WorldWideScience

Sample records for monomethyl ester cyclase

  1. Identification of the chlE gene encoding oxygen-independent Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester cyclase in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanashi, Kaori; Minamizaki, Kei; Fujita, Yuichi

    2015-08-07

    The fifth ring (E-ring) of chlorophyll (Chl) a is produced by Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester (MPE) cyclase. There are two evolutionarily unrelated MPE cyclases: oxygen-independent (BchE) and oxygen-dependent (ChlA/AcsF) MPE cyclases. Although ChlA is the sole MPE cyclase in Synechocystis PCC 6803, it is yet unclear whether BchE exists in cyanobacteria. A BLAST search suggests that only few cyanobacteria possess bchE. Here, we report that two bchE candidate genes from Cyanothece strains PCC 7425 and PCC 7822 restore the photosynthetic growth and bacteriochlorophyll production in a bchE-lacking mutant of Rhodobacter capsulatus. We termed these cyanobacterial bchE orthologs "chlE."

  2. Mutation in Mg-Protoporphyrin IX Monomethyl Ester Cyclase Decreases Photosynthesis Capacity in Rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuexia; Huang, Rongfeng; Quan, Ruidang

    2017-01-01

    In photosynthesis, the pigments chlorophyll a/b absorb light energy to convert to chemical energy in chloroplasts. Though most enzymes of chlorophyll biosynthesis from glutamyl-tRNA to chlorophyll a/b have been identified, the exact composition and regulation of the multimeric enzyme Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester cyclase (MPEC) is largely unknown. In this study, we isolated a rice pale-green leaf mutant m167 with yellow-green leaf phenotype across the whole lifespan. Chlorophyll content decreases 43–51% and the granal stacks of chloroplasts becomes thinner in m167. Chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, including Fv/Fm (the maximum quantum efficiency of PSII) and quantum yield of PSII (Y(II)), were lower in m167 than those in wild type plants (WT), and photosynthesis rate decreases 40% in leaves of m167 mutant compared with WT plants, which lead to yield reduction in m167. Genetic analysis revealed that yellow-green leaf phenotype of m167 is controlled by a single recessive genetic locus. By positional cloning, a single mutated locus, G286A (Alanine 96 to Threonine in protein), was found in the coding sequence of LOC_Os01g17170 (Rice Copper Response Defect 1, OsCRD1), encoding a putative subunit of MPEC. Expression profile analysis demonstrated that OsCRD1 is mainly expressed in green tissues of rice. Sequence alignment analysis of CRD1 indicated that Alanine 96 is very conserved in all green plants and photosynthetic bacteria. OsCRD1 protein mainly locates in chloroplast and the point mutation A96T in OsCRD1 does not change its location. Therefore, Alanine96 of OsCRD1 might be fundamental for MPEC activity, mutation of which leads to deficiency in chlorophyll biosynthesis and chloroplast development and decreases photosynthetic capacity in rice. PMID:28129387

  3. The magnesium-protoporphyrin IX (oxidative) cyclase system. Studies on the mechanism and specificity of the reaction sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C J; Mansfield, K E; Rezzano, I N; Hanamoto, C M; Smith, K M; Castelfranco, P A

    1988-10-15

    Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester cyclase activity was assayed in isolated developing cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. var. Beit Alpha) chloroplasts [Chereskin, Wong & Castelfranco (1982) Plant Physiol. 70, 987-993]. The presence of both 6- and 7-methyl esterase activities was detected, which permitted the use of diester porphyrins in a substrate-specificity study. It was found that: (1) the 6-methyl acrylate derivative of Mg-protoporphyrin monomethyl ester was inactive as a substrate for cyclization; (2) only one of the two enantiomers of 6-beta-hydroxy-Mg-protoporphyrin dimethyl ester had detectable activity as a substrate for the cyclase; (3) the 2-vinyl-4-ethyl-6-beta-oxopropionate derivatives of Mg-protoporphyrin mono- or di-methyl ester were approx. 4 times more active as substrates for cyclization than the corresponding divinyl forms; (4) at the level of Mg-protoporphyrin there was no difference in cyclase activity between the 4-vinyl and 4-ethyl substrates; (5) reduction of the side chain of Mg-protoporphyrin in the 2-position from a vinyl to an ethyl resulted in a partial loss of cyclase activity. This work suggests that the original scheme for cyclization proposed by Granick [(1950) Harvey Lect. 44, 220-245] should now be modified by the omission of the 6-methyl acrylate derivative of Mg-protoporphyrin monomethyl ester and the introduction of stereo-specificity at the level of the hydroxylated intermediate.

  4. NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase and 2-Cys peroxiredoxins are needed for the protection of Mg-protoporphyrin monomethyl ester cyclase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenbæk, Anne; Hansson, Andreas; Wulff, Ragna Peterson

    2008-01-01

    . These findings support the hypothesis that this NADPH-dependent hydrogen peroxide scavenging system is particularly important during periods with limited reducing power from photosynthesis, e. g. under chloroplast biogenesis. (c) 2008 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All...... rights reserved....

  5. SwissProt search result: AK059435 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK059435 001-027-F10 (P51277) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_PORPU 1e-125 ...

  6. Cluster (Cyanobacteria): 35823:1616 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 35823:1616 Aerobic magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester (oxidative) cyclase... (Aerobic Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) 1150:4785 118562:2193|129910:1313|376219:2106 ...

  7. SwissProt search result: AK069333 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069333 J023014B03 (P51277) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_PORPU 1e-125 ...

  8. Cluster (Cyanobacteria): 1117:315 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1117:315 Aerobic magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester (oxidative) cyclase (...Aerobic Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) 1118:156|1161:2697|1150:4785|52604:2287|1189:1741|307596:2369|1212:1702 ...

  9. SwissProt search result: AK058287 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK058287 001-013-E02 (P51277) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_PORPU 1e-125 ...

  10. SwissProt search result: AK110370 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK110370 002-165-B09 (P51277) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_PORPU 1e-111 ...

  11. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 17676 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_09781941.1 1117:315 1150:4785 35823:1616 376219:2106 Aerobic magnesium-protoporp...hyrin IX monomethyl ester (oxidative) cyclase (Aerobic Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cycla

  12. Plant adenylate cyclases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomovatskaya, Lidiya A; Romanenko, Anatoliy S; Filinova, Nadejda V

    2008-01-01

    Adenylate cyclase (AC) (ATP diphosphate-lyase cyclizing; EC 4.6.1.1) is a key component of the adenylate cyclase signaling system and catalyzes the generation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) from ATP. This review summarizes data from the literature and the authors' laboratory on the investigation of plant transmembrane (tmAC) and soluble (sAC) adenylate cyclases, in comparison with some key characteristics of adenylate cyclases of animal cells. Plant sAC has been demonstrated to exhibit similarities with animal sAC with respect to certain characteristics. External factors, such as far-red and red light, temperature, exogenous phytohormones, as well as specific triggering compounds of fungal and bacterial origin exert a significant influence on the activity of plant tmAC and sAC.

  13. Evaluation of workers exposed to ethylene glycol monomethyl ether and ethylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jiyoung; Yoon, Chungsik; Byun, Hyaejeong; Kim, Yangho; Park, Donguk; Ha, Kwonchul; Lee, Sang man; Park, Sungki; Chung, Eunkyo

    2012-01-01

    Ethylene glycol monomethyl ether (EGME) and ethylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate (EGMEA) are widely used in industries as solvents for coatings, paint and ink, but exposure data are limited because they are minor components out of mixed solvents, as well as because of inconsistency in desorption solvent use. The objective of this study was to investigate the worker exposure profile of EGME and EGMEA. Our study investigated 27 workplaces from June to September 2008 and detected EGME and EGMEA in 20 and 13, respectively. Both personal and area sampling were conducted using a charcoal tube to collect EGME and EGMEA. Gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector was used to analyze these compounds after desorption using a mixture of methylene chloride and methanol. The arithmetic mean concentrations of EGME and EGMEA during periods of full work shifts were 2.59 ppm and 0.33 ppm, respectively. The exposure levels were lower than the Korean Ministry of Labor (MOL) OEL (5 ppm) but higher than the ACGIH TLV (0.1 ppm). In general, the working environments were poor and required much improvement, including the use of personal protective equipment. Only 50% of the workplaces had local exhaust ventilation systems in operation. The average capture velocity of the operating local exhaust ventilation systems was 0.27 m/s, which did not meet the legal requirement of 0.5 m/s. Educating workers to clearly understand the handling and use of hazardous chemicals and improving working conditions are strongly suggested.

  14. Rapeseed Oil Monoester of Ethylene Glycol Monomethyl Ether as a New Biodiesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Dayong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel biodiesel named rapeseed oil monoester of ethylene glycol monomethyl ether is developed. This fuel has one more ester group than the traditional biodiesel. The fuel was synthesized and structurally identified through FT-IR and P1PH NMR analyses. Engine test results show that when a tested diesel engine is fueled with this biodiesel in place of 0# diesel fuel, engine-out smoke emissions can be decreased by 25.0%–75.0%, CO emissions can be reduced by 50.0%, and unburned HC emissions are lessened significantly. However, NOx emissions generally do not change noticeably. In the area of combustion performance, both engine in-cylinder pressure and its changing rate with crankshaft angle are increased to some extent. Rapeseed oil monoester of ethylene glycol monomethyl ether has a much higher cetane number and shorter ignition delay, leading to autoignition 1.1°CA earlier than diesel fuel during engine operation. Because of certain amount of oxygen contained in the new biodiesel, the engine thermal efficiency is improved 13.5%–20.4% when fueled with the biodiesel compared with diesel fuel.

  15. SwissProt search result: AK069333 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069333 J023014B03 (Q8YX57) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase 1 (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase 1) ACSF1_ANASP 1e-102 ...

  16. SwissProt search result: AK110370 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK110370 002-165-B09 (Q7VBV0) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_PROMA 1e-59 ...

  17. SwissProt search result: AK059435 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK059435 001-027-F10 (Q8DI68) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase 2 (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase 2) ACSF2_SYNEL 1e-103 ...

  18. SwissProt search result: AK058287 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK058287 001-013-E02 (Q8DI68) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase 2 (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase 2) ACSF2_SYNEL 1e-103 ...

  19. SwissProt search result: AK059435 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK059435 001-027-F10 (Q85FX6) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_CYAME 1e-110 ...

  20. SwissProt search result: AK061646 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK061646 001-036-B09 (Q9TLR8) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_CYACA 1e-13 ...

  1. SwissProt search result: AK059435 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK059435 001-027-F10 (Q6N9J7) Aerobic magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Aerobic Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_RHOPA 6e-78 ...

  2. SwissProt search result: AK058287 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK058287 001-013-E02 (Q8YRZ2) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase 3 (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase 3) ACSF3_ANASP 1e-128 ...

  3. SwissProt search result: AK061646 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK061646 001-036-B09 (Q6SJV8) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase, chloroplast precursor (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) CRD1_GOSHI 8e-54 ...

  4. SwissProt search result: AK069333 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069333 J023014B03 (P74134) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase 2 (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase 2) ACSF2_SYNY3 1e-105 ...

  5. SwissProt search result: AK110370 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK110370 002-165-B09 (Q9TLR8) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_CYACA 1e-107 ...

  6. SwissProt search result: AK058287 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK058287 001-013-E02 (Q7V1M1) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_PROMP 1e-102 ...

  7. SwissProt search result: AK058287 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK058287 001-013-E02 (P72584) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase 1 (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase 1) ACSF1_SYNY3 1e-124 ...

  8. SwissProt search result: AK059435 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK059435 001-027-F10 (Q7VBV0) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_PROMA 1e-62 ...

  9. SwissProt search result: AK110370 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK110370 002-165-B09 (Q7V3Y9) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_PROMM 3e-58 ...

  10. SwissProt search result: AK059435 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK059435 001-027-F10 (Q6B8U1) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_GRATL 1e-123 ...

  11. SwissProt search result: AK110370 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK110370 002-165-B09 (Q8VPB5) Aerobic magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Aerobic Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_RHOGE 2e-69 ...

  12. SwissProt search result: AK058287 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK058287 001-013-E02 (Q8DJ05) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase 1 (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase 1) ACSF1_SYNEL 1e-112 ...

  13. SwissProt search result: AK110370 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK110370 002-165-B09 (Q6B8U1) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_GRATL 1e-110 ...

  14. SwissProt search result: AK110370 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK110370 002-165-B09 (Q5MZZ2) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_SYNP6 1e-111 ...

  15. SwissProt search result: AK059435 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK059435 001-027-F10 (P74134) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase 2 (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase 2) ACSF2_SYNY3 1e-105 ...

  16. SwissProt search result: AK061646 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK061646 001-036-B09 (Q8YRZ2) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase 3 (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase 3) ACSF3_ANASP 2e-18 ...

  17. SwissProt search result: AK059435 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK059435 001-027-F10 (P72584) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase 1 (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase 1) ACSF1_SYNY3 1e-124 ...

  18. SwissProt search result: AK069333 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069333 J023014B03 (P72584) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase 1 (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase 1) ACSF1_SYNY3 1e-124 ...

  19. SwissProt search result: AK058287 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK058287 001-013-E02 (Q7V3Y9) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_PROMM 2e-60 ...

  20. SwissProt search result: AK059435 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK059435 001-027-F10 (Q8VPB5) Aerobic magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Aerobic Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_RHOGE 1e-70 ...

  1. SwissProt search result: AK110370 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK110370 002-165-B09 (Q8DJ05) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase 1 (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase 1) ACSF1_SYNEL 1e-108 ...

  2. SwissProt search result: AK058287 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK058287 001-013-E02 (Q7NFA1) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_GLOVI 1e-101 ...

  3. SwissProt search result: AK110370 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK110370 002-165-B09 (Q7NFA1) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_GLOVI 5e-96 ...

  4. SwissProt search result: AK069333 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069333 J023014B03 (Q8YVU4) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase 2 (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase 2) ACSF2_ANASP 1e-103 ...

  5. SwissProt search result: AK069333 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069333 J023014B03 (Q5MZZ2) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_SYNP6 1e-117 ...

  6. SwissProt search result: AK110370 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK110370 002-165-B09 (Q8YX57) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase 1 (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase 1) ACSF1_ANASP 1e-102 ...

  7. SwissProt search result: AK058287 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK058287 001-013-E02 (Q8YX57) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase 1 (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase 1) ACSF1_ANASP 1e-103 ...

  8. SwissProt search result: AK058287 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK058287 001-013-E02 (Q5EFU4) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase, chloroplast precursor (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) (Protein Xantha-l) CRD1_HORVU 0.0 ...

  9. SwissProt search result: AK110370 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK110370 002-165-B09 (Q7V1M1) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_PROMP 1e-101 ...

  10. SwissProt search result: AK059435 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK059435 001-027-F10 (Q8YX57) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase 1 (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase 1) ACSF1_ANASP 1e-102 ...

  11. SwissProt search result: AK069333 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069333 J023014B03 (Q8YRZ2) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase 3 (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase 3) ACSF3_ANASP 1e-128 ...

  12. SwissProt search result: AK069333 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069333 J023014B03 (Q5EFU4) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase, chloroplast precursor (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) (Protein Xantha-l) CRD1_HORVU 0.0 ...

  13. SwissProt search result: AK061646 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK061646 001-036-B09 (Q8YX57) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase 1 (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase 1) ACSF1_ANASP 2e-13 ...

  14. SwissProt search result: AK059435 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK059435 001-027-F10 (Q6SJV8) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase, chloroplast precursor (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) CRD1_GOSHI 0.0 ...

  15. SwissProt search result: AK061646 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK061646 001-036-B09 (Q85FX6) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_CYAME 8e-11 ...

  16. SwissProt search result: AK061646 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK061646 001-036-B09 (Q5EFU4) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase, chloroplast precursor (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) (Protein Xantha-l) CRD1_HORVU 1e-52 ...

  17. SwissProt search result: AK061646 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK061646 001-036-B09 (P74134) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase 2 (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase 2) ACSF2_SYNY3 1e-15 ...

  18. SwissProt search result: AK059435 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK059435 001-027-F10 (Q7U6Y8) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_SYNPX 1e-113 ...

  19. SwissProt search result: AK061646 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK061646 001-036-B09 (Q7NFA1) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_GLOVI 2e-12 ...

  20. SwissProt search result: AK069333 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069333 J023014B03 (Q945B7) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase, chloroplast precursor (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) CRD1_EUPES 0.0 ...

  1. SwissProt search result: AK069333 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069333 J023014B03 (Q8DI68) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase 2 (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase 2) ACSF2_SYNEL 1e-103 ...

  2. SwissProt search result: AK059435 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK059435 001-027-F10 (Q8DJ05) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase 1 (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase 1) ACSF1_SYNEL 1e-111 ...

  3. SwissProt search result: AK069333 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069333 J023014B03 (Q8DJ05) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase 1 (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase 1) ACSF1_SYNEL 1e-111 ...

  4. SwissProt search result: AK069333 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069333 J023014B03 (Q7V1M1) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_PROMP 1e-102 ...

  5. SwissProt search result: AK059435 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK059435 001-027-F10 (Q8YRZ2) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase 3 (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase 3) ACSF3_ANASP 1e-128 ...

  6. SwissProt search result: AK110370 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK110370 002-165-B09 (Q945B7) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase, chloroplast precursor (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) CRD1_EUPES 1e-141 ...

  7. SwissProt search result: AK110370 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK110370 002-165-B09 (Q8YVU4) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase 2 (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase 2) ACSF2_ANASP 1e-103 ...

  8. SwissProt search result: AK069333 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069333 J023014B03 (Q7U6Y8) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_SYNPX 1e-113 ...

  9. SwissProt search result: AK061646 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK061646 001-036-B09 (Q6B8U1) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_GRATL 2e-17 ...

  10. SwissProt search result: AK110370 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK110370 002-165-B09 (P72584) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase 1 (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase 1) ACSF1_SYNY3 1e-120 ...

  11. SwissProt search result: AK069333 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069333 J023014B03 (Q7NFA1) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_GLOVI 1e-101 ...

  12. SwissProt search result: AK059435 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK059435 001-027-F10 (Q8YVU4) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase 2 (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase 2) ACSF2_ANASP 1e-103 ...

  13. SwissProt search result: AK061646 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK061646 001-036-B09 (Q8DJ05) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase 1 (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase 1) ACSF1_SYNEL 3e-16 ...

  14. SwissProt search result: AK061646 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK061646 001-036-B09 (Q8DI68) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase 2 (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase 2) ACSF2_SYNEL 8e-17 ...

  15. SwissProt search result: AK059435 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK059435 001-027-F10 (Q7V1M1) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_PROMP 1e-102 ...

  16. SwissProt search result: AK058287 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK058287 001-013-E02 (Q8YVU4) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase 2 (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase 2) ACSF2_ANASP 1e-103 ...

  17. SwissProt search result: AK058287 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK058287 001-013-E02 (P74134) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase 2 (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase 2) ACSF2_SYNY3 1e-105 ...

  18. SwissProt search result: AK110370 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK110370 002-165-B09 (Q8YRZ2) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase 3 (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase 3) ACSF3_ANASP 1e-118 ...

  19. SwissProt search result: AK069333 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069333 J023014B03 (Q8VPB5) Aerobic magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Aerobic Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_RHOGE 8e-71 ...

  20. SwissProt search result: AK058287 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK058287 001-013-E02 (Q8VPB5) Aerobic magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Aerobic Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_RHOGE 7e-71 ...

  1. SwissProt search result: AK058287 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK058287 001-013-E02 (Q5MZZ2) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_SYNP6 1e-117 ...

  2. SwissProt search result: AK058287 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK058287 001-013-E02 (Q945B7) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase, chloroplast precursor (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) CRD1_EUPES 0.0 ...

  3. SwissProt search result: AK069333 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069333 J023014B03 (Q6SJV8) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase, chloroplast precursor (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) CRD1_GOSHI 0.0 ...

  4. SwissProt search result: AK061646 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK061646 001-036-B09 (Q7U6Y8) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_SYNPX 5e-17 ...

  5. SwissProt search result: AK069333 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069333 J023014B03 (Q7VBV0) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_PROMA 8e-63 ...

  6. SwissProt search result: AK110370 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK110370 002-165-B09 (Q8DI68) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase 2 (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase 2) ACSF2_SYNEL 1e-100 ...

  7. SwissProt search result: AK061646 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK061646 001-036-B09 (Q8YVU4) Magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [oxidative...] cyclase 2 (EC 1.14.13.81) (Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase 2) ACSF2_ANASP 4e-11 ...

  8. SwissProt search result: AK058287 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK058287 001-013-E02 (Q6N9J7) Aerobic magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester ...[oxidative] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Aerobic Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_RHOPA 5e-78 ...

  9. SwissProt search result: AK069333 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069333 J023014B03 (Q6N9J7) Aerobic magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester [...oxidative] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Aerobic Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_RHOPA 5e-78 ...

  10. SwissProt search result: AK110370 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK110370 002-165-B09 (Q6N9J7) Aerobic magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester ...[oxidative] cyclase (EC 1.14.13.81) (Aerobic Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase) ACSF_RHOPA 5e-74 ...

  11. 76 FR 69659 - Methacrylic Acid-Methyl Methacrylate-Polyethylene Glycol Monomethyl Ether Methacrylate Graft...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 Methacrylic Acid-Methyl Methacrylate-Polyethylene Glycol Monomethyl Ether... residues of methacrylic acid-methyl methacrylate- polyethylene glycol monomethyl ether methacrylate graft... permissible level for residues of methacrylic acid-methyl methacrylate-polyethylene glycol monomethyl...

  12. Guanylate cyclase in Dictyostelium discoideum with the topology of mammalian adenylate cyclase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, J; Snippe, H; Kleineidam, RG; Van Haastert, PJM

    2001-01-01

    The core of adenylate and guanylate cyclases is formed by an intramolecular ol intermolecular dimer of two cyclase domains arranged in an antiparallel fashion. Metazoan membrane-bound adenylate cyclases are composed of 12 transmembrane spanning regions, and two cyclase domains which function as a he

  13. Ester Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopez Garzon, C.S.; Straathof, A.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    The present invention is in the field of a process for producing an ester, such as a biobased ester, from an aqueous biomass comprising solution, batch wise or continuously, wherein use of raw material is limited and if possible re-used. The present invention is in the field of green technology.

  14. Ester Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopez Garzon, C.S.; Straathof, A.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    The present invention is in the field of a process for producing an ester, such as a biobased ester, from an aqueous biomass comprising solution, batch wise or continuously, wherein use of raw material is limited and if possible re-used. The present invention is in the field of green technology.

  15. Degradation of the Alternaria mycotoxins alternariol, alternariol monomethyl ether, and altenuene upon bread baking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, David; Feist, Michael; Proske, Matthias; Koch, Matthias; Nehls, Irene

    2010-09-01

    The stability of the Alternaria mycotoxins alternariol, alternariol monomethyl ether, and altenuene upon bread baking was investigated by model experiments using a spiked wholemeal wheat flour matrix. For alternariol and alternariol monomethyl ether, but not for altenuene, degradation products, formed through a sequence of hydrolysis and decarboxylation, could be identified in pilot studies. The simultaneous quantification of alternariol, alternariol monomethyl ether, altenuene, and the degradation products was achieved by a newly developed high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) multimethod. The obtained quantitative data indicate that the Alternaria mycotoxins are barely degraded during wet baking, while significant degradation occurs upon dry baking, with the stability decreasing in the order alternariol monomethyl ether>alternariol>altenuene. The novel degradation products could be detected after the wet baking of flour spiked with alternariol and in a sample survey of 24 commercial cereal based baking products.

  16. Chitosan grafted monomethyl fumaric acid as a potential food preservative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Imran; Ullah, Shafi; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2016-11-01

    The present study aims at in vitro antibacterial and antioxidant activity evaluation of chitosan modified with monomethyl fumaric acid (MFA) using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) as mediator. Three different kinds of chitosan derivatives Ch-Ds-1,Ch-Ds-2 and Ch-Ds-3 were synthesized by feeding different concentration of MFA. The chemical structures of resulting materials were characterized by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, HR-XRD, FT-IR and TNBS assay. The results showed that Ch-Ds-1, Ch-Ds-2 and Ch-Ds-3 were successfully synthesized. The % amino groups of chitosan modified by MFA were evaluated by TNBS assay and ranging from 1.82±0.05% to 7.88±0.04%. All the chitosan derivatives are readily soluble in water and swelled by dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), toluene and dimethyl formamide (DMF). The antioxidant activity for all the chitosan derivatives have been significantly improved (Pfood preservative and packaging material for long time food safety and security.

  17. Chronic exposures to monomethyl phthalate in Western clawed frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu-Denoncourt, Justine; de Solla, Shane R; Langlois, Valerie S

    2015-08-01

    Polymer flexibility and elasticity is enhanced by plasticizers. However, plasticizers are often not covalently bound to plastics and thus can leach from products into the environment. Much research effort has focused on their effects in mammalian species, but data on aquatic species are scarce. In this study, Western clawed frog (Silurana tropicalis) embryos were exposed to 1.3, 12.3, and 128.7mg/L monomethyl phthalate (MMP) until the juvenile stage (11weeks) and to 1.3mg/L MMP until the adult stage (51weeks). MMP decreased survival, hastened metamorphosis, and biased the sex ratio toward males (2M:1F) at the juvenile stage without altering the expression of a subset of thyroid hormone-, sex steroid-, cellular stress- or transcription regulation-related genes in the juvenile frog livers. At the adult stage, exposure to MMP did not have significant adverse health effects, except that females had larger interocular distance and the expression of the heat shock protein 70 was decreased by 60% in the adult liver. In conclusion, this study shows that MMP is unlikely to threaten amphibian populations as only concentrations four orders of magnitude higher than the reported environmental concentrations altered the animal physiology. This is the first complete investigation of the effects of phthalates in a frog species, encompassing the entire life cycle of the organisms. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Preliminary report of clinical application of hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether in photodynamic therapy for alimentary cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ying; Li, Junheng; Xu, De-Yu; Zhang, Zi-Qi; Huang, Yingcai; Wang, Kai

    1995-03-01

    A new sensitizer, hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME), purified by the Second Military Medical University was used with a gold vapor laser for PDT in 8 cases of alimentary cancers. The results showed that 2 cases of early stage gastric cancer and 1 case of rectal polyps with malignancy revealed CR, SR was obtained in 1 case of esophageal cancer and 4 others were MR. No sunburn occurred within the 8 patients who received 12 doses of HMME at 5 mg/kg 2 - 3 hours prior to laser treatment and who were kept away from sun light only 6 hours. Hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether is an effective single compound and safer for PDT.

  19. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide and migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zagami, Alessandro S; Edvinsson, Lars; Goadsby, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP) is found in human trigeminocervical complex and can trigger migraine. PACAP levels were measured using a sensitive radioimmunoassay. Stimulation of the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) in cat elevated PACAP levels in cranial blood. Patients...

  20. Mechanistic investigations on six bacterial terpene cyclases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Rabe

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The products obtained by incubation of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP with six purified bacterial terpene cyclases were characterised by one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopic methods, allowing for a full structure elucidation. The absolute configurations of four terpenes were determined based on their optical rotary powers. Incubation experiments with 13C-labelled isotopomers of FPP in buffers containing water or deuterium oxide allowed for detailed insights into the cyclisation mechanisms of the bacterial terpene cyclases.

  1. Systemic lupus erythematosus patients contain significantly less igm against mono-methylated lysine than healthy subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha Guo

    Full Text Available Post-translational modifications on proteins are important in biological processes but may create neo-epitopes that induce autoimmune responses. In this study, we measured the serum IgG and IgM response to a set of non-modified or acetyl- and methyl-modified peptides corresponding to residues 1-19 of the histone 3 N-terminal tail in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE patients and healthy subjects. Our results indicated that the SLE patients and healthy subjects produced antibodies (Abs to the peptides, but the two groups had different Ab isotype and epitope preferences. Abs to the non-modified form, H31-19, were of the IgG isotype and produced by SLE patients. They could not recognize the scrambled H31-19, which contained the same amino acid composition but a different sequence as H31-19. In comparison, healthy subjects in general did not produce IgG against H31-19. However, about 70% of the healthy subjects produced IgM Abs against mono-methylated K9 of H31-19 (H31-19K9me. Our further studies revealed that ε-amine mono-methylated lysine could completely inhibit the IgM binding to H31-19K9me, but lysine had no inhibitory effect. In addition, the IgM Abs could bind peptides containing a mono-methylated lysine residue but with totally different sequences. Thus, mono-methylated lysine was the sole epitope for the IgM. Interestingly, SLE patients had much lower levels of this type of IgM. There was no obvious correlation between the IgM levels and disease activity and the decreased IgM was unlikely caused by medical treatments.We also found that the IgM Abs were not polyreactive to dsDNA, ssDNA, lipopolysaccharide (LPS or insulin and they did not exist in umbilical cord serum, implying that they were not natural Abs. The IgM Abs against mono-methylated lysine are present in healthy subjects but are significantly lower in SLE patients, suggesting a distinct origin of production and special physiological functions.

  2. Characterization of two unusual guanylyl cyclases from Dictyostelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, Jeroen; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    2002-01-01

    Guanylyl cyclase A (GCA) and soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) encode GCs in Dictyostelium and have a topology similar to 12-transmembrane and soluble adenylyl cyclase, respectively. We demonstrate that all detectable GC activity is lost in a cell line in which both genes have been inactivated. Cell li

  3. Degradation of Phthalate Esters by Fusarium sp. DMT-5-3 and Trichosporon sp. DMI-5-1 Isolated from Mangrove Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhu-Hua; Pang, Ka-Lai; Wu, Yi-Rui; Gu, Ji-Dong; Chow, Raymond K K; Vrijmoed, L L P

    2012-01-01

    Phthalate esters (PAEs) are important industrial compounds mainly used as plasticizers to increase flexibility and softness of plastic products. PAEs are of major concern because of their widespread use, ubiquity in the environment, and endocrine-disrupting toxicity. In this study, two fungal strains, Fusarium sp. DMT-5-3 and Trichosporon sp. DMI-5-1 which had the capability to degrade dimethyl phthalate esters (DMPEs), were isolated from mangrove sediments in the Futian Nature Reserve of Shenzhen, China, by enrichment culture technique. These fungi were identified on the basis of spore morphology and molecular typing using 18S rDNA sequence. Comparative investigations on the biodegradation of three isomers of DMPEs, namely dimethyl phthalate (DMP), dimethyl isophthalate (DMI), and dimethyl terephthalate (DMT), were carried out with these two fungi. It was found that both fungi could not completely mineralize DMPEs but transform them to the respective monomethyl phthalate or phthalate acid. Biochemical degradation pathways for different DMPE isomers by both fungi were different. Both fungi could transform DMT to monomethyl terephthalate (MMT) and further to terephthalic acid (TA) by stepwise hydrolysis of two ester bonds. However, they could only carry out one-step ester hydrolysis to transform DMI to monomethyl isophthalate (MMI). Further metabolism of MMI did not proceed. Only Trichosporon sp. was able to transform DMP to monomethyl phthalate (MMP) but not Fusarium sp. The optimal pH for DMI and DMT degradation by Fusarium sp. was 6.0 and 4.5, respectively, whereas for Trichosporon sp., the optimal pH for the degradation of all the three DMPE isomers was at 6.0. These results suggest that the fungal esterases responsible for hydrolysis of the two ester bonds of PAEs are highly substrate specific.

  4. Ethylene glycol monomethyl ether (EGME) and propylene glycol monomethyl ether (PGME): inhalation fertility and teratogenicity studies in rats, mice and rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, T R; Young, J T; John, J A; Rao, K S

    1984-08-01

    A combined dominant lethal-fertility study was conducted in which male and female Sprague-Dawley (CD) rats were exposed to 0, 30, 100 or 300 ppm of ethylene glycol monomethyl ether (EGME) vapor for 6 hr/day, 5 days/week for 13 weeks and then mated to untreated counterparts. Among males, fertility was completely suppressed after exposure to 300 ppm. A partial restoration of reproductive function was evident following 13 weeks of recovery. No treatment-related reproductive effects were observed among males exposed subchronically to 100 ppm, or among females exposed to 300 ppm or below of EGME. Studies to assess the effects of inhaled EGME on embryonal and fetal development were also conducted in Fischer 344 rats, CF-1 mice, and New Zealand White rabbits. Rats and rabbits were exposed to concentrations of 0, 3, 10 or 50 ppm for 6 hr/day on days 6-15 or 6-18 of gestation, respectively. Exposure of rabbits to 50 ppm resulted in significant teratologic effects, an increased resorption rate, and decreased fetal body weight. Slight fetotoxicity in the form of skeletal variations were observed among rats exposed to 50 ppm. Exposure of pregnant mice to 0, 10, or 50 ppm for 6 hr/day on days 6-15 of gestation resulted in slight fetotoxicity at 50 ppm. No significant treatment-related effects were observed at 10 ppm of EGME or below in any of the species tested. Separate groups of pregnant rats and rabbits were exposed to 0, 500, 1500 or 3000 ppm of propylene glycol monomethyl ether (PGME) during organogenesis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Ethylene glycol monomethyl ether (EGME) and propylene glycol monomethyl ether (PGME): inhalation fertility and teratogenicity studies in rats, mice and rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanley, T.R. Jr.; Young, J.T.; John, J.A.; Rao, K.S.

    1984-08-01

    A combined dominant lethal-fertility study was conducted in which male and female Sprague-Dawley (CD) rats were exposed to 0, 30, 100, or 300 ppm of ethylene glycol monomethyl ether (EGME) vapor for 6 hr/day, 5 days/week for 13 weeks and then mated to untreated counterparts. Among males, fertility was completely suppressed after exposure to 300 ppm. A partial restoration of reproductive function was evident following 13 weeks of recovery. No treatment-related reproductive effects were observed among males exposed subchronically to 100 ppm, or among females exposed to 300 ppm or below of EGME. Studies to assess the effects of inhaled EGME on embryonal and fetal development were also conducted in Fischer 344 rats. CF-1 mice, and New Zealand White rabbits. Rats and rabbits were exposed to concentrations of 0, 3, 10, or 50 ppm for 6 hr/day on days 6-15 or 6-18 of gestation, respectively. Exposure of rabbits to 50 ppm resulted in significant teratologic effects, an increased resorption rate, and decreased fetal body weight. Slight fetotoxicity in the form of skeletal variations were observed among rats exposed to 50 ppm. Separate groups of pregnant rats and rabbits were exposed to 0, 500, 1500, or 3000 ppm of propylene glycol monomethyl ether (PGME) during organogenesis. Mild CNS depression was observed among rats and rabbits exposed to 3000 ppm of PGME. Fetal examination revealed no embryotoxic or teratogenic effects among either species. Thus, it was concluded that PGME was not teratogenic at exposure levels up to 3000 ppm.

  6. Bicarbonate-Regulated Soluble Adenylyl Cyclase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuttke MS

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC represents a novel form of mammalian adenylyl cyclase structurally, molecularly, and biochemically distinct from the G protein-regulated, transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs. sAC possesses no transmembrane domains and is insensitive to classic modulators of tmACs, such as heterotrimeric G proteins and P site ligands. Thus, sAC defines an independently regulated cAMP signaling system within mammalian cells. sAC is directly stimulated by bicarbonate ion both in vivo in heterologously expressing cells and in vitro using purified protein. sAC appears to be the predominant form of adenylyl cyclase (AC in mammalian sperm, and its direct activation by bicarbonate provides a mechanism for generating the cAMP required to complete the bicarbonate-induced processes necessary for fertilization, including hyperactivated motility, capacitation, and the acrosome reaction. Immunolocalization studies reveal sAC is also abundantly expressed in other tissues which respond to bicarbonate or carbon dioxide levels suggesting it may function as a general bicarbonate/CO(2 sensor throughout the body.

  7. Mycoflora and occurrence of alternariol and alternariol monomethyl ether in Brazilian sunflower from sowing to harvest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, Claudia R; Braghini, Raquel; Arcaro, Juliana R P; Zorzete, Patricia; Israel, Ana Lia M; Pozar, Ivani Otsuk; Denucci, Silmar; Corrêa, Benedito

    2005-07-13

    The present study aimed to analyze the mycoflora and the occurrence of alternariol (AOH) and alternariol monomethyl ether (AME) in grain samples of sunflower during different stages of plant development in Nova Odessa, State of São Paulo, Brazil. The data obtained were correlated with the presence of fungi in soil, wind-dispersed fungi, and the predominant climatic conditions of the region where the experiment was carried out. Analysis of the mycoflora revealed the presence of Fusarium verticillioides and Alternaria alternata in 70% and 46% of the samples, respectively. The profile of wind-dispersed fungi also showed F. verticillioides as the most frequently isolated fungus (68%), although A. alternata was detected in 28% of samples. In soil, Penicillium was the most frequent species (49.9%), followed by F. verticillioides (47.7%) and A. alternata (10.9%). Regarding water activity, sunflower grains presenting a high frequency of isolation of F. verticillioides and A. alternatahad a water activity ranging from 0.92 to 0.96, and statistical analysis revealed a negative linear correlation between the isolation of fungi and water activity. HPLC analysis showed that 18% of the sunflower grains were contaminated with alternariol (24.9-170.9 ng/g) and 10% with alternariol monomethyl ether (14.1-108.6 ng/g). The contamination of sunflower grains with AOH and AME in the field was low when compared to the LD50 necessary to cause toxicity to animals. However, the contamination with other toxigenic fungi such as F. verticillioides may indicate the presence of other mycotoxins in sunflower grains and a possible synergistic effect between them. This is the first report of the natural occurrence of alternariol and alternariol monomethyl ether in sunflower grains in Brazil.

  8. Preparation of diethylene glycol monomethyl ether monolaurate catalyzed by active carbon supported KF/CaO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Shengfeng; Jia, Lihua; Guo, Xiangfeng; Wu, Ping; Gao, Lianbing; Wang, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Diethylene glycol monomethyl ether monolaurate (DGMEML) was synthesized via the reaction of diethylene glycol monomethyl ether (DGME) with methyl laurate (ML) by a new solid base catalyst of KF/CaO/AC, which was prepared by impregnation method using active carbon as carrier. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nitrogen physisorption-desorption and Hammett indicator methods; the effect of the mole ratio of KF to CaO, DGME to ML molar ratio, amount of catalyst, reaction time and temperature on the yield of DGMEML were studied; and the relationship between the structure of the catalyst and the yield of DGMEML was investigated. The formed KCaF3 and K2O were acting as the main active components in the catalytic transesterification; the highest yield of 96.3 % was obtained as KF-to-CaO molar ratio of 2.0, DGME to ML molar ratio of 4.0, catalyst amount of 5 wt%, and reaction time of 30 min at 75 °C; and the catalyst displayed good stability in the transesterification.

  9. Diterpene Cyclases and the Nature of the Isoprene Fold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Rong; Zhang, Yonghui; Mann, Francis M.; Huang, Cancan; Mukkamala, Dushyant; Hudock, Michael P.; Mead, Matthew; Prisic, Sladjana; Wang, Ke; Lin, Fu-Yang; Chang, Ting-Kai; Peters, Reuben; Oldfield, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The structures and mechanism of action of many terpene cyclases are known, but there are no structures of diterpene cyclases. Here, we propose structural models based on bioinformatics, site-directed mutagenesis, domain swapping, enzyme inhibition and spectroscopy that help explain the nature of diterpene cyclase structure, function, and evolution. Bacterial diterpene cyclases contain ∼20 α-helices and the same conserved “QW” and DxDD motifs as in triterpene cyclases, indicating the presence of a βγ barrel structure. Plant diterpene cyclases have a similar catalytic motif and βγ-domain structure together with a third, α-domain, forming an αβγ structure, and in H+-initiated cyclases, there is an EDxxD-like Mg2+/diphosphate binding motif located in the γ-domain. The results support a new view of terpene cyclase structure and function and suggest evolution from ancient (βγ) bacterial triterpene cyclases to (βγ) bacterial and thence to (αβγ) plant diterpene cyclases. PMID:20602361

  10. Modification of chitosan with monomethyl fumaric acid in an ionic liquid solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaodong; Zheng, Liuchun; Li, Chuncheng; Zhang, Dong; Xiao, Yaonan; Guan, Guohu; Zhu, Wenxiang

    2015-03-01

    Antibacterial and antioxidant monomethyl fumaric acid (MFA) was selected to modify chitosan, using aqueous solution of an ionic liquid as a homogeneous and green reaction media. The chemical structures of resulting polymers were systematically characterized by (1)H NMR, diffusion ordered spectroscopy, solid (13)C NMR and wide-angle X-ray diffraction. The results show that two kinds of MFA modified chitosan materials with totally different chemical structures have been synthesized. One product was a MF-chitosan salt composed of chitosan cation and MFA anion, which was obtained with the mediation of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide. The other one synthesized with the mediation of EDC was a MF-chitosan amide in which MFA and chitosan are covalently attached. Solubility of chitosan has been improved, and MF-chitosan salt can be readily dissolved in water. The antioxidant activity has been enhanced with the introduction of MFA, irrespective of the chemical structure.

  11. Developing A New Sampling and Analysis Method for Hydrazine and Monomethyl Hydrazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, John R.

    2002-01-01

    Solid phase microextraction (SPME) will be used to develop a method for detecting monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) and hydrazine (Hz). A derivatizing agent, pentafluorobenzoyl chloride (PFBCl), is known to react readily with MMH and Hz. The SPME fiber can either be coated with PFBCl and introduced into a gaseous stream containing MMH, or PFBCl and MMH can react first in a syringe barrel and after a short equilibration period a SPME is used to sample the resulting solution. These methods were optimized and compared. Because Hz and MMH can degrade the SPME, letting the reaction occur first gave better results. Only MMH could be detected using either of these methods. Future research will concentrate on constructing calibration curves and determining the detection limit.

  12. Structural characterization of aqueous solution poly(oligo(ethylene oxide) monomethyl methacrylate)-grafted silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Arnaldo T; Ponnapati, Ramakrishna; Chatterjee, Tirtha; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan

    2016-01-01

    The structure of aqueous dispersions of poly(oligo(ethylene oxide) monomethyl methacrylate)-grafted silica nanoparticles was characterized using contrast variation small-angle neutron scattering studies. Modeling the low hybrid concentration dispersion scattering data using a fuzzy sphere and a polydisperse core-shell model, demonstrated that the polymer chains are highly swollen in the dispersions as compared to the dimensions of the free polymer chains in dilute solution. At higher hybrid concentrations, the dispersions were well described using a Percus-Yevick approximation to describe the structure factor. These structural characterization tools are excellent starting points for effective molecular level descriptors of dewetting and macroscopic phase transitions for polymer tethered hybrid nanoparticle systems.

  13. Developing A New Sampling and Analysis Method for Hydrazine and Monomethyl Hydrazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, John R.

    2002-01-01

    Solid phase microextraction (SPME) will be used to develop a method for detecting monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) and hydrazine (Hz). A derivatizing agent, pentafluorobenzoyl chloride (PFBCl), is known to react readily with MMH and Hz. The SPME fiber can either be coated with PFBCl and introduced into a gaseous stream containing MMH, or PFBCl and MMH can react first in a syringe barrel and after a short equilibration period a SPME is used to sample the resulting solution. These methods were optimized and compared. Because Hz and MMH can degrade the SPME, letting the reaction occur first gave better results. Only MMH could be detected using either of these methods. Future research will concentrate on constructing calibration curves and determining the detection limit.

  14. Effect of association with adenylyl cyclase-associated protein on the interaction of yeast adenylyl cyclase with Ras protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, F; Yamawaki-Kataoka, Y; Yanagihara, C; Tamada, M; Okada, T; Kariya, K; Kataoka, T

    1997-03-01

    Posttranslational modification of Ras protein has been shown to be critical for interaction with its effector molecules, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase. However, the mechanism of its action was unknown. In this study, we used a reconstituted system with purified adenylyl cyclase and Ras proteins carrying various degrees of the modification to show that the posttranslational modification, especially the farnesylation step, is responsible for 5- to 10-fold increase in Ras-dependent activation of adenylyl cyclase activity even though it has no significant effect on their binding affinity. The stimulatory effect of farnesylation is found to depend on the association of adenylyl cyclase with 70-kDa adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP), which was known to be required for proper in vivo response of adenylyl cyclase to Ras protein, by comparing the levels of Ras-dependent activation of purified adenylyl cyclase with and without bound CAP. The region of CAP required for this effect is mapped to its N-terminal segment of 168 amino acid residues, which coincides with the region required for the in vivo effect. Furthermore, the stimulatory effect is successfully reconstituted by in vitro association of CAP with the purified adenylyl cyclase molecule lacking the bound CAP. These results indicate that the association of adenylyl cyclase with CAP is responsible for the stimulatory effect of posttranslational modification of Ras on its activity and that this may be the mechanism underlying its requirement for the proper in vivo cyclic AMP response.

  15. Isoform-targeted regulation of cardiac adenylyl cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Yoshihiro

    2003-01-01

    Numerous attempts have been made to develop strategies for regulating the intracellular cyclic AMP signal pharmacologically, with an intention to establish either new medical therapeutic methods or experimental tools. In the past decades, many pharmacological reagents have been identified that regulate this pathway at the level of the receptor. G protein, adenylyl cyclase, cyclic AMP, protein kinase A and phosphodiesterase. Since the cloning of adenylyl cyclase isoforms during the 1990s, investigators including ourselves have tried to find reagents that regulate the activity of this enzyme directly in an isoform-dependent manner. The ultimate goal of developing such reagents would be to regulate the cyclic AMP signal in an organ-dependent manner. Ourselves and other workers have reported that such reagents may vary from a simple cation to kinases. In a more recent study, using the results from crystallographic studies and computer-assisted drug design programs, we have identified subtype-selective regulators of adenylyl cyclase. Such regulators are mostly based upon forskolin, a diterpene compound obtained from Coleus forskolii, that acts directly on adenylyl cyclase to increase the intracellular levels of cyclic AMP. Similarly, novel reagents have been identified that inhibit a specific adenylyl cyclase isoform (e.g. type 5 adenylyl cyclase). Such reagents would potentially provide a new therapeutic strategy to treat hypertension, for example, as well as methods to selectively stimulate or inhibit this adenylyl cyclase isoform, which may be reminiscent of overexpression or knocking out of the cardiac adenylyl cyclase isoform by the use of a pharmacological method.

  16. Crystallization of cyclase-associated protein from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Andreas; Hess, Sonja; Noegel, Angelika A; Schleicher, Michael; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2002-10-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is a conserved two-domain protein that helps to activate the catalytic activity of adenylyl cyclase in the cyclase-bound state through interaction with Ras, which binds to the cyclase in a different region. With its other domain, CAP can bind monomeric actin and therefore also carries a cytoskeletal function. The protein is thus involved in Ras/cAMP-dependent signal transduction and most likely serves as an adapter protein translocating the adenylyl cyclase complex to the actin cytoskeleton. Crystals belonging to the orthorhombic space group C222, with unit-cell parameters a = 71.2, b = 75.1, c = 162.9 A, have been obtained from Dictyostelium discoideum CAP carrying a C-terminal His tag. A complete native data set extending to 2.2 A resolution was collected from a single crystal using an in-house X-ray system. The asymmetric unit contains one molecule of CAP.

  17. Ester Tuiksoo / Ester Tuiksoo ; interv. Piret Tali

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tuiksoo, Ester, 1965-

    2007-01-01

    Juhan Partsi valitsuse (05.04.2004-13.04.2005) ja Andrus Ansipi valitsuse (13.04.2005-) põllumajandusminister Ester Tuiksoo oma lapsepõlvest ja elukutsevalikust, poliitilise karjääri algusest ja erakonna valikust, ministritöö kogemustest, naistest poliitikas

  18. Ester Tuiksoo / Ester Tuiksoo ; interv. Piret Tali

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tuiksoo, Ester, 1965-

    2007-01-01

    Juhan Partsi valitsuse (05.04.2004-13.04.2005) ja Andrus Ansipi valitsuse (13.04.2005-) põllumajandusminister Ester Tuiksoo oma lapsepõlvest ja elukutsevalikust, poliitilise karjääri algusest ja erakonna valikust, ministritöö kogemustest, naistest poliitikas

  19. Evaluation of Triethylene Glycol Monomethyl Ether (TRIEGME) as an Alternative Fuel System Icing Inhibitor for JP-8 Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    could be explained by a non-uniform condensation on the surface of the panel due to non-uniform surface temperatures created by inadequate contact...RXS 10-090 7 RECOMMENDATION Careful engineering review and risk analyses must be performed by weapon systems managers considering switching...heart following prenatal exposure to ethylene glycol monomethyl ether. Drug Chem. Toxicol. 9:1-14. 29. Hoflack, JC; et aI., 1995, Mutat Res, 341(4

  20. Differential morphological effects in rat corpora lutea among ethylene glycol monomethyl ether, atrazine, and bromocriptine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taketa, Yoshikazu; Inoue, Kaoru; Takahashi, Miwa; Yamate, Jyoji; Yoshida, Midori

    2013-07-01

    Ethylene glycol monomethyl ether (EGME) or atrazine induces luteal cell hypertrophy in rats. Our previous study suggested that EGME stimulates both new and old corpora lutea (CL), while atrazine stimulates new CL. Bromocriptine (BRC) is known to suppress the luteolysis in rats. This study investigated the light- and electron-microscopic luteal changes induced by EGME, atrazine, or BRC. Female rats were treated with EGME (300 mg/kg/day), BRC (2 mg/kg/day), EGME and BRC (EGME + BRC), or atrazine (300 mg/kg/day) for 7 days. Luteal cell hypertrophy induced by EGME, EGME + BRC, and atrazine was subclassified into the following two types: CL hypertrophy, vacuolated type (CL-V) characterized by intracytoplasmic fine vacuoles, and CL hypertrophy, eosinophilic type (CL-E) characterized by eosinophilic and abundant cytoplasm. The proportions of CL-V and CL-E were different among the treatments. BRC-treated old CL showed lower proportion of endothelial cells and fibroblasts than normal old CL. Ultrastructural observation revealed that the luteal cells of CL-V contained abundant lipid droplets, whereas those of CL-E in EGME and EGME + BRC groups showed uniformly well-developed smooth endoplasmic reticulum. No clear ultrastructural difference was observed between the control CL and atrazine-treated CL-E. These results indicate that EGME, atrazine, and BRC have differential luteal morphological effects.

  1. Effect of hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether-sonodynamic therapy (HMME-SDT on hypertrophic scarring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanjun Zhang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to explore the potential for hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether-Sonodynamic Therapy (HMME-SDT treatment of hypertrophic scars within rabbit ears. METHODS: 60 white rabbits were randomly divided into five groups: (1 untreated controls, (2 lesioned, (3 lesioned + HMME, (4 lesioned + US (Ultrasound, and (5 lesioned +HMME-SDT. After induction of a lesion upon the ears of the rabbits, hypertrophic scars were assessed at 14, 28, 42 and 56 days post-lesion +/- treatment. Assessments consisted of visual inspection in the change of the skin, scar formation pathological morphology by hematoxylin and eosin (HE staining technique with optical microscopy, calculation of a hypertrophic index, fibroblastic density measures, and observation of collagen changes in the scar tissue by Van Gieson's (VGStain along with calculation of collagen area density. RESULTS: With continued HMME-SDT treatment there was a gradual improvement in all parameters over the duration of the experiment. The lesion-induced scars of rabbits receiving HMME-SDT treatment were soft, the size was reduced, hyperplasia was flat and the color pale. The fibroblasts and collagens were reduced and the collagens were light red, sparse and orderly. The hypertrophic index was reduced, since the fibroblastic density was lowered and collagen area density was decreased. CONCLUSION: HMME is an effective sonosensitizer and the combination of HMME-SDT treatment can exert significant benefits in reducing the formation of hypertrophic scars.

  2. Adipose tissue monomethyl branched chain fatty acids and insulin sensitivity: effects of obesity and weight loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiong; Magkos, Faidon; Zhou, Dequan; Eagon, J. Christopher; Fabbrini, Elisa; Okunade, Adewole L.; Klein, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Objective An increase in circulating branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) is associated with insulin resistance. Adipose tissue is a potentially important site for BCAA metabolism. We evaluated whether monomethyl branched chain fatty acids (mmBCFA) in adipose tissue, which are likely derived from BCAA catabolism, are associated with insulin sensitivity. Design and Methods Insulin-stimulated glucose disposal was determined by using the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp procedure with stable isotope glucose tracer infusion, in 9 lean and 9 obese subjects, and in a separate group of 9 obese subjects before and 1 year after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery (38% weight loss). Adipose tissue mmBCFA content was measured in tissue biopsies taken in the basal state. Results Total adipose tissue mmBCFA content was ~30% lower in obese than lean subjects (P = 0.02), and increased by ~65% after weight loss in the RYGB group (P = 0.01). Adipose tissue mmBCFA content correlated positively with skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity (R2 = 35%, P = 0.01, n = 18). Conclusions These results demonstrate a novel association between adipose tissue mmBCFA content and obesity-related insulin resistance. Additional studies are needed to determine whether the association between adipose tissue mmBCFA and muscle insulin sensitivity is causal or a simple association. PMID:25328153

  3. Effect of pravastatin on responsiveness to N-monomethyl-L-arginine in patients with hypercholesterolaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayerle-Eder, Michaela; Fuchsjäger-Mayrl, Gabriele; Sieder, Anna; Polska, Elzbieta; Roden, Michael; Stulnig, Thomas; Bischof, Martin G; Waldhäusl, Werner; Schmetterer, Leopold; Wolzt, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Improvement of endothelial function in hypercholesterolaemia is attributed to lipid lowering and to pleiotropic effects of statin therapy. We investigated whether responsiveness to inhibition of constitutive NO formation with N-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) is improved after 7 and 28 days of pravastatin. Twelve female and four male subjects with mild or moderate primary hypercholesterolaemia were randomized to pravastatin (20 mg per oral (p.o.) n=8) or placebo (n=8) in a double blind parallel group design. Vascular responsiveness was studied by intravenous bolus infusions of L-NMMA (cumulative doses of 3 and 6 mg/kg). Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and pulse rate (PR) were measured noninvasively, pulsatile choroidal blood flow was assessed with laser interferometric measurement of fundus pulsation amplitudes (FPA) and renal plasma flow (RPF) was measured by the PAH clearance method. Pravastatin lowered plasma cholesterol levels by 16 and 24% after 7 and 28 days of treatment, respectively (P<0.01). L-NMMA caused comparable changes in MAP, PR and RPF between groups. L-NMMA reduced FPA to a similar extent in both groups before and after 7 days of treatment, but the response to L-NMMA was significantly enhanced after 28 days of pravastatin (21%; P<0.001 vs baseline) and greater than after placebo (15%; P<0.01 vs pravastatin). Pravastatin enhances responsiveness to L-NMMA in the ocular microvasculature. Improved responsiveness is associated with changes in total cholesterol levels.

  4. Dimethyl Mercury in Seawater: a Potential Source of Monomethyl Mercury in Fog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coale, K. H.; Heim, W. A.; Olson, A.; Chiswell, H.; Byington, A.; Newman, A.; Bonnema, A.; Johnson, M.; Fernandez, D.; Weiss-Penzias, P. S.; Parker, C.

    2015-12-01

    Our collaborative studies show that maritime advective fog transports monomethyl mercury (MMHg) from the oceans to land where terrestrial biota accumulate this neurotoxin to high levels. To date the source of MMHg and the mechanism of this cycling remain unknown. We show that the rate of gaseous evasion of dimethyl mercury (DMHg) is fairly large. Vertical gradients of dimethyl mercury (DMHg) from cyclonic eddies in the California Current indicate an evasive loss of this compound of over 10 pmol m-2 d-1 from these and other upwelling systems. Previous experiments, however, indicated that the rate of photolytic demethylation of DMHg to MMHg is extremely slow in seawater. In this study we performed photodemethylation experiments in both natural seawater and seawater acidified to pH = 5 (the pH of fog). These results confirm the low rates of photodemethylation of DMHg previously observed, yet also show that photodemethylation is a significant factor in the demethylation of DMHg at low pH and thus a potential source of MMHg in fog. These findings suggest photodemethylation may occur atmospherically, and may explain both the high concentrations of MMHg found in fog, and the difference in concentrations of MMHg found in fog water vs rainwater.

  5. Mechanism of Alternariol monomethyl ether-induced mitochondrial apoptosis in human colon carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensassi, Fatma; Gallerne, Cindy; el Dein, Ossama Sharaf; Hajlaoui, Mohamed Rabeh; Bacha, Hassen; Lemaire, Christophe

    2011-12-18

    Alternariol monomethyl ether (AME) is a major mycotoxin produced by fungi of the genus Alternaria and a common contaminant of food products such as fruits and cereals worldwide. AME can cause serious health problems for animals as well as for humans. In this study, human colon carcinoma cells (HCT116) were used to explore the mechanisms of cell death induced by AME. Exposure of HCT116 cells to AME resulted in significant cytotoxicity manifested by a loss in cell viability mainly mediated by activation of apoptotic process. AME activated the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway evidenced by the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP), loss of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) downstream generation of O(2)(-), cytochrome c release and caspase 9 and 3 activation. Experiments conducted on isolated organelles indicated that AME does not directly target mitochondria to induce PTP-dependent permeabilization of mitochondrial membranes. Moreover, no difference was observed in Bax-KO cells in comparison to parental cells, suggesting that the pro-apoptotic protein Bax is not involved in AME-induced mitochondrial apoptosis. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that AME induces cell death in human colon carcinoma cells by activating the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis.

  6. Photodynamic inactivation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and biofilms by hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengcheng; Hu, Min; Ma, Dandan; Lei, Jin'e; Xu, Jiru

    2016-02-01

    The worldwide increase in bacterial antibiotic resistance has led to a search for alternative antibacterial therapies. A promising approach to killing antibiotic-resistant bacteria is photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy, which uses light in combination with a photosensitizer to induce a phototoxic reaction. We evaluated the photodynamic inactivation (PDI) efficiency of hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME) on antibiotic-resistant bacteria and biofilms. HMME exhibited no significant dark toxicity and provided dose-dependent inactivation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and biofilms. After incubation with 100-μM HMME and irradiation with 72-J cm(-2) white light, 4.19-7.59 log10 reductions in survival were achieved in planktonic suspension. Antibiotic-resistant strains were as susceptible to PDI in biofilms as in planktonic suspensions, but the inactivation of bacterial cells in biofilms was attenuated. In addition, gram-positive bacterial strains and biofilms were more susceptible than gram-negative strains and biofilms to the PDI effect of HMME. Thus, HMME is a promising photosensitizer for the treatment of infectious diseases caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria, especially gram-positive bacteria.

  7. Effects of sulpiride and ethylene glycol monomethyl ether on endometrial carcinogenicity in Donryu rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taketa, Yoshikazu; Inoue, Kaoru; Takahashi, Miwa; Sakamoto, Yohei; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi; Yoshida, Midori

    2016-06-01

    Sulpiride and ethylene glycol monomethyl ether (EGME) are known ovarian toxicants that stimulate prolactin (PRL) secretion, resulting in hypertrophy of the corpora lutea and increased progesterone (P4) production. The purpose of the present study was to investigate how the PRL stimulatory agents affected uterine carcinogenesis and to clarify the effects of PRL on endometrial adenocarcinoma progression in rats. Ten-week-old female Donryu rats were treated once with N-ethyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (20 mg kg(-1) ), followed by treatment with sulpiride (200 ppm) or EGME (1250 ppm) from 11 weeks of age to 12 months of age. Sulpiride treatment inhibited the incidence of uterine adenocarcinoma and precancerous lesions of atypical endometrial hyperplasia, whereas EGME had no effect on uterine carcinogenesis. Sulpiride markedly prevented the onset of persistent estrus throughout the study period, and EGME delayed and inhibited the onset of persistent estrus. Moreover, sulpiride-treated animals showed high PRL and P4 serum levels without changes in the levels of estradiol-17β, low uterine weights and histological luteal cell hypertrophy. EGME did not affect serum PRL and P4 levels. These results suggest that the prolonged low estradiol-17β to P4 ratio accompanied by persistent estrous cycle abnormalities secondary to the luteal stimulatory effects of PRL may explain the inhibitory effects of sulpiride on uterine carcinogenesis in rats. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Natural occurrence of alternariol and alternariol monomethyl ether in soya beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oviedo, M S; Barros, G G; Chulze, S N; Ramirez, M L

    2012-08-01

    The natural occurrence of alternariol (AOH) and alternariol monomethyl ether (AME) in soya beans harvested in Argentina was evaluated. Both toxins were simultaneously detected by using HPLC analysis coupled with a solid phase extraction column clean-up. Characteristics of this in-house method such as accuracy, precision and detection and quantification limits were defined by means of recovery test with spiked soya bean samples. Out of 50 soya bean samples, 60% showed contamination with the mycotoxins analyzed; among them, 16% were only contaminated with AOH and 14% just with AME. Fifteen of the positive samples showed co-occurrence of both mycotoxins analyzed. AOH was detected in concentrations ranging from 25 to 211 ng/g, whereas AME was found in concentrations ranging from 62 to 1,153 ng/g. Although a limited number of samples were evaluated, this is the first report on the natural occurrence of Alternaria toxins in soya beans and is relevant from the point of view of animal public health.

  9. Adenylate cyclases involvement in pathogenicity, a minireview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costache, Adriana; Bucurenci, Nadia; Onu, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP), one of the most important secondary messengers, is produced by adenylate cyclase (AC) from adenosine triphosphate (ATP). AC is a widespread enzyme, being present both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Although they have the same enzymatic activity (ATP cyclization), the structure of these proteins varies, depending on their function and the producing organism. Some pathogenic bacteria utilize these enzymes as toxins which interact with calmodulin (or another eukaryote activator), causing intense cAMP synthesis and disruption of infected cell functions. In contrast, other pathogenic bacteria benefit of augmentation of AC activity for their own function. Based on sequence analysis ofAC catalytic domain from two pathogenic bacteria (Bacillus anthracis and Bordetellapertussis) with known three-dimensional structures, a possible secondary structure for 1-255 amino acid fragment from Pseudomonas aeruginosa AC (with 80TKGFSVKGKSS90 as the ATP binding site) is proposed.

  10. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis by systemic N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine administration in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, U; Bangsbo, J; Langberg, Henning

    2000-01-01

    (controls) and with prior N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) infusion (4 mg/kg, intravenously). Samples from the interstitial fluid were obtained at rest, during exercise and after exercise with the microdialysis technique. Interstitial adenosine in controls increased (p0.05) to controls. The 6...

  11. Interaction between a phorbol ester and dopamine DA1 receptors on vascular smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, K; Kohno, M; Murakawa, K; Yokokawa, K; Horio, T; Takeda, T

    1993-01-01

    The interaction between dopamine DA1 receptors and a phorbol ester was studied to elucidate the role of protein kinase C in the response of this receptor. The in vitro binding of [3H]Sch 23390 to DA1 receptor sites on vascular smooth muscle cells was saturable. The extent of [3H]Sch 23390 binding to phorbol ester-treated cells was increased without any change in the dissociation constant. The production of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) in response to DA1 receptor stimulation was enhanced by preincubation of vascular smooth muscle cells with the phorbol ester for 4 h. However, no enhancement was observed when the medium used for preincubation was supplemented with a protein kinase C inhibitor. Direct stimulation of stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein with 5-guanylylimidodiphosphate and direct stimulation of adenylate cyclase with forskolin produced no significant differences in cyclase levels between phorbol ester-treated and untreated cells. These results suggest that activation of protein kinase C triggers an increase in the membrane expression of DA1 receptors, thereby enhancing receptor-coupled cAMP generation.

  12. Calcium regulation of adenylyl cyclase relevance for endocrine control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, F A

    1997-01-01

    A fundamental process in the hormonal regulation of body functions is the conversion of the intercellular signal into an intracellular signal. The first recognized intracellular messengers mediating the actions of hormones were calcium ions (Ca(2+)) and adenosine 3':5' monophosphate (cAMP), which is synthesized from ATP by adenylyl cyclase. Recent work on the structure of adenylyl cyclases has shown that these enzymes are individually tailored molecular machines controlled by diverse Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms. These include allosteric regulation of enzyme activity through the Ca(2+)-receptor protein calmodulin, apparently direct actions of Ca(2+)on the cyclase catalytic moiety and phosphorylation/dephosphorylation by Ca(2+)-regulated protein kinases and protein phosphatases. This article is a brief review of the recent developments in the area of cyclase control that forecast a major revival of the interest in cAMP-Ca(2+)interactions. (c) 1997, Elsevier Science Inc. (Trends Endocrinol Metab 1997;8:7-14).

  13. Control of guanylate cyclase activity in the rod outer segment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannbacker, R G

    1973-12-14

    Mammalian photoreceptors contain a guanylate cyclase which has a high specific activity and is inhibited by exposure of the rod outer segment to light. Several minutes are required for this inhibition to take effect, indicating that it is not a step in visual excitation. The activity of the enzyme is sensitive to the concentration of calcium ion in the medium, suggesting that light-induced changes in calcium distribution in the photoreceptor could control guanylate cyclase activity.

  14. Adenyl cyclase in the human placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, K; Ryan, K J

    1971-09-21

    This study demonstrated that the human placenta possesses an adenyl cyclase system responsive to catecholamines and sodium flouride (NaF). 2.5 gm human term placentas were homogenized, centrifuged, washed, resuspended, and used as the enzyme system when placed with various agents. Incubations and the determination of adenosine 3', 5' monophosphate (cyclic AMP) formed were performed. Samples stimulated by .0001 M catecholamines (L-epinephrine or L-norepinephrine) or .01 M NaF had higher levels of cyclic AMP than the controls (p. 005 for catecholamine-treated samples and p. 001 for NaF-treated samples). A concentration of .0001 M L-epinephrine or L-norepinephrine appeared to be a maximum effective dose and .0000001 M a minimum. L=epinephrine was 10 times as effective in the stimulation as L-norepinephrine. With .0001 M, 499 and 439 pmoles/10 minutes per 25 mg of tissue was formed, whereas in the control (no added hormones) 256 pmoles/10 minutes were formed. 3.2% ethanol activated the system by a small amount (p.02). Propranolol alone did not appear to have any effect; however, the effect of .0001 M L-epinephrine was reduced by 95% in the presence of .00001 M propranolol. Propranolol had no effect on NaF-stimulated activity.

  15. Thyrotropin receptor-adenylate cyclase function in human thyroid neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltiel, A R; Powel-Jones, C H; Thomas, C G; Nayfeh, S N

    1981-06-01

    The action of thyrotropin (TSH) on plasma membranes was studied to elucidate the mechanism of hormonal regulation of malignant versus normal human thyroid tissue. Thyroid plasma membranes of six specimens of papillary or follicular carcinoma and six of adenoma, as well as adjacent normal tissue obtained from these patients, were evaluated with respect to binding of 125I-labeled TSH and stimulation of adenylate cyclase. Scatchard analysis of TSH binding revealed the presence of two species of binding sites in normal thyroid of different affinities and capacities. In 11 of 12 tumors studied, the high-affinity binding site remained intact; however, the total number of low-affinity sites was markedly lower than normal tissue. Other parameters of binding were not altered in neoplastic thyroid. In each of these tissues, the hormone responsiveness and kinetics of adenylate cyclase activation were essentially identical to those observed in normal tissue, although basal activity was typically greater in the neoplasm. One carcinoma was totally deficient in both 125I-labeled TSH binding and TSH-stimulatable adenylate cyclase, although basal activity was detected. Furthermore, adenylate cyclase of this specimen was not activated by prostaglandin, in contrast to normal thyroid and other thyroid tumors. These results suggest that: (a) clinical behavior of thyroid carcinomas may not be reflected by TSH receptor-adenylate cyclase function; (b) lack of clinical response as manifest by tumor regression cannot be ascribed to the absence of functional TSH receptors or adenylate cyclase; and (c) decreased low-affinity binding present in tumors is not correlated with altered hormone responsiveness of adenylate cyclase but may reflect more general cancer-induced changes in membrane structure or composition.

  16. Apomorphine and its esters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borkar, Nrupa; Chen, Zhizhong; Saaby, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    Oral delivery of apomorphine via prodrug principle may be a potential treatment for Parkinson's disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the transport and stability of apomorphine and its esters across Caco-2 cell monolayer and their affinity towards chylomicrons. Apomorphine...... cells. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to understand the stability of the esters on a molecular level. The affinity of the compounds towards plasma derived chylomicrons was assessed. The A-B transport of intact DLA was about 150 times lower than the transport of apomorphine...

  17. Phorbol ester and atrial natriuretic peptide receptor response on vascular smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, K; Kohno, M; Murakawa, K; Yokokawa, K; Horio, T; Takeda, T

    1992-04-01

    At least two types of receptors for natriuretic peptides have been reported: biologically active receptors coupled with guanylate cyclase (atrial natriuretic peptide [ANP]-B receptors) and clearance receptors (ANP-C receptors). To elucidate the role of protein kinase C (PKC) in the regulation of ANP-B receptors, vascular smooth muscle cells in culture were treated with phorbol ester. Incubation with receptor agonists and phorbol ester led to the desensitization of receptor-mediated cyclic guanosine monophosphate (ANP-B receptor response) in rat vascular smooth muscle cells. Although a PKC inhibitor and downregulation of PKC by long-term incubation of cells with phorbol esters blocked the phorbol ester-induced desensitization of the ANP-B receptor response, they did not block the ANP-induced desensitization of the ANP-B receptor response. In addition, when desensitization by phorbol esters was observed, ANP was still capable of desensitization. These observations suggest that the mechanism for regulating ANP-B receptor sensitivity may be both PKC-dependent and PKC-independent and mediated by phorbol esters and ANP, respectively.

  18. The histone H4 lysine 20 monomethyl mark, set by PR-Set7 and stabilized by L(3mbt, is necessary for proper interphase chromatin organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayako Sakaguchi

    Full Text Available Drosophila PR-Set7 or SET8 is a histone methyltransferase that specifically monomethylates histone H4 lysine 20 (H4K20. L(3MBT has been identified as a reader of methylated H4K20. It contains several conserved domains including three MBT repeats binding mono- and dimethylated H4K20 peptides. We find that the depletion of PR-Set7 blocks de novo H4K20me1 resulting in the immediate activation of the DNA damage checkpoint, an increase in the size of interphase nuclei, and drastic reduction of cell viability. L(3mbt on the other hand stabilizes the monomethyl mark, as L(3mbt-depleted S2 cells show a reduction of more than 60% of bulk monomethylated H4K20 (H4K20me1 while viability is barely affected. Ploidy and basic chromatin structure show only small changes in PR-Set7-depleted cells, but higher order interphase chromatin organization is significantly affected presumably resulting in the activation of the DNA damage checkpoint. In the absence of any other known functions of PR-Set7, the setting of the de novo monomethyl mark appears essential for cell viability in the presence or absence of the DNA damage checkpoint, but once newly assembled chromatin is established the monomethyl mark, protected by L(3mbt, is dispensable.

  19. Sources of inorganic and monomethyl mercury to high and sub Arctic marine ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Jane Liza

    Monomethyl mercury (MMHg), a toxic and bioaccumulative form of Hg, is present in some Canadian high and sub Arctic marine mammals at concentrations high enough to pose health risks to Northern peoples using these animals as food. To quantify potentially large sources of Hg to Arctic marine ecosystems, we examined several aspects of Hg cycling in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA) and Hudson Bay. Firstly, we quantified net Hg inputs to Hudson Bay from atmospheric Hg depletion events (AMDEs). During AMDEs, gaseous elemental Hg(0) (GEM), which is present in the Arctic atmosphere at global background concentrations, is oxidized to inorganic Hg(II) species that deposit to snowpacks. By simultaneously monitoring Hg in the atmosphere and in snowpacks of western Hudson Bay, we demonstrated that most of the Hg(II) deposited during AMDEs is rapidly (photo)reduced and emitted to the atmosphere. Secondly, we examined Hg speciation in marine waters of the CAA and Hudson Bay. We found high concentrations of MMHg and dimethyl Hg (DMHg; a toxic, gaseous form of Hg) in deep marine waters, where they are likely produced from Hg(II). Arctic marine waters were also found to be a substantial source of DMHg and GEM to the atmosphere. Thirdly, we quantified Hg exports to Hudson Bay from two major rivers, the Nelson and the Churchill, which have been altered for hydroelectric power production. When landscapes are inundated during river diversion or reservoir creation, microbial production of MMHg is stimulated in flooded soils. Newly produced MMHg can then be exported to downstream waterbodies. We found that annual inputs of total Hg (THg; includes both Hg(II) and MMHg) to Hudson Bay from combined Nelson and Churchill River discharge were comparable to inputs from AMDEs. MMHg inputs from river discharge are, however, ˜13 times greater than those from annual snowmelt of Hudson Bay snowpacks. Finally, although combined river and AMDE Hg inputs may account for a large portion of the THg

  20. Monospecific antibody against Bordetella pertussis Adenylate Cyclase protects from Pertussis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmeen Faiz Kazi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Acellular pertussis vaccines has been largely accepted world-wide however, there are reports about limitedantibody response against these vaccines suggesting that multiple antigens should be included in acellular vaccinesto attain full protection. The aim of present study was to evaluate the role of Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase as aprotective antigen.Materials and methods: Highly mono-specific antibody against adenylate cyclase (AC was raised in rabbits usingnitrocellulose bound adenylate cyclase and the specificity was assessed by immuoblotting. B.pertussis 18-323, wasincubated with the mono-specific serum and without serum as a control. Mice were challenged intra-nasally and pathophysiolgicalresponses were recorded.Results: The production of B.pertussis adenylate cyclase monospecific antibody that successfully recognized on immunoblotand gave protection against fatality (p< 0.01 and lung consolidation (p <0.01. Mouse weight gain showedsignificant difference (p< 0.05.Conclusion: These preliminary results highlight the role of the B.pertussis adenylate cyclase as a potential pertussisvaccine candidate. B.pertussis AC exhibited significant protection against pertussis in murine model. J Microbiol InfectDis 2012; 2(2: 36-43Key words: Pertussis; monospecific; antibody; passive-protection

  1. Esters van tetrathioorthotinzuur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, Jan

    1934-01-01

    Claesson claims to have obtained the tetraethyl ester of tetrathioorthostannic acid by shaking an aqueous solution of stannic chloride with ethylmercaptan and by distilling the heavy oily product. This could not be confirmed. A mixture of different products is formed, containing possibly among

  2. Phosphate Esters, Thiophosphate Esters and Metal Thiophosphates as Lubricant Additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Johnson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Phosphate esters, thiophosphate esters and metal thiophosphates have been used as lubricant additives for over 50 years. While their use has been extensive, a detailed knowledge of how they work has been a much more recent development. In this paper, the use of phosphate esters and thiophosphate esters as anti-wear or extreme pressure additives is reviewed with an emphasis on their mechanism of action. The review includes the use of alkyl phosphates, triaryl phosphates and metal containing thiophosphate esters. The mechanisms of these materials interacting with a range of iron and steel based bearing material are examined.

  3. Molecular Physiology of Membrane Guanylyl Cyclase Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Michaela

    2016-04-01

    cGMP controls many cellular functions ranging from growth, viability, and differentiation to contractility, secretion, and ion transport. The mammalian genome encodes seven transmembrane guanylyl cyclases (GCs), GC-A to GC-G, which mainly modulate submembrane cGMP microdomains. These GCs share a unique topology comprising an extracellular domain, a short transmembrane region, and an intracellular COOH-terminal catalytic (cGMP synthesizing) region. GC-A mediates the endocrine effects of atrial and B-type natriuretic peptides regulating arterial blood pressure/volume and energy balance. GC-B is activated by C-type natriuretic peptide, stimulating endochondral ossification in autocrine way. GC-C mediates the paracrine effects of guanylins on intestinal ion transport and epithelial turnover. GC-E and GC-F are expressed in photoreceptor cells of the retina, and their activation by intracellular Ca(2+)-regulated proteins is essential for vision. Finally, in the rodent system two olfactorial GCs, GC-D and GC-G, are activated by low concentrations of CO2and by peptidergic (guanylins) and nonpeptidergic odorants as well as by coolness, which has implications for social behaviors. In the past years advances in human and mouse genetics as well as the development of sensitive biosensors monitoring the spatiotemporal dynamics of cGMP in living cells have provided novel relevant information about this receptor family. This increased our understanding of the mechanisms of signal transduction, regulation, and (dys)function of the membrane GCs, clarified their relevance for genetic and acquired diseases and, importantly, has revealed novel targets for therapies. The present review aims to illustrate these different features of membrane GCs and the main open questions in this field.

  4. Role of glutaminyl cyclases in thyroid carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehlen, Astrid; Haegele, Monique; Menge, Katja; Gans, Kathrin; Immel, Uta-Dorothee; Hoang-Vu, Cuong; Klonisch, Thomas; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich

    2013-02-01

    CCL2 is a chemokine known to recruit monocytes/macrophages to sites of inflammation. CCL2 is also associated with tumor progression in several cancer types. Recently, we showed that the N-terminus of CCL2 is modified to a pyroglutamate (pE)-residue by both glutaminyl cyclases (QC (QPCT)) and its isoenzyme (isoQC (QPCTL)). The pE-residue increases stability against N-terminal degradation by aminopeptidases. Here, we report an upregulation of QPCT expression in tissues of patients with thyroid carcinomas compared with goiter tissues, whereas QPCTL was not regulated. In thyroid carcinoma cell lines, QPCT gene expression correlates with the mRNA levels of its substrate CCL2. Both QPCT and CCL2 are regulated in a NF-κB-dependent pathway shown by stimulation with TNFa and IL1b as well as by inhibition with the IKK2 inhibitor and RNAi of p50. In the culture supernatant of thyroid carcinoma cells, equal amounts of pECCL2 and total CCL2 were detected by two ELISAs discriminating between total CCL2 and pECCL2, concluding that all CCL2 is secreted as pECCL2. Activation of the CCL2/CCR2 pathway by recombinant CCL2 increased tumor cell migration of FTC238 cells in scratch assays as well as thyroid carcinoma cell-derived CCL2-induced migration of monocytic THP1 cells. Suppression of CCL2 signaling by CCR2 antagonist, IKK2 inhibitor, and QPCT RNAi reduced FTC238 cell growth measured by WST8 proliferation assays. Our results reveal new evidence for a novel role of QC in thyroid carcinomas and provide an intriguing rationale for the use of QC inhibitors as a means of blocking pECCL2 formation and preventing thyroid cancer metastasis.

  5. Nucleotidyl cyclase activity of particulate guanylyl cyclase A: comparison with particulate guanylyl cyclases E and F, soluble guanylyl cyclase and bacterial adenylyl cyclases CyaA and edema factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Y Beste

    Full Text Available Guanylyl cyclases (GCs regulate many physiological processes by catalyzing the synthesis of the second messenger cGMP. The GC family consists of seven particulate GCs (pGCs and a nitric oxide-activated soluble GC (sGC. Rat sGC α1β1 possesses much broader substrate specificity than previously assumed. Moreover, the exotoxins CyaA from Bordetella pertussis and edema factor (EF from Bacillus anthracis possess nucleotidyl cyclase (NC activity. pGC-A is a natriuretic peptide-activated homodimer with two catalytic sites that act cooperatively. Here, we studied the NC activity of rat pGC-A in membranes of stably transfected HEK293 cells using a highly sensitive and specific HPLC-MS/MS technique. GTP and ITP were effective, and ATP and XTP were only poor, pGC-A substrates. In contrast to sGC, pGC-A did not use CTP and UTP as substrates. pGC-E and pGC-F expressed in bovine rod outer segment membranes used only GTP as substrate. In intact HEK293 cells, pGC-A generated only cGMP. In contrast to pGCs, EF and CyaA showed very broad substrate-specificity. In conclusion, NCs exhibit different substrate-specificities, arguing against substrate-leakiness of enzymes and pointing to distinct physiological functions of cyclic purine and pyrimidine nucleotides.

  6. Computational identification of candidate nucleotide cyclases in higher plants

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Aloysius Tze

    2013-09-03

    In higher plants guanylyl cyclases (GCs) and adenylyl cyclases (ACs) cannot be identified using BLAST homology searches based on annotated cyclic nucleotide cyclases (CNCs) of prokaryotes, lower eukaryotes, or animals. The reason is that CNCs are often part of complex multifunctional proteins with different domain organizations and biological functions that are not conserved in higher plants. For this reason, we have developed CNC search strategies based on functionally conserved amino acids in the catalytic center of annotated and/or experimentally confirmed CNCs. Here we detail this method which has led to the identification of >25 novel candidate CNCs in Arabidopsis thaliana, several of which have been experimentally confirmed in vitro and in vivo. We foresee that the application of this method can be used to identify many more members of the growing family of CNCs in higher plants. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  7. Computational identification of candidate nucleotide cyclases in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Aloysius; Gehring, Chris

    2013-01-01

    In higher plants guanylyl cyclases (GCs) and adenylyl cyclases (ACs) cannot be identified using BLAST homology searches based on annotated cyclic nucleotide cyclases (CNCs) of prokaryotes, lower eukaryotes, or animals. The reason is that CNCs are often part of complex multifunctional proteins with different domain organizations and biological functions that are not conserved in higher plants. For this reason, we have developed CNC search strategies based on functionally conserved amino acids in the catalytic center of annotated and/or experimentally confirmed CNCs. Here we detail this method which has led to the identification of >25 novel candidate CNCs in Arabidopsis thaliana, several of which have been experimentally confirmed in vitro and in vivo. We foresee that the application of this method can be used to identify many more members of the growing family of CNCs in higher plants.

  8. SYNTHESIS OF 2,2-DIMETHYL-MALONIC ACID MONOMETHYL ESTER%2,2-二甲基丙二酸单甲酯的合成

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈群; 刘长春

    2015-01-01

    以新戊二醇为原料,经氧化、酯化、水解反应制备出目标化合物,产率61.2%.考察了硝化反应时间、硝酸浓度、催化剂用量、氢氧化钠质量分数和用量对反应收率的影响.适宜的反应条件为:氧化反应保温时间6h,硝酸质量分数68%,m(SOC12)∶m(2,2-二甲基丙二酸)=0.07∶1,n(NaOH)∶n(2,2-二甲基丙二酸)=1∶1,氢氧化钠质量分数10%.

  9. Deducing the origin of soluble adenylyl cyclase, a gene lost in multiple lineages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, Jeroen; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    2002-01-01

    The family of eukaryotic adenylyl cyclases consists of a very large group of 12 transmembrane adenylyl cyclases and a very small group of soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC). Orthologs of human sAC are present in rat Diclyostelium and bacteria but absent from the completely sequenced genomes of Drosophil

  10. Pertussis toxin inhibits cAMP-induced desensitization of adenylate cyclase in Dictyostelium discoideum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snaar-Jagalska, B. Ewa; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1990-01-01

    cAMP binds to surface receptors of Dictyostelium discoideum cells, transducing the signal to adenylate cyclase, guanylate cyclase and to chemotaxis. The activation of adenylate cyclase is maximal after 1 min and then declines to basal levels due to desensitization, which is composed of two component

  11. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the human guanylyl cyclase C receptor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rashna Bhandari; Roy Mathew; K Vijayachandra; Sandhya S Visweswariah

    2000-12-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation events are key components of several cellular signal transduction pathways. This study describes a novel method for identification of substrates for tyrosine kinases. Co-expression of the tyrosine kinase EphB1 with the intracellular domain of guanylyl cyclase C (GCC) in Escherichia coli cells resulted in tyrosine phosphorylation of GCC, indicating that GCC is a potential substrate for tyrosine kinases. Indeed, GCC expressed in mammalian cells is tyrosine phosphorylated, suggesting that tyrosine phosphorylation may play a role in regulation of GCC signalling. This is the first demonstration of tyrosine phosphorylation of any member of the family of membrane-associated guanylyl cyclases.

  12. AKAPs and Adenylyl Cyclase in Cardiovascular Physiology and Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efendiev, Riad; Dessauer, Carmen W.

    2011-01-01

    Cyclic AMP, generated by adenylyl cyclase (AC), serves as a second messenger in signaling pathways regulating many aspects of cardiac physiology including contraction rate and action potential duration, and in the pathophysiology of hypertrophy and heart failure. A kinase-anchoring proteins (AKAPs) localize the effect of cAMP in space and time by organizing receptors, adenylyl cyclase, protein kinase A and other components of the cAMP cascade into multiprotein complexes. In this review we discuss how interaction of AKAPs with distinct AC isoforms affects cardiovascular physiology. PMID:21978991

  13. Ectopic expression of cyclase associated protein CAP restores the streaming and aggregation defects of adenylyl cyclase a deficient Dictyostelium discoideum cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sultana Hameeda; Neelakanta Girish; Rivero Francisco; Blau-Wasser Rosemarie; Schleicher Michael; Noegel Angelika A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Cell adhesion, an integral part of D. discoideum development, is important for morphogenesis and regulated gene expression in the multicellular context and is required to trigger cell-differentiation. G-protein linked adenylyl cyclase pathways are crucially involved and a mutant lacking the aggregation specific adenylyl cyclase ACA does not undergo multicellular development. Results Here, we have investigated the role of cyclase-associated protein (CAP), an important regul...

  14. Soluble guanylate cyclase : a potential therapeutic target for heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gheorghiade, Mihai; Marti, Catherine N.; Sabbah, Hani N.; Roessig, Lothar; Greene, Stephen J.; Boehm, Michael; Burnett, John C.; Campia, Umberto; Cleland, John G. F.; Collins, Sean P.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Levy, Phillip D.; Metra, Marco; Pitt, Bertram; Ponikowski, Piotr; Sato, Naoki; Voors, Adriaan A.; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; Butler, Javed

    2013-01-01

    The number of annual hospitalizations for heart failure (HF) and the mortality rates among patients hospitalized for HF remains unacceptably high. The search continues for safe and effective agents that improve outcomes when added to standard therapy. The nitric oxide (NO)-soluble guanylate cyclase

  15. Multilevel control of glucose homeostasis by adenylyl cyclase 8

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raoux, Matthieu; Vacher, Pierre; Papin, Julien; Picard, Alexandre; Kostrzewa, Elzbieta; Devin, Anne; Gaitan, Julien; Limon, Isabelle; Kas, Martien J.; Magnan, Christophe; Lang, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis: Nutrient homeostasis requires integration of signals generated by glucose metabolism and hormones. Expression of the calcium-stimulated adenylyl cyclase ADCY8 is regulated by glucose and the enzyme is capable of integrating signals from multiple pathways. It may thus have an

  16. General base-general acid catalysis by terpenoid cyclases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemberton, Travis A; Christianson, David W

    2016-07-01

    Terpenoid cyclases catalyze the most complex reactions in biology, in that more than half of the substrate carbon atoms often undergo changes in bonding during the course of a multistep cyclization cascade that proceeds through multiple carbocation intermediates. Many cyclization mechanisms require stereospecific deprotonation and reprotonation steps, and most cyclization cascades are terminated by deprotonation to yield an olefin product. The first bacterial terpenoid cyclase to yield a crystal structure was pentalenene synthase from Streptomyces exfoliatus UC5319. This cyclase generates the hydrocarbon precursor of the pentalenolactone family of antibiotics. The structures of pentalenene synthase and other terpenoid cyclases reveal predominantly nonpolar active sites typically lacking amino acid side chains capable of serving general base-general acid functions. What chemical species, then, enables the Brønsted acid-base chemistry required in the catalytic mechanisms of these enzymes? The most likely candidate for such general base-general acid chemistry is the co-product inorganic pyrophosphate. Here, we briefly review biological and nonbiological systems in which phosphate and its derivatives serve general base and general acid functions in catalysis. These examples highlight the fact that the Brønsted acid-base activities of phosphate derivatives are comparable to the Brønsted acid-base activities of amino acid side chains.

  17. Multilevel control of glucose homeostasis by adenylyl cyclase 8

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raoux, Matthieu; Vacher, Pierre; Papin, Julien; Picard, Alexandre; Kostrzewa, Elzbieta; Devin, Anne; Gaitan, Julien; Limon, Isabelle; Kas, Martien J.; Magnan, Christophe; Lang, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis: Nutrient homeostasis requires integration of signals generated by glucose metabolism and hormones. Expression of the calcium-stimulated adenylyl cyclase ADCY8 is regulated by glucose and the enzyme is capable of integrating signals from multiple pathways. It may thus have an importa

  18. The 70-kilodalton adenylyl cyclase-associated protein is not essential for interaction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase with RAS proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, J; Suzuki, N.; Kataoka, T

    1992-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, adenylyl cyclase is regulated by RAS proteins. We show here that the yeast adenylyl cyclase forms at least two high-molecular-weight complexes, one with the RAS protein-dependent adenylyl cyclase activity and the other with the Mn(2+)-dependent activity, which are separable by their size difference. The 70-kDa adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) existed in the former complex but not in the latter. Missense mutations in conserved motifs of the leuci...

  19. Method of making alkyl esters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Brian

    2010-09-14

    Methods of making alkyl esters are described herein. The methods are capable of using raw, unprocessed, low-cost feedstocks and waste grease. Generally, the method involves converting a glyceride source to a fatty acid composition and esterifying the fatty acid composition to make alkyl esters. In an embodiment, a method of making alkyl esters comprises providing a glyceride source. The method further comprises converting the glyceride source to a fatty acid composition comprising free fatty acids and less than about 1% glyceride by mass. Moreover, the method comprises esterifying the fatty acid composition in the presence of a solid acid catalyst at a temperature ranging firm about 70.degree. C. to about 120.degree. C. to produce alkyl esters, such that at least 85% of the free fatty acids are converted to alkyl esters. The method also incorporates the use of packed bed reactors for glyceride conversion and/or fatty acid esterification to make alkyl esters.

  20. Metabolic engineering of potato tuber carotenoids through tuber-specific silencing of lycopene epsilon cyclase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papacchioli Velia

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Potato is a major staple food, and modification of its provitamin content is a possible means for alleviating nutritional deficiencies. beta-carotene is the main dietary precursor of vitamin A. Potato tubers contain low levels of carotenoids, composed mainly of the xanthophylls lutein, antheraxanthin, violaxanthin, and of xanthophyll esters. None of these carotenoids have provitamin A activity. Results We silenced the first dedicated step in the beta-epsilon- branch of carotenoid biosynthesis, lycopene epsilon cyclase (LCY-e, by introducing, via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, an antisense fragment of this gene under the control of the patatin promoter. Real Time measurements confirmed the tuber-specific silencing of Lcy-e. Antisense tubers showed significant increases in beta-beta-carotenoid levels, with beta-carotene showing the maximum increase (up to 14-fold. Total carotenoids increased up to 2.5-fold. These changes were not accompanied by a decrease in lutein, suggesting that LCY-e is not rate-limiting for lutein accumulation. Tuber-specific changes in expression of several genes in the pathway were observed. Conclusion The data suggest that epsilon-cyclization of lycopene is a key regulatory step in potato tuber carotenogenesis. Upon tuber-specific silencing of the corresponding gene, beta-beta-carotenoid and total carotenoid levels are increased, and expression of several other genes in the pathway is modified.

  1. Developing a New Sampling And Analysis Method For Hydrazine And Monomethyl Hydrazine: Using a Derivatizing Agent With Solid Phase Microextraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, John

    2001-01-01

    Solid phase microextraction (SPME) will be used to develop a method for detecting monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) and hydrazine (Hz). A derivatizing agent, pentafluorobenzoyl chloride (PFBCI), is known to react readily with MMH and Hz. The SPME fiber can either be coated with PFBCl and introduced into a gaseous stream containing MMH, or PFBCl and MMH can react first in a syringe barrel and after a short equilibration period a SPME is used to sample the resulting solution. These methods were optimized and compared. Because Hz and MMH can degrade the SPME, letting the reaction occur first gave better results. Only MMH could be detected using either of these methods. Future research will concentrate on constructing calibration curves and determining the detection limit.

  2. Screening for occupational vitiligo in workers exposed to hydroquinone monomethyl ether and to paratertiary-amyl-phenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Sullivan, J.J.; Stevenson, C.J.

    1981-11-01

    Two men reported previously with vitiligo after occupational exposure to hydroquinone monomethyl ether (HMME) have been reviewed after eight years. Repigmentation of significant degree was found in one man and of limited degree in the other. One hundred and sixty-nine men in the same works have been screened with Wood's light for evidence of vitiligo. No cases were found in the 148 men exposed to HMME (colleagues who screened 100 men exposed to HMME in two other factories also found no case) or in the 129 who had been exposed to paratertiary-amyl-phenol. Loss of light reflection on Wood's light examination was observed in 13 men due to scars or to other skin disorders.

  3. Developing a New Sampling And Analysis Method For Hydrazine And Monomethyl Hydrazine: Using a Derivatizing Agent With Solid Phase Microextraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, John

    2001-01-01

    Solid phase microextraction (SPME) will be used to develop a method for detecting monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) and hydrazine (Hz). A derivatizing agent, pentafluorobenzoyl chloride (PFBCI), is known to react readily with MMH and Hz. The SPME fiber can either be coated with PFBCl and introduced into a gaseous stream containing MMH, or PFBCl and MMH can react first in a syringe barrel and after a short equilibration period a SPME is used to sample the resulting solution. These methods were optimized and compared. Because Hz and MMH can degrade the SPME, letting the reaction occur first gave better results. Only MMH could be detected using either of these methods. Future research will concentrate on constructing calibration curves and determining the detection limit.

  4. Characterization of local vascular effects of the nitric oxide inhibitor NG-monomethyl-L-arginine on dorsal hand veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Christoph; Leuschner, Sven; Schwanebeck, Uta; Kirch, Wilhelm

    2012-06-01

    Infusion of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA; 6.4 µmol/min) into hand veins can cause a 20% increase in vein size in specific subjects. This study explored potential underlying mechanisms in healthy male participants. Ten healthy male participants received in phenylephrine (PE)-preconstricted veins a dose-response curve (DRC) to L-NMMA (0.2-6.4 µmol/min) without and with coinfusion of the endothelium-dependent dilator histamine, a DRC to L-arginine with and without coinfusion of L-NMMA, a DRC to NG-monomethyl-D-arginine (D-NMMA), and a DRC to L-NMMA in prostaglandin F(2α)-(PGF(2α))-preconstricted veins. Participants were classified as L-NMMA responders (R) and nonresponders (NR). Infusion of L-NMMA resulted in a maximum venodilation of 38% ± 11% (R) versus 10% ± 5% (NR; P = .005). In PGF(2α)-preconstricted veins, L-NMMA caused venodilation to 26% ± 34% (NS) in responders. Results suggest that endothelial nitric oxide synthase-mediated formation of nitric oxide (NO) from L-NMMA in doses >3.2 µmol/min and continuous PE-induced α-adrenergic stimulation resulting in release of very small amounts of NO from L-NMMA contribute to the observed L-NMMA-induced increase in vein size. Venous reactivity to L-NMMA resulting in a phenotype as R or NR is most likely genetically predetermined, which requires further study.

  5. Esters with water esters 2-c to 6-c

    CERN Document Server

    Getzen, F W; Hefter, G T; Maczynski, Andrzej

    1992-01-01

    This volume is the first of two devoted to esters and water. It includes solubility data for binary systems containing an ester and water up to the end of 1988. The critical evaluations were all prepared by one author and an introductory section has been included to elaborate the philosophy and methodology followed in the evaluations.

  6. The crystal structure of the catalytic domain of a eukaryotic guanylate cyclase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marletta Michael A

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Soluble guanylate cyclases generate cyclic GMP when bound to nitric oxide, thereby linking nitric oxide levels to the control of processes such as vascular homeostasis and neurotransmission. The guanylate cyclase catalytic module, for which no structure has been determined at present, is a class III nucleotide cyclase domain that is also found in mammalian membrane-bound guanylate and adenylate cyclases. Results We have determined the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of a soluble guanylate cyclase from the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii at 2.55 Å resolution, and show that it is a dimeric molecule. Conclusion Comparison of the structure of the guanylate cyclase domain with the known structures of adenylate cyclases confirms the close similarity in architecture between these two enzymes, as expected from their sequence similarity. The comparison also suggests that the crystallized guanylate cyclase is in an inactive conformation, and the structure provides indications as to how activation might occur. We demonstrate that the two active sites in the dimer exhibit positive cooperativity, with a Hill coefficient of ~1.5. Positive cooperativity has also been observed in the homodimeric mammalian membrane-bound guanylate cyclases. The structure described here provides a reliable model for functional analysis of mammalian guanylate cyclases, which are closely related in sequence.

  7. Coiled-coil interaction of N-terminal 36 residues of cyclase-associated protein with adenylyl cyclase is sufficient for its function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae ras pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Y; Shima, F; Sen, H; Tanaka, Y; Yanagihara, C; Yamawaki-Kataoka, Y; Kariya, K; Kataoka, T

    1998-10-23

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, association with the 70-kDa cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is required for proper response of adenylyl cyclase to Ras proteins. We show here that a small segment comprising the N-terminal 36 amino acid residues of CAP is sufficient for association with adenylyl cyclase as well as for its function in the Ras-adenylyl cyclase pathway as assayed by the ability to confer RAS2(Val-19)-dependent heat shock sensitivity to yeast cells. The CAP-binding site of adenylyl cyclase was mapped to a segment of 119 amino acid residues near its C terminus. Both of these regions contained tandem repetitions of a heptad motif alphaXXalphaXXX (where alpha represents a hydrophobic amino acid and X represents any amino acid), suggesting a coiled-coil interaction. When mutants of CAP defective in associating with adenylyl cyclase were isolated by screening of a pool of randomly mutagenized CAP, they were found to carry substitution mutations in one of the key hydrophobic residues in the heptad repeats. Furthermore, mutations of the key hydrophobic residues in the heptad repeats of adenylyl cyclase also resulted in loss of association with CAP. These results indicate the coiled-coil mechanism as a basis of the CAP-adenylyl cyclase interaction.

  8. The 70-kilodalton adenylyl cyclase-associated protein is not essential for interaction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase with RAS proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J; Suzuki, N; Kataoka, T

    1992-11-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, adenylyl cyclase is regulated by RAS proteins. We show here that the yeast adenylyl cyclase forms at least two high-molecular-weight complexes, one with the RAS protein-dependent adenylyl cyclase activity and the other with the Mn(2+)-dependent activity, which are separable by their size difference. The 70-kDa adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) existed in the former complex but not in the latter. Missense mutations in conserved motifs of the leucine-rich repeats of the catalytic subunit of adenylyl cyclase abolished the RAS-dependent activity, which was accompanied by formation of a very high molecular weight complex having the Mn(2+)-dependent activity. Contrary to previous results, disruption of the gene encoding CAP did not alter the extent of RAS protein-dependent activation of adenylyl cyclase, while a concomitant decrease in the size of the RAS-responsive complex was observed. These results indicate that CAP is not essential for interaction of the yeast adenylyl cyclase with RAS proteins even though it is an inherent component of the RAS-responsive adenylyl cyclase complex.

  9. Intracellular cAMP signaling by soluble adenylyl cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresguerres, Martin; Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen

    2011-06-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a recently identified source of the ubiquitous second messenger cyclic adenosine 3',5' monophosphate (cAMP). sAC is distinct from the more widely studied source of cAMP, the transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs); its activity is uniquely regulated by bicarbonate anions, and it is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and in cellular organelles. Due to its unique localization and regulation, sAC has various functions in a variety of physiological systems that are distinct from tmACs. In this review, we detail the known functions of sAC, and we reassess commonly held views of cAMP signaling inside cells.

  10. New lipophilic tyrosyl esters. Comparative antioxidant evaluation with hydroxytyrosyl esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, Raquel; Trujillo, Mariana; Pereira-Caro, Gema; Madrona, Andrés; Cert, Arturo; Espartero, José Luis

    2008-11-26

    New lipophilic esters of tyrosol, a naturally occurring phenol with interesting biological properties, have been synthesized in good yields by a chemoselective procedure, using lipase from Candida antarctica or p-toluenesulfonic acid as catalysts. Their antioxidant activities have been evaluated by the Rancimat test in lipophilic food matrices, as well as by FRAP and ABTS assays in methanolic solutions, and compared with those of previously synthesized hydroxytyrosyl esters. Free tyrosol, hydroxytyrosol, butylhydroxytoluene, and alpha-tocopherol were used as standards. All methods used for the antioxidant activity evaluation emphasized the high influence of the ortho-diphenolic structure on the antioxidant capacity, tyrosol and its derivatives being less active than hydroxytyrosol and its analogues and even less than BHT and alpha-tocopherol. In addition, the Rancimat test revealed a lower activity for ester derivatives than for their respective reference compounds (HTy or Ty), in agreement with the polar paradox. On the other hand, FRAP and ABTS methods reported an opposite behavior between the synthetic esters and their respective references. Thus, hydroxytyrosyl esters were more active than HTy, whereas tyrosyl esters were less active than Ty. The length and nature of the acyl side chain did not seem to play an important role in the antioxidant activity of either the hydroxytyrosyl or tyrosyl ester series, since no significant differences were observed among them.

  11. Overexpression of functional human oxidosqualene cyclase in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kürten, Charlotte; Uhlén, Mathias; Syrén, Per-Olof

    2015-01-01

    The generation of multicyclic scaffolds from linear oxidosqualene by enzymatic polycyclization catalysis constitutes a cornerstone in biology for the generation of bioactive compounds. Human oxidosqualene cyclase (hOSC) is a membrane-bound triterpene cyclase that catalyzes the formation of the te......The generation of multicyclic scaffolds from linear oxidosqualene by enzymatic polycyclization catalysis constitutes a cornerstone in biology for the generation of bioactive compounds. Human oxidosqualene cyclase (hOSC) is a membrane-bound triterpene cyclase that catalyzes the formation...

  12. Enhancer-associated H3K4 monomethylation by trithorax-related, the drosophila homolog of mammalian MLL3/MLL4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.-M. Herz (Hans-Martin); M. Mohan (Man); A.S. Garruss (Alexander); K. Liang (Kaiwei); Y.-H. Takahashi (Yoh-hei); K. Mickey (Kristen); O. Voets (Olaf); C.P. Verrijzer (Peter); A. Shilatifard (Ali)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractMonomethylation of histone H3 on Lys 4 (H3K4me1) and acetylation of histone H3 on Lys 27 (H3K27ac) are histone modifications that are highly enriched over the body of actively transcribed genes and on enhancers. Although in yeast all H3K4 methylation patterns, including H3K4me1, are impl

  13. Restoration of adenylate cyclase responsiveness in murine myeloid leukemia permits inhibition of proliferation by hormone. Butyrate augments catalytic activity of adenylate cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inhorn, L; Fleming, J W; Klingberg, D; Gabig, T G; Boswell, H S

    1988-04-01

    Mechanisms of leukemic cell clonal dominance may include aberrations of transmembrane signaling. In particular, neoplastic transformation has been associated with reduced capacity for hormone-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. In the present study, prostaglandin E, a hormonal activator of adenylate cyclase that has antiproliferative activity in myeloid cells, and cholera toxin, an adenylate cyclase agonist that functions at a postreceptor site by activating the adenylate cyclase stimulatory GTP-binding protein (Gs), were studied for antiproliferative activity in two murine myeloid cell lines. FDC-P1, an interleukin 3 (IL 3)-dependent myeloid cell line and a tumorigenic IL 3-independent subline, FI, were resistant to these antiproliferative agents. The in vitro ability of the "differentiation" agent, sodium butyrate, to reverse their resistance to adenylate cyclase agonists was studied. The antiproliferative action of butyrate involved augmentation of transmembrane adenylate cyclase activity. Increased adenylate cyclase catalyst activity was the primary alteration of this transmembrane signaling group leading to the functional inhibitory effects on leukemia cells, although alterations in regulatory G-proteins appear to play a secondary role.

  14. The NRF2 transcriptional target, OSGIN1, contributes to monomethyl fumarate-mediated cytoprotection in human astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Melanie S.; Matos, Maria F.; Richter, Karl E.; Li, Bing; Scannevin, Robert H.

    2017-01-01

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is indicated for the treatment of relapsing multiple sclerosis and may exert therapeutic effects via activation of the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NRF2) pathway. Following oral DMF administration, central nervous system (CNS) tissue is predominantly exposed to monomethyl fumarate (MMF), the bioactive metabolite of DMF, which can stabilize NRF2 and induce antioxidant gene expression; however, the detailed NRF2-dependent mechanisms modulated by MMF that lead to cytoprotection are unknown. Our data identify a mechanism for MMF-mediated cytoprotection in human astrocytes that functions in an OSGIN1-dependent manner, specifically via upregulation of the OSGIN1-61 kDa isoform. NRF2-dependent OSGIN1 expression induced P53 nuclear translocation following MMF administration, leading to cell-cycle inhibition and cell protection against oxidative challenge. This study provides mechanistic insight into MMF-mediated cytoprotection via NRF2, OSGIN1, and P53 in human CNS-derived cells and contributes to our understanding of how DMF may act clinically to ameliorate pathological processes in neurodegenerative disease. PMID:28181536

  15. Adipose tissue monomethyl branched-chain fatty acids and insulin sensitivity: Effects of obesity and weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiong; Magkos, Faidon; Zhou, Dequan; Eagon, J Christopher; Fabbrini, Elisa; Okunade, Adewole L; Klein, Samuel

    2015-02-01

    An increase in circulating branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) is associated with insulin resistance. Adipose tissue is a potentially important site for BCAA metabolism. It was evaluated whether monomethyl branched-chain fatty acids (mmBCFA) in adipose tissue, which are likely derived from BCAA catabolism, are associated with insulin sensitivity. Insulin-stimulated glucose disposal was determined by using the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp procedure with stable isotope glucose tracer infusion in nine lean and nine obese subjects, and in a separate group of nine obese subjects before and 1 year after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery (38% weight loss). Adipose tissue mmBCFA content was measured in tissue biopsies taken in the basal state. Total adipose tissue mmBCFA content was ∼30% lower in obese than lean subjects (P=0.02) and increased by ∼65% after weight loss in the RYGB group (P=0.01). Adipose tissue mmBCFA content correlated positively with skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity (R(2) =35%, P=0.01, n=18). These results demonstrate a novel association between adipose tissue mmBCFA content and obesity-related insulin resistance. Additional studies are needed to determine whether the association between adipose tissue mmBCFA and muscle insulin sensitivity is causal or a simple association. © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  16. Evaluation of Hydrogel Suppositories for Delivery of 5-Aminolevulinic Acid and Hematoporphyrin Monomethyl Ether to Rectal Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xuying; Yin, Huijuan; Lu, Yu; Zhang, Haixia; Wang, Han

    2016-10-12

    We evaluated the potential utility of hydrogels for delivery of the photosensitizing agents 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME) to rectal tumors. Hydrogel suppositories containing ALA or HMME were administered to the rectal cavity of BALB/c mice bearing subcutaneous tumors of SW837 rectal carcinoma cells. For comparison, ALA and HMME were also administered by three common photosensitizer delivery routes; local administration to the skin and intratumoral or intravenous injection. The concentration of ALA-induced protoporphyrin IX or HMME in the rectal wall, skin, and subcutaneous tumor was measured by fluorescence spectrophotometry, and their distribution in vertical sections of the tumor was measured using a fluorescence spectroscopy system. The concentration of ALA-induced protoporphyrin IX in the rectal wall after local administration of suppositories to the rectal cavity was 9.76-fold (1 h) and 5.8-fold (3 h) higher than in the skin after cutaneous administration. The maximal depth of ALA penetration in the tumor was ~3-6 mm at 2 h after cutaneous administration. Much lower levels of HMME were observed in the rectal wall after administration as a hydrogel suppository, and the maximal depth of tumor penetration was suppository is thus a potential delivery route for photodynamic therapy of rectal cancer.

  17. Evaluation of Hydrogel Suppositories for Delivery of 5-Aminolevulinic Acid and Hematoporphyrin Monomethyl Ether to Rectal Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuying Ye

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the potential utility of hydrogels for delivery of the photosensitizing agents 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA and hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME to rectal tumors. Hydrogel suppositories containing ALA or HMME were administered to the rectal cavity of BALB/c mice bearing subcutaneous tumors of SW837 rectal carcinoma cells. For comparison, ALA and HMME were also administered by three common photosensitizer delivery routes; local administration to the skin and intratumoral or intravenous injection. The concentration of ALA-induced protoporphyrin IX or HMME in the rectal wall, skin, and subcutaneous tumor was measured by fluorescence spectrophotometry, and their distribution in vertical sections of the tumor was measured using a fluorescence spectroscopy system. The concentration of ALA-induced protoporphyrin IX in the rectal wall after local administration of suppositories to the rectal cavity was 9.76-fold (1 h and 5.8-fold (3 h higher than in the skin after cutaneous administration. The maximal depth of ALA penetration in the tumor was ~3–6 mm at 2 h after cutaneous administration. Much lower levels of HMME were observed in the rectal wall after administration as a hydrogel suppository, and the maximal depth of tumor penetration was <2 mm after cutaneous administration. These data show that ALA more readily penetrates the mucosal barrier than the skin. Administration of ALA as an intrarectal hydrogel suppository is thus a potential delivery route for photodynamic therapy of rectal cancer.

  18. Analysis of the function of the 70-kilodalton cyclase-associated protein (CAP) by using mutants of yeast adenylyl cyclase defective in CAP binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J; Suzuki, N; Nishida, Y; Kataoka, T

    1993-07-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, adenylyl cyclase forms a complex with the 70-kDa cyclase-associated protein (CAP). By in vitro mutagenesis, we assigned a CAP-binding site of adenylyl cyclase to a small segment near its C terminus and created mutants which lost the ability to bind CAP. CAP binding was assessed first by observing the ability of the overproduced C-terminal 150 residues of adenylyl cyclase to sequester CAP, thereby suppressing the heat shock sensitivity of yeast cells bearing the activated RAS2 gene (RAS2Val-19), and then by immunoprecipitability of adenylyl cyclase activity with anti-CAP antibody and by direct measurement of the amount of CAP bound. Yeast cells whose chromosomal adenylyl cyclase genes were replaced by the CAP-nonbinding mutants possessed adenylyl cyclase activity fully responsive to RAS2 protein in vitro. However, they did not exhibit sensitivity to heat shock in the RAS2Val-19 background. When glucose-induced accumulation of cyclic AMP (cAMP) was measured in these mutants carrying RAS2Val-19, a rapid transient rise indistinguishable from that of wild-type cells was observed and a high peak level and following persistent elevation of the cAMP concentration characteristic of RAS2Val-19 were abolished. In contrast, in the wild-type RAS2 background, similar cyclase gene replacement did not affect the glucose-induced cAMP response. These results suggest that the association with CAP, although not involved in the in vivo response to the wild-type RAS2 protein, is somehow required for the exaggerated response of adenylyl cyclase to activated RAS2.

  19. Esters van tetrathioorthokiezelzuur en tetrathioorthogermaniumzuur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stienstra, Folkert Jans

    1934-01-01

    The germaniun tetrachloride required was prepared from the mineral germanite. For this a simpler method was elaborated. For the preparation of the esters of tetrathioorthosilicic acid and tetrathioorthogermanic acid, silicon tetrachloride and germanium tetrachloride were made to react with a

  20. Liquid Crystalline Esters of Dibenzophenazines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin John Anthony Bozek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of esters of 2,3,6,7-tetrakis(hexyloxydibenzo[a,c]phenazine-11-carboxylic acid was prepared in order to probe the effects of the ester groups on the liquid crystalline behavior. These compounds exhibit columnar hexagonal phases over broad temperature ranges. Variations in chain length, branching, terminal groups, and the presence of cyclic groups were found to modify transition temperatures without substantially destabilizing the mesophase range.

  1. OPTIMASI PRODUKSI METIL ESTER SULFONAT DARI METIL ESTER MINYAK JELANTAH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Hidayati

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available OPTIMATION OF METHYL ESTER SULFONATES PRODUCTION FROM WASTE COOKING METHYL ESTER. An experiment of sulfonation process of methyl ester to produce methyl ester sulfonates (MES was caried out using waste palm methyl ester and sulfuric acid as sulfonating agent with variation of H2SO4 concentration (60% (K1, 70% (K2, dan 80% (K3 and sulfonation time (60 minute (L1, 75 minute (L2 and 90 minute (L3 using factorial on Randomized Complete Design Block. The experiment result showed the best sulfonation condition present in 80% H2SO4 concentration and sulfonation time of 90 minutes.  The best characteristic of MES is produced showed surface tension of 27.35 dyne/cm, emulsion stability of 89.44%, acid value of 17.72 mg KOH/g and interfacial tension of 0.0361 dyne/cm at MES concentration of 2% in 10,000 ppm salinity water. Sebuah penelitian tentang proses produksi metil ester sulfonat menggunakan minyak bekas kelapa sawit dilakukan dengan menggunakan H2SO4 sebagai agen pensulfonasi dengan variasi konsentrasi H2SO4 (60% (K1, 70% (K2, dan 80% (K3 dan lama sulfonasi (60 menit (L1, 75 menit (L2 and 90 menit (L3 dengan menggunakan faktorial dalam Rancangan Kelompok Teracak Lengkap. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa kondisi proses sulfonasi terbaik terdapat pada konsentrasi H2SO4 80% dan lama reaksi 90 menit. Karakteristik Metil Ester Sulfonat (MES terbaik yang dihasilkan memperlihatkan nilai tegangan permukaan 27,35 dyne/cm, stabilitas emulsi 89,44%, nilai bilangan asam antara 17,72 mg KOH/g dan nilai tegangan antar muka pada konsentrasi MES 2% di dalam air dengan salinitas 10.000 ppm yaitu 0,0361 dyne/cm.

  2. Discovery of LRE1 as a specific and allosteric inhibitor of soluble adenylyl cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Espiritu, Lavoisier; Kleinboelting, Silke; Navarrete, Felipe A; Alvau, Antonio; Visconti, Pablo E; Valsecchi, Federica; Starkov, Anatoly; Manfredi, Giovanni; Buck, Hannes; Adura, Carolina; Zippin, Jonathan H; van den Heuvel, Joop; Glickman, J Fraser; Steegborn, Clemens; Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen

    2016-10-01

    The prototypical second messenger cAMP regulates a wide variety of physiological processes. It can simultaneously mediate diverse functions by acting locally in independently regulated microdomains. In mammalian cells, two types of adenylyl cyclase generate cAMP: G-protein-regulated transmembrane adenylyl cyclases and bicarbonate-, calcium- and ATP-regulated soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC). Because each type of cyclase regulates distinct microdomains, methods to distinguish between them are needed to understand cAMP signaling. We developed a mass-spectrometry-based adenylyl cyclase assay, which we used to identify a new sAC-specific inhibitor, LRE1. LRE1 bound to the bicarbonate activator binding site and inhibited sAC via a unique allosteric mechanism. LRE1 prevented sAC-dependent processes in cellular and physiological systems, and it will facilitate exploration of the therapeutic potential of sAC inhibition.

  3. Bisamidate Prodrugs of 2-Substituted 9-[2-(Phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]adenine (PMEA, adefovir) as Selective Inhibitors of Adenylate Cyclase Toxin from Bordetella pertussis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Česnek, Michal; Jansa, Petr; Šmídková, Markéta; Mertlíková-Kaiserová, Helena; Dračínský, Martin; Brust, Tarsis F; Pávek, Petr; Trejtnar, František; Watts, Val J; Janeba, Zlatko

    2015-08-01

    Novel small-molecule agents to treat Bordetella pertussis infections are highly desirable, as pertussis (whooping cough) remains a serious health threat worldwide. In this study, a series of 2-substituted derivatives of 9-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]adenine (PMEA, adefovir), in their isopropyl ester bis(L-phenylalanine) prodrug form, were designed and synthesized as potent inhibitors of adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) isolated from B. pertussis. The series consists of PMEA analogues bearing either a linear or branched aliphatic chain or a heteroatom at the C2 position of the purine moiety. Compounds with a small C2 substituent showed high potency against ACT without cytotoxic effects as well as good selectivity over human adenylate cyclase isoforms AC1, AC2, and AC5. The most potent ACT inhibitor was found to be the bisamidate prodrug of the 2-fluoro PMEA derivative (IC50 =0.145 μM). Although the bisamidate prodrugs reported herein exhibit overall lower activity than the bis(pivaloyloxymethyl) prodrug (adefovir dipivoxil), their toxicity and plasma stability profiles are superior. Furthermore, the bisamidate prodrug was shown to be more stable in plasma than in macrophage homogenate, indicating that the free phosphonate can be effectively distributed to target tissues, such as the lungs. Thus, ACT inhibitors based on acyclic nucleoside phosphonates may represent a new strategy to treat whooping cough.

  4. Expression of the Intestinal Biomarkers Guanylyl Cyclase C and CDX2 in Poorly Differentiated Colorectal Carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winn, Brody; Tavares, Rosemarie; Matoso, Andres; Noble, Lelia; Fanion, Jacqueline; Waldman, Scott A.; Resnick, Murray B.

    2009-01-01

    Guanylyl cyclase C a receptor for bacterial diarrheagenic enterotoxins is expressed selectively by intestinal epithelium and is an endogenous downstream target of CDX2. The expression of Guanylyl cyclase C is preserved throughout the adenoma/carcinoma sequence in the colorectum. Detection of Guanylyl cyclase C expression by RT-PCR is currently being validated as a technique to identify occult lymph node metastases in patients with colorectal cancer and for circulating cells in the blood for postoperative surveillance. Although Guanylyl cyclase C is widely expressed by well differentiated colorectal cancer, its expression in poorly differentiated colorectal cancer has not been evaluated. A tissue microarray was created from 69 archival specimens including 44 poorly differentiated, 15 undifferentiated or medullary and 10 signet ring cell colorectal carcinomas. Matched normal colonic mucosa was used as a positive control. Immunohistochemical staining for Guanylyl cyclase C and CDX2 was evaluated as positive or negative based on at least a 10% extent of staining. Out of the 69 tumor samples 75%, 47%, and 90% of the poorly differentiated, medullary and signet ring cell tumors were positive for Guanylyl cyclase C and 75%, 40% and 90% of these subsets were positive for CDX2 respectively. There was excellent correlation between Guanylyl cyclase C and CDX2 expression on a case per case basis (p<0.0001). There was also a statistically significant difference in the GCC staining pattern between MC and PDC (p=0.05). Immunopositivity for Guanylyl cyclase C was greater than 95% in a separately stained microarray series of well/moderately differentiated colorectal carcinomas. In conclusion, Guanylyl cyclase C expression is lost in a quarter of poorly differentiated and half of undifferentiated colorectal carcinomas. Therefore the utility of Guanylyl cyclase C expression as a diagnostic marker for colorectal carcinoma may be questionable in poorly differentiated colorectal

  5. Cyclic Nucleotide Monophosphates and Their Cyclases in Plant Signaling

    KAUST Repository

    Gehring, Christoph A.

    2017-10-04

    The cyclic nucleotide monophosphates (cNMPs), and notably 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) are now accepted as key signaling molecules in many processes in plants including growth and differentiation, photosynthesis, and biotic and abiotic defense. At the single molecule level, we are now beginning to understand how cNMPs modify specific target molecules such as cyclic nucleotide-gated channels, while at the systems level, a recent study of the Arabidopsis cNMP interactome has identified novel target molecules with specific cNMP-binding domains. A major advance came with the discovery and characterization of a steadily increasing number of guanylate cyclases (GCs) and adenylate cyclases (ACs). Several of the GCs are receptor kinases and include the brassinosteroid receptor, the phytosulfokine receptor, the Pep receptor, the plant natriuretic peptide receptor as well as a nitric oxide sensor. We foresee that in the near future many more molecular mechanisms and biological roles of GCs and ACs and their catalytic products will be discovered and further establish cNMPs as a key component of plant responses to the environment.

  6. Inhibition of a plant sesquiterpene cyclase by mevinolin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vögeli, U; Chappell, J

    1991-07-01

    The specificity of mevinolin as an inhibitor of sterol and sesquiterpene metabolism in tobacco cell suspension cultures was examined. Exogenous mevinolin inhibited [14C]acetate, but not [3H]mevalonate incorporation into free sterols. In contrast, mevinolin inhibited the incorporation of both [14C]acetate and [3H]mevalonate into capsidiol, an extracellular sesquiterpene. Microsomal 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A reductase was inhibited greater than 90% by microM mevinolin, while squalene synthetase was insensitive to even 600 microM mevinolin. Sesquiterpene cyclase, the first branch point enzyme specific for sesquiterpene biosynthesis, was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by mevinolin with a 50% reduction in activity at 100 microM. Kinetic analysis indicated that the mechanism for inhibition was complex with mevinolin acting as both a competitive and noncompetitive inhibitor. The results suggest that the mevinolin inhibition of [3H]mevalonate incorporation into extracellular sesquiterpenes can, in part, be attributed to a secondary, but specific, site of inhibition, the sesquiterpene cyclase.

  7. Ester Tuiksoo otsib endiselt pesa / Paavo Kangur

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kangur, Paavo, 1966-

    2012-01-01

    Maadevahetuse protsessi raames süüdistati Ester Tuiksood, et põllumajandusministrina sai ta altkäemaksu Rävala 19 asunud korteri kasutamise eest. Ester Tuiksoo ja kinnisvaraeksperdi Tõnis Rüütli kommentaarid

  8. Synthesis of substituted 2-cyanoarylboronic esters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysén, Morten; Hansen, Henriette M; Begtrup, Mikael

    2006-01-01

    The synthesis of substituted 2-cyanoarylboronic esters is described via lithiation/in situ trapping of the corresponding methoxy-, trifluoromethyl-, fluoro-, chloro-, and bromobenzonitriles. The crude arylboronic esters were obtained in high yields and purities and with good regioselectivities....

  9. ANALYSIS OF COCONUT ETHYL ESTER (BIODIESEL) AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ANALYSIS OF COCONUT ETHYL ESTER (BIODIESEL) AND FOSSIL DIESEL BLENDING: PROPERTIES AND CORROSION CHARACTERISTICS. ... resulting coconut oil ethyl ester (COEE) was blended with fossil diesel (B0). ... Article Metrics.

  10. Ester Tuiksoo otsib endiselt pesa / Paavo Kangur

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kangur, Paavo, 1966-

    2012-01-01

    Maadevahetuse protsessi raames süüdistati Ester Tuiksood, et põllumajandusministrina sai ta altkäemaksu Rävala 19 asunud korteri kasutamise eest. Ester Tuiksoo ja kinnisvaraeksperdi Tõnis Rüütli kommentaarid

  11. Liquid Crystalline Thermosets from Ester, Ester-imide, and Ester-amide Oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingemans, Theodorus J. (Inventor); Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); St. Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Main chain thermotropic liquid crystal esters, ester-imides, and ester-amides were prepared from AA, BB, and AB type monomeric materials and end-capped with phenylacetylene, phenylmaleimide, or nadimide reactive end-groups. The end-capped liquid crystal oligomers are thermotropic and have, preferably, molecular weights in the range of approximately 1000-15,000 grams per mole. The end-capped liquid crystaloligomers have broad liquid crystalline melting ranges and exhibit high melt stability and very low melt viscosities at accessible temperatures. The end-capped liquid crystal oli-gomers are stable forup to an hour in the melt phase. They are highly processable by a variety of melt process shape forming and blending techniques. Once processed and shaped, the end-capped liquid crystal oigomers were heated to further polymerize and form liquid crystalline thermosets (LCT). The fully cured products are rubbers above their glass transition temperatures.

  12. Ibogaine and noribogaine potentiate the inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity by opioid and 5-HT receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, R A; Winter, J C

    1996-12-05

    The effects of the putative anti-addictive compound ibogaine and its principal metabolite, noribogaine, on adenylyl cyclase activity were determined in various areas of the rat brain. Neither compound altered either basal or forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activities in the frontal cortex, midbrain or striatum. However, in all three brain areas the addition of ibogaine and noribogaine significantly enhanced inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity by a maximally effective concentration of morphine. Similarly, both compounds also potentiated the inhibition of hippocampal adenylyl cyclase activity by a maximally effective concentration of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). Although ibogaine appears to be more potent than noribogaine in augmenting opioid- and 5-HT-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity, both compounds appear to be of comparable efficacy. Neither compound, however, modified the inhibitory action of the muscarinic acetylcholine agonist, carbachol, on adenylyl cyclase activity. The present data indicate that ibogaine and noribogaine cause a selective increase in receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity. This potentiation may be involved in the pharmacological actions of these compounds.

  13. Asymmetrically acting lycopene beta-cyclases (CrtLm) from non-photosynthetic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, L; Picataggio, S; Rouvière, P E; Cheng, Q

    2004-03-01

    Carotenoids have important functions in photosynthesis, nutrition, and protection against oxidative damage. Some natural carotenoids are asymmetrical molecules that are difficult to produce chemically. Biological production of carotenoids using specific enzymes is a potential alternative to extraction from natural sources. Here we report the isolation of lycopene beta-cyclases that selectively cyclize only one end of lycopene or neurosporene. The crtLm genes encoding the asymmetrically acting lycopene beta-cyclases were isolated from non-photosynthetic bacteria that produced monocyclic carotenoids. Co-expression of these crtLm genes with the crtEIB genes from Pantoea stewartii (responsible for lycopene synthesis) resulted in the production of monocyclic gamma-carotene in Escherichia coli. The asymmetric cyclization activity of CrtLm could be inhibited by the lycopene beta-cyclase inhibitor 2-(4-chlorophenylthio)-triethylamine (CPTA). Phylogenetic analysis suggested that bacterial CrtL-type lycopene beta-cyclases might represent an evolutionary link between the common bacterial CrtY-type of lycopene beta-cyclases and plant lycopene beta- and epsilon-cyclases. These lycopene beta-cyclases may be used for efficient production of high-value asymmetrically cyclized carotenoids.

  14. Identification of a fourth family of lycopene cyclases in photosynthetic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresca, Julia A; Graham, Joel E; Wu, Martin; Eisen, Jonathan A; Bryant, Donald A

    2007-07-10

    A fourth and large family of lycopene cyclases was identified in photosynthetic prokaryotes. The first member of this family, encoded by the cruA gene of the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum, was identified in a complementation assay with a lycopene-producing strain of Escherichia coli. Orthologs of cruA are found in all available green sulfur bacterial genomes and in all cyanobacterial genomes that lack genes encoding CrtL- or CrtY-type lycopene cyclases. The cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 has two homologs of CruA, denoted CruA and CruP, and both were shown to have lycopene cyclase activity. Although all characterized lycopene cyclases in plants are CrtL-type proteins, genes orthologous to cruP also occur in plant genomes. The CruA- and CruP-type carotenoid cyclases are members of the FixC dehydrogenase superfamily and are distantly related to CrtL- and CrtY-type lycopene cyclases. Identification of these cyclases fills a major gap in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathways of green sulfur bacteria and cyanobacteria.

  15. Suppression of the humoral immune response by cannabinoids is partially mediated through inhibition of adenylate cyclase by a pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein coupled mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, N E; Koh, W S; Yang, K H; Lee, M; Kessler, F K

    1994-11-16

    Cannabinoid compounds, including the major psychoactive component of marihuana, delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC), have been widely established as being inhibitory on a broad array of humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. The presence of cannabinoid receptors has been identified recently on mouse spleen cells, which possess structural and functional characteristics similar to those of the G-protein coupled cannabinoid receptor originally identified in rat brain. These findings, together with those demonstrating that delta 9-THC inhibits adenylate cyclase in splenocytes, strongly suggest that certain aspects of immune inhibition by cannabinoids may be mediated through a cannabinoid receptor-associated mechanism. The objective of the present studies was to determine whether inhibition of adenylate cyclase is relevant to mouse spleen cell immune function and, if so, whether this inhibition is mediated through a Gi-protein coupled mechanism as previously described in neuronal tissue. Spleen cell activation by the phorbol ester phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), plus the calcium ionophore ionomycin, produced a rapid but transient increase in cytosolic cAMP, which was inhibited completely by immunosuppressive concentrations of delta 9-THC (22 microM) and the synthetic bicyclic cannabinoid CP-55940 (5.2 microM), which produced no effect on cell viability. Inhibition by cannabinoids of lymphocyte proliferative responses to PMA plus ionomycin and sheep erythrocyte (sRBC) IgM antibody-forming cell (AFC) response, was abrogated completely by low concentrations of dibutyryl-cAMP (10-100 microM). Inhibition of the sRBC AFC response by both delta 9-THC (22 microM) and CP-55940 (5.2 microM) was also abrogated by preincubation of splenocytes for 24 hr with pertussis toxin (0.1-100 ng/mL). Pertussis toxin pretreatment of spleen cells was also found to directly abrogate cannabinoid inhibition of adenylate cyclase, as measured by forskolin-stimulated accumulation

  16. pH-Responsive Polyethylene Glycol Monomethyl Ether-ε-Polylysine-G-Poly (Lactic Acid)-Based Nanoparticles as Protein Delivery Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Huiqin; Li, Yijia; Yang, Rui; Gao, Xiujun; Ying, Guoguang

    2016-01-01

    The application of poly(lactic acid) for sustained protein delivery is restricted by the harsh pH inside carriers. In this study, we synthesized a pH-responsive comb-shaped block copolymer, polyethylene glycol monomethyl ether-ε-polylysine-g-poly (lactic acid) (PEP)to deliver protein (bovine serum albumin (BSA)). The PEP nanoparticles could automatically adjust the internal pH to a milder level, as shown by the quantitative ratio metric results. The circular dichroism spectra showed that prot...

  17. Mechanical properties and chemical stability of pivalolactone-based poly(ether ester)s

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijsma, E.J.; Does, van der L.; Bantjes, A.; Vulic, I.

    1994-01-01

    The processing, mechanical and chemical properties of poly(ether ester)s, prepared from pivalolactone (PVL), 1,4-butanediol (4G) and dimethyl terephthalate (DMT), were studied. The poly(ether ester)s could easily be processed by injection moulding, owing to their favourable rheological and thermal p

  18. Esters van tetrathioorthokiezelzuur en tetrathioorthogermaniumzuur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stienstra, Folkert Jans

    1934-01-01

    The germaniun tetrachloride required was prepared from the mineral germanite. For this a simpler method was elaborated. For the preparation of the esters of tetrathioorthosilicic acid and tetrathioorthogermanic acid, silicon tetrachloride and germanium tetrachloride were made to react with a suspens

  19. 40 CFR 721.2805 - Acrylate ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acrylate ester. 721.2805 Section 721... Acrylate ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an acrylate ester (PMN P-96-824) is subject to reporting under...

  20. 40 CFR 721.537 - Organosilane ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Organosilane ester. 721.537 Section... § 721.537 Organosilane ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an organosilane ester (PMN P-96-1661/P-95-1654)...

  1. 40 CFR 721.3034 - Methylamine esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methylamine esters. 721.3034 Section... Substances § 721.3034 Methylamine esters. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as methylamine esters (PMN P-94-982) is subject...

  2. Crystallographic Analysis of Analogous Silicon and Carbon Containing Di(Cyanate Ester)s and Tri(Cyanate Ester)s

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-29

    lander are made from M55J/cyanate ester composites • The solar panel supports on the MESSENGER space probe use cyanate ester composite tie layers...Distribution Unlimited. PA# 17275 Cyanate Esters Around the Solar System 3 Images: courtesy NASA (public release) • The science decks on the Mars Phoenix

  3. Inferring biological functions of guanylyl cyclases with computational methods

    KAUST Repository

    Alquraishi, May Majed

    2013-09-03

    A number of studies have shown that functionally related genes are often co-expressed and that computational based co-expression analysis can be used to accurately identify functional relationships between genes and by inference, their encoded proteins. Here we describe how a computational based co-expression analysis can be used to link the function of a specific gene of interest to a defined cellular response. Using a worked example we demonstrate how this methodology is used to link the function of the Arabidopsis Wall-Associated Kinase-Like 10 gene, which encodes a functional guanylyl cyclase, to host responses to pathogens. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  4. Prokaryotic adenylate cyclase toxin stimulates anterior pituitary cells in culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronin, M.J.; Evans, W.S.; Rogol, A.D.; Weiss, A.A.; Thorner, M.O.; Orth, D.N.; Nicholson, W.E.; Yasumoto, T.; Hewlett, E.L.

    1986-08-01

    Bordetella pertussis synthesis a variety of virulence factors including a calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase (AC) toxin. Treatment of anterior pituitary cells with this AC toxin resulted in an increase in cellular cAMP levels that was associated with accelerated exocytosis of growth hormone (GH), prolactin, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and luteinizing hormone (LH). The kinetics of release of these hormones, however, were markedly different; GH and prolactin were rapidly released, while LH and ACTH secretion was more gradually elevated. Neither dopamine agonists nor somatostatin changes the ability of AC toxin to generate cAMP (up to 2 h). Low concentrations of AC toxin amplified the secretory response to hypophysiotrophic hormones. The authors conclude that bacterial AC toxin can rapidly elevate cAMP levels in anterior pituitary cells and that it is the response that explains the subsequent acceleration of hormone release.

  5. Integrative signaling networks of membrane guanylate cyclases: Biochemistry and physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rameshwar K Sharma

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This monograph presents a historical perspective of cornerstone developments on the biochemistry and physiology of mammalian membrane guanylate cyclases (MGCs, highlighting contributions made by the authors and their collaborators. Upon resolution of early, contentious studies, cyclic GMP emerged, alongside cyclic AMP, as an important intracellular second messenger for hormonal signaling. However, the two signaling pathways differ in significant ways. In the cyclic AMP pathway, hormone binding to a G protein coupled receptor leads to stimulation or inhibition of an adenylate cyclase, whereas the cyclic GMP pathway dispenses with intermediaries; hormone binds to an MGC to affect its activity. Although the cyclic GMP pathway is direct, it is by no means simple. The modular design of the molecule incorporates regulation by ATP binding and phosphorylation. MGCs can form complexes with Ca2+-sensing subunits that either increase or decrease cyclic GMP synthesis, depending on subunit identity. In some systems, co-expression of two Ca2+ sensors, GCAP1 and S100B with ROS-GC1 confers bimodal signaling marked by increases in cyclic GMP synthesis when intracellular Ca2+ concentration rises or falls. Some MGCs monitor or are modulated by carbon dioxide via its conversion to bicarbonate. One MGC even functions as a thermosensor as well as a chemosensor; activity reaches a maximum with a mild drop in temperature. The complexity afforded by these multiple limbs of operation enables MGC networks to perform transductions traditionally reserved for G protein coupled receptors and TRP (Transient Receptor Potential channels and to serve a diverse array of functions, including control over cardiac vasculature, smooth muscle relaxation, blood pressure regulation, cellular growth, sensory transductions, neural plasticity and memory.

  6. Integrative Signaling Networks of Membrane Guanylate Cyclases: Biochemistry and Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rameshwar K.; Duda, Teresa; Makino, Clint L.

    2016-01-01

    This monograph presents a historical perspective of cornerstone developments on the biochemistry and physiology of mammalian membrane guanylate cyclases (MGCs), highlighting contributions made by the authors and their collaborators. Upon resolution of early contentious studies, cyclic GMP emerged alongside cyclic AMP, as an important intracellular second messenger for hormonal signaling. However, the two signaling pathways differ in significant ways. In the cyclic AMP pathway, hormone binding to a G protein coupled receptor leads to stimulation or inhibition of an adenylate cyclase, whereas the cyclic GMP pathway dispenses with intermediaries; hormone binds to an MGC to affect its activity. Although the cyclic GMP pathway is direct, it is by no means simple. The modular design of the molecule incorporates regulation by ATP binding and phosphorylation. MGCs can form complexes with Ca2+-sensing subunits that either increase or decrease cyclic GMP synthesis, depending on subunit identity. In some systems, co-expression of two Ca2+ sensors, GCAP1 and S100B with ROS-GC1 confers bimodal signaling marked by increases in cyclic GMP synthesis when intracellular Ca2+ concentration rises or falls. Some MGCs monitor or are modulated by carbon dioxide via its conversion to bicarbonate. One MGC even functions as a thermosensor as well as a chemosensor; activity reaches a maximum with a mild drop in temperature. The complexity afforded by these multiple limbs of operation enables MGC networks to perform transductions traditionally reserved for G protein coupled receptors and Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) ion channels and to serve a diverse array of functions, including control over cardiac vasculature, smooth muscle relaxation, blood pressure regulation, cellular growth, sensory transductions, neural plasticity and memory.

  7. The application of hyaluronic acid-derivatized carbon nanotubes in hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether-based photodynamic therapy for in vivo and in vitro cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi J

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Jinjin Shi,* Rourou Ma,* Lei Wang, Jing Zhang, Ruiyuan Liu, Lulu Li, Yan Liu, Lin Hou, Xiaoyuan Yu, Jun Gao, Zhenzhong Zhang School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs have shown great potential in both photothermal therapy and drug delivery. In this study, a CNT derivative, hyaluronic acid-derivatized CNTs (HA-CNTs with high aqueous solubility, neutral pH, and tumor-targeting activity, were synthesized and characterized, and then a new photodynamic therapy agent, hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME, was adsorbed onto the functionalized CNTs to develop HMME-HA-CNTs. Tumor growth inhibition was investigated both in vivo and in vitro by a combination of photothermal therapy and photodynamic therapy using HMME-HA-CNTs. The ability of HMME-HA-CNT nanoparticles to combine local specific photodynamic therapy with external near-infrared photothermal therapy significantly improved the therapeutic efficacy of cancer treatment. Compared with photodynamic therapy or photothermal therapy alone, the combined treatment demonstrated a synergistic effect, resulting in higher therapeutic efficacy without obvious toxic effects to normal organs. Overall, it was demonstrated that HMME-HA-CNTs could be successfully applied to photodynamic therapy and photothermal therapy simultaneously in future tumor therapy.Keywords: photodynamic therapy, photothermal therapy, HA-derivatized carbon nanotubes, tumor targeting, synergistic effect, hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether

  8. Crystal structures of eight mono-methyl alkanes (C26–C32 via single-crystal and powder diffraction and DFT-D optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Brooks

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structures of eight mono-methyl alkanes have been determined from single-crystal or high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. Mono-methyl alkanes can be found on the cuticles of insects and are believed to act as recognition pheromones in some social species, e.g. ants, wasps etc. The molecules were synthesized as pure S enantiomers and are (S-9-methylpentacosane, C26H54; (S-9-methylheptacosane and (S-11-methylheptacosane, C28H58; (S-7-methylnonacosane, (S-9-methylnonacosane, (S-11-methylnonacosane and (S-13-methylnonacosane, C30H62; and (S-9-methylhentriacontane, C32H66. All crystallize in space group P21. Depending on the position of the methyl group on the carbon chain, two packing schemes are observed, in which the molecules pack together hexagonally as linear rods with terminal and side methyl groups clustering to form distinct motifs. Carbon-chain torsion angles deviate by less than 10° from the fully extended conformation, but with one packing form showing greater curvature than the other near the position of the methyl side group. The crystal structures are optimized by dispersion-corrected DFT calculations, because of the difficulties in refining accurate structural parameters from powder diffraction data from relatively poorly crystalline materials.

  9. Mercury, monomethyl mercury, and dissolved organic carbon concentrations in surface water entering and exiting constructed wetlands treated with metal-based coagulants, Twitchell Island, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpner, Elizabeth B.; Kraus, Tamara E.C.; Fleck, Jacob A.; Hansen, Angela M.; Bachand, Sandra M.; Horwath, William R.; DeWild, John F.; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Bachand, Philip A.M.

    2015-09-02

    Coagulation with metal-based salts is a practice commonly employed by drinking-water utilities to decrease particle and dissolved organic carbon concentrations in water. In addition to decreasing dissolved organic carbon concentrations, the effectiveness of iron- and aluminum-based coagulants for decreasing dissolved concentrations both of inorganic and monomethyl mercury in water was demonstrated in laboratory studies that used agricultural drainage water from the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta of California. To test the effectiveness of this approach at the field scale, nine 15-by-40‑meter wetland cells were constructed on Twitchell Island that received untreated water from island drainage canals (control) or drainage water treated with polyaluminum chloride or ferric sulfate coagulants. Surface-water samples were collected approximately monthly during November 2012–September 2013 from the inlets and outlets of the wetland cells and then analyzed by the U.S. Geological Survey for total concentrations of mercury and monomethyl mercury in filtered (less than 0.3 micrometers) and suspended-particulate fractions and for concentrations of dissolved organic carbon.

  10. Crystal structures of eight mono-methyl alkanes (C26-C32) via single-crystal and powder diffraction and DFT-D optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Lee; Brunelli, Michela; Pattison, Philip; Jones, Graeme R; Fitch, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    The crystal structures of eight mono-methyl alkanes have been determined from single-crystal or high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. Mono-methyl alkanes can be found on the cuticles of insects and are believed to act as recognition pheromones in some social species, e.g. ants, wasps etc. The molecules were synthesized as pure S enantiomers and are (S)-9-methylpentacosane, C26H54; (S)-9-methylheptacosane and (S)-11-methylheptacosane, C28H58; (S)-7-methylnonacosane, (S)-9-methylnonacosane, (S)-11-methylnonacosane and (S)-13-methylnonacosane, C30H62; and (S)-9-methylhentriacontane, C32H66. All crystallize in space group P21. Depending on the position of the methyl group on the carbon chain, two packing schemes are observed, in which the molecules pack together hexagonally as linear rods with terminal and side methyl groups clustering to form distinct motifs. Carbon-chain torsion angles deviate by less than 10° from the fully extended conformation, but with one packing form showing greater curvature than the other near the position of the methyl side group. The crystal structures are optimized by dispersion-corrected DFT calculations, because of the difficulties in refining accurate structural parameters from powder diffraction data from relatively poorly crystalline materials.

  11. [Biosynthesis of cyclic GMP in plant cells - new insight into guanylate cyclases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świeżawska, Brygida; Marciniak, Katarzyna; Szmidt-Jaworska, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic 3',5'-guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is involved in many physiological processes in plants. Concentration of this second messenger in plant cell is determined by guanylyl cyclases (GCs) responsible for cGMP synthesis and phosphodiesterases (PDEs) involved in cGMP inactivation. First discovered plant GCs were localized in cytosol, but few years ago a new family of plasma membrane proteins with guanylyl cyclase activity was identified in Arabidopsis thaliana. These proteins belong to the family of a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR-RLK) with extracellular leucine-rich repeat domain, a transmembrane-spanning domain, and an intracellular kinase domain. A novel class of guanylyl cyclases contain the GC catalytic center encapsulated within the intracellular kinase domain. These molecules are different to animal GCs in that the GC catalytic center is nested within the kinase domain. In presented paper we summarized the most recent data concerning plant guanylyl cyclases.

  12. [Soluble guanylate cyclase in the molecular mechanism underlying the therapeutic action of drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatakova, N V; Severina, I S

    2012-01-01

    The influence of ambroxol--a mucolytic drug--on the activity of human platelet soluble guanylate cyclase and rat lung soluble guanylate cyclase and activation of both enzymes by NO-donors (sodium nitroprusside and Sin-1) were investigated. Ambroxol in the concentration range from 0.1 to 10 microM had no effect on the basal activity of both enzymes. Ambroxol inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner the sodium nitroprusside-induced human platelet soluble guanylate cyclase and rat lung soluble guanylate cyclase with the IC50 values 3.9 and 2.1 microM, respectively. Ambroxol did not influence the stimulation of both enzymes by protoporphyrin IX. The influence of artemisinin--an antimalarial drug--on human platelet soluble guanylate cyclase activity and the enzyme activation by NO-donors were investigated. Artemisinin (0.1-100 microM) had no effect on the basal activity of the enzyme. Artemisinin inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner the sodium nitroprusside-induced activation of human platelet guanylate cyclase with an IC50 value 5.6 microM. Artemisinin (10 microM) also inhibited (by 71 +/- 4.0%) the activation of the enzyme by thiol-dependent NO-donor the derivative of furoxan, 3,4-dicyano-1,2,5-oxadiazolo-2-oxide (10 microM), but did not influence the stimulation of soluble guanylate cyclase by protoporphyrin IX. It was concluded that the sygnalling system NO-soluble guanylate cyclase-cGMP is involved in the molecular mechanism of the therapeutic action of ambroxol and artemisinin.

  13. Genetic and biochemical analysis of the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein, cap, in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    OpenAIRE

    Kawamukai, M; Gerst, J; Field, J.; Riggs, M.; Rodgers, L; Wigler, M; Young, D

    1992-01-01

    We have identified, cloned, and studied a gene, cap, encoding a protein that is associated with adenylyl cyclase in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This protein shares significant sequence homology with the adenylyl cyclase-associated CAP protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. CAP is a bifunctional protein; the N-terminal domain appears to be involved in cellular responsiveness to RAS, whereas loss of the C-terminal portion is associated with morphological and nutritional...

  14. Lycopene cyclase paralog CruP protects against reactive oxygen species in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms

    OpenAIRE

    Bradbury, Louis M. T.; Shumskaya, Maria; Tzfadia, Oren; Wu, Shi-Biao; Kennelly, Edward J.; Wurtzel, Eleanore T

    2012-01-01

    In photosynthetic organisms, carotenoids serve essential roles in photosynthesis and photoprotection. A previous report designated CruP as a secondary lycopene cyclase involved in carotenoid biosynthesis [Maresca J, et al. (2007) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 104:11784–11789]. However, we found that cruP KO or cruP overexpression plants do not exhibit correspondingly reduced or increased production of cyclized carotenoids, which would be expected if CruP was a lycopene cyclase. Instead, we show that...

  15. Choreographing the adenylyl cyclase signalosome: sorting out the partners and the steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrom, Rennolds S; Bogard, Amy S; Gros, Robert; Feldman, Ross D

    2012-01-01

    Adenylyl cyclases are a ubiquitous family of enzymes and are critical regulators of metabolic and cardiovascular function. Multiple isoforms of the enzyme are expressed in a range of tissues. However, for many processes, the adenylyl cyclase isoforms have been thought of as essentially interchangeable, with their impact more dependent on their common actions to increase intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate content regardless of the isoform involved. It has long been appreciated that each subfamily of isoforms demonstrate a specific pattern of "upstream" regulation, i.e., specific patterns of ion dependence (e.g., calcium-dependence) and specific patterns of regulation by kinases (protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase C (PKC), raf). However, more recent studies have suggested that adenylyl cyclase isoform-selective patterns of signaling are a wide-spread phenomenon. The determinants of these selective signaling patterns relate to a number of factors, including: (1) selective coupling of specific adenylyl cyclase isoforms with specific G protein-coupled receptors, (2) localization of specific adenylyl cyclase isoforms in defined structural domains (AKAP complexes, caveolin/lipid rafts), and (3) selective coupling of adenylyl cyclase isoforms with specific downstream signaling cascades important in regulation of cell growth and contractility. The importance of isoform-specific regulation has now been demonstrated both in mouse models as well as in humans. Adenylyl cyclase has not been viewed as a useful target for therapeutic regulation, given the ubiquitous expression of the enzyme and the perceived high risk of off-target effects. Understanding which isoforms of adenylyl cyclase mediate distinct cellular effects would bring new significance to the development of isoform-specific ligands to regulate discrete cellular actions.

  16. Structure and mechanism of the diterpene cyclase ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Köksal, Mustafa; Hu, Huayou; Coates, Robert M.; Peters, Reuben J.; Christianson, David W. (UIUC); (Iowa State); (Penn)

    2011-09-20

    The structure of ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase reveals three {alpha}-helical domains ({alpha}, {beta} and {gamma}), as also observed in the related diterpene cyclase taxadiene synthase. However, active sites are located at the interface of the {beta}{gamma} domains in ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase but exclusively in the {alpha} domain of taxadiene synthase. Modular domain architecture in plant diterpene cyclases enables the evolution of alternative active sites and chemical strategies for catalyzing isoprenoid cyclization reactions.

  17. Structure and Mechanism of the Diterpene Cyclase ent-Copalyl Diphosphate Synthase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köksal, Mustafa; Hu, Huayou; Coates, Robert M.; Peters, Reuben J.; Christianson, David W.

    2011-01-01

    The structure of ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase (CPS) reveals three α-helical domains (α, β, γ), as also observed in the related diterpene cyclase taxadiene synthase. However, active sites are located at the interface of the βγ domains in CPS but exclusively in the α domain of taxadiene synthase. Modular domain architecture in plant diterpene cyclases enables the evolution of alternative active sites and chemical strategies for catalyzing isoprenoid cyclization reactions. PMID:21602811

  18. Dimerization Domain of Retinal Membrane Guanylyl Cyclase 1 (RetGC1) Is an Essential Part of Guanylyl Cyclase-activating Protein (GCAP) Binding Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peshenko, Igor V; Olshevskaya, Elena V; Dizhoor, Alexander M

    2015-08-01

    The photoreceptor-specific proteins guanylyl cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs) bind and regulate retinal membrane guanylyl cyclase 1 (RetGC1) but not natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPRA). Study of RetGC1 regulation in vitro and its association with fluorescently tagged GCAP in transfected cells showed that R822P substitution in the cyclase dimerization domain causing congenital early onset blindness disrupted RetGC1 ability to bind GCAP but did not eliminate its affinity for another photoreceptor-specific protein, retinal degeneration 3 (RD3). Likewise, the presence of the NPRA dimerization domain in RetGC1/NPRA chimera specifically disabled binding of GCAPs but not of RD3. In subsequent mapping using hybrid dimerization domains in RetGC1/NPRA chimera, multiple RetGC1-specific residues contributed to GCAP binding by the cyclase, but the region around Met(823) was the most crucial. Either positively or negatively charged residues in that position completely blocked GCAP1 and GCAP2 but not RD3 binding similarly to the disease-causing mutation in the neighboring Arg(822). The specificity of GCAP binding imparted by RetGC1 dimerization domain was not directly related to promoting dimerization of the cyclase. The probability of coiled coil dimer formation computed for RetGC1/NPRA chimeras, even those incapable of binding GCAP, remained high, and functional complementation tests showed that the RetGC1 active site, which requires dimerization of the cyclase, was formed even when Met(823) or Arg(822) was mutated. These results directly demonstrate that the interface for GCAP binding on RetGC1 requires not only the kinase homology region but also directly involves the dimerization domain and especially its portion containing Arg(822) and Met(823).

  19. Diazepam inhibits forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity in human tumour cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, L P; Wang, J

    1999-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that the benzodiazepine agonist, diazepam, suppresses adenylyl cyclase activity in rat brain, via a G protein-coupled benzodiazepine receptor. Since diazepam binding sites are also present in diverse non-neuronal tissues including tumour cells, its effects on adenylyl cyclase activity were examined in membranes from human MCF-7 (breast cancer) and M-6 (melanoma) cells. Diazepam caused a biphasic and concentration-dependent inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity in MCF-7 membranes. The first phase of inhibition, at picomolar to nanomolar drug concentrations (EC50=5.7 x 10(-12)M), is similar to the receptor mediated phase observed in the rat brain. At micromolar concentrations of diazepam (EC50= 1.8 x 10(-4)M), the steep decrease in adenylyl cyclase activity may involve a direct action on the enzyme itself, as detected previously in rat brain membranes. Diazepam-induced suppression of adenylyl cyclase activity was also detected in M-6 membranes. However, in contrast to MCF-7 findings, only micromolar concentrations of diazepam (EC50=5.2 x 10(-4)M) inhibited enzyme activity in M-6 membranes. These findings suggest that G protein-coupled benzodiazepine receptors, which mediate inhibition of the adenylyl cyclase-cAMP pathway in the brain, are also expressed in MCF-7 cells.

  20. Methods of making alkyl esters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Brian

    2010-08-03

    A method comprising contacting an alcohol, a feed comprising one or more glycerides and equal to or greater than 2 wt % of one or more free fatty acids, and a solid acid catalyst, a nanostructured polymer catalyst, or a sulfated zirconia catalyst in one or more reactors, and recovering from the one or more reactors an effluent comprising equal to or greater than about 75 wt % alkyl ester and equal to or less than about 5 wt % glyceride.

  1. The Cyclase-associated Protein CAP as Regulator of Cell Polarity and cAMP Signaling in Dictyostelium

    OpenAIRE

    Noegel, Angelika A; Blau-Wasser, Rosemarie; Sultana, Hameeda; Müller, Rolf; Israel, Lars; Schleicher, Michael; Patel, Hitesh; Weijer, Cornelis J

    2004-01-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is an evolutionarily conserved regulator of the G-actin/F-actin ratio and, in yeast, is involved in regulating the adenylyl cyclase activity. We show that cell polarization, F-actin organization, and phototaxis are altered in a Dictyostelium CAP knockout mutant. Furthermore, in complementation assays we determined the roles of the individual domains in signaling and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. We studied in detail the adenylyl cyclase activity and fo...

  2. Human recombinant soluble guanylyl cyclase: expression, purification, and regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y. C.; Martin, E.; Murad, F.

    2000-01-01

    The alpha1- and beta1-subunits of human soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) were coexpressed in the Sf9 cells/baculovirus system. In addition to the native enzyme, constructs with hexahistidine tag at the amino and carboxyl termini of each subunit were coexpressed. This permitted the rapid and efficient purification of active recombinant enzyme on a nickel-affinity column. The enzyme has one heme per heterodimer and was readily activated with the NO donor sodium nitroprusside or 3-(5'-hydroxymethyl-2'furyl)-1-benzyl-indazole (YC-1). Sodium nitroprusside and YC-1 treatment potentiated each other in combination and demonstrated a remarkable 2,200-fold stimulation of the human recombinant sGC. The effects were inhibited with 1H-(1,2, 4)oxadiazole(4,3-a)quinoxalin-1one (ODQ). The kinetics of the recombinant enzyme with respect to GTP was examined. The products of the reaction, cGMP and pyrophosphate, inhibited the enzyme. The extent of inhibition by cGMP depended on the activation state of the enzyme, whereas inhibition by pyrophosphate was not affected by the enzyme state. Both reaction products displayed independent binding and cooperativity with respect to enzyme inhibition. The expression of large quantities of active enzyme will facilitate structural characterization of the protein.

  3. Synthesis of arborane triterpenols by a bacterial oxidosqualene cyclase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banta, Amy B.; Wei, Jeremy H.; Gill, Clare C. C.; Giner, José-Luis; Welander, Paula V.

    2017-01-01

    Cyclic triterpenoids are a broad class of polycyclic lipids produced by bacteria and eukaryotes. They are biologically relevant for their roles in cellular physiology, including membrane structure and function, and biochemically relevant for their exquisite enzymatic cyclization mechanism. Cyclic triterpenoids are also geobiologically significant as they are readily preserved in sediments and are used as biomarkers for ancient life throughout Earth's history. Isoarborinol is one such triterpenoid whose only known biological sources are certain angiosperms and whose diagenetic derivatives (arboranes) are often used as indicators of terrestrial input into aquatic environments. However, the occurrence of arborane biomarkers in Permian and Triassic sediments, which predates the accepted origin of angiosperms, suggests that microbial sources of these lipids may also exist. In this study, we identify two isoarborinol-like lipids, eudoraenol and adriaticol, produced by the aerobic marine heterotrophic bacterium Eudoraea adriatica. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrates that the E. adriatica eudoraenol synthase is an oxidosqualene cyclase homologous to bacterial lanosterol synthases and distinct from plant triterpenoid synthases. Using an Escherichia coli heterologous sterol expression system, we demonstrate that substitution of four amino acid residues in a bacterial lanosterol synthase enabled synthesis of pentacyclic arborinols in addition to tetracyclic sterols. This variant provides valuable mechanistic insight into triterpenoid synthesis and reveals diagnostic amino acid residues to differentiate between sterol and arborinol synthases in genomic and metagenomic datasets. Our data suggest that there may be additional bacterial arborinol producers in marine and freshwater environments that could expand our understanding of these geologically informative lipids.

  4. Structure of RNA 3'-phosphate cyclase bound to substrate RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Kevin K; Bingman, Craig A; Cheng, Chin L; Phillips, George N; Raines, Ronald T

    2014-10-01

    RNA 3'-phosphate cyclase (RtcA) catalyzes the ATP-dependent cyclization of a 3'-phosphate to form a 2',3'-cyclic phosphate at RNA termini. Cyclization proceeds through RtcA-AMP and RNA(3')pp(5')A covalent intermediates, which are analogous to intermediates formed during catalysis by the tRNA ligase RtcB. Here we present a crystal structure of Pyrococcus horikoshii RtcA in complex with a 3'-phosphate terminated RNA and adenosine in the AMP-binding pocket. Our data reveal that RtcA recognizes substrate RNA by ensuring that the terminal 3'-phosphate makes a large contribution to RNA binding. Furthermore, the RNA 3'-phosphate is poised for in-line attack on the P-N bond that links the phosphorous atom of AMP to N(ε) of His307. Thus, we provide the first insights into RNA 3'-phosphate termini recognition and the mechanism of 3'-phosphate activation by an Rtc enzyme.

  5. Ester Tuiksoo. Proua Suhkru kibedad päevad / Ester Tuiksoo ; interv. Piret Tali

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tuiksoo, Ester, 1965-

    2005-01-01

    Põllumajandusminister Ester Tuiksoo, kellel peagi täitub ministri ametis aasta Euroopa Liidu suhkrutrahvist, maaettevõtlusest, põllumajandusest, Euroopa Liidu toetustest, ministri elu- ja teenistuskäigust. Lisa: Ester Tuiksoo

  6. Ester Tuiksoo. Proua Suhkru kibedad päevad / Ester Tuiksoo ; interv. Piret Tali

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tuiksoo, Ester, 1965-

    2005-01-01

    Põllumajandusminister Ester Tuiksoo, kellel peagi täitub ministri ametis aasta Euroopa Liidu suhkrutrahvist, maaettevõtlusest, põllumajandusest, Euroopa Liidu toetustest, ministri elu- ja teenistuskäigust. Lisa: Ester Tuiksoo

  7. Arabidopsis CHL27, located in both envelope and thylakoid membranes, is required for the synthesis of protochlorophyllide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tottey, Stephen; Block, Maryse A; Allen, Michael; Westergren, Tomas; Albrieux, Catherine; Scheller, Henrik V; Merchant, Sabeeha; Jensen, Poul Erik

    2003-12-23

    CHL27, the Arabidopsis homologue to Chlamydomonas Crd1, a plastid-localized putative diiron protein, is required for the synthesis of protochlorophyllide and therefore is a candidate subunit of the aerobic cyclase in chlorophyll biosynthesis. delta-Aminolevulinic acid-fed antisense Arabidopsis plants with reduced amounts of Crd1/CHL27 accumulate Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester, the substrate of the cyclase reaction. Mutant plants have chlorotic leaves with reduced abundance of all chlorophyll proteins. Fractionation of Arabidopsis chloroplast membranes shows that Crd1/CHL27 is equally distributed on a membrane-weight basis in the thylakoid and inner-envelope membranes.

  8. Evidence for adenylate cyclase as a scaffold protein for Ras2-Ira interaction in Saccharomyces cerevisie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Sonia; Paiardi, Chiara; Pardons, Katrien; Winderickx, Joris; Martegani, Enzo

    2014-05-01

    Data in literature suggest that budding yeast adenylate cyclase forms a membrane-associated complex with the upstream components of the cAMP/PKA pathway. Here we provide evidences that adenylate cyclase (Cyr1p) acts as a scaffold protein keeping Ras2 available for its regulatory factors. We show that in a strain with deletion of the CYR1 gene (cyr1Δ pde2Δ msn2Δ msn4Δ) the basal Ras2-GTP level is very high and this is independent on the lack of feedback inhibition that could result from the absence of adenylate cyclase activity. Moreover, strains effected either in the intrinsic adenylate cyclase activity (fil1 strain) or in the stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity by active G-proteins (lcr1 strain) had a normal basal and glucose-induced Ras2-GTP level, indicating that adenylate cyclase activity does not influence the Ras2 activation state and suggesting that Cyr1 protein is required for the proper interaction between Ras2 and the Ira proteins. We also provide evidence that the two Ras-binding sites mapped on Cyr1p are required for the signalling complex assembly. In fact, we show that the cyr1Δ strain expressing CYR1 alleles lacking either the LRR region or the C-terminal domain still have a high basal and glucose-induced Ras2-GTP level. In contrast, a mutant expressing a Cyr1 protein only missing the N-terminal domain showed a normal Ras2 activation pattern. Likewise, the Ras2-GTP levels are comparable in the wild type strain and the srv2Δ strain, supporting the hypothesis that Cap is not essential for the Ras-adenylate cyclase interaction.

  9. Method of making a cyanate ester foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celina, Mathias C.; Giron, Nicholas Henry

    2014-08-05

    A cyanate ester resin mixture with at least one cyanate ester resin, an isocyanate foaming resin, other co-curatives such as polyol or epoxy compounds, a surfactant, and a catalyst/water can react to form a foaming resin that can be cured at a temperature greater than 50.degree. C. to form a cyanate ester foam. The cyanate ester foam can be heated to a temperature greater than 400.degree. C. in a non-oxidative atmosphere to provide a carbonaceous char foam.

  10. Neurohypophyseal hormone-responsive renal adenylate cyclase. IV. A random-hit matrix model for coupline in a hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, R N; Hechter, O

    1978-05-10

    A "random-hit" matrix model is proposed to account for the dynamic and steady state relationship between occupation of bovine renal medullary membrane receptors by [Lys8]vasopressin (LVP) and neurohypophyseal hormones (NHH) and the associated activation of membrane-bound adenylate cyclase. The model was developed by systematic introduction of specific rules concerning receptor coupling into a general structural model which consists of two square matrices of identical size, one composed of homogeneous R ("receptor") units, the second of homogeneous C ("cyclase") units. R units are either occupied (RO) or unoccupied (RU); C units are either active (CA) or inactive (CI). Hormone molecules are envisioned to "collide" with R units randomly; collision with RU leads to "binding", and occupation is maintained for a characteristic mean occupancy time, TO. In this structure, each R unit has an "interaction field" which consists of the "twin" unit in the "C" matrix, and the 4 nearest neighbor C units surrounding the twin. Occupation of an R unit leads to activation of all CI units in the interaction field of that R; CA units in the interaction field are refractory. Thus binding at a given R may "recruit" a variable number of inactive neighboring C units (5, 4, 3, 2, 1, or 0). The model requires that there be individual coupling delays between the moment of binding at a given R and subsequent activation of CI units (mean coupling delay (Td) approximately 10% To). Activation of C units persists as long as the "parent" R is occupied and is maintained for an additional short time interval (Tp) after RO reverts to RU, corresponding to hormone dissociation from receptor. The model accounts for the following previously demonstrated relations between LVP occupation of receptors and adenylate cyclase activation in bovine renal medullary membranes: 1) the shape of the nonlinear steady state relation between normalized (percentage maximal) receptor occupation (O) and cyclase activation

  11. Vitamin D₃ and monomethyl fumarate enhance natural killer cell lysis of dendritic cells and ameliorate the clinical score in mice suffering from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jaderi, Zaidoon; Maghazachi, Azzam A

    2015-11-13

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a CD4⁺ T cell mediated inflammatory demyelinating disease that is induced in mice by administration of peptides derived from myelin proteins. We developed EAE in SJL mice by administration of PLP139-151 peptide. The effect of treating these mice with 1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D₃ (vitamin D₃), or with monomethyl fumarate (MMF) was then examined. We observed that both vitamin D₃ and MMF inhibited and/or prevented EAE in these mice. These findings were corroborated with isolating natural killer (NK) cells from vitamin D₃-treated or MMF-treated EAE mice that lysed immature or mature dendritic cells. The results support and extend other findings indicating that an important mechanism of action for drugs used to treat multiple sclerosis (MS) is to enhance NK cell lysis of dendritic cells.

  12. Fumaric acid esters in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Wollina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fumaric acid esters (FAE are substances of interest in dermatology. FAE exert various activities on cutaneous cells and cytokine networks. So far only a mixture of dimethylfumarate (DMF and three salts of monoethylfumarate (MEF have gained approval for the oral treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque-type psoriasis in Germany. DMF seems to be the major active component. There is evidence that FAE are not only effective and safe in psoriasis but granulomatous non-infectious diseases like granuloma annulare, necrobiosis lipoidica and sarcoidosis. In vitro and animal studies suggest some activity in malignant melanoma as well.

  13. Steroidal esters from Ferula sinkiangensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangzhi; Li, Xiaojin; Cao, Li; Shen, Liangang; Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Junchi; Zhang, Lijing; Si, Jianyong

    2014-09-01

    Two new steroidal esters with an unusual framework, Sinkiangenorin A and B, a new organic acid glycoside, Sinkiangenorin C, and four known lignin compounds were isolated from the seeds of Ferula sinkiangensis. The structures of these compounds were established by spectroscopic analysis and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. All of the isolated compounds were tested against Hela, K562 and AGS human cancer cell lines. Sinkiangenorin C showed cytotoxic activity against AGS cells with an IC50 of 36.9 μM.

  14. Cobalt-catalyzed hydrogenation of esters to alcohols: unexpected reactivity trend indicates ester enolate intermediacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srimani, Dipankar; Mukherjee, Arup; Goldberg, Alexander F G; Leitus, Gregory; Diskin-Posner, Yael; Shimon, Linda J W; Ben David, Yehoshoa; Milstein, David

    2015-10-12

    The atom-efficient and environmentally benign catalytic hydrogenation of carboxylic acid esters to alcohols has been accomplished in recent years mainly with precious-metal-based catalysts, with few exceptions. Presented here is the first cobalt-catalyzed hydrogenation of esters to the corresponding alcohols. Unexpectedly, the evidence indicates the unprecedented involvement of ester enolate intermediates.

  15. 肌醇的天然单甲醚类衍生物研究进展%Nature monomethyl ether derivatives of inositol:research progress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马杰; 王海勇; 薛晓文

    2014-01-01

    肌醇是自然界中广泛存在的一种六元醇,有广泛的生理、生化作用,特别是能够促进肝和其他组织中的脂肪代谢、降低血中胆固醇,临床用于治疗脂肪肝、肝硬化,动脉硬化及高血脂症。近年来,一些肌醇衍生物已被报道具有其他生物活性,包括降血糖、镇咳,抗炎等作用,其中,松醇、白坚木皮醇、红杉醇等肌醇单甲醚类衍生物的研究较为深入,本文重点对这些肌醇单甲醚类衍生物的生物活性、提取制备和开发应用等方面进行综述。%Inositol,a hexol widely found in nature with a wide range of physiological and biochemical effects,can promote fat metabolism in liver and other tissues and lower blood cholesterol and thus has been used for the clinical treatment of fatty liver, cirrhosis,atherosclerosis and hyperlipidemia. Some derivatives of inositol have been reported to have different biological activities including hypoglycemic,antitussive,anti-inflammatory and other effects. In recent years,its monomethyl ether derivatives,such as pinitol,quebrachitol,and sequoyiol,have been studied widely. In this paper,the bioactivity,extraction,preparation and applications of these monomethyl ether derivatives of inositol are reviewed.

  16. The role of transcriptional regulation in maintaining the availability of mycobacterial adenylate cyclases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J. Casey

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium species have a complex cAMP regulatory network indicated by the high number of adenylate cyclases annotated in their genomes. However the need for a high level of redundancy in adenylate cyclase genes remains unknown. We have used semiquantitiative RT-PCR to examine the expression of eight Mycobacterium smegmatis cyclases with orthologs in the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, where cAMP has recently been shown to be important for virulence. All eight cyclases were transcribed in all environments tested, and only four demonstrated environmental-mediated changes in transcription. M. smegmatis genes MSMEG_0545 and MSMEG_4279 were upregulated during starvation conditions while MSMEG_0545 and MSMEG_4924 were downregulated in H2O2 and MSMEG_3780 was downregulated in low pH and starvation. Promoter fusion constructs containing M. tuberculosis H37Rv promoters showed consistent regulation compared to their M. smegmatis orthologs. Overall our findings indicate that while low levels of transcriptional regulation occur, regulation at the mRNA level does not play a major role in controlling cellular cyclase availability in a given environment.

  17. Identification of olivetolic acid cyclase from Cannabis sativa reveals a unique catalytic route to plant polyketides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagne, Steve J; Stout, Jake M; Liu, Enwu; Boubakir, Zakia; Clark, Shawn M; Page, Jonathan E

    2012-07-31

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other cannabinoids are responsible for the psychoactive and medicinal properties of Cannabis sativa L. (marijuana). The first intermediate in the cannabinoid biosynthetic pathway is proposed to be olivetolic acid (OA), an alkylresorcinolic acid that forms the polyketide nucleus of the cannabinoids. OA has been postulated to be synthesized by a type III polyketide synthase (PKS) enzyme, but so far type III PKSs from cannabis have been shown to produce catalytic byproducts instead of OA. We analyzed the transcriptome of glandular trichomes from female cannabis flowers, which are the primary site of cannabinoid biosynthesis, and searched for polyketide cyclase-like enzymes that could assist in OA cyclization. Here, we show that a type III PKS (tetraketide synthase) from cannabis trichomes requires the presence of a polyketide cyclase enzyme, olivetolic acid cyclase (OAC), which catalyzes a C2-C7 intramolecular aldol condensation with carboxylate retention to form OA. OAC is a dimeric α+β barrel (DABB) protein that is structurally similar to polyketide cyclases from Streptomyces species. OAC transcript is present at high levels in glandular trichomes, an expression profile that parallels other cannabinoid pathway enzymes. Our identification of OAC both clarifies the cannabinoid pathway and demonstrates unexpected evolutionary parallels between polyketide biosynthesis in plants and bacteria. In addition, the widespread occurrence of DABB proteins in plants suggests that polyketide cyclases may play an overlooked role in generating plant chemical diversity.

  18. Cloning and Functional Characterization of a Lycopene β-Cyclase from Macrophytic Red Alga Bangia fuscopurpurea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-Jun Cao

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Lycopene cyclases cyclize the open ends of acyclic lycopene (ψ,ψ-carotene into β- or ε-ionone rings in the crucial bifurcation step of carotenoid biosynthesis. Among all carotenoid constituents, β-carotene (β,β-carotene is found in all photosynthetic organisms, except for purple bacteria and heliobacteria, suggesting a ubiquitous distribution of lycopene β-cyclase activity in these organisms. In this work, we isolated a gene (BfLCYB encoding a lycopene β-cyclase from Bangia fuscopurpurea, a red alga that is considered to be one of the primitive multicellular eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms and accumulates carotenoid constituents with both β- and ε-rings, including β-carotene, zeaxanthin, α-carotene (β,ε-carotene and lutein. Functional complementation in Escherichia coli demonstrated that BfLCYB is able to catalyze cyclization of lycopene into monocyclic γ-carotene (β,ψ-carotene and bicyclic β-carotene, and cyclization of the open end of monocyclic δ-carotene (ε,ψ-carotene to produce α-carotene. No ε-cyclization activity was identified for BfLCYB. Sequence comparison showed that BfLCYB shares conserved domains with other functionally characterized lycopene cyclases from different organisms and belongs to a group of ancient lycopene cyclases. Although B. fuscopurpurea also synthesizes α-carotene and lutein, its enzyme-catalyzing ε-cyclization is still unknown.

  19. Regulation of adenylate cyclase of Dictyostelium discoideum by divalent cations and adenosine analogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khachatrian, L.; Howlett, A.; Klein, C.

    1986-03-05

    Cyclic AMP is synthesized and secreted in a pulsatile fashion as a chemotactic signaling system intrinsic to the differentiation program of D. discoideum. They examined the regulation of D. dischoideum adenylate cyclase using a membrane fraction which exhibits high specific activity enzyme. When Mn-ATP was used as substrate, increasing Mn/sup 2 +/ concentrations activated the enzyme 3 to 8 fold. In contrast, Mg ion increased the adenylate cyclase activity by only 60%. These results suggested an activation of the catalytic subunit by Mn/sup 2 +/. Inhibition of activity was observed in response to adenosine and its analogs. P-site agonist, 2',5'-Dideoxy-adenosine, inhibited activity by about 25% in the presence of Mg/sup 2 +/, and about 80% in presence of Mn/sup 2 +/. This inhibition was not dependent on guanine nucleotides. The data are in agreement with characteristics of P-site regulation of the catalytic subunit of eukaryotic systems. Kinetic analysis of previously reported inhibition of D. discoideum adenylate cyclase by guanine nucleotides revealed that guanine nucleotides do not compete for the substrate binding site. Further, the enzyme activity cannot be accounted for by guanylate cyclase. Their data suggest that regulation of adenylate cyclase may exist not only at the catalytic subunit but also via inhibitory G protein, N/sub i/.

  20. Cloning and Functional Characterization of a Lycopene β-Cyclase from Macrophytic Red Alga Bangia fuscopurpurea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Tian-Jun; Huang, Xing-Qi; Qu, Yuan-Yuan; Zhuang, Zhong; Deng, Yin-Yin; Lu, Shan

    2017-04-11

    Lycopene cyclases cyclize the open ends of acyclic lycopene (ψ,ψ-carotene) into β- or ε-ionone rings in the crucial bifurcation step of carotenoid biosynthesis. Among all carotenoid constituents, β-carotene (β,β-carotene) is found in all photosynthetic organisms, except for purple bacteria and heliobacteria, suggesting a ubiquitous distribution of lycopene β-cyclase activity in these organisms. In this work, we isolated a gene (BfLCYB) encoding a lycopene β-cyclase from Bangia fuscopurpurea, a red alga that is considered to be one of the primitive multicellular eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms and accumulates carotenoid constituents with both β- and ε-rings, including β-carotene, zeaxanthin, α-carotene (β,ε-carotene) and lutein. Functional complementation in Escherichia coli demonstrated that BfLCYB is able to catalyze cyclization of lycopene into monocyclic γ-carotene (β,ψ-carotene) and bicyclic β-carotene, and cyclization of the open end of monocyclic δ-carotene (ε,ψ-carotene) to produce α-carotene. No ε-cyclization activity was identified for BfLCYB. Sequence comparison showed that BfLCYB shares conserved domains with other functionally characterized lycopene cyclases from different organisms and belongs to a group of ancient lycopene cyclases. Although B. fuscopurpurea also synthesizes α-carotene and lutein, its enzyme-catalyzing ε-cyclization is still unknown.

  1. Synthesis of insecticidal sucrose esters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Zi-juan; Li Shu-jun; Chen Xi; Liu Li-mei; Song Zhan-qian

    2006-01-01

    Some synthetic sucrose esters (SE) are a relatively new class of insecticidal compounds produced by reacting sugars with fatty acids, which are safe for the environment. Especially, sucrose esters composed of C6-C12 fatty acids have desirable insecticidal properties against many soft-bodied arthropod pests. In our study, sucrose octanoate which has the highest activity against a range of arthropod species was synthesized by a trans-esterification method and proved its insecticidal property. Under the condition of a homogeneous liquid, sucrose octanoate was prepared by reacting ethyl octanoate with sucrose at reduced pressure; the yield was 79.11%. Sucrose octanoate synthesized was identified and its property analyzed by IR, TLC and spectrophotometric analysis. It was shown that the ratio of monoester to polyester in sucrose octanoate was 1.48:1. The insecticidal activity of the synthetic sucrose octanoate was evaluated at a concentration of 4 and 8 mg·mL-1. The mortality of first-instar larvae ofLymantria dispar from its contact toxicity was 72.5% after 36 hours, the revision insect reduced rate of Aphis glycines reached above 80% at 4 and 8 mg·mL-1 after being treated for 5 days. Since the SE products are nontoxic to humans and higher animals, fully biodegradable and hydrolyzed to readily metabolizable sucrose and fatty acid, they are not harmful to crops and appear to be good insecticide candidates.

  2. Comparative analysis of rubber seed methyl ester with other methyl ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative analysis of rubber seed methyl ester with other methyl esters. ... In order to achieve a two-step transesterification process was developed to convert rubber seed oil to its methyl esters. The first step, acid catalyzed ... Article Metrics.

  3. Estradiol rapidly inhibits soluble guanylyl cyclase expression in rat uterus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumenacker, J. S.; Hyder, S. M.; Murad, F.

    2001-01-01

    Previous reports that investigated the regulation of the NO/soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)/cGMP pathway by estrogenic compounds have focused primarily on the levels of NO, NO-producing enzymes, and cGMP in various tissues. In this study, we demonstrate that 17beta-estradiol (E2) regulates the alpha(1) and beta(1) subunits of the NO receptor, sGC, at the mRNA and protein levels in rat uterus. Using real-time quantitative PCR, we found that within 1 h of in vivo E2 administration to rats, sGC mRNA levels begin to diminish. After 3 h, there is a maximal diminution of sGC mRNA expression (sGC alpha(1) 10% and sGC beta(1) 33% of untreated). This effect was blocked by the estrogen receptor antagonist, ICI 182,780, indicating that estrogen receptor is required. The effect of E2 also was observed in vitro with incubations of uterine tissue, indicating that the response does not depend on the secondary release of other hormones or factors from other tissues. Puromycin did not block the effect, suggesting the effects occur because of preexisting factors in uterine tissues and do not require new protein synthesis. Using immunoblot analysis, we found that sGC protein levels also were reduced by E2 over a similar time course as the sGC mRNA. We conclude that sGC plays a vital role in the NO/sGC/cGMP regulatory pathway during conditions of elevated estrogen levels in the rat uterus as a result of the reduction of sGC expression.

  4. Adenylate cyclase regulates elongation of mammalian primary cilia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ou, Young; Ruan, Yibing; Cheng, Min; Moser, Joanna J. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4N1 (Canada); Rattner, Jerome B. [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4N1 (Canada); Hoorn, Frans A. van der, E-mail: fvdhoorn@ucalgary.ca [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 4N1 (Canada)

    2009-10-01

    The primary cilium is a non-motile microtubule-based structure that shares many similarities with the structures of flagella and motile cilia. It is well known that the length of flagella is under stringent control, but it is not known whether this is true for primary cilia. In this study, we found that the length of primary cilia in fibroblast-like synoviocytes, either in log phase culture or in quiescent state, was confined within a range. However, when lithium was added to the culture to a final concentration of 100 mM, primary cilia of synoviocytes grew beyond this range, elongating to a length that was on average approximately 3 times the length of untreated cilia. Lithium is a drug approved for treating bipolar disorder. We dissected the molecular targets of this drug, and observed that inhibition of adenylate cyclase III (ACIII) by specific inhibitors mimicked the effects of lithium on primary cilium elongation. Inhibition of GSK-3{beta} by four different inhibitors did not induce primary cilia elongation. ACIII was found in primary cilia of a variety of cell types, and lithium treatment of these cell types led to their cilium elongation. Further, we demonstrate that different cell types displayed distinct sensitivities to the lithium treatment. However, in all cases examined primary cilia elongated as a result of lithium treatment. In particular, two neuronal cell types, rat PC-12 adrenal medulla cells and human astrocytes, developed long primary cilia when lithium was used at or close to the therapeutic relevant concentration (1-2 mM). These results suggest that the length of primary cilia is controlled, at least in part, by the ACIII-cAMP signaling pathway.

  5. Expanding ester biosynthesis in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Gabriel M; Tashiro, Yohei; Atsumi, Shota

    2014-04-01

    To expand the capabilities of whole-cell biocatalysis, we have engineered Escherichia coli to produce various esters. The alcohol O-acyltransferase (ATF) class of enzyme uses acyl-CoA units for ester formation. The release of free CoA upon esterification with an alcohol provides the free energy to facilitate ester formation. The diversity of CoA molecules found in nature in combination with various alcohol biosynthetic pathways allows for the biosynthesis of a multitude of esters. Small to medium volatile esters have extensive applications in the flavor, fragrance, cosmetic, solvent, paint and coating industries. The present work enables the production of these compounds by designing several ester pathways in E. coli. The engineered pathways generated acetate esters of ethyl, propyl, isobutyl, 2-methyl-1-butyl, 3-methyl-1-butyl and 2-phenylethyl alcohols. In particular, we achieved high-level production of isobutyl acetate from glucose (17.2 g l(-1)). This strategy was expanded to realize pathways for tetradecyl acetate and several isobutyrate esters.

  6. Esteróles en esponjas marinas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmenza Duque

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Esta revisión bibliográfica comprende la mayona del trabajo publicado hasta el momento sobre esteróles aislados de esponjas marinas. Estos esteróles comprenden compuestos desde Cig hasta C31 con estructuras convencionales y con estructuras novedosas (núcleo y/o cadena lateral no convencional.

  7. Preparation of Spirocyclic β-Proline Esters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjelbye, Kasper; Marigo, Mauro; Clausen, Rasmus Prætorius

    2017-01-01

    A series of novel N-Bn-protected spirocyclic β-proline esters were prepared using [3+2] cycloaddition and subsequently converted into their corresponding aldehydes. In addition, two novel N-Cbz-protected spirocyclic β-proline esters were prepared using intramolecular cyclization starting from...

  8. Ethanolysis of rapeseed oil - distribution of ethyl esters, glycerides and glycerol between ester and glycerol phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernoch, Michal; Hájek, Martin; Skopal, Frantisek

    2010-04-01

    The distribution of ethyl esters, triglycerides, diglycerides, monoglycerides, and glycerol between the ester and glycerol phase was investigated after the ethanolysis of rapeseed oil at various reaction conditions. The determination of these substances in the ester and glycerol phases was carried out by the GC method. The amount of ethyl esters in the glycerol phase was unexpectedly high and therefore the possibility of the reduction of this amount was investigated. The distribution coefficients and the weight distributions of each investigated substance were calculated and compared mutually. The distribution coefficients between the ester and glycerol phase increase in this sequence: glycerol, monoglycerides, diglycerides, ethyl esters, and triglycerides. Soaps and monoglycerides in the reaction mixture cause a worse separation of ethyl esters from the reaction mixture. The existence of a non-separable reaction mixture was observed also, and its composition was determined.

  9. Short and stereoselective total synthesis of furano lignans (+/-)-dihydrosesamin, (+/-)-lariciresinol dimethyl ether, (+/-)-acuminatin methyl ether, (+/-)-sanshodiol methyl ether, (+/-)-lariciresinol, (+/-)-acuminatin, and (+/-)-lariciresinol monomethyl ether and furofuran lignans (+/-)-sesamin, (+/-)-eudesmin, (+/-)-piperitol methyl ether, (+/-)-pinoresinol, (+/-)-piperitol, and (+/-)-pinoresinol monomethyl ether by radical cyclization of epoxides using a transition-metal radical source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Subhas Chandra; Rana, Kalyan Kumar; Guin, Chandrani

    2002-05-17

    Intramolecular radical cyclization of suitably substituted epoxy ethers 4a-g using bis(cyclopentadienyl)titanium(III) chloride as the radical source resulted in trisubstituted tetrahydrofurano lignans and 2,6-diaryl-3,7-dioxabicyclo[3.3.0]octane lignans depending on the reaction conditions. The titanium(III) species was prepared in situ from commercially available titanocene dichloride and activated zinc dust in THF. Upon radical cyclization followed by acidic workup, epoxy olefinic ethers 4a-g afforded furano lignans dihydrosesamin 1a, lariciresinol dimethyl ether 1b, acuminatin methyl ether 1e, and sanshodiol methyl ether 1g directly and lariciresinol 1h, acuminatin 1i, and lariciresinol monomethyl ether 1j after removal of the benzyl protecting group by controlled hydrogenolysis of the corresponding cyclized products. The furofuran lignans sesamin 2a, eudesmin 2b, and piperitol methyl ether 2e were also prepared directly by using the same precursors 4a-f on radical cyclization followed by treatment with iodine and pinoresinol 2h, piperitol 2i, and pinoresinol monomethyl ether 2j after controlled hydrogenolysis of the benzyl protecting group of the corresponding cyclized products. Two naturally occurring acyclic lignans, secoisolariciresinol 5h and secoisolariciresinol dimethyl ether 5b, have also been prepared by exhaustive hydrogenolysis of 2h and 2b, respectively.

  10. Anticholinesterase activity of fluorochloronitroacetic acid esters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Yu.Ya.; Brel, V.K. Martynov, I.V.

    1984-11-01

    Results are presented from pharmacologic and biochemical experiments leading to the conclusion that fluorochloronitroacetic acid esters have anticholinesterase activity. Since the esters caused muscular weakness in mice, experiments were performed on isolated tissue preparation. The biochemical experiments consisted of finding the biomolecular constants of irreversible inhibition of acetylcholinesterase by the esters, using acetylcholinesterase from human erythrocytes, as well as horse serum cholinesterase. The ethyl and n-propyl esters of halogen nitroacetic acid were used in all experiments. It was found that the propyl ester caused an increase in the force of individual contractions in the isolated muscle specimens, plus an inability of the muscle to retain tetanus. The substances were determined to have an anticholinesterase effect. The mechanism of cholinesterase inhibition is not yet known. It is probable that the substances acylate the serine hydroxyl of the esterase center of the cholinestersase. 7 references, 1 figure.

  11. In Vitro Assessment of Guanylyl Cyclase Activity of Plant Receptor Kinases

    KAUST Repository

    Raji, Misjudeen

    2017-05-31

    Cyclic nucleotides such as 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) are increasingly recognized as key signaling molecules in plants, and a growing number of plant mononucleotide cyclases, both adenylate cyclases (ACs) and guanylate cyclases (GCs), have been reported. Catalytically active cytosolic GC domains have been shown to be part of many plant receptor kinases and hence directly linked to plant signaling and downstream cellular responses. Here we detail, firstly, methods to identify and express essential functional GC domains of receptor kinases, and secondly, we describe mass spectrometric methods to quantify cGMP generated by recombinant GCs from receptor kinases in vitro.

  12. Simultaneous stimulation of GABA and beta adrenergic receptors stabilizes isotypes of activated adenylyl cyclase heterocomplex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robichon Alain

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We investigated how the synthesis of cAMP, stimulated by isoproterenol acting through β-adrenoreceptors and Gs, is strongly amplified by simultaneous incubation with baclofen. Baclofen is an agonist of δ-aminobutyric acid type B receptors [GABAB], known to inhibit adenylyl cyclase via Gi. Because these agents have opposite effects on cAMP levels, the unexpected increase in cAMP synthesis when they are applied simultaneously has been intensively investigated. From previous reports, it appears that cyclase type II contributes most significantly to this phenomenon. Results We found that simultaneous application of isoproterenol and baclofen specifically influences the association/dissociation of molecules involved in the induction and termination of cyclase activity. Beta/gamma from [GABA]B receptor-coupled Gi has a higher affinity for adenylyl cyclase isoform(s when these isoforms are co-associated with Gs. Our data also suggest that, when beta/gamma and Gαs are associated with adenylyl cyclase isoform(s, beta/gamma from [GABA]B receptor-coupled Gi retards the GTPase activity of Gαs from adrenergic receptor. These reciprocal regulations of subunits of the adenylyl cyclase complex might be responsible for the drastic increase of cAMP synthesis in response to the simultaneous signals. Conclusions Simultaneous signals arriving at a particular synapse converge on molecular detectors of coincidence and trigger specific biochemical events. We hypothesize that this phenomenon comes from the complex molecular architectures involved, including scaffolding proteins that make reciprocal interactions between associated molecules possible. The biochemistry of simultaneous signaling is addressed as a key to synaptic function.

  13. Highly cooperative feedback control of retinal rod guanylate cyclase by calcium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, K W; Stryer, L

    1988-07-07

    Visual excitation in retinal rod cells is mediated by a cascade that leads to the amplified hydrolysis of cyclic GMP (cGMP) and the consequent closure of cGMP-activated cation-specific channels in the plasma membrane. Recovery of the dark state requires the resynthesis of cGMP, which is catalysed by guanylate cyclase, an axoneme-associated enzyme. The lowering of the cytosolic calcium concentration (Cai) following illumination is thought to be important in stimulating cyclase activity. This hypothesis is supported by the finding that the cGMP content of rod outer segments increases several-fold when Cai is lowered to less than 10 nM. It is evident that cGMP and Cai levels are reciprocally controlled by negative feedback. Guanylate cyclase from toad ROS is strongly stimulated when the calcium level is lowered from 10 microM to 10 nM, but only if they are excited by light. We show here that the guanylate cyclase activity of unilluminated bovine rod outer segments increases markedly (5 to 20-fold) when the calcium level is lowered from 200 nM to 50 nM. This steep dependence of guanylate cyclase activity on the calcium level in the physiological range has a Hill coefficient of 3.9. Stimulation at low calcium levels is mediated by a protein that can be released from the outer segment membranes by washing with a low salt buffer. Calcium sensitivity is partially restored by adding the soluble extract back to the washed membranes. The highly cooperative activation of guanylate cyclase by the light-induced lowering of Cai is likely to be a key event in restoring the dark current after excitation.

  14. A Novel Mechanism for Adenylyl Cyclase Inhibition from the Crystal Structure of its Complex with Catechol Estrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steegborn,C.; Litvin, T.; Hess, K.; Capper, A.; Taussig, R.; Buck, J.; Levin, L.; Wu, H.

    2005-01-01

    Catechol estrogens are steroid metabolites that elicit physiological responses through binding to a variety of cellular targets. We show here that catechol estrogens directly inhibit soluble adenylyl cyclases and the abundant trans-membrane adenylyl cyclases. Catechol estrogen inhibition is non-competitive with respect to the substrate ATP, and we solved the crystal structure of a catechol estrogen bound to a soluble adenylyl cyclase from Spirulina platensis in complex with a substrate analog. The catechol estrogen is bound to a newly identified, conserved hydrophobic patch near the active center but distinct from the ATP-binding cleft. Inhibitor binding leads to a chelating interaction between the catechol estrogen hydroxyl groups and the catalytic magnesium ion, distorting the active site and trapping the enzyme substrate complex in a non-productive conformation. This novel inhibition mechanism likely applies to other adenylyl cyclase inhibitors, and the identified ligand-binding site has important implications for the development of specific adenylyl cyclase inhibitors.

  15. Antifungal properties of halofumarate esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershon, H; Shanks, L

    1978-04-01

    Alkyl esters (C1--C4) of the four halofumaric acids were tested for antifungal activity against Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger, Mucor mucedo, and Trichophyton mentagrophytes at pH 5.6 and 7.0 in the absence and presence of 10% beef serum in Sabouraud dextrose agar. The most toxic compound to each organism was: C. albicans, ethyl iodofumarate (0.054 mmole/liter); A. niger, methyl bromofumarate (0.090 mmole/liter); M. mucedo, methyl fluorofumarate (0.037 mmole/liter); and T. mentagrophytes, ethyl iodofumarate (0.020 mmole/liter). The order of overall activity of the six most toxic compounds was: ethyl iodofumarate greater than ethyl chlorofumarate greater than methyl iodofumarate = methyl bromofumarate greater than methyl chlorofumarate greater than bromofumarate.

  16. Multifunctional oxidosqualene cyclases and cytochrome P450involved in the biosynthesis of apple fruit triterpenic acids

    OpenAIRE

    Andre, Christelle; Legay, Sylvain; Deleruelle, Amélie; Nieuwenhuizen, Niels; Punter, Matthew; Brendolise, Cyril; M.Cooney, Janine; Lateur, Marc; Hausman, Jean-François; Larondelle, Yvan; A.Laing, William

    2016-01-01

    Summary Apple (Malus × domestica) accumulates bioactive ursane‐, oleanane‐, and lupane‐type triterpenes in its fruit cuticle, but their biosynthetic pathway is still poorly understood. We used a homology‐based approach to identify and functionally characterize two new oxidosqualene cyclases (MdOSC4 and MdOSC5) and one cytochrome P450 (CYP716A175). The gene expression patterns of these enzymes and of previously described oxidosqualene cyclases were further studied in 20 apple cultivars with co...

  17. [The aspects of adenylate cyclase activity regulation in myocardium cell membranes during hypokinesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanova, K Ia; Komar, E S; Lobanok, L M

    1999-01-01

    Nonstimulated and isoproterenol, GTF, GITF, NaF stimulated activities of the adenylate cyclase in sarcolemma in white rats' myocardium was studied after two weeks of hypokinesia. As was established, in restrained animals the sensitivity of adenylate cyclase to the specified agents was increased and transition to the bimodal GTF regulation took place. It is hypothesised that involvement of membrane-bound Gi-proteins in the adrenergic effects on cardiomyocytes is one of mechanisms of the cardiotropic effects of restraint and heart distresses.

  18. Identification of a fourth family of lycopene cyclases in photosynthetic bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Maresca, Julia A.; Graham, Joel E.; Wu, Martin; Eisen, Jonathan A; Bryant, Donald A.

    2007-01-01

    A fourth and large family of lycopene cyclases was identified in photosynthetic prokaryotes. The first member of this family, encoded by the cruA gene of the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum, was identified in a complementation assay with a lycopene-producing strain of Escherichia coli. Orthologs of cruA are found in all available green sulfur bacterial genomes and in all cyanobacterial genomes that lack genes encoding CrtL- or CrtY-type lycopene cyclases. The cyanobacterium Synechoc...

  19. Purification and assay of cell-invasive form of calmodulin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase from Bordetella pertussis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masure, H.R.; Donovan, M.G.; Storm, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    An invasive form of the CaM-sensitive adenylyl cyclase from Bordetella pertussis can be isolated from bacterial culture supernatants. This isolation is achieved through the use of QAE-Sephadex anion-exchange chromatography. It has been demonstrated that the addition of exogenous Ca{sup 2}{sup +} to the anion-exchange gradient buffers will affect elution from the column and will thereby affect the isolation of invasive adenylyl cyclase. This is probably due to a Ca2(+)-dependent interaction of the catalytic subunit with another component in the culture supernatant. Two peaks of adenylyl cyclase activity are obtained. The Pk1 adenylyl cyclase preparation is able to cause significant increases in intracellular cAMP levels in animal cells. This increase occurs rapidly and in a dose-dependent manner in both N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells and human erythrocytes. The Pk2 adenylyl cyclase has catalytic activity but is not cell invasive. This material can serve, therefore, as a control to ensure that the cAMP which is measured is, indeed, intracellular. A second control is to add exogenous CaM to the Pk1 adenylyl cyclase preparation. The 45-kDa catalytic subunit-CaM complex is not cell invasive. Although the mechanism for membrane translocation of the adenylyl cyclase is unknown, there is evidence that the adenylyl cyclase enters animal cells by a mechanism distinct from receptor-mediated endocytosis. Calmodulin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase activity can be removed from preparations of the adenylyl cyclase that have been subjected to SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This property of the enzyme has enabled purification of the catalytic subunit to apparent homogeneity. The purified catalytic subunit from culture supernatants has a predicted molecular weight of 45,000. This polypeptide interacts directly with Ca{sup 2}{sup +} and this interaction may be important for its invasion into animal cells.

  20. Multiple lineage specific expansions within the guanylyl cyclase gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Halloran Damien M

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guanylyl cyclases (GCs are responsible for the production of the secondary messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate, which plays important roles in a variety of physiological responses such as vision, olfaction, muscle contraction, homeostatic regulation, cardiovascular and nervous function. There are two types of GCs in animals, soluble (sGCs which are found ubiquitously in cell cytoplasm, and receptor (rGC forms which span cell membranes. The complete genomes of several vertebrate and invertebrate species are now available. These data provide a platform to investigate the evolution of GCs across a diverse range of animal phyla. Results In this analysis we located GC genes from a broad spectrum of vertebrate and invertebrate animals and reconstructed molecular phylogenies for both sGC and rGC proteins. The most notable features of the resulting phylogenies are the number of lineage specific rGC and sGC expansions that have occurred during metazoan evolution. Among these expansions is a large nematode specific rGC clade comprising 21 genes in C. elegans alone; a vertebrate specific expansion in the natriuretic receptors GC-A and GC-B; a vertebrate specific expansion in the guanylyl GC-C receptors, an echinoderm specific expansion in the sperm rGC genes and a nematode specific sGC clade. Our phylogenetic reconstruction also shows the existence of a basal group of nitric oxide (NO insensitive insect and nematode sGCs which are regulated by O2. This suggests that the primordial eukaryotes probably utilized sGC as an O2 sensor, with the ligand specificity of sGC later switching to NO which provides a very effective local cell-to-cell signalling system. Phylogenetic analysis of the sGC and bacterial heme nitric oxide/oxygen binding protein domain supports the hypothesis that this domain originated from a cyanobacterial source. Conclusion The most salient feature of our phylogenies is the number of lineage specific expansions

  1. Gi proteins regulate adenylyl cyclase activity independent of receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melsom, Caroline Bull; Ørstavik, Øivind; Osnes, Jan-Bjørn; Skomedal, Tor; Levy, Finn Olav; Krobert, Kurt Allen

    2014-01-01

    Despite the view that only β2- as opposed to β1-adrenoceptors (βARs) couple to G(i), some data indicate that the β1AR-evoked inotropic response is also influenced by the inhibition of Gi. Therefore, we wanted to determine if Gi exerts tonic receptor-independent inhibition upon basal adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity in cardiomyocytes. We used the Gs-selective (R,R)- and the Gs- and G(i)-activating (R,S)-fenoterol to selectively activate β2ARs (β1AR blockade present) in combination with Gi inactivation with pertussis toxin (PTX). We also determined the effect of PTX upon basal and forskolin-mediated responses. Contractility was measured ex vivo in left ventricular strips and cAMP accumulation was measured in isolated ventricular cardiomyocytes from adult Wistar rats. PTX amplified both the (R,R)- and (R,S)-fenoterol-evoked maximal inotropic response and concentration-dependent increases in cAMP accumulation. The EC50 values of fenoterol matched published binding affinities. The PTX enhancement of the Gs-selective (R,R)-fenoterol-mediated responses suggests that Gi regulates AC activity independent of receptor coupling to Gi protein. Consistent with this hypothesis, forskolin-evoked cAMP accumulation was increased and inotropic responses to forskolin were potentiated by PTX treatment. In non-PTX-treated tissue, phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3 and 4 inhibition or removal of either constitutive muscarinic receptor activation of Gi with atropine or removal of constitutive adenosine receptor activation with CGS 15943 had no effect upon contractility. However, in PTX-treated tissue, PDE3 and 4 inhibition alone increased basal levels of cAMP and accordingly evoked a large inotropic response. Together, these data indicate that Gi exerts intrinsic receptor-independent inhibitory activity upon AC. We propose that PTX treatment shifts the balance of intrinsic G(i) and Gs activity upon AC towards Gs, enhancing the effect of all cAMP-mediated inotropic agents.

  2. Ectopic expression of cyclase associated protein CAP restores the streaming and aggregation defects of adenylyl cyclase a deficient Dictyostelium discoideum cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultana Hameeda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell adhesion, an integral part of D. discoideum development, is important for morphogenesis and regulated gene expression in the multicellular context and is required to trigger cell-differentiation. G-protein linked adenylyl cyclase pathways are crucially involved and a mutant lacking the aggregation specific adenylyl cyclase ACA does not undergo multicellular development. Results Here, we have investigated the role of cyclase-associated protein (CAP, an important regulator of cell polarity and F-actin/G-actin ratio in the aca- mutant. We show that ectopic expression of GFP-CAP improves cell polarization, streaming and aggregation in aca- cells, but it fails to completely restore development. Our studies indicate a requirement of CAP in the ACA dependent signal transduction for progression of the development of unicellular amoebae into multicellular structures. The reduced expression of the cell adhesion molecule DdCAD1 together with csA is responsible for the defects in aca- cells to initiate multicellular development. Early development was restored by the expression of GFP-CAP that enhanced the DdCAD1 transcript levels and to a lesser extent the csA mRNA levels. Conclusions Collectively, our data shows a novel role of CAP in regulating cell adhesion mechanisms during development that might be envisioned to unravel the functions of mammalian CAP during animal embryogenesis.

  3. New ester alkaloids from lupins (genus lupinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlbauer, P; Witte, L; Wink, M

    1988-06-01

    Esters of 13-hydroxylupanine and 4-hydroxylupanine with acetic, propionic, butyric, isobutyric, valeric, isovaleric, tiglic, benzoic, and TRANS-cinnamic acid have been synthesized and characterized by capillary gas-liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (EI-MS, CI-MS). In LUPINUS POLYPHYLLUS, L. ALBUS, L. ANGUSTIFOLIUS, and L. MUTABILIS we could identify new ester alkaloids (e.g. 13-propyloxylupanine, 13-butyryloxylupanine, 13-isobutyryloxylupanine, and 4-tigloyloxylupanine) besides the known esters, i.e. 13-acetoxylupanine, 13-isovaleroyloxylupanine, 13-angeloyloxylupanine, 13-tigloyloxylupanine, 13-benzoyloxylupanine, 13- CIS-cinnamoyloxylupanine nine, and 13- TRANS-cinnamoyloxylupanine.

  4. Cold Flow Properties of Fatty Esters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Kleinová

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the study of cold fl ow properties of neat esters of branched chain alcohols with fatty acids and blends of these esters with fossil diesel fuel. According to the determined CFPP values, the influence of alcohol branching on the fuel filterability is negligible and was detected only in the case of 2-ethyl hexanol. Fossil fuel blending with fatty esters up to 10 % vol. does not substantially change the cold flow properties of fossil fuel. DSC cooling scan parameters should be employed to predict CFPP of blended diesel fuel.

  5. Synthesis of Trimethylolpropane Esters of Calophyllum Methyl Esters : Effect of Temperature and Molar Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeti Widyawati

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Trimethylolpropane esters were synthesized by transesterification of calophyllum methyl esters and trimethylolpropane using a calcium oxide as the catalyst. The results showed that the optimal reaction conditions (temperature: 130 0C, reaction time: 5 h, reactant molar ratio: 3.9:1, catalyst amount 3%w/w, and formed  trimethylolpropane ester of 79.0% were obtained. The basic physicochemical properties of the trimethylolpropane esters were the following : kinematic viscosities of 56.40 cSt and 8.8 cSt at 40 0C and 100 0C,  viscosity index 193, flash point 218 0C and pour point -3 0C. So Methyl esters of fatty acids of would callophylum  methyl ester is good raw material for the synthesis of lubricating oils.

  6. 21 CFR 172.854 - Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids. 172.854 Section... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.854 Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids. Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids, up to and including the decaglycerol esters, may be safely used in food in...

  7. Soluble guanylyl cyclase is involved in PDT-induced injury of crayfish glial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleva, V. D.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2016-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a potential tool for selective destruction of malignant brain tumors. However, not only malignant but also healthy neurons and glial cells may be damaged during PDT. Nitric oxide is an important modulator of cell viability and intercellular neuroglial communications. NO have been already shown to participate in PDT-induced injury of neurons and glial cells. As soluble guanylyl cyclase is the only known receptor for NO, we have studied the possible role of soluble guanylyl cyclase in the regulation of survival and death of neurons and surrounding glial cells under photo-oxidative stress induced by photodynamic treatment (PDT). The crayfish stretch receptor consisting of a single identified sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells is a simple but informative model object. It was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine photosens (10 nM) and irradiated with a laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2). Using inhibitory analysis we have shown that during PDT soluble guanylyl cyclase, probably, has proapoptotic and antinecrotic effect on the glial cells of the isolated crayfish stretch receptor. Proapoptotic effect of soluble guanylyl cyclase could be mediated by protein kinase G (PKG). Thus, the involvement of NO/sGC/cGMP/PKG signaling pathway in PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells was indirectly demonstrated.

  8. Impairment of adenylyl cyclase signal transduction in mecobalamin-deficient rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatta, S; Watanabe, M; Ikeda, H; Kamada, H; Saito, T; Ohshika, H

    1995-11-30

    This study examined alterations in the beta-adrenoceptor-G5-adenylyl cyclase system in cerebral cortex membranes from vitamin B12-deficient rats fed a diet lacking vitamin B12 (mecobalamin) for 15 weeks. Basal, 5(7)-guanylylimidodiphosphate (GppNHp)-, isoproterenol-, and forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activities were significantly reduced in mecobalamin-deficient rats compared with those in control rats. However, no significant differences were observed in the amount and function of G5- estimated by immunoblotting and guanine nucleotide photoaffinity labeling, respectively, or in the densities and the dissociation constants of beta-adrenoceptors, estimated by [125I] pindolol binding, between control and the deficient rats. These results indicate that vitamin B12 deficiency results in the impairment of the coupling among the beta-adrenoceptor, G5- and the catalytic subunit of adenylyl cyclase, and in dysfunction of the catalytic subunit of the enzyme, suggesting that vitamin B12 participates in the regulation of neuronal adenylyl cyclase signal transduction.

  9. A novel Myb homolog initiates Dictyostelium development by induction of adenylyl cyclase expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otsuka, Hideshi; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1998-01-01

    Dictyostelium development is induced by starvation. The adenylyl cyclase gene ACA is one of the first genes expressed upon starvation. ACA produces extracellular cAMP that induces chemotaxis, aggregation, and differentiation in neighboring cells. Using insertional mutagenesis we have isolated a muta

  10. A short history of cGMP, guanylyl cyclases, and cGMP-dependent protein kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kots, Alexander Y; Martin, Emil; Sharina, Iraida G; Murad, Ferid

    2009-01-01

    Here, we review the early studies on cGMP, guanylyl cyclases, and cGMP-dependent protein kinases to facilitate understanding of development of this exciting but complex field of research encompassing pharmacology, biochemistry, physiology, and molecular biology of these important regulatory molecules.

  11. Multiple diguanylate cyclase-coordinated regulation of pyoverdine synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yicai; Yuan, Mingjun; Mohanty, Anee

    2015-01-01

    The nucleotide signalling molecule bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) plays an essential role in regulating microbial virulence and biofilm formation. C-di-GMP is synthesized by diguanylate cyclase (DGC) enzymes and degraded by phosphodiesterase (PDE) enzymes. One intri...

  12. Comparison of human CAP and CAP2, homologs of the yeast adenylyl cyclase-associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, G; Swiston, J; Young, D

    1994-06-01

    We previously reported the identification of human CAP, a protein that is related to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe adenylyl cyclase-associated CAP proteins. The two yeast CAP proteins have similar functions: the N-terminal domains are required for the normal function of adenylyl cyclase, while loss of the C-terminal domains result in morphological and nutritional defects that are unrelated to the cAMP pathways. We have amplified and cloned cDNAs from a human glioblastoma library that encode a second CAP-related protein, CAP2. The human CAP and CAP2 proteins are 64% identical. Expression of either human CAP or CAP2 in S. cerevisiae cap- strains suppresses phenotypes associated with deletion of the C-terminal domain of CAP, but does not restore hyper-activation of adenylyl cyclase by RAS2val19. Similarly, expression of either human CAP or CAP2 in S. pombe cap- strains suppresses the morphological and temperature-sensitive phenotypes associated with deletion of the C-terminal domain of CAP in this yeast. In addition, expression of human CAP, but not CAP2, suppresses the propensity to sporulate due to deletion of the N-terminal domain of CAP in S. pombe. This latter observation suggests that human CAP restores normal adenylyl cyclase activity in S. pombe cap- cells. Thus, functional properties of both N-terminal and C-terminal domains are conserved between the human and S. pombe CAP proteins.

  13. Cryptic indole hydroxylation by a non-canonical terpenoid cyclase parallels bacterial xenobiotic detoxification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugel, Susann; Baunach, Martin; Baer, Philipp; Ishida-Ito, Mie; Sundaram, Srividhya; Xu, Zhongli; Groll, Michael; Hertweck, Christian

    2017-06-01

    Terpenoid natural products comprise a wide range of molecular architectures that typically result from C-C bond formations catalysed by classical type I/II terpene cyclases. However, the molecular diversity of biologically active terpenoids is substantially increased by fully unrelated, non-canonical terpenoid cyclases. Their evolutionary origin has remained enigmatic. Here we report the in vitro reconstitution of an unusual flavin-dependent bacterial indoloterpenoid cyclase, XiaF, together with a designated flavoenzyme-reductase (XiaP) that mediates a key step in xiamycin biosynthesis. The crystal structure of XiaF with bound FADH2 (at 2.4 Å resolution) and phylogenetic analyses reveal that XiaF is, surprisingly, most closely related to xenobiotic-degrading enzymes. Biotransformation assays show that XiaF is a designated indole hydroxylase that can be used for the production of indigo and indirubin. We unveil a cryptic hydroxylation step that sets the basis for terpenoid cyclization and suggest that the cyclase has evolved from xenobiotics detoxification enzymes.

  14. Differential calcium signaling by cone specific guanylate cyclase-activating proteins from the zebrafish retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Scholten

    Full Text Available Zebrafish express in their retina a higher number of guanylate cyclase-activating proteins (zGCAPs than mammalians pointing to more complex guanylate cyclase signaling systems. All six zGCAP isoforms show distinct and partial overlapping expression profiles in rods and cones. We determined critical Ca(2+-dependent parameters of their functional properties using purified zGCAPs after heterologous expression in E.coli. Isoforms 1-4 were strong, 5 and 7 were weak activators of membrane bound guanylate cyclase. They further displayed different Ca(2+-sensitivities of guanylate cyclase activation, which is half maximal either at a free Ca(2+ around 30 nM (zGCAP1, 2 and 3 or around 400 nM (zGCAP4, 5 and 7. Zebrafish GCAP isoforms showed also differences in their Ca(2+/Mg(2+-dependent conformational changes and in the Ca(2+-dependent monomer-dimer equilibrium. Direct Ca(2+-binding revealed that all zGCAPs bound at least three Ca(2+. The corresponding apparent affinity constants reflect binding of Ca(2+ with high (≤ 100 nM, medium (0.1-5 µM and/or low (≥ 5 µM affinity, but were unique for each zGCAP isoform. Our data indicate a Ca(2+-sensor system in zebrafish rod and cone cells supporting a Ca(2+-relay model of differential zGCAP operation in these cells.

  15. Age-associated alterations in hepatic. beta. -adrenergic receptor/adenylate cyclase complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, S.M.; Herring, P.A.; Arinze, I.J.

    1987-09-01

    The effect of age on catecholamine regulation of hepatic glycogenolysis and on hepatic adenylate cyclase was studied in male rats up to 24 mo of age. Epinephrine and norepinephrine stimulated glycogenolysis in isolated hepatocytes at all age groups studied. Isoproterenol, however, stimulated glycogenolysis only at 24 mo. In isolated liver membranes, usual activators of adenylate cyclase increased the activity of the enzyme considerably more in membranes from 24-mo-old rats than in membranes from either 3- or 22-mo-old rats. The Mn/sup 2 +/-dependent activity of the cyclase was increased by 2.9-fold in 3-mo-old animals and approx. 5.7-fold in 24-mo-old rats, indicating a substantial age-dependent increase in the intrinsic activity of the catalytic unit. The density of the ..beta..-adrenergic receptor, as measured by the binding of (/sup 125/I)-iodocyanopindolol to plasma membranes, was 5-8 fmol/mg protein in rats aged 3-12 mo but increased to 19 fmol/mg protein in 24-mo-old rats. Computer-aided analysis of isoproterenol competition of the binding indicated a small age-dependent increase in the proportion of ..beta..-receptors in the high-affinity state. These observations suggest that ..beta..-receptor-mediated hepatic glycogenolysis in the aged rat is predicated upon increases in the density of ..beta..-receptors as well as increased intrinsic activity of the catalytic unit of adenylate cyclase.

  16. A novel Myb homolog initiates Dictyostelium development by induction of adenylyl cyclase expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otsuka, Hideshi; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1998-01-01

    Dictyostelium development is induced by starvation. The adenylyl cyclase gene ACA is one of the first genes expressed upon starvation. ACA produces extracellular cAMP that induces chemotaxis, aggregation, and differentiation in neighboring cells. Using insertional mutagenesis we have isolated a muta

  17. Ester Tuiksoo - riigi peakokk / Peeter Kuimet

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kuimet, Peeter

    2007-01-01

    Põllumajandusminister Ester Tuiksoo eelseisvast vastuvõtust Estonias, jopede kinkimisest maaelu arengukava väljatöötamisega seotud inimestele. Minister Tuiksoo kohta tehtud kriitikast. SDE esimehe Ivari Padari arvamus. Lisa: Tuiksoo jopedest ja tassidest

  18. Space-Qualifiable Cyanate Ester Elastomer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Phase 1, CRG demonstrated the feasibility of a novel approach to prepare cyanate ester based elastomers. This approach polymerizes in-situ siloxane within a...

  19. Space-Qualifiable Cyanate Ester Elastomer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group, Inc. (CRG) proposes to design and develop a space-qualifiable cyanate ester elastomer for application in self-deployable space structures...

  20. Ester Tuiksoo - riigi peakokk / Peeter Kuimet

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kuimet, Peeter

    2007-01-01

    Põllumajandusminister Ester Tuiksoo eelseisvast vastuvõtust Estonias, jopede kinkimisest maaelu arengukava väljatöötamisega seotud inimestele. Minister Tuiksoo kohta tehtud kriitikast. SDE esimehe Ivari Padari arvamus. Lisa: Tuiksoo jopedest ja tassidest

  1. Pharmacokinetics of Ketorolac Pentyl Ester, a Novel Ester Derivative of Ketorolac, in Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jann-Inn Tzeng

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Ketorolac is a potent nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Recently, a novel ester of ketorolac, ketorolac pentyl ester, was synthesized. When prepared in injectable oil, the new agent demonstrated a long duration of action. Ketorolac pentyl ester was synthesized using a prodrug design by esterification of ketorolac, and appeared to be a prodrug of ketorolac in vivo, which needed to be confirmed. The aim of the present study was to establish the prodrug's pharmacokinetics in vivo, and to confirm whether or not ketorolac pentyl ester was a prodrug of ketorolac. Pharmacokinetic profiles of intravenous ketorolac and its pentyl ester on an equal-molar basis in six rabbits were evaluated. A high-performance liquid chromatographic method was used to determine the plasma concentrations of ketorolac and its pentyl ester. We found that the plasma concentrations of ketorolac pentyl ester declined rapidly after injection and so did the conversion of ketorolac pentyl ester to ketorolac. Also, the conversion of ketorolac was proved complete when compared with intravenous ketorolac under an equi-molar basis. In conclusion, this in vivo pharmacokinetic study confirmed that keterolac pentyl ester was a prodrug of keterolac.

  2. P2 purinergic receptor activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase and guanylyl cyclase in the dorsal facial area of the medulla increases blood flow in the common carotid arteries of cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Y-W; Leung, Y-M; Lin, N-N; Lee, T J-F; Kuo, J-S; Tung, K-C; Gong, C-L

    2015-02-12

    In the dorsal facial area (DFA) of the medulla, an activation of either P2 purinergic receptor or nitric oxide synthase (NOS) results in the release of glutamate, leading to an increase in blood flow of the common carotid artery (CCA). It is not known whether activation of the P2 receptor by ATP may mediate activation of NOS/guanylyl cyclase to cause glutamate release and/or whether L-Arg (nitric oxide (NO) precursor) may also cause ATP release from any other neuron, to cause an increase in CCA flow. We demonstrated that microinjections of P2 receptor agonists (ATP, α,β-methylene ATP) or NO precursor (L-arginine) into the DFA increased CCA blood flow. The P2-induced CCA blood flow increase was dose-dependently reduced by pretreatment with NG-nitro-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, a non-specific NOS inhibitor), 7-nitroindazole (7-NI, a relatively selective neuronal NOS inhibitor) or methylene blue (MB, a guanylyl cyclase inhibitor) but not by that with D-NAME (an isomer of L-NAME) or N5-(1-iminoethyl)-L-ornithine (L-NIO, a potent endothelial NOS inhibitor). Involvement of glutamate release in these responses were substantiated by microdialysis studies, in which perfusions of ATP into the DFA increased the glutamate concentration in dialysates, but co-perfusion of ATP with L-NAME or 7-NI did not. Nevertheless, the arginine-induced CCA blood flow increase was abolished by combined pretreatment of L-NAME and MB, but not affected by pretreatment with a selective P2 receptor antagonist, pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulphonic acid (PPADS). In conclusion, ATP activation of the P2 receptor in the DFA induced activation of neuronal NOS/guanylyl cyclase, which causes glutamate release leading to an increase in CCA blood flow. However, arginine activation of neuronal NOS/guanylyl cyclase, which also caused glutamate release and CCA blood flow increase, did not induce activation of P2 receptors. These findings provide important information for drug design and

  3. Rapid Output Growth of Special Acrylic Esters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Lianzhi

    2007-01-01

    @@ Acrylic esters are usually classified into general-purpose varieties and special varieties. The production and application of general-purpose varieties is already quite matured in the world and their output growth tends to be flat. Owing to the development of coatings, electronics, automobiles,textiles, printing and construction sectors, especially the application of radiation curing technology in various sectors, special acrylic esters have developed rapidly.

  4. New daucane esters from Ferula tingitana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miski, M; Mabry, T J

    1986-01-01

    In addition to the three known daucane esters (2,3,8) and one phenylpropanoid (9), the petroleum ether extract of the roots of Ferula tingitana yielded four new daucane esters: 14-p-anisoyloxy-dauc-4,8-diene (1), acetyltingitanol (4), acetyldesoxodehydrolaserpitine (5), and 4-beta-hydroxy-6-alpha-p-hydroxybenzoyloxy-10-alpha-angeloyloxy dauc-8-ene (6). A possible biogenetic pathway for 1,5-cis- and 1,5-trans-daucanes is presented.

  5. Conversion of carbohydrates to levulinic acid esters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to the field of converting carbohydrates into levulinic acid, a platform chemical for many chemical end products. More specifically the invention relates to a method for converting carbohydrates such as mono-, di- or polysaccharides, obtained from for example biomass...... production into a suitable levulinic acid ester in the presence of a zeolite or zeotype catalyst and a suitable alcohol, and the ester may be further converted into levulinic acid if desired....

  6. Synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, David E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Nitrate esters have been known as useful energetic materials since the discovery of nitroglycerin by Ascanio Sobrero in 1846. The development of methods to increase the safety and utility of nitroglycerin by Alfred Nobel led to the revolutionary improvement in the utility of nitroglycerin in explosive applications in the form of dynamite. Since then, many nitrate esters have been prepared and incorporated into military applications such as double-based propellants, detonators and as energetic plasticizers. Nitrate esters have also been shown to have vasodilatory effects in humans and thus have been studied and used for treatments of ailments such as angina. The mechanism of the biological response towards nitrate esters has been elucidated recently. Interestingly, many of the nitrate esters used for military purposes are liquids (ethylene glycol dinitrate, propylene glycol dinitrate, etc). Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) is one of the only solid nitrate esters, besides nitrocellulose, that is used in any application. Unfortunately, PETN melting point is above 100 {sup o}C, and thus must be pressed as a solid for detonator applications. A more practical material would be a melt-castable explosive, for potential simplification of manufacturing processes. Herein we describe the synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester (1) that is a solid at ambient temperatures, has a melting point of 85-86 {sup o}C and has the highest density of any known nitrate ester composed only of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen. We also describe the chemical, thermal and sensitivity properties of 1 as well as some preliminary explosive performance data.

  7. Both H4K20 mono-methylation and H3K56 acetylation mark transcription-dependent histone turnover in fission yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hanna [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Chang Seob [Department of Chemistry and Biology, Korea Science Academy of KAIST, Busan, 614-822 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yoonjung, E-mail: jjungii@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Daeyoup, E-mail: daeyoup@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-05

    Nucleosome dynamics facilitated by histone turnover is required for transcription as well as DNA replication and repair. Histone turnover is often associated with various histone modifications such as H3K56 acetylation (H3K56Ac), H3K36 methylation (H3K36me), and H4K20 methylation (H4K20me). In order to correlate histone modifications and transcription-dependent histone turnover, we performed genome wide analyses for euchromatic regions in G2/M-arrested fission yeast. The results show that transcription-dependent histone turnover at 5′ promoter and 3′ termination regions is directly correlated with the occurrence of H3K56Ac and H4K20 mono-methylation (H4K20me1) in actively transcribed genes. Furthermore, the increase of H3K56Ac and H4K20me1 and antisense RNA production was observed in the absence of the histone H3K36 methyltransferase Set2 and histone deacetylase complex (HDAC) that are involved in the suppression of histone turnover within the coding regions. These results together indicate that H4K20me1 as well as H3K56Ac are bona fide marks for transcription-dependent histone turnover in fission yeast.

  8. Developmental Defects of Caenorhabditis elegans Lacking Branched-chain α-Ketoacid Dehydrogenase Are Mainly Caused by Monomethyl Branched-chain Fatty Acid Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Fan; Cui, Mingxue; Than, Minh T; Han, Min

    2016-02-01

    Branched-chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKDH) catalyzes the critical step in the branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) catabolic pathway and has been the focus of extensive studies. Mutations in the complex disrupt many fundamental metabolic pathways and cause multiple human diseases including maple syrup urine disease (MSUD), autism, and other related neurological disorders. BCKDH may also be required for the synthesis of monomethyl branched-chain fatty acids (mmBCFAs) from BCAAs. The pathology of MSUD has been attributed mainly to BCAA accumulation, but the role of mmBCFA has not been evaluated. Here we show that disrupting BCKDH in Caenorhabditis elegans causes mmBCFA deficiency, in addition to BCAA accumulation. Worms with deficiency in BCKDH function manifest larval arrest and embryonic lethal phenotypes, and mmBCFA supplementation suppressed both without correcting BCAA levels. The majority of developmental defects caused by BCKDH deficiency may thus be attributed to lacking mmBCFAs in worms. Tissue-specific analysis shows that restoration of BCKDH function in multiple tissues can rescue the defects, but is especially effective in neurons. Taken together, we conclude that mmBCFA deficiency is largely responsible for the developmental defects in the worm and conceivably might also be a critical contributor to the pathology of human MSUD.

  9. Thermal Conductivity of Liquid Diethylene Glycol Monomethyl Ether%二乙二醇单甲醚液相导热系数的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘雅珺; 李晓静; 吴江涛

    2011-01-01

    利用钽丝作为热线的瞬态双热线系统对温度区间233-373K、压力区间为0.1—30 MPa的液相二乙二醇单甲醚(diethylene glycol monom ethylether,DGMME)的导热系数进行了实验研究,并将实验数据拟合为温度和压力的关联式。实验数据与导热系数关联式计算结果的标准偏差和最大偏差分别为0.23%和0.86%,导热系数的合成标准不确定度小于±1.0%。%The thermal conductivity of liquid diethylene glycol monomethyl ether (DEGMME) was measured from 233 to 373 K and pressures from 0.1 to 30 MPa, by the transient hot-wire technique employing two anodized tantalum hot wires. The experimental data was correlated as a function of temperature and pressure. The absolute average deviation and the maximum deviation of the experimental results from the correlated equation were 0.23% and 0.86%. The uncertainty of the thermal conductivity was 11.0% with a coverage factor of k ±2.

  10. Glatiramer Acetate, Dimethyl Fumarate, and Monomethyl Fumarate Upregulate the Expression of CCR10 on the Surface of Natural Killer Cells and Enhance Their Chemotaxis and Cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghazachi, Azzam A.; Sand, Kristin L.; Al-Jaderi, Zaidoon

    2016-01-01

    In vitro harnessing of immune cells is the most important advance in the field of cancer immunotherapy. Results shown in the current paper may be used to harness natural killer (NK) cells in vitro. It is observed that drugs used to treat multiple sclerosis such as glatiramer acetate, dimethyl fumarate, and monomethyl fumarate upregulate the expression of chemokines receptor 10 (CCR10) on the surface of human IL-2-activated NK cells. This is corroborated with increased chemotaxis of these cells toward the concentration gradients of the ligands for CCR10, namely CCL27 and CCL28. It is also demonstrated that these three drugs enhance NK cell cytotoxicity against tumor target cells, an activity that is abrogated by prior incubation of the cells with anti-CCR10 antibody. Because CCL27 and CCL28 are secreted by selective tumor types such as malignant melanoma, squamous cell carcinomas, and colorectal cancer, respectively, it is hypothesized that activated NK cells may be harnessed in vitro with any of these drugs before utilizing them as a therapeutic modality for cancer.

  11. Receptor binding and adenylate cyclase activities of glucagon analogues modified in the N-terminal region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKee, R.L.; Pelton, J.T.; Trivedi, D.; Johnson, D.G.; Coy, D.H.; Sueiras-Diaz, J.; Hruby, V.J.

    1986-04-08

    In this study, we determined the ability of four N-terminally modified derivatives of glucagon, (3-Me-His1,Arg12)-, (Phe1,Arg12)-, (D-Ala4,Arg12)-, and (D-Phe4)glucagon, to compete with 125I-glucagon for binding sites specific for glucagon in hepatic plasma membranes and to activate the hepatic adenylate cyclase system, the second step involved in producing many of the physiological effects of glucagon. Relative to the native hormone, (3-Me-His1,Arg12)glucagon binds approximately twofold greater to hepatic plasma membranes but is fivefold less potent in the adenylate cyclase assay. (Phe1,Arg12)glucagon binds threefold weaker and is also approximately fivefold less potent in adenylate cyclase activity. In addition, both analogues are partial agonists with respect to adenylate cyclase. These results support the critical role of the N-terminal histidine residue in eliciting maximal transduction of the hormonal message. (D-Ala4,Arg12)glucagon and (D-Phe4)glucagon, analogues designed to examine the possible importance of a beta-bend conformation in the N-terminal region of glucagon for binding and biological activities, have binding potencies relative to glucagon of 31% and 69%, respectively. (D-Ala4,Arg12)glucagon is a partial agonist in the adenylate cyclase assay system having a fourfold reduction in potency, while the (D-Phe4) derivative is a full agonist essentially equipotent with the native hormone. These results do not necessarily support the role of an N-terminal beta-bend in glucagon receptor recognition. With respect to in vivo glycogenolysis activities, all of the analogues have previously been reported to be full agonists.

  12. Copper-catalyzed cascade reactions of α,β-unsaturated esters with keto esters

    OpenAIRE

    Zhengning Li; Chongnian Wang; Zengchang Li

    2015-01-01

    A copper-catalyzed cascade reaction of α,β-unsaturated esters with keto esters is reported. It features a copper-catalyzed reductive aldolization followed by a lactonization. This method provides a facile approach to prepare γ-carboxymethyl-γ-lactones and δ-carboxymethyl-δ-lactones under mild reaction conditions.

  13. Detection of testosterone esters in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsdahl, Guro; Erceg, Damir; Geisendorfer, Thomas; Turkalj, Mirjana; Plavec, Davor; Thevis, Mario; Tretzel, Laura; Gmeiner, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Injections of synthetic esters of testosterone are among the most common forms of testosterone application. In doping control, the detection of an intact ester of testosterone in blood gives unequivocal proof of the administration of exogenous testosterone. The aim of the current project was to investigate the detection window for injected testosterone esters as a mixed substance preparation and as a single substance preparation in serum and plasma. Furthermore, the suitability of different types of blood collection devices was evaluated. Collection tubes with stabilizing additives, as well as non-stabilized serum separation tubes, were tested. A clinical study with six participants was carried out, comprising a single intramuscular injection of either 1000 mg testosterone undecanoate (Nebido(®)) or a mixture of 30 mg testosterone propionate, 60 mg testosterone phenylpropionate, 60 mg testosterone isocaproate, and 100 mg testosterone decanoate (Sustanon(®)). Blood was collected throughout a testing period of 60 days. The applied analytical method for blood analysis included liquid-liquid extraction and preparation of oxime derivatives, prior to TLX-sample clean-up and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) detection. All investigated testosterone esters could be detected in post-administration blood samples. The detection time depended on the type of ester administered. Furthermore, results from the study show that measured blood concentrations of especially short-chained testosterone esters are influenced by the type of blood collection device applied. The testosterone ester detection window, however, was comparable. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Production and biological function of volatile esters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saerens, Sofie M. G.; Delvaux, Freddy R.; Verstrepen, Kevin J.; Thevelein, Johan M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The need to understand and control ester synthesis is driven by the fact that esters play a key role in the sensorial quality of fermented alcoholic beverages like beer, wine and sake. As esters are synthesized in yeast via several complex metabolic pathways, there is a need to gain a clear understanding of ester metabolism and its regulation. The individual genes involved, their functions and regulatory mechanisms have to be identified. In alcoholic beverages, there are two important groups of esters: the acetate esters and the medium‐chain fatty acid (MCFA) ethyl esters. For acetate ester synthesis, the genes involved have already been cloned and characterized. Also the biochemical pathways and the regulation of acetate ester synthesis are well defined. With respect to the molecular basis of MCFA ethyl ester synthesis, however, significant progress has only recently been made. Next to the characterization of the biochemical pathways and regulation of ester synthesis, a new and more important question arises: what is the advantage for yeast to produce these esters? Several hypotheses have been proposed in the past, but none was satisfactorily. This paper reviews the current hypotheses of ester synthesis in yeast in relation to the complex regulation of the alcohol acetyl transferases and the different factors that allow ester formation to be controlled during fermentation. PMID:21255318

  15. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) in the circulation after sumatriptan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Møller; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Petersen, Jesper Troensegaard;

    2013-01-01

    The origin of migraine pain is still elusive, but increasingly researchers focus on the neuropeptides in the perivascular space of cranial vessels as important mediators of nociceptive input during migraine attacks. The parasympathetic neurotransmitters, pituitary adenylate cyclase activating...

  16. Curdlan ester derivatives: synthesis, structure, and properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marubayashi, Hironori; Yukinaka, Kazuyori; Enomoto-Rogers, Yukiko; Takemura, Akio; Iwata, Tadahisa

    2014-03-15

    A series of ester derivatives of curdlan, which is a β-(1 → 3)-D-glucan extracellularly produced by microorganism, with varying alkyl chain lengths (C2-C12) were synthesized by the heterogeneous reaction using trifluoroacetic anhydride. As a result, high-molecular-weight (Mw ≥ 6 × 10(5)) and fully-acylated curdlan was obtained with relatively high yield (>70%). Thermal stability of curdlan was greatly improved by esterification. Crystallization was observed for curdlan esters with C2-C6 side chains. Both Tg (170 → 50 °C) and Tm (290 → 170 °C) of curdlan esters decreased with increasing the side-chain length. By the increase in the side-chain carbon number, curdlan esters showed lower Young's modulus and tensile strength, and larger elongation at break. Thus, material properties of curdlan esters can be controlled by changing the side-chain length. It was found that the increase of the side-chain length resulted in the decrease of crystallinity and the change of crystal structures.

  17. Overexpression of guanylate cyclase activating protein 2 in rod photoreceptors in vivo leads to morphological changes at the synaptic ribbon

    OpenAIRE

    Natalia López-del Hoyo; Lucrezia Fazioli; Santiago López-Begines; Laura Fernández-Sánchez; Nicolás Cuenca; Jordi Llorens; Pedro de la Villa; Ana Méndez

    2012-01-01

    Guanylate cyclase activating proteins are EF-hand containing proteins that confer calcium sensitivity to retinal guanylate cyclase at the outer segment discs of photoreceptor cells. By making the rate of cGMP synthesis dependent on the free intracellular calcium levels set by illumination, GCAPs play a fundamental role in the recovery of the light response and light adaptation. The main isoforms GCAP1 and GCAP2 also localize to the synaptic terminal, where their function is not known. Based o...

  18. Impact of water activity and temperature on growth and alternariol and alternariol monomethyl ether production of Alternaria alternata isolated from soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oviedo, M S; Ramirez, M L; Barros, G G; Chulze, S N

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of water activity (a(w); 0.995, 0.98, 0.96, 0.94, 0.92, and 0.90), temperature (5, 18, 25, and 30 degrees C), incubation time (7 to 35 days), and their interactions on mycelial growth and alternariol (AOH) and alternariol monomethyl ether (AME) production. Two Alternaria alternata strains isolated from soybeans in Argentina were grown on 2% soybean extract agar. Maximum growth rates were obtained at the highest a(w) (0.995) and 25 degrees C, with growth decreasing as the water availability of the medium was reduced. Maximum amount of AOH was produced at 0.98 a(w) and 25 degrees C for both strains. Maximum AME production was obtained for both strains at 30 degrees C but different a(w) values, 0.92 and 0.94, for the strains RC 21 and RC 39, respectively. The concentrations of both toxins varied considerably depending on the a(w) and temperature interactions assayed. The two metabolites were produced from 5 to 30 degrees C and at a(w) values of 0.92 to 0.995. Although at 5 and 18 degrees C little mycotoxin was produced at a(w) lower than 0.94. Two-dimensional profiles of a(w) by temperature interactions were developed from these data to identify areas where conditions indicate a significant risk from AOH and AME accumulation on soybeans. All the conditions of a(w) and temperature that resulted in maximum production of both toxins are those found during soybean development in the field. Thus, field conditions are likely to be conducive to optimum A. alternata growth and toxin production.

  19. HematoPorphyrin Monomethyl Ether polymer contrast agent for ultrasound/photoacoustic dual-modality imaging-guided synergistic high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Sijing; LU, Min; Ding, Xiaoya; Chen, Fei; He, Xuemei; Xu, Chunyan; Zhou, Hang; Wang, Qi; Hao, Lan; Zou, Jianzhong

    2016-01-01

    This study is to prepare a hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME)-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microcapsules (HMME/PLGA), which could not only function as efficient contrast agent for ultrasound (US)/photoacoustic (PA) imaging, but also as a synergistic agent for high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation. Sonosensitizer HMME nanoparticles were integrated into PLGA microcapsules with the double emulsion evaporation method. After characterization, the cell-killing and cell proliferation-inhibiting effects of HMME/PLGA microcapsules on ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells were assessed. The US/PA imaging-enhancing effects and synergistic effects on HIFU were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. HMME/PLGA microcapsules were highly dispersed with well-defined spherical morphology (357 ± 0.72 nm in diameter, PDI = 0.932). Encapsulation efficiency and drug-loading efficiency were 58.33 ± 0.95% and 4.73 ± 0.15%, respectively. The HMME/PLGA microcapsules remarkably killed the SKOV3 cells and inhibited the cell proliferation, significantly enhanced the US/PA imaging results and greatly enhanced the HIFU ablation effects on ovarian cancer in nude mice by the HMME-mediated sono-dynamic chemistry therapy (SDT). HMME/PLGA microcapsules represent a potential multifunctional contrast agent for HIFU diagnosis and treatment, which might provide a novel strategy for the highly efficient imaging-guided non-invasive HIFU synergistic therapy for cancers by SDT in clinic. PMID:27535093

  20. Differential stimulation pathways of progesterone secretion from newly formed corpora lutea in rats treated with ethylene glycol monomethyl ether, sulpiride, or atrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taketa, Yoshikazu; Yoshida, Midori; Inoue, Kaoru; Takahashi, Miwa; Sakamoto, Yohei; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi; Yamate, Jyoji; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi

    2011-06-01

    Ethylene glycol monomethyl ether (EGME), sulpiride, and atrazine are known ovarian toxicants, which increase progesterone (P4) secretion and induce luteal cell hypertrophy following repeated administration. The aim of this study was to define the pathways by which these compounds exerted their effects on the ovary and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. In the ovary, changes in the steroidogenic activity of new and old corpora lutea (CL) were addressed. EGME (300 mg/kg), sulpiride (100 mg/kg), or atrazine (300 mg/kg) were orally given daily for four times from proestrus to diestrus in normal cycling rats. Treatment with all chemicals significantly increased serum P4 levels, and EGME as well as sulpiride induced increases in prolactin (PRL) levels. In new CL, at both the gene and the protein levels, all three chemicals upregulated the following steroidogenic factors: scavenger receptor class B type I, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage, and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) and downregulated the luteolytic gene, 20α-HSD. Coadministration of EGME and bromocriptine, a D2 agonist, completely inhibited PRL but not P4 secretion. Additionally, steroidogenic factor expression levels were upregulated, and 20α-HSD level was downregulated in new CL. These results suggest that EGME both directly and indirectly stimulates P4 production in luteal cells, whereas sulpiride elevates P4 through activation of PRL secretion in the pituitary. Atrazine may directly activate new CL by stimulating steroidogenic factor expressions. The present study suggests that multiple pathways mediate the effects of EGME, sulpiride, and atrazine on the HPG axis and luteal P4 production in female rats in vivo.

  1. HematoPorphyrin Monomethyl Ether polymer contrast agent for ultrasound/photoacoustic dual-modality imaging-guided synergistic high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Sijing; Lu, Min; Ding, Xiaoya; Chen, Fei; He, Xuemei; Xu, Chunyan; Zhou, Hang; Wang, Qi; Hao, Lan; Zou, Jianzhong

    2016-08-01

    This study is to prepare a hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME)-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microcapsules (HMME/PLGA), which could not only function as efficient contrast agent for ultrasound (US)/photoacoustic (PA) imaging, but also as a synergistic agent for high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation. Sonosensitizer HMME nanoparticles were integrated into PLGA microcapsules with the double emulsion evaporation method. After characterization, the cell-killing and cell proliferation-inhibiting effects of HMME/PLGA microcapsules on ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells were assessed. The US/PA imaging-enhancing effects and synergistic effects on HIFU were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. HMME/PLGA microcapsules were highly dispersed with well-defined spherical morphology (357 ± 0.72 nm in diameter, PDI = 0.932). Encapsulation efficiency and drug-loading efficiency were 58.33 ± 0.95% and 4.73 ± 0.15%, respectively. The HMME/PLGA microcapsules remarkably killed the SKOV3 cells and inhibited the cell proliferation, significantly enhanced the US/PA imaging results and greatly enhanced the HIFU ablation effects on ovarian cancer in nude mice by the HMME-mediated sono-dynamic chemistry therapy (SDT). HMME/PLGA microcapsules represent a potential multifunctional contrast agent for HIFU diagnosis and treatment, which might provide a novel strategy for the highly efficient imaging-guided non-invasive HIFU synergistic therapy for cancers by SDT in clinic.

  2. Precise determination of the Alternaria mycotoxins alternariol and alternariol monomethyl ether in cereal, fruit and vegetable products using stable isotope dilution assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asam, Stefan; Konitzer, Katharina; Rychlik, Michael

    2011-02-01

    Cereal, fruit and vegetable products were analyzed for contamination with the Alternaria mycotoxins alternariol (AOH) and alternariol monomethyl ether (AME) using stable isotope dilution assays (SIDAs). Both toxins were practically not detected in cereals and cereal products: AOH-one out of 13 samples at a content of 4.1 μg/kg; AME-two out of 13 samples at contents ranging between 0.2 and 0.6 μg/kg. However, if cereals for animal nutrition were analyzed, much higher values were found: AOH-five out of six samples (13-250 μg/kg); AME-six out of six samples (3-100 μg/kg). This finding may pose a potential problem concerning animal health. AOH and AME were frequently detected in vegetable products: AOH-5 out of 10 samples (2.6-25 μg/kg); AME-6 out of 10 samples (0.1-5 μg/kg). Tomato products were affected, especially. The highest content of AOH (25 μg/kg) and AME (5 μg/kg) were found in triple concentrated tomato paste. Special wines like "Trockenbeerenauslese" or "Spätlese" (affected by noble rot in the vineyard) contained AOH (4/6 samples; 1.2-4.9 μg/kg) and AME (4/6 samples; 0.1-0.3 μg/kg), but the values did not exceed the values of both toxins that were found generally in wines.

  3. Catecholamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase of caudate nucleus and cerebral cortex. Effects of guanine nucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulakhe, P V; Leung, N L; Arbus, A T; Sulakhe, S J; Jan, S H; Narayanan, N

    1977-01-01

    1. GTP and GMP-P(NH)P (guanyl-5'-yl imidodiphosphate) were observed to increase the stimulation of neural adenylate cyclase by dopamine (3,4-dihydroxyphenethylamine) and noradrenaline. 2. GMP-P(NH)P had a biphasic effect on the enzyme activity. 3. Preincubation of membranes with GMP-P(NH)P activated the enzyme by a process dependent on time and temperature. Catecholamines increased the speed and the extent of this activation. 4. Membrane fractions contained high- and low-affinity sites for GMP-P(NH)P binding: this binding was due to protein(s) of the membrane preparations. 5. Low-affinity-site binding of GMP-P(NH)P appeared to be related to the stimulatory effect on the adenylate cyclase activity. PMID:18147

  4. Receptor-type guanylate cyclase is required for carbon dioxide sensation by Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallem, Elissa A; Spencer, W Clay; McWhirter, Rebecca D; Zeller, Georg; Henz, Stefan R; Rätsch, Gunnar; Miller, David M; Horvitz, H Robert; Sternberg, Paul W; Ringstad, Niels

    2011-01-04

    CO(2) is both a critical regulator of animal physiology and an important sensory cue for many animals for host detection, food location, and mate finding. The free-living soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans shows CO(2) avoidance behavior, which requires a pair of ciliated sensory neurons, the BAG neurons. Using in vivo calcium imaging, we show that CO(2) specifically activates the BAG neurons and that the CO(2)-sensing function of BAG neurons requires TAX-2/TAX-4 cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels and the receptor-type guanylate cyclase GCY-9. Our results delineate a molecular pathway for CO(2) sensing and suggest that activation of a receptor-type guanylate cyclase is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism by which animals detect environmental CO(2).

  5. The metabolic/pH sensor soluble adenylyl cyclase is a tumor suppressor protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Espiritu, Lavoisier; Diaz, Ana; Nardin, Charlee; Saviola, Anthony J.; Shaw, Fiona; Plitt, Tamar; Yang, Xia; Wolchok, Jedd; Pirog, Edyta C.; Desman, Garrett; Sboner, Andrea; Zhang, Tuo; Xiang, Jenny; Merghoub, Taha; Levin, Lonny R.; Buck, Jochen; Zippin, Jonathan H.

    2016-01-01

    cAMP signaling pathways can both stimulate and inhibit the development of cancer; however, the sources of cAMP important for tumorigenesis remain poorly understood. Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a non-canonical, evolutionarily conserved, nutrient- and pH-sensing source of cAMP. sAC has been implicated in the metastatic potential of certain cancers, and it is differentially localized in human cancers as compared to benign tissues. We now show that sAC expression is reduced in many human cancers. Loss of sAC increases cellular transformation in vitro and malignant progression in vivo. These data identify the metabolic/pH sensor soluble adenylyl cyclase as a previously unappreciated tumor suppressor protein. PMID:27323809

  6. Structure-Function Relationships Underlying the Capacity of Bordetella Adenylate Cyclase Toxin to Disarm Host Phagocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Jakub; Cerny, Ondrej; Osickova, Adriana; Linhartova, Irena; Masin, Jiri; Bumba, Ladislav; Sebo, Peter; Osicka, Radim

    2017-09-24

    Bordetellae, pathogenic to mammals, produce an immunomodulatory adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin (CyaA, ACT or AC-Hly) that enables them to overcome the innate immune defense of the host. CyaA subverts host phagocytic cells by an orchestrated action of its functional domains, where an extremely catalytically active adenylyl cyclase enzyme is delivered into phagocyte cytosol by a pore-forming repeat-in-toxin (RTX) cytolysin moiety. By targeting sentinel cells expressing the complement receptor 3, known as the CD11b/CD18 (αMβ₂) integrin, CyaA compromises the bactericidal functions of host phagocytes and supports infection of host airways by Bordetellae. Here, we review the state of knowledge on structural and functional aspects of CyaA toxin action, placing particular emphasis on signaling mechanisms by which the toxin-produced 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) subverts the physiology of phagocytic cells.

  7. Muscarinic receptor binding and muscarinic receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase in rat brain myelin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larocca, J.N.; Ledeen, R.W.; Dvorkin, B.; Makman, M.H.

    1987-12-01

    High-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors were detected in myelin purified from rat brain stem with use of the radioligands /sup 3/H-N-methylscopolamine (/sup 3/H-NMS), /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (/sup 3/H-QNB), and /sup 3/H-pirenzepine. /sup 3/H-NMS binding was also present in myelin isolated from corpus callosum. In contrast, several other receptor types, including alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, present in the starting brain stem, were not detected in myelin. Based on Bmax values from Scatchard analyses, /sup 3/H-pirenzepine, a putative M1 selective ligand, bound to about 25% of the sites in myelin labeled by /sup 3/H-NMS, a nonselective ligand that binds to both M1 and M2 receptor subtypes. Agonist affinity for /sup 3/H-NMS binding sites in myelin was markedly decreased by Gpp(NH)p, indicating that a major portion of these receptors may be linked to a second messenger system via a guanine-nucleotide regulatory protein. Purified myelin also contained adenylate cyclase activity; this activity was stimulated several fold by forskolin and to small but significant extents by prostaglandin E1 and the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Myelin adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by carbachol and other muscarinic agonists; this inhibition was blocked by the antagonist atropine. Levels in myelin of muscarinic receptors were 20-25% and those of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase 10% of the values for total particulate fraction of whole brain stem. These levels in myelin are appreciably greater than would be predicted on the basis of contamination. Also, additional receptors and adenylate cyclase, added by mixing nonmyelin tissue with whole brain stem, were quantitatively removed during the purification procedure.

  8. Elevation of lutein content in tomato: a biochemical tug-of-war between lycopene cyclases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorio, Giovanni; Yildirim, Arzu; Stigliani, Adriana Lucia; D'Ambrosio, Caterina

    2013-11-01

    Lutein is becoming increasingly important in preventive medicine due to its possible role in maintaining good vision and in preventing age-related maculopathy. Average daily lutein intake in developed countries is often below suggested daily consumption levels, and lutein supplementation could be beneficial. Lutein is also valuable in the food and feed industries and is emerging in nutraceutical and pharmaceutical markets. Currently, lutein is obtained at high cost from marigold petals, and synthesis alternatives are thus desirable. Tomato constitutes a promising starting system for production as it naturally accumulates high levels of lycopene. To develop tomato for lutein synthesis, the tomato Red Setter cultivar was transformed with the tomato lycopene ε-cyclase-encoding gene under the control of a constitutive promoter, and the HighDelta (HD) line, characterised by elevated lutein and δ-carotene content in ripe fruits, was selected. HD was crossed to the transgenic HC line and to RS(B) with the aim of converting all residual fruit δ-carotene to lutein. Fruits of both crosses were enriched in lutein and presented unusual carotenoid profiles. The unique genetic background of the crosses used in this study permitted an unprecedented analysis of the role and regulation of the lycopene cyclase enzymes in tomato. A new defined biochemical index, the relative cyclase activity ratio, was used to discern post-transcriptional regulation of cyclases, and will help in the study of carotenoid biosynthesis in photosynthetic plant species and particularly in those, like tomato, that have been domesticated for the production of food, feed or useful by-products.

  9. Bicarbonate-responsive “soluble” adenylyl cyclase defines a nuclear cAMP microdomain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zippin, Jonathan H.; Farrell, Jeanne; Huron, David; Kamenetsky, Margarita; Hess, Kenneth C.; Fischman, Donald A.; Levin, Lonny R.; Buck, Jochen

    2004-01-01

    Bicarbonate-responsive “soluble” adenylyl cyclase resides, in part, inside the mammalian cell nucleus where it stimulates the activity of nuclear protein kinase A to phosphorylate the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). The existence of this complete and functional, nuclear-localized cAMP pathway establishes that cAMP signals in intracellular microdomains and identifies an alternate pathway leading to CREB activation. PMID:14769862

  10. Bicarbonate-responsive “soluble” adenylyl cyclase defines a nuclear cAMP microdomain

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Bicarbonate-responsive “soluble” adenylyl cyclase resides, in part, inside the mammalian cell nucleus where it stimulates the activity of nuclear protein kinase A to phosphorylate the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). The existence of this complete and functional, nuclear-localized cAMP pathway establishes that cAMP signals in intracellular microdomains and identifies an alternate pathway leading to CREB activation.

  11. Adenylate cyclase activity along the rabbit nephron as measured in single isolated segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbert, M; Chabardès, D; Montégut, M; Clique, A; Morel, F

    1975-01-01

    A method is described, which allows adenylate cyclase activity measurement in single pieces of various nephron segments. Tubular samples of 0.5 to 2 mm length were isolated by microdissection from collagenase treated slices of rabbit kidney. A photograph of each piece was taken in order to measure its length. After a permeabilisation treatment involving preincubation in a hypoosmotic medium and a freezing step, each sample was incubated for 30 mm at 30 degrees C in a medium containing high specific (alpha-32-P)-ATP 3-10-4 M, final volume 2.5 mu 1. The (32P)-cAMP formed was separated from the other labelled nucleotides by filtering the incubate on a dry aluminium oxide microcolumn, 3H cAMP was added as a tracer for measuring cAMP recovery. The sensitivity of the method was found to be a few fentomoles (10-15 M) cAMP. cAMP generation increased linearly as a function of the incubation time up to more than 30 min, and as a function of the length of the segment used. Control and fluoride (5 mM) stimulated adenvlate cyclase activities were measured in the following segments of the nephron: early proximal convoluted tubule (PCT), pars recta of the proximal tubule (PR), thin descending limb of the loop (TDL), cortical portion of the thick ascending limb (CAL), distal convoluted tubule (dct), first branched portion of the collecting tubule (BCT), further cortical (CCT) and medullary (MCT) portions of the collecting tubule. Mean control adenylate cyclase activity varied from 7 (PR) to 75 (BCT) fmoles/mm/30 min. Flouride addition resulted in a 10 (BCT) to 50 (PR) fold increase in enzyme activity. Series of replicates gave a scatter equal to plus or minus 20% (S.D. as a per cent of the mean). The method described appears to be suitable to determine which nephron segments contain hormone-dependent adenylate cyclase.

  12. Interaction Of GCAP1 With Retinal Guanylyl Cyclase And Calcium: Sensitivity to Fatty Acylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor V. Peshenko

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Guanylyl cyclase activating proteins (GCAP1 are calcium/magnesium binding proteins within neuronal calcium sensor proteins group (NCS of the EF-hand proteins superfamily. GCAPs activate retinal guanylyl cyclase (RetGC in vertebrate photoreceptors in response to light-dependent fall of the intracellular free Ca2+ concentrations. GCAPs consist of four EF-hand domains and contain N-terminal fatty acylated glycine, which in GCAP1 is required for the normal activation of RetGC. We analyzed the effects of a substitution prohibiting N-myristoylation (Gly2 → Ala on the ability of the recombinant GCAP1 to co-localize with its target enzyme when heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells. We also compared Ca2+ binding and RetGC-activating properties of the purified non-acylated G2A mutant and C14:0 acylated GCAP1 in vitro. The G2A GCAP1 expressed with a C-terminal GFP tag was able to co-localize with the cyclase, albeit less efficiently than the wild type, but much less effectively stimulated cyclase activity in vitro. Ca2+ binding isotherm of the G2A GCAP1 was slightly shifted toward higher free Ca2+ concentrations and so was Ca2+ sensitivity of RetGC reconstituted with the non-acylated mutant. At the same time, myristoylation had little effect on the high-affinity Ca2+-binding in the EF-hand that is proximal to the myristoyl residue in the three-dimensional GCAP1 structure. These data indicate that the N-terminal fatty acyl group may alter the activity of EF-hands in the distal portion of the GCAP1 molecule via presently unknown intramolecular mechanism.

  13. Stimulatory and inhibitory effects of forskolin on adenylate cyclase in rat normal hepatocytes and hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, K; Sanae, F; Koshiura, R; Matsunaga, T; Takagi, K; Satake, T; Hasegawa, T

    1989-02-01

    Forskolin synergistically potentiated adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate formation by prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) in rat normal hepatocytes freshly prepared by collagenase digestion and rat ascites hepatoma AH66 cells, but dose-dependently inhibited the accumulation by PGE1 in AH66F cells. Forskolin activated adenylate cyclase in a dose-dependent manner in homogenates of all cell lines. In normal hepatocytes and AH66 cells, simultaneous addition of forskolin and other adenylate cyclase activators [isoproterenol (IPN), PGE1, guanosine 5'-triphosphate sodium salt (GTP), 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate sodium salt (Gpp (NH)p), NaF, cholera toxin, islet activating protein and MnCl2] gave greater than additive responses. On the other hand, in AH66F cells, the effect of forskolin on adenylate cyclase was hardly influenced by GTP, but forskolin diminished the activities induced by high concentrations of GTP to that by the diterpene alone. Forskolin also significantly inhibited the PGE1-stimulated and the guanine nucleotide binding regulatory protein-stimulated activities. Because AH66F cells were insensitive to IPN, the combination with forskolin and IPN gave similar activity to that obtained with the diterpene alone. The effect of forskolin on the activation by manganese ion was neither synergistic nor inhibitory but was additive in AH66F cells. These results suggest that forskolin promotes the interaction between the stimulatory guanine nucleotide binding regulatory protein and the catalytic unit in normal hepatocytes and AH66 cells, but in AH66F cells forskolin interferes with the coupling of the two components of adenylate cyclase.

  14. Application conditions for ester cured alkaline phenolic resin sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren-he Huang; Bao-ping Zhang; Yao-ji Tang

    2016-01-01

    Five organic esters with different curing speeds: propylene carbonate (i.e. high-speed ester A); 1, 4-butyrolactone; glycerol triacetate (i.e. medium-speed ester B); glycerol diacetate; dibasic ester (DBE) (i.e. low-speed ester C), were chosen to react with alkaline phenolic resin to analyze the application conditions of ester cured alkaline phenolic resin. The relationships between the curing performances of the resin (including pH value, gel pH value, gel time of resin solution, heat release rate of the curing reaction and tensile strength of the resin sand) and the amount of added organic ester and curing temperature were investigated. The results indicated the folowing: (1) The optimal added amount of organic ester should be 25wt.%-30wt.% of alkaline phenolic resin and it must be above 20wt.%-50 wt.% of the organic ester hydrolysis amount. (2) High-speed ester A (propylene carbonate) has a higher curing speed than 1, 4-butyrolactone, and they were both used as high-speed esters. Glycerol diacetate is not a high-speed ester in alkaline phenolic resin although it was used as a high-speed ester in ester cured sodium silicate sand; glycerol diacetate and glycerol triacetate can be used as medium-speed esters in alkaline phenolic resin. (3) High-speed ester A, medium-speed ester B (glycerol triacetate) and low-speed ester C (dibasic ester, i.e., DBE) should be used below 15 ºC, 35 ºC and 50 ºC, respectively. High-speed ester A or low-speed ester C should not be used alone but mixed with medium-speed ester B to improve the strength of the resin sand. (4) There should be a suitable solid content (generaly 45wt.%-65wt.% of resin), alkali content (generaly 10wt.%-15wt.% of resin) and viscosity of alkaline phenolic resin (generaly 50-300 mPa·s) in the preparation of alkaline phenolic resin. Finaly, the technique conditions of alkaline phenolic resin preparation and the application principles of organic ester were discussed.

  15. Zero birefringence films of pullulan ester derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danjo, Takahiro; Enomoto, Yukiko; Shimada, Hikaru; Nobukawa, Shogo; Yamaguchi, Masayuki; Iwata, Tadahisa

    2017-04-01

    High-performance films with almost zero-birefringence and zero-wavelength dispersion were succeeded to prepare from pullulan esters derivatives (PLEs) without any additives. Optical transmittance analysis, birefringence measurement of PLE cast film and hot stretched films, and infrared dichroism analysis were conducted to characterize optical properties of PLE films comparing with cellulose triacetate which is commercially used as low-birefringence in optical devices. The aims of this study, characterization of optical properties of pullulan esters, can develop a deep understanding of the fundamental knowing and applicability of polysaccharides. Accordingly, authors believe this paper will open the gate for researches in the application of polysaccharides.

  16. Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin: a unique combination of a pore-forming moiety with a cell-invading adenylate cyclase enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masin, Jiri; Osicka, Radim; Bumba, Ladislav; Sebo, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin (CyaA, ACT or AC-Hly) is a key virulence factor of the whooping cough agent Bordetella pertussis. CyaA targets myeloid phagocytes expressing the complement receptor 3 (CR3, known as αMβ2 integrin CD11b/CD18 or Mac-1) and translocates by a poorly understood mechanism directly across the cytoplasmic membrane into cell cytosol of phagocytes an adenylyl cyclase(AC) enzyme. This binds intracellular calmodulin and catalyzes unregulated conversion of cytosolic ATP into cAMP. Among other effects, this yields activation of the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1, BimEL accumulation and phagocyte apoptosis induction. In parallel, CyaA acts as a cytolysin that forms cation-selective pores in target membranes. Direct penetration of CyaA into the cytosol of professional antigen-presenting cells allows the use of an enzymatically inactive CyaA toxoid as a tool for delivery of passenger antigens into the cytosolic pathway of processing and MHC class I-restricted presentation, which can be exploited for induction of antigen-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T-lymphocyte immune responses.

  17. Changes of Adenylate Cyclase and Guanylate Cyclase in the Frontal Cortex, Lenticula, Corpus Amygdaloideum, and Hippocampus in Morphine-dependent Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijun Hong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To detect the changes of adenylate cyclase (AC and guanylate cyclase (GC in the four cerebral regions that are concerned with psychogenic dependence of morphine in rats, including the frontal cortex, lenticula, corpus amygdaloideum, and hippocampus. To discuss the relation between the expressions of AC and GC with the psychogenic dependence on morphine. Different periods of morphine-dependent rat models were established, and enzyme histochemistry was used to detect the variations of AC and GC in four cerebral regions. Compared with the control group, AC and GC in all the morphine-dependent groups increased. The data indicated that the amounts of AC and GC were significantly different between the morphine-dependent groups and the control group when tested at periods of 1 week, 2 weeks, 4 weeks, and 8 weeks (P ˂ 0.05 or P ˂ 0.01. There were significant differences when comparing the 1-week group with the 2-week, 4-week, and 8-week groups (P ˂ 0.05 or P ˂ 0.01. There were significant differences when comparing the 2-week dependent group with the 4-week dependent group or the 8-week dependent group (P ˂ 0.05 or P ˂ 0.01. The activities of AC and GC increased in four cerebral regions of morphine-dependent rats. The psychogenic dependence on morphine appears to be closely linked to the upgrade of AC and GC.

  18. Cyclase-associated proteins: CAPacity for linking signal transduction and actin polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubberstey, Andrew V; Mottillo, Emilio P

    2002-04-01

    Many extracellular signals elicit changes in the actin cytoskeleton, which are mediated through an array of signaling proteins and pathways. One family of proteins that plays a role in regulating actin remodeling in response to cellular signals are the cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs). CAPs are highly conserved monomeric actin binding proteins present in a wide range of organisms including yeast, fly, plants, and mammals. The original CAP was isolated as a component of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase complex that serves as an effector of Ras during nutritional signaling. CAPs are multifunctional molecules that contain domains involved in actin binding, adenylyl cyclase association in yeast, SH3 binding, and oligomerization. Genetic studies in yeast have implicated CAPs in vesicle trafficking and endocytosis. CAPs play a developmental role in multicellular organisms, and studies of Drosophila have illuminated the importance of the actin cytoskeleton during eye development and in establishing oocyte polarity. This review will highlight the critical structural and functional domains of CAPs, describe recent studies that have implied important roles for these proteins in linking cell signaling with actin polymerization, and highlight their roles in vesicle trafficking and development.

  19. H2S induces vasoconstriction of rat cerebral arteries via cAMP/adenylyl cyclase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sen; Ping, Na-Na; Cao, Lei; Mi, Yan-Ni; Cao, Yong-Xiao

    2015-12-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), traditionally known for its toxic effects, is now involved in regulating vascular tone. Here we investigated the vasoconstrictive effect of H2S on cerebral artery and the underlying mechanism. Sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), a donor of H2S, concentration-dependently induced vasoconstriction on basilar artery, which was enhanced in the presence of isoprenaline, a β-adrenoceptor agonist or forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator. Administration of NaHS attenuated the vasorelaxant effects of isoprenaline or forskolin. Meanwhile, the NaHS-induced vasoconstriction was diminished in the presence of 8B-cAMP, an analog of cAMP, but was not affected by Bay K-8644, a selective L-type Ca(2+) channel agonist. These results could be explained by the revised effects of NaHS on isoprenaline-induced cAMP elevation and forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity. Additionally, NaHS-induced vasoconstriction was enhanced by removing the endothelium or in the presence of L-NAME, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase. L-NAME only partially attenuated the effect of NaHS which was given together with forskolin on the pre-contracted artery. In conclusion, H2S induces vasoconstriction of cerebral artery via, at least in part, cAMP/adenylyl cyclase pathway.

  20. Identification of photoactivated adenylyl cyclases in Naegleria australiensis and BLUF-containing protein in Naegleria fowleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukawa, Hiro; Sato, Aya; Kita, Ayaka; Kodaira, Ken-Ichi; Iseki, Mineo; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Shibusawa, Mami; Watanabe, Masakatsu; Yagita, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Complete genome sequencing of Naegleria gruberi has revealed that the organism encodes polypeptides similar to photoactivated adenylyl cyclases (PACs). Screening in the N. australiensis genome showed that the organism also encodes polypeptides similar to PACs. Each of the Naegleria proteins consists of a "sensors of blue-light using FAD" domain (BLUF domain) and an adenylyl cyclase domain (AC domain). PAC activity of the Naegleria proteins was assayed by comparing sensitivities of Escherichia coli cells heterologously expressing the proteins to antibiotics in a dark condition and a blue light-irradiated condition. Antibiotics used in the assays were fosfomycin and fosmidomycin. E. coli cells expressing the Naegleria proteins showed increased fosfomycin sensitivity and fosmidomycin sensitivity when incubated under blue light, indicating that the proteins functioned as PACs in the bacterial cells. Analysis of the N. fowleri genome revealed that the organism encodes a protein bearing an amino acid sequence similar to that of BLUF. A plasmid expressing a chimeric protein consisting of the BLUF-like sequence found in N. fowleri and the adenylyl cyclase domain of N. gruberi PAC was constructed to determine whether the BLUF-like sequence functioned as a sensor of blue light. E. coli cells expressing a chimeric protein showed increased fosfomycin sensitivity and fosmidomycin sensitivity when incubated under blue light. These experimental results indicated that the sequence similar to the BLUF domain found in N. fowleri functioned as a sensor of blue light.

  1. Genetic reduction of chronic muscle pain in mice lacking calcium/calmodulin-stimulated adenylyl cyclases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrovic Michele J

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Ca2+/calmodulin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase (AC isoforms AC1 and AC8, couple NMDA receptor activation to cAMP signaling pathways in neurons and are important for development, learning and memory, drug addiction and persistent pain. AC1 and AC8 in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC and the spinal cord were previously shown to be important in subcutaneous inflammatory pain. Muscle pain is different from cutaneous pain in its characteristics as well as conducting fibers. Therefore, we conducted the present work to test the role of AC1 and AC8 in both acute persistent and chronic muscle pain. Results Using an acute persistent inflammatory muscle pain model, we found that the behavioral nociceptive responses of both the late phase of acute muscle pain and the chronic muscle inflammatory pain were significantly reduced in AC1 knockout (KO and AC1&8 double knockout (DKO mice. Activation of other adenylyl cyclases in these KO mice by microinjection of forskolin into the ACC or spinal cord, but not into the peripheral tissue, rescued the behavioral nociceptive responses. Additionally, intra-peritoneal injection of an AC1 inhibitor significantly reduced behavioral responses in both acute persistent and chronic muscle pain. Conclusion The results of the present study demonstrate that neuronal Ca2+/calmodulin-stimulated adenylyl cyclases in the ACC and spinal cord are important for both late acute persistent and chronic inflammatory muscle pain.

  2. Soluble guanylate cyclase α1-deficient mice: a novel murine model for primary open angle glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel S Buys

    Full Text Available Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG is a leading cause of blindness worldwide. The molecular signaling involved in the pathogenesis of POAG remains unknown. Here, we report that mice lacking the α1 subunit of the nitric oxide receptor soluble guanylate cyclase represent a novel and translatable animal model of POAG, characterized by thinning of the retinal nerve fiber layer and loss of optic nerve axons in the context of an open iridocorneal angle. The optic neuropathy associated with soluble guanylate cyclase α1-deficiency was accompanied by modestly increased intraocular pressure and retinal vascular dysfunction. Moreover, data from a candidate gene association study suggests that a variant in the locus containing the genes encoding for the α1 and β1 subunits of soluble guanylate cyclase is associated with POAG in patients presenting with initial paracentral vision loss, a disease subtype thought to be associated with vascular dysregulation. These findings provide new insights into the pathogenesis and genetics of POAG and suggest new therapeutic strategies for POAG.

  3. Microarray evidence of glutaminyl cyclase gene expression in melanoma: implications for tumor antigen specific immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillis John

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years encouraging progress has been made in developing vaccine treatments for cancer, particularly with melanoma. However, the overall rate of clinically significant results has remained low. The present research used microarray datasets from previous investigations to examine gene expression patterns in cancer cell lines with the goal of better understanding the tumor microenvironment. Methods Principal Components Analyses with Promax rotational transformations were carried out with 90 cancer cell lines from 3 microarray datasets, which had been made available on the internet as supplementary information from prior publications. Results In each of the analyses a well defined melanoma component was identified that contained a gene coding for the enzyme, glutaminyl cyclase, which was as highly expressed as genes from a variety of well established biomarkers for melanoma, such as MAGE-3 and MART-1, which have frequently been used in clinical trials of melanoma vaccines. Conclusion Since glutaminyl cyclase converts glutamine and glutamic acid into a pyroglutamic form, it may interfere with the tumor destructive process of vaccines using peptides having glutamine or glutamic acid at their N-terminals. Finding ways of inhibiting the activity of glutaminyl cyclase in the tumor microenvironment may help to increase the effectiveness of some melanoma vaccines.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the glutaminyl cyclase from Carica papaya latex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azarkan, Mohamed [Laboratoire de Chimie Générale I, Faculté de Médecine-ULB CP609, 808 Route de Lennik, B-1070 Brussels (Belgium); Clantin, Bernard; Bompard, Coralie [CNRS-UMR 8525, Institut de Biologie de Lille, BP 477, 1 Rue du Professeur Calmette, F-59021 Lille (France); Belrhali, Hassan [EMBL Grenoble Outstation, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, BP 181, F-38042 Grenoble CEDEX 9 (France); Baeyens-Volant, Danielle [Laboratoire de Chimie Générale I, Faculté de Médecine-ULB CP609, 808 Route de Lennik, B-1070 Brussels (Belgium); Looze, Yvan [Laboratoire de Chimie Générale, Institut de Pharmacie-ULB CP206/04, Boulevard du Triomphe, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Villeret, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.villeret@ibl.fr [CNRS-UMR 8525, Institut de Biologie de Lille, BP 477, 1 Rue du Professeur Calmette, F-59021 Lille (France); Wintjens, René, E-mail: vincent.villeret@ibl.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Générale, Institut de Pharmacie-ULB CP206/04, Boulevard du Triomphe, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Laboratoire de Chimie Générale I, Faculté de Médecine-ULB CP609, 808 Route de Lennik, B-1070 Brussels (Belgium)

    2005-01-01

    The glutaminyl cyclase isolated from C. papaya latex has been crystallized using the hanging-drop method. Diffraction data have been collected at ESRF beamline BM14 and processed to 1.7 Å resolution. In living systems, the intramolecular cyclization of N-terminal glutamine residues is accomplished by glutaminyl cyclase enzymes (EC 2.3.2.5). While in mammals these enzymes are involved in the synthesis of hormonal and neurotransmitter peptides, the physiological role played by the corresponding plant enzymes still remains to be unravelled. Papaya glutaminyl cyclase (PQC), a 33 kDa enzyme found in the latex of the tropical tree Carica papaya, displays an exceptional resistance to chemical and thermal denaturation as well as to proteolysis. In order to elucidate its enzymatic mechanism and to gain insights into the structural determinants underlying its remarkable stability, PQC was isolated from papaya latex, purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 62.82, b = 81.23, c = 108.17 Å and two molecules per asymmetric unit. Diffraction data have been collected at ESRF beamline BM14 and processed to a resolution of 1.7 Å.

  5. A Simple Luminescent Adenylate-Cyclase Functional Assay for Evaluation of Bacillus anthracis Edema Factor Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma’ayan Israeli

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Edema Factor (EF, the toxic sub-unit of the Bacillus anthracis Edema Toxin (ET is a calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase whose detrimental activity in the infected host results in severe edema. EF is therefore a major virulence factor of B. anthracis. We describe a simple, rapid and reliable functional adenylate-cyclase assay based on inhibition of a luciferase-mediated luminescence reaction. The assay exploits the efficient adenylate cyclase-mediated depletion of adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP, and the strict dependence on ATP of the light-emitting luciferase-catalyzed luciferin-conversion to oxyluciferin, which can be easily visualized. The assay exhibits a robust EF-dose response decrease in luminescence, which may be specifically reverted by anti-EF antibodies. The application of the assay is exemplified in: (a determining the presence of EF in B. anthracis cultures, or its absence in cultures of EF-defective strains; (b evaluating the anti-EF humoral response in experimental animals infected/vaccinated with B. anthracis; and (c rapid discrimination between EF producing and non-producing bacterial colonies. Furthermore, the assay may be amenable with high-throughput screening for EF inhibitory molecules.

  6. The first structure of a bacterial diterpene cyclase: CotB2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Ronja; Görner, Christian; Hirte, Max; Brück, Thomas; Loll, Bernhard

    2014-06-01

    Sesquiterpenes and diterpenes are a diverse class of secondary metabolites that are predominantly derived from plants and some prokaryotes. The properties of these natural products encompass antitumor, antibiotic and even insecticidal activities. Therefore, they are interesting commercial targets for the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Owing to their structural complexity, these compounds are more efficiently accessed by metabolic engineering of microbial systems than by chemical synthesis. This work presents the first crystal structure of a bacterial diterpene cyclase, CotB2 from the soil bacterium Streptomyces melanosporofaciens, at 1.64 Å resolution. CotB2 is a diterpene cyclase that catalyzes the cyclization of the linear geranylgeranyl diphosphate to the tricyclic cyclooctat-9-en-7-ol. The subsequent oxidation of cyclooctat-9-en-7-ol by two cytochrome P450 monooxygenases leads to bioactive cyclooctatin. Plasticity residues that decorate the active site of CotB2 have been mutated, resulting in alternative monocyclic, dicyclic and tricyclic compounds that show bioactivity. These new compounds shed new light on diterpene cyclase reaction mechanisms. Furthermore, the product of mutant CotB2(W288G) produced the new antibiotic compound (1R,3E,7E,11S,12S)-3,7,18-dolabellatriene, which acts specifically against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. This opens a sustainable route for the industrial-scale production of this bioactive compound.

  7. Adenylate cyclase toxin promotes internalisation of integrins and raft components and decreases macrophage adhesion capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Martín

    Full Text Available Bordetella pertussis, the bacterium that causes whooping cough, secretes an adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT that must be post-translationally palmitoylated in the bacterium cytosol to be active. The toxin targets phagocytes expressing the CD11b/CD18 integrin receptor. It delivers a catalytic adenylate cyclase domain into the target cell cytosol producing a rapid increase of intracellular cAMP concentration that suppresses bactericidal functions of the phagocyte. ACT also induces calcium fluxes into target cells. Biochemical, biophysical and cell biology approaches have been applied here to show evidence that ACT and integrin molecules, along with other raft components, are rapidly internalized by the macrophages in a toxin-induced calcium rise-dependent process. The toxin-triggered internalisation events occur through two different routes of entry, chlorpromazine-sensitive receptor-mediated endocytosis and clathrin-independent internalisation, maybe acting in parallel. ACT locates into raft-like domains, and is internalised, also in cells devoid of receptor. Altogether our results suggest that adenylate cyclase toxin, and maybe other homologous pathogenic toxins from the RTX (Repeats in Toxin family to which ACT belongs, may be endowed with an intrinsic capacity to, directly and efficiently, insert into raft-like domains, promoting there its multiple activities. One direct consequence of the integrin removal from the cell surface of the macrophages is the hampering of their adhesion ability, a fundamental property in the immune response of the leukocytes that could be instrumental in the pathogenesis of Bordetella pertussis.

  8. Effects of dopamine on adenylyl cyclase activity and amylase secretion in rat parotid tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatta, S; Amemiya, N; Takemura, H; Ohshika, H

    1995-06-01

    Several previous studies have shown that dopamine causes amylase secretion from rat parotid tissue. However, the mechanism of this dopamine action is still unclear. The present study was designed to characterize dopamine action in rat parotid gland tissue by examining the effects of dopamine on cyclic AMP accumulation, adenylyl cyclase activity, and amylase release. Dopamine significantly enhanced accumulation of cyclic AMP in parotid slices and stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity in parotid membrane preparations. It also significantly stimulated amylase release from parotid slices. The stimulatory effects of dopamine on cyclic AMP accumulation, adenylyl cyclase activity, and amylase release were effectively blocked with propranolol, a beta-adrenergic antagonist, but not by either SCH 23390, a preferential D1 antagonist, or butaclamol, a preferential D2 antagonist. No substantial specific binding sites for D1 receptors were detectable by [3H]SCH 23390 binding in parotid membranes. These results suggest that the stimulatory effect of dopamine on amylase secretion in rat parotid tissue is not mediated through specific D1 dopamine receptors but rather through beta-adrenergic receptors.

  9. Trichomonas transmembrane cyclases result from massive gene duplication and concomitant development of pseudogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jike Cui

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Trichomonas vaginalis has an unusually large genome (approximately 160 Mb encoding approximately 60,000 proteins. With the goal of beginning to understand why some Trichomonas genes are present in so many copies, we characterized here a family of approximately 123 Trichomonas genes that encode transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (TMACs.The large family of TMACs genes is the result of recent duplications of a small set of ancestral genes that appear to be unique to trichomonads. Duplicated TMAC genes are not closely associated with repetitive elements, and duplications of flanking sequences are rare. However, there is evidence for TMAC gene replacements by homologous recombination. A high percentage of TMAC genes (approximately 46% are pseudogenes, as they contain stop codons and/or frame shifts, or the genes are truncated. Numerous stop codons present in the genome project G3 strain are not present in orthologous genes of two other Trichomonas strains (S1 and B7RC2. Each TMAC is composed of a series of N-terminal transmembrane helices and a single C-terminal cyclase domain that has adenylyl cyclase activity. Multiple TMAC genes are transcribed by Trichomonas cloned by limiting dilution.We conclude that one reason for the unusually large genome of Trichomonas is the presence of unstable families of genes such as those encoding TMACs that are undergoing massive gene duplication and concomitant development of pseudogenes.

  10. Identification of Adenyl Cyclase Activity in a Disease Resistance Protein in Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Hussein, Rana

    2012-11-01

    Cyclic nucleotide, cAMP, is an important signaling molecule in animals and plants. However, in plants the enzymes that synthesize this second messenger, adenyl cyclases (ACs), remain elusive. Given the physiological importance of cAMP in signaling, particularly in response to biotic and abiotic stresses, it is thus important to identify and characterize ACs in higher plants. Using computational approaches, a disease resistance protein from Arabidopsis thaliana, At3g04220 was found to have an AC catalytic center motif. In an attempt to prove that this candidate has adenyl cyclases activity in vitro, the coding sequence of the putative AC catalytic domain of this protein was cloned and expressed in E. coli and the recombinant protein was purified. The nucleotide cyclase activity of the recombinant protein was examined using cyclic nucleotide enzyme immunoassays. In parallel, the expression of At3g04220 was measured in leaves under three different stress conditions in order to determine under which conditions the disease resistance protein could function. Results show that the purified recombinant protein has Mn2+ dependent AC activity in vitro, and the expression analysis supports a role for At3g04220 and cAMP in plant defense.

  11. Affinity labelling enzymes with esters of aromatic sulfonic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Show-Chu; Shaw, Elliott

    1977-01-01

    Novel esters of aromatic sulfonic acids are disclosed. The specific esters are nitrophenyl p- and m-amidinophenylmethanesulfonate. Also disclosed is a method for specific inactivation of the enzyme, thrombin, employing nitrophenyl p-amidinophenylmethanesulfonate.

  12. Catalytic Synthesis of Ethyl Ester From Some Common Oils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... seed oil FAEE that shows high acid value and total ash content the esters could be used directly or as blend in diesel engines to give good performance. Key words: Ethyl ester, synthesis, catalytic activity, common oils, biodiesel potential.

  13. Chiral extraction of ketoprofen enantiomers with chiral selector tartaric esters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Dan; LIU Jia-jia; TANG Ke-wen; HUANG Ke-long

    2007-01-01

    Distribution behavior of ketoprofen enantiomers was examined in methanol aqueous and organic solvent mixture containing tartaric esters. The influence of length of alkyl chain of tartaric esters, concentration of L-tartaric esters and methanol aqueous, kind of organic solvent on partition ratio and separation factors was investigated. The results show that L-tartaric and D-tartaric esters have different chiral recognition abilities. S-ketoprofen is easily extracted by L-tartaric esters, and R-ketoprofen is easily extracted by D-tartaric esters. L-tartaric esters form more stable diastereomeric complexes with S-enantiomer than that with R-enantiomer. This distribution behavior is consistent with chiral recognition mechanism. With the increase of the concentration of tartaric ester from 0 to 0.3 mol/L, partition coefficient K and separation factor α increase. Also, the kind of organic solvent and the concentration of the methanol aqueous have significant influence on K and α.

  14. Effect of Sucrose Esters on the Physicochemical Properties of Wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Sucrose Esters on the Physicochemical Properties of Wheat Starch. ... Methods: Sucrose ester was mixed with wheat starch extracted from normal soft wheat cultivars and heated. Change in starch properties arising ... Article Metrics.

  15. Biocatalytic synthesis and antioxidant capacities of ascorbyl esters ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biocatalytic synthesis and antioxidant capacities of ascorbyl esters by Novozym 435 in tert-butanol ... Novozym 435 was used to catalyze the synthesis of fatty acid (FA) ascorbyl esters in tert-butanol using methyl palmitate, ... Article Metrics.

  16. Phthalate ester plasticizers in freshwater systems of Venda, South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phthalate ester plasticizers in freshwater systems of Venda, South Africa and potential health effects. ... Abstract. Phthalate ester plasticizers were determined in rivers and dams of the Venda region, South Africa. Liquid-liquid ... Article Metrics.

  17. Evaluation of the levels of phthalate ester plasticizers in surface ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of the levels of phthalate ester plasticizers in surface water of Ethiope River System, Delta State, Nigeria. ... studies of the river. Keywords: phthalates, acid esters, plasticizers, Ethiope River, surface water, pollution ... Article Metrics.

  18. Study of shellac glycerol esters as microencapsulating materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labhasetwar, V D; Puranik, P K; Dorle, A K

    1989-01-01

    Shellac esters were prepared by heating shellac with glycerol and intermediate reaction products were withdrawn. Salicyclic acid granules were encapsulated using a 20 per cent w/v alcoholic solution of shellac and shellac esters. The coated microcapsules were evaluated for moisture absorption, flow properties, and dissolution studies. The drug release from coated granules was seen to depend upon the acid value of the esters. Results indicate that shellac esters could be better encapsulating material than shellac in sustained release formulation.

  19. Acrylic Acid and Esters Will Be Oversupply

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Chengwang

    2007-01-01

    @@ Drastic capacity growth The production capacity of acrylic acid in China has grown drastically in recent years. With the completion of the 80 thousand t/a acrylic acid and 130 thous and t/a acrylic ester project in Shenyang Paraffin Chemical Industrial Co., Ltd., (CCR2006,No. 31) the capacity of acrylic acid in China has reached 882 thousand t/a.

  20. Avocado and olive oil methyl esters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel, the mono-alkyl esters of vegetable oils, animal fats or other triacylglycerol-containing materials and an alternative to conventional petroleum-based diesel fuel, has been derived from a variety of feedstocks. Numerous feedstocks have been investigated as potential biodiesel sources, incl...

  1. Complexes with Methionine Methyl Ester. Equilibria and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    Methionine methyl ester forms 1:1 and 1:2 complexes with diorganotin(IV). The corresponding ... coordination compounds R2SnX2L2 is controlled by the nature of. R, the leaving ... nitrate were obtained from Acros Organics. Carbonate-free.

  2. Naturally Occurring Cinnamic Acid Sugar Ester Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxin Tian

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cinnamic acid sugar ester derivatives (CASEDs are a class of natural product with one or several phenylacrylic moieties linked with the non-anomeric carbon of a glycosyl skeleton part through ester bonds. Their notable anti-depressant and brains protective activities have made them a topic of great interest over the past several decades. In particular the compound 3′,6-disinapoylsucrose, the index component of Yuanzhi (a well-known Traditional Chinese Medicine or TCM, presents antidepressant effects at a molecular level, and has become a hotspot of research on new lead drug compounds. Several other similar cinnamic acid sugar ester derivatives are reported in traditional medicine as compounds to calm the nerves and display anti-depression and neuroprotective activity. Interestingly, more than one third of CASEDs are distributed in the family Polygalaceae. This overview discusses the isolation of cinnamic acid sugar ester derivatives from plants, together with a systematic discussion of their distribution, chemical structures and properties and pharmacological activities, with the hope of providing references for natural product researchers and draw attention to these interesting compounds.

  3. Saliva-catalyzed hydrolysis of a ketobemidone ester prodrug

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L.B.; Christrup, Lona Louring; Bundgaard, H.

    1992-01-01

    Saliva enzyme-catalysed hydrolysis of ester prodrugs or drugs containing sensitive ester groups may be a limiting factor for the buccal absorption of such compounds. Using the isopropyl carbonate ester of ketobemidone as a model substance of a hydrolysis-sensitive prodrug the esterase activity...

  4. 40 CFR 721.329 - Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.329 Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (generic). (a) Chemical substance... halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (PMN P-90-1527) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  5. 40 CFR 721.1732 - Nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.1732 Nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester (PMN...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10180 - Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10180 Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... acrylic ester (PMN P-04-692) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  7. 40 CFR 721.2925 - Brominated aromatic ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Brominated aromatic ester. 721.2925... Substances § 721.2925 Brominated aromatic ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a brominated aromatic ester (PMN...

  8. 40 CFR 721.5310 - Neononanoic acid, ethenyl ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Neononanoic acid, ethenyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.5310 Neononanoic acid, ethenyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as neononanoic acid, ethenyl ester (PMN...

  9. 40 CFR 721.2825 - Alkyl ester (generic name).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkyl ester (generic name). 721.2825... Substances § 721.2825 Alkyl ester (generic name). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance alkyl ester (PMN P-84-968) is subject to reporting under this...

  10. 21 CFR 172.735 - Glycerol ester of rosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Glycerol ester of rosin. 172.735 Section 172.735 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.735 Glycerol ester of rosin. Glycerol ester of wood...

  11. 40 CFR 721.3085 - Brominated phthalate ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Brominated phthalate ester. 721.3085... Substances § 721.3085 Brominated phthalate ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as brominated phthalate ester (PMN P-90-581)...

  12. 40 CFR 721.3140 - Vinyl epoxy ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vinyl epoxy ester. 721.3140 Section... Substances § 721.3140 Vinyl epoxy ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance vinyl epoxy ester (PMN P-85-527) is subject to reporting under...

  13. 21 CFR 175.210 - Acrylate ester copolymer coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acrylate ester copolymer coating. 175.210 Section... COATINGS Substances for Use as Components of Coatings § 175.210 Acrylate ester copolymer coating. Acrylate ester copolymer coating may safely be used as a food-contact surface of articles intended for...

  14. 40 CFR 721.4158 - Hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.4158 Hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester (PMN...

  15. 40 CFR 721.4215 - Hexanedioic acid, diethenyl ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hexanedioic acid, diethenyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.4215 Hexanedioic acid, diethenyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as hexanedioic acid, diethenyl ester (PMN...

  16. 40 CFR 721.2121 - Thiosubstituted carbonate ester (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Thiosubstituted carbonate ester... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2121 Thiosubstituted carbonate ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance... Thiosubstituted carbonate ester (PMN P-99-0654) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  17. 75 FR 71556 - Polyoxyalkylated Glycerol Fatty Acid Esters; Tolerance Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 Polyoxyalkylated Glycerol Fatty Acid Esters; Tolerance Exemption AGENCY... from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of polyoxyalkylated glycerol fatty acid esters; the... ethylene oxide or propylene oxide, also known as polyoxyalkylated glycerol fatty acid esters, when used as...

  18. 40 CFR 721.2950 - Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. 721... Substances § 721.2950 Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as carboxylic acid glycidyl ester...

  19. 21 CFR 556.240 - Estradiol and related esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Estradiol and related esters. 556.240 Section 556... Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.240 Estradiol and related esters. No residues of estradiol, resulting from the use of estradiol or any of the related esters, are permitted in excess of the following...

  20. An overview of the properties of fatty acid alkyl esters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatty acid alkyl esters of plant oils, especially in the form of methyl esters, have numerous applications with fuel use having received the most attention in recent times due to the potential high volume. Various properties imparted by neat fatty acid alkyl esters have been shown to influence fuel ...

  1. Determination of Mass Spectrometric Sensitivity of Different Metalloporphyrin Esters Relative to Porphyrin Ester

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Elfinn; Egsgaard, Helge; Møller, J.

    1977-01-01

    Quantitative determination of metalloporphyrin contamination in preparations of biologically important porphyrins was achieved mass spectrometrically by application of the integrated ion current technique. For this purpose, the relative molecular ion sensitivities of the contaminating metal compl...... complexes were determined from the ratios of the integrated molecular ion currents of a series of calibration samples containing a porphyrin ester and one of its metal complexes in known molar ratio. Complexes formed with divalent ions of Cu, Zn, Fe, Co and Ni of copro- as well as uro......-prophyrin permethylester were all found to have the same molecular ion sensitivities as their metal-free porphyrin ester. The relative metalloporphyrin ester content in a sample of porphyrin ester was thus obtained directly as the integrated ion current ratios of the normalized molecular ions. The preparation...

  2. Ester Tuiksoo - Eesti esimene naissoost põllumajandusminister / Ester Tuiksoo ; interv. Toomas Verrev

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tuiksoo, Ester, 1965-

    2007-01-01

    Ametist lahkuv põllumajandusminister Ester Tuiksoo räägib saadud juhtimiskogemusest, Euroopa Liidu ühise põllumajanduspoliitika juurutamisest, rahvuskala valimisest, Rahvaliidu käekäigust parlamendivalimistel

  3. Ester Tuiksoo - Eesti esimene naissoost põllumajandusminister / Ester Tuiksoo ; interv. Toomas Verrev

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tuiksoo, Ester, 1965-

    2007-01-01

    Ametist lahkuv põllumajandusminister Ester Tuiksoo räägib saadud juhtimiskogemusest, Euroopa Liidu ühise põllumajanduspoliitika juurutamisest, rahvuskala valimisest, Rahvaliidu käekäigust parlamendivalimistel

  4. Expanding the modular ester fermentative pathways for combinatorial biosynthesis of esters from volatile organic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layton, Donovan S; Trinh, Cong T

    2016-08-01

    Volatile organic acids are byproducts of fermentative metabolism, for example, anaerobic digestion of lignocellulosic biomass or organic wastes, and are often times undesired inhibiting cell growth and reducing directed formation of the desired products. Here, we devised a general framework for upgrading these volatile organic acids to high-value esters that can be used as flavors, fragrances, solvents, and biofuels. This framework employs the acid-to-ester modules, consisting of an AAT (alcohol acyltransferase) plus ACT (acyl CoA transferase) submodule and an alcohol submodule, for co-fermentation of sugars and organic acids to acyl CoAs and alcohols to form a combinatorial library of esters. By assembling these modules with the engineered Escherichia coli modular chassis cell, we developed microbial manufacturing platforms to perform the following functions: (i) rapid in vivo screening of novel AATs for their catalytic activities; (ii) expanding combinatorial biosynthesis of unique fermentative esters; and (iii) upgrading volatile organic acids to esters using single or mixed cell cultures. To demonstrate this framework, we screened for a set of five unique and divergent AATs from multiple species, and were able to determine their novel activities as well as produce a library of 12 out of the 13 expected esters from co-fermentation of sugars and (C2-C6) volatile organic acids. We envision the developed framework to be valuable for in vivo characterization of a repertoire of not-well-characterized natural AATs, expanding the combinatorial biosynthesis of fermentative esters, and upgrading volatile organic acids to high-value esters. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1764-1776. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Direct Determination of MCPD Fatty Acid Esters and Glycidyl Fatty Acid Esters in Vegetable Oils by LC–TOFMS

    OpenAIRE

    Haines, Troy D.; Adlaf, Kevin J.; Pierceall, Robert M.; Lee, Inmok; Venkitasubramanian, Padmesh; Collison, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of MCPD esters and glycidyl esters in vegetable oils using the indirect method proposed by the DGF gave inconsistent results when salting out conditions were varied. Subsequent investigation showed that the method was destroying and reforming MCPD during the analysis. An LC time of flight MS method was developed for direct analysis of both MCPD esters and glycidyl esters in vegetable oils. The results of the LC–TOFMS method were compared with the DGF method. The DGF method consistent...

  6. Triterpene hexahydroxydiphenoyl esters and a quinic acid purpurogallin carbonyl ester from the leaves of Castanopsis fissa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong-Lin; Tsujita, Takaaki; Tanaka, Takashi; Matsuo, Yosuke; Kouno, Isao; Li, Dian-Peng; Nonaka, Gen-ichiro

    2011-11-01

    Triterpene hexahydroxydiphenoyl (HHDP) esters have only been isolated from Castanopsis species, and the distribution of these esters in nature is of chemotaxonomical interest. In this study, the chemical constituents of the leaves of Castanopsis fissa were examined in detail to identify and isolate potential HHDP esters. Together with 53 known compounds, 3,4-di-O-galloyl-1-O-purpurogallin carbonyl quinic acid (1) and 3,24-(S)-HHDP-2α,3β,23,24-tetrahydroxytaraxastan-28,20β-olide (2) were isolated and their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic and chemical methods. The polyphenols of the leaves were mainly composed of galloyl quinic acids, triterpenes HHDP esters, ellagitannins and flavonol glycosides. In particular, the isolation yields of 1,3,4-trigalloyl quinic acid and compound 2 were 1.53% and 0.27%, respectively, from the fresh leaves. The presence of lipid soluble HHDP esters of oleanane-type triterpenes as one of the major metabolites is an important chemotaxonomical discovery. Lipase inhibition activities and ORAC values of the major constituents were compared. The triterpene HHDP ester showed moderate lipase inhibition activity and myricitrin gave the largest ORAC value.

  7. The cyclase-associated protein CAP as regulator of cell polarity and cAMP signaling in Dictyostelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noegel, Angelika A; Blau-Wasser, Rosemarie; Sultana, Hameeda; Müller, Rolf; Israel, Lars; Schleicher, Michael; Patel, Hitesh; Weijer, Cornelis J

    2004-02-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is an evolutionarily conserved regulator of the G-actin/F-actin ratio and, in yeast, is involved in regulating the adenylyl cyclase activity. We show that cell polarization, F-actin organization, and phototaxis are altered in a Dictyostelium CAP knockout mutant. Furthermore, in complementation assays we determined the roles of the individual domains in signaling and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. We studied in detail the adenylyl cyclase activity and found that the mutant cells have normal levels of the aggregation phase-specific adenylyl cyclase and that receptor-mediated activation is intact. However, cAMP relay that is responsible for the generation of propagating cAMP waves that control the chemotactic aggregation of starving Dictyostelium cells was altered, and the cAMP-induced cGMP production was significantly reduced. The data suggest an interaction of CAP with adenylyl cyclase in Dictyostelium and an influence on signaling pathways directly as well as through its function as a regulatory component of the cytoskeleton.

  8. Effect of mitomycin C on the activation of adenylate cyclase in rat ascites hepatoma AH130 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, K; Matsunaga, T; Sanae, F; Koshiura, R

    1986-09-01

    Isoproterenol (IPN)-stimulated activity of adenylate cyclase was enhanced in a dose-dependent manner by exposure of AH130 cells to mitomycin C (MMC). The enhancement was also observed in prostaglandin E1-, guanine nucleotide analog-, NaF-, cholera toxin- and forskolin-stimulated activities of the enzyme but not in manganese-stimulated activity. In addition, even when the cells pretreated with islet-activating protein were exposed to MMC, IPN-stimulated activity of adenylate cyclase was enhanced. Anaerobic exposure of AH130 cells to MMC somewhat inhibited IPN-stimulated activity of adenylate cyclase in contrast with aerobic exposure. Exposure of cells to adriamycin also caused enhancement of IPN-stimulated activity of adenylate cyclase but exposure to nitrogen mustard inhibited the enzyme stimulation by IPN. The enhancing effect of MMC was lost by the combined treatment with alpha-tocopherol. From these results, it was shown that MMC modulated the activity of adenylate cyclase, probably through alterations in membrane structure.

  9. Curing mechanism of alkaline phenolic resin with organic ester

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Renhe; Wang Yanmin; Zhang Baoping

    2014-01-01

    To study the curing mechanism of alkaline phenolic resin with organic ester, three esters were chosen to react with three systems - alkaline phenolic resin, potassium hydroxide aqueous solution containing phenol, and potassium hydroxide aqueous solution. The variations of pH, heat release and gel pH during the reactions were monitored and measured. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) and thermal gravity analysis (TG) techniques were used to characterize the curing reaction. It was found that organic ester is only partial y hydrolyzed and resin can be cured through organic ester hydrolysis process as wel as the reaction with redundant organic ester. The sequential curing mechanism of alkaline phenolic resin cured by organic ester was identified as fol ows: a portion of organic ester is firstly hydrolyzed owing to the effect of the strong alkaline; the gel is then formed after the pH decreases to about 10.8-10.88, meanwhile, the redundant organic ester (i.e. non-hydrolysis ester) starts the curing reaction with the resin. It has also been found that the curing rate depends on the hydrolysis velocity of organic ester. The faster the hydrolysis speed of the ester, the faster the curing rate of the resin.

  10. Real-Time monitoring of intracellular wax ester metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karp Matti

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wax esters are industrially relevant molecules exploited in several applications of oleochemistry and food industry. At the moment, the production processes mostly rely on chemical synthesis from rather expensive starting materials, and therefore solutions are sought from biotechnology. Bacterial wax esters are attractive alternatives, and especially the wax ester metabolism of Acinetobacter sp. has been extensively studied. However, the lack of suitable tools for rapid and simple monitoring of wax ester metabolism in vivo has partly restricted the screening and analyses of potential hosts and optimal conditions. Results Based on sensitive and specific detection of intracellular long-chain aldehydes, specific intermediates of wax ester synthesis, bacterial luciferase (LuxAB was exploited in studying the wax ester metabolism in Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1. Luminescence was detected in the cultivation of the strain producing wax esters, and the changes in signal levels could be linked to corresponding cell growth and wax ester synthesis phases. Conclusions The monitoring system showed correlation between wax ester synthesis pattern and luminescent signal. The system shows potential for real-time screening purposes and studies on bacterial wax esters, revealing new aspects to dynamics and role of wax ester metabolism in bacteria.

  11. Fumaric Acid Esters Do Not Reduce Inflammatory NF-κB/p65 Nuclear Translocation, ICAM-1 Expression and T-Cell Adhesiveness of Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Haarmann

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Dimethyl fumarate (DMF is approved for disease-modifying treatment of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Animal experiments suggested that part of its therapeutic effect is due to a reduction of T-cell infiltration of the central nervous system (CNS by uncertain mechanisms. Here we evaluated whether DMF and its primary metabolite monomethyl fumarate (MMF modulate pro-inflammatory intracellular signaling and T-cell adhesiveness of nonimmortalized single donor human brain microvascular endothelial cells at low passages. Neither DMF nor MMF at concentrations of 10 or 50 µM blocked the IL-1β-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB/p65, whereas the higher concentration of DMF inhibited the nuclear entry of p65 in human umbilical vein endothelium cultured in parallel. DMF and MMF also did not alter the IL-1β-stimulated activation of p38 MAPK in brain endothelium. Furthermore, neither DMF nor MMF reduced the basal or IL-1β-inducible expression of ICAM-1. In accordance, both fumaric acid esters did not reduce the adhesion of activated Jurkat T cells to brain endothelium under basal or inflammatory conditions. Therefore, brain endothelial cells probably do not directly mediate a potential blocking effect of fumaric acid esters on the inflammatory infiltration of the CNS by T cells.

  12. Fumaric Acid Esters Do Not Reduce Inflammatory NF-κB/p65 Nuclear Translocation, ICAM-1 Expression and T-Cell Adhesiveness of Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarmann, Axel; Nehen, Mathias; Deiß, Annika; Buttmann, Mathias

    2015-08-13

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is approved for disease-modifying treatment of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Animal experiments suggested that part of its therapeutic effect is due to a reduction of T-cell infiltration of the central nervous system (CNS) by uncertain mechanisms. Here we evaluated whether DMF and its primary metabolite monomethyl fumarate (MMF) modulate pro-inflammatory intracellular signaling and T-cell adhesiveness of nonimmortalized single donor human brain microvascular endothelial cells at low passages. Neither DMF nor MMF at concentrations of 10 or 50 µM blocked the IL-1β-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB/p65, whereas the higher concentration of DMF inhibited the nuclear entry of p65 in human umbilical vein endothelium cultured in parallel. DMF and MMF also did not alter the IL-1β-stimulated activation of p38 MAPK in brain endothelium. Furthermore, neither DMF nor MMF reduced the basal or IL-1β-inducible expression of ICAM-1. In accordance, both fumaric acid esters did not reduce the adhesion of activated Jurkat T cells to brain endothelium under basal or inflammatory conditions. Therefore, brain endothelial cells probably do not directly mediate a potential blocking effect of fumaric acid esters on the inflammatory infiltration of the CNS by T cells.

  13. Adenylyl cyclase 3/adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1) complex mediates the anti-migratory effect of forskolin in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Sierra N; Graves, Sarai H; Dains-McGahee, Clayton; Friedman, Emilee M; Hassan, Humma; Witkowski, Piotr; Sabbatini, Maria E

    2017-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal human malignancies. A better understanding of the intracellular mechanism of migration and invasion is urgently needed to develop treatment that will suppress metastases and improve overall survival. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP) is a second messenger that has shown to regulate migration and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells. The rise of cyclic AMP suppressed migration and invasion of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells. Cyclic AMP is formed from cytosolic ATP by the enzyme adenylyl cyclase (AC). There are ten isoforms of ACs; nine are anchored in the plasma membrane and one is soluble. What remains unknown is the extent to which the expression of transmembrane AC isoforms is both modified in pancreatic cancer and mediates the inhibitory effect of forskolin on cell motility. Using real-time PCR analysis, ADCY3 was found to be highly expressed in pancreatic tumor tissues, resulting in a constitutive increase in cyclic AMP levels. On the other hand, ADCY2 was down-regulated. Migration, invasion, and filopodia formation in two different pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines, HPAC and PANC-1 deficient in AC1 or AC3, were studied. We found that AC3, upon stimulation with forskolin, enhanced cyclic AMP levels and inhibited cell migration and invasion. Unlikely to be due to a cytotoxic effect, the inhibitory effects of forskolin involved the quick formation of AC3/adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1)/G-actin complex, which inhibited filopodia formation and cell motility. Using Western blotting analysis, forskolin, through AC3 activation, caused phosphorylation of CREB, but not ERK. The effect of CREB phosphorylation is likely to be associated with long-term signaling changes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Association of yeast adenylyl cyclase with cyclase-associated protein CAP forms a second Ras-binding site which mediates its Ras-dependent activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, F; Okada, T; Kido, M; Sen, H; Tanaka, Y; Tamada, M; Hu, C D; Yamawaki-Kataoka, Y; Kariya, K; Kataoka, T

    2000-01-01

    Posttranslational modification, in particular farnesylation, of Ras is crucial for activation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase (CYR1). Based on the previous observation that association of CYR1 with cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is essential for its activation by posttranslationally modified Ras, we postulated that the associated CAP might contribute to the formation of a Ras-binding site of CYR1, which mediates CYR1 activation, other than the primary Ras-binding site, the leucine-rich repeat domain. Here, we observed a posttranslational modification-dependent association of Ras with a complex between CAP and CYR1 C-terminal region. When CAP mutants defective in Ras signaling but retaining the CYR1-binding activity were isolated by screening of a pool of randomly mutagenized CAP, CYR1 complexed with two of the obtained three mutants failed to be activated efficiently by modified Ras and exhibited a severely impaired ability to bind Ras, providing a genetic evidence for the importance of the physical association with Ras at the second Ras-binding site. On the other hand, CYR1, complexed with the other CAP mutant, failed to be activated by Ras but exhibited a greatly enhanced binding to Ras. Conversely, a Ras mutant E31K, which exhibits a greatly enhanced binding to the CYR1-CAP complex, failed to activate CYR1 efficiently. Thus, the strength of interaction at the second Ras-binding site appears to be a critical determinant of CYR1 regulation by Ras: too-weak and too-strong interactions are both detrimental to CYR1 activation. These results, taken together with those obtained with mammalian Raf, suggest the importance of the second Ras-binding site in effector regulation.

  15. Probing the electronic structures and properties of neutral and charged monomethylated arsenic species (CH3As(n)((-1,0,+1)), n = 1-7) using Gaussian-3 theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xue; Zhang, Qiancheng; Yang, Jucai; Ning, Hongmei

    2012-09-20

    The structures and energies of neutral and charged monomethylated arsenic species CH(3)As(n)((-1,0,+1)) (n = 1-7) have been systematically investigated with the Gaussian-3 (G3) method. The ground-state structures of monomethylated arsenic species including the neutrals and the ions are vertex-methylated type. The lowest-energy structures of neutral methylated arsenic species and their ions can be viewed as being derived from corresponding to neutral and ionic arsenic clusters, respectively. The reliable electron affinities and ionization potentials of CH(3)As(n) have been evaluated. And there are odd-even alternations in both electron affinities and ionization potentials as a function of size of CH(3)As(n). The dissociation energies of CH(3) from neutral CH(3)As(n) and their ions have been calculated to examine relative stabilities. The results characterized the odd-numbered neutral CH(3)As(n) as more stable than the even-numbered systems, and the even-numbered cationic CH(3)As(n)(+) as more stable than the odd-numbered species with the exception of n = 1. The dissociation energy of CH(3)As(+) is the maximum among all of these values. There are no odd-even alternations for anionic CH(3)As(n)(-) with n ≤ 7.

  16. Multifunctional oxidosqualene cyclases and cytochrome P450 involved in the biosynthesis of apple fruit triterpenic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Christelle M; Legay, Sylvain; Deleruelle, Amélie; Nieuwenhuizen, Niels; Punter, Matthew; Brendolise, Cyril; Cooney, Janine M; Lateur, Marc; Hausman, Jean-François; Larondelle, Yvan; Laing, William A

    2016-09-01

    Apple (Malus × domestica) accumulates bioactive ursane-, oleanane-, and lupane-type triterpenes in its fruit cuticle, but their biosynthetic pathway is still poorly understood. We used a homology-based approach to identify and functionally characterize two new oxidosqualene cyclases (MdOSC4 and MdOSC5) and one cytochrome P450 (CYP716A175). The gene expression patterns of these enzymes and of previously described oxidosqualene cyclases were further studied in 20 apple cultivars with contrasting triterpene profiles. MdOSC4 encodes a multifunctional oxidosqualene cyclase producing an oleanane-type triterpene, putatively identified as germanicol, as well as β-amyrin and lupeol, in the proportion 82 : 14 : 4. MdOSC5 cyclizes 2,3-oxidosqualene into lupeol and β-amyrin at a ratio of 95 : 5. CYP716A175 catalyses the C-28 oxidation of α-amyrin, β-amyrin, lupeol and germanicol, producing ursolic acid, oleanolic acid, betulinic acid, and putatively morolic acid. The gene expression of MdOSC1 was linked to the concentrations of ursolic and oleanolic acid, whereas the expression of MdOSC5 was correlated with the concentrations of betulinic acid and its caffeate derivatives. Two new multifuntional triterpene synthases as well as a multifunctional triterpene C-28 oxidase were identified in Malus × domestica. This study also suggests that MdOSC1 and MdOSC5 are key genes in apple fruit triterpene biosynthesis.

  17. Structure, signaling mechanism and regulation of the natriuretic peptide receptor guanylate cyclase.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misono, K. S.; Philo, J. S.; Arakawa, T.; Ogata, C. M.; Qiu, Y.; Ogawa, H.; Young, H. S. (Biosciences Division); (Univ. of Nevada); (Alliance Protein Labs.)

    2011-06-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and the homologous B-type natriuretic peptide are cardiac hormones that dilate blood vessels and stimulate natriuresis and diuresis, thereby lowering blood pressure and blood volume. ANP and B-type natriuretic peptide counterbalance the actions of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and neurohormonal systems, and play a central role in cardiovascular regulation. These activities are mediated by natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPRA), a single transmembrane segment, guanylyl cyclase (GC)-linked receptor that occurs as a homodimer. Here, we present an overview of the structure, possible chloride-mediated regulation and signaling mechanism of NPRA and other receptor GCs. Earlier, we determined the crystal structures of the NPRA extracellular domain with and without bound ANP. Their structural comparison has revealed a novel ANP-induced rotation mechanism occurring in the juxtamembrane region that apparently triggers transmembrane signal transduction. More recently, the crystal structures of the dimerized catalytic domain of green algae GC Cyg12 and that of cyanobacterium GC Cya2 have been reported. These structures closely resemble that of the adenylyl cyclase catalytic domain, consisting of a C1 and C2 subdomain heterodimer. Adenylyl cyclase is activated by binding of G{sub s}{alpha} to C2 and the ensuing 7{sup o} rotation of C1 around an axis parallel to the central cleft, thereby inducing the heterodimer to adopt a catalytically active conformation. We speculate that, in NPRA, the ANP-induced rotation of the juxtamembrane domains, transmitted across the transmembrane helices, may induce a similar rotation in each of the dimerized GC catalytic domains, leading to the stimulation of the GC catalytic activity.

  18. Identification of Glutaminyl Cyclase Genes Involved in Pyroglutamate Modification of Fungal Lignocellulolytic Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent W. Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The breakdown of plant biomass to simple sugars is essential for the production of second-generation biofuels and high-value bioproducts. Currently, enzymes produced from filamentous fungi are used for deconstructing plant cell wall polysaccharides into fermentable sugars for biorefinery applications. A post-translational N-terminal pyroglutamate modification observed in some of these enzymes occurs when N-terminal glutamine or glutamate is cyclized to form a five-membered ring. This modification has been shown to confer resistance to thermal denaturation for CBH-1 and EG-1 cellulases. In mammalian cells, the formation of pyroglutamate is catalyzed by glutaminyl cyclases. Using the model filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, we identified two genes (qc-1 and qc-2 that encode proteins homologous to mammalian glutaminyl cyclases. We show that qc-1 and qc-2 are essential for catalyzing the formation of an N-terminal pyroglutamate on CBH-1 and GH5-1. CBH-1 and GH5-1 produced in a Δqc-1 Δqc-2 mutant, and thus lacking the N-terminal pyroglutamate modification, showed greater sensitivity to thermal denaturation, and for GH5-1, susceptibility to proteolytic cleavage. QC-1 and QC-2 are endoplasmic reticulum (ER-localized proteins. The pyroglutamate modification is predicted to occur in a number of additional fungal proteins that have diverse functions. The identification of glutaminyl cyclases in fungi may have implications for production of lignocellulolytic enzymes, heterologous expression, and biotechnological applications revolving around protein stability.

  19. Identification of Glutaminyl Cyclase Genes Involved in Pyroglutamate Modification of Fungal Lignocellulolytic Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Vincent W.; Dana, Craig M.; Iavarone, Anthony T.; Clark, Douglas S.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The breakdown of plant biomass to simple sugars is essential for the production of second-generation biofuels and high-value bioproducts. Currently, enzymes produced from filamentous fungi are used for deconstructing plant cell wall polysaccharides into fermentable sugars for biorefinery applications. A post-translational N-terminal pyroglutamate modification observed in some of these enzymes occurs when N-terminal glutamine or glutamate is cyclized to form a five-membered ring. This modification has been shown to confer resistance to thermal denaturation for CBH-1 and EG-1 cellulases. In mammalian cells, the formation of pyroglutamate is catalyzed by glutaminyl cyclases. Using the model filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, we identified two genes (qc-1 and qc-2) that encode proteins homologous to mammalian glutaminyl cyclases. We show that qc-1 and qc-2 are essential for catalyzing the formation of an N-terminal pyroglutamate on CBH-1 and GH5-1. CBH-1 and GH5-1 produced in a Δqc-1 Δqc-2 mutant, and thus lacking the N-terminal pyroglutamate modification, showed greater sensitivity to thermal denaturation, and for GH5-1, susceptibility to proteolytic cleavage. QC-1 and QC-2 are endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized proteins. The pyroglutamate modification is predicted to occur in a number of additional fungal proteins that have diverse functions. The identification of glutaminyl cyclases in fungi may have implications for production of lignocellulolytic enzymes, heterologous expression, and biotechnological applications revolving around protein stability. PMID:28096492

  20. Inhibition of adenylyl and guanylyl cyclase isoforms by the antiviral drug foscarnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudlacek, O; Mitterauer, T; Nanoff, C; Hohenegger, M; Tang, W J; Freissmuth, M; Kleuss, C

    2001-02-02

    The pyrophosphate (PP(i)) analog foscarnet inhibits viral DNA-polymerases and is used to treat cytomegalovirus and human immunodeficiency vius infections. Nucleotide cyclases and DNA-polymerases catalyze analogous reactions, i.e. a phosphodiester bond formation, and have similar topologies in their active sites. Inhibition by foscarnet of adenylyl cyclase isoforms was therefore tested with (i) purified catalytic domains C1 and C2 of types I and VII (IC1 and VIIC1) and of type II (IIC2) and (ii) membrane-bound holoenzymes (from mammalian tissues and types I, II, and V heterologously expressed in Sf9 cell membranes). Foscarnet was more potent than PP(i) in suppressing forskolin-stimulated catalysis by both, IC1/IIC2 and VIIC1/IIC2. Stimulation of VIIC1/IIC2 by Galpha(s) relieved the inhibition by foscarnet but not that by PP(i). The IC(50) of foscarnet on membrane-bound adenylyl cyclases also depended on their mode of regulation. These findings predict that receptor-dependent cAMP formation is sensitive to inhibition by foscarnet in some, but not all, cells. This was verified with two cell lines; foscarnet blocked cAMP accumulation after A(2A)-adenosine receptor stimulation in PC12 but not in HEK-A(2A) cells. Foscarnet also inhibited soluble and, to a lesser extent, particulate guanylyl cylase. Thus, foscarnet interferes with the generation of cyclic nucleotides, an effect which may give rise to clinical side effects. The extent of inhibition varies with the enzyme isoform and with the regulatory input.

  1. Atmospheric oxidation of selected alcohols and esters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, K.H.; Cavalli, F.

    2001-03-01

    The decision whether it is appropriate and beneficial for the environment to deploy specific oxygenated organic compounds as replacements for traditional solvent types requires a quantitative assessment of their potential atmospheric impacts including tropospheric ozone and other photooxidant formation. This involves developing chemical mechanisms for the gasphase atmospheric oxidation of the compounds which can be reliably used in models to predict their atmospheric reactivity under a variety of environmental conditions. Until this study, there was very little information available concerning the atmospheric fate of alcohols and esters. The objectives of this study were to measure the atmospheric reaction rates and to define atmospheric reaction mechanisms for the following selected oxygenated volatile organic compounds: the alcohols, 1-butanol and 1-pentanol, and the esters, methyl propionate and dimethyl succinate. The study has successfully addressed these objectives. (orig.)

  2. Reduction of Aromatic α-Keto Esters by Commercially Available Zinc Dust and Ammonium Formate:Formation of Aromatic a-Hydroxy Esters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Gang; YAO Guo-xin; SONG Guang-wei; ZHU Jin-tao

    2011-01-01

    Various aromatic α-keto esters were rapidly and selectively reduced to aromatic α-hydroxy esters by commercially available zinc dust and ammonium formate in the presence of other functional groups such as halogens,methoxy and esters.

  3. From Kinase to Cyclase: An Unusual Example of Catalytic Promiscuity Modulated by Metal Switching

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez-Moreno, Israel; Iturrate Montoya, Laura; Martín-Hoyos, Rocio; Jimeno, M. Luisa; Mena, Montaña; Bastida, Ágatha; García-Junceda, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    “This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: Sánchez-Moreno, I., Iturrate, L., Martín-Hoyos, R., Jimeno, M. L., Mena, M., Bastida, A. and García-Junceda, E. (2009) From Kinase to Cyclase: An Unusual Example of Catalytic Promiscuity Modulated by Metal Switching. ChemBioChem. 10, 225-229, which has been published in final form at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121544668/abstract?CRETRY=1&SRETRY=0.”

  4. Cyclic 3', 5'-AMP relay in Dictyostelium discoideum: adaptation is independent of activation of adenylate cyclase

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    In Dictyostelium discoideum, binding of cAMP to high affinity surface receptors leads to a rapid activation of adenylate cyclase followed by subsequent adaptation within several minutes. The rate of secretion of [ 3H ]cAMP, which reflects the state of activation of the enzyme, was measured. Caffeine noncompetitively inhibited the response to cAMP. Inhibition was rapidly reversible and pretreatment of cells with caffeine for up to 22 min had little effect on the subsequent responsiveness to cA...

  5. A kinase-anchoring proteins and adenylyl cyclase in cardiovascular physiology and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efendiev, Riad; Dessauer, Carmen W

    2011-10-01

    3'-5'-Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), generated by adenylyl cyclase (AC), serves as a second messenger in signaling pathways regulating many aspects of cardiac physiology, including contraction rate and action potential duration, and in the pathophysiology of hypertrophy and heart failure. A kinase-anchoring proteins localize the effect of cAMP in space and time by organizing receptors, AC, protein kinase A, and other components of the cAMP cascade into multiprotein complexes. In this review, we discuss how the interaction of A kinase-anchoring proteins with distinct AC isoforms affects cardiovascular physiology.

  6. Adenylyl Cyclase-Associated Protein 1 in the Development of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakurina, G V; Kondakova, I V; Cheremisina, O V; Shishkin, D A; Choinzonov, E L

    2016-03-01

    We compared the content of adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1) in the blood and tissues of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (with and without regional metastases), patients with chronic inflammatory diseases aggravated by laryngeal and laryngopharyngeal dysplasia, and healthy individuals. The data suggest that serum CAP1 concentration correlated with the depth of primary tumor invasion and the presence of regional metastases. In cancer patients, the serum level of CAP1 was lower than in patients with laryngeal and laryngopharyngeal dysplasia, which can be of importance for differential and timely diagnostics of malignant tumors.

  7. Forskolin photoaffinity labels with specificity for adenylyl cyclase and the glucose transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, D.I.; Robbins, J.D.; Ruoho, A.E.; Sutkowski, E.M.; Seamon, K.B. (Division of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1991-07-15

    Two photolabels, N-(3-(4-azido-3-125I-phenyl)-propionamide)-6- aminoethylcarbamylforskolin(125I-6-AIPP-Fsk) and N-(3-(4-azido-3-125I-phenyl)propionamide)-7-aminoethylcarbamyl-7- desacetylforskolin (125I-7-AIPP-Fsk) were synthesized with specific activities of 2200 Ci/mmol and used to label adenylyl cyclase and the glucose transporter. The affinities of the photolabels for adenylyl cyclase were determined by their inhibition of (3H)forskolin binding to bovine brain membranes. 6-AIPP-Fsk and 7-AIPP-Fsk inhibited (3H)forskolin binding with IC50 values of 15 nM and 200 nM, respectively. 125I-6-AIPP-Fsk labeled a 115-kDa protein in control and GTP {gamma} S-preactivated bovine brain membranes. This labeling was inhibited by forskolin but not by 1,9-dideoxyforskolin or cytochalasin B. 125I-6-AIPP-Fsk labeling of partially purified adenylyl cyclase was inhibited by forskolin but not by 1,9-dideoxyforskolin. 125I-7-AIPP-Fsk specifically labeled a 45-kDa protein and not a 115-kDa protein in control and GTP {gamma} S-preactivated brain membranes. This labeling was inhibited by forskolin, 1,9-dideoxyforskolin, cytochalasin B, and D-glucose but not cytochalasin E or L-glucose. Human erythrocyte membranes were photolyzed with 125I-6-AIPP-Fsk and 125I-7-AIPP-Fsk. 125I-7-AIPP-Fsk, but not 125I-6-AIPP-Fsk, strongly labeled a broad 45-70-kDa band. Forskolin, 7-bromoacetyl-7-desacetylforskolin, 1,9-dideoxyforskolin, cytochalasin B, and D-glucose, but not cytochalasin E or L-glucose, inhibited 125I-7-AIPP-Fsk labeling of the 45-70-kDa band. 125I-6-AIPP-Fsk and 125I-7-AIPP-Fsk are high affinity photolabels with specificity for adenylyl cyclase and the glucose transporter, respectively.

  8. Delivery of Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin to target cells via outer membrane vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Donato, Gina M.; Goldsmith, Cynthia S.; Paddock, Christopher D.; Eby, Joshua C.; Gray, Mary C.; Hewlett, Erik L.

    2012-01-01

    B.pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) intoxicates cells by producing intracellular cAMP. B.pertussis outer membrane vesicles (OMV) contain ACT on their surface (OMV-ACT), but the properties of OMV-ACT were previously unknown. We found that B.pertussis in the lung from a fatal pertussis case contains OMV, suggesting an involvement in pathogenesis. OMV-ACT and ACT intoxicate cells with and without the toxin’s receptor CD11b/CD18. Intoxication by ACT is blocked by antitoxin and anti-CD11b an...

  9. Structural basis for olivetolic acid formation by a polyketide cyclase from Cannabis sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinmei; Matsui, Takashi; Kodama, Takeshi; Mori, Takahiro; Zhou, Xiaoxi; Taura, Futoshi; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Abe, Ikuro; Morita, Hiroyuki

    2016-03-01

    In polyketide biosynthesis, ring formation is one of the key diversification steps. Olivetolic acid cyclase (OAC) from Cannabis sativa, involved in cannabinoid biosynthesis, is the only known plant polyketide cyclase. In addition, it is the only functionally characterized plant α+β barrel (DABB) protein that catalyzes the C2-C7 aldol cyclization of the linear pentyl tetra-β-ketide CoA as the substrate, to generate olivetolic acid (OA). Herein, we solved the OAC apo and OAC-OA complex binary crystal structures at 1.32 and 1.70 Å resolutions, respectively. The crystal structures revealed that the enzyme indeed belongs to the DABB superfamily, as previously proposed, and possesses a unique active-site cavity containing the pentyl-binding hydrophobic pocket and the polyketide binding site, which have never been observed among the functionally and structurally characterized bacterial polyketide cyclases. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis studies indicated that Tyr72 and His78 function as acid/base catalysts at the catalytic center. Structural and/or functional studies of OAC suggested that the enzyme lacks thioesterase and aromatase activities. These observations demonstrated that OAC employs unique catalytic machinery utilizing acid/base catalytic chemistry for the formation of the precursor of OA. The structural and functional insights obtained in this work thus provide the foundation for analyses of the plant polyketide cyclases that will be discovered in the future. Structural data reported in this paper are available in the Protein Data Bank under the accession numbers 5B08 for the OAC apo, 5B09 for the OAC-OA binary complex and 5B0A, 5B0B, 5B0C, 5B0D, 5B0E, 5B0F and 5B0G for the OAC His5Q, Ile7F, Tyr27F, Tyr27W, Val59M, Tyr72F and His78S mutant enzymes, respectively. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  10. Specific and efficient N-propionylation of histones with propionic acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester for histone marks characterization by LC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Rijing; Wu, Haiping; Deng, Haibing; Yu, Yanyan; Hu, Min; Zhai, Huili; Yang, Pengyuan; Zhou, Shaolian; Yi, Wei

    2013-02-19

    Histones participate in epigenetic regulation via a variety of dynamic posttranslational modifications (PTMs) on them. Mass spectrometry (MS) has become a powerful tool to investigate histone PTMs. With the bottom-up mass spectrometry approach, chemical derivatization of histones with propionic anhydride or deuterated acetic anhydride followed by trypsin digestion was widely used to block the hydrophilic lysine residues and generate compatible peptides for LC-MS analysis. However, certain severe side reactions (such as acylation on tyrosine or serine) caused by acid anhydrides will lead to a number of analytical issues such as reducing results accuracy and impairing the reproducibility and sensitivity of MS analysis. As an alternative approach, we report a novel derivatization method that utilizes N-hydroxysuccinimide ester to specifically and efficiently derivatize both free and monomethylated amine groups in histones. A competitive inhibiting strategy was implemented in our method to effectively prevent the side reactions. We demonstrated that our method can achieve excellent specificity and efficiency for histones derivatization in a reproducible manner. Using this derivatization method, we succeeded to quantitatively profile the histone PTMs in KMS11 cell line with selective knock out of translocated NSD2 allele (TKO) and the original parental KMS11 cell lines (PAR) (NSD2, a histone methyltransferase that catalyzes the histone H3 K36 methylation), which revealed a significant crosstalk between H3 protein K27 methylation and adjacent K36 methylation.

  11. Withanolides and Sucrose Esters from Physalis neomexicana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Cong-Mei; Wu, Xiaoqing; Kindscher, Kelly; Xu, Liang; Timmermann, Barbara N

    2015-10-23

    Four withanolides (1-4) and two sucrose esters (5, 6) were isolated from the aerial parts of Physalis neomexicana. The structures of 1-6 were elucidated through a variety of spectroscopic techniques. Cytotoxicity studies of the isolates revealed that 2 inhibited human breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7) with IC50 values of 1.7 and 6.3 μM, respectively.

  12. Determination of phthalate esters in human semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waliszewski, M; Szymczyński, G A

    1990-01-01

    Phthalate esters are a large group of chemical compounds used in the production of plastics, household articles, packages, cosmetics and plant pesticides. World production of phthalates is estimated to be several million tons a year. Recent observations indicate some mutagenic, cancerogenic and orchidotoxic effect of these compounds. Therefore, to assess the extent of risk it is imperative to have an adequate analytical method. The following is simple and relatively inexpensive. The study group consisted of 58 men.

  13. Antibacterial sesquiterpene aryl esters from Armillaria mellea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, D M; Abe, F; Coveney, D; Fukuda, N; O'Reilly, J; Polonsky, J; Prangé, T

    1985-01-01

    Investigation of the mycelial extract of Armillaria mellea led to the isolation of the known melleolide (2a) and two new sesquiterpene aryl eters, 4-O-methylmelleolide (2b) and judeol (1c). Their structures were deduced from spectral data and that of (2b) confirmed by X-ray analysis. The new esters (1c) and (2b) showed strong antibacterial activity against gram-positive bacteria.

  14. Differential Effects of Temperature on cAMP-induced Excitation, Adaptation, and Deadaptation of Adenylate and Guanylate Cyclase in Dictyostelium discoideum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1987-01-01

    Extracellular cAMP induces excitation of adenylate and guanylate cyclase in Dictyostelium discoideum. Continuous stimulation with cAMP leads to adaptation, while cells deadapt upon removal of the cAMP stimulus. Excitation of guanylate cyclase by cAMP has a lag time of ~1 s; excitation of adenylate c

  15. Ethyl ester production from (RBD palm oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Mauricio Martínez Ávila

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This work develops a methodology for obtaining ethyl esters from RBD (refined, bleached and deodorised palm oil by evaluating the oil’s transesterification and separation. Two catalysts were first tested (KOH and NaOH by studying the effect of water presence on the reaction. The separation process was then evaluated by using water and water-salt and water-acid mixtures, establishing the agent offering the best results and carrying out the purification stage. Raw materials and products were characterised for comparing the latter with those obtained by traditional means and verifying the quality of the esters so produced; minimum differences were found bet-ween both. The proposed methodology thus allows esters to be used as raw material in petrochemical industry applications. A more profitable process can be obtained compared to those used today, given the amounts of separation agent so established (1% H3PO4 solution, in water. The overall process achieved 74.4% yield, based on the oil being used.

  16. Methyl and ethyl soybean esters production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pighinelli, Anna Leticia Montenegro Turtelli; Park, Kil Jin; Zorzeto, Thais Queiroz [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FEAGRI/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Agricola], E-mail: annalets@feagri.unicamp.br; Bevilaqua, Gabriela [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (IQ/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2008-07-01

    Biodiesel is a fuel obtained from triglycerides found in nature, like vegetable oils and animal fats. Nowadays it has been the subject of many researches impulses by the creation of the Brazilian law that determined the blend of 2% of biodiesel with petrodiesel. Basically, there are no limitations on the oilseed type for chemical reaction, but due to high cost of this major feedstock, it is important to use the grain that is available in the region of production. Soybean is the oilseed mostly produced in Brazil and its oil is the only one that is available in enough quantity to supply the current biodiesel demand. The objective of this work was to study the effects of reaction time and temperature on soybean oil transesterification reaction with ethanol and methanol. A central composite experimental design with five variation levels was used and response surface methodology applied for the data analysis. The statistical analysis of the results showed that none of the factors affected the ethyl esters production. However, the methyl esters production suffered the influence of temperature (linear effect), reaction time (linear and quadratic) and interaction of these two variables. None of the generated models showed significant regression consequently it was not possible to build the response surface. The experiments demonstrated that methanol is the best alcohol for transesterification reactions and the ester yield was up to 85%. (author)

  17. Enzymatic 13C Labeling and Multidimensional NMR Analysis of Miltiradiene Synthesized by Bifunctional Diterpene Cyclase in Selaginella moellendorffii*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugai, Yoshinori; Ueno, Yohei; Hayashi, Ken-ichiro; Oogami, Shingo; Toyomasu, Tomonobu; Matsumoto, Sadamu; Natsume, Masahiro; Nozaki, Hiroshi; Kawaide, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Diterpenes show diverse chemical structures and various physiological roles. The diversity of diterpene is primarily established by diterpene cyclases that catalyze a cyclization reaction to form the carbon skeleton of cyclic diterpene. Diterpene cyclases are divided into two types, monofunctional and bifunctional cyclases. Bifunctional diterpene cyclases (BDTCs) are involved in hormone and defense compound biosyntheses in bryophytes and gymnosperms, respectively. The BDTCs catalyze the successive two-step type-B (protonation-initiated cyclization) and type-A (ionization-initiated cyclization) reactions of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGDP). We found that the genome of a lycophyte, Selaginella moellendorffii, contains six BDTC genes with the majority being uncharacterized. The cDNA from S. moellendorffii encoding a BDTC-like enzyme, miltiradiene synthase (SmMDS), was cloned. The recombinant SmMDS converted GGDP to a diterpene hydrocarbon product with a molecular mass of 272 Da. Mutation in the type-B active motif of SmMDS abolished the cyclase activity, whereas (+)-copalyl diphosphate, the reaction intermediate from the conversion of GGDP to the hydrocarbon product, rescued the cyclase activity of the mutant to form a diterpene hydrocarbon. Another mutant lacking type-A activity accumulated copalyl diphosphate as the reaction intermediate. When the diterpene hydrocarbon was enzymatically synthesized from [U-13C6]mevalonate, all carbons were labeled with 13C stable isotope (>99%). The fully 13C-labeled product was subjected to 13C-13C COSY NMR spectroscopic analyses. The direct carbon-carbon connectivities observed in the multidimensional NMR spectra demonstrated that the hydrocarbon product by SmMDS is miltiradiene, a putative biosynthetic precursor of tanshinone identified from the Chinese medicinal herb Salvia miltiorrhiza. Hence, SmMDS functions as a bifunctional miltiradiene synthase in S. moellendorffii. In this study, we demonstrate that one-dimensional and

  18. Human glutaminyl cyclase and bacterial zinc aminopeptidase share a common fold and active site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misquitta Stephanie A

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutaminyl cyclase (QC forms the pyroglutamyl residue at the amino terminus of numerous secretory peptides and proteins. We previously proposed the mammalian QC has some features in common with zinc aminopeptidases. We now have generated a structural model for human QC based on the aminopeptidase fold (pdb code 1AMP and mutated the apparent active site residues to assess their role in QC catalysis. Results The structural model proposed here for human QC, deposited in the protein databank as 1MOI, is supported by a variety of fold prediction programs, by the circular dichroism spectrum, and by the presence of the disulfide. Mutagenesis of the six active site residues present in both 1AMP and QC reveal essential roles for the two histidines (140 and 330, QC numbering and the two glutamates (201 and 202, while the two aspartates (159 and 248 appear to play no catalytic role. ICP-MS analysis shows less than stoichiometric zinc (0.3:1 in the purified enzyme. Conclusions We conclude that human pituitary glutaminyl cyclase and bacterial zinc aminopeptidase share a common fold and active site residues. In contrast to the aminopeptidase, however, QC does not appear to require zinc for enzymatic activity.

  19. Expression, purification and crystallization of a plant polyketide cyclase from Cannabis sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinmei; Matsui, Takashi; Mori, Takahiro; Taura, Futoshi; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Abe, Ikuro; Morita, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    Plant polyketides are a structurally diverse family of natural products. In the biosynthesis of plant polyketides, the construction of the carbocyclic scaffold is a key step in diversifying the polyketide structure. Olivetolic acid cyclase (OAC) from Cannabis sativa L. is the only known plant polyketide cyclase that catalyzes the C2-C7 intramolecular aldol cyclization of linear pentyl tetra-β-ketide-CoA to generate olivetolic acid in the biosynthesis of cannabinoids. The enzyme is also thought to belong to the dimeric α+β barrel (DABB) protein family. However, because of a lack of functional analysis of other plant DABB proteins and low sequence identity with the functionally distinct bacterial DABB proteins, the catalytic mechanism of OAC has remained unclear. To clarify the intimate catalytic mechanism of OAC, the enzyme was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized using the vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffracted X-rays to 1.40 Å resolution and belonged to space group P3121 or P3221, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 47.3, c = 176.0 Å. Further crystallographic analysis will provide valuable insights into the structure-function relationship and catalytic mechanism of OAC.

  20. Phosphorylation-independent regulation of the diguanylate cyclase WspR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabanita De

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Environmental signals that trigger bacterial pathogenesis and biofilm formation are mediated by changes in the level of cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP, a unique eubacterial second messenger. Tight regulation of cellular c-di-GMP concentration is governed by diguanylate cyclases and phosphodiesterases, which are responsible for its production and degradation, respectively. Here, we present the crystal structure of the diguanylate cyclase WspR, a conserved GGDEF domain-containing response regulator in Gram-negative bacteria, bound to c-di-GMP at an inhibitory site. Biochemical analyses revealed that feedback regulation involves the formation of at least three distinct oligomeric states. By switching from an active to a product-inhibited dimer via a tetrameric assembly, WspR utilizes a novel mechanism for modulation of its activity through oligomerization. Moreover, our data suggest that these enzymes can be activated by phosphodiesterases. Thus, in addition to the canonical pathways via phosphorylation of the regulatory domains, both product and enzyme concentration contribute to the coordination of c-di-GMP signaling. A structural comparison reveals resemblance of the oligomeric states to assemblies of GAF domains, widely used regulatory domains in signaling molecules conserved from archaea to mammals, suggesting a similar mechanism of regulation.

  1. Cyclic AMP intoxication of macrophages by a Mycobacterium tuberculosis adenylate cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Nisheeth; Lamichhane, Gyanu; Gupta, Radhika; Nolan, Scott; Bishai, William R

    2009-07-02

    With 8.9 million new cases and 1.7 million deaths per year, tuberculosis is a leading global killer that has not been effectively controlled. The causative agent, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, proliferates within host macrophages where it modifies both its intracellular and local tissue environment, resulting in caseous granulomas with incomplete bacterial sterilization. Although infection by various mycobacterial species produces a cyclic AMP burst within macrophages that influences cell signalling, the underlying mechanism for the cAMP burst remains unclear. Here we show that among the 17 adenylate cyclase genes present in M. tuberculosis, at least one (Rv0386) is required for virulence. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the Rv0386 adenylate cyclase facilitates delivery of bacterial-derived cAMP into the macrophage cytoplasm. Loss of Rv0386 and the intramacrophage cAMP it delivers results in reductions in TNF-alpha production via the protein kinase A and cAMP response-element-binding protein pathway, decreased immunopathology in animal tissues, and diminished bacterial survival. Direct intoxication of host cells by bacterial-derived cAMP may enable M. tuberculosis to modify both its intracellular and tissue environments to facilitate its long-term survival.

  2. G protein β1γ2 subunits purification and their interaction with adenylyl cyclase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Julian; (陈巨莲); NI; Hanxiang; (倪汉祥); SUN; Jingrui; (孙京瑞); WENG; Gezhi

    2003-01-01

    A preliminary study on the interaction of G protein (guanine triphosphate binding pro- tein) β1γ2 subunits and their coupled components in cell signal transduction was conducted in vitro. The insect cell lines, Sf9 (Spodoptera frugiperda) and H5 (Trichoplusia ni) were used to express the recombinant protein Gβ1γ2. The cell membrane containing Gβ1γ2 was isolated through affinity chromatography column with Ni-NTA agarose by FPLC method, and the highly purified protein was obtained. The adenylyl cyclase 2 (AC2) activity assay showed that the purified Gβ1γ2 could significantly stimulate AC2 activity. The interaction of β1γ2 subunits of G protein with the cytoplasmic tail of various mammalian adenylyl cyclases was monitored by BIAcore technology using NTA sensor chip, which relies on the phenomenon of surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The experiments showed the direct binding of Gβ1γ2 to the cytoplasmic tail C2 domain of AC2. The specific binding domain of AC2 with Gβ1γ2 was the same as AC2 activity domain which was stimulated by β1γ2.

  3. Adenyl cyclases and cAMP in plant signaling - Past and present

    KAUST Repository

    Gehring, Christoph A.

    2010-06-25

    In lower eukaryotes and animals 3\\'-5\\'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and adenyl cyclases (ACs), enzymes that catalyse the formation of cAMP from ATP, have long been established as key components and second messengers in many signaling pathways. In contrast, in plants, both the presence and biological role of cAMP have been a matter of ongoing debate and some controversy. Here we shall focus firstly on the discovery of cellular cAMP in plants and evidence for a role of this second messenger in plant signal transduction. Secondly, we shall review current evidence of plant ACs, analyse aspects of their domain organisations and the biological roles of candidate molecules. In addition, we shall assess different approaches based on search motifs consisting of functionally assigned amino acids in the catalytic centre of annotated and/or experimentally tested nucleotide cyclases that can contribute to the identification of novel candidate molecules with AC activity such as F-box and TIR proteins. 2010 Gehring; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  4. The Bordetella Adenylate Cyclase Repeat-in-Toxin (RTX) Domain Is Immunodominant and Elicits Neutralizing Antibodies*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianzhe; Maynard, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    The adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) is a multifunctional virulence factor secreted by Bordetella species. Upon interaction of its C-terminal hemolysin moiety with the cell surface receptor αMβ2 integrin, the N-terminal cyclase domain translocates into the host cell cytosol where it rapidly generates supraphysiological cAMP concentrations, which inhibit host cell anti-bacterial activities. Although ACT has been shown to induce protective immunity in mice, it is not included in any current acellular pertussis vaccines due to protein stability issues and a poor understanding of its role as a protective antigen. Here, we aimed to determine whether any single domain could recapitulate the antibody responses induced by the holo-toxin and to characterize the dominant neutralizing antibody response. We first immunized mice with ACT and screened antibody phage display libraries for binding to purified ACT. The vast majority of unique antibodies identified bound the C-terminal repeat-in-toxin (RTX) domain. Representative antibodies binding two nonoverlapping, neutralizing epitopes in the RTX domain prevented ACT association with J774A.1 macrophages and soluble αMβ2 integrin, suggesting that these antibodies inhibit the ACT-receptor interaction. Sera from mice immunized with the RTX domain showed similar neutralizing activity as ACT-immunized mice, indicating that this domain induced an antibody response similar to that induced by ACT. These data demonstrate that RTX can elicit neutralizing antibodies and suggest it may present an alternative to ACT. PMID:25505186

  5. Adenylyl cyclase 3 haploinsufficiency confers susceptibility to diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Tao; Shen, Ying; Lee, Han-Woong; Yu, Rina; Park, Taesun

    2016-01-01

    Adenylyl cyclase 3 (Adcy3), a member of the mammalian adenylyl cyclase family responsible for generating the second messenger cAMP, has long been known to play an essential role in olfactory signal transduction. Here, we demonstrated that Adcy3 heterozygous null mice displayed increased visceral adiposity in the absence of hyperphagia and developed abnormal metabolic features characterized by impaired insulin sensitivity, dyslipidemia, and increased plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines on both chow and high-fat diet (HFD). Of note, HFD decreased the Adcy3 expression in white adipose tissue, liver, and muscle. We also report for the first time that Adcy3 haploinsufficiency resulted in reduced expression of genes involved in thermogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, and insulin signaling, with enhanced expression of genes related to adipogenesis in peripheral tissues of mice. In conclusion, these findings suggest that cAMP signals generated by Adcy3 in peripheral tissues may play a pivotal role in modulating obesity and insulin sensitivity. PMID:27678003

  6. Mechanistic studies of sesquiterpene cyclases based on their carbon isotope ratios at natural abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wenhua; Bartram, Stefan; Boland, Wilhelm

    2017-01-03

    During the process of terpene biosynthesis, C-C bond breaking and forming steps are subjected to kinetic carbon isotope effects, leading to distinct carbon isotopic signatures of the products. Accordingly, carbon isotopic signatures could be used to reveal the 'biosynthetic history' of the produced terpenoids. Five known sesquiterpene cyclases, regulating three different pathways, representing simple to complex biosynthetic sequences, were heterologously expressed and used for in vitro assays with farnesyl diphosphate as substrate. Compound specific isotope ratio mass spectrometry measurements of the enzyme substrate farnesyl diphosphate (FDP) and the products of all the five cyclases were performed. The calculated δ(13) C value for FDP, based on δ(13) C values and relative amounts of the products, was identical with its measured δ(13) C value, confirming the reliability of the approach and the precision of measurements. The different carbon isotope ratios of the products reflect the complexity of their structure and are correlated with the frequency of carbon-carbon bond forming and breaking steps on their individual biosynthetic pathways. Thus, the analysis of carbon isotopic signatures of terpenes at natural abundance can be used as a powerful tool in elucidation of associated biosynthetic mechanisms of terpene synthases and in future in vivo studies even without 'touching' the plant. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Adenylate Cyclase AcyA Regulates Development, Aflatoxin Biosynthesis and Fungal Virulence in Aspergillus flavus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kunlong; Qin, Qiuping; Liu, Yinghang; Zhang, Limei; Liang, Linlin; Lan, Huahui; Chen, Chihao; You, Yunchao; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Shihua

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is one of the most important opportunistic pathogens of crops and animals. The carcinogenic mycotoxin, aflatoxins produced by this pathogen cause a health problem to human and animals. Since cyclic AMP signaling controls a range of physiological processes, like fungal development and infection when responding to extracellular stimuli in fungal pathogens, in this study, we investigated the function of adenylate cyclase, a core component of cAMP signaling, in aflatoxins biosynthesis and virulence on plant seeds in A. flavus. A gene replacement strategy was used to generate the deletion mutant of acyA that encodes the adenylate cyclase. Severe defects in fungal growth, sporulation and sclerotia formation were observed in the acyA deletion mutant. The defect in radical growth could be partially rescued by exogenous cAMP analog. The acyA mutant was also significantly reduced in aflatoxins production and virulence. Similar to the former studies in other fungi, The acyA mutant showed enhancing tolerance to oxidative stress, but more sensitive to heat stress. Overall, the pleiotropic defects of the acyA deletion mutant indicates that the cAMP-PKA pathway is involved in fungal development, aflatoxins biosynthesis and plant seed invasion in A. flavus. PMID:28066725

  8. Adenylate-cyclase activity in platelets of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Marazziti, S Baroni

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available D Marazziti, S Baroni, L Palego, I Masala, G Consoli, M Catena Dell’Osso, G Giannaccini, A LucacchiniDipartimento di Psichiatria, Neurobiologia, Farmacologia e Biotecnologie, Università di Pisa, Pisa, ItalyAbstract: Although the main biological hypothesis on the pathophysiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD is centered on the serotonin system, indications are available that other neurotransmitters, and even second messengers, particularly the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP signaling, may be involved, though effective data are few. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate and compare the basal and isoprenaline (ISO-stimulated velocity of adenylate-cyclase (AC in human platelet membranes of patients with OCD and healthy control subjects. The results showed that the basal and ISO-stimulated AC activity, as well as the dose-response curves of ISO by using agonist concentrations ranging between 0.1 nM and 10 µM, were not different in the two groups. However, OCD patients showed lower EC50 and higher Emax values than healthy subjects. These findings suggest the presence of supersensitive β-adrenergic receptors in platelets of OCD patients.Keywords: obsessive-compulsive disorder, norepinephrine, second messengers, adenylate-cyclase, platelets, isoprenaline, β-adrenergic receptors

  9. Characterization of Plasmodium falciparum adenylyl cyclase-β and its role in erythrocytic stage parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Salazar

    Full Text Available The most severe form of human malaria is caused by the parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The second messenger cAMP has been shown to be important for the parasite's ability to infect the host's liver, but its role during parasite growth inside erythrocytes, the stage responsible for symptomatic malaria, is less clear. The P. falciparum genome encodes two adenylyl cyclases, the enzymes that synthesize cAMP, PfACα and PfACβ. We now show that one of these, PfACβ, plays an important role during the erythrocytic stage of the P. falciparum life cycle. Biochemical characterization of PfACβ revealed a marked pH dependence, and sensitivity to a number of small molecule inhibitors. These inhibitors kill parasites growing inside red blood cells. One particular inhibitor is selective for PfACβ relative to its human ortholog, soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC; thus, PfACβ represents a potential target for development of safe and effective antimalarial therapeutics.

  10. Modification of a bi-functional diguanylate cyclase-phosphodiesterase to efficiently produce cyclic diguanylate monophosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha M. Nesbitt

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic-diGMP is a bacterial messenger that regulates many physiological processes, including many attributed to pathogenicity. Bacteria synthesize cyclic-diGMP from GTP using diguanylate cyclases; its hydrolysis is catalyzed by phosphodiesterases. Here we report the over-expression and purification of a bi-functional diguanylate cyclase-phosphodiesterase from Agrobacterium vitis S4. Using homology modeling and primary structure alignment, we identify several amino acids predicted to participate in the phosphodiesterase reaction. Upon altering selected residues, we obtain variants of the enzyme that efficiently and quantitatively catalyze the synthesis of cyclic-diGMP from GTP without hydrolysis to pGpG. Additionally, we identify a variant that produces cyclic-diGMP while immobilized to NiNTA beads and can catalyze the conversion of [α-32P]-GTP to [32P]-cyclic-diGMP. In short, we characterize a novel cyclic-diGMP processing enzyme and demonstrate its utility for efficient and cost-effective production of cyclic-diGMP, as well as modified cyclic-diGMP molecules, for use as probes in studying the many important biological processes mediated by cyclic-diGMP.

  11. Bicarbonate-sensing soluble adenylyl cyclase is an essential sensor for acid/base homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresguerres, Martin; Parks, Scott K; Salazar, Eric; Levin, Lonny R; Goss, Greg G; Buck, Jochen

    2010-01-05

    pH homeostasis is essential for life, yet it remains unclear how animals sense their systemic acid/base (A/B) status. Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is an evolutionary conserved signaling enzyme that produces the second messenger cAMP in response to bicarbonate ions (HCO(3)(-)). We cloned the sAC ortholog from the dogfish, a shark that regulates blood A/B by absorbing and secreting protons (H(+)) and HCO(3)(-) at its gills. Similar to mammalian sAC, dogfish soluble adenylyl cyclase (dfsAC) is activated by HCO(3)(-) and can be inhibited by two structurally and mechanistically distinct small molecule inhibitors. dfsAC is expressed in the gill epithelium, where the subset of base-secreting cells resides. Injection of inhibitors into animals under alkaline stress confirmed that dfsAC is essential for maintaining systemic pH and HCO(3)(-) levels in the whole organism. One of the downstream effects of dfsAC is to promote the insertion of vacuolar proton pumps into the basolateral membrane to absorb H(+) into the blood. sAC orthologs are present throughout metazoans, and mammalian sAC is expressed in A/B regulatory organs, suggesting that systemic A/B sensing via sAC is widespread in the animal kingdom.

  12. Soluble adenylyl cyclase is an acid-base sensor in epithelial base-secreting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roa, Jinae N; Tresguerres, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Blood acid-base regulation by specialized epithelia, such as gills and kidney, requires the ability to sense blood acid-base status. Here, we developed primary cultures of ray (Urolophus halleri) gill cells to study mechanisms for acid-base sensing without the interference of whole animal hormonal regulation. Ray gills have abundant base-secreting cells, identified by their noticeable expression of vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase (VHA), and also express the evolutionarily conserved acid-base sensor soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC). Exposure of cultured cells to extracellular alkalosis (pH 8.0, 40 mM HCO3 (-)) triggered VHA translocation to the cell membrane, similar to previous reports in live animals experiencing blood alkalosis. VHA translocation was dependent on sAC, as it was blocked by the sAC-specific inhibitor KH7. Ray gill base-secreting cells also express transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs); however, tmAC inhibition by 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine did not prevent alkalosis-dependent VHA translocation, and tmAC activation by forskolin reduced the abundance of VHA at the cell membrane. This study demonstrates that sAC is a necessary and sufficient sensor of extracellular alkalosis in ray gill base-secreting cells. In addition, this study indicates that different sources of cAMP differentially modulate cell biology. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Environmentally friendly properties of vegetable oil methyl esters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gateau Paul

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Measurements were carried out on Vegetable Oil Methyl Esters (VOME or FAME answering the most recent specifications. The products tested are RME (Rapeseed oil Methyl Ester, ERME (Erucic Rapeseed oil Methyl Esters, SME (Sunflower oil Methyl Esters, and HOSME (High Oleic Sunflower oil Methyl Esters. They contain more than 99.5% of fatty acid mono esters. The compositions are given. VOME are not volatile and they are not easily flammable. They are not soluble in water and they are biodegradable. According to the methods implemented for the determination of the German classification of substances hazardous to waters WGK, they are not toxic on mammals and unlike diesel fuel they are not toxic on fish, daphnia, algae and bacteria. The RME is not either toxic for shrimps. According to tests on rabbits, RME and SME are not irritating for the skin and the eyes. VOME display particularly attractive environmental properties.

  14. Acyl-lupeol esters from Parahancornia amapa (Apocynaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho,Mário G. de; Velloso,Carlos R. X.; Braz-Filho,Raimundo; Costa,William F. da

    2001-01-01

    From the roots of Parahancornia amapa, family Apocynaceae, the following compounds were isolated and identified nine new and ten known 3beta-O-acyl lupeol esters, beta-sitosterol, stigmasterol, beta-sitosterone, the triterpenoids beta-amyrin, alpha-amyrin, lupeol and their acetyl derivatives. The structures of these compounds were established by spectroscopic data, mainly ¹H and 13C (HBBD and DEPT) NMR spectra. The methyl esters obtained by hydrolysis of acyl lupeol esters and methylation of ...

  15. Isolation and identification of an ester from a crude oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, H.F.; Breger, I.A.

    1958-01-01

    A dioctylphthalate has been isolated from a crude oil by means of adsorption column chromatography. The ester was identified by means of elemental analysis, refractive index, and its infra-red absorption spectrum. Saponification of the isolate and examination of the resultant alcohol by means of infrared absorption spectra led to the conclusion that the ester is a branched chain dioctylphthalate. This is the first reported occurrence of an ester in crude petroleum. ?? 1958.

  16. Wax Ester Fermentation and Its Application for Biofuel Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Tamoi, Masahiro

    2017-01-01

    In Euglena cells under anaerobic conditions, paramylon, the storage polysaccharide, is promptly degraded and converted to wax esters. The wax esters synthesized are composed of saturated fatty acids and alcohols with chain lengths of 10-18, and the major constituents are myristic acid and myristyl alcohol. Since the anaerobic cells gain ATP through the conversion of paramylon to wax esters, the phenomenon is named "wax ester fermentation". The wax ester fermentation is quite unique in that the end products, i.e. wax esters, have relatively high molecular weights, are insoluble in water, and accumulate in the cells, in contrast to the common fermentation end products such as lactic acid and ethanol.A unique metabolic pathway involved in the wax ester fermentation is the mitochondrial fatty acid synthetic system. In this system, fatty acid are synthesized by the reversal of β-oxidation with an exception that trans-2-enoyl-CoA reductase functions instead of acyl-CoA dehydrogenase. Therefore, acetyl-CoA is directly used as a C2 donor in this fatty acid synthesis, and the conversion of acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA, which requires ATP, is not necessary. Consequently, the mitochondrial fatty acid synthetic system makes possible the net gain of ATP through the synthesis of wax esters from paramylon. In addition, acetyl-CoA is provided in the anaerobic cells from pyruvate by the action of a unique enzyme, oxygen sensitive pyruvate:NADP(+) oxidoreductase, instead of the common pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex.Wax esters produced by anaerobic Euglena are promising biofuels because myristic acid (C14:0) in contrast to other algal produced fatty acids, such as palmitic acid (C16:0) and stearic acid (C18:0), has a low freezing point making it suitable as a drop-in jet fuel. To improve wax ester production, the molecular mechanisms by which wax ester fermentation is regulated in response to aerobic and anaerobic conditions have been gradually elucidated by identifying

  17. Baker's yeast: production of D- and L-3-hydroxy esters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Allan Carsten; Madsen, Jørgen Øgaard

    1998-01-01

    Baker's yeast grown under oxygen limited conditions and used in the reduction of 3-oxo esters results in a shift of the stereoselectivity of the yeast towards D-hydroxy esters as compared with ordinary baker's yeast. The highest degree of stereoselectivity was obtained with growing yeast or yeast...... harvested while growing. In contrast, the stereoselectivity was shifted towards L-hydroxy esters when the oxo esters were added slowly to ordinary baker's yeast supplied with gluconolactone as co-substrate. The reduction rate with gluconolactone was increased by active aeration. Ethyl L-(S)-3...

  18. Chemical and physical analyses of wax ester properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sejal Patel

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Wax esters are major constituents of the surface lipids in many terrestrial arthropods, but their study is complicated by their diversity. We developed a procedure for quantifying isomers in mixtures of straight-chain saturated and unsaturated wax esters having the same molecular weights, using single-ion monitoring of the total ion current data from gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We examined the biological consequences of structural differences by measuring the melting temperatures, Tm, of >60 synthetic wax esters, containing 26-48 carbon atoms. Compounds containing saturated alcohol and acid moieties melted at 38-73°C. The main factor affecting Tm was the total chain length of the wax ester, but the placement of the ester bond also affected Tm. Insertion of a double bond into either the alcohol or acid moiety decreased Tm by ~30°C. Simple mixtures of wax esters with n-alkanes melted several °C lower than predicted from the melting points of the component lipids. Our results indicate that the wax esters of primary alcohols that are most typically found on the cuticle of terrestrial arthropods occur in a solid state under physiological conditions, thereby conferring greater waterproofing. Wax esters of secondary alcohols, which occur on melanopline grasshoppers, melted >60°C below primary esters of the same molecular weight and reduced Tm of the total surface lipids to environmental values.

  19. Pengaruh Rasio Mol Reaktan dan Lama Sulfonasi terhadap Karakteristik Methyl Ester Sulfonic (MES) dari Metil Ester Minyak Sawit (Effects of Mol Ratio and Sulfonation Time on Methyl Ester Sulfonic (MES) Characteristics from Methyl Ester of Palm Oil)

    OpenAIRE

    Sri Hidayati; Pudji Permadi; Hestuti Eni

    2017-01-01

    An experiment of sulfonation process of methyl ester to produce methyl ester sulfonates (MES) was caried out using methyl ester palm oil in factorial design and NaHSO as sulfonating agent with variation of ratio mol NaHSO : methyl ester (1:1.25, 1:1.5, 1:1.75 and 1:2 ) and sulfonation time (3 hour (L1), 4.5 hour (L2) and 6 hour (L3). The result showed that the best sulfonation condition present in 1:1,5 mol ratio and sulfonation time of 4,5 hour. The best characteristic of MES was produced em...

  20. A novel thermooxidatively stable poly(ester-imide-benzoxazole)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundar, R.A.; Mathias, L.J. [Univ. of Sothern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS (United States)

    1993-12-31

    A poly(ester-amide-imide) was synthesized by the low temperature solution polycondensation of 4-amino-5-hydroxy-N,4{prime}-hydroxyphenyl phthalimide with isophthaloyl chloride. Subsequent thermal cyclodehydration of the poly(ester-amide-imide) at 320{degrees}C in vacuum afforded the poly(ester-imide-benzoxazole). This polymer was only soluble in sulfuric acid. FTIR and NMR spectra confirmed structure. The poly(ester-imide-benzoxazole) had no detectable thermal transitions up to 500{degrees}C in nitrogen, and was reasonably stable in air and nitrogen, with weight retentions of 95% at 500{degrees}C.

  1. Estereótipos e mulheres na cultura marroquina

    OpenAIRE

    Sadiqi,Fatima

    2008-01-01

    Estereótipos sobre as mulheres no Marrocos podem ser caracterizados como crenças culturais incompletas e inexatas mantidas por algumas pessoas e que se encontram inscritos em expressões lingüísticas ou em discursos subliminares. A cultura popular marroquina emprega representações poderosas para transmitir e sustentar tais estereótipos. Embora existam alguns estereótipos positivos, a maioria dos estereótipos sobre as mulheres no Marrocos é negativa e reflete ditames patriarcais subliminares qu...

  2. Papain-specific activating esters in aqueous dipeptide synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beer, Roseri J A C; Zarzycka, Barbara; Mariman, Michiel; Amatdjais-Groenen, Helene I V; Mulders, Marc J; Quaedflieg, Peter J L M; van Delft, Floris L; Nabuurs, Sander B; Rutjes, Floris P J T

    2012-06-18

    Enzymatic peptide synthesis has the potential to be a viable alternative for chemical peptide synthesis. Because of the increasing commercial interest in peptides, new and improved enzymatic synthesis methods are desirable. In recently developed enzymatic strategies such as substrate mimetic approaches and enzyme-specific activation, use of the guanidinophenyl ester (OGp) group has been shown to suffer from some drawbacks. OGp esters are sensitive to spontaneous chemical hydrolysis and the group is expensive to synthesize and therefore not suitable for large-scale applications. On the basis of earlier computational studies, we hypothesized that OGp might be replaceable by simpler ester groups to make the enzyme-specific activation approach to peptide bond formation more accessible. To this end, a set of potential activating esters (Z-Gly-Act) was designed, synthesized, and evaluated. Both the benzyl (OBn) and the dimethylaminophenyl (ODmap) esters gave promising results. For these esters, the scope of a model dipeptide synthesis reaction under aqueous conditions was investigated by varying the amino acid donor. The results were compared with those obtained from a previous study of Z-X(AA) -OGp esters. Computational docking analysis of the set of esters was performed in order to provide insight into the differences in the reactivities of all the potential activating esters. Finally, selected ODmap- and OBn-activated amino acids were applied in the synthesis of two biologically active dipeptides on preparative scales. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Bioactive caffeic acid esters from Glycyrrhiza glabra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Surajit; Deepak, Mundkinajeddu; Setty, Manjunath; D'Souza, Prashanth; Agarwal, Amit; Sangli, Gopal Krishna

    2009-01-01

    Thin layer chromatography bioautography (using DPPH spray reagent) guided fractionation of Glycyrrhiza glabra led to the isolation of two caffeic acid derivative esters, viz. eicosanyl caffeate (1) and docosyl caffeate (2). The two compounds exhibited potent elastase inhibitory activity, with IC(50) values of 0.99 microg mL(-1) and 1.4 microg mL(-1) for 1 and 2, respectively. The compounds also showed moderate antioxidant activity in DPPH and ABTS scavenging assays. The results indicate a possible role of caffeic acid derivatives, in addition to flavonoids in the anti-ulcer properties of G. glabra.

  4. Tandem transformation of glycerol to esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotenko, Maria V; Rebroš, Martin; Sans, Victor S; Loponov, Konstantin N; Davidson, Matthew G; Stephens, Gill; Lapkin, Alexei A

    2012-12-31

    Tandem transformation of glycerol via microbial fermentation and enzymatic esterification is presented. The reaction can be performed with purified waste glycerol from biodiesel production in a continuous mode, combining continuous fermentation with membrane-supported enzymatic esterification. Continuous anaerobic fermentation was optimized resulting in the productivity of 2.4 g L⁻¹ h⁻¹ of 1,3-propanediol. Biphasic esterification of 1,3-propanediol was optimized to achieve ester yield of up to 75%. A hollow fibre membrane contactor with immobilized Rhizomucor miehei lipase was demonstrated for the continuous tandem fermentation-esterification process.

  5. Transferable force field for carboxylate esters: application to fatty acid methylic ester phase equilibria prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, Nicolas; Lachet, Véronique; Boutin, Anne

    2012-03-15

    In this work, a new transferable united-atoms force field for carboxylate esters is proposed. All Lennard-Jones parameters are reused from previous parametrizations of the AUA4 force field, and only a unique set of partial electrostatic charges is introduced for the ester chemical function. Various short alkyl-chain esters (methyl acetate, ethyl acetate, methyl propionate, ethyl propionate) and two fatty acid methylic esters (methyl oleate and methyl palmitate) are studied. Using this new force field in Monte Carlo simulations, we show that various pure compound properties are accurately predicted: saturated liquid densities, vapor pressures, vaporization enthalpies, critical properties, liquid-vapor surface tensions. Furthermore, a good accuracy is also obtained in the prediction of binary mixture pressure-composition diagrams, without introducing empirical binary interaction parameters. This highlights the transferability of the proposed force field and gives the opportunity to simulate mixtures of industrial interest: a demonstration is performed through the simulation of the methyl oleate + methanol mixture involved in the purification sections of biodiesel production processes.

  6. How Well Does BODIPY-Cholesteryl Ester Mimic Unlabeled Cholesteryl Esters in High Density Lipoprotein Particles?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karilainen, Topi; Vuorela, Timo; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2015-01-01

    We compare the behavior of unlabeled and BODIPY-labeled cholesteryl ester (CE) in high density lipoprotein by atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. We find through replica exchange umbrella sampling and unbiased molecular dynamics simulations that BODIPY labeling has no significant effect on ...

  7. Half esters and coating compositions comprising reactions products of half esters and polyepoxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaauw, R.; Mulder, W.J.; Koelewijn, R.; Boswinkel, G.

    2006-01-01

    The present invention relates to half esters based on dicarboxylic acid derivatives and dimer fatty diols, wherein the dimer fatty dio ls are based on dimerised and/or trimerised and/or oligomerised unsaturated fatty acids. The present invention further relates to resin compositions based on the hal

  8. Effects of high-melting methyl esters on crystallization properties of fatty acid methyl ester mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel is a renewable alternative diesel fuel made from vegetable oils and animal fats. The most common form of biodiesel in the United States are fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) from soybean, canola, and used cooking oils, waste greases, and tallow. Cold flow properties of biodiesel depend on th...

  9. Structural evidence for variable oligomerization of the N-terminal domain of cyclase-associated protein (CAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Adlina Mohd; Hu, Nien-Jen; Wlodawer, Alexander; Hofmann, Andreas

    2005-02-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is a highly conserved and widely distributed protein that links the nutritional response signaling to cytoskeleton remodeling. In yeast, CAP is a component of the adenylyl cyclase complex and helps to activate the Ras-mediated catalytic cycle of the cyclase. While the N-terminal domain of CAP (N-CAP) provides a binding site for adenylyl cyclase, the C-terminal domain (C-CAP) possesses actin binding activity. Our attempts to crystallize full-length recombinant CAP from Dictyostelium discoideum resulted in growth of orthorhombic crystals containing only the N-terminal domain (residues 42-227) due to auto-proteolytic cleavage. The structure was solved by molecular replacement with data at 2.2 A resolution. The present crystal structure allows the characterization of a head-to-tail N-CAP dimer in the asymmetric unit and a crystallographic side-to-side dimer. Comparison with previously published structures of N-CAP reveals variable modes of dimerization of this domain, but the presence of a common interface for the side-to-side dimer.

  10. Molecular Cloning,Expression,and Characterization of an Adenylyl Cyclase-associated Protein from Gossypium arboreum Fuzzless Mutant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    CAP,an adenylyl cyclase-associated protein,is predicted to be involved in cytoskeletal organization and signal transduction.Recently,we found that CAP may play an important role in fuzz-like fiber cell initiation in cotton.For the further research,we isolated two CAP homologues from wild type

  11. BIOTIC STRESS IMPACT ON ACTIVITY OF VARIOUS FORMS OF ADENYLATE CYCLASE IN ORGANELLES OF POTATO PLANT CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lomovatskaya L.A.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Notwithstanding significant interest towards study of adenylate cyclase plant signal system, there is still no complete picture of functioning and regulation mechanisms of this signal system in plants under biotic stress. With this in view, our study was aimed at identification of various forms of adenylate cyclase (transmembrane and “soluble” in the nucleus and chloroplasts of potato cells and modulation of their activity under the impact of exopolysaсcharides ofpotato ring rot pathogen. The investigations conducted allowed to conclude that two forms of adenylate cyclase function in nuclei and chloroplasts of potato plants: transmembrane and “soluble”. Activity of these forms of the enzyme extracted from plant cells of the two potato varieties contrasted by resistance to potato ring rot pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus, changed in the reverse manner with the mediated impact of exopolysaсcharides secreted by virulent and mucinous strain of bacterial pathogen: in the plants of resistant сultivar it increased, in the plants of sensitive сultivar it was oppressed. It was concluded that activity of both forms of adenylate cyclase directly depended on the degree of resistance of a particular potato variety to given pathogen.

  12. Isolation of a cotton CAP gene: a homologue of adenylyl cyclase-associated protein highly expressed during fiber elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, M; Aotsuka, S; Uchimiya, H

    1998-12-01

    The cDNA encoding CAP (adenylyl cyclase-associated protein) was isolated from a cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) fiber cDNA library. The cDNA (GhCAP) contained an open reading frame that encoded 471 amino acid residues. RNA blot analysis showed that the cotton CAP gene was expressed mainly in young fibers.

  13. Stereoselective Formation of Trisubstituted Vinyl Boronate Esters by the Acid-Mediated Elimination of α-Hydroxyboronate Esters

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Weiye; Michael, Alicia K.; McIntosh, Melissa L.; Koren-Selfridge, Liza; Scott, John P.; Clark, Timothy B.

    2014-01-01

    The copper-catalyzed diboration of ketones followed by an acid-catalyzed elimination leads to the formation of 1,1-disubstituted and trisubstituted vinyl boronate esters with moderate to good yields and selectivity. Addition of tosic acid to the crude diboration products provides the corresponding vinyl boronate esters upon elimination. The trisubstituted vinyl boronate esters are formed as the (Z)-olefin isomer, which was established by subjecting the products to a Suzuki–Miyaura coupling re...

  14. Specific detection of intramitochondrial superoxide produced by either cell activation or apoptosis by employing a newly developed cell-permeative lucigenin derivative, 10,10'-dimethyl-9,9'-biacridinium bis(monomethyl terephthalate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Soichiro; Yamada, Sachiko; Iwamura, Michiko; Kobayashi, Yoshiro

    2013-12-01

    Here we developed a new cell-permeative lucigenin derivative, 10,10'-dimethyl-9,9'-biacridinium bis(monomethyl terephthalate) (MMT), to detect intracellular superoxide production. Both MMT and lucigenin were specific to superoxide among reactive oxygen species tested. Although lucigenin barely penetrated into cells, MMT accumulated in mitochondria in a variety of cells such as neutrophils. By employing MMT, we found that, upon activation of neutrophils with phorbol myristate acetate, superoxide was generated extracellularly as well as intramitochondrially and that such intramitochondrial superoxide production was dependent on oxidative phosphorylation. We also found that, during apoptosis, superoxide was gradually produced in mitochondria in association with phosphatidylserine exposure and that the kinetics of superoxide production was very heterogeneous at the single-cell level. Thus this study demonstrates that MMT could serve as a specific probe for intramitochondrial superoxide in either activated or apoptotic cells.

  15. Membrane Guanylate Cyclase catalytic Subdomain: Structure and Linkage with Calcium Sensors and Bicarbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravichandran, Sarangan; Duda, Teresa; Pertzev, Alexandre; Sharma, Rameshwar K

    2017-01-01

    Membrane guanylate cyclase (MGC) is a ubiquitous multi-switching cyclic GMP generating signaling machine linked with countless physiological processes. In mammals it is encoded by seven distinct homologous genes. It is a single transmembrane spanning multi-modular protein; composed of integrated blocks and existing in homo-dimeric form. Its core catalytic domain (CCD) module is a common transduction center where all incoming signals are translated into the production of cyclic GMP, a cellular signal second messenger. Crystal structure of the MGC's CCD does not exist and its precise identity is ill-defined. Here, we define it at a sub-molecular level for the phototransduction-linked MGC, the rod outer segment guanylate cyclase type 1, ROS-GC1. (1) The CCD is a conserved 145-residue structural unit, represented by the segment V(820)-P(964). (2) It exists as a homo-dimer and contains seven conserved catalytic elements (CEs) wedged into seven conserved motifs. (3) It also contains a conserved 21-residue neurocalcin δ-modulated structural domain, V(836)-L(857). (4) Site-directed mutagenesis documents that each of the seven CEs governs the cyclase's catalytic activity. (5) In contrast to the soluble and the bacterium MGC which use Mn(2+)-GTP substrate for catalysis, MGC CCD uses the natural Mg(2+)-GTP substrate. (6) Strikingly, the MGC CCD requires anchoring by the Transmembrane Domain (TMD) to exhibit its major (∼92%) catalytic activity; in isolated form the activity is only marginal. This feature is not linked with any unique sequence of the TMD; there is minimal conservation in TMD. Finally, (7) the seven CEs control each of four phototransduction pathways- -two Ca(2+)-sensor GCAPs-, one Ca(2+)-sensor, S100B-, and one bicarbonate-modulated. The findings disclose that the CCD of ROS-GC1 has built-in regulatory elements that control its signal translational activity. Due to conservation of these regulatory elements, it is proposed that these elements also control the

  16. The YHS-Domain of an Adenylyl Cyclase from Mycobacterium phlei Is a Probable Copper-Sensor Module.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Ulrich Linder

    Full Text Available YHS-domains are small protein modules which have been proposed to bind transition-metal ions like the related TRASH-domains. They are found in a variety of enzymes including copper-transporting ATPases and adenylyl cyclases. Here we investigate a class IIIc adenylyl cyclase from Mycobacterium phlei which contains a C-terminal YHS-domain linked to the catalytic domain by a peptide of 8 amino acids. We expressed the isolated catalytic domain and the full-length enzyme in E. coli. The catalytic domain requires millimolar Mn2+ as a cofactor for efficient production of cAMP, is unaffected by low micromolar concentrations of Cu2+ and inhibited by concentrations higher than 10 μM. The full-length enzyme also requires Mn2+ in the absence of an activator. However, 1-10 μM Cu2+ stimulate the M. phlei adenylyl cyclase sixfold when assayed with Mn2+. With Mg2+ as the probable physiological cofactor of the adenylyl cyclase Cu2+ specifically switches the enzyme from an inactive to an active state. Other transition-metal ions do not elicit activity with Mg2+. We favor the view that the YHS-domain of M. phlei adenylyl cyclase acts as a sensor for copper ions and signals elevated levels of the transition-metal via cAMP. By analogy to TRASH-domains binding of Cu2+ probably occurs via one conserved aspartate and three conserved cysteine-residues in the YHS-domain.

  17. Moonlighting kinases with guanylate cyclase activity can tune regulatory signal networks

    KAUST Repository

    Irving, Helen R.

    2012-02-01

    Guanylate cyclase (GC) catalyzes the formation of cGMP and it is only recently that such enzymes have been characterized in plants. One family of plant GCs contains the GC catalytic center encapsulated within the intracellular kinase domain of leucine rich repeat receptor like kinases such as the phytosulfokine and brassinosteroid receptors. In vitro studies show that both the kinase and GC domain have catalytic activity indicating that these kinase-GCs are examples of moonlighting proteins with dual catalytic function. The natural ligands for both receptors increase intracellular cGMP levels in isolated mesophyll protoplast assays suggesting that the GC activity is functionally relevant. cGMP production may have an autoregulatory role on receptor kinase activity and/or contribute to downstream cell expansion responses. We postulate that the receptors are members of a novel class of receptor kinases that contain functional moonlighting GC domains essential for complex signaling roles.

  18. Oxygen promotes biofilm formation of Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 through a diguanylate cyclase and an adhesin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chao; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Yin, Hao; Song, Xiang-Ning; Li, Wen-Wei; Zhou, Xian-Xuan; Zhao, Li-Ping; Tian, Li-Jiao; Han, Jun-Cheng; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-01-01

    Although oxygen has been reported to regulate biofilm formation by several Shewanella species, the exact regulatory mechanism mostly remains unclear. Here, we identify a direct oxygen-sensing diguanylate cyclase (DosD) and reveal its regulatory role in biofilm formation by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 under aerobic conditions. In vitro and in vivo analyses revealed that the activity of DosD culminates to synthesis of cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) in the presence of oxygen. DosD regulates the transcription of bpfA operon which encodes seven proteins including a large repetitive adhesin BpfA and its cognate type I secretion system (TISS). Regulation of DosD in aerobic biofilms is heavily dependent on an adhesin BpfA and the TISS. This study offers an insight into the molecular mechanism of oxygen-stimulated biofilm formation by S. putrefaciens CN32.

  19. Distribution and protective function of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP in the retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoya eNakamachi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP, which is found in 27- or 38-amino acid forms, belongs to the VIP/glucagon/secretin family. PACAP and its three receptor subtypes are expressed in neural tissues, with PACAP known to exert a protective effect against several types of neural damage. The retina is considered to be part of the central nervous system, and retinopathy is a common cause of profound and intractable loss of vision. This review will examine the expression and morphological distribution of PACAP and its receptors in the retina, and will summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the protective effect of PACAP against different kinds of retinal damage, such as that identified in association with diabetes, ultraviolet light, hypoxia, optic nerve transection, and toxins. This article will also address PACAP-mediated protective pathways involving retinal glial cells.

  20. The roles of cysteines in the heme domain of human soluble guanylate cyclase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Fang Zhong; Xiao Xiao Liu; Jie Pan; Zhong Xian Huang; Xiang Shi Tan

    2012-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is a critical heme-containing enzyme involved in NO signaling.The dimerization of sGC subunits is necessary for its bioactivity and its mechanism is a striiking and an indistinct issue.The roles of heme domain cysteines of the sGC on the dimerization and heme binding were investigated herein.The site-directed mutations of three conserved cysteines (C78A,C 122A and C 174S) were studied systematically and the three mutants were characterized by gel filtration analysis,UV-vis spectroscopy and heime transfer examination.Cys78 was involved in heme binding but not referred to the dimerization,while Cys174 was demonstrated to be involved in the homodimerization.These results provide new insights into the cysteine-related dimerization regulation of sGC.

  1. The effect of adenylate cyclase stimulation on endocochlear potential in the guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, K; Mori, N; Matsunaga, T

    1990-01-01

    Forskolin, a diterpene extracted from Coleus forskohlii, is potentially an important tool for studying the modulation of ionic currents by cAMP because it stimulates adenylate cyclase in a variety of cells. We studied the effect of forskolin on cochlear potentials and found that its perfusion of the scala vestibuli (SV) to a concentration more than 10(-5) M and the scala tympani (ST) to more than 10(-4) M produced a reversible elevation of the endocochlear potential (EP) in a dose-dependent manner. The cochlear microphonics recorded simultaneously with the EP was not depressed during the EP elevation. A large negative EP was induced by anoxia following the SV perfusion with forskolin (2 X 10(-4) M). The results suggest that the EP elevation produced by forskolin does not result from the decrease in the negative component of EP but from the increase in the positive component of EP.

  2. Reconstitution of a fungal meroterpenoid biosynthesis reveals the involvement of a novel family of terpene cyclases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Takayuki; Tokunaga, Kinya; Matsuda, Yudai; Fujii, Isao; Abe, Ikuro; Ebizuka, Yutaka; Kushiro, Tetsuo

    2010-10-01

    Meroterpenoids are hybrid natural products of both terpenoid and polyketide origin. We identified a biosynthetic gene cluster that is responsible for the production of the meroterpenoid pyripyropene in the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus through reconstituted biosynthesis of up to five steps in a heterologous fungal expression system. The cluster revealed a previously unknown terpene cyclase with an unusual sequence and protein primary structure. The wide occurrence of this sequence in other meroterpenoid and indole-diterpene biosynthetic gene clusters indicates the involvement of these enzymes in the biosynthesis of various terpenoid-bearing metabolites produced by fungi and bacteria. In addition, a novel polyketide synthase that incorporated nicotinyl-CoA as the starter unit and a prenyltransferase, similar to that in ubiquinone biosynthesis, was found to be involved in the pyripyropene biosynthesis. The successful production of a pyripyropene analogue illustrates the catalytic versatility of these enzymes for the production of novel analogues with useful biological activities.

  3. Adenylyl Cyclase Signaling in the Developing Chick Heart: The Deranging Effect of Antiarrhythmic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Hejnova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The adenylyl cyclase (AC signaling system plays a crucial role in the regulation of cardiac contractility. Here we analyzed the key components of myocardial AC signaling in the developing chick embryo and assessed the impact of selected β-blocking agents on this system. Application of metoprolol and carvedilol, two commonly used β-blockers, at embryonic day (ED 8 significantly downregulated (by about 40% expression levels of AC5, the dominant cardiac AC isoform, and the amount of Gsα protein at ED9. Activity of AC stimulated by forskolin was also significantly reduced under these conditions. Interestingly, when administered at ED4, these drugs did not produce such profound changes in the myocardial AC signaling system, except for markedly increased expression of Giα protein. These data indicate that β-blocking agents can strongly derange AC signaling during the first half of embryonic heart development.

  4. Isoform-specific regulation of adenylyl cyclase: a potential target in future pharmacotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwatsubo, Kousaku; Tsunematsu, Takashi; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro

    2003-06-01

    Adenylyl cyclase (AC) is a target enzyme of multiple G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In the past decade, the cloning, structure and biochemical properties of nine AC isoforms were reported, and each isoform of AC shows distinct patterns of tissue distribution and biochemical/pharmacological properties. In addition to the conventional regulators of this enzyme, such as calmodulin (CaM) or PKC, novel regulators, for example, caveolin, have been identified. Most importantly, these regulators work on AC in an isoform dependent manner. Recent studies have demonstrated that certain classic AC inhibitors, i.e., P-site inhibitors, show an isoform-dependent inhibition of AC. The side chain modifications of forskolin, a diterpene extract from Coleus forskolii, markedly enhance its isoform selectivity. When taken together, these findings suggest that it is feasible to develop new pharmacotherapeutic agents that target AC isoforms to regulate various neurohormonal signals in a highly tissue-/organ-specific manner.

  5. Adenylate cyclase 5 is required for melanophore and male pattern development in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottler, Verena A; Künstner, Axel; Koch, Iris; Flötenmeyer, Matthias; Langenecker, Tobias; Hoffmann, Margarete; Sharma, Eshita; Weigel, Detlef; Dreyer, Christine

    2015-09-01

    Guppies (Poecilia reticulata) are colorful fish that have attracted the attention of pigmentation researchers for almost a century. Here, we report that the blond phenotype of the guppy is caused by a spontaneous mutation in the guppy ortholog of adenylate cyclase 5 (adcy5). Using double digest restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (ddRADseq) and quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping, we linked the blond phenotype to a candidate region of 118 kb, in which we subsequently identified a 2-bp deletion in adcy5 that alters splicing and leads to a premature stop codon. We show that adcy5, which affects life span and melanoma growth in mouse, is required for melanophore development and formation of male orange pigmentation traits in the guppy. We find that some components of the male orange pattern are particularly sensitive to loss of Adcy5 function. Our work thus reveals a function for Adcy5 in patterning of fish color ornaments.

  6. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide: occurrence and relaxant effect in female genital tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenstrup, B R; Alm, P; Hannibal, J

    1995-01-01

    that PACAP was located in delicate varicose nerve fibers that were most abundant in the internal cervical os, where they mainly seemed to innervate blood vessels and smooth muscle cells. PACAP-38 and PACAP-27 (10(-10)-10(-6) M) caused a concentration-dependent relaxation of the spontaneous activity......The distribution, localization, and smooth muscle effects of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) were studied in the human female genital tract. The concentrations of PACAP-38 and PACAP-27 were measured by radioimmunoassays, and both peptides were found throughout the genital...... of the nonvascular smooth muscle strips from fallopian tube and myometrium in vitro. Likewise, both peptides (10(-10)-10(-6) M) caused relaxation of nonrepinephrine (10(-6) M)-precontracted intramyometrial arteries. No effect of the PACAP sequences, PACAP-(6-27), PACAP-(16-38), and PACAP-(18-27), on fallopian tube...

  7. Delivery of Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin to target cells via outer membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, Gina M; Goldsmith, Cynthia S; Paddock, Christopher D; Eby, Joshua C; Gray, Mary C; Hewlett, Erik L

    2012-02-17

    Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) intoxicates cells by producing intracellular cAMP. B. pertussis outer membrane vesicles (OMV) contain ACT on their surface (OMV-ACT), but the properties of OMV-ACT were previously unknown. We found that B. pertussis in the lung from a fatal pertussis case contains OMV, suggesting an involvement in pathogenesis. OMV-ACT and ACT intoxicate cells with and without the toxin's receptor CD11b/CD18. Intoxication by ACT is blocked by antitoxin and anti-CD11b antibodies, but not by cytochalasin-D; in contrast, OMV-ACT is unaffected by either antibody and blocked by cytochalasin-D. Thus OMV-ACT can deliver ACT by processes distinct from those of ACT alone. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. All rights reserved.

  8. Preparation of esters of gallic acid with higher primary alcohols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerk, G.J.M. van der; Verbeek, J.H.; Cleton, J.C.F.

    1951-01-01

    The esters of gallic acid and higher primary alcohols, especially fatty alcohols, have recently gained considerable interest as possible antioxidants for fats. Two independent methods for the preparation of these esters are described. In the first method the hitherto unknown compound galloyl chlorid

  9. 40 CFR 721.3080 - Substituted phosphate ester (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted phosphate ester (generic... Substances § 721.3080 Substituted phosphate ester (generic). (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a substituted phosphate...

  10. Engineering modular ester fermentative pathways in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layton, Donovan S; Trinh, Cong T

    2014-11-01

    Sensation profiles are observed all around us and are made up of many different molecules, such as esters. These profiles can be mimicked in everyday items for their uses in foods, beverages, cosmetics, perfumes, solvents, and biofuels. Here, we developed a systematic 'natural' way to derive these products via fermentative biosynthesis. Each ester fermentative pathway was designed as an exchangeable ester production module for generating two precursors- alcohols and acyl-CoAs that were condensed by an alcohol acyltransferase to produce a combinatorial library of unique esters. As a proof-of-principle, we coupled these ester modules with an engineered, modular, Escherichia coli chassis in a plug-and-play fashion to create microbial cell factories for enhanced anaerobic production of a butyrate ester library. We demonstrated tight coupling between the modular chassis and ester modules for enhanced product biosynthesis, an engineered phenotype useful for directed metabolic pathway evolution. Compared to the wildtype, the engineered cell factories yielded up to 48 fold increase in butyrate ester production from glucose.

  11. 40 CFR 721.3110 - Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic... Substances § 721.3110 Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polycarboxylic acid...

  12. 40 CFR 721.8660 - Propionic acid methyl ester (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Propionic acid methyl ester (generic... Substances § 721.8660 Propionic acid methyl ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a propionic acid methyl...

  13. Physical and monolayer film properties of potential fatty ester biolubricants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Linxing [Iowa State University; Hammond, Earl G [Iowa State University; Wang, Tong [Iowa State University; Bu, Wei [Ames Laboratory; Vaknin, David [Ames Laboratory

    2014-04-03

    The desire to replace petroleum-based lubricants with alternatives that are environmentally friendly and made from sustainable sources has encouraged the development of biolubricants based on vegetable oils. To be good lubricants, the materials should have low melting points, appropriate viscosity and oxidative stability. In this paper, we report the melting point and viscosity of oleate esters of ethylene glycol, 1,2-propanediol, 2,3-butanediol, and pentaerythritol as well as the decanoate esters of 2,3-butanediol and the 12-methyltetradecanoate esters of 1,2-propanediol. Polyol esters that have a free hydroxy group had lower melting points than the completely esterified polyols, but the completely esterified polyol esters exhibited less change in viscosity with temperature than those having a free hydroxy group. 2, 3-Butanediol monooleate, which melted at -48.6°C shows promise as a biolubricant, but its viscosity index was estimated to be 100. Pentaerythritol oleate esters, with melting points below -10°C and viscosity indices in the range of 170–197, may be suitable candidates as biolubricants. The behavior of esters spread as a monomolecular film at air/water interface may provide insight into the way they behave when spread on metal or polar surfaces, so the pressure-area isotherms of 2,3-butanediol monoleate and selected esters are also reported.

  14. Phenylpropanoid acid esters from Korean propolis and their antioxidant activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, In-Kyoung; Han, Myung-Suk; Kim, Dae-Won; Yun, Bong-Sik

    2014-08-01

    Ten phenylpropanoic acid esters were isolated from an ethanolic extract of Korean propolis. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods including NMR and ESI-MS. Caffeic acid esters with catechol moiety exhibited significant ABTS and DPPH radical scavenging activity and protective effect against DNA damage by a Fenton reaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Phthalic acid esters found in municipal organic waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Hinrich; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2003-01-01

    Contamination of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) with xenobiotic compounds and their fate during anaerobic digestion was investigated. The phthalic acid ester di-(2- ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) was identified as the main contaminant in OFMSW in concentrations more than half...... matter with high biogas yields and efficient reduction of the phthalic acid ester contamination....

  16. The Preparation and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of a Library of Esters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Elizabeth M.; Smith, Traci L.

    2008-01-01

    An investigative case study involving the preparation of a library of esters using Fischer esterification and alcoholysis of acid chlorides and their subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis by pig liver esterase and orange peel esterase is described. Students work collaboratively to prepare and characterize the library of esters and complete and evaluate…

  17. Production of both esters and biogas from Mexican poppy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    Methyl esters of fatty acids are produced by the transesterification of triglycerides of vegetable oils with methanol with the help of a catalyst. (Klass, 1998). ... sodium sulphate (20 g) and was evaporated at 40°C to get purified oil. For making it more ... producing mixture of fatty acid alkyls ester and glycerol. Proximate analysis ...

  18. 13-week oral toxicity study with stanol esters in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turnbull, D.; Whittaker, M.H.; Frankos, V.H.; Jonker, D.

    1999-01-01

    Plant sterols and their saturated derivatives, known as stanols, reduce serum cholesterol when consumed in amounts of approximately 2 g per day. Stanol fatty acid esters have been developed as a highly fat-soluble form that may lower cholesterol more effectively than stanols. Stanol esters occur nat

  19. The enantioselective b-keto ester reductions by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    HASSAN TAJIK; KHALIL TABATABAEIAN; MAHMOOD SHAHBAZI

    2006-01-01

    The enantioselective yeast reduction of aromatic b-keto esters, by use of potassium dihydrogen phosphate, calcium phosphate (monobasic), magnesium sulfate and ammonium tartrate (diammonium salt) (10:1:1:50) in water at pH 7 as a buffer for 72–120 h with 45–90 % conversion to the corresponding aromatic -hydroxy esters was achieved by means of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  20. The Preparation and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of a Library of Esters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Elizabeth M.; Smith, Traci L.

    2008-01-01

    An investigative case study involving the preparation of a library of esters using Fischer esterification and alcoholysis of acid chlorides and their subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis by pig liver esterase and orange peel esterase is described. Students work collaboratively to prepare and characterize the library of esters and complete and evaluate…

  1. New structural forms of a mycobacterial adenylyl cyclase Rv1625c

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deivanayaga Barathy

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Rv1625c is one of 16 adenylyl cyclases encoded in the genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In solution Rv1625c exists predominantly as a monomer, with a small amount of dimer. It has been shown previously that the monomer is active and the dimeric fraction is inactive. Both fractions of wild-type Rv1625c crystallized as head-to-head inactive domain-swapped dimers as opposed to the head-to-tail dimer seen in other functional adenylyl cyclases. About half of the molecule is involved in extensive domain swapping. The strain created by a serine residue located on a hinge loop and the crystallization condition might have led to this unusual domain swapping. The inactivity of the dimeric form of Rv1625c could be explained by the absence of the required catalytic site in the swapped dimer. A single mutant of the enzyme was also generated by changing a phenylalanine predicted to occur at the functional dimer interface to an arginine. This single mutant exists as a dimer in solution but crystallized as a monomer. Analysis of the structure showed that a salt bridge formed between a glutamate residue in the N-terminal segment and the mutated arginine residue hinders dimer formation by pulling the N-terminal region towards the dimer interface. Both structures reported here show a change in the dimerization-arm region which is involved in formation of the functional dimer. It is concluded that the dimerization arm along with other structural elements such as the N-terminal region and certain loops are vital for determining the oligomeric nature of the enzyme, which in turn dictates its activity.

  2. Guanylyl Cyclase C Hormone Axis at the Intersection of Obesity and Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomain, Erik S; Merlino, Dante J; Pattison, Amanda M; Snook, Adam E; Waldman, Scott A

    2016-09-01

    Obesity has emerged as a principal cause of mortality worldwide, reflecting comorbidities including cancer risk, particularly in colorectum. Although this relationship is established epidemiologically, molecular mechanisms linking colorectal cancer and obesity continue to be refined. Guanylyl cyclase C (GUCY2C), a membrane-bound guanylyl cyclase expressed in intestinal epithelial cells, binds the paracrine hormones guanylin and uroguanylin, inducing cGMP signaling in colorectum and small intestine, respectively. Guanylin is the most commonly lost gene product in sporadic colorectal cancer, and its universal loss early in transformation silences GUCY2C, a tumor suppressor, disrupting epithelial homeostasis underlying tumorigenesis. In small intestine, eating induces endocrine secretion of uroguanylin, the afferent limb of a novel gut-brain axis that activates hypothalamic GUCY2C-cGMP signaling mediating satiety opposing obesity. Recent studies revealed that diet-induced obesity suppressed guanylin and uroguanylin expression in mice and humans. Hormone loss reflects reversible calorie-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and the associated unfolded protein response, rather than the endocrine, adipokine, or inflammatory milieu of obesity. Loss of intestinal uroguanylin secretion silences the hypothalamic GUCY2C endocrine axis, creating a feed-forward loop contributing to hyperphagia in obesity. Importantly, calorie-induced guanylin loss silences the GUCY2C-cGMP paracrine axis underlying obesity-induced epithelial dysfunction and colorectal tumorigenesis. Indeed, genetically enforced guanylin replacement eliminated diet-induced intestinal tumorigenesis in mice. Taken together, these observations suggest that GUCY2C hormone axes are at the intersection of obesity and colorectal cancer. Moreover, they suggest that hormone replacement that restores GUCY2C signaling may be a novel therapeutic paradigm to prevent both hyperphagia and intestinal tumorigenesis in obesity.

  3. Lycopene cyclase paralog CruP protects against reactive oxygen species in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Louis M T; Shumskaya, Maria; Tzfadia, Oren; Wu, Shi-Biao; Kennelly, Edward J; Wurtzel, Eleanore T

    2012-07-03

    In photosynthetic organisms, carotenoids serve essential roles in photosynthesis and photoprotection. A previous report designated CruP as a secondary lycopene cyclase involved in carotenoid biosynthesis [Maresca J, et al. (2007) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 104:11784-11789]. However, we found that cruP KO or cruP overexpression plants do not exhibit correspondingly reduced or increased production of cyclized carotenoids, which would be expected if CruP was a lycopene cyclase. Instead, we show that CruP aids in preventing accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), thereby reducing accumulation of β-carotene-5,6-epoxide, a ROS-catalyzed autoxidation product, and inhibiting accumulation of anthocyanins, which are known chemical indicators of ROS. Plants with a nonfunctional cruP accumulate substantially higher levels of ROS and β-carotene-5,6-epoxide in green tissues. Plants overexpressing cruP show reduced levels of ROS, β-carotene-5,6-epoxide, and anthocyanins. The observed up-regulation of cruP transcripts under photoinhibitory and lipid peroxidation-inducing conditions, such as high light stress, cold stress, anoxia, and low levels of CO(2), fits with a role for CruP in mitigating the effects of ROS. Phylogenetic distribution of CruP in prokaryotes showed that the gene is only present in cyanobacteria that live in habitats characterized by large variation in temperature and inorganic carbon availability. Therefore, CruP represents a unique target for developing resilient plants and algae needed to supply food and biofuels in the face of global climate change.

  4. A reduced susceptibility to chemoconvulsant stimulation in adenylyl cyclase 8 knockout mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xia; Dong, Guoying; Zheng, Changhong; Wang, Hongbing; Yun, Wenwei; Zhou, Xianju

    2015-01-01

    Objective Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) catalyze the synthesis of cAMP from ATP, and cAMP signaling affects a large number of neuronal processes. Ca2+-stimualted adenylyl cyclase 8 (AC8) expressed in the CNS plays a role in synaptic plasticity, drug addiction and ethanol sensitivity, and chronic pain. This study was to aim at examining the contributions of AC8 to epileptogenesis. Methods In this study, we observed the seizure behavior induced by kainic acid (20mg/kg or 30mg/kg) or pilocarpine (350mg/kg) in AC8 KO and wild-type mice. Next we injected kainic acid or pilocarpine to induce status epilepticus (SE), and examined neuronal degeneration (by Fluoro-Jade B staining) and mossy fiber sprouting (by Timm staining) 24 hr and 2 weeks after SE termination in the hippocampus, respectively. Finally, 15min after intraperitoneal injection of kainic acid (30mg/kg), we examined phosphor-ERK1/2 in the hippocampus by western blot and immunochemistry staining. Results We first observed that AC8 KO mutants display reduced susceptibility (including seizure latency and episodes) to two chemoconvulsants, kainic acid and pilocarpine. Moreover, we found that degenerative neurons and mossy fiber sprouting induced by chemoconvulsants were significant decreased in the hippocampus. Further, western blot and immunochemistry analysis revealed that the MAPK signaling in the hippocampus was attenuated in kainic acid-injected AC8 KO mice. Conclusion AC8 is involved in epileptogenesis, and may serve as a potential target for the treatment of epilepsy. PMID:26656781

  5. Interaction of retinal guanylate cyclase with the alpha subunit of transducin: potential role in transducin localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, Derek H; Nair, K Saidas; Levay, Konstantin; Peshenko, Igor V; Crabb, John W; Dizhoor, Alexander M; Slepak, Vladlen Z

    2009-02-01

    Vertebrate phototransduction is mediated by cGMP, which is generated by retGC (retinal guanylate cyclase) and degraded by cGMP phosphodiesterase. Light stimulates cGMP hydrolysis via the G-protein transducin, which directly binds to and activates phosphodiesterase. Bright light also causes relocalization of transducin from the OS (outer segments) of the rod cells to the inner compartments. In the present study, we show experimental evidence for a previously unknown interaction between G(alphat) (the transducin alpha subunit) and retGC. G(alphat) co-immunoprecipitates with retGC from the retina or from co-transfected COS-7 cells. The retGC-G(alphat) complex is also present in cones. The interaction also occurs in mice lacking RGS9 (regulator of G-protein signalling 9), a protein previously shown to associate with both G(alphat) and retGC. The G(alphat)-retGC interaction is mediated primarily by the kinase homology domain of retGC, which binds GDP-bound G(alphat) stronger than the GTP[S] (GTPgammaS; guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate) form. Neither G(alphat) nor G(betagamma) affect retGC-mediated cGMP synthesis, regardless of the presence of GCAP (guanylate cyclase activating protein) and Ca2+. The rate of light-dependent transducin redistribution from the OS to the inner segments is markedly accelerated in the retGC-1-knockout mice, while the migration of transducin to the OS after the onset of darkness is delayed. Supplementation of permeabilized photoreceptors with cGMP does not affect transducin translocation. Taken together, these results suggest that the protein-protein interaction between G(alphat) and retGC represents a novel mechanism regulating light-dependent translocation of transducin in rod photoreceptors.

  6. Stimulation of renin secretion by catecholamines is dependent on adenylyl cyclases 5 and 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldehni, Fadi; Tang, Tong; Madsen, Kirsten; Plattner, Michael; Schreiber, Andrea; Friis, Ulla G; Hammond, H Kirk; Han, Pyung Lim; Schweda, Frank

    2011-03-01

    The sympathetic nervous system stimulates renin release from juxtaglomerular cells via the β-adrenoreceptor-cAMP pathway. Recent in vitro studies have suggested that the calcium-inhibited adenylyl cyclases (ACs) 5 and 6 possess key roles in the control of renin exocytosis. To investigate the relative contribution of AC5 and AC6 to the regulation of renin release in vivo we performed experiments using AC5 and AC6 knockout mice. Male AC5(-/-) mice exhibited normal plasma renin concentrations, renal renin synthesis (mRNA and renin content), urinary volume, and systolic blood pressure. In male AC6(-/-) mice, plasma renin concentration (AC6(-/-): 732 ± 119; AC6 (+/+): 436 ± 78 ng of angiotensin I per hour*mL(-1); Prenin synthesis were stimulated associated with an increased excretion of dilute urine (1.55-fold; Pplasma renin concentration by a single injection of the β-adrenoreceptor agonist isoproterenol (10 mg/kg IP) was significantly attenuated in AC5(-/-) (male: -20%; female: -33%) compared with wild-type mice in vivo. The mitigation of the plasma renin concentration response to isoproterenol was even more pronounced in AC6(-/-) (male: -63%; female: -50% versus AC6(+/+)). Similarly, the effects of isoproterenol, prostaglandin E2, and pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide on renin release from isolated perfused kidneys were attenuated to a higher extent in AC6(-/-) (-51% to -98% versus AC6(+/+)) than in AC5(-/-) (-31% to 46% versus AC5(+/+)). In conclusion, both AC5 and AC6 are involved in the stimulation of renin secretion in vivo, and AC6 is the dominant isoforms in this process.

  7. Allosteric activation of Bordetella pertussis adenylyl cyclase by calmodulin: molecular dynamics and mutagenesis studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selwa, Edithe; Davi, Marilyne; Chenal, Alexandre; Sotomayor-Pérez, Ana-Cristina; Ladant, Daniel; Malliavin, Thérèse E

    2014-07-25

    Adenylyl cyclase (AC) toxin is an essential toxin that allows Bordetella pertussis to invade eukaryotic cells, where it is activated after binding to calmodulin (CaM). Based on the crystal structure of the AC catalytic domain in complex with the C-terminal half of CaM (C-CaM), our previous molecular dynamics simulations (Selwa, E., Laine, E., and Malliavin, T. (2012) Differential role of calmodulin and calcium ions in the stabilization of the catalytic domain of adenyl cyclase CyaA from Bordetella pertussis. Proteins 80, 1028–1040) suggested that three residues (i.e. Arg(338), Asn(347), and Asp(360)) might be important for stabilizing the AC/CaM interaction. These residues belong to a loop-helix-loop motif at the C-terminal end of AC, which is located at the interface between CaM and the AC catalytic loop. In the present study, we conducted the in silico and in vitro characterization of three AC variants, where one (Asn(347); ACm1A), two (Arg(338) and Asp(360); ACm2A), or three residues (Arg(338), Asn(347), and Asp(360); ACm3A) were substituted with Ala. Biochemical studies showed that the affinities of ACm1A and ACm2A for CaM were not affected significantly, whereas that of ACm3A was reduced dramatically. To understand the effects of these modifications, molecular dynamics simulations were performed based on the modified proteins. The molecular dynamics trajectories recorded for the ACm3AC-CaM complex showed that the calcium-binding loops of C-CaM exhibited large fluctuations, which could be related to the weakened interaction between ACm3A and its activator. Overall, our results suggest that the loop-helix-loop motif at the C-terminal end of AC is crucial during CaM binding for stabilizing the AC catalytic loop in an active configuration.

  8. Forskolin inhibits the Gs-stimulated adenylate cyclase in rat ascites hepatoma AH66F cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, K; Sanae, F; Koshiura, R; Matsunaga, T; Hasegawa, T; Takagi, K; Satake, T

    1989-09-01

    Forskolin increased intracellular cyclic AMP and augmented cyclic AMP formation by prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) in normal rat hepatocytes and ascites hepatoma AH66 cells. However, in AH66F cells which were derived from the AH66 cell line, the diterpene only slightly increased the cyclic AMP level, and dose-dependently inhibited the accumulation caused by PGE1. Forskolin dose-dependently activated adenylate cyclase in these membranes, and the magnitude of activation by forskolin was largest in the following order: hepatocytes, AH66 cells, and AH66F cells. This difference may be based on the number of forskolin-binding sites. The binding affinity of forskolin for each cell membrane was similar. The number and affinity of forskolin-binding sites in these cells were not influenced by 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate [Gpp(NH)p]. In hepatocytes and AH66 cells, forskolin and other adenylate cyclase activators such as PGE1, GTP, Gpp(NH)p, F-, and Mn2+ synergistically increased the enzyme activity. In AH66F cells, the forskolin-stimulated activity was hardly influenced by the GTP analog, and forskolin diminished the activities induced by the GTP analog in a manner similar to that of diterpene alone. Forskolin (10 microM) also significantly inhibited the activities induced by PGE1, GTP, and F-. The effect of forskolin with Mn2+ was additive in AH66F cells. The data suggest that forskolin promotes the interaction between the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding protein and the catalytic unit in the membrane of normal hepatocytes and AH66 cells, but it interferes with the coupling in AH66F cells.

  9. Membrane Guanylyl Cyclase Complexes Shape the Photoresponses of Retinal Rods and Cones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Hong eWen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In vertebrate rods and cones, photon capture by rhodopsin leads to the destruction of cyclic GMP (cGMP and the subsequent closure of cyclic nucleotide gated (CNG ion channels in the outer segment plasma membrane. Replenishment of cGMP and reopening of the channels limit the growth of the photon response and are requisite for its recovery. In different vertebrate retinas, there may be as many as four types of membrane guanylyl cyclases (GCs for cGMP synthesis. Ten neuronal Ca2+ sensor proteins could potentially modulate their activities. The mouse is proving to be an effective model for characterizing the roles of individual components because its relative simplicity can be reduced further by genetic engineering. There are two types of guanylyl cyclase activating proteins (GCAPs and two types of GCs in mouse rods, whereas cones express one type of GCAP and one type of GC. Mutant mouse rods and cones bereft of both GCAPs have large, long lasting photon responses. Thus, GCAPs normally mediate negative feedback tied to the light-induced decline in intracellular Ca2+ that accelerates GC activity to curtail the growth and duration of the photon response. Rods from other mutant mice that express a single GCAP type reveal how the two GCAPs normally work together as a team. Because of its lower Ca2+ affinity, GCAP1 is the first responder that senses the initial decrease in Ca2+ following photon absorption and acts to limit response amplitude. GCAP2, with a higher Ca2+ affinity, is recruited later during the course of the photon response as Ca2+ levels continue to decline further. The main role of GCAP2 is to provide for a timely response recovery and it is particularly important after exposure to very bright light. The multiplicity of GC isozymes and GCAP homologs in the retinas of other vertebrates confers greater flexibility in shaping the photon responses in order to tune visual sensitivity, dynamic range and frequency response.

  10. Rapid NIR determination of alkyl esters in virgin olive oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Cayuela

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of The European Union for olive oil and olive pomace established the limit of 35 mg·kg-1 for fatty acids ethyl ester contents in extra virgin olive oils, from grinding seasons after 2016. In this work, predictive models have been established for measuring fatty acid ethyl and methyl esters and to measure the total fatty acid alkyl esters based on near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS, and used successfully for this purpose. The correlation coefficients from the external validation exercises carried out with these predictive models ranged from 0.84 to 0.91. Different classification tests using the same models for the thresholds 35 mg·kg-1 for fatty acid ethyl esters and 75 mg·kg-1 for fatty acid alkyl esters provided success percentages from 75.0% to 95.2%.

  11. Crystallisation and Melting Behavior of Methyl Esters of Palm Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng S. Foon

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The methyl esters of palm oil, which consists of saturated and unsaturated esters (0.6 to 95.9% unsaturation of the C12 to C18 fatty acids, solidify at the two temperature ranges, -52 to -45°C and -24 to 21°C, when the esters are cooled. When the esters are heated, they melt at two distinct temperatures, -25 and -33°C and a broad peak at -9 to 28°C. The heating thermograms also showed an exothermic crystallisation peak in between two endothermic melting peaks, indicating the occurrence of re-crystallisation of low melting methyl esters into higher melting point crystal and then melt again at higher temperature.

  12. Methods of refining and producing dibasic esters and acids from natural oil feedstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, Thomas E.; Cohen, Steven A.; Gildon, Demond L.

    2016-06-14

    Methods and systems for making dibasic esters and/or dibasic acids using metathesis are generally disclosed. In some embodiments, the methods comprise reacting a terminal olefin ester with an internal olefin ester in the presence of a metathesis catalyst to form a dibasic ester and/or dibasic acid. In some embodiments, the terminal olefin ester or the internal olefin ester are derived from a renewable feedstock, such as a natural oil feedstock. In some such embodiments, the natural oil feedstock, or a transesterified derivative thereof, is metathesized to make the terminal olefin ester or the internal olefin ester.

  13. In vitro metacyclogenesis of Trypanosoma cruzi induced by starvation correlates with a transient adenylyl cyclase stimulation as well as with a constitutive upregulation of adenylyl cyclase expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedi, Afsaneh; Botelho, Larisse; Britto, Constança; Fragoso, Stenio Perdigão; Umaki, Adriana Castilhos Souza; Goldenberg, Samuel; Bottu, Guy; Salmon, Didier

    2015-01-01

    The Trypanosoma cruzi adenylyl cyclase (AC) multigene family encodes different isoforms (around 15) sharing a variable large N-terminal domain, which is extracellular and receptor-like, followed by a transmembrane helix and a conserved C-terminal catalytic domain. It was proposed that these key enzymes in the cAMP signalling pathway allow the parasite to sense its changing extracellular milieu in order to rapidly adapt to its new environment, which is generally achieved through a differentiation process. One of the critical differentiation events the parasitic protozoan T. cruzi undergoes during its life cycle, known as metacyclogenesis, occurs in the digestive tract of the insect and corresponds to the differentiation from noninfective epimastigotes to infective metacyclic trypomastigote forms. By in vitro monitoring the activity of AC during metacyclogenesis, we showed that both the activity of AC and the intracellular cAMP content follow a similar pattern of transient stimulation in a two-step process, with a first activation peak occurring during the first hours of nutritional stress and a second peak between 6 and 48 h, corresponding to the cellular adhesion. During this differentiation process, a general mechanism of upregulation of AC expression of both mRNA and protein is triggered and in particular for a major subclass of these enzymes that are present in various gene copies commonly associated to the THT gene clusters. Although the scattered genome distribution of these gene copies is rather unusual in trypanosomatids and seems to be a recent acquisition in the evolution of the T. cruzi clade, their encoded product redistributed on the flagellum of the parasite upon differentiation could be important to sense the extracellular milieu.

  14. Adenylyl cyclase 2 selectively couples to E prostanoid type 2 receptors, whereas adenylyl cyclase 3 is not receptor-regulated in airway smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogard, Amy S; Adris, Piyatilake; Ostrom, Rennolds S

    2012-08-01

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) are important regulators of airway smooth muscle function, because β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) agonists stimulate AC activity and cAMP production. We have previously shown in a number of cell types that AC6 selectively couples to βAR and these proteins are coexpressed in lipid rafts. We overexpressed AC2, AC3, and AC6 in mouse bronchial smooth muscle cells (mBSMCs) and human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells by using recombinant adenoviruses and assessed their localization and regulation by various G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). AC3 and AC6 were expressed primarily in caveolin-rich fractions, whereas AC2 expression was excluded from these domains. AC6 expression enhanced cAMP production in response to isoproterenol but did not increase responses to butaprost, reflecting the colocalization of AC6 with β(2)AR but not E prostanoid type 2 receptor (EP(2)R) in lipid raft fractions. AC2 expression enhanced butaprost-stimulated cAMP production but had no effect on the β(2)AR-mediated response. AC3 did not couple to any GPCR tested. Forskolin-induced arborization of mBSMCs was assessed as a functional readout of cAMP signaling. Arborization was enhanced by overexpression of AC6 and AC3, but AC2 had no effect. GPCR-stimulated arborization mirrored the selective coupling observed for cAMP production. With the addition of the phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitor rolipram AC2 accelerated forskolin-stimulated arborization. Thus, AC2 selectively couples to EP(2)R, but signals from this complex are limited by PDE4 activity. AC3 does not seem to couple to GPCR in either mBSMCs or HEK-293 cells, so it probably exists in a distinct signaling domain in these cells.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of novel biodegradable poly(carbonate ester)s with photolabile protecting groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhigang; Hu, Xiuli; Chen, Xuesi; Sun, Jing; Shi, Quan; Jing, Xiabin

    2008-01-01

    Novel biodegradable poly(carbonate ester)s with photolabile protecting groups were synthesized by ring-opening copolymerization of L-lactide (LA) with 5-methyl-5-(2-nitro-benzoxycarbonyl)-1,3-dioxan-2-one (MNC) with diethyl zinc (Et2Zn) as catalyst. The poly(L-lactide-co-5-methyl-5-carboxyl-1,3-dioxan-2-one) (P(LA-co-MCC)) was obtained by UV irradiation of poly(L-lactide acid-co-5-methyl-5-(2-nitro-benzoxycarbonyl)-1,3-dioxan-2-one) (P(LA-co-MNC)) to remove the protective 2-nitrobenzyl group. The free carboxyl groups on the copolymers P(LA-co-MCC) were reacted with paclitaxel, a common antitumor drug. Gel permeation chromatography and NMR studies confirmed the copolymer structures and successful attachment of paclitaxel to the copolymer.

  16. Cholesteryl esters in human malignant neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, M R; Bottura, G; Lucchi, P; Reggiani, A; Trinchero, A; Tugnoli, V

    2003-01-01

    Cholesteryl esters (CholE) were detected in human malignant neoplasms by means of in vitro nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Spectroscopic analysis of the total lipid extracts obtained from cerebral tumors revealed appreciable amount of esterified cholesterol in high grade gliomas such as glioblastomas and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas, characterized by prominent neovascularity. The finding that no CholE were detected in the healthy brain and in low grade and benign tumors supports a possible correlation between this class of lipids and histological vascular proliferation. Compared with high grade gliomas, renal cell carcinomas show higher levels of CholE, absent in the healthy renal parenchyma and in benign oncocytomas. In nefro-carcinomas, cytoplasmic lipid inclusions and prominent vascularization contribute to the increased levels of CholE present mainly as oleate. CholE are discussed as potential biochemical markers of cancer and as a target for new therapeutic strategies.

  17. Ketone ester effects on metabolism and transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veech, Richard L

    2014-10-01

    Ketosis induced by starvation or feeding a ketogenic diet has widespread and often contradictory effects due to the simultaneous elevation of both ketone bodies and free fatty acids. The elevation of ketone bodies increases the energy of ATP hydrolysis by reducing the mitochondrial NAD couple and oxidizing the coenzyme Q couple, thus increasing the redox span between site I and site II. In contrast, metabolism of fatty acids leads to a reduction of both mitochondrial NAD and mitochondrial coenzyme Q causing a decrease in the ΔG of ATP hydrolysis. In contrast, feeding ketone body esters leads to pure ketosis, unaccompanied by elevation of free fatty acids, producing a physiological state not previously seen in nature. The effects of pure ketosis on transcription and upon certain neurodegenerative diseases make approach not only interesting, but of potential therapeutic value.

  18. Phthalate esters: heartrate depressors in the goldfish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfuderer, P.; Francis, A.A.

    1975-03-01

    The effect of phthalate esters isolated from carp tissue on the heart rate of goldfish is examined. Di-n-butyl phthalate, benzyl-butyl phthalate, and di-2-ethyl hexyl phthalate were previously isolated from carp tissue. It was found that the di-n-buhyl and the benzyl-butyl phthalate had significant effect on the heart rate. The effect of chloroform extracts of heart, liver, brain, kidney, gut, and remainder of fish were tested and greatest depression activity was found in the liver with some activity noted for the heart and brain. Atropine reverses the effect, so phthalate is presumed to act on the nervous system. Food chain concentration of phthalates represents a potential threat to aquatic organisms and possibly even to man. (JWP)

  19. Electrochemistry of polyamidoamine dendrimers ester gel electrolytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Hong; MO Zunli

    2004-01-01

    This paper described the first example of polyamidoamine dendrimers ester (PAMAM) used as a gel electrolyte with a short-chain polyethylene glycol (MPEG-400) as a plasticizer. The polymer films are solid and sticky. Background cyclic voltammetry (CV) shows a potential window between +0.7 and -0.7 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The voltammetry of ferrocene and 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) indicates that diffusion coefficients are in the range of 10-a-10-9 cm2/s.Ionic conductivities are approximately 10-6 S/cm. Similar films using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as a plasticizer instead of MPEG-400 have demonstrated ionic conductivities of 10-4 S/cra and reversible voltammetry. However, UV spectrophotometry shows that 70% of the DMSO is lost under vacuum, indicating the difficulty in quantifying the DMSO content when exposed to vacuum.

  20. Occurrence of 3-monochloropropanediol esters and glycidyl esters in commercial infant formulas in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Jessica; MacMahon, Shaun

    2017-03-01

    This work presents occurrence data for fatty acid esters of 3-chloro-1,2-propanediol (3-MCPD) and glycidol in 98 infant formula samples purchased in the United States. These contaminants are considered potentially carcinogenic and/or genotoxic, making their presence in refined oils and foods a potential health risk. Recently, attention has focused on methodology to quantify MCPD and glycidyl esters in infant formula for risk-assessment purposes. Occurrence data for 3-MCPD and glycidyl esters were produced using a procedure for extracting fat from infant formula and an LC-MS/MS method for analysing fat extracts for intact esters. Infant formulas were produced by seven manufacturers, five of which use palm oil and/or palm olein in their formulations. In formulas containing palm/palm olein, concentrations for bound 3-MCPD and glycidol ranged from 0.021 to 0.92 mg kg(-)(1) (ppm) and from < LOQ to 0.40 mg kg(-)(1) (ppm), respectively. Formulas not containing palm/palm olein, bound 3-MCPD and glycidol concentrations ranged from 0.072 to 0.16 mg kg(-)(1) (ppm) and from 0.005 to 0.15 mg kg(-)(1) (ppm), respectively. Although formulas from manufacturers A and G did not contain palm/palm olein, formulas from manufacturer E (containing palm olein) had the lowest concentrations of bound 3-MCPD and glycidol, demonstrating the effectiveness of industrial mitigation strategies.

  1. Synthesis and anti-tumor activity of alkenyl camptothecin esters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-song CAO; John MENDOZA; Albert DEJESUS; Beppino GIOVANELLA

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To study the degrees of influence of changing side ester chains at position C20 of camptothecin on the anti-tumor activity of the molecules. Methods: The esterification reaction of camptothecin 1 and 9-nitrocamptothecin 2 with crotonic anhydride in pyridine gave the corresponding esters 3 and 4, respectively. The acylation of 1 and 2 with cinnamoyl chloride gave products 7 and 8. Epoxidation reaction of 3 and 4 with m-chloroperoxybenzoic acid in benzene solvent gave the products 5 and 6. Esters 3, 4, and 5 were tested for anti-tumor activity against 14 human cancer cell lines. Results: Both in vitro and in vivo anti-tumor activity studies for these esters were conducted and the data demonstrated positive results, that is, these esters were active against the tested tumor lines. Conclusion: Alkenyl esters 3 and 4 showed strong anti-tumor activity in vitro against 14 different cancer cell lines. Ester 3 was active against human breast carcinoma in mice and the toxicity of the agent was not observed in mice during the treatment, implying that this agent is effective for treatment with low toxicity.

  2. Short-chain aliphatic ester synthesis using Thermobifida fusca cutinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Lingqia; Hong, Ruoyu; Guo, Xiaojie; Wu, Jing; Xia, Yongmei

    2016-09-01

    Short-chain aliphatic esters are commonly used as fruit flavorings in the food industry. In this study, Thermobifida fusca (T. fusca) cutinase was used for the synthesis of aliphatic esters, and the maximum yield of ethyl caproate reached 99.2% at a cutinase concentration of 50U/ml, 40°C, and water content of 0.5%, representing the highest ester yield to date. The cutinase-catalyzed esterification displayed strong tolerance for water content (up to 8%) and acid concentration (up to 0.8M). At substrate concentrations ⩽0.8M, the ester yield remained above 80%. Moreover, ester yields of more than 98% and 95% were achieved for acids of C3-C8 and alcohols of C1-C6, respectively, indicating extensive chain length selectivity of the cutinase. These results demonstrate the superior ability of T. fusca cutinase to catalyze the synthesis of short-chain esters. This study provides the basis for industrial production of short-chain esters using T. fusca cutinase.

  3. Preparation of polyol esters based on vegetable and animal fats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryglewicz, S; Piechocki, W; Gryglewicz, G

    2003-03-01

    The possibility of using some natural fats: rapeseed oil, olive oil and lard, as starting material for the preparation of neopentyl glycol (NPG) and trimethylol propane (TMP) esters is reported. The syntheses of final products were performed by alcoholysis of fatty acid methyl esters, obtained from natural fats studied, with the appropriate polyhydric alcohol using calcium methoxide as a catalyst. The basic physicochemical properties of the NPG and TMP esters synthesized were the following: viscosity at 40 degrees C in the range of 13.5-37.6 cSt, pour point between -10.5 and -17.5 degrees C and very high viscosity indices, higher than 200. Generally, the esters of neopentyl alcohols were characterized by higher stability in thermo-oxidative conditions in comparison to native triglycerides. Due to the low content of polyunsaturated acids, the olive oil based esters showed the highest thermo-oxidative resistance. Also, methyl esters of fatty acids of lard would constitute a good raw material for the synthesis of lubricating oils, provided that their saturated acids content was lowered. This permits synthesis of NPG and TMP esters with a lower pour point (below -10 degrees C) than natural lard (+33 degrees C).

  4. A HCO(3)(-)-dependent mechanism involving soluble adenylyl cyclase for the activation of Ca²⁺ currents in locus coeruleus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imber, Ann N; Santin, Joseph M; Graham, Cathy D; Putnam, Robert W

    2014-12-01

    Hypercapnic acidosis activates Ca²⁺ channels and increases intracellular Ca²⁺ levels in neurons of the locus coeruleus, a known chemosensitive region involved in respiratory control. We have also shown that large conductance Ca²⁺-activated K⁺ channels, in conjunction with this pathway, limits the hypercapnic-induced increase in firing rate in locus coeruleus neurons. Here, we present evidence that the Ca²⁺ current is activated by a HCO(3)(-)-sensitive pathway. The increase in HCO(3)(-) associated with hypercapnia activates HCO(3)(-)-sensitive adenylyl cyclase (soluble adenylyl cyclase). This results in an increase in cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels and activation of Ca²⁺ channels via cyclic adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase A. We also show the presence of soluble adenylyl cyclase in the cytoplasm of locus coeruleus neurons, and that the cyclic adenosine monophosphate analogue db-cyclic adenosine monophosphate increases Ca²⁺i. Disrupting this pathway by decreasing HCO(3)(-) levels during acidification or inhibiting either soluble adenylyl cyclase or protein kinase A, but not transmembrane adenylyl cyclase, can increase the magnitude of the firing rate response to hypercapnia in locus coeruleus neurons from older neonates to the same extent as inhibition of K⁺ channels. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The role of soluble adenylyl cyclase in health and disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. NMR structural characterization of the N-terminal domain of the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) from Dictyostelium discoideum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavoungou, Chrystelle [Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry (Germany); Israel, Lars [Ludwig Maximilians-University, Adolf Butenandt Institute, Cell Biology (Germany); Rehm, Till; Ksiazek, Dorota; Krajewski, Marcin; Popowicz, Grzegorz [Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry (Germany); Noegel, Angelika A. [University of Cologne, Institute for Biochemistry (Germany); Schleicher, Michael [Ludwig Maximilians-University, Adolf Butenandt Institute, Cell Biology (Germany); Holak, Tad A. [Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry (Germany)

    2004-05-15

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are highly conserved, ubiquitous actin binding proteins that are involved in microfilament reorganization. The N-termini of CAPs play a role in Ras signaling and bind adenylyl cyclase; the C-termini bind to G-actin. We report here the NMR characterization of the amino-terminal domain of CAP from Dictyostelium discoideum (CAP(1-226)). NMR data, including the steady state {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N heteronuclear NOE experiments, indicate that the first 50 N-terminal residues are unstructured and that this highly flexible serine-rich fragment is followed by a stable, folded core starting at Ser 51. The NMR structure of the folded core is an {alpha}-helix bundle composed of six antiparallel helices, in a stark contrast to the recently determined CAP C-terminal domain structure, which is solely built by {beta}-strands.

  6. Structure of the N-terminal domain of the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksiazek, Dorota; Brandstetter, Hans; Israel, Lars; Bourenkov, Gleb P; Katchalova, Galina; Janssen, Klaus-Peter; Bartunik, Hans D; Noegel, Angelika A; Schleicher, Michael; Holak, Tad A

    2003-09-01

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are widely distributed and highly conserved proteins that regulate actin remodeling in response to cellular signals. The N termini of CAPs play a role in Ras signaling and bind adenylyl cyclase; the C termini bind to G-actin and thereby alter the dynamic rearrangements of the microfilament system. We report here the X-ray structure of the core of the N-terminal domain of the CAP from Dictyostelium discoideum, which comprises residues 51-226, determined by a combination of single isomorphous replacement with anomalous scattering (SIRAS). The overall structure of this fragment is an alpha helix bundle composed of six antiparallel helices. Results from gel filtration and crosslinking experiments for CAP(1-226), CAP(255-464), and the full-length protein, together with the CAP N-terminal domain structure and the recently determined CAP C-terminal domain structure, provide evidence that the functional structure of CAP is multimeric.

  7. NMR structural characterization of the N-terminal domain of the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavoungou, Chrystelle; Israel, Lars; Rehm, Till; Ksiazek, Dorota; Krajewski, Marcin; Popowicz, Grzegorz; Noegel, Angelika A; Schleicher, Michael; Holak, Tad A

    2004-05-01

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are highly conserved, ubiquitous actin binding proteins that are involved in microfilament reorganization. The N-termini of CAPs play a role in Ras signaling and bind adenylyl cyclase; the C-termini bind to G-actin. We report here the NMR characterization of the amino-terminal domain of CAP from Dictyostelium discoideum (CAP(1-226)). NMR data, including the steady state (1)H-(15)N heteronuclear NOE experiments, indicate that the first 50 N-terminal residues are unstructured and that this highly flexible serine-rich fragment is followed by a stable, folded core starting at Ser 51. The NMR structure of the folded core is an alpha-helix bundle composed of six antiparallel helices, in a stark contrast to the recently determined CAP C-terminal domain structure, which is solely built by beta-strands.

  8. The Arabidopsis thalianaK+-uptake permease 7 (AtKUP7) contains a functional cytosolic adenylate cyclase catalytic centre

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Younis, Inas

    2015-11-27

    Adenylate Cyclases (ACs) catalyze the formation of the second messenger cyclic adenosine 3′, 5′-monophosphate (cAMP) from adenosine 5’-triphosphate (ATP). Although cAMP is increasingly recognized as an important signaling molecule in higher plants, ACs have remained somewhat elusive. Here we used a search motif derived from experimentally tested guanylyl cyclases (GCs), substituted the residues essential for substrate specificity and identified the Arabidopsis thaliana K+-uptake permease 7 (AtKUP7) as one of several candidate ACs. Firstly, we show that a recombinant N-terminal, cytosolic domain of AtKUP71-100 is able to complement the AC-deficient mutant cyaA in Escherichia coli and thus restoring the fermentation of lactose, and secondly, we demonstrate with both enzyme immunoassays and mass spectrometry that a recombinant AtKUP71-100 generates cAMP in vitro.

  9. Morphine-induced changes of adenylate and guanylate cyclase in locus ceruleus, periaqueductal gray, and substantia nigra in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shijun, Hong; Liping, Zhao; Yongqiang, Qu; Zhen, Li; Yonghe, Zhao; Lihua, Li

    2009-01-01

    To observe the changes of adenylate cyclase (AC) and guanylate cyclase (GC) in the cerebral regions including the locus ceruleus, periaqueductal gray, and substantia nigra in rats that were physiologically dependent on morphine. We also investigated the relationship of enzymatic changes in these cerebral regions to the mechanism of morphine dependence. A morphine-dependent rat model was established and withdrawal symptoms evaluated. Enzyme histochemistry was used to detect the variations of AC and GC in cerebral regions. Compared to controls, AC and GC significantly increased in morphine-dependent groups. Comparisons of four different morphine-dependent groups also showed AC and GC significantly differed at weeks 1, 2, 4, and 8. Results found that the content of AC and GC increased in these cerebral regions in rats that demonstrated morphine dependence and appeared to be closely linked to increases in AC and GC activity.

  10. Somatic 'soluble' adenylyl cyclase isoforms are unaffected in Sacy tm1Lex/Sacy tm1Lex 'knockout' mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Jeanne; Ramos, Lavoisier; Tresguerres, Martin; Kamenetsky, Margarita; Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen

    2008-09-22

    Mammalian Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC, Adcy10, or Sacy) represents a source of the second messenger cAMP distinct from the widely studied, G protein-regulated transmembrane adenylyl cyclases. Genetic deletion of the second through fourth coding exons in Sacy(tm1Lex)/Sacy(tm1Lex) knockout mice results in a male sterile phenotype. The absence of any major somatic phenotype is inconsistent with the variety of somatic functions identified for sAC using pharmacological inhibitors and RNA interference. We now use immunological and molecular biological methods to demonstrate that somatic tissues express a previously unknown isoform of sAC, which utilizes a unique start site, and which 'escapes' the design of the Sacy(tm1Lex) knockout allele. These studies reveal increased complexity at the sAC locus, and they suggest that the known isoforms of sAC play a unique function in male germ cells.

  11. Preparation and characterization of rosin glycerin ester and its bromide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Caili; Zhang Faai

    2006-01-01

    Rosin glycerin ester and its bromide were prepared from natural renewable rosin,glycerin and liquid bromine which were first subjected to an esterification reaction,followed by an addition reaction.Their structures were characterized by an infrared(IR)spectrum and their thermal resistance was conducted with thermal gravity(TG)and differential scanning calorimetry(DSC).It showed that the bromide in the rosin glycerin ester decomposed faster than the ester;hence it may be used as fire-resistant material.

  12. Sugar ester surfactants: enzymatic synthesis and applications in food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neta, Nair S; Teixeira, José A; Rodrigues, Lígia R

    2015-01-01

    Sugar esters are non-ionic surfactants that can be synthesized in a single enzymatic reaction step using lipases. The stability and efficiency of lipases under unusual conditions and using non-conventional media can be significantly improved through immobilization and protein engineering. Also, the development of de novo enzymes has seen a significant increase lately under the scope of the new field of synthetic biology. Depending on the esterification degree and the nature of fatty acid and/or sugar, a range of sugar esters can be synthesized. Due to their surface activity and emulsifying capacity, sugar esters are promising for applications in food industry.

  13. Modular synthesis of cell-permeating 2-ketoglutarate esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengeya, Thomas T; Kulkarni, Rhushikesh A; Meier, Jordan L

    2015-05-15

    Cell-permeating esters of 2-ketoglutarate (2-KG) have been synthesized through a convergent sequence from two modules in two and three steps, respectively. This route provides access to a full series of mono- and disubstituted 2-KG esters, enabling us to define the effect of regioisomeric masking on metabolite release and antihypoxic activity in cell-based assays. In addition to providing insight into the biological activity of cell permeable 2-KG esters, the straightforward and modular nature of this synthetic route may prove useful for the development of next-generation 2-KG analogues for diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  14. The role of cyclase-associated protein in regulating actin filament dynamics – more than a monomer-sequestration factor

    OpenAIRE

    Ono, Shoichiro

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton is fundamental to a number of cell biological events. A variety of actin-regulatory proteins modulate polymerization and depolymerization of actin and contribute to actin cytoskeletal reorganization. Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is a conserved actin-monomer-binding protein that has been studied for over 20 years. Early studies have shown that CAP sequesters actin monomers; recent studies, however, have revealed more active roles of CAP in a...

  15. Cyclase-associated Protein 1 (CAP1) Promotes Cofilin-induced Actin Dynamics in Mammalian Nonmuscle CellsV⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Bertling, Enni; Hotulainen, Pirta; Mattila, Pieta K.; Matilainen, Tanja; Salminen, Marjo; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2004-01-01

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are highly conserved actin monomer binding proteins present in all eukaryotes. However, the mechanism by which CAPs contribute to actin dynamics has been elusive. In mammals, the situation is further complicated by the presence of two CAP isoforms whose differences have not been characterized. Here, we show that CAP1 is widely expressed in mouse nonmuscle cells, whereas CAP2 is the predominant isoform in developing striated muscles. In cultured NIH3T3 and B1...

  16. Temporal and Regional Regulation of Gene Expression by Calcium-Stimulated Adenylyl Cyclase Activity during Fear Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Lindsay Wieczorek; James W Maas; Muglia, Lisa M.; Vogt, Sherri K.; Muglia, Louis J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Ca2+-stimulated adenylyl cyclases (ACs), AC1 and AC8, are key components of long-term memory processing. AC1 and AC8 double knockout mice (Adcy1(-/-)Adcy8(-/-); DKO) display impaired fear memory processing; the mechanism of this impairment is largely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We hypothesize that the Ca2+-stimulated ACs modulate long-lasting transcriptional changes essential for fear memory consolidation and maintenance. Here, we report a genome-wide study of gen...

  17. Atrial natriuretic factor receptor guanylate cyclase, ANF-RGC, transduces two independent signals, ANF and Ca2+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa eDuda

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Atrial natriuretic factor receptor guanylate cyclase, ANF-RGC, was the first discovered member of the mammalian membrane guanylate cyclase family. The hallmark feature of the family is that a single protein contains both the site for recognition of the regulatory signal and the ability to transduce it into the production of the second messenger, cyclic GMP. For over two decades, the family has been classified into two subfamilies, the hormone receptor subfamily with ANF-RGC being its paramount member, and the Ca2+ modulated subfamily, which includes the rod outer segment guanylate cyclases, ROS-GC1 and 2, and the olfactory neuroepithelial guanylate cyclase, ONE-GC. ANF-RGC is the receptor and the signal transducer of the most hypotensive hormones, atrial natriuretic factor (ANF and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP. After binding these hormones at the extracellular domain it, at its intracellular domain, signals activation of the C-terminal catalytic module and accelerates the production of cyclic GMP. Cyclic GMP then serves the second messenger role in biological responses of ANF and BNP such as natriuresis, diuresis, vasorelaxation and anti-proliferation. Very recently another modus operandi for ANF-RGC was revealed. Its crux is that ANF-RGC activity is also regulated by Ca2+. The Ca2+ sensor neurocalcin  mediates this signaling mechanism. Strikingly, the Ca2+ and ANF signaling mechanisms employ separate structural motifs of ANF-RGC in modulating its core catalytic domain in accelerating the production of cyclic GMP. In this review the biochemistry and physiology of these mechanisms with emphasis on cardiovascular regulation will be discussed.

  18. The CD38-independent ADP-ribosyl cyclase from mouse brain synaptosomes: a comparative study of neonate and adult brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceni, Claire; Pochon, Nathalie; Villaz, Michel; Muller-Steffner, Hélène; Schuber, Francis; Baratier, Julie; De Waard, Michel; Ronjat, Michel; Moutin, Marie-Jo

    2006-04-15

    cADPR (cADP-ribose), a metabolite of NAD+, is known to modulate intracellular calcium levels and to be involved in calcium-dependent processes, including synaptic transmission, plasticity and neuronal excitability. However, the enzyme that is responsible for producing cADPR in the cytoplasm of neural cells, and particularly at the synaptic terminals of neurons, remains unknown. In the present study, we show that endogenous concentrations of cADPR are much higher in embryonic and neonate mouse brain compared with the adult tissue. We also demonstrate, by comparing wild-type and Cd38-/- tissues, that brain cADPR content is independent of the presence of CD38 (the best characterized mammalian ADP-ribosyl cyclase) not only in adult but also in developing tissues. We show that Cd38-/- synaptosome preparations contain high ADP-ribosyl cyclase activities, which are more important in neonates than in adults, in line with the levels of endogenous cyclic nucleotide. By using an HPLC method and adapting the cycling assay developed initially to study endogenous cADPR, we accurately examined the properties of the synaptosomal ADP-ribosyl cyclase. This intracellular enzyme has an estimated K(m) for NAD+ of 21 microM, a broad optimal pH at 6.0-7.0, and the concentration of free calcium has no major effect on its cADPR production. It binds NGD+ (nicotinamide-guanine dinucleotide), which inhibits its NAD+-metabolizing activities (K(i)=24 microM), despite its incapacity to cyclize this analogue. Interestingly, it is fully inhibited by low (micromolar) concentrations of zinc. We propose that this novel mammalian ADP-ribosyl cyclase regulates the production of cADPR and therefore calcium levels within brain synaptic terminals. In addition, this enzyme might be a potential target of neurotoxic Zn2+.

  19. CelR, an Ortholog of the Diguanylate Cyclase PleD of Caulobacter, Regulates Cellulose Synthesis in Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    OpenAIRE

    Barnhart, D. Michael; Su, Shengchang; Baccaro, Brenna E.; Banta, Lois M.; Farrand, Stephen K.

    2013-01-01

    Cellulose fibrils play a role in attachment of Agrobacterium tumefaciens to its plant host. While the genes for cellulose biosynthesis in the bacterium have been identified, little is known concerning the regulation of the process. The signal molecule cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) has been linked to the regulation of exopolysaccharide biosynthesis in many bacterial species, including A. tumefaciens. In this study, we identified two putative diguanylate cyclase genes, celR (atu1297) and atu1060, th...

  20. Protein-protein docking and analysis reveal that two homologous bacterial adenylyl cyclase toxins interact with calmodulin differently.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qing; Jureller, Justin E; Warren, Julia T; Solomaha, Elena; Florián, Jan; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2008-08-29

    Calmodulin (CaM), a eukaryotic calcium sensor that regulates diverse biological activities, consists of N- and C-terminal globular domains (N-CaM and C-CaM, respectively). CaM serves as the activator of CyaA, a 188-kDa adenylyl cyclase toxin secreted by Bordetella pertussis, which is the etiologic agent for whooping cough. Upon insertion of the N-terminal adenylyl cyclase domain (ACD) of CyaA to its targeted eukaryotic cells, CaM binds to this domain tightly ( approximately 200 pm affinity). This interaction activates the adenylyl cyclase activity of CyaA, leading to a rise in intracellular cAMP levels to disrupt normal cellular signaling. We recently solved the structure of CyaA-ACD in complex with C-CaM to elucidate the mechanism of catalytic activation. However, the structure of the interface between N-CaM and CyaA, the formation of which contributes a 400-fold increase of binding affinity between CyaA and CaM, remains elusive. Here, we used site-directed mutations and molecular dynamic simulations to generate several working models of CaM-bound CyaA-ACD. The validity of these models was evaluated by disulfide bond cross-linking, point mutations, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments. Our study reveals that a beta-hairpin region (amino acids 259-273) of CyaA-ACD likely makes contacts with the second calcium binding motif of the extended CaM. This mode of interaction differs from the interaction of N-CaM with anthrax edema factor, which binds N-CaM via its helical domain. Thus, two structurally conserved, bacterial adenylyl cyclase toxins have evolved to utilize distinct binding surfaces and modes of activation in their interaction with CaM, a highly conserved eukaryotic signaling protein.