles, monotremes and therian mammals such as rodents, tree-shrews, colugos and primates, including humans, are compared with the information available in the literature. Our observations and comparisons clearly stress that, with regard to the number of pectoral and forelimb muscles, the most striking transition within sarcopterygian evolutionary history was that leading to the origin of tetrapods. Whereas extant sarcopterygian fish have an abductor and adductor of the fin and a largely undifferentiated hypaxial and epaxial musculature, extant salamanders such as Ambystoma have more than 40 pectoral and forelimb muscles. There is no clear increase in the number of pectoral and forelimb muscles within the evolutionary transition that led to the origin of mammals and surely not to that leading to the origin of primates and humans. PMID:19438764

  17. Evolution of the patellar sesamoid bone in mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark E. Samuels

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The patella is a sesamoid bone located in the major extensor tendon of the knee joint, in the hindlimb of many tetrapods. Although numerous aspects of knee morphology are ancient and conserved among most tetrapods, the evolutionary occurrence of an ossified patella is highly variable. Among extant (crown clade groups it is found in most birds, most lizards, the monotreme mammals and almost all placental mammals, but it is absent in most marsupial mammals as well as many reptiles. Here, we integrate data from the literature and first-hand studies of fossil and recent skeletal remains to reconstruct the evolution of the mammalian patella. We infer that bony patellae most likely evolved between four and six times in crown group Mammalia: in monotremes, in the extinct multituberculates, in one or more stem-mammal genera outside of therian or eutherian mammals and up to three times in therian mammals. Furthermore, an ossified patella was lost several times in mammals, not including those with absent hindlimbs: once or more in marsupials (with some re-acquisition and at least once in bats. Our inferences about patellar evolution in mammals are reciprocally informed by the existence of several human genetic conditions in which the patella is either absent or severely reduced. Clearly, development of the patella is under close genomic control, although its responsiveness to its mechanical environment is also important (and perhaps variable among taxa. Where a bony patella is present it plays an important role in hindlimb function, especially in resisting gravity by providing an enhanced lever system for the knee joint. Yet the evolutionary origins, persistence and modifications of a patella in diverse groups with widely varying habits and habitats—from digging to running to aquatic, small or large body sizes, bipeds or quadrupeds—remain complex and perplexing, impeding a conclusive synthesis of form, function, development and genetics across

  18. First steps in eukaryogenesis: Physical phenomena in the origin and evolution of chromosome structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chela Flores, J.

    1995-01-01

    Our present understanding of the origin and evolution of chromosomes differs considerably from current understanding of the origin and evolution of the cell itself. Chromosome origins have been less prominent in research, as the emphasis has not shifted so far appreciably from the phenomenon of primeval nucleic acid encapsulation to that of the origin of gene organization, expression, and regulation. In this work we discuss some reasons why preliminary steps in this direction are being taken. We have been led to examine properties that have contributed to raise the ancestral prokaryotic programmes to a level where we can appreciate in eukaryotes a clear departure from earlier themes in the evolution of the cell from the last common ancestor. We shift our point of view from evolution of cell morphology to the point of view of the genes. In particular, we focus attention on possible physical bases for the way transmission of information has evolved in eukaryotes, namely, the inactivation of whole chromosomes. The special case of inactivation of the X chromosome in mammals is discussed, paying particular attention to the physical process of the spread of X inactivation in monotremes (platypus and echidna.) When experimental data is unavailable some theoretical analysis is possible based on the idea that in certain cases collective phenomena in genetics, rather than chemical detail, are better correlates of complex chemical processes. (author). Abstract only

  19. The mitochondrial genomes of the iguana (Iguana iguana) and the caiman (Caiman crocodylus): implications for amniote phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, A; Erpenbeck, D; Nilsson, M; Arnason, U

    2001-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genomes of two reptiles, the common iguana (Iguana iguana) and the caiman (Caiman crocodylus), were sequenced in order to investigate phylogenetic questions of tetrapod evolution. The addition of the two species allows analysis of reptilian relationships using data sets other than those including only fast-evolving species. The crocodilian mitochondrial genomes seem to have evolved generally at a higher rate than those of other vertebrates. Phylogenetic analyses of 2889 amino-acid sites from 35 mitochondrial genomes supported the bird-crocodile relationship, lending no support to the Haematotherma hypothesis (with birds and mammals representing sister groups). The analyses corroborated the view that turtles are at the base of the bird-crocodile branch. This position of the turtles makes Diapsida paraphyletic. The origin of the squamates was estimated at 294 million years (Myr) ago and that of the turtles at 278 Myr ago. Phylogenetic analysis of mammalian relationships using the additional outgroups corroborated the Marsupionta hypothesis, which joins the monotremes and the marsupials to the exclusion of the eutherians. PMID:11297180

  20. Mast cells are present in the choroid of the normal eye in most vertebrate classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMenamin, Paul Gerard; Polla, Emily

    2013-07-01

    Mast cells are bone marrow-derived tissue-homing leukocytes, which have traditionally been regarded as effector cells in allergic disorders, responses against parasites, and regulation of blood flow, but a broader perspective of their functional heterogeneity, such as immunomodulation, angiogenesis, tissue repair, and remodeling after injury, is now emerging. The persistence of mast cells in connective tissues throughout the evolution of vertebrates is evidence of strong selective pressure suggesting that these cells must have multiple beneficial and important roles in normal homeostasis. While mast cells are present within the uveal tract of eutherian mammals, there is little known about their presence in the choroid of other vertebrate classes. Eye tissues from a range of vertebrate species (fish, amphibian, reptiles, birds, marsupials, monotreme, and eutherian mammals) were investigated. Tissues were fixed in either 2% glutaraldehyde, 2% paraformaldehyde or a mixture of both and processed for resin embedding. Semi-thin sections of the retina and choroid were cut and stained with toluidine blue. Mast cells were identified in the choroid of all classes of vertebrates investigated except sharks. Their morphology, location, and staining characteristics were remarkably similar from teleost fish through to eutherian mammals and bore close morphological resemblance to mammalian connective tissue mast cells. The similar morphology and distribution of mast cells in the choroid of all vertebrate classes studied suggest a basic physiological function that has been retained since the evolution of the vertebrate eye. © 2013 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  1. First steps in eukaryogenesis: Physical phenomena in the origin and evolution of chromosome structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chela Flores, J.

    1995-08-01

    Our present understanding of the origin and evolution of chromosomes differs considerably from current understanding of the origin and evolution of the cell itself. Chromosome origins have been less prominent in research, as the emphasis has not shifted so far appreciably from the phenomenon of primeval nucleic acid encapsulation to that of the origin of gene organization, expression, and regulation. In this work we discuss some reasons why preliminary steps in this direction are being taken. We have been led to examine properties that have contributed to raise the ancestral prokaryotic programmes to a level where we can appreciate in eukaryotes a clear departure from earlier themes in the evolution of cell from the last common ancestor. We shift our point of view from evolution of cell morphology to the point of view of the genes. In particular we focus attention on possible physical bases for the way transmission of information has evolved in eukaryotes, namely, the inactivation of whole chromosomes. The special case of the inactivation of the X chromosome in mammals is discussed, paying particular attention to the physical process of the spread of X inactivation in monotremes (platypus and echidna). When experimental data is unavailable some theoretical analysis is possible based on the idea that in certain cases collective phenomena in genetics, rather than chemical detail, are better correlates of complex chemical processes. (author). 65 refs

  2. Vascularization of the gray whale palate (Cetacea, Mysticeti, Eschrichtius robustus): soft tissue evidence for an alveolar source of blood to baleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekdale, Eric G; Deméré, Thomas A; Berta, Annalisa

    2015-04-01

    The origin of baleen in mysticetes heralded a major transition during cetacean evolution. Extant mysticetes are edentulous in adulthood, but rudimentary teeth develop in utero within open maxillary and mandibular alveolar grooves. The teeth are resorbed prenatally and the alveolar grooves close as baleen germ develops. Arteries supplying blood to highly vascularized epithelial tissue from which baleen develops pass through lateral nutrient foramina in the area of the embryonic alveolar grooves and rudimentary teeth. Those vessels are hypothesized to be branches of the superior alveolar artery, but branches of the greater palatine arteries may play a role in the baleen vascularization. Through a combination of latex injection, CT, and traditional dissection of the palate of a neonatal gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus), we confirm that the baleen receives blood from vessels within the superior alveolar canal via the lateral foramina. The greater palatine artery is restricted to its own passage with no connections to the baleen. This study has implications for the presence of baleen in extinct taxa by identifying the vessels and bony canals that supply blood to the epithelium from which baleen develops. The results indicate that the lateral foramina in edentulous mysticete fossils are bony correlates for the presence of baleen, and the results can be used to help identify bony canals and foramina that have been used to reconstruct baleen in extinct mysticetes that retained teeth in adulthood. Further comparisons are made with mammals that also possess oral keratin structures, including ruminants, ornithorhynchid monotremes, and sirenians. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Fast running restricts evolutionary change of the vertebral column in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galis, Frietson; Carrier, David R; van Alphen, Joris; van der Mije, Steven D; Van Dooren, Tom J M; Metz, Johan A J; ten Broek, Clara M A

    2014-08-05

    The mammalian vertebral column is highly variable, reflecting adaptations to a wide range of lifestyles, from burrowing in moles to flying in bats. However, in many taxa, the number of trunk vertebrae is surprisingly constant. We argue that this constancy results from strong selection against initial changes of these numbers in fast running and agile mammals, whereas such selection is weak in slower-running, sturdier mammals. The rationale is that changes of the number of trunk vertebrae require homeotic transformations from trunk into sacral vertebrae, or vice versa, and mutations toward such transformations generally produce transitional lumbosacral vertebrae that are incompletely fused to the sacrum. We hypothesize that such incomplete homeotic transformations impair flexibility of the lumbosacral joint and thereby threaten survival in species that depend on axial mobility for speed and agility. Such transformations will only marginally affect performance in slow, sturdy species, so that sufficient individuals with transitional vertebrae survive to allow eventual evolutionary changes of trunk vertebral numbers. We present data on fast and slow carnivores and artiodactyls and on slow afrotherians and monotremes that strongly support this hypothesis. The conclusion is that the selective constraints on the count of trunk vertebrae stem from a combination of developmental and biomechanical constraints.

  4. Extreme telomere length dimorphism in the Tasmanian devil and related marsupials suggests parental control of telomere length.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah S Bender

    Full Text Available Telomeres, specialised structures that protect chromosome ends, play a critical role in preserving chromosome integrity. Telomere dynamics in the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii are of particular interest in light of the emergence of devil facial tumour disease (DFTD, a transmissible malignancy that causes rapid mortality and threatens the species with extinction. We used fluorescent in situ hybridisation to investigate telomere length in DFTD cells, in healthy Tasmanian devils and in four closely related marsupial species. Here we report that animals in the Order Dasyuromorphia have chromosomes characterised by striking telomere length dimorphism between homologues. Findings in sex chromosomes suggest that telomere length dimorphism may be regulated by events in the parental germlines. Long telomeres on the Y chromosome imply that telomere lengthening occurs during spermatogenesis, whereas telomere diminution occurs during oogenesis. Although found in several somatic cell tissue types, telomere length dimorphism was not found in DFTD cancer cells, which are characterised by uniformly short telomeres. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of naturally occurring telomere length dimorphism in any species and suggests a novel strategy of telomere length control. Comparative studies in five distantly related marsupials and a monotreme indicate that telomere dimorphism evolved at least 50 million years ago.

  5. Last glacial megafaunal death assemblage and early human occupation at Lake Menindee, southeastern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupper, Matthew L.; Duncan, Jacqui

    2006-09-01

    The Tedford subfossil locality at Lake Menindee preserves a diverse assemblage of marsupials, monotremes and placental rodents. Of the 38 mammal taxa recorded at the site, almost a third are of extinct megafauna. Some of the bones are articulated or semi-articulated and include almost complete skeletons, indicating that aeolian sediments rapidly buried the animals following death. New optical ages show the site dates to the early part of the last glacial (55,700 ± 1300 yr weighted mean age). This is close to the 51,200-39,800 yr Australia-wide extinction age for megafauna suggested by Roberts et al. [2001, Science 292:1888-1892], but like all previous researchers, we cannot conclusively determine whether humans were implicated in the deaths of the animals. Although an intrusive hearth at the site dating to 45,100 ± 1400 yr ago is the oldest evidence of human occupation of the Darling River, no artifacts were identified in situ within the sub-fossil-bearing unit. Non-anthropogenic causes, such as natural senescence or ecosystem stress due to climatic aridity, probably explain the mortality of the faunal assemblage at Lake Menindee.

  6. Postembryonic Nephrogenesis and Persistence of Six2-Expressing Nephron Progenitor Cells in the Reptilian Kidney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarata, Troy; Howard, Alexis; Elsey, Ruth M.; Raza, Sarah; O’Connor, Alice; Beatty, Brian; Conrad, Jack; Solounias, Nikos; Chow, Priscilla; Mukta, Saima; Vasilyev, Aleksandr

    2016-01-01

    New nephron formation (nephrogenesis) ceases in mammals around birth and is completely absent in adults. In contrast, postembryonic nephrogenesis is well documented in the mesonephric kidneys of fishes and amphibians. The transient mesonephros in reptiles (including birds) and mammals is replaced by the metanephros during embryogenesis. Thus, one may speculate that postembryonic nephrogenesis is restricted to the mesonephric kidney. Previous reports have suggested the metanephros of non-avian reptiles (hereafter reptiles) may continually form nephrons throughout life. We investigated the presence of adult nephrogenesis in reptiles by examining adult kidneys from several species including Trachemys scripta, Chrysemys picta, Boa constrictor, Tupinambis tegu, Anolis carolinensis, and Alligator mississipiensis among others. We found that all major reptilian groups (Testudines, Crocodylia, and Squamates) showed the presence of adult nephrogenesis. The total amount of nephrogenesis varied greatly between species with turtles displaying the highest density of nephrogenesis. In contrast, we were unable to detect adult nephrogenesis in monotremes, and in the iguanid A. carolinensis. Nephron progenitor cells express the transcription factor Six2, which in mammals, becomes downregulated as the progenitor cell population is exhausted and nephrogenesis ends. Using the alligator as a model, we were able to detect Six2-positive cap mesenchyme cells in the adult kidney, which spatially correlated with areas of nephrogenesis. These results suggest that the metanephric kidney of reptiles has maintained the ability to continually grow new nephrons during postembryonic life, a process lost early in mammalian evolution, likely due to the persistence of a Six2-expressing progenitor cell population. PMID:27144443

  7. Weird mammals provide insights into the evolution of mammalian sex chromosomes and dosage compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Jennifer A Marshall

    2015-12-01

    The deep divergence of mammalian groups 166 and 190 million years ago (MYA) provide genetic variation to explore the evolution of DNA sequence, gene arrangement and regulation of gene expression in mammals. With encouragement from the founder of the field, Mary Lyon, techniques in cytogenetics and molecular biology were progressively adapted to characterize the sex chromosomes of kangaroos and other marsupials, platypus and echidna-and weird rodent species. Comparative gene mapping reveals the process of sex chromosome evolution from their inception 190 MYA (they are autosomal in platypus) to their inevitable end (the Y has disappeared in two rodent lineages). Our X and Y are relatively young, getting their start with the evolution of the sex-determining SRY gene, which triggered progressive degradation of the Y chromosome. Even more recently, sex chromosomes of placental mammals fused with an autosomal region which now makes up most of the Y. Exploration of gene activity patterns over four decades showed that dosage compensation via X-chromosome inactivation is unique to therian mammals, and that this whole chromosome control process is different in marsupials and absent in monotremes and reptiles, and birds. These differences can be exploited to deduce how mammalian sex chromosomes and epigenetic silencing evolved.

  8. Musculoskeletal networks reveal topological disparity in mammalian neck evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Patrick; Esteve-Altava, Borja; Fischer, Martin S

    2017-12-13

    The increase in locomotor and metabolic performance during mammalian evolution was accompanied by the limitation of the number of cervical vertebrae to only seven. In turn, nuchal muscles underwent a reorganization while forelimb muscles expanded into the neck region. As variation in the cervical spine is low, the variation in the arrangement of the neck muscles and their attachment sites (i.e., the variability of the neck's musculoskeletal organization) is thus proposed to be an important source of neck disparity across mammals. Anatomical network analysis provides a novel framework to study the organization of the anatomical arrangement, or connectivity pattern, of the bones and muscles that constitute the mammalian neck in an evolutionary context. Neck organization in mammals is characterized by a combination of conserved and highly variable network properties. We uncovered a conserved regionalization of the musculoskeletal organization of the neck into upper, mid and lower cervical modules. In contrast, there is a varying degree of complexity or specialization and of the integration of the pectoral elements. The musculoskeletal organization of the monotreme neck is distinctively different from that of therian mammals. Our findings reveal that the limited number of vertebrae in the mammalian neck does not result in a low musculoskeletal disparity when examined in an evolutionary context. However, this disparity evolved late in mammalian history in parallel with the radiation of certain lineages (e.g., cetartiodactyls, xenarthrans). Disparity is further facilitated by the enhanced incorporation of forelimb muscles into the neck and their variability in attachment sites.

  9. Precerebellar and vestibular nuclei of the short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwell, K W S; Paxinos, G; Watson, C R R

    2007-09-01

    The monotremes are a unique group of living mammals, which diverged from the line leading to placental mammals at least 125 million years ago. We have examined the organization of pontine, inferior olivary, lateral reticular and vestibular nuclei in the brainstem of the short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus) to determine if the cyto- and chemoarchitecture of these nuclei are similar to that in placental mammals and marsupials. We have used Nissl staining in conjunction with enzyme-histochemistry for acetylcholinesterase, cytochrome oxidase and NADPH diaphorase as well as immunohistochemistry for non-phosphorylated neurofilament protein (SMI-32 antibody) and calcium binding proteins (parvalbumin, calbindin, calretinin). Homologies could be established between the arch shaped inferior olivary complex of the echidna and the principal, dorsal and medial accessory subdivisions of the therian inferior olivary complex. The pontine nuclei of the echidna included basilar and reticulotegmental components with similar cyto- and chemarchitectural features to therians and there were magnocellular and subtrigeminal components of the lateral reticular nucleus, also as seen in therians. Subdivisions and chemoarchitecture of the vestibular complex of the echidna were both similar to that region in rodents. In all three precerebellar nuclear groups studied and in the vestibular nucleus organization, the cyto- and chemoarchitecture of the echidna was very similar to that seen in therian mammals and no "primitive" or "reptilian" features were evident.

  10. Postembryonic Nephrogenesis and Persistence of Six2-Expressing Nephron Progenitor Cells in the Reptilian Kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarata, Troy; Howard, Alexis; Elsey, Ruth M; Raza, Sarah; O'Connor, Alice; Beatty, Brian; Conrad, Jack; Solounias, Nikos; Chow, Priscilla; Mukta, Saima; Vasilyev, Aleksandr

    2016-01-01

    New nephron formation (nephrogenesis) ceases in mammals around birth and is completely absent in adults. In contrast, postembryonic nephrogenesis is well documented in the mesonephric kidneys of fishes and amphibians. The transient mesonephros in reptiles (including birds) and mammals is replaced by the metanephros during embryogenesis. Thus, one may speculate that postembryonic nephrogenesis is restricted to the mesonephric kidney. Previous reports have suggested the metanephros of non-avian reptiles (hereafter reptiles) may continually form nephrons throughout life. We investigated the presence of adult nephrogenesis in reptiles by examining adult kidneys from several species including Trachemys scripta, Chrysemys picta, Boa constrictor, Tupinambis tegu, Anolis carolinensis, and Alligator mississipiensis among others. We found that all major reptilian groups (Testudines, Crocodylia, and Squamates) showed the presence of adult nephrogenesis. The total amount of nephrogenesis varied greatly between species with turtles displaying the highest density of nephrogenesis. In contrast, we were unable to detect adult nephrogenesis in monotremes, and in the iguanid A. carolinensis. Nephron progenitor cells express the transcription factor Six2, which in mammals, becomes downregulated as the progenitor cell population is exhausted and nephrogenesis ends. Using the alligator as a model, we were able to detect Six2-positive cap mesenchyme cells in the adult kidney, which spatially correlated with areas of nephrogenesis. These results suggest that the metanephric kidney of reptiles has maintained the ability to continually grow new nephrons during postembryonic life, a process lost early in mammalian evolution, likely due to the persistence of a Six2-expressing progenitor cell population.

  11. The nocturnal bottleneck and the evolution of activity patterns in mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerkema, Menno P.; Davies, Wayne I. L.; Foster, Russell G.; Menaker, Michael; Hut, Roelof A.

    2013-01-01

    In 1942, Walls described the concept of a ‘nocturnal bottleneck’ in placental mammals, where these species could survive only by avoiding daytime activity during times in which dinosaurs were the dominant taxon. Walls based this concept of a longer episode of nocturnality in early eutherian mammals by comparing the visual systems of reptiles, birds and all three extant taxa of the mammalian lineage, namely the monotremes, marsupials (now included in the metatherians) and placentals (included in the eutherians). This review describes the status of what has become known as the nocturnal bottleneck hypothesis, giving an overview of the chronobiological patterns of activity. We review the ecological plausibility that the activity patterns of (early) eutherian mammals were restricted to the night, based on arguments relating to endothermia, energy balance, foraging and predation, taking into account recent palaeontological information. We also assess genes, relating to light detection (visual and non-visual systems) and the photolyase DNA protection system that were lost in the eutherian mammalian lineage. Our conclusion presently is that arguments in favour of the nocturnal bottleneck hypothesis in eutherians prevail. PMID:23825205

  12. Phylogenetic analysis of the MS4A and TMEM176 gene families.

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    Jonathan Zuccolo

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The MS4A gene family in humans includes CD20 (MS4A1, FcRbeta (MS4A2, Htm4 (MS4A3, and at least 13 other syntenic genes encoding membrane proteins, most having characteristic tetraspanning topology. Expression of MS4A genes is variable in tissues throughout the body; however, several are limited to cells in the hematopoietic system where they have known roles in immune cell functions. Genes in the small TMEM176 group share significant sequence similarity with MS4A genes and there is evidence of immune function of at least one of the encoded proteins. In this study, we examined the evolutionary history of the MS4A/TMEM176 families as well as tissue expression of the phylogenetically earliest members, in order to investigate their possible origins in immune cells.Orthologs of human MS4A genes were found only in mammals; however, MS4A gene homologs were found in most jawed vertebrates. TMEM176 genes were found only in mammals and bony fish. Several unusual MS4A genes having 2 or more tandem MS4A sequences were identified in the chicken (Gallus gallus and early mammals (opossum, Monodelphis domestica and platypus, Ornithorhyncus anatinus. A large number of highly conserved MS4A and TMEM176 genes was found in zebrafish (Danio rerio. The most primitive organism identified to have MS4A genes was spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthus. Tissue expression of MS4A genes in S. acanthias and D. rerio showed no evidence of expression restricted to the hematopoietic system.Our findings suggest that MS4A genes first appeared in cartilaginous fish with expression outside of the immune system, and have since diversified in many species into their modern forms with expression and function in both immune and nonimmune cells.

  13. Phylogenetic Analysis of the MS4A and TMEM176 Gene Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccolo, Jonathan; Bau, Jeremy; Childs, Sarah J.; Goss, Greg G.; Sensen, Christoph W.; Deans, Julie P.

    2010-01-01

    Background The MS4A gene family in humans includes CD20 (MS4A1), FcRβ (MS4A2), Htm4 (MS4A3), and at least 13 other syntenic genes encoding membrane proteins, most having characteristic tetraspanning topology. Expression of MS4A genes is variable in tissues throughout the body; however, several are limited to cells in the hematopoietic system where they have known roles in immune cell functions. Genes in the small TMEM176 group share significant sequence similarity with MS4A genes and there is evidence of immune function of at least one of the encoded proteins. In this study, we examined the evolutionary history of the MS4A/TMEM176 families as well as tissue expression of the phylogenetically earliest members, in order to investigate their possible origins in immune cells. Principal Findings Orthologs of human MS4A genes were found only in mammals; however, MS4A gene homologs were found in most jawed vertebrates. TMEM176 genes were found only in mammals and bony fish. Several unusual MS4A genes having 2 or more tandem MS4A sequences were identified in the chicken (Gallus gallus) and early mammals (opossum, Monodelphis domestica and platypus, Ornithorhyncus anatinus). A large number of highly conserved MS4A and TMEM176 genes was found in zebrafish (Danio rerio). The most primitive organism identified to have MS4A genes was spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthus). Tissue expression of MS4A genes in S. acanthias and D. rerio showed no evidence of expression restricted to the hematopoietic system. Conclusions/Significance Our findings suggest that MS4A genes first appeared in cartilaginous fish with expression outside of the immune system, and have since diversified in many species into their modern forms with expression and function in both immune and nonimmune cells. PMID:20186339

  14. Mechanisms and evolutionary patterns of mammalian and avian dosage compensation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Julien

    Full Text Available As a result of sex chromosome differentiation from ancestral autosomes, male mammalian cells only contain one X chromosome. It has long been hypothesized that X-linked gene expression levels have become doubled in males to restore the original transcriptional output, and that the resulting X overexpression in females then drove the evolution of X inactivation (XCI. However, this model has never been directly tested and patterns and mechanisms of dosage compensation across different mammals and birds generally remain little understood. Here we trace the evolution of dosage compensation using extensive transcriptome data from males and females representing all major mammalian lineages and birds. Our analyses suggest that the X has become globally upregulated in marsupials, whereas we do not detect a global upregulation of this chromosome in placental mammals. However, we find that a subset of autosomal genes interacting with X-linked genes have become downregulated in placentals upon the emergence of sex chromosomes. Thus, different driving forces may underlie the evolution of XCI and the highly efficient equilibration of X expression levels between the sexes observed for both of these lineages. In the egg-laying monotremes and birds, which have partially homologous sex chromosome systems, partial upregulation of the X (Z in birds evolved but is largely restricted to the heterogametic sex, which provides an explanation for the partially sex-biased X (Z expression and lack of global inactivation mechanisms in these lineages. Our findings suggest that dosage reductions imposed by sex chromosome differentiation events in amniotes were resolved in strikingly different ways.

  15. Losses of functional opsin genes, short-wavelength cone photopigments, and color vision--a significant trend in the evolution of mammalian vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Gerald H

    2013-03-01

    All mammalian cone photopigments are derived from the operation of representatives from two opsin gene families (SWS1 and LWS in marsupial and eutherian mammals; SWS2 and LWS in monotremes), a process that produces cone pigments with respective peak sensitivities in the short and middle-to-long wavelengths. With the exception of a number of primate taxa, the modal pattern for mammals is to have two types of cone photopigment, one drawn from each of the gene families. In recent years, it has been discovered that the SWS1 opsin genes of a widely divergent collection of eutherian mammals have accumulated mutational changes that render them nonfunctional. This alteration reduces the retinal complements of these species to a single cone type, thus rendering ordinary color vision impossible. At present, several dozen species from five mammalian orders have been identified as falling into this category, but the total number of mammalian species that have lost short-wavelength cones in this way is certain to be much larger, perhaps reaching as high as 10% of all species. A number of circumstances that might be used to explain this widespread cone loss can be identified. Among these, the single consistent fact is that the species so affected are nocturnal or, if they are not technically nocturnal, they at least feature retinal organizations that are typically associated with that lifestyle. At the same time, however, there are many nocturnal mammals that retain functional short-wavelength cones. Nocturnality thus appears to set the stage for loss of functional SWS1 opsin genes in mammals, but it cannot be the sole circumstance.

  16. A Polychaete’s Powerful Punch: Venom Gland Transcriptomics of Glycera Reveals a Complex Cocktail of Toxin Homologs

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Reumont, Björn M.; Richter, Sandy; Hering, Lars; Sykes, Dan; Hetmank, Jörg; Jenner, Ronald A.; Bleidorn, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Glycerids are marine annelids commonly known as bloodworms. Bloodworms have an eversible proboscis adorned with jaws connected to venom glands. Bloodworms prey on invertebrates, and it is known that the venom glands produce compounds that can induce toxic effects in animals. Yet, none of these putative toxins has been characterized on a molecular basis. Here we present the transcriptomic profiles of the venom glands of three species of bloodworm, Glycera dibranchiata, Glycera fallax and Glycera tridactyla, as well as the body tissue of G. tridactyla. The venom glands express a complex mixture of transcripts coding for putative toxin precursors. These transcripts represent 20 known toxin classes that have been convergently recruited into animal venoms, as well as transcripts potentially coding for Glycera-specific toxins. The toxins represent five functional categories: Pore-forming and membrane-disrupting toxins, neurotoxins, protease inhibitors, other enzymes, and CAP domain toxins. Many of the transcripts coding for putative Glycera toxins belong to classes that have been widely recruited into venoms, but some are homologs of toxins previously only known from the venoms of scorpaeniform fish and monotremes (stonustoxin-like toxin), turrid gastropods (turripeptide-like peptides), and sea anemones (gigantoxin I-like neurotoxin). This complex mixture of toxin homologs suggests that bloodworms employ venom while predating on macroscopic prey, casting doubt on the previously widespread opinion that G. dibranchiata is a detritivore. Our results further show that researchers should be aware that different assembly methods, as well as different methods of homology prediction, can influence the transcriptomic profiling of venom glands. PMID:25193302

  17. A Polychaete's powerful punch: venom gland transcriptomics of Glycera reveals a complex cocktail of toxin homologs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Reumont, Björn M; Campbell, Lahcen I; Richter, Sandy; Hering, Lars; Sykes, Dan; Hetmank, Jörg; Jenner, Ronald A; Bleidorn, Christoph

    2014-09-05

    Glycerids are marine annelids commonly known as bloodworms. Bloodworms have an eversible proboscis adorned with jaws connected to venom glands. Bloodworms prey on invertebrates, and it is known that the venom glands produce compounds that can induce toxic effects in animals. Yet, none of these putative toxins has been characterized on a molecular basis. Here we present the transcriptomic profiles of the venom glands of three species of bloodworm, Glycera dibranchiata, Glycera fallax and Glycera tridactyla, as well as the body tissue of G. tridactyla. The venom glands express a complex mixture of transcripts coding for putative toxin precursors. These transcripts represent 20 known toxin classes that have been convergently recruited into animal venoms, as well as transcripts potentially coding for Glycera-specific toxins. The toxins represent five functional categories: Pore-forming and membrane-disrupting toxins, neurotoxins, protease inhibitors, other enzymes, and CAP domain toxins. Many of the transcripts coding for putative Glycera toxins belong to classes that have been widely recruited into venoms, but some are homologs of toxins previously only known from the venoms of scorpaeniform fish and monotremes (stonustoxin-like toxin), turrid gastropods (turripeptide-like peptides), and sea anemones (gigantoxin I-like neurotoxin). This complex mixture of toxin homologs suggests that bloodworms employ venom while predating on macroscopic prey, casting doubt on the previously widespread opinion that G. dibranchiata is a detritivore. Our results further show that researchers should be aware that different assembly methods, as well as different methods of homology prediction, can influence the transcriptomic profiling of venom glands. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  18. Brain Sexual Differentiation and Requirement of SRY: Why or Why Not?

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    Cheryl S. Rosenfeld

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Brain sexual differentiation is orchestrated by precise coordination of sex steroid hormones. In some species, programming of select male brain regions is dependent upon aromatization of testosterone to estrogen. In mammals, these hormones surge during the organizational and activational periods that occur during perinatal development and adulthood, respectively. In various fish and reptiles, incubation temperature during a critical embryonic period results in male or female sexual differentiation, but this can be overridden in males by early exposure to estrogenic chemicals. Testes development in mammals requires a Y chromosome and testis determining gene SRY (in humans/Sry (all other therian mammals, although there are notable exceptions. Two species of spiny rats: Amami spiny rat (Tokudaia osimensis and Tokunoshima spiny rat (Tokudaia tokunoshimensis and two species of mole voles (Ellobius lutescens and Ellobius tancrei, lack a Y chromosome/Sry and possess an XO chromosome system in both sexes. Such rodent species, prototherians (monotremes, who also lack Sry, and fish and reptile species that demonstrate temperature sex determination (TSD seemingly call into question the requirement of Sry for brain sexual differentiation. This review will consider brain regions expressing SRY/Sry in humans and rodents, respectively, and potential roles of SRY/Sry in the brain will be discussed. The evidence from various taxa disputing the requirement of Sry for brain sexual differentiation in mammals (therians and prototherians and certain fish and reptilian species will be examined. A comparative approach to address this question may elucidate other genes, pathways, and epigenetic modifications stimulating brain sexual differentiation in vertebrate species, including humans.

  19. The head and neck muscles of the serval and tiger: homologies, evolution, and proposal of a mammalian and a veterinary muscle ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diogo, Rui; Pastor, Francisco; De Paz, Felix; Potau, Josep M; Bello-Hellegouarch, Gaëlle; Ferrero, Eva M; Fisher, Rebecca E

    2012-12-01

    Here we describe the head and neck muscles of members of the two extant felid subfamilies (Leptailurus serval: Felinae; Panthera tigris: Pantherinae) and compare these muscles with those of other felids, other carnivorans (e.g., domestic dogs), other eutherian mammals (e.g., rats, tree-shrews and modern humans), and noneutherian mammals including monotremes. Another major goal of the article is to discuss and help clarify nomenclatural discrepancies found in the Nomina Anatomica Veterinaria and in veterinary atlases and textbooks that use cats and dogs as models to understand the anatomy of domestic mammals and to stress differences with modern humans. We propose a unifying nomenclature that is expanded to all the head and neck muscles and to all mammalian taxa in order to help build veterinary and mammalian muscle ontologies. Our observations and comparisons and the specific use of this nomenclature point out that felids such as tigers and servals and other carnivorans such as dogs have more facial muscle structures related to the mobility of both the auricular and orbital regions than numerous other mammals, including modern humans, which might be the result of an ancient adaptation related to the remarkable predatory capacities of carnivorans. Interestingly, the skeletal differences, mainly concerning the hyoid apparatus, pharynx, and larynx, that are likely associated with the different types of vocalizations seen in the Felinae (mainly purring) and Pantherinae (mainly roaring) are not accompanied by clear differences in the musculature connected to these structures in the feline L. serval and the pantherine P. tigris. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Insights into the evolution of mammalian telomerase: Platypus TERT shares similarities with genes of birds and other reptiles and localizes on sex chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrdličková Radmila

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The TERT gene encodes the catalytic subunit of the telomerase complex and is responsible for maintaining telomere length. Vertebrate telomerase has been studied in eutherian mammals, fish, and the chicken, but less attention has been paid to other vertebrates. The platypus occupies an important evolutionary position, providing unique insight into the evolution of mammalian genes. We report the cloning of a platypus TERT (OanTERT ortholog, and provide a comparison with genes of other vertebrates. Results The OanTERT encodes a protein with a high sequence similarity to marsupial TERT and avian TERT. Like the TERT of sauropsids and marsupials, as well as that of sharks and echinoderms, OanTERT contains extended variable linkers in the N-terminal region suggesting that they were present already in basal vertebrates and lost independently in ray-finned fish and eutherian mammals. Several alternatively spliced OanTERT variants structurally similar to avian TERT variants were identified. Telomerase activity is expressed in all platypus tissues like that of cold-blooded animals and murine rodents. OanTERT was localized on pseudoautosomal regions of sex chromosomes X3/Y2, expanding the homology between human chromosome 5 and platypus sex chromosomes. Synteny analysis suggests that TERT co-localized with sex-linked genes in the last common mammalian ancestor. Interestingly, female platypuses express higher levels of telomerase in heart and liver tissues than do males. Conclusions OanTERT shares many features with TERT of the reptilian outgroup, suggesting that OanTERT represents the ancestral mammalian TERT. Features specific to TERT of eutherian mammals have, therefore, evolved more recently after the divergence of monotremes.

  1. Postembryonic Nephrogenesis and Persistence of Six2-Expressing Nephron Progenitor Cells in the Reptilian Kidney.

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    Troy Camarata

    Full Text Available New nephron formation (nephrogenesis ceases in mammals around birth and is completely absent in adults. In contrast, postembryonic nephrogenesis is well documented in the mesonephric kidneys of fishes and amphibians. The transient mesonephros in reptiles (including birds and mammals is replaced by the metanephros during embryogenesis. Thus, one may speculate that postembryonic nephrogenesis is restricted to the mesonephric kidney. Previous reports have suggested the metanephros of non-avian reptiles (hereafter reptiles may continually form nephrons throughout life. We investigated the presence of adult nephrogenesis in reptiles by examining adult kidneys from several species including Trachemys scripta, Chrysemys picta, Boa constrictor, Tupinambis tegu, Anolis carolinensis, and Alligator mississipiensis among others. We found that all major reptilian groups (Testudines, Crocodylia, and Squamates showed the presence of adult nephrogenesis. The total amount of nephrogenesis varied greatly between species with turtles displaying the highest density of nephrogenesis. In contrast, we were unable to detect adult nephrogenesis in monotremes, and in the iguanid A. carolinensis. Nephron progenitor cells express the transcription factor Six2, which in mammals, becomes downregulated as the progenitor cell population is exhausted and nephrogenesis ends. Using the alligator as a model, we were able to detect Six2-positive cap mesenchyme cells in the adult kidney, which spatially correlated with areas of nephrogenesis. These results suggest that the metanephric kidney of reptiles has maintained the ability to continually grow new nephrons during postembryonic life, a process lost early in mammalian evolution, likely due to the persistence of a Six2-expressing progenitor cell population.

  2. An analysis of the factors that influence the level and scaling of mammalian BMR.

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    McNab, Brian Keith

    2008-09-01

    The factors influencing the basal rate of metabolism (BMR) in 639 species of mammals include body mass, food habits, climate, habitat, substrate, a restriction to islands or highlands, use of torpor, and type of reproduction. They collectively account for 98.8% of the variation in mammalian BMR, but often interact in complex ways. The factor with the greatest impact on BMR, as always, is body mass (accounting for 96.8% of its variation), the extent of its impact reflecting the 10(6.17)-fold range of mass in measured species. The attempt to derive mathematically the power relationship of BMR in mammals is complicated by the necessity to include all of the factors that influence BMR that are themselves correlated with body mass. BMR also correlates with taxonomic affiliation because many taxa are distinguished by their ecological and behavioral characteristics. Phylogeny, reflecting previous commitments, may influence BMR either through a restriction on the realized range of behaviors or by opening new behavioral and ecological opportunities. A new opportunity resulted from the evolution by eutherians of a type of reproduction that permitted species feeding on high quality resources to have high BMRs. These rates facilitated high rates of gas, nutrient, and waste exchange between a pregnant eutherian and her placental offspring. This pattern led to high rates of reproduction in some eutherians, a response denied all monotremes and marsupials, thereby permitting eutherians to occupy cold-temperate and polar environments and to dominate other mammals in all environments to which ecologically equivalent eutherians had access.

  3. A second corticotropin-releasing hormone gene (CRH2) is conserved across vertebrate classes and expressed in the hindbrain of a basal neopterygian fish, the spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus).

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    Grone, Brian P; Maruska, Karen P

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the origins of the vertebrate stress-response system, we searched sequenced vertebrate genomes for genes resembling corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). We found that vertebrate genomes possess, in addition to CRH, another gene that resembles CRH in sequence and syntenic environment. This paralogous gene was previously identified only in the elephant shark (a holocephalan), but we find it also in marsupials, monotremes, lizards, turtles, birds, and fishes. We examined the relationship of this second vertebrate CRH gene, which we name CRH2, to CRH1 (previously known as CRH) and urocortin1/urotensin1 (UCN1/UTS1) in primitive fishes, teleosts, and tetrapods. The paralogs CRH1 and CRH2 likely evolved via duplication of CRH during a whole-genome duplication early in the vertebrate lineage. CRH2 was subsequently lost in both teleost fishes and eutherian mammals but retained in other lineages. To determine where CRH2 is expressed relative to CRH1 and UTS1, we used in situ hybridization on brain tissue from spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus), a neopterygian fish closely related to teleosts. In situ hybridization revealed widespread distribution of both crh1 and uts1 in the brain. Expression of crh2 was restricted to the putative secondary gustatory/secondary visceral nucleus, which also expressed calcitonin-related polypeptide alpha (calca), a marker of parabrachial nucleus in mammals. Thus, the evolutionary history of CRH2 includes restricted expression in the brain, sequence changes, and gene loss, likely reflecting release of selective constraints following whole-genome duplication. The discovery of CRH2 opens many new possibilities for understanding the diverse functions of the CRH family of peptides across vertebrates. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Ancient Exaptation of a CORE-SINE Retroposon into a Highly Conserved Mammalian Neuronal Enhancer of the Proopiomelanocortin Gene

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    Bumaschny, Viviana F; Low, Malcolm J; Rubinstein, Marcelo

    2007-01-01

    The proopiomelanocortin gene (POMC) is expressed in the pituitary gland and the ventral hypothalamus of all jawed vertebrates, producing several bioactive peptides that function as peripheral hormones or central neuropeptides, respectively. We have recently determined that mouse and human POMC expression in the hypothalamus is conferred by the action of two 5′ distal and unrelated enhancers, nPE1 and nPE2. To investigate the evolutionary origin of the neuronal enhancer nPE2, we searched available vertebrate genome databases and determined that nPE2 is a highly conserved element in placentals, marsupials, and monotremes, whereas it is absent in nonmammalian vertebrates. Following an in silico paleogenomic strategy based on genome-wide searches for paralog sequences, we discovered that opossum and wallaby nPE2 sequences are highly similar to members of the superfamily of CORE-short interspersed nucleotide element (SINE) retroposons, in particular to MAR1 retroposons that are widely present in marsupial genomes. Thus, the neuronal enhancer nPE2 originated from the exaptation of a CORE-SINE retroposon in the lineage leading to mammals and remained under purifying selection in all mammalian orders for the last 170 million years. Expression studies performed in transgenic mice showed that two nonadjacent nPE2 subregions are essential to drive reporter gene expression into POMC hypothalamic neurons, providing the first functional example of an exapted enhancer derived from an ancient CORE-SINE retroposon. In addition, we found that this CORE-SINE family of retroposons is likely to still be active in American and Australian marsupial genomes and that several highly conserved exonic, intronic and intergenic sequences in the human genome originated from the exaptation of CORE-SINE retroposons. Together, our results provide clear evidence of the functional novelties that transposed elements contributed to their host genomes throughout evolution. PMID:17922573

  5. What lies beneath: sub-articular long bone shape scaling in eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs suggests different locomotor adaptations for gigantism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnan, Matthew F; Wilhite, D Ray; Masters, Simon L; Yates, Adam M; Gardner, Christine K; Aguiar, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs both evolved lineages of huge terrestrial herbivores. Although significantly more saurischian dinosaurs were giants than eutherians, the long bones of both taxa scale similarly and suggest that locomotion was dynamically similar. However, articular cartilage is thin in eutherian mammals but thick in saurischian dinosaurs, differences that could have contributed to, or limited, how frequently gigantism evolved. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that sub-articular bone, which supports the articular cartilage, changes shape in different ways between terrestrial mammals and dinosaurs with increasing size. Our sample consisted of giant mammal and reptile taxa (i.e., elephants, rhinos, sauropods) plus erect and non-erect outgroups with thin and thick articular cartilage. Our results show that eutherian mammal sub-articular shape becomes narrow with well-defined surface features as size increases. In contrast, this region in saurischian dinosaurs expands and remains gently convex with increasing size. Similar trends were observed in non-erect outgroup taxa (monotremes, alligators), showing that the trends we report are posture-independent. These differences support our hypothesis that sub-articular shape scales differently between eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs. Our results show that articular cartilage thickness and sub-articular shape are correlated. In mammals, joints become ever more congruent and thinner with increasing size, whereas archosaur joints remained both congruent and thick, especially in sauropods. We suggest that gigantism occurs less frequently in mammals, in part, because joints composed of thin articular cartilage can only become so congruent before stress cannot be effectively alleviated. In contrast, frequent gigantism in saurischian dinosaurs may be explained, in part, by joints with thick articular cartilage that can deform across large areas with increasing load.

  6. Conserved regulatory modules in the Sox9 testis-specific enhancer predict roles for SOX, TCF/LEF, Forkhead, DMRT, and GATA proteins in vertebrate sex determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri-Fam, Stefan; Sinclair, Andrew H; Koopman, Peter; Harley, Vincent R

    2010-03-01

    While the primary sex determining switch varies between vertebrate species, a key downstream event in testicular development, namely the male-specific up-regulation of Sox9, is conserved. To date, only two sex determining switch genes have been identified, Sry in mammals and the Dmrt1-related gene Dmy (Dmrt1bY) in the medaka fish Oryzias latipes. In mice, Sox9 expression is evidently up-regulated by SRY and maintained by SOX9 both of which directly activate the core 1.3 kb testis-specific enhancer of Sox9 (TESCO). How Sox9 expression is up-regulated and maintained in species without Sry (i.e. non-mammalian species) is not understood. In this study, we have undertaken an in-depth comparative genomics approach and show that TESCO contains an evolutionarily conserved region (ECR) of 180 bp which is present in marsupials, monotremes, birds, reptiles and amphibians. The ECR contains highly conserved modules that predict regulatory roles for SOX, TCF/LEF, Forkhead, DMRT, and GATA proteins in vertebrate sex determination/differentiation. Our data suggest that tetrapods share common aspects of Sox9 regulation in the testis, despite having different sex determining switch mechanisms. They also suggest that Sox9 autoregulation is an ancient mechanism shared by all tetrapods, raising the possibility that in mammals, SRY evolved by mimicking this regulation. The validation of ECR regulatory sequences conserved from human to frogs will provide new insights into vertebrate sex determination. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. What lies beneath: sub-articular long bone shape scaling in eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs suggests different locomotor adaptations for gigantism.

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    Matthew F Bonnan

    Full Text Available Eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs both evolved lineages of huge terrestrial herbivores. Although significantly more saurischian dinosaurs were giants than eutherians, the long bones of both taxa scale similarly and suggest that locomotion was dynamically similar. However, articular cartilage is thin in eutherian mammals but thick in saurischian dinosaurs, differences that could have contributed to, or limited, how frequently gigantism evolved. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that sub-articular bone, which supports the articular cartilage, changes shape in different ways between terrestrial mammals and dinosaurs with increasing size. Our sample consisted of giant mammal and reptile taxa (i.e., elephants, rhinos, sauropods plus erect and non-erect outgroups with thin and thick articular cartilage. Our results show that eutherian mammal sub-articular shape becomes narrow with well-defined surface features as size increases. In contrast, this region in saurischian dinosaurs expands and remains gently convex with increasing size. Similar trends were observed in non-erect outgroup taxa (monotremes, alligators, showing that the trends we report are posture-independent. These differences support our hypothesis that sub-articular shape scales differently between eutherian mammals and saurischian dinosaurs. Our results show that articular cartilage thickness and sub-articular shape are correlated. In mammals, joints become ever more congruent and thinner with increasing size, whereas archosaur joints remained both congruent and thick, especially in sauropods. We suggest that gigantism occurs less frequently in mammals, in part, because joints composed of thin articular cartilage can only become so congruent before stress cannot be effectively alleviated. In contrast, frequent gigantism in saurischian dinosaurs may be explained, in part, by joints with thick articular cartilage that can deform across large areas with increasing load.

  8. Ancient exaptation of a CORE-SINE retroposon into a highly conserved mammalian neuronal enhancer of the proopiomelanocortin gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea M Santangelo

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The proopiomelanocortin gene (POMC is expressed in the pituitary gland and the ventral hypothalamus of all jawed vertebrates, producing several bioactive peptides that function as peripheral hormones or central neuropeptides, respectively. We have recently determined that mouse and human POMC expression in the hypothalamus is conferred by the action of two 5' distal and unrelated enhancers, nPE1 and nPE2. To investigate the evolutionary origin of the neuronal enhancer nPE2, we searched available vertebrate genome databases and determined that nPE2 is a highly conserved element in placentals, marsupials, and monotremes, whereas it is absent in nonmammalian vertebrates. Following an in silico paleogenomic strategy based on genome-wide searches for paralog sequences, we discovered that opossum and wallaby nPE2 sequences are highly similar to members of the superfamily of CORE-short interspersed nucleotide element (SINE retroposons, in particular to MAR1 retroposons that are widely present in marsupial genomes. Thus, the neuronal enhancer nPE2 originated from the exaptation of a CORE-SINE retroposon in the lineage leading to mammals and remained under purifying selection in all mammalian orders for the last 170 million years. Expression studies performed in transgenic mice showed that two nonadjacent nPE2 subregions are essential to drive reporter gene expression into POMC hypothalamic neurons, providing the first functional example of an exapted enhancer derived from an ancient CORE-SINE retroposon. In addition, we found that this CORE-SINE family of retroposons is likely to still be active in American and Australian marsupial genomes and that several highly conserved exonic, intronic and intergenic sequences in the human genome originated from the exaptation of CORE-SINE retroposons. Together, our results provide clear evidence of the functional novelties that transposed elements contributed to their host genomes throughout evolution.

  9. Territorial Behavior and Social Stability in the Mouse Require Correct Expression of Imprinted Cdkn1c

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    Gráinne I. McNamara

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Genomic imprinting, the epigenetic process by which transcription occurs from a single parental allele, is believed to influence social behaviors in mammals. An important social behavior is group living, which is enriched in Eutherian mammals relative to monotremes and marsupials. Group living facilitates resource acquisition, defense of territory and co-care of young, but requires a stable social group with complex inter-individual relationships. Co-occurring with increased group living in Eutherians is an increase in the number of imprinted loci, including that spanning the maternally expressed Cdkn1c. Using a ‘loss-of-imprinting’ model of Cdkn1c (Cdkn1cBACx1, we demonstrated that twofold over expression of Cdkn1c results in abnormal social behaviors. Although, our previous work indicated that male Cdkn1cBACx1 mice were more dominant as measured by tube test encounters with unfamiliar wild-type (WT males. Building upon this work, using more ecologically relevant assessments of social dominance, indicated that within their normal social group, Cdkn1cBACx1 mice did not occupy higher ranking positions. Nevertheless, we find that presence of Cdkn1cBACx1 animals within a group leads to instability of the normal social hierarchy, as indicated by greater variability in social rank within the group over time and an increase in territorial behavior in WT cage-mates. Consequently, these abnormal behaviors led to an increased incidence of fighting and wounding within the group. Taken together these data indicate that normal expression of Cdkn1c is required for maintaining stability of the social group and suggests that the acquisition of monoallelic expression of Cdkn1c may have enhanced social behavior in Eutherian mammals to facilitate group living.

  10. Tracing the Origins of IgE, Mast Cells, and Allergies by Studies of Wild Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Lars Torkel; Akula, Srinivas; Thorpe, Michael; Fu, Zhirong

    2017-01-01

    In most industrialized countries, allergies have increased in frequency quite dramatically during the past 50 years. Estimates show that 20-30% of the populations are affected. Allergies have thereby become one of the major medical challenges of the twenty-first century. Despite several theories including the hygiene hypothesis, there are still very few solid clues concerning the causes of this increase. To trace the origins of allergies, we have studied cells and molecules of importance for the development of IgE-mediated allergies, including the repertoire of immunoglobulin genes. These studies have shown that IgE and IgG most likely appeared by a gene duplication of IgY in an early mammal, possibly 220-300 million years ago. Receptors specific for IgE and IgG subsequently appeared in parallel with the increase in Ig isotypes from a subfamily of the recently identified Fc receptor-like molecules. Circulating IgE levels are generally very low in humans and laboratory rodents. However, when dogs and Scandinavian wolfs were analyzed, IgE levels were found to be 100-200 times higher compared to humans, indicating a generally much more active IgE synthesis in free-living animals, most likely connected to intestinal parasite infections. One of the major effector molecules released upon IgE-mediated activation by mast cells are serine proteases. These proteases, which belong to the large family of hematopoietic serine proteases, are extremely abundant and can account for up to 35% of the total cellular protein. Recent studies show that several of these enzymes, including the chymases and tryptases, are old. Ancestors for these enzymes were most likely present in an early mammal more than 200 million years ago before the separation of the three extant mammalian lineages; monotremes, marsupials, and placental mammals. The aim is now to continue these studies of mast cell biology and IgE to obtain additional clues to their evolutionary conserved functions. A focus

  11. Tracing the Origins of IgE, Mast Cells, and Allergies by Studies of Wild Animals

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    Lars Torkel Hellman

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In most industrialized countries, allergies have increased in frequency quite dramatically during the past 50 years. Estimates show that 20–30% of the populations are affected. Allergies have thereby become one of the major medical challenges of the twenty-first century. Despite several theories including the hygiene hypothesis, there are still very few solid clues concerning the causes of this increase. To trace the origins of allergies, we have studied cells and molecules of importance for the development of IgE-mediated allergies, including the repertoire of immunoglobulin genes. These studies have shown that IgE and IgG most likely appeared by a gene duplication of IgY in an early mammal, possibly 220–300 million years ago. Receptors specific for IgE and IgG subsequently appeared in parallel with the increase in Ig isotypes from a subfamily of the recently identified Fc receptor-like molecules. Circulating IgE levels are generally very low in humans and laboratory rodents. However, when dogs and Scandinavian wolfs were analyzed, IgE levels were found to be 100–200 times higher compared to humans, indicating a generally much more active IgE synthesis in free-living animals, most likely connected to intestinal parasite infections. One of the major effector molecules released upon IgE-mediated activation by mast cells are serine proteases. These proteases, which belong to the large family of hematopoietic serine proteases, are extremely abundant and can account for up to 35% of the total cellular protein. Recent studies show that several of these enzymes, including the chymases and tryptases, are old. Ancestors for these enzymes were most likely present in an early mammal more than 200 million years ago before the separation of the three extant mammalian lineages; monotremes, marsupials, and placental mammals. The aim is now to continue these studies of mast cell biology and IgE to obtain additional clues to their evolutionary conserved

  12. The evolution of milk secretion and its ancient origins.

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    Oftedal, O T

    2012-03-01

    Lactation represents an important element of the life history strategies of all mammals, whether monotreme, marsupial, or eutherian. Milk originated as a glandular skin secretion in synapsids (the lineage ancestral to mammals), perhaps as early as the Pennsylvanian period, that is, approximately 310 million years ago (mya). Early synapsids laid eggs with parchment-like shells intolerant of desiccation and apparently dependent on glandular skin secretions for moisture. Mammary glands probably evolved from apocrine-like glands that combined multiple modes of secretion and developed in association with hair follicles. Comparative analyses of the evolutionary origin of milk constituents support a scenario in which these secretions evolved into a nutrient-rich milk long before mammals arose. A variety of antimicrobial and secretory constituents were co-opted into novel roles related to nutrition of the young. Secretory calcium-binding phosphoproteins may originally have had a role in calcium delivery to eggs; however, by evolving into large, complex casein micelles, they took on an important role in transport of amino acids, calcium and phosphorus. Several proteins involved in immunity, including an ancestral butyrophilin and xanthine oxidoreductase, were incorporated into a novel membrane-bound lipid droplet (the milk fat globule) that became a primary mode of energy transfer. An ancestral c-lysozyme lost its lytic functions in favor of a role as α-lactalbumin, which modifies a galactosyltransferase to recognize glucose as an acceptor, leading to the synthesis of novel milk sugars, of which free oligosaccharides may have predated free lactose. An ancestral lipocalin and an ancestral whey acidic protein four-disulphide core protein apparently lost their original transport and antimicrobial functions when they became the whey proteins β-lactoglobulin and whey acidic protein, which with α-lactalbumin provide limiting sulfur amino acids to the young. By the late

  13. Molecular evolution of the polyamine oxidase gene family in Metazoa

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    Polticelli Fabio

    2012-06-01

    monophyletic clades including, respectively, all the SMOs and APAOs from vertebrates. The two vertebrate monophyletic clades clustered strictly mirroring the organismal phylogeny of fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Evidences from comparative genomic analysis, structural evolution and functional divergence in a phylogenetic framework across Metazoa suggested an evolutionary scenario where the ancestor PAO coding sequence, present in invertebrates as an orthologous gene, has been duplicated in the vertebrate branch to originate the paralogous SMO and APAO genes. A further genome evolution event concerns the SMO gene of placental, but not marsupial and monotremate, mammals which increased its functional variation following an alternative splicing (AS mechanism. Conclusions In this study the explicit integration in a phylogenomic framework of phylogenetic tree construction, structure prediction, and biochemical function data/prediction, allowed inferring the molecular evolutionary history of the PAO gene family and to disambiguate paralogous genes related by duplication event (SMO and APAO and orthologous genes related by speciation events (PAOs, SMOs/APAOs. Further, while in vertebrates experimental data corroborate SMO and APAO molecular function predictions, in invertebrates the finding of a supported phylogenetic clusters of insect PAOs and the co-occurrence of two PAO variants in the amphioxus urgently claim the need for future structure-function studies.

  14. Paleobiogeografía y paleoecología de los mamíferos continentales de América del Sur durante el Cretácico tardío-Paleoceno: una revisión

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    Ortiz Jaureguizar, E.

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to outline the most recent advances in the knowledge of paleobiogeography and paleoecology of the South American continental mammals during the late Cretaceous-Paleocene span. Two basic parameters were considered: (1 taxonomic richness; and (2 trophic diversity. The genera recorded in the four «land-mammal Ages» (SALMAs that represent the late Cretaceous-Paleocene span, i.e., Alamitian (late Cretaceous, Tiupampian (early Paleocene, Itaboraian (middle Paleocene, and Riochican (late Paleocene, were used as analytical units. As conclusion, is possible to point out that: 1 During the Alamitian SALMA the faunistic composition of South America was markedly different of that of the holarctic continents, due to the exclusive presence of pre-tribosphenic taxa of pangeic jurassic ancestry, although mostly showing a marked degree of endemism. 2 The tiupampian fauna was basically characterized by the absence of most of the alamitian pre-tribosphenic groups (except the gondwanatherian «multituberculates» and by the presence of a «mix» of taxa with narrow relationships with North America (e.g., pantodonts in association with other proper of South America but with holarctic (e.g., marsupial s or eastern gondwanic ancestry (i.e., monotremes. 3 The most marked compositional change in the South American mammal fauna was recorded between the Alamitian and Tiupampian SALMAs. 4 Beginning to the Itaboraian SALMA, the South American mammal fauna newly shows a marked endemic character that will distinguish all the continental mammal faunas throughout the rest of the Cenozoico 5 The absence of xenarthrans in the pre-itaboraian mammal- bearing sediments is particularly surprising. 6 The diversity of trophic types increases from Alamitian to Riochican SALMAs, because of the progressive occupation of the empty adaptive zones after the dinosaurs extinction, and the opening of new ones. 7 The «cast- of the trophic types