WorldWideScience

Sample records for monodisperse carbon-based nanomaterials

  1. Nano-QSPR Modelling of Carbon-Based Nanomaterials Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salahinejad, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of chemical and physical properties of nanomaterials is of critical importance in a broad variety of nanotechnology researches. There is an increasing interest in computational methods capable of predicting properties of new and modified nanomaterials in the absence of time-consuming and costly experimental studies. Quantitative Structure- Property Relationship (QSPR) approaches are progressive tools in modelling and prediction of many physicochemical properties of nanomaterials, which are also known as nano-QSPR. This review provides insight into the concepts, challenges and applications of QSPR modelling of carbon-based nanomaterials. First, we try to provide a general overview of QSPR implications, by focusing on the difficulties and limitations on each step of the QSPR modelling of nanomaterials. Then follows with the most significant achievements of QSPR methods in modelling of carbon-based nanomaterials properties and their recent applications to generate predictive models. This review specifically addresses the QSPR modelling of physicochemical properties of carbon-based nanomaterials including fullerenes, single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT), multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) and graphene.

  2. Carbon-based nanomaterials: multifunctional materials for biomedical engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Chaenyung; Shin, Su Ryon; Annabi, Nasim; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-04-23

    Functional carbon-based nanomaterials (CBNs) have become important due to their unique combinations of chemical and physical properties (i.e., thermal and electrical conductivity, high mechanical strength, and optical properties), and extensive research efforts are being made to utilize these materials for various industrial applications, such as high-strength materials and electronics. These advantageous properties of CBNs are also actively investigated in several areas of biomedical engineering. This Perspective highlights different types of carbon-based nanomaterials currently used in biomedical applications.

  3. Carbon-based smart nanomaterials in biomedicine and neuroengineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonina M. Monaco

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The search for advanced biomimetic materials that are capable of offering a scaffold for biological tissues during regeneration or of electrically connecting artificial devices with cellular structures to restore damaged brain functions is at the forefront of interdisciplinary research in materials science. Bioactive nanoparticles for drug delivery, substrates for nerve regeneration and active guidance, as well as supramolecular architectures mimicking the extracellular environment to reduce inflammatory responses in brain implants, are within reach thanks to the advancements in nanotechnology. In particular, carbon-based nanostructured materials, such as graphene, carbon nanotubes (CNTs and nanodiamonds (NDs, have demonstrated to be highly promising materials for designing and fabricating nanoelectrodes and substrates for cell growth, by virtue of their peerless optical, electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties. In this review we discuss the state-of-the-art in the applications of nanomaterials in biological and biomedical fields, with a particular emphasis on neuroengineering.

  4. Biological and ecological responses to carbon-based nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnikova, Tatsiana A.

    This dissertation examines the biological and ecological responses to carbon nanoparticles, a major class of nanomaterials which have been mass produced and extensively studied for their rich physical properties and commercial values. Chapter I of this dissertation offers a comprehensive review on the structures, properties, applications, and implications of carbon nanomaterials, especially related to the perspectives of biological and ecosystems. Given that there are many types of carbon nanomaterials available, this chapter is focused on three major types of carbon-based nanomaterials only, namely, fullerenes, single walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes. On the whole organism level, specifically, Chapter II presents a first study on the fate of fullerenes and multiwalled carbon nanotubes in rice plants, which was facilitated by the self assembly of these nanomaterials with NOM. The aspects of fullerene uptake, translocation, biodistribution, and generational transfer in the plants were examined and quantified using bright field and electron microscopy, FT-Raman, and FTIR spectroscopy. The uptake and transport of fullerene in the plant vascular system were attributed to water transpiration, convection, capillary force, and the fullerene concentration gradient from the roots to the leaves of the plants. On the cellular level, Chapter III documents the differential uptake of hydrophilic C60(OH)20 vs. amphiphilic C70-NOM complex in Allium cepa plant cells and HT-29 colon carcinoma cells. This study was conducted using a plant cell viability assay, and complemented by bright field, fluorescence and electron microscopy imaging. In particular, C60(OH)20 and C70-NOM showed contrasting uptake in both the plant and mammalian cells, due to their significant differences in physicochemistry and the presence of an extra hydrophobic plant cell wall in the plant cells. Consequently, C60(OH)20 was found to induce toxicity in Allium cepa cells but not in HT-29 cells, while C70

  5. Processing and applications of carbon based nano-materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Aiping

    Carbon-based nanomaterials, including single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and graphite nanoplatelets (GNPs, multi-layer graphene), possess exceptional electrical, thermal and mechanical properties coupled with high aspect ratio and high temperature stability. These unique properties have attracted increased attention during the past decade. These materials form the basis of the work presented here, which includes research targeting fabrication, processing and applications in new composites and devices. As-prepared SWNTs are typically contaminated with amorphous carbon as well as metal catalyst and graphitic nanoparticles. We have demonstrated an efficient approach for removing most of these impurities by the combination of nitric acid treatment and both low speed (2000 g) and high speed centrifugation (20,000 g). This approach gives rise to the highest-purified arc-discharge SWNTs which are almost free from impurities, and in addition are left in a low state of aggregation. The new purification process offers a convenient way to obtain different grade of SWNTs and allows the study of the effect purity on the thermal conductivity of SWNT epoxy composite. Purified functionalized SWNTs provide a significantly greater enhancement of the thermal conductivity, whereas AP-SWNTs allow the best electrical properties because of their ability to form efficient percolating network. We found that purified SWNTs provide ˜5 times greater enhancement of the thermal conductivity than the impure SWNT fraction demonstrating the significance of SWNTs quality for thermal management. The introduced GNPs have directed the thermal management project to a new avenue due to the significant improvement of the thermal conductivity of the composites in comparison with that of SWNTs. A novel process was demonstrated to achieve a 4-graphene layer structure referred to GNPs with a thickness of ˜2 nm. This material was embedded in an epoxy resin matrix and the measured thermal conductivity of

  6. Decontamination of Surfaces Exposed to Carbon-Based Nanotubes and Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Su

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Contamination of surfaces by nanomaterials can happen due to accidental spillage and release or gradual accumulation during processing or handling. Considering the increasingly wide use of nanomaterials in industry and research labs and also taking into account the diversity of physical and chemical properties of different nanomaterials (such as solubility, aggregation/agglomeration, and surface reactivity, there is a pressing need to define reliable nanomaterial-specific decontamination guidelines. In this paper, we propose and investigate a potential method for surface decontamination of carbon-based nanomaterials using solvent cleaning and wipes. The results show that the removal efficiency for single- and multiwalled carbon nanotubes from silicon wafers sprayed with water-surfactant solutions prior to mechanical wiping is greater than 90% and 95%, respectively. The need for further studies to understand the mechanisms of nanomaterial removal from surfaces and development of standard techniques for surface decontamination of nanomaterials is highlighted.

  7. Possibilities and limitations of advanced transmission electron microscopy for carbon-based nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoxing Ke; Carla Bittencourt; Gustaaf Van Tendeloo

    2015-01-01

    A major revolution for electron microscopy in the past decade is the introduction of aberration correction, which enables one to increase both the spatial resolution and the energy resolution to the optical limit. Aberration correction has contributed significantly to the imaging at low operating voltages. This is crucial for carbon-based nanomaterials which are sensitive to electron irradiation. The research of carbon nanomaterials and nanohybrids, in particular the fundamental understanding...

  8. Carbon-Based Nanomaterials: Multi-Functional Materials for Biomedical Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Chaenyung; Shin, Su Ryon; Annabi, Nasim; Dokmeci, Mehmet R.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Functional carbon-based nanomaterials (CBNs) have become important due to their unique combinations of chemical and physical properties (i.e., thermal and electrical conductivity, high mechanical strength, and optical properties), extensive research efforts are being made to utilize these materials for various industrial applications, such as high-strength materials and electronics. These advantageous properties of CBNs are also actively investigated in several areas of biomedical engineering. This Perspective highlights different types of carbon-based nanomaterials currently used in biomedical applications. PMID:23560817

  9. Influence of carbon-based nanomaterials on lux-bioreporter Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Kun; Marks, Robert S; Ionescu, Rodica E

    2014-08-01

    The cytotoxic effects of carbon-based nanomaterials are evaluated via the induction of luminescent genetically engineered Escherichia coli bacterial cells. Specifically, two engineered E. coli bacteria strains of DPD2794 and TV1061 were incubated with aqueous dispersion of three carbon allotropes (multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), graphene nanosheets and carbon black nanopowders) with different concentrations and the resulting bioluminescence was recorded at 30°C and 25°C, respectively. The corresponding optical density changes of bacterial cells in the presence of various carbon nanomaterials were recorded as well. Based on these results, E. coli DPD2794 bacterial induction responds to a greater degree than E. coli TV1061 bacteria when exposed to various carbon-based nanomaterials. Finally, the surface morphology of E. coli DPD2794 bacteria cells before and after carbon-based nanomaterials treatment was observed using a field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), from which morphological changes from the presence of carbon-based nanomaterials were observed and discussed.

  10. Recent applications of carbon-based nanomaterials in analytical chemistry: critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scida, Karen; Stege, Patricia W; Haby, Gabrielle; Messina, Germán A; García, Carlos D

    2011-04-08

    The objective of this review is to provide a broad overview of the advantages and limitations of carbon-based nanomaterials with respect to analytical chemistry. Aiming to illustrate the impact of nanomaterials on the development of novel analytical applications, developments reported in the 2005-2010 period have been included and divided into sample preparation, separation, and detection. Within each section, fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, graphene, and composite materials will be addressed specifically. Although only briefly discussed, included is a section highlighting nanomaterials with interesting catalytic properties that can be used in the design of future devices for analytical chemistry.

  11. Development of effective nanobiocatalytic systems through the immobilization of hydrolases on functionalized carbon-based nanomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlidis, Ioannis V.; Vorhaben, Torge; Tsoufis, Theodoros; Rudolf, Petra; Bornscheuer, Uwe T.; Gournis, Dimitrios; Stamatis, Haralambos

    2012-01-01

    In this study we report the use of functionalized carbon-based nanomaterials, such as amine-functionalized graphene oxide (GO) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs), as effective immobilization supports for various lipases and esterases of industrial interest. Structural and biochemical character

  12. Development of effective nanobiocatalytic systems through the immobilization of hydrolases on functionalized carbon-based nanomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlidis, Ioannis V.; Vorhaben, Torge; Tsoufis, Theodoros; Rudolf, Petra; Bornscheuer, Uwe T.; Gournis, Dimitrios; Stamatis, Haralambos

    In this study we report the use of functionalized carbon-based nanomaterials, such as amine-functionalized graphene oxide (GO) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs), as effective immobilization supports for various lipases and esterases of industrial interest. Structural and biochemical

  13. Possibilities and limitations of advanced transmission electron microscopy for carbon-based nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxing Ke

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A major revolution for electron microscopy in the past decade is the introduction of aberration correction, which enables one to increase both the spatial resolution and the energy resolution to the optical limit. Aberration correction has contributed significantly to the imaging at low operating voltages. This is crucial for carbon-based nanomaterials which are sensitive to electron irradiation. The research of carbon nanomaterials and nanohybrids, in particular the fundamental understanding of defects and interfaces, can now be carried out in unprecedented detail by aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (AC-TEM. This review discusses new possibilities and limits of AC-TEM at low voltage, including the structural imaging at atomic resolution, in three dimensions and spectroscopic investigation of chemistry and bonding. In situ TEM of carbon-based nanomaterials is discussed and illustrated through recent reports with particular emphasis on the underlying physics of interactions between electrons and carbon atoms.

  14. Possibilities and limitations of advanced transmission electron microscopy for carbon-based nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Xiaoxing; Bittencourt, Carla; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf

    2015-01-01

    A major revolution for electron microscopy in the past decade is the introduction of aberration correction, which enables one to increase both the spatial resolution and the energy resolution to the optical limit. Aberration correction has contributed significantly to the imaging at low operating voltages. This is crucial for carbon-based nanomaterials which are sensitive to electron irradiation. The research of carbon nanomaterials and nanohybrids, in particular the fundamental understanding of defects and interfaces, can now be carried out in unprecedented detail by aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (AC-TEM). This review discusses new possibilities and limits of AC-TEM at low voltage, including the structural imaging at atomic resolution, in three dimensions and spectroscopic investigation of chemistry and bonding. In situ TEM of carbon-based nanomaterials is discussed and illustrated through recent reports with particular emphasis on the underlying physics of interactions between electrons and carbon atoms.

  15. Transparent Electrodes: A Review of the Use of Carbon-Based Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar J. López-Naranjo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Transparent conducting electrodes (TCE are extensively applied in a great range of optoelectronic and photovoltaic equipment (e.g., solar cells, touch panels, and flexible devices. Carbon-based nanomaterials are considered as suitable replacements to substitute traditional materials to manufacture TCE due to their remarkable characteristics, for example, high optical transmittance and outstanding electrical properties. In comparison with traditional indium tin oxide electrodes, carbon-based electrodes show good mechanical properties, chemical stability, and low cost. Nevertheless, major issues related to the development of good quality manufacture methods to produce carbon-based nanomaterials have to be overcome to meet massive market requirements. Hence, the development of alternative TCE materials as well as appropriate large production techniques that meet the requirements of a proper sheet resistance along with a high optical transparency is a priority. Therefore, in this work, we summarize and discuss novel production and synthesis methods, chemical treatments, and hybrid materials developed to satisfy the worldwide request for carbon-based nanomaterials.

  16. Bacterial Cellulose: A Robust Platform for Design of Three Dimensional Carbon-Based Functional Nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhen-Yu; Liang, Hai-Wei; Chen, Li-Feng; Hu, Bi-Cheng; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2016-01-19

    Three dimensional (3D) carbon nanomaterials exhibit great application potential in environmental protection, electrochemical energy storage and conversion, catalysis, polymer science, and advanced sensors fields. Current methods for preparing 3D carbon nanomaterials, for example, carbonization of organogels, chemical vapor deposition, and self-assembly of nanocarbon building blocks, inevitably involve some drawbacks, such as expensive and toxic precursors, complex equipment and technological requirements, and low production ability. From the viewpoint of practical application, it is highly desirable to develop a simple, cheap, and environmentally friendly way for fabricating 3D carbon nanomaterials in large scale. On the other hand, in order to extend the application scope and improve the performance of 3D carbon nanomaterials, we should explore efficient strategies to prepare diverse functional nanomaterials based on their 3D carbon structure. Recently, many researchers tend to fabricate high-performance 3D carbon-based nanomaterials from biomass, which is low cost, easy to obtain, and nontoxic to humans. Bacterial cellulose (BC), a typical biomass material, has long been used as the raw material of nata-de-coco (an indigenous dessert food of the Philippines). It consists of a polysaccharide with a β-1,4-glycosidic linkage and has a interconnected 3D porous network structure. Interestingly, the network is made up of a random assembly of cellulose nanofibers, which have a high aspect ratio with a diameter of 20-100 nm. As a result, BC has a high specific surface area. Additionally, BC hydrogels can be produced on an industrial scale via a microbial fermentation process at a very low price. Thus, it can be an ideal platform for design of 3D carbon-based functional nanomaterials. Before our work, no systematic work and summary on this topic had been reported. This Account presents the concepts and strategies of our studies on BC in the past few years, that is

  17. Thermionic Properties of Carbon Based Nanomaterials Produced by Microhollow Cathode PECVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, John R.; Wolinksy, Jason J.; Bailey, Paul S.; George, Jeffrey A.; Go, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Thermionic emission is the process in which materials at sufficiently high temperature spontaneously emit electrons. This process occurs when electrons in a material gain sufficient thermal energy from heating to overcome the material's potential barrier, referred to as the work function. For most bulk materials very high temperatures (greater than 1500 K) are needed to produce appreciable emission. Carbon-based nanomaterials have shown significant promise as emission materials because of their low work functions, nanoscale geometry, and negative electron affinity. One method of producing these materials is through the process known as microhollow cathode PECVD. In a microhollow cathode plasma, high energy electrons oscillate at very high energies through the Pendel effect. These high energy electrons create numerous radical species and the technique has been shown to be an effective method of growing carbon based nanomaterials. In this work, we explore the thermionic emission properties of carbon based nanomaterials produced by microhollow cathode PECVD under a variety of synthesis conditions. Initial studies demonstrate measureable current at low temperatures (approximately 800 K) and work functions (approximately 3.3 eV) for these materials.

  18. Non-covalently functionalized carbon nanostructures for synthesizing carbon-based hybrid nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiqing; Song, Sing I; Song, Ga Young; Kim, Il

    2014-02-01

    Carbon nanostructures (CNSs) such as carbon nanotubes, graphene sheets, and nanodiamonds provide an important type of substrate for constructing a variety of hybrid nanomaterials. However, their intrinsic chemistry-inert surfaces make it indispensable to pre-functionalize them prior to immobilizing additional components onto their surfaces. Currently developed strategies for functionalizing CNSs include covalent and non-covalent approaches. Conventional covalent treatments often damage the structure integrity of carbon surfaces and adversely affect their physical properties. In contrast, the non-covalent approach offers a non-destructive way to modify CNSs with desired functional surfaces, while reserving their intrinsic properties. Thus far, a number of surface modifiers including aromatic compounds, small-molecular surfactants, amphiphilic polymers, and biomacromolecules have been developed to non-covalently functionalize CNS surfaces. Mediated by these surface modifiers, various functional components such as organic species and inorganic nanoparticles were further decorated onto their surfaces, resulting in versatile carbon-based hybrid nanomaterials with broad applications in chemical engineering and biomedical areas. In this review, the recent advances in the generation of such hybrid nanostructures based on non-covalently functionalized CNSs will be reviewed.

  19. Enhanced thermal conductivity of n-octadecane containing carbon-based nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motahar, Sadegh; Alemrajabi, Ali A.; Khodabandeh, Rahmatollah

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, carbon-based nanomaterials including multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and vapor-grown carbon nanofibers (CNFs) were dispersed in n-octadecane as a phase change material (PCM) at various mass fractions of 0.5, 1, 2 and 5 wt% by the two-step method. The transient plane source technique was used to measure thermal conductivity of samples at various temperatures in solid (5-25 °C) and liquid (30-55 °C) phases. The experimental results showed that thermal conductivity of the composites increases with increasing the loading of the MWCNTs and CNFs. A maximum thermal conductivity enhancement of 36 % at 5 wt% MWCNTs and 5 °C as well as 50 % at 2 wt% and 55 °C were experimentally obtained for n-octadecane/MWCNTs samples. Dispersing CNFs into n-octadecane raised the thermal conductivity up to 18 % at 5 wt% and 10 °C and 21 % at 5 wt% and 55 °C. However, the average enhancement of 19 and 21 % for solid and liquid phases of MWCNTs composite as well as 33 and 46 % for solid and liquid phase of CNFs promised a better heat transfer characteristics of MWCNTs in n-octadecane. A comparison between results of the present work and available literature revealed a satisfactory enhancement of thermal conductivity. For the investigated n-octadecane/MWCNTs and n-octadecane/CNFs composites, a new correlation was proposed for predicting the thermal conductivity as a function of temperature and nanomaterials loading.

  20. Comparative study of plant responses to carbon-based nanomaterials with different morphologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiani, Mohamed H.; Dervishi, Enkeleda; Ivanov, Ilia; Chen, Jihua; Khodakovskaya, Mariya

    2016-07-01

    The relationship between the morphology of carbon-based nanomaterials (CBNs) and the specific response of plants exposed to CBNs has not been studied systematically. Here, we prove that CBNs with different morphologies can activate cell growth, germination, and plant growth. A tobacco cell culture growth was found to increase by 22%-46% when CBNs such as helical multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), few-layered graphene, long MWCNTs, and short MWCNTs were added to the growth medium at a concentration of 50 μg ml-1. The germination of exposed tomato seeds, as well as the growth of exposed tomato seedlings, were significantly enhanced by the addition of all tested CBNs. The presence of CBNs inside exposed seeds was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The effects of helical MWCNTs on gene expression in tomato seeds and seedlings were investigated by microarray technology and real time-PCR. Helical MWCNTs affected a number of genes involved in cellular and metabolic processes and response to stress factors. It was shown that the expression of the tomato water channel gene in tomato seeds exposed to helical MWCNTs was upregulated. These established findings demonstrate that CBNs with different morphologies can cause the same biological effects and share similar mechanisms in planta.

  1. Key physicochemical properties of nanomaterials in view of their toxicity: an exploratory systematic investigation for the example of carbon-based nanomaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salieri, Beatrice; Pasteris, Andrea; Netkueakul, Woranan; Hischier, Roland

    2017-03-01

    Currently, a noncomprehensive understanding of the physicochemical properties of carbon-based nanomaterial (CBNs), which may affect toxic effects, is still observable. In this study, an exploratory systematic investigation into the key physicochemical properties of multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT), single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT), and C60-fullerene on their ecotoxicity has been undertaken. We undertook an extensive survey of the literature pertaining to the ecotoxicity of organism representative of the trophic level of algae, crustaceans, and fish. Based on this, a set of data reporting both the physicochemical properties of carbon-based nanomaterial and the observed toxic effect has been established. The relationship between physicochemical properties and observed toxic effect was investigated based on various statistical approaches. Specifically, analysis of variance by one-way ANOVA was used to assess the effect of categorical properties (use of a dispersant or treatments in the test medium, type of carbon-based nanomaterial, i.e., SWCNT, MWCNT, C60-fullerene, functionalization), while multiple regression analysis was used to assess the effect of quantitative properties (i.e., diameter length of nanotubes, secondary size) on the toxicity values. The here described investigations revealed significant relationships among the physicochemical properties and observed toxic effects. The research was mainly affected by the low availability of data and also by the low variability of the studies collected. Overall, our results demonstrate that the here proposed and applied approach could have a major role in identifying the physicochemical properties of relevance for the toxicity of nanomaterial. However, the future success of the approach would require that the ENMs and the experimental conditions used in the toxicity studies are fully characterized.

  2. Decontamination of Surfaces Exposed to Carbon-Based Nanotubes and Nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Su; Babak Haghpanah; William W. Doerr; Zahra Karimi; Syed Hassan; Louis Gritzo; Ahmed A. Busnaina; Ashkan Vaziri

    2014-01-01

    Contamination of surfaces by nanomaterials can happen due to accidental spillage and release or gradual accumulation during processing or handling. Considering the increasingly wide use of nanomaterials in industry and research labs and also taking into account the diversity of physical and chemical properties of different nanomaterials (such as solubility, aggregation/agglomeration, and surface reactivity), there is a pressing need to define reliable nanomaterial-specific decontamination gui...

  3. Applications of Carbon-Based Nanomaterials for Drug Delivery in Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi-Polyachenko, Nicole H.; Carroll, David L.; Stewart, John H.

    The goal of this chapter is to introduce carbon nanomaterials and highlight research focused on their use as cancer therapeutics. The physical properties of fullerenes and carbon nanotubes, including their spectral characteristics are described. Current oncology treatment regimes are described to provide an overview of where carbon nanomaterials may have significant value in further development of the established standards of care procedures. Photodynamic therapy and drug delivery using fullerene C60 is explored. Thermal ablation techniques using carbon nanotubes are explained and alternate hyperthermic methods using carbon nanotubes are described. Specifically, carbon nanotubes are examined for their potential contribution to the currently practiced clinical therapy intraperitoneal hyperthermic chemoperfusion. Nanotubes and nanohorns filled with chemotherapeutic agents are examined as are different methods for filling and containment of drug moieties. The attachment of active molecules to fullerenes is described with examples for use in oncology. Toxicity issues are explored and the future directions and potential for carbon nanomaterial types concludes the chapter.

  4. Chemosensitizing effects of carbon-based nanomaterials in cancer cells: enhanced apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation as underlying mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Kati; Ringel, Jessica; Hampel, Silke; Rieger, Christiane; Huebner, Doreen; Wirth, Manfred P.; Fuessel, Susanne

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanofibres (CNFs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can exert antitumor activities themselves and sensitize cancer cells to conventional chemotherapeutics such as carboplatin and cisplatin. In the present study, the chemosensitizing effect of CNFs and CNTs on cancer cells of urological origin was investigated regarding the underlying mechanisms. Prostate cancer (DU-145, PC-3) and bladder cancer (EJ28) cells were treated with carbon nanomaterials (CNFs, CNTs) and chemotherapeutics (carboplatin, cisplatin) alone as well as in combination for 24 h. Forty-eight (EJ28) or 72 h (DU-145, PC-3) after the end of treatment the effects on cellular proliferation, clonogenic survival, cell death rate and cell cycle distribution were evaluated. Depending on the cell line, simultaneous administration of chemotherapeutics and carbon nanomaterials produced an additional inhibition of cellular proliferation and clonogenic survival of up to 77% and 98%, respectively, compared to the inhibitory effects of the chemotherapeutics alone. These strongly enhanced antiproliferative effects were accompanied by an elevated cell death rate, which was predominantly mediated via apoptosis and not by necrosis. The antitumor effects of combinations with CNTs were less pronounced than those with CNFs. The enhanced effects of the combinatory treatments on cellular function were mostly of additive to partly synergistic nature. Furthermore, cell cycle analysis demonstrated an arrest at the G2/M phase mediated by a monotreatment with chemotherapeutics. Following combinatory treatments, mostly less than or nearly additive increases of cell fractions in the G2/M phase could be observed. In conclusion, the pronounced chemosensitizing effects of CNFs and CNTs were mediated by an enhanced apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation. The combination of carbon-based nanomaterials and conventional chemotherapeutics represents a novel

  5. High surface adsorption properties of carbon-based nanomaterials are responsible for mortality, swimming inhibition, and biochemical responses in Artemia salina larvae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesarič, Tina, E-mail: tina.mesaric84@gmail.com [Department of Biology, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana (Slovenia); Gambardella, Chiara, E-mail: chiara.gambardella@ge.ismar.cnr.it [Institute of Marine Sciences, National Research Council, Genova (Italy); Milivojević, Tamara, E-mail: milivojevictamara@gmail.com [Department of Biology, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana (Slovenia); Faimali, Marco, E-mail: marco.faimali@ismar.cnr.it [Institute of Marine Sciences, National Research Council, Genova (Italy); Drobne, Damjana, E-mail: damjana.drobne@bf.uni-lj.si [Department of Biology, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana (Slovenia); Centre of Excellence in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (CO Nanocentre), Ljubljana (Slovenia); Centre of Excellence in Advanced Materials and Technologies for the Future (CO NAMASTE), Ljubljana (Slovenia); Falugi, Carla, E-mail: carlafalugi@hotmail.it [Department of Earth, Environment and Life Sciences, University of Genova, Genova (Italy); Makovec, Darko, E-mail: darko.makovec@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jemec, Anita, E-mail: anita.jemec@bf.uni-lj.si [Department of Biology, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana (Slovenia); Sepčić, Kristina, E-mail: kristina.sepcic@bf.uni-lj.si [Department of Biology, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Carbon-based nanomaterials adsorb onto the body surface of A. salina larvae. • Surface adsorption results in concentration–dependent inhibition of larval swimming. • Carbon-based nanomaterials induce no significant mortality of A. salina larvae. - Abstract: We investigated the effects of three different carbon-based nanomaterials on brine shrimp (Artemia salina) larvae. The larvae were exposed to different concentrations of carbon black, graphene oxide, and multiwall carbon nanotubes for 48 h, and observed using phase contrast and scanning electron microscopy. Acute (mortality) and behavioural (swimming speed alteration) responses and cholinesterase, glutathione-S-transferase and catalase enzyme activities were evaluated. These nanomaterials were ingested and concentrated in the gut, and attached onto the body surface of the A. salina larvae. This attachment was responsible for concentration–dependent inhibition of larval swimming, and partly for alterations in the enzyme activities, that differed according to the type of tested nanomaterials. No lethal effects were observed up to 0.5 mg/mL carbon black and 0.1 mg/mL multiwall carbon nanotubes, while graphene oxide showed a threshold whereby it had no effects at 0.6 mg/mL, and more than 90% mortality at 0.7 mg/mL. Risk quotients calculated on the basis of predicted environmental concentrations indicate that carbon black and multiwall carbon nanotubes currently do not pose a serious risk to the marine environment, however if uncontrolled release of nanomaterials continues, this scenario can rapidly change.

  6. Guiding osteogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells using carbon-based nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ee-Seul; Kim, Da-Seul; Suhito, Intan Rosalina; Choo, Sung-Sik; Kim, Seung-Jae; Song, Inbeom; Kim, Tae-Hyung

    2017-01-01

    In the field of regenerative medicine, stem cells are highly promising due to their innate ability to generate multiple types of cells that could replace/repair damaged parts of human organs and tissues. It has been reported that both in vitro and in vivo function/survival of stem cells could significantly be improved by utilizing functional materials such as biodegradable polymers, metal composites, nanopatterns and nanohybrid particles. Of various biocompatible materials available for use in stem cell-based therapy and research, carbon-based materials—including fullerenes graphene/graphene oxide and carbon nanotubes—have been found to possess unique physicochemical characteristics that contribute to the effective guidance of stem cell differentiation into specific lineages. In this review, we discuss a number of previous reports that investigated the use of carbon-based materials to control stem cell behavior, with a particular focus on their immense potential to guide the osteogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We hope that this review will provide information on the full potential of using various carbon-based materials in stem cell-mediated regenerative therapy, particularly for bone regeneration and repair.

  7. Application of Carbon Based Nano-Materials to Aeronautics and Space Lubrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Wal, Randy L. Vander

    2007-01-01

    The tribology program at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, is investigating carbon based nano-particles for their potential in advanced concept lubrication products. Service conditions range from high temperature atmospheric to low temperature vacuum. Some of the lubricants and surface coatings of tribological significance that we have evaluated include neat nano-particles, both grown in-situ and as bulk material deposited on the substrate, and nano-particles dispersed in oils which are all highly substrate interactive. We discuss results of testing these systems in a spiral orbit tribometer (SOT) and a unidirectional pin-on-disc (PoD) tribometer. A nano-onions/Krytox mixture evaluated as a lubricant for angular contact bearings in air caused a marked lowering of the coefficient of friction (CoF) (0.04 to 0.05) for the mixture with an eight-fold improvement in lifetime over that of the Krytox alone. In vacuum, no effect was observed from the nano-onions. Multi-walled nanotubes (MWNT) and graphitized MWNT were tested under sliding friction in both air and vacuum. The MWNT which were grown in-situ oriented normal to the sliding surface exhibited low CoF (0.04) and long wear lives. Bulk MWNT also generate low CoF (0.01 to 0.04, vacuum; and 0.06, air) and long wear life (>1 million orbits, vacuum; and >3.5 million, air). Dispersed graphitized MWNT were superior to MWNT and both were superior to aligned MWNT indicating that orientation is not an issue for solid lubrication. Single-walled nanotubes (SWNT) were modified by cutting into shorter segments and by fluorination. All SWNTs exhibited low CoF in air, with good wear lives. The SWNT with slight fluorination yielded an ultra-low CoF of 0.002 although the best wear life was attributed to the nascent SWNT.

  8. Nano-biomedical approaches of cancer therapy using carbon based and magnetic nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Alokita

    Since the inception of nanoparticles, they have affected almost each and every field of modern science and technology both in terms of research and application. Due to its subcellular level size and ease of modification for biological and medical purposes, nanoparticles have contributed greatly in various field of biomedical reaserch including cancer research. In this dissertation, emphasis has been given on an important area of research of a multi-modal anticancer therapeutic approach using carbon-based and magnetic inorganic nanoparticles. Ethylenediamine functionalized single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been used to deliver a functional copy of p53 gene in a plasmid construct, to human breast cancer cell line MCF-7, in order to restore the activity of p53 protein, which in this case is extremely short-lived. The attachment of the plasmid on the SWNTs was determined by atomic force microscopy. The nanutobe has successfully delivered the plasmid into the MCF-7 cell which follows the expression of the p53 protein into the cell as evidenced by the expression of Green fluorescence protein which was tagged to p53 plasmid. Upon expression, the functional activity of the p53 protein was found to be significantly restored as after 72 hours of incubation ~40% of cancer cells were apoptotic. Apoptosis was further determined by caspase assay. In chapter 3, we have used SWNTs to accomplish the targeted delivery by functionalizing it with human epidermal growth factor (EGF). As EGF receptor is over expressed in many of the cancer cells, it is possible to deliver any chemotherapeutic agents selectively to those cancer cells. We used EGF conjugated to SWNTs for targeted delivery to PANC-1 cells. Results indicate EGF-functionalized SWNTs accumulate more into PANC-1 cells compared to only SWNTs only. Upon targeting, Raman spectroscopy and ELIZA assay were used to determine the association and dissociation pattern of the targeted SWCNTs. 2D-Raman mapping was used to show

  9. A novel one-step synthesis for carbon-based nanomaterials from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Essawy, Noha A; Konsowa, Abdelaziz H; Elnouby, Mohamed; Farag, Hassan A

    2017-03-01

    Nowadays our planet suffers from an accumulation of plastic products that have the potential to cause great harm to the environment in the form of air, water, and land pollution. Plastic water bottles have become a great problem in the environment because of the large numbers consumed throughout the world. Certain types of plastic bottles can be recycled but most of them are not. This paper describes an economical solvent-free process that converts polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles waste into carbon nanostructure materials via thermal dissociation in a closed system under autogenic pressure together with additives and/or catalyst, which can act as cluster nuclei for carbon nanostructure materials such as fullerenes and carbon nanotubes. This research succeeded in producing and controlling the microstructure of various forms of carbon nanoparticles from the PET waste by optimizing the preparation parameters in terms of time, additives, and amounts of catalyst. Plastic water bottles are becoming a growing segment of the municipal solid waste stream in the world; some are recycled but many are left in landfill sites. Recycling PET bottles waste can positively impact the environment in several ways: for instance, reduced waste, resource conservation, energy conservation, reduced greenhouse gas emissions, and decreasing the amount of pollution in air and water sources. The main novelty of the present work is based on the acquisition of high-value carbon-based nanomaterials from PET waste by a simple solvent-free chemical technique. Thus, the prepared materials are considered to be promising, cheap, eco-friendly materials that may find use in different applications.

  10. High surface adsorption properties of carbon-based nanomaterials are responsible for mortality, swimming inhibition, and biochemical responses in Artemia salina larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesarič, Tina; Gambardella, Chiara; Milivojević, Tamara; Faimali, Marco; Drobne, Damjana; Falugi, Carla; Makovec, Darko; Jemec, Anita; Sepčić, Kristina

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the effects of three different carbon-based nanomaterials on brine shrimp (Artemia salina) larvae. The larvae were exposed to different concentrations of carbon black, graphene oxide, and multiwall carbon nanotubes for 48 h, and observed using phase contrast and scanning electron microscopy. Acute (mortality) and behavioural (swimming speed alteration) responses and cholinesterase, glutathione-S-transferase and catalase enzyme activities were evaluated. These nanomaterials were ingested and concentrated in the gut, and attached onto the body surface of the A. salina larvae. This attachment was responsible for concentration-dependent inhibition of larval swimming, and partly for alterations in the enzyme activities, that differed according to the type of tested nanomaterials. No lethal effects were observed up to 0.5mg/mL carbon black and 0.1mg/mL multiwall carbon nanotubes, while graphene oxide showed a threshold whereby it had no effects at 0.6 mg/mL, and more than 90% mortality at 0.7 mg/mL. Risk quotients calculated on the basis of predicted environmental concentrations indicate that carbon black and multiwall carbon nanotubes currently do not pose a serious risk to the marine environment, however if uncontrolled release of nanomaterials continues, this scenario can rapidly change.

  11. One decade of research into the fate and transport of carbon-based nanomaterials - Lessons learnt and future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüffer, Thorsten; Hofmann, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    Carbon-based nanomaterials (CNM) exhibit unique physico-chemical properties (e.g., large surface area to volume ratios, electron delocalization), which make them promising for a great number of applications. The production, use, and disposal of CNM and CNM-containing products will inevitably result in the release of these materials into the environment. The fate and transport of CNM greatly depends on their physico-chemical properties and surrounding environmental conditions. This field of research has constantly increased over recent years. Yet little is known on how transformation processes such as changes in surface properties or aggregation influence their interaction with other environmental species (i.e., solid surfaces or contaminants). For example, changes in redox chemistry in combination with irradiation have shown to significantly alter the surface chemistry of C60 fullerenes and consequently decreased their sorption affinity towards non-polar organic contaminants [1]. The presence of natural organic matter (NOM) seems to play a major role on the aggregation of CNM; however, the results are not consistent whether this leads to an increase or decrease in interactions with solid surfaces or contaminants. Either increased interactions resulting from a higher dispersion of CNM or decreased interactions of CNM, which was assigned to an offset of "creating" new sorption sites due to increased dispersion by a reduced accessibility of polar moieties. For the latter effect, NOM was proposed to either directly compete for sorption sites on CNM surface or a blocking of CNM pores by large NOM molecules [2]. The potential consequences of these changes in surface properties of CNM on their toxic effects on microorganisms have only been partially examined. For an environmental risk assessment, data on the occurrence of CNM is obligatory but to date the environmental concentrations of CNM are still difficult to assess due to still unsolved analytical issues in matrix

  12. Nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Vollath, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    This full-colored introduction to nanomaterials and nanotechnology in particular addresses the needs of engineers who need to know the special phenomena and potentials, without getting bogged down in the scientific detail of the physics and chemistry involved. Based on the author's own courses, this textbook shows how to produce nanomaterials and use them in engineering applications for novel products. Following an introduction, the text goes on to treat synthesis, characterization techniques, thermal, optical, magnetic and electronic properties, processing and, finally, emerging applications. A sound overview of the "nano world" from an application-oriented perspective.

  13. Screening-engineered Field-effect Photovoltaics and Synthesis, Characterization, and Applications of Carbon-based and Related Nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Regan, William Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials, and especially graphene (a 2D carbon allotrope), possess unique electronic, optical, and mechanical properties and allow access to both new physical phenomena and reinventions of familiar technologies. In the first part of this thesis (chapter 2), the low carrier density and high conductivity of graphene are used to repurpose the electric field effect (used for many decades in transistors) into a universally-applicable doping method for electrically-contacted semiconduct...

  14. Screening-engineered Field-effect Photovoltaics and Synthesis, Characterization, and Applications of Carbon-based and Related Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, William Raymond

    Carbon nanomaterials, and especially graphene (a 2D carbon allotrope), possess unique electronic, optical, and mechanical properties and allow access to both new physical phenomena and reinventions of familiar technologies. In the first part of this thesis (chapter 2), the low carrier density and high conductivity of graphene are used to repurpose the electric field effect (used for many decades in transistors) into a universally-applicable doping method for electrically-contacted semiconductors. This method, referred to as "screening-engineered field-effect photovoltaics" as the electric field doping is enabled by a carefully-designed poorly-screening electrode (e.g. graphene), is shown to open up many new low-cost and abundant semiconductors for use in high efficiency solar cells. We extend this method beyond ultrathin materials such as graphene and show that 1D nanowire electrodes made of any material also allow penetration of applied electric fields. The next part of this thesis (chapter 3) focuses on the fundamental properties of graphene -- its structure, synthesis, characterization, and manipulation -- and on using graphene as a building block for other nanostructures: grafold, graphene sandwiches and veils, and graphritos. In chapter 4, various graphene electronics are constructed and tested. Graphene field-effect transistors (FETs) and p-n junctions are fabricated to study the influence of the substrate on graphene carrier mobility and doping. Graphene nanoribbons and grafold FETs are made to investigate the effects of additional confinement on electronic transport. Chapter 5 summarizes synthesis methods and additional experiments with other nanomaterials, including dichalcogenides and chalcogenides (magnesium diboride, gallium selenide, and tin sulfide), carbon nanomaterials (carbon nanotubes and graphene), and copper oxide. Additional measurement and fabrication methods are discussed in appendix A.

  15. 碳纳米材料在生物医学领域的应用现状及展望%Application Status and Prospect of Carbon-Based Nanomaterials in Biomedical Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张金超; 杨康宁; 张海松; 梁兴杰

    2013-01-01

    Nanomaterials have become a new type of materials with a rapid development of nanotechnology. Nanomaterials have unique physical and chemical properties such as small size effect, large surface area, high reactivity, and quantum effects. These features make the nanoscience as one of the three pillars of the world science. Carbon-based nanomaterials are an important part of nanomaterials, they include carbon nanotubes, fullerene, graphene, nanodiamond and their derivatives. Due to their unique physical and chemical properties, carbon-based nanomaterials have broad applications in the biomedical field. In addition, with the industrialization of nanotechnology, various forms of carbon-based nanomaterials have come into human life in different ways, and the biosafety is increasingly attracting attention of scientists around the world. This article reviews the potential applications of all four types of carbon-based nanomaterials in the biomedical field including tissue engineering, drug/gene carrier, biological imaging, cancer treatment, anti-HIV/anti-bacterial activity, and biological sensing. In addition, the biosafety issue is also reviewed. Finally, we discuss the need for future research. Specifically, we identify the most important research topics, which urgently need to be studied.%随着纳米技术的飞速发展,纳米材料已成为一种新型材料.纳米材料具有独特的物理化学性质,如小尺寸效应、巨大比表面积、极高的反应活性、量子效应等,这些特性使纳米科学成为当今世界三大支柱科学之一.碳纳米材料是纳米材料领域重要的组成部分,主要包括碳纳米管、富勒烯、石墨烯、纳米钻石及其衍生物等.由于其独特的理化特性,它们在生物医学领域具有广泛的应用前景.另外,随着碳纳米材料的产业化,各种形式的碳纳米材料将以不同途径进入人们的生活,纳米材料的生物安全性问题正受到世界各国科学家的广泛关注.

  16. Surface Functionalization and Biological Application of Carbon-based Nanomaterials with Photothermal Effects%碳基光热转换纳米材料的表面功能化和生物应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈志钢; 张丽莎; 田启威; 胡俊青

    2012-01-01

    Photothermal therapy technology is attracted much attention, and a prerequisite for the development of its biological applications is to obtain photothermal agents with excellent conversion efficiency and stability. Carbon-based photothermal agents is drawn increasing interest due to their advantages such as low toxicity and excellent stability. The recent research progress in carbon-based nanomaterials with photothermal effects is reviewed, including carbon nanotube and graphene. The main attention is given to the advance in their surface modification technologies including non-covalent modification and covalent modification. Subsequently, the functionalization methods of carbon-based photothermal agents with RGD, antibody, folic acid and DNA are summarized. At last, their biological applications, including photothermal ablation therapy and NIR photothermal imaging are introduced.%光热治疗技术已经引起了广泛的重视,其走向应用的前提是开发出高效稳定的光热转换材料.碳基光热转换纳米材料具有毒性小、稳定性高等优点,已经成为了研究的热点.综述了碳基光热转换纳米材料(包括纳米碳管和石墨烯)的研究进展,重点论述了其表面改性技术(包括非共价键改性和共价键改性方法);随后总结了其表面功能化方法,主要有RGD、抗体、叶酸和DNA等靶向性功能化的修饰方法;最后介绍了其在光热治疗、近红外热成像等生物医药方面的应用.

  17. 碳纳米材料去除水中重金属研究进展%Advances in Research of Removing Heavy Metals from Water by Carbon-based Nano-materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊伟; 卞战强; 田向红; 张娟

    2013-01-01

    Novel nano-materials for removing heavy metals from water were introduced in this paper,including types and characteristics of carbon-based nano-materials,among others,the carbon nano-tubes and graphene.Studies on mechanism of heavy metals removal by the nano-materials were reviewed and the progress in developing new composite materials to cope with various difficulties involved in water purification was summarized.%碳纳米材料具有极大的比表面积,经氧化处理后的原子结构层上含有大量的羟基,羧基等含氧功能团,增强了它们与水中重金属污染物的离子交换能力和络合作用,是一类高效的水中重金属去除材料.文章介绍了碳纳米材料的种类、结构特点,总结了碳纳米材料去除水中重金属的研究现状,分析了去除重金属的机理.指出碳纳米材料在水处理实际应用中存在的问题,展望了应用前景,为开发新型重金属废水处理和供水处理工艺提供理论依据.

  18. A 3-dimensional micro- and nanoparticle transport and filtration model (MNM3D) applied to the migration of carbon-based nanomaterials in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Carlo; Tosco, Tiziana; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2016-10-01

    Engineered nanoparticles (NPs) in the environment can act both as contaminants, when they are unintentionally released, and as remediation agents when injected on purpose at contaminated sites. In this work two carbon-based NPs are considered, namely CARBO-IRON®, a new material developed for contaminated site remediation, and single layer graphene oxide (SLGO), a potential contaminant of the next future. Understanding and modeling the transport and deposition of such NPs in aquifer systems is a key aspect in both cases, and numerical models capable to simulate NP transport in groundwater in complex 3D scenarios are necessary. To this aim, this work proposes a modeling approach based on modified advection-dispersion-deposition equations accounting for the coupled influence of flow velocity and ionic strength on particle transport. A new modeling tool (MNM3D - Micro and Nanoparticle transport Model in 3D geometries) is presented for the simulation of NPs injection and transport in 3D scenarios. MNM3D is the result of the integration of the numerical code MNMs (Micro and Nanoparticle transport, filtration and clogging Model - Suite) in the well-known transport model RT3D (Clement et al., 1998). The injection in field-like conditions of CARBO-IRON® (20 g/l) amended by CMC (4 g/l) in a 2D vertical tank (0.7 × 1.0 × 0.12 m) was simulated using MNM3D, and compared to experimental results under the same conditions. Column transport tests of SLGO at a concentration (10 mg/l) representative of a possible spill of SLGO-containing waste water were performed at different values of ionic strength (0.1 to 35 mM), evidencing a strong dependence of SLGO transport on IS, and a reversible blocking deposition. The experimental data were fitted using the numerical code MNMs and the ionic strength-dependent transport was up-scaled for a full scale 3D simulation of SLGO release and long-term transport in a heterogeneous aquifer. MNM3D showed to potentially represent a valid tool for

  19. Template synthesis of monodisperse carbon nanodots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdyukov, D. A.; Eurov, D. A.; Stovpiaga, E. Yu.; Kirilenko, D. A.; Konyakhin, S. V.; Shvidchenko, A. V.; Golubev, V. G.

    2016-12-01

    Monodisperse carbon nanodots in pores of mesoporous silica particles are obtained by template synthesis. This method is based on introducing a precursor (organosilane) into pores, its thermal decomposition with formation of carbon nanodots, and the template removal. Structural analysis of the nanomaterial has been performed, which showed that carbon nanodots have an approximately spherical form and a graphite-like structure. According to dynamic light scattering data, the size of carbon nanodots is 3.3 ± 0.9 nm.

  20. Purifying Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh (Inventor); Hurst, Janet (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of purifying a nanomaterial and the resultant purified nanomaterial in which a salt, such as ferric chloride, at or near its liquid phase temperature, is used to penetrate and wet the internal surfaces of a nanomaterial to dissolve impurities that may be present, for example, from processes used in the manufacture of the nanomaterial.

  1. Engineered monodisperse mesoporous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, R.S.; Small, J.H.; Lagasse, R.R.; Schroeder, J.L.; Jamison, G.M.

    1997-08-01

    Porous materials technology has developed products with a wide variety of pore sizes ranging from 1 angstrom to 100`s of microns and beyond. Beyond 15{angstrom} it becomes difficult to obtain well ordered, monodisperse pores. In this report the authors describe efforts in making novel porous material having monodisperse, controllable pore sizes spanning the mesoporous range (20--500 {angstrom}). They set forth to achieve this by using unique properties associated with block copolymers--two linear homopolymers attached at their ends. Block copolymers phase separate into monodisperse mesophases. They desired to selectively remove one of the phases and leave the other behind, giving the uniform monodisperse pores. To try to achieve this the authors used ring-opening metathesis polymerization to make the block copolymers. They synthesized a wide variety of monomers and surveyed their polymers by TGA, with the idea that one phase could be made thermally labile while the other phase would be thermally stable. In the precipitated and sol-gel processed materials, they determined by porosimetry measurements that micropores, mesopores, and macropores were created. In the film processed sample there was not much porosity present. They moved to a new system that required much lower thermal treatments to thermally remove over 90% of the labile phase. Film casting followed by thermal treatment and solvent extraction produced the desired monodisperse materials (based solely on SEM results). Modeling using Density Functional Theory was also incorporated into this project. The modeling was able to predict accurately the domain size and spacing vs. molecular weight for a model system, as well as accurate interfacial thicknesses.

  2. Nanomaterial Registry

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Nanomaterial Registry compiles data from multiple databases into a single resource. The goal of this resource is to establish a curated nanomaterial registry,...

  3. Antimicrobial Activity of Carbon-Based Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solmaz Maleki Dizaj

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the vast and inappropriate use of the antibiotics, microorganisms have begun to develop resistance to the commonly used antimicrobial agents. So therefore, development of the new and effective antimicrobial agents seems to be necessary. According to some recent reports, carbon-based nanomaterials such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes (CNTs (especially single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and graphene oxide (GO nanoparticles show potent antimicrobial properties. In present review, we have briefly summarized the antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanoparticles together with their mechanism of action. Reviewed literature show that the size of carbon nanoparticles plays an important role in the inactivation of the microorganisms. As major mechanism, direct contact of microorganisms with carbon nanostructures seriously affects their cellular membrane integrity, metabolic processes and morphology. The antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanostructures may interestingly be investigated in the near future owing to their high surface/volume ratio, large inner volume and other unique chemical and physical properties. In addition, application of functionalized carbon nanomaterials as carriers for the ordinary antibiotics possibly will decrease the associated resistance, enhance their bioavailability and provide their targeted delivery.

  4. Bioengineered nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Atul

    2013-01-01

    Many varieties of new, complex diseases are constantly being discovered, which leaves scientists with little choice but to embrace innovative methods for controlling the invasion of life-threatening problems. The use of nanotechnology has given scientists an opportunity to create nanomaterials that could help medical professionals in diagnosing and treating problems quickly and effectively. Bioengineered Nanomaterials presents in-depth information on bioengineered nanomaterials currently being developed in leading research laboratories around the world. In particular, the book focuses on nanom

  5. Nanomaterials handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Gogotsi, Yury

    2006-01-01

    Even before it was identified as a science and given a name,  nanotechnology was the province of the most innovative inventors. In medieval times, craftsmen, ingeniously employing nanometer-sized gold particles, created the enchanting red hues found in the gold ruby glass of cathedral windows. Today, nanomaterials are being just as creatively used to improve old products, as well as usher in new ones. From tires to CRTs to sunscreens, nanomaterials are becoming a part of every industry. The Nanomaterials Handbook provides a comprehensive overview of the current state of nanomaterials. Employ

  6. Investigating the Toxicity and Environmental Fate of Graphene Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Hersam Laboratory at Northwestern University works with the Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology and the United States Environmental Protection Agency to study the toxicity and environmental fate of emergent nanomaterials, specifically carbon-based nanomate...

  7. Preparation of large monodisperse vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting F Zhu

    Full Text Available Preparation of monodisperse vesicles is important both for research purposes and for practical applications. While the extrusion of vesicles through small pores (approximately 100 nm in diameter results in relatively uniform populations of vesicles, extrusion to larger sizes results in very heterogeneous populations of vesicles. Here we report a simple method for preparing large monodisperse multilamellar vesicles through a combination of extrusion and large-pore dialysis. For example, extrusion of polydisperse vesicles through 5-microm-diameter pores eliminates vesicles larger than 5 microm in diameter. Dialysis of extruded vesicles against 3-microm-pore-size polycarbonate membranes eliminates vesicles smaller than 3 microm in diameter, leaving behind a population of monodisperse vesicles with a mean diameter of approximately 4 microm. The simplicity of this method makes it an effective tool for laboratory vesicle preparation with potential applications in preparing large monodisperse liposomes for drug delivery.

  8. Carbon-Based Materials for Photo-Triggered Theranostic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karunya Albert

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Carbon-based nanomaterials serve as a type of smart material for photo-triggered disease theranostics. The inherent physicochemical properties of these nanomaterials facilitate their use for less invasive treatments. This review summarizes the properties and applications of materials including fullerene, nanotubes, nanohorns, nanodots and nanographenes for photodynamic nanomedicine in cancer and antimicrobial therapies. Carbon nanomaterials themselves do not usually act as photodynamic therapy (PDT agents owing to the high hydrophobicity, however, when the surface is passivated or functionalized, these materials become great vehicles for PDT. Moreover, conjugation of carbonaceous nanomaterials with the photosensitizer (PS and relevant targeting ligands enhances properties such as selectivity, stability, and high quantum yield, making them readily available for versatile biomedical applications.

  9. Nanomaterial Registry

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — By leveraging and developing a set of Minimal Information About Nanomaterials (MIAN), ontology and standards through a community effort, it has developed a data...

  10. A facile method to produce highly monodispersed nanospheres of cystine aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hongliang; Wang, Chungang; Ma, Zhanfang; Su, Zhongmin

    2006-10-01

    Multiple shapes of nano- and micro-structured cystine aggregates, including spheres, rods, spindles, dendrites, and multipods, were easily synthesized just by adjusting the concentrations and pH values of L-Cysteine solutions under ultrasonic irritation. Importantly, highly monodispersed nanospheres of cystine aggregates 225 nm in diameter without any other shapes were easily obtained for the system of 0.1 M L-Cysteine with pH 8. This will provide a very simple and effective approach to produce monodispersed cystine microspheres, which could promote new possibilities for future applications in biosensor, drug delivery, medicine, and the production of nanomaterials.

  11. A facile method to produce highly monodispersed nanospheres of cystine aggregates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han Hongliang; Wang Chungang; Ma Zhanfang; Su Zhongmin [Chemistry Department, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China)

    2006-10-28

    Multiple shapes of nano- and micro-structured cystine aggregates, including spheres, rods, spindles, dendrites, and multipods, were easily synthesized just by adjusting the concentrations and pH values of L-Cysteine solutions under ultrasonic irritation. Importantly, highly monodispersed nanospheres of cystine aggregates 225 nm in diameter without any other shapes were easily obtained for the system of 0.1 M L-Cysteine with pH 8. This will provide a very simple and effective approach to produce monodispersed cystine microspheres, which could promote new possibilities for future applications in biosensor, drug delivery, medicine, and the production of nanomaterials.

  12. Biosensor nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Songjun; Li, He; Banerjee, Ipsita A

    2011-01-01

    Focusing on the materials suitable for biosensor applications, such as nanoparticles, quantum dots, meso- and nanoporous materials and nanotubes, this text enables the reader to prepare the respective nanomaterials for use in actual devices by appropriate functionalization, surface processing or directed self-assembly. The main detection methods used are electrochemical, optical, and mechanical, providing solutions to challenging tasks.The result is a reference for researchers and developers, disseminating first-hand information on which nanomaterial is best suited to a particular applicat

  13. Superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlugon, Katarzyna

    The purpose of this thesis is to explain the phenomenon of superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials such as graphene, fullerenes and carbon nanotubes. In the introductory chapter, there is a description of superconductivity and how it occurs at critical temperature (Tc) that is characteristic and different to every superconducting material. The discovery of superconductivity in mercury in 1911 by Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes is also mentioned. Different types of superconductors, type I and type II, low and high temperatures superconductors, as well as the BCS theory that was developed in 1957 by Bardeen, Cooper, and Schrieffer, are also described in detail. The BCS theory explains how Cooper's pairs are formed and how they are responsible for the superconducting properties of many materials. The following chapters explain superconductivity in doped fullerenes, graphene and carbon nanotubes, respectively. There is a thorough explanation followed by many examples of different types of carbon nanomaterials in which small changes in chemical structure cause significant changes in superconducting properties. The goal of this research was not only to take into consideration well known carbon based superconductors but also to search for the newest available materials such as the fullerene nanowhiskers discovered quite recently. There is also a presentation of fairly new ideas about inducing superconductivity in a monolayer of graphene which is more challenging than inducing superconductivity in graphite by simply intercalating metal atoms between its graphene sheets. An effort has been taken to look for any available information about carbon nanomaterials that have the potential to superconduct at room temperature, mainly because discovery of such materials would be a real revolution in the modern world, although no such materials have been discovered yet.

  14. Coupling carbon nanomaterials with photochromic molecules for the generation of optically responsive materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Hou, Lili; Samorì, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Multifunctional carbon-based nanomaterials offer routes towards the realization of smart and high-performing (opto)electronic (nano)devices, sensors and logic gates. Meanwhile photochromic molecules exhibit reversible transformation between two forms, induced by the absorption of electromagnetic radiation. By combining carbon-based nanomaterials with photochromic molecules, one can achieve reversible changes in geometrical structure, electronic properties and nanoscale mechanics triggering by light. This thus enables a reversible modulation of numerous physical and chemical properties of the carbon-based nanomaterials towards the fabrication of cognitive devices. This review examines the state of the art with respect to these responsive materials, and seeks to identify future directions for investigation.

  15. Aerosol fabrication methods for monodisperse nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xingmao; Brinker, C Jeffrey

    2014-10-21

    Exemplary embodiments provide materials and methods for forming monodisperse particles. In one embodiment, the monodisperse particles can be formed by first spraying a nanoparticle-containing dispersion into aerosol droplets and then heating the aerosol droplets in the presence of a shell precursor to form core-shell particles. By removing either the shell layer or the nanoparticle core of the core-shell particles, monodisperse nanoparticles can be formed.

  16. Electrically tunable functional nanomaterials for actuation and photonics

    OpenAIRE

    Shao, Li-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Nanomaterials with tunable electronic structure exploit the large specific surface area of metal nanostructures along with the strategy of tuning the surface properties through the controlled introduction of space-charge regions. Then, materials with tunable macroscopic properties can be created. The present thesis work achieved a successful synthesis of metallic and carbon-based tunable nanomaterials and demonstrated novel functional behavior in two fields of application: actuation and photo...

  17. Structure and Hydration of Highly Branched, Monodisperse Phytoglycogen Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, John; Nickels, Jonathan; Stanley, Christopher; Diallo, Souleymane; Katsaras, John; Dutcher, John

    Monodisperse phytoglycogen nanoparticles are a promising, new soft colloidal nanomaterial with many applications in the personal care, food, nutraceutical and pharmaceutical industries. These applications rely on exceptional properties that emerge from the highly branched structure of phytoglycogen and its interaction with water, such as extraordinarily high water retention, and low viscosity and exceptional stability in water. The structure and hydration of the nanoparticles was characterized using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). SANS allowed us to determine the size of the nanoparticles, evaluate their radial density profile, quantify the particle-to-particle spacing, and determine their water content. The results show clearly that the nanoparticles are highly hydrated, with each nanoparticle containing 250% of its mass in water, and that aqueous dispersions approach a jamming transition at ~ 25% (w/w). QENS experiments provided an independent and consistent measure of the high level of hydration of the particles.

  18. Mutagenicity of carbon nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallin, Håkan; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; White, Paul A

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials such carbon nanotubes, graphene and fullerenes are some the most promising nanomaterials. Although carbon nanomaterials have been reported to possess genotoxic potential, it is imperitive to analyse the data on the genotoxicity of carbon nanomaterials in vivo and in vitro...

  19. Aggregation, Deposition and Release of Graphene Oxide Nanomaterials in the Aquatic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graphene is an atomically thin two dimensional carbon-based nanomaterial that is composed of a single layer of sp2 – hybridized carbon atoms as found in graphite.1, 2 Usage of graphene-based nanomaterials is increasing rapidly and these materials are predicted to be the most abun...

  20. Advances in nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Zishan

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a review of the latest research findings and key applications in the field of nanomaterials. The book contains twelve chapters on different aspects of nanomaterials. It begins with key fundamental concepts to aid readers new to the discipline of nanomaterials, and then moves to the different types of nanomaterials studied. The book includes chapters based on the applications of nanomaterials for nano-biotechnology and solar energy. Overall, the book comprises chapters on a variety of topics on nanomaterials from expert authors across the globe. This book will appeal to researchers and professional alike, and may also be used as a reference for courses in nanomaterials.

  1. Impact of humic/fulvic acid on the removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions using nanomaterials: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wang-Wang; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Gong, Ji-Lai; Liang, Jie; Xu, Piao; Zhang, Chang; Huang, Bin-Bin

    2014-01-15

    Nowadays nanomaterials have been widely used to remove heavy metals from water/wastewater due to their large surface area and high reactivity. Humic acid (HA) and fulvic acid (FA) exist ubiquitously in aquatic environments and have a variety of functional groups which allow them to complex with metal ions and interact with nanomaterials. These interactions can not only alter the environmental behavior of nanomaterials, but also influence the removal and transportation of heavy metals by nanomaterials. Thus, the interactions and the underlying mechanisms involved warrant specific investigations. This review outlined the effects of HA/FA on the removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions by various nanomaterials, mainly including carbon-based nanomaterials, iron-based nanomaterials and photocatalytic nanomaterials. Moreover, mechanisms involved in the interactions were discussed and potential environmental implications of HA/FA to nanomaterials and heavy metals were evaluated.

  2. Nanomaterials for Electronics and Optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehne, Jessica E.; Meyyappan, M.

    2011-01-01

    Nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes(CNTs), graphene, and inorganic nanowires(INWs) have shown interesting electronic, mechanical, optical, thermal, and other properties and therefore have been pursued for a variety of applications by the nanotechnology community ranging from electronics to nanocomposites. While the first two are carbon-based materials, the INWs in the literature include silicon, germanium, III-V, II-VI, a variety of oxides, nitrides, antimonides and others. In this talk, first an overview of growth of these three classes of materials by CVD and PECVD will be presented along with results from characterization. Then applications in development of chemical sensors, biosensors, energy storage devices and novel memory architectures will be discussed.

  3. Handbook of nanomaterials properties

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Dan; Schricker, Scott R; Sigmund, Wolfgang; Zauscher, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials attract tremendous attention in recent researches. Although extensive research has been done in this field it still lacks a comprehensive reference work that presents data on properties of different Nanomaterials. This Handbook of Nanomaterials Properties will be the first single reference work that brings together the various properties with wide breadth and scope.

  4. Nanomaterials for membrane fouling control: accomplishments and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qian; Mi, Baoxia

    2013-11-01

    We report a review of recent research efforts on incorporating nanomaterials-including metal/metal oxide nanoparticles, carbon-based nanomaterials, and polymeric nanomaterials-into/onto membranes to improve membrane antifouling properties in biomedical or potentially medical-related applications. In general, nanomaterials can be incorporated into/onto a membrane by blending them into membrane fabricating materials or by attaching them to membrane surfaces via physical or chemical approaches. Overall, the fascinating, multifaceted properties (eg, high hydrophilicity, superparamagnetic properties, antibacterial properties, amenable functionality, strong hydration capability) of nanomaterials provide numerous novel strategies and unprecedented opportunities to fully mitigate membrane fouling. However, there are still challenges in achieving a broader adoption of nanomaterials in the membrane processes used for biomedical applications. Most of these challenges arise from the concerns over their long-term antifouling performance, hemocompatibility, and toxicity toward humans. Therefore, rigorous investigation is still needed before the adoption of some of these nanomaterials in biomedical applications, especially for those nanomaterials proposed to be used in the human body or in contact with living tissue/body fluids for a long period of time. Nevertheless, it is reasonable to predict that the service lifetime of membrane-based biomedical devices and implants will be prolonged significantly with the adoption of appropriate fouling control strategies.

  5. Price tag in nanomaterials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkika, D. A.; Vordos, N.; Nolan, J. W.; Mitropoulos, A. C.; Vansant, E. F.; Cool, P.; Braet, J.

    2017-05-01

    With the evolution of the field of nanomaterials in the past number of years, it has become apparent that it will be key to future technological developments. However, while there are unlimited research undertakings on nanomaterials, limited research results on nanomaterial costs exist; all in spite of the generous funding that nanotechnology projects have received. There has recently been an exponential increase in the number of studies concerning health-related nanomaterials, considering the various medical applications of nanomaterials that drive medical innovation. This work aims to analyze the effect of the cost factor on acceptability of health-related nanomaterials independently or in relation to material toxicity. It appears that, from the materials studied, those used for cancer treatment applications are more expensive than the ones for drug delivery. The ability to evaluate cost implications improves the ability to undertake research mapping and develop opinions on nanomaterials that can drive innovation.

  6. EDITORIAL: Whither nanomaterials? Whither nanomaterials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallouk, Thomas E.; Pinkerton, Fred; Stetson, Ned

    2009-10-01

    As the journal Nanotechnology enters its third decade it is interesting to look back on the field and to think about where it may be headed in the future. The growth of the journal over the past twenty years mirrors that of the field, with exponentially rising numbers of citations and a widening diversity of topics that we identify as nanotechnology. In the early 1990s, Nanotechnology was focused primarily on nanoscale electronics and on scanning probe tools for fabricating and characterizing nanostructures. The synthesis and assembly of nanomaterials was already an active area in chemical research; however, it did not yet intersect strongly with the activities of the physics community, which was interested primarily in new phenomena that emerged on the nanoscale and on the devices that derived from them. In the 1990s there were several key advances that began to bridge this gap. Techniques were developed for making nanocrystals of compound semiconductors, oxides, and metals with very fine control over shape and superstructure. Carbon nanotubes were discovered and their unique electronic properties were demonstrated. Research on the self-assembly of organic molecules on surfaces led to the development of soft lithography and layer-by- layer assembly of materials. The potential to use DNA and then proteins as building blocks of precise assemblies of nanoparticles was explored. These bottom-up structures could not be made by top-down techniques, and their unique properties as components of sensors, electronic devices, biological imaging agents, and drug delivery vehicles began to change the definition of the field. Ten years ago, Inelke Malsch published a study on the scientific trends and organizational dynamics of nanotechology in Europe (1999 Nanotechnology 10 1-7). Scientists from a variety of disciplines were asked which areas of research they would include in the definition of nanotechnology. Although the article concluded with forward-looking thoughts in the

  7. Small silicon, big opportunities: the development and future of colloidally-stable monodisperse silicon nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastronardi, Melanie L; Henderson, Eric J; Puzzo, Daniel P; Ozin, Geoffrey A

    2012-11-14

    Nanomaterials are becoming increasingly widespread in consumer technologies, but there is global concern about the toxicity of nanomaterials to humans and the environment as they move rapidly from the research laboratory to the market place. With this in mind, it makes sense to intensify the nanochemistry community's global research effort on the synthesis and study of nanoparticles that are purportedly "green". One potentially green nanoparticle that seems to be a most promising candidate in this context is silicon, whose appealing optical, optoelectronic, photonic, and biomedical attributes are recently gaining much attention. In this paper, we outline some of our recent contributions to the development of the growing field of silicon nanocrystals (ncSi) in order to stress the importance of continued study of ncSi as a green alternative to the archetypal semiconductor nanocrystals like CdSe, InAs, and PbS. While a variety of developments in synthetic methods, characterization techniques, and applications have been reported in recent years, the ability to prepare colloidally-stable monodisperse ncSi samples may prove to have the largest impact on the field, as it opens the door to study and access the tunable size-dependent properties of ncSi. Here, we summarize our recent contributions in size-separation methods to achieve monodisperse samples, the characterization of size-dependant property trends, the development of ncSi applications, and their potential impact on the promising future of ncSi.

  8. Nanomaterials in preventive dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannig, Matthias; Hannig, Christian

    2010-08-01

    The prevention of tooth decay and the treatment of lesions and cavities are ongoing challenges in dentistry. In recent years, biomimetic approaches have been used to develop nanomaterials for inclusion in a variety of oral health-care products. Examples include liquids and pastes that contain nano-apatites for biofilm management at the tooth surface, and products that contain nanomaterials for the remineralization of early submicrometre-sized enamel lesions. However, the treatment of larger visible cavities with nanomaterials is still at the research stage. Here, we review progress in the development of nanomaterials for different applications in preventive dentistry and research, including clinical trials.

  9. Nanomaterials meet microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumera, Martin

    2011-05-28

    Nanomaterials and lab-on-a-chip platforms have undergone enormous development during the past decade. Here, we present an overview of how microfluidics benefited from the use of nanomaterials for the enhanced separation and detection of analytes. We also discuss how nanomaterials benefit from microfluidics in terms of synthesis and in terms of the simulation of environments for nanomotors and nanorobots. In our opinion, the "marriage" of nanomaterials and microfluidics is highly beneficial and is expected to solve vital challenges in related fields.

  10. Biophysical responses upon the interaction of nanomaterials with cellular interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yun-Long; Putcha, Nirupama; Ng, Kee Woei; Leong, David Tai; Lim, Chwee Teck; Loo, Say Chye Joachim; Chen, Xiaodong

    2013-03-19

    The explosion of study of nanomaterials in biological applications (the nano-bio interface) can be ascribed to nanomaterials' growing importance in diagnostics, therapeutics, theranostics (therapeutic diagnostics), and targeted modulation of cellular processes. However, a growing number of critics have raised concerns over the potential risks of nanomaterials to human health and safety. It is essential to understand nanomaterials' potential toxicity before they are tested in humans. These risks are complicated to unravel, however, because of the complexity of cells and their nanoscale macromolecular components, which enable cells to sense and respond to environmental cues, including nanomaterials. In this Account, we explore these risks from the perspective of the biophysical interactions between nanomaterials and cells. Biophysical responses to the uptake of nanomaterials can include conformational changes in biomolecules like DNA and proteins, and changes to the cellular membrane and the cytoskeleton. Changes to the latter two, in particular, can induce changes in cell elasticity, morphology, motility, adhesion, and invasion. This Account reviews what is known about cells' biophysical responses to the uptake of the most widely studied and used nanoparticles, such as carbon-based, metal, metal-oxide, and semiconductor nanomaterials. We postulate that the biophysical structure impairment induced by nanomaterials is one of the key causes of nanotoxicity. The disruption of cellular structures is affected by the size, shape, and chemical composition of nanomaterials, which are also determining factors of nanotoxicity. Currently, popular nanotoxicity characterizations, such as the MTT and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays, only provide end-point results through chemical reactions. Focusing on biophysical structural changes induced by nanomaterials, possibly in real-time, could deepen our understanding of the normal and altered states of subcellular structures and

  11. Electrodynamic Arrays Having Nanomaterial Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigwell, Steven (Inventor); Biris, Alexandru S. (Inventor); Calle, Carlos I. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electrodynamic array of conductive nanomaterial electrodes and a method of making such an electrodynamic array. In one embodiment, a liquid solution containing nanomaterials is deposited as an array of conductive electrodes on a substrate, including rigid or flexible substrates such as fabrics, and opaque or transparent substrates. The nanomaterial electrodes may also be grown in situ. The nanomaterials may include carbon nanomaterials, other organic or inorganic nanomaterials or mixtures.

  12. Genotoxicity investigations on nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oesch, Franz; Landsiedel, Robert

    2012-07-01

    This review is based on the lecture presented at the April 2010 nanomaterials safety assessment Postsatellite to the 2009 EUROTOX Meeting and summarizes genotoxicity investigations on nanomaterials published in the open scientific literature (up to 2008). Special attention is paid to the relationship between particle size and positive versus negative outcome, as well as the dependence of the outcome on the test used. Salient conclusions and outstanding recommendations emerging from the information summarized in this review are as follows: recognize that nanomaterials are not all the same; therefore know and document what nanomaterial has been tested and in what form; take nanomaterials specific properties into account; in order to make your results comparable with those of others and on other nanomaterials: use or at least include in your studies standardized methods; use in vivo studies to put in vitro results into perspective; take uptake and distribution of the nanomaterial into account; and in order to become able to make extrapolations to risk for human: learn about the mechanism of nanomaterials genotoxic effects. Past experience with standard non-nanosubstances already had shown that mechanisms of genotoxic effects can be complex and their elucidation can be demanding, while there often is an immediate need to assess the genotoxic hazard. Thus, a practical and pragmatic approach to genotoxicity investigations of novel nanomaterials is the use of a battery of standard genotoxicity testing methods covering a wide range of mechanisms. Application of these standard methods to nanomaterials demands, however, adaptations, and the interpretation of results from the genotoxicity testing of nanomaterials needs additional considerations exceeding those used for standard size materials.

  13. Spontaneous Breakup of Extended Monodisperse Polymer Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Yu, Kaijia

    2011-01-01

    We apply continuum mechanical based, numerical modeling to study the dynamics of extended monodisperse polymer melts during the relaxation. The computations are within the ideas of the microstructural ‘‘interchain pressure’’ theory. The computations show a delayed necking resulting in a rupture...

  14. Nanomaterials and Retinal Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The neuroretina should be considered as a potential site of nanomaterial toxicity. Engineered nanomaterials may reach the retina through three potential routes of exposure including; intra­ vitreal injection of therapeutics; blood-borne delivery in the retinal vasculature an...

  15. Molecular toxicity of nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xue-Ling; Yang, Sheng-Tao; Xing, Gengmei

    2014-10-01

    With the rapid developments in the fields of nanoscience and nanotechnlogy, more and more nanomaterials and their based consumer products have been used into our daily life. The safety concerns of nanomaterials have been well recognized by the scientific community and the public. Molecular mechanism of interactions between nanomaterials and biosystems is the most essential topic and final core of the biosafety. In the last two decades, nanotoxicology developed very fast and toxicity phenomena of nanomaterials have been reported. To achieve better understanding and detoxication of nanomaterials, thorough studies of nanotoxicity at molecular level are important. The interactions between nanomaterials and biomolecules have been widely investigated as the first step toward the molecular nanotoxicology. The consequences of such interactions have been discussed in the literature. Besides this, the chemical mechanism of nanotoxicology is gaining more attention, which would lead to a better design of nontoxic nanomaterials. In this review, we focus on the molecular nanotoxicology and explore the toxicity of nanomaterials at molecular level. The molecular level studies of nanotoxicology are summarized and the published nanotoxicological data are revisited.

  16. Nanomaterials and Retinal Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The neuroretina should be considered as a potential site of nanomaterial toxicity. Engineered nanomaterials may reach the retina through three potential routes of exposure including; intra­ vitreal injection of therapeutics; blood-borne delivery in the retinal vasculature an...

  17. Electrode materials for microbial fuel cells: nanomaterial approach

    KAUST Repository

    Mustakeem, Mustakeem

    2015-11-05

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology has the potential to become a major renewable energy resource by degrading organic pollutants in wastewater. The performance of MFC directly depends on the kinetics of the electrode reactions within the fuel cell, with the performance of the electrodes heavily influenced by the materials they are made from. A wide range of materials have been tested to improve the performance of MFCs. In the past decade, carbon-based nanomaterials have emerged as promising materials for both anode and cathode construction. Composite materials have also shown to have the potential to become materials of choice for electrode manufacture. Various transition metal oxides have been investigated as alternatives to conventional expensive metals like platinum for oxygen reduction reaction. In this review, different carbon-based nanomaterials and composite materials are discussed for their potential use as MFC electrodes.

  18. Enrichment and characterization of ferritin for nanomaterial applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Mutskova, Radina; Schwartz, Chad

    2016-01-29

    Ferritin is a ubiquitous iron storage protein utilized as a nanomaterial for labeling biomolecules and nanoparticle construction. Commercially available preparations of horse spleen ferritin, widely used as a starting material, contain a distribution of ferritins with different iron loads. We describe a detailed approach to the enrichment of differentially loaded ferritin molecules by common biophysical techniques such as size exclusion chromatography and preparative ultracentrifugation, and characterize these preparations by dynamic light scattering, and analytical ultracentrifugation. We demonstrate a combination of methods to standardize an approach for determining the chemical load of nearly any particle, including nanoparticles and metal colloids. Purification and characterization of iron content in monodisperse ferritin species is particularly critical for several applications in nanomaterial science.

  19. Enrichment and characterization of ferritin for nanomaterial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Mutskova, Radina; Schwartz, Chad

    2016-01-01

    Ferritin is a ubiquitous iron storage protein utilized as a nanomaterial for labeling biomolecules and nanoparticle construction. Commercially available preparations of horse spleen ferritin, widely used as a starting material, contain a distribution of ferritins with different iron loads. We describe a detailed approach to the enrichment of differentially loaded ferritin molecules by common biophysical techniques such as size exclusion chromatography and preparative ultracentrifugation, and characterize these preparations by dynamic light scattering, and analytical ultracentrifugation. We demonstrate a combination of methods to standardize an approach for determining the chemical load of nearly any particle, including nanoparticles and metal colloids. Purification and characterization of iron content in monodisperse ferritin species is particularly critical for several applications in nanomaterial science.

  20. Nanomaterials and nanofabrication for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chao-Min; Chia-Wen Wu, Kevin

    2013-08-01

    carriers (e.g. polymers, gold nanoparticles, Prussian blue nanoparticles, mesoporous silica nanoparticles and carbon-based nanomaterials). Here, we would like to show our deep appreciation to all authors and reviewers. Without their great help and contributions, this focus issue, including the review and original papers, would not have been published on schedule. This focus issue may not cover all issues in this emerging scientific field; however, we believe that our efforts have great potential 'to hurl a boulder to draw a jade' and ignite innovation and challenging discussion in the relevant scientific communities.

  1. Safe use of nanomaterials

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The use of nanomaterials  is on the increase worldwide, including at CERN. The HSE Unit has established a safety guideline to inform you of the main requirements for the safe handling and disposal of nanomaterials at CERN.   A risk assessment tool has also been developed which guides the user through the process of evaluating the risk for his or her activity. Based on the calculated risk level, the tool provides a list of recommended control measures.   We would therefore like to draw your attention to: Safety Guideline C-0-0-5 - Safe handling and disposal of nanomaterials; and Safety Form C-0-0-2 - Nanomaterial Risk Assessment   You can consult all of CERN’s safety rules and guidelines here. Please contact the HSE Unit for any questions you may have.   The HSE Unit

  2. Towards Safer Nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Rune; Baun, Anders

    2014-01-01

    As nanomaterials become more widespread in everything from industrial processes to consumer products, concerns about human and environmental safety are being taken increasingly more seriously. In our research we are working with minimizing the impact and risks of engineered nanomaterials by looking...... into how the design of nanomaterials can be optimized to minimize their toxicity while still preserving their beneficial or wanted properties. Current efforts in this field are focusing on identifying design rules or parameters that can be adjusted to obtain a risk reduction, either by reducing the hazard...... or the exposure and optimally both. Examples include the 5 SAFER principles (Morose, 2010) or screenings of early warning signs (Hansen et al., 2013). Taking the full life cycle of nanomaterials into account, the principles of Green chemistry and Green engineering could also prove useful to reduce...

  3. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) explores the unique properties of materials and processes at the nanoscale. The CFN is a user-oriented research center...

  4. Potential risks of nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakalova, Totka; Louda, Petr

    2014-05-01

    Nanotechnology is the design and manipulation of materials at the nanometer scale such that novel or enhanced properties emerge. It is a new area of knowledge that promises a dazzling array of opportunities in areas as diverse as manufacturing, energy, health care, and waste treatment. But while the ability to develop nanomaterials and incorporate them into products is advancing rapidly, our understanding of the potential environmental, health, and safety effects of nanomaterials — and of the most effective ways to manage such effects — has proceeded at a much slower pace. Because of the novel properties that emerge at the nano scale, nanomaterials may require more and different information than called for under traditional risk management systems. And given the enormous commercial and societal benefits that may potentially come from this technology, it is likely that nanomaterials, and the products and other applications containing them, will be widely produced and used. Therefore it is especially important to understand and minimize the potential risks.

  5. Nanomaterials and Nanochemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Bréchignac, Catherine; Lahmani, Marcel

    2007-01-01

    Nanomaterials are a fast developing field of research and applications lie in many separate domains, such as in hi-tech (optics, electronics, biology, aeronautics), but also in consumer industries (automotive, concrete, surface treatments (including paints), cosmetics, etc.).

  6. Food decontamination using nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    The research indicates that nanomaterials including nanoemulsions are promising decontamination media for the reduction of food contaminating pathogens. The inhibitory effect of nanoparticles for pathogens could be due to deactivate cellular enzymes and DNA; disrupting of membrane permeability; and/...

  7. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) explores the unique properties of materials and processes at the nanoscale. The CFN is a user-oriented research center...

  8. Carbon-based Fuel Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven S. C. Chuang

    2005-08-31

    The direct use of coal in the solid oxide fuel cell to generate electricity is an innovative concept for power generation. The C-fuel cell (carbon-based fuel cell) could offer significant advantages: (1) minimization of NOx emissions due to its operating temperature range of 700-1000 C, (2) high overall efficiency because of the direct conversion of coal to CO{sub 2}, and (3) the production of a nearly pure CO{sub 2} exhaust stream for the direct CO{sub 2} sequestration. The objective of this project is to determine the technical feasibility of using a highly active anode catalyst in a solid oxide fuel for the direct electrochemical oxidation of coal to produce electricity. Results of this study showed that the electric power generation from Ohio No 5 coal (Lower Kittanning) Seam, Mahoning County, is higher than those of coal gas and pure methane on a solid oxide fuel cell assembly with a promoted metal anode catalyst at 950 C. Further study is needed to test the long term activity, selectivity, and stability of anode catalysts.

  9. Measurement of oxidative damage to DNA in nanomaterial exposed cells and animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Peter; Jensen, Ditte Marie; Christophersen, Daniel Vest

    2015-01-01

    Increased levels of oxidatively damaged DNA have been documented in studies of metal, metal oxide, carbon-based and ceramic engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). In particular, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) is widely assessed as a DNA nucleobase oxidation product, measured...

  10. Direct Dry-Grinding Synthesis of Monodisperse Lipophilic CuS Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yajuan; Scott, Julie; Chen, Yi-Tzai; Guo, Liangran; Zhao, Mingyang; Wang, Xiaodong; Lu, Wei

    2015-07-15

    Copper sulfide nanoparticles, effective absorbers of near-infrared light, are recently attracting broad interest as a photothermal coupling agent for cancer therapy. Lipophilic copper sulfide nanoparticles are preferred for high performance biomedical applications due to high tissue affinity. Synthesis of lipophilic copper sulfide nanoparticles requires complicated multi-step processes under severe conditions. Here, we describe a new synthetic process, developed by direct dry-grinding of copper(II) acetylacetonate with sulfur under ambient environment at low temperature. The formed CuS nanoparticles are of uniform size, ~10 nm in diameter, and are monodispersed in chloroform. Each covellite CuS nanocrystal surface is modified with oleylamine through hydrogen bonding between sulfur atoms and amine groups of oleylamine. The nanoparticles demonstrate near-infrared light absorption for photothermal applications. The synthetic methodology described here is more convenient and less extreme than previous methods, and should thus greatly facilitate the preparation of photothermal lipophilic copper sulfide nanomaterials for cancer therapy.

  11. On-demand one-step synthesis of monodisperse functional polymeric microspheres with droplet microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xu; Cheng, Gong; Zhou, Ming-Da; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2015-04-07

    A simple and robust method for one-step synthesis of monodisperse functional polymeric microspheres was established by generation of reversed microemulsion droplets in aqueous phase inside microfluidic chips and controlled evaporation of the organic solvent. Using this method, water-soluble nanomaterials can be easily encapsulated into biodegradable Poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) to form functional microspheres. By controlling the flow rate of microemulsion phase, PLGA polymeric microspheres with narrow size distribution and diameters in the range of ∼50-100 μm were obtained. As a demonstration of the versatility of the approach, high-quality fluorescent CdTe:Zn(2+) quantum dots (QDs) of various emission spectra, superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles, and water-soluble carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were used to synthesize fluorescent PLGA@QDs, magnetic PLGA@Fe3O4, and PLGA@CNTs polymeric microspheres, respectively. In order to show specific applications, the PLGA@Fe3O4 were modified with polydopamine (PDA), and then the silver nanoparticles grew on the surfaces of the PLGA@Fe3O4@PDA polymeric microspheres by reducting the Ag(+) to Ag(0). The as-prepared PLGA@Fe3O4@PDA-Ag microspheres showed a highly efficient catalytic reduction of the 4-nitrophenol, a highly toxic substance. The monodisperse uniform functional PLGA polymeric microspheres can potentially be critically important for multiple biomedical applications.

  12. Microfluidic Production of Monodisperse Perfluorocarbon Microdroplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, David; Schalte, Kevin; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Bull, Joseph

    2010-11-01

    Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) is process in which liquid perfluorocarbon (PFC) microdroplets are vaporized using focused ultrasound to form gas bubbles that are approximately 125 times larger in volume. Gas embolotherapy is a novel cancer treatment that uses ADV in vivo to strategically form gas emoboli, which can lodge in the microcirculation and starve tumors. Current methods to produce PFC microdroplets, such has high speed shaking or sonication, result in polydisperse droplet distributions where a fraction of droplets fall within the 2-10 microns range. In the clinical application with such a droplet distribution, large droplets are filtered by the lungs and small droplets result in bubbles that are too small to lodge in the tumor vasculature. Consequently, there is a need for a monodisperse droplet distribution. A microfluidic based device has been developed in order to produce such monodisperse PFC microdroplets. The device used hydrodynamic flow focusing to create droplets with a mean diameter less than 10 microns in diameter. This work is supported by NIH grant R01EB006476.

  13. Biological and Pharmaceutical Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Challa S. S. R.

    2006-01-01

    This first comprehensive yet concise overview of all important classes of biological and pharmaceutical nanomaterials presents in one volume the different kinds of natural biological compounds that form nanomaterials or that may be used to purposefully create them. This unique single source of information brings together the many articles published in specialized journals, which often remain unseen by members of other, related disciplines. Covering pharmaceutical, nucleic acid, peptide and DNA-Chitosan nanoparticles, the book focuses on those innovative materials and technologies needed for the continued growth of medicine, healthcare, pharmaceuticals and human wellness. For chemists, biochemists, cell biologists, materials scientists, biologists, and those working in the pharmaceutical and chemical industries.

  14. Nanomaterials for Defense Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turaga, Uday; Singh, Vinitkumar; Lalagiri, Muralidhar; Kiekens, Paul; Ramkumar, Seshadri S.

    Nanotechnology has found a number of applications in electronics and healthcare. Within the textile field, applications of nanotechnology have been limited to filters, protective liners for chemical and biological clothing and nanocoatings. This chapter presents an overview of the applications of nanomaterials such as nanofibers and nanoparticles that are of use to military and industrial sectors. An effort has been made to categorize nanofibers based on the method of production. This chapter particularly focuses on a few latest developments that have taken place with regard to the application of nanomaterials such as metal oxides in the defense arena.

  15. Elongational viscosity of monodisperse and bidisperse polystyrene melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Hassager, Ole

    2006-01-01

    The start-up and steady uniaxial elongational viscosity have been measured for two monodisperse polystyrene melts with molecular weights of 52 and 103 kg/mole, and for three bidisperse polystyrene melts. The monodisperse melts show a maximum in the steady elongational viscosity vs. the elongation...

  16. From Carbon-Based Nanotubes to Nanocages for Advanced Energy Conversion and Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiang; Yang, Lijun; Wang, Xizhang; Hu, Zheng

    2017-02-21

    Carbon-based nanomaterials have been the focus of research interests in the past 30 years due to their abundant microstructures and morphologies, excellent properties, and wide potential applications, as landmarked by 0D fullerene, 1D nanotubes, and 2D graphene. With the availability of high specific surface area (SSA), well-balanced pore distribution, high conductivity, and tunable wettability, carbon-based nanomaterials are highly expected as advanced materials for energy conversion and storage to meet the increasing demands for clean and renewable energies. In this context, attention is usually attracted by the star material of graphene in recent years. In this Account, we overview our studies on carbon-based nanotubes to nanocages for energy conversion and storage, including their synthesis, performances, and related mechanisms. The two carbon nanostructures have the common features of interior cavity, high conductivity, and easy doping but much different SSAs and pore distributions, leading to different performances. We demonstrated a six-membered-ring-based growth mechanism of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with benzene precursor based on the structural similarity of the benzene ring to the building unit of CNTs. By this mechanism, nitrogen-doped CNTs (NCNTs) with homogeneous N distribution and predominant pyridinic N were obtained with pyridine precursor, providing a new kind of support for convenient surface functionalization via N-participation. Accordingly, various transition-metal nanoparticles were directly immobilized onto NCNTs without premodification. The so-constructed catalysts featured high dispersion, narrow size distribution and tunable composition, which presented superior catalytic performances for energy conversions, for example, the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and methanol oxidation in fuel cells. With the advent of the new field of carbon-based metal-free electrocatalysts, we first extended ORR catalysts from the electron-rich N-doped to the

  17. Intracellular signal modulation by nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Salik; Garantziotis, Stavros; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Baeza-Squiban, Armelle; Boland, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the interactions of nanomaterials with biological systems and the resulting activation of signal transduction pathways is essential for the development of safe and consumer friendly nanotechnology. Here we present an overview of signaling pathways induced by nanomaterial exposures and describe the possible correlation of their physicochemical characteristics with biological outcomes. In addition to the hierarchical oxidative stress model and a review of the intrinsic and cell-mediated mechanisms of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating capacities of nanomaterials, we also discuss other oxidative stress dependent and independent cellular signaling pathways. Induction of the inflammasome, calcium signaling, and endoplasmic reticulum stress are reviewed. Furthermore, the uptake mechanisms can be of crucial importance for the cytotoxicity of nanomaterials and membrane-dependent signaling pathways have also been shown to be responsible for cellular effects of nanomaterials. Epigenetic regulation by nanomaterials, effects of nanoparticle-protein interactions on cell signaling pathways, and the induction of various cell death modalities by nanomaterials are described. We describe the common trigger mechanisms shared by various nanomaterials to induce cell death pathways and describe the interplay of different modalities in orchestrating the final outcome after nanomaterial exposures. A better understanding of signal modulations induced by nanomaterials is not only essential for the synthesis and design of safer nanomaterials but will also help to discover potential nanomedical applications of these materials. Several biomedical applications based on the different signaling pathways induced by nanomaterials are already proposed and will certainly gain a great deal of attraction in the near future.

  18. Magnetic Nanomaterials and Their Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurii K. Gun'ko

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This Special Issue of Nanomaterials is dedicated to the development of new magnetic nanomaterials and their applications in biomedicine, catalysis, spintronics and other areas. The publications in this Issue demonstrate that the interest in magnetic nanomaterials is continuously growing and their realm is expanding rapidly. Some highlights of the publications in this issue are discussed below. [...

  19. Two-Dimensional Nanomaterials for Biomedical Applications: Emerging Trends and Future Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimene, David; Alge, Daniel L; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K

    2015-12-02

    Two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials are ultrathin nanomaterials with a high degree of anisotropy and chemical functionality. Research on 2D nanomaterials is still in its infancy, with the majority of research focusing on elucidating unique material characteristics and few reports focusing on biomedical applications of 2D nanomaterials. Nevertheless, recent rapid advances in 2D nanomaterials have raised important and exciting questions about their interactions with biological moieties. 2D nanoparticles such as carbon-based 2D materials, silicate clays, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), and transition metal oxides (TMOs) provide enhanced physical, chemical, and biological functionality owing to their uniform shapes, high surface-to-volume ratios, and surface charge. Here, we focus on state-of-the-art biomedical applications of 2D nanomaterials as well as recent developments that are shaping this emerging field. Specifically, we describe the unique characteristics that make 2D nanoparticles so valuable, as well as the biocompatibility framework that has been investigated so far. Finally, to both capture the growing trend of 2D nanomaterials for biomedical applications and to identify promising new research directions, we provide a critical evaluation of potential applications of recently developed 2D nanomaterials.

  20. Engineered Carbon-Nanomaterial-Based Electrochemical Sensors for Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Jitendra N; Vij, Varun; Kemp, K Christian; Kim, Kwang S

    2016-01-26

    The study of electrochemical behavior of bioactive molecules has become one of the most rapidly developing scientific fields. Biotechnology and biomedical engineering fields have a vested interest in constructing more precise and accurate voltammetric/amperometric biosensors. One rapidly growing area of biosensor design involves incorporation of carbon-based nanomaterials in working electrodes, such as one-dimensional carbon nanotubes, two-dimensional graphene, and graphene oxide. In this review article, we give a brief overview describing the voltammetric techniques and how these techniques are applied in biosensing, as well as the details surrounding important biosensing concepts of sensitivity and limits of detection. Building on these important concepts, we show how the sensitivity and limit of detection can be tuned by including carbon-based nanomaterials in the fabrication of biosensors. The sensing of biomolecules including glucose, dopamine, proteins, enzymes, uric acid, DNA, RNA, and H2O2 traditionally employs enzymes in detection; however, these enzymes denature easily, and as such, enzymeless methods are highly desired. Here we draw an important distinction between enzymeless and enzyme-containing carbon-nanomaterial-based biosensors. The review ends with an outlook of future concepts that can be employed in biosensor fabrication, as well as limitations of already proposed materials and how such sensing can be enhanced. As such, this review can act as a roadmap to guide researchers toward concepts that can be employed in the design of next generation biosensors, while also highlighting the current advancements in the field.

  1. Predictive tests to evaluate oxidative potential of engineered nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiazza, Mara; Carella, Emanuele; Oliaro-Bosso, Simonetta; Corazzari, Ingrid; Viola, Franca; Fenoglio, Ivana

    2013-04-01

    Oxidative stress constitutes one of the principal injury mechanisms through which particulate toxicants (asbestos, crystalline silica, hard metals) and engineered nanomaterials can induce adverse health effects. ROS may be generated indirectly by activated cells and/or directly at the surface of the material. The occurrence of these processes depends upon the type of material. Many authors have recently demonstrated that metal oxides and carbon-based nanoparticles may influence (increasing or decreasing) the generation of oxygen radicals in a cell environment. Metal oxide, such as iron oxides, crystalline silica, and titanium dioxide are able to generate free radicals via different mechanisms causing an imbalance within oxidant species. The increase of ROS species may lead to inflammatory responses and in some cases to the development of cancer. On the other hand carbon-based nanomaterials, such as fullerene, carbon nanotubes, carbon black as well as cerium dioxide are able to scavenge the free radicals generated acting as antioxidant. The high numbers of new-engineered nanomaterials, which are introduced in the market, are exponentially increasing. Therefore the definition of toxicological strategies is urgently needed. The development of acellular screening tests will make possible the reduction of the number of in vitro and in vivo tests to be performed. An integrated protocol that may be used to predict the oxidant/antioxidant potential of engineered nanoparticles will be here presented.

  2. Multiscale experimental mechanics of hierarchical carbon-based materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Horacio D; Filleter, Tobin; Naraghi, Mohammad

    2012-06-05

    Investigation of the mechanics of natural materials, such as spider silk, abalone shells, and bone, has provided great insight into the design of materials that can simultaneously achieve high specific strength and toughness. Research has shown that their emergent mechanical properties are owed in part to their specific self-organization in hierarchical molecular structures, from nanoscale to macroscale, as well as their mixing and bonding. To apply these findings to manmade materials, researchers have devoted significant efforts in developing a fundamental understanding of multiscale mechanics of materials and its application to the design of novel materials with superior mechanical performance. These efforts included the utilization of some of the most promising carbon-based nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes, carbon nanofibers, and graphene, together with a variety of matrix materials. At the core of these efforts lies the need to characterize material mechanical behavior across multiple length scales starting from nanoscale characterization of constituents and their interactions to emerging micro- and macroscale properties. In this report, progress made in experimental tools and methods currently used for material characterization across multiple length scales is reviewed, as well as a discussion of how they have impacted our current understanding of the mechanics of hierarchical carbon-based materials. In addition, insight is provided into strategies for bridging experiments across length scales, which are essential in establishing a multiscale characterization approach. While the focus of this progress report is in experimental methods, their concerted use with theoretical-computational approaches towards the establishment of a robust material by design methodology is also discussed, which can pave the way for the development of novel materials possessing unprecedented mechanical properties.

  3. Synthesis, properties and biomedical applications of carbon-based quantum dots: An updated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namdari, Pooria; Negahdari, Babak; Eatemadi, Ali

    2017-03-01

    Carbon-based quantum dots (CQDs) are a newly developed class of carbon nano-materials that have attracted much interest and attention as promising competitors to already available semiconductor quantum dots owing to their un-comparable and unique properties. In addition, controllability of CQDs unique physiochemical properties is as a result of their surface passivation and functionalization. This is an update article (between 2013 and 2016) on the recent progress, characteristics and synthesis methods of CQDs and different advantages in varieties of applications.

  4. Nanomaterial disposal by incineration

    Science.gov (United States)

    As nanotechnology-based products enter into widespread use, nanomaterials will end up in disposal waste streams that are ultimately discharged to the environment. One possible end-of-life scenario is incineration. This review attempts to ascertain the potential pathways by which ...

  5. Toxicity of nanomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharifi, Shahriar; Behzadi, Shahed; Laurent, Sophie; Forrest, M. Laird; Stroeve, Pieter; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2012-01-01

    Nanoscience has matured significantly during the last decade as it has transitioned from bench top science to applied technology. Presently, nanomaterials are used in a wide variety of commercial products such as electronic components, sports equipment, sun creams and biomedical applications. There

  6. Toxicity of nanomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharifi, Shahriar; Behzadi, Shahed; Laurent, Sophie; Forrest, M. Laird; Stroeve, Pieter; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2012-01-01

    Nanoscience has matured significantly during the last decade as it has transitioned from bench top science to applied technology. Presently, nanomaterials are used in a wide variety of commercial products such as electronic components, sports equipment, sun creams and biomedical applications. There

  7. Nanomaterials for reducing amyloid cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Mao, Xiaobo; Yu, Yue; Wang, Chen-Xuan; Yang, Yan-Lian; Wang, Chen

    2013-07-26

    This review is intended to reflect the recent progress on therapeutic applications of nanomaterials in amyloid diseases. The progress on anti-amyloid functions of various nanomaterials including inorganic nanoparticles, polymeric nanoparticles, carbon nanomaterials and biomolecular aggregates, is reviewed and discussed. The main functionalization strategies for general nanoparticle modifications are reviewed for potential applications of targeted therapeutics. The interaction mechanisms between amyloid peptides and nanomaterials are discussed from the perspectives of dominant interactions and kinetics. The encapsulation of anti-amyloid drugs, targeted drug delivery, controlled drug release and drug delivery crossing blood brain barrier by application of nanomaterials would also improve the therapeutics of amyloid diseases.

  8. Synthesis of monodisperse crosslinked polystyrene microspheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Kai; Chen Sheng-Li; Dong Peng; Liu Renxiao

    2008-01-01

    Monodisperse crosslinked polystyrene (CPS) particles were prepared through the normal emulsion polymerization method by adding crosslinker-divinylbenzene (DVB) into the reaction system after polystyrene (PS) particles grew to ~80% of the final size. When the amount of crosslinker DVB added was less than 6.17 wt% based on styrene, the prepared CPS particles were spherical and uniform and the size of the CPS particles could be predicted through the normal emulsion method. The glass transition temperature (Tg) of the prepared CPS particles was higher than that of un-crosslinked PS particles and, the more crosslinker that was added, the higher the Tg of CPS Particles. The prepared CPS particles had strong resistance to organic solvents.

  9. Monodisperse microdroplet generation and stopping without coalescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2016-02-23

    A system for monodispersed microdroplet generation and trapping including providing a flow channel in a microchip; producing microdroplets in the flow channel, the microdroplets movable in the flow channel; providing carrier fluid in the flow channel using a pump or pressure source; controlling movement of the microdroplets in the flow channel and trapping the microdroplets in a desired location in the flow channel. The system includes a microchip; a flow channel in the microchip; a droplet maker that generates microdroplets, the droplet maker connected to the flow channel; a carrier fluid in the flow channel, the carrier fluid introduced to the flow channel by a source of carrier fluid, the source of carrier fluid including a pump or pressure source; a valve connected to the carrier fluid that controls flow of the carrier fluid and enables trapping of the microdroplets.

  10. Theranostic applications of carbon nanomaterials in cancer: Focus on imaging and cargo delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Daiqin; Dougherty, Casey A; Zhu, Kaicheng; Hong, Hao

    2015-07-28

    Carbon based nanomaterials have attracted significant attention over the past decades due to their unique physical properties, versatile functionalization chemistry, and biological compatibility. In this review, we will summarize the current state-of-the-art applications of carbon nanomaterials in cancer imaging and drug delivery/therapy. The carbon nanomaterials will be categorized into fullerenes, nanotubes, nanohorns, nanodiamonds, nanodots and graphene derivatives based on their morphologies. The chemical conjugation/functionalization strategies of each category will be introduced before focusing on their applications in cancer imaging (fluorescence/bioluminescence, magnetic resonance (MR), positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), photoacoustic, Raman imaging, etc.) and cargo (chemo/gene/therapy) delivery. The advantages and limitations of each category and the potential clinical utilization of these carbon nanomaterials will be discussed. Multifunctional carbon nanoplatforms have the potential to serve as optimal candidates for image-guided delivery vectors for cancer.

  11. Modeling of nanotoxicity molecular interactions of nanomaterials with bionanomachines

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Ruhong

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of the fundamentals of nanotoxicity modeling and its implications for the development of novel nanomedicines. It lays out the fundamentals of nanotoxicity modeling for an array of nanomaterial systems, ranging from carbon-based nanoparticles to noble metals, metal oxides, and quantum dots. The author illustrates how molecular (classical mechanics) and atomic (quantum mechanics) modeling approaches can be applied to bolster our understanding of many important aspects of this critical nanotoxicity issue. Each chapter is organized by types of nanomaterials for practicality, making this an ideal book for senior undergraduate students, graduate students, and researchers in nanotechnology, chemistry, physics, molecular biology, and computer science. It is also of interest to academic and industry professionals who work on nanodrug delivery and related biomedical applications, and aids readers in their biocompatibility assessment efforts in the coming age of nanotechnology...

  12. CE and nanomaterials - Part II: Nanomaterials in CE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Vojtech; Vaculovicova, Marketa

    2017-10-01

    The scope of this two-part review is to summarize publications dealing with CE and nanomaterials together. This topic can be viewed from two broad perspectives, and this article is trying to highlight these two approaches: (i) CE of nanomaterials, and (ii) nanomaterials in CE. The second part aims at summarization of publications dealing with application of nanomaterials for enhancement of CE performance either in terms of increasing the separation resolution or for improvement of the detection. To increase the resolution, nanomaterials are employed as either surface modification of the capillary wall forming open tubular column or as additives to the separation electrolyte resulting in a pseudostationary phase. Moreover, nanomaterials have proven to be very beneficial for increasing also the sensitivity of detection employed in CE or even they enable the detection (e.g., fluorescent tags of nonfluorescent molecules). © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Soft bioelectronics using nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunjae; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2016-09-01

    Recently, soft bioelectronics has attracted significant attention because of its potential applications in biointegrated healthcare devices and minimally invasive surgical tools. Mechanical mismatch between conventional electronic/optoelectronic devices and soft human tissues/organs, however, causes many challenges in materials and device designs of bio-integrated devices. Intrinsically soft hybrid materials comprising twodimensional nanomaterials are utilized to solve these issues. In this paper, we describe soft bioelectronic devices based on graphene synthesized by a chemical vapor deposition process. These devices have unique advantages over rigid electronics, particularly in biomedical applications. The functionalized graphene is hybridized with other nanomaterials and fabricated into high-performance sensors and actuators toward wearable and minimally invasive healthcare devices. Integrated bioelectronic systems constructed using these devices solve pending issues in clinical medicine while providing new opportunities in personalized healthcare.

  14. Multi-functional carbon nanomaterials: Tailoring morphology for multidisciplinary applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dervishi, Enkeleda [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-05-14

    Carbon based nanomaterials are being developed to have many new properties and applications. Graphene, is a mono-layer 2D atomic thick structure formed from hexagons of carbon atoms bound together by sp^2hybrid bonds. A carbon nanotube (CNT) can be viewed as a sheet of graphene rolled up into a cylinder, usually 1-2 nanometers in diameter and a few microns thick. A few applications of graphene and carbon nanotubes include the development of Nanoelectronics, nanocomposite materials, Hydrogen storage and Li⁺ battery, etc.

  15. Nanomaterials in Electrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    of the polymer. 46. C. R. Martin, D. T. Mitchell, and J. C. Hulteen, Anal. Chem., Submitted. 47. D. Linden , Handbook of Batteries t2ndV New York...nanoparticles of Li+-intercalation materials for possible use as electrodes in Li-ion batteries . 14. Subject terms: Nanomaterials, electrochemistry...for possible use as electrodes in Li+ batteries . II. Ensembles of Nanoscopic Electrodes. Electrochemistry at electrodes with nanoscopic dimensions

  16. Nanomaterials in ecotoxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott-Fordsmand, Janeck James; Krogh, Paul Henning; Lead, Jamie M

    2008-01-01

    In ecotoxicology, a problem exists of quantifying real exposure and corresponding effects, especially in complex environments such as the soil. Hence, for a given total soil concentration to which the organism is exposed, the effect level depends on the available fraction and the chemical status ...... ion activity models (FlAM) and biotic ligand models (BLM). Quantification and characterization of actual exposure is also of concern for nanomaterial and nanoparticle (NP) terrestrial ecotoxicology...

  17. Nanomaterials in ecotoxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott-Fordsmand, Janeck James; Krogh, Paul Henning; Lead, Jamie M

    2008-01-01

    In ecotoxicology, a problem exists of quantifying real exposure and corresponding effects, especially in complex environments such as the soil. Hence, for a given total soil concentration to which the organism is exposed, the effect level depends on the available fraction and the chemical status ...... ion activity models (FlAM) and biotic ligand models (BLM). Quantification and characterization of actual exposure is also of concern for nanomaterial and nanoparticle (NP) terrestrial ecotoxicology...

  18. Graphene, carbon nanotubes, zinc oxide and gold as elite nanomaterials for fabrication of biosensors for healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Ahlawat, Wandit; Kumar, Rajesh; Dilbaghi, Neeraj

    2015-08-15

    Technological advancements worldwide at rapid pace in the area of materials science and nanotechnology have made it possible to synthesize nanoparticles with desirable properties not exhibited by the bulk material. Among variety of available nanomaterials, graphene, carbon nanotubes, zinc oxide and gold nanopartilces proved to be elite and offered amazing electrochemical biosensing. This encourages us to write a review which highlights the recent achievements in the construction of genosensor, immunosensor and enzymatic biosensor based on the above nanomaterials. Carbon based nanomaterials offers a direct electron transfer between the functionalized nanomaterials and active site of bioreceptor without involvement of any mediator which not only amplifies the signal but also provide label free sensing. Gold shows affinity towards immunological molecules and is most routinely used for immunological sensing. Zinc oxide can easily immobilize proteins and hence offers a large group of enzyme based biosensor. Modification of the working electrode by introduction of these nanomaterials or combination of two/three of above nanomaterials together and forming a nanocomposite reflected the best results with excellent stability, reproducibility and enhanced sensitivity. Highly attractive electrochemical properties and electrocatalytic activity of these elite nanomaterials have facilitated achievement of enhanced signal amplification needed for the construction of ultrasensitive electrochemical affinity biosensors for detection of glucose, cholesterol, Escherichia coli, influenza virus, cancer, human papillomavirus, dopamine, glutamic acid, IgG, IgE, uric acid, ascorbic acid, acetlycholine, cortisol, cytosome, sequence specific DNA and amino acids. Recent researches for bedside biosensors are also discussed.

  19. Facile Method for Preparation of Silica Coated Monodisperse Superparamagnetic Microspheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan-Hung Pham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a facile method for preparation of silica coated monodisperse superparamagnetic microsphere. Herein, monodisperse porous polystyrene-divinylbenzene microbeads were prepared by seeded emulsion polymerization and subsequently sulfonated with acetic acid/H2SO4. The as-prepared sulfonated macroporous beads were magnetized in presence of Fe2+/Fe3+ under alkaline condition and were subjected to silica coating by sol-gel process, providing water compatibility, easily modifiable surface form, and chemical stability. FE-SEM, TEM, FT-IR, and TGA were employed to characterize the silica coated monodisperse magnetic beads (~7.5 μm. The proposed monodisperse magnetic beads can be used as mobile solid phase particles candidate for protein and DNA separation.

  20. Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The CFN at Brookhaven National Laboratory focuses on understanding the chemical and physical response of nanomaterials to make functional materials such as sensors,...

  1. Manipulation the properties of supramolecular hydrogels of α-cyclodextrin/Tyloxapol/carbon-based nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jinglin; Xin, Xia; Liu, Teng; Tong, Lu; Xu, Guiying; Yuan, Shiling

    2016-04-15

    Supermolecular hydrogels were prepared by α-cyclodeatrin (α-CD) and Tyloxapol, which can be considered as an oligomer of the nonionic surfactant polyoxyethylene tert-octylphenyl ether (TX-100) with a polymerization degree below 7. Two carbon materials, graphene oxide (GO) and graphene, were mixed into the α-CD/Tyloxapol hydrogel to adjust the physicochemical properties of hydrogel. In order to get stable graphene dispersion and then mix it with α-CD/Tyloxapol hydrogel, both TX-100 and Tyloxapol were used to disperse graphene for comparison. Interestingly, it can be found that TX-100 could disperse graphene better than Tyloxapol owing to smaller molecular size of TX-100 compared with Tyloxapol. Then, both the α-CD/Tyloxapol/GO and α-CD/Tyloxapol/graphene hydrogels were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and rheological measurements. The results revealed that the addition of carbon materials into α-CD/Tyloxapol hydrogel can change their microstructures and the rheological properties. Furthermore, it can be confirmed that a little amount of carbon materials could induce fluorescence quenching sharply which could be a promising candidate for optical sensor.

  2. Recent progress on carbon-based superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubozono, Yoshihiro; Eguchi, Ritsuko; Goto, Hidenori; Hamao, Shino; Kambe, Takashi; Terao, Takahiro; Nishiyama, Saki; Zheng, Lu; Miao, Xiao; Okamoto, Hideki

    2016-08-24

    This article reviews new superconducting phases of carbon-based materials. During the past decade, new carbon-based superconductors have been extensively developed through the use of intercalation chemistry, electrostatic carrier doping, and surface-proving techniques. The superconducting transition temperature T c of these materials has been rapidly elevated, and the variety of superconductors has been increased. This review fully introduces graphite, graphene, and hydrocarbon superconductors and future perspectives of high-T c superconductors based on these materials, including present problems. Carbon-based superconductors show various types of interesting behavior, such as a positive pressure dependence of T c. At present, experimental information on superconductors is still insufficient, and theoretical treatment is also incomplete. In particular, experimental results are still lacking for graphene and hydrocarbon superconductors. Therefore, it is very important to review experimental results in detail and introduce theoretical approaches, for the sake of advances in condensed matter physics. Furthermore, the recent experimental results on hydrocarbon superconductors obtained by our group are also included in this article. Consequently, this review article may provide a hint to designing new carbon-based superconductors exhibiting higher T c and interesting physical features.

  3. Biomedical nanomaterials from design to implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Webster, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Biomedical Nanomaterials brings together the engineering applications and challenges of using nanostructured surfaces and nanomaterials in healthcare in a single source. Each chapter covers important and new information in the biomedical applications of nanomaterials.

  4. Nonlinear absorption and optical damage threshold of carbon-based nanostructured material embedded in a protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janulewicz, K. A.; Hapiddin, A.; Joseph, D.; Geckeler, K. E.; Sung, J. H.; Nickles, P. V.

    2014-12-01

    Physical processes in laser-matter interaction used to be determined by generation of fast electrons resulting from efficient conversion of the absorbed laser radiation. Composite materials offer the possibility to control the absorption by choice of the host material and dopants. Reported here strong absorption of ultrashort laser pulse in a composite carbon-based nanomaterial including single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) or multilayer graphene was measured in the intensity range between 1012 and 1016 W cm-2. A protein (lysozyme) was used as the host. The maximum absorption of femtosecond laser pulse has reached 92-96 %. The optical damage thresholds of the coatings were registered at an intensity of (1.1 ± 0.5) × 1013 W cm-2 for the embedded SWCNTs and at (3.4 ± 0.3) × 1013 W cm-2 for the embedded graphene. Encapsulated variant of the dispersed nanomaterial was investigated as well. It was found that supernatant protein in the coating material tends to dominate the absorption process, independently of the embedded nanomaterial. The opposite was observed for the encapsulated material.

  5. Electrocatalysis at metal nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lin

    Direct liquid fuel cells, such as direct methanol fuel cells and direct formic acid fuel cells, have attracted much attention in the past decades due to the need of clean and efficient power sources. One of the most critical issues in the development of highly efficient fuel cells is to increase the rates of fuel-cell reactions as a commercial product. As a result, the topic of electrocatalysis plays a significant role in the investigations of fuel cell reactions. For methanol oxidation, platinum based nanomaterials are the most important catalysts. For formic acid oxidation, both platinum and palladium based nanomaterials are widely employed as the catalysts. Recently, shape-control of the nanoparticles has become an imperative task due to the fact that most of the reactions in fuel cells are sensitive to the surface structure of the catalysts. Though numerous studies have been conducted in past to elucidate the catalytic activity on the nanomaterials with different shapes, the results are inconclusive. Herein, systematic comparison of catalytic activity toward methanol and formic acid oxidation on shape-controlled cubic platinum-based alloy nanoparticles with different alloy element are reported in this dissertation. Methanol and formic acid oxidation reactions on spherical and cubic Pt-Cu nanoparticles are also studied. Cu-Pd nanoparticles are synthesized through galvanic redox reactions to provide significantly higher and much more stable formic acid oxidation activities. Interparticle distance effect is investigated on two dimensional nanoparticle array electrodes with controlled particle size, which is ideal model system for exploring the interparticle distance effects on the voltammetric behavior and reaction mechanisms.

  6. Nanomaterial-Based Electrochemical Biosensors and Bioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guodong; Mao, Xun; Gurung, Anant; Baloda, Meenu; Lin, Yuehe; He, Yuqing

    2010-08-31

    This book chapter summarizes the recent advance in nanomaterials for electrochemical biosensors and bioassays. Biofunctionalization of nanomaterials for biosensors fabrication and their biomedical applications are discussed.

  7. Nanomaterials design and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Balbuena, Perla

    2006-01-01

    Over the past few decades, several approaches have been developed for designing nano-structured or molecularly-structured materials. These advances have revolutionized practically all fields of science and engineering, providing an additional design variable, the feature size of the nano-structures, which can be tailored to provide new materials with very special characteristics. Nanomaterials: Design and Simulation explores the role that such advances have made toward a rational design of nanostructures and covers a variety of methods from ab initio electronic structure techniques, ab initio

  8. Biological Interactions of Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    mg Inositol, 4.4 mg Folic acid , 2 mLs β-mercaptoethanol, 5 mL L- glutamine, 0.75 g sodium bicarbonate, 62.5 mL Horse serum, 62.5mL FBS normal. The...research acquired the fundamental knowledge needed to improve understanding of nano-bio interaction mechanisms and provided in-depth analyses of...corresponding effects on biological systems. This knowledge will help to improve nanomaterial safety strategies for the protection of both human and

  9. Nanomaterials in catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Serp, Philippe; Somorjai, Gabor A; Chaudret, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Nanocatalysis has emerged as a field at the interface between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis and offers unique solutions to the demanding requirements for catalyst improvement. Heterogeneous catalysis represents one of the oldest commercial applications of nanoscience and nanoparticles of metals, semiconductors, oxides, and other compounds have been widely used for important chemical reactions. The main focus of this fi eld is the development of well-defined catalysts, which may include both metal nanoparticles and a nanomaterial as the support. These nanocatalysts should display the

  10. LCA of metal nanomaterial production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miseljic, Mirko; Diaz, Elsa Gabriela Alvarado; Olsen, Stig Irving

    The use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in commercial product has reached a new stage, where consumers in their daily life are frequently encountered with products containing this new material class. Metal and metal-oxide nanomaterials are among the most commonly used ENMs in products. Potential...

  11. React now regarding nanomaterial regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steffen Foss

    2017-01-01

    The time has come to implement a regulatory framework tailored to manufactured materials. I propose a new legislative framework that combines registration, evaluation, authorization and categorization of nanomaterials.......The time has come to implement a regulatory framework tailored to manufactured materials. I propose a new legislative framework that combines registration, evaluation, authorization and categorization of nanomaterials....

  12. Carbon-Based Adsorbents for Postcombustion CO2 Capture: A Critical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creamer, Anne Elise; Gao, Bin

    2016-07-19

    The persistent increase in atmospheric CO2 from anthropogenic sources makes research directed toward carbon capture and storage imperative. Current liquid amine absorption technology has several drawbacks including hazardous byproducts and a high-energy requirement for regeneration; therefore, research is ongoing to develop more practical methods for capturing CO2 in postcombustion scenarios. The unique properties of carbon-based materials make them specifically promising for CO2 adsorption at low temperature and moderate to high partial pressure. This critical review aims to highlight the development of carbon-based solid sorbents for postcombustion CO2 capture. Specifically, it provides an overview of postcombustion CO2 capture processes with solid adsorbents and discusses a variety of carbon-based materials that could be used. This review focuses on low-cost pyrogenic carbon, activated carbon (AC), and metal-carbon composites for CO2 capture. Further, it touches upon the recent progress made to develop metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and carbon nanomaterials and their general CO2 sorption potential.

  13. Rapid enumeration of phage in monodisperse emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjhung, Katrina F; Burnham, Sean; Anany, Hany; Griffiths, Mansel W; Derda, Ratmir

    2014-06-17

    Phage-based detection assays have been developed for the detection of viable bacteria for applications in clinical diagnosis, monitoring of water quality, and food safety. The majority of these assays deliver a positive readout in the form of newly generated progeny phages by the bacterial host of interest. Progeny phages are often visualized as plaques, or holes, in a lawn of bacteria on an agar-filled Petri dish; however, this rate-limiting step requires up to 12 h of incubation time. We have previously described an amplification of bacteriophages M13 inside droplets of media suspended in perfluorinated oil; a single phage M13 in a droplet yields 10(7) copies in 3-4 h. Here, we describe that encapsulation of reporter phages, both lytic T4-LacZ and nonlytic M13, in monodisperse droplets can also be used for rapid enumeration of phage. Compartmentalization in droplets accelerated the development of the signal from the reporter enzyme; counting of "positive" droplets yields accurate enumeration of phage particles ranging from 10(2) to 10(6) pfu/mL. For enumeration of T4-LacZ phage, the fluorescent signal appeared in as little as 90 min. Unlike bulk assays, quantification in emulsion is robust and insensitive to fluctuations in environmental conditions (e.g., temperature). Power-free emulsification using gravity-driven flow in the absence of syringe pumps and portable fluorescence imaging solutions makes this technology promising for use at the point of care in low-resource environments. This droplet-based phage enumeration method could accelerate and simplify point-of-care detection of the pathogens for which reporter bacteriophages have been developed.

  14. Monodispersed calcium carbonate nanoparticles modulate local pH and inhibit tumor growth in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Som, Avik; Raliya, Ramesh; Tian, Limei; Akers, Walter; Ippolito, Joseph E.; Singamaneni, Srikanth; Biswas, Pratim; Achilefu, Samuel

    2016-06-01

    The acidic extracellular environment of tumors potentiates their aggressiveness and metastasis, but few methods exist to selectively modulate the extracellular pH (pHe) environment of tumors. Transient flushing of biological systems with alkaline fluids or proton pump inhibitors is impractical and nonselective. Here we report a nanoparticles-based strategy to intentionally modulate the pHe in tumors. Biochemical simulations indicate that the dissolution of calcium carbonate nanoparticles (nano-CaCO3) in vivo increases pH asymptotically to 7.4. We developed two independent facile methods to synthesize monodisperse non-doped vaterite nano-CaCO3 with distinct size range between 20 and 300 nm. Using murine models of cancer, we demonstrate that the selective accumulation of nano-CaCO3 in tumors increases tumor pH over time. The associated induction of tumor growth stasis is putatively interpreted as a pHe increase. This study establishes an approach to prepare nano-CaCO3 over a wide particle size range, a formulation that stabilizes the nanomaterials in aqueous solutions, and a pH-sensitive nano-platform capable of modulating the acidic environment of cancer for potential therapeutic benefits.The acidic extracellular environment of tumors potentiates their aggressiveness and metastasis, but few methods exist to selectively modulate the extracellular pH (pHe) environment of tumors. Transient flushing of biological systems with alkaline fluids or proton pump inhibitors is impractical and nonselective. Here we report a nanoparticles-based strategy to intentionally modulate the pHe in tumors. Biochemical simulations indicate that the dissolution of calcium carbonate nanoparticles (nano-CaCO3) in vivo increases pH asymptotically to 7.4. We developed two independent facile methods to synthesize monodisperse non-doped vaterite nano-CaCO3 with distinct size range between 20 and 300 nm. Using murine models of cancer, we demonstrate that the selective accumulation of nano-CaCO3

  15. Carbon Nanomaterials as Antibacterial Colloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Maas

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanomaterials like graphene, carbon nanotubes, fullerenes and the various forms of diamond have attracted great attention for their vast potential regarding applications in electrical engineering and as biomaterials. The study of the antibacterial properties of carbon nanomaterials provides fundamental information on the possible toxicity and environmental impact of these materials. Furthermore, as a result of the increasing prevalence of resistant bacteria strains, the development of novel antibacterial materials is of great importance. This article reviews current research efforts on characterizing the antibacterial activity of carbon nanomaterials from the perspective of colloid and interface science. Building on these fundamental findings, recent functionalization strategies for enhancing the antibacterial effect of carbon nanomaterials are described. The review concludes with a comprehensive outlook that summarizes the most important discoveries and trends regarding antibacterial carbon nanomaterials.

  16. Nanomaterials promise better bone repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qifei Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials mimicking the nano-features of bones and offering unique smart functions are promising for better bone fracture repair. This review provides an overview of the current state-of-the-art research in developing and using nanomaterials for better bone fracture repair. This review begins with a brief introduction of bone fracture repair processes, then discusses the importance of vascularization, the role of growth factors in bone fracture repair, and the failure of bone fracture repair. Next, the review discusses the applications of nanomaterials for bone fracture repair, with a focus on the recent breakthroughs such as nanomaterials leading to precise immobilization of growth factors at the molecular level, promoting vascularization without the use of growth factors, and re-loading therapeutic agents after implantation. The review concludes with perspectives on challenges and future directions for developing nanomaterials for improved bone fracture repair.

  17. MAPLE deposition of nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caricato, A.P., E-mail: annapaola.caricato@le.infn.it [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Arima, V.; Catalano, M. [National Nanotechnology Laboratory (NNL), CNR Istituto Nanoscienze, c/o Distretto Tecnologico, Via Arnesano n. 16, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Cesaria, M. [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Cozzoli, P.D. [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); National Nanotechnology Laboratory (NNL), CNR Istituto Nanoscienze, c/o Distretto Tecnologico, Via Arnesano n. 16, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Martino, M. [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Taurino, A.; Rella, R. [Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems, IMM-CNR, Via Monteroni, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Scarfiello, R. [National Nanotechnology Laboratory (NNL), CNR Istituto Nanoscienze, c/o Distretto Tecnologico, Via Arnesano n. 16, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Tunno, T. [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Zacheo, A. [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); National Nanotechnology Laboratory (NNL), CNR Istituto Nanoscienze, c/o Distretto Tecnologico, Via Arnesano n. 16, I-73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2014-05-01

    The matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) has been recently exploited for depositing films of nanomaterials by combining the advantages of colloidal inorganic nanoparticles and laser-based techniques. MAPLE-deposition of nanomaterials meeting applicative purposes demands their peculiar properties to be taken into account while planning depositions to guarantee a congruent transfer (in terms of crystal structure and geometric features) and explain the deposition outcome. In particular, since nanofluids can enhance thermal conductivity with respect to conventional fluids, laser-induced heating can induce different ablation thermal regimes as compared to the MAPLE-treatment of soft materials. Moreover, nanoparticles exhibit lower melting temperatures and can experience pre-melting phenomena as compared to their bulk counterparts, which could easily induce shape and or crystal phase modification of the material to be deposited even at very low fluences. In this complex scenario, this review paper focuses on examples of MAPLE-depositions of size and shape controlled nanoparticles for different applications highlights advantages and challenges of the MAPLE-technique. The influence of the deposition parameters on the physical mechanisms which govern the deposition process is discussed.

  18. Nanomaterials and Chemical Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukumar BASU

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials and nanosensors are two most important iconic words of the modern science & Technology. Though nano technology is relatively a new area of research & development it will soon be included in the most modern electronic circuitry used for advanced computing systems. Since it will provide the potential link between the nanotechnology and the macroscopic world the development is primarily directed towards exploitation of nanotechnology to computer chip miniaturization and vast storage capacity. However, for implementation in the consumer products the present high cost of production must be overcome. There are different ways to make nanosensors e.g. top-down lithography, bottom-up assembly, and self molecular assembly. Consequently, nanomaterials & nanosensors have to be made compatible with the consumer technologies. The progress in detecting and sensing different chemical species with increased accuracy may transform the human society from uncertainty and inaccuracy to more precise and definite world of information. For example, extremely low concentrations of air pollutants or toxic materials in air & water around us can be accurately and economically detected in no time to save the human beings from the serious illnesses. Also, the medical sensors will help in diagnoses of the diseases, their treatment and in predicting the future profile of the individual so that the health insurance companies may exploit the opportunity to grant or to deny the health coverage. Other social issues like privacy invasion and security may be best monitored by the widespread use of the surveillance devices using nanosensors.

  19. Synthesis and Magnetic Properties of Nearly Monodisperse CoFe2O4Nanoparticles Through a Simple Hydrothermal Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xing-Hua

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nearly monodisperse cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4 nanoparticles without any size-selection process have been prepared through an alluring method in an oleylamine/ethanol/water system. Well-defined nanospheres with an average size of 5.5 nm have been synthesized using metal chloride as the law materials and oleic amine as the capping agent, through a general liquid–solid-solution (LSS process. Magnetic measurement indicates that the particles exhibit a very high coercivity at 10 K and perform superparamagnetism at room temperature which is further illuminated by ZFC/FC curves. These superparamagnetic cobalt ferrite nanomaterials are considered to have potential application in the fields of biomedicine. The synthesis method is possible to be a general approach for the preparation of other pure binary and ternary compounds.

  20. Carbon-based metal-free catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xien; Dai, Liming

    2016-11-01

    Metals and metal oxides are widely used as catalysts for materials production, clean energy generation and storage, and many other important industrial processes. However, metal-based catalysts suffer from high cost, low selectivity, poor durability, susceptibility to gas poisoning and have a detrimental environmental impact. In 2009, a new class of catalyst based on earth-abundant carbon materials was discovered as an efficient, low-cost, metal-free alternative to platinum for oxygen reduction in fuel cells. Since then, tremendous progress has been made, and carbon-based metal-free catalysts have been demonstrated to be effective for an increasing number of catalytic processes. This Review provides a critical overview of this rapidly developing field, including the molecular design of efficient carbon-based metal-free catalysts, with special emphasis on heteroatom-doped carbon nanotubes and graphene. We also discuss recent advances in the development of carbon-based metal-free catalysts for clean energy conversion and storage, environmental protection and important industrial production, and outline the key challenges and future opportunities in this exciting field.

  1. Soft X-ray spectromicroscopy for speciation, quantitation and nano-eco-toxicology of nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, J R; Swerhone, G D W; Dynes, J J; Korber, D R; Hitchcock, A P

    2016-02-01

    There is a critical need for methods that provide simultaneous detection, identification, quantitation and visualization of nanomaterials at their interface with biological and environmental systems. The approach should allow speciation as well as elemental analysis. Using the intrinsic X-ray absorption properties, soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray spectromicroscopy (STXM) allows characterization and imaging of a broad range of nanomaterials, including metals, oxides and organic materials, and at the same time is able to provide detailed mapping of biological components. Thus, STXM offers considerable potential for application to research on nanomaterials in biology and the environment. The potential and limitations of STXM in this context are discussed using a range of examples, focusing on the interaction of nanomaterials with microbial cells, biofilms and extracellular polymers. The studies outlined include speciation and mapping of metal-containing nanomaterials (Ti, Ni, Cu) and carbon-based nanomaterials (multiwalled carbon nanotubes, C60 fullerene). The benefits of X-ray fluorescence detection in soft X-ray STXM are illustrated with a study of low levels of Ni in a natural river biofilm.

  2. An efficient analysis of nanomaterial cytotoxicity based on bioimpedance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, Karthikeyan; Choi, Cheol Soo; Kim, Sanghyo

    2010-09-01

    In the emerging nanotechnology field, there is an urgent need for the development of a significant and sensitive method that can be used to analyse and compare the cytotoxicities of nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), since such materials can be applied as contrast agents or drug delivery carriers. The bioimpedance system possesses great potential in many medical research fields including nanotechnology. Electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) is a particular bioimpedance system that offers a real-time, non-invasive, and quantitative measurement method for the cytotoxicity of various materials. The present work compared the cytotoxicity of AuNPs to that of purchased single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The size-controlled and monodispersed AuNPs were synthesized under autoclaved conditions and reduced by ascorbic acid (AA) whereas the purchased SWCNTs were used without any surface modifications. Bioimpedance results were validated by conventional WST-1 and trypan blue assays, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) were performed to examine nanomaterials inside the VERO cells. This research evaluates the ability of the ECIS system compared to those of conventional methods in analyzing the cytotoxicity of AuNPs and SWCNTs with higher sensitivity under real-time conditions.

  3. An efficient analysis of nanomaterial cytotoxicity based on bioimpedance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandasamy, Karthikeyan; Kim, Sanghyo [College of Bionanotechnology, Kyungwon University, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Cheol Soo, E-mail: samkim@kyungwon.ac.kr [Lee Gil Ya Diabetes and Cancer Institute, Gachon University of Medicine and Science, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-17

    In the emerging nanotechnology field, there is an urgent need for the development of a significant and sensitive method that can be used to analyse and compare the cytotoxicities of nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), since such materials can be applied as contrast agents or drug delivery carriers. The bioimpedance system possesses great potential in many medical research fields including nanotechnology. Electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) is a particular bioimpedance system that offers a real-time, non-invasive, and quantitative measurement method for the cytotoxicity of various materials. The present work compared the cytotoxicity of AuNPs to that of purchased single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The size-controlled and monodispersed AuNPs were synthesized under autoclaved conditions and reduced by ascorbic acid (AA) whereas the purchased SWCNTs were used without any surface modifications. Bioimpedance results were validated by conventional WST-1 and trypan blue assays, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) were performed to examine nanomaterials inside the VERO cells. This research evaluates the ability of the ECIS system compared to those of conventional methods in analyzing the cytotoxicity of AuNPs and SWCNTs with higher sensitivity under real-time conditions.

  4. Decontamination of Surfaces Exposed to Carbonbased Nanotubes and Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Zahra

    Contamination of surfaces by nanomaterials can happen due to accidental spillage and release or gradual accumulation during processing or handling. Considering the increasingly wide use of nanomaterials in industry and research labs and also taking into account the diversity of physical and chemical properties of different nanomaterials (such as solubility, aggregation/agglomeration, and surface reactivity), there is a pressing need to define reliable nanomaterial-specific decontamination guidelines. In this project, we propose and investigate a potential method for surface decontamination of carbon-based nanomaterials using solvent cleaning and wipes. The results show that the surfactant-assisted removal efficiencies of multi-walled carbon nanotubes, single walled carbon nantubes and single walled carbon nano-horns from silicon wafers through wiping is greater than 95%, 90% and 78%, respectively. The need for further studies to understand the mechanisms of nanomaterial removal from surfaces and development of standard techniques for surface decontamination of nanomaterials is highlighted. Another phase of experiments were performed to examine the efficiency of surfactants to remove multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) from silicon substrates with nano and microscaled features. In the first set of experiments, nanoscale features were induced on silicon wafers using SF6 and O2 plasma. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to observe the surface topology and roughness. In the second set, well-defined microscale topological features were induced on silicon wafers using photo lithography and plasma etching. The etching time was varied to create semi-ellipsoidal pits with average diameter and height of ~ 7-9 microm, and ~ 1-3 microm, respectively. MWCNTs in the form of liquid solution were deposited on the surface of silicon wafers using the spin coating process. For the cleaning process, the contaminated surfaces were first sprayed with different types of surfactant

  5. Functional Nanomaterial’s Synthesis and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-28

    Nanomaterials for solid state lighting and energy efficiency: Research in Dr. Strouse group centers on synthesizing nanomaterials (quantum dots) for... nanomaterials . As can be seen the techniques of the different investigators are complimentary and this has already resulted in different people working...assembly of quantum dots and magnetic nanomaterials . Utilizing the equipment purchased, we have recently submitted a center proposal to National

  6. Characterization Challenges for Nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, Donald R.; Amonette, James E.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Gaspar, Daniel J.; Karakoti, Ajay S.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Nurmi, James; Qiang, You; Sarathy, Vaishnavi; Seal, Sudipta; Sharma, Amit M.; Tratnyek, P. G.; Wang, Chong M.

    2008-03-10

    Nanostructured materials are increasingly subject to nearly every type of chemical and physical analysis possible. Because of their small feature size there is a significant focus on tools with high spatial resolution. Because of their high surface area, it is also natural to characterize nanomaterials using tools designed to analyze surfaces. Regardless of the approach, nanostructured materials present a variety of obstacles to adequate, useful and needed analysis. This paper provides short overviews to some of the issues and complications including: particle stability, environmental effects, specimen handling, surface coating, contamination and time. Some specific examples are provided from a our work focused on ceria nanoparticles and iron metal-core/oxide-shell nanoparticles in which we use a combination of tools for routine analysis including XPS, TEM, and XRD and apply other methods as needed to obtain essential information.

  7. Radiation damage tolerant nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.J. Beyerlein

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Designing a material from the atomic level to achieve a tailored response in extreme conditions is a grand challenge in materials research. Nanostructured metals and composites provide a path to this goal because they contain interfaces that attract, absorb and annihilate point and line defects. These interfaces recover and control defects produced in materials subjected to extremes of displacement damage, impurity implantation, stress and temperature. Controlling radiation-induced-defects via interfaces is shown to be the key factor in reducing the damage and imparting stability in certain nanomaterials under conditions where bulk materials exhibit void swelling and/or embrittlement. We review the recovery of radiation-induced point defects at free surfaces and grain boundaries and stabilization of helium bubbles at interphase boundaries and present an approach for processing bulk nanocomposites containing interfaces that are stable under irradiation.

  8. Growth Kinetics of Monodisperse Polystyrene Microspheres Prepared by Dispersion Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dispersion polymerization has been widely applied to the synthesis of monodisperse micron-sized polymer colloidal spheres. Many efforts have been devoted to studying the influence of initial conditions on the size and uniformity of the resultant microspheres, aiming to synthesize micron-size monodisperse colloidal spheres. However, the inner contradiction between the size and the size distribution of colloidal spheres hinders the realization of this goal. In this work, we drew our attention from the initial conditions to the growth stage of dispersion polymerization. We tracked the size evolution of colloidal sphere during the dispersion polymerization, through which we established a kinetic model that described the relationship between the monomer concentration and the reaction time. The model may provide a guideline to prepare large polymer colloidal spheres with good monodispersity by continuous monomer feeding during the growth stage to maintain the concentration of monomer at a constant value in a dispersion polymerization process.

  9. Low Dimension Semiconducting Composite Nanomaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Mang; CHEN Hong-zheng; SUN Jing-zhi

    2004-01-01

    Recently, low dimension nanostructures have gained considerable attention due to their technological potential as unique types of nanoscale building blocks for future optoelectronic devices and systems. Semiconducting composite nanomaterials, which can combine the advantages of two or more components, have been the focus in the area of nanomaterials synthesis and device application.In this paper, we report our work on the preparation of composite nanomaterials based on CNTs.CNTs were coated by organic or inorganic species via novel and facile methods (Fig. 1 and Fig.2).These functional CNTs based composites show eminent prospects and opportunities for new applications in a wide variation of areas.

  10. Nanomaterials for Space Exploration Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, Padraig G.

    2006-01-01

    Nano-engineered materials are multi-functional materials with superior mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. Nanomaterials may be used for a variety of space exploration applications, including ultracapacitors, active/passive thermal management materials, and nanofiltration for water recovery. Additional applications include electrical power/energy storage systems, hybrid systems power generation, advanced proton exchange membrane fuel cells, and air revitalization. The need for nanomaterials and their growth, characterization, processing and space exploration applications is discussed. Data is presented for developing solid-supported amine adsorbents based on carbon nanotube materials and functionalization of nanomaterials is examined.

  11. Conductive nanomaterials for printed electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamyshny, Alexander; Magdassi, Shlomo

    2014-09-10

    This is a review on recent developments in the field of conductive nanomaterials and their application in printed electronics, with particular emphasis on inkjet printing of ink formulations based on metal nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, and graphene sheets. The review describes the basic properties of conductive nanomaterials suitable for printed electronics (metal nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, and graphene), their stabilization in dispersions, formulations of conductive inks, and obtaining conductive patterns by using various sintering methods. Applications of conductive nanomaterials for electronic devices (transparent electrodes, metallization of solar cells, RFID antennas, TFTs, and light emitting devices) are also briefly reviewed.

  12. Tribology of Carbon-Based Coatings : Past, Present, and Future

    OpenAIRE

    Broitman, Esteban; Hultman, Lars

    2013-01-01

    In this talk, the development of carbon-based coatings will be reviewed. The most recent findings in the synthesis, characterization and application of carbon-based coatings will be highlighted. Future perspectives of new fullerene-like carbon-based tribological coatings will be discussed. Novel applications of fullerene-like CNx, CPx, and CFx will be envisioned.

  13. A new method for preparing mono-dispersed nanoparticles using magnetized water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhaei Pour, Ali; Gholizadeh, Mostafa; Housaindokht, Mohammadreza; Moosavi, Fatemeh; Monhemi, Hasan

    2017-04-01

    We studied the use of magnetized water on the size of the nanoparticles. Magnetized water found to reduce the diameter of the nanoparticles during a homogeneous precipitation process, which is a combination of nucleation and nuclei growth processes. We found that the modified water, which demonstrated different physical properties especially on the surface tension and viscosity, significantly influenced the both processes. Therefore, the nucleation process was initially prolonged in the homogeneous precipitation process due to the lower critical size of nucleus and higher rate of nucleation, and consequently formed smaller particles and a larger number of particles. Furthermore, the growth rate of nanoparticles was hindered owing to the higher viscosity of the water and restriction in the mass transport process. As a result, the precipitated particles with the magnetized water were eventually structured smaller particle diameter compared to the bulk. The presented method in here indicated a low cost, straightforward, and feasible technique for industrial application. In addition, this method could open a new promising perspective on nanomaterial synthesis in order to facilitate the production of monodispersed nanoparticles. Molecular dynamic confirmed that surface tension decreased as the external magnetic field was applied. Moreover, the density profile illustrated that the average number of hydrogen atoms is greater than oxygen atoms.

  14. Direct dry-grinding synthesis of monodisperse lipophilic CuS nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yajuan; Scott, Julie; Chen, Yi-Tzai; Guo, Liangran; Zhao, Mingyang; Wang, Xiaodong [Department of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, The University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02881 (United States); Lu, Wei, E-mail: weilu@uri.edu [Department of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, The University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02881 (United States); School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, Shanghai 201203 (China)

    2015-07-15

    Copper sulfide nanoparticles, effective absorbers of near-infrared light, are recently attracting broad interest as a photothermal coupling agent for cancer therapy. Lipophilic copper sulfide nanoparticles are preferred for high performance biomedical applications due to high tissue affinity. Synthesis of lipophilic copper sulfide nanoparticles requires complicated multi-step processes under severe conditions. Here, we describe a new synthetic process, developed by direct dry-grinding of copper(II) acetylacetonate with sulfur under ambient environment at low temperature. The formed CuS nanoparticles are of uniform size, ∼10 nm in diameter, and are monodispersed in chloroform. Each covellite CuS nanocrystal surface is modified with oleylamine through hydrogen bonding between sulfur atoms and amine groups of oleylamine. The nanoparticles demonstrate near-infrared light absorption for photothermal applications. The synthetic methodology described here is more convenient and less extreme than previous methods, and should thus greatly facilitate the preparation of photothermal lipophilic copper sulfide nanomaterials for cancer therapy. - Highlights: • We make lipophilic CuS nanoparticles by mechanical grinding method in large scale. • The reaction condition is studied to obtain high yield and uniform size. • The synthesis does not need nitrogen protection or high temperature. • Lipophilic CuS nanoparticles show significant near-infrared absorbance.

  15. Spontaneous droplet formation techniques for monodisperse emulsions preparation – Perspectives for food applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maan, A.A.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Boom, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous droplet formation through Laplace pressure differences is a simple method for making monodisperse emulsions and is claimed to be suited for shear and temperature sensitive products, and those requiring high monodispersity. Techniques belonging to this category include (grooved) microchan

  16. Carbon nanomaterials in biological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pu Chun Ke [Laboratory of Single-Molecule Biophysics and Polymer Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Qiao Rui [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

    2007-09-19

    This paper intends to reflect, from the biophysical viewpoint, our current understanding on interfacing nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes and fullerenes, with biological systems. Strategies for improving the solubility, and therefore, the bioavailability of nanomaterials in aqueous solutions are summarized. In particular, the underlining mechanisms of attaching biomacromolecules (DNA, RNA, proteins) and lysophospholipids onto carbon nanotubes and gallic acids onto fullerenes are analyzed. The diffusion and the cellular delivery of RNA-coated carbon nanotubes are characterized using fluorescence microscopy. The translocation of fullerenes across cell membranes is simulated using molecular dynamics to offer new insight into the complex issue of nanotoxicity. To assess the fate of nanomaterials in the environment, the biomodification of lipid-coated carbon nanotubes by the aquatic organism Daphnia magna is discussed. The aim of this paper is to illuminate the need for adopting multidisciplinary approaches in the field study of nanomaterials in biological systems and in the environment. (topical review)

  17. Nanomaterial-Enabled Neural Stimulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Yongchen; Guo, Liang

    2016-01-01

    .... In these techniques, a nanomaterial converts a remotely transmitted primary stimulus such as a light, magnetic or ultrasonic signal to a localized secondary stimulus such as an electric field or heat...

  18. Regional Knowledge Production in Nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimpe, Christoph; Patuelli, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Nanomaterials are seen as a key technology for the twenty-first century, and much is expected of them in terms of innovation and economic growth. They could open the way to many radically new applications, which would form the basis of innovative products. As nanomaterials are still...... distance being detrimental to the extent that spillovers can be realised. Due to the technological complexity, however, proximity could also be less important as relevant nanomaterials research is globally dispersed. Hence in this paper, we analyse the effects of co-location of R&D activities...... on nanomaterial patenting. Based on European Patent Office data at the German district level (NUTS-3), we estimate two negative binomial models in a knowledge production function framework and include a spatial filtering approach to adjust for spatial autocorrelation. Our results indicate...

  19. Environmental effects of engineered nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützhøft, Hans-Christian Holten; Hartmann, Nanna B.; Brinch, Anna

    This report presents ecotoxicological data and Predicted No-Effect Concentrations (PNECs) for nine selected nanomaterials which are considered to be environmentally relevant due to high usage or how they are used. These data will together with data from other reports/projects be used in an overall...... assessment of the environmental risk of nanomaterials in Denmark. The nine investigated nanomaterials are: Titanium Dioxide, Zinc Oxide, Silver, Carbon Nanotubes, Copper Oxide, Nano Zero Valent Iron, Cerium Dioxide, Quantum Dots and Carbon Black. To support the assessment of the data found in the peer...... reviewed scientific literature, the current project has developed a scoring system that evaluates the liability and relevance of the data in relation to nanomaterials....

  20. Neurotoxicity of manganese oxide nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanescu, Diana M.; Khoshnan, Ali; Patterson, Paul H.; Hering, Janet G.

    2009-11-01

    Manganese (Mn) toxicity in humans has been observed as manganism, a disease that resembles Parkinson's disease. The mechanism of Mn toxicity and the chemical forms that may be responsible for its neurotoxicity are not well understood. We examined the toxicity of Mn oxide nanomaterials in a neuronal precursor cell model, using the MTS assay to evaluate mitochondrial function in living cells and the LDH assay to quantify the release of the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase as a result of damage to the cell membrane. Both assays show that the toxicity of Mn is dependent on the type of Mn oxide nanomaterial and its concentration as well as on the state of cell differentiation. Following exposure to Mn oxide nanomaterials, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated, and flow cytometry experiments suggest that cell death occurred through apoptosis. During exposure to Mn oxide nanomaterials, increased levels of the transcription factor NF-κB (which mediates the cellular inflammatory response) were observed.

  1. Emerging Carbon and Post-Carbon Nanomaterial Inks for Printed Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secor, Ethan B; Hersam, Mark C

    2015-02-19

    Carbon and post-carbon nanomaterials present desirable electrical, optical, chemical, and mechanical attributes for printed electronics, offering low-cost, large-area functionality on flexible substrates. In this Perspective, recent developments in carbon nanomaterial inks are highlighted. Monodisperse semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes compatible with inkjet and aerosol jet printing are ideal channels for thin-film transistors, while inkjet, gravure, and screen-printable graphene-based inks are better-suited for electrodes and interconnects. Despite the high performance achieved in prototype devices, additional effort is required to address materials integration issues encountered in more complex systems. In this regard, post-carbon nanomaterial inks (e.g., electrically insulating boron nitride and optically active transition-metal dichalcogenides) present promising opportunities. Finally, emerging work to extend these nanomaterial inks to three-dimensional printing provides a path toward nonplanar devices. Overall, the superlative properties of these materials, coupled with versatile assembly by printing techniques, offer a powerful platform for next-generation printed electronics.

  2. Preparation of Silicon-Carbon-Based Dots@Dopamine and Its Application in Intracellular Ag(+) Detection and Cell Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuliang; Wang, Zhaoyin; Dai, Zhihui

    2016-02-17

    A novel nanocomposite, silicon-carbon-based dots@dopamine (Si-CDs@DA) was prepared using (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane, glycerol, and dopamine as raw materials via a rapid microwave-assisted irradiation. This type of Si-CDs@DA exhibited ultrabright fluorescence emission (quantum yield of 12.4%) and could response to Ag(+) selectively and sensitively. Moreover, the obtained Si-CDs@DA can be further applied in sensing intracellular Ag(+) and cell imaging, because of its photostability, salt stability, and low cytotoxicity. This study provides a simple and efficient approach for preparing novel Ag(+) fluorescent probes, which could expand the application of carbon nanomaterials in designing related biosensors.

  3. Nanomaterials promise better bone repair

    OpenAIRE

    Qifei Wang; Jianhua Yan; Junlin Yang; Bingyun Li

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials mimicking the nano-features of bones and offering unique smart functions are promising for better bone fracture repair. This review provides an overview of the current state-of-the-art research in developing and using nanomaterials for better bone fracture repair. This review begins with a brief introduction of bone fracture repair processes, then discusses the importance of vascularization, the role of growth factors in bone fracture repair, and the failure of bone fracture rep...

  4. Coherent phonons in carbon based nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, G. D.; Nugraha, A. R. T.; Sato, K.; Kim, J.-H.; Lim, Y.-S.; Kono, J.; Saito, R.; Stanton, C. J.

    2014-06-01

    We have developed a theory for the generation and detection of coherent phonons in carbon based nanotstructures such as single walled nanotubes (SWNTs), graphene, and graphene nanoribbons. Coherent phonons are generated via the deformation potential electron/hole-phonon interaction with ultrafast photo-excited carriers. They modulate the reflectance or absorption of an optical probe pules on a THz time scale and might be useful for optical modulators. In our theory the electronic states are treated in a third nearest neighbor extended tight binding formalism which gives a good description of the states over the entire Brillouin zone while the phonon states are treated using valence force field models which include bond stretching, in-plane and out-of-plane bond bending, and bond twisting interactions up to fourth neighbor distances. We compare our theory to experiments for the low frequency radial breathing mode (RBM) in micelle suspended single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs). The analysis of such data provides a wealth of information on the dynamics and interplay of photons, phonons and electrons in these carbon based nanostructures.

  5. Thermoplastic polyurethanes with TDI-based monodisperse hard segments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De, D.; Araichimani, A.; ten Hoopen, Hermina W.M.; Gaymans, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    Polyurethanes with PTMO soft segments and toluene diisocyanate diamide as urethane segment were studied. The toluene diisocyanate diamide urethane segment was monodisperse in length. The soft segment length was changed by extending PTMO with TDI units to a soft segment length varying from 2 250 to

  6. Highly monodisperse bismuth nanoparticles and their three-dimensional superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarema, Maksym; Kovalenko, Maksym V; Hesser, Günter; Talapin, Dmitri V; Heiss, Wolfgang

    2010-11-01

    A simple and reproducible synthesis of highly monodisperse and ligand-protected bismuth nanoparticles (Bi NPs) is reported. The size of the single-crystalline and spherically shaped NPs is controlled between 11 and 22 nm mainly by the reaction temperature. The high uniformity of the NPs allows their self-assembly into long-range-ordered two- and three-dimensional superstructures.

  7. A general approach for monodisperse colloidal perovskites, Chemistry of Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demirors, A.F.; Imhof, A.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a novel general method for synthesizing monodisperse colloidal perovskite particles at room temperature by postsynthesis addition of metal hydroxides to amorphous titania colloids. In previous work, we used titania particles to synthesize homogenously mixed silica-titania composite parti

  8. Applications of nanomaterials in sensors and diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuantranont, Adisorn (ed.) [National Electronics and Computer Technology Center (NECTEC), Pathumthani (Thailand). Nanoelectronics and MEMS Laboratory

    2013-11-01

    Recent progress in the synthesis of nanomaterials and our fundamental understanding of their properties has led to significant advances in nanomaterial-based gas, chemical and biological sensors. Leading experts around the world highlight the latest findings on a wide range of nanomaterials including nanoparticles, quantum dots, carbon nanotubes, molecularly imprinted nanostructures or plastibodies, nanometals, DNA-based structures, smart nanomaterials, nanoprobes, magnetic nanomaterials, organic molecules like phthalocyanines and porphyrins, and the most amazing novel nanomaterial, called graphene. Various sensing techniques such as nanoscaled electrochemical detection, functional nanomaterial-amplified optical assays, colorimetry, fluorescence and electrochemiluminescence, as well as biomedical diagnosis applications, e.g. for cancer and bone disease, are thoroughly reviewed and explained in detail. This volume will provide an invaluable source of information for scientists working in the field of nanomaterial-based technology as well as for advanced students in analytical chemistry, biochemistry, electrochemistry, material science, micro- and nanotechnology.

  9. Engineered Nanomaterials Elicit Cellular Stress Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineered nanomaterials are being developed continuously and incorporated into consumer products, resulting in increased human exposures. The study of engineered nanomaterials has focused largely on toxicity endpoints without further investigating potential mechanisms or pathway...

  10. Nanomaterials, Autophagy, and Lupus Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Alberto; Muller, Sylviane

    2016-01-19

    Nanoscale materials hold great promise in the therapeutic field. In particular, as carriers or vectors, they help bioactive molecules reach their primary targets. Furthermore, by themselves, certain nanomaterials-regarded as protective-can modulate particular metabolic pathways that are deregulated in pathological situations. They can also synergistically improve the effects of a payload drug. These properties are the basis of their appeal. However, nanoscale materials can also have intrinsic properties that limit their use, and this is the case for certain types of nanomaterials that influence autophagy. This property can be beneficial in some pathological settings, but in others, if the autophagic flux is already accelerated, it can be deleterious. This is notably the case for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and other chronic inflammatory diseases, including certain neurological diseases. The nanomaterial-autophagy interaction therefore must be treated with caution for therapeutic molecules and peptides that require vectorization for their administration.

  11. Nanomaterials: Regulation and Risk Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steffen Foss; Grieger, Khara Deanne; Baun, Anders

    2013-01-01

    The topics of regulation and risk assessment of nanomaterials have never been more relevant and controversial in Europe than they are at this point in time. In this entry, we present and discuss a number of major pieces of legislation relevant for the regulation of nanomaterials, including REACH...... Regulation. Chemical risk assessment provides a fundamental element in support of existing legislation. Risk assessment is normally said to consist of four elements, i.e., hazard identification, dose–response assessment, exposure assessment, and risk characterization. Each of these four elements hold......, the Water Framework Directive, pharmaceuticals regulation, and the Novel Foods Regulation. Current regulation of nanomaterials entail three overall challenges: 1) limitations in regard to terminology and definitions of key terms such as a “substance,” “novel food,” etc.; 2) safety assessment requirements...

  12. Porous substrates filled with nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Stadermann, Michael

    2014-08-19

    A composition comprising: at least one porous carbon monolith, such as a carbon aerogel, comprising internal pores, and at least one nanomaterial, such as carbon nanotubes, disposed uniformly throughout the internal pores. The nanomaterial can be disposed in the middle of the monolith. In addition, a method for making a monolithic solid with both high surface area and good bulk electrical conductivity is provided. A porous substrate having a thickness of 100 microns or more and comprising macropores throughout its thickness is prepared. At least one catalyst is deposited inside the porous substrate. Subsequently, chemical vapor deposition is used to uniformly deposit a nanomaterial in the macropores throughout the thickness of the porous substrate. Applications include electrical energy storage, such as batteries and capacitors, and hydrogen storage.

  13. Nanomaterials for optical data storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Min; Zhang, Qiming; Lamon, Simone

    2016-12-01

    The growing amount of data that is generated every year creates an urgent need for new and improved data storage methods. Nanomaterials, which have unique mechanical, electronic and optical properties owing to the strong confinement of electrons, photons and phonons at the nanoscale, are enabling the development of disruptive methods for optical data storage with ultra-high capacity, ultra-long lifetime and ultra-low energy consumption. In this Review, we survey recent advancements in nanomaterials technology towards the next generation of optical data storage systems, focusing on metallic nanoparticles, graphene and graphene oxide, semiconductor quantum dots and rare-earth-doped nanocrystals. We conclude by discussing the use of nanomaterials in data storage systems that do not rely on optical mechanisms and by surveying the future prospects for the field.

  14. The nanomaterial toolkit for neuroengineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shreyas

    2016-10-01

    There is a growing interest in developing effective tools to better probe the central nervous system (CNS), to understand how it works and to treat neural diseases, injuries and cancer. The intrinsic complexity of the CNS has made this a challenging task for decades. Yet, with the extraordinary recent advances in nanotechnology and nanoscience, there is a general consensus on the immense value and potential of nanoscale tools for engineering neural systems. In this review, an overview of specialized nanomaterials which have proven to be the most effective tools in neuroscience is provided. After a brief background on the prominent challenges in the field, a variety of organic and inorganic-based nanomaterials are described, with particular emphasis on the distinctive properties that make them versatile and highly suitable in the context of the CNS. Building on this robust nano-inspired foundation, the rational design and application of nanomaterials can enable the generation of new methodologies to greatly advance the neuroscience frontier.

  15. Carbon nanomaterials for gas adsorption

    CERN Document Server

    Terranova, Maria Letizia

    2012-01-01

    Research in adsorption of gases by carbon nanomaterials has experienced considerable growth in recent years, with increasing interest for practical applications. Many research groups are now producing or using such materials for gas adsorption, storage, purification, and sensing. This book provides a selected overview of some of the most interesting scientific results regarding the outstanding properties of carbon nanomaterials for gas adsorption and of interest both for basic research and technological applications. Topics receiving special attention in this book include storage of H, purific

  16. Nanomaterials under high-pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San-Miguel, Alfonso

    2006-10-01

    The use of high-pressure for the study and elaboration of homogeneous nanostructures is critically reviewed. Size effects, the interaction between nanostructures and guest species or the interaction of the nanosystem with the pressure transmitting medium are emphasized. Phase diagrams and the possibilities opened by the combination of pressure and temperature for the elaboration of new nanomaterials is underlined through the examination of three different systems: nanocrystals, nano-cage materials which include fullerites and group-14 clathrates, and single wall nanotubes. This tutorial review is addressed to scientist seeking an introduction or a panoramic view of the study of nanomaterials under high-pressure.

  17. A co-flow-focusing monodisperse microbubble generator

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Jiaming

    2014-02-14

    We use a simple and inexpensive microfluidic device, which is based on microscope glass slides and two tapered glass capillaries, to produce monodisperse microbubbles. The innermost capillary used for transporting the gas is inserted into the second capillary, with its 2 μm sharp tip aligned with the center of the converging-diverging throat of the second capillary. This configuration provides a small and smooth gas flow rate, and a high velocity gradient at the tube outlet. Highly monodisperse microbubbles with diameters ranging from 3.5 to 60 microns have been successfully produced at a rate of up to 40 kHz. A simple scaling law, which is based on the capillary number and liquid-to-gas flow rate ratio, successfully predicts the bubble size. © 2014 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  18. Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of monodisperse copper nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk, Tomasz; Szczepanowicz, Krzysztof; Stefańska, Joanna; Socha, Robert P; Warszyński, Piotr

    2015-04-01

    Metallic monodisperse copper nanoparticles at a relatively high concentration (300 ppm CuNPs) have been synthesized by the reduction of copper salt with hydrazine in the aqueous SDS solution. The average particles size and the distribution size were characterized by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), Nanosight-Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA). The morphology and structure of nanoparticles were investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The chemical composition of the copper nanoparticles was determined by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Monodisperse copper nanoparticles with average diameter 50 nm were received. UV/vis absorption spectra confirmed the formation of the nanoparticles with the characteristic peak 550 nm. The antimicrobial studies showed that the copper nanoparticles had high activity against Gram-positive bacteria, standard and clinical strains, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, comparable to silver nanoparticles and some antibiotics. They also exhibited antifungal activity against Candida species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Synthesis of Monodisperse Iron Oxide Nanoparticles without Surfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Chen Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Monodisperse iron oxide nanoparticles could be successfully synthesized with two kinds of precipitants through a precipitation method. As-prepared nanoparticles in the size around 10 nm with regular spherical-like shape were achieved by adjusting pH values. NaOH and NH3·H2O were used as two precipitants for comparison. The average size of nanoparticles with NH3·H2O precipitant got smaller and represented better dispersibility, while nanoparticles with NaOH precipitant represented better magnetic property. This work provided a simple method without using any organic solvents, organic metal salts, or surfactants which could easily obtain monodisperse nanoparticles with tunable morphology.

  20. Preparation and Characterization of Monodisperse Nickel Nanoparticles by Polyol Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Peng; GUAN Jianguo; ZHANG Qingjie; ZHAO Wenyu

    2005-01-01

    Polymer-protected monodisperse nickel nanoparticles were synthesized by a modified polyol reduction method in the presence of poly ( N-vinyl- 2-pyrrolidone ). These nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X- ray diffraction ( XRD ), selected area electron diffraction ( SAED ), as well as vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The experimental results show that the addition of PVP and the concentration of NaOH have strong influences on the size, agglomeration and uniformity of nanoparticles. In the presence of PVP and NaOH with low concentrations, monodisperse nickel nanoparticles with average diameters about 42 nm were obtained and characterized to be pure nickel crystalline with fcc structure. Secondary structures such as clusters, loops, and strings resulted from magnetic interactions between particles were observed. The chemical interaction between the PVP and nickel nanoparticles was found by FTIR. The saturation magnetization ( Ms ), remanent magnetization (Mr) and coercivity ( Hc ) of these nickel nanoparticles are lower than those of bulk nickel.

  1. Monodispersive CoPt Nanoparticles Synthesized Using Chemical Reduction Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Cheng-Min; HUI Chao; YANG Tian-Zhong; XIAO Cong-Wen; CHEN Shu-Tang; DING Hao; GAO Hong-Jun

    2008-01-01

    @@ Monodispersive CoPt nanoparticles in sizes of about 2.2 nm are synthesized by superhydride reduction of CoCl2 and PtCl2 in diphenyl ether. The as-prepared nanoparticles show a chemically disordered A1 structure and are superparamagnetic. Thermal annealing transforms the A1 structure into chemically ordered L1o structure and the particles are ferromagnetic at room temperature.

  2. Monodisperse magnesium hydride nanoparticles uniformly self-assembled on graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Guanglin; Tan, Yingbin; Chen, Xiaowei; Sun, Dalin; Guo, Zaiping; Liu, Huakun; Ouyang, Liuzhang; Zhu, Min; Yu, Xuebin

    2015-10-21

    Monodisperse MgH2 nanoparticles with homogeneous distribution and a high loading percent are developed through hydrogenation-induced self-assembly under the structure-directing role of graphene. Graphene acts not only as a structural support, but also as a space barrier to prevent the growth of MgH2 nanoparticles and as a thermally conductive pathway, leading to outstanding performance.

  3. Facile Synthesis of Monodisperse CdS Nanocrystals via Microreaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Xinggui

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract CdS-based nanocrystals (NCs have attracted extensive interest due to their potential application as key luminescent materials for blue and white LEDs. In this research, the continuous synthesis of monodisperse CdS NCs was demonstrated utilizing a capillary microreactor. The enhanced heat and mass transfer in the microreactor was useful to reduce the reaction temperature and residence time to synthesize monodisperse CdS NCs. The superior stability of the microreactor and its continuous operation allowed the investigation of synthesis parameters with high efficiency. Reaction temperature was found to be a key parameter for balancing the reactivity of CdS precursors, while residence time was shown to be an important factor that governs the size and size distribution of the CdS NCs. Furthermore, variation of OA concentration was demonstrated to be a facile tuning mechanism for controlling the size of the CdS NCs. The variation of the volume percentage of OA from 10.5 to 51.2% and the variation of the residence time from 17 to 136 s facilitated the synthesis of monodisperse CdS NCs in the size range of 3.0–5.4 nm, and the NCs produced photoluminescent emissions in the range of 391–463 nm.

  4. Brittle Destruction of Carbon Based Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koza, Y.; Amouroux, S.; Bazylev, B. N.; Berthe, E.; Kuehnlein, W.; Linke, J.; Penkalla, H. J.; Singheiser, L.

    Erosion mechanisms for different carbon based materials (graphite, carbon fiber composites (CFCs), Si-doped CFC) have been studied under brittle destruction under intense transient thermal loads (ELMs, plasma disruptions, VDEs) with respect to material erosion in different particle emission regimes, characterization of emitted particles, and behavior of preheated samples. Furthermore, the experimental data were compared with 3-D numerical simulation on the onset of brittle destruction. From a morphological point of view, the resulting erosion patterns on the test samples and ejected particles differ significantly for the three materials. The isotropic graphite shows a homogeneous erosion profile with flat craters, while the CFC forms no crater and only preferential erosion in localized spots in the PAN fiber area while the pitch fiber strands remain almost undamaged. The particles originating from graphite samples which have been collected on TEM grids are composed of nano sized amorphous carbon. CFCs have been the source for sub Î 1/4 m sized agglomerated fragments of crystalline carbon or silicon particles with âe 1/4 50 nm diameter. Preheating of the test samples to 500 or 800°C results in a remarkable increase of the erosion depth and weight loss compared to the samples loaded at room temperature and identical heat fluxes. In particular, melting phenomena in the Si-doped CFC materials became essential at elevated temperatures.

  5. Nanomaterials for fuel cell catalysis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ozoemena, KI

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Global experts provide an authoritative source of information on the use of electrochemical fuel cells, and in particular discuss the use of nanomaterials to enhance the performance of existing energy systems. The book covers the state of the art...

  6. Magnetic characterization techniques for nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    Sixth volume of a 40 volume series on nanoscience and nanotechnology, edited by the renowned scientist Challa S.S.R. Kumar. This handbook gives a comprehensive overview about Magnetic Characterization Techniques for Nanomaterials. Modern applications and state-of-the-art techniques are covered and make this volume an essential reading for research scientists in academia and industry.

  7. Nanomaterials in the aquatic environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selck, Henriette; Handy, Richard D; Fernandes, Teresa F.

    2016-01-01

    on work within the Ecotoxicology Community of Research (2012–2015) the present Focus article provides an overview of the state of the art of nanomaterials (NMs) in the aquatic environment by addressing different research questions, with a focus on ecotoxicological test systems and the challenges faced...

  8. Raman spectroscopy for nanomaterials characterization

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    First volume of a 40-volume series on nanoscience and nanotechnology, edited by the renowned scientist Challa S.S.R. Kumar. This handbook gives a comprehensive overview about Raman spectroscopy for the characterization of nanomaterials. Modern applications and state-of-the-art techniques are covered and make this volume essential reading for research scientists in academia and industry.

  9. Nanomaterials for photohyperthermia: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jonathan; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2013-01-01

    The unique properties of nanomaterials have propelled the field of nanomedicine. Nanomaterials have been used as drug delivery, imaging, and photothermal agents for diagnosis and therapy of diseases. Recently, photohyperthermia has attracted great interest from researchers and is actively being investigated as an alternative method of therapy for cancer and even bacteria. Photohyperthermia, or photothermal therapy, is the process of a photothermal agent absorbing light and converting it into heat for the destruction of malignant cells, which is due to elevated temperatures. This technique is non-invasive, can target specific diseased cells for minimal adverse side effects, and can be used in conjunction with other cancer treatments, such as chemotherapy. In this review, we will discuss different nanomaterials that have been implemented as photothermal agents for the treatment of various cancer and bacterial cells. The review will mainly focus on gold nanoparticles, magnetic nanoparticles, and carbon nanotubes. However, other nanomaterials, such as semiconductor nanoparticles and polymer composites, will be briefly discussed. In addition, the photothermal mechanism, current developments, dual imaging and therapy, and future perspectives of nanoparticle-based photohyperthermia will be presented.

  10. Computational design of safer nanomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burello, E.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials are expected to find applications in numerous consumer products, posing the challenge to guarantee their safety and environmental sustainability before they can be transferred from research labs to end-consumer products. One emerging solution, called safe design, relies on the implemen

  11. Exploring Carbon Nanomaterial Diversity for Nucleation of Protein Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govada, Lata; Leese, Hannah S.; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Kassen, Sean; Chain, Benny; Khurshid, Sahir; Menzel, Robert; Hu, Sheng; Shaffer, Milo S. P.; Chayen, Naomi E.

    2016-02-01

    Controlling crystal nucleation is a crucial step in obtaining high quality protein crystals for structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) including carbon nanotubes, graphene oxide, and carbon black provide a range of surface topographies, porosities and length scales; functionalisation with two different approaches, gas phase radical grafting and liquid phase reductive grafting, provide routes to a range of oligomer functionalised products. These grafted materials, combined with a range of controls, were used in a large-scale assessment of the effectiveness for protein crystal nucleation of 20 different carbon nanomaterials on five proteins. This study has allowed a direct comparison of the key characteristics of carbon-based nucleants: appropriate surface chemistry, porosity and/or roughness are required. The most effective solid system tested in this study, carbon black nanoparticles functionalised with poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether of mean molecular weight 5000, provides a novel highly effective nucleant, that was able to induce crystal nucleation of four out of the five proteins tested at metastable conditions.

  12. Large-scale, low-cost synthesis of monodispersed gold nanorods using a gemini surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yong; Zhao, Yang; Chen, Lei; Wang, Xuchun; Sun, Jianxia; Wu, Haihua; Bao, Feng; Fan, Jian; Zhang, Qiao

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that monodispersed gold nanorods (AuNRs) can be obtained in a large-scale and cost-effective way. By using an industrial grade gemini surfactant (P16-8-16), the cost of the synthesis of high-quality AuNRs can be significantly reduced by 90%. The synthesis can be scaled up to over 4 L. The aspect ratio of AuNRs can be well tuned from ~2.4 to ~6.3, resulting in a wide tunability of the SPR properties. Systematic studies reveal that P16-8-16 could have a dual function: it can not only act as a capping ligand to stabilize AuNRs but also it can pre-reduce Au3+ to Au+ by the unsaturated C&z.dbd;C bond. Furthermore, the shape of AuNRs can be tailored from straight nanorods to ``dog-bones'' by simply varying the concentration of the surfactant. A mechanistic study shows that the shape change can be attributed to the presence of excess bromide ions because of the complex effect between bromide ions and gold ions. This work will not only help to achieve the industrial production of AuNRs, but also promote research into practical applications of various nanomaterials.In this work, we demonstrate that monodispersed gold nanorods (AuNRs) can be obtained in a large-scale and cost-effective way. By using an industrial grade gemini surfactant (P16-8-16), the cost of the synthesis of high-quality AuNRs can be significantly reduced by 90%. The synthesis can be scaled up to over 4 L. The aspect ratio of AuNRs can be well tuned from ~2.4 to ~6.3, resulting in a wide tunability of the SPR properties. Systematic studies reveal that P16-8-16 could have a dual function: it can not only act as a capping ligand to stabilize AuNRs but also it can pre-reduce Au3+ to Au+ by the unsaturated C&z.dbd;C bond. Furthermore, the shape of AuNRs can be tailored from straight nanorods to ``dog-bones'' by simply varying the concentration of the surfactant. A mechanistic study shows that the shape change can be attributed to the presence of excess bromide ions because of the

  13. Engineering nanomaterial surfaces for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Li-Hong; Ramström, Olof; Yan, Mingdi

    2009-10-01

    Nanomaterials, possessing unique physical and chemical properties, have attracted much interest and generated wide varieties of applications. Recent investigations of functionalized nanomaterials have expanded into the biological area, providing a versatile platform in biomedical applications such as biomolecular sensing, biological imaging, drug delivery and disease therapy. Bio-functions and bio-compatibility of nanomaterials are realized by introducing synthetic ligands or natural biomolecules onto nanomaterials, and combining ligand-receptor biological interactions with intrinsic nanomaterial properties. Common strategies of engineering nanomaterial surfaces involve physisorption or chemisorption of desired ligands. We developed a photochemically initiated surface coupling chemistry, bringing versatility and simplicity to nanomaterial functionalization. The method was applied to attach underivatized carbohydrates efficiently on gold and iron oxide nanoparticles, and the resulting glyconanoparticles were successfully used as a sensitive biosensing system probing specific interactions between carbohydrates and proteins as well as bacteria.

  14. Cellulose nanomaterials in water treatment technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Alexis Wells; de Lannoy, Charles-François; Wiesner, Mark R

    2015-05-05

    Cellulose nanomaterials are naturally occurring with unique structural, mechanical and optical properties. While the paper and packaging, automotive, personal care, construction, and textiles industries have recognized cellulose nanomaterials' potential, we suggest cellulose nanomaterials have great untapped potential in water treatment technologies. In this review, we gather evidence of cellulose nanomaterials' beneficial role in environmental remediation and membranes for water filtration, including their high surface area-to-volume ratio, low environmental impact, high strength, functionalizability, and sustainability. We make direct comparison between cellulose nanomaterials and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in terms of physical and chemical properties, production costs, use and disposal in order to show the potential of cellulose nanomaterials as a sustainable replacement for CNTs in water treatment technologies. Finally, we comment on the need for improved communication and collaboration across the myriad industries invested in cellulose nanomaterials production and development to achieve an efficient means to commercialization.

  15. Engineering Nanomaterial Surfaces for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Li-Hong; Ramström, Olof; Yan, Mingdi

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials, possessing unique physical and chemical properties, have attracted much interest and generated wide varieties of applications. Recent investigations of functionalized nanomaterials have expanded into the biological area, providing a versatile platform in biomedical applications such as biomolecular sensing, biological imaging, drug delivery and disease therapy. Bio-functions and bio-compatibility of nanomaterials are realized by introducing synthetic ligands or natural biomolecules onto nanomaterials, and combining ligand-receptor biological interactions with intrinsic nanomaterial properties. Common strategies of engineering nanomaterial surfaces involve physisorption or chemisorption of desired ligands. We developed a photochemically initiated surface coupling chemistry, bringing versatility and simplicity to nanomaterial functionalization. The method was applied to attach underivatized carbohydrates efficiently on gold and iron oxide nanoparticles, and the resulting glyconanoparticles were successfully used as a sensitive biosensing system probing specific interactions between carbohydrates and proteins as well as bacteria. PMID:19596820

  16. Carbon-based tribofilms from lubricating oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdemir, Ali; Ramirez, Giovanni; Eryilmaz, Osman L.; Narayanan, Badri; Liao, Yifeng; Kamath, Ganesh; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K. R. S.

    2016-08-03

    Moving mechanical interfaces are commonly lubricated and separated by a combination of fluid films and solid 'tribofilms', which together ensure easy slippage and long wear life(1). The efficacy of the fluid film is governed by the viscosity of the base oil in the lubricant; the efficacy of the solid tribofilm, which is produced as a result of sliding contact between moving parts, relies upon the effectiveness of the lubricant's anti-wear additive (typically zinc dialkyldithiophosphate)(2). Minimizing friction and wear continues to be a challenge, and recent efforts have focused on enhancing the anti-friction and anti-wear properties of lubricants by incorporating inorganic nanoparticles and ionic liquids(3,4). Here, we describe the in operando formation of carbon-based tribofilms via dissociative extraction from base-oil molecules on catalytically active, sliding nanometre-scale crystalline surfaces, enabling base oils to provide not only the fluid but also the solid tribofilm. We study nanocrystalline catalytic coatings composed of nitrides of either molybdenum or vanadium, containing either copper or nickel catalysts, respectively. Structurally, the resulting tribofilms are similar to diamond-like carbon(5). Ball-on-disk tests at contact pressures of 1.3 gigapascals reveal that these tribofilms nearly eliminate wear, and provide lower friction than tribofilms formed with zinc dialkyldithiophosphate. Reactive and ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations show that the catalytic action of the coatings facilitates dehydrogenation of linear olefins in the lubricating oil and random scission of their carbon-carbon backbones; the products recombine to nucleate and grow a compact, amorphous lubricating tribofilm.

  17. Carbon-based tribofilms from lubricating oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemir, Ali; Ramirez, Giovanni; Eryilmaz, Osman L.; Narayanan, Badri; Liao, Yifeng; Kamath, Ganesh; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K. R. S.

    2016-08-01

    Moving mechanical interfaces are commonly lubricated and separated by a combination of fluid films and solid ‘tribofilms’, which together ensure easy slippage and long wear life. The efficacy of the fluid film is governed by the viscosity of the base oil in the lubricant; the efficacy of the solid tribofilm, which is produced as a result of sliding contact between moving parts, relies upon the effectiveness of the lubricant’s anti-wear additive (typically zinc dialkyldithiophosphate). Minimizing friction and wear continues to be a challenge, and recent efforts have focused on enhancing the anti-friction and anti-wear properties of lubricants by incorporating inorganic nanoparticles and ionic liquids. Here, we describe the in operando formation of carbon-based tribofilms via dissociative extraction from base-oil molecules on catalytically active, sliding nanometre-scale crystalline surfaces, enabling base oils to provide not only the fluid but also the solid tribofilm. We study nanocrystalline catalytic coatings composed of nitrides of either molybdenum or vanadium, containing either copper or nickel catalysts, respectively. Structurally, the resulting tribofilms are similar to diamond-like carbon. Ball-on-disk tests at contact pressures of 1.3 gigapascals reveal that these tribofilms nearly eliminate wear, and provide lower friction than tribofilms formed with zinc dialkyldithiophosphate. Reactive and ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations show that the catalytic action of the coatings facilitates dehydrogenation of linear olefins in the lubricating oil and random scission of their carbon-carbon backbones; the products recombine to nucleate and grow a compact, amorphous lubricating tribofilm.

  18. New Nanomaterials and Luminescent Optical Sensors for Detection of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia A. Burmistrova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Accurate methods that can continuously detect low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 have a huge application potential in biological, pharmaceutical, clinical and environmental analysis. Luminescent probes and nanomaterials are used for fabrication of sensors for H2O2 that can be applied for these purposes. In contrast to previous reviews focusing on the chemical design of molecular probes for H2O2, this mini-review highlights the latest luminescent nanoparticular materials and new luminescent optical sensors for H2O2 in terms of the nanomaterial composition and luminescent receptor used in the sensors. The nanomaterial section is subdivided into schemes based on gold nanoparticles, polymeric nanoparticles with embedded enzymes, probes showing aggregation-induced emission enhancement, quantum dots, lanthanide-based nanoparticles and carbon based nanomaterials, respectively. Moreover, the sensors are ordered according to the type of luminescent receptor used within the sensor membranes. Among them are lanthanide complexes, metal-ligand complexes, oxidic nanoparticles and organic dyes. Further, the optical sensors are confined to those that are capable to monitor the concentration of H2O2 in a sample over time or are reusable. Optical sensors responding to gaseous H2O2 are not covered. All nanomaterials and sensors are characterized with respect to the analytical reaction towards H2O2, limit of detection (LOD, analytical range, electrolyte, pH and response time/incubation time. Applications to real samples are given. Finally, we assess the suitability of the nanomaterials to be used in membrane-based sensors and discuss future trends and perspectives of these sensors in biomedical research.

  19. Morphologically and size uniform monodisperse particles and their shape-directed self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Joshua E.; Bell, Howard Y.; Ye, Xingchen; Murray, Christopher Bruce

    2015-11-17

    Monodisperse particles having: a single pure crystalline phase of a rare earth-containing lattice, a uniform three-dimensional size, and a uniform polyhedral morphology are disclosed. Due to their uniform size and shape, the monodisperse particles self assemble into superlattices. The particles may be luminescent particles such as down-converting phosphor particles and up-converting phosphors. The monodisperse particles of the invention have a rare earth-containing lattice which in one embodiment may be an yttrium-containing lattice or in another may be a lanthanide-containing lattice. The monodisperse particles may have different optical properties based on their composition, their size, and/or their morphology (or shape). Also disclosed is a combination of at least two types of monodisperse particles, where each type is a plurality of monodisperse particles having a single pure crystalline phase of a rare earth-containing lattice, a uniform three-dimensional size, and a uniform polyhedral morphology; and where the types of monodisperse particles differ from one another by composition, by size, or by morphology. In a preferred embodiment, the types of monodisperse particles have the same composition but different morphologies. Methods of making and methods of using the monodisperse particles are disclosed.

  20. Morphologically and size uniform monodisperse particles and their shape-directed self-assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Joshua E.; Bell, Howard Y.; Ye, Xingchen; Murray, Christopher Bruce

    2017-09-12

    Monodisperse particles having: a single pure crystalline phase of a rare earth-containing lattice, a uniform three-dimensional size, and a uniform polyhedral morphology are disclosed. Due to their uniform size and shape, the monodisperse particles self assemble into superlattices. The particles may be luminescent particles such as down-converting phosphor particles and up-converting phosphors. The monodisperse particles of the invention have a rare earth-containing lattice which in one embodiment may be an yttrium-containing lattice or in another may be a lanthanide-containing lattice. The monodisperse particles may have different optical properties based on their composition, their size, and/or their morphology (or shape). Also disclosed is a combination of at least two types of monodisperse particles, where each type is a plurality of monodisperse particles having a single pure crystalline phase of a rare earth-containing lattice, a uniform three-dimensional size, and a uniform polyhedral morphology; and where the types of monodisperse particles differ from one another by composition, by size, or by morphology. In a preferred embodiment, the types of monodisperse particles have the same composition but different morphologies. Methods of making and methods of using the monodisperse particles are disclosed.

  1. Current trends in nanomaterial embedded field effect transistor-based biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehra, Anuj; Pal Singh, Krishna

    2015-12-15

    Recently, as metal-, polymer-, and carbon-based biocompatible nanomaterials have been increasingly incorporated into biosensing applications, with various nanostructures having been used to increase the efficacy and sensitivity of most of the detecting devices, including field effect transistor (FET)-based devices. These nanomaterial-based methods also became the ideal for the amalgamation of biomolecules, especially for the fabrication of ultrasensitive, low-cost, and robust FET-based biosensors; these are categorically very successful at binding the target specified entities in the confined gated micro-region for high functionality. Furthermore, the contemplation of nanomaterial-based FET biosensors to various applications encompasses the desire for detection of many targets with high selectivity, and specificity. We assess how such devices have empowered the achievement of elevated biosensor performance in terms of high sensitivity, selectivity and low detection limits. We review the recent literature here to illustrate the diversity of FET-based biosensors, based on various kinds of nanomaterials in different applications and sum up that graphene or its assisted composite based FET devices are comparatively more efficient and sensitive with highest signal to noise ratio. Lastly, the future prospects and limitations of the field are also discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Carbon Nanomaterials Based Electrochemical Sensors/Biosensors for the Sensitive Detection of Pharmaceutical and Biological Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bal-Ram Adhikari

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical sensors and biosensors have attracted considerable attention for the sensitive detection of a variety of biological and pharmaceutical compounds. Since the discovery of carbon-based nanomaterials, including carbon nanotubes, C60 and graphene, they have garnered tremendous interest for their potential in the design of high-performance electrochemical sensor platforms due to their exceptional thermal, mechanical, electronic, and catalytic properties. Carbon nanomaterial-based electrochemical sensors have been employed for the detection of various analytes with rapid electron transfer kinetics. This feature article focuses on the recent design and use of carbon nanomaterials, primarily single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs, reduced graphene oxide (rGO, SWCNTs-rGO, Au nanoparticle-rGO nanocomposites, and buckypaper as sensing materials for the electrochemical detection of some representative biological and pharmaceutical compounds such as methylglyoxal, acetaminophen, valacyclovir, β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrate (NADH, and glucose. Furthermore, the electrochemical performance of SWCNTs, rGO, and SWCNT-rGO for the detection of acetaminophen and valacyclovir was comparatively studied, revealing that SWCNT-rGO nanocomposites possess excellent electrocatalytic activity in comparison to individual SWCNT and rGO platforms. The sensitive, reliable and rapid analysis of critical disease biomarkers and globally emerging pharmaceutical compounds at carbon nanomaterials based electrochemical sensor platforms may enable an extensive range of applications in preemptive medical diagnostics.

  3. Carbon Based Transistors and Nanoelectronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhi, Nima

    Carbon based materials (carbon nanotube and graphene) has been extensively researched during the past decade as one of the promising materials to be used in high performance device technology. In long term it is thought that they may replace digital and/or analog electronic devices, due to their size, near-ballistic transport, and high stability. However, a more realistic point of insertion into market may be the printed nanoelectronic circuits and sensors. These applications include printed circuits for flexible electronics and displays, large-scale bendable electrical contacts, bio-membranes and bio sensors, RFID tags, etc. In order to obtain high performance thin film transistors (as the basic building block of electronic circuits) one should be able to manufacture dense arrays of all semiconducting nanotubes. Besides, graphene synthesize and transfer technology is in its infancy and there is plenty of room to improve the current techniques. To realize the performance of nanotube and graphene films in such systems, we need to economically fabricate large-scale devices based on these materials. Following that the performance control over such devices should also be considered for future design variations for broad range of applications. Here we have first investigated carbon nanotube ink as the base material for our devices. The primary ink used consisted of both metallic and semiconducting nanotubes which resulted in networks suitable for moderate-resistivity electrical connections (such as interconnects) and rfmatching circuits. Next, purified all-semiconducting nanotube ink was used to fabricate waferscale, high performance (high mobility, and high on/off ratio) thin film transistors for printed electronic applications. The parameters affecting device performance were studied in detail to establish a roadmap for the future of purified nanotube ink printed thin film transistors. The trade of between mobility and on/off ratio of such devices was studied and the

  4. Electrospun nanomaterials for ultrasensitive sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Ding

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Increasing demands for ever more sensitive sensors for global environmental monitoring, food inspection and medical diagnostics have led to an upsurge of interests in nanostructured materials such as nanofibers and nanowebs. Electrospinning exhibits the unique ability to produce diverse forms of fibrous assemblies. The remarkable specific surface area and high porosity bring electrospun nanomaterials highly attractive to ultrasensitive sensors and increasing importance in other nanotechnological applications. In this review, we summarize recent progress in developments of the electrospun nanomaterials with applications in some predominant sensing approaches such as acoustic wave, resistive, photoelectric, optical, amperometric, and so on, illustrate with examples how they work, and discuss their intrinsic fundamentals and optimization designs. We are expecting the review to pave the way for developing more sensitive and selective nanosensors.

  5. Final Report: "Energetics of Nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navrotsky, Alexandra [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Ross, Nancy [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Woodfield, Brian [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)

    2015-02-14

    Nanomaterials, solids with very small particle size, form the basis of new technologies that are revolutionizing fields such as energy, lighting, electronics, medical diagnostics, and drug delivery. These nanoparticles are different from conventional bulk materials in many ways we do not yet fully understand. This project focused on their structure and thermodynamics and emphasized the role of water in nanoparticle surfaces. Using a unique and synergistic combination of high-tech techniques—namely oxide melt solution calorimetry, cryogenic heat capacity measurements, and inelastic neutron scattering—this work has identified differences in structure, thermodynamic stability, and water behavior on nanoparticles as a function of composition and particle size. The systematics obtained increase the fundamental understanding needed to synthesize, retain, and apply these technologically important nanomaterials and to predict and tailor new materials for enhanced functionality, eventually leading to a more sustainable way of life.

  6. Editorial: Nanomaterials at the Biointerface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Ping (Gordon Xu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Bioapplication of nanomaterials involves several key processes that occurat the biointerface, such as internalization of nanoparticles by various cells, attachment of nanomaterials onto the bacteria to form granulates, and penetration of nutrient elements on the leaf surface from the nutrient reservoir – nanocrystals. This special issue therefore presents the most recent research development of nanomaterials at the biointerface, as summarized by a multidisciplinary team of international experts in these broad fields. Biomedical applications of various nanomaterials are intensively investigated in the recent decades. For example, many efforts have been made to develop functional mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs to enhance the biocompatibility, drug loading efficacy, drug delivery efficiency, drug control releaseproperties and cancer treatment effectiveness. In this issue, Zhang et al. (Tianjin University, China [1]briefly review the recent progresses in this particular area. Another example is utilization of nanoparticles as biomarkers. So this special issue also includes a mini-review paper by Centeno and Xie (University Technology Malaysia [2] thatconcisely presents the principle and simulation results of dye molecules’ fluorescence enhancement by the nearby nanostructured metals through their coupling effect. Nanomaterials can alsobe used as effective antimicrobial agents. For example, Liu et al. (Curtin University of Technology, Australia [3] briefly review the recent progress of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs, andin particular, their efforts to modify AgNPs by conjugating antimicrobial cell penetration peptide to selectively bind to microorganism and improve the therapeutic index. More interestingly, nanomaterialsare increasingly investigated as effective foliar fertilizers to provide micronutrient elements for a longer term. This particularly takes the advantage of nanocrystals’sheet-like morphology as sheet-like crystals have the

  7. Introduction to nanoscience and nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, Dinesh C

    2013-01-01

    This textbook is aimed primarily at the senior undergraduate and first year graduate students from the various engineering and sciences departments including physics, chemistry, materials engineering, chemical engineering, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, bioengineering, and biology. Researchers in the areas of nanomaterials and nanoscience will also find the book useful for building the background necessary to understand the current literature and as a reference book. The text assumes only a basic level of competency in physics, chemistry and mathematics. Some of the background material and introductory matter are included in the first few chapters and as appendices. Although this material may be familiar to some of the students, it is the author's experience after teaching such a course for many years that this can not be taken for granted and moreover, serves as a ready reference to understand the text. As the area of nanoscience, nanotechnology and nanomaterials is a fast developing one, a...

  8. Pathophysiologic mechanisms of biomedical nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liming; Chen, Chunying

    2016-05-15

    Nanomaterials (NMs) have been widespread used in biomedical fields, daily consuming, and even food industry. It is crucial to understand the safety and biomedical efficacy of NMs. In this review, we summarized the recent progress about the physiological and pathological effects of NMs from several levels: protein-nano interface, NM-subcellular structures, and cell-cell interaction. We focused on the detailed information of nano-bio interaction, especially about protein adsorption, intracellular trafficking, biological barriers, and signaling pathways as well as the associated mechanism mediated by nanomaterials. We also introduced related analytical methods that are meaningful and helpful for biomedical effect studies in the future. We believe that knowledge about pathophysiologic effects of NMs is not only significant for rational design of medical NMs but also helps predict their safety and further improve their applications in the future.

  9. A Facile Solvothermal Synthesis of Monodisperse Ni Nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Peng-fei; CUI Bin; ZHANG Yan; SHI Qi-zhen

    2008-01-01

    A simple solvothermal approach was developed to synthesize uniform spherical monodisperse Ni nanoparticles, which can easily disperse in nonpolar solvents to form homogenous colloidal solution. The as-prepared sample was characterized by XRD, TEM, and FTIR. The results indicate that Ni nanoparticles have the structure of face-centered cube and a narrow distribution with a diameter of (3.5±0.5) nm. The FTIR spectrum reveals that the as a surfactant. The probable formation mechanism of the spherical nanoparticles was also discussed.

  10. Structural disorder versus spin canting in monodisperse maghemite nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubickova, S.; Vejpravova, J., E-mail: vejpravo@fzu.cz [Department of Magnetic Nanosystems, Institute of Physics of the ASCR, v.v.i., Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague (Czech Republic); Niznansky, D. [Faculty of Science, Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Charles University in Prague, Albertov 2030, 128 40 Prague (Czech Republic); Morales Herrero, M. P. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, C/Sor Juana Ins de la Cruz 3, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Salas, G. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, C/Sor Juana Ins de la Cruz 3, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Instituto Madrileno de Estudios Avanzados en Nanociencia, Campus Universitario de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-06-02

    Monodisperse maghemite nanoparticles with diameter ranging from 7 to 20 nm were examined by the In-field Mössbauer Spectroscopy (IFMS) in varying external magnetic field up to 6 T. Surprisingly, the small-sized particles (7 nm) exhibit nearly no spin canting in contrast to the larger particles with lower surface-to-volume ratio. We demonstrate that the observed phenomenon is originated by lower relative crystallinity of the larger particles with different internal structure. Hence, the persistence of the 2nd and 5th absorption lines in the IFMS cannot be unambiguously assigned to the surface spins.

  11. Monodisperse Silver Nanoparticles Synthesized by a Microwave-Assisted Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Shao-Peng; TANG Shao-Chun; MENG Xiang-Kang

    2009-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles with an average size of about 2Onto are synthesized in a colloidal solution with the aid of microwave irradiation. Neither additional reductant nor stabilizer is required in this microwave-assisted method.The color of the colloidal solution is found to be dark green, different from the characteristic yellow of silver colloidal solutions. The silver nanoparticles in the colloidal solution have a narrow size distribution and large yield quantity. UV-visible absorption spectroscopy analysis reveals that the as-synthesized monodisperse silver nanoparticles have exceptional optical properties. Raman spectroscopy measurements demonstrate that these silver nanoparticles exhibit a notable surface-enhanced Raman scattering ability.

  12. MONODISPERSE MICRON-SIZED POLYACRYLAMIDE PARTICLES SYNTHESIZED BY DISPERSION POLYMERIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Hou; Bo Gao; Zhe-guo Zhang; Kang-de Yao

    2007-01-01

    Monodisperse micron-sized polyacrylamide (PAM) particles with a regular shape have been successfully prepared through dispersion polymerization of the monomer using a rotary reactor. FTIR and NMR spectroscopic results demonstrated the formation of PAM. POM and TEM observations revealed that PAM particles had a regular shape and good dispersity. A thick layer of surfactant (PVP) still existed on PAM particles after multiple centrifugation and ultrasonic re-dispersion in ethanol, which indicates a strong interaction between PVP and PAM. The effects of various polymerization factors on the average size of PAM particles have also been studied.

  13. Final Report: "Energetics of Nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navrotsky, Alexandra [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Ross, Nancy [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Woodfield, Brian [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)

    2015-02-14

    Nanomaterials, solids with very small particle size, form the basis of new technologies that are revolutionizing fields such as energy, lighting, electronics, medical diagnostics, and drug delivery. These nanoparticles are different from conventional bulk materials in many ways we do not yet fully understand. This project focused on their structure and thermodynamics and emphasized the role of water in nanoparticle surfaces. Using a unique and synergistic combination of high-tech techniques—namely oxide melt solution calorimetry, cryogenic heat capacity measurements, and inelastic neutron scattering—this work has identified differences in structure, thermodynamic stability, and water behavior on nanoparticles as a function of composition and particle size. The systematics obtained increase the fundamental understanding needed to synthesize, retain, and apply these technologically important nanomaterials and to predict and tailor new materials for enhanced functionality, eventually leading to a more sustainable way of life. Highlights are reported on the following topics: surface energies, thermochemistry of nanoparticles, and changes in stability at the nanoscale; heat capacity models and the gapped phonon spectrum; control of pore structure, acid sites, and thermal stability in synthetic γ-aluminas; the lattice contribution is the same for bulk and nanomaterials; and inelastic neutron scattering studies of water on nanoparticle surfaces.

  14. Ecofriendly Application of Nanomaterials: Nanobioremediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Rizwan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials exhibit unique physical and chemical properties and, hence, they have received much attention from scientists and researchers in different areas of environmental sciences, specifically in bioremediation. Bioremediation provides a good clean-up strategy for some types of waste, but as it is expected, it will not be useful for all. For example, bioremediation may not provide a feasible strategy at sites with high concentrations of chemicals that are toxic to most microorganisms. These include heavy metals and salt. Further, the advancement in science and technology has increased standard of living which directly or indirectly contributes to the increase in waste and toxic material. Therefore, the remediation of contaminants by use of existing technology is not effective and efficient in cleaning up the environment. Hence, nanomaterials may be applied for bioremediation, which will not only have less toxic effect on microorganisms, but will also improve the microbial activity of the specific waste and toxic material which will reduce the overall time consumption as well as reduce the overall cost. In this paper we have briefly summarized the major types of nanomaterials that have been used so far in bioremediation of waste and toxic materials.

  15. Nanomaterial-enabled neural stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongchen eWang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Neural stimulation is a critical technique in treating neurological diseases and investigating brain functions. Traditional electrical stimulation uses electrodes to directly create intervening electric fields in the immediate vicinity of neural tissues. Second-generation stimulation techniques directly use light, magnetic fields or ultrasound in a non-contact manner. An emerging generation of non- or minimally invasive neural stimulation techniques is enabled by nanotechnology to achieve a high spatial resolution and cell-type specificity. In these techniques, a nanomaterial converts a remotely transmitted primary stimulus such as a light, magnetic or ultrasonic signal to a localized secondary stimulus such as an electric field or heat to stimulate neurons. The ease of surface modification and bio-conjugation of nanomaterials facilitates cell-type-specific targeting, designated placement and highly localized membrane activation. This review focuses on nanomaterial-enabled neural stimulation techniques primarily involving opto-electric, opto-thermal, magneto-electric, magneto-thermal and acousto-electric transduction mechanisms. Stimulation techniques based on other possible transduction schemes and general consideration for these emerging neurotechnologies are also discussed.

  16. Nanomaterial-Enabled Neural Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongchen; Guo, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Neural stimulation is a critical technique in treating neurological diseases and investigating brain functions. Traditional electrical stimulation uses electrodes to directly create intervening electric fields in the immediate vicinity of neural tissues. Second-generation stimulation techniques directly use light, magnetic fields or ultrasound in a non-contact manner. An emerging generation of non- or minimally invasive neural stimulation techniques is enabled by nanotechnology to achieve a high spatial resolution and cell-type specificity. In these techniques, a nanomaterial converts a remotely transmitted primary stimulus such as a light, magnetic or ultrasonic signal to a localized secondary stimulus such as an electric field or heat to stimulate neurons. The ease of surface modification and bio-conjugation of nanomaterials facilitates cell-type-specific targeting, designated placement and highly localized membrane activation. This review focuses on nanomaterial-enabled neural stimulation techniques primarily involving opto-electric, opto-thermal, magneto-electric, magneto-thermal and acousto-electric transduction mechanisms. Stimulation techniques based on other possible transduction schemes and general consideration for these emerging neurotechnologies are also discussed.

  17. Stabilization of Soft Soil Using Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaid Hameed Majeed

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Tests were conducted to investigate the influence of using nanomaterials in the modification and stabilization of soft soil. The soft soils were collected from two sites and treated with three nanomaterial types (nano-copper, nano-clay and nano-magnesium. Nanomaterials were added in small amount (≤1.0% by dry weight of the soil. Laboratory tests to determine the Atterberg limits, linear shrinkage, compaction characteristics and unconfined compressive strength were performed. Results of the investigation showed significant improvement in maximum dry density, plasticity index, linear shrinkage and unconfined compressive strength. The improvement is dependent on the type of nanomaterials. The unconfined compressive strength and maximum dry density increased as the nanomaterials content increased until reach a percentage after which the strength will be decrease. Thus, the addition of finer particles such as nanomaterials, even at low doses, could enhance the properties of soil.

  18. Toxicity of nanomaterials; an undermined issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogharabi, Mehdi; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali

    2014-08-15

    Nanomaterials are employed in extensive variety of commercial products such as electronic components, cosmetics, food, sports equipment, biomedical applications, and medicine. With the increasing utilization of engineered nanomaterials, the potential exposure of human to nanoparticles is rapidly increasing. Nowadays when new nanomaterials with new applications are introduced, mostly good and positive effects are mentioned whereas possible hazards arising from nanosize of the compounds are undermined. Toxicology studies of nanomaterials demonstrate some adverse effects in some human organs such as central nerve system, immune system, and lung. There is lack of complete information about human toxicity and environmental waste of nanomaterials. We aimed to highlight current toxicological concerns of potentially useful nanomaterials which are now used in pharmaceutical and biomedical sciences.

  19. Functional DNA-containing nanomaterials: cellular applications in biosensing, imaging, and targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hao; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Lv, Yifan; Gong, Liang; Wang, Ruowen; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Ronghua; Tan, Weihong

    2014-06-17

    -stranded DNA. Nanomaterials can be designed and synthesized in needed sizes and shapes, and they possess unique chemical and physical properties, which make them useful as DNA carriers or assistants, excellent signal reporters, transducers, and amplifiers. When nanomaterials are combined with functional DNAs to create novel assay platforms, highly sensitive biosensing and high-resolution imaging result. For example, gold nanoparticles and graphene oxides can quench fluorescence efficiently to achieve low background and effectively increase the signal-to-background ratio. Meanwhile, gold nanoparticles themselves can be colorimetric reporters because of their different optical absorptions between monodispersion and aggregation. DNA self-assembled nanomaterials contain several properties of both DNA and nanomaterials. Compared with DNA-nanomaterial complexes, DNA self-assembled nanomaterials more closely resemble living beings, and therefore they have lower cytotoxicity at high concentrations. Functional DNA self-assemblies also have high density of DNA for multivalent reaction and three-dimensional nanostructures for cell uptake. Now and in the future, we envision the use of DNA bases in making designer molecules for many challenging applications confronting chemists. With the further development of artificial DNA bases using smart organic synthesis, DNA macromolecules based on elegant molecular assembly approaches are expected to achieve great diversity, additional versatility, and advanced functions.

  20. Stabilization of Soft Soil Using Nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Zaid Hameed Majeed; Mohd Raihan Taha; Ibtehaj Taha Jawad

    2014-01-01

    Tests were conducted to investigate the influence of using nanomaterials in the modification and stabilization of soft soil. The soft soils were collected from two sites and treated with three nanomaterial types (nano-copper, nano-clay and nano-magnesium). Nanomaterials were added in small amount (≤1.0%) by dry weight of the soil. Laboratory tests to determine the Atterberg limits, linear shrinkage, compaction characteristics and unconfined compressive strength were performed. Results of the ...

  1. Stabilization of Soft Soil Using Nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Zaid Hameed Majeed; Mohd Raihan Taha; Ibtehaj Taha Jawad

    2014-01-01

    Tests were conducted to investigate the influence of using nanomaterials in the modification and stabilization of soft soil. The soft soils were collected from two sites and treated with three nanomaterial types (nano-copper, nano-clay and nano-magnesium). Nanomaterials were added in small amount (≤1.0%) by dry weight of the soil. Laboratory tests to determine the Atterberg limits, linear shrinkage, compaction characteristics and unconfined compressive strength were performed. Results of the ...

  2. FORMING AND PRECISION MACHINING TO NANOMATERIALS LUMP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhan Jie; Zhang Jin; Chen Bingkui; Chen Xiaoan

    2004-01-01

    The technology of forming and machining lump nano-materials has been investigated. Grinding, abrasive machining test has been conducted to Fe, Co, Ni and Al lump nano-materials. Experiments have been done to measure grinding force, grinding thermal, machining roughness and micro-hardness. Image analysis is carried out by metallographic and scanning tunnel microscopic microscope. Researches provide the basis data for forming and machining lump nano-materials.

  3. Recent advances in carbon-based dots for electroanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulong, Ying; Xinsheng, Peng

    2016-04-25

    Carbon-based dots represent a new type of quantum dot with unique and well-defined properties owing to their quantum confinement and edge effects, which are widely employed in sensing, light-emitting diodes, nanomedicine, photocatalysis, electrocatalysis, bioimaging, etc. In this review, we update the latest research results of carbon-based dots in this rapidly evolving field of electroanalysis, place emphases on their applications as sensors and give future perspectives for developing more smart sensors.

  4. Interactions of engineered nanomaterials in physiological media and implications for in vitro dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joel; Deloid, Glen; Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; Demokritou, Philip

    2013-06-01

    In vitro toxicity assays are efficient and inexpensive tools for screening the increasing number of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) entering the consumer market. However, the data produced by in vitro studies often vary substantially among different studies and from in vivo data. In part, these discrepancies may be attributable to lack of standardisation in dispersion protocols and inadequate characterisation of particle-media interactions which may affect the particle kinetics and the dose delivered to cells. In this study, a novel approach for preparation of monodisperse, stabilised liquid suspensions is presented and coupled with a numerical model which estimates delivered dose values. Empirically derived material- and media-specific functions are presented for each media-ENM system that can be used to convert administered doses to delivered doses. The interactions of ENMs with a variety of physiologic media were investigated and the importance of this approach was demonstrated by in vitro cytotoxicity assays using THP-1 macrophages.

  5. Nano-material and method of fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menchhofer, Paul A; Seals, Roland D; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2015-02-03

    A fluffy nano-material and method of manufacture are described. At 2000.times. magnification the fluffy nanomaterial has the appearance of raw, uncarded wool, with individual fiber lengths ranging from approximately four microns to twenty microns. Powder-based nanocatalysts are dispersed in the fluffy nanomaterial. The production of fluffy nanomaterial typically involves flowing about 125 cc/min of organic vapor at a pressure of about 400 torr over powder-based nano-catalysts for a period of time that may range from approximately thirty minutes to twenty-four hours.

  6. A novel method for preparing monodispersed polystyrene nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Kaiyi; WANG Zhaoqun

    2007-01-01

    A preparation manner for monodispersed polystyrene(PS)nanoparticles polymerized by using a novel addition procedure of a monomer is suggested.In systems containing a smaller amount of surfactant compared with conventional microemulsion polymerization,the polymerization processes consists of three stages:adding dropwise the first part of the monomer for a few minutes at 80℃ and polymerizing for 1 h;adding collectively the residual part of the monomer and polymerizing at the same temperature for another 1 h;and then polymerizing at 85℃ for another 1 h.Based on discussions on the nucleation mechanism of particles in the polymerization system,the influences of monomer weight added dropwise,and amounts of initiator and emulsifier on the size and distribution of PS particles were investigated.PS nanoparticles with smaller diameter such as a number-average diameter of 18.7 nm and better monodispersity were obtained since the dropped styrene amount was suitable under 20wt-% emulsifier amount and 3wt-% initiator amount based on the monomer.

  7. Interchain tube pressure effect in extensional flows of oligomer diluted nearly monodisperse polystyrene melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Huang, Qian

    2014-01-01

    We have derived a constitutive equation to explain the extensional dynamics of oligomer-diluted monodisperse polymers, if the length of the diluent has at least two Kuhn steps. These polymer systems have a flow dynamics which distinguish from pure monodisperse melts and solutions thereof, if the ...

  8. Monodisperse Femto- to Atto-liter Droplet Formation Using a Nano-Microchannel Interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shui, Lingling; Berg, van den Albert; Eijkel, Jan C.T.; Kim, Tae Song; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Chung, Taek-Dong; Jeon, Noo Li; Suh, Kahp-Yang; Choo, Jaebum; Kim, Yong-Kweon

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate the production of sub-micrometer diameter monodisperse droplets by using a nano-micro channel interface. A perfectly steady nanoscopic liquid filament can be formed by a geometric confinement which eventually gives rise to a stable production of nearly perfectly monodisperse droplets.

  9. Surface properties of poly(ethylene oxide)-based segmented block copolymers with monodisperse hard segments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Husken, D.; Feijen, Jan; Gaymans, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    The surface properties of segmented block copolymers based on poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) segments and monodisperse crystallizable tetra-amide segments were studied. The monodisperse crystallizable segments (T6T6T) were based on terephthalate (T) and hexamethylenediamine (6). Due to the crystallinity

  10. Nanomaterials vs Ambient Ultrafine Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stone, Vicki; Miller, Mark R.; Clift, Martin J. D.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A rich literature exists that has demonstrated adverse human health effects following exposure to ambient air particulate matter (PM), with strong support for an important role for ultrafine (nano-sized) particles. At present, relatively little human health or epidemiology data exists...... for engineered nanomaterials (NM) despite clear parallels in their physicochemical properties and biological actions in in vitro models. OBJECTIVES: NMs are available in a range of physicochemical characteristics which allow a more systematic toxicological analysis. Therefore, the study of ultrafine particles...

  11. Environmental assessment of nanomaterial use in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjølholt, Jesper; Gottschalk, Fadri; Brinch, Anna

    This is the concluding report of the project "Nanomaterials – occurrence and effects in the Danish environment" (abbreviated NanoDEN), which part the Danish Government's initiative "Better Control of Nanomaterials" (“Bedre styr på nanomaterialer”) which is administered by the Danish Environmental...

  12. Environmental fate and behaviour of nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Nanna Isabella Bloch; Skjolding, Lars Michael; Hansen, Steffen Foss

    In the current report, the existing knowledge on the fate of nanomaterials in the environment is reviewed and the major knowledge gaps are identified.......In the current report, the existing knowledge on the fate of nanomaterials in the environment is reviewed and the major knowledge gaps are identified....

  13. In vitro assessments of nanomaterial toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Clinton F; Grainger, David W

    2009-06-21

    Nanotechnology has grown from a scientific interest to a major industry with both commodity and specialty nanomaterial exposure to global populations and ecosystems. Sub-micron materials are currently used in a wide variety of consumer products and in clinical trials as drug delivery carriers and imaging agents. Due to the expected growth in this field and the increasing public exposure to nanomaterials, both from intentional administration and inadvertent contact, improved characterization and reliable toxicity screening tools are required for new and existing nanomaterials. This review discusses current methodologies used to assess nanomaterial physicochemical properties and their in vitro effects. Current methods lack the desired sensitivity, reliability, correlation and sophistication to provide more than limited, often equivocal, pieces of the overall nanomaterial performance parameter space, particularly in realistic physiological or environmental models containing cells, proteins and solutes. Therefore, improved physicochemical nanomaterial assays are needed to provide accurate exposure risk assessments and genuine predictions of in vivo behavior and therapeutic value. Simpler model nanomaterial systems in buffer do not accurately duplicate this complexity or predict in vivo behavior. A diverse portfolio of complementary material characterization tools and bioassays are required to validate nanomaterial properties in physiology.

  14. Cellulose Nanomaterials in Water Treatment Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Carpenter, Alexis Wells; de Lannoy, Charles François; Mark R. Wiesner

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose nanomaterials are naturally occurring with unique structural, mechanical and optical properties. While the paper and packaging, automotive, personal care, construction, and textiles industries have recognized cellulose nanomaterials’ potential, we suggest cellulose nanomaterials have great untapped potential in water treatment technologies. In this review, we gather evidence of cellulose nanomaterials’ beneficial role in environmental remediation and membranes for water filtration, ...

  15. Self-assembled nanomaterials for photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Pei-Pei; Zhao, Xiao-Xiao; Wang, Hao

    2016-02-07

    In recent years, extensive endeavors have been paid to construct functional self-assembled nanomaterials for various applications such as catalysis, separation, energy and biomedicines. To date, different strategies have been developed for preparing nanomaterials with diversified structures and functionalities via fine tuning of self-assembled building blocks. In terms of biomedical applications, bioimaging technologies are urgently calling for high-efficient probes/contrast agents for high-performance bioimaging. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is an emerging whole-body imaging modality offering high spatial resolution, deep penetration and high contrast in vivo. The self-assembled nanomaterials show high stability in vivo, specific tolerance to sterilization and prolonged half-life stability and desirable targeting properties, which is a kind of promising PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. Herein, we focus on summarizing recent advances in smart self-assembled nanomaterials with NIR absorption as PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. According to the preparation strategy of the contrast agents, the self-assembled nanomaterials are categorized into two groups, i.e., the ex situ and in situ self-assembled nanomaterials. The driving forces, assembly modes and regulation of PA properties of self-assembled nanomaterials and their applications for long-term imaging, enzyme activity detection and aggregation-induced retention (AIR) effect for diagnosis and therapy are emphasized. Finally, we conclude with an outlook towards future developments of self-assembled nanomaterials for PA imaging.

  16. Antimicrobial and biocompatible properties of nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ul-Islam, M; Shehzad, A; Khan, S; Khattak, W A; Ullah, M W; Park, J K

    2014-01-01

    The rapid development of drug-resistant characteristics in pathogenic viral, bacterial, and fungal species and the consequent spread of infectious diseases are currently receiving serious attention. Indeed, there is a pressing demand to explore novel materials and develop new strategies that can address these issues of serious concern. Nanomaterials are currently proving to be the most capable therapeutic agents to cope with such hazards. The exceptional physiochemical properties and impressive antimicrobial capabilities of nanoparticles have provoked their utilization in biomedical fields. Nanomaterials of both organic and inorganic nature have shown the capabilities of disrupting microbial cells through different mechanisms. Along with the direct influence on the microbial cell membrane, DNA and proteins, these nanomaterials produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that damage cell components and viruses. Currently, a serious hazard associated with these antimicrobial nanomaterials is their toxicity to human and animal cells. Extensive studies have reported the dose, time, and cell-dependent toxicology of various nanomaterials, and some have shown excellent biocompatible properties. Nevertheless, there is still debate regarding the use of nanomaterials for medical applications. Therefore, in this review, the antimicrobial activities of various nanomaterials with details of their acting mechanisms were compiled. The relative toxic and biocompatible behavior of nanomaterials emphasized in this study provides information pertaining to their practical applicability in medical fields.

  17. Multi-metal oxide ceramic nanomaterial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Stephen; Liu, Shuangyi; Huang, Limin

    2016-06-07

    A convenient and versatile method for preparing complex metal oxides is disclosed. The method uses a low temperature, environmentally friendly gel-collection method to form a single phase nanomaterial. In one embodiment, the nanomaterial consists of Ba.sub.AMn.sub.BTi.sub.CO.sub.D in a controlled stoichiometry.

  18. Organic nanomaterials: synthesis, characterization, and device applications

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in nanoscience and nanotechnology have given rise to a new generation of functional organic nanomaterials with controlled morphology and well-defined properties, which enable a broad range of useful applications. This book explores some of the most important of these organic nanomaterials, describing how they are synthesized and characterized. Moreover, the book explains how researchers have incorporated organic nanomaterials into devices for real-world applications.Featuring contributions from an international team of leading nanoscientists, Organic Nanomaterials is divided into five parts:Part One introduces the fundamentals of nanomaterials and self-assembled nanostructuresPart Two examines carbon nanostructures—from fullerenes to carbon nanotubes to graphene—reporting on properties, theoretical studies, and applicationsPart Three investigates key aspects of some inorganic materials, self-assembled monolayers,...

  19. Auxetic nanomaterials: Recent progress and future development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jin-Wu; Kim, Sung Youb; Park, Harold S.

    2016-12-01

    Auxetic materials (materials with negative Poisson's ratio) and nanomaterials have independently been, for many years, two of the most active research fields in material science. Recently, these formerly independent fields have begun to intersect in new and interesting ways due to the recent discovery of auxeticity in nanomaterials like graphene, metal nanoplates, black phosphorus, and others. Here, we review the research emerging at the intersection of auxeticity and nanomaterials. We first survey the atomistic mechanisms, both intrinsic and extrinsic, that have been found, primarily through atomistic simulations, to cause auxeticity in nanomaterials. We then outline the available experimental evidence for auxetic nanomaterials. In order to lay the groundwork for future work in this exciting area, we close by discussing several future prospects as well as the current challenges in this field.

  20. Nanomaterial Based Sensors for NASA Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehne, Jessica E.

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), carbon nanofibers (CNFs), graphene and metal nanowires have shown interesting electronic properties and therefore have been pursued for a variety of space applications requiring ultrasensitive and light-weight sensor and electronic devices. We have been pursuing development of chemical and biosensors using carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers for the last several years and this talk will present the benefits of nanomaterials these applications. More recently, printing approaches to manufacturing these devices have been explored as a strategy that is compatible to a microgravity environment. Nanomaterials are either grown in house or purchased and processed as electrical inks. Chemical modification or coatings are added to the nanomaterials to tailor the nanomaterial to the exact application. The development of printed chemical sensors and biosensors will be discussed for applications ranging from crew life support to exploration missions.

  1. Antitumor therapy using nanomaterial-mediated thermolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawdon, Alicia; Weydemeyer, Ethan; Peng, Ching-An

    2014-09-01

    Nanomaterial-based systems present several novel therapeutic opportunities for cancer therapy based solely upon their unique physical and chemical properties. Despite advances in current cancer treatment, collateral damage to neighboring healthy tissues still cannot be avoided. By exploiting the strong optical and/or electromagnetic properties offered by nanomaterials, they are being employed as thermal nanoscalpels for the ablation of cancer cells. Through surface functionalization, these nanomaterials can be specifically targeted to tumorous tissue allowing for an increase in therapeutic potential and reduction in side effects. Moreover, these features provide nanomaterials with a tunable surface which can be used to modify optical, magnetic, thermal and mechanical properties. This review highlights carbon nanomaterials, nanogolds, magnetic nanoparticles and emerging hybrids applied for the thermolysis of cancer cells.

  2. Carbon Nanomaterials: Efficacy and Safety for Nanomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuo Tsutsumi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanomaterials, including fullerenes, carbon nanohorns, and carbon nanotubes, are increasingly being used in various fields owing to these materials’ unique, size-dependent functions and physicochemical properties. Recently, because of their high variability and stability, carbon nanomaterials have been explored as a novel tool for the delivery of therapeutic molecules including peptide and nucleic acid cancer drugs. However, insufficient information is available regarding the safety of carbon nanomaterials for human health, even though such information is vital for the development of safe and effective nanomedicine technologies. In this review, we discuss currently available information regarding the safety of carbon nanomaterials in nanomedicine applications, including information obtained from our own studies; and we discuss types of carbon nanomaterials that demonstrate particular promise for safe nanomedicine technologies.

  3. Tiny Medicine: Nanomaterial-Based Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Watts

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Tiny medicine refers to the development of small easy to use devices that can help in the early diagnosis and treatment of disease. Early diagnosis is the key to successfully treating many diseases. Nanomaterial-based biosensors utilize the unique properties of biological and physical nanomaterials to recognize a target molecule and effect transduction of an electronic signal. In general, the advantages of nanomaterial-based biosensors are fast response, small size, high sensitivity, and portability compared to existing large electrodes and sensors. Systems integration is the core technology that enables tiny medicine. Integration of nanomaterials, microfluidics, automatic samplers, and transduction devices on a single chip provides many advantages for point of care devices such as biosensors. Biosensors are also being used as new analytical tools to study medicine. Thus this paper reviews how nanomaterials can be used to build biosensors and how these biosensors can help now and in the future to detect disease and monitor therapies.

  4. Microwave chemistry for inorganic nanomaterials synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilecka, Idalia; Niederberger, Markus

    2010-08-01

    This Feature Article gives an overview of microwave-assisted liquid phase routes to inorganic nanomaterials. Whereas microwave chemistry is a well-established technique in organic synthesis, its use in inorganic nanomaterials' synthesis is still at the beginning and far away from having reached its full potential. However, the rapidly growing number of publications in this field suggests that microwave chemistry will play an outstanding role in the broad field of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology. This article is not meant to give an exhaustive overview of all nanomaterials synthesized by the microwave technique, but to discuss the new opportunities that arise as a result of the unique features of microwave chemistry. Principles, advantages and limitations of microwave chemistry are introduced, its application in the synthesis of different classes of functional nanomaterials is discussed, and finally expected benefits for nanomaterials' synthesis are elaborated.

  5. Techniques for Investigating Molecular Toxicology of Nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanli; Li, Chenchen; Yao, Chenjie; Ding, Lin; Lei, Zhendong; Wu, Minghong

    2016-06-01

    Nanotechnology has been a rapidly developing field in the past few decades, resulting in the more and more exposure of nanomaterials to human. The increased applications of nanomaterials for industrial, commercial and life purposes, such as fillers, catalysts, semiconductors, paints, cosmetic additives and drug carriers, have caused both obvious and potential impacts on human health and environment. Nanotoxicology is used to study the safety of nanomaterials and has grown at the historic moment. Molecular toxicology is a new subdiscipline to study the interactions and impacts of materials at the molecular level. To better understand the relationship between the molecular toxicology and nanomaterials, this review summarizes the typical techniques and methods in molecular toxicology which are applied when investigating the toxicology of nanomaterials and include six categories: namely; genetic mutation detection, gene expression analysis, DNA damage detection, chromosomal aberration analysis, proteomics, and metabolomics. Each category involves several experimental techniques and methods.

  6. Nanomaterials for Cardiac Myocyte Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Amezcua

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Since their synthesizing introduction to the research community, nanomaterials have infiltrated almost every corner of science and engineering. Over the last decade, one such field has begun to look at using nanomaterials for beneficial applications in tissue engineering, specifically, cardiac tissue engineering. During a myocardial infarction, part of the cardiac muscle, or myocardium, is deprived of blood. Therefore, the lack of oxygen destroys cardiomyocytes, leaving dead tissue and possibly resulting in the development of arrhythmia, ventricular remodeling, and eventual heart failure. Scarred cardiac muscle results in heart failure for millions of heart attack survivors worldwide. Modern cardiac tissue engineering research has developed nanomaterial applications to combat heart failure, preserve normal heart tissue, and grow healthy myocardium around the infarcted area. This review will discuss the recent progress of nanomaterials for cardiovascular tissue engineering applications through three main nanomaterial approaches: scaffold designs, patches, and injectable materials.

  7. MONODISPERSED AND NANOSIZED DENDRIMER/POLYSTYRENE LATEX PARTICLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changfeng Yi; Zushun Xu; Warren T. Ford

    2004-01-01

    Emulsion polymerization of styrene was carried out using dendrimer DAB-dendr-(NH2)64 as seed. The size and size distribution of the emulsion particles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS), and the effects of emulsion polymerization conditions on the preparation of emulsion particle were investigated. It has been found that the nanosized dendrimer/polystyrene polymer emulsion particles obtained were in the range of 26~64 nm in diameter, and were monodisperse; the size and size distribution of emulsion particles were influenced by the contents of dendrimer DAB-dendr-(NH2)64, emulsifier and initiator, as well as the pH value.

  8. Selection of quasi-monodisperse super-micron aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rösch, Michael; Pfeifer, Sascha; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Stratmann, Frank

    2014-05-01

    Size-segregated quasi monodisperse particles are essential for e.g. fundamental research concerning cloud microphysical processes. Commonly a DMA (Differential Mobility Analyzer) is used to produce quasi-monodisperse submicron particles. Thereto first, polydisperse aerosol particles are bipolarly charged by a neutralizer, and then selected according to their electrical mobility with the DMA [Knutson et al. 1975]. Selecting a certain electrical mobility with a DMA results in a particle size distribution, which contains singly charged particles as well as undesired multiply charged larger particles. Often these larger particles need to either be removed from the generated aerosol or their signals have to be corrected for in the data inversion and interpretation process. This problem becomes even more serious when considering super-micron particles. Here we will present two different techniques for generating quasi-monodisperse super-micron aerosol particles with no or only an insignificant number of larger sized particles being present. First, we use a combination of a cyclone with adjustable aerodynamic cut-off diameter and our custom-built Maxi-DMA [Raddatz et al. 2013]. The cyclone removes particles larger than the desired ones prior to mobility selection with the DMA. This results in a reduction of the number of multiply charged particles of up to 99.8%. Second, we utilize a new combination of cyclone and PCVI (Pumped Counterflow Virtual Impactor), which is based on purely inertial separation and avoids particle charging. The PCVI instrument was previously described by Boulter et al. (2006) and Kulkarni et al. (2011). With our two setups we are able to produce quasi-monodisperse aerosol particles in the diameter range from 0.5 to 4.4 µm without a significant number of larger undesired particles being present. Acknowledgements: This work was done within the framework of the DFG funded Ice Nucleation research UnIT (INUIT, FOR 1525) under WE 4722/1-1. References

  9. Monodisperse Clusters in Charged Attractive Colloids: Linear Renormalization of Repulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Růžička, Štěpán; Allen, Michael P

    2015-08-11

    Experiments done on polydisperse particles of cadmium selenide have recently shown that the particles form spherical isolated clusters with low polydispersity of cluster size. The computer simulation model of Xia et al. ( Nat. Nanotechnol. 2011 , 6 , 580 ) explaining this behavior used a short-range van der Waals attraction combined with a variable long-range screened electrostatic repulsion, depending linearly on the volume of the clusters. In this work, we term this dependence "linear renormalization" of the repulsive term, and we use advanced Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the kinetically slowed down phase separation in a similar but simpler model. We show that amorphous drops do not dissolve and crystallinity evolves very slowly under linear renormalization, and we confirm that low polydispersity of cluster size can also be achieved using this model. The results indicate that the linear renormalization generally leads to monodisperse clusters.

  10. Solvent: A Key in Digestive Ripening for Monodisperse Au Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Qi, Xuan; Zhang, Xuemin; Wang, Tieqiang; Li, Yunong; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Shuang; Zhou, Jun; Fu, Yu

    2017-01-01

    This work has mainly investigated the influence of the solvent on the nanoparticles distribution in digestive ripening. The experiments suggested that the solvents played a key role in digestive ripening of Au nanoparticles (Au NPs). For the benzol solvents, the resulting size distribution of Au NPs was inversely related to the solvent polarity. It may be interpreted by the low Gibbs free energy of nanoparticles in the high polarity medium, which was supposedly in favor of reducing the nanoparticles distribution. Through digestive ripening in the highly polar benzol solvent of p-chlorotoluene, monodisperse Au NPs with relative standard deviation (RSD) of 4.8% were achieved. This indicated that digestive ripening was an effective and practical way to prepare high-quality nanoparticles, which holds great promise for the nanoscience and nanotechnology.

  11. Effect of pressure on nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Uma D. [Department of Physics, G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar-263145 (India); Kumar, M., E-mail: munish_dixit@yahoo.co [Department of Physics, G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar-263145 (India)

    2010-07-01

    A simple theory is proposed to predict the effect of pressure on nanomaterials, which gets support from the Mie-Gruneisen theory of thermal expansivity as formulated by Born and Huang. We considered LiAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} to study the effect of pressure in the light of other formulations, viz. Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet and Kumar. The results obtained are found to present a good agreement with the experimental data as well as other formulations. To confirm the validity of the formulation, we applied the method to study the compression behaviour of a number of nanomaterials, viz. CdSe, Rb{sub 3}C{sub 60}, Ni(20 nm), carbon nanotube, {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {epsilon}-Fe (Hexagonal iron), MgO, CuO, {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (67 nm), {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {alpha}-Fe (filled nanotube), TiO{sub 2} (anatase), 3C-SiC (30 nm), TiO{sub 2} (rutile phase), Zr{sub 0.1}Ti{sub 0.9}O{sub 2}, AlN (hexagonal), {gamma}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, Ni-filled MWCNT and Fe-filled MWCNT. The results obtained are compared with the experimental data. A good agreement between theory and experiment demonstrates the validity of the present approach.

  12. Nanochemistry and nanomaterials for photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guanying; Seo, Jangwon; Yang, Chunhui; Prasad, Paras N

    2013-11-01

    Nanochemistry and nanomaterials provide numerous opportunities for a new generation of photovoltaics with high solar energy conversion efficiencies at low fabrication cost. Quantum-confined nanomaterials and polymer-inorganic nanocomposites can be tailored to harvest sun light over a broad range of the spectrum, while plasmonic structures offer effective ways to reduce the thickness of light-absorbing layers. Multiple exciton generation, singlet exciton fission, photon down-conversion, and photon up-conversion realized in nanostructures, create significant interest for harvesting underutilized ultraviolet and currently unutilized infrared photons. Nanochemical interface engineering of nanoparticle surfaces and junction-interfaces enable enhanced charge separation and collection. In this review, we survey these recent advances employed to introduce new concepts for improving the solar energy conversion efficiency, and reduce the device fabrication cost in photovoltaic technologies. The review concludes with a summary of contributions already made by nanochemistry. It then describes the challenges and opportunities in photovoltaics where the chemical community can play a vital role.

  13. Progress in electronics and photonics with nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishra, Yogendra Kumar; Murugan, Arul; Kotakoski, Jani

    2017-01-01

    Nanomaterials have been at the center of attraction for almost five decades as their contributions to different disciplines such as electronics, photonics and medicine are enormous. Various kinds of nanomaterials have been developed and are currently utilized in innumerable applications. Neverthe......Nanomaterials have been at the center of attraction for almost five decades as their contributions to different disciplines such as electronics, photonics and medicine are enormous. Various kinds of nanomaterials have been developed and are currently utilized in innumerable applications....... Nevertheless, their simple realization and easy and efficient upscaling are topics under intense investigation. Innovative strategies have been adopted for nanomaterial synthesis and their usability. Here, we provide a brief overview on nanomaterials ranging from basic understanding of their structure......-property relationship to advanced applications. This editorial covers various aspects about nanomaterials, which will be useful/attractive for beginners in the field of nanotechnology as well as for experts and for industrialists looking forward to exploit them for real world applications....

  14. Nanomaterials for Engineering Stem Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerativitayanan, Punyavee; Carrow, James K; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K

    2015-08-05

    Recent progress in nanotechnology has stimulated the development of multifunctional biomaterials for tissue engineering applications. Synergistic interactions between nanomaterials and stem cell engineering offer numerous possibilities to address some of the daunting challenges in regenerative medicine, such as controlling trigger differentiation, immune reactions, limited supply of stem cells, and engineering complex tissue structures. Specifically, the interactions between stem cells and their microenvironment play key roles in controlling stem cell fate, which underlines therapeutic success. However, the interactions between nanomaterials and stem cells are not well understood, and the effects of the nanomaterials shape, surface morphology, and chemical functionality on cellular processes need critical evaluation. In this Review, focus is put on recent development in nanomaterial-stem cell interactions, with specific emphasis on their application in regenerative medicine. Further, the emerging technologies based on nanomaterials developed over the past decade for stem cell engineering are reviewed, as well as the potential applications of these nanomaterials in tissue regeneration, stem cell isolation, and drug/gene delivery. It is anticipated that the enhanced understanding of nanomaterial-stem cell interactions will facilitate improved biomaterial design for a range of biomedical and biotechnological applications.

  15. Future prospects of luminescent nanomaterial based security inks: from synthesis to anti-counterfeiting applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pawan; Singh, Satbir; Gupta, Bipin Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Counterfeiting of valuable documents, currency and branded products is a challenging problem that has serious economic, security and health ramifications for governments, businesses and consumers all over the world. It is estimated that counterfeiting represents a multi-billion dollar underground economy with counterfeit products being produced on a large scale every year. Counterfeiting is an increasingly high-tech crime and calls for high-tech solutions to prevent and deter the acts of counterfeiting. The present review briefly outlines and addresses the key challenges in this area, including the above mentioned concerns for anti-counterfeiting applications. This article describes a unique combination of all possible kinds of security ink formulations based on lanthanide doped luminescent nanomaterials, quantum dots (semiconductor and carbon based), metal organic frameworks as well as plasmonic nanomaterials for their possible use in anti-counterfeiting applications. Moreover, in this review, we have briefly discussed and described the historical background of luminescent nanomaterials, basic concepts and detailed synthesis methods along with their characterization. Furthermore, we have also discussed the methods adopted for the fabrication and design of luminescent security inks, various security printing techniques and their anti-counterfeiting applications.

  16. Assembly of ordered carbon shells on semiconducting nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Eli Anguelova; Sutter, Peter Werner

    2012-10-02

    In some embodiments of the invention, encapsulated semiconducting nanomaterials are described. In certain embodiments the nanostructures described are semiconducting nanomaterials encapsulated with ordered carbon shells. In some aspects a method for producing encapsulated semiconducting nanomaterials is disclosed. In some embodiments applications of encapsulated semiconducting nanomaterials are described.

  17. Assembly of ordered carbon shells on semiconducting nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Eli Anguelova; Sutter, Peter Werner

    2010-05-11

    In some embodiments of the invention, encapsulated semiconducting nanomaterials are described. In certain embodiments the nanostructures described are semiconducting nanomaterials encapsulated with ordered carbon shells. In some aspects a method for producing encapsulated semiconducting nanomaterials is disclosed. In some embodiments applications of encapsulated semiconducting nanomaterials are described.

  18. Piezoelectric nanomaterials for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Menciassi, Arianna

    2012-01-01

    Nanoscale structures and materials have been explored in many biological applications because of their novel and impressive physical and chemical properties. Such properties allow remarkable opportunities to study and interact with complex biological processes. This book analyses the state of the art of piezoelectric nanomaterials and introduces their applications in the biomedical field. Despite their impressive potentials, piezoelectric materials have not yet received significant attention for bio-applications. This book shows that the exploitation of piezoelectric nanoparticles in nanomedicine is possible and realistic, and their impressive physical properties can be useful for several applications, ranging from sensors and transducers for the detection of biomolecules to “sensible” substrates for tissue engineering or cell stimulation.

  19. Chemical Design of Functional Nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeblad, Kresten

    zeolites behave like molecular sieves capable of separating molecules by their size. This property in combination with acidic properties resulting from hydroxyl groups bridging silicon and aluminum ions in the zeolite framework make zeolites interesting as shapeselective solid acid catalysts. Unfortunately......This thesis deals with a very specific class of functional nanomaterials known as mesoporous zeolites. Zeolites are a class of crystalline aluminosilicate minerals characterized by featuring pores or cavities of molecular dimensions as part of their crystal structure. Mesoporous zeolites...... and the meso-/macropores. The main methods for preparing mesoporous zeolite single crystals are by crystallization of the zeolite in the presence of carbon which is subsequently removed by combustion or by subjecting normal purely microporous zeolites to alkaline treatments resulting in mesopore formation...

  20. Green chemistry of carbon nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiuk, Elena V; Basiuk, Vladimir A

    2014-01-01

    The global trend of looking for more ecologically friendly, "green" techniques manifested itself in the chemistry of carbon nanomaterials. The main principles of green chemistry emphasize how important it is to avoid the use, or at least to reduce the consumption, of organic solvents for a chemical process. And it is precisely this aspect that was systematically addressed and emphasized by our research group since the very beginning of our work on the chemistry of carbon nanomaterials in early 2000s. The present review focuses on the results obtained to date on solvent-free techniques for (mainly covalent) functionalization of fullerene C60, single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs and MWNTs, respectively), as well as nanodiamonds (NDs). We designed a series of simple and fast functionalization protocols based on thermally activated reactions with chemical compounds stable and volatile at 150-200 degrees C under reduced pressure, when not only the reactions take place at a high rate, but also excess reagents are spontaneously removed from the functionalized material, thus making its purification unnecessary. The main two classes of reagents are organic amines and thiols, including bifunctional ones, which can be used in conjunction with different forms of nanocarbons. The resulting chemical processes comprise nucleophilic addition of amines and thiols to fullerene C60 and to defect sites of pristine MWNTs, as well as direct amidation of carboxylic groups of oxidized nanotubes (mainly SWNTs) and ND. In the case of bifunctional amines and thiols, reactions of the second functional group can give rise to cross-linking effects, or be employed for further derivatization steps.

  1. Carbon Nanomaterials for Road Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaporotskova Irina Vladimirovna

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The requirement of developing and modernizing the roads in Russia and in the Volgograd region in particular, is based on need of expanding the directions of scientific research on road and transport complexes. They have to be aimed at the development of the theory of transport streams, traffic safety increase, and, first of all, at the application of original methods of road development and modernization, introduction of modern technologies and road-building materials.On the basis of the analysis of the plans for transportation sphere development in the Volgograd region assuming the need to apply the new technologies allowing to create qualitative paving, the authors propose the technology of creating a heavy-duty paving with the use of carbon nanomaterial. The knowledge on strengthening the characteristics of carbon nanotubes is a unique material for nanotechnology development which allowed to assume the analysis of general information about asphalt concrete. The analysis showed that carbon nanotubes can be used for improvement of operational characteristics of asphalt concrete, and it is possible to carry out additives of nanotubes in hot as well as in cold bitumen. The article contains the basic principles of creation of the new road material received by means of bitumen reinforcing by carbon nanotubes. The structures received by the offered technique binding on the basis of the bitumens modified by carbon nanomaterial can be used for coverings and bases on highways of all categories in all road and climatic zones of Russia. The technical result consists in increasing the durability and elasticity of the received asphalt covering, and also the increase of water resistance, heat resistance and frost resistance, the expansion of temperature range of its laying in the field of negative temperatures.

  2. Stimuli responsive nanomaterials for controlled release applications

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Song

    2012-01-01

    The controlled release of therapeutics has been one of the major challenges for scientists and engineers during the past three decades. Coupled with excellent biocompatibility profiles, various nanomaterials have showed great promise for biomedical applications. Stimuli-responsive nanomaterials guarantee the controlled release of cargo to a given location, at a specific time, and with an accurate amount. In this review, we have combined the major stimuli that are currently used to achieve the ultimate goal of controlled and targeted release by "smart" nanomaterials. The most heavily explored strategies include (1) pH, (2) enzymes, (3) redox, (4) magnetic, and (5) light-triggered release.

  3. Performance Enhancement of Carbon Nanomaterials for Supercapacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin M. Saleem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes, carbon nanofibers, and graphene are exploited extensively due to their unique electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties and recently investigated for energy storage application (supercapacitor due to additional high specific surface area and chemical inertness properties. The supercapacitor is an energy storage device which, in addition to long cycle life (one million, can give energy density higher than parallel plate capacitor and power density higher than battery. In this paper, carbon nanomaterials and their composites are reviewed for prospective use as electrodes for supercapacitor. Moreover, different physical and chemical treatments on these nanomaterials which can potentially enhance the capacitance are also reviewed.

  4. Toxicology and cellular effect of manufactured nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fanqing

    2014-07-22

    The increasing use of nanotechnology in consumer products and medical applications underlies the importance of understanding its potential toxic effects to people and the environment. Herein are described methods and assays to predict and evaluate the cellular effects of nanomaterial exposure. Exposing cells to nanomaterials at cytotoxic doses induces cell cycle arrest and increases apoptosis/necrosis, activates genes involved in cellular transport, metabolism, cell cycle regulation, and stress response. Certain nanomaterials induce genes indicative of a strong immune and inflammatory response within skin fibroblasts. Furthermore, the described multiwall carbon nanoonions (MWCNOs) can be used as a therapeutic in the treatment of cancer due to its cytotoxicity.

  5. Graphene-based nanomaterials and their electrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumera, Martin

    2010-11-01

    Graphene-based nanomaterials are in the forefront of chemical research. This tutorial review provides an introduction to their electrochemistry, its fundamentals and applications. Selected examples of applications in energy storage and sensing are presented. The synthetic methods for preparing graphenes as well as their materials chemistry are thoroughly discussed, as they have a profound influence on the electronic and electrochemical behavior of graphene-related nanomaterials. Inherent electrochemistry and spectroelectrochemistry of graphene nanomaterials is discussed thoroughly. Important application in sensing and energy storage areas are highlighted.

  6. Polydopamine Integrated Nanomaterials and Their Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoping; Huang, Yongshun; Yang, Gang; Li, Jiaxing; Wang, Tingting; Schulz, Olaf H; Jennings, Lisa K

    2015-01-01

    In the past few decades, the applications of nanomaterials in biologic systems have become one of the most studied areas. Many novel syntheses and processing methods have been developed to generate nanomaterials to enhance biomedical applications. Among those methods, polydopamine (PDA) integrated nanomaterials have attracted considerable interest for various types of biomedical applications. This concise review outlines the basic chemistry and material science regarding PDA and discusses its successful applications in drug delivery, biosensing, antifouling and antimicrobial activities, as well as its interaction with cells.

  7. Applied Research of Nanomaterials in Photo-thermal Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Sun Hang; Zuo Xuejun; Liang Gang

    2015-01-01

    In the applied research of nanomaterials in photo-thermal therapy and based on the understanding of the principle of photo-thermal therapy and its medical equipment, this paper analyzes nanomaterials used for photo-thermal therapy, establishes model by the use of comprehensive evaluation method and selects nano-materials that are suiTable for photo-thermal therapy, namely, carbon nanomaterials and precious metal nano-materials. In addition, this paper analyzes the importance of human surgical...

  8. Monodispersed Zinc Oxide Nanoparticle-Dye Dyads and Triads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladfelter, Wayne L. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Blank, David A. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Mann, Kent R. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2017-06-22

    events at a fundamental level. This was combined with the synthesis of a broad range of sensitizers that provide systematic variation of the energetics, excited state dynamics, structure and interfacial bonding. The key is that the monodisperse nature and high dispersibility of the ZnO NCs made these experiments reproducible; in essence, the measurements were on discrete molecular species rather than on the complicated mixtures that resulted from the typical fabrication of functional photovoltaic cells. The monodispersed nature of the NCs also allowed the use of quantum confinement to investigate the role of donor/acceptor energetic alignment in chemically identical systems. The results added significantly to our basic understanding of energy and charge transfer events at molecule-semiconductor interfaces and will help the R&D community realize zinc oxide's full potential in solar cell applications.

  9. Efficient thermolysis route to monodisperse Cu₂ZnSnS₄ nanocrystals with controlled shape and structure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Guo, Guobiao; Ji, Cheng; Huang, Kai; Zha, Chenyang; Wang, Yifeng; Shen, Liming; Gupta, Arunava; Bao, Ningzhong

    2014-01-01

    Monodisperse Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) nanocrystals with tunable shape, crystalline phase, and composition are synthesized by efficient thermolysis of a single source precursor of mixed metal-oleate complexes in hot organic solvents...

  10. Cr/alpha-Cr2O3 monodispersed spherical core-shell particles based solar absorbers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khamlich, S

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Monodispersed spherical core-shell particles of Cr/alpha-Cr2O3 cermet ACG coatings investigated within this contribution could be successfully employed in thermal converters. Their selectivity depends on their chemical, physical and structural...

  11. Facile and Scalable Synthesis of Monodispersed Spherical Capsules with a Mesoporous Shell

    KAUST Repository

    Qi, Genggeng

    2010-05-11

    Monodispersed HMSs with tunable particle size and shell thickness were successfully synthesized using relatively concentrated polystyrene latex templates and a silica precursor in a weakly basic ethanol/water mixture. The particle size of the capsules can vary from 100 nm to micrometers. These highly engineered monodispersed capsules synthesized by a facile and scalable process may find applications in drug delivery, catalysis, separationm or as biological and chemical microreactors. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  12. Preparation of Monodisperse Nanoparticle of Layered Double Hydroxides and Polyoxyethylene Sulfate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Huizhong; QIN Lianjie; ZHANG Hong; YANG Qinzheng; YANG Jing

    2005-01-01

    In order to obtain the bio-molecule/ LDHs nanocomposites having regular crystal structure,three nanocomposites of layered double hydroxides and polyoxyethylene sulfates were prepared by ion-exchange method. TEM analysis reveals that the monodisperse rigid .sphere of approximately 200 nm in diameter could be gotten when the intergallery anion was PEGS-400. Such monodisperse nanoparticle could be used as a promising precursor for preparing bio-molecule/LDHs nanocomposites.

  13. Review of ORD Nanomaterial Case Studies Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    The following is a letter report from the Executive Committee of the BOSC concerning the review of the ORD Nanomaterial Case Studies Workshop: Developing a Comprehensive Environmental Assessment Research Strategy for Nanoscale Titanium Dioxide.

  14. A global view of regulations affecting nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steffen Foss

    2010-01-01

    The 2000s have been characterized by an unprecedented exploration into research and development of nanotechnology and nanomaterials. Despite a slow start, new regulatory initiatives are popping up like mushrooms internationally. Many of these initiatives have yet to materialize themselves...

  15. Modification and characterization of (energetic) nanomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, A.E.D.M. van der; Creyghton, Y.L.M.; Peppel, R.J.E. van de; Abadjieva, E.

    2010-01-01

    Nanomaterials are a topic of increased interest, since they have properties which differ from their macroscopic counterparts. Many applications nowadays take advantage of the new functionalities which natural and manufactured nanoparticles possess. Based on these developments, also the research on

  16. Corrosion protection and control using nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, R

    2012-01-01

    This book covers the use of nanomaterials to prevent corrosion. The first section deals with the fundamentals of corrosion prevention using nanomaterials. Part two includes a series of case studies and applications of nanomaterials for corrosion control.$bCorrosion is an expensive and potentially dangerous problem in many industries. The potential application of different nanostructured materials in corrosion protection, prevention and control is a subject of increasing interest. Corrosion protection and control using nanomaterials explores the potential use of nanotechnology in corrosion control. The book is divided into two parts. Part one looks at the fundamentals of corrosion behaviour and the manufacture of nanocrystalline materials. Chapters discuss the impact of nanotechnology in reducing corrosion cost, and investigate the influence of various factors including thermodynamics, kinetics and grain size on the corrosion behaviour of nanocrystalline materials. There are also chapters on electrodeposition ...

  17. Assessing the Environmental Safety of Engineered Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanotechnology research in the United States is coordinated under the National Nano-technology Initiative with the goal of fostering development and implementation of nanomaterials and products that incorporate them and assuring that they are environmentally safe. The environmen...

  18. Method to synthesize metal chalcogenide monolayer nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Sanchez, Bernadette A.; Boyle, Timothy J.

    2016-12-13

    Metal chalcogenide monolayer nanomaterials can be synthesized from metal alkoxide precursors by solution precipitation or solvothermal processing. The synthesis routes are more scalable, less complex and easier to implement than other synthesis routes.

  19. Exposure assessment method for products containing nanomaterials using a gas sample introduction system for ICP-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Yasuto; Kato, Nobuyuki; Nishiguchi, Kohe; Yoneda, Minoru

    2017-06-01

    General aerosol-measuring instruments allow real-time measurements of air particle concentrations. However, these measurements cannot distinguish free particles from target nanomaterials because they do not differentiate nanomaterials. The purpose of this study is investigation of the quantitative nature of atmospheric nanoparticles using GED (Gas Exchange Device)-ICP-MS to detect and measure nanoparticles as an element. The per particle signal intensity increased proportionally to the volume until the particle size reaches 120 nm. For all particle sizes from 20 nm to 160nm, the measured values of FMPS (Fast Mobility Particle Sizer) were consistently higher than those for ICP-MS. The system will be able to adapt to an exposure assessment of CNT (Carbon Nanotube) because carbon-base materials can be identified and quantified as long as an index element can be found.

  20. Systemic Absorption of Nanomaterials by Oral Exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binderup, Mona-Lise; Bredsdorff, Lea; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    This report and accompanying database systematically evaluates the reliability and relevance of the existing scientific literature regarding systemic absorption of nanomaterials by oral exposure and makes specific recommendations for future testing approaches.......This report and accompanying database systematically evaluates the reliability and relevance of the existing scientific literature regarding systemic absorption of nanomaterials by oral exposure and makes specific recommendations for future testing approaches....

  1. Magnetic nanomaterials undamentals, synthesis and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Sellmyer, David J

    2017-01-01

    Timely and comprehensive, this book presents recent advances in magnetic nanomaterials research, covering the latest developments, including the design and preparation of magnetic nanoparticles, their physical and chemical properties as well as their applications in different fields, including biomedicine, magnetic energy storage, wave–absorbing and water remediation. By allowing researchers to get to the forefront developments related to magnetic nanomaterials in various disciplines, this is invaluable reading for the nano, magnetic, energy, medical, and environmental communities.

  2. Nanomaterials for Hydrogen Storage Applications: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Niemann, Michael U.; Sesha S. Srinivasan; Phani, Ayala R.; Ashok Kumar; D. Yogi Goswami; Elias K. Stefanakos

    2008-01-01

    Nanomaterials have attracted great interest in recent years because of the unusual mechanical, electrical, electronic, optical, magnetic and surface properties. The high surface/volume ratio of these materials has significant implications with respect to energy storage. Both the high surface area and the opportunity for nanomaterial consolidation are key attributes of this new class of materials for hydrogen storage devices. Nanostructured systems including carbon nanotubes, nano-magnesium ba...

  3. Anisotropic nanomaterials: structure, growth, assembly, and functions

    OpenAIRE

    Panikkanvalappil R. Sajanlal; Theruvakkattil S. Sreeprasad; Samal, Akshaya K.; Thalappil Pradeep

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge over the shape of nanomaterials is a critical factor in designing devices with desired functions. Due to this reason, systematic efforts have been made to synthesize materials of diverse shape in the nanoscale regime. Anisotropic nanomaterials are a class of materials in which their properties are direction-dependent and more than one structural parameter is needed to describe them. Their unique and fine-tuned physical and chemical properties make them ideal candidates...

  4. Periodic jetting and monodisperse jet drops from oblique gas injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Oliver; Gaillard, Antoine; Bird, James C.

    2017-07-01

    When air is blown in a straw or tube near an air-liquid interface, typically one of two behaviors is observed: a dimple in the liquid's surface, or a frenzy of sputtering bubbles, waves, and spray. Here we report and characterize an intermediate regime that can develop when a confined air jet enters the interface at an angle. This regime is oscillatory with a distinct characteristic frequency and can develop periodic angled jets that can break up into monodisperse aerosols. The underlying mechanisms responsible for this highly periodic regime are not well understood. Here we flow a continuous stream of gas through a tube near a liquid surface, observing both optically and acoustically the deformation of the liquid-air interface as various parameters are systematically adjusted. We show that the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is responsible for the inception of waves within a cavity formed by the gas. Inertia, gravity, and capillary forces both shape the cavity and govern the frequency and amplitude of these gas-induced cavity waves. The flapping cavity focuses the waves into a series of periodic jets that can break up into droplets following the Rayleigh-Plateau instability. We present scaling arguments to rationalize the fundamental frequencies driving this system, as well as the conditions that bound the periodic regime. These frequencies and conditions compare well with our experimental results.

  5. Jamming of Monodisperse Cylindrical Grains in Featureless Vertical Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedl, Nicholas; Baxter, G. William

    2014-03-01

    We study jamming of low aspect-ratio cylindrical Delrin grains falling through a featureless vertical channel under the influence of gravity. These grains have an aspect-ratio less than two (H/D aspirin tablets, 35mm film canisters, poker chips, or coins. Monodisperse grains are allowed to fall under the influence of gravity through a uniform channel of square cross-section where the channel width is greater than the grain size and constant along the length of the channel. No combination of grain heights and diameters is equal to the channel width. Collections of grains sometimes form jams, stable structures in which the grains are supported by the channel walls and not by grains or walls beneath them. The probability of a jam occurring and the jam's strength are influenced by the grain dimensions and channel width. We will present experimental measurements of the jamming probability and jam strength and discuss the relationship of these results to other experiments and theories. Supported by an Undergraduate Research Grant from Penn State Erie, The Behrend College.

  6. Biotemplate synthesis of monodispersed iron phosphate hollow microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Feng; Li, Dongxu

    2010-03-01

    Monodispersed iron phosphate hollow microspheres with a high degree of crystallization were prepared through a facile in situ deposition method using rape pollen grains as a biotemplate. The functional group on the surface of the pollen grains could adsorb Fe(3+), which provided the nucleation sites for growth of iron phosphate nanoparticles. After being sintered at 600 degrees C for 10 h, the pollen grains were removed and iron phosphate hollow microspheres were obtained. A scanning electron microscope and x-ray diffraction were applied to characterize the morphology and crystalline structure of the pollen grains, iron phosphate-coated pollen grains and iron phosphate hollow microspheres. Differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravity analyses were performed to investigate the thermal behavior of the iron phosphate-coated pollen grains during the calcinations. Energy dispersive spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were utilized to investigate the interaction between the pollen grains and iron phosphate. The effect of the pollen wall on the surface morphology of these iron phosphate hollow microspheres was also proven in this work.

  7. Monodisperse Platinum and Rhodium Nanoparticles as Model Heterogeneous Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grass, Michael Edward [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Model heterogeneous catalysts have been synthesized and studied to better understand how the surface structure of noble metal nanoparticles affects catalytic performance. In this project, monodisperse rhodium and platinum nanoparticles of controlled size and shape have been synthesized by solution phase polyol reduction, stabilized by polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Model catalysts have been developed using these nanoparticles by two methods: synthesis of mesoporous silica (SBA-15) in the presence of nanoparticles (nanoparticle encapsulation, NE) to form a composite of metal nanoparticles supported on SBA-15 and by deposition of the particles onto a silicon wafer using Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayer deposition. The particle shapes were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution TEM (HRTEM) and the sizes were determined by TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and in the case of NE samples, room temperature H2 and CO adsorption isotherms. Catalytic studies were carried out in homebuilt gas-phase reactors. For the nanoparticles supported on SBA-15, the catalysts are in powder form and were studied using the homebuilt systems as plug-flow reactors. In the case of nanoparticles deposited on silicon wafers, the same systems were operated as batch reactors. This dissertation has focused on the synthesis, characterization, and reaction studies of model noble metal heterogeneous catalysts. Careful control of particle size and shape has been accomplished though solution phase synthesis of Pt and Rh nanoparticles in order to elucidate further structure-reactivity relationships in noble metal catalysis.

  8. Facile Synthesis of Monodisperse Gold Nanocrystals Using Virola oleifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milaneze, Bárbara A.; Oliveira, Jairo P.; Augusto, Ingrid; Keijok, Wanderson J.; Côrrea, Andressa S.; Ferreira, Débora M.; Nunes, Otalíbio C.; Gonçalves, Rita de Cássia R.; Kitagawa, Rodrigo R.; Celante, Vinícius G.; da Silva, André Romero; Pereira, Ana Claudia H.; Endringer, Denise C.; Schuenck, Ricardo P.; Guimarães, Marco C. C.

    2016-10-01

    The development of new routes and strategies for nanotechnology applications that only employ green synthesis has inspired investigators to devise natural systems. Among these systems, the synthesis of gold nanoparticles using plant extracts has been actively developed as an alternative, efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally safe method for producing nanoparticles, and this approach is also suitable for large-scale synthesis. This study reports reproducible and completely natural gold nanocrystals that were synthesized using Virola oleifera extract. V. oleifera resin is rich in epicatechin, ferulic acid, gallic acid, and flavonoids (i.e., quercetin and eriodictyol). These gold nanoparticles play three roles. First, these nanoparticles exhibit remarkable stability based on their zeta potential. Second, these nanoparticles are functionalized with flavonoids, and third, an efficient, economical, and environmentally friendly mechanism can be employed to produce green nanoparticles with organic compounds on the surface. Our model is capable of reducing the resin of V. oleifera, which creates stability and opens a new avenue for biological applications. This method does not require painstaking conditions or hazardous agents and is a rapid, efficient, and green approach for the fabrication of monodisperse gold nanoparticles.

  9. Ultrasonically Aided Electrospray source for monodisperse, charged nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Weidong

    This dissertation presents a new method of producing nearly monodisperse electrospray using charged capillary standing waves. This method, based on the Ultrasonically Aided Electrospraying (UAE) technology concept invented by the author, includes the steps of dispensing a liquid on the top surface of a diaphragm so as to form a liquid film on the surface of the diaphragm, setting the diaphragm into vibration using piezoelectric transducers so as to induce capillary standing waves in the liquid film, applying electric charge to the capillary standing waves so that electrospray is extracted from the crests of the capillary standing waves. Theoretical analysis on the formation of charged particles from charged capillary standing waves at critically stable condition is performed. An experimental UAE system is designed, built, and tested and the performance of this new technology concept is assessed. Experimental results validate the capabilities of the UAE concept. The method has several applications including electric space propulsion, nano particulate technologies, nanoparticle spray coating and painting techniques, semiconductor fabrication and biomedical processes. Two example applications in electric space propulsion and nanoparticle spray coating are introduced.

  10. Spark Ignition of Monodisperse Fuel Sprays. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danis, Allen M.; Cernansky, Nicholas P.; Namer, Izak

    1987-01-01

    A study of spark ignition energy requirements was conducted with a monodisperse spray system allowing independent control of droplet size, equivalent ratio, and fuel type. Minimum ignition energies were measured for n-heptane and methanol sprays characterized at the spark gap in terms of droplet diameter, equivalence ratio (number density) and extent of prevaporization. In addition to sprays, minimum ignition energies were measured for completely prevaporized mixtures of the same fuels over a range of equivalence ratios to provide data at the lower limit of droplet size. Results showed that spray ignition was enhanced with decreasing droplet size and increasing equivalence ratio over the ranges of the parameters studied. By comparing spray and prevaporized ignition results, the existence of an optimum droplet size for ignition was indicated for both fuels. Fuel volatility was seen to be a critical factor in spray ignition. The spray ignition results were analyzed using two different empirical ignition models for quiescent mixtures. Both models accurately predicted the experimental ignition energies for the majority of the spray conditions. Spray ignition was observed to be probabilistic in nature, and ignition was quantified in terms of an ignition frequency for a given spark energy. A model was developed to predict ignition frequencies based on the variation in spark energy and equivalence ratio in the spark gap. The resulting ignition frequency simulations were nearly identical to the experimentally observed values.

  11. Biotemplate synthesis of monodispersed iron phosphate hollow microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Feng; Li Dongxu, E-mail: dongxuli@njut.edu.c [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Jiangsu Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2010-03-15

    Monodispersed iron phosphate hollow microspheres with a high degree of crystallization were prepared through a facile in situ deposition method using rape pollen grains as a biotemplate. The functional group on the surface of the pollen grains could adsorb Fe{sup 3+}, which provided the nucleation sites for growth of iron phosphate nanoparticles. After being sintered at 600 deg. C for 10 h, the pollen grains were removed and iron phosphate hollow microspheres were obtained. A scanning electron microscope and x-ray diffraction were applied to characterize the morphology and crystalline structure of the pollen grains, iron phosphate-coated pollen grains and iron phosphate hollow microspheres. Differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravity analyses were performed to investigate the thermal behavior of the iron phosphate-coated pollen grains during the calcinations. Energy dispersive spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were utilized to investigate the interaction between the pollen grains and iron phosphate. The effect of the pollen wall on the surface morphology of these iron phosphate hollow microspheres was also proven in this work.

  12. Formation of monodisperse mesoporous silica microparticles via spray-drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, Kathryn; Wu, Winston Duo; Wu, Zhangxiong; Liu, Wenjie; Selomulya, Cordelia; Zhao, Dongyuan; Chen, Xiao Dong

    2014-03-15

    In this work, a protocol to synthesize monodisperse mesoporous silica microparticles via a unique microfluidic jet spray-drying route is reported for the first time. The microparticles demonstrated highly ordered hexagonal mesostructures with surface areas ranging from ~900 up to 1500 m(2)/g and pore volumes from ~0.6 to 0.8 cm(3)/g. The particle size could be easily controlled from ~50 to 100 μm from the same diameter nozzle via changing the initial solute content, or changing the drying temperature. The ratio of the surfactant (CTAB) and silica (TEOS), and the amount of water in the precursor were found to affect the degree of ordering of mesopores by promoting either the self-assembly of the surfactant-silica micelles or the condensation of the silica as two competing processes in evaporation induced self-assembly. The drying rate and the curvature of particles also affected the self-assembly of the mesostructure. The particle mesostructure is not influenced by the inlet drying temperature in the range of 92-160 °C, with even a relatively low temperature of 92 °C producing highly ordered mesoporous microparticles. The spray-drying derived mesoporous silica microparticles, while of larger sizes and more rapidly synthesized, showed a comparable performance with the conventional mesoporous silica MCM-41 in controlled release of a dye, Rhodamine B, indicating that these spray dried microparticles could be used for the immobilisation and controlled release of small molecules.

  13. Monodisperse droplet generation for microscale mass transfer studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Christine; Rao, Rekha; Grillet, Anne; Jove-Colon, Carlos; Brooks, Carlton; Nemer, Martin

    2011-11-01

    Understanding interfacial mass transport on a droplet scale is essential for modeling liquid-liquid extraction processes. A thin flow-focusing microfluidic channel is evaluated for generating monodisperse liquid droplets for microscale mass transport studies. Surface treatment of the microfluidic device allows creation of both oil in water and water in oil emulsions, facilitating a large parameter study of viscosity and flow rate ratios. The unusually thin channel height promotes a flow regime where no droplets form. Through confocal microscopy, this regime is shown to be highly influenced by the contact angle of the liquids with the channel. Drop sizes are found to scale with a modified capillary number. Liquid streamlines within the droplets are inferred by high speed imagery of microparticles dispersed in the droplet phase. Finally, species mass transfer to the droplet fluid is quantitatively measured using high speed imaging. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85.

  14. Virtual substrate method for nanomaterials characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    da, Bo; Liu, Jiangwei; Yamamoto, Mahito; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Kazuyuki; Cuong, Nguyen Thanh; Li, Songlin; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Iwai, Hideo; Tanuma, Shigeo; Guo, Hongxuan; Gao, Zhaoshun; Sun, Xia; Ding, Zejun

    2017-05-01

    Characterization techniques available for bulk or thin-film solid-state materials have been extended to substrate-supported nanomaterials, but generally non-quantitatively. This is because the nanomaterial signals are inevitably buried in the signals from the underlying substrate in common reflection-configuration techniques. Here, we propose a virtual substrate method, inspired by the four-point probe technique for resistance measurement as well as the chop-nod method in infrared astronomy, to characterize nanomaterials without the influence of underlying substrate signals from four interrelated measurements. By implementing this method in secondary electron (SE) microscopy, a SE spectrum (white electrons) associated with the reflectivity difference between two different substrates can be tracked and controlled. The SE spectrum is used to quantitatively investigate the covering nanomaterial based on subtle changes in the transmission of the nanomaterial with high efficiency rivalling that of conventional core-level electrons. The virtual substrate method represents a benchmark for surface analysis to provide `free-standing' information about supported nanomaterials.

  15. Nanomaterial Induced Immune Responses and Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ashraf; Suhail, Mohd; Mathew, Shilu; Shah, Muhammad Ali; Harakeh, Steve M; Ahmad, Sultan; Kazmi, Zulqarnain; Alhamdan, Mohammed Abdul Rahman; Chaudhary, Adeel; Damanhouri, Ghazi Abdullah; Qadri, Ishtiaq

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials are utilized in a wide array of end user products such as pharmaceuticals, electronics, clothes and cosmetic products. Due to its size (< 100 nm), nanoparticles have the propensity to enter through the airway and skin, making its path perilous with the potential to cause damages of varying severity. Once within the body, these particles have unconstrained access to different tissues and organs including the brain, liver, and kidney. As a result, nanomaterials may cause the perturbation of the immune system eliciting an inflammatory response and cytotoxicity. This potential role is dependent on many factors such as the characteristics of the nanomaterials, presence or absence of diseases, and genetic predisposition. Cobalt and nickel nanoparticles, for example, were shown to have inflammogenic properties, while silver nanoparticles were shown to reduce allergic inflammation. Just as asbestos fibers, carbon nanotubes were shown to cause lungs damage. Some nanomaterials were shown, based on animal studies, to result in cell damage, leading to the formation of pre-cancerous lesions. This review highlights the impact of nanomaterials on immune system and its effect on human health with toxicity consideration. It recommends the development of suitable animal models to study the toxicity and bio-clearance of nanomaterials and propose safety guidelines.

  16. Rational design of nanomaterials for water treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Renyuan; Zhang, Lianbin; Wang, Peng

    2015-10-01

    The ever-increasing human demand for safe and clean water is gradually pushing conventional water treatment technologies to their limits. It is now a popular perception that the solutions to the existing and future water challenges will hinge upon further developments in nanomaterial sciences. The concept of rational design emphasizes on `design-for-purpose' and it necessitates a scientifically clear problem definition to initiate the nanomaterial design. The field of rational design of nanomaterials for water treatment has experienced a significant growth in the past decade and is poised to make its contribution in creating advanced next-generation water treatment technologies in the years to come. Within the water treatment context, this review offers a comprehensive and in-depth overview of the latest progress in rational design, synthesis and applications of nanomaterials in adsorption, chemical oxidation and reduction reactions, membrane-based separation, oil-water separation, and synergistic multifunctional all-in-one nanomaterials/nanodevices. Special attention is paid to the chemical concepts related to nanomaterial design throughout the review.

  17. Rational design of nanomaterials for water treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Renyuan

    2015-08-26

    The ever-increasing human demand for safe and clean water is gradually pushing conventional water treatment technologies to their limits and it is now a popular perception that the solutions to the existing and future water challenges will highly hinge upon the further development of nanomaterial sciences. The concept of rational design emphasizes ‘design-for-purpose’ and it necessitates a scientifically clear problem definition to initiate the nanomaterial design. The field of rational design of nanomaterials for water treatment has experienced a significant growth in the past decade and is poised to make its contribution in creating advanced next-generation water treatment technologies in the years to come. Within the water treatment context, this review offers a comprehensive and in-depth overview of the latest progress of the rational design, synthesis and applications of nanomaterials in adsorption, chemical oxidation and reduction reactions, membrane-based separation, oil/water separation, and synergistic multifunctional all-in-one nanomaterials/nanodevices. Special attention is paid on chemical concepts of the nanomaterial designs throughout the review.

  18. Hybrid upconversion nanomaterials for optogenetic neuronal control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shreyas; Liu, Jing-Jing; Pasquale, Nicholas; Lai, Jinping; McGowan, Heather; Pang, Zhiping P.; Lee, Ki-Bum

    2015-10-01

    Nanotechnology-based approaches offer the chemical control required to develop precision tools suitable for applications in neuroscience. We report a novel approach employing hybrid upconversion nanomaterials, combined with the photoresponsive ion channel channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), to achieve near-infrared light (NIR)-mediated optogenetic control of neuronal activity. Current optogenetic methodologies rely on using visible light (e.g. 470 nm blue light), which tends to exhibit high scattering and low tissue penetration, to activate ChR2. In contrast, our approach enables the use of 980 nm NIR light, which addresses the short-comings of visible light as an excitation source. This was facilitated by embedding upconversion nanomaterials, which can convert NIR light to blue luminescence, into polymeric scaffolds. These hybrid nanomaterial scaffolds allowed for NIR-mediated neuronal stimulation, with comparable efficiency as that of 470 nm blue light. Our platform was optimized for NIR-mediated optogenetic control by balancing multiple physicochemical properties of the nanomaterial (e.g. size, morphology, structure, emission spectra, concentration), thus providing an early demonstration of rationally-designing nanomaterial-based strategies for advanced neural applications.Nanotechnology-based approaches offer the chemical control required to develop precision tools suitable for applications in neuroscience. We report a novel approach employing hybrid upconversion nanomaterials, combined with the photoresponsive ion channel channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), to achieve near-infrared light (NIR)-mediated optogenetic control of neuronal activity. Current optogenetic methodologies rely on using visible light (e.g. 470 nm blue light), which tends to exhibit high scattering and low tissue penetration, to activate ChR2. In contrast, our approach enables the use of 980 nm NIR light, which addresses the short-comings of visible light as an excitation source. This was facilitated by

  19. [Modern toxicology of magnetic nanomaterials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cywińska, Monika A; Grudziński, Ireneusz P

    2012-01-01

    Current advances in nanobiotechnology have led to the development of new field of nanomedicine, which includes many applications of nano(bio)materials for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes (theranostics). Major expectations and challenges are on bioengineered magnetic nanoparticles when their come to delivering drug compounds, especially to targeting anticancer drugs to specific molecular endpoints in cancer therapy. The unique physicochemical properties of these nanoparticles offer great promise in modern cancer nanomedicine to provide new technological breakthroughs, such as guided drug and gene delivery, magnetic hyperthermia cancer therapy, tissue engineering, cancer cell tracking and molecular magnetic resonance imaging. Along with the expanding interest in bio-engineered magnetic nanoproducts their potential toxicity has become one of the major concerns. To date, a number of recent scientific evidences suggest that certain properties of magnetic nanoparticles (e.g., enhanced reactive area, ability to cross cell membranes, resistance to biodegradation) may amplify their cytotoxic potential relative to bulk non-nanoscale counterparts. In other words, safety assessment developed for ordinary magnetic materials may be of limited use in determining the health and environmental risks of the novel bio-engineered magnetic nanoproducts. In the present paper we discuss the main directions of research conducted to assess the toxicity of magnetic nanocompounds in experimental in vitro and in vivo models, pointing to the key issues concerning the toxicological analysis of magnetic nanomaterials. In addition new research directions of nanotoxicological studies elucidating the importance of developing alternative methods for testing magnetic nano(bio)products are also presented.

  20. Health implications of engineered nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietroiusti, Antonio

    2012-02-01

    With the development of nanotechnology, a growing number of people are expected to be exposed to its products, the engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). Some physico-chemical properties of ENMs, linked to their size in the nanoscale (1-100 nm), make them potentially more reactive, and therefore raise concern about possible adverse effects in humans. In this article, I discuss human diseases which may be predicted after exposure to ENMs, and how their pathogenetic mechanisms may be linked to exposure; in this regard, special emphasis has been given to the triad of oxidative stress/inflammation/genotoxicity and to the interaction of ENMs/proteins in different biological compartments. The analysis of possible adverse effects has been made on an organ-by-organ basis, starting from the skin, respiratory system and gastrointestinal tract. These sites are in fact not only those exposed to the highest amounts of ENMs, but are also the portals of entry to internal organs for possible systemic effects. Although the list and the relevance of possible human disorders linked to ENM exposure are at least as impressive as that of their direct or indirect beneficial effects for human health, we must be clear that ENM-linked diseases belong to the realm of possible risk (i.e. cannot be excluded, but are unlikely), whereas ENMs with proven beneficial effects are on the market. Therefore, the mandatory awareness about possible adverse effects of ENMs should in no way be interpreted as a motivation to disregard the great opportunity represented by nanotechnology.

  1. Carbon dioxide conversion over carbon-based nanocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavarian, Mehrnoush; Chai, Siang-Piao; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2013-07-01

    The utilization of carbon dioxide for the production of valuable chemicals via catalysts is one of the efficient ways to mitigate the greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. It is known that the carbon dioxide conversion and product yields are still low even if the reaction is operated at high pressure and temperature. The carbon dioxide utilization and conversion provides many challenges in exploring new concepts and opportunities for development of unique catalysts for the purpose of activating the carbon dioxide molecules. In this paper, the role of carbon-based nanocatalysts in the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide and direct synthesis of dimethyl carbonate from carbon dioxide and methanol are reviewed. The current catalytic results obtained with different carbon-based nanocatalysts systems are presented and how these materials contribute to the carbon dioxide conversion is explained. In addition, different strategies and preparation methods of nanometallic catalysts on various carbon supports are described to optimize the dispersion of metal nanoparticles and catalytic activity.

  2. Carbon-based nano-electro-mechanical systems

    OpenAIRE

    Kaul, A. B.; A. R. Khan; Megerian, K. G.; Epp, L.; Leduc, H. G.; Bagge, L.; Jennings, A. T.; Jang, D.; Greer, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    We provide an overview of our work where carbon-based nanostructures have been applied to twodimensional (2D) planar and three-dimensional (3D) vertically-oriented nano-electro-mechanical (NEM) switches. In the first configuration, laterally oriented single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) synthesized using thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) were implemented for forming bridge-type 2D NEMS switches, where switching voltages were on the order of a few volts. In the second configuration, verticall...

  3. AFM study of the thrombogenicity of carbon-based coatings for cardiovascular applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karagkiozaki, V. [Department of Physics, Laboratory for Thin Films-Nanosystems and Nanometrology (LTFN), Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki GR-54124 (Greece); AHEPA Hospital, 1st Cardiology Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki GR-54124 (Greece); Logothetidis, S. [Department of Physics, Laboratory for Thin Films-Nanosystems and Nanometrology (LTFN), Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki GR-54124 (Greece)], E-mail: logot@auth.gr; Laskarakis, A. [Department of Physics, Laboratory for Thin Films-Nanosystems and Nanometrology (LTFN), Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki GR-54124 (Greece); Giannoglou, G. [AHEPA Hospital, 1st Cardiology Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki GR-54124 (Greece); Lousinian, S. [Department of Physics, Laboratory for Thin Films-Nanosystems and Nanometrology (LTFN), Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki GR-54124 (Greece)

    2008-08-25

    The new nanotechnologies in biomaterials for cardiovascular applications target at surface alterations for prevention of platelets aggregation and subsequent clotting as their usual failure arises from thrombogenicity. Knowledge of structural properties of platelets during their adhesion on nanostructure materials is required to obtain a comprehensive understanding of their activation and the conventional imaging tools require special preparation of the samples and does not guarantee the viability of the cells. Thus, in this study, the atomic force microscope (AFM) which is a non-destructive and nanoscale precision technique is implemented for the study of platelets' adhesion onto amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) thin films and a methodology is developed. Carbon-based thin films grown by magnetron sputtering under different deposition conditions are considered to meet the requirements for biomedical applications and were selected as well-characterized, case study materials. Platelet rich plasma drawn from healthy donors was used for the study of platelets adhesion onto the a-C:H films. The fourier transform IR phase modulated spectroscopic ellipsometry (FTIRSE) (900-3500 cm{sup -1}) being a powerful, non-destructive, optical technique was used for the investigation of bonding structure of the adherent platelets onto the a-C:H materials and the contribution of the different vibration bands of the platelet bonding groups was shown and discussed. The effect of nanostructure, surface properties and wettability of the carbon thin films on their thrombogenic potential was verified and it was found that the different deposition conditions determine their structural, surface and biological properties. Thus, the tailoring of surface properties of biomaterials and the informative study of platelets-nanomaterials interactions with AFM and FTIRSE will revolutionize the development of less thrombogenic biomaterials.

  4. Controlled synthesis and magnetic properties of monodispersed ceria nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumeet Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, monodispersed CeO2 nanoparticles (NPs of size 8.5 ± 1.0, 11.4 ± 1.0 and 15.4 ± 1.0 nm were synthesized using the sol-gel method. Size-dependent structural, optical and magnetic properties of as-prepared samples were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD, field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM, ultra-violet visible (UV-VIS spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM measurements. The value of optical band gap is calculated for each particle size. The decrease in the value of optical band gap with increase of particle size may be attributed to the quantum confinement, which causes to produce localized states created by the oxygen vacancies due to the conversion of Ce4+ into Ce3+ at higher calcination temperature. The Raman spectra showed a peak at ∼461 cm-1 for the particle size 8.5 nm, which is attributed to the 1LO phonon mode. The shift in the Raman peak could be due to lattice strain developed due to variation in particle size. Weak ferromagnetism at room temperature is observed for each particle size. The values of saturation magnetization (Ms, coercivity (Hc and retentivity (Mr are increased with increase of particle size. The increase of Ms and Mr for larger particle size may be explained by increase of density of oxygen vacancies at higher calcination temperature. The latter causes high concentrations of Ce3+ ions activate more coupling between the individual magnetic moments of the Ce ions, leading to an increase of Ms value with the particle size. Moreover, the oxygen vacancies may also produce magnetic moment by polarizing spins of f electrons of cerium (Ce ions located around oxygen vacancies, which causes ferromagnetism in pure CeO2 samples.

  5. Controlled synthesis and magnetic properties of monodispersed ceria nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Sumeet; Ojha, Animesh K. [Department of Physics, Motilal Nehru National Institute of Technology, Allahabad-211004 (India); Srivastava, Manish, E-mail: 84.srivastava@gmail.com, E-mail: manish-mani84@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007 (India); Singh, Jay [Department of Applied Chemistry and Polymer Technology, Delhi Technological University, Shahbad Daulatpur, Main Bawana Road, Delhi 110042 (India); Layek, Samar [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208016 (India); Yashpal, Madhu [Electron Microscope Facility, Department of Anatomy Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Materny, Arnulf [Center for Functional Materials and Nanomolecular Science, Jacobs University Bremen, Campus Ring, 28759 Bremen (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    In the present study, monodispersed CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles (NPs) of size 8.5 ± 1.0, 11.4 ± 1.0 and 15.4 ± 1.0 nm were synthesized using the sol-gel method. Size-dependent structural, optical and magnetic properties of as-prepared samples were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), ultra-violet visible (UV-VIS) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) measurements. The value of optical band gap is calculated for each particle size. The decrease in the value of optical band gap with increase of particle size may be attributed to the quantum confinement, which causes to produce localized states created by the oxygen vacancies due to the conversion of Ce{sup 4+} into Ce{sup 3+} at higher calcination temperature. The Raman spectra showed a peak at ∼461 cm{sup -1} for the particle size 8.5 nm, which is attributed to the 1LO phonon mode. The shift in the Raman peak could be due to lattice strain developed due to variation in particle size. Weak ferromagnetism at room temperature is observed for each particle size. The values of saturation magnetization (Ms), coercivity (Hc) and retentivity (Mr) are increased with increase of particle size. The increase of Ms and Mr for larger particle size may be explained by increase of density of oxygen vacancies at higher calcination temperature. The latter causes high concentrations of Ce{sup 3+} ions activate more coupling between the individual magnetic moments of the Ce ions, leading to an increase of Ms value with the particle size. Moreover, the oxygen vacancies may also produce magnetic moment by polarizing spins of f electrons of cerium (Ce) ions located around oxygen vacancies, which causes ferromagnetism in pure CeO{sub 2} samples.

  6. Environmental implications and applications of nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Priyanka

    Recent advances in material science and nanotechnology have given rise to a myriad of developments, while in the meantime call for research into the impacts of nanomaterials on the environment and human health. Although considerable progress has been made in the past decade concerning the behavior of nanomaterials in biological systems, such understanding is critically lacking with respect to the fate of nanomaterials in ecosystems. Accordingly, this dissertation addresses the interactions between nanomaterials and algae---the major constituent of the aquatic food chain (Part I, Chapter two), and exploits the physicochemistry of nanoscaled synthetic dendritic polymers for environmental applications, especially for water purification that is a focused theme of the entire dossier (Part II, Chapters two--five). This dissertation is organized as follows. Chapter one presents a general review of the physical/physicochemical properties, characterizations, implications---especially ecological implication, and applications of a host of most produced and studied nanomaterials. In addition, advances in environmental applications of nanomaterials are discussed. Chapter two examines algal responses to two major types of engineered nanomaterials---quantum dots and polystyrene. Inhibited photosynthetic activities of green algae are observed as a result of the physical adsorption of the nanomaterials. Chapter three elucidates the physicochemical properties of poly(amidoamine)-tris(hydroxymethyl)amidomethane- and amine-terminated dendrimers towards their applications in water remediation. Here, the capacities and mechanisms of the dendrimers in hosting cationic copper, anionic nitrate, polyaromatic phenanthrene, and the more heterogeneous humic acids are discussed. Based on the results of Chapter three, Chapter four presents a dendrimer-based novel optical scheme for improving the detection sensitivity and selectivity of environmental pollutants. Specifically, the surface plasmon

  7. Characterization of nanomaterials with transmission electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Anjum, Dalaver H.

    2016-08-01

    The field of nanotechnology is about research and development on materials whose at least one dimension is in the range of 1 to 100 nanometers. In recent years, the research activity for developing nano-materials has grown exponentially owing to the fact that they offer better solutions to the challenges faced by various fields such as energy, food, and environment. In this paper, the importance of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) based techniques is demonstrated for investigating the properties of nano-materials. Specifically the nano-materials that are investigated in this report include gold nano-particles (Au-NPs), silver atom-clusters (Ag-ACs), tantalum single-atoms (Ta-SAs), carbon materials functionalized with iron cobalt (Fe-Co) NPs and titania (TiO2) NPs, and platinum loaded Ceria (Pt-CeO2) Nano composite. TEM techniques that are employed to investigate nano-materials include aberration corrected bright-field TEM (BF-TEM), high-angle dark-field scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM), electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), and BF-TEM electron tomography (ET). With the help presented of results in this report, it is proved herein that as many TEM techniques as available in a given instrument are essential for a comprehensive nano-scale analysis of nanomaterials.

  8. Applications of nanomaterials as vaccine adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Motao; Wang, Rongfu; Nie, Guangjun

    2014-01-01

    Vaccine adjuvants are applied to amplify the recipient's specific immune responses against pathogen infection or malignancy. A new generation of adjuvants is being developed to meet the demands for more potent antigen-specific responses, specific types of immune responses, and a high margin of safety. Nanotechnology provides a multifunctional stage for the integration of desired adjuvant activities performed by the building blocks of tailor-designed nanoparticles. Using nanomaterials for antigen delivery can provide high bioavailability, sustained and controlled release profiles, and targeting and imaging properties resulting from manipulation of the nanomaterials' physicochemical properties. Moreover, the inherent immune-regulating activity of particular nanomaterials can further promote and shape the cellular and humoral immune responses toward desired types. The combination of both the delivery function and immunomodulatory effect of nanomaterials as adjuvants is thought to largely benefit the immune outcomes of vaccination. In this review, we will address the current achievements of nanotechnology in the development of novel adjuvants. The potential mechanisms by which nanomaterials impact the immune responses to a vaccine and how physicochemical properties, including size, surface charge and surface modification, impact their resulting immunological outcomes will be discussed. This review aims to provide concentrated information to promote new insights for the development of novel vaccine adjuvants.

  9. Applications of Nanomaterials in Food Packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumbudsanpharoke, Nattinee; Choi, Jungwook; Ko, Seonghyuk

    2015-09-01

    Nanomaterials have drawn great interest in recent years due to their extraordinary properties that make them advantageous in food packaging applications. Specifically, nanoparticles can impart significant barrier properties, as well as mechanical, optical, catalytic, and antimicrobial properties into packaging. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and nanoclay account for the majority of the nano-enabled food packaging on the market, while others, such as nano-zinc oxide (ZnO) and titanium, share less of the current market. In current food packaging, these nanomaterials are primarily used to impart antimicrobial function and to improve barrier properties, thereby extending the shelf life and freshness of packaged food. On the other hand, there is growing concern about the migration of nanomaterials from food contact materials to foodstuffs and its associated potential risks. Indeed, insufficient data about environmental and human safety assessments of migration and exposure of nanomaterials are hindering their market growth. To overcome this barrier, the public believes that legislation from government agencies is critical. This review provides an overview of the characteristics and functions of major nanomaterials that are commonly applied to food packaging, including available and near- future products. Migration research, safety issues, and public concerns are also discussed.

  10. Nanomaterial-based drug delivery carriers for cancer therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Tao

    2017-01-01

    This brief summarizes different types of organic and inorganic nanomaterials for drug delivery in cancer therapy. It highlights that precisely designed nanomaterials will be the next-generation therapeutic agents for cancer treatment.

  11. Development and In Vitro Bioactivity Profiling of Alternative Sustainable Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sustainable, environmentally benign nanomaterials (NMs) are being designed as alternatives based on functionality to conventional metal-based nanomaterials (NMs) in order to minimize potential risk to human health and the environment. Development of rapid methods to evaluate the ...

  12. Mapping the surface adsorption forces of nanomaterials in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xin R; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A; Mathur, Sanjay; Song, Xuefeng; Xiao, Lisong; Oldenberg, Steven J; Fadeel, Bengt; Riviere, Jim E

    2011-11-22

    The biological surface adsorption index (BSAI) is a novel approach to characterize surface adsorption energy of nanomaterials that is the primary force behind nanoparticle aggregation, protein corona formation, and other complex interactions of nanomaterials within biological systems. Five quantitative nanodescriptors were obtained to represent the surface adsorption forces (hydrophobicity, hydrogen bond, polarity/polarizability, and lone-pair electrons) of the nanomaterial interaction with biological components. We have mapped the surface adsorption forces over 16 different nanomaterials. When the five-dimensional information of the nanodescriptors was reduced to two dimensions, the 16 nanomaterials were classified into distinct clusters according their surface adsorption properties. BSAI nanodescriptors are intrinsic properties of nanomaterials useful for quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model development. This is the first success in quantitative characterization of the surface adsorption forces of nanomaterials in biological conditions, which could open a quantitative avenue in predictive nanomedicine development, risk assessment, and safety evaluation of nanomaterials. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  13. Applicability of Different Isothermal EOS at Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepika P. Joshi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study explains the behaviour of nanomaterials such as AlN, CdSe, Ge, WC, and Ni- and Fe-filled-MWCNTs under high pressure. Among the number of isothermal EOSs available, we prefer only two parameter-based isothermal equations (i.e., Murnaghan equation, usual Tait's equation, Suzuki equation and Shanker equation. The present work shows the theoretical study of thermo-elastic properties especially relative compression (V/V0, isothermal bulk modulus (KP/K0, and compressibility (αP/α0 of nanomaterials. After comparing all formulations with available experimental data, we conclude that pressure dependence of relative compression (V/V0 for the nanomaterials, are in good agreement for all the equations at lower pressure range. At higher pressure range, Suzuki and Shanker formulations show some deviation from experimental values.

  14. Nanomaterials Applied in Asphalt Modification: A Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changqing Fang; Ruien Yu; Shaolong Liu; Yan Li

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology has been gradually penetrated into the field of asphalt modification.Seemingly magic effects of nanomaterials have now been brought to improve the performance of asphalt.To demonstrate many of the prospective applications,researchers have conducted a series of positive and effective efforts dealing with the preparation of modified asphalt to demonstrate the mechanism of modification and the resultant improvement in performance.In this review,various nanomaterials used in asphalt modification are initially presented,followed by the methods employed to modify the asphalt with these materials and finally the effects of nanomaterials on the performance of base asphalt are presented and the modification mechanisms are discussed.Based on the current research results,the influence of preparation process parameters on the compatibility of every phase in the modified asphalt and the stability of the modified asphalt system are described.Finally,the development trend of the topic field is projected.

  15. Recent developments in carbon nanomaterial sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Frederico R; Belhout, S A; Giordani, S; Quinn, S J

    2015-07-07

    Carbon nanomaterials are among the most broadly discussed, researched and applied of synthetic nanomaterials. The structural diversity of these materials provides an array of unique electronic, magnetic and optical properties, which when combined with their robust chemistry and ease of manipulation, makes them attractive candidates for sensor applications. Furthermore, the biocompatibility exhibited by many carbon nanomaterials has seen them used as in vivo biosensors. Carbon nanotubes, graphene and carbon dots have come under intense scrutiny, as either discrete molecular-like sensors, or as components which can be integrated into devices. In this review we consider recent developments in the use of carbon nanoparticles and nanostructures as sensors and consider how they can be used to detect a diverse range of analytes.

  16. 3rd International Conference Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Yatsenko, Leonid

    2016-01-01

    This book presents some of the latest achievements in nanotechnology and nanomaterials from leading researchers in Ukraine, Europe, and beyond. It features contributions from participants in the 3rd International Science and Practice Conference Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials (NANO2015) held in Lviv, Ukraine on August 26-30, 2015. The International Conference was organized jointly by the Institute of Physics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, University of Tartu (Estonia), Ivan Franko National University of Lviv (Ukraine), University of Turin (Italy), Pierre and Marie Curie University (France), and European Profiles A.E. (Greece). Internationally recognized experts from a wide range of universities and research institutions share their knowledge and key results on topics ranging from nanooptics, nanoplasmonics, and interface studies to energy storage and biomedical applications. Presents cutting-edge advances in nanocomposites and carbon and silicon-based nanomaterials for a wide range of engine...

  17. Synthesis of nanoparticles and nanomaterials biological approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Abdullaeva, Zhypargul

    2017-01-01

    This book covers biological synthesis approaches for nanomaterials and nanoparticles, including introductory material on their structure, phase compositions and morphology, nanomaterials chemical, physical, and biological properties. The chapters of this book describe in sequence the synthesis of various nanoparticles by microorganisms, bacteria, yeast, algae, and actynomycetes; plant and plant extract-based synthesis; and green synthesis methods. Each chapter provides basic knowledge on the synthesis of nanomaterials, defines fundamental terms, and aims to build a solid foundation of knowledge, followed by explanations, examples, visual photographs, schemes, tables and illustrations. Each chapter also contains control questions, problem drills, as well as case studies that clarify theory and the explanations given in the text. This book is ideal for researchers and advanced graduate students in materials engineering, biotechnology, and nanotechnology fields. As a reference book this work is also appropriate ...

  18. About aerogels based on carbon nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fail Sultanov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this review a current trends in development and application of carbon nanomaterials and derivatives based on them are presented. Aerogels based on graphene and other carbon nanomaterials present a class of novel ultralight materials in which a liquid phase is completely substituted by gaseous. In its turn graphene based aerogel was named as the lightest material, thus the record of aerographite, which has retained for a long time was beaten. Aerogels are characterized by low density, high surface area and high index of hydrophobicity. In addition, depending on its application, aerogels based on carbon nanomaterials can be electrically conductive and magnetic, while retaining the flexibility of its 3D structure. Impressive properties of novel material – aerogels causes a huge interest of scientists in order to find their application in various fields, ranging from environment problems to medicine and electronics.

  19. 4th International Conference Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Yatsenko, Leonid

    2017-01-01

    This book presents some of the latest achievements in nanotechnology and nanomaterials from leading researchers in Ukraine, Europe, and beyond. It features contributions from participants in the 4th International Science and Practice Conference Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials (NANO2016) held in Lviv, Ukraine on August 24-27, 2016. The International Conference was organized jointly by the Institute of Physics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Ivan Franko National University of Lviv (Ukraine), University of Tartu (Estonia), University of Turin (Italy), and Pierre and Marie Curie University (France). Internationally recognized experts from a wide range of universities and research institutions share their knowledge and key results on topics ranging from nanooptics, nanoplasmonics, and interface studies to energy storage and biomedical applications. Presents cutting-edge advances in nanocomposites and carbon and silicon-based nanomaterials for a wide range of engineering and medical applications Co...

  20. Specific heat and thermal conductivity of nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Sandhya; Kumar, Raghuvesh; Kumar, Munish

    2017-01-01

    A model is proposed to study the size and shape effects on specific heat and thermal conductivity of nanomaterials. The formulation developed for specific heat is based on the basic concept of cohesive energy and melting temperature. The specific heat of Ag and Au nanoparticles is reported and the effect of size and shape has been studied. We observed that specific heat increases with the reduction of particle size having maximum shape effect for spherical nanoparticle. To provide a more critical test, we extended our model to study the thermal conductivity and used it for the study of Si, diamond, Cu, Ni, Ar, ZrO2, BaTiO3 and SrTiO3 nanomaterials. A significant reduction is found in the thermal conductivity for nanomaterials by decreasing the size. The model predictions are consistent with the available experimental and simulation results. This demonstrates the suitability of the model proposed in this paper.

  1. Nanomaterials as Analytical Tools for Genosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anees Ahmad Ansari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials are being increasingly used for the development of electrochemical DNA biosensors, due to the unique electrocatalytic properties found in nanoscale materials. They offer excellent prospects for interfacing biological recognition events with electronic signal transduction and for designing a new generation of bioelectronic devices exhibiting novel functions. In particular, nanomaterials such as noble metal nanoparticles (Au, Pt, carbon nanotubes (CNTs, magnetic nanoparticles, quantum dots and metal oxide nanoparticles have been actively investigated for their applications in DNA biosensors, which have become a new interdisciplinary frontier between biological detection and material science. In this article, we address some of the main advances in this field over the past few years, discussing the issues and challenges with the aim of stimulating a broader interest in developing nanomaterial-based biosensors and improving their applications in disease diagnosis and food safety examination.

  2. The Nanomaterial Registry: facilitating the sharing and analysis of data in the diverse nanomaterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostraat, Michele L; Mills, Karmann C; Guzan, Kimberly A; Murry, Damaris

    2013-01-01

    The amount of data being generated in the nanotechnology research space is significant, and the coordination, sharing, and downstream analysis of the data is complex and consistently deliberated. The complexities of the data are due in large part to the inherently complicated characteristics of nanomaterials. Also, testing protocols and assays used for nanomaterials are diverse and lacking standardization. The Nanomaterial Registry has been developed to address such challenges as the need for standard methods, data formatting, and controlled vocabularies for data sharing. The Registry is an authoritative, web-based tool whose purpose is to simplify the community's level of effort in assessing nanomaterial data from environmental and biological interaction studies. Because the Registry is meant to be an authoritative resource, all data-driven content is systematically archived and reviewed by subject-matter experts. To support and advance nanomaterial research, a set of minimal information about nanomaterials (MIAN) has been developed and is foundational to the Registry data model. The MIAN has been used to create evaluation and similarity criteria for nanomaterials that are curated into the Registry. The Registry is a publicly available resource that is being built through collaborations with many stakeholder groups in the nanotechnology community, including industry, regulatory, government, and academia. Features of the Registry website (http://www.nanomaterialregistry.org) currently include search, browse, side-by-side comparison of nanomaterials, compliance ratings based on the quality and quantity of data, and the ability to search for similar nanomaterials within the Registry. This paper is a modification and extension of a proceedings paper for the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.

  3. The Nanomaterial Registry: facilitating the sharing and analysis of data in the diverse nanomaterial community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostraat ML

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Michele L Ostraat, Karmann C Mills, Kimberly A Guzan, Damaris MurryRTI International, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: The amount of data being generated in the nanotechnology research space is significant, and the coordination, sharing, and downstream analysis of the data is complex and consistently deliberated. The complexities of the data are due in large part to the inherently complicated characteristics of nanomaterials. Also, testing protocols and assays used for nanomaterials are diverse and lacking standardization. The Nanomaterial Registry has been developed to address such challenges as the need for standard methods, data formatting, and controlled vocabularies for data sharing. The Registry is an authoritative, web-based tool whose purpose is to simplify the community's level of effort in assessing nanomaterial data from environmental and biological interaction studies. Because the registry is meant to be an authoritative resource, all data-driven content is systematically archived and reviewed by subject-matter experts. To support and advance nanomaterial research, a set of minimal information about nanomaterials (MIAN has been developed and is foundational to the Registry data model. The MIAN has been used to create evaluation and similarity criteria for nanomaterials that are curated into the Registry. The Registry is a publicly available resource that is being built through collaborations with many stakeholder groups in the nanotechnology community, including industry, regulatory, government, and academia. Features of the Registry website (https://www.nanomaterialregistry.org/ currently include search, browse, side-by-side comparison of nanomaterials, compliance ratings based on the quality and quantity of data, and the ability to search for similar nanomaterials within the Registry. This paper is a modification and extension of a proceedings paper for the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.Keywords: nanoinformatics

  4. Solvothermal synthesis and characterization of monodisperse superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shichuan; Zhang, Tonglai; Tang, Runze; Qiu, Hao [State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Wang, Caiqin [Shandong Special Industry Group Co., Ltd, Shandong 255201 (China); Zhou, Zunning [State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2015-04-01

    A series of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle clusters with different structure guide agents were synthesized by a modified solvothermal method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermogravimetric analyses (TG), a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). It is found that the superparamagnetic nanoparticles guided by NaCit (sodium citrate) have high saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of 69.641 emu/g and low retentivity (M{sub r}) of 0.8 emu/g. Guiding to form superparamagnetic clusters with size range of 80–110 nm, the adherent small-molecule citrate groups on the surface prevent the prefabricated ferrite crystals growing further. In contrast, the primary small crystal guided and stabilized by the PVP long-chain molecules assemble freely to larger ones and stop growing in size range of 100–150 nm, which has saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of 97.979 emu/g and retentivity (M{sub r}) of 46.323 emu/g. The relevant formation mechanisms of the two types of samples are proposed at the end. The superparamagnetic ferrite clusters guided by sodium citrate are expected to be used for movement controlling of passive interference particles to avoid aggregation and the sample guided by PVP will be a candidate of nanometer wave absorbing material. - Highlights: • A facile synthesis of two kinds of monodisperse iron oxide nano-particle clusters was performed via a modified one-step solvothermal method in this work. • The NaCit and PVP as different guiding agents are used to control the formation and aggregation of nano-crystals during reacting and the ripening processes. • The superparamagnetic NaCit–Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} samples have high saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of 69.641 emu/g and low retentivity (M{sub r}) of 0.8 emu/g. • The relevant formation mechanisms of the two types of samples are proposed.

  5. Nanomaterials and Optical Diagnosis of HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valizadeh, Alireza

    2016-09-01

    The investigators had previously shown that the risk of AIDS/HIV-related illness and transmission reduced (by 96%) with early antiretroviral treatment. Nanomaterials could be applied in early diagnosis of HIV by improving the ability to detect serum biomarkers of the blood-borne infectious diseases, with low sample volume, rapidity, and more sensitivity than currently available FDA-approved methods such as ELISA, particle agglutination assay, and Western Blotting assay. We have demonstrated several experimental studies for optical HIV diagnosis based on nanomaterials in three categories (e.g., the fluorescence-, the SPR-, and the SERS- based biosensors), and have explained each assay.

  6. Structure and multiscale mechanics of carbon nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book aims at providing a broad overview on the relationship between structure and mechanical properties of carbon nanomaterials from world-leading scientists in the field. The main aim is to get an in-depth understanding of the broad range of mechanical properties of carbon materials based on their unique nanostructure and on defects of several types and at different length scales. Besides experimental work mainly based on the use of (in-situ) Raman and X-ray scattering and on nanoindentation, the book also covers some aspects of multiscale modeling of the mechanics of carbon nanomaterials.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of WO3 nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, N K; Tiwari, Karunesh; Roy, Akash

    2011-02-01

    This work reports a simple, quick and economical method to prepare WO3 nanomaterials. Prepared tungsten trioxide materials have been sintered at 700 degrees C for three hours. The material has been studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). Crystallite size of the WO3 nanostructures obtained by Shearer's formula are between 12 and 72 nm and their grain size by SEM are from 20 to 105 nm. The humidity-sensitive electrical properties of the WO3 nanomaterial have been studied using d.c. measurements.

  8. Thin Films for Coating Nanomaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.M.Mukhopadhyay; P.Joshi; R.V.Pulikollu

    2005-01-01

    therefore, effective as an inert layer to passivate nanomaterials.

  9. EDITORIAL: Excelling under strain: band engineering in nanomaterials Excelling under strain: band engineering in nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna

    2013-08-01

    interest in strain studies as well. Researchers in China investigated the effects of tensile strain on the thermal conductivity of graphene nanoribbons. Tuning the thermal conductivity of nanomaterials is highly desirable to optimize their functionality [5]. Wei and colleagues use computer simulations based on reverse nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (RNEMD) to demonstrate what they describe as 'a strain-induced magic flexibility of thermal engineering for carbon-based nanostructures', which may provide a new approach for tailoring nanomaterial functionality. Despite the attractions of more recently discovered carbon nanomaterials silicon remains the bedrock of the semiconductor device industry. Germanium nanostructures also hold significant interest, such as Ge nanowires, which have high mobility and a conveniently low synthesis temperature [6]. In fact the potential applications of germanium nanowires in field effect transistors and nanobridge devices prompted Jagadish and colleagues in Australia, Korea and the UK to investigate the growth of taper-free kinked Ge nanowires in silicon [7]. As they point out many recent reports have highlighted such kinked nanowires as valuable components for novel nanodevices. The work reported by Hrauda and colleagues in this issue looks at the growth of germanium islands on a silicon substrate rather than nanowires [2]. They grow islands on pre-patterned silicon with different levels of Ge deposition with the aim of better understanding how to manage the effects of strain due to lattice mismatch between the two metals. Their results show that considerably more Ge can be deposited without dislocations forming than previously thought and reveal a distinctive cycle of changing island morphologies as Ge is deposited. They add, 'Strain relaxation is revealed to be the main driving force of a rather complex evolution of island shape and Ge distribution'. In reference to his theory of atoms Bohr is once said to have told Werner Heisenberg

  10. 78 FR 36784 - Survey of Nanomaterial Risk Management Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Survey of Nanomaterial Risk Management... of Nanomaterial Risk Management Practices; Notice of Public Meeting and Request for Comments. SUMMARY... nanomaterial producers, distributors, end-users, and R&D laboratories for inclusion in a sampling frame? (3) A...

  11. Grouping nanomaterials to predict their potential to induce pulmonary inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braakhuis, Hedwig M; Oomen, Agnes G; Cassee, Flemming R

    2016-01-01

    The rapidly expanding manufacturing, production and use of nanomaterials have raised concerns for both worker and consumer safety. Various studies have been published in which induction of pulmonary inflammation after inhalation exposure to nanomaterials has been described. Nanomaterials can vary in

  12. Plasma-Liquid Interaction: a New Way to Synthesize Nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Qiang; Li, Yongfeng; Zhang, Xianhui; Yang, Size

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we have summarized the recent advances and present conditions of the nanomaterials synthesis from the plasma-liquid interactions. A theoretical analysis for the nanomaterials synthesis process is presented by analyzing the experimental data. Besides the theoretical analysis, the practical applications in several nanomaterials syntheses of the the plasma-liquid interactions are also presented.

  13. Grouping nanomaterials to predict their potential to induce pulmonary inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braakhuis, Hedwig M; Oomen, Agnes G; Cassee, Flemming R

    2016-05-15

    The rapidly expanding manufacturing, production and use of nanomaterials have raised concerns for both worker and consumer safety. Various studies have been published in which induction of pulmonary inflammation after inhalation exposure to nanomaterials has been described. Nanomaterials can vary in aspects such as size, shape, charge, crystallinity, chemical composition, and dissolution rate. Currently, efforts are made to increase the knowledge on the characteristics of nanomaterials that can be used to categorise them into hazard groups according to these characteristics. Grouping helps to gather information on nanomaterials in an efficient way with the aim to aid risk assessment. Here, we discuss different ways of grouping nanomaterials for their risk assessment after inhalation. Since the relation between single intrinsic particle characteristics and the severity of pulmonary inflammation is unknown, grouping of nanomaterials by their intrinsic characteristics alone is not sufficient to predict their risk after inhalation. The biokinetics of nanomaterials should be taken into account as that affects the dose present at a target site over time. The parameters determining the kinetic behaviour are not the same as the hazard-determining parameters. Furthermore, characteristics of nanomaterials change in the life-cycle, resulting in human exposure to different forms and doses of these nanomaterials. As information on the biokinetics and in situ characteristics of nanomaterials is essential but often lacking, efforts should be made to include these in testing strategies. Grouping nanomaterials will probably be of the most value to risk assessors when information on intrinsic characteristics, life-cycle, biokinetics and effects are all combined.

  14. Introduction. Carbon-based electronics: fundamentals and device applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Robin J; Mainwood, Alison; Eaves, Laurence

    2008-01-28

    Carbon-based materials offer a number of exciting possibilities for both new science and applications. Many of these are based on the novel band structure of graphene, by which solids mimic the properties of relativistic fermions and which offers the potential for high speed nanoscale electronics. When sheets of graphene are rolled up to make carbon nanotubes, further interesting properties are found; for example, both semiconducting and metallic nanotubes able to be produced. The novel properties of these new materials, together with the already remarkable properties of diamond itself, are discussed by a series of experts who came together in May 2007 to discuss and debate the potential for future development.

  15. Carbon-based electrode materials for DNA electroanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Dai; Niwa, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    This review addresses recent studies of newly developed carbon-based electrode materials and their use for DNA electroanalysis. Recently, new carbon materials including carbon nanotubes (CNT), graphene and diamond-based nanocarbon electrodes have been actively developed as sensing platforms for biomolecules, such as DNA and proteins. Electrochemical techniques using these new material-based electrodes can provide very simple and inexpensive sensing platforms, and so are expected to be used as one of the "post-light" DNA analysis methods, which include coulometric detection, amperometric detection with electroactive tags or intercalators, and potentiometric detection. DNA electroanalysis using these new carbon materials is summarized in view of recent advances on electrodes.

  16. Monodisperse, submicrometer droplets via condensation of microfluidic-generated gas bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Minseok; Matsuura, Naomi

    2012-09-10

    Microfluidics (MFs) can produce monodisperse droplets with precise size control. However, the synthesis of monodisperse droplets much smaller than the minimum feature size of the microfluidic device (MFD) remains challenging, thus limiting the production of submicrometer droplets. To overcome the minimum micrometer-scale droplet sizes that can be generated using typical MFDs, the droplet material is heated above its boiling point (bp), and then MFs is used to produce monodisperse micrometer-scale bubbles (MBs) that are easily formed in the size regime where standard MFDs have excellent size control. After MBs are formed, they are cooled, condensing into dramatically smaller droplets that are beyond the size limit achievable using the original MFD, with a size decrease corresponding to the density difference between the gas and liquid phases of the droplet material. Herein, it is shown experimentally that monodisperse, submicrometer droplets of predictable sizes can be condensed from a monodisperse population of MBs as generated by MFs. Using perfluoropentane (PFP) as a representative solvent due to its low bp (29.2 °C), it is demonstrated that monodisperse PFP MBs can be produced at MFD temperatures >3.6 °C above the bp of PFP over a wide range of sizes (i.e., diameters from 2 to 200 μm). Independent of initial size, the generated MBs shrink rapidly in size from about 3 to 0 °C above the bp of PFP, corresponding to a phase change from gas to liquid, after which they shrink more slowly to form fully condensed droplets with diameters 5.0 ± 0.1 times smaller than the initial size of the MBs, even in the submicrometer size regime. This new method is versatile and flexible, and may be applied to any type of low-bp solvent for the manufacture of different submicrometer droplets for which precisely controlled dimensions are required.

  17. PREPARATION OF MONODISPERSE CROSSLINKED POLYMER MICROSPHERES HAVING CHLOROMETHYL GROUP BY DISTILLATION-PRECIPITATION POLYMERIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Feng Li; Xin-Lin Yang; Wen-Qiang Huang

    2005-01-01

    Monodisperse crosslinked poly(chloromethylstyrene-co-divinylbenzene) (poly(CMSt-co-DVB)) microspheres were prepared by distillation-precipitation copolymerization of chloromethylstyrene (CMSt) and divinylbenzene (DVB) in neat acetonitrile. The polymer particles had clean surfaces due to the absence of any added stabilizer. The size of the particles ranges from 2.59 μm to 3.19 μm and with mono-dispersity around 1.002-1.014. The effects of monomer feed in copolymerization on the microsphere formation were described. The polymer microspheres were characterized by SEM and chlorinity elemental analysis.

  18. Supramolecularly self-organized nanomaterials: A voyage from inorganic particles to organic light-harvesting materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varotto, Alessandro

    In 2009 the U.S. National Science Foundation announced the realignment of the Chemistry Divisions introducing the new interdisciplinary program of "Macromolecular, Supramolecular and Nanochemistry." This statement officially recognizes a field of studies that has already seen the publication of many thousands of works in the past 20 years. Nanotechnology and supramolecular chemistry can be found in the most diverse disciplines, from biology to engineering, to physics. Furthermore, many technologies rely on nanoscale dimensions for more than one component. Nanomaterials and technologies are on the market with a range of applications from composite materials, to electronics, to medicine, to sensing and more. This thesis will introduce a variety of studies and applications of supramolecular chemistry to form nanoscale photonic materials from soft matter. We will first illustrate a method to synthesize metallic nanoparticles using plasmids DNA as a mold. The circular DNA functions as a sacrificial template to shape the particles into narrowly monodispersed nanodiscs. Secondly, we will describe the synthesis of a highly fluorinated porphyrin derivative and how the fluorines improve the formation of ultra thin films when the porphyrin is blended with fullerene C60. Finally, we will show how to increase the short-circuit current in a solar cell built with an internal parallel tandem light harvesting design. A blend of phthalocyanines, each with a decreasing optical band gap, is supramolecularly self-organized with pyridyl-C60 within thin films. The different band gaps of the single phthalocyanines capture a wider segment of the solar spectrum increasing the overall efficiency of the device. In conclusion, we have presented a number of studies for the preparation of inorganic and organic nanomaterials and their application in supramolecularly organized photonic devices.

  19. Implications of in vitro dosimetry on toxicological ranking of low aspect ratio engineered nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Anoop K; Bello, Dhimiter; Cohen, Joel; Demokritou, Philip

    2015-01-01

    In vitro high throughput screening platforms based on mechanistic injury pathways are been used for hazard assessment of engineered nanomaterials (ENM). Toxicity screening and other in vitro nanotoxicology assessment efforts in essence compare and rank nanomaterials relative to each other. We hypothesize that this ranking of ENM is susceptible to dispersion and dosimetry protocols, which continue to be poorly standardized. Our objective was to quantitate the impact of dosimetry on toxicity ranking of ENM. A set of eight well-characterized and diverse low aspect ratio ENMs, were utilized. The recently developed in vitro dosimetry platform at Harvard, which includes preparation of fairly monodispersed suspensions, measurement of the effective density of formed agglomerates in culture media and fate and transport modeling was used for calculating the effective dose delivered to cells as a function of time. Changes in the dose-response relationships between the administered and delivered dose were investigated with two representative endpoints, cell viability and IL-8 production, in the human monocytic THP-1 cells. The slopes of administered/delivered dose-response relationships changed 1:4.94 times and were ENM-dependent. The overall relative ranking of ENM intrinsic toxicity also changed considerably, matching notably better the in vivo inflammation data (R(2 )= 0.97 versus 0.64). This standardized dispersion and dosimetry methodology presented here is generalizable to low aspect ratio ENMs. Our findings further reinforce the need to reanalyze and reinterpret in vitro ENM hazard ranking data published in the nanotoxicology literature in the light of dispersion and dosimetry considerations (or lack thereof) and to adopt these protocols in future in vitro nanotoxicology testing.

  20. Cassini observations of carbon-based anions in Titan's ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Ravindra; Lewis, Gethyn; Waite, J. Hunter; Kataria, Dhiren; Wellbrock, Anne; Jones, Geraint; Coates, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    Cassini observations of Titan's ionosphere revealed an atmosphere rich in positively and negatively charged ions and organic molecules. The detection of large quantities of negatively charged ions was particularly surprising and adds Titan to the growing list of locations where anion chemistry has been observed to play an important role. In this study we present updated analysis on these negatively charged ions through an enhanced understanding of the Cassini CAPS Electron Spectrometer (CAPS-ELS) instrument response. The ionisation of Titan's dominant atmospheric constituent, N2, by the HeII Solar line, results in an observable photoelectron population at 24.1eV which we use to correct for differential spacecraft charging. Correcting for further energy-angle signatures within this dataset, we use an updated fitting procedure to show how the ELS mass spectrum, previously grouped into broad mass ranges, can be resolved into specific peaks at multiples of carbon-based anion species up to over 100amu/q. These peaks are shown to be ubiquitous within Titan's upper atmosphere and reminiscent of carbon-based anions identified in dense molecular clouds beyond our Solar System. It is thus shown how the moon Titan in the Outer Solar System can be used as an analogue to study these even more remote and exotic astrophysical environments.

  1. The Nanomaterial Registry: facilitating the sharing and analysis of data in the diverse nanomaterial community

    OpenAIRE

    Ostraat ML; Mills KC; Guzan KA; Murry D

    2013-01-01

    Michele L Ostraat, Karmann C Mills, Kimberly A Guzan, Damaris MurryRTI International, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: The amount of data being generated in the nanotechnology research space is significant, and the coordination, sharing, and downstream analysis of the data is complex and consistently deliberated. The complexities of the data are due in large part to the inherently complicated characteristics of nanomaterials. Also, testing protocols and assays used for nanomaterials are diverse and l...

  2. CLP application to nanomaterials: a specific aspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alessandrelli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at describing some relevant aspects related to the classification, labelling and packaging of nanomaterials. Concerns have been raised about potential adverse effects to humans or the environment as result of impacts of nanomaterials. The new Regulation (EC no. 1272/2008 on classification, labelling and packaging of substances and mixtures (CLP does not contain any specific definition or provision related to nanomaterials nevertheless they are covered by the definition of substance set in the Regulation. It is recognized that different particle sizes or forms of the same substance can have different classification. Thus, if substances are placed on the market both at nanoscale and as bulk, a separate classification and labelling may be required if the available data on the intrinsic properties indicate a difference in hazard class between the two forms. CLP Regulation requires the manufacturer or importer to ensure that the information used to classify relates to the forms or physical states in which the substance is placed on the market and in which it can reasonably be expected to be used. Moreover, CLP demands testing relating to physical hazards to be performed if such information is missing or not adequate to conclude on classification. Further developments of the CLP guidance documents and implementation tools are needed in order to cover nanomaterials more specifically.

  3. Applications of Nanomaterials in Electrochemical Enzyme Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodi Yang

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A biosensor is defined as a kind of analytical device incorporating a biological material, a biologically derived material or a biomimic intimately associated with or integrated within a physicochemical transducer or transducing microsystem. Electrochemical biosensors incorporating enzymes with nanomaterials, which combine the recognition and catalytic properties of enzymes with the electronic properties of various nanomaterials, are new materials with synergistic properties originating from the components of the hybrid composites. Therefore, these systems have excellent prospects for interfacing biological recognition events through electronic signal transduction so as to design a new generation of bioelectronic devices with high sensitivity and stability. In this review, we describe approaches that involve nanomaterials in direct electrochemistry of redox proteins, especially our work on biosensor design immobilizing glucose oxidase (GOD, horseradish peroxidase (HRP, cytochrome P450 (CYP2B6, hemoglobin (Hb, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH. The topics of the present review are the different functions of nanomaterials based on modification of electrode materials, as well as applications of electrochemical enzyme biosensors.

  4. Cellulose-Based Nanomaterials for Energy Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xudong; Yao, Chunhua; Wang, Fei; Li, Zhaodong

    2017-09-13

    Cellulose is the most abundant natural polymer on earth, providing a sustainable green resource that is renewable, degradable, biocompatible, and cost effective. Recently, nanocellulose-based mesoporous structures, flexible thin films, fibers, and networks are increasingly developed and used in photovoltaic devices, energy storage systems, mechanical energy harvesters, and catalysts components, showing tremendous materials science value and application potential in many energy-related fields. In this Review, the most recent advancements of processing, integration, and application of cellulose nanomaterials in the areas of solar energy harvesting, energy storage, and mechanical energy harvesting are reviewed. For solar energy harvesting, promising applications of cellulose-based nanostructures for both solar cells and photoelectrochemical electrodes development are reviewed, and their morphology-related merits are discussed. For energy storage, the discussion is primarily focused on the applications of cellulose-based nanomaterials in lithium-ion batteries, including electrodes (e.g., active materials, binders, and structural support), electrolytes, and separators. Applications of cellulose nanomaterials in supercapacitors are also reviewed briefly. For mechanical energy harvesting, the most recent technology evolution in cellulose-based triboelectric nanogenerators is reviewed, from fundamental property tuning to practical implementations. At last, the future research potential and opportunities of cellulose nanomaterials as a new energy material are discussed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Nanomaterials in Advanced Batteries and Supercapacitors

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ozoemena, Kenneth I

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This book provides an authoritative source of information on the use of nanomaterials to enhance the performance of existing electrochemical energy storage systems and the manners in which new such systems are being made possible. The book covers...

  6. Risk-based classification system of nanomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tervonen, Tommi; Linkov, Igor; Figueira, Jose Rui; Steevens, Jeffery; Chappell, Mark; Merad, Myriam

    Various stakeholders are increasingly interested in the potential toxicity and other risks associated with nanomaterials throughout the different stages of a product's life cycle (e.g., development, production, use, disposal). Risk assessment methods and tools developed and applied to chemical and

  7. Surface science tools for nanomaterials characterization

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Fourth volume of a 40volume series on nano science and nanotechnology, edited by the renowned scientist Challa S.S.R. Kumar. This handbook gives a comprehensive overview about Surface Science Tools for Nanomaterials Characterization. Modern applications and state-of-the-art techniques are covered and make this volume an essential reading for research scientists in academia and industry.

  8. Redefining risk research priorities for nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grieger, Khara Deanne; Baun, Anders; Owen, R.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical-based risk assessment underpins the current approach to responsible development of nanomaterials (NM). It is now recognised, however, that this process may take decades, leaving decision makers with little support in the near term. Despite this, current and near future research efforts...

  9. Managing the Life Cycle Risks of Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    International Center for Scholars Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies (PEN) consumer products inventory, 16 is found in wound dressings, socks, and soap...acceptance authority. 8. Track hazards, their closures , and residual mishap risk throughout the system life cycle. When properly applied, the...Risks of Nanomaterials Report consumption, land use, ozone depletion, global warming, acidification, eutrophication, tropospheric ozone formation

  10. Modification and characterization of (energetic) nanomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, A.E.D.M. van der; Creyghton, Y.L.M.; Peppel, R.J.E. van de; Abadjieva, E.

    2010-01-01

    Nanomaterials are a topic of increased interest, since they have properties which differ from their macroscopic counterparts. Many applications nowadays take advantage of the new functionalities which natural and manufactured nanoparticles possess. Based on these developments, also the research on e

  11. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Third volume of a 40volume series on nanoscience and nanotechnology, edited by the renowned scientist Challa S.S.R. Kumar. This handbook gives a comprehensive overview about Transmission electron microscopy characterization of nanomaterials. Modern applications and state-of-the-art techniques are covered and make this volume an essential reading for research scientists in academia and industry.

  12. Lyotropic Liquid Crystal Phases from Anisotropic Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingo Dierking

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Liquid crystals are an integral part of a mature display technology, also establishing themselves in other applications, such as spatial light modulators, telecommunication technology, photonics, or sensors, just to name a few of the non-display applications. In recent years, there has been an increasing trend to add various nanomaterials to liquid crystals, which is motivated by several aspects of materials development. (i addition of nanomaterials can change and thus tune the properties of the liquid crystal; (ii novel functionalities can be added to the liquid crystal; and (iii the self-organization of the liquid crystalline state can be exploited to template ordered structures or to transfer order onto dispersed nanomaterials. Much of the research effort has been concentrated on thermotropic systems, which change order as a function of temperature. Here we review the other side of the medal, the formation and properties of ordered, anisotropic fluid phases, liquid crystals, by addition of shape-anisotropic nanomaterials to isotropic liquids. Several classes of materials will be discussed, inorganic and mineral liquid crystals, viruses, nanotubes and nanorods, as well as graphene oxide.

  13. The insurability of nanomaterial production risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Martin; Murphy, Finbarr; Baublyte, Lijana; McAlea, Eamonn M.; Tofail, Syed A. M.

    2013-04-01

    Without insurance the long-term sustainability of nanotechnology is questionable, but insurance companies are encumbered by their institutional memory of losses from the asbestos crisis and the absence of suitable actuarial models to measure the potential risks of nanotechnology. Here we propose a framework that supports the transfer of nanomaterial production risk to the insurance sector.

  14. Risk-based classification system of nanomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tervonen, Tommi; Linkov, Igor; Figueira, Jose Rui; Steevens, Jeffery; Chappell, Mark; Merad, Myriam

    2009-01-01

    Various stakeholders are increasingly interested in the potential toxicity and other risks associated with nanomaterials throughout the different stages of a product's life cycle (e.g., development, production, use, disposal). Risk assessment methods and tools developed and applied to chemical and b

  15. Anisotropic nanomaterials: structure, growth, assembly, and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajanlal, Panikkanvalappil R; Sreeprasad, Theruvakkattil S; Samal, Akshaya K; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge over the shape of nanomaterials is a critical factor in designing devices with desired functions. Due to this reason, systematic efforts have been made to synthesize materials of diverse shape in the nanoscale regime. Anisotropic nanomaterials are a class of materials in which their properties are direction-dependent and more than one structural parameter is needed to describe them. Their unique and fine-tuned physical and chemical properties make them ideal candidates for devising new applications. In addition, the assembly of ordered one-dimensional (1D), two-dimensional (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) arrays of anisotropic nanoparticles brings novel properties into the resulting system, which would be entirely different from the properties of individual nanoparticles. This review presents an overview of current research in the area of anisotropic nanomaterials in general and noble metal nanoparticles in particular. We begin with an introduction to the advancements in this area followed by general aspects of the growth of anisotropic nanoparticles. Then we describe several important synthetic protocols for making anisotropic nanomaterials, followed by a summary of their assemblies, and conclude with major applications.

  16. Anisotropic nanomaterials: structure, growth, assembly, and functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panikkanvalappil R. Sajanlal

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Comprehensive knowledge over the shape of nanomaterials is a critical factor in designing devices with desired functions. Due to this reason, systematic efforts have been made to synthesize materials of diverse shape in the nanoscale regime. Anisotropic nanomaterials are a class of materials in which their properties are direction-dependent and more than one structural parameter is needed to describe them. Their unique and fine-tuned physical and chemical properties make them ideal candidates for devising new applications. In addition, the assembly of ordered one-dimensional (1D, two-dimensional (2D, and three-dimensional (3D arrays of anisotropic nanoparticles brings novel properties into the resulting system, which would be entirely different from the properties of individual nanoparticles. This review presents an overview of current research in the area of anisotropic nanomaterials in general and noble metal nanoparticles in particular. We begin with an introduction to the advancements in this area followed by general aspects of the growth of anisotropic nanoparticles. Then we describe several important synthetic protocols for making anisotropic nanomaterials, followed by a summary of their assemblies, and conclude with major applications.

  17. Nanomaterials environmental risks and recycling: Actual issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Dragana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnologies are being spoken of as the driving force behind a new industrial revolution. Nanoscience has matured significantly during the last decade as it has transitioned from bench top science to applied technology. Presently, nanomaterials are used in a wide variety of commercial products such as electronic components, sports equipment, sun creams and biomedical applications. The size of nanoparticles allows them to interact strongly with biological structures, so they present potential human and environmental health risk. Nanometer size presents also a problem for separation, recovery, and reuse of the particulate matter. Therefore, industrial-scale manufacturing and use of nanomaterials could have strong impact on human health and the environment or the problematic of nanomaterials recycling. The catch-all term ''nanotechnology' is not sufficiently precise for risk governance and risk management purposes. The estimation of possible risks depends on a consideration of the life cycle of the material being produced, which involves understanding the processes and materials used in manufacture, the likely interactions between the product and individuals or the environment during its manufacture and useful life, and the methods used in its eventual disposal. From a risk-control point of view it will be necessary to systematically identify those critical issues, which should be looked at in more detail. Brief review of actual trends in nanomaterials environmental risks and recycling is given in this paper.

  18. Not just graphene: The wonderful world of carbon and related nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogotsi, Yury

    2015-11-27

    Carbon, with its variety of allotropes and forms, is the most versatile material, and virtually any combination of mechanical, optical, electrical, and chemical properties can be achieved with carbon by controlling its structure and surface chemistry. The goal of this article is to help readers appreciate the variety of carbon nanomaterials and to describe some engineering applications of the most important of these. Many different materials are needed to meet a variety of performance requirements, but they can all be built of carbon. Considering the example of supercapacitor electrodes, zero- and one-dimensional nanoparticles, such as carbon onions and nanotubes, respectively, deliver very high power because of fast ion sorption/desorption on their outer surfaces. Two-dimensional (2D) graphene offers higher charge/discharge rates than porous carbons and a high volumetric energy density. Three-dimensional porous activated, carbide-derived, and templated carbon networks, with high surface areas and porosities in the angstrom or nanometer range, can provide high energy densities if the pore size is matched with the electrolyte ion size. Finally, carbon-based nanostructures further expand the range of available nanomaterials: Recently discovered 2D transition-metal carbides (MXenes) have already grown into a family with close to 20 members in about four years and challenge graphene in some applications.

  19. Tomato Seed Coat Permeability to Selected Carbon Nanomaterials and Enhancement of Germination and Seedling Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnikova, Tatsiana A; Podila, Ramakrishna; Rao, Apparao M; Taylor, Alan G

    2015-01-01

    Seed coat permeability was examined using a model that tested the effects of soaking tomato (Solanum lycopersicon) seeds in combination with carbon-based nanomaterials (CBNMs) and ultrasonic irradiation (US). Penetration of seed coats to the embryo by CBNMs, as well as CBNMs effects on seed germination and seedling growth, was examined. Two CBNMs, C60(OH)20 (fullerol) and multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs), were applied at 50 mg/L, and treatment exposure ranged from 0 to 60 minutes. Bright field, fluorescence, and electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy provided corroborating evidence that neither CBNM was able to penetrate the seed coat. The restriction of nanomaterial (NM) uptake was attributed to the semipermeable layer located at the innermost layer of the seed coat adjacent to the endosperm. Seed treatments using US at 30 or 60 minutes in the presence of MWNTs physically disrupted the seed coat; however, the integrity of the semipermeable layer was not impaired. The germination percentage and seedling length and weight were enhanced in the presence of MWNTs but were not altered by C60(OH)20. The combined exposure of seeds to NMs and US provided insight into the nanoparticle-seed interaction and may serve as a delivery system for enhancing seed germination and early seedling growth.

  20. Graphene-based nanomaterials for nanobiotechnology and biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, K Vijaya; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Verma, Sandeep; Bianco, Alberto

    2013-10-01

    Graphene family nanomaterials are currently being extensively explored for applications in the field of nanotechnology. The unique intrinsic properties treasured in their simple molecular design and their ability to work in coherence with other existing nanomaterials make graphene family nanomaterials the most promising candidates for different types of applications. This review highlights the scope and utility of these multifaceted nanomaterials in nanobiotechnology and biomedicine. In a tandem approach, this review presents the smooth inclusion of these nanomaterials into existing designs for creating efficient working models at the nanoscale level as well as discussing their broad future possibilities.

  1. One-dimensional nanomaterials: Synthesis and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Bo

    My research mainly covers three types of one-dimensional (1D) nanomaterials: metal oxide nanowires, transition metal oxide core-shell nanowires and single-walled carbon nanotubes. This new class of nanomaterials has generated significant impact in multiple fields including electronics, medicine, computing and energy. Their peculiar, fascinating properties are promising for unique applications on electronics, spintronics, optical and chemical/biological sensing. This dissertation will summarize my research work on these three 1D nanomaterials and propose some ideas that may lead to further development. Chapter 1 will give a brief introduction of nanotechnology journey and 1D nanomaterials. Chapter 2 and 3 will discuss indium oxide nanowires, as the representative of metal oxide nanwires. More specifically, chapter 2 is focused on the synthesis, material characterization, transport studies and doping control of indium oxide nanowires; Chapter 3 will give a comprehensive review of our systematic studies on molecular memory applications based on molecule/indium oxide nanowire heterostructures. Chapter 4 will introduce another 1D nanomaterial-transition metal oxide (TMO) core-shell nanowires. The discuss will focus on the synthesis of TMO nanowires, material analysis and their electronic properties as a function of temperature and magnetic field. Chapter 5 is dedicated to aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on synthesis with rational control of position and orientation, detailed characterization and construction of scaled top-gated transistors. This chapter presents a way to produce the p- and n-type nanotube transistors based on gate voltage polarity control during electrical breakdown. Finally, chapter 6 summarizes the above discussions and proposes some suggestions for future studies.

  2. Green processes for nanotechnology from inorganic to bioinspired nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Basiuk, Elena

    2015-01-01

    This book provides the state-of-the-art survey of green techniques in preparation of different classes of nanomaterials, with an emphasis on the use of renewable sources. Key topics covered include fabrication of nanomaterials using green techniques as well as their properties and applications, the use of renewable sources to obtain nanomaterials of different classes, from simple metal and metal oxide nanoparticles to complex bioinspired nanomaterials, economic contributions of nanotechnology to green and sustainable growth, and more. This is an ideal book for students, lecturers, researchers and engineers dealing with versatile (mainly chemical, biological, and medical) aspects of nanotechnology, including fabrication of nanomaterials using green techniques and their properties and applications. This book also: Maximizes reader insights into the design and fabrication of bioinspired nanomaterials and the design of complex bio-nanohybrids Covers many different applications for nanomaterials, bioinspired nanom...

  3. Nanomaterial cytotoxicity is composition, size, and cell type dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohaebuddin, Syed K; Thevenot, Paul T; Baker, David; Eaton, John W; Tang, Liping

    2010-08-21

    Despite intensive research efforts, reports of cellular responses to nanomaterials are often inconsistent and even contradictory. Additionally, relationships between the responding cell type and nanomaterial properties are not well understood. Using three model cell lines representing different physiological compartments and nanomaterials of different compositions and sizes, we have systematically investigated the influence of nanomaterial properties on the degrees and pathways of cytotoxicity. In this study, we selected nanomaterials of different compositions (TiO2 and SiO2 nanoparticles, and multi-wall carbon nanotubes [MWCNTs]) with differing size (MWCNTs of different diameters 50 nm; but same length 0.5-2 microm) to analyze the effects of composition and size on toxicity to 3T3 fibroblasts, RAW 264.7 macrophages, and telomerase-immortalized (hT) bronchiolar epithelial cells. Following characterization of nanomaterial properties in PBS and serum containing solutions, cells were exposed to nanomaterials of differing compositions and sizes, with cytotoxicity monitored through reduction in mitochondrial activity. In addition to cytotoxicity, the cellular response to nanomaterials was characterized by quantifying generation of reactive oxygen species, lysosomal membrane destabilization and mitochondrial permeability. The effect of these responses on cellular fate - apoptosis or necrosis - was then analyzed. Nanomaterial toxicity was variable based on exposed cell type and dependent on nanomaterial composition and size. In addition, nanomaterial exposure led to cell type dependent intracellular responses resulting in unique breakdown of cellular functions for each nanomaterial: cell combination. Nanomaterials induce cell specific responses resulting in variable toxicity and subsequent cell fate based on the type of exposed cell. Our results indicate that the composition and size of nanomaterials as well as the target cell type are critical determinants of

  4. Nanomaterial cytotoxicity is composition, size, and cell type dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohaebuddin Syed K

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite intensive research efforts, reports of cellular responses to nanomaterials are often inconsistent and even contradictory. Additionally, relationships between the responding cell type and nanomaterial properties are not well understood. Using three model cell lines representing different physiological compartments and nanomaterials of different compositions and sizes, we have systematically investigated the influence of nanomaterial properties on the degrees and pathways of cytotoxicity. In this study, we selected nanomaterials of different compositions (TiO2 and SiO2 nanoparticles, and multi-wall carbon nanotubes [MWCNTs] with differing size (MWCNTs of different diameters 50 nm; but same length 0.5-2 μm to analyze the effects of composition and size on toxicity to 3T3 fibroblasts, RAW 264.7 macrophages, and telomerase-immortalized (hT bronchiolar epithelial cells. Results Following characterization of nanomaterial properties in PBS and serum containing solutions, cells were exposed to nanomaterials of differing compositions and sizes, with cytotoxicity monitored through reduction in mitochondrial activity. In addition to cytotoxicity, the cellular response to nanomaterials was characterized by quantifying generation of reactive oxygen species, lysosomal membrane destabilization and mitochondrial permeability. The effect of these responses on cellular fate - apoptosis or necrosis - was then analyzed. Nanomaterial toxicity was variable based on exposed cell type and dependent on nanomaterial composition and size. In addition, nanomaterial exposure led to cell type dependent intracellular responses resulting in unique breakdown of cellular functions for each nanomaterial: cell combination. Conclusions Nanomaterials induce cell specific responses resulting in variable toxicity and subsequent cell fate based on the type of exposed cell. Our results indicate that the composition and size of nanomaterials as well as the

  5. National Survey of Workplaces Handling and Manufacturing Nanomaterials, Exposure to and Health Effects of Nanomaterials, and Evaluation of Nanomaterial Safety Data Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongho Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A national survey on workplace environment nanomaterial handling and manufacturing was conducted in 2014. Workplaces relevant to nanomaterials were in the order of TiO2 (91, SiO2 (88, carbon black (84, Ag (35, Al2O3 (35, ZnO (34, Pb (33, and CeO2 (31. The survey results indicated that the number of workplaces handling or manufacturing nanomaterials was 340 (0.27% of total 126,846 workplaces. The number of nanomaterials used and products was 546 (1.60 per company and 583 (1.71 per company, respectively. For most workplaces, the results on exposure to hazardous particulate materials, including nanomaterials, were below current OELs, yet a few workplaces were above the action level. As regards the health status of workers, 9 workers were diagnosed with a suspected respiratory occupational disease, where 7 were recommended for regular follow-up health monitoring. 125 safety data sheets (SDSs were collected from the nanomaterial-relevant workplaces and evaluated for their completeness and reliability. Only 4 CNT SDSs (3.2% included the term nanomaterial, while most nanomaterial SDSs were not regularly updated and lacked hazard information. When taken together, the current analysis provides valuable national-level information on the exposure and health status of workers that can guide the next policy steps for nanomaterial management in the workplace.

  6. National Survey of Workplaces Handling and Manufacturing Nanomaterials, Exposure to and Health Effects of Nanomaterials, and Evaluation of Nanomaterial Safety Data Sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongho; Yu, Il Je

    2016-01-01

    A national survey on workplace environment nanomaterial handling and manufacturing was conducted in 2014. Workplaces relevant to nanomaterials were in the order of TiO2 (91), SiO2 (88), carbon black (84), Ag (35), Al2O3 (35), ZnO (34), Pb (33), and CeO2 (31). The survey results indicated that the number of workplaces handling or manufacturing nanomaterials was 340 (0.27% of total 126,846) workplaces. The number of nanomaterials used and products was 546 (1.60 per company) and 583 (1.71 per company), respectively. For most workplaces, the results on exposure to hazardous particulate materials, including nanomaterials, were below current OELs, yet a few workplaces were above the action level. As regards the health status of workers, 9 workers were diagnosed with a suspected respiratory occupational disease, where 7 were recommended for regular follow-up health monitoring. 125 safety data sheets (SDSs) were collected from the nanomaterial-relevant workplaces and evaluated for their completeness and reliability. Only 4 CNT SDSs (3.2%) included the term nanomaterial, while most nanomaterial SDSs were not regularly updated and lacked hazard information. When taken together, the current analysis provides valuable national-level information on the exposure and health status of workers that can guide the next policy steps for nanomaterial management in the workplace.

  7. Conventional and microwave hydrothermal synthesis of monodispersed metal oxide nanoparticles at liquid-liquid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monodispersed nanoparticles of metal oxide including ferrites MFe2O4 (M=, Ni, Co, Mn) and γ-Fe2O3, Ta2O5 etc. have been synthesized using a water-toluene interface under both conventional and microwave hydrothermal conditions. This general synthesis procedure uses readily availab...

  8. Monodispersed water-in-oil emulsions prepared with semi-metal microfluidic EDGE systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maan, A.A.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Boom, R.M.

    2013-01-01

    Monodispersed water-in-oil emulsions were prepared with EDGE (Edge based Droplet GEneration) systems, which generate many droplets simultaneously from one junction. The devices (with plateau height of 1.0 µm) were coated with Cu and CuNi having the same hydrophobicity but different surface

  9. Lock and key colloids through polymerization-induced buckling of monodisperse silicon oil droplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sacanna, S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/311471676; Irvine, W.T.M.; Rossi, L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314410376; Pine, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a new simple method to fabricate bulk amounts of colloidal spheres with well defined cavities from monodisperse emulsions. Herein, we describe the formation mechanism of ‘‘reactive’’ silicon oil droplets that deform to reproducible shapes via a polymerization-induced buckling

  10. Multimedia Environmental Distribution of Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haoyang Haven

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), which may be released to the environment due to human-related activities, can move across environmental phase boundaries and be found in most media. Given the rapid development and growing applications of nanotechnology, there is concern and thus the need to assess the potential environmental impact associated with ENMs. Accordingly, a modeling platform was developed to enable evaluation of the dynamic multimedia environmental distribution of ENMs (MendNano) and the range of potential exposure concentrations of ENMs. The MendNano was based on a dynamic multimedia compartmental modeling approach that was guided by detailed analysis of the agglomeration of ENMs, life-cycle analysis based estimates of their potential release to the environment, and incorporation of mechanistic sub-models of various intermedia transport processes. Model simulations for various environmental scenarios indicated that ENM accumulation in the sediment increased significantly with increased ENMs attachment to suspended solids in water. Atmospheric dry and wet depositions can be important pathways for ENMs input to the terrestrial environment in the absence of direct and distributed ENM release to soil. Increased ENM concentration in water due to atmospheric deposition (wet and dry) is expected as direct ENM release to water diminishes. However, for soluble ENMs dissolution can be the dominant pathway for suspended ENM removal from water even compared to advective transport. For example, simulations for Los Angeles showed that dry deposition, rain scavenging, and wind dilution can remove 90% of ENMs from the atmospheric airshed in ~100-230 days, ~2-6 hrs, and ~0.5-2 days, respectively. For the evaluated ENMs (metal, metal oxides, carbon nanotubes (CNT), nanoclays), mass accumulation in the multimedia environment was mostly in the soil and sediment. Additionally, simulation results for TiO2 in Los Angeles demonstrates that the ENM concentrations in air and

  11. Carbon-based strong solid acid for cornstarch hydrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nata, Iryanti Fatyasari; Irawan, Chairul; Mardina, Primata; Lee, Cheng-Kang

    2015-10-01

    Highly sulfonated carbonaceous spheres with diameter of 100-500 nm can be generated by hydrothermal carbonization of glucose in the presence of hydroxyethylsulfonic acid and acrylic acid at 180 °C for 4 h. The acidity of the prepared carbonaceous sphere C4-SO3H can reach 2.10 mmol/g. It was used as a solid acid catalyst for the hydrolysis of cornstarch. Total reducing sugar (TRS) concentration of 19.91 mg/mL could be obtained by hydrolyzing 20 mg/mL cornstarch at 150 °C for 6 h using C4-SO3H as solid acid catalyst. The solid acid catalyst demonstrated good stability that only 9% decrease in TRS concentration was observed after five repeat uses. The as-prepared carbon-based solid acid catalyst can be an environmentally benign replacement for homogeneous catalyst.

  12. Carbon-Based Fibrous EDLC Capacitors and Supercapacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lekakou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates electrochemical double-layer capacitors (EDLCs including two alternative types of carbon-based fibrous electrodes, a carbon fibre woven fabric (CWF and a multiwall carbon nanotube (CNT electrode, as well as hybrid CWF-CNT electrodes. Two types of separator membranes were also considered. An organic gel electrolyte PEO-LiCIO4-EC-THF was used to maintain a high working voltage. The capacitor cells were tested in cyclic voltammetry, charge-discharge, and impedance tests. The best separator was a glass fibre-fine pore filter. The carbon woven fabric electrode and the corresponding supercapacitor exhibited superior performance per unit area, whereas the multiwall carbon nanotube electrode and corresponding supercapacitor demonstrated excellent specific properties. The hybrid CWF-CNT electrodes did not show a combined improved performance due to the lack of carbon nanotube penetration into the carbon fibre fabric.

  13. Polymer/Carbon-Based Hybrid Aerogels: Preparation, Properties and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizeng Zuo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aerogels are synthetic porous materials derived from sol-gel materials in which the liquid component has been replaced with gas to leave intact solid nanostructures without pore collapse. Recently, aerogels based on natural or synthetic polymers, called polymer or organic aerogels, have been widely explored due to their porous structures and unique properties, such as high specific surface area, low density, low thermal conductivity and dielectric constant. This paper gives a comprehensive review about the most recent progresses in preparation, structures and properties of polymer and their derived carbon-based aerogels, as well as their potential applications in various fields including energy storage, adsorption, thermal insulation and flame retardancy. To facilitate further research and development, the technical challenges are discussed, and several future research directions are also suggested in this review.

  14. Enantioselective Nanoporous Carbon Based on Chiral Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Ido; Fechler, Nina; Antonietti, Markus; Mastai, Yitzhak

    2016-01-04

    One of the greatest challenges in modern chemical processing is to achieve enantiospecific control in chemical reactions using chiral media such as chiral mesoporous materials. Herein, we describe a novel and effective synthetic pathway for the preparation of enantioselective nanoporous carbon, based on chiral ionic liquids (CILs). CILs of phenylalanine (CIL(Phe)) are used as precursors for the carbonization of chiral mesoporous carbon. We employ circular dichroism spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and chronoamperometry in order to demonstrate the chiral nature of the mesoporous carbon. The approach presented in this paper is highly significant for the development of a new type of chiral porous materials for enantioselective chemistry. In addition, it contributes significantly to our understanding of the structure and nature of chiral nanoporous materials and surfaces. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Carbon-based nanodevices for sensors, actuators, and electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, E. H.; Strauf, S.; Fisher, F.; Choi, D. S.

    2009-05-01

    We are pursuing several projects aimed at developing carbon-based nanodevices for sensing, actuation, and nanoelectronics applications. In one project, we are seeking to fabricate and characterize carbon nanotube quantum dots (CNT-QDs) with potential application as future electronic memories with high-performance, bandwidth, and throughput. In a second effort, we have used pulsed laser deposition (PLD) to create thermal bimorph nanoactuators based on multi-wall nano tubes (MWNTs) coated on one side with a thin metal film. Lastly, graphene materials are being studied to investigate its field emission properties for vacuum electronics and to exploit its differential conductivity. These devices have potential in a wide range of applications including sensors, detectors, system-on-a-chip, system-in-a-package, programmable logic controls, energy storage systems and all-electronic systems.

  16. CVD synthesis of carbon-based metallic photonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Zakhidov, A A; Baughman, R H; Iqbal, Z

    1999-01-01

    Three-dimensionally periodic nanostructures on the scale of hundreds of nanometers, known as photonic crystals, are attracting increasing interest because of a number of exciting predicted properties. In particular, interesting behavior should be obtainable for carbon- based structures having a dimensional scale larger than fullerenes and nanotubes, but smaller than graphitic microfibers. We show here how templating of porous opals by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) allows us to obtain novel types of graphitic nanostructures. We describe the synthesis of new cubic forms of carbon having extended covalent connectivity in three dimensions, which provide high electrical conductivity and unit cell dimensions comparable to optical wavelengths. Such materials are metallic photonic crystals that show intense Bragg diffraction. (14 refs).

  17. N-Modified Carbon-Based Materials: Nanoscience for Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prati, Laura; Chan-Thaw, Carine E; Campisi, Sebastiano; Villa, Alberto

    2016-10-01

    Carbon-based materials constitute a large family of materials characterized by some peculiarities such as resistance to both acidic and basic environments, flexibility of structure, and surface chemical groups. Moreover, they can be deeply modified by simple organic reactions (acid-base or redox) to acquire different properties. In particular, the introduction of N-containing groups, achieved by post-treatments or during preparation of the material, enhances the basic properties. Moreover, it has been revealed that the position and chemical nature of the N-containing groups is important in determining the interaction with metal nanoparticles, and thus, their reactivity. The modified activity was addressed to a different metal dispersion. Moreover, experiments on catalysts, showing the same metal dispersion, demonstrated that the best results were obtained when N was embedded into the carbon structure and not very close to the metal active site.

  18. Transport of carbon-based nanoparticles in saturated porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerlund, Fritjof; Hedayati, Maryeh; Sharma, Prabhakar; Katyal, Deeksha

    2015-04-01

    Carbon-based nanoparticles (NPs) are commonly occurring, both with origin from natural sources such as fires, and in the form of man-made, engineered nanoparticles, manufactured and widely used in many applications due to their unique properties. Toxicity of carbonbased NPs has been observed, and their release and distribution into the environment is therefore a matter of concern. In this research, transport and retention of three types of carbon-based NPs in saturated porous media were investigated. This included two types of engineered NPs; multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and C60 with cylindrical and spherical shapes, respectively, and natural carbon NPs in the extinguishing water collected at a site of a building fire. Several laboratory experiments were conducted to study the transport and mobility of NPs in a sand-packed column. The effect of ionic strength on transport of the NPs with different shapes was investigated. Results were interpreted using Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. It was observed that the mobility of the two types of engineered NPs was reduced with an increase in ionic strength from 1.3 mM to 60 mM. However, at ionic strength up to 10.9 mM, C60 was relatively more mobile than MWCNTs but the mobility of MWCNTs became significantly higher than C60 at 60 mM. In comparison with natural particles originating from a fire, both engineered NPs were much less mobile at the selected experimental condition. Inverse modelling was also used to calculate parameters such as attachment efficiency, the longitudinal dispersivity, and capacity of the solid phase for the removal of particles. The simulated results were in good agreement with the observed data.

  19. Controllable synthesis and biomedical applications of silver nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhihai; Jiang, Xiaoli; Guo, Dawei; Gu, Ning

    2011-11-01

    Silver nanomaterials have lots of peculiar and exciting physical and chemical properties that are different from massive silver, so the synthesis and applications of silver nanomaterials have attracted a great deal of attention in the last decade. Currently, all kinds of silver nanomaterials having different shapes and sizes have been synthesized by many ingenious methods, and silver nanomaterials have exhibited extensive application prospects in many fields especially in biomedical aspect. In this article, the controllable synthesis of silver nanomaterials including nanorods, nanowires, nanotubes, nanoprisms, nanoplates, nanodisks, nanospheres, and nanopolyhedrons, etc. are reviewed. Silver nanomaterials are most utilized in the form of nanoparticles, so the main biomedical applications of silver nanoparticles, such as antibacterial and antiviral applications, antitumor applications, biosensors and biological labels, optical imaging and imaging intensifier, are discussed. Although antibacterial applications are still the most important aspects of silver nanomaterials at present, antitumor, optical sensors and imaging applications of silver nanomaterials have also shown good potential perspectives. More biomedical applications of silver nanomaterials still need to be exploited for the future, and the biological safety of silver nanomaterials also should be paid enough attention before their practical applications.

  20. Ablation Properties of the Carbon-Based Composites Used in Artificial Heat Source Under Fire Accident

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG; Xian; HUANG; Jin-ming; ZHOU; Shao-jian; LUO; Zhi-fu

    2012-01-01

    <正>The ablation properties of the carbon-based composites used in artificial heat source under fire accident were investigated by the arc heater. In this work, we tested the carbon-based composites referring to Fig. 1. Their linear/mass ablation ratio and ablation morphologies were studied. The results showed that the carbon-based composites used in artificial heat source behaved well

  1. Characterisation of nanomaterial hydrophobicity using engineered surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmet, Cloé; Valsesia, Andrea; Oddo, Arianna; Ceccone, Giacomo; Spampinato, Valentina; Rossi, François; Colpo, Pascal

    2017-03-01

    Characterisation of engineered nanomaterials (NMs) is of outmost importance for the assessment of the potential risks arising from their extensive use. NMs display indeed a large variety of physico-chemical properties that drastically affect their interaction with biological systems. Among them, hydrophobicity is an important property that is nevertheless only slightly covered by the current physico-chemical characterisation techniques. In this work, we developed a method for the direct characterisation of NM hydrophobicity. The determination of the nanomaterial hydrophobic character is carried out by the direct measurement of the affinity of the NMs for different collectors. Each collector is an engineered surface designed in order to present specific surface charge and hydrophobicity degrees. Being thus characterised by a combination of surface energy components, the collectors enable the NM immobilisation with surface coverage in relation to their hydrophobicity. The experimental results are explained by using the extended DLVO theory, which takes into account the hydrophobic forces acting between NMs and collectors.

  2. Assessing the protection of the nanomaterial workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Paul A; Iavicoli, Ivo; Rantanen, Jorma H; Dahmann, Dirk; Iavicoli, Sergio; Pipke, Rüdiger; Guseva Canu, Irina; Boccuni, Fabio; Ricci, Maximo; Polci, Maria Letizia; Sabbioni, Enrico; Pietroiusti, Antonio; Mantovani, Elvio

    2016-09-01

    Responsible development of any technology, including nanotechnology, requires protecting workers, the first people to be exposed to the products of the technology. In the case of nanotechnology, this is difficult to achieve because in spite of early evidence raising health and safety concerns, there are uncertainties about hazards and risks. The global response to these concerns has been the issuance by authoritative agencies of precautionary guidance to strictly control exposures to engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). This commentary summarizes discussions at the "Symposium on the Health Protection of Nanomaterial Workers" held in Rome (25 and 26 February 2015). There scientists and practitioners from 11 countries took stock of what is known about hazards and risks resulting from exposure to ENMs, confirmed that uncertainties still exist, and deliberated on what it would take to conduct a global assessment of how well workers are being protected from potentially harmful exposures.

  3. Toxicology of Nanomaterials: Permanent interactive learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castranova Vince

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Particle and Fibre Toxicology wants to play a decisive role in a time where particle research is challenged and driven by the developments and applications of nanomaterials. This aim is not merely quantitative in publishing a given number of papers on nanomaterials, but also qualitatively since the field of nanotoxicology is rapidly emerging and benchmarks for good science are needed. Since then a number of things have happened that merit further analysis. The interactive learning issue is best shown by report and communications on the toxicology of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNT. A special workshop on the CNT has now been organized twice in Nagano (Japan and this editorial contains a summary of the most important outcomes. Finally, we take the opportunity discuss some recent reports from the nanotech literature, and more specifically a Chinese study that claims severe consequences of nanoparticle exposure.

  4. Metal halide perovskite nanomaterials: synthesis and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Son-Tung; Su, Rui; Xing, Jun; Zhang, Qing; Xiong, Qihua

    2017-04-01

    Nanomaterials refer to those with at least one dimension being at the nanoscale (i.e. applications. The different synthesis approaches and growth mechanisms will be discussed along with their novel characteristics and applications. Taking perovskite quantum dots as an example, the quantum confinement effect and high external quantum efficiency are among these novel properties and their excellent performance in applications, such as single photon emitters and LEDs, will be discussed. Understanding the mechanism behind the formation of these nanomaterial forms of perovskite will help researchers to come up with effective strategies to combat the emerging challenges of this family of materials, such as stability under ambient conditions and toxicity, towards next generation applications in photovoltaics and optoelectronics.

  5. Carbon Nanomaterials as Reinforcements for Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials including fellerenes, nanotubes (CNT) and nanofibers have been proposed for many applications. One of applications is to use the carbon nanomaterials as reinforcements for composites, especially for polymer matrices. Carbon nanotubes is a good reinforcement for lightweight composite applications due to its low mass density and high Young's modulus. Two obscures need to overcome for carbon nanotubes as reinforcements in composites, which are large quantity production and functioning the nanotubes. This presentation will discuss the carbon nanotube growth by chemical vapor deposition. In order to reduce the cost of producing carbon nanotubes as well as preventing the sliding problems, carbon nanotubes were also synthesized on carbon fibers. The synthesis process and characterization results of nanotubes and nanotubes/fibers will be discussed in the presentation.

  6. “Smart”nanomaterials for cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LE; GUYADER; Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Recent development in nanotechnology has provided new tools for cancer therapy and diagnostics.Because of their small size,nanoscale devices readily interact with biomolecules both on the cell surface and inside the cell.Nanomaterials,such as fullerenes and their derivatives,are effective in terms of interactions with the immune system and have great potential as anticancer drugs.Comparatively,other nanomaterials are able to load active drugs to cancer cells by selectively using the unique tumor environment,such as their enhanced permeability,retention effect and the specific acidic microenvironment.Multifunctional and multiplexed nanoparticles,as the next generation of nanoparticles,are now being extensively investigated and are promising tools to achieve personalized and tailored cancer treatments.

  7. Creating biological nanomaterials using synthetic biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, MaryJoe K.; Ruder, Warren C.

    2014-02-01

    Synthetic biology is a new discipline that combines science and engineering approaches to precisely control biological networks. These signaling networks are especially important in fields such as biomedicine and biochemical engineering. Additionally, biological networks can also be critical to the production of naturally occurring biological nanomaterials, and as a result, synthetic biology holds tremendous potential in creating new materials. This review introduces the field of synthetic biology, discusses how biological systems naturally produce materials, and then presents examples and strategies for incorporating synthetic biology approaches in the development of new materials. In particular, strategies for using synthetic biology to produce both organic and inorganic nanomaterials are discussed. Ultimately, synthetic biology holds the potential to dramatically impact biological materials science with significant potential applications in medical systems.

  8. Nanomaterials and preservation mechanisms of architecture monuments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ion, Rodica-Mariana; Radu, Adrian; Teodorescu, Sofia; Fierǎscu, Irina; Fierǎscu, Radu-Claudiu; Ştirbescu, Raluca-Maria; Dulamǎ, Ioana Daniela; Şuicǎ-Bunghez, Ioana-Raluca; Bucuricǎ, Ioan Alin; Ion, Mihaela-Lucia

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge of the chemical composition of the building materials of the monuments may help us to preserve and protect them from the pollution of our cities. The aim of this work is to characterize the materials of the walls from ancient buildings, the decay products that could be appear due to the action of pollution and a new method based on nanomaterials (hydroxyapatite -HAp) for a conservative preservation of the treated walls. Some analytical techniques have been used, as follow: X-ray fluorescence energy dispersive (EDXRF) (for the relative abundance of major, minor and trace elements), FTIR and Raman spectroscopy (for stratigraphic study of cross-sections of multi-layered materials found in wall paintings), Optical microscopy (OM), (for morphology of the wall samples). The nanomaterial suspension HAp applied on the sample surface by spraying, decreased the capillary water uptake, do not modify significantly the color of the samples and induced a reduced mass loss for the treated samples.

  9. Advances in Multiferroic Nanomaterials Assembled with Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shifeng Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As an entirely new perspective of multifunctional materials, multiferroics have attracted a great deal of attention. With the rapidly developing micro- and nano-electro-mechanical system (MEMS&NEMS, the new kinds of micro- and nanodevices and functionalities aroused extensive research activity in the area of multiferroics. As an ideal building block to assemble the nanostructure, cluster exhibits particular physical properties related to the cluster size at nanoscale, which is efficient in controlling the multiferroic properties for nanomaterials. This review focuses on our recent advances in multiferroic nanomaterials assembled with clusters. In particular, the single phase multiferroic films and compound heterostructured multiferroic films assembled with clusters were introduced detailedly. This technique presents a new and efficient method to produce the nanostructured multiferroic materials for their potential application in NEMS devices.

  10. Characterization of Nanomaterials by Physical Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, C. N. R.; Biswas, Kanishka

    2009-07-01

    Much progress in nanoscience and nanotechnology has been made in the past few years thanks to the increased availability of sophisticated physical methods to characterize nanomaterials. These techniques include electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopies, in addition to standard techniques such as X-ray and neutron diffraction, X-ray scattering, and various spectroscopies. Characterization of nanomaterials includes the determination not only of size and shape, but also of the atomic and electronic structures and other important properties. In this article we describe some of the important methods employed for characterization of nanostructures, describing a few case studies for illustrative purposes. These case studies include characterizations of Au, ReO3, and GaN nanocrystals; ZnO, Ni, and Co nanowires; inorganic and carbon nanotubes; and two-dimensional graphene.

  11. Molecularly Imprinted Nanomaterials for Sensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Irshad

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imprinting is a well-established technology to mimic antibody-antigen interaction in a synthetic platform. Molecularly imprinted polymers and nanomaterials usually possess outstanding recognition capabilities. Imprinted nanostructured materials are characterized by their small sizes, large reactive surface area and, most importantly, with rapid and specific analysis of analytes due to the formation of template driven recognition cavities within the matrix. The excellent recognition and selectivity offered by this class of materials towards a target analyte have found applications in many areas, such as separation science, analysis of organic pollutants in water, environmental analysis of trace gases, chemical or biological sensors, biochemical assays, fabricating artificial receptors, nanotechnology, etc. We present here a concise overview and recent developments in nanostructured imprinted materials with respect to various sensor systems, e.g., electrochemical, optical and mass sensitive, etc. Finally, in light of recent studies, we conclude the article with future perspectives and foreseen applications of imprinted nanomaterials in chemical sensors.

  12. Biological Surface Adsorption Index of Nanomaterials: Modelling Surface Interactions of Nanomaterials with Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ran; Riviere, Jim E

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of the interactions between nanomaterials and their surrounding environment is crucial for safety evaluation in the application of nanotechnology as well as its development and standardization. In this chapter, we demonstrate the importance of the adsorption of surrounding molecules onto the surface of nanomaterials by forming biocorona and thus impact the bio-identity and fate of those materials. We illustrate the key factors including various physical forces in determining the interaction happening at bio-nano interfaces. We further discuss the mathematical endeavors in explaining and predicting the adsorption phenomena, and propose a new statistics-based surface adsorption model, the Biological Surface Adsorption Index (BSAI), to quantitatively analyze the interaction profile of surface adsorption of a large group of small organic molecules onto nanomaterials with varying surface physicochemical properties, first employing five descriptors representing the surface energy profile of the nanomaterials, then further incorporating traditional semi-empirical adsorption models to address concentration effects of solutes. These Advancements in surface adsorption modelling showed a promising development in the application of quantitative predictive models in biological applications, nanomedicine, and environmental safety assessment of nanomaterials.

  13. Biosensors based on nanomaterials and nanodevices

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Biosensors Based on Nanomaterials and Nanodevices links interdisciplinary research from leading experts to provide graduate students, academics, researchers, and industry professionals alike with a comprehensive source for key advancements and future trends in nanostructured biosensor development. It describes the concepts, principles, materials, device fabrications, functions, system integrations, and applications of various types of biosensors based on signal transduction mechanisms, including fluorescence, photonic crystal, surface-enhanced Raman scattering, electrochemistry, electro-lumine

  14. Nanomaterials for electrochemical sensing and biosensing

    CERN Document Server

    Pumera, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Part 1: Nanomaterial-Based ElectrodesCarbon Nanotube-Based Electrochemical Sensors and Biosensors, Martin Pumera, National Institute for Materials Science, JapanElectrochemistry on Single Carbon Nanotube, Pat Collier, Caltech, USATheory of Voltammetry at Nanoparticle-Modified Electrodes, Richard G. Compton, Oxford University, UKMetal Oxide Nanoparticle-Modified Electrodes, Frank Marken, University of Bath, UKSemiconductor Quantum Dots for Electrochemical Bioanalysis, Eugenii Katz, Clarkson University, USAN

  15. Thermoelectric nanomaterials materials design and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Koumoto, Kunihito

    2014-01-01

    Presently, there is an intense race throughout the world to develop good enough thermoelectric materials which can be used in wide scale applications. This book focuses comprehensively on very recent up-to-date breakthroughs in thermoelectrics utilizing nanomaterials and methods based in nanoscience. Importantly, it provides the readers with methodology and concepts utilizing atomic scale and nanoscale materials design (such as superlattice structuring, atomic network structuring and properties control, electron correlation design, low dimensionality, nanostructuring, etc.). Furthermore, also

  16. Nanomaterials for biosensing applications: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eHolzinger

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A biosensor device is defined by its biological, or bioinspired receptor unit with unique specificities towards corresponding analytes. These analytes are often of biological origin like DNAs or proteins from the immune system (antibodies, antigens of diseases or infections. Such analytes can also be simple molecules like glucose or pollutants when a biological receptor unit with particular specificity is available. One of many other challenges in biosensor development is the efficient signal capture of the biological recognition event (transduction. Such transducers translate the interaction of the analyte with the biological element into electrochemical, electrochemiluminescent, magnetic, gravimetric, or optical signals. In order to increase sensitivities and to lower detection limits down to even individual molecules, nanomaterials are promising candidates due to the possibility to immobilize an enhanced quantity of bioreceptor units at reduced volumes and even to act itself as transduction element. Among such nanomaterials, gold nanoparticles, semi-conductor quantum dots, polymer nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, nanodiamonds, and graphene are intensively studied. Due to the vast evolution of this research field, this review summarizes in a non-exhaustive way the advantages of nanomaterials by focusing on nano-objects which provide further beneficial properties than just an enhanced surface area.

  17. Nanomaterials for Hydrogen Storage Applications: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael U. Niemann

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials have attracted great interest in recent years because of the unusual mechanical, electrical, electronic, optical, magnetic and surface properties. The high surface/volume ratio of these materials has significant implications with respect to energy storage. Both the high surface area and the opportunity for nanomaterial consolidation are key attributes of this new class of materials for hydrogen storage devices. Nanostructured systems including carbon nanotubes, nano-magnesium based hydrides, complex hydride/carbon nanocomposites, boron nitride nanotubes, TiS2/MoS2 nanotubes, alanates, polymer nanocomposites, and metal organic frameworks are considered to be potential candidates for storing large quantities of hydrogen. Recent investigations have shown that nanoscale materials may offer advantages if certain physical and chemical effects related to the nanoscale can be used efficiently. The present review focuses the application of nanostructured materials for storing atomic or molecular hydrogen. The synergistic effects of nanocrystalinity and nanocatalyst doping on the metal or complex hydrides for improving the thermodynamics and hydrogen reaction kinetics are discussed. In addition, various carbonaceous nanomaterials and novel sorbent systems (e.g. carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, nanofibers, polyaniline nanospheres and metal organic frameworks etc. and their hydrogen storage characteristics are outlined.

  18. Nanomaterials for biosensing applications: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzinger, Michael; Le Goff, Alan; Cosnier, Serge

    2014-08-01

    A biosensor device is defined by its biological, or bioinspired receptor unit with unique specificities towards corresponding analytes. These analytes are often of biological origin like DNAs or proteins from the immune system (antibodies, antigens) of diseases or infections. Such analytes can also be simple molecules like glucose or pollutants when a biological receptor unit with particular specificity is available. One of many other challenges in biosensor development is the efficient signal capture of the biological recognition event (transduction). Such transducers translate the interaction of the analyte with the biological element into electrochemical, electrochemiluminescent, magnetic, gravimetric, or optical signals. In order to increase sensitivities and to lower detection limits down to even individual molecules, nanomaterials are promising candidates due to the possibility to immobilize an enhanced quantity of bioreceptor units at reduced volumes and even to act itself as transduction element. Among such nanomaterials, gold nanoparticles, semi-conductor quantum dots, polymer nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, nanodiamonds, and graphene are intensively studied. Due to the vast evolution of this research field, this review summarizes in a non-exhaustive way the advantages of nanomaterials by focusing on nano-objects which provide further beneficial properties than “just” an enhanced surface area.

  19. Nanomaterials Enabled Dye-sensitized Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Pei

    Dye sensitized solar cells (DSCs), as the third generation of solar cells, have attracted tremendous attention for their unique properties. The semi-transparent nature, low-cost, environmental friendliness, and convenient manufacturing conditions of this generation of solar cells are promising aspects of DSCs that make them competitive in their future applications. However, much improvement in many aspects of DSCs' is required for the realization of its full potential. In this thesis, various nanomaterials, such as graphene, multi wall carbon nanotubes, vertically aligned single wall carbon nanotubes, hybrid structures and etc, have been used to improve the performance of DSCs. First, the application of graphene covered metal grids as transparent conductive electrodes in DSCs is explored. It is demonstrated that the mechanical properties of these flexible hybrid transparent electrodes, in both bending and stretching tests, are better than their oxide-based counter parts. Moreover, different kinds of carbon nanotubes, for instance vertically aligned single wall carbon nanotubes, have been used as a replacement for traditional platinum counter electrodes, in both iodine electrolyte, and sulfide-electrolyte. Further, a flexible, seamlessly connected, 3-dimensional vertically-aligned few wall carbon nanotubes graphene hybrid structures on Ni foil as DSCs' counter electrodes improve their efficiency significantly. All these nanomaterials enabled DSCs architectures achieve a comparable or better performance than standard brittle platinum/fluorine doped tin oxide combination. The large surface area of such nanomaterials in addition to the high electrical conductivity and their mechanical robustness provides a platform for significant enhancements in DSCs' performance.

  20. Functional Nanomaterials for Environmental Applications and Bioassemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Michelle Anne

    The rational design of nanomaterials has yielded new technologies that have revolutionized numerous diverse fields. The work detailed herein first describes the application of photocatalytic nanomaterials towards the environmental remediation of harmful toxins. Specifically, a low-temperature solution-phase synthetic route for size-controlled Cu2O octahedra particles was developed, and these materials were evaluated as catalysts for the photocatalytic degradation of aromatic organic compounds. Moreover, cubic Cu2O/Pd composite structures were fabricated and demonstrated to be effective photocatalysts for the generation of H2 and the reductive dehalogenation of polychlorinated biphenyls, well-known carcinogens present at many contaminated sites around the world. This photocatalytic approach to environmental remediation exemplifies the adaptation of light-driven technologies and sustainable practices to energy-intensive catalytic systems. In addition, this work also investigates the organic/inorganic interface of peptide-mediated Au nanoparticles as a means to identify rational design principles for materials binding peptide sequences for the advancement of stimuli-responsive bionanoassemblies. Factors inherent to peptide sequences that can promote strong materials-binding affinity and/or effective nanoparticle stabilization capability were identified in order to progress biomimetic technologies. These findings were elucidated using a combinational approach of peptide binding experiments to Au in partnership with molecular dynamics simulations. Overall, this work demonstrates the growing applications of nanomaterials in remediation technologies and aids in the understanding of the origins of peptide material affinity and nanoparticle stabilization.

  1. The European commission tries to define nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidén, Göran

    2011-01-01

    In 2010, the European Commission held a short consultation on a proposed definition for nanomaterials, to be used in European Union legislation and programmes. This was in response to a European Parliament resolution, and the definition followed a proposal by one of the Commission's scientific committees. The definition has three parts: on size distribution, size of internal structural elements, and surface area; a material caught by any of these parts meets the definition. There are a number of problems. The definition seems to be written with engineered nanomaterials in mind but as written applies to non-supplied materials, such as smokes. The structural element component seems to capture items such as sunscreen and tennis rackets, which include nanomaterials. Use of the definition will require some international standards, which have yet to be written and which will involve some difficult decisions. It is understandable why there are both size and surface area requirements, but they are not wholly consistent. The Commission plans a further consultation in 2012, but it might be better to delay this until after the standardisation work.

  2. Nanomaterials - What energy landscapes can tell us

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Christian Schön

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials bridge the gaps between crystalline materials, thin films, and molecules, and are of great importance in the design of new classes of materials, since the existence of many modifications of a nano-object for the same overall composition allows us to tune the properties of the nanomaterial. However, the structural analysis of nano-size systems is often difficult and their structural stability is frequently relatively low. Thus, a study of their energy landscape is needed to determine or predict possible structures, and analyse their stability, via the determination of the minima on the landscape and the generalized barriers separating them. In this contribution, we introduce the major concepts of energy landscapes for chemical systems, and present summaries of four applications to nano-materials: a MgO monolayer on a sapphire substrate, possible quasitwo-dimensional carbon-silicon networks, the ab initio energy landscape of Cu4Ag4-clusters, and the possible arrangements of ethane molecules on an ideally smooth substrate.

  3. Inorganic nanomaterials for printed electronics: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei

    2017-06-08

    Owing to their capability of bypassing conventional high-priced and inflexible silicon based electronics to manufacture a variety of devices on flexible substrates by using large-scale and high-volume printing techniques, printed electronics (PE) have attracted increasing attention in the field of manufacturing industry for electronic devices. This simple and cost-effective approach could enhance current methods of constructing a patterned surface for nanomaterials and offer opportunities for developing fully-printed functional devices, especially offering the possibility of ubiquitous low-cost and flexible devices. This review presents a summary of work to date on the inorganic nanomaterials involved in PE applications, focused on the utilization of inorganic nanomaterials-based inks in the successful preparation of printed conductive patterns, electrodes, sensors, thin film transistors (TFTs) and other micro-/nanoscale devices. The printing techniques, sintering methods and printability of functional inks with their associated challenges are discussed, and we look forward so you can glimpse the future of PE applications.

  4. Layered-nanomaterial-amplified chemiluminescence systems and their analytical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jinpan; Yuan, Zhiqin; Lu, Chao

    2016-12-01

    Layered nanomaterial has become a popular hierarchical material for amplifying chemiluminescence (CL) in recent years, mainly because of its ease of preparation and modification, large specific surface area, and high catalytic activity. In this review, we mainly discuss layered-nanomaterial-amplified CL systems based on graphene and its derivatives, layered double hydroxides, and clay. Detection mechanisms and strategies of layered-nanomaterial-amplified CL systems are provided to show the basic concepts for designing sensitive and selective sensing systems. Strategies for expanding the applications of layered-nanomaterial-amplified CL systems by combination with surfactants, quantum dots, organic dyes, and nanoparticles are introduced for the analysis of various analytes in real samples. The challenges and future trends of layered-nanomaterial-amplified CL systems are discussed at the end of the review. Graphical Abstract Schematic illustration of layered nanomaterial amplified chemiluminescence.

  5. Nanomaterial surface chemistry design for advancements in capillary electrophoresis modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Michael R; Haes, Amanda J

    2011-01-07

    Tailored surface chemistry impacts nanomaterial function and stability in applications including in various capillary electrophoresis (CE) modes. Although colloidal nanoparticles were first integrated as colouring agents in artwork and pottery over 2000 years ago, recent developments in nanoparticle synthesis and surface modification increased their usefulness and incorporation in separation science. For instance, precise control of surface chemistry is critically important in modulating nanoparticle functionality and stability in dynamic environments. Herein, recent developments in nanomaterial pseudostationary and stationary phases will be summarized. First, nanomaterial core and surface chemistry compositions will be classified. Next, characterization methods will be described and related to nanomaterial function in various CE modes. Third, methods and implications of nanomaterial incorporation into CE will be discussed. Finally, nanoparticle-specific mechanisms likely involved in CE will be related to nanomaterial surface chemistry. Better understanding of surface chemistry will improve nanoparticle design for the integration into separation techniques.

  6. The applicability of chemical alternatives assessment for engineered nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Rune; Hansen, Steffen Foss; Jacobs, Molly;

    2017-01-01

    The use of alternatives assessment to substitute hazardous chemicals with inherently safer options is gaining momentum worldwide as a legislative and corporate strategy to minimize consumer, occupational, and environmental risks. Engineered nanomaterials represent an interesting case for alternat......The use of alternatives assessment to substitute hazardous chemicals with inherently safer options is gaining momentum worldwide as a legislative and corporate strategy to minimize consumer, occupational, and environmental risks. Engineered nanomaterials represent an interesting case...... for alternatives assessment approaches as they can be considered both emerging “chemicals” of concern, as well as potentially safer alternatives to hazardous chemicals. However, comparing the hazards of nanomaterials to traditional chemicals or to other nanomaterials is challenging and critical elements...... in chemical hazard and exposure assessment may have to be fundamentally altered to sufficiently address nanomaterials. The aim of this paper is to assess the overall applicability of alternatives assessment methods for nanomaterials and outline recommendations to enhance their use in this context. This paper...

  7. Mesoporous Carbon-based Materials for Alternative Energy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Kimberly Michelle

    Increasing concerns for the escalating issues activated by the effect of carbon dioxide emissions on the global climate from extensive use of fossil fuels and the limited amount of fossil resources has led to an in-depth search for alternative energy systems, primarily based on nuclear or renewable energy sources. Recent innovations in the production of more efficient devices for energy harvesting, storage, and conversion are based on the incorporation of nanostructured materials into electrochemical systems. The aforementioned nano-electrochemical energy systems hold particular promise for alternative energy transportation related technologies including fuel cells, hydrogen storage, and electrochemical supercapacitors. In each of these devices, nanostructured materials can be used to increase the surface area where the critical chemical reactions occur within the same volume and mass, thereby increasing the energy density, power density, electrical efficiency, and physical robustness of the system. Durable corrosion resistant carbon support materials for fuel cells have been designed by adding conductive low cost carbon materials with chemically robust ceramic materials. Since a strict control of the pore size is mandatory to optimize properties for improved performance, chemical activation agents have been utilized as porogens to tune surface areas, pore size distributions, and composition of carbon-based mesoporous materials. Through the use of evaporative self-assembly methods, both randomly disordered and surfactant-templated, ordered carbon-silica nanocomposites have been synthesized with controlled surface area, pore volume, and pore size ranging from 50-800 m2/g, 0.025-0.75 cm3/g, and 2-10 nm, respectively. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) ranging from 0.05-1.0 wt. % were added to the aforementioned carbon-silica nanocomposites, which provided an additional increase in surface area and improved conductivity. Initially, a conductivity value of 0.0667 S

  8. Management of nanomaterials safety in research environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riediker Michael

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite numerous discussions, workshops, reviews and reports about responsible development of nanotechnology, information describing health and environmental risk of engineered nanoparticles or nanomaterials is severely lacking and thus insufficient for completing rigorous risk assessment on their use. However, since preliminary scientific evaluations indicate that there are reasonable suspicions that activities involving nanomaterials might have damaging effects on human health; the precautionary principle must be applied. Public and private institutions as well as industries have the duty to adopt preventive and protective measures proportionate to the risk intensity and the desired level of protection. In this work, we present a practical, 'user-friendly' procedure for a university-wide safety and health management of nanomaterials, developed as a multi-stakeholder effort (government, accident insurance, researchers and experts for occupational safety and health. The process starts using a schematic decision tree that allows classifying the nano laboratory into three hazard classes similar to a control banding approach (from Nano 3 - highest hazard to Nano1 - lowest hazard. Classifying laboratories into risk classes would require considering actual or potential exposure to the nanomaterial as well as statistical data on health effects of exposure. Due to the fact that these data (as well as exposure limits for each individual material are not available, risk classes could not be determined. For each hazard level we then provide a list of required risk mitigation measures (technical, organizational and personal. The target 'users' of this safety and health methodology are researchers and safety officers. They can rapidly access the precautionary hazard class of their activities and the corresponding adequate safety and health measures. We succeed in convincing scientist dealing with nano-activities that adequate safety measures and

  9. Earthworm's immunity in the nanomaterial world: new room, future challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayashi, Yuya; Engelmann, Péter

    2013-01-01

    Since the advent of the nanotechnology era, the environmental sink has been continuously receiving engineered nanomaterials as well as their derivatives. Our current understanding of the potential impact of nanomaterials on invertebrate immunity is limited to only a handful of initial studies...... researches in vertebrate models tell us that study of the nanoparticle recognition involved in cellular uptake as well as sub- and inter-cellular events may uncover further intriguing insights into earthworm’s immunity in the nanomaterial world....

  10. Effects of Engineered Nanomaterials on Plants Growth: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Farzad Aslani; Samira Bagheri; Nurhidayatullaili Muhd Julkapli; Abdul Shukor Juraimi; Farahnaz Sadat Golestan Hashemi; Ali Baghdadi

    2014-01-01

    Rapid development and wide applications of nanotechnology brought about a significant increment on the number of engineered nanomaterials (ENs) inevitably entering our living system. Plants comprise of a very important living component of the terrestrial ecosystem. Studies on the influence of engineered nanomaterials (carbon and metal/metal oxides based) on plant growth indicated that in the excess content, engineered nanomaterials influences seed germination. It assessed the shoot-to-root ra...

  11. Biological Responses to Engineered Nanomaterials: Needs for the Next Decade

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Catherine J.; Vartanian, Ariane M.; Geiger, Franz M.; Hamers, Robert J.; Pedersen, Joel; Cui, Qiang; Haynes, Christy L.; Carlson, Erin E.; Hernandez, Rigoberto; Klaper, Rebecca D; Orr, Galya; Rosenzweig, Ze’ev

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of nanomaterials with biomolecules, cells, and organisms is an enormously vital area of current research, with applications in nanoenabled diagnostics, imaging agents, therapeutics, and contaminant removal technologies. Yet the potential for adverse biological and environmental impacts of nanomaterial exposure is considerable and needs to be addressed to ensure sustainable development of nanomaterials. In this Outlook four research needs for the next decade are outlined: (i) m...

  12. The applicability of chemical alternatives assessment for engineered nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjorth, Rune; Hansen, Steffen Foss; Jacobs, Molly; Tickner, Joel; Ellenbecker, Michael; Baun, Anders

    2017-01-01

    The use of alternatives assessment to substitute hazardous chemicals with inherently safer options is gaining momentum worldwide as a legislative and corporate strategy to minimize consumer, occupational, and environmental risks. Engineered nanomaterials represent an interesting case for alternatives assessment approaches, because they can be considered both emerging "chemicals" of concern, as well as potentially safer alternatives to hazardous chemicals. However, comparing the hazards of nanomaterials to traditional chemicals or to other nanomaterials is challenging, and critical elements in chemical hazard and exposure assessment may have to be fundamentally altered to sufficiently address nanomaterials. The aim of this paper is to assess the overall applicability of alternatives assessment methods for nanomaterials and to outline recommendations to enhance their use in this context. The present paper focuses on the adaptability of existing hazard and exposure assessment approaches to engineered nanomaterials as well as strategies to design inherently safer nanomaterials. We argue that alternatives assessment for nanomaterials is complicated by the sheer number of nanomaterials possible. As a result, the inclusion of new data tools that can efficiently and effectively evaluate nanomaterials as substitutes is needed to strengthen the alternatives assessment process. However, we conclude that with additional tools to enhance traditional hazard and exposure assessment modules of alternatives assessment, such as the use of mechanistic toxicity screens and control banding tools, alternatives assessment can be adapted to evaluate engineered nanomaterials as potential substitutes for chemicals of concern and to ensure safer nanomaterials are incorporated in the design of new products. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2017;13:177-187. © 2016 SETAC.

  13. Functional nanomaterials can optimize the efficacy of vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ye; Xu, Yingying; Tian, Yue; Chen, Chunying; Wang, Chen; Jiang, Xingyu

    2014-11-01

    Nanoscale materials can improve the efficacy of vaccines. Herein we review latest developments that use nanomaterials for vaccines. By highlighting the relationships between the nanoscale physicochemical characteristics and working mechanisms of nanomaterials, this paper shows the current status of the developments where researchers employ functional nanomaterials as vector and/or immunoregulators for vaccines. It also provides us some clues for improving the design and application of nanomaterials to optimize the efficacy of vaccines. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Nanomaterials in Lubricants: An Industrial Perspective on Current Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Zhmud

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an overview on the use of various classes of nanomaterials in lubricant formulations. The following classes of nanomaterials are considered: fullerenes, nanodiamonds, ultradispersed boric acid and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE. Current advances in using nanomaterials in engine oils, industrial lubricants and greases are discussed. Results of numerous studies combined with formulation experience of the authors strongly suggest that nanomaterials do indeed have potential for enhancing certain lubricant properties, yet there is a long way to go before balanced formulations are developed.

  15. Exploring the possibilities and limitations of a nanomaterials genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Chenxi; Siler, Todd; Ozin, Geoffrey A

    2015-01-07

    What are we going to do with the cornucopia of nanomaterials appearing in the open and patent literature, every day? Imagine the benefits of an intelligent and convenient means of categorizing, organizing, sifting, sorting, connecting, and utilizing this information in scientifically and technologically innovative ways by building a Nanomaterials Genome founded upon an all-purpose Periodic Table of Nanomaterials. In this Concept article, inspired by work on the Human Genome project, which began in 1989 together with motivation from the recent emergence of the Materials Genome project initiated in 2011 and the Nanoinformatics Roadmap 2020 instigated in 2010, we envision the development of a Nanomaterials Genome (NMG) database with the most advanced data-mining tools that leverage inference engines to help connect and interpret patterns of nanomaterials information. It will be equipped with state-of-the-art visualization techniques that rapidly organize and picture, categorize and interrelate the inherited behavior of complex nanomatter from the information programmed in its constituent nanomaterials building blocks. A Nanomaterials Genome Initiative (NMGI) of the type imagined herein has the potential to serve the global nanoscience community with an opportunity to speed up the development continuum of nanomaterials through the innovation process steps of discovery, structure determination and property optimization, functionality elucidation, system design and integration, certification and manufacturing to deployment in technologies that apply these versatile nanomaterials in environmentally responsible ways. The possibilities and limitations of this concept are critically evaluated in this article.

  16. Carbon-Based Nano-Electro-Mechanical-Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, A. B.; Khan, A. R.; Megerian, K. G.; Epp, L.; LeDuc, G.; Bagge, L.; Jennings, A. T.; Jang, D.; Greer, J. R.

    2011-01-01

    We provide an overview of our work where carbon-based nanostructures have been applied to two-dimensional (2D) planar and three-dimensional (3D) vertically-oriented nano-electro-mechanical (NEM) switches. In the first configuration, laterally oriented single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) synthesized using thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) were implemented for forming bridge-type 2D NEMS switches, where switching voltages were on the order of a few volts. In the second configuration, vertically oriented carbon nanofibers (CNFs) synthesized using plasma-enhanced (PE) CVD have been explored for their potential application in 3D NEMS. We have performed nanomechanical measurements on such vertically oriented tubes using nanoindentation to determine the mechanical properties of the CNFs. Electrostatic switching was demonstrated in the CNFs synthesized on refractory metallic nitride substrates, where a nanoprobe was used as the actuating electrode inside a scanning-electron-microscope. The switching voltages were determined to be in the tens of volts range and van der Waals interactions at these length scales appeared significant, suggesting such structures are promising for nonvolatile memory applications. A finite element model was also developed to determine a theoretical pull-in voltage which was compared to experimental results.

  17. Preparation and properties of pitch carbon based supercapacitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Using the mesophase pitch as precursor, KOH and CO2 as activated agents, the activated carbon electrode material was fabricated by physical-chemical combined activated technique for supercapacitor. The influence of activated process on the pore structure of activated carbon was analyzed and 14 F supercapacitor with working voltage of 2.5 V was prepared. The charge and discharge behaviors, the properties of cyclic voltammetry, specific capacitance, equivalent serials resistance (ESR), cycle properties, and temperature properties of prepared supercapacitor were examined. The cyclic voltammetry curve results indicate that the carbon based supercapacitor using the self-made activated carbon as electrode materials shows the desired capacitance properties. In 1 mol/L Et4NBFVAN electrolyte, the capacitance and ESR of the supercapacitor are 14.7 F and 60 mΩ, respectively. The specific capacitance of activated carbon electrode materials is 99.6 F/g; its energy density can reach 2.96 W·h/kg under the large current discharge condition. There is no obvious capacitance decay that can be observed after 5000 cycles. The leakage current is below 0.2 mA after keeping the voltage at 2.5 V for 1 h. Meanwhile, the supercapacitor shows desired temperature property; it can be operated normally in the temperature ranging from -40 ℃ to 70 ℃.

  18. Carbon-based strong solid acid for cornstarch hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nata, Iryanti Fatyasari, E-mail: yanti_tkunlam@yahoo.com [Chemical Engineering Study Program, Faculty of Engineering, Lambung Mangkurat University, Jl. A. Yani Km. 36 Banjarbaru, South Kalimantan 70714 (Indonesia); Irawan, Chairul; Mardina, Primata [Chemical Engineering Study Program, Faculty of Engineering, Lambung Mangkurat University, Jl. A. Yani Km. 36 Banjarbaru, South Kalimantan 70714 (Indonesia); Lee, Cheng-Kang, E-mail: cklee@mail.ntust.edu.tw [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, 43 Keelung Rd. Sec.4, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2015-10-15

    Highly sulfonated carbonaceous spheres with diameter of 100–500 nm can be generated by hydrothermal carbonization of glucose in the presence of hydroxyethylsulfonic acid and acrylic acid at 180 °C for 4 h. The acidity of the prepared carbonaceous sphere C4-SO{sub 3}H can reach 2.10 mmol/g. It was used as a solid acid catalyst for the hydrolysis of cornstarch. Total reducing sugar (TRS) concentration of 19.91 mg/mL could be obtained by hydrolyzing 20 mg/mL cornstarch at 150 °C for 6 h using C4-SO{sub 3}H as solid acid catalyst. The solid acid catalyst demonstrated good stability that only 9% decrease in TRS concentration was observed after five repeat uses. The as-prepared carbon-based solid acid catalyst can be an environmentally benign replacement for homogeneous catalyst. - Highlights: • Carbon solid acid was successfully prepared by one-step hydrothermal carbonization. • The acrylic acid as monomer was effectively reduce the diameter size of particle. • The solid acid catalyst show good catalytic performance of starch hydrolysis. • The solid acid catalyst is not significantly deteriorated after repeated use.

  19. Carbon-based nano-electro-mechanical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, A. B.; Khan, A. R.; Megerian, K. G.; Epp, L.; LeDuc, H. G.; Bagge, L.; Jennings, A. T.; Jang, D.; Greer, J. R.

    2010-04-01

    We provide an overview of our work where carbon-based nanostructures have been applied to twodimensional (2D) planar and three-dimensional (3D) vertically-oriented nano-electro-mechanical (NEM) switches. In the first configuration, laterally oriented single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) synthesized using thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) were implemented for forming bridge-type 2D NEMS switches, where switching voltages were on the order of a few volts. In the second configuration, vertically oriented carbon nanofibers (CNFs) synthesized using plasma-enhanced (PE) CVD have been explored for their potential application in 3D NEMS. We have performed nanomechanical measurements on such vertically oriented tubes using nanoindentation to determine the mechanical properties of the CNFs. Electrostatic switching was demonstrated in the CNFs synthesized on refractory metallic nitride substrates, where a nanoprobe was used as the actuating electrode inside a scanning-electron-microscope. The switching voltages were determined to be in the tens of volts range and van der Waals interactions at these length scales appeared significant, suggesting such structures are promising for nonvolatile memory applications. A finite element model was also developed to determine a theoretical pull-in voltage which was compared to experimental results.

  20. Structure and Dynamics of Water at Carbon-Based Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Martí

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Water structure and dynamics are affected by the presence of a nearby interface. Here, first we review recent results by molecular dynamics simulations about the effect of different carbon-based materials, including armchair carbon nanotubes and a variety of graphene sheets—flat and with corrugation—on water structure and dynamics. We discuss the calculations of binding energies, hydrogen bond distributions, water’s diffusion coefficients and their relation with surface’s geometries at different thermodynamical conditions. Next, we present new results of the crystallization and dynamics of water in a rigid graphene sieve. In particular, we show that the diffusion of water confined between parallel walls depends on the plate distance in a non-monotonic way and is related to the water structuring, crystallization, re-melting and evaporation for decreasing inter-plate distance. Our results could be relevant in those applications where water is in contact with nanostructured carbon materials at ambient or cryogenic temperatures, as in man-made superhydrophobic materials or filtration membranes, or in techniques that take advantage of hydrated graphene interfaces, as in aqueous electron cryomicroscopy for the analysis of proteins adsorbed on graphene.

  1. Effect of Mixed Solvent on Fabrication, Morphology and Monodispersity of Microspheres with Hydrophobic Poly(butyl methacrylate) Shells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Xincai; LU Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Monodisperse microspheres (mean diameter 200-300 nm) with polystyrene cores and poly(acrylamide-co-buty1 methacrylate) shells were prepared by using a free radical polymerization method.Moreover,the effect of mixed solvent on the preparation,morphology and monodispersity was investigated.The experimental results showed that solubility parameter of butyl methacrylate and solvent affected mainly the molding of monodisperse core-shell microspheres.When the microspheres were fabricated in a sequential synthesis process,addition of hydrophilic and organic solvent including butyl methacrylate led to spherical degree of the particles becoming worse,and the mean diameter of the microspheres decreased and the monodispersity became better with increasing the crosslinker methylenebisacrylamide dosage.

  2. 75 FR 49487 - Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... AGENCY Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray AGENCY: Environmental Protection... period for the draft document ``Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray'' (EPA.... ] ADDRESSES: The draft ``Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray'' is available...

  3. Formation mechanism of monodisperse, low molecular weight chitosan nanoparticles by ionic gelation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wen; Yan, Wei; Xu, Zushun; Ni, Hong

    2012-02-01

    Chitosan nanoparticles have been extensively studied for drug and gene delivery. In this paper, monodisperse, low molecular weight (LMW) chitosan nanoparticles were prepared by a novel method based on ionic gelation using sodium tripolyphosphate (TPP) as cross-linking agent. The objective of this study was to solve the problem of preparation of chitosan/TPP nanoparticles with high degree of monodispersity and stability, and investigate the effect of various parameters on the formation of LMW chitosan/TPP nanoparticles. It was found that the particle size distribution of the nanoparticles could be significantly narrowed by a combination of decreasing the concentration of acetic acid and reducing the ambient temperature during cross-linking process. The optimized nanoparticles exhibited a mean hydrodynamic diameter of 138 nm with a polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.026 and a zeta potential of +35 mV, the nanoparticles had good storage stability at room temperature up to at least 20 days.

  4. Controlled Synthesis and Characterization of Monodisperse Fe3O4 Nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI,Rongrong; GAO,Guanhua; YI,Ran; ZHOU,Kechao; QIU,Guanzhou; LIU,Xiaohe

    2009-01-01

    Monodisperse Fe3O4 nanoparticles were successfully synthesized through the thermal decomposition of iron acetylacetonate in octadecene solvent in the presence of oleic acid and oleylamine.The influences of experimental parameters,such as reacting temperature,amounts and kinds of surfactants,solvents,oleic acid and oleylamine,on the size and shape of monodisperse Fe3O4 nanoparticles were discussed.The phase structures,morphology,and size of the as-prepared products were investigated in detail by X-ray diffraction (XRD),transmission electron microscopy (TEM),selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM).Magnetic property was measured using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) at room temperature,which revealed that Fe3O4 nanoparticles were of ferromagnetism with a saturation magnetization (Ms) of 74.0 emu/g and coercivity (Hc) of 72.6 Oe.

  5. Simple and inexpensive microfluidic devices for the generation of monodisperse multiple emulsions

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Erqiang

    2013-12-16

    Droplet-based microfluidic devices have become a preferred versatile platform for various fields in physics, chemistry and biology. Polydimethylsiloxane soft lithography, the mainstay for fabricating microfluidic devices, usually requires the usage of expensive apparatus and a complex manufacturing procedure. Here, we report the design and fabrication of simple and inexpensive microfluidic devices based on microscope glass slides and pulled glass capillaries, for generating monodisperse multiple emulsions. The advantages of our method lie in a simple manufacturing procedure, inexpensive processing equipment and flexibility in the surface modification of the designed microfluidic devices. Different types of devices have been designed and tested and the experimental results demonstrated their robustness for preparing monodisperse single, double, triple and multi-component emulsions. © 2014 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  6. Micro-spherical cochleate composites: method development for monodispersed cochleate system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarsekar, Kalpa; Ashtikar, Mukul; Steiniger, Frank; Thamm, Jana; Schacher, Felix H; Fahr, Alfred

    2017-03-01

    Cochleates have been of increasing interest in pharmaceutical research due to their extraordinary stability. However the existing techniques used in the production of cochleates still need significant improvements to achieve sufficiently monodispersed formulations. In this study, we report a simple method for the production of spherical composite microparticles (3-5 μm in diameter) made up of nanocochleates from phosphatidylserine and calcium (as binding agent). Formulations obtained from the proposed method were evaluated using electron microscopy and small angle X-ray scattering and were compared with conventional cochleate preparation techniques. In this new method, an ethanolic lipid solution and aqueous solution of a binding agent is subjected to rapid and uniform mixing with a microfluidic device. The presence of high concentration of organic solvent promotes the formation of composite microparticles made of nanocochleates. This simple methodology eliminates elaborate preparation methods, while providing a monodisperse cochleate system with analogous quality.

  7. Enhanced thermal stability of monodispersed silver cluster arrays assembled on block copolymer scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, C H; Chen, X; Liu, Y J; Xie, B; Han, M [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Song, F Q; Wang, G H, E-mail: sjhanmin@nju.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2010-05-14

    Triblock copolymer poly(styrene-b-butadiene-b-styrene) (SBS) films with long-range ordered self-assembled nanopatterns are used as templates to selectively adsorb soft-landing silver clusters. Closely spaced cluster arrays with high monodispersity are formed through the confinement of the block copolymer scaffolds, and show a much enhanced thermal stability as compared with the cluster assemblies on the surfaces of covalent amorphous solids, or even on the disordered SBS films. Their morphologies are barely influenced by long time thermal annealing at a temperature as high as 180 deg. C, while in the latter case intense aggregations and coalescences of silver clusters are commonly observed upon annealing. The different thermal stabilities of the cluster assemblies also induce different evolutions of their optical extinction spectra under annealing. This promises a simple way to control the monodispersity and thermal stability of metal cluster assembly via self-assembled block copolymer template.

  8. A granocentric model captures the statistical properties of monodisperse random packings

    CERN Document Server

    Newhall, Katherine A; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric; Brujic, Jasna

    2012-01-01

    We present a generalization of the granocentric model proposed in [Clusel et al., Nature, 2009, 460, 611615] that is capable of describing the local fluctuations inside not only polydisperse but also monodisperse packings of spheres. This minimal model does not take into account the relative particle positions, yet it captures positional disorder through local stochastic processes sampled by efficient Monte Carlo methods. The disorder is characterized by the distributions of local parameters, such as the number of neighbors and contacts, filled solid angle around a central particle and the cell volumes. The model predictions are in good agreement with our experimental data on monodisperse random close packings of PMMA particles. Moreover, the model can be used to predict the distributions of local fluctuations in any packing, as long as the average number of neighbors, contacts and the packing fraction are known. These distributions give a microscopic foundation to the statistical mechanics framework for jamm...

  9. Understanding and Controlling the Growth of Monodisperse CdS Nanowires in Solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xi, Lifei; Tan, Winnie Xiu Wen; Boothroyd, Chris;

    2008-01-01

    diffusion rate of the precursor and hence low reactivity. Therefore, ODPA is good for generating nearly monodisperse and high aspect ratio US nanowires. Our nanowires have a high degree of dispersibility and thus can be easily processed for potential applications as solar cells and transistors. Finally......Cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanowires with a monodisperse diameter of 3.5 nm and length of about 600 nm were successfully synthesized using a simple and reproducible hot coordination solvents method. Structural characterization showed that the one-dimensional nanowires grow along the [001] direction......, we propose that the ODPA-to-Cd mole ratio is the key factor affecting the morphology of the nanowires because it affects both the cleavage rate of the P=S double bond and the nucleation/growth rate of the anisotropic nanocrystals. In addition, it was found that Cd-ODPA complexes give rise to a low...

  10. Fabrication of monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles released in solution using a block copolymer template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morcrette, Mélissa; Ortiz, Guillermo; Tallegas, Salomé; Joisten, Hélène; Tiron, Raluca; Baron, Thierry; Hou, Yanxia; Lequien, Stéphane; Bsiesy, Ahmad; Dieny, Bernard

    2017-07-01

    This paper describes a fabrication process of monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles released in solution, based on combined ‘top-down’ and ‘bottom-up’ approaches. The process involves the use of a self-assembled PS-PMMA block copolymer formed on a sacrificial layer. Such an approach was so far mostly explored for the preparation of patterned magnetic media for ultrahigh density magnetic storage. It is here extended to the preparation of released monodisperse nanoparticles for biomedical applications. A special sacrificial layer had to be developed compatible with the copolymer self-organization. The resulting nanoparticles exhibit very narrow size dispersion (≈7%) and can be good candidates as contrast agents for medical imaging i.e. magnetic resonance imaging or magnetic particle imaging. The approach provides a great freedom in the choice of the particles shapes and compositions. In particular, they can be made of biocompatible magnetic material.

  11. Towards Cluster-Assembled Materials of True Monodispersity in Size and Chemical Environment: Synthesis, Dynamics and Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-27

    pathway Status: not yet published Diverse technologies, from catalyst coking to graphene synthesis , entail hydrocarbon dehydrogena- tion and...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0037 Towards cluster-assembled materials of true monodispersity in size and chemical environment: Synthesis , Dynamics and...Towards cluster-assembled materials of true monodispersity in size and chemical environment: synthesis , dynamics and activity 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  12. Size reduction of cosolvent-infused microbubbles to form acoustically responsive monodisperse perfluorocarbon nanodroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Minseok; Williams, Ross; Matsuura, Naomi

    2015-09-07

    Perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanodroplet agents are exciting new biomaterials that can be remotely vapourized by ultrasound or light to change into micron-scale gas bubbles in situ. After PFC nanodroplet vapourization, the micron-scale gas bubble can interact strongly with ultrasound radiation, such that the bubbles can be used for cancer imaging and therapy. For these phase-change agents to be useful, however, PFC nanodroplets must be produced in the range of 100 to 400 nm in diameter with high size control and monodispersity, restrictions that remain a challenge. Here, we address this challenge by taking advantage of the size control offered by microfluidics, in combination with the size reduction provided by cosolvent-infused PFC bubbles through both condensation and cosolvent dissolution. In this approach, PFC bubbles with a high percentage of cosolvent (in this study, diethyl ether, DEE) are produced using microfluidics at a temperature above the boiling point. After synthesis, these bubbles become much smaller through both condensation of the gas into liquid droplets and from dissolution of the DEE into the continuous phase. This approach demonstrates that monodisperse, cosolvent-incorporated PFC bubbles can directly form monodisperse PFC nanodroplets a factor of 24 times smaller than the precursor bubbles. We also demonstrate that these nanoscale droplets can be converted to echogenic microbubbles after exposure to ultrasound, showing that these PFC nanodroplets are viable for the in situ production of ultrasound contrast agents. We show that this system can overcome the minimum droplet size limit of standard microfluidics, and is a powerful new tool for generating monodisperse, PFC phase-change ultrasound contrast agents for treating and imaging cancer.

  13. Aerosol-Assisted Synthesis of Monodisperse Single-Crystalline α-Cristobalite Nanospheres

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Xingmao; Bao, Lihong; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Dunphy, Darren R.; Li, Xiaodong; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Monodisperse single-crystalline α-cristobalite nanospheres have been synthesized by hydrocarbon-pyrolysis-induced carbon deposition on amorphous silica aerosol nanoparticles, devitrification of the coated silica at high temperature, and subsequent carbon removal by oxidation. The nanosphere size can be well controlled by tuning the size of the colloidal silica precursor. Uniform, high-purity nanocrystalline α-cristobalite is important for catalysis, nanocomposites, advanced polishing, and und...

  14. On sufficient stability conditions of the Couette — Poiseuille flow of monodisperse mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, D. I.; Sagalakov, A. M.; Nikitenko, N. G.

    2011-06-01

    The stability of the Couette — Poiseuille flow of a monodisperse mixture is considered. Sufficient stability conditions are derived. Results of the computation of the spectrum are presented. A considerable stabilization of the flow with particles admixture to small disturbances is observed. It is found that the regions of instability generation may have complex geometry. The influence of the main velocity profile and admixture parameters on the stability conditions is considered.

  15. Enhancement of magnetic coercivity and macroscopic quantum tunneling in monodispersed Co/CoO cluster assemblies

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, D. L.; Sumiyama, Kenji; Hihara, Takehiko; Yamamuro, S.; ヒハラ, タケヒコ; スミヤマ, ケンジ; 日原, 岳彦; 隅山, 兼治; Hihara, T.; Sumiyama, K.

    1999-01-01

    Magnetic properties have been measured for monodisperse-sized Co/CoO cluster assemblies prepared by a plasma-gas-condensation-type cluster beam deposition technique. The clear correlation obtained between exchange bias field and coercivity suggests the enhancement of uniaxial anisotropy owing to the exchange coupling between the ferromagnetic Co core and antiferromagnetic CoO shell, and magnetic disorder at the core-shell interface. A nonthermal magnetic relaxation observed below 8 K, being r...

  16. Aqueous dispersion of monodisperse magnetic iron oxide nanocrystals through phase transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, William W [Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Chang, Emmanuel [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Sayes, Christie M [Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Drezek, Rebekah [Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Colvin, Vicki L [Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States)

    2006-09-14

    A facile method was developed for completely transferring high quality monodisperse iron oxide nanocrystals from organic solvents to water. The as-prepared aqueous dispersions of iron oxide nanocrystals were extremely stable and could be functionalized for bioconjugation with biomolecules. These iron oxide nanocrystals showed negligible cytotoxicity to human breast cancer cells (SK-BR-3) and human dermal fibroblast cells. This method is general and versatile for many organic solvent-synthesized nanoparticles, including fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals.

  17. Monodisperse spherical meso-macroporous silica particles: Synthesis and adsorption of biological macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovpiaga, E. Yu.; Grudinkin, S. A.; Kurdyukov, D. A.; Kukushkina, Yu. A.; Nashchekin, A. V.; Sokolov, V. V.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Golubev, V. G.

    2016-11-01

    Monodispersed spherical silica particles, including large mesopores (over 10 nm) and macropores (up to 100 nm) were obtained by chemical etching in an autoclave. A method for introducing globular protein myoglobin molecules into the pores is developed. The method of filling is based on a high adsorption capacity of the developed internal pore structure of the particles. The structure and adsorption properties of the materials are studied.

  18. Monodispersed bimetallic PdAg nanoparticles with twinned structures: Formation and enhancement for the methanol oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhen Yin; Yining Zhang; Kai Chen; Jing Li; Wenjing Li; Pei Tang; Huabo Zhao; Qingjun Zhu; Xinhe Bao; Ding Ma

    2014-01-01

    Monodispersed bimetallic PdAg nanoparticles can be fabricated through the emulsion-assisted ethylene glycol (EG) ternary system. Different compositions of bimetallic PdAg nanoparticles, Pd80Ag20, Pd65Ag35 and Pd46Ag54 can be obtained via adjusting the reaction parameters. For the formation process of the bimetallic PdAg nanoparticles, there have two-stage growth processes: firstly, nucleation and growth of the primary nanoclusters; secondly, formation of the secondary nanoparticles with the s...

  19. In-site synthesis of monodisperse, oleylamine-capped Ag nanoparticles through microemulsion approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shun; Ju, Yanyun; Guo, Yi; Xiong, Chuanxi; Dong, Lijie

    2017-03-01

    Ag NPs were in-site synthesized through microemulsion method by reducing silver acetate with oleylamine-mediated at 70 °C with highly monodisperse and narrow size from 10 to 20 nm. The synthesis of Ag NPs was aided by oleylamine and the role of oleylamine was researched. This in-site synthesis approach to Ag NPs was reproducibility and high yield more than 80% with stable store about 6 months.

  20. One-pot polyol synthesis of highly monodisperse short green silver nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patarroyo, Javier; Genç, Aziz; Arbiol, Jordi; Bastús, Neus G; Puntes, Victor

    2016-09-21

    Green silver nanorods (Ag NRs) of a low aspect ratio (2.8) have been produced in high yields via an optimized, simple, and robust one-pot polyol method in the presence of tannic acid, which favors the nucleation of decahedral seeds needed for the production of monodisperse Ag NRs. These Ag NRs were further used as sacrificial templates to produce Au hollow nanostructures via galvanic replacement reaction with HAuCl4 at room temperature.

  1. Effects of PVP on the preparation and growth mechanism of monodispersed Ni nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Monodispersed Ni nanoparticles were successfully prepared by chemical reduction with hydrazine hydrate in ethylene glycol.The effect of the amount of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP-K30) on the preparation of Ni nanoparticles was investigated.X-ray diffraction (XRD),transmission electron microscopy (TEM),and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) were employed to characterize the nickel particles are spherical in shape and are not agglomerated.A possible extensive mechanism of nickel nanoparticle formation has been suggested.

  2. Studies on Monodispersed Microspheres of Zinc Sulfide Doped with Mn2+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, zinc acetate, manganese acetate and thiacetamide are used as raw materials to successfully synthesize monodispersed ZnS:Mn2+ microspheres by using hydrothermal method and taking P123 surfactant as a template. The products were characterized by XRD, STEM,FT-IR and N2 adsorption-desorption. And the results show that the diameter of this microsphere is 1.0 μm or so, which is larger than that of ZnS microsphere without Mn2+ doping, and it has monodispersion, smooth surface and uniform size. The doping of Mn2+ does not obviously change the structure of monodispersed ZnS microsphere. The photoluminescence peak lies in a wide band ranging from 450 to 650 nm, and the microspheres emit orange light;with the increase of Mn2+concentration, fluorescence intensity of ZnS:Mn2+ microsphere changes, and when the mole ratio of Mn2+:Zn2+is 0.3:1, the fluorescence intensity is the strongest.

  3. Monodispersity of recombinant Cre recombinase correlates with its effectiveness in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edenhofer Frank

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cre recombinase is a common reagent used for the in vivo on/off switching of the expression of target genes flanked by loxP sites. In particular, recombinant TAT-Cre fusion constructs purified from bacteria have been used to promote the cell uptake of the enzyme. However, the recovery of active TAT-Cre remains a demanding process and its specific activity varies significantly among batches, making difficult data comparison. Results We noticed a strong correlation between recombinase activity and enzyme monodispersity. The existence of such correlation enabled us to indirectly monitor the TAT-Cre recombinase activity during the multi-step purification process by measuring its monodispersity, a parameter detectable by means of a spectrofluorimetric assay that allows the calculation of the Aggregation Index (AI in an easy and rapid way. AI values were recorded after each purification passage to identify the critical steps and to choose optimal alternatives for chromatographic conditions, desalting procedures, and protocols for bacterial endotoxin removal. Furthermore, the effect of metal ions and temperature on TAT-Cre aggregation and inactivation was characterized in vitro. Finally, we optimized the enzyme delivery protocol in vivo by following the accumulation tuning of the reporter protein β-catenin. Conclusion A rational purification protocol for TAT-Cre has been developed by choosing the options that minimize the enzyme aggregation. Our data suggest that AI measurement should support the optimization of any protocol aiming at the recovery of monodispersed protein.

  4. Existence of isostatic, maximally random jammed monodisperse hard-disk packings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Steven; Stillinger, Frank H; Torquato, Salvatore

    2014-12-30

    We generate jammed packings of monodisperse circular hard-disks in two dimensions using the Torquato-Jiao sequential linear programming algorithm. The packings display a wide diversity of packing fractions, average coordination numbers, and order as measured by standard scalar order metrics. This geometric-structure approach enables us to show the existence of relatively large maximally random jammed (MRJ) packings with exactly isostatic jammed backbones and a packing fraction (including rattlers) of [Formula: see text]. By contrast, the concept of random close packing (RCP) that identifies the most probable packings as the most disordered misleadingly identifies highly ordered disk packings as RCP in 2D. Fundamental structural descriptors such as the pair correlation function, structure factor, and Voronoi statistics show a strong contrast between the MRJ state and the typical hyperstatic, polycrystalline packings with [Formula: see text] that are more commonly obtained using standard packing protocols. Establishing that the MRJ state for monodisperse hard disks is isostatic and qualitatively distinct from commonly observed polycrystalline packings contradicts conventional wisdom that such a disordered, isostatic packing does not exist due to a lack of geometrical frustration and sheds light on the nature of disorder. This prompts the question of whether an algorithm may be designed that is strongly biased toward generating the monodisperse disk MRJ state.

  5. Synthesis of monodisperse silver nanoparticles for ink-jet printed flexible electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Zhiliang; Zhang Xingye; Xin Zhiqing; Deng Mengmeng; Wen Yongqiang; Song Yanlin, E-mail: zhangxy@iccas.ac.cn, E-mail: ylsong@iccas.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Key Lab of Organic Solids, Laboratory of New Materials, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2011-10-21

    In this study, monodisperse silver nanoparticles were synthesized with a new reduction system consisting of adipoyl hydrazide and dextrose at ambient temperature. By this facile and rapid approach, high concentration monodisperse silver nanoparticles were obtained on a large scale at low protectant/AgNO{sub 3} mass ratio which was highly beneficial to low cost and high conductivity. Based on the synthesized monodisperse silver nanoparticles, conductive inks were prepared with water, ethanol and ethylene glycol as solvents, and were expected to be more environmentally friendly. A series of electrocircuits were fabricated by ink-jet printing silver nanoparticle ink on paper substrate with a commercial printer, and they had low resistivity in the range of 9.18 x 10{sup -8}-8.76 x 10{sup -8} {Omega} m after thermal treatment at 160 {sup 0}C for 30 min, which was about five times that of bulk silver (1.586 x 10{sup -8} {Omega} m). Moreover, a radio frequency identification (RFID) antenna was fabricated by ink-jet printing, and 6 m wireless identification was realized after an Alien higgs-3 chip was mounted on the printed antenna by the flip-chip method. These flexible electrocircuits produced by ink-jet printing would have enormous potential for low cost electrodes and sensor devices.

  6. Synthesis of monodisperse silver nanoparticles for ink-jet printed flexible electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiliang; Zhang, Xingye; Xin, Zhiqing; Deng, Mengmeng; Wen, Yongqiang; Song, Yanlin

    2011-10-21

    In this study, monodisperse silver nanoparticles were synthesized with a new reduction system consisting of adipoyl hydrazide and dextrose at ambient temperature. By this facile and rapid approach, high concentration monodisperse silver nanoparticles were obtained on a large scale at low protectant/AgNO(3) mass ratio which was highly beneficial to low cost and high conductivity. Based on the synthesized monodisperse silver nanoparticles, conductive inks were prepared with water, ethanol and ethylene glycol as solvents, and were expected to be more environmentally friendly. A series of electrocircuits were fabricated by ink-jet printing silver nanoparticle ink on paper substrate with a commercial printer, and they had low resistivity in the range of 9.18 × 10( - 8)-8.76 × 10( - 8) Ω m after thermal treatment at 160 °C for 30 min, which was about five times that of bulk silver (1.586 × 10( - 8) Ω m). Moreover, a radio frequency identification (RFID) antenna was fabricated by ink-jet printing, and 6 m wireless identification was realized after an Alien higgs-3 chip was mounted on the printed antenna by the flip-chip method. These flexible electrocircuits produced by ink-jet printing would have enormous potential for low cost electrodes and sensor devices.

  7. NEIMiner: nanomaterial environmental impact data miner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang K

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Kaizhi Tang,1 Xiong Liu,1 Stacey L Harper,2 Jeffery A Steevens,3 Roger Xu1 1Intelligent Automation, Inc, Rockville, MD, USA; 2Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA; 3US Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS, USA Abstract: As more engineered nanomaterials (eNM are developed for a wide range of applications, it is crucial to minimize any unintended environmental impacts resulting from the application of eNM. To realize this vision, industry and policymakers must base risk management decisions on sound scientific information about the environmental fate of eNM, their availability to receptor organisms (eg, uptake, and any resultant biological effects (eg, toxicity. To address this critical need, we developed a model-driven, data mining system called NEIMiner, to study nanomaterial environmental impact (NEI. NEIMiner consists of four components: NEI modeling framework, data integration, data management and access, and model building. The NEI modeling framework defines the scope of NEI modeling and the strategy of integrating NEI models to form a layered, comprehensive predictability. The data integration layer brings together heterogeneous data sources related to NEI via automatic web services and web scraping technologies. The data management and access layer reuses and extends a popular content management system (CMS, Drupal, and consists of modules that model the complex data structure for NEI-related bibliography and characterization data. The model building layer provides an advanced analysis capability for NEI data. Together, these components provide significant value to the process of aggregating and analyzing large-scale distributed NEI data. A prototype of the NEIMiner system is available at http://neiminer.i-a-i.com/. Keywords: nanomaterial environmental impact, data integration, data management

  8. Programming structure into 3D nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dara Van Gough

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Programming three dimensional nanostructures into materials is becoming increasingly important given the need for ever more highly functional solids. Applications for materials with complex programmed structures include solar energy harvesting, energy storage, molecular separation, sensors, pharmaceutical agent delivery, nanoreactors and advanced optical devices. Here we discuss examples of molecular and optical routes to program the structure of three-dimensional nanomaterials with exquisite control over nanomorphology and the resultant properties and conclude with a discussion of the opportunities and challenges of such an approach.

  9. Development of nanomaterials for environmental monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    El monitoreig ambiental basat en sistemes de biosensors té molta rellevància, no només en el camp de la investigació sinó també en aplicacions reals a nivell industrial. Això és degut als avantatges d'aquestes plataformes analítiques com, especialment, la seva simplicitat i alta rendibilitat pel seu cost. A més, els avenços recents en nanociència i nanotecnologia incrementen donen lloc a nous nanomaterials que tenen propietats elèctriques interessants com ara la seva capacitat de millorar la ...

  10. Nanodevices and Nanomaterials for Ecological Security

    CERN Document Server

    Kiv, Arnold

    2012-01-01

      This book is devoted to a wide range of problems concerning applications of nanomaterials and nanodevices as effective solutions to modern ecological problems. Leading experts in nanoscience and nanotechnology present the key theoretical, experimental and implementation issues related to the creation and utilization of novel nanoscale devices to help ensure ecological security. The authors discuss appropriate nanotechnologies for minimizing various types of risk: to human life, technogenic risk, or indeed terrorist threats. Particular emphasis is placed on defining and studying the required materials properties, and – in the field – on nanoscale devices for sensors and monitoring.

  11. Nanomechanics of Fiber-like Nanomaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Property characterization of nanomaterials is challenged by the small size of the structure because of the difficulties in manipulation. Here we demonstrate a novel approach that allows a direct measurement of the mechanical properties of individual nanotube-like structures by in-situ transmission electron microscopy(TEM).The technique is powerful in a way that it can directly correlate the atomic-scale microstructure of the carbon nanotube with its physical properties,providing a one-to-one correspondence in structure-property characterization. Applications of the technique will be demonstrated on mechanical properties, the electron field emission and the ballistic quantum conductance in individual nanotubes.

  12. Polymer-mediated formation of polyoxomolybdate nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Quan

    A polymer-mediated synthetic pathway to a polyoxomolybdate nanomaterial is investigated in this work. Block copolymers or homopolymers containing poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) are mixed with a MoO2(OH)(OOH) aqueous solution to form a golden gel or viscous solution. As revealed by synchrotron X-ray scattering measurements, electron microscopy, and other characterization techniques, the final dark blue polyoxomolybdate product is a highly ordered simple cubic network similar to certain zeolite structure but with a much larger lattice constant of ˜5.2 nm. The average size of the cube-like single crystals is close to 1 mum. Based on its relatively low density (˜2.2 g/cm3), the nanomaterial can be highly porous if the amount of the residual polymer can be substantially reduced. The valence of molybdenum is ˜5.7 based on cerimetric titration, representing the mixed-valence nature of the polyoxomolybdate structure. The self-assembled structures (if any) of the polymer gel do not have any correlation with the final polyoxomolybdate nanostructure, excluding the possible role of polymers being a structure-directing template. On the other hand, the PEO polymer stabilizes the precursor molybdenum compound through coordination between its ether oxygen atoms and molybdenum atoms, and reduces the molybdenum (VI) precursor compound with its hydroxyl group being a reducing agent. The rare simple cubic ordering necessitates the existence of special affinities among the polyoxomolybdate nanosphere units resulted from the reduction reaction. Our mechanism study shows that the acidified condition is necessary for the synthesis of the mixed-valence polyoxomolybdate clusters, while H2O2 content modulates the rate of the reduction reaction. The polymer degradation is evidenced by the observation of a huge viscosity change, and is likely through a hydrolysis process catalyzed by molybdenum compounds. Cube-like polyoxomolybdate nanocrystals with size of ˜40 nm are obtained by means of

  13. Functionalization of Semiconductor Nanomaterials for Optoelectronic Devices And Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-04

    alternative for single quarter wavelength coating. Previous investigations on Ta2O5 include corrosion protection coating, electrochromic devices ...Functionalization of semiconductor nanomaterials for optoelectronic devices and components 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-10-1-0136 5c. PROGRAM...Distribution A 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES None 14. ABSTRACT Various semiconductor nanomaterials were functionalized for optoelectronic devices , such

  14. Characterization of nanomaterials in food by electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dudkiewicz, Agnieszka; Tiede, Karen; Löschner, Katrin

    2011-01-01

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are increasingly being used in the food industry. In order to assess the efficacy and the risks of these materials, it is essential to have access to methods that not only detect the nanomaterials, but also provide information on the characteristics of the materials...

  15. Synthesis, Growth Mechanism, and Applications of Zinc Oxide Nanomaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shulin JI; Changhui YE

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews recent progresses in growth mechanism, synthesis, and applications of zinc oxide nanomaterials (mainly focusing on one-dimensional (1D) nanomaterials). In the first part of this article, we briefly introduce the importance, the synthesis methods and growth mechanisms, the properties and applications of ZnO 1D nanomaterials. In the second part of this article, the growth mechanisms of ZnO 1D nanomaterials will be discussed in detail in the framework of vapor-liquid-solid (VLS), vapor-solid (VS), and aqueous solution growth (ASG) approaches. Both qualitative and quantitative information will be provided to show how a controlled synthesis of ZnO 1D nanomaterials can be achieved. In the third part of this article, we present recent progresses in our group for the synthesis of ZnO 1D nanomaterials, and the results from other groups will only be mentioned briefly. Especially, experiment designing according to theories will be elaborated to demonstrate the concept of controlled synthesis. In the fourth part of this article, the properties and potential applications of ZnO 1D nanomaterials will be treated. Finally, a summary part will be presented in the fifth section. The future trend of research for ZnO 1D nanomaterials will be pointed out and key issues to be solved will be proposed.

  16. Recent Development of Nano-Materials Used in DNA Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibin Ying

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available As knowledge of the structure and function of nucleic acid molecules has increased, sequence-specific DNA detection has gained increased importance. DNA biosensors based on nucleic acid hybridization have been actively developed because of their specificity, speed, portability, and low cost. Recently, there has been considerable interest in using nano-materials for DNA biosensors. Because of their high surface-to-volume ratios and excellent biological compatibilities, nano-materials could be used to increase the amount of DNA immobilization; moreover, DNA bound to nano-materials can maintain its biological activity. Alternatively, signal amplification by labeling a targeted analyte with nano-materials has also been reported for DNA biosensors in many papers. This review summarizes the applications of various nano-materials for DNA biosensors during past five years. We found that nano-materials of small sizes were advantageous as substrates for DNA attachment or as labels for signal amplification; and use of two or more types of nano-materials in the biosensors could improve their overall quality and to overcome the deficiencies of the individual nano-components. Most current DNA biosensors require the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR in their protocols. However, further development of nano-materials with smaller size and/or with improved biological and chemical properties would substantially enhance the accuracy, selectivity and sensitivity of DNA biosensors. Thus, DNA biosensors without PCR amplification may become a reality in the foreseeable future.

  17. Development of a Nanomaterials One-Week Intersession Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Keith A.; Bullen, Heather A.

    2008-01-01

    A novel one-week intersession lecture-lab hybrid course on nanomaterials is presented. The course provided a combination of background theory and hands-on laboratory experiments to educate students about nanomaterials and nanotechnology. The design of the course, subject matter, and laboratory experiments are discussed. Topics and level were…

  18. Effects of engineered nanomaterials on plants growth: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Farzad; Bagheri, Samira; Muhd Julkapli, Nurhidayatullaili; Juraimi, Abdul Shukor; Hashemi, Farahnaz Sadat Golestan; Baghdadi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Rapid development and wide applications of nanotechnology brought about a significant increment on the number of engineered nanomaterials (ENs) inevitably entering our living system. Plants comprise of a very important living component of the terrestrial ecosystem. Studies on the influence of engineered nanomaterials (carbon and metal/metal oxides based) on plant growth indicated that in the excess content, engineered nanomaterials influences seed germination. It assessed the shoot-to-root ratio and the growth of the seedlings. From the toxicological studies to date, certain types of engineered nanomaterials can be toxic once they are not bound to a substrate or if they are freely circulating in living systems. It is assumed that the different types of engineered nanomaterials affect the different routes, behavior, and the capability of the plants. Furthermore, different, or even opposing conclusions, have been drawn from most studies on the interactions between engineered nanomaterials with plants. Therefore, this paper comprehensively reviews the studies on the different types of engineered nanomaterials and their interactions with different plant species, including the phytotoxicity, uptakes, and translocation of engineered nanomaterials by the plant at the whole plant and cellular level.

  19. NanoRisk - A Conceptual Decision Support Tool for Nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steffen Foss; Baun, Anders; Alstrup Jensen, K.

    2011-01-01

    Only a few risk assessment methodologies and approaches are useful for assessing the risk for professional end-users, consumers and the environment. We have developed a generic framework (NanoRiskCat) that can be used by companies and risk assessors to categorize nanomaterials considering existing...... environmental, health and safety information and known uncertainties. In NanoRiskCat’s simplest form, the final evaluation outcome for a specific nanomaterial in a given application will be communicated in the form of a short title (e.g. TiO2 in sunscreen) describing the use of the nanomaterial. This short...... to the exposure and hazard potential are green , yellow corresponding to none, possible, expected and unknown, respectively. The exposure potential was evaluated based on 1) the location of the nanomaterial and 2) a judgment of the potential of nanomaterial exposure based on the description and explanation...

  20. Recent advances in nanomaterial-based biosensors for antibiotics detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Lingyi; Yao, Yao; Ping, Jianfeng; Ying, Yibin

    2017-05-15

    Antibiotics are able to be accumulated in human body by food chain and may induce severe influence to human health and safety. Hence, the development of sensitive and simple methods for rapid evaluation of antibiotic levels is highly desirable. Nanomaterials with excellent electronic, optical, mechanical, and thermal properties have been recognized as one of the most promising materials for opening new gates in the development of next-generation biosensors. This review highlights the current advances in the nanomaterial-based biosensors for antibiotics detection. Different kinds of nanomaterials including carbon nanomaterials, metal nanomaterials, magnetic nanoparticles, up-conversion nanoparticles, and quantum dots have been applied to the construction of biosensors with two main signal-transducing mechanisms, i.e. optical and electrochemical. Furthermore, the current challenges and future prospects in this field are also included to provide an overview for future research directions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. NanoRisk - A Conceptual Decision Support Tool for Nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steffen Foss; Baun, Anders; Alstrup Jensen, K.

    2011-01-01

    Only a few risk assessment methodologies and approaches are useful for assessing the risk for professional end-users, consumers and the environment. We have developed a generic framework (NanoRiskCat) that can be used by companies and risk assessors to categorize nanomaterials considering existing...... environmental, health and safety information and known uncertainties. In NanoRiskCat’s simplest form, the final evaluation outcome for a specific nanomaterial in a given application will be communicated in the form of a short title (e.g. TiO2 in sunscreen) describing the use of the nanomaterial. This short...... to the exposure and hazard potential are green , yellow corresponding to none, possible, expected and unknown, respectively. The exposure potential was evaluated based on 1) the location of the nanomaterial and 2) a judgment of the potential of nanomaterial exposure based on the description and explanation...

  2. Occupational Exposure Assessment of Nanomaterials using Control Banding Tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liguori, Biase

    Nanotechnology can be termed as the “new industrial revolution”. A broad range of potential benefits in various applications for the environment and everyday life of humans can be related to the use of nanotechnology. Nanomaterials are used in a large variety of products already in the market...... assessment to nanomaterials is still a promising route. A few years ago a new conceptual model for the assessment of inhalation exposure to nanomaterials was developed. As illustrated in this thesis, this new model includes considerations on nanoparticles behaviour and physical and chemical properties...... to pursue the development of an advanced CB tool for occupational exposure assessment to nanomaterials. Such as model could be a suitable strategic component for a first exposure assessment and may also improve the risk communication between stakeholders involved in risk assessment of nanomaterials...

  3. The Nanopharmacology and Nanotoxicology of Nanomaterials: New Opportunities and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radomska, Anna; Leszczyszyn, Jarosław; Radomski, Marek W

    2016-01-01

    The very dynamic growth of nanotechnology, nanomaterials (sized 1-100 nm) and their medical applications over the past 10 years has promised to add a new impetus to the diagnostics and therapeutics of a wide range of human pathologies, including cancer, cardiovascular diseases and diseases of the central nervous system. This growth in nanomedicine also fuels advances in bioengineering, regenerative medicine and the development of medical devices. However, as with all new pharmaceuticals and medical devices, new opportunities are inherently accompanied by new challenges due to the ability of nanomaterials to interact with the body on the cellular, subcellular and molecular levels. This article reviews some of the most compelling problems related to the nanopharmacology and nanotoxicology of nanomaterials. The overview focuses on opportunities emerging from the development of multifunctional nanomaterials and nanotheranostics for the diagnostics and therapy of both major and rare diseases. Challenges related to the hemocompatibility of nanomaterials are also discussed.

  4. Applied Research of Nanomaterials in Photo-thermal Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Hang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the applied research of nanomaterials in photo-thermal therapy and based on the understanding of the principle of photo-thermal therapy and its medical equipment, this paper analyzes nanomaterials used for photo-thermal therapy, establishes model by the use of comprehensive evaluation method and selects nano-materials that are suiTable for photo-thermal therapy, namely, carbon nanomaterials and precious metal nano-materials. In addition, this paper analyzes the importance of human surgical health by the use of photo-thermal therapy and gives considerations from three aspects, that is, the surgical equipment health, the operating room hygiene and the medical health. This paper also establishes a mathematical model through correlation analysis and credibility analysis, thus emphasizing the necessity of surgical health.

  5. Application of Ferrite Nanomaterial in RF On-Chip Inductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Lin Cai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Several kinds of ferrite-integrated on-chip inductors are presented. Ferrite nanomaterial applied in RF on-chip inductors is prepared and analyzed to show the properties of high permeability, high ferromagnetic resonance frequency, high resistivity, and low loss, which has the potential that will improve the performance of RF on-chip inductors. Simulations of different coil and ferrite nanomaterial parameters, inductor structures, and surrounding structures are also conducted to achieve the trend of gains of inductance and quality factor of on-chip inductors. By integrating the prepared ferrite magnetic nanomaterial to the on-chip inductors with different structures, the measurement performances show an obvious improvement even in GHz frequency range. In addition, the studies of CMOS compatible process to integrate the nanomaterial promote the widespread application of magnetic nanomaterial in RF on-chip inductors.

  6. Design of nanomaterial based systems for novel vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Li, Wen; Kirberger, Michael; Liao, Wenzhen; Ren, Jiaoyan

    2016-05-26

    With lower cell toxicity and higher specificity, novel vaccines have been greatly developed and applied to emerging infectious and chronic diseases. However, due to problems associated with low immunogenicity and complicated processing steps, the development of novel vaccines has been limited. With the rapid development of bio-technologies and material sciences, nanomaterials are playing essential roles in novel vaccine design. Incorporation of nanomaterials is expected to improve delivery efficiency, to increase immunogenicity, and to reduce the administration dosage. The purpose of this review is to discuss the employment of nanomaterials, including polymeric nanoparticles, liposomes, virus-like particles, peptide amphiphiles micelles, peptide nanofibers and microneedle arrays, in vaccine design. Compared to traditional methods, vaccines made from nanomaterials display many appealing benefits, including precise stimulation of immune responses, effective targeting to certain tissue or cells, and desirable biocompatibility. Current research suggests that nanomaterials may improve our approach to the design and delivery of novel vaccines.

  7. Aptamer-assembled nanomaterials for fluorescent sensing and imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Danqing

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers, which are selected in vitro by a technology known as the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX, represent a crucial recognition element in molecular sensing. With advantages such as good biocompatibility, facile functionalization, and special optical and physical properties, various nanomaterials can protect aptamers from enzymatic degradation and nonspecific binding in living systems and thus provide a preeminent platform for biochemical applications. Coupling aptamers with various nanomaterials offers many opportunities for developing highly sensitive and selective sensing systems. Here, we focus on the recent applications of aptamer-assembled nanomaterials in fluorescent sensing and imaging. Different types of nanomaterials are examined along with their advantages and disadvantages. Finally, we look toward the future of aptamer-assembled nanomaterials.

  8. A practical approach to determine dose metrics for nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmaar, Christiaan J E; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M; Oomen, Agnes G; Chen, Jingwen; de Jong, Wim H; Sips, Adriënne J A M; Wang, Zhuang; Park, Margriet V D Z

    2015-05-01

    Traditionally, administered mass is used to describe doses of conventional chemical substances in toxicity studies. For deriving toxic doses of nanomaterials, mass and chemical composition alone may not adequately describe the dose, because particles with the same chemical composition can have completely different toxic mass doses depending on properties such as particle size. Other dose metrics such as particle number, volume, or surface area have been suggested, but consensus is lacking. The discussion regarding the most adequate dose metric for nanomaterials clearly needs a systematic, unbiased approach to determine the most appropriate dose metric for nanomaterials. In the present study, the authors propose such an approach and apply it to results from in vitro and in vivo experiments with silver and silica nanomaterials. The proposed approach is shown to provide a convenient tool to systematically investigate and interpret dose metrics of nanomaterials. Recommendations for study designs aimed at investigating dose metrics are provided.

  9. Aptamer-assembled nanomaterials for fluorescent sensing and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Danqing; He, Lei; Zhang, Ge; Lv, Aiping; Wang, Ruowen; Zhang, Xiaobing; Tan, Weihong

    2017-01-01

    Aptamers, which are selected in vitro by a technology known as the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), represent a crucial recognition element in molecular sensing. With advantages such as good biocompatibility, facile functionalization, and special optical and physical properties, various nanomaterials can protect aptamers from enzymatic degradation and nonspecific binding in living systems and thus provide a preeminent platform for biochemical applications. Coupling aptamers with various nanomaterials offers many opportunities for developing highly sensitive and selective sensing systems. Here, we focus on the recent applications of aptamer-assembled nanomaterials in fluorescent sensing and imaging. Different types of nanomaterials are examined along with their advantages and disadvantages. Finally, we look toward the future of aptamer-assembled nanomaterials.

  10. Solid-state NMR Reveals the Carbon-based Molecular Architecture of Cryptococcus neoformans Fungal Eumelanins in the Cell Wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Subhasish; Prados-Rosales, Rafael; Itin, Boris; Casadevall, Arturo; Stark, Ruth E

    2015-05-29

    Melanin pigments protect against both ionizing radiation and free radicals and have potential soil remediation capabilities. Eumelanins produced by pathogenic Cryptococcus neoformans fungi are virulence factors that render the fungal cells resistant to host defenses and certain antifungal drugs. Because of their insoluble and amorphous characteristics, neither the pigment bonding framework nor the cellular interactions underlying melanization of C. neoformans have yielded to comprehensive molecular-scale investigation. This study used the C. neoformans requirement of exogenous obligatory catecholamine precursors for melanization to produce isotopically enriched pigment "ghosts" and applied 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation solid-state NMR to reveal the carbon-based architecture of intact natural eumelanin assemblies in fungal cells. We demonstrated that the aliphatic moieties of solid C. neoformans melanin ghosts include cell-wall components derived from polysaccharides and/or chitin that are associated proximally with lipid membrane constituents. Prior to development of the mature aromatic fungal pigment, these aliphatic moieties form a chemically resistant framework that could serve as the scaffold for melanin synthesis. The indole-based core aromatic moieties show interconnections that are consistent with proposed melanin structures consisting of stacked planar assemblies, which are associated spatially with the aliphatic scaffold. The pyrrole aromatic carbons of the pigments bind covalently to the aliphatic framework via glycoside or glyceride functional groups. These findings establish that the structure of the pigment assembly changes with time and provide the first biophysical information on the mechanism by which melanin is assembled in the fungal cell wall, offering vital insights that can advance the design of bioinspired conductive nanomaterials and novel therapeutics.

  11. Uncertainty in Life Cycle Assessment of Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seager, T. P.; Linkov, I.

    Despite concerns regarding environmental fate and toxicology, engineered nanostructured material manufacturing is expanding at an increasingly rapid pace. In particular, the unique properties of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) have made them attractive in many areas, including high-tech power applications such as experimental batteries, fuel cells or electrical wiring. The intensity of research interest in SWCNT has raised questions regarding the life cycle environmental impact of nanotechnologies, including assessment of: worker and consumer safety, greenhouse gas emissions, toxicological risks associated with production or product emissions and the disposition of nanoproducts at end of life. However, development of appropriate nanotechnology assessment tools has lagged progress in the nanotechnologies themselves. In particular, current approaches to life cycle assessment (LCA) — originally developed for application in mature manufacturing industries such as automobiles and chemicals — suffer from several shortcomings that make applicability to nanotechnologies problematic. Among these are uncertainties related to the variability of material properties, toxicity and risk, technology performance in the use phase, nanomaterial degradation and change during the product life cycle and the impact assessment stage of LCA. This chapter expounds upon the unique challenges presented by nanomaterials in general, specifies sources of uncertainty and variability in LCA of SWCNT for use in electric and hybrid vehicle batteries and makes recommendations for modeling and decision-making using LCA in a multi-criteria decision analysis framework under conditions of high uncertainty.1

  12. NEIMiner: nanomaterial environmental impact data miner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Kaizhi; Liu, Xiong; Harper, Stacey L; Steevens, Jeffery A; Xu, Roger

    2013-01-01

    As more engineered nanomaterials (eNM) are developed for a wide range of applications, it is crucial to minimize any unintended environmental impacts resulting from the application of eNM. To realize this vision, industry and policymakers must base risk management decisions on sound scientific information about the environmental fate of eNM, their availability to receptor organisms (eg, uptake), and any resultant biological effects (eg, toxicity). To address this critical need, we developed a model-driven, data mining system called NEIMiner, to study nanomaterial environmental impact (NEI). NEIMiner consists of four components: NEI modeling framework, data integration, data management and access, and model building. The NEI modeling framework defines the scope of NEI modeling and the strategy of integrating NEI models to form a layered, comprehensive predictability. The data integration layer brings together heterogeneous data sources related to NEI via automatic web services and web scraping technologies. The data management and access layer reuses and extends a popular content management system (CMS), Drupal, and consists of modules that model the complex data structure for NEI-related bibliography and characterization data. The model building layer provides an advanced analysis capability for NEI data. Together, these components provide significant value to the process of aggregating and analyzing large-scale distributed NEI data. A prototype of the NEIMiner system is available at http://neiminer.i-a-i.com/.

  13. Nanomaterial Case Studies: Nanoscale Titanium Dioxide ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This draft document presents two case studies of nanoscale titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) used (1) to remove arsenic from drinking water and (2) as an active ingredient in topical sunscreen. The draft case studies are organized around a comprehensive environmental assessment approach that combines a product life cycle framework with the risk assessment paradigm. The document does not draw conclusions about potential risks. Rather, the case studies are intended to help identify what needs to be known in order to conduct a comprehensive environmental assessment of the potential risks related to nano-TiO2. This draft document is part of a process that will inform the development of EPA’s research strategy to support nanomaterial risk assessments. The complex properties of various nanomaterials make evaluating them in the abstract or with generalizations difficult if not impossible. Thus, this document focuses on two specific uses of nano-TiO2, as a drinking water treatment and as topical sunscreen. These case studies do not represent completed or even preliminary assessments; rather, they present the structure for identifying and prioritizing research needed to support future assessments.

  14. Nanomaterial Case Studies: Nanoscale Titanium Dioxide in ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, Nanomaterial Case Studies: Nanoscale Titanium Dioxide in Water Treatment and in Topical Sunscreen. This report is a starting point to determine what is known and what needs to be known about selected nanomaterials as part of a process to identify and prioritize research to inform future assessments of the potential ecological and health implications of these materials. Two specific applications of nanoscale titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) are considered: (1) as an agent for removing arsenic from drinking water; and (2) as an active ingredient in topical sunscreen. These case studies are organized around a comprehensive environmental assessment (CEA) framework that combines a product life cycle perspective with the risk assessment paradigm. They are intended to help identify what may need to be known in order to conduct a comprehensive environmental assessment of the potential risks related to nano-TiO2. These “case studies” do not represent completed or even preliminary assessments, nor are they intended to serve as a basis for risk management decisions in the near term on these specific uses of nano TiO2. Rather, the intent is to use this document in developing the scientific and technical information needed for future assessment efforts.

  15. Nanomanufacturing metrology for cellulosic nanomaterials: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postek, Michael T.

    2014-08-01

    The development of the metrology and standards for advanced manufacturing of cellulosic nanomaterials (or basically, wood-based nanotechnology) is imperative to the success of this rising economic sector. Wood-based nanotechnology is a revolutionary technology that will create new jobs and strengthen America's forest-based economy through industrial development and expansion. It allows this, previously perceived, low-tech industry to leap-frog directly into high-tech products and processes and thus improves its current economic slump. Recent global investments in nanotechnology programs have led to a deeper appreciation of the high performance nature of cellulose nanomaterials. Cellulose, manufactured to the smallest possible-size ( 2 nm x 100 nm), is a high-value material that enables products to be lighter and stronger; have less embodied energy; utilize no catalysts in the manufacturing, are biologically compatible and, come from a readily renewable resource. In addition to the potential for a dramatic impact on the national economy - estimated to be as much as $250 billion worldwide by 2020 - cellulose-based nanotechnology creates a pathway for expanded and new markets utilizing these renewable materials. The installed capacity associated with the US pulp and paper industry represents an opportunity, with investment, to rapidly move to large scale production of nano-based materials. However, effective imaging, characterization and fundamental measurement science for process control and characterization are lacking at the present time. This talk will discuss some of these needed measurements and potential solutions.

  16. Health impact and safety of engineered nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teow, Yiwei; Asharani, P V; Hande, M Prakash; Valiyaveettil, Suresh

    2011-07-07

    Many engineered nanomaterials (NMs) are being synthesized and explored for potential use in consumer and medical products. Already, nanoparticles (NPs) of titanium dioxide (TiO(2)), zinc oxide (ZnO), silver (Ag) and other metals or their oxides are present in commercial products such as sunscreens, cosmetics, wound dressings, surgical tools, detergents, automotive paints and tires. More recent and advanced FDA-approved use of NMs includes quantum dots (QDs) in live cell imaging, zirconium oxides in bone replacement and prosthetic devices and nanocarriers in drug delivery. The benefits from nanotechnology are aplenty, comprising antimicrobial activities, scratch- and water-resistance, long-lasting shine, improved processor speeds and better display resolution, to name a few. While developers of these products often focus on the exciting beneficial aspects of their products, safety and toxicity issues are often not discussed in detail. Long-term effects such as chronic exposure and environmental pollution are even less documented. Along with widespread manufacture and use of NMs, concerns for occupational hazards, proper handling, disposal, storage, shipping and clean up are expected to rise. This review focus on the possible biological impact of engineered NPs, serving as a reminder that nanomaterials can become a double-edged sword if not properly handled.

  17. Design of nanomaterial synthesis by aerosol processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buesser, Beat; Pratsinis, Sotiris E

    2012-01-01

    Aerosol synthesis of materials is a vibrant field of particle technology and chemical reaction engineering. Examples include the manufacture of carbon blacks, fumed SiO(2), pigmentary TiO(2), ZnO vulcanizing catalysts, filamentary Ni, and optical fibers, materials that impact transportation, construction, pharmaceuticals, energy, and communications. Parallel to this, development of novel, scalable aerosol processes has enabled synthesis of new functional nanomaterials (e.g., catalysts, biomaterials, electroceramics) and devices (e.g., gas sensors). This review provides an access point for engineers to the multiscale design of aerosol reactors for the synthesis of nanomaterials using continuum, mesoscale, molecular dynamics, and quantum mechanics models spanning 10 and 15 orders of magnitude in length and time, respectively. Key design features are the rapid chemistry; the high particle concentrations but low volume fractions; the attainment of a self-preserving particle size distribution by coagulation; the ratio of the characteristic times of coagulation and sintering, which controls the extent of particle aggregation; and the narrowing of the aggregate primary particle size distribution by sintering.

  18. Design of Nanomaterial Synthesis by Aerosol Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buesser, Beat; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.

    2013-01-01

    Aerosol synthesis of materials is a vibrant field of particle technology and chemical reaction engineering. Examples include the manufacture of carbon blacks, fumed SiO2, pigmentary TiO2, ZnO vulcanizing catalysts, filamentary Ni, and optical fibers, materials that impact transportation, construction, pharmaceuticals, energy, and communications. Parallel to this, development of novel, scalable aerosol processes has enabled synthesis of new functional nanomaterials (e.g., catalysts, biomaterials, electroceramics) and devices (e.g., gas sensors). This review provides an access point for engineers to the multiscale design of aerosol reactors for the synthesis of nanomaterials using continuum, mesoscale, molecular dynamics, and quantum mechanics models spanning 10 and 15 orders of magnitude in length and time, respectively. Key design features are the rapid chemistry; the high particle concentrations but low volume fractions; the attainment of a self-preserving particle size distribution by coagulation; the ratio of the characteristic times of coagulation and sintering, which controls the extent of particle aggregation; and the narrowing of the aggregate primary particle size distribution by sintering. PMID:22468598

  19. NEIMiner: nanomaterial environmental impact data miner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Kaizhi; Liu, Xiong; Harper, Stacey L; Steevens, Jeffery A; Xu, Roger

    2013-01-01

    As more engineered nanomaterials (eNM) are developed for a wide range of applications, it is crucial to minimize any unintended environmental impacts resulting from the application of eNM. To realize this vision, industry and policymakers must base risk management decisions on sound scientific information about the environmental fate of eNM, their availability to receptor organisms (eg, uptake), and any resultant biological effects (eg, toxicity). To address this critical need, we developed a model-driven, data mining system called NEIMiner, to study nanomaterial environmental impact (NEI). NEIMiner consists of four components: NEI modeling framework, data integration, data management and access, and model building. The NEI modeling framework defines the scope of NEI modeling and the strategy of integrating NEI models to form a layered, comprehensive predictability. The data integration layer brings together heterogeneous data sources related to NEI via automatic web services and web scraping technologies. The data management and access layer reuses and extends a popular content management system (CMS), Drupal, and consists of modules that model the complex data structure for NEI-related bibliography and characterization data. The model building layer provides an advanced analysis capability for NEI data. Together, these components provide significant value to the process of aggregating and analyzing large-scale distributed NEI data. A prototype of the NEIMiner system is available at http://neiminer.i-a-i.com/. PMID:24098076

  20. Applied spectroscopy and the science of nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on several areas of intense topical interest related to applied spectroscopy and the science of nanomaterials. The eleven chapters in the book cover the following areas of interest relating to applied spectroscopy and nanoscience: ·         Raman spectroscopic characterization, modeling and simulation studies of carbon nanotubes, ·         Characterization of plasma discharges using laser optogalvanic spectroscopy, ·         Fluorescence anisotropy in understanding protein conformational disorder and aggregation, ·         Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in nanomedicine, ·         Calculation of Van der Waals interactions at the nanoscale, ·         Theory and simulation associated with adsorption of gases in nanomaterials, ·         Atom-precise metal nanoclusters, ·         Plasmonic properties of metallic nanostructures, two-dimensional materials, and their composites, ·         Applications of graphe...

  1. Reinforcement of cement-based matrices with graphite nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiq, Muhammad Maqbool

    Cement-based materials offer a desirable balance of compressive strength, moisture resistance, durability, economy and energy-efficiency; their tensile strength, fracture energy and durability in aggressive environments, however, could benefit from further improvements. An option for realizing some of these improvements involves introduction of discrete fibers into concrete. When compared with today's micro-scale (steel, polypropylene, glass, etc.) fibers, graphite nanomaterials (carbon nanotube, nanofiber and graphite nanoplatelet) offer superior geometric, mechanical and physical characteristics. Graphite nanomaterials would realize their reinforcement potential as far as they are thoroughly dispersed within cement-based matrices, and effectively bond to cement hydrates. The research reported herein developed non-covalent and covalent surface modification techniques to improve the dispersion and interfacial interactions of graphite nanomaterials in cement-based matrices with a dense and well graded micro-structure. The most successful approach involved polymer wrapping of nanomaterials for increasing the density of hydrophilic groups on the nanomaterial surface without causing any damage to the their structure. The nanomaterials were characterized using various spectrometry techniques, and SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy). The graphite nanomaterials were dispersed via selected sonication procedures in the mixing water of the cement-based matrix; conventional mixing and sample preparation techniques were then employed to prepare the cement-based nanocomposite samples, which were subjected to steam curing. Comprehensive engineering and durability characteristics of cement-based nanocomposites were determined and their chemical composition, microstructure and failure mechanisms were also assessed through various spectrometry, thermogravimetry, electron microscopy and elemental analyses. Both functionalized and non-functionalized nanomaterials as well as different

  2. Carbon-based nanostructured surfaces for enhanced phase-change cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj Kousalya, Arun

    To maintain acceptable device temperatures in the new generation of electronic devices under development for high-power applications, conventional liquid cooling schemes will likely be superseded by multi-phase cooling solutions to provide substantial enhancement to the cooling capability. The central theme of the current work is to investigate the two-phase thermal performance of carbon-based nanostructured coatings in passive and pumped liquid-vapor phase-change cooling schemes. Quantification of the critical parameters that influence thermal performance of the carbon nanostructured boiling surfaces presented herein will lead to improved understanding of the underlying evaporative and boiling mechanisms in such surfaces. A flow boiling experimental facility is developed to generate consistent and accurate heat transfer performance curves with degassed and deionized water as the working fluid. New means of boiling heat transfer enhancement by altering surface characteristics such as surface energy and wettability through light-surface interactions is explored in this work. In this regard, carbon nanotube (CNT) coatings are exposed to low-intensity irradiation emitted from a light emitting diode and the subcooled flow boiling performance is compared against a non-irradiated CNT-coated copper surface. A considerable reduction in surface superheat and enhancement in average heat transfer coefficient is observed. In another work involving CNTs, the thermal performance of CNT-integrated sintered wick structures is evaluated in a passively cooled vapor chamber. A physical vapor deposition process is used to coat the CNTs with varying thicknesses of copper to promote surface wetting with the working fluid, water. Thermal performance of the bare sintered copper powder sample and the copper-functionalized CNT-coated sintered copper powder wick samples is compared using an experimental facility that simulates the capillary fluid feeding conditions of a vapor chamber

  3. Functionalization of gold nanoparticles as antidiabetic nanomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatachalam, M; Govindaraju, K; Mohamed Sadiq, A; Tamilselvan, S; Ganesh Kumar, V; Singaravelu, G

    2013-12-01

    In the present investigation, functionalization of gold nanoparticles synthesized using propanoic acid 2-(3-acetoxy-4,4,14-trimethylandrost-8-en-17-yl) (PAT) an active biocomponent isolated from Cassia auriculata is studied in detail. On reaction of PAT with aqueous HAuCl4, rapid formation of stable gold nanoparticles was achieved. Formation of gold nanoparticles was confirmed by UV-vis spectroscopy, XRD, GC-MS,FTIR, TEM and SEM with EDAX. Gold nanoparticles mostly were monodisperse, spherical in shape and ranged in size 12-41 nm. Gold nanoparticles synthesised using PAT was administered to alloxan (150 mg/kg body weight) induced diabetic male albino rats at different doses (0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0mg/kg body weight) for 28 days. Plasma glucose level, cholesterol and triglyceride were significantly (pgold nanoparticles at dosage of 0.5mg/kg body weight and plasma insulin increased significantly. The newly genre green gold nanoparticles exhibit remarkable protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitory activity.

  4. Recent developments in the layer-by-layer assembly of polyaniline and carbon nanomaterials for energy storage and sensing applications. From synthetic aspects to structural and functional characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmisollé, Waldemar A.; Azzaroni, Omar

    2016-05-01

    The construction of hybrid polymer-inorganic nanoarchitectures for electrochemical purposes based on the layer-by-layer assembly of conducting polymers and carbon nanomaterials has become increasingly popular over the last decade. This explosion of interest is primarily related to the increasing mastery in the design of supramolecular constructs using simple wet chemical approaches. Concomitantly, this continuous research activity paved the way to the rapid development of nanocomposites or ``nanoblends'' readily integrable into energy storage and sensing devices. In this sense, the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly technique has allowed us to access three-dimensional (3D) multicomponent carbon-based network nanoarchitectures displaying addressable electrical, electrochemical and transport properties in which conducting polymers, such as polyaniline, and carbon nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes or nanographene, play unique roles without disrupting their inherent functions - complementary entities coexisting in harmony. Over the last few years the level of functional sophistication reached by LbL-assembled carbon-based 3D network nanoarchitectures, and the level of knowledge related to how to design, fabricate and optimize the properties of these 3D nanoconstructs have advanced enormously. This feature article presents and discusses not only the recent advances but also the emerging challenges in complex hybrid nanoarchitectures that result from the layer-by-layer assembly of polyaniline, a quintessential conducting polymer, and diverse carbon nanomaterials. This is a rapidly developing research area, and this work attempts to provide an overview of the diverse 3D network nanoarchitectures prepared up to now. The importance of materials processing and LbL integration is explored within each section and while the overall emphasis is on energy storage and sensing applications, the most widely-used synthetic strategies and characterization methods for ``nanoblend

  5. Comparative assessment of nanomaterial definitions and safety evaluation considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boverhof, Darrell R; Bramante, Christina M; Butala, John H; Clancy, Shaun F; Lafranconi, Mark; West, Jay; Gordon, Steve C

    2015-10-01

    Nanomaterials continue to bring promising advances to science and technology. In concert have come calls for increased regulatory oversight to ensure their appropriate identification and evaluation, which has led to extensive discussions about nanomaterial definitions. Numerous nanomaterial definitions have been proposed by government, industry, and standards organizations. We conducted a comprehensive comparative assessment of existing nanomaterial definitions put forward by governments to highlight their similarities and differences. We found that the size limits used in different definitions were inconsistent, as were considerations of other elements, including agglomerates and aggregates, distributional thresholds, novel properties, and solubility. Other important differences included consideration of number size distributions versus weight distributions and natural versus intentionally-manufactured materials. Overall, the definitions we compared were not in alignment, which may lead to inconsistent identification and evaluation of nanomaterials and could have adverse impacts on commerce and public perceptions of nanotechnology. We recommend a set of considerations that future discussions of nanomaterial definitions should consider for describing materials and assessing their potential for health and environmental impacts using risk-based approaches within existing assessment frameworks. Our intent is to initiate a dialogue aimed at achieving greater clarity in identifying those nanomaterials that may require additional evaluation, not to propose a formal definition. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Autophagy and lysosomal dysfunction as emerging mechanisms of nanomaterial toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stern Stephan T

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The study of the potential risks associated with the manufacture, use, and disposal of nanoscale materials, and their mechanisms of toxicity, is important for the continued advancement of nanotechnology. Currently, the most widely accepted paradigms of nanomaterial toxicity are oxidative stress and inflammation, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly defined. This review will highlight the significance of autophagy and lysosomal dysfunction as emerging mechanisms of nanomaterial toxicity. Most endocytic routes of nanomaterial cell uptake converge upon the lysosome, making the lysosomal compartment the most common intracellular site of nanoparticle sequestration and degradation. In addition to the endo-lysosomal pathway, recent evidence suggests that some nanomaterials can also induce autophagy. Among the many physiological functions, the lysosome, by way of the autophagy (macroautophagy pathway, degrades intracellular pathogens, and damaged organelles and proteins. Thus, autophagy induction by nanoparticles may be an attempt to degrade what is perceived by the cell as foreign or aberrant. While the autophagy and endo-lysosomal pathways have the potential to influence the disposition of nanomaterials, there is also a growing body of literature suggesting that biopersistent nanomaterials can, in turn, negatively impact these pathways. Indeed, there is ample evidence that biopersistent nanomaterials can cause autophagy and lysosomal dysfunctions resulting in toxicological consequences.

  7. Autophagy and lysosomal dysfunction as emerging mechanisms of nanomaterial toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Stephan T; Adiseshaiah, Pavan P; Crist, Rachael M

    2012-06-14

    The study of the potential risks associated with the manufacture, use, and disposal of nanoscale materials, and their mechanisms of toxicity, is important for the continued advancement of nanotechnology. Currently, the most widely accepted paradigms of nanomaterial toxicity are oxidative stress and inflammation, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly defined. This review will highlight the significance of autophagy and lysosomal dysfunction as emerging mechanisms of nanomaterial toxicity. Most endocytic routes of nanomaterial cell uptake converge upon the lysosome, making the lysosomal compartment the most common intracellular site of nanoparticle sequestration and degradation. In addition to the endo-lysosomal pathway, recent evidence suggests that some nanomaterials can also induce autophagy. Among the many physiological functions, the lysosome, by way of the autophagy (macroautophagy) pathway, degrades intracellular pathogens, and damaged organelles and proteins. Thus, autophagy induction by nanoparticles may be an attempt to degrade what is perceived by the cell as foreign or aberrant. While the autophagy and endo-lysosomal pathways have the potential to influence the disposition of nanomaterials, there is also a growing body of literature suggesting that biopersistent nanomaterials can, in turn, negatively impact these pathways. Indeed, there is ample evidence that biopersistent nanomaterials can cause autophagy and lysosomal dysfunctions resulting in toxicological consequences.

  8. Synthesis of Carbon Nanomaterials by Atmospheric Pressure Microdischarge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Qin; Wang, Mingzhi; Li, Yanguo; Zou, Lianghua

    2009-12-01

    Atmospheric pressure microdischarge of CH4 was generated in a removable gas cell fitted in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) for synthesizing carbon nanomaterials. A Pd alloy needle with 12 μm tip curve radius and a polycrystalline Pt film with 600 nm thickness were used as the anode and the cathode respectively. A pulse voltage was applied. The pressure of CH4 was 100 kPa. The gaps between the anode and the cathode were changed from 5 μm to 100 μm. The field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and the energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX) results showed that spherical or sticklike carbon nanomaterials were fabricated in the discharge area on the surface of the Pt film cathode after the microdischarge. With the time of microdischarge increase, the spherical carbon nanomaterials grew into the sticklike gradually within 7 s. For 7 s deposition, the length and the diameter of some sticklike carbon nanomaterials were 1000 nm and 20 nm respectively. However, when the deposition time was longer than 8 s, the discharge center was melted. A high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) was also used to characterize the structures of the sticklike carbon nanomaterials, which showed that the sticklike carbon nanomaterials were nanorods. This microdischarge is a fast and simple method for synthesizing carbon nanomaterial.

  9. Knowledge gaps between nanotoxicological research and nanomaterial safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiangang; Li, Dandan; Gao, Yue; Mu, Li; Zhou, Qixing

    2016-09-01

    With the wide research and application of nanomaterials in various fields, the safety of nanomaterials attracts much attention. An increasing number of reports in the literature have shown the adverse effects of nanomaterials, representing the quick development of nanotoxicology. However, many studies in nanotoxicology have not reflected the real nanomaterial safety, and the knowledge gaps between nanotoxicological research and nanomaterial safety remain large. Considering the remarkable influence of biological or environmental matrices (e.g., biological corona) on nanotoxicity, the situation of performing nanotoxicological experiments should be relevant to the environment and humans. Given the possibility of long-term and low-concentration exposure of nanomaterials, the reversibility of and adaptation to nanotoxicity, and the transgenerational effects should not be ignored. Different from common pollutants, the specific analysis methodology for nanotoxicology need development and exploration furthermore. High-throughput assay integrating with omics was highlighted in the present review to globally investigate nanotoxicity. In addition, the biological responses beyond individual levels, special mechanisms and control of nanotoxicity deserve more attention. The progress of nanotoxicology has been reviewed by previous articles. This review focuses on the blind spots in nanotoxicological research and provides insight into what we should do in future work to support the healthy development of nanotechnology and the evaluation of real nanomaterial safety.

  10. [Nanomaterials in cosmetics--present situation and future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masunaga, Takuji

    2014-01-01

    Cosmetics are consumer products intended to contribute to increasing quality of life and designed for long-term daily use. Due to such features of cosmetics, they are required to ensure quality and safety at a high level, as well as to perform well, in response to consumers' demands. Recently, the technology associated with nanomaterials has progressed rapidly and has been applied to various products, including cosmetics. For example, nano-sized titanium dioxide has been formulated in sunscreen products in pursuit of improving its performance. As some researchers and media have expressed concerns about the safety of nanomaterials, a vague feeling of anxiety has been raised in society. In response to this concern, the Japan Cosmetic Industry Association (JCIA) has begun original research related to the safety assurance of nanomaterials formulated in cosmetics, to allow consumers to use cosmetics without such concerns. This paper describes the activities of the JCIA regarding safety research on nanomaterials, including a survey of the actual usage of nanomaterials in cosmetics, analysis of the existence of nanomaterials on the skin, and assessment of skin carcinogenicity of nano-sized titanium dioxide. It also describes the international status of safety assurance and regulation regarding nanomaterials in cosmetics.

  11. Versatile in situ gas analysis apparatus for nanomaterials reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meysami, Seyyed Shayan; Snoek, Lavina C; Grobert, Nicole

    2014-09-02

    We report a newly developed technique for the in situ real-time gas analysis of reactors commonly used for the production of nanomaterials, by showing case-study results obtained using a dedicated apparatus for measuring the gas composition in reactors operating at high temperature (nanomaterials with tailored properties. Our studies demonstrate that the composition of the precursors dynamically changes as they travel inside of the reactor, causing a nonuniform growth of nanomaterials. Moreover, mapping of the nanomaterials reactor using quantitative gas analysis revealed the actual contribution of thermocatalytic cracking and a quantification of individual precursor fragments. This information is particularly important for quality control of the produced nanomaterials and for the recycling of exhaust residues, ultimately leading toward a more cost-effective continuous production of nanomaterials in large quantities. Our case study of multiwall carbon nanotube synthesis was conducted using the probe in conjunction with chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques. Given the similarities of this particular CVD setup to other CVD reactors and high-temperature setups generally used for nanomaterials synthesis, the concept and methodology of in situ gas analysis presented here does also apply to other systems, making it a versatile and widely applicable method across a wide range of materials/manufacturing methods, catalysis, as well as reactor design and engineering.

  12. Granular biodurable nanomaterials: No convincing evidence for systemic toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Horn, Marcus; Gebel, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Nanomaterials are usually defined by primary particle diameters ranging from 1 to 100 nm. The scope of this review is an evaluation of experimental animal studies dealing with the systemic levels and putative systemic effects induced by nanoparticles which can be characterized as being granular biodurable particles without known specific toxicity (GBP). Relevant examples of such materials comprise nanosized titanium dioxide (TiO2) and carbon black. The question was raised whether GBP nanomaterials systemically accumulate and may possess a relevant systemic toxicity. With few exceptions, the 56 publications reviewed were not performed using established standard protocols, for example, OECD guidelines but used non-standard study designs. The studies including kinetic investigations indicated that GBP nanomaterials were absorbed and systemically distributed to rather low portions only. There was no valid indication that GPB nanomaterials possess novel toxicological hazard properties. In addition, no convincing evidence for a relevant specific systemic toxicity of GBP nanomaterials could be identified. The minority of the papers reviewed (15/56) investigated both nanosized and microsized GBP materials in parallel. A relevant different translocation of GBP nanomaterials in contrast to GBP micromaterials was not observed in these studies. There was no evidence that GPB nanomaterials possess toxicological properties other than their micromaterial counterparts.

  13. Fate and Toxicity of Zinc Oxide Nanomaterial in Municipal Wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeraldi, Josh; Ganesh, Rajagopalan; Hosseini, Turaj; Khatib, Leila; Olson, Betty H; Rosso, Diego

    2017-09-01

      The production of zinc nanomaterial has increased significantly over the past several years and, as a result, nanoparticles have navigated their way into wastewater streams. The transportation and toxicity of zinc nanomaterial within the wastewater treatment processes is not well known. In this study, the zinc nanomaterial and its fate were characterized in an activated sludge treatment process. The tests performed included batch studies to evaluate abiotic and biotic removal, toxicity studies to evaluate inhibition to coliform and nitrifying bacteria, and bioreactor studies to evaluate impact on operating parameters. Stock solutions of zinc nanomaterial varied in size from 50 to 500 nm, but when added to an activated sludge solution, the nanoparticles agglomerated to larger sizes such that more than 60% of the zinc nanomaterial settled out of solution. However, when ionic zinc was added to activated sludge, more than 60% of the ionic zinc remained in suspension. It is likely that the ionic strength of the wastewater influenced the aggregation of the nanomaterial. Differences in the extent of removal between ionic and nano zinc species indicate that the mechanisms governing their removal are different. Toxicity analysis showed that zinc nanomaterial did not inhibit growth of coliform and ammonia oxidizing bacteria. However, ionic zinc inhibited the growth of both the coliform and ammonia oxidizing bacteria. Bioreactors were set up using activated sludge that was collected from a local treatment plant operating only in carbon oxidation mode. The treatment plant was operated at an SRT of 1.2 days and an MLSS of 650 mg/L. Several key parameters (COD, MLSS, pH) in the bioreactors were monitored through a 7-day incubation period, but showed no significant changes due to the addition of nano or ionic zinc. It is possible that the toxicity of zinc nanomaterial was not observed in these experiments because the nanomaterial agglomerated and settled out of solution.

  14. Characterization of airborne particles during production of carbonaceous nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeganeh, Behnoush; Kull, Christy M; Hull, Matthew S; Marr, Linsey C

    2008-06-15

    Despite the rapid growth in nanotechnology, very little is known about the unintended health or environmental effects of manufactured nanomaterials. The development of nanotechnology risk assessments and regulations requires quantitative information on the potential for exposure to nanomaterials. The objective of this research isto characterize airborne particle concentrations during the production of carbonaceous nanomaterials, such as fullerenes and carbon nanotubes, in a commercial nanotechnology facility. We measured fine particle mass concentrations (PM2.5), submicrometer size distributions, and photoionization potential, an indicator of the particles' carbonaceous content, at three locations inside the facility: inside the fume hood where nanomaterials were produced, just outside the fume hood, and in the background. The measurements were not selective for engineered nanomaterials and may have included both engineered nanomaterials and naturally occurring or incidental particles. Average PM2.5 and particle number concentrations were not significantly different inside the facility versus outdoors. However, large, short-term increases in PM2.5 and particle number concentrations were associated with physical handling of nanomaterials and other production activities. In many cases, an increase in the number of sub-100 nm particles accounted for the majority of the increase in total number concentrations. Photoionization results indicate that the particles suspended during nanomaterial handling inside the fume hood were carbonaceous and therefore likely to include engineered nanoparticles, whereas those suspended by other production activities taking place outside the fume hood were not. Based on the measurements in this study, the engineering controls at the facility appear to be effective at limiting exposure to nanomaterials.

  15. Seed mediated synthesis of highly mono-dispersed gold nanoparticles in the presence of hydroquinone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dhiraj; Mutreja, Isha; Sykes, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are being studied for several biomedical applications, including drug delivery, biomedical imaging, contrast agents and tumor targeting. The synthesis of nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution is critical for these applications. We report the synthesis of highly mono-dispersed AuNPs by a seed mediated approach, in the presence of tri-sodium citrate and hydroquinone (HQ). AuNPs with an average size of 18 nm were used for the synthesis of highly mono-dispersed nanocrystals of an average size 40 nm, 60 nm, 80 nm and ˜100 nm; but the protocol is not limited to these sizes. The colloidal gold was subjected to UV-vis absorbance spectroscopy, showing a red shift in lambda max wavelength, peaks at 518.47 nm, 526.37 nm, 535.73 nm, 546.03 nm and 556.50 nm for AuNPs seed (18 nm), 40 nm, 60 nm, 80 nm and ˜100 nm respectively. The analysis was consistent with dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy. Hydrodynamic diameters measured were 17.6 nm, 40.8 nm, 59.8 nm, 74.1 nm, and 91.4 nm (size by dynamic light scattering—volume %); with an average poly dispersity index value of 0.088, suggesting mono-dispersity in the size distribution, which was also confirmed by transmission electron microscopy analysis. The advantage of a seed mediated approach is a multi-step growth of nanoparticle size that enables us to control the number of nanoparticles in the suspension, for size ranging from 24.5 nm to 95.8 nm. In addition, the HQ-based synthesis of colloidal nanocrystals allowed control of the particle size and size distribution by tailoring either the number of seeds, amount of gold precursor or reducing agent (HQ) in the final reaction mixture.

  16. Microfluidic separation of satellite droplets as the basis of a monodispersed micron and submicron emulsification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yung-Chieh; Lee, Abraham Phillip

    2005-10-01

    Emulsions are widely used to produce sol-gel, drugs, synthetic materials, and food products. Recent advancements in microfluidic droplet emulsion technology has enabled the precise sampling and processing of small volumes of fluids (picoliter to femtoliter) by the controlled viscous shearing in microchannels. However the generation of monodispersed droplets smaller than 1 microm without surfactants has been difficult to achieve. Normally, the generation of satellite droplets along with parent droplets is undesirable and makes it difficult to control volume and purity of samples in droplets. In this paper, however, several methods are presented to passively filter out satellite droplets from the generation of parent droplets and use these satellite droplets as the source for monodispersed production of submicron emulsions. A passive satellite droplet filtration system and a dynamic satellite droplet separation system are demonstrated. Satellite droplets are filtered from parent droplets with a two-layer channel geometry. This design allows the creation and collection of droplets that are less than 100 nm in diameter. In the dynamic separation system, satellite droplets of defined sizes can be selectively separated into different collecting zones. The separation of the satellite droplets into different collecting zones correlates with the cross channel position of the satellite droplets during the breakup of the liquid thread. The delay time for droplets to switch between the different alternating collecting zones is nominally 1 min and is proportional to the ratio of the oil shear flows. With our droplet generation system, monodispersed satellite droplets with an average radius of 2.23 +/- 0.11 microm, and bidispersed secondary and tertiary satellite droplets with radii of 1.55 +/- 0.07 microm and 372 +/- 46 nm respectively, have been dynamically separated and collected.

  17. Seed mediated synthesis of highly mono-dispersed gold nanoparticles in the presence of hydroquinone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dhiraj; Mutreja, Isha; Sykes, Peter

    2016-09-02

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are being studied for several biomedical applications, including drug delivery, biomedical imaging, contrast agents and tumor targeting. The synthesis of nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution is critical for these applications. We report the synthesis of highly mono-dispersed AuNPs by a seed mediated approach, in the presence of tri-sodium citrate and hydroquinone (HQ). AuNPs with an average size of 18 nm were used for the synthesis of highly mono-dispersed nanocrystals of an average size 40 nm, 60 nm, 80 nm and ∼100 nm; but the protocol is not limited to these sizes. The colloidal gold was subjected to UV-vis absorbance spectroscopy, showing a red shift in lambda max wavelength, peaks at 518.47 nm, 526.37 nm, 535.73 nm, 546.03 nm and 556.50 nm for AuNPs seed (18 nm), 40 nm, 60 nm, 80 nm and ∼100 nm respectively. The analysis was consistent with dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy. Hydrodynamic diameters measured were 17.6 nm, 40.8 nm, 59.8 nm, 74.1 nm, and 91.4 nm (size by dynamic light scattering-volume %); with an average poly dispersity index value of 0.088, suggesting mono-dispersity in the size distribution, which was also confirmed by transmission electron microscopy analysis. The advantage of a seed mediated approach is a multi-step growth of nanoparticle size that enables us to control the number of nanoparticles in the suspension, for size ranging from 24.5 nm to 95.8 nm. In addition, the HQ-based synthesis of colloidal nanocrystals allowed control of the particle size and size distribution by tailoring either the number of seeds, amount of gold precursor or reducing agent (HQ) in the final reaction mixture.

  18. Functionalized carbon nanomaterials derived from carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadeesan, Dinesh; Eswaramoorthy, Muthusamy

    2010-02-01

    A tremendous growth in the field of carbon nanomaterials has led to the emergence of carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, mesoporous carbon and more recently graphene. Some of these materials have found applications in electronics, sensors, catalysis, drug delivery, composites, and so forth. The high temperatures and hydrocarbon precursors involved in their synthesis usually yield highly inert graphitic surfaces. As some of the applications require functionalization of their inert graphitic surface with groups like -COOH, -OH, and -NH(2), treatment of these materials in oxidizing agents and concentrated acids become inevitable. More recent works have involved using precursors like carbohydrates to produce carbon nanostructures rich in functional groups in a single-step under hydrothermal conditions. These carbon nanostructures have already found many applications in composites, drug delivery, materials synthesis, and Li ion batteries. The review aims to highlight some of the recent developments in the application of carbohydrate derived carbon nanostructures and also provide an outlook of their future prospects.

  19. Nanomaterials and nanoparticles : Sources and toxicity

    CERN Document Server

    Buzea, Cristina; Robbie, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    This review is written with the goal of informing public health concerns related to nanoscience, while raising awareness of nanomaterials toxicity among scientists and manufacturers handling them. We show that humans have always been exposed to nanoparticles and dust from natural sources and human activities, the recent development of industry and combustion-based engine transportation profoundly increasing anthropogenic nanoparticulate pollution. The key to understanding the toxicity of nanoparticles is that their minute size, smaller than cells and cellular organelles, allows them to penetrate these basic biological structures, disrupting their normal function. Among diseases associated with nanoparticles are asthma, bronchitis, lung cancer, neurodegenerative diseases (such as Parkinson`s and Alzheimer`s diseases), Crohn`s disease, colon cancer. Nanoparticles that enter the circulatory system are related to occurrence of arteriosclerosis, and blood clots, arrhythmia, heart diseases, and ultimately cardiac d...

  20. Modification of conductive polyaniline with carbon nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedaghat, Sajjad; Alavijeh, Mahdi Soleimani

    2014-08-01

    The synthesis of polyaniline/single-wall nanotube, polyaniline/multi-wall nanotube and polyaniline/single-wall nanotube/graphen nanosheets nanocomposites by in situ polymerization are reported in this study. The substrates were treated with a mixture of concentrated sulfuric acid and concentrated nitric acid before usage to functionalize with carboxylic and hydroxyl groups. Aniline monomers are adsorbed and polymerized on the surface of these fillers. Structural analysis using scanning electron microscopy showed that nanomaterials dispersed into polymer matrix and made tubular structures with diameters several tens to hundreds nanometers depending on the polyaniline content. These nanocomposites can be used for production of excellent electrode materials applications in high-performance supercapacitors.