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Sample records for monoenergetic flare produced

  1. Z-dependence of thick-target bremsstrahlung produced by monoenergetic low-energy electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, S.; Short, A.; Williams, S.

    2016-07-01

    The dependence of thick-target bremsstrahlung emitted by low-energy beams of monoenergetic electrons on the atomic number of the target material has been investigated experimentally for incident electron energies of 4.25 keV and 5.00 keV using thick aluminum, copper, silver, tungsten, and gold targets. Experimental data suggest that the intensity of the thick-target bremsstrahlung emitted is more strongly dependent on the atomic number of the target material for photons with energies that are approximately equal to the energy of the incident electrons than at lower energies, and also that the dependence of thick-target bremsstrahlung on the atomic number of the target material is stronger for incident electrons of higher energies than for incident electrons of lower energies. The results of the experiments are compared to the results of simulations performed using the PENELOPE program (which is commonly used in medical physics) and to thin-target bremsstrahlung theory, as well. Comparisons suggest that the experimental dependence of thick-target bremsstrahlung on the atomic number of the target material may be slightly stronger than the results of the PENELOPE code suggest.

  2. Observable quasi-periodic oscillations produced by steep pulse profiles in magnetar flares

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.R. d' Angelo; A.L. Watts

    2012-01-01

    Strong quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in the tails of the giant gamma-ray flares seen in SGR 1806-20 and SGR 1900+14 are thought to be produced by starquakes in the flaring magnetar. However, the large fractional amplitudes (up to ~20%) observed are difficult to reconcile with predicted amplitud

  3. The Relationship between Magnetic Gradient and Magnetic Shear in Five Super Active Regions Producing Great Flares

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Min Wang; Hui Song; Ju Jing; Vasyl Yurchyshyn; Yuan-Yong Deng; Hong-Qi Zhang; David Falconer; Jing Li

    2006-01-01

    We study the magnetic structure of five well-known active regions that produced great flares (X5 or larger). The six flares under investigation are the X12 flare on 1991 June 9in AR 6659, the X5.7 flare on 2000 July 14 in AR 9077, the X5.6 flare on 2001 April 6 in AR 9415, the X5.3 flare on 2001 August 25 in AR 9591, the X17 flare on 2003 October 28 and the X10 flare on 2003 October 29, both in AR 10486. The last five events had corresponding LASCO observations and were all associated with Halo CMEs. We analyzed vector magnetograms from Big Bear Solar Observatory, Huairou Solar Observing Station, Marshall Space Flight Center and Mees Solar Observatory. In particular, we studied the magnetic gradient derived from line-of-sight magnetograms and magnetic shear derived from vector magnetograms, and found an apparent correlation between these two parameters at a level of about 90%. We found that the magnetic gradient could be a better proxy than the shear for predicting where a major flare might occur: all six flares occurred in neutral lines with maximum gradient. The mean gradient of the flaring neutral lines ranges from 0.14 to 0.50 G km-1, 2.3to 8 times the average value for all the neutral lines in the active regions. If we use magnetic shear as the proxy, the flaring neutral line in at least one, possibly two, of the six events would be mis-identified.

  4. Table-top solar flares produced with laser driven magnetic reconnections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong J.Y.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The American Nuclear Society (ANS has presented the prestigious Edward Teller award to Dr. Bruce A. Remington during the 2011 IFSA conference due to his “pioneering scientific work in the fields of inertial confinement fusion (ICF, and especially developing an international effort in high energy density laboratory astrophysics” [1,2]. This is a great acknowledgement to the subject of high energy density laboratory astrophysics. In this context, we report here one experiment conducted to model solar flares in the laboratory with intense lasers [3]. The mega-gauss –scale magnetic fields produced by laser produced plasmas can be used to make magnetic reconnection topology. We have produced one table-top solar flare in our laboratory experiment with the same geometric setup as associated with solar flares.

  5. GRB Afterglow Blast Wave Encountering Sudden Circumburst Density Change Produces No Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Gat, Ilana; MacFadyen, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Afterglows of gamma-ray bursts are observed to produce light curves with the flux following power law evolution in time. However, recent observations reveal bright flares at times on the order of minutes to days. One proposed explanation for these flares is the interaction of a relativistic blast wave with a circumburst density transition. In this paper, we model this type of interaction computationally in one and two dimensions, using a relativistic hydrodynamics code with adaptive mesh refinement called ram, and analytically in one dimension. We simulate a blast wave traveling in a stellar wind environment that encounters a sudden change in density, followed by a homogeneous medium, and compute the observed radiation using a synchrotron model. We show that flares are not observable for an encounter with a sudden density increase, such as a wind termination shock, nor for an encounter with a sudden density decrease. Furthermore, by extending our analysis to two dimensions, we are able to resolve the spreadin...

  6. Clusters of small eruptive flares produced by magnetic reconnection in the sun

    CERN Document Server

    Archontis, V

    2015-01-01

    We report on the formation of small solar flares produced by patchy magnetic reconnection between interacting magnetic loops. A three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical experiment was performed, where a uniform magnetic flux sheet was injected into a fully developed convective layer. The gradual emergence of the field into the solar atmosphere results in a network of magnetic loops, which interact dynamically forming current layers at their interfaces. The formation and ejection of plasmoids out of the current layers leads to patchy reconnection and the spontaneous formation of several small (size ? 1-2Mm) flares. We find that these flares are short-lived (30 s - 3 min) bursts of energy in the range O(10^25 - 10^27) ergs, which is basically the nanoflare-microflare range. Their persistent formation and co-operative action and evolution leads to recurrent emission of fast EUV/X-ray jets and considerable plasma heating in the active corona.

  7. An expanding radio nebula produced by a giant flare from the magnetar SGR 1806-20

    CERN Document Server

    Gaensler, B M; Gelfand, J D; Taylor, G B; Eichler, D; Wijers, R A M J; Granot, J; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Lyubarsky, Y E; Hunstead, R W; Campbell-Wilson, D; Van der Host, A J; McLaughlin, M A; Fender, R P; Garrett, M A; Newton-McGee, K J; Palmer, D M; Gehrels, N; Woods, P M

    2005-01-01

    Soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) are "magnetars", a small class of slowly spinning neutron stars with extreme surface magnetic fields, ~10^15 gauss. On 2004 December 27, a giant flare was detected from the magnetar SGR 1806-20, the third such event ever recorded. This burst of energy was detected by a variety of instruments and even caused an ionospheric disturbance in the Earth's upper atmosphere recorded around the globe. Here we report the detection of a fading radio afterglow produced by this outburst, with a luminosity 500 times larger than the only other detection of a similar source. From day 6 to day 19 after the flare from SGR 1806-20, a resolved, linearly polarized, radio nebula was seen, expanding at approximately a quarter the speed of light. To create this nebula, at least 4x10^43 ergs of energy must have been emitted by the giant flare in the form of magnetic fields and relativistic particles. The combination of spatially resolved structure and rapid time evolution allows a study in unprecedented det...

  8. An Expanding Radio Nebula Produced by a Giant Flare from the Magnetar SGR 1806-20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaensler, B.

    2005-03-04

    Soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) are ''magnetars'', a small class of slowly spinning neutron stars with extreme surface magnetic fields, B {approx} 10{sup 15} gauss. On 2004 December 27, a giant flare was detected from the magnetar SGR 1806-20, the third such event ever recorded. This burst of energy was detected by a variety of instruments and even caused an ionospheric disturbance in the Earth's upper atmosphere recorded around the globe. Here we report the detection of a fading radio afterglow produced by this outburst, with a luminosity 500 times larger than the only other detection of a similar source. From day 6 to day 19 after the flare from SGR 1806-20, a resolved, linearly polarized, radio nebula was seen, expanding at approximately a quarter the speed of light. To create this nebula, at least 4 x 10{sup 43} ergs of energy must have been emitted by the giant flare in the form of magnetic fields and relativistic particles. The combination of spatially resolved structure and rapid time evolution allows a study in unprecedented detail of a nearby analog to supernovae and gamma-ray bursts.

  9. An expanding radio nebula produced by a giant flare from the magnetar SGR 1806-20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaensler, B M; Kouveliotou, C; Gelfand, J D; Taylor, G B; Eichler, D; Wijers, R A M J; Granot, J; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Lyubarsky, Y E; Hunstead, R W; Campbell-Wilson, D; van der Horst, A J; McLaughlin, M A; Fender, R P; Garrett, M A; Newton-McGee, K J; Palmer, D M; Gehrels, N; Woods, P M

    2005-04-28

    Soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) are 'magnetars', a small class of slowly spinning neutron stars with extreme surface magnetic fields, B approximately 10(15) gauss (refs 1 , 2 -3). On 27 December 2004, a giant flare was detected from the magnetar SGR 1806-20 (ref. 2), only the third such event recorded. This burst of energy was detected by a variety of instruments and even caused an ionospheric disturbance in the Earth's upper atmosphere that was recorded around the globe. Here we report the detection of a fading radio afterglow produced by this outburst, with a luminosity 500 times larger than the only other detection of a similar source. From day 6 to day 19 after the flare from SGR 1806-20, a resolved, linearly polarized, radio nebula was seen, expanding at approximately a quarter of the speed of light. To create this nebula, at least 4 x 10(43) ergs of energy must have been emitted by the giant flare in the form of magnetic fields and relativistic particles.

  10. Generation of monoenergetic positrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Dale, J.M.; Miller, P.D. Jr.; Moak, C.D.; Pendyala, S.; Triftshaeuser, W.; Howell, R.H.; Alvarez, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Many experiments have been performed in the generation and application of monoenergetic positron beams using annealed tungsten moderators and fast sources of /sup 58/Co, /sup 22/Na, /sup 11/C, and LINAC bremstrahlung. This paper will compare the degrees of success from our various approaches. Moderators made from both single crystal and polycrystal tungsten have been tried. Efforts to grow thin films of tungsten to be used as transmission moderators and brightness enhancement devices are in progress.

  11. Production of flare-produced H/sup 2/ and He/sup 3/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothwell, P.L.

    1976-02-01

    Recent measurement indicate the enriched production of He/sup 4/ but not of H/sup 2/ in some solar flares. This leads to an apparent paradox if the reaction H+He/sup 3/..-->..H/sup 2/+He/sup 3/ is the dominant mode of production. A detailed Monte Carlo calculation for this reaction is performed to determine the kinematical regions where He/sup 3/ dominates. It is found that for the thin-target case, no such region exists. For the thick-target case, He/sup 3/ dominates in the backward and perpendicular directions relative to the incident proton. Obtaining reliable production ratios above approx.10 MeV/nucleon is not possible because of uncertainties in the production cross section at high incident proton energies (E/subp/> or =400 MeV). One possibility recently proposed by Ramaty and Kozlovsky (1974) is that the measured He/sup 3/ are accelerated after being produced by protons impinging on the solar atmosphere. This hypothesis is examined and it is concluded that the required postproduction acceleration must occur over very small distances on a solar scale and before photospheric turbulence mixes the separated H/sup 2/ and He/sup 3/. It is concluded that a thick-target model based on primary protons mirroring just below the solar surface is the most likely source of the He/sup 3/ enriched events. (AIP)

  12. Structural properties of the solar flare-producing coronal current system developed in an emerging magnetic flux tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magara, Tetsuya

    2017-02-01

    The activity of a magnetic structure formed in the solar corona depends on a coronal current system developed in the structure, which determines how an electric current flows in the corona. To investigate structural properties of the coronal current system responsible for producing a solar flare, we perform magnetohydrodynamic simulation of an emerging magnetic flux tube which forms a coronal magnetic structure. Investigation using fractal dimensional analysis and electric current streamlines reveals that the flare-producing coronal current system relies on a specific coronal current structure of two-dimensional spatiality, which has a sub-region where a nearly anti-parallel magnetic field configuration is spontaneously generated. We discuss the role of this locally generated anti-parallel magnetic field configuration in causing the reconnection of a three-dimensional magnetic field, which is a possible mechanism for producing a flare. We also discuss how the twist of a magnetic flux tube affects structural properties of a coronal current system, showing how much volume current flux is carried into the corona by an emerging flux tube. This gives a way to evaluate the activity of a coronal magnetic structure.

  13. Effect of Gas Flaring on Buildings in the Oil Producing Rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    pollution levels and the level of impact on the sampled buildings (OR = 3.2,. 95%, C.I. 1.3 – 6.7). ... Key Words: buildings, degradation, effect, exposure, emissions, gas flaring ... Gas Analyzer MRU (2002 Model) with electrochemical measuring principles ..... of volatile organic Compounds Emission Control Int. J. Environ Sc.

  14. An Expanding Radio Nebula Produced by a Giant Flare from the Magnetar SGR 1806-20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaensler, B. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Gelfand, J. D.; Taylor, G. B.; Eichler, D.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Granot, J.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Lyubarsky, Y. E.; Hunstead, R. W.

    2005-01-01

    Soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) are "magnetars", a small class of slowly spinning neutron stars with extreme surface magnetic fields, B approx. 10(sup 15) gauss. On 2004 December 27, a giant flare was detected from the magnetar SGR 1806-20, the third such event ever recorded. This burst of energy, which resulted in the highest flux of gamma-rays ever measured from a celestial object, was detected by a variety of instruments and even caused an ionospheric disturbance in the Earth's upper atmosphere recorded around the globe. Here we report the detection of a very bright but rapidly-fading radio source at the position of SGR 1806-20 following this outburst. From day 6 to day 19 after the flare, we see a resolved, linearly polarized, radio nebula, expanding at a velocity of approximately 0.3c. To create this nebula, at least 4 x 10(exp 43) ergs of energy must have been emitted by the giant flare in the form of magnetic fields and relativistic particles. The steep decline of the radio flux may indicate episodic particle acceleration followed by adiabatic expansion, as could occur if the ejecta have energized a thin shell surrounding a preexisting cavity.

  15. MODELING OF GYROSYNCHROTRON RADIO EMISSION PULSATIONS PRODUCED BY MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC LOOP OSCILLATIONS IN SOLAR FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mossessian, George; Fleishman, Gregory D. [Center For Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States)

    2012-04-01

    A quantitative study of the observable radio signatures of the sausage, kink, and torsional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillation modes in flaring coronal loops is performed. Considering first non-zero order effect of these various MHD oscillation modes on the radio source parameters such as magnetic field, line of sight, plasma density and temperature, electron distribution function, and the source dimensions, we compute time-dependent radio emission (spectra and light curves). The radio light curves (of both flux density and degree of polarization) at all considered radio frequencies are then quantified in both time domain (via computation of the full modulation amplitude as a function of frequency) and in Fourier domain (oscillation spectra, phases, and partial modulation amplitude) to form the signatures specific to a particular oscillation mode and/or source parameter regime. We found that the parameter regime and the involved MHD mode can indeed be distinguished using the quantitative measures derived in the modeling. We apply the developed approach to analyze radio burst recorded by Owens Valley Solar Array and report possible detection of the sausage mode oscillation in one (partly occulted) flare and kink or torsional oscillations in another flare.

  16. Modeling of gyrosynchrotron radio emission pulsations produced by MHD loop oscillations in solar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Mossessian, George

    2011-01-01

    A quantitative study of the observable radio signatures of the sausage, kink, and torsional MHD oscillation modes in flaring coronal loops is performed. Considering first non-zero order effect of these various MHD oscillation modes on the radio source parameters such as magnetic field, line of sight, plasma density and temperature, electron distribution function, and the source dimensions, we compute time dependent radio emission (spectra and light curves). The radio light curves (of both flux density and degree of polarization) at all considered radio frequencies are than quantified in both time domain (via computation of the full modulation amplitude as a function of frequency) and in Fourier domain (oscillation spectra, phases, and partial modulation amplitude) to form the signatures specific to a particular oscillation mode and/or source parameter regime. We found that the parameter regime and the involved MHD mode can indeed be distinguished using the quantitative measures derived in the modeling. We app...

  17. Generation of monoenergetic ion beams with a laser accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfotenhauer, Sebastian M.

    2009-01-29

    A method for the generation of monoenergetic proton and ion beams from a laser-based particle accelerator is presented. This method utilizes the unique space-charge effects occurring during relativistic laser-plasma interactions on solid targets in combination with a dot-like particle source. Due to this unique interaction geometry, MeV proton beams with an intrinsically narrow energy spectrum were obtained, for the first time, from a micrometer-scale laser accelerator. Over the past three years, the acceleration scheme has been consistently improved to enhance both the maximum particle energy and the reliability of the setup. The achieved degree of reliability allowed to derive the first scaling laws specifically for monoenergetic proton beams. Furthermore, the acceleration scheme was expanded on other target materials, enabling the generation of monoenergetic carbon beams. The experimental work was strongly supported by the parallel development of a complex theoretical model, which fully accounts for the observations and is in excellent agreement with numerical simulations. The presented results have an extraordinarily broad scope way beyond the current thesis: The availability of monoenergetic ion beams from a compact laser-plasma beam source - in conjunction with the unique properties of laser-produced particle beams - addresses a number of outstanding applications in fundamental research, material science and medical physics, and will help to shape a new generation of accelerators. (orig.)

  18. Thermalization of monoenergetic neutrons in a concrete room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H.R.; Manzanares A, E.; Hernandez D, V.M.; Mercado, G.A. [UAZ, A.P. 336, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico); Iniguez, M.P.; Martin M, A. [Universidad de Valladolid, (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    The thermalization of neutrons from monoenergetic neutron sources in a concrete room has been studied. During calibration of neutron detectors it is mandatory to make corrections due to neutron scattering produced by the room walls, therefore this factor must be known in advance. The scattered neutrons are thermalized and produce a neutron field that is directly proportional to source strength and inversely proportional to room total wall-surfaces, the proportional coefficient has been calculated for neutrons whose energy goes from 1 eV to 20 MeV. This coefficient was calculated using Monte Carlo methods for 150, 200 and 300 cm-radius spherical cavity, where monoenergetic neutrons were located at the center, along the spherical cavity radius neutron spectra were calculated at several source-to-detector distances inside the cavity. The obtained coefficient is almost three times larger than the factor normally utilized. (Author)

  19. Solar Flares: Magnetohydrodynamic Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunari Shibata

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines the current understanding of solar flares, mainly focused on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD processes responsible for producing a flare. Observations show that flares are one of the most explosive phenomena in the atmosphere of the Sun, releasing a huge amount of energy up to about 10^32 erg on the timescale of hours. Flares involve the heating of plasma, mass ejection, and particle acceleration that generates high-energy particles. The key physical processes for producing a flare are: the emergence of magnetic field from the solar interior to the solar atmosphere (flux emergence, local enhancement of electric current in the corona (formation of a current sheet, and rapid dissipation of electric current (magnetic reconnection that causes shock heating, mass ejection, and particle acceleration. The evolution toward the onset of a flare is rather quasi-static when free energy is accumulated in the form of coronal electric current (field-aligned current, more precisely, while the dissipation of coronal current proceeds rapidly, producing various dynamic events that affect lower atmospheres such as the chromosphere and photosphere. Flares manifest such rapid dissipation of coronal current, and their theoretical modeling has been developed in accordance with observations, in which numerical simulations proved to be a strong tool reproducing the time-dependent, nonlinear evolution of a flare. We review the models proposed to explain the physical mechanism of flares, giving an comprehensive explanation of the key processes mentioned above. We start with basic properties of flares, then go into the details of energy build-up, release and transport in flares where magnetic reconnection works as the central engine to produce a flare.

  20. Note: A monoenergetic proton backlighter for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rygg, J. R.; LePape, S.; Bachmann, B.; Khan, S. F.; Sayre, D. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Zylstra, A. B.; Séguin, F. H.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Lahmann, B. J.; Petrasso, R. D.; Sio, H. W. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Craxton, R. S.; Garcia, E. M.; Kong, Y. Z.; McKenty, P. W. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Rinderknecht, H. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Rosenberg, M. J. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    A monoenergetic, isotropic proton source suitable for proton radiography applications has been demonstrated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A deuterium and helium-3 gas-filled glass capsule was imploded with 39 kJ of laser energy from 24 of NIF’s 192 beams. Spectral, spatial, and temporal measurements of the 15-MeV proton product of the {sup 3}He(d,p){sup 4}He nuclear reaction reveal a bright (10{sup 10} protons/sphere), monoenergetic (ΔE/E = 4%) spectrum with a compact size (80 μm) and isotropic emission (∼13% proton fluence variation and <0.4% mean energy variation). Simultaneous measurements of products produced by the D(d,p)T and D(d,n){sup 3}He reactions also show 2 × 10{sup 10} isotropically distributed 3-MeV protons.

  1. Laser-driven shock acceleration of monoenergetic ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Fiuza, F; Boella, E; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O; Haberberger, D; Tochitsky, S; Gong, C; Mori, W B; Joshi, C

    2012-01-01

    We show that monoenergetic ion beams can be accelerated by moderate Mach number collisionless, electrostatic shocks propagating in a long scale-length exponentially decaying plasma profile. Strong plasma heating and density steepening produced by an intense laser pulse near the critical density can launch such shocks that propagate in the extended plasma at high velocities. The generation of a monoenergetic ion beam is possible due to the small and constant sheath electric field associated with the slowly decreasing density profile. The conditions for the acceleration of high-quality, energetic ion beams are identified through theory and multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The scaling of the ion energy with laser intensity shows that it is possible to generate $\\sim 200$ MeV proton beams with state-of-the-art 100 TW class laser systems.

  2. Note: A monoenergetic proton backlighter for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rygg, J. R.; Zylstra, A. B.; Séguin, F. H.; LePape, S.; Bachmann, B.; Craxton, R. S.; Garcia, E. M.; Kong, Y. Z.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Khan, S. F.; Lahmann, B. J.; McKenty, P. W.; Petrasso, R. D.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sayre, D. B.; Sio, H. W.

    2015-11-01

    A monoenergetic, isotropic proton source suitable for proton radiography applications has been demonstrated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A deuterium and helium-3 gas-filled glass capsule was imploded with 39 kJ of laser energy from 24 of NIF's 192 beams. Spectral, spatial, and temporal measurements of the 15-MeV proton product of the 3He(d,p)4He nuclear reaction reveal a bright (1010 protons/sphere), monoenergetic (ΔE/E = 4%) spectrum with a compact size (80 μm) and isotropic emission (˜13% proton fluence variation and <0.4% mean energy variation). Simultaneous measurements of products produced by the D(d,p)T and D(d,n)3He reactions also show 2 × 1010 isotropically distributed 3-MeV protons.

  3. Calibration of CR-39 with monoenergetic protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaojiao, Duan; Xiaofei, Lan; Zhixin, Tan; Yongsheng, Huang; Shilun, Guo; Dawei, Yang; Naiyan, Wang

    2009-10-01

    Calibration of solid state nuclear track detector CR-39 was carried out with very low-energy monoenergetic protons of 20-100 keV from a Cockcroft Walton accelerator. To reduce the beam of the proton from the accelerator, a novel method was adopted by means of a high voltage pulse generator. The irradiation time of the proton beam on each CR-39 sheet was shortened to one pulse with duration of 100 ns, so that very separated proton tracks around 104 cm-2 can be irradiated and observed and measured on the surface of the CR-39 detector after etching. The variations of track diameter with etching time as well as with proton energy response curve has been carefully calibrated for the first time in this very low energy region. The calibration shows that the optical limit for the observation of etched tracks of protons in CR-39 is about or a little lower that 20 keV, above which the proton tracks can be seen clearly and the response curve can be used to distinguish protons from the other ions and determine the energy of the protons. The extension of response curve of protons from traditionally 20 to 100 keV in CR-39 is significant in retrieving information of protons produced in the studies of nuclear physics, plasma physics, ultrahigh intensity laser physics and laser acceleration.

  4. Turbulent pitch-angle scattering and diffusive transport of hard-X-ray producing electrons in flaring coronal loops

    CERN Document Server

    Kontar, E P; Emslie, A G; Vilmer, N

    2013-01-01

    Recent observations from {\\em RHESSI} have revealed that the number of non-thermal electrons in the coronal part of a flaring loop can exceed the number of electrons required to explain the hard X-ray-emitting footpoints of the same flaring loop. Such sources cannot, therefore, be interpreted on the basis of the standard collisional transport model, in which electrons stream along the loop while losing their energy through collisions with the ambient plasma; additional physical processes, to either trap or scatter the energetic electrons, are required. Motivated by this and other observations that suggest that high energy electrons are confined to the coronal region of the source, we consider turbulent pitch angle scattering of fast electrons off low frequency magnetic fluctuations as a confinement mechanism, modeled as a spatial diffusion parallel to the mean magnetic field. In general, turbulent scattering leads to a reduction of the collisional stopping distance of non-thermal electrons along the loop and ...

  5. Relativistic Electrons Produced by Reconnecting Electric Fields in a Laser-driven Bench-top Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, J. Y.; Lin, J.; Li, Y. T.; Wang, X.; Li, Y.; Zhang, K.; Yuan, D. W.; Ping, Y. L.; Wei, H. G.; Wang, J. Q.; Su, L. N.; Li, F.; Han, B.; Liao, G. Q.; Yin, C. L.; Fang, Y.; Yuan, X.; Wang, C.; Sun, J. R.; Liang, G. Y.; Wang, F. L.; Ding, Y. K.; He, X. T.; Zhu, J. Q.; Sheng, Z. M.; Li, G.; Zhao, G.; Zhang, J.

    2016-08-01

    Laboratory experiments have been carried out to model the magnetic reconnection process in a solar flare with powerful lasers. Relativistic electrons with energy up to megaelectronvolts are detected along the magnetic separatrices bounding the reconnection outflow, which exhibit a kappa-like distribution with an effective temperature of ˜109 K. The acceleration of non-thermal electrons is found to be more efficient in the case with a guide magnetic field (a component of a magnetic field along the reconnection-induced electric field) than in the case without a guide field. Hardening of the spectrum at energies ≥500 keV is observed in both cases, which remarkably resembles the hardening of hard X-ray and γ-ray spectra observed in many solar flares. This supports a recent proposal that the hardening in the hard X-ray and γ-ray emissions of solar flares is due to a hardening of the source-electron spectrum. We also performed numerical simulations that help examine behaviors of electrons in the reconnection process with the electromagnetic field configurations occurring in the experiments. The trajectories of non-thermal electrons observed in the experiments were well duplicated in the simulations. Our numerical simulations generally reproduce the electron energy spectrum as well, except for the hardening of the electron spectrum. This suggests that other mechanisms such as shock or turbulence may play an important role in the production of the observed energetic electrons.

  6. Flare Heating in Stellar Coronae

    CERN Document Server

    Kashyap, V L; Güdel, M; Audard, M; Kashyap, Vinay; Drake, Jeremy; Guedel, Manuel; Audard, Marc

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the contribution of very weak flares to the coronal luminosity of low-mass active stars. We analyze EUVE/DS events data from FK Aqr, V1054 Oph, and AD Leo and conclude that in all these cases the coronal emission is dominated by flares to such an extent that in some cases the entire emission may be ascribed to flare heating. We have developed a new method to directly model for the first time stochastically produced flare emission, including undetectable flares, and their effects on the observed photon arrival times. We find that the index of the power-law distribution of flare energies (dN/dE ~ E^{-alpha}) is 2.6+-0.34, 2.74+-0.35, and 2.03-2.32 for FK Aqr, V1054 Oph, and AD Leo respectively. We also find that the flare component accounts for a large fraction (generally >50 percent) of the total flux.

  7. Analysis of the response of innovative neutron detectors with monoenergetic neutron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romei, C.; Ciolini, R.; Mirzajani, N.; Selici, S. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleare e della Produzione, Universita di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Di Fulvio, A.; D' Errico, F. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleare e della Produzione, Universita di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); Souza, S. O. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Sao Cristovao (Brazil); Piotto, M. [Istituto di Ingegneria Elettronica, Computer e Telecomunicazioni, CNR, Pisa (Italy); Esposito, J.; Colautti, P. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Padova) (Italy)

    2013-07-18

    Various neutron detectors are currently under development at the University of Pisa. The response of these devices is investigated using monoenergetic neutron beams produced at the CN accelerator of INFN Legnaro National Laboratories with thin lithium target bombarded by protons at different energies, exploiting the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction.

  8. Parametric injection for monoenergetic electron acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguchi, A; Takano, K; Hotta, E; Nemoto, K [Department of Energy Sciences Tokyo Institute of Technology 4259 Nagatsuta-cho Midori-ku Yokohama 226-8502 Japan (Japan); Zhidkov, A [Central Research Instistute of Electric Power Industry 2-6-1 Nagasaka Yokosuka Kanagawa 240-0196 Japan (Japan); Nakajima, K [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, KEK 1-1 Oho Tsukuba Ibaraki 305-0801 Japan (Japan)], E-mail: blue-ayu@plasma.es.titech.ac.jp

    2008-05-01

    Electrons are accelerated in the laser wakefield (LWFA). This mechanism has been studied by 2D or 3D Particle In Cell simulation. However, how the electrons are injected in the wakefield is not understood. In this paper, we consider about the process of self -injection and propose new scheme. When plasma electron density modulates, parametric resonance of electron momentum is induced. The parametric resonance depends on laser waist modulation. We carried out 2D PIC simulation with the initial condition decided from resonance condition. Moreover, we analyze experimental result that generated 200-250 MeV monoenergetic electron beam with 400TW intense laser in CAEP in China.

  9. Nasal flaring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be caused by any of the following: Asthma flare-up Blocked airway (any cause) Swelling and mucus ... Tests that may be done include: Arterial blood gas analysis Complete blood count (CBC) ECG to check ...

  10. Study of nuclear recoils in liquid argon with monoenergetic neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Regenfus, C; Amsler, C; Creus, W; Ferella, A; Rochet, J; Walter, M

    2012-01-01

    For the development of liquid argon dark matter detectors we assembled a setup in the laboratory to scatter neutrons on a small liquid argon target. The neutrons are produced mono-energetically (E_kin=2.45 MeV) by nuclear fusion in a deuterium plasma and are collimated onto a 3" liquid argon cell operating in single-phase mode (zero electric field). Organic liquid scintillators are used to tag scattered neutrons and to provide a time-of-flight measurement. The setup is designed to study light pulse shapes and scintillation yields from nuclear and electronic recoils as well as from {\\alpha}-particles at working points relevant to dark matter searches. Liquid argon offers the possibility to scrutinise scintillation yields in noble liquids with respect to the populations of the two fundamental excimer states. Here we present experimental methods and first results from recent data towards such studies.

  11. Flare Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benz Arnold O.

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Solar flares are observed at all wavelengths from decameter radio waves to gamma-rays at 100 MeV. This review focuses on recent observations in EUV, soft and hard X-rays, white light, and radio waves. Space missions such as RHESSI, Yohkoh, TRACE, and SOHO have enlarged widely the observational base. They have revealed a number of surprises: Coronal sources appear before the hard X-ray emission in chromospheric footpoints, major flare acceleration sites appear to be independent of coronal mass ejections (CMEs, electrons, and ions may be accelerated at different sites, there are at least 3 different magnetic topologies, and basic characteristics vary from small to large flares. Recent progress also includes improved insights into the flare energy partition, on the location(s of energy release, tests of energy release scenarios and particle acceleration. The interplay of observations with theory is important to deduce the geometry and to disentangle the various processes involved. There is increasing evidence supporting reconnection of magnetic field lines as the basic cause. While this process has become generally accepted as the trigger, it is still controversial how it converts a considerable fraction of the energy into non-thermal particles. Flare-like processes may be responsible for large-scale restructuring of the magnetic field in the corona as well as for its heating. Large flares influence interplanetary space and substantially affect the Earth’s lower ionosphere. While flare scenarios have slowly converged over the past decades, every new observation still reveals major unexpected results, demonstrating that solar flares, after 150 years since their discovery, remain a complex problem of astrophysics including major unsolved questions.

  12. A Statistical Approach to a Better Understanding of the Conditions that Produce White-Light Enhancements in Solar Flares Observed by Hinode/SOT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K.; Masuda, S.

    2015-12-01

    After Hinode was launched in 2006, the observing program designed to catch rare white-light (WL) events has steadily been improved. So we now have a large enough number of WL events to make a statistical study. To understand the conditions that produce enhancements of WL in solar flares, we performed a statistical analysis of Hinode/SOT WL data. From the analysis of data obtained between January 2011 and August 2013, we found that the precipitation of large amounts of accelerated electrons into a compact area within a short time plays a key role in generating a WL event (Kitagawa et al., submitted to ApJ). And we also found that the coronal magnetic field strength in the flare region is one of the important factors that can distinguish between WL and non-WL (NWL) events. In this paper, we present the results derived from a new statistical study from the observing period extended to December 2014. In this study, we use not only the Hinode/SOT WL (G-band, Blue, Green, Red) data, but we also SDO/HMI continuum data. The total number of events is now about two times larger than that of Kitagawa's previous study. We compared the white-light emission data with GOES soft X-rays, RHESSI hard X-rays and/or the strength of the photospheric magnetic fields, and investigated the relationships between many physical parameters. For example, from scatter plots of the start-to-peak time-scale in X-rays and the energy of nonthermal electrons, one can easily find a clear boundary between WL and NWL events. WL events show a relatively shorter time-scale among events with almost the same nonthermal energy. Most of the results in this study show the same characteristics as in the previous study, but they are more clearly seen thanks to the larger number of events. We also report some statistical results on WL and NWL events from Nobeyama Radio Heliograph (NoRH) and Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters (NoRP) data, which give information on the magnetic field of the flare loop.

  13. Cycle 23 Variation in Solar Flare Productivity

    CERN Document Server

    Hudson, Hugh; McTiernan, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The NOAA listings of solar flares in cycles 21-24, including the GOES soft X-ray magnitudes, enable a simple determination of the number of flares each flaring active region produces over its lifetime. We have studied this measure of flare productivity over the interval 1975-2012. The annual averages of flare productivity remained approximately constant during cycles 21 and 22, at about two reported M or X flares per region, but then increased significantly in the declining phase of cycle 23 (the years 2004-2005). We have confirmed this by using the independent RHESSI flare catalog to check the NOAA events listings where possible. We note that this measure of solar activity does not correlate with the solar cycle. The anomalous peak in flare productivity immediately preceded the long solar minimum between cycles 23 and 24.

  14. Solar-flare implanted He-4/He-3 and solar-proton-produced Ne and Ar concentration profiles preserved in lunar rock 61016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M. N.; Garrison, D. H.; Bogard, D. D.; Reedy, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    Depth profiles for Ne-21, Ne-22, and Ar-38 isotopes from oriented lunar rock 61016 are reported. Concentration profiles of cosmogenic GCR+SCR (Galactic cosmic ray and solar cosmic ray-produced) isotopes are determined, quantitatively resolving neon and argon produced by energetic solar flares from that produced by Galactic cosmic rays. The SCR component is resolved from the GCR component as a function of shielding, and excellent agreement is found between experimental SCR production profiles for the isotopes and theoretically calculated values. A characteristic SW He-4/He-3 ratio of 3450 +/- 81, representing energies down to as few keV/amu. In slightly deeper samples an SRF He-4/He-3 ratio of 3450 +/- 725 is found for He particles with E larger than about 1 MeV/amu. These results indicate that the isotopic composition of SF He, averaged over the long term, is energy-dependent. An implanted Ne-20/Ne-22 ratio of 12.4 is measured in unetched samples, representing E greater than 1 MeV/amu, and a ratio of 11.6 is inferred in the samples, representing E larger than about 5 MeV/amu.

  15. Multiple quasi-monoenergetic electron beams from laser-wakefield acceleration with spatially structured laser pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Y.; Li, M. H.; Li, Y. F.; Wang, J. G.; Tao, M. Z.; Han, Y. J.; Zhao, J. R.; Huang, K.; Yan, W. C.; Ma, J. L.; Li, Y. T. [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100080 (China); Chen, L. M., E-mail: lmchen@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100080 (China); Department of Physics and Astronomy and IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Li, D. Z. [Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, Z. Y. [Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621999 (China); Sheng, Z. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Department of Physics, Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Zhang, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-08-15

    By adjusting the focus geometry of a spatially structured laser pulse, single, double, and treble quasi-monoenergetic electron beams were generated, respectively, in laser-wakefield acceleration. Single electron beam was produced as focusing the laser pulse to a single spot. While focusing the laser pulse to two spots that are approximately equal in energy and size and intense enough to form their own filaments, two electron beams were produced. Moreover, with a proper distance between those two focal spots, three electron beams emerged with a certain probability owing to the superposition of the diffractions of those two spots. The energy spectra of the multiple electron beams are quasi-monoenergetic, which are different from that of the large energy spread beams produced due to the longitudinal multiple-injection in the single bubble.

  16. High speed photospheric material flow observed at the polarity inversion line of a delta-type sunspot producing an X5.4 flare on 7 March 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Shimizu, Toshifumi; Bamba, Yumi

    2014-01-01

    Solar flares abruptly release the free energy stored as a non-potential magnetic field in the corona and may be accompanied by eruptions of the coronal plasma. Formation of a non-potential magnetic field and the mechanisms for triggering the onset of flares are still poorly understood. In particular, photospheric dynamics observed near those polarity inversion lines that are sites of major flare production have not been well observed with high spatial resolution spectro-polarimetry. This paper reports on a remarkable high-speed material flow observed along the polarity inversion line located between flare ribbons at the main energy release side of an X5.4 flare on 7 March 2012. Observations were carried out by the spectro-polarimeter of the Solar Optical Telescope onboard Hinode. The high-speed material flow was observed in the horizontally-oriented magnetic field formed nearly parallel to the polarity inversion line. This flow persisted from at least 6 hours before the onset of the flare, and continued for a...

  17. Fast electrons in small solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, R. P.

    1975-01-01

    This review summarizes both the direct spacecraft observations of nonrelativistic solar electrons, and observations of the X-ray and radio emission generated by these particles at the sun and in the interplanetary medium. These observations bear on the basic astrophysical process of particle acceleration in tenuous plasmas. We find that in many small solar flares, the nearly 5-100 keV electrons accelerated during flash phase constitute the bulk of the total flare energy. Thus the basic flare mechanism in these flares essentially converts the available flare energy into fast electrons. These electrons may produce the other flare electromagnetic emissions through their interactions with the solar atmosphere. In large proton flares these electrons may provide the energy to eject material from the sun and to create a shock wave which could accelerate nuclei and electrons to much higher energies.

  18. Characterization of Monoenergetic Neutron Reference Fields with a High Resolution Diamond Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Zimbal, A; Nolte, R; Schuhmacher, H

    2009-01-01

    A novel radiation detector based on an artificial single crystal diamond was used to characterize in detail the energy distribution of neutron reference fields at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) and their contamination with charged particles. The monoenergetic reference fields at PTB in the neutron energy range from 1.5 MeV up to 19 MeV are generated by proton and deuteron beams impinging on solid and gas targets of tritium and deuterium. The energy of the incoming particles and the variation of the angle under which the measurement is performed produce monoenergetic reference fields with different mean energies and line shapes. In this paper we present high resolution neutron spectrometry measurements of different monoenergetic reference fields. The results are compared with calculated spectra taking into account the actual target parameters. Line structures in the order of 80 keV for a neutron energy of 9 MeV were resolved. The shift of the mean energy and the increasing of the width of the ...

  19. Pre-Flare Dynamics of Sunspot Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Korsos, M B; Ludmany, A

    2014-01-01

    Several papers provide evidences that the most probable sites of flare onset are the regions of high horizontal magnetic field gradients in solar active regions. Besides the localization of flare producing areas the present work intends to reveal the characteristic temporal variations in these regions prior to flares. This study uses sunspot data instead of magnetograms, it follows the behaviour of a suitable defined proxy measure representing the horizontal magnetic field gradient. The source of the data is the SDD (SOHO/MDI-Debrecen Data) sunspot catalogue. The most promising pre-flare signatures are the following properties of the gradient variation: i) steep increase, ii) high maximum, iii) significant fluctuation and iv) a gradual decrease between the maximum and the flare onset which can be related to the "pull mode" of the current layer. These properties may yield a tool for the assessment of flare probability and intensity within the next 8-10 hours.

  20. Pre-flare dynamics of sunspot groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsós, M. B.; Baranyi, T.; Ludmány, A., E-mail: korsos.marianna@csfk.mta.hu, E-mail: baranyi.tunde@csfk.mta.hu, E-mail: ludmany.andras@csfk.mta.hu [Heliophysical Observatory, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 4010 Debrecen, P.O. Box 30 (Hungary)

    2014-07-10

    Several papers provide evidence that the most probable sites of flare onset are the regions of high horizontal magnetic field gradients in solar active regions. Besides the localization of flare-producing areas, this work intends to reveal the characteristic temporal variations in these regions prior to flares. This study uses sunspot data instead of magnetograms and follows the behavior of a suitable defined proxy measure representing the horizontal magnetic field gradient. The source of the data is the SDD (SOHO/MDI-Debrecen Data) sunspot catalog. The most promising pre-flare signatures are the following properties of gradient variation: (1) steep increase, (2) high maximum, (3) significant fluctuation, and (4) a gradual decrease between the maximum and the flare onset that can be related to the 'pull mode' of the current layer. These properties may yield a tool for the assessment of flare probability and intensity within the following 8-10 hr.

  1. OVERVIEW OF MONO-ENERGETIC GAMMA-RAY SOURCES & APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Anderson, G G; Anderson, S G; Bayramian, A J; Betts, S M; Chu, T S; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Fisher, S E; Gibson, D J; Ladran, A S; Marsh, R A; Messerly, M J; O' Neill, K L; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C P; Vlieks, A E; Jongewaard, E N; Tantawi, S G; Raubenheimer, T O

    2010-05-18

    Recent progress in accelerator physics and laser technology have enabled the development of a new class of tunable gamma-ray light sources based on Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam and a high intensity laser pulse produced via chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). A precision, tunable Mono-Energetic Gamma-ray (MEGa-ray) source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac is currently under development and construction at LLNL. High-brightness, relativistic electron bunches produced by an X-band linac designed in collaboration with SLAC NAL will interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps, diode-pumped CPA laser pulse to generate tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range via Compton scattering. This MEGa-ray source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence in various isotopes. Applications include homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. The source design, key parameters, and current status are presented, along with important applications, including nuclear resonance fluorescence. In conclusion, we have optimized the design of a high brightness Compton scattering gamma-ray source, specifically designed for NRF applications. Two different parameters sets have been considered: one where the number of photons scattered in a single shot reaches approximately 7.5 x 10{sup 8}, with a focal spot size around 8 {micro}m; in the second set, the spectral brightness is optimized by using a 20 {micro}m spot size, with 0.2% relative bandwidth.

  2. Characterization of Monoenergetic Low Energy Neutron Fields with the {mu}TPC Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golabek, C.; Lebreton, L.; Petit, M. [Laboratoire de Metrologie et de Dosimetrie des Neutrons, IRSN Cadarache, 13115 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Billard, J.; Grignon, C.; Bosson, G.; Bourrion, O.; Guillaudin, O.; Mayet, F.; Richer, J.-P.; Santos, D. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Universite Joseph (France)

    2011-12-13

    The AMANDE facility produces monoenergetic neutron fields from 2 keV to 20 MeV for metrological purposes. To be considered as a reference facility, fluence and energy distributions of neutron fields have to be determined by primary measurement standards. For this purpose, a micro Time Projection Chamber is being developed to be dedicated to measure neutron fields with energy ranging from 2 keV up to 1 MeV. We present simulations showing that such a detector, which allows the measurement of the ionization energy and the 3D reconstruction of the recoil nucleus, provides the determination of neutron energy and fluence of such low energy neutron fields.

  3. Generation of quasi-monoenergetic carbon ions accelerated parallel to the plane of a sandwich target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J. W., E-mail: wang-jw@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Murakami, M.; Weng, S. M. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Xu, H. [National Laboratory for Parallel and Distributed Processing, School of Computer Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Ju, J. J.; Luan, S. X.; Yu, W. [Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2014-12-15

    A new ion acceleration scheme, namely, target parallel Coulomb acceleration, is proposed in which a carbon plate sandwiched between gold layers is irradiated with intense linearly polarized laser pulses. The high electrostatic field generated by the gold ions efficiently accelerates the embedded carbon ions parallel to the plane of the target. The ion beam is found to be collimated by the concave-shaped Coulomb potential. As a result, a quasi-monoenergetic and collimated C{sup 6+}-ion beam with an energy exceeding 10 MeV/nucleon is produced at a laser intensity of 5 × 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}.

  4. Isotope-specific detection of low density materials with mono-energetic (gamma)-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Hagmann, C A; Johnson, M S; Messerly, M J; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Tremaine, A M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C J

    2009-03-16

    The first demonstration of isotope-specific detection of a low-Z, low density object, shielded by a high-Z and high density material using mono-energetic gamma-rays is reported. Isotope-specific detection of LiH shielded by Pb and Al is accomplished using the nuclear resonance fluorescence line of {sup 7}Li at 0.478 MeV. Resonant photons are produced via laser-based Compton scattering. The detection techniques are general and the confidence level obtained is shown to be superior to that yielded by conventional x-ray/{gamma}-ray techniques in these situations.

  5. Filtered epithermal quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams at research reactor facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansy, M S; Bashter, I I; El-Mesiry, M S; Habib, N; Adib, M

    2015-03-01

    Filtered neutron techniques were applied to produce quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams in the energy range of 1.5-133keV at research reactors. A simulation study was performed to characterize the filter components and transmitted beam lines. The filtered beams were characterized in terms of the optimal thickness of the main and additive components. The filtered neutron beams had high purity and intensity, with low contamination from the accompanying thermal emission, fast neutrons and γ-rays. A computer code named "QMNB" was developed in the "MATLAB" programming language to perform the required calculations.

  6. Impact of Monoenergetic Photon Sources on Nonproliferation Applications Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geddes, Cameron [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ludewigt, Bernhard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Valentine, John [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Quiter, Brian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Descalle, Marie-Anne [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Warren, Glen [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kinlaw, Matt [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Thompson, Scott [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Chichester, David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miller, Cameron [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Pozzi, Sara [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Near-monoenergetic photon sources (MPSs) have the potential to improve sensitivity at greatly reduced dose in existing applications and enable new capabilities in other applications, particularly where passive signatures do not penetrate or are insufficiently accurate. MPS advantages include the ability to select energy, energy spread, flux, and pulse structures to deliver only the photons needed for the application, while suppressing extraneous dose and background. Some MPSs also offer narrow angular divergence photon beams which can target dose and/or mitigate scattering contributions to image contrast degradation. Current bremsstrahlung photon sources (e.g., linacs and betatrons) produce photons over a broad range of energies, thus delivering unnecessary dose that in some cases also interferes with the signature to be detected and/or restricts operations. Current sources must be collimated (reducing flux) to generate narrow divergence beams. While MPSs can in principle resolve these issues, they remain at relatively low TRL status. Candidate MPS technologies for nonproliferation applications are now being developed, each of which has different properties (e.g. broad vs. narrow angular divergence). Within each technology, source parameters trade off against one another (e.g. flux vs. energy spread), representing a large operation space. This report describes a broad survey of potential applications, identification of high priority applications, and detailed simulations addressing those priority applications. Requirements were derived for each application, and analysis and simulations were conducted to define MPS parameters that deliver benefit. The results can inform targeting of MPS development to deliver strong impact relative to current systems.

  7. LASER TECHNOLOGY FOR PRECISION MONOENERGETIC GAMMA-RAY SOURCE R&D AT LLNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shverdin, M Y; Bayramian, A; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Betts, S M; Chu, T S; Cross, R R; Gibson, D J; Marsh, R; Messerly, M; Phan, H; Prantil, M; Wu, S; Ebbers, C; Scarpetti, R D; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Bonanno, R E; Barty, C P

    2010-04-20

    Generation of mono-energetic, high brightness gamma-rays requires state of the art lasers to both produce a low emittance electron beam in the linac and high intensity, narrow linewidth laser photons for scattering with the relativistic electrons. Here, we overview the laser systems for the 3rd generation Monoenergetic Gamma-ray Source (MEGa-ray) currently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL). We also describe a method for increasing the efficiency of laser Compton scattering through laser pulse recirculation. The fiber-based photoinjector laser will produce 50 {micro}J temporally and spatially shaped UV pulses at 120 Hz to generate a low emittance electron beam in the X-band RF photoinjector. The interaction laser generates high intensity photons that focus into the interaction region and scatter off the accelerated electrons. This system utilizes chirped pulse amplification and commercial diode pumped solid state Nd:YAG amplifiers to produce 0.5 J, 10 ps, 120 Hz pulses at 1064 nm and up to 0.2 J after frequency doubling. A single passively mode-locked Ytterbium fiber oscillator seeds both laser systems and provides a timing synch with the linac.

  8. Pre-flare coronal dimmings

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Q M; Ji, H S

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the pre-flare coronal dimmings. We report our multiwavelength observations of the GOES X1.6 solar flare and the accompanying halo CME produced by the eruption of a sigmoidal magnetic flux rope (MFR) in NOAA active region (AR) 12158 on 2014 September 10. The eruption was observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) aboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). The photospheric line-of-sight magnetograms were observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) aboard SDO. The soft X-ray (SXR) fluxes were recorded by the GOES spacecraft. The halo CME was observed by the white light coronagraphs of the Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) aboard SOHO.} {About 96 minutes before the onset of flare/CME, narrow pre-flare coronal dimmings appeared at the two ends of the twisted MFR. They extended very slowly with their intensities decreasing with time, while their apparent widths (8$-$9 Mm) nearly kept constant. During the impulsive and decay phases of flare, typical fanlike ...

  9. A New Paradigm for Flare Particle Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidoni, Silvina E.; Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C. Richard

    2017-08-01

    The mechanism that accelerates particles to the energies required to produce the observed high-energy impulsive emission and its spectra in solar flares is not well understood. Here, we propose a first-principle-based model of particle acceleration that produces energy spectra that closely resemble those derived from hard X-ray observations. Our mechanism uses contracting magnetic islands formed during fast reconnection in solar flares to accelerate electrons, as first proposed by Drake et al. (2006) for kinetic-scale plasmoids. We apply these ideas to MHD-scale islands formed during fast reconnection in a simulated eruptive flare. A simple analytic model based on the particles’ adiabatic invariants is used to calculate the energy gain of particles orbiting field lines in our ultrahigh-resolution, 2.5D, MHD numerical simulation of a solar eruption (flare + coronal mass ejection). Then, we analytically model electrons visiting multiple contracting islands to account for the observed high-energy flare emission. Our acceleration mechanism inherently produces sporadic emission because island formation is intermittent. Moreover, a large number of particles could be accelerated in each macroscopic island, which may explain the inferred rates of energetic-electron production in flares. We conclude that island contraction in the flare current sheet is a promising candidate for electron acceleration in solar eruptions. This work was supported in part by the NASA LWS and H-SR programs..

  10. MWA targeted campaign of nearby, flaring M dwarf stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, C.; Murphy, T.; Kaplan, D. L.

    2017-01-01

    Flaring activity is a common characteristic of magnetically active stellar systems. Flare events produce emission throughout the electromagnetic spectrum, implying a range of physical processes. Early 100 - 200 MHz observations of M dwarf flare stars detected bright (>100 mJy) flares with occurrence rates between 0.06 - 0.8 flares per hour. These rates imply that observing 100 - 200 MHz flares from M dwarf stars is fairly easy with many detections expected for modern low-frequency telescopes. However, long observational campaigns using these modern telescopes have not reproduced these early detections. This could be because the rates are over estimated and contaminated by radio frequency interference. Recently Lynch et al. (submitted) detected four flares from UV Ceti at 154 MHz using the Murchison Widefield Array. The flares have flux densities between 10-65 mJy -- a factor of 100 fainter than most flares in the literature at these frequencies -- and are only detected in circular polarization. The flare rates for these newly detected flares are roughly consistent with earlier rates however the uncertainties are large. Building off this result we propose a 102 hour survey of the closet six M dwarf stars with observed magnetic activity traced in X-rays and 100 - 200 MHz emission. The rates measured from this survey would inform the duration required for future blind surveys for flares from M dwarf stars.

  11. Numerical Study of Injection Mechanisms for Generation of Mono-Energetic Femtosecond Electron Bunch from the Plasma Cathode

    CERN Document Server

    Ohkubo, Takeru; Zhidkov, Alexei

    2005-01-01

    Acceleration gradients of up to the order of 100GV/m and mono-energetic electron bunch up to 200MeV have recently been observed in several plasma cathode experiments. However, mechanisms of self-injection in plasma are not sufficiently clarified, presently. In this study, we carried out 2D PIC simulation to reveal the mechanisms of mono-energetic femtosecond electron bunch generation. We found two remarkable conditions for the generation: electron density gradient at vacuum-plasma interface and channel formation in plasma. Steep electron density gradient (~ plasma wave length) causes rapid injection and produces an electron bunch with rather high charge and less than 100fs duration. The channel formation guides an injected laser pulse and decreases the threshold of laser self-focusing, which leads to high electric field necessary for wave-breaking injection.

  12. Advances In Understanding Solar And Stellar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Adam F.

    2016-07-01

    Flares result from the sudden reconnection and relaxation of magnetic fields in the coronae of stellar atmospheres. The highly dynamic atmospheric response produces radiation across the electromagnetic spectrum, from the radio to X-rays, on a range of timescales, from seconds to days. New high resolution data of solar flares have revealed the intrinsic spatial properties of the flaring chromosphere, which is thought to be where the majority of the flare energy is released as radiation in the optical and near-UV continua and emission lines. New data of stellar flares have revealed the detailed properties of the broadband (white-light) continuum emission, which provides straightforward constraints for models of the transformation of stored magnetic energy in the corona into thermal energy of the lower atmosphere. In this talk, we discuss the physical processes that produce several important spectral phenomena in the near-ultraviolet and optical as revealed from new radiative-hydrodynamic models of flares on the Sun and low mass stars. We present recent progress with high-flux nonthermal electron beams in reproducing the observed optical continuum color temperature of T 10,000 K and the Balmer jump properties in the near-ultraviolet. These beams produce dense, heated chromospheric condensations, which can explain the shape and strength of the continuum emission in M dwarf flares and the red-wing asymmetries in the chromospheric emission lines in recent observations of solar flares from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph. Current theoretical challenges and future modeling directions will be discussed, as well as observational synergies between solar and stellar flares.

  13. Generating monoenergetic proton beam by using circularly polarlzed laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bi-Cheng; YAN Xue-Qing; LIN Chen; Lu Yuan-Rong; GUO Zhi-Yu; FANG Jia-Xun; SHENG Zheng-Ming; LI Yu-Tong; CHEN Jia-Er

    2009-01-01

    The interaction of ultrashort intense circularly polarized laser with ultra thin overdense foil is studied by particle-in-cell simulation and analytic model.It is found that with the balance between pondermotive force and electrostatic force,highly quasi-monoenergetic proton beam can be generated by Phase Stable Acceleration(PSA)process.As in conventional accelerators,ion will be accelerated and bunched up in the longitudinal direction at the same time.

  14. Whether solar flares can trigger earthquakes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, R.

    2007-05-01

    We present the study of 682 earthquakes of ¡Ý4.0 magnitude observed during January 1991 to January 2007 in the light of solar flares observed by GOES and SOXS missions in order to explore the possibility of any association between solar flares and earthquakes. Our investigation preliminarily shows that each earthquake under study was preceded by a solar flare of GOES importance B to X class by 10-100 hrs. However, each flare was not found followed by earthquake of magnitude ¡Ý4.0. We classified the earthquake events with respect to their magnitude and further attempted to look for their correlation with GOES importance class and delay time. We found that with the increasing importance of flares the delay in the onset of earthquake reduces. The critical X-ray intensity of the flare to be associated with earthquake is found to be ~10-6 Watts/m2. On the other hand no clear evidence could be established that higher importance flares precede high magnitude earthquakes. Our detailed study of 50 earthquakes associated with solar flares observed by SOXS mission and other wavebands revealed many interesting results such as the location of the flare on the Sun and the delay time in the earthquake and its magnitude. We propose a model explaining the charged particles accelerated during the solar flare and released in the space that undergone further acceleration by interplanetary shocks and produce the ring current in the earth's magnetosphere, which may enhance the process of tectonics plates motion abruptly at fault zones. It is further proposed that such sudden enhancement in the process of tectonic motion of plates in fault zones may increase abruptly the heat gradients on spatial (dT/dx) and temporal (dT/dt) scales responsible for earthquakes.

  15. Probing the Role of Magnetic-Field Variations in NOAA AR 8038 in Producing Solar Flare and CME on 12 May 1997

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Rajmal; Chandel, Babita; Bharti, Lokesh; Hanaoka, Y; Kiplinger, A L

    2011-01-01

    We carried out a multi-wavelength study of a CME and a medium-size 1B/C1.3 flare occurring on 12 May 1997. We present the investigation of magnetic-field variations in the NOAA Active Region 8038 which was observed on the Sun during 7--16 May 1997. Analyses of H{\\alpha} filtergrams and MDI/SOHO magnetograms revealed continual but discrete surge activity, and emergence and cancellation of flux in this active region. The movie of these magnetograms revealed two important results that the major opposite polarities of pre-existing region as well as in the emerging flux region (EFR) were approaching towards each other and moving magnetic features (MMF) were ejecting out from the major north polarity at a quasi-periodicity of about ten hrs during 10--13 May 1997. These activities were probably caused by the magnetic reconnection in the lower atmosphere driven by photospheric convergence motions, which were evident in magnetograms. The magnetic field variations such as flux, gradient, and sunspot rotation revealed t...

  16. Predictability of Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mares, Peter; Balasubramaniam, K. S.

    2009-05-01

    Solar flares are significant drivers of space weather. With the availability of high cadence solar chromospheric and photospheric data from the USAF's Optical Solar PAtrol Network (OSPAN; photosphere and chromosphere imaging) Telescope and the Global Oscillations Network Group (GONG; photosphere magnetic imaging), at the National Solar Observatory, we have gained insights into potential uses of the data for solar flare prediction. We apply the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to parameterize the flaring system and extract consistent observables at solar chromospheric and photospheric layers that indicate a viable recognition of flaring activity. Rather than limiting ourselves to a few known indicators of solar activity, PCA helps us to characterize the entire system using several tens of variables for each observed layer. The components of the Eigen vectors derived from PCA help us recognize and quantify innate characteristics of solar flares and compare them. We will present an analysis of these results to explore the viability of PCA to assist in predicting solar flares.

  17. Feasibility of flare gas reformation to practical energy in Farashband gas refinery: no gas flaring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimpour, Mohammad Reaza; Jokar, Seyyed Mohammad

    2012-03-30

    A suggested method for controlling the level of hazardous materials in the atmosphere is prevention of combustion in flare. In this work, three methods are proposed to recover flare gas instead of conventional gas-burning in flare at the Farashband gas refinery. These methods aim to minimize environmental and economical disadvantages of burning flare gas. The proposed methods are: (1) gas to liquid (GTL) production, (2) electricity generation with a gas turbine and, (3) compression and injection into the refinery pipelines. To find the most suitable method, the refinery units that send gas to the flare as well as the required equipment for the three aforementioned methods are simulated. These simulations determine the amount of flare gas, the number of GTL barrels, the power generated by the gas turbine and the required compression horsepower. The results of simulation show that 563 barrels/day of valuable GTL products is produced by the first method. The second method provides 25 MW electricity and the third method provides a compressed natural gas with 129 bar pressure for injection to the refinery pipelines. In addition, the economics of flare gas recovery methods are studied and compared. The results show that for the 4.176MMSCFD of gas flared from the Farashband gas refinery, the electricity production gives the highest rate of return (ROR), the lowest payback period, the highest annual profit and mild capital investment. Therefore, the electricity production is the superior method economically. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A Fifteen Year Record of Global Natural Gas Flaring Derived from Satellite Data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Christopher D Elvidge; Daniel Ziskin; Kimberly E Baugh; Benjamin T Tuttle; Tilottama Ghosh; Dee W Pack; Edward H Erwin; Mikhail Zhizhin

    2009-01-01

      We have produced annual estimates of national and global gas flaring and gas flaring efficiency from 1994 through 2008 using low light imaging data acquired by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP...

  19. Solar flares. [plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper deals with explosions in a magnetized solar plasma, known as flares, whose effects are seen throughout the electromagnetic spectrum, from gamma-rays through the visible and to the radio band. The diverse phenomena associated with flares are discussed, along with the physical mechanisms that have been advanced to explain them. The impact of solar flare research on the development of plasma physics and magnetohydrodynamics is noted. The rapid development of solar flare research during the past 20 years, owing to the availability of high-resolution images, detailed magnetic field measurements, and improved spectral data, is illustrated.

  20. Solar Eruptions: Coronal Mass Ejections and Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2012-01-01

    This lecture introduces the topic of Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares, collectively known as solar eruptions. During solar eruptions, the released energy flows out from the Sun in the form of magnetized plasma and electromagnetic radiation. The electromagnetic radiation suddenly increases the ionization content of the ionosphere, thus impacting communication and navigation systems. Flares can be eruptive or confined. Eruptive flares accompany CMEs, while confined flares hav only electromagnetic signature. CMEs can drive MHD shocks that accelerate charged particles to very high energies in the interplanetary space, which pose radiation hazard to astronauts and space systems. CMEs heading in the direction of Earth arrive in about two days and impact Earth's magnetosphere, producing geomagnetic storms. The magnetic storms result in a number of effects including induced currnts that can disrupt power grids, railroads, and underground pipelines

  1. Directional Searches at DUNE for Sub-GeV Monoenergetic Neutrinos Arising from Dark Matter Annihilation in the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Rott, Carsten; Kumar, Jason; Yaylali, David

    2016-01-01

    We consider the use of directionality in the search for monoenergetic sub-GeV neutrinos arising from the decay of stopped kaons, which can be produced by dark matter annihilation in the core of the Sun. When these neutrinos undergo charged-current interactions with a nucleus at a neutrino detector, they often eject a proton which is highly peaked in the forward direction. The direction of this track can be measured at DUNE, allowing one to distinguish signal from background by comparing on-source and off-source event rates. We find that directional information can enhance the signal to background ratio by up to a factor of 5.

  2. Directional searches at DUNE for sub-GeV monoenergetic neutrinos arising from dark matter annihilation in the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rott, Carsten; In, Seongjin; Kumar, Jason; Yaylali, David

    2017-01-01

    We consider the use of directionality in the search for monoenergetic sub-GeV neutrinos arising from the decay of stopped kaons, which can be produced by dark matter annihilation in the core of the Sun. When these neutrinos undergo charged-current interactions with a nucleus at a neutrino detector, they often eject a proton which is highly peaked in the forward direction. The direction of this track can be measured at DUNE, allowing one to distinguish signal from background by comparing on-source and off-source event rates. We find that directional information can enhance the signal to background ratio by up to a factor of 5.

  3. Microdosimetry calculations for monoenergetic electrons using Geant4-DNA combined with a weighted track sampling algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famulari, Gabriel; Pater, Piotr; Enger, Shirin A.

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to calculate microdosimetric distributions for low energy electrons simulated using the Monte Carlo track structure code Geant4-DNA. Tracks for monoenergetic electrons with kinetic energies ranging from 100 eV to 1 MeV were simulated in an infinite spherical water phantom using the Geant4-DNA extension included in Geant4 toolkit version 10.2 (patch 02). The microdosimetric distributions were obtained through random sampling of transfer points and overlaying scoring volumes within the associated volume of the tracks. Relative frequency distributions of energy deposition f(>E)/f(>0) and dose mean lineal energy (\\bar{y}D ) values were calculated in nanometer-sized spherical and cylindrical targets. The effects of scoring volume and scoring techniques were examined. The results were compared with published data generated using MOCA8B and KURBUC. Geant4-DNA produces a lower frequency of higher energy deposits than MOCA8B. The \\bar{y}D values calculated with Geant4-DNA are smaller than those calculated using MOCA8B and KURBUC. The differences are mainly due to the lower ionization and excitation cross sections of Geant4-DNA for low energy electrons. To a lesser extent, discrepancies can also be attributed to the implementation in this study of a new and fast scoring technique that differs from that used in previous studies. For the same mean chord length (\\bar{l} ), the \\bar{y}D calculated in cylindrical volumes are larger than those calculated in spherical volumes. The discrepancies due to cross sections and scoring geometries increase with decreasing scoring site dimensions. A new set of \\bar{y}D values has been presented for monoenergetic electrons using a fast track sampling algorithm and the most recent physics models implemented in Geant4-DNA. This dataset can be combined with primary electron spectra to predict the radiation quality of photon and electron beams.

  4. Initial results from a multiple monoenergetic gamma radiography system for nuclear security

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day, Buckley E.; Hartwig, Zachary S.; Lanza, Richard C.; Danagoulian, Areg

    2016-10-01

    The detection of assembled nuclear devices and concealed special nuclear materials (SNM) such as plutonium or uranium in commercial cargo traffic is a major challenge in mitigating the threat of nuclear terrorism. Currently available radiographic and active interrogation systems use ∼1-10 MeV bremsstrahlung photon beams. Although simple to build and operate, bremsstrahlung-based systems deliver high radiation doses to the cargo and to potential stowaways. To eliminate problematic issues of high dose, we are developing a novel technique known as multiple monoenergetic gamma radiography (MMGR). MMGR uses ion-induced nuclear reactions to produce two monoenergetic gammas for dual-energy radiography. This allows us to image the areal density and effective atomic number (Zeff) of scanned cargo. We present initial results from the proof-of-concept experiment, which was conducted at the MIT Bates Research and Engineering Center. The purpose of the experiment was to assess the capabilities of MMGR to measure areal density and Zeff of container cargo mockups. The experiment used a 3.0 MeV radiofrequency quadrupole accelerator to create sources of 4.44 MeV and 15.11 MeV gammas from the 11B(d,nγ)12C reaction in a thick natural boron target; the gammas are detected by an array of NaI(Tl) detectors after transmission through cargo mockups . The measured fluxes of transmitted 4.44 MeV and 15.11 MeV gammas were used to assess the areal density and Zeff. Initial results show that MMGR is capable of discriminating the presence of high-Z materials concealed in up to 30 cm of iron shielding from low- and mid-Z materials present in the cargo mockup.

  5. Sgr A* flares: tidal disruption of asteroids and planets?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zubovas, K.; Nayakshin, S.; Markoff, S.

    2012-01-01

    It is theoretically expected that a supermassive black hole (SMBH) in the centre of a typical nearby galaxy disrupts a solar-type star every ∼105 yr, resulting in a bright flare lasting for months. Sgr A*, the resident SMBH of the Milky Way, produces (by comparison) tiny flares that last only hours

  6. Further observations of protons resulting from the decay of neutrons ejected by solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenson, P. A.; Kroeger, R.; Meyer, P.

    1985-01-01

    The solar flare of 1984 April 24 produced a large gamma ray fluence with energy 2MeV. The time profile of the interplanetary flux from this flare indicates the presence of decaying solar neutrons. This makes a total of three neutron flares so far observed by this method. The three flares are used to place constraints on the fluence and spectra of neutrons emitted by the Sun.

  7. A Monte Carlo study of monoenergetic and polyenergetic normalized glandular dose (DgN) coefficients in mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarno, Antonio; Mettivier, Giovanni; Di Lillo, Francesca; Russo, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the influence of model assumptions in GEANT4 Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for the calculation of monoenergetic and polyenergetic normalized glandular dose coefficients (DgN) in mammography, focussing on the effect of the skin thickness and composition, of the role of compression paddles and of the bremsstrahlung processes. We showed that selecting a skin thickness of 4 mm instead of 1.45 mm produced DgN values with deviations from 9% to 32% for x-ray spectra routinely adopted in mammography. Consideration of the bremsstrahlung radiation had a weak influence on monoenergetic DgN. Simulations (in the range 8-40 kVp) which included consideration of bremsstrahlung radiation, a skin thickness of 1.45 mm and a 2 mm thick compression paddles produced polyenergetic DgN coefficients up to 19% higher than corresponding literature data. Adding a 2 mm thick adipose layer between the skin layer and the radiosensitive portion of the breast produces polyenergetic DgN values up to 15% higher than those routinely adopted. These findings provide a quantitative estimate of the influence of model parameters on the calculation of the mean glandular dose in mammography.

  8. Monoenergetic electron parameters in a spheroid bubble model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.Sattarian; Sh.Rahmatallahpur; T.Tohidi

    2013-01-01

    A reliable analytical expression for the potential of plasma waves with phase velocities near the speed of light is derived.The presented spheroid cavity model is more consistent than the previous spherical and ellipsoidal models and it explains the mono-energetic electron trajectory more accurately,especially at the relativistic region.The maximum energy of electrons is calculated and it is shown that the maximum energy of the spheroid model is less than that of the spherical model.The electron energy spectrum is also calculated and it is found that the energy distribution ratio of electrons △E/E for the spheroid model under the conditions reported here is half that of the spherical model and it is in good agreement with the experimental value in the same conditions.As a result,the quasi-mono-energetic electron output beam interacting with the laser plasma can be more appropriately described with this model.

  9. Gas flaring from a rural landowner's perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasseur, P. [Farmers' Advocate of Alberta, Three Hills, AB (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    The public perception of flaring by the petroleum and natural gas industry was discussed. Flaring has never been embraced by the rural community in Alberta. Flaring is seen as an infringement on health and a contributing source of air pollution. While several studies have been undertaken to determine the effects of flaring, it seems that any conclusive information has not been made available to the public. The author suggested that some rural residents suspect that only favourable information is released or that it has been influenced by the energy sector. They also firmly believe that an increase in animal and health concerns is directly associated with emissions from flaring. Studies have identified about 250 different compounds in flare emissions, including volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other toxic and carcinogenic compounds such as toluene, benzene, and xylene. Some rural residents are sceptical that scientists know the full extent of the effects from the 250 compounds produced by flaring. Also, since emissions from all flares are not the same, this would require an individual study for each flare for a thorough analysis. Studies have also shown that some flares have a combustion efficiency of only 64 per cent. Other studies do not support complaints that health problems stem from nearby wells. Other major perceptions are that flaring adds to the greenhouse effect, it contributes to climatic change and damages soils and vegetation. The author emphasized that the energy sector has to make an effort to reduce the number of flares and most importantly communicate with the rural community more effectively.

  10. Solar Features - Solar Flares

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A solar flare is a short-lived sudden increase in the intensity of radiation emitted in the neighborhood of sunspots. For many years it was best monitored in the...

  11. What Causes Lupus Flares?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, David; Kirou, Kyriakos A

    2016-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the prototypic systemic autoimmune disease, follows a chronic disease course, punctuated by flares. Disease flares often occur without apparent cause, perhaps from progressive inherent buildup of autoimmunity. However, there is evidence that certain environmental factors may trigger the disease. These include exposure to UV light, infections, certain hormones, and drugs which may activate the innate and adaptive immune system, resulting in inflammation, cytotoxic effects, and clinical symptoms. Uncontrolled disease flares, as well as their treatment, especially with glucocorticoids, can cause significant organ damage. Tight surveillance and timely control of lupus flares with judicial use of effective treatments to adequately suppress the excessive immune system activation are required to bring about long term remission of the disease. We hope that new clinical trials will soon offer additional effective and target-specific biologic treatments for SLE.

  12. The investigation of the Neupert effect in two solar flares

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The Neupert effect suggests a flare model in which the nonthermal emissions are produced by energetic electrons which heat lower corona and chromosphere to produce the thermal emissions. Based on this concept, we investigate the Neupert effect to test the correlation between the hard X-ray spectral index and the time rate of the UV flare area at 1600 or 171 . Using the T RACE and RHESSI observations, we explore these quantities for two solar flares, one on March 14, 2002 and the other on November 1, 2003. The negative dependence between the spectral index and the time rate of the UV flare area is found, especially during the hard X-ray sub-peaks. This finding indicates that the electron-beam-driven heating plays a prominent role in the UV emission of these two flares.

  13. Laser Acceleration of Quasi-Monoenergetic Protons via Radiation Pressure Driven Thin Foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuan S.; Shao, Xi; Eliasson, Bengt; Liu, T. C.; Dudnikova, Galina; Sagdeev, Roald Z.

    2011-01-01

    We present a theoretical and simulation study of laser acceleration of quasi-monoenergetic protons in a thin foil irradiated by high intensity laser light. The underlying physics of radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) is discussed, including the importance of optimal thickness and circularly polarized light for efficient acceleration of ions to quasi-monoenergetic beams. Preliminary two-dimensional simulation studies show that certain parameter regimes allow for stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and possibility of acceleration of monoenergetic ions to an excess of 200 MeV, making them suitable for important applications such as medical cancer therapy and fast ignition.

  14. Identifying flares in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bykerk, Vivian P; Bingham, Clifton O; Choy, Ernest H

    2016-01-01

    Set. METHODS: Candidate flare questions and legacy measures were administered at consecutive visits to Canadian Early Arthritis Cohort (CATCH) patients between November 2011 and November 2014. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) core set indicators were recorded. Concordance to identify flares...... to flare, with escalation planned in 61%. CONCLUSIONS: Flares are common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and are often preceded by treatment reductions. Patient/MD/DAS agreement of flare status is highest in patients worsening from R/LDA. OMERACT RA flare questions can discriminate between patients with...

  15. High Energy Neutrinos from Recent Blazar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Halzen, Francis

    2016-01-01

    The energy density of cosmic neutrinos measured by IceCube matches the one observed by Fermi in extragalactic photons that predominantly originate in blazars. This has inspired attempts to match Fermi sources with IceCube neutrinos. A spatial association combined with a coincidence in time with a flaring source may represent a smoking gun for the origin of the IceCube flux. In June 2015, the Fermi Large Area Telescope observed an intense flare from blazar 3C 279 that exceeded the steady flux of the source by a factor of forty for the duration of a day. We show that IceCube is likely to observe neutrinos, if indeed hadronic in origin, in data that are still blinded at this time. We also discuss other opportunities for coincident observations that include a recent flare from blazar 1ES 1959+650 that previously produced an intriguing coincidence with AMANDA observations.

  16. Safe and efficient flare gas recovery; Safety flaring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross-Petersen, Joergen; Wills, Martin; Johnston, Ian

    2010-07-01

    Flaring of gas in connection with the production of hydrocarbons represents both an undesirable emission to the atmosphere and a loss of valuable resource. As part of the efforts further to reduce flaring Maersk Oil consider installation of Flare Gas Recovery (FGR) where appropriate, significant efforts have therefor been made by Maersk Oil as operator for Danish Underground Consortium (DUC) to reduce the flaring from the facilities operated in the Danish North Sea. (Author)

  17. Flaring variability of Microquasars

    CERN Document Server

    Trushkin, Sergei A; Nizhelskij, Nikolaj A

    2008-01-01

    We discuss flaring variability of radio emission of microquasars, measured in monitoring programs with the RATAN-600 radio telescope. We carried out a multi-frequency (1-30 GHz) daily monitoring of the radio flux variability of the microquasars SS433, GRS1915+105, and Cyg X-3 during the recent sets in 2005-2007. A lot of bright short-time flares were detected from GRS 1915+105 and they could be associated with active X-ray events. In January 2006 we detected a drop down of the quiescent fluxes from Cyg X-3 (from 100 to $\\sim$20 mJy), then the 1 Jy-flare was detected on 2 February 2006 after 18 days of quenched radio emission. The daily spectra of the flare in the maximum were flat from 2 to 110 GHz, using the quasi-simultaneous observations at 110 GHz with the RT45m telescope and the NMA millimeter array of NRO in Japan. Several bright radio flaring events (1-15 Jy) followed during the continuing state of very variable and intensive 1-12 keV X-ray emission ($\\sim$0.5 Crab), which was monitored in the RXTE ASM...

  18. Flare Plasma Iron Abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Dan, Chau; Jain, Rajmal; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    The equivalent width of the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV seen in flare X-ray spectra suggests that the iron abundance of the hottest plasma at temperatures >approx.10 MK may sometimes be significantly lower than the nominal coronal abundance of four times the photospheric value that is commonly assumed. This conclusion is based on X-ray spectral observations of several flares seen in common with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) on the second Indian geostationary satellite, GSAT-2. The implications of this will be discussed as it relates to the origin of the hot flare plasma - either plasma already in the corona that is directly heated during the flare energy release process or chromospheric plasma that is heated by flare-accelerated particles and driven up into the corona. Other possible explanations of lower-than-expected equivalent widths of the iron-line complex will also be discussed.

  19. Solar Flares and the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Solar flares are the biggest explosions in the solar system. They are important both for understanding explosive events in the Universe and for their impact on human technology and communications. The satellite-based HESSI is designed to study the explosive release of energy and the acceleration of electrons, protons, and other charged particles to high energies in solar flares. HESSI produces "color" movies of the Sun in high-energy X rays and gamma rays radiated by these energetic particles. HESSI's X-ray and gamma-ray images of flares are obtained using techniques similar to those used in radio interferometry. Ground-based radio observations of the Sun provide an important complement to the HESSI observations of solar flares. I will describe the HESSI Project and the high-energy aspects of solar flares, and how these relate to radio astronomy techniques and observations.

  20. Overview of Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray Sources and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartemann, Fred; /LLNL, Livermore; Albert, Felicie; /LLNL, Livermore; Anderson, Scott; /LLNL, Livermore; Barty, Christopher; /LLNL, Livermore; Bayramian, Andy; /LLNL, Livermore; Chu, Tak Sum; /LLNL, Livermore; Cross, R.; /LLNL, Livermore; Ebbers, Chris; /LLNL, Livermore; Gibson, David; /LLNL, Livermore; Marsh, Roark; /LLNL, Livermore; McNabb, Dennis; /LLNL, Livermore; Messerly, Michael; /LLNL, Livermore; Shverdin, Miroslav; /LLNL, Livermore; Siders, Craig; /LLNL, Livermore; Jongewaard, Erik; /SLAC; Raubenheimer, Tor; /SLAC; Tantawi, Sami; /SLAC; Vlieks, Arnold; /SLAC; Semenov, Vladimir; /UC, Berkeley

    2012-06-25

    Recent progress in accelerator physics and laser technology have enabled the development of a new class of tunable gamma-ray light sources based on Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam and a high intensity laser pulse produced via chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). A precision, tunable Mono-Energetic Gamma-ray (MEGa-ray) source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac is currently under development and construction at LLNL. High-brightness, relativistic electron bunches produced by an X-band linac designed in collaboration with SLAC NAL will interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps, diode-pumped CPA laser pulse to generate tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range via Compton scattering. This MEGaray source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence in various isotopes. Applications include homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. The source design, key parameters, and current status are presented, along with important applications, including nuclear resonance fluorescence.

  1. Monoenergetic computed tomography reconstructions reduce beam hardening artifacts from dental restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzmann, Paul; Winklhofer, Sebastian; Schwendener, Nicole; Alkadhi, Hatem; Thali, Michael J; Ruder, Thomas D

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential of monoenergetic computed tomography (CT) images to reduce beam hardening artifacts in comparison to standard CT images of dental restoration on dental post-mortem CT (PMCT). Thirty human decedents (15 male, 58 ± 22 years) with dental restorations were examined using standard single-energy CT (SECT) and dual-energy CT (DECT). DECT data were used to generate monoenergetic CT images, reflecting the X-ray attenuation at energy levels of 64, 69, 88 keV, and at an individually adjusted optimal energy level called OPTkeV. Artifact reduction and image quality of SECT and monoenergetic CT were assessed objectively and subjectively by two blinded readers. Subjectively, beam artifacts decreased visibly in 28/30 cases after monoenergetic CT reconstruction. Inter- and intra-reader agreement was good (k = 0.72, and k = 0.73 respectively). Beam hardening artifacts decreased significantly with increasing monoenergies (repeated-measures ANOVA p < 0.001). Artifact reduction was greatest on monoenergetic CT images at OPTkeV. Mean OPTkeV was 108 ± 17 keV. OPTkeV yielded the lowest difference between CT numbers of streak artifacts and reference tissues (-163 HU). Monoenergetic CT reconstructions significantly reduce beam hardening artifacts from dental restorations and improve image quality of post-mortem dental CT.

  2. Precursor flares in OJ 287

    OpenAIRE

    Pihajoki, P.; Valtonen, M.; Zola, S.; Liakos, A.; Drozdz, M.; Winiarski, M.; Ogloza, W.; Koziel-Wierzbowska, D.; Provencal, J.; Nilsson, K.; Berdyugin, A.; Lindfors, E.; Reinthal, R.; Sillanpää, A.; Takalo, L.

    2012-01-01

    We have studied three most recent precursor flares in the light curve of the blazar OJ 287 while invoking the presence of a precessing binary black hole in the system to explain the nature of these flares. Precursor flare timings from the historical light curves are compared with theoretical predictions from our model that incorporate effects of an accretion disk and post-Newtonian description for the binary black hole orbit. We find that the precursor flares coincide with the secondary black...

  3. Exergy analysis of waste emissions from gas flaring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olawale Saheed ISMAIL

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Gas flaring produces a stream of waste gases at high temperature and pressure which contains carbon monoxide, Hydrogen Sulphide etc. The resultant effect of which is detrimental to our planet and, consequently, to the life of both the living and the non-living things. It’s well known that gas flaring contributes in no small measure to the global warming. Exergy analysis is applied in this work to analyze waste emissions from gas flaring so as to have a model through which impact of gas flaring can be measured. The study considers both the thermo-mechanical exergy and the chemical exergy of these gases. Relevant data on gas flaring activities in the Niger-Delta region of Nigeria between the periods of fifteen (15 years was obtained from the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC. A computer program (Exergy Calculator was developed based on the equations generated in the Model. Exergy associated with gas flaring activities in Nigeria between the periods of 1998 through 2012 was calculated. The results show that 1 mscf (in thousand cubic feet of flared gases generate 0.000041 MWh of energy leading to a value of 440158.607 MWh of energy for the period under review.The analysis provides important conclusions and recommendations for improving oil platforms operationsin in order to safeguard the environment, health of the populace, and maximize recovered exergy from gas flaring.

  4. Observations and Modelling of the Pre-flare Period of the 29 March 2014 X1 Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, M. M.; Harra, L. K.; Matthews, S. A.; Mackay, D. H.; Dacie, S.; Long, D. M.

    2017-02-01

    On 29 March 2014, NOAA Active Region (AR) 12017 produced an X1 flare that was simultaneously observed by an unprecedented number of observatories. We have investigated the pre-flare period of this flare from 14:00 UT until 19:00 UT using joint observations made by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrometer (IRIS) and the Hinode Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). Spectral lines providing coverage of the solar atmosphere from the chromosphere to the corona were analysed to investigate pre-flare activity within the AR. The results of the investigation have revealed evidence of strongly blue-shifted plasma flows, with velocities up to 200 km s^{-1}, being observed 40 minutes prior to flaring. These flows are located along the filament present in the active region and are both spatially discrete and transient. In order to constrain the possible explanations for this activity, we undertake non-potential magnetic field modelling of the active region. This modelling indicates the existence of a weakly twisted flux rope along the polarity inversion line in the region where a filament and the strong pre-flare flows are observed. We then discuss how these observations relate to the current models of flare triggering. We conclude that the most likely drivers of the observed activity are internal reconnection in the flux rope, early onset of the flare reconnection, or tether-cutting reconnection along the filament.

  5. Reducing the effects of metal artefact using high keV monoenergetic reconstruction of dual energy CT (DECT) in hip replacements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Mark [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Norwich (United Kingdom); Norwich Radiology Academy, Norwich (United Kingdom); Reid, Karen [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Norwich (United Kingdom); Toms, Andoni P. [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital and University of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-15

    The aim of this study was to determine whether high keV monoenergetic reconstruction of dual energy computed tomography (DECT) could be used to overcome the effects of beam hardening artefact that arise from preferential deflection of low energy photons. Two phantoms were used: a Charnley total hip replacement set in gelatine and a Catphan 500. DECT datasets were acquired at 100, 200 and 400 mA (Siemens Definition Flash, 100 and 140 kVp) and reconstructed using a standard combined algorithm (1:1) and then as monoenergetic reconstructions at 10 keV intervals from 40 to 190 keV. Semi-automated segmentation with threshold inpainting was used to obtain the attenuation values and standard deviation (SD) of the streak artefact. High contrast line pair resolution and background noise were assessed using the Catphan 500. Streak artefact is progressively reduced with increasing keV monoenergetic reconstructions. Reconstruction of a 400 mA acquisition at 150 keV results in reduction in the volume of streak artefact from 65 cm{sup 3} to 17 cm{sup 3} (74 %). There was a decrease in the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) at higher tube voltages, with the peak CNR seen at 70-80 keV. High contrast spatial resolution was maintained at high keV values. Monoenergetic reconstruction of dual energy CT at increasing theoretical kilovoltages reduces the streak artefact produced by beam hardening from orthopaedic prostheses, accompanied by a modest increase in heterogeneity of background image attenuation, and decrease in contrast to noise ratio, but no deterioration in high contrast line pair resolution. (orig.)

  6. Optimal energy for cell radiosensitivity enhancement by gold nanoparticles using synchrotron-based monoenergetic photon beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman WN

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Wan Nordiana Rahman,1,2 Stéphanie Corde,3,4 Naoto Yagi,5 Siti Aishah Abdul Aziz,1 Nathan Annabell,2 Moshi Geso21School of Health Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kelantan, Malaysia; 2Division of Medical Radiation, School of Medical Sciences, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Bundoora, VIC, 3Radiation Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, High Street, Randwick, 4Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia; 5Japanese Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Sayo-gun, Hyogo, JapanAbstract: Gold nanoparticles have been shown to enhance radiation doses delivered to biological targets due to the high absorption coefficient of gold atoms, stemming from their high atomic number (Z and physical density. These properties significantly increase the likelihood of photoelectric effects and Compton scattering interactions. Gold nanoparticles are a novel radiosensitizing agent that can potentially be used to increase the effectiveness of current radiation therapy techniques and improve the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. However, the optimum radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles is strongly dependent on photon energy, which theoretically is predicted to occur in the kilovoltage range of energy. In this research, synchrotron-generated monoenergetic X-rays in the 30–100 keV range were used to investigate the energy dependence of radiosensitization by gold nanoparticles and also to determine the photon energy that produces optimum effects. This investigation was conducted using cells in culture to measure dose enhancement. Bovine aortic endothelial cells with and without gold nanoparticles were irradiated with X-rays at energies of 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 81, and 100 keV. Trypan blue exclusion assays were performed after irradiation to determine cell viability. Cell radiosensitivity enhancement was indicated by the dose enhancement factor which was found to be maximum at 40 keV with a value of 3

  7. Dark Matter Searches for Monoenergetic Neutrinos Arising from Stopped Meson Decay in the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Rott, Carsten; Kumar, Jason; Yaylali, David

    2015-01-01

    Dark matter can be gravitationally captured by the Sun after scattering off solar nuclei. Annihilations of the dark matter trapped and accumulated in the centre of the Sun could result in one of the most detectable and recognizable signals for dark matter. Searches for high-energy neutrinos produced in the decay of annihilation products have yielded extremely competitive constraints on the spin-dependent scattering cross sections of dark matter with nuclei. Recently, the low energy neutrino signal arising from dark-matter annihilation to quarks which then hadronize and shower has been suggested as a competitive and complementary search strategy. These high-multiplicity hadronic showers give rise to a large amount of pions which will come to rest in the Sun and decay, leading to a unique sub-GeV neutrino signal. We here improve on previous works by considering the monoenergetic neutrino signal arising from both pion and kaon decay. We consider searches at liquid scintillation, liquid argon, and water Cherenkov...

  8. Monoenergetic proton emission from nuclear reaction induced by high intensity laser-generated plasmaa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, L.; Cavallaro, S.; Cutroneo, M.; Giuffrida, L.; Krasa, J.; Margarone, D.; Velyhan, A.; Kravarik, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Wolowski, J.; Szydlowski, A.; Rosinski, M.

    2012-02-01

    A 1016 W/cm2 Asterix laser pulse intensity, 1315 nm at the fundamental frequency, 300 ps pulse duration, was employed at PALS laboratory of Prague, to irradiate thick and thin primary CD2 targets placed inside a high vacuum chamber. The laser irradiation produces non-equilibrium plasma with deutons and carbon ions emission with energy of up to about 4 MeV per charge state, as measured by time-of-flight (TOF) techniques by using ion collectors and silicon carbide detectors. Accelerated deutons may induce high D-D cross section for fusion processes generating 3 MeV protons and 2.5 MeV neutrons, as measured by TOF analyses. In order to increase the mono-energetic proton yield, secondary CD2 targets can be employed to be irradiated by the plasma-accelerated deutons. Experiments demonstrated that high intensity laser pulses can be employed to promote nuclear reactions from which characteristic ion streams may be developed. Results open new scenario for applications of laser-generated plasma to the fields of ion sources and ion accelerators.

  9. Monoenergetic proton emission from nuclear reaction induced by high intensity laser-generated plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, L; Cavallaro, S; Cutroneo, M; Giuffrida, L; Krasa, J; Margarone, D; Velyhan, A; Kravarik, J; Ullschmied, J; Wolowski, J; Szydlowski, A; Rosinski, M

    2012-02-01

    A 10(16) W∕cm(2) Asterix laser pulse intensity, 1315 nm at the fundamental frequency, 300 ps pulse duration, was employed at PALS laboratory of Prague, to irradiate thick and thin primary CD(2) targets placed inside a high vacuum chamber. The laser irradiation produces non-equilibrium plasma with deutons and carbon ions emission with energy of up to about 4 MeV per charge state, as measured by time-of-flight (TOF) techniques by using ion collectors and silicon carbide detectors. Accelerated deutons may induce high D-D cross section for fusion processes generating 3 MeV protons and 2.5 MeV neutrons, as measured by TOF analyses. In order to increase the mono-energetic proton yield, secondary CD(2) targets can be employed to be irradiated by the plasma-accelerated deutons. Experiments demonstrated that high intensity laser pulses can be employed to promote nuclear reactions from which characteristic ion streams may be developed. Results open new scenario for applications of laser-generated plasma to the fields of ion sources and ion accelerators.

  10. Monoenergetic proton emission from nuclear reaction induced by high intensity laser-generated plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrisi, L. [INFN-LNS Via S. Sofia 44, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dip.to di Fisica, Universita di Messina, V.le F.S. D' Alcontres 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy); Cavallaro, S.; Giuffrida, L. [INFN-LNS Via S. Sofia 44, 95123 Catania (Italy); Cutroneo, M. [Dip.to di Fisica, Universita di Messina, V.le F.S. D' Alcontres 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy); Krasa, J.; Margarone, D.; Velyhan, A.; Ullschmied, J. [Institute of Physics, ASCR, v.v.i., 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Kravarik, J. [Czech Technical University, Faculty of Electro-Engineering, Prague (Czech Republic); Wolowski, J.; Szydlowski, A.; Rosinski, M. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, IPPLM, 23 Hery Str., 01-497 Warsaw (Poland)

    2012-02-15

    A 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} Asterix laser pulse intensity, 1315 nm at the fundamental frequency, 300 ps pulse duration, was employed at PALS laboratory of Prague, to irradiate thick and thin primary CD{sub 2} targets placed inside a high vacuum chamber. The laser irradiation produces non-equilibrium plasma with deutons and carbon ions emission with energy of up to about 4 MeV per charge state, as measured by time-of-flight (TOF) techniques by using ion collectors and silicon carbide detectors. Accelerated deutons may induce high D-D cross section for fusion processes generating 3 MeV protons and 2.5 MeV neutrons, as measured by TOF analyses. In order to increase the mono-energetic proton yield, secondary CD{sub 2} targets can be employed to be irradiated by the plasma-accelerated deutons. Experiments demonstrated that high intensity laser pulses can be employed to promote nuclear reactions from which characteristic ion streams may be developed. Results open new scenario for applications of laser-generated plasma to the fields of ion sources and ion accelerators.

  11. Approximate One-Dimensional Models for Monoenergetic Neutral Particle Transport in Ducts with Wall Migration

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, Arnulfo

    2016-01-01

    The problem of monoenergetic neutral particle transport in a duct, where particles travel inside the duct walls, is treated using an approximate one-dimensional model. The one-dimensional model uses three-basis functions, as part of a previously derived weighted-residual procedure, to account for the geometry of particle transport in a duct system (where particle migration into the walls is not considered). Our model introduces two stochastic parameters to account for particle-wall interactions: an albedo approximation yielding the fraction of particles that return to the duct after striking the walls, and a mean-distance travelled in the walls transverse to the duct by particles that re-enter the duct. Our model produces a set of three transport equations with a non-local scattering kernel. We solve these equations using discrete ordinates with source iteration. Numerical results for the reflection and transmission probabilities of neutron transport in ducts of circular cross section are compared to Monte Ca...

  12. Response of a lithium gadolinium borate scintillator in monoenergetic neutron fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, A M; Beeley, P A; Spyrou, N M

    2004-01-01

    Accurate estimation of neutron dose requires knowledge of the neutron energy distribution in the working environment. Existing neutron spectrometry systems, Bonner spheres for example, are large and bulky, and require long data acquisition times. A portable system that could indicate the approximate neutron energy spectrum in a short time would be extremely useful in radiation protection. A composite scintillator, consisting of lithium gadolinium borate crystals in a plastic scintillator matrix, produced by Photogenics is being tested for this purpose. A prototype device based on this scintillator and digital pulse processing electronics has been calibrated using quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields at the low-scatter facility of the UK National Physical Laboratory (NPL). Energies selected were 144, 250, 565, 1400, 2500 and 5000 keV, with correction for scattered neutrons being made using the shadow cone technique. Measurements were also made in the NPL thermal neutron field. Pulse distributions collected with the digitiser in capture-gated mode are presented, and detection efficiency and energy resolution derived. For comparison, neutron spectra were also collected using the commercially available Microspec N-Probe from Bubble Technology Industries, which consists of an NE213 scintillator and a 3He proportional counter.

  13. Dark matter searches for monoenergetic neutrinos arising from stopped meson decay in the Sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rott, Carsten; In, Seongjin [Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University,Suwon, 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kumar, Jason [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Hawai’i,Honolulu, HI, 96822 (United States); Yaylali, David [Department of Physics, University of Arizona,Tucson, AZ, 85721 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Maryland,College Park, MD, 20742 (United States)

    2015-11-24

    Dark matter can be gravitationally captured by the Sun after scattering off solar nuclei. Annihilations of the dark matter trapped and accumulated in the centre of the Sun could result in one of the most detectable and recognizable signals for dark matter. Searches for high-energy neutrinos produced in the decay of annihilation products have yielded extremely competitive constraints on the spin-dependent scattering cross sections of dark matter with nuclei. Recently, the low energy neutrino signal arising from dark-matter annihilation to quarks which then hadronize and shower has been suggested as a competitive and complementary search strategy. These high-multiplicity hadronic showers give rise to a large amount of pions which will come to rest in the Sun and decay, leading to a unique sub-GeV neutrino signal. We here improve on previous works by considering the monoenergetic neutrino signal arising from both pion and kaon decay. We consider searches at liquid scintillation, liquid argon, and water Cherenkov detectors and find very competitive sensitivities for few-GeV dark matter masses.

  14. A model for the recurrent flares in EXO 2030 + 375

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taam, Ronald E.; Brown, D. A.; Fryxell, B. A.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that nonsteady hydrodynamical flows associated with mass and angular momentum capture by a neutron star during a mass ejection phase from a Be star can produce flares with remarkable resemblance to those observed during an outburst from the X-ray transient pulsar EXO 2030 + 375. To reproduce the recurrent time scale of the flares, the velocity of the outflowing matter is estimated to be about 550 km/s. Since the theoretical model requires that a transient disk circulating in one direction is followed by a transient disk circulating in the opposite direction, the time derivative of the pulse period is expected to change sign after each flare event.

  15. MAGNETIC AND DYNAMICAL PHOTOSPHERIC DISTURBANCES OBSERVED DURING AN M3.2 SOLAR FLARE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuckein, C. [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482, Potsdam (Germany); Collados, M.; Sainz, R. Manso, E-mail: ckuckein@aip.de [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), Vía Láctea s/n, E-38205, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2015-02-01

    This Letter reports on a set of full-Stokes spectropolarimetric observations in the near-infrared He i 10830 Å spectral region covering the pre-flare, flare, and post-flare phases of an M3.2 class solar flare. The flare originated on 2013 May 17 and belonged to active region NOAA 11748. We detected strong He i 10830 Å emission in the flare. The red component of the He i triplet peaks at an intensity ratio to the continuum of about 1.86. During the flare, He i Stokes V is substantially larger and appears reversed compared to the usually larger Si i Stokes V profile. The photospheric Si i inversions of the four Stokes profiles reveal the following: (1) the magnetic field strength in the photosphere decreases or is even absent during the flare phase, as compared to the pre-flare phase. However, this decrease is not permanent. After the flare, the magnetic field recovers its pre-flare configuration in a short time (i.e., 30 minutes after the flare). (2) In the photosphere, the line of sight velocities show a regular granular up- and downflow pattern before the flare erupts. During the flare, upflows (blueshifts) dominate the area where the flare is produced. Evaporation rates of ∼10{sup −3} and ∼10{sup −4} g cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} have been derived in the deep and high photosphere, respectively, capable of increasing the chromospheric density by a factor of two in about 400 s.

  16. Two-Step Coronal Transport of Solar Flare Particles from Magnetic Multipolarity Sources in a Flare Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yong-Nian; WANG Shi-Jin

    2001-01-01

    The transport of solar flare particles in the corona is studied. Considering the problems in terms of the character istics of a sunspot group producing solar cosmic rays and solar flare processes, we find that formation of the fast propagation process is associated with annihilation of sunspots in the group with magnetic multipolarity. The slower propagation process depends on magnetic irregularities in the corona, and the evolution of the transport is related to the flare processes. Equations for the coronal transport are proposed and their initial and boundary conditions are given. The predicted results agree with the main observational features.

  17. Blazar flares powered by plasmoids in relativistic reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropoulou, Maria; Giannios, Dimitrios; Sironi, Lorenzo

    2016-11-01

    Powerful flares from blazars with short (˜min) variability time-scales are challenging for current models of blazar emission. Here, we present a physically motivated ab initio model for blazar flares based on the results of recent particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of relativistic magnetic reconnection. PIC simulations demonstrate that quasi-spherical plasmoids filled with high-energy particles and magnetic fields are a self-consistent by-product of the reconnection process. By coupling our PIC-based results (i.e. plasmoid growth, acceleration profile, particle and magnetic content) with a kinetic equation for the evolution of the electron distribution function we demonstrate that relativistic reconnection in blazar jets can produce powerful flares whose temporal and spectral properties are consistent with the observations. In particular, our model predicts correlated synchrotron and synchrotron self-Compton flares of duration of several hours-days powered by the largest and slowest moving plasmoids that form in the reconnection layer. Smaller and faster plasmoids produce flares of sub-hour duration with higher peak luminosities than those powered by the largest plasmoids. Yet, the observed fluence in both types of flares is similar. Multiple flares with a range of flux-doubling time-scales (minutes to several hours) observed over a longer period of flaring activity (days or longer) may be used as a probe of the reconnection layer's orientation and the jet's magnetization. Our model shows that blazar flares are naturally expected as a result of magnetic reconnection in a magnetically dominated jet.

  18. "Magnetar Hyper-Flares: Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' on"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2008-01-01

    The giant flares produced by highly magnetized neutron stars, "magnetars," are the brightest sources of high energy radiation outside our solar system. High frequency oscillations have been discovered during portions of the two most recently observed giant flares which may represent the first detection of global oscillation modes of neutron stars. I will give an observational and theoretical overview of these oscillations and describe how they might allow us to probe neutron star interiors and dense matter physics.

  19. Fast X-Ray Oscillations during Magnetar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmayer Tod E.

    2009-01-01

    The giant flares produced by highly magnetized neutron stars, "magnetars," are the brightest sources of high energy radiation outside our solar system. High frequency oscillations have been discovered during portions of the two most recently observed giant flares which may represent the first detection of global oscillation modes of neutron stars. I will give an observational and theoretical overview of these oscillations and describe how they might allow us to probe neutron star interiors and dense matter physics.

  20. Dual frequency observations of flares with the VLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulk, G. A.; Bastian, T. S.; Hurford, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    Observations are presented of two subflares near the limb on 21 and 22 November 1981 and an M7.7 flare on 8 May 1981 made at 5 and 15 GHz using the VLA. One of the November flares produced no 5 GHz radiation, while the 15 GHz radiation in the other flare emanated from a source which was smaller, lower, and displaced from the 5 GHz source. The flare occurring on 8 May was intense and complex, and contained two or more sources at both 5 and 15 GHz. Prior to the peak of the flare, the sources were found to grow in size, after which time only weak subsources were visible to the VLA. These subsources were found to be located between or at the edge of the H-alpha ribbons and the two hard X-ray sources imaged by the Hinotori satellite. Highly polarized, bursty radiation was observed at 1 and 2 GHz, which indicated that an electron-cyclotron maser operated during the flare. The maximum field strength in flaring loops is estimated to be 360-600 gauss.

  1. Gamma-ray Burst Flares: X-ray Flaring. II

    CERN Document Server

    Swenson, C A

    2013-01-01

    We present a catalog of 497 flaring periods found in gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves taken from the online XRT GRB Catalogue. We analyzed 680 individual light curves using a flare detection method developed and used on our UV/optical GRB Flare Catalog. The method makes use of the Bayesian Information Criterion to analyze the residuals of fitted GRB light curves and statistically determines the optimal fit to the light curve residuals in attempt to identify any additional features. These features, which we classify as flares, are identified by iteratively adding additional `breaks' to the light curve. We find evidence of flaring in 310 of the analyzed light curves. For those light curves with flares, we find an average number of ~1.5 flares per GRB. As with the UV/optical, flaring in our sample is generally confined to the first 1000 s of the afterglow, but can be detected to beyond 10^5 s. Only ~50% of the detected flares follow the `classical' definition of \\Delta t/t << 1, with many of the largest ...

  2. A Fifteen Year Record of Global Natural Gas Flaring Derived from Satellite Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Zhizhin

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available We have produced annual estimates of national and global gas flaring and gas flaring efficiency from 1994 through 2008 using low light imaging data acquired by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP. Gas flaring is a widely used practice for the disposal of associated gas in oil production and processing facilities where there is insufficient infrastructure for utilization of the gas (primarily methane. Improved utilization of the gas is key to reducing global carbon emissions to the atmosphere. The DMSP estimates of flared gas volume are based on a calibration developed with a pooled set of reported national gas flaring volumes and data from individual flares. Flaring efficiency was calculated as the volume of flared gas per barrel of crude oil produced. Global gas flaring has remained largely stable over the past fifteen years, in the range of 140 to 170 billion cubic meters (BCM. Global flaring efficiency was in the seven to eight cubic meters per barrel from 1994 to 2005 and declined to 5.6 m3 per barrel by 2008. The 2008 gas flaring estimate of 139 BCM represents 21% of the natural gas consumption of the USA with a potential retail market value of $68 billion. The 2008 flaring added more than 278 million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e into the atmosphere. The DMSP estimated gas flaring volumes indicate that global gas flaring has declined by 19% since 2005, led by gas flaring reductions in Russia and Nigeria, the two countries with the highest gas flaring levels. The flaring efficiency of both Russia and Nigeria improved from 2005 to 2008, suggesting that the reductions in gas flaring are likely the result of either improved utilization of the gas, reinjection, or direct venting of gas into the atmosphere, although the effect of uncertainties in the satellite data cannot be ruled out. It is anticipated that the capability to estimate gas flaring volumes based on satellite data will spur improved utilization of

  3. PRECURSOR FLARES IN OJ 287

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pihajoki, P.; Berdyugin, A.; Lindfors, E.; Reinthal, R.; Sillanpaeae, A.; Takalo, L. [Tuorla Observatory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FI-21500 Piikkioe (Finland); Valtonen, M.; Nilsson, K. [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO, University of Turku, FI-21500 Piikkioe (Finland); Zola, S.; Koziel-Wierzbowska, D. [Astronomical Observatory, Jagiellonian University, ul. Orla 171, PL-30-244 Krakow (Poland); Liakos, A. [Department of Astrophysics, Astronomy and Mechanics, University of Athens, GR 157 84 Zografos, Athens, Hellas (Greece); Drozdz, M.; Winiarski, M.; Ogloza, W. [Mount Suhora Observatory, Pedagogical University, ul. Podchorazych 2, PL-30-084 Krakow (Poland); Provencal, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Santangelo, M. M. M. [O.A.C. Osservatorio Astronomico di Capannori, Via di Valle, I-55060 Vorno, Capannori (Italy); Salo, H. [Department of Physical Sciences, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FI-90014 University of Oulu (Finland); Chandra, S.; Ganesh, S.; Baliyan, K. S., E-mail: popiha@utu.fi [Astronomy and Astrophysics Division, Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad 380009 (India); and others

    2013-02-10

    We have studied three most recent precursor flares in the light curve of the blazar OJ 287 while invoking the presence of a precessing binary black hole in the system to explain the nature of these flares. Precursor flare timings from the historical light curves are compared with theoretical predictions from our model that incorporate effects of an accretion disk and post-Newtonian description for the binary black hole orbit. We find that the precursor flares coincide with the secondary black hole descending toward the accretion disk of the primary black hole from the observed side, with a mean z-component of approximately z{sub c} = 4000 AU. We use this model of precursor flares to predict that precursor flare of similar nature should happen around 2020.96 before the next major outburst in 2022.

  4. Monoenergetic source of kilodalton ions from Taylor cones of ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larriba, C.; Castro, S.; Fernandez de la Mora, J.; Lozano, P.

    2007-04-01

    The ionic liquid ion sources (ILISs) recently introduced by Lozano and Martinez Sanchez [J. Colloid Interface Sci. 282, 415 (2005)], based on electrochemically etched tungsten tips as emitters for Taylor cones of ionic liquids (ILs), have been tested with ionic liquids [A+B-] of increasing molecular weight and viscosity. These ILs have electrical conductivities well below 1S/m and were previously thought to be unsuitable to operate in the purely ionic regime because their Taylor cones produce mostly charged drops from conventional capillary tube sources. Strikingly, all the ILs tried on ILIS form charged beams composed exclusively of small ions and cluster ions A+(AB)n or B-(AB)n, with abundances generally peaking at n =1. Particularly interesting are the positive and negative ion beams produced from the room temperature molten salts 1-methyl-3-pentylimidazolium tris(pentafluoroethyl) trifluorophosphate (C5MI-(C2F5)3PF3) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(pentafluoroethyl) sulfonylimide (EMI-(C2F5SO3)2N). We extend to these heavier species the previous conclusions from Lozano and Martinez Sanchez on the narrow energy distributions of the ion beams. In combination with suitable ILs, this source yields nanoamphere currents of positive and negative monoenergetic molecular ions with masses exceeding 2000amu. Potential applications are in biological secondary ion mass spectrometry, chemically assisted high-resolution ion beam etching, and electrical propulsion. Advantages of the ILISs versus similar liquid metal ion sources include the possibility to form negative as well as positive ion beams and a much wider range of ion compositions and molecular masses.

  5. Imaging coronal magnetic-field reconnection in a solar flare

    CERN Document Server

    Su, Yang; Holman, Gordon D; Dennis, Brian R; Wang, Tongjiang; Temmer, Manuela; Gan, Weiqun

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic-field reconnection is believed to play a fundamental role in magnetized plasma systems throughout the Universe1, including planetary magnetospheres, magnetars and accretion disks around black holes. This letter present extreme ultraviolet and X-ray observations of a solar flare showing magnetic reconnection with a level of clarity not previously achieved. The multi-wavelength extreme ultraviolet observations from SDO/AIA show inflowing cool loops and newly formed, outflowing hot loops, as predicted. RHESSI X-ray spectra and images simultaneously show the appearance of plasma heated to >10 MK at the expected locations. These two data sets provide solid visual evidence of magnetic reconnection producing a solar flare, validating the basic physical mechanism of popular flare models. However, new features are also observed that need to be included in reconnection and flare studies, such as three-dimensional non-uniform, non-steady and asymmetric evolution.

  6. Blazar flares powered by plasmoids in relativistic reconnection

    CERN Document Server

    Petropoulou, Maria; Sironi, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Powerful flares from blazars with short ($\\sim$ min) variability timescales are challenging for current models of blazar emission. Here, we present a physically motivated ab initio model for blazar flares based on the results of recent particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of relativistic magnetic reconnection. PIC simulations demonstrate that quasi-spherical plasmoids filled with high-energy particles and magnetic fields are a self-consistent by-product of the reconnection process. By coupling our PIC-based results (i.e., plasmoid growth, acceleration profile, particle and magnetic content) with a kinetic equation for the evolution of the electron distribution function we demonstrate that relativistic reconnection in blazar jets can produce powerful flares whose temporal and spectral properties are consistent with the observations. In particular, our model predicts correlated synchrotron and synchrotron self-Compton flares of duration of several hours--days powered by the largest and slowest moving plasmoids th...

  7. The flares of August 1972. [solar flare characteristics and spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirin, H.; Tanaka, K.

    1973-01-01

    Observations of the August, 1972 flares at Big Bear and Tel Aviv, involving monochromatic movies, magnetograms, and spectra, are analyzed. The region (McMath 11976) showed inverted polarity from its inception on July 11; the great activity was due to extremely high shear and gradients in the magnetic field, as well as a constant invasion of one polarity into the opposite; observations in lambda 3835 show remarkable fast flashes in the impulsive flare of 18:38 UT on Aug. 2 with lifetimes of 5 sec, which may be due to dumping of particles in the lower chromosphere. Flare loops show evolutionary increases of their tilts to the neutral line in the flares of Aug. 4 and 7. Spectroscopic observations show red asymmetry and red shift of the H alpha emission in the flash phase of the Aug. 7 flare, as well as substantial velocity shear in the photosphere during the flare, somewhat like earthquake movement along a fault. Finally the total H alpha emission of the Aug. 7 flare could be measured accurately as about 2.5 x 10 to the 30th power erg, considerably less than coarser previous estimates for great flares.

  8. GRB Flares: UV/Optical Flaring (Paper I)

    CERN Document Server

    Swenson, C A; De Pasquale, M; Oates, S R

    2013-01-01

    We present a new algorithm for the detection of flares in gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves and use this algorithm to detect flares in the UV/optical. The algorithm makes use of the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) to analyze the residuals of the fitted light curve, removing all major features, and to determine the statistically best fit to the data by iteratively adding additional `breaks' to the light curve. These additional breaks represent the individual components of the detected flares: T_start, T_stop, and T_peak. We present the detection of 119 unique flaring periods detected by applying this algorithm to light curves taken from the Second Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) GRB Afterglow Catalog. We analyzed 201 UVOT GRB light curves and found episodes of flaring in 68 of the light curves. For those light curves with flares, we find an average number of ~2 flares per GRB. Flaring is generally restricted to the first 1000 seconds of the afterglow, but can be observed and detected beyond 10...

  9. Models for Flare Statistics and the Waiting-time Distribution of Solar Flare Hard X-ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatland, M. S.; Edney, S. D.

    1999-12-01

    In a previous study (Wheatland, Sturrock, McTiernan 1998), a waiting-time distribution was constructed for solar flare hard X-ray bursts observed by the ICE/ISEE-3 spacecraft. A comparison of the observed distribution with that of a time-dependent Poisson process indicated an overabundance of short waiting times (10~s -- 10~min), implying that the hard X-ray bursts are not independent events. Models for flare statistics assume or predict that flares are independent events -- in particular the avalanche model makes this specific prediction. The results of the previous study may be reconciled with the avalanche picture if individual flares produce several distinct bursts of hard X-ray emission. A detailed comparison of the avalanche model and the ICE/ISEE-3 waiting-time distribution is presented here.

  10. Solar flare leaves sun quaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-05-01

    energy, and produce X-rays, microwaves and a shock wave that heats the solar surface. Kosovichev and Zharkova developed a theory that predicts the nature and magnitude of the shock waves that this beam of energetic electrons should create when they slam down into the solar atmosphere. Although their theory directed them to the right area to search for the seismic waves, the waves that they found were 10 times stronger than they had predicted. "They were so strong that you can see them in the raw data," Kosovichev says. The solar seismic waves appear to be compression waves like the "P" waves generated by an earthquake. They travel throughout the Sun's interior. In fact, the waves should recombine on the opposite side of the Sun from the location of the flare to create a faint duplicate of the original ripple pattern, Kosovichev predicts. Now that they know how to find them, the SOHO scientists say that the seismic waves generated by solar flares should allow them to verify independently some of the conditions in the solar interior that they have inferred from studying the pattern of waves that are continually ruffling the Sun's surface. SOHO is part of the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) program, a global effort to observe and understand our star and its effects on our environment. The ISTP mission includes more than 20 satellites, coupled with with ground-based observatories and modeling centers, that allow scientists to study the Sun, the Earth, and the space between them in unprecedented detail. ISTP is a joint program of NASA, ESA, Japan's Institute for Astronautical Science, and Russia's Space Research Institute. Still images of the solar quake can be found at the following internet address: FTP://PAO.GSFC.NASA.GOV/newsmedia/QUAKE/ For further information, please contact : ESA Public Relations Division Tel:+33(0)1.53.69.71.55 Fax: +33(0)1.53.69.76.90 3

  11. Development of high pressure deuterium gas targets for the generation of intense mono-energetic fast neutron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzek, J. E-mail: jguzek@debeers.co.za; Richardson, K.; Franklyn, C.B.; Waites, A.; McMurray, W.R.; Watterson, J.I.W.; Tapper, U.A.S

    1999-06-01

    Two different technical solutions to the problem of generation of mono-energetic fast neutron beams on the gaseous targets are presented here. A simple and cost-effective design of a cooled windowed gas target system is described in the first part of this paper. It utilises a thin metallic foil window and circulating deuterium gas cooled down to 100 K. The ultimate beam handling capability of such target is determined by the properties of the window. Reliable performance of this gas target system was achieved at 1 bar of deuterium gas, when exposed to a 45 {mu}A beam of 5 MeV deuterons, for periods in excess of 6 h. Cooling of the target gas resulted in increased fast neutron output and improved neutron to gamma-ray ratio. The second part of this paper discusses the design of a high pressure, windowless gas target for use with pulsed, low duty cycle accelerators. A rotating seal concept was applied to reduce the gas load in a differentially pumped system. This allows operation at 1.23 bar of deuterium gas pressure in the gas cell region. Such a gas target system is free from the limitations of the windowed target but special attention has to be paid to the heat dissipation capability of the beam dump, due to the use of a thin target. The rotating seal concept is particularly suitable for use with accelerators such as radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linacs that operate with a very high peak current at low duty cycle. The performance of both target systems was comprehensively characterized using the time-of-flight (TOF) technique. This demonstrated that very good quality mono-energetic fast neutron beams were produced with the slow neutron and gamma-ray component below 10% of the total target output.

  12. Bremsstrahlung versus Monoenergetic Photon Dose and Photonuclear Stimulation Comparisons At Long Standoff Distances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. L. Jones; J.W. Sterbentz; W.Y. Yoon

    2009-06-01

    Energetic photon sources with energies greater than 6 MeV continue to be recognized as viable source for various types of inspection applications, especially those related to nuclear and/or explosive material detection. These energetic photons can be produced as a continuum of energies (i.e., bremsstrahlung distribution) or as a set of one or more discrete photon energies (i.e., monoenergetic distribution). This paper will provide a follow-on extension of the photon dose comparison presented at the 9th International Conference on Applications of Nuclear Techniques (June 2008). The latter paper showed the comparative advantages and disadvantages of the photon doses provided by these two energetic interrogation sources and highlighted the higher energy advantage of the bremsstrahlung source, especially at long standoff distances (i.e., distance from source to the inspected object). Specifically, this paper will pursue this higher energy photon inspection advantage (up to 100 MeV) by providing dose and stimulated photonuclear interaction predictions for air and an infinitely dilute interrogated material (used for comparative interaction rate assessments since it excludes material self-shielding) as the interrogation object positioned forward on the inspection beam axis at increasing standoff distances. In addition to the direct energetic photon-induced stimulation, the predictions will identify the importance of any secondary downscattered/attenuated source-term effects arising from the photon transport in the intervening atmosphere. *Supported in part by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency and Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho Operations Office under Contract Number DE-AC07-05ID14517.

  13. Modelling repeatedly flaring delta-sunspots

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Piyali; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Active regions (AR) appearing on the surface of the Sun are classified into $\\alpha$, $\\beta$, $\\gamma$, and $\\delta$ by the rules of the Mount Wilson Observatory, California on the basis of their topological complexity. Amongst these, the $\\delta$-sunspots are known to be super-active and produce the most X-ray flares. Here, we present results from a simulation of the Sun by mimicking the upper layers and the corona, but starting at a more primitive stage than any earlier treatment. We find that this initial state consisting of only a thin sub-photospheric magnetic sheet breaks into multiple flux-tubes which evolve into a colliding-merging system of spots of opposite polarity upon surface emergence, similar to those often seen on the Sun. The simulation goes on to produce many exotic $\\delta$-sunspot associated phenomena: repeated flaring in the range of typical solar flare energy release and ejective helical flux ropes with embedded cool-dense plasma filaments resembling solar coronal mass ejections.

  14. Search for monoenergetic gamma rays produced in pp annihilations at rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brando, T.; Bromberg, C.; Daftari, I. K.; Kalogeropoulos, T.; Lewis, R. A.; Lowenstein, D.; Miller, R.; Oh, B. Y.; Onengut, G.; Peaslee, D. C.; Petridou, C.; Potter, T.; Smith, G. A.; Tzanakos, G.; Whitmore, J.

    1984-05-01

    Narrow (Γ Panofsky line is seen from secondary π- in addition a narrow anomaly of 3.3σ significance appears at Eγ = 105 +/- 3 MeV. If this is in fact a gamma line, its features suggest a mixed qq + NN model.

  15. Comparison of emission properties of two homologous flares in AR 11283

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yan; Jing, Ju; Wang, Shuo; Wang, Haimin, E-mail: yx2@njit.edu [Space Weather Research Lab, Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology 323 Martin Luther King Boulevard, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    Large, complex, active regions may produce multiple flares within a certain period of one or two days. These flares could occur in the same location with similar morphologies, commonly referred to as 'homologous flares'. In 2011 September, active region NOAA 11283 produced a pair of homologous flares on the 6th and 7th, respectively. Both of them were white-light (WL) flares, as captured by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory in visible continuum at 6173 Å which is believed to originate from the deep solar atmosphere. We investigate the WL emission of these X-class flares with HMI's seeing-free imaging spectroscopy. The durations of impulsive peaks in the continuum are about 4 minutes. We compare the WL with hard X-ray (HXR) observations for the September 6 flare and find a good correlation between the continuum and HXR both spatially and temporally. In absence of RHESSI data during the second flare on September 7, the derivative of the GOES soft X-ray is used and also found to be well correlated temporally with the continuum. We measure the contrast enhancements, characteristic sizes, and HXR fluxes of the twin flares, which are similar for both flares, indicating analogous triggering and heating processes. However, the September 7 flare was associated with conspicuous sunquake signals whereas no seismic wave was detected during the flare on September 6. Therefore, this comparison suggests that the particle bombardment may not play a dominant role in producing the sunquake events studied in this paper.

  16. The Fourier transform solution for the Green's function of monoenergetic neutron transport theory

    OpenAIRE

    Ganapol, Barry D.

    2014-01-01

    Nearly 45 years ago, Ken Case published his seminal paper on the singular eigenfunction solution for the Green's function of the monoenergetic neutron transport equation with isotropic scattering. Previously, the solution had been obtained by Fourier transform. While it is apparent the two had to be equivalent, a convincing equivalence proof for general anisotropic scattering remained a challenge until now.

  17. Development of a monoenergetic neutron beam (Theoretical aspects, experimental developments and applications)

    CERN Document Server

    Varela-G, A

    2003-01-01

    By the use of a neutron time of flight system at the Tandem Accelerator of the National Nuclear Research Institute; with neutrons provided by means of the sup 2 H(d, n) sup 3 He we intend to use the associated particle technique in order to have monoenergetic neutrons. This neutron beam will be used both in basic and applied research. (Author)

  18. The COMPTEL solar flare catalog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, J.; Varendorff, M.; McConnell, M.; Forrest, D.; Schoenfelder, V.; Lichti, G.; Diehl, R.; Rank, G.; Bennett, K.; Hanlon, L.; Winkler, W.; Swanenburg, B.; Bloemen, H. Hermsen, W.

    1993-01-01

    COMPTEL, the Imaging Compton Telescope on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, has registered many solar gamma ray flares during its two years on orbit. It detects and measures gamma rays from flares by two methods: (1) utilizing two independent large NaI gamma ray spectrometers operating from 0.2 to 2 MeV and 0.6 to 10 MeV and (2) using the telescope and imaging capabilities to acquire spectra from 0.75 to 30 MeV. Solar neutrons can also be measured in the telescope mode. The authors report here the solar gamma ray flare list compiled from COMPTEL data in the two modes of operation. They also describe the methods of searching for flares in the COMPTEL data and the qualitative nature of the flares detected.

  19. Latitudinal Distribution of Solar Flares and Their Association with Coronal Mass Ejections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pankaj K. Shrivastava; Neelam Singh

    2005-01-01

    Major solar flare events have been utilised to study the latitudinal frequency distribution of solar flares in northern and southern hemispheres for the period of 1986 to 2003. A statistical analysis has been performed to obtain the correlation between Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and Forbush decrease (Fds)of cosmic ray intensity. Almost the same flares distribution in both hemispheres is found in association with CMEs. In a further analysis, it is noted that a larger number of CME-associated solar flares located in the northern hemisphere are found to be more effective in producing Forbush decreases.

  20. Upstream petroleum industry flaring report for year ending December 31, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    A summary of flared volumes for the various oil and gas industry sectors including well tests, gas plants, gas gathering systems and batteries were presented in this report along with data on solution gas conserved, flared and vented in Alberta during 2000. This report is published in response to a commitment that the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB) made to ensure that flaring data is more accessible to the public and industry. The data included in the report is based on information submitted by companies. The information is tabulated and operators are ranked based on solution gas flared, solution gas vented, total gas produced, and total oil from crude oil and crude bitumen batteries. The report demonstrates the significant progress industry has made towards reducing solution flare gas and vent volumes in the province. The volume of solution gas flared and vented in Alberta decreased by 38 per cent in 2000. tabs.

  1. Magnetic Topology of the 29 October 2003 X10 flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Jardins, Angela C.; Canfield, R.; Longcope, D.

    2006-06-01

    In order to improve the understanding of both flare initiation and evolution, we take advantage of powerful new topological methods and the high spatial resolution of RHESSI to examine where magnetic reconnection takes place in flare-producing solar active regions. Up to this time, such studies have been carried out on a very small number of active regions. According to present ideas, reconnection is expected to occur at either a separatrix or separator topological feature. We use the powerful X10 flare on 29 October 2003 (peak: 20:49 UT, location: (80'', 275'')) as a test of the ability to interpret the topological location of reconnection. The 29 October 2003 flare was well observed by RHESSI and MDI, occurred near the sun's central meridian, and thus is thus a prime candidate for a study on the topological location of magnetic reconnection. In this flare study, we use the MPOLE (http://solar.physics.montana.edu/dana/mpole/) software to extrapolate from the photospheric magnetic field, as observed by MDI, to a coronal field. MPOLE is a suite of IDL programs implementing the Minimum Current Corona Model (Longcope 1996) and currently includes a new method that uses a hierarchy of topological features (Beveridge 2006). The extrapolation gives the location of topological features such as poles, nulls, separatricies, separators, and spine lines. We examine the flare emission observed by RHESSI in the context of these topological features. In the case of the 29 October 2003 flare, we find a relationship between the spine lines and the temporal evolution of the HXR flare footpoints. In this poster, we present observations supporting the relationship, explore uncertainties in the consistency between MPOLE and RHESSI data, and survey possible results.This work is supported by NASA.

  2. Three Solar Gamma-Ray Flares Observed by Yohkoh In Autumn of 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, M. A. Mosalam

    The Japanese mission Yohkoh (sun-beam) observed three solar gamma-ray flares of October, November and December 1991, on the declining phase of solar cycle 22. Each flare has different spectral characteristics, strong narrow line flare, broad line flare and continuum gamma-ray flare.The solar gamma-ray flares of October, November and December 1991 are produced from the three solar active regions NOAA/USAF 6891, 6919 and 6952 respectively. The aim of the present work is to study the general characteristics of these three active regions, and perform an evolution for the sunspots and their magnetic fields which lead to releasing highly energetic impulsive flares associated with gamma-ray emissions.The method of cumulative summation curves for X-ray bursts and Hα flares produced from the active regions and also, cumulative summation curves for sunspots area and count number for the same active regions are applied to show any steep increase in the trend in the curves for few days prior to the γ-ray flare occurrences

  3. Comparison between Major Confined and Eruptive Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Yashiro, S.; Mäkelä, P.; Dennis, B. R.

    2012-05-01

    Statistical studies have shown that a large fraction of major solar flares (42% M-class and 15% X-class) are not associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The CME-less flares are confined flares as opposed to the eruptive flares associated with CMEs. Confined flares are certainly good particle accelerators as inferred from intense microwave, hard X-ray, and gamma-ray emissions. Note that a single acceleration mechanism operates in confined flares, whereas eruptive flares can have both flare-resident and shock accelerations (the shock acceleration is due to energetic CMEs). In this paper, we report on a statistical study of more than two dozen confined flares with soft X-ray flare size exceeding M5 in comparison with a control sample of eruptive flares with similar soft X-ray flare size. We compare the microwave and X-ray emission characteristics in the two populations; these emissions correspond to sunward energy flow. For a given X-ray flare size, the microwave flux is scattered over a wider range for the eruptive flares when compared to the confined flares. We also compare the metric and longer wavelength radio bursts between the two populations; these emissions correspond to the flow of nonthermal electrons away from the Sun. We find that almost all the confined flares lack metric radio bursts, suggesting that there is very little flow of energy into the interplanetary medium. On the other hand, there is high degree of association between eruptive flares and metric radio bursts. This suggests that in confined flares the accelerated electrons have no access to open magnetic field lines. Finally, we examined the association of EUV waves with the two flare populations. While we find EUV waves in most of the eruptive flares, there was no confined flare with EUV waves. This suggests that CMEs is a necessary condition for the generation of global waves.

  4. Solar flare associated coronal mass ejections causing geo-effectiveness and Forbush decreases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Beena; Chandra, Harish

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, we have selected 35 halo Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) associated with solar flares, Geomagnetic Storms (GSs) and Forbush decrease (Fd) chosen from 1st January 2000 to 31st December 2007 (i.e., the descending phase of solar cycle 23) observed by the Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) on board the SOHO spacecraft. Statistical analyses are performed to look at the distribution of solar flares associated with halo CMEs causing GSs and Fd and investigated the relationship between solar flare and halo CME parameters with GSs and Fd. Forbush decrease is the phenomenon of rapid decrease in cosmic ray intensity following the CME. Our analysis indicates that during 2000 to 2007 the northern region produced 44 % of solar flares associated with halo CMEs, GSs, and Fd, whereas 56 % solar flares associated with halo CMEs, GSs, and Fd were produced in the southern region. The northern and the southern hemispheres between 10° to 20° latitudinal belts are found to be more effective in producing events leading to Fd. From our selected events, we found that about 60 % of super-intense storms (Dst ≤ -200 nT) caused by halo CMEs are associated with X-class flares. Fast halo CMEs associated with X-class flares originating from 0° to 25° latitudes are better potential candidates in producing super-intense GSs than the slow halo CMEs associated with other classes of flares.

  5. Flare physics at high energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaty, R.

    1990-01-01

    High-energy processes, involving a rich variety of accelerated particle phenomena, lie at the core of the solar flare problem. The most direct manifestation of these processes are high-energy radiations, gamma rays, hard X-rays and neutrons, as well as the accelerated particles themselves, which can be detected in interplanetary space. In the study of astrophysics from the moon, the understanding of these processes should have great importance. The inner solar system environment is strongly influenced by activity on the sun; the physics of solar flares is of great intrinsic interest; and much high-energy astrophysics can be learned from investigations of flare physics at high energies.

  6. Use of simulation in flare countermeasure development

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Delport, JP

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available ● Assume enough flare energy ● Questions addressed ● Timing ● Geometry ● Dispense logic ● Obscuration ● Physics based, spectrally correct ● Question addressed ● Flare spectrum ● Environmental influences © CSIR 2008 AOC Conference – 12 November... November 2008 Slide 12 Engagement Scenarios & Simulations ● Aircraft with flares versus missile ● Flight conditions ● Flare dispense logic ● Flare pod placement, angles ● Multitude of simulated launches ● Visualisation...

  7. High-energy Gamma-Ray Emission from Solar Flares: Summary of Fermi Large Area Telescope Detections and Analysis of Two M-class Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Bottacini, E.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chen, Q.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Inoue, Y.; Jackson, M. S.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Kawano, T.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Murphy, R.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Ritz, S.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Takahashi, H.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, Y.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Tronconi, V.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Werner, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, D. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yang, Z.; Fermi LAT Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    We present the detections of 18 solar flares detected in high-energy γ-rays (above 100 MeV) with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) during its first 4 yr of operation. This work suggests that particle acceleration up to very high energies in solar flares is more common than previously thought, occurring even in modest flares, and for longer durations. Interestingly, all these flares are associated with fairly fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We then describe the detailed temporal, spatial, and spectral characteristics of the first two long-lasting events: the 2011 March 7 flare, a moderate (M3.7) impulsive flare followed by slowly varying γ-ray emission over 13 hr, and the 2011 June 7 M2.5 flare, which was followed by γ-ray emission lasting for 2 hr. We compare the Fermi LAT data with X-ray and proton data measurements from GOES and RHESSI. We argue that the γ-rays are more likely produced through pion decay than electron bremsstrahlung, and we find that the energy spectrum of the proton distribution softens during the extended emission of the 2011 March 7 flare. This would disfavor a trapping scenario for particles accelerated during the impulsive phase of the flare and point to a continuous acceleration process at play for the duration of the flares. CME shocks are known for accelerating the solar energetic particles (SEPs) observed in situ on similar timescales, but it might be challenging to explain the production of γ-rays at the surface of the Sun while the CME is halfway to the Earth. A stochastic turbulence acceleration process occurring in the solar corona is another likely scenario. Detailed comparison of characteristics of SEPs and γ-ray-emitting particles for several flares will be helpful to distinguish between these two possibilities.

  8. Building Big Flares: Constraining Generating Processes of Solar Flare Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyse Jackson, T.; Kashyap, V.; McKillop, S.

    2015-12-01

    We address mechanisms which seek to explain the observed solar flare distribution, dN/dE ~ E1.8. We have compiled a comprehensive database, from GOES, NOAA, XRT, and AIA data, of solar flares and their characteristics, covering the year 2013. These datasets allow us to probe how stored magnetic energy is released over the course of an active region's evolution. We fit power-laws to flare distributions over various attribute groupings. For instance, we compare flares that occur before and after an active region reaches its maximum area, and show that the corresponding flare distributions are indistinguishable; thus, the processes that lead to magnetic reconnection are similar in both cases. A turnover in the distribution is not detectable at the energies accessible to our study, suggesting that a self-organized critical (SOC) process is a valid mechanism. However, we find changes in the distributions that suggest that the simple picture of an SOC where flares draw energy from an inexhaustible reservoir of stored magnetic energy is incomplete. Following the evolution of the flare distribution over the lifetimes of active regions, we find that the distribution flattens with time, and for larger active regions, and that a single power-law model is insufficient. This implies that flares that occur later in the lifetime of the active region tend towards higher energies. We conclude that the SOC process must have an upper bound. Increasing the scope of the study to include data from other years and more instruments will increase the robustness of these results. This work was supported by the NSF-REU Solar Physics Program at SAO, grant number AGS 1263241, NASA Contract NAS8-03060 to the Chandra X-ray Center and by NASA Hinode/XRT contract NNM07AB07C to SAO

  9. The dark connection between the EGRET excess of diffuse Galactic gamma rays, the Canis Major dwarf, the Monoceros ring, the INTEGRAL 511 keV annihilation line, the gas flaring and the Galactic rotation curve

    CERN Document Server

    de Boer, Wim

    2007-01-01

    The EGRET excess of diffuse Galactic gamma rays shows all the key features of dark matter annihilation (DMA) for a WIMP mass in the range 50-100 GeV, especially the distribution of the excess is compatible with a standard halo profile with some additional ringlike substructures at 4 and 13 kpc from the Galactic centre. These substructures coincide with the gravitational potential well expected from the ring of dust at 4 kpc and the tidal stream of dark matter from the Canis Major satellite galaxy at 13 kpc, as deduced from N-body simulations fitting to the Monoceros ring of stars. Strong independent support for this substructure is given by the gas flaring in our Galaxy. The gamma rays from DMA are originating predominantly from the hadronization of mono-energetic quarks, which should produce also a small, but known fraction of protons and antiprotons. Bergstrom et al. an antiproton flux far above the observed antiproton flux and they conclude that the DMA interpretation of the EGRET excess can therefore be e...

  10. Magnetic Properties of Solar Active Regions that Govern Large Solar Flares and Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toriumi, Shin; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Harra, Louise; Hudson, Hugh S.; Nagashima, Kaori

    2017-08-01

    Strong flares and CMEs are often produced from active regions (ARs). In order to better understand the magnetic properties and evolutions of such ARs, we conducted statistical investigations on the SDO/HMI and AIA data of all flare events with GOES levels >M5.0 within 45 deg from the disk center for 6 years from May 2010 (from the beginning to the declining phase of solar cycle 24). Out of the total of 51 flares from 29 ARs, more than 80% have delta-sunspots and about 15% violate Hale’s polarity rule. We obtained several key findings including (1) the flare duration is linearly proportional to the separation of the flare ribbons (i.e., scale of reconnecting magnetic fields) and (2) CME-eruptive events have smaller sunspot areas. Depending on the magnetic properties, flaring ARs can be categorized into several groups, such as spot-spot, in which a highly-sheared polarity inversion line is formed between two large sunspots, and spot-satellite, where a newly-emerging flux next to a mature sunspot triggers a compact flare event. These results point to the possibility that magnetic structures of the ARs determine the characteristics of flares and CMEs. In the presentation, we will also show new results from the systematic flux emergence simulations of delta-sunspot formation and discuss the evolution processes of flaring ARs.

  11. Gas flaring and resultant air pollution: A review focusing on black carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawole, Olusegun G; Cai, X-M; MacKenzie, A R

    2016-09-01

    Gas flaring is a prominent source of VOCs, CO, CO2, SO2, PAH, NOX and soot (black carbon), all of which are important pollutants which interact, directly and indirectly, in the Earth's climatic processes. Globally, over 130 billion cubic metres of gas are flared annually. We review the contribution of gas flaring to air pollution on local, regional and global scales, with special emphasis on black carbon (BC, "soot"). The temporal and spatial characteristics of gas flaring distinguishes it from mobile combustion sources (transport), while the open-flame nature of gas flaring distinguishes it from industrial point-sources; the high temperature, flame control, and spatial compactness distinguishes gas flaring from both biomass burning and domestic fuel-use. All of these distinguishing factors influence the quantity and characteristics of BC production from gas flaring, so that it is important to consider this source separately in emissions inventories and environmental field studies. Estimate of the yield of pollutants from gas flaring have, to date, paid little or no attention to the emission of BC with the assumption often being made that flaring produces a smokeless flame. In gas flares, soot yield is known to depend on a number of factors, and there is a need to develop emission estimates and modelling frameworks that take these factors into consideration. Hence, emission inventories, especially of the soot yield from gas flaring should give adequate consideration to the variation of fuel gas composition, and to combustion characteristics, which are strong determinants of the nature and quantity of pollutants emitted. The buoyant nature of gas flaring plume, often at temperatures in the range of 2000 K, coupled with the height of the stack enables some of the pollutants to escape further into the free troposphere aiding their long-range transport, which is often not well-captured by model studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Solar Features - Solar Flares - Patrol

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The H-alpha Flare Patrol identifies time periods each day when the sun is being continuously monitored by select ground-based solar observatories.

  13. Automatic prediction of solar flares and super geomagnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hui

    Space weather is the response of our space environment to the constantly changing Sun. As the new technology advances, mankind has become more and more dependent on space system, satellite-based services. A geomagnetic storm, a disturbance in Earth's magnetosphere, may produce many harmful effects on Earth. Solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are believed to be the major causes of geomagnetic storms. Thus, establishing a real time forecasting method for them is very important in space weather study. The topics covered in this dissertation are: the relationship between magnetic gradient and magnetic shear of solar active regions; the relationship between solar flare index and magnetic features of solar active regions; based on these relationships a statistical ordinal logistic regression model is developed to predict the probability of solar flare occurrences in the next 24 hours; and finally the relationship between magnetic structures of CME source regions and geomagnetic storms, in particular, the super storms when the D st index decreases below -200 nT is studied and proved to be able to predict those super storms. The results are briefly summarized as follows: (1) There is a significant correlation between magnetic gradient and magnetic shear of active region. Furthermore, compared with magnetic shear, magnetic gradient might be a better proxy to locate where a large flare occurs. It appears to be more accurate in identification of sources of X-class flares than M-class flares; (2) Flare index, defined by weighting the SXR flares, is proved to have positive correlation with three magnetic features of active region; (3) A statistical ordinal logistic regression model is proposed for solar flare prediction. The results are much better than those data published in the NASA/SDAC service, and comparable to the data provided by the NOAA/SEC complicated expert system. To our knowledge, this is the first time that logistic regression model has been applied

  14. Observation of monoenergetic protons from a near-critical gas target tailored by a hydrodynamic shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.-H.; Helle, M. H.; Ting, A.; Gordon, D. F.; Polyanskiy, M. N.; Pogorelsky, I.; Babzien, M.; Najmudin, Z.

    2015-05-01

    We present our recent experimental results of monoenergetic protons accelerated from the interaction of an intense terawatt CO2 laser pulse with a near-critical hydrogen gas target, with its density profile tailored by a hydrodynamic shock. A 5-ns Nd:YAG laser pulse is focused onto a piece of stainless steel foil mounted at the front edge of the gas jet nozzle orifice. The ablation launches a spherical shock into the near-critical gas column, which creates a sharp density gradient at the front edge of the target, with ~ 6X local density enhancement up to several times of critical density within ~<100 microns. With such density profile, we have obtained monoenergetic proton beams with good shot-to-shot reproducibility and energies up to 1.2 MeV.

  15. A Case Study Examining Egypt, Nigeria, and Venezuela and their Flaring Behavior Utilizing VIIRS Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englander, J. G.; Austin, A. T.; Brandt, A. R.

    2016-12-01

    The need to quantify flaring by oil and gas fields is receiving more scrutiny, as there has been scientific and regulatory interest in quantifying the greenhouse gas (GHG) impact of oil and gas production. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has developed a method to track flaring activity using a Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) satellite.[1] This reports data on the average size, power, and light intensity of each flare. However, outside of some small studies, the flaring intensity has generally been estimated at the country level.[2]While informative, country-level assessments cannot provide guidance about the sustainability of particular crude streams or products produced. In this work we generate detailed oil-field-level flaring intensities for a number of global oilfield operations. We do this by merging the VIIRS dataset with global oilfield atlases and other spatial data sources. Joining these datasets together with production data allows us to provide better estimates for the GHG intensity of flaring at the field level for these countries.[3]First, we compute flaring intensities at the field level for 75 global oil fields representing approximately 25% of global production. In addition, we examine in detail three oil producing countries known to have high rates of flaring: Egypt, Nigeria, and Venezuela. For these countries we compute the flaring rate for all fields in the country and explore within-and between-country variation. The countries' fields will be analyzed to determine the correlation of flare activity to a certain field type, crude type, region, or production method. [1] Cao, C. "Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS)." NOAA NPP VIIRS. NOAA, 2013. Web. 30 July 2016. [2] Elvidge, C. D. et al., "A Fifteen Year Record of Global Natural Gas Flaring Derived from Satellite Data," Energies, vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 595-622, Aug. 2009. [3] World Energy Atlas. 6th ed. London: Petroleum Economist, 2011. Print.

  16. Two-Colour Free Electron Laser with Wide Frequency Separation using a Single Monoenergetic Electron Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, L T; Reiche, S

    2014-01-01

    Studies of a broad bandwidth, two-colour FEL amplifier using one monoenergetic electron beam are presented. The two-colour FEL interaction is achieved using a series of undulator modules alternately tuned to two well-separated resonant frequencies. Using the broad bandwidth FEL simulation code Puffin, the electron beam is shown to bunch strongly and simultaneously at the two resonant frequencies. Electron bunching components are also generated at the sum and difference of the resonant frequencies.

  17. Development of a monoenergetic ultraslow antiproton beam source for high-precision investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kuroda

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The ASACUSA collaboration developed an ultraslow antiproton beam source, monoenergetic ultraslow antiproton source for high-precision investigation (MUSASHI, consisting of an electromagnetic trap with a liquid He free superconducting solenoid and a low energy antiproton beam transport line. The MUSASHI was capable of trapping and cooling more than 1×10^{7} antiprotons and extracting them as an ultraslow antiproton beam with energy of 150–250 eV.

  18. Efficiency determination of resistive plate chambers for fast quasi-monoenergetic neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roeder, M.; Cowan, T.E.; Kempe, M.; Yakorev, D. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Elekes, Z. [MTA ATOMKI, Debrecen (Hungary); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Aumann, T.; Caesar, C. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Bemmerer, D.; Sobiella, M.; Stach, D.; Wagner, A. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Boretzky, K.; Hehner, J.; Heil, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Maroussov, V. [Universitaet zu Koeln, Koeln (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Nusair, O. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Al-Balqa Applied University, Salt (Jordan); Prokofiev, A.V. [Uppsala University, The Svedberg Laboratory, Uppsala (Sweden); Reifarth, R. [Johann Wolfgang Goethe - Universitaet, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Zilges, A. [Universitaet zu Koeln, Koeln (Germany); Zuber, K. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Collaboration: R3B Collaboration

    2014-07-15

    Composite detectors made of stainless-steel converters and multigap resistive plate chambers have been irradiated with quasi-monoenergetic neutrons with a peak energy of 175 MeV. The neutron detection efficiency has been determined using two different methods. The data are in agreement with the output of Monte Carlo simulations. The simulations are then extended to study the response of a hypothetical array made of these detectors to energetic neutrons from a radioactive ion beam experiment. (orig.)

  19. Value of monoenergetic dual-energy CT (DECT) for artefact reduction from metallic orthopedic implants in post-mortem studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filograna, Laura [University of Zurich, Department of Forensic Medicine and Imaging, Institute of Forensic Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Catholic University of Rome, School of Medicine, University Hospital ' ' A. Gemelli' ' , Department of Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy); Magarelli, Nicola; Leone, Antonio; Bonomo, Lorenzo [Catholic University of Rome, School of Medicine, University Hospital ' ' A. Gemelli' ' , Department of Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy); Guggenberger, Roman; Winklhofer, Sebastian [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Thali, Michael John [University of Zurich, Department of Forensic Medicine and Imaging, Institute of Forensic Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-09-15

    The aim of this ex vivo study was to assess the performance of monoenergetic dual-energy CT (DECT) reconstructions to reduce metal artefacts in bodies with orthopedic devices in comparison with standard single-energy CT (SECT) examinations in forensic imaging. Forensic and clinical impacts of this study are also discussed. Thirty metallic implants in 20 consecutive cadavers with metallic implants underwent both SECT and DECT with a clinically suitable scanning protocol. Extrapolated monoenergetic DECT images at 64, 69, 88, 105, 120, and 130 keV and individually adjusted monoenergy for optimized image quality (OPTkeV) were generated. Image quality of the seven monoenergetic images and of the corresponding SECT image was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively by visual rating and measurements of attenuation changes induced by streak artefact. Qualitative and quantitative analyses showed statistically significant differences between monoenergetic DECT extrapolated images and SECT, with improvements in diagnostic assessment in monoenergetic DECT at higher monoenergies. The mean value of OPTkeV was 137.6 ± 4.9 with a range of 130 to 148 keV. This study demonstrates that monoenergetic DECT images extrapolated at high energy levels significantly reduce metallic artefacts from orthopedic implants and improve image quality compared to SECT examination in forensic imaging. (orig.)

  20. Assessment of Impact of Monoenergetic Photon Sources on Prioritized Nonproliferation Applications: Simulation Study Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geddes, Cameron [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ludewigt, Bernhard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Valentine, John [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Quiter, Brian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Descalle, Marie-Anne [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Warren, Glen [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kinlaw, Matt [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Thompson, Scott [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Chichester, David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miller, Cameron [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Pozzi, Sara [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-12-30

    Near-monoenergetic photon sources (MPSs) have the potential to improve sensitivity at greatly reduced dose in existing applications and enable new capabilities in other applications. MPS advantages include the ability to select energy, energy spread, flux, and pulse structures to deliver only the photons needed for the application, while suppressing extraneous dose and background. Some MPSs also offer narrow divergence photon beams which can target dose and/or mitigate scattering contributions to image contrast degradation. Current broad-band, bremsstrahlung photon sources (e.g., linacs and betatrons) deliver unnecessary dose that in some cases also interferes with the signature to be detected and/or restricts operations, and must be collimated (reducing flux) to generate narrow divergence beams. While MPSs can in principle resolve these issues, they are technically challenging to produce. Candidate MPS technologies for nonproliferation applications are now being developed, each of which have different properties (e.g. broad divergence vs. narrow). Within each technology, source parameters trade off against one another (e.g. flux vs. energy spread), representing a large operation space. To guide development, requirements for each application of interest must be defined and simulations conducted to define MPS parameters that deliver benefit relative to current systems. The present project conducted a broad assessment of potential nonproliferation applications where MPSs may provide new capabilities or significant performance enhancement (reported separately), which led to prioritization of several applications for detailed analysis. The applications prioritized were: cargo screening and interdiction of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM), detection of hidden SNM, treaty/dismantlement verification, and spent fuel dry storage cask content verification. High resolution imaging for stockpile stewardship was considered as a sub-area of the treaty topic, as it is also of

  1. Calibration of Cherenkov detectors for monoenergetic photon imaging in active interrogation applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, P. B.; Erickson, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    Active interrogation of cargo containers using monoenergetic photons offers a rapid and low-dose approach to search for shielded special nuclear materials. Cherenkov detectors can be used for imaging of the cargo provided that gamma ray energies used in interrogation are well resolved, as the case in 11B(d,n-γ)12C reaction resulting in 4.4 MeV and 15.1 MeV photons. While an array of Cherenkov threshold detectors reduces low energy background from scatter while providing the ability of high contrast transmission imaging, thus confirming the presence of high-Z materials, these detectors require a special approach to energy calibration due to the lack of resolution. In this paper, we discuss the utility of Cherenkov detectors for active interrogation with monoenergetic photons as well as the results of computational and experimental studies of their energy calibration. The results of the studies with sources emitting monoenergetic photons as well as complex gamma ray spectrum sources, for example 232Th, show that calibration is possible as long as the energies of photons of interest are distinct.

  2. Comparison of Emission Properties of two Homologous Flares in AR 11283

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Yan; Wang, Shuo; Wang, Haimin

    2014-01-01

    Large, complex, active regions may produce multiple flares within a certain period of one or two days. These flares could occur in the same location with similar morphologies, commonly referred to as homologous flares. In 2011 September, active region NOAA 11283 produced a pair of homologous flares on the 6th and 7th, respectively. Both of them were white-light (WL) flares, as captured by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory in visible continuum at 617.3 nm which is believed to originate from the deep solar atmosphere.We investigate the WL emission of these X-class flares with HMIs seeing-free imaging spectroscopy. The durations of impulsive peaks in the continuum are about 4 minutes. We compare the WL with hard X-ray (HXR) observations for the September 6 flare and find a good correlation between the continuum and HXR both spatially and temporally. In absence of RHESSI data during the second flare on September 7, the derivative of the GOES soft X-ray is used and a...

  3. Upstream petroleum industry flaring and venting report : industry performance for year ending December 31, 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    Solution gas, gas from oil and bitumen batteries, is the largest source of flaring and venting in Alberta. A summary of solution gas conserved, flared and vented in Alberta during the year ending December 31, 2001 was presented along with flared volumes for the various oil and gas industry sectors such as gas plants, gas gathering systems, well tests and oil, bitumen and gas batteries. The report identifies the sources of flaring and venting in Alberta and monitors the progress the industry has made in reducing the volume of solution gas flared since 1996. Operators were ranked provincially, as well as within each field centre of the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board, based on solution gas flared, vented, total solution gas produced, and total oil from crude oil and bitumen batteries. The report demonstrates the significant progress industry has made towards reducing solution flare gas and vent volumes in the province. In 2001, the industry decreased overall flared and vented volumes by 16 per cent compared to year 2000 from all sources. Two new tables in this year's report indicate the top 25 solution gas producers in Alberta and the top 25 companies venting solution gas. The table provides information regarding each company's conservation performance and production volumes as a percentage of the provincial total.

  4. Electron Acceleration in Contracting Magnetic Islands during Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovikov, D.; Tenishev, V.; Gombosi, T. I.; Guidoni, S. E.; DeVore, C. R.; Karpen, J. T.; Antiochos, S. K.

    2017-01-01

    Electron acceleration in solar flares is well known to be efficient at generating energetic particles that produce the observed bremsstrahlung X-ray spectra. One mechanism proposed to explain the observations is electron acceleration within contracting magnetic islands formed by magnetic reconnection in the flare current sheet. In a previous study, a numerical magnetohydrodynamic simulation of an eruptive solar flare was analyzed to estimate the associated electron acceleration due to island contraction. That analysis used a simple analytical model for the island structure and assumed conservation of the adiabatic invariants of particle motion. In this paper, we perform the first-ever rigorous integration of the guiding-center orbits of electrons in a modeled flare. An initially isotropic distribution of particles is seeded in a contracting island from the simulated eruption, and the subsequent evolution of these particles is followed using guiding-center theory. We find that the distribution function becomes increasingly anisotropic over time as the electrons’ energy increases by up to a factor of five, in general agreement with the previous study. In addition, we show that the energized particles are concentrated on the Sunward side of the island, adjacent to the reconnection X-point in the flare current sheet. Furthermore, our analysis demonstrates that the electron energy gain is dominated by betatron acceleration in the compressed, strengthened magnetic field of the contracting island. Fermi acceleration by the shortened field lines of the island also contributes to the energy gain, but it is less effective than the betatron process.

  5. On the Study of Solar Flares with Neutrino Observatories

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    Since the end of the eighties, in response to a reported increase of the total neutrino flux in the Homestake experiment in coincidence with solar flares, neutrino detectors have searched for signals of neutrinos associated with solar flare activity. Protons which are accelerated by the magnetic structures of such flares may collide with the solar atmosphere, producing mesons which subsequently decay, resulting in neutrinos at O(MeV-GeV) energies. The study of such neutrinos would provide a new window on the underlying physics of the acceleration process. The sensitivity to solar flares of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, located at the geographical South Pole, is currently under study. We introduce a new approach for a time profile analysis. This is based on a stacking method of selected solar flares which are likely to be connected with pion production. An initial approach towards a neutrino search using the current IceCube experiment as well as first efforts to improve the detection efficiency in the futu...

  6. Explosive Chromospheric Evaporation in a Circular-ribbon Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Q M; Ning, Z J; Su, Y N; Ji, H S; Guo, Y

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report our multiwavelength observations of the C4.2 circular-ribbon flare in active region (AR) 12434 on 2015 October 16. The short-lived flare was associated with positive magnetic polarities and a negative polarity inside, as revealed by the photospheric line-of-sight magnetograms. Such magnetic pattern is strongly indicative of a magnetic null point and spine-fan configuration in the corona. The flare was triggered by the eruption of a mini-filament residing in the AR, which produced the inner flare ribbon (IFR) and the southern part of a closed circular flare ribbon (CFR). When the eruptive filament reached the null point, it triggered null point magnetic reconnection with the ambient open field and generated the bright CFR and a blowout jet. Raster observations of the \\textit{Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph} (\\textit{IRIS}) show plasma upflow at speed of 35$-$120 km s$^{-1}$ in the Fe {\\sc xxi} 1354.09 {\\AA} line ($\\log T\\approx7.05$) and downflow at speed of 10$-$60 km s$^{-1}$ i...

  7. A Blazar-Like Radio Flare in Mrk 231

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, Cormac; O'Dea, Christopher; Hurley-Walker, Natasha; Wrobel, Joan

    2013-01-01

    Radio monitoring of the broad absorption line quasar (BALQSO) Mrk 231 from 13.9 GHz to 17.6 GHz detected a strong flat spectrum flare. Even though BALQSOs are typically weak radio sources, the 17.6 GHz flux density doubled in ~150 days, from ~135 mJy to ~270 mJy. It is demonstrated that the elapsed rise time in the quasar rest frame and the relative magnitude of the flare is typical of some of the stronger flares in blazars that are associated with the ejection of discrete components on parsec scales. The decay of a similar flare was found in a previous monitoring campaign at 22 GHz. We conclude that these flares are not rare and indicate the likely ejection of a new radio component that can be resolved from the core with Very Long Baseline Interferometry. The implication is that Mrk 231 seems to be a quasar in which the physical mechanism that produces the BAL wind is in tension with the emergence of a fledgling blazar.

  8. Analysis of Enhanced Velocity Signals Observed during Solar Flares

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Brajesh Kumar; B. Ravindra

    2006-12-01

    Solar flares are known to release a large amount of energy. It is believed that the flares can excite velocity oscillations in active regions. We report here the changes in velocity signals in three active regions which have produced large X-class flares. The enhanced velocity signals appeared during the rise time of the GOES soft X-ray flux. These signals are located close to the vicinity of the hard X-ray source regions as observed with RHESSI. The power maps of the active region show enhancement in the frequency regime 5–6.5 mHz, while there is feeble or no enhancement of these signals in 2–4 mHz frequency band. High energy particles with sufficient momentum seem to be the cause for these observed enhanced velocity signals.

  9. Combined Particle Acceleration in Solar Flares and Associated CME Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosian, Vahe

    2016-07-01

    I will review some observations of the characteristics of accelerated electrons seen near Earth (as SEPs) and those producing flare radiation in the low corona and chromosphere. The similarities and differences between the numbers, spectral distribution, etc. of the two population can shed light on the mechanism and sites of the acceleration. I will show that in some events the origin of both population appears to be the flare site while in others, with harder SEP spectra, in addition to acceleration at the flare site, there appears to be a need for a second stage re-acceleration in the associated fast Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) environment. This scenario can also describe a similar dichotomy that exists between the so called impulsive, highly enriched (3He and heavy ions) and softer SEP ion events, and stronger more gradual SEP events with near normal ionic abundances and harder spectra. I will also describe under what conditions such hardening can be achieved.

  10. Energy Partitions and Evolution in a Purely Thermal Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Fleishman, Gregory D; Gary, Dale E

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a solely thermal flare, which we detected in the microwave range from the thermal gyro- and free-free emission it produced. An advantage of analyzing thermal gyro emission is its unique ability to precisely yield the magnetic field in the radiating volume. When combined with observationally-deduced plasma density and temperature, these magnetic field measurements offer a straightforward way of tracking evolution of the magnetic and thermal energies in the flare. For the event described here, the magnetic energy density in the radio-emitting volume declines over the flare rise phase, then stays roughly constant during the extended peak phase, but recovers to the original level over the decay phase. At the stage where the magnetic energy density decreases, the thermal energy density increases; however, this increase is insufficient, by roughly an order of magnitude, to compensate for the magnetic energy decrease. When the magnetic energy release is over, the source parameters come back to ne...

  11. Homologous flares and the evolution of NOAA Active Region 2372

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, K. T.; Smith, J. B., Jr.; Mccabe, M. K.; Machado, M. E.; Saba, J. L. R.; Simnett, G. M.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed record of the evolution of NOAA Active Region 2372 has been compiled by the FBS Homology Study Group. It was one of the most prolific flare-producing regions observed by SMM. The flares occurred in distinct stages which corresponded to particular evolutionary phases in the development of the active region magnetic field. By comparison with a similar but less productive active region, it is found that the activity seems to be related to the magnetic complexity of the region and the amount of shear in the field. Further, the soft X-ray emission in the quiescent active region is related to its flare rate. Within the broader definition of homology adopted, there was a degree of homology between the events within each stage of evolution of AR2372.

  12. Design and demonstration of a quasi-monoenergetic neutron source

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, T H; Mozin, V; Norman, E B; Sorensen, P; Foxe, M; Bench, G; Bernstein, A

    2014-01-01

    The design of a neutron source capable of producing 24 and 70 keV neutron beams with narrow energy spread is presented. The source exploits near-threshold kinematics of the $^{7}$Li(p,n)$^{7}$Be reaction while taking advantage of the interference `notches' found in the scattering cross-sections of iron. The design was implemented and characterized at the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Alternative filters such as vanadium and manganese are also explored and the possibility of studying the response of different materials to low-energy nuclear recoils using the resultant neutron beams is discussed.

  13. Magnetic Properties of Solar Active Regions That Govern Large Solar Flares and Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toriumi, Shin; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Harra, Louise K.; Hudson, Hugh; Nagashima, Kaori

    2017-01-01

    Solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), especially the larger ones, emanate from active regions (ARs). With the aim of understanding the magnetic properties that govern such flares and eruptions, we systematically survey all flare events with Geostationary Orbiting Environmental Satellite levels of ≥M5.0 within 45° from disk center between 2010 May and 2016 April. These criteria lead to a total of 51 flares from 29 ARs, for which we analyze the observational data obtained by the Solar Dynamics Observatory. More than 80% of the 29 ARs are found to exhibit δ-sunspots, and at least three ARs violate Hale’s polarity rule. The flare durations are approximately proportional to the distance between the two flare ribbons, to the total magnetic flux inside the ribbons, and to the ribbon area. From our study, one of the parameters that clearly determine whether a given flare event is CME-eruptive or not is the ribbon area normalized by the sunspot area, which may indicate that the structural relationship between the flaring region and the entire AR controls CME productivity. AR characterization shows that even X-class events do not require δ-sunspots or strong-field, high-gradient polarity inversion lines. An investigation of historical observational data suggests the possibility that the largest solar ARs, with magnetic flux of 2 × 1023 Mx, might be able to produce “superflares” with energies of the order of 1034 erg. The proportionality between the flare durations and magnetic energies is consistent with stellar flare observations, suggesting a common physical background for solar and stellar flares.

  14. Realistic radiative MHD simulation of a solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempel, Matthias D.; Cheung, Mark; Chintzoglou, Georgios; Chen, Feng; Testa, Paola; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Sainz Dalda, Alberto; DeRosa, Marc L.; Viktorovna Malanushenko, Anna; Hansteen, Viggo H.; De Pontieu, Bart; Carlsson, Mats; Gudiksen, Boris; McIntosh, Scott W.

    2017-08-01

    We present a recently developed version of the MURaM radiative MHD code that includes coronal physics in terms of optically thin radiative loss and field aligned heat conduction. The code employs the "Boris correction" (semi-relativistic MHD with a reduced speed of light) and a hyperbolic treatment of heat conduction, which allow for efficient simulations of the photosphere/corona system by avoiding the severe time-step constraints arising from Alfven wave propagation and heat conduction. We demonstrate that this approach can be used even in dynamic phases such as a flare. We consider a setup in which a flare is triggered by flux emergence into a pre-existing bipolar active region. After the coronal energy release, efficient transport of energy along field lines leads to the formation of flare ribbons within seconds. In the flare ribbons we find downflows for temperatures lower than ~5 MK and upflows at higher temperatures. The resulting soft X-ray emission shows a fast rise and slow decay, reaching a peak corresponding to a mid C-class flare. The post reconnection energy release in the corona leads to average particle energies reaching 50 keV (500 MK under the assumption of a thermal plasma). We show that hard X-ray emission from the corona computed under the assumption of thermal bremsstrahlung can produce a power-law spectrum due to the multi-thermal nature of the plasma. The electron energy flux into the flare ribbons (classic heat conduction with free streaming limit) is highly inhomogeneous and reaches peak values of about 3x1011 erg/cm2/s in a small fraction of the ribbons, indicating regions that could potentially produce hard X-ray footpoint sources. We demonstrate that these findings are robust by comparing simulations computed with different values of the saturation heat flux as well as the "reduced speed of light".

  15. IMPULSIVITY PARAMETER FOR SOLAR FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajardo-Mendieta, W. G.; Alvarado-Gómez, J. D.; Calvo-Mozo, B. [Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá (Colombia); Martinez-Oliveros, J. C., E-mail: wgfajardom@unal.edu.co, E-mail: bcalvom@unal.edu.co, E-mail: oliveros@ssl.berkeley.edu, E-mail: jalvarad@eso.org [Space Sciences Laboratory, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-02-10

    Three phases are typically observed during solar flares: the preflare, impulsive, and decay phases. During the impulsive phase, it is believed that the electrons and other particles are accelerated after the stored energy in the magnetic field is released by reconnection. The impulsivity of a solar flare is a quantifiable property that shows how quickly this initial energy release occurs. It is measured via the impulsivity parameter, which we define as the inverse of the overall duration of the impulsive phase. We take the latter as the raw width of the most prominent nonthermal emission of the flare. We computed this observable over a work sample of 48 M-class events that occurred during the current Solar Cycle 24 by using three different methods. The first method takes into account all of the nonthermal flare emission and gives very accurate results, while the other two just cover fixed energy intervals (30–40 keV and 25–50 keV) and are useful for fast calculations. We propose an alternative way to classify solar flares according to their impulsivity parameter values, defining three different types of impulsivity, namely, high, medium, and low. This system of classification is independent of the manner used to calculated the impulsivity parameter. Lastly, we show the relevance of this tool as a discriminator of different HXR generation processes.

  16. Global Properties of Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Hudson, Hugh S

    2011-01-01

    This article broadly reviews our knowledge of solar flares. There is a particular focus on their global properties, as opposed to the microphysics such as that needed for magnetic reconnection or particle acceleration as such. Indeed solar flares will always remain in the domain of remote sensing, so we cannot observe the microscales directly and must understand the basic physics entirely via the global properties plus theoretical inference. The global observables include the general energetics -radiation in flares and mass loss in coronal mass ejections (CMEs) - and the formation of different kinds of ejection and global wave disturbance: the type II radio-burst exciter, the Moreton wave, the EIT "wave," and the "sunquake" acoustic waves in the solar interior. Flare radiation and CME kinetic energy can have comparable magnitudes, of order 10^32 erg each for an X-class event, with the bulk of the radiant energy in the visible-UV continuum. We argue that the impulsive phase of the flare dominates the energetic...

  17. A New Eye on the VHE Transient Universe with the HAWC Online Flare Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Weisgarber, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory recently began full-scale operations, surveying 2/3 of the entire sky at very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV). This new view of the sky offers the opportunity to detect flares from blazars, facilitating studies of the mechanisms powering their central engines and providing an avenue to constrain the properties of particles and fields in intergalactic space. The HAWC Collaboration has implemented an online flare monitor to search for rapid and extreme transient activity from a set of blazars either known or suspected to produce VHE emission. The goal of this project is to issue alerts sufficiently rapidly to form a complete multiwavelength picture of the flare. We describe the current status of the online flare monitor, demonstrating its ability to detect flares via a study of the blazars Markarian 421 and Markarian 501 in offline data.

  18. What's an Asthma Flare-Up?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old What's an Asthma Flare-Up? KidsHealth > For Parents > What's an Asthma ... of a straw that's being pinched. Causes of Asthma Flare-Ups People with asthma have airways that ...

  19. Astrophysics: Unexpected X-ray flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, Sergio

    2016-10-01

    Two sources of highly energetic flares have been discovered in archival X-ray data of 70 nearby galaxies. These flares have an undetermined origin and might represent previously unknown astrophysical phenomena. See Letter p.356

  20. X-ray flares in GRBs: general considerations and photospheric origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beniamini, Paz; Kumar, Pawan

    2016-03-01

    Observations of X-ray flares from Gamma Ray Bursts imply strong constraints on possible physical models. We provide a general discussion of these. In particular, we show that in order to account for the relatively flat and weak optical flux during the X-ray flares, the size of the emitting region should be ≲3 × 1014cm. The bolometric luminosity of flares also strongly constrain the energy budget, and are inconsistent with late time activity of a central engine powered by the spin-down of a magnetar. We provide a simple toy model according to which flares are produced by an outflow of modest Lorentz factor (a few tens instead of hundreds) that is launched more or less simultaneously with the highly relativistic jet which produced the prompt gamma-ray emission. The `slower moving outflow produces the flare as it reaches its photosphere. If the X-ray flare jets are structured, the existence of such a component may naturally resolve the observational challenges imposed by flares, outlined in this work.

  1. Extremely Energetic 4B/X17.2 Flare and Associated Phenomena

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wahab Uddin; Ramesh Chandra; Syed Salman Ali

    2006-06-01

    We observed 4B/X17.2 flare in H from super-active region NOAA 10486 at ARIES, Nainital. This is one of the largest flares of current solar cycle 23, which occurred near the Sun’s center and produced extremely energetic emission almost at allwavelengths from -ray to radio-waves. The flare is associated with a bright/fast full-halo earth directed CME, strong type II, type III and type IV radio bursts, an intense proton event and GLE. This flare is well observed by SOHO, RHESSI and TRACE. Our H observations show the stretching/de-twisting and eruption of helically twisted S shaped (sigmoid) filament in the south–west direction of the active region with bright shock front followed by rapid increase in intensity and area of the gigantic flare. The flare shows almost similar evolution in H, EUV and UV. We measure the speed of H ribbon separation and the mean value is ∼ 70 km s-1. This is used together with photospheric magnetic field to infer a magnetic reconnection rate at three HXR sources at the flare maximum. In this paper, we also discuss the energetics of active region filament, flare and associated CME.

  2. Prediction of Solar Flares Using Unique Signatures of Magnetic Field Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raboonik, Abbas; Safari, Hossein; Alipour, Nasibe; Wheatland, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    Prediction of solar flares is an important task in solar physics. The occurrence of solar flares is highly dependent on the structure and topology of solar magnetic fields. A new method for predicting large (M- and X-class) flares is presented, which uses machine learning methods applied to the Zernike moments (ZM) of magnetograms observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory for a period of six years from 2010 June 2 to 2016 August 1. Magnetic field images consisting of the radial component of the magnetic field are converted to finite sets of ZMs and fed to the support vector machine classifier. ZMs have the capability to elicit unique features from any 2D image, which may allow more accurate classification. The results indicate whether an arbitrary active region has the potential to produce at least one large flare. We show that the majority of large flares can be predicted within 48 hr before their occurrence, with only 10 false negatives out of 385 flaring active region magnetograms and 21 false positives out of 179 non-flaring active region magnetograms. Our method may provide a useful tool for the prediction of solar flares, which can be employed alongside other forecasting methods.

  3. Solar Flares Observed with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2004-01-01

    Solar flares are impressive examples of explosive energy release in unconfined, magnetized plasma. It is generally believed that the flare energy is derived from the coronal magnetic field. However, we have not been able to establish the specific energy release mechanism(s) or the relative partitioning of the released energy between heating, particle acceleration (electrons and ions), and mass motions. NASA's RHESSI Mission was designed to study the acceleration and evolution of electrons and ions in flares by observing the X-ray and gamma-ray emissions these energetic particles produce. This is accomplished through the combination of high-resolution spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging, including the first images of flares in gamma rays. RHESSI has observed over 12,000 solar flares since its launch on February 5, 2002. I will demonstrate how we use the RHESSI spectra to deduce physical properties of accelerated electrons and hot plasma in flares. Using images to estimate volumes, w e typically find that the total energy in accelerated electrons is comparable to that in the thermal plasma. I will also present flare observations that provide strong support for the presence of magnetic reconnection in a large-scale, vertical current sheet in the solar corona. RHESSI observations such as these are allowing us to probe more deeply into the physics of solar flares.

  4. Comprehensive study of the X-ray flares from gamma-ray bursts observed by Swift

    CERN Document Server

    Yi, Shuang-Xi; Yu, Hai; Wang, F Y; Mu, Hui-Jun; Lv, Lian-Zhong; Liang, En-Wei

    2016-01-01

    X-ray flares are generally supposed to be produced by the later central engine activities, and may share the similar physical origin with prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In this paper, we have analyzed all significant X-ray flares from the GRBs observed by {\\em Swift} from April 2005 to March 2015. The catalog contains 468 bright X-ray flares, including 200 flares with redshifts. We obtain the fitting results of X-ray flares, such as start time, peak time, duration, peak flux, fluence, peak luminosity, and mean luminosity. The peak luminosity decreases with peak time, following a power-law behavior $L_p \\propto T_{peak,z}^{-1.27}$. The flare duration increases with peak time. The 0.3-10 keV isotropic energy of X-ray flares distribution is a lognormal peaked at $10^{51.2}$ erg. We also study the frequency distributions of flare parameters, including energies, durations, peak fluxes, rise times, decay times and waiting times. Power-law distributions of energies, durations, peak fluxes, and waiting t...

  5. Chasing White-Light Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, H. S.

    2016-05-01

    In this memoir I describe my life in research, mostly in the area of solar physics. The recurring theme is "white-light flares," and several sections of this paper deal with this and related phenomena; I wind up describing how I see the state of the art in this still-interesting and crucially important (as it has been since 1859) area of flare research. I also describe my participation in two long-lived satellite programs dedicated to solar observations ( Yohkoh and RHESSI) and elaborate on their discoveries. These have both helped with white-light flares both directly and also with closely related X-ray and γ-ray emissions), with the result that this article leans heavily in that direction.

  6. Turbulence, Complexity, and Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    McAteer, R T James; Conlon, Paul A

    2009-01-01

    The issue of predicting solar flares is one of the most fundamental in physics, addressing issues of plasma physics, high-energy physics, and modelling of complex systems. It also poses societal consequences, with our ever-increasing need for accurate space weather forecasts. Solar flares arise naturally as a competition between an input (flux emergence and rearrangement) in the photosphere and an output (electrical current build up and resistive dissipation) in the corona. Although initially localised, this redistribution affects neighbouring regions and an avalanche occurs resulting in large scale eruptions of plasma, particles, and magnetic field. As flares are powered from the stressed field rooted in the photosphere, a study of the photospheric magnetic complexity can be used to both predict activity and understand the physics of the magnetic field. The magnetic energy spectrum and multifractal spectrum are highlighted as two possible approaches to this.

  7. FLARE FLAME INSTABILITY AND BURNER COMBUSTION CONTROL

    OpenAIRE

    БОНДАРЕНКО А.В.; В. Э. Волков; Максимов, М. В.

    2014-01-01

    Research of the flare instability development and the laminar-to-turbulent transition for the flares was executed. It was proved that the effects of viscosity and compressibility have the stabilizing influence on the gas flame. The study of the individual flare stability makes the theoretical basis of the fuel burning technology in combustion chambers and for the burner combustion control.

  8. Effects of X-ray flares on the aeronomy of Mars: Simultaneous measurements of ionospheric effects of X-ray flares on Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Syed A.; Machado Santos, Angela; Abdu, Mangalathayil A.; Batista, Inez S.; Shah, Siddhi Y.; Thirupathaiah, P.

    2016-07-01

    MIRI: Validation and Testing Requirements We have studied X-ray aeronomy in the ionospheric E region of Mars during six X-ray flares that occurred on 28 March and 6 April, 2001; 17,18 March and 21 April, 2003 and 19 February, 2005 respectively. These flares were responded by the corresponding electron density profiles of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). The time series of photoionization rate, photoelectron impact ionization rate, photoelectron flux, ion density, electron density and total Electron Content (TEC) are predicted for each flare day. The estimated production rate, flux and densities are increased by 1-2 orders of magnitude due to effects of these flares in the E region ionosphere of Mars. The normalized estimated TEC are compared with the normalized measured TEC of MGS profiles. At the peak flare time the normalized estimated and normalized measured TEC were enhanced by a factor of 5-10 and 2 respectively. The effects of these flares were also registered in the D region equatorial ionosphere of Earth at Fortaleza observatory. The flares of 6 April, 2001, 17 March and 21 April, 2003 also produced electron density enhancement in the E region ionosphere of Earth at College AK and Cachoeira Paulista observatories. The minimum frequency fmin, recorded in ionogram, increased by 100% (due to D region absorption) while the foE increased by 20%, in the Earth's ionosphere.

  9. On Flare Driven Global Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Karoff, C.

    2008-01-01

    We recently presented evidence of a strong correlation between the energy in the high-frequency part of the acoustic spectrum of the Sun and the solar X-ray flux Karoff & Kjeldsen (2008). The discovery indicates that flares drive global oscillations in the Sun in the same way that the entire Earth is set ringing for several weeks after a major earthquake, such as the 2004 December Sumatra-Andaman one. If this indication turns out to be true we might be able to use the relation between flares ...

  10. Instant CloudFlare starter

    CERN Document Server

    Dickey, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks. Written as a practical guide, CloudFlare Starter will show you all you need to know in order to effectively improve your online presence in a multitude of different ways. ""Instant CloudFlare Starter"" is a practical yet accessible guide for website owners looking to optimize their site for optimum security and maximum performance.

  11. Detection of the Acceleration Site in a Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Kontar, E. P.; Nita, G. M.; Gary, D. E.

    2011-05-01

    We report the observation of an unusual cold, tenuous solar flare (ApJL, v. 731, p. L19, 2011), which reveals itself via numerous and prominent non-thermal manifestations, while lacking any noticeable thermal emission signature. RHESSI hard X-rays and 0.1-18 GHz radio data from OVSA and Phoenix-2 show copious electron acceleration (1035 electrons per second above 10 keV) typical for GOES M-class flares with electrons energies up to 100 keV, but GOES temperatures not exceeding 6.1 MK. The HXR footpoints and coronal radio sources belong, supposedly, to a single magnetic loop, which departs strongly from the corresponding potential loop (obtained from a photospheric extrapolation) in agreement with the apparent need of a non-potential magnetic field structure to produce a flare. The imaging, temporal, and spectral characteristics of the flare have led us to a firm conclusion that the bulk of the microwave continuum emission from this flare was produced directly in the acceleration region. We found that the electron acceleration efficiency is very high in the flare, so almost all available thermal electrons are eventually accelerated. However, given a relatively small flaring volume and rather low thermal density at the flaring loop, the total energy release turned out to be insufficient for a significant heating of the coronal plasma or for a prominent chromospheric response giving rise to chromospheric evaporation. Some sort of stochastic acceleration process is needed to account for an approximately energy-independent lifetime of about 3 s for the electrons in the acceleration region. This work was supported in part by NSF grants AGS-0961867, AST-0908344, and NASA grants NNX10AF27G and NNX11AB49G to New Jersey Institute of Technology. This work was supported by a UK STFC rolling grant, STFC/PPARC Advanced Fellowship, and the Leverhulme Trust, UK. Financial support by the European Commission through the SOLAIRE and HESPE Networks is gratefully acknowledged.

  12. How gas-dynamic flare models powered by Petschek reconnection differ from those with ad hoc energy sources

    CERN Document Server

    Longcope, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Aspects of solar flare dynamics, such as chromospheric evaporation and flare light-curves, have long been studied using one-dimensional models of plasma dynamics inside a static flare loop, subjected to some energy input. While extremely successful at explaining the observed characteristics of flares, all such models so far have specified energy input ad hoc, rather than deriving it self-consistently. There is broad consensus that flares are powered by magnetic energy released through reconnection. Recent work has generalized Petschek's basic reconnection scenario, topological change followed by field line retraction and shock heating, to permit its inclusion into a one-dimensional flare loop model. Here we compare the gas dynamics driven by retraction and shocking to those from more conventional static loop models energized by ad hoc source terms. We find significant differences during the first minute, when retraction leads to larger kinetic energies and produces higher densities at the loop top, while ad h...

  13. The cross-section data from neutron activation experiments on niobium in the NPI p-7Li quasi-monoenergetic neutron field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simakov S.P.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The reaction of protons on 7Li target produces the high-energy quasi- monoenergetic neutron spectrum with the tail to lower energies. Proton energies of 19.8, 25.1, 27.6, 30.1, 32.6, 35.0 and 37.4 MeV were used to obtain quasi-monoenergetic neutrons with energies of 18, 21.6, 24.8, 27.6, 30.3, 32.9 and 35.6 MeV, respectively. Nb cross-section data for neutron energies higher than 22.5 MeV do not exist in the literature. Nb is the important material for fusion applications (IFMIF as well. The variable-energy proton beam of NPI cyclotron is utilized for the production of neutron field using thin lithium target. The carbon backing serves as the beam stopper. The system permits to produce neutron flux density about 109  n/cm2/s in peak at 30 MeV neutron energy. The niobium foils of 15 mm in diameter and approx. 0.75 g weight were activated. The nuclear spectroscopy methods with HPGe detector technique were used to obtain the activities of produced isotopes. The large set of neutron energies used in the experiment allows us to make the complex study of the cross-section values. The reactions (n,2n, (n,3n, (n,4n, (n,He3, (n,α and (n,2nα are studied. The cross-sections data of the (n,4n and (n,2nα are obtained for the first time. The cross-sections of (n,2n and (n,α reactions for higher neutron energies are strongly influenced by low energy tail of neutron spectra. This effect is discussed. The results are compared with the EAF-2007 library.

  14. Reconnection in Solar Flares: Outstanding Questions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hiroaki Isobe; Kazunari Shibata

    2009-06-01

    Space observations of solar flares such as those from Yohkoh, SOHO,TRACE, and RHESSI have revealed a lot of observational evidence of magnetic reconnection in solar flares: cusp-shaped arcades, reconnection inflows, plasmoids, etc. Thus it has been established, at least phenomenologically, that magnetic reconnection does occur in solar flares. However, a number of fundamental questions and puzzles still remain in the physics of reconnection in solar flares. In this paper, we discuss the recent progresses and future prospects in the study of magnetic reconnection in solar flares from both theoretical and observational points of view.

  15. Summary of monoenergetic neutron beam sources for energies gt 14 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, F.P.; Romero, J.L. (Univ. of California-Davis, Crocker Nuclear Lab., Davis, CA (US))

    1990-11-01

    This paper examines the production of neutron beams for energies between {approx}20 and 100 MeV. Considerations for obtaining monoenergetic beams as well as some of the limiting factors, such as energy resolution are examined as well. Production cross sections at 0 deg are reviewed for proton- and deuteron-induced reactions on light elements. Some current facilities in the context of neutron beams obtained by collimation, by the associate particle method, and by the use of a beam swinger are also discussed.

  16. Modeling Gamma-Ray Burst X-Ray Flares within the Internal Shock Model

    CERN Document Server

    Maxham, Amanda

    2009-01-01

    X-ray afterglow light curves have been collected for over 400 Swift gamma-ray bursts with nearly half of them having X-ray flares superimposed on the regular afterglow decay. Evidence suggests that gamma-ray prompt emission and X-ray flares share a common origin and that at least some flares can only be explained by long-lasting central engine activity. We have developed a shell model code to address the question of how X-ray flares are produced within the framework of the internal shock model. The shell model creates randomized GRB explosions from a central engine with multiple shells and follows those shells as they collide, merge and spread, producing prompt emission and X-ray flares. We pay special attention to the time history of central engine activity, internal shocks, and observed flares, but do not calculate the shock dynamics and radiation processes in detail. Using the empirical E_p - E_iso (Amati) relation with an assumed Band function spectrum for each collision and an empirical flare temporal pr...

  17. Impulsivity Parameter for Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Fajardo-Mendieta, W G; Alvarado-Gómez, J D; Calvo-Mozo, B

    2016-01-01

    Three phases are typically observed during solar flares: the preflare, impulsive, and decay phases. During the impulsive phase, it is believed that the electrons and other particles are accelerated after the stored energy in the magnetic field is released by reconnection. The impulsivity of a solar flare is a quantifiable property that shows how quickly this initial energy release occurs. It is measured via the impulsivity parameter, which we define as the inverse of the overall duration of the impulsive phase. We take the latter as the raw width of the most prominent nonthermal emission of the flare. We computed this observable over a work sample of 48 M-class events that occurred during the current Solar Cycle 24 by using three different methods. The first method takes into account all of the nonthermal flare emission and gives very accurate results, while the other two just cover fixed energy intervals (30-40 keV and 25-50 keV) and are useful for fast calculations. We propose an alternative way to classify...

  18. Flare emission from Sagittarius A*

    CERN Document Server

    Eckart, A; Vogel, S N; Teuben, P; Morris, M R; Baganoff, F; Dexter, J; Schoedel, R; Witzel, G; Valencia-S., M; Karas, V; Kunneriath, D; Bremer, M; Straubmeier, C; Moser, L; Sabha, N; Buchholz, R; Zamaninasab, M; Muzic, K; Moultaka, J; Zensus, J A

    2012-01-01

    Based on Bremer et al. (2011) and Eckart et al. (2012) we report on simultaneous observations and modeling of the millimeter, near-infrared, and X-ray flare emission of the source Sagittarius A* (SgrA*) associated with the super-massive black hole at the Galactic Center. We study physical processes giving rise to the variable emission of SgrA* from the radio to the X-ray domain. To explain the statistics of the observed variability of the (sub-)mm spectrum of SgrA*, we use a sample of simultaneous NIR/X-ray flare peaks and model the flares using a synchrotron and SSC mechanism. The observations reveal flaring activity in all wavelength bands that can be modeled as the signal from adiabatically expanding synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) components. The model parameters suggest that either the adiabatically expanding source components have a bulk motion larger than v_exp or the expanding material contributes to a corona or disk, confined to the immediate surroundings of SgrA*. For the bulk of the synchrotron and ...

  19. The Crab Nebula flaring activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Montani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery made by AGILE and Fermi of a short time scale flaring activity in the gamma-ray energy emission of the Crab Nebula is a puzzling and unexpected feature, challenging particle acceleration theory. In the present work we propose the shock-induced magnetic reconnection as a viable mechanism to explain the Crab flares. We postulate that the emitting region is located at ∼1015 cm from the central pulsar, well inside the termination shock, which is exactly the emitting region size as estimated by the overall duration of the phenomenon ∼1 day. We find that this location corresponds to the radial distance at which the shock-induced magnetic reconnection process is able to accelerate the electrons up to a Lorentz factor ∼109, as required by the spectral fit of the observed Crab flare spectrum. The main merit of the present analysis is to highlight the relation between the observational constraints to the flare emission and the radius at which the reconnection can trigger the required Lorentz factor. We also discuss different scenarios that can induce the reconnection. We conclude that the existence of a plasma instability affecting the wind itself as the Weibel instability is the privileged scenario in our framework.

  20. The Crab Nebula flaring activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montani, G., E-mail: giovanni.montani@frascati.enea.it [ENEA – C.R, UTFUS-MAG, via Enrico Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati (RM) (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma “Sapienza”, p.le Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Bernardini, M.G. [INAF – Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, via Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy)

    2014-12-12

    The discovery made by AGILE and Fermi of a short time scale flaring activity in the gamma-ray energy emission of the Crab Nebula is a puzzling and unexpected feature, challenging particle acceleration theory. In the present work we propose the shock-induced magnetic reconnection as a viable mechanism to explain the Crab flares. We postulate that the emitting region is located at ∼10{sup 15} cm from the central pulsar, well inside the termination shock, which is exactly the emitting region size as estimated by the overall duration of the phenomenon ∼1 day. We find that this location corresponds to the radial distance at which the shock-induced magnetic reconnection process is able to accelerate the electrons up to a Lorentz factor ∼10{sup 9}, as required by the spectral fit of the observed Crab flare spectrum. The main merit of the present analysis is to highlight the relation between the observational constraints to the flare emission and the radius at which the reconnection can trigger the required Lorentz factor. We also discuss different scenarios that can induce the reconnection. We conclude that the existence of a plasma instability affecting the wind itself as the Weibel instability is the privileged scenario in our framework.

  1. On the State of a Solar Active Region Before Flares and CMEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsós, M. B.; Erdélyi, R.

    2016-06-01

    Several attempts have been made to find reliable diagnostic tools to determine the state prior to flares and related coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in solar active regions (ARs). Characterization of the level of mixed states is carried out using the Debrecen sunspot Data for 116 flaring ARs. Conditional flare probabilities (CFPs) are calculated for different flaring classes. The association with slow/fast CMEs is examined. Two precursor parameters are introduced: (i) the sum of the (daily averaged) horizontal magnetic gradient G S (G DS ) and (ii) the separation parameter {S}l-f. We found that if {S}l-f≤slant 1 for a flaring AR then the CFP of the expected highest-intensity flare being X-class is more than 70%. If 1≤slant {S}l-f≤slant 3 the CFP is more than 45% for the highest-intensity flare(s) to be M-class, and if 3≤slant {S}l-f≤slant 13 there is larger than 60% CFP that C-class flare(s) may have the strongest intensity within 48 hr. Next, from analyzing G S for determining CFP we found: if 5.5≤slant {log}({G}S) ≤slant 6.5, then it is very likely that C-class flare(s) may be the most intense; if 6.5≤slant {log}({G}S)≤slant 7.5 then there is ˜45% CFP that M-class could have the highest intensity; finally, if 7.5≤slant {log}({G}S) then there is at least 70% chance that the strongest energy release will be X-class in the next 48 hr. ARs are unlikely to produce X-class flare(s) if 13≤slant {S}l-f and log(G S ) ≤slant 5.5. Finally, in terms of providing an estimate of an associated slow/fast CME, we found that, if {log}({S}l-f) ≥slant 0.4 or {log}({G}{DS}) ≤slant 6.5, there is no accompanying fast CME in the following 24 hr.

  2. Pre-Flare Flows in the Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, A. J.; Harra, L. K.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Green, L. M.; Matthews, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    Solar flares take place in regions of strong magnetic fields and are generally accepted to be the result of a resistive instability leading to magnetic reconnection. When new flux emerges into a pre-existing active region it can act as a flare and coronal mass ejection trigger. In this study we observed active region 10955 after the emergence of small-scale additional flux at the magnetic inversion line. We found that flaring began when additional positive flux levels exceeded 1.38×1020 Mx (maxwell), approximately 7 h after the initial flux emergence. We focussed on the pre-flare activity of one B-class flare that occurred on the following day. The earliest indication of activity was a rise in the non-thermal velocity one hour before the flare. 40 min before flaring began, brightenings and pre-flare flows were observed along two loop systems in the corona, involving the new flux and the pre-existing active region loops. We discuss the possibility that reconnection between the new flux and pre-existing loops before the flare drives the flows by either generating slow mode magnetoacoustic waves or a pressure gradient between the newly reconnected loops. The subsequent B-class flare originated from fast reconnection of the same loop systems as the pre-flare flows.

  3. Predicting Solar Flares Using SDO/HMI Vector Magnetic Data Products and the Random Forest Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Deng, Na; Wang, Jason T. L.; Wang, Haimin

    2017-07-01

    Adverse space-weather effects can often be traced to solar flares, the prediction of which has drawn significant research interests. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) produces full-disk vector magnetograms with continuous high cadence, while flare prediction efforts utilizing this unprecedented data source are still limited. Here we report results of flare prediction using physical parameters provided by the Space-weather HMI Active Region Patches (SHARP) and related data products. We survey X-ray flares that occurred from 2010 May to 2016 December and categorize their source regions into four classes (B, C, M, and X) according to the maximum GOES magnitude of flares they generated. We then retrieve SHARP-related parameters for each selected region at the beginning of its flare date to build a database. Finally, we train a machine-learning algorithm, called random forest (RF), to predict the occurrence of a certain class of flares in a given active region within 24 hr, evaluate the classifier performance using the 10-fold cross-validation scheme, and characterize the results using standard performance metrics. Compared to previous works, our experiments indicate that using the HMI parameters and RF is a valid method for flare forecasting with fairly reasonable prediction performance. To our knowledge, this is the first time that RF has been used to make multiclass predictions of solar flares. We also find that the total unsigned quantities of vertical current, current helicity, and flux near the polarity inversion line are among the most important parameters for classifying flaring regions into different classes.

  4. Ion Acceleration in Solar Flares Determined by Solar Neutron Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K.; Solar Neutron Observation Group

    2013-05-01

    Large amounts of particles can be accelerated to relativistic energy in association with solar flares and/or accompanying phenomena (e.g., CME-driven shocks), and they sometimes reach very near the Earth and penetrate the Earth's atmosphere. These particles are observed by ground-based detectors (e.g., neutron monitors) as Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs). Some of the GLEs originate from high energy solar neutrons which are produced in association with solar flares. These neutrons are also observed by ground-based neutron monitors and solar neutron telescopes. Recently, some of the solar neutron detectors have also been operating in space. By observing these solar neutrons, we can obtain information about ion acceleration in solar flares. Such neutrons were observed in association with some X-class flares in solar cycle 23, and sometimes they were observed by two different types of detectors. For example, on 2005 September 7, large solar neutron signals were observed by the neutron monitor at Mt. Chacaltaya in Bolivia and Mexico City, and by the solar neutron telescopes at Chacaltaya and Mt. Sierra Negra in Mexico in association with an X17.0 flare. The neutron signal continued for more than 20 minutes with high statistical significance. Intense gamma-ray emission was also registered by INTEGRAL, and by RHESSI during the decay phase. We analyzed these data using the solar-flare magnetic-loop transport and interaction model of Hua et al. (2002), and found that the model could successfully fit the data with intermediate values of loop magnetic convergence and pitch angle scattering parameters. These results indicate that solar neutrons were produced at the same time as the gamma-ray line emission and that ions were continuously accelerated at the emission site. In this paper, we introduce some of the solar neutron observations in solar cycle 23, and discuss the tendencies of the physical parameters of solar neutron GLEs, and the energy spectrum and population of the

  5. Benchmarking of the mono-energetic transport coefficients-results from the International Collaboration on Neoclassical Transport in Stellarators (ICNTS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beidler, C. D. [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Association, Greifswald, Germany; Allmaier, K. [Insitut fur Theoretische Physik, Association EURATOM, Graz, Austria; Isaev, Maxim Yu [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia; Kasilov, K. [Insitute of Plasma Physics, NSC-KhIPT, Kharkov, Ukraine; Kernbichler, W. [Insitut fur Theoretische Physik, Association EURATOM, Graz, Austria; Leitold, G. [Insitut fur Theoretische Physik, Association EURATOM, Graz, Austria; Maassberg, H. [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Association, Greifswald, Germany; Mikkelsen, D. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Murakami, Masanori [ORNL; Schmidt, M. [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Association, Greifswald, Germany; Spong, Donald A [ORNL; Tribaidos, V. [Universidad Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Wakasa, A. [Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan

    2011-01-01

    Numerical results for the three mono-energetic transport coefficients required for a complete neoclassical description of stellarator plasmas have been benchmarked within an international collaboration. These transport coefficients are flux-surface-averaged moments of solutions to the linearized drift kinetic equation which have been determined using field-line-integration techniques, Monte Carlo simulations, a variational method employing Fourier-Legendre test functions and a finite-difference scheme. The benchmarking has been successfully carried out for past, present and future devices which represent different optimization strategies within the extensive configuration space available to stellarators. A qualitative comparison of the results with theoretical expectations for simple model fields is provided. The behaviour of the results for the mono-energetic radial and parallel transport coefficients can be largely understood from such theoretical considerations but the mono-energetic bootstrap current coefficient exhibits characteristics which have not been predicted.

  6. KEPLER FLARES. II. THE TEMPORAL MORPHOLOGY OF WHITE-LIGHT FLARES ON GJ 1243

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davenport, James R. A.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Johnson, Emily C.; Peraza, Jesus; Jansen, Tiffany C.; Larsen, Daniel M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, P.O. Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Hebb, Leslie [Department of Physics, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, 300 Pulteney Street, Geneva, NY 14456 (United States); Wisniewski, John P.; Malatesta, Michael; Keil, Marcus; Silverberg, Steven M.; Scheffler, Matthew S.; Berdis, Jodi R. [HL Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 W Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Kowalski, Adam F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Hilton, Eric J., E-mail: jrad@astro.washington.edu [Universe Sandbox, 911 E. Pike Street #333, Seattle, WA 98122 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    We present the largest sample of flares ever compiled for a single M dwarf, the active M4 star GJ 1243. Over 6100 individual flare events, with energies ranging from 10{sup 29} to 10{sup 33} erg, are found in 11 months of 1 minute cadence data from Kepler. This sample is unique for its completeness and dynamic range. We have developed automated tools for finding flares in short-cadence Kepler light curves, and performed extensive validation and classification of the sample by eye. From this pristine sample of flares we generate a median flare template. This template shows that two exponential cooling phases are present during the white-light flare decay, providing fundamental constraints for models of flare physics. The template is also used as a basis function to decompose complex multi-peaked flares, allowing us to study the energy distribution of these events. Only a small number of flare events are not well fit by our template. We find that complex, multi-peaked flares occur in over 80% of flares with a duration of 50 minutes or greater. The underlying distribution of flare durations for events 10 minutes and longer appears to follow a broken power law. Our results support the idea that sympathetic flaring may be responsible for some complex flare events.

  7. The Atmospheric Response to High Nonthermal Electron Beam Fluxes in Solar Flares. I. Modeling the Brightest NUV Footpoints in the X1 Solar Flare of 2014 March 29

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Allred, Joel C.; Daw, Adrian; Cauzzi, Gianna; Carlsson, Mats

    2017-02-01

    The 2014 March 29 X1 solar flare (SOL20140329T17:48) produced bright continuum emission in the far- and near-ultraviolet (NUV) and highly asymmetric chromospheric emission lines, providing long-sought constraints on the heating mechanisms of the lower atmosphere in solar flares. We analyze the continuum and emission line data from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of the brightest flaring magnetic footpoints in this flare. We compare the NUV spectra of the brightest pixels to new radiative-hydrodynamic predictions calculated with the RADYN code using constraints on a nonthermal electron beam inferred from the collisional thick-target modeling of hard X-ray data from Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager. We show that the atmospheric response to a high beam flux density satisfactorily achieves the observed continuum brightness in the NUV. The NUV continuum emission in this flare is consistent with hydrogen (Balmer) recombination radiation that originates from low optical depth in a dense chromospheric condensation and from the stationary beam-heated layers just below the condensation. A model producing two flaring regions (a condensation and stationary layers) in the lower atmosphere is also consistent with the asymmetric Fe ii chromospheric emission line profiles observed in the impulsive phase.

  8. Photospheric Magnetic Field Properties of Flaring vs. Flare-Quiet Active Regions I: Data, General Approach, and Statistical Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leka, K. D.; Barnes, G.

    2003-05-01

    Photospheric vector magnetic field data from the U. Hawai`i Imaging Vector Magnetograph are examined for pre-event signatures unique to solar energetic phenomena. Parameters are constructed from B(x,y) to describe (for example) the distributions of the field, spatial gradients of the field, vertical current, current helicity, ''twist'' parameter α and magnetic shear angles. A quantitative statistical approach employing discriminant analysis and Hotelling's T2-test is applied to the magnitude and temporal evolution of parameters from 24 flare-event and flare-quiet epochs from seven active regions. We demonstrate that (1) when requiring a flare-unique signature, numerous candidate parameters are nullified by considering flare-quiet epochs, (2) a more robust method exists for estimating error rates than conventional ''truth tables'', (3) flaring and flare-quiet populations do not necessarily have low error rates for classification even when statistically distinguishable, and that (4) simultaneous consideration of a large number of variables is required to produce acceptable error rates. That is, when the parameters are considered individually, they show little ability to differentiate between the two populations; multi-variable combinations can discriminate the populations and/or result in perfect classification tables. In lieu of constructing a single all-variable discriminant function to quantify the flare-predictive power of the parameters considered, we devise a method whereby all permutations of the four-variable discriminant functions are ranked by Hotelling's T2. We present those parameters (e.g. the temporal increase of the kurtosis of the spatial distribution of the vertical current density) which consistently appear in the best combinations, indicating that they may play an important role in defining a pre-event photospheric state. While no single combination is clearly the best discriminator, we demonstrate here the requisite approach: include flare

  9. STEREO/SEPT observations of upstream particle events: almost monoenergetic ion beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Klassen

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available We present observations of Almost Monoenergetic Ion (AMI events in the energy range of 100–1200 keV detected with the Solar Electron and Proton Telescope (SEPT onboard both STEREO spacecraft. The energy spectrum of AMI events contain 1, 2, or 3 narrow peaks with the relative width at half maximum of 0.1–0.7 and their energy maxima varies for different events from 120 to 1200 keV. These events were detected close to the bow-shock (STEREO-A&B and to the magnetopause at STEREO-B as well as unexpectedly far upstream of the bow-shock and far away from the magnetotail at distances up to 1100 RE (STEREO-B and 1900 RE (STEREO-A. We discuss the origin of AMI events, the connection to the Earth's bow-shock and to the magnetosphere, and the conditions of the interplanetary medium and magnetosphere under which these AMI bursts occur. Evidence that the detected spectral peaks were caused by quasi-monoenergetic beams of protons, helium, and heavier ions are given. Furthermore, we present the spatial distribution of all AMI events from December 2006 until August 2007.

  10. Dual-fission chamber and neutron beam characterization for fission product yield measurements using monoenergetic neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatia, C.; Fallin, B. [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Gooden, M.E., E-mail: megooden@tunl.duke.edu [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27605 (United States); Howell, C.R. [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Kelley, J.H. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27605 (United States); Tornow, W. [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Arnold, C.W.; Bond, E.M.; Bredeweg, T.A.; Fowler, M.M.; Moody, W.A.; Rundberg, R.S.; Rusev, G.; Vieira, D.J.; Wilhelmy, J.B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Becker, J.A.; Macri, R.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S.A.; Stoyer, M.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-09-01

    A program has been initiated to measure the energy dependence of selected high-yield fission products used in the analysis of nuclear test data. We present out initial work of neutron activation using a dual-fission chamber with quasi-monoenergetic neutrons and gamma-counting method. Quasi-monoenergetic neutrons of energies from 0.5 to 15 MeV using the TUNL 10 MV FM tandem to provide high-precision and self-consistent measurements of fission product yields (FPY). The final FPY results will be coupled with theoretical analysis to provide a more fundamental understanding of the fission process. To accomplish this goal, we have developed and tested a set of dual-fission ionization chambers to provide an accurate determination of the number of fissions occurring in a thick target located in the middle plane of the chamber assembly. Details of the fission chamber and its performance are presented along with neutron beam production and characterization. Also presented are studies on the background issues associated with room-return and off-energy neutron production. We show that the off-energy neutron contribution can be significant, but correctable, while room-return neutron background levels contribute less than <1% to the fission signal.

  11. The challenges of the models of solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, A. V.; Zaitsev, V. V.

    2016-12-01

    The challenges of `standard' model of solar flares motivated by new observations with the spacecrafts and ground-based telescopes are presented. The most important problems are in situ heating of photospheric and chromospheric loop footpoints up to the coronal temperatures without precipitating particle beams accelerated in the corona, and the sunquakes which are unlikely to be explained by the impact of highenergy particles producing hard X-ray emission. There is also the long-standing `number problem' in the physics of solar flares. It is shown that modern observations favored an important role of the electric currents in the energy release processes in the low solar atmosphere. Particle acceleration mechanism in the electric fields driven by the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the chromosphere is proposed. The electric current value I ≥ 1010 A, needed for the excitation of super-Dreicer electric fields in the chromosphere is determined. It is shown that both Joule dissipation of the electric currents and the particles accelerated in the chromosphere can be responsible for in situ heating of the low solar atmosphere. Alternative model of the solar flare based on the analogy between the flaring loop and an equivalent electric circuit which is good tool for the electric current diagnostics is presented. Interaction of a current-carrying loop with the partially-ionized plasma of prominence in the context of particle acceleration is considered. The role of plasma radiation mechanism in the sub-THz emission from the chromosphere is discussed.

  12. Disk--Jet Coupling Following a Stellar Tidal Disruption Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranga Reddy Pasham, Deeraj; van Velzen, Sjoert

    2017-08-01

    Tidal disruption of stars by supermassive black holes can result in transient radio emission. The electrons producing these synchrotron radio flares could be accelerated inside a relativistic jet or externally by shocks resulting from the interaction of an outflow with the circumnuclear medium. Until now, evidence for internal emission has been lacking and nearly all tidal disruption flare studies have adopted the external shock model to explain the observed properties of radio flares. I will talk about our recent discovery of a correlation between the changes in the x-ray and the radio flux of a tidal disruption flare. The radio lags the x-ray emission by about 13 days. This demonstrates that the x-ray emitting accretion disk regulates the radio emission. This coupling is inconsistent with all previous external models but is naturally explained if the radio emission originates from a freely expanding jet. I will also discuss the importance of similar observations in the future to understand how jets evolve in their earliest stages.

  13. Probabilistic forecasting of solar flares from vector magnetogram data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, G.; Leka, K. D.; Schumer, E. A.; Della-Rose, D. J.

    2007-09-01

    Discriminant analysis is a statistical approach for assigning a measurement to one of several mutually exclusive groups. Presented here is an application of the approach to solar flare forecasting, adapted to provide the probability that a measurement belongs to either group, the groups in this case being solar active regions which produced a flare within 24 hours and those that remained flare quiet. The technique is demonstrated for a large database of vector magnetic field measurements obtained by the University of Hawai'i Imaging Vector Magnetograph. For a large combination of variables characterizing the photospheric magnetic field, the results are compared to a Bayesian approach for solar flare prediction, and to the method employed by the U.S. Space Environment Center (SEC). Although quantitative comparison is difficult as the present application provides active region (rather than whole-Sun) forecasts, and the present database covers only part of one solar cycle, the performance of the method appears comparable to the other approaches.

  14. Soft X-ray emission in flaring coronal loops

    CERN Document Server

    Pinto, R F; Brun, A S

    2014-01-01

    Solar flares are associated with intense soft X-ray emission generated by the hot flaring plasma in coronal magnetic loops. Kink unstable twisted flux-ropes provide a source of magnetic energy which can be released impulsively and account for the heating of the plasma in flares. We investigate the temporal, spectral and spatial evolution of the properties of the thermal X-ray emission produced in such kink-unstable magnetic flux-ropes using a series of MHD simulations. We deduce emission diagnostics and their temporal evolution and discuss the results of the simulations with respect to observations. The numerical setup used consists of a highly twisted loop embedded in a region of uniform and untwisted background coronal magnetic field. We let the kink instability develop, compute the evolution of the plasma properties in the loop (density, temperature) and deduce the X-ray emission properties of the plasma during the whole flaring episode. During the initial phase of the instability plasma heating is mostly ...

  15. The Problematic High-Energy Flares of 2012 March 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, James M.; De Nolfo, Georgia

    2017-08-01

    Two X-class flares occurred on 2012 March 7, an X5.3 and an X1.1. The earlier X5 flare gathered much attention, initiating a powerful and fast CME from the eastern hemisphere. The “forgotten” X1 flare exhibited much smaller CME from the same active region one hour later. However, extended high-energy gamma emission was present for almost the entire day of 2012 March 7. We have resolved the gamma emission into two separate, but overlapping extended occurrences, being from the two sequential X-class flares. We find that the later X1 event was slightly more prolific in gamma emission, mostly due to its duration, despite being much weaker in soft x rays and dynamic coronal activity. We attribute the entirety of the gamma emission from particle precipitation from the footpoints two separate quasi-static large-scale (of order 1 solar radius) coronal loops and not from the associated CMEs. Using constraints from ancillary data, we estimate the bounds in parameter space of the loop sizes and embedded turbulence necessary to accelerate protons and ions to high energies producing the gamma emission.

  16. Theoretical aspects related to plasma flows observed in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somov, Boris

    I review the current state of affairs in the magnetohydrodynamic theories and models for large-scale high-speed plasma flows in solar flares. Main attension is payed to the coronal signatures and their relation to the photosphere and the heliosphere.The large-scale structure and dynamics of coronal plasma flows, as seen in EUV and soft X-rays, can be explained in terms of the three-dimensional reconnection at magnetic separators in the corona. More specifically, this reconnection is determined by the large-scale photospheric flows mainly of two types. First, the shear flows, which are parallel to the photospheric neutral line, increase the length of field lines in the corona an excess of magnetic energy. Second, the converging flows, directed to the neutral line, create the preflare slowly-reconnecting current layers in the corona and provide an excess of energy sufficient to produce a large flare. During the flare, both excesses of energy are released mainly as fast flows of coronal plasma as well as powerful heat fluxes and accelerated particles. The impulsive heating of the upper chromosphere creates a fast expansion of high-temperature plasma upwards into the corona, called the chromospheric `evaporation'. Basic properties of such flows are also reviewed together with draining with cooling. Ref.: Somov B.V., Plasma Astrophysics, Part II, Reconnection and Flares. Second Edition. Springer SBM, New York, 2013.

  17. 3D flare particle model for ShipIR/NTCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, Srinivasan; Vaitekunas, David A.

    2016-05-01

    A key component in any soft-kill response to an incoming guided missile is the flare /chaff decoy used to distract or seduce the seeker homing system away from the naval platform. This paper describes a new 3D flare particle model in the naval threat countermeasure simulator (NTCS) of the NATO-standard ship signature model (ShipIR), which provides independent control over the size and radial distribution of its signature. The 3D particles of each flare sub-munition are modelled stochastically and rendered using OpenGL z-buffering, 2D projection, and alpha-blending to produce a unique and time varying signature. A sensitivity analysis on each input parameter provides the data and methods needed to synthesize a model from an IR measurement of a decoy. The new model also eliminated artifacts and deficiencies in our previous model which prevented reliable tracks from the adaptive track gate algorithm already presented by Ramaswamy and Vaitekunas (2015). A sequence of scenarios are used to test and demonstrate the new flare model during a missile engagement.

  18. Properties of the 15 February 2011 Flare Seismic Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Zharkov, S; Matthews, S A; Zharkova, V V

    2012-01-01

    The first near-side X-class flare of the Solar Cycle 24 occurred in February 2011 and produced a very strong seismic response in the photosphere. One sunquake was reported by Kosovichev (2011) followed by the discovery of a second sunquake by Zharkov et al (2011). The flare had a two-ribbon structure and was associated with a flux rope eruption and a halo coronal mass ejection (CME) as reported in the CACTus catalogue. Following the discovery of the second sunquake and the spatial association of both sources with the locations of the feet of the erupting flux rope (Zharkov et al 2011) we present here a more detailed analysis of the observed photospheric changes in and around the seismic sources. These sunquakes are quite unusual, taking place early in the impulsive stage of the flare, with the seismic sources showing little hard X-ray (HXR) emission, and strongest X-ray emission sources located in the flare ribbons. We present a directional time--distance diagram computed for the second source, which clearly ...

  19. The Kepler Catalog of Stellar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, James R. A.

    2016-09-01

    A homogeneous search for stellar flares has been performed using every available Kepler light curve. An iterative light curve de-trending approach was used to filter out both astrophysical and systematic variability to detect flares. The flare recovery completeness has also been computed throughout each light curve using artificial flare injection tests, and the tools for this work have been made publicly available. The final sample contains 851,168 candidate flare events recovered above the 68% completeness threshold, which were detected from 4041 stars, or 1.9% of the stars in the Kepler database. The average flare energy detected is ˜1035 erg. The net fraction of flare stars increases with g - i color, or decreasing stellar mass. For stars in this sample with previously measured rotation periods, the total relative flare luminosity is compared to the Rossby number. A tentative detection of flare activity saturation for low-mass stars with rapid rotation below a Rossby number of ˜0.03 is found. A power-law decay in flare activity with Rossby number is found with a slope of -1, shallower than typical measurements for X-ray activity decay with Rossby number.

  20. Study of SMM flares in gamma-rays and neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunphy, Philip P.; Chupp, Edward L.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of the research supported by NASA grant NAGW-2755 and lists the papers and publications produced through the grant. The objective of the work was to study solar flares that produced observable signals from high-energy (greater than 10 MeV) gamma-rays and neutrons in the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS). In 3 of 4 flares that had been studied previously, most of the neutrons and neutral pions appear to have been produced after the 'main' impulsive phase as determined from hard x-rays and gamma-rays. We, therefore, proposed to analyze the timing of the high-energy radiation, and its implications for the acceleration, trapping, and transport of flare particles. It was equally important to characterize the spectral shapes of the interacting energetic electrons and protons - another key factor in constraining possible particle acceleration mechanisms. In section 2.0, we discuss the goals of the research. In section 3.0, we summarize the results of the research. In section 4.0, we list the papers and publications produced under the grant. Preprints or reprints of the publications are attached as appendices.

  1. Discovery of transient infrared emission from dust heated by stellar tidal disruption flares

    CERN Document Server

    van Velzen, Sjoert; Krolik, Julian H; Gorjian, Varoujan

    2016-01-01

    Stars that pass within the Roche radius of a supermassive black hole will be tidally disrupted, yielding a sudden injection of gas close to the black hole horizon which produces an electromagnetic flare. A few dozen of these flares have been discovered in recent years, but current observations provide poor constraints on the bolometric luminosity and total accreted mass of these events. Using images from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), we have discovered transient 3.4 micron emission from several previously known tidal disruption flares. The observations can be explained by dust heated to its sublimation temperature due to the intense radiation of the tidal flare. From the break in the infrared light curve we infer that this hot dust is located ~0.1 pc from the supermassive black hole. Since the dust has been heated by absorbing UV and (potentially) soft X-ray photons of the flare, the reprocessing light curve yields an estimate of the bolometric flare luminosity. For the flare PTF-09ge, we in...

  2. Miscibility Development Computation in Enhanced Oil Recovery by Flare Gas Flooding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjokorde Walmiki Samadhi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of flare gas as injection gas in miscible gas flooding enhanced oil recovery (MGF-EOR presents a potential synergy between oil production improvement and greenhouse gases emission mitigation. This work is a preliminary evaluation of the feasibility of miscible flare gas injection based on phase behavior computations of a model oil (43%n-C5H12 : 57%n-C16H34 and a model flare gas (91%CH4 : 9%C2H6. The computations employed the multiple mixing-cell model with Peng-Robinson and PC-SAFT equations of state, and compared the minimum miscibility pressure (MMP value in the cases of flare gas injection and CO2 injection. For CO2 injection, both equations of state produced MMP values close to the measured value of 10.55 MPa. Flare gas injection MMP values were predicted to be 3.6-4.5 times those of CO2 injection. This very high MMP implies high gas compression costs, and may compromise the integrity of the reservoir. Subsequent studies shall explore the gas-oil miscibility behavior of mixtures of flare gas with intermediate hydrocarbon gases and CO2, in order to identify a suitable approach for rendering flare gas feasible as an injection gas in MGF-EOR.

  3. On the non-Kolmogorov nature of flare-productive solar active regions

    CERN Document Server

    Mandage, Revati S

    2016-01-01

    A magnetic power spectral analysis is performed on 53 solar active regions, observed from August 2011 to July 2012. Magnetic field data obtained from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, inverted as Active Region Patches, are used to study the evolution of the magnetic power index as each region rotates across the solar disk. Active regions are classified based on the number, and sizes, of solar flares they produce, in order to study the relationship between flare productivity and the magnetic power index. The choice of window size and inertial range plays a key role in determining the correct magnetic power index. The overall distribution of magnetic power indices has a range of $1.0-2.5$. Flare-quiet regions peak at a value of 1.6, however flare-productive regions peak at a value of 2.2. Overall, the histogram of the distribution of power indices of flare-productive active regions is well separated from flare-quiet active regions. Only 12\\% of flare-quiet regions exhibit an index greater than 2, whereas 90...

  4. Universal Behavior of X-Ray Flares from Black Hole Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F. Y.; Dai, Z. G.; Yi, S. X.; Xi, S. Q.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray flares have been discovered in black hole systems such as gamma-ray bursts, the tidal disruption event Swift J1644+57, the supermassive black hole Sagittarius A* at the center of our Galaxy, and some active galactic nuclei. Occurrences of X-ray flares are always accompanied by relativistic jets. However, it is still unknown whether or not there is a physical analogy among such X-ray flares produced in black hole systems spanning nine orders of magnitude in mass. Here, we report observed data of X-ray flares and show that they have three statistical properties similar to solar flares, including power-law distributions of their energies, durations, and waiting times, which can be explained by a fractal-diffusive, self-organized criticality model. These statistical similarities, together with the fact that solar flares are triggered by a magnetic reconnection process, suggest that all of the X-ray flares are consistent with magnetic reconnection events, implying that their concomitant relativistic jets may be magnetically dominated.

  5. High Energetic Solar Proton Flares on the Declining Phase of Solar Cycle 22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, M. A. Mosalam

    1995-06-01

    The year 1991 is a part of the declining phase of the solar cycle 22, during which high energetic flares have been produced by active regions NOAA/USAF 6659 in June. The associated solar proton events have affected the Earth environment and their proton fluxes have been measured by GOES space craft. The evaluation of solar activity during the first half of June 1991, have been carried out by applying a method for high energetic solar flares prediction on the flares of June 1991. The method depends on cumulative summation curves according to observed H-alpha flares, X-ray bursts, in the active region 6659 during one rotation when the energetic solar flares of June 1991 have occurred. It has been found that the steep trend of increased activity sets on several tens of hours prior to the occurrence of the energetic flare, which can be used, together with other methods, for forecasts of major flares. All the used data at the present work are received from NOAA, Boulder, Colorado, USA.

  6. X-ray flares in GRBs: general considerations and photospheric origin

    CERN Document Server

    Beniamini, Paz

    2015-01-01

    Observations of X-ray flares from Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) imply strong constraints on possible physical models. We provide a general discussion of these. In particular, we show that in order to account for the relatively flat and weak optical flux during the X-ray flares, the size of the emitting region should be $\\lesssim 3\\times 10^{14}$cm. The bolometric luminosity of flares also strongly constrain the energy budget, and are inconsistent with late time activity of a central engine powered by the spin-down of a magnetar. We provide a simple toy model according to which flares are produced by an outflow of modest Lorentz factor (a few tens instead of hundreds) that is launched more or less simultaneously with the highly relativistic jet which produced the prompt gamma-ray emission. The "slower" moving outflow produces the flare as it reaches its photosphere. The existence of such a component would naturally resolve the observational challenges imposed by flares, outlined in this work.

  7. The solar active region No. 10486 and its production of high energetic flares at October-November 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Hady, Ahmed; Shaltout, M. A.

    The solar active region No. 10486 can be considered as one of the very large and powerful active regions since 1976. This region has produced the most important two solar flares during the period (1976-2003). The first flare released at 12:15UT on 28 October 2003 with importance X17/4B, and the second flare released at 22:25UT on 4 November 2003 with importance X28/3B. Both flares are the highest level in x-ray production since 1976, when different detectors, onboard various spacecrafts, have taken the data, and since 1996, when SOHO was launched to space. The first flare on 28 October 2003 produced protons events at 6:15UT on 29 Oct. 2003 with energies > 10 MeV. The maximum solar wind speed is 1905 and 1986 km/sec at 29 and 30 October 2003 respectively. The same region after its rotation across the sun was appeared again on the sun's edge at 18 November 2003, and produced high energetic flare at 19 November 2003, which led to increase the solar wind speed to 947 km/sec at 20 November 2003. The evaluation of the active region No. 10486 is very important for understanding the high energetic proton flares. The aim of this study is to follow the morphological and magnetic changes of the active region before, during, and after the high energetic flares were produced. Also, applying the cumulative summation curves method for the different index of the active region to predict the flare of high energy has been carried out. The results are promising and can be used for proton flares and Geomagnetic storms prediction, few days before their occurrence.

  8. Monitoring of FR Cnc Flaring Activity

    CERN Document Server

    Golovin, A; Pavlenko, E; Kuznyetsova, Yu; Krushevska, V; Sergeev, A

    2007-01-01

    Being excited by the detection of the first ever-observed optical flare in FR Cnc, we decided to continue photometrical monitoring of this object. The observations were carried out at Crimean Astrophysical Observatory (Crimea, Ukraine; CrAO - hereafter) and at the Terskol Observatory (Russia, Northern Caucasus). The obtained lightcurves are presented and discussed. No distinguishable flares were detected that could imply that flares on FR Cnc are very rare event.

  9. X-ray Studies of Flaring Plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B. Sylwester; J. Sylwester; K. J. H. Phillips

    2008-03-01

    We present some methods of X-ray data analysis employed in our laboratory for deducing the physical parameters of flaring plasma. For example, we have used a flare well observed with Polish instrument RESIK aboard Russian CORONAS-F satellite. Based on a careful instrument calibration, the absolute fluxes in a number of individual spectral lines have been obtained. The analysis of these lines allows us to follow the evolution of important thermodynamic parameters characterizing the emitting plasma throughout this flare evolution.

  10. Predicting Solar Flares Using SDO/HMI Vector Magnetic Data Product and Random Forest Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Deng, Na; Wang, Jason; Wang, Haimin

    2017-08-01

    Adverse space weather effects can often be traced to solar flares, prediction of which has drawn significant research interests. Many previous forecasting studies used physical parameters derived from photospheric line-of-sight field or ground-based vector field observations. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory produces full-disk vector magnetograms with continuous high-cadence, while flare prediction efforts utilizing this unprecedented data source are still limited. Here we report results of flare prediction using physical parameters provided by the Space-weather HMI Active Region Patches (SHARP) and related data products. We survey X-ray flares occurred from 2010 May to 2016 December, and categorize their source regions into four classes (B, C, M, and X) according to the maximum GOES magnitude of flares they generated. We then retrieve SHARP related parameters for each selected region at the beginning of its flare date to build a database. Finally, we train a machine-learning algorithm, called random forest (RF), to predict the occurrence of a certain class of flares in a given active region within 24 hours, evaluate the classifier performance using the 10-fold cross validation scheme, and characterize the results using standard performace metrics. Compared to previous works, our experiments indicate that using the HMI parameters and RF is a valid method for flare forecasting with fairly reasonable prediction performance. We also find that the total unsigned quantities of vertical current, current helicity, and flux near polarity inversion line are among the most important parameters for classifying flaring regions into different classes.

  11. Sixteen years of X-ray monitoring of Sagittarius A*: Evidence for a decay of the faint flaring rate from 2013 August, 13 months before a rise in the bright flaring rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossoux, Enmanuelle; Grosso, Nicolas

    2017-08-01

    rate from 1999 to 2015 and a rise in the flaring rate by a factor of three for the most luminous and most energetic flares from 2014 August 31, i.e., about four months after the pericenter passage of the Dusty S-cluster Object (DSO)/G2 close to Sgr A*. In addition, we identify a decay of the flaring rate for the less luminous and less energetic flares from 2013 August and November, respectively, i.e., about 10 and 7 months before the pericenter passage of the DSO/G2 and 13 and 10 months before the rise in the bright flaring rate. Conclusions: The decay of the faint flaring rate is difficult to explain in terms of the tidal disruption of a dusty cloud since it occurred well before the pericenter passage of the DSO/G2, whose stellar nature is now well established. Moreover, a mass transfer from the DSO/G2 to Sgr A* is not required to produce the rise in the bright flaring rate since the energy saved by the decay of the number of faint flares during a long period of time may be later released by several bright flares during a shorter period of time.

  12. RBE of quasi-monoenergetic 60 MeV neutron radiation for induction of dicentric chromosomes in human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, R; Mühlbradt, K-H; Meulders, J P; Stephan, G; Haney, M; Schmid, E

    2005-12-01

    The production of dicentric chromosomes in human lymphocytes by high-energy neutron radiation was studied using a quasi-monoenergetic 60 MeV neutron beam. The average yield coefficient [see text] of the linear dose-response relationship for dicentric chromosomes was measured to be (0.146+/-0.016) Gy-1. This confirms our earlier observations that above 400 keV, the yield of dicentric chromosomes decreases with increasing neutron energy. Using the linear-quadratic dose-response relationship for dicentric chromosomes established in blood of the same donor for 60Co gamma-rays as a reference radiation, an average maximum low-dose RBE (RBEM) of 14+/-4 for 60 MeV quasi-monoenergetic neutrons with a dose-weighted average energy [see text] of 41.0 MeV is obtained. A correction procedure was applied, to account for the low-energy continuum of the quasi-monoenergetic spectral neutron distribution, and the yield coefficient alpha for 60 MeV neutrons was determined from the measured average yield coefficient [see text]. For alpha, a value of (0.115+/-0.026) Gy-1 was obtained corresponding to an RBEM of 11+/-4. The present experiments extend earlier investigations with monoenergetic neutrons to higher energies.

  13. The Statistical Analyses of the White-Light Flares: Two Main Results About Flare Behaviours

    CERN Document Server

    Dal, H A

    2012-01-01

    We present two main results, based on the models and the statistical analyses of 1672 U-band flares. We also discuss the behaviours of the white-light flares. In addition, the parameters of the flares detected from two years of observations on CR Dra are presented. By comparing with the flare parameters obtained from other UV Ceti type stars, we examine the behaviour of optical flare processes along the spectral types. Moreover, we aimed, using large white-light flare data,to analyse the flare time-scales in respect to some results obtained from the X-ray observations. Using the SPSS V17.0 and the GraphPad Prism V5.02 software, the flares detected from CR Dra were modelled with the OPEA function and analysed with t-Test method to compare similar flare events in other stars. In addition, using some regression calculations in order to derive the best histograms, the time-scales of the white-light flares were analysed. Firstly, CR Dra flares have revealed that the white-light flares behave in a similar way as th...

  14. Relationship of Non-potentiality and Flaring: Intercomparison for an M-class Flare

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashok Ambastha; Shibu K. Mathew

    2000-09-01

    We have made an attempt to obtain relationship of magnetic shear and vertical currents in NOAA AR7321. Intercomparison of changes observed at several flaring and non-flaring sites associated with an M4/2B flare observed on October 26, 1992 is reported.

  15. The Kepler Catalog of Stellar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Davenport, James R A

    2016-01-01

    A homogeneous search for stellar flares has been performed using every available Kepler light curve. An iterative light curve de-trending approach was used to filter out both astrophysical and systematic variability to detect flares. The flare recovery completeness has also been computed throughout each light curve using artificial flare injection tests, and the tools for this work have been made publicly available. The final sample contains 851,168 candidate flare events recovered above the 68% completeness threshold, which were detected from 4041 stars, or 1.9% of the stars in the Kepler database. The average flare energy detected is ~$10^{35}$ erg. The net fraction of flare stars increases with $g-i$ color, or decreasing stellar mass. For stars in this sample with previously measured rotation periods, the total relative flare luminosity is compared to the Rossby number. A tentative detection of flare activity saturation for low-mass stars with rapid rotation below a Rossby number of ~0.03 is found. A power...

  16. Photospheric, Chromospheric and Helioseismic Signatures of a Large Flare in Super-active Region NOAA 10486

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashok Ambastha

    2006-06-01

    NOAA 10486 produced several powerful flares, including the 4B/X17.2 superflare of October 28, 2003/11:10 UT. This flare was extensively covered by the H and GONG instruments operated at the Udaipur Solar Observatory (USO). The central location of the active region on October 28, 2003was well-suited for the ring diagram analysis to obtain the 3-D power spectra and search for helioseismic response of this large flare on the amplitude, frequency and width of the p-modes. Further, using USO observations, we have identified the sites of new flux emergences, large proper motions and line-of-sight velocity flows in the active region and their relationship with the flare.

  17. A Comparison of Flare Forecasting Methods, I: Results from the "All-Clear" Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, G; Schrijver, C J; Colak, T; Qahwaji, R; Ashamari, O W; Yuan, Y; Zhang, J; McAteer, R T J; Bloomfield, D S; Higgins, P A; Gallagher, P T; Falconer, D A; Georgoulis, M K; Wheatland, M S; Balch, C; Dunn, T; Wagner, E L

    2016-01-01

    Solar flares produce radiation which can have an almost immediate effect on the near-Earth environment, making it crucial to forecast flares in order to mitigate their negative effects. The number of published approaches to flare forecasting using photospheric magnetic field observations has proliferated, with varying claims about how well each works. Because of the different analysis techniques and data sets used, it is essentially impossible to compare the results from the literature. This problem is exacerbated by the low event rates of large solar flares. The challenges of forecasting rare events have long been recognized in the meteorology community, but have yet to be fully acknowledged by the space weather community. During the interagency workshop on "all clear" forecasts held in Boulder, CO in 2009, the performance of a number of existing algorithms was compared on common data sets, specifically line-of-sight magnetic field and continuum intensity images from MDI, with consistent definitions of what ...

  18. Particle Acceleration at a Flare Termination Shock: Effect of Large-scale Magnetic Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Fan

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the acceleration of charged particles (both electrons and protons) at collisionless shocks predicted to exist in the vicinity of solar flares. The existence of standing termination shocks has been examined by flare models and numerical simulations e.g., Shibata,Forbes. We study electron energization by numerically integrating the equations of motion of a large number of test-particle electrons in the time-dependent two-dimensional electric and magnetic fields generated from hybrid simulations (kinetic ions and fluid electron) using parameters typical of the solar flare plasma environment. The shock is produced by injecting plasma flow toward a rigid piston. Large-scale magnetic fluctuations -- known to exist in plasmas and known to have important effects on the nonthermal electron acceleration at shocks -- are also included in our simulations. For the parameters characteristic of the flaring region, our calculations suggest that the termination shock formed in the reconnection outflow region (a...

  19. Suppression of multiple ion bunches and generation of monoenergetic ion beams in laser foil-plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Shan; Xie Bai-Song; Hong Xue-Ren; Wu Hai-Cheng; Aimierding Aimidula; Zhao Xue-Yan; Liu Ming-Ping

    2011-01-01

    In one-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, this paper shows that the formation of multiple ion bunches is disadvantageous to the generation of monoenergetic ion beams and can be suppressed by choosing an optimum target thickness in the radiation pressure acceleration mechanism by a circularly polarised laser pulse. As the laser pulse becomes intense, the optimum target thickness obtained by a non-relativistic treatment is no longer adequate. Considering the relativistic Doppler-shifted pressure, it proposes a relativistic formulation to determine the optimum target thickness. The theoretical predictions agree with the simulation results well. The model is also valid for two-dimensional cases. The accelerated ion beams can be compelled to be more stable by choosing the optimum target thickness when they exhibit some unstable behaviours.

  20. Native cation vacancies in Si-doped AlGaN studied by monoenergetic positron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uedono, A.; Tenjinbayashi, K.; Tsutsui, T.; Shimahara, Y.; Miyake, H.; Hiramatsu, K.; Oshima, N.; Suzuki, R.; Ishibashi, S.

    2012-01-01

    Native defects in Si-doped AlGaN grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy were probed by monoenergetic positron beams. Doppler broadening spectra of the annihilation radiation and positron lifetimes were measured, and these were compared with results obtained using first-principles calculation. For Si-doped AlxGa1-xN (4 × 1017 Si/cm3), the vacancy-type defects were introduced at above x = 0.54, and this was attributed to the transition of the growth mode to the Stranski-Krastanov mechanism from the Frank-van der Merwe mechanism. For Si-doped Al0.6Ga0.4N, the vacancy concentration increased with increasing Si concentration, and the major defect species was identified as Al vacancies. A clear correlation between the suppression of cathodoluminescence and the defect concentration was obtained, suggesting the cation vacancies act as nonradiative centers in AlGaN.

  1. Quasi-monoenergetic positron beam generation from ultra-intense laser-matter interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tatsufumi; Hayakawa, Takehito

    2016-10-01

    In ultra-intense laser-matter interactions in which the radiation reaction effect plays an important role, γ-rays are effectively generated that are intense, collimated, and of short duration. These γ-rays propagate through the target, which results in the electron-positron pair creation caused by the interaction of the γ-rays with the nuclear electric fields. The positron beam thus generated has several unique features; it is quasi-monoenergetic in nature with a peak energy of hundreds of MeV, well collimated, and of ultra-short duration. Based on the numerical simulations, the dependences of the number and monochromaticity of the positrons on the laser and target parameters are explored, which leads to the proposal of a new type of the laser-driven positron source.

  2. A Decisive Disappearance Search at High-$\\Delta m^2$ with Monoenergetic Muon Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Axani, S; Conrad, JM; Shaevitz, MH; Spitz, J; Wongjirad, T

    2015-01-01

    "KPipe" is a proposed experiment which will study muon neutrino disappearance for a sensitive test of the $\\Delta m^2\\sim1 \\mathrm{eV}^2$ anomalies, possibly indicative of one or more sterile neutrinos. The experiment is to be located at the J-PARC Materials and Life Science Facility's spallation neutron source, which represents the world's most intense source of charged kaon decay-at-rest monoenergetic (236 MeV) muon neutrinos. The detector vessel, designed to measure the charged current interactions of these neutrinos, will be 3 m in diameter and 120 m long, extending radially at a distance of 32 m to 152 m from the source. This design allows a sensitive search for $\

  3. MAGNETIC-ISLAND CONTRACTION AND PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN SIMULATED ERUPTIVE SOLAR FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidoni, S. E. [The Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue Northeast, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); DeVore, C. R.; Karpen, J. T. [Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Lynch, B. J., E-mail: silvina.e.guidoni@nasa.gov [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-03-20

    The mechanism that accelerates particles to the energies required to produce the observed high-energy impulsive emission in solar flares is not well understood. Drake et al. proposed a mechanism for accelerating electrons in contracting magnetic islands formed by kinetic reconnection in multi-layered current sheets (CSs). We apply these ideas to sunward-moving flux ropes (2.5D magnetic islands) formed during fast reconnection in a simulated eruptive flare. A simple analytic model is used to calculate the energy gain of particles orbiting the field lines of the contracting magnetic islands in our ultrahigh-resolution 2.5D numerical simulation. We find that the estimated energy gains in a single island range up to a factor of five. This is higher than that found by Drake et al. for islands in the terrestrial magnetosphere and at the heliopause, due to strong plasma compression that occurs at the flare CS. In order to increase their energy by two orders of magnitude and plausibly account for the observed high-energy flare emission, the electrons must visit multiple contracting islands. This mechanism should produce sporadic emission because island formation is intermittent. Moreover, a large number of particles could be accelerated in each magnetohydrodynamic-scale island, which may explain the inferred rates of energetic-electron production in flares. We conclude that island contraction in the flare CS is a promising candidate for electron acceleration in solar eruptions.

  4. High energy neutron and pion-decay gamma-ray emissions from solar flares

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Edward L. Chupp; James M. Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Solar flare gamma-ray emissions from energetic ions and electrons have been detected and measured to GeV energies since 1980. In addition, neutrons produced in solar flares with 100 MeV to GeV energies have been observed at the Earth. These emis-sions are produced by the highest energy ions and electrons accelerated at the Sun and they provide our only direct (albeit secondary) knowledge about the properties of the acceler-ator(s) acting in a solar flare. The solar flares, which have direct evidence for pion-decaygamma-rays, are unique and are the focus of this paper. We review our current knowl-edge of the highest energy solar emissions, and how the characteristics of the acceleration process are deduced from the observations. Results from the RHESSI, INTEGRAL and CORONAS missions will also be covered. The review will also cover the solar flare ca-pabilities of the new mission, FERMI GAMMA RAY SPACE TELESCOPE, launched on 2008 June 11. Finally, we discuss the requirements for future missions to advance this vital area of solar flare physics.

  5. The predicted impact of increased formaldehyde emissions from industrial flares on ozone concentrations in Houston, TX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. T.; Vizuete, W.

    2015-12-01

    Houston features one of the largest concentrations of the petrochemical industry in all of North America and flares are widely used there as the final treatment process for unwanted volatile organic compounds. These flares have the potential to produce formaldehyde as the result of incomplete combustion. Formaldehyde emissions are an important precursor to producing hydroxyl radicals and thus can impact atmospheric chemistry and the formation of ozone. Formaldehyde emissions from flares, however, are difficult to measure in situ. Recently, alternative measurement techniques have been developed, like open path optical methods, that allow the direct measurement of flare emissions from the facility's fence line (Johansson et al., 2014; Pikelnaya, Flynn, Tsai, & Stutz, 2013). This observational data indicates that the emission rate of formaldehyde from flares is about 10-20 times greater than those found in the regulatory models developed by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality's (TCEQ). This research will use air quality models to quantify the impact that increased formaldehyde emission from flares will have on Houston ozone concentrations. This study relies on the CAMx model (version 6.1) and emission data developed by Alpine Geophysics LLC (AG) and Climate & Atmospheric Research Associates (CARA) based on the combined databases from TCEQ, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and National Emission Inventory (NEI2008). This model also used meteorology data from the results of WRF-ARW dynamics. The CAMx generated process analysis data will also be used to quantify changes in radical budgets and NOx budgets critical to ozone production.

  6. Observations and modeling of ionospheric scintillations at South Pole during six X‐class solar flares in 2013

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Priyadarshi, S; Zhang, Q.‐H; Ma, Y.‐Z; Wang, Y; Xing, Z.‐Y

    2016-01-01

    ...‐class solar flares have been studied during the summer and winter months, using the produced scintillation indices based on the observations from the GPS receiver at South Pole and the in situ plasma...

  7. Oilfield Flare Gas Electricity Systems (OFFGASES Project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rachel Henderson; Robert Fickes

    2007-12-31

    The Oilfield Flare Gas Electricity Systems (OFFGASES) project was developed in response to a cooperative agreement offering by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under Preferred Upstream Management Projects (PUMP III). Project partners included the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) as lead agency working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the California Oil Producers Electric Cooperative (COPE). The project was designed to demonstrate that the entire range of oilfield 'stranded gases' (gas production that can not be delivered to a commercial market because it is poor quality, or the quantity is too small to be economically sold, or there are no pipeline facilities to transport it to market) can be cost-effectively harnessed to make electricity. The utilization of existing, proven distribution generation (DG) technologies to generate electricity was field-tested successfully at four marginal well sites, selected to cover a variety of potential scenarios: high Btu, medium Btu, ultra-low Btu gas, as well as a 'harsh', or high contaminant, gas. Two of the four sites for the OFFGASES project were idle wells that were shut in because of a lack of viable solutions for the stranded noncommercial gas that they produced. Converting stranded gas to useable electrical energy eliminates a waste stream that has potential negative environmental impacts to the oil production operation. The electricity produced will offset that which normally would be purchased from an electric utility, potentially lowering operating costs and extending the economic life of the oil wells. Of the piloted sites, the most promising technologies to handle the range were microturbines that have very low emissions. One recently developed product, the Flex-Microturbine, has the potential to handle the entire range of oilfield gases. It is deployed at an oilfield near Santa Barbara to run on waste gas

  8. Kepler Flares II: The Temporal Morphology of White-Light Flares on GJ 1243

    CERN Document Server

    Davenport, James R A; Hebb, Leslie; Wisniewski, John P; Kowalski, Adam F; Johnson, Emily C; Malatesta, Michael; Peraza, Jesus; Keil, Marcus; Silverberg, Steven M; Jansen, Tiffany C; Scheffler, Matthew S; Berdis, Jodi R; Larsen, Daniel M; Hilton, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    We present the largest sample of flares ever compiled for a single M dwarf, the active M4 star GJ 1243. Over 6100 individual flare events, with energies ranging from $10^{29}$ to $10^{33}$ erg, are found in 11 months of 1-minute cadence data from Kepler. This sample is unique for its completeness and dynamic range. We have developed automated tools for finding flares in short-cadence Kepler light curves, and performed extensive validation and classification of the sample by eye. From this pristine sample of flares we generate a median flare template. This template shows that two exponential cooling phases are present during the white-light flare decay, providing fundamental constraints for models of flare physics. The template is also used as a basis function to decompose complex multi-peaked flares, allowing us to study the energy distribution of these events. Only a small number of flare events are not well fit by our template. We find that complex, multi-peaked flares occur in over 80% of flares with a dur...

  9. Prediction of Solar Flare Size and Time-to-Flare Using Support Vector Machine Regression

    CERN Document Server

    Boucheron, Laura E; McAteer, R T James

    2015-01-01

    We study the prediction of solar flare size and time-to-flare using 38 features describing magnetic complexity of the photospheric magnetic field. This work uses support vector regression to formulate a mapping from the 38-dimensional feature space to a continuous-valued label vector representing flare size or time-to-flare. When we consider flaring regions only, we find an average error in estimating flare size of approximately half a \\emph{geostationary operational environmental satellite} (\\emph{GOES}) class. When we additionally consider non-flaring regions, we find an increased average error of approximately 3/4 a \\emph{GOES} class. We also consider thresholding the regressed flare size for the experiment containing both flaring and non-flaring regions and find a true positive rate of 0.69 and a true negative rate of 0.86 for flare prediction. The results for both of these size regression experiments are consistent across a wide range of predictive time windows, indicating that the magnetic complexity fe...

  10. Shock Versus Solar Flare Production of Heliospheric Relativistic Electron Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, S. W.; Cliver, E. W.

    2006-12-01

    Electrons with relativistic (E > 0.3 MeV) energies are often observed as discrete events in the inner heliosphere. Their sharp onsets and antisunward flows indicate that they are produced in solar transient events. In general their origins can be associated in time with both solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Unlike the solar energetic proton (SEP) and ion events, we do not have the advantage of particle elemental abundances and charge states as source diagnostics. We review the characteristics of the electron events observed on the Helios, Venera, ISEE-3, Phobos, and other inner heliospheric spacecraft to determine whether they are more likely to be produced by broad coronal shocks driven by CMEs or by solar flare processes associated with magnetic reconnection. Electron intensity-time profiles and energy spectra are compared with properties of flares and CMEs for this determination. Recent comparisons of peak electron and SEP event intensities provide strong evidence for the shock interpretation, but definitive results require the observations provided by the Sentinels mission.

  11. Real-Time CME Forecasting Using HMI Active-Region Magnetograms and Flare History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, David; Moore, Ron; Barghouty, Abdulnasser F.; Khazanov, Igor

    2011-01-01

    We have recently developed a method of predicting an active region s probability of producing a CME, an X-class Flare, an M-class Flare, or a Solar Energetic Particle Event from a free-energy proxy measured from SOHO/MDI line-of-sight magnetograms. This year we have added three major improvements to our forecast tool: 1) Transition from MDI magnetogram to SDO/HMI magnetogram allowing us near-real-time forecasts, 2) Automation of acquisition and measurement of HMI magnetograms giving us near-real-time forecasts (no older than 2 hours), and 3) Determination of how to improve forecast by using the active region s previous flare history in combination with its free-energy proxy. HMI was turned on in May 2010 and MDI was turned off in April 2011. Using the overlap period, we have calibrated HMI to yield what MDI would measure. This is important since the value of the free-energy proxy used for our forecast is resolution dependent, and the forecasts are made from results of a 1996-2004 database of MDI observations. With near-real-time magnetograms from HMI, near-real-time forecasts are now possible. We have augmented the code so that it continually acquires and measures new magnetograms as they become available online, and updates the whole-sun forecast from the coming day. The next planned improvement is to use an active region s previous flare history, in conjunction with its free-energy proxy, to forecast the active region s event rate. It has long been known that active regions that have produced flares in the past are likely to produce flares in the future, and that active regions that are nonpotential (have large free-energy) are more likely to produce flares in the future. This year we have determined that persistence of flaring is not just a reflection of an active region s free energy. In other words, after controlling for free energy, we have found that active regions that have flared recently are more likely to flare in the future.

  12. Flare forecasting at the Met Office Space Weather Operations Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, S. A.; Bingham, S.; Sharpe, M.; Jackson, D. R.

    2017-04-01

    The Met Office Space Weather Operations Centre produces 24/7/365 space weather guidance, alerts, and forecasts to a wide range of government and commercial end-users across the United Kingdom. Solar flare forecasts are one of its products, which are issued multiple times a day in two forms: forecasts for each active region on the solar disk over the next 24 h and full-disk forecasts for the next 4 days. Here the forecasting process is described in detail, as well as first verification of archived forecasts using methods commonly used in operational weather prediction. Real-time verification available for operational flare forecasting use is also described. The influence of human forecasters is highlighted, with human-edited forecasts outperforming original model results and forecasting skill decreasing over longer forecast lead times.

  13. Diagnostics of solar flare reconnection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Karlický

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We present new diagnostics of the solar flare reconnection, mainly based on the plasma radio emission. We propose that the high-frequency (600-2000 MHz slowly drifting pulsating structures map the flare magnetic field reconnection. These structures correspond to the radio emission from plasmoids which are formed in the extended current sheet due to tearing and coalescence processes. An increase of the frequency drift of the drifting structures is interpreted as an increase of the reconnection rate. Using this model, time scales of slowly drifting pulsating structure observed during the 12 April 2001 flare by the Trieste radiopolarimeter with high time resolution (1 ms are interpreted as a radio manifestation of electron beams accelerated in the multi-scale reconnection process. For short periods Fourier spectra of the observed structure have a power-law form with power-law indices in the 1.3-1.6 range. For comparison the 2-D MHD numerical modeling of the multi-scale reconnection is made and it is shown that Fourier spectrum of the reconnection dissipation power has also a power-law form, but with power-law index 2. Furthermore, we compute a time evolution of plasma parameters (density, magnetic field etc in the 2-D MHD model of the reconnection. Then assuming a plasma radio emission from locations, where the 'double-resonance' instability generates the upper-hybrid waves due to unstable distribution function of suprathermal electrons, we model radio spectra. Effects of the MHD turbulence are included. The resulting spectra are compared with those observed. It is found, that depending on model parameters the lace bursts and the decimetric spikes can be reproduced. Thus, it is shown that the model can be used for diagnostics of the flare reconnection process. We also point out possible radio signatures of reconnection outflow termination shocks. They are detected as type II-like herringbone structures in the 200-700 MHz frequency range. Finally

  14. Offshore production flares: a PETROBRAS review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagot, Paulo R.; Burmann, Clovis P.; Araujo, Paulo Bento de; Motomura, Tsukasa [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of the present work is to briefly present the offshore flare system technological evolution and the main design criteria for flare and its supporting structure. In order to perform the aimed task, this work was divided into two parts: the first part presents the technological evolution of the offshore production flares and the second one discusses the flare system designing criteria. The evolution of the technology associated to the offshore production flares is organized by the authors just dividing the history in four chronological phases. Each phase is defined by the predominant use of the, by the time, most up-to-date technological alternative and it will be described with the help of sketches, drawings, photographs, data and information about the platforms where such technologies were applied. The second part of the present work discusses the dimensional criteria, interesting aspects and flaws of the offshore flare systems in two different fields, which are: definition of the flare system capacity; and flow and thermal design of the flare system. (author)

  15. Excitation of XUV radiation in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emslie, A. Gordon

    1992-01-01

    The goal of the proposed research was to understand the means by which XUV radiation in solar flares is excited, and to use this radiation as diagnostics of the energy release and transport processes occurring in the flare. Significant progress in both of these areas, as described, was made.

  16. Flare Ribbon Expansion and Energy Release

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ayumi Asai; Takaaki Yokoyama; Masumi Shimojo; Satoshi Masuda; Kazunari Shibata

    2006-06-01

    We report a detailed examination about the relationship between the evolution of the H flare ribbons and the released magnetic energy during the April 10 2001 flare. In the H images, several bright kernels are observed in the flare ribbons. We identified the conjugated footpoints, by analyzing the lightcurves at each H kernels, and showed their connectivities during the flare. Then, based on the magnetic reconnection model, we calculated quantitatively the released energy by using the photospheric magnetic field strengths and separation speeds of the H flare ribbons. Finally, we examined the downward motions which are observed at the H kernels. We found that the stronger the red-asymmetry tends to be associated with the brighter the H kernel.

  17. The local Poisson hypothesis for solar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Wheatland, M S

    2001-01-01

    The question of whether flares occur as a Poisson process has important consequences for flare physics. Recently Lepreti et al. presented evidence for local departure from Poisson statistics in the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) X-ray flare catalog. Here it is argued that this effect arises from a selection effect inherent in the soft X-ray observations; namely that the slow decay of enhanced flux following a large flare makes detection of subsequent flares less likely. It is also shown that the power-law tail of the GOES waiting-time distribution varies with the solar cycle. This counts against any intrinsic significance to the appearance of a power law, or to the value of its index.

  18. SWIFT AND FERMI OBSERVATIONS OF X-RAY FLARES: THE CASE OF LATE INTERNAL SHOCK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troja, E. [Center for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Piro, L. [INAF-IAPS, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Vasileiou, V. [Laboratoire Univers et Particules de Montpellier, Universite Montpellier 2, and CNRS/IN2P3, Montpellier (France); Omodei, N. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Burgess, J. M.; Connaughton, V. [University of Alabama in Huntsville, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Cutini, S. [ASI Science Data Center, via Galileo Galilei, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); McEnery, J. E., E-mail: eleonora.troja@nasa.gov, E-mail: luigi.piro@iaps.inaf.it, E-mail: Vlasios.Vasileiou@lupm.in2p3.fr [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2015-04-10

    Simultaneous Swift and Fermi observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer a unique broadband view of their afterglow emission, spanning more than 10 decades in energy. We present the sample of X-ray flares observed by both Swift and Fermi during the first three years of Fermi operations. While bright in the X-ray band, X-ray flares are often undetected at lower (optical), and higher (MeV to GeV) energies. We show that this disfavors synchrotron self-Compton processes as the origin of the observed X-ray emission. We compare the broadband properties of X-ray flares with the standard late internal shock model, and find that in this scenario, X-ray flares can be produced by a late-time relativistic (Γ > 50) outflow at radii R ∼ 10{sup 13}-10{sup 14} cm. This conclusion holds only if the variability timescale is significantly shorter than the observed flare duration, and implies that X-ray flares can directly probe the activity of the GRB central engine.

  19. Radiative hydrodynamic modelling and observations of the X-class solar flare on 2011 March 9

    CERN Document Server

    Kennedy, Michael B; Allred, Joel C; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Keenan, Francis P

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the response of the solar atmosphere to non-thermal electron beam heating using the radiative transfer and hydrodynamics modelling code RADYN. The temporal evolution of the parameters that describe the non-thermal electron energy distribution were derived from hard X-ray observations of a particular flare, and we compared the modelled and observed parameters. The evolution of the non-thermal electron beam parameters during the X1.5 solar flare on 2011 March 9 were obtained from analysis of RHESSI X-ray spectra. The RADYN flare model was allowed to evolve for 110 seconds, after which the electron beam heating was ended, and was then allowed to continue evolving for a further 300s. The modelled flare parameters were compared to the observed parameters determined from extreme-ultraviolet spectroscopy. The model produced a hotter and denser flare loop than that observed and also cooled more rapidly, suggesting that additional energy input in the decay phase of the flare is required. In the explosi...

  20. Particle propagation, wave growth and energy dissipation in a flaring flux tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, S. M.; Melrose, D. B.; Dulk, G. A.

    1986-01-01

    Wave amplification by downgoing particles in a common flare model is investigated. The flare is assumed to occur at the top of a coronal magnetic flux loop, and results in the heating of plasma in the flaring region. The hot electrons propagate down the legs of the flux tube towards increasing magnetic field. It is simple to demonstrate that the velocity distributions which result in this model are unstable to both beam instabilities and cyclotron maser action. An explanation is presented for the propagation effects on the distribution, and the properties of the resulting amplified waves are explored, concentrating on cyclotron maser action, which has properties (emission in the z mode below the local gyrofrequency) quite different from maser action by other distributions considered in the context of solar flares. The z mode waves will be damped in the coronal plasma surrounding the flaring flux tube and lead to heating there. This process may be important in the overall energy budget of the flare. The downgoing maser is compared with the loss cone maser, which is more likely to produce observable bursts.

  1. Swift and Fermi Observations of X-Ray Flares: The Case of Late Internal Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troja, E.; Piro, L.; Vasileiou, V.; Omodei, N.; Burgess, J. M.; Cutini, S.; Connaughton, V.; McEnery, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous Swift and Fermi observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer a unique broadband view of their afterglow emission, spanning more than 10 decades in energy. We present the sample of X-ray flares observed by both Swift and Fermi during the first three years of Fermi operations. While bright in the X-ray band, X-ray flares are often undetected at lower (optical), and higher (MeV to GeV) energies. We show that this disfavors synchrotron self-Compton processes as the origin of the observed X-ray emission. We compare the broadband properties of X-ray flares with the standard late internal shock model, and find that in this scenario, X-ray flares can be produced by a late-time relativistic (gamma greater than 50) outflow at radii R approximately 10(exp 13) - 10(exp 14) cm. This conclusion holds only if the variability timescale is significantly shorter than the observed flare duration, and implies that X-ray flares can directly probe the activity of the GRB central engine.

  2. Swift and Fermi Observations of X-Ray Flares: The Case of Late Internal Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troja, E.; Piro, L.; Vasileiou, V.; Omodei, N.; Burgess, J. M.; Cutini, S.; Connaughton, V.; McEnery, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous Swift and Fermi observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer a unique broadband view of their afterglow emission, spanning more than 10 decades in energy. We present the sample of X-ray flares observed by both Swift and Fermi during the first three years of Fermi operations. While bright in the X-ray band, X-ray flares are often undetected at lower (optical), and higher (MeV to GeV) energies. We show that this disfavors synchrotron self-Compton processes as the origin of the observed X-ray emission. We compare the broadband properties of X-ray flares with the standard late internal shock model, and find that in this scenario, X-ray flares can be produced by a late-time relativistic (gamma greater than 50) outflow at radii R approximately 10(exp 13) - 10(exp 14) cm. This conclusion holds only if the variability timescale is significantly shorter than the observed flare duration, and implies that X-ray flares can directly probe the activity of the GRB central engine.

  3. Solar X-ray Flare Hazards on the Surface of Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, D S; Smith, David S.; Scalo, John M.

    2006-01-01

    Putative organisms on the Martian surface would be exposed to potentially high doses of ionizing radiation during strong solar X-ray flares. We extrapolate the observed flare frequency-energy release scaling relation to releases much larger than seen so far for the sun, an assumption supported by observations of flares on other solar- and subsolar-mass main sequence stars. We calculate the surficial reprocessed X-ray spectra using a Monte Carlo code we have developed. Biological doses from indirect genome damage are calculated for each parameterized flare spectrum by integration over the X-ray opacity of water. We estimate the mean waiting time for solar flares producing a given biological dose of ionizing radiation on Mars and compare with lethal dose data for a wide range of terrestrial organisms. These timescales range from decades for significant human health risk to 0.5 Myr for D. radiodurans lethality. Such doses require total flare energies of 10^33--10^38 erg, the lower range of which has been observe...

  4. Universal Behavior of X-ray Flares from Black Hole Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, F Y; Yi, S X; Xi, S Q

    2014-01-01

    X-ray flares have been discovered in black hole systems, such as gamma-ray bursts, the tidal disruption event Swift J1644+57, the supermassive black hole Sagittarius A$^*$ at the center of our Galaxy, and some active galactic nuclei. Their occurrences are always companied by relativistic jets. However, it is still unknown whether there is a physical analogy among such X-ray flares produced in black hole systems spanning nine orders of magnitude in mass. Here we report the observed data of X-ray flares, and show that they have three statistical properties similar to solar flares, including power-law distributions of energies, durations, and waiting times, which both can be explained by a fractal-diffusive self-organized criticality model. These statistical similarities, together with the fact that solar flares are triggered by a magnetic reconnection process, suggest that all of the X-ray flares are consistent with magnetic reconnection events, implying that their concomitant relativistic jets may be magnetica...

  5. Why is a flare-rich active region CME-poor?

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Lijuan; Wang, Jingxiu; Shen, Chenglong; Ye, Pinzhong; Liu, Rui; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Quanhao; Wang, S

    2016-01-01

    Solar active regions (ARs) are the major sources of two kinds of the most violent solar eruptions, namely flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The largest AR in the past 24 years, NOAA AR 12192, crossed the visible disk from 2014 October 17 to 30, unusually produced more than one hundred flares, including 32 M-class and 6 X-class ones, but only one small CME. Flares and CMEs are believed to be two phenomena in the same eruptive process. Why is such a flare-rich AR so CME-poor? We compared this AR with other four ARs; two were productive in both and two were inert. The investigation of the photospheric parameters based on the SDO/HMI vector magnetogram reveals that the flare-rich AR 12192, as the other two productive ARs, has larger magnetic flux, current and free magnetic energy than the two inert ARs, but contrast to the two productive ARs, it has no strong, concentrated current helicity along both sides of the flaring neutral line, indicating the absence of a mature magnetic structure consisting of hig...

  6. Flaring Rates and the Evolution of Sunspot Group McIntosh Classifications

    CERN Document Server

    McCloskey, Aoife E; Bloomfield, D Shaun

    2016-01-01

    Sunspot groups are the main source of solar flares, with the energy to power them being supplied by magnetic-field evolution (e.g. flux emergence or twisting/shearing). To date, few studies have investigated the statistical relation between sunspot-group evolution and flaring, with none considering evolution in the McIntosh classification scheme. Here we present a statistical analysis of sunspot groups from Solar Cycle 22, focusing on 24-hour changes in the three McIntosh classification components. Evolution-dependent >C1.0, >M1.0, and >X1.0 flaring rates are calculated, leading to the following results: (i) flaring rates become increasingly higher for greater degrees of upward evolution through the McIntosh classes, with the opposite found for downward evolution; (ii) the highest flaring rates are found for upward evolution from larger, more complex, classes (e.g. Zurich D- and E-classes evolving upward to F-class produce >C1.0 rates of 2.66 +/- 0.28 and 2.31 +/- 0.09 flares per 24 hours, respectively); (iii...

  7. Why is a Flare-rich Active Region CME-poor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lijuan; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Jingxiu; Shen, Chenglong; Ye, Pinzhong; Liu, Rui; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Quanhao; Wang, S.

    2016-08-01

    Solar active regions (ARs) are the major sources of two of the most violent solar eruptions, namely flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The largest AR in the past 24 years, NOAA AR 12192, which crossed the visible disk from 2014 October 17 to 30, unusually produced more than one hundred flares, including 32 M-class and 6 X-class ones, but only one small CME. Flares and CMEs are believed to be two phenomena in the same eruptive process. Why is such a flare-rich AR so CME-poor? We compared this AR with other four ARs; two were productive in both and two were inert. The investigation of the photospheric parameters based on the SDO/HMI vector magnetogram reveals that the flare-rich AR 12192, as with the other two productive ARs, has larger magnetic flux, current, and free magnetic energy than the two inert ARs but, in contrast to the two productive ARs, it has no strong, concentrated current helicity along both sides of the flaring neutral line, indicating the absence of a mature magnetic structure consisting of highly sheared or twisted field lines. Furthermore, the decay index above the AR 12192 is relatively low, showing strong constraint. These results suggest that productive ARs are always large and have enough current and free energy to power flares, but whether or not a flare is accompanied by a CME is seemingly related to (1) the presence of a mature sheared or twisted core field serving as the seed of the CME, or (2) a weak enough constraint of the overlying arcades.

  8. Synchrotron self-Compton flaring of TeV blazars. I. Linear electron cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlickeiser, R.; Röken, C.

    2008-01-01

    The vast improvement of the sensitivity of modern ground-based air Cherenkov telescopes, together with the sensitive flux measurements at lower frequencies, requires accurate elaborations of the theoretical radiation models for flaring blazars. Here the flaring of TeV blazars due to the synchrotron-self Compton (SSC) process is considered. We assume that, at the moment t=t_0, a flare in the emission knot occurs due to the instantaneous injection of monoenergetic (E_0) ultrarelativistic electrons. The ultrarelativistic electrons are injected uniformly over the knot volume and at later times are subject to linear synchrotron radiation cooling in a magnetic field whose strength remains constant during the time evolution of the relativistic electrons. The generated synchrotron photons are subject to multiple Thomson-scattering off the cold electrons in the source giving rise to spatial photon diffusion. Optically thick and thin synchrotron radiation intensities and photon density distributions in the emission knot as functions of frequency and time are analytically determined. The synchrotron photons serve as target photons for the SSC process, which is calculated in the optically thin frequency range using the Thomson approximation of the inverse Compton cross section. It is shown that the optically thick part of the synchrotron radiation process provides a negligible contribution to the resulting SSC intensity at all frequencies and times. Because the high-energy TeV photons undergo no elastic multiple Compton scatterings, we neglect the influence of photon diffusion in the calculation of the SSC intensity and fluence distribution with energy. The SSC fluence exhibits a break at E_f=15.8b-1/3 GeV from a ∝ E_s-1/4-power law spectrum at lower photon energies E_t≤ E_s≤ Ef to a ∝ E_s-2[1-(E_s/E_0)7/3]-distribution at high energies E_f≤ E_s≤ E_0. The application to the observed TeV fluence spectrum of the flare of PKS 2155-304 on July 28, 2006 yields δ b-1

  9. Generation of quasi-monoenergetic protons from a double-species target driven by the radiation pressure of an ultraintense laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pae, Ki Hong; Kim, Chul Min; Nam, Chang Hee

    2016-03-01

    In laser-driven proton acceleration, generation of quasi-monoenergetic proton beams has been considered a crucial feature of the radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) scheme, but the required difficult physical conditions have hampered its experimental realization. As a method to generate quasi-monoenergetic protons under experimentally viable conditions, we investigated using double-species targets of controlled composition ratio in order to make protons bunched in the phase space in the RPA scheme. From a modified optimum condition and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we showed by varying the ion composition ratio of proton and carbon that quasi-monoenergetic protons could be generated from ultrathin plane targets irradiated with a circularly polarized Gaussian laser pulse. The proposed scheme should facilitate the experimental realization of ultrashort quasi-monoenergetic proton beams for unique applications in high field science.

  10. Solar Flare X-ray Source Motion as a Response to Electron Spectral Hardening

    CERN Document Server

    O'Flannagain, A; Brown, J; Milligan, R; Holman, G

    2013-01-01

    Context: Solar flare hard X-rays (HXRs) are thought to be produced by nonthermal coronal electrons stopping in the chromosphere, or remaining trapped in the corona. The collisional thick target model (CTTM) predicts that sources produced by harder power-law injection spectra should appear further down the legs or footpoints of a flare loop. Therefore, hardening of the injected power-law electron spectrum during flare onset should be concurrent with a descending hard X-ray source. Aims: To test this implication of the CTTM by comparing its predicted HXR source locations with those derived from observations of a solar flare which exhibits a nonthermally-dominated spectrum before the peak in HXRs, known as an early impulsive event. Methods: HXR images and spectra of an early impulsive C-class flare were obtained using the Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). Images were reconstructed to produce HXR source height evolutions for three energy bands. Spatially-integrated spectral analysis was perf...

  11. Identifying core domains to assess flare in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartlett, Susan J; Hewlett, Sarah; Bingham, Clifton O

    2012-01-01

    For rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there is no consensus on how to define and assess flare. Variability in flare definitions impairs understanding of findings across studies and limits ability to pool results. The OMERACT RA Flare Group sought to identify domains to define RA flares from patient...

  12. Self-Injection and Acceleration of Monoenergetic Electron Beams from Laser Wakefield Accelerators in a Highly Relativistic Regime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. Yoshitama; WEN Xian-Lun; WEN Tian-Shu; WU Yu-Chi; ZHANG Bao-San; ZHU Qi-Hua; HUANG Xiao-Jun; AN Wei-Min; HUNG Wen-Hui; TANG Chuan-Xiang; LIN Yu-Zheng; T. Kameshima; WANG Xiao-Dong; CHEN Li-Ming; H. Kotaki; M. Kando; K. Nakajima; GU Yu-Qiu; GUO Yi; JIAO Chun-Ye; LIU Hong-Jie; PENG Han-Sheng; TANG Chuan-Ming; WANG Xiao-Dong

    2008-01-01

    @@ Self-injection and acceleration of monoenergetic electron beams from laser wakefield accelerators are first in-vestigated in the highly relativistic regime, using 100 TW class, 27 fs laser pulses. Quasi-monoenergetic multi-bunched beams with energies as high as multi-hundredMeV are observed with simultaneous measurements of side-scattering emissions that indicate the formation of self-channelling and self-injection of electrons into a plasma wake, referred to as a 'bubble'. The three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations confirmed multiple self-injection of electron bunches into the bubble and their beam acceleration with gradient of 1.5 GeV/cm.

  13. Pion-decay radiation and two-phase acceleration in the June 3, 1982 solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaty, R.; Dermer, C. D.; Murphy, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    The June 3, 1982 flare is unique in the wealth of observed neutron, gamma-ray and energetic-particle emission that it produced. Using calculations of high-energy emissions to fit the various time-dependent gamma-ray fluxes, a self-consistent interaction model for the June 3 flare is constructed in which the observed fluxes are produced by two distinct particle populations with different acceleration and interaction time histories as well as different but time-independent energy spectra. The two populations are associated with first- and second-phase particle acceleration, respectively.

  14. Diurnal Variation of Anterior Chamber Flare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Adam

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate the ideal time and reproducibility of anterior chamber flare measurements. Materials and Methods: Anterior chamber flare measurements were performed with laser flaremetre device at 8 am to 45 volunteers and these measurements were repeated on the same day at 12 pm and 4 pm. Results: Twenty-five (55.5% of the volunteers were women and 20 (44.5% were men; mean age was 28.67±7.40 (18-49 years. The mean anterior chamber flare measurements taken following the ophthalmologic examination were 5.94±1.41 foton/msn at 8 am, 5.65±1.45 foton/msn at 12 pm, and 5.79±1.20 foton/msn at 4 pm. No statistical difference was found between the measurements (p=0.08. Subgroup analysis according to eye color, revealed no significant difference between flare measurements in brown, hazel, and green eyes (p=0.21. Correlation analysis demonstrated association between age and all flare measurements within the day (r=0.24, p=0.03; r=0.41, p=0.01, r=0.27, p=0.01. Conclusion: No significant diurnal change was detected in the flare measurements of our study subjects but positive correlation with age was observed. Hence, all flare measurements within a day are reliable and have high repeatability in healthy subjects. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2015; 45: 52-5

  15. Particle Acceleration in Solar Flares and Associated CME Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Petrosian, Vahe'

    2016-01-01

    Observations relating the characteristics of electrons seen near Earth (SEPs) and those producing flare radiation show that in certain (prompt) events the origin of both population appears to be the flare site, which show strong correlation between the number and spectral index of SEP and hard X-ray radiating electrons, but in others(delayed), which are associated with fast CMEs, this relation is complex and SEPs tend to be harder. Prompt event spectral relation disagrees with that expected in thick or thin target models. We show that using a a more accurate treatment of the transport of the accelerated electrons to the footpoints and to the Earth can account for this discrepancy. Our results are consistent with those found by Chen and Petrosian (2013) for two flares using non-parametric inversion methods, according to which we have weak diffusion conditions, and trapping mediated by magnetic field convergence. The weaker correlations and harder spectra of delayed events can come about by re-acceleration of e...

  16. ENERGY PARTITIONS AND EVOLUTION IN A PURELY THERMAL SOLAR FLARE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Nita, Gelu M.; Gary, Dale E. [Center For Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a solely thermal flare, which we detected in the microwave range from the thermal gyro- and free–free emission it produced. An advantage of analyzing thermal gyro emission is its unique ability to precisely yield the magnetic field in the radiating volume. When combined with observationally deduced plasma density and temperature, these magnetic field measurements offer a straightforward way of tracking evolution of the magnetic and thermal energies in the flare. For the event described here, the magnetic energy density in the radio-emitting volume declines over the flare rise phase, then stays roughly constant during the extended peak phase, but recovers to the original level over the decay phase. At the stage where the magnetic energy density decreases, the thermal energy density increases; however, this increase is insufficient, by roughly an order of magnitude, to compensate for the magnetic energy decrease. When the magnetic energy release is over, the source parameters come back to nearly their original values. We discuss possible scenarios to explain this behavior.

  17. The Atmospheric Response to High Nonthermal Electron Beam Fluxes in Solar Flares I: Modeling the Brightest NUV Footpoints in the X1 Solar Flare of 2014 March 29

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalski, Adam F; Daw, Adrian N; Cauzzi, Gianna; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-01-01

    The 2014 March 29 X1 solar flare (SOL20140329T17:48) produced bright continuum emission in the far- and near-ultraviolet (NUV) and highly asymmetric chromospheric emission lines, providing long-sought constraints on the heating mechanisms of the lower atmosphere in solar flares. We analyze the continuum and emission line data from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of the brightest flaring magnetic footpoints in this flare. We compare the NUV spectra of the brightest pixels to new radiative-hydrodynamic predictions calculated with the RADYN code using constraints on a nonthermal electron beam inferred from the collisional thick-target modeling of hard X-ray data from RHESSI. We show that the atmospheric response to a high beam flux density satisfactorily achieves the observed continuum brightness in the NUV. The NUV continuum emission in this flare is consistent with hydrogen (Balmer) recombination radiation that originates from low optical depth in a dense chromospheric condensation and from th...

  18. Beta-Decay Study of ^{150}Er, ^{152}Yb, and ^{156}Yb: Candidates for a Monoenergetic Neutrino Beam Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estevez Aguado, M. E. [CSIC-Universidad de Valencia; Algora, A. [CSIC-Universidad de Valencia; Rubio, B. [CSIC-Universidad de Valencia; Bernabeu, J. [CSIC-Universidad de Valencia; Nacher, E. [CSIC-Universidad de Valencia; Tain, J. L. [CSIC-Universidad de Valencia; Gadea, A. [CSIC-Universidad de Valencia; Agramunt, J. [CSIC-Universidad de Valencia; Burkard, K. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Hueller, W. [GSI-Hemholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany; Doring, J. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Kirchner, R. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Mukha, I. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Plettner, C. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Roeckl, E. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Grawe, H. [GSI-Hemholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany; Collatz, R. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Hellstrom, M. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Cano-Ott, D. [CIEMAT, Madrid; Karny, M. [University of Warsaw; Janas, Z. [University of Warsaw; Gierlik, M. [University of Warsaw; Plochocki, A. [University of Warsaw; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr [ORNL; Batist, L. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, Russia; Moroz, F. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, Russia; Wittman, V. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, Russia; Blazhev, A. [University of Cologne; Valiente, J. J. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Italy; Espinoza, C. [CFPT-IST, Lisbon

    2011-01-01

    The beta decays of ^{150}Er, ^{152}Yb, and ^{156}Yb nuclei are investigated using the total absorption spectroscopy technique. These nuclei can be considered possible candidates for forming the beam of a monoenergetic neutrino beam facility based on the electron capture (EC) decay of radioactive nuclei. Our measurements confirm that for the cases studied, the EC decay proceeds mainly to a single state in the daughter nucleus.

  19. Neutrons production during the interaction of monoenergetic electrons with a thin tungsten target; Produccion de neutrones durante la interaccion de electrones monoenergeticos con un blanco delgado de tungsteno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto B, T. G.; Medina C, D. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Programa de Doctorado en Ciencias Basicas, 98068 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico); Baltazar R, A. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Ingenieria Electrica, Programa de Doctorado en Ingenieria y Tecnologia Aplicada, 98068 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico); Vega C, H. R., E-mail: tzinnia.soto@gmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

    2016-10-15

    When a linear accelerator for radiotherapy operates with acceleration voltages higher than 8 MV, neutrons are produced, as secondary radiation which deposits an undesirable and undesirable dose in the patient. Depending on the type of tumor, its location in the body and the characteristics of the patient, the cancer treatment with a Linac is performed with photon or electron beams, which produce neutrons through reactions (γ, n) and (e, e n) respectively. Because the effective section for the neutrons production by reactions (γ, n) is approximately two orders of magnitude larger than the effective section of the reactions (e, e n), studies on the effects of this secondary radiation have focused on photo neutrons. en a Linac operates with electron beams, the beam coming out of the magnetic deflector is impinged on the dispersion lamella in order to cause quasi-elastic interactions and to expand the spatial distribution of the electrons; the objective of this work is to determine the characteristics of the photons and neutrons that occur when a mono-energetic electron beam of 2 mm in diameter (pencil beam) is made to impinge on a tungsten lamella of 1 cm in diameter and 0.5 mm of thickness. The study was done using Monte Carlo methods with code MCNP6 for electron beams of 8, 10, 12, 15 and 18 MeV. The spectra of photons and neutrons were estimated in 4 point detectors placed at different equidistant points from the center of the lamella. (Author)

  20. Modeling Gamma-Ray Burst X-Ray Flares Within the Internal Shock Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxham, Amanda; Zhang, Bing

    2009-12-01

    X-ray afterglow light curves have been collected for over 400 Swift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with nearly half of them having X-ray flares superimposed on the regular afterglow decay. Evidence suggests that gamma-ray prompt emission and X-ray flares share a common origin and that at least some flares can only be explained by long-lasting central engine activity. We have developed a shell model code to address the question of how X-ray flares are produced within the framework of the internal shock model. The shell model creates randomized GRB explosions from a central engine with multiple shells and follows those shells as they collide, merge, and spread, producing prompt emission and X-ray flares. We pay special attention to the time history of central engine activity, internal shocks, and observed flares, but do not calculate the shock dynamics and radiation processes in detail. Using the empirical Ep -E iso (Amati) relation with an assumed Band function spectrum for each collision and an empirical flare temporal profile, we calculate the gamma-ray (Swift/BAT band) and X-ray (Swift/XRT band) lightcurves for arbitrary central engine activity and compare the model results with the observational data. We show that the observed X-ray flare phenomenology can be explained within the internal shock model. The number, width, and occurring time of flares are then used to diagnose the central engine activity, putting constraints on the energy, ejection time, width, and number of ejected shells. We find that the observed X-ray flare time history generally reflects the time history of the central engine, which reactivates multiple times after the prompt emission phase with progressively reduced energy. The same shell model predicts an external shock X-ray afterglow component, which has a shallow decay phase due to the initial pile-up of shells onto the blast wave. However, the predicted X-ray afterglow is too bright as compared with the observed flux level, unless epsilon e is

  1. Arcade Implosion Caused by a Filament Eruption in a Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juntao; Simões, P. J. A.; Fletcher, L.; Thalmann, J. K.; Hudson, H. S.; Hannah, I. G.

    2016-12-01

    Coronal implosions—the convergence motion of plasmas and entrained magnetic field in the corona due to a reduction in magnetic pressure—can help to locate and track sites of magnetic energy release or redistribution during solar flares and eruptions. We report here on the analysis of a well-observed implosion in the form of an arcade contraction associated with a filament eruption, during the C3.5 flare SOL2013-06-19T07:29. A sequence of events including the magnetic flux-rope instability and distortion, followed by a filament eruption and arcade implosion, lead us to conclude that the implosion arises from the transfer of magnetic energy from beneath the arcade as part of the global magnetic instability, rather than due to local magnetic energy dissipation in the flare. The observed net contraction of the imploding loops, which is found also in nonlinear force-free field extrapolations, reflects a permanent reduction of magnetic energy underneath the arcade. This event shows that, in addition to resulting in the expansion or eruption of an overlying field, flux-rope instability can also simultaneously implode an unopened field due to magnetic energy transfer. It demonstrates the “partial opening of the field” scenario, which is one of the ways in 3D to produce a magnetic eruption without violating the Aly-Sturrock hypothesis. In the framework of this observation, we also propose a unification of three main concepts for active region magnetic evolution, namely the metastable eruption model, the implosion conjecture, and the standard “CSHKP” flare model.

  2. Neutron-decay Protons from Solar Flares as Seed Particles for CME-shock Acceleration in the Inner Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Ronald J.; Ko, Yuan-Kuen

    2017-09-01

    The protons in large solar energetic particle events are accelerated in the inner heliosphere by fast shocks produced by coronal mass ejections. Unless there are other sources, the protons these shocks act upon would be those of the solar wind (SW). The efficiency of the acceleration depends on the kinetic energy of the protons. For a 2000 km s‑1 shock, the most effective proton energies would be 30–100 keV; i.e., within the suprathermal tail component of the SW. We investigate one possible additional source of such protons: those resulting from the decay of solar-flare-produced neutrons that escape from the Sun into the low corona. The neutrons are produced by interactions of flare-accelerated ions with the solar atmosphere. We discuss the production of low-energy neutrons in flares and their decay on a interplanetary magnetic field line near the Sun. We find that even when the flaring conditions are optimal, the 30–100 keV neutron-decay proton density produced by even a very large solar flare would be only about 10% of that of the 30–100 keV SW suprathermal tail. We discuss the implication of a seed-particle source of more frequent, small flares.

  3. Flaring down project for Algeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bienek, S. [Joh. Heinr. Bornemann GmbH, Obernkirchen (Germany)

    2008-06-15

    Multiphase boosting as a production scenario for lowering wellhead backpressure, avoiding field separation stations, and achieving longer flow distances is widely accepted by major oil companies. Flaring down of gas is no longer necessary and therefore the use of multiphase pumps has a positive impact on a healthy environment. The twin-screw pump plays a major role when selecting the equipment. Due to its volumetric character heavy slugging, varying water content and other typical multiphase operating challenges, this pump type is well suited for this purpose. With its low speed the fluid is treated very sensitively, so as to widely avoid emulsifying oil and water - a definite advantage for the later separation of the phases. (orig.)

  4. Solar flare count periodicities in different X-ray flare classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peng-Xin; Xu, Jing-Chen

    2016-04-01

    Using the Morlet wavelet transform and the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), we investigate the periodic behaviours of C, M and X-class flare counts, respectively, recorded by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) from 1983 May to 2014 December, which cover the two complete solar cycles (SCs) 22 and 23 as well as the part of declining phase of SC 21 and rise and maximum phases of SC 24. Analyses show that the periodic behaviours of various class flare counts are different. (1) Not all periods of various class flare counts appear dominant during the cycle maxima. For C-class flares, during SC 23, periods appear dominant during the maximum phase, however, compared to those during SC 23, there are more periods during the declining phase of SC 22; for M-class flares, during SCs 22 and 23, periods appear dominant during the cycle maxima; for X-class flares, during SC 22, almost all periods appear during the maximum phase; however, during SC 23, there are more periods during the declining phase compared to those during SC 22. (2) For C-class flares, the appearance of periods do not follow the amplitude of C-class flare cycles; while, for M and X-class flares, the appearance of periods follows the amplitude of the investigated corresponding class flare cycles. (3) From the overall trends, the 10 yr and longer time-scale trends of the monthly numbers of M and X-class flares, we can infer that the maximum values of the monthly M and X-class flare numbers would increase during SC 25.

  5. Exploring new features of neutrino oscillations with very low energy monoenergetic neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vergados, J.D., E-mail: Vergados@cc.uoi.g [University of Ioannina, Ioannina, GR 45110 (Greece); Novikov, Yu.N. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, 188300, Gatchina (Russian Federation)

    2010-11-01

    In the present work we propose to study neutrino oscillations employing sources of monoenergetic neutrinos following electron capture by the nucleus. Since the neutrino energy is very low the smaller of the two oscillation lengths, L{sub 23}, appearing in this electronic neutrino disappearance experiment can be so small that the full oscillation can take place inside the detector and one may determine very accurately the neutrino oscillation parameters. Since in this case the oscillation probability is proportional to sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 13}, one can measure or set a better limit on the unknown parameter {theta}{sub 13}. This is quite important, since, if this mixing angle vanishes, there is not going to be CP violation in the leptonic sector. The best way to detect it is by measuring electron recoils in neutrino-electron scattering. One, however, has to pay the price that the expected counting rates are very small. Thus one needs a very intensive neutrino source and a large detector with as low as possible energy threshold and high energy and position resolution. Both spherical gaseous and cylindrical liquid detectors are studied. Different source candidates are considered.

  6. Vacancy-type defects induced by grinding of Si wafers studied by monoenergetic positron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uedono, Akira; Yoshihara, Nakaaki [Division of Applied Physics, Faculty of Pure and Applied Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Mizushima, Yoriko [Devices and Materials Labs Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd., Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0197 (Japan); ICE Cube Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Kim, Youngsuk [ICE Cube Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Disco Corporation, Ota, Tokyo 143-8580 (Japan); Nakamura, Tomoji [Devices and Materials Labs Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd., Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0197 (Japan); Ohba, Takayuki [ICE Cube Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Oshima, Nagayasu; Suzuki, Ryoichi [Research Institute of Instrumentation Frontier, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2014-10-07

    Vacancy-type defects introduced by the grinding of Czochralski-grown Si wafers were studied using monoenergetic positron beams. Measurements of Doppler broadening spectra of the annihilation radiation and the lifetime spectra of positrons showed that vacancy-type defects were introduced in the surface region (<98 nm), and the major defect species were identified as (i) relatively small vacancies incorporated in dislocations and (ii) large vacancy clusters. Annealing experiments showed that the defect concentration decreased with increasing annealing temperature in the range between 100 and 500°C. After 600–700°C annealing, the defect-rich region expanded up to about 170 nm, which was attributed to rearrangements of dislocation networks, and a resultant emission of point defects toward the inside of the sample. Above 800°C, the stability limit of those vacancies was reached and they started to disappear. After the vacancies were annealed out (900°C), oxygen-related defects were the major point defects and they were located at <25 nm.

  7. SEE Measurements and Simulations Using Mono-Energetic GeV-Energy Hadron Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Alia, Ruben Garcia; Brugger, Markus; Roed, Ketil; Uznanski, Slawosz; Wrobel, Frederic; Ferlet-Cavrois, Veronique; Danzeca, Salvatore; Saigne, Frederic; Spiezia, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Single Event Upset (SEU) measurements were performed on the ESA SEU Monitor using mono-energetic GeV-energy hadron beams available in the North Experimental Area at CERN. A 400 GeV proton beam in the H4IRRAD test area and a 120 GeV mixed pion and proton beam at the CERN-EU high Energy Reference Field facility (CERF) were used for this purpose. The resulting cross section values are presented and discussed as well as compared to the several hundred MeV case (typical for standard test facilities) from a physical interaction perspective with the intention of providing a more general understanding of the behavior. Moreover, the implications of the cross section dependence with energy above the several hundred MeV range are analyzed for different environments. In addition, analogous measurements are proposed for Single Event Latchup (SEL), motivated by discussed simulation results. Finally, a brief introduction of the future CHARM (CERN High-energy AcceleratoR Mixed facility) test installation is included.

  8. High-energy quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields: existing facilities and future needs

    CERN Document Server

    Pomp, S; Mayer, S; Reitz, G; Rottger, S; Silari, M; Smit, F D; Vincke, H; Yasuda, H

    2014-01-01

    The argument that well-characterised quasi-monoenergetic neutron (QMN) sources reaching into the energy domain >20 MeV are needed is presented. A brief overview of the existing facilities is given, and a list of key factors that an ideal QMN source for dosimetry and spectrometry should offer is presented. The authors conclude that all of the six QMN facilities currently in existence worldwide operate in sub-optimal conditions for dosimetry. The only currently available QMN facility in Europe capable of operating at energies >40 MeV, TSL in Uppsala, Sweden, is threatened with shutdown in the immediate future. One facility, NFS at GANIL, France, is currently under construction. NFS could deliver QMN beams up to about 30 MeV. It is, however, so far not clear if and when NFS will be able to offer QMN beams or operate with only so-called white neutron beams. It is likely that by 2016, QMN beams with energies >40 MeV will be available only in South Africa and Japan, with none in Europe.

  9. An angular multigrid method for computing mono-energetic particle beams in Flatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börgers, Christoph; MacLachlan, Scott

    2010-04-01

    Beams of microscopic particles penetrating scattering background matter play an important role in several applications. The parameter choices made here are motivated by the problem of electron-beam cancer therapy planning. Mathematically, a steady particle beam penetrating matter, or a configuration of several such beams, is modeled by a boundary value problem for a Boltzmann equation. Grid-based discretization of such a problem leads to a system of algebraic equations. This system is typically very large because of the large number of independent variables in the Boltzmann equation—six if no dimension-reducing assumptions other than time independence are made. If grid-based methods are to be practical for these problems, it is therefore necessary to develop very fast solvers for the discretized problems. For beams of mono-energetic particles interacting with a passive background, but not with each other, in two space dimensions, the first author proposed such a solver, based on angular domain decomposition, some time ago. Here, we propose and test an angular multigrid algorithm for the same model problem. Our numerical experiments show rapid, grid-independent convergence. For high-resolution calculations, our method is substantially more efficient than the angular domain decomposition method. In addition, unlike angular domain decomposition, the angular multigrid method works well even when the angular diffusion coefficient is fairly large.

  10. N-V-related fluorescence of the monoenergetic high-energy electron-irradiated diamond nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remes, Z. [Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Czech Technical University, Kladno (Czech Republic); Czech Academy of Sciences, Praha (Czech Republic). Institute of Physics; Micova, J. [Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Czech Technical University, Kladno (Czech Republic); Czech Academy of Sciences, Praha (Czech Republic). Institute of Physics; Institute of Chemistry, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava (Slovakia); Krist, P.; Chvatil, D. [Czech Academy of Sciences, Rez (Czech Republic). Department of Accelerators; Effenberg, R. [University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague (Czech Republic); Nesladek, M. [Hasselt University, Institute for Materials Research, Diepenbeek (Belgium); IMOMEC, IMEC, Diepenbeek (Belgium)

    2015-11-15

    Fluorescent diamond nanoparticles (FND) have recently been introduced as promising luminescent probes for bioimaging to compete with more commonly used fluorophores and quantum dots. In this work, we investigate the formation of NV color centers in diamond nanocrystallites using monoenergetic electrons. A large quantity (1.4 g) of FNDs has been irradiated in the cyclic relativistic electron accelerator (Microtron) with the surface charge up to 3C/cm{sup 2} using collimated accelerated electrons extracted with monochromatic energies 6-25 MeV. The nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers have been activated by the high temperature vacuum annealing followed by the oxidation and sonification to remove sp2 carbon from the surface and to form stable colloid solutions with the concentration 1 mg/ml and the electro-kinetic (zeta) potential about -35 mV. The steady state fluorescence spectra show that the fluorescence yield increases linearly with the surface charge irradiation. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Decisive disappearance search at high Δ m2 with monoenergetic muon neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axani, S.; Collin, G.; Conrad, J. M.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Spitz, J.; Wongjirad, T.

    2015-11-01

    "KPipe" is a proposed experiment which will study muon neutrino disappearance for a sensitive test of the Δ m2˜1 eV2 anomalies, possibly indicative of one or more sterile neutrinos. The experiment is to be located at the J-PARC Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility's spallation neutron source, which represents the world's most intense source of charged kaon decay-at-rest monoenergetic (236 MeV) muon neutrinos. The detector vessel, designed to measure the charged-current interactions of these neutrinos, will be 3 m in diameter and 120 m long, extending radially at a distance of 32 to 152 m from the source. This design allows a sensitive search for νμ disappearance associated with currently favored light sterile neutrino models and features the ability to reconstruct the neutrino oscillation wave within a single, extended detector. The required detector design, technology, and costs are modest. The KPipe measurements will be robust since they depend on a known energy neutrino source with low expected backgrounds. Further, since the measurements rely only on the measured rate of detected events as a function of distance, with no required knowledge of the initial flux and neutrino interaction cross section, the results will be largely free of systematic errors. The experimental sensitivity to oscillations, based on a shape-only analysis of the L /E distribution, will extend an order of magnitude beyond present experimental limits in the relevant high-Δ m2 parameter space.

  12. Experimental determination of the response functions of a Bonner sphere spectrometer to monoenergetic neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Z.; Chen, Z.; Peng, X.; Du, T.; Cui, Z.; Ge, L.; Zhu, W.; Wang, Z.; Zhu, X.; Chen, J.; Zhang, G.; Li, X.; Chen, J.; Zhang, H.; Zhong, G.; Hu, L.; Wan, B.; Gorini, G.; Fan, T.

    2017-06-01

    A Bonner sphere spectrometer (BSS) plays an important role in characterizing neutron spectra and determining their neutron dose in a neutron-gamma mixed field. A BSS consisting of a set of nine polyethylene spheres with a 3He proportional counter was developed at Peking University to perform neutron spectrum and dosimetry measurements. Response functions (RFs) of the BSS were calculated with the general Monte Carlo code MCNP5 for the neutron energy range from thermal up to 20 MeV, and were experimentally calibrated with monoenergetic neutron beams from 144 keV to 14 MeV on a 4.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator. The calculated RFs were corrected with the experimental values, and the whole response matrix was completely established. The spectrum of a 241Am-Be source was obtained after unfolding the measurement data of the BSS to the source and in fair agreement with the expected one. The integral ambient dose equivalent corresponding to the spectrum was 0.95 of the expected value. Results of the unfolded spectrum and the integral dose equivalent measured by the BSS verified that the RFs of the BSS were well established.

  13. Initiation Processes for the 2013 May 13 X1.7 Limb Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jinhua; Wang, Ya; Zhou, Tuanhui; Ji, Haisheng

    2017-01-01

    For the X1.7 class flare on 2013 May 13 (SOL2013-05-13T01:53), its initiation process was well observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory and the Extreme UltraViolet Imager (EUVI) on board STEREO-B. The initiation process incorporates the following phenomena: an X-ray precursor that started ∼9 minutes before flare onset, two hot magnetic loops (as seen with AIA hot channels) forming a sigmoidal core magnetic structure (as seen with the EUVI), a rapidly formed magnetic flux rope (MFR) that expands outward, and a flare loop that contracts inward. The two hot magnetic loops were activated after the occurrence of the X-ray precursor. After activation, magnetic reconnection occurred between the two hot magnetic loops (inside the sigmoid structure), which produced the expanding MFR and the contracting flare loop (CFL). The MFR and CFL can only be seen with AIA hot and cool channels, respectively. For this flare, the real initiation time can be regarded as being from the starting time of the precursor, and its impulsive phase started when the MFR began its fast expansion. In addition, the CFL and the growing postflare magnetic loops are different loop systems, and the CFL was the product of magnetic reconnection between sheared magnetic fields that also produced the MFR.

  14. Observation and Interpretation of Energetic Neutral Hydrogen Atoms from the December 5, 2006 Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghouty, A. F.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Leske, R. A.; Shih, A. Y.; Stone, E. C.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. C.; Labrador, A. W.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss observations of energetic neutral hydrogen atoms (ENAs) from a solar flare/coronal mass ejection event reported by Mewaldt et al. (2009). The observations were made during the 5 December 2006 X9 solar flare, located at E79, by the Low Energy Telescopes (LETs) on STEREO A and B. Prior to the arrival of the main solar energetic particle (SEP) event at Earth, both LETs observed a sudden burst of 1.6 to 15 MeV particles arriving from the Sun. The derived solar emission profile, arrival directions, and energy spectrum all show that the atoms produced by either flare or shock-accelerated protons. RHESSI measurements of the 2.2-MeV gamma-ray line provide an estimate of the number of interacting flare-accelerated protons in this event, which leads to an improved estimate of ENA production by flare-accelerated protons. CME-driven shock acceleration is also considered. Taking into account ENA losses, we conclude that the observed ENAs must have been produced in the high corona at heliocentric distances .2 solar radii.

  15. Energetic Electrons in Solar Flares - As Viewed in X-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2004-01-01

    Hard X-ray observations provide the most direct diagnostic we have of the suprathermal electrons and the hottest thermal plasma present in solar flares. The Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) is obtaining the most comprehensive observations of individual solar flares ever available in hard X-rays. For the first time, high-resolution spectra are available for a large number of flares that accurately display the spectral shape and its evolution and, in many cases, allow us to identify the transition from the bremsstrahlung X-rays produced by suprathermal electrons to the bremsstrahlung at lower energies emitted by thermal plasma. Also, for the first time, images can be produced in arbitrary energy bands above 3 keV, and spectra of distinct imaged components can be obtained. I will review what we have learned from RHESSI observations about flare suprathermal electron distributions and their evolution Next, I will present computations of the energy deposited by these suprathermal electrons in individual flares and compare this with the energy contained in the hot thermal plasma. I will point out unsolved problems in deducing both suprathermal electron distributions and the energy content of the thermal plasma, and discuss possible solutions. Finally, I will present evidence that electron acceleration is associated with magnetic reconnection in the corona.

  16. New solar flare evidence may solve mystery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    An international group of scientists led by the Mullard Space Science Laboratory (MSSL), University College London, has discovered important new evidence that points to the cataclysmic events that trigger a solar flare and the mechanisms that drive its subsequent evolution.

  17. Active Longitude and Solar Flare Occurrences

    CERN Document Server

    Gyenge, N; Baranyi, T

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to specify the spatio-temporal characteristics of flare activity observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) satellites in connection with the behaviour of the longitudinal domain of enhanced sunspot activity known as active longitude (AL). By using our method developed for this purpose, we identified the AL in every Carrington Rotation provided by the Debrecen Photoheliographic Data (DPD). The spatial probability of flare occurrence has been estimated depending on the longitudinal distance from AL in the northern and southern hemispheres separately. We have found that more than the 60\\% of the RHESSI and GOES flares is located within $\\pm 36^{\\circ}$ from the active longitude. Hence, the most flare-productive active regions tend to be located in or close to the active longitudinal belt. This observed feature may allow predicting the geo-effective position of the domain of enhanced fla...

  18. Solar Flare Magnetic Fields and Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, George

    2012-01-01

    This volume is devoted to the dynamics and diagnostics of solar magnetic fields and plasmas in the Sun’s atmosphere. Five broad areas of current research in Solar Physics are presented: (1) New techniques for incorporating radiation transfer effects into three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic models of the solar interior and atmosphere, (2) The connection between observed radiation processes occurring during flares and the underlying flare energy release and transport mechanisms, (3) The global balance of forces and momenta that occur during flares, (4) The data-analysis and theoretical tools needed to understand and assimilate vector magnetogram observations and (5) Connecting flare and CME phenomena to the topological properties of the magnetic field in the Solar Atmosphere. The role of the Sun’s magnetic field is a major emphasis of this book, which was inspired by a workshop honoring Richard C. (Dick) Canfield.  Dick has been making profound contributions to these areas of research over a long and pro...

  19. A UNIFIED MODEL FOR SOLAR FLARES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChenPengfei; FangCheng; DingMingde; TangYuhua

    1999-01-01

    We performed 2.5 - dimensional numerical simulation for two cases, one with the the reconnection point at a high altitude, the other with the reconnection point at a low altitude, in the high-altitude case, the bright loop appears to rise for a long time, with its two footpoints separating and the field lines below the bright loop shrinking,which are all typical features of two - ribbon flares. In the low- altitude case, the bright loops cease rising only a short time after the impulsive phase of the reconnection and then become rather stable, which shows a large similarity to the compact flares. The results imply that the two types of solar flares, i. e., the two - ribbon flares and the compact ones, might be unified into the same magnetic reconnection model, where the height of the reconnection point leads to the bifurcation.

  20. X-ray Emission from Solar Flares

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajmal Jain; Malini Aggarwal; Raghunandan Sharma

    2008-03-01

    Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS), the first space-borne solar astronomy experiment of India was designed to improve our current understanding of X-ray emission from the Sun in general and solar flares in particular. SOXS mission is composed of two solid state detectors, viz., Si and CZT semiconductors capable of observing the full disk Sun in X-ray energy range of 4–56 keV. The X-ray spectra of solar flares obtained by the Si detector in the 4–25 keV range show evidence of Fe and Fe/Ni line emission and multi-thermal plasma. The evolution of the break energy point that separates the thermal and non-thermal processes reveals increase with increasing flare plasma temperature. Small scale flare activities observed by both the detectors are found to be suitable to heat the active region corona; however their location appears to be in the transition region.

  1. Magnetic Fields in Limb Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozitsky, V. G.; Lozitska, N. I.; Botygina, O. A.

    2013-02-01

    Two limb solar flares, of 14 July 2005 and 19 July 2012, of importance X1.2 and M7.7, are analyzed at present work. Magnetic field strength in named flares are investigated by Stokes I±V profiles of Hα and D3 HeI lines. There are direct evidences to the magnetic field inhomogeneity in flares, in particular, non-paralelism of bisectors in I+V and I-V profiles. In some flare places, the local maximums of bisectors splitting were found in both lines. If these bisector splittings are interpreted as Zeeman effect manifestation, the following magnetic field strengths reach up to 2200 G in Hα and 1300 G in D3. According to calculations, the observed peculiarities of line profiles may indicate the existence of optically thick emissive small-scale elements with strong magnetic fields and lowered temperature.

  2. 40 CFR 65.147 - Flares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... submission of the notice specified in § 65.167(a). Upon implementing the change, a flare compliance... standard cubic meter; where the net enthalpy per mole of offgas is based on combustion at 25 °C and 760...

  3. The CME Flare Arcade and the Width of the CME in the Outer Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ron; Falconer, David; Sterling, Alphonse

    2008-01-01

    Moore, Sterling, & Suess (2007, ApJ, 668, 1221) present evidence that (1) a CME is typically a magnetic bubble, a low-beta gplasmoid with legs h having roughly the 3D shape of a light bulb, and (2) in the outer corona the CME plasmoid is in lateral pressure equilibrium with the ambient magnetic field. They present three CMEs observed by SOHO/LASCO, each from a very different source located near the limb. One of these CMEs came from a compact ejective eruption from a small part of a sunspot active region, another came from a large quiet-region filament eruption, and the third CME, an extremely large and fast one, was produced in tandem with an X20 flare arcade that was centered on a huge delta sunspot. Each of these CMEs had more or less the classic lightbulb silhouette and attained a constant heliocentric angular width in the outer corona. This indicates that the CME plasmoid attained lateral magnetic pressure balance with the ambient radial magnetic field in the outer corona. This lateral pressure balance, together with the standard scenario for CME production by the eruption of a sheared-core magnetic arcade, yields the following simple estimate of the strength B(sub Flare) of the magnetic field in the flare arcade produced together with the CME: B(sub Flare) 1.4(theta CME/theta Flare)sup 2 G, where theta (sub CME) is the heliocentric angular width of the CME plasmoid in the outer corona and theta (sub Flare) is the heliocentric angular width of the full-grown flare arcade. Conversely, theta (sub CME) approximately equal to (R(sub Sun)sup -1(phi(sub Flare)/1.4)sup 1/2 radians, where Flare is the magnetic flux covered by the full-grown flare arcade. In addition to presenting the three CMEs of Moore, Sterling, & Suess (2007) and their agreement with this relation between CME and Flare, we present a further empirical test of this relation. For CMEs that erupt from active regions, the co-produced flare arcade seldom if ever covers the entire active region: if AR is

  4. Modelling emissions from natural gas flaring

    OpenAIRE

    G. Ezaina Umukoro; O. Saheed Ismail

    2017-01-01

    The world today recognizes the significance of environmental sustainability to the development of nations. Hence, the role oil and gas industry plays in environmental degrading activities such as gas flaring is of global concern. This study presents material balance equations and predicts results for non-hydrocarbon emissions such as CO2, CO, NO, NO2, and SO2 etc. from flaring (combustion) of 12 natural gas samples representing composition of natural gas of global origin. Gaseous emission est...

  5. First evidence of non-Gaussian solar flare EUV spectral line profiles and accelerated non-thermal ion motion

    CERN Document Server

    Jeffrey, Natasha; Labrosse, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    The properties of solar flare plasma can be determined from observations of optically thin EUV lines. The spectral line profiles emitted in a flaring MK plasma are expected to be dominated by Doppler broadening, producing Gaussian line profiles, if the underlying ion velocity distribution is Maxwellian. We look for non-Gaussian line profiles during a flare, that may indicate the presence of accelerated ion and/or plasma non-thermal velocity distributions. We study EUV spectral lines during a flare SOL2013-05-15T01:45 using the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). The flare is located close to the eastern solar limb. It has an extended loop structure, allowing different flare features: ribbons, hard X-ray (HXR) footpoints and the loop-top source to be clearly observed in EUV and X-rays. EUV line spectroscopy is performed in seven regions covering the flare features. We study the line profiles of isolated and unblended Fe XVI lines (262.9760 A) formed at temperatures of 2-4 MK. Suitable Fe XVI line profiles c...

  6. The Variable Crab Nebula: Evidence for a Connection between GeV flares and Hard X-ray Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Kust Harding, Alice; Hays, Elizabeth A.; Cherry, Michael L.; Case, Gary L.; Finger, Mark H.; Jenke, Peter; Zhang, Xiao-Ling

    2016-04-01

    In 2010, hard X-ray variations (Wilson-Hodge et al. 2011) and GeV flares (Tavani et al 2011, Abdo et al. 2011) from the Crab Nebula were discovered. Connections between these two phenomena were unclear, in part because the timescales were quite different, with yearly variations in hard X-rays and hourly to daily variations in the GeV flares. The hard X-ray flux from the Crab Nebula has again declined since 2014, much like it did in 2008-2010. During both hard X-ray decline periods, the Fermi LAT detected no GeV flares, suggesting that injection of particles from the GeV flares produces the much slower and weaker hard X-ray variations. The timescale for the particles emitting the GeV flares to lose enough energy to emit synchrotron photons in hard X-rays is consistent with the yearly variations observed in hard X-rays and with the expectation that the timescale for variations slowly increases with decreasing energy. This hypothesis also predicts even slower and weaker variations below 10 keV, consistent with the non-detection of counterparts to the GeV flares by Chandra (Weisskopf et al 2013). We will present a comparison of the observed hard X-ray variations and a simple model of the decay of particles from the GeV flares to test our hypothesis.

  7. Photometric Study on Stellar Magnetic Activity: I. Flare Variability of Red Dwarf Stars in the Open Cluster M37

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, S -W; Hartman, J D

    2015-01-01

    Based on one-month long MMT time-series observations of the open cluster M37, we monitored light variations of nearly 2500 red dwarfs and successfully identified 420 flare events from 312 cluster M dwarf stars. For each flare light curve, we derived observational and physical parameters, such as flare shape, peak amplitude, duration, energy, and peak luminosity. We show that cool stars produce serendipitous flares energetic enough to be observed in the $r$-band, and their temporal and peak characteristics are almost the same as those in traditional $U$-band observations. We also found many large-amplitude flares with inferred $\\Delta u > 6$ mag in the cluster sample which had been rarely reported in previous ground-based observations. Following the ergodic hypothesis, we investigate in detail statistical properties of flare parameters over a range of energy ($E_{r}$ $\\simeq$ $10^{31}-10^{34}$ erg). As expected, there are no statistical differences in the distributions of flare timescales, energies, and freque...

  8. Super-Acceleration in the Flaring Crab Nebula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavani, Marco, E-mail: marco.tavani@inaf.it

    2013-10-15

    The Crab Nebula continues to surprise us. The Crab system (energized by a very powerful pulsar at the center of the Supernova Remnant SN1054) is known to be a very efficient particle “accelerator” which can reach PeV energies. Today, new surprising data concerning the gamma-ray flares produced by the Crab Nebula challenge models of particle acceleration. The total energy flux from the Crab has been considered for many decades substantially stable at X-ray and gamma-ray energies. However, this paradigm was shattered by the AGILE discovery and Fermi confirmation in September 2010 of transient gamma-ray emission from the Crab. Indeed, we can state that four major flaring gamma-ray episodes have been detected by AGILE and Fermi during the period mid-2007/2012. During these events, transient particle acceleration occurs in a regime which apparently violates the MHD conditions and synchrotron cooling constraints. This fact justifies calling “super-acceleration” the mechanism which produces the “flaring Crab phenomenon”. Radiation between 50 MeV and a few GeV is emitted with a quite hard spectrum within a short timescale (hours-days), with no obvious relation with simultaneous optical and X-ray emissions in the inner Nebula. “Super-acceleration” implies overcoming synchrotron cooling by strong (and “parallel”) electric fields most likely produced by magnetic field reconnection within the pulsar wind outflow. This acceleration appears to be very efficient and, remarkably, limited by radiation reaction. It is not clear at the moment where in the Nebula this phenomenon occurs. An intense observational program is now focused on the Crab Nebula to resolve its most challenging mystery.

  9. Modelling emissions from natural gas flaring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ezaina Umukoro

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The world today recognizes the significance of environmental sustainability to the development of nations. Hence, the role oil and gas industry plays in environmental degrading activities such as gas flaring is of global concern. This study presents material balance equations and predicts results for non-hydrocarbon emissions such as CO2, CO, NO, NO2, and SO2 etc. from flaring (combustion of 12 natural gas samples representing composition of natural gas of global origin. Gaseous emission estimates and pattern were modelled by coding material balance equations for six reaction types and combustion conditions with a computer program. On the average, anticipated gaseous emissions from flaring natural gas with an average annual global flaring rate 126 bcm per year (between 2000 and 2011 in million metric tonnes (mmt are 560 mmt, 48 mmt, 91 mmt, 93 mmt and 50 mmt for CO2, CO, NO, NO2 and SO2 respectively. This model predicted gaseous emissions based on the possible individual combustion types and conditions anticipated in gas flaring operation. It will assist in the effort by environmental agencies and all concerned to track and measure the extent of environmental pollution caused by gas flaring operations in the oil and gas industry.

  10. Analysis of Chromospheric Evaporation in Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykov, Viacheslav M.; Kosovichev, Alexander G.

    2017-08-01

    Chromospheric evaporation is one of the key processes of solar flares. Properties of chromospheric evaporation are thought to be closely connected to the energy release rates and energy transport mechanisms. Previous investigations revealed that in addition to electron-beam heating the chromospheric evaporation can be driven by heat fluxes and, probably, by other mechanisms. In this work, we present a study of flare events simultaneously observed by IRIS, SDO and RHESSI, focusing on spatio-temporal characteristics of the flare dynamics and its relation to the magnetic field topology. Event selection is performed using the Interactive Multi-Instrument Database of Solar Flares (IMIDSF) recently developed by the Center for Computational Heliophysics (CCH) at NJIT. The selection of IRIS observations was restricted to the fast-scanning regimes (coarse-raster or sparse-raster modes with ≥ 4 slit positions, ≥ 6`` spatial coverage, and ≤ 60 sec loop time). We have chosen 14 events, and estimated the spatially-resolved intensities and Doppler shifts of the chromospheric (Mg II), transition region (C II) and hot coronal (Fe XXI) lines reflecting the dynamics of the chromospheric evaporation. The correlations among the derived line profile properties, flare morphology, magnetic topology and hard X-ray characteristics will be presented, and compared with the RADYN flare models and other scenarios of chromospheric evaporations.

  11. Absolute Abundance Measurements in Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Harry

    2014-06-01

    We present measurements of elemental abundances in solar flares with EVE/SDO and EIS/Hinode. EVE observes both high temperature Fe emission lines Fe XV-XXIV and continuum emission from thermal bremsstrahlung that is proportional to the abundance of H. By comparing the relative intensities of line and continuum emission it is possible to determine the enrichment of the flare plasma relative to the composition of the photosphere. This is the first ionization potential or FIP bias (F). Since thermal bremsstrahlung at EUV wavelengths is relatively insensitive to the electron temperature it is important to account for the distribution of electron temperatures in the emitting plasma. We accomplish this by using the observed spectra to infer the differential emission measure distribution and FIP bias simultaneously. In each of the 21 flares that we analyze we find that the observed composition is close to photospheric. The mean FIP bias in our sample is F=1.17+-0.22. Furthermore, we have compared the EVE measurements with corresponding flare observations of intermediate temperature S, Ar, Ca, and Fe emission lines taken with EIS. Our initial calculations also indicate a photospheric composition for these observations. This analysis suggests that the bulk of the plasma evaporated during a flare comes from deep in the chromosphere, below the region where elemental fractionation in the non-flaring corona occurs.

  12. Multithread Hydrodynamic Modeling of a Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Harry P.

    2006-01-01

    Past hydrodynamic simulations have been able to reproduce the high temperatures and densities characteristic of solar flares. These simulations, however, have not been able to account for the slow decay of the observed flare emission or the absence of blueshifts in high spectral resolution line profiles. Recent work has suggested that modeling a flare as a sequence of independently heated threads instead of as a single loop may resolve the discrepancies between the simulations and observations. In this paper, we present a method for computing multithread, time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations of solar flares and apply it to observations of the Masuda flare of 1992 January 13. We show that it is possible to reproduce the temporal evolution of high temperature thermal flare plasma observed with the instruments on the GOES and Yohkoh satellites. The results from these simulations suggest that the heating timescale for a individual thread is on the order of 200 s. Significantly shorter heating timescales (20 s) lead to very high temperatures and are inconsistent with the emission observed by Yohkoh.

  13. Physics of Transient Seismic Emission from Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Charles A.; Donea, A.; Malanushenko, A.

    2012-05-01

    We consider the physics of seismic activity in solar flares, i.e., the release of powerful seismic transients into the solar interior during the impulsive phases of some flares. Recent work by Hudson, Fisher, Welsch and Bercik has attracted a great deal of positive attention to the possible role of Lorentz-force transients in driving seismic transient emission in flares. The implications of direct involvement by magnetic forces in seismic transient emission, if this could be confirmed, would be major, since magnetic fields are thought to hold the energy source of the flares themselves. The energy invested into acoustic transients is a small fraction of the total released by the flare, but requires a massive impulse many times that required to accelerate high-energy electrons into which the energy is initially thought to be invested. What does this say about a flare mechanism that sometimes does both? We discuss some of the outstanding diagnostic questions that confront the recognition of magnetic-field transients associated with Lorentz force transients based on resources HMI, Hinode, AIA and other facilities offer us.

  14. Using Two-Ribbon Flare Observations and MHD Simulations to Constrain Flare Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazachenko, Maria D.; Lynch, Benjamin J.; Welsch, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Flare ribbons are emission structures that are frequently observed during flares in transition-region and chromospheric radiation. These typically straddle a polarity inversion line (PIL) of the radial magnetic field at the photosphere, and move apart as the flare progresses. The ribbon flux - the amount of unsigned photospheric magnetic flux swept out by flare ribbons - is thought to be related to the amount coronal magnetic reconnection, and hence provides a key diagnostic tool for understanding the physical processes at work in flares and CMEs. Previous measurements of the magnetic flux swept out by flare ribbons required time-consuming co-alignment between magnetograph and intensity data from different instruments, explaining why those studies only analyzed, at most, a few events. The launch of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), both aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), presented a rare opportunity to compile a much larger sample of flare-ribbon events than could readily be assembled before. We created a dataset of 363 events of both flare ribbon positions and fluxes, as a function of time, for all C9.-class and greater flares within 45 degrees of disk center observed by SDO from June 2010 till April 2015. For this purpose, we used vector magnetograms (2D magnetic field maps) from HMI and UV images from AIA. A critical problem with using unprocessed AIA data is the existence of spurious intensities in AIA data associated with strong flare emission, most notably "blooming" (spurious smearing of saturated signal into neighboring pixels, often in streaks). To overcome this difficulty, we have developed an algorithmic procedure that effectively excludes artifacts like blooming. We present our database and compare statistical properties of flare ribbons, e.g. evolutions of ribbon reconnection fluxes, reconnection flux rates and vertical currents with the properties from MHD simulations.

  15. Effects of flare definitions on the statistics of derived flare distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, D. F.; Dominique, M.; Seaton, D.; Stegen, K.; White, A.

    2016-08-01

    The statistical examination of solar flares is crucial to revealing their global characteristics and behaviour. Such examinations can tackle large-scale science questions or give context to detailed single-event studies. However, they are often performed using standard but basic flare detection algorithms relying on arbitrary thresholds. This arbitrariness may lead to important scientific conclusions being drawn from results caused by subjective choices in algorithms rather than the true nature of the Sun. In this paper, we explore the effect of the arbitrary thresholds used in the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) event list and Large Yield RAdiometer (LYRA) Flare Finder algorithms. We find that there is a small but significant relationship between the power law exponent of the GOES flare peak flux frequency distribution and the flare start thresholds of the algorithms. We also find that the power law exponents of these distributions are not stable, but appear to steepen with increasing peak flux. This implies that the observed flare size distribution may not be a power law at all. We show that depending on the true value of the exponent of the flare size distribution, this deviation from a power law may be due to flares missed by the flare detection algorithms. However, it is not possible determine the true exponent from GOES/XRS observations. Additionally we find that the PROBA2/LYRA flare size distributions are artificially steep and clearly non-power law. We show that this is consistent with an insufficient degradation correction. This means that PROBA2/LYRA should not be used for flare statistics or energetics unless degradation is adequately accounted for. However, it can be used to study variations over shorter timescales and for space weather monitoring.

  16. The Shape of M Dwarf Flares in Kepler Light Curves

    CERN Document Server

    Davenport, James R A

    2015-01-01

    Ultra-precise light curves from Kepler provide the best opportunity to determine rates and statistical properties of stellar flares. From 11 months of data on the active M4 dwarf, GJ 1243, we have built the largest catalog of flares for a single star: over 6100 events. Combining 885 of our most pristine flares, we generated an empirical white-light flare template. This high-fidelity template shows a rapid initial rise, and two distinct exponential cooling phases. This template is useful in constraining flare energies and for improved flare detection in many surveys. Complex, multi-peaked events are more common for higher energy flares in this sample. Using our flare template we characterize the structure of complex events. In this contributed talk, I presented results from our boutique study of GJ 1243, and described an expanded investigation of the structure of complex flares and their connection to solar events.

  17. Statistical and theoretical studies of flares from Sagittarius A*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ya-Ping; Yuan, Qiang; Wang, Q. Daniel; Chen, P. F.; Neilsen, Joseph; Fang, Taotao; Zhang, Shuo; Dexter, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Multi-wavelength flares have routinely been observed from the supermassive black hole, Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), at our Galactic center. The nature of these flares remains largely unclear, despite many theoretical models. We study the statistical properties of the Sgr A* X-ray flares and find that they are consistent with the theoretical prediction of the self-organized criticality system with the spatial dimension S = 3. We suggest that the X-ray flares represent plasmoid ejections driven by magnetic reconnection (similar to solar flares) in the accretion flow onto the black hole. Motivated by the statistical results, we further develop a time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model for the multi-band flares from Sgr A* by analogy with models of solar flares/coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We calculate the X-ray, infrared flare light curves, and the spectra, and find that our model can explain the main features of the flares.

  18. Response functions of Fuji imaging plates to monoenergetic protons in the energy range 0.6-3.2 MeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, T; Comet, M; Denis-Petit, D; Gobet, F; Hannachi, F; Tarisien, M; Versteegen, M; Aleonard, M M

    2013-01-01

    We have measured the responses of Fuji MS, SR, and TR imaging plates (IPs) to protons with energies ranging from 0.6 to 3.2 MeV. Monoenergetic protons were produced with the 3.5 MV AIFIRA (Applications Interdisciplinaires de Faisceaux d'Ions en Région Aquitaine) accelerator at the Centre d'Etudes Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan (CENBG). The IPs were irradiated with protons backscattered off a tantalum target. We present the photo-stimulated luminescence response of the IPs together with the fading measurements for these IPs. A method is applied to allow correction of fading effects for variable proton irradiation duration. Using the IP fading corrections, a model of the IP response function to protons was developed. The model enables extrapolation of the IP response to protons up to proton energies of 10 MeV. Our work is finally compared to previous works conducted on Fuji TR IP response to protons.

  19. Cross-section measurements of neutron-induced reactions on GaAs using monoenergetic beams from 7.5 to 15 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, R.; Crowell, A. S.; Fallin, B.; Howell, C. R.; Huibregtse, C.; Kelley, J. H.; Kawano, T.; Kwan, E.; Rusev, G.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2011-04-01

    Cross-section measurements for neutron-induced reactions on GaAs have been carried out at twelve different neutron energies from 7.5 to 15 MeV using the activation technique. The monoenergetic neutron beams were produced via the H2(d,n)He3 reaction. GaAs samples were activated along with Au and Al monitor foils to determine the incident neutron flux. The activities induced by the reaction products were measured using high-resolution γ-ray spectroscopy. Cross sections for five reaction channels, viz., Ga69(n,2n)Ga68, Ga69(n,p)Zn69m, Ga71(n,p)Zn71m, As75(n,2n)As74, and As75(n,p)Ge75, are reported. The results are compared with the previous measurements and available data evaluations. Statistical-model calculations, based on the Hauser-Feshbach formalism, have been carried out using the TALYS and the COH3 codes and are compared with the experimental results.

  20. Cross Section Measurements of Neutron Induced Reactions on GaAs using Monoenergetic Beams from 7.5 to 15 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, R.; Crowell, A. S.; Fallin, B.; Howell, C. R.; Huibregtse, C.; Kelley, J. H.; Kawano, T.; Kwan, E.; Rusev, G.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2011-09-01

    Cross section measurements for the neutron induced reactions on GaAs have been carried out at ten different neutron energies from 7.5 to 15 MeV, using the activation technique. The monoenergetic neutron beams were produced via the 2H(d,n)3He reaction, known for it's high neutron yield in the chosen energy regime. GaAs samples were activated along with the Au and Al monitor foils, for estimating the incident neutron flux. The induced activiy was measured using high resolution γ-ray spectroscopy. Five reaction channels viz., 69Ga(n, 2n) Ga, 69Ga(n,p)69mZn, 71Ga(n,p)71mZn, 75As(n, 2n)74As and 75As(n,p)75Ge, have been reported for the comprehensive cross section measurements. The results are compared with the existing literature data and the available evaluations. Statistical model calculations, based on the Hauser-Feshbach formalism, have been carried out using the TALYS and EMPIRE codes and are compared with the experimental values.

  1. Study of response of {sup 3}He detectors to monoenergetic neutrons; Etude des reponses des detecteurs a {sup 3}He par des neutrons monoenergetiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abanades, A. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (CERN); Andriamonje, S.; Arnould, H.; Barreau, G.; Bercion, M. [Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires, Bordeaux-1 Univ., 33 Gradignan (France); Casagrande, F.; Cennini, P. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (CERN); Del Moral, R. [Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires, Bordeaux-1 Univ., 33 Gradignan (France); Gonzales, E. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (CERN); Lacoste, V.; Pdemay, G.; Pravikoff, M.S. [Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires, Bordeaux-1 Univ., 33 Gradignan (France); TARC Collaboration under leadership of C. Rubbia

    1997-06-01

    In the search of a hybrid system (the coupling of the particle accelerator to an under-critical reactor) for radioactive waste transmutation the TARC (Transmutation by Adiabatic Resonance Crossing) program has been developed. Due to experimental limitations, the time-energy relation at higher neutron energies, particularly, around 2 MeV, which is an important domain for TARC, cannot be applied. Consequently the responses of the {sup 3}He ionization neutron detector developed for TARC experiment have been studied using a fast monoenergetic neutron source. The neutrons were produced by the interaction of the proton delivered by Van de Graaff accelerator of CENBG. The originality of the detector consists in its structure of three series of electric conductors which are mounted around the anode: a grid ensuring the detector proportionality, a cylindrical suit of alternating positive voltage and grounded wires aiming at eliminating the radial end effects, serving as veto and two cylinders serving as end plugs to eliminate the perpendicular end effects. Examples of anode spectra conditioned (in anticoincidence) by the mentioned vetoes are given. One can see the contribution of the elastic scattering from H and {sup 3}He. By collimating the neutron beam through a borated polyethylene system it was possible to obtain a mapping of the detector allowing the study of its response as a function of the irradiated zones (anode and grid) 2 refs. This paper is related to TRN FR9810178

  2. An analysis of flaring and venting activity in the Alberta upstream oil and gas industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew R; Coderre, Adam R

    2011-02-01

    Alberta, Canada, is an important global producer of petroleum resources. In association with this production, large amounts of gas (1.14 billion m3 in 2008) are flared or vented. Although the amount of flaring and venting has been measurably reduced since 2002, data from 2005 reveal sharp increases in venting, which have important implications in terms of resource conservation and greenhouse gas emissions (which exceeded 8 million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent in 2008). With use of extensive monthly production data for 18,203 active batteries spanning the years 2002-2008 obtained in close cooperation with the Alberta Energy Resources Conservation Board, a detailed analysis has been completed to examine activity patterns of flaring and venting and reasons behind these trends in the Alberta upstream oil and gas industry. In any given year, approximately 6000 batteries reported flaring and/or venting, but the distribution of volumes flared and vented at individual sites was highly skewed, such that small numbers of sites handled large fractions of the total gas flaring and venting in the Province. Examination of month-to-month volume variability at individual sites, cast in terms of a nominal turndown ratio that would be required for a compressor to capture that gas and direct it into a pipeline, further revealed that volumes at a majority of sites were reasonably stable and there was no evidence that larger or more stable sites had been preferentially reduced, leaving potential barriers to future mitigation. Through linking of geospatial data with production data coupled with additional statistical analysis, the 31.2% increase in venting volumes since 2005 was revealed to be predominantly associated with increased production of heavier oils and bitumen in the Lloydminster region of the Province. Overall, the data suggest that quite significant reductions in flaring and venting could be realized by seeking mitigation solutions for only the largest batteries in

  3. Discovery of Transient Infrared Emission from Dust Heated by Stellar Tidal Disruption Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Velzen, S.; Mendez, A. J.; Krolik, J. H.; Gorjian, V.

    2016-09-01

    Stars that pass within the Roche radius of a supermassive black hole will be tidally disrupted, yielding a sudden injection of gas close to the black hole horizon which produces an electromagnetic flare. A few dozen of these flares have been discovered in recent years, but current observations provide poor constraints on the bolometric luminosity and total accreted mass of these events. Using images from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, we have discovered transient 3.4 μm emission from several previously known tidal disruption flares. The observations can be explained by dust heated to its sublimation temperature due to the intense radiation of the tidal flare. From the break in the infrared light curve we infer that this hot dust is located ˜0.1 pc from the supermassive black hole. Since the dust has been heated by absorbing UV and (potentially) soft X-ray photons of the flare, the reprocessing light curve yields an estimate of the bolometric flare luminosity. For the flare PTF-09ge, we infer that the most likely value of the luminosity integrated over frequencies at which dust can absorb photons is 8× {10}44 erg s-1, with a factor of 3 uncertainty due to the unknown temperature of the dust. This bolometric luminosity is a factor ˜10 larger than the observed blackbody luminosity. Our work is the first to probe dust in the nuclei of non-active galaxies on sub-parsec scales. The observed infrared luminosity implies a covering factor ˜1% for the nuclear dust in the host galaxies.

  4. Monoenergetic positron beam at the reactor based positron source at FRM-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugenschmidt, C.; Kögel, G.; Repper, R.; Schreckenbach, K.; Sperr, P.; Straßer, B.; Triftshäuser, W.

    2002-05-01

    The principle of the in-pile positron source at the Munich research reactor FRM-II is based on absorption of high energy prompt γ-rays from thermal neutron capture in 113Cd. For this purpose, a cadmium cap is placed inside the tip of the inclined beam tube SR-11 in the moderator tank of the reactor, where an undisturbed thermal neutron flux up to 2×10 14n cm-2 s-1 is expected. Inside the cadmium cap a structure of platinum foils is placed for converting high energy γ-radiation into positron-electron pairs. Due to the negative positron work function, moderation in annealed platinum leads to emission of monoenergetic positrons. Therefore, platinum will also be used as moderator, since its moderation property seems to yield long-term stability under reactor conditions and it is much easier to handle than tungsten. Model calculations were performed with SIMION-7.0w to optimise geometry and potential of Pt-foils and electrical lenses. It could be shown that the potentials between the Pt-foils must be chosen in the range of 1-10 V to extract moderated positrons. After successive acceleration to 5 keV by four electrical lenses the beam is magnetically guided in a solenoid field of 7.5 mT resulting in a beam diameter of about 25 mm. An intensity of about 10 10 slow positrons per second is expected in the primary positron beam. Outside of the reactor shield a W(1 0 0) single crystal remoderation stage will lead to an improvement of the positron beam brilliance before the positrons are guided to the experimental facilities.

  5. International key comparison of neutron fluence measurements in monoenergetic neutron fields: CCRI(III)-K11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gressier, V.; Bonaldi, A. C.; Dewey, M. S.; Gilliam, D. M.; Harano, H.; Masuda, A.; Matsumoto, T.; Moiseev, N.; Nico, J. S.; Nolte, R.; Oberstedt, S.; Roberts, N. J.; Röttger, S.; Thomas, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    To ensure the validity of their national standards, National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) participate regularly in international comparisons. In the area of neutron metrology, Section III of the Consultative Committee for Ionizing Radiation is in charge of the organization of these comparisons. From September 2011 to October 2012, the eleventh key comparison, named CCRI(III)-K11, took place at the AMANDE facility of the LNE-IRSN, in France. Participants from nine NMIs came with their own primary reference instruments, or instruments traceable to primary standards, with the aim of determining the neutron fluence, at 1 m distance from the target in vacuum, per monitor count at four monoenergetic neutron fields: 27 keV, 565 keV, 2.5 MeV and 17 MeV. The key comparison reference values (KCRV) were evaluated as the weighted mean values of the results provided by seven participants. The uncertainties of each KCRV are between 0.9% and 1.7%. The degree of equivalence (DoE), defined as the deviation of the result reported by the laboratories for each energy from the corresponding KCRV, and the associated expanded uncertainty are also reported and discussed. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  6. Development of a High- Brightness, Quasi- Monoenergetic Neutron Source at LLNL for Nuclear Physics Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M. S.; Anderson, S. G.; Bleuel, D.; Fitsos, P. J.; Gibson, D.; Hall, J. M.; Marsh, R.; Rusnak, B.

    2016-09-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is developing a high-brightness, quasi-monoenergetic neutron source. The intensity of the neutron source is expected to be 1011 n/s/sr with energies between 7 MeV and 10 MeV at 5% bandwidth at 0-degrees. This energy region is important for the study of neutron-induced reactions, nuclear astrophysics, and nuclear structure. For example, for neutrons between 1 and 10 MeV, the capturing states are below the GDR in many nuclei and the dominant reactions are compound and direct capture. The intensity and energy selection of the source makes it appealing for measurements of sparse targets at specific energies. We will present an array of nuclear physics measurements that will benefit from this source. The source is also of interest to generating activated targets for decay-out studies or for target production for other reaction-based measurements, e.g. fusion-evaporation reactions. Other usage examples include practical applications for imaging of very dense objects such as machine parts. For this presentation, we will discuss our method to use (d,n) production reaction on deuterium in a windowless gas target system. This approach is required because of the large power of the 7 MeV, 300 μA deuteron beams. We will discuss our facility and its capabilities. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. Flare energetics: analysis of a large flare on YZ Canis Minoris observed simultaneously in the ultraviolet, optical and radio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Oord, G. H. J.; Doyle, J. G.; Rodono, M.; Gary, D. E.; Henry, G. W.; Byrne, P. B.; Linsky, J. L.; Haisch, B. M.; Pagano, I.; Leto, G.

    1996-06-01

    The results of coordinated observations of the dMe star YZ CMi at optical, UV and radio wavelengths during 3-7 February 1983 are presented. YZ CMi showed repeated optical flaring with the largest flare having a magnitude of 3.8 in the U-band. This flare coincided with an IUE exposure which permits a comparison of the emission measure curves of YZ CMi in its flaring and quiescent state. During the flare a downward shift of the transition zone is observed while the radiative losses in the range 10^4^-10^7^K strongly increase. The optical flare is accompanied with a radio flare at 6cm, while at 20cm no emission is detected. The flare is interpreted in terms of optically thick synchrotron emission. We present a combined interpretation of the optical/radio flare and show that the flare can be interpreted within the context of solar two-ribbon/white-light flares. Special attention is paid to the bombardment of dMe atmospheres by particle beams. We show that the characteristic temperature of the heated atmosphere is almost independent of the beam flux and lies within the range of solar white-light flare temperatures. We also show that it is unlikely that stellar flares emit black-body spectra. The fraction of accelerated particles, as follows from our combined optical/radio interpretation is in good agreement with the fraction determined by two-ribbon flare reconnection models.

  8. Which mechanism for gamma-ray flares of the Crab nebula ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akramov, T.; Baty, H.

    2016-12-01

    We report preliminary results using two dimensional (2D) classical MagnetoHydroDynamic (MHD) simulations with the aim to investigate the physical mechanism underlying gamma-ray flares. We explore the explosive reconnection mechanism proposed by te{2013Baty} in order to confirm its ability to produce flares when located in the stripped wind region. In particular, the time scale of the process is shown to be independent of the unkown dissipation, enforcing the robustness of the model. A considerable particle acceleration is also obtained, involving a potentially important non thermal contribution for the resulting synchrotron radiation.

  9. Solar Flares and Magnetospheric Particles: Investigations Based upon the ONR-602 Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    of neutrons produced during a solar flare. These neutrons will decay in- .0- flight and have been observed as 5 Ne-C 4 a pulse of protons in Ne-S...location of the protons from the neutron decay . Note Figure 3. Neon Isotopic Composition. ’I.: . .. ....* * •:. :..: :-- .: .,. -. - I-’ -A7.~~~ -d- ..9...have too high a background to observe the small flux from this flare. However, the discovery of a pulse of protons corresponding to the neutron decay

  10. Effects of flare definitions on the statistics of derived flare distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Ryan, Daniel F; Seaton, Dan; Stegen, Koen; White, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    The statistical examination of solar flares is crucial to revealing their global characteristics and behaviour. Such examinations can tackle large-scale science questions or give context to detailed single-event studies. However, they are often performed using standard but basic flare detection algorithms relying on arbitrary thresholds. This arbitrariness may lead to important scientific conclusions being drawn from results caused by subjective choices in algorithms rather than the true nature of the Sun. In this paper, we explore the effect of the arbitrary thresholds used in the GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) event list and LYRA (Large Yield RAdiometer) Flare Finder algorithms. We find that there is a small but significant relationship between the power law exponent of the GOES flare peak flux frequency distribution and the flare start thresholds of the algorithms. We also find that the power law exponents of these distributions are not stable, but appear to steepen with increasin...

  11. Exceptions to the rule: the X-flares of AR 2192 Lacking Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalmann, J. K.; Su, Y.; Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.

    2016-04-01

    NOAA Active region (AR) 2192, that was present on the Sun in October 2014, was the largest region which occurred since November 1990 (see Figure 1). The huge size accompanied by a very high activity level, was quite unexpected as it appeared during the unusually weak solar cycle 24. Nevertheless, the AR turned out to be one of the most prolific flaring ARs of cycle 24. It produced in total 6 X, 29 M, 79 C flares during its disk passage from October 18-29, 2014 (see Figure 2). Surprisingly, all flares greater than GOES class M5 and X were confined, i.e. had no coronal mass ejections (CME) associated. All the flare events had some obvious similarity in morphology, as they were located in the core of the AR and revealed only minor separation motion away from the neutral line but a large initial separation of the conjugate flare ribbons. In the paper by Thalmann et al. (2015) we describe the series of flares and give details about the confined X1.6 flare event from October 22, 2014 as well as the single eruptive M4.0 flare event from October 24, 2014. The study of the X1.6 flare revealed a large initial separation of flare ribbons together with recurrent flare brightenings, which were related to two episodes of enhanced hard X-ray emission as derived from RHESSI observations. This suggests that magnetic field structures connected to specific regions were repeatedly involved in the process of reconnection and energy release. Opposite to the central location of the sequence of confined events within the AR, a single eruptive (M4.0) event occurred on the outskirt of the AR in the vicinity of open magnetic fields. Our investigations revealed a predominantly north-south oriented magnetic system of arcade fields overlying the AR that could have preserved the magnetic arcade to erupt, and consequently kept the energy release trapped in a localized volume of magnetic field high up in the corona (as supported by the absence of a lateral motion of the flare ribbons and the

  12. Spectral Hardening and Geoeffectiveness of Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, R.; Kumar, S.; Dave, H.; Deshpande, M. R.

    We present the results of a few typical flares that observed by the first space borne solar astronomy experiment of India namely "Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS)" mission, which has completed one year of its successful operation in geostationary orbit. The SOXS mission onboard GSAT-2 Indian spacecraft was launched successfully by GSLV-D2 rocket on 08 May 2003 to study the energy release and particle acceleration in solar flares. The SOXS is composed of two independent payloads viz. SOXS Low Energy Detector (SLD) payload, and SOXS High Energy Detector (SHD) payload. We restrict our presentation to SLD payload that designed, developed and fabricated by Physical Research Laboratory (PRL) in collaboration with Space Application Centre (SAC), Ahmedabad and ISRO Satellite Centre (ISAC), Bangalore of Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO). We briefly present the scientific objectives and instrumentation of the SLD payload. The SLD payload employs the state-of-art solid state detectors viz. Si PIN and CZT detectors, which reveal sub-keV spectral and 100ms temporal resolution characteristics that are necessary to study the spectral response of the flare components. The dynamic range of Si and CZT detectors is 4-25 and 4-56 keV respectively. The SLD has observed more than 140 flares of C and M class since its commissioning in the orbit. We present the X-ray emission characteristics of a few typical flares in view of their spectral hardening and geo-effectiveness. We extend our study of these flares to optical and radio waveband observations in order to improve the relationship of X-ray spectral hardening and geo-effectiveness. The flares with harder spectra and associated with small or large CME, and radio emission at frequencies above 10 GHz are found geo-effective.

  13. Risks due to X-ray Flares during Astronaut Extravehicular Activity

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, David S; 10.1029/2006SW000300

    2009-01-01

    Solar hard X-ray flares can expose astronauts on lunar and deep space extravehicular activities (EVAs) to dangerous acute biological doses. We combine calculations of radiative transfer through shielding materials with subsequent transfer through tissue to show that hazardous doses, taken as >= 0.1 Gy, should occur with a probability of about 10% per 100 hours of accumulated EVA inside current spacesuits. The rapid onset and short duration of X-ray flares and the lack of viable precursor events require strategies for quick retreat, in contrast to solar proton events, which usually take hours to deliver significant fluence and can often be anticipated by flares or other light-speed precursors. Our results contrast with the view that only particle radiation poses dangers for human space exploration. Heavy-element shields provide the most efficient protection from X-ray flares, since X-rays produce no significant secondary radiation. We calculate doses due to X-ray flares behind aluminum shields and estimate the...

  14. IRIS Observations of the Mg II h & k Lines During a Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Kerr, Graham S; Qiu, Jiong; Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2015-01-01

    The bulk of the radiative output of a solar flare is emitted from the chromosphere, which produces enhancements in the optical and UV continuum, and in many lines, both optically thick and thin. We have, until very recently, lacked observations of two of the strongest of these lines: the Mg II h & k resonance lines. We present a detailed study of the response of these lines to a solar flare. The spatial and temporal behaviour of the integrated intensities, k/h line ratios, line of sight velocities, line widths and line asymmetries were investigated during an M class flare (SOL2014-02-13T01:40). Very intense, spatially localised energy input at the outer edge of the ribbon is observed, resulting in redshifts equivalent to velocities of ~15-26km/s, line broadenings, and a blue asymmetry in the most intense sources. The characteristic central reversal feature that is ubiquitous in quiet Sun observations is absent in flaring profiles, indicating that the source function increases with height during the flare....

  15. Evaluation of expected solar flare neutrino events in the IceCube observatory

    CERN Document Server

    de Wasseige, G; Hanson, K; van Eijndhoven, N; Klein, K -L

    2015-01-01

    Since the end of the eighties and in response to a reported increase in the total neutrino flux in the Homestake experiment in coincidence with a solar flare, solar neutrino detectors have searched for solar flare signals. Neutrinos from the decay of mesons, which are themselves produced in collisions of accelerated protons with the solar atmosphere, would provide a novel window on the underlying physics of the acceleration process. For our studies we focus on the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, a cubic kilometer neutrino detector located at the geographical South Pole. Due to its Supernova data acquisition system and its DeepCore component, dedicated to low energy neutrinos, IceCube may be sensitive to solar flare neutrinos and thus permit either a measurement of the signal or the establishment of more stringent upper limits on the solar flare neutrino flux. We present an approach for a time profile analysis based on a stacking method and an evaluation of a possible solar flare signal in IceCube using the Gean...

  16. Prediction of Solar Flares Using Unique Signatures of Magnetic Field Images

    CERN Document Server

    Raboonik, Abbas; Alipour, Nasibe; Wheatland, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Prediction of solar flares is an important task in solar physics. The occurrence of solar flares is highly dependent on the structure and the topology of solar magnetic fields. A new method for predicting large (M and X class) flares is presented, which uses machine learning methods applied to the Zernike moments of magnetograms observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) for a period of six years from 2 June 2010 to 1 August 2016. Magnetic field images consisting of the radial component of the magnetic field are converted to finite sets of Zernike moments and fed to the Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier. Zernike moments have the capability to elicit unique features from any 2-D image, which may allow more accurate classification. The results indicate whether an arbitrary active region has the potential to produce at least one large flare. We show that the majority of large flares can be predicted within 48 hours before their occurrence, with only ...

  17. Homologous Flare-CME Events and Their Metric Type II Radio Burst Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashiro, S.; Gopalswamy, N.; Makela, P.; Akiyama, S.; Uddin, W.; Srivastava, A. K.; Joshi, N. C.; Chandra, R.; Manoharan, P. K.; Mahalakshmi, K.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Active region NOAA 11158 produced many flares during its disk passage. At least two of these flares can be considered as homologous: the C6.6 flare at 06:51 UT and C9.4 flare at 12:41 UT on February 14, 2011. Both flares occurred at the same location (eastern edge of the active region) and have a similar decay of the GOES soft X-ray light curve. The associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were slow (334 and 337 km/s) and of similar apparent widths (43deg and 44deg), but they had different radio signatures. The second event was associated with a metric type II burst while the first one was not. The COR1 coronagraphs on board the STEREO spacecraft clearly show that the second CME propagated into the preceding CME that occurred 50 min before. These observations suggest that CME-CME interaction might be a key process in exciting the type II radio emission by slow CMEs.

  18. Automatic Tracking of Active Regions and Detection of Solar Flares in Solar EUV Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, C.; Aranda, M. C.

    2014-05-01

    Solar catalogs are frequently handmade by experts using a manual approach or semi-automated approach. The appearance of new tools is very useful because the work is automated. Nowadays it is impossible to produce solar catalogs using these methods, because of the emergence of new spacecraft that provide a huge amount of information. In this article an automated system for detecting and tracking active regions and solar flares throughout their evolution using the Extreme UV Imaging Telescope (EIT) on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft is presented. The system is quite complex and consists of different phases: i) acquisition and preprocessing; ii) segmentation of regions of interest; iii) clustering of these regions to form candidate active regions which can become active regions; iv) tracking of active regions; v) detection of solar flares. This article describes all phases, but focuses on the phases of tracking and detection of active regions and solar flares. The system relies on consecutive solar images using a rotation law to track the active regions. Also, graphs of the evolution of a region and solar evolution are presented to detect solar flares. The procedure developed has been tested on 3500 full-disk solar images (corresponding to 35 days) taken from the spacecraft. More than 75 % of the active regions are tracked and more than 85 % of the solar flares are detected.

  19. Particle Acceleration and the Origin of X-ray Flares in GRMHD simulations of Sgr A*

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, David; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Chan, Chi-kwan

    2016-01-01

    Significant X-ray variability and flaring has been observed from Sgr A* but is poorly understood from a theoretical standpoint. We perform GRMHD simulations that take into account a population of non-thermal electrons with energy distributions and injection rates that are motivated by PIC simulations of magnetic reconnection. We explore the effects of including these non-thermal electrons on the predicted broadband variability of Sgr A* and find that X-ray variability is a generic result of localizing non-thermal electrons to highly magnetized regions, where particles are likely to be accelerated via magnetic reconnection. The proximity of these high-field regions to the event horizon forms a natural connection between IR and X-ray variability and accounts for the rapid timescales associated with the X-ray flares. The qualitative nature of this variability is consistent with observations, producing X-ray flares that are always coincident with IR flares, but not vice versa, i.e., there are a number of IR flare...

  20. A giant gamma-ray flare from the magnetar SGR 1806-20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, D M; Barthelmy, S; Gehrels, N; Kippen, R M; Cayton, T; Kouveliotou, C; Eichler, D; Wijers, R A M J; Woods, P M; Granot, J; Lyubarsky, Y E; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Barbier, L; Chester, M; Cummings, J; Fenimore, E E; Finger, M H; Gaensler, B M; Hullinger, D; Krimm, H; Markwardt, C B; Nousek, J A; Parsons, A; Patel, S; Sakamoto, T; Sato, G; Suzuki, M; Tueller, J

    2005-04-28

    Two classes of rotating neutron stars-soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) and anomalous X-ray pulsars-are magnetars, whose X-ray emission is powered by a very strong magnetic field (B approximately 10(15) G). SGRs occasionally become 'active', producing many short X-ray bursts. Extremely rarely, an SGR emits a giant flare with a total energy about a thousand times higher than in a typical burst. Here we report that SGR 1806-20 emitted a giant flare on 27 December 2004. The total (isotropic) flare energy is 2 x 10(46) erg, which is about a hundred times higher than the other two previously observed giant flares. The energy release probably occurred during a catastrophic reconfiguration of the neutron star's magnetic field. If the event had occurred at a larger distance, but within 40 megaparsecs, it would have resembled a short, hard gamma-ray burst, suggesting that flares from extragalactic SGRs may form a subclass of such bursts.

  1. Determination of the Acceleration Region Size in a Loop-structured Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Jingnan; Kontar, Eduard P; Benvenuto, Federico; Massone, Anna Maria; Piana, Michele

    2012-01-01

    In order to study the acceleration and propagation of bremsstrahlung-producing electrons in solar flares, we analyze the evolution of the flare loop size with respect to energy at a variety of times. A GOES M3.7 loop-structured flare starting around 23:55 on 2002 April 14 is studied in detail using \\textit{Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager} (\\textit{RHESSI}) observations. We construct photon and mean-electron-flux maps in 2-keV energy bins by processing observationally-deduced photon and electron visibilities, respectively, through several image-processing methods: a visibility-based forward-fit (FWD) algorithm, a maximum entropy (MEM) procedure and the uv-smooth (UVS) approach. We estimate the sizes of elongated flares (i.e., the length and width of flaring loops) by calculating the second normalized moments of the intensity in any given map. Employing a collisional model with an extended acceleration region, we fit the loop lengths as a function of energy in both the photon and electron domains....

  2. A Correlation between Proton Events and Hα Flares and its Possible Interpretation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Comparing space proton event data obtained during 1970-1980 with their identified Hα flare signatures we discover a peculiar correlation between them,according to which weak and small Hα flares can also produce proton events, and we reveal a characteristic "triangle" distribution of Hα flares accompanying protonevents. In order to explain such feature of proton events, we accept the accelerationmechanism by DC electric field. To deduce the parallel electric field we use the elec-tric current helicity (or force-free parameter α) determined by the Huairou vectormagnetograph. A comparison of E‖ with E shows that the former is negligiblein flaring sites. We show that in the flaring current sheet ion-anisotropy is gener-ated, and it, in turn, gives rise to ion-anisotropic instability which competes withelectric acceleration to give one possibility: the acceleration by DC electric field orannihilation of the built-up energy. The competition of DC acceleration and ion-anisotropic instability annihilation in the current sheet gives a possible explanationfor the above-mentioned "triangle" character of the distribution.

  3. Ultra-Narrow Negative Flare Front Observed in Helium-10830 Å Using the1.6m New Solar Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Ding, Mingde; Kleint, Lucia; Su, Jiangtao; Liu, Chang; Ji, Haisheng; Chae, Jongchul; Jing, Ju; Cho, Kyuhyoun; Cho, Kyung-Suk; Gary, Dale E.; Wang, Haimin

    2016-05-01

    Solar flares are sudden flashes of brightness on the Sun and are often associated with coronal mass ejections and solar energetic particles that have adverse effects on the near-Earth environment. By definition, flares are usually referred to as bright features resulting from excess emission. Using the newly commissioned 1.6-m New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory, we show a striking “negative” flare with a narrow but unambiguous “dark” moving front observed in He I 10830 Å, which is as narrow as 340 km and is associated with distinct spectral characteristics in Hα and Mg II lines. Theoretically, such negative contrast in He I 10830 Å can be produced under special circumstances by nonthermal electron collisions or photoionization followed by recombination. Our discovery, made possible due to unprecedented spatial resolution, confirms the presence of the required plasma conditions and provides unique information in understanding the energy release and radiative transfer in solar flares.

  4. Analysis of sudden variations in photospheric magnetic fields during a large flare and their influences in the solar atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Brajesh; Venkatakrishnan, P; Mathew, Shibu K

    2016-01-01

    The solar active region NOAA 11719 produced a large two-ribbon flare on 11 April 2013. We have investigated the sudden variations in the photospheric magnetic fields in this active region during the flare employing the magnetograms obtained in the spectral line Fe I 6173 Angstrom by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The analysis of the line-of-sight magnetograms from HMI show sudden and persistent magnetic field changes at different locations of the active region before the onset of the flare and during the flare. The vector magnetic field observations available from HMI also show coincident variations in the total magnetic field strength and its inclination angle at these locations. Using the simultaneous Dopplergrams obtained from HMI, we observe perturbations in the photospheric Doppler signals following the sudden changes in the magnetic fields in the aforementioned locations. The power spectrum analysis of these velocity signals show enhanced acoustic po...

  5. Hadronic origin of the TeV flare of M87 in April 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, Sarira [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Circuito Exterior, C.U., A., Postal 70-543, Mexico, DF (Mexico); Palacios, Eddie [Universidad Veracruzana, Facultad de Fisica e Inteligencia Artificial, Xalapa, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2015-02-01

    M87 is a giant radio galaxy with FR-I morphology. It underwent three episodes of TeV flaring in recent years with the strongest one in April 2010 which was jointly monitored by MAGIC, VERITAS and H.E.S.S. We explain its spectral energy distribution in the energy range 0.3-5 TeV by assuming that the flaring occurs in the innermost region of the jet. In this region the low energy SSC photons serve as the target for the Fermi-accelerated high energy protons of energy ≤30 TeV to form a delta resonance. The TeV photons are produced from the subsequent decay of the delta resonance to neutral pions. In this scenario the observed TeV flux of April 2010 flare is fitted very well. (orig.)

  6. No flares from GRB afterglow blast waves encountering sudden circumburst density change

    CERN Document Server

    Gat, Ilana; MacFadyen, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Afterglows of gamma-ray bursts are observed to produce light curves with the flux following power law evolution in time. However, recent observations reveal bright flares at times on the order of minutes to days. One proposed explanation for these flares is the interaction of a relativistic blast wave with a circumburst density transition. In this paper, we model this type of interaction computationally in one and two dimensions, using a relativistic hydrodynamics code with adaptive mesh refinement called RAM, and analytically in one dimension. We simulate a blast wave traveling in a stellar wind environment that encounters a sudden change in density, followed by a homogeneous medium, and compute the observed radiation using a synchrotron model. We show that flares are not observable for an encounter with a sudden density increase, such as a wind termination shock, nor for an encounter with a sudden density decrease. Furthermore, by extending our analysis to two dimensions, we are able to resolve the spreadin...

  7. Hadronic-origin TeV flare of M87 in April 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Sahu, Sarira

    2013-01-01

    M87 is a giant radio galaxy with FR-I morphology. It underwent three episodes of TeV flaring in recent years with the strongest one in April 2010 which was jointly monitored by MAGIC, VERITAS and H.E.S.S. We explain its spectral energy distribution in the energy range 0.3 TeV to 5 TeV by assuming that the flaring occurs in the innermost region of the jet. In this region the low energy SSC photons serve as the target for the Fermi-accelerated high energy protons of energy < 30 TeV to form a delta resonance. The TeV photons are produced from the subsequent decay of the delta resonance to neutral pions. In this scenario the observed TeV flux of the 2010 flare is fitted very well.

  8. Observation of a reversal of rotation in a sunspot during a solar flare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Yi; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Hong, Junchao; Li, Haidong; Yang, Bo; Xu, Zhe

    2016-12-13

    The abrupt motion of the photospheric flux during a solar flare is thought to be a back reaction caused by the coronal field reconfiguration. However, the type of motion pattern and the physical mechanism responsible for the back reaction has been uncertain. Here we show that the direction of a sunspot's rotation is reversed during an X1.6 flare using observations from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. A magnetic field extrapolation model shows that the corresponding coronal magnetic field shrinks with increasing magnetic twist density. This suggests that the abrupt reversal of rotation in the sunspot may be driven by a Lorentz torque that is produced by the gradient of twist density from the solar corona to the solar interior. These results support the view that the abrupt reversal in the rotation of the sunspot is a dynamic process responding to shrinkage of the coronal magnetic field during the flare.

  9. The spatial, spectral and polarization properties of solar flare X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Jeffrey, Natasha L S

    2014-01-01

    X-rays are a valuable diagnostic tool for the study of high energy accelerated electrons. Bremsstrahlung X-rays produced by, and directly related to, high energy electrons accelerated during a flare, provide a powerful diagnostic tool for determining both the properties of the accelerated electron distribution, and of the flaring coronal and chromospheric plasmas. This thesis is specifically concerned with the study of spatial, spectral and polarization properties of solar flare X-ray sources via both modelling and X-ray observations using the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). Firstly, a new model is presented, accounting for finite temperature, pitch angle scattering and initial pitch angle injection. This is developed to accurately infer the properties of the acceleration region from the observations of dense coronal X-ray sources. Moreover, examining how the spatial properties of dense coronal X-ray sources change in time, interesting trends in length, width, position, number density ...

  10. First Flare-related Rapid Change of Photospheric Magnetic Field Observed by Solar Dynamics Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shuo; Liu, Rui; Deng, Na; Liu, Yang; Wang, Haimin

    2011-01-01

    Photospheric magnetic field not only plays important roles in building up free energy and triggering solar eruptions, but also has been observed to change rapidly and permanently responding to the coronal magnetic field restructuring due to coronal transients. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instrument (HMI) on board the newly launched Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) produces seeing-free full-disk vector magnetograms at consistently high resolution and high cadence, which finally makes possible an unambiguous and comprehensive study of this important back-reaction process. In this study, we present a near disk-center, GOES-class X2.2 flare occurred at NOAA AR 11158 on 2011 February 15 using the magnetic field measurements made by HMI. We obtained the first solid evidence of an enhancement in the transverse magnetic field at the flaring magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL) by a magnitude of 70%. This rapid and irreversible field evolution is unequivocally associated with the flare occurrence, with the ...

  11. The application of metal artifact reduction (MAR) in CT scans for radiation oncology by monoenergetic extrapolation with a DECT scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwahofer, Andrea [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology; Clinical Center Vivantes, Neukoelln (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Oncology; Baer, Esther [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology; Kuchenbecker, Stefan; Kachelriess, Marc [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Medical Physics in Radiology; Grossmann, J. Guenter [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology; Ortenau Klinikum Offenburg-Gengenbach (Germany). Dept. of Radiooncology; Sterzing, Florian [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    2015-07-01

    Metal artifacts in computed tomography CT images are one of the main problems in radiation oncology as they introduce uncertainties to target and organ at risk delineation as well as dose calculation. This study is devoted to metal artifact reduction (MAR) based on the monoenergetic extrapolation of a dual energy CT (DECT) dataset. In a phantom study the CT artifacts caused by metals with different densities: aluminum (ρ{sub Al} = 2.7 g/cm{sup 3}), titanium (ρ{sub Ti} = 4.5 g/cm{sup 3}), steel (ρ{sub steel} = 7.9 g/cm{sup 3}) and tungsten (ρ{sub W} = 19.3 g/cm{sup 3}) have been investigated. Data were collected using a clinical dual source dual energy CT (DECT) scanner (Siemens Sector Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany) with tube voltages of 100 kV and 140 kV (Sn). For each tube voltage the data set in a given volume was reconstructed. Based on these two data sets a voxel by voxel linear combination was performed to obtain the monoenergetic data sets. The results were evaluated regarding the optical properties of the images as well as the CT values (HU) and the dosimetric consequences in computed treatment plans. A data set without metal substitute served as the reference. Also, a head and neck patient with dental fillings (amalgam ρ = 10 g/cm{sup 3}) was scanned with a single energy CT (SECT) protocol and a DECT protocol. The monoenergetic extrapolation was performed as described above and evaluated in the same way. Visual assessment of all data shows minor reductions of artifacts in the images with aluminum and titanium at a monoenergy of 105 keV. As expected, the higher the densities the more distinctive are the artifacts. For metals with higher densities such as steel or tungsten, no artifact reduction has been achieved. Likewise in the CT values, no improvement by use of the monoenergetic extrapolation can be detected. The dose was evaluated at a point 7 cm behind the isocenter of a static field. Small improvements (around 1%) can be seen with 105 ke

  12. The application of metal artifact reduction (MAR) in CT scans for radiation oncology by monoenergetic extrapolation with a DECT scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwahofer, Andrea; Bär, Esther; Kuchenbecker, Stefan; Grossmann, J Günter; Kachelrieß, Marc; Sterzing, Florian

    2015-12-01

    Metal artifacts in computed tomography CT images are one of the main problems in radiation oncology as they introduce uncertainties to target and organ at risk delineation as well as dose calculation. This study is devoted to metal artifact reduction (MAR) based on the monoenergetic extrapolation of a dual energy CT (DECT) dataset. In a phantom study the CT artifacts caused by metals with different densities: aluminum (ρ Al=2.7 g/cm(3)), titanium (ρ Ti=4.5 g/cm(3)), steel (ρ steel=7.9 g/cm(3)) and tungsten (ρ W=19.3g/cm(3)) have been investigated. Data were collected using a clinical dual source dual energy CT (DECT) scanner (Siemens Sector Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany) with tube voltages of 100 kV and 140 kV(Sn). For each tube voltage the data set in a given volume was reconstructed. Based on these two data sets a voxel by voxel linear combination was performed to obtain the monoenergetic data sets. The results were evaluated regarding the optical properties of the images as well as the CT values (HU) and the dosimetric consequences in computed treatment plans. A data set without metal substitute served as the reference. Also, a head and neck patient with dental fillings (amalgam ρ=10 g/cm(3)) was scanned with a single energy CT (SECT) protocol and a DECT protocol. The monoenergetic extrapolation was performed as described above and evaluated in the same way. Visual assessment of all data shows minor reductions of artifacts in the images with aluminum and titanium at a monoenergy of 105 keV. As expected, the higher the densities the more distinctive are the artifacts. For metals with higher densities such as steel or tungsten, no artifact reduction has been achieved. Likewise in the CT values, no improvement by use of the monoenergetic extrapolation can be detected. The dose was evaluated at a point 7 cm behind the isocenter of a static field. Small improvements (around 1%) can be seen with 105 keV. However, the dose uncertainty remains of the order of 10

  13. Evaluation of monoenergetic late iodine enhancement dual-energy computed tomography for imaging of chronic myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wichmann, Julian L.; Kerl, J.M.; Frellesen, Claudia; Bodelle, Boris; Lehnert, Thomas; Vogl, Thomas J.; Bauer, Ralf W. [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Arbaciauskaite, Ruta [Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Department of Cardiology, Kaunas (Lithuania); Monsefi, Nadejda [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    To evaluate image quality and diagnostic accuracy of selective monoenergetic reconstructions of late iodine enhancement (LIE) dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) for imaging of chronic myocardial infarction (CMI). Twenty patients with a history of coronary bypass surgery underwent cardiac LIE-DECT and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). LIE-DECT images were reconstructed as selective monoenergetic spectral images with photon energies of 40, 60, 80, and 100 keV and the standard linear blending setting (M{sub 0}.6). Images were assessed for late enhancement, transmural extent, signal characteristics and subjective image quality. Seventy-nine myocardial segments (23 %) showed LGE. LIE-DECT detected 76 lesions. Images obtained at 80 keV and M{sub 0}.6 showed a high signal-to-noise ratio (15.9; 15.1), contrast-to-noise ratio (4.2; 4.0) and sensitivity (94.9 %; 92.4 %) while specificity was identical (99.6 %). Differences between these series were not statistically significant. Transmural extent of LIE was overestimated in both series (80 keV: 40 %; M{sub 0}.6: 35 %) in comparison to MRI. However, observers preferred 80 keV in 13/20 cases (65 %, κ = 0.634) over M{sub 0}.6 (4/20 cases) regarding subjective image quality. Post-processing of LIE-DECT data with selective monoenergetic reconstructions at 80 keV significantly improves subjective image quality while objective image quality shows no significant difference compared to standard linear blending. (orig.)

  14. Short-term predictions of solar flares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burov, V. A.

    1990-02-01

    A review of present-day theoretical investigations of the problem of the accumulation and release of energy in solar flares permits advancing the opinion that only individual flare events are described by a concrete model and that a single model alone does not describe the entire diversity of flares. Consideration of the observational data does not permit claiming the existence of a single universal mechanism known today of flare events. It appears possible to treat the problem of prediction in terms of the algebra of logic (Boolean logic) and to compare the truth table with the often-used contingency table. The introduction of a number of very general assumptions permits forming a general approach to the development of predictive schemes and selection of the individual elements of the models and informative criteria. Experimental results are given on the testing of some prediction procedures. The author's procedure of routine short-term prediction of flares on the basis of the methods of instruction on pattern recognition implemented in the form of a set of programs is outlined. The results of the application of this procedure in 1986 - 1988 are presented.

  15. Radio-flaring Ultracool Dwarf Population Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Route, Matthew

    2017-08-01

    Over a dozen ultracool dwarfs (UCDs), low-mass objects of spectral types ≥M7, are known to be sources of radio flares. These typically several-minutes-long radio bursts can be up to 100% circularly polarized and have high brightness temperatures, consistent with coherent emission via the electron cyclotron maser operating in approximately kilogauss magnetic fields. Recently, the statistical properties of the bulk physical parameters that describe these UCDs have become described adequately enough to permit synthesis of the population of radio-flaring objects. For the first time, I construct a Monte Carlo simulator to model the population of these radio-flaring UCDs. This simulator is powered by Intel Secure Key (ISK), a new processor technology that uses a local entropy source to improve random number generation that has heretofore been used to improve cryptography. The results from this simulator indicate that only ∼5% of radio-flaring UCDs within the local interstellar neighborhood (radio-flaring fraction and suggest that the observed behavior is likely a result of several factors. The performance of ISK as compared to other pseudorandom number generators is also evaluated, and its potential utility for other astrophysical codes is briefly described.

  16. Deterministically Driven Avalanche Models of Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strugarek, Antoine; Charbonneau, Paul; Joseph, Richard; Pirot, Dorian

    2014-08-01

    We develop and discuss the properties of a new class of lattice-based avalanche models of solar flares. These models are readily amenable to a relatively unambiguous physical interpretation in terms of slow twisting of a coronal loop. They share similarities with other avalanche models, such as the classical stick-slip self-organized critical model of earthquakes, in that they are driven globally by a fully deterministic energy-loading process. The model design leads to a systematic deficit of small-scale avalanches. In some portions of model space, mid-size and large avalanching behavior is scale-free, being characterized by event size distributions that have the form of power-laws with index values, which, in some parameter regimes, compare favorably to those inferred from solar EUV and X-ray flare data. For models using conservative or near-conservative redistribution rules, a population of large, quasiperiodic avalanches can also appear. Although without direct counterparts in the observational global statistics of flare energy release, this latter behavior may be relevant to recurrent flaring in individual coronal loops. This class of models could provide a basis for the prediction of large solar flares.

  17. Flare differentially rotates sunspot on Sun's surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Deng, Na; Lee, Jeongwoo; Hudson, Hugh S.; Gary, Dale E.; Wang, Jiasheng; Jing, Ju; Wang, Haimin

    2016-10-01

    Sunspots are concentrations of magnetic field visible on the solar surface (photosphere). It was considered implausible that solar flares, as resulted from magnetic reconnection in the tenuous corona, would cause a direct perturbation of the dense photosphere involving bulk motion. Here we report the sudden flare-induced rotation of a sunspot using the unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution of the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope, supplemented by magnetic data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. It is clearly observed that the rotation is non-uniform over the sunspot: as the flare ribbon sweeps across, its different portions accelerate (up to ~50° h-1) at different times corresponding to peaks of flare hard X-ray emission. The rotation may be driven by the surface Lorentz-force change due to the back reaction of coronal magnetic restructuring and is accompanied by a downward Poynting flux. These results have direct consequences for our understanding of energy and momentum transportation in the flare-related phenomena.

  18. Flare differentially rotates sunspot on Sun's surface

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chang; Cao, Wenda; Deng, Na; Lee, Jeongwoo; Hudson, Hugh S; Gary, Dale E; Wang, Jiasheng; Jing, Ju; Wang, Haimin

    2016-01-01

    Sunspots are concentrations of magnetic field visible on the solar surface (photosphere). It was considered implausible that solar flares, as resulted from magnetic reconnection in the tenuous corona, would cause a direct perturbation of the dense photosphere involving bulk motion. Here we report the sudden flare-induced rotation of a sunspot using the unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution of the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope, supplemented by magnetic data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. It is clearly observed that the rotation is non-uniform over the sunspot: as the flare ribbon sweeps across, its different portions accelerate (up to 50 deg per hr) at different times corresponding to peaks of flare hard X-ray emission. The rotation may be driven by the surface Lorentz-force change due to the back reaction of coronal magnetic restructuring and is accompanied by a downward Poynting flux. These results have direct consequences for our understanding of energy and momentum transportation in the flare-related p...

  19. On Flare-Driven Global Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoff, C.

    2009-12-01

    We recently presented evidence of a strong correlation between the energy in the high-frequency part of the acoustic spectrum of the Sun and the solar X-ray flux (Karoff & Kjeldsen 2008). The discovery indicates that flares drive global oscillations in the Sun in the same way that the entire Earth is set ringing for several weeks after a major earthquake, such as the 2004 December Sumatra-Andaman one. If this indication turns out to be true we might be able to use the relation between flares and the energy in the high-frequency part of the acoustic spectrum to detect e.g. flares on the far side of the Sun and flares on other solar-like stars. But, the discovery also opens many new questions such as why is it only the high-frequency part of the acoustic spectrum that is correlated with the X-ray flux? And, is there energy enough in solar flares to drive global oscillations?

  20. Multi-spectral observations of flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccarello, F.

    2016-11-01

    Observations show that during solar flares radiation can be emitted across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, spanning from gamma rays to radio waves. These emissions, related to the conversion of magnetic energy into other forms of energy (kinetic, thermal, waves) through magnetic reconnection, are due to different physical processes that can occur in different layers of the Sun. This means that flare observations need to be carried out using instruments operating in different wave-bands in order to achieve a complete scenario of the processes going on. Taking into account that most of the radiative energy is emitted at optical and UV wavelengths, observations carried out from space, need to be complemented by observations carried out from ground-based telescopes. Nowadays, the possibility to carry on high temporal, spatial and spectral resolution from ground-based telescopes in coordinated campaigns with space-borne instruments (like, i.e., IRIS and HINODE) gives the opportunity to investigate the details of the flare emission at different wavelengths and can provide useful hints to understand these phenomena and compare observations with models. However, it is undoubted that sometimes the pointing to the flaring region is not an easy task, due to the necessity to provide the target coordinates to satellites with some hours in advance. Some problems arising from this issue will be discussed. Moreover, new projects related to flare catalogues and archives will be presented.

  1. Radiative transfer simulations of magnetar flare beaming

    CERN Document Server

    van Putten, T; Baring, M G; Wijers, R A M J

    2016-01-01

    Magnetar giant flares show oscillatory modulations in the tails of their light curves, which can only be explained via some form of beaming. The fireball model for magnetar bursts has been used successfully to fit the phase-averaged light curves of the tails of giant flares, but so far no attempts have been made to fit the pulsations. We present a relatively simple numerical model to simulate beaming of magnetar flare emission. In our simulations, radiation escapes from the base of a fireball trapped in a dipolar magnetic field, and is scattered through the optically thick magnetosphere of the magnetar until it escapes. Beaming is provided by the presence of a relativistic outflow, as well as by the geometry of the system. We find that a simple picture for the relativistic outflow is enough to create the pulse fraction and sharp peaks observed in pulse profiles of magnetar flares, while without a relativistic outflow the beaming is insufficient to explain giant flare rotational modulations.

  2. Radiative transfer simulations of magnetar flare beaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Putten, T.; Watts, A. L.; Baring, M. G.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2016-09-01

    Magnetar giant flares show oscillatory modulations in the tails of their light curves, which can only be explained via some form of beaming. The fireball model for magnetar bursts has been used successfully to fit the phase-averaged light curves of the tails of giant flares, but so far no attempts have been made to fit the pulsations. We present a relatively simple numerical model to simulate beaming of magnetar flare emission. In our simulations, radiation escapes from the base of a fireball trapped in a dipolar magnetic field, and is scattered through the optically thick magnetosphere of the magnetar until it escapes. Beaming is provided by the presence of a relativistic outflow, as well as by the geometry of the system. We find that a simple picture for the relativistic outflow is enough to create the pulse fraction and sharp peaks observed in pulse profiles of magnetar flares, while without a relativistic outflow the beaming is insufficient to explain giant flare rotational modulations.

  3. An MHD model for magnetar giant flares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Y.; Lin, J.; Zhang, Q. S. [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 110, Kunming, Yunnan 650011 (China); Zhang, L. [Department of Physics, Yunnan University, Kunming, Yunnan 650091 (China); Reeves, K. K. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Yuan, F., E-mail: mengy@ynao.ac.cn, E-mail: jlin@ynao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2014-04-10

    Giant flares on soft gamma-ray repeaters that are thought to take place on magnetars release enormous energy in a short time interval. Their power can be explained by catastrophic instabilities occurring in the magnetic field configuration and the subsequent magnetic reconnection. By analogy with the coronal mass ejection events on the Sun, we develop a theoretical model via an analytic approach for magnetar giant flares. In this model, the rotation and/or displacement of the crust causes the field to twist and deform, leading to flux rope formation in the magnetosphere and energy accumulation in the related configuration. When the energy and helicity stored in the configuration reach a threshold, the system loses its equilibrium, the flux rope is ejected outward in a catastrophic way, and magnetic reconnection helps the catastrophe develop to a plausible eruption. By taking SGR 1806–20 as an example, we calculate the free magnetic energy released in such an eruptive process and find that it is more than 10{sup 47} erg, which is enough to power a giant flare. The released free magnetic energy is converted into radiative energy, kinetic energy, and gravitational energy of the flux rope. We calculated the light curves of the eruptive processes for the giant flares of SGR 1806–20, SGR 0526–66, and SGR 1900+14, and compared them with the observational data. The calculated light curves are in good agreement with the observed light curves of giant flares.

  4. Flare differentially rotates sunspot on Sun's surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Deng, Na; Lee, Jeongwoo; Hudson, Hugh S; Gary, Dale E; Wang, Jiasheng; Jing, Ju; Wang, Haimin

    2016-10-10

    Sunspots are concentrations of magnetic field visible on the solar surface (photosphere). It was considered implausible that solar flares, as resulted from magnetic reconnection in the tenuous corona, would cause a direct perturbation of the dense photosphere involving bulk motion. Here we report the sudden flare-induced rotation of a sunspot using the unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution of the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope, supplemented by magnetic data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. It is clearly observed that the rotation is non-uniform over the sunspot: as the flare ribbon sweeps across, its different portions accelerate (up to ∼50° h(-1)) at different times corresponding to peaks of flare hard X-ray emission. The rotation may be driven by the surface Lorentz-force change due to the back reaction of coronal magnetic restructuring and is accompanied by a downward Poynting flux. These results have direct consequences for our understanding of energy and momentum transportation in the flare-related phenomena.

  5. Evaluation of Neutron Response of Criticality Accident Alarm System Detector to Quasi-Monoenergetic 24 keV Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Norio; Yoshida, Tadayoshi; Yashima, Hiroshi

    The criticality accident alarm system (CAAS), which was recently developed and installed at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency's Tokai Reprocessing Plant, consists of a plastic scintillator combined with a cadmium-lined polyethylene moderator and thereby responds to both neutrons and gamma rays. To evaluate the neutron absorbed dose rate response of the CAAS detector, a 24 keV quasi-monoenergetic neutron irradiation experiment was performed at the B-1 facility of the Kyoto University Research Reactor. The detector's evaluated neutron response was confirmed to agree reasonably well with prior computer-predicted responses.

  6. Solar flare hard and soft x ray relationship determined from SMM HXRBS and BCS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toot, G. David

    1989-01-01

    The exact nature of the solar flare process is still somewhat a mystery. A key element to understanding flares if the relationship between the hard x rays emitted by the most energetic portions of the flare and the soft x rays from other areas and times. This relationship was studied by comparing hard x ray light curved from the Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS) with the soft x ray light curve and its derivation from the Bent Crystal Spectrometer (BCS) which is part of the X-Ray Polychrometer (XRP), these instruments being on the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft (SMM). Data sample was taken from flares observed with the above instruments during 1980, the peak of the previous maximum of solar activity. Flares were chosen based on complete coverage of the event by several instruments. The HXRBS data covers the x ray spectrum from about 25 keV to about 440 keV in 15 spectral channels, while the BCS data used covers a region of the Spectrum around 3 angstroms including emission from the Ca XIX ion. Both sets of data were summed over their spectral ranges and plotted against time at a maximum time resolution of around 3 seconds. The most popular theory of flares holds that a beam of electrons produces the hard x rays by bremsstrahlung while the soft x rays are the thermal response to this energy deposition. The question is whether the rate of change of soft x ray emission might reflect the variability of the electron beam and hence the variability of the hard x rays. To address this, we took the time derivative of the soft x ray light curve and compared it to the hard flares, 12 of them showed very closed agreement between the soft x ray derivative and the hard x ray light curve. The other five did not show this behavior but were similar to each other in general soft x ray behavior. Efforts to determine basic differences between the two kinds of flares continue. In addition the behavior of soft x ray temperature of flares was examined.

  7. Flare forecasting based on sunspot-groups characteristics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Contarino, Lidia; Zuccarello, Francesca; Romano, Paolo; Spadaro, Daniele; Guglielmino, Salvatore L; Battiato, Viviana

    2009-01-01

    ... accurate flare forecasting. In order to give a contribution to this aspect, we focused our attention on the characteristics that must be fulfilled by sunspot-groups in order to be flare-productive...

  8. The Origin of the Solar Flare Waiting-Time Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Wheatland, M S

    2000-01-01

    It was recently pointed out that the distribution of times between solar flares (the flare waiting-time distribution) follows a power law, for long waiting times. Based on 25 years of soft X-ray flares observed by Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) instruments it is shown that 1. the waiting-time distribution of flares is consistent with a time-dependent Poisson process, and 2. the fraction of time the Sun spends with different flaring rates approximately follows an exponential distribution. The second result is a new phenomenological law for flares. It is shown analytically how the observed power-law behavior of the waiting times originates in the exponential distribution of flaring rates. These results are argued to be consistent with a non-stationary avalanche model for flares.

  9. KEPLER FLARES. I. ACTIVE AND INACTIVE M DWARFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawley, Suzanne L.; Davenport, James R. A.; Kowalski, Adam F.; Wisniewski, John P.; Deitrick, Russell; Hilton, Eric J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Hebb, Leslie, E-mail: slhawley@uw.edu [Department of Physics, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, 300 Pulteney Street, Geneva, NY 14456 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    We analyzed Kepler short-cadence M dwarf observations. Spectra from the Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5 m telescope identify magnetically active (Hα in emission) stars. The active stars are of mid-M spectral type, have numerous flares, and have well-defined rotational modulation due to starspots. The inactive stars are of early M type, exhibit less starspot signature, and have fewer flares. A Kepler to U-band energy scaling allows comparison of the Kepler flare frequency distributions with previous ground-based data. M dwarfs span a large range of flare frequency and energy, blurring the distinction between active and inactive stars designated solely by the presence of Hα. We analyzed classical and complex (multiple peak) flares on GJ 1243, finding strong correlations between flare energy, amplitude, duration, and decay time, with only a weak dependence on rise time. Complex flares last longer and have higher energy at the same amplitude, and higher energy flares are more likely to be complex. A power law fits the energy distribution for flares with log E{sub K{sub p}}> 31 erg, but the predicted number of low-energy flares far exceeds the number observed, at energies where flares are still easily detectable, indicating that the power-law distribution may flatten at low energy. There is no correlation of flare occurrence or energy with starspot phase, the flare waiting time distribution is consistent with flares occurring randomly in time, and the energies of consecutive flares are uncorrelated. These observations support a scenario where many independent active regions on the stellar surface are contributing to the observed flare rate.

  10. Analysis of the 9th November 1990 flare

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anita Joshi; Wahab Uddin

    2000-09-01

    In this paper we present complete two-dimensional measurements of the observed brightness of the 9th November 1990 flare, using a PDS microdensitometer scanner and image processing software MIDAS. The resulting isophotal contour maps, were used to describe morphological-cum-temporal behaviour of the flare and also the kernels of the flare. Correlation of the flare with SXR and MW radiations were also studied.

  11. Electrodynamical response of the Indian low-mid latitude ionosphere to the very large solar flare of 28 October 2003 – a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sridharan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The electrodynamic effects on the low-mid latitude ionospheric region have been investigated using GPS (global positioning system data, ionosonde data and ΔH values, during the very large solar flare (X17.2/4B of 28 October 2003. The results bring out the flare induced unusual behaviour of the equatorial ionosphere on this day just prior to sunset. The important observations are i Large and prolonged Ne enhancements observed from ionosonde data just after the flare-related peak enhancement in EUV flux. The observed enhancement in Ne is due to the increase in ionization production due to the enhanced EUV flux and the persistence of the enhancement is probably due to the prompt penetration related upliftment of the F layer (just prior to the flare peak phase to higher altitudes, where recombination rates are lower. ii A significant enhancement in total electron content (TEC (~10 TEC units at regions around the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA crest region (Ahmedabad during the flare in association with the flare related EUV flux enhancement. iii Similar enhancements seen at stations of Jodhpur and Delhi in the mid latitude sector. ivThe flare related flux enhancements in different longitude sectors in the equatorial electrojet region have been shown to produce positive and negative variations in electrojet strength indicating the presence of current systems having positive and negative polarities in different longitude sectors. Thus the flare effect reveals the longitudinal variation of the counter electrojet events in the Equatorial Electrojet (EEJ region.

  12. Evaluation of ground level concentration of pollutant due to gas flaring by computer simulation: A case study of Niger - Delta area of Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. ABDULKAREEM

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The disposal of associated gases through flaring has been a major problem for the Nigerian oil and gas industries and most of theses gases are flared due to the lack of commercial out lets. The resultant effects of gas flaring are the damaging effect of the environment due to acid rain formation, green house effect, global warming and ozone depletion.This writes up is aimed at evaluating ground level concentration of CO2, SO2, NO2 and total hydrocarbon (THC, which are product of gas flared in oil producing areas. Volumes of gas flared at different flow station were collected as well as geometrical parameters. The results of simulation of model developed based on the principles of gaseous dispersion by Gaussian showed a good agreement with dispersion pattern.The results showed that the dispersion pattern of pollutants at ground level depends on the volume of gas flared, wind speed, velocity of discharge and nearness to the source of flaring. The results shows that continuous gas flaring irrespective of the quantity deposited in the immediate environment will in long run lead to change in the physicochemical properties of soil.

  13. Microwave View on Particle Acceleration in Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Fleishman, Gregory D

    2013-01-01

    The thermal-to-nonthermal partition was found to vary greatly from one flare to another resulting in a broad variety of cases from 'heating without acceleration' to 'acceleration without heating'. Recent analysis of microwave data of these differing cases suggests that a similar acceleration mechanism, forming a power-law nonthermal tail up to a few MeV or even higher, operates in all the cases. However, the level of this nonthermal spectrum compared to the original thermal distribution differs significantly from one case to another, implying a highly different thermal-to-nonthermal energy partition in various cases. This further requires a specific mechanism capable of extracting the charged particles from the thermal pool and supplying them to a bulk acceleration process to operate in flares \\textit{in addition} to the bulk acceleration process itself, which, in contrast, efficiently accelerates the seed particles, while cannot accelerate the thermal particles. Within this 'microwave' view on the flare ener...

  14. Remote Oscillatory responses to a solar flare

    CERN Document Server

    Andic, Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    The processes governing energy storage and release in the Sun are both related to the solar magnetic field. We demonstrate the existence of a magnetic connection between energy released caused by a flare and increased oscillatory power in the lower solar atmosphere. The oscillatory power in active regions tends to increase in response to explosive events at a different location, but not in the region itself. We carry out timing studies and show that this is probably caused by a large scale magnetic connection between the regions, and not a globally propagating wave. We show that oscillations tend to exist in longer lived wave trains at short periods (P< 200s) at the time of a flare. This may be a mechanism by which flare energy can be redistributed throughout the solar atmosphere.

  15. Image watermarking against lens flare effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotikawanid, Piyanart; Amornraksa, Thumrongrat

    2017-02-01

    Lens flare effects in various photo and camera software nowadays can partially or fully damage the watermark information within the watermarked image. We propose in this paper a spatial domain based image watermarking against lens flare effects. The watermark embedding is based on the modification of the saturation color component in HSV color space of a host image. For watermark extraction, a homomorphic filter is used to predict the original embedding component from the watermarked component, and the watermark is blindly recovered by differentiating both components. The watermarked image's quality is evaluated by wPSNR, while the extracted watermark's accuracy is evaluated by NC. The experimental results against various types of lens flare effects from both computer software and mobile application showed that our proposed method outperformed the previous methods.

  16. Measurements of Absolute Abundances in Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Harry P

    2013-01-01

    We present measurements of elemental abundances in solar flares with the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). EVE observes both high temperature Fe emission lines (Fe XV-Fe XXIV) and continuum emission from thermal bremsstrahlung that is proportional to the abundance of H. By comparing the relative intensities of line and continuum emission it is possible to determine the enrichment of the flare plasma relative to the composition of the photosphere. This is the first ionization potential or FIP bias ($f$). Since thermal bremsstrahlung at EUV wavelengths is relatively insensitive to the electron temperature, it is important to account for the distribution of electron temperatures in the emitting plasma. We accomplish this by using the observed spectra to infer the differential emission measure distribution and FIP bias simultaneously. In each of the 21 flares that we analyze we find that the observed composition is close to photospheric. The mean FIP bias in our sample is $...

  17. Magnetic Field Amplification and Blazar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xuhui; Fossati, Giovanni; Pohl, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Recent multiwavelength observations of PKS 0208-512 by SMARTS, Fermi, and Swift revealed that gamma-ray and optical light curves of this flat spectrum radio quasars are highly correlated, but with an exception of one large optical flare having no corresponding gamma-ray activity or even detection. On the other hand, recent advances in SNRs observations and plasma simulations both reveal that magnetic field downstream of astrophysical shocks can be largely amplified beyond simple shock compression. These amplifications, along with their associated particle acceleration, might contribute to blazar flares, including the peculiar flare of PKS 0208-512. Using our time dependent multizone blazar emission code, we evaluate several scenarios that may represent such phenomena. This code combines Monte Carlo method that tracks the radiative processes including inverse Compton scattering, and Fokker-Planck equation that follows the cooling and acceleration of particles. It is a comprehensive time dependent code that ful...

  18. Optimizing window settings for improved presentation of virtual monoenergetic images in dual-energy computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wanyi; Marin, Daniele; Ramirez-Giraldo, Juan Carlos; Choudhury, Kingshuk Roy; Solomon, Justin; Schabel, Christoph; Patel, Bhavik N; Samei, Ehsan

    2017-08-04

    Dual-energy computed tomography virtual monoenergetic imaging (VMI) at 40 keV exhibits superior contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), although practicing radiologists do not consistently prefer it over VMI at 70 keV due to high perceivable noise. We hypothesize that the presentation of 40 keV VMI may be compromised using window settings (i.e., window-and-level values [W-L values]) designed for conventional single-energy CT. This study aimed to devise optimum window settings that reduce the apparent noise and utilize the high CNR of 40 keV VMI, in order to improve the conspicuity of hypervascular liver lesions. Three W-L value adjustment methods were investigated to alter the presentation of 40 keV VMI. To harness the high CNR of 40 keV VMI, the methods were designed to achieve (a) liver histogram distribution, (b) lesion-to-liver contrast, or (c) liver background noise comparable to those perceived in 70 keV VMI. This IRB-approved study included 18 patient abdominal datasets reconstructed at 40 and 70 keV. For each patient, the W-L values were determined using the three methods. For each of the images with default or adjusted W-L values, the noise, contrast, and CNR were calculated in terms of both display space and native CT number (referred to as HU) space. An observer study was performed to compare the 40 keV images with the three adjusted W-L values, and 40 and 70 keV images with default W-L values in terms of noise, contrast, and diagnostic preference. A comparison was also made in terms of the applicability of using patient-specific or patient-averaged W-L values. Using the default W-L values, 40 keV VMI exhibited higher HU CNR than 70 keV VMI by 24.6 ± 14.9% (P VMI dataset image quality by improving the actual display CNR. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  19. Arbitrary quadratures determination of the monoenergetic neutron density in an homogeneous finite sphere with isotropic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez G, J., E-mail: julian.sanchez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    The solution of the so-called Canonical problems of neutron transport theory has been given by Case, who developed a method akin to the classical eigenfunction expansion procedure, extended to admit singular eigenfunctions. The solution is given as a set consisting of a Fredholm integral equation coupled with a transcendental equation, which has to be solved for the expansion coefficients by iteration. CASE's method make extensive use of the results of the theory of functions of a complex variable and many successful approaches to solve in an approximate form the above mentioned set have been reported in the literature. We present here an entirely different approach which deals with the canonical problems in a more direct and elementary manner. As far as we know, the original idea for the latter method is due to Carlvik who devised the escape probability approximation to the solution of the neutron transport equation in its integral form. In essence, the procedure consists in assuming a sectionally constant form of the neutron density that in turn yields a set of linear algebraic equations obeyed by the assumed constant values of the density. Very well established techniques of numerical analysis for the solution of integral equations consist in independent approaches that generalize the sectionally constant approach by assuming a sectionally low degree polynomial for the unknown function. This procedure also known as the arbitrary quadratures method is especially suited to deal with cases where the kernel of the integral equation is singular. The author wishes to present the results obtained with the arbitrary quadratures method for the numerical calculation of the monoenergetic neutron density in a critical, homogeneous sphere of finite radius with isotropic scattering. The singular integral equation obeyed by the neutron density in the critical sphere is introduced, an outline of the method's main features is given, and tables and graphs of the density

  20. Active Region Emergence and Remote Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yixing; Welsch, Brian T.

    2016-02-01

    We study the effect of new emerging solar active regions on the large-scale magnetic environment of existing regions. We first present a theoretical approach to quantify the "interaction energy" between new and pre-existing regions as the difference between i) the summed magnetic energies of their individual potential fields and ii) the energy of their superposed potential fields. We expect that this interaction energy can, depending upon the relative arrangements of newly emerged and pre-existing magnetic flux, indicate the existence of "topological" free magnetic energy in the global coronal field that is independent of any "internal" free magnetic energy due to coronal electric currents flowing within the newly emerged and pre-existing flux systems. We then examine the interaction energy in two well-studied cases of flux emergence, but find that the predicted energetic perturbation is relatively small compared to energies released in large solar flares. Next, we present an observational study of the influence of the emergence of new active regions on flare statistics in pre-existing active regions, using NOAA's Solar Region Summary and GOES flare databases. As part of an effort to precisely determine the emergence time of active regions in a large event sample, we find that emergence in about half of these regions exhibits a two-stage behavior, with an initial gradual phase followed by a more rapid phase. Regarding flaring, we find that the emergence of new regions is associated with a significant increase in the occurrence rate of X- and M-class flares in pre-existing regions. This effect tends to be more significant when pre-existing and new emerging active regions are closer. Given the relative weakness of the interaction energy, this effect suggests that perturbations in the large-scale magnetic field, such as topology changes invoked in the "breakout" model of coronal mass ejections, might play a significant role in the occurrence of some flares.

  1. The Flare-ona of EK Draconis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    2015-07-01

    EK Draconis (HD 129333: G1.5 V) is a well-known young (50 Myr) solar analog. In 2012, Hubble Space Telescope returned to EK Dra to follow up a far-ultraviolet (FUV) SNAPshot visit by Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) two years earlier. The brief SNAP pointing had found surprisingly redshifted, impulsively variable subcoronal “hot-line” emission of Si iv 1400 Å (T ˜ 8 × 104 K). Serendipitously, the 2012 follow-on program witnessed one of the largest FUV flares ever recorded on a sunlike star, which again displayed strong redshifts (downflows) of 30-40 km s-1, even after compensating for small systematics in the COS velocity scales, uncovered through a cross-calibration by Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). The (now reduced, but still substantial) ˜10 km s-1 hot-line redshifts outside the flaring interval did not vary with rotational phase, so cannot be caused by “Doppler imaging” (bright surface patches near a receding limb). Density diagnostic O iv] 1400 Å multiplet line ratios of EK Dra suggest ne ˜ 1011 cm-3, an order of magnitude larger than in low-activity solar twin α Centauri A, but typical of densities inferred in large stellar soft X-ray events. The self-similar FUV hot-line profiles between the flare decay and the subsequent more quiet periods, and the unchanging but high densities, reinforce a long-standing idea that the coronae of hyperactive dwarfs are flaring all the time, in a scale-free way; a flare-ona if you will. In this picture, the subsonic hot-line downflows probably are a byproduct of the post-flare cooling process, something like “coronal rain” on the Sun. All in all, the new STIS/COS program documents a complex, energetic, dynamic outer atmosphere of the young sunlike star.

  2. Flares in the X-ray source EXO 2030 + 375

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apparao, Krishna M. V.

    1991-01-01

    Six X-ray flares were observed in the source EXO 2030 + 375 with an average time interval of about 4 hr between the flares. It is shown here that the flares can be due to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities near the magnetospheric boundary of the neutron star when it reaches the equilibrium period.

  3. Absorption events associated with solar flares

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    During the upward period of solar cycle 23, the imaging riometer at Zhongshan, Antarctica (geomag. lat. 74.5°S) was used to study the solar proton events and the X-ray solar flares which are associated with the absorption events. In our study, the relationship between the absorption intensity and X-ray flux is found in a power form which is consistent with the theoretical result. The imaging riometer absorption data at Ny-?lesund, Svalbard reconfirm the above relationship. We also argue that only M-class flares can generate a significant daytime absorption.

  4. Universality in solar flare and earthquake occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Arcangelis, L; Godano, C; Lippiello, E; Nicodemi, M

    2006-02-10

    Earthquakes and solar flares are phenomena involving huge and rapid releases of energy characterized by complex temporal occurrence. By analyzing available experimental catalogs, we show that the stochastic processes underlying these apparently different phenomena have universal properties. Namely, both problems exhibit the same distributions of sizes, interoccurrence times, and the same temporal clustering: We find after flare sequences with power law temporal correlations as the Omori law for seismic sequences. The observed universality suggests a common approach to the interpretation of both phenomena in terms of the same driving physical mechanism.

  5. On the detection of neutrinos from solar flares using pion-decay photons to provide a time window template

    CERN Document Server

    de Wasseige, G; van Eijndhoven, N; Evenson, P; Klein, K -L

    2015-01-01

    Since the end of the eighties and in response to a reported increase in the total neutrino flux in the Homestake experiment in coincidence with solar flares, solar neutrino detectors have searched for solar flare signals. Even though these detectors have used different solar flare samples and analyses, none of them has been able to confirm the possible signal seen by Homestake. Neutrinos from the decay of mesons, which are themselves produced in collisions of accelerated ions with the solar atmosphere would provide a novel window on the underlying physics of the hadronic acceleration and interaction processes during solar flares. Solar flare neutrino flux measurements would indeed help to constrain current parameters such as the composition of the accelerated flux, the proton/ion spectral index and the high energy cutoff or the magnetic configuration in the interaction region. We describe here a new way to search for these neutrinos by considering a specific solar flare sample and a data driven time window te...

  6. A recent strong X-ray flaring activity of 1ES 1959+650 with possibly less efficient stochastic acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapanadze, B.; Dorner, D.; Vercellone, S.; Romano, P.; Kapanadze, S.; Mdzinarishvili, T.

    2016-09-01

    We present an X-ray flaring activity of 1ES 1959+650 in 2015 August-2016 January, which was the most powerful and prolonged during the 10.75 yr period since the start of its monitoring with X-ray Telescope onboard Swift. A new highest historical 0.3-10 keV count rate was recorded three times that makes this object the third BL Lacertae source exceeding the level of 20 counts s-1. Along with the overall variability by a factor of 5.7, this epoch was characterized by fast X-ray flares by a factor of 2.0-3.1, accompanied with an extreme spectral variability. The source also shows a simultaneous flaring activity in the optical - UV and 0.3-100 GeV bands, although a fast γ-ray flare without significant optical - X-ray counterparts is also found. In contrast to the X-ray flares in the previous years, the stochastic acceleration seems be less important for the electrons responsible for producing X-ray emission during this flare that challenges the earlier suggestion that the electrons in the jets of TeV-detected BL Lacertae objects should undergo an efficient stochastic acceleration resulting in a lower X-ray spectral curvature.

  7. Observations and Simulations of the Na i D1 Line Profiles in an M-class Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuridze, D.; Mathioudakis, M.; Christian, D. J.; Kowalski, A. F.; Jess, D. B.; Grant, S. D. T.; Kawate, T.; Simões, P. J. A.; Allred, J. C.; Keenan, F. P.

    2016-12-01

    We study the temporal evolution of the Na i D1 line profiles in the M3.9 flare SOL2014-06-11T21:03 UT, using observations at high spectral resolution obtained with the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer instrument on the Dunn Solar Telescope combined with radiative hydrodynamic simulations. Our results show a significant increase in the intensities of the line core and wings during the flare. The analysis of the line profiles from the flare ribbons reveals that the Na i D1 line has a central reversal with excess emission in the blue wing (blue asymmetry). We combine RADYN and RH simulations to synthesize Na i D1 line profiles of the flaring atmosphere and find good agreement with the observations. Heating with a beam of electrons modifies the radiation field in the flaring atmosphere and excites electrons from the ground state 3s 2S to the first excited state 3p 2P, which in turn modifies the relative population of the two states. The change in temperature and the population density of the energy states make the sodium line profile revert from absorption into emission. Furthermore, the rapid changes in temperature break the pressure balance between the different layers of the lower atmosphere, generating upflow/downflow patterns. Analysis of the simulated spectra reveals that the asymmetries of the Na i D1 flare profile are produced by the velocity gradients in the lower solar atmosphere.

  8. OBSERVATIONS OF A SERIES OF FLARES AND ASSOCIATED JET-LIKE ERUPTIONS DRIVEN BY THE EMERGENCE OF TWISTED MAGNETIC FIELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Eun-Kyung; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl; Kim, Sujin; Cho, Kyung-Suk; Kumar, Pankaj; Kim, Yeon-Han [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeokdae-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung-Hong [Institute for Astronomy, Astrophysics, Space Applications and Remote Sensing (IAASARS), National Observatory of Athens, Penteli 15236 (Greece); Chae, Jongchul; Yang, Heesu; Cho, Kyuhyoun; Song, Donguk, E-mail: eklim@kasi.re.kr [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-20

    We studied temporal changes of morphological and magnetic properties of a succession of four confined flares followed by an eruptive flare using the high-resolution New Solar Telescope (NST) operating at the Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) magnetograms and Atmospheric Image Assembly (AIA) EUV images provided by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). From the NST/Hα and the SDO/AIA 304 Å observations we found that each flare developed a jet structure that evolved in a manner similar to evolution of the blowout jet: (1) an inverted-Y-shaped jet appeared and drifted away from its initial position; (2) jets formed a curtain-like structure that consisted of many fine threads accompanied by subsequent brightenings near the footpoints of the fine threads; and finally, (3) the jet showed a twisted structure visible near the flare maximum. Analysis of the HMI data showed that both the negative magnetic flux and the magnetic helicity have been gradually increasing in the positive-polarity region, indicating the continuous injection of magnetic twist before and during the series of flares. Based on these results, we suggest that the continuous emergence of twisted magnetic flux played an important role in producing successive flares and developing a series of blowout jets.

  9. CHROMOSPHERIC AND CORONAL OBSERVATIONS OF SOLAR FLARES WITH THE HELIOSEISMIC AND MAGNETIC IMAGER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez Oliveros, Juan-Carlos; Krucker, Säm; Hudson, Hugh S.; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Bain, Hazel [Space Sciences Laboratory, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lindsey, Charles [North West Research Associates, CORA Division, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Bogart, Rick; Couvidat, Sebastien; Scherrer, Phil [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Schou, Jesper [Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2014-01-10

    We report observations of white-light ejecta in the low corona, for two X-class flares on 2013 May 13, using data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) of the Solar Dynamics Observatory. At least two distinct kinds of sources appeared (chromospheric and coronal), in the early and later phases of flare development, in addition to the white-light footpoint sources commonly observed in the lower atmosphere. The gradual emissions have a clear identification with the classical loop-prominence system, but are brighter than expected and possibly seen here in the continuum rather than line emission. We find the HMI flux exceeds the radio/X-ray interpolation of the bremsstrahlung produced in the flare soft X-ray sources by at least one order of magnitude. This implies the participation of cooler sources that can produce free-bound continua and possibly line emission detectable by HMI. One of the early sources dynamically resembles {sup c}oronal rain{sup ,} appearing at a maximum apparent height and moving toward the photosphere at an apparent constant projected speed of 134 ± 8 km s{sup –1}. Not much literature exists on the detection of optical continuum sources above the limb of the Sun by non-coronagraphic instruments and these observations have potential implications for our basic understanding of flare development, since visible observations can in principle provide high spatial and temporal resolution.

  10. Thermo-hydraulic modeling of flow in flare systems

    OpenAIRE

    Meindinyo, Remi-Erempagamo T.

    2012-01-01

    Flare systems play a major role in the safety of Oil and Gas installations by serving as outlets for emergency pressure relief in case of process upsets. Accurate and reliable estimation of system thermo-hydraulic parameters, especially system back-pressure is critical to the integrity of a flare design. FlareNet (Aspen Flare System Analyzer Version 7) is a steady state simulation tool tailored for flare system design and has found common use today. But design based on steady state modelin...

  11. Spatial Offsets in Flare-CME Current Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, John C.; Giordano, Silvio; Ciaravella, Angela

    2017-07-01

    Magnetic reconnection plays an integral part in nearly all models of solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The reconnection heats and accelerates the plasma, produces energetic electrons and ions, and changes the magnetic topology to form magnetic flux ropes and to allow CMEs to escape. Structures that appear between flare loops and CME cores in optical, UV, EUV, and X-ray observations have been identified as current sheets and have been interpreted in terms of the nature of the reconnection process and the energetics of the events. Many of these studies have used UV spectral observations of high temperature emission features in the [Fe xviii] and Si xii lines. In this paper, we discuss several surprising cases in which the [Fe xviii] and Si xii emission peaks are spatially offset from each other. We discuss interpretations based on asymmetric reconnection, on a thin reconnection region within a broader streamer-like structure, and on projection effects. Some events seem to be easily interpreted as the projection of a sheet that is extended along the line of sight that is viewed an angle, but a physical interpretation in terms of asymmetric reconnection is also plausible. Other events favor an interpretation as a thin current sheet embedded in a streamer-like structure.

  12. A solar tornado triggered by flares?

    CERN Document Server

    Panesar, N K; Tiwari, S K; Low, B C

    2012-01-01

    Solar tornados are dynamical, conspicuously helical magnetic structures mainly observed as a prominence activity. We investigate and propose a triggering mechanism for the solar tornado observed in a prominence cavity by SDO/AIA on September 25, 2011. High-cadence EUV images from the SDO/AIA and the Ahead spacecraft of STEREO/EUVI are used to correlate three flares in the neighbouring active-region (NOAA 11303), and their EUV waves, with the dynamical developments of the tornado. The timings of the flares and EUV waves observed on-disk in 195\\AA\\ are analyzed in relation to the tornado activities observed at the limb in 171\\AA. Each of the three flares and its related EUV wave occurred within 10 hours of the onset of the tornado. They have an observed causal relationship with the commencement of activity in the prominence where the tornado develops. Tornado-like rotations along the side of the prominence start after the second flare. The prominence cavity expands with acceleration of tornado motion after the ...

  13. Do all Flares have White Light Emission?

    CERN Document Server

    Jess, D B; Crockett, P J; Keenan, F P

    2008-01-01

    High-cadence, multiwavelength optical observations of a solar active region (NOAA 10969), obtained with the Swedish Solar Telescope, are presented. Difference imaging of white light continuum data reveals a white light brightening, 2 min in duration, linked to a co-temporal and co-spatial C2.0 flare event. The flare kernel observed in the white light images has a diameter of 300 km, thus rendering it below the resolution limit of most space-based telescopes. Continuum emission is present only during the impulsive stage of the flare, with the effects of chromospheric emission subsequently delayed by approximately 2 min. The localized flare emission peaks at 300% above the quiescent flux. This large, yet tightly confined, increase in emission is only resolvable due to the high spatial resolution of the Swedish Solar Telescope. An investigation of the line-of-sight magnetic field derived from simultaneous MDI data shows that the continuum brightening is located very close to a magnetic polarity inversion line. A...

  14. Measurements of Absolute Abundances in Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Harry P.

    2014-05-01

    We present measurements of elemental abundances in solar flares with the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. EVE observes both high temperature Fe emission lines (Fe XV-Fe XXIV) and continuum emission from thermal bremsstrahlung that is proportional to the abundance of H. By comparing the relative intensities of line and continuum emission it is possible to determine the enrichment of the flare plasma relative to the composition of the photosphere. This is the first ionization potential or FIP bias (f). Since thermal bremsstrahlung at EUV wavelengths is relatively insensitive to the electron temperature, it is important to account for the distribution of electron temperatures in the emitting plasma. We accomplish this by using the observed spectra to infer the differential emission measure distribution and FIP bias simultaneously. In each of the 21 flares that we analyze we find that the observed composition is close to photospheric. The mean FIP bias in our sample is f = 1.17 ± 0.22. This analysis suggests that the bulk of the plasma evaporated during a flare comes from deep in the chromosphere, below the region where elemental fractionation occurs.

  15. The flare origin of Forbush decreases not associated with solar flares on the visible hemisphere of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iucci, N.; Parisi, M.; Signorini, C.; Storini, M.; Villoresi, G.

    1985-01-01

    Investigations have shown that Forbush decreases (Fds) are produced by the propagation into the interplanetary space of a strong perturbation originating from a solar flare (Sf) accompanied by Type IV radioemission. As the front of the perturbation propagates into the interplanetary space, the region in which the galactic cosmic rays are modulated (Fd-modulated region) rotates westward with the Sun and is generally included between two boundary streams; therefore the Fds not associated with observed type IV Sfs (N.Ass.Fds) are likely to be produced by type IV Sfs occurred on the Sun's backside: these vents can be observed when the Earth crosses the corotating Western boundary of the modulated region.

  16. The Relation between Solar Eruption Topologies and Observed Flare Features I: Flare Ribbons

    CERN Document Server

    Savcheva, A; McKillop, S; McCauley, P; Hanson, E; Su, Y; Werner, E; DeLuca, E E

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a topological magnetic field investigation of seven two-ribbon flares in sigmoidal active regions observed with Hinode, STEREO, and SDO. We first derive the 3D coronal magnetic field structure of all regions using marginally unstable 3D coronal magnetic field models created with the flux rope insertion method. The unstable models have been shown to be a good model of the flaring magnetic field configurations. Regions are selected based on their pre-flare configurations along with the appearance and observational coverage of flare ribbons, and the model is constrained using pre-flare features observed in extreme ultraviolet and X-ray passbands. We perform a topology analysis of the models by computing the squashing factor, Q, in order to determine the locations of prominent quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs). QSLs from these maps are compared to flare ribbons at their full extents. We show that in all cases the straight segments of the two J-shaped ribbons are matched very well by the flux...

  17. Optical flares and flaring oscillations on the M-type eclipsing binary CU Cnc

    CERN Document Server

    -B., Qian S; Zhu, L -Y; Liu, L; Liao, W -P; Zhao, E -G; He, J -J; Li, L -J; Li, K; Dai, Z -B

    2012-01-01

    We report here the discovery of an optical flare observed in R band from the red-dwarf eclipsing binary CU Cnc whose component stars are at the upper boundary of full convection (M1=0.43 and M2=0.4M0, M0 is the solar mass). The amplitude of the flare is the largest among those detected in R band (~0.52mag) and the duration time is about 73 minutes. As those observed on the Sun, quasi-periodic oscillations were seen during and after the flare. Three more R-band flares were found by follow up monitoring. In total, this binary was monitored photometrically by using R filter for 79.9 hours, which reveals a R-band flare rate about 0.05 flares per hour. These detections together with other strong chromospheric and coronal activities, i.e., very strong H_alpha and H_beta emission features and an EUV and X-ray source, indicate that it has very strong magnetic activity. Therefore, the apparent faintness (~1.4 magnitude in V) of CU Cnc compared with other single red dwarfs of the same mass can be plausibly explained by...

  18. GRB Flares: A New Detection Algorithm, Previously Undetected Flares, and Implications on GRB Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Swenson, C A

    2013-01-01

    Flares in GRB light curves have been observed since shortly after the discovery of the first GRB afterglow. However, it was not until the launch of the Swift satellite that it was realized how common flares are, appearing in nearly 50% of all X-ray afterglows as observed by the XRT instrument. The majority of these observed X-ray flares are easily distinguishable by eye and have been measured to have up to as much fluence as the original prompt emission. Through studying large numbers of these X-ray flares it has been determined that they likely result from a distinct emission source different than that powering the GRB afterglow. These findings could be confirmed if similar results were found using flares in other energy ranges. However, until now, the UVOT instrument on Swift seemed to have observed far fewer flares in the UV/optical than were seen in the X-ray. This was primarily due to poor sampling and data being spread across multiple filters, but a new optimal co-addition and normalization of the UVOT ...

  19. Field Measurements of Black Carbon Yields from Gas Flaring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Bradley M; Johnson, Matthew R

    2017-02-07

    Black carbon (BC) emissions from gas flaring in the oil and gas industry are postulated to have critical impacts on climate and public health, but actual emission rates remain poorly characterized. This paper presents in situ field measurements of BC emission rates and flare gas volume-specific BC yields for a diverse range of flares. Measurements were performed during a series of field campaigns in Mexico and Ecuador using the sky-LOSA optical measurement technique, in concert with comprehensive Monte Carlo-based uncertainty analyses. Parallel on-site measurements of flare gas flow rate and composition were successfully performed at a subset of locations enabling direct measurements of fuel-specific BC yields from flares under field conditions. Quantified BC emission rates from individual flares spanned more than 4 orders of magnitude (up to 53.7 g/s). In addition, emissions during one notable ∼24-h flaring event (during which the plume transmissivity dropped to zero) would have been even larger than this maximum rate, which was measured as this event was ending. This highlights the likely importance of superemitters to global emission inventories. Flare gas volume-specific BC yields were shown to be strongly correlated with flare gas heating value. A newly derived correlation fitting current field data and previous lab data suggests that, in the context of recent studies investigating transport of flare-generated BC in the Arctic and globally, impacts of flaring in the energy industry may in fact be underestimated.

  20. MOST Observations of Our Nearest Neighbor: Flares on Proxima Centauri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, James R. A.; Kipping, David M.; Sasselov, Dimitar; Matthews, Jaymie M.; Cameron, Chris

    2016-10-01

    We present a study of white-light flares from the active M5.5 dwarf Proxima Centauri using the Canadian microsatellite Microvariability and Oscillations of STars. Using 37.6 days of monitoring data from 2014 to 2015, we have detected 66 individual flare events, the largest number of white-light flares observed to date on Proxima Cen. Flare energies in our sample range from 1029 to 1031.5 erg. The flare rate is lower than that of other classic flare stars of a similar spectral type, such as UV Ceti, which may indicate Proxima Cen had a higher flare rate in its youth. Proxima Cen does have an unusually high flare rate given its slow rotation period, however. Extending the observed power-law occurrence distribution down to 1028 erg, we show that flares with flux amplitudes of 0.5% occur 63 times per day, while superflares with energies of 1033 erg occur ∼8 times per year. Small flares may therefore pose a great difficulty in searches for transits from the recently announced 1.27 M ⊕ Proxima b, while frequent large flares could have significant impact on the planetary atmosphere.

  1. Flare Characteristics from X-ray Light Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryciuk, M.; Siarkowski, M.; Sylwester, J.; Gburek, S.; Podgorski, P.; Kepa, A.; Sylwester, B.; Mrozek, T.

    2017-06-01

    A new methodology is given to determine basic parameters of flares from their X-ray light curves. Algorithms are developed from the analysis of small X-ray flares occurring during the deep solar minimum of 2009, between Solar Cycles 23 and 24, observed by the Polish Solar Photometer in X-rays (SphinX) on the Complex Orbital Observations Near-Earth of Activity of the Sun-Photon (CORONAS- Photon) spacecraft. One is a semi-automatic flare detection procedure that gives start, peak, and end times for single ("elementary") flare events under the assumption that the light curve is a simple convolution of a Gaussian and exponential decay functions. More complex flares with multiple peaks can generally be described by a sum of such elementary flares. Flare time profiles in the two energy ranges of SphinX (1.16 - 1.51 keV, 1.51 - 15 keV) are used to derive temperature and emission measure as a function of time during each flare. The result is a comprehensive catalogue - the SphinX Flare Catalogue - which contains 1600 flares or flare-like events and is made available for general use. The methods described here can be applied to observations made by Geosynchronous Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES), the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and other broad-band spectrometers.

  2. Relativistically Induced Transparency Acceleration (RITA) - laser-plasma accelerated quasi-monoenergetic GeV ion-beams with existing lasers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Aakash A.

    2013-10-01

    Laser-plasma ion accelerators have the potential to produce beams with unprecedented characteristics of ultra-short bunch lengths (100s of fs) and high bunch-charge (1010 particles) over acceleration length of about 100 microns. However, creating and controlling mono-energetic bunches while accelerating to high-energies has been a challenge. If high-energy mono-energetic beams can be demonstrated with minimal post-processing, laser (ω0)-plasma (ωpe) ion accelerators may be used in a wide-range of applications such as cancer hadron-therapy, medical isotope production, neutron generation, radiography and high-energy density science. Here we demonstrate using analysis and simulations that using relativistic intensity laser-pulses and heavy-ion (Mi ×me) targets doped with a proton (or light-ion) species (mp ×me) of trace density (at least an order of magnitude below the cold critical density) we can scale up the energy of quasi-mono-energetically accelerated proton (or light-ion) beams while controlling their energy, charge and energy spectrum. This is achieved by controlling the laser propagation into an overdense (ω0 <ωpeγ = 1) increasing plasma density gradient by incrementally inducing relativistic electron quiver and thereby rendering them transparent to the laser while the heavy-ions are immobile. Ions do not directly interact with ultra-short laser that is much shorter in duration than their characteristic time-scale (τp <<√{mp} /ω0 <<√{Mi} /ω0). For a rising laser intensity envelope, increasing relativistic quiver controls laser propagation beyond the cold critical density. For increasing plasma density (ωpe2 (x)), laser penetrates into higher density and is shielded, stopped and reflected where ωpe2 (x) / γ (x , t) =ω02 . In addition to the laser quivering the electrons, it also ponderomotively drives (Fp 1/γ∇za2) them forward longitudinally, creating a constriction of snowplowed e-s. The resulting longitudinal e--displacement from laser

  3. Characteristics of the quarry as shielding for {sup 241}AmBe neutrons and monoenergetic photons; Caracteristicas de la cantera como blindaje para los neutrones del {sup 241}AmBe y fotones monoenergeticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H. R.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Letechipia de L, C.; Salas L, M. A. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico); Rodriguez R, J. A.; Juarez A, C. A., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Facultad de Ingenieria Civil, Pedro de Alba s/n, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    Shielding is an important element in radiation protection since allows the management of radiation sources. Currently there are different materials of natural or anthropogenic origin that are used as shielding for both photons and neutrons. The quarry is a material of natural origin and abundant in our country, which is used in construction or for the manufacture of sculptures, however its characteristics as shielding have not been reported. In this paper we report some of the properties of the quarry as shielding for monoenergetic photons and for neutrons produced by an isotopic neutron source of {sup 241}AmBe. A quarry piece was used to determine its density and its chemical composition, with the XCOM code the elemental composition was determined and the mass interaction and total attenuation coefficients of the quarry were determined with photons of 10{sup -3} to 10{sup -5} MeV; the interaction coefficients included coherent dispersion, photoelectric absorption, Compton dispersion and the production of pairs in the nuclear and electronic field. Using the MCNP5 code, a narrow geometry attenuation experiment was modeled and the photon fluence was estimated that reaches a point detector at a distance of 42 cm from a point source, isotropic and monoenergetic photon when the source and the point detector were added quarry pieces of different thicknesses. The reduction of the number of photons as a function of the thickness of the quarry was used to determine the coefficient of linear attenuation of the quarry before photons of 0.03, 0.07, 0.1, 0.3, 1, 2 and 3 MeV that were the same as those calculated with the XCOM code. With the MCNP, the K a and H(10) transmission curves were also calculated. This same model was used to determined the variation of the {sup 241}AmBe neutron spectrum as a function of quarry thickness, as well as the E{sub ROT} and H(10) transmission curves. (Author)

  4. Ultraviolet and radio flares from UX Arietis and HR 1099

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Kenneth R.; Willson, Robert F.

    1988-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of the RS CVn systems UX Ari and HR 1099 with the IUE satellite and the VLA are presented. Flaring activity is observed at ultraviolet wavelengths with the IUE when none is detected at radio wavelengths with the VLA. Radio flares with no detectable ultraviolet activity have also been observed. Thus, flares in the two spectral regions are either uncorrelated or weakly correlated. The flaring emission probably originates in different regions at the two wavelengths. Radio flares from RS CVn stars may originate in sources that are larger than, or comparable to, a star in size. This is in sharp contrast to compact, coherent radio flares from dwarf M stars. The ultraviolet flares from RS CVn stars probably originate in sources that are smaller than a component star.

  5. Solar flare prediction using highly stressed longitudinal magnetic field parameters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Huang; Hua-Ning Wang

    2013-01-01

    Three new longitudinal magnetic field parameters are extracted from SOHO/MDI magnetograms to characterize properties of the stressed magnetic field in active regions,and their flare productivities are calculated for 1055 active regions.We find that the proposed parameters can be used to distinguish flaring samples from non-flaring samples.Using the long-term accumulated MDI data,we build the solar flare prediction model by using a data mining method.Furthermore,the decision boundary,which is used to divide flaring from non-flaring samples,is determined by the decision tree algorithm.Finally,the performance of the prediction model is evaluated by 10-fold cross validation technology.We conclude that an efficient solar flare prediction model can be built by the proposed longitudinal magnetic field parameters with the data mining method.

  6. X-ray Flares of EV Lac: Statistics, Spectra, Diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Huenemoerder, David P; Testa, Paola; Drake, Jeremy J; Osten, Rachel A; Reale, Fabio

    2010-01-01

    We study the spectral and temporal behavior of X-ray flares from the active M-dwarf EV Lac in 200 ks of exposure with the Chandra/HETGS. We derive flare parameters by fitting an empirical function which characterizes the amplitude, shape, and scale. The flares range from very short (<1 ks) to long (10 ks) duration events with a range of shapes and amplitudes for all durations. We extract spectra for composite flares to study their mean evolution and to compare flares of different lengths. Evolution of spectral features in the density-temperature plane shows probable sustained heating. The short flares are significantly hotter than the longer flares. We determined an upper limit to the Fe K fluorescent flux, the best fit value being close to what is expected for compact loops.

  7. Study of sunspot group morphological variations leading to flaring events

    CERN Document Server

    Korsos, M B; Ludmany, A

    2014-01-01

    It is widely assumed that the most probable sites of flare occurrences are the locations of high horizontal magnetic field gradients in the active regions. Instead of magnetograms the present work checks this assumption by using sunspot data, the targeted phenomenon is the pre-flare behaviour of the strong horizontal gradients of the magnetic field at the location of the flare. The empirical basis of the work is the SDD (SOHO/MDI-Debrecen sunspot Data) sunspot catalogue. Case studies of two active regions and five X-flares have been carried out to find possible candidates for pre-flare signatures. It has been found that the following properties of the temporal variations of horizontal magnetic field gradient are promising for flare forecast: the speed of its growth, its maximal value, its decrease after the maximum until the flare and the rate of its fluctuation.

  8. The CME - Flare Relationship During The Present Solar Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, M.; Mahrous, A.; Youssef, M.; Mawad, R.; El-Naway, M.

    The relation between the Coronal mass Ejection CME and the solar flare is statistically studied More than ten thousand CME events observed by SOHO LASCO during the period 1996-2005 have been analyzed The soft x-ray flux measurements provided by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite GEOS recorded more than twenty thousand flares in the same time period The data have been filtered under certain temporal and spatial conditions to select the CME-flare associated events The results show that the lift-off time of CME-flare associated events having a time interval within the range 0 4 sim 0 6 hour after the occurrence time of associated flares The CME events have been classified into a certain categories according to its energy E CME and the classes of the associated flares In addition we found a good linear correlation between the E CME and the x-ray flux of associated flare events

  9. Orphan γ-ray flares from relativistic blobs encountering luminous stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banasiński, P.; Bednarek, W.; Sitarek, J.

    2016-11-01

    We propose that {\\gamma} -rays in blazars can be produced during encounters of relativistic blobs of plasma with radiation field produced by luminous stars within (or close to) the jet. The blob is expected to contain relativistic electrons which comptonize stellar radiation to the GeV-TeV energies. Produced {\\gamma} -rays can initiate the Inverse Compton e+/- pair cascade in the stellar radiation. We propose that such a scenario can be responsible for the appearance of the so-called orphan {\\gamma} -ray flares. We show that the relativistic blob/luminous star collision model can explain the appearance of the extreme orphan {\\gamma} -ray flare observed in the GeV and sub-TeV energy range from the flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 1222+21.

  10. Unusual Emissions at Various Energies Prior to the Impulsive Phase of the Large Solar Flare and Coronal Mass Ejection of 4 November 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Pierre; Holman, Gordon D.; Su, Yang; de Castro, C. Guillermo Gimenez; Correia, Emilia; Fernandes, Luis O. T.; de Souza, Rodney V.; Marun, Adolfo; Pereyra, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    The GOES X28 flare of 4 November 2003 was the largest ever recorded in its class. It produced the first evidence for two spectrally separated emission components, one at microwaves and the other in the THz range of frequencies.We analyzed the pre-flare phase of this large flare, twenty minutes before the onset of the major impulsive burst. This periodis characterized by unusual activity in X-rays, sub-THz frequencies, H, and microwaves.The CME onset occurred before the onset of the large burst by about 6 min.

  11. Unusual Stokes V profiles during flaring activity of a delta sunspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, C. E.; Keller, C. U.; Snik, F.; Fletcher, L.; Socas-Navarro, H.

    2012-11-01

    Aims: We analyze a set of full Stokes profile observations of the flaring active region NOAA 10808. The region was recorded with the Vector-Spectromagnetograph of the Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun facility. The active region produced several successive X-class flares between 19:00 UT and 24:00 UT on September 13, 2005 and we aim to quantify transient and permanent changes in the magnetic field and velocity field during one of the flares, which has been fully captured. Methods: The Stokes profiles were inverted using the height-dependent inversion code LILIA to analyze magnetic field vector changes at the flaring site. We report multilobed asymmetric Stokes V profiles found in the δ-sunspot umbra. We fit the asymmetric Stokes V profiles assuming an atmosphere consisting of two components (SIR inversions) to interpret the profile shape. The results are put in context with Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) magnetograms and reconstructed X-ray images from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager. Results: We obtain the magnetic field vector and find signs of restructuring of the photospheric magnetic field during the flare close to the polarity inversion line at the flaring site. At two locations in the umbra we encounter strong fields (~3 kG), as inferred from the Stokes I profiles, which, however, exhibit a low polarization signal. During the flare we observe in addition asymmetric Stokes V profiles at one of these sites. The asymmetric Stokes V profiles appear co-spatial and co-temporal with a strong apparent polarity reversal observed in MDI-magnetograms and a chromospheric hard X-ray source. The two-component atmosphere fits of the asymmetric Stokes profiles result in line-of-sight velocity differences in the range of ~12 km s-1 to 14 km s-1 between the two components in the photosphere. Another possibility is that local atmospheric heating is causing the observed asymmetric Stokes V profile shape. In either case our analysis

  12. Impact of an advanced image-based monoenergetic reconstruction algorithm on coronary stent visualization using third generation dual-source dual-energy CT: a phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangold, Stefanie [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Cannao, Paola M. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University of Milan, Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Milan (Italy); Schoepf, U.J. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Charleston, SC (United States); Wichmann, Julian L. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Canstein, Christian [Siemens Medical Solutions, Malvern, PA (United States); Fuller, Stephen R.; Varga-Szemes, Akos [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Muscogiuri, Giuseppe; De Cecco, Carlo N. [Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University of Rome ' ' Sapienza' ' , Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, Rome (Italy); Nikolaou, Konstantin [Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    To evaluate the impact of an advanced monoenergetic (ME) reconstruction algorithm on CT coronary stent imaging in a phantom model. Three stents with lumen diameters of 2.25, 3.0 and 3.5 mm were examined with a third-generation dual-source dual-energy CT (DECT). Tube potential was set at 90/Sn150 kV for DE and 70, 90 or 120 kV for single-energy (SE) acquisitions and advanced modelled iterative reconstruction was used. Overall, 23 reconstructions were evaluated for each stent including three SE acquisitions and ten advanced and standard ME images with virtual photon energies from 40 to 130 keV, respectively. In-stent luminal diameter was measured and compared to nominal lumen diameter to determine stent lumen visibility. Contrast-to-noise ratio was calculated. Advanced ME reconstructions substantially increased lumen visibility in comparison to SE for stents ≤3 mm. 130 keV images produced the best mean lumen visibility: 86 % for the 2.25 mm stent (82 % for standard ME and 64 % for SE) and 82 % for the 3.0 mm stent (77 % for standard ME and 69 % for SE). Mean DLP for SE 120 kV and DE acquisitions were 114.4 ± 9.8 and 58.9 ± 2.2 mGy x cm, respectively. DECT with advanced ME reconstructions improves the in-lumen visibility of small stents in comparison with standard ME and SE imaging. (orig.)

  13. Flare SOL2012-07-06: On the Origin of the Circular Polarization Reversal Between 17 GHz and 34 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altyntsev, A.; Meshalkina, N.; Myshyakov, I.; Pal`shin, V.; Fleishman, G.

    2017-09-01

    The new generation of multiwavelength radioheliographs with high spatial resolution will employ microwave imaging spectropolarimetry to recover flare topology and plasma parameters in the flare sources and along the wave propagation paths. The recorded polarization depends on the emission mechanism and emission regime (optically thick or thin), the emitting particle properties, and propagation effects. Here, we report an unusual flare, SOL2012-07-06T01:37, whose optically thin gyrosynchrotron emission of the main source displays an apparently ordinary mode sense of polarization in contrast to the classical theory that favors the extraordinary mode. This flare produced copious nonthermal emission in hard X-rays and in high-frequency microwaves up to 80 GHz. It is found that the main flare source corresponds to an interaction site of two loops with greatly different sizes. The flare occurred in the central part of the solar disk, which allows reconstructing the magnetic field in the flare region using vector magnetogram data. We have investigated the three possible known reasons of the circular polarization sense reversal - mode coupling, positron contribution, and the effect of beamed angular distribution. We excluded polarization reversal due to contribution of positrons because there was no relevant response in the X-ray emission. We find that a beam-like electron distribution can produce the observed polarization behavior, but the source thermal density must be much higher than the estimate from to the X-ray data. We conclude that the apparent ordinary wave emission in the optically thin mode is due to radio wave propagation across the quasi-transverse (QT) layer. The abnormally high transition frequency (above 35 GHz) can be achieved reasonably low in the corona where the magnetic field value is high and transverse to the line of sight. This places the microwave source below this QT layer, i.e. very low in the corona.

  14. Five years of gas flaring by country, oil field or flare observed by the Suomi NPP satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhizhin, M. N.; Elvidge, C.; Baugh, K.; Hsu, F. C.

    2016-12-01

    We will present a new methodology and the resulting interactive map and statistical estimates of flared gas volumes in 2012-2016 using multispectral infrared images from VIIRS radiometer at the Suomi NPP satellite. The high temperature gas flares are detected at the night side of the Earth with the Nightfire algorithm. Gas flares are distinct from biomass burning and industrial heat sources because they have higher temperatures. Sums of the radiative heat from the detected flares are calibrated with country-level flared volumes reported by CEDIGAZ. Statistical analysis of the database with accumulated 5 years of the Nightfire detections makes it possible to estimate instant flow rate for an individual flare, as well as integral flared volumes and long term trends for all the countries or oil and gas fields.

  15. Development of a monoenergetic neutron beam (Theoretical aspects, experimental developments and applications); Desarrollo de un haz de neutrones monoenergeticos (Aspectos teoricos, desarrollos experimentales y aplicaciones)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varela G, A

    2003-07-01

    By the use of a neutron time of flight system at the Tandem Accelerator of the National Nuclear Research Institute; with neutrons provided by means of the {sup 2} H(d, n) {sup 3} He we intend to use the associated particle technique in order to have monoenergetic neutrons. This neutron beam will be used both in basic and applied research. (Author)

  16. Giant electromagnetic vortex and MeV monoenergetic electrons generated by short laser pulses in underdense plasma near quarter critical density region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhidkov, Alexei; Nemoto, Koshichi; Nayuki, Takuya; Oishi, Yuji; Fuji, Takashi

    2007-07-01

    Very efficient generation of monoenergetic, about 1MeV , electrons from underdense plasma with its electron density close to the critical, when irradiated by an intense femtosecond laser pulse, is found via two dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. The stimulated Raman scattering of a laser pulse with frequency omega300 keV .

  17. A direct-drive exploding-pusher implosion as the first step in development of a monoenergetic charged-particle backlighting platform at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Séguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Waugh, C. J.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Rygg, J. R.; Amendt, P. A.; Bellei, C.; Benedetti, L. R.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Bionta, R. M.; Casey, D. T.; Divol, L.; Edwards, M. J.; Glenn, S.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hicks, D. G.; Kimbrough, J. R.; Landen, O. L.; Lindl, J. D.; MacPhee, A.; McNaney, J. M.; Meezan, N. B.; Moody, J. D.; Moran, M. J.; Park, H.-S.; Pino, J.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H.; Rosen, M. D.; Wilks, S. C.; Zacharias, R. A.; McKenty, P. W.; Hohenberger, M.; Radha, P. B.; Edgell, D.; Marshall, F. J.; Delettrez, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Betti, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Knauer, J. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hoffman, N. M.; Kyrala, G. A.; Leeper, R. J.; Olson, R. E.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Nikroo, A.

    2016-03-01

    A thin-glass-shell, D3He-filled exploding-pusher inertial confinement fusion implosion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has been demonstrated as a proton source that serves as a promising first step toward development of a monoenergetic proton, alpha, and triton backlighting platform at the NIF. Among the key measurements, the D3He-proton emission on this experiment (shot N121128) has been well-characterized spectrally, temporally, and in terms of emission isotropy, revealing a highly monoenergetic (ΔE / E ∼ 4 %) and isotropic source (~3% proton fluence variation and ~0.5% proton energy variation). On a similar shot (N130129, with D2 fill), the DD-proton spectrum has been obtained as well, illustrating that monoenergetic protons of multiple energies may be utilized in a single experiment. These results, and experiments on OMEGA, point toward future steps in the development of a precision, monoenergetic proton, alpha, and triton source that can readily be implemented at the NIF for backlighting a broad range of high energy density physics (HEDP) experiments in which fields and flows are manifest, and also utilized for studies of stopping power in warm dense matter and in classical plasmas.

  18. A reconnection-driven model of the hard X-ray loop-top source from flare 2004-Feb-26

    CERN Document Server

    Longcope, Dana; Brewer, Jasmine

    2016-01-01

    A compact X-class flare on 2004-Feb-26 showed a concentrated source of hard X-rays at the tops of the flare's loops. This was analyzed in previous work (Longcope et al. 2010), and interpreted as plasma heated and compressed by slow magnetosonic shocks generated during post-reconnection retraction of the flux. That work used analytic expressions from a thin flux tube (TFT) model, which neglected many potentially important factors such as thermal conduction and chromospheric evaporation. Here we use a numerical solution of the TFT equations to produce a more comprehensive and accurate model of the same flare, including those effects previously omitted. These simulations corroborate the prior hypothesis that slow mode shocks persist well after the retraction has ended, thus producing a compact, loop-top source instead of an elongated jet, as steady reconnection models predict. Thermal conduction leads to densities higher than analytic estimates had predicted, and evaporation enhances the density still higher, bu...

  19. First flight of the Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Shih, Albert Y.; Duncan, Nicole; Bain, Hazel; Maruca, Bennett A.; Kelley, Nicole; Godbole, Niharika; Kaufmann, Pierre; Caspi, Amir; Sample, John; Hoberman, Jane; Mochizuki, Brent; Olson, Jerry; Boggs, Steven E.; Zoglauer, Andreas; Hurford, Gordon J.; Smith, David M.; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Amman, Mark

    2016-05-01

    The Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS) high altitude balloon payload was successfully flown in January 2016 from Antarctica (Jan 19 to Jan 30).GRIPS provides a near-optimal combination of high-resolution imaging, spectroscopy, and polarimetry of solar-flare gamma ray/hard X-ray emissions from ~20 keV to >~10 MeV. GRIPS’s goal is to address questions raised by recent solar flare observations regarding particle acceleration and energy release, such as: What causes the spatial separation between energetic electrons producing hard X-rays and energetic ions producing gamma-ray lines? How anisotropic are the relativistic electrons, and why can they dominate in the corona? How do the compositions of accelerated and ambient material vary with space and time, and why? The spectrometer/polarimeter consists of six 3D position-sensitive germanium detectors (3D-GeDs), where each energy deposition is individually recorded with an energy resolution of a few keV FWHM and a spatial resolution gamma-ray energies (12.5 arcsec FWHM), sufficient to separate 2.2 MeV footpoint sources for almost all flares. Polarimetry is accomplished by analyzing the anisotropy of reconstructed Compton scattering in the 3D-GeDs, with an estimated minimum detectable polarization of a few percent at 150-650 keV in an X-class flare. GRIPS was also equipped with active BGO shields, and three piggy-back instruments: a solar terahertz radiometer (Solar-T), a hard X-ray spectrometer (SMASH), and a sonic anemometer (TILDAE).We will present an overview of GRIPS's first flight, the performance of its instruments and subsystems, including the solar pointing and aspect systems, and the current progress of our data analysis.

  20. Origin of the 30 THz emission detected during the 2012 March 13 solar flare at 17:20 UT

    CERN Document Server

    Trottet, G; MacKinnon, A; de Castro, G Giménez; Simões, P J A; Cabezas, D; de La Luz, V; Luoni, M; Kaufmann, P

    2015-01-01

    Solar observations in the infrared domain can bring important clues on the response of the low solar atmosphere to primary energy released during flares. At present the infrared continuum has been detected at 30 THz (10 $\\mu$m) in only a few flares. In this work we present a detailed multi-frequency analysis of SOL2012-03-13, including observations at radio millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths, in hard X-rays (HXR), gamma-rays (GR), H-alpha, and white-light. HXR/GR spectral analysis shows that the event is a GR line flare and allows estimating the numbers of and energy contents in electrons, protons and alpha particles produced during the flare. The energy spectrum of the electrons producing the HXR/GR continuum is consistent with a broken power-law with an energy break at ~800 keV. It is shown that the high-energy part (above ~800 keV) of this distribution is responsible for the high-frequency radio emission (> 20 GHz) detected during the flare. By comparing the 30 THz emission expected from semi-empiri...

  1. Thermal to Nonthermal Energy Partition at the Early Rise Phase of Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Altyntsev, Alexander A; Lesovoi, Sergey V; Meshalkina, Natalia S

    2012-01-01

    In some flares the thermal component appears much earlier than the nonthermal component in X-ray range. Using sensitive microwave observations we revisit this finding made by Battaglia et al. (2009) based on RHESSI data analysis. We have found that nonthermal microwave emission produced by accelerated electrons with energy of at least several hundred keV, appears as early as the thermal soft X-ray emission indicative that the electron acceleration takes place at the very early flare phase. The non-detection of the hard X-rays at that early stage of the flares is, thus, an artifact of a limited RHESSI sensitivity. In all considered events, the microwave emission intensity increases at the early flare phase. We found that either thermal or nonthermal gyrosynchrotron emission can dominate the low-frequency part of the microwave spectrum below the spectral peak occurring at 3-10 GHz. In contrast, the high-frequency optically thin part of the spectrum is always formed by the nonthermal, accelerated electron compon...

  2. The flaring HI disk of the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 2683

    CERN Document Server

    Vollmer, B; Ibata, R

    2015-01-01

    New deep VLA D array HI observations of the highly inclined nearby spiral galaxy NGC 2683 are presented. Archival C array data were processed and added to the new observations. To investigate the 3D structure of the atomic gas disk, we made different 3D models for which we produced model HI data cubes. The main ingredients of our best-fit model are (i) a thin disk inclined by 80 degrees; (ii) a crude approximation of a spiral and/or bar structure by an elliptical surface density distribution of the gas disk; (iii) a slight warp in inclination; (iv) an exponential flare; and (v) a low surface-density gas ring. The slope of NGC 2683's flare is comparable, but somewhat steeper than those of other spiral galaxies. NGC 2683's maximum height of the flare is also comparable to those of other galaxies. On the other hand, a saturation of the flare is only observed in NGC 2683. Based on the comparison between the high resolution model and observations, we exclude the existence of an extended atomic gas halo around the ...

  3. Helium line formation and abundance during a C-class flare

    CERN Document Server

    Andretta, Vincenzo; Falchi, Ambretta; Teriaca, Luca

    2008-01-01

    During a coordinated campaign which took place in May 2001, a C-class flare was observed both with SOHO instruments and with the Dunn Solar Telescope of the National Solar Observatory at Sacramento Peak. In two previous papers we have described the observations and discussed some dynamical aspects of the earlier phases of the flare, as well as the helium line formation in the active region prior to the event. Here we extend the analysis of the helium line formation to the later phases of the flare in two different locations of the flaring area. We have devised a new technique, exploiting all available information from various SOHO instruments, to determine the spectral distribution of the photoionizing EUV radiation produced by the corona overlying the two target regions. In order to find semiempirical models matching all of our observables, we analyzed the effect on the calculated helium spectrum both of A(He) (the He abundance) and of the uncertainties in the incident EUV radiation (level and spectral distr...

  4. Gamma-Ray Observations of a Giant Flare From the Magnetar Sgr 1806-20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, D.

    2005-03-09

    Magnetars comprise two classes of rotating neutron stars (Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGRs) and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars), whose X-ray emission is powered by an ultrastrong magnetic field, B {approx} 10{sup 15} G. Occasionally SGRs enter into active episodes producing many short X-ray bursts; extremely rarely (about once per 50 years per source), SGRs emit a giant flare, an event with total energy at least 103 higher than their typical bursts. Here we report that, on 2004 December 27, SGR 1806-20 emitted the brightest extra-solar transient event ever recorded, even surpassing the full moon brightness for 0.2 seconds. The total (isotropic) flare energy is 2 x 10{sup 46} erg, {approx}100 times higher than the only two previous events, making this flare a once in a century event. This colossal energy release likely occurred during a catastrophic reconfiguration of the magnetar's magnetic field. Such an event would have resembled a short, hard Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) if it had occurred within 40 Mpc, suggesting that extragalactic SGR flares may indeed form a subclass of GRBs.

  5. Charge-exchange limits on low-energy alpha-particle fluxes in solar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Hudson, Hugh; MacKinnon, Alec; Woods, Tom

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a search for flare emission via charge-exchange radiation in the wings of the Lyman-alpha line of He ii at 304 A, as originally suggested for hydrogen by Orrall and Zirker. Via this mechanism a primary alpha particle that penetrates into the neutral chromosphere can pick up an atomic electron and emit in the He ii bound-bound spectrum before it stops. The Extreme-ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) gives us our first chance to search for this effect systematically. The Orrall-Zirker mechanism has great importance for flare physics because of the essential roles that particle acceleration plays; this mechanism is one of the few proposed that would allow remote sensing of primary accelerated particles below a few MeV/nucleon. We study ten events in total, including the gamma-ray events SOL2010-06-12 (M2.0) and SOL2011-02-24 (M3.5) (the latter a limb flare), seven X-class flares, and one prominent M-class event that produced solar energetic...

  6. Multi-TeV flaring from blazars: Markarian 421 as a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, Sarira; Miranda, Luis Salvador [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Mexico, DF (Mexico); Rajpoot, Subhash [California State University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Long Beach, CA (United States)

    2016-03-15

    The TeV blazar Markarian 421 underwent multi-TeV flaring during April 2004 and simultaneously observations in the X-ray and TeV energies were made. It was observed that the TeV outbursts had no counterparts in the lower energy range. One implication of this is that it might be an orphan flare. We show that Fermi-accelerated protons of energy ≤ 168 TeV can interact with the low energy tail of the background synchrotron self-Compton photons in the inner region of the blazar to produce the multi-TeV flare and our results fit very well with the observed spectrum. Based on our study, we predict that the blazars with a deep valley in between the end of the synchrotron spectrum and the beginning of the SSC spectrum are possible candidates for orphan flaring. Future possible candidates for this scenario are the HBLs Mrk 501 and PG 1553 + 113 objects. (orig.)

  7. Magnetic shear in flaring regions. I - Quantitative evaluation of the change in shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaraman, K. R.; Rausaria, R. R.; Aleem, S. M.

    1992-04-01

    The shear angle of the neutral line of the nonpotential magnetic field has been evaluated for one or two days prior to and after the flare event for 10 cases. The H-alpha filament positions were used to evaluate the shear in the neutral line. It is found that it is the change in the shear that occurs a day prior to the flare that can lead to the event. This change can be in either direction, i.e., it can be a large increase from a small value or a decrease from a large initial value. Thus it is the change in the shear angle that seems to be a deciding criterion for a flare to occur and not a large value for the shear angle itself. One instance is found where there was no significant change in the shear angle over a period of a few days and this region, although similar to other active regions studied, did not produce any flare activity.

  8. Inference of Heating Properties from "Hot" Non-flaring Plasmas in Active Region Cores. II. Nanoflare Trains

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, W T; Bradshaw, S J

    2016-01-01

    Despite its prediction over two decades ago, the detection of faint, high-temperature ("hot") emission due to nanoflare heating in non-flaring active region cores has proved challenging. Using an efficient two-fluid hydrodynamic model, this paper investigates the properties of the emission expected from repeating nanoflares (a nanoflare train) of varying frequency as well as the separate heating of electrons and ions. If the emission measure distribution ($\\mathrm{EM}(T)$) peaks at $T = T_m$, we find that $\\mathrm{EM}(T_m)$ is independent of details of the nanoflare train, and $\\mathrm{EM}(T)$ above and below $T_m$ reflects different aspects of the heating. Below $T_m$ the main influence is the relationship of the waiting time between successive nanoflares to the nanoflare energy. Above $T_m$ power-law nanoflare distributions lead to an extensive plasma population not present in a monoenergetic train. Furthermore, in some cases characteristic features are present in $\\mathrm{EM}(T)$. Such details may be detec...

  9. Precision photo-induced cross-section measurements using the monoenergetic and polarized photon beams at HIγS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonchev, A. P.; Howell, C. R.; Kwan, E.; Rusev, G.; Tornow, W.; Kelley, J. H.; Huibregtse, C.; Hammond, S. L.; Vieira, D.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2009-10-01

    A research program has been initiated at TUNL to perform precision (γ,γ') and (γ,xn) cross-section measurements on actinide nuclei using the novel source of radiation at the High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HIγS) facility. This facility provides nearly mono-energetic (E/E ± 2%) and intense (10^8 s-1) photon beams after the recent upgrade. A precision knowledge of photoinduced processes is of practical importance for new reactor technologies, nuclear transmutation, and nuclear forensics. Our recent photodisintegration cross section measurements on radioactive ^241Am targets in the energy range from 9 < Eγ < 16 MeV will be presented. The experimental data for the ^241Am(γ,n) reaction in the giant dipole resonance energy region will be compared with statistical nuclear-model calculations.

  10. Uniform heating of materials into the warm dense matter regime with laser-driven quasi-monoenergetic ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Bang, W; Bradley, P A; Vold, E L; Boettger, J C; Fernández, J C

    2015-01-01

    In a recent experiment on the Trident laser facility, a laser-driven beam of quasi-monoenergetic aluminum ions was used to heat solid gold and diamond foils isochorically to 5.5 eV and 1.7 eV, respectively. Here theoretical calculations are presented that suggest the gold and diamond were heated uniformly by these laser-driven ion beams. According to calculations and SESAME equation-of-state tables, laser-driven aluminum ion beams achievable on Trident, with a finite energy spread of (delta E)/E ~ 20%, are expected to heat the targets more uniformly than a beam of 140 MeV aluminum ions with zero energy spread. The robustness of the expected heating uniformity relative to the changes in the incident ion energy spectra is evaluated, and expected plasma temperatures of various target materials achievable with the current experimental platform are presented.

  11. Quasi-monoenergetic electron beams from a few-terawatt laser driven plasma acceleration using a nitrogen gas jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, B. S.; Moorti, A.; Chakera, J. A.; Naik, P. A.; Gupta, P. D.

    2017-06-01

    An experimental investigation on the laser plasma acceleration of electrons has been carried out using 3 TW, 45 fs duration titanium sapphire laser pulse interaction with a nitrogen gas jet at an intensity of 2 × 1018 W cm-2. We have observed the stable generation of a well collimated electron beam with divergence and pointing variation ˜10 mrad from nitrogen gas jet plasma at an optimum plasma density around 3 × 1019 cm-3. The energy spectrum of the electron beam was quasi-monoenergetic with an average peak energy and a charge around 25 MeV and 30 pC respectively. The results will be useful for better understanding and control of ionization injection and the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) of electrons in high-Z gases and also towards the development of practical LWFA for various applications including injectors for high energy accelerators.

  12. Dual isotope notch observer for isotope identification, assay and imaging with mono-energetic gamma-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barty, Christopher P.J.

    2013-02-05

    A dual isotope notch observer for isotope identification, assay and imaging with mono-energetic gamma-ray sources includes a detector arrangement consists of three detectors downstream from the object under observation. The latter detector, which operates as a beam monitor, is an integrating detector that monitors the total beam power arriving at its surface. The first detector and the middle detector each include an integrating detector surrounding a foil. The foils of these two detectors are made of the same atomic material, but each foil is a different isotope, e.g., the first foil may comprise U235 and second foil may comprise U238. The integrating detectors surrounding these pieces of foil measure the total power scattered from the foil and can be similar in composition to the final beam monitor. Non-resonant photons will, after calibration, scatter equally from both foils.

  13. MOST Observations of our Nearest Neighbor: Flares on Proxima Centauri

    CERN Document Server

    Davenport, James R A; Sasselov, Dimitar; Matthews, Jaymie M; Cameron, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of white light flares from the active M5.5 dwarf Proxima Centauri using the Canadian microsatellite MOST. Using 37.6 days of monitoring data from 2014 and 2015, we have detected 66 individual flare events, the largest number of white light flares observed to date on Proxima Cen. Flare energies in our sample range from $10^{29}$-$10^{31.5}$ erg, with complex, multi-peaked structure found in 22% of these events. The flare rate is lower than that of other classic flare stars of similar spectral type, such as UV Ceti, which may indicate Proxima Cen had a higher flare rate in its youth. Proxima Cen does have an unusually high flare rate given the slow reported rotation period, however. Extending the observed power-law occurrence distribution down to $10^{28}$ erg, we show that flares with flux amplitudes of 0.5% occur 63 times per day, while superflares with energies of $10^{33}$ erg occur ~8 times per year. Small flares may therefore pose a great difficulty in searches for transits from the rec...

  14. Characteristics of the Polarity Inversion Line and Solar Flare Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykov, Viacheslav M.; Kosovichev, Alexander G.

    2017-08-01

    Studying connection between solar flares and properties of magnetic field in active regions is very important for understanding the flare physics and developing space weather forecasts. In this work, we analyze relationship between the flare X-ray peak flux from the GOES satellite, and characteristics of the line-of-sight (LOS) magnetograms obtained by the SDO/HMI instrument during the period of April, 2010 - June, 2016. We try to answer two questions: 1) What characteristics of the LOS magnetic field are most important for the flare initiation and magnitude? 2) Is it possible to construct a reliable forecast of ≥ M1.0 and ≥ X1.0 class flares based only on the LOS magnetic field characteristics? To answer these questions, we apply a Polarity Inversion Line (PIL) detection algorithm, and derive various properties of the PIL and the corresponding Active Regions (AR). The importance of these properties for flare forecasting is determined by their ability to separate flaring cases from non-flaring, and their Fisher ranking score. It is found that the PIL characteristics are of special importance for the forecasts of both ≥ M1.0 and ≥ X1.0 flares, while the global AR characteristics become comparably discriminative only for ≥ X1.0 flares. We use the Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier and train it on the six characteristics of the most importance for each case. The obtained True Skill Statistics (TSS) values of 0.70 for ≥ M1.0 flares and 0.64 for ≥ X1.0 flares are better than the currently-known expert-based predictions. Therefore, the results confirm the importance of the LOS magnetic field data and, in particular, the PIL region characteristics for flare forecasts.

  15. Endoleaks after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair: Improved detection with noise-optimized virtual monoenergetic dual-energy CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Simon S; Wichmann, Julian L; Weyer, Hendrik; Scholtz, Jan-Erik; Leithner, Doris; Spandorfer, Adam; Bodelle, Boris; Jacobi, Volkmar; Vogl, Thomas J; Albrecht, Moritz H

    2017-09-01

    To assess image quality and diagnostic performance of a noise-optimized algorithm to reconstruct virtual monoenergetic images (VMI+) for the detection of endoleaks after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) using dual-energy CT angiography (DE-CTA). Seventy-five patients (42 men; 66.2±11.7years) underwent DE-CTA following EVAR. Arterial phase images were acquired in dual-energy mode for the reconstruction of standard linearly-blended M_0.5, VMI+ and traditional monoenergetic images (VMI) at 40-100keV in 10-keV intervals. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were calculated for the area of leakage in patients with endoleaks. Diagnostic accuracy for endoleak detection was evaluated by three blinded radiologists using the objectively best series for each reconstruction technique. Thirty-four out of 75 patients showed endoleaks. Quantitative image parameters were highest at 40-keV VMI+ (CNR, 21.3±11.1), compared to M_0.5 (CNR, 10.9±5.5) and all VMI series that showed highest values at 70keV (CNR, 13.5±6.6; all PVMI+ series, which was significantly higher (P≤0.039) compared to 70-keV VMI (0.914) and M_0.5 series (0.916). Noise-optimized VMI+ series at 40keV improve diagnostic accuracy for the detection and rule-out of endoleaks after EVAR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Dense optical and near-infrared monitoring of CTA 102 during high state in 2012 with OISTER: Detection of intra-night "orphan polarized flux flare"

    CERN Document Server

    Itoh, Ryosuke; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T; Abe, Yuhei; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Arai, Akira; Hayashi, Masahiko; Hori, Takafumi; Isogai, Mizuki; Izumiura, Hideyuki; Kawabata, Koji S; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kuroda, Daisuke; Miyanoshita, Ryo; Moritani, Yuki; Morokuma, Tomoki; Nagayama, Takahiro; Nakamoto, Jumpei; Nakata, Chikako; Oasa, Yumiko; Ohshima, Tomohito; Ohsugi, Takashi; Okumura, Shin-ichiro; Saito, Yoshihiko; Saito, Yu; Sasada, Mahito; Sekiguchi, Kazuhiro; Takagi, Yuhei; Takahashi, Jun; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Takaki, Katsutoshi; Uemura, Makoto; Ueno, Issei; Urakawa, Seitaro; Watanabe, Makoto; Yamanaka, Masayuki; Yonekura, Yoshinori; Yoshida, Michitoshi

    2013-01-01

    CTA 102, classified as a flat spectrum radio quasar at z=1.037, produced exceptionally bright optical flare in 2012 September. Following Fermi-LAT detection of enhanced gamma-ray activity, we densely monitored this source in the optical and near-infrared bands for the subsequent ten nights using twelve telescopes in Japan and South-Africa. On MJD 56197 (2012 September 27, 4-5 days after the peak of bright gamma-ray flare), polarized flux showed a transient increase, while total flux and polarization angle remained almost constant during the "orphan polarized-flux flare". We also detected an intra-night and prominent flare on MJD 56202. The total and polarized fluxes showed quite similar temporal variations, but PA again remained constant during the flare. Interestingly, the polarization angles during the two flares were significantly different from the jet direction. Emergence of a new emission component with high polarization degree (PD) up to 40% would be responsible for the observed two flares, and such a ...

  17. Flares in the Crab Nebula Driven by Untwisting Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Sturrock, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The recent discovery of PeV electrons from the Crab nebula, produced on rapid time scales of one day or less with a sharply peaked gamma-ray spectrum without hard X-rays, challenges traditional models of diffusive shock acceleration followed by synchrotron radiation. Here we outline an accleration model involving a DC electric field parallel to the magnetic field in a twisted toroidal field around the pulsar. Sudden developments of resistivity in localized regions of the twisted field are thought to drive the particle acceleration, up to PeV energies, resulting in flares. This model can reproduce the observed time scales of $T \\approx 1$ day, the peak photon energies of $U_{\\Phi,rr} \\approx 1$ MeV, maximum electron energies of $U_{e,rr} \\approx 1$ PeV, and luminosities of $L \\approx 10^{36}$ erg s$^{-1}$.

  18. Black carbon in the Arctic: the underestimated role of gas flaring and residential combustion emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stohl

    2013-09-01

    annual mean Arctic BC surface concentrations due to residential combustion by 68% when using daily emissions. A large part (93% of this systematic increase can be captured also when using monthly emissions; the increase is compensated by a decreased BC burden at lower latitudes. In a comparison with BC measurements at six Arctic stations, we find that using daily-varying residential combustion emissions and introducing gas flaring emissions leads to large improvements of the simulated Arctic BC, both in terms of mean concentration levels and simulated seasonality. Case studies based on BC and carbon monoxide (CO measurements from the Zeppelin observatory appear to confirm flaring as an important BC source that can produce pollution plumes in the Arctic with a high BC / CO enhancement ratio, as expected for this source type. BC measurements taken during a research ship cruise in the White, Barents and Kara seas north of the region with strong flaring emissions reveal very high concentrations of the order of 200–400 ng m−3. The model underestimates these concentrations substantially, which indicates that the flaring emissions (and probably also other emissions in northern Siberia are rather under- than overestimated in our emission data set. Our results suggest that it may not be "vertical transport that is too strong or scavenging rates that are too low" and "opposite biases in these processes" in the Arctic and elsewhere in current aerosol models, as suggested in a recent review article (Bond et al., Bounding the role of black carbon in the climate system: a scientific assessment, J. Geophys. Res., 2013, but missing emission sources and lacking time resolution of the emission data that are causing opposite model biases in simulated BC concentrations in the Arctic and in the mid-latitudes.

  19. Black carbon in the Arctic: the underestimated role of gas flaring and residential combustion emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohl, A.; Klimont, Z.; Eckhardt, S.; Kupiainen, K.; Shevchenko, V. P.; Kopeikin, V. M.; Novigatsky, A. N.

    2013-09-01

    BC surface concentrations due to residential combustion by 68% when using daily emissions. A large part (93%) of this systematic increase can be captured also when using monthly emissions; the increase is compensated by a decreased BC burden at lower latitudes. In a comparison with BC measurements at six Arctic stations, we find that using daily-varying residential combustion emissions and introducing gas flaring emissions leads to large improvements of the simulated Arctic BC, both in terms of mean concentration levels and simulated seasonality. Case studies based on BC and carbon monoxide (CO) measurements from the Zeppelin observatory appear to confirm flaring as an important BC source that can produce pollution plumes in the Arctic with a high BC / CO enhancement ratio, as expected for this source type. BC measurements taken during a research ship cruise in the White, Barents and Kara seas north of the region with strong flaring emissions reveal very high concentrations of the order of 200-400 ng m-3. The model underestimates these concentrations substantially, which indicates that the flaring emissions (and probably also other emissions in northern Siberia) are rather under- than overestimated in our emission data set. Our results suggest that it may not be "vertical transport that is too strong or scavenging rates that are too low" and "opposite biases in these processes" in the Arctic and elsewhere in current aerosol models, as suggested in a recent review article (Bond et al., Bounding the role of black carbon in the climate system: a scientific assessment, J. Geophys. Res., 2013), but missing emission sources and lacking time resolution of the emission data that are causing opposite model biases in simulated BC concentrations in the Arctic and in the mid-latitudes.

  20. Slipping magnetic reconnections with multiple flare ribbons during an X-class solar flare

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Wang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    With the observations of the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we present the slipping magnetic reconnections with multiple flare ribbons (FRs) during an X1.2 eruptive flare on 2014 January 7. A center negative polarity was surrounded by several positive ones, and there appeared three FRs. The three FRs showed apparent slipping motions, and hook structures formed at their ends. Due to the moving footpoints of the erupting structures, one tight semi-circular hook disappeared after the slippage along its inner and outer edge, and coronal dimmings formed within the hook. The east hook also faded as a result of the magnetic reconnection between the arcades of a remote filament and a hot loop that was impulsively heated by the under flare loops. Our results are accordant with the slipping magnetic reconnection regime in 3D standard model for eruptive flares. We suggest that complex structures of the flare is likely a consequence of the more complex flux distribution in the photosphere, and the eruption involves at least...

  1. Temporal evolution and spatial distribution of white-light flare kernels in a solar flare

    CERN Document Server

    Kawate, Tomoko; Nakatani, Yoshikazu; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Asai, Ayumi; Morita, Satoshi; Masuda, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    On 2011 September 6, we observed an X2.1-class flare in continuum and H$\\alpha$ with a frame rate of about 30~Hz. After processing images of the event by using a speckle-masking image reconstruction, we identified white-light (WL) flare ribbons on opposite sides of the magnetic neutral line. We derive the lightcurve decay times of the WL flare kernels at each resolution element by assuming that the kernels consist of one or two components that decay exponentially, starting from the peak time. As a result, 42% of the pixels have two decay-time components with average decay times of 15.6 and 587 s, whereas the average decay time is 254 s for WL kernels with only one decay-time component. The peak intensities of the shorter decay-time component exhibit good spatial correlation with the WL intensity, whereas the peak intensities of the long decay-time components tend to be larger in the early phase of the flare at the inner part of the flare ribbons, close to the magnetic neutral line. The average intensity of th...

  2. The Power-Law Distribution of Flare Kernels and Fractal Current Sheets in a Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Nishizuka, N; Takasaki, H; Kurokawa, H; Shibata, K; 10.1088/0004-637X/694/1/L74

    2013-01-01

    We report a detailed examination of the fine structure inside flare ribbons and the temporal evolution of this fine structure during the X2.5 solar flare that occurred on 2004 November 10. We examine elementary bursts of the C IV (1550{\\AA}) emission lines seen as local transient brightenings inside the flare ribbons in the ultraviolet (1600{\\AA}) images taken with Transition Region and Coronal Explorer, and we call them C IV kernels. This flare was also observed in Ha with the Sartorius 18 cm Refractor telescope at Kwasan observatory, Kyoto University, and in hard X-rays (HXR) with Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager. Many C IV kernels, whose sizes were comparable to or less than 2", were found to brighten successively during the evolution of the flare ribbon. The majority of them were well correlated with the Ha kernels in both space and time, while some of them were associated with the HXR emission. These kernels were thought to be caused by the precipitation of nonthermal particles at the...

  3. Ensemble Forecasting of Major Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Guerra, J A; Uritsky, V M

    2015-01-01

    We present the results from the first ensemble prediction model for major solar flares (M and X classes). Using the probabilistic forecasts from three models hosted at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (NASA-GSFC) and the NOAA forecasts, we developed an ensemble forecast by linearly combining the flaring probabilities from all four methods. Performance-based combination weights were calculated using a Monte Carlo-type algorithm by applying a decision threshold $P_{th}$ to the combined probabilities and maximizing the Heidke Skill Score (HSS). Using the probabilities and events time series from 13 recent solar active regions (2012 - 2014), we found that a linear combination of probabilities can improve both probabilistic and categorical forecasts. Combination weights vary with the applied threshold and none of the tested individual forecasting models seem to provide more accurate predictions than the others for all values of $P_{th}$. According to the maximum values of HSS, a performance-based weights ...

  4. Gravitational fragmentation of the Carina Flare supershell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wünsch, Richard

    2015-03-01

    We study the gravitational fragmentation of a thick shell comparing the analytical theory to 3D hydrodynamic simulations and to observations of the Carina Flare supershell. We use both grid-based (AMR) and particle-based (SPH) codes to follow the idealised model of the fragmenting shell and found an excellent agreement between the two codes. Growth rates of fragments at different wavelength are well described by the pressure assisted gravitational instability (PAGI) - a new theory of the thick shell fragmentation. Using the APEX telescope we observe a part of the surface of the Carina Flare supershell (GSH287+04-17) in the 13CO(2-1) line. We apply a new clump-finding algorithm DENDROFIND to identify 50 clumps. We determine the clump mass function and we construct the minimum spanning tree connecting clumps positions to estimate the typical distance among clumps. We conclude that the observed masses and distances correspond well to the prediction of PAGI.

  5. Heavy Ion Acceleration in Impulsive Solar Flares

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王德焴

    2002-01-01

    The abundance enhancements of heavy ions Ne, Mg, Si and Fe in impulsive solar energetic particle (SEP) eventsare explained by a plasma acceleration mechanism. In consideration of the fact that the coronal plasma is mainlycomposed of hydrogen and helium ions, we think that theion-ion hybrid wave and quasi-perpendicular wave can.be excited by the energetic electron beam in impulsive solar flares. These waves may resonantly be absorbed byheavy ions when the frequencies of these waves are close to the second-harmonic gyrofrequencies of these heavyions. This requires the coronal plasma temperature to be located in the range ofT ~ (5 - 9) × 106 K in impulsivesolar flares and makes the average ionic charge state of these heavy ions in impulsive SEP events higher than theaverage ionic charge state of these heavy ions in gradual SEP events. These pre-heated and enhanced heavy ionsin impulsive SEP events.

  6. High energy flare physics group summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. M.; Kurfess, J. D.

    1989-01-01

    The contributions of the High Energy Flare Physics Special Session in the American Astronomical Society Solar Physics Division Meeting are reviewed. Oral and poster papers were presented on observatories and instruments available for the upcoming solar maximum. Among these are the space-based Gamma Ray Observatory, the Solar Flare and Cosmic Burst Gamma Ray Experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft, the Soft X Ray Telescope on the spacecraft Solar-A, and the balloon-based Gamma Ray Imaging Device. Ground based observatories with new capabilities include the BIMA mm-wave interferometer (Univ. of California, Berkeley; Univ. of Illinois; Univ. of Maryland), Owens Valley Radio Observatory and the Very Large Array. The highlights of the various instrument performances are reported and potential data correlations and collaborations are suggested.

  7. Millimeter Observation of Solar Flares with Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, D. F.; Valio, A. B. M.

    2016-04-01

    We present the investigation of two solar flares on February 17 and May 13, 2013, studied in radio from 5 to 405 GHz (RSTN, POEMAS, SST), and in X-rays up to 300 keV (FERMI and RHESSI). The objective of this work is to study the evolution and energy distribution of the population of accelerated electrons and the magnetic field configuration. For this we constructed and fit the radio spectrum by a gyro synchrotron model. The optically thin spectral indices from radio observations were compared to that of the hard X-rays, showing that the radio spectral index is harder than the latter by 2. These flares also presented 10-15 % circular polarized emission at 45 and 90 GHz that suggests that the sources are located at different legs of an asymmetric loop.

  8. Search for neutrinos from flaring blazars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreter, Michael [Lehrstuhl fuer Astronomie, Universitaet Wuerzburg, Emil-Fischer-Strasse 31, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); ECAP, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Eberl, Thomas; James, Clancy [ECAP, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Kadler, Matthias [Lehrstuhl fuer Astronomie, Universitaet Wuerzburg, Emil-Fischer-Strasse 31, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Collaboration: ANTARES-KM3NeT-Erlangen-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Jets from Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are among the best candidates for the recently detected extraterrestrial neutrino flux. Hadronic AGN jet-emission models predict a tight correlation between the neutrino flux and the time-variable gamma-ray emission. At the same time, the atmospheric-background (noise) signal, which often dominates in neutrino-astronomical observations, can be substantially reduced by rejecting long-lasting periods of low flux. For these reasons, short high-amplitude gamma-ray flares, as often observed in blazars, can be used to substantially increase the sensitivity of neutrino telescopes in point-source searches. We develop a strategy to search for TeV neutrinos from flaring blazar jets from the TANAMI sample using the ANTARES telescope and Fermi gamma-ray light curves. An unbinned maximum-likelihood method is applied to optimize the probability of a neutrino detection from TANAMI sources.

  9. Nonlocal thermal transport in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpen, Judith T.; Devore, C. Richard

    1987-01-01

    A flaring solar atmosphere is modeled assuming classical thermal transport, locally limited thermal transport, and nonlocal thermal transport. The classical, local, and nonlocal expressions for the heat flux yield significantly different temperature, density, and velocity profiles throughout the rise phase of the flare. Evaporation of chromospheric material begins earlier in the nonlocal case than in the classical or local calculations, but reaches much lower upward velocities. Much higher coronal temperatures are achieved in the nonlocal calculations owing to the combined effects of delocalization and flux limiting. The peak velocity and momentum are roughly the same in all three cases. A more impulsive energy release influences the evolution of the nonlocal model more than the classical and locally limited cases.

  10. Selective Acceleration in Impulsive Solar Flares

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王德焴

    2001-01-01

    A plasma acceleration mechanism is proposed to explain the dramatic enhancement in the ratio of 3 He/4He, (enhancement factor 102 - 103) observed in solar 3He-rich flares. Considering that coronal plasma is mainly composed of hydrogen and helium ions, the hydrogen ion-helium ion hybrid waves and quasi-perpendicular waves can be excited by energetic electron beam during the impulsive solarflares. The frequencies of these waves are close to the 3He++ ion gyrofrequency, but far from the 4He++ ion gyrofrequency. Most of these waves are selectively absorbed by 3He ions. These preheated 3He ions can be successively stochastic accelerated by Alfvén turbulence, when their velocities are larger than the local Alfvén velocity. It makes the ratio of 3He/4He dramatically enhanced and the acceleration energy spectrum of 3He ions forms a power-law distribution during the impulsive solar flares.

  11. Monitoring and modeling radio flares from microquasars

    CERN Document Server

    Trushkin, S A; Bursov, N N

    2000-01-01

    We present results of long-term daily monitoring of a sample of Galactic radio-emitting X-ray binaries showing relativistic jets (RJXRB): SS433, Cyg X-3, and GRS 1915+105, with the RATAN-600 radio telescope in the 0.6-22 GHz range. We carried out the modeling calculations to understand the temporal (1--100 days) and spectral (1-22 GHz) dependence. We tested the finite jet segment models and we found that the geometry of the conical hollow jets is responsible for either a power law or an exponential decay of the flares. SS433 was monitored for 100 days in 1997 and 120 days in 1999. From the quiescent radio light curves, we obtained clear evidence of a 6.04-day 10-15% modulation. Three powerful flares (up to 13 Jy) from Cyg X-3 were detected in April 2000.

  12. First experimental results of a cryogenic stopping cell with short-lived, heavy uranium fragments produced at 1000 MeV/u

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purushothaman, S.; Reiter, M. P.; Haettner, E.; Dendooven, P.; Dickel, T.; Geissel, H.; Ebert, J.; Jesch, C.; Plass, W. R.; Ranjan, M.; Weick, H.; Amjad, F.; Ayet, S.; Diwisch, M.; Estrade, A.; Farinon, F.; Greiner, F.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Knoebel, R.; Kurcewicz, J.; Lang, J.; Moore, I. D.; Mukha, I.; Nociforo, C.; Petrick, M.; Pfuetzner, M.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Rink, A. -K.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Scheidenberger, C.; Takechi, M.; Tanaka, Y. K.; Winfield, J. S.; Yavor, M. I.

    2013-01-01

    A cryogenic stopping cell (CSC) has been commissioned with U-238 projectile fragments produced at 1000 MeV/u. The spatial isotopic separation in flight was performed with the FRS applying a monoenergetic degrader. For the first time, a stopping cell was operated with exotic nuclei at cryogenic tempe

  13. Cyclical Variability of Prominences, CMEs and Flares

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. L. Ballester

    2000-09-01

    Solar flares, prominences and CMEs are well known manifestations of solar activity. For many years, qualitative studies were made about the cyclical behaviour of such phenomena. Nowadays, more quantitative studies have been undertaken with the aim to understand the solar cycle dependence of such phenomena as well as peculiar behaviour, such as asymmetries and periodicities, occurring within the solar cycle. Here, we plan to review the more recent research concerning all these topics.

  14. Protection of Communication System From Solar Flares

    OpenAIRE

    Karthik, K.(Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY, United States of America); Shirvram, B.

    2008-01-01

    Solar flares are enormous explosions on the surface of the sun and they release energy of the order of billion megatons of TNThis energy is in the form of electromagnetic radiations such as alpha, gamma, and ultraviolet rays. When exposed to high doses of radiation like 2-15 kilorad (Si), silicon integrated circuits in satellite communication systems fail to operate properly, thus affecting the performance of communication systems. Therefore, the major issue that needs to be addressed is the ...

  15. Universality in solar flare and earthquake occurrence

    OpenAIRE

    de Arcangelis, L.; Godano, C.; Lippiello, E.; Nicodemi, M.

    2006-01-01

    Earthquakes and solar flares are phenomena involving huge and rapid releases of energy characterized by complex temporal occurrence. By analysing available experimental catalogs, we show that the stochastic processes underlying these apparently different phenomena have universal properties. Namely both problems exhibit the same distributions of sizes, inter-occurrence times and the same temporal clustering: we find afterflare sequences with power law temporal correlations as the Omori law for...

  16. The Discriminant Analysis Flare Forecasting System (DAFFS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leka, K. D.; Barnes, Graham; Wagner, Eric; Hill, Frank; Marble, Andrew R.

    2016-05-01

    The Discriminant Analysis Flare Forecasting System (DAFFS) has been developed under NOAA/Small Business Innovative Research funds to quantitatively improve upon the NOAA/SWPC flare prediction. In the Phase-I of this project, it was demonstrated that DAFFS could indeed improve by the requested 25% most of the standard flare prediction data products from NOAA/SWPC. In the Phase-II of this project, a prototype has been developed and is presently running autonomously at NWRA.DAFFS uses near-real-time data from NOAA/GOES, SDO/HMI, and the NSO/GONG network to issue both region- and full-disk forecasts of solar flares, based on multi-variable non-parametric Discriminant Analysis. Presently, DAFFS provides forecasts which match those provided by NOAA/SWPC in terms of thresholds and validity periods (including 1-, 2-, and 3- day forecasts), although issued twice daily. Of particular note regarding DAFFS capabilities are the redundant system design, automatically-generated validation statistics and the large range of customizable options available. As part of this poster, a description of the data used, algorithm, performance and customizable options will be presented, as well as a demonstration of the DAFFS prototype.DAFFS development at NWRA is supported by NOAA/SBIR contracts WC-133R-13-CN-0079 and WC-133R-14-CN-0103, with additional support from NASA contract NNH12CG10C, plus acknowledgment to the SDO/HMI and NSO/GONG facilities and NOAA/SWPC personnel for data products, support, and feedback. DAFFS is presently ready for Phase-III development.

  17. Sunspot waves and flare energy release

    CERN Document Server

    Sych, R; Altyntsev, A; Dudík, J; Kashapova, L

    2014-01-01

    We address a possibility of the flare process initiation and further maintenance of its energy release due to a transformation of sunspot longitudinal waves into transverse magnetic loop oscillations with initiation of reconnection. This leads to heating maintaining after the energy release peak and formation of a flat stage on the X-ray profile. We applied the time-distance plots and pixel wavelet filtration (PWF) methods to obtain spatio-temporal distribution of wave power variations in SDO/AIA data. To find magnetic waveguides, we used magnetic field extrapolation of SDO/HMI magnetograms. The propagation velocity of wave fronts was measured from their spatial locations at specific times. In correlation curves of the 17 GHz (NoRH) radio emission we found a monotonous energy amplification of 3-min waves in the sunspot umbra before the 2012 June 7 flare. This dynamics agrees with an increase in the wave-train length in coronal loops (SDO/AIA, 171 {\\AA}) reaching the maximum 30 minutes prior to the flare onset...

  18. Fine structure of flare ribbons and evolution of electric currents

    CERN Document Server

    Sharykin, I N

    2014-01-01

    Emission of solar flares across the electromagnetic spectrum is often observed in the form of two expanding ribbons. The standard flare model explains the flare ribbons as footpoints of magnetic arcades, emitting due to interaction of energetic particles with the chromospheric plasma. However, the physics of this interaction and properties of the accelerated particles are still unknown. We present results of multiwavelength observations of C2.1 flare of August 15, 2013, observed with New Solar Telescope (NST) of Big Bear Solar Observatory, Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), GOES and FERMI spacecraft. The observations reveal previously unresolved sub-arcsecond structure of the flare ribbons in regions of strong magnetic field consisting from numerous small-scale bright knots. We observe red-blue asymmetry of H alpha flare ribbons with a width as small as 100 km. We discuss the relationship between the ribbons and vertical electric currents estimated from vector magnetograms, and show that Joule heating can be r...

  19. Investigation of the Relationship between Solar Flares and Sunspot Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, S.; Kilcik, A.

    2017-01-01

    We studied the relationship between X-Ray flare numbers (C, M, and, X class flares) and sunspot counts in four categories (Simple (A + B), Medium (C), Large (D + E + F), and End (H)). All data sets cover the whole Solar Cycle 23 and the ascending and maximum phases of Cycle 24 (1996-2014). Pearson correlation analysis method was used to investigate the degree of relationship between monthly solar flare numbers and sunspot counts observed in different sunspot categories. We found that the C, M, and X class flares have highest correlation with the large group sunspot counts, while the small category does not any meaningful correlation. Obtained correlation coefficients between large groups and C, M, and X class flare numbers are 0.79, 0.74, and 0.4, respectively. Thus, we conclude that the main sources of X-Ray solar flares are the complex/large sunspot groups.

  20. CME-flare association during the 23rd solar cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahrous, A.; Shaltout, M.; Beheary, M. M.; Mawad, R.; Youssef, M.

    2009-04-01

    The relation between coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares are statistically studied. More than 10,000 CME events observed by SOHO/LASCO during the period 1996-2005 have been analyzed. The soft X-ray flux measurements provided by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), recorded more than 20,000 flares in the same time period. The data is filtered under certain temporal and spatial conditions to select the CME-flare associated events. The results show that CME-flare associated events are triggered with a lift-off time within the range 0.4-1.0 h. We list a set of 41 CME-flare associated events satisfying the temporal and spatial conditions. The listed events show a good correlation between the CME energy and the X-ray flux of the CME-flare associated events with correlation coefficient of 0.76.

  1. An Analysis of the Sunspot Groups and Flares of Solar Cycle 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    for compact interior. The classes AXX, BXO , BXI, CRO, HSX, HAX, HRX, and HHX have a negligibly small probability of producing an Hα flare. Sunspot...to DRO, HHX, CHO, CRI, and CRO in this study and to FAO, FAC, AXX, BXO , and HRX in Kildahl (1980). While there is good agreement between the two...simplest classes AXX, BXO and CRO accounted for a nearly 28% decrease in total sunspot contribution. Figure 5 indicates that these categories are

  2. X-ray Emission Characteristics of Flares Associated with CMEs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Malini Aggarwal; Rajmal Jain; A. P. Mishra; P. G. Kulkarni; Chintan Vyas; R. Sharma; Meera Gupta

    2008-03-01

    We present the study of 20 solar flares observed by ``Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS)” mission during November 2003 to December 2006 and found associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) seen by LASCO/SOHO mission. In this investigation, X-ray emission characteristics of solar flares and their relationship with the dynamics of CMEs have been presented.We found that the fast moving CMEs, i.e., positive acceleration are better associated with short rise time (< 150 s) flares. However, the velocity of CMEs increases as a function of duration of the flares in both 4.1–10 and 10–20 keV bands. This indicates that the possibility of association of CMEs with larger speeds exists with long duration flare events. We observed that CMEs decelerate with increasing rise time, decay time and duration of the associated X-ray flares. A total 10 out of 20 CMEs under current investigation showed positive acceleration, and 5 of them whose speed did not exceed 589 km/s were associated with short rise time (< 150 s) and short duration (< 1300 s) flares. The other 5 CMEs were associated with long duration or large rise time flare events. The unusual feature of all these positive accelerating CMEs was their low linear speed ranging between 176 and 775 km/s. We do not find any significant correlation between X-ray peak intensity of the flares with linear speed as well as acceleration of the associated CMEs. Based on the onset time of flares and associated CMEs within the observing cadence of CMEs by LASCO, we found that in 16 cases CME preceded the flare by 23 to 1786 s, while in 4 cases flare occurred before the CME by 47 to 685 s. We argue that both events are closely associated with each other and are integral parts of one energy release system.

  3. Observing the formation of flare-driven coronal rain

    OpenAIRE

    Scullion, E.; Rouppe van der Voort, L.; Antolin, P.; Wedemeyer, S.; Vissers, G.; E. P. Kontar; Gallagher, P

    2016-01-01

    PA. GV are funded by the European Research Council under the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) / ERC grant agreement nr. 291058 Flare-driven coronal rain can manifest from rapidly cooled plasma condensations near coronal loop-tops in thermally unstable post-flare arcades. We detect 5 phases that characterise the post-flare decay:heating, evaporation, conductive cooling dominance for ~120 s, radiative/ enthalpy cooling dominance for ~4700 s and finally catastrophic ...

  4. H$\\mathbf{\\alpha}$ Intensity Oscillations in Large Flares

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ram Ajor Maurya; Ashok Ambastha

    2008-03-01

    We reinvestigate the problem of Hα intensity oscillations in large flares, particularly those classified as X-class flares. We have used high spatial and temporal resolution digital observations obtained from Udaipur Solar Observatory during the period 1998–2006 and selected several events. Normalized Lomb–Scargle periodogram method for spectral analysis was used to study the oscillatory power in quiet and active chromospheric locations, including the flare ribbons.

  5. The Study of Flare Stars in Byurakan Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melikian, N. D.

    2016-09-01

    A brief description of the observations and the study of flare stars in Byurakan observatory is presented. In particular it is shown that there is a real dependence between flare activity and the distance between components of UV Ceti. The spectral study of a flare on WX Uma indicated on strong influence of the continuous emission, which is operated from 6000Å and rapidly growing to the short wavelength.

  6. Spots and White Light Flares in an L Dwarf

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Program GN-2012A-Q-37) GMOS spectrograph (Hook et al. 2004) when a series of flares occurred. A spectrum of the most powerful flare in its impulsive...10:14 Hα HeI HeI HeI OI Fig. 4. Gemini-North GMOS spectra of W1906+40 in quiescence (below) and in flare. Note the broad Hα, atomic emission lines

  7. Evidence of Significant Energy Input in the Late Phase of A Solar Flare from NuSTAR X-Ray Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhar, Matej; Krucker, Sam; Hannah, Iain G.; Glesener, Lindsay; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Hudson, Hugh S.; White, Stephen M.; Smith, David M.; Marsh, Andrew J.; hide

    2017-01-01

    We present observations of the occulted active region AR 12222 during the third Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray (NuSTAR) solar campaign on 2014 December 11, with concurrent Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/ AIA and FOXSI-2 sounding rocket observations. The active region produced a medium-size solar flare 1 day before the observations, at approximately 18 UT on 2014 December 10, with the post-flare loops still visible at the time of NuSTAR observations. The time evolution of the source emission in the SDO/AIA 335 Å channel reveals the characteristics of an extreme-ultraviolet late-phase event, caused by the continuous formation of new post-flare loops that arch higher and higher in the solar corona. The spectral fitting of NuSTAR observations yields an isothermal source, with temperature 3.8-4.6 MK, emission measure (0.3-1.8) × 1046 cm-3, and density estimated at (2.5-6.0) × 108 cm-3. The observed AIA fluxes are consistent with the derived NuSTAR temperature range, favoring temperature values in the range of 4.0-4.3 MK. By examining the post-flare loops' cooling times and energy content, we estimate that at least 12 sets of post-flare loops were formed and subsequently cooled between the onset of the flare and NuSTAR observations, with their total thermal energy content an order of magnitude larger than the energy content at flare peak time. This indicates that the standard approach of using only the flare peak time to derive the total thermal energy content of a flare can lead to a large underestimation of its value.

  8. Evidence of Significant Energy Input in the Late Phase of a Solar Flare from NuSTAR X-Ray Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhar, Matej; Krucker, Säm; Hannah, Iain G.; Glesener, Lindsay; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Hudson, Hugh S.; White, Stephen M.; Smith, David M.; Marsh, Andrew J.; Wright, Paul J.; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William W.

    2017-01-01

    We present observations of the occulted active region AR 12222 during the third Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray (NuSTAR) solar campaign on 2014 December 11, with concurrent Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/AIA and FOXSI-2 sounding rocket observations. The active region produced a medium-size solar flare 1 day before the observations, at ∼18 UT on 2014 December 10, with the post-flare loops still visible at the time of NuSTAR observations. The time evolution of the source emission in the SDO/AIA 335 Å channel reveals the characteristics of an extreme-ultraviolet late-phase event, caused by the continuous formation of new post-flare loops that arch higher and higher in the solar corona. The spectral fitting of NuSTAR observations yields an isothermal source, with temperature 3.8–4.6 MK, emission measure (0.3–1.8) × 1046 cm‑3, and density estimated at (2.5–6.0) × 108 cm‑3. The observed AIA fluxes are consistent with the derived NuSTAR temperature range, favoring temperature values in the range of 4.0–4.3 MK. By examining the post-flare loops’ cooling times and energy content, we estimate that at least 12 sets of post-flare loops were formed and subsequently cooled between the onset of the flare and NuSTAR observations, with their total thermal energy content an order of magnitude larger than the energy content at flare peak time. This indicates that the standard approach of using only the flare peak time to derive the total thermal energy content of a flare can lead to a large underestimation of its value.

  9. Flare-induced signals in polarization measurements during the X2.6 flare on 2005 January 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Meng; Wang, Jing-Xiu; Matthews, Sarah; Ming-DeDing; Zhao, Hui; Jin, Chun-Lan

    2009-07-01

    Flare-induced signals in polarization measurements which were manifested as apparent polarity reversal in magnetograms have been reported since 1981. We are motivated to further quantify the phenomenon by asking two questions: can we distinguish the flare-induced signals from real magnetic changes during flares, and what we can learn about flare energy release from the flare-induced signals? We select the X2.6 flare that occurred on 2005 January 15, for further study. The flare took place in NOAA active region (AR) 10720 at approximately the central meridian, which makes the interpretation of the vector magnetograms less ambiguous. We have identified that flare-induced signals during this flare appeared in six zones. The zones are located within an average distance of 5 Mm from their weight center to the main magnetic neutral line, have an average size of (0.6±0.4)×1017 cm2, duration of 13±4 min, and flux density change of 181±125 G in the area of reversed polarity. The following new facts have been revealed by this study: (1) the flare-induced signal is also seen in the transverse magnetograms but with smaller magnitude, e.g., about 50 G; (2) the flare-induced signal mainly manifests itself as apparent polarity reversal, but the signal starts and ends as a weakening of flux density; (3) The flare-induced signals appear in phase with the peaks of hard X-ray emission as observed by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), and mostly trace the position of RHESSI hard X-ray footpoint sources. (4) in four zones, it takes place co-temporally with real magnetic changes which persist after the flare. Only for the other two zones does the flux density recover to the pre-flare level immediately after the flare. The physical implications of the flare-induced signal are discussed in view of its relevance to the non-thermal electron precipitation and primary energy release in the flare.

  10. Flare-induced signals in polarization measurements during the X2.6 flare on 2005 January 15

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng Zhao; Jing-Xiu Wang; Sarah Matthews; Ming-De Ding; Hui Zhao; Chun-Lan Jin

    2009-01-01

    Flare-induced signals in polarization measurements which were manifested as apparent polarity reversal in magnetograms have been reported since 1981. We are motivated to further quantify the phenomenon by asking two questions: can we distinguish the flare-induced signals from real magnetic changes during flares, and what we can learn about flare energy release from the flare-induced signals? We select the X2.6 flare that occurred on 2005 January 15, for further study. The flare took place in NOAA active re-gion (AR) 10720 at approximately the central meridian, which makes the interpretation of the vector magnetograms less ambiguous. We have identified that flare-induced signals during this flare appeared in six zones. The zones are located within an average distance of 5 Mm from their weight center to the main magnetic neutral line, have an average size of (0.6±0.4)×1017 cm2, duration of 13±4 min, and flux density change of 181±125 G in the area of reversed polarity. The following new facts have been revealed by this study: (1) the flare-induced signal is also seen in the transverse magnetograms but with smaller magnitude, e.g., about 50 G; (2) the flare-induced signal mainly manifests itself as apparent polarity reversal, but the signal starts and ends as a weakening of flux density; (3) The flare-induced signals appear in phase with the peaks of hard X-ray emission as observed by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic lmager (RHESSI), and mostly trace the position of RHESSI hard X-ray footpoint sources. (4) in four zones, it takes place cotemporally with real magnetic changes which persist after the flare. Only for the other two zones does the flux density recover to the pre-flare level immediately after the flare.The physical implications of the flare-induced signal are discussed in view of its relevance to the non-thermal electron precipitation and primary energy release in the flare.

  11. A Comparison of Flare Forecasting Methods. I. Results from the “All-Clear” Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, G.; Leka, K. D.; Schrijver, C. J.; Colak, T.; Qahwaji, R.; Ashamari, O. W.; Yuan, Y.; Zhang, J.; McAteer, R. T. J.; Bloomfield, D. S.; Higgins, P. A.; Gallagher, P. T.; Falconer, D. A.; Georgoulis, M. K.; Wheatland, M. S.; Balch, C.; Dunn, T.; Wagner, E. L.

    2016-10-01

    Solar flares produce radiation that can have an almost immediate effect on the near-Earth environment, making it crucial to forecast flares in order to mitigate their negative effects. The number of published approaches to flare forecasting using photospheric magnetic field observations has proliferated, with varying claims about how well each works. Because of the different analysis techniques and data sets used, it is essentially impossible to compare the results from the literature. This problem is exacerbated by the low event rates of large solar flares. The challenges of forecasting rare events have long been recognized in the meteorology community, but have yet to be fully acknowledged by the space weather community. During the interagency workshop on “all clear” forecasts held in Boulder, CO in 2009, the performance of a number of existing algorithms was compared on common data sets, specifically line-of-sight magnetic field and continuum intensity images from the Michelson Doppler Imager, with consistent definitions of what constitutes an event. We demonstrate the importance of making such systematic comparisons, and of using standard verification statistics to determine what constitutes a good prediction scheme. When a comparison was made in this fashion, no one method clearly outperformed all others, which may in part be due to the strong correlations among the parameters used by different methods to characterize an active region. For M-class flares and above, the set of methods tends toward a weakly positive skill score (as measured with several distinct metrics), with no participating method proving substantially better than climatological forecasts.

  12. A CIRCULAR-RIBBON SOLAR FLARE FOLLOWING AN ASYMMETRIC FILAMENT ERUPTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chang; Deng, Na; Lee, Jeongwoo; Wang, Haimin [Space Weather Research Laboratory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, University Heights, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States); Liu, Rui [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Department of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Pariat, Étienne [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, PSL Research University, CNRS, Sorbonne Universits, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, Univ. Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, F-92190 Meudon (France); Wiegelmann, Thomas [Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Liu, Yang [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States); Kleint, Lucia, E-mail: chang.liu@njit.edu [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Bahnhofstrasse 6, 5210 Windisch (Switzerland)

    2015-10-20

    The dynamic properties of flare ribbons and the often associated filament eruptions can provide crucial information on the flaring coronal magnetic field. This Letter analyzes the GOES-class X1.0 flare on 2014 March 29 (SOL2014-03-29T17:48), in which we found an asymmetric eruption of a sigmoidal filament and an ensuing circular flare ribbon. Initially both EUV images and a preflare nonlinear force-free field model show that the filament is embedded in magnetic fields with a fan-spine-like structure. In the first phase, which is defined by a weak but still increasing X-ray emission, the western portion of the sigmoidal filament arches upward and then remains quasi-static for about five minutes. The western fan-like and the outer spine-like fields display an ascending motion, and several associated ribbons begin to brighten. Also found is a bright EUV flow that streams down along the eastern fan-like field. In the second phase that includes the main peak of hard X-ray (HXR) emission, the filament erupts, leaving behind two major HXR sources formed around its central dip portion and a circular ribbon brightened sequentially. The expanding western fan-like field interacts intensively with the outer spine-like field, as clearly seen in running difference EUV images. We discuss these observations in favor of a scenario where the asymmetric eruption of the sigmoidal filament is initiated due to an MHD instability and further facilitated by reconnection at a quasi-null in corona; the latter is in turn enhanced by the filament eruption and subsequently produces the circular flare ribbon.

  13. A swirling flare-related EUV jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q. M.; Ji, H. S.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: We report our observations of a swirling flare-related extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) jet on 2011 October 15 at the edge of NOAA active region 11314. Methods: We used the multiwavelength observations in the EUV passbands from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We extracted a wide slit along the jet axis and 12 thin slits across its axis to investigate the longitudinal motion and transverse rotation. We also used data from the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) aboard the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft to investigate the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the jet. Ground-based Hα images from the El Teide Observatory, a member of the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG), provide a good opportunity to explore the relationship between the cool surge and the hot jet. Line-of-sight magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) aboard SDO enable us to study the magnetic evolution of the flare/jet event. We carried out potential-field extrapolation to calculate the magnetic configuration associated with the jet. Results: The onset of jet eruption coincided with the start time of the C1.6 flare impulsive phase. The initial velocity and acceleration of the longitudinal motion were 254 ± 10 km s-1 and -97 ± 5 m s-2, respectively. The jet presented helical structure and transverse swirling motion at the beginning of its eruption. The counter-clockwise rotation slowed down from an average velocity of ~122 km s-1 to ~80 km s-1. The interwinding thick threads of the jet untwisted into multiple thin threads during the rotation that lasted for one cycle with a period of ~7 min and an amplitude that increases from ~3.2 Mm at the bottom to ~11 Mm at the upper part. Afterwards, the curtain-like leading edge of the jet continued rising without rotation, leaving a dimming region behind, before falling back to the solar surface. The appearance/disappearance of dimming corresponded to the

  14. Computations of Photon Orbits Emitted by Flares at the ISCO of Accretion Disks Around Rotating Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes; Fukumura, K.

    2009-01-01

    We present detailed computations of photon orbits emitted by flares at the ISCO of accretion disks around rotating black holes. We show that for sufficiently large spin parameter, i.e. $a > 0.94 M$, following a flare at ISCO, a sufficient number of photons arrive at an observer after multiple orbits around the black hole, to produce an "photon echo" of constant lag, i.e. independent of the relative phase between the black hole and the observer, of $\\Delta T \\simeq 14 M$. This constant time delay, then, leads to the presence of a QPO in the source power spectrum at a frequency $\

  15. A characterization of solution gas flaring in Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M R; Kostiuk, L W; Spangelo, J L

    2001-08-01

    Information reported here is the result of a detailed analysis of data on flared and vented solution gas in the Province of Alberta in 1999. A goal of characterizing these flares was to aid in the improved management of solution gas flaring. In total, 4499 oil and bitumen batteries reported flaring or venting with a combined gas volume of 1.42 billion m3. There was significant site-to-site variation in volumes of gas flared or vented, gas composition, and flare design. Approximately 5% of physical batteries generate 35.7% of the gas flared and vented from oil and bitumen batteries. Therefore, if one were to attempt to mitigate flaring, significant progress could be made by starting with only the largest sites. The monthly variability of gas volumes was considered because high variability could affect implementation of alternative technologies. It was found that slightly more than 40% of the sites were reasonably steady and had monthly deviations of 100% or less from the average flared volume. The variability in monthly volumes was less for the larger batteries. Data from individual well sites show significant variability in the relative concentrations of each of the major species contained in solution gas.

  16. A statistical study of post-flare-associated CME events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, M.; Mawad, R.; shaltout, Mosalam

    2013-04-01

    We present a statistical study of post-flare-associated CMEs (PFA-CMEs) during the period from 1996 to 2010. By investigating all CMEs and X-ray flares, respectively, in the LASCO and GOES archives, we found 15875 CMEs of which masses are well measured and 25112 X-ray flares of which positions are determined from their optical counterparts. Under certain temporal and spatial criteria of these CMEs and solar flare events, 291PFA-CMEs events have been selected. Linking the flare fluxes with CME speeds of these paired events, we found that there is a reasonable positive linear relation between the CME linear speed and associated flare flux. The results show also the CME width increases as the flux of its associated solar flare increases. Besides we found that there is a fine positive linear relation between the CME mass and its width. Matching the flare fluxes with CME masses of these paired events, we find the CME mass increases as the flux of its associated solar flare increases. Finally we find the PFA-CME events are in regular more decelerated than the other CMEs.

  17. Nuclear processes and neutrino production in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingenfelter, R. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Kozlovsky, S.

    1985-01-01

    The determination of flare neutrino flux is approached from the standpoint of recent observations and theoretical results on the nuclear processes in solar flares. Attention is given to the energy spectra and total numbers of accelerated particles in flares, as well as their resulting production of beta(+)-emitting radionuclei and pions; these should be the primary sources of neutrinos. The observed 0.511 MeV line flux for the June 21, 1980 flare is compared with the expected from the number and spectrum of accelerated particles.

  18. Global Energetics of Solar Flares. V. Energy Closure in Flares and Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Caspi, Amir; Cohen, Christina M. S.; Holman, Gordon; Jing, Ju; Kretzschmar, Matthieu; Kontar, Eduard P.; McTiernan, James M.; Mewaldt, Richard A.; O’Flannagain, Aidan; Richardson, Ian G.; Ryan, Daniel; Warren, Harry P.; Xu, Yan

    2017-02-01

    In this study we synthesize the results of four previous studies on the global energetics of solar flares and associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which include magnetic, thermal, nonthermal, and CME energies in 399 solar M- and X-class flare events observed during the first 3.5 yr of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission. Our findings are as follows. (1) The sum of the mean nonthermal energy of flare-accelerated particles ({E}{nt}), the energy of direct heating ({E}{dir}), and the energy in CMEs ({E}{CME}), which are the primary energy dissipation processes in a flare, is found to have a ratio of ({E}{nt}+{E}{dir}+{E}{CME})/{E}{mag}=0.87+/- 0.18, compared with the dissipated magnetic free energy {E}{mag}, which confirms energy closure within the measurement uncertainties and corroborates the magnetic origin of flares and CMEs. (2) The energy partition of the dissipated magnetic free energy is: 0.51 ± 0.17 in nonthermal energy of ≥slant 6 {keV} electrons, 0.17 ± 0.17 in nonthermal ≥slant 1 {MeV} ions, 0.07 ± 0.14 in CMEs, and 0.07 ± 0.17 in direct heating. (3) The thermal energy is almost always less than the nonthermal energy, which is consistent with the thick-target model. (4) The bolometric luminosity in white-light flares is comparable to the thermal energy in soft X-rays (SXR). (5) Solar energetic particle events carry a fraction ≈ 0.03 of the CME energy, which is consistent with CME-driven shock acceleration. (6) The warm-target model predicts a lower limit of the low-energy cutoff at {e}c≈ 6 {keV}, based on the mean peak temperature of the differential emission measure of T e = 8.6 MK during flares. This work represents the first statistical study that establishes energy closure in solar flare/CME events.

  19. From GHz to mHz: A Multiwavelength Study of the Acoustically Active 14 August 2004 M7.4 Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez-Oliveros, J C; Besliu-Ionescu, D; Donea, A -C; Cally, P S; Lindsey, C

    2007-01-01

    We carried out an electromagnetic acoustic analysis of the solar flare of 14 August 2004 in active region AR10656 from the radio to the hard X-ray spectrum. The flare was a GOES soft X-ray class M7.4 and produced a detectable sun quake, confirming earlier inferences that relatively low-energy flares may be able to generate sun quakes. We introduce the hypothesis that the seismicity of the active region is closely related to the heights of coronal magnetic loops that conduct high-energy particles from the flare. In the case of relatively short magnetic loops, chromospheric evaporation populates the loop interior with ionized gas relatively rapidly, expediting the scattering of remaining trapped high-energy electrons into the magnetic loss cone and their rapid precipitation into the chromosphere. This increases both the intensity and suddenness of the chromospheric heating, satisfying the basic conditions for an acoustic emission that penetrates into the solar interior.

  20. GeV Blazar flares several parsecs from the central engine. Who pays the seed photon bill?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breiding, Peter; Georganopoulos, Markos; Meyer, Eileen

    2016-04-01

    In Blazars, multi-wavelength observations suggest that some GeV flares take place at the location of the mm VLBI core, several pc from the black hole. This location for the GeV emission requires a yet un-identified source of seed photons to be Inverse Compton scattered to GeV energies. Our model for these flares involves a fast spine and slow sheath configuration for the relativistic jet, where the mildly beamed sheath emission will illuminate with a large opening angle the outer regions of the Molecular Torus. The heated clouds will then radiate and their emission will be relativistically boosted in the spine frame where it can they be up-scattered to GeV energies. We argue, through analytical work and simulations, that this can be the seed photon source that produces the GeV flares.

  1. Primordial flares, flux tubes, MHD waves in the early universe and genesis of cosmic gamma ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Hiremath, K M

    2009-01-01

    It is conjectured that energy sources of the gamma ray bursts are similar to energy sources which trigger solar and stellar transient activity phenomena like flares, plasma accelerated flows in the flux tubes and, dissipation of energy and acceleration of particles by the MHD waves. Phenomenologically we examine in detail the following energy sources which may trigger gamma ray bursts : (i) cosmic primordial flares which could be solar flare like phenomena in the region of inter galactic or inter galactic cluster regions, (ii) primordial magnetic flux tubes that might have been formed from the convective collapse of the primordial magnetic flux (iii) nonlinear interaction and dissipation of MHD waves that are produced from the perturbations of large-scale inter galactic or inter cluster magnetic field of primordial origin. We examine in detail each of the afore mentioned phenomena keeping in mind that whether such processes are responsible for energy sources of the gamma ray bursts. By considering the similar...

  2. H-alpha macrospicules - Identification with EUV macrospicules and with flares in X-ray bright points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. L.; Tang, F.; Bohlin, J. D.; Golub, L.

    1977-01-01

    The paper presents observational evidence that two newly observed transient solar phenomena, EUV macrospicules and X-ray bright-point flares, are closely related. Time-lapse H-alpha filtergram observations of the limb in quiet regions show small surgelike eruptions called H-alpha macrospicules. From the similarity of H-alpha macrospicules and EUV macrospicules, and from comparison of simultaneous H-alpha and He II 304 A observations, we conclude that H-alpha macrospicules are EUV macrospicules viewed in H-alpha, although most EUV macrospicules are too faint in H-alpha to appear on H-alpha filtergrams of normal exposure. From comparison of simultaneous X-ray and H-alpha observations of flares in X-ray bright points situated on the limb, we show that flares in X-ray bright points often produce H-alpha macrospicules.

  3. Ultra-narrow Negative Flare Front Observed in Helium-10830~\\AA\\ using the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Yan; Ding, Mingde; Kleint, Lucia; Su, Jiangtao; Liu, Chang; Ji, Haisheng; Chae, Jongchul; Jing, Ju; Cho, Kyuhyoun; Cho, Kyungsuk; Gary, Dale; Wang, Haimin

    2016-01-01

    Solar flares are sudden flashes of brightness on the Sun and are often associated with coronal mass ejections and solar energetic particles which have adverse effects in the near Earth environment. By definition, flares are usually referred to bright features resulting from excess emission. Using the newly commissioned 1.6~m New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory, here we show a striking "negative" flare with a narrow, but unambiguous "dark" moving front observed in He I 10830 \\AA, which is as narrow as 340 km and is associated with distinct spectral characteristics in H-alpha and Mg II lines. Theoretically, such negative contrast in He I 10830 \\AA\\ can be produced under special circumstances, by nonthermal-electron collisions, or photoionization followed by recombination. Our discovery, made possible due to unprecedented spatial resolution, confirms the presence of the required plasma conditions and provides unique information in understanding the energy release and radiative transfer in astronomi...

  4. Distribution characteristics of coronal electric current density as an indicator for the occurrence of a solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jihye; Magara, Tetsuya; Inoue, Satoshi; Kubo, Yuki; Nishizuka, Naoto

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we investigate the distribution characteristics of the coronal electric current density in a flare-producing active region (AR12158; SOL2014-09-10) by reconstructing nonlinear force-free (NLFF) fields from photospheric magnetic field data. A time series of NLFF fields shows the spatial distribution and its temporal development of coronal current density in this active region. A fractal dimensional analysis shows that a concentrated coronal current forms a structure of fractal spatiality. Furthermore, the distribution function of coronal current density is featured with a double power-law profile, and the value of electric current density at the breaking point of a double power-law fitting function shows a noticeable time variation toward the onset of an X-class flare. We discuss that this quantity will be a useful indicator for the occurrence of a flare.

  5. Distribution characteristics of coronal electric current density as an indicator for the occurrence of a solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jihye; Magara, Tetsuya; Inoue, Satoshi; Kubo, Yuki; Nishizuka, Naoto

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we investigate the distribution characteristics of the coronal electric current density in a flare-producing active region (AR12158; SOL2014-09-10) by reconstructing nonlinear force-free (NLFF) fields from photospheric magnetic field data. A time series of NLFF fields shows the spatial distribution and its temporal development of coronal current density in this active region. A fractal dimensional analysis shows that a concentrated coronal current forms a structure of fractal spatiality. Furthermore, the distribution function of coronal current density is featured with a double power-law profile, and the value of electric current density at the breaking point of a double power-law fitting function shows a noticeable time variation toward the onset of an X-class flare. We discuss that this quantity will be a useful indicator for the occurrence of a flare.

  6. A comparison between magnetic shear and flare shear in a well-observed M-class flare

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tuan-Hui Zhou; Hai-Sheng Ji

    2009-01-01

    We give an extensive multi-wavelength analysis of an eruptive M1.0/1N class solar flare, which occurred in the active region NOAA 10044 on 2002 July 26. Our empha-sis is on the relationship between magnetic shear and flare shear. Flare shear is defined as the angle formed between the line connecting the centroids of the two ribbons of the flare and the line perpendicular to the magnetic neutral line. The magnetic shear is computed from vector magnetograms observed at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO), while the flare shear is computed from Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) 1700A images. By a detailed comparison, we find that: 1) The magnetic shear and the flare shear of this event are basically consistent, as judged from the directions of the transverse mag-netic field and the line connecting the two ribbons' centroids. 2) During the period of the enhancement of magnetic shear, flare shear had a fast increase followed by a fluctuated decrease. 3) When the magnetic shear stopped its enhancement, the fluctuated decreasing behavior of the flare shear became very smooth. 4) Hard X-ray (HXR) spikes are well correlated with the unshearing peaks on the time profile of the rate of change of the flare shear. We give a discussion of the above phenomena.

  7. Optical flare observed in the flaring gamma-ray blazar S5 1044+71

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pursimo, Tapio; Blay, Pere; Telting, John; Ojha, Roopesh

    2017-01-01

    We report optical photometry of the blazar S5 1044+71, obtained with the 2.56m Nordic Optical Telescope in La Palma, to look for any enhanced optical activity associated with a recent flare in the daily averaged gamma-ray flux (ATel#9928).

  8. Flare Ribbons In The Early Phase Of An SDO Flare: Emission Measure And Energetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Lyndsay; Hannah, I. G.; Hudson, H. S.; Innes, D. E.

    2012-05-01

    We report on the M1.0 flare of 7th August 2010, which displayed extended early phase chromospheric ribbons, well observed by SDO/AIA and RHESSI. Most large flares saturate rapidly in the high-temperature AIA channels, however this event could be followed in unsaturated AIA images for ten minutes in the build-up to and first few minutes of the impulsive phase. Analysis of GOES, RHESSI and SDO/AIA demonstrates the presence of high temperature ( 10MK), compact plasma volumes in the chromospheric flare ribbons, with a column emission measure of on average 3-7 x 1028 cm-5. We construct a time-resolved energy budget for the ribbon plasma, including also SDO/EVE data, and discuss the implications of the observed ribbon properties for flare energisation. This work was supported by the UK’s Science and Technology Facilities Council (ST/1001801), and by the European Commission through the FP7 HESPE project (FP7-2010-SPACE-263086).

  9. Can dual-energy computed tomography improve visualization of hypoenhancing liver lesions in portal venous phase? Assessment of advanced image-based virtual monoenergetic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Damiano; De Cecco, Carlo N; Schoepf, U Joseph; Schaefer, Amanda R; Leland, Parker W; Johnson, Dustin; Laghi, Andrea; Hardie, Andrew D

    The purpose was to assess image quality of portal-venous phase dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) for liver lesions. We performed 120-kVp-equivalent linear-blended (LB) and monoenergetic reconstructions from 40 to 190 keV by standard (VMI) and advanced virtual monoenergetic (VMI+) methods. Diagnostic performance, and quantitative and qualitative image analyses were assessed and compared. Liver contrast to noise ratio peaked at 40 keV_VMI+, while image quality and reader preference peaked at 50 keV_VMI+. 50 keV_VMI+ scored overall higher diagnostic performance: lesion sensitivity 95.4% vs. 83.3% for both 75 keV_VMI and LB. DECT improves assessment of hypoenhancing liver lesions on portal venous phase. 50 keV_VMI+ demonstrated the highest image quality and diagnostic performance over VMI and LB. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Monte Carlo calculations of monoenergetic electron depth dose distributions in LiF chips: Skin dose correction factors for beta rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horowitz, Y.S. [Ben Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheva (Israel); Hirning, C.R. [Ontario Hydro, Whitby (Canada); Yuen, P.; Wong, P. [Chalk River Labs., Ontario (Canada)

    1994-10-01

    Monte Carlo calculations have been carried out for monoenergetic electrons from 0.1 to 4 MeV irradiating LiF chips in both perpendicular and isotropic geometry. This enabled the calculation of skin dose correction factors (beta factors) for typical beta energy spectra as measured with a beta-ray spectrometer at CANDU nuclear generating stations. The correction factors were estimated by averaging the depth dose distributions for the monoenergetic electrons over the experimentally measured beta-ray spectra. The calculations illustrate the large uncertainty in beta factors arising from the unknown angular distribution of the beta-ray radiation field and uncertainties in the shape of the beta-ray spectra below 500 keV. 28 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. What Are Special About Ground-Level Events? Flares, CMEs, Active Regions And Magnetic Field Connection

    CERN Document Server

    Nitta, N V; DeRosa, M L; Nightingale, R W

    2012-01-01

    Ground level events (GLEs) occupy the high-energy end of gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events. They are associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares, but we still do not clearly understand the special conditions that produce these rare events. During Solar Cycle 23, a total of 16 GLEs were registered, using ground-based neutron monitor data. We first ask if these GLEs are clearly distinguishable from other SEP events observed from space. Setting aside possible difficulties in identifying all GLEs consistently, we then try to find observables which may unmistakably isolate these GLEs by studying the basic properties of the associated eruptions and the active regions (ARs) that produced them. It is found that neither the magnitudes of the CMEs and flares nor the complexities of the ARs give sufficient conditions for GLEs. It is possible to find CMEs, flares or ARs that are not associated with GLEs but that have more extreme properties than those associated with GLEs. We also try to ev...

  12. Optical Flares from the Tidal Disruption of Stars by Massive Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Strubbe, Linda E

    2009-01-01

    A star that wanders too close to a massive black hole (BH) is shredded by the BH's tidal gravity. Stellar gas falls back to the BH, releasing a flare of energy. In anticipation of upcoming transient surveys, we predict the light curves and spectra of tidal flares as a function of time, highlighting the unique signatures of tidal flares in the optical and near-IR. Some of the gas initially bound to the BH is likely blown away when the fallback rate is super-Eddington at early times. This outflow produces an optical luminosity comparable to that of a supernova; such events have durations of ~10 days and may have been missed in supernova searches that exclude the nuclear regions of galaxies. When the fallback rate subsides below Eddington, the gas accretes onto the BH via a thin disk whose emission peaks in the UV to soft X-rays. Some of this emission is reprocessed by the unbound stellar debris, producing a spectrum of very broad emission lines (with no corresponding narrow forbidden lines). These lines are str...

  13. First flight of the Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS) instrument

    CERN Document Server

    Duncan, Nicole; Shih, A Y; Hurford, G J; Bain, H M; Amman, M; Mochizuki, B A; Hoberman, J; Olson, J; Maruca, B A; Godbole, N M; Smith, D M; Sample, J; Kelley, N A; Zoglauer, A; Caspi, A; Kaufmann, P; Boggs, S; Lin, R P

    2016-01-01

    The Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS) is a balloon-borne telescope designed to study solar-flare particle acceleration and transport. We describe GRIPS's first Antarctic long-duration flight in Jan 2016 and report preliminary calibration and science results. Electron and ion dynamics, particle abundances and the ambient plasma conditions in solar flares can be understood by examining hard X-ray (HXR) and gamma-ray emission (20 keV to 10 MeV) with enhanced imaging, spectroscopy and polarimetry. GRIPS is specifically designed to answer questions including: What causes the spatial separation between energetic electrons producing HXRs and energetic ions producing gamma-ray lines? How anisotropic are the relativistic electrons, and why can they dominate in the corona? How do the compositions of accelerated and ambient material vary with space and time, and why? GRIPS's key technological improvements over the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) include 3D position-sensi...

  14. Gas flare characterisation with Sentinel-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caseiro, Alexandre; Kaiser, Johannes W.; Ruecker, Gernot; Tiemann, Joachim; Leimbach, David

    2017-04-01

    Gas Flaring (GF) is the process of burning waste gases at the tip of a stack. It is widely used in the upstream oil and gas industry. It is a contributor to the imbalance of the greenhouse gases (GHG) concentration in the earth's atmosphere, which prompts global warming. Besides GHG, GF also emits black carbon (BC), a known carcinogen and climate active species. At higher latitudes, GF has been estimated as the main input of atmospheric BC, alongside vegetation fires. The consideration of GF as a source to global budgets has been hindered by technical difficulties of in-situ measurements and the inexistence of a systematic reporting system. Remote sensing offers the possibility of a continuous, global and systematic monitoring of GF over extended periods. Being a high temperature process, GF can be detected from space using measurements at appropriate wavelengths. Considering 1800K as a typical GF temperature and Wien's displacement law, the peak emission will be in the short-wave infrared region. This spectral region is observed by two channels (S5 and S6) of the SLSTR instrument aboard ESA's newly launched Sentinel-3 satellite. Because of solar contamination, only night-time observations are used. In order to characterise the identified gas flares in terms of temperature and area, two Planck curves are fitted to SLSTR radiance observations in five spectral channels (S5 through S9, with F1 and F2). In this work, we present the methodology in detail as well as results for known flaring regions around the world. A comparison with VIIRS on Suomi-NPP and with HSRS on TET-1 over known GF locations is also considered.

  15. Metallic artefact reduction with monoenergetic dual-energy CT: systematic ex vivo evaluation of posterior spinal fusion implants from various vendors and different spine levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guggenberger, R.; Winklhofer, S.; Andreisek, G.; Alkadhi, H.; Stolzmann, P. [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Osterhoff, G.; Wanner, G.A. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland); Fortunati, M. [The Spine Center, Thun (Switzerland)

    2012-11-15

    To evaluate optimal monoenergetic dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) settings for artefact reduction of posterior spinal fusion implants of various vendors and spine levels. Posterior spinal fusion implants of five vendors for cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine were examined ex vivo with single-energy (SE) CT (120 kVp) and DECT (140/100 kVp). Extrapolated monoenergetic DECT images at 64, 69, 88, 105 keV and individually adjusted monoenergy for optimised image quality (OPTkeV) were generated. Two independent radiologists assessed quantitative and qualitative image parameters for each device and spine level. Inter-reader agreements of quantitative and qualitative parameters were high (ICC = 0.81-1.00, {kappa} = 0.54-0.77). HU values of spinal fusion implants were significantly different among vendors (P < 0.001), spine levels (P < 0.01) and among SECT, monoenergetic DECT of 64, 69, 88, 105 keV and OPTkeV (P < 0.01). Image quality was significantly (P < 0.001) different between datasets and improved with higher monoenergies of DECT compared with SECT (V = 0.58, P < 0.001). Artefacts decreased significantly (V = 0.51, P < 0.001) at higher monoenergies. OPTkeV values ranged from 123-141 keV. OPTkeV according to vendor and spine level are presented herein. Monoenergetic DECT provides significantly better image quality and less metallic artefacts from implants than SECT. Use of individual keV values for vendor and spine level is recommended. (orig.)

  16. Relationship of type III radio bursts with quasi-periodic pulsations in a solar flare

    CERN Document Server

    Kupriyanova, E G; Reid, H A S; Myagkova, I N

    2016-01-01

    We studied a solar flare with pronounced quasi-periodic pulsations detected in the microwave, X-ray, and radio bands. We used the methods of correlation, Fourier, and wavelet analyses to examine the temporal fine structures and relationships between the time profiles in each wave band. We found that the time profiles of the microwaves, hard X-rays and type III radio bursts vary quasi-periodically with the common period of 40-50 s. The average amplitude of the variations is high, above 30% of the background flux level and reaching 80% after the flare maximum. We did not find the periodicity in either the thermal X-ray flux component or source size dynamics. Our findings indicate that the detected periodicity is likely to be associated with periodic dynamics in the injection of non-thermal electrons, that can be produced by periodic modulation of magnetic reconnection.

  17. Magnetic Field Modeling of Hot Channels in four Flare/CME Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tie; Su, Yingna

    2017-08-01

    We study the magnetic structure and 3D geometrical morphology of four active regions with sigmoidal hot channels which produced flare/CME events. Observational study has been done by Cheng & Ding (2016). Using the flux rope insertion method developed by van Ballegooijen (2004), we construct a series of magnetic field models of the four flare/CME events. Through comparing with non-potential coronal loops observed by SDO/AIA , we find that the critical stable model (i.e.,a magnetic field configuration at the boundary between stable and unstable states in parameter space) and the best-fit preflare model (unstable model) which best matches observations for every case, and we think that the real preflare magnetic field configuration may lie between the two models. Finally we calculate the magnetic energy free energy and magnetic helicity of the two selected models,and study the eruption mechanism.

  18. Acceleration of Relativistic Protons during the 20 January 2005 Flare and CME

    CERN Document Server

    Masson, S; Buetikofer, R; Flueckiger, E; Kurt, V; Yushkov, B; Krucker, S

    2009-01-01

    The origin of relativistic solar protons during large flare/CME events has not been uniquely identified so far.We perform a detailed comparative analysis of the time profiles of relativistic protons detected by the worldwide network of neutron monitors at Earth with electromagnetic signatures of particle acceleration in the solar corona during the large particle event of 20 January 2005. The intensity-time profile of the relativistic protons derived from the neutron monitor data indicates two successive peaks. We show that microwave, hard X-ray and gamma-ray emissions display several episodes of particle acceleration within the impulsive flare phase. The first relativistic protons detected at Earth are accelerated together with relativistic electrons and with protons that produce pion decay gamma-rays during the second episode. The second peak in the relativistic proton profile at Earth is accompanied by new signatures of particle acceleration in the corona within approximatively 1 solar radius above the phot...

  19. Alfv\\'enic Wave Heating of the Upper Chromosphere in Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Reep, Jeffrey W

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a numerical model of flare heating due to the dissipation of Alfv\\'enic waves propagating from the corona to the chromosphere. With this model, we present an investigation of the key parameters of these waves on the energy transport, heating, and subsequent dynamics. For sufficiently high frequencies and perpendicular wave numbers, the waves dissipate significantly in the upper chromosphere, strongly heating it to flare temperatures. This heating can then drive strong chromospheric evaporation, bringing hot and dense plasma to the corona. We therefore find three important conclusions: (1) Alfv\\'enic waves, propagating from the corona to the chromosphere, are capable of heating the upper chromosphere and the corona, (2) the atmospheric response to heating due to the dissipation of Alfv\\'enic waves can be strikingly similar to heating by an electron beam, and (3) this heating can produce explosive evaporation.

  20. A model for the optical flares from the Galactic transient SWIFT J195509+261406

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The Galactic hard X-ray transient SWIFT J195509+261406 was first observed as gamma-ray burst GRB 070610.Within 3 days after the burst,more than forty optical flares had been observed.Here,we propose that this peculiar event should be associated with a white dwarf.The hard X-ray burst itself may be triggered by a collision between two planets orbiting the white dwarf.Some cracked fragments produced in the collision then fell onto the surface of the white dwarf over several days,giving birth to the observed optical flares via cyclotron radiation.Our model can satisfactorily explain the basic features of the observations.

  1. ALFVÉNIC WAVE HEATING OF THE UPPER CHROMOSPHERE IN FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reep, J. W. [National Research Council Post-Doc Program, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Russell, A. J. B., E-mail: jeffrey.reep.ctr@nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: arussell@maths.dundee.ac.uk [Division of Mathematics, University of Dundee, Nethergate, Dundee, DD1 4HN (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-10

    We have developed a numerical model of flare heating due to the dissipation of Alfvénic waves propagating from the corona to the chromosphere. With this model, we present an investigation of the key parameters of these waves on the energy transport, heating, and subsequent dynamics. For sufficiently high frequencies and perpendicular wave numbers, the waves dissipate significantly in the upper chromosphere, strongly heating it to flare temperatures. This heating can then drive strong chromospheric evaporation, bringing hot and dense plasma to the corona. We therefore find three important conclusions: (1) Alfvénic waves, propagating from the corona to the chromosphere, are capable of heating the upper chromosphere and the corona, (2) the atmospheric response to heating due to the dissipation of Alfvénic waves can be strikingly similar to heating by an electron beam, and (3) this heating can produce explosive evaporation.

  2. Recent Voyager Evidence for Rapid Transport of Flare-Generated Disturbances by Polar Coronal Hole Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intriligator, D. S.; Miller, W. D.; Intriligator, J.; Webber, W.; Sun, W.; Detman, T.; Dryer, M.; Deehr, C.

    2017-09-01

    Disturbances observed by Voyagers 1 and 2 during the past five years or more may have been transported by plasma emitted from polar coronal holes, thereby having travelled much faster from the Sun to the termination shock than previously recognized. Estimating the average speed to the shock as 750 km/s has produced consistently good associations between solar flares, or groups of them, and dynamic pressure increases at Voyager 2 and plasma wave events at Voyager 1. Furthermore, magnetograph observations confirm that polar coronal holes were present around the times of the flares to which the events at the Voyagers have been attributed. These calculations also provide revised estimates of the transport of heliospheric current sheet fluctuations. We discuss the possibilities that extrapolations from past observations and simulations based on them may provide insight into currently challenging issues and possible future developments.

  3. Searching for Missing Pieces for Solar Flare Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leka, K. D.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of the state of the solar photospheric magnetic field at a single instant in time does not appear sufficient to uniquely predict the size and timing of impending solar flares. Such knowledge may provide necessary conditions, such as estimates of the magnetic energy needed for a flare to occur. Given the necessary conditions, it is often assumed that the evolution of the field, possibly by only a small amount, may trigger the onset of a flare. We present the results of a study using time series of photospheric vector field data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) to quantitatively parameterize both the state and evolution of solar active regions - their complexity, magnetic topology and energy - as related to solar flare events. We examine both extensive and intensive parameters and their short-term temporal behavior, in the context of predicting flares at various thresholds. Statistical tests based on nonparametric Discriminant Analysis are used to compare pre-flare epochs to a control group of flare-quiet epochs and active regions. Results regarding the type of photospheric signature examined and the efficacy of using the present state vs. temporal evolution to predict solar flares is quantified by standard skill scores. This work is made possible by contracts NASA NNH12CG10C and NOAA/SBIR WC-133R-13-CN-0079.

  4. Blazar Alerts with the HAWC Online Flare Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Weisgarber, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory monitors the gamma-ray sky in the 100 GeV to 100 TeV energy range with > 95% uptime and unprecedented sensitivity for a survey instrument. The HAWC Collaboration has implemented an online flare monitor that detects episodes of rapid flaring activity from extragalactic very high energy (VHE) sources in the declination band from -26 to 64 degrees. This allows timely alerts to be sent to multiwavelength instruments without human intervention. The preliminary configuration of the online flare monitor achieves sensitivity to flares of at least 1 hour duration that attain an average flux of 10 times that of the Crab Nebula. While flares of this magnitude are not common, several flares reaching the level of 10 Crab have been observed in the VHE band within the past decade. With its survey capabilities and high duty cycle, HAWC will expand the observational data set on these particularly extreme flares. We characterize the sensitivity of the online flare monitor an...

  5. Kepler Flares I. Active and Inactive M dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Hawley, Suzanne L; Kowalski, Adam F; Wisniewski, John P; Hebb, Leslie; Deitrick, Russell; Hilton, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed Kepler short-cadence M dwarf observations. Spectra from the ARC 3.5m telescope identify magnetically active (H$\\alpha$ in emission) stars. The active stars are of mid-M spectral type, have numerous flares, and well-defined rotational modulation due to starspots. The inactive stars are of early-M type, exhibit less starspot signature, and have fewer flares. A Kepler to U-band energy scaling allows comparison of the Kepler flare frequency distributions with previous ground-based data. M dwarfs span a large range of flare frequency and energy, blurring the distinction between active and inactive stars designated solely by the presence of H$\\alpha$. We analyzed classical and complex (multiple peak) flares on GJ 1243, finding strong correlations between flare energy, amplitude, duration and decay time, with only a weak dependence on rise time. Complex flares last longer and have higher energy at the same amplitude, and higher energy flares are more likely to be complex. A power law fits the energy dist...

  6. Development and Optimization of Flow-Cast Magnesium Flare Compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-06-01

    unsaturated olefins. Resins were studied of ethylene glycol (EG) (52 percent oxgyen) and MA (49 percent); hydroxy- ethyl acrylate...CUttification LINK A I Illumination flares Flares Magnesium Sodium Nitrate Binders Epoxy resins Castable pyrotechnics Flow casting Polyester Vinyl ester UNCLASSTFTFn Security Classification ^^^. ...Lane. Major contributions were made by Erwin M. Jankowiak and Keith Roberson. This technical report has been reviewed and is approved.

  7. Hα Line Profile Asymmetries and the Chromospheric Flare Velocity Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuridze, D.; Mathioudakis, M.; Simões, P. J. A.; Rouppe van der Voort, L.; Carlsson, M.; Jafarzadeh, S.; Allred, J. C.; Kowalski, A. F.; Kennedy, M.; Fletcher, L.; Graham, D.; Keenan, F. P.

    2015-11-01

    The asymmetries observed in the line profiles of solar flares can provide important diagnostics of the properties and dynamics of the flaring atmosphere. In this paper the evolution of the Hα and Ca ii λ8542 lines are studied using high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution ground-based observations of an M1.1 flare obtained with the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope. The temporal evolution of the Hα line profiles from the flare kernel shows excess emission in the red wing (red asymmetry) before flare maximum and excess in the blue wing (blue asymmetry) after maximum. However, the Ca ii λ8542 line does not follow the same pattern, showing only a weak red asymmetry during the flare. RADYN simulations are used to synthesize spectral line profiles for the flaring atmosphere, and good agreement is found with the observations. We show that the red asymmetry observed in Hα is not necessarily associated with plasma downflows, and the blue asymmetry may not be related to plasma upflows. Indeed, we conclude that the steep velocity gradients in the flaring chromosphere modify the wavelength of the central reversal in the Hα line profile. The shift in the wavelength of maximum opacity to shorter and longer wavelengths generates the red and blue asymmetries, respectively.

  8. Interactive Multi-Instrument Database of Solar Flares (IMIDSF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykov, Viacheslav M.; Nita, Gelu M.; Oria, Vincent; Kosovichev, Alexander G.

    2017-08-01

    Solar flares represent a complicated physical phenomenon observed in a broad range of the electromagnetic spectrum, from radiowaves to gamma-rays. For a complete understanding of the flares it is necessary to perform a combined multi-wavelength analysis using observations from many satellites and ground-based observatories. For efficient data search, integration of different flare lists and representation of observational data, we have developed the Interactive Multi-Instrument Database of Solar Flares (https://solarflare.njit.edu/). The web database is fully functional and allows the user to search for uniquely-identified flare events based on their physical descriptors and availability of observations of a particular set of instruments. Currently, data from three primary flare lists (GOES, RHESSI and HEK) and a variety of other event catalogs (Hinode, Fermi GBM, Konus-Wind, OVSA flare catalogs, CACTus CME catalog, Filament eruption catalog) and observing logs (IRIS and Nobeyama coverage), are integrated. An additional set of physical descriptors (temperature and emission measure) along with observing summary, data links and multi-wavelength light curves is provided for each flare event since January 2002. Results of an initial statistical analysis will be presented.

  9. Type II Shocks Characteristics: Comparison with associated CMEs and Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Pothitakis, G; Preka-Papadema, P; Moussas, X; Caroubalos, C; Alissandrakis, C E; Hillaris, A; Tsitsipis, P; Kontogeorgos, A; Bougeret, J -L; Dumas, G; 10.1063/1.2347985

    2010-01-01

    A number of metric (100-650 MHz) typeII bursts was recorded by the ARTEMIS-IV radiospectrograph in the 1998-2000 period; the sample includes both CME driven shocks and shocks originating from flare blasts. We study their characteristics in comparison with characteristics of associated CMEs and flares.

  10. Relationships of a growing magnetic flux region to flares

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schadee, A.; Martin, S.F.; Bentley, R.D.; Antalova, A.; Kucera, A.; Dezs, L.; Gesztelyi, L.; Harvey, K.L.; Jones, H.; Livi, S.H.B.; Wang, J.

    1984-01-01

    Some sites for solar flares are known to develop where new magnetic flux emerges and becomes abutted against opposite polarity pre-existing magnetic flux (review by Galzauskas/1/). We have identified and analyzed the evolution of such flare sites at the boundaries of a major new and growing magnetic

  11. Flare activity on low-mass eclipsing binary GJ 3236*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šmelcer, L.; Wolf, M.; Kučáková, H.; Bílek, F.; Dubovský, P.; Hoňková, K.; Vraštil, J.

    2017-04-01

    We report the discovery of optical flares on the very low-mass red-dwarf eclipsing binary GJ 3236 and the results of our 2014-2016 photometric campaign. In total, this binary was monitored photometrically in all filters for about 900 h, which has revealed a flare rate of about 0.06 flares per hour. The amplitude of its flares is the largest among those detected in the V band (∼1.3 mag), R band (∼0.8 mag), I band (∼0.2 mag) and clear band (∼0.5 mag). The light curves of GJ 3236 were analysed and the statistics of detected flare events are presented. The energy released during individual flares was calculated as up to 2.4 × 1027 J and compared with other known active stars. The cumulative distribution of flare energies appears to follow a broken power law. The flare activity of this binary also plays an important role in the precise determination of its physical parameters and evolutionary status.

  12. 46 CFR 117.68 - Distress flares and smoke signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Distress flares and smoke signals. 117.68 Section 117.68 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE... AND ARRANGEMENTS Emergency Communications § 117.68 Distress flares and smoke signals. (a)...

  13. 46 CFR 180.68 - Distress flares and smoke signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Distress flares and smoke signals. 180.68 Section 180.68... signals. (a) Oceans, coastwise, limited coastwise, and Great Lakes routes. A vessel on an oceans, coastwise, limited coastwise, or Great Lakes route must carry— (1) Six hand red flare distress signals...

  14. An Interactive Multi-instrument Database of Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykov, Viacheslav M.; Kosovichev, Alexander G.; Oria, Vincent; Nita, Gelu M.

    2017-07-01

    Solar flares are complicated physical phenomena that are observable in a broad range of the electromagnetic spectrum, from radio waves to γ-rays. For a more comprehensive understanding of flares, it is necessary to perform a combined multi-wavelength analysis using observations from many satellites and ground-based observatories. For an efficient data search, integration of different flare lists, and representation of observational data, we have developed the Interactive Multi-Instrument Database of Solar Flares (IMIDSF, https://solarflare.njit.edu/). The web-accessible database is fully functional and allows the user to search for uniquely identified flare events based on their physical descriptors and the availability of observations by a particular set of instruments. Currently, the data from three primary flare lists (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites, RHESSI, and HEK) and a variety of other event catalogs (Hinode, Fermi GBM, Konus-W IND, the OVSA flare catalogs, the CACTus CME catalog, the Filament eruption catalog) and observing logs (IRIS and Nobeyama coverage) are integrated, and an additional set of physical descriptors (temperature and emission measure) is provided along with an observing summary, data links, and multi-wavelength light curves for each flare event since 2002 January. We envision that this new tool will allow researchers to significantly speed up the search of events of interest for statistical and case studies.

  15. Performance of a plasma window for a high pressure differentially pumped deuterium gas target for mono-energetic fast neutron production - Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, A. de; Hershcovitch, A.; Franklyn, C.B.; Straaten, S. van; Guzek, J. E-mail: jguzek@debeers.co.za

    2000-09-01

    The reactions D(d,n){sup 3}He and T(d,n){sup 4}He are frequently used for production of the mono-energetic or quasi mono-energetic neutron beams but successful applications are often limited by the intensity of the generated neutron beams. The development of a suitable neutron source for such applications as studies of resonance phenomena, fast neutron radiography, selective fast neutron activation, explosives and contraband detection and others, depends on the output ion current of the accelerator and the design of the target system. A practical solution for a high pressure gas target was previously developed and successfully implemented at De Beers Diamond Research Laboratory in Johannesburg (Guzek et al., 1999), but it is limited to applications using low (<20%) duty cycle accelerators. The concept of a plasma window for the separation of a high pressure gas target region and accelerator vacuum, that was originally developed by Hershcovitch (1995) for electron welding applications, may be suitable for operation with continuous wave accelerators at high particle current output. Preliminary test results, which have been performed with various gases (argon, helium and deuterium), indicate that implementation of the plasma window into a gas target system, for the production of intense mono-energetic fast neutron beams will be achievable.

  16. 30 CFR 250.1162 - When may I burn produced liquid hydrocarbons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Requirements Flaring, Venting, and Burning Hydrocarbons § 250.1162 When may I burn produced liquid hydrocarbons...

  17. Implications of RHESSI Flare Observations for Magnetic Reconnection Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Sui, Linhui; Dennis, Brian R.

    2004-01-01

    The Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observations of the 2002 April 15 solar flare and related flares provide compelling evidence for the formation of a large-scale, reconnecting current sheet in at least some flares. We describe the observed evolution of the April 15 flare in terms of magnetic reconnection models. We argue that the flare most likely evolved through magnetic geometries associated with super-slow reconnection (early rise phase), fast reconnection (impulsive phase), and slow reconnection (gradual phase). We also provide evidence for X-ray brightenings within the evolving current sheet, possibly induced by the tearing mode instability. This work was supported in part by the RHESSI Program and NASA's Sun-Earth Connection Program. This work would not have been possible without the dedicated efforts of the entire RHESSI team.

  18. EUV Flare Activity in Late-Type Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Audard, M; Drake, J J; Kashyap, V L; Audard, Marc; Guedel, Manuel; Drake, Jeremy J.

    2000-01-01

    \\textit{Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer} Deep Survey observations of cool stars (spectral type F to M) have been used to investigate the distribution of coronal flare rates in energy and its relation to activity indicators and rotation parameters. Cumulative and differential flare rate distributions were constructed and fitted with different methods. Power laws are found to approximately describe the distributions. A trend toward flatter distributions for later-type stars is suggested in our sample. Assuming that the power laws continue below the detection limit, we have estimated that the superposition of flares with radiated energies of about $10^{29}-10^{31}$ergs could explain the observed radiative power loss of these coronae, while the detected flares are contributing only $\\approx 10$%. While the power-law index is not correlated with rotation parameters (rotation period, projected rotational velocity, Rossby number) and only marginally with the X-ray luminosity, the flare occurrence rate is correlated wit...

  19. COMPLEX FLARE DYNAMICS INITIATED BY A FILAMENT–FILAMENT INTERACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Chunming; McAteer, R. T. James [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, NM 88003 (United States); Liu, Rui [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Department of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Alexander, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, TX 77005 (United States); Sun, Xudong, E-mail: czhu@nmsu.edu [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    We report on an eruption involving a relatively rare filament–filament interaction on 2013 June 21, observed by SDO and STEREO-B. The two filaments were separated in height with a “double-decker” configuration. The eruption of the lower filament began simultaneously with a descent of the upper filament, resulting in a convergence and direct interaction of the two filaments. The interaction was accompanied by the heating of surrounding plasma and an apparent crossing of a loop-like structure through the upper filament. The subsequent coalescence of the filaments drove a bright front ahead of the erupting structures. The whole process was associated with a C3.0 flare followed immediately by an M2.9 flare. Shrinking loops and descending dark voids were observed during the M2.9 flare at different locations above a C-shaped flare arcade as part of the energy release, giving us unique insight into the flare dynamics.

  20. Modeling High Resolution Flare Spectra Using Hydrodynamic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Harry; Doschek, G.

    2006-06-01

    Understanding the hydrodynamic response of the solar atmosphere to the release of energy during a flare has been a long standing problem in solar physics. Early time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations were able to reproduce the high temperatures and densities observed in solar flares, but were not able to model the observations in any detail. For example, these simulations could not account for the relatively slow decay of the observed emission or the absence of blueshifts in high spectral resolution line profiles at flare onset. We have found that by representing the flare as a succession of independently heated filaments it is possible to reproduce both the evolution of line intensity and the shape of the line profile using hydrodynamic simulations. Here we present detailed comparisons between our simulation results and several flares observed with the Yohkoh Bragg Crystal Spectrometer (BCS). Comparisons with 3D MHD simulations will also be discussed.