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Sample records for monomeric channels mutation

  1. Disease causing mutations of calcium channels.

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    Lorenzon, Nancy M; Beam, Kurt G

    2008-01-01

    Calcium ions play an important role in the electrical excitability of nerve and muscle, as well as serving as a critical second messenger for diverse cellular functions. As a result, mutations of genes encoding calcium channels may have subtle affects on channel function yet strongly perturb cellular behavior. This review discusses the effects of calcium channel mutations on channel function, the pathological consequences for cellular physiology, and possible links between altered channel function and disease. Many cellular functions are directly or indirectly regulated by the free cytosolic calcium concentration. Thus, calcium levels must be very tightly regulated in time and space. Intracellular calcium ions are essential second messengers and play a role in many functions including, action potential generation, neurotransmitter and hormone release, muscle contraction, neurite outgrowth, synaptogenesis, calcium-dependent gene expression, synaptic plasticity and cell death. Calcium ions that control cell activity can be supplied to the cell cytosol from two major sources: the extracellular space or intracellular stores. Voltage-gated and ligand-gated channels are the primary way in which Ca(2+) ions enter from the extracellular space. The sarcoplasm reticulum (SR) in muscle and the endoplasmic reticulum in non-muscle cells are the main intracellular Ca(2+) stores: the ryanodine receptor (RyR) and inositol-triphosphate receptor channels are the major contributors of calcium release from internal stores.

  2. Rescue of mutated cardiac ion channels in inherited arrhythmia syndromes.

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    Balijepalli, Sadguna Y; Anderson, Corey L; Lin, Eric C; January, Craig T

    2010-08-01

    Inherited arrhythmia syndromes comprise an increasingly complex group of diseases involving mutations in multiple genes encoding ion channels, ion channel accessory subunits and channel interacting proteins, and various regulatory elements. These mutations serve to disrupt normal electrophysiology in the heart, leading to increased arrhythmogenic risk and death. These diseases have added impact as they often affect young people, sometimes without warning. Although originally thought to alter ion channel function, it is now increasingly recognized that mutations may alter ion channel protein and messenger RNA processing, to reduce the number of channels reaching the surface membrane. For many of these mutations, it is also known that several interventions may restore protein processing of mutant channels to increase their surface membrane expression toward normal. In this article, we reviewed inherited arrhythmia syndromes, focusing on long QT syndrome type 2, and discuss the complex biology of ion channel trafficking and pharmacological rescue of disease-causing mutant channels. Pharmacological rescue of misprocessed mutant channel proteins, or their transcripts providing appropriate small molecule drugs can be developed, has the potential for novel clinical therapies in some patients with inherited arrhythmia syndromes.

  3. Voltage-gated sodium channels: mutations, channelopathies and targets.

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    Andavan, G S B; Lemmens-Gruber, R

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels produce fast depolarization, which is responsible for the rising phase of the action potential in neurons, muscles and heart. These channels are very large membrane proteins and are encoded by ten genes in mammals. Sodium channels are a crucial component of excitable tissues; hence, they are a target for various neurotoxins that are produced by plants and animals for defence and protection, such as tetrodotoxin, scorpion toxins and batrachotoxin. Several mutations in various sodium channel subtypes cause multiple inherited diseases known as channelopathies. When these mutated sodium channel subtypes are expressed in various tissues, channelopathies in brain, skeletal muscle and cardiac muscle develop as well as neuropathic pain. In this review, we discuss aspects of voltage-gated sodium channel genes with an emphasis on cardiac muscle sodium channels. In addition, we report novel mutations that underlie a spectrum of diseases, such as Brugada, long QT syndrome and inherited conduction disorders. Furthermore, this review explains commonalities and differences among the channel subtypes, the channelopathies caused by the sodium channel gene mutation and the specificity of toxins and blockers of the channel subtypes.

  4. Sodium Channel Mutations and Pyrethroid Resistance in Aedes aegypti

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    Yuzhe Du

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Pyrethroid insecticides are widely used to control insect pests and human disease vectors. Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary targets of pyrethroid insecticides. Mutations in the sodium channel have been shown to be responsible for pyrethroid resistance, known as knockdown resistance (kdr, in various insects including mosquitoes. In Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, the principal urban vectors of dengue, zika, and yellow fever viruses, multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms in the sodium channel gene have been found in pyrethroid-resistant populations and some of them have been functionally confirmed to be responsible for kdr in an in vitro expression system, Xenopus oocytes. This mini-review aims to provide an update on the identification and functional characterization of pyrethroid resistance-associated sodium channel mutations from Aedes aegypti. The collection of kdr mutations not only helped us develop molecular markers for resistance monitoring, but also provided valuable information for computational molecular modeling of pyrethroid receptor sites on the sodium channel.

  5. Sodium Channel Mutations and Pyrethroid Resistance in Aedes aegypti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Zhorov, Boris S.; Dong, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are widely used to control insect pests and human disease vectors. Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary targets of pyrethroid insecticides. Mutations in the sodium channel have been shown to be responsible for pyrethroid resistance, known as knockdown resistance (kdr), in various insects including mosquitoes. In Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, the principal urban vectors of dengue, zika, and yellow fever viruses, multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms in the sodium channel gene have been found in pyrethroid-resistant populations and some of them have been functionally confirmed to be responsible for kdr in an in vitro expression system, Xenopus oocytes. This mini-review aims to provide an update on the identification and functional characterization of pyrethroid resistance-associated sodium channel mutations from Aedes aegypti. The collection of kdr mutations not only helped us develop molecular markers for resistance monitoring, but also provided valuable information for computational molecular modeling of pyrethroid receptor sites on the sodium channel. PMID:27809228

  6. A sodium-channel mutation causes isolated cardiac conduction disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, HL; Bink-Boelkens, MTE; Bezzina, CR; Viswanathan, PC; Beaufort-Krol, GCM; van Tintelen, PJ; van den Berg, MP; Wilde, AAM; Balser, [No Value

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac conduction disorders slow the heart rhythm and cause disability in millions of people worldwide. Inherited mutations in SCN5A, the gene encoding the human cardiac sodium (Na+) channel, have been associated with rapid heart rhythms that occur suddenly and are life-threatening(1-3); however, a

  7. Mutational consequences of aberrant ion channels in neurological disorders.

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    Kumar, Dhiraj; Ambasta, Rashmi K; Kumar, Pravir

    2014-11-01

    Neurological channelopathies are attributed to aberrant ion channels affecting CNS, PNS, cardiac, and skeletal muscles. To maintain the homeostasis of excitable tissues, functional ion channels are necessary to rely electrical signals, whereas any malfunctioning serves as an intrinsic factor to develop neurological channelopathies. Molecular basis of these disease is studied based on genetic and biophysical approaches, e.g., loci positional cloning, whereas pathogenesis and bio-behavioral analysis revealed the dependency on genetic mutations and inter-current triggering factors. Although electrophysiological studies revealed the possible mechanisms of diseases, analytical study of ion channels remained unsettled and therefore underlying mechanism in channelopathies is necessary for better clinical application. Herein, we demonstrated (i) structural and functional role of various ion channels (Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+),Cl(-)), (ii) pathophysiology involved in the onset of their associated channelopathies, and (iii) comparative sequence and phylogenetic analysis of diversified sodium, potassium, calcium, and chloride ion channel subtypes.

  8. Multiple mutations and mutation combinations in the sodium channel of permethrin resistant mosquitoes, Culex quinquefasciatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Zhang, Lee; Reid, William R.; Xu, Qiang; Dong, Ke; Liu, Nannan

    2012-10-01

    A previous study identified 3 nonsynonymous and 6 synonymous mutations in the entire mosquito sodium channel of Culex quinquefasciatus, the prevalence of which were strongly correlated with levels of resistance and increased dramatically following insecticide selection. However, it is unclear whether this is unique to this specific resistant population or is a common mechanism in field mosquito populations in response to insecticide pressure. The current study therefore further characterized these mutations and their combinations in other field and permethrin selected Culex mosquitoes, finding that the co-existence of all 9 mutations was indeed correlated with the high levels of permethrin resistance in mosquitoes. Comparison of mutation combinations revealed several common mutation combinations presented across different field and permethrin selected populations in response to high levels of insecticide resistance, demonstrating that the co-existence of multiple mutations is a common event in response to insecticide resistance across different Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquito populations.

  9. Channelopathies from Mutations in the Cardiac Sodium Channel Protein Complex

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    Adsit, Graham S.; Vaidyanathan, Ravi; Galler, Carla M.; Kyle, John W.; Makielski, Jonathan C.

    2013-01-01

    The cardiac sodium current underlies excitability in heart, and inherited abnormalities of the proteins regulating and conducting this current cause inherited arrhythmia syndromes. This review focuses on inherited mutations in non-pore forming proteins of sodium channel complexes that cause cardiac arrhythmia, and the deduced mechanisms by which they affect function and dysfunction of the cardiac sodium current. Defining the structure and function of these complexes and how they are regulated will contribute to understanding the possible roles for this complex in normal and abnormal physiology and homeostasis. PMID:23557754

  10. Channelopathies from mutations in the cardiac sodium channel protein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adsit, Graham S; Vaidyanathan, Ravi; Galler, Carla M; Kyle, John W; Makielski, Jonathan C

    2013-08-01

    The cardiac sodium current underlies excitability in heart, and inherited abnormalities of the proteins regulating and conducting this current cause inherited arrhythmia syndromes. This review focuses on inherited mutations in non-pore forming proteins of sodium channel complexes that cause cardiac arrhythmia, and the deduced mechanisms by which they affect function and dysfunction of the cardiac sodium current. Defining the structure and function of these complexes and how they are regulated will contribute to understanding the possible roles for this complex in normal and abnormal physiology and homeostasis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Na(+) Regulation in Cardiac Myocytes". Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Sodium ion channel mutations in glioblastoma patients correlate with shorter survival

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    Velculescu Victor E

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM is the most common and invasive astrocytic tumor associated with dismal prognosis. Treatment for GBM patients has advanced, but the median survival remains a meager 15 months. In a recent study, 20,000 genes from 21 GBM patients were sequenced that identified frequent mutations in ion channel genes. The goal of this study was to determine whether ion channel mutations have a role in disease progression and whether molecular targeting of ion channels is a promising therapeutic strategy for GBM patients. Therefore, we compared GBM patient survival on the basis of presence or absence of mutations in calcium, potassium and sodium ion transport genes. Cardiac glycosides, known sodium channel inhibitors, were then tested for their ability to inhibit GBM cell proliferation. Results Nearly 90% of patients showed at least one mutation in ion transport genes. GBM patients with mutations in sodium channels showed a significantly shorter survival compared to patients with no sodium channel mutations, whereas a similar comparison based on mutational status of calcium or potassium ion channel mutations showed no survival differences. Experimentally, targeting GBM cells with cardiac glycosides such as digoxin and ouabain demonstrated preferential cytotoxicity against U-87 and D54 GBM cells compared to non-tumor astrocytes (NTAs. Conclusions These pilot studies of GBM patients with sodium channel mutations indicate an association with a more aggressive disease and significantly shorter survival. Moreover, inhibition of GBM cells by ion channel inhibitors such as cardiac glycosides suggest a therapeutic strategy with relatively safe drugs for targeting GBM ion channel mutations. Key Words: glioblastoma multiforme, ion channels, mutations, small molecule inhibitors, cardiac glycosides.

  12. Mutation in S6 domain of HCN4 channel in patient with suspected Brugada syndrome modifies channel function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biel, Stephanie; Aquila, Marco; Hertel, Brigitte; Berthold, Anne; Neumann, Thomas; DiFrancesco, Dario; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard; Kauferstein, Silke

    2016-10-01

    Diseases such as the sick sinus and the Brugada syndrome are cardiac abnormalities, which can be caused by a number of genetic aberrances. Among them are mutations in HCN4, a gene, which encodes the hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel 4; this pacemaker channel is responsible for the spontaneous activity of the sinoatrial node. The present genetic screening of patients with suspected or diagnosed Brugada or sick sinus syndrome identified in 1 out of 62 samples the novel mutation V492F. It is located in a highly conserved site of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN)4 channel downstream of the filter at the start of the last transmembrane domain S6. Functional expression of mutant channels in HEK293 cells uncovered a profoundly reduced channel function but no appreciable impact on channel synthesis and trafficking compared to the wild type. The inward rectifying HCN4 current could be partially rescued by an expression of heteromeric channels comprising wt and mutant monomers. These heteromeric channels were responsive to cAMP but they required a more negative voltage for activation and they exhibited a lower current density than the wt channel. This suggests a dominant negative effect of the mutation in patients, which carry this heterozygous mutation. Such a modulation of HCN4 activity could be the cause of the diagnosed cardiac abnormality.

  13. Mutations in the Kv1.5 channel gene KCNA5 in cardiac arrest patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Nathalie H; Winkel, Bo G; Kanters, Jørgen K

    2007-01-01

    identified the point mutations P91L and E33V in the KCNA5 gene encoding the Kv1.5 potassium channel that has not previously been associated with arrhythmia. We functionally characterized the mutations in HEK293 cells. The mutated channels behaved similarly to the wild-type with respect to biophysical......Mutations in one of the ion channels shaping the cardiac action potential can lead to action potential prolongation. However, only in a minority of cardiac arrest cases mutations in the known arrhythmia-related genes can be identified. In two patients with arrhythmia and cardiac arrest, we...... characteristics and drug sensitivity. Both patients also carried a D85N polymorphism in KCNE1, which was neither found to influence the Kv1.5 nor the Kv7.1 channel activity. We conclude that although the two N-terminal Kv1.5 mutations did not show any apparent electrophysiological phenotype, it is possible...

  14. Novel chloride channel gene mutations in two unrelated Chinese families with myotonia congenita

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    Gao Feng

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Myotonia congenita (MC is a genetic disease characterized by mutations in the muscle chloride channel gene (CLCN1. To date, approximately 130 different mutations on the CLCN1 gene have been identified. However, most of the studies have focused on Caucasians, and reports on CLCN1 mutations in Chinese population are rare. This study investigated the mutation of CLCN1 in two Chinese families with MC. Direct sequencing of the CLCN1 gene revealed a heterozygous mutation (892G>A, resulting in A298T in one family and a compound heterozygous mutations (782A>G, resulting in Y261C; 1679T>C, resulting in M560T in the other family, None of the 100 normal controls had these mutations. Our findings add more to the available information on the CLCN1 mutation spectrum, and provide a valuable reference for studying the mutation types and inheritance pattern of CLCN1 in the Chinese population.

  15. What can naturally occurring mutations tell us about Cav1.x channel function?☆

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    Stockner, Thomas; Koschak, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated Ca2 + channels allow for Ca2 +-dependent intracellular signaling by directly mediating Ca2 + ion influx, by physical coupling to intracellular Ca2 + release channels or functional coupling to other ion channels such as Ca2 + activated potassium channels. L-type Ca2 + channels that comprise the family of Cav1 channels are expressed in many electrically excitable tissues and are characterized by their unique sensitivity to dihydropyridines. In this issue, we summarize genetic defects in L-type Ca2 + channels and analyze their role in human diseases (Ca2 + channelopathies); e.g. mutations in Cav1.2 α1 cause Timothy and Brugada syndrome, mutations in Cav1.3 α1 are linked to sinoatrial node dysfunction and deafness while mutations in Cav1.4 α1 are associated with X-linked retinal disorders such as an incomplete form of congenital stationary night blindness. Herein, we also put the mutations underlying the channel's dysfunction into the structural context of the pore-forming α1 subunit. This analysis highlights the importance of combining functional data with structural analysis to gain a deeper understanding for the disease pathophysiology as well as for physiological channel function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium channels. PMID:23219801

  16. The molecular mechanisms and pharmacotherapy of ATP-sensitive potassium channel gene mutations underlying neonatal diabetes

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    Veronica Lang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Veronica Lang, Peter E LightDepartment of Pharmacology and Alberta Diabetes Institute, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, School of Molecular and Systems Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, CanadaAbstract: Neonatal diabetes mellitus (NDM is a monogenic disorder caused by mutations in genes involved in regulation of insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells. Mutations in the KCNJ11 and ABCC8 genes, encoding the adenosine triphosphate (ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP channel Kir6.2 and SUR1 subunits, respectively, are found in ~50% of NDM patients. In the pancreatic β-cell, KATP channel activity couples glucose metabolism to insulin secretion via cellular excitability and mutations in either KCNJ11 or ABCC8 genes alter KATP channel activity, leading to faulty insulin secretion. Inactivation mutations decrease KATP channel activity and stimulate excessive insulin secretion, leading to hyperinsulinism of infancy. In direct contrast, activation mutations increase KATP channel activity, resulting in impaired insulin secretion, NDM, and in severe cases, developmental delay and epilepsy. Many NDM patients with KCNJ11 and ABCC8 mutations can be successfully treated with sulfonylureas (SUs that inhibit the KATP channel, thus replacing the need for daily insulin injections. There is also strong evidence indicating that SU therapy ameliorates some of the neurological defects observed in patients with more severe forms of NDM. This review focuses on the molecular and cellular mechanisms of mutations in the KATP channel that underlie NDM. SU pharmacogenomics is also discussed with respect to evaluating whether patients with certain KATP channel activation mutations can be successfully switched to SU therapy.Keywords: neonatal diabetes, KCNJ11, ABCC8, ATP-sensitive potassium channels

  17. Ultrahigh and High Resolution Structures and Mutational Analysis of Monomeric Streptococcus pyogenes SpeB Reveal a Functional Role for the Glycine-rich C-terminal Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González-Páez, Gonzalo E.; Wolan, Dennis W. (Scripps)

    2012-09-05

    Cysteine protease SpeB is secreted from Streptococcus pyogenes and has been studied as a potential virulence factor since its identification almost 70 years ago. Here, we report the crystal structures of apo mature SpeB to 1.06 {angstrom} resolution as well as complexes with the general cysteine protease inhibitor trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido(4-guanidino)butane and a novel substrate mimetic peptide inhibitor. These structures uncover conformational changes associated with maturation of SpeB from the inactive zymogen to its active form and identify the residues required for substrate binding. With the use of a newly developed fluorogenic tripeptide substrate to measure SpeB activity, we determined IC{sub 50} values for trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido(4-guanidino)butane and our new peptide inhibitor and the effects of mutations within the C-terminal active site loop. The structures and mutational analysis suggest that the conformational movements of the glycine-rich C-terminal loop are important for the recognition and recruitment of biological substrates and release of hydrolyzed products.

  18. Leaky sodium channels from voltage sensor mutations in periodic paralysis, but not paramyotonia

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    Francis, David G.; Rybalchenko, Volodymyr; Struyk, Arie

    2011-01-01

    Background: Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP) is associated with mutations in either the CaV1.1 calcium channel or the NaV1.4 sodium channel. Some NaV1.4 HypoPP mutations have been shown to cause an anomalous inward current that may contribute to the attacks of paralysis. Herein, we test whether disease-associated NaV1.4 mutations in previously untested homologous regions of the channel also give rise to the anomalous current. Methods: The functional properties of mutant NaV1.4 channels were studied with voltage-clamp techniques in an oocyte expression system. Results: The HypoPP mutation NaV1.4-R1132Q conducts an anomalous gating pore current, but the homologous R1448C mutation in paramyotonia congenita does not. Conclusions: Gating pore currents arising from missense mutations at arginine residues in the voltage sensor domains of NaV1.4 are a common feature of HypoPP mutant channels and contribute to the attacks of paralysis. PMID:21490317

  19. A double mutation in families with periodic paralysis defines new aspects of sodium channel slow inactivation

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    Bendahhou, Saïd; Cummins, Theodore R.; Hahn, Angelika F.; Langlois, Sylvie; Waxman, Stephen G.; Ptácek, Louis J.

    2000-01-01

    Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HyperKPP) is an autosomal dominant skeletal muscle disorder caused by single mutations in the SCN4A gene, encoding the human skeletal muscle voltage-gated Na+ channel. We have now identified one allele with two novel mutations occurring simultaneously in the SCN4A gene. These mutations are found in two distinct families that had symptoms of periodic paralysis and malignant hyperthermia susceptibility. The two nucleotide transitions predict phenylalanine 1490→leucine and methionine 1493→isoleucine changes located in the transmembrane segment S5 in the fourth repeat of the α-subunit Na+ channel. Surprisingly, this mutation did not affect fast inactivation parameters. The only defect produced by the double mutant (F1490L-M1493I, expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells) is an enhancement of slow inactivation, a unique behavior not seen in the 24 other disease-causing mutations. The behavior observed in these mutant channels demonstrates that manifestation of HyperKPP does not necessarily require disruption of slow inactivation. Our findings may also shed light on the molecular determinants and mechanism of Na+ channel slow inactivation and help clarify the relationship between Na+ channel defects and the long-term paralytic attacks experienced by patients with HyperKPP. PMID:10930446

  20. Can robots patch-clamp as well as humans? Characterization of a novel sodium channel mutation.

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    Estacion, M; Choi, J S; Eastman, E M; Lin, Z; Li, Y; Tyrrell, L; Yang, Y; Dib-Hajj, S D; Waxman, S G

    2010-06-01

    Ion channel missense mutations cause disorders of excitability by changing channel biophysical properties. As an increasing number of new naturally occurring mutations have been identified, and the number of other mutations produced by molecular approaches such as in situ mutagenesis has increased, the need for functional analysis by patch-clamp has become rate limiting. Here we compare a patch-clamp robot using planar-chip technology with human patch-clamp in a functional assessment of a previously undescribed Nav1.7 sodium channel mutation, S211P, which causes erythromelalgia. This robotic patch-clamp device can increase throughput (the number of cells analysed per day) by 3- to 10-fold. Both modes of analysis show that the mutation hyperpolarizes activation voltage dependence (8 mV by manual profiling, 11 mV by robotic profiling), alters steady-state fast inactivation so that it requires an additional Boltzmann function for a second fraction of total current (approximately 20% manual, approximately 40% robotic), and enhances slow inactivation (hyperpolarizing shift--15 mV by human,--13 mV robotic). Manual patch-clamping demonstrated slower deactivation and enhanced (approximately 2-fold) ramp response for the mutant channel while robotic recording did not, possibly due to increased temperature and reduced signal-to-noise ratio on the robotic platform. If robotic profiling is used to screen ion channel mutations, we recommend that each measurement or protocol be validated by initial comparison to manual recording. With this caveat, we suggest that, if results are interpreted cautiously, robotic patch-clamp can be used with supervision and subsequent confirmation from human physiologists to facilitate the initial profiling of a variety of electrophysiological parameters of ion channel mutations.

  1. Mutation in the neuronal voltage-gated sodium channel SCN1A in familial hemiplegic migraine.

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    Dichgans, Martin; Freilinger, Tobias; Eckstein, Gertrud; Babini, Elena; Lorenz-Depiereux, Bettina; Biskup, Saskia; Ferrari, Michel D; Herzog, Jürgen; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Pusch, Michael; Strom, Tim M

    Familial hemiplegic migraine is an autosomal dominant severe subtype of migraine with aura characterised by some degree of hemiparesis during the attacks. So far, mutations in two genes regulating ion translocation-CACNA1A and ATP1A2-have been identified in pedigrees with this disease. To identify additional genes for familial hemiplegic migraine, we did a genome-wide linkage analysis of two disease pedigrees without mutations in CACNA1A and ATP1A2. Ion channel genes in the candidate interval were analysed for mutations, and the functional consequences of the recorded sequence alteration were determined. We identified a novel locus for familial hemiplegic migraine on chromosome 2q24. Sequencing of candidate genes in this region revealed a heterozygous missense mutation (Gln1489Lys) in the neuronal voltage-gated sodium channel gene SCN1A, mutations of which have been associated with epilepsy. This same mutation was present in three families with familial hemiplegic migraine. It results in a charge-altering aminoacid exchange in the so-called hinged-lid domain of the protein, which is critical for fast inactivation of the channel. Whole-cell recordings in transiently transfected tsA201 cells expressing the highly homologous SCN5A sodium channel showed that the mutation induces a two-fold to four-fold accelerated recovery from fast inactivation without altering any of the other channel parameters investigated. Dysfunction of the neuronal sodium channel SCN1A can cause familial hemiplegic migraine. Our findings have implications for the understanding of migraine aura. Moreover, our study reinforces the molecular links between migraine and epilepsy, two common paroxysmal disorders.

  2. Characterization of two new dominant ClC-1 channel mutations associated with myotonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Morten; Jespersen, Thomas; Colding-Jørgensen, Eskild

    2003-01-01

    Voltage-gated ClC-1 chloride channels encoded by the CLCN1 gene have a major role in setting the membrane potential in skeletal muscle. More than 60 CLCN1 mutations have been associated with myotonia congenita. These mutations are traditionally classified as recessive (Becker's disease) or dominant...... (Thomsen's disease). In this study, we have electrophysiologically characterized two new dominant ClC-1 mutations, thereby elucidating the observed phenotype in patients. The two ClC-1 mutants M128V and E193K were identified, and the DNA was isolated from patients and subsequently expressed in Xenopus...... revealed a change in reversal potential compared to wild-type channels. This finding supports the notion that the E193 amino acid is an important determinant in the selectivity filter of the human ClC-1 channel. The electrophysiological behavior of both mutants demonstrates a severe reduction in ClC-1...

  3. Fatty acid analogue N-arachidonoyl taurine restores function of IKs channels with diverse long QT mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liin, Sara I; Larsson, Johan E; Barro-Soria, Rene

    2016-01-01

    . Finally, we find that the fatty acid analogue N-arachidonoyl taurine restores channel gating of many different mutant channels, even though the mutations are in different domains of the IKs channel and affect the channel by different molecular mechanisms. N-arachidonoyl taurine is therefore an interesting...

  4. Mutations Causing Slow-Channel Myasthenia Reveal That a Valine Ring in the Channel Pore of Muscle AChR is Optimized for Stabilizing Channel Gating.

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    Shen, Xin-Ming; Okuno, Tatsuya; Milone, Margherita; Otsuka, Kenji; Takahashi, Koji; Komaki, Hirofumi; Giles, Elizabeth; Ohno, Kinji; Engel, Andrew G

    2016-10-01

    We identify two novel mutations in acetylcholine receptor (AChR) causing a slow-channel congenital myasthenia syndrome (CMS) in three unrelated patients (Pts). Pt 1 harbors a heterozygous βV266A mutation (p.Val289Ala) in the second transmembrane domain (M2) of the AChR β subunit (CHRNB1). Pts 2 and 3 carry the same mutation at an equivalent site in the ε subunit (CHRNE), εV265A (p.Val285Ala). The mutant residues are conserved across all AChR subunits of all species and are components of a valine ring in the channel pore, which is positioned four residues above the leucine ring. Both βV266A and εV265A reduce the amino acid size and lengthen the channel opening bursts by fourfold by enhancing gating efficiency by approximately 30-fold. Substitution of alanine for valine at the corresponding position in the δ and α subunit prolongs the burst duration four- and eightfold, respectively. Replacing valine at ε codon 265 either by a still smaller glycine or by a larger leucine also lengthens the burst duration. Our analysis reveals that each valine in the valine ring contributes to channel kinetics equally, and the valine ring has been optimized in the course of evolution to govern channel gating.

  5. A novel mutation in the calcium channel gene in a family with hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

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    Hirano, Makito; Kokunai, Yosuke; Nagai, Asami; Nakamura, Yusaku; Saigoh, Kazumasa; Kusunoki, Susumu; Takahashi, Masanori P

    2011-10-15

    Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP) type 1 is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in the Ca(V)1.1 calcium channel encoded by the CACNA1S gene. Only seven mutations have been found since the discovery of the causative gene in 1994. We describe a patient with HypoPP who had a high serum potassium concentration after recovery from a recent paralysis, which complicated the correct diagnosis. This patient and other affected family members had a novel mutation, p.Arg900Gly, in the CACNA1S gene. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A sodium channel mutation identified in Aedes aegypti selectively reduces cockroach sodium channel sensitivity to type I, but not type II pyrethroids.

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    Hu, Zhaonong; Du, Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Dong, Ke

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary target of pyrethroid insecticides. Numerous point mutations in sodium channel genes have been identified in pyrethroid-resistant insect species, and many have been confirmed to reduce or abolish sensitivity of channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes to pyrethroids. Recently, several novel mutations were reported in sodium channel genes of pyrethroid-resistant Aedes mosquito populations. One of the mutations is a phenylalanine (F) to cysteine (C) change in segment 6 of domain III (IIIS6) of the Aedes mosquito sodium channel. Curiously, a previous study showed that alanine substitution of this F did not alter the action of deltamethrin, a type II pyrethroid, on a cockroach sodium channel. In this study, we changed this F to C in a pyrethroid-sensitive cockroach sodium channel and examined mutant channel sensitivity to permethrin as well as five other type I or type II pyrethroids in Xenopus oocytes. Interestingly, the F to C mutation drastically reduced channel sensitivity to three type I pyrethroids, permethrin, NRDC 157 (a deltamethrin analogue lacking the α-cyano group) and bioresemthrin, but not to three type II pyrethroids, cypermethrin, deltamethrin and cyhalothrin. These results confirm the involvement of the F to C mutation in permethrin resistance, and raise the possibility that rotation of type I and type II pyrethroids might be considered in the control of insect pest populations where this particular mutation is present.

  7. Molecular Mechanism that Leads to Development of Epilepsy by a Sodium Channel Mutation

    OpenAIRE

    Velazquez, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The number of mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.1, encoded by SCN1A, that have been associated with genetic epilepsy is extremely high compared to the other sodium channel genes. The crucial function of the voltage-gated sodium channels in the central nervous system (CNS) is to regulate the influx of sodium or sodium current into the neurons. Sodium currents are required for the generation and propagation of action potentials. Subsequently the action potentials cause the rele...

  8. Mutations in Sodium Channel Gene SCN9A and the Pain Perception Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Marković, Danica; Janković, Radmilo; Veselinović, Ines

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV) play a crucial role in development and propagation of action potentials in neurons and muscle cells. NaV1.7 channels take a special place in modern science since it is believed that they contribute to nerve hyperexcitability. Mutations of the gene SCN9A, which codes the α subunit of NaV1.7 channels, are associated with pain perception disorders (primary erythermalgia, congenital analgesia, and paroxysmal pain disorder). It is considered that the SCN9A gene ...

  9. Brugada syndrome and calcium channel mutation in a patient with congenital deaf mutism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uğur Canpolat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To the best of our knowledge, for the first time in the literature, we described a congenitally deaf-mute patient with Brugada syndrome (BrS in whom a mutation in L-type Ca+2 channel [CACNA1C (Cav1.2α1] was identified.

  10. Brugada syndrome and calcium channel mutation in a patient with congenital deaf mutism

    OpenAIRE

    Canpolat, Uğur; Coteli, Cem; Aytemir, Kudret

    2017-01-01

    To the best of our knowledge, for the first time in the literature, we described a congenitally deaf-mute patient with Brugada syndrome (BrS) in whom a mutation in L-type Ca+2 channel [CACNA1C (Cav1.2?1)] was identified.

  11. SCN9A mutations define primary erythermalgia as a neuropathic disorder of voltage gated sodium channels.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenth, J.P.H.; Morsche, R.H.M. te; Guillet, G.; Taieb, A.; Kirby, R.L.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.

    2005-01-01

    Primary erythermalgia is a rare disorder characterized by recurrent attacks of red, warm and painful hands, and/or feet. We previously localized the gene for primary erythermalgia to a 7.94 cM region on chromosome 2q. Recently, Yang et al identified two missense mutations of the sodium channel alpha

  12. Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis M1592V mutation modifies activation in human skeletal muscle Na+ channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, C V; Neely, A; Velasco-Loyden, G; Palma, V; Kukuljan, M

    1999-01-01

    Mutations in the human skeletal muscle Na+ channel underlie the autosomal dominant disease hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HPP). Muscle fibers from affected individuals exhibit sustained Na+ currents thought to depolarize the sarcolemma and thus inactivate normal Na+ channels. We expressed human wild-type or M1592V mutant alpha-subunits with the beta1-subunit in Xenopus laevis oocytes and recorded Na+ currents using two-electrode and cut-open oocyte voltage-clamp techniques. The most prominent functional difference between M1592V mutant and wild-type channels is a 5- to 10-mV shift in the hyperpolarized direction of the steady-state activation curve. The shift in the activation curve for the mutant results in a larger overlap with the inactivation curve than that observed for wild-type channels. Accordingly, the current through M1592V channels displays a larger noninactivating component than does that through wild-type channels at membrane potentials near -40 mV. The functional properties of the M1592V mutant resemble those of the previously characterized HPP T704M mutant. Both clinically similar phenotypes arise from mutations located at a distance from the putative voltage sensor of the channel.

  13. A novel LQT3 mutation implicates the human cardiac sodium channel domain IVS6 in inactivation kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewegen, WA; Bezzina, CR; van Tintelen, JP; Hoorntje, TM; Mannens, MMAM; Wilde, AAM; Jongsma, HJ; Rook, MB

    2003-01-01

    The Long QT3 syndrome is associated with mutations in the cardiac sodium channel gene SCN5A. Objective: The aim of the present study was the identification and functional characterization of a mutation in a family with the long QT3 syndrome. Methods: The human cardiac sodium channel gene SCN5A was s

  14. Myoclonus epilepsy and ataxia due to potassium channel mutation (MEAK) is caused by heterozygous KCNC1 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Fábio A; Andrade, Danielle M

    2016-09-01

    Progressive myoclonus epilepsy (PME) is a distinct group of seizure disorders characterized by gradual neurological decline with ataxia, myoclonus and recurring seizures. There are several forms of PME, among which the most recently described is MEAK - myoclonus epilepsy and ataxia due to potassium channel mutation. This particular subtype is caused by a recurrent de novo heterozygous mutation (c.959G>A, p.Arg320His) in the KCNC1 gene, which maps to chromosome 11 and encodes for the Kv3.1 protein (a subunit of the Kv3 subfamily of voltage-gated potassium channels). Loss of Kv3 function disrupts the firing properties of fast-spiking neurons, affects neurotransmitter release and induces cell death. Specifically regarding Kv3.1 malfunctioning, the most affected neurons include inhibitory GABAergic interneurons and cerebellar neurons. Impairment of the former cells is believed to contribute to myoclonus and seizures, whereas dysfunction of the latter to ataxia and tremor. Phenotypically, MEAK patients generally have a normal early development. At the age of 6 to 14 years, they present with myoclonus, which tends to progressively worsen with time. Tonic-clonic seizures may or may not be present, and some patients develop mild cognitive impairment following seizure onset. Typical electroencephalographic features comprise generalized epileptiform discharges and, in some cases, photosensitivity. Brain imaging is either normal or shows cerebellar atrophy. The identification of MEAK has both expanded the phenotypic and genotypic spectra of PME and established an emerging role for de novo mutations in PME.

  15. SCN9A mutations define primary erythermalgia as a neuropathic disorder of voltage gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drenth, Joost P H; te Morsche, Rene H M; Guillet, Gerard; Taieb, Alain; Kirby, R Lee; Jansen, Jan B M J

    2005-06-01

    Primary erythermalgia is a rare disorder characterized by recurrent attacks of red, warm and painful hands, and/or feet. We previously localized the gene for primary erythermalgia to a 7.94 cM region on chromosome 2q. Recently, Yang et al identified two missense mutations of the sodium channel alpha subunit SCN9A in patients with erythermalgia. The presence of voltage-gated sodium channels in sensory neurons is thought to play a crucial role in several chronic painful neuropathies. We examined four different families and two sporadic cases and detected missense sequence variants in SCN9A to be present in primary erythermalgia patients. A total of five of six mutations were located in highly conserved regions. One family with autosomal dominantly inherited erythermalgia was double heterozygous for two separate SCN9A mutations. These data establish primary erythermalgia as a neuropathic disorder and offers hope for treatment of this incapacitating painful disorder.

  16. Gain-of-function mutation in TASK-4 channels and severe cardiac conduction disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Corinna; Rinné, Susanne; Zumhagen, Sven; Kiper, Aytug K; Silbernagel, Nicole; Netter, Michael F; Stallmeyer, Birgit; Schulze-Bahr, Eric; Decher, Niels

    2014-07-01

    Analyzing a patient with progressive and severe cardiac conduction disorder combined with idiopathic ventricular fibrillation (IVF), we identified a splice site mutation in the sodium channel gene SCN5A. Due to the severe phenotype, we performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) and identified an additional mutation in the KCNK17 gene encoding the K2P potassium channel TASK-4. The heterozygous change (c.262G>A) resulted in the p.Gly88Arg mutation in the first extracellular pore loop. Mutant TASK-4 channels generated threefold increased currents, while surface expression was unchanged, indicating enhanced conductivity. When co-expressed with wild-type channels, the gain-of-function by G88R was conferred in a dominant-active manner. We demonstrate that KCNK17 is strongly expressed in human Purkinje cells and that overexpression of G88R leads to a hyperpolarization and strong slowing of the upstroke velocity of spontaneously beating HL-1 cells. Thus, we propose that a gain-of-function by TASK-4 in the conduction system might aggravate slowed conductivity by the loss of sodium channel function. Moreover, WES supports a second hit-hypothesis in severe arrhythmia cases and identified KCNK17 as a novel arrhythmia gene.

  17. Temperature dependence of erythromelalgia mutation L858F in sodium channel Nav1.7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rush Anthony M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The disabling chronic pain syndrome erythromelalgia (also termed erythermalgia is characterized by attacks of burning pain in the extremities induced by warmth. Pharmacological treatment is often ineffective, but the pain can be alleviated by cooling of the limbs. Inherited erythromelalgia has recently been linked to mutations in the gene SCN9A, which encodes the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7. Nav1.7 is preferentially expressed in most nociceptive DRG neurons and in sympathetic ganglion neurons. It has recently been shown that several disease-causing erythromelalgia mutations alter channel-gating behavior in a manner that increases DRG neuron excitability. Results Here we tested the effects of temperature on gating properties of wild type Nav1.7 and mutant L858F channels. Whole-cell voltage-clamp measurements on wild type or L858F channels expressed in HEK293 cells revealed that cooling decreases current density, slows deactivation and increases ramp currents for both mutant and wild type channels. However, cooling differentially shifts the midpoint of steady-state activation in a depolarizing direction for L858F but not for wild type channels. Conclusion The cooling-dependent shift of the activation midpoint of L858F to more positive potentials brings the threshold of activation of the mutant channels closer to that of wild type Nav1.7 at lower temperatures, and is likely to contribute to the alleviation of painful symptoms upon cooling in affected limbs in patients with this erythromelalgia mutation.

  18. The effects of Tmc1 Beethoven mutation on mechanotransducer channel function in cochlear hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beurg, Maryline; Goldring, Adam C; Fettiplace, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Sound stimuli are converted into electrical signals via gating of mechano-electrical transducer (MT) channels in the hair cell stereociliary bundle. The molecular composition of the MT channel is still not fully established, although transmembrane channel-like protein isoform 1 (TMC1) may be one component. We found that in outer hair cells of Beethoven mice containing a M412K point mutation in TMC1, MT channels had a similar unitary conductance to that of wild-type channels but a reduced selectivity for Ca(2+). The Ca(2+)-dependent adaptation that adjusts the operating range of the channel was also impaired in Beethoven mutants, with reduced shifts in the relationship between MT current and hair bundle displacement for adapting steps or after lowering extracellular Ca(2+); these effects may be attributed to the channel's reduced Ca(2+) permeability. Moreover, the density of stereociliary CaATPase pumps for Ca(2+) extrusion was decreased in the mutant. The results suggest that a major component of channel adaptation is regulated by changes in intracellular Ca(2+). Consistent with this idea, the adaptive shift in the current-displacement relationship when hair bundles were bathed in endolymph-like Ca(2+) saline was usually abolished by raising the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration.

  19. Mutations of the S4-S5 linker alter activation properties of HERG potassium channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanguinetti, M C; Xu, Q P

    1999-02-01

    1. The structural basis for the activation gate of voltage-dependent K+ channels is not known, but indirect evidence has implicated the S4-S5 linker, the cytoplasmic region between the fourth and fifth transmembrane domains of the channel subunit. We have studied the effects of mutations in the S4-S5 linker of HERG (human ether-á-go-go-related gene), a human delayed rectifier K+ channel, in Xenopus oocytes. 2. Mutation of acidic residues (D540, E544) in the S4-S5 linker of HERG channels to neutral (Ala) or basic (Lys) residues accelerated the rate of channel deactivation. Most mutations greatly accelerated the rate of activation. However, E544K HERG channels activated more slowly than wild-type HERG channels. 3. Mutation of residues in the S4-S5 linker had little or no effect on fast inactivation, consistent with independence of HERG channel activation and inactivation 4. In response to large hyperpolarizations, D540K HERG channels can reopen into a state that is distinct from the normal depolarization-induced open state. It is proposed that substitution of a negatively charged Asp with the positively charged Lys disrupts a subunit interaction that normally stabilizes the channel in a closed state at negative transmembrane potentials. 5. The results indicate that the S4-S5 linker is a crucial component of the activation gate of HERG channels.

  20. Activating Mutations of the TRPML1 Channel Revealed by Proline-scanning Mutagenesis*

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    The mucolipin TRP (TRPML) proteins are a family of endolysosomal cation channels with genetically established importance in humans and rodent. Mutations of human TRPML1 cause type IV mucolipidosis, a devastating pediatric neurodegenerative disease. Our recent electrophysiological studies revealed that, although a TRPML1-mediated current can only be recorded in late endosome and lysosome (LEL) using the lysosome patch clamp technique, a proline substitution in TRPML1 (TRPML1V432P) results in a...

  1. Characterizations of a loss-of-function mutation in the Kir3.4 channel subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calloe, Kirstine; Ravn, Lasse Steen; Schmitt, Nicole

    2007-01-01

    Kir3.4 and Kir3.1 potassium channel subunits mediate the acetylcholine induced inwardly rectifying current I(KACh) in the heart. We found a glycine to arginine substitution in codon 247 of Kir3.4 in a patient with a single episode of atrial fibrillation (AF). Expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes ...... the lack of clear clinical manifestations and further studies are necessary to elucidate if mutations in Kir3.4 are predisposing AF. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Dec-28...

  2. A novel mutation in the sodium channel α1 subunit gene in a child with Dravet syndrome in Turkey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mutluay Arslan; Ulu(c) Yi(s); Hande (C)a(g)layan; R1dvan Akin

    2013-01-01

    Dravet syndrome is a rare epileptic encephalopathy characterized by frequent seizures beginning in the first year of life and behavioral disorders. Mutations in the sodium channel α1 subunit gene are the main cause of this disease. We report two patients with refractory seizures and psychomotor retardation in whom the final diagnosis was Dravet syndrome with confirmed mutations in the sodium channel α1 subunit gene. The mutation identified in the second patient was a novel frame shift mutation, which resulted from the deletion of five nucleotides in exon 24.

  3. Effects of local anesthetics on Na+ channels containing the equine hyperkalemic periodic paralysis mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, R L; Tsushima, R G; Backx, P H

    1998-08-01

    We examined the ability of local anesthetics to correct altered inactivation properties of rat skeletal muscle Na+ channels containing the equine hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (eqHPP) mutation when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Increased time constants of current decay in eqHPP channels compared with wild-type channels were restored by 1 mM benzocaine but were not altered by lidocaine or mexiletine. Inactivation curves, which were determined by measuring the dependence of the relative peak current amplitude after depolarization to -10 mV on conditioning prepulse voltages, could be shifted in eqHPP channels back toward that observed for wild-type (WT) channels using selected concentrations of benzocaine, lidocaine, and mexiletine. Recovery from inactivation at -80 mV (50-ms conditioning pulse) in eqHPP channels followed a monoexponential time course and was markedly accelerated compared with wild-type channels (tauWT = 10.8 +/- 0.9 ms; taueqHPP = 2.9 +/- 0.4 ms). Benzocaine slowed the time course of recovery (taueqHPP,ben = 9.6 +/- 0.4 ms at 1 mM) in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, the recovery from inactivation with lidocaine and mexiletine had a fast component (taufast,lid = 3.2 +/- 0.2 ms; taufast,mex = 3.1 +/- 0.2 ms), which was identical to the recovery in eqHPP channels without drug, and a slow component (tauslow,lid = 1,688 +/- 180 ms; tauslow,mex = 2,323 +/- 328 ms). The time constant of the slow component of the recovery from inactivation was independent of the drug concentration, whereas the fraction of current recovering slowly depended on drug concentrations and conditioning pulse durations. Our results show that local anesthetics are generally incapable of fully restoring normal WT behavior in inactivation-deficient eqHPP channels.

  4. Hallmarks of the channelopathies associated with L-type calcium channels: a focus on the Timothy mutations in Ca(v)1.2 channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidaud, Isabelle; Lory, Philippe

    2011-12-01

    Within the voltage-gated calcium channels (Cav channels) family, there are four genes coding for the L-type Cav channels (Cav1). The Cav1 channels underly many important physiological functions like excitation-contraction coupling, hormone secretion, neuronal excitability and gene transcription. Mutations found in the genes encoding the Cav channels define a wide variety of diseases called calcium channelopathies and all four genes coding the Cav1 channels are carrying such mutations. L-type calcium channelopathies include muscular, neurological, cardiac and vision syndromes. Among them, the Timothy syndrome (TS) is linked to missense mutations in CACNA1C, the gene that encodes the Ca(v)1.2 subunit. Here we review the important features of the Cav1 channelopathies. We also report on the specific properties of TS-Ca(v)1.2 channels, which display non-inactivating calcium current as well as higher plasma membrane expression. Overall, we conclude that both electrophysiological and surface expression properties must be investigated to better account for the functional consequences of mutations linked to calcium channelopathies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Molecular Pathogenesis of Achromatopsia Associated with Mutations in the Cone Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channel CNGA3 Subunit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xi-Qin; Fitzgerald, J. Browning; Quiambao, Alexander B.; Harry, Cynthia S.; Malykhina, Anna P.

    2012-01-01

    Cone photoreceptor cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel is essential for central and color vision and visual acuity. Mutations in the cone channel subunits CNGA3 and CNGB3 are linked to achromatopsia and progressive cone dystrophy in humans. Over 50 mutations have been identified in the CNGA3 subunit. The R277C and R283W substitutions are among the most frequently occurring mutations. This study investigated the defects of these two mutations using a heterologous expression system. The wild type and mutant CNGA3 were expressed in HEK293 cells, the channel’s expression and cellular localization were examined by immunoblotting and immunofluorecences labeling, and activity of the channel was evaluated by ratiometric [Ca2+]i measurements and by electrophysiological recordings. By using this model system we observed dysfunction of the mutant channels. Co-expression of the mutant channel with the wild type subunit did not affect the wild type channel’s activity. Immunoflurescence labeling showed apparent cytosol aggregation of the immunoreactivity in cells expressing the mutants. Thus these disease-causing mutations appear to induce loss of function by impairing the channel cellular trafficking and plasma membrane targeting. Therapeutic supplementation of the wild type transgene may help correct the visual disorders caused by these two mutations. PMID:20238023

  6. Mutations in sodium channel {beta}-subunit SCN3B are associated with early-onset lone atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Morten Salling; Jespersen, Thomas; Nielsen, Jonas Bille

    2011-01-01

    across species. Electrophysiological studies on the SCN3B mutation were carried out and all three SCN3B mutations caused a functionally reduced sodium channel current. One synonymous variant was found in SCN4B. CONCLUSION: In 192 young lone AF patients, we found three patients with suspected disease...

  7. Mutations in sodium channel {beta}-subunit SCN3B are associated with early-onset lone atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Morten Salling; Jespersen, Thomas; Nielsen, Jonas Bille

    2011-01-01

    across species. Electrophysiological studies on the SCN3B mutation were carried out and all three SCN3B mutations caused a functionally reduced sodium channel current. One synonymous variant was found in SCN4B. CONCLUSION: In 192 young lone AF patients, we found three patients with suspected disease...

  8. Hlf is a genetic modifier of epilepsy caused by voltage-gated sodium channel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Nicole A; Kearney, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in voltage-gated sodium channel genes cause several types of human epilepsies. Often, individuals with the same sodium channel mutation exhibit diverse phenotypes. This suggests that factors beyond the primary mutation influence disease severity, including genetic modifiers. Mouse epilepsy models with voltage-gated sodium channel mutations exhibit strain-dependent phenotype variability, supporting a contribution of genetic modifiers in epilepsy. The Scn2a(Q54) (Q54) mouse model has a strain-dependent epilepsy phenotype. Q54 mice on the C57BL/6J (B6) strain exhibit delayed seizure onset and improved survival compared to [B6xSJL/J]F1.Q54 mice. We previously mapped two dominant modifier loci that influence Q54 seizure susceptibility and identified Hlf (hepatic leukemia factor) as a candidate modifier gene at one locus. Hlf and other PAR bZIP transcription factors had previously been associated with spontaneous seizures in mice thought to be caused by down-regulation of the pyridoxine pathway. An Hlf targeted knockout mouse model was used to evaluate the effect of Hlf deletion on Q54 phenotype severity. Hlf(KO/KO);Q54 double mutant mice exhibited elevated frequency and reduced survival compared to Q54 controls. To determine if direct modulation of the pyridoxine pathway could alter the Q54 phenotype, mice were maintained on a pyridoxine-deficient diet for 6 weeks. Dietary pyridoxine deficiency resulted in elevated seizure frequency and decreased survival in Q54 mice compared to control diet. To determine if Hlf could modify other epilepsies, Hlf(KO/+) mice were crossed with the Scn1a(KO/+) Dravet syndrome mouse model to examine the effect on premature lethality. Hlf(KO/+);Scn1a(KO/+) offspring exhibited decreased survival compared to Scn1a(KO/+) controls. Together these results demonstrate that Hlf is a genetic modifier of epilepsy caused by voltage-gated sodium channel mutations and that modulation of the pyridoxine pathway can also influence phenotype

  9. Activating mutations of the TRPML1 channel revealed by proline-scanning mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xian-ping; Wang, Xiang; Shen, Dongbiao; Chen, Su; Liu, Meiling; Wang, Yanbin; Mills, Eric; Cheng, Xiping; Delling, Markus; Xu, Haoxing

    2009-11-13

    The mucolipin TRP (TRPML) proteins are a family of endolysosomal cation channels with genetically established importance in humans and rodent. Mutations of human TRPML1 cause type IV mucolipidosis, a devastating pediatric neurodegenerative disease. Our recent electrophysiological studies revealed that, although a TRPML1-mediated current can only be recorded in late endosome and lysosome (LEL) using the lysosome patch clamp technique, a proline substitution in TRPML1 (TRPML1(V432P)) results in a large whole cell current. Thus, it remains unknown whether the large TRPML1(V432P)-mediated current results from an increased surface expression (trafficking), elevated channel activity (gating), or both. Here we performed systemic Pro substitutions in a region previously implicated in the gating of various 6 transmembrane cation channels. We found that several Pro substitutions displayed gain-of-function (GOF) constitutive activities at both the plasma membrane (PM) and endolysosomal membranes. Although wild-type TRPML1 and non-GOF Pro substitutions localized exclusively in LEL and were barely detectable in the PM, the GOF mutations with high constitutive activities were not restricted to LEL compartments, and most significantly, exhibited significant surface expression. Because lysosomal exocytosis is Ca(2+)-dependent, constitutive Ca(2+) permeability due to Pro substitutions may have resulted in stimulus-independent intralysosomal Ca(2+) release, hence the surface expression and whole cell current of TRPML1. Indeed, surface staining of lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (Lamp-1) was dramatically increased in cells expressing GOF TRPML1 channels. We conclude that TRPML1 is an inwardly rectifying, proton-impermeable, Ca(2+) and Fe(2+)/Mn(2+) dually permeable cation channel that may be gated by unidentified cellular mechanisms through a conformational change in the cytoplasmic face of the transmembrane 5 (TM5). Furthermore, activation of TRPML1 in LEL may lead to the

  10. Pore mutations of the Escherichia coli MscS channel affect desensitization but not ionic preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Michelle D; Bartlett, Wendy; Booth, Ian R

    2008-04-15

    Mechanosensitive channels rescue bacterial cells from a fate of lysis when they transfer from a high- to low-osmolarity environment. Of three Escherichia coli mechanosensitive proteins studied to date, only MscS-Ec demonstrates a small anionic preference and a desensitized, nonconducting state under sustained pressure. Little is known about the mechanisms generating these distinctive properties. Eliminating the sole positive charge in the MscS-Ec pore region (Arg(88)) did not alter anionic preference. Adding positive charges at either end of the pore did not augment anionic preference, and placing negative charges within the pore did not diminish it. Thus, pore charges do not control this characteristic. However, from this analysis we identified mutations in the hinge region of the MscS-Ec pore helix (at Gly(113)) that profoundly affected ability of the channel to desensitize. Substitution with nonpolar (Ala, Pro) or polar (Asp, Arg, Ser) residues inhibited transition to the desensitized state. Interestingly, Gly(113) replaced with Met did not impede desensitization. Thus, although Gly is not specifically required at position 113, MscS desensitization is strongly influenced by the residue situated here. Mutations at residues further into the pore also regulated desensitization. Transition to this unique mechanosensitive channel state is discussed in terms of existing data.

  11. Mutations in Potassium Channel Kir2.6 Cause Susceptibility to Thyrotoxic Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Devon P.; da Silva, Magnus R. Dias; Soong, Tuck Wah; Fontaine, Bertrand; Donaldson, Matt R.; Kung, Annie W.C.; Jongjaroenprasert, Wallaya; Liang, Mui Cheng; Khoo, Daphne H.C.; Cheah, Jin Seng; Ho, Su Chin; Bernstein, Harold S.; Macie, Rui M.B.; Brown, Robert H.; Ptáčcek, Louis J.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis (TPP) is characterized by acute attacks of weakness, hypokalemia, and thyrotoxicosis of various etiologies. These transient attacks resemble those of patients with familial hypokalemic periodic paralysis (hypoKPP) and resolve with treatment of the underlying hyperthyroidism. Because of the phenotypic similarity of these conditions, we hypothesized that TPP might also be a channelopathy. While sequencing candidate genes, we identified a previously unreported gene (not present in human sequence databases) that encodes an inwardly rectifying potassium (Kir) channel, Kir2.6. This channel, nearly identical to Kir2.2, is expressed in skeletal muscle and is transcriptionally regulated by thyroid hormone. Expression of Kir2.6 in mammalian cells revealed normal Kir currents in whole-cell and single-channel recordings. Kir2.6 mutations were present in up to 33% of the unrelated TPP patients in our collection. Some of these mutations clearly alter a variety of Kir2.6 properties, all altering muscle membrane excitability leading to paralysis. PMID:20074522

  12. Mutations in potassium channel Kir2.6 cause susceptibility to thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Devon P; da Silva, Magnus R Dias; Soong, Tuck Wah; Fontaine, Bertrand; Donaldson, Matt R; Kung, Annie W C; Jongjaroenprasert, Wallaya; Liang, Mui Cheng; Khoo, Daphne H C; Cheah, Jin Seng; Ho, Su Chin; Bernstein, Harold S; Maciel, Rui M B; Brown, Robert H; Ptácek, Louis J

    2010-01-08

    Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis (TPP) is characterized by acute attacks of weakness, hypokalemia, and thyrotoxicosis of various etiologies. These transient attacks resemble those of patients with familial hypokalemic periodic paralysis (hypoKPP) and resolve with treatment of the underlying hyperthyroidism. Because of the phenotypic similarity of these conditions, we hypothesized that TPP might also be a channelopathy. While sequencing candidate genes, we identified a previously unreported gene (not present in human sequence databases) that encodes an inwardly rectifying potassium (Kir) channel, Kir2.6. This channel, nearly identical to Kir2.2, is expressed in skeletal muscle and is transcriptionally regulated by thyroid hormone. Expression of Kir2.6 in mammalian cells revealed normal Kir currents in whole-cell and single-channel recordings. Kir2.6 mutations were present in up to 33% of the unrelated TPP patients in our collection. Some of these mutations clearly alter a variety of Kir2.6 properties, all altering muscle membrane excitability leading to paralysis.

  13. Functional effects of spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 mutations are conserved in zebrafish Kv3.3 channels

    OpenAIRE

    Mock Allan F; Richardson Jessica L; Hsieh Jui-Yi; Rinetti Gina; Papazian Diane M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The zebrafish has been suggested as a model system for studying human diseases that affect nervous system function and motor output. However, few of the ion channels that control neuronal activity in zebrafish have been characterized. Here, we have identified zebrafish orthologs of voltage-dependent Kv3 (KCNC) K+ channels. Kv3 channels have specialized gating properties that facilitate high-frequency, repetitive firing in fast-spiking neurons. Mutations in human Kv3.3 caus...

  14. Malignant hyperthermia-like reaction in a family with a sodium channel mutation at residue 1306

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vita, G.M.; Jedlicka, A.E.; Levitt, R.C. [Johns Hopkins Medical Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS) is an autosomal dominant, hypermetabolic disorder, triggered by potent inhalational anesthetics. We have previously suggeste the skeletal muscle sodium channel {alpha}-subunit (SCN4A) as a gene candidate to explain some forms of MHS. To evaluate this gene for mutations that might lead to a MHS-like episode, we amplified genomic DNA by PCR and used SSCP to screen each exon. We studied multiple MHS families which may be linked to this gene. The proband and a sibling from one of these families suspected of having MHS experienced trismus and body rigidity after induction of anesthesia. The caffiene and halothane contracture test proved diagnostic in these individuals and EMG studies suggested a form of myotomia. A mutation co-segregating with the myotonia/MHS phenotype was found in the region of exon 22.

  15. Beyond the Electrocardiogram: Mutations in Cardiac Ion Channel Genes Underlie Nonarrhythmic Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M Roston

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac ion channelopathies are an important cause of sudden death in the young and include long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, idiopathic ventricular fibrillation, and short QT syndrome. Genes that encode ion channels have been implicated in all of these conditions, leading to the widespread implementation of genetic testing for suspected channelopathies. Over the past half-century, researchers have also identified systemic pathologies that extend beyond the arrhythmic phenotype in patients with ion channel gene mutations, including deafness, epilepsy, cardiomyopathy, periodic paralysis, and congenital heart disease. A coexisting phenotype, such as cardiomyopathy, can influence evaluation and management. However, prior to recent molecular advances, our understanding and recognition of these overlapping phenotypes were poor. This review highlights the systemic and structural heart manifestations of the cardiac ion channelopathies, including their phenotypic spectrum and molecular basis.

  16. Mutations at the signature sequence of CFTR create a Cd(2+)-gated chloride channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohui; Bompadre, Silvia G; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2009-01-01

    The canonical sequence LSGGQ, also known as the signature sequence, defines the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporter superfamily. Crystallographic studies reveal that the signature sequence, together with the Walker A and Walker B motifs, forms the ATP-binding pocket upon dimerization of the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) in a head-to-tail configuration. The importance of the signature sequence is attested by the fact that a glycine to aspartate mutation (i.e., G551D) in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) results in a severe phenotype of cystic fibrosis. We previously showed that the G551D mutation completely eliminates ATP-dependent gating of the CFTR chloride channel. Here, we report that micromolar [Cd(2+)] can dramatically increase the activity of G551D-CFTR in the absence of ATP. This effect of Cd(2+) is not seen in wild-type channels or in G551A. Pretreatment of G551D-CFTR with the cysteine modification reagent 2-aminoethyl methane thiosulfonate hydrobromide protects the channel from Cd(2+) activation, suggesting an involvement of endogenous cysteine residue(s) in mediating this effect of Cd(2+). The mutants G551C, L548C, and S549C, all in the signature sequence of CFTR's NBD1, show robust response to Cd(2+). On the other hand, negligible effects of Cd(2+) were seen with T547C, Q552C, and R553C, indicating that a specific region of the signature sequence is involved in transmitting the signal of Cd(2+) binding to the gate. Collectively, these results suggest that the effect of Cd(2+) is mediated by a metal bridge formation between yet to be identified cysteine residue(s) and the engineered aspartate or cysteine in the signature sequence. We propose that the signature sequence serves as a switch that transduces the signal of ligand binding to the channel gate.

  17. Rare mutations of CACNB2 found in autism spectrum disease-affected families alter calcium channel function.

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    Alexandra F S Breitenkamp

    Full Text Available Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD are complex neurodevelopmental diseases clinically defined by dysfunction of social interaction. Dysregulation of cellular calcium homeostasis might be involved in ASD pathogenesis, and genes coding for the L-type calcium channel subunits CaV1.2 (CACNA1C and CaVβ2 (CACNB2 were recently identified as risk loci for psychiatric diseases. Here, we present three rare missense mutations of CACNB2 (G167S, S197F, and F240L found in ASD-affected families, two of them described here for the first time (G167S and F240L. All these mutations affect highly conserved regions while being absent in a sample of ethnically matched controls. We suggest the mutations to be of physiological relevance since they modulate whole-cell Ba2+ currents through calcium channels when expressed in a recombinant system (HEK-293 cells. Two mutations displayed significantly decelerated time-dependent inactivation as well as increased sensitivity of voltage-dependent inactivation. In contrast, the third mutation (F240L showed significantly accelerated time-dependent inactivation. By altering the kinetic parameters, the mutations are reminiscent of the CACNA1C mutation causing Timothy Syndrome, a Mendelian disease presenting with ASD. In conclusion, the results of our first-time biophysical characterization of these three rare CACNB2 missense mutations identified in ASD patients support the hypothesis that calcium channel dysfunction may contribute to autism.

  18. A Korean Family of Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis with Mutation in a Voltage-gated Calcium Channel (R1239G)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, June-Bum; Lee, Kyung-Yil

    2005-01-01

    Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HOPP) is a rare disease characterized by reversible attacks of muscle weakness accompanied by episodic hypokalemia. Recent molecular work has revealed that the majority of familial HOPP is due to mutations in a skeletal muscle voltage-dependent calcium-channel: the dihydropyridine receptor. We report a 13-yr old boy with HOPP from a family in which 6 members are affected in three generations. Genetic examination identified a nucleotide 3705 C to G mutation in exon 30 of the calcium channel gene, CACNA1S. This mutation predicts a codon change from arginine to glycine at the amino acid position #1239 (R1239G). Among the three known mutations of the CACNA1S gene, the R1239G mutation was rarely reported. This boy and the other family members who did not respond to acetazolamide, showed a marked improvement of the paralytic symptoms after spironolactone treatment. PMID:15716625

  19. Mutations in voltage-gated potassium channel KCNC3 cause degenerative and developmental central nervous system phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Michael F; Minassian, Natali A; Stevanin, Giovanni; Figueroa, Karla P; Bannister, John P A; Nolte, Dagmar; Mock, Allan F; Evidente, Virgilio Gerald H; Fee, Dominic B; Müller, Ulrich; Dürr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Papazian, Diane M; Pulst, Stefan M

    2006-04-01

    Potassium channel mutations have been described in episodic neurological diseases. We report that K+ channel mutations cause disease phenotypes with neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative features. In a Filipino adult-onset ataxia pedigree, the causative gene maps to 19q13, overlapping the SCA13 disease locus described in a French pedigree with childhood-onset ataxia and cognitive delay. This region contains KCNC3 (also known as Kv3.3), encoding a voltage-gated Shaw channel with enriched cerebellar expression. Sequencing revealed two missense mutations, both of which alter KCNC3 function in Xenopus laevis expression systems. KCNC3(R420H), located in the voltage-sensing domain, had no channel activity when expressed alone and had a dominant-negative effect when co-expressed with the wild-type channel. KCNC3(F448L) shifted the activation curve in the negative direction and slowed channel closing. Thus, KCNC3(R420H) and KCNC3(F448L) are expected to change the output characteristics of fast-spiking cerebellar neurons, in which KCNC channels confer capacity for high-frequency firing. Our results establish a role for KCNC3 in phenotypes ranging from developmental disorders to adult-onset neurodegeneration and suggest voltage-gated K+ channels as candidates for additional neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Mutation analysis of potassium channel genes KCNQ1 and KCNH2 in patients with long QT syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘文玲; 胡大一; 李翠兰; 李萍; 李运田; 李志明; 李蕾; 秦绪光; 董玮; 戚豫; 陈胜寒; 王擎

    2003-01-01

    Objective To determine mutations of two common potassium channel subunit genes KCNQ1, KCNH2 causing long QT syndrome (LQTS) in the Chinese.Methods Thirty-one Chinese LQTS pedigrees were characterized for mutations in the two LQTS genes, KCNQ1 and KCNH2, by sequencing.Results Two novel KCNQ1 mutations, S277L in the S5 domain and G306V in the channel pore, and two novel KCNH2 mutations, L413P in the transmembrane domain S1 and L559H in the transmembrane domain S5 were identified. The triggering factors for cardiac events developed in these mutation carriers included physical exercise and excitation. Mutation L413P in KCNH2 was associated with the notched T wave on ECGs. Mutation L559H in KCNH2 was associated with the typical bifid T wave on ECGs. Mutation S277L in KCNQ1 was associated with a high-amplitude T wave and G306V was associated with a low-amplitude T wave. Two likely polymorphisms, IVS11+18C>T in KCNQ1 and L520V in KCNH2 were also identified in two LQTS patients.Conclusions The mutation rates for both KCNQ1 (6.4%) and KCNH2 (6.4%) are lower in the Chinese population than those from North America or Europe.

  1. Myotonia congenita-associated mutations in chloride channel-1 affect zebrafish body wave swimming kinematics.

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    Wei Cheng

    Full Text Available Myotonia congenita is a human muscle disorder caused by mutations in CLCN1, which encodes human chloride channel 1 (CLCN1. Zebrafish is becoming an increasingly useful model for human diseases, including muscle disorders. In this study, we generated transgenic zebrafish expressing, under the control of a muscle specific promoter, human CLCN1 carrying mutations that have been identified in human patients suffering from myotonia congenita. We developed video analytic tools that are able to provide precise quantitative measurements of movement abnormalities in order to analyse the effect of these CLCN1 mutations on adult transgenic zebrafish swimming. Two new parameters for body-wave kinematics of swimming reveal changes in body curvature and tail offset in transgenic zebrafish expressing the disease-associated CLCN1 mutants, presumably due to their effect on muscle function. The capability of the developed video analytic tool to distinguish wild-type from transgenic zebrafish could provide a useful asset to screen for compounds that reverse the disease phenotype, and may be applicable to other movement disorders besides myotonia congenita.

  2. Myotonia Congenita-Associated Mutations in Chloride Channel-1 Affect Zebrafish Body Wave Swimming Kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wei; Tian, Jing; Burgunder, Jean-Marc; Hunziker, Walter; Eng, How-Lung

    2014-01-01

    Myotonia congenita is a human muscle disorder caused by mutations in CLCN1, which encodes human chloride channel 1 (CLCN1). Zebrafish is becoming an increasingly useful model for human diseases, including muscle disorders. In this study, we generated transgenic zebrafish expressing, under the control of a muscle specific promoter, human CLCN1 carrying mutations that have been identified in human patients suffering from myotonia congenita. We developed video analytic tools that are able to provide precise quantitative measurements of movement abnormalities in order to analyse the effect of these CLCN1 mutations on adult transgenic zebrafish swimming. Two new parameters for body-wave kinematics of swimming reveal changes in body curvature and tail offset in transgenic zebrafish expressing the disease-associated CLCN1 mutants, presumably due to their effect on muscle function. The capability of the developed video analytic tool to distinguish wild-type from transgenic zebrafish could provide a useful asset to screen for compounds that reverse the disease phenotype, and may be applicable to other movement disorders besides myotonia congenita. PMID:25083883

  3. Mutations in SCN9A, encoding a sodium channel alpha subunit, in patients with primary erythermalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Wang, Y; Li, S; Xu, Z; Li, H; Ma, L; Fan, J; Bu, D; Liu, B; Fan, Z; Wu, G; Jin, J; Ding, B; Zhu, X; Shen, Y

    2004-03-01

    Primary erythermalgia is a rare autosomal dominant disease characterised by intermittent burning pain with redness and heat in the extremities. A previous study established the linkage of primary erythermalgia to a 7.94 cM interval on chromosome 2q, but the causative gene was not identified. We performed linkage analysis in a Chinese family with primary erythermalgia, and screened the mutations in the two candidate genes, SCN9A and GCA, in the family and a sporadic patient. Linkage analysis yielded a maximum lod score of 2.11 for both markers D2S2370 and D2S2330. Based on critical recombination events in two patients in the family, we further limited the genetic region to 5.98 cM between D2S2370 and D2S2345. We then identified two missense mutations in SCN9A in the family (T2573A) and the sporadic patient (T2543C). Our data suggest that mutations in SCN9A cause primary erythermalgia. SCN9A, encoding a voltage-gated sodium channel alpha subunit predominantly expressed in sensory and sympathetic neurones, may play an important role in nociception and vasomotor regulation.

  4. Distinct functional defect of three novel Brugada syndrome related cardiac sodium channel mutations

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    Juang Jyh-Ming

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Brugada syndrome is characterized by ST segment elevation in the right precodial leads V1-V3 on surface ECG accompanied by episodes of ventricular fibrillation causing syncope or even sudden death. The molecular and cellular mechanisms that lead to Brugada syndrome are not yet completely understood. However, SCN5A is the most well known responsible gene that causes Brugada syndrome. Until now, more than a hundred mutations in SCN5A responsible for Brugada syndrome have been described. Functional studies of some of the mutations have been performed and show that a reduction of human cardiac sodium current accounts for the pathogenesis of Brugada syndrome. Here we reported three novel SCN5A mutations identified in patients with Brugada syndrome in Taiwan (p.I848fs, p.R965C, and p.1876insM. Their electrophysiological properties were altered by patch clamp analysis. The p.I848fs mutant generated no sodium current. The p.R965C and p.1876insM mutants produced channels with steady state inactivation shifted to a more negative potential (9.4 mV and 8.5 mV respectively, and slower recovery from inactivation. Besides, the steady state activation of p.1876insM was altered and was shifted to a more positive potential (7.69 mV. In conclusion, the SCN5A channel defect related to Brugada syndrome might be diverse but all resulted in a decrease of sodium current.

  5. Functional effects of spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 mutations are conserved in zebrafish Kv3.3 channels

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    Mock Allan F

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The zebrafish has been suggested as a model system for studying human diseases that affect nervous system function and motor output. However, few of the ion channels that control neuronal activity in zebrafish have been characterized. Here, we have identified zebrafish orthologs of voltage-dependent Kv3 (KCNC K+ channels. Kv3 channels have specialized gating properties that facilitate high-frequency, repetitive firing in fast-spiking neurons. Mutations in human Kv3.3 cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 (SCA13, an autosomal dominant genetic disease that exists in distinct neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative forms. To assess the potential usefulness of the zebrafish as a model system for SCA13, we have characterized the functional properties of zebrafish Kv3.3 channels with and without mutations analogous to those that cause SCA13. Results The zebrafish genome (release Zv8 contains six Kv3 family members including two Kv3.1 genes (kcnc1a and kcnc1b, one Kv3.2 gene (kcnc2, two Kv3.3 genes (kcnc3a and kcnc3b, and one Kv3.4 gene (kcnc4. Both Kv3.3 genes are expressed during early development. Zebrafish Kv3.3 channels exhibit strong functional and structural homology with mammalian Kv3.3 channels. Zebrafish Kv3.3 activates over a depolarized voltage range and deactivates rapidly. An amino-terminal extension mediates fast, N-type inactivation. The kcnc3a gene is alternatively spliced, generating variant carboxyl-terminal sequences. The R335H mutation in the S4 transmembrane segment, analogous to the SCA13 mutation R420H, eliminates functional expression. When co-expressed with wild type, R335H subunits suppress Kv3.3 activity by a dominant negative mechanism. The F363L mutation in the S5 transmembrane segment, analogous to the SCA13 mutation F448L, alters channel gating. F363L shifts the voltage range for activation in the hyperpolarized direction and dramatically slows deactivation. Conclusions The functional properties of

  6. Calmodulin is essential for cardiac IKS channel gating and assembly: impaired function in long-QT mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shamgar, Liora; Ma, Lijuan; Schmitt, Nicole;

    2006-01-01

    The slow IKS K+ channel plays a major role in repolarizing the cardiac action potential and consists of the assembly of KCNQ1 and KCNE1 subunits. Mutations in either KCNQ1 or KCNE1 genes produce the long-QT syndrome, a life-threatening ventricular arrhythmia. Here, we show that long-QT mutations...... located in the KCNQ1 C terminus impair calmodulin (CaM) binding, which affects both channel gating and assembly. The mutations produce a voltage-dependent macroscopic inactivation and dramatically alter channel assembly. KCNE1 forms a ternary complex with wild-type KCNQ1 and Ca(2+)-CaM that prevents...... the risk of ventricular arrhythmias. Udgivelsesdato: 2006-Apr-28...

  7. Characterization and mechanisms of action of novel NaV1.5 channel mutations associated with Brugada syndrome

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    Callø, Kirstine; Refaat, Marwan M.; Grubb, Søren;

    2013-01-01

    Brugada syndrome is a heterogeneous heart rhythm disorder characterized by an atypical right bundle block pattern with ST-segment elevation and T-wave inversion in the right precordial leads. Loss-of-function mutations in SCN5A encoding the cardiac sodium channel Na(V)1.5 are associated with Brug......Brugada syndrome is a heterogeneous heart rhythm disorder characterized by an atypical right bundle block pattern with ST-segment elevation and T-wave inversion in the right precordial leads. Loss-of-function mutations in SCN5A encoding the cardiac sodium channel Na(V)1.5 are associated...... with Brugada syndrome. We found novel mutations in SCN5A in 2 different families diagnosed with Brugada syndrome and investigated how those affected Na(V)1.5 channel function....

  8. Cellular hyper-excitability caused by mutations that alter the activation process of voltage-gated sodium channels

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    Mohamed-Yassine eAMAROUCH

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav are widely expressed as macro-molecular complexes in both excitable and non-excitable tissues. In excitable tissues, the upstroke of the action potential is the result of the passage of a large and rapid influx of sodium ions through these channels. NaV dysfunction has been associated with an increasingly wide range of neurological, muscular and cardiac disorders. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recently identified sodium channel mutations that are linked to hyper-excitability phenotypes and associated with the alteration of the activation process of voltage gated sodium channels. Indeed, several clinical manifestations that demonstrate an alteration of tissue excitability were recently shown to be strongly associated with the presence of mutations that affect the activation process of the voltage-gated sodium channels. These emerging genotype-phenotype correlations have expanded the clinical spectrum of sodium channelopathies to include disorders which feature a hyper-excitability phenotype that may or may not be associated with a cardiomyopathy. The p.I141V mutation in SCN4A and SCN5A, as well as its homologous p.I136V mutation in SCN9A, are interesting examples of mutations that have been linked to inherited hyperexcitability myotonia, exercise-induced polymorphic ventricular arrhythmias and erythromelalgia, respectively. Regardless of which sodium channel isoform is investigated, the substitution of the isoleucine to valine in the locus 141 induces similar modifications in the biophysical properties of the voltage-gated sodium channels by shifting the voltage-dependence of steady state activation towards more negative potentials.

  9. Mutations in cytoplasmic loops of the KCNQ1 channel and the risk of life-threatening events

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    Barsheshet, Alon; Goldenberg, Ilan; O-Uchi, Jin

    2012-01-01

    β-Adrenergic stimulation is the main trigger for cardiac events in type 1 long-QT syndrome (LQT1). We evaluated a possible association between ion channel response to β-adrenergic stimulation and clinical response to β-blocker therapy according to mutation location.......β-Adrenergic stimulation is the main trigger for cardiac events in type 1 long-QT syndrome (LQT1). We evaluated a possible association between ion channel response to β-adrenergic stimulation and clinical response to β-blocker therapy according to mutation location....

  10. Ovine congenital myotonia associated with a mutation in the muscle chloride channel gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteagudo, Luis Vicente; Tejedor, María Teresa; Ramos, Juan José; Lacasta, Delia; Ferrer, Luis Miguel

    2015-04-01

    Congenital myotonia (CM) is characterised by a delay in muscular relaxation after sudden contractions. In a recent outbreak of ovine CM affecting 1% of new-born lambs in a Spanish flock of Rasa Aragonesa sheep, a comparative pathology approach was taken: because a mutation in the muscle chloride channel gene (CLCN1) was identified as responsible for CM in goats, the same gene was sequenced in the affected lambs. A non-synonymous single nucleotide variation (SNV) in the second exon of CLCN1 was associated with this pathology. Rams carrying this SNV heterozygously were thereafter identified and replaced by wild-type homozygous young males. No additional CM cases were detected in subsequent lambing seasons.

  11. The HCN4 channel mutation D553N associated with bradycardia has a C-linker mediated gating defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netter, Michael F; Zuzarte, Marylou; Schlichthörl, Günter; Klöcker, Nikolaj; Decher, Niels

    2012-01-01

    The D553N mutation located in the C-linker of the cardiac pacemaker channel HCN4 is thought to cause sino-atrial dysfunction via a pronounced dominant-negative trafficking defect. Since HCN4 mutations usually have a minor defect in channel gating, it was our aim to further characterize the disease causing mechanism of D553N. Fluorescence microscopy, FACS, TEVC and patch-clamp recordings were performed to characterize D553N. Surprisingly, we found that D553N channels reach the plasma membrane and have no apparent trafficking defect. Co-expression of D553N with HCN4 also revealed no dominant-negative effect on wild-type channels. Consistent with the normal cell surface expression of D553N, it was possible to extensively characterize D553N mutants in Xenopus oocytes and mammalian cells. D553N channels generate currents with reduced amplitude, while the kinetics of activation and deactivation are not altered. While the regulation of D553N by tyrosine kinases is normal, we observed a change in the cAMP regulation which however cannot account for the strong loss-of-function of the mutant. The pronounced current reduction and the regular surface expression indicate a major gating defect of the C-linker gate. We hypothesize that the D553N mutation stabilizes a previously reported salt bridge important for the gating of the channel. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Mutation of the melastatin-related cation channel, TRPM3, underlies inherited cataract and glaucoma.

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    Thomas M Bennett

    Full Text Available Inherited forms of cataract are a clinically important and genetically heterogeneous cause of visual impairment that usually present at an early age with or without systemic and/or other ocular abnormalities. Here we have identified a new locus for inherited cataract and high-tension glaucoma with variable anterior segment defects, and characterized an underlying mutation in the gene coding for transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily M, member-3 (TRPM3, melastatin-2. Genome-wide linkage analysis mapped the ocular disease locus to the pericentric region of human chromosome 9. Whole exome and custom-target next-generation sequencing detected a heterozygous A-to-G transition in exon-3 of TRPM3 that co-segregated with disease. As a consequence of alternative splicing this missense mutation was predicted to result in the substitution of isoleucine-to-methionine at codon 65 (c.195A>G; p.I65 M of TRPM3 transcript variant 9, and at codon 8 (c.24A>G; p.I8 M of a novel TRPM3 transcript variant expressed in human lens. In both transcript variants the I-to-M substitution was predicted in silico to exert damaging effects on protein function. Furthermore, transient expression studies of a recombinant TRPM3-GFP reporter product predicted that the I-to-M substitution introduced an alternative translation start-site located 89 codons upstream from the native initiator methionine found in eight other TRPM3 transcript variants (1-8. Collectively, these studies have provided the first evidence that TRPM3 is associated with inherited ocular disease in humans, and further provide support for the important role of this cation channel in normal eye development.

  13. Sodium Channel Gene Mutations in Children with GEFS+ and Dravet Syndrome: A Cross Sectional Study

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    Seyed Hassan TONEKABONI

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available  How to Cite This Article: Tonekaboni SH, Ebrahimi A, Bakhshandeh Bali MK, Houshmand M, Moghaddasi M, Taghdiri MM, Nasehi MM. Sodium Channel Gene Mutations in Children with GEFS+ and Dravet Syndrome: A Cross Sectional Study. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Winter; 7 (1:25-29. Objective Dravet syndrome or severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI is a baleful epileptic encephalopathy that begins in the first year of life. This syndrome specified by febrile seizures followed by intractable epilepsy, disturbed psychomotor development, and ataxia. Clinical similarities between Dravet syndrome and generalized epilepsy with febrile seizure plus (GEFS+ includes occurrence of febrile seizures and joint molecular genetic etiology. Shared features of these two diseases support the idea that these two disorders represent a severity spectrum of the same illness. Nowadays, more than 60 heterozygous pattern SCN1A mutations, which many are de novo mutations, have been detected in Dravet syndrome. Materials & Methods From May 2008 to August 2012, 35 patients who referred to Pediatric Neurology Clinic of Mofid Children Hospital in Tehran were enrolled in this study. Entrance criterion of this study was having equal or more than four criteria for Dravet syndrome. We compared clinical features and genetic findings of the patients diagnosed as Dravet syndrome or GEFS+. Results 35 patients (15 girls and 20 boys underwent genetic testing. Mean age of them was 7.7 years (a range of 13 months to 15 years. Three criteria that were best evident in SCN1A mutation positive patients are as follows: Normal development before the onset of seizures, onset of seizure before age of one year, and psychomotor retardation after onset of seizures. Our genetic testing showed that 1 of 3 (33.3% patients with clinical Dravet syndrome and 3 of 20 (15% patients that diagnosed as GEFS+, had SCN1A mutation. Conclusion In this study, normal development before seizure onset, seizures beginning

  14. Characterization of N-terminally mutated cardiac Na+ channels associated with long QT syndrome 3 and Brugada syndrome

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    Christian eGütter

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in SCN5A, the gene encoding the cardiac voltage-gated Na+ channel hNav1.5, can result in life-threatening arrhythmias including long QT syndrome 3 (LQT3 and Brugada syndrome (BrS. Numerous mutant hNav1.5 channels have been characterized upon heterologous expression and patch-clamp recordings during the last decade. These studies revealed functionally important regions in hNav1.5 and provided insight into gain-of-function or loss-of-function channel defects underlying LQT3 or BrS, respectively. The N-terminal region of hNav1.5, however, has not yet been investigated in detail, although several mutations were reported in the literature. In the present study we investigated three mutant channels, previously associated with LQT3 (G9V, R18W, V125L, and six mutant channels, associated with BrS (R18Q, R27H, G35S, V95I, R104Q, K126E. We applied both the two-microelectrode voltage clamp technique, using cRNA-injected Xenopus oocytes, and the whole-cell patch clamp technique using transfected HEK293 cells. Surprisingly, four out of the nine mutations did not affect channel properties. Gain-of-function, as typically observed in LQT3 mutant channels, was observed only in R18W and V125L, whereas loss-of-function, frequently found in BrS mutants, was found only in R27H, R104Q, and K126E. Our results indicate that the hNav1.5 N-terminus plays an important role for channel kinetics and stability. At the same time, we suggest that additional mechanisms, as e.g. disturbed interactions of the Na+ channel N-terminus with other proteins, contribute to severe clinical phenotypes.

  15. Expression patterns, mutation detection and RNA interference of Rhopalosiphum padi voltage-gated sodium channel genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Yayun; Peng, Xiong; Wang, Kang; Lin, Fangfei; Li, Yuting; Chen, Maohua

    2016-07-01

    The voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) is the target of sodium-channel-blocking insecticides. Traditionally, animals were thought to have only one VGSC gene comprising a α-subunit with four homologous domains (DI-DIV). The present study showed that Rhopalosiphum padi, an economically important crop pest, owned a unique heterodimeric VGSC (H1 and H2 subunits) encoded by two genes (Rpvgsc1 and Rpvgsc2), which is unusual in insects and other animals. The open reading frame (ORF) of Rpvgsc1 consisted 1150 amino acids, and the ORF of Rpvgsc2 had 957 amino acids. Rpvgsc1 showed 64.1% amino acid identity to DI-DII of Drosophila melanogaster VGSC and Rpvgsc2 showed 64.0% amino acid identity to DIII-DIV of D. melanogaster VGSC. A M918L mutation previously reported in pyrethroids-resistant strains of other insects was found in the IIS4-S6 region of R. padi field sample. The two R. padi VGSC genes were expressed at all developmental stages and showed similar expression patterns after treatment with beta-cypermethrin. Knockdown of Rpvgsc1 or Rpvgsc2 caused significant reduction in mortality rate of R. padi after exposure to beta-cypermethrin. These findings suggest that the two R. padi VGSC genes are both functional genes.

  16. A novel SCN9A mutation responsible for primary erythromelalgia and is resistant to the treatment of sodium channel blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min-Tzu; Huang, Po-Yuan; Yen, Chen-Tung; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Lee, Ming-Jen

    2013-01-01

    Primary erythromelalgia (PE) is an autosomal dominant neurological disorder characterized by severe burning pain and erythema in the extremities upon heat stimuli or exercise. Mutations in human SCN9A gene, encoding the α-subunit of the voltage-gated sodium channel, Na(v)1.7, were found to be responsible for PE. Three missense mutations of SCN9A gene have recently been identified in Taiwanese patients including a familial (I136V) and two sporadic mutations (I848T, V1316A). V1316A is a novel mutation and has not been characterized yet. Topologically, I136V is located in DI/S1 segment and both I848T and V1316A are located in S4-S5 linker region of DII and DIII domains, respectively. To characterize the elelctrophysiological manifestations, the channel conductance with whole-cell patch clamp was recorded on the over-expressed Chinese hamster overy cells. As compared with wild type, the mutant channels showed a significant hyperpolarizing shift in voltage dependent activation and a depolarizing shift in steady-state fast inactivation. The recovery time from channel inactivation is faster in the mutant than in the wild type channels. Since warmth can trigger and exacerbate symptoms, we then examine the influence of tempearture on the sodium channel conduction. At 35°C, I136V and V1316A mutant channels exhibit a further hyperpolarizing shift at activation as compared with wild type channel, even though wild type channel also produced a significant hyperpolarizing shift compared to that of 25°C. High temperature caused a significant depolarizing shift in steady-state fast inactivation in all three mutant channels. These findings may confer to the hyperexcitability of sensory neurons, especially at high temperature. In order to identifying an effective treatment, we tested the IC₅₀ values of selective sodium channel blockers, lidocaine and mexiletine. The IC₅₀ for mexiletine is lower for I848T mutant channel as compared to that of the wild type and other two

  17. A novel SCN9A mutation responsible for primary erythromelalgia and is resistant to the treatment of sodium channel blockers.

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    Min-Tzu Wu

    Full Text Available Primary erythromelalgia (PE is an autosomal dominant neurological disorder characterized by severe burning pain and erythema in the extremities upon heat stimuli or exercise. Mutations in human SCN9A gene, encoding the α-subunit of the voltage-gated sodium channel, Na(v1.7, were found to be responsible for PE. Three missense mutations of SCN9A gene have recently been identified in Taiwanese patients including a familial (I136V and two sporadic mutations (I848T, V1316A. V1316A is a novel mutation and has not been characterized yet. Topologically, I136V is located in DI/S1 segment and both I848T and V1316A are located in S4-S5 linker region of DII and DIII domains, respectively. To characterize the elelctrophysiological manifestations, the channel conductance with whole-cell patch clamp was recorded on the over-expressed Chinese hamster overy cells. As compared with wild type, the mutant channels showed a significant hyperpolarizing shift in voltage dependent activation and a depolarizing shift in steady-state fast inactivation. The recovery time from channel inactivation is faster in the mutant than in the wild type channels. Since warmth can trigger and exacerbate symptoms, we then examine the influence of tempearture on the sodium channel conduction. At 35°C, I136V and V1316A mutant channels exhibit a further hyperpolarizing shift at activation as compared with wild type channel, even though wild type channel also produced a significant hyperpolarizing shift compared to that of 25°C. High temperature caused a significant depolarizing shift in steady-state fast inactivation in all three mutant channels. These findings may confer to the hyperexcitability of sensory neurons, especially at high temperature. In order to identifying an effective treatment, we tested the IC₅₀ values of selective sodium channel blockers, lidocaine and mexiletine. The IC₅₀ for mexiletine is lower for I848T mutant channel as compared to that of the wild type

  18. De-novo mutations of the sodium channel gene SCN1A in alleged vaccine encephalopathy : a retrospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkovic, SF; Harkin, L; McMahon, JM; Pelekanos, JT; Zuberi, SM; Wirrell, EC; Gill, DS; Iona, [No Value; Mulley, JC; Scheffer, IE

    2006-01-01

    Background Vaccination, particularly for pertussis, has been implicated as a direct cause of an encephalopathy with refractory seizures and intellectual impairment. We postulated that cases of so-called vaccine encephalopathy could have mutations in the neuronal sodium channel alpha 1 subunit gene (

  19. Gain-of-function mutations in potassium channel subunit KCNE2 associated with early-onset lone atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jonas Bille; Bentzen, Bo Hjorth; Olesen, Morten Salling;

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia. Disturbances in cardiac potassium conductance are considered as one of the disease mechanisms in AF. We aimed to investigate if mutations in potassium-channel β-subunits KCNE2 and KCNE3 are associated with early-onset lone AF. ...

  20. Activating mutation in a mucolipin transient receptor potential channel leads to melanocyte loss in varitint-waddler mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haoxing; Delling, Markus; Li, Linyu; Dong, Xianping; Clapham, David E

    2007-11-13

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) genes of the mucolipin subfamily (TRPML1-3 and MCOLN1-3) are presumed to encode ion channel proteins of intracellular endosomes and lysosomes. Mutations in human TRPML1 (mucolipin 1/MCOLN1) result in mucolipidosis type IV, a severe inherited neurodegenerative disease associated with defective lysosomal biogenesis and trafficking. A mutation in mouse TRPML3 (A419P; TRPML3(Va)) results in the varitint-waddler (Va) phenotype. Va mice are deaf, exhibit circling behavior due to vestibular defects, and have variegated/dilute coat color as a result of pigmentation defects. Prior electrophysiological studies of presumed TRPML plasma membrane channels are contradictory and inconsistent with known TRP channel properties. Here, we report that the Va mutation produces a gain-of-function that allows TRPML1 and TRPML3 to be measured and identified as inwardly rectifying, proton-impermeant, Ca(2+)-permeant cation channels. TRPML3 is highly expressed in normal melanocytes. Melanocyte markers are lost in the Va mouse, suggesting that their variegated and hypopigmented fur is caused by severe alteration of melanocyte function or cell death. TRPML3(Va) expression in melanocyte cell lines results in high resting Ca(2+) levels, rounded, poorly adherent cells, and loss of membrane integrity. We conclude that the Va phenotype is caused by mutation-induced TRPML3 gain-of-function, resulting in cell death.

  1. The Brugada syndrome mutation A39V does not affect surface expression of neuronal rat Cav1.2 channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simms Brett A

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A loss of function of the L-type calcium channel, Cav1.2, results in a cardiac specific disease known as Brugada syndrome. Although many Brugada syndrome channelopathies reduce channel function, one point mutation in the N-terminus of Cav1.2 (A39V has been shown to elicit disease a phenotype because of a loss of surface trafficking of the channel. This lack of cell membrane expression could not be rescued by the trafficking chaperone Cavβ. Findings We report that despite the striking loss of trafficking described previously in the cardiac Cav1.2 channel, the A39V mutation while in the background of the brain isoform traffics and functions normally. We detected no differences in biophysical properties between wild type Cav1.2 and A39V-Cav1.2 in the presence of either a cardiac (Cavβ2b, or a neuronal beta subunit (Cavβ1b. In addition, the A39V-Cav1.2 mutant showed a normal Cavβ2b mediated increase in surface expression in tsA-201 cells. Conclusions The Brugada syndrome mutation A39V when introduced into rat brain Cav1.2 does not trigger the loss-of-trafficking phenotype seen in a previous study on the human heart isoform of the channel.

  2. Compound-Specific Effects of Mutations at Val787 in DII-S6 of Nav1.4 Sodium Channels on the Action of Sodium Channel Inhibitor Insecticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Stein, Richard T.; Soderlund, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Sodium channel inhibitor (SCI) insecticides are hypothesized to inhibit voltage-gated sodium channels by binding selectively to the slow-inactivated state. Replacement of valine at position 787 in the S6 segment of homology domain II of the rat Nav1.4 sodium channel by lysine (V787K) enchances slow inactivation of this channel whereas replacement by alanine or cysteine (V787A, V787C) inhibits slow inactivation. To test the hypothesis that SCI insecticides bind selectively to the slow-inactivated state, we constructed mutated Nav1.4/V787A, Nav1.4/V787C, and Nav1.4/V787K cDNAs, expressed wildtype and mutated channels with the auxiliary β1 subunit in Xenopus oocytes, and used the two-electrode voltage clamp technique to examine the effects of these mutations on channel inhibition by four SCI insecticides (indoxacarb, its bioactivated metabolite DCJW, metaflumizone, and RH3421). Mutations at Val787 affected SCI insecticide sensitivity in a manner that was independent of mutation-induced changes in slow inactivation gating. Sensitivity to inhibition by 10 μM indoxacarb was significantly increased in all three mutated channels, whereas sensitivity to inhibition by 10 μM metaflumizone was significantly reduced in Nav1.4/V787A channels and completely abolished in Nav1.4/V787K channels. The effects of Val787 mutations on metaflumizone were correlated with the hydrophobicity of the substituted amino acid rather than the extent of slow inactivation. None of the mutations at Val787 significantly affected the sensitivity to inhibition by DCJW or RH3421. These results demonstrate that the impact of mutations at Val787 on sodium channel inhibition by SCI insecticides depends on the specific insecticide examined and is independent of mutation-induced changes in slow inactivation gating. We propose that Val787 may be a unique determinant of metaflumizone binding. PMID:22983119

  3. Energetics of discrete selectivity bands and mutation-induced transitions in the calcium-sodium ion channels family

    CERN Document Server

    Kaufman, I; Tindjong, R; McClintock, P V E; Eisenberg, R S

    2013-01-01

    We use Brownian dynamics simulations to study the permeation properties of a generic electrostatic model of a biological ion channel as a function of the fixed charge Q_f at its selectivity filter. We reconcile the recently-discovered discrete calcium conduction bands M0 (Q_f=1e), M1 (3e), M2 (5e) with the set of sodium conduction bands L0 (0.5-0.7e), L1 (1.5-2e) thereby obtaining a completed pattern of conduction and selectivity bands v Q_f for the sodium-calcium channels family. An increase of Q_f leads to an increase of calcium selectivity: L0 (sodium selective, non-blocking channel) -> M0 (non-selective channel) -> L1 (sodium selective channel with divalent block) -> M1 (calcium selective channel exhibiting the anomalous mole fraction effect). We create a consistent identification scheme where the L1 band is identified with the eukaryotic (DEKA) sodium channel, and L0 (speculatively) with the bacterial NaChBac channel. The scheme created is able to account for the experimentally observed mutation-induced ...

  4. Sar1-GTPase-dependent ER exit of KATP channels revealed by a mutation causing congenital hyperinsulinism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taneja, Tarvinder K; Mankouri, Jamel; Karnik, Rucha

    2009-01-01

    The ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channel controls insulin secretion by coupling glucose metabolism to excitability of the pancreatic beta-cell membrane. The channel comprises four subunits each of Kir6.2 and the sulphonylurea receptor (SUR1), encoded by KCNJ11 and ABCC8, respectively. Mutations...... in these genes that result in reduced activity or expression of K(ATP) channels lead to enhanced beta-cell excitability, insulin hypersecretion and hypoglycaemia, and in humans lead to the clinical condition congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI). Here we have investigated the molecular basis of the focal form of CHI...... caused by one such mutation in Kir6.2, E282K. The study led to the discovery that Kir6.2 contains a di-acidic ER exit signal, (280)DLE(282), which promotes concentration of the channel into COPII-enriched ER exit sites prior to ER export via a process that requires Sar1-GTPase. The E282K mutation...

  5. Sodium channel SCN8A (Nav1.6: properties and de novo mutations in epileptic encephalopathy and intellectual disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janelle Elizabeth O'Brien

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The sodium channel Nav1.6, encoded by the gene SCN8A, is one of the major voltage-gated channels in human brain. The sequences of sodium channels have been highly conserved during evolution, and minor changes in biophysical properties can have a major impact in vivo. Insight into the role of Nav1.6 has come from analysis of spontaneous and induced mutations of mouse Scn8a during the past 18 years. Only within the past year has the role of SCN8A in human disease become apparent from whole exome and genome sequences of patients with sporadic disease. Unique features of Nav1.6 include its contribution to persistent current, resurgent current, repetitive neuronal firing, and subcellular localization at the axon initial segment and nodes of Ranvier. Loss of Nav1.6 activity results in reduced neuronal excitability, while gain-of-function mutations can increase neuronal excitability. Mouse Scn8a (med mutants exhibit movement disorders including ataxia, tremor and dystonia. Thus far, more than ten human de novo mutations have been identified in patients with two types of disorders, epileptic encephalopathy and intellectual disability. We review these human mutations as well as the unique features of Nav1.6 that contribute to its role in determining neuronal excitability in vivo. A supplemental figure illustrating the positions of amino acid residues within the 4 domains and 24 transmembrane segments of Nav1.6 is provided to facilitate the location of novel mutations within the channel protein.

  6. Loss-of-function mutations in sodium channel Nav1.7 cause anosmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jan; Pyrski, Martina; Jacobi, Eric; Bufe, Bernd; Willnecker, Vivienne; Schick, Bernhard; Zizzari, Philippe; Gossage, Samuel J; Greer, Charles A; Leinders-Zufall, Trese; Woods, C Geoffrey; Wood, John N; Zufall, Frank

    2011-04-14

    Loss of function of the gene SCN9A, encoding the voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.7, causes a congenital inability to experience pain in humans. Here we show that Na(v)1.7 is not only necessary for pain sensation but is also an essential requirement for odour perception in both mice and humans. We examined human patients with loss-of-function mutations in SCN9A and show that they are unable to sense odours. To establish the essential role of Na(v)1.7 in odour perception, we generated conditional null mice in which Na(v)1.7 was removed from all olfactory sensory neurons. In the absence of Na(v)1.7, these neurons still produce odour-evoked action potentials but fail to initiate synaptic signalling from their axon terminals at the first synapse in the olfactory system. The mutant mice no longer display vital, odour-guided behaviours such as innate odour recognition and avoidance, short-term odour learning, and maternal pup retrieval. Our study creates a mouse model of congenital general anosmia and provides new strategies to explore the genetic basis of the human sense of smell.

  7. Mutations in sodium-channel gene SCN9A cause a spectrum of human genetic pain disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Drenth, J.P.H.; Waxman, S G

    2007-01-01

    The voltage-gated sodium-channel type IX alpha subunit, known as Na(v)1.7 and encoded by the gene SCN9A, is located in peripheral neurons and plays an important role in action potential production in these cells. Recent genetic studies have identified Na(v)1.7 dysfunction in three different human pain disorders. Gain-of-function missense mutations in Na(v)1.7 have been shown to cause primary erythermalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder, while nonsense mutations in Na(v)1.7 result in los...

  8. Novel HCN2 mutation contributes to febrile seizures by shifting the channel's kinetics in a temperature-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Nakamura

    Full Text Available Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channel-mediated currents, known as I h, are involved in the control of rhythmic activity in neuronal circuits and in determining neuronal properties including the resting membrane potential. Recent studies have shown that HCN channels play a role in seizure susceptibility and in absence and limbic epilepsy including temporal lobe epilepsy following long febrile seizures (FS. This study focused on the potential contributions of abnormalities in the HCN2 isoform and their role in FS. A novel heterozygous missense mutation in HCN2 exon 1 leading to p.S126L was identified in two unrelated patients with FS. The mutation was inherited from the mother who had suffered from FS in a pedigree. To determine the effect of this substitution we conducted whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology. We found that mutant channels had elevated sensitivity to temperature. More specifically, they displayed faster kinetics at higher temperature. Kinetic shift by change of temperature sensitivity rather than the shift of voltage dependence led to increased availability of I h in conditions promoting FS. Responses to cyclic AMP did not differ between wildtype and mutant channels. Thus, mutant HCN2 channels cause significant cAMP-independent enhanced availability of I h during high temperatures, which may contribute to hyperthermia-induced neuronal hyperexcitability in some individuals with FS.

  9. Mutations in the potassium channel subunit KCNE1 are associated with early-onset familial atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olesen Morten S

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common arrhythmia. The potassium current IKs is essential for cardiac repolarization. Gain-of-function mutations in KV7.1, the pore-forming α-subunit of the IKs channel, have been associated with AF. We hypothesized that early-onset lone AF is associated with mutations in the IKs channel regulatory subunit KCNE1. Methods In 209 unrelated early-onset lone AF patients (KCNE1 was bidirectionally sequenced. We analyzed the identified KCNE1 mutants electrophysiologically in heterologous expression systems. Results Two non-synonymous mutations G25V and G60D were found in KCNE1 that were not present in the control group (n = 432 alleles and that have not previously been reported in any publicly available databases or in the exom variant server holding exom data from more than 10.000 alleles. Proband 1 (female, age 45, G25V had onset of paroxysmal AF at the age of 39 years. Proband 2 (G60D was diagnosed with lone AF at the age of 33 years. The patient has inherited the mutation from his mother, who also has AF. Both probands had no mutations in genes previously associated with AF. In heterologous expression systems, both mutants showed significant gain-of-function for IKs both with respect to steady-state current levels, kinetic parameters, and heart rate-dependent modulation. Conclusions Mutations in KV7.1 leading to gain-of-function of IKs current have previously been described in lone AF, yet this is the first time a mutation in the beta-subunit KCNE1 is associated with the disease. This finding further supports the hypothesis that increased potassium current enhances AF susceptibility.

  10. An atypical phenotype of hypokalemic periodic paralysis caused by a mutation in the sodium channel gene SCN4A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yang Hee; Kim, June Bum

    2010-10-01

    Familial hypokalemic periodic paralysis is an autosomal-dominant channelopathy characterized by episodic muscle weakness with hypokalemia. The respiratory and cardiac muscles typically remain unaffected, but we report an atypical case of a family with hypokalemic periodic paralysis in which the affected members presented with frequent respiratory insufficiency during severe attacks. Molecular analysis revealed a heterozygous c.664 C>T transition in the sodium channel gene SCN4A, leading to an Arg222Trp mutation in the channel protein. The patients described here presented unusual clinical characteristics that included a severe respiratory phenotype, an incomplete penetrance in female carriers, and a different response to medications.

  11. Familial hyperkalemic periodic paralysis caused by a de novo mutation in the sodium channel gene SCN4A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ji-Yeon; Kim, June-Bum

    2011-11-01

    Familial hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HYPP) is an autosomaldominant channelopathy characterized by transient and recurrent episodes of paralysis with concomitant hyperkalemia. Mutations in the skeletal muscle voltage-gated sodium channel gene SCN4A have been reported to be responsible for this disease. Here, we report the case of a 16-year-old girl with HYPP whose mutational analysis revealed a heterozygous c.2111C>T substitution in the SCN4A gene leading to a Thr704Met mutation in the protein sequence. The parents were clinically unaffected and did not have a mutation in the SCN4A gene. A de novo SCN4A mutation for familial HYPP has not previously been reported. The patient did not respond to acetazolamide, but showed a marked improvement in paralytic symptoms upon treatment with hydrochlorothiazide. The findings in this case indicate that a de novo mutation needs to be considered when an isolated family member is found to have a HYPP phenotype.

  12. Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis caused by recurring mutation in the adult muscle sodium channel alpha-subunit gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillén, A; Wadelius, C; Sundvall, M; Ahlsten, G; Gustavson, K H

    1996-01-01

    Linkage studies and mutation analysis were performed in two Swedish families with hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HYPP), an autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterized by episodic muscle weakness associated with increasing or high levels of serum potassium. The gene for HYPP is the gene encoding the alpha-subunit of the sodium channel of adult human skeletal muscle (SCN4A). SCN4A has been localized on chromosome 17 q closely linked to the human growth hormone gene. Linkage between a microsatellite polymorphism in the SCN4A gene and the disease was shown in two Swedish families (Z = 12.10 theta = 0). Sequence analysis revealed that the two Swedish families have got a C to T transition at position 2188 in the cDNA. At the protein level this Thr 704 to Met mutation is located in the fifth membrane spanning segment of domain II of the protein, as previously described (28). The mutation was linked to different microsatellite alleles regarding both a (GT)n and a (GA)n repeat in the gene. Either the families are related and new mutations have occurred in both microsatellites when the pedigrees were separated or the mutation has arisen independently in the two families analysed. From the mutant alleles characterized so far it seems as if a limited number of mutations is present in this gene.

  13. Familial hyperkalemic periodic paralysis caused by a de novo mutation in the sodium channel gene SCN4A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Yeon Han

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Familial hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HYPP is an autosomaldominant channelopathy characterized by transient and recurrent episodes of paralysis with concomitant hyperkalemia. Mutations in the skeletal muscle voltage-gated sodium channel gene SCN4A have been reported to be responsible for this disease. Here, we report the case of a 16-year-old girl with HYPP whose mutational analysis revealed a heterozygous c.2111C>T substitution in the SCN4A gene leading to a Thr704Met mutation in the protein sequence. The parents were clinically unaffected and did not have a mutation in the SCN4A gene. A de novo SCN4A mutation for familial HYPP has not previously been reported. The patient did not respond to acetazolamide, but showed a marked improvement in paralytic symptoms upon treatment with hydrochlorothiazide. The findings in this case indicate that a de novo mutation needs to be considered when an isolated family member is found to have a HYPP phenotype.

  14. The Pathogenic A116V Mutation Enhances Ion-Selective Channel Formation by Prion Protein in Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabareesan, Ambadi Thody; Singh, Jogender; Roy, Samrat; Udgaonkar, Jayant B; Mathew, M K

    2016-04-26

    Prion diseases are a group of fatal neurodegenerative disorders that afflict mammals. Misfolded and aggregated forms of the prion protein (PrP(Sc)) have been associated with many prion diseases. A transmembrane form of PrP favored by the pathogenic mutation A116V is associated with Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome, but no accumulation of PrP(Sc) is detected. However, the role of the transmembrane form of PrP in pathological processes leading to neuronal death remains unclear. This study reports that the full-length mouse PrP (moPrP) significantly increases the permeability of living cells to K(+), and forms K(+)- and Ca(2+)-selective channels in lipid membranes. Importantly, the pathogenic mutation A116V greatly increases the channel-forming capability of moPrP. The channels thus formed are impermeable to sodium and chloride ions, and are blocked by blockers of voltage-gated ion channels. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange studies coupled with mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) show that upon interaction with lipid, the central hydrophobic region (109-132) of the protein is protected against exchange, making it a good candidate for inserting into the membrane and lining the channel. HDX-MS also shows a dramatic increase in the protein-lipid stoichiometry for A116V moPrP, providing a rationale for its increased channel-forming capability. The results suggest that ion channel formation may be a possible mechanism of PrP-mediated neurodegeneration by the transmembrane forms of PrP.

  15. An X-linked channelopathy with cardiomegaly due to a CLIC2 mutation enhancing ryanodine receptor channel activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Kyoko; Liu, Dan; Tarpey, Patrick; Gallant, Esther; Lam, Alex; Witham, Shawn; Alexov, Emil; Chaubey, Alka; Stevenson, Roger E; Schwartz, Charles E; Board, Philip G; Dulhunty, Angela F

    2012-10-15

    Chloride intracellular channel 2 (CLIC2) protein is a member of the glutathione transferase class of proteins. Its' only known function is the regulation of ryanodine receptor (RyR) intracellular Ca(2+) release channels. These RyR proteins play a major role in the regulation of Ca(2+) signaling in many cells. Utilizing exome capture and deep sequencing of genes on the X-chromosome, we have identified a mutation in CLIC2 (c.303C>G, p.H101Q) which is associated with X-linked intellectual disability (ID), atrial fibrillation, cardiomegaly, congestive heart failure (CHF), some somatic features and seizures. Functional studies of the H101Q variant indicated that it stimulated rather than inhibited the action of RyR channels, with channels remaining open for longer times and potentially amplifying Ca(2+) signals dependent on RyR channel activity. The overly active RyRs in cardiac and skeletal muscle cells and neuronal cells would result in abnormal cardiac function and trigger post-synaptic pathways and neurotransmitter release. The presence of both cardiomegaly and CHF in the two affected males and atrial fibrillation in one are consistent with abnormal RyR2 channel function. Since the dysfunction of RyR2 channels in the brain via 'leaky mutations' can result in mild developmental delay and seizures, our data also suggest a vital role for the CLIC2 protein in maintaining normal cognitive function via its interaction with RyRs in the brain. Therefore, our patients appear to suffer from a new channelopathy comprised of ID, seizures and cardiac problems because of enhanced Ca(2+) release through RyRs in neuronal cells and cardiac muscle cells.

  16. Keppen-Lubinsky syndrome is caused by mutations in the inwardly rectifying K+ channel encoded by KCNJ6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masotti, Andrea; Uva, Paolo; Davis-Keppen, Laura; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Cohen, Lior; Pisaneschi, Elisa; Celluzzi, Antonella; Bencivenga, Paola; Fang, Mingyan; Tian, Mingyu; Xu, Xun; Cappa, Marco; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2015-02-05

    Keppen-Lubinsky syndrome (KPLBS) is a rare disease mainly characterized by severe developmental delay and intellectual disability, microcephaly, large prominent eyes, a narrow nasal bridge, a tented upper lip, a high palate, an open mouth, tightly adherent skin, an aged appearance, and severe generalized lipodystrophy. We sequenced the exomes of three unrelated individuals affected by KPLBS and found de novo heterozygous mutations in KCNJ6 (GIRK2), which encodes an inwardly rectifying potassium channel and maps to the Down syndrome critical region between DIRK1A and DSCR4. In particular, two individuals shared an in-frame heterozygous deletion of three nucleotides (c.455_457del) leading to the loss of one amino acid (p.Thr152del). The third individual was heterozygous for a missense mutation (c.460G>A) which introduces an amino acid change from glycine to serine (p.Gly154Ser). In agreement with animal models, the present data suggest that these mutations severely impair the correct functioning of this potassium channel. Overall, these results establish KPLBS as a channelopathy and suggest that KCNJ6 (GIRK2) could also be a candidate gene for other lipodystrophies. We hope that these results will prompt investigations in this unexplored class of inwardly rectifying K(+) channels.

  17. Walker mutations reveal loose relationship between catalytic and channel-gating activities of purified CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramjeesingh, M; Li, C; Garami, E; Huan, L J; Galley, K; Wang, Y; Bear, C E

    1999-02-02

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) functions as an ATPase and as a chloride channel. It has been hypothesized, on the basis of electrophysiological findings, that the catalytic activity of CFTR is tightly coupled to the opening and closing of the channel gate. In the present study, to determine the structural basis for the ATPase activity of CFTR, we assessed the effect of mutations within the "Walker A" consensus motifs on ATP hydrolysis by the purified, intact protein. Mutation of the lysine residue in the "Walker A" motif of either the first nucleotide binding fold (CFTRK464A) or the second nucleotide binding fold (CFTRK1250A) inhibited the ATPase activity of the purified intact CFTR protein significantly, by greater than 50%. This finding suggests that the two nucleotide binding folds of CFTR are functioning cooperatively in catalysis. However, the rate of channel gating was only significantly inhibited in one of these purified mutants, CFTRK1250A, suggesting that ATPase activity may not be tightly coupled to channel gating as previously hypothesized.

  18. A gain-of-function mutation in the sodium channel gene Scn2a results in seizures and behavioral abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, J A; Plummer, N W; Smith, M R; Kapur, J; Cummins, T R; Waxman, S G; Goldin, A L; Meisler, M H

    2001-01-01

    The GAL879-881QQQ mutation in the cytoplasmic S4-S5 linker of domain 2 of the rat brain IIA sodium channel (Na(v)1.2) results in slowed inactivation and increased persistent current when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The neuron-specific enolase promoter was used to direct in vivo expression of the mutated channel in transgenic mice. Three transgenic lines exhibited seizures, and line Q54 was characterized in detail. The seizures in these mice began at two months of age and were accompanied by behavioral arrest and stereotyped repetitive behaviors. Continuous electroencephalogram monitoring detected focal seizure activity in the hippocampus, which in some instances generalized to involve the cortex. Hippocampal CA1 neurons isolated from presymptomatic Q54 mice exhibited increased persistent sodium current which may underlie hyperexcitability in the hippocampus. During the progression of the disorder there was extensive cell loss and gliosis within the hippocampus in areas CA1, CA2, CA3 and the hilus. The lifespan of Q54 mice was shortened and only 25% of the mice survived beyond six months of age. Four independent transgenic lines expressing the wild-type sodium channel were examined and did not exhibit any abnormalities. The transgenic Q54 mice provide a genetic model that will be useful for testing the effect of pharmacological intervention on progression of seizures caused by sodium channel dysfunction. The human ortholog, SCN2A, is a candidate gene for seizure disorders mapped to chromosome 2q22-24.

  19. Selective disruption of high sensitivity heat activation but not capsaicin activation of TRPV1 channels by pore turret mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yuanyuan; Yang, Fan; Cao, Xu; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Wang, KeWei; Zheng, Jie

    2012-04-01

    The capsaicin receptor transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV)1 is a highly heat-sensitive ion channel. Although chemical activation and heat activation of TRPV1 elicit similar pungent, painful sensation, the molecular mechanism underlying synergistic activation remains mysterious. In particular, where the temperature sensor is located and whether heat and capsaicin share a common activation pathway are debated. To address these fundamental issues, we searched for channel mutations that selectively affected one form of activation. We found that deletion of the first 10 amino acids of the pore turret significantly reduced the heat response amplitude and shifted the heat activation threshold, whereas capsaicin activation remained unchanged. Removing larger portions of the turret disrupted channel function. Introducing an artificial sequence to replace the deleted region restored sensitive capsaicin activation in these nonfunctional channels. The heat activation, however, remained significantly impaired, with the current exhibiting diminishing heat sensitivity to a level indistinguishable from that of a voltage-gated potassium channel, Kv7.4. Our results demonstrate that heat and capsaicin activation of TRPV1 are structurally and mechanistically distinct processes, and the pore turret is an indispensible channel structure involved in the heat activation process but is not part of the capsaicin activation pathway. Synergistic effect of heat and capsaicin on TRPV1 activation may originate from convergence of the two pathways on a common activation gate.

  20. B22 Glu Des-B30 Insulin: A Novel Monomeric Insulin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Juan DU; Jia-Hao SHI; Da-Fu CUI; You-Shang ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    Studies on monomeric insulin with reduced self-association are important in the development of insulin pharmaceutical preparations with rapid hypoglycemic action on patients with diabetes. Here we report a novel monomeric insulin, B22 Glu des-B30 insulin, prepared from a single chain insulin precursor with B22 Arg mutated to Glu, which was expressed in Pichia pastoris and converted to B22 Glu des-B30 insulin by tryptic digestion. It still retains 50% of the in vivo biological activity of porcine insulin and does not form a dimer even at a concentration of 10 mg/ml, showing that B22 Glu plays a key role in reducing the selfassociation of the insulin molecule without greatly reducing its biological activity. This novel monomeric insulin might have potential applications in the clinic.

  1. CACNA1H missense mutations associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis alter Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel activity and reticular thalamic neuron firing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzhepetskyy, Yuriy; Lazniewska, Joanna; Blesneac, Iulia; Pamphlett, Roger; Weiss, Norbert

    2016-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. In a recent study by Steinberg and colleagues, 2 recessive missense mutations were identified in the Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel gene (CACNA1H), in a family with an affected proband (early onset, long duration ALS) and 2 unaffected parents. We have introduced and functionally characterized these mutations using transiently expressed human Cav3.2 channels in tsA-201 cells. Both of these mutations produced mild but significant changes on T-type channel activity that are consistent with a loss of channel function. Computer modeling in thalamic reticular neurons suggested that these mutations result in decreased neuronal excitability of thalamic structures. Taken together, these findings implicate CACNA1H as a susceptibility gene in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  2. Characterization of an aquaporin-2 water channel gene mutation causing partial nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in a Mexican family: evidence of increased frequency of the mutation in the town of origin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boccalandro, C.; Mattia, F.P. de; Guo, D.C.; Xue, L.; Orlander, P.; King, T.M.; Gupta, P.; Deen, P.M.T.; Lavis, V.R.; Milewicz, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    A Mexican family with partial congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) that resulted from a mutation in the aquaporin-2 water channel (AQP2) was characterized, and the source of this rare mutation was traced to the family's town of origin in Mexico. Affected individuals with profound polyuria

  3. Characterization of an aquaporin-2 water channel gene mutation causing partial nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in a Mexican family: evidence of increased frequency of the mutation in the town of origin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boccalandro, C.; Mattia, F.P. de; Guo, D.C.; Xue, L.; Orlander, P.; King, T.M.; Gupta, P.; Deen, P.M.T.; Lavis, V.R.; Milewicz, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    A Mexican family with partial congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) that resulted from a mutation in the aquaporin-2 water channel (AQP2) was characterized, and the source of this rare mutation was traced to the family's town of origin in Mexico. Affected individuals with profound polyuria

  4. Propofol inhibits hERG K(+) channels and enhances the inhibition effects on its mutations in HEK293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sheng-Na; Jing, Ying; Yang, Lin-Lin; Zhang, Zhao; Zhang, Li-Rong

    2016-11-15

    QT interval prolongation, a potential risk for arrhythmias, may result from gene polymorphisms relevant to cardiomyocyte repolarization. Another noted cause of QT interval prolongation is the administration of chemical compounds such as anesthetics, which may affect a specific type of cardiac K(+) channel encoded by the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG). hERG K(+) current was recorded using whole-cell patch clamp in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells expressing wild type (WT) or mutated hERG channels. Expression of hERG K(+) channel proteins was evaluated using western blot and confirmed by fluorescent staining and imaging. Computational modeling was adopted to identify the possible binding site(s) of propofol with hERG K(+) channels. Propofol had a significant inhibitory effect on WT hERG K(+) currents in a concentration-dependent manner, with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 60.9±6.4μM. Mutations in drug-binding sites (Y652A or F656C) of the hERG channel were found to attenuate hERG current blockage by propofol. However, propofol did not inhibit the trafficking of hERG protein to the cell membrane. Meanwhile, for the three selective hERG K(+) channel mutant heterozygotes WT/Q738X-hERG, WT/A422T-hERG, and WT/H562P-hERG, the IC50 of propofol was calculated as 14.2±2.8μM, 3.3±1.2μM, and 5.9±1.9μM, respectively, which were much lower than that for the wild type. These findings indicate that propofol may potentially increase QT interval prolongation risk in patients via direct inhibition of the hERG K(+) channel, especially in those with other concurrent triggering factors such as hERG gene mutations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The Mutation P.T613a in the Pore Helix of the Kv 11.1 Potassium Channel is Associated with Long Qt Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Kristian L; Hotait, Mostafa; Calloe, Kirstine

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Loss-of-function mutations in the voltage gated potassium channel Kv 11.1 have been associated with the Long QT Syndrome (LQTS) type 2. We identified the p.T613A mutation in Kv 11.1 in a family with LQTS. T613A is located in the outer part of the pore helix, a structure that is involv...

  6. Myoclonus epilepsy and ataxia due to KCNC1 mutation: Analysis of 20 cases and K(+) channel properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Karen L; Franceschetti, Silvana; Milligan, Carol J; Muona, Mikko; Mandelstam, Simone A; Canafoglia, Laura; Boguszewska-Chachulska, Anna M; Korczyn, Amos D; Bisulli, Francesca; Di Bonaventura, Carlo; Ragona, Francesca; Michelucci, Roberto; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Straussberg, Rachel; Panzica, Ferruccio; Massano, João; Friedman, Daniel; Crespel, Arielle; Engelsen, Bernt A; Andermann, Frederick; Andermann, Eva; Spodar, Krystyna; Lasek-Bal, Anetta; Riguzzi, Patrizia; Pasini, Elena; Tinuper, Paolo; Licchetta, Laura; Gardella, Elena; Lindenau, Matthias; Wulf, Annette; Møller, Rikke S; Benninger, Felix; Afawi, Zaid; Rubboli, Guido; Reid, Christopher A; Maljevic, Snezana; Lerche, Holger; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Petrou, Steven; Berkovic, Samuel F

    2017-05-01

    To comprehensively describe the new syndrome of myoclonus epilepsy and ataxia due to potassium channel mutation (MEAK), including cellular electrophysiological characterization of observed clinical improvement with fever. We analyzed clinical, electroclinical, and neuroimaging data for 20 patients with MEAK due to recurrent KCNC1 p.R320H mutation. In vitro electrophysiological studies were conducted using whole cell patch-clamp to explore biophysical properties of wild-type and mutant KV 3.1 channels. Symptoms began at between 3 and 15 years of age (median = 9.5), with progressively severe myoclonus and rare tonic-clonic seizures. Ataxia was present early, but quickly became overshadowed by myoclonus; 10 patients were wheelchair-bound by their late teenage years. Mild cognitive decline occurred in half. Early death was not observed. Electroencephalogram (EEG) showed generalized spike and polyspike wave discharges, with documented photosensitivity in most. Polygraphic EEG-electromyographic studies demonstrated a cortical origin for myoclonus and striking coactivation of agonist and antagonist muscles. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed symmetrical cerebellar atrophy, which appeared progressive, and a prominent corpus callosum. Unexpectedly, transient clinical improvement with fever was noted in 6 patients. To explore this, we performed high-temperature in vitro recordings. At elevated temperatures, there was a robust leftward shift in activation of wild-type KV 3.1, increasing channel availability. MEAK has a relatively homogeneous presentation, resembling Unverricht-Lundborg disease, despite the genetic and biological basis being quite different. A remarkable improvement with fever may be explained by the temperature-dependent leftward shift in activation of wild-type KV 3.1 subunit-containing channels, which would counter the loss of function observed for mutant channels, highlighting KCNC1 as a potential target for precision therapeutics. Ann Neurol 2017

  7. Structural and Biochemical Consequences of Disease-Causing Mutations in the Ankyrin Repeat Domain of the Human TRPV4 Channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inada, Hitoshi; Procko, Erik; Sotomayor, Marcos; Gaudet, Rachelle (Harvard-Med); (Harvard)

    2012-10-23

    The TRPV4 calcium-permeable cation channel plays important physiological roles in osmosensation, mechanosensation, cell barrier formation, and bone homeostasis. Recent studies reported that mutations in TRPV4, including some in its ankyrin repeat domain (ARD), are associated with human inherited diseases, including neuropathies and skeletal dysplasias, probably because of the increased constitutive activity of the channel. TRPV4 activity is regulated by the binding of calmodulin and small molecules such as ATP to the ARD at its cytoplasmic N-terminus. We determined structures of ATP-free and -bound forms of human TRPV4-ARD and compared them with available TRPV-ARD structures. The third inter-repeat loop region (Finger 3 loop) is flexible and may act as a switch to regulate channel activity. Comparisons of TRPV-ARD structures also suggest an evolutionary link between ARD structure and ATP binding ability. Thermal stability analyses and molecular dynamics simulations suggest that ATP increases stability in TRPV-ARDs that can bind ATP. Biochemical analyses of a large panel of TRPV4-ARD mutations associated with human inherited diseases showed that some impaired thermal stability while others weakened ATP binding ability, suggesting molecular mechanisms for the diseases.

  8. Mutations within the S4-S5 linker alter voltage sensor constraints in hERG K+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Slyke, Aaron C; Rezazadeh, Saman; Snopkowski, Mischa; Shi, Patrick; Allard, Charlene R; Claydon, Tom W

    2010-11-03

    Human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG) channel gating is associated with slow activation, yet the mechanistic basis for this is unclear. Here, we examine the effects of mutation of a unique glycine residue (G546) in the S4-S5 linker on voltage sensor movement and its coupling to pore gating. Substitution of G546 with residues possessing different physicochemical properties shifted activation gating by ∼-50 mV (with the exception of G546C). With the activation shift taken into account, the time constant of activation was also accelerated, suggesting a stabilization of the closed state by ∼1.6-4.3 kcal/mol (the energy equivalent of one to two hydrogen bonds). Predictions of the α-helical content of the S4-S5 linker suggest that the presence of G546 in wild-type hERG provides flexibility to the helix. Deactivation gating was affected differentially by the G546 substitutions. G546V induced a pronounced slow component of closing that was voltage-independent. Fluorescence measurements of voltage sensor movement in G546V revealed a slow component of voltage sensor return that was uncoupled from charge movement, suggesting a direct effect of the mutation on voltage sensor movement. These data suggest that G546 plays a critical role in channel gating and that hERG channel closing involves at least two independently modifiable reconfigurations of the voltage sensor.

  9. An autism-associated mutation in CaV1.3 channels has opposing effects on voltage- and Ca(2+)-dependent regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limpitikul, Worawan B; Dick, Ivy E; Ben-Johny, Manu; Yue, David T

    2016-06-03

    CaV1.3 channels are a major class of L-type Ca(2+) channels which contribute to the rhythmicity of the heart and brain. In the brain, these channels are vital for excitation-transcription coupling, synaptic plasticity, and neuronal firing. Moreover, disruption of CaV1.3 function has been associated with several neurological disorders. Here, we focus on the de novo missense mutation A760G which has been linked to autism spectrum disorder (ASD). To explore the role of this mutation in ASD pathogenesis, we examined the effects of A760G on CaV1.3 channel gating and regulation. Introduction of the mutation severely diminished the Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation (CDI) of CaV1.3 channels, an important feedback system required for Ca(2+) homeostasis. This reduction in CDI was observed in two major channel splice variants, though to different extents. Using an allosteric model of channel gating, we found that the underlying mechanism of CDI reduction is likely due to enhanced channel opening within the Ca(2+)-inactivated mode. Remarkably, the A760G mutation also caused an opposite increase in voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI), resulting in a multifaceted mechanism underlying ASD. When combined, these regulatory deficits appear to increase the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, thus potentially disrupting neuronal development and synapse formation, ultimately leading to ASD.

  10. CACNA1D de novo mutations in autism spectrum disorders activate Cav1.3 L-type calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinggera, Alexandra; Lieb, Andreas; Benedetti, Bruno; Lampert, Michaela; Monteleone, Stefania; Liedl, Klaus R; Tuluc, Petronel; Striessnig, Jörg

    2015-05-01

    Cav1.3 voltage-gated L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) are part of postsynaptic neuronal signaling networks. They play a key role in brain function, including fear memory and emotional and drug-taking behaviors. A whole-exome sequencing study identified a de novo mutation, p.A749G, in Cav1.3 α1-subunits (CACNA1D), the second main LTCC in the brain, as 1 of 62 high risk-conferring mutations in a cohort of patients with autism and intellectual disability. We screened all published genetic information available from whole-exome sequencing studies and identified a second de novo CACNA1D mutation, p.G407R. Both mutations are present only in the probands and not in their unaffected parents or siblings. We functionally expressed both mutations in tsA-201 cells to study their functional consequences using whole-cell patch-clamp. The mutations p.A749G and p.G407R caused dramatic changes in channel gating by shifting (~15 mV) the voltage dependence for steady-state activation and inactivation to more negative voltages (p.A749G) or by pronounced slowing of current inactivation during depolarizing stimuli (p.G407R). In both cases, these changes are compatible with a gain-of-function phenotype. Our data, together with the discovery that Cav1.3 gain-of-function causes primary aldosteronism with seizures, neurologic abnormalities, and intellectual disability, suggest that Cav1.3 gain-of-function mutations confer a major part of the risk for autism in the two probands and may even cause the disease. Our findings have immediate clinical relevance because blockers of LTCCs are available for therapeutic attempts in affected individuals. Patients should also be explored for other symptoms likely resulting from Cav1.3 hyperactivity, in particular, primary aldosteronism. Copyright © 2015 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Mutations in the sodium channel gene SCN2A cause neonatal epilepsy with late-onset episodic ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, N; Hahn, A; Bast, T; Müller, S; Löffler, H; Maljevic, S; Gaily, E; Prehl, I; Biskup, S; Joensuu, T; Lehesjoki, A-E; Neubauer, B A; Lerche, H; Hedrich, U B S

    2016-02-01

    Mutations in SCN2A cause epilepsy syndromes of variable severity including neonatal-infantile seizures. In one case, we previously described additional childhood-onset episodic ataxia. Here, we corroborate and detail the latter phenotype in three further cases. We describe the clinical characteristics, identify the causative SCN2A mutations and determine their functional consequences using whole-cell patch-clamping in mammalian cells. In total, four probands presented with neonatal-onset seizures remitting after five to 13 months. In early childhood, they started to experience repeated episodes of ataxia, accompanied in part by headache or back pain lasting minutes to several hours. In two of the new cases, we detected the novel mutation p.Arg1882Gly. While this mutation occurred de novo in both patients, one of them carries an additional known variant on the same SCN2A allele, inherited from the unaffected father (p.Gly1522Ala). Whereas p.Arg1882Gly alone shifted the activation curve by -4 mV, the combination of both variants did not affect activation, but caused a depolarizing shift of voltage-dependent inactivation, and a significant increase in Na(+) current density and protein production. p.Gly1522Ala alone did not change channel gating. The third new proband carries the same de novo SCN2A gain-of-function mutation as our first published case (p.Ala263Val). Our findings broaden the clinical spectrum observed with SCN2A gain-of-function mutations, showing that fairly different biophysical mechanisms can cause a convergent clinical phenotype of neonatal seizures and later onset episodic ataxia.

  12. A Kir6.2 pore mutation causes inactivation of ATP-sensitive potassium channels by disrupting PIP2-dependent gating.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy D Bushman

    Full Text Available In the absence of intracellular nucleotides, ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP channels exhibit spontaneous activity via a phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2-dependent gating process. Previous studies show that stability of this activity requires subunit-subunit interactions in the cytoplasmic domain of Kir6.2; selective mutagenesis and disease mutations at the subunit interface result in time-dependent channel inactivation. Here, we report that mutation of the central glycine in the pore-lining second transmembrane segment (TM2 to proline in Kir6.2 causes KATP channel inactivation. Unlike C-type inactivation, a consequence of selectivity filter closure, in many K(+ channels, the rate of inactivation in G156P channels was insensitive to changes in extracellular ion concentrations or ion species fluxing through the pore. Instead, the rate of G156P inactivation decreased with exogenous application of PIP2 and increased when PIP2-channel interaction was inhibited with neomycin or poly-L-lysine. These findings indicate the G156P mutation reduces the ability of PIP2 to stabilize the open state of KATP channels, similar to mutations in the cytoplasmic domain that produce inactivation. Consistent with this notion, when PIP2-dependent open state stability was substantially increased by addition of a second gain-of-function mutation, G156P inactivation was abolished. Importantly, bath application and removal of Mg(2+-free ATP or a nonhydrolyzable analog of ATP, which binds to the cytoplasmic domain of Kir6.2 and causes channel closure, recover G156P channel from inactivation, indicating crosstalk between cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains. The G156P mutation provides mechanistic insight into the structural and functional interactions between the pore and cytoplasmic domains of Kir6.2 during gating.

  13. Inherited macular degeneration-associated mutations in CNGB3 increase the ligand sensitivity and spontaneous open probability of cone cyclic nucleotide-gated channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meighan, Peter C.; Peng, Changhong; Varnum, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide gated (CNG) channels are a critical component of the visual transduction cascade in the vertebrate retina. Mutations in the genes encoding these channels have been associated with a spectrum of inherited retinal disorders. To gain insight into their pathophysiological mechanisms, we have investigated the functional consequences of several CNGB3 mutations, previously associated with macular degeneration (Y469D and L595F) or complete achromatopsia (S156F, P309L, and G558C), by expressing these subunits in combination with wild-type CNGA3 in Xenopus oocytes and characterizing them using patch-clamp recordings in the inside-out configuration. These mutations did not prevent the formation of functional heteromeric channels, as indicated by sensitivity to block by L-cis-diltiazem. With the exception of S156F, each of the mutant channels displayed electrophysiological properties reflecting enhanced channel activity at physiological concentrations of cGMP (i.e., a gain-of-function phenotype). The increased channel activity produced by these mutations resulted from either increased functional expression levels, or increased sensitivity to cyclic nucleotides. Furthermore, L595F increased the spontaneous open probability in the absence of activating ligand, signifying a ligand independent gain-of-function change. In addition to the CNGB3 disease-associate mutations, we characterized the effects of several common CNGB3 and CNGA3 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on heteromeric CNGA3+CNGB3 channel function. Two of the SNPs examined (A3-T153M, and B3-W234C) produced decreased ligand sensitivity for heteromeric CNG channels. These changes may contribute to background disease susceptibility when combined with other genetic or non-genetic factors. Together, these studies help to define the underlying molecular phenotype for mutations relating to CNG channel disease pathogenesis. PMID:26106334

  14. Inherited macular degeneration-associated mutations in CNGB3 increase the ligand sensitivity and spontaneous open probability of cone cyclic nucleotide-gated channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eMeighan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic nucleotide gated (CNG channels are a critical component of the visual transduction cascade in the vertebrate retina. Mutations in the genes encoding these channels have been associated with a spectrum of inherited retinal disorders. To gain insight into their pathophysiological mechanisms, we have investigated the functional consequences of several CNGB3 mutations, previously associated with macular degeneration (Y469D and L595F or complete achromatopsia (S156F, P309L, and G558C, by expressing these subunits in combination with wild-type CNGA3 in Xenopus oocytes and characterizing them using patch-clamp recordings in the inside-out configuration. These mutations did not prevent the formation of functional heteromeric channels, as indicated by sensitivity to block by L-cis-diltiazem. With the exception of S156F, each of the mutant channels displayed electrophysiological properties reflecting enhanced channel activity at physiological concentrations of cGMP (i.e., a gain-of-function phenotype. The increased channel activity produced by these mutations resulted from either increased functional expression levels, or increased sensitivity to cyclic nucleotides. Furthermore, L595F increased the spontaneous open probability in the absence of activating ligand, signifying a ligand independent gain-of-function change. In addition to the CNGB3 disease-associate mutations, we characterized the effects of several common CNGB3 and CNGA3 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs on heteromeric CNGA3+CNGB3 channel function. Two of the SNPs examined (A3-T153M, and B3-W234C produced decreased ligand sensitivity for heteromeric CNG channels. These changes may contribute to background disease susceptibility when combined with other genetic or nongenetic factors. Together, these studies help to define the underlying molecular phenotype for mutations relating to CNG channel disease pathogenesis.

  15. Novel Mutations in the Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel of Pyrethroid-Resistant Varroa destructor Populations from the Southeastern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Cabrera, Joel; Rodríguez-Vargas, Sonia; Davies, T. G. Emyr; Field, Linda M.; Schmehl, Daniel; Ellis, James D.; Krieger, Klemens; Williamson, Martin S.

    2016-01-01

    The parasitic mite Varroa destructor has a significant worldwide impact on bee colony health. In the absence of control measures, parasitized colonies invariably collapse within 3 years. The synthetic pyrethroids tau-fluvalinate and flumethrin have proven very effective at managing this mite within apiaries, but intensive control programs based mainly on one active ingredient have led to many reports of pyrethroid resistance. In Europe, a modification of leucine to valine at position 925 (L925V) of the V. destructor voltage-gated sodium channel was correlated with resistance, the mutation being found at high frequency exclusively in hives with a recent history of pyrethroid treatment. Here, we identify two novel mutations, L925M and L925I, in tau-fluvalinate resistant V. destructor collected at seven sites across Florida and Georgia in the Southeastern region of the USA. Using a multiplexed TaqMan® allelic discrimination assay, these mutations were found to be present in 98% of the mites surviving tau-fluvalinate treatment. The mutations were also found in 45% of the non-treated mites, suggesting a high potential for resistance evolution if selection pressure is applied. The results from a more extensive monitoring programme, using the Taqman® assay described here, would clearly help beekeepers with their decision making as to when to include or exclude pyrethroid control products and thereby facilitate more effective mite management programmes. PMID:27191597

  16. Novel Mutations in the Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel of Pyrethroid-Resistant Varroa destructor Populations from the Southeastern USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel González-Cabrera

    Full Text Available The parasitic mite Varroa destructor has a significant worldwide impact on bee colony health. In the absence of control measures, parasitized colonies invariably collapse within 3 years. The synthetic pyrethroids tau-fluvalinate and flumethrin have proven very effective at managing this mite within apiaries, but intensive control programs based mainly on one active ingredient have led to many reports of pyrethroid resistance. In Europe, a modification of leucine to valine at position 925 (L925V of the V. destructor voltage-gated sodium channel was correlated with resistance, the mutation being found at high frequency exclusively in hives with a recent history of pyrethroid treatment. Here, we identify two novel mutations, L925M and L925I, in tau-fluvalinate resistant V. destructor collected at seven sites across Florida and Georgia in the Southeastern region of the USA. Using a multiplexed TaqMan® allelic discrimination assay, these mutations were found to be present in 98% of the mites surviving tau-fluvalinate treatment. The mutations were also found in 45% of the non-treated mites, suggesting a high potential for resistance evolution if selection pressure is applied. The results from a more extensive monitoring programme, using the Taqman® assay described here, would clearly help beekeepers with their decision making as to when to include or exclude pyrethroid control products and thereby facilitate more effective mite management programmes.

  17. Update on the frequency of Ile1016 mutation in voltage-gated sodium channel gene of Aedes aegypti in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siller, Quetzaly; Ponce, Gustavo; Lozano, Saul; Flores, Adriana E

    2011-12-01

    We analyzed 790 Aedes aegypti from 14 localities of Mexico in 2009 to update information on the frequency of the Ile1016 allele in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene that confers resistance to pyrethroids and DDT. The Ile1016 mutation was present in all 17 collections, and was close to fixation in Acapulco (frequency = 0.97), Iguala (0.93), and San Nicolas (0.90). Genotypes at the 1016 locus were not in Hardy-Weinberg proportions in collections from Panuco, Veracruz, Cosoleacaque, Coatzacoalcos, Tantoyuca, and Monterrey due in every case to an excess of homozygotes. The high frequencies of this mutation in Ae. aegypti are probably due to selection pressure from pyrethroid insecticides, particularly permethrin, which has been used in mosquito control programs for >10 years in Mexico.

  18. Mutations in sodium-channel gene SCN9A cause a spectrum of human genetic pain disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drenth, Joost P H; Waxman, Stephen G

    2007-12-01

    The voltage-gated sodium-channel type IX alpha subunit, known as Na(v)1.7 and encoded by the gene SCN9A, is located in peripheral neurons and plays an important role in action potential production in these cells. Recent genetic studies have identified Na(v)1.7 dysfunction in three different human pain disorders. Gain-of-function missense mutations in Na(v)1.7 have been shown to cause primary erythermalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder, while nonsense mutations in Na(v)1.7 result in loss of Na(v)1.7 function and a condition known as channelopathy-associated insensitivity to pain, a rare disorder in which affected individuals are unable to feel physical pain. This review highlights these recent developments and discusses the critical role of Na(v)1.7 in pain sensation in humans.

  19. Primary erythromelalgia in a 12-year-old boy: positive response to sodium channel blockers despite negative SCN9A mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakob, A; Creutzfeldt, R; Staszewski, O; Winterpacht, A; Berner, R; Hufnagel, M

    2012-09-01

    Erythromelalgia is a rare disorder characterized by recurrent pain attacks, swelling and redness in the distal extremities. The primary forms of the disorder are caused by mutations in voltage-gated sodium channels. Treatment is difficult and controlled therapeutic studies offer little to no guidance. We report on a 12-year-old boy and his first occurrence of primary erythromelalgia. Genetic findings for mutations in the SCN9A gene, which encodes for the α-subunit of sodium channel NaV1.7, were negative. Although initial treatment with sodium nitroprusside was ineffective, subsequent medication with lidocaine and mexiletine, in combination with gabapentin, was successful. Despite negative findings for mutations in the sodium channels, the use of sodium channel blockers should be considered in these patients.

  20. Inherited Cardiac Diseases Caused by Mutations in the Nav1.5 Sodium Channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Jacob; Winkel, Bo Gregers; Grunnet, Morten

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac Diseases Caused by SCN5A Mutations. A prerequisite for a normal cardiac function is a proper generation and propagation of electrical impulses. Contraction of the heart is obtained through a delicate matched transmission of the electrical impulses. A pivotal element of the impulse propaga......-QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, and AF, reported to be associated with mutations in SCN5A, are thoroughly described. (J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol, Vol. pp. 1-9)....

  1. Point mutations at the local anesthetic receptor site modulate the state-dependent block of rat Na v1.4 sodium channels by pyrazoline-type insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Kristopher S; Soderlund, David M

    2007-05-01

    Pyrazoline-type insecticides (PTIs) selectively block sodium channels at membrane potentials that promote slow sodium channel inactivation and are proposed to interact with a site that overlaps the local anesthetic (LA) receptor site. Mutagenesis studies identified two amino acid residues in the S6 segment of homology domain IV (Phe-1579 and Tyr-1586 in the rat Na(v)1.4 sodium channel) as principal elements of the LA receptor. To test the hypothesis that PTIs bind to the LA receptor, we constructed mutated Na(v)1.4/F1579A and Na(v)1.4/Y1586A cDNAs, expressed native and mutated channels in Xenopus oocytes, and examined the effects of these mutations on channel block by three PTIs (indoxacarb, its bioactivation product DCJW, and RH3421) by two-electrode voltage clamp. DCJW and RH3421 had no effect on Na(v)1.4 channels held at -120mV but caused a slowly developing block upon depolarization to -30mV. Estimated IC(50) values following 15min of exposure were 1 and 4muM for DCJW and RH3421, respectively. Indoxacarb failed to block Na(v)1.4 channels under all experimental conditions. Sensitivity to block by DCJW and RH3421 at -30mV was significantly reduced in Na(v)1.4/F1579A channels, a finding that is consistent with the impact of this mutation on drug binding. In contrast to its effect on drug binding, the Y1586A mutation increased the sensitivity of Na(v)1.4 channels held at -30mV to all three compounds, conferring modest sensitivity to indoxacarb and increasing sensitivity to DCJW and RH3421 by 58- and 16-fold, respectively. These results provide direct evidence for the action of PTIs at the LA receptor.

  2. A1152D mutation of the Na+ channel causes paramyotonia congenita and emphasizes the role of DIII/S4-S5 linker in fast inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhours, Magali; Luce, Sandrine; Sternberg, Damien; Willer, Jean Claude; Fontaine, Bertrand; Tabti, Nacira

    2005-06-01

    Missense mutations in the human skeletal muscle Na+ channel alpha subunit (hSkM1) are responsible for a number of muscle excitability disorders. Among them, paramyotonia congenita (PC) is characterized by episodes of muscle stiffness induced by cold and aggravated by exercise. We have identified a new PC-associated mutation, which substitutes aspartic acid for a conserved alanine in the S4-S5 linker of domain III (A1152D). This residue is of particular interest since its homologue in the rat brain type II Na+ channel has been suggested as an essential receptor site for the fast inactivation particle. To identify the biophysical changes induced by the A1152D mutation, we stably expressed hSkM1 mutant or wild-type (WT) channels in HEK293 (human embryonic kidney) cells, and recorded whole-cell Na+ currents with the patch-clamp technique. Experiments were performed both at 21 and 11 degrees C to better understand the sensitivity to cold of paramyotonia. The A1152D mutation disrupted channel fast inactivation. In comparison to the WT, mutant channels inactivated with slower kinetics and displayed a 5 mV depolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of the steady-state. The other noticeable defect of A1152D mutant channels was an accelerated rate of deactivation from the inactivated state. Decreasing temperature by 10 degrees C amplified the differences in channel gating kinetics between mutant and WT, and unveiled differences in both the sustained current and channel deactivation from the open state. Overall, cold-exacerbated mutant defects may result in a sufficient excess of Na+ influx to produce repetitive firing and myotonia. In the light of previous reports, our data point to functional as well as phenotypic differences between mutations of conserved S4-S5 residues in domains II and III of the human skeletal muscle Na+ channel.

  3. Multi-country Survey Revealed Prevalent and Novel F1534S Mutation in Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel (VGSC Gene in Aedes albopictus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiabao Xu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Aedes albopictus is an important dengue vector because of its aggressive biting behavior and rapid spread out of its native home range in Southeast Asia. Pyrethroids are widely used for adult mosquito control, and resistance to pyrethroids should be carefully monitored because vector control is the only effective method currently available to prevent dengue transmission. The voltage-gated sodium channel gene is the target site of pyrethroids, and mutations in this gene cause knockdown resistance (kdr. Previous studies reported various mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC gene, but the spatial distribution of kdr mutations in Ae. albopictus has not been systematically examined, and the association between kdr mutation and phenotypic resistance has not been established.A total of 597 Ae. albopictus individuals from 12 populations across Asia, Africa, America and Europe were examined for mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene. Three domains for a total of 1,107 bp were sequenced for every individual. Two populations from southern China were examined for pyrethroid resistance using the World Health Organization standard tube bioassay, and the association between kdr mutations and phenotypic resistance was tested.A total of 29 synonymous mutations were found across domain II, III and IV of the VGSC gene. Non-synonymous mutations in two codons of the VGSC gene were detected in 5 populations from 4 countries. A novel mutation at 1532 codon (I1532T was found in Rome, Italy with a frequency of 19.7%. The second novel mutation at codon 1534 (F1534S was detected in southern China and Florida, USA with a frequency ranging from 9.5-22.6%. The WHO insecticide susceptibility bioassay found 90.1% and 96.1% mortality in the two populations from southern China, suggesting resistance and probable resistance. Positive association between kdr mutations with deltamethrin resistance was established in these two populations.Two novel kdr

  4. SCN9A mutations in paroxysmal extreme pain disorder: allelic variants underlie distinct channel defects and phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertleman, Caroline R; Baker, Mark D; Parker, Keith A; Moffatt, Sarah; Elmslie, Frances V; Abrahamsen, Bjarke; Ostman, Johan; Klugbauer, Norbert; Wood, John N; Gardiner, R Mark; Rees, Michele

    2006-12-07

    Paroxysmal extreme pain disorder (PEPD), previously known as familial rectal pain (FRP, or OMIM 167400), is an inherited condition characterized by paroxysms of rectal, ocular, or submandibular pain with flushing. A genome-wide linkage search followed by mutational analysis of the candidate gene SCN9A, which encodes hNa(v)1.7, identified eight missense mutations in 11 families and 2 sporadic cases. Functional analysis in vitro of three of these mutant Na(v)1.7 channels revealed a reduction in fast inactivation, leading to persistent sodium current. Other mutations in SCN9A associated with more negative activation thresholds are known to cause primary erythermalgia (PE). Carbamazepine, a drug that is effective in PEPD, but not PE, showed selective block of persistent current associated with PEPD mutants, but did not affect the negative activation threshold of a PE mutant. PEPD and PE are allelic variants with distinct underlying biophysical mechanisms and represent a separate class of peripheral neuronal sodium channelopathy.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of a monomeric mutant Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase with partially reconstituted enzymic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banci, L; Bertini, I; Chiu, C Y; Mullenbach, G T; Viezzoli, M S

    1995-12-15

    A monomeric analog of human Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (F50E/G51E SOD), previously characterized and found to have reduced enzymic activity, was here further modified by replacing Glu133 with Gln. This substitution does not dramatically affect the coordination geometry at the active site, but enhances enzymic activity, and also increases the affinity for anions at the active site. This behavior parallels earlier published results in which this point mutation was made in the dimeric wild-type enzyme. The analog described here has afforded for the first time a monomeric superoxide dismutase with substantial activity. This point mutation does not significantly influence the protein structure but interactions with anions, including superoxide, are altered with respect to the monomeric form. The present monomeric Glu133Gln mutant has partially restored enzymic activity. The diminished activity of the monomeric analogs is discussed in the light of possible minor structural changes and some of their characteristics are compared with those of naturally occurring mutants associated with various neurological diseases.

  6. Size separation of analytes using monomeric surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Edward S.; Wei, Wei

    2005-04-12

    A sieving medium for use in the separation of analytes in a sample containing at least one such analyte comprises a monomeric non-ionic surfactant of the of the general formula, B-A, wherein A is a hydrophilic moiety and B is a hydrophobic moiety, present in a solvent at a concentration forming a self-assembled micelle configuration under selected conditions and having an aggregation number providing an equivalent weight capable of effecting the size separation of the sample solution so as to resolve a target analyte(s) in a solution containing the same, the size separation taking place in a chromatography or electrophoresis separation system.

  7. Monomeric Friction Coefficient of Metalnanodispersible Polymeric Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.B. Kolupayev

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Influence of a nanodispersible metal excipient in number of 0    5,0 vol.% Cu for the size of a monomeric friction coefficient of polyvinylchloride (PVC systems in temperature range 298  Т  (Tg + 10 K is investigated. It is shown that various types of coordination movements of building blocks are described by a friction coefficient which serves as a measure of influence of external fields and ingredients on viscoelastic behavior of a composite. The analysis of processes of a relaxation on the basis of the theory of flexible chains taking into account power and entropic factors is carried out.

  8. Mutations at opposite ends of the DIII/S4-S5 linker of sodium channel NaV1.7 produce distinct pain disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyrrell Lynda

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two groups of gain-of-function mutations in sodium channel NaV1.7, which are expressed in dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons, produce two clinically-distinct pain syndromes - inherited erythromelalgia (IEM and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder (PEPD. IEM is characterized by intermittent burning pain and skin redness in the feet or hands, triggered by warmth or mild exercise, while PEPD is characterized by episodes of rectal, ocular and mandibular pain accompanied with skin flushing, triggered by bowel movement and perianal stimulation. Most of the IEM mutations are located within channel domains I and II, while most of the PEPD mutations are located within domains III and IV. The structural dichotomy parallels the biophysical effects of the two types of mutations, with IEM mutations shifting voltage-dependence of NaV1.7 activation in a hyperpolarized direction, and PEPD mutations shifting fast-inactivation of NaV1.7 in a depolarized direction. While four IEM and four PEPD mutations are located within cytoplasmic linkers joining segments 4 and 5 (S4-S5 linkers in the different domains (IEM: domains I and II; PEPD: domains III and IV, no S4-S5 linker has been reported to house both IEM and PEPD mutations thus far. Results We have identified a new IEM mutation P1308L within the C-terminus of the DIII/S4-S5 linker of NaV1.7, ten amino acids from a known PEPD mutation V1298F which is located within the N-terminus of this linker. We used voltage-clamp to compare the biophysical properties of the two mutant channels and current-clamp to study their effects on DRG neuron excitability. We confirm that P1308L and V1298F behave as prototypical IEM and PEPD mutations, respectively. We also show that DRG neurons expressing either P1308L or V1298F become hyperexcitable, compared to DRG neurons expressing wild-type channels. Conclusions Our results provide evidence for differential roles of the DIII/S4-S5 linker N- and C-termini in channel

  9. Discriminative detection of low-abundance point mutations using a PCR/ligase detection reaction/capillary gel electrophoresis method and fluorescence dual-channel monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Mariko; Shimase, Koji; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhiko; Hashimoto, Masahiko

    2014-04-01

    We applied a facile LIF dual-channel monitoring system recently developed and reported by our group to the polymerase chain reaction/ligase detection reaction/CGE method for detecting low-abundance point mutations present in a wild-type sequence-dominated population. Mutation discrimination limits and signaling fidelity of the analytical system were evaluated using three mutant variations in codon 12 of the K-ras oncogene that have high diagnostic value for colorectal cancer. We demonstrated the high sensitivity of the present method by detecting rare mutations present among an excess of wild-type alleles (one mutation among ~100 normal sequences). This method also simultaneously interrogated the allelic compositions of the test samples with high specificity through spectral discrimination of the dye-tagged ligase detection reaction products using the dual-channel monitoring system. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Effects of familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 mutations on neuronal P/Q-type Ca2+ channel activity and inhibitory synaptic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yu-Qing; Tsien, Richard W

    2005-02-15

    Inhibitory synapses play key roles in the modulatory circuitry that regulates pain signaling and generation of migraine headache. A rare, dominant form of this common disease, familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1), arises from missense mutations in the pore-forming alpha1A subunit of P/Q-type Ca2+ channels. These channels are normally vital for presynaptic Ca2+ entry and neurotransmitter release at many central synapses, raising questions about effects of FHM1 mutations on neuronal Ca2+ influx and inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission. We have expressed the four original FHM1 mutant channels in hippocampal neurons from alpha1A knockout mice. Whole-cell recordings indicated that FHM1 mutant channels were less effective than wild-type channels in their ability to conduct P/Q-type current, but not generally different from wild type in voltage-dependent channel gating. Ca2+ influx triggered by action potential waveforms was also diminished. In keeping with decreased channel activity, FHM1 mutant channels were correspondingly impaired in supporting the P/Q-type component of inhibitory neurotransmission. When expressed in wild-type inhibitory neurons, FHM1 mutant channels reduced the contribution of P/Q-type channels to GABAergic synaptic currents, consistent with a competition of mutant and endogenous channels for P/Q-specific slots. In all cases, N-type channels took up the burden of supporting transmission and homeostatic mechanisms maintained overall synaptic strength. The shift to reliance on N-type channels greatly increased the susceptibility to G protein-coupled modulation of neurotransmission, studied with the GABAB agonist baclofen. Thus, mutant-expressing synapses might be weakened in a heightened state of neuromodulation like that provoked by triggers of migraine such as stress.

  11. Phenotypical Manifestations of Mutations in the Genes Encoding Subunits of the Cardiac Sodium Channel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Brugada, Ramon

    2011-01-01

    Variations in the gene encoding for the major sodium channel (Na(v)1.5) in the heart, SCN5A, has been shown to cause a number of arrhythmia syndromes (with or without structural changes in the myocardium), including the long-QT syndrome (type 3), Brugada syndrome, (progressive) cardiac conduction di

  12. Mutations at the Signature Sequence of CFTR Create a Cd2+-gated Chloride Channel

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaohui; Bompadre, Silvia G.; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2009-01-01

    The canonical sequence LSGGQ, also known as the signature sequence, defines the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporter superfamily. Crystallographic studies reveal that the signature sequence, together with the Walker A and Walker B motifs, forms the ATP-binding pocket upon dimerization of the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) in a head-to-tail configuration. The importance of the signature sequence is attested by the fact that a glycine to aspartate mutation (i.e., G55...

  13. A cyclic nucleotide-gated channel mutation associated with canine daylight blindness provides insight into a role for the S2 segment tri-Asp motif in channel biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Naoto; Delemotte, Lucie; Klein, Michael L; Komáromy, András M; Tanaka, Jacqueline C

    2014-01-01

    Cone cyclic nucleotide-gated channels are tetramers formed by CNGA3 and CNGB3 subunits; CNGA3 subunits function as homotetrameric channels but CNGB3 exhibits channel function only when co-expressed with CNGA3. An aspartatic acid (Asp) to asparagine (Asn) missense mutation at position 262 in the canine CNGB3 (D262N) subunit results in loss of cone function (daylight blindness), suggesting an important role for this aspartic acid residue in channel biogenesis and/or function. Asp 262 is located in a conserved region of the second transmembrane segment containing three Asp residues designated the Tri-Asp motif. This motif is conserved in all CNG channels. Here we examine mutations in canine CNGA3 homomeric channels using a combination of experimental and computational approaches. Mutations of these conserved Asp residues result in the absence of nucleotide-activated currents in heterologous expression. A fluorescent tag on CNGA3 shows mislocalization of mutant channels. Co-expressing CNGB3 Tri-Asp mutants with wild type CNGA3 results in some functional channels, however, their electrophysiological characterization matches the properties of homomeric CNGA3 channels. This failure to record heteromeric currents suggests that Asp/Asn mutations affect heteromeric subunit assembly. A homology model of S1-S6 of the CNGA3 channel was generated and relaxed in a membrane using molecular dynamics simulations. The model predicts that the Tri-Asp motif is involved in non-specific salt bridge pairings with positive residues of S3/S4. We propose that the D262N mutation in dogs with CNGB3-day blindness results in the loss of these inter-helical interactions altering the electrostatic equilibrium within in the S1-S4 bundle. Because residues analogous to Tri-Asp in the voltage-gated Shaker potassium channel family were implicated in monomer folding, we hypothesize that destabilizing these electrostatic interactions impairs the monomer folding state in D262N mutant CNG channels during

  14. Snowflake vitreoretinal degeneration (SVD) mutation R162W provides new insights into Kir7.1 ion channel structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattnaik, Bikash R; Tokarz, Sara; Asuma, Matti P; Schroeder, Tyler; Sharma, Anil; Mitchell, Julie C; Edwards, Albert O; Pillers, De-Ann M

    2013-01-01

    Snowflake Vitreoretinal Degeneration (SVD) is associated with the R162W mutation of the Kir7.1 inwardly-rectifying potassium channel. Kir7.1 is found at the apical membrane of Retinal Pigment Epithelial (RPE) cells, adjacent to the photoreceptor neurons. The SVD phenotype ranges from RPE degeneration to an abnormal b-wave to a liquid vitreous. We sought to determine how this mutation alters the structure and function of the human Kir7.1 channel. In this study, we expressed a Kir7.1 construct with the R162W mutation in CHO cells to evaluate function of the ion channel. Compared to the wild-type protein, the mutant protein exhibited a non-functional Kir channel that resulted in depolarization of the resting membrane potential. Upon co-expression with wild-type Kir7.1, R162W mutant showed a reduction of IKir7.1 and positive shift in '0' current potential. Homology modeling based on the structure of a bacterial Kir channel protein suggested that the effect of R162W mutation is a result of loss of hydrogen bonding by the regulatory lipid binding domain of the cytoplasmic structure.

  15. Snowflake vitreoretinal degeneration (SVD mutation R162W provides new insights into Kir7.1 ion channel structure and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bikash R Pattnaik

    Full Text Available Snowflake Vitreoretinal Degeneration (SVD is associated with the R162W mutation of the Kir7.1 inwardly-rectifying potassium channel. Kir7.1 is found at the apical membrane of Retinal Pigment Epithelial (RPE cells, adjacent to the photoreceptor neurons. The SVD phenotype ranges from RPE degeneration to an abnormal b-wave to a liquid vitreous. We sought to determine how this mutation alters the structure and function of the human Kir7.1 channel. In this study, we expressed a Kir7.1 construct with the R162W mutation in CHO cells to evaluate function of the ion channel. Compared to the wild-type protein, the mutant protein exhibited a non-functional Kir channel that resulted in depolarization of the resting membrane potential. Upon co-expression with wild-type Kir7.1, R162W mutant showed a reduction of IKir7.1 and positive shift in '0' current potential. Homology modeling based on the structure of a bacterial Kir channel protein suggested that the effect of R162W mutation is a result of loss of hydrogen bonding by the regulatory lipid binding domain of the cytoplasmic structure.

  16. Mutations in the Gene Encoding the Calcium-Permeable Ion Channel TRPV4 Produce Spondylometaphyseal Dysplasia, Kozlowski Type and Metatropic Dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakow, Deborah; Vriens, Joris; Camacho, Natalia; Luong, Phi; Deixler, Hannah; Funari, Tara L.; Bacino, Carlos A.; Irons, Mira B.; Holm, Ingrid A.; Sadler, Laurie; Okenfuss, Ericka B.; Janssens, Annelies; Voets, Thomas; Rimoin, David L.; Lachman, Ralph S.; Nilius, Bernd; Cohn, Daniel H.

    2009-01-01

    The spondylometaphyseal dysplasias (SMDs) are a group of short-stature disorders distinguished by abnormalities in the vertebrae and the metaphyses of the tubular bones. SMD Kozlowski type (SMDK) is a well-defined autosomal-dominant SMD characterized by significant scoliosis and mild metaphyseal abnormalities in the pelvis. The vertebrae exhibit platyspondyly and overfaced pedicles similar to autosomal-dominant brachyolmia, which can result from heterozygosity for activating mutations in the gene encoding TRPV4, a calcium-permeable ion channel. Mutation analysis in six out of six patients with SMDK demonstrated heterozygosity for missense mutations in TRPV4, and one mutation, predicting a R594H substitution, was recurrent in four patients. Similar to autosomal-dominant brachyolmia, the mutations altered basal calcium channel activity in vitro. Metatropic dysplasia is another SMD that has been proposed to have both clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Patients with the nonlethal form of metatropic dysplasia present with a progressive scoliosis, widespread metaphyseal involvement of the appendicular skeleton, and carpal ossification delay. Because of some similar radiographic features between SMDK and metatropic dysplasia, TRPV4 was tested as a disease gene for nonlethal metatropic dysplasia. In two sporadic cases, heterozygosity for de novo missense mutations in TRPV4 was found. The findings demonstrate that mutations in TRPV4 produce a phenotypic spectrum of skeletal dysplasias from the mild autosomal-dominant brachyolmia to SMDK to autosomal-dominant metatropic dysplasia, suggesting that these disorders should be grouped into a new bone dysplasia family. PMID:19232556

  17. The familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 mutation K1336E affects direct G protein-mediated regulation of neuronal P/Q-type Ca2+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza-López, Edgar; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Gandini, María A; Sandoval, Alejandro; Felix, Ricardo

    2013-04-01

    Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM-1) is an autosomal dominant form of migraine with aura characterized by recurrent migraine, hemiparesis and ataxia. FHM-1 has been linked to missense mutations in the CACNA1A gene encoding the pore-forming subunit of the neuronal voltage-gated P/Q-type Ca(2+) channel (CaV2.1α1). Here, we explored the effects of the FHM-1 K1336E mutation on G protein-dependent modulation of the recombinant P/Q-type channel. The mutation was introduced into the human CaV2.1α1 subunit and its functional consequences investigated after heterologous expression in HEK-293 cells using patch-clamp recordings. Functional analysis of the K1336E mutation revealed a reduction of Ca(2+) current densities, a ∼10 mV left-shift in the current-voltage relationship, and the slowing of current inactivation kinetics. When co-expressed along with the human μ-opioid receptor, application of the agonist DAMGO inhibited whole-cell currents through both the wild-type and the mutant channels. Prepulse facilitation was also reduced by the K1336E mutation. Likewise, the kinetic analysis of the onset and decay of facilitation showed that the mutation affects the apparent dissociation and reassociation rates of the Gβγ dimer from the channel complex. These results suggest that the extent of G-protein-mediated inhibition is significantly reduced in the K1336E mutant CaV2.1 Ca(2+) channels. This alteration would contribute to render the neuronal network hyperexcitable, possibly as a consequence of reduced presynaptic inhibition, and may help to explain some aspects of the FHM-1 pathophysiology.

  18. Mutations in different functional domains of the human muscle acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit in patients with the slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croxen, R; Newland, C; Beeson, D; Oosterhuis, H; Chauplannaz, G; Vincent, A; NewsomDavis, J

    1997-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are a group of rare genetic disorders that compromise neuromuscular transmission. A subset of these disorders, the slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome (SCCMS), is dominantly inherited and has been shown to involve mutations within the muscle acetylcholine rece

  19. First de novo KCND3 mutation causes severe Kv4.3 channel dysfunction leading to early onset cerebellar ataxia, intellectual disability, oral apraxia and epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smets, Katrien; Duarri, Anna; Deconinck, Tine; Ceulemans, Berten; van de Warrenburg, Bart P.; Zuechner, Stephan; Gonzalez, Michael Anthony; Schuele, Rebecca; Synofzik, Matthis; Van der Aa, Nathalie; De Jonghe, Peter; Verbeek, Dineke S.; Baets, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Identification of the first de novo mutation in potassium voltage-gated channel, shal-related subfamily, member 3 (KCND3) in a patient with complex early onset cerebellar ataxia in order to expand the genetic and phenotypic spectrum. Methods: Whole exome sequencing in a cerebellar ataxia

  20. First de novo KCND3 mutation causes severe Kv4.3 channel dysfunction leading to early onset cerebellar ataxia, intellectual disability, oral apraxia and epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smets, K.; Duarri, A.; Deconinck, T.; Ceulemans, B.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Zuchner, S.; Gonzalez, M.A.; Schule, R.; Synofzik, M.; Aa, N. van der; Jonghe, P. De; Verbeek, D.S.; Baets, J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Identification of the first de novo mutation in potassium voltage-gated channel, shal-related subfamily, member 3 (KCND3) in a patient with complex early onset cerebellar ataxia in order to expand the genetic and phenotypic spectrum. METHODS: Whole exome sequencing in a cerebellar ataxia

  1. Characterization and mechanisms of action of novel NaV1.5 channel mutations associated with Brugada syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callø, Kirstine; Refaat, Marwan M.; Grubb, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Brugada syndrome is a heterogeneous heart rhythm disorder characterized by an atypical right bundle block pattern with ST-segment elevation and T-wave inversion in the right precordial leads. Loss-of-function mutations in SCN5A encoding the cardiac sodium channel Na(V)1.5 are associated with Brug...

  2. Use-dependent block of the voltage-gated Na(+) channel by tetrodotoxin and saxitoxin: effect of pore mutations that change ionic selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chien-Jung; Schild, Laurent; Moczydlowski, Edward G

    2012-10-01

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels (NaV channels) are specifically blocked by guanidinium toxins such as tetrodotoxin (TTX) and saxitoxin (STX) with nanomolar to micromolar affinity depending on key amino acid substitutions in the outer vestibule of the channel that vary with NaV gene isoforms. All NaV channels that have been studied exhibit a use-dependent enhancement of TTX/STX affinity when the channel is stimulated with brief repetitive voltage depolarizations from a hyperpolarized starting voltage. Two models have been proposed to explain the mechanism of TTX/STX use dependence: a conformational mechanism and a trapped ion mechanism. In this study, we used selectivity filter mutations (K1237R, K1237A, and K1237H) of the rat muscle NaV1.4 channel that are known to alter ionic selectivity and Ca(2+) permeability to test the trapped ion mechanism, which attributes use-dependent enhancement of toxin affinity to electrostatic repulsion between the bound toxin and Ca(2+) or Na(+) ions trapped inside the channel vestibule in the closed state. Our results indicate that TTX/STX use dependence is not relieved by mutations that enhance Ca(2+) permeability, suggesting that ion-toxin repulsion is not the primary factor that determines use dependence. Evidence now favors the idea that TTX/STX use dependence arises from conformational coupling of the voltage sensor domain or domains with residues in the toxin-binding site that are also involved in slow inactivation.

  3. Kv3.3 channels harbouring a mutation of spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 alter excitability and induce cell death in cultured cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irie, Tomohiko; Matsuzaki, Yasunori; Sekino, Yuko; Hirai, Hirokazu

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum plays crucial roles in controlling sensorimotor functions. The neural output from the cerebellar cortex is transmitted solely by Purkinje cells (PCs), whose impairment causes cerebellar ataxia. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 (SCA13) is an autosomal dominant disease, and SCA13 patients exhibit cerebellar atrophy and cerebellar symptoms. Recent studies have shown that missense mutations in the voltage-gated K(+) channel Kv3.3 are responsible for SCA13. In the rodent brain, Kv3.3 mRNAs are expressed most strongly in PCs, suggesting that the mutations severely affect PCs in SCA13 patients. Nevertheless, how these mutations affect the function of Kv3.3 in PCs and, consequently, the morphology and neuronal excitability of PCs remains unclear. To address these questions, we used lentiviral vectors to express mutant mouse Kv3.3 (mKv3.3) channels harbouring an R424H missense mutation, which corresponds to the R423H mutation in the Kv3.3 channels of SCA13 patients, in mouse cerebellar cultures. The R424H mutant-expressing PCs showed decreased outward current density, broadened action potentials and elevated basal [Ca(2+)]i compared with PCs expressing wild-type mKv3.3 subunits or those expressing green fluorescent protein alone. Moreover, expression of R424H mutant subunits induced impaired dendrite development and cell death selectively in PCs, both of which were rescued by blocking P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels in the culture conditions. We therefore concluded that expression of R424H mutant subunits in PCs markedly affects the function of endogenous Kv3 channels, neuronal excitability and, eventually, basal [Ca(2+)]i, leading to cell death. These results suggest that PCs in SCA13 patients also exhibit similar defects in PC excitability and induced cell death, which may explain the pathology of SCA13.

  4. The episodic ataxia type 1 mutation I262T alters voltage-dependent gating and disrupts protein biosynthesis of human Kv1.1 potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Szu-Han; Fu, Ssu-Ju; Huang, Jing-Jia; Tang, Chih-Yung

    2016-01-18

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are essential for setting neuronal membrane excitability. Mutations in human Kv1.1 channels are linked to episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1). The EA1-associated mutation I262T was identified from a patient with atypical phenotypes. Although a previous report has characterized its suppression effect, several key questions regarding the impact of the I262T mutation on Kv1.1 as well as other members of the Kv1 subfamily remain unanswered. Herein we show that the dominant-negative effect of I262T on Kv1.1 current expression is not reversed by co-expression with Kvβ1.1 or Kvβ2 subunits. Biochemical examinations indicate that I262T displays enhanced protein degradation and impedes membrane trafficking of Kv1.1 wild-type subunits. I262T appears to be the first EA1 mutation directly associated with impaired protein stability. Further functional analyses demonstrate that I262T changes the voltage-dependent activation and Kvβ1.1-mediated inactivation, uncouples inactivation from activation gating, and decelerates the kinetics of cumulative inactivation of Kv1.1 channels. I262T also exerts similar dominant effects on the gating of Kv1.2 and Kv1.4 channels. Together our data suggest that I262T confers altered channel gating and reduced functional expression of Kv1 channels, which may account for some of the phenotypes of the EA1 patient.

  5. Dominant-negative mutation p.Arg324Thr in KCNA1 impairs Kv1.1 channel function in episodic ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tristán-Clavijo, Enriqueta; Scholl, Francisco G; Macaya, Alfons; Iglesias, Gemma; Rojas, Ana M; Lucas, Miguel; Castellano, Antonio; Martinez-Mir, Amalia

    2016-11-01

    Episodic ataxia type 1 is a rare autosomal dominant neurological disorder caused by mutations in the KCNA1 gene that encodes the α subunit of voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.1. The functional consequences of identified mutations on channel function do not fully correlate with the clinical phenotype of patients. A clinical and genetic study was performed in a family with 5 patients with episodic ataxia type 1, with concurrent epilepsy in 1 of them. Protein expression, modeling, and electrophysiological analyses were performed to study Kv1.1 function. Whole-genome linkage and candidate gene analyses revealed the novel heterozygous mutation p.Arg324Thr in the KCNA1 gene. The encoded mutant Kv1.1 channel displays reduced currents and altered activation and inactivation. Taken together, we provide genetic and functional evidence that mutation p.Arg324Thr in the KCNA1 gene is pathogenic and results in episodic ataxia type 1 through a dominant-negative effect. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  6. A Disease Mutation Causing Episodic Ataxia Type I in the S1 Links Directly to the Voltage Sensor and the Selectivity Filter in Kv Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitjean, Dimitri; Kalstrup, Tanja; Zhao, Juan; Blunck, Rikard

    2015-09-02

    The mutation F184C in Kv1.1 leads to development of episodic ataxia type I (EA1). Although the mutation has been said to alter activation kinetics and to lower expression, we show here that the underlying molecular mechanisms may be more complex. Although F184 is positioned in the "peripheral" S1 helix, it occupies a central position in the 3D fold. We show in cut-open oocyte voltage-clamp recordings of gating and ionic currents of the Shaker Kv channel expressed in Xenopus oocytes that F184 not only interacts directly with the gating charges of the S4, but also creates a functional link to the selectivity filter of the neighboring subunit. This link leads to impaired fast and slow inactivation. The effect on fast inactivation is of an allosteric nature considering that fast inactivation is caused by a linked cytosolic ball peptide. The extensive effects of F184C provide a new mechanism underlying EA. Episodic ataxia (EA) is an inherited disease that leads to occasional loss of motor control in combination with variable other symptoms such as vertigo or migraine. EA type I (EA1), studied here, is caused by mutations in a voltage-gated potassium channel that contributes to the generation of electrical signals in the brain. The mechanism by which mutations in voltage-gated potassium channels lead to EA is still unknown and there is no consistent pharmacological treatment. By studying in detail one disease-causing mutation in Kv1.1, we describe a novel molecular mechanism distinct from mechanisms described previously. This mechanism contributes to the understanding of potassium channel function in general and might lead to a better understanding of how EA develops. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3512198-09$15.00/0.

  7. L925I mutation in the Para-type sodium channel is associated with pyrethroid resistance in Triatoma infestans from the Gran Chaco region.

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    Natalia Capriotti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chagas' disease is an important public health concern in Latin America. Despite intensive vector control efforts using pyrethroid insecticides, the elimination of Triatoma infestans has failed in the Gran Chaco, an ecoregion that extends over Argentina, Paraguay, Bolivia and Brazil. The voltage-gated sodium channel is the target site of pyrethroid insecticides. Point mutations in domain II region of the channel have been implicated in pyrethroid resistance of several insect species. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In the present paper, we identify L925I, a new pyrethroid resistance-conferring mutation in T. infestans. This mutation has been found only in hemipterans. In T. infestans, L925I mutation occurs in a resistant population from the Gran Chaco region and is associated with inefficiency in the control campaigns. We also describe a method to detect L925I mutation in individuals from the field. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The findings have important implications in the implementation of strategies for resistance management and in the rational design of campaigns for the control of Chagas' disease transmission.

  8. Co-occurrence of point mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel of pyrethroid-resistant Aedes aegypti populations in Myanmar.

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    Hitoshi Kawada

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Single amino acid substitutions in the voltage-gated sodium channel associated with pyrethroid resistance constitute one of the main causative factors of knockdown resistance in insects. The kdr gene has been observed in several mosquito species; however, point mutations in the para gene of Aedes aegypti populations in Myanmar have not been fully characterized. The aim of the present study was to determine the types and frequencies of mutations in the para gene of Aedes aegypti collected from used tires in Yangon City, Myanmar. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We determined high pyrethroid resistance in Aedes aegypti larvae at all collection sites in Yangon City, by using a simplified knockdown bioassay. We showed that V1016G and S989P mutations were widely distributed, with high frequencies (84.4% and 78.8%, respectively. By contrast, we were unable to detect I1011M (or I1011V or L1014F mutations. F1534C mutations were also widely distributed, but with a lower frequency than the V1016G mutation (21.2%. High percentage of co-occurrence of the homozygous V1016G/S989P mutations was detected (65.7%. Additionally, co-occurrence of homozygous V1016G/F1534C mutations (2.9% and homozygous V1016G/F1534C/S989P mutations (0.98% were detected in the present study. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Pyrethroid insecticides were first used for malaria control in 1992, and have since been constantly used in Myanmar. This intensive use may explain the strong selection pressure toward Aedes aegypti, because this mosquito is generally a domestic and endophagic species with a preference for indoor breeding. Extensive use of DDT for malaria control before the use of this chemical was banned may also explain the development of pyrethroid resistance in Aedes aegypti.

  9. Co-occurrence of point mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel of pyrethroid-resistant Aedes aegypti populations in Myanmar.

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    Kawada, Hitoshi; Oo, Sai Zaw Min; Thaung, Sein; Kawashima, Emiko; Maung, Yan Naung Maung; Thu, Hlaing Myat; Thant, Kyaw Zin; Minakawa, Noboru

    2014-01-01

    Single amino acid substitutions in the voltage-gated sodium channel associated with pyrethroid resistance constitute one of the main causative factors of knockdown resistance in insects. The kdr gene has been observed in several mosquito species; however, point mutations in the para gene of Aedes aegypti populations in Myanmar have not been fully characterized. The aim of the present study was to determine the types and frequencies of mutations in the para gene of Aedes aegypti collected from used tires in Yangon City, Myanmar. We determined high pyrethroid resistance in Aedes aegypti larvae at all collection sites in Yangon City, by using a simplified knockdown bioassay. We showed that V1016G and S989P mutations were widely distributed, with high frequencies (84.4% and 78.8%, respectively). By contrast, we were unable to detect I1011M (or I1011V) or L1014F mutations. F1534C mutations were also widely distributed, but with a lower frequency than the V1016G mutation (21.2%). High percentage of co-occurrence of the homozygous V1016G/S989P mutations was detected (65.7%). Additionally, co-occurrence of homozygous V1016G/F1534C mutations (2.9%) and homozygous V1016G/F1534C/S989P mutations (0.98%) were detected in the present study. Pyrethroid insecticides were first used for malaria control in 1992, and have since been constantly used in Myanmar. This intensive use may explain the strong selection pressure toward Aedes aegypti, because this mosquito is generally a domestic and endophagic species with a preference for indoor breeding. Extensive use of DDT for malaria control before the use of this chemical was banned may also explain the development of pyrethroid resistance in Aedes aegypti.

  10. The voltage-sensing domain of kv7.2 channels as a molecular target for epilepsy-causing mutations and anticonvulsants

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    Francesco eMiceli

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying voltage-dependent gating in voltage-gated ion channels (VGICs has been a major effort over the last decades. In recent years, changes in the gating process have emerged as common denominators for several genetically-determined channelopathies affecting heart rhythm (arrhythmias, neuronal excitability (epilepsy, pain or skeletal muscle contraction (periodic paralysis. Moreover, gating changes appear as the main molecular mechanism by which several natural toxins from a variety of species affect ion channel function.In this work, we describe the pathophysiological and pharmacological relevance of the gating process in voltage-gated K+ channels encoded by the Kv7 gene family. After reviewing the current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms and on the structural models of voltage-dependent gating in VGICs, we describe the physiological relevance of these channels, with particular emphasis on those formed by Kv7.2-5 subunits having a well-established role in controlling neuronal excitability in humans. In fact, genetically-determined alterations in Kv7.2 and Kv7.3 genes are responsible for benign familial neonatal convulsions, a rare seizure disorder affecting newborns, and the pharmacological activation of Kv7.2/3 channels can exert antiepileptic activity in humans. Both mutation-triggered channel dysfunction and drug-induced channel activation can occur by impeding or facilitating, respectively, channel sensitivity to membrane voltage and can affect overlapping molecular sites within the voltage-sensing domain of these channels. Thus, understanding the molecular steps involved in voltage-sensing in Kv7 channels will allow to better define the pathogenesis of rare human epilepsy, and to design innovative pharmacological strategies for the treatment of epilepsies and, possibly, other human diseases characterized by neuronal hyperexcitability.

  11. Dysregulation of large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel expression in nonsyndromal mental retardation due to a cereblon p.R419X mutation.

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    Higgins, Joseph J; Hao, Jin; Kosofsky, Barry E; Rajadhyaksha, Anjali M

    2008-07-01

    A nonsense mutation (R419X) in the human cereblon gene [mutation (mut) CRBN] causes a mild type of autosomal recessive nonsyndromal mental retardation (ARNSMR). CRBN, a cytosolic protein, regulates the assembly and neuronal surface expression of large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (BK(Ca)) in brain regions involved in memory and learning. Using the real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we show that mut CRBN disturbs the development of adult brain BK(Ca) isoforms. These changes are predicted to result in BK(Ca) channels with a higher intracellular Ca(2+) sensitivity, faster activation, and slower deactivation kinetics. Such alterations may contribute to cognitive impairments in patients with mild ARNSMR.

  12. Analysis of trafficking, stability and function of human connexin 26 gap junction channels with deafness-causing mutations in the fourth transmembrane helix.

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    Cinzia Ambrosi

    Full Text Available Human Connexin26 gene mutations cause hearing loss. These hereditary mutations are the leading cause of childhood deafness worldwide. Mutations in gap junction proteins (connexins can impair intercellular communication by eliminating protein synthesis, mis-trafficking, or inducing channels that fail to dock or have aberrant function. We previously identified a new class of mutants that form non-functional gap junction channels and hemichannels (connexons by disrupting packing and inter-helix interactions. Here we analyzed fourteen point mutations in the fourth transmembrane helix of connexin26 (Cx26 that cause non-syndromic hearing loss. Eight mutations caused mis-trafficking (K188R, F191L, V198M, S199F, G200R, I203K, L205P, T208P. Of the remaining six that formed gap junctions in mammalian cells, M195T and A197S formed stable hemichannels after isolation with a baculovirus/Sf9 protein purification system, while C202F, I203T, L205V and N206S formed hemichannels with varying degrees of instability. The function of all six gap junction-forming mutants was further assessed through measurement of dye coupling in mammalian cells and junctional conductance in paired Xenopus oocytes. Dye coupling between cell pairs was reduced by varying degrees for all six mutants. In homotypic oocyte pairings, only A197S induced measurable conductance. In heterotypic pairings with wild-type Cx26, five of the six mutants formed functional gap junction channels, albeit with reduced efficiency. None of the mutants displayed significant alterations in sensitivity to transjunctional voltage or induced conductive hemichannels in single oocytes. Intra-hemichannel interactions between mutant and wild-type proteins were assessed in rescue experiments using baculovirus expression in Sf9 insect cells. Of the four unstable mutations (C202F, I203T, L205V, N206S only C202F and N206S formed stable hemichannels when co-expressed with wild-type Cx26. Stable M195T hemichannels

  13. Episodic ataxia type 1 mutations affect fast inactivation of K+ channels by a reduction in either subunit surface expression or affinity for inactivation domain.

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    Imbrici, Paola; D'Adamo, Maria Cristina; Grottesi, Alessandro; Biscarini, Andrea; Pessia, Mauro

    2011-06-01

    Episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by continuous myokymia and episodic attacks of ataxia. Mutations in the gene KCNA1 that encodes the voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.1 are responsible for EA1. In several brain areas, Kv1.1 coassembles with Kv1.4, which confers N-type inactivating properties to heteromeric channels. It is therefore likely that the rate of inactivation will be determined by the number of Kv1.4 inactivation particles, as set by the precise subunit stoichiometry. We propose that EA1 mutations affect the rate of N-type inactivation either by reduced subunit surface expression, giving rise to a reduced number of Kv1.1 subunits in heterotetramer Kv1.1-Kv1.4 channels, or by reduced affinity for the Kv1.4 inactivation domain. To test this hypothesis, quantified amounts of mRNA for Kv1.4 or Kv1.1 containing selected EA1 mutations either in the inner vestibule of Kv1.1 on S6 or in the transmembrane regions were injected into Xenopus laevis oocytes and the relative rates of inactivation and stoichiometry were determined. The S6 mutations, V404I and V408A, which had normal surface expression, reduced the rate of inactivation by a decreased affinity for the inactivation domain while the mutations I177N in S1 and E325D in S5, which had reduced subunit surface expression, increased the rate of N-type inactivation due to a stoichiometric increase in the number of Kv1.4 subunits.

  14. Autosomal dominant hypercalciuria in a mouse model due to a mutation of the epithelial calcium channel, TRPV5.

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    Nellie Y Loh

    Full Text Available Hypercalciuria is a major cause of nephrolithiasis, and is a common and complex disorder involving genetic and environmental factors. Identification of genetic factors for monogenic forms of hypercalciuria is hampered by the limited availability of large families, and to facilitate such studies, we screened for hypercalciuria in mice from an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis programme. We identified a mouse with autosomal dominant hypercalciuria (HCALC1. Linkage studies mapped the Hcalc1 locus to a 11.94 Mb region on chromosome 6 containing the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, members 5 (Trpv5 and 6 (Trpv6 genes. DNA sequence analysis of coding regions, intron-exon boundaries and promoters of Trpv5 and Trpv6 identified a novel T to C transition in codon 682 of TRPV5, mutating a conserved serine to a proline (S682P. Compared to wild-type littermates, heterozygous (Trpv5(682P/+ and homozygous (Trpv5(682P/682P mutant mice had hypercalciuria, polyuria, hyperphosphaturia and a more acidic urine, and ∼10% of males developed tubulointerstitial nephritis. Trpv5(682P/682P mice also had normal plasma parathyroid hormone but increased 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3 concentrations without increased bone resorption, consistent with a renal defect for the hypercalciuria. Expression of the S682P mutation in human embryonic kidney cells revealed that TRPV5-S682P-expressing cells had a lower baseline intracellular calcium concentration than wild-type TRPV5-expressing cells, suggesting an altered calcium permeability. Immunohistological studies revealed a selective decrease in TRPV5-expression from the renal distal convoluted tubules of Trpv5(682P/+ and Trpv5(682P/682P mice consistent with a trafficking defect. In addition, Trpv5(682P/682P mice had a reduction in renal expression of the intracellular calcium-binding protein, calbindin-D(28K, consistent with a specific defect in TRPV5-mediated renal calcium reabsorption. Thus, our findings

  15. Spinocerebellar ataxia-13 Kv3.3 potassium channels: arginine-to-histidine mutations affect both functional and protein expression on the cell surface.

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    Zhao, Jian; Zhu, Jing; Thornhill, William B

    2013-09-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channel Kv3.3 is the causative gene of SCA13 (spinocerebellar ataxia type 13), an autosomal dominant neurological disorder. The four dominant mutations identified to date cause Kv3.3 channels to be non-functional or have altered gating properties in Xenopus oocytes. In the present paper, we report that SCA13 mutations affect functional as well as protein expression of Kv3.3 channels in a mammalian cell line. The reduced protein level of SCA13 mutants is caused by a shorter protein half-life, and blocking the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway increases the total protein of SCA13 mutants more than wild-type. SCA13 mutated amino acids are highly conserved, and the side chains of these residues play a critical role in the stable expression of Kv3.3 proteins. In addition, we show that mutant Kv3.3 protein levels could be partially rescued by treatment with the chemical chaperone TMAO (trimethylamine N-oxide) and to a lesser extent with co-expression of Kv3.1b. Thus our results suggest that amino acid side chains of SCA13 positions affect the protein half-life and/or function of Kv3.3, and the adverse effect on protein expression cannot be fully rescued.

  16. First de novo KCND3 mutation causes severe Kv4.3 channel dysfunction leading to early onset cerebellar ataxia, intellectual disability, oral apraxia and epilepsy.

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    Smets, Katrien; Duarri, Anna; Deconinck, Tine; Ceulemans, Berten; van de Warrenburg, Bart P; Züchner, Stephan; Gonzalez, Michael Anthony; Schüle, Rebecca; Synofzik, Matthis; Van der Aa, Nathalie; De Jonghe, Peter; Verbeek, Dineke S; Baets, Jonathan

    2015-07-21

    Identification of the first de novo mutation in potassium voltage-gated channel, shal-related subfamily, member 3 (KCND3) in a patient with complex early onset cerebellar ataxia in order to expand the genetic and phenotypic spectrum. Whole exome sequencing in a cerebellar ataxia patient and subsequent immunocytochemistry, immunoblotting and patch clamp assays of the channel were performed. A de novo KCND3 mutation (c.877_885dupCGCGTCTTC; p.Arg293_Phe295dup) was found duplicating the RVF motif and thereby adding an extra positive charge to voltage-gated potassium 4.3 (Kv4.3) in the voltage-sensor domain causing a severe shift of the voltage-dependence gating to more depolarized voltages. The patient displayed a severe phenotype with early onset cerebellar ataxia complicated by intellectual disability, epilepsy, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, strabismus, oral apraxia and joint hyperlaxity. We identified a de novo KCND3 mutation causing the most marked change in Kv4.3's channel properties reported so far, which correlated with a severe and unique spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) type 19/22 disease phenotype.

  17. Gain-of-function mutations in the K(ATP channel (KCNJ11 impair coordinated hand-eye tracking.

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    James S McTaggart

    Full Text Available Gain-of-function mutations in the ATP-sensitive potassium channel can cause permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus (PNDM or neonatal diabetes accompanied by a constellation of neurological symptoms (iDEND syndrome. Studies of a mouse model of iDEND syndrome revealed that cerebellar Purkinje cell electrical activity was impaired and that the mice exhibited poor motor coordination. In this study, we probed the hand-eye coordination of PNDM and iDEND patients using visual tracking tasks to see if poor motor coordination is also a feature of the human disease.Control participants (n = 14, patients with iDEND syndrome (n = 6 or 7, and patients with PNDM (n = 7 completed three computer-based tasks in which a moving target was tracked with a joystick-controlled cursor. Patients with PNDM and iDEND were being treated with sulphonylurea drugs at the time of testing.No differences were seen between PNDM patients and controls. Patients with iDEND syndrome were significantly less accurate than controls in two of the three tasks. The greatest differences were seen when iDEND patients tracked blanked targets, i.e. when predictive tracking was required. In this task, iDEND patients incurred more discrepancy errors (p = 0.009 and more velocity errors (p= 0.009 than controls.These results identify impaired hand-eye coordination as a new clinical feature of iDEND. The aetiology of this feature is likely to involve cerebellar dysfunction. The data further suggest that sulphonylurea doses that control the diabetes of these patients may be insufficient to fully correct their neurological symptoms.

  18. Conformational equilibria in monomeric alpha-synuclein at the single-molecule level.

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    Massimo Sandal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Human alpha-Synuclein (alphaSyn is a natively unfolded protein whose aggregation into amyloid fibrils is involved in the pathology of Parkinson disease. A full comprehension of the structure and dynamics of early intermediates leading to the aggregated states is an unsolved problem of essential importance to researchers attempting to decipher the molecular mechanisms of alphaSyn aggregation and formation of fibrils. Traditional bulk techniques used so far to solve this problem point to a direct correlation between alphaSyn's unique conformational properties and its propensity to aggregate, but these techniques can only provide ensemble-averaged information for monomers and oligomers alike. They therefore cannot characterize the full complexity of the conformational equilibria that trigger the aggregation process. We applied atomic force microscopy-based single-molecule mechanical unfolding methodology to study the conformational equilibrium of human wild-type and mutant alphaSyn. The conformational heterogeneity of monomeric alphaSyn was characterized at the single-molecule level. Three main classes of conformations, including disordered and "beta-like" structures, were directly observed and quantified without any interference from oligomeric soluble forms. The relative abundance of the "beta-like" structures significantly increased in different conditions promoting the aggregation of alphaSyn: the presence of Cu2+, the pathogenic A30P mutation, and high ionic strength. This methodology can explore the full conformational space of a protein at the single-molecule level, detecting even poorly populated conformers and measuring their distribution in a variety of biologically important conditions. To the best of our knowledge, we present for the first time evidence of a conformational equilibrium that controls the population of a specific class of monomeric alphaSyn conformers, positively correlated with conditions known to promote the formation of

  19. Presence of two alternative kdr-like mutations, L1014F and L1014S, and a novel mutation, V1010L, in the voltage gated Na+ channel of Anopheles culicifacies from Orissa, India

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    Bhatt Rajendra M

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knockdown resistance in insects resulting from mutation(s in the voltage gated Na+ channel (VGSC is one of the mechanisms of resistance against DDT and pyrethroids. Recently a point mutation leading to Leu-to-Phe substitution in the VGSC at residue 1014, a most common kdr mutation in insects, was reported in Anopheles culicifacies-a major malaria vector in the Indian subcontinent. This study reports the presence of two additional amino acid substitutions in the VGSC of an An. culicifacies population from Malkangiri district of Orissa, India. Methods Anopheles culicifacies sensu lato (s.l. samples, collected from a population of Malkangiri district of Orissa (India, were sequenced for part of the second transmembrane segment of VGSC and analyzed for the presence of non-synonymous mutations. A new primer introduced restriction analysis-PCR (PIRA-PCR was developed for the detection of the new mutation L1014S. The An. culicifacies population was genotyped for the presence of L1014F substitution by an amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS and for L1014S substitutions by using a new PIRA-PCR developed in this study. The results were validated through DNA sequencing. Results DNA sequencing of An. culicifacies individuals collected from district Malkangiri revealed the presence of three amino acid substitutions in the IIS6 transmembrane segments of VGSC, each one resulting from a single point mutation. Two alternative point mutations, 3042A>T transversion or 3041T>C transition, were found at residue L1014 leading to Leu (TTA-to-Phe (TTT or -Ser (TCA changes, respectively. A third and novel substitution, Val (GTG-to-Leu (TTG or CTG, was identified at residue V1010 resulting from either of the two transversions–3028G>T or 3028G>C. The L1014S substitution co-existed with V1010L in all the samples analyzed irrespective of the type of point mutation associated with the latter. The PIRA-PCR strategy developed for the

  20. Episodic ataxia/myokymia syndrome is associated with point mutations in the human potassium channel gene-KCNA1 (Kv1.1)

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    Browne, D.L.; Gancher, S.T.; Nutt, J.G. [Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland, OR (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Episodic ataxia (EA) is a rare, familial disorder producing attacks of generalized ataxia, with normal or near-normal neurological function between attacks. One type of EA (MIM No.160120) displays autosomal dominant inheritance and is characterized by episodes of ataxia lasting seconds to minutes with myokymia (rippling of small muscles) evident between attacks. Genetic linkage studies in 4 families suggested localization of an EA/myokymia gene near the K{sup +} channel gene KCNA1 (Kv1.1) on chromosome 12p. Chemical cleavage mismatch and DNA sequence analysis of the KCNA1 coding region in these families identified 4 different missense point mutations present in the heterozygous state. The mutations found were Val174Phe, Arg239Ser, Phe249Ile and Val408Ala; the residue numbers correspond to those in the published amino acid sequence of KCNA1 (Genbank Accession No. L02750). Each of these mutations affects an amino acid residue that is invariant among Drosophila melanogaster, mouse, rat and human, The mutations were present in the affected members of the family and absent in all of the unaffected members and in at least 70 unrelated control individuals. These data strongly suggest that EA/myokymia can result from mutations in the KCNA1 gene.

  1. Discovery of Point Mutations in the Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel from African Aedes aegypti Populations: Potential Phylogenetic Reasons for Gene Introgression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muranami, Yuto; Kawashima, Emiko; Osei, Joseph H. N.; Sakyi, Kojo Yirenkyi; Dadzie, Samuel; de Souza, Dziedzom K.; Appawu, Maxwell; Ohta, Nobuo; Minakawa, Noboru

    2016-01-01

    Background Yellow fever is endemic in some countries in Africa, and Aedes aegpyti is one of the most important vectors implicated in the outbreak. The mapping of the nation-wide distribution and the detection of insecticide resistance of vector mosquitoes will provide the beneficial information for forecasting of dengue and yellow fever outbreaks and effective control measures. Methodology/Principal Findings High resistance to DDT was observed in all mosquito colonies collected in Ghana. The resistance and the possible existence of resistance or tolerance to permethrin were suspected in some colonies. High frequencies of point mutations at the voltage-gated sodium channel (F1534C) and one heterozygote of the other mutation (V1016I) were detected, and this is the first detection on the African continent. The frequency of F1534C allele and the ratio of F1534C homozygotes in Ae. aegypti aegypti (Aaa) were significantly higher than those in Ae. aegypti formosus (Aaf). We could detect the two types of introns between exon 20 and 21, and the F1534C mutations were strongly linked with one type of intron, which was commonly found in South East Asian and South and Central American countries, suggesting the possibility that this mutation was introduced from other continents or convergently selected after the introgression of Aaa genes from the above area. Conclusions/Significance The worldwide eradication programs in 1940s and 1950s might have caused high selection pressure on the mosquito populations and expanded the distribution of insecticide-resistant Ae. aegypti populations. Selection of the F1534C point mutation could be hypothesized to have taken place during this period. The selection of the resistant population of Ae. aegypti with the point mutation of F1534C, and the worldwide transportation of vector mosquitoes in accordance with human activity such as trading of used tires, might result in the widespread distribution of F1534C point mutation in tropical countries

  2. Discovery of Point Mutations in the Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel from African Aedes aegypti Populations: Potential Phylogenetic Reasons for Gene Introgression.

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    Hitoshi Kawada

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Yellow fever is endemic in some countries in Africa, and Aedes aegpyti is one of the most important vectors implicated in the outbreak. The mapping of the nation-wide distribution and the detection of insecticide resistance of vector mosquitoes will provide the beneficial information for forecasting of dengue and yellow fever outbreaks and effective control measures.High resistance to DDT was observed in all mosquito colonies collected in Ghana. The resistance and the possible existence of resistance or tolerance to permethrin were suspected in some colonies. High frequencies of point mutations at the voltage-gated sodium channel (F1534C and one heterozygote of the other mutation (V1016I were detected, and this is the first detection on the African continent. The frequency of F1534C allele and the ratio of F1534C homozygotes in Ae. aegypti aegypti (Aaa were significantly higher than those in Ae. aegypti formosus (Aaf. We could detect the two types of introns between exon 20 and 21, and the F1534C mutations were strongly linked with one type of intron, which was commonly found in South East Asian and South and Central American countries, suggesting the possibility that this mutation was introduced from other continents or convergently selected after the introgression of Aaa genes from the above area.The worldwide eradication programs in 1940s and 1950s might have caused high selection pressure on the mosquito populations and expanded the distribution of insecticide-resistant Ae. aegypti populations. Selection of the F1534C point mutation could be hypothesized to have taken place during this period. The selection of the resistant population of Ae. aegypti with the point mutation of F1534C, and the worldwide transportation of vector mosquitoes in accordance with human activity such as trading of used tires, might result in the widespread distribution of F1534C point mutation in tropical countries.

  3. Determining the Advantages, Costs, and Trade-Offs of a Novel Sodium Channel Mutation in the Copepod Acartia hudsonica to Paralytic Shellfish Toxins (PST.

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    Michael Finiguerra

    Full Text Available The marine copepod Acartia hudsonica was shown to be adapted to dinoflagellate prey, Alexandrium fundyense, which produce paralytic shellfish toxins (PST. Adaptation to PSTs in other organisms is caused by a mutation in the sodium channel. Recently, a mutation in the sodium channel in A. hudsonica was found. In this study, we rigorously tested for advantages, costs, and trade-offs associated with the mutant isoform of A. hudsonica under toxic and non-toxic conditions. We combined fitness with wild-type: mutant isoform ratio measurements on the same individual copepod to test our hypotheses. All A. hudsonica copepods express both the wild-type and mutant sodium channel isoforms, but in different proportions; some individuals express predominantly mutant (PMI or wild-type isoforms (PWI, while most individuals express relatively equal amounts of each (EI. There was no consistent pattern of improved performance as a function of toxin dose for egg production rate (EPR, ingestion rate (I, and gross growth efficiency (GGE for individuals in the PMI group relative to individuals in the PWI expression group. Neither was there any evidence to indicate a fitness benefit to the mutant isoform at intermediate toxin doses. No clear advantage under toxic conditions was associated with the mutation. Using a mixed-diet approach, there was also no observed relationship between individual wild-type: mutant isoform ratios and among expression groups, on both toxic and non-toxic diets, for eggs produced over three days. Lastly, expression of the mutant isoform did not mitigate the negative effects of the toxin. That is, the reductions in EPR from a toxic to non-toxic diet for copepods were independent of expression groups. Overall, the results did not support our hypotheses; the mutant sodium channel isoform does not appear to be related to adaptation to PST in A. hudsonica. Other potential mechanisms responsible for the adaptation are discussed.

  4. Voltage-sensor movements describe slow inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels II: a periodic paralysis mutation in Na(V)1.4 (L689I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jonathan R; Goldstein, Steve A N

    2013-03-01

    In skeletal muscle, slow inactivation (SI) of Na(V)1.4 voltage-gated sodium channels prevents spontaneous depolarization and fatigue. Inherited mutations in Na(V)1.4 that impair SI disrupt activity-induced regulation of channel availability and predispose patients to hyperkalemic periodic paralysis. In our companion paper in this issue (Silva and Goldstein. 2013. J. Gen. Physiol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1085/jgp.201210909), the four voltage sensors in Na(V)1.4 responsible for activation of channels over microseconds are shown to slowly immobilize over 1-160 s as SI develops and to regain mobility on recovery from SI. Individual sensor movements assessed via attached fluorescent probes are nonidentical in their voltage dependence, time course, and magnitude: DI and DII track SI onset, and DIII appears to reflect SI recovery. A causal link was inferred by tetrodotoxin (TTX) suppression of both SI onset and immobilization of DI and DII sensors. Here, the association of slow sensor immobilization and SI is verified by study of Na(V)1.4 channels with a hyperkalemic periodic paralysis mutation; L689I produces complex changes in SI, and these are found to manifest directly in altered sensor movements. L689I removes a component of SI with an intermediate time constant (~10 s); the mutation also impedes immobilization of the DI and DII sensors over the same time domain in support of direct mechanistic linkage. A model that recapitulates SI attributes responsibility for intermediate SI to DI and DII (10 s) and a slow component to DIII (100 s), which accounts for residual SI, not impeded by L689I or TTX.

  5. Voltage-sensor movements describe slow inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels II: A periodic paralysis mutation in NaV1.4 (L689I)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, slow inactivation (SI) of NaV1.4 voltage-gated sodium channels prevents spontaneous depolarization and fatigue. Inherited mutations in NaV1.4 that impair SI disrupt activity-induced regulation of channel availability and predispose patients to hyperkalemic periodic paralysis. In our companion paper in this issue (Silva and Goldstein. 2013. J. Gen. Physiol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1085/jgp.201210909), the four voltage sensors in NaV1.4 responsible for activation of channels over microseconds are shown to slowly immobilize over 1–160 s as SI develops and to regain mobility on recovery from SI. Individual sensor movements assessed via attached fluorescent probes are nonidentical in their voltage dependence, time course, and magnitude: DI and DII track SI onset, and DIII appears to reflect SI recovery. A causal link was inferred by tetrodotoxin (TTX) suppression of both SI onset and immobilization of DI and DII sensors. Here, the association of slow sensor immobilization and SI is verified by study of NaV1.4 channels with a hyperkalemic periodic paralysis mutation; L689I produces complex changes in SI, and these are found to manifest directly in altered sensor movements. L689I removes a component of SI with an intermediate time constant (∼10 s); the mutation also impedes immobilization of the DI and DII sensors over the same time domain in support of direct mechanistic linkage. A model that recapitulates SI attributes responsibility for intermediate SI to DI and DII (10 s) and a slow component to DIII (100 s), which accounts for residual SI, not impeded by L689I or TTX. PMID:23401572

  6. Mutating the Conserved Q-loop Glutamine 1291 Selectively Disrupts Adenylate Kinase-dependent Channel Gating of the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Adenylate Kinase Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) and Reduces Channel Function in Primary Human Airway Epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qian; Ernst, Sarah E; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Shah, Viral S; Ver Heul, Amanda R; Welsh, Michael J; Randak, Christoph O

    2015-05-29

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and two other non-membrane-bound ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, exhibit adenylate kinase activity in the presence of physiologic concentrations of ATP and AMP or ADP (ATP + AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). The crystal structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of an SMC protein in complex with the adenylate kinase bisubstrate inhibitor P(1),P(5)-di(adenosine-5') pentaphosphate (Ap5A) suggests that AMP binds to the conserved Q-loop glutamine during the adenylate kinase reaction. Therefore, we hypothesized that mutating the corresponding residue in CFTR, Gln-1291, selectively disrupts adenylate kinase-dependent channel gating at physiologic nucleotide concentrations. We found that substituting Gln-1291 with bulky side-chain amino acids abolished the effects of Ap5A, AMP, and adenosine 5'-monophosphoramidate on CFTR channel function. 8-Azidoadenosine 5'-monophosphate photolabeling of the AMP-binding site and adenylate kinase activity were disrupted in Q1291F CFTR. The Gln-1291 mutations did not alter the potency of ATP at stimulating current or ATP-dependent gating when ATP was the only nucleotide present. However, when physiologic concentrations of ADP and AMP were added, adenylate kinase-deficient Q1291F channels opened significantly less than wild type. Consistent with this result, we found that Q1291F CFTR displayed significantly reduced Cl(-) channel function in well differentiated primary human airway epithelia. These results indicate that a highly conserved residue of an ABC transporter plays an important role in adenylate kinase-dependent CFTR gating. Furthermore, the results suggest that adenylate kinase activity is important for normal CFTR channel function in airway epithelia.

  7. Retigabine, a Kv7.2/Kv7.3-Channel Opener, Attenuates Drug-Induced Seizures in Knock-In Mice Harboring Kcnq2 Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, Yukiko; Tomonoh, Yuko; Deshimaru, Masanobu; Zhang, Bo; Uchida, Taku; Ishii, Atsushi; Hirose, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    The hetero-tetrameric voltage-gated potassium channel Kv7.2/Kv7.3, which is encoded by KCNQ2 and KCNQ3, plays an important role in limiting network excitability in the neonatal brain. Kv7.2/Kv7.3 dysfunction resulting from KCNQ2 mutations predominantly causes self-limited or benign epilepsy in neonates, but also causes early onset epileptic encephalopathy. Retigabine (RTG), a Kv7.2/ Kv7.3-channel opener, seems to be a rational antiepileptic drug for epilepsies caused by KCNQ2 mutations. We therefore evaluated the effects of RTG on seizures in two strains of knock-in mice harboring different Kcnq2 mutations, in comparison to the effects of phenobarbital (PB), which is the first-line antiepileptic drug for seizures in neonates. The subjects were heterozygous knock-in mice (Kcnq2Y284C/+ and Kcnq2A306T/+) bearing the Y284C or A306T Kcnq2 mutation, respectively, and their wild-type (WT) littermates, at 63-100 days of age. Seizures induced by intraperitoneal injection of kainic acid (KA, 12mg/kg) were recorded using a video-electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring system. Effects of RTG on KA-induced seizures of both strains of knock-in mice were assessed using seizure scores from a modified Racine's scale and compared with those of PB. The number and total duration of spike bursts on EEG and behaviors monitored by video recording were also used to evaluate the effects of RTG and PB. Both Kcnq2Y284C/+ and Kcnq2A306T/+ mice showed significantly more KA-induced seizures than WT mice. RTG significantly attenuated KA-induced seizure activities in both Kcnq2Y284C/+ and Kcnq2A306T/+ mice, and more markedly than PB. This is the first reported evidence of RTG ameliorating KA-induced seizures in knock-in mice bearing mutations of Kcnq2, with more marked effects than those observed with PB. RTG or other Kv7.2-channel openers may be considered as first-line antiepileptic treatments for epilepsies resulting from KCNQ2 mutations.

  8. Retigabine, a Kv7.2/Kv7.3-Channel Opener, Attenuates Drug-Induced Seizures in Knock-In Mice Harboring Kcnq2 Mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukiko Ihara

    Full Text Available The hetero-tetrameric voltage-gated potassium channel Kv7.2/Kv7.3, which is encoded by KCNQ2 and KCNQ3, plays an important role in limiting network excitability in the neonatal brain. Kv7.2/Kv7.3 dysfunction resulting from KCNQ2 mutations predominantly causes self-limited or benign epilepsy in neonates, but also causes early onset epileptic encephalopathy. Retigabine (RTG, a Kv7.2/ Kv7.3-channel opener, seems to be a rational antiepileptic drug for epilepsies caused by KCNQ2 mutations. We therefore evaluated the effects of RTG on seizures in two strains of knock-in mice harboring different Kcnq2 mutations, in comparison to the effects of phenobarbital (PB, which is the first-line antiepileptic drug for seizures in neonates. The subjects were heterozygous knock-in mice (Kcnq2Y284C/+ and Kcnq2A306T/+ bearing the Y284C or A306T Kcnq2 mutation, respectively, and their wild-type (WT littermates, at 63-100 days of age. Seizures induced by intraperitoneal injection of kainic acid (KA, 12mg/kg were recorded using a video-electroencephalography (EEG monitoring system. Effects of RTG on KA-induced seizures of both strains of knock-in mice were assessed using seizure scores from a modified Racine's scale and compared with those of PB. The number and total duration of spike bursts on EEG and behaviors monitored by video recording were also used to evaluate the effects of RTG and PB. Both Kcnq2Y284C/+ and Kcnq2A306T/+ mice showed significantly more KA-induced seizures than WT mice. RTG significantly attenuated KA-induced seizure activities in both Kcnq2Y284C/+ and Kcnq2A306T/+ mice, and more markedly than PB. This is the first reported evidence of RTG ameliorating KA-induced seizures in knock-in mice bearing mutations of Kcnq2, with more marked effects than those observed with PB. RTG or other Kv7.2-channel openers may be considered as first-line antiepileptic treatments for epilepsies resulting from KCNQ2 mutations.

  9. Mutation I136V alters electrophysiological properties of the NaV1.7 channel in a family with onset of erythromelalgia in the second decade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dib-Hajj Sulayman D

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary erythromelalgia is an autosomal dominant pain disorder characterized by burning pain and skin redness in the extremities, with onset of symptoms during the first decade in the families whose mutations have been physiologically studied to date. Several mutations of voltage-gated Na+ channel NaV1.7 have been linked with primary erythromelalgia. Recently, a new substitution NaV1.7/I136V has been reported in a Taiwanese family, in which pain appeared at later ages (9–22 years, with onset at 17 years of age or later in 5 of 7 family members, with relatively slow progression (8–10 years to involvement of the hands. The proband reported onset of symptoms first in his feet at the age of 11, which then progressed to his hands at the age of 19. The new mutation is located in transmembrane segment 1 (S1 of domain I (DI in contrast to all NaV1.7 mutations reported to date, which have been localized in the voltage sensor S4, the linker joining segments S4 and S5 or pore-lining segments S5 and S6 in DI, II and III. Results In this study, we characterized the gating and kinetic properties of I136V mutant channels in HEK293 cells using whole-cell patch clamp. I136V shifts the voltage-dependence of activation by -5.7 mV, a smaller shift in activation than the other erythromelalgia mutations that have been characterized. I136V also decreases the deactivation rate, and generates larger ramp currents. Conclusion The I136V substitution in NaV1.7 alters channel gating and kinetic properties. Each of these changes may contribute to increased excitability of nociceptive dorsal root ganglion neurons, which underlies pain in erythromelalgia. The smaller shift in voltage-dependence of activation of NaV1.7, compared to the other reported cases of inherited erythromelalgia, may contribute to the later age of onset and slower progression of the symptoms reported in association with this mutation.

  10. Mutation analysis of the inwardly rectifying K(+) channels KCNJ6 (GIRK2) and KCNJ3 (GIRK1) in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallmann, K; Durner, M; Sander, T; Steinlein, O K

    2000-02-07

    Genetic factors play a major role in the etiology of idiopathic generalized epilepsy. However, in most syndromes, especially the common ones, multiple genetic factors seem to be involved. Mutations in K(+) channel genes have previously found to be associated with epilepsy both in humans and in mice. The weaver mice phenotype, characterized by ataxia, tremor, male infertility, and tonic-clonic seizures, is caused by a point mutation in the inwardly rectifier K(+) channel gene KCNJ6 (GIRK2). A knockout mouse model deprived of functional KCNJ6 protein is susceptible to spontaneous and provoked seizures without showing the histological signs of neuronal cell death found in the weaver mouse. Thus, the KCNJ6 gene seems to play an important role in seizure control. We therefore performed a mutation analysis of KCNJ6 and the related KCNJ3 gene in 38 patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME). Two novel same-sense nucleotide exchanges were identified, but none of these changed the coding sequence. These results do not support a major role for the KCNJ6/KCNJ3 heteromeric receptor in the etiology of JME. Am. J. Med. Genet. (Neuropsychiatr. Genet.) 96:8-11, 2000

  11. Functional Analysis of Orai1 Concatemers Supports a Hexameric Stoichiometry for the CRAC Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Michelle; Lokteva, Ludmila A; Lewis, Richard S

    2016-11-01

    Store-operated Ca(2+) entry occurs through the binding of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) sensor STIM1 to Orai1, the pore-forming subunit of the Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channel. Although the essential steps leading to channel opening have been described, fundamental questions remain, including the functional stoichiometry of the CRAC channel. The crystal structure of Drosophila Orai indicates a hexameric stoichiometry, while studies of linked Orai1 concatemers and single-molecule photobleaching suggest that channels assemble as tetramers. We assessed CRAC channel stoichiometry by expressing hexameric concatemers of human Orai1 and comparing in detail their ionic currents to those of native CRAC channels and channels generated from monomeric Orai1 constructs. Cell surface biotinylation results indicated that Orai1 channels in the plasma membrane were assembled from intact hexameric polypeptides and not from truncated protein products. In addition, the L273D mutation depressed channel activity equally regardless of which Orai1 subunit in the concatemer carried the mutation. Thus, functional channels were generated from intact Orai1 hexamers in which all subunits contributed equally. These hexameric Orai1 channels displayed the biophysical fingerprint of native CRAC channels, including the distinguishing characteristics of gating (store-dependent activation, Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation, open probability), permeation (ion selectivity, affinity for Ca(2+) block, La(3+) sensitivity, unitary current magnitude), and pharmacology (enhancement and inhibition by 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate). Because permeation characteristics depend strongly on pore geometry, it is unlikely that hexameric and tetrameric pores would display identical Ca(2+) affinity, ion selectivity, and unitary current magnitude. Thus, based on the highly similar pore properties of the hexameric Orai1 concatemer and native CRAC channels, we conclude that the CRAC channel functions as a

  12. How acidic are monomeric structural units of heparin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remko, Milan; Broer, Ria; Van Duijnen, Piet Th.

    2013-12-01

    Density functional theory methods with the B3LYP functional have been used to letter the acidity of carboxyl, O-sulfo and N-sulfo groups in six basic monomeric structural units of heparin (1-OMe ΔUA-2S, 1-OMe GlcN-S6S, 1,4-DiOMe GlcA, 1,4-DiOMe GlcN-S3S6S, 1,4-DiOMe IdoA-2S, and 1,4-DiOMe GlcN-S6S). The predicted gas-phase acidity of the acidic functional groups in the monomeric structural units of heparin is: O-sulfo > N-sulfo > carboxyl. The computed pKa values provide the same order of acidity as was observed in water solution. This implies that hydration does not change ordering of acidity of major acidic groups of monomeric structural units of heparin.

  13. The SRS2 suppressor of rad6 mutations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae acts by channeling DNA lesions into the RAD52 DNA repair pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiestl, R.H.; Prakash, S.; Prakash, L. (Univ. of Rochester School of Medicine, NY (USA))

    1990-04-01

    rad6 mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are defective in the repair of damaged DNA, DNA damage induced mutagenesis, and sporulation. In order to identify genes that can substitute for RAD6 function, the authors have isolated genomic suppressors of the UV sensitivity of rad6 deletion (rad6{Delta}) mutations and show that they also suppress the {gamma}-ray sensitivity but not the UV mutagenesis or sporulation defects of rad6. The suppressors show semidominance for suppression of UV sensitivity and dominance for suppression of {gamma}-ray sensitivity. The six suppressor mutations they isolated are all alleles of the same locus and are also allelic to a previously described suppressor of the rad6-1 nonsense mutation, SRS2. They show that suppression of rad6{Delta} is dependent on the RAD52 recombinational repair pathway since suppression is not observed in the rad6{Delta} SRS2 strain containing an additional mutation in either the RAD51, RAD52, RAD54, RAD55 or RAD57 genes. Possible mechanisms by which SRS2 may channel unrepaired DNA lesions into the RAD52 DNA repair pathway are discussed.

  14. Presynaptic CaV2.1 calcium channels carrying familial hemiplegic migraine mutation R192Q allow faster recovery from synaptic depression in mouse calyx of Held.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inchauspe, Carlota González; Urbano, Francisco J; Di Guilmi, Mariano N; Ferrari, Michel D; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Forsythe, Ian D; Uchitel, Osvaldo D

    2012-12-01

    Ca(V)2.1 Ca(2+) channels have a dominant and specific role in initiating fast synaptic transmission at central excitatory synapses, through a close association between release sites and calcium sensors. Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM-1) is an autosomal-dominant subtype of migraine with aura, caused by missense mutations in the CACNA1A gene that encodes the α(1A) pore-forming subunit of Ca(V)2.1 channel. We used knock-in (KI) transgenic mice harboring the FHM-1 mutation R192Q to study the consequences of this mutation in neurotransmission at the giant synapse of the auditory system formed by the presynaptic calyx of Held terminal and the postsynaptic neurons of the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB). Although synaptic transmission seems unaffected by low-frequency stimulation in physiological Ca(2+) concentration, we observed that with low Ca(2+) concentrations (<1 mM) excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) showed increased amplitudes in R192Q KI mice compared with wild type (WT), meaning significant differences in the nonlinear calcium dependence of nerve-evoked transmitter release. In addition, when EPSCs were evoked by broadened presynaptic action potentials (achieved by inhibition of K(+) channels) via Ca(v)2.1-triggered exocytosis, R192Q KI mice exhibited further enhancement of EPSC amplitude and charge compared with WT mice. Repetitive stimulation of afferent axons to the MNTB at different frequencies caused short-term depression of EPSCs that recovered significantly faster in R192Q KI mice than in WT mice. Faster recovery in R192Q KI mice was prevented by the calcium chelator EGTA-AM, pointing to enlarged residual calcium as a key factor in accelerating the replenishment of synaptic vesicles.

  15. Familial hemiplegic migraine type-1 mutated cav2.1 calcium channels alter inhibitory and excitatory synaptic transmission in the lateral superior olive of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inchauspe, Carlota González; Pilati, Nadia; Di Guilmi, Mariano N; Urbano, Francisco J; Ferrari, Michel D; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Forsythe, Ian D; Uchitel, Osvaldo D

    2015-01-01

    CaV2.1 Ca(2+) channels play a key role in triggering neurotransmitter release and mediating synaptic transmission. Familial hemiplegic migraine type-1 (FHM-1) is caused by missense mutations in the CACNA1A gene that encodes the α1A pore-forming subunit of CaV2.1 Ca(2+) channels. We used knock-in (KI) transgenic mice harbouring the pathogenic FHM-1 mutation R192Q to study inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission in the principle neurons of the lateral superior olive (LSO) in the auditory brainstem. We tested if the R192Q FHM-1 mutation differentially affects excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission, disturbing the normal balance between excitation and inhibition in this nucleus. Whole cell patch-clamp was used to measure neurotransmitter elicited excitatory (EPSCs) and inhibitory (IPSCs) postsynaptic currents in wild-type (WT) and R192Q KI mice. Our results showed that the FHM-1 mutation in CaV2.1 channels has multiple effects. Evoked EPSC amplitudes were smaller whereas evoked and miniature IPSC amplitudes were larger in R192Q KI compared to WT mice. In addition, in R192Q KI mice, the release probability was enhanced compared to WT, at both inhibitory (0.53 ± 0.02 vs. 0.44 ± 0.01, P = 2.10(-5), Student's t-test) and excitatory synapses (0.60 ± 0.03 vs. 0.45 ± 0.02, P = 4 10(-6), Student's t-test). Vesicle pool size was diminished in R192Q KI mice compared to WT mice (68 ± 6 vs 91 ± 7, P = 0.008, inhibitory; 104 ± 13 vs 335 ± 30, P = 10(-6), excitatory, Student's t-test). R192Q KI mice present enhanced short-term plasticity. Repetitive stimulation of the afferent axons caused short-term depression (STD) of E/IPSCs that recovered significantly faster in R192Q KI mice compared to WT. This supports the hypothesis of a gain-of-function of the CaV2.1 channels in R192Q KI mice, which alters the balance of excitatory/inhibitory inputs and could also have implications in the altered cortical excitability responsible for FHM

  16. Mutation in the myelin proteolipid protein gene alters BK and SK channel function in the caudal medulla

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, Catherine A.; Macklin, Wendy B.; Avishai, Nanthawan; Balan, Kannan; Wilson, Christopher G.; Miller, Martha J.

    2009-01-01

    Proteolipid protein (Plp) gene mutation in rodents causes severe CNS dysmyelination, early death, and lethal hypoxic ventilatory depression (Miller et al. 2004). To determine if Plp mutation alters neuronal function critical for control of breathing, the nucleus tractus solitarii (nTS) of four rodent strains were studied: myelin deficient rats (MD), myelin synthesis deficient (Plpmsd), and Plpnull mice, as well as shiverer (Mbpshi) mice, a myelin basic protein mutant. Current-voltage relation...

  17. Exome sequencing identifies de novo gain of function missense mutation in KCND2 in identical twins with autism and seizures that slows potassium channel inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hane; Lin, Meng-chin A; Kornblum, Harley I; Papazian, Diane M; Nelson, Stanley F

    2014-07-01

    Numerous studies and case reports show comorbidity of autism and epilepsy, suggesting some common molecular underpinnings of the two phenotypes. However, the relationship between the two, on the molecular level, remains unclear. Here, whole exome sequencing was performed on a family with identical twins affected with autism and severe, intractable seizures. A de novo variant was identified in the KCND2 gene, which encodes the Kv4.2 potassium channel. Kv4.2 is a major pore-forming subunit in somatodendritic subthreshold A-type potassium current (ISA) channels. The de novo mutation p.Val404Met is novel and occurs at a highly conserved residue within the C-terminal end of the transmembrane helix S6 region of the ion permeation pathway. Functional analysis revealed the likely pathogenicity of the variant in that the p.Val404Met mutant construct showed significantly slowed inactivation, either by itself or after equimolar coexpression with the wild-type Kv4.2 channel construct consistent with a dominant effect. Further, the effect of the mutation on closed-state inactivation was evident in the presence of auxiliary subunits that associate with Kv4 subunits to form ISA channels in vivo. Discovery of a functionally relevant novel de novo variant, coupled with physiological evidence that the mutant protein disrupts potassium current inactivation, strongly supports KCND2 as the causal gene for epilepsy in this family. Interaction of KCND2 with other genes implicated in autism and the role of KCND2 in synaptic plasticity provide suggestive evidence of an etiological role in autism.

  18. Two mutations in the IV/S4-S5 segment of the human skeletal muscle Na+ channel disrupt fast and enhance slow inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekov, A K; Peter, W; Mitrovic, N; Lehmann-Horn, F; Lerche, H

    2001-06-29

    Fast and slow inactivation (FI, SI) of the voltage-gated Na+ channel are two kinetically distinct and structurally dissociated processes. The voltage sensor IV/S4 and the intracellular IV/S4-S5 loop have been shown to play an important role in FI mediating the coupling between activation and inactivation. Two mutations in IV/S4-S5 of the human muscle Na+ channel, L1482C/A, disrupt FI by inducing a persistent Na+ current, shifting steady-state inactivation in the depolarizing direction and accelerating its recovery. These effects were more pronounced for L1482A. In contrast, SI of L1482C/A channels was enhanced showing a more complete SI and a 3-fold slowing of its recovery. Effects on SI were more pronounced for L1482C. The results indicate an important role of the IV/S4-S5 loop not only in FI but also in SI of the Na+ channel.

  19. Homotropic cooperativity of monomeric cytochrome P450 3A4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baas, Bradley J.; Denisov, Ilia G.; Sligar, Stephen G. (UIUC)

    2010-11-16

    Mechanistic studies of mammalian cytochrome P450s are often obscured by the phase heterogeneity of solubilized preparations of membrane enzymes. The various protein-protein aggregation states of microsomes, detergent solubilized cytochrome or a family of aqueous multimeric complexes can effect measured substrate binding events as well as subsequent steps in the reaction cycle. In addition, these P450 monooxygenases are normally found in a membrane environment and the bilayer composition and dynamics can also effect these catalytic steps. Here, we describe the structural and functional characterization of a homogeneous monomeric population of cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP 3A4) in a soluble nanoscale membrane bilayer, or Nanodisc [Nano Lett. 2 (2002) 853]. Cytochrome P450 3A4:Nanodisc assemblies were formed and purified to yield a 1:1 ratio of CYP 3A4 to Nanodisc. Solution small angle X-ray scattering was used to structurally characterize this monomeric CYP 3A4 in the membrane bilayer. The purified CYP 3A4:Nanodiscs showed a heretofore undescribed high level of homotropic cooperativity in the binding of testosterone. Soluble CYP 3A4:Nanodisc retains its known function and shows prototypic hydroxylation of testosterone when driven by hydrogen peroxide. This represents the first functional characterization of a true monomeric preparation of cytochrome P450 monooxygenase in a phospholipid bilayer and elucidates new properties of the monomeric form.

  20. Monomeric tartrate resistant acid phosphatase induces insulin sensitive obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernilla Lång

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity is associated with macrophage infiltration of adipose tissue, which may link adipose inflammation to insulin resistance. However, the impact of inflammatory cells in the pathophysiology of obesity remains unclear. Tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP is an enzyme expressed by subsets of macrophages and osteoclasts that exists either as an enzymatically inactive monomer or as an active, proteolytically processed dimer. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using mice over expressing TRAP, we show that over-expression of monomeric, but not the dimeric form in adipose tissue leads to early onset spontaneous hyperplastic obesity i.e. many small fat cells. In vitro, recombinant monomeric, but not proteolytically processed TRAP induced proliferation and differentiation of mouse and human adipocyte precursor cells. In humans, monomeric TRAP was highly expressed in the adipose tissue of obese individuals. In both the mouse model and in the obese humans the source of TRAP in adipose tissue was macrophages. In addition, the obese TRAP over expressing mice exhibited signs of a low-grade inflammatory reaction in adipose tissue without evidence of abnormal adipocyte lipolysis, lipogenesis or insulin sensitivity. CONCLUSION: Monomeric TRAP, most likely secreted from adipose tissue macrophages, induces hyperplastic obesity with normal adipocyte lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity.

  1. Congenital ataxia and hemiplegic migraine with cerebral edema associated with a novel gain of function mutation in the calcium channel CACNA1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Segarra, Nuria; Gautschi, Ivan; Mittaz-Crettol, Laureane; Kallay Zetchi, Christine; Al-Qusairi, Lama; Van Bemmelen, Miguel Xavier; Maeder, Philippe; Bonafé, Luisa; Schild, Laurent; Roulet-Perez, Eliane

    2014-07-15

    Mutations in the CACNA1A gene, encoding the α1 subunit of the voltage-gated calcium channel Ca(V)2.1 (P/Q-type), have been associated with three neurological phenotypes: familial and sporadic hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1, SHM1), episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2), and spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6). We report a child with congenital ataxia, abnormal eye movements and developmental delay who presented severe attacks of hemiplegic migraine triggered by minor head traumas and associated with hemispheric swelling and seizures. Progressive cerebellar atrophy was also observed. Remission of the attacks was obtained with acetazolamide. A de novo 3 bp deletion was found in heterozygosity causing loss of a phenylalanine residue at position 1502, in one of the critical transmembrane domains of the protein contributing to the inner part of the pore. We characterized the electrophysiology of this mutant in a Xenopus oocyte in vitro system and showed that it causes gain of function of the channel. The mutant Ca(V)2.1 activates at lower voltage threshold than the wild type. These findings provide further evidence of this molecular mechanism as causative of FHM1 and expand the phenotypic spectrum of CACNA1A mutations with a child exhibiting severe SHM1 and non-episodic ataxia of congenital onset. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. p.D1690N sodium voltage-gated channel α subunit 5 mutation reduced sodium current density and is associated with Brugada syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhipeng; Xie, Qiang; Huang, Yuan; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Li, Weihua; Huang, Zhengrong

    2016-06-01

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) is an inherited primary arrhythmia disorder, leading to sudden cardiac death due to ventricular tachyarrhythmia, but does not exhibit clinical cardiac abnormalities. The sodium voltage-gated channel α subunit 5 (SCN5A) gene, which encodes the α subunit of the cardiac sodium channel, Nav1.5, is the most common pathogenic gene, although ≥22 BrS‑susceptibility genes have previously been identified. In the present study, a novel genetic variant (p.D1690N) localized in the S5‑S6 linker of domain IV of the Nav1.5 channels was identified in a Chinese Han family. Wild‑type (WT) and p.D1690N Nav1.5 channels were transiently over‑expressed in HEK293 cells and analyzed via the whole-cell patch clamp technique. The p.D1690N mutation significantly reduced the peak sodium current density to 23% of WT (at ‑20 mV; P<0.01), shifted steady‑state activation by 7 mV to increasingly positive potentials (P<0.01). Furthermore, prolonging of the recovery from inactivation was observed in the p.D1690N mutant. No significant change was identified in steady‑state inactivation. Thus, the mutant‑induced changes contributed to the loss of function of Nav1.5 channels, which indicates that the p.D1690N variant may have a pathogenic role in BrS.

  3. Field-collected permethrin-resistant Aedes aegypti from central Thailand contain point mutations in the domain IIS6 of the sodium channel gene (KDR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srisawat, Raweewan; Komalamisra, Narumon; Apiwathnasorn, Chamnarn; Paeporn, Pungasem; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Rongsriyam, Yupha; Eshita, Yuki

    2012-11-01

    One of the mechanisms responsible for pyrethroid resistance in mosquitoes is mutations in domain IIS6 of voltage-gated sodium channel gene (kdr). Aedes aegypti larvae were collected from the central provinces of Thailand (Bangkok, Prachin Buri and Ratchaburi) and colonized until they became adults. Partial fragment of kdr of permethrin-resistant mosquitoes were amplified by RT-PCR and sequenced. Among the four nucleotide mutations detected, two mutations resulted in two amino acid substitutions, S(TCC) 989 P(CCC) and V(GTA)1016 G(GGA). Among 94 permethrin-resistant mosquitoes, the SS genotype (SS/VV) was found to predominate (n = 74), followed by SR (SP/VG) (n = 15) and RR (PP/ GG) genotypes (n = 5), with the resistant allele frequency ranging from 0.03 to 0.17. As pyrethroid insecticides are currently being advocated for use in Thailand, investigations of pyrethroid resistance in other regions of the country are needed to prevent potential cross-resistance among different types of insecticides.

  4. Evolutionary analyses of KCNQ1 and HERG voltage-gated potassium channel sequences reveal location-specific susceptibility and augmented chemical severities of arrhythmogenic mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Accili Eric A

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in HERG and KCNQ1 potassium channels have been associated with Long QT syndrome and atrial fibrillation, and more recently with sudden infant death syndrome and sudden unexplained death. In other proteins, disease-associated amino acid mutations have been analyzed according to the chemical severity of the changes and the locations of the altered amino acids according to their conservation over metazoan evolution. Here, we present the first such analysis of arrhythmia-associated mutations (AAMs in the HERG and KCNQ1 potassium channels. Results Using evolutionary analyses, AAMs in HERG and KCNQ1 were preferentially found at evolutionarily conserved sites and unevenly distributed among functionally conserved domains. Non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs are under-represented at evolutionarily conserved sites in HERG, but distribute randomly in KCNQ1. AAMs are chemically more severe, according to Grantham's Scale, than changes observed in evolution and their severity correlates with the expected chemical severity of the involved codon. Expected chemical severity of a given amino acid also correlates with its relative contribution to arrhythmias. At evolutionarily variable sites, the chemical severity of the changes is also correlated with the expected chemical severity of the involved codon. Conclusion Unlike nsSNPs, AAMs preferentially locate to evolutionarily conserved, and functionally important, sites and regions within HERG and KCNQ1, and are chemically more severe than changes which occur in evolution. Expected chemical severity may contribute to the overrepresentation of certain residues in AAMs, as well as to evolutionary change.

  5. Mechanism for attenuated outward conductance induced by mutations in the cytoplasmic pore of Kir2.1 channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsueh-Kai; Iwamoto, Masayuki; Oiki, Shigetoshi; Shieh, Ru-Chi

    2015-12-01

    Outward currents through Kir2.1 channels regulate the electrical properties of excitable cells. These currents are subject to voltage-dependent attenuation by the binding of polyamines to high- and low-affinity sites, which leads to inward rectification, thereby controlling cell excitability. To examine the effects of positive charges at the low-affinity site in the cytoplasmic pore on inward rectification, we studied a mutant Kir channel (E224K/H226E) and measured single-channel currents and streaming potentials (Vstream), the latter provide the ratio of water to ions queued in a single-file permeation process in the selectivity filter. The water-ion coupling ratio was near one at a high K+ concentration ([K+]) for the wild-type channel and increased substantially as [K+] decreased. On the other hand, fewer ions occupied the selectivity filter in the mutant at all [K+]. A model for the Kir channel involving a K+ binding site in the wide pore was introduced. Model analyses revealed that the rate constants associated with the binding and release to and from the wide-pore K+ binding site was modified in the mutant. These effects lead to the reduced contribution of a conventional two-ion permeation mode to total conductance, especially at positive potentials, thereby inward rectification.

  6. A thermosensitive mutation alters the effects of lacosamide on slow inactivation in neuronal voltage-gated sodium channels, NaV1.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelsayed, Mena; Sokolov, Stanislav; Ruben, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy is a disorder characterized by seizures and convulsions. The basis of epilepsy is an increase in neuronal excitability that, in some cases, may be caused by functional defects in neuronal voltage gated sodium channels (NaVs). The C121W mutation of the β1 subunit, in particular, gives rise to the thermosensitive generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) phenotype. Lacosamide is used to treat epileptic seizures and is distinct from other anti-seizure drugs by targeting NaV slow-inactivation. We studied the effects of a physiologically relevant concentration of lacosamide on the biophysical properties of NaV1.2 channels associated with either WT-β1 or the mutant C121W-β1 subunit. Biophysical parameters were measured at both normal (22°C) and elevated (34°C) temperatures to elicit the differential temperature-sensitivity of C121W. Lacosamide was more effective in NaV1.2 associated with the WT-β1 than with C121W-β1 at either temperature. There is also a more potent effect by lacosamide on slow inactivation at elevated temperatures. Our data suggest a modulatory role is imparted by the β1 subunit in the interaction between the drug and the channel. PMID:24065921

  7. Novel mutations in the gene for α-subunit of retinal cone cyclic nucleotide-gated channels in a Japanese patient with congenital achromatopsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Muraki-Oda, Sanae; Ueyama, Hisao; Toyoda, Futoshi; Sakuramoto, Hiroyuki; Ogita, Hisakazu; Irifune, Motohiro; Yamamoto, Shuji; Nakao, Akira; Tsunoda, Kazushige; Iwata, Takeshi; Ohji, Masahito; Shimomura, Yoshikazu

    2016-05-01

    To present the characteristics and pathology of a patient with congenital achromatopsia. The patient was a 22-year-old Japanese woman who was 8 years old when she first visited our clinic. Comprehensive ophthalmic examinations including visual acuity measurements, perimetry, optical coherence tomography (OCT), fundus autofluorescence (FAF) imaging, electroretinography (ERG), and color vision tests were performed. Her genomic DNA was used as the template for the amplification of exons of five candidate genes for achromatopsia; CNGA3, CNGB3, GNAT2, PDE6C, and PDE6H, and the amplified products were sequenced. A missense mutation, found in the CNGA3, was studied both electrophysiologically and biochemically. Her phenotype was typical of congenital complete achromatopsia. She was followed for 14 years, and her vision and fundus findings were stable. However, the scotopic ERG b-waves at age 22 were smaller than those at age 8, and her FAF images showed increased autofluorescence in both maculae. Genetic examinations revealed combined heterozygous mutations of c.997_998delGA and p.M424V in the CNGA3 gene. The homomeric channel consisting of the CNGA3 subunit with the p.M424V mutation had a weak cGMP-activated current in patch-clamp recordings. In heterologous expression analyses, the expression at the cell surface of the mutant CNGA3 subunit was about 28 % of the wild type. The two novel mutations found in the CNGA3 gene, c.997_998delGA and p.M424V, can cause complete achromatopsia. The vision of the patient was stationary until the third decade of life although the FAF was altered at the age of 22 years.

  8. Rab3 interacting molecule 3 mutations associated with autism alter regulation of voltage-dependent Ca²⁺ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Yoshinori; Hirano, Mitsuru; Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Ueda, Yoshifumi; Yamaguchi, Kazuma; Nakahara, Keiko; Mori, Masayuki X; Mori, Yasuo

    2015-09-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental psychiatric disorder characterized by impaired reciprocal social interaction, disrupted communication, and restricted and stereotyped patterns of interests. Autism is known to have a strong genetic component. Although mutations in several genes account for only a small proportion of individuals with autism, they provide insight into potential biological mechanisms that underlie autism, such as dysfunction in Ca(2+) signaling, synaptic dysfunction, and abnormal brain connectivity. In autism patients, two mutations have been reported in the Rab3 interacting molecule 3 (RIM3) gene. We have previously demonstrated that RIM3 physically and functionally interacts with voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs) expressed in neurons via the β subunits, and increases neurotransmitter release. Here, by introducing corresponding autism-associated mutations that replace glutamic acid residue 176 with alanine (E176A) and methionine residue 259 with valine (M259V) into the C2B domain of mouse RIM3, we demonstrate that both mutations partly cancel the suppressive RIM3 effect on voltage-dependent inactivation of Ba(2+) currents through P/Q-type CaV2.1 recombinantly expressed in HEK293 cells. In recombinant N-type CaV2.2 VDCCs, the attenuation of the suppressive RIM3 effect on voltage-dependent inactivation is conserved for M259V but not E176A. Slowing of activation speed of P/Q-type CaV2.1 currents by RIM3 is abolished in E176A, while the physical interaction between RIM3 and β subunits is significantly attenuated in M259V. Moreover, increases by RIM3 in depolarization-induced Ca(2+) influx and acetylcholine release are significantly attenuated by E176A in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. Thus, our data raise the interesting possibility that autism phenotypes are elicited by synaptic dysfunction via altered regulation of presynaptic VDCC function and neurotransmitter release.

  9. Monomerization of viral entry inhibitor griffithsin elucidates the relationship between multivalent binding to carbohydrates and anti-HIV activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulaei, Tinoush; Shenoy, Shilpa R; Giomarelli, Barbara; Thomas, Cheryl; McMahon, James B; Dauter, Zbigniew; O'Keefe, Barry R; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2010-09-08

    Mutations were introduced to the domain-swapped homodimer of the antiviral lectin griffithsin (GRFT). Whereas several single and double mutants remained dimeric, insertion of either two or four amino acids at the dimerization interface resulted in a monomeric form of the protein (mGRFT). Monomeric character of the modified proteins was confirmed by sedimentation equilibrium ultracentrifugation and by their high resolution X-ray crystal structures, whereas their binding to carbohydrates was assessed by isothermal titration calorimetry. Cell-based antiviral activity assays utilizing different variants of mGRFT indicated that the monomeric form of the lectin had greatly reduced activity against HIV-1, suggesting that the antiviral activity of GRFT stems from crosslinking and aggregation of viral particles via multivalent interactions between GRFT and oligosaccharides present on HIV envelope glycoproteins. Atomic resolution crystal structure of a complex between mGRFT and nonamannoside revealed that a single mGRFT molecule binds to two different nonamannoside molecules through all three carbohydrate-binding sites present on the monomer.

  10. Induction of antibodies against epitopes inaccessible on the HIV type 1 envelope oligomer by immunization with recombinant monomeric glycoprotein 120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Bolmstedt, A; Novotny, J

    1998-01-01

    An N-glycan (N306) at the base of the V3 loop of HIV-BRU gp120 is shielding a linear neutralization epitope at the tip of the V3 loop on oligomeric Env. In contrast, this epitope is readily antigenic on monomeric gp120. Immunization with recombinant monomeric HIV-BRU gp120 may thus be expected...... to elicit antibodies preferentially neutralizing mutant variants of HIV-BRU lacking the N306 glycan. Therefore, two guinea pigs were immunized with monomeric wild-type HIV-BRU gp120 possessing the N306 glycan and immune sera were tested for neutralization against target viruses HIV-BRU, -A308, and -A308T321....... HIV-A308 and HIV-A308T321 lack the N306 glycan; HIV-A308T321 contains an additional mutation at the tip of V3 rendering it resistant to MAb binding at this epitope. Both immune sera preferentially neutralized the two mutant virus variants lacking the N306 glycan, with a 10- to 20-fold increase...

  11. Induction of antibodies against epitopes inaccessible on the HIV type 1 envelope oligomer by immunization with recombinant monomeric glycoprotein 120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Bolmstedt, A; Novotny, J

    1998-01-01

    An N-glycan (N306) at the base of the V3 loop of HIV-BRU gp120 is shielding a linear neutralization epitope at the tip of the V3 loop on oligomeric Env. In contrast, this epitope is readily antigenic on monomeric gp120. Immunization with recombinant monomeric HIV-BRU gp120 may thus be expected...... to elicit antibodies preferentially neutralizing mutant variants of HIV-BRU lacking the N306 glycan. Therefore, two guinea pigs were immunized with monomeric wild-type HIV-BRU gp120 possessing the N306 glycan and immune sera were tested for neutralization against target viruses HIV-BRU, -A308, and -A308T321....... HIV-A308 and HIV-A308T321 lack the N306 glycan; HIV-A308T321 contains an additional mutation at the tip of V3 rendering it resistant to MAb binding at this epitope. Both immune sera preferentially neutralized the two mutant virus variants lacking the N306 glycan, with a 10- to 20-fold increase...

  12. Mutations in sodium-channel gene SCN9A cause a spectrum of human genetic pain disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenth, J.P.H.; Waxman, S.G.

    2007-01-01

    The voltage-gated sodium-channel type IX alpha subunit, known as Na(v)1.7 and encoded by the gene SCN9A, is located in peripheral neurons and plays an important role in action potential production in these cells. Recent genetic studies have identified Na(v)1.7 dysfunction in three different human pa

  13. Mutations in sodium-channel gene SCN9A cause a spectrum of human genetic pain disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenth, J.P.H.; Waxman, S.G.

    2007-01-01

    The voltage-gated sodium-channel type IX alpha subunit, known as Na(v)1.7 and encoded by the gene SCN9A, is located in peripheral neurons and plays an important role in action potential production in these cells. Recent genetic studies have identified Na(v)1.7 dysfunction in three different human pa

  14. Keppen-Lubinsky Syndrome Is Caused by Mutations in the Inwardly Rectifying K+ Channel Encoded by KCNJ6

    OpenAIRE

    Masotti, Andrea; Uva, Paolo; Davis-Keppen, Laura; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Cohen, Lior; Pisaneschi, Elisa; Celluzzi, Antonella; Bencivenga, Paola; Fang, Mingyan; Tian, Mingyu; Xu, Xun; Cappa, Marco; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Keppen-Lubinsky syndrome (KPLBS) is a rare disease mainly characterized by severe developmental delay and intellectual disability, microcephaly, large prominent eyes, a narrow nasal bridge, a tented upper lip, a high palate, an open mouth, tightly adherent skin, an aged appearance, and severe generalized lipodystrophy. We sequenced the exomes of three unrelated individuals affected by KPLBS and found de novo heterozygous mutations in KCNJ6 (GIRK2), which encodes an inwardly rectifying potassi...

  15. Synthesis and structure of monomeric, trimeric, and mixed phenylcyanamides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Harald; Mayer, Peter; Schulz, Axel; Soller, Thomas; Villinger, Alexander

    2008-06-02

    In a new synthetic approach phenylcyanamide (Hpca) was synthesized by methylation of phenylthiourea followed by a basic work-up. All products along the synthetic route have been fully characterized by means of NMR, IR, and X-ray studies. The first structural report of neutral mixed crystals of phenylcyanamide containing monomeric and trimeric Hpca is presented. Examination of these intriguing mixed crystals revealed the formation of distinct layers of monomeric and trimeric Hpca. These layers are interconnected by weak hydrogen bonds. The trimer represents triphenylisomelamine, which readily isomerizes to the triphenylmelamine in the melt, in accord with computations at the B3LYP level, indicating an exothermic process (DeltaH = -49.4 kcal mol(-1)). Pure trimeric Hpca (triphenylisomelamine) was obtained either by recrystallization of the mixed crystals from boiling water or by trimerization of monomeric Hpca in isopropanol for 12 h under reflux conditions. For comparison tritylcyanamide (Htca) and potassium phenylcyanamide as an [18]crown-6 complex [K([18]crown-6)pca] have been synthesized, and the solid-state structures were determined using X-ray diffraction techniques. The thermal behavior was studied by thermo-analytical experiments. In agreement with the experimental results, computations predict an exothermic cyclotrimerization process for Hpca (DeltaH = -41.3 kcal mol(-1)).

  16. Autosomal dominant erythermalgia associated with a novel mutation in the voltage-gated sodium channel alpha subunit Nav1.7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michiels, Jan J; te Morsche, Rene H M; Jansen, Jan B M J; Drenth, Joost P H

    2005-10-01

    Autosomal dominant primary erythermalgia is a rare disorder characterized by recurrent attacks of red, warm, and painful hands and/or feet. To describe the phenotypes and molecular data of a 10-member family with 5 symptomatic living patients with erythermalgia. The clinical phenotype of this family was featured by episodic or continuous symmetrical red swelling, irritating warmth, and burning pain of feet and lower legs provoked or aggravated by warmth and exercise, and relief was always obtained by application of cold, such as putting feet in (ice-) cold water. The symptoms in this family were only partially controlled by analgesics and sedatives. All affected family members were heterozygous for a novel mutation (S241T) of the voltage-gated sodium channel alpha subunit Nav1.7. Primary erythermalgia may be a neuropathic disorder of the small peripheral sensory and sympathetic neurons, and may be caused by hyperexcitability of Nav1.7.

  17. Coevolution of the Ile1,016 and Cys1,534 Mutations in the Voltage Gated Sodium Channel Gene of Aedes aegypti in Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Z Vera-Maloof

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide the mosquito Aedes aegypti (L. is the principal urban vector of dengue viruses. Currently 2.5 billion people are at risk for infection and reduction of Ae. aegypti populations is the most effective means to reduce the risk of transmission. Pyrethroids are used extensively for adult mosquito control, especially during dengue outbreaks. Pyrethroids promote activation and prolong the activation of the voltage gated sodium channel protein (VGSC by interacting with two distinct pyrethroid receptor sites [1], formed by the interfaces of the transmembrane helix subunit 6 (S6 of domains II and III. Mutations of S6 in domains II and III synergize so that double mutants have higher pyrethroid resistance than mutants in either domain alone. Computer models predict an allosteric interaction between mutations in the two domains. In Ae. aegypti, a Ile1,016 mutation in the S6 of domain II was discovered in 2006 and found to be associated with pyrethroid resistance in field populations in Mexico. In 2010 a second mutation, Cys1,534 in the S6 of domain III was discovered and also found to be associated with pyrethroid resistance and correlated with the frequency of Ile1,016.A linkage disequilibrium analysis was performed on Ile1,016 and Cys1,534 in Ae. aegypti collected in Mexico from 2000-2012 to test for statistical associations between S6 in domains II and III in natural populations. We estimated the frequency of the four dilocus haplotypes in 1,016 and 1,534: Val1,016/Phe1,534 (susceptible, Val1,016/Cys1,534, Ile1,016/Phe1,534, and Ile1,016/Cys1,534 (resistant. The susceptible Val1,016/Phe1,534 haplotype went from near fixation to extinction and the resistant Ile1,016/Cys1,534 haplotype increased in all collections from a frequency close to zero to frequencies ranging from 0.5-0.9. The Val1,016/Cys1,534 haplotype increased in all collections until 2008 after which it began to decline as Ile1,016/Cys1,534 increased. However, the Ile1,016/Phe1

  18. Caution Is Required in Interpretation of Mutations in the Voltage Sensing Domain of Voltage Gated Channels as Evidence for Gating Mechanisms

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    Alisher M. Kariev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The gating mechanism of voltage sensitive ion channels is generally considered to be the motion of the S4 transmembrane segment of the voltage sensing domains (VSD. The primary supporting evidence came from R→C mutations on the S4 transmembrane segment of the VSD, followed by reaction with a methanethiosulfonate (MTS reagent. The cys side chain is –SH (reactive form –S−; the arginine side chain is much larger, leaving space big enough to accommodate the MTS sulfonate head group. The cavity created by the mutation has space for up to seven more water molecules than were present in wild type, which could be displaced irreversibly by the MTS reagent. Our quantum calculations show there is major reorientation of three aromatic residues that face into the cavity in response to proton displacement within the VSD. Two phenylalanines reorient sufficiently to shield/unshield the cysteine from the intracellular and extracellular ends, depending on the proton positions, and a tyrosine forms a hydrogen bond to the cysteine sulfur with its side chain –OH. These could produce the results of the experiments that have been interpreted as evidence for physical motion of the S4 segment, without physical motion of the S4 backbone. The computations strongly suggest that the interpretation of cysteine substitution reaction experiments be re-examined in the light of these considerations.

  19. A Missense Mutation in Epsilon-subunit of Acetylcholine Receptor Causing Autosomal Dominant Slow-channel Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome in a Chinese Family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-Ze Tan; Yuan Man; Fei Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Background:Congenital myasthenic syndromes are a group orrare disorders that are clinically and genetically heterogeneous and caused by mutations in the genes encoding proteins of the neuromuscular junction.Here,we described a Chinese family that presented with phenotypes of classic slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome (SCCMS).Methods:Clinical characteristics and electrophysiological features of three patients from a Chinese family were examined,and next-generation sequencing followed by direct sequencing was carried out.Results:The patients revealed variability in clinical and electrophysiological features.However,weakness,scoliosis,and repetitive-compound muscle action potential were found in all affected members in the family.A heterozygous C>T missense mutation at nucleotide 865 in acetylcholine receptor epsilon-subunit (CHRNE) gene that causes a leucine-to-phenylalanine substitution at position 289 (L289F) was found.Conclusions:We reported a SCCMS family of Chinese origin.In the family,classical clinical phenotype with phenotypic variability among different members was found.Genetic testing could help diagnose this rare disease.

  20. Mutation in the kv3.3 voltage-gated potassium channel causing spinocerebellar ataxia 13 disrupts sound-localization mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middlebrooks, John C; Nick, Harry S; Subramony, S H; Advincula, Joel; Rosales, Raymond L; Lee, Lillian V; Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Waters, Michael F

    2013-01-01

    Normal sound localization requires precise comparisons of sound timing and pressure levels between the two ears. The primary localization cues are interaural time differences, ITD, and interaural level differences, ILD. Voltage-gated potassium channels, including Kv3.3, are highly expressed in the auditory brainstem and are thought to underlie the exquisite temporal precision and rapid spike rates that characterize brainstem binaural pathways. An autosomal dominant mutation in the gene encoding Kv3.3 has been demonstrated in a large Filipino kindred manifesting as spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 (SCA13). This kindred provides a rare opportunity to test in vivo the importance of a specific channel subunit for human hearing. Here, we demonstrate psychophysically that individuals with the mutant allele exhibit profound deficits in both ITD and ILD sensitivity, despite showing no obvious impairment in pure-tone sensitivity with either ear. Surprisingly, several individuals exhibited the auditory deficits even though they were pre-symptomatic for SCA13. We would expect that impairments of binaural processing as great as those observed in this family would result in prominent deficits in localization of sound sources and in loss of the "spatial release from masking" that aids in understanding speech in the presence of competing sounds.

  1. Mutation in the kv3.3 voltage-gated potassium channel causing spinocerebellar ataxia 13 disrupts sound-localization mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C Middlebrooks

    Full Text Available Normal sound localization requires precise comparisons of sound timing and pressure levels between the two ears. The primary localization cues are interaural time differences, ITD, and interaural level differences, ILD. Voltage-gated potassium channels, including Kv3.3, are highly expressed in the auditory brainstem and are thought to underlie the exquisite temporal precision and rapid spike rates that characterize brainstem binaural pathways. An autosomal dominant mutation in the gene encoding Kv3.3 has been demonstrated in a large Filipino kindred manifesting as spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 (SCA13. This kindred provides a rare opportunity to test in vivo the importance of a specific channel subunit for human hearing. Here, we demonstrate psychophysically that individuals with the mutant allele exhibit profound deficits in both ITD and ILD sensitivity, despite showing no obvious impairment in pure-tone sensitivity with either ear. Surprisingly, several individuals exhibited the auditory deficits even though they were pre-symptomatic for SCA13. We would expect that impairments of binaural processing as great as those observed in this family would result in prominent deficits in localization of sound sources and in loss of the "spatial release from masking" that aids in understanding speech in the presence of competing sounds.

  2. TMEM16A is associated with voltage-gated calcium channels in mouse retina and its function is disrupted upon mutation of the auxiliary α2δ4 subunit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Antonella; Piano, Ilaria; Demontis, Gian Carlo; Bacchi, Niccolò; Casarosa, Simona; Santina, Luca Della; Gargini, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Photoreceptors rely upon highly specialized synapses to efficiently transmit signals to multiple postsynaptic targets. Calcium influx in the presynaptic terminal is mediated by voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC). This event triggers neurotransmitter release, but also gates calcium-activated chloride channels (TMEM), which in turn regulate VGCC activity. In order to investigate the relationship between VGCC and TMEM channels, we analyzed the retina of wild type (WT) and Cacna2d4 mutant mice, in which the VGCC auxiliary α2δ4 subunit carries a nonsense mutation, disrupting the normal channel function. Synaptic terminals of mutant photoreceptors are disarranged and synaptic proteins as well as TMEM16A channels lose their characteristic localization. In parallel, calcium-activated chloride currents are impaired in rods, despite unaltered TMEM16A protein levels. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed the interaction between VGCC and TMEM16A channels in the retina. Heterologous expression of these channels in tsA-201 cells showed that TMEM16A associates with the CaV1.4 subunit, and the association persists upon expression of the mutant α2δ4 subunit. Collectively, our experiments show association between TMEM16A and the α1 subunit of VGCC. Close proximity of these channels allows optimal function of the photoreceptor synaptic terminal under physiological conditions, but also makes TMEM16A channels susceptible to changes occurring to calcium channels. PMID:26557056

  3. Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 mutations W1684R and V1696I alter G protein-mediated regulation of Ca(V)2.1 voltage-gated calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza-López, Edgar; Sandoval, Alejandro; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Gandini, María A; Van den Maagdenberg, Arn; De Waard, Michel; Felix, Ricardo

    2012-08-01

    Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM-1) is a monogenic form of migraine with aura that is characterized by recurrent attacks of a typical migraine headache with transient hemiparesis during the aura phase. In a subset of patients, additional symptoms such as epilepsy and cerebellar ataxia are part of the clinical phenotype. FHM-1 is caused by missense mutations in the CACNA1A gene that encodes the pore-forming subunit of Ca(V)2.1 voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. Although the functional effects of an increasing number of FHM-1 mutations have been characterized, knowledge on the influence of most of these mutations on G protein regulation of channel function is lacking. Here, we explored the effects of G protein-dependent modulation on mutations W1684R and V1696I which cause FHM-1 with and without cerebellar ataxia, respectively. Both mutations were introduced into the human Ca(V)2.1α(1) subunit and their functional consequences investigated after heterologous expression in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293) cells using patch-clamp recordings. When co-expressed along with the human μ-opioid receptor, application of the agonist [d-Ala2, N-MePhe4, Gly-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) inhibited currents through both wild-type (WT) and mutant Ca(V)2.1 channels, which is consistent with the known modulation of these channels by G protein-coupled receptors. Prepulse facilitation, which is a way to characterize the relief of direct voltage-dependent G protein regulation, was reduced by both FHM-1 mutations. Moreover, the kinetic analysis of the onset and decay of facilitation showed that the W1684R and V1696I mutations affect the apparent dissociation and reassociation rates of the Gβγ dimer from the channel complex, suggesting that the G protein-Ca(2+) channel affinity may be altered by the mutations. These biophysical studies may shed new light on the pathophysiology underlying FHM-1.

  4. Urea Unfolding Study of E. coli Alanyl-tRNA Synthetase and Its Monomeric Variants Proves the Role of C-Terminal Domain in Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baisakhi Banerjee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available E. coli alanyl-tRNA exists as a dimer in its native form and the C-terminal coiled-coil part plays an important role in the dimerization process. The truncated N-terminal containing the first 700 amino acids (1–700 forms a monomeric variant possessing similar aminoacylation activity like wild type. A point mutation in the C-terminal domain (G674D also produces a monomeric variant with a fivefold reduced aminoacylation activity compared to the wild type enzyme. Urea induced denaturation of these monomeric mutants along with another alaRS variant (N461 alaRS was studied together with the full-length enzyme using various spectroscopic techniques such as intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, 1-anilino-8-naphthalene-sulfonic acid binding, near- and far-UV circular dichroism, and analytical ultracentrifugation. Aminoacylation activity assay after refolding from denatured state revealed that the monomeric mutants studied here were unable to regain their activity, whereas the dimeric full-length alaRS gets back similar activity as the native enzyme. This study indicates that dimerization is one of the key regulatory factors that is important in the proper folding and stability of E. coli alaRS.

  5. Urea Unfolding Study of E. coli Alanyl-tRNA Synthetase and Its Monomeric Variants Proves the Role of C-Terminal Domain in Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Baisakhi; Banerjee, Rajat

    2015-01-01

    E. coli alanyl-tRNA exists as a dimer in its native form and the C-terminal coiled-coil part plays an important role in the dimerization process. The truncated N-terminal containing the first 700 amino acids (1–700) forms a monomeric variant possessing similar aminoacylation activity like wild type. A point mutation in the C-terminal domain (G674D) also produces a monomeric variant with a fivefold reduced aminoacylation activity compared to the wild type enzyme. Urea induced denaturation of these monomeric mutants along with another alaRS variant (N461 alaRS) was studied together with the full-length enzyme using various spectroscopic techniques such as intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, 1-anilino-8-naphthalene-sulfonic acid binding, near- and far-UV circular dichroism, and analytical ultracentrifugation. Aminoacylation activity assay after refolding from denatured state revealed that the monomeric mutants studied here were unable to regain their activity, whereas the dimeric full-length alaRS gets back similar activity as the native enzyme. This study indicates that dimerization is one of the key regulatory factors that is important in the proper folding and stability of E. coli alaRS. PMID:26617997

  6. Mutations in ionotropic AMPA receptor 3 alter channel properties and are associated with moderate cognitive impairment in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ye; Arai, Amy C; Rumbaugh, Gavin; Srivastava, Anand K; Turner, Gillian; Hayashi, Takashi; Suzuki, Erika; Jiang, Yuwu; Zhang, Lilei; Rodriguez, Jayson; Boyle, Jackie; Tarpey, Patrick; Raymond, F Lucy; Nevelsteen, Joke; Froyen, Guy; Stratton, Mike; Futreal, Andy; Gecz, Jozef; Stevenson, Roger; Schwartz, Charles E; Valle, David; Huganir, Richard L; Wang, Tao

    2007-11-13

    Ionotropic alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors (iGluRs) mediate the majority of excitatory synaptic transmission in the CNS and are essential for the induction and maintenance of long-term potentiation and long-term depression, two cellular models of learning and memory. We identified a genomic deletion (0.4 Mb) involving the entire GRIA3 (encoding iGluR3) by using an X-array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and four missense variants (G833R, M706T, R631S, and R450Q) in functional domains of iGluR3 by sequencing 400 males with X-linked mental retardation (XLMR). Three variants were found in males with moderate MR and were absent in 500 control males. Expression studies in HEK293 cells showed that G833R resulted in a 78% reduction of iGluR3 due to protein misfolding. Whole-cell recording studies of iGluR3 homomers in HEK293 cells revealed that neither iGluR3-M706T (S2 domain) nor iGluR3-R631S (near channel core) had substantial channel function, whereas R450Q (S1 domain) was associated with accelerated receptor desensitization. When forming heteromeric receptors with iGluR2 in HEK293 cells, all four iGluR3 variants had altered desensitization kinetics. Our study provides the genetic and functional evidence that mutant iGluR3 with altered kinetic properties is associated with moderate cognitive impairment in humans.

  7. Slow Unfolding of Monomeric Proteins from Hyperthermophiles with Reversible Unfolding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Mukaiyama

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the differences in their optimal growth temperatures microorganisms can be classified into psychrophiles, mesophiles, thermophiles, and hyperthermophiles. Proteins from hyperthermophiles generally exhibit greater stability than those from other organisms. In this review, we collect data about the stability and folding of monomeric proteins from hyperthermophilies with reversible unfolding, from the equilibrium and kinetic aspects. The results indicate that slow unfolding is a general strategy by which proteins from hyperthermophiles adapt to higher temperatures. Hydrophobic interaction is one of the factors in the molecular mechanism of the slow unfolding of proteins from hyperthermophiles.

  8. Addition-type polyimides from solutions of monomeric reactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvigs, P.; Serafini, T. T.; Lightsey, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    The monomeric reactants approach was used to fabricate addition-type polyimide/graphite fiber composites with improved mechanical properties and thermal stability characteristics over those of composites derived from addition-type amide acid prepolymers. A screening study of 24 different monomer combinations was performed. The results of a more extensive investigation of a selected number of monomer combinations showed that the combination providing the best thermomechanical properties was 5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboxylic acid monomethyl ester/4,4'-methylenedianiline/3,3'4,4'-benzophenone tetracarboxylic acid dimethyl ester at a molar ratio of 2/3.09/2.09.

  9. Long QT syndrome-associated mutations in the S4-S5 linker of KvLQT1 potassium channels modify gating and interaction with minK subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franqueza, L; Lin, M; Shen, J; Splawski, I; Keating, M T; Sanguinetti, M C

    1999-07-23

    Long QT syndrome is an inherited disorder of cardiac repolarization caused by mutations in cardiac ion channel genes, including KVLQT1. In this study, the functional consequences of three long QT-associated missense mutations in KvLQT1 (R243C, W248R, E261K) were characterized using the Xenopus oocyte heterologous expression system and two-microelectrode voltage clamp techniques. These mutations are located in or near the intracellular linker between the S4 and S5 transmembrane domains, a region implicated in activation gating of potassium channels. The E261K mutation caused loss of function and did not interact with wild-type KvLQT1 subunits. R243C or W248R KvLQT1 subunits formed functional channels, but compared with wild-type KvLQT1 current, the rate of activation was slower, and the voltage dependence of activation and inactivation was shifted to more positive potentials. Co expression of minK and KvLQT1 channel subunits induces a slow delayed rectifier K(+) current, I(Ks), characterized by slow activation and a markedly increased magnitude compared with current induced by KvLQT1 subunits alone. Coexpression of minK with R243C or W248R KvLQT1 subunits suppressed current, suggesting that coassembly of mutant subunits with minK prevented normal channel gating. The decrease in I(Ks) caused by loss of function or altered gating properties explains the prolonged QT interval and increased risk of arrhythmia and sudden death associated with these mutations in KVLQT1.

  10. Characterization of monomeric intermediates during VSV glycoprotein structural transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie A Albertini

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Entry of enveloped viruses requires fusion of viral and cellular membranes, driven by conformational changes of viral glycoproteins. Crystal structures provide static pictures of pre- and post-fusion conformations of these proteins but the transition pathway remains elusive. Here, using several biophysical techniques, including analytical ultracentrifugation, circular dichroïsm, electron microscopy and small angle X-ray scattering, we have characterized the low-pH-induced fusogenic structural transition of a soluble form of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV glycoprotein G ectodomain (G(th, aa residues 1-422, the fragment that was previously crystallized. While the post-fusion trimer is the major species detected at low pH, the pre-fusion trimer is not detected in solution. Rather, at high pH, G(th is a flexible monomer that explores a large conformational space. The monomeric population exhibits a marked pH-dependence and adopts more elongated conformations when pH decreases. Furthermore, large relative movements of domains are detected in absence of significant secondary structure modification. Solution studies are complemented by electron micrographs of negatively stained viral particles in which monomeric ectodomains of G are observed at the viral surface at both pH 7.5 and pH 6.7. We propose that the monomers are intermediates during the conformational change and thus that VSV G trimers dissociate at the viral surface during the structural transition.

  11. Lateral diffusion, function, and expression of the slow channel congenital myasthenia syndrome αC418W nicotinic receptor mutation with changes in lipid raft components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyola-Cintrón, Jessica; Caballero-Rivera, Daniel; Ballester, Leomar; Baéz-Pagán, Carlos A; Martínez, Hernán L; Vélez-Arroyo, Karla P; Quesada, Orestes; Lasalde-Dominicci, José A

    2015-10-30

    Lipid rafts, specialized membrane microdomains in the plasma membrane rich in cholesterol and sphingolipids, are hot spots for a number of important cellular processes. The novel nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) mutation αC418W, the first lipid-exposed mutation identified in a patient that causes slow channel congenital myasthenia syndrome was shown to be cholesterol-sensitive and to accumulate in microdomains rich in the membrane raft marker protein caveolin-1. The objective of this study is to gain insight into the mechanism by which lateral segregation into specialized raft membrane microdomains regulates the activable pool of nAChRs. We performed fluorescent recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), quantitative RT-PCR, and whole cell patch clamp recordings of GFP-encoding Mus musculus nAChRs transfected into HEK 293 cells to assess the role of cholesterol and caveolin-1 (CAV-1) in the diffusion, expression, and functionality of the nAChR (WT and αC418W). Our findings support the hypothesis that a cholesterol-sensitive nAChR might reside in specialized membrane microdomains that upon cholesterol depletion become disrupted and release the cholesterol-sensitive nAChRs to the pool of activable receptors. In addition, our results in HEK 293 cells show an interdependence between CAV-1 and αC418W that could confer end plates rich in αC418W nAChRs to a susceptibility to changes in cholesterol levels that could cause adverse drug reactions to cholesterol-lowering drugs such as statins. The current work suggests that the interplay between cholesterol and CAV-1 provides the molecular basis for modulating the function and dynamics of the cholesterol-sensitive αC418W nAChR.

  12. Why does the inner-helix mutation A413C double the stoichiometry of Kv1.3 channel block by emopamil but not by verapamil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossokhin, Alexey; Dreker, Tobias; Grissmer, Stephan; Zhorov, Boris S

    2011-04-01

    hKv1.3 channels in lymphocytes are targets for the chemotherapy treatment of autoimmune diseases. Phenylalkylamines block Kv1.3 channels by poorly understood mechanisms. In the inactivation-reduced mutant H399T, the second mutation A413C in S6 substantially decreases the potency of phenylalkylamines with a para-methoxy group at the phenylethylamine end, whereas potency of phenylalkylamines lacking this group is less affected. Intriguingly, completely demethoxylated emopamil blocks mutant H399T/A413C with a 2:1 stoichiometry. Here, we generated a triple mutant, H399T/C412A/A413C, and found that its emopamil-binding properties are similar to those of the double mutant. These data rule out disulfide bonding Cys412-Cys413, which would substantially deform the inner helix, suggest a clash of Cys413 with the para-methoxy group, and provide a distance constraint to dock phenylalkylamines in a Kv1.2-based homology model. Monte Carlo minimizations predict that the verapamil ammonium group donates an H-bond to the backbone carbonyl of Thr391 at the P-loop turn, the pentanenitrilephenyl moiety occludes the pore, whereas the phenylethylamine meta- and para-methoxy substituents approach, respectively, the side chains of Met390 and Ala413. In the double-mutant model, the Cys413 side chains accept H-bonds from two emopamil molecules whose phenyl rings fit in the hydrophobic intersubunit interfaces, whereas the pentanenitrilephenyl moieties occlude the pore. Because these interfaces are unattractive for a methoxylated phenyl ring, the ammonium group of respective phenylalkylamines cannot approach the Cys413 side chain and binds at the focus of P-helices, whereas the para-methoxy group clashes with Cys413. Our study proposes an atomistic mechanism of Kv1.3 block by phenylalkylamines and highlights the intra- and intersubunit interfaces as ligand binding loci.

  13. Identification of a single cytosine base insertion mutation at Arg-597 of the beta subunit of the human epithelial sodium channel in a family with Liddle's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, T; Okauchi, Y; Matsuzaki, Y; Kuwajima, K; Kondo, H; Horiuchi, N; Nakao, K; Iwata, M; Yokogoshi, Y; Shintani, Y; Bando, H; Saito, S

    1998-06-01

    We describe a family with Liddle's disease caused by a novel mutation of the beta subunit of the human epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). A 15-year-old Japanese female was referred to our outclinic because of hypertension. The physical examination showed no abnormal findings except mild hypertension, but the laboratory data revealed low levels of plasma renin activity, plasma aldosterone and serum potassium. A comprehensive analysis of steroid hormones showed only high levels of urinary free cortisol and 17-hydroxycorticosteroids. During loading tests, blood pressure and serum potassium responded well to triamterene and slightly to spironolactone, but did not respond to dexamethasone. In addition, the normal ratio of tetrahydrocortisol plus 5alpha-tetrahydrocortisol to tetrahydrocortisone in a 24 h urinary excretion test strongly suggested a diagnosis of Liddle's disease rather than apparent mineralocorticoid excess syndrome. DNA sequence analysis of members of this family revealed a single cytosine base insertion at Arg-597 of the beta human ENaC in the proband and her mother, leading to a loss of the last 34 amino acids from the normally encoded protein as the result of a frameshift. We conclude that a de novo cytosine insertion into the final exon of the C-terminus of the beta human ENaC is responsible for Liddle's disease in this Japanese family.

  14. Frequency of V1016I and F1534C mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene in Aedes aegypti in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Leslie C; Ponce, Gustavo; Saavedra-Rodriguez, Karla; Lopez, Beatriz; Flores, Adriana E

    2015-06-01

    The V1016I and F1534C mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene have been associated with resistance to pyrethroids and DDT in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. A study was carried out to determine the frequency of I1016 and C1534 by real-time PCR in five natural populations of Ae. aegypti in Venezuela during 2008, 2010 and 2012, as well as in a strain selected with 0.14 µg of deltamethrin for 15 generations. In natural populations, frequencies of I1016 varied between 0.01 and 0.37, and frequencies of C1534 between 0.35 and 1.0. In the Pampanito strain, the frequency of I1016 increased from 0.02 in F1 up to 0.5 in F15 and from 0.35 up to fixation for C1534 after selection with deltamethrin. The results showed that C1534 frequencies are higher than I1016 frequencies in natural populations of Ae. aegypti in Venezuela, and that deltamethrin selected the C1534 more rapidly than I1016. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Treatment with carbamazepine and gabapentin of a patient with primary erythermalgia (erythromelalgia) identified to have a mutation in the SCN9A gene, encoding a voltage-gated sodium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natkunarajah, J; Atherton, D; Elmslie, F; Mansour, S; Mortimer, P

    2009-12-01

    Primary erythermalgia (erythromelalgia) is a rare autosomal dominant condition characterized by intermittent attacks of erythema, increased skin temperature and severe burning pain in the extremities, in a bilateral symmetrical distribution. Mutations in the SCN9A gene, which encodes a voltage-gated sodium channel have been shown to cause this disease. We report a family identified to have a mutation in the SCN9A gene, in which one severely affected family member has responded to the therapeutic combination of gabapentin and carbamazepine treatment.

  16. Isolation and Characterization of Lewis Base Stabilized Monomeric Parent Stibanylboranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardt, Christian; Hegen, Oliver; Hautmann, Matthias; Balázs, Gábor; Bodensteiner, Michael; Virovets, Alexander V; Timoshkin, Alexey Y; Scheer, Manfred

    2015-10-26

    The synthesis of the Lewis base stabilized monomeric parent compound of stibanylboranes, "H2 Sb-BH2 ", is reported. Through a salt metathesis route, the silyl-substituted compounds (Me3 Si)2 Sb-BH2 ⋅LB (LB=NMe3 , NHC(Me) ) were synthesized as representatives of derivatives with a Sb-B σ bond. Under very mild conditions, they could be transformed into the target compounds Me3 N⋅H2 B-HSb-BH2 ⋅NMe3 and H2 Sb-BH2 ⋅NHC(Me) , respectively. The products were characterized by X-ray structure analysis, NMR spectroscopy, IR spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. DFT calculations give further insight into the stability and bonding of these unique compounds.

  17. Light-induced structural changes in a monomeric bacteriophytochrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heikki Takala

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Phytochromes sense red light in plants and various microorganism. Light absorption causes structural changes within the protein, which alter its biochemical activity. Bacterial phytochromes are dimeric proteins, but the functional relevance of this arrangement remains unclear. Here, we use time-resolved X-ray scattering to reveal the solution structural change of a monomeric variant of the photosensory core module of the phytochrome from Deinococcus radiodurans. The data reveal two motions, a bend and a twist of the PHY domain with respect to the chromophore-binding domains. Infrared spectroscopy shows the refolding of the PHY tongue. We conclude that a monomer of the phytochrome photosensory core is sufficient to perform the light-induced structural changes. This implies that allosteric cooperation with the other monomer is not needed for structural activation. The dimeric arrangement may instead be intrinsic to the biochemical output domains of bacterial phytochromes.

  18. Characterization of the Partially Folded Monomeric Intermediate of Creatine Kinase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朴龙斗; 周海梦

    2002-01-01

    The importance of understanding the protein folding pathway and intermediates is well recognized on the basis of extensive studies of protein folding in vitro and in vivo. Creatine kinase (CK) is a typical model for studying unfolding and refolding of proteins due to several interesting properties. Recent studies on the folding of CK show that its partially folded monomeric intermediate is present kinetically and is stable at equilibrium. The present paper contains 33 References as a mini review to characterize the properties of CK from studies on the CK folding pathway. Characterization of these intermediates is an essential step toward understanding the mechanism of protein folding. Some well-determined schemes are suggested as protein folding models.

  19. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Monomeric LHCII: Experiment and Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Malý, Pavel; van Grondelle, Rienk; Mančal, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    We derive approximate equations of motion for excited state dynamics of a multilevel open quantum system weakly interacting with light to describe fluorescence detected single molecule spectra. Based on the Frenkel exciton theory, we construct a model for the chlorophyll part of the LHCII complex of higher plants and its interaction with previously proposed excitation quencher in the form of the lutein molecule Lut 1. The resulting description is valid over a broad range of timescales relevant for single molecule spectroscopy, i.e. from ps to minutes. Validity of these equations is demonstrated by comparing simulations of ensemble and single-molecule spectra of monomeric LHCII with experiments. Using a conformational change of the LHCII protein as a switching mechanism, the intensity and spectral time traces of individual LHCII complexes are simulated, and the experimental statistical distributions are reproduced. Based on our model, it is shown that with reasonable assumptions about its interaction with chlo...

  20. mKikGR, a monomeric photoswitchable fluorescent protein.

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    Satoshi Habuchi

    Full Text Available The recent demonstration and utilization of fluorescent proteins whose fluorescence can be switched on and off has greatly expanded the toolkit of molecular and cell biology. These photoswitchable proteins have facilitated the characterization of specifically tagged molecular species in the cell and have enabled fluorescence imaging of intracellular structures with a resolution far below the classical diffraction limit of light. Applications are limited, however, by the fast photobleaching, slow photoswitching, and oligomerization typical for photoswitchable proteins currently available. Here, we report the molecular cloning and spectroscopic characterization of mKikGR, a monomeric version of the previously reported KikGR that displays high photostability and switching rates. Furthermore, we present single-molecule imaging experiments that demonstrate that individual mKikGR proteins can be localized with a precision of better than 10 nanometers, suggesting their suitability for super-resolution imaging.

  1. Computational design and characterization of a monomeric helical dinuclear metalloprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Jennifer R; Kono, Hidetoshi; Lahr, Steven; Wang, Wei; DeGrado, William F; Saven, Jeffery G

    2003-12-12

    The de novo design of di-iron proteins is an important step towards understanding the diversity of function among this complex family of metalloenzymes. Previous designs of due ferro (DF) proteins have resulted in tetrameric and dimeric four-helix bundles having crystallographically well-defined structures and active-site geometries. Here, the design and characterization of DFsc, a 114 residue monomeric four-helix bundle, is presented. The backbone was modeled using previous oligomeric structures and appropriate inter-helical turns. The identities of 26 residues were predetermined, including the primary and secondary ligands in the active site, residues involved in active site accessibility, and the gamma beta gamma beta turn between helices 2 and 3. The remaining 88 amino acid residues were determined using statistical computer aided design, which is based upon a recent statistical theory of protein sequences. Rather than sampling sequences, the theory directly provides the site-specific amino acid probabilities, which are then used to guide sequence design. The resulting sequence (DFsc) expresses well in Escherichia coli and is highly soluble. Sedimentation studies confirm that the protein is monomeric in solution. Circular dichroism spectra are consistent with the helical content of the target structure. The protein is structured in both the apo and the holo forms, with the metal-bound form exhibiting increased stability. DFsc stoichiometrically binds a variety of divalent metal ions, including Zn(II), Co(II), Fe(II), and Mn(II), with micromolar affinities. 15N HSQC NMR spectra of both the apo and Zn(II) proteins reveal excellent dispersion with evidence of a significant structural change upon metal binding. DFsc is then a realization of complete de novo design, where backbone structure, activity, and sequence are specified in the design process.

  2. An Intrinsically Disordered Motif Mediates Diverse Actions of Monomeric C-reactive Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai-Yun; Wang, Jing; Meng, Fan; Jia, Zhe-Kun; Su, Yang; Bai, Qi-Feng; Lv, Ling-Ling; Ma, Fu-Rong; Potempa, Lawrence A; Yan, Yong-Bin; Ji, Shang-Rong; Wu, Yi

    2016-04-15

    Most proinflammatory actions of C-reactive protein (CRP) are only expressed following dissociation of its native pentameric assembly into monomeric form (mCRP). However, little is known about what underlies the greatly enhanced activities of mCRP. Here we show that a single sequence motif, i.e. cholesterol binding sequence (CBS; a.a. 35-47), is responsible for mediating the interactions of mCRP with diverse ligands. The binding of mCRP to lipoprotein component ApoB, to complement component C1q, to extracellular matrix components fibronectin and collagen, to blood coagulation component fibrinogen, and to membrane lipid component cholesterol, are all found to be markedly inhibited by the synthetic CBS peptide but not by other CRP sequences tested. Likewise, mutating CBS in mCRP also greatly impairs these interactions. Functional experiments further reveal that CBS peptide significantly reduces the effects of mCRP on activation of endothelial cells in vitro and on acute induction of IL-6 in mice. The potency and specificity of CBS are critically determined by the N-terminal residues Cys-36, Leu-37, and His-38; while the versatility of CBS appears to originate from its intrinsically disordered conformation polymorphism. Together, these data unexpectedly identify CBS as the major recognition site of mCRP and suggest that this motif may be exploited to tune the proinflammatory actions of mCRP.

  3. Single-channel analysis of a point mutation of a conserved serine residue in the S2 ligand-binding domain of the NR2A NMDA receptor subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyllie, David J A; Johnston, Alexander R; Lipscombe, Diane; Chen, Philip E

    2006-07-15

    We have examined the function of a conserved serine residue (Ser670) in the S2 ligand-binding region of the NR2A N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit, using recombinant NR1/NR2A receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Mutation of Ser670 to glycine (S670G) in NR2A reduced the potency of glutamate by 124-fold. Single-channel conductance and the duration of apparent open periods of NR2A(S670G) receptor mutants were, however, indistinguishable from wild-type NMDA receptors. NR1/NR2A(S670G) shut-time distributions were best described by a mixture of six exponential components, and the four shortest shut intervals of each distribution were considered to occur within a channel activation (burst). Bursts of single-channel openings were fitted with a mixture of four exponential components. The longest two components carried the majority of the charge transfer and had mean durations of 9.6 +/- 0.5 and 29.6 +/- 1.5 ms. The overall channel open probability during a burst was high (mean, 0.83 +/- 0.06). Consistent with a shortening of NMDA receptor-channel burst lengths was the observation of an increased deactivation rate of macroscopic currents evoked by brief applications of glutamate to outside-out membrane patches. Correlations between shut times and adjacent open times were observed in all data records. Noticeably, shorter than average openings tended to occur next to long closed periods, whereas longer than average openings tended to occur next to short closings. Our single-channel data, together with modelling using a kinetic scheme to describe channel activations, support our hypothesis that the S670G point mutation reduces the dwell time of glutamate in its binding site.

  4. Ion permeation and block of the gating pore in the voltage sensor of NaV1.4 channels with hypokalemic periodic paralysis mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Stanislav; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A

    2010-08-01

    Hypokalemic periodic paralysis and normokalemic periodic paralysis are caused by mutations of the gating charge-carrying arginine residues in skeletal muscle Na(V)1.4 channels, which induce gating pore current through the mutant voltage sensor domains. Inward sodium currents through the gating pore of mutant R666G are only approximately 1% of central pore current, but substitution of guanidine for sodium in the extracellular solution increases their size by 13- +/- 2-fold. Ethylguanidine is permeant through the R666G gating pore at physiological membrane potentials but blocks the gating pore at hyperpolarized potentials. Guanidine is also highly permeant through the proton-selective gating pore formed by the mutant R666H. Gating pore current conducted by the R666G mutant is blocked by divalent cations such as Ba(2+) and Zn(2+) in a voltage-dependent manner. The affinity for voltage-dependent block of gating pore current by Ba(2+) and Zn(2+) is increased at more negative holding potentials. The apparent dissociation constant (K(d)) values for Zn(2+) block for test pulses to -160 mV are 650 +/- 150 microM, 360 +/- 70 microM, and 95.6 +/- 11 microM at holding potentials of 0 mV, -80 mV, and -120 mV, respectively. Gating pore current is blocked by trivalent cations, but in a nearly voltage-independent manner, with an apparent K(d) for Gd(3+) of 238 +/- 14 microM at -80 mV. To test whether these periodic paralyses might be treated by blocking gating pore current, we screened several aromatic and aliphatic guanidine derivatives and found that 1-(2,4-xylyl)guanidinium can block gating pore current in the millimolar concentration range without affecting normal Na(V)1.4 channel function. Together, our results demonstrate unique permeability of guanidine through Na(V)1.4 gating pores, define voltage-dependent and voltage-independent block by divalent and trivalent cations, respectively, and provide initial support for the concept that guanidine-based gating pore blockers

  5. Properties of monomeric paramyosin using a transient electric birefringence techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaney, D; Krause, S

    1976-01-01

    Paramyosin samples obtained from the chowder clam, Mercenaria mercenaria, by different extraction techniques were studied using transient electric birefringence techniques. The protein remain monomeric (unaggregated) in 1 mM buffer solution at pH 3.1 to 3.8 and near pH 10. At pH 3.2, the molecules obtained by different extraction techniques exhibit rotational diffusion constants that indicate a 5% difference in length between them, with the probable native form of paramyosin being the longer species. This difference in rotational diffusion constant disappears at higher pH, and, in addition, a large difference in dipole moment between the molecules observed at pH 3.2 also disappears at high pH. These results are used to hypothesize that the rodlike native paramyosin molecules have one or two partly flexible portions on their ends; at one end of each molecule this portion probably contains excess basic amino acids which are charged at low pH to account for the higher dipole moment of this form of paramyosin at these low pH values. At pH 3.2, these portions of the macromolecule are not flexible and act as stiff parts of the rodlike molecules, but they gradually become flexible at higher pH. Possible mechanisms for this change in flexibility are discussed.

  6. Labeling Monomeric Insulin with Renal-Clearable Luminescent Gold Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinluan, Rodrigo D; Yu, Mengxiao; Gannaway, Melissa; Sullins, Justin; Xu, Jing; Zheng, Jie

    2015-12-16

    In the native physiological environment, inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) often induce nonspecific protein adsorption, which could significantly alter the function of the proteins they labeled. As a result, small fluorescent dyes are still widely used in the imaging of proteins in animals due to their minimal interference with protein function. Here, we used monomeric insulin as a model and compared its bioactivity before and after labeling with renal-clearable near-infrared-emitting gold NPs. These NPs were chosen because they have high resistance to serum protein adsorption and low nonspecific accumulation. We have found that a 1:1 insulin-NP ratio can be achieved, where the insulin-NPs show minimal serum protein binding with fully retained bioactivity comparable to that of unlabeled insulin. These results show a proof of concept that renal-clearable NPs can behave like small molecules in protein labeling without changing the individual protein's function, laying down a foundation for in vivo tracking of proteins with multimodality imaging techniques.

  7. Substrate-Induced Dimerization of Engineered Monomeric Variants of Triosephosphate Isomerase from Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Lara-Gonzalez

    Full Text Available The dimeric nature of triosephosphate isomerases (TIMs is maintained by an extensive surface area interface of more than 1600 Å2. TIMs from Trichomonas vaginalis (TvTIM are held in their dimeric state by two mechanisms: a ball and socket interaction of residue 45 of one subunit that fits into the hydrophobic pocket of the complementary subunit and by swapping of loop 3 between subunits. TvTIMs differ from other TIMs in their unfolding energetics. In TvTIMs the energy necessary to unfold a monomer is greater than the energy necessary to dissociate the dimer. Herein we found that the character of residue I45 controls the dimer-monomer equilibrium in TvTIMs. Unfolding experiments employing monomeric and dimeric mutants led us to conclude that dimeric TvTIMs unfold following a four state model denaturation process whereas monomeric TvTIMs follow a three state model. In contrast to other monomeric TIMs, monomeric variants of TvTIM1 are stable and unexpectedly one of them (I45A is only 29-fold less active than wild-type TvTIM1. The high enzymatic activity of monomeric TvTIMs contrast with the marginal catalytic activity of diverse monomeric TIMs variants. The stability of the monomeric variants of TvTIM1 and the use of cross-linking and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments permit us to understand the differences between the catalytic activities of TvTIMs and other marginally active monomeric TIMs. As TvTIMs do not unfold upon dimer dissociation, herein we found that the high enzymatic activity of monomeric TvTIM variants is explained by the formation of catalytic dimeric competent species assisted by substrate binding.

  8. Introduction into Ca(v)2.1 of the homologous mutation of Ca(v)1.2 causing the Timothy syndrome questions the role of V421 in the phenotypic definition of P-type Ca(2+) channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cens, Thierry; Leyris, Jean-Philippe; Charnet, Pierre

    2008-11-01

    The Timothy syndrome is a multisystem disorder associated with the mutation of a Gly residue (G402 or G406) in the Ca(v)1.2 Ca(2+) channel. G406 is localized at the end of the IS6 segment and just before the intracellular I-II loop, which is important for the regulation of channel inactivation and the binding of the Ca(v)beta subunit. This Gly residue is conserved in all Ca(v)1 and Ca(v)2 channels, and the G to R exchange produces a strong decrease of inactivation not only in Ca(v)1.2 but also in Ca(v)2.3. Here, we show that the mutation into Arg or Glu of the homologous Gly residue in Ca(v)2.1 (G363) produces also a slowing of inactivation. However, the G-to-A exchange that decreases the inactivation rate in Ca(v)1.2 and Ca(v)2.3 increases inactivation in Ca(v)2.1. Each mutation affects specifically the gating properties of Ca(v)2.1 that remain nevertheless modulated by the co-expressed beta subunit as with wild-type channel. The strong decrease of inactivation produced by the G363R or G363E mutations was reminiscent to that previously described for a specific splice variant of Ca(v)2.1 that contains a single Val residue inserted in the I-II loop (V421). We unexpectedly found that the V421 insertion does not affect the inactivation rate of Ca(v)2.1 and that the effects previously attributed to this insertion, including those on G-protein regulation, can be reproduced by the G363E mutation. Altogether, our results highlight the role of G363 in gating properties, inactivation kinetics, and G-protein regulation of Ca(v)2.1 and the lack of effect of V421 insertion on inactivation.

  9. SGCC successfully developed large-capacity sodium-sulfur monomeric battery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Through many years' cooperation,SGCC and Shanghai Silicate Research Institute of Chinese Academy of Science successfully developed 650 ampere-hours capacity sodium-sulfur monomeric storage battery with the independent intellectual property right

  10. Amphiphile dependency of the monomeric and dimeric forms of acetylcholinesterase from human erythrocyte membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, P; Brodbeck, U

    1984-08-08

    Human erythrocyte membrane-bound acetylcholinesterase was converted to a monomeric species by treatment of ghosts with 2-mercaptoethanol and iodoacetic acid. After solubilization with Triton X-100, the reduced and alkylated enzyme was partially purified by affinity chromatography and separated from residual dimeric enzyme by sucrose density gradient centrifugation in a zonal rotor. Monomeric and dimeric acetylcholinesterase showed full enzymatic activity in presence of Triton X-100 whereas in the absence of detergent, activity was decreased to approx. 20% and 15%, respectively. Preformed egg phosphatidylcholine vesicles fully sustained activity of the monomeric species whereas the dimer was only 80% active. The results suggest that a dimeric structure is not required for manifestation of amphiphile dependency of membrane-bound acetylcholinesterase from human erythrocytes. Furthermore, monomeric enzyme appears to be more easily inserted into phospholipid bilayers than the dimeric species.

  11. Mutational robustness of gene regulatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aalt D J van Dijk

    Full Text Available Mutational robustness of gene regulatory networks refers to their ability to generate constant biological output upon mutations that change network structure. Such networks contain regulatory interactions (transcription factor-target gene interactions but often also protein-protein interactions between transcription factors. Using computational modeling, we study factors that influence robustness and we infer several network properties governing it. These include the type of mutation, i.e. whether a regulatory interaction or a protein-protein interaction is mutated, and in the case of mutation of a regulatory interaction, the sign of the interaction (activating vs. repressive. In addition, we analyze the effect of combinations of mutations and we compare networks containing monomeric with those containing dimeric transcription factors. Our results are consistent with available data on biological networks, for example based on evolutionary conservation of network features. As a novel and remarkable property, we predict that networks are more robust against mutations in monomer than in dimer transcription factors, a prediction for which analysis of conservation of DNA binding residues in monomeric vs. dimeric transcription factors provides indirect evidence.

  12. Whole-exome sequencing reveals an inherited R566X mutation of the epithelial sodium channel β-subunit in a case of early-onset phenotype of Liddle syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polfus, Linda M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Gibbs, Richard A; Metcalf, Ginger; Muzny, Donna; Veeraraghavan, Narayanan; Grove, Megan; Shete, Sanjay; Wallace, Stephanie; Milewicz, Dianna; Hanchard, Neil; Lupski, James R; Hashmi, Syed Shahrukh; Gupta-Malhotra, Monesha

    2016-11-01

    To comprehensively evaluate a European-American child with severe hypertension, whole-exome sequencing (WES) was performed on the child and parents, which identified causal variation of the proband's early-onset disease. The proband's hypertension was resistant to treatment, requiring a multiple drug regimen including amiloride, spironolactone, and hydrochlorothiazide. We suspected a monogenic form of hypertension because of the persistent hypokalemia with low plasma levels of renin and aldosterone. To address this, we focused on rare functional variants and indels, and performed gene-based tests incorporating linkage scores and allele frequency and filtered on deleterious functional mutations. Drawing upon clinical presentation, 27 genes were selected evidenced to cause monogenic hypertension and matched to the gene-based results. This resulted in the identification of a stop-gain mutation in an epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), SCNN1B, an established Liddle syndrome gene, shared by the child and her father. Interestingly, the father also harbored a missense mutation (p.Trp552Arg) in the α-subunit of the ENaC trimer, SCNN1A, possibly pointing to pseudohypoaldosteronism type I. This case is unique in that we present the early-onset disease and treatment response caused by a canonical stop-gain mutation (p.Arg566*) as well as ENaC digenic hits in the father, emphasizing the utility of WES informing precision medicine.

  13. Unique fluorophores in the dimeric archaeal histones hMfB and hPyA1 reveal the impact of nonnative structure in a monomeric kinetic intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stump, Matthew R; Gloss, Lisa M

    2008-02-01

    Homodimeric archaeal histones and heterodimeric eukaryotic histones share a conserved structure but fold through different kinetic mechanisms, with a correlation between faster folding/association rates and the population of kinetic intermediates. Wild-type hMfB (from Methanothermus fervidus) has no intrinsic fluorophores; Met35, which is Tyr in hyperthermophilic archaeal histones such as hPyA1 (from Pyrococcus strain GB-3A), was mutated to Tyr and Trp. Two Tyr-to-Trp mutants of hPyA1 were also characterized. All fluorophores were introduced into the long, central alpha-helix of the histone fold. Far-UV circular dichroism (CD) indicated that the fluorophores did not significantly alter the helical content of the histones. The equilibrium unfolding transitions of the histone variants were two-state, reversible processes, with DeltaG degrees (H2O) values within 1 kcal/mol of the wild-type dimers. The hPyA1 Trp variants fold by two-state kinetic mechanisms like wild-type hPyA1, but with increased folding and unfolding rates, suggesting that the mutated residues (Tyr-32 and Tyr-36) contribute to transition state structure. Like wild-type hMfB, M35Y and M35W hMfB fold by a three-state mechanism, with a stopped-flow CD burst-phase monomeric intermediate. The M35 mutants populate monomeric intermediates with increased secondary structure and stability but exhibit decreased folding rates; this suggests that nonnative interactions occur from burial of the hydrophobic Tyr and Trp residues in this kinetic intermediate. These results implicate the long central helix as a key component of the structure in the kinetic monomeric intermediates of hMfB as well as the dimerization transition state in the folding of hPyA1.

  14. Genetic Control of Potassium Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Ahmad S; Wilde, Arthur A M

    2016-06-01

    Approximately 80 genes in the human genome code for pore-forming subunits of potassium (K(+)) channels. Rare variants (mutations) in K(+) channel-encoding genes may cause heritable arrhythmia syndromes. Not all rare variants in K(+) channel-encoding genes are necessarily disease-causing mutations. Common variants in K(+) channel-encoding genes are increasingly recognized as modifiers of phenotype in heritable arrhythmia syndromes and in the general population. Although difficult, distinguishing pathogenic variants from benign variants is of utmost importance to avoid false designations of genetic variants as disease-causing mutations.

  15. A monomeric variant of insulin degrading enzyme (IDE loses its regulatory properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Suk Song

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE is a key enzyme in the metabolism of both insulin and amyloid beta peptides. IDE is unique in that it is subject to allosteric activation which is hypothesized to occur through an oligomeric structure. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: IDE is known to exist as an equilibrium mixture of monomers, dimers, and higher oligomers, with the dimer being the predominant form. Based on the crystal structure of IDE we deleted the putative dimer interface in the C-terminal region, which resulted in a monomeric variant. Monomeric IDE retained enzymatic activity, however instead of the allosteric behavior seen with wild type enzyme it displayed Michaelis-Menten kinetic behavior. With the substrate Abz-GGFLRKHGQ-EDDnp, monomeric IDE retained approximately 25% of the wild type activity. In contrast with the larger peptide substrates beta-endorphin and amyloid beta peptide 1-40, monomeric IDE retained only 1 to 0.25% of wild type activity. Unlike wild type IDE neither bradykinin nor dynorphin B-9 activated the monomeric variant of the enzyme. Similarly, monomeric IDE was not activated by polyphosphates under conditions in which the activity of wild type enzyme was increased more than 50 fold. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings serve to establish the dimer interface in IDE and demonstrate the requirement for an oligomeric form of the enzyme for its regulatory properties. The data support a mechanism where the binding of activators to oligomeric IDE induces a conformational change that cannot occur in the monomeric variant. Since a conformational change from a closed to a more open structure is likely the rate-determining step in the IDE reaction, the subunit induced conformational change likely shifts the structure of the oligomeric enzyme to a more open conformation.

  16. Mutations in conserved amino acids in the KCNQ1 channel and risk of cardiac events in type-1 long-QT syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jons, Christian; Moss, Arthur J; Lopes, Coeli M

    2009-01-01

    with the highest tertile scores (>0.665; n = 196) showed significantly increased risk of cardiac events (HR = 3.32, P gender, age, and beta......-blocker therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Mutations in highly conserved amino acid residues in the KCNQ1 gene are associated with a significant risk of cardiac events independent of QTc, gender, and beta-blocker therapy Udgivelsesdato: 2009/8...

  17. Enhancing the Predictive Power of Mutations in the C-Terminus of the KCNQ1-Encoded Kv7.1 Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapplinger, Jamie D.; Tseng, Andrew S.; Salisbury, Benjamin A.; Tester, David J.; Callis, Thomas E.; Alders, Marielle; Wilde, Arthur A.M.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the overrepresentation of Kv7.1 mutations among patients with a robust diagnosis of LQTS, a background rate of innocuous Kv7.1 missense variants observed in healthy controls creates ambiguity in the interpretation of LQTS genetic test results. A recent study showed the probability of pathogenicity for rare missense mutations depends in part on the topological location of the variant in Kv7.1’s various structure-function domains. Since the Kv7.1 C-terminus accounts for nearly 50% of the overall protein and nearly 50% of the overall background rate of rare variants falls within the C-terminus, further enhancement in mutation calling may provide guidance in distinguishing pathogenic LQT1-causing mutations from non-disease causing rare variants in Kv7.1’s C-terminus. Therefore, we have used conservation analysis and a large case/control study to generate topology-based estimative predictive values to aid in interpretation; identifying three regions of high conservation within the Kv7.1 C-terminus which have a high probability of LQT1 pathogenicity. PMID:25854863

  18. Familial hemiplegic migraine CaV2.1 channel mutation R192Q enhances ATP-gated P2X3 receptor activity of mouse sensory ganglion neurons mediating trigeminal pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nair Asha

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The R192Q mutation of the CACNA1A gene, encoding for the α1 subunit of voltage-gated P/Q Ca2+ channels (Cav2.1, is associated with familial hemiplegic migraine-1. We investigated whether this gain-of-function mutation changed the structure and function of trigeminal neuron P2X3 receptors that are thought to be important contributors to migraine pain. Results Using in vitro trigeminal sensory neurons of a mouse genetic model knockin for the CACNA1A R192Q mutation, we performed patch clamp recording and intracellular Ca2+ imaging that showed how these knockin ganglion neurons generated P2X3 receptor-mediated responses significantly larger than wt neurons. These enhanced effects were reversed by the Cav2.1 blocker ω-agatoxin. We, thus, explored intracellular signalling dependent on kinases and phosphatases to understand the molecular regulation of P2X3 receptors of knockin neurons. In such cells we observed strong activation of CaMKII reversed by ω-agatoxin treatment. The CaMKII inhibitor KN-93 blocked CaMKII phosphorylation and the hyperesponsive P2X3 phenotype. Although no significant difference in membrane expression of knockin receptors was found, serine phosphorylation of knockin P2X3 receptors was constitutively decreased and restored by KN-93. No change in threonine or tyrosine phosphorylation was detected. Finally, pharmacological inhibitors of the phosphatase calcineurin normalized the enhanced P2X3 receptor responses of knockin neurons and increased their serine phosphorylation. Conclusions The present results suggest that the CACNA1A mutation conferred a novel molecular phenotype to P2X3 receptors of trigeminal ganglion neurons via CaMKII-dependent activation of calcineurin that selectively impaired the serine phosphorylation state of such receptors, thus potentiating their effects in transducing trigeminal nociception.

  19. Anthocyanins and their variation in red wines I. Monomeric anthocyanins and their color expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fei; Liang, Na-Na; Mu, Lin; Pan, Qiu-Hong; Wang, Jun; Reeves, Malcolm J; Duan, Chang-Qing

    2012-02-07

    Originating in the grapes, monomeric anthocyanins in young red wines contribute the majority of color and the supposed beneficial health effects related to their consumption, and as such they are recognized as one of the most important groups of phenolic metabolites in red wines. In recent years, our increasing knowledge of the chemical complexity of the monomeric anthocyanins, their stability, together with the phenomena such as self-association and copigmentation that can stabilize and enhance their color has helped to explain their color representation in red wine making and aging. A series of new enological practices were developed to improve the anthocyanin extraction, as well as their color expression and maintenance. This paper summarizes the most recent advances in the studies of the monomeric anthocyanins in red wines, emphasizing their origin, occurrence, color enhancing effects, their degradation and the effect of various enological practices on them.

  20. Anthocyanins and Their Variation in Red Wines I. Monomeric Anthocyanins and Their Color Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Qing Duan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Originating in the grapes, monomeric anthocyanins in young red wines contribute the majority of color and the supposed beneficial health effects related to their consumption, and as such they are recognized as one of the most important groups of phenolic metabolites in red wines. In recent years, our increasing knowledge of the chemical complexity of the monomeric anthocyanins, their stability, together with the phenomena such as self-association and copigmentation that can stabilize and enhance their color has helped to explain their color representation in red wine making and aging. A series of new enological practices were developed to improve the anthocyanin extraction, as well as their color expression and maintenance. This paper summarizes the most recent advances in the studies of the monomeric anthocyanins in red wines, emphasizing their origin, occurrence, color enhancing effects, their degradation and the effect of various enological practices on them.

  1. p.R254Q mutation in the aquaporin-2 water channel causing dominant nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is due to a lack of arginine vasopressin-induced phosphorylation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savelkoul, P.J.M.; Mattia, F.P. de; Li, Yuedan; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Konings, I.B.M.; Sluijs, P. van der; Deen, P.M.T.

    2009-01-01

    Vasopressin regulates human water homeostasis by re-distributing homotetrameric aquaporin-2 (AQP2) water channels from intracellular vesicles to the apical membrane of renal principal cells, a process in which phosphorylation of AQP2 at S256 by cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) is thought to be

  2. Impact of phosphomimetic and non-phosphorylatable mutations of phospholemman on L-type calcium channels gating in HEK 293T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kai; Wang, Yue-Peng; Zhou, Zhi-Wen; Jiang, Yi-Bo; Li, Wei; Chen, Xiao-Meng; Li, Yi-Gang

    2015-03-01

    Phospholemman (PLM) is an important phosphorylation substrate for protein kinases A and C in the heart. Until now, the association between PLM phosphorylation status and L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) gating has not been fully understood. We investigated the kinetics of LTCCs in HEK 293T cells expressing phosphomimetic or nonphosphorylatable PLM mutants. The LTCCs gating was measured in HEK 293T cells transfected with LTCC and wild-type (WT) PLM, phosphomimetic or nonphosphorylatable PLM mutants: 6263AA, 6869AA, AAAA, 6263DD, 6869DD or DDDD. WT PLM significantly slowed LTCCs activation and deactivation while enhanced voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI). PLM mutants 6869DD and DDDD significantly increased the peak of the currents. 6263DD accelerated channel activation, while 6263AA slowed it more than WT PLM. 6869DD significantly enhanced PLM-induced increase of VDI. AAAA slowed the channel activation more than 6263AA, and DDDD accelerated the channel VDI more than 6869DD. Our results demonstrate that phosphomimetic PLM could stimulate LTCCs and alter their dynamics, while PLM nonphosphorylatable mutant produced the opposite effects. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  3. Familial hemiplegic migraine and episodic ataxia type-2 are caused by mutations in the Ca2+ channel gene CACNL1A4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. Ophoff (Roel); G.M. Terwindt (Gisela); Y. Vergouwe (Yvonne); R. van Eijk (Ronald); P.J. Oefner (Peter); S.M.G. Hoffman (Susan M.); J.E. Lamerdin (Jane); H.W. Mohrenweiser (Harvey); B. Bulman; M. Ferrari (Maurizio); J. Haan (Joost); D. Lindhout (Dick); G.J. van Ommen (Gert); M.A. Hofker (Marten); M.D. Ferrari (Michel); R.R. Frants (Rune)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractGenes for familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) and episodic ataxia type-2 (EA-2) have been mapped to chromosome 19p13. We characterized a brain- specific P/Q-type Ca2+ channel α1-subunit gene, CACNLIA4, covering 300 kb with 47 exons. Sequencing of all exons and their surroundings revealed

  4. Directed evolution of a monomeric, bright and photostable version of Clavularia cyan fluorescent protein: structural characterization and applications in fluorescence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al, Hui-wang; Henderson, J. Nathan; Remington, S. James; Campbell, Robert E. (Alberta); (Oregon)

    2008-05-07

    The arsenal of engineered variants of the GFP [green FP (fluorescent protein)] from Aequorea jellyfish provides researchers with a powerful set of tools for use in biochemical and cell biology research. The recent discovery of diverse FPs in Anthozoa coral species has provided protein engineers with an abundance of alternative progenitor FPs from which improved variants that complement or supersede existing Aequorea GFP variants could be derived. Here, we report the engineering of the first monomeric version of the tetrameric CFP (cyan FP) cFP484 from Clavularia coral. Starting from a designed synthetic gene library with mammalian codon preferences, we identified dimeric cFP484 variants with fluorescent brightness significantly greater than the wild-type protein. Following incorporation of dimer-breaking mutations and extensive directed evolution with selection for blue-shifted emission, high fluorescent brightness and photostability, we arrived at an optimized variant that we have named mTFP1 [monomeric TFP1 (teal FP 1)]. The new mTFP1 is one of the brightest and most photostable FPs reported to date. In addition, the fluorescence is insensitive to physiologically relevant pH changes and the fluorescence lifetime decay is best fitted as a single exponential. The 1.19 {angstrom} crystal structure (1 {angstrom}=0.1 nm) of mTFP1 confirms the monomeric structure and reveals an unusually distorted chromophore conformation. As we experimentally demonstrate, the high quantum yield of mTFP1 (0.85) makes it particularly suitable as a replacement for ECFP (enhanced CFP) or Cerulean as a FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) donor to either a yellow or orange FP acceptor.

  5. Rational design of a monomeric and photostable far-red fluorescent protein for fluorescence imaging in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dan; Dong, Zhiqiang; Gustafson, William Clay; Ruiz-González, Rubén; Signor, Luca; Marzocca, Fanny; Borel, Franck; Klassen, Matthew P; Makhijani, Kalpana; Royant, Antoine; Jan, Yuh-Nung; Weiss, William A; Guo, Su; Shu, Xiaokun

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are powerful tools for cell and molecular biology. Here based on structural analysis, a blue-shifted mutant of a recently engineered monomeric infrared fluorescent protein (mIFP) has been rationally designed. This variant, named iBlueberry, bears a single mutation that shifts both excitation and emission spectra by approximately 40 nm. Furthermore, iBlueberry is four times more photostable than mIFP, rendering it more advantageous for imaging protein dynamics. By tagging iBlueberry to centrin, it has been demonstrated that the fusion protein labels the centrosome in the developing zebrafish embryo. Together with GFP-labeled nucleus and tdTomato-labeled plasma membrane, time-lapse imaging to visualize the dynamics of centrosomes in radial glia neural progenitors in the intact zebrafish brain has been demonstrated. It is further shown that iBlueberry can be used together with mIFP in two-color protein labeling in living cells and in two-color tumor labeling in mice.

  6. Binding of the monomeric form of C-reactive protein to enzymatically-modified low-density lipoprotein: effects of phosphoethanolamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sanjay K.; Suresh, Madathilparambil V.; Hammond, David J.; Rusiñol, Antonio E.; Potempa, Lawrence A.; Agrawal, Alok

    2009-01-01

    Background The 5 subunits of native pentameric C-reactive protein (CRP) are dissociated to generate monomeric form of CRP (mCRP) in some in vitro conditions, both physiological and non-physiological, and also in vivo. Many bioactivities of mCRP generated by urea-treatment of CRP and of mCRP generated by mutating the primary structure of CRP have been reported. The bioactivities of mCRP generated by spontaneous dissociation of CRP are largely unexplored. Methods We purified mCRP generated by spontaneous dissociation of CRP and investigated the binding of mCRP to enzymatically-modified low-density lipoprotein (E-LDL). Results mCRP was approximately 60 times more potent than CRP in binding to E-LDL. In the presence of the small-molecule compound phosphoethanolamine (PEt), at 37°C, the binding of mCRP to E-LDL was enhanced 10-fold. In contrast, PEt inhibited the binding of both CRP and mCRP to pneumococcal C-polysaccharide, another phosphocholine-containing ligand to which CRP and mCRP were found to bind. We have not investigated yet whether PEt alters the structure of CRP at 37°C. Conclusions Combined data suggest that the targeting of CRP with the aim to monomerize CRP in vivo may be an effective approach to capture modified forms of LDL. PMID:19545552

  7. A novel method to highly versatile monomeric PNA building blocks by multi component reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dömling, Alexander; Chi, Kai-Zu; Barrère, Mathieux

    1999-01-01

    A novel approach to monomeric PNA building blocks by a solution phase Ugi multi component reaction (MCR) is described. The reaction is easily performed in 96 well plates. The products precipitate from the reaction solution and are thus obtained in high yields and purity. Those products are not amena

  8. Monomeric G-proteins as signal transducers in airway physiology and pathophysiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, Dedmer; Roscioni, Sara S.; Meurs, Herman; Schmidt, Martina

    2008-01-01

    Monomeric G-proteins, also referred to as small GTPases, function as biological hubs being activated by extracellular stimuli and regulate downstream signalling events, which result in different cellular responses. The importance of these mechanisms is mirrored by the fact that several pathological

  9. Self-healing mechanism based on dispersed solid particles of various monomeric bismaleimides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turkenburg, D.H.; Fischer, H.R.

    2016-01-01

    In view of self-healing materials for high temperature applications we have studied the use of solid monomeric bismaleimide particles as embedded self-healing component dispersed in a host material. Below the self-healing activation temperature, bismaleimides remain inert while above it they may rap

  10. Monomeric red fluorescent protein variants used for imaging studies in different species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller-Taubenberger, Annette; Vos, Michel J.; Boettger, Angelika; Lasi, Margherita; Lai, Frank P. L.; Fischer, Markus; Rottner, Klemens

    2006-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins have proven to be excellent tools for live-cell imaging studies. In addition to green fluorescent protein (GFP) and its variants, recent progress was achieved in the development of monomeric red fluorescent proteins (mRFPs) that show improved properties in respect to maturation

  11. Monomeric and dendritic second generation Grubbs- and Hoveyda-Grubbs-type catalysts for olefin metathesis Metallodendrimers Special Issue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijnenburg, Niels J M; Tomás-Mendivil, Eder; Mayland, Kimberley E.; Kleijn, Henk; Lutz, Martin; Spek, Anthony L.; Van Koten, Gerard; Klein Gebbink, Bert

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of monomeric and dendritic Grubbs II and Hoveyda-Grubbs II-based complexes are reported. These complexes were synthesized via a route based on the connection of monomeric or dendritic N-alkyl-N′-mesitylimidazol-2-ylidene pre-ligands to Grubbs I or Hoveyda-Grubbs I

  12. Calcium channels and migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrobon, Daniela

    2013-07-01

    Missense mutations in CACNA1A, the gene that encodes the pore-forming α1 subunit of human voltage-gated Ca(V)2.1 (P/Q-type) calcium channels, cause a rare form of migraine with aura (familial hemiplegic migraine type 1: FHM1). Migraine is a common disabling brain disorder whose key manifestations are recurrent attacks of unilateral headache that may be preceded by transient neurological aura symptoms. This review, first, briefly summarizes current understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms that are believed to underlie migraine headache, migraine aura and the onset of a migraine attack, and briefly describes the localization and function of neuronal Ca(V)2.1 channels in the brain regions that have been implicated in migraine pathogenesis. Then, the review describes and discusses i) the functional consequences of FHM1 mutations on the biophysical properties of recombinant human Ca(V)2.1 channels and native Ca(V)2.1 channels in neurons of knockin mouse models carrying the mild R192Q or severe S218L mutations in the orthologous gene, and ii) the functional consequences of these mutations on neurophysiological processes in the cerebral cortex and trigeminovascular system thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of migraine, and the insights into migraine mechanisms obtained from the functional analysis of these processes in FHM1 knockin mice. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium channels. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Monomeric yeast PCNA mutants are defective in interacting with and stimulating the ATPase activity of RFC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, Costin N; Shea, Kathleen A; Mehra, Rajendra; Prundeanu, Lucia; McAlear, Michael A

    2002-10-29

    Yeast PCNA is a homo-trimeric, ring-shaped DNA polymerase accessory protein that can encircle duplex DNA. The integrity of this multimeric sliding DNA clamp is maintained through the protein-protein interactions at the interfaces of adjacent subunits. To investigate the importance of trimer stability for PCNA function, we introduced single amino acid substitutions at residues (A112T, S135F) that map to opposite ends of the monomeric protein. Recombinant wild-type and mutant PCNAs were purified from E. coli, and they were tested for their properties in vitro. Unlike the stable wild-type PCNA trimers, the mutant PCNA proteins behaved as monomers when diluted to low nanomolar concentrations. In contrast to what has been reported for a monomeric form of the beta clamp in E. coli, the monomeric PCNAs were compromised in their ability to interact with their associated clamp loader, replication factor C (RFC). Similarly, monomeric PCNAs were not effective in stimulating the ATPase activity of RFC. The mutant PCNAs were able to form mixed trimers with wild-type subunits, although these mixed trimers were unstable when loaded onto DNA. They were able to function as weak DNA polymerase delta processivity factors in vitro, and when the monomeric PCNA-41 (A112T, S135F double mutant) allele was introduced as the sole source of PCNA in vivo, the cells were viable and healthy. These pol30-41 mutants were, however, sensitive to UV irradiation and to the DNA damaging agent methylmethane sulfonate, implying that DNA repair pathways have a distinct requirement for stable DNA clamps.

  14. Mutation of neuronal channels of sodium and chloride associated with generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (gefs+ Mutaciones de los canales neuronales de sodio y cloro asociadas a epilepsia generalizada con convulsiones febriles plus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Bedoya Berrío

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Generalized Epilepsy with Febrile Seizures Plus (GEFS+ is a frequent entity characterized by generalized seizures with a wide phenotypic variety; the age of onset is 3 months and it persists beyond 6 years. Seizures may or may not be induced by fever. The disease has shown an autosomic dominant trait, incomplete penetrance and association with mutations on the genes that encode voltage-dependent sodium channels and the chloride neuronal channels on the central nervous system. The wide spectrum GEFS+ phenotype has been related with others entities such as Severe Myoclonic Epilepsy of Infancy (SMEI and Intractable Childhood Epilepsy with Frequent Generalized Tonic-Clonic Seizures (ICEGTC; they have mutations in common with GEFS+ according to several recently published articles. This review compiles up to date information about EGCF+ with the aim of giving the reader a knowledge of this entity and of its association with mutations that participate in its pathogenesis. La Epilepsia Generalizada Con Convulsiones Febriles Plus (EGCF+, es una entidad relativamente común. Se caracteriza por convulsiones de tipo generalizado con una gran variabilidad fenotípica; se presenta desde los 3 meses de edad y persiste más allá de los 6 años; las convulsiones pueden ser precipitadas por fiebre pero se presentan también sin ella. La enfermedad se ha asociado a herencia autosómica dominante con penetrancia incompleta, en la que intervienen mutaciones de los genes que codifican los canales iónicos de sodio dependientes del voltaje y de los canales iónicos de cloro en las neuronas del Sistema Nervioso Central (SNC. El amplio fenotipo de la EGCF+ se ha encontrado en asociación con otras entidades como la Epilepsia Mioclónica Severa del Lactante (EMSL y la Epilepsia Generalizada Tónico-Clónica Intratable de la Infancia (EGTCII, las cuales han presentado mutaciones comunes con las de la EGCF+, según informes recientemente publicados. Esta revisi

  15. Functional alteration of a dimeric insecticidal lectin to a monomeric antifungal protein correlated to its oligomeric status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilanjana Banerjee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (ASAL is a 25-kDa homodimeric, insecticidal, mannose binding lectin whose subunits are assembled by the C-terminal exchange process. An attempt was made to convert dimeric ASAL into a monomeric form to correlate the relevance of quaternary association of subunits and their functional specificity. Using SWISS-MODEL program a stable monomer was designed by altering five amino acid residues near the C-terminus of ASAL. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By introduction of 5 site-specific mutations (-DNSNN-, a β turn was incorporated between the 11(th and 12(th β strands of subunits of ASAL, resulting in a stable monomeric mutant ASAL (mASAL. mASAL was cloned and subsequently purified from a pMAL-c2X system. CD spectroscopic analysis confirmed the conservation of secondary structure in mASAL. Mannose binding assay confirmed that molecular mannose binds efficiently to both mASAL and ASAL. In contrast to ASAL, the hemagglutination activity of purified mASAL against rabbit erythrocytes was lost. An artificial diet bioassay of Lipaphis erysimi with mASAL displayed an insignificant level of insecticidal activity compared to ASAL. Fascinatingly, mASAL exhibited strong antifungal activity against the pathogenic fungi Fusarium oxysporum, Rhizoctonia solani and Alternaria brassicicola in a disc diffusion assay. A propidium iodide uptake assay suggested that the inhibitory activity of mASAL might be associated with the alteration of the membrane permeability of the fungus. Furthermore, a ligand blot assay of the membrane subproteome of R. solani with mASAL detected a glycoprotein receptor having interaction with mASAL. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Conversion of ASAL into a stable monomer resulted in antifungal activity. From an evolutionary aspect, these data implied that variable quaternary organization of lectins might be the outcome of defense-related adaptations to diverse situations in plants. Incorporation of m

  16. Functional alteration of a dimeric insecticidal lectin to a monomeric antifungal protein correlated to its oligomeric status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Nilanjana; Sengupta, Subhadipa; Roy, Amit; Ghosh, Prithwi; Das, Kalipada; Das, Sampa

    2011-04-07

    Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (ASAL) is a 25-kDa homodimeric, insecticidal, mannose binding lectin whose subunits are assembled by the C-terminal exchange process. An attempt was made to convert dimeric ASAL into a monomeric form to correlate the relevance of quaternary association of subunits and their functional specificity. Using SWISS-MODEL program a stable monomer was designed by altering five amino acid residues near the C-terminus of ASAL. By introduction of 5 site-specific mutations (-DNSNN-), a β turn was incorporated between the 11(th) and 12(th) β strands of subunits of ASAL, resulting in a stable monomeric mutant ASAL (mASAL). mASAL was cloned and subsequently purified from a pMAL-c2X system. CD spectroscopic analysis confirmed the conservation of secondary structure in mASAL. Mannose binding assay confirmed that molecular mannose binds efficiently to both mASAL and ASAL. In contrast to ASAL, the hemagglutination activity of purified mASAL against rabbit erythrocytes was lost. An artificial diet bioassay of Lipaphis erysimi with mASAL displayed an insignificant level of insecticidal activity compared to ASAL. Fascinatingly, mASAL exhibited strong antifungal activity against the pathogenic fungi Fusarium oxysporum, Rhizoctonia solani and Alternaria brassicicola in a disc diffusion assay. A propidium iodide uptake assay suggested that the inhibitory activity of mASAL might be associated with the alteration of the membrane permeability of the fungus. Furthermore, a ligand blot assay of the membrane subproteome of R. solani with mASAL detected a glycoprotein receptor having interaction with mASAL. Conversion of ASAL into a stable monomer resulted in antifungal activity. From an evolutionary aspect, these data implied that variable quaternary organization of lectins might be the outcome of defense-related adaptations to diverse situations in plants. Incorporation of mASAL into agronomically-important crops could be an alternative method to protect them

  17. Rem, a member of the RGK GTPases, inhibits recombinant CaV1.2 channels using multiple mechanisms that require distinct conformations of the GTPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tingting; Xu, Xianghua; Kernan, Timothy; Wu, Vincent; Colecraft, Henry M

    2010-05-15

    Rad/Rem/Gem/Kir (RGK) GTPases potently inhibit Ca(V)1 and Ca(V)2 (Ca(V)1-2) channels, a paradigm of ion channel regulation by monomeric G-proteins with significant physiological ramifications and potential biotechnology applications. The mechanism(s) underlying how RGK proteins inhibit I(Ca) is unknown, and it is unclear how key structural and regulatory properties of these GTPases (such as the role of GTP binding to the nucleotide binding domain (NBD), and the C-terminus which contains a membrane-targeting motif) feature in this effect. Here, we show that Rem inhibits Ca(V)1.2 channels by three independent mechanisms that rely on distinct configurations of the GTPase: (1) a reduction in surface density of channels is accomplished by enhancing dynamin-dependent endocytosis, (2) a diminution of channel open probability (P(o)) that occurs without impacting on voltage sensor movement, and (3) an immobilization of Ca(V) channel voltage sensors. The presence of both the Rem NBD and C-terminus (whether membrane-targeted or not) in one molecule is sufficient to reconstitute all three mechanisms. However, membrane localization of the NBD by a generic membrane-targeting module reconstitutes only the decreased P(o) function (mechanism 2). A point mutation that prevents GTP binding to the NBD selectively eliminates the capacity to immobilize voltage sensors (mechanism 3). The results reveal an uncommon multiplicity in the mechanisms Rem uses to inhibit I(Ca), predict new physiological dimensions of the RGK GTPase-Ca(V) channel crosstalk, and suggest original approaches for developing novel Ca(V) channel blockers.

  18. Monomeric carbohydrates production from olive tree pruning biomass: modeling of dilute acid hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puentes, Juan G; Mateo, Soledad; Fonseca, Bruno G; Roberto, Inês C; Sánchez, Sebastián; Moya, Alberto J

    2013-12-01

    Statistical modeling and optimization of dilute sulfuric acid hydrolysis of olive tree pruning biomass has been performed using response surface methodology. Central composite rotatable design was applied to assess the effect of acid concentration, reaction time and temperature on efficiency and selectivity of hemicellulosic monomeric carbohydrates to d-xylose. Second-order polynomial model was fitted to experimental data to find the optimum reaction conditions by multiple regression analysis. The monomeric d-xylose recovery 85% (as predicted by the model) was achieved under optimized hydrolysis conditions (1.27% acid concentration, 96.5°C and 138 min), confirming the high validity of the developed model. The content of d-glucose (8.3%) and monosaccharide degradation products (0.1% furfural and 0.04% 5-hydroxymethylfurfural) provided a high quality subtract, ready for subsequent biochemical conversion to value-added products.

  19. The Roles of Monomeric GTP-Binding Proteins in Macroautophagy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Yang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a cellular degradation process that sequesters components into a double-membrane structure called the autophagosome, which then fuses with the lysosome or vacuole for hydrolysis and recycling of building blocks. Bulk phase autophagy, also known as macroautophagy, controlled by specific Atg proteins, can be triggered by a variety of stresses, including starvation. Because autophagy relies extensively on membrane traffic to form the membranous structures, factors that control membrane traffic are essential for autophagy. Among these factors, the monomeric GTP-binding proteins that cycle between active and inactive conformations form an important group. In this review, we summarize the functions of the monomeric GTP-binding proteins in autophagy, especially with reference to experiments in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  20. An RNA Aptamer Inhibits a Mutation-Induced Inactivating Misfolding of a Serpin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jeppe B; Andersen, Lisbeth M; Dupont, Daniel M

    2016-01-01

    to a more stable state during reaction with the target protease. However, the metastable state also makes serpins vulnerable to mutations, resulting in disease caused by inactive and misfolded monomeric or polymeric forms ("serpinopathy"). Misfolding can occur either intracellularly (type-I serpinopathies...

  1. Multistage modeling of protein dynamics with monomeric Myc oncoprotein as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiaojiao; Dai, Jin; He, Jianfeng; Niemi, Antti J.; Ilieva, Nevena

    2017-03-01

    We propose to combine a mean-field approach with all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) into a multistage algorithm that can model protein folding and dynamics over very long time periods yet with atomic-level precision. As an example, we investigate an isolated monomeric Myc oncoprotein that has been implicated in carcinomas including those in colon, breast, and lungs. Under physiological conditions a monomeric Myc is presumed to be an example of intrinsically disordered proteins that pose a serious challenge to existing modeling techniques. We argue that a room-temperature monomeric Myc is in a dynamical state, it oscillates between different conformations that we identify. For this we adopt the C α backbone of Myc in a crystallographic heteromer as an initial ansatz for the monomeric structure. We construct a multisoliton of the pertinent Landau free energy to describe the C α profile with ultrahigh precision. We use Glauber dynamics to resolve how the multisoliton responds to repeated increases and decreases in ambient temperature. We confirm that the initial structure is unstable in isolation. We reveal a highly degenerate ground-state landscape, an attractive set towards which Glauber dynamics converges in the limit of vanishing ambient temperature. We analyze the thermal stability of this Glauber attractor using room-temperature molecular dynamics. We identify and scrutinize a particularly stable subset in which the two helical segments of the original multisoliton align in parallel next to each other. During the MD time evolution of a representative structure from this subset, we observe intermittent quasiparticle oscillations along the C-terminal α helix, some of which resemble a translating Davydov's Amide-I soliton. We propose that the presence of oscillatory motion is in line with the expected intrinsically disordered character of Myc.

  2. Fine blood vascular casting by monomeric methacrylate injection and microwave treatment

    OpenAIRE

    日根野谷, 仁

    1992-01-01

    A modified injection replica SEM method was introduced. Thorough injection of a resin mixture (monomeric metacrylate containing 1% benzoyl peroxide and 1% N, N-dimethylaniline) prior to the microwave treatment prepares good and fine blood vascular casts or replicas of brain, hypophysis, pineal body, thyroid gland and other organs. These casts sufficiently withstood ionbombardment and were useful for scanning electron microscopy. In this casting, preliminary perfusion fixation prior to the res...

  3. Ion channels-related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworakowska, B; Dołowy, K

    2000-01-01

    There are many diseases related to ion channels. Mutations in muscle voltage-gated sodium, potassium, calcium and chloride channels, and acetylcholine-gated channel may lead to such physiological disorders as hyper- and hypokalemic periodic paralysis, myotonias, long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, malignant hyperthermia and myasthenia. Neuronal disorders, e.g., epilepsy, episodic ataxia, familial hemiplegic migraine, Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, hyperekplexia may result from dysfunction of voltage-gated sodium, potassium and calcium channels, or acetylcholine- and glycine-gated channels. Some kidney disorders, e.g., Bartter's syndrome, policystic kidney disease and Dent's disease, secretion disorders, e.g., hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy and cystic fibrosis, vision disorders, e.g., congenital stationary night blindness and total colour-blindness may also be linked to mutations in ion channels.

  4. Heteroexpression and characterization of a monomeric isocitrate dehydrogenase from the multicellular prokaryote Streptomyces avermitilis MA-4680.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ao; Cao, Zheng-Yu; Wang, Peng; Liu, Ai-Min; Pan, Wei; Wang, Jie; Zhu, Guo-Ping

    2011-08-01

    A monomeric NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase from the multicellular prokaryote Streptomyces avermitilis MA-4680 (SaIDH) was heteroexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the His-tagged enzyme was further purified to homogeneity. The molecular weight of SaIDH was about 80 kDa which is typical for monomeric isocitrate dehydrogenases. Structure-based sequence alignment reveals that the deduced amino acid sequence of SaIDH shows high sequence identity with known momomeric isocitrate dehydrogenase, and the coenzyme, substrate and metal ion binding sites are completely conserved. The optimal pH and temperature of SaIDH were found to be pH 9.4 and 45°C, respectively. Heat-inactivation studies showed that heating for 20 min at 50°C caused a 50% loss in enzymatic activity. In addition, SaIDH was absolutely specific for NADP+ as electron acceptor. Apparent Km values were 4.98 μM for NADP+ and 6,620 μM for NAD+, respectively, using Mn2+ as divalent cation. The enzyme performed a 33,000-fold greater specificity (kcat/Km) for NADP+ than NAD+. Moreover, SaIDH activity was entirely dependent on the presence of Mn2+ or Mg2+, but was strongly inhibited by Ca2+ and Zn2+. Taken together, our findings implicate the recombinant SaIDH is a divalent cation-dependent monomeric isocitrate dehydrogenase which presents a remarkably high cofactor preference for NADP+.

  5. Two mechanisms for dissipation of excess light in monomeric and trimeric light-harvesting complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall' Osto, Luca [Univ. di Verona, Verona (Italy). Dipartimento di Biotecnologie; Cazzaniga, Stefano [Univ. di Verona, Verona (Italy). Dipartimento di Biotecnologie; Bressan, Mauro [Univ. di Verona, Verona (Italy). Dipartimento di Biotecnologie; Paleček, David [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Physics; Židek, Karel [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Physics; Niyogi, Krishna K. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Howard Hughes Medical Inst., Dept. of Plant and Microbial Biology; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Division; Fleming, Graham R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry, Graduate Group in Applied Science and Technology; Zigmantas, Donatas [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Physics; Bassi, Roberto [Univ. di Verona, Verona (Italy). Dipartimento di Biotecnologie; Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Firenze (Italy). Istituto per la Protezione delle Piante (IPP)

    2017-04-10

    Oxygenic photoautotrophs require mechanisms for rapidly matching the level of chlorophyll excited states from light harvesting with the rate of electron transport from water to carbon dioxide. These photoprotective reactions prevent formation of reactive excited states and photoinhibition. The fastest response to excess illumination is the so-called non-photochemical quenching which, in higher plants, requires the luminal pH sensor PsbS and other yet unidentified components of the photosystem II antenna. Both trimeric light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) and monomeric LHC proteins have been indicated as site(s) of the heat-dissipative reactions. Different mechanisms have been proposed: Energy transfer to a lutein quencher in trimers, formation of a zeaxanthin radical cation in monomers. Here, we report on the construction of a mutant lacking all monomeric LHC proteins but retaining LHCII trimers. Its non-photochemical quenching induction rate was substantially slower with respect to the wild type. A carotenoid radical cation signal was detected in the wild type, although it was lost in the mutant. Here, we conclude that non-photochemical quenching is catalysed by two independent mechanisms, with the fastest activated response catalysed within monomeric LHC proteins depending on both zeaxanthin and lutein and on the formation of a radical cation. Trimeric LHCII was responsible for the slowly activated quenching component whereas inclusion in supercomplexes was not required. Finally, this latter activity does not depend on lutein nor on charge transfer events, whereas zeaxanthin was essential.

  6. Peracetic Acid Depolymerization of Biorefinery Lignin for Production of Selective Monomeric Phenolic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ruoshui; Guo, Mond; Lin, Kuan-Ting; Hebert, Vincent R; Zhang, Jinwen; Wolcott, Michael P; Quintero, Melissa; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K; Chen, Xiaowen; Zhang, Xiao

    2016-07-25

    Lignin is the largest source of renewable material with an aromatic skeleton. However, due to the recalcitrant and heterogeneous nature of the lignin polymer, it has been a challenge to effectively depolymerize lignin and produce high-value chemicals with high selectivity. In this study, a highly efficient lignin-to-monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC) conversion method based on peracetic acid (PAA) treatment was reported. PAA treatment of two biorefinery lignin samples, diluted acid pretreated corn stover lignin (DACSL) and steam exploded spruce lignin (SESPL), led to complete solubilization and production of selective hydroxylated monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC-H) and monomeric phenolic acid compounds (MPC-A) including 4-hydroxy-2-methoxyphenol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, syringic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid. The maximized MPC yields obtained were 18 and 22 % based on the initial weight of the lignin in SESPL and DACSL, respectively. However, we found that the addition of niobium pentoxide catalyst to PAA treatment of lignin can significantly improve the MPC yields up to 47 %. The key reaction steps and main mechanisms involved in this new lignin-to-MPC valorization pathway were investigated and elucidated.

  7. Peracetic Acid Depolymerization of Biorefinery Lignin for Production of Selective Monomeric Phenolic Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ruoshui [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Guo, Mond [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Lin, Kuan-ting [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Hebert, Vincent R. [Food and Environmental Laboratory, Washington State, University-TriCities, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Zhang, Jinwen [Wood Materials and Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Wolcott, Michael P. [Wood Materials and Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Quintero, Melissa [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K. [Chemical and Biological Process Development Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Chen, Xiaowen [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Lab, 1617 Cole Blvd Golden CO 80127 USA; Zhang, Xiao [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA

    2016-07-04

    Lignin is the largest source of renewable material with an aromatic skeleton. However, due to the recalcitrant and heterogeneous nature of the lignin polymer as well as its complex side chain structures, it has been a challenge to effectively depolymerize lignin and produce high value chemicals with high selectivity. In this study, a highly efficient lignin-to-monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC) conversion method based on peracetic acid (PAA) treatment was reported. PAA treatment of two biorefinery lignin samples, diluted acid pretreated corn stover lignin (DACSL) and steam exploded spruce lignin (SESPL), led to complete solubilization and production of selective hydroxylated monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC-H) and monomeric phenolic acid compounds (MPC-A) inclduing 4-hydroxy-2-methoxyphenol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, syringic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid. The maximized MPCs yields obtained were 18% and 22% based on the initial weight of the lignin in SESPL and DACSL respectively. However, we found that the addition of niobium pentoxide catalyst to PAA treatment of lignin can significantly improve the MPC yields up to 47%. The key reaction steps and main mechanisms involved in this new lignin-to-MPC valorization pathway were investigated and elucidated.

  8. Peracetic Acid Depolymerization of Biorefinery Lignin for Production of Selective Monomeric Phenolic Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ruoshui [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Guo, Mond [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Lin, Kuan-ting [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Hebert, Vincent R. [Food and Environmental Laboratory, Washington State, University-TriCities, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Zhang, Jinwen [Wood Materials and Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Wolcott, Michael P. [Wood Materials and Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Quintero, Melissa [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K. [Chemical and Biological Process Development Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Chen, Xiaowen [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Lab, 1617 Cole Blvd Golden CO 80127 USA; Zhang, Xiao [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA

    2016-07-04

    Lignin is the largest source of renewable material with an aromatic skeleton. However, due to the recalcitrant and heterogeneous nature of the lignin polymer, it has been a challenge to effectively depolymerize lignin and produce high-value chemicals with high selectivity. In this study, a highly efficient lignin-to-monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC) conversion method based on peracetic acid (PAA) treatment was reported. PAA treatment of two biorefinery lignin samples, diluted acid pretreated corn stover lignin (DACSL) and steam exploded spruce lignin (SESPL), led to complete solubilization and production of selective hydroxylated monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC-H) and monomeric phenolic acid compounds (MPC-A) including 4-hydroxy-2-methoxyphenol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, syringic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid. The maximized MPC yields obtained were 18 and 22 % based on the initial weight of the lignin in SESPL and DACSL, respectively. However, we found that the addition of niobium pentoxide catalyst to PAA treatment of lignin can significantly improve the MPC yields up to 47 %. The key reaction steps and main mechanisms involved in this new lignin-to-MPC valorization pathway were investigated and elucidated.

  9. First synthesis and structural determination of a monomeric, unsolvated lithium amide, LiNH(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotjahn, D B; Sheridan, P M; Al Jihad, I; Ziurys, L M

    2001-06-13

    Alkali metal amides typically aggregate in solution and the solid phase, and even in the gas phase. In addition, even in the few known monomeric structures, the coordination number of the alkali metal is raised by binding of Lewis-basic solvent molecules, with concomitant changes in structure. In contrast, the simplest lithium amide LiNH(2) has never been made in a monomeric form, even though its structure has been theoretically predicted several times. Here, the first experimental structural data for a monomeric, unsolvated lithium amide are determined using a combination of gas-phase synthesis and millimeter/submillimeter-wave spectroscopy. All data point to a planar structure for LiNH(2). The r(o) structure of LiNH(2) has a Li-N distance of 1.736(3) A, an N-H distance of 1.022(3) A, and a H-N-H angle of 106.9(1) degrees. These results are compared with theoretical predictions for LiNH(2), and experimental data for oligomeric, solid-phase samples, which could not resolve the question of whether LiNH(2) is planar or not. In addition, comparisons are made with revised gas-phase and solid-phase data and calculated structures of NaNH(2).

  10. The peroxisomal protein import machinery displays a preference for monomeric substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Marta O; Francisco, Tânia; Rodrigues, Tony A; Lismont, Celien; Domingues, Pedro; Pinto, Manuel P; Grou, Cláudia P; Fransen, Marc; Azevedo, Jorge E

    2015-04-01

    Peroxisomal matrix proteins are synthesized on cytosolic ribosomes and transported by the shuttling receptor PEX5 to the peroxisomal membrane docking/translocation machinery, where they are translocated into the organelle matrix. Under certain experimental conditions this protein import machinery has the remarkable capacity to accept already oligomerized proteins, a property that has heavily influenced current models on the mechanism of peroxisomal protein import. However, whether or not oligomeric proteins are really the best and most frequent clients of this machinery remain unclear. In this work, we present three lines of evidence suggesting that the peroxisomal import machinery displays a preference for monomeric proteins. First, in agreement with previous findings on catalase, we show that PEX5 binds newly synthesized (monomeric) acyl-CoA oxidase 1 (ACOX1) and urate oxidase (UOX), potently inhibiting their oligomerization. Second, in vitro import experiments suggest that monomeric ACOX1 and UOX are better peroxisomal import substrates than the corresponding oligomeric forms. Finally, we provide data strongly suggesting that although ACOX1 lacking a peroxisomal targeting signal can be imported into peroxisomes when co-expressed with ACOX1 containing its targeting signal, this import pathway is inefficient.

  11. Treatment of iron deficiency anemia: are monomeric iron compounds suitable for parenteral administration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A; Crumbliss, A L

    2000-11-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional problem worldwide, especially in the developing countries. Oral iron supplementation programs have failed because of noncompliance and gastrointestinal toxicity, thereby necessitating parenteral administration of iron. For parenteral administration, only iron-carbohydrate complexes are currently used, because monomeric iron salts release free iron, thereby causing oxidant injury. However, iron-carbohydrate complexes also have significant toxicity, and they are expensive. We have proposed the hypothesis that monomeric iron salts can be safely administered by the parenteral route if iron is tightly complexed to the ligand, thereby causing clinically insignificant release of free iron, and the kinetic properties of the compound allow rapid transfer of iron to plasma transferrin. A detailed analysis of the physicochemical and kinetic properties reveals that ferric iron complexed to pyrophosphate or acetohydroxamate anions may be suitable for parenteral administration. We have demonstrated that infusion of ferric pyrophosphate into the circulation via the dialysate is safe and effective in maintaining iron balance in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis. Parenteral administration of monomeric iron compounds is a promising approach to the treatment of iron deficiency in the general population and merits further investigation.

  12. Skeletal Muscle Na+ Channel Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina eSimkin

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Five inherited human disorders affecting skeletal muscle contraction have been traced to mutations in the gene encoding the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.4. The main symptoms of these disorders are myotonia or periodic paralysis caused by changes in skeletal muscle fiber excitability. Symptoms of these disorders vary from mild or latent disease to incapacitating or even death in severe cases. As new human sodium channel mutations corresponding to disease states become discovered, the importance of understanding the role of the sodium channel in skeletal muscle function and disease state grows.

  13. Induction of antibodies against epitopes inaccessible on the HIV type 1 envelope oligomer by immunization with recombinant monomeric glycoprotein 120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Bolmstedt, A; Novotny, J;

    1998-01-01

    An N-glycan (N306) at the base of the V3 loop of HIV-BRU gp120 is shielding a linear neutralization epitope at the tip of the V3 loop on oligomeric Env. In contrast, this epitope is readily antigenic on monomeric gp120. Immunization with recombinant monomeric HIV-BRU gp120 may thus be expected to...... immunogenic structures inaccessible on the envelope oligomer. The limited ability of recombinant gp120 vaccines to induce neutralizing antibodies against primary isolates may thus not exclusively reflect genetic variation.......An N-glycan (N306) at the base of the V3 loop of HIV-BRU gp120 is shielding a linear neutralization epitope at the tip of the V3 loop on oligomeric Env. In contrast, this epitope is readily antigenic on monomeric gp120. Immunization with recombinant monomeric HIV-BRU gp120 may thus be expected...

  14. Aggregation of a slow-folding mutant of a beta-clam protein proceeds through a monomeric nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatova, Zoya; Gierasch, Lila M

    2005-05-17

    Mechanistic understanding of protein aggregation, leading either to structured amyloid fibrils or to amorphous inclusion body-like deposits, should facilitate the identification of potential therapeutic intervention strategies for the devastating amyloid-based diseases. Here we focus on the in vitro aggregation of a slow-folding mutant of the beta-clam protein, cellular retinoic acid-binding protein I (P39A CRABP I), which forms inclusion bodies when expressed in Escherichia coli. Aggregation was monitored by observing the fluorescence of a fluorescein-based biarsenical dye (FlAsH) that ligates to a tetra-Cys motif, here incorporated into a flexible Omega-loop. The fluorescence signal of FlAsH on the tetra-Cys-containing P39A CRABP I is sensitive to whether this protein is native or unfolded, and was used in combination with other techniques to follow aggregate formation. The aggregation time course is compatible with a nucleation-dependent polymerization model, and detailed kinetic analysis showed that the energetically unfavorable nucleus is monomeric. A similar conclusion was reached previously for poly(Gln) species [Chen, S., Ferrone, F. A., and Wetzel, R. (2002) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 11884-11889] and points to an unfavorable equilibrium between the misfolded intermediate and the bulk pool of monomers as causative in aggregation. The P39A mutation, which removes a helix-stop signal, may slow closure of the beta-barrel in P39A CRABP I relative to the wild type, leaving it vulnerable to aggregation. Wide-angle X-ray scattering showed that the amorphous aggregates formed by the aggregation-prone intermediates of P39A CRABP I contain predominantly beta-strands structured in a lamellar fashion with 10.03 A spacing between adjacent beta-sheets.

  15. Multimeric nature of voltage-gated proton channels

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, Hans P.; Kurokawa, Tatsuki; Okochi, Yoshifumi; Sasaki, Mari; Okamura, Yasushi; Larsson, H. Peter

    2008-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels are comprised of four subunits, and each subunit has a pore domain and a voltage-sensing domain (VSD). The four pore domains assemble to form one single central pore, and the four individual VSDs control the gate of the pore. Recently, a family of voltage-gated proton channels, such as HV or voltage sensor only protein (VSOP), was discovered that contain a single VSD but no pore domain. It has been assumed that VSOP channels are monomeric and contain a single ...

  16. PRRT2 gene mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Alice R.; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Stamelou, Maria; Dale, Russell C.; Kurian, Manju A.; Schneider, Susanne A.; Wali, G.M.; Counihan, Tim; Schapira, Anthony H.; Spacey, Sian D.; Valente, Enza-Maria; Silveira-Moriyama, Laura; Teive, Hélio A.G.; Raskin, Salmo; Sander, Josemir W.; Lees, Andrew; Warner, Tom; Kullmann, Dimitri M.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Hanna, Michael

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The proline-rich transmembrane protein (PRRT2) gene was recently identified using exome sequencing as the cause of autosomal dominant paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) with or without infantile convulsions (IC) (PKD/IC syndrome). Episodic neurologic disorders, such as epilepsy, migraine, and paroxysmal movement disorders, often coexist and are thought to have a shared channel-related etiology. To investigate further the frequency, spectrum, and phenotype of PRRT2 mutations, we analyzed this gene in 3 large series of episodic neurologic disorders with PKD/IC, episodic ataxia (EA), and hemiplegic migraine (HM). Methods: The PRRT2 gene was sequenced in 58 family probands/sporadic individuals with PKD/IC, 182 with EA, 128 with HM, and 475 UK and 96 Asian controls. Results: PRRT2 genetic mutations were identified in 28 out of 58 individuals with PKD/IC (48%), 1/182 individuals with EA, and 1/128 individuals with HM. A number of loss-of-function and coding missense mutations were identified; the most common mutation found was the p.R217Pfs*8 insertion. Males were more frequently affected than females (ratio 52:32). There was a high proportion of PRRT2 mutations found in families and sporadic cases with PKD associated with migraine or HM (10 out of 28). One family had EA with HM and another large family had typical HM alone. Conclusions: This work expands the phenotype of mutations in the PRRT2 gene to include the frequent occurrence of migraine and HM with PKD/IC, and the association of mutations with EA and HM and with familial HM alone. We have also extended the PRRT2 mutation type and frequency in PKD and other episodic neurologic disorders. PMID:23077024

  17. Monomeric banana lectin at acidic pH overrules conformational stability of its native dimeric form.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javed M Khan

    Full Text Available Banana lectin (BL is a homodimeric protein categorized among jacalin-related family of lectins. The effect of acidic pH was examined on conformational stability of BL by using circular dichroism, intrinsic fluorescence, 1-anilino-8-napthalene sulfonate (ANS binding, size exclusion chromatography (SEC and dynamic light scattering (DLS. During acid denaturation of BL, the monomerization of native dimeric protein was found at pH 2.0. The elution profile from SEC showed two different peaks (59.65 ml & 87.98 ml at pH 2.0 while single peak (61.45 ml at pH 7.4. The hydrodynamic radii (R h of native BL was 2.9 nm while at pH 2.0 two species were found with R h of 1.7 and 3.7 nm. Furthermore at, pH 2.0 the secondary structures of BL remained unaltered while tertiary structure was significantly disrupted with the exposure of hydrophobic clusters confirming the existence of molten globule like state. The unfolding of BL with different subunit status was further evaluated by urea and temperature mediated denaturation to check their stability. As inferred from high Cm and ΔG values, the monomeric form of BL offers more resistance towards chemical denaturation than the native dimeric form. Besides, dimeric BL exhibited a Tm of 77°C while no loss in secondary structures was observed in monomers even up to 95°C. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on monomeric subunit of lectins showing more stability against denaturants than its native dimeric state.

  18. Isolation of monomeric photosystem II that retains the subunit PsbS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haniewicz, Patrycja; De Sanctis, Daniele; Büchel, Claudia; Schröder, Wolfgang P; Loi, Maria Cecilia; Kieselbach, Thomas; Bochtler, Matthias; Piano, Dario

    2013-12-01

    Photosystem II has been purified from a transplastomic strain of Nicotiana tabacum according to two different protocols. Using the procedure described in Piano et al. (Photosynth Res 106:221-226, 2010) it was possible to isolate highly active PSII composed of monomers and dimers but depleted in their PsbS protein content. A "milder" procedure than the protocol reported by Fey et al. (Biochim Biophys Acta 1777:1501-1509, 2008) led to almost exclusively monomeric PSII complexes which in part still bind the PsbS protein. This finding might support a role for PSII monomers in higher plants.

  19. Monomeric CH3: A Small, Stable Antibody Domain with Therapeutic Promise | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer Antibody domains are emerging as promising biopharmaceuticals because of their relatively small size compared to full-sized antibodies, which are too large to effectively penetrate tumors and bind to sterically restricted therapeutic targets. In an article published in The Journal of Biological Chemistry, Tianlei Ying, Ph.D., Dimiter Dimitrov, Ph.D., and their colleagues in the Protein Interactions Group, Cancer and Inflammation Program, Center for Cancer Research, reported their design of a novel antibody domain, monomeric CH3 (mCH3).

  20. The Beckman DxI 800 prolactin assay demonstrates superior specificity for monomeric prolactin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, Brendan

    2010-02-01

    Commercially available prolactin immunoassays detect macroprolactin to variable degrees. Best practice requires laboratories to assess the cross-reactivity of their prolactin assay with macroprolactin, and where appropriate, introduce a screen for the presence of macroprolactin. Our policy has been to reanalyse hyperprolactinaemic samples following polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation and to report the resultant value as the monomeric prolactin content of the sample. The goal of this study was to determine the need to continue PEG precipitation when prolactin measurements with the Wallac AutoDELFIA were replaced by the Beckman DxI 800.

  1. S4153R is a gain-of-function mutation in the cardiac Ca(2+) release channel ryanodine receptor associated with catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhabyeyev, Pavel; Hiess, Florian; Wang, Ruiwu; Liu, Yingjie; Wayne Chen, S R; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2013-08-01

    Mutations in ryanodine receptor 2 (RYR2) gene can cause catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). The novel RYR2-S4153R mutation has been implicated as a cause of CPVT and atrial fibrillation. The mutation has been functionally characterized via store-overload-induced Ca(2+) release (SOICR) and tritium-labelled ryanodine ([(3)H]ryanodine) binding assays. The S4153R mutation enhanced propensity for spontaneous Ca(2+) release and reduced SOICR threshold but did not alter Ca(2+) activation of [(3)H]ryanodine binding, a common feature of other CPVT gain-of-function RYR2 mutations. We conclude that the S4153R mutation is a gain-of-function RYR2 mutation associated with a clinical phenotype characterized by both CPVT and atrial fibrillation.

  2. Allosteric Partial Inhibition of Monomeric Proteases. Sulfated Coumarins Induce Regulation, not just Inhibition, of Thrombin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verespy III, Stephen; Mehta, Akul Y.; Afosah, Daniel; Al-Horani, Rami A.; Desai, Umesh R.

    2016-01-01

    Allosteric partial inhibition of soluble, monomeric proteases can offer major regulatory advantages, but remains a concept on paper to date; although it has been routinely documented for receptors and oligomeric proteins. Thrombin, a key protease of the coagulation cascade, displays significant conformational plasticity, which presents an attractive opportunity to discover small molecule probes that induce sub-maximal allosteric inhibition. We synthesized a focused library of some 36 sulfated coumarins to discover two agents that display sub-maximal efficacy (~50%), high potency (150-fold). Michaelis-Menten, competitive inhibition, and site-directed mutagenesis studies identified exosite 2 as the site of binding for the most potent sulfated coumarin. Stern-Volmer quenching of active site-labeled fluorophore suggested that the allosteric regulators induce intermediate structural changes in the active site as compared to those that display ~80–100% efficacy. Antithrombin inactivation of thrombin was impaired in the presence of the sulfated coumarins suggesting that allosteric partial inhibition arises from catalytic dysfunction of the active site. Overall, sulfated coumarins represent first-in-class, sub-maximal inhibitors of thrombin. The probes establish the concept of allosteric partial inhibition of soluble, monomeric proteins. This concept may lead to a new class of anticoagulants that are completely devoid of bleeding. PMID:27053426

  3. Nortriptyline inhibits aggregation and neurotoxicity of alpha-synuclein by enhancing reconfiguration of the monomeric form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Timothy J; Srivastava, Kinshuk R; Justman, Craig; Grammatopoulous, Tom; Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Prokesch, Manuela; Havas, Daniel; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Liu, Fang; Jock, Kevin; de Oliveira, Patrícia; Stirtz, Georgia L; Dettmer, Ulf; Sortwell, Caryl E; Feany, Mel B; Lansbury, Peter; Lapidus, Lisa; Paumier, Katrina L

    2017-10-01

    The pathology of Parkinson's disease and other synucleinopathies is characterized by the formation of intracellular inclusions comprised primarily of misfolded, fibrillar α-synuclein (α-syn). One strategy to slow disease progression is to prevent the misfolding and aggregation of its native monomeric form. Here we present findings that support the contention that the tricyclic antidepressant compound nortriptyline (NOR) has disease-modifying potential for synucleinopathies. Findings from in vitro aggregation and kinetics assays support the view that NOR inhibits aggregation of α-syn by directly binding to the soluble, monomeric form, and by enhancing reconfiguration of the monomer, inhibits formation of toxic conformations of the protein. We go on to demonstrate that NOR inhibits the accumulation, aggregation and neurotoxicity of α-syn in multiple cell and animal models. These findings suggest that NOR, a compound with established safety and efficacy for treatment of depression, may slow progression of α-syn pathology by directly binding to soluble, native, α-syn, thereby inhibiting pathological aggregation and preserving its normal functions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Monomeric, Oligomeric and Polymeric Proteins in Huntington Disease and Other Diseases of Polyglutamine Expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guylaine Hoffner

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Huntington disease and other diseases of polyglutamine expansion are each caused by a different protein bearing an excessively long polyglutamine sequence and are associated with neuronal death. Although these diseases affect largely different brain regions, they all share a number of characteristics, and, therefore, are likely to possess a common mechanism. In all of the diseases, the causative protein is proteolyzed, becomes abnormally folded and accumulates in oligomers and larger aggregates. The aggregated and possibly the monomeric expanded polyglutamine are likely to play a critical role in the pathogenesis and there is increasing evidence that the secondary structure of the protein influences its toxicity. We describe here, with special attention to huntingtin, the mechanisms of polyglutamine aggregation and the modulation of aggregation by the sequences flanking the polyglutamine. We give a comprehensive picture of the characteristics of monomeric and aggregated polyglutamine, including morphology, composition, seeding ability, secondary structure, and toxicity. The structural heterogeneity of aggregated polyglutamine may explain why polyglutamine-containing aggregates could paradoxically be either toxic or neuroprotective.

  5. Analysis of amino acid residues involved in cold activity of monomeric isocitrate dehydrogenase from psychrophilic bacteria, Colwellia maris and Colwellia psychrerythraea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Wataru; Kobayashi, Miyuki; Takada, Yasuhiro

    2013-11-01

    Monomeric isocitrate dehydrogenases from psychrophilic bacteria, Colwellia maris and Colwellia psychrerythraea (CmIDH-II and CpIDH-M, respectively) are cold-adapted enzymes and show a high degree of amino acid sequential identity to each other (77%). However, maximum activity of CpIDH-M at optimum temperature is much less than that of CmIDH-II. In the C-terminal region 3 of these enzymes, which was suggested from previous study to be responsible for their distinct catalytic ability, several sequential differences of amino acid residue are present. Among them, ten amino acid residues were exchanged between them by site-directed mutagenesis and several properties of the mutated enzymes were examined in this study. The mutated enzymes of CmIDH-II substituted its Gln671, Leu724 and Phe735 residues with the corresponding residues of CpIDH-M (termed Q671K, L724Q and F735L, respectively) showed lower specific activity and thermostability for activity than the wild-type enzyme. Furthermore, the decreased specific activity was also observed in L693F. In contrast, the corresponding mutants of CpIDH-M, F693L, Q724L and L735F, showed the increased specific activity and thermostability for activity. The catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) values of these mutated CmIDH-II and CpIDH-M were lower and higher than those of their wild-type IDHs, respectively. These results suggest that the Gln671, Leu693, Leu724 and Phe735 residues of CmIDH-II are important for exerting its high catalytic ability.

  6. Dravet综合征的临床特点分析及SCN1A基因新突变%Clinical Analysis of Dravet Syndrome and Novel Gene Mutation of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel α1-Su-bunit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王新华; 周水珍

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the clinical characteristics of Dravet syndrome and to screen the voltage -gated sodium channel αl -subunit( SCNI A ) of a newly diagnosed child, hoping to find the gene mutation. Methods The clinical information of 3 Dravet syndrome children were collected,the blood sample of a new diagnostic child was provided. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes using relax gene blood DNA system. The total 26 exons of SCN1A were amplified by polymerase chain reaction( PCR), and the PCR products were screened by Denaturing high performance liquid chromatography, then the abnormal fragments were sequenced by Sanger method in order to find the mutations of SCN 1A gene. Results 1. The common manifestations of 3 Dravet syndrome cases: onset during the first year of life; in all children, the seizures were associated with febrile seizures and they changed to afebrile seizures after 1 year; the forms of seizures included clonus,myoclonus and atypical absence;the seizures were difficult to control with anti -epileptic drugs; all children presented some degree of psychomotor development delay; there were sharp - slow waves, spike - slow waves and multi spike - slow waves in EEG of diapause. 2. A missense mutation of SCNI A gene (c. 2867T > G, M956R) was found in the Dravet syndrome child, which had not been reported up to Nov.2010. Conclusions Dravet syndrome is an epileptic encephalopathy with a bad prognosis,and it needs to be differentiate it frome febrile seizures. The missense mutation of SCNIA gene supports the relationship of SCNIA mutation and Dravet syndrom.%目的 分析Dravet综合征的临床特点,并对新诊断患儿进行SCN1A基因筛查,寻找基因突变.方法收集3例Dravet综合征患儿临床资料,留取例1患儿血样标本,提取外周血白细胞基因组DNA,对SCN1A全部外显子进行PCR扩增,通过变性高效液相色谱法对PCR产物进行突变片段筛查,对于变性高效液相色谱法筛查有异常的片段

  7. Properties and metathesis activity of monomeric and dimeric Mo centres variously located on γ-alumina A DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handzlik, Jarosław

    2007-05-01

    Ethene metathesis proceeding on monomeric and dimeric Mo species on the (1 0 0) and (1 1 0) γ-alumina is investigated by density functional theory, applying the cluster approach. The calculated vibrational frequencies of the surface OH groups are assigned to the experimental IR bands. It is shown that both monomeric and dimeric Mo forms can be the active sites of olefin metathesis. Metathesis activity and stability of the Mo-methylidene centres depend on their location on alumina. The differences in the sites reactivity are explained on the basis of their geometrical and electronic structure parameters. For the monomeric centres, isomerisation of the trigonal bipyramidal intermediate to the stable square pyramidal molybdacyclobutane is kinetically favoured over the cycloreversal step. The situation is opposite in the case of the dimeric species.

  8. Lyophilization-induced protein denaturation in phosphate buffer systems: monomeric and tetrameric beta-galactosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikal-Cleland, K A; Carpenter, J F

    2001-09-01

    During freezing in phosphate buffers, selective precipitation of a less soluble buffer component and subsequent pH shifts may induce protein denaturation. Previous reports indicate significantly more inactivation and secondary structural perturbation of monomeric and tetrameric beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) during freeze-thawing in sodium phosphate (NaP) buffer as compared with potassium phosphate (KP) buffer. This observation was attributed to the significant pH shifts (from 7.0 to as low as 3.8) observed during freezing in the NaP buffer (1). In the current study, we investigated the impact of the additional stress of dehydration after freezing on the recovery of active protein on reconstitution and the retention of the native structure in the dried state. Freeze-drying monomeric and tetrameric beta-gal in either NaP or KP buffer resulted in significant secondary structural perturbations, which were greatest for the NaP samples. However, similar recoveries of active monomeric protein were observed after freeze-thawing and freeze-drying, indicating that most dehydration-induced unfolding was reversible on reconstitution of the freeze-dried protein. In contrast, the tetrameric protein was more susceptible to dehydration-induced denaturation as seen by the greater loss in activity after reconstitution of the freeze-dried samples relative to that measured after freeze-thawing. To ensure optimal protein stability during freeze-drying, the protein must be protected from both freezing and dehydration stresses. Although poly(ethylene glycol) and dextran are preferentially excluded solutes and should confer protection during freezing, they were unable to prevent lyophilization-induced denaturation. In addition, Tween did not foster maintenance of native protein during freeze-drying. However, sucrose, which hydrogen bonds to dried protein in the place of lost water, greatly reduced freezing- and drying-induced denaturation, as observed by the high retention of native

  9. Ion Channels in Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pravir; Kumar, Dhiraj; Jha, Saurabh Kumar; Jha, Niraj Kumar; Ambasta, Rashmi K

    2016-01-01

    The convergent endeavors of the neuroscientist to establish a link between clinical neurology, genetics, loss of function of an important protein, and channelopathies behind neurological disorders are quite intriguing. Growing evidence reveals the impact of ion channels dysfunctioning in neurodegenerative disorders (NDDs). Many neurological/neuromuscular disorders, viz, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and age-related disorders are caused due to altered function or mutation in ion channels. To maintain cell homeostasis, ion channels are playing a crucial role which is a large transmembrane protein. Further, these channels are important as it determines the membrane potential and playing critically in the secretion of neurotransmitter. Behind NDDs, losses of pathological proteins and defective ion channels have been reported and are found to aggravate the disease symptoms. Moreover, ion channel dysfunctions are eliciting a range of symptoms, including memory loss, movement disabilities, neuromuscular sprains, and strokes. Since the possible mechanistic role played by aberrant ion channels, their receptor and associated factors in neurodegeneration remained elusive; therefore, it is a challenging task for the neuroscientist to implement the therapeutics for targeting NDDs. This chapter reviews the potential role of the ion channels in membrane physiology and brain homeostasis, where ion channels and their associated factors have been characterized with their functional consequences in neurological diseases. Moreover, mechanistic role of perturbed ion channels has been identified in various NDDs, and finally, ion channel modulators have been investigated for their therapeutic intervention in treating common NDDs.

  10. A NOVEL KCNA1 MUTATION CAUSING EPISODIC ATAXIA TYPE I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lassche, Saskia; Lainez, Sergio; Bloem, Bastiaan R.; van de Warrenburg, Bart P. C.; Hofmeijer, Jeannette; Lemmink, Henny H.; Hoenderop, Joost G. J.; Bindels, Rene J. M.; Drost, Gea

    2014-01-01

    We describe the clinical phenotype of a novel de novo KNCA1 mutation, and functional characterization of the effects of the mutation on Kv1.1 channel function. HEK293 cells were transfected transiently with either wild-type or mutant channels. Representative currents were evoked after application of

  11. A NOVEL KCNA1 MUTATION CAUSING EPISODIC ATAXIA TYPE I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lassche, Saskia; Lainez, Sergio; Bloem, Bastiaan R.; van de Warrenburg, Bart P. C.; Hofmeijer, Jeannette; Lemmink, Henny H.; Hoenderop, Joost G. J.; Bindels, Rene J. M.; Drost, Gea

    2014-01-01

    We describe the clinical phenotype of a novel de novo KNCA1 mutation, and functional characterization of the effects of the mutation on Kv1.1 channel function. HEK293 cells were transfected transiently with either wild-type or mutant channels. Representative currents were evoked after application of

  12. A novel KCNA1 mutation causing episodic ataxia type I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lassche, S.; Lainez, S.; Bloem, B.R.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Hofmeijer, J.; Lemmink, H.H.; Hoenderop, J.G.; Bindels, R.J.M.; Drost, G.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the clinical phenotype of a novel de novo KNCA1 mutation, and functional characterization of the effects of the mutation on Kv1.1 channel function. HEK293 cells were transfected transiently with either wild-type or mutant channels. Representative currents were evoked after application of

  13. Extracellular monomeric tau protein is sufficient to initiate the spread of tau protein pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Claire H; Kumar, Satish; Pinotsi, Dorothea; Tunnacliffe, Alan; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Kaminski, Clemens F; Kaminski Schierle, Gabriele S

    2014-01-10

    Understanding the formation and propagation of aggregates of the Alzheimer disease-associated Tau protein in vivo is vital for the development of therapeutics for this devastating disorder. Using our recently developed live-cell aggregation sensor in neuron-like cells, we demonstrate that different variants of exogenous monomeric Tau, namely full-length Tau (hTau40) and the Tau-derived construct K18 comprising the repeat domain, initially accumulate in endosomal compartments, where they form fibrillar seeds that subsequently induce the aggregation of endogenous Tau. Using superresolution imaging, we confirm that fibrils consisting of endogenous and exogenous Tau are released from cells and demonstrate their potential to spread Tau pathology. Our data indicate a greater pathological risk and potential toxicity than hitherto suspected for extracellular soluble Tau.

  14. Monomeric GLP-1/GIP/glucagon triagonism corrects obesity, hepatosteatosis, and dyslipidemia in female mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jall, Sigrid; Sachs, Stephan; Clemmensen, Christoffer

    2017-01-01

    . RESULTS: Our results show that GLP-1/GIP/glucagon triple agonism inhibits food intake and decreases body weight and body fat mass with comparable potency in male and female mice that have been matched for body fat mass. Treatment improved dyslipidemia in both sexes and reversed diet......OBJECTIVE: Obesity is a major health threat that affects men and women equally. Despite this fact, weight-loss potential of pharmacotherapies is typically first evaluated in male mouse models of diet-induced obesity (DIO). To address this disparity we herein determined whether a monomeric peptide...... mice and a cohort of fatmass-matched C57BL/6J male mice were treated for 27 days via subcutaneous injections with either the GLP-1/GIP/glucagon triagonist or PBS. A second cohort of C57BL/6J male mice was included to match the females in the duration of the high-fat, high-sugar diet (HFD) exposure...

  15. Novel Monomeric Phenanthroline—Thallium(Ⅲ) Complexes Multinuclear NMR Characterization in Organic Solvents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GuiBinMA; JuliusGLASER

    2002-01-01

    A novel complex of monomeric thallium (Ⅲ) with the nitrogen donor ligand phenanthroline (phen) has been prepared and characterized by multimuclear NMR(1H,13C,205Tl). The three complexes exist in equilibria in DMSO and acetonitrile solution, which was proved by the 205Tl NMR spectra. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of tris-phen T1(Ⅲ) complex have been measured, where the spin-spin coupling between T1(I=1/2) and 13C or 1H signals were observed with the 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy in acetonitrile. The coupling constants are presented and the chemical shifts of complexes are discussed in detail.

  16. Novel Monomeric Phenanthroline - Thallium(Ⅲ) Complexes Multinuclear NMR Characterization in Organic Solvents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A novel complex of monomeric thallium(III) with the nitrogen donor ligand phenanthrolinc (phen) has been prepared and characterized by multinuclear NMR (1H, 13C, 205T1).The three complexes exist in equilibria in DMSO and acetonitrile solution, which was proved by the 205Tl NMR spectra. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of tris-phen Tl(III) complex have been measured, where the spin-spin coupling between TI (1 = 1/2) and 13C or 1H signals were observed with the 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy in acetonitrile. The coupling constants are presented and the chemical shifts of complexes are discussed in detail.

  17. Kinetics of carbon monoxide binding to monomeric hemoproteins. Role of the proximal histidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletta, M; Ascenzi, P; Traylor, T G; Brunori, M

    1985-04-10

    The effect of pH on (i) the second-order rate constant for CO binding and (ii) the spectral properties of the deoxygenated derivative of several monomeric hemoproteins has been investigated in the pH range between 2.3 and 9.0. As in the case of 3-[1-imidazolyl]-propylamide monomethyl ester mesoheme, the rate constant for CO binding to sperm whale, horse, Dermochelys coriacea, Coryphaena hippurus, and Aplysia limacina myoglobins (the latter only in the presence of acetate/acetic acid mixture) increases, as the pH is lowered, to a value at least 1 order of magnitude higher than at pH 7.0. Such an effect is not observed in A. limacina myoglobin (in the absence of the acetate/acetic acid mixture) and Chironomus thummi thummi erythrocruorin. Moreover, the absorption spectrum, in the visible region, of the deoxy derivative of all these monomeric hemoproteins (with the exception of A. limacina myoglobin in the absence of the acetate/acetic acid mixture) undergoes a transition as the pH is lowered, an effect observed previously with 3-[1-imidazolyl]-propylamide monomethyl ester protoheme. On the basis of analogous spectroscopic and kinetic properties of chelated heme model compounds we attribute this behavior to the protonation of the N epsilon of the proximal imidazole involved in the bond with the iron atom. On the basis of this model the movement of the iron atom to the heme plane appears as a crucial step for CO binding, the activation free energy of the process amounting to approximately 2 kcal/mol.

  18. LRP1 Modulates APP Intraneuronal Transport and Processing in Its Monomeric and Dimeric State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus U. Pietrzik

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1, LRP1, interacts with APP and affects its processing. This is assumed to be mostly caused by the impact of LRP1 on APP endocytosis. More recently, also an interaction of APP and LRP1 early in the secretory pathway was reported whereat retention of LRP1 in the ER leads to decreased APP cell surface levels and in turn, to reduced Aβ secretion. Here, we extended the biochemical and immunocytochemical analyses by showing via live cell imaging analyses in primary neurons that LRP1 and APP are transported only partly in common (one third but to a higher degree in distinct fast axonal transport vesicles. Interestingly, co-expression of LRP1 and APP caused a change of APP transport velocities, indicating that LRP1 recruits APP to a specific type of fast axonal transport vesicles. In contrast lowered levels of LRP1 facilitated APP transport. We further show that monomeric and dimeric APP exhibit similar transport characteristics and that both are affected by LRP1 in a similar way, by slowing down APP anterograde transport and increasing its endocytosis rate. In line with this, a knockout of LRP1 in CHO cells and in primary neurons caused an increase of monomeric and dimeric APP surface localization and in turn accelerated shedding by meprin β and ADAM10. Notably, a choroid plexus specific LRP1 knockout caused a much higher secretion of sAPP dimers into the cerebrospinal fluid compared to sAPP monomers. Together, our data show that LRP1 functions as a sorting receptor for APP, regulating its cell surface localization and thereby its processing by ADAM10 and meprin β, with the latter exhibiting a preference for APP in its dimeric state.

  19. LRP1 Modulates APP Intraneuronal Transport and Processing in Its Monomeric and Dimeric State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Uta-Mareike; Strecker, Paul; Storck, Steffen E; Thomas, Carolin; Rabiej, Verena; Junker, Anne; Schilling, Sandra; Schmidt, Nadine; Dowds, C Marie; Eggert, Simone; Pietrzik, Claus U; Kins, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1, LRP1, interacts with APP and affects its processing. This is assumed to be mostly caused by the impact of LRP1 on APP endocytosis. More recently, also an interaction of APP and LRP1 early in the secretory pathway was reported whereat retention of LRP1 in the ER leads to decreased APP cell surface levels and in turn, to reduced Aβ secretion. Here, we extended the biochemical and immunocytochemical analyses by showing via live cell imaging analyses in primary neurons that LRP1 and APP are transported only partly in common (one third) but to a higher degree in distinct fast axonal transport vesicles. Interestingly, co-expression of LRP1 and APP caused a change of APP transport velocities, indicating that LRP1 recruits APP to a specific type of fast axonal transport vesicles. In contrast lowered levels of LRP1 facilitated APP transport. We further show that monomeric and dimeric APP exhibit similar transport characteristics and that both are affected by LRP1 in a similar way, by slowing down APP anterograde transport and increasing its endocytosis rate. In line with this, a knockout of LRP1 in CHO cells and in primary neurons caused an increase of monomeric and dimeric APP surface localization and in turn accelerated shedding by meprin β and ADAM10. Notably, a choroid plexus specific LRP1 knockout caused a much higher secretion of sAPP dimers into the cerebrospinal fluid compared to sAPP monomers. Together, our data show that LRP1 functions as a sorting receptor for APP, regulating its cell surface localization and thereby its processing by ADAM10 and meprin β, with the latter exhibiting a preference for APP in its dimeric state.

  20. Ion channels in development and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels have emerged as regulators of developmental processes. In model organisms and in people with mutations in ion channels, disruption of ion channel function can affect cell proliferation, cell migration, and craniofacial and limb patterning. Alterations of ion channel function affect morphogenesis in fish, frogs, mammals, and flies, demonstrating that ion channels have conserved roles in developmental processes. One model suggests that ion channels affect proliferation and migration through changes in cell volume. However, ion channels have not explicitly been placed in canonical developmental signaling cascades until recently. This review gives examples of ion channels that influence developmental processes, offers a potential underlying molecular mechanism involving bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, and finally explores exciting possibilities for manipulating ion channels to influence cell fate for regenerative medicine and to impact disease.

  1. Quantification of the predominant monomeric catechins in baking chocolate standard reference material by LC/APCI-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Bryant C; Sharpless, Katherine E

    2003-01-29

    Catechins are polyphenolic plant compounds (flavonoids) that may offer significant health benefits to humans. These benefits stem largely from their anticarcinogenic, antioxidant, and antimutagenic properties. Recent epidemiological studies suggest that the consumption of flavonoid-containing foods is associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. Chocolate is a natural cocoa bean-based product that reportedly contains high levels of monomeric, oligomeric, and polymeric catechins. We have applied solid-liquid extraction and liquid chromatography coupled with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry to the identification and determination of the predominant monomeric catechins, (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin, in a baking chocolate Standard Reference Material (NIST Standard Reference Material 2384). (+)-Catechin and (-)-epicatechin are detected and quantified in chocolate extracts on the basis of selected-ion monitoring of their protonated [M + H](+) molecular ions. Tryptophan methyl ester is used as an internal standard. The developed method has the capacity to accurately quantify as little as 0.1 microg/mL (0.01 mg of catechin/g of chocolate) of either catechin in chocolate extracts, and the method has additionally been used to certify (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin levels in the baking chocolate Standard Reference Material. This is the first reported use of liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry for the quantitative determination of monomeric catechins in chocolate and the only report certifying monomeric catechin levels in a food-based Standard Reference Material.

  2. Principal component regression analysis of the relation between CIELAB color and monomeric anthocyanins in young Cabernet Sauvignon wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fu-Liang; Zhang, Wen-Na; Pan, Qiu-Hong; Zheng, Cheng-Rong; Chen, Hai-Yan; Duan, Chang-Qing

    2008-11-17

    Color is one of the key characteristics used to evaluate the sensory quality of red wine, and anthocyanins are the main contributors to color. Monomeric anthocyanins and CIELAB color values were investigated by HPLC-MS and spectrophotometry during fermentation of Cabernet Sauvignon red wine, and principal component regression (PCR), a statistical tool, was used to establish a linkage between the detected anthocyanins and wine coloring. The results showed that 14 monomeric anthocyanins could be identified in wine samples, and all of these anthocyanins were negatively correlated with the L*, b* and H*ab values, but positively correlated with a* and C*ab values. On an equal concentration basis for each detected anthocyanin, cyanidin-3-O-glucoside (Cy3-glu) had the most influence on CIELAB color value, while malvidin 3-O-glucoside (Mv3-glu) had the least. The color values of various monomeric anthocyanins were influenced by their structures, substituents on the B-ring, acyl groups on the glucoside and the molecular steric structure. This work develops a statistical method for evaluating correlation between wine color and monomeric anthocyanins, and also provides a basis for elucidating the effect of intramolecular copigmentation on wine coloring.

  3. Principal Component Regression Analysis of the Relation Between CIELAB Color and Monomeric Anthocyanins in Young Cabernet Sauvignon Wines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Qing Duan

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Color is one of the key characteristics used to evaluate the sensory quality of red wine, and anthocyanins are the main contributors to color. Monomeric anthocyanins and CIELAB color values were investigated by HPLC-MS and spectrophotometry during fermentation of Cabernet Sauvignon red wine, and principal component regression (PCR, a statistical tool, was used to establish a linkage between the detected anthocyanins and wine coloring. The results showed that 14 monomeric anthocyanins could be identified in wine samples, and all of these anthocyanins were negatively correlated with the L*, b* and H*ab values, but positively correlated with a* and C*ab values. On an equal concentration basis for each detected anthocyanin, cyanidin-3-O-glucoside (Cy3-glu had the most influence on CIELAB color value, while malvidin 3-O-glucoside (Mv3-glu had the least. The color values of various monomeric anthocyanins were influenced by their structures, substituents on the B-ring, acyl groups on the glucoside and the molecular steric structure. This work develops a statistical method for evaluating correlation between wine color and monomeric anthocyanins, and also provides a basis for elucidating the effect of intramolecular copigmentation on wine coloring.

  4. The sigma-1 receptors are present in monomeric and oligomeric forms in living cells in the presence and absence of ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Deo R.; Biener, Gabriel; Yang, Jay; Oliver, Julie A.; Ruoho, Arnold; Raicu, Valerică

    2015-01-01

    The sigma-1 receptor (S1R) is a 223-amino-acid membrane protein that resides in the endoplasmic reticulum and the plasma membrane of some mammalian cells. The S1R is regulated by various synthetic molecules including (+)-pentazocine, cocaine and haloperidol and endogenous molecules such as sphingosine, dimethyltryptamine and dehydroepiandrosterone. Ligand-regulated protein chaperone functions linked to oxidative stress and neurodegenerative disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and neuropathic pain have been attributed to the S1R. Several client proteins that interact with S1R have been identified including various types of ion channels and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). When S1R constructs containing C-terminal monomeric GFP2 and YFP fusions were co-expressed in COS-7 cells and subjected to FRET spectrometry analysis, monomers, dimers and higher oligomeric forms of S1R were identified under non-liganded conditions. In the presence of the prototypic S1R agonist, (+)-pentazocine, however, monomers and dimers were the prevailing forms of S1R. The prototypic antagonist, haloperidol, on the other hand, favoured higher order S1R oligomers. These data, in sum, indicate that heterologously expressed S1Rs occur in vivo in COS-7 cells in multiple oligomeric forms and that S1R ligands alter these oligomeric structures. We suggest that the S1R oligomerization states may regulate its function(s). PMID:25510962

  5. Reactivity studies on [Cp'FeI]2: monomeric amido, phenoxo, and alkyl complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Marc D; White, Peter S

    2012-11-05

    A series of monomeric mono(cyclopentadienyl) iron amido, phenoxo, and alkyl complexes were synthesized, and their structure and reactivity are presented. The iron(II) centers in these 14VE one-legged piano stool complexes are high spin (S = 2) in solid state and solution independent of solvent. The silylamide compound [Cp'FeN(SiMe(3))(2)] (2a, Cp' = 1,2,4-(Me(3)C)(3)C(5)H(2)) is an excellent starting material for the reaction with more acidic substrates such as phenols. Sterically encumbered phenols 2,6-(Me(3)C)(2)(4-R)C(6)H(2)OH (R = H, Me, and tBu) were investigated. In all cases monomeric iron phenoxo half-sandwich complexes [Cp'FeOR'] (4-R) are initially formed. Rearrangement of 4-R to the diamagnetic oxocyclohexadienyl complex [Cp'Fe(η(5)-O═C(6)H(2)R'(2)R")] (5-R) is observed for 2,6-(Me(3)C)(2)(4-R)C(6)H(2)OH (R = H and Me) and the Gibbs free enthalpy of activation (ΔG(‡)) was determined. In contrast this rearrangement is inhibited when the 4-position is blocked by a tBu group. Removing the steric bulk from the 2,6-positions leads to the formation of a μ-phenoxo dimer, [Cp'Fe(μ-OC(6)H(3)tBu(2)-3,5)](2) (5). Density functional theory (DFT) was used to further elucidate the structure-reactivity relationship in these molecules. The one-legged piano stool anilido complex [Cp'Fe(NHC(6)H(2)tBu(3)-2,4,6)] (7) is not accessible via acid-base reaction between 2a and H(2)NC(6)H(2)tBu(3)-2,4,6, but can be prepared by conventional salt metathesis reaction from [Cp'FeI](2) and [Li(NHC(6)H(2)tBu(3)-2,4,6)(OEt(2))](2). In contrast, reaction of 2a with Ph(2)NH yields the bimetallic [Cp'Fe(N,C-κ(1),η(5)-C(6)H(5)NPh)Fe(N-κ(1)-NPh(2))Cp'] (8) which combines two iron centers in the same oxidation state (+2), but different spin-states (S = 0 and S = 2) which is reflected in very different Cp(cent)-Fe distances of 1.68 and 2.04 Å, respectively. A monomeric iron alkyl half-sandwich complex [Cp'FeCH(SiMe(3))(2)] (9) was prepared that exhibits no reactivity toward H(2), C

  6. Ataxia Telangiectasia-Mutated (ATM) kinase activity is regulated by ATP-driven conformational changes in the Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 (MRN) complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.-H. Lee (Ji-Hoon); M.R. Mand (Michael); R.A. Deshpande (Rajashree); E. Kinoshita (Eri); S.-H. Yang (Soo-Hyun); C. Wyman (Claire); T.T. Paull

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe Ataxia Telangiectasia-Mutated (ATM) protein kinase is recruited to sites of double-strand DNA breaks by the Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 (MRN) complex, which also facilitates ATM monomerization and activation. MRN exists in at least two distinct conformational states, dependent on ATP binding an

  7. Synthesis and structural characterization of monomeric mercury(II) selenolate complexes derived from 2-phenylbenzamide ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Saket; Meenakshi; Hodage, Ananda S; Verma, Ajay; Agrawal, Shailendra; Yadav, Abhimanyu; Kumar, Sangit

    2016-03-07

    Monomeric Hg(II) selenolate complexes derived from 2-phenylbenzamide ligands were prepared by oxidative addition of diselenides [{C6H4(CONR2)Se}2, R = Me, Et, iPr] to elemental Hg and reductive cleavage of the Se–N bond of isoselenazolone derivatives [(NO2)C6H3(CONSe)R, (R = allyl, nbutyl)] followed by the treatment with HgCl2. The complexes have been characterized by multinuclear NMR (1H, 13C and 77Se) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry which suggest the monomeric form of these in solution. The molecular structures of diselenides [C6H4(CONR2)Se]2 and mercury selenolates [Hg{(NO2)C6H3(CONH-C3H5) Se}2], [Hg{C6H4(CONiPr2)Se}2] and [Hg{C6H4(CONMe2)Se}2] were established by a single crystal X-ray diffraction study. Diselenides show strong intramolecular non-bonded Se⋯O interactions, which are influenced by the nature of C(O)NR̲2 and decrease with the sterically bulky alkyl substituent (Se⋯O =2.823 Å for R = di-Me, 2.760 Å for R = allyl, and 3.157 Å for R = di-iPr). Mercury complexes derived from less bulky 2-phenyl-N,N-dialkylbenzamide ligands associated with poor or no intramolecular nonbonded Hg⋯O interactions (4.91 Å for R = di-Me, 4.199 Å for R = allyl) and instead strong intermolecular Hg⋯O [2.792(3) and 2.820(4) Å] for di-Me and allyl and Hg⋯Se [3.3212(5) and 3.4076(8) Å] interactions were observed which lead to a dimeric form in the crystals. On the other hand, the mercury complex derived from the sterically bulky diisopropyl amide ligand shows a strong intramolecular non-bonded Hg⋯O (2.860 Å) interaction, adopts linear geometry and exists as a monomer. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of the mercury selenolate complexes revealed two-step decomposition which leads to the formation of HgSe. The mercury selenolate complex 3c derived from the sterically bulky 2-phenyl-N,Ndiisopropylbenzamide ligand decomposed to give HgSe in the range of 220-300 °C.

  8. 11 Efficacy and Tolerability of HDM Injective Immunotherapy With Monomeric Allergoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compalati, Enrico; Atzeni, Isabella; Cabras, Sergio; Fancello, Paolo; Gaspardini, Giulio; Longo, Rocco; Patella, Vincenzo; Tore, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    Background Subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) is an effective treatment of respiratory allergy and carbamylated monomeric allergoids (monoids), by virtue of their reduced IgE-binding activity, resulted clinically safe by sublingual administration. Purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy and tolerability of immunotherapy with house dust mites (HDM) monoid administered by injective route in patients with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (AR). Methods A preparation of 0.70 mL of 10 BU/mL containing modified extract with 50% Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and 50% Dermatophagoides farinae (amount of major allergen: 4 μg of group 1 per milliliter) was delivered monthly for 12 months, following a 5-week build-up induction phase (0.10–0.20–0.30–0.50–0.70 mL), to 58 patients (60% males, mean age 25.1 ± 12.7) suffering from AR due to mites for at least 2 years, whereas 60 patients with similar baseline characteristics were observed as controls. All patients were allowed to assume traditional drug therapy for their condition. At the end of the study changes from baseline in symptoms scores, in number of days with drug assumption, in severity of AR (according to ARIA classification) were compared between the 2 groups; moreover an overall assessment of clinical efficacy and tolerability was based on patients' and physicians' judgements (unsatisfactory, mild, good, optimal). Results In respect to baseline both groups showed, after 1 year, an improvement in symptoms score (P < 0.001) with a significant difference in favour of SCIT group (P < 0.05). Days of drug intake were significantly lower in patients receiving SCIT (P < 0.05). The number of patients with severe AR decreased in the first group while no variation was observed in controls. The subjective clinical overall assessment was optimal in 31 cases and good in 24 according to physicians' and patients' judgements; similarly 38 patients judged tolerability as optimal and 18 as good, whereas according to

  9. Holistic versus monomeric strategies for hydrological modelling of human-modified hydrosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalbantis, I.; Efstratiadis, A.; Rozos, E.; Kopsiafti, M.; Koutsoyiannis, D.

    2011-03-01

    The modelling of human-modified basins that are inadequately measured constitutes a challenge for hydrological science. Often, models for such systems are detailed and hydraulics-based for only one part of the system while for other parts oversimplified models or rough assumptions are used. This is typically a bottom-up approach, which seeks to exploit knowledge of hydrological processes at the micro-scale at some components of the system. Also, it is a monomeric approach in two ways: first, essential interactions among system components may be poorly represented or even omitted; second, differences in the level of detail of process representation can lead to uncontrolled errors. Additionally, the calibration procedure merely accounts for the reproduction of the observed responses using typical fitting criteria. The paper aims to raise some critical issues, regarding the entire modelling approach for such hydrosystems. For this, two alternative modelling strategies are examined that reflect two modelling approaches or philosophies: a dominant bottom-up approach, which is also monomeric and, very often, based on output information, and a top-down and holistic approach based on generalized information. Critical options are examined, which codify the differences between the two strategies: the representation of surface, groundwater and water management processes, the schematization and parameterization concepts and the parameter estimation methodology. The first strategy is based on stand-alone models for surface and groundwater processes and for water management, which are employed sequentially. For each model, a different (detailed or coarse) parameterization is used, which is dictated by the hydrosystem schematization. The second strategy involves model integration for all processes, parsimonious parameterization and hybrid manual-automatic parameter optimization based on multiple objectives. A test case is examined in a hydrosystem in Greece with high complexities

  10. Holistic versus monomeric strategies for hydrological modelling of human-modified hydrosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Nalbantis

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The modelling of human-modified basins that are inadequately measured constitutes a challenge for hydrological science. Often, models for such systems are detailed and hydraulics-based for only one part of the system while for other parts oversimplified models or rough assumptions are used. This is typically a bottom-up approach, which seeks to exploit knowledge of hydrological processes at the micro-scale at some components of the system. Also, it is a monomeric approach in two ways: first, essential interactions among system components may be poorly represented or even omitted; second, differences in the level of detail of process representation can lead to uncontrolled errors. Additionally, the calibration procedure merely accounts for the reproduction of the observed responses using typical fitting criteria. The paper aims to raise some critical issues, regarding the entire modelling approach for such hydrosystems. For this, two alternative modelling strategies are examined that reflect two modelling approaches or philosophies: a dominant bottom-up approach, which is also monomeric and, very often, based on output information, and a top-down and holistic approach based on generalized information. Critical options are examined, which codify the differences between the two strategies: the representation of surface, groundwater and water management processes, the schematization and parameterization concepts and the parameter estimation methodology. The first strategy is based on stand-alone models for surface and groundwater processes and for water management, which are employed sequentially. For each model, a different (detailed or coarse parameterization is used, which is dictated by the hydrosystem schematization. The second strategy involves model integration for all processes, parsimonious parameterization and hybrid manual-automatic parameter optimization based on multiple objectives. A test case is examined in a hydrosystem in Greece

  11. Mapping the dynamics and nanoscale organization of synaptic adhesion proteins using monomeric streptavidin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamma, Ingrid; Letellier, Mathieu; Butler, Corey; Tessier, Béatrice; Lim, Kok-Hong; Gauthereau, Isabel; Choquet, Daniel; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Park, Sheldon; Sainlos, Matthieu; Thoumine, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The advent of super-resolution imaging (SRI) has created a need for optimized labelling strategies. We present a new method relying on fluorophore-conjugated monomeric streptavidin (mSA) to label membrane proteins carrying a short, enzymatically biotinylated tag, compatible with SRI techniques including uPAINT, STED and dSTORM. We demonstrate efficient and specific labelling of target proteins in confined intercellular and organotypic tissues, with reduced steric hindrance and no crosslinking compared with multivalent probes. We use mSA to decipher the dynamics and nanoscale organization of the synaptic adhesion molecules neurexin-1β, neuroligin-1 (Nlg1) and leucine-rich-repeat transmembrane protein 2 (LRRTM2) in a dual-colour configuration with GFP nanobody, and show that these proteins are diffusionally trapped at synapses where they form apposed trans-synaptic adhesive structures. Furthermore, Nlg1 is dynamic, disperse and sensitive to synaptic stimulation, whereas LRRTM2 is organized in compact and stable nanodomains. Thus, mSA is a versatile tool to image membrane proteins at high resolution in complex live environments, providing novel information about the nano-organization of biological structures. PMID:26979420

  12. SuperNova, a monomeric photosensitizing fluorescent protein for chromophore-assisted light inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemoto, Kiwamu; Matsuda, Tomoki; Sakai, Naoki; Fu, Donald; Noda, Masanori; Uchiyama, Susumu; Kotera, Ippei; Arai, Yoshiyuki; Horiuchi, Masataka; Fukui, Kiichi; Ayabe, Tokiyoshi; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Nagai, Takeharu

    2013-01-01

    Chromophore-assisted light inactivation (CALI) is a powerful technique for acute perturbation of biomolecules in a spatio-temporally defined manner in living specimen with reactive oxygen species (ROS). Whereas a chemical photosensitizer including fluorescein must be added to specimens exogenously and cannot be restricted to particular cells or sub-cellular compartments, a genetically-encoded photosensitizer, KillerRed, can be controlled in its expression by tissue specific promoters or subcellular localization tags. Despite of this superiority, KillerRed hasn't yet become a versatile tool because its dimerization tendency prevents fusion with proteins of interest. Here, we report the development of monomeric variant of KillerRed (SuperNova) by direct evolution using random mutagenesis. In contrast to KillerRed, SuperNova in fusion with target proteins shows proper localization. Furthermore, unlike KillerRed, SuperNova expression alone doesn't perturb mitotic cell division. Supernova retains the ability to generate ROS, and hence promote CALI-based functional analysis of target proteins overcoming the major drawbacks of KillerRed.

  13. Hydrogen production from the monomeric sugars hydrolyzed from hemicellulose by Enterobacter aerogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Yunli; Wang, Jianji; Liu, Zhen; Ren, Yunlai; Li, Guozhi [School of Chemical Engineering and Pharmaceutics, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang 471039, Henan (China)

    2009-12-15

    Relatively large percentages of xylose with glucose, arabinose, mannose, galactose and rhamnose constitute the hydrolysis products of hemicellulose. In this paper, hydrogen production performance of facultative anaerobe (Enterobacter aerogenes) has been investigated from these different monomeric sugars except glucose. It was shown that the stereoisomers of mannose and galactose were more effective for hydrogen production than those of xylose and arabinose. The substrate of 5 g/l xylose resulted in a relative high level of hydrogen yield (73.8 mmol/l), hydrogen production efficiency (2.2 mol/mol) and a maximum hydrogen production rate (249 ml/l/h). The hydrogen yield, hydrogen production efficiency and the maximum hydrogen production rate reached 104 mmol/l, 2.35 mol/mol and 290 ml/l/h, respectively, on a substrate of 10 g/l galactose. The hydrogen yields and the maximum hydrogen production rates increased with an increase of mannose concentrations and reached 119 mmol/l and 518 ml/l/h on the culture of 25 g/l mannose. However, rhamnose was a relative poor carbon resource for E. aerogenes to produce hydrogen, from which the hydrogen yield and hydrogen production efficiency were about one half of that from the mannose substrate. E. aerogenes was found to be a promising strain for hydrogen production from hydrolysis products of hemicellulose. (author)

  14. Generation of transgenic Wuzhishan miniature pigs expressing monomeric red fluorescent protein by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yue; Kang, Jin-Dan; Li, Suo; Wang, Wei; Jin, Jun-Xue; Hong, Yu; Cui, Cheng-du; Yan, Chang-Guo; Yin, Xi-Jun

    2013-08-01

    Red fluorescent protein and its variants enable researchers to study gene expression, localization, and protein-protein interactions in vitro in real-time. Fluorophores with higher wavelengths are usually preferred since they efficiently penetrate tissues and produce less toxic emissions. A recently developed fluorescent protein marker, monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP1), is particularly useful because of its rapid maturation and minimal interference with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and GFP-derived markers. We generated a pCX-mRFP1-pgk-neoR construct and evaluated the ability of mRFP1 to function as a fluorescent marker in transgenic Wuzhishan miniature pigs. Transgenic embryos were generated by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) of nuclei isolated from ear fibroblasts expressing mRFP1. Embryos generated by SCNT developed into blastocysts in vitro (11.65%; 31/266). Thereafter, a total of 685 transgenic embryos were transferred into the oviducts of three recipients, two of which became pregnant. Of these, one recipient had six aborted fetuses, whereas the other recipient gave birth to four offspring. All offspring expressed the pCX-mRFP1-pgk-neoR gene as shown by PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. The transgenic pigs expressed mRFP1 in all organs and tissues at high levels. These results demonstrate that Wuzhishan miniature pigs can express mRFP1. To conclude, this transgenic animal represents an excellent model with widespread applications in medicine and agriculture.

  15. Retention mechanism for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in reversed-phase liquid chromatography with monomeric stationary phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafferty, Jake L; Siepmann, J Ilja; Schure, Mark R

    2011-12-23

    Reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) is the foremost technique for the separation of analytes that have very similar chemical functionalities, but differ only in their molecular shape. This ability is crucial in the analysis of various mixtures with environmental and biological importance including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and steroids. A large amount of effort has been devoted to studying this phenomenon experimentally, but a detailed molecular-level description remains lacking. To provide some insight on the mechanism of shape selectivity in RPLC, particle-based simulations were carried out for stationary phases and chromatographic parameters that closely mimic those in an experimental study by Sentell and Dorsey [J. Chromatogr. 461 (1989) 193]. The retention of aromatic hydrocarbons ranging in size from benzene to the isomeric PAHs of the formula C(18)H(12) was examined for model RPLC systems consisting of monomeric dimethyl octadecylsilane (ODS) stationary phases with surface coverages ranging from 1.6 to 4.2 μmol/m(2) (i.e., stationary phases yielding low to intermediate shape selectivity) in contact with a 67/33 mol% acetonitrile/water mobile phase. The simulations show that the stationary phase acts as a very heterogeneous environment where analytes with different shapes prefer different spatial regions with specific local bonding environments of the ODS chains. However, these favorable retentive regions cannot be described as pre-existing cavities because the chain conformation in these local stationary phase regions adapts to accommodate the analytes.

  16. Contribution of Monomeric Anthocyanins to the Color of Young Red Wine: Statistical and Experimental Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fu Liang; Li, Zheng; Xu, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Monomeric anthocyanin contributions to young red wine color were investigated using partial least square regression (PLSR) and aqueous alcohol solutions in this study. Results showed that the correlation between the anthocyanin concentration and the solution color fitted in a quadratic regression rather than linear or cubic regression. Malvidin-3-O-glucoside was estimated to show the highest contribution to young red wine color according to its concentration in wine, whereas peonidin-3-O-glucoside in its concentration contributed the least. The PLSR suggested that delphinidin-3-O-glucoside and peonidin-3-O-glucoside under the same concentration resulted in a stronger color of young red wine compared with malvidin-3-O-glucoside. These estimates were further confirmed by their color in aqueous alcohol solutions. These results suggested that delphinidin-3-O-glucoside and peonidin-3-O-glucoside were primary anthocyanins to enhance young red wine color by increasing their concentrations. This study could provide an alternative approach to improve young red wine color by adjusting anthocyanin composition and concentration.

  17. Model of a DNA-protein complex of the architectural monomeric protein MC1 from Euryarchaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Paquet

    Full Text Available In Archaea the two major modes of DNA packaging are wrapping by histone proteins or bending by architectural non-histone proteins. To supplement our knowledge about the binding mode of the different DNA-bending proteins observed across the three domains of life, we present here the first model of a complex in which the monomeric Methanogen Chromosomal protein 1 (MC1 from Euryarchaea binds to the concave side of a strongly bent DNA. In laboratory growth conditions MC1 is the most abundant architectural protein present in Methanosarcina thermophila CHTI55. Like most proteins that strongly bend DNA, MC1 is known to bind in the minor groove. Interaction areas for MC1 and DNA were mapped by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR data. The polarity of protein binding was determined using paramagnetic probes attached to the DNA. The first structural model of the DNA-MC1 complex we propose here was obtained by two complementary docking approaches and is in good agreement with the experimental data previously provided by electron microscopy and biochemistry. Residues essential to DNA-binding and -bending were highlighted and confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. It was found that the Arg25 side-chain was essential to neutralize the negative charge of two phosphates that come very close in response to a dramatic curvature of the DNA.

  18. Crystal structure of monomeric photosystem II from Thermosynechococcus elongatus at 3.6-a resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broser, Matthias; Gabdulkhakov, Azat; Kern, Jan; Guskov, Albert; Müh, Frank; Saenger, Wolfram; Zouni, Athina

    2010-08-20

    The membrane-embedded photosystem II core complex (PSIIcc) uses light energy to oxidize water in photosynthesis. Information about the spatial structure of PSIIcc obtained from x-ray crystallography was so far derived from homodimeric PSIIcc of thermophilic cyanobacteria. Here, we report the first crystallization and structural analysis of the monomeric form of PSIIcc with high oxygen evolution capacity, isolated from Thermosynechococcus elongatus. The crystals belong to the space group C222(1), contain one monomer per asymmetric unit, and diffract to a resolution of 3.6 A. The x-ray diffraction pattern of the PSIIcc-monomer crystals exhibit less anisotropy (dependence of resolution on crystal orientation) compared with crystals of dimeric PSIIcc, and the packing of the molecules within the unit cell is different. In the monomer, 19 protein subunits, 35 chlorophylls, two pheophytins, the non-heme iron, the primary plastoquinone Q(A), two heme groups, 11 beta-carotenes, 22 lipids, seven detergent molecules, and the Mn(4)Ca cluster of the water oxidizing complex could be assigned analogous to the dimer. Based on the new structural information, the roles of lipids and protein subunits in dimer formation of PSIIcc are discussed. Due to the lack of non-crystallographic symmetry and the orientation of the membrane normal of PSIIcc perpendicular ( approximately 87 degrees ) to the crystallographic b-axis, further information about the structure of the Mn(4)Ca cluster is expected to become available from orientation-dependent spectroscopy on this new crystal form.

  19. Design of monomeric water-soluble β-hairpin and β-sheet peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, M Angeles

    2014-01-01

    Since the first report in 1993 (JACS 115, 5887-5888) of a peptide able to form a monomeric β-hairpin structure in aqueous solution, the design of peptides forming either β-hairpins (two-stranded antiparallel β-sheets) or three-stranded antiparallel β-sheets has become a field of growing interest and activity. These studies have yielded great insights into the principles governing the stability and folding of β-hairpins and antiparallel β-sheets. This chapter provides an overview of the reported β-hairpin/β-sheet peptides focussed on the applied design criteria, reviews briefly the factors contributing to β-hairpin/β-sheet stability, and describes a protocol for the de novo design of β-sheet-forming peptides based on them. Guidelines to select appropriate turn and strand residues and to avoid self-association are provided. The methods employed to check the success of new designed peptides are also summarized. Since NMR is the best technique to that end, NOEs and chemical shifts characteristic of β-hairpins and three-stranded antiparallel β-sheets are given.

  20. Lipoamino acid-based micelles as promising delivery vehicles for monomeric amphotericin B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafim, Cláudia; Ferreira, Inês; Rijo, Patrícia; Pinheiro, Lídia; Faustino, Célia; Calado, António; Garcia-Rio, Luis

    2016-01-30

    Lipoamino acid-based micelles have been developed as delivery vehicles for the hydrophobic drug amphotericin B (AmB). The micellar solubilisation of AmB by a gemini lipoamino acid (LAA) derived from cysteine and its equimolar mixtures with the bile salts sodium cholate (NaC) and sodium deoxycholate (NaDC), as well as the aggregation sate of the drug in the micellar systems, was studied under biomimetic conditions (phosphate buffered-saline, pH 7.4) using UV-vis spectroscopy. Pure surfactant systems and equimolar mixtures were characterized by tensiometry and important parameters were determined, such as critical micelle concentration (CMC), surface tension at the CMC (γCMC), maximum surface excess concentration (Γmax), and minimum area occupied per molecule at the water/air interface (Amin). Rheological behaviour from viscosity measurements at different shear rates was also addressed. Solubilisation capacity was quantified in terms of molar solubilisation ratio (χ), micelle-water partition coefficient (KM) and Gibbs energy of solubilisation (ΔGs°). Formulations of AmB in micellar media were compared in terms of drug loading, encapsulation efficiency, aggregation state of AmB and in vitro antifungal activity against Candida albicans. The LAA-containing micellar systems solubilise AmB in its monomeric and less toxic form and exhibit in vitro antifungal activity comparable to that of the commercial formulation Fungizone.

  1. Postnatal Loss of P/Q-type Channels Confined to Rhombic Lip Derived Neurons Alters Synaptic Transmission at the Parallel Fiber to Purkinje Cell Synapse and Replicates Genomic Cacna1a Mutation Phenotype of Ataxia and Seizures in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maejima, Takashi; Wollenweber, Patric; Teusner, Lena U. C.; Noebels, Jeffrey L.; Herlitze, Stefan; Mark, Melanie D.

    2013-01-01

    Ataxia, episodic dyskinesia and thalamocortical seizures are associated with an inherited loss of P/Q-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channel function. P/Q-type channels are widely expressed throughout the neuraxis, obscuring identification of the critical networks underlying these complex neurological disorders. We recently showed that the conditional postnatal loss of P/Q-type channels in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) in mice (purky) leads to these aberrant phenotypes, suggesting that intrinsic alteration in PC output is a sufficient pathogenic factor for disease initiation. The question arises whether P/Q-type channel deletion confined to a single upstream cerebellar synapse might induce the pathophysiological abnormality of genomically inherited P/Q-type channel disorders. PCs integrate two excitatory inputs, climbing fibers from inferior olive and parallel fibers (PFs) from granule cells (GCs) that receive mossy fiber (MF) input derived from precerebellar nuclei. In this paper, we introduce a new mouse model with a selective knock-out of P/Q-type channels in rhombic lip derived neurons including PF- and MF-pathways (quirky). We found that in quirky mice, PF-PC synaptic transmission is reduced during low-frequency stimulation. Using focal light stimulation of GCs that express optogenetic light-sensitive channels, channelrhodopsin-2, we found that modulation of PC firing via GC input is reduced in quirky mice. Phenotypic analysis revealed that quirky mice display ataxia, dyskinesia and absence epilepsy. These results suggest that developmental alteration of patterned input confined to only one of the main afferent cerebellar excitatory synaptic pathways has a significant role in generating the neurological phenotype associated with the global genomic loss of P/Q-type channel function. PMID:23516282

  2. Monomeric malonate precursors for the MOCVD of HfO2 and ZrO2 thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Milanov, Andrian; Parala, Harish; Winter, Manuela; Fischer, Roland A; Devi, Anjana

    2009-01-28

    New Hf and Zr malonate complexes have been synthesized by the reaction of metal amides with different malonate ligands (L = dimethyl malonate (Hdmml), diethyl malonate (Hdeml), di-tert-butyl malonate (Hdbml) and bis(trimethylsilyl) malonate (Hbsml)). Homoleptic eight-coordinated monomeric compounds of the type ML4 were obtained for Hf with all the malonate ligands employed. In contrast, for Zr only Hdmml and Hdeml yielded the eight-coordinated monomeric compounds of the type ML4, while using the bulky Hdbml and Hbsml ligands resulted into mixed alkoxo-malonato six-coordinated compounds of the type [ML2(OR)2]. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies of all the compounds are presented and discussed, and they are found to be monomeric. The complexes are solids and in solution, they retain their monomeric nature as evidenced by NMR measurements. Compared to the classical beta-diketonate complexes, [M(acac)4] and [M(thd)4] (M = Hf, Zr; acac: acetylacetonate; thd: tetramethylheptadione), the new malonate compounds are more volatile, decompose at lower temperatures and have lower melting points. In particular, the homoleptic diethyl malonate complexes of Hf and Zr melt at temperatures as low as 62 degrees C. In addition, the compounds are very stable in air and can be sublimed quantitatively. The promising thermal properties makes these compounds interesting for metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). This was demonstrated by depositing HfO2 and ZrO2 thin films successfully with two representative Hf and Zr complexes.

  3. Neurodevelopmental Expression Profile of Dimeric and Monomeric Group 1 mGluRs: Relevance to Schizophrenia Pathogenesis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Jeremy S.; Fernandez, Francesca; Matosin, Natalie; Andrews, Jessica L.; Huang, Xu-Feng; Ooi, Lezanne; Newell, Kelly A.

    2016-01-01

    Group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1/mGluR5) play an integral role in neurodevelopment and are implicated in psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia. mGluR1 and mGluR5 are expressed as homodimers, which is important for their functionality and pharmacology. We examined the protein expression of dimeric and monomeric mGluR1α and mGluR5 in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus throughout development (juvenile/adolescence/adulthood) and in the perinatal phencyclidine (PCP) model of schizophrenia. Under control conditions, mGluR1α dimer expression increased between juvenile and adolescence (209–328%), while monomeric levels remained consistent. Dimeric mGluR5 was steadily expressed across all time points; monomeric mGluR5 was present in juveniles, dramatically declining at adolescence and adulthood (−97–99%). The mGluR regulators, Homer 1b/c and Norbin, significantly increased with age in the PFC and hippocampus. Perinatal PCP treatment significantly increased juvenile dimeric mGluR5 levels in the PFC and hippocampus (37–50%) but decreased hippocampal mGluR1α (−50–56%). Perinatal PCP treatment also reduced mGluR1α dimer levels in the PFC at adulthood (−31%). These results suggest that Group 1 mGluRs have distinct dimeric and monomeric neurodevelopmental patterns, which may impact their pharmacological profiles at specific ages. Perinatal PCP treatment disrupted the early expression of Group 1 mGluRs which may underlie neurodevelopmental alterations observed in this model. PMID:27721389

  4. Study Progress of Nervous Diseases Caused by Genetic Mutation of Voltage-gated Sodium Channel%电压门控钠离子通道相关基因突变致神经系统病变的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鲲

    2012-01-01

    电压门控钠通道是神经元启动和传播动作电位的根源,通过其快速的开放和关闭改变膜电位.当编码离子通道亚单位的基因发生突变或者表达异常,或体内出现针对通道的病理性内源物质时,通道的功能出现不同程度的削减或增强,从而导致机体整体生理功能的紊乱,导致某些先天性和后天获得性疾病.电压门控钠离子通道是离子通道的一种,其相关基因的出现异常导致的神经系统疾病主要见于癫痫、家族性偏头痛、周期性麻痹、原发性红斑肢痛症.%The voltage-gated sodium channel,changing potential through its rapid opening and closing,is the origin of generating and spreading action potential from neurons. When the mutation, abnormal expression or pathological endogeneous substances occurred in subunits of sodium channel, psychological dysfunction comes along with dysfunction in channels,which lead to some congenital or acquired disorders. The voltage-gated sodium channel is a type of ion channel, the nevous system disorders caused by the related gene abnormality include epilepsy, familial migraine, periodic paralysis and primary erythermalgia.

  5. Phenotype variation and newcomers in ion channel disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulman, D E

    1997-01-01

    Ion channels are part of a large family of macromolecules whose functions include the control and maintenance of electrical potential across cell membranes, secretion and signal transduction. Close inspection of the physiological processes involved in channel function and the secondary structure of various ion channels has served as a basis for subdividing ion channels into a number of superfamilies. The voltage-gated ion channels are one of these superfamilies. Recent work has shown that mutations in various ion channel genes are responsible for a number of neuromuscular and neurological disorders. Correlation of the various mutations with the clinical phenotype is providing us with insight into the pathophysiology of these channel proteins. Interestingly, different mutations within the same gene may cause quite distinct clinical disorders, while mutations in different channel genes may result in very similar phenotypes (genetic heterogeneity). Examples of phenotypic variation and genetic heterogeneity are presented in the context of the periodic paralytic disorders of skeletal muscle, episodic ataxia, migraine, long QT syndrome and paroxysmal dyskinesia. Some of these disorders are known to be caused by mutations in ion channel genes, while in the episodic movement disorders, ion channel genes are considered excellent candidate genes.

  6. Identification of the chromophores involved in aggregation-dependent energy quenching of the monomeric photosystem II antenna protein Lhcb5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballottari, Matteo; Girardon, Julien; Betterle, Nico; Morosinotto, Tomas; Bassi, Roberto

    2010-09-03

    Non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of excess absorbed light energy is a fundamental process that regulates photosynthetic light harvesting in higher plants. Among several proposed NPQ mechanisms, aggregation-dependent quenching (ADQ) and charge transfer quenching have received the most attention. In vitro spectroscopic features of both mechanisms correlate with very similar signals detected in more intact systems and in vivo, where full NPQ can be observed. A major difference between the models is the proposed quenching site, which is predominantly the major trimeric light-harvesting complex II in ADQ and exclusively monomeric Lhcb proteins in charge transfer quenching. Here, we studied ADQ in both monomeric and trimeric Lhcb proteins, investigating the activities of each antenna subunit and their dependence on zeaxanthin, a major modulator of NPQ in vivo. We found that monomeric Lhcb proteins undergo stronger quenching than light-harvesting complex II during aggregation and that this is enhanced by binding to zeaxanthin, as occurs during NPQ in vivo. Finally, the analysis of Lhcb5 mutants showed that chlorophyll 612 and 613, in close contact with lutein bound at site L1, are important facilitators of ADQ.

  7. Insight toward epithelial Na+ channel mechanism revealed by the acid-sensing ion channel 1 structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockand, James D; Staruschenko, Alexander; Pochynyuk, Oleh; Booth, Rachell E; Silverthorn, Dee U

    2008-09-01

    The epithelial Na(+) channel/degenerin (ENaC/DEG) protein family includes a diverse group of ion channels, including nonvoltage-gated Na(+) channels of epithelia and neurons, and the acid-sensing ion channel 1 (ASIC1). In mammalian epithelia, ENaC helps regulate Na(+) and associated water transport, making it a critical determinant of systemic blood pressure and pulmonary mucosal fluidity. In the nervous system, ENaC/DEG proteins are related to sensory transduction. While the importance and physiological function of these ion channels are established, less is known about their structure. One hallmark of the ENaC/DEG channel family is that each channel subunit has only two transmembrane domains connected by an exceedingly large extracellular loop. This subunit structure was recently confirmed when Jasti and colleagues determined the crystal structure of chicken ASIC1, a neuronal acid-sensing ENaC/DEG channel. By mapping ENaC to the structural coordinates of cASIC1, as we do here, we hope to provide insight toward ENaC structure. ENaC, like ASIC1, appears to be a trimeric channel containing 1alpha, 1beta, and 1gamma subunit. Heterotrimeric ENaC and monomeric ENaC subunits within the trimer possibly contain many of the major secondary, tertiary, and quaternary features identified in cASIC1 with a few subtle but critical differences. These differences are expected to have profound effects on channel behavior. In particular, they may contribute to ENaC insensitivity to acid and to its constitutive activity in the absence of time- and ligand-dependent inactivation. Experiments resulting from this comparison of cASIC1 and ENaC may help clarify unresolved issues related to ENaC architecture, and may help identify secondary structures and residues critical to ENaC function.

  8. Multimeric nature of voltage-gated proton channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Hans P; Kurokawa, Tatsuki; Okochi, Yoshifumi; Sasaki, Mari; Okamura, Yasushi; Larsson, H Peter

    2008-07-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels are comprised of four subunits, and each subunit has a pore domain and a voltage-sensing domain (VSD). The four pore domains assemble to form one single central pore, and the four individual VSDs control the gate of the pore. Recently, a family of voltage-gated proton channels, such as H(V) or voltage sensor only protein (VSOP), was discovered that contain a single VSD but no pore domain. It has been assumed that VSOP channels are monomeric and contain a single VSD that functions as both the VSD and the pore domain. It remains unclear, however, how a protein that contains only a VSD and no pore domain can conduct ions. Using fluorescence measurements and immunoprecipitation techniques, we show here that VSOP channels are expressed as multimeric channels. Further, FRET experiments on constructs with covalently linked subunits show that VSOP channels are dimers. Truncation of the cytoplasmic regions of VSOP reduced the dimerization, suggesting that the dimerization is caused mainly by cytoplasmic protein-protein interactions. However, these N terminus- and C terminus-deleted channels displayed large proton currents. Therefore, we conclude that even though VSOP channels are expressed mainly as dimers in the cell membrane, single VSOP subunits could function independently as proton channels.

  9. Monomeric and gemini surfactants as antimicrobial agents - influence on environmental and reference strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziróg, Anna; Brycki, Bogumił

    2015-01-01

    Quaternary ammonium salts (QAS) belong to surfactant commonly used both, in the household and in different branches of industry, primarily in the process of cleaning and disinfection. They have several positive features inter alia effectively limiting the development of microorganisms on many surfaces. In the present work, two compounds were used as biocides: hexamethylene-1,6-bis-(N,N-dimethyl-N-dodecylammonium bromide) that belongs to the gemini surfactant (GS), and its single analogue - dodecyl(trimethyl)ammonium bromide (DTAB). Two fold dilution method was used to determine the minimum concentration of compounds (MIC) which inhibit the growth of bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538 and an environmental strain), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 85327 and an environmental strain), and yeast Candida albicans (ATCC 11509 and an environmental strain). The viability of cells in liquid cultures with addition of these substances at ¼ MIC, ½ MIC and MIC concentrations were also determined. The obtained results show that DTAB inhibits the growth of bacteria at the concentration of 0.126-1.010 µM/ml, and gemini surfactant is active at 0.036-0.029 µM/ml. Therefore, GS is active at more than 17-70-fold lower concentrations than its monomeric analogue. Strains isolated from natural environment are less sensitive upon testing biocides than the references strains. Both compounds at the MIC value reduced the number of cells of all strains. The use of too low concentration of biocides can limit the growth of microorganisms, but often only for a short period of time in case of special environmental strains. Later on, they can adapt to adverse environmental conditions and begin to evolve defence mechanisms.

  10. Production of transgenic cloned pigs expressing the far-red fluorescent protein monomeric Plum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masahito; Kobayashi, Mirina; Nagaya, Masaki; Matsunari, Hitomi; Nakano, Kazuaki; Maehara, Miki; Hayashida, Gota; Takayanagi, Shuko; Sakai, Rieko; Umeyama, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Nobuyuki; Onodera, Masafumi; Nagashima, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Monomeric Plum (Plum), a far-red fluorescent protein with photostability and photopermeability, is potentially suitable for in vivo imaging and detection of fluorescence in body tissues. The aim of this study was to generate transgenic cloned pigs exhibiting systemic expression of Plum using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology. Nuclear donor cells for SCNT were obtained by introducing a Plum-expression vector driven by a combination of the cytomegalovirus early enhancer and chicken beta-actin promoter into porcine fetal fibroblasts (PFFs). The cleavage and blastocyst formation rates of reconstructed SCNT embryos were 81.0% (34/42) and 78.6% (33/42), respectively. At 36-37 days of gestation, three fetuses systemically expressing Plum were obtained from one recipient to which 103 SCNT embryos were transferred (3/103, 2.9%). For generation of offspring expressing Plum, rejuvenated PFFs were established from one cloned fetus and used as nuclear donor cells. Four cloned offspring and one stillborn cloned offspring were produced from one recipient to which 117 SCNT embryos were transferred (5/117, 4.3%). All offspring exhibited high levels of Plum fluorescence in blood cells, such as lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes. In addition, the skin, heart, kidney, pancreas, liver and spleen also exhibited Plum expression. These observations demonstrated that transfer of the Plum gene did not interfere with the development of porcine SCNT embryos and resulted in the successful generation of transgenic cloned pigs that systemically expressed Plum. This is the first report of the generation and characterization of transgenic cloned pigs expressing the far-red fluorescent protein Plum.

  11. Crystal structure of a monomeric thiolase-like protein type 1 (TLP1 from Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelanjana Janardan

    Full Text Available An analysis of the Mycobacterium smegmatis genome suggests that it codes for several thiolases and thiolase-like proteins. Thiolases are an important family of enzymes that are involved in fatty acid metabolism. They occur as either dimers or tetramers. Thiolases catalyze the Claisen condensation of two acetyl-Coenzyme A molecules in the synthetic direction and the thiolytic cleavage of 3-ketoacyl-Coenzyme A molecules in the degradative direction. Some of the M. smegmatis genes have been annotated as thiolases of the poorly characterized SCP2-thiolase subfamily. The mammalian SCP2-thiolase consists of an N-terminal thiolase domain followed by an additional C-terminal domain called sterol carrier protein-2 or SCP2. The M. smegmatis protein selected in the present study, referred to here as the thiolase-like protein type 1 (MsTLP1, has been biochemically and structurally characterized. Unlike classical thiolases, MsTLP1 is a monomer in solution. Its structure has been determined at 2.7 Å resolution by the single wavelength anomalous dispersion method. The structure of the protomer confirms that the N-terminal domain has the thiolase fold. An extra C-terminal domain is indeed observed. Interestingly, it consists of six β-strands forming an anti-parallel β-barrel which is completely different from the expected SCP2-fold. Detailed sequence and structural comparisons with thiolases show that the residues known to be essential for catalysis are not conserved in MsTLP1. Consistent with this observation, activity measurements show that MsTLP1 does not catalyze the thiolase reaction. This is the first structural report of a monomeric thiolase-like protein from any organism. These studies show that MsTLP1 belongs to a new group of thiolase related proteins of unknown function.

  12. Purification and biochemical characterization of a monomeric form of papaya mosaic potexvirus coat protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecours, Katia; Tremblay, Marie-Hélène; Gagné, Marie-Eve Laliberté; Gagné, Stéphane M; Leclerc, Denis

    2006-05-01

    Papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) is a flexuous rod shape virus made of 1400 subunits that assemble around a plus sense genomic RNA. The structure determination of PapMV and of flexuous viruses in general is a major challenge for both NMR and X-ray crystallography. In this report, we present the characterization of a truncated version of the PapMV coat protein (CP) that is suitable for NMR study. The deletion of the N-terminal 26 amino acids of the PapMV CP (CP27-215) generates a monomer that can be expressed to high level and easily purified for production of an adequate NMR sample. The RNA gel shift assay showed that CP27-215 lost its ability to bind RNA in vitro, suggesting that the multimerization of the subunit is important for this function. The fusion of a 6x His tag at the C-terminus improved the solubility of the monomer and allowed its concentration to 0.2 mM. The CD spectra of the truncated and the wild-type proteins were similar, suggesting that both proteins are well ordered and have a similar secondary structure. CP27-215 was 15N labeled for NMR studies and a 2D 1H-15N-HSQC spectrum confirmed the presence of a well-ordered structure and the monomeric form of the protein. These results show that CP27-215 is amenable to a complete and exhaustive NMR study that should lead to the first three-dimensional structure determination of a flexuous rod shape virus.

  13. Production of transgenic cloned pigs expressing the far-red fluorescent protein monomeric Plum

    Science.gov (United States)

    WATANABE, Masahito; KOBAYASHI, Mirina; NAGAYA, Masaki; MATSUNARI, Hitomi; NAKANO, Kazuaki; MAEHARA, Miki; HAYASHIDA, Gota; TAKAYANAGI, Shuko; SAKAI, Rieko; UMEYAMA, Kazuhiro; WATANABE, Nobuyuki; ONODERA, Masafumi; NAGASHIMA, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Monomeric Plum (Plum), a far-red fluorescent protein with photostability and photopermeability, is potentially suitable for in vivo imaging and detection of fluorescence in body tissues. The aim of this study was to generate transgenic cloned pigs exhibiting systemic expression of Plum using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology. Nuclear donor cells for SCNT were obtained by introducing a Plum-expression vector driven by a combination of the cytomegalovirus early enhancer and chicken beta-actin promoter into porcine fetal fibroblasts (PFFs). The cleavage and blastocyst formation rates of reconstructed SCNT embryos were 81.0% (34/42) and 78.6% (33/42), respectively. At 36–37 days of gestation, three fetuses systemically expressing Plum were obtained from one recipient to which 103 SCNT embryos were transferred (3/103, 2.9%). For generation of offspring expressing Plum, rejuvenated PFFs were established from one cloned fetus and used as nuclear donor cells. Four cloned offspring and one stillborn cloned offspring were produced from one recipient to which 117 SCNT embryos were transferred (5/117, 4.3%). All offspring exhibited high levels of Plum fluorescence in blood cells, such as lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes. In addition, the skin, heart, kidney, pancreas, liver and spleen also exhibited Plum expression. These observations demonstrated that transfer of the Plum gene did not interfere with the development of porcine SCNT embryos and resulted in the successful generation of transgenic cloned pigs that systemically expressed Plum. This is the first report of the generation and characterization of transgenic cloned pigs expressing the far-red fluorescent protein Plum. PMID:25739316

  14. Structural Analysis of Monomeric RNA-Dependent Polymerases: Evolutionary and Therapeutic Implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Jácome

    Full Text Available The crystal structures of monomeric RNA-dependent RNA polymerases and reverse transcriptases of more than 20 different viruses are available in the Protein Data Bank. They all share the characteristic right-hand shape of DNA- and RNA polymerases formed by the fingers, palm and thumb subdomains, and, in many cases, "fingertips" that extend from the fingers towards the thumb subdomain, giving the viral enzyme a closed right-hand appearance. Six conserved structural motifs that contain key residues for the proper functioning of the enzyme have been identified in all these RNA-dependent polymerases. These enzymes share a two divalent metal-ion mechanism of polymerization in which two conserved aspartate residues coordinate the interactions with the metal ions to catalyze the nucleotidyl transfer reaction. The recent availability of crystal structures of polymerases of the Orthomyxoviridae and Bunyaviridae families allowed us to make pairwise comparisons of the tertiary structures of polymerases belonging to the four main RNA viral groups, which has led to a phylogenetic tree in which single-stranded negative RNA viral polymerases have been included for the first time. This has also allowed us to use a homology-based structural prediction approach to develop a general three-dimensional model of the Ebola virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Our model includes several of the conserved structural motifs and residues described in other viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases that define the catalytic and highly conserved palm subdomain, as well as portions of the fingers and thumb subdomains. The results presented here help to understand the current use and apparent success of antivirals, i.e. Brincidofovir, Lamivudine and Favipiravir, originally aimed at other types of polymerases, to counteract the Ebola virus infection.

  15. Epilepsy-Related Slack Channel Mutants Lead to Channel Over-Activity by Two Different Mechanisms

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    Qiong-Yao Tang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Twelve sodium-activated potassium channel (KCNT1, Slack genetic mutants have been identified from severe early-onset epilepsy patients. The changes in biophysical properties of these mutants and the underlying mechanisms causing disease remain elusive. Here, we report that seven of the 12 mutations increase, whereas one mutation decreases, the channel’s sodium sensitivity. Two of the mutants exhibit channel over-activity only when the intracellular Na+ ([Na+]i concentration is ∼80 mM. In contrast, single-channel data reveal that all 12 mutants increase the maximal open probability (Po. We conclude that these mutant channels lead to channel over-activity predominantly by increasing the ability of sodium binding to activate the channel, which is indicated by its maximal Po. The sodium sensitivity of these epilepsy causing mutants probably determines the [Na+]i concentration at which these mutants exert their pathological effects.

  16. A thermosensitive mutation alters the effects of lacosamide on slow inactivation in neuronal voltage-gated sodium channels, NaV 1.2.Mena Abdelsayed1, Stanislav Sokolov1, Peter C. Ruben*1 - These authors contributed equally to this work* - Corresponding author

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mena eAbdelsayed

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a disorder characterized by seizures and convulsions. The basis of epilepsy is an increase in neuronal excitability that, in some cases, may be caused by functional defects in neuronal voltage gated sodium channels (NaVs. The C121W mutation of the β1 subunit, in particular, gives rise to the thermosensitive generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+ phenotype. Lacosamide is used to treat epileptic seizures and is distinct from other anti-seizure drugs by targeting NaV slow-inactivation. We studied the effects of 100 µM lacosamide on the biophysical properties of NaV1.2 channels associated with either WT-β1 or the mutant C121W-β1 subunit. Biophysical parameters were measured at both normal (22 °C and elevated (34 °C temperatures to elicit the differential temperature-sensitivity of C121W. Lacosamide was less effective in NaV1.2 associated with the C121W-β1 at either temperature than in NaV1.2 + WT-β1. There is also a more potent effect by lacosamide on slow inactivation at elevated temperatures. Our data suggest a modulatory role is imparted by the β1 subunit in the interaction between the drug and the channel.

  17. Mechanosensitive Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinac, Boris

    Living cells are exposed to a variety of mechanical stimuli acting throughout the biosphere. The range of the stimuli extends from thermal molecular agitation to potentially destructive cell swelling caused by osmotic pressure gradients. Cellular membranes present a major target for these stimuli. To detect mechanical forces acting upon them cell membranes are equipped with mechanosensitive (MS) ion channels. Functioning as molecular mechanoelectrical transducers of mechanical forces into electrical and/or chemical intracellular signals these channels play a critical role in the physiology of mechanotransduction. Studies of prokaryotic MS channels and recent work on MS channels of eukaryotes have significantly increased our understanding of their gating mechanism, physiological functions, and evolutionary origins as well as their role in the pathology of disease.

  18. Monomeric adiponectin increases cell viability in porcine aortic endothelial cells cultured in normal and high glucose conditions: Data on kinases activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Grossini

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We found that monomeric adiponectin was able to increase cell viability in porcine aortic endothelial cells (PAE cultured both in normal and high glucose condition. Moreover, in normal glucose condition monomeric adiponectin increased p38MAPK, Akt, ERK1/2 and eNOS phosphorylation in a dose- and time-dependent way. Also in high glucose condition monomeric adiponectin increased eNOS and above kinases phosphorylation with similar patterns but at lower extent. For interpretation of the data presented in this article, please see the research article “Monomeric adiponectin modulates nitric oxide release and calcium movements in porcine aortic endothelial cells in normal/high glucose conditions” (Grossini et al., in press [1].

  19. A monomeric methyl and hydroxypropyl methacrylate injection medium and its utility in casting blood capillaries and liver bile canaliculi for scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, T; Itoshima, T; Hitomi, K; Ohtsuka, A; Jones, A L

    1984-06-01

    A mixture of 50-60% monomeric methyl methacrylate and 40-50% monomeric 2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate was supplemented with 1.5% benzoyl peroxide (catalyst) and 1.5% N,N-dimethylaniline (accelerator) and injected into glutaraldehyde-perfusion fixed rat hypophyseal and other endocrine organ blood vessels and biliary tracts. This injection medium rapidly polymerized at room temperature and did not require partial polymerization prior to injection. Good casts of blood vessels, including the hypophyseal capillaries, were obtained for scanning electron microscopy. The monomeric methacrylate medium possesses a great advantage over previous ones, as its fluidity enables the casting of very fine vessels such as bile canaliculi. In the case of non-fixed tissues, the monomeric methacrylate medium should be injected carefully, as it is toxic and destructive to the vessels.

  20. Testing two methods to detect voltage-gated sodium channels gene mutations in Tetranychusurticae%两种方法在二斑叶螨电压门控钠离子通道基因突变检测中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨顺义; 岳秀利; 王进军; 沈慧敏; 郭金梅; 沈一凡; 周兴隆

    2014-01-01

    Target mutation produces high levels of resistance to pyrethroid insecticides in the spider mite Tet-ranychusurticae.However,as there are many techniques for detecting target mutations it would be advanta-geous to identify methods that are both economical and effective.Three mutations (L1022V,A1215D and F1538I)have been identified in the voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs)of T.urticae.We have tested the ability of two different methods,PCR product direct sequencing and polymerase chain reaction-restriction frag-ment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP),to detect these VGSC gene mutations in two field strains (WW-R and LZ-R)of T.urticae.The results of PCR product direct sequencing showed that the A1215D and F1538I mutations existed in the VGSC genes of both the WW-R and LZ-R strains,but that the F1022V mutation was not detected.The A1215D mutation was located between domains IIS6 and IIIS1 of the VGSCs,while the F1538I mutation was identified in domain IIIS6.The PCR-RFLP method,however,proved able to identify only the A1215D mutation.Our testing of these two methods shows that detecting VGSC mutations in field strains of T.urticaehas the potential to develop molecular-based monitoring that can be used to manage the species’resistance to pyrethroid insecticides.%靶标突变是二斑叶螨对拟除虫菊酯类药剂产生高抗性的重要原因,而用于靶标突变检测的方法较多,有必要寻找一种经济、灵敏且有效的方法进行突变检测。本研究根据二斑叶螨电压门控钠离子通道(voltage-gated sodi-um channels,VGSCs)基因上已报道的3个点突变(L1022V、A1215D和F1538I),采用PCR产物直接测序和限制性片段长度多态性聚合酶链反应(polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism,PCR-RFLP)两种不同的方法对二斑叶螨田间种群(WW-R和LZ-R)进行靶标VGSCs 基因突变检测。PCR产物直接测序结果显示,与SS种群相比,WW-R和LZ-R种群VGSCs基

  1. Homozygosity for dominant mutations increases severity of muscle channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzel-Hézode, Marianne; Sternberg, Damien; Tabti, Nacira; Vicart, Savine; Goizet, Cyril; Eymard, Bruno; Fontaine, Bertrand; Fournier, Emmanuel

    2010-04-01

    Muscle channelopathies caused by mutations in the SCN4A gene that encodes the muscle sodium channel are transmitted by autosomal-dominant inheritance. We report herein the first cases of homozygous patients for sodium channel mutations responsible for paramyotonia congenita (I1393T) or hypokalemic periodic paralysis (R1132Q). A parallel was drawn between this unprecedented situation and that of myotonia congenita by including patients homozygous or heterozygous for the CLCN1 I556N channel mutation, which is known for incomplete dominance and penetrance. Standardized electromyographic (EMG) protocols combining exercise and cold served as provocative tests to compare homozygotes with heterozygotes for each of the three mutations. Surface-recorded compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) were used to monitor muscle electrical activity, and myotonic discharges were evaluated by needle EMG. In heterozygous patients, exercise tests disclosed abnormal patterns of CMAP changes, which matched those previously described for similar dominant sodium and chloride channel mutations. Homozygotes showed much more severe clinical features and CMAP changes. We hypothesized that the presence of 100% defective ion channels in the homozygotes could account for the most severe phenotype. This suggests that the severity of muscle channelopathies depends both on the degree of channel impairment caused by the mutation and on the number of mutant channels engaged in the pathophysiological process. Overall, this study has practical consequences for the diagnosis of muscle channelopathies and raises new questions about their pathophysiology.

  2. Monomeric TonB and the Ton box are required for the Formation of a High-Affinity Transporter-TonB Complex†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Daniel M.; Lukasik, Stephen M.; Sikora, Arthur; Mokdad, Audrey; Cafiso, David S.

    2013-01-01

    The energy-dependent uptake of trace nutrients by Gram-negative bacteria involves the coupling of an outer membrane transport protein to the transperiplasmic protein TonB. In the present study, a soluble construct of Escherichia coli TonB (residues 33–239) was used to determine the affinity of TonB to the outer membrane transporters BtuB, FecA and FhuA. Using fluorescence anisotropy, TonB(33–239) was found to bind with high-affinity (tens of nM) to both BtuB and FhuA; however, no high-affinity binding was observed to FecA. In BtuB, the high affinity binding of TonB(33–239) was eliminated by mutations in the Ton box, which yield transport-defective protein, or by the addition of a Colicin E3 fragment, which stabilizes the Ton box in a folded state. These results indicate that transport requires a high-affinity transporter-TonB interaction that is mediated by the Ton box. Characterization of TonB(33–239) using double electron-electron resonance (DEER) demonstrates that a significant population of TonB(33–239) exists as a dimer; moreover, interspin distances are in approximate agreement with interlocked dimers observed previously by crystallography for shorter TonB fragments. When bound to the outer membrane transporter, DEER shows that the TonB(33–239) dimer is converted to a monomeric form, suggesting that a dimer-monomer conversion takes place at the outer membrane during the TonB-dependent transport cycle. PMID:23517233

  3. Monomeric TonB and the Ton box are required for the formation of a high-affinity transporter-TonB complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Daniel M; Lukasik, Stephen M; Sikora, Arthur; Mokdad, Audrey; Cafiso, David S

    2013-04-16

    The energy-dependent uptake of trace nutrients by Gram-negative bacteria involves the coupling of an outer membrane transport protein to the transperiplasmic protein TonB. In this study, a soluble construct of Escherichia coli TonB (residues 33-239) was used to determine the affinity of TonB for outer membrane transporters BtuB, FecA, and FhuA. Using fluorescence anisotropy, TonB(33-239) was found to bind with high affinity (tens of nanomolar) to both BtuB and FhuA; however, no high-affinity binding to FecA was observed. In BtuB, the high-affinity binding of TonB(33-239) was eliminated by mutations in the Ton box, which yield transport-defective protein, or by the addition of a Colicin E3 fragment, which stabilizes the Ton box in a folded state. These results indicate that transport requires a high-affinity transporter-TonB interaction that is mediated by the Ton box. Characterization of TonB(33-239) using double electron-electron resonance (DEER) demonstrates that a significant population of TonB(33-239) exists as a dimer; moreover, interspin distances are in approximate agreement with interlocked dimers observed previously by crystallography for shorter TonB fragments. When the TonB(33-239) dimer is bound to the outer membrane transporter, DEER shows that the TonB(33-239) dimer is converted to a monomeric form, suggesting that a dimer-monomer conversion takes place at the outer membrane during the TonB-dependent transport cycle.

  4. Single Enzyme Studies Reveal the Existence of Discrete Functional States for Monomeric Enzymes and How They Are “Selected” upon Allosteric Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatzakis, Nikos S.; Wei, Li; Jørgensen, Sune Klamer

    2012-01-01

    allosteric regulation of monomeric enzymes is poorly understood. Here we monitored for the first time allosteric regulation of enzymatic activity at the single molecule level. We measured single stochastic catalytic turnovers of a monomeric metabolic enzyme (Thermomyces lanuginosus Lipase) while titrating...... its proximity to a lipid membrane that acts as an allosteric effector. The single molecule measurements revealed the existence of discrete binary functional states that could not be identified in macroscopic measurements due to ensemble averaging. The discrete functional states correlate...

  5. Myoclonus epilepsy and ataxia due to KCNC1 mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliver, Karen L; Franceschetti, Silvana; Milligan, Carol J

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To comprehensively describe the new syndrome of myoclonus epilepsy and ataxia due to potassium channel mutation (MEAK), including cellular electrophysiological characterization of observed clinical improvement with fever. METHODS: We analyzed clinical, electroclinical, and neuroimaging...

  6. Total allowable concentrations of monomeric inorganic aluminum and hydrated aluminum silicates in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willhite, Calvin C; Ball, Gwendolyn L; McLellan, Clifton J

    2012-05-01

    Maximum contaminant levels are used to control potential health hazards posed by chemicals in drinking water, but no primary national or international limits for aluminum (Al) have been adopted. Given the differences in toxicological profiles, the present evaluation derives total allowable concentrations for certain water-soluble inorganic Al compounds (including chloride, hydroxide, oxide, phosphate and sulfate) and for the hydrated Al silicates (including attapulgite, bentonite/montmorillonite, illite, kaolinite) in drinking water. The chemistry, toxicology and clinical experience with Al materials are extensive and depend upon the particular physical and chemical form. In general, the water solubility of the monomeric Al materials depends on pH and their water solubility and gastrointestinal bioavailability are much greater than that of the hydrated Al silicates. Other than Al-containing antacids and buffered aspirin, food is the primary source of Al exposure for most healthy people. Systemic uptake of Al after ingestion of the monomeric salts is somewhat greater from drinking water (0.28%) than from food (0.1%). Once absorbed, Al accumulates in bone, brain, liver and kidney, with bone as the major site for Al deposition in humans. Oral Al hydroxide is used routinely to bind phosphate salts in the gut to control hyperphosphatemia in people with compromised renal function. Signs of chronic Al toxicity in the musculoskeletal system include a vitamin D-resistant osteomalacia (deranged membranous bone formation characterized by accumulation of the osteoid matrix and reduced mineralization, reduced numbers of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, decreased lamellar and osteoid bands with elevated Al concentrations) presenting as bone pain and proximal myopathy. Aluminum-induced bone disease can progress to stress fractures of the ribs, femur, vertebrae, humerus and metatarsals. Serum Al ≥100 µg/L has a 75-88% positive predictive value for Al bone disease. Chronic Al

  7. Physiologic alterations in ataxia: Channeling changes into novel therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakkottai, Vikram G.; Paulson, Henry L.

    2009-01-01

    The ataxias constitute a heterogeneous group of diseases in which cerebellar dysfunction typically underlies the major neurologic manifestations. It is increasingly clear that ataxia can result directly from mutations in ion channels or from perturbations in ion channel physiology in the absence of a primary channel defect. Neuronal dysfunction stemming from perturbed channel activity likely explains some motor deficits in episodic and degenerative ataxias. Understanding these pathophysiologic changes may reveal novel therapeutic targets for symptomatic treatment of ataxia. PMID:19822774

  8. Use of the quartz crystal microbalance to determine the monomeric friction coefficient of polyimides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtold, Mary M.

    1995-01-01

    When a thin film of polymer is coated on to a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), the QCM can be used to detect the rate of increase in weight of the polymer film as the volatile penetrant diffuses into the polymer. From this rate information the diffusion coefficient of the penetrant into the polymer can be computed. Calculations requiring this diffusion coefficient lead to values which approximate the monomeric friction coefficient of the polymer. This project has been concerned with the trial of crystal oscillating circuits suitable for driving polymer coated crystals in an atmosphere of penetrant. For these studies done at room temperature, natural rubber was used as an easily applied polymer that is readily penetrated by toluene vapors, qualities anticipated with polyimides when they are tested at T(g) in the presence of toluene. Three quartz crystal oscillator circuits were tested. The simplest circuit used +/- 5 volt dc and had a transistor to transistor logic (TTL) inverter chip that provides a 180 deg phase shift via a feed back loop. This oscillator circuit was stable but would not drive the crystal when the crystal was coated with polymer and subjected to toluene vapors. Removal of a variable resistor from this circuit increased stability but did not otherwise increase performance. Another driver circuit tested contained a two stage differential input, differential output, wide band video amplifier and also contain a feed back loop. The circuit voltage could not be varied and operated at +/- 5 volts dc; this circuit was also stable but failed to oscillate the polymer coated crystal in an atmosphere saturated with toluene vapors. The third oscillator circuit was of similar construction and relied on the same video amplifier but allowed operation with variable voltage. This circuit would drive the crystal when the crystal was submerged in liquid toluene and when the crystal was coated with polymer and immersed in toluene vapors. The frequency readings

  9. Structure/function analysis of PARP-1 in oxidative and nitrosative stress-induced monomeric ADPR formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Buelow

    Full Text Available Poly adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1 is a multifunctional enzyme that is involved in two major cellular responses to oxidative and nitrosative (O/N stress: detection and response to DNA damage via formation of protein-bound poly adenosine diphosphate-ribose (PAR, and formation of the soluble 2(nd messenger monomeric adenosine diphosphate-ribose (mADPR. Previous studies have delineated specific roles for several of PARP-1's structural domains in the context of its involvement in a DNA damage response. However, little is known about the relationship between the mechanisms through which PARP-1 participates in DNA damage detection/response and those involved in the generation of monomeric ADPR. To better understand the relationship between these events, we undertook a structure/function analysis of PARP-1 via reconstitution of PARP-1 deficient DT40 cells with PARP-1 variants deficient in catalysis, DNA binding, auto-PARylation, and PARP-1's BRCT protein interaction domain. Analysis of responses of the respective reconstituted cells to a model O/N stressor indicated that PARP-1 catalytic activity, DNA binding, and auto-PARylation are required for PARP-dependent mADPR formation, but that BRCT-mediated interactions are dispensable. As the BRCT domain is required for PARP-dependent recruitment of XRCC1 to sites of DNA damage, these results suggest that DNA repair and monomeric ADPR 2(nd messenger generation are parallel mechanisms through which PARP-1 modulates cellular responses to O/N stress.

  10. Monomeric Cu(Ⅱ) Complex Containing Chiral Phase-transfer Catalyst as Ligand and Its Asymmetrically Catalytic Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QU Zhi-Rong; XIONG Ren-Gen

    2008-01-01

    The thermal treatment of CuCl2 with N-(4'-vinylbenzyl)cinchonidinitim chloride(L1)afforded a monomeric discrete homochiral copper(Ⅱ)complex N-4'-(vinylbenzyl)cinchonidinium trichlorocoprate(Ⅱ)(1).Their applications to the enantioselectively catalytic alkylation reaction of N-(diphenylmethylidene)glycine tert-butyl ester(3)show that the higher ee value observed in catalyst 1 than that in the corresponding free ligand L1 is probably due to the rigidity enhancement after the coordination of N atom of quinoline ring to the copper ion.

  11. Two-dimensional crystallization of monomeric bovine cytochrome c oxidase with bound cytochrome c in reconstituted lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuda, Yukiho; Shinzawa-Itoh, Kyoko; Tani, Kazutoshi; Maeda, Shintaro; Yoshikawa, Shinya; Tsukihara, Tomitake; Gerle, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase utilizes electrons provided by cytochrome c for the active vectorial transport of protons across the inner mitochondrial membrane through the reduction of molecular oxygen to water. Direct structural evidence on the transient cytochrome c oxidase-cytochrome c complex thus far, however, remains elusive and its physiological relevant oligomeric form is unclear. Here, we report on the 2D crystallization of monomeric bovine cytochrome c oxidase with tightly bound cytochrome c at a molar ratio of 1:1 in reconstituted lipid membranes at the basic pH of 8.5 and low ionic strength.

  12. CNGA3 mutations in hereditary cone photoreceptor disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissinger, B; Gamer, D; Jagle, H; Giorda, R; Marx, T; Mayer, S; Tippmann, S; Broghammer, M; Jurklies, B; Rosenberg, T; Jacobson, SG; Sener, EC; Tatlipinar, S; Hoyng, CB; Castellan, C; Bitoun, P; Andreasson, S; Rudolph, G; Kellner, U; Lorenz, B; Wolff, G; Verellen-Dumoulin, C; Schwartz, M; Cremers, FPM; Apfelstedt-ylla, E; Zrenner, E; Salati, R; Sharpe, LT; Kohl, S

    2001-01-01

    We recently showed that mutations in the CNGA3 gene encoding the alpha -subunit of the cone photoreceptor cGMP-gated channel cause autosomal recessive complete achromatopsia linked to chromosome 2q11. We now report the results of a first comprehensive screening for CNGA3 mutations in a cohort of 258

  13. CNGA3 mutations in hereditary cone photoreceptor disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissinger, B; Gamer, D; Jagle, H; Giorda, R; Marx, T; Mayer, S; Tippmann, S; Broghammer, M; Jurklies, B; Rosenberg, T; Jacobson, SG; Sener, EC; Tatlipinar, S; Hoyng, CB; Castellan, C; Bitoun, P; Andreasson, S; Rudolph, G; Kellner, U; Lorenz, B; Wolff, G; Verellen-Dumoulin, C; Schwartz, M; Cremers, FPM; Apfelstedt-ylla, E; Zrenner, E; Salati, R; Sharpe, LT; Kohl, S

    2001-01-01

    We recently showed that mutations in the CNGA3 gene encoding the alpha -subunit of the cone photoreceptor cGMP-gated channel cause autosomal recessive complete achromatopsia linked to chromosome 2q11. We now report the results of a first comprehensive screening for CNGA3 mutations in a cohort of 258

  14. Positron Channeling

    CERN Document Server

    Badikyan, Karen

    2016-01-01

    The possibility of channeling the low-energy relativistic positrons around separate crystallographic axes with coaxial symmetry of negative ions in some types of crystals is shown. The process of annihilation of positrons with electrons of medium was studied in detail.

  15. Brands & Channels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alice Yang

    2009-01-01

    @@ "Brands" and "Channels" are the two most important things in Ku-Hai Chen's eyes when doing business with Main-land China. Ku-Hai Chen, Executive Director of the International Trade Institute of Taiwan External Trade Development Council (TAITRA), flies frequently between Chinese Taipei and Mainland China, and was in Beijing earlier this month for his seminar.

  16. CF Mutation Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing; Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Mutation Analysis; CFTR Mutation Analysis Formal name: Cystic Fibrosis Gene Mutation ... an elevated immunoreactive trypsinogen (IRT) or positive sweat chloride test , to confirm the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. ...

  17. Scanning and analysis of the KATP channel mutations in 12 cases of infancy onset type 1 diabetes mellitus%婴儿期起病的1型糖尿病患儿12例ATP敏感性钾通道基因突变分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任力; 杨文利; 闫洁; 吴玉筠; 桑艳梅; 朱逞; 倪桂臣

    2016-01-01

    Objective To screen the mutation of KATP channel mutations in Chinese pedigrees with infantile onset type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and neonatal diabetes mellitus.Methods A cohort of 12 children of infant onset T1DM and neonatal diabetes mellitus admitted into Beijing Children's Hospital between March 2004 and June 2013 were selected.PCR amplification and direct sequencing were used to analyze the 39 exons of ABCC8 gene and one exon of KCNJ11.And the mutational sites of the parents of the probands was sequenced in order to identify the inheritance.Results Analysis revealed ABCC8 mutation in 25% (3/12 cases) of the patients,a case of transient neonatal diabetes (TNDM),a case of permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus (PNDM) and a case of infant onset T1DM.All positive patients showed a known heterozygosis mutation in the ABCC8 gene(R1182Q,c.3545G > A,D209E,c.627C > G,E208K c.622G > A).The residue R1182Q,which was located at a position involved in joining transmembrane domain 2 to nucleotide binding domain 2,the mutations E208K and D209E were located in the intracellular region that links the transmembrane domain with the gatekeeper module.All the three mutations were located throughout the cytoplasm part of SUR1 protein.The TNDM successfully transferred from insulin to oral sulfonylureas therapy.Conclusions There is a complex genetic pathogenesis in neonatal and infant-onset diabetes.The KATP channel activating mutations is one of the main causes of neonatal diabetes mellitus and may cause T1DM in infants in China.Oral Glibenclamide therapy seems highly effective for some patients with the KATP channel activating mutations.%目的 了解ATP敏感性钾通道(KATP)基因突变致中国婴儿1型糖尿病(T1DM)及新生儿糖尿病的发病情况及致病机制.方法 选取北京儿童医院2004年3月至2013年6月住院的婴儿T1DM及新生儿糖尿病患儿12例为研究对象,应用PCR扩增和DNA直接测序技术对患儿KCNJ11

  18. Channel Power in Multi-Channel Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G. Dekimpe (Marnik); B. Skiera (Bernd)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn the literature, little attention has been paid to instances where companies add an Internet channel to their direct channel portfolio. However, actively managing multiple sales channels requires knowing the customers’ channel preferences and the resulting channel power. Two key compon

  19. Channel Power in Multi-Channel Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G. Dekimpe (Marnik); B. Skiera (Bernd)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn the literature, little attention has been paid to instances where companies add an Internet channel to their direct channel portfolio. However, actively managing multiple sales channels requires knowing the customers’ channel preferences and the resulting channel power. Two key

  20. Conditions for homogeneous preparation of stable monomeric and oligomeric forms of activated Vip3A toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunthic, Thittaya; Surya, Wahyu; Promdonkoy, Boonhiang; Torres, Jaume; Boonserm, Panadda

    2016-07-29

    Bacillus thuringiensis vegetative insecticidal proteins like Vip3A have been used for crop protection and to delay resistance to existing insecticidal Cry toxins. However, little is known about Vip3A's behavior or its mechanism of action, and a structural model is required. Herein, in an effort to facilitate future crystallization and functional studies, we have used the orthogonal biophysical techniques of light scattering and sedimentation to analyze the aggregation behavior and stability of trypsin-activated Vip3A toxin in solution. Both scattering and sedimentation data suggest that at pH 10 the toxin is monomeric and adopts an elongated shape, but after overnight incubation aggregation was observed at all pH values tested (5-12). The narrowest size distribution was observed at pH 7, but it was consistent with large oligomers of ~50 nm on average. The addition of β-D-glucopyranoside (OG) helped in achieving preparations that were stable and with a narrower particle size distribution. In this case, scattering was consistent with a 4-nm monomeric globular Vip3A form. After OG dialysis, 40-nm particles were detected, with a molecular weight consistent with homotetramers. Therefore, OG is proposed as the detergent of choice to obtain a Vip3A crystal for structural studies, either before (monomers) or after dialysis (tetramers).

  1. Structural analysis of the bright monomeric yellow-green fluorescent protein mNeonGreen obtained by directed evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavel, Damien; Gotthard, Guillaume; von Stetten, David; De Sanctis, Daniele; Pasquier, Hélène; Lambert, Gerard G; Shaner, Nathan C; Royant, Antoine

    2016-12-01

    Until recently, genes coding for homologues of the autofluorescent protein GFP had only been identified in marine organisms from the phyla Cnidaria and Arthropoda. New fluorescent-protein genes have now been found in the phylum Chordata, coding for particularly bright oligomeric fluorescent proteins such as the tetrameric yellow fluorescent protein lanYFP from Branchiostoma lanceolatum. A successful monomerization attempt led to the development of the bright yellow-green fluorescent protein mNeonGreen. The structures of lanYFP and mNeonGreen have been determined and compared in order to rationalize the directed evolution process leading from a bright, tetrameric to a still bright, monomeric fluorescent protein. An unusual discolouration of crystals of mNeonGreen was observed after X-ray data collection, which was investigated using a combination of X-ray crystallography and UV-visible absorption and Raman spectroscopies, revealing the effects of specific radiation damage in the chromophore cavity. It is shown that X-rays rapidly lead to the protonation of the phenolate O atom of the chromophore and to the loss of its planarity at the methylene bridge.

  2. Processing and storage effects on monomeric anthocyanins, percent polymeric color, and antioxidant capacity of processed blueberry products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownmiller, C; Howard, L R; Prior, R L

    2008-06-01

    This study evaluated the effects of processing and 6 mo of storage on total monomeric anthocyanins, percent polymeric color, and antioxidant capacity of blueberries that were canned in syrup (CS), canned in water (CW), pureed, and juiced (clarified and nonclarified). Total monomeric anthocyanins, percent polymeric color, and oxygen radical absorbing capacity (ORAC) assay using fluorescein (ORAC(FL)) were determined postprocessing after 1 d, and 1, 3, and 6 mo of storage. Thermal processing resulted in marked losses in total anthocyanins (28% to 59%) and ORAC(FL) values (43% to 71%) in all products, with the greatest losses occurring in clarified juices and the least in nonclarified juices. Storage at 25 degrees C for 6 mo resulted in dramatic losses in total anthocyanins, ranging from 62% in berries CW to 85% in clarified juices. This coincided with marked increases in percent polymeric color values of these products over the 6-mo storage. The ORAC(FL) values showed little change during storage, indicating that the formation of polymers compensated for the loss of antioxidant capacity due to anthocyanin degradation. Methods are needed to retain anthocyanins in thermally processed blueberries.

  3. Processing and storage effects on monomeric anthocyanins, percent polymeric color, and antioxidant capacity of processed black raspberry products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, A; Howard, L R; Prior, R L; Brownmiller, C

    2008-08-01

    This study evaluated the effects of processing and 6 mo of storage on total monomeric anthocyanins, percent polymeric color, and antioxidant capacity of black raspberries that were individually quick-frozen (IQF), canned-in-syrup, canned-in-water, pureed, and juiced (clarified and nonclarified). Total monomeric anthocyanins, percent polymeric color, and ORAC(FL) were determined 1 d postprocessing and after 1, 3, and 6 mo of storage. Thermal processing resulted in marked losses in total anthocyanins ranging from 37% in puree to 69% to 73% in nonclarified and clarified juices, respectively, but only the juices showed substantial losses (38% to 41%) in ORAC(FL). Storage at 25 degrees C of all thermally processed products resulted in dramatic losses in total anthocyanins ranging from 49% in canned-in-syrup to 75% in clarified juices. This coincided with marked increases in percent polymeric color values of these products over the 6-mo storage. ORAC(FL) values showed little change during storage, indicating that the formation of polymers compensated for the loss of antioxidant capacity due to anthocyanin degradation. Total anthocyanins and ORACFL of IQF berries were well retained during long-term storage at -20 degrees C.

  4. Interaction of Classical Platinum Agents with the Monomeric and Dimeric Atox1 Proteins: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolei Wang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We carried out molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations for a series of binary and ternary models of the cisplatin, transplatin and oxaliplatin agents binding to a monomeric Atox1 protein and a dimeric Atox1 protein to investigate their interaction mechanisms. All three platinum agents could respectively combine with the monomeric Atox1 protein and the dimeric Atox1 protein to form a stable binary and ternary complex due to the covalent interaction of the platinum center with the Atox1 protein. The results suggested that the extra interaction from the oxaliplatin ligand–Atox1 protein interface increases its affinity only for the OxaliPt + Atox1 model. The binding of the oxaliplatin agent to the Atox1 protein might cause larger deformation of the protein than those of the cisplatin and transplatin agents due to the larger size of the oxaliplatin ligand. However, the extra interactions to facilitate the stabilities of the ternary CisPt + 2Atox1 and OxaliPt + 2Atox1 models come from the α1 helices and α2-β4 loops of the Atox1 protein–Atox1 protein interface due to the cis conformation of the platinum agents. The combinations of two Atox1 proteins in an asymmetric way in the three ternary models were analyzed. These investigations might provide detailed information for understanding the interaction mechanism of the platinum agents binding to the Atox1 protein in the cytoplasm.

  5. Nonlinear channelizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In, Visarath; Longhini, Patrick; Kho, Andy; Neff, Joseph D.; Leung, Daniel; Liu, Norman; Meadows, Brian K.; Gordon, Frank; Bulsara, Adi R.; Palacios, Antonio

    2012-12-01

    The nonlinear channelizer is an integrated circuit made up of large parallel arrays of analog nonlinear oscillators, which, collectively, serve as a broad-spectrum analyzer with the ability to receive complex signals containing multiple frequencies and instantaneously lock-on or respond to a received signal in a few oscillation cycles. The concept is based on the generation of internal oscillations in coupled nonlinear systems that do not normally oscillate in the absence of coupling. In particular, the system consists of unidirectionally coupled bistable nonlinear elements, where the frequency and other dynamical characteristics of the emergent oscillations depend on the system's internal parameters and the received signal. These properties and characteristics are being employed to develop a system capable of locking onto any arbitrary input radio frequency signal. The system is efficient by eliminating the need for high-speed, high-accuracy analog-to-digital converters, and compact by making use of nonlinear coupled systems to act as a channelizer (frequency binning and channeling), a low noise amplifier, and a frequency down-converter in a single step which, in turn, will reduce the size, weight, power, and cost of the entire communication system. This paper covers the theory, numerical simulations, and some engineering details that validate the concept at the frequency band of 1-4 GHz.

  6. Charges in the cytoplasmic pore control intrinsic inward rectification and single-channel properties in Kir1.1 and Kir2.1 channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsueh-Kai; Yeh, Shih-Hao; Shieh, Ru-Chi

    2007-02-01

    An E224G mutation of the Kir2.1 channel generates intrinsic inward rectification and single-channel fluctuations in the absence of intracellular blockers. In this study, we showed that positively charged residues H226, R228 and R260, near site 224, regulated the intrinsic inward rectification and single-channel properties of the E224G mutant. By carrying out systematic mutations, we found that the charge effect on the intrinsic inward rectification and single-channel conductance is consistent with a long-range electrostatic mechanism. A Kir1.1 channel where the site equivalent to E224 in the Kir2.1 channel is a glycine residue does not show inward rectification or single-channel fluctuations. The G223K and N259R mutations of the Kir1.1 channel induced intrinsic inward rectification and reduced the single-channel conductance but did not generate large open-channel fluctuations. Substituting the cytoplasmic pore of the E224G mutant into the Kir1.1 channel induced open-channel fluctuations and intrinsic inward rectification. The single-channel conductance of the E224G mutant showed inward rectification. Also, a voltage-dependent gating mechanism decreased open probability during depolarization and contributed to the intrinsic inward rectification in the E224G mutant. In addition to an electrostatic effect, a close interaction of K(+) with channel pore may be required for generating open-channel fluctuations in the E224G mutant.

  7. Hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia and diabetes mellitus due to dominant ABCC8/KCNJ11 mutations.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kapoor, R R

    2011-10-01

    Dominantly acting loss-of-function mutations in the ABCC8\\/KCNJ11 genes can cause mild medically responsive hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia (HH). As controversy exists over whether these mutations predispose to diabetes in adulthood we investigated the prevalence of diabetes in families with dominantly inherited ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channel mutations causing HH in the proband.

  8. Genetic Mutations Associated with Pesticide Resistance in Rhipicephalus microplus and Haematobia irritans

    Science.gov (United States)

    A number of gene mutation in various arthropods have been found to be associated with pesticide resistance. Some of these mutations have been found in the two cattle pests, Rhipicephalus microplus and Haematobia irritans. Sodium channel gene mutations have been associated with pyrethroid resistance ...

  9. The gating of the CFTR channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an anion channel expressed in the apical membrane of epithelia. Mutations in the CFTR gene are the cause of cystsic fibrosis. CFTR is the only ABC-protein that constitutes an ion channel pore forming subunit. CFTR gating is regulated in complex manner as phosphorylation is mandatory for channel activity and gating is directly regulated by binding of ATP to specific intracellular sites on the CFTR protein. This review covers our current understanding on the gating mechanism in CFTR and illustrates the relevance of alteration of these mechanisms in the onset of cystic fibrosis.

  10. A myomesin mutation associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy deteriorates dimerisation properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegert, Romy; Perrot, Andreas; Keller, Sandro; Behlke, Joachim; Michalewska-Włudarczyk, Aleksandra; Wycisk, Anna; Tendera, Michal; Morano, Ingo; Ozcelik, Cemil

    2011-02-18

    Myomesin plays an important structural and functional role in the M-band of striated muscles. The C-terminal domain 13 of myomesin dimerises and forms antiparallel strands which cross-link neighboring Myosin filaments and titin in the M-line of the sarcomeres. These interactions stabilise the contractile apparatus during striated muscle contraction. Since myomesin is an important component of the M-band we screened the myomesin gene for genetic variants in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We identified the missense mutation V1490I in domain 12 of myomesin in a family with inherited HCM. Analytical ultracentrifugation experiments, circular dichroism spectra, and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy of myomesin fragments were carried out to investigate the effects of the mutation V1490I on structure and function of myomesin domains 11-13 and 12-13. Both the wild type and mutated myomesin domains My11-13 revealed similar secondary structures and formed stable dimers. Mutated myomesin domains My11-13 and My12-13 dimers revealed a reduced thermal stability and a significantly decreased dimerisation affinity, showing disturbed functional properties of V1490I mutated myomesin. However, monomeric myomesin domains My11-12, i.e. without dimerisation domain 13 showed no difference in thermal stability between wild type and V1490I mutated myomesin. In conclusion, the V1490I mutation associated with HCM lead to myomesin proteins with abnormal functional properties which affect dimerisation properties of myomesin domain 13. These effects may contribute to the pathogenesis of HCM. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The double life of connexin channels: single is a treat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzone, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    Although several genetic diseases are caused by mutations in channels made by connexin family members, there has been little progress in the development and validation of therapeutic options. An in vitro study in this issue of JID suggests that an anti-malarial drug may be beneficial in keratitis-ichthyosis deafness, a severe conexin channel disease associated with potentially fatal recurrent infections.

  12. Diagnóstico bioquímico de la hiperprolactinemia monomérica Biochemical diagnosis of monomeric hyperprolactinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rivero

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Fundamento. La prolactina se puede presentar bajo varias formas moleculares siendo la forma monomérica (PRLm la biológicamente activa. La presencia de macroprolactina (MPRL puede originar un falso diagnóstico de hiperprolactinemia debido a la interferencia en el procedimiento de medida. El objetivo ha sido desarrollar un protocolo que permita diagnosticar la hiperprolactinemia monomérica, que además sea complementario al procedimiento que detecta MPRL. Material y métodos. La población de referencia para PRLm estaba formada por 122 mujeres y 140 hombres aparentemente sanos a los que se les extrajo sangre para la cuantificación de PRL. Además, se recogieron 49 sueros (33 mujeres y 16 hombres hiperprolactinémicos. Se cuantificó PRL en todas las muestras en un Immulite 2000. La detección de MPRL y de PRLm se realizó tras precipitación con polietilenglicol. Se confirmó el resultado por cromatografía de filtración en gel. Para la obtención de los valores de referencia se siguieron las indicaciones del Panel de Expertos de la IFCC. Resultados. Los valores de referencia de PRLm fueron 3,4-26,6 μg/L y 4,6-16,4 μg/L en mujeres y varones, respectivamente. De los 49 pacientes hiperprolactinémicos, en el 57 % la concentración de PRLm tras PEG se encontraba fuera del intervalo de referencia previamente obtenido, confirmándose la presencia de hiperprolactinemia monomérica. Conclusiones. Se ha desarrollado e implantado un protocolo para la cuantificación de PRLm. La obtención de los valores de referencia de PRLm permite el diagnóstico de la hiperprolactinemia monomérica o activa de forma complementaria a la identificación de MPRL.Background. Prolactin can take several molecular forms of which the most biologically active is the monomeric form (PRLm. The presence of macroprolactin (MPRL can give rise to a false diagnosis of hyperprolactinemia due to interference in the measuring procedure. The aim was to develop a protocol that

  13. A monomeric G protein-coupled receptor isolated in a high-density lipoprotein particle efficiently activates its G protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whorton, Matthew R; Bokoch, Michael P; Rasmussen, Søren Gøgsig Faarup;

    2007-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) respond to a diverse array of ligands, mediating cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters, as well as the senses of smell and taste. The structures of the GPCR rhodopsin and several G proteins have been determined by x-ray crystallography, yet...... the organization of the signaling complex between GPCRs and G proteins is poorly understood. The observations that some GPCRs are obligate heterodimers, and that many GPCRs form both homo- and heterodimers, has led to speculation that GPCR dimers may be required for efficient activation of G proteins. However......, technical limitations have precluded a definitive analysis of G protein coupling to monomeric GPCRs in a biochemically defined and membrane-bound system. Here we demonstrate that a prototypical GPCR, the beta2-adrenergic receptor (beta2AR), can be incorporated into a reconstituted high-density lipoprotein...

  14. Flavonoid regulation of EAG1 channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Anne E.; Brelidze, Tinatin I.

    2013-01-01

    The voltage-gated, K+-selective ether á go-go 1 (EAG1) channel is expressed throughout the brain where it is thought to regulate neuronal excitability. Besides its normal physiological role in the brain, EAG1 is abnormally expressed in several cancer cell types and promotes tumor progression. Like all other channels in the KCNH family, EAG1 channels have a large intracellular carboxy-terminal region that shares structural similarity with cyclic nucleotide–binding homology domains (CNBHDs). EAG1 channels, however, are not regulated by the direct binding of cyclic nucleotides and have no known endogenous ligands. In a screen of biological metabolites, we have now identified four flavonoids as potentiators of EAG1 channels: fisetin, quercetin, luteolin, and kaempferol. These four flavonoids shifted the voltage dependence of activation toward more hyperpolarizing potentials and slowed channel deactivation. All four flavonoids regulated channel gating with half-maximal concentrations of 2–8 µM. The potentiation of gating did not require the amino-terminal or post-CNBHD regions of EAG1 channels. However, in fluorescence resonance energy transfer and anisotropy-based binding assays, flavonoids bound to the purified CNBHD of EAG1 channels. The CNBHD of KCNH channels contains an intrinsic ligand, a conserved stretch of residues that occupy the cyclic nucleotide–binding pocket. Mutations of the intrinsic ligand in EAG1 (Y699A) potentiated gating similar to flavonoids, and flavonoids did not further potentiate EAG1-Y699A channels. Furthermore, the Y699A mutant CNBHD bound to flavonoids with higher affinity than wild-type CNBHD. These results suggest that the flavonoids identified here potentiated EAG1 channels by binding to the CNBHD, possibly by displacing their intrinsic ligand. EAG1 channels should be considered as a possible target for the physiological effects of flavonoids. PMID:23440277

  15. Synthesis of monomeric and polymeric alkali and alkaline earth metal complexes using a phosphinoselenoic amide ligand in metal coordination sphere

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jayeeta Bhattacharjee; Ravi K Kottalanka; Harinath Adimulam; Tarun K Panda

    2014-09-01

    We report the monomeric complexes of magnesium and calcium of composition [M(THF){2-Ph2P(Se)N(CMe3)}2] [M= Mg (3), n = 1 andM = Ca (4), n = 2)] and polymeric complexes of potassium and barium of composition [K(THF)2{Ph2P(Se)N(CMe3)}] (2) and [K(THF)Ba{Ph2P(Se)N(CMe3)}3](5) respectively. The potassium complex 2 was readily prepared by the reaction of potassium bis(trimethylsilyl)amide with phosphinoselenoic amide ligand (1) at ambient temperature. The calcium complex 4 was prepared by two synthetic routes: in the first method, commonly known as salt metathesis reaction, the potassium complex 2 was made to react with alkaline earth metal diiodide at room temperature to afford the corresponding calcium complex. The metal bis(trimethylsilyl)amides were made to react with protic ligand 1 in the second method to eliminate the volatile bis(trimethyl)silyl amine. The magnesium complex 3 and barium complex 5 were prepared only through the first method. Solid-state structures of all the new complexes were established by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The smaller ionic radii of Mg2+ (0.72Å) and Ca2+ (0.99Å) ions form the monomeric complex, whereas the larger ions K+ (1.38Å) and Ba2+ (1.35Å) were found to form onedimensional polymeric complexes with monoanionic ligand 1. Compound 2 serves an example of magnesium complex with a Mg-Se direct bond.

  16. Modulation of human Nav1.7 channel gating by synthetic α-scorpion toxin OD1 and its analogs

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Nine different voltage-gated sodium channel isoforms are responsible for inducing and propagating action potentials in the mammalian nervous system. The Nav1.7 channel isoform plays an important role in conducting nociceptive signals. Specific mutations of this isoform may impair gating behavior of the channel resulting in several pain syndromes. In addition to channel mutations, similar or opposite changes in gating may be produced by spider and scorpion toxins binding to different parts of ...

  17. Catalyst-like modulation of transition states for CFTR channel opening and closing: New stimulation strategy exploits nonequilibrium gating

    OpenAIRE

    Csanády, László; Töröcsik, Beáta

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is the chloride ion channel mutated in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. It is an ATP-binding cassette protein, and its resulting cyclic nonequilibrium gating mechanism sets it apart from most other ion channels. The most common CF mutation (ΔF508) impairs folding of CFTR but also channel gating, reducing open probability (Po). This gating defect must be addressed to effectively treat CF. Combining single-channel and macroscopic current ...

  18. Migraine: Role of the TRESK two-pore potassium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafrenière, Ronald G; Rouleau, Guy A

    2011-11-01

    Migraine is a severe episodic headache disorder affecting one in five people. Genetic studies have identified mutations in the CACNA1, ATP1A2 and SCN1A genes in the rare familial hemiplegic migraine. Recently, a mutation in the KCNK18 gene, encoding the TRESK two-pore domain potassium channel, was described in a large family with migraine with aura. This review will elaborate on the possible role of the TRESK channel in regulating neuronal excitability, its role in migraine pathogenesis, and on promising therapeutic opportunities targeting this channel. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Order-disorder transitions govern kinetic cooperativity and allostery of monomeric human glucokinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mioara Larion

    Full Text Available Glucokinase (GCK catalyzes the rate-limiting step of glucose catabolism in the pancreas, where it functions as the body's principal glucose sensor. GCK dysfunction leads to several potentially fatal diseases including maturity-onset diabetes of the young type II (MODY-II and persistent hypoglycemic hyperinsulinemia of infancy (PHHI. GCK maintains glucose homeostasis by displaying a sigmoidal kinetic response to increasing blood glucose levels. This positive cooperativity is unique because the enzyme functions exclusively as a monomer and possesses only a single glucose binding site. Despite nearly a half century of research, the mechanistic basis for GCK's homotropic allostery remains unresolved. Here we explain GCK cooperativity in terms of large-scale, glucose-mediated disorder-order transitions using 17 isotopically labeled isoleucine methyl groups and three tryptophan side chains as sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR probes. We find that the small domain of unliganded GCK is intrinsically disordered and samples a broad conformational ensemble. We also demonstrate that small-molecule diabetes therapeutic agents and hyperinsulinemia-associated GCK mutations share a strikingly similar activation mechanism, characterized by a population shift toward a more narrow, well-ordered ensemble resembling the glucose-bound conformation. Our results support a model in which GCK generates its cooperative kinetic response at low glucose concentrations by using a millisecond disorder-order cycle of the small domain as a "time-delay loop," which is bypassed at high glucose concentrations, providing a unique mechanism to allosterically regulate the activity of human GCK under physiological conditions.

  20. Engineering an enhanced, thermostable, monomeric bacterial luciferase gene as a reporter in plant protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Boyu; Zhang, Lifeng; Song, Yunhong; Wei, Jinsong; Li, Changfu; Wang, Tietao; Wang, Yao; Zhao, Tianyong; Shen, Xihui

    2014-01-01

    The application of the luxCDABE operon of the bioluminescent bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens as a reporter has been published for bacteria, yeast and mammalian cells. We report here the optimization of fused luxAB (the bacterial luciferase heterodimeric enzyme) expression, quantum yield and its application as a reporter gene in plant protoplasts. The fused luxAB gene was mutated by error prone PCR or chemical mutagenesis and screened for enhanced luciferase activity utilizing decanal as substrate. Positive luxAB mutants with superior quantum yield were subsequently shuffled by DNase I digestion and PCR assembly for generation of recombinants with additional increases in luciferase activity in bacteria. The coding sequence of the best recombinant, called eluxAB, was then optimized further to conform to Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) codon usage. A plant expression vector of the final, optimized eluxAB gene (opt-eluxAB) was constructed and transformed into protoplasts of Arabidopsis and maize (Zea mays). Luciferase activity was dramatically increased for opt-eluxAB compared to the original luxAB in Arabidopsis and maize cells. The opt-eluxAB driven by two copies of the 35S promoter expresses significantly higher than that driven by a single copy. These results indicate that the eluxAB gene can be used as a reporter in plant protoplasts. To our knowledge, this is the first report to engineer the bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens luciferase luxAB as a reporter by directed evolution which paved the way for further improving the luxAB reporter in the future.

  1. Major Channels Involved In Neuropsychiatric Disorders And Therapeutic Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola eImbrici

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated ion channels are important mediators of physiological functions in the central nervous system. The cyclic activation of these channels influences neurotransmitter release, neuron excitability, gene transcription and plasticity, providing distinct brain areas with unique physiological and pharmacological response. A growing body of data has implicated ion channels in the susceptibility or pathogenesis of psychiatric diseases. Indeed, population studies support the association of polymorphisms in calcium and potassium channels with the genetic risk for bipolar disorders or schizophrenia. Moreover, point mutations in calcium, sodium and potassium channel genes have been identified in some childhood developmental disorders. Finally, antibodies against potassium channel complexes occur in a series of autoimmune psychiatric diseases. Here we report recent studies assessing the role of calcium, sodium and potassium channels in bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders, and briefly summarize promising pharmacological strategies targeted on ion channels for the therapy of mental illness and related genetic tests.

  2. Epidural Analgesia with Ropivacaine during Labour in a Patient with a SCN5A Gene Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. M. J. van der Knijff-van Dortmont

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available SCN5A gene mutations can lead to ion channel defects which can cause cardiac conduction disturbances. In the presence of specific ECG characteristics, this mutation is called Brugada syndrome. Many drugs are associated with adverse events, making anesthesia in patients with SCN5A gene mutations or Brugada syndrome challenging. In this case report, we describe a pregnant patient with this mutation who received epidural analgesia using low dose ropivacaine and sufentanil during labour.

  3. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of decameric and monomeric forms of C49S mutant thioredoxin-dependent AhpC from Helicobacter pylori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supangat [Division of Applied Life Science (BK21 Program), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Environmental Biotechnology National Core Research Center, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Kyung Hye; Furqoni, Ahmad [Division of Applied Life Science (BK21 Program), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Environmental Biotechnology National Core Research Center, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Research Center, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Young-Chul; Cho, Myung-Je; Rhee, Kwang-Ho [Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Yeol; Lee, Kon Ho, E-mail: lkh@gsnu.ac.kr [Division of Applied Life Science (BK21 Program), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Environmental Biotechnology National Core Research Center, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Research Center, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-01

    Decameric and monomeric forms of recombinant C49S mutant AhpC from H. pylori have been crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.8 and 2.25 Å, respectively. Cys49Ser mutant Helicobacter pylori alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (C49S HpAhpC) was purified under reducing conditions in monomeric and decameric forms. The monomeric form was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffracted to 2.25 Å resolution and belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 245.8, b = 140.7, c = 189.5 Å, β = 127°, and contained 20 molecules in the asymmetric unit. A crystal of the decameric form was obtained by the microbatch crystallization method and diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution. It belonged to space group C222, with unit-cell parameters a = 257.5, b = 417.5, c = 95.6 Å. The structure of the monomeric form of C49S HpAhpC has been solved by the molecular-replacement method.

  4. Calcium, acylation, and molecular confinement favor folding of Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase CyaA toxin into a monomeric and cytotoxic form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karst, Johanna C; Ntsogo Enguéné, V Yvette; Cannella, Sara E; Subrini, Orso; Hessel, Audrey; Debard, Sylvain; Ladant, Daniel; Chenal, Alexandre

    2014-10-31

    The adenylate cyclase (CyaA) toxin, a multidomain protein of 1706 amino acids, is one of the major virulence factors produced by Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough. CyaA is able to invade eukaryotic target cells in which it produces high levels of cAMP, thus altering the cellular physiology. Although CyaA has been extensively studied by various cellular and molecular approaches, the structural and functional states of the toxin remain poorly characterized. Indeed, CyaA is a large protein and exhibits a pronounced hydrophobic character, making it prone to aggregation into multimeric forms. As a result, CyaA has usually been extracted and stored in denaturing conditions. Here, we define the experimental conditions allowing CyaA folding into a monomeric and functional species. We found that CyaA forms mainly multimers when refolded by dialysis, dilution, or buffer exchange. However, a significant fraction of monomeric, folded protein could be obtained by exploiting molecular confinement on size exclusion chromatography. Folding of CyaA into a monomeric form was found to be critically dependent upon the presence of calcium and post-translational acylation of the protein. We further show that the monomeric preparation displayed hemolytic and cytotoxic activities suggesting that the monomer is the genuine, physiologically active form of the toxin. We hypothesize that the structural role of the post-translational acylation in CyaA folding may apply to other RTX toxins.

  5. Analysis of by-product formation and sugar monomerization in sugarcane bagasse pretreated at pilot plant scale: Differences between autohydrolysis, alkaline and acid pretreatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, van der E.C.; Bakker, R.; Zeeland, van A.N.T.; Sanchez Garcia, D.; Punt, A.M.; Eggink, G.

    2015-01-01

    Sugarcane bagasse is an interesting feedstock for the biobased economy since a large fraction is polymerized sugars. Autohydrolysis, alkaline and acid pretreatment conditions combined with enzyme hydrolysis were used on lignocellulose rich bagasse to acquire monomeric. By-products found after pretre

  6. Dual channel real-time PCR melting curve analysis-based assay for detecting of anti-tuberculosis drug-resistant mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis%双通道实时荧光PCR熔解曲线法检测结核分枝杆菌药物耐药相关基因突变

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳清云; 罗涛; 李静; 梅建; 高谦

    2013-01-01

    目的 基于双标记荧光探针熔解曲线分析技术,建立一种利用实时荧光PCR快速检测结核分枝杆菌耐药突变的方法.方法 根据结核分枝杆菌一线药物常见耐药突变位点(包括rpoB 81 bp耐药决定区、inhA启动子、katG315、ahpC启动子以及embB306)设计6条荧光双标记探针和对应引物,通过PCR扩增耐药突变位点所在基因片段,在扩增完成后通过熔解曲线检测分析实现对耐药突变的快速检测.通过对2008年上海市疾控中心收集的76株临床耐多药(MDR)菌株进行检测,验证本方法的敏感度和特异度.结果 本方法成功从76株MDR菌株中检测出相关耐药突变,各种突变对应ATm值范围为1.8~14.4℃.将检测结果和测序结果对比表明该方法检测敏感度和特异度都为100%(rpoB,80/80:inhA,7/7;katG315,59/59;ahpC,8/8;embB306,27/27).本方法可以成功从最低浓度为100拷贝/μl的结核分枝杆菌DNA样本中准确地检测耐药突变.结论 双通道实时荧光PCR熔解曲线法可以快速灵敏地检测结核分枝杆菌常见耐药突变.该方法具有检测迅速准确、结果易判读、交叉污染概率低等特点,可用于快速检测临床结核耐药相关的基因突变,并对结核耐药情况进行评估.%Objective Based on dual channel melting curve analysis-based assay,we developed a method to rapidly detect the drug-resistant mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis through real-time PCR.Methods According to the common first-line drug-resistant mutations of Mycobacterium tuberculosis,we designed six dual-labeled fluorescence probes to rapidly detect the drug-resistant mutations through realtime PCR melting curve after amplifications of drug-resistant related gene region of DNA.The targets include rpoB 81 bp core region,katG315,inhA promoter,ahpC promoter and embB306.To validate the sensitivity and specificity of our method,we performed real-time PCR assays to detect drug-resistant mutations in 76

  7. Molecular biology of insect sodium channels and pyrethroid resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ke; Du, Yuzhe; Rinkevich, Frank; Nomura, Yoshiko; Xu, Peng; Wang, Lingxin; Silver, Kristopher; Zhorov, Boris S

    2014-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are essential for the initiation and propagation of the action potential in neurons and other excitable cells. Because of their critical roles in electrical signaling, sodium channels are targets of a variety of naturally occurring and synthetic neurotoxins, including several classes of insecticides. This review is intended to provide an update on the molecular biology of insect sodium channels and the molecular mechanism of pyrethroid resistance. Although mammalian and insect sodium channels share fundamental topological and functional properties, most insect species carry only one sodium channel gene, compared to multiple sodium channel genes found in each mammalian species. Recent studies showed that two posttranscriptional mechanisms, alternative splicing and RNA editing, are involved in generating functional diversity of sodium channels in insects. More than 50 sodium channel mutations have been identified to be responsible for or associated with knockdown resistance (kdr) to pyrethroids in various arthropod pests and disease vectors. Elucidation of molecular mechanism of kdr led to the identification of dual receptor sites of pyrethroids on insect sodium channels. Many of the kdr mutations appear to be located within or close to the two receptor sites. The accumulating knowledge of insect sodium channels and their interactions with insecticides provides a foundation for understanding the neurophysiology of sodium channels in vivo and the development of new and safer insecticides for effective control of arthropod pests and human disease vectors.

  8. Molecular Biology of Insect Sodium Channels and Pyrethroid Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ke; Du, Yuzhe; Rinkevich, Frank; Nomura, Yoshiko; Xu, Peng; Wang, Lingxin; Silver, Kristopher; Zhorov, Boris S.

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are essential for the initiation and propagation of the action potential in neurons and other excitable cells. Because of their critical roles in electrical signaling, sodium channels are targets of a variety of naturally occurring and synthetic neurotoxins, including several classes of insecticides. This review is intended to provide an update on the molecular biology of insect sodium channels and the molecular mechanism of pyrethroid resistance. Although mammalian and insect sodium channels share fundamental topological and functional properties, most insect species carry only one sodium channel gene, compared to multiple sodium channel genes found in each mammalian species. Recent studies showed that two posttranscriptional mechanisms, alternative splicing and RNA editing, are involved in generating functional diversity of sodium channels in insects. More than 50 sodium channel mutations have been identified to be responsible for or associated with knockdown resistance (kdr) to pyrethroids in various arthropod pests and disease vectors. Elucidation of molecular mechanism of kdr led to the identification of dual receptor sites of pyrethroids on insect sodium channels. Most of the kdr mutations appear to be located within or close to the two receptor sites. The accumulating knowledge of insect sodium channels and their interactions with insecticides provides a foundation for understanding the neurophysiology of sodium channels in vivo and the development of new and safer insecticides for effective control of arthropod pests and human disease vectors. PMID:24704279

  9. Interpreting the functional role of a novel interaction motif in prokaryotic sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sula, Altin; Wallace, B A

    2017-06-05

    Voltage-gated sodium channels enable the translocation of sodium ions across cell membranes and play crucial roles in electrical signaling by initiating the action potential. In humans, mutations in sodium channels give rise to several neurological and cardiovascular diseases, and hence they are targets for pharmaceutical drug developments. Prokaryotic sodium channel crystal structures have provided detailed views of sodium channels, which by homology have suggested potentially important functionally related structural features in human sodium channels. A new crystal structure of a full-length prokaryotic channel, NavMs, in a conformation we proposed to represent the open, activated state, has revealed a novel interaction motif associated with channel opening. This motif is associated with disease when mutated in human sodium channels and plays an important and dynamic role in our new model for channel activation. © 2017 Sula and Wallace.

  10. Ferritin Protein Nanocage Ion Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosha, Takehiko; Behera, Rabindra K.; Ng, Ho-Leung; Bhattasali, Onita; Alber, Tom; Theil, Elizabeth C.

    2012-01-01

    Ferritin protein nanocages, self-assembled from four-α-helix bundle subunits, use Fe2+ and oxygen to synthesize encapsulated, ferric oxide minerals. Ferritin minerals are iron concentrates stored for cell growth. Ferritins are also antioxidants, scavenging Fenton chemistry reactants. Channels for iron entry and exit consist of helical hairpin segments surrounding the 3-fold symmetry axes of the ferritin nanocages. We now report structural differences caused by amino acid substitutions in the Fe2+ ion entry and exit channels and at the cytoplasmic pores, from high resolution (1.3–1.8 Å) protein crystal structures of the eukaryotic model ferritin, frog M. Mutations that eliminate conserved ionic or hydrophobic interactions between Arg-72 and Asp-122 and between Leu-110 and Leu-134 increase flexibility in the ion channels, cytoplasmic pores, and/or the N-terminal extensions of the helix bundles. Decreased ion binding in the channels and changes in ordered water are also observed. Protein structural changes coincide with increased Fe2+ exit from dissolved, ferric minerals inside ferritin protein cages; Fe2+ exit from ferritin cages depends on a complex, surface-limited process to reduce and dissolve the ferric mineral. High concentrations of bovine serum albumin or lysozyme (protein crowders) to mimic the cytoplasm restored Fe2+ exit in the variants to wild type. The data suggest that fluctuations in pore structure control gating. The newly identified role of the ferritin subunit N-terminal extensions in gating Fe2+ exit from the cytoplasmic pores strengthens the structural and functional analogies between ferritin ion channels in the water-soluble protein assembly and membrane protein ion channels gated by cytoplasmic N-terminal peptides. PMID:22362775

  11. Transgenic Animal Mutation Assays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Chen; Ph.D.D.A.B.T.

    2005-01-01

    @@ The novel transgenic mouse and rat mutation assays have provided a tool for analyzing in vivo mutation in any tissue, thus permitting the direct comparison of cancer incidence with mutant frequency.

  12. Dental enamel cells express functional SOCE channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurbaeva, Meerim K; Eckstein, Miriam; Concepcion, Axel R; Smith, Charles E; Srikanth, Sonal; Paine, Michael L; Gwack, Yousang; Hubbard, Michael J; Feske, Stefan; Lacruz, Rodrigo S

    2015-10-30

    Dental enamel formation requires large quantities of Ca(2+) yet the mechanisms mediating Ca(2+) dynamics in enamel cells are unclear. Store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) channels are important Ca(2+) influx mechanisms in many cells. SOCE involves release of Ca(2+) from intracellular pools followed by Ca(2+) entry. The best-characterized SOCE channels are the Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels. As patients with mutations in the CRAC channel genes STIM1 and ORAI1 show abnormal enamel mineralization, we hypothesized that CRAC channels might be an important Ca(2+) uptake mechanism in enamel cells. Investigating primary murine enamel cells, we found that key components of CRAC channels (ORAI1, ORAI2, ORAI3, STIM1, STIM2) were expressed and most abundant during the maturation stage of enamel development. Furthermore, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) but not ryanodine receptor (RyR) expression was high in enamel cells suggesting that IP3Rs are the main ER Ca(2+) release mechanism. Passive depletion of ER Ca(2+) stores with thapsigargin resulted in a significant raise in [Ca(2+)]i consistent with SOCE. In cells pre-treated with the CRAC channel blocker Synta-66 Ca(2+) entry was significantly inhibited. These data demonstrate that enamel cells have SOCE mediated by CRAC channels and implicate them as a mechanism for Ca(2+) uptake in enamel formation.

  13. Functional architecture of the CFTR chloride channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsdell, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of membrane transport proteins. CFTR is unique among ABC proteins in that it functions not as an active transporter but as an ATP-gated Cl(-) channel. As an ion channel, the function of the CFTR transmembrane channel pore that mediates Cl(-) movement has been studied in great detail. On the other hand, only low resolution structural data is available on the transmembrane parts of the protein. The structure of the channel pore has, however, been modeled on the known structure of active transporter ABC proteins. Currently, significant barriers exist to building a unified view of CFTR pore structure and function. Reconciling functional data on the channel with indirect structural data based on other proteins with very different transport functions and substrates has proven problematic. This review summarizes current structural and functional models of the CFTR Cl(-) channel pore, including a comprehensive review of previous electrophysiological investigations of channel structure and function. In addition, functional data on the three-dimensional arrangement of pore-lining helices, as well as contemporary hypotheses concerning conformational changes in the pore that occur during channel opening and closing, are discussed. Important similarities and differences between different models of the pore highlight current gaps in our knowledge of CFTR structure and function. In order to fill these gaps, structural and functional models of the membrane-spanning pore need to become better integrated.

  14. Voltage-gated Calcium Channels and Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitenkamp, Alexandra F; Matthes, Jan; Herzig, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder is a complex-genetic disease and its etiology is unknown for the majority of cases. So far, more than one hundred different susceptibility genes were detected. Voltage-gated calcium channels are among the candidates linked to autism spectrum disorder by results of genetic studies. Mutations of nearly all pore-forming and some auxiliary subunits of voltage gated calcium channels have been revealed from investigations of autism spectrum disorder patients and populations. Though there are only few electrophysiological characterizations of voltage-gated calcium channel mutations found in autistic patients these studies suggest their functional relevance. In summary, both genetic and functional data suggest a potential role of voltage-gated calcium channels in autism spectrum disorder. Future studies require refinement of the clinical and systems biological concepts of autism spectrum disorder and an appropriate holistic approach at the molecular level, e.g. regarding all facets of calcium channel functions.

  15. Kv7 channels can function without constitutive calmodulin tethering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Camilo Gómez-Posada

    Full Text Available M-channels are voltage-gated potassium channels composed of Kv7.2-7.5 subunits that serve as important regulators of neuronal excitability. Calmodulin binding is required for Kv7 channel function and mutations in Kv7.2 that disrupt calmodulin binding cause Benign Familial Neonatal Convulsions (BFNC, a dominantly inherited human epilepsy. On the basis that Kv7.2 mutants deficient in calmodulin binding are not functional, calmodulin has been defined as an auxiliary subunit of Kv7 channels. However, we have identified a presumably phosphomimetic mutation S511D that permits calmodulin-independent function. Thus, our data reveal that constitutive tethering of calmodulin is not required for Kv7 channel function.

  16. Kv7 Channels Can Function without Constitutive Calmodulin Tethering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberdi, Araitz; Alaimo, Alessandro; Etxeberría, Ainhoa; Fernández-Orth, Juncal; Zamalloa, Teresa; Roura-Ferrer, Meritxell; Villace, Patricia; Areso, Pilar; Casis, Oscar; Villarroel, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    M-channels are voltage-gated potassium channels composed of Kv7.2-7.5 subunits that serve as important regulators of neuronal excitability. Calmodulin binding is required for Kv7 channel function and mutations in Kv7.2 that disrupt calmodulin binding cause Benign Familial Neonatal Convulsions (BFNC), a dominantly inherited human epilepsy. On the basis that Kv7.2 mutants deficient in calmodulin binding are not functional, calmodulin has been defined as an auxiliary subunit of Kv7 channels. However, we have identified a presumably phosphomimetic mutation S511D that permits calmodulin-independent function. Thus, our data reveal that constitutive tethering of calmodulin is not required for Kv7 channel function. PMID:21980481

  17. Voltage-sensor mutations in channelopathies of skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Stephen C

    2010-01-01

    Mutations of voltage-gated ion channels cause several channelopathies of skeletal muscle, which present clinically with myotonia, periodic paralysis, or a combination of both. Expression studies have revealed both loss-of-function and gain-of-function defects for the currents passed by mutant channels. In many cases, these functional changes could be mechanistically linked to the defects of fibre excitability underlying myotonia or periodic paralysis. One remaining enigma was the basis for depolarization-induced weakness in hypokalaemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP) arising from mutations in either sodium or calcium channels. Curiously, 14 of 15 HypoPP mutations are at arginines in S4 voltage sensors, and recent observations show that these substitutions support an alternative pathway for ion conduction, the gating pore, that may be the source of the aberrant depolarization during an attack of paralysis. PMID:20156847

  18. Selective permeability of gap junction channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Gary S; Valiunas, Virginijus; Brink, Peter R

    2004-03-23

    Gap junctions mediate the transfer of small cytoplasmic molecules between adjacent cells. A family of gap junction proteins exist that form channels with unique properties, and differ in their ability to mediate the transfer of specific molecules. Mutations in a number of individual gap junction proteins, called connexins, cause specific human diseases. Therefore, it is important to understand how gap junctions selectively move molecules between cells. Rules that dictate the ability of a molecule to travel through gap junction channels are complex. In addition to molecular weight and size, the ability of a solute to transverse these channels depends on its net charge, shape, and interactions with specific connexins that constitute gap junctions in particular cells. This review presents some data and interpretations pertaining to mechanisms that govern the differential transfer of signals through gap junction channels.

  19. Maize Mutator transposon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yijun WANG; Mingliang XU; Dexiang DENG; Yunlong BIAN

    2008-01-01

    Transposable elements are widely distributed in eukaryotes. Due to its high copy numbers, high forward mutation rate and preferential insertion into low-copy DNA sequences, among others, the Mutator system has been widely used as a mutagen in genomic research. The discovery, classification, transposition specificity and epige-netic regulation of Mutator transposons were described. The application of Mutator tagging in plant genomic research was also presented. The role of Mu-like elements in genome evolution was briefly depicted. Moreover, the direction of Mutator transposon research in the future was discussed.

  20. Potassium channels and human epileptic phenotypes: an updated overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara eVilla

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Potassium (K+ channels are expressed in almost every cells and are ubiquitous in neuronal and glial cell membranes. These channels have been implicated in different disorders, in particular in epilepsy. K+ channel diversity depends on the presence in the human genome of a large number of genes either encoding pore-forming or accessory subunits. More than 80 genes encoding the K+ channels were cloned and they represent the largest group of ion channels regulating the electrical activity of cells in different tissues, including the brain. It is therefore not surprising that mutations in these genes lead to K+ channels dysfunctions linked to inherited epilepsy in humans and non-human model animals.This article reviews genetic and molecular progresses in exploring the pathogenesis of different human epilepsies, with special emphasis on the role of K+ channels in monogenic forms.

  1. Monomeric, porous type II collagen scaffolds promote chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaddon, M.; Burrows, M.; Ferreira, S. A.; Dazzi, F.; Apperley, J. F.; Bradshaw, A.; Brand, D. D.; Czernuszka, J.; Gentleman, E.

    2017-03-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common cause of pain and disability and is often associated with the degeneration of articular cartilage. Lesions to the articular surface, which are thought to progress to OA, have the potential to be repaired using tissue engineering strategies; however, it remains challenging to instruct cell differentiation within a scaffold to produce tissue with appropriate structural, chemical and mechanical properties. We aimed to address this by driving progenitor cells to adopt a chondrogenic phenotype through the tailoring of scaffold composition and physical properties. Monomeric type-I and type-II collagen scaffolds, which avoid potential immunogenicity associated with fibrillar collagens, were fabricated with and without chondroitin sulfate (CS) and their ability to stimulate the chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells was assessed. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that cells produced abundant collagen type-II on type-II scaffolds and collagen type-I on type-I scaffolds. Gene expression analyses indicated that the addition of CS – which was released from scaffolds quickly – significantly upregulated expression of type II collagen, compared to type-I and pure type-II scaffolds. We conclude that collagen type-II and CS can be used to promote a more chondrogenic phenotype in the absence of growth factors, potentially providing an eventual therapy to prevent OA.

  2. Monomeric, porous type II collagen scaffolds promote chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaddon, M; Burrows, M; Ferreira, S A; Dazzi, F; Apperley, J F; Bradshaw, A; Brand, D D; Czernuszka, J; Gentleman, E

    2017-03-03

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common cause of pain and disability and is often associated with the degeneration of articular cartilage. Lesions to the articular surface, which are thought to progress to OA, have the potential to be repaired using tissue engineering strategies; however, it remains challenging to instruct cell differentiation within a scaffold to produce tissue with appropriate structural, chemical and mechanical properties. We aimed to address this by driving progenitor cells to adopt a chondrogenic phenotype through the tailoring of scaffold composition and physical properties. Monomeric type-I and type-II collagen scaffolds, which avoid potential immunogenicity associated with fibrillar collagens, were fabricated with and without chondroitin sulfate (CS) and their ability to stimulate the chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells was assessed. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that cells produced abundant collagen type-II on type-II scaffolds and collagen type-I on type-I scaffolds. Gene expression analyses indicated that the addition of CS - which was released from scaffolds quickly - significantly upregulated expression of type II collagen, compared to type-I and pure type-II scaffolds. We conclude that collagen type-II and CS can be used to promote a more chondrogenic phenotype in the absence of growth factors, potentially providing an eventual therapy to prevent OA.

  3. Age-dependent preferential dense-core vesicle exocytosis in neuroendocrine cells revealed by newly developed monomeric fluorescent timer protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Takashi; Kitaguchi, Tetsuya; Karasawa, Satoshi; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Although it is evident that only a few secretory vesicles accumulating in neuroendocrine cells are qualified to fuse with the plasma membrane and release their contents to the extracellular space, the molecular mechanisms that regulate their exocytosis are poorly understood. For example, it has been controversial whether secretory vesicles are exocytosed randomly or preferentially according to their age. Using a newly developed protein-based fluorescent timer, monomeric Kusabira Green Orange (mK-GO), which changes color with a predictable time course, here we show that small GTPase Rab27A effectors regulate age-dependent exocytosis of secretory vesicles in PC12 cells. When the vesicles were labeled with mK-GO-tagged neuropeptide Y or tissue-type plasminogen activator, punctate structures with green or red fluorescence were observed. Application of high [K(+)] stimulation induced exocytosis of new (green) fluorescent secretory vesicles but not of old (red) vesicles. Overexpression or depletion of rabphilin and synaptotagmin-like protein4-a (Slp4-a), which regulate exocytosis positively and negatively, respectively, disturbed the age-dependent exocytosis of the secretory vesicles in different manners. Our results suggest that coordinate functions of the two effectors of Rab27A, rabphilin and Slp4-a, are required for regulated secretory pathway.

  4. Differing modes of interaction between monomeric Aβ(1-40) peptides and model lipid membranes: an AFM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Khizar; Giordani, Cristiano; McManus, Jennifer J; Hovgaard, Mads Bruun; Jarvis, Suzanne P

    2012-02-01

    Membrane interactions with β-amyloid peptides are implicated in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease and cholesterol has been shown to be key modulator of this interaction, yet little is known about the mechanism of this interaction. Using atomic force microscopy, we investigated the interaction of monomeric Aβ(1-40) peptides with planar mica-supported bilayers composed of DOPC and DPPC containing varying concentrations of cholesterol. We show that below the bilayer melting temperature, Aβ monomers adsorb to, and assemble on, the surface of DPPC bilayers to form layers that grow laterally and normal to the bilayer plane. Above the bilayer melting temperature, we observe protofibril formation. In contrast, in DOPC bilayers, Aβ monomers exhibit a detergent-like action, forming defects in the bilayer structure. The kinetics of both modes of interaction significantly increases with increasing membrane cholesterol content. We conclude that the mode and rate of the interaction of Aβ monomers with lipid bilayers are strongly dependent on lipid composition, phase state and cholesterol content.

  5. The full-length cell-cell fusogen EFF-1 is monomeric and upright on the membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeev-Ben-Mordehai, Tzviya; Vasishtan, Daven; Siebert, C. Alistair; Grünewald, Kay

    2014-05-01

    Fusogens are membrane proteins that remodel lipid bilayers to facilitate membrane merging. Although several fusogen ectodomain structures have been solved, structural information on full-length, natively membrane-anchored fusogens is scarce. Here we present the electron cryo microscopy three-dimensional reconstruction of the Caenorhabditis elegans epithelial fusion failure 1 (EFF-1) protein natively anchored in cell-derived membrane vesicles. This reveals a membrane protruding, asymmetric, elongated monomer. Flexible fitting of a protomer of the EFF-1 crystal structure, which is homologous to viral class-II fusion proteins, shows that EFF-1 has a hairpin monomeric conformation before fusion. These structural insights, when combined with our observations of membrane-merging intermediates between vesicles, enable us to propose a model for EFF-1 mediated fusion. This process, involving identical proteins on both membranes to be fused, follows a mechanism that shares features of SNARE-mediated fusion while using the structural building blocks of the unilaterally acting class-II viral fusion proteins.

  6. Recessive inheritance and variable penetrance of slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndromes (Retracted Article. See vol 72, pg 294, 2009)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croxen, R; Hatton, C; Shelley, C; Brydson, M; Chauplannaz, G; Oosterhuis, H; Vincent, A; Newsom-Davis, J; Colquhoun, D; Beeson, D

    2002-01-01

    Background: Slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndromes (SCCMS) typically show dominant inheritance. They are caused by missense mutations within the subunits of muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChR) that result in prolonged ion channel activations. SCCMS mutations within the AChR a

  7. Pharmacological rescue of trafficking-impaired ATP-sensitive potassium channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory M. Martin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP channels link cell metabolism to membrane excitability and are involved in a wide range of physiological processes including hormone secretion, control of vascular tone, and protection of cardiac and neuronal cells against ischemic injuries. In pancreatic β-cells, KATP channels play a key role in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, and gain or loss of channel function results in neonatal diabetes or congenital hyperinsulinism, respectively. The β-cell KATP channel is formed by co-assembly of four Kir6.2 inwardly rectifying potassium channel subunits encoded by KCNJ11 and four sulfonylurea receptor 1 subunits encoded by ABCC8. Many mutations in ABCC8 or KCNJ11 cause loss of channel function, thus congenital hyperinsulinism by hampering channel biogenesis and hence trafficking to the cell surface. The trafficking defects caused by a subset of these mutations can be corrected by sulfonylureas, KATP channel antagonists that have long been used to treat type 2 diabetes. More recently, carbamazepine, an anticonvulsant that is thought to target primarily voltage-gated sodium channels has been shown to correct KATP channel trafficking defects. This article reviews studies to date aimed at understanding the mechanisms by which mutations impair channel biogenesis and trafficking and the mechanisms by which pharmacological ligands overcome channel trafficking defects. Insight into channel structure-function relationship and therapeutic implications from these studies are discussed.

  8. Calcium channels, neuromuscular synaptic transmission and neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano, Francisco J; Pagani, Mario R; Uchitel, Osvaldo D

    2008-09-15

    Voltage-dependent calcium channels are essential in neuronal signaling and synaptic transmission, and their functional alterations underlie numerous human disorders whether monogenic (e.g., ataxia, migraine, etc.) or autoimmune. We review recent work on Ca(V)2.1 or P/Q channelopathies, mostly using neuromuscular junction preparations, and focus specially on the functional hierarchy among the calcium channels recruited to mediate neurotransmitter release when Ca(V)2.1 channels are mutated or depleted. In either case, synaptic transmission is greatly compromised; evidently, none of the reported functional replacements with other calcium channels compensates fully.

  9. Recent genetic discoveries implicating ion channels in human cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Alfred L

    2014-04-01

    The term 'channelopathy' refers to human genetic disorders caused by mutations in genes encoding ion channels or their interacting proteins. Recent advances in this field have been enabled by next-generation DNA sequencing strategies such as whole exome sequencing with several intriguing and unexpected discoveries. This review highlights important discoveries implicating ion channels or ion channel modulators in cardiovascular disorders including cardiac arrhythmia susceptibility, cardiac conduction phenotypes, pulmonary and systemic hypertension. These recent discoveries further emphasize the importance of ion channels in the pathophysiology of human disease and as important druggable targets.

  10. Regulation of heartbeat by G protein-coupled ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, A M

    1990-12-01

    The coupling of ion channels to receptors by G proteins is the subject of this American Physiological Society Walter B. Cannon Memorial "Physiology in Perspective" Lecture. This subject is particularly appropriate because it includes a molecular explanation of a homeostatic mechanism involving the autonomic nervous system and the latter subject preoccupied Dr. Cannon during most of his career. With the use of reconstitution methods, we and others have shown that heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding (G) proteins couple receptors to ion channels by both membrane-delimited, direct pathways and cytoplasmic second messenger pathways. Furthermore, one set of receptors may be coupled to as many as three different sets of ion channels to form networks. Dual G protein pathways lead to the prediction of biphasic ion current responses in cell signaling, and this prediction was confirmed. In sinoatrial pacemaker cells, the pacemaking hyperpolarization-activated inward current (If) is directly regulated by the G proteins Gs and Go, and the two can act simultaneously. This could explain the classical observation that vagal inhibition of heart rate is greater during sympathetic stimulation. Because deactivation of the muscarinic response occurs much faster than the G protein alpha-subunit hydrolyzes guanosine 5'-triphosphate, we looked for accessory cellular factors. A surprising result was that the small monomeric ras G protein blocked the muscarinic pathway. The significance of this observation is unknown, but it appears that small and large G proteins may interact in ion channel signaling pathways.

  11. Cardiac ion channels in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Ahmad S; Tan, Hanno L; Wilde, Arthur A M

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac electrical activity depends on the coordinated propagation of excitatory stimuli through the heart and, as a consequence, the generation of action potentials in individual cardiomyocytes. Action potential formation results from the opening and closing (gating) of ion channels that are expressed within the sarcolemma of cardiomyocytes. Ion channels possess distinct genetic, molecular, pharmacologic, and gating properties and exhibit dissimilar expression levels within different cardiac regions. By gating, ion channels permit ion currents across the sarcolemma, thereby creating the different phases of the action potential (e.g., resting phase, depolarization, repolarization). The importance of ion channels in maintaining normal heart rhythm is reflected by the increased incidence of arrhythmias in inherited diseases that are linked to mutations in genes encoding ion channels or their accessory proteins and in acquired diseases that are associated with changes in ion channel expression levels or gating properties. This review discusses ion channels that contribute to action potential formation in healthy hearts and their role in inherited and acquired diseases.

  12. Dysfunctional HCN ion channels in neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiFrancesco, Jacopo C; DiFrancesco, Dario

    2015-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are expressed as four different isoforms (HCN1-4) in the heart and in the central and peripheral nervous systems. HCN channels are activated by membrane hyperpolarization at voltages close to resting membrane potentials and carry the hyperpolarization-activated current, dubbed If (funny current) in heart and Ih in neurons. HCN channels contribute in several ways to neuronal activity and are responsible for many important cellular functions, including cellular excitability, generation, and modulation of rhythmic activity, dendritic integration, transmission of synaptic potentials, and plasticity phenomena. Because of their role, defective HCN channels are natural candidates in the search for potential causes of neurological disorders in humans. Several data, including growing evidence that some forms of epilepsy are associated with HCN mutations, support the notion of an involvement of dysfunctional HCN channels in different experimental models of the disease. Additionally, some anti-epileptic drugs are known to modify the activity of the Ih current. HCN channels are widely expressed in the peripheral nervous system and recent evidence has highlighted the importance of the HCN2 isoform in the transmission of pain. HCN channels are also present in the midbrain system, where they finely regulate the activity of dopaminergic neurons, and a potential role of these channels in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease has recently emerged. The function of HCN channels is regulated by specific accessory proteins, which control the correct expression and modulation of the neuronal Ih current. Alteration of these proteins can severely interfere with the physiological channel function, potentially predisposing to pathological conditions. In this review we address the present knowledge of the association between HCN dysfunctions and neurological diseases, including clinical, genetic, and physiopathological

  13. Dysfunctional HCN ion channels in neurological diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacopo C. DiFrancesco

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels are expressed as four different isoforms (HCN1-4 in the heart and in the central and peripheral nervous systems. HCN channels are activated by membrane hyperpolarization at voltages close to resting membrane potentials and carry the hyperpolarization-activated current, dubbed If (funny current in heart and Ih in neurons. HCN channels contribute in several ways to neuronal activity and are responsible for many important cellular functions, including cellular excitability, generation and modulation of rhythmic activity, dendritic integration, transmission of synaptic potentials and plasticity phenomena. Because of their role, defective HCN channels are natural candidates in the search for potential causes of neurological disorders in humans. Several data, including growing evidence that some forms of epilepsy are associated with HCN mutations, support the notion of an involvement of dysfunctional HCN channels in different experimental models of the disease. Additionally, some anti-epileptic drugs are known to modify the activity of the Ih current. HCN channels are widely expressed in the peripheral nervous system and recent evidence has highlighted the importance of the HCN2 isoform in the transmission of pain. HCN channels are also present in the midbrain system, where they finely regulate the activity of dopaminergic neurons, and a potential role of these channels in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease has recently emerged. The function of HCN channels is regulated by specific accessory proteins, which control the correct expression and modulation of the neuronal Ih current. Alteration of these proteins can severely interfere with the physiological channel function, potentially predisposing to pathological conditions. In this review we address the present knowledge of the association between HCN dysfunctions and neurological diseases, including clinical, genetic and

  14. Diseases caused by mutations in ORAI1 and STIM1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacruz, Rodrigo S.; Feske, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels mediate a specific form of Ca2+ influx called store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) that contributes to the function of many cell types. CRAC channels are formed by ORAI1 proteins located in the plasma membrane, which form its ion-conducting pore. ORAI1 channels are activated by stromal interaction molecule (STIM) 1 and STIM2 located in the endoplasmic reticulum. Loss- and gain-of-function gene mutations in ORAI1 and STIM1 in human patients cause distinct disease syndromes. CRAC channelopathy is caused by loss-of-function mutations in ORAI1 and STIM1 that abolish CRAC channel function and SOCE; it is characterized by severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)-like disease, autoimmunity, muscular hypotonia, and ectodermal dysplasia, with defects in dental enamel. The latter defect emphasizes an important role of CRAC channels in tooth development. By contrast, autosomal dominant gain-of-function mutations in these genes result in constitutive CRAC channel activation, SOCE, and increased intracellular Ca2+ levels that are associated with an overlapping spectrum of diseases, including non-syndromic tubular aggregate myopathy (TAM) and York platelet and Stormorken syndromes, two syndromes defined, besides myopathy, by thrombocytopenia, thrombopathy, and bleeding diathesis. The fact that myopathy results from loss- and gain-of-function mutations in ORAI1 and STIM1 highlights the importance of CRAC channels for Ca2+ homeostasis in skeletal muscle function. The cellular dysfunction and clinical disease spectrum observed in mutant patients provide important information about the molecular regulation of ORAI1 and STIM1 proteins and the role of CRAC channels in human physiology. PMID:26469693

  15. Mobile radio channels

    CERN Document Server

    Pätzold, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Providing a comprehensive overview of the modelling, analysis and simulation of mobile radio channels, this book gives a detailed understanding of fundamental issues and examines state-of-the-art techniques in mobile radio channel modelling. It analyses several mobile fading channels, including terrestrial and satellite flat-fading channels, various types of wideband channels and advanced MIMO channels, providing a fundamental understanding of the issues currently being investigated in the field. Important classes of narrowband, wideband, and space-time wireless channels are explored in deta

  16. Drosophila KCNQ channel displays evolutionarily conserved electrophysiology and pharmacology with mammalian KCNQ channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Cavaliere

    Full Text Available Of the five human KCNQ (Kv7 channels, KCNQ1 with auxiliary subunit KCNE1 mediates the native cardiac I(Ks current with mutations causing short and long QT cardiac arrhythmias. KCNQ4 mutations cause deafness. KCNQ2/3 channels form the native M-current controlling excitability of most neurons, with mutations causing benign neonatal febrile convulsions. Drosophila contains a single KCNQ (dKCNQ that appears to serve alone the functions of all the duplicated mammalian neuronal and cardiac KCNQ channels sharing roughly 50-60% amino acid identity therefore offering a route to investigate these channels. Current information about the functional properties of dKCNQ is lacking therefore we have investigated these properties here. Using whole cell patch clamp electrophysiology we compare the biophysical and pharmacological properties of dKCNQ with the mammalian neuronal and cardiac KCNQ channels expressed in HEK cells. We show that Drosophila KCNQ (dKCNQ is a slowly activating and slowly-deactivating K(+ current open at sub-threshold potentials that has similar properties to neuronal KCNQ2/3 with some features of the cardiac KCNQ1/KCNE1 accompanied by conserved sensitivity to a number of clinically relevant KCNQ blockers (chromanol 293B, XE991, linopirdine and opener (zinc pyrithione. We also investigate the molecular basis of the differential selectivity of KCNQ channels to the opener retigabine and show a single amino acid substitution (M217W can confer sensitivity to dKCNQ. We show dKCNQ has similar electrophysiological and pharmacological properties as the mammalian KCNQ channels, allowing future study of physiological and pathological roles of KCNQ in Drosophila and whole organism screening for new modulators of KCNQ channelopathies.

  17. Three kinds of mutation

    CERN Document Server

    Buan, Aslak Bakke; Thomas, Hugh

    2010-01-01

    For a finite dimensional hereditary algebra, we consider: exceptional sequences in the category of finite dimensional modules, silting objects in the bounded derived category, and m-cluster tilting objects in the m-cluster category. There are mutation operations on both the set of m-cluster tilting objects and the set of exceptional sequences. It is also possible to define a mutation operation for silting objects. We compare these three different notions of mutation.

  18. New strategy for high-level expression and purification of biologically active monomeric TGF-β1/C77S in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yana V; Gasparian, Marine E; Bocharov, Eduard V; Chertkova, Rita V; Tkach, Elena N; Dolgikh, Dmitry A; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P

    2015-02-01

    Mature transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-β1) is a homodimeric protein with a single disulfide bridge between Cys77 on the respective monomers. The synthetic DNA sequence encoding the mature human TGF-β1/C77S (further termed TGF-β1m) was cloned into plasmid pET-32a downstream to the gene of fusion partner thioredoxin (Trx) immediately after the DNA sequence encoding enteropeptidase recognition site. High-level expression (~1.5 g l(-1)) of Trx/TGF-β1m fusion was achieved in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strain mainly in insoluble form. The fusion was solubilized and refolded in glutathione redox system in the presence of zwitterionic detergent CHAPS. After refolding, Trx/TGF-β1m fusion was cleaved by enteropeptidase, and the carrier protein of TGF-β1m was separated from thioredoxin on Ni-NTA agarose. Separation of monomeric molecules from the noncovalently bounded oligomers was done using cation-exchange chromatography. The structure of purified TGF-β1m was confirmed by circular dichroism analysis. The developed technology allowed purifying biologically active tag-free monomeric TGF-β1m from bacteria with a yield of about 2.8 mg from 100 ml cell culture. The low-cost and easy purification steps allow considering that our proposed preparation of recombinant monomeric TGF-β1 could be employed for in vitro and in vivo experiments as well as for therapeutic intervention.

  19. Channel nut tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Marvin

    2016-01-12

    A method, system, and apparatus for installing channel nuts includes a shank, a handle formed on a first end of a shank, and an end piece with a threaded shaft configured to receive a channel nut formed on the second end of the shaft. The tool can be used to insert or remove a channel nut in a channel framing system and then removed from the channel nut.

  20. Physiology and Pathophysiology of CLC-1: Mechanisms of a Chloride Channel Disease, Myotonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Yung Tang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The CLC-1 chloride channel, a member of the CLC-channel/transporter family, plays important roles for the physiological functions of skeletal muscles. The opening of this chloride channel is voltage dependent and is also regulated by protons and chloride ions. Mutations of the gene encoding CLC-1 result in a genetic disease, myotonia congenita, which can be inherited as an autosmal dominant (Thomsen type or an autosomal recessive (Becker type pattern. These mutations are scattered throughout the entire protein sequence, and no clear relationship exists between the inheritance pattern of the mutation and the location of the mutation in the channel protein. The inheritance pattern of some but not all myotonia mutants can be explained by a working hypothesis that these mutations may exert a “dominant negative” effect on the gating function of the channel. However, other mutations may be due to different pathophysiological mechanisms, such as the defect of protein trafficking to membranes. Thus, the underlying mechanisms of myotonia are likely to be quite diverse, and elucidating the pathophysiology of myotonia mutations will require the understanding of multiple molecular/cellular mechanisms of CLC-1 channels in skeletal muscles, including molecular operation, protein synthesis, and membrane trafficking mechanisms.

  1. Targeting ion channels in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, Marcus A; Galietta, Luis J V

    2015-09-01

    Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene cause a characteristic defect in epithelial ion transport that plays a central role in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF). Hence, pharmacological correction of this ion transport defect by targeting of mutant CFTR, or alternative ion channels that may compensate for CFTR dysfunction, has long been considered as an attractive approach to a causal therapy of this life-limiting disease. The recent introduction of the CFTR potentiator ivacaftor into the therapy of a subgroup of patients with specific CFTR mutations was a major milestone and enormous stimulus for seeking effective ion transport modulators for all patients with CF. In this review, we discuss recent breakthroughs and setbacks with CFTR modulators designed to rescue mutant CFTR including the common mutation F508del. Further, we examine the alternative chloride channels TMEM16A and SLC26A9, as well as the epithelial sodium channel ENaC as alternative targets in CF lung disease, which remains the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with CF. Finally, we will focus on the hurdles that still need to be overcome to make effective ion transport modulation therapies available for all patients with CF irrespective of their CFTR genotype.

  2. Recognition profile of Morus nigra agglutinin (Morniga G) expressed by monomeric ligands, simple clusters and mammalian polyvalent glycotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tanuja; Wu, June H; Peumans, Willy J; Rougé, Pierre; Van Damme, Els J M; Wu, Albert M

    2007-01-01

    The carbohydrate binding properties of a novel member of the subfamily of galactose-specific jacalin-related lectin isolated from the bark of black mulberry (Morus nigra) (Morniga G) was studied in detail by enzyme-linked lectinosorbent and inhibition assays using panels of monomeric saccharides, mammalian polyvalent glycotopes and polysaccharides. Among the natural glycans tested for lectin binding, Morniga G reacted best with glycoproteins (gps) presenting a high density of tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens Tn (GalNAcalpha1-Ser/Thr) and Talpha (Galbeta1-3GalNAcalpha1-). Their reactivities, on a nanogram basis, were up to 72.5, 3.9x10(3), 6.0x10(3), 8.8x10(3) and 2.9x10(4) times higher than that of Tn-containing glycopeptides (M.W.Man/Glc, GlcNAc and lFuc; (ii) the mammalian glycotope specificity is Talpha1-benzyl>T>Tn>GalNAcbeta1-3Gal (P), while B/E (Galalpha1-3/4Gal), I/II (Galbeta1-3/4GlcNAc), S (GalNAcbeta1-4Gal), F/A (GalNAcalpha1-3GalNAc/Gal) and L (Galbeta1-4Glc) are inactive; (iii) the most active ligand is T/Tn; (iv) simple clustered Tn or triantennary N-glycans with II termini (Tri-II) have limited impact; (v) high-density polyvalent glycotopes play a prominent role for enhancing Morniga G reactivity. These results provide evidence for the binding of this lectin to dense cell surface T/Tn glycoconjugates and facilitate future usage of this lectin in biotechnological and medical applications.

  3. Pleiotropic benefit of monomeric and oligomeric flavanols on vascular health--a randomized controlled clinical pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje R Weseler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular diseases are expanding to a major social-economic burden in the Western World and undermine man's deep desire for healthy ageing. Epidemiological studies suggest that flavanol-rich foods (e.g. grapes, wine, chocolate sustain cardiovascular health. For an evidenced-based application, however, sound clinical data on their efficacy are strongly demanded. METHODS: In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled intervention study we supplemented 28 male smokers with 200 mg per day of monomeric and oligomeric flavanols (MOF from grape seeds. At baseline, after 4 and 8 weeks we measured macro- and microvascular function and a cluster of systemic biomarkers for major pathological processes occurring in the vasculature: disturbances in lipid metabolism and cellular redox balance, and activation of inflammatory cells and platelets. RESULTS: In the MOF group serum total cholesterol and LDL decreased significantly (P ≤ 0.05 by 5% (n = 11 and 7% (n = 9, respectively in volunteers with elevated baseline levels. Additionally, after 8 weeks the ratio of glutathione to glutathione disulphide in erythrocytes rose from baseline by 22% (n = 15, P<0.05 in MOF supplemented subjects. We also observed that MOF supplementation exerts anti-inflammatory effects in blood towards ex vivo added bacterial endotoxin and significantly reduces expression of inflammatory genes in leukocytes. Conversely, alterations in macro- and microvascular function, platelet aggregation, plasma levels of nitric oxide surrogates, endothelin-1, C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, prostaglandin F2alpha, plasma antioxidant capacity and gene expression levels of antioxidant defense enzymes did not reach statistical significance after 8 weeks MOF supplementation. However, integrating all measured effects into a global, so-called vascular health index revealed a significant improvement of overall vascular health by MOF compared to placebo (P ≤ 0.05. CONCLUSION: Our

  4. Occurrence and Speciation of Polymeric Chromium(III), Monomeric Chromium(III) and Chromium(VI) in Environmental Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    HU, LIGANG; CAI, YONG; JIANG, GUIBIN

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory experiments suggest that polymeric Cr(III) could exist in aqueous solution for a relative long period of time. However, the occurrence of polymeric Cr(III) has not been reported in environmental media due partially to the lack of method for speciating polymeric Cr. We observed an unknown Cr species during the course of study on speciation of Cr in the leachates of chromated-copper-arsenate (CCA)-treated wood. Efforts were made to identify structure of the unknown Cr species. Considering the forms of Cr existed in the CCA-treated woods, we mainly focused our efforts to determine if the unknown species were polymeric Cr(III), complex of Cr/As or complex of Cr with dissolved organic matter (DOM). In order to evaluate whether polymeric Cr(III) largely exist in wood leachates, high performance liquid chromatography coupled with inductively coupled mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICPMS was used) for simultaneous speciation of monomeric Cr(III), polymeric Cr(III), and Cr(VI). In addition to wood leachates where polymeric Cr (III) ranged from 39.1 to 67.4 %, occurrence of the unknown Cr species in other environmental matrices, including surface waters, tap and waste waters, was also investigated. It was found that polymeric Cr(III) could exist in environmental samples containing μg/L level of Cr, at a level up to 60% of total Cr, suggesting that polymeric Cr(III) could significantly exist in natural environments. Failure in quantifying polymeric Cr(III) would lead to the underestimation of total Cr and bias in Cr speciation. The environmental implication of the presence of polymeric Cr(III) species in the environment deserves further study. PMID:27156211

  5. Stability, structural and functional properties of a monomeric, calcium–loaded adenylate cyclase toxin, CyaA, from Bordetella pertussis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannella, Sara E.; Ntsogo Enguéné, Véronique Yvette; Davi, Marilyne; Malosse, Christian; Sotomayor Pérez, Ana Cristina; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Vachette, Patrice; Durand, Dominique; Ladant, Daniel; Chenal, Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough, secretes an adenylate cyclase toxin, CyaA, which invades eukaryotic cells and alters their physiology by cAMP overproduction. Calcium is an essential cofactor of CyaA, as it is the case for most members of the Repeat-in-ToXins (RTX) family. We show that the calcium-bound, monomeric form of CyaA, hCyaAm, conserves its permeabilization and haemolytic activities, even in a fully calcium-free environment. In contrast, hCyaAm requires sub-millimolar calcium in solution for cell invasion, indicating that free calcium in solution is involved in the CyaA toxin translocation process. We further report the first in solution structural characterization of hCyaAm, as deduced from SAXS, mass spectrometry and hydrodynamic studies. We show that hCyaAm adopts a compact and stable state that can transiently conserve its conformation even in a fully calcium-free environment. Our results therefore suggest that in hCyaAm, the C-terminal RTX-domain is stabilized in a high-affinity calcium-binding state by the N-terminal domains while, conversely, calcium binding to the C-terminal RTX-domain strongly stabilizes the N-terminal regions. Hence, the different regions of hCyaAm appear tightly connected, leading to stabilization effects between domains. The hysteretic behaviour of CyaA in response to calcium is likely shared by other RTX cytolysins. PMID:28186111

  6. Production of Monomeric Aromatic Compounds from Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch Fiber Lignin by Chemical and Enzymatic Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Pei-Ling; Hassan, Osman; Maskat, Mohamad Yusof; Badri, Khairiah

    2015-01-01

    In this study, oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFBF) was pretreated with alkali, and lignin was extracted for further degradation into lower molecular weight phenolic compounds using enzymes and chemical means. Efficiency of monomeric aromatic compounds production from OPEFBF lignin via chemical (nitrobenzene versus oxygen) and enzymatic [cutinase versus manganese peroxidase (MnP)] approaches was investigated. The effects of sodium hydroxide concentration (2, 5, and 10% wt.) and reaction time (30, 90, and 180 minutes) on the yield of aromatic compounds were studied. The results obtained indicated that nitrobenzene oxidation produced the highest yield (333.17 ± 49.44 ppm hydroxybenzoic acid, 5.67 ± 0.25 ppm p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, 25.57 ± 1.64 ppm vanillic acid, 168.68 ± 23.23 ppm vanillin, 75.44 ± 6.71 ppm syringic acid, 815.26 ± 41.77 ppm syringaldehyde, 15.21 ± 2.19 ppm p-coumaric acid, and 44.75 ± 3.40 ppm ferulic acid), among the tested methods. High sodium hydroxide concentration (10% wt.) was needed to promote efficient nitrobenzene oxidation. However, less severe oxidation condition was preferred to preserve the hydroxycinnamic acids (p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid). Cutinase-catalyzed hydrolysis was found to be more efficient than MnP-catalyzed oxidation in the production of aromatic compounds. By hydrolyzed 8% wt. of lignin with 0.625 mL cutinase g(-1) lignin at pH 8 and 55°C for 24 hours, about 642.83 ± 14.45 ppm hydroxybenzoic acid, 70.19 ± 3.31 ppm syringaldehyde, 22.80 ± 1.04 ppm vanillin, 27.06 ± 1.20 ppm p-coumaric acid, and 50.19 ± 2.23 ppm ferulic acid were produced.

  7. Novel SCN9A mutations underlying extreme pain phenotypes: unexpected electrophysiological and clinical phenotype correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Edward C; Habib, Abdella M; Cox, James J; Nicholas, Adeline K; Gribble, Fiona M; Woods, C Geoffrey; Reimann, Frank

    2015-05-20

    The importance of NaV1.7 (encoded by SCN9A) in the regulation of pain sensing is exemplified by the heterogeneity of clinical phenotypes associated with its mutation. Gain-of-function mutations are typically pain-causing and have been associated with inherited erythromelalgia (IEM) and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder (PEPD). IEM is usually caused by enhanced NaV1.7 channel activation, whereas mutations that alter steady-state fast inactivation often lead to PEPD. In contrast, nonfunctional mutations in SCN9A are known to underlie congenital insensitivity to pain (CIP). Although well documented, the correlation between SCN9A genotypes and clinical phenotypes is still unclear. Here we report three families with novel SCN9A mutations. In a multiaffected dominant family with IEM, we found the heterozygous change L245 V. Electrophysiological characterization showed that this mutation did not affect channel activation but instead resulted in incomplete fast inactivation and a small hyperpolarizing shift in steady-state slow inactivation, characteristics more commonly associated with PEPD. In two compound heterozygous CIP patients, we found mutations that still retained functionality of the channels, with two C-terminal mutations (W1775R and L1831X) exhibiting a depolarizing shift in channel activation. Two mutations (A1236E and L1831X) resulted in a hyperpolarizing shift in steady-state fast inactivation. To our knowledge, these are the first descriptions of mutations with some retained channel function causing CIP. This study emphasizes the complex genotype-phenotype correlations that exist for SCN9A and highlights the C-terminal cytoplasmic region of NaV1.7 as a critical region for channel function, potentially facilitating analgesic drug development studies.

  8. Gestational mutations in radiation carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza, R.; Luebeck, G.; Moolgavkar, S.

    Mutations in critical genes during gestation could increase substantially the risk of cancer. We examine the consequences of such mutations using the Luebeck-Moolgavkar model for colorectal cancer and the Lea-Coulson modification of the Luria-Delbruck model for the accumulation of mutations during gestation. When gestational mutation rates are high, such mutations make a significant contribution to cancer risk even for adult tumors. Furthermore, gestational mutations ocurring at distinct times during emryonic developmemt lead to substantially different numbers of mutated cells at birth, with early mutations leading to a large number (jackpots) of mutated cells at birth and mutation occurring late leading to only a few mutated cells. Thus gestational mutations could confer considerable heterogeneity of the risk of cancer. If the fetus is exposed to an environmental mutagen, such as ionizing radiation, the gestational mutation rate would be expected to increase. We examine the consequences of such exposures during gestation on the subsequent development of cancer.

  9. A calcium channel mutant mouse model of hypokalemic periodic paralysis

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Fenfen; Mi, Wentao; Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O.; Burns, Dennis K.; Fu, Yu; Gray, Hillery F; Struyk, Arie F.; Martin F Schneider; Cannon, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP) is a familial skeletal muscle disorder that presents with recurrent episodes of severe weakness lasting hours to days associated with reduced serum potassium (K+). HypoPP is genetically heterogeneous, with missense mutations of a calcium channel (CaV1.1) or a sodium channel (NaV1.4) accounting for 60% and 20% of cases, respectively. The mechanistic link between CaV1.1 mutations and the ictal loss of muscle excitability during an attack of weakness in Hy...

  10. Quantum biological channel modeling and capacity calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, Ivan B

    2012-12-10

    Quantum mechanics has an important role in photosynthesis, magnetoreception, and evolution. There were many attempts in an effort to explain the structure of genetic code and transfer of information from DNA to protein by using the concepts of quantum mechanics. The existing biological quantum channel models are not sufficiently general to incorporate all relevant contributions responsible for imperfect protein synthesis. Moreover, the problem of determination of quantum biological channel capacity is still an open problem. To solve these problems, we construct the operator-sum representation of biological channel based on codon basekets (basis vectors), and determine the quantum channel model suitable for study of the quantum biological channel capacity and beyond. The transcription process, DNA point mutations, insertions, deletions, and translation are interpreted as the quantum noise processes. The various types of quantum errors are classified into several broad categories: (i) storage errors that occur in DNA itself as it represents an imperfect storage of genetic information, (ii) replication errors introduced during DNA replication process, (iii) transcription errors introduced during DNA to mRNA transcription, and (iv) translation errors introduced during the translation process. By using this model, we determine the biological quantum channel capacity and compare it against corresponding classical biological channel capacity. We demonstrate that the quantum biological channel capacity is higher than the classical one, for a coherent quantum channel model, suggesting that quantum effects have an important role in biological systems. The proposed model is of crucial importance towards future study of quantum DNA error correction, developing quantum mechanical model of aging, developing the quantum mechanical models for tumors/cancer, and study of intracellular dynamics in general.

  11. Quantum Biological Channel Modeling and Capacity Calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan B. Djordjevic

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantum mechanics has an important role in photosynthesis, magnetoreception, and evolution. There were many attempts in an effort to explain the structure of genetic code and transfer of information from DNA to protein by using the concepts of quantum mechanics. The existing biological quantum channel models are not sufficiently general to incorporate all relevant contributions responsible for imperfect protein synthesis. Moreover, the problem of determination of quantum biological channel capacity is still an open problem. To solve these problems, we construct the operator-sum representation of biological channel based on codon basekets (basis vectors, and determine the quantum channel model suitable for study of the quantum biological channel capacity and beyond. The transcription process, DNA point mutations, insertions, deletions, and translation are interpreted as the quantum noise processes. The various types of quantum errors are classified into several broad categories: (i storage errors that occur in DNA itself as it represents an imperfect storage of genetic information, (ii replication errors introduced during DNA replication process, (iii transcription errors introduced during DNA to mRNA transcription, and (iv translation errors introduced during the translation process. By using this model, we determine the biological quantum channel capacity and compare it against corresponding classical biological channel capacity. We demonstrate that the quantum biological channel capacity is higher than the classical one, for a coherent quantum channel model, suggesting that quantum effects have an important role in biological systems. The proposed model is of crucial importance towards future study of quantum DNA error correction, developing quantum mechanical model of aging, developing the quantum mechanical models for tumors/cancer, and study of intracellular dynamics in general.

  12. A novel KCNA1 mutation in a family with episodic ataxia and malignant hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, Tiago A; Manole, Andreea; MacDonald, Heather; Riazi, Sheila; Kraeva, Natalia; Hanna, Michael G; Lang, Anthony E; Männikkö, Roope; Yoon, Grace

    2016-10-01

    Episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1) is an autosomal dominant channelopathy caused by mutations in KCNA1, which encodes the voltage-gated potassium channel, Kv1.1. Eleven members of an EA family were evaluated with molecular and functional studies. A novel c.746T>G (p.Phe249Cys) missense mutation of KCNA1 segregated in the family members with episodic ataxia, myokymia, and malignant hyperthermia susceptibility. No mutations were found in the known malignant hyperthermia genes RYR1 or CACNA1S. The Phe249Cys-Kv1.1 channels did not show any currents upon functional expression, confirming a pathogenic role of the mutation. Malignant hyperthermia may be a presentation of KCNA1 mutations, which has significant implications for the clinical care of these patients and illustrates the phenotypic heterogeneity of KCNA1 mutations.

  13. Multi-Channel Retailing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Morschett, Dr.,

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-channel retailing entails the parallel use by retailing enterprises of several sales channels. The results of an online buyer survey which has been conducted to investigate the impact of multi-channel retailing (i.e. the use of several retail channels by one retail company on consumer behaviour show that the frequently expressed concern that the application of multi-channel systems in retailing would be associated with cannibalization effects, has proven unfounded. Indeed, the appropriate degree of similarity, consistency, integration and agreement achieves the exact opposite. Different channels create different advantages for consumers. Therefore the total benefit an enterprise which has a multi-channel system can offer to its consumers is larger, the greater the number of available channels. The use of multi-channel systems is associated with additional purchases in the different channels. Such systems are thus superior to those offering only one sales channel to their customers. Furthermore, multi-channel systems with integrated channels are superior to those in which the channels are essentially autonomous and independent of one another. In integrated systems, consumers can achieve synergy effects in the use of sales-channel systems. Accordingly, when appropriately formulated, multi-channel systems in retailing impact positively on consumers. They use the channels more frequently, buy more from them and there is a positive customer-loyalty impact. Multi-channel systems are strategic options for achieving customer loyalty, exploiting customer potential and for winning new customers. They are thus well suited for approaching differing and varied target groups.

  14. Mutation and premating isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, R C; Thompson, J N

    2002-11-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  15. Functional effects of KCNE3 mutation and its role in the development of Brugada syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delpón, Eva; Cordeiro, Jonathan M; Núñez, Lucía

    2008-01-01

    (to)) is thought to play a prominent role in the expression of the syndrome, mutations in I(to)-related genes have not been identified as yet. METHODS AND RESULTS: One hundred and five probands with BrS were screened for ion channel gene mutations using single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP...

  16. A recurrent de novo mutation in KCNC1 causes progressive myoclonus epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muona, M.; Berkovic, S. F.; Dibbens, L. M.

    2015-01-01

    determinants of high-frequency neuronal firing. Functional analysis of the Arg320His mutant channel showed a dominant-negative loss-of-function effect. Ten cases had pathogenic mutations in known PME-associated genes (NEU1, NHLRC1, AFG3L2, EPM2A, CLN6 and SERPINI1). Identification of mutations in PRNP, SACS...

  17. TPC1 - SV Channels Gain Shape

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rainer Hedrich; Irene Marten

    2011-01-01

    T The most prominent ion channel localized in plant vacuoles is the slow activating SV type. Slow vacuolar (SV)channels were discovered by patch clamp studies as early as 1986. In the following two decades, numerous studies revealed that these calcium- and voltage-activated, nonselective cation channels are expressed in the vacuoles of all plants and every plant tissue. The voltage-dependent properties of the SV channel are susceptible to modulation by calcium, pH, redox state, as well as regulatory proteins. In Arabidopsis, the SV channel is encoded by the AtTPC1 gene, and even though its gene product represents the by far largest conductance of the vacuolar membrane, tpc1-loss-of-function mutants appeared not to be impaired in major physiological functions such as growth, development, and reproduction. In contrast, the fou2 gain-of-function point mutation D454N within TPC1 leads to a pronounced growth phenotype and increased synthesis of the stress hormone jasmonate. Since the TPC1 gene is present in all land plants, it likely encodes a very general function. In this review, we will discuss major SV channel properties and their impact on plant cell physiology.

  18. Functional multimerization of mucolipin channel proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curcio-Morelli, Cyntia; Zhang, Peng; Venugopal, Bhuvarahamurthy; Charles, Florie A; Browning, Marsha F; Cantiello, Horacio F; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A

    2010-02-01

    MCOLN1 encodes mucolipin-1 (TRPML1), a member of the transient receptor potential TRPML subfamily of channel proteins. Mutations in MCOLN1 cause mucolipidosis-type IV (MLIV), a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by severe neurologic, ophthalmologic, and gastrointestinal abnormalities. Along with TRPML1, there are two other TRPML family members, mucolipin-2 (TRPML2) and mucolipin-3 (TRPML3). In this study, we used immunocytochemical analysis to determine that TRPML1, TRPML2, and TRPML3 co-localize in cells. The multimerization of TRPML proteins was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis, which demonstrated that TRPML1 homo-multimerizes as well as hetero-multimerizes with TRPML2 and TRPML3. MLIV-causing mutants of TRPML1 also interacted with wild-type TRPML1. Lipid bilayer re-constitution of in vitro translated TRPML2 and TRPML3 confirmed their cation channel properties with lower single channel conductance and higher partial permeability to anions as compared to TRPML1. We further analyzed the electrophysiological properties of single channel TRPML hetero-multimers, which displayed functional differences when compared to individual TRPMLs. Our data shows for the first time that TRPMLs form distinct functional channel complexes. Homo- and hetero-multimerization of TRPMLs may modulate channel function and biophysical properties, thereby increasing TRPML functional diversity.

  19. Purinergic regulation of CFTR and Ca2+ -activated Cl- channels and K+ channels in human pancreatic duct epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jing; Haanes, Kristian A; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    dependent on intracellular Ca(2+). Apically applied ATP/UTP stimulated CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) (CaCC) channels, which were inhibited by CFTRinh-172 and niflumic acid, respectively. The basolaterally applied ATP stimulated CFTR. In CFPAC-1 cells, which have...... mutated CFTR, basolateral ATP and UTP had negligible effects. In addition to Cl(-) transport in Capan-1 cells, the effects of 5,6-dichloro-1-ethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazol-2-one (DC-EBIO) and clotrimazole indicated functional expression of the intermediate conductance K(+) channels (IK, KCa3...... receptors both Cl(-) channels (TMEM16A/ANO1 and CFTR) and K(+) channels (IK). The K(+) channels provide the driving force for Cl(-)-channel-dependent secretion, and luminal ATP provided locally or secreted from acini may potentiate secretory processes. Future strategies in augmenting pancreatic duct...

  20. Mutations in KCNT1 cause a spectrum of focal epilepsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke Steensbjerre; Heron, Sarah E.; Larsen, Line H. G.

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant mutations in the sodium-gated potassium channel subunit gene KCNT1 have been associated with two distinct seizure syndromes, nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE) and malignant migrating focal seizures of infancy (MMFSI). To further explore the phenotypic spectrum associated w...

  1. Mutations in KCNT1 cause a spectrum of focal epilepsies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Møller, Rikke S.; Heron, Sarah E.; Larsen, Line H G; Lim, Chiao Xin; Ricos, Michael G.; Bayly, Marta A.; Van Kempen, Marjan J A; Klinkenberg, Sylvia; Andrews, Ian; Kelley, Kent; Ronen, Gabriel M.; Callen, David; McMahon, Jacinta M.; Yendle, Simone C.; Carvill, Gemma L.; Mefford, Heather C.; Nabbout, Rima; Poduri, Annapurna; Striano, Pasquale; Baglietto, Maria G.; Zara, Federico; Smith, Nicholas J.; Pridmore, Clair; Gardella, Elena; Nikanorova, Marina; Dahl, Hans Atli; Gellert, Pia; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Gunning, Boudewijn; Kragh-Olsen, Bente; Dibbens, Leanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Autosomal dominant mutations in the sodium-gated potassium channel subunit gene KCNT1 have been associated with two distinct seizure syndromes, nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE) and malignant migrating focal seizures of infancy (MMFSI). To further explore the phenotypic spectrum associa

  2. Molecular modeling of mechanosensory ion channel structural and functional features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessmann, Renate; Kourtis, Nikos; Petratos, Kyriacos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios

    2010-09-16

    The DEG/ENaC (Degenerin/Epithelial Sodium Channel) protein family comprises related ion channel subunits from all metazoans, including humans. Members of this protein family play roles in several important biological processes such as transduction of mechanical stimuli, sodium re-absorption and blood pressure regulation. Several blocks of amino acid sequence are conserved in DEG/ENaC proteins, but structure/function relations in this channel class are poorly understood. Given the considerable experimental limitations associated with the crystallization of integral membrane proteins, knowledge-based modeling is often the only route towards obtaining reliable structural information. To gain insight into the structural characteristics of DEG/ENaC ion channels, we derived three-dimensional models of MEC-4 and UNC-8, based on the available crystal structures of ASIC1 (Acid Sensing Ion Channel 1). MEC-4 and UNC-8 are two DEG/ENaC family members involved in mechanosensation and proprioception respectively, in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We used these models to examine the structural effects of specific mutations that alter channel function in vivo. The trimeric MEC-4 model provides insight into the mechanism by which gain-of-function mutations cause structural alterations that result in increased channel permeability, which trigger cell degeneration. Our analysis provides an introductory framework to further investigate the multimeric organization of the DEG/ENaC ion channel complex.

  3. Molecular modeling of mechanosensory ion channel structural and functional features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renate Gessmann

    Full Text Available The DEG/ENaC (Degenerin/Epithelial Sodium Channel protein family comprises related ion channel subunits from all metazoans, including humans. Members of this protein family play roles in several important biological processes such as transduction of mechanical stimuli, sodium re-absorption and blood pressure regulation. Several blocks of amino acid sequence are conserved in DEG/ENaC proteins, but structure/function relations in this channel class are poorly understood. Given the considerable experimental limitations associated with the crystallization of integral membrane proteins, knowledge-based modeling is often the only route towards obtaining reliable structural information. To gain insight into the structural characteristics of DEG/ENaC ion channels, we derived three-dimensional models of MEC-4 and UNC-8, based on the available crystal structures of ASIC1 (Acid Sensing Ion Channel 1. MEC-4 and UNC-8 are two DEG/ENaC family members involved in mechanosensation and proprioception respectively, in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We used these models to examine the structural effects of specific mutations that alter channel function in vivo. The trimeric MEC-4 model provides insight into the mechanism by which gain-of-function mutations cause structural alterations that result in increased channel permeability, which trigger cell degeneration. Our analysis provides an introductory framework to further investigate the multimeric organization of the DEG/ENaC ion channel complex.

  4. A novel KCNA1 mutation causing episodic ataxia type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassche, Saskia; Lainez, Sergio; Bloem, Bastiaan R; van de Warrenburg, Bart P C; Hofmeijer, Jeannette; Lemmink, Henny H; Hoenderop, Joost G J; Bindels, René J M; Drost, Gea

    2014-08-01

    We describe the clinical phenotype of a novel de novo KNCA1 mutation, and functional characterization of the effects of the mutation on Kv1.1 channel function. HEK293 cells were transfected transiently with either wild-type or mutant channels. Representative currents were evoked after application of a series of square voltage steps from -80 mV to +50 mV in 200-ms intervals from Vh = -80 mV. Extracellular K(+) was added to evoke tail currents. Equal amounts of wild-type and Kv1.1(I262M) mutant DNA were transfected transiently in HEK293 cells to evaluate the influence of the mutation. We found that Kv1.1(I262M) leads to a defective voltage-gated potassium channel. Coexpression studies revealed a dominant-negative effect. We describe the phenotype of a novel KCNA1 mutation causing episodic ataxia. Patch-clamp studies confirm the pathogenicity of the mutation in vitro and suggest that it is dominant with respect to wild-type. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Channels Active in the Excitability of Nerves and Skeletal Muscles across the Neuromuscular Junction: Basic Function and Pathophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Barbara E.

    2008-01-01

    Ion channels are essential for the basic physiological function of excitable cells such as nerve, skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle cells. Mutations in genes that encode ion channels have been identified to cause various diseases and disorders known as channelopathies. An understanding of how individual ion channels are involved in the…

  6. Channels Active in the Excitability of Nerves and Skeletal Muscles across the Neuromuscular Junction: Basic Function and Pathophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Barbara E.

    2008-01-01

    Ion channels are essential for the basic physiological function of excitable cells such as nerve, skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle cells. Mutations in genes that encode ion channels have been identified to cause various diseases and disorders known as channelopathies. An understanding of how individual ion channels are involved in the…

  7. Hadamard quantum broadcast channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingle; Das, Siddhartha; Wilde, Mark M.

    2017-10-01

    We consider three different communication tasks for quantum broadcast channels, and we determine the capacity region of a Hadamard broadcast channel for these various tasks. We define a Hadamard broadcast channel to be such that the channel from the sender to one of the receivers is entanglement-breaking and the channel from the sender to the other receiver is complementary to this one. As such, this channel is a quantum generalization of a degraded broadcast channel, which is well known in classical information theory. The first communication task we consider is classical communication to both receivers, the second is quantum communication to the stronger receiver and classical communication to other, and the third is entanglement-assisted classical communication to the stronger receiver and unassisted classical communication to the other. The structure of a Hadamard broadcast channel plays a critical role in our analysis: The channel to the weaker receiver can be simulated by performing a measurement channel on the stronger receiver's system, followed by a preparation channel. As such, we can incorporate the classical output of the measurement channel as an auxiliary variable and solve all three of the above capacities for Hadamard broadcast channels, in this way avoiding known difficulties associated with quantum auxiliary variables.

  8. Constitutive activity of the human TRPML2 channel induces cell degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Shaya; Zeevi, David A; Frumkin, Ayala; Offen-Glasner, Vered; Bach, Gideon; Minke, Baruch

    2010-01-22

    The mucolipin (TRPML) ion channel proteins represent a distinct subfamily of channel proteins within the transient receptor potential (TRP) superfamily of cation channels. Mucolipin 1, 2, and 3 (TRPML1, -2, and -3, respectively) are channel proteins that share high sequence homology with each other and homology in the transmembrane domain with other TRPs. Mutations in the TRPML1 protein are implicated in mucolipidosis type IV, whereas mutations in TRPML3 are found in the varitint-waddler mouse. The properties of the wild type TRPML2 channel are not well known. Here we show functional expression of the wild type human TRPML2 channel (h-TRPML2). The channel is functional at the plasma membrane and characterized by a significant inward rectification similar to other constitutively active TRPML mutant isoforms. The h-TRPML2 channel displays nonselective cation permeability, which is Ca(2+)-permeable and inhibited by low extracytosolic pH but not Ca(2+) regulated. In addition, constitutively active h-TRPML2 leads to cell death by causing Ca(2+) overload. Furthermore, we demonstrate by functional mutation analysis that h-TRPML2 shares similar characteristics and structural similarities with other TRPML channels that regulate the channel in a similar manner. Hence, in addition to overall structure, all three TRPML channels also share common modes of regulation.

  9. A novel splice mutation of HERG in a Chinese family with long QT syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANG Yun-peng; XIE Xu-dong; WANG Xing-xiang; CHEN Jun-zhu; ZHU Jian-hua; TAO Qian-min; ZHENG Liang-rong

    2005-01-01

    Congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a genetically heterogeneous disease in which six ion-channel genes have been identified. The phenotype-genotype relationships of the HERG (human ether-a-go-go-related gene) mutations are not fully understood. The objective of this study is to identify the underlying genetic basis of a Chinese family with LQTS and to characterize the clinical manifestations properties of the mutation. Single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analyses were conducted on DNA fragments amplified by polymerase chain reaction from five LQT-related genes. Aberrant conformers were analyzed by DNA sequencing. A novel splice mutation in C-terminus of HERG was identified in this Chinese LQTS family,leading to the deletion of 11-bp at the acceptor splice site of Exon9 [Exon9 IVS del (-12→-2)]. The mutation might affect,through deficient splicing, the putative cyclic nucleotide binding domain (CNBD) of the HERG K+ channel. This mutation resulted in a mildly affected phenotype. Only the proband had a history of syncopes, while the other three individuals with long QT interval had no symptoms. Two other mutation carriers displayed normal phenotype. No sudden death occurred in the family. The 4 affected individuals and the two silent mutation carriers were all heterozygous for the mutation. It is the first splice mutation of HERG reported in Chinese LQTS families. Clinical data suggest that the CNBD mutation may be less malignant than mutations occurring in the pore region and be partially dominant over wild-type function.

  10. Trafficking defect and proteasomal degradation contribute to the phenotype of a novel KCNH2 long QT syndrome mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Mihic

    Full Text Available The Kv11.1 (hERG K+ channel plays a fundamental role in cardiac repolarization. Missense mutations in KCNH2, the gene encoding Kv11.1, cause long QT syndrome (LQTS and frequently cause channel trafficking-deficiencies. This study characterized the properties of a novel KCNH2 mutation discovered in a LQT2 patient resuscitated from a ventricular fibrillation arrest. Proband genotyping was performed by SSCP and DNA sequencing. The electrophysiological and biochemical properties of the mutant channel were investigated after expression in HEK293 cells. The proband manifested a QTc of 554 ms prior to electrolyte normalization. Mutation analysis revealed an autosomal dominant frameshift mutation at proline 1086 (P1086fs+32X; 3256InsG. Co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated that wild-type Kv11.1 and mutant channels coassemble. Western blot showed that the mutation did not produce mature complex-glycosylated Kv11.1 channels and coexpression resulted in reduced channel maturation. Electrophysiological recordings revealed mutant channel peak currents to be similar to untransfected cells. Co-expression of channels in a 1∶1 ratio demonstrated dominant negative suppression of peak Kv11.1 currents. Immunocytochemistry confirmed that mutant channels were not present at the plasma membrane. Mutant channel trafficking rescue was attempted by incubation at reduced temperature or with the pharmacological agents E-4031. These treatments did not significantly increase peak mutant currents or induce the formation of mature complex-glycosylated channels. The proteasomal inhibitor lactacystin increased the protein levels of the mutant channels demonstrating proteasomal degradation, but failed to induce mutant Kv11.1 protein trafficking. Our study demonstrates a novel dominant-negative Kv11.1 mutation, which results in degraded non-functional channels leading to a LQT2 phenotype.

  11. Voltage-gated ion channel dysfunction precedes cardiomyopathy development in the dystrophic heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xaver Koenig

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, is associated with severe cardiac complications including cardiomyopathy and cardiac arrhythmias. Recent research suggests that impaired voltage-gated ion channels in dystrophic cardiomyocytes accompany cardiac pathology. It is, however, unknown if the ion channel defects are primary effects of dystrophic gene mutations, or secondary effects of the developing cardiac pathology.To address this question, we first investigated sodium channel impairments in cardiomyocytes derived from dystrophic neonatal mice prior to cardiomyopahty development, by using the whole cell patch clamp technique. Besides the most common model for DMD, the dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse, we also used mice additionally carrying an utrophin mutation. In neonatal cardiomyocytes, dystrophin-deficiency generated a 25% reduction in sodium current density. In addition, extra utrophin-deficiency significantly altered sodium channel gating parameters. Moreover, also calcium channel inactivation was considerably reduced in dystrophic neonatal cardiomyocytes, suggesting that ion channel abnormalities are universal primary effects of dystrophic gene mutations. To assess developmental changes, we also studied sodium channel impairments in cardiomyocytes derived from dystrophic adult mice, and compared them with the respective abnormalities in dystrophic neonatal cells. Here, we found a much stronger sodium current reduction in adult cardiomyocytes. The described sodium channel impairments slowed the upstroke of the action potential in adult cardiomyocytes, and only in dystrophic adult mice, the QRS interval of the electrocardiogram was prolonged.Ion channel impairments precede pathology development in the dystrophic heart, and may thus be considered potential cardiomyopathy triggers.

  12. Mutation rates among RNA viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Drake, John W.; Holland, John J.

    1999-01-01

    The rate of spontaneous mutation is a key parameter in modeling the genetic structure and evolution of populations. The impact of the accumulated load of mutations and the consequences of increasing the mutation rate are important in assessing the genetic health of populations. Mutation frequencies are among the more directly measurable population parameters, although the information needed to convert them into mutation rates is often lacking. A previous analysis of mutation rates in RNA viru...

  13. USACE Navigation Channels 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This dataset represents both San Francisco and Los Angeles District navigation channel lines. All San Francisco District channel lines were digitized from CAD files...

  14. Channelling versus inversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gale, A.S.; Surlyk, Finn; Anderskouv, Kresten

    2013-01-01

    . Within this channel were smaller erosional structures (hardgrounds, and locally have a basal fill of granular phosphorite. The entire channel system was progressively infilled by chalk, as demonstrated by the expanded succession...

  15. Stable divalent germanium, tin and lead amino(ether)-phenolate monomeric complexes: structural features, inclusion heterobimetallic complexes, and ROP catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingfang; Roşca, Sorin-Claudiu; Poirier, Valentin; Sinbandhit, Sourisak; Dorcet, Vincent; Roisnel, Thierry; Carpentier, Jean-François; Sarazin, Yann

    2014-03-21

    Stable germanium(II) and lead(II) amido complexes {LO(i)}M(N(SiMe3)2) (M = Ge(II), Pb(II)) bearing amino(ether)phenolate ligands are readily available using the proteo-ligands {LO(i)}H of general formula 2-CH2NR2-4,6-tBu2-C6H2OH (i = 1, NR2 = N((CH2)2OCH3)2; i = 2, NR2 = NEt2; i = 3, NR2 = aza-15-crown-5) and M(N(SiMe3)2)2 precursors. The molecular structures of these germylenes and plumbylenes, as well as those of {LO(3)}GeCl, {LO(3)}SnCl and of the congeneric {LO(4)}Sn(II)(N(SiMe3)2) where NR2 = aza-12-crown-4, have been determined crystallographically. All complexes are monomeric, with 3-coordinate metal centres. The phenolate systematically acts as a N^O(phenolate) bidentate ligand, with no interactions between the metal and the O(side-arm) atoms in these cases (for {LO(1)}(-), {LO(3)}(-) and {LO(4)}(-)) where they could potentially arise. For each family, the lone pair of electrons essentially features ns(2) character, and there is little, if any, hybridization of the valence orbitals. Heterobimetallic complexes {LO(3)}M(N(SiMe3)2)·LiOTf, where the Li(+) cation sits inside the tethered crown-ether, were prepared by reaction of {LO(3)}M(N(SiMe3)2) and LiOTf (M = Ge(II), Sn(II)). The inclusion of Li(+) (featuring a close contact with the triflate anion) in the macrocycle bears no influence on the coordination sphere of the divalent tetrel element. In association with iPrOH, the amido germylenes, stannylenes and plumbylenes catalyse the controlled polymerisation of L- and racemic lactide. The activity increases linearly according to Ge(II) ≪ Sn(II) ≪ Pb(II). The simple germylenes generate very sluggish catalysts, but the activity is significantly boosted if the heterobimetallic complex {LO(3)}Ge(N(SiMe3)2)·LiOTf is used instead. On the other hand, with 10-25 equiv. of iPrOH, the plumbylenes afford highly active binary catalysts, converting 1000 or 5000 equiv. of monomer at 60 °C within 3 or 45 min, respectively, in a controlled fashion.

  16. Production of rhesus monkey cloned embryos expressing monomeric red fluorescent protein by interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Hai-Ying; Kang, Jin-Dan; Li, Suo; Jin, Jun-Xue; Hong, Yu; Jin, Long; Guo, Qing; Gao, Qing-Shan; Yan, Chang-Guo; Yin, Xi-Jun, E-mail: yinxj33@msn.com

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • Rhesus monkey cells were electroporated with a plasmid containing mRFP1, and an mRFP1-expressing cell line was generated. • For the first time, mRFP1-expressing rhesus monkey cells were used as donor cells for iSCNT. • The effect of VPA on the development of embryos cloned using iSCNT was determined. - Abstract: Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) is a promising method to clone endangered animals from which oocytes are difficult to obtain. Monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 (mRFP1) is an excellent selection marker for transgenically modified cloned embryos during somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). In this study, mRFP-expressing rhesus monkey cells or porcine cells were transferred into enucleated porcine oocytes to generate iSCNT and SCNT embryos, respectively. The development of these embryos was studied in vitro. The percentage of embryos that underwent cleavage did not significantly differ between iSCNT and SCNT embryos (P > 0.05; 71.53% vs. 80.30%). However, significantly fewer iSCNT embryos than SCNT embryos reached the blastocyst stage (2.04% vs. 10.19%, P < 0.05). Valproic acid was used in an attempt to increase the percentage of iSCNT embryos that developed to the blastocyst stage. However, the percentages of embryos that underwent cleavage and reached the blastocyst stage were similar between untreated iSCNT embryos and iSCNT embryos treated with 2 mM valproic acid for 24 h (72.12% vs. 70.83% and 2.67% vs. 2.35%, respectively). These data suggest that porcine-rhesus monkey interspecies embryos can be generated that efficiently express mRFP1. However, a significantly lower proportion of iSCNT embryos than SCNT embryos reach the blastocyst stage. Valproic acid does not increase the percentage of porcine-rhesus monkey iSCNT embryos that reach the blastocyst stage. The mechanisms underling nuclear reprogramming and epigenetic modifications in iSCNT need to be investigated further.

  17. Production of Monomeric Aromatic Compounds from Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch Fiber Lignin by Chemical and Enzymatic Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Ling Tang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFBF was pretreated with alkali, and lignin was extracted for further degradation into lower molecular weight phenolic compounds using enzymes and chemical means. Efficiency of monomeric aromatic compounds production from OPEFBF lignin via chemical (nitrobenzene versus oxygen and enzymatic [cutinase versus manganese peroxidase (MnP] approaches was investigated. The effects of sodium hydroxide concentration (2, 5, and 10% wt. and reaction time (30, 90, and 180 minutes on the yield of aromatic compounds were studied. The results obtained indicated that nitrobenzene oxidation produced the highest yield (333.17±49.44 ppm hydroxybenzoic acid, 5.67±0.25 ppm p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, 25.57±1.64 ppm vanillic acid, 168.68±23.23 ppm vanillin, 75.44±6.71 ppm syringic acid, 815.26±41.77 ppm syringaldehyde, 15.21±2.19 ppm p-coumaric acid, and 44.75±3.40 ppm ferulic acid, among the tested methods. High sodium hydroxide concentration (10% wt. was needed to promote efficient nitrobenzene oxidation. However, less severe oxidation condition was preferred to preserve the hydroxycinnamic acids (p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid. Cutinase-catalyzed hydrolysis was found to be more efficient than MnP-catalyzed oxidation in the production of aromatic compounds. By hydrolyzed 8% wt. of lignin with 0.625 mL cutinase g−1 lignin at pH 8 and 55°C for 24 hours, about 642.83±14.45 ppm hydroxybenzoic acid, 70.19±3.31 ppm syringaldehyde, 22.80±1.04 ppm vanillin, 27.06±1.20 ppm p-coumaric acid, and 50.19±2.23 ppm ferulic acid were produced.

  18. Development and characterization of mouse monoclonal antibodies against monomeric dengue virus non-structural glycoprotein 1 (NS1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelanew, Tesfaye; Poole-Smith, B Katherine; Hunsperger, Elizabeth

    2015-09-15

    Dengue virus (DENV) nonstructural-1 (NS1) glycoprotein is useful for diagnosis of DENV infections in the first 8 days of illness with any of the four serotypes (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3 and DENV-4). However, NS1 diagnostics are less sensitive for secondary DENV infections so the utility of NS1 diagnostics in dengue endemic countries where there is predominantly secondary infections is being questioned. Heat-mediated immunecomplex dissociation (ICD) prior to testing serum samples can significantly improve NS1 test sensitivity in secondary infections but requires monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) reactive to heat-denatured NS1. In order to incorporate a simple heat-mediated ICD step, a crucial step was to develop new MAbs with high affinity and specificity to heat-denatured DENV NS1 protein. In the present study, six new MAbs were isolated from BALB/c mice immunized with recombinant monomeric NS1 of DENV-1 and DENV-2. Characterization using three different methods: indirect ELISA, fixed cell ELISA and western blot revealed that all six MAbs are serotype-cross-reactive and capable of recognizing dimeric and hexameric isoforms as well as heat-denatured NS1 from all four DENV serotypes. No cross-reactivity to NS1 of West Nile virus and Yellow fever virus was observed on western blot and indirect ELISA. Five of the six MAbs mapped to the DENV NS1 region of 105-119 amino acids. The remaining MAb mapped to DENV NS1 region of 25-39 amino acids. These two NS1 regions were found to be highly conserved among all four DENV serotypes by sequences analysis and database comparison. These MAbs were used to develop an NS1 capture ELISA and tested using a small panel of clinical specimens. The results from the NS1 capture ELISA indicated at least a three-fold increase in NS1 antigen detection in heat-denatured samples compared to untreated specimens. Furthermore, artificial immunecomplexed results also demonstrated the binding efficiency of these MAbs to heat denatured NS1. Taken together

  19. Curcumin could reduce the monomer of TTR with Tyr114Cys mutation via autophagy in cell model of familial amyloid polyneuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li H

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Hui Li,1,* Yu Zhang,1,* Li Cao,1 Ran Xiong,1 Bei Zhang,1 Li Wu,1 Zongbo Zhao,1 Sheng-Di Chen1,2 1Department of Neurology and Institute of Neurology, Ruijin Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 2Key Laboratory of Stem Cell Biology and Laboratory of Neurodegenerative Diseases, Institute of Health Science, Shanghai Institutes of Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Science, and Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Transthyretin (TTR familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP is an autosomal ­dominant inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by various mutations in the transthyretin gene. We aimed to identify the mechanisms underlying TTR FAP with Tyr114Cys (Y114C mutation. Our study showed that TTR Y114C mutation led to an increase in monomeric TTR and impaired autophagy. Treatment with curcumin resulted in a significant decrease of monomeric TTR by recovering autophagy. Our research suggests that impairment of autophagy might be involved in the pathogenesis of TTR FAP with Y114C mutation, and curcumin might be a potential therapeutic approach for TTR FAP. Keywords: curcumin, familial amyloid polyneuropathy, transthyretin, autophagy

  20. Quantum Multiple Access Channel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯广; 黄民信; 张永德

    2002-01-01

    We consider the transmission of classical information over a quantum channel by many senders, which is a generalization of the two-sender case. The channel capacity region is shown to be a convex hull bound by the yon Neumann entropy and the conditional yon Neumann entropies. The result allows a reasonable distribution of channel capacity over the senders.

  1. Dominant KCNA2 mutation causes episodic ataxia and pharmacoresponsive epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Mark A; Bellows, Susannah T; Li, Melody; Carroll, Renée; Micallef, Silvana; Carvill, Gemma L; Myers, Candace T; Howell, Katherine B; Maljevic, Snezana; Lerche, Holger; Gazina, Elena V; Mefford, Heather C; Bahlo, Melanie; Berkovic, Samuel F; Petrou, Steven; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Gecz, Jozef

    2016-11-08

    To identify the genetic basis of a family segregating episodic ataxia, infantile seizures, and heterogeneous epilepsies and to study the phenotypic spectrum of KCNA2 mutations. A family with 7 affected individuals over 3 generations underwent detailed phenotyping. Whole genome sequencing was performed on a mildly affected grandmother and her grandson with epileptic encephalopathy (EE). Segregating variants were filtered and prioritized based on functional annotations. The effects of the mutation on channel function were analyzed in vitro by voltage clamp assay and in silico by molecular modeling. KCNA2 was sequenced in 35 probands with heterogeneous phenotypes. The 7 family members had episodic ataxia (5), self-limited infantile seizures (5), evolving to genetic generalized epilepsy (4), focal seizures (2), and EE (1). They had a segregating novel mutation in the shaker type voltage-gated potassium channel KCNA2 (CCDS_827.1: c.765_773del; p.255_257del). A rare missense SCN2A (rs200884216) variant was also found in 2 affected siblings and their unaffected mother. The p.255_257del mutation caused dominant negative loss of channel function. Molecular modeling predicted repositioning of critical arginine residues in the voltage-sensing domain. KCNA2 sequencing revealed 1 de novo mutation (CCDS_827.1: c.890G>A; p.Arg297Gln) in a girl with EE, ataxia, and tremor. A KCNA2 mutation caused dominantly inherited episodic ataxia, mild infantile-onset seizures, and later generalized and focal epilepsies in the setting of normal intellect. This observation expands the KCNA2 phenotypic spectrum from EE often associated with chronic ataxia, reflecting the marked variation in severity observed in many ion channel disorders. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  2. A global defect in scaling relationship between electrical activity and availability of muscle sodium channels in hyperkalemic periodic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melamed-Frank, M; Marom, S

    1999-07-01

    Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HyperPP) is a hereditary disorder characterized by alternate episodic attacks of muscle weakness and muscle myotonia. The most common mutation associated with HyperPP is a T704M substitution in the skeletal-muscle sodium channel. This mutation increases sodium persistent currents, alters voltage dependence of activation and impairs slow inactivation. The present study shows experimental evidence in support of a potentially important global defect caused by the T704M mutation. While the effective rate of recovery from slow inactivation, in both normal and mutated channels, is related to the duration of past activity by a power law function, the scaling power of the mutated channel is significantly greater. This difference between the channels offers a clue for an explanation to the wide range of time scales, history dependence, and the mixed myotonic/paralysis effect, which mark the clinical picture of HyperPP.

  3. Mutations in connexin genes and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfenniger, Anna; Wohlwend, Annelise; Kwak, Brenda R

    2011-01-01

    Connexins are a family of transmembrane proteins that are widely expressed in the human body. Connexins play an important role in cell-cell communication and homeostasis in various tissues by forming gap junction channels, which enable a direct passage of ions or metabolites from one cell to another. Twenty-one different connexins are expressed in humans, each having distinct expression patterns and regulation properties. Knowledge on this family of proteins can be gained by making an inventory of mutations and associated diseases in human. PubMed and other relevant databases were searched. In addition, key review articles were screened for relevant original publications. Sections of representative organs were photographed and annotated. The crucial role of connexins is highlighted by the discovery of mutations in connexin genes which cause a variety of disorders such as myelin-related diseases, skin disorders, hearing loss, congenital cataract, or more complex syndromes such as the oculodendrodigital dysplasia. This review systematically addresses current knowledge on mutations in connexin genes and disease, focusing on the correlation between genetic defects, cellular phenotypes and clinical manifestations. The review of diseases caused by mutations in connexin genes highlights the essential nature of connexin function and intercellular communication in tissue homeostasis. © 2010 The Authors. European Journal of Clinical Investigation © 2010 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  4. Voltage-Gated Channels as Causative Agents for Epilepsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutasem Abuhamed

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder that afflicts 1-2% of the general population worldwide. It encompasses a variety of disorders with seizures. Approach: Idiopathic epilepsies were defined as a heterogeneous group of seizure disorders that show no underlying cause .Voltage-gated ion channels defect were recognized etiology of epilepsy in the central nervous system. The aim of this article was to provide an update on voltage-gated channels and their mutation as causative agents for epilepsies. We described the structures of the voltage-gated channels, discuss their current genetic studies, and then review the effects of voltage-gated channels as causative agents for epilepsies. Results: Channels control the flow of ions in and out of the cell causing depolarization and hyper polarization of the cell. Voltage-gated channels were classified into four types: Sodium, potassium calcium ands chloride. Voltage-gated channels were macromolecular protein complexes within the lipid membrane. They were divided into subunits. Each subunit had a specific function and was encoded by more than one gen. Conclusion: Current genetic studies of idiopathic epilepsies show the importance of genetic influence on Voltage-gated channels. Different genes may regulate a function in a channel; the channel defect was directly responsible for neuronal hyper excitability and seizures.

  5. DDESC: Dragon database for exploration of sodium channels in human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovanovic Aleksandar

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sodium channels are heteromultimeric, integral membrane proteins that belong to a superfamily of ion channels. The mutations in genes encoding for sodium channel proteins have been linked with several inherited genetic disorders such as febrile epilepsy, Brugada syndrome, ventricular fibrillation, long QT syndrome, or channelopathy associated insensitivity to pain. In spite of these significant effects that sodium channel proteins/genes could have on human health, there is no publicly available resource focused on sodium channels that would support exploration of the sodium channel related information. Results We report here Dragon Database for Exploration of Sodium Channels in Human (DDESC, which provides comprehensive information related to sodium channels regarding different entities, such as "genes and proteins", "metabolites and enzymes", "toxins", "chemicals with pharmacological effects", "disease concepts", "human anatomy", "pathways and pathway reactions" and their potential links. DDESC is compiled based on text- and data-mining. It allows users to explore potential associations between different entities related to sodium channels in human, as well as to automatically generate novel hypotheses. Conclusion DDESC is first publicly available resource where the information related to sodium channels in human can be explored at different levels. This database is freely accessible for academic and non-profit users via the worldwide web http://apps.sanbi.ac.za/ddesc.

  6. Mutations in GABRB3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke S; Wuttke, Thomas V; Helbig, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the role of mutations in GABRB3 encoding the β3 subunit of the GABAA receptor in individual patients with epilepsy with regard to causality, the spectrum of genetic variants, their pathophysiology, and associated phenotypes. METHODS: We performed massive parallel sequencing...... of GABRB3 in 416 patients with a range of epileptic encephalopathies and childhood-onset epilepsies and recruited additional patients with epilepsy with GABRB3 mutations from other research and diagnostic programs. RESULTS: We identified 22 patients with heterozygous mutations in GABRB3, including 3...... probands from multiplex families. The phenotypic spectrum of the mutation carriers ranged from simple febrile seizures, genetic epilepsies with febrile seizures plus, and epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures to West syndrome and other types of severe, early-onset epileptic encephalopathies...

  7. AIP mutations and gigantism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostomyan, Liliya; Potorac, Iulia; Beckers, Pablo; Daly, Adrian F; Beckers, Albert

    2017-06-01

    AIP mutations are rare in sporadic acromegaly but they are seen at a higher frequency among certain specific populations of pituitary adenoma patients (pituitary gigantism cases, familial isolated pituitary adenoma (FIPA) kindreds, and patients with macroadenomas who are diagnosed ≤30 years). AIP mutations are most prevalent in patients with pituitary gigantism (29% of this group were found to have mutations in AIP gene). These data support targeted genetic screening for AIP mutations/deletions in these groups of pituitary adenoma patients. Earlier diagnosis of AIP-related acromegaly-gigantism cases enables timely clinical evaluation and treatment, thereby improving outcomes in terms of excessive linear growth and acromegaly comorbidities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Mapping Mutations on Phylogenies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    This chapter provides a short review of recent methodologies developed for mapping mutations on phylogenies. Mapping of mutations, or character changes in general, using the maximum parsimony principle has been one of the most powerful tools in phylogenetics, and it has been used in a variety...... of different applications, for example, in the detection of correlated evolution and to identify selection acting on DNA sequences. However, many uses of parsimony mappings have been criticized because they focus on only one of many possible mappings and/or because they do not incorporate statistical...... uncertainty in the mapping. Recently developed probabilistic methods can incorporate statistical uncertainty in the character mappings. In these methods, focus is on a probability distribution of mutational mappings instead of a single estimate of the mutational mapping....

  9. Ion channels in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baluška, František; Mancuso, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    In his recent opus magnum review paper published in the October issue of Physiology Reviews, Rainer Hedrich summarized the field of plant ion channels.1 He started from the earliest electric recordings initiated by Charles Darwin of carnivorous Dionaea muscipula,1,2 known as Venus flytrap, and covered the topic extensively up to the most recent discoveries on Shaker-type potassium channels, anion channels of SLAC/SLAH families, and ligand-activated channels of glutamate receptor-like type (GLR) and cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNGC).1 PMID:23221742

  10. Trapping of Vibrio cholerae cytolysin in the membrane-bound monomeric state blocks membrane insertion and functional pore formation by the toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Anand Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Kausik

    2014-06-13

    Vibrio cholerae cytolysin (VCC) is a potent membrane-damaging cytolytic toxin that belongs to the family of β barrel pore-forming protein toxins. VCC induces lysis of its target eukaryotic cells by forming transmembrane oligomeric β barrel pores. The mechanism of membrane pore formation by VCC follows the overall scheme of the archetypical β barrel pore-forming protein toxin mode of action, in which the water-soluble monomeric form of the toxin first binds to the target cell membrane, then assembles into a prepore oligomeric intermediate, and finally converts into the functional transmembrane oligomeric β barrel pore. However, there exists a vast knowledge gap in our understanding regarding the intricate details of the membrane pore formation process employed by VCC. In particular, the membrane oligomerization and membrane insertion steps of the process have only been described to a limited extent. In this study, we determined the key residues in VCC that are critical to trigger membrane oligomerization of the toxin. Alteration of such key residues traps the toxin in its membrane-bound monomeric state and abrogates subsequent oligomerization, membrane insertion, and functional transmembrane pore-formation events. The results obtained from our study also suggest that the membrane insertion of VCC depends critically on the oligomerization process and that it cannot be initiated in the membrane-bound monomeric form of the toxin. In sum, our study, for the first time, dissects membrane binding from the subsequent oligomerization and membrane insertion steps and, thus, defines the exact sequence of events in the membrane pore formation process by VCC.

  11. The impact of single nucleotide polymorphism in monomeric alpha-amylase inhibitor genes from wild emmer wheat, primarily from Israel and Golan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Ze-Hong

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various enzyme inhibitors act on key insect gut digestive hydrolases, including alpha-amylases and proteinases. Alpha-amylase inhibitors have been widely investigated for their possible use in strengthening a plant's defense against insects that are highly dependent on starch as an energy source. We attempted to unravel the diversity of monomeric alpha-amylase inhibitor genes of Israeli and Golan Heights' wild emmer wheat with different ecological factors (e.g., geography, water, and temperature. Population methods that analyze the nature and frequency of allele diversity within a species and the codon analysis method (comparing patterns of synonymous and non-synonymous changes in protein coding sequences were used to detect natural selection. Results Three hundred and forty-eight sequences encoding monomeric alpha-amylase inhibitors (WMAI were obtained from 14 populations of wild emmer wheat. The frequency of SNPs in WMAI genes was 1 out of 16.3 bases, where 28 SNPs were detected in the coding sequence. The results of purifying and the positive selection hypothesis (p Conclusions Great diversity at the WMAI locus, both between and within populations, was detected in the populations of wild emmer wheat. It was revealed that WMAI were naturally selected for across populations by a ratio of dN/dS as expected. Ecological factors, singly or in combination, explained a significant proportion of the variations in the SNPs. A sharp genetic divergence over very short geographic distances compared to a small genetic divergence between large geographic distances also suggested that the SNPs were subjected to natural selection, and ecological factors had an important evolutionary role in polymorphisms at this locus. According to population and codon analysis, these results suggested that monomeric alpha-amylase inhibitors are adaptively selected under different environmental conditions.

  12. Non-specific activation of the epithelial sodium channel by the CFTR chloride channel

    OpenAIRE

    Nagel, Georg; Szellas, Tanjef; Riordan, John R.; Friedrich, Thomas; Hartung, Klaus

    2001-01-01

    The genetic disease cystic fibrosis is caused by mutation of the gene coding for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Controversial studies reported regulation of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) by CFTR. We found that uptake of 22Na+ through ENaC is modulated by activation of CFTR in oocytes, coexpressing CFTR and ENaC, depending on extracellular chloride concentration. Furthermore we found that the effect of CFTR activation could be mimicked by other chloride ...

  13. Antioxidant effects of phenolic rye (Secale cereale L.) extracts, monomeric hydroxycinnamates, and ferulic acid dehydrodimers on human low-density lipoproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Mette Findal; Landbo, A K; Christensen, L P

    2001-01-01

    Dietary antioxidants that protect low-density lipoprotein (LDL) from oxidation may help to prevent atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. The antioxidant activities of purified monomeric and dimeric hydroxycinnamates and of phenolic extracts from rye (whole grain, bran, and flour) were...... investigated using an in vitro copper-catalyzed human LDL oxidation assay. The most abundant ferulic acid dehydrodimer (diFA) found in rye, 8-O-4-diFA, was a slightly better antioxidant than ferulic acid and p-coumaric acid. The antioxidant activity of the 8-5-diFA was comparable to that of ferulic acid...

  14. Antioxidant effects of phenolic rye (Secale cereale L.) extracts, monomeric hydroxycinnamates, and ferulic acid dehydrodimers on human low-density lipoproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, M.F.; Landbo, Anne-Katrine Regel; Christensen, L.P.

    2001-01-01

    Dietary antioxidants that protect low-density lipoprotein (LDL) from oxidation may help to prevent atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. The antioxidant activities of purified monomeric and dimeric hydroxycinnamates and of phenolic extracts from rye (whole grain, bran, and flour) were...... investigated using an in vitro copper-catalyzed human LDL oxidation assay. The most abundant ferulic acid dehydrodimer (diFA) found in rye, 8-O-4- diFA, was a slightly better antioxidant than ferulic acid and p-coumaric acid. The antioxidant activity of the 8-5-diFA was comparable to that of ferulic acid...

  15. The spectrum of ABCC8 mutations in Norwegian patients with congenital hyperinsulinism of infancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandal, T; Laborie, L B; Brusgaard, K

    2009-01-01

    Potassium channels in the plasma membrane of the pancreatic beta cells are critical in maintaining glucose homeostasis by responding to ATP and coupling metabolic changes to insulin secretion. These channels consist of subunits denoted the sulfonylurea receptor SUR1 and the inwardly rectifying ion...... channel KIR6.2, which are encoded by the genes ABCC8 and KCNJ11, respectively. Activating mutations in the subunit genes can result in monogenic diabetes, whereas inactivating mutations are the most common cause of congenital hyperinsulinism of infancy (CHI). Twenty-six Norwegian probands with CHI were...

  16. Protocol channels as a new design alternative of covert channels

    CERN Document Server

    Wendzel, Steffen

    2008-01-01

    Covert channel techniques are used by attackers to transfer hidden data. There are two main categories of covert channels: timing channels and storage channels. This paper introduces a third category called protocol channels. A protocol channel switches one of at least two protocols to send a bit combination to a destination while sent packets include no hidden information themselves.

  17. Surface vacancy channels through ion channeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redinger, Alex; Standop, Sebastian; Michely, Thomas [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Koeln, Zuelpicher Strasse 77, 50937 Koeln (Germany); Rosandi, Yudi; Urbassek, Herbert M. [Fachbereich Physik, Technische Universitaet Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger-Strasse, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Damage patterns of single ion impacts on Pt(111) have been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and molecular dynamics simulations (MD). Low temperature experiments, where surface diffusion is absent, have been performed for argon and xenon ions with energies between 1 keV and 15 keV at an angle of incidence of 86 {sup circle} measured with respect to the surface normal. Ions hitting preexisting illuminated step edges penetrate into the crystal and are guided in open crystallographic directions, one or more layers underneath the surface (subsurface channeling). In the case of argon channeling the resulting surface damage consists of adatom and vacancy pairs aligned in ion beam direction. After xenon channeling thin surface vacancy trenches along the ion trajectories - surface vacancy channels - are observed. They result from very efficient sputtering and adatom production along the ion trajectory. This phenomena is well reproduced in molecular dynamics simulations of single ion impacts at 0 K. The damage patterns of Argon and Xenon impacts can be traced back to the different energy losses of the particles in the channel. Channeling distances exceeding 1000 A for 15 keV xenon impacts are observed.

  18. Subquivers of mutation-acyclic quivers are mutation-acyclic

    CERN Document Server

    Warkentin, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Quiver mutation plays a crucial role in the definition of cluster algebras by Fomin and Zelevinsky. It induces an equivalence relation on the set of all quivers without loops and two-cycles. A quiver is called mutation-acyclic if it is mutation-equivalent to an acyclic quiver. The aim of this note is to show that full subquivers of mutation-acyclic quivers are mutation-acyclic.

  19. The S4-S5 linker couples voltage sensing and activation of pacemaker channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J; Mitcheson, J S; Tristani-Firouzi, M; Lin, M; Sanguinetti, M C

    2001-09-25

    Voltage-gated channels are normally opened by depolarization and closed by repolarization of the membrane. Despite sharing significant sequence homology with voltage-gated K(+) channels, the gating of hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic-nucleotide-gated (HCN) pacemaker channels has the opposite dependence on membrane potential: hyperpolarization opens, whereas depolarization closes, these channels. The mechanism and structural basis of the process that couples voltage sensor movement to HCN channel opening and closing is not understood. On the basis of our previous studies of a mutant HERG (human ether-a-go-go-related gene) channel, we hypothesized that the intracellular linker that connects the fourth and fifth transmembrane domains (S4-S5 linker) of HCN channels might be important for channel gating. Here, we used alanine-scanning mutagenesis of the HCN2 S4-S5 linker to identify three residues, E324, Y331, and R339, that when mutated disrupted normal channel closing. Mutation of a basic residue in the S4 domain (R318Q) prevented channel opening, presumably by disrupting S4 movement. However, channels with R318Q and Y331S mutations were constitutively open, suggesting that these channels can open without a functioning S4 domain. We conclude that the S4-S5 linker mediates coupling between voltage sensing and HCN channel activation. Our findings also suggest that opening of HCN and related channels corresponds to activation of a gate located near the inner pore, rather than recovery of channels from a C-type inactivated state.

  20. Mutations in calmodulin cause ventricular tachycardia and sudden cardiac death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyegaard, Mette; Overgaard, Michael Toft; Søndergaard, Mads

    2012-01-01

    a substantial part of sudden cardiac deaths in young individuals. Mutations in RYR2, encoding the cardiac sarcoplasmic calcium channel, have been identified as causative in approximately half of all dominantly inherited CPVT cases. Applying a genome-wide linkage analysis in a large Swedish family with a severe...... dominantly inherited form of CPVT-like arrhythmias, we mapped the disease locus to chromosome 14q31-32. Sequencing CALM1 encoding calmodulin revealed a heterozygous missense mutation (c.161A>T [p.Asn53Ile]) segregating with the disease. A second, de novo, missense mutation (c.293A>G [p.Asn97Ser......]) was subsequently identified in an individual of Iraqi origin; this individual was diagnosed with CPVT from a screening of 61 arrhythmia samples with no identified RYR2 mutations. Both CALM1 substitutions demonstrated compromised calcium binding, and p.Asn97Ser displayed an aberrant interaction with the RYR2...

  1. Influence of point mutations on the stability, dimerization and oligomerization of human cystatin C and its L68Q variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta eSzymanska

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Human cystatin C (hCC is a small but very intriguing protein. Produced by all nucleated cells is found in almost all tissues and body fluids where, at physiological conditions, plays a role of a very potent inhibitor of cysteine proteases. Biologically active hCC is a monomeric protein but during cellular trafficking it forms dimers, transiently loosing its inhibitory activity. In vitro, dimerization of cystatin C was observed for the mature protein during crystallization trials, revealing that the mechanism of this process is based on the three dimensional swapping of the protein domains. In our work we have focused on the impact of two proposed hot spots in cystatin C structure on its conformational stability. Encouraged by promising results of the theoretical calculations, we designed and produced several hCC hinge region point mutation variants that display a variety of conformational stability and propensity for dimerization and aggregation. A similar approach, i.e. rational mutagenesis, has been also applied to study the amyloidogenic L68Q variant to determine the contribution of hydrophobic interactions and steric effect on the stability of monomeric cystatin C. In this overview we would like to summarize the results of our studies. The impact of a particular mutation on the properties of the studied proteins will be presented in the context of their thermal and mechanical stability, in vitro dimerization tendency as well as the outcome of crystallization. Better understanding of the mechanism and, especially, factors affecting conformational stability of cystatin C and access to stable monomeric and dimeric versions of the protein opens new perspectives in explaining the role of dimers and the domain swapping process in hCC oligomerization, as well as designing potential inhibitors of this process.

  2. Mechanotransduction in m