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Sample records for monitoring training exercise

  1. Monitoring Training Progress During Exercise Training in Cancer Survivors : A Submaximal Exercise Test as an Alternative for a Maximal Exercise Test?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    May, Anne M.; van Weert, Ellen; Korstjens, Irene; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette E.; van der Schans, Cees P.; Zonderland, Maria L.; Mesters, Ilse; van den Borne, Bart; Ros, Wynand J.

    May AM, van Weert E, Korstjens 1, Hoekstra-Weebers JE, van der Schans CP, Zonderland ML, Mesters 1, van den Borne B, Ros WJ. Monitoring training progress during exercise training in cancer survivors: a submaximal exercise test as an alternative for a maximal exercise test? Arch Phys Med Rehabil

  2. Variation in heart rate during submaximal exercise: Implications for monitoring training : Implications for monitoring training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamberts, R.P.; Lemmink, K.A.P.M.; Durandt, J.J.; Lambert, M.I.

    2004-01-01

    A change in heart rate at a controlled submaximal exercise intensity is used as a marker of training status. However, the standard error of measurement has not been studied systematically, and therefore a change in heart rate, which can be considered relevant, has not been determined. Forty-four

  3. Variation in heart rate during submaximal exercise: Implications for monitoring training : Implications for monitoring training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamberts, R.P.; Lemmink, K.A.P.M.; Durandt, J.J.; Lambert, M.I.

    2004-01-01

    A change in heart rate at a controlled submaximal exercise intensity is used as a marker of training status. However, the standard error of measurement has not been studied systematically, and therefore a change in heart rate, which can be considered relevant, has not been determined. Forty-four sub

  4. Cardiac Acceleration at the Onset of Exercise : A Potential Parameter for Monitoring Progress During Physical Training in Sports and Rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hettinga, Florentina J.; Monden, Paul G.; van Meeteren, Nico L. U.; Daanen, Hein A. M.

    There is a need for easy-to-use methods to assess training progress in sports and rehabilitation research. The present review investigated whether cardiac acceleration at the onset of physical exercise (HRonset) can be used as a monitoring variable. The digital databases of Scopus and PubMed were

  5. Cardiac acceleration at the onset of exercise: A potential parameter for monitoring progress during physical training in sports and rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hettinga, F.J.; Monden, P.G.; Meeteren, N.L.U. van; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for easy-to-use methods to assess training progress in sports and rehabilitation research. The present review investigated whether cardiac acceleration at the onset of physical exercise (HRonset) can be used as a monitoring variable. The digital databases of Scopus and PubMed were

  6. Cardiac Acceleration at the Onset of Exercise : A Potential Parameter for Monitoring Progress During Physical Training in Sports and Rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hettinga, Florentina J.; Monden, Paul G.; van Meeteren, Nico L. U.; Daanen, Hein A. M.

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for easy-to-use methods to assess training progress in sports and rehabilitation research. The present review investigated whether cardiac acceleration at the onset of physical exercise (HRonset) can be used as a monitoring variable. The digital databases of Scopus and PubMed were se

  7. Variation in heart rate during submaximal exercise : implications for monitoring training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamberts, R.P.; Lemmink, K.A.; Durandt, J.J.; Lambert, M.I.

    2004-01-01

    A change in heart rate at a controlled submaximal exercise intensity is used as a marker of training status. However, the standard error of measurement has not been studied systematically, and therefore a change in heart rate, which can be considered relevant, has not been determined. Forty-four sub

  8. THE EFFECT OF TELE-MONITORING ON EXERCISE TRAINING ADHERENCE, FUNCTIONAL CAPACITY, QUALITY OF LIFE AND GLYCEMIC CONTROL IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE II DIABETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Marios

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We used tele-monitoring to attempt to improve exercise adherence (number of hours of exercise completed, peak VO2, HbA1c% and quality of life in an unsupervised, home based exercise program in people with type II diabetes, a cost analysis was also conducted. Thirty-nine patients with type II diabetes were randomized to tele-monitoring (TELE or control (CON groups. All patients were asked to complete 6 months exercise training and complete an exercise activity diary. The TELE group was instructed to record their exercise heart rates using a monitor and received weekly telephone calls from an exercise physiologist. Six TELE patients and seven CON patients did not complete the 6 month testing. TELE patients completed a mean weekly volume of 138 minutes, moderate intensity exercise, while CON patients completed 58 minutes weekly (p < 0.02. Neither group achieved the American Heart Association statement guideline for weekly exercise volume of 150 minutes. TELE patients improved peak VO2 (5.5 %, but neither group improved HbA1c% or quality of life. The CON group showed a 4.9% reduction in peak VO2. While tele-monitored patients completed more hours of exercise and demonstrated improved peak VO2 compared to controls, the exercise volume completed was insufficient to improve glycemic control. There is the potential via tele-monitoring to enable people with diabetes to meet exercise training guidelines.

  9. Cardiac acceleration at the onset of exercise: a potential parameter for monitoring progress during physical training in sports and rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettinga, Florentina J; Monden, Paul G; van Meeteren, Nico L U; Daanen, Hein A M

    2014-05-01

    There is a need for easy-to-use methods to assess training progress in sports and rehabilitation research. The present review investigated whether cardiac acceleration at the onset of physical exercise (HRonset) can be used as a monitoring variable. The digital databases of Scopus and PubMed were searched to retrieve studies investigating HRonset. In total 652 studies were retrieved. These articles were then classified as having emphasis on HRonset in a sports or rehabilitation setting, which resulted in 8 of 112 studies with a sports application and 6 of 68 studies with a rehabilitation application that met inclusion criteria. Two co-existing mechanisms underlie HRonset: feedforward (central command) and feedback (mechanoreflex, metaboreflex, baroreflex) control. A number of studies investigated HRonset during the first few seconds of exercise (HRonsetshort), in which central command and the mechanoreflex determine vagal withdrawal, the major mechanism by which heart rate (HR) increases. In subsequent sports and rehabilitation studies, interest focused on HRonset during dynamic exercise over a longer period of time (HRonsetlong). Central command, mechanoreflexes, baroreflexes, and possibly metaboreflexes contribute to HRonset during the first seconds and minutes of exercise, which in turn leads to further vagal withdrawal and an increase in sympathetic activity. HRonset has been described as the increase in HR compared with resting state (delta HR) or by exponential modeling, with measurement intervals ranging from 0-4 s up to 2 min. Delta HR was used to evaluate HRonsetshort over the first 4 s of exercise, as well as for analyzing HRonsetlong. In exponential modeling, the HR response to dynamic exercise is biphasic, consisting of fast (parasympathetic, 0-10 s) and slow (sympathetic, 1-4 min) components. Although available studies differed largely in measurement protocols, cross-sectional and longitudinal training studies showed that studies analyzing HRonset

  10. Pelvic floor muscle training exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003975.htm Pelvic floor muscle training exercises To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pelvic floor muscle training exercises are a series of exercises ...

  11. Does rating of perceived exertion result in target exercise intensity during interval training in cardiac rehabilitation? A study of the Borg scale versus a heart rate monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamot, Inger-Lise; Forbord, Siv Hege; Karlsen, Trine; Støylen, Asbjørn

    2014-09-01

    To assess whether rating of perceived exertion using the Borg 6-20 scale is a valid method for achieving target exercise intensity during high-intensity interval training in cardiac rehabilitation. A single-group cross-over design. Ten participants (56 (6.5) years) who were enrolled in a high-intensity interval training cardiac rehabilitation program were recruited. A target exercise intensity of Borg 17 (very hard) was used for exercise intensity guidance in the initial four exercise sessions that took place before a cardiopulmonary exercise test, as in usual care rehabilitation. The heart rate was recorded and blinded to the participants. After performing the test, the participants were then instructed using heart rate monitors openly for exercise guidance in four subsequent exercise sessions, at an intensity corresponding to 85-95% of peak heart rate. The mean exercise intensity during high-intensity bouts was 82% (6%) of peak heart rate for the rating of perceived exertion and 85% (6%) using heart rate monitors (p=0.005). Bland-Altman limits of agreement analysis with a mean bias showed a bias of 2.97 (-2.08, 8.02) percentage points for the two methods. Exercise intensity was highly repeatable with intra-class correlations of 0.95 (95% CI 0.86-0.99, pexercise sessions using rating of perceived exertion and percentage of peak heart rate for intensity control, respectively. Rating of perceived exertion results in an exercise intensity below target during high-intensity interval training bouts in cardiac rehabilitation. Heart rate monitoring should be used for accurate intensity guidance. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Use of Session RPE to Monitor the Intensity of Weight Training in Older Women: Acute Responses to Eccentric, Concentric, and Dynamic Exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro S. Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The rating of perceived exertion (RPE is ability to detect and interpret organic sensations while performing exercises. This method has been used to measure the level of effort that is felt during weight-training at a given intensity. The purpose of this investigation was to compare session RPE values with those of traditional RPE measurements for different weight-training muscle actions, performed together or separately. Fourteen women with no former weight-training experience were recruited for the investigation. All participants completed five sessions of exercise: familiarization, maximum force, concentric-only (CONC-only, eccentric-only (ECC-only, and dynamic (DYN = CONC + ECC. The traditional RPE method was measured after each series of exercises, and the session RPE was measured 30 min after the end of the training session. The statistical analyses used were the paired t-test, one-way analysis of variance, and repeated measures analysis of variance. Significant differences between traditional RPE and session RPE for DYN, CONC, and ECC exercises were not found. This investigation demonstrated that session RPE is similar to traditional RPE in terms of weight-training involving concentric, eccentric, or dynamic muscle exercises, and that it can be used to prescribe and monitor weight-training sessions in older subjects.

  13. Monitorização ambulatorial da pressão arterial em indivíduos normotensos submetidos a duas sessões únicas de exercícios: resistido e aeróbio Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in normotensive individuals undergoing two single exercise sessions: resistive exercise training and aerobic exercise training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambrosina Maria Lignani de Miranda Bermudes

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Investigar a influência de duas sessões únicas de exercício resistido (circuito com pesos e aeróbio sobre as alterações pressóricas, em indivíduos sedentários e normotensos. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados pela monitorização numa situação controle, sem realização de exercícios (MAPA 1 25 indivíduos, após exercício resistido (MAPA 2 e após exercício aeróbio (MAPA 3. Os exercícios resistidos foram realizados sob forma de circuito com pesos, com intensidade de 40% da força máxima individual e os exercícios aeróbicos em cicloergômetro, com intensidade entre 60% e 70% da freqüência cardíaca (FC máxima alcançada no teste ergométrico. RESULTADOS: A pressão arterial sistólica (PAS de 24h e sub-períodos vigília e sono não apresentaram variações estatisticamente significantes quando comparada à MAPA2 e MAPA3 e MAPA2 e MAPA3 entre si. A pressão arterial diastólica (PAD de 24h e diurna apresentaram reduções significantes (POBJECTIVE: To assess the influence of 2 single exercise sessions on blood pressure in sedentary normotensive individuals: one of resistive exercise training (circuit weight training and the other of aerobic exercise training. METHODS: Using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, this study assessed 25 individuals as follows: in a controlled situation at rest (ABPM 1; after resistive exercise training (ABPM 2; and after aerobic exercise training (ABPM 3. Resistive exercise training was performed as circuit weight training with an intensity of 40% of each individual's maximum strength. The aerobic exercise training was performed on a cycloergometer with intensity between 60% and 70% of the maximum heart rate (HR reached during previous exercise testing. RESULTS: Systolic blood pressure (SBP values during 24 hours and during subperiods of wakefulness and sleep showed no statistically significant variations when the results obtained at rest were compared with those of ABPM2 and ABPM3, and when

  14. Strength training and aerobic exercise training for muscle disease (Review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voet, N.B.M.; Kooi, E.L. van der; Riphagen, I.I.; Lindeman, E.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Strength training or aerobic exercise programmes might optimise muscle and cardiorespiratory function and prevent additional disuse atrophy and deconditioning in people with a muscle disease. OBJECTIVES: To examine the safety and efficacy of strength training and aerobic exercise trainin

  15. Strength training and aerobic exercise training for muscle disease (Review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voet, N.B.M.; Kooi, E.L. van der; Riphagen, I.I.; Lindeman, E.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Strength training or aerobic exercise programmes might optimise muscle and cardiorespiratory function and prevent additional disuse atrophy and deconditioning in people with a muscle disease. OBJECTIVES: To examine the safety and efficacy of strength training and aerobic exercise trainin

  16. Eccentric exercise testing and training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, Priscilla M.

    1994-01-01

    Some researchers and practitioners have touted the benefits of including eccentric exercise in strength training programs. However, others have challenged its use because they believe that eccentric actions are dangerous and lead to injuries. Much of the controversy may be based on a lack of understanding of the physiology of eccentric actions. This review will present data concerning eccentric exercise in strength training, the physiological characteristics of eccentric exercise, and the possible stimulus for strength development. Also a discussion of strength needs for extended exposure to microgravity will be presented. Not only is the use of eccentric exercise controversial, but the name itself is fraught with problems. The correct pronunciation is with a hard 'c' so that the word sounds like ekscentric. The confusion in pronunciation may have been prevented if the spelling that Asmussen used in 1953, excentric, had been adopted. Another problem concerns the expressions used to describe eccentric exercise. Commonly used expressions are negatives, eccentric contractions, lengthening contractions, resisted muscle lengthenings, muscle lengthening actions, and eccentric actions. Some of these terms are cumbersome (i.e., resisted muscle lengthenings), one is slang (negatives), and another is an oxymoron (lengthening contractions). Only eccentric action is appropriate and adoption of this term has been recommended by Cavanagh. Despite the controversy that surrounds eccentric exercise, it is important to note that these types of actions play an integral role in normal daily activities. Eccentric actions are used during most forms of movement, for example, in walking when the foot touches the ground and the center of mass is decelerated and in lowering objects, such as placing a bag of groceries in the car.

  17. The presence of the NOS3 gene polymorphism for intron 4 mitigates the beneficial effects of exercise training on ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponton, Carlos H; Esposti, Rodrigo; Rodovalho, Cynara M; Ferreira, Maycon J; Jarrete, Aline P; Anaruma, Chadi P; Bacci, Mauricio; Zanesco, Angelina

    2014-06-15

    The number of studies that have evaluated exercise training (ET) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS)3 gene polymorphisms is scarce. The present study was designed to evaluate the relationship between exercise training and NOS3 polymorphisms at -786T>C, 894G>T, and intron 4b/a on blood pressure (BP) using 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM), nitrate/nitrite levels (NOx), and redox state. Eighty-six volunteers (51 ± 0.6 yr old) were genotyped into nonpolymorphic and polymorphic groups for each of the three positions of NOS3 polymorphisms. Auscultatory BP, ABPM, SOD activity, catalase activity, NOx levels, and malondialdehyde levels were measured. DNA was extracted from leukocytes, and PCR followed by sequencing was applied for genotype analysis. Aerobic ET consisted of 24 sessions for 3 days/wk for 40 min at moderate intensity. This study was performed in a double-blind and crossover format. ET was effective in lowering office BP (systolic BP: 3.2% and diastolic BP: 3%) as well as ABPM (systolic BP: 2% and diastolic BP: 1.3%). Increased SOD and catalase activity (42.6% and 15.1%, respectively) were also observed. The NOS3 polymorphism for intron 4 mitigated the beneficial effect of ET for systolic BP (nonpolymorphic group: -3.0% and polymorphic group: -0.6%) and diastolic BP (nonpolymorphic group: -3.2% and polymorphic group: -0.5%), but it was not associated with NOx level and redox state. Paradoxical responses were found for positions T786-C and G894T for the NOS3 gene. Consistently, the presence of the polymorphism for intron 4 blunted the beneficial effects of ET in middle-aged adults. Possibly, this effect might be as consequence of intron 4 acting as a short intronic repeat RNA controlling endothelial NOS activity epigenetically. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Cardiovascular adaptations to exercise training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Nyberg, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Aerobic exercise training leads to cardiovascular changes that markedly increase aerobic power and lead to improved endurance performance. The functionally most important adaptation is the improvement in maximal cardiac output which is the result of an enlargement in cardiac dimension, improved...... contractility, and an increase in blood volume, allowing for greater filling of the ventricles and a consequent larger stroke volume. In parallel with the greater maximal cardiac output, the perfusion capacity of the muscle is increased, permitting for greater oxygen delivery. To accommodate the higher aerobic...

  19. Monitoring spike train synchrony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuz, Thomas; Chicharro, Daniel; Houghton, Conor; Andrzejak, Ralph G; Mormann, Florian

    2013-03-01

    Recently, the SPIKE-distance has been proposed as a parameter-free and timescale-independent measure of spike train synchrony. This measure is time resolved since it relies on instantaneous estimates of spike train dissimilarity. However, its original definition led to spuriously high instantaneous values for eventlike firing patterns. Here we present a substantial improvement of this measure that eliminates this shortcoming. The reliability gained allows us to track changes in instantaneous clustering, i.e., time-localized patterns of (dis)similarity among multiple spike trains. Additional new features include selective and triggered temporal averaging as well as the instantaneous comparison of spike train groups. In a second step, a causal SPIKE-distance is defined such that the instantaneous values of dissimilarity rely on past information only so that time-resolved spike train synchrony can be estimated in real time. We demonstrate that these methods are capable of extracting valuable information from field data by monitoring the synchrony between neuronal spike trains during an epileptic seizure. Finally, the applicability of both the regular and the real-time SPIKE-distance to continuous data is illustrated on model electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings.

  20. [Exercise training in chronic pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamplona, Paula; Morais, Luísa

    2007-01-01

    Exercise training has become a cornerstone of Pulmonary Rehabilitation. Since the nineties, the effectiveness in clinically relevant improvements in exercise capacity and health-related quality of life has been proved. Current guidelines (Evidence A) recommend high intensity continuous exercise for lower extremities as the most effective exercise modality, however, for some patients it is often difficult to initiate such an exercise programme due to the limitation of dyspnoea or leg fatigue. In recent years, special relevance has been given to the integration of other modalities of exercise (continuous versus interval, aerobic versus strength, inclusion or not of respiratory muscle training). The authors carry out a review of the current literature concerning exercise training in chronic pulmonary disease and this highlights the role of tailored exercise to break the vicious cycle of dyspnoea and inactivity.

  1. Exercise training before and after lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Sunita; Hornblower, Elizabeth; Levy, Robert D

    2009-10-01

    The benefits of exercise training in individuals with chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, and interstitial lung disease have been well documented. Although there is limited research available, it appears that exercise is safe and beneficial for people with severe end-stage chronic lung disease who are awaiting lung transplantation in addition to recipients of lung transplants. Evidence-based guidelines for exercise training in the pre- and post-lung transplantation phases have not yet been developed. However, by considering exercise guidelines for people with chronic lung disease and in older adults in light of the physiological changes that can occur either pre- or post-lung transplantation, a safe and appropriate exercise training program can be developed. Depending on the individual's exercise capacity and goals, the training program may include aerobic and resistance exercise, and flexibility and balance training. In the pre-transplant and acute post-transplant phases, the intensity of exercise is dictated primarily by symptom limitation and adequate rest, which is required between exercise bouts to allow for recovery. In the post-transplant phase, it is possible for lung transplant recipients to increase their exercise capacity and even participate in sports. Further research needs to be conducted to determine the optimal training guidelines and the long-term benefits of exercise, both in lung transplant candidates and recipients.

  2. Benefits of Exercise Training in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motl, Robert W; Sandroff, Brian M

    2015-09-01

    Exercise training represents a behavioral approach for safely managing many of the functional, symptomatic, and quality of life consequences of multiple sclerosis (MS). This topical review paper summarizes evidence from literature reviews and meta-analyses, supplemented by recent individual studies, indicating that exercise training can yield small but important improvements in walking, balance, cognition, fatigue, depression, and quality of life in MS. The paper highlights limitations of research on exercise training and its consequences and future research directions and provides an overview for promotion of exercise training in MS based on recent prescriptive guidelines. Collectively, the evidence for the benefits of exercise training in MS suggests that the time is ripe for the promotion of exercise by healthcare providers, particularly neurologists as a central part of the clinical care and management of MS patients.

  3. Exercise Training and Bone Mineral Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohman, Timothy G.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of exercise on total and regional bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal women is reviewed. Studies on non-estrogen-replete postmenopausal women show 1-2% changes in regional BMD with 1 year of weight-bearing exercises. Studies of exercise training in the estrogen-replete postmenopausal population suggest large BMD changes.…

  4. Nonlinear Exercise Training in Advanced Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Is Superior to Traditional Exercise Training A Randomized Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijn, Peter; van Keimpema, Anton; Legemaat, Monique; Gosselink, Rik; van Stel, Henk

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: The optimal exercise training intensity and strategy for individualized exercise training in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is not clear. Objectives: This study compares the effects of nonlinear periodized exercise (NLPE) training used in athletes to traditional endurance an

  5. Exercise training in metabolic myopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, J

    2016-01-01

    stages of exercise and at high work intensities. Thus, patients with GSDs typically have symptoms early in exercise, have low peak work capacities and develop painful contractures in exercised muscles. Muscle relies on fat oxidation at rest and to a great extent during prolonged exercise, and therefore...

  6. Effect of exercise training on leucine oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrix, M.K.; Layman, D.K.

    1986-03-01

    Oxidation of the BCAA leucine is increased during a bout of exhaustive exercise. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of exercise training on leu oxidation during aerobic exercise. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a commercial diet ad lib and divided into sedentary and two trained groups. Animals were trained to run on a treadmill with a 10/sup 0/ incline at 28 m/min for 5 wks for either 50 or 120 min/day. There were no differences in food intake or body weight. After a 12 hr fast, animals were run for 50 or 120 min and changes in leu catabolism determined by measurement of in vivo leu oxidation and activity of branched chain keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKAD). For measurement of leu oxidation, rats were injected IP with 4 ..mu..Ci 1-/sup 14/C-leu during the last 15 min of exercise, placed in glass metabolic chambers, and /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ collected in 1 N NaOH for 30 min periods. Leu oxidation was increased by 40% after 50 min of exercise and by 79% after 120 min of exercise. Five weeks of training reduced the rate of leu oxidation during an exercise bout. The activity of the BCKAD was not increased in the trained animals after either 50 or 120 min of exercise. These data indicate that the rate of leu oxidation during exercises is dependent on the duration of the exercise and that training will reduce the magnitude of this effect.

  7. Core Muscle Activation in Suspension Training Exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cugliari, Giovanni; Boccia, Gennaro

    2017-02-01

    A quantitative observational laboratory study was conducted to characterize and classify core training exercises executed in a suspension modality on the base of muscle activation. In a prospective single-group repeated measures design, seventeen active male participants performed four suspension exercises typically associated with core training (roll-out, bodysaw, pike and knee-tuck). Surface electromyographic signals were recorded from lower and upper parts of rectus abdominis, external oblique, internal oblique, lower and upper parts of erector spinae muscles using concentric bipolar electrodes. The average rectified values of electromyographic signals were normalized with respect to individual maximum voluntary isometric contraction of each muscle. Roll-out exercise showed the highest activation of rectus abdominis and oblique muscles compared to the other exercises. The rectus abdominis and external oblique reached an activation higher than 60% of the maximal voluntary contraction (or very close to that threshold, 55%) in roll-out and bodysaw exercises. Findings from this study allow the selection of suspension core training exercises on the basis of quantitative information about the activation of muscles of interest. Roll-out and bodysaw exercises can be considered as suitable for strength training of rectus abdominis and external oblique muscles.

  8. Monitoring spike train synchrony

    CERN Document Server

    Kreuz, Thomas; Houghton, Conor; Andrzejak, Ralph G; Mormann, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the SPIKE-distance has been proposed as a parameter-free and time-scale independent measure of spike train synchrony. This measure is time-resolved since it relies on instantaneous estimates of spike train dissimilarity. However, its original definition led to spuriously high instantaneous values for event-like firing patterns. Here we present a substantial improvement of this measure which eliminates this shortcoming. The reliability gained allows us to track changes in instantaneous clustering, i.e., time-localized patterns of (dis)similarity among multiple spike trains. Additional new features include selective and triggered temporal averaging as well as the instantaneous comparison of spike train groups. In a second step, a causal SPIKE-distance is defined such that the instantaneous values of dissimilarity rely on past information only so that time-resolved spike train synchrony can be estimated in real-time. We demonstrate that these methods are capable of extracting valuable information from ...

  9. Variable Accuracy of Wearable Heart Rate Monitors during Aerobic Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillinov, Stephen; Etiwy, Muhammad; Wang, Robert; Blackburn, Gordon; Phelan, Dermot; Gillinov, A Marc; Houghtaling, Penny; Javadikasgari, Hoda; Desai, Milind Y

    2017-08-01

    Athletes and members of the public increasingly rely on wearable HR monitors to guide physical activity and training. The accuracy of newer, optically based monitors is unconfirmed. We sought to assess the accuracy of five optically based HR monitors during various types of aerobic exercise. Fifty healthy adult volunteers (mean ± SD age = 38 ± 12 yr, 54% female) completed exercise protocols on a treadmill, a stationary bicycle, and an elliptical trainer (±arm movement). Each participant underwent HR monitoring with an electrocardiogaphic chest strap monitor (Polar H7), forearm monitor (Scosche Rhythm+), and two randomly assigned wrist-worn HR monitors (Apple Watch, Fitbit Blaze, Garmin Forerunner 235, and TomTom Spark Cardio), one on each wrist. For each exercise type, HR was recorded at rest, light, moderate, and vigorous intensity. Agreement between HR measurements was assessed using Lin's concordance correlation coefficient (rc). Across all exercise conditions, the chest strap monitor (Polar H7) had the best agreement with ECG (rc = 0.996) followed by the Apple Watch (rc = 0.92), the TomTom Spark (rc = 0.83), and the Garmin Forerunner (rc = 0.81). Scosche Rhythm+ and Fitbit Blaze were less accurate (rc = 0.75 and rc = 0.67, respectively). On treadmill, all devices performed well (rc = 0.88-0.93) except the Fitbit Blaze (rc = 0.76). While bicycling, only the Garmin, Apple Watch, and Scosche Rhythm+ had acceptable agreement (rc > 0.80). On the elliptical trainer without arm levers, only the Apple Watch was accurate (rc = 0.94). None of the devices was accurate during elliptical trainer use with arm levers (all rc exercise type and is greatest on the treadmill and lowest on elliptical trainer. Electrode-containing chest monitors should be used when accurate HR measurement is imperative.

  10. Central nervous system adaptation to exercise training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Lois Anne

    Exercise training causes physiological changes in skeletal muscle that results in enhanced performance in humans and animals. Despite numerous studies on exercise effects on skeletal muscle, relatively little is known about adaptive changes in the central nervous system. This study investigated whether spinal pathways that mediate locomotor activity undergo functional adaptation after 28 days of exercise training. Ventral horn spinal cord expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a trophic factor at the neuromuscular junction, choline acetyltransferase (Chat), the synthetic enzyme for acetylcholine, vesicular acetylcholine transporter (Vacht), a transporter of ACh into synaptic vesicles and calcineurin (CaN), a protein phosphatase that phosphorylates ion channels and exocytosis machinery were measured to determine if changes in expression occurred in response to physical activity. Expression of these proteins was determined by western blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Comparisons between sedentary controls and animals that underwent either endurance training or resistance training were made. Control rats received no exercise other than normal cage activity. Endurance-trained rats were exercised 6 days/wk at 31m/min on a treadmill (8% incline) for 100 minutes. Resistance-trained rats supported their weight plus an additional load (70--80% body weight) on a 60° incline (3 x 3 min, 5 days/wk). CGRP expression was measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). CGRP expression in the spinal dorsal and ventral horn of exercise-trained animals was not significantly different than controls. Chat expression measured by Western blot and IHC was not significantly different between runners and controls but expression in resistance-trained animals assayed by IHC was significantly less than controls and runners. Vacht and CaN immunoreactivity in motor neurons of endurance-trained rats was significantly elevated relative to control and resistance-trained animals. Ventral

  11. The role of cardiopulmonary exercise test for individualized exercise training recommendation in young obese subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian Hoble

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is affecting a growing segment of the population and should be considered a serious health problem which will lead to medical complications and decreased life span. Lifestyle changes by adopting healthy food and increase energy consumption through physical activity is the most important treatment for obesity. Cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET is considered the gold standard for exercise capacity assessment. Purpose: This study is aiming to demonstrate that individualized exercise training programs, designed using CPET results, leads to increase of physical fitness, aerobic capacity, ventilatory and cardiac exercise performance in young obese subjects.Material and method:We performed a prospective research study of 6 months. 43 sedentary subjects without contraindications to exercise, 21.3±3.1 years old, 93% female were included in the study. Assessments were made at baseline and after six months of intervention and consists of cardiopulmonary exercise test on bicycle ergometer. After we recorded oxygen uptake at aerobic threshold (AT, anaerobic threshold (in the range of respiratory compensation point – RCP and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max we designed the training program according to these parameters and individualized heart rate training zones of each subject. Exercise training (60 minutes/session, 3 sessions/week was performed taking in consideration the training zones and using a circuit on cardio devices. Each subject was supervised by a physiotherapist and using heart rate monitors. The number of subjects evaluated at the end of the study was 27 (dropout rate 37%.Results:After six months of intervention we noticed an improvement of maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max (from 22.7±3.69 to 27.44±5.55, aerobic threshold (VO2_AT (from 15.48±2.66 to 20.07±4.64 ml/min/kg, p<0.0001 and anaerobic threshold (VO2_RCP (from 20.3±3.66 to 25.11±5.84 ml/min/kg, p<0.0001, cardiac performance during exercise evaluated trough maximal oxygen

  12. Physical training--beyond increasing exercise capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdrenghea, D; Poantă, Laura; Pop, Dana; Zdrenghea, V; Zdrenghea, M

    2008-01-01

    Physical training has traditionally represented the main method used in cardiovascular rehabilitation of ischemic patients in the past years. Nowadays, cardiovascular rehabilitation has been extended to other cardiovascular diseases, such as heart failure. Also, cardiovascular rehabilitation included psychological, social and professional measures along with secondary prevention methods such as lifestyle changes. It has also been found that physical training has other additional effects which increased exercise tolerance. Effects on the risk factors regard beneficial effect on body weight, on the serum lipids levels, on psychosocial stress, on high blood pressure and on insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus. Physical exercise has also beneficial effects on the balance between sympathetic--vagal tone, inducing a vagal predominance, has anti-atherogenic and anti-ischemic effects, influencing the endothelial function, the inflammation (anti-inflammatory effect), both arteriogenesis and angiogenesis and thrombosis. Physical training could improve the symptoms of coronary patients by preconditioning, which has a protective effect for the myocardium. We may state that physical exercise has beneficial effects in cardiovascular patients because it increases exercise tolerance with positive consequences on the quality of life and professional reintegration, but also because it has positive effects beyond this. Thus, physical exercise should be practiced through cardiac rehabilitation programs, by all cardiovascular patients.

  13. Exercise Training During Bed Rest Attenuates Deconditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Hargens, Alan R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A 30-day 6 deg. head-down bed rest study was conducted to evaluate high-intensity, short-duration, alternating isotonic cycle ergometer exercise (ITE) training and high-intensity intermittent isokinetic exercise (IKE) training regiments designed to maintain peak VO2 and muscle mass, strength, and endurance at ambulatory control levels throughout prolonged bed rest. Other elements of the deconditioning (acclimation) syndrome, such as proprioception, psychological performance, hypovolemia, water balance, body composition, and orthostatic tolerance, were also measured. Compared with response during bed rest of the no exercise (NOE) control group: the ITE training regimen (a) maintained work capacity (peak VO2), (b) maintained plasma and red cell volume, (c) induced positive body water balance, (d) decreased quality of sleep and mental concentration, and (e) had no effect on the decrease in orthostatic tolerance; the IKE training regimen (a) attenuated the decrease in peak VO2 by 50%, (b) attenuated loss of red cell volume by 40%, but had no effect on loss of plasma volume, (c) induced positive body water balance, (d) had no adverse effect on quality of sleep or concentration, and (e) had no effect on the decrease in orthostatic tolerance. These findings suggest that various elements of the deconditioning syndrome can be manipulated by duration and intensity of ITE or IKE training regiments, and that several different training protocols will be required to maintain or restore physiological and psychological performance of individuals confined to prolonged bed rest.

  14. Endurance exercise training and diferuloyl methane supplement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roshan, Valiollah Dabidi; Hosseinzadeh, Somayeh; Mahjoub, Soleiman

    2013-01-01

    For many years it has been known that lead is life-threatening, not only as an air pollutant but also because of it has been associated with several conditions including degenerative disease of the nervous system. In the current study we investigated neuroprotection effects of exercise training a...

  15. Adherence to Commonly Prescribed, Home-Based Strength Training Exercises for the Lower Extremity Can Be Objectively Monitored Using the Bandcizer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathleff, Michael S; Thorborg, Kristian; Rode, Line A;

    2015-01-01

    , total and single repetition, and contraction phase-specific time under tension (TUT). Files from the elastic band sensor contained identical dates, time of day, and number of repetitions for each exercise set compared with those for the gold standard. Total TUT and total single repetition TUT were...... highly correlated with the stretch sensor (r = 0.83-0.96) but lower for contraction phase-specific TUTs (r = 0.45-0.94). There were systematic differences between the methods ranging from 0.0 to 2.2 seconds (0.0-6.3%) for total TUT and total single repetition TUT, and between 0.0 and 3.3 seconds (0.......0-33.3%) for contraction phase-specific TUTs. The elastic band sensor is a valid measure of date, time of day, number of repetitions and sets, total TUT, and total single repetition TUT during commonly used home-based strength training exercises. However, the elastic band sensor seems unable to validly measure TUT...

  16. Exercise training as treatment in cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira, Fábio Santos; Neto, José Cesar Rosa; Seelaender, Marília

    2014-06-01

    Cachexia is a wasting syndrome that may accompany a plethora of diseases, including cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, aids, and rheumatoid arthritis. It is associated with central and systemic increases of pro-inflammatory factors, and with decreased quality of life, response to pharmacological treatment, and survival. At the moment, there is no single therapy able to reverse cachexia many symptoms, which include disruption of intermediary metabolism, endocrine dysfunction, compromised hypothalamic appetite control, and impaired immune function, among other. Growing evidence, nevertheless, shows that chronic exercise, employed as a tool to counteract systemic inflammation, may represent a low-cost, safe alternative for the prevention/attenuation of cancer cachexia. Despite the well-documented capacity of chronic exercise to counteract sustained disease-related inflammation, few studies address the effect of exercise training in cancer cachexia. The aim of the present review was hence to discuss the results of cachexia treatment with endurance training. As opposed to resistance exercise, endurance exercise may be performed devoid of equipment, is well tolerated by patients, and an anti-inflammatory effect may be observed even at low-intensity. The decrease in inflammatory status induced by endurance protocols is paralleled by recovery of various metabolic pathways. The mechanisms underlying the response to the treatment are considered.

  17. Strength training and aerobic exercise training for muscle disease (Review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voet, N.B.M.; Kooi, E.L. van der; Riphagen, I.I.; Lindeman, E.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Strength training or aerobic exercise programmes might optimise muscle and cardiorespiratory function and prevent additional disuse atrophy and deconditioning in people with a muscle disease. This is an update of a review first published in 2004. OBJECTIVES: To examine the safety and eff

  18. Aging, Functional Capacity and Eccentric Exercise Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gault, Mandy L.; Willems, Mark E.T.

    2013-01-01

    Aging is a multi-factorial process that ultimately induces a decline in our physiological functioning, causing a decreased health-span, quality of life and independence for older adults. Exercise participation is seen as a way to reduce the impact of aging through maintenance of physiological parameters. Eccentric exercise is a model that can be employed with older adults, due to the muscle’s ability to combine high muscle force production with a low energy cost. There may however be a risk of muscle damage before the muscle is able to adapt. The first part of this review describes the process of aging and how it reduces aerobic capacity, muscle strength and therefore functional mobility. The second part highlights eccentric exercise and the associated muscle damage, in addition to the repeated bout effect. The final section reviews eccentric exercise interventions that have been completed by older adults with a focus on the changes in functional mobility. In conclusion, eccentric endurance exercise is a potential training modality that can be applied to older adults for improving muscle strength, aerobic capacity and functional ability. However, further research is needed to assess the effects on aerobic capacity and the ideal prescription for eccentric endurance exercise. PMID:24307968

  19. Aerobic exercise training for adults with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidonde, Julia; Busch, Angela J; Schachter, Candice L; Overend, Tom J; Kim, Soo Y; Góes, Suelen M; Boden, Catherine; Foulds, Heather Ja

    2017-06-21

    Exercise training is commonly recommended for individuals with fibromyalgia. This review is one of a series of reviews about exercise training for people with fibromyalgia that will replace the "Exercise for treating fibromyalgia syndrome" review first published in 2002. • To evaluate the benefits and harms of aerobic exercise training for adults with fibromyalgia• To assess the following specific comparisons ० Aerobic versus control conditions (eg, treatment as usual, wait list control, physical activity as usual) ० Aerobic versus aerobic interventions (eg, running vs brisk walking) ० Aerobic versus non-exercise interventions (eg, medications, education) We did not assess specific comparisons involving aerobic exercise versus other exercise interventions (eg, resistance exercise, aquatic exercise, flexibility exercise, mixed exercise). Other systematic reviews have examined or will examine these comparisons (Bidonde 2014; Busch 2013). We searched the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, Embase, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), Thesis and Dissertation Abstracts, the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED), the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP), and the ClinicalTrials.gov registry up to June 2016, unrestricted by language, and we reviewed the reference lists of retrieved trials to identify potentially relevant trials. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in adults with a diagnosis of fibromyalgia that compared aerobic training interventions (dynamic physical activity that increases breathing and heart rate to submaximal levels for a prolonged period) versus no exercise or another intervention. Major outcomes were health-related quality of life (HRQL), pain intensity, stiffness, fatigue, physical function, withdrawals, and adverse events. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, extracted

  20. Exercise Training in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobby Cheema

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The Maori and Pacific Islands peoples of New Zealand suffer a greater burden of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and associated comorbidities than their European counterparts. Empirical evidence supports the clinical application of aerobic and resistance training for effective diabetes management and potential remission, but few studies have investigated the effectiveness of these interventions in specific ethnic cohorts. We recently conducted the first trial to investigate the effect of prescribed exercise training in Polynesian people with T2DM. This article presents the cultural considerations undertaken to successfully implement the study. The research procedures were accepted and approved by cultural liaisons and potential participants. The approved methodology involved a trial evaluating and comparing the effects of two, 16-week exercise regimens (i.e. aerobic training and resistance training on glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c, related diabetes markers (i.e. insulin resistance, blood lipids, relevant cytokines and anthropometric and hemodynamic indices and health-related quality of life. Future exercise-related research or implementation strategies in this cohort should focus on cultural awareness and techniques to enhance participation and compliance. Our approach to cultural consultation could be considered by researchers undertaking trials in this and other ethnic populations suffering an extreme burden of T2DM, including indigenous Australians and Americans.

  1. Predictability of psychic outcome for exercise training and exercise training including relaxation therapy after myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Duivenvoorden (Hugo); J. van Dixhoorn (J.)

    1991-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Predictability of the psychic outcome for two cardiac rehabilitation programmes was investigated in 119 myocardial infarction patients. They were randomly assigned to either a five-week daily exercise training or to an identical training in combination with six sessions

  2. Cancer Cachexia: Muscle Physiology and Exercise Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew L. Goodwin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Cachexia in cancer patients is a condition marked by severe tissue wasting and a myriad of quality of life and health consequences. Cachexia is also directly linked to the issues of morbidity and survivability in cancer patients. Therapeutic means of mitigating cachexia and its effects are thus critical in cancer patient treatment. We present a discussion on the use of physical exercise activities in the context of such treatment as a means to disruption the tissue wasting effects (i.e., muscle tissue losses via anorexigenic pro-inflammatory cytokines of cachexia. In addition we propose a theoretical model (Exercise Anti-Cachectic Hypothetical—“EACH” model as to how exercise training may promote a disruption in the cycle of events leading to advancing cachexia and in turn promote an enhanced functionality and thus improved quality of life in cancer patients.

  3. Cancer cachexia: muscle physiology and exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglini, Claudio L; Hackney, Anthony C; Goodwin, Matthew L

    2012-11-29

    Cachexia in cancer patients is a condition marked by severe tissue wasting and a myriad of quality of life and health consequences. Cachexia is also directly linked to the issues of morbidity and survivability in cancer patients. Therapeutic means of mitigating cachexia and its effects are thus critical in cancer patient treatment. We present a discussion on the use of physical exercise activities in the context of such treatment as a means to disruption the tissue wasting effects (i.e., muscle tissue losses via anorexigenic pro-inflammatory cytokines) of cachexia. In addition we propose a theoretical model (Exercise Anti-Cachectic Hypothetical-"EACH" model) as to how exercise training may promote a disruption in the cycle of events leading to advancing cachexia and in turn promote an enhanced functionality and thus improved quality of life in cancer patients.

  4. [New strategies for exercise training in osteoporosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, A; Schilling, S; Neuerburg, C; Mutschler, W; Böcker, W; Felsenberg, D; Stumpf, U

    2015-11-01

    In the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis, movement with muscle strengthening and proprioceptive training plays a major role. This was taken into consideration in the guidelines by the governing body on osteoporosis (Dachverband Osteoporose, DVO) from 2014 on prophylaxis, diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis and in the DVO guidelines from 2008 on physiotherapy and exercise therapy for osteoporosis. Increases in lumbar bone density of between 0.5 % and 2.5 % can be achieved in women by strengthening exercises with high resistance. With this combination and strengthening of the quadriceps muscle a reduction of falls and hence the fracture risk could also be achieved. In traumatology, training for muscle strengthening is not always possible, especially for elderly patients. Practically relevant alternatives are regular walking and aquatraining, which may also lead to a significant increase in bone mineral density. Furthermore, large effects can be achieved with alternating side whole-body vibration (WBV) training with whole body vibration plates with only 3 days of training per week and with short training periods (15-20 min). Rates of increase in leg strength between 20 % and almost 40 % and in bone density between 0.5 % and 4 % in 6 months have been described. Whether and with what intensity whole body vibration therapy could be used for e.g. more rapid healing of fractures, is currently unclear. Initial positive results have been described in animal models.

  5. Exercise training is beneficial for Alzheimer's patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana-Sosa, E; Barriopedro, M I; López-Mojares, L M; Pérez, M; Lucia, A

    2008-10-01

    Decreased ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs) associated with deterioration in physical capacity are key determinants of the poor quality of life and loss of independence of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a 12-week training program (including resistance, flexibility, joint mobility and balance/coordination exercises) for Spanish patients with AD on their i) overall functional capacity (muscle strength and flexibility, agility and balance while moving, and endurance fitness), and ii) ability to perform ADLs. Using a randomized block design, 16 patients were assigned to a training (mean [SD] age: 76 [4] yrs) or control group (73 [4] yrs) (n = 8 subjects [3 male, 5 female] per group). The results showed significant improvements after training (p scale) and in the ability to perform ADLs independently (Katz and Barthel scores). No changes (p > 0.05) were found in the control group over the 12-week period. Exercise training could be included in the overall medical/nursing care protocol for patients with AD.

  6. Effect of training mode on post-exercise heart rate recovery of trained cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kelia G; Grote, Silvie; Shoepe, Todd C

    2014-06-28

    The sympathetic nervous system dominates the regulation of body functions during exercise. Therefore after exercise, the sympathetic nervous system withdraws and the parasympathetic nervous system helps the body return to a resting state. In the examination of this relationship, the purpose of this study was to compare recovery heart rates (HR) of anaerobically versus aerobically trained cyclists. With all values given as means ± SD, anaerobically trained track cyclists (n=10, age=25.9 ± 6.0 yrs, body mass=82.7 ± 7.1 kg, body fat=10.0 ± 6.3%) and aerobically trained road cyclists (n=15, age=39.9 ± 8.5 yrs, body mass=75.3 ± 9.9 kg, body fat=13.1 ± 4.5%) underwent a maximal oxygen uptake test. Heart rate recovery was examined on a relative basis using heart rate reserve as well as the absolute difference between maximum HR and each of two recovery HRs. The post-exercise change in HR at minute one for the track cyclists and road cyclists respectively were 22 ± 8 bpm and 25 ± 12 bpm. At minute two, the mean drop for track cyclists was significantly (pheart rate recovery in trained cyclists. Greater variability in recovery heart rate at minute two versus minute one suggests that the heart rate should be monitored longer than one minute of recovery for a better analysis of post-exercise autonomic shift.

  7. Telemonitoring of home exercise cycle training in patients with COPD

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Franke, Karl-Josef; Domanski, Ulrike; Schroeder, Maik; Jansen, Volker; Artmann, Frank; Weber, Uwe; Ettler, Rainer; Nilius, Georg

    2016-01-01

    ... calls on daily exercise times with newly established home exercise bicycle training. The secondary aim was to examine the potential improvement in health-related quality of life and physical activity compared to baseline. Methods...

  8. Endurance exercise training and diferuloyl methane supplement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roshan, Valiollah Dabidi; Hosseinzadeh, Somayeh; Mahjoub, Soleiman

    2013-01-01

    For many years it has been known that lead is life-threatening, not only as an air pollutant but also because of it has been associated with several conditions including degenerative disease of the nervous system. In the current study we investigated neuroprotection effects of exercise training and...... resulted in a significantly increase in the malondialdehyde (MDA) in plasma, but not in hippocampus. In addition, it led to significantly decreased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in hippocampus and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) levels, as compared to sham group. Treadmill running, curcumin...... supplementation, or both resulted in a significant decrease in MDA levels and significantly increased BDNF and TAC levels, as compared to lead acetate group. These results provide a rationale for an inhibitory role of curcumin and regular exercise in the attenuation of lead-induced neurotoxicity....

  9. Exercise training in chronic heart failure: mechanisms and therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Piepoli, M. F.

    2012-01-01

    Decreased exercise capacity negatively affects the individuals’ ability to adequately perform activities required for normal daily life and, therefore, the independence and quality of life. Regular exercise training is associated with improved quality of life and survival in healthy individuals and in cardiovascular disease patients. Also in patients with stable heart failure, exercise training can relieve symptoms, improve exercise capacity and reduce disability, hospitalisation and probably...

  10. Strength exercise and training in postprandial lipaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Correa, C; Rebolledo Cobos, R C; Reischak-Oliveira, Á

    2015-09-01

    The development of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) has been associated to alterations on lipid profile as well found during postprandial period, phenomenon known as postprandial lipaemia (PL). Physical exercise is currently the major non-pharmacological intervention used to prevention and reduction of risk factors to developing of CVD. For this reason, there is growing interest under the effects of physical exercise, especially strength training, on regulation and balance of lipid metabolism, particularly of risk groups such as post-menopausal women that have more prone to CVD than men and lose much of the cardioprotective effect of estradiol during and after menopause period. In this review, we seek to compare the results of articles that addressed the beneficial effects of strength training on PL. We used articles selected in databases PubMed, Scopus and EBSCO dating from the year 1975-2012, with many quotes from leading researchers in subject and published in international journals. All studies were obtained to report at least three variables of interest. The authors of this review concluded that strength training proves to be effective in reducing PL concentrations by inducing an improvement of basal energy demand, can be seen as an important strategy to treatment of chronic diseases such as atherosclerosis.

  11. Recommendations for Recruiting and Retaining Adolescent Girls in Chronic Exercise (Training Research Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Massie

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Extensive challenges are often encountered when recruiting participants to chronic exercise (training studies. High participant burden during chronic exercise training programmes can result in low uptake to and/or poor compliance with the study. The aim of this qualitative study was to identify factors affecting adolescent girls’ recruitment and adherence to chronic exercise training research studies. Twenty-six adolescent girls (aged 12 to 15 years participated in one of five focus groups discussing recruitment and retention to exercise physiology research involving a chronic exercise training programme. A thematic analysis was used to analyse the data and eight final themes were inductively identified. Seven evidence-based practical recommendations are suggested to improve the recruitment and retention of participants for prospective, chronic exercise training studies. Successful recruitment requires: (i the defining of exercise-related terms; (ii appropriate choice of recruitment material; and (iii an understanding of participant motivations. Retention strategies include: (iv regular monitoring of participant motives; and (v small groups which foster peer and researcher support. Finally, (vi friendship and ability groups were favoured in addition to (vii a variety of activities to promote adherence to an exercise training programme.

  12. Improved functional vasodilation in obese Zucker rats following exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebai, Mohamad; Lu, Silu; Xiang, Lusha; Hester, Robert L

    2011-09-01

    Obese individuals exhibit impaired functional vasodilation and exercise performance. We have demonstrated in obese Zucker rats (OZ), a model of morbid obesity, that insulin resistance impairs functional vasodilation via an increased thromboxane receptor (TP)-mediated vasoconstriction. Chronic treadmill exercise training improves functional vasodilation in the spinotrapezius muscle of the OZ, but the mechanisms responsible for the improvement in functional vasodilation are not clear. Based on evidence that exercise training improves insulin resistance, we hypothesized that, in the OZ, exercise training increases functional vasodilation and exercise capability due to decreases TP-mediated vasoconstriction associated with improved insulin sensitivity. Six-week-old lean Zucker rats (LZ) and OZ were exercised on a treadmill (24 m/min, 30 min/day, 5 days/wk) for 6 wk. An oral glucose tolerance test was performed at the end of the training period. We measured functional vasodilation in both exercise trained (spinotrapezius) and nonexercise trained (cremaster) muscles to determine whether the improved functional vasodilation following exercise training in OZ is due to a systemic improved insulin resistance. Compared with LZ, the sedentary OZ exhibited impairments in glucose tolerance and functional vasodilation in both muscles. The TP antagonist SQ-29548 improved the vasodilator responses in the sedentary OZ with no effect in the LZ. Exercising training of the LZ increased the functional vasodilation in spinotrapezius muscle, with no effect in the cremaster muscle. Exercising training of the OZ improved glucose tolerance, along with increased functional vasodilation, in both the spinotrapezius and cremaster muscles. SQ-29548 treatment had no effect on the vasodilator responses in either cremaster or spinotrapezius muscles of the exercise-trained OZ. These results suggest that, in the OZ, there is a global effect of exercising training to improve insulin resistance and

  13. Measuring Virtual Simulations Value in Training Exercises - USMC Use Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-04

    The assessment results provide support for the thesis that both the primary and secondary training audiences are able to realize training value through...assessments for T&R standards. Post Event Training Impacts In addition to the data collected during LSE-14, the realized training value of...The realized value of the LVC integrated training capability has resulted in it being a required training event prior to Integrated Training Exercise

  14. Exercise training on chronotropic response and exercise capacity in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Li; Min, Gao; Wei, Chen; Min, He; Jie,Zhou

    2017-01-01

    The study was designed to observe the effects and relationship of exercise on chronotropic response (CR) and exercise capacity in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A total of 30 patients with T2DM underwent symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) after excluding contraindication. For each subject individualized exercise prescription was formulated, and they received 12 weeks of exercise training after CPET retest to complete the comparison of CR indicators, includ...

  15. Depth-Sensor-Based Monitoring of Therapeutic Exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu-Chun Su

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a self-organizing feature map-based (SOM monitoring system which is able to evaluate whether the physiotherapeutic exercise performed by a patient matches the corresponding assigned exercise. It allows patients to be able to perform their physiotherapeutic exercises on their own, but their progress during exercises can be monitored. The performance of the proposed the SOM-based monitoring system is tested on a database consisting of 12 different types of physiotherapeutic exercises. An average 98.8% correct rate was achieved.

  16. Exercise training in congestive heart failure: risks and benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keteyian, Steven J

    2011-01-01

    After decades of concern about the safety and effectiveness of exercise training in patients with heart failure (HF) due to reduced ejection fraction, initial research demonstrated the feasibility and physiologic benefits associated with such an intervention. Subsequent controlled studies confirmed these results and suggested improved clinical outcomes as well. This review summarizes the findings from single-site and multisite trials and meta-analyses that addressed the effects of exercise training on exercise capacity and clinical outcomes. Conclusions from these studies indicate that exercise is safe, improves health status and exercise capacity, attenuates much of the abnormal physiology that develops with HF, and yields a modest reduction in clinical events. Future research needs to identify which patient subgroups might benefit the most, the optimal exercise dose needed to lessen disease-related symptoms and maximize clinical benefit, and the effects of exercise training in patients with HF and preserved ejection fraction.

  17. Exercise training in older patients with systolic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, Eva; Hjardem-Hansen, Rasmus; Dela, Flemming

    2009-01-01

    Training improves exercise capacity in patients with heart failure (CHF) but most evidence is on selected younger patients with systolic CHF.......Training improves exercise capacity in patients with heart failure (CHF) but most evidence is on selected younger patients with systolic CHF....

  18. Monitoring training in athletes with reference to overtraining syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, C

    1998-07-01

    Overtraining is primarily related to sustained high load training, often coupled with other stressors. Studies in animal models have suggested that unremittingly heavy training (monotonous training) may increase the likelihood of developing overtraining syndrome. The purpose of this study was to extend our preliminary observations by relating the incidence of illnesses and minor injuries to various indices of training. We report observations of the relationship of banal illnesses (a frequently cited marker of overtraining syndrome) to training load and training monotony in experienced athletes (N = 25). Athletes recorded their training using a method that integrates the exercise session RPE and the duration of the training session. Illnesses were noted and correlated with indices of training load (rolling 6 wk average), monotony (daily mean/standard deviation), and strain (load x monotony). It was observed that a high percentage of illnesses could be accounted for when individual athletes exceeded individually identifiable training thresholds, mostly related to the strain of training. These suggest that simple methods of monitoring the characteristics of training may allow the athlete to achieve the goals of training while minimizing undesired training outcomes.

  19. Exercise-Trained Men and Women: Role of Exercise and Diet on Appetite and Energy Intake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Stephanie M.; Hand, Taryn M.; Manore, Melinda M.

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of appetite and energy intake is influenced by numerous hormonal and neural signals, including feedback from changes in diet and exercise. Exercise can suppress subjective appetite ratings, subsequent energy intake, and alter appetite-regulating hormones, including ghrelin, peptide YY, and glucagon-like peptide 1(GLP-1) for a period of time post-exercise. Discrepancies in the degree of appetite suppression with exercise may be dependent on subject characteristics (e.g., body fatness, fitness level, age or sex) and exercise duration, intensity, type and mode. Following an acute bout of exercise, exercise-trained males experience appetite suppression, while data in exercise-trained women are limited and equivocal. Diet can also impact appetite, with low-energy dense diets eliciting a greater sense of fullness at a lower energy intake. To date, little research has examined the combined interaction of exercise and diet on appetite and energy intake. This review focuses on exercise-trained men and women and examines the impact of exercise on hormonal regulation of appetite, post-exercise energy intake, and subjective and objective measurements of appetite. The impact that low-energy dense diets have on appetite and energy intake are also addressed. Finally, the combined effects of high-intensity exercise and low-energy dense diets are examined. This research is in exercise-trained women who are often concerned with weight and body image issues and consume low-energy dense foods to keep energy intakes low. Unfortunately, these low-energy intakes can have negative health consequences when combined with high-levels of exercise. More research is needed examining the combined effect of diet and exercise on appetite regulation in fit, exercise-trained individuals. PMID:25389897

  20. Exercise-Trained Men and Women: Role of Exercise and Diet on Appetite and Energy Intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M. Howe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of appetite and energy intake is influenced by numerous hormonal and neural signals, including feedback from changes in diet and exercise. Exercise can suppress subjective appetite ratings, subsequent energy intake, and alter appetite-regulating hormones, including ghrelin, peptide YY, and glucagon-like peptide 1(GLP-1 for a period of time post-exercise. Discrepancies in the degree of appetite suppression with exercise may be dependent on subject characteristics (e.g., body fatness, fitness level, age or sex and exercise duration, intensity, type and mode. Following an acute bout of exercise, exercise-trained males experience appetite suppression, while data in exercise-trained women are limited and equivocal. Diet can also impact appetite, with low-energy dense diets eliciting a greater sense of fullness at a lower energy intake. To date, little research has examined the combined interaction of exercise and diet on appetite and energy intake. This review focuses on exercise-trained men and women and examines the impact of exercise on hormonal regulation of appetite, post-exercise energy intake, and subjective and objective measurements of appetite. The impact that low-energy dense diets have on appetite and energy intake are also addressed. Finally, the combined effects of high-intensity exercise and low-energy dense diets are examined. This research is in exercise-trained women who are often concerned with weight and body image issues and consume low-energy dense foods to keep energy intakes low. Unfortunately, these low-energy intakes can have negative health consequences when combined with high-levels of exercise. More research is needed examining the combined effect of diet and exercise on appetite regulation in fit, exercise-trained individuals.

  1. Exercise-trained men and women: role of exercise and diet on appetite and energy intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Stephanie M; Hand, Taryn M; Manore, Melinda M

    2014-11-10

    The regulation of appetite and energy intake is influenced by numerous hormonal and neural signals, including feedback from changes in diet and exercise. Exercise can suppress subjective appetite ratings, subsequent energy intake, and alter appetite-regulating hormones, including ghrelin, peptide YY, and glucagon-like peptide 1(GLP-1) for a period of time post-exercise. Discrepancies in the degree of appetite suppression with exercise may be dependent on subject characteristics (e.g., body fatness, fitness level, age or sex) and exercise duration, intensity, type and mode. Following an acute bout of exercise, exercise-trained males experience appetite suppression, while data in exercise-trained women are limited and equivocal. Diet can also impact appetite, with low-energy dense diets eliciting a greater sense of fullness at a lower energy intake. To date, little research has examined the combined interaction of exercise and diet on appetite and energy intake. This review focuses on exercise-trained men and women and examines the impact of exercise on hormonal regulation of appetite, post-exercise energy intake, and subjective and objective measurements of appetite. The impact that low-energy dense diets have on appetite and energy intake are also addressed. Finally, the combined effects of high-intensity exercise and low-energy dense diets are examined. This research is in exercise-trained women who are often concerned with weight and body image issues and consume low-energy dense foods to keep energy intakes low. Unfortunately, these low-energy intakes can have negative health consequences when combined with high-levels of exercise. More research is needed examining the combined effect of diet and exercise on appetite regulation in fit, exercise-trained individuals.

  2. Mitochondrial plasticity with exercise training and extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boushel, Robert; Lundby, Carsten; Qvortrup, Klaus; Sahlin, Kent

    2014-10-01

    Mitochondria form a reticulum in skeletal muscle. Exercise training stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis, yet an emerging hypothesis is that training also induces qualitative regulatory changes. Substrate oxidation, oxygen affinity, and biochemical coupling efficiency may be regulated differentially with training and exposure to extreme environments. Threshold training doses inducing mitochondrial upregulation remain to be elucidated considering fitness level.

  3. Effect of Training Mode on Post-Exercise Heart Rate Recovery of Trained Cyclists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDonald Kelia G.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The sympathetic nervous system dominates the regulation of body functions during exercise. Therefore after exercise, the sympathetic nervous system withdraws and the parasympathetic nervous system helps the body return to a resting state. In the examination of this relationship, the purpose of this study was to compare recovery heart rates (HR of anaerobically versus aerobically trained cyclists. With all values given as means ± SD, anaerobically trained track cyclists (n=10, age=25.9 ± 6.0 yrs, body mass=82.7 ± 7.1 kg, body fat=10.0 ± 6.3% and aerobically trained road cyclists (n=15, age=39.9 ± 8.5 yrs, body mass=75.3 ± 9.9 kg, body fat=13.1 ± 4.5% underwent a maximal oxygen uptake test. Heart rate recovery was examined on a relative basis using heart rate reserve as well as the absolute difference between maximum HR and each of two recovery HRs. The post-exercise change in HR at minute one for the track cyclists and road cyclists respectively were 22 ± 8 bpm and 25 ± 12 bpm. At minute two, the mean drop for track cyclists was significantly (p<0.05 greater than the road cyclists (52 ± 15 bpm and 64 ± 11 bpm. Training mode showed statistically significant effects on the speed of heart rate recovery in trained cyclists. Greater variability in recovery heart rate at minute two versus minute one suggests that the heart rate should be monitored longer than one minute of recovery for a better analysis of post-exercise autonomic shift.

  4. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing – effective method for evaluation and recommendation of individualized exercise training in patients with metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudiu Avram

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to emphasize the role of cardiopulmonary exercise training (CPET in evaluation and recommendation of individualized exercise training in patients with a metabolic syndrome. Methods: We performed a prospective longitudinal study of 9 months. The study group consisted of 28 young patients (21.3±3.1 years old without contraindications to exercise, previously diagnosed with metabolic syndrome according to NCEP-ATPIII criteria. All patients were evaluating at baseline and after 3 months of intervention and at the end of the study (after 9 months. The evaluation consists in performing a CPET on bicycle ergometer in which subjects were monitored in terms of cardiac and respiratory parameters. The CPET results allow us to establish the range of effort intensity in which the patient should exercise in order to burn calories and achieve the maximum fat oxidation rate. All patients benefit from an intensive interval exercise training programme, supervised and guided by a physical therapist. Exercise training consisted in 50 minutes sessions, 3 times per week, at intensive endurance training zone (in the range of anaerobic threshold, completed by 1 minute interval in the range between anaerobic threshold (AT and respiratory compensation point (RCP, for every 5 minutes of training. Results: After 9 months of intervention we noticed an improvement of abdominal obesity (waist circumference decreased from 98.98±10.14 cm to 89.54±12.32 cm, p<0.001, physical fitness (V’O2peak increased from 1.83±0.33 l/min to 2.13±0.4 l/min, p<0.001 and endurance (Oxygen uptake in the range of anaerobic treshold increase from 1.27±0.27 l/min to 1.55±0.31 l/min, p<0.001. Conclusions: Cardiopulmonary exercise testing together with training zones determinations is a useful tool for assessing the exercise capacity and drawing up individual workouts. Active and closely monitored intervention by individualized exercise training programmes leads to

  5. The Effects of Acute Exercise and Exercise Training on Plasma Homocysteine: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Deminice

    Full Text Available Although studies have demonstrated that physical exercise alters homocysteine levels in the blood, meta-analyses of the effects of acute exercise and exercise training on homocysteine blood concentration have not been performed, especially regarding the duration and intensity of exercise, which could affect homocysteine levels differently.The aim of this meta-analysis was to ascertain the effects of acute exercise and exercise training on homocysteine levels in the blood.A review was conducted according to the guidelines of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses using the online databases PubMed, SPORTDiscus, and SciELO to identify relevant studies published through June 2015. Review Manager was used to calculate the effect size of acute exercise and exercise training using the change in Hcy plasmaserum concentration from baseline to post-acute exercise and trained vs. sedentary control groups, respectively. Weighted mean differences were calculated using random effect models.Given the abundance of studies, acute exercise trials were divided into two subgroups according to exercise volume and intensity, whereas the effects of exercise training were analyzed together. Overall, 22 studies with a total of 520 participants indicated increased plasma homocysteine concentration after acute exercise (1.18 μmol/L, 95% CI: 0.71 to 1.65, p < .01. Results of a subgroup analysis indicated that either long-term exercise of low-to-moderate intensity (1.39 μmol/L, 95% CI: 0.9 to 1.89, p < .01 or short-term exercise of high intensity (0.83 μmol/L, 95% CI: 0.19 to 1.40, p < .01 elevated homocysteine levels in the blood. Increased homocysteine induced by exercise was significantly associated with volume of exercise, but not intensity. By contrast, resistance training reduced plasma homocysteine concentration (-1.53 μmol/L, 95% CI: -2.77 to -0.28, p = .02, though aerobic training did not. The cumulative results of the seven

  6. Exercise training improves heart rate variability after methamphetamine dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolezal, Brett Andrew; Chudzynski, Joy; Dickerson, Daniel; Mooney, Larissa; Rawson, Richard A; Garfinkel, Alan; Cooper, Christopher B

    2014-06-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) reflects a healthy autonomic nervous system and is increased with physical training. Methamphetamine dependence (MD) causes autonomic dysfunction and diminished HRV. We compared recently abstinent methamphetamine-dependent participants with age-matched, drug-free controls (DF) and also investigated whether HRV can be improved with exercise training in the methamphetamine-dependent participants. In 50 participants (MD = 28; DF = 22), resting heart rate (HR; R-R intervals) was recorded over 5 min while seated using a monitor affixed to a chest strap. Previously reported time domain (SDNN, RMSSD, pNN50) and frequency domain (LFnu, HFnu, LF/HF) parameters of HRV were calculated with customized software. MD were randomized to thrice-weekly exercise training (ME = 14) or equal attention without training (MC = 14) over 8 wk. Groups were compared using paired and unpaired t-tests. Statistical significance was set at P ≤ 0.05. Participant characteristics were matched between groups (mean ± SD): age = 33 ± 6 yr; body mass = 82.7 ± 12 kg, body mass index = 26.8 ± 4.1 kg·min. Compared with DF, the MD group had significantly higher resting HR (P increased SDNN (+14.7 ± 2.0 ms, +34%), RMSSD (+19.6 ± 4.2 ms, +63%), pNN50 (+22.6% ± 2.7%, +173%), HFnu (+14.2 ± 1.9, +60%), and decreased HR (-5.2 ± 1.1 bpm, -7%), LFnu (-9.6 ± 1.5, -16%), and LF/HF (-0.7 ± 0.3, -19%). These measures did not change from baseline in the MC group. HRV, based on several conventional indices, was diminished in recently abstinent, methamphetamine-dependent individuals. Moreover, physical training yielded a marked increase in HRV, representing increased vagal modulation or improved autonomic balance.

  7. Exposing College Students to Exercise: The Training Interventions and Genetics of Exercise Response (TIGER) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailors, Mary H.; Jackson, Andrew S.; McFarlin, Brian K.; Turpin, Ian; Ellis, Kenneth J.; Foreyt, John P.; Hoelscher, Deanna M.; Bray, Molly S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The Training Interventions and Genetics of Exercise Response (TIGER) study is an exercise program designed to introduce sedentary college students to regular physical activity and to identify genetic factors that influence response to exercise. Participants: A multiracial/ethnic cohort (N = 1,567; 39% male), age 18 to 35 years,…

  8. Astragalus membranaceus Improves Exercise Performance and Ameliorates Exercise-Induced Fatigue in Trained Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Shao Yeh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Astragalus membranaceus (AM is a popular “Qi-tonifying” herb with a long history of use as a Traditional Chinese Medicine with multiple biological functions. However, evidence for the effects of AM on exercise performance and physical fatigue is limited. We evaluated the potential beneficial effects of AM on ergogenic and anti-fatigue functions following physiological challenge. Male ICR strain mice were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 10 per group for treatment: (1 sedentary control and vehicle treatment (vehicle control; (2 exercise training with vehicle treatment (exercise control; and (3 exercise training with AM treatment at 0.615 g/kg/day (Ex-AM1 or (4 3.075 g/kg/day (Ex-AM5. Both the vehicle and AM were orally administered for 6 weeks. Exercise performance and anti-fatigue function were evaluated by forelimb grip strength, exhaustive swimming time, and levels of serum lactate, ammonia, glucose, and creatine kinase after 15-min swimming exercise. Exercise training combined with AM supplementation increased endurance exercise capacity and increased hepatic and muscle glycogen content. AM reduced exercise-induced accumulation of the byproducts blood lactate and ammonia with acute exercise challenge. Moreover, we found no deleterious effects from AM treatment. Therefore, AM supplementation improved exercise performance and had anti-fatigue effects in mice. It may be an effective ergogenic aid in exercise training.

  9. Exposing college students to exercise: the training interventions and genetics of exercise response (TIGER) study

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Training Interventions and Genetics of Exercise Response (TIGER) study is an exercise program designed to introduce sedentary college students to regular physical activity and to identify genetic factors that influence response to exercise. A multiracial/ethnic cohort (N = 1,567; 39% male), age ...

  10. Monitorização ambulatorial da pressão arterial em indivíduos com resposta exagerada dos níveis pressóricos em esforço. Influência do condicionamento físico Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in individuals with exaggerated blood pressure response to exercise, influence of exercise training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliudem Galvão Lima

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar em indivíduos hiper-reatores ao teste ergométrico (TE, a influência de um programa regular de exercícios sobre os parâmetros ergométricos e da MAPA. MÉTODOS: Estudaram-se 22 indivíduos (44±1 anos, sedentários, assintomáticos, normotensos e que apresentavam elevação exagerada da pressão sistólica (PAS >220mmHg durante o TE, divididos, através de amostragem casual simples, em dois grupos: grupo hiper-reator sedentário (GHS e grupo hiper-reator condicionado (GHC. Os indivíduos do GHS foram orientados a não realizar qualquer tipo de exercício físico regular durante o período de 4 meses e o GHC composto de 10 indivíduos submetidos a programa de condicionamento físico aeróbico durante o mesmo período. RESULTADOS: Um programa de exercícios aeróbicos de moderada intensidade não promove redução significativa dos níveis pressóricos durante a monitorização (P>0,05; mas, durante a realização do TE nesses indivíduos, verificamos redução (pPURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of exercise training on ergometric test and Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring (ABPM in normotensive individuals with exaggerated blood pressure response to exercise. METHODS: We studied 22 sedentary and normotensive subjects (mean 44±1 years old showing an exaggerated systolic blood pressure response (SBP>220mmHg during a cycloergometric test. These individuals were divided in two groups: sedentary hyperreactive group (SHG and trained hyperreactive group (THG. The THG was submitted to a 4 month aerobic exercise training program. RESULTS: A program of moderate aerobic exercise did not reduce (P>0.05 ABPM blood pressure levels. However, in the submaximal loads of dynamic exercise we observed a significant fall in the SBP and heart rate (P<0.05. CONCLUSION: Normotensive individuals with exaggerated blood pressure response to dynamical exercise submitted to physical training presented a reduction in their systolic blood pressure and

  11. Nonlinear exercise training in advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is superior to traditional exercise training. A randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klijn, Peter; van Keimpema, Anton; Legemaat, Monique; Gosselink, Rik; van Stel, Henk

    2013-07-15

    The optimal exercise training intensity and strategy for individualized exercise training in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is not clear. This study compares the effects of nonlinear periodized exercise (NLPE) training used in athletes to traditional endurance and progressive resistance (EPR) training in patients with severe COPD. A total of 110 patients with severe COPD (FEV1 32% predicted) were randomized to EPR or NLPE. Exercise training was performed three times per week for 10 weeks. The primary outcomes were cycling endurance time and health-related quality of life using the Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire. The difference in change between EPR and NLPE was assessed using linear mixed-effects modeling. NLPE resulted in significantly greater improvements in cycling endurance time compared with EPR. The difference in change was +300.6 seconds (95% confidence interval [CI] = 197.2-404.2 s; P training methods. Clinical trial registered with www.trialregister.nl (The Netherlands Trial Register; NTR 1045).

  12. Mitochondrial Plasticity With Exercise Training and Extreme Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert; Lundby, Carsten; Qvortrup, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria form a reticulum in skeletal muscle. Exercise training stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis, yet an emerging hypothesis is that training also induces qualitative regulatory changes. Substrate oxidation, oxygen affinity and biochemical coupling efficiency may be differentially regulated...... with training and exposure to extreme environments. Threshold training doses inducing mitochondrial up-regulation remain to be elucidated considering fitness level. SUMMARY: Muscle mitochondrial are responsive to training and environment, yet thresholds for volume vs. regulatory changes and their physiological...

  13. Moderate Load Eccentric Exercise; A Distinct Novel Training Modality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppeler, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 20 years a number of studies have been published using progressive eccentric exercise protocols on motorized ergometers or similar devices that allow for controlled application of eccentric loads. Exercise protocols ramp eccentric loads over an initial 3 weeks period in order to prevent muscle damage and delayed onset muscle soreness. Final training loads reach 400-500 W in rehabilitative settings and over 1200 W in elite athletes. Training is typically carried out three times per week for durations of 20-30 min. This type of training has been characterizes as moderate load eccentric exercise. It has also been denoted RENEW (Resistance Exercise via Negative Eccentric Work by LaStayo et al., 2014). It is distinct from plyometric exercises (i.e., drop jumps) that impose muscle loads of several thousand Watts on muscles and tendons. It is also distinct from eccentric overload training whereby loads in a conventional strength training setting are increased in the eccentric phase of the movement to match concentric loads. Moderate load eccentric exercise (or RENEW) has been shown to be similarly effective as conventional strength training in increasing muscle strength and muscle volume. However, as carried out at higher angular velocities of joint movement, it reduces joint loads. A hallmark of moderate load eccentric exercise is the fact that the energy requirements are typically 4-fold smaller than in concentric exercise of the same load. This makes moderate load eccentric exercise training the tool of choice in medical conditions with limitations in muscle energy supply. The use and effectiveness of moderate load eccentric exercise has been demonstrated mostly in small scale studies for cardiorespiratory conditions, sarcopenia of old age, cancer, diabetes type 2, and neurological conditions. It has also been used effectively in the prevention and rehabilitation of injuries of the locomotor system in particular the rehabilitation after anterior cruciate

  14. Tai Chi as an adjunct to cardiac rehabilitation exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Piliae, Ruth E

    2003-01-01

    Heart disease is a chronic condition needing lifetime secondary prevention measures to decrease morbidity and mortality, and to improve quality of life. Cardiac rehabilitation exercise training, one aspect of cardiac recovery, traditionally includes some form of aerobic fitness and, more recently, muscle strength training to improve exercise tolerance. Tai chi, widely practiced in China for centuries, is a popular form of exercise among older Chinese persons associated with enhanced well-being and health among traditional Chinese practitioners. Recent research has reported improvement in cardiorespiratory function, balance and postural stability, fall prevention, and stress reduction. A review of the literature suggests potential benefits from tai chi exercise performed as an adjunct to cardiac rehabilitation exercise training. Tai chi is cost-effective and facilitates a lifestyle of health-related behavior practices.

  15. Distance exercised during submaximal training on race winnings for Thoroughbred racehorses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Berkman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Evaluations of the physical fitness of Thoroughbred racehorses have been correlated with race earnings, but few reports exist about the influence of the distance exercised during training on both physical conditioning indices and financial productivity. During one training season sixteen claiming Thoroughbred horses were subjected to submaximal training and monitored by a global positioning system (GPS coupled to a heart rate monitor. After initial and single monitoring, the horses were distributed into two groups of eight individuals each; one group exercised short distances (SD between 1600 and 1900m, while the other exercised long distances (LD between 2000 and 2350m. The duration (min and mean and maximal velocities (ms-1attained during each session were determined, as well as the difference in distances exercised (m between official races and each training session. Blood lactate concentration ([LA] during recovery was also determined. Student's t-test was used for a non-paired analysis, with P≤0.05 considered significant. The winnings (USD of each horse were correlated with the peak heart rate (HRpeak attained during the training session. The distances exercised in the training sessions were greater in relation to the official races distances by 24.7% and 40% for SD and LD, respectively. Lactatemia did not differ between the groups. The HRpeak obtained during the training session was lower in LD group. The velocity at which the heart rate reached 200 bpm (V200 was higher in LD group. There was a moderate correlation (r= 0.42 between the highest winnings and lowest HRpeak. The horses that ran longer distances during their submaximal training session had better cardiac conditioning and tendency to increase financial productivity

  16. Exercise training improves functional recovery and motor nerve conduction velocity after sciatic nerve crush lesion in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gispen, W.H.; Meeteren, N.L.U.; Brakkee, J.H.; Hamers, F.P.T.; Helders, P.J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effects of exercise training on recuperation of sensorimotor function in the early phase of regeneration, and to monitor the long-term effects of exercise on electrophysiological aspects of the regenerating nerve. Design: After sciatic nerve crush in 20 male Wistar rats, o

  17. Effects of Exercise Training on Haematology and Maximal Cardiac Output

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonne, Thomas Christian

    Qmax may increase within a few weeks of exercise and the underlying mechanisms leading to this are likely to be multi-factorial. Plasma volume is generally thought to rapidly increase in response to exercise training driving an increase in Qmax and hence VO2max. Structural and functional changes...... to the heart ultra structure possibly also play a role for improving Qmax. Other mechanisms that can improve exercise capacity include hypoxia. It is universally accepted that hypoxia is a main stimulant of erythropoiesis and altitude training is considered a possibility to increase red blood cell volume...... and hence exercise performance in elite athletes. However, the efficacy of altitude training for sea level performance is still debated and the literature is divergent on this matter. Even if the haematological changes following altitude training may be inadequate to substantially improve performance...

  18. Exercise training and depression in ESRD: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrou, Georgia I; Grigoriou, Stefania S; Konstantopoulou, Evi; Theofilou, Paraskevi; Giannaki, Christoforos D; Stefanidis, Ioannis; Karatzaferi, Christina; Sakkas, Giorgos K

    2013-01-01

    Depression, a mental disorder with a high personal, societal, and economic impact, affects at least 20-30% of patients receiving hemodialysis therapy. It is associated with a high mortality rate, low adherence to medication, and a low perceived quality of life. Exercise training is a promising nonpharmacological intervention that can be safely applied to these patients. Beyond the well-publicized physiological benefits of exercise training, a number of studies have focused on the effects of exercise training on mental factors and quality of life parameters including its less appreciated effects on depression symptoms. This evidence-based review article reviews and discusses the effects of exercise training on depression in end-stage renal disease patients.

  19. Effects of Exercise Training on Haematology and Maximal Cardiac Output

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonne, Thomas Christian

    Qmax may increase within a few weeks of exercise and the underlying mechanisms leading to this are likely to be multi-factorial. Plasma volume is generally thought to rapidly increase in response to exercise training driving an increase in Qmax and hence VO2max. Structural and functional changes...... to the heart ultra structure possibly also play a role for improving Qmax. Other mechanisms that can improve exercise capacity include hypoxia. It is universally accepted that hypoxia is a main stimulant of erythropoiesis and altitude training is considered a possibility to increase red blood cell volume...... and hence exercise performance in elite athletes. However, the efficacy of altitude training for sea level performance is still debated and the literature is divergent on this matter. Even if the haematological changes following altitude training may be inadequate to substantially improve performance...

  20. Training Studies with Compressed Air Breathing Apparatus – Methodology, Exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buks Roberts

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The current article describes topics ranging from the respiratory physiology and the structure of compressed air breathing apparatus to the performance of practical training exercises in an unbreathable environment (hereinafter referred to as UE.

  1. Exercise Training and Parkinson's Disease: Placebo or Essential Treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Iris; Engelhardt, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Exercise training is often recommended for people with Parkinson's disease, though there is debate about the pathophysiologic cause of impaired movement in Parkinsonism which makes it difficult to develop a specific exercise treatment for symptoms that include hypokinesia, tremor, and muscular rigidity. Most published studies show a benefit of…

  2. Exercise Training and Energy Expenditure following Weight Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary R; Fisher, Gordon; Neumeier, William H; Carter, Stephen J; Plaisance, Eric P

    2015-09-01

    This study aims to determine the effects of aerobic or resistance training on activity-related energy expenditure (AEE; kcal·d(-1)) and physical activity index (activity-related time equivalent (ARTE)) following weight loss. It was hypothesized that weight loss without exercise training would be accompanied by decreases in AEE, ARTE, and nontraining physical activity energy expenditure (nonexercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT)) and that exercise training would prevent decreases in free-living energy expenditure. One hundred forty premenopausal women had an average weight loss of 25 lb during a diet (800 kcal·d(-1)) of furnished food. One group aerobically trained 3 times per week (40 min·d(-1)), another group resistance-trained 3 times per week (10 exercises/2 sets × 10 repetitions), and the third group did not exercise. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry was used to measure body composition, indirect calorimetry was used to measure resting energy expenditure (REE) and walking energy expenditure, and doubly labeled water was used to measure total energy expenditure (TEE). AEE, ARTE, and nontraining physical activity energy expenditure (NEAT) were calculated. TEE, REE, and NEAT all decreased following weight loss for the no-exercise group, but not for aerobic and resistance trainers. Only REE decreased in the two exercise groups. Resistance trainers increased ARTE. HR and oxygen uptake while walking on the flat and up a grade were consistently related to TEE, AEE, NEAT, and ARTE. Exercise training prevents a decrease in energy expenditure, including free-living energy expenditure separate from exercise training, following weight loss. Resistance training increases physical activity, whereas economy/ease of walking is associated with increased TEE, AEE, NEAT, and ARTE.

  3. Exercise Training Improves Heart Rate Variability after Methamphetamine Dependency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolezal, Brett A.; Chudzynski, Joy; Dickerson, Daniel; Mooney, Larissa; Rawson, Richard A.; Garfinkel, Alan; Cooper, Christopher B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Heart rate variability (HRV) reflects a healthy autonomic nervous system and is increased with physical training. Methamphetamine dependence (MD) causes autonomic dysfunction and diminished HRV. We compared recently abstinent MD participants with age-matched, drug free controls (DF) and also investigated whether HRV can be improved with exercise training in the MD participants. Methods In 50 participants (MD=28; DF=22) resting heart rate (R-R intervals) was recorded over 5 min while seated using a monitor affixed to a chest strap. Previously reported time-domain (SDNN, RMSSD, pNN50) and frequency-domain (LFnu, HFnu, LF/HF) parameters of HRV were calculated with customized software. MD were randomized to thrice weekly exercise training (ME=14) or equal attention without training (MC=14) over 8 weeks. Groups were compared using paired and unpaired t-tests. Statistical significance was set at P≤0.05. Results Participant characteristics were matched between groups: age 33±6 years; body mass 82.7±12 kg, BMI 26.8±4.1 kg•min−2, mean±SD. Compared with DF, the MD group had significantly higher resting heart rate (P<0.05), LFnu, and LF/HF (P<0.001) as well as lower SDNN, RMSSD, pNN50 and HFnu (all P<0.001). At randomization, HRV indices were similar between ME and MC groups. However, after training, the ME group significantly (all P<0.001) increased SDNN (+14.7±2.0 ms, +34%), RMSSD (+19.6±4.2 ms, +63%), pNN50 (+22.6±2.7%, +173%), HFnu (+14.2±1.9, +60%) and decreased HR (−5.2±1.1 beats·min−1, −7%), LFnu (−9.6±1.5, −16%) and LF/HF (−0.7±0.3, −19%). These measures did not change from baseline in the MC group. Conclusion HRV, based on several conventional indices, was diminished in recently abstinent, methamphetamine dependent individuals. Moreover, physical training yielded a marked increase of HRV representing increased vagal modulation or improved autonomic balance. PMID:24162556

  4. Exercise training on chronotropic response and exercise capacity in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Li; Min, Gao; Wei, Chen; Min, He; Jie, Zhou

    2017-03-01

    The study was designed to observe the effects and relationship of exercise on chronotropic response (CR) and exercise capacity in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A total of 30 patients with T2DM underwent symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) after excluding contraindication. For each subject individualized exercise prescription was formulated, and they received 12 weeks of exercise training after CPET retest to complete the comparison of CR indicators, including the ratio of maximum exercise heart rate to predicted maximum heart rate value (rHR), heart rate reserve rate (HRRes), heart rate recovery (HRR) of 1-6 min after exercise termination (HRR1-6), exercise capacity (peak VO2/kg) and other indicators. The results showed that after 12 weeks of exercise treatment, rHR, HRRes, HRR1-6, and peak VO2/kg were significantly higher than before (Pexercise training can improve cardiac dysfunction, abnormal HRR, enhance exercise capacity and adaptability of the cardiovascular system to exercise stress in T2DM patients.

  5. Principles of exercise physiology: responses to acute exercise and long-term adaptations to training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Brown, Anita M; Frontera, Walter R

    2012-11-01

    Physical activity and fitness are associated with a lower prevalence of chronic diseases, such as heart disease, cancer, high blood pressure, and diabetes. This review discusses the body's response to an acute bout of exercise and long-term physiological adaptations to exercise training with an emphasis on endurance exercise. An overview is provided of skeletal muscle actions, muscle fiber types, and the major metabolic pathways involved in energy production. The importance of adequate fluid intake during exercise sessions to prevent impairments induced by dehydration on endurance exercise, muscular power, and strength is discussed. Physiological adaptations that result from regular exercise training such as increases in cardiorespiratory capacity and strength are mentioned. The review emphasizes the cardiovascular and metabolic adaptations that lead to improvements in maximal oxygen capacity. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Exercise training in children with asthma: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanrooij, Vera H M; Willeboordse, Maartje; Dompeling, Edward; van de Kant, Kim D G

    2014-07-01

    Exercise can provoke asthma symptoms, such as dyspnoea, in children with asthma. Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) is prevalent in 40-90% of children with asthma. Conversely, exercise can improve physical fitness. The purpose of this paper is to provide a systematic review of the literature regarding the effects of exercise training in children with asthma, particularly in relation to: EIB, asthma control, pulmonary function, cardiorespiratory parameters and parameters of underlying pathophysiology. A systematic search in several databases was performed. Controlled trials that undertook a physical training programme in children with asthma (aged 6-18 years) were selected. Twenty-nine studies were included. Training had positive effects on several cardiorespiratory fitness parameters. A few studies demonstrated that training could improve EIB, especially in cases where there was sufficient room for improvement. Peak expiratory flow was the only lung function parameter that could be improved substantially by training. The effects of training on asthma control, airway inflammation and bronchial hyper-responsiveness were barely studied. Owing to the overall beneficial effects of training and the lack of negative effects, it can be concluded that physical exercise is safe and can be recommended in children with asthma. A training programme should have a minimum duration of 3 months, with at least two 60 min training sessions per week, and a training intensity set at the (personalised) ventilatory threshold. Further research is recommended regarding the effects of exercise on underlying pathophysiological mechanisms and asthma control in children with asthma. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. Heritability of submaximal exercise heart rate response to exercise training is accounted for by nine SNPs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tuomo Rankinen; Yun Ju Sung; Mark A. Sarzynski; Treva K. Rice; D. C. Rao; Claude Bouchard

    2012-01-01

    .... The purpose of our study was to perform a genome-wide association study to uncover DNA sequence variants associated with submaximal exercise heart rate training responses in the HERITAGE Family Study...

  8. The endocrine response to exercise and training in young athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliakim, Alon; Nemet, Dan

    2013-11-01

    The manuscript "Plasma Somatomedin-C in 8- to 10-Year-Old Swimmers" by Denison and Ben-Ezra published in the first issue of Pediatric Exercise Science in 1989 was among the first to address the relationship between growth, the growth hormone (GH)/Insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) axis, and exercise. Since their pioneering article, this topic has become of great interest to pediatricians and pediatric exercise researchers, and today our understanding of the effects of exercise training on the growth axis during childhood and puberty, on differences between systemic and local (i.e., muscle) responses to exercise, and our ability to use these responses to assist the adolescent competitive athlete in the evaluation of the training load have markedly improved. The aim of the present review is to summarize our current knowledge on this topic.

  9. AMPKα in Exercise-Induced Substrate Metabolism and Exercise Training-Induced Metabolic and Mitochondrial Adaptations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fentz, Joachim

    in response to 4 weeks of voluntary running wheel exercise training. However, the acute exercise-induced increase in mRNA expression of several metabolic and mitochondrial marker genes is impaired in the mice lacking AMPKα1 and α2. In addition to the two studies and some currently unpublished data this thesis...

  10. Exercise training and the progression of chronic renal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eidemak, I; Haaber, A B; Feldt-Rasmussen, B

    1997-01-01

    The possible beneficial effect of regular exercise training on the progression of chronic renal failure was studied in a prospective randomized controlled study. Thirty patients with a median glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of 25 ml/(min.1.73 m2) (range 10-43) were randomized to physical training...... the rate of progression judged by the slope of GFR versus time plot was equal in the two groups. Hence, the beneficial effect of exercise training, earlier observed in rat studies, could not be reproduced in our patients. Physical exercise had no untoward effect on progression of renal disease....... (30 min of bicycling daily or an equal amount of other physical activities) or to maintenance of the usual lifestyle. The median maximal work capacity increased significantly in the exercise group and remained unchanged in the control group during a median observation time of 20 months whereas...

  11. Training intensities for aerobic exercise determined on untrained healthy men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miura,Mochiyoshi

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the aerobic training intensity from the maximal and submaximal running exercise in 21 untrained adult men. To accomplish this, we evaluated the relationship between physiological (oxygen intake and heart rate and physical parameters (running speed of training intensity, and determined the training intensity at the submaximal exercise. Oxygen intake and heart rate were measured by a treadmill test. The maximal oxygen intake (VO2 max, and the aerobic threshold (AerT and anaerobic threshold (AT were measured to determine respiratory gas exchange. Running capacity was measured by a 12-min running and treadmill test. For the maximal exercise, there was a significant correlation (r = 0.88, P < 0.01 between VO2 max and 12-min running distance (speed. In addition, the oxygen intake and heart rate at AerT and AT in the submaximal exercise were linearly correlated with running speed. Three levels of training intensity at the submaximal exercise were termed: light, moderate, and heavy. Since AerT was the lower limit intensity and AT was the upper limit, we took the middle of their values as the moderate intensity. The end point for the determination of the training intensity at the submaximal exercise was estimated to be 85% VO2 max and 180 beats.min-1.

  12. Telemetric analysis of haemodynamic regulation during voluntary exercise training in mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danson, E. J.; Zhang, M. H.; Casadei, B.; Paterson, D. J.; Channon, K. M.

    2017-01-01

    Regular physical exercise reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease and improves outcome in patients with cardiovascular diseases. The dynamic changes in blood pressure and heart rate with acute exercise are independently predictive of prognosis. Quantification of the haemodynamic response to exercise training in genetically modified mouse models may provide insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of exercise. We describe, for the first time, the use of radiotelemetry to provide continuous blood pressure monitoring in C57BL/6J mice during a programme of voluntary wheel exercise with continuous simultaneous recording and analysis of wheel rotations and beat-by-beat haemodynamic parameters. We define distinct haemodynamic profiles at rest, during normal cage activity and during episodes of voluntary wheel running. We show that whilst cage activity is associated with significant rises both in blood pressure and in heart rate, voluntary wheel running leads to a further substantial rise in heart rate with only a small increment in blood pressure. With 5 weeks of chronic exercise training, resting heart rate progressively falls, but heart rate during episodes of wheel running initially increases. In contrast, there are minimal changes in blood pressure in response to chronic exercise training. Finally, we have quantified the acute changes in heart rate at the onset of and recovery from individual episodes of wheel running, revealing that changes in heart rate are extremely rapid and that the peak rate of change of heart rate increases with chronic exercise training. The results of this study have important implications for the use of genetically modified mouse models to investigate the beneficial haemodynamic effects of chronic exercise on blood pressure and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:21824998

  13. Assessing the Training Potential of MTDS in Exercise First Wave

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gehr, S.E.; Schurig, M.; Jacobs, L.R.M.A.; Pal, J. van der; Bennett, W.; Schreiber, B.

    2005-01-01

    Exercise First WAVE (EFW) was conducted in November 2004 and was the first large-scale NATO MTDS event that focused on investigating and providing COMAO training for warfighters and mission support staff in a distributed synthetic environment. To assess the training potential of EFW, the NATO partne

  14. Adaptations with intermittent exercise training in post- and premenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, Kåre; Nyberg, Michael Permin; Piil, Peter Bergmann

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The purposes of the present study was to examine the effect of intermittent exercise training on musculoskeletal and metabolic health in postmenopausal (PM) and premenopausal (PRM) women and, furthermore, to evaluate whether the adaptations can be maintained with a reduced training ...

  15. The effects of exercise training in patients with peripheral vascular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To prove that exercise training is effective, walking tests are necessary. ... shown to be a beneficial treatment for patients with PVD. Therefore studies have ... weeks) was of sufficient duration to improve functional ca- pacity in ... cise to maximal claudication pain in order to elicit the best training ..... of the intervention period.

  16. Design of the multicenter standardized supervised exercise training intervention for the claudication: exercise vs endoluminal revascularization (CLEVER) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronas, Ulf G; Hirsch, Alan T; Murphy, Timothy; Badenhop, Dalynn; Collins, Tracie C; Ehrman, Jonathan K; Ershow, Abby G; Lewis, Beth; Treat-Jacobson, Diane J; Walsh, M Eileen; Oldenburg, Niki; Regensteiner, Judith G

    2009-11-01

    The CLaudication: Exercise Vs Endoluminal Revascularization (CLEVER) study is the first randomized, controlled, clinical, multicenter trial that is evaluating a supervised exercise program compared with revascularization procedures to treat claudication. In this report, the methods and dissemination techniques of the supervised exercise training intervention are described. A total of 217 participants are being recruited and randomized to one of three arms: (1) optimal medical care; (2) aortoiliac revascularization with stent; or (3) supervised exercise training. Of the enrolled patients, 84 will receive supervised exercise therapy. Supervised exercise will be administered according to a protocol designed by a central CLEVER exercise training committee based on validated methods previously used in single center randomized control trials. The protocol will be implemented at each site by an exercise committee member using training methods developed and standardized by the exercise training committee. The exercise training committee reviews progress and compliance with the protocol of each participant weekly. In conclusion, a multicenter approach to disseminate the supervised exercise training technique and to evaluate its efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness for patients with claudication due to peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is being evaluated for the first time in CLEVER. The CLEVER study will further establish the role of supervised exercise training in the treatment of claudication resulting from PAD and provide standardized methods for use of supervised exercise training in future PAD clinical trials as well as in clinical practice.

  17. The cooperative monitoring of military forces: An exercise in strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    This exercise examines a hypothetical security problem associated with conventional military forces and border security: a surprise attack. The goal of the exercise is to provide an opportunity to think about how cooperative monitoring can be part of regional security. Two hypothetical countries, VOLCANOES and MOUNTAINS, have been created for this exercise based on the US states of Arizona and New Mexico. They were selected for their size and variety of terrain. Hypothetical background information and characteristics of the two countries are provided. An outline of activities is given, including prioritization of security concerns and monitoring of objectives for security concerns. 6 tabs.

  18. High-intensity interval training (HIT) for effective and time-efficient pre-surgical exercise interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Matthew; Weston, Kathryn L; Prentis, James M; Snowden, Chris P

    2016-01-01

    The advancement of perioperative medicine is leading to greater diversity in development of pre-surgical interventions, implemented to reduce patient surgical risk and enhance post-surgical recovery. Of these interventions, the prescription of pre-operative exercise training is gathering momentum as a realistic means for enhancing patient surgical outcome. Indeed, the general benefits of exercise training have the potential to pre-operatively optimise several pre-surgical risks factors, including cardiorespiratory function, frailty and cognitive function. Any exercise programme incorporated into the pre-operative pathway of care needs to be effective and time efficient in that any fitness gains are achievable in the limited period between the decision for surgery and operation (e.g. 4 weeks). Fortunately, there is a large volume of research describing effective and time-efficient exercise training programmes within the discipline of sports science. Accordingly, the objective of our commentary is to synthesise contemporary exercise training research, both from non-clinical and clinical populations, with the overarching aim of informing the development of effective and time-efficient pre-surgical exercise training programmes. The development of such exercise training programmes requires the careful consideration of several key principles, namely frequency, intensity, time, type and progression of exercise. Therefore, in light of more recent evidence demonstrating the effectiveness and time efficiency of high-intensity interval training-which involves brief bouts of intense exercise interspersed with longer recovery periods-the principles of exercise training programme design will be discussed mainly in the context of such high-intensity interval training programmes. Other issues pertinent to the development, implementation and evaluation of pre-operative exercise training programmes, such as individual exercise prescription, training session monitoring and potential

  19. Exercise training changes autonomic cardiovascular balance in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, K; Wichi, R B; Jesus, W R A; Moreira, E D; Morris, M; Krieger, E M; Irigoyen, M C

    2004-06-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate the influence of exercise training on cardiovascular function in mice. Heart rate, arterial pressure, baroreflex sensitivity, and autonomic control of heart rate were measured in conscious, unrestrained male C57/6J sedentary (n = 8) and trained mice (n = 8). The exercise training protocol used a treadmill (1 h/day; 5 days/wk for 4 wk). Baroreflex sensitivity was evaluated by the tachycardic and bradycardic responses induced by sodium nitroprusside and phenylephrine, respectively. Autonomic control of heart rate and intrinsic heart rate were determined by use of methylatropine and propranolol. Resting bradycardia was observed in trained mice compared with sedentary animals [485 +/- 9 vs. 612 +/- 5 beats/min (bpm)], whereas mean arterial pressure was not different between the groups (106 +/- 2 vs. 108 +/- 3 mmHg). Baroreflex-mediated tachycardia was significantly enhanced in the trained group (6.97 +/- 0.97 vs. 1.6 +/- 0.21 bpm/mmHg, trained vs. sedentary), whereas baroreflex-mediated bradycardia was not altered by training. The tachycardia induced by methylatropine was significantly increased in trained animals (139 +/- 12 vs. 40 +/- 9 bpm, trained vs. sedentary), whereas the propranolol effect was significantly reduced in the trained group (49 +/- 11 vs. 97 +/- 11 bpm, trained vs. sedentary). Intrinsic heart rate was similar between groups. In conclusion, dynamic exercise training in mice induced a resting bradycardia and an improvement in baroreflex-mediated tachycardia. These changes are likely related to an increased vagal and decreased sympathetic tone, similar to the exercise response observed in humans.

  20. PGC-1alpha in exercise- and exercise training-induced metabolic adaptations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Stine Ringholm

    and interferes with the exercise-induced adaptive response in human skeletal muscle. Study II demonstrates that mouse liver glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) mRNA content increased in recovery from acute exercise in both wildtype (WT) and PGC-1α knockout (KO) mice, while phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK...... content in WT, but not in PGC-1α KO mice. This shows that exercise training increases UCP1, COXIV and CD31 protein in mouse iWAT, likely as a cumulative effect of transient increases in mRNA expression after each exercise bout, and that PGC-1α is required for these adaptations. Study IV demonstrates...

  1. Resistance strength training exercise in children with spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewelt, Aga; Krosschell, Kristin J; Stoddard, Gregory J; Weng, Cindy; Xue, Mei; Marcus, Robin L; Gappmaier, Eduard; Viollet, Louis; Johnson, Barbara A; White, Andrea T; Viazzo-Trussell, Donata; Lopes, Philippe; Lane, Robert H; Carey, John C; Swoboda, Kathryn J

    2015-10-01

    Preliminary evidence in adults with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and in SMA animal models suggests exercise has potential benefits in improving or stabilizing muscle strength and motor function. We evaluated feasibility, safety, and effects on strength and motor function of a home-based, supervised progressive resistance strength training exercise program in children with SMA types II and III. Up to 14 bilateral proximal muscles were exercised 3 times weekly for 12 weeks. Nine children with SMA, aged 10.4 ± 3.8 years, completed the resistance training exercise program. Ninety percent of visits occurred per protocol. Training sessions were pain-free (99.8%), and no study-related adverse events occurred. Trends in improved strength and motor function were observed. A 12-week supervised, home-based, 3-day/week progressive resistance training exercise program is feasible, safe, and well tolerated in children with SMA. These findings can inform future studies of exercise in SMA. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Exercise training modalities and strategies to improve exercise performance in patients with respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, P; Rodrigues, F

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation is an evidence-based, multidisciplinary, comprehensive intervention for patients with chronic respiratory diseases who are symptomatic and whose daily living activities are often restricted. Pulmonary rehabilitation programs are designed to improve the physical and emotional condition of people with chronic respiratory disease and to promote long-term adherence to health-enhancing behavior. Exercise training is at the core of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) programs. The benefits of exercise training include decreased dyspnea, improved health-related quality of life, fewer days of hospitalization, and decreased health-care utilization. To gain PR benefits, patients should be able to complete an exercise training program, preferably with high intensity exercise, and it is likely that these benefits will translate into a change from a pattern of a sedentary lifestyle to a physically active lifestyle. Chronic respiratory patients, namely COPD patients, have a low exercise tolerance due to multiple factors, such as dynamic hyperinflation and peripheral muscle dysfunction. In this article, the authors describe a variety of modalities and strategies to overcome exercise limitations and improve the effects of exercise training.

  3. Recognizing the intensity of strength training exercises with wearable sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernek, Igor; Kurillo, Gregorij; Stiglic, Gregor; Bajcsy, Ruzena

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we propose a system based on a network of wearable accelerometers and an off-the-shelf smartphone to recognize the intensity of stationary activities, such as strength training exercises. The system uses a hierarchical algorithm, consisting of two layers of Support Vector Machines (SVMs), to first recognize the type of exercise being performed, followed by recognition of exercise intensity. The first layer uses a single SVM to recognize the type of the performed exercise. Based on the recognized type a corresponding intensity prediction SVM is selected on the second layer, specializing in intensity prediction for the recognized type of exercise. We evaluate the system for a set of upper-body exercises using different weight loads. Additionally, we compare the most important features for exercise and intensity recognition tasks and investigate how different sliding window combinations, sensor configurations and number of training subjects impact the algorithm performance. We perform all of the experiments for two different types of features to evaluate the feasibility of implementation on resource constrained hardware. The results show the algorithm is able to recognize exercise types with approximately 85% accuracy and 6% intensity prediction error. Furthermore, due to similar performance using different types of features, the algorithm offers potential for implementation on resource constrained hardware.

  4. Heart Rate and Lactate Levels during Weight-Training Exercise in Trained and Untrained Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Michael H.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A study of effects of squatting exercise on heart rate and blood lactate levels in trained and untrained males indicated that trained subjects performed more work and had higher heart rates and lactate levels at exhaustion untrained subjects, though heart rate and lactate levels were lower for trained subjects at a given bar mass or submaximal…

  5. Double-leg isometric exercise training in older men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baross AW

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anthony W Baross,1 Jonathan D Wiles,2 Ian L Swaine21Sport and Exercise Science, University of Northampton, Northampton, UK; 2Sport and Exercise Science, Canterbury Christ Church University, Canterbury, Kent, UKAbstract: Double-leg isometric training has been demonstrated to reduce resting blood pressure in young men when using electromyographic activity (EMG to regulate exercise intensity. This study assessed this training method in healthy older (45–60 years. men. Initially, 35 older men performed an incremental isometric exercise test to determine the linearity of the heart rate versus percentage peak EMG (%EMGpeak and systolic blood pressure versus %EMGpeak relationship. Thereafter, 20 participants were allocated to a training or control group. The training group performed three double-leg isometric sessions per week for 8 weeks, at 85% of peak heart rate. The training resulted in a significant reduction in resting systolic (11 ± 8 mmHg, P < 0.05 and mean arterial (5 ± 7 mmHg, P < 0.05 blood pressure. There was no significant change in resting systolic blood pressure for the control group or diastolic blood pressure in either group (all P > 0.05. These findings show that this training method, used previously in young men, is also effective in reducing resting systolic and mean arterial blood pressure in older men.Keywords: electromyography, resting blood pressure, heart rate

  6. Development of Training Aids for Nuclear Forensics Exercises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sangjun; Lee, Seungmin; Lim, Hobin; Hyung, Sangcheol; Kim, Jaekwang [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Current radioactive-related training has focused on the prevention of a radiation disaster. Procedures to recover nuclear and radiological materials have been simplified due to the lack of training tools to reproduce real conditions for security and staff at nuclear facilities. The process of recovering materials is crucial in order to collect evidence and secure the safety of response forces. Moreover, exercises for recovering lost or missing a low dose radiation sources, does not well match with explosive like RDD blast situations. Therefore KINAC has been developing training aids in order to closely reproduce conditions of an actual terrorist attack and enhance effectiveness of exercises. These tools will be applied to Nuclear Forensics Exercises in which evidence collection is important at the time of an incident. KINAC has been developing training aids to enhance the effectiveness of such exercises by providing simulated conditions of actual terrorist incidents. Simulated training aids, based on the beacon system, operate with electromagnetic waves. These tools are able to simulate environments close to actual conditions by supplying similar properties of radioactivity. Training aids will be helpful in giving experience to security personnel and staff in the event of a terrorist incident. This experience includes collecting evidence for nuclear forensics. KINAC also has a plan to hold drills using these tools this year with The Armed Force CBR Defense Command.

  7. Influence of Regular Exercise Training on Post-exercise Hemodynamic Regulation to Orthostatic Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun eSugawara

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available To prevent orthostatic hypotension, arterial blood pressure (BP is neurally and hormonally regulated via increases in heart rate (HR and peripheral vascular tone. After dynamic exercise, however, the latter arm is blunted because of the increased vasodilators in exercised muscles. Orthostatic tachycardia is likely a more important compensatory mechanism for post-exercise orthostatic intolerance in individuals who have higher leg vasodilator capacity, such as endurance-trained athletes. To test the hypothesis that regular endurance training was associated with the greater augmentation of tachycardia response to post-exercise orthostasis, we compared hemodynamic responses to 5-min 60-degree head-up tilt (HUT before and after 60 min of cycling at 70% of HR reserve in the endurance-trained (n=8 and sedentary men (n=9. Calf peak vascular conductance was 62% greater in the endurance-trained than the sedentary (P<0.001. After the exercise, the HUT-induced reduction of SV was significantly augmented in the endurance-trained (from -27.7±6.9 to -33.7±7.7 ml, P=0.03 but not in their sedentary peers. Nevertheless, MAP was well maintained during post-exercise HUT even in the endurance-trained (from 81±10 to 80±8 mmHg. Tachycardia responses during sustained orthostasis were significantly increased in the sedentary (1.3-fold vs. pre-exercise and more in the endurance-trained (2.0-fold. The augmented response of HUT-induced tachycardia was greater in the endurance-trained than the sedentary (P=0.04. Additionally, cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity (BRS, evaluated by the HR response to the hypotensive perturbation, was improved after the exercise in the endurance-trained (from -0.56±0.32 to -1.03±0.26 bpm/mmHg, P=0.007 but not in the sedentary. These results suggest that in the endurance-trained men the increased orthostatic tachycardia and augmented cardiovagal BRS may favorably mitigate accumulated risks for orthostatic intolerance in the early phase of

  8. Improved functional vasodilation in obese Zucker rats following exercise training

    OpenAIRE

    Sebai, Mohamad; Lu, Silu; Xiang, Lusha; Hester, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    Obese individuals exhibit impaired functional vasodilation and exercise performance. We have demonstrated in obese Zucker rats (OZ), a model of morbid obesity, that insulin resistance impairs functional vasodilation via an increased thromboxane receptor (TP)-mediated vasoconstriction. Chronic treadmill exercise training improves functional vasodilation in the spinotrapezius muscle of the OZ, but the mechanisms responsible for the improvement in functional vasodilation are not clear. Based on ...

  9. Exercise training and habitual physical activity: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Damon L; Johannsen, Neil M; Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Earnest, Conrad P; Johnson, William D; Blair, Steven N; Sénéchal, Martin; Church, Timothy S

    2012-12-01

    Exercise training reduces adiposity and risk of cardiovascular disease. However, the combined effects of habitual free-living physical activity and aerobic training on waist circumference, weight, fitness, and blood pressure in postmenopausal women are unknown. To evaluate the effects of habitual physical activity levels during aerobic training on weight, waist circumference, fitness, and blood pressure. Secondary analysis of an RCT. Original data collected April 2001 to June 2005 and analyzed in 2012. Postmenopausal women in a supervised exercise trial. Women (n=325) were randomized to 4, 8, or 12 kcal/kg per week of aerobic training or a control group for 6 months. All outcome measures were collected at baseline and follow-up. Changes in dependent variables within each training group were evaluated across tertiles of pedometer-determined habitual physical activity outside exercise training sessions. Changes in waist circumference and weight. Reductions in waist circumference were significantly greater with higher steps/day accumulated outside exercise training compared to lower levels in the 4 (high: -4.8 cm vs low: -1.4 cm, p=0.03); 8 (high: -4.2 cm vs low: -0.4 cm, p=0.03), and 12 kcal/kg per week groups (high: -4.1 cm vs low: -0.7 cm, p=0.05). For all groups, p-trend≤0.03. A trend was observed for greater weight reduction with higher steps/day in the 4 kcal/kg per week group (p-trend=0.04) but not for the other exercise doses. No effects were observed for blood pressure or fitness measures (all p>0.05). In postmenopausal women, higher habitual physical activity while participating in aerobic training was associated with greater reductions in central adiposity, and was supportive of weight loss compared to lower levels. Copyright © 2012 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Redox modulation of mitochondriogenesis in exercise. Does antioxidant supplementation blunt the benefits of exercise training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Cabrera, Mari Carmen; Salvador-Pascual, Andrea; Cabo, Helena; Ferrando, Beatriz; Viña, Jose

    2015-09-01

    Physical exercise increases the cellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in muscle, liver, and other organs. This is unlikely due to increased mitochondrial production but rather to extramitochondrial sources such as NADPH oxidase or xanthine oxidase. We have reported a xanthine oxidase-mediated increase in ROS production in many experimental models from isolated cells to humans. Originally, ROS were considered as detrimental and thus as a likely cause of cell damage associated with exhaustion. In the past decade, evidence showing that ROS act as signals has been gathered and thus the idea that antioxidant supplementation in exercise is always recommendable has proved incorrect. In fact, we proposed that exercise itself can be considered as an antioxidant because training increases the expression of classical antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase and, in general, lowering the endogenous antioxidant enzymes by administration of antioxidant supplements may not be a good strategy when training. Antioxidant enzymes are not the only ones to be activated by training. Mitochondriogenesis is an important process activated in exercise. Many redox-sensitive enzymes are involved in this process. Important signaling molecules like MAP kinases, NF-κB, PGC-1α, p53, heat shock factor, and others modulate muscle adaptation to exercise. Interventions aimed at modifying the production of ROS in exercise must be performed with care as they may be detrimental in that they may lower useful adaptations to exercise.

  11. Heart failure accompanied by sick euthyroid syndrome and exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psirropoulos, D; Lefkos, N; Boudonas, G; Efthimiadis, A; Vogas, V; Keskilidis, C; Tsapas, G

    2002-05-01

    Sick euthyroid syndrome is defined as the decrease of serum free triiodothyronine with normal free L-thyroxin and thyrotropin. Its appearance in patients with chronic heart failure is an indicator of severity. Exercise training through a wide variety of mechanisms reverses sick euthyroid syndrome (normalization of free triiodothyronine levels) and improves the ability to exercise. There is a connection during exercise among dyspnea, hyperventilation, fatigue, catecholamines, a decrease in the number and function of beta-blocker receptors, and elevation of serum free triiodothyronine. It is not known whether sick euthyroid syndrome contributes to the development of heart failure or is only an attendant syndrome.

  12. Exercise training and beta-alanine-induced muscle carnosine loading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tine eBex

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Beta-alanine (BA supplementation has been shown to augment muscle carnosine concentration, thereby promoting high-intensity exercise performance. Trained muscles of athletes have a higher increase in carnosine concentration after BA supplementation compared to untrained muscles, but it remains to be determined whether this is due to an accumulation of acute exercise effects or to chronic adaptations from prior training. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether high-volume (HV and/or high-intensity (HI exercise can improve BA-induced carnosine loading in untrained subjects.Methods. All participants (n=28 were supplemented with 6.4 g/day of BA for 23 days. The subjects were allocated to a control group, HV or HI training group. During the BA supplementation period, the training groups performed 9 exercise sessions consisting of either 75–90 min continuous cycling at 35–45% Wmax (HV or 3 to 5 repeats of 30s cycling at 165% Wmax with 4 min recovery (HI. Carnosine content was measured in soleus and gastrocnemius medialis by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy.Results. There was no difference in absolute increase in carnosine content between the groups in soleus and gastrocnemius muscle. For the average muscle carnosine content, a higher absolute increase was found in HV (+ 2.95 mM; P = 0.046 and HI (+ 3.26 mM; P = 0.028 group compared to the control group (+ 1.91 mM. However, there was no additional difference between the HV and HI training group.Conclusions. HV and HI exercise training showed no significant difference on BA-induced muscle carnosine loading in soleus and gastrocnemius muscle. It can be suggested that there can be a small cumulative effect of exercise on BA supplementation efficiency, although differences did not reach significance on individual muscle level.

  13. Exercise training in hypertension: Role of microRNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vander; José; das; Neves; Tiago; Fernandes; Fernanda; Roberta; Roque; Ursula; Paula; Renó; Soci; Stéphano; Freitas; Soares; Melo; Edilamar; Menezes; de; Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is a complex disease that constitutes an important public health problem and demands many studies in order to understand the molecular mechanisms involving his pathophysiology. Therefore, an increasing number of studies have been conducted and new therapies are continually being discovered. In this context, exercise training has emerged as an important non-pharmacological therapy to treat hypertensive patients, minimizing the side effects of pharmacological therapies and frequently contributing to allow pharmacotherapy to be suspended. Several mechanisms have been associated with the pathogenesis of hypertension, such as hyperactivity of the sympathetic nervous system and renin-angiotensin aldosterone system,impaired endothelial nitric oxide production, increased oxygen-reactive species, vascular thickening and stiffening, cardiac hypertrophy, impaired angiogenesis, and sometimes genetic predisposition. With the advent of microRNAs(miRNAs), new insights have been added to the perspectives for the treatment of this disease, and exercise training has been shown to be able to modulate the miRNAs associated with it. Elucidation of the relationship between exercise training and miRNAs in the pathogenesis of hypertension is fundamental in order to understand how exercise modulates the cardiovascular system at genetic level. This can be promising even for the development of new drugs. This article is a review of how exercise training acts on hypertension by means of specific miRNAs in the heart, vascular system, and skeletal muscle.

  14. Individual Variability in Aerobic Fitness Adaptations to 70-d of Bed Rest and Exercise Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Meghan; Buxton, Roxanne; Goetchius, Elizabeth; DeWitt, John; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Change in maximal aerobic capacity (VO2pk) in response to exercise training and disuse is highly variable among individuals. Factors that could contribute to the observed variability (lean mass, daily activity, diet, sleep, stress) are not routinely controlled in studies. The NASA bed rest (BR) studies use a highly controlled hospital based model as an analog of spaceflight. In this study, diet, hydration, physical activity and light/dark cycles were precisely controlled and provided the opportunity to investigate individual variability. PURPOSE. Evaluate the contribution of exercise intensity and lean mass on change in VO2pk during 70-d of BR or BR + exercise. METHODS. Subjects completed 70-d of BR alone (CON, N=9) or BR + exercise (EX, N=17). The exercise prescription included 6 d/wk of aerobic exercise at 70 - 100% of max and 3 d/wk of lower body resistance exercise. Subjects were monitored 24 hr/d. VO2pk and lean mass (iDXA) were measured pre and post BR. ANOVA was used to evaluate changes in VO2pk pre to post BR. Subjects were retrospectively divided into high and low responders based on change in VO2pk (CON > 20% loss, n=5; EX >10% loss, n=4, or 5% gain, n=4) to further understand individual variability. RESULTS. VO2pk decreased from pre to post BR in CON (Ptraining induced gains in VO2pk appear unrelated to lean mass or exercise intensity.

  15. Exercise training improves liver steatosis in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alex, Sheril; Boss, Andreas; Heerschap, Arend; Kersten, Sander

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is rapidly turning into the most common liver disorder worldwide. One of the strategies that has been shown to effectively improve NAFLD is regular exercise, which seems to lower steatosis partly independent of weight loss. However,

  16. Exercise training improves liver steatosis in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alex, S.; Boss, A.; Heerschap, A.; Kersten, S.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is rapidly turning into the most common liver disorder worldwide. One of the strategies that has been shown to effectively improve NAFLD is regular exercise, which seems to lower steatosis partly independent of weight loss. However, limited data

  17. Postprandial oxidative stress: influence of sex and exercise training status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomer, Richard J; Ferebee, David E; Fisher-Wellman, Kelsey H; Quindry, John C; Schilling, Brian K

    2009-12-01

    An individual's sex and exercise training status may influence oxidative stress. No study has compared postprandial oxidative stress in exercise-trained and untrained men and women. To compare oxidative stress biomarkers and triglycerides (TAG) in 16 trained and 16 untrained men and women after ingestion of a high-fat meal. Blood samples were collected before, and at 1, 2, 4, and 6 h after intake of a high-fat meal and analyzed for Trolox-equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), malondialdehyde, hydrogen peroxide, xanthine oxidase activity, protein carbonyls (PC), and TAG. Area under the curve was calculated for each variable. Sex main effects were noted for all variables (P 0.05), with higher values for men compared with women. A training status main effect was noted for TEAC (P = 0.02), with higher values for trained compared with untrained subjects. No interaction effects were noted (P > 0.05). Regression analysis indicated that TAG explained the greatest degree of variability for oxidative stress variables, and premeal TAG best predicted the TAG response to feeding (R(2) = 0.50). With the exception of TEAC, for which higher values were noted for trained compared with untrained subjects, our findings indicate that sex, not exercise training status, influences postprandial oxidative stress. Specifically, women experience a significantly lower oxidative stress response to feeding compared with men. This seems mediated in part by the TAG response to feeding.

  18. Effect of resistance training on muscle use during exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploutz, Lori L.; Tesch, Per A.; Biro, Ronald L.; Dudley, Gary A.

    1994-01-01

    This study examined the effect of resistance training on exercise-induced contrast shift in magnetic resonance (MR) images. It was hypothesized that a given load could be lifted after training with less muscle showing contrast shift, thereby suggesting less muscle was used to perform the exercise. Nine males trained the left quadriceps femoris (QF) muscle 2 days/wk for 9 wk using 3-6 sets of 12 knee extensions each day. The right QF served as a control. Exercise-induced contrast shifts in MR images evoked by each of three bouts of exercise (5 sets of 10 knee extensions with a load equal to 50, 75, and 100% of the maximum pretraining load that could be lifted for 5 sets of 10 repetitions) were quantified pre- and posttraining. MR image contrast shift was quantified by determining QF cross-sectional area (CSA) showing increased spin-spin relaxation time. One repetition maximum increased 14% in the left trained QF and 7% in the right untrained QF. Left QF CSA increased 5%, with no change in right QSF CSA. Left QF CSA showing contrast shift was less after each bout of the exercise test posttraining. This was also true, to a lesser extent, for the right QF at the higher two loads. The results suggest that short-term resistance training reduces MR image contrast shift evoked by a given effort, thereby reflecting the use of less muscle to lift the load. Because this response was evident in both trained and contralateral untrained muscle, neural factors are suggested to be responsible. The consequence of this adaptation could be to increase 'stress' per unit area of active muscle during the course of training and thereby evoke hypertrophy.

  19. The effect of exercise training on lower trunk muscle morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahtahmassebi, Behnaz; Hebert, Jeffrey J; Stomski, Norman J; Hecimovich, Mark; Fairchild, Timothy J

    2014-10-01

    Skeletal muscle plays an important role in maintaining the stability of the lumbar region. However, there is conflicting evidence regarding the effects of exercise on trunk muscle morphology. To systematically review the literature on the effects of exercise training on lower trunk muscle morphology to determine the comparative effectiveness of different exercise interventions. A systematic search strategy was conducted in the following databases: PubMed, SportDiscus, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library and PEDro. We included full, peer-reviewed, prospective longitudinal studies, including randomized controlled trials and single-group designs, such as pre- to post-intervention and crossover studies, reporting on the effect of exercise training on trunk muscle morphology. Study quality was assessed with the Cochrane risk-of-bias tool. We classified each exercise intervention into four categories, based on the primary exercise approach: motor control, machine-based resistance, non-machine-based resistance or cardiovascular. Treatment effects were estimated using within-group standardized mean differences (SMDs). The systematic search identified 1,911 studies; of which 29 met our selection criteria: motor control (n = 12), machine-based resistance (n = 10), non-machine-based resistance (n = 5) and cardiovascular (n = 2). Fourteen studies (48 %) reported an increase in trunk muscle size following exercise training. Among positive trials, the largest effects were reported by studies testing combined motor control and non-machine-based resistance exercise (SMD [95 % CI] = 0.66 [0.06 to 1.27] to 3.39 [2.80 to 3.98]) and machine-based resistance exercise programmes (SMD [95 % CI] = 0.52 [0.01 to 1.03] to 1.79 [0.87 to 2.72]). Most studies investigating the effects of non-machine-based resistance exercise reported no change in trunk muscle morphology, with one study reporting a medium effect on trunk muscle size (SMD [95 % CI] = 0.60 [0.03 to 1.16]). Cardiovascular exercise

  20. Dynamic regulation of circulating microRNA during acute exhaustive exercise and sustained aerobic exercise training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggish, Aaron L; Hale, Andrew; Weiner, Rory B; Lewis, Gregory D; Systrom, David; Wang, Francis; Wang, Thomas J; Chan, Stephen Y

    2011-01-01

    Abstract MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are intracellular mediators of essential biological functions. Recently, plasma-based ‘circulating’ miRNAs (c-miRNAs) have been shown to control cellular processes, but the c-miRNA response to human exercise remains unknown. We sought to determine whether c-miRNAs are dynamically regulated in response to acute exhaustive cycling exercise and sustained rowing exercise training using a longitudinal, repeated measures study design. Specifically, c-miRNAs involved in angiogenesis (miR-20a, miR-210, miR-221, miR-222, miR-328), inflammation (miR-21, miR-146a), skeletal and cardiac muscle contractility (miR-21, miR-133a), and hypoxia/ischaemia adaptation (miR-21, miR-146a, and miR-210) were measured at rest and immediately following acute exhaustive cycling exercise in competitive male rowers (n = 10, age = 19.1 ± 0.6 years) before and after a 90 day period of rowing training. Distinct patterns of c-miRNA response to exercise were observed and adhered to four major profiles: (1) c-miRNA up-regulated by acute exercise before and after sustained training (miR-146a and miR-222), (2) c-miRNA responsive to acute exercise before but not after sustained training (miR-21 and miR-221), (3) c-miRNA responsive only to sustained training (miR-20a), and (4) non-responsive c-miRNA (miR-133a, miR-210, miR-328). Linear correlations were observed between peak exercise levels of miR-146a and (r = 0.63, P = 0.003) and between changes in resting miR-20a and changes in (pre-training vs. post-training, r = 0.73; P = 0.02). Although future work is required, these results suggest the potential value of c-miRNAs as exercise biomarkers and their possible roles as physiological mediators of exercise-induced cardiovascular adaptation. PMID:21690193

  1. Influence of aerobic exercise training on post-exercise responses of aortic pulse pressure and augmentation pressure in postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuhiko eAkazawa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Central arterial blood pressure (BP is more predictive of future cardiovascular events than is brachial BP because it reflects the BP load imposed on the left ventricle with greater accuracy. However, little is known about the effects of exercise training on central hemodynamic response to acute exercise. The purpose of the present study was to determine the influence of an aerobic exercise regimen on the response of aortic BP after a single aerobic exercise in postmenopausal women. Nine healthy postmenopausal women (age: 61 ± 2 years participated in a 12-week aerobic exercise training regimen. Before and after the training, each subjects performed a single bout of cycling at ventilatory thresholds for 30 min. We evaluated the post-exercise aortic BP response, which was estimated via the general transfer function from applanation tonometry. After the initial pre-training aerobic exercise session, aortic BP did not change significantly: however, aortic pulse pressure and augmentation pressure were significantly attenuated after the single aerobic exercise session following the 12-week training regimen. The present study demonstrated that a regular aerobic exercise training regimen induced the post-exercise reduction of aortic pulse pressure and augmentation pressure. Regular aerobic exercise training may enhance post-exercise reduction in aortic BP.

  2. Exercise Training for Persons with Alzheimer's Disease and Caregivers: A Review of Dyadic Exercise Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamotte, Guillaume; Shah, Raj C; Lazarov, Orly; Corcos, Daniel M

    2016-11-21

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia and the prevalence will increase dramatically in the next decades. Although exercise has shown benefits for people with dementia due to AD as well as their caregivers, the impact of a dyadic exercise intervention including both groups as study participants remains to be determined. The authors review the current clinical evidence for dyadic exercise interventions, which are exercise regimens applied to both the person with dementia and the caregiver. A total of 4 controlled trials were reviewed. This review shows that dyadic exercise interventions are feasible and may produce a positive effect on functional independence and caregiver burden. However, there was insufficient evidence to support a benefit of dyadic exercise intervention on cognitive performance and on behavioral and neuropsychiatric symptoms in participants with dementia due to AD. A dyadic exercise intervention improves functional independence and caregiver burden. However, there is a need for well-designed randomized controlled clinical trials to confirm these benefits and to investigate several important points such as the effects of a dyadic exercise intervention on cognitive and noncognitive outcomes of AD, the optimal intensity of exercise training, and the cost effectiveness of such a program.

  3. Extensive functional evaluations to monitor aerobic training in Becker Muscular Dystrophy: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Tramonti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Low-intensity aerobic training seems to have positive effects on muscle strength, endurance and fatigue in Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD patients. We describe the case of a 33-year old BMD man, who performed a four-week aerobic training. Extensive functional evaluations were executed to monitor the efficacy of the rehabilitative treatment. Results evidenced an increased force exertion and an improvement in muscle contraction during sustained exercise. An improvement of walk velocity, together with agility, endurance capacity and oxygen consumption during exercise was observed. Moreover, an enhanced metabolic efficiency was evidenced, as shown by reduced lactate blood levels after training. Interestingly, CK showed higher levels after the training protocol, revealing possible muscle damage. In conclusion, aerobic training may represent an effective method improving exercise performance, functional status and metabolic efficiency. Anyway, a careful functional assessment should be taken into account as a useful approach in the management of the disease’s rehabilitative treatment.

  4. PGC-1alpha in exercise- and exercise training-induced metabolic adaptations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Stine Ringholm

    . Furthermore the physical inactivity abolished the exercise-induced mRNA response of PGC-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in skeletal muscle that was present before bed rest. This indicates that just 7 days of physical inactivity reduces the metabolic capacity of human skeletal muscle...... and interferes with the exercise-induced adaptive response in human skeletal muscle. Study II demonstrates that mouse liver glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) mRNA content increased in recovery from acute exercise in both wildtype (WT) and PGC-1α knockout (KO) mice, while phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK...... content in WT, but not in PGC-1α KO mice. This shows that exercise training increases UCP1, COXIV and CD31 protein in mouse iWAT, likely as a cumulative effect of transient increases in mRNA expression after each exercise bout, and that PGC-1α is required for these adaptations. Study IV demonstrates...

  5. Sand training: Exercise-induced muscle damage and inflammatory responses to matched-intensity exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Henry; Dawson, Brian; Binnie, Martyn J; Pinnington, Hugh; Sim, Marc; Clemons, Tristan D; Peeling, Peter

    2017-07-01

    This study compared markers of muscle damage and inflammation elevated by a matched-intensity interval running session on soft sand and grass surfaces. In a counterbalanced, repeated-measures and crossover design, 10 well-trained female athletes completed 2 interval-based running sessions 1 week apart on either a grass or a sand surface. Exercise heart rate (HR) was fixed at 83-88% of HR maximum. Venous blood samples were collected pre-, post- and 24 h post-exercise, and analysed for myoglobin (Mb) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Perceptual ratings of exertion (RPE) and muscle soreness (DOMS) were recorded immediately post- and 24 h post-exercise. A significant time effect showed that Mb increased from pre- to post-exercise on grass (p = .008) but not on sand (p = .611). Furthermore, there was a greater relative increase in Mb on grass compared with that on sand (p = .026). No differences in CRP were reported between surfaces (p > .05). The HR, RPE and DOMS scores were not significantly different between conditions (p  >  .05). These results suggest that in response to a matched-intensity exercise bout, markers of post-exercise muscle damage may be reduced by running on softer ground surfaces. Such training strategy may be used to minimize musculoskeletal strain while still incurring an equivalent cardiovascular training stimulus.

  6. Effect of acute exercise and exercise training on VEGF splice variants in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Lotte; Pilegaard, Henriette; Neufer, P Darrell; Hellsten, Ylva

    2004-08-01

    The present study investigated the effect of an acute exercise bout on the mRNA response of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) splice variants in untrained and trained human skeletal muscle. Seven habitually active young men performed one-legged knee-extensor exercise training at an intensity corresponding to approximately 70% of the maximal workload in an incremental test five times/week for 4 wk. Biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle of the trained and untrained leg 40 h after the last training session. The subjects then performed 3 h of two-legged knee-extensor exercise, and biopsies were obtained from both legs after 0, 2, 6, and 24 h of recovery. Real-time PCR was used to examine the expression of VEGF mRNA containing exon 1 and 2 (all VEGF isoforms), exon 6 or exon 7, and VEGF(165) mRNA. Acute exercise induced an increase (P < 0.05) in total VEGF mRNA levels as well as VEGF(165) and VEGF splice variants containing exon 7 at 0, 2, and 6 h of recovery. The increase in VEGF mRNA was higher in the untrained than in the trained leg (P < 0.05). The results suggest that in human skeletal muscle, acute exercise increases total VEGF mRNA, an increase that appears to be explained mainly by an increase in VEGF(165) mRNA. Furthermore, 4 wk of training attenuated the exercise-induced response in skeletal muscle VEGF(165) mRNA.

  7. Effects of high-intensity interval versus continuous exercise training on post-exercise heart rate recovery in coronary heart-disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villelabeitia-Jaureguizar, Koldobika; Vicente-Campos, Davinia; Senen, Alejandro Berenguel; Jiménez, Verónica Hernández; Garrido-Lestache, María Elvira Barrios; Chicharro, Jose López

    2017-10-01

    Heart rate recovery (HRR) has been considered a prognostic and mortality indicator in both healthy and coronary patients. Physical exercise prescription has shown improvements in VO2peak and HRR, but most of the studies have been carried out applying continuous training at a moderate intensity, being very limited the use of protocols of high intensity interval training in coronary patients. We aimed to compare the effects of a moderate continuous training (MCT) versus a high intensity interval training (HIIT) programme on VO2peak and HRR. Seventy three coronary patients were assigned to either HIIT or MCT groups for 8weeks. Incremental exercise tests in a cycloergometer were performed to obtain VO2peak data and heart rate was monitored during and after the exercise test to obtain heart rate recovery data. Both exercise programmes significantly increase VO2peak with a higher increase in the HIIT group (HIIT: 4.5±4.46ml/kg/min vs MCT: 2.46±3.57ml/kg/min; p=0.039). High intensity interval training resulted in a significantly increase in HRR at the first and second minute of the recovery phase (15,44±7,04 vs 21,22±6,62, pheart disease of low risk resulted in an improvement in VO2peak, and also improvements in post-exercise heart-rate recovery, compared with continuous training. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Is hypoxia training good for muscles and exercise performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Michael; Hoppeler, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Altitude training has become very popular among athletes as a means to further increase exercise performance at sea level or to acclimatize to competition at altitude. Several approaches have evolved during the last few decades, with "live high-train low" and "live low-train high" being the most popular. This review focuses on functional, muscular, and practical aspects derived from extensive research on the "live low-train high" approach. According to this, subjects train in hypoxia but remain under normoxia for the rest of the time. It has been reasoned that exercising in hypoxia could increase the training stimulus. Hypoxia training studies published in the past have varied considerably in altitude (2300-5700 m) and training duration (10 days to 8 weeks) and the fitness of the subjects. The evidence from muscle structural, biochemical, and molecular findings point to a specific role of hypoxia in endurance training. However, based on the available performance capacity data such as maximal oxygen uptake (Vo(2)max) and (maximal) power output, hypoxia as a supplement to training is not consistently found to be advantageous for performance at sea level. Stronger evidence exists for benefits of hypoxic training on performance at altitude. "Live low-train high" may thus be considered when altitude acclimatization is not an option. In addition, the complex pattern of gene expression adaptations induced by supplemental training in hypoxia, but not normoxia, suggest that muscle tissue specifically responds to hypoxia. Whether and to what degree these gene expression changes translate into significant changes in protein concentrations that are ultimately responsible for observable structural or functional phenotypes remains open. It is conceivable that the global functional markers such as Vo(2)max and (maximal) power output are too coarse to detect more subtle changes that might still be functionally relevant, at least to high-level athletes.

  9. Exercise training programs to improve hand rim wheelchair propulsion capacity: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwinkels, M.; Verschuren, O.; Janssen, T.W.J.; Ketelaar, M.; Takken, T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: An adequate wheelchair propulsion capacity is required to perform daily life activities. Exercise training may be effective to gain or improve wheelchair propulsion capacity. This review investigates whether different types of exercise training programs are effective in improving wheelcha

  10. Exercise training programs to improve hand rim wheelchair propulsion capacity: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwinkels, M.; Verschuren, O.; Janssen, T.W.J.; Ketelaar, M.; Takken, T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: An adequate wheelchair propulsion capacity is required to perform daily life activities. Exercise training may be effective to gain or improve wheelchair propulsion capacity. This review investigates whether different types of exercise training programs are effective in improving

  11. Exercise training programs to improve hand rim wheelchair propulsion capacity: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwinkels, M.G.J.; Verschuren, O.W.; Janssen, T.; Ketelaar, M.; Takken, T.; Backx, F.J.G.; Groot, J.F. de; Smits, D.W.; Volman, MJM

    2014-01-01

    Objective: An adequate wheelchair propulsion capacity is required to perform daily life activities. Exercise training may be effective to gain or improve wheelchair propulsion capacity. This review investigates whether different types of exercise training programs are effective in improving

  12. Biochemical characterization of exercise-trained porcine myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, M H; Hale, C C; Novela, L; Gute, D; Hamilton, N; Ianuzzo, C D

    1991-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether cardiac biochemical adaptations are induced by chronic exercise training (ET) of miniature swine. Female Yucatan miniature swine were trained on a treadmill or were cage confined (C) for 16-22 wk. After training, the ET pigs had increased exercise tolerance, lower heart rates during exercise at submaximal intensities, moderate cardiac hypertrophy, increased coronary blood flow capacity, and increased oxidative capacity of skeletal muscle. Myosin from both the C and ET hearts was 100% of the V3 isozyme, and there were no differences between the myosin adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) or myofibrillar ATPase activities of C and ET hearts. Also, the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase activity and Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange activity of sarcolemmal vesicles were the same in cardiac muscle of C and ET hearts. Finally, the glycolytic and oxidative capacity of ET cardiac muscle was not different from control, since phosphofructokinase, citrate synthase, and 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activities were the same in cardiac tissue from ET and C pigs. We conclude that endurance exercise training does not provide sufficient stress on the heart of a large mammal to induce changes in any of the three major cardiac biochemical systems of the porcine myocardium: the contractile system, the Ca2+ regulatory systems, or the metabolic system.

  13. Impact of exercise training on arterial wall thickness in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijssen, D.H.J.; Cable, N.T.; Green, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    Thickening of the carotid artery wall has been adopted as a surrogate marker of pre-clinical atherosclerosis, which is strongly related to increased cardiovascular risk. The cardioprotective effects of exercise training, including direct effects on vascular function and lumen dimension, have been co

  14. Impact of moderate versus mild aerobic exercise training on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    inflammatory cytokines in obese type 2 diabetic patients: a ... There is little information about the effects of aerobic exercise training on these biomarkers and the risk of .... Skeletal muscle is another source of cytokines, called ... experiment would be terminated and the Human ... to 75 % of the maximum heart rate (HRmax).

  15. Exercise manual for the Augmented Computer Exercise for Inspection Training (ACE-IT) software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobranich, P.R.; Widney, T.W.; Goolsby, P.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Cooperative Monitoring Center and Regional Security; Nelson, J.D.; Evanko, D.A. [Ogden Environmental and Energy Services, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-09-01

    The on-site inspection provisions in many current and proposed arms control agreements require extensive preparation and training on the part of both the Inspected Party and the Inspection Team. Current training techniques include table-top inspections and practice inspections. The Augmented Computer Exercise for Inspection Training (ACE-IT), an interactive computer training tool, increases the utility of table-top inspections. ACE-IT has been designed to provide training for a hypothetical challenge inspection under the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC); however, this training tool can be modified for other inspection regimes. Although ACE-IT provides training from notification of an inspection through post-inspection activities, the primary emphasis of ACE-IT is in the inspection itself--particularly with the concept of managed access. ACE-IT also demonstrates how inspection provisions impact compliance determination and the protection of sensitive information. The Exercise Manual supplements the ACE-IT software by providing general information on on-site inspections and detailed information for the CWC challenge inspection exercise. The detailed information includes the pre-inspection briefing, maps, list of sensitive items, medical records, and shipping records.

  16. Intensive Exercise Training During Bed Rest Attenuates Deconditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1997-01-01

    Intensive exercise training during bed rest attenuates deconditioning. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 29, No. 2, pp. 207-215, 1997. A 30-d 6 deg head-down bed rest project was conducted to evaluate variable high-intensity, short-duration, isotonic cycle ergometer exercise (ITE) training and high-intensity intermittent resistive isokinetic exercise (IKE) training regimens designed to maintain peak VO2 and muscle mass, strength, and endurance at ambulatory control levels throughout prolonged bed rest. Other elements of the deconditioning (adaptive) syndrome, such as proprioception, psychological performance, hypovolemia, water balance, body composition, and orthostatic tolerance, were also measured. Major findings are summarized in this paper. Compared with response during bed rest of the no exercise (NOE) control group: the ITE training regimen (a) maintained work capacity (peak VO2), (b) maintained plasma and red cell volumes, (c) induced positive body water balance, (d) decreased quality of sleep and mental concentration, and (e) had no effect on the decrease in orthostatic tolerance; the IKE training regimen (f) attenuated the decrease in peak VO2 by 50%, (g) attenuated loss of red cell volume by 40% but had no effect on loss of plasma volume, (b) induced positive body water balance, (i) had no adverse effect on quality of sleep or concentration, and 0) had no effect on the decrease in orthostatic tolerance. These findings suggest that various elements of the deconditioning syndrome can be manipulated by duration and intensity of ITE or IKE training regimens and that several different training protocols will be required to maintain or restore physiological and psychological performance of individuals confined to prolonged bed rest.

  17. Intensive Exercise Training During Bed Rest Attenuates Deconditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1997-01-01

    Intensive exercise training during bed rest attenuates deconditioning. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 29, No. 2, pp. 207-215, 1997. A 30-d 6 deg head-down bed rest project was conducted to evaluate variable high-intensity, short-duration, isotonic cycle ergometer exercise (ITE) training and high-intensity intermittent resistive isokinetic exercise (IKE) training regimens designed to maintain peak VO2 and muscle mass, strength, and endurance at ambulatory control levels throughout prolonged bed rest. Other elements of the deconditioning (adaptive) syndrome, such as proprioception, psychological performance, hypovolemia, water balance, body composition, and orthostatic tolerance, were also measured. Major findings are summarized in this paper. Compared with response during bed rest of the no exercise (NOE) control group: the ITE training regimen (a) maintained work capacity (peak VO2), (b) maintained plasma and red cell volumes, (c) induced positive body water balance, (d) decreased quality of sleep and mental concentration, and (e) had no effect on the decrease in orthostatic tolerance; the IKE training regimen (f) attenuated the decrease in peak VO2 by 50%, (g) attenuated loss of red cell volume by 40% but had no effect on loss of plasma volume, (b) induced positive body water balance, (i) had no adverse effect on quality of sleep or concentration, and 0) had no effect on the decrease in orthostatic tolerance. These findings suggest that various elements of the deconditioning syndrome can be manipulated by duration and intensity of ITE or IKE training regimens and that several different training protocols will be required to maintain or restore physiological and psychological performance of individuals confined to prolonged bed rest.

  18. Exercise training after burn injury: a survey of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diego, Alejandro M; Serghiou, Michael; Padmanabha, Anand; Porro, Laura J; Herndon, David N; Suman, Oscar E

    2013-01-01

    Exercise programs capable of contributing positively to the long-term rehabilitation of burn patients should be included in outpatient rehabilitation programs. However, the extent and intensity of the resistance and cardiopulmonary exercise prescribed are unclear. This study was conducted to investigate the existence, design, content, and prescription of outpatient cardiopulmonary and resistance exercise programs within outpatient burn rehabilitation. A survey was designed to gather information on existing exercise programs for burn survivors and to assess the extent to which these programs are included in overall outpatient rehabilitation programs. Three hundred and twenty-seven surveys were distributed in the licensed physical and occupational therapists part of the American Burn Association Physical Therapy/Occupational Therapy Special Interest Group. One hundred and three surveys were completed. Eighty-two percent of respondents indicated that their institutions offered outpatient therapy after discharge. The frequency of therapists' contact with patients during this period varied greatly. Interestingly, 81% of therapists stated that no hospital-based cardiopulmonary endurance exercise programs were available. Patients' physical function was infrequently determined through the use of cardiopulmonary parameters (oxygen consumption and heart rate) or muscle strength. Instead, more subjective parameters such as range of motion (75%), manual muscle testing (61%), and quality of life (61%) were used. Prescription and follow-up assessment of cardiopulmonary endurance training are inconsistent among institutions, underscoring the need for greater awareness of the importance of exercise in any burn rehabilitation program. Identification of cardiopulmonary and progressive resistance parameters for establishing and tracking exercise training is also needed to maximize exercise-induced benefits.

  19. Increased fatigue resistance of respiratory muscles during exercise after respiratory muscle endurance training

    OpenAIRE

    Verges, S; Lenherr, O; Haner, A C; Schulz, C.; Spengler, C M

    2007-01-01

    Respiratory muscle fatigue develops during exhaustive exercise and can limit exercise performance. Respiratory muscle training, in turn, can increase exercise performance. We investigated whether respiratory muscle endurance training (RMT) reduces exercise-induced inspiratory and expiratory muscle fatigue. Twenty-one healthy, male volunteers performed twenty 30-min sessions of either normocapnic hyperpnoea (n = 13) or sham training (CON, n = 8) over 4-5 wk. Before and after training, subjects...

  20. High-intensity training versus traditional exercise interventions for promoting health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Lars; Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus D

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of brief intense interval training as exercise intervention for promoting health and to evaluate potential benefits about common interventions, that is, prolonged exercise and strength training.......The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of brief intense interval training as exercise intervention for promoting health and to evaluate potential benefits about common interventions, that is, prolonged exercise and strength training....

  1. ASCAN Helms simulates parachute jump during VAFB training exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    1990 Group 13 Astronaut Candidate (ASCAN) Susan J. Helms simulates a parachute jump during ground egress and parasail training exercises at Vance Air Force Base (VAFB), Enid, Oklahoma. With her arms folded against her chest, Helms jumps from a brick platform onto the ground. In line behind her are Charles J. Precourt followed by Leroy Chiao. The training is designed to prepare the ASCANs for proper survival measures to take in the event of an emergency aboard the T-38 jet trainer aircraft they will frequently use once they become full-fledged astronauts. ASCANs completed the VAFB training courses from 07-29-90 through 07-31-90.

  2. The development of radioactive sample surrogates for training and exercises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martha Finck; Bevin Brush; Dick Jansen; David Chamberlain; Don Dry; George Brooks; Margaret Goldberg

    2012-03-01

    The development of radioactive sample surrogates for training and exercises Source term information is required for to reconstruct a device used in a dispersed radiological dispersal device. Simulating a radioactive environment to train and exercise sampling and sample characterization methods with suitable sample materials is a continued challenge. The Idaho National Laboratory has developed and permitted a Radioactive Response Training Range (RRTR), an 800 acre test range that is approved for open air dispersal of activated KBr, for training first responders in the entry and exit from radioactively contaminated areas, and testing protocols for environmental sampling and field characterization. Members from the Department of Defense, Law Enforcement, and the Department of Energy participated in the first contamination exercise that was conducted at the RRTR in the July 2011. The range was contaminated using a short lived radioactive Br-82 isotope (activated KBr). Soil samples contaminated with KBr (dispersed as a solution) and glass particles containing activated potassium bromide that emulated dispersed radioactive materials (such as ceramic-based sealed source materials) were collected to assess environmental sampling and characterization techniques. This presentation summarizes the performance of a radioactive materials surrogate for use as a training aide for nuclear forensics.

  3. Exercise and Training at Altitudes: Physiological Effects and Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Cecilia Vargas Pinilla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An increase in altitude leads to a proportional fall in the barometric pressure, and a decrease in atmospheric oxygen pressure, producing hypobaric hypoxia that affects, in different degrees, all body organs, systems and functions. The chronically reduced partial pressure of oxygen causes that individuals adapt and adjust to physiological stress. These adaptations are modulated by many factors, including the degree of hypoxia related to altitude, time of exposure, exercise intensity and individual conditions. It has been established that exposure to high altitude is an environmental stressor that elicits a response that contributes to many adjustments and adaptations that influence exercise capacity and endurance performance. These adaptations include in crease in hemoglobin concentration, ventilation, capillary density and tissue myoglobin concentration. However, a negative effect in strength and power is related to a decrease in muscle fiber size and body mass due to the decrease in the training intensity. Many researches aim at establishing how training or living at high altitudes affects performance in athletes. Training methods, such as living in high altitudes training low, and training high-living in low altitudes have been used to research the changes in the physical condition in athletes and how the physiological adaptations to hypoxia can enhanceperformance at sea level. This review analyzes the literature related to altitude training focused on how physiological adaptations to hypoxic environments influence performance, and which protocols are most frequently used to train in high altitudes.

  4. Optimal sampling frequency in recording of resistance training exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardella, Paolo; Carrasquilla García, Irene; Pozzo, Marco; Tous-Fajardo, Julio; Saez de Villareal, Eduardo; Suarez-Arrones, Luis

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the raw lifting speed collected during four different resistance training exercises to assess the optimal sampling frequency. Eight physically active participants performed sets of Squat Jumps, Countermovement Jumps, Squats and Bench Presses at a maximal lifting speed. A linear encoder was used to measure the instantaneous speed at a 200 Hz sampling rate. Subsequently, the power spectrum of the signal was computed by evaluating its Discrete Fourier Transform. The sampling frequency needed to reconstruct the signals with an error of less than 0.1% was f99.9 = 11.615 ± 2.680 Hz for the exercise exhibiting the largest bandwidth, with the absolute highest individual value being 17.467 Hz. There was no difference between sets in any of the exercises. Using the closest integer sampling frequency value (25 Hz) yielded a reconstruction of the signal up to 99.975 ± 0.025% of its total in the worst case. In conclusion, a sampling rate of 25 Hz or above is more than adequate to record raw speed data and compute power during resistance training exercises, even under the most extreme circumstances during explosive exercises. Higher sampling frequencies provide no increase in the recording precision and may instead have adverse effects on the overall data quality.

  5. A 2 year multidomain intervention of diet, exercise, cognitive training, and vascular risk monitoring versus control to prevent cognitive decline in at-risk elderly people (FINGER): a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngandu, Tiia; Lehtisalo, Jenni; Solomon, Alina; Levälahti, Esko; Ahtiluoto, Satu; Antikainen, Riitta; Bäckman, Lars; Hänninen, Tuomo; Jula, Antti; Laatikainen, Tiina; Lindström, Jaana; Mangialasche, Francesca; Paajanen, Teemu; Pajala, Satu; Peltonen, Markku; Rauramaa, Rainer; Stigsdotter-Neely, Anna; Strandberg, Timo; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Soininen, Hilkka; Kivipelto, Miia

    2015-06-06

    Modifiable vascular and lifestyle-related risk factors have been associated with dementia risk in observational studies. In the Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER), a proof-of-concept randomised controlled trial, we aimed to assess a multidomain approach to prevent cognitive decline in at-risk elderly people from the general population. In a double-blind randomised controlled trial we enrolled individuals aged 60-77 years recruited from previous national surveys. Inclusion criteria were CAIDE (Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Aging and Dementia) Dementia Risk Score of at least 6 points and cognition at mean level or slightly lower than expected for age. We randomly assigned participants in a 1:1 ratio to a 2 year multidomain intervention (diet, exercise, cognitive training, vascular risk monitoring), or a control group (general health advice). Computer-generated allocation was done in blocks of four (two individuals randomly allocated to each group) at each site. Group allocation was not actively disclosed to participants and outcome assessors were masked to group allocation. The primary outcome was change in cognition as measured through comprehensive neuropsychological test battery (NTB) Z score. Analysis was by modified intention to treat (all participants with at least one post-baseline observation). This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01041989. Between Sept 7, 2009, and Nov 24, 2011, we screened 2654 individuals and randomly assigned 1260 to the intervention group (n=631) or control group (n=629). 591 (94%) participants in the intervention group and 599 (95%) in the control group had at least one post-baseline assessment and were included in the modified intention-to-treat analysis. Estimated mean change in NTB total Z score at 2 years was 0·20 (SE 0·02, SD 0·51) in the intervention group and 0·16 (0·01, 0·51) in the control group. Between-group difference in the change of NTB

  6. Acute hypoxic exercise does not alter post-exercise iron metabolism in moderately trained endurance athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Govus, A.D.; Abbiss, C.R.; Garvican-Lewis, L.A.; Swinkels, D.W.; Laarakkers, C.M.; Gore, C.J.; Peeling, P.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study measured the influence of acute hypoxic exercise on Interleukin-6 (IL-6), hepcidin, and iron biomarkers in athletes. METHODS: In a repeated measures design, 13 moderately trained endurance athletes performed 5 x 4 min intervals at 90 % of their peak oxygen consumption velocity (v

  7. Exercise training in older patients with systolic heart failure: Adherence, exercise capacity, inflammation and glycemic control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, Eva; Hjardem-Hansen, Rasmus; Dela, Flemming

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. Training improves exercise capacity in patients with heart failure (CHF) but most evidence is on selected younger patients with systolic CHF. Design. All patients diagnosed with CHF over 3 years were screened for inclusion and exclusion criteria. Fifty two patients with systolic CHF...

  8. Resistance exercise countermeasures for space flight: implications of training specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamman, M. M.; Caruso, J. F.

    2000-01-01

    While resistance exercise should be a logical choice for prevention of strength loss during unloading, the principle of training specificity cannot be overlooked. Our purpose was to explore training specificity in describing the effect of our constant load exercise countermeasure on isokinetic strength performance. Twelve healthy men (mean +/- SD: 28.0 +/- 5.2 years, 179.4 +/- 3.9 cm, 77.5 +/- 13.6 kg) were randomly assigned to no exercise or resistance exercise (REX) during 14 days of bed rest. REX performed five sets of leg press exercise to volitional fatigue (6-10 repetitions) every other day. Unilateral isokinetic concentric-eccentric knee extension testing performed before and on day 15 prior to reambulation included torque-velocity and power-velocity relationships at four velocities (0.52, 1.75, 2.97, and 4.19 rad s-1), torque-position relationship, and contractile work capacity (10 repetitions at 1.05 rad s-1). Two (group) x 2 (time) ANOVA revealed no group x time interactions; thus, groups were combined. Across velocities, angle-specific torque fell 18% and average power fell 20% (p eccentric) x time interactions were noted. Torque x position decreased on average 24% (p < 0.05). Total contractile work dropped 27% (p < 0.05). Results indicate bed rest induces rapid and marked reductions in strength and our constant load resistance training protocol did not prevent isokinetic strength losses. Differences between closed-chain training and open-chain testing may explain the lack of protection.

  9. Sake Protein Supplementation Affects Exercise Performance and Biochemical Profiles in Power-Exercise-Trained Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ming Chen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Exercise and fitness training programs have attracted the public’s attention in recent years. Sports nutrition supplementation is an important issue in the global sports market. Purpose: In this study, we designed a power exercise training (PET program with a mouse model based on a strength and conditional training protocol for humans. We tested the effect of supplementation with functional branched-chain amino acid (BCAA-rich sake protein (SP to determine whether the supplement had a synergistic effect during PET and enhanced athletic performance and resistance to fatigue. Methods: Male ICR mice were divided into three groups (n = 8 per group for four-week treatment: sedentary controls with vehicle (SC, and PET and PET groups with SP supplementation (3.8 g/kg, PET + SP. Exercise performance was evaluated by forelimb grip strength and exhaustive swimming time as well as changes in body composition and anti-fatigue activity levels of serum lactate, ammonia, glucose, and creatine kinase (CK after a 15-min swimming exercise. The biochemical parameters were measured at the end of the experiment. Results: four-week PET significantly increased grip strength and exhaustive swimming time and decreased epididymal fat pad (EFP weight and area. Levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, creatinine, and uric acid (UA were significantly increased. PET + SP supplementation significantly decreased serum lactate, ammonia and CK levels after the 15-min swimming exercise. The resting serum levels of AST, ALT, CREA and UA were all significantly decreased with PET + SP. Conclusion: The PET program could increase the exercise performance and modulate the body composition of mice. PET with SP conferred better anti-fatigue activity, improved biochemical profiles, and may be an effective ergogenic aid in strength training.

  10. Automated Management of Exercise Intervention at the Point of Care: Application of a Web-Based Leg Training System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedov, Vadim N; Dedova, Irina V

    2015-11-23

    Recent advances in information and communication technology have prompted development of Web-based health tools to promote physical activity, the key component of cardiac rehabilitation and chronic disease management. Mobile apps can facilitate behavioral changes and help in exercise monitoring, although actual training usually takes place away from the point of care in specialized gyms or outdoors. Daily participation in conventional physical activities is expensive, time consuming, and mostly relies on self-management abilities of patients who are typically aged, overweight, and unfit. Facilitation of sustained exercise training at the point of care might improve patient engagement in cardiac rehabilitation. In this study we aimed to test the feasibility of execution and automatic monitoring of several exercise regimens on-site using a Web-enabled leg training system. The MedExercise leg rehabilitation machine was equipped with wireless temperature sensors in order to monitor its usage by the rise of temperature in the resistance unit (Δt°). Personal electronic devices such as laptop computers were fitted with wireless gateways and relevant software was installed to monitor the usage of training machines. Cloud-based software allowed monitoring of participant training over the Internet. Seven healthy participants applied the system at various locations with training protocols typically used in cardiac rehabilitation. The heart rates were measured by fingertip pulse oximeters. Exercising in home chairs, in bed, and under an office desk was made feasible and resulted in an intensity-dependent increase of participants' heart rates and Δt° in training machine temperatures. Participants self-controlled their activities on smart devices, while a supervisor monitored them over the Internet. Individual Δt° reached during 30 minutes of moderate-intensity continuous training averaged 7.8°C (SD 1.6). These Δt° were used as personalized daily doses of exercise with

  11. The effect of detraining and reduced training on the physiological adaptations to aerobic exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufer, P D

    1989-11-01

    In previously sedentary individuals, regularly performed aerobic exercise results in significant improvements in exercise capacity. The development of peak exercise performance, as typified by competitive endurance athletes, is dependent upon several months to years of aerobic training. The physiological adaptations associated with these improvements in both maximal exercise performance, as reflected by increases in maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), and submaximal exercise endurance include increases in both cardiovascular function and skeletal muscle oxidative capacity. Despite prolonged periods of aerobic training, reductions in maximal and submaximal exercise performance occur within weeks after the cessation of training. These losses in exercise performance coincide with declines in cardiovascular function and muscle metabolic potential. Significant reductions in VO2max have been reported to occur within 2 to 4 weeks of detraining. This initial rapid decline in VO2max is likely related to a corresponding fall in maximal cardiac output which, in turn, appears to be mediated by a reduced stroke volume with little or no change in maximal heart rate. A loss in blood volume appears to, at least partially, account for the decline in stroke volume and VO2max during the initial weeks of detraining, although changes in cardiac hypertrophy, total haemoglobin content, skeletal muscle capillarisation and temperature regulation have been suggested as possible mediating factors. When detraining continues beyond 2 to 4 weeks, further declines in VO2max appear to be a function of corresponding reductions in maximal arterial-venous (mixed) oxygen difference. Whether reductions in oxygen delivery to and/or extraction by working muscle regulates this progressive decline is not readily apparent. Changes in maximal oxygen delivery may result from decreases in total haemoglobin content and/or maximal muscle blood flow and vascular conductance. The declines in skeletal muscle oxidative

  12. Exercise testing, limitation and training in patients with cystic fibrosis. A personalized approach

    OpenAIRE

    Werkman, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    Exercise testing and training are cornerstones in regular CF care. However, no consensus exists in literature about which exercise test protocol should be used for individual patients. Furthermore, divergence exists in insights about both the dominant exercise limiting mechanisms and the possibilities to aim and institute exercise training strategies, based on these individual limitations. Therefore, this thesis intends to expand current knowledge in [1] alternative exercise test procedures i...

  13. Effects of Acute Endurance Exercise on Plasma Protein Profiles of Endurance-Trained and Untrained Individuals over Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Schild

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute physical exercise and repeated exercise stimuli affect whole-body metabolic and immunologic homeostasis. The aim of this study was to determine plasma protein profiles of trained (EET, n=19 and untrained (SED, n=17 individuals at rest and in response to an acute bout of endurance exercise. Participants completed a bicycle exercise test at an intensity corresponding to 80% of their VO2max. Plasma samples were taken before, directly after, and three hours after exercise and analyzed using multiplex immunoassays. Seventy-eight plasma variables were included in the final analysis. Twenty-nine variables displayed significant acute exercise effects in both groups. Seven proteins differed between groups, without being affected by acute exercise. Among these A2Macro and IL-5 were higher in EET individuals while leptin showed elevated levels in SED individuals. Fifteen variables revealed group and time differences with elevated levels for IL-3, IL-7, IL-10, and TNFR2 in EET individuals. An interaction effect could be observed for nine variables including IL-6, MMP-2, MMP-3, and muscle damage markers. The proteins that differ between groups indicate a long-term exercise effect on plasma protein concentrations. These findings might be of importance in the development of exercise-based strategies in the prevention and therapy of chronic metabolic and inflammatory diseases and for training monitoring.

  14. Exercise training improves free testosterone in lifelong sedentary aging men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Lawrence D; Herbert, Peter; Sculthorpe, Nicholas F; Grace, Fergal M

    2017-07-01

    As the impact of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on systemic hormones in aging men is unstudied to date, we investigated whether total testosterone (TT), sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), free testosterone (free-T) and cortisol (all in serum) were altered following HIIT in a cohort of 22 lifelong sedentary (62 ± 2 years) older men. As HIIT requires preconditioning exercise in sedentary cohorts, participants were tested at three phases, each separated by six-week training; baseline (phase A), following conditioning exercise (phase B) and post-HIIT (phase C). Each measurement phase used identical methods. TT was significantly increased following HIIT (~17%; P sedentary older males, with the HIIT stimulus accounting for a small but statistically significant increase in free-T. Further study is required to determine the biological importance of small improvements in free-T in aging men. © 2017 The authors.

  15. Diminished hormonal responses to exercise in trained rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galbo, H; Richter, Erik; Holst, J J

    1977-01-01

    Male rats (120 g) either were subjected to a 12-wk physical training program (T rats) or were sedentary controls (C rats). Subsequently the rats were killed at rest or after a 45- or 90-min forced swim. At rest, T rats had higher liver and muscle glycogen concentrations but lower plasma insulin....... In trained rats the hormonal response to exercise is blunted partly due to higher glucose concentrations. In these rats adipose tissue sensitivity to catecholamines is increased, and changes in glucagon and insulin concentrations are not necessary for increased lipolysis and hepatic glycogen depletion during...

  16. Astronaut John Glenn during training exercise in Mercury Procedures Trainer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1962-01-01

    Close-up view of Mercury Astronaut John H. Glenn Jr. as he runs through a training exercise in the Mercury Procedures Trainer in use at Space Task Group, Langley Field, Virginia. This Link-type spacecraft simulator permits the practice of both normal and emergency modes of systems operations. Glenn is in the Mercury pressure suit and is wearing his helmet, just as he would if the flight were real.

  17. Influence of aerobic exercise training on cardiovascular and endocrine-inflammatory biomarkers in hypertensive postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline P. Jarrete

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Given that few studies have examined the interaction between endocrine-inflammatory mediators and aerobic exercise training in hypertensive postmenopausal women, the aim of this study was to investigate whether aerobic exercise training (AET for twenty-four sessions would alter cortisol, leptin and interleukin-1β (IL-1β levels. To further analyze endothelium function in response to AET, we also examined redox state as well as NO/cGMP pathway in this population. Eighteen hypertensive postmenopausal women finished this study. AET program consisted of 24 sessions in treadmill, 3 times per week, duration of 30 up to 40 min for each session, for 8 weeks at intensity of 100% of the MLSS according to previous incremental test. Heart rate was monitored in all studied time (resting and during exercise sessions. After 48 h of the last exercise session, blood samples were collected for biochemical analyses (levels of cortisol, leptin, IL-1β, nitrite/nitrate (NOx−, cGMP, malondialdehyde (MDA and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA; superoxide and catalase activity. We also measured systolic and diastolic blood pressure. A significant reduction in body mass was observed. As expected, systolic and diastolic blood pressure values were significantly reduced after AET in hypertensive women. We also found a marked increase in NOx− levels as well as cGMP concentration in trained women, approximately 37.7 and 30.8%, respectively. No changes in cortisol, leptin, ADMA and IL-1β levels were observed after AET. Similarly, MDA levels and catalase activity were not affected by AET. In contrast, a marked increase in SOD activity was found (86.6%. In conclusion, our findings show that aerobic exercise training for twenty-four sessions promoted a significant reduction in blood pressure by activating NO/cGMP pathway as well as by promoting an up-regulation of SOD activity without changing in cortisol/leptin levels in postmenopausal hypertensive women.

  18. The Effect of Different Doses of Aerobic Exercise Training on Exercise Blood Pressure in Overweight and Obese Postmenopausal Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Damon L.; Earnest, Conrad P.; Katzmarzyk, Peter T.; Rankinen, Tuomo; Blair, Steven N.; Church, Timothy S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Abnormally elevated exercise blood pressure is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Aerobic exercise training has been shown to reduce exercise blood pressure. However, it is unknown if these improvements occur in a dose dependent manner. The purpose of the present study is to determine the effect of different doses of aerobic exercise training on exercise blood pressure in obese postmenopausal women. Methods Participants (n=404) were randomized to one of 4 groups: 4, 8, or 12 kilocalories per kilogram of energy expenditure per week (kcal/kg/week) or the non-exercise control group for 6 months. Exercise blood pressure was obtained during the 50 watts stage of a cycle ergometer maximal exercise test. Results There was a significant reduction in systolic blood pressure at 50 watts in the 4 kcal/kg/week (−10.9 mmHg, pexercise training dose significantly reduced diastolic blood pressure (−4.3 mmHg, p= 0.033) compared to control. Additionally, resting blood pressure was not altered following exercise training (p>0.05) compared to control, and was not associated with changes in exercise systolic (r=0.09, p=0.09) or diastolic (r=0.10, p=0.08) blood pressure. Conclusions Aerobic exercise training reduces exercise blood pressure and may be more modifiable than changes in resting blood pressure. A high dose of aerobic exercise is recommended to successfully reduce both exercise systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and therefore may attenuate the CVD risk associated with abnormally elevated exercise blood pressure. PMID:22547251

  19. Nutritional assessment and its role in evaluation and prescription of exercise training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Meşină

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Nutritional assessment gives accurate and reproducible information as regards the existence of an optimal energy metabolism: resting metabolic rate (RMR, the proportion of nutritional principles (fat, carbohydrate, protein used by the body in the basal metabolism, the intensity of effort during exercise where the maximum fat oxidation rate (MFOR is achieved. These information are used for the individualization of physical training programs and for the calorie intake adjustment in accordance with the body needs. The aim of this study is to underline once again the importance of physical activity in the weight management and to demonstrate the importance of nutritional assessment in the prescription of physical training in obese subjects.Material and methods:We investigated 43 young obese, with a mean age of 21.2 ± 3.1 years old, of which 93% were females. The subject’s evaluations consisted in: nutritional assessment (using indirect calorimetry method, maximal exercise test at baseline and the end of the study (after 6 months. After the exercise test, the subjects performed an individualized physical training with a minimum frequency of three times a week. Subject’s heart rate was monitorized during exercise by a physical therapist using a heart rate monitor (Polar F3, Finland. The dropout rate from the physical training program as part of the study was 35%, in the end remaining only 28 subjects.Results:After 6 months of individualized exercise training, we noticed a statistically significant increase of the following parameters: maximum fat oxidation rate (MFOR from 16.96±7.75 to 22.07±8.4 g/h, p=0.0043; resting metabolic rate (RMR from 2007±300.3 to 2105±290.4 kcal/day, p = 0.0026; along with the resting oxygen uptake (VO2 rest from 0.29±0.04 to 0.3±0.04 l / min, p = 0, 0035. The only parameter that has improved, but not reaching statistical significance was heart rate average at MFOR (HR_MFOR which increased from 127.1

  20. Peripheral insulin sensitivity as modified by diet and exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimditch, G K; Barnard, R J; Hendricks, L; Weitzman, D

    1988-07-01

    To determine which component of a high-fat sucrose diet (HFS) caused insulin resistance and whether exercise training or fiber could prevent it, six dietary treatments were tested in rats: low-fat complex carbohydrate (LFCC); high-fat complex carbohydrate (HFCC); low-fat sucrose (LFS); high-fat sucrose (HFS); HFS plus fiber (HFS + F); and HFS plus exercise training (HFS + EX). After 10 wk rats were subjected to an intravenous glucose-tolerance test. The HFS and HFS + F groups developed glucose intolerance, as indicated by significantly greater areas under their glucose curves compared with the LFCC group's areas. The LFS, HFS, HFS + F, and HFS + EX groups developed insulin resistance, as indicated by significantly greater areas under their insulin curves compared with the LFCC and HFCC groups' areas. Either the presence of sucrose or the absence of complex carbohydrates, not high fat, was responsible for the insulin resistance and it was not improved by adding fiber to the diet or by exercise training.

  1. AUTONOMIC CONTROL OF HEART RATE AFTER EXERCISE IN TRAINED WRESTLERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Báez, San Martín E.; Von Oetinger, A.; Cañas, Jamett R.; Ramírez, Campillo R.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to establish differences in vagal reactivation, through heart rate recovery and heart rate variability post exercise, in Brazilian jiu-jitsu wrestlers (BJJW). A total of 18 male athletes were evaluated, ten highly trained (HT) and eight moderately trained (MT), who performed a maximum incremental test. At the end of the exercise, the R-R intervals were recorded during the first minute of recovery. We calculated heart rate recovery (HRR60s), and performed linear and non-linear (standard deviation of instantaneous beat-to-beat R-R interval variability – SD1) analysis of heart rate variability (HRV), using the tachogram of the first minute of recovery divided into four segments of 15 s each (0-15 s, 15-30 s, 30-45 s, 45-60 s). Between HT and MT individuals, there were statistically significant differences in HRR60s (p <0.05) and in the non linear analysis of HRV from SD130-45s (p <0.05) and SD145-60s (p <0.05). The results of this research suggest that heart rate kinetics during the first minute after exercise are related to training level and can be used as an index for autonomic cardiovascular control in BJJW. PMID:24744476

  2. Exercise training improves mean arterial pressure in breast cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C. Mills

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Currently, many breast cancer survivors worldwide live with treatment-related side effects, including cardiovascular health problems. This study examined effects of a 5-month exercise intervention on non-invasive markers of cardiovascular health in breast cancer survivors. Relationships between these markers and commonly used markers of overall health were also explored. Fifty-two survivors completed the exercise training at a rehabilitation center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill between 2008-2011. A combined aerobic and resistance exercise intervention (3 times/week for 1h at intensities progressing from low (40% to moderate (65-70% of VO2max for aerobic and 8-12 repetitions max for the resistance exercise were implemented. Significant reduction in mean arterial pressure (MAP was observed from baseline to final assessment. A significant correlation was found between MAP and Body Mass Index (BMI. In conclusion, 5-months combined aerobic and resistance exercise intervention positively improved MAP which was, in part, attributed to changes in BMI.

  3. Eccentric exercise: mechanisms and effects when used as training regime or training adjunct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Michael; Hoppeler, Hans H

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the current review is to discuss applications and mechanism of eccentric exercise in training regimes of competitive sports. Eccentric muscle work is important in most sports. Eccentric muscle contractions enhance the performance during the concentric phase of stretch-shortening cycles, which is important in disciplines like sprinting, jumping, throwing, and running. Muscles activated during lengthening movements can also function as shock absorbers, to decelerate during landing tasks or to precisely deal with high external loading in sports like alpine skiing. The few studies available on trained subjects reveal that eccentric training can further enhance maximal muscle strength and power. It can further optimize muscle length for maximal tension development at a greater degree of extension, and has potential to improve muscle coordination during eccentric tasks. In skeletal muscles, these functional adaptations are based on increases in muscle mass, fascicle length, number of sarcomeres, and cross-sectional area of type II fibers. Identified modalities for eccentric loading in athletic populations involve classical isotonic exercises, accentuated jumping exercises, eccentric overloading exercises, and eccentric cycle ergometry. We conclude that eccentric exercise offers a promising training modality to enhance performance and to prevent injuries in athletes. However, further research is necessary to better understand how the neuromuscular system adapts to eccentric loading in athletes. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  4. EFFECTS OF EXERCISE TRAINING ON CARDIOVASCULAR ADRENERGIC SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario eLeosco

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In heart failure (HF, exercise has been shown to modulate cardiac sympathetic hyperactivation which is one of the earliest features of neurohormonal derangement in this syndrome and correlates with adverse outcome. An important molecular alteration related to chronic sympathetic overstimulation in HF is represented by cardiac β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR dysfunction . It has been demonstrated that exercise reverses β-AR dysfunction by restoring cardiac receptor membrane density and G-protein-dependent adenylyl cyclase activation. In particular, several evidence indicate that exercise reduces levels of cardiac G-protein coupled receptor kinase-2 (GRK2 which is known to be involved in both β1-AR and β2-AR dysregulation in HF. Similar alterations of β-AR system have been described also in the senescent heart. It has also been demonstrated that exercise training restores adrenal GRK2/α-2AR/cathecolamine (CA production axis. At vascular level, exercise shows a therapeutic effect on age-related impairment of vascular reactivity to adrenergic stimulation and restores β-AR-dependent vasodilatation by increasing vascular β-AR responsiveness and reducing endothelial GRK2 activity. Sympathetic nervous system overdrive is thought to account for >50 % of all cases of hypertension and a lack of balance between parasympathetic and sympathetic modulation has been observed in hypertensive subjects. Non-pharmacological, lifestyle interventions have been associated with reductions in SNS overactivity and blood pressure in hypertension. Several evidence have highlighted the blood pressure lowering effects of aerobic endurance exercise in patients with hypertension and the significant reduction in sympathetic neural activity has been reported as one of the main mechanisms explaining the favourable effects of exercise on blood pressure control.

  5. EFFECTIVENESS OF ECCENTRIC TRAINING, DYNAMIC RANGE OF MOTION EXERCISES AND STATIC STRETCHING ON FLEXIBILITY OF HAMSTRING MUSCLE AMONG FOOTBALL PLAYERS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Askar P.V

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hamstring stretch is an important part of treatment programs aimed at decreasing the likelihood of hamstring injury. Few studies have examine the effect of eccentric training, static stretching and dynamic range of motion(DROM exercise in improving hamstring flexibility this study compares the effect of eccentric training and static stretching in improving hamstring flexibility. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of Eccentric training, Static stretching and Dynamic range of motion (DROM exercise in improving hamstring flexibility and the second objective is find which technique is more effective in improving hamstring flexibility when compared with a control group. Study design is Experimental pre-test post-test design. Methods: 88 male subjects with limited hamstring flexibility were recruited for this study were assigned to four group. Group1 received eccentric training, group2 received dynamic range of motion exercise, group3 received static stretching and group4 was served as control group. Hamstring length was measured pre intervention and post intervention using a self-monitored active knee extension test. Results: Eccentric training, static stretching and dynamic range of motion exercise showed a significant increase in hamstring length between pre and post intervention. Following a between group analysis done by independent t test revealed a significant difference between group1 group2 and group3 Conclusion: It is concluded that eccentric training, dynamic range of motion (DROM exercise and static stretching groups improved hamstring flexibility.

  6. Therapeutic value of exercise training in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, I; Engelhardt, M; Stecker, K; Baas, H

    1999-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of an intensive exercise training on motor disability, mood, and subjective well-being in parkinsonian patients. The study was designed as an open long-term pilot trial over 20 wk. Sixteen slightly to moderately affected idiopathic parkinsonian patients (PD) were included. An intensive standardized exercise training was performed twice weekly over 14 wk in all patients. Evaluations were performed before the start of the study (exam. 1), after 7 wk (exam 2), 14 wk (exam 3), and 20 wk (exam 4/long-term effect). The test battery included: 1) basic motor test (BMT) [test for muscle strength, flexibility, and coordination]; 2) Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and Columbia University Rating Scale (CURS) for PD-specific motor disability; and 3) registration of psychometric data by Mini Mental State (MMS) for dementia and the Adjective Mood Questionnaire of Zeersen (AMQZ) and Sickness Impact Profile (SIP) for subjective well-being. UPDRS sigma score (P exercise training. Six weeks after termination of the training program, the majority of the patients had lost only minor components of their regained motor skills. There was no significant change in cognitive function during the study. The results of open interviews referring to subjective well-being were confirmed by the AMQZ and SIP. As an unexpected side effect, dyskinesias seemed to be better controlled. Motor disability as well as mood and subjective well-being can be clearly improved by intensive sports activities in early to medium stage PD patients. A sustained ongoing benefit outlasting the active training period for at least 6 wk can be achieved but the exact duration of this benefit is open.

  7. Effects of aging and training status on ventilatory response during incremental cycling exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenti, Mauro; De Vito, Giuseppe; Scotto di Palumbo, Alessandro; Sbriccoli, Paola; Quattrini, Filippo M; Sacchetti, Massimo

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of aging and training status on ventilatory response during incremental cycling exercise. Eight young (24 ± 5 years) and 8 older (64 ± 3 years) competitive cyclists together with 8 young (27 ± 4 years) and 8 older (63 ± 2 years) untrained individuals underwent a continuous incremental cycling test to exhaustion to determine ventilatory threshold (VT), respiratory compensation point (RCP), and maximal oxygen uptake (VO₂max). In addition, the isocapnic buffering (IB) phase was calculated together with the hypocapnic hyperventilation. Ventilatory threshold occurred at similar relative exercise intensities in all groups, whereas RCP was recorded at higher intensities in young and older cyclists compared to the untrained subjects. The IB phase, reported as the difference between VT and RCP and expressed either in absolute (ml·min⁻¹·kg⁻¹ VO₂) or in relative terms, was greater (p < 0.01) in both young and older trained cyclists than in untrained subjects, who were also characterized by a lower exercise capacity. Isocapnic buffering was particularly small in the older untrained volunteers. Although young untrained and older trained subjects had a similar level of VO₂max, older athletes exhibited a larger IB. In addition, a higher absolute but similar relative IB was observed in young vs. older cyclists, despite a higher VO₂max in the former. In conclusion, the present study shows that aging is associated with a reduction of the IB phase recorded during an incremental exercise test. Moreover, endurance training induces adaptations that result in an enlargement of the IB phase independent of age. This information can be used for the characterization and monitoring of the physiological adaptations induced by endurance training.

  8. Optimising exercise training in prevention and treatment of diastolic heart failure (OptimEx-CLIN): rationale and design of a prospective, randomised, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchy, Christiane; Massen, Lilian; Rognmo, Oivind; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline M; Beckers, Paul; Kraigher-Krainer, Elisabeth; Linke, Axel; Adams, Volker; Wisløff, Ulrik; Pieske, Burkert; Halle, Martin

    2014-11-01

    Heart failure with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HFpEF) currently affects more than seven million Europeans and is the only cardiovascular disease increasing in prevalence and incidence. No pharmacological agent has yet been shown to improve symptoms or prognosis. The most promising way to improve pathophysiology and deprived exercise-tolerance in HFpEF patients seems to be exercise training, but the optimal approach and dose of exercise is still unknown. The major objective of the optimising exercise training in prevention and treatment of diastolic heart failure study (OptimEx-CLIN) is to define the optimal dose of exercise training in patients with HFpEF. In order to optimise adherence, supervision and economic aspects of exercise training a novel telemedical approach will be introduced and investigated. In a prospective randomised multi-centre study, 180 patients with stable symptomatic HFpEF will be randomised (1:1:1) to moderate intensity continuous training, high intensity interval training, or a control group. The training intervention includes three months supervised followed by nine months of telemedically monitored home-based training. The primary endpoint is change in exercise capacity, defined as change in peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) after three months, assessed by cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Secondary endpoints include diastolic filling pressure (E/e') and further echocardiographic and cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX) parameters, biomarkers, quality of life and endothelial function. Training sessions and physical activity will be monitored and documented throughout the study with accelerometers and heart rate monitors developed on a telemedical platform for the OptimEx-CLIN study. Inclusion of patients started in July 2014, first results are expected in 2017. © Authors 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  9. Monitoring training status with HR measures: do all roads lead to Rome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eBuchheit

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring an athlete's physiological status in response to various types and volumes of (aerobic-oriented training can provide useful information for optimizing training programs. Measures of resting, exercise and recovery heart rate (HR are receiving increasing interest for monitoring fatigue, fitness and endurance performance responses, which has direct implications for adjusting training load 1 daily during specific training blocks and 2 throughout the competitive season. These measures are still not widely implemented to monitor athletes’ responses to training load, probably because of apparent contradictory findings in the literature. In this review I contend that most of the contradictory findings are related to methodological inconsistencies and/or misinterpretation of the data rather than to limitations of heart rate measures to accurately inform on training status. I also provide evidence that measures derived from 5-min (almost daily recordings of resting (indices capturing beat-to-beat changes in HR, reflecting parasympathetic activity and submaximal exercise (30- to 60-s average HR are likely the most useful monitoring tools. For appropriate interpretation at the individual level, changes in a given measure should be interpreted by taking into account the error of measurement and the smallest important change of the measure, as well as the training context (training phase, load and intensity distribution. The decision to use a given measure should be based upon the level of information that is required by the athlete, the marker’s sensitivity to changes in training status and the practical constrains required for the measurements. However, measures of HR cannot inform on all aspects of wellness, fatigue and performance, so their use in combination with daily training logs, psychometric questionnaires and non-invasive, cost-effective performance tests such as a countermovement jump may offer a complete solution to monitor

  10. Hypoxic training methods for improving endurance exercise performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob A. Sinex

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Endurance athletic performance is highly related to a number of factors that can be altered through altitude and hypoxic training including increases in erythrocyte volume, maximal aerobic exercise capacity, capillary density, and economy. Physiological adaptations in response to acute and chronic exposure to hypoxic environments are well documented and range from short-term detrimental effects to longer-term adaptations that can improve performance at altitude and in sea-level competitions. Many altitude and hypoxic training protocols have been developed, employing various combinations of living and training at sea-level, low, moderate, and high altitudes and utilizing natural and artificial altitudes, with varying degrees of effectiveness. Several factors have been identified that are associated with individual responses to hypoxic training, and techniques for identifying those athletes most likely to benefit from hypoxic training continue to be investigated. Exposure to sufficiently high altitude (2000–3000 m for more than 12 h/day, while training at lower altitudes, for a minimum of 21 days is recommended. Timing of altitude training related to competition remains under debate, although general recommendations can be considered.

  11. High-intensity exercise training for the prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rynders, Corey A; Weltman, Arthur

    2014-02-01

    Aerobic exercise training and diet are recommended for the primary prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends that adults with prediabetes engage in ≥ 150 minutes per week of moderate activity and target a 7% weight loss. However, traditional moderate-intensity (MI) exercise training programs are often difficult to sustain for prediabetic adults; a commonly cited barrier to physical activity in this population is the "lack of time" to exercise. When matched for total energy expenditure, high-intensity (HI) exercise training has a lower overall time commitment compared with traditional low-intensity (LI) or MI exercise training. Several recent studies comparing HI exercise training with LI and MI exercise training reported that HI exercise training improves skeletal muscle metabolic control and cardiovascular function in a comparable and/or superior way relative to LI and MI exercise training. Although patients can accrue all exercise benefits by performing LI or MI activities such as walking, HI activities represent a time-efficient alternative to meeting physical activity guidelines. High-intensity exercise training is a potent tool for improving cardiometabolic risk for prediabetic patients with limited time and may be prescribed when appropriate.

  12. Excess postexercise oxygen consumption after aerobic exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlock, Darlene A; Lee, Man-Gyoon; Flynn, Michael G; Park, Kyung-Shin; Kamimori, Gary H

    2010-08-01

    Literature examining the effects of aerobic exercise training on excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) is sparse. In this study, 9 male participants (19-32 yr) trained (EX) for 12 wk, and 10 in a control group (CON) maintained normal activity. VO(2max), rectal temperature (T(re)), epinephrine, norepinephrine, free fatty acids (FFA), insulin, glucose, blood lactate (BLA), and EPOC were measured before (PRE) and after (POST) the intervention. EPOC at PRE was measured for 120 min after 30 min of treadmill running at 70% VO(2max). EX completed 2 EPOC trials at POST, i.e., at the same absolute (ABS) and relative (REL) intensity; 1 EPOC test for CON served as both the ABS and REL trial because no significant change in VO(2max) was noted. During the ABS trial, total EPOC decreased significantly (p EPOC during the REL trial; however, epinephrine was significantly lower, and norepinephrine and FFA, significantly higher, at endexercise after training. Results indicate that EPOC varies as a function of relative rather than absolute metabolic stress and that training improves the efficiency of metabolic regulation during recovery from exercise. Mechanisms for the decreased magnitude of EPOC in the ABS trial include decreases in BLA, T(re), and perhaps epinephrine-mediated hepatic glucose production and insulin-mediated glucose uptake.

  13. Oral quercetin supplementation hampers skeletal muscle adaptations in response to exercise training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casuso, R A; Martínez-López, E J; Nordsborg, Nikolai Baastrup

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to test exercise-induced adaptations on skeletal muscle when quercetin is supplemented. Four groups of rats were tested: quercetin sedentary, quercetin exercised, placebo sedentary, and placebo exercised. Treadmill exercise training took place 5 days a week for 6 weeks. Quercetin groups ...

  14. Exercise Training in Children and Adolescents with Cystic Fibrosis: Theory into Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig A. Williams

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity and exercise training play an important role in the clinical management of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF. Exercise training is more common and recognized as an essential part of rehabilitation programmes and overall CF care. Regular exercise training is associated with improved aerobic and anaerobic capacity, higher pulmonary function, and enhanced airway mucus clearance. Furthermore, patients with higher aerobic fitness have an improved survival. Aerobic and anaerobic training may have different effects, while the combination of both have been reported to be beneficial in CF. However, exercise training remains underutilised and not always incorporated into routine CF management. We provide an update on aerobic and anaerobic responses to exercise and general training recommendations in children and adolescents with CF. We propose that an active lifestyle and exercise training are an efficacious part of regular CF patient management.

  15. Resistance exercise, but not endurance exercise, induces IKKβ phosphorylation in human skeletal muscle of training-accustomed individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Andreas Buch; Vendelbo, Mikkel Holm; Rahbek, Stine Klejs

    2013-01-01

    of repeated biopsy sampling on protein expression and phosphorylation was observed. In conclusion, resistance exercise, but not endurance exercise, increases IKKβ phosphorylation in trained human subjects, which support the idea that IKKβ can influence the activation of mTORC1 in human skeletal muscle.......The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is considered an important role in the muscular adaptations to exercise. It has been proposed that exercise-induced signaling to mTORC1 do not require classic growth factor PI3K/Akt signaling. Activation of IKKβ and the mitogen-activated protein...... following exercise. Previously, we demonstrated that mTOR is preferentially activated in response to resistance exercise compared to endurance exercise in trained individuals without concomitant activation of Akt. In the present study, we extended this investigation by examining IκB kinase complex (IKK...

  16. EFFECTIVENESS OF TRUNK TRAINING EXERCISES VERSUS SWISS BALL EXERCISES FOR IMPROVING SITTING BALANCE AND GAIT PARAMETERS IN ACUTE STROKE SUBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kothalanka Viswaja

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of trunk training and Swiss ball exercises in acute stroke subjects. Trunk is often neglected part in the stroke rehabilitation, trunk training exercises and Swiss ball exercises result in better recruitment of trunk muscles thus improving sitting balance and gait parameters in acute stroke subjects. However literature evidences for trunk training exercises and Swiss ball exercises in improving sitting balance and gait are scarce in acute stroke population. Methods: A total of 60 subjects who met the inclusion criteria were recruited from department of physiotherapy, G.S.L general hospital and were randomly allocated into 2 groups with 30 subjects in each group. Initially all of them were screened for balance and gait using trunk impairment scale and by assessing gait parameters, after that they were given a 30min of trunk training and Swiss ball exercises for 5 days a week for 4 weeks. Both the groups received conventional physiotherapy for 4 weeks. Results: Post intervention there was no significant difference between the two groups. There was improvement post treatment in trunk training group (P0.5. Conclusion: The results had shown that both groups noted significant difference. But when comparing between these two groups there is no statistical significance noted. So this study concluded that there is no significant difference between trunk training exercises and Swiss ball exercises on sitting balance and gait parameters in subjects with stroke.

  17. Exercise training improves free testosterone in lifelong sedentary aging men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence D Hayes

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available As the impact of high-intensity interval training (HIIT on systemic hormones in aging men is unstudied to date, we investigated whether total testosterone (TT, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG, free testosterone (free-T and cortisol (all in serum were altered following HIIT in a cohort of 22 lifelong sedentary (62 ± 2 years older men. As HIIT requires preconditioning exercise in sedentary cohorts, participants were tested at three phases, each separated by six-week training; baseline (phase A, following conditioning exercise (phase B and post-HIIT (phase C. Each measurement phase used identical methods. TT was significantly increased following HIIT (~17%; P < 0.001 with most increase occurring during preconditioning (~10%; P = 0.007. Free-T was unaffected by conditioning exercise (P = 0.102 but was significantly higher following HIIT compared to baseline (~4.5%; P = 0.023. Cortisol remained unchanged from A to C (P = 0.138. The present data indicate a combination of preconditioning, and HIIT increases TT and SHBG in sedentary older males, with the HIIT stimulus accounting for a small but statistically significant increase in free-T. Further study is required to determine the biological importance of small improvements in free-T in aging men.

  18. Exercise training does not enhance hypothalamic responsiveness to leptin or ghrelin in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, M L; Andrews, Z B; Watt, M J

    2014-02-01

    The detection of hormone and nutrient signals by the hypothalamus is blunted in obesity and contributes to dysregulated energy homeostasis. We investigated whether aerobic exercise training would improve long-term hypothalamic sensitivity to both leptin and ghrelin, independent of acute exercise-induced signalling. Male C57Bl/6J mice were fed either a chow or high-fat diet for 6 weeks, then remained sedentary on their respective diet, or completed 6 weeks of treadmill exercise training with a progressive increase in exercise volume and intensity. Food intake and hypothalamic signalling were assessed in mice injected with leptin or ghrelin at least 24 h after the last exercise bout. Exercise training reduced body mass, increased daily food intake and improved glucose tolerance. Intraperitoneal leptin administration reduced food intake in lean and obese mice, and this was not enhanced after exercise training. Leptin-mediated activation of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 in the arcuate nucleus and ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus was not enhanced with exercise training. Ghrelin increased food intake and c-Fos positive neurones in the hypothalamus in lean and obese mice, and these physiological and molecular responses were not enhanced with exercise training. This suggests that the previously reported exercise effects on sensitising hypothalamic signalling and food intake responses may be limited to the period immediately after an exercise bout, and are not a result of stable structural or molecular changes that occur with exercise training. © 2014 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  19. The intervention composed of aerobic training and non-exercise physical activity (I-CAN) study: Rationale, design and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Damon L; Dover, Sara E; Nevels, Tyara R; Solar, Chelsey A; Brophy, Patricia M; Hall, Tyler R; Houmard, Joseph A; Lutes, Lesley D

    2015-11-01

    Recent data has suggested that prolonged sedentary behavior is independent risk factor for cardiovascular and all-cause mortality independent of adequate amounts of moderate to vigorous physical activity. However, few studies have prospectively evaluated if exercise training and increasing non-exercise physical activity leads to greater reduction in cardiometabolic risk compared to aerobic training alone. The purpose of the Intervention Composed of Aerobic Training and Non-Exercise Physical Activity (I-CAN) study is to determine whether a physical activity program composed of both aerobic training (consistent with public health recommendations) and increasing non-exercise physical activity (3000 steps above baseline levels) leads to enhanced improvements in waist circumference, oral glucose tolerance, systemic inflammation, body composition, and fitness compared to aerobic training alone in obese adults (N=45). Commercially available accelerometers (Fitbits) will be used to monitor physical activity levels and behavioral coaching will be used to develop strategies of how to increase non-exercise physical activity levels. In this manuscript, we describe the design, rationale, and methodology associated with the I-CAN study.

  20. Acute post-exercise change in blood pressure and exercise training response in patients with coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antti M Kiviniemi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We tested the hypothesis that acute post-exercise change in blood pressure (BP may predict exercise training responses in BP in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD. Patients with CAD (n=116, age 62±5 years, 85 men underwent BP assessments at rest and during 10-min recovery following a symptom-limited exercise test before and after the 6-month training intervention (one strength and 3-4 aerobic moderate-intensity exercises weekly. Post-exercise change in systolic BP (SBP was calculated by subtracting resting SBP from lowest post-exercise SBP. The training-induced change in resting SBP was -2±13 mmHg (p=0.064, ranging from -42 to 35 mmHg. Larger post-exercise decrease in SBP and baseline resting SBP predicted a larger training-induced decrement in SBP (β=0.46 and β=-0.44, respectively, p<0.001 for both. Acute post-exercise decrease in SBP provided additive value to baseline resting SBP in the prediction of training-induced change in resting SBP (R squared from 0.20 to 0.26, p=0.002. After further adjustments for other potential confounders (sex, age, baseline body mass index, realized training load, post-exercise decrease in SBP still predicted the training response in resting SBP (β=0.26, p=0.015. Acute post-exercise change in SBP was associated with training-induced change in resting SBP in patients with CAD, providing significant predictive information beyond baseline resting SBP.

  1. Therapeutic validity and effectiveness of supervised physical exercise training on exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vooijs, M.; Siemonsma, P.C.; Heus, I.; Sont, J.K.; Rövekamp, T.A.; Meeteren, N.L. van

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Our aim was to determine the effectiveness of supervised physical exercise training on exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease taken into consideration indices such as therapeutic validity of interventions, methodological quality of studies, and exercise v

  2. Effects of exercise training on regulation of skeletal muscle glucose metabolism in elderly men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biensø, Rasmus Sjørup; Olesen, Jesper; Gliemann, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim was to investigate the molecular mechanisms behind exercise training-induced improvements in glucose regulation in aged subjects. METHODS: Twelve elderly male subjects completed 8 weeks of exercise training. Before and after the training period, the subjects completed an oral ...

  3. EFFECT OF A HOME EXERCISE TRAINING-PROGRAM IN PATIENTS WITH CYSTIC-FIBROSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEJONG, W; GREVINK, RG; ROORDA, RJ; KAPTEIN, AA; VANDERSCHANS, CP

    1994-01-01

    Physical training in patients with pulmonary diseases, including cystic fibrosis (CF), may improve exercise tolerance in these patients. Most training programs are performed in a clinical setting. Little information is available concerning the effect of home exercise training programs in CF patients

  4. Exercise-training intervention studies in competitive swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspenes, Stian Thoresen; Karlsen, Trine

    2012-06-01

    Competitive swimming has a long history and is currently one of the largest Olympic sports, with 16 pool events. Several aspects separate swimming from most other sports such as (i) the prone position; (ii) simultaneous use of arms and legs for propulsion; (iii) water immersion (i.e. hydrostatic pressure on thorax and controlled respiration); (iv) propulsive forces that are applied against a fluctuant element; and (v) minimal influence of equipment on performance. Competitive swimmers are suggested to have specific anthropometrical features compared with other athletes, but are nevertheless dependent on physiological adaptations to enhance their performance. Swimmers thus engage in large volumes of training in the pool and on dry land. Strength training of various forms is widely used, and the energetic systems are addressed by aerobic and anaerobic swimming training. The aim of the current review was to report results from controlled exercise training trials within competitive swimming. From a structured literature search we found 17 controlled intervention studies that covered strength or resistance training, assisted sprint swimming, arms-only training, leg-kick training, respiratory muscle training, training the energy delivery systems and combined interventions across the aforementioned categories. Nine of the included studies were randomized controlled trials. Among the included studies we found indications that heavy strength training on dry land (one to five repetitions maximum with pull-downs for three sets with maximal effort in the concentric phase) or sprint swimming with resistance towards propulsion (maximal pushing with the arms against fixed points or pulling a perforated bowl) may be efficient for enhanced performance, and may also possibly have positive effects on stroke mechanics. The largest effect size (ES) on swimming performance was found in 50 m freestyle after a dry-land strength training regimen of maximum six repetitions across three

  5. Endurance Exercise Training in Young Adults with Barth Syndrome: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cade, W Todd; Reeds, Dominic N; Peterson, Linda R; Bohnert, Kathryn L; Tinius, Rachel A; Benni, Paul B; Byrne, Barry J; Taylor, Carolyn L

    2017-01-01

    Barth syndrome (BTHS) is a rare X-linked disorder that is characterized by mitochondrial abnormalities, cardio-skeletal myopathy, exercise intolerance, and premature mortality. The effect on endurance exercise training on exercise tolerance, cardio-skeletal function, and quality of life in BTHS is unknown. Four young adults (23 ± 5 years, n = 4) with BTHS participated in a 12-week, supervised, individualized endurance exercise training program. Exercise training was performed on a cycle ergometer for 30-45' three times per week at a moderate intensity level. Exercise tolerance was measured by graded exercise testing and peak oxygen consumption, heart function via two-dimensional and M-mode echocardiography, skeletal muscle function by near-infrared spectroscopy, and quality of life through the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure questionnaire. There were no adverse events during exercise testing or training for any participant. Peak oxygen consumption modestly (~5%) improved in three or four participants. Mean quality of life questions regarding dyspnea and side effects from medications significantly improved following exercise training. Mean resting heart function or skeletal muscle oxygen extraction during exercise did not improve after exercise training. Endurance exercise training is safe and appears to modestly improve peak exercise tolerance and certain measures of quality of life in young adults with BTHS. However, compared to improvements resulting from endurance exercise training seen in other non-BTHS mitochondrial myopathies and heart failure, these improvements appear blunted. Further research into the most beneficial mode, intensity and frequency of exercise training in BTHS is warranted.

  6. The influence of respiratory muscle training upon intermittent exercise performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicks, C R; Morgan, D W; Fuller, D K; Caputo, J L

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of respiratory muscle training (RMT) on intermittent exercise performance, respiratory muscle strength (PI (max)), respiratory muscle fatigue (RMF), and dyspnea in soccer athletes. Collegiate soccer athletes (20 male, 7 female) were randomly divided into either a RMT or control condition during off-season conditioning. The RMT group performed a 30RM protocol (10 times weekly) for 5 weeks using a commercially-available training device, while the controls received no RMT. Performance was evaluated utilizing Level 1 of the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test (IRT) and dyspnea was assessed during and immediately following the IRT. RMF was quantified within 2 minutes (RMF2) and 10 minutes (RMF10) after completing the IRT. Following training, the RMT group significantly increased IRT performance by 216.6 +/- 231.0 meters (p = .008) while the 49.2 +/- 75.1 meter increase observed in the controls was not significant. PI (max) in the RMT group increased from 138.1 +/- 19.6 to 165.3 +/- 23.5 cmH (2)O (p RMT did not significantly affect RMF or dyspnea. In conclusion, RMT improved intermittent exercise performance in these soccer athletes. The mechanisms by which RMT improves performance warrant further study.

  7. Exercise training intervention after coronary angioplasty: the ETICA trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belardinelli, R; Paolini, I; Cianci, G; Piva, R; Georgiou, D; Purcaro, A

    2001-06-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the effects of exercise training (ET) on functional capacity and quality of life (QOL) in patients who received percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) or coronary stenting (CS), the effects on the restenosis rate and the outcome. It is unknown whether ET induces beneficial effects after coronary angioplasty. We studied 118 consecutive patients with coronary artery disease (mean age 57+/-10 years) who underwent PTCA or CS on one (69%) or two (31%) native epicardial coronary arteries. Patients were randomized into two matched groups. Group T (n = 59) was exercised three times a week for six months at 60% of peak VO2. Group C (n = 59) was the control group. Only trained patients had significant improvements in peak VO2 (26%, p < 0.001) and quality of life (26.8%, p = 0.001 vs. C). The angiographic restenosis rate was unaffected by ET (T: 29%; C: 33%, P = NS) and was not significantly different after PTCA or CS. However, residual diameter stenosis was lower in trained patients (-29.7%, p = 0.045). In patients with angiographic restenosis, thallium uptake improved only in group T (19%; p < 0.001). During the follow-up (33+/-7 months) trained patients had a significantly lower event rate than controls (11.9 vs. 32.2%, RR: 0.71, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.60 to 0.91, p = 0.008) and a lower rate of hospital readmission (18.6 vs. 46%, RR: 0.69, 95% CI: 0.55 to 0.93, p < 0.001). Moderate ET improves functional capacity and QOL after PTCA or CS. During the follow-up, trained patients had fewer events and a lower hospital readmission rate than controls, despite an unchanged restenosis rate.

  8. Structural protein alterations to resistance and endurance cycling exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parcell, Allen C; Woolstenhulme, Mandy T; Sawyer, Robert D

    2009-03-01

    The muscle cytoskeleton is necessary for the effective transmission of forces generated by actin-myosin interactions. We have examined the impact of muscle force and exercise volume on the cytoskeleton by measuring desmin and dystrophin content in human skeletal muscle after 12 weeks of progressive resistance or endurance cycle training. Muscle biopsies of the vastus lateralis were obtained before and after training. Desmin and dystrophin content was determined using immunoblotting techniques. After resistance training, desmin content increased 82 +/- 18% (p < 0.05), whereas there was no change in desmin content with endurance cycling. Dystrophin content did not change in either group. One-repetition maximum and VO2max increased (p < 0.05) in the resistance and endurance groups, respectively. These data demonstrate that a high-tension stimulus impacts the cytoskeleton in contrast to high-volume concentric contractions. The tensile loading and eccentric components of resistance training are implicated in desmin alterations. Indeed, the functional improvements resulting from resistance training may be related in part to the mechanical integration provided by the desmin protein.

  9. The effect of exercise training on transverse tubules in normal, remodeled, and reverse remodeled hearts

    OpenAIRE

    Kemi, Ole J.; Hoydal, Morten A; MacQuaide, Niall; Haram, Per M; Koch, Lauren G.; Steven L Britton; Ellingsen, Oyvind; Smith, Godfrey L.; Wisloff, Ulrik

    2011-01-01

    The response of transverse (T)-tubules to exercise training in health and disease remains unclear. Therefore, we studied the effect of exercise training on the density and spacing of left ventricle cardiomyocyte T-tubules in normal and remodeled hearts that associate with detubulation, by confocal laser scanning microscopy. First, exercise training in normal rats increased cardiomyocyte volume by 16% (P < 0.01), with preserved T-tubule density. Thus, the T-tubules adapted to the physiologi...

  10. Larger Lateral Prefrontal Cortex Volume Predicts Better Exercise Adherence Among Older Women: Evidence From Two Exercise Training Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, John R; Chiu, Bryan K; Hall, Peter A; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa

    2017-06-01

    Recent research has suggested an important role of lateral prefrontal cortex (lPFC) in consistent implementation of positive health behaviors and avoidance of negative health behaviors. We examined whether gray matter volume in the lPFC prospectively predicts exercise class attendance among older women (n = 122) who underwent either a 52-week or 26-week exercise training intervention. Structural magnetic resonance imaging determined gray matter volume at baseline. Independent of intracranial volume, age, education, body composition, mobility, depressive symptoms, and general cognitive functioning, larger lPFC volume predicted greater exercise class attendance (all p values exercise adherence as well as identified other regions, especially in the insula and temporal cortex, that predicted exercise adherence. These findings suggest that sustained engagement in exercise training might rely in part on functions of the lPFC and that lPFC volume might be a reasonable proxy for such functions.

  11. Molecular mechanisms for mitochondrial adaptation to exercise training in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Joshua C; Wilson, Rebecca J; Yan, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Exercise training enhances physical performance and confers health benefits, largely through adaptations in skeletal muscle. Mitochondrial adaptation, encompassing coordinated improvements in quantity (content) and quality (structure and function), is increasingly recognized as a key factor in the beneficial outcomes of exercise training. Exercise training has long been known to promote mitochondrial biogenesis, but recent work has demonstrated that it has a profound impact on mitochondrial dynamics (fusion and fission) and clearance (mitophagy), as well. In this review, we discuss the various mechanisms through which exercise training promotes mitochondrial quantity and quality in skeletal muscle.

  12. Aerobic training improves exercise-induced lipolysis in SCAT and lipid utilization in overweight men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Glisezinski, I; Moro, C; Pillard, F; Marion-Latard, F; Harant, I; Meste, M; Berlan, M; Crampes, F; Rivière, D

    2003-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether endurance training improves lipid mobilization and oxidation in overweight subjects. Eleven young men (25.6 +/- 1.4 yr and body mass index 27.7 +/- 0.2) performed a 4-mo training program consisting of practicing aerobic exercise 5 days/wk. Before and after the training period, lipid oxidation was explored during a 60-min exercise at 50% of peak O2 consumption by use of indirect calorimetry. Lipid mobilization and antilipolytic alpha2-adrenoceptor effect were also studied using the microdialysis method in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (SCAT). After training, plasma nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) levels, at rest and during exercise, were significantly lower than before (P < 0.001). Lipolysis in SCAT was significantly higher after than before training. An antilipolytic alpha2-adrenoceptor effect in SCAT was underlined during exercise before training and disappeared after. The respiratory exchange ratio was lower after training, i.e., the percentage of lipid oxidation was higher only at rest. The amount of lipid oxidized was higher after training, at rest, and during exercise. Although exercise power was higher after training, the relative intensity was equivalent, as suggested by a similar increase in plasma catecholamine concentrations before and after training. In conclusion, 4-mo training in overweight men improved lipid mobilization through a decrease of antilipolytic alpha2-adrenoceptor effect in SCAT and lipid oxidation during moderate exercise. Training induced a decrease of blood NEFA, predicting better prevention of obesity.

  13. IL-6 regulates exercise and training-induced adaptations in subcutaneous adipose tissue in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Claus; Jakobsen, Anne Hviid; Hassing, Helle Adser

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that IL-6 regulates exercise-induced gene responses in subcutaneous adipose tissue in mice. Methods: Four months old male IL-6 whole body knockout (KO) mice and C57B wild-type (WT) mice performed 1h of treadmill exercise, where subcutaneous...... adipose tissue (AT) was removed either immediately after, 4h or 10h after exercise as well as from mice not running acutely. Moreover, AT was sampled at resting conditions after 5 weeks of exercise training. Results: AT leptin mRNA decreased immediately after a single running exercise bout in both...... in regulating exercise and training-induced leptin and PPAR¿ expression in adipose tissue. In addition, while IL-6 is required for TNF-a mRNA reduction in response to acute exercise, IL-6 does not appear to be mandatory for anti-inflammatory effects of exercise training in adipose tissue....

  14. Voluntary aerobic exercise increases the cognitive enhancing effects of working memory training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew M; Spiegler, Kevin M; Sauce, Bruno; Wass, Christopher D; Sturzoiu, Tudor; Matzel, Louis D

    2013-11-01

    Increases in performance on tests of attention and learning are often observed shortly after a period of aerobic exercise, and evidence suggests that humans who engage in regular exercise are partially protected from age-related cognitive decline. However, the cognitive benefits of exercise are typically short-lived, limiting the practical application of these observations. Here, we explored whether physical exercise might induce lasting changes in general cognitive ability if that exercise was combined with working memory training, which is purported to broadly impact cognitive performance. Mice received either exercise treatment (6 weeks of voluntary running wheel access), working memory training (in a dual radial-arm maze), both treatments, or various control treatments. After this period of exercise, working memory training was initiated (alternating with days of exercise), and continued for several weeks. Upon completion of these treatments, animals were assessed (2-4 weeks later) for performance on four diverse learning tasks, and the aggregate performance of individual animals across all four learning tasks was estimated. Working memory training alone promoted small increases in general cognitive performance, although any beneficial effects of exercise alone had dissipated by the time of learning assessments. However, the two treatments in combination more than doubled the improvement in general cognitive performance supported by working memory training alone. Unlike the transient effects that acute aerobic exercise can have on isolated learning tasks, these results indicate that an acute period of exercise combined with working memory training can have synergistic and lasting impact on general cognitive performance.

  15. Placental and vascular adaptations to exercise training before and during pregnancy in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey S; Banek, Christopher T; Bauer, Ashley J; Gingery, Anne; Dreyer, Hans C

    2012-09-01

    Although exercise during pregnancy is generally recommended and thought to be beneficial to mother and fetus, the nature of the adaptations to exercise during pregnancy and how they may be beneficial remain poorly understood. Recent studies suggest that exercise may stimulate expression of several cytoprotective and pro-angiogenic molecules such as heat shock proteins (HSP) and vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF). We hypothesized that exercise training during pregnancy improves angiogenic balance, increases HSP expression, and improves endothelial function. Female rats were given access to an exercise wheel for 6 wk before and during pregnancy. On day 19 of pregnancy tissues were collected and snap frozen for later analysis. Western blots were performed in skeletal muscle and placenta. HSP 27 (3.7 ± 0.36 vs. 2.2 ± 0.38; P exercise-trained rats compared with sedentary controls. In addition, exercise training increased (P exercise training stimulates HSP expression in the placenta and that regular exercise training increases circulating VEGF in pregnant but not in nonpregnant rats. Although the present findings suggest that exercise before and during pregnancy may promote the expression of molecules that could attenuate placental and vascular dysfunction in complicated pregnancies, further studies are needed to determine the safety and effectiveness of exercise training as a therapeutic modality in pregnancy.

  16. Combined Interval Training and Post-exercise Nutrition in Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Control Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique E. Francois

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: High-intensity interval training (HIIT can improve several aspects of cardiometabolic health. Previous studies have suggested that adaptations to exercise training can be augmented with post-exercise milk or protein consumption, but whether this nutritional strategy can impact the cardiometabolic adaptations to HIIT in type 2 diabetes is unknown.Objective: To determine if the addition of a post-exercise milk or protein beverage to a high-intensity interval training (HIIT intervention improves cardiometabolic health in individuals with type 2 diabetes.Design: In a proof-of-concept, double-blind clinical trial 53 adults with uncomplicated type 2 diabetes were randomized to one of three nutritional beverages (500 mL skim-milk, macronutrient control, or flavored water placebo consumed after exercise (3 days/week during a 12 week low-volume HIIT intervention. HIIT involved 10 X 1-min high-intensity intervals separated by 1-min low-intensity recovery periods. Two sessions per week were cardio-based (at ~90% of heart rate max and one session involved resistance-based exercises (at RPE of 5–6; CR-10 scale in the same interval pattern. Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, cardiorespiratory fitness (V˙O2peak, blood pressure, and endothelial function (%FMD were measured before and after the intervention.Results: There were significant main effects of time (all p < 0.05 but no difference between groups (Interaction: all p > 0.71 for CGM 24-h mean glucose (−0.5 ± 1.1 mmol/L, HbA1c (−0.2 ± 0.4%, percent body fat (−0.8 ± 1.6%, and lean mass (+1.1 ± 2.8 kg. Similarly, V˙O2peak (+2.5 ± 1.6 mL/kg/min and %FMD (+1.4 ± 1.9% were increased, and mean arterial blood pressure reduced (−6 ± 7 mmHg, after 12 weeks of HIIT (all p < 0.01 with no difference between beverage groups (Interaction: all p > 0.11.Conclusion: High-intensity interval training is a

  17. Exercise Training suppresses vascular fibrosis in aging obesity induced rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin Young; Lee, Jin

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of exercise training (ET) on vascular fibrosis in aging model rats with diet-induced obesity. [Methods] Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups: Aging control (A-C), A-C with high fat diet (AHF), AHF with ET (AHF + ET). Aging was induced by D-galactose (D-gal) and obesity was induced by HFD (60% fat) for 9 weeks. The experimental rats performed swimming (60 min/day, 5 days/week) for 8 weeks. All rat aorta samples were harvested for RT-PCR and morphologic analyses. [Results] The exercise training significantly decreased levels of AT-1, TGF-ß and Coll-1 gene expression compared to AHF group. The AHF + ET group showed a reduced collagen accumulation in the aorta media compared to AHF group. [Conclusion] These results suggest that ET could protect the aging obesity aorta against down-regulation of fibrotic factors (AT-1, TGF-ß and Coll-1 gene) and fibrosis by inhibition of collagen accumulation in the aorta media. PMID:25566453

  18. Exercise training improves hemodynamic recovery to isometric exercise in obese men with type 2 diabetes but not in obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaley, Jill A; Goulopoulou, Styliani; Franklin, Ruth; Baynard, Tracy; Carhart, Robert L; Weinstock, Ruth S; Fernhall, Bo

    2012-12-01

    Women with type 2 diabetes (T2D) show greater rates of mortality due to ischemic heart disease than men with T2D. We aimed to examine cardiovascular and autonomic function responses to isometric handgrip (IHG) exercise between men and women with T2D, before and after an exercise training program. Hemodynamic responses were measured in 22 men and women with T2D during and following a 3-min IHG test, and before and after 16 wks of aerobic exercise training. Women had a smaller decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and systolic blood pressure (BP) during recovery from IHG (ΔMAP(REC)) than men pre- and post-training (Pexercise training improved this response in men but not in women (men, pre-training: -13.9±1.8, post-training: -20.5±5.3 mmHg vs. women, pre-training: -10.7±1.7, post-training: -4.1±4.9 mmHg; Pexercise training in obese men, but not in obese women with T2D which reflects a better adaptive autonomic response to exercise training. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of Resveratrol Supplementation and Exercise Training on Exercise Performance in Middle-Aged Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nai-Wen Kan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol (RES has antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antidiabetic, antiasthmatic, antalgic, and anti-fatigue activities. Exercise training (ET improves frailty resulting from aging. This study evaluated the effects of a combination of RES supplementation and ET on the exercise performance of aged mice. C57BL/6J mice (16 months old were randomly divided into four groups: an older control group (OC group, supplementation with RES group (RES group, ET group (ET group, and a combination of ET and RES supplementation group (ET+RES group. Other 10-week-old mice were used as a young control group (Y-Ctrl group. In this study, exercise performance was evaluated using forelimb grip strength and exhaustive swimming time, as well as levels of plasma lactate, ammonia, glucose, and creatine kinase after an acute swimming exercise. Our results showed that the forelimb grip strength of mice in the ET+RES group was significantly higher than those in the OC, RES, and ET groups (by 1.3-, 1.2-, and 1.1-fold, respectively, p < 0.05, and exhibited no difference with the Y-Ctrl group. The endurance swimming test showed that swimming times of the ET and ET+RES groups were significantly longer than those of the OC and RES groups. Moreover, plasma lactate and ammonia levels of the ET + RES group after acute swimming exercise were significantly lower compared to the OC group (p < 0.05. Thus, it was suggested that by combining RES supplementation with ET for 4 weeks, the muscle strength and endurance performance of aged mice were significantly improved compared to the single intervention with either RES or ET alone. This combination might help shorten the extent of deterioration accompanying the aging process.

  20. The value of electrical stimulation as an exercise training modality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, Dean P.; Ray, J. Michael; Nyland, John; Noteboom, Tim

    1994-01-01

    capability of muscle. NMES in exercise training is our major concern.

  1. Is moderate intensity exercise training combined with high intensity interval training more effective at improving cardiorespiratory fitness than moderate intensity exercise training alone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxburgh, Brendon H; Nolan, Paul B; Weatherwax, Ryan M; Dalleck, Lance C

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of either continuous moderate intensity exercise training (CMIET) alone vs. CMIET combined with a single weekly bout of high intensity interval training (HIIT) on cardiorespiratory fitness. Twenty nine sedentary participants (36.3 ± 6.9 yrs) at moderate risk of cardiovascular disease were recruited for 12 weeks of exercise training on a treadmill and cycle ergometer. Participants were randomised into three groups: CMIET + HIIT (n = 7; 8-12 x 60 sec at 100% VO2max, 150 sec active recovery), CMIET (n = 6; 30 min at 45-60% oxygen consumption reserve (VO2R)) and a sedentary control group (n = 7). Participants in the CMIET + HIIT group performed a single weekly bout of HIIT and four weekly sessions of CMIET, whilst the CMIET group performed five weekly CMIET sessions. Probabilistic magnitude-based inferences were determined to assess the likelihood that the true value of the effect represents substantial change. Relative VO2max increased by 10.1% (benefit possible relative to control) in in the CMIET + HIIT group (32.7 ± 9.2 to 36.0 ± 11.5 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) and 3.9% (benefit possible relative to control) in the CMIET group (33.2 ± 4.0 to 34.5 ± 6.1 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)), whilst there was a 5.7% decrease in the control group (30.0 ± 4.6 to 28.3 ± 6.5 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)). It was 'unclear' if a clinically significant difference existed between the effect of CMIET + HIIT and CMIET on the change in VO2max. Both exercising groups showed clinically meaningful improvements in VO2max. Nevertheless, it remains 'unclear' whether one type of exercise training regimen elicits a superior improvement in cardiorespiratory fitness relative to its counterpart. Key PointsBoth continuous moderate intensity exercise training (CMIET) alone and CMIET combined with a single weekly bout of high intensity interval training (CMIET + HIIT) elicit 'possibly beneficial' clinically meaningful improvements in cardiorespiratory

  2. Exercise Sensing and Pose Recovery Inference Tool (ESPRIT) - A Compact Stereo-based Motion Capture Solution For Exercise Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mun Wai

    2015-01-01

    Crew exercise is important during long-duration space flight not only for maintaining health and fitness but also for preventing adverse health problems, such as losses in muscle strength and bone density. Monitoring crew exercise via motion capture and kinematic analysis aids understanding of the effects of microgravity on exercise and helps ensure that exercise prescriptions are effective. Intelligent Automation, Inc., has developed ESPRIT to monitor exercise activities, detect body markers, extract image features, and recover three-dimensional (3D) kinematic body poses. The system relies on prior knowledge and modeling of the human body and on advanced statistical inference techniques to achieve robust and accurate motion capture. In Phase I, the company demonstrated motion capture of several exercises, including walking, curling, and dead lifting. Phase II efforts focused on enhancing algorithms and delivering an ESPRIT prototype for testing and demonstration.

  3. Effects of Low Volume Aerobic Training on Muscle Desaturation During Exercise in Elderly Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Shun; Kime, Ryotaro; Murase, Norio; Niwayama, Masatsugu; Osada, Takuya; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2016-01-01

    Aging enhances muscle desaturation responses due to reduced O2 supply. Even though aerobic training enhances muscle desaturation responses in young subjects, it is unclear whether the same is true in elderly subjects. Ten elderly women (age: 62±4 years) participated in 12-weeks of cycling exercise training. Training consisted of 30 min cycling exercise at the lactate threshold. The subjects exercised 15±6 sessions during training. Before and after endurance training, the subjects performed ramp cycling exercise. Muscle O2 saturation (SmO2) was measured at the vastus lateralis by near infrared spectroscopy during the exercise. There were no significant differences in SmO2 between before and after training. Nevertheless, changes in peak pulmonary O2 uptake were significantly negatively related to changes in SmO2 (r=-0.67, pexercise in elderly subjects.

  4. Hypoxic Living and Exercise Training Alter Adipose Tissue Leptin/Leptin Receptor in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yingli; Feng, Lianshi; Xie, Minhao; Zhang, Li; Xu, Jianfang; He, Zihong; You, Tongjian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypobaric hypoxia results in weight loss in obese individuals, and exercise training is advocated for the treatment of obesity and its related metabolic dysfunctions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of hypoxic living and exercise training on obesity and adipose tissue leptin/leptin receptor in dietary-induced obese rats. Methods: One hundred and thirty high-fat diet fed Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned into one of the following groups (n = 10 each): control, sedentary hypoxic living for 1-4 weeks (SH1, SH2, SH3, and SH4), living, and exercise training in normoxic conditions for 1-4 weeks (TN1, TN2, TN3, and TN4), and living and exercise training in hypoxic conditions for 1-4 weeks (TN1, TN2, TN3, and TN4). Epididymal adipose tissue expression levels of leptin and leptin receptor were determined Results: Compared to hypoxic living and living and exercise training in normoxic conditions, living and exercise training in hypoxic conditions for 3-4 weeks resulted in lower Lee index (P leptin and leptin receptor (P adipose tissue. Conclusion: In a rodent model of altitude training, living, and exercise training in hypoxic conditions resulted in greater alterations in obesity and adipose tissue leptin/leptin receptor than hypoxic living alone and living and exercise training in normoxic conditions.

  5. Effect of training in the fasted state on metabolic responses during exercise with carbohydrate intake

    OpenAIRE

    De Bock, Katrien; Derave, W.; Eijnde, B. O.; Hesselink, M.K.; Koninckx, Erwin; Rose, A.J.; Schrauwen, P.; Bonen, A.; Richter, E A; Hespel, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Skeletal muscle gene response to exercise depends on nutritional status during and after exercise, but it is unknown whether muscle adaptations to endurance training are affected by nutritional status during training sessions. Therefore, this study investigated the effect of an endurance training program (6 wk, 3 day/wk, 1-2 h, 75% of peak (V) over dot O-2) in moderately active males. They trained in the fasted (F; n = 10) or carbohydratefed state (CHO; n = 10) while receiving a standardized ...

  6. Specific training improves skeletal muscle mitochondrial calcium homeostasis after eccentric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattray, Ben; Thompson, Martin; Ruell, Patricia; Caillaud, Corinne

    2013-02-01

    There is limited understanding of the mitochondrial adaptation following repeated eccentric exercise bouts, a model resulting in muscle adaptation known as the repeat bout effect. It was hypothesized that downhill training would reduce mitochondrial calcium content (MCC) post an acute eccentric bout with concurrent improvements in mitochondrial respiratory function. Thirty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: control (N), control with acute eccentric exercise (N (ecc)), trained control (X) and trained with acute eccentric exercise (X (ecc)). Training for X and X (ecc) consisted of 30 min per day for five consecutive days of downhill treadmill running. The acute eccentric exercise bout was a -14° treadmill exercise for 90 min performed 2 weeks after the training period. Animals were killed 48 h post-exercise. Isolated mitochondria from the red quadriceps allowed for the measure of mitochondrial respiratory indices and MCC. Calpain activity and heat shock protein 72 expression (HSP72) were also measured. MCC dramatically increased following the acute bout of eccentric exercise in N (ecc) (p eccentric exercise. The results suggest that downhill exercise training improves mitochondrial calcium homeostasis following an acute bout of prolonged eccentric exercise and may stabilize mitochondrial respiratory function. These improvements coincide with a reduction in calpain activity and heat shock protein upregulation.

  7. STS-47 crew during fire fighting exercises at JSC's Fire Training Pit

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, crewmembers line up along water hoses to extinguish a blaze in JSC's Fire Training Pit during fire fighting exercises. Manning the hose in the foreground are Payload Specialist Mamoru Mohri, holding the hose nozzle, backup Payload Specialist Takao Doi, Mission Specialist (MS) Jerome Apt, and Commander Robert L. Gibson, at rear. Lined up on the second hose are Pilot Curtis L. Brown, Jr, holding the hose nozzle, followed by MS N. Jan Davis, MS and Payload Commander (PLC) Mark C. Lee, and backup Payload Specialist Stan Koszelak. A veteran firefighter monitors the effort from a position between the two hoses. In the background, backup Payload Specialist Chiaki Naito-Mukai, donning gloves, and MS Mae C. Jemison look on. The Fire Training Pit is located across from the Gilruth Center Bldg 207. Mohri, Doi, and Mukai all represent Japan's National Space Development Agency (NASDA).

  8. Exercise testing, limitation and training in patients with cystic fibrosis. A personalized approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werkman, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    Exercise testing and training are cornerstones in regular CF care. However, no consensus exists in literature about which exercise test protocol should be used for individual patients. Furthermore, divergence exists in insights about both the dominant exercise limiting mechanisms and the possibiliti

  9. Non-invasive ventilation during exercise training for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menadue, C.; Piper, A.J.; Hul, A.J. van 't; Wong, K.K.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exercise training as a component of pulmonary rehabilitation improves health-related quality of life (HRQL) and exercise capacity in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, some individuals may have difficulty performing exercise at an adequate intensity. Non-i

  10. Analyzing Exercise Training Effect and Its Impact on Cardiorespiratory and Cardiovascular Fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laumakis, Paul J.; McCormack, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides a statistical investigation of the impact of heart rate levels on training effect for a specific exercise regimen, including an analysis of post-exercise heart rate recovery. Results indicate optimum target values for both average and maximum heart rate during exercise in order to improve both cardiorespiratory and…

  11. Efficacy and Safety of Exercise Training in Chronic Pulmonary Hypertension: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ambarish; Garg, Sushil; Khunger, Monica; Garg, Sonia; Kumbhani, Dharam J; Chin, Kelly M; Berry, Jarett D

    2015-11-01

    Exercise training has been shown to improve cardiorespiratory fitness, physical capacity, and quality of life in patients with cardiopulmonary conditions, such as heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, its role in management of pulmonary hypertension is not well defined. In this study, we aim to evaluate the efficacy and safety of exercise training in patients with pulmonary hypertension. We included all prospective intervention studies that evaluated the efficacy and safety of exercise training in patients with pulmonary hypertension. Primary outcome of this meta-analysis was a change in 6-minute walk distance. We also assessed the effect of exercise on peak oxygen uptake, resting pulmonary arterial systolic pressure, peak exercise heart rate, and quality of life. A total of 469 exercise-training participants enrolled in 16 separate training studies were included. In the pooled analysis, exercise training was associated with significant improvement in 6-minute walk distance (weighted mean difference, 53.3 m; 95% confidence interval, 39.5-67.2), peak oxygen uptake (weighted mean difference, 1.8 mL/kg per minute; 95% confidence interval, 1.4-2.3), pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (weighted mean difference, -3.7 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, -5.4 to -1.9), peak exercise heart rate (weighted mean difference, 10 beats per min; 95% confidence interval, 6-15), and quality of life as measured on SF-36 questionnaire subscale scores. Furthermore, exercise training was well tolerated with a low dropout rate, and no major adverse events were related to exercise training. Exercise training in patients with pulmonary hypertension appears safe and is associated with a significant improvement in exercise capacity, pulmonary arterial pressure, and quality of life. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Exercise and Cognition in Older Adults: Is there a Role for Resistance Training Programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu-Ambrose, Teresa; Donaldson, Meghan G

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a strong interest in physical activity as a primary behavioural prevention strategy against cognitive decline. A number of large prospective cohort studies have highlighted the protective role of regular physical activity in lowering the risk of cognitive impairment and dementia. The majority of prospective intervention studies of exercise and cognition to date have focused on aerobic-based exercise training. These studies highlight that aerobic-based exercise training enhances both brain structure and function. However, it has been suggested that other types of exercise training, such as resistance training, may also benefit cognition. The purpose of this brief review is to examine the evidence regarding resistance training and cognitive benefits. Three recent randomized exercise trials involving resistance training among seniors provide evidence that resistance training may have cognitive benefits. Resistance training may prevent cognitive decline among seniors via mechanisms involving IGF-1 and homocysteine. A side benefit of resistance training, albeit a very important one, is its established role in reducing morbidity among seniors. Resistance training specifically moderates the development of sarcopenia. The multifactorial deleterious sequelae of sarcopenia include increased falls and fracture risk as well as physical disability. Thus, clinicians should consider encouraging their clients to undertake both aerobic-based exercise training and resistance training not only for ‘physical health’ but also because of the almost certain benefits for ‘brain health’. PMID:19019904

  13. Velocity-specific and time-dependent adaptations following a standardized Nordic Hamstring Exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, T; Nodler, Y T; Severin, J; Knicker, A J; Strüder, H K

    2017-03-01

    The Nordic Hamstring Exercise (NHE) is effective for selective hamstring strengthening to improve muscle balance between knee flexors and extensors. The purpose of this study (within subject design of repeated measures) was to determine the effects of a standardized 4-week NHE training on thigh strength and muscle balance with concomitant kinetic and kinematic monitoring. Sixteen male sprinters (22 years, 181 cm, 76 kg) performed a standardized 4-week NHE training consisting of three sessions per week (each 3×3 repetitions). Six rope-assisted and six unassisted sessions were performed targeting at a constant knee extension angular velocity of ~15°/s across a ~90-100° knee joint range of motion. Kinetic (peak and mean moment, impulse) and kinematic parameters (eg, ROM to downward acceleration, ROMDWA ) were recorded during selected sessions. Unilateral isokinetic tests of concentric and eccentric knee flexors and extensors quantified muscle group-, contraction mode-, and velocity-specific training adaptations. Peak moments and contractional work demonstrated strong interactions of time with muscle group, contraction modes, and angular velocities (η²>.150). NHE training increased eccentric hamstring strength by 6%-14% as well as thigh muscle balance with biggest adaptations at 150°/s 2 weeks after NHE training. Throughout the training period significant increases (P.05). A 4-week NHE training significantly strengthened the hamstrings and improved muscle balance between knee flexors and extensors. Despite the slow training velocity, biggest adaptations emerged at the highest velocity 2 weeks after training ended. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Exercise training upregulates nitric oxide synthases in the kidney of rats with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Daisuke; Ito, Osamu; Mori, Nobuyoshi; Cao, Pengyu; Suda, Chihiro; Muroya, Yoshikazu; Hao, Kiyotaka; Shimokawa, Hiroaki; Kohzuki, Masahiro

    2013-09-01

    There is an interaction between heart and kidney diseases, which is a condition termed cardiorenal syndrome. Exercise training has cardioprotective effects, involving upregulation of endothelial (e) nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the cardiovascular system. However, the effects of exercise training on NOS in the kidney with heart disease are unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether exercise training upregulates NOS in the kidney, left ventricle and aorta of rats with chronic heart failure (CHF). Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent left coronary artery ligation (LCAL) to induce CHF and were randomly assigned to sedentary or treadmill exercise groups 4 weeks after LCAL. Three days after exercising for 4 weeks, urine samples were collected for 24 h and blood samples were collected following decapitation. Nitric oxide synthase activity and protein expression were examined. Significant interactions between CHF and exercise training were observed on parameters of cardiac and renal function. Exercise training improved cardiac function, decreased plasma B-type natriuretic peptide levels, decreased urinary albumin excretion and increased creatinine clearance in CHF rats. Nitric oxide synthase activity, eNOS expression and neuronal (n) NOS expression were significantly decreased in the left ventricle and kidney of CHF rats. Exercise training significantly increased NOS activity and eNOS and nNOS expression. Upregulation of NOS in the kidney and left ventricle may contribute, in part, to the renal and cardiac protective effects of exercise training in cardiorenal syndrome in CHF rats.

  15. Effect of birth weight and 12 weeks of exercise training on exercise-induced AMPK signaling in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Brynjulf; Hingst, Janne Rasmuss; Frederiksen, Nicklas;

    2013-01-01

    Subjects with a low birth weight (LBW) display increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D). We hypothesized that this is associated with defects in muscle adaptations following acute and regular physical activity, evident by impairments in the exercise-induced activation of AMPK signaling....... the need for AMPK to control energy turnover during exercise. Thus, the remaining ¿3-associated AMPK activation by acute exercise after exercise training might be sufficient to maintain cellular energy balance........ We investigated 21 LBW and 21 normal birth weight (NBW) subjects during 1 hour of acute exercise performed at the same relative workload before and after 12 weeks of exercise training. Multiple skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained before and after exercise. Protein levels and phosphorylation status...... were determined by Western blotting. AMPK activities were measured using activity assays. Protein levels of AMPK isoforms a1 and ¿1 were significantly increased while ¿3 levels decreased with training independent of group. The LBW group had higher exercise-induced AMPK Thr(172) phosphorylation before...

  16. Comparison of morning and afternoon exercise training for asthmatic children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.S. Silva

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Fitness improvement was used to compare morning with afternoon exercise periods for asthmatic children. Children with persistent moderate asthma (according to GINA criteria, 8 to 11 years old, were divided into 3 groups: morning training group (N = 23, afternoon training group (N = 23, and non-training group (N = 23. The program was based on twice a week 90-min sessions for 4 months. We measured the 9-min running distance, resting heart rate and abdominal muscle strength (sit-up number before and after the training. All children took budesonide, 400 µg/day, and an on demand inhaled ß-agonist. The distance covered in 9 min increased (mean ± SEM from 1344 ± 30 m by 248 ± 30 m for the morning group, from 1327 ± 30 m by 162 ± 20 m for the afternoon group, and from 1310 ± 20 m by 2 ± 20 m for the control group (P 0.05 for morning with afternoon comparison. The reduction of resting heart rate from 83 ± 1, 85 ± 2 and 86 ± 1 bpm was 5.1 ± 0.8 bpm in the morning group, 4.4 ± 0.8 bpm in the afternoon group, and -0.2 ± 0.7 bpm in the control group (P > 0.05 for morning with afternoon comparison and P 0.05 for morning with afternoon comparison and P < 0.05 versus control. No statistically significant differences were detected between the morning and afternoon groups in terms of physical training of asthmatic children.

  17. AMPKα in Exercise-Induced Substrate Metabolism and Exercise Training-Induced Metabolic and Mitochondrial Adaptations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fentz, Joachim

    and profile. In most AMPK deficient models only a single isoform of the two aatalytic α-subunits has been targeted for inactivation. But turning to other models of disrupted AMPK-function such as the AMPKβ1β2M-KO mouse or the LKB1 KO mouse (indirect effect on AMPK-function), it has been found that exercise......-regulated metabolism and exercise training-induced adaptations are abnormal. This could be due to a more complete ablation of AMPK function and perhaps related to the catalytic properires of the α-subunits. In study 1 we show that deletion of both AMPKα subunits in skeletal muscle of mice decreases exerciseinduced......A bout of exercise potently stimulates skeletal muscle energy metabolism. The ATP turnover may rise up to0 ~100 fold compared to the resting state and this presents a substantial stress on skeletal muscle ATP regeneration. To prepare for future events of metabolic stress, the muscle increases its...

  18. Affect-regulated exercise intensity: does training at an intensity that feels 'good' improve physical health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfitt, Gaynor; Alrumh, Amnah; Rowlands, Alex V

    2012-11-01

    Affect-regulated exercise to feel 'good' can be used to control exercise intensity amongst both active and sedentary individuals and should support exercise adherence. It is not known, however, whether affect-regulated exercise training can lead to physical health gains. The aim of this study was to examine if affect-regulated exercise to feel 'good' leads to improved fitness over the course of an 8-week training programme. A repeated measures design (pretest-posttest) with independent groups (training and control). 20 sedentary females completed a submaximal graded exercise test and were then allocated to either a training group or control group. The training group completed two supervised sessions and one unsupervised session per week for 8 weeks. Exercise intensity was affect-regulated to feel 'good'. Following the 8 weeks of training, both groups completed a second submaximal graded exercise test. Repeated measures analyses of variance indicated a significant increase in the time to reach ventilatory threshold in the training group (318 ± 23.7s) compared to control (248 ± 16.9s). Overall compliance to training was high (>92%). Participants in the training group exercised at intensities that would be classified as being in the lower range of the recommended guidelines (≈ 50% V˙O(2) max) for cardiovascular health. Affect-regulated exercise to feel 'good' can be used in a training programme to regulate exercise intensity. This approach led to a 19% increase in time to reach ventilatory threshold, which is indicative of improved fitness. Copyright © 2012 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Physiological and Neural Adaptations to Eccentric Exercise: Mechanisms and Considerations for Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayatpour, Nosratollah; Falla, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Eccentric exercise is characterized by initial unfavorable effects such as subcellular muscle damage, pain, reduced fiber excitability, and initial muscle weakness. However, stretch combined with overload, as in eccentric contractions, is an effective stimulus for inducing physiological and neural adaptations to training. Eccentric exercise-induced adaptations include muscle hypertrophy, increased cortical activity, and changes in motor unit behavior, all of which contribute to improved muscle function. In this brief review, neuromuscular adaptations to different forms of exercise are reviewed, the positive training effects of eccentric exercise are presented, and the implications for training are considered.

  20. Physiological and Neural Adaptations to Eccentric Exercise: Mechanisms and Considerations for Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nosratollah Hedayatpour

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Eccentric exercise is characterized by initial unfavorable effects such as subcellular muscle damage, pain, reduced fiber excitability, and initial muscle weakness. However, stretch combined with overload, as in eccentric contractions, is an effective stimulus for inducing physiological and neural adaptations to training. Eccentric exercise-induced adaptations include muscle hypertrophy, increased cortical activity, and changes in motor unit behavior, all of which contribute to improved muscle function. In this brief review, neuromuscular adaptations to different forms of exercise are reviewed, the positive training effects of eccentric exercise are presented, and the implications for training are considered.

  1. Dose-response relationship of baroreflex sensitivity and heart rate variability to individually-tailored exercise training in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iellamo, Ferdinando; Manzi, Vincenzo; Caminiti, Giuseppe; Sposato, Barbara; Massaro, Michele; Cerrito, Anna; Rosano, Giuseppe; Volterrani, Maurizio

    2013-06-20

    Heart Rate Variability (HRV) and Baroreflex Sensitivity (BRS) are impaired in patients with Chronic Heart Failure (CHF) and carry negative prognosis. Exercise training improves these parameters. However, the relationship between exercise training with HRV and BRS has been investigated without regard for individual training loads. We tested the hypothesis that in CHF patients changes in HRV and BRS are dose-response related to individual volume/intensity training load (TL). Twenty patients with stable postinfarction CHF under optimal medical treatment were randomized to either aerobic continuous training (ACT) or aerobic interval training (AIT) for 12weeks. Individualized TL was monitored by the Training Impulses (TRIMPi) method, which was determined using the individual HR and lactate profiling determined during a treadmill test at baseline. HRV (standard deviation of mean R-R interval) and BRS were assessed at rest and 3weeks apart, throughout the study. HRV, BRS and R-R interval increased significantly with training, being very highly correlated to the dose of exercise with a second-order regression model (r(2) ranged from 0.75 to 0.96; Pincrease in functional capacity. No significant differences were detected between ACT and AIT in any variable. These results suggest that improvements in HRV and BRS by exercise training in CHF patients are dose related to TL in a non-linear fashion on an individual basis, with optimal results at moderate doses of exercise. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of physical fitness and physical exercise training on work productivity among health care workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongstad, Malte Bue; Christensen, Jeanette Reffstrup; Sjøgaard, Gisela

    THE EFFECT OF PHYSICAL FITNESS AND PHYSICAL EXERCISE TRAINING ON WORK PRODUCTIVITY AMONG HEALTH CARE WORKERS Kongstad, M. 1, Sjøgaard, G. 1, Søgaard, K. 1, Christensen, JR. 1 1: SDU (Odense, Denmark) Introduction Workplace health promotion involving physical exercise training may negate lifestyle...

  3. The miRNA Plasma Signature in Response to Acute Aerobic Exercise and Endurance Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren; Åkerström, Thorbjörn; Rinnov, Anders

    2014-01-01

    the miRNA signature in human plasma in response to acute exercise and chronic endurance training by utilizing a novel methodological approach. RNA was isolated from human plasma collected from young healthy men before and after an acute endurance exercise bout and following 12 weeks of endurance training...

  4. The impact of exercise training on the diameter dilator response to forearm ischaemia in healthy men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijssen, D.H.J.; Tinken, T.M.; Hopkins, N.; Dawson, E.A.; Cable, N.T.; Green, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    AIM: Recent studies found differences between groups in the rate of diameter increase following the flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Whilst exercise training alters the magnitude of the FMD, little is known about the impact of exercise training on the rate of diameter increase. The aim of this study is

  5. Strongwomen® Program Evaluation: Effect of Strength Training Exercises on Physical Fitness of Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Anil Kumar; Van Horn, Beth; Corbin, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    The Strongwomen® Program (SWP) is a nationally disseminated group strength-training exercise and nutrition education program delivered by Extension. The study reported here examined the effect of strength training exercises in SWP on improvement in physical fitness of program participants. Senior Fitness Test was used to collect data. Upon…

  6. Hypoxic Living and Exercise Training Alter Adipose Tissue Leptin/Leptin Receptor in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yingli; Feng, Lianshi; Xie, Minhao; Zhang, Li; Xu, Jianfang; He, Zihong; You, Tongjian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypobaric hypoxia results in weight loss in obese individuals, and exercise training is advocated for the treatment of obesity and its related metabolic dysfunctions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of hypoxic living and exercise training on obesity and adipose tissue leptin/leptin receptor in dietary-induced obese rats. Methods: One hundred and thirty high-fat diet fed Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned into one of the following groups (n = 10 each): control, sedentary hypoxic living for 1–4 weeks (SH1, SH2, SH3, and SH4), living, and exercise training in normoxic conditions for 1–4 weeks (TN1, TN2, TN3, and TN4), and living and exercise training in hypoxic conditions for 1–4 weeks (TN1, TN2, TN3, and TN4). Epididymal adipose tissue expression levels of leptin and leptin receptor were determined Results: Compared to hypoxic living and living and exercise training in normoxic conditions, living and exercise training in hypoxic conditions for 3–4 weeks resulted in lower Lee index (P exercise training in hypoxic conditions resulted in greater alterations in obesity and adipose tissue leptin/leptin receptor than hypoxic living alone and living and exercise training in normoxic conditions. PMID:27932989

  7. Adipose triglyceride lipase in human skeletal muscle is upregulated by exercise training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alsted, Thomas J; Schweiger, Martina; Nybo, Lars

    2009-01-01

    ) is not changed. Recently, adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) was identified as a TG-specific lipase in various rodent tissues. To investigate whether human skeletal muscle ATGL protein is regulated by endurance exercise training, 10 healthy young men completed 8 wk of supervised endurance exercise training...

  8. Exercise training and artery function in humans: nonresponse and its relationship to cardiovascular risk factors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Green, D.J.; Eijsvogels, T.M.; Bouts, Y.M.; Maiorana, A.J.; Naylor, L.H.; Scholten, R.R.; Spaanderman, M.E.; Pugh, C.J.; Sprung, V.S.; Schreuder, T.H.; Jones, H.; Cable, T.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Thijssen, D.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of our study were to examine 1) the proportion of responders and nonresponders to exercise training in terms of vascular function; 2) a priori factors related to exercise training-induced changes in conduit artery function, and 3) the contribution of traditional cardiovascular risk fa

  9. Strongwomen® Program Evaluation: Effect of Strength Training Exercises on Physical Fitness of Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Anil Kumar; Van Horn, Beth; Corbin, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    The Strongwomen® Program (SWP) is a nationally disseminated group strength-training exercise and nutrition education program delivered by Extension. The study reported here examined the effect of strength training exercises in SWP on improvement in physical fitness of program participants. Senior Fitness Test was used to collect data. Upon…

  10. The benefit of exercise training in pulmonary hypertension: a clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Karen S W; Wong, Peter K K; Faux, Steven G; McLachlan, Craig S; Kotlyar, Eugene

    2017-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a clinical condition characterised by raised pulmonary artery pressure, which results in increased right ventricular afterload and dyspnoea. This is accompanied by reduced exercise capacity, quality of life and, eventually, death. An increasing range of targeted medications has transformed the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension, a specific type of PH. Supervised exercise training is recommended as part of a multifaceted management plan for PH. However, many questions remain regarding how exercise training improves exercise capacity and quality of life. The optimal exercise regimen (frequency, timing, duration and intensity) also remains unclear. This review provides an update on the pathophysiology of exercise impairment in PH, suggests mechanisms by which exercise may improve symptoms and function and offers evidence-based recommendations regarding the frequency and intensity of an exercise programme for patients with PH.

  11. Exercise training modifies gut microbiota in normal and diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Jennifer E; Myslicki, Jason P; Bomhof, Marc R; Belke, Darrell D; Shearer, Jane; Reimer, Raylene A

    2015-07-01

    Cecal microbiota from type 2 diabetic (db/db) and control (db/(+)) mice was obtained following 6 weeks of sedentary or exercise activity. qPCR analysis revealed a main effect of exercise, with greater abundance of select Firmicutes species and lower Bacteroides/Prevotella spp. in both normal and diabetic exercised mice compared with sedentary counterparts. Conversely, Bifidobacterium spp. was greater in exercised normal but not diabetic mice (exercise × diabetes interaction). How exercise influences gut microbiota requires further investigation.

  12. Interference between concurrent resistance and endurance exercise: molecular bases and the role of individual training variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyfe, Jackson J; Bishop, David J; Stepto, Nigel K

    2014-06-01

    Concurrent training is defined as simultaneously incorporating both resistance and endurance exercise within a periodized training regime. Despite the potential additive benefits of combining these divergent exercise modes with regards to disease prevention and athletic performance, current evidence suggests that this approach may attenuate gains in muscle mass, strength, and power compared with undertaking resistance training alone. This has been variously described as the interference effect or concurrent training effect. In recent years, understanding of the molecular mechanisms mediating training adaptation in skeletal muscle has emerged and provided potential mechanistic insight into the concurrent training effect. Although it appears that various molecular signaling responses induced in skeletal muscle by endurance exercise can inhibit pathways regulating protein synthesis and stimulate protein breakdown, human studies to date have not observed such molecular 'interference' following acute concurrent exercise that might explain compromised muscle hypertrophy following concurrent training. However, given the multitude of potential concurrent training variables and the limitations of existing evidence, the potential roles of individual training variables in acute and chronic interference are not fully elucidated. The present review explores current evidence for the molecular basis of the specificity of training adaptation and the concurrent interference phenomenon. Additionally, insights provided by molecular and performance-based concurrent training studies regarding the role of individual training variables (i.e., within-session exercise order, between-mode recovery, endurance training volume, intensity, and modality) in the concurrent interference effect are discussed, along with the limitations of our current understanding of this complex paradigm.

  13. Aerobic Interval Exercise Training Induces Greater Reduction in Cardiac Workload in the Recovery Period in Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Juliana Pereira, E-mail: julipborges@gmail.com; Masson, Gustavo Santos; Tibiriçá, Eduardo; Lessa, Marcos Adriano [Instituto Oswaldo Cruz - FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-01-15

    Aerobic interval exercise training has greater benefits on cardiovascular function as compared with aerobic continuous exercise training. The present study aimed at analyzing the effects of both exercise modalities on acute and subacute hemodynamic responses of healthy rats. Thirty male rats were randomly assigned into three groups as follows: continuous exercise (CE, n = 10); interval exercise (IE, n = 10); and control (C, n = 10). Both IE and CE groups performed a 30-minute exercise session. The IE group session consisted of three successive 4-minute periods at 60% of maximal velocity (Max Vel), with 4-minute recovery intervals at 40% of Max Vel. The CE group ran continuously at 50% of Max Vel. Heart rate (HR), blood pressure(BP), and rate pressure product (RPP) were measured before, during and after the exercise session. The CE and IE groups showed an increase in systolic BP and RPP during exercise as compared with the baseline values. After the end of exercise, the CE group showed a lower response of systolic BP and RPP as compared with the baseline values, while the IE group showed lower systolic BP and mean BP values. However, only the IE group had a lower response of HR and RPP during recovery. In healthy rats, one interval exercise session, as compared with continuous exercise, induced similar hemodynamic responses during exercise. However, during recovery, the interval exercise caused greater reductions in cardiac workload than the continuous exercise.

  14. Improving Peripheral and Central Vascular Adjustments during Exercise through a Training Program in Adolescents with Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Valérie Julian; David Thivel; Bruno Pereira; Frédéric Costes; Ruddy Richard; Martine Duclos

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The effects of a training program (TP) on muscle microvascularization during exercise remained to be explored in adolescents with obesity. We hypothesized that a TP would lead to better microvascular adaptations to exercise in skeletal muscle. Methods: 15 inactive adolescents followed a 12-week TP where both peripheral (muscular microvascularization) and central (cardiac) adaptations to exercise (40 min exercise set at 70% V̇O2peak) were assessed before and after interventio...

  15. Telemetric analysis of haemodynamic regulation during voluntary exercise training in mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Adlam, D; De Bono, J. P.; Danson, E. J.; Zhang, M. H.; Casadei, B.; Paterson, D.J.; Channon, K M

    2011-01-01

    Regular physical exercise reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease and improves outcome in patients with cardiovascular diseases. The dynamic changes in blood pressure and heart rate with acute exercise are independently predictive of prognosis. Quantification of the haemodynamic response to exercise training in genetically modified mouse models may provide insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of exercise. We describe, for the first time, the use of radiot...

  16. Risks and Benefits of Exercise Training in Adults With Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaix, Marie-A; Marcotte, François; Dore, Annie; Mongeon, François-Pierre; Mondésert, Blandine; Mercier, Lise-Andrée; Khairy, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Exercise capacity in adults with various forms of congenital heart disease is substantially lower than that of the general population. Although the underlying congenital heart defect, and its sequelae, certainly contribute to observed exercise limitations, there is evidence suggesting that deconditioning and a sedentary lifestyle are important implicated factors. The prevalence of acquired cardiovascular comorbidities is on the increase in the aging population with congenital heart disease, such that obesity and a sedentary lifestyle confer increased risk. Health fears and misconceptions are common barriers to regular physical activity in adults with congenital heart disease, despite evidence linking lower functional capacity to poor outcomes, and data supporting the safety and efficacy of exercise in bestowing numerous physical and psychosocial rewards. With few exceptions, adults with congenital heart disease should be counselled to exercise regularly. In this contemporary review, we provide a practical approach to assessing adults with congenital heart disease before exercise training. We examine available evidence supporting the safety and benefits of exercise training. Risks associated with exercise training in adults with congenital heart disease are discussed, particularly with regard to sudden cardiac death. Finally, recommendations for exercise training are provided, with consideration for the type of congenital heart disease, the nature (ie, static vs dynamic) and intensity (ie, low, medium, high) of the physical activity, and associated factors such as systemic ventricular dysfunction and residual defects. Further research is required to determine optimal exercise regimens and to identify effective strategies to implement exercise training as a key determinant of healthy living.

  17. Hypothalamic neurogenesis is not required for the improved insulin sensitivity following exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Melissa L; Lemus, Moyra; Reichenbach, Alex; Selathurai, Ahrathy; Oldfield, Brian J; Andrews, Zane B; Watt, Matthew J

    2014-11-01

    Neurons within the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) are important regulators of energy balance. Recent studies suggest that neurogenesis in the ARC is an important regulator of body mass in response to pharmacological stressors. Regular exercise training improves insulin action, and is a primary treatment modality for obesity and type 2 diabetes. We examined whether exercise training causes hypothalamic neurogenesis and whether this contributes to exercise-induced improvements in insulin action. Short-term exercise in adult mice induced a proneurogenic transcriptional program involving growth factors, cell proliferation, and neurogenic regulators in the hypothalamus. Daily exercise training for 7 days increased hypothalamic cell proliferation 3.5-fold above that of sedentary mice, and exercise-induced cell proliferation was maintained in diet-induced obese mice. Colocalization studies indicated negligible neurogenesis in the ARC of sedentary or exercise-trained mice. Blocking cell proliferation via administration of the mitotic blocker arabinosylcytosine (AraC) did not affect food intake or body mass in obese mice. While 4 weeks of exercise training improved whole-body insulin sensitivity compared with sedentary mice, insulin action was not affected by AraC administration. These data suggest that regular exercise training induces significant non-neuronal cell proliferation in the hypothalamus of obese mice, but this proliferation is not required for enhanced insulin action.

  18. Exercise strategies to optimize glycemic control in type 2 diabetes : a continuing glucose monitoring perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Jan-Willem; van Loon, Luc J C

    2015-01-01

    IN BRIEF The introduction of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) several years ago enabled researchers to investigate the impact of exercise strategies on 24-hour glycemic control. Such unique information on the glucoregulatory properties of exercise will ultimately lead to more effective exercise p

  19. Benefits of supplemental oxygen in exercise training in nonhypoxemic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emtner, Margareta; Porszasz, Janos; Burns, Mary; Somfay, Attila; Casaburi, Richard

    2003-11-01

    Supplemental oxygen improves exercise tolerance of normoxemic and hypoxemic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. We determined whether nonhypoxemic COPD patients undergoing exercise training while breathing supplemental oxygen achieve higher intensity and therefore improve exercise capacity more than patients breathing air. A double-blinded trial was performed involving 29 nonhypoxemic patients (67 years, exercise SaO2 > 88%) with COPD (FEV1 = 36% predicted). All exercised on cycle ergometers for 45 minutes, 3 times per week for 7 weeks at high-intensity targets. During exercise, they received oxygen (3 L/minute) (n = 14) or compressed air (3 L/minute) (n = 15). Both groups had a higher exercise tolerance after training and when breathing oxygen. However, the oxygen-trained group increased the training work rate more rapidly than the air-trained group. The mean +/- SD work rate during the last week was 62 +/- 19 W (oxygen-trained group) and 52 +/- 22 W (air-trained group) (p exercise tolerance in laboratory testing.

  20. Effects of Exercise Training on Autonomic Function in Chronic Heart Failure: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chung-Yin; Hsieh, Ping-Lun; Hsiao, Shu-Fang; Chien, Meng-Yueh

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Cardiac autonomic imbalance accompanies the progression of chronic heart failure (CHF). It is unclear whether exercise training could modulate autonomic control in CHF. This study aimed to review systematically the effects of exercise training on heart rate recovery (HRR) and heart rate variability (HRV) in patients with CHF. Methods. Literatures were systematically searched in electronic databases and relevant references. Only published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) focusing on exercise training for CHF were eligible for inclusion. Outcome measurements included HRR and HRV parameters. Results. Eight RCTs were eligible for inclusion and provided data on 280 participants (186 men). The participants were 52-70 years of age with New York Heart Association functional class II-III of CHF. Each study examined either aerobic or resistance exercise. Two trials addressed outcome of HRR and six HRV among these studies. Two RCTs showed that moderate aerobic exercise could improve HRR at 2 minutes after exercise training in CHF. Five of six RCTs demonstrated positive effects of exercise training on HRV which revealed the increments in high frequency (HF) and decrements in LF (low frequency)/HF ratio after training. Conclusion. Participation in an exercise training program has positive effects on cardiac autonomic balance in patients with CHF.

  1. EFFECTS OF EXERCISE TRAINING ON BLOOD LIPIDS AND LIPOPROTEINS IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Stoedefalke

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The following review aims to describe what is known about the effects of exercise training in children and adolescents on the following blood lipids and lipoproteins: total cholesterol (TC, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, and triglycerides (TG. Only studies that described mode, frequency, duration and intensity of the exercise were included in the review. The results of the studies reviewed were equivocal. Clearly the effects of exercise training on the blood lipid and lipoprotein levels of normolipidemic children and adolescents are equivocal. Of the 14 studies reviewed, six observed a positive alteration in the blood lipid and lipoprotein profile, four of the studies observed no alteration in the blood lipid and lipoprotein profile and one study observed a negative effect on HDL-C but an overall improvement in the lipid and lipoprotein profile due to the decrease in the TC/HDL ratio. It appears that methodological problems present in the majority of the exercise training studies limits the ability to make a conclusive, evidence based statement regarding the effect exercise training has on blood lipid levels in normolipidemic children. Most of the research design flaws can be linked to one or more of the following: small numbers of subjects in each study, low or no representation of girls, inclusion of both boys and girls in the subject pool, inclusion of boys and girls at different maturational stages in the subject pool, exercise training regimes that do not adequately control for exercise intensity, exercise training regimes that do not last longer than 8 weeks and exercise training studies that do not have an adequate exercise volume to elicit a change. Ideally, future research should focus on longitudinal studies which examine the effects of exercise training from the primary school years through adulthood

  2. Enhanced Training for Cyber Situational Awareness in Red versus Blue Team Exercises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbajal, Armida J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Human Factors and Statistics; Stevens-Adams, Susan Marie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Risk and Reliability Analysis; Silva, Austin Ray [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Cognitive Modeling; Nauer, Kevin S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Cyber Security Technologies; Anderson, Benjamin Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Assurance Technologies and Assessment; Forsythe, James Chris [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Cognitive Modeling

    2012-09-01

    This report summarizes research conducted through the Sandia National Laboratories Enhanced Training for Cyber Situational Awareness in Red Versus Blue Team Exercises Laboratory Directed Research and Development project. The objective of this project was to advance scientific understanding concerning how to best structure training for cyber defenders. Two modes of training were considered. The baseline training condition (Tool-Based training) was based on current practices where classroom instruction focuses on the functions of a software tool with various exercises in which students apply those functions. In the second training condition (Narrative-Based training), classroom instruction addressed software functions, but in the context of adversary tactics and techniques. It was hypothesized that students receiving narrative-based training would gain a deeper conceptual understanding of the software tools and this would be reflected in better performance within a red versus blue team exercise.

  3. Beneficial metabolic adaptations due to endurance exercise training in the fasted state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Proeyen, Karen; Szlufcik, Karolina; Nielens, Henri; Ramaekers, Monique; Hespel, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Training with limited carbohydrate availability can stimulate adaptations in muscle cells to facilitate energy production via fat oxidation. Here we investigated the effect of consistent training in the fasted state, vs. training in the fed state, on muscle metabolism and substrate selection during fasted exercise. Twenty young male volunteers participated in a 6-wk endurance training program (1-1.5 h cycling at ∼70% Vo(₂max), 4 days/wk) while receiving isocaloric carbohydrate-rich diets. Half of the subjects trained in the fasted state (F; n = 10), while the others ingested ample carbohydrates before (∼160 g) and during (1 g·kg body wt⁻¹·h⁻¹) the training sessions (CHO; n = 10). The training similarly increased Vo(₂max) (+9%) and performance in a 60-min simulated time trial (+8%) in both groups (P Metabolic measurements were made during a 2-h constant-load exercise bout in the fasted state at ∼65% pretraining Vo(₂max). In F, exercise-induced intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) breakdown was enhanced in type I fibers (P Training did not affect IMCL breakdown in CHO. In addition, F (+21%) increased the exercise intensity corresponding to the maximal rate of fat oxidation more than did CHO (+6%) (P exercise-induced drop in blood glucose concentration (P exercise-induced net IMCL degradation. In addition, F but not CHO prevented drop of blood glucose concentration during fasting exercise.

  4. Time to adapt exercise training regimens in pulmonary rehabilitation – a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee AL

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Annemarie L Lee,1–4 Anne E Holland1–3 1Physiotherapy, Alfred Health, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 2Institute for Breathing and Sleep, Austin Health, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 3Physiotherapy, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 4Westpark Healthcare Centre, ON, Canada Abstract: Exercise intolerance, exertional dyspnea, reduced health-related quality of life, and acute exacerbations are features characteristic of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Patients with a primary diagnosis of COPD often report comorbidities and other secondary manifestations, which diversifies the clinical presentation. Pulmonary rehabilitation that includes whole body exercise training is a critical part of management, and core programs involve endurance and resistance training for the upper and lower limbs. Improvement in maximal and submaximal exercise capacity, dyspnea, fatigue, health-related quality of life, and psychological symptoms are outcomes associated with exercise training in pulmonary rehabilitation, irrespective of the clinical state in which it is commenced. There may be benefits for the health care system as well as the individual patient, with fewer exacerbations and subsequent hospitalization reported with exercise training. The varying clinical profile of COPD may direct the need for modification to traditional training strategies for some patients. Interval training, one-legged cycling (partitioning and non-linear periodized training appear to be equally or more effective than continuous training. Inspiratory muscle training may have a role as an adjunct to whole body training in selected patients. The benefits of balance training are also emerging. Strategies to ensure that health enhancing behaviors are adopted and maintained are essential. These may include training for an extended duration, alternative environments to undertake the initial program, maintenance programs following initial exercise training, program repetition

  5. Implementing intelligent physical exercise training at the workplace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalager, Tina; Justesen, Just Bendix; Murray, Mike

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim was to assess 1-year cardiovascular health effects of Intelligent Physical Exercise Training, IPET. METHODS: Office workers from six companies were randomized 1:1 to a training group, TG (N = 194) or a control group, CG (N = 195). TG received 1-h supervised high intensity IPET......, and musculoskeletal health. RESULTS: There were no baseline differences between groups. CRF assessed as VO2max in absolute values and relative to body weight was (mean ± SD): 3.0 ± 0.8 l/min and 35.4 ± 10.9 ml/min/kg for females, 3.9 ± 1.0 l/min and 37.9 ± 11.79 ml/min/kg for males. Intention to treat analysis...... demonstrated a significant almost 5 % increase in VO2max in TG compared with CG. A per protocol analysis of those with an adherence of ≥70 % demonstrated a significant increase in CRF of more than 10 % compared with CG, and a significant reduction in systolic blood pressure (-5.3 ± 13.7 mm Hg) compared with CG...

  6. Physiological cardiac remodelling in response to endurance exercise training: cellular and molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Georgina M; Waring, Cheryl D; Vicinanza, Carla; Torella, Daniele

    2012-01-01

    Exercise training fosters the health and performance of the cardiovascular system, and represents nowadays a powerful tool for cardiovascular therapy. Exercise exerts its beneficial effects through reducing cardiovascular risk factors, and directly affecting the cellular and molecular remodelling of the heart. Traditionally, moderate endurance exercise training has been viewed to determine a balanced and revertible physiological growth, through cardiomyocyte hypertrophy accompanied by appropriate neoangiogenesis (the Athlete's Heart). These cellular adaptations are due to the activation of signalling pathways and in particular, the IGF-1/IGF-1R/Akt axis appears to have a major role. Recently, it has been shown that physical exercise determines cardiac growth also through new cardiomyocyte formation. Accordingly, burgeoning evidence indicates that exercise training activates circulating, as well as resident tissue-specific cardiac, stem/progenitor cells. Dissecting the mechanisms for stem/progenitor cell activation with exercise will be instrumental to devise new effective therapies, encompassing myocardial regeneration for a large spectrum of cardiovascular diseases.

  7. Effects of functional exercise training on performance and muscle strength after meniscectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ericsson, Y B; Dahlberg, L E; Roos, E M

    2008-01-01

    Muscular deficits and functional limitations have been found years after meniscectomy of the knee. The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to examine the effect of functional exercise training on functional performance and isokinetic thigh muscle strength in middle-aged patients...... subsequent to meniscectomy for a degenerative tear. Four years after meniscectomy, 45 patients (29 men, 16 women) were randomized to functional exercise training, supervised by a physical therapist, three times weekly for 4 months or to no intervention. The exercise program comprised of postural stability...... training and functional strength and endurance exercises for leg and trunk muscles. Outcomes were three functional performance tests and isokinetic muscle strength. Thirty patients (16 exercisers/14 controls) completed the study. Compared with control patients, the exercise group showed significant...

  8. Exercise Strategies to Optimize Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes: A Continuing Glucose Monitoring Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    van Dijk, Jan-Willem; van Loon, Luc J. C.

    2015-01-01

    IN BRIEF The introduction of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) several years ago enabled researchers to investigate the impact of exercise strategies on 24-hour glycemic control. Such unique information on the glucoregulatory properties of exercise will ultimately lead to more effective exercise programs to prevent and treat type 2 diabetes. This article reviews the role of exercise and physical activity in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, complemented by recent data obtained by CGM.

  9. Modern Techniques and Technologies Applied to Training and Performance Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, William A; Kavanaugh, Ashley A; Murray, Steven R; McNeal, Jeni R; Jemni, Monèm

    2016-12-05

    Athlete preparation and performance continues to increase in complexity and costs. Modern coaches are shifting from reliance on personal memory, experience, and opinion to evidence from collected training load data. Training load monitoring may hold vital information for developing systems of monitoring that follow the training process with such precision that both performance prediction and day-to-day management of training become an adjunct to preparation and performance. Time series data collection and analyses in sport are still in their infancy with considerable efforts being applied in "big-data" analytics and models of the appropriate variables to monitor and methods for doing so. Training monitoring has already garnered important applications, but lacks a theoretical framework from which to develop further. As such, we propose a framework involving the following: analyses of individuals, trend analyses, rules-based analysis, and statistical process control.

  10. Efficacy of a simple and inexpensive exercise training program for advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients in community hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothirat, Chaicharn; Chaiwong, Warawut; Phetsuk, Nittaya

    2015-04-01

    Exercise training is an important part of pulmonary rehabilitation; however it may not be appropriate for large-scale practice in community hospitals due to the complexity of the program and expensive training equipment, including cycle ergometry and treadmills. This study therefore aims to evaluate the efficacy of a more simplified exercise training program with inexpensive training equipment. A multicentre study of a mild to moderate intensity exercise training program was conducted based on incremental strength and endurance with two 35-40-minute sessions per week for 8 weeks. The program was performed by 30 outpatients from five community hospitals. Patients were monitored regularly for various parameters including strength of trained muscles, level of dyspnea, 6-minute walk distance, and quality of life (QoL) at baseline at 1, 2, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. Unpaired t-tests were applied to determine the progress of trained muscle strength and minimal clinically important differences (MCIDs) were used to assess clinical outcomes. Thirty patients (13 males, 17 females) were enrolled with a mean age of 69.1±8.9 years, body mass index 20.5±4.4 kg/m(2), and mean % of predicted forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) 45.1±10.8. According to GOLD classification, eight (26.7%) cases were in stage II, 20 (66.7%) cases in stage III, and two (6.6%) cases in stage IV. Limb and chest wall muscle strength, dyspnea level, exercise capacity and QoL showed statistically significant improvements throughout the 12-month follow-up (Pprogram was shown to be effective for advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients in community hospitals.

  11. Effects of interval and continuous exercise training on autonomic cardiac function in COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Diego A; Arbillaga, Ane; Barberan-Garcia, Anael; Ramirez-Sarmiento, Alba; Torralba, Yolanda; Vilaró, Jordi; Gimeno-Santos, Elena; Gea, Joaquim; Orozco-Levi, Mauricio; Roca, Josep; Marco, Ester

    2016-01-01

    Both interval (IT) and continuous (CT) exercise training results in an improvement of aerobic capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD); however, their effects on cardiac autonomic function remains unclear. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of a supervised CT vs IT on autonomic cardiac function in COPD patients. COPD patients were divided into two different groups according to training modality (IT or CT). Autonomic cardiac dysfunction (ACD) was defined as a heart rate recovery lower than 12 bpm heart rate after the first minute of maximal exercise (HRR1 ) and an abnormal chronotropic response (CR) to exercise (exercise training improve heart rate recovery and CR in COPD patients. These benefits could help to individualize exercise training. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Athletes' use of exercise imagery during weight training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbernagel, Michael S; Short, Sandra E; Ross-Stewart, Lindsay C

    2007-11-01

    Imagery is a cognitive process during which people use their minds to create (or recreate) experiences that are similar to real-life situations. This study examined how college athletes used imagery during weight training. Subjects were 295 Division I (n = 163) and Division II (n = 132) college student athletes (men: n = 138, women: n = 157) who participated in a weight training program as a requirement of their sport. They completed a slightly modified version of the "Weight Lifting Imagery Questionnaire." Results showed that appearance imagery (i.e., images related to the attainment of a fit-looking body) was used and considered the most effective followed by technique imagery (i.e., images related to performing the skill and techniques correctly with good form) and energy imagery (i.e., images related to getting "psyched up" or feeling energized). Other variables that effected imagery use were gender, age, time of season, and levels of motivation. In addition, gender, previous imagery training, and level of motivation had an effect on the perceptions of imagery effectiveness. Confidence in the ability to image was associated with both imagery use and effectiveness, and imagery use and effectiveness were associated with confidence in the weight room. The findings support previous research in exercise imagery that appearance imagery is most used followed by technique and energy imagery and extend them in such a way that strength coaches have practical advice on how to use imagery in a positive way with their athletes. Suggestions about how strength coaches can use imagery with their clients are provided.

  13. Training at the Gym, Training for Life: Creating Better Versions of the Self Through Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Ceren

    2015-08-01

    The present study draws on Scott's (2011) notion of the Re-Inventive Institution and explores how gym members make sense and give meaning to their exercise regime. Overall, it is argued that for many participants gym exercise is more than physical training; it is also training for life. Based on a thematic analysis of 32 semi-structured interviews it is argued that gym workout is a means to create better versions of the self on mainly three levels. First, gym participants perceive themselves to be efficient and productive in general. Second, gym training is believed to increase the control they have over their lives. Third, gym members associate their gym workout with amplified emotional resilience, believing that fitness workout makes them not only fitter in a physical sense but also fitter and better equipped in a psychological sense. Surprisingly, a small group of regular gym users displayed more critical sentiments and distanced themselves from the images and values the gym stands for. The results of this study can be linked to broader political discourses on health and fitness that make use of corporate managerial vocabularies and are based on ideals of rationalization and efficiency.

  14. Effect of endurance training and cinnamon supplementation on post-exercise oxidative responses in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Dehghan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the preventative and therapeutic effects of regular exercise, exhaustive exercise may be harmful to health. The present study aimed to determine the protective effect of endurance training and cinnamon bark extract (CBE supplementation on oxidative responses induced by an exhaustive exercise schedule in rats. The rats were randomly divided into the following five groups of 6; control sedentary (Con/Sed, control exercised (Con/Ex, trained exercised (Tr/Ex, supplemented exercised (Sup/Ex, and trained, supplemented and exercised (Tr/Sup/Ex. Animals in exercise groups ran on a rodent treadmill for an 8-week endurance training program. At the end of the experiment, blood samples were collected and (MDA and total thiol (TT levels were measured in plasma. Glutathione peroxidase (GPX, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and catalase (CAT activities were determined in soleus muscles. Results showed significant increases in SOD activity and malondealdehyde (MDA levels in the soleus muscles and serum of exercised rats fed with the normal diet. The exhaustive exercise also induced a decrease in serum total thiol level and GPX activity. Elevated levels of total thiol and total antioxidant capacity (TAC and reduced serum MDA levels were found in the Sup/Ex and Tr/Sup/Ex groups. CAT and GPX activities increased by CBE treatment in trained rats. Regular training increased CAT and GPX activities in the Tr/Sup/Ex group. CAT, GPX and SOD activities were not affected by the CBE treatment in untrained rats. Results suggest that additional use of regular training and CBE supplementation increase TAC and protect healthy male rats against oxidative damage induced by exhaustive exercise.

  15. The Effect of Inspiratory Muscle Training on Respiratory and Limb Locomotor Muscle Deoxygenation During Exercise with Resistive Inspiratory Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, L A; Tecklenburg-Lund, S L; Chapman, R; Shei, R-J; Wilhite, D P; Mickleborough, T

    2016-07-01

    We investigated how inspiratory muscle training impacted respiratory and locomotor muscle deoxygenation during submaximal exercise with resistive inspiratory loading. 16 male cyclists completed 6 weeks of either true (n=8) or sham (n=8) inspiratory muscle training. Pre- and post-training, subjects completed 3, 6-min experimental trials performed at ~80%  ˙VO2peak with interventions of either moderate inspiratory loading, heavy inspiratory loading, or maximal exercise imposed in the final 3 min. Locomotor and respiratory muscle oxy-, deoxy-, and total-haemoglobin and myoglobin concentration was continuously monitored using near-infrared spectroscopy. Locomotor muscle deoxygenation changes from 80%  ˙VO2peak to heavy inspiratory loading were significantly reduced pre- to post-training from 4.3±5.6 µM to 2.7±4.7 µM. Respiratory muscle deoxygenation was also significantly reduced during the heavy inspiratory loading trial (4.6±3.5 µM to 1.9±1.5 µM) post-training. There was no significant difference in oxy-, deoxy-, or total-haemoglobin and myoglobin during any of the other loading trials, from pre- to post-training, in either group. After inspiratory muscle training, highly-trained cyclists exhibited decreased locomotor and respiratory muscle deoxygenation during exercise with heavy inspiratory loading. These data suggest that inspiratory muscle training reduces oxygen extraction by the active respiratory and limb muscles, which may reflect changes in respiratory and locomotor muscle oxygen delivery.

  16. Mitochondrial function following downhill and/or uphill exercise training in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlagowski, Anna-Isabel; Isner-Horobeti, Marie-Eve; Dufour, Stéphane P; Rasseneur, Laurence; Enache, Irina; Lonsdorfer-Wolf, Evelyne; Doutreleau, Stéphane; Charloux, Anne; Goupilleau, Fabienne; Bentz, Isabelle; Charles, Anne Laure; Kouassi, Blah Y; Zoll, Joffrey; Geny, Bernard; Favret, Fabrice

    2016-11-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the effects of downhill (DH), uphill (UH), and UH-DH exercise training, at the same metabolic rate, on exercise capacity and skeletal muscle mitochondrial function. Thirty-two Wistar rats were separated into a control and 3 trained groups. The trained groups exercised for 4 weeks, 5 times per week at the same metabolic rate, either in UH, DH, or combined UH-DH. Twenty-four hours after the last training session, the soleus, gastrocnemius, and vastus intermedius muscles were removed for assessment of mitochondrial respiration. Exercise training, at the same metabolic rate, improved maximal running speed without specificity for exercise modalities. Maximal fiber respiration was enhanced in soleus and vastus intermedius in the UH group only. Exercise training, performed at the same metabolic rate, improved exercise capacity, but only UH-trained rats enhanced mitochondrial function in both soleus and vastus intermedius skeletal muscle. Muscle Nerve 54: 925-935, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Exercise training fails to modify arterial baroreflex sensitivity in ovariectomized female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Naoyoshi; Mori, Nobuyoshi; Nagasaka, Makoto; Ito, Osamu; Ogawa, Mika; Kurosawa, Hajime; Kanazawa, Masayuki; Kohzuki, Masahiro

    2007-04-01

    In men, exercise training attenuates age-related reduction in baroreflex sensitivity, which is related to cardiovascular health. It is unknown, however, if this holds true for post-menopausal women. We examined the effects of exercise training on baroreceptor-heart rate (HR) reflex sensitivity in ovariectomized (OVX) and sham-operated (SO) Wistar-Kyoto rats. At the age of 8 weeks, OVX and SO rats were assigned to either sedentary or exercise-trained group. Exercise training was performed on a treadmill 5 days per week. At the age of 20 weeks, baroreflex sensitivity in response to increases in blood pressure (BRSinc) and decreases in blood pressure (BRSdec) were evaluated by injections of phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside, respectively. Both BRSinc and BRSdec were significantly reduced in sedentary OVX rats compared with sedentary SO rats. Exercise training decreased resting HR and BRSdec, but had no effect on BRSinc in SO rats. In OVX rats, exercise training decreased resting HR but modified neither BRSdec nor BRSinc. We conclude that withdrawal of female sex hormones in normotensive female rats is associated with reduced baroreflex sensitivity in response to both increase and decrease in blood pressure and that exercise training fails to modulate the decline of BRSinc associated with withdrawal of female sex hormones. To maintain high level of BRSinc in post-menopausal women, hormone replacement therapy may be needed.

  18. Exercise training and artery function in humans: nonresponse and its relationship to cardiovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Daniel J; Eijsvogels, Thijs; Bouts, Yvette M; Maiorana, Andrew J; Naylor, Louise H; Scholten, Ralph R; Spaanderman, Marc E A; Pugh, Christopher J A; Sprung, Victoria S; Schreuder, Tim; Jones, Helen; Cable, Tim; Hopman, Maria T E; Thijssen, Dick H J

    2014-08-15

    The objectives of our study were to examine 1) the proportion of responders and nonresponders to exercise training in terms of vascular function; 2) a priori factors related to exercise training-induced changes in conduit artery function, and 3) the contribution of traditional cardiovascular risk factors to exercise-induced changes in artery function. We pooled data from our laboratories involving 182 subjects who underwent supervised, large-muscle group, endurance-type exercise training interventions with pre-/posttraining measures of flow-mediated dilation (FMD%) to assess artery function. All studies adopted an identical FMD protocol (5-min ischemia, distal cuff inflation), contemporary echo-Doppler methodology, and observer-independent automated analysis. Linear regression analysis was used to identify factors contributing to changes in FMD%. We found that cardiopulmonary fitness improved, and weight, body mass index (BMI), cholesterol, and mean arterial pressure (MAP) decreased after training, while FMD% increased in 76% of subjects (P cardiovascular risk factors were not significantly related to changes in FMD% (P > 0.05). In conclusion, we found that, while some subjects do not demonstrate increases following exercise training, improvement in FMD% is present in those with lower pretraining body weight and endothelial function. Moreover, exercise training-induced change in FMD% did not correlate with changes in traditional cardiovascular risk factors, indicating that some cardioprotective effects of exercise training are independent of improvement in risk factors.

  19. Transferability of running and cycling training zones in triathletes: implications for steady-state exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Daniel G; Tofte, Courtney; Pliego, German J; Raymond, Robert L

    2009-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine whether physiological measurements obtained from one mode of testing and training could be applied to another mode, as in prescribing heart rate (HR) zone training from cyling to running. Secondary objectives were 1) to assess the validity of applying data from incremental testing to steady-state exercise, and 2) to compare breakpoint in respiratory rate (RR) with the conventional method of anaerobic threshold (AT) breakpoint, the ventilatory equivalent for oxygen VE/VO2). Sixteen experienced triathletes performed VO2max testing on a cycle ergometer (CE) and treadmill (TM). In addition, a 30-minute time trial (TT) was performed on a CE. No significant differences were observed between modes of testing for VO2max (CE = 68.4 +/- 11.1 mlxkgxmin, TM = 69.0 +/- 13.2 mlxkgxmin), maximum HR (CE = 177.1 +/- 6.1 bpm, TM = 178.1 +/- 7.4 bpm), or AT (CE AT HR = 153.9 +/- 10.5 bpm, TM AT HR = 157.0 +/- 9.5 bpm). Although the mean difference in AT HR was small (3.1 bpm), a small correlation coefficient (0.321) between the AT for the 2 testing modes resulted in a large total error (TE = 12.1 bpm), indicating limited practical application of training zones between modes of testing. Mean TT HR and mean TT RR were significantly greater than mean AT HR (159.4 +/- 8.9 vs. 153.9 +/- 10.5 bpm) and mean AT RR (37.8 +/- 6.0 vs. 32.4 +/- 3.2 breaths per minute) because of significant "drift" in these 2 variables over time, whereas TT watts and AT watts were not significantly different (249.1 +/- 47.8 vs. 240.6 +/- 71.1 W). Finally, a significant difference and large TE (9.0 bpm) betweenVE/VO2 AT HR and the RR AT HR (153.9 +/- 10.5 and 158.4 +/- 10.0 bpm) may preclude the practical use of the RR breakpoint. From the results of this study, it is recommended that the triathlete perform sport-specific testing to assess training zones for cycling and running. In addition, because both HR and RR "drift" upward with steady-state exercise, AT

  20. Assessment of protein synthesis in highly aerobic canine species at the onset and during exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Benjamin F; Ehrlicher, Sarah E; Drake, Joshua C; Peelor, Frederick F; Biela, Laurie M; Pratt-Phillips, Shannon; Davis, Michael; Hamilton, Karyn L

    2015-04-01

    Canis lupus familiaris, the domesticated dog, is capable of extreme endurance performance. The ability to perform sustained aerobic exercise is dependent on a well-developed mitochondrial reticulum. In this study we examined the cumulative muscle protein and DNA synthesis in groups of athletic dogs at the onset of an exercise training program and following a strenuous exercise training program. We hypothesized that both at the onset and during an exercise training program there would be greater mitochondrial protein synthesis rates compared with sedentary control with no difference in mixed or cytoplasmic protein synthesis rates. Protein synthetic rates of three protein fractions and DNA synthesis were determined over 1 wk using (2)H2O in competitive Alaskan Huskies and Labrador Retrievers trained for explosive device detection. Both groups of dogs had very high rates of skeletal muscle protein synthesis in the sedentary state [Alaskan Huskies: Mixed = 2.28 ± 0.12, cytoplasmic (Cyto) = 2.91 ± 0.10, and mitochondrial (Mito) = 2.62 ± 0.07; Labrador Retrievers: Mixed = 3.88 ± 0.37, Cyto = 3.85 ± 0.06, and Mito = 2.92 ± 0.20%/day]. Mitochondrial (Mito) protein synthesis rates did not increase at the onset of an exercise training program. Exercise-trained dogs maintained Mito protein synthesis during exercise training when mixed (Mixed) and cytosolic (Cyto) fractions decreased, and this coincided with a decrease in p-RpS6 but also a decrease in p-ACC signaling. Contrary to our hypothesis, canines did not have large increases in mitochondrial protein synthesis at the onset or during an exercise training program. However, dogs have a high rate of protein synthesis compared with humans that perhaps does not necessitate an extra increase in protein synthesis at the onset of aerobic exercise training.

  1. Exercise training does not increase muscle FNDC5 protein or mRNA expression in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fain, John N; Company, Joseph M; Booth, Frank W; Laughlin, M Harold; Padilla, Jaume; Jenkins, Nathan T; Bahouth, Suleiman W; Sacks, Harold S

    2013-10-01

    Exercise training elevates circulating irisin and induces the expression of the FNDC5 gene in skeletal muscles of mice. Our objective was to determine whether exercise training also increases FNDC5 protein or mRNA expression in the skeletal muscles of pigs as well as plasma irisin. Castrated male pigs of the Rapacz familial hypercholesterolemic (FHM) strain and normal (Yucatan miniature) pigs were sacrificed after 16-20 weeks of exercise training. Samples of cardiac muscle, deltoid and triceps brachii muscle, subcutaneous and epicardial fat were obtained and FNDC5 mRNA, along with that of 6 other genes, was measured in all tissues of FHM pigs by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. FNDC protein in deltoid and triceps brachii was determined by Western blotting in both FHM and normal pigs. Citrate synthase activity was measured in the muscle samples of all pigs as an index of exercise training. Irisin was measured by an ELISA assay. There was no statistically significant effect of exercise training on FNDC5 gene expression in epicardial or subcutaneous fat, deltoid muscle, triceps brachii muscle or heart muscle. Exercise-training elevated circulating levels of irisin in the FHM pigs and citrate synthase activity in deltoid and triceps brachii muscle. A similar increase in citrate synthase activity was seen in muscle extracts of exercise-trained normal pigs but there was no alteration in circulating irisin. Exercise training in pigs does not increase FNDC5 mRNA or protein in the deltoid or triceps brachii of FHM or normal pigs while increasing circulating irisin only in the FHM pigs. These data indicate that the response to exercise training in normal pigs is not comparable to that seen in mice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Does exercise training prior to ovariectomy protect against liver and adipocyte fat accumulation in rats?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pighon, A; Barsalani, R; Yasari, S; Prud'homme, D; Lavoie, J-M

    2010-06-01

    To determine whether a training state protects against the metabolically deleterious effects of ovariectomy on liver and adipocyte fat accumulation in rats. Female rats were randomly assigned to each group (n = 8 rats/group). The animals were first either exercise-trained (Tr) for 6 weeks or kept sedentary (Sed) before being sham-operated (Sham), ovariectomized (Ovx), or ovariectomized with 17beta-estradiol supplementation (OvxE2). Following surgery, sedentary rats either remained sedentary (Sed-Sed) or undertook exercise training for 6 weeks (Sed-Tr) while exercise-trained rats either became sedentary (Tr-Sed) or resumed exercise training (Tr-Tr). Body weight and energy intake along with intra-abdominal and subcutaneous fat pad weights and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were significantly (p effect of a previous exercise-trained state. On the other hand, training conducted after surgery resulted in a lowering of fat mass and HOMA-IR whether rats had been trained or not before surgery (Sed-Tr and Tr-Tr), indicating the effectiveness of exercise training even initiated after surgery. These responses were independent of surgery. Interestingly, liver triacylglycerol concentrations followed a pattern of responses identical to fat mass with the exception that all of the responses were observed only in the Ovx group (p effect of a previous exercise-training state on ovariectomy-induced liver and adipocyte fat accumulation if rats remain sedentary after ovariectomy. However, training conducted concurrently with estrogen withdrawal has protective effects, especially on liver fat accumulation, whether or not rats were previously trained.

  3. No Effect of Exercise Intensity on Appetite in Highly-Trained Endurance Women

    OpenAIRE

    Howe, Stephanie M; Taryn M. Hand; D. Enette Larson-Meyer; Kathleen J. Austin; Alexander, Brenda M.; Melinda M. Manore

    2016-01-01

    In endurance-trained men, an acute bout of exercise is shown to suppress post-exercise appetite, yet limited research has examined this response in women. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of exercise intensity on appetite and gut hormone responses in endurance-trained women. Highly-trained women (n = 15, 18–40 years, 58.4 ± 6.4 kg, VO2MAX = 55.2 ± 4.3 mL/kg/min) completed isocaloric bouts (500 kcals or 2093 kJ) of moderate-intensity (MIE, 60% VO2MAX) and high-intensity ...

  4. High-intensity training vs. traditional exercise interventions for promoting health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Lars; Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus D.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE:: to determine the effectiveness of brief intense interval training as exercise intervention for promoting health and evaluate potential benefits with reference to common interventions; i.e. prolonged exercise and strength training. METHODS:: 36 untrained men were divided into groups...... in cardiorespiratory fitness was superior in INT (14+/-2% increase in VO2max) compared to the other two exercise interventions (7+/-2% and 3+/-2% increases). The blood glucose concentration 2 hours following oral ingestion of 75 g of glucose was lowered to a similar extent following training in the INT (from 6...

  5. Moderate exercise training does not worsen left ventricle remodeling and function in untreated severe hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boissiere, Julien; Eder, Véronique; Machet, Marie-Christine; Courteix, Daniel; Bonnet, Pierre

    2008-02-01

    Exercise training and hypertension induced cardiac hypertrophy but modulate differently left ventricle (LV) function. This study set out to evaluate cardiac adaptations induced by moderate exercise training in normotensive and untreated severe hypertensive rats. Four groups of animals were studied: normotensive (Ctl) and severe hypertensive (HT) Wistar rats were assigned to be sedentary (Sed) or perform a moderate exercise training (Ex) over a 10-wk period. Severe hypertension was induced in rat by a two-kidney, one-clip model. At the end of the training period, hemodynamic parameters and LV morphology and function were assessed using catheterism and conventional pulsed Doppler echocardiography. LV histology was performed to study fibrosis infiltrations. Severe hypertension increased systolic blood pressure to 202 +/- 9 mmHg and induced pathological hypertrophy (LV hypertrophy index was 0.34 +/- 0.02 vs. 0.44 +/- 0.02 in Ctl-Sed and HT-Sed groups, respectively) with LV relaxation alteration (early-to-atrial wave ratio = 2.02 +/- 0.11 vs. 1.63 +/- 0.12). Blood pressure was not altered by exercise training, but arterial stiffness was reduced in trained hypertensive rats (pulse pressure was 75 +/- 7 vs. 62 +/- 3 mmHg in HT-Sed and HT-Ex groups, respectively). Exercise training induced eccentric hypertrophy in both Ex groups by increasing LV cavity without alteration of LV systolic function. However, LV hypertrophy index was significantly decreased in normotensive rats only (0.34 +/- 0.02 vs. 0.30 +/- 0.02 in Ctl-Sed and Ctl-Ex groups, respectively). Moreover, exercise training improved LV passive filling in Ctl-Ex rats but not in Ht-Ex rats. In this study, exercise training did not reduce blood pressure and induced an additional physiological hypertrophy in untreated HT rats, which was slightly blunted when compared with Ctl rats. However, cardiac function was not worsened by exercise training.

  6. Exercise Training in Patients With Chronic Heart Failure and Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Nancy; Merrill, Peter; Parikh, Kishan S; Whellan, David J; Piña, Ileana L; Fiuzat, Mona; Kraus, William E; Kitzman, Dalane W; Keteyian, Steven J; O'Connor, Christopher M; Mentz, Robert J

    2017-04-04

    The safety and efficacy of aerobic exercise in heart failure (HF) patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) has not been well evaluated. This study examined whether outcomes with exercise training in HF vary according to AF status. HF-ACTION (Heart Failure: A Controlled Trial Investigating Outcomes of Exercise Training) randomized 2,331 ambulatory HF patients with ejection fraction ≤35% to exercise training or usual care. We examined clinical characteristics and outcomes (mortality/hospitalization) by baseline AF status (past history of AF or AF on baseline electrocardiogram vs. no AF) using adjusted Cox models and explored an interaction with exercise training. We assessed post-randomization AF events diagnosed via hospitalizations for AF and reports of serious arrhythmia caused by AF. Of 2,292 patients with baseline rhythm data, 382 (17%) had AF, 1,602 (70%) had sinus rhythm, and 308 (13%) had "other" rhythm. Patients with AF were older and had lower peak Vo2. Over a median follow-up of 2.6 years, AF was associated with a 24% per year higher rate of mortality/hospitalization (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.53; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.34 to 1.74; p  0.10). There was no interaction between AF and exercise training on measures of functional status or clinical outcomes (all p > 0.10). AF in patients with chronic HF was associated with older age, reduced exercise capacity at baseline, and a higher overall rate of clinical events, but not a differential response to exercise training for clinical outcomes or changes in exercise capacity. (Heart Failure: A Controlled Trial Investigating Outcomes of Exercise Training [HF-ACTION]; NCT00047437). Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of exercise training on skeletal muscle cytokine expression in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Gatta, Paul A; Garnham, Andrew P; Peake, Jonathan M; Cameron-Smith, David

    2014-07-01

    Aging is associated with increased circulating pro-inflammatory and lower anti-inflammatory cytokines. Exercise training, in addition to improving muscle function, reduces these circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines. Yet, few studies have evaluated changes in the expression of cytokines within skeletal muscle after exercise training. The aim of the current study was to examine the expression of cytokines both at rest and following a bout of isokinetic exercise performed before and after 12weeks of resistance exercise training in young (n=8, 20.3±0.8yr) and elderly men (n=8, 66.9±1.6yr). Protein expression of various cytokines was determined in muscle homogenates. The expression of MCP-1, IL-8 and IL-6 (which are traditionally classified as 'pro-inflammatory') increased substantially after acute exercise. By contrast, the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4, IL-10 and IL-13 increased only slightly (or not at all) after acute exercise. These responses were not significantly different between young and elderly men, either before or after 12weeks of exercise training. However, compared with the young men, the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines 2h post exercise tended to be greater in the elderly men prior to training. Training attenuated this difference. These data suggest that the inflammatory response to unaccustomed exercise increases with age. Furthermore, regular exercise training may help to normalize this inflammatory response, which could have important implications for muscle regeneration and adaptation in the elderly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Aerobic exercise training increases plasma Klotho levels and reduces arterial stiffness in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Tomoko; Miyaki, Asako; Akazawa, Nobuhiko; Choi, Youngju; Ra, Song-Gyu; Tanahashi, Koichiro; Kumagai, Hiroshi; Oikawa, Satoshi; Maeda, Seiji

    2014-02-01

    The Klotho gene is a suppressor of the aging phenomena, and the secretion as well as the circulation of Klotho proteins decrease with aging. Although habitual exercise has antiaging effects (e.g., a decrease in arterial stiffness), the relationship between Klotho and habitual exercise remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effect of habitual exercise on Klotho, with a particular focus on arterial stiffness. First, we examined the correlation between plasma Klotho concentration and arterial stiffness (carotid artery compliance and β-stiffness index) or aerobic exercise capacity [oxygen uptake at ventilatory threshold (VT)] in 69 healthy, postmenopausal women (50-76 years old) by conducting a cross-sectional study. Second, we tested the effects of aerobic exercise training on plasma Klotho concentrations and arterial stiffness. A total of 19 healthy, postmenopausal women (50-76 years old) were divided into two groups: control group and exercise group. The exercise group completed 12 wk of moderate aerobic exercise training. In the cross-sectional study, plasma Klotho concentrations positively correlated with carotid artery compliance and VT and negatively correlated with the β-stiffness index. In the interventional study, aerobic exercise training increased plasma Klotho concentrations and carotid artery compliance and decreased the β-stiffness index. Moreover, the changes in plasma Klotho concentration and arterial stiffness were found to be correlated. These results suggest a possible role for secreted Klotho in the exercise-induced modulation of arterial stiffness.

  9. High-intensity intermittent exercise training with chlorella intake accelerates exercise performance and muscle glycolytic and oxidative capacity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horii, Naoki; Hasegawa, Natsuki; Fujie, Shumpei; Uchida, Masataka; Miyamoto-Mikami, Eri; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Tabata, Izumi; Iemitsu, Motoyuki

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of chronic chlorella intake alone or in combination with high-intensity intermittent exercise (HIIE) training on exercise performance and muscle glycolytic and oxidative metabolism in rats. Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to the four groups: sedentary control, chlorella intake (0.5% chlorella powder in normal feed), HIIE training, and combination of HIIE training and chlorella intake for 6 wk (n = 10 each group). HIIE training comprised 14 repeats of a 20-s swimming session with a 10-s pause between sessions, while bearing a weight equivalent to 16% of body weight, 4 days/week. Exercise performance was tested after the interventions by measuring the maximal number of HIIE sessions that could be completed. Chlorella intake and HIIE training significantly increased the maximal number of HIIE sessions and enhanced the expression of monocarboxylate transporter (MCT)1, MCT4, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α concomitantly with the activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), phosphofructokinase, citrate synthase (CS), and cytochrome-c oxidase (COX) in the red region of the gastrocnemius muscle. Furthermore, the combination further augmented the increased exercise performance and the enhanced expressions and activities. By contrast, in the white region of the muscle, MCT1 expression and LDH, CS, and COX activities did not change. These results showed that compared with only chlorella intake and only HIIE training, chlorella intake combined with HIIE training has a more pronounced effect on exercise performance and muscle glycolytic and oxidative metabolism, in particular, lactate metabolism. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Effects of aerobic training intensity on resting, exercise and post-exercise blood pressure, heart rate and heart-rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, V A; Verheyden, B; Aubert, A E; Fagard, R H

    2010-03-01

    We aimed to investigate the effects of endurance training intensity (1) on systolic blood pressure (SBP) and heart rate (HR) at rest before exercise, and during and after a maximal exercise test; and (2) on measures of HR variability at rest before exercise and during recovery from the exercise test, in at least 55-year-old healthy sedentary men and women. A randomized crossover study comprising three 10-week periods was performed. In the first and third period, participants exercised at lower or higher intensity (33% or 66% of HR reserve) in random order, with a sedentary period in between. Training programmes were identical except for intensity, and were performed under supervision thrice for 1 h per week. The results show that in the three conditions, that is, at rest before exercise, during exercise and during recovery, we found endurance training at lower and higher intensity to reduce SBP significantly (Pexercise, and chronic endurance training did not affect the response of SBP after an acute bout of exercise. The effect of training on HR at rest, during exercise and recovery was more pronounced (Peffect on sympathovagal balance. In conclusion, in participants at higher age, both training programmes exert similar effects on SBP at rest, during exercise and during post-exercise recovery, whereas the effects on HR are more pronounced after higher intensity training.

  11. Aerobic vs anaerobic exercise training effects on the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Harsh; Alkhawam, Hassan; Madanieh, Raef; Shah, Niel; Kosmas, Constantine E; Vittorio, Timothy J

    2017-02-26

    Physical exercise is one of the most effective methods to help prevent cardiovascular (CV) disease and to promote CV health. Aerobic and anaerobic exercises are two types of exercise that differ based on the intensity, interval and types of muscle fibers incorporated. In this article, we aim to further elaborate on these two categories of physical exercise and to help decipher which provides the most effective means of promoting CV health.

  12. Aerobic vs anaerobic exercise training effects on the cardiovascular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Harsh; Alkhawam, Hassan; Madanieh, Raef; Shah, Niel; Kosmas, Constantine E; Vittorio, Timothy J

    2017-01-01

    Physical exercise is one of the most effective methods to help prevent cardiovascular (CV) disease and to promote CV health. Aerobic and anaerobic exercises are two types of exercise that differ based on the intensity, interval and types of muscle fibers incorporated. In this article, we aim to further elaborate on these two categories of physical exercise and to help decipher which provides the most effective means of promoting CV health. PMID:28289526

  13. Diabetes and Exercise: When to Monitor Your Blood Sugar

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... plan. To avoid potential problems, check your blood sugar before, during and after exercise. By Mayo Clinic ... diabetes. Exercise can help you improve your blood sugar control, boost your overall fitness, and reduce your ...

  14. Sex differences in response to maximal exercise stress test in trained adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fomin Åsa

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sex comparisons between girls and boys in response to exercise in trained adolescents are missing and we investigated similarities and differences as a basis for clinical interpretation and guidance. Methods A total of 24 adolescent females and 27 adolescent males aged 13–19 years underwent a maximal bicycle exercise stress test with measurement of cardiovascular variables, cardiac output, lung volumes, metabolic factors/lactate concentrations and breath-by-breath monitoring of ventilation, and determination of peak VO2. Results Maximum heart rate was similar in females (191 ± 9 bpm and males (194 ± 7 bpm, cardiac index at maximum exercise was lower in females (7.0 ± 1.0 l/min/m2 than in males (8.3 ± 1.4 l/min/m2, P 2 was lower in females (2.37 ± 0.34 l/min than in males (3.38 ± 0.49 l/min, P 2 was normalized to leg muscle mass sex differences disappeared (females: 161 ± 21 ml/min/kg vs. males: 170 ± 23 ml/min/kg. The increase in cardiac index during exercise is the key factor responsible for the greater peak VO2 in adolescent boys compared to girls. Conclusions Differences in peak VO2 in adolescent boys and girls disappear when peak VO2 is normalized to estimated leg muscle mass and therefore provide a tool to conduct individual and intersex comparisons of fitness when evaluating adolescent athletes in aerobic sports.

  15. Limitations in intense exercise performance of athletes - effect of speed endurance training on ion handling and fatigue development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hostrup, Morten; Bangsbo, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying fatigue development and limitations for performance during intense exercise have been intensively studied during the past couple of decades. Fatigue development may involve several interacting factors and depends on type of exercise undertaken and training level...... and power output during intense exercise. Regular speed endurance training (SET), i.e. exercise performed at intensities above that corresponding to maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max ), enhances intense exercise performance. However, most of the studies that have provided mechanistic insight...

  16. Preferred Exertion across Three Common Modes of Exercise Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Stephen C.; Chvala, Angela M.

    2001-01-01

    Examined the influence of exercise mode on self-selected exercise intensities. Participants performed three types of intensity tests. Researchers collected data on VO2 values continuously and recorded 1-minute averages several times for each submaximal test. Participants allowed to self-select exercise intensity chose work rates within the…

  17. Comparison of Different Forms of Exercise Training in Patients With Cardiac Disease: Where Does High-Intensity Interval Training Fit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayda, Mathieu; Ribeiro, Paula A B; Juneau, Martin; Nigam, Anil

    2016-04-01

    In this review, we discuss the most recent forms of exercise training available to patients with cardiac disease and their comparison or their combination (or both) during short- and long-term (phase II and III) cardiac rehabilitation programs. Exercise training modalities to be discussed include inspiratory muscle training (IMT), resistance training (RT), continuous aerobic exercise training (CAET), and high-intensity interval training (HIIT). Particular emphasis is placed on HIIT compared or combined (or both) with other forms such as CAET or RT. For example, IMT combined with CAET was shown to be superior to CAET alone for improving functional capacity, ventilatory function, and quality of life in patients with chronic heart failure. Similarly, RT combined with CAET was shown to optimize benefits with respect to functional capacity, muscle function, and quality of life. Furthermore, in recent years, HIIT has emerged as an alternative or complementary (or both) exercise modality to CAET, providing equivalent if not superior benefits to conventional continuous aerobic training with respect to aerobic fitness, cardiovascular function, quality of life, efficiency, safety, tolerance, and exercise adherence in both short- and long-term training studies. Finally, short-interval HIIT was shown to be useful in the initiation and improvement phases of cardiac rehabilitation, whereas moderate- or longer-interval (or both) HIIT protocols appear to be more appropriate for the improvement and maintenance phases because of their high physiological stimulus. We now propose progressive models of exercise training (phases II-III) for patients with cardiac disease, including a more appropriate application of HIIT based on the scientific literature in the context of a multimodal cardiac rehabilitation program.

  18. Time to adapt exercise training regimens in pulmonary rehabilitation--a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Annemarie L; Holland, Anne E

    2014-01-01

    Exercise intolerance, exertional dyspnea, reduced health-related quality of life, and acute exacerbations are features characteristic of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Patients with a primary diagnosis of COPD often report comorbidities and other secondary manifestations, which diversifies the clinical presentation. Pulmonary rehabilitation that includes whole body exercise training is a critical part of management, and core programs involve endurance and resistance training for the upper and lower limbs. Improvement in maximal and submaximal exercise capacity, dyspnea, fatigue, health-related quality of life, and psychological symptoms are outcomes associated with exercise training in pulmonary rehabilitation, irrespective of the clinical state in which it is commenced. There may be benefits for the health care system as well as the individual patient, with fewer exacerbations and subsequent hospitalization reported with exercise training. The varying clinical profile of COPD may direct the need for modification to traditional training strategies for some patients. Interval training, one-legged cycling (partitioning) and non-linear periodized training appear to be equally or more effective than continuous training. Inspiratory muscle training may have a role as an adjunct to whole body training in selected patients. The benefits of balance training are also emerging. Strategies to ensure that health enhancing behaviors are adopted and maintained are essential. These may include training for an extended duration, alternative environments to undertake the initial program, maintenance programs following initial exercise training, program repetition, and incorporation of approaches to address behavioral change. This may be complemented by methods designed to maximize uptake and completion of a pulmonary rehabilitation program.

  19. Effects of Electrical Stimulation, Exercise Training and Motor Skills Training on Strength of Children with Meningomyelocele: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagenais, Liese M.; Lahay, Erin R.; Stueck, Kailey A.; White, Erin; Williams, Lindsay; Harris, Susan R.

    2009-01-01

    This systematic review provides a critical synthesis of research regarding the effects of electrical stimulation, exercise training, and motor skills training on muscle strength in children with meningomyelocele. Nine databases were searched using terms related to meningomyelocele and physical therapy interventions. Of 298 potentially relevant…

  20. Effects of Electrical Stimulation, Exercise Training and Motor Skills Training on Strength of Children with Meningomyelocele: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagenais, Liese M.; Lahay, Erin R.; Stueck, Kailey A.; White, Erin; Williams, Lindsay; Harris, Susan R.

    2009-01-01

    This systematic review provides a critical synthesis of research regarding the effects of electrical stimulation, exercise training, and motor skills training on muscle strength in children with meningomyelocele. Nine databases were searched using terms related to meningomyelocele and physical therapy interventions. Of 298 potentially relevant…

  1. Concentrically trained cyclists are not more susceptible to eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage than are stretch-shortening exercise-trained runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snieckus, Audrius; Kamandulis, Sigitas; Venckūnas, Tomas; Brazaitis, Marius; Volungevičius, Gintautas; Skurvydas, Albertas

    2013-03-01

    Here, we test the hypothesis that continuous concentric exercise training renders skeletal muscles more susceptible to damage in response to eccentric exercise. Elite road cyclists (CYC; n = 10, training experience 8.1 ± 2.0 years, age 22.9 ± 3.7 years), long-distance runners (LDR; n = 10, 9.9 ± 2.3 years, 24.4 ± 2.5 years), and healthy untrained (UT) men (n = 10; 22.4 ± 1.7 years) performed 100 submaximal eccentric contractions at constant angular velocity of 60° s(-1). Concentric isokinetic peak torque, isometric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), and electrically induced knee extension torque were measured at baseline and immediately and 48 h after an eccentric exercise bout. Muscle soreness was assessed and plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity was measured at baseline and 48 h after exercise. Voluntary and electrically stimulated knee extension torque reduction were significantly greater (p exercise, MVC decreased by 32 % and 20 % in UT, 20 % and 5 % in LDR, and 25 % and 6 % in CYC. Electrically induced 20 Hz torque decreased at the same times by 61 and 29 % in UT, 40 and 17 % in LDR, and 26 and 14 % in CYC. Muscle soreness and plasma CK activity 48 h after exercise did not differ significantly between athletes and UT subjects. In conclusion, even though elite endurance athletes are more resistant to eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage than are UT people, stretch-shortening exercise-trained LDR have no advantage over concentrically trained CYC.

  2. Downhill exercise training in monocrotaline-injected rats: Effects on echocardiographic and haemodynamic variables and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enache, Irina; Favret, Fabrice; Doutreleau, Stéphane; Goette Di Marco, Paola; Charles, Anne-Laure; Geny, Bernard; Charloux, Anne

    2017-02-01

    Eccentric exercise training has been shown to improve muscle force strength without excessive cardiovascular stress. Such an exercise modality deserves to be tested in pulmonary arterial hypertension. We aimed to assess the effects of an eccentric training modality on cardiac function and survival in an experimental monocrotaline-induced model of pulmonary arterial hypertension with right ventricular dysfunction. Forty rats were randomly assigned to one of four groups: 40mg/kg monocrotaline-injected sedentary rats; 40mg/kg monocrotaline-injected eccentric-trained rats; sedentary control rats; or eccentric-trained control rats. Eccentric exercise training consisted of downhill running on a treadmill with a -15° slope for 30minutes, 5 days a week for 4 weeks. Training tolerance was assessed by echocardiography, right ventricle catheterization and the rats' maximal eccentric speed. Survival in monocrotaline-injected eccentric-trained rats was not different from that in monocrotaline-injected sedentary rats. Monocrotaline-injected eccentric-trained rats tolerated this training modality well, and haemodynamic status did not deteriorate further compared with monocrotaline-injected sedentary rats. The eccentric maximal speed decline was less pronounced in trained compared with sedentary pulmonary arterial hypertension rats. Eccentric exercise training had no detrimental effects on right heart pressure, cardiac function and survival in rats with stable monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of training in the fasted state on metabolic responses during exercise with carbohydrate intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bock, K; Derave, W; Eijnde, B O; Hesselink, M K; Koninckx, E; Rose, A J; Schrauwen, P; Bonen, A; Richter, E A; Hespel, P

    2008-04-01

    Skeletal muscle gene response to exercise depends on nutritional status during and after exercise, but it is unknown whether muscle adaptations to endurance training are affected by nutritional status during training sessions. Therefore, this study investigated the effect of an endurance training program (6 wk, 3 day/wk, 1-2 h, 75% of peak Vo(2)) in moderately active males. They trained in the fasted (F; n = 10) or carbohydrate-fed state (CHO; n = 10) while receiving a standardized diet [65 percent of total energy intake (En) from carbohydrates, 20%En fat, 15%En protein]. Before and after the training period, substrate use during a 2-h exercise bout was determined. During these experimental sessions, all subjects were in a fed condition and received extra carbohydrates (1 g.kg body wt(-1) .h(-1)). Peak Vo(2) (+7%), succinate dehydrogenase activity, GLUT4, and hexokinase II content were similarly increased between F and CHO. Fatty acid binding protein (FABPm) content increased significantly in F (P = 0.007). Intramyocellular triglyceride content (IMCL) remained unchanged in both groups. After training, pre-exercise glycogen content was higher in CHO (545 +/- 19 mmol/kg dry wt; P = 0.02), but not in F (434 +/- 32 mmol/kg dry wt; P = 0.23). For a given initial glycogen content, F blunted exercise-induced glycogen breakdown when compared with CHO (P = 0.04). Neither IMCL breakdown (P = 0.23) nor fat oxidation rates during exercise were altered by training. Thus short-term training elicits similar adaptations in peak Vo(2) whether carried out in the fasted or carbohydrate-fed state. Although there was a decrease in exercise-induced glycogen breakdown and an increase in proteins involved in fat handling after fasting training, fat oxidation during exercise with carbohydrate intake was not changed.

  4. Regulation of the STARS signaling pathway in response to endurance and resistance exercise and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamon, Séverine; Wallace, Marita A; Stefanetti, Renae J; Rahbek, Stine K; Vendelbo, Mikkel H; Russell, Aaron P; Vissing, Kristian

    2013-09-01

    The striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS) protein and members of its downstream signaling pathway, including myocardin-related transcription factor-A (MRTF-A) and SRF, are increased in response to prolonged resistance exercise training but also following a single bout of endurance cycling. The aim of the present study was to measure and compare the regulation of STARS, MRTF-A and SRF mRNA and protein following 10 weeks of endurance training (ET) versus resistance training (RT), as well as before and following a single bout of endurance (EE) versus resistance exercise (RE). Following prolonged training, STARS, MRTF-A and SRF mRNA levels were all increased by similar magnitude, irrespective of training type. In the training-habituated state, STARS mRNA increased following a single-bout RE when measured 2.5 and 5 h post-exercise and had returned to resting level by 22 h following exercise. MRTF-A and SRF mRNA levels were decreased by 2.5, 5, and 22 h following a single bout of RE and EE exercise when compared to their respective basal levels, with no significant difference seen between the groups at any of the time points. No changes in protein levels were observed following the two modes of exercise training or a single bout of exercise. This study demonstrates that the stress signals elicited by ET and RT result in a comparable regulation of members of the STARS pathway. In contrast, a single bout of EE and RE, performed in the trained state, elicit different responses. These observations suggest that in the trained state, the acute regulation of the STARS pathway following EE or RE may be responsible for exercise-specific muscle adaptations.

  5. Is Moderate Intensity Exercise Training Combined with High Intensity Interval Training More Effective at Improving Cardiorespiratory Fitness than Moderate Intensity Exercise Training Alone?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendon H. Roxburgh, Paul B. Nolan, Ryan M. Weatherwax, Lance C. Dalleck

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of either continuous moderate intensity exercise training (CMIET alone vs. CMIET combined with a single weekly bout of high intensity interval training (HIIT on cardiorespiratory fitness. Twenty nine sedentary participants (36.3 ± 6.9 yrs at moderate risk of cardiovascular disease were recruited for 12 weeks of exercise training on a treadmill and cycle ergometer. Participants were randomised into three groups: CMIET + HIIT (n = 7; 8-12 x 60 sec at 100% VO2max, 150 sec active recovery, CMIET (n = 6; 30 min at 45-60% oxygen consumption reserve (VO2R and a sedentary control group (n = 7. Participants in the CMIET + HIIT group performed a single weekly bout of HIIT and four weekly sessions of CMIET, whilst the CMIET group performed five weekly CMIET sessions. Probabilistic magnitude-based inferences were determined to assess the likelihood that the true value of the effect represents substantial change. Relative VO2max increased by 10.1% (benefit possible relative to control in in the CMIET + HIIT group (32.7 ± 9.2 to 36.0 ± 11.5 mL·kg-1·min-1 and 3.9% (benefit possible relative to control in the CMIET group (33.2 ± 4.0 to 34.5 ± 6.1 mL·kg-1·min-1, whilst there was a 5.7% decrease in the control group (30.0 ± 4.6 to 28.3 ± 6.5 mL·kg-1·min-1. It was ‘unclear’ if a clinically significant difference existed between the effect of CMIET + HIIT and CMIET on the change in VO2max. Both exercising groups showed clinically meaningful improvements in VO2max. Nevertheless, it remains ‘unclear’ whether one type of exercise training regimen elicits a superior improvement in cardiorespiratory fitness relative to its counterpart.

  6. Effect of periodized water exercise training program on functional autonomy in elderly women

    OpenAIRE

    Paulina Yesica Ochoa Martínez; Javier Arturo Hall López; Alberto Paredones Hernández; Estélio Henrique Martin Dantas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Scientific evidence have been related negative functional autonomy to sedentary lifestyle in elderly women by other hand physical exercise is highly recommended to prevent deterioration of neuromuscular functions and proposed during the rehabilitation of physical disability and fall accidents. Aim: To determine the effect of periodized water exercise training on functional autonomy in elderly women. Methods: Twenty-six subjects were randomly assigned in two, water exercise interve...

  7. Exercise training and postural correction improve upper extremity symptoms among touchscreen smartphone users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeer Ahmed Abdelhameed

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Postural correction combined with a selected exercise training programme improved the hand grip, key pinch grip strength, and upper extremity disability and symptoms associated with smartphone use among university students.

  8. Capillary growth, ultrastructure remodeling and exercise training in skeletal muscle of essential hypertensive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gliemann, Lasse; Buess, Rahel; Nyberg, Michael Permin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: The aim was to elucidate whether essential hypertension is associated with altered capillary morphology and density and to what extend exercise training can normalize these parameters. METHODS: To investigate angiogenesis and capillary morphology in essential hypertension, muscle biopsies we...

  9. Tailored cognitive-behavioural therapy and exercise training improves the physical fitness of patients with fibromyalgia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spillekom-van Koulil, S.; Lankveld, W.G.J.M. van; Kraaimaat, F.W.; Helmond, T. van; Vedder, A.; Hoorn, H. van; Donders, A.R.T.; Wirken, L.; Cats, H.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Evers, A.W.M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Patients with fibromyalgia have diminished levels of physical fitness, which may lead to functional disability and exacerbating complaints. Multidisciplinary treatment comprising cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) and exercise training has been shown to be effective in improving physica

  10. Cycle training modulates satellite cell and transcriptional responses to a bout of resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murach, Kevin A; Walton, R Grace; Fry, Christopher S; Michaelis, Sami L; Groshong, Jason S; Finlin, Brian S; Kern, Philip A; Peterson, Charlotte A

    2016-09-01

    This investigation evaluated whether moderate-intensity cycle ergometer training affects satellite cell and molecular responses to acute maximal concentric/eccentric resistance exercise in middle-aged women. Baseline and 72 h postresistance exercise vastus lateralis biopsies were obtained from seven healthy middle-aged women (56 ± 5 years, BMI 26 ± 1, VO2max 27 ± 4) before and after 12 weeks of cycle training. Myosin heavy chain (MyHC) I- and II-associated satellite cell density and cross-sectional area was determined via immunohistochemistry. Expression of 93 genes representative of the muscle-remodeling environment was also measured via NanoString. Overall fiber size increased ~20% with cycle training (P = 0.052). MyHC I satellite cell density increased 29% in response to acute resistance exercise before endurance training and 50% with endurance training (P training, MyHC I satellite cell density decreased by 13% in response to acute resistance exercise (acute resistance × training interaction, P trained state in response to resistance exercise. Similar satellite cell and gene expression response patterns indicate coordinated regulation of the muscle environment to promote adaptation. Moderate-intensity endurance cycle training modulates the response to acute resistance exercise, potentially conditioning the muscle for more intense concentric/eccentric activity. These results suggest that cycle training is an effective endurance exercise modality for promoting growth in middle-aged women, who are susceptible to muscle mass loss with progressing age.

  11. Exercise training in pediatric patients with end-stage renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Bergen (Monique); T. Takken (Tim); R.H.H. Engelbert (Raoul); J. Groothoff (Jaap); J. Nauta (Jeroen); J. van Hoeck (Koen); P. Helders (Paul); M. Lilien (Marc)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe objective of this study was to determine the feasibility and efficacy of an exercise training program to improve exercise capacity and fatigue level in pediatric patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Twenty children on dialysis intended to perform a 12-week graded

  12. Exercise training in pediatric patients with end-stage renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bergen, M.; Takken, T.; Engelbert, R.; Groothoff, J.; Nauta, J.; van Hoeck, K.; Helders, P.; Lilien, M.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility and efficacy of an exercise training program to improve exercise capacity and fatigue level in pediatric patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Twenty children on dialysis intended to perform a 12-week graded community-based

  13. Seventh Fleet field training exercise : Fleet Battle Experiment Kilo : fires initiatives final report

    OpenAIRE

    Schacher, G. E.; Pilnick, Steve; Irvine, Nelson; Gallup, Shelley

    2003-01-01

    Fleet Battle Experiment Kilo was conducted during Seventh Fleet exercise Tandem Thrust 03. During the Field Training Exercise phase, testing of Time Sensitive Targets processes using the Joint Fires Network was carried out. This report contains results obtained on contributions made by the Joint Fires Network to Navy Time Sensitive Targeting and experiment lessons learned. NA

  14. Adaptation of exercise-induced stress in well-trained healthy young men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen Duijghuijsen, L.M.; Keijer, J.; Mensink, M.R.; Lenaerts, Kaatje; Ridder, L.O.; Nierkens, Stefan; Kartaram, Shirley; Verschuren, Martie C.M.; Pieters, Raymond; Bas, Richard; Witkamp, R.F.; Wichers, H.J.; Norren, van K.

    2017-01-01

    Strenuous exercise induces different stress-related physiological changes, potentially including changes in intestinal barrier function. In the Protégé Study (ISRCTN14236739; www.isrctn.com) we determined the test-retest repeatability in responses to exercise in well-trained individuals.
    Eleven

  15. Adaptation of exercise-induced stress in well-trained healthy young men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JanssenDuijghuijsen, Lonneke M; Keijer, Jaap; Mensink, Marco; Lenaerts, Kaatje; Ridder, Lars; Nierkens, Stefan; Kartaram, Shirley W; Verschuren, Martie C M; Pieters, Raymond H H; Bas, Richard; Witkamp, Renger F; Wichers, Harry J; van Norren, Klaske

    2017-01-01

    Strenuous exercise induces different stress-related physiological changes, potentially including changes in intestinal barrier function. In the Protégé Study (ISRCTN14236739; www.isrctn.com) we determined the test-retest repeatability in responses to exercise in well-trained individuals. Eleven

  16. Exercise training in pediatric patients with end-stage renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Bergen (Monique); T. Takken (Tim); R.H.H. Engelbert (Raoul); J. Groothoff (Jaap); J. Nauta (Jeroen); J. van Hoeck (Koen); P. Helders (Paul); M. Lilien (Marc)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe objective of this study was to determine the feasibility and efficacy of an exercise training program to improve exercise capacity and fatigue level in pediatric patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Twenty children on dialysis intended to perform a 12-week graded community-b

  17. Effect of Aerobic Exercise Training on Chinese Population with Mild to Moderate Depression in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra W. H. Ho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Exercise has been suggested to be a viable treatment for depression. This study investigates the effect of supervised aerobic exercise training on depressive symptoms and physical performance among Chinese patients with mild to moderate depression in early in-patient phase. Methods. A randomized repeated measure and assessor-blinded study design was used. Subjects in aerobic exercise group received 30 minutes of aerobic training, five days a week for 3 weeks. Depressive symptoms (MADRS and C-BDI and domains in physical performance were assessed at baseline and program end. Results. Subjects in aerobic exercise group showed a more significant reduction in depressive scores (MADRS as compared to control (between-group mean difference = 10.08 ± 9.41; P=0.026 after 3 weeks training. The exercise group also demonstrated a significant improvement in flexibility (between-group mean difference = 4.4 ± 6.13; P=0.02. Limitations. There was lack of longitudinal followup to examine the long-term effect of aerobic exercise on patients with depression. Conclusions. Aerobic exercise in addition to pharmacological intervention can have a synergistic effect in reducing depressive symptoms and increasing flexibility among Chinese population with mild to moderate depression. Early introduction of exercise training in in-patient phase can help to bridge the gap of therapeutic latency of antidepressants during its nonresponse period.

  18. 77 FR 31333 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals: Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Navy Training Exercises...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ... VACAPES Range Complex, the Navy implemented vessel and aerial surveys and deployed passive acoustic... exercise (MINEX) W-50 box in conjunction with a MINEX event, and the Firing Exercise (FIREX) 7C/7D training boxes in junction with a FIREX event. A vessel survey was conducted on July 14, 2011, in...

  19. Aerobic exercise training attenuates obesity-related hypogonadism in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Tongjian; Disanzo, Beth L; Arsenis, Nicole C

    2013-07-01

    Hypogonadism is associated with obesity and other features of metabolic syndrome in males. The purpose of this study was to compare lean and obese male Zucker rats on their reproductive endocrine function in response to aerobic exercise training. Lean (Fa/Fa) and obese (fa/fa) male Zucker rats at 2 months of age were randomly assigned to a sedentary and an aerobic exercise training group (lean sedentary, n = 7; lean exercise, n = 8; obese sedentary, n = 7; obese exercise, n = 7). The exercise group walked on a rat treadmill, starting at 10 m · min(-1) for 20 min and building up to 20 m · min(-1) for 60 min, five times per week for 8 wk. Serum levels of total and free testosterone and testicular levels of testosterone, as well as epididymal and inguinal adipose tissue monocyte chemotactic protein 1 release levels, were measured. There were significant obesity-by-exercise interactions on serum levels of total and free testosterone and testicular levels of testosterone (all P obese sedentary rats had lower serum and testicular testosterone levels (0.72- to 0.74-fold, all P exercise rats on serum and testicular testosterone levels. However, compared to the obese sedentary group, the obese exercise group had higher serum and testicular testosterone levels (1.37- to 1.47-fold, all P exercise training could improve severe obesity-related hypogonadism in male Zucker rats. The underlying mechanism needs to be further clarified.

  20. Effects of exercise training and Mediterranean diet on vascular risk reduction in post-menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhatib, Ahmad; Klonizakis, Markos

    2014-01-01

    This study tested the potential risk-reduction benefits of Mediterranean Diet (MD) and regular exercise training on microvascular activity and cardiorespiratory capacity in postmenopausal women. Fifteen sedentary postmenopausal participants (age = 54.6 ± 3.6) were randomised into either exercise training or exercise combined with following MD for eight-weeks, and were assessed for their cardiorespiratory capacity, and upper- and lower-limb endothelial cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) test using Laser Doppler Fluximetry (LDF), coupled with measuring endothelium-dependent Acetylcholine Chloride (Ach) and -dependent Sodium Nitropurruside (SNP) vasodilators. Exercise training improved cardiorespiratory capacity as indicated by ventilatory threshold (11.5 ± 2.1 vs. 14.0 ± 3.0 ml·kg-1·min-1, p exercise with MD showed a stronger improvement in Ach (p = 0.02, d = 0.36) of the lower limb, than in exercise alone group. The results suggest that regular moderate exercise improves microcirculatory vascular function and increases exercise tolerance, both are responsible for reducing cardiovascular risk in postmenopausal women. However, combining MD with exercise suggests additional microvascular vasodialiatory improvement, suggesting an effective strategy for further cardiovascular risk-reduction in this high-risk group.

  1. Exercise training modifies ghrelin and adiponectin concentrations and is related to inflammation in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markofski, Melissa M; Carrillo, Andres E; Timmerman, Kyle L; Jennings, Kristofer; Coen, Paul M; Pence, Brandt D; Flynn, Michael G

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe exercise training-induced effects on adiponectin, leptin, and ghrelin. Twenty-nine older, healthy participants were classified as physically active (comparison group: N = 15, 70.9 ± 1.2 years) or physically inactive (exercise group: N = 14, 70.5 ± 1.4 years). Exercise group participants completed 12 weeks of combined aerobic and resistance exercise training, whereas comparison group participants maintained their current level of exercise and served as a physically active comparison group. Monocyte phenotype, as well as serum ghrelin, leptin, adiponectin, and soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor II were analyzed prior to and following the 12-week period. Ghrelin and adiponectin increased 47% and 55%, respectively, in exercise group participants following exercise training. Percent change in ghrelin (post and pre) was negatively correlated with the percent change in CD14+CD16+ monocytes (post and pre) in exercise group participants. Despite no changes in body mass, these data contribute to evidence for the anti-inflammatory effects of exercise. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Angelica sinensis Improves Exercise Performance and Protects against Physical Fatigue in Trained Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Shao Yeh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Angelica sinensis (AS is a well-known medicinal herb and food material with antioxidative and multifunctional pharmacological activities. However, we lack evidence of the effect of AS on exercise performance and physical fatigue. We aimed to evaluate the potential beneficial effect of AS on ergogenic and anti-fatigue functions after physiological challenge. Male ICR strain mice were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 10 per group for treatment: (1 sedentary control and vehicle treatment (vehicle control; (2 exercise training with vehicle treatment (exercise control; (3 exercise training with AS treatment at 0.41 g/kg/day (Ex-AS1; and (4 2.05 g/kg/day (Ex-AS5; both the vehicle and AS were orally administered for 6 weeks. Exercise performance and anti-fatigue function were evaluated by forelimb grip strength, exhaustive swimming time, and levels of serum lactate, ammonia, glucose, and creatine kinase (CK after a 15-min swimming exercise. Trend analysis revealed that AS treatments significantly increased endurance swimming time and blood glucose level, and decreased serum lactate, ammonia and CK levels. Liver and muscle glycogen contents were higher for Ex-AS1 and Ex-AS5 groups than the exercise control. Therefore, AS supplementation improved exercise performance and had anti-fatigue properties in mice and may be an effective ergogenic aid in exercise training.

  3. Enjoyment for High-Intensity Interval Exercise Increases during the First Six Weeks of Training: Implications for Promoting Exercise Adherence in Sedentary Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisz, Jennifer J; Tejada, Mary Grace M; Paolucci, Emily M; Muir, Cameron

    2016-01-01

    This is the first study to show that enjoyment for high-intensity interval exercise increases with chronic training. Prior acute studies typically report high-intensity interval training (HIT) as being more enjoyable than moderate continuous training (MCT) unless the high-intensity intervals are too strenuous or difficult to complete. It follows that exercise competency may be a critical factor contributing to the enjoyment of HIT, and therefore building competency through chronic training may be one way to increase its enjoyment. To test this, we randomly assigned sedentary young adults to six weeks of HIT or MCT, and tracked changes in their enjoyment for the exercise. Enjoyment for HIT increased with training whereas enjoyment for MCT remained constant and lower. Changes in exercise enjoyment were predicted by increases in workload, suggesting that strength adaptions may be important for promoting exercise enjoyment. The results point to HIT as a promising protocol for promoting exercise enjoyment and adherence in sedentary young adults.

  4. Exercise training normalizes skeletal muscle vascular endothelial growth factor levels in patients with essential hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ane Håkansson; Nielsen, Jens Jung; Saltin, Bengt

    2010-01-01

    METHODS: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein and capillarization were determined in muscle vastus lateralis biopsy samples in individuals with essential hypertension (n = 10) and normotensive controls (n = 10). The hypertensive individuals performed exercise training for 16 weeks....... Muscle samples as well as muscle microdialysis fluid samples were obtained at rest, during and after an acute exercise bout, performed prior to and after the training period, for the determination of muscle VEGF levels, VEGF release, endothelial cell proliferative effect and capillarization. RESULTS......: Prior to training, the hypertensive individuals had 36% lower levels of VEGF protein and 22% lower capillary density in the muscle compared to controls. Training in the hypertensive group reduced (P

  5. Lack of alpha(2)-adrenergic antilipolytic effect during exercise in subcutaneous adipose tissue of trained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Glisezinski, I; Marion-Latard, F; Crampes, F; Berlan, M; Hejnova, J; Cottet-Emard, J M; Stich, V; Rivière, D

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of the antilipolytic alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor pathway in the regulation of lipolysis during exercise in subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (SCAAT). Seven trained men and 15 untrained men were studied. With the use of microdialysis, the extracellular glycerol concentration was measured in SCAAT at rest and during 60 min of exercise at 50% of maximal oxygen consumption. One microdialysis probe was perfused with Ringer solution; the other was supplemented with phentolamine (alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor antagonist). No differences in baseline extracellular or plasma glycerol concentrations were found between the two groups. The exercise-induced extracellular and plasma glycerol increase was higher in trained compared with untrained subjects (P < 0.05). Addition of phentolamine to the perfusate enhanced the exercise-induced response of extracellular glycerol in untrained subjects but not in trained subjects. The exercise-induced increase in plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine concentrations and the decrease in plasma insulin were not different in the two groups. These in vivo findings demonstrate higher exercise-induced lipolysis in trained compared with untrained subjects and show that, in trained subjects, the alpha(2)-mediated antilipolytic action is not involved in the regulation of lipolysis in SCAAT during exercise.

  6. Exercise training improves vascular function in adolescents with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Louise H; Davis, Elizabeth A; Kalic, Rachelle J; Paramalingam, Niru; Abraham, Mary B; Jones, Timothy W; Green, Daniel J

    2016-02-01

    The impact of exercise training on vascular health in adolescents with type 2 diabetes has not been previously studied. We hypothesized that exercise training would improve micro- and macrovascular health in adolescents with type 2 diabetes. Thirteen adolescents (13-21 years, 10F) with type 2 diabetes were recruited from Princess Margaret Hospital. Participants were randomized to receive either an exercise program along with standard clinical care (n = 8) or standard care alone (n = 5). Those in the intervention group received 12 weeks of gym-based, personalized, and supervised exercise training. Those in the control group were instructed to maintain usual activity levels. Assessments were conducted at baseline and following week 12. The exercise group was also studied 12 weeks following the conclusion of their program. Assessments consisted of conduit artery endothelial function (flow-mediated dilation, FMD) and microvascular function (cutaneous laser Doppler). Secondary outcomes included body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, DXA), glycemic control (whole body insulin sensitivity, M) assessed using the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp protocol, cardiorespiratory fitness (V˙O2peak), and muscular strength (1RM). Exercise training increased FMD (P improvements in vascular function were reversed. This study indicates that exercise training can improve both conduit and microvascular endothelial function and health, independent of changes in insulin sensitivity in adolescents with type 2 diabetes.

  7. Effects of a Strength Training Session After an Exercise Inducing Muscle Damage on Recovery Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaïdia, Abd-Elbasset; Delecroix, Barthélémy; Leduc, Cédric; Lamblin, Julien; McCall, Alan; Baquet, Georges; Dupont, Grégory

    2017-01-01

    Abaïdia, A-E, Delecroix, B, Leduc, C, Lamblin, J, McCall, A, Baquet, G, and Dupont, G. Effects of a strength training session after an exercise inducing muscle damage on recovery kinetics. J Strength Cond Res 31(1): 115-125, 2017-The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an upper-limb strength training session the day after an exercise inducing muscle damage on recovery of performance. In a randomized crossover design, subjects performed the day after the exercise, on 2 separate occasions (passive vs. active recovery conditions) a single-leg exercise (dominant in one condition and nondominant in the other condition) consisting of 5 sets of 15 eccentric contractions of the knee flexors. Active recovery consisted of performing an upper-body strength training session the day after the exercise. Creatine kinase, hamstring strength, and muscle soreness were assessed immediately and 20, 24, and 48 hours after exercise-induced muscle damage. The upper-body strength session, after muscle-damaging exercise accelerated the recovery of slow concentric force (effect size = 0.65; 90% confidence interval = -0.06 to 1.32), but did not affect the recovery kinetics for the other outcomes. The addition of an upper-body strength training session the day after muscle-damaging activity does not negatively affect the recovery kinetics. Upper-body strength training may be programmed the day after a competition.

  8. Autonomic modulation in resistance-trained individuals after acute resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsley, J D; Hochgesang, S; Brewer, A; Buxton, E; Martinson, M; Heidner, G

    2014-09-01

    The effects of different types of acute bouts of resistance exercise on autonomic modulation in individuals that are resistance-trained compared to untrained individuals are unknown. Seventeen untrained and 17 resistance-trained participants were assessed for autonomic modulation after various acute resistance exercise bouts. Electrocardiogram readings were collected at rest and 25 min after a control period, whole-, lower-, or upper-body acute bouts of resistance exercise. Heart rate variability and heart rate complexity were used to assess autonomic modulation. Participants were similar for age, height, weight and measures of body composition (p>0.05) and were different for measures of maximal strength (p0.05) in autonomic modulation at rest between groups. Significant decreases (p<0.05) in parasympathetic modulation after the acute bouts of resistance exercise were noted. Sample entropy was not affected in the untrained group, but was significantly decreased after whole- (-17.5%) and upper-body exercise (-13.5%) in the resistance training group. The changes in sample entropy after lower-body resistance exercise were not significant (-15.7%; p=0.06). These data suggest that resistance exercise training further attenuates the parasympathetic responses to an acute bout of resistance training regardless of the modality compared to the untrained state.

  9. Reversal of adaptive left ventricular atrophy following electrically-stimulated exercise training in human tetraplegics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, M S; Bilsker, S; Marcillo, A E; Isaac, S M; Botelho, L A; Klose, K J; Green, B A; Rountree, M T; Shea, J D

    1991-11-01

    Left ventricular (LV) myocardial atrophy and diminished cardiac function have been shown to accompany chronic human tetraplegia. These changes are attributable both to physical immobilisation and abnormal autonomic circulatory regulation imposed by a spinal cord injury (SCI). To test whether exercise training increases LV mass following chronic SCI, 8 neurologically complete quadriplegic males at 2 SCI rehabilitation and research centres underwent one month of electrically-stimulated quadriceps strengthening followed by 6 months of electrically-stimulated cycling exercise. Resting M-mode and 2-D echocardiograms were measured before and after exercise training to quantify the interventricular septal and posterior wall thicknesses at end-diastole (IVSTED and PWTED, respectively), and the LV internal dimension at end-diastole (LVIDED). LV mass was computed from these measurements using standard cube function geometry. Results showed a 6.5% increase in LVIDED following exercise training (p less than 0.02), with increases in IVSTED and PWTED of 17.8 (p less than 0.002) and 20.3% (p less than 0.01), respectively. Computed LV mass increased by 35% following exercise training (p = 0.002). These data indicate that myocardial atrophy is reversed in tetraplegics following electrically-stimulated exercise training, and that the changes in cardiac architecture are likely to be the result of both pressure and volume challenge to the heart imposed by exercise.

  10. Strength training prior to endurance exercise: impact on the neuromuscular system, endurance performance and cardiorespiratory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conceição, Matheus; Cadore, Eduardo Lusa; González-Izal, Miriam; Izquierdo, Mikel; Liedtke, Giane Veiga; Wilhelm, Eurico Nestor; Pinto, Ronei Silveira; Goltz, Fernanda Reistenbach; Schneider, Cláudia Dornelles; Ferrari, Rodrigo; Bottaro, Martim; Kruel, Luiz Fernando Martins

    2014-12-09

    This study aimed to investigate the acute effects of two strength-training protocols on the neuromuscular and cardiorespiratory responses during endurance exercise. Thirteen young males (23.2 ± 1.6 years old) participated in this study. The hypertrophic strength-training protocol was composed of 6 sets of 8 squats at 75% of maximal dynamic strength. The plyometric strength-training protocol was composed of 6 sets of 8 jumps performed with the body weight as the workload. Endurance exercise was performed on a cycle ergometer at a power corresponding to the second ventilatory threshold until exhaustion. Before and after each protocol, a maximal voluntary contraction was performed, and the rate of force development and electromyographic parameters were assessed. After the hypertrophic strength-training and plyometric strength-training protocol, significant decreases were observed in the maximal voluntary contraction and rate of force development, whereas no changes were observed in the electromyographic parameters. Oxygen uptake and a heart rate during endurance exercise were not significantly different among the protocols. However, the time-to-exhaustion was significantly higher during endurance exercise alone than when performed after hypertrophic strength-training or plyometric strength-training (p strength-training, with no oxygen uptake or heart rate changes during the exercise.

  11. EFFICACY OF ISOKINETIC STRENGTH TRAINING AND BALANCE EXERCISES ON LOWER LIMB MUSCLES IN SUBJECTS WITH STROKE

    OpenAIRE

    Dr.P.Keerthi Chandra Sekhar; Dr K. Madhavi; Dr. V.Srikumari; Dr. Patchava Appa Rao; Dr. A.Chathurvedi .P

    2013-01-01

    Background:To evaluate the efficacy of isokinetic strength training and balance exercises on lower limb musclesamong the subjects suffering with stroke.Materials and Methods:40 subjects who are suffering from strokewere divided into two groups, Experimental group received Isokinetic strength training and balance exercises(n=20) and Control group received conventional physiotherapy, results were measured withIsokinetic deviceand Berg balance scale for peak torque of knee extensors on paretic l...

  12. Effects of systemic hypoxia on human muscular adaptations to resistance exercise training

    OpenAIRE

    Kon, Michihiro; Ohiwa, Nao; Honda, Akiko; Matsubayashi, Takeo; Ikeda, Tatsuaki; Akimoto, Takayuki; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Hirano, Yuichi; Russell, Aaron P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Hypoxia is an important modulator of endurance exercise‐induced oxidative adaptations in skeletal muscle. However, whether hypoxia affects resistance exercise‐induced muscle adaptations remains unknown. Here, we determined the effect of resistance exercise training under systemic hypoxia on muscular adaptations known to occur following both resistance and endurance exercise training, including muscle cross‐sectional area (CSA), one‐repetition maximum (1RM), muscular endurance, and ma...

  13. Exercise training prior to myocardial infarction attenuates cardiac deterioration and cardiomyocyte dysfunction in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Henrique Marchesi Bozi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The present study was performed to investigate 1 whether aerobic exercise training prior to myocardial infarction would prevent cardiac dysfunction and structural deterioration and 2 whether the potential cardiac benefits of aerobic exercise training would be associated with preserved morphological and contractile properties of cardiomyocytes in post-infarct remodeled myocardium. METHODS: Male Wistar rats underwent an aerobic exercise training protocol for eight weeks. The rats were then assigned to sham surgery (SHAM, sedentary lifestyle and myocardial infarction or exercise training and myocardial infarction groups and were evaluated 15 days after the surgery. Left ventricular tissue was analyzed histologically, and the contractile function of isolated myocytes was measured. Student's t-test was used to analyze infarct size and ventricular wall thickness, and the other parameters were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Dunn's test or a one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test (p<0.05. RESULTS: Myocardial infarctions in exercise-trained animals resulted in a smaller myocardial infarction extension, a thicker infarcted wall and less collagen accumulation as compared to myocardial infarctions in sedentary animals. Myocardial infarction-induced left ventricular dilation and cardiac dysfunction, as evaluated by +dP/dt and -dP/dt, were both prevented by previous aerobic exercise training. Moreover, aerobic exercise training preserved cardiac myocyte shortening, improved the maximum shortening and relengthening velocities in infarcted hearts and enhanced responsiveness to calcium. CONCLUSION: Previous aerobic exercise training attenuated the cardiac dysfunction and structural deterioration promoted by myocardial infarction, and such benefits were associated with preserved cardiomyocyte morphological and contractile properties.

  14. Effects of Exercise Training on Autonomic Function in Chronic Heart Failure: Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Chung-Yin Hsu; Ping-Lun Hsieh; Shu-Fang Hsiao; Meng-Yueh Chien

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Cardiac autonomic imbalance accompanies the progression of chronic heart failure (CHF). It is unclear whether exercise training could modulate autonomic control in CHF. This study aimed to review systematically the effects of exercise training on heart rate recovery (HRR) and heart rate variability (HRV) in patients with CHF. Methods. Literatures were systematically searched in electronic databases and relevant references. Only published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) focusin...

  15. 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase activity and subunit expression in exercise-trained human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jakob Nis; Mustard, Kirsty J.W.; Graham, Drew A.

    2002-01-01

    5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been proposed to be a pivotal factor in cellular responses to both acute exercise and exercise training. To investigate whether protein levels and gene expression of catalytic (alpha(1), alpha(2)) and regulatory (beta(1), beta(2), gamma(1), gamma(2), gam...... muscle has increased alpha(1)-AMPK protein levels and blunted AMPK activation during exercise.......5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been proposed to be a pivotal factor in cellular responses to both acute exercise and exercise training. To investigate whether protein levels and gene expression of catalytic (alpha(1), alpha(2)) and regulatory (beta(1), beta(2), gamma(1), gamma(2), gamma......(3)) AMPK subunits and exercise-induced AMPK activity are influenced by exercise training status, muscle biopsies were obtained from seven endurance exercise-trained and seven sedentary young healthy men. The alpha(1)- and alpha(2)-AMPK mRNA contents in trained subjects were both 117 +/- 2...

  16. Endurance exercise training induces fat depot-specific differences in basal autophagic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Goki; Kato, Hisashi; Izawa, Tetsuya, E-mail: tizawa@mail.doshisha.ac.jp

    2015-10-23

    The purpose of this study was to uncover the effect of exercise training on the expression of autophagy marker proteins in epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT), inguinal WAT (iWAT), and the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) collected from eWAT. Male Wistar rats aged 4–5 weeks were randomly divided into two groups, sedentary control (n = 7) and exercise-trained (n = 7). Rats in the exercise-trained group were exercised on a treadmill set at a 5° incline 5 days/week for 9 weeks. We determined that the expression levels of an autophagosome-associating form of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3)-II and of p62 were significantly higher in eWAT from exercise-trained than from control rats, while those of adipose-specific deletion of autophagy-related protein (ATG7) and lysosomal-associated membrane protein type 2A (LAMP2a) showed no difference between groups. However, in iWAT, the expression levels of LC3-II and ATG7 were significantly higher in exercise-trained than in control rats. The expression of p62 was highly correlated with that of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a master regulator of adipogenesis and lipid metabolism, in both WAT types (eWAT, r = 0.856, P < 0.05; iWAT, r = 0.762, P < 0.05), whereas LC3-II and PPARγ levels were highly correlated in eWAT (r = 0.765, P < 0.05) but not in iWAT (r = −0.306, ns). In SVF, the expression levels of LC3II, ATG7, and LAMP2a were significantly higher in exercise-trained than in control rats. These results suggest that exercise training suppresses basal autophagy activity in eWAT, but that this activity is enhanced in iWAT and SVF collected from eWAT. Thus, the adaptation of basal autophagic activity following exercise training exhibits fat depot-specific differences. - Highlights: • Autophagy has been associated with obesity and associated diseases. • We examined exercise-associated rat white adipose tissue (WAT) autophagy markers. • Exercise increased

  17. Beneficial metabolic adaptations due to endurance exercise training in the fasted state

    OpenAIRE

    Van Proeyen, Karen; Szlufcik, Karolina; Nielens, Henri; Ramaekers, Monique; Hespel, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Training with limited carbohydrate availability can stimulate adaptations in muscle cells to facilitate energy production via fat oxidation. Here we investigated the effect of consistent training in the fasted state, vs. training in the fed state, on muscle metabolism and substrate selection during fasted exercise. Twenty young male volunteers participated in a 6-wk endurance training program (1-1.5 h cycling at ∼70% Vo(₂max), 4 days/wk) while receiving isocaloric carbohydrate-rich diets. Hal...

  18. High-intensity training reduces CD8+ T-cell redistribution in response to exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witard, O.C.; Turner, J.E.; Jackman, S.R.; Tipton, K.D.; Jeukendrup, A.E.; Kies, A.K.; Bosch, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We examined whether exercise-induced lymphocytosis and lymphocytopenia are impaired with high-intensity training. Methods: Eight trained cyclists (V·O2max = 64.2 ± 6.5 mL·kg-1·min-1) undertook 1 wk of normal-intensity training and a second week of high-intensity training. On day 7 of each w

  19. Low-frequency group exercise improved the motor functions of community-dwelling elderly people in a rural area when combined with home exercise with self-monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubayashi, Yoshito; Asakawa, Yasuyoshi; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined whether low-frequency group exercise improved the motor functions of community-dwelling elderly people in a rural area when combined with home exercise with self-monitoring. [Subjects] The subjects were community-dwelling elderly people in a rural area of Japan. [Methods] One group (n = 50) performed group exercise combined with home exercise with self-monitoring. Another group (n = 37) performed group exercise only. Low-frequency group exercise (warm-up, exercises for motor functions, and cool-down) was performed in seven 40 to 70-minute sessions over 9 weeks by both groups. Five items of motor functions were assessed before and after the intervention. [Results] Significant interactions were observed between groups and assessment times for all motor functions. Improvements in motor functions were significantly greater in the group that performed group exercise combined with home exercise with self-monitoring than in the group that performed group exercise only. Post-hoc comparisons revealed significant differences in 3 items of motor functions. No significant improvements were observed in motor functions in the group that performed group exercise only. [Conclusions] Group exercise combined with home exercise with self-monitoring improved motor functions in the setting of low-frequency group exercise for community-dwelling elderly people in a rural area. PMID:27065520

  20. Improved heart rate recovery despite reduced exercise performance following heavy training: A within-subject analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Rebecca L; Bellenger, Clint R; Howe, Peter R C; Karavirta, Laura; Buckley, Jonathan D

    2016-03-01

    The recovery of heart rate (HRR) after exercise is a potential indicator of fitness which has been shown to respond to changes in training. This study investigated the within-individual association between HRR and exercise performance following three different training loads. 11 male cyclists/triathletes were tested after two weeks of light training, two weeks of heavy training and two days of rest. Exercise performance was measured using a 5-min maximal cycling time-trial. HRR was measured over 60s during supine recovery. Exercise performance decreased 2.2±2.5% following heavy training compared with post-light training (p=0.01), and then increased 4.0±4.2% following rest (p=0.004). Most HRR indices indicated a more rapid recovery of heart rate (HR) following heavy training, and reverted to post light training levels following two days of rest. HRR indices did not differ between post-light training and after the rest period (p>0.6). There were inverse within-subject relationships between indices of HRR and performance (r=-0.6, p≤0.004). Peak HR decreased 3.2±5.1bpm following heavy training (p=0.06) and significantly increased 4.9±4.3bpm following recovery (p=0.004). There was a moderate within-subject relationship between peak HR and exercise performance (r=0.7, p≤0.001). Controlling for peak HR reduced the relationships between HRR and performance (r=-0.4-0.5, pexercise performance within-individuals, such that increases in HRR are associated with poorer exercise performance following heavy training. Peak HR can be compromised under conditions of fatigue, and needs to be taken into account in HRR analyses. Copyright © 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Weight loss and exercise training effect on oxygen uptake and heart rate response to locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary R; Fisher, Gordon; Bryan, David R; Zuckerman, Paul A

    2012-05-01

    Effects of resistance and aerobic training on the ease of physical activity during and after weight loss are unknown. The purpose of the study was to determine what effect weight loss combined with either aerobic or resistance training has on the ease of locomotion (net V[Combining Dot Above]O2 and heart rate). It is hypothesized that exercise training will result in an increased ease, lowers heart rate during locomotion. Seventy-three overweight premenopausal women were assigned to diet and aerobic training, diet and resistance training, or diet only. Subjects were evaluated while overweight, after diet-induced weight loss (average, 12.5 kg loss), and 1 year after weight loss (5.5 kg regain). Submaximal walking, grade walking, stair climbing, and bike oxygen uptake and heart rate were measured at all time points. Weight loss diet was 800 kcal per day. Exercisers trained 3 times per week during weight loss and 2 times per week during 1-year follow-up. Resistance training increased strength, and aerobic training increased maximum oxygen uptake. Net submaximal oxygen uptake was not affected by weight loss or exercise training. However, heart rate during walking, stair climbing, and bicycling was reduced after weight loss. No significant differences in reduction in heart rate were observed among the 3 treatment groups for locomotion after weight loss. However, during 1-year follow-up, exercise training resulted in maintenance of lower submaximal heart rate, whereas nonexercisers increased heart rate during locomotion. Results suggest that moderately intense exercise is helpful in improving the ease of movement after weight loss. Exercise training may be helpful in increasing the participation in free-living physical activity.

  2. The effect of exercise training on transverse tubules in normal, remodeled, and reverse remodeled hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemi, Ole J; Hoydal, Morten A; Macquaide, Niall; Haram, Per M; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Ellingsen, Oyvind; Smith, Godfrey L; Wisloff, Ulrik

    2011-09-01

    The response of transverse (T)-tubules to exercise training in health and disease remains unclear. Therefore, we studied the effect of exercise training on the density and spacing of left ventricle cardiomyocyte T-tubules in normal and remodeled hearts that associate with detubulation, by confocal laser scanning microscopy. First, exercise training in normal rats increased cardiomyocyte volume by 16% (P hypertrophy. Next, we studied T-tubules in a rat model of metabolic syndrome with pressure overload-induced concentric left ventricle hypertrophy, evidenced by 15% (P Exercise training further increased cardiomyocyte volume by 8% (P eccentric and concentric hypertrophy and 55% (P Exercise training reversed 50% (P hypertrophy, whereas the T-tubule density increased by 40% (P hypertrophy associated with conserved T-tubule spacing (~1.8-1.9 µm), whereas in pathologic hypertrophy, T-tubules appeared disorganized without regular spacing. In conclusion, cardiomyocytes maintain the relative T-tubule density during physiologic hypertrophy and after mild concentric pathologic hypertrophy, whereas after severe pathologic remodeling with a substantial loss of T-tubules; exercise training reverses the remodeling and partly corrects the T-tubule density.

  3. Respiratory muscle training in healthy individuals: physiological rationale and implications for exercise performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheel, A William

    2002-01-01

    The respiratory system has traditionally been viewed to be capable of meeting the substantial demands for ventilation and gas exchange and the cardiopulmonary interactions imposed by short-term maximum exercise or long-term endurance exercise. Recent studies suggest that specific respiratory muscle (RM) training can improve the endurance and strength of the respiratory muscles in healthy humans. The effects of RM training on exercise performance remains controversial. When whole-body exercise performance is evaluated using submaximal fixed work-rate tests, significant improvements are seen and smaller, but significant improvements have also been reported in placebo-trained individuals. When performance is measured using time-trial type performance measures versus fixed workload tests, performance is increased to a much lesser extent with RM training. It appears that RM training influences relevant measures of physical performance to a limited extent at most. Interpretation of the collective literature is difficult because most studies have utilised relatively small sample sizes and very few studies have used appropriate control or placebo groups. Mechanisms to explain the purported improvements in exercise performance remain largely unknown. However, possible candidates include improved ratings of breathing perception, delay of respiratory muscle fatigue, ventilatory efficiency, or blood-flow competition between respiratory and locomotor muscles. This review summarises the current literature on the physiology of RM training in healthy individuals and critically evaluates the possible implications for exercise performance.

  4. Duration-controlled swimming exercise training induces cardiac hypertrophy in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.S. Evangelista

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Exercise training associated with robust conditioning can be useful for the study of molecular mechanisms underlying exercise-induced cardiac hypertrophy. A swimming apparatus is described to control training regimens in terms of duration, load, and frequency of exercise. Mice were submitted to 60- vs 90-min session/day, once vs twice a day, with 2 or 4% of the weight of the mouse or no workload attached to the tail, for 4 vs 6 weeks of exercise training. Blood pressure was unchanged in all groups while resting heart rate decreased in the trained groups (8-18%. Skeletal muscle citrate synthase activity, measured spectrophotometrically, increased (45-58% only as a result of duration and frequency-controlled exercise training, indicating that endurance conditioning was obtained. In groups which received duration and endurance conditioning, cardiac weight (14-25% and myocyte dimension (13-20% increased. The best conditioning protocol to promote physiological hypertrophy, our primary goal in the present study, was 90 min, twice a day, 5 days a week for 4 weeks with no overload attached to the body. Thus, duration- and frequency-controlled exercise training in mice induces a significant conditioning response qualitatively similar to that observed in humans.

  5. Effect of aquatic exercise training on lipids profile and glycaemia: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Delevatti

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the acute and chronic effects of aquatic exercise training on glycaemia and lipids profile. A systematic review of clinical trials was performed assessing the effects of aquatic exercise and/or training in upright position on lipids profile and glycaemic index. Two raters independently assessed the eligibility criteria and the methodological quality of the studies using the PEDro scale. Average and standard deviation of all variables significantly altered by the interventions were extracted for calculating percentage alterations. Three studies involving the acute effect of aquatic aerobic exercise on the variables of interest were analysed, with two of them demonstrating the efficacy of this type of training in improving lipids profile. Nine studies involving the chronic effects of aquatic training on the same variables were also analysed; eight of them, which assessed different training interventions for different populations, reported benefits of exercise regarding these variables. In conclusion, the improvements found in response to aquatic exercise training in upright position in glycaemia and lipids profile indicate the aquatic environment as a favourable environment for conducting exercise programmes.

  6. Physiological adaptations to interval training and the role of exercise intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacInnis, Martin J; Gibala, Martin J

    2017-05-01

    Interval exercise typically involves repeated bouts of relatively intense exercise interspersed by short periods of recovery. A common classification scheme subdivides this method into high-intensity interval training (HIIT; 'near maximal' efforts) and sprint interval training (SIT; 'supramaximal' efforts). Both forms of interval training induce the classic physiological adaptations characteristic of moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) such as increased aerobic capacity (V̇O2 max ) and mitochondrial content. This brief review considers the role of exercise intensity in mediating physiological adaptations to training, with a focus on the capacity for aerobic energy metabolism. With respect to skeletal muscle adaptations, cellular stress and the resultant metabolic signals for mitochondrial biogenesis depend largely on exercise intensity, with limited work suggesting that increases in mitochondrial content are superior after HIIT compared to MICT, at least when matched-work comparisons are made within the same individual. It is well established that SIT increases mitochondrial content to a similar extent to MICT despite a reduced exercise volume. At the whole-body level, V̇O2 max is generally increased more by HIIT than MICT for a given training volume, whereas SIT and MICT similarly improve V̇O2 max despite differences in training volume. There is less evidence available regarding the role of exercise intensity in mediating changes in skeletal muscle capillary density, maximum stroke volume and cardiac output, and blood volume. Furthermore, the interactions between intensity and duration and frequency have not been thoroughly explored. While interval training is clearly a potent stimulus for physiological remodelling in humans, the integrative response to this type of exercise warrants further attention, especially in comparison to traditional endurance training. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  7. Exercise Training for Heart Failure Patients with and without Systolic Dysfunction: An Evidence-Based Analysis of How Patients Benefit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Smart

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant benefits can be derived by heart failure patients from exercise training. This paper provides an evidence-based assessment of expected clinical benefits of exercise training for heart failure patients. Meta-analyses and randomized, controlled trials of exercise training in heart failure patients were reviewed from a search of PubMed, Cochrane Controlled Trial Registry (CCTR, CINAHL, and EMBASE. Exercise training improves functional capacity, quality of life, hospitalization, and systolic and diastolic function in heart failure patients. Heart failure patients with preserved systolic function (HFnEF participating in exercise training studies are more likely to be women and are 5–7 years older than their systolic heart failure (CHF counterparts. All patients exhibit low functional capacities, although in HFnEF patients this may be age related, therefore subtle differences in exercise prescriptions are required. Published works report that exercise training is beneficial for heart failure patients with and without systolic dysfunction.

  8. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Smoking Weight Patient Safety Exercise Strengthening Strengthen Your Core! Stretching/Flexibility Aerobic Exercise Cervical Exercise Strength Training for the Elderly Other Back Pack Safety ...

  9. The impact of exercise training on conduit artery wall thickness and remodeling in chronic heart failure patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maiorana, A.J.; Naylor, L.H.; Exterkate, A.; Swart, A.; Thijssen, D.H.J.; Lam, K.; O'Driscoll, G.; Green, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    Exercise training is an important adjunct to medical therapy in chronic heart failure, but the extent to which exercise impacts on conduit artery remodeling is unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of aerobic and resistance exercise training modalities on arterial remodeling in

  10. Muscle Volume Increases Following 16 Weeks of Resistive Exercise Training with the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) and Free Weights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, R. E.; Loehr, J. A.; Lee, S. M. C.; English, K. L.; Evans, H.; Smith, S. A.; Hagan, R. D.

    2009-01-01

    Space flight-induced muscle atrophy, particularly in the postural and locomotorymuscles, may impair task performance during long-duration space missions and planetary exploration. High intensity free weight (FW) resistive exercise training has been shown to prevent atrophy during bed rest, a space flight analog. NASA developed the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) to simulate the characteristics of FW exercise (i.e. constant mass, inertial force) and to be used as a countermeasure during International Space Station (ISS) missions. PURPOSE: To compare the efficacy of ARED and FW training to induce hypertrophy in specific muscle groups in ambulatory subjects prior to deploying ARED on the ISS. METHODS: Twenty untrained subjects were assigned to either the ARED (8 males, 3 females) or FW (6 males, 3 females) group and participated in a periodizedtraining protocol consisting of squat (SQ), heel raise (HR), and deadlift(DL) exercises 3 d wk-1 for 16 wks. SQ, HR, and DL muscle strength (1RM) was measured before, after 8 wks, and after 16 wks of training to prescribe exercise and measure strength changes. Muscle volume of the vastigroup (V), hamstring group (H), hip adductor group (ADD), medial gastrocnemius(MG), lateral gastrocnemius(LG), and deep posterior muscles including soleus(DP) was measured using MRI pre-and post-training. Consecutive cross-sectional images (8 mm slices with a 2 mm gap) were analyzed and summed. Anatomical references insured that the same muscle sections were analyzed pre-and post-training. Two-way repeated measures ANOVAs (pmuscle strength and volume between training devices. RESULTS: SQ, HR, and DL 1RM increased in both FW (SQ: 49+/-6%, HR: 12+/-2%, DL: 23+/-4%) and ARED (SQ: 31+/-4%, HR: 18+/-2%, DL: 23+/-3%) groups. Both groups increased muscle volume in the V (FW: 13+/-2%, ARED: 10+/-2%), H (FW: 3+/-1%, ARED: 3+/-1 %), ADD (FW: 15=/-2%, ARED: 10+/-1%), LG (FW: 7+/-2%, ARED: 4+/-1%), MG (FW: 7+/-2%, ARED: 5+/-2%), and DP (FW: 2

  11. No Effect of Exercise Intensity on Appetite in Highly-Trained Endurance Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M. Howe

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In endurance-trained men, an acute bout of exercise is shown to suppress post-exercise appetite, yet limited research has examined this response in women. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of exercise intensity on appetite and gut hormone responses in endurance-trained women. Highly-trained women (n = 15, 18–40 years, 58.4 ± 6.4 kg, VO2MAX = 55.2 ± 4.3 mL/kg/min completed isocaloric bouts (500 kcals or 2093 kJ of moderate-intensity (MIE, 60% VO2MAX and high-intensity (HIE, 85% VO2MAX treadmill running at the same time of day, following a similar 48-h diet/exercise period, and at least 1-week apart. Blood was drawn pre-exercise (baseline, immediately post-exercise and every 20-min for the next 60-min. Plasma concentrations of acylated ghrelin, PYY3–36, GLP-1 and subjective appetite ratings via visual analog scale (VAS were assessed at each time point. Acylated ghrelin decreased (p = 0.014 and PYY3–36 and GLP-1 increased (p = 0.036, p < 0.0001 immediately post-exercise, indicating appetite suppression. VAS ratings of hunger and desire to eat decreased immediately post-exercise (p = 0.0012, p = 0.0031, respectively, also indicating appetite suppression. There were no differences between exercise intensities for appetite hormones or VAS. Similar to males, post-exercise appetite regulatory hormones were altered toward suppression in highly-trained women and independent of energy cost of exercise. Results are important for female athletes striving to optimize nutrition for endurance performance.

  12. Change in body composition following a 15-week, heart rate monitored aerobic exercise program: The TIGER study

    Science.gov (United States)

    The joint goals of the Training Interventions and Genetics of Exercise Response (TIGER) study are to introduce sedentary college-age individuals to regular exercise and identify genetic factors that influence physiologic response to aerobic exercise training. The purpose of the study was to examine ...

  13. Hippocampal ultrastructural changes and apoptotic cell death in rats following endurance training and acute exhaustive exercise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianjun Zhang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exhaustive exercise can lead to apoptosis of skeletal muscle cells and myocardial cells as a result of pathological changes in the corresponding cellular ultrastructure. It is hypothesized that such changes could also occur in neurons. OBJECTIVE: To observe brain cell apoptosis and ultrastmctural changes in hippocampal neurons in rats following endurance training and acute exhaustive exercise. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A randomized, controlled, morphological analysis was performed at the Medical Laboratory Center of Zhengzhou University between July and November 2007. MATERIALS: Forty male, 8-week-old, Sprague Dawley rats were included in this study. METHODS: Endurance training consisted of treadmill running once a day, 6 days a week, for 4 weeks. For acute exhaustive exercise, graded treadmill running was conducted. Rats were exposed to exercise at an increasing speed (10 m/min, increasing to 20 and 36 m/min for moderate- and high-intensity exhaustive exercise, respectively, and then was continued until exhaustion). A total of 40 rats were evenly distributed into the following 4 groups: Group A-rats were not exercised; Group B- rats were not trained but sacrificed 24 hours after acute exhaustive treadmill running exercise; Group C rats were subjected to endurance training and sacrificed immediately after acute exhaustive treadmill running exercise; Group D-rats were subjected to endurance training and sacrificed 24 hours after acute exhaustive treadmill running exercise. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Apoptotic cell death was detected by the TUNEL method and hippocampal neuronal ultrastructural change was observed through using transmission electron microscopy. RESULTS: All 40 rats were included in the final analysis. Subsequent to exhaustive exercise, rat cerebral cortex and hippocampal neurons appeared contracted and degenerated. In addition, high amount of lipofuscin was visible in the hippocampal region. Necrotic neurons encased by glial cells appeared in

  14. Exercise training decreases body mass index in subjects aged 50 years and over

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignatio Rika Haryono

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Exercise training can improve blood pressure in normotensive, prehypertensive, and hypertensive subjects. One of the mechanisms of blood pressure reduction in hypertensive patients with obesity is through weight loss. This study aimed to examine the effect of exercise training on bodyweight and the relationship between weight loss and reduction of blood pressure. An experimental pre-post test design without controls was used to evaluate the effect of exercise training on weight loss. The study involved 89 elderly aged 50 years or more, consisting of 40 men and 49 women, who were members of Senayan Sport Fitness Club and had been exercising for at least three months. Exercise training was programmed and performed three times a week, consisting of aerobic (walking, jogging, static cycling, and resistance exercise. All exercise was performed for one to two hours with mild to moderate intensity. Blood pressure and body weight were obtained from medical records. Paired t-test showed that systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP, mean arterial pressure (MAP, pulse pressure (PP, and body mass index (BMI were significantly lower after training [(systolic, 126.3 ± 2.9 vs 122.3 ± 2.7, p=0.02, (diastolic, 80.2 ± 3.1 vs 77.2 ± 2.4, p=0.00, (MAP, 95.6 ± 4.6 vs 92.2 ± 3.4, p=0.00, (PP, 46.1 ± 4.2 vs 45.1 ± 3.6, p=0.04, (BMI, 24.5 ± 2.9 vs 23.6 ± 2.9, p=0.04]. Duration of training was the most influential factor affecting rBMI, (Beta = 0.38; p=0.00. Exercise training could lower BMI and the reduction in diastolic blood pressure was higher for the subjects aged 70 years and over.

  15. Exercise training decreases body mass index in subjects aged 50 years and over

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignatio Rika Haryono

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Exercise training can improve blood pressure in normotensive, prehypertensive, and hypertensive subjects. One of the mechanisms of blood pressure reduction in hypertensive patients with obesity is through weight loss. This study aimed to examine the effect of exercise training on bodyweight and the relationship between weight loss and reduction of blood pressure. An experimental pre-post test design without controls was used to evaluate the effect of exercise training on weight loss. The study involved 89 elderly aged 50 years or more, consisting of 40 men and 49 women, who were members of Senayan Sport Fitness Club and had been exercising for at least three months. Exercise training was programmed and performed three times a week, consisting of aerobic (walking, jogging, static cycling, and resistance exercise. All exercise was performed for one to two hours with mild to moderate intensity. Blood pressure and body weight were obtained from medical records. Paired t-test showed that systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP, mean arterial pressure (MAP, pulse pressure (PP, and body mass index (BMI were significantly lower after training [(systolic, 126.3 ± 2.9 vs 122.3 ± 2.7, p=0.02, (diastolic, 80.2 ± 3.1 vs 77.2 ± 2.4, p=0.00, (MAP, 95.6 ± 4.6 vs 92.2 ± 3.4, p=0.00, (PP, 46.1 ± 4.2 vs 45.1 ± 3.6, p=0.04, (BMI, 24.5 ± 2.9 vs 23.6 ± 2.9, p=0.04]. Duration of training was the most influential factor affecting rBMI, (Beta = 0.38; p=0.00. Exercise training could lower BMI and the reduction in diastolic blood pressure was higher for the subjects aged 70 years and over.

  16. Melatonin Supplementation Decreases Aerobic Exercise Training Induced-Lipid Peroxidation and Malondialdehyde in Sedentary Young Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziaadini Fatemeh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Five percent of consumed oxygen produces a number of reactive oxygen species (ROS including free radicals and other chemical products such as malondialdehyde (MDA. MDA increases lipid peroxidation such as low density lipoproteins cholesterol (LDL-c. Melatonin can decrease MDA and lipid peroxidation, but there are limited data about melatonin supplementation on MDA and lipid peroxidation of women. So the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of melatonin supplementation on exercise-induced MDA and lipid peroxidation of sedentary young women. Twenty sedentary young (20–25 years old women were selected and randomly divided into two exercise training-supplement (n=10 and exercise training (n=10 groups. Pretest/posttest body mass, BMI, rest heart rate (RHR, body fat percent, menstrual cycle, blood sampling for MDA and lipid profile were collected. Aerobic exercise training was performed for 8 weeks, triple weekly. Melatonin supplementation was ingested at 3 mg/day for exercise training-supplement. Results showed that the long term exercise training increased MDA concentrations, and melatonin supplementation significantly suppressed MDA surge (−25.2±2.87; 95% CI=−30.91 to −19.49. Moreover, post-exercise training LDL-c levels significantly declined due to melatonin supplementation in sedentary young women (19.5±2.41; 95% CI=12.272 to 25.728. We concluded that 3 mg melatonin supplementation following aerobic exercise training would attenuate ROS and improve lipid profile of young sedentary women.

  17. Moderate exercise training promotes adaptations in coronary blood flow and adenosine production in normotensive rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda R. Roque

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Aerobic exercise training prevents cardiovascular risks. Regular exercise promotes functional and structural adaptations that are associated with several cardiovascular benefits. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of swimming training on coronary blood flow, adenosine production and cardiac capillaries in normotensive rats. METHODS: Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups: control (C and trained (T. An exercise protocol was performed for 10 weeks and 60 min/day with a tail overload of 5% bodyweight. Coronary blood flow was quantified with a color microsphere technique, and cardiac capillaries were quantified using light microscopy. Adenine nucleotide hydrolysis was evaluated by enzymatic activity, and protein expression was evaluated by western blot. The results are presented as the means ± SEMs (p<0.05. RESULTS: Exercise training increased the coronary blood flow and the myocardial capillary-to-fiber ratio. Moreover, the circulating and cardiac extracellular adenine nucleotide hydrolysis was higher in the trained rats than in the sedentary rats due to the increased activity and protein expression of enzymes, such as E-NTPDase and 59- nucleotidase. CONCLUSIONS: Swimming training increases coronary blood flow, number of cardiac capillaries, and adenine nucleotide hydrolysis. Increased adenosine production may be an important contributor to the enhanced coronary blood flow and angiogenesis that were observed in the exercise-trained rats; collectively, these results suggest improved myocardial perfusion.

  18. Strength Training Prior to Endurance Exercise: Impact on the Neuromuscular System, Endurance Performance and Cardiorespiratory Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conceição Matheus

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the acute effects of two strength-training protocols on the neuromuscular and cardiorespiratory responses during endurance exercise. Thirteen young males (23.2 ± 1.6 years old participated in this study. The hypertrophic strength-training protocol was composed of 6 sets of 8 squats at 75% of maximal dynamic strength. The plyometric strength-training protocol was composed of 6 sets of 8 jumps performed with the body weight as the workload. Endurance exercise was performed on a cycle ergometer at a power corresponding to the second ventilatory threshold until exhaustion. Before and after each protocol, a maximal voluntary contraction was performed, and the rate of force development and electromyographic parameters were assessed. After the hypertrophic strengthtraining and plyometric strength-training protocol, significant decreases were observed in the maximal voluntary contraction and rate of force development, whereas no changes were observed in the electromyographic parameters. Oxygen uptake and a heart rate during endurance exercise were not significantly different among the protocols. However, the time-to-exhaustion was significantly higher during endurance exercise alone than when performed after hypertrophic strength-training or plyometric strength-training (p <0.05. These results suggest that endurance performance may be impaired when preceded by strength-training, with no oxygen uptake or heart rate changes during the exercise.

  19. The influence of training characteristics on the effect of aerobic exercise training in patients with chronic heart failure : A meta-regression analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vromen, T.; Kraal, J. J.; Kuiper, J.; Spee, R. F.; Peek, N.; Kemps, H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Although aerobic exercise training has shown to be an effective treatment for chronic heart failure patients, there has been a debate about the design of training programs and which training characteristics are the strongest determinants of improvement in exercise capacity. Therefore, we performed a

  20. The influence of training characteristics on the effect of aerobic exercise training in patients with chronic heart failure : A meta-regression analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vromen, T.; Kraal, J. J.; Kuiper, J.; Spee, R. F.; Peek, N.; Kemps, H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Although aerobic exercise training has shown to be an effective treatment for chronic heart failure patients, there has been a debate about the design of training programs and which training characteristics are the strongest determinants of improvement in exercise capacity. Therefore, we performed a

  1. The Effects and Safety of Exercise Training in Subjects With Chronic Heart Failure—Do Elder Subjects Gain Similar Benefits?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiau-Fu Hsieh

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, chronic heart failure (CHF subjects are often recommended to rest and restrict physical activity; however, this advice may exacerbate the disease. Exercise training is associated with many central and peripheral adaptations that improve clinical outcomes. Exercise training can restore the abnormal autonomic function, attenuate the production of proinflammatory cytokines and the N-terminal precursor of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP, and improve the endothelial dysfunction and the oxidative capacity of peripheral muscle. The current evidence supports the concept that exercise training can effectively improve the exercise capacity and quality of life of subjects with CHF, to some extent, as well as reduce hospitalization and risk of mortality. Structured exercise training is proved to be safe for CHF subjects. Exercise training had no detrimental effects on the left ventricular remodeling. Ultimately, trained subjects showed a significant improvement in left ventricle function. An important limitation of current published studies is that only a few have included significant proportions of elderly subjects with CHF. The limited data available suggests that elderly subjects derive similar benefits from exercise training as younger subjects. In summary, exercise training is an inexpensive and effective intervention for subjects with CHF. This article reviews the current knowledge of the effects of exercise training on the exercise capacity, quality of life, and mortality and morbidity of subjects with CHF and elderly subjects. A major challenge for the future is the inclusion of representative proportions of elderly and frail subjects in heart failure training trials.

  2. Adaptations to exercise training and contraction-induced muscle injury in animal models of muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Gregory T; Abresch, R Ted; Fowler, William M

    2002-11-01

    This article reviews the current status of exercise training and contraction-induced muscle-injury investigations in animal models of muscular dystrophy. Most exercise-training studies have compared the adaptations of normal and dystrophic muscles with exercise. Adaptation of diseased muscle to exercise occurs at many levels, starting with the extracellular matrix, but also involves cytoskeletal architecture, muscle contractility, repair mechanisms, and gene regulation. The majority of exercise-injury investigations have attempted to determine the susceptibility of dystrophin-deficient muscles to contraction-induced injury. There is some evidence in animal models that diseased muscle can adapt and respond to mechanical stress. However, exercise-injury studies show that dystrophic muscles have an increased susceptibility to high mechanical forces. Most of the studies involving exercise training have shown that muscle adaptations in dystrophic animals were qualitatively similar to the adaptations observed in control muscle. Deleterious effects of the dystrophy usually occur only in older animals with advanced muscle fiber degeneration or after high-resistive eccentric training. The main limitations in applying these conclusions to humans are the differences in phenotypic expression between humans and genetically homologous animal models and in the significant biomechanical differences between humans and these animal models.

  3. Carbohydrate dependence during hard-intensity exercise in trained cyclists in the competitive season: importance of training status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manetta, J; Brun, J F; Maimoun, L; Galy, O; Coste, O; Maso, F; Raibaut, J L; Benezis, C; Lac, G; Mercier, J

    2002-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that intensive endurance training increases CHO utilisation during hard-intensity exercise, seven competitive road cyclists (Cy) performed three 50-min steady-state exercise tests on a cycle ergometer above their ventilatory threshold (+ 15 %) over the course of a cycling season (January [ET1], May [ET2] and September [ET3]). We compared the data with the baseline values of seven sedentary controls (Sed). CHO oxidation in Cy was higher in ET2 and ET3 than in ET1 (p competitive cyclists increase CHO oxidation during hard-intensity exercise over the course of a season, but show a decline by the end of the season in association with the appearance of an overtraining state. Thus, well-trained cyclists develop a CHO dependence, which is modified with training status.

  4. Cardioprotective effects of early and late aerobic exercise training in experimental pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira-Gonçalves, Daniel; Ferreira, Rita; Fonseca, Hélder; Padrão, Ana Isabel; Moreno, Nuno; Silva, Ana Filipa; Vasques-Nóvoa, Francisco; Gonçalves, Nádia; Vieira, Sara; Santos, Mário; Amado, Francisco; Duarte, José Alberto; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F; Henriques-Coelho, Tiago

    2015-11-01

    Clinical studies suggest that aerobic exercise can exert beneficial effects in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We compared the impact of early or late aerobic exercise training on right ventricular function, remodeling and survival in experimental PAH. Male Wistar rats were submitted to normal cage activity (SED), exercise training in early (EarlyEX) and in late stage (LateEX) of PAH induced by monocrotaline (MCT, 60 mg/kg). Both exercise interventions resulted in improved cardiac function despite persistent right pressure-overload, increased exercise tolerance and survival, with greater benefits in EarlyEX+MCT. This was accompanied by improvements in the markers of cardiac remodeling (SERCA2a), neurohumoral activation (lower endothelin-1, brain natriuretic peptide and preserved vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA), metabolism and mitochondrial oxidative stress in both exercise interventions. EarlyEX+MCT provided additional improvements in fibrosis, tumor necrosis factor-alpha/interleukin-10 and brain natriuretic peptide mRNA, and beta/alpha myosin heavy chain protein expression. The present study demonstrates important cardioprotective effects of aerobic exercise in experimental PAH, with greater benefits obtained when exercise training is initiated at an early stage of the disease.

  5. Blunted heart rate recovery is improved following exercise training in overweight adults with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Christopher E; Crowley, E Patrick; Ewing, Gary B; Burch, James B; Blair, Steven N; Durstine, J Larry; Davis, J Mark; Youngstedt, Shawn D

    2013-08-20

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) predisposes individuals to cardiovascular morbidity, and cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) markers prognostic for cardiovascular disease have been found to be abnormal in adults with OSA. Due to the persistence of OSA and its cardiovascular consequences, whether the cardiovascular adaptations normally conferred by exercise are blunted in adults not utilizing established OSA treatment is unknown. The aims of this study were to document whether OSA participants have abnormal CPET responses and determine whether exercise modifies these CPET markers in individuals with OSA. The CPET responses of 43 sedentary, overweight adults (body mass index [BMI]>25) with untreated OSA (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI]≥ 15) were compared against matched non-OSA controls (n=9). OSA participants were then randomized to a 12-week exercise training (n=27) or stretching control treatment (n=16), followed by a post-intervention CPET. Measures of resting, exercise, and post-exercise recovery heart rate (HRR), blood pressure, and ventilation, as well as peak oxygen consumption (VO(2peak)), were obtained. OSA participants had blunted HRR compared to non-OSA controls at 1 (P=.03), 3 (P=.02), and 5-min post-exercise (P=.03). For OSA participants, exercise training improved VO2 peak (P=.04) and HRR at 1 (P=.03), 3 (Pexercise (Pexercise (r=-.30, Pexercise training, by increasing HRR and VO2 peak, may attenuate autonomic imbalance and improve functional capacity independent of OSA severity reduction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of intensity and duration of exercise on muscular responses to training of thoroughbred racehorses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, José-Luis L; Ruz, Antonio; Martí-Korff, Silvia; Estepa, José-Carlos; Aguilera-Tejero, Escolástico; Werkman, Jutta; Sobotta, Mathias; Lindner, Arno

    2007-05-01

    This study examined the effects of the intensity and duration of exercise on the nature and magnitude of training adaptations in muscle of adolescent (2-3 yr old) racehorses. Six thoroughbreds that had been pretrained for 2 mo performed six consecutive conditioning programs of varying lactate-guided intensities [velocities eliciting blood lactate concentrations of 2.5 mmol/l (v2.5) and 4 mmol/l (v4), respectively] and durations (5, 15, 25 min). Pre- and posttraining gluteus muscle biopsies were analyzed for myosin heavy chain content, fiber-type composition, fiber size, capillarization, and fiber histochemical oxidative and glycolytic capabilities. Although training adaptations were similar in nature, they varied greatly in magnitude among the different training protocols. Overall, the use of v4 as the exercise intensity for 25 min elicited the most consistent training adaptations in muscle, whereas the minimal training stimulus that evoked any significant change was identified with exercises of 15 min at v2.5. Within this range, muscular adaptations showed significant trends to be proportional to the exercise load of specific training programs. Taken together, these data suggest that muscular adaptations to training in horses occur on a continuum that is based on the exercise intensity and duration of training. The practical implications of this study are that exercises for 15 to 25 min/day at velocities between v2.5 and v4 can improve in the short term (3 wk) the muscular stamina in thoroughbreds. However, exercises of 5-15 min at v4 are necessary to enhance muscular features related to strength (hypertrophy).

  7. Acetic acid enhances endurance capacity of exercise-trained mice by increasing skeletal muscle oxidative properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Jun Ho; Kim, Hyung Min; Lee, Eui Seop; Shin, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Seongpil; Shin, Minkyeong; Kim, Sang Ho; Lee, Jin Hyup; Kim, Young Jun

    2015-01-01

    Acetic acid has been shown to promote glycogen replenishment in skeletal muscle during exercise training. In this study, we investigated the effects of acetic acid on endurance capacity and muscle oxidative metabolism in the exercise training using in vivo mice model. In exercised mice, acetic acid induced a significant increase in endurance capacity accompanying a reduction in visceral adipose depots. Serum levels of non-esterified fatty acid and urea nitrogen were significantly lower in acetic acid-fed mice in the exercised mice. Importantly, in the mice, acetic acid significantly increased the muscle expression of key enzymes involved in fatty acid oxidation and glycolytic-to-oxidative fiber-type transformation. Taken together, these findings suggest that acetic acid improves endurance exercise capacity by promoting muscle oxidative properties, in part through the AMPK-mediated fatty acid oxidation and provide an important basis for the application of acetic acid as a major component of novel ergogenic aids.

  8. LEPTIN, ITS IMPLICATION IN PHYSICAL EXERCISE AND TRAINING: A SHORT REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anissa Bouassida

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Leptin, a hormone synthesized by fat tissue had been noted to regulate energy balance and metabolism and thus to influence body weight. The influence of acute exercise and chronic exercise training on circulating leptin and its relationship with hormonal and metabolic changes that induce energy balance are presented. Research that has examined the influence of exercise under various experimental conditions on leptin and the conflicts in the literature are presented. It appears that a significant caloric perturbation (> 800 kcals is necessary for acute exercise to result in a significant reduction in leptin. In contrast, exercise training can result in a leptin decline but typically this manifests a reduction in adipose tissue stores. In addition, future directions are presented

  9. Treatment-related cardiovascular late effects and exercise training countermeasures in testicular germ cell cancer survivorship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jesper F; Bandak, Mikkel; Campbell, Anna

    2015-01-01

    -induced cardiovascular dysfunction to prevent premature onset of clinical cardiovascular disease in germ cell cancer survivors, with a view towards highlighting future directions of exercise-based survivorship research in the germ cell cancer setting. CONCLUSION: As exercise training may have the potential to ameliorate...... and/or reverse long-term cardiovascular disease sequelae in germ cell cancer survivors, a strong rationale exists for the promotion of exercise oncology research in this setting, in order to provide exercise recommendations for optimal germ cell cancer survivorship......., are subjected to toxicities, which individually, and synergistically, can cause physiological impairments leading to sub-clinical or clinical cardiovascular disorders (i.e. the 'multiple-hit hypothesis'). Furthermore, we discuss the efficacy and utility of structured exercise training to ameliorate treatment...

  10. Effects of exercise training with blood flow restriction on blood pressure in medicated hypertensive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Antônio Cezar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The development of non-pharmacological approaches to hypertension (HA is critical for both prevention and treatment. This study examined the hemodynamic and biochemical responses of medicated hypertensive women to resistance exercise with blood flow restriction (vascular occlusion. Twenty-three women were randomly assigned to one of three groups: High intensity strength training (n = 8; low-intensity resistance exercise with occlusion (n = 8; and control (n = 7. The first two groups underwent eight weeks of training performed twice a week, including three series of wrist flexion exercises with or without vascular occlusion. The exercised with occlusion group showed pre- to post-test reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, and double product, whereas the other groups showed no significant hemodynamic changes. In conclusion, resistance exercise during 8 weeks was effective in lowering blood pressure in medicated hypertensive subjects.

  11. Basic Training of Student’s Outdoor Club Increases Muscle Mass after Five Weeks of Exercise in Males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novie Salsabila

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aerobic and anaerobic exercises, may lead to increase muscle mass. The aim of this study was to determine the change in muscle mass during basic training of students’ outdoor club. Methods: This was an observational analytic study to college students who joined basic training of students’ outdoor club for 19 weeks. Subjects consisted of 17 male and 15 female students, measured five times consecutively by using Body Fat/Hydration monitor scale, with Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis principle. Data collection was performed five times, from February to July 2012 in Bandung. Statistical analysis was processed using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA. Results: The result in males showed the mean 43.35±3.15 on the initial measurement. The muscle mass further increased significantly after five, ten, fifteen, and nineteen weeks of exercise (43.73±3.18 (p0.05; 38.08±1.67 (p>0.05 ; 38.23±1.52 (p>0.05 ; 38.61±1.52 (p<0.05 vs 37.77±2.00 respectively. Conclusion: Basic training of student’s outdoor club increases muscle mass significantly after five weeks of exercise in males, but not in females

  12. Acute EPOC response in women to circuit training and treadmill exercise of matched oxygen consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, W A; Hawthorne, W E; Markofski, M M

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of circuit training (CT) and treadmill exercise performed at matched rates of oxygen consumption and exercise duration on elevated post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) in untrained women, while controlling for the menstrual cycle. Eight, untrained females (31.3 +/- 9.1 years; 2.04 +/- 0.26 l min(-1) estimated VO2max; BMI=24.6+/-3.9 kg/m2) volunteered to participate in the study. Testing was performed during the early follicular phase for each subject to minimize hormonal variability between tests. Subjects performed two exercise sessions approximately 28 days apart. Resting, supine energy expenditure was measured for 30 min preceding exercise and for 1 h after completion of exercise. Respiratory gas exchange data were collected continuously during rest and exercise periods via indirect calorimetry. CT consisted of three sets of eight common resistance exercises. Pre-exercise and exercise oxygen consumption was not different between testing days (P>0.05). Thus, exercise conditions were appropriately matched. Analysis of EPOC data revealed that CT resulted in a significantly higher (pEPOC period (pEPOC.

  13. CONTINUOUS MONITORING OF LACTATE DURING EXERCISE IN HUMANS USING SUBCUTANEOUS AND TRANSCUTANEOUS MICRODIALYSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEBOER, J; PLIJTERGROENDIJK, H; VISSER, KR; MOOK, GA; KORF, J

    1994-01-01

    We have evaluated the possibility of monitoring the plasma lactate concentration in human volunteers during cycle ergometer exercise using subcutaneous and transcutaneous microdialysis. In transcutaneous microdialysis, the relative increase in dialysate lactate concentration exceeded that of plasma

  14. CONTINUOUS MONITORING OF LACTATE DURING EXERCISE IN HUMANS USING SUBCUTANEOUS AND TRANSCUTANEOUS MICRODIALYSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEBOER, J; PLIJTERGROENDIJK, H; VISSER, KR; MOOK, GA; KORF, J

    1994-01-01

    We have evaluated the possibility of monitoring the plasma lactate concentration in human volunteers during cycle ergometer exercise using subcutaneous and transcutaneous microdialysis. In transcutaneous microdialysis, the relative increase in dialysate lactate concentration exceeded that of plasma

  15. ISOMETRIC EXERCISE AND ITS EFFECT ON BLOOD PRESSURE AND HEART RATE, BEFORE AND AFTER TRAINING IN YOUNG HEALTHY MALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Isometric exercise is a normal part of everyday activities and many occupational tasks. Preventive services are important as they give physicians an opportunity and responsibility to promote regular physical activity, reduc e high blood pressure, and help in weight control. Physical inactivity is recognized as a risk factor for coronary artery disease. Regular aerobic physical activity increases exercise capacity and plays a role in both primary and secondary prevention of ca rdiovascular disease. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of isometric handgrip training on Blood pressure and Heart rate in healthy young males in the age group of 18 - 22 years. MATERIALS AND METHOD : Study subjects consisted of 30 healthy adult males in the age group of 18 - 22 yrs. Age and sex matched adults who were not active in sports or in physical activities constituted the control group (n=30. Blood pressure and heart rate were recorded and eval uated after a defined protocol of handgrip sustained static (isometric contractions performed with the handgrip dynamometer at Rest and Post Exercise. BP and HR were recorded with the help of automated blood pressure monitor and power lab 8/30 series inst rument available in the Department of Physiology , Navodaya Medical college, Raichur. RESULTS: There was no change in Resting Blood pressure and Heart rate between the subject and control group before the training sessions. There was significant decrease in resting Blood pressure and Heart rate in trained subject group when compared to untrained control group after 5 weeks of training sessions. CONCLUSION : Isometric hand grip training is effective in lowering arterial pressure in normotensive subjects. Isome tric training may be an effective intervention in the prevention and treatment of hypertension

  16. Knee-joint proprioception during 30-day 6 degrees head-down bed rest with isotonic and isokinetic exercise training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernauer, E. M.; Walby, W. F.; Ertl, A. C.; Dempster, P. T.; Bond, M.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    To determine if daily isotonic exercise or isokinetic exercise training coupled with daily leg proprioceptive training, would influence leg proprioceptive tracking responses during bed rest (BR), 19 men (36 +/- SD 4 years, 178 +/- 7 cm, 76.8 +/- 7.8 kg) were allocated into a no-exercise (NOE) training control group (n = 5), and isotonic exercise (ITE, n = 7) and isokinetic exercise (IKE, n = 7) training groups. Exercise training was conducted during BR for two 30-min periods.d-1, 5 d.week-1. Only the IKE group performed proprioceptive training using a new isokinetic procedure with each lower extremity for 2.5 min before and after the daily exercise training sessions; proprioceptive testing occurred weekly for all groups. There were no significant differences in proprioceptive tracking scores, expressed as a percentage of the perfect score of 100, in the pre-BR ambulatory control period between the three groups. Knee extension and flexion tracking responses were unchanged with NOE during BR, but were significantly greater (*p proprioceptive tracking was unchanged during BR with NOE, both isotonic exercise training (without additional proprioceptive training) and especially isokinetic exercise training when combined with daily proprioceptive training, significantly improved knee proprioceptive tracking responses after 30 d of BR.

  17. Endurance Exercise Training Reduces Cardiac Sodium/Calcium Exchanger Expression in Animals Susceptible to Ventricular Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica eKukielka

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Increased sodium/calcium exchanger activity (NCX1, an important regulator of cardiomyocyte cystolic calcium may provoke arrhythmias. Exercise training can decrease NCX1 expression in animals with heart failure improving cytosolic calcium regulation, and could thereby reduce the risk for ventricular fibrillation (VF. Methods: To test this hypothesis, a 2-min coronary occlusion was made during the last min. of exercise in dogs with healed myocardial infarctions; 23 had VF (S, susceptible and 13 did not (R, resistant. The animals were randomly assigned to either 10-wk exercise training (progressively increasing treadmill running (S n = 9; R n = 8 or 10-wk sedentary (S n = 14; R n = 5 groups. At the end of the 10-wk period, the exercise + ischemia test provoked VF in sedentary but not trained susceptible dogs. On a subsequent day, cardiac tissue was harvested and NCX1 protein expression was determined by Western blot. Results: In the sedentary group, NCX1 expression was significantly (ANOVA, P<0.05 higher in susceptible compared to resistant dogs. In contrast, NCX1 levels were similar in the exercise trained resistant and susceptible animals. Conclusion: These data suggest that exercise training can restore a more normal NCX1 level in dogs susceptible to ventricular fibrillation, improving cystolic calcium regulation and could thereby reduce the risk for sudden death following myocardial infarction.

  18. Effects of eight weeks of exercise training and orlistat therapy on body composition and maximal exercise capacity in obese females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcelik, O; Dogan, H; Kelestimur, H

    2006-01-01

    A comparative assessment was made of the short-term effects of orlistat therapy and exercise training on body composition and aerobic fitness in obese females. A total of 24 obese patients were enrolled in to the study; 12 received orlistat therapy (DO) and 12 participated in a regular aerobic exercise-training programme (DE). All patients were on hypocaloric diets. Each patient performed three incremental ramp exercise tests (one at Week 0, one at the end of Week 4 and one at the end of Week 8) to exhaustion using an electromagnetically braked cycle ergometer to determine their anaerobic threshold and maximal exercise (Wmax) capacity. Patients in the DE group performed continuous exercise at a work rate that corresponded to the anaerobic threshold. Weight loss and loss of fat mass after 8 weeks were -6.4% (P=0.002) and -13.4% (DE) vs -5.8% (P=0.002) and -6.4% (P=0.008) (DO), respectively. Wmax capacity was 90.8+/-5 W (basal) vs 92.9+/-5 W (Week 4, P=0.1) and 100.4+/-6 W (Week 8, 10.5%, P=0.04) in the DO group, and 96.2+/-6 W (basal) vs 129.1+/-4 W (Week 4, 34.1%, P=0.002) and 137.5+/-5 W(Week 8, 42.9%, P=0.002) in the DE group. Despite similar decreases in body weight in both groups, patients in the DE group achieved a markedly higher level of Wmax, reflecting a better improvement in cardiopulmonary fitness, compared with patients in the DO group. Considering the improvement of aerobic fitness in the short term, an aerobic exercise-training programme should be considered for sedentary obese patients to improve their aerobic fitness and thereby reduce the negative outcomes of obesity.

  19. High-intensity interval training evokes larger serum BDNF levels compared with intense continuous exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saucedo Marquez, Cinthia Maria; Vanaudenaerde, Bart; Troosters, Thierry; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2015-12-15

    Exercise can have a positive effect on the brain by activating brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-related processes. In healthy humans there appears to be a linear relationship between exercise intensity and the positive short-term effect of acute exercise on BDNF levels (i.e., the highest BDNF levels are reported after high-intensity exercise protocols). Here we performed two experiments to test the effectiveness of two high-intensity exercise protocols, both known to improve cardiovascular health, to determine whether they have a similar efficacy in affecting BDNF levels. Participants performed a continuous exercise (CON) protocol at 70% of maximal work rate and a high-intensity interval-training (HIT) protocol at 90% of maximal work rate for periods of 1 min alternating with 1 min of rest (both protocols lasted 20 min). We observed similar BDNF kinetics in both protocols, with maximal BDNF concentrations being reached toward the end of training (experiment 1). We then showed that both exercise protocols significantly increase BDNF levels compared with a rest condition (CON P = 0.04; HIT P exercise are slightly more effective than continuous high-intensity exercise for elevating serum BDNF. Additionally, 73% of the participants preferred the HIT protocol (P = 0.02). Therefore, we suggest that the HIT protocol might represent an effective and preferred intervention for elevating BDNF levels and potentially promoting brain health.

  20. Acute and training effects of resistance exercise on heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsley, J Derek; Figueroa, Arturo

    2016-05-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) has been used as a non-invasive method to evaluate heart rate (HR) regulation by the parasympathetic and sympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system. In this review, we discuss the effect of resistance exercise both acutely and after training on HRV in healthy individuals and in those with diseases characterized by autonomic dysfunction, such as hypertension and fibromyalgia. HR recovery after exercise is influenced by parasympathetic reactivation and sympathetic recovery to resting levels. Therefore, examination of HRV in response to acute exercise yields valuable insight into autonomic cardiovascular modulation and possible underlying risk for disease. Acute resistance exercise has shown to decrease cardiac parasympathetic modulation more than aerobic exercise in young healthy adults suggesting an increased risk for cardiovascular dysfunction after resistance exercise. Resistance exercise training appears to have no effect on resting HRV in healthy young adults, while it may improve parasympathetic modulation in middle-aged adults with autonomic dysfunction. Acute resistance exercise appears to decrease parasympathetic activity regardless of age. This review examines the acute and chronic effects of resistance exercise on HRV in young and older adults. © 2014 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Effect of exercise and training on phospholemman phosphorylation in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benziane, Boubacar; Widegren, Ulrika; Pirkmajer, Sergej; Henriksson, Jan; Stepto, Nigel K; Chibalin, Alexander V

    2011-09-01

    Phospholemman (PLM, FXYD1) is a partner protein and regulator of the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase (Na(+)-K(+) pump). We explored the impact of acute and short-term training exercise on PLM physiology in human skeletal muscle. A group of moderately trained males (n = 8) performed a 1-h acute bout of exercise by utilizing a one-legged cycling protocol. Muscle biopsies were taken from vastus lateralis at 0 and 63 min (non-exercised leg) and 30 and 60 min (exercised leg). In a group of sedentary males (n = 9), we determined the effect of a 10-day intense aerobic cycle training on Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase subunit expression, PLM phosphorylation, and total PLM expression as well as PLM phosphorylation in response to acute exercise (1 h at ∼72% Vo(2peak)). Biopsies were taken at rest, immediately following, and 3 h after an acute exercise bout before and at the conclusion of the 10-day training study. PLM phosphorylation was increased both at Ser(63) and Ser(68) immediately after acute exercise (75%, P PLM phosphorylation at Ser(63) and Ser(68), nor was the total amount of PLM altered posttraining. The protein expressions of α(1)-, α(2)-,and β(1)-subunits of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase were increased after training (113%, P PLM on Ser(63) and Ser(68), and data from one-legged cycling indicate that this effect of exercise on PLM phosphorylation is not due to systemic factors. Our results provide evidence that phosphorylation of PLM may play a role in the acute regulation of the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase response to exercise.

  2. No Effect of Exercise Intensity on Appetite in Highly-Trained Endurance Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Stephanie M; Hand, Taryn M; Larson-Meyer, D Enette; Austin, Kathleen J; Alexander, Brenda M; Manore, Melinda M

    2016-04-18

    In endurance-trained men, an acute bout of exercise is shown to suppress post-exercise appetite, yet limited research has examined this response in women. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of exercise intensity on appetite and gut hormone responses in endurance-trained women. Highly-trained women (n = 15, 18-40 years, 58.4 ± 6.4 kg, VO2MAX = 55.2 ± 4.3 mL/kg/min) completed isocaloric bouts (500 kcals or 2093 kJ) of moderate-intensity (MIE, 60% VO2MAX) and high-intensity (HIE, 85% VO2MAX) treadmill running at the same time of day, following a similar 48-h diet/exercise period, and at least 1-week apart. Blood was drawn pre-exercise (baseline), immediately post-exercise and every 20-min for the next 60-min. Plasma concentrations of acylated ghrelin, PYY3-36, GLP-1 and subjective appetite ratings via visual analog scale (VAS) were assessed at each time point. Acylated ghrelin decreased (p = 0.014) and PYY3-36 and GLP-1 increased (p = 0.036, p appetite suppression. VAS ratings of hunger and desire to eat decreased immediately post-exercise (p = 0.0012, p = 0.0031, respectively), also indicating appetite suppression. There were no differences between exercise intensities for appetite hormones or VAS. Similar to males, post-exercise appetite regulatory hormones were altered toward suppression in highly-trained women and independent of energy cost of exercise. Results are important for female athletes striving to optimize nutrition for endurance performance.

  3. The lung cancer exercise training study: a randomized trial of aerobic training, resistance training, or both in postsurgical lung cancer patients: rationale and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crawford Jeffrey

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Lung Cancer Exercise Training Study (LUNGEVITY is a randomized trial to investigate the efficacy of different types of exercise training on cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2peak, patient-reported outcomes, and the organ components that govern VO2peak in post-operative non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients. Methods/Design Using a single-center, randomized design, 160 subjects (40 patients/study arm with histologically confirmed stage I-IIIA NSCLC following curative-intent complete surgical resection at Duke University Medical Center (DUMC will be potentially eligible for this trial. Following baseline assessments, eligible participants will be randomly assigned to one of four conditions: (1 aerobic training alone, (2 resistance training alone, (3 the combination of aerobic and resistance training, or (4 attention-control (progressive stretching. The ultimate goal for all exercise training groups will be 3 supervised exercise sessions per week an intensity above 70% of the individually determined VO2peak for aerobic training and an intensity between 60 and 80% of one-repetition maximum for resistance training, for 30-45 minutes/session. Progressive stretching will be matched to the exercise groups in terms of program length (i.e., 16 weeks, social interaction (participants will receive one-on-one instruction, and duration (30-45 mins/session. The primary study endpoint is VO2peak. Secondary endpoints include: patient-reported outcomes (PROs (e.g., quality of life, fatigue, depression, etc. and organ components of the oxygen cascade (i.e., pulmonary function, cardiac function, skeletal muscle function. All endpoints will be assessed at baseline and postintervention (16 weeks. Substudies will include genetic studies regarding individual responses to an exercise stimulus, theoretical determinants of exercise adherence, examination of the psychological mediators of the exercise - PRO relationship, and exercise-induced changes

  4. 40 CFR 112.21 - Facility response training and drills/exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Facility response training and drills/exercises. 112.21 Section 112.21 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS OIL POLLUTION PREVENTION Response Requirements § 112.21 Facility response training and...

  5. VO2 Max in Variable Type Exercise Among Well-Trained Upper Body Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Douglas R.; Mullin, John P.

    1982-01-01

    The maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max) of well-trained upper body athletes was compared to that of untrained individuals in four types of exercise: arm cranking, legs only cycling, graded treadmill running, and combined arm cranking and leg cycling. Results of the study showed that well-trained upper body athletes attained a significantly higher…

  6. Baroreflex deficit blunts exercise training-induced cardiovascular and autonomic adaptations in hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes-Silva, I C; De La Fuente, R N; Mostarda, C; Rosa, K; Flues, K; Damaceno-Rodrigues, N R; Caldini, E G; De Angelis, K; Krieger, E M; Irigoyen, M C

    2010-03-01

    1. Baroreceptors regulate moment-to-moment blood pressure (BP) variations, but their long-term effect on the cardiovascular system remains unclear. Baroreceptor deficit accompanying hypertension contributes to increased BP variability (BPV) and sympathetic activity, whereas exercise training has been associated with an improvement in these baroreflex-mediated changes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the autonomic, haemodynamic and cardiac morphofunctional effects of long-term sinoaortic baroreceptor denervation (SAD) in trained and sedentary spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). 2. Rats were subjected to SAD or sham surgery and were then further divided into sedentary and trained groups. Exercise training was performed on a treadmill (five times per week, 50-70% maximal running speed). All groups were studied after 10 weeks. 3. Sinoaortic baroreceptor denervation in SHR had no effect on basal heart rate (HR) or BP, but did augment BPV, impairing the cardiac function associated with increased cardiac hypertrophy and collagen deposition. Exercise training reduced BP and HR, re-established baroreflex sensitivity and improved both HR variability and BPV. However, SAD in trained SHR blunted all these improvements. Moreover, the systolic and diastolic hypertensive dysfunction, reduced left ventricular chamber diameter and increased cardiac collagen deposition seen in SHR were improved after the training protocol. These benefits were attenuated in trained SAD SHR. 4. In conclusion, the present study has demonstrated that the arterial baroreflex mediates cardiac disturbances associated with hypertension and is crucial for the beneficial cardiovascular morphofunctional and autonomic adaptations induced by chronic exercise in hypertension.

  7. The effect of training on cardiovascular responses to arm exercise in individuals with tetraplegia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopman, M T; Dallmeijer, A J; Snoek, G; van der Woude, L H

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the physiological responses to maximal and submaximal arm-cranking exercise in 21 individuals with tetraplegia (TP) and to evaluate the effect of a 3 and 6-month training period (mean frequency of 1.5 h.week-1, mean intensity at 35% of the training time above

  8. The influence of training characteristics on the effect of aerobic exercise training in patients with chronic heart failure: A meta-regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vromen, T; Kraal, J J; Kuiper, J; Spee, R F; Peek, N; Kemps, H M

    2016-04-01

    Although aerobic exercise training has shown to be an effective treatment for chronic heart failure patients, there has been a debate about the design of training programs and which training characteristics are the strongest determinants of improvement in exercise capacity. Therefore, we performed a meta-regression analysis to determine a ranking of the individual effect of the training characteristics on the improvement in exercise capacity of an aerobic exercise training program in chronic heart failure patients. We focused on four training characteristics; session frequency, session duration, training intensity and program length, and their product; total energy expenditure. A systematic literature search was performed for randomized controlled trials comparing continuous aerobic exercise training with usual care. Seventeen unique articles were included in our analysis. Total energy expenditure appeared the only training characteristic with a significant effect on improvement in exercise capacity. However, the results were strongly dominated by one trial (HF-action trial), accounting for 90% of the total patient population and showing controversial results compared to other studies. A repeated analysis excluding the HF-action trial confirmed that the increase in exercise capacity is primarily determined by total energy expenditure, followed by session frequency, session duration and session intensity. These results suggest that the design of a training program requires high total energy expenditure as a main goal. Increases in training frequency and session duration appear to yield the largest improvement in exercise capacity.

  9. High-intensity exercise training produces morphological and biochemical changes in adrenal gland of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartalucci, A; Ferrucci, M; Fulceri, F; Lazzeri, G; Lenzi, P; Toti, L; Serpiello, F R; La Torre, A; Gesi, M

    2012-06-01

    The effects of training are dependent on complex, adaptive changes which are induced by acute physical exercise at different levels. In particular, evidence shows that the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenocortical axis, as well as the sympatho-adrenomedullary system, is mainly involved in mediating the physiological effects of physical exercise. The aim of the present study was to investigate, through a morphological and biochemical approach, the effects of training on the adrenal gland of mice, following two different protocols consisting of either low- or high-intensity training. Mice were run daily on a motorised treadmill for 8 weeks, at a velocity corresponding to 60% (low-intensity exercise) or 90% (high-intensity exercise) of the maximal running velocity previously determined by an incremental exercise test. We found that physical exercise produced an increase in the adrenal gland size compared with the control (sedentary) mice. The increase was 31.04% for mice that underwent high-intensity exercise and 10.08% for mice that underwent low intensity exercise, and this appeared to be the result of an increase in the area of both the adrenal cortex and adrenal medulla. Morphological analysis of the adrenal cortex showed that both types of exercise produced an increase in cytoplasmic vacuoles in steroidogenic cells, appearing more abundant after high-intensity exercise. No change was found in the reticulate zone. In the adrenal medulla, despite the absence of morphological changes, immunohistochemistry for tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine β-hydroxylase and phenyl-ethanolamine-N-methyltransferase demonstrated an increased immunopositivity for these cathecolamine-synthesizing enzymes after intense exercise. These results were confirmed by immunoblot accompanied by densitometric analysis.

  10. The influence of specific training on trunk muscle recruitment patterns in healthy subjects during stabilization exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Veerle K; Coorevits, Pascal L; Bouche, Katie G; Mahieu, Nele N; Vanderstraeten, Guy G; Danneels, Lieven A

    2007-08-01

    Low back pain is a major problem involving high medical costs, therefore effective prevention strategies are essential. Stabilization exercises seem to facilitate the neuromuscular control of the lumbar spine and may be useful in prevention programs. To investigate whether specific lumbar stabilization training has an effect on muscle recruitment patterns in a healthy population, in the present study 30 subjects were recruited to perform two types of testing exercises, i.e. bridging exercises and exercises in four-point kneeling, both before and after training. Surface electromyographic data of different abdominal and back muscles were obtained. After training, analysis of the relative muscle activity levels (percentage of maximal voluntary isometric contraction) showed a higher activity of the local (segmental-stabilizing) abdominal muscles, but not of the local back muscles; minimal changes in global (torque-producing) muscle activity also occurred. Analysis of the local/global relative muscle activity ratios revealed higher ratios during all exercises after training, although not all differences were significant. These results indicate that muscle recruitment patterns can be changed in healthy subjects by means of a training program that focuses on neuromuscular control. Additional studies are needed to evaluate this type of training as a prevention strategy.

  11. Imbalance in SOD/CAT activities in rat skeletal muscles submitted to treadmill training exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Ricardo A; Andrades, Michael E; Oliveira, Marcos R; Pirola, Aline C; Zago, Morgana S; Silveira, Paulo C L; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Moreira, José Cláudio F

    2006-10-01

    The association between physical exercise and oxidative damage in the skeletal musculature has been the focus of many studies in literature, but the balance between superoxide dismutase and catalase activities and its relation to oxidative damage is not well established. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the association between regular treadmill physical exercise, oxidative damage and antioxidant defenses in skeletal muscle of rats. Fifteen male Wistar rats (8-12 months) were randomly separated into two groups (trained n=9 and untrained n=6). Trained rats were treadmill-trained for 12 weeks in progressive exercise (velocity, time, and inclination). Training program consisted in a progressive exercise (10 m/min without inclination for 10 min/day). After 1 week the speed, time and inclination were gradually increased until 17 m/min at 10% for 50 min/day. After the training period animals were killed, and gastrocnemius and quadriceps were surgically removed to the determination of biochemical parameters. Lipid peroxidation, protein oxidative damage, catalase, superoxide dismutase and citrate synthase activities, and muscular glycogen content were measured in the isolated muscles. We demonstrated that there is a different modulation of CAT and SOD in skeletal muscle in trained rats when compared to untrained rats (increased SOD/CAT ratio). TBARS levels were significantly decreased and, in contrast, a significant increase in protein carbonylation was observed. These results suggest a non-described adaptation of skeletal muscle against exercise-induced oxidative stress.

  12. Review: Multiple sclerosis and physical exercise: recommendations for the application of resistance-, endurance- and combined training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgas, U; Stenager, E; Ingemann-Hansen, T

    2008-01-01

    This review summarizes the existing knowledge regarding the effects of physical exercise in patients suffering from multiple sclerosis (MS). Furthermore, recommendations are given regarding exercise prescription for MS patients and for future study directions. Previously, MS patients were advised...... not to participate in physical exercise. During recent years, it has been increasingly acknowledged that exercise benefits MS patients. The requirement for exercise in MS patients is emphasized by their physiological profile, which probably reflects both the effects of the disease per se and the reversible effects...... of an inactive lifestyle. To date the effects of exercise have only been studied in moderately impaired MS patients with an EDSS score of less than 7. Evidence exists for recommending participation in endurance training at low to moderate intensity, as the existing literature demonstrates that MS patients can...

  13. Randomized controlled trial using bosentan to enhance the impact of exercise training in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, T.H.A.; Duncker, D.J.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Thijssen, D.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    In type 2 diabetes patients, endothelin (ET) receptor blockade may enhance blood flow responses to exercise training. The combination of exercise training and ET receptor blockade may represent a more potent stimulus than training alone to improve vascular function, physical fitness and glucose home

  14. Swim training does not protect mice from skeletal muscle oxidative damage following a maximum exercise test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, Tatiane Oliveira; Cleto, Lorena Sabino; Gioda, Carolina Rosa; Silva, Renata Sabino; Campi-Azevedo, Ana Carolina; de Sousa-Franco, Junia; de Magalhães, José Carlos; Penaforte, Claudia Lopes; Pinto, Kelerson Mauro de Castro; Cruz, Jader dos Santos; Rocha-Vieira, Etel

    2012-07-01

    We investigated whether swim training protects skeletal muscle from oxidative damage in response to a maximum progressive exercise. First, we investigated the effect of swim training on the activities of the antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), in the gastrocnemius muscle of C57Bl/6 mice, 48 h after the last training session. Mice swam for 90 min, twice a day, for 5 weeks at 31°C (± 1°C). The activities of SOD and CAT were increased in trained mice (P swim test. Compared to control mice (untrained, not acutely exercised), malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were increased in the skeletal muscle of both trained and untrained mice after maximum swim. The activity of GPx was increased in the skeletal muscle of both trained and untrained mice, while SOD activity was increased only in trained mice after maximum swimming. CAT activity was increased only in the untrained compared to the control group. Although the trained mice showed increased activity of citrate synthase in skeletal muscle, swim performance was not different compared to untrained mice. Our results show an imbalance in the activities of SOD, CAT and GPx in response to swim training, which could account for the oxidative damage observed in the skeletal muscle of trained mice in response to maximum swim, resulting in the absence of improved exercise performance.

  15. Moderate exercise training modulates cytokine profile and sleep in elderly people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, R V T; Viana, V A R; Boscolo, R A; Marques, V G; Santana, M G; Lira, F S; Tufik, S; de Mello, M T

    2012-12-01

    Aging causes several physiological alterations, including alterations in sleep. It is possible that difficulty sleeping can be exacerbated by increased inflammation in older individuals. Moderate exercise training may be a modality of non-pharmacological treatment for sleep disorders and inflammation. We aimed to assess the effects of moderate exercise training on sleep in elderly people as well as their cytokine profiles. Additionally, we examined the effect of exercise training on quality of life parameters using a SF-36 questionnaire. Twenty-two male, sedentary, healthy, elderly volunteers performed moderate training for 60 min/day, 3 days/week for 24 week at a work rate equivalent to their ventilatory aerobic threshold. The environment was kept at a temperature of 23 ± 2°C, with a humidity of 60 ± 5%. Blood and polysomnograph were collected twice: at baseline (1 week before training began) and after 6 months of training. Training increased aerobic capacity parameters (pexercise training was shown to improve quality of life parameters. Our results suggest that 6 months of training can improve sleep in the elderly and is related to the anti-inflammatory effect of moderate training, which modifies cytokine profiles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Does exercise training affect resting metabolic rate in adolescents with obesity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberga, Angela S; Prud'homme, Denis; Sigal, Ronald J; Goldfield, Gary S; Hadjiyannakis, Stasia; Gougeon, Réjeanne; Phillips, Penny; Malcolm, Janine; Wells, George A; Doucette, Steve; Ma, Jinhui; Kenny, Glen P

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the hypothesis that resistance exercise training performed alone or in combination with aerobic exercise training would increase resting metabolic rate (RMR) relative to aerobic-only and nonexercising control groups. Postpubertal adolescents (N = 304) aged 14-18 years with obesity (body mass index (BMI) ≥ 95th percentile) or overweight (BMI ≥ 85th percentile + additional diabetes risk factor(s)) were randomized to 4 groups for 22 weeks: Aerobic exercise training, Resistance exercise training, Combined aerobic and resistance exercise training, or Control. All participants received dietary counselling targeting a daily energy deficit of 250 kcal. RMR was measured by indirect calorimetry and body composition by magnetic resonance imaging. There was no significant change in RMR in any group, in spite of significant within-group increases in fat-free mass in the Aerobic, Resistance, and Combined exercise training groups. RMR at baseline and 6 months were Aerobic: 1972 ± 38 and 1990 ± 41; Resistance: 2024 ± 37 and 1992 ± 41; Combined: 2023 ± 38 and 1995 ± 38; Control: 2075 ± 38 and 2073 ± 39 kcal/day (p > 0.05). There were no between-group differences in RMR after adjustment for total body weight or fat-free mass between groups over time. Per-protocol analyses including only participants with ≥70% adherence, and analyses stratified by sex, also showed no within- or between-group differences in RMR. In conclusion, despite an increase in fat-free mass in all exercise groups, 6 months of aerobic, resistance, or combined training with modest dietary restriction did not increase RMR compared with diet only in adolescents with obesity.

  17. One-legged endurance training: leg blood flow and oxygen extraction during cycling exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rud, B; Foss, O; Krustrup, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Aim: As a consequence of enhanced local vascular conductance, perfusion of muscles increases with exercise intensity to suffice the oxygen demand. However, when maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2) max) and cardiac output are approached, the increase in conductance is blunted. Endurance training increases...... muscle metabolic capacity, but to what extent that affects the regulation of muscle vascular conductance during exercise is unknown. Methods: Seven weeks of one-legged endurance training was carried out by twelve subjects. Pulmonary VO(2) during cycling and one-legged cycling was tested before and after...... training, while VO(2) of the trained leg (TL) and control leg (CL) during cycling was determined after training. Results: VO(2) max for cycling was unaffected by training, although one-legged VO(2) max became 6.7 (2.3)% (mean ± SE) larger with TL than with CL. Also TL citrate synthase activity was higher...

  18. Exercise Training and Weight Gain in Obese Pregnant Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial (ETIP Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsti Krohn Garnæs

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of exercise training for preventing excessive gestational weight gain (GWG and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM is still uncertain. As maternal obesity is associated with both GWG and GDM, there is a special need to assess whether prenatal exercise training programs provided to obese women reduce the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. Our primary aim was to assess whether regular supervised exercise training in pregnancy could reduce GWG in women with prepregnancy overweight/obesity. Secondary aims were to examine the effects of exercise in pregnancy on 30 outcomes including GDM incidence, blood pressure, blood measurements, skinfold thickness, and body composition.This was a single-center study where we randomized (1:1 91 pregnant women with a prepregnancy body mass index (BMI ≥ 28 kg/m2 to exercise training (n = 46 or control (standard maternity care (n = 45. Assessments were done at baseline (pregnancy week 12-18 and in late pregnancy (week 34-37, as well as at delivery. The exercise group was offered thrice weekly supervised sessions of 35 min of moderate intensity endurance exercise and 25 min of strength training. Seventeen women were lost to follow-up (eight in the exercise group and nine in the control group. Our primary endpoint was GWG from baseline testing to delivery. The principal analyses were done as intention-to-treat analyses, with supplementary per protocol analyses where we assessed outcomes in the women who adhered to the exercise program (n = 19 compared to the control group. Mean GWG from baseline to delivery was 10.5 kg in the exercise group and 9.2 kg in the control group, with a mean difference of 0.92 kg (95% CI -1.35, 3.18; p = 0.43. Among the 30 secondary outcomes in late pregnancy, an apparent reduction was recorded in the incidence of GDM (2009 WHO definition in the exercise group (2 cases; 6.1% compared to the control group (9 cases; 27.3%, with an odds ratio of 0.1 (95% CI 0.02, 0.95; p = 0

  19. Monitoring markers of muscle damage during a 3 week periodized drop-jump exercise programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamandulis, Sigitas; Skurvydas, Albertas; Snieckus, Audrius;

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine changes in indirect markers of muscle damage during 3 weeks of stretch-shortening exercise with a progressively increasing load and continued modulation of various key training variables. Eight healthy untrained men performed a drop-jump programme involving a ......-stimulation-evoked torque decreased acutely after each training session relative to pre-exercise values (P ......The aim of this study was to examine changes in indirect markers of muscle damage during 3 weeks of stretch-shortening exercise with a progressively increasing load and continued modulation of various key training variables. Eight healthy untrained men performed a drop-jump programme involving...... a progressive increase in load impact with respect to the number of jumps performed, drop (platform) height, squat depth amplitude, and addition of weights. Maximal concentric and isometric knee extensor strength were assessed immediately before and 10 min after each training session. Voluntary and 100 Hz...

  20. Monitoring muscle damage markers during a four-week downhill walking exercise program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Coelho Rabello de Lima

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Eccentric-based exercise is known to induce muscle damage (MD. The purpose of this study was to investigate effect of downhill walking (DW sessions on MD and aerobic markers in young adults. Eight male subjects were submitted to a 4-week DW periodized exercise program. Subjects' soreness (SOR was assessed each training day. Serum creatine quinase activity (CK was collected before the first training session, and at the end of each of the four weeks. Oxygen uptake (VO2 and perceived exertion (PE were assessed during the last training session every week. Increases in SOR were found only at the third and fourth training days. Increased CK concentration was found at the third training week. No significant increases in VO2 and PE were found throughout the program. We concluded that DW sessions elicit significant MD, but not enough to impair it in further sessions. Therefore, DW can be used as a training protocol following proper periodization.

  1. Exercise Therapy for Management of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Superior Efficacy of Activity Monitors over Pedometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezono, Tomoya; Fukagawa, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    We compared the efficacy of activity monitor (which displays exercise intensity and number of steps) versus that of pedometer in exercise therapy for patients with type 2 diabetes. The study subjects were divided into the activity monitor group (n = 92) and pedometer group (n = 95). The primary goal was improvement in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). The exercise target was set at 8,000 steps/day and 20 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise (≥3.5 metabolic equivalents). The activity monitor is equipped with a triple-axis accelerometer sensor capable of measuring medium-intensity walking duration, number of steps, walking distance, calorie consumption, and total calorie consumption. The pedometer counts the number of steps. Blood samples for laboratory tests were obtained during the visits. The first examination was conducted at the start of the study and repeated at 2 and 6 months. A significant difference in the decrease in HbA1c level was observed between the two groups at 2 months. The results suggest that the use of activity level monitor that displays information on exercise intensity, in addition to the number of steps, is useful in exercise therapy as it enhances the concept of exercise therapy and promotes lowering of HbA1c in diabetic patients. PMID:27761471

  2. Exercise Therapy for Management of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Superior Efficacy of Activity Monitors over Pedometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Miyauchi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We compared the efficacy of activity monitor (which displays exercise intensity and number of steps versus that of pedometer in exercise therapy for patients with type 2 diabetes. The study subjects were divided into the activity monitor group (n=92 and pedometer group (n=95. The primary goal was improvement in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c. The exercise target was set at 8,000 steps/day and 20 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise (≥3.5 metabolic equivalents. The activity monitor is equipped with a triple-axis accelerometer sensor capable of measuring medium-intensity walking duration, number of steps, walking distance, calorie consumption, and total calorie consumption. The pedometer counts the number of steps. Blood samples for laboratory tests were obtained during the visits. The first examination was conducted at the start of the study and repeated at 2 and 6 months. A significant difference in the decrease in HbA1c level was observed between the two groups at 2 months. The results suggest that the use of activity level monitor that displays information on exercise intensity, in addition to the number of steps, is useful in exercise therapy as it enhances the concept of exercise therapy and promotes lowering of HbA1c in diabetic patients.

  3. Pre-Sleep Protein Ingestion to Improve the Skeletal Muscle Adaptive Response to Exercise Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trommelen, Jorn; van Loon, Luc J C

    2016-11-28

    Protein ingestion following resistance-type exercise stimulates muscle protein synthesis rates, and enhances the skeletal muscle adaptive response to prolonged resistance-type exercise training. As the adaptive response to a single bout of resistance exercise extends well beyond the first couple of hours of post-exercise recovery, recent studies have begun to investigate the impact of the timing and distribution of protein ingestion during more prolonged recovery periods. Recent work has shown that overnight muscle protein synthesis rates are restricted by the level of amino acid availability. Protein ingested prior to sleep is effectively digested and absorbed, and thereby stimulates muscle protein synthesis rates during overnight recovery. When applied during a prolonged period of resistance-type exercise training, protein supplementation prior to sleep can further augment gains in muscle mass and strength. Recent studies investigating the impact of pre-sleep protein ingestion suggest that at least 40 g of protein is required to display a robust increase in muscle protein synthesis rates throughout overnight sleep. Furthermore, prior exercise allows more of the pre-sleep protein-derived amino acids to be utilized for de novo muscle protein synthesis during sleep. In short, pre-sleep protein ingestion represents an effective dietary strategy to improve overnight muscle protein synthesis, thereby improving the skeletal muscle adaptive response to exercise training.

  4. Early Exercise Training After Renal Transplantation and Asymmetric Dimethylarginine: The Effect of Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimír Teplan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: To assess, in a prospective cohort study of 238 renal transplant patients, our hypothesis that elevated ADMA levels may be influenced by physical exercise and obesity. Methods: Blood samples before and after six months were obtained from 116 transplant patients participating in an aerobic exercise (Group I. A control group consisted of 122 matched transplant patients who did not exercise regularly (Group II. Results: There were no significant differences in ADMA levels between both groups before the training program (Group IB vs Group IIB. After six months of exercise, ADMA levels in Group I decreased (Group IB vs Group IA : 3.50 ± 0.45 vs 2.11 ± 0.35μmol/L; pA vs Group IIA : 2 11 ± 0 23 vs 3 25 ± 0 34μmol/L; p2 confirmed a smaller effect of exercise training (Group IBO vs Group IAO : 3 75 ± 0 52 vs 3 45 ± 0 45; pAO vs Group IIAO : 3.45 ± 0.45 vs 3.74 ± 0.62; p1C, insulin, and systolic BP were also affected by the training program. Conclusion: Elevated ADMA levels were significantly decreased by early exercise after renal transplantation. The effect of exercise was smaller in obese patients.

  5. Voluntary Exercise Training: Analysis of Mice in Uninjured, Inflammatory, and Nerve-Injured Pain States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayler D Sheahan

    Full Text Available Both clinical and animal studies suggest that exercise may be an effective way to manage inflammatory and neuropathic pain conditions. However, existing animal studies commonly use forced exercise paradigms that incorporate varying degrees of stress, which itself can elicit analgesia, and thus may complicate the interpretation of the effects of exercise on pain. We investigated the analgesic potential of voluntary wheel running in the formalin model of acute inflammatory pain and the spared nerve injury model of neuropathic pain in mice. In uninjured, adult C57BL/6J mice, 1 to 4 weeks of exercise training did not alter nociceptive thresholds, lumbar dorsal root ganglia neuronal excitability, or hindpaw intraepidermal innervation. Further, exercise training failed to attenuate formalin-induced spontaneous pain. Lastly, 2 weeks of exercise training was ineffective in reversing spared nerve injury-induced mechanical hypersensitivity or in improving muscle wasting or hindpaw denervation. These findings indicate that in contrast to rodent forced exercise paradigms, short durations of voluntary wheel running do not improve pain-like symptoms in mouse models of acute inflammation and peripheral nerve injury.

  6. Operational Applications of Autogenic Feedback Training Exercise as a Treatment for Airsickness in the Military

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebreyesus, Fiyore; Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, William B.

    2012-01-01

    Airsickness is experienced by about 50% of military aviators some time in their career. Aviators who suffer from recurrent episodes of airsickness are typically referred to the Naval Aerospace Medical Institute (NAMI) at Pensacola where they undergo extensive evaluation and 8 weeks of training in the Self-Paced Airsickness Desensitization (SPAD) program. Researchers at NASA Ames have developed an alternative mitigation training program, Autogenic Feedback Training Exercise (AFTE) that has demonstrated an 80% success rate for improving motion sickness tolerance.

  7. Exercise training combined with psychological interventions for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, Louise; Cafarella, Paul; Williams, Marie T

    2015-01-01

    Previous systematic reviews have confirmed the benefits of both exercise training and psychological interventions in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The objective of this systematic review was to examine the effect of interventions which combine exercise training and psychological interventions for a range of health outcomes in people with COPD. Database searches identified randomized controlled trials of people with COPD participating in interventions that combined exercise training with a psychological strategy compared with control (usual care, waiting list) or active comparators (education, exercise, psychological interventions alone). Health outcomes included dyspnoea, anxiety, depression, quality of life or functional exercise capacity. Standardized mean differences (SMD) were calculated for each intervention arm/control comparison. Across the 12 included studies (738 participants), compared with control conditions, SMD consistently favoured interventions which included both exercise + psychological components (SMD range dyspnoea -1.63 to -0.25; anxiety -0.50 to -0.20; depression -0.46 to -0.18; quality of life 0.09 to 1.16; functional exercise capacity 0.22 to 1.23). When compared with active comparators, SMD consistently favoured interventions that included exercise training + psychological component for dyspnoea (SMD range -0.35 to -0.97), anxiety (SMD range -0.13 to -1.00) and exercise capacity (SMD range 0.64 to 0.71) but were inconsistent for depression (-0.11 to 1.27) and quality of life (0.02 to -2.00). The magnitude of effect for most interventions was greater than the minimum required for clinical significance (i.e. > 0.32) in behavioural medicine. While interventions, outcomes and effect sizes differed substantially between studies, combining exercise training with a psychological intervention may provide a means of optimizing rehabilitation in people with COPD.

  8. Active Video Game Exercise Training Improves the Clinical Control of Asthma in Children: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelim L F D Gomes

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine whether aerobic exercise involving an active video game system improved asthma control, airway inflammation and exercise capacity in children with moderate to severe asthma.A randomized, controlled, single-blinded clinical trial was carried out. Thirty-six children with moderate to severe asthma were randomly allocated to either a video game group (VGG; N = 20 or a treadmill group (TG; n = 16. Both groups completed an eight-week supervised program with two weekly 40-minute sessions. Pre-training and post-training evaluations involved the Asthma Control Questionnaire, exhaled nitric oxide levels (FeNO, maximum exercise testing (Bruce protocol and lung function.No differences between the VGG and TG were found at the baseline. Improvements occurred in both groups with regard to asthma control and exercise capacity. Moreover, a significant reduction in FeNO was found in the VGG (p < 0.05. Although the mean energy expenditure at rest and during exercise training was similar for both groups, the maximum energy expenditure was higher in the VGG.The present findings strongly suggest that aerobic training promoted by an active video game had a positive impact on children with asthma in terms of clinical control, improvement in their exercise capacity and a reduction in pulmonary inflammation.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01438294.

  9. Do responses to exercise training in cystic fibrosis depend on initial fitness level?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, W; Orenstein, D M; Braumann, K M

    2011-12-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the responses to an exercise programme with respect to initial fitness in subjects with cystic fibrosis (CF). 72 subjects (42 female) aged 10-43 yrs (forced expiratory volume in 1 s of 62.0 ± 26.7% predicted) were included. Participants were divided into three groups based on peak oxygen uptake expressed as % predicted. Subjects participated in a multifaceted rehabilitation programme, including five-times-a-week exercise training, for 6 weeks. Exercise and ventilatory capacity were determined by a maximal incremental cycling test. Oxygen uptake, workload and peak cardiac frequency at peak and submaximal workload were used as parameters for exercise capacity and responsiveness to training. Lung function values were significantly different between groups (p fitness level. Responsiveness to training showed differences between groups (p fitness level. The improvements in exercise parameters in CF at peak and VAT depended on the fitness level at baseline, independent of lung function. These improvements seen after training were comparable with those seen in healthy subjects, suggesting that responsiveness to exercise is similar in CF and in healthy untrained persons.

  10. Whole body vibration: unsupervised training or combined with a supervised multi-purpose exercise for fitness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerenziani, Gian Pietro; Meucci, Marco; Gallotta, Maria Chiara; Buzzachera, Cosme Franklim; Guidetti, Laura; Baldari, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effect of an unsupervised whole body vibration (WBV) training and two different supervised multi-purpose exercise programmes, with and without WBV, on body composition, functional fitness and self-reported well-being in middle-aged adults. Fifty-four healthy participants (age 48.6 ± 6.7 years) were randomly assigned to a vibration group (VG), a multi-purpose exercise group (MG) and a multi-purpose exercise with vibration group (VMG) and trained 3 days a week for 4 months. VG performed a standardised unsupervised WBV protocol, MG a supervised multi-purpose exercise and VMG a multi-purpose exercise including vibration. After training, drop out was significantly higher in VG group (P = 0.016) when compared to VMG group. In both MG and VMG, body composition, sit-up, push-up, sit and reach, agility test, hopping test and self-reported general health significantly improved (P fitness and the best results in adherence could be achieved integrating WBV practice into a multi-purpose exercise training.

  11. Effects of exercise training on chronic inflammation in obesity : current evidence and potential mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Tongjian; Arsenis, Nicole C; Disanzo, Beth L; Lamonte, Michael J

    2013-04-01

    Chronic, systemic inflammation is an independent risk factor for several major clinical diseases. In obesity, circulating levels of inflammatory markers are elevated, possibly due to increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines from several tissues/cells, including macrophages within adipose tissue, vascular endothelial cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Recent evidence supports that adipose tissue hypoxia may be an important mechanism through which enlarged adipose tissue elicits local tissue inflammation and further contributes to systemic inflammation. Current evidence supports that exercise training, such as aerobic and resistance exercise, reduces chronic inflammation, especially in obese individuals with high levels of inflammatory biomarkers undergoing a longer-term intervention. Several studies have reported that this effect is independent of the exercise-induced weight loss. There are several mechanisms through which exercise training reduces chronic inflammation, including its effect on muscle tissue to generate muscle-derived, anti-inflammatory 'myokine', its effect on adipose tissue to improve hypoxia and reduce local adipose tissue inflammation, its effect on endothelial cells to reduce leukocyte adhesion and cytokine production systemically, and its effect on the immune system to lower the number of pro-inflammatory cells and reduce pro-inflammatory cytokine production per cell. Of these potential mechanisms, the effect of exercise training on adipose tissue oxygenation is worth further investigation, as it is very likely that exercise training stimulates adipose tissue angiogenesis and increases blood flow, thereby reducing hypoxia and the associated chronic inflammation in adipose tissue of obese individuals.

  12. The Effect of Exercise Training on Skeletal Muscle Glucose Transorter Isoform GLUT4 Concentration in the Obese Zucker Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-01

    NUMBERS The Effect of Exercise Training on Skeletal Muscle Glucose Transorter Isoform GLUT4 Concentration in the Obese Zucker Rat 6. AUTHOR(S) Eric A...Zr) THE EFFECT OF EXERCISE TRAINING ON SKELETAL MUSCLE GLUCOSE TRANSPORTER ISOFORM GLUT4 CONCENTRATION IN THE OBESE ZUCKER RAT by Eric Anthony Banks...laboratory for their help. Eric A. Banks v ABSTRACT THE EFFECT OF EXERCISE TRAINING ON SKELETAL MUSCLE GLUCOSE TRANSPORTER ISOFORM GLUT4 CONCENTRATION IN

  13. Elevated skeletal muscle glucose transporter levels in exercise-trained middle-aged men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houmard, J A; Egan, P C; Neufer, P D; Friedman, J E; Wheeler, W S; Israel, R G; Dohm, G L

    1991-10-01

    Exercise training has been proposed to improve whole body insulin sensitivity through a postreceptor adaptation in skeletal muscle. This study examined if levels of the insulin-responsive muscle glucose transporter protein (GLUT-4) were associated with improved insulin sensitivity in trained vs. sedentary middle-aged individuals. Muscle GLUT-4 levels and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) responses were obtained in age-matched trained and sedentary men (n = 11). Plasma insulin levels during the OGTT were significantly lower (P less than 0.01) in the trained men, whereas no differences were seen in plasma glucose responses. GLUT-4 protein content was approximately twofold higher in the trained men (2.41 +/- 0.17 vs. 1.36 +/- 0.11 micrograms standard, P less than 0.001). OGTT responses and GLUT-4 levels were not altered 15-18 h after a standard exercise bout in six representative sedentary subjects. These data suggest that GLUT-4 levels are increased in conjunction with insulin sensitivity in chronically exercise-trained middle-aged men. This finding suggests a possible mechanism for the improved insulin sensitivity observed with exercise training in humans.

  14. Do antioxidant supplements interfere with skeletal muscle adaptation to exercise training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merry, Troy L; Ristow, Michael

    2016-09-15

    A popular belief is that reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) produced during exercise by the mitochondria and other subcellular compartments ubiquitously cause skeletal muscle damage, fatigue and impair recovery. However, the importance of ROS and RNS as signals in the cellular adaptation process to stress is now evident. In an effort to combat the perceived deleterious effects of ROS and RNS it has become common practice for active individuals to ingest supplements with antioxidant properties, but interfering with ROS/RNS signalling in skeletal muscle during acute exercise may blunt favourable adaptation. There is building evidence that antioxidant supplementation can attenuate endurance training-induced and ROS/RNS-mediated enhancements in antioxidant capacity, mitochondrial biogenesis, cellular defence mechanisms and insulin sensitivity. However, this is not a universal finding, potentially indicating that there is redundancy in the mechanisms controlling skeletal muscle adaptation to exercise, meaning that in some circumstances the negative impact of antioxidants on acute exercise response can be overcome by training. Antioxidant supplementation has been more consistently reported to have deleterious effects on the response to overload stress and high-intensity training, suggesting that remodelling of skeletal muscle following resistance and high-intensity exercise is more dependent on ROS/RNS signalling. Importantly there is no convincing evidence to suggest that antioxidant supplementation enhances exercise-training adaptions. Overall, ROS/RNS are likely to exhibit a non-linear (hormetic) pattern on exercise adaptations, where physiological doses are beneficial and high exposure (which would seldom be achieved during normal exercise training) may be detrimental.

  15. Effects of Exhaustive Aerobic Exercise on Tryptophan-Kynurenine Metabolism in Trained Athletes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Strasser

    Full Text Available Exhaustive exercise can cause a transient depression of immune function. Data indicate significant effects of immune activation cascades on the biochemistry of monoamines and amino acids such as tryptophan. Tryptophan can be metabolized through different pathways, a major route being the kynurenine pathway, which is often systemically up-regulated when the immune response is activated. The present study was undertaken to examine the effect of exhaustive aerobic exercise on biomarkers of immune activation and tryptophan metabolism in trained athletes. After a standardized breakfast 2 h prior to exercise, 33 trained athletes (17 women, 16 men performed an incremental cycle ergometer exercise test at 60 rpm until exhaustion. After a 20 min rest phase, the participants performed a 20 min maximal time-trial on a cycle ergometer (RBM Cyclus 2, Germany. During the test, cyclists were strongly encouraged to choose a maximal pedalling rate that could be maintained for the respective test duration. Serum concentrations of amino acids tryptophan, kynurenine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine were determined by HPLC and immune system biomarker neopterin by ELISA at rest and immediately post exercise. Intense exercise was associated with a strong increase in neopterin concentrations (p<0.001, indicating increased immune activation following intense exercise. Exhaustive exercise significantly reduced tryptophan concentrations by 12% (p<0.001 and increased kynurenine levels by 6% (p = 0.022. Also phenylalanine to tyrosine ratios were lower after exercise as compared with baseline (p<0.001. The kynurenine to tryptophan ratio correlated with neopterin (r = 0.560, p<0.01. Thus, increased tryptophan catabolism by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase appears likely. Peak oxygen uptake correlated with baseline tryptophan and kynurenine concentrations (r = 0.562 and r = 0.511, respectively, both p<0.01. Findings demonstrate that exhaustive aerobic exercise is associated with

  16. Effect of chronic ethanol ingestion and exercise training on skeletal muscle in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, L; Ferrando, A; Voces, J; Cabral de Oliveira, C; Prieto, J G; Alvarez, A I

    2001-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the interactive effects of exercise training and chronic ethanol consumption on metabolism, capillarity, and myofibrillar composition in rat limb muscles. Male Wistar rats were treated in separate groups as follows: non exercised-control; ethanol (15%) in animals' drinking water for 12 weeks; exercise training in treadmill and ethanol administration plus exercise for 12 weeks. Ethanol administration decreased capillarity and increased piruvate kinase and lactate dehydrogenase activities in white gastrocnemius; in plantaris muscle, ethanol increased citrate synthase activity and decreased cross-sectional area of type I, IIa, and IIb fibres. Exercise increased capillarity in all four limb muscles and decreased type I fibre area in plantaris. The decreased capillarity effect induced by ethanol in some muscles, was ameliorated when alcohol was combined with exercise. While alcoholic myopathy affects predominantly type IIb fibres, ethanol administration and aerobic exercise in some cases can affect type I and type IIa fibre areas. The exercise can decrease some harmful effects produced by ethanol in the muscle, including the decrease in the fibre area and capillary density.

  17. Novel insights into cardiac remodelling revealed by proteomic analysis of the trout heart during exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dindia, Laura A; Alderman, Sarah L; Gillis, Todd E

    2017-05-24

    The changes in the cardiac proteome of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were quantified during the early phases (4, 7, and 14d) of a typical exercise-training regime to provide a comprehensive overview of the cellular changes responsible for developing a trained heart phenotype. Enhanced somatic growth during the 14d experiment was paralleled by cardiac growth to maintain relative ventricular mass. This was reflected in the cardiac proteome by the increased abundance of contractile proteins and cellular integrity proteins as early as Day 4, including a pronounced and sustained increase in blood vessel epicardial substance - an intercellular adhesion protein expressed in the vertebrate heart. An unexpected finding was that proteins involved in energy pathways, including glycolysis, β-oxidation, the TCA cycle, and the electron transport chain, were generally present at lower levels relative to Day 0 levels, suggesting a reduced investment in the maintenance of energy production pathways. However, as the fish demonstrated somatic and cardiac growth during the exercise-training program, this change did not appear to influence cardiac function. The in-depth analysis of temporal changes in the cardiac proteome of trout during the early stages of exercise training reveals novel insights into cardiac remodelling in an important model species. Rainbow trout hearts have a remarkable ability for molecular, structural, and functional plasticity, and the inherent athleticism of these fish makes them ideal models for studies in comparative exercise physiology. Indeed, several decades of research using exercise-trained trout has shown both conserved and unique aspects of cardiac plasticity induced by a sustained increase in the workload of the heart. Despite a strong appreciation for the outcome of exercise training, however, the temporal events that generate this phenotype are not known. This study interrogates the early stages of exercise training using in-depth proteomic

  18. EFFECT OF EXERCISE TRAINING OF DIFFERENT INTENSITIES ON ANTI-INFLAMMATORY REACTION IN STREPTOZOTOCIN-INDUCED DIABETIC RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.–S. Kim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the effect of high- and low-intensity exercise training on inflammatory reaction of blood and skeletal muscle in streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic male Sprague-Dawley rats (243 ± 7 g, 8 weeks. The rats completed treadmill running in either high-intensity exercise (6 weeks of exercise training, acute bouts of exercise or low-intensity exercise (6 weeks of exercise training. Non-running, sedentary rats served as controls. To induce diabetes mellitus, rats received a peritoneal injection of STZ (50 mg · kg-1. Rats were sacrificed immediately after an acute bout of exercise and 6 weeks of exercise training. Inflammatory factors were analyzed by ELISA and by immune blotting from the soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles. In the serum, inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-4 and reactive oxygen species (ROS (nitric oxide and malondialdehyde increased in diabetic rats. However, all exercise training groups displayed reduced inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species. In skeletal muscles, low-intensity exercise training, but not high intensity exercise, reduced the levels of COX-2, iNOS, and MMP-2, which were otherwise markedly elevated in the presence of STZ. Moreover, the levels of GLUT-4 and MyoD were effectively increased by different exercise intensity and exercise duration. Low-intensity exercise training appeared most effective to reduce diabetes-related inflammation. However, high-intensity training also reduced inflammatory factors in tissue-specific muscles. The data implicate regular exercise in protecting against chronic inflammatory diseases, such as diabetes.

  19. Effect of exercise training of different intensities on anti-inflammatory reaction in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J-S; Lee, Y-H; Kim, J-C; Ko, Y-H; Yoon, C-S; Yi, H-K

    2014-03-01

    The study investigated the effect of high- and low-intensity exercise training on inflammatory reaction of blood and skeletal muscle in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic male Sprague-Dawley rats (243 ± 7 g, 8 weeks). The rats completed treadmill running in either high-intensity exercise (6 weeks of exercise training, acute bouts of exercise) or low-intensity exercise (6 weeks of exercise training). Non-running, sedentary rats served as controls. To induce diabetes mellitus, rats received a peritoneal injection of STZ (50 mg · kg(-1)). Rats were sacrificed immediately after an acute bout of exercise and 6 weeks of exercise training. Inflammatory factors were analyzed by ELISA and by immune blotting from the soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles. In the serum, inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-4) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) (nitric oxide and malondialdehyde) increased in diabetic rats. However, all exercise training groups displayed reduced inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species. In skeletal muscles, low-intensity exercise training, but not high intensity exercise, reduced the levels of COX-2, iNOS, and MMP-2, which were otherwise markedly elevated in the presence of STZ. Moreover, the levels of GLUT-4 and MyoD were effectively increased by different exercise intensity and exercise duration. Low-intensity exercise training appeared most effective to reduce diabetes-related inflammation. However, high-intensity training also reduced inflammatory factors in tissue-specific muscles. The data implicate regular exercise in protecting against chronic inflammatory diseases, such as diabetes.

  20. Artificial Gravity with Ergometric Exercise Training Improves Cardiovascular Function in Ambulatory Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xi-Qing; Zhu, Chao; Shang, Shu; Yao, Yong-Jie

    2008-06-01

    The necessity of preventing physiological deconditioning in astronauts exposed to long-term space flights is well known. Artificial gravity training via short-arm centrifugation as a countermeasure to microgravity has been considered for many years. However, an optimal duration, level and rate of exposure to artificial gravity have not yet been determined. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the cardiovascular effects of three weeks of intermittent artificial gravity with ergometric exercise training on normal ambulatory men. During 3 weeks experiment, eight healthy male subjects received alternate +1 to +2 Gz (at the foot) short-arm centrifuge training with 30 W ergometric exercise for 30 min per day. Cardiac function, heart rate variability, heart rate and blood pressure were measured before and after training. Stroke volume and total peripheral resistance increased significantly after 3 weeks training, compared with the pre-training baseline. Left ventricular ejection time (LVET) and ejection fraction increased significantly after 3 weeks training, while heart rate, the ratio of pre-ejection period to LVET, and the ratio of low frequency to high frequency power decreased significantly after 3 weeks training. These results suggest that three weeks short-arm centrifuge training with ergometric exercise could improve human cardiac systolic and pumping functions, and increase cardiac vagal modulation.

  1. The evidence of benefits of exercise training in interstitial lung disease: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowman, Leona M; McDonald, Christine F; Hill, Catherine J; Lee, Annemarie L; Barker, Kathryn; Boote, Claire; Glaspole, Ian; Goh, Nicole S L; Southcott, Anne M; Burge, Angela T; Gillies, Rebecca; Martin, Alicia; Holland, Anne E

    2017-07-01

    Uncertainty exists regarding the clinical relevance of exercise training across the range of interstitial lung diseases (ILDs). To establish the impact of exercise training in patients with ILDs of differing aetiology and severity. 142 participants with ILD (61 idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), 22 asbestosis, 23 connective tissue disease-related ILD (CTD-ILD) and 36 with other aetiologies) were randomised to either 8 weeks of supervised exercise training or usual care. Six-minute walk distance (6MWD), Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire (CRDQ), St George Respiratory Questionnaire IPF-specific version (SGRQ-I) and modified Medical Research Council dyspnoea score were measured at baseline, 9 weeks and 6 months. Exercise training significantly increased 6MWD (25 m, 95% CI 2 to 47 m) and health-related quality of life (CRDQ and SGRQ-I) in people with ILD. Larger improvements in 6MWD, CRDQ, SGRQ-I and dyspnoea occurred in asbestosis and IPF compared with CTD-ILD, but with few significant differences between subgroups. Benefits declined at 6 months except in CTD-ILD. Lower baseline 6MWD and worse baseline symptoms were associated with greater benefit in 6MWD and symptoms following training. Greater gains were seen in those whose exercise prescription was successfully progressed according to the protocol. At 6 months, sustained improvements in 6MWD and symptoms were associated with better baseline lung function and less pulmonary hypertension. Exercise training is effective in patients across the range of ILDs, with clinically meaningful benefits in asbestosis and IPF. Successful exercise progression maximises improvements and sustained treatment effects favour those with milder disease. Results, ACTRN12611000416998. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. The effect of exercise training on cutaneous microvascular reactivity: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanting, Sean M; Johnson, Nathan A; Baker, Michael K; Caterson, Ian D; Chuter, Vivienne H

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to review the efficacy of exercise training for improving cutaneous microvascular reactivity in response to local stimulus in human adults. Systematic review with meta-analysis. A systematic search of Medline, Cinahl, AMED, Web of Science, Scopus, and Embase was conducted up to June 2015. Included studies were controlled trials assessing the effect of an exercise training intervention on cutaneous microvascular reactivity as instigated by local stimulus such as local heating, iontophoresis and post-occlusive reactive hyperaemia. Studies where the control was only measured at baseline or which included participants with vasospastic disorders were excluded. Two authors independently reviewed and selected relevant controlled trials and extracted data. Quality was assessed using the Downs and Black checklist. Seven trials were included, with six showing a benefit of exercise training but only two reaching statistical significance with effect size ranging from -0.14 to 1.03. The meta-analysis revealed that aerobic exercise had a moderate statistically significant effect on improving cutaneous microvascular reactivity (effect size (ES)=0.43, 95% CI: 0.08-0.78, p=0.015). Individual studies employing an exercise training intervention have tended to have small sample sizes and hence lacked sufficient power to detect clinically meaningful benefits to cutaneous microvascular reactivity. Pooled analysis revealed a clear benefit of exercise training on improving cutaneous microvascular reactivity in older and previously inactive adult cohorts. Exercise training may provide a cost-effective option for improving cutaneous microvascular reactivity in adults and may be of benefit to those with cardiovascular disease and metabolic disorders such as diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Prior exercise training blunts short-term high-fat diet-induced weight gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snook, Laelie A; MacPherson, Rebecca E K; Monaco, Cynthia M F; Frendo-Cumbo, Scott; Castellani, Laura; Peppler, Willem T; Anderson, Zachary G; Buzelle, Samyra L; LeBlanc, Paul J; Holloway, Graham P; Wright, David C

    2016-08-01

    High-fat diets rapidly cause weight gain and glucose intolerance. We sought to determine whether these changes could be mitigated with prior exercise training. Male C57BL/6J mice were exercise-trained by treadmill running (1 h/day, 5 days/wk) for 4 wk. Twenty-four hours after the final bout of exercise, mice were provided with a high-fat diet (HFD; 60% kcal from lard) for 4 days, with no further exercise. In mice fed the HFD prior to exercise training, the results were blunted weight gain, reduced fat mass, and a slight attenuation in glucose intolerance that was mirrored by greater insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation in skeletal muscle compared with sedentary mice fed the HFD. When ad libitum-fed sedentary mice were compared with sedentary high-fat fed mice that were calorie restricted (-30%) to match the weight gain of the previously trained high-fat fed mice, the same attenuated impairments in glucose tolerance were found. Blunted weight gain was associated with a greater capacity to increase energy expenditure in trained compared with sedentary mice when challenged with a HFD. Although mitochondrial enzymes in white adipose tissue and UCP-1 protein content in brown adipose tissue were increased in previously exercised compared with sedentary mice fed a HFD, ex vivo mitochondrial respiration was not increased in either tissue. Our data suggest that prior exercise training attenuates high-fat diet-induced weight gain and glucose intolerance and is associated with a greater ability to increase energy expenditure in response to a high-fat diet.

  4. Protein-Pacing and Multi-Component Exercise Training Improves Physical Performance Outcomes in Exercise-Trained Women: The PRISE 3 Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J. Arciero

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The beneficial cardiometabolic and body composition effects of combined protein-pacing (P; 5–6 meals/day at 2.0 g/kg BW/day and multi-mode exercise (resistance, interval, stretching, endurance; RISE training (PRISE in obese adults has previously been established. The current study examines PRISE on physical performance (endurance, strength and power outcomes in healthy, physically active women. Thirty exercise-trained women (>4 days exercise/week were randomized to either PRISE (n = 15 or a control (CON, 5–6 meals/day at 1.0 g/kg BW/day; n = 15 for 12 weeks. Muscular strength (1-RM bench press, 1-RM BP endurance (sit-ups, SUs; push-ups, PUs, power (bench throws, BTs, blood pressure (BP, augmentation index, (AIx, and abdominal fat mass were assessed at Weeks 0 (pre and 13 (post. At baseline, no differences existed between groups. Following the 12-week intervention, PRISE had greater gains (p < 0.05 in SUs, PUs (6 ± 7 vs. 10 ± 7, 40%; 8 ± 13 vs. 14 ± 12, 43% ∆reps, respectively, BTs (11 ± 35 vs. 44 ± 34, 75% ∆watts, AIx (1 ± 9 vs. −5 ± 11, 120%, and DBP (−5 ± 9 vs. −11 ± 11, 55% ∆mmHg. These findings suggest that combined protein-pacing (P; 5–6 meals/day at 2.0 g/kg BW/day diet and multi-component exercise (RISE training (PRISE enhances muscular endurance, strength, power, and cardiovascular health in exercise-trained, active women.

  5. Beneficial effects of combined exercise training on early recovery cardiopulmonary exercise testing indices in patients with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgantas, Andreas; Dimopoulos, Stavros; Tasoulis, Athanasios; Karatzanos, Eleftherios; Pantsios, Chris; Agapitou, Varvara; Ntalianis, Argyrios; Roditis, Petros; Terrovitis, John; Nanas, Serafim

    2014-01-01

    Exercise training induces several beneficial effects in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). This study investigated the effects of high-intensity aerobic interval training (AIT) compared with combined AIT and strength training (COM) on early ventilatory and metabolic recovery pattern after symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) in CHF patients. Stable CHF patients (N = 42; 54 ± 10 years [mean ± SD], 35 males) participated in an exercise training program for 12 weeks, 3 times per week. Participants were randomly assigned to either AIT (n = 20) or COM group (n = 22). Cardiopulmonary exercise testing was performed before and after completion of the program. Primary measurements included absolute and percentage difference of oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide output, minute ventilation ((Equation is included in full-text article.)E), tidal volume (VT), respiratory rate, and the first-degree slope of oxygen uptake ((Equation is included in full-text article.)O2/t slope) and carbon dioxide output ((Equation is included in full-text article.)CO2/t slope) during the first minute of recovery after maximal exercise. The COM group had a greater improvement in the absolute and the percentage difference of (Equation is included in full-text article.)E (P = .03 and P = .04, respectively) and respiratory rate (P = .02 and P = .01, respectively) during the first minute of recovery period after exercise compared with the AIT group alone. No significant changes were noted for VT measurements. A significant increase in (Equation is included in full-text article.)CO2/t slope was observed in COM compared with the AIT group (P = .01). There was a trend for a greater increase in (Equation is included in full-text article.)O2/t slope in the COM group (P = .07). The addition of strength training to AIT induces significant beneficial effects in terms of ventilatory and metabolic recovery kinetics than AIT alone in CHF patients, possibly indicating greater ventilatory

  6. Use of Martial Art Exercises in Performance Enhancement Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, Tim; Anderson, Warren

    2002-01-01

    Details some of the many martial arts training techniques and their potential applications for inclusion in performance enhancement programs, focusing on the benefits of martial training, the arts continuum, and martial arts training modes. The article concludes that the various martial arts techniques provide a stimulating and intuitively…

  7. Use of Martial Art Exercises in Performance Enhancement Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, Tim; Anderson, Warren

    2002-01-01

    Details some of the many martial arts training techniques and their potential applications for inclusion in performance enhancement programs, focusing on the benefits of martial training, the arts continuum, and martial arts training modes. The article concludes that the various martial arts techniques provide a stimulating and intuitively…

  8. Effects of exercise on ankle proprioception in adult women during 16 weeks of training and eight weeks of detraining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cui; Sun, Wei; Yu, Bing; Song, Qipeng; Mao, Dewei

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the effects of training and detraining on ankle proprioception in terms of kinesthesia in adult women. Sixty participants were randomly assigned to three groups. Tai Chi and Brisk Walking Groups went through a 16-week training period followed by an eight-week detraining period. The ankle plantar-flexion, dorsal-flexion, inversion, and eversion kinesthesia were measured every four weeks. The ankle kinesthesia in plantar/dorsal flexion of both exercise groups decreased, but the Tai Chi Group decreased more and sooner than the Brisk Walking Group. The training effects of Tai Chi exercise were retained but diminished during the detraining. The training effects of Brisk Walking exercise were not retained. The kinesthesia of ankle inversion and eversion remained unchanged after training. The results suggest that Tai Chi exercise is more effective in training ankle proprioception in plantar and dorsal flexion and in retaining the training effects compared with Brisk Walking exercise.

  9. Treating NAFLD in OLETF rats with vigorous-intensity interval exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Melissa A; Fletcher, Justin A; Morris, E Matthew; Meers, Grace M; Laughlin, M Harold; Booth, Frank W; Sowers, James R; Ibdah, Jamal A; Thyfault, John P; Rector, R Scott

    2015-03-01

    There is increasing use of high-intensity interval-type exercise training in the management of many lifestyle-related diseases. This study aimed to test the hypothesis that vigorous-intensity interval exercise is as effective as traditional moderate-intensity aerobic exercise training for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) outcomes in obese, Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats. OLETF rats (age, 20 wk; n = 8-10 per group) were assigned to sedentary (O-SED), moderate-intensity exercise training (O-MOD EX; 20 m·min(-1), 15% incline, 60 min·d(-1), 5 d·wk(-1) of treadmill running), or vigorous-intensity interval exercise training (O-VIG EX; 40 m·min(-1), 15% incline, 6 × 2.5 min bouts per day, 5 d·wk(-1) of treadmill running) groups for 12 wk. Both MOD EX and VIG EX effectively lowered hepatic triglycerides, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), perivenular fibrosis, and hepatic collagen 1α1 messenger RNA (mRNA) expression (vs O-SED, P training programs for patients with NAFLD.

  10. Physical Training Status Determines Oxidative Stress and Redox Changes in Response to an Acute Aerobic Exercise

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    Farnaz Seifi-skishahr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the influence of different physical training status on exercise-induced oxidative stress and changes in cellular redox state. Methods. Thirty male subjects participated in this study and were assigned as well-trained (WT, moderately trained (MT, and untrained (UT groups. The levels of cortisol, creatine kinase, plasma reduced glutathione to oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG, cysteine/cystine (Cys/CySS, and GSH/GSSG ratio in red blood cells (RBCs were measured immediately and 10 and 30 min after exercise. Results. Following the exercise, plasma GSH/GSSG (p=0.001 and Cys/CySS (p=0.005 were significantly reduced in all groups. Reduction in plasma GSH/GSSG ratio in all groups induced a transient shift in redox balance towards a more oxidizing environment without difference between groups (p=0.860, while RBCs GSH/GSSG showed significant reduction (p=0.003 and elevation (p=0.007 in UT and MT groups, respectively. The highest level of RBCs GSH/GSSG ratio was recorded in MT group, and the lowest one was recorded in the WT group. Conclusion. Long term regular exercise training with moderate intensity shifts redox balance towards more reducing environment, versus intensive exercise training leads to more oxidizing environment and consequently development of related diseases.

  11. Exercise training improves vascular endothelial function in patients with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchsjäger-Mayrl, Gabriele; Pleiner, Johannes; Wiesinger, Günther F; Sieder, Anna E; Quittan, Michael; Nuhr, Martin J; Francesconi, Claudia; Seit, Hans-Peter; Francesconi, Mario; Schmetterer, Leopold; Wolzt, Michael

    2002-10-01

    OBJECTIVE-Impaired endothelial function of resistance and conduit arteries can be detected in patients with type 1 diabetes. We studied whether a persistent improvement of endothelial function can be achieved by regular physical training. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS-The study included 26 patients with type 1 diabetes of 20 +/- 10 years' duration and no overt angiopathy; 18 patients (42 +/- 10 years old) participated in a bicycle exercise training program, and 8 patients with type 1 diabetes (33 +/- 11 years old) served as control subjects. Vascular function of conduit arteries was assessed by flow-mediated and endothelium-independent dilation of the brachial artery and of resistance vessels by the response of ocular fundus pulsation amplitudes to intravenous N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) at baseline, after 2 and 4 months of training, and 8 months after cessation of regular exercise. RESULTS-Training increased peak oxygen uptake (VO(2max)) by 13% after 2 months and by 27% after 4 months (P = 0.04). Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery increased from 6.5 +/- 1.1 to 9.8 +/- 1.1% (P = 0.04) by training. L-NMMA administration decreased fundus pulsation amplitude (FPA) by 9.1 +/- 0.9% before training and by 13.4 +/- 1.5% after 4 months of training (P = 0.02). VO(2max), FMD, and FPA were unchanged in the control group. Vascular effects from training were abrogated 8 months after cessation of exercise. CONCLUSIONS-Our study demonstrates that aerobic exercise training can improve endothelial function in different vascular beds in patients with long-standing type 1 diabetes, who are at considerable risk for diabetic angiopathy. However, the beneficial effect on vascular function is not maintained in the absence of exercise.

  12. Effect of Exercise Intensity on Differentiated and Undifferentiated Ratings of Perceived Exertion During Cycle and Treadmill Exercise in Recreationally Active and Trained Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolgar, Melinda R.; Baker, Carol E.; Goss, Fredric. L.; Nagle, Elizabeth; Robertson, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to examine the effect of aerobic exercise intensity on components of the differentiated perceived exertion model in young women performing weight bearing and non-weight bearing aerobic exercise. Subjects were 18-25 yr old women who were recreationally active (n = 19; VO2max = 33.40 ml·kg-1·min-1) and trained (N = 22; VO2max = 43.3 ml·kg-1·min-1). Subjects underwent two graded exercise tests (GXT) on a treadmill and bike which were separated by 48 hours. RPE-Overall, -Legs, and -Chest, as well as oxygen uptake (VO2) and heart rate were recorded each minute. Individual regression analyses were used to identify RPE-Overall,-Legs, and -Chest at 40, 60, 80% VO2max/peak. Separate two factor (site (3) x intensity (3)) ANOVAs with repeated measures on site and intensity were computed for each training status. Furthermore, RPE responses were also examined with a one factor (site (3)) within subject ANOVA with repeated measure on site at the ventilatory breakpoint. For both the recreationally active and trained groups no significant differences were observed for RPE-Overall, -Legs, and -Chest during treadmill exercise. However, for cycling exercise results indicated that RPE-Legs was significantly greater at all exercise intensities than RPE-Overall and RPE-Chest for trained subjects while for recreationally active subjects RPE-Legs was only significantly higher at the highest exercise intensity. Responses at the ventilatory breakpoint during cycle exercise indicated that RPE-Legs was significantly greater than RPE-Chest and RPE-Overall for trained subjects but not for recreationally active subjects. Signal dominance was not observed at an intensity equivalent to the ventilatory breakpoint during treadmill exercise in either of the groups. In recreationally active and trained females signal dominance was demonstrated only during cycling exercise, but not during treadmill exercise. Signal integration could not be demonstrated during cycling and

  13. Short term effects of exercise training on exercise capacity and quality of life in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

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    Gain Kevin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in the understanding and management of pulmonary arterial hypertension have enabled earlier diagnosis and improved prognosis. However, despite best available therapy, symptoms of exertional dyspnoea and fatigue are commonly reported and result in a reduced capacity to perform daily activities and impaired quality of life. Exercise training has demonstrated efficacy in individuals with other respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. Historically, however, exercise training has not been utilised as a form of therapy in pulmonary arterial hypertension due to the perceived risk of sudden cardiac death and the theoretical possibility that exercise would lead to worsening pulmonary vascular haemodynamics and deterioration in right heart function. Now, with the advances in pharmaceutical management, determining the safety and benefits of exercise training in this population has become more relevant. Only three studies of supervised exercise training in pulmonary arterial hypertension have been published. These studies demonstrated improvements in exercise capacity and quality of life, in the absence of adverse events or clinical deterioration. However, these studies have not utilised an outpatient-based, whole body exercise training program, the most common format for exercise programs within Australia. It is uncertain whether this form of training is beneficial and capable of producing sustained benefits in exercise capacity and quality of life in this population. Design/Methods This randomised controlled trial will determine whether a 12 week, outpatient-based, supervised, whole body exercise training program, followed by a home-based exercise program, is safe and improves exercise capacity and quality of life in individuals with pulmonary arterial hypertension. This study aims to recruit 34 subjects who will be randomly allocated to the exercise group (supervised exercise training 3 times a week for 12 weeks, followed by

  14. Role of exercise training in cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction and mortality in diabetic ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Silvia B C; Flues, Karin; Paulini, Janaina; Mostarda, Cristiano; Rodrigues, Bruno; Souza, Leandro E; Irigoyen, Maria-Cláudia; De Angelis, Kátia

    2007-10-01

    Diabetes and menopause markedly increase the risk of cardiovascular disease in women. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of exercise training on cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction and on total mortality in diabetic female rats undergoing ovarian hormone deprivation. Female Wistar rats were divided into ovariectomized groups: sedentary and trained controls and sedentary and trained diabetic rats (streptozotocin, 50 mg/kg IV). Trained groups were submitted to an exercise training protocol on a treadmill (8 weeks). The baroreflex sensitivity was evaluated by heart rate responses to arterial pressure changes. Heart rate variability was determined using the SD of the basal heart rate. Vagal and sympathetic tonus were evaluated by pharmacological blockade. Diabetes impaired baroreflex sensitivity ( approximately 55%), vagal tonus ( approximately 68%), and heart rate variability ( approximately 38%). Exercise training improved baroreflex sensitivity and heart rate variability in control and diabetic groups in relation to their sedentary groups. Trained control rats presented increased vagal tonus compared with that of sedentary ones. The sympathetic tonus was reduced in the trained diabetic group as compared with that of other studied groups. Significant correlations were obtained between heart rate variability and vagal tonus with baroreflex sensitivity. Mortality, assessed during the training period, was reduced in trained diabetic (25%) rats compared with mortality in sedentary diabetic rats (60%). Together, these findings suggest that decreases in baroreflex sensitivity and heart rate variability may be related to increased mortality in female diabetic subjects and that improved autonomic regulation induced by exercise training may contribute to decreased mortality in this population.

  15. Supplemental Oxygen During High-Intensity Exercise Training in Nonhypoxemic Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neunhäuserer, Daniel; Steidle-Kloc, Eva; Weiss, Gertraud; Kaiser, Bernhard; Niederseer, David; Hartl, Sylvia; Tschentscher, Marcus; Egger, Andreas; Schönfelder, Martin; Lamprecht, Bernd; Studnicka, Michael; Niebauer, Josef

    2016-11-01

    Physical exercise training is an evidence-based treatment in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and patients' peak work rate is associated with reduced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease mortality. We assessed whether supplemental oxygen during exercise training in nonhypoxemic patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease might lead to superior training outcomes, including improved peak work rate. This was a randomized, double-blind, controlled, crossover trial. Twenty-nine patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (aged 63.5 ± 5.9 years; forced expiratory volume in 1 second percent predicted, 46.4 ± 8.6) completed 2 consecutive 6-week periods of endurance and strength training with progressive intensity, which was performed 3 times per week with supplemental oxygen or compressed medical air (flow via nasal cannula: 10 L/min). Each session of electrocardiography-controlled interval cycling lasted 31 minutes and consisted of a warm-up, 7 cycles of 1-minute intervals at 70% to 80% of peak work rate alternating with 2 minutes of active recovery, and final cooldown. Thereafter, patients completed 8 strength-training exercises of 1 set each with 8 to 15 repetitions to failure. Change in peak work rate was the primary study end point. The increase in peak work rate was more than twice as high when patients exercised with supplemental oxygen compared with medical air (0.16 ± 0.02 W/kg vs 0.07 ± 0.02 W/kg; P exercise capacity. The impact of oxygen on peak work rate was 39.1% of the overall training effect, whereas it had no influence on strength gain (P > .1 for all exercises). We report that supplemental oxygen in nonhypoxemic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease doubled the effect of endurance training but had no effect on strength gain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Noninvasive Monitoring of Training Induced Muscle Adaptation with -MRS: Fibre Type Shifts Correlate with Metabolic Changes

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    Eike Hoff

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate training induced metabolic changes noninvasively with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (-MRS for measuring muscle fibre type adaptation. Methods. Eleven volunteers underwent a 24-week training, consisting of speed-strength, endurance, and detraining (each 8 weeks. Prior to and following each training period, needle biopsies and -MRS of the resting gastrocnemius muscle were performed. Fibre type distribution was analyzed histologically and tested for correlation with the ratios of high energy phosphates ([PCr]/[], [PCr]/[βATP] and [PCr + ]/[βATP]. The correlation between the changes of the -MRS parameters during training and the resulting changes in fibre composition were also analysed. Results. We observed an increased type-II-fibre proportion after speed-strength and detraining. After endurance training the percentage of fast-twitch fibres was reduced. The progression of the [PCr]/[]-ratio was similar to that of the fast-twitch fibres during the training. We found a correlation between the type-II-fibre proportion and [PCr]/[] (, or [PCr]/[βATP] (, ; the correlations between its changes (delta and the fibre-shift were significant as well (delta[PCr]/[] , delta[PCr]/[βATP] , . Conclusion. Shifts in fibre type composition and high energy phosphate metabolite content covary in human gastrocnemius muscle. Therefore -MRS might be a feasible method for noninvasive monitoring of exercise-induced fibre type transformation.

  17. Within Session Sequence of Balance and Plyometric Exercises Does Not Affect Training Adaptations with Youth Soccer Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaouachi, Mehdi; Granacher, Urs; Makhlouf, Issam; Hammami, Raouf; Behm, David G; Chaouachi, Anis

    2017-01-01

    The integration of balance and plyometric training has been shown to provide significant improvements in sprint, jump, agility, and other performance measures in young athletes. It is not known if a specific within session balance and plyometric exercise sequence provides more effective training adaptations. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of using a sequence of alternating pairs of exercises versus a block (series) of all balance exercises followed by a block of plyometric exercises on components of physical fitness such as muscle strength, power, speed, agility, and balance. Twenty-six male adolescent soccer players (13.9 ± 0.3 years) participated in an 8-week training program that either alternated individual balance (e.g., exercises on unstable surfaces) and plyometric (e.g., jumps, hops, rebounds) exercises or performed a block of balance exercises prior to a block of plyometric exercises within each training session. Pre- and post-training measures included proxies of strength, power, agility, sprint, and balance such as countermovement jumps, isometric back and knee extension strength, standing long jump, 10 and 30-m sprints, agility, standing stork, and Y-balance tests. Both groups exhibited significant, generally large magnitude (effect sizes) training improvements for all measures with mean performance increases of approximately >30%. There were no significant differences between the training groups over time. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of combining balance and plyometric exercises within a training session on components of physical fitness with young adolescents. The improved performance outcomes were not significantly influenced by the within session exercise sequence. Key points The combination of balance and plyometric exercises can induce significant and substantial training improvements in muscle strength, power, speed, agility, and balance with adolescent youth athletes The within training session

  18. Skeletal muscle signaling and the heart rate and blood pressure response to exercise: insight from heart rate pacing during exercise with a trained and a deconditioned muscle group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Stefan P; Svendsen, Jesper H; Ersbøll, Mads; Hellsten, Ylva; Secher, Niels H; Saltin, Bengt

    2013-05-01

    Endurance training lowers heart rate and blood pressure responses to exercise, but the mechanisms and consequences remain unclear. To determine the role of skeletal muscle for the cardioventilatory response to exercise, 8 healthy young men were studied before and after 5 weeks of 1-legged knee-extensor training and 2 weeks of deconditioning of the other leg (leg cast). Hemodynamics and muscle interstitial nucleotides were determined during exercise with the (1) deconditioned leg, (2) trained leg, and (3) trained leg with atrial pacing to the heart rate obtained with the deconditioned leg. Heart rate was ≈ 15 bpm lower during exercise with the trained leg (Prate-pressure product, and ventilation were lower during exercise with the trained leg (Pheart rate was controlled by atrial pacing, stroke volume decreased (Pblood flow, arterial pressures, and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure remained unchanged. Circulating [norepinephrine], [lactate] and [K(+)] were lower and interstitial [ATP] and pH were higher in the trained leg (Pexercise with the trained leg is partly coupled to a reduced signaling from skeletal muscle likely mediated by K(+), lactate, or pH, whereas the lower cardiac afterload increases stroke volume. These results demonstrate that skeletal muscle training reduces the cardioventilatory response to exercise without compromising O2 delivery, and it can therefore be used to reduce the load on the heart during physical activity.

  19. Exercise training in childhood cancer survivors with subclinical cardiomyopathy who were treated with anthracyclines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Webb A; Ness, Kirsten K; Joshi, Vijaya; Hudson, Melissa M; Robison, Leslie L; Green, Daniel M

    2013-11-06

    Childhood cancer survivors (CCS) treated with anthracyclines are at risk for cardiomyopathy. This case series evaluated the response of anthracycline exposed CCS with subclinical cardiomyopathy to aerobic and strength training. Body composition, strength and cardiopulmonary fitness were evaluated before and after the 12-week intervention. All equipment and materials were provided to five 10+ year CCS (3 males, mean age 38.0 ± 3.3 years) for a guideline-based home exercise program. All five completed the study with no adverse events. Compliance with exercise was 86%. These results suggest that exercise training may improve exercise capacity of CCS with subclinical cardiomyopathy. Pediatr Blood Cancer. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Exercise physiology, testing, and training in patients supported by a left ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyaga-Rendon, Renzo Y; Plaisance, Eric P; Arena, Ross; Shah, Keyur

    2015-08-01

    The left ventricular assist device (LVAD) is an accepted treatment alternative for the management of end-stage heart failure. As we move toward implantation of LVADs in less severe cases of HF, scrutiny of functional capacity and quality of life becomes more important. Patients demonstrate improvements in exercise capacity after LVAD implantation, but the effect is less than predicted. Exercise training produces multiple beneficial effects in heart failure patients, which would be expected to improve quality of life. In this review, we describe factors that are thought to participate in the persistent exercise impairment in LVAD-supported patients, summarize current knowledge about the effect of exercise training in LVAD-supported patients, and suggest areas for future research.

  1. Chronic exercise training versus acute endurance exercise in reducing neurotoxicity in rats exposed to lead acetate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Shahandeh; Valiollah Dabidi Roshan; Somayeh Hosseinzadeh; Soleiman Mahjoub; Vaginak Sarkisian

    2013-01-01

    After intraperitoneal injection of 20 mg/kg lead acetate, rats received 8 weeks of treadmill exercise (15–22 m/min, 25–64 minutes) and/or treadmill exercise at 1.6 km/h until exhaustion. The markers related to neurotoxicity were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. 8 weeks of treadmill exercise significantly increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor level in the hippocampus (P = 0.04) and plasma level of total antioxidant capacity of rats exposed to lead acetate (P < 0.001), and significantly decreased plasma level of malondialdehyde (P < 0.001). Acute exercise only decreased the hippocampal malondialdehyde level (P = 0.09) and increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor level in the hippocampus (P = 0.66). Acute exercise also enhanced the total antioxidant capacity in rats exposed to lead acetate, insignificantly (P = 0.99). These findings suggest that chronic treadmill exercise can significantly decrease neurotoxicity and alleviate oxidative stress in rats exposed to lead acetate. However, acute endurance exercise was not associated with these beneficial effects.

  2. Resveratrol modulates the angiogenic response to exercise training in skeletal muscle of aged men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gliemann Hybholt, Lasse; Olesen, Jesper; Biensø, Rasmus S

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The polyphenol resveratrol has in animal studies been shown to influence several pathways of importance for angiogenesis in skeletal muscle. The aim was to examine the angiogenic effect of resveratrol supplementation with parallel exercise training in aged men. Methods: Forty-three healthy...... physically inactive aged men (65±1 years) were divided into A) a training group that conducted 8 weeks of intense exercise training where half of the subjects received a daily intake of either 250 mg trans resveratrol (n=14) and the other half received placebo (n=13); and B) a non-training group...... that received either 250 mg trans resveratrol (n=9) or placebo (n=7). Results: The group that trained with placebo showed a ~20% increase in capillary to fiber (C:F) ratio, an increase in the muscle protein expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGF receptor-2, and tissue inhibitor of matrix...

  3. Abdominal fat reducing outcome of exercise training: fat burning or hydrocarbon source redistribution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chia-Hua; Harris, M Brennan

    2016-07-01

    Fat burning, defined by fatty acid oxidation into carbon dioxide, is the most described hypothesis to explain the actual abdominal fat reducing outcome of exercise training. This hypothesis is strengthened by evidence of increased whole-body lipolysis during exercise. As a result, aerobic training is widely recommended for obesity management. This intuition raises several paradoxes: first, both aerobic and resistance exercise training do not actually elevate 24 h fat oxidation, according to data from chamber-based indirect calorimetry. Second, anaerobic high-intensity intermittent training produces greater abdominal fat reduction than continuous aerobic training at similar amounts of energy expenditure. Third, significant body fat reduction in athletes occurs when oxygen supply decreases to inhibit fat burning during altitude-induced hypoxia exposure at the same training volume. Lack of oxygen increases post-meal blood distribution to human skeletal muscle, suggesting that shifting the postprandial hydrocarbons towards skeletal muscle away from adipose tissue might be more important than fat burning in decreasing abdominal fat. Creating a negative energy balance in fat cells due to competition of skeletal muscle for circulating hydrocarbon sources may be a better model to explain the abdominal fat reducing outcome of exercise than the fat-burning model.

  4. Influence of endurance exercise training status and gender on postexercise hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senitko, Annette N; Charkoudian, Nisha; Halliwill, John R

    2002-06-01

    In sedentary individuals, postexercise hypotension after a single bout of aerobic exercise is due to a peripheral vasodilation. Endurance exercise training has the potential to modify this response and perhaps reduce the degree of postexercise hypotension. We tested the hypothesis that endurance exercise-trained men and women would have blunted postexercise hypotension compared with sedentary subjects but that the mechanism of hypotension would be similar (i.e., vasodilation). We studied 16 endurance-trained and 16 sedentary men and women. Arterial pressure, cardiac output, and total peripheral resistance were determined before and after a single 60-min bout of exercise at 60% peak oxygen consumption. All groups exhibited a similar degree of postexercise hypotension (approximately 4-5 mmHg; P men and women, hypotension was the result of vasodilation (Deltaresistance: -8.9 +/- 2.2%). In endurance-trained women, hypotension was also the result of vasodilation (-8.1 +/- 4.1%). However, in endurance-trained men, hypotension was the result of a reduced cardiac output (-5.2 +/- 2.4%; P men and women but that endurance-trained men and women achieve this fall in pressure via different mechanisms.

  5. User`s guide for the Augmented Computer Exercise for Inspection Training (ACE-IT) software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobranich, P.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Cooperative Monitoring Center and Regional Security; Horak, K.E.; Hagan, D.; Evanko, D.; Nelson, J.; Ryder, C.; Hedlund, D. [Ogden Environmental and Energy Services, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-09-01

    The on-site inspection provisions in many current and proposed arms control agreements require extensive preparation and training on the part of both the Inspection Teams (inspectors) and Inspected Parties (host). Current training techniques include table-top inspections and practice inspections. The Augmented Computer Exercise for Inspection Training (ACE-IT), an interactive computer training tool, increases the utility of table-top inspections. ACE-IT has been designed to provide training for challenge inspections under the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC); however, this training tool can be modified for other inspection regimes. Although ACE-IT provides training from notification of an inspection through post-inspection activities, the primary emphasis of ACE-IT is in the inspection itself--particularly with the concept of managed access. ACE-IT also demonstrates how inspection provisions impact compliance determination and the protection of sensitive information. This User`s Guide describes the use of the ACE-IT training software.

  6. Eccentric and concentric cardiac hypertrophy induced by exercise training: microRNAs and molecular determinants

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, T.; Soci, U.P.R.; E.M. Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    Among the molecular, biochemical and cellular processes that orchestrate the development of the different phenotypes of cardiac hypertrophy in response to physiological stimuli or pathological insults, the specific contribution of exercise training has recently become appreciated. Physiological cardiac hypertrophy involves complex cardiac remodeling that occurs as an adaptive response to static or dynamic chronic exercise, but the stimuli and molecular mechanisms underlying transduction of th...

  7. Physiological and Neural Adaptations to Eccentric Exercise: Mechanisms and Considerations for Training

    OpenAIRE

    Nosratollah Hedayatpour; Deborah Falla

    2015-01-01

    Eccentric exercise is characterized by initial unfavorable effects such as subcellular muscle damage, pain, reduced fiber excitability, and initial muscle weakness. However, stretch combined with overload, as in eccentric contractions, is an effective stimulus for inducing physiological and neural adaptations to training. Eccentric exercise-induced adaptations include muscle hypertrophy, increased cortical activity, and changes in motor unit behavior, all of which contribute to improved muscl...

  8. Rehabilitation (exercise and strength training) and osteoarthritis: A critical narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Christelle; Lefèvre-Colau, Marie-Martine; Poiraudeau, Serge; Rannou, François

    2016-06-01

    Rehabilitation is widely recommended in national and international guidelines for managing osteoarthritis (OA) in primary care settings. According to the 2014 OA Research Society International (OARSI) recommendations, rehabilitation is even considered the core treatment of OA and is recommended for all patients. Rehabilitation for OA widely includes land- and water-based exercise, strength training, weight management, self-management and education, biomechanical interventions, and physically active lifestyle. We performed a critical narrative review of the efficacy and safety of rehabilitation for managing OA and discuss evidence-based international recommendations. The process of article selection was unsystematic. Articles were selected based on authors' expertise, self-knowledge, and reflective practice. For the purpose of the review, we focused on land- and water-based exercise and strength training for knee, hip and hand OA. Other aspects of rehabilitation in OA are treated elsewhere in this special issue. Exercise therapy is widely recommended for managing knee, hip and hand OA. However, the level of evidence varies according to OA location. Overall, consistent evidence suggests that exercise therapy and specific strengthening exercise or strength training for the lower limb reduce pain and improve physical function in knee OA. Evidence for other OA sites are less consistent. Therefore, because of the lack of specific studies, recommendations for hip and hand OA are mainly derived from studies of knee OA. In addition, no recommendations have been established regarding the exercise regimen. The efficacy and safety of exercise therapy and strength training need to be further evaluated in randomized controlled trials of patients with hip and hand OA. The optimal delivery of exercise programs also has to be more clearly defined.

  9. Cardioprotective effects of exercise training on myofilament calcium activation in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bupha-Intr, Tepmanas; Wattanapermpool, Jonggonnee

    2004-05-01

    The risks associated with hormone replacement therapy, especially cardiac diseases in postmenopausal women, have prompted extensive studies for other preventive or therapeutic alternatives. We investigated the cardioprotective effects of exercise training on the changes in cardiac myofilament Ca2+ activation in 10-wk-old ovariectomized rats. The exercise groups were subjected to a 9-wk running program on a motor-driven treadmill 1 wk after surgery. The relationship between pCa (-log molar free Ca2+ concentration) and myofibrillar MgATPase activity of exercise-sham myofibrils or exercise-ovariectomized myofibrils was the same and could not be distinguished from that of sedentary-sham control hearts. In contrast, a significant suppression in maximum MgATPase activity and a leftward shift of pCa50 (half-maximally activating pCa) in the pCa-ATPase activity relationship were detected in sedentary-ovariectomized rats. Exercise training also prevented the shift in myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms toward beta-MHC in ovariectomized hearts. The upregulation of beta1-adrenergic receptors in the left ventricular membranes of ovariectomized rat hearts, as measured by receptor binding and immunoblot analyses, was no longer observed in exercise-ovariectomized hearts. Immunoblot analyses of heat shock protein (HSP) 72, an inducible form of HSP70, demonstrated a significant downregulation in ovariectomized hearts. Exercise training in ovariectomized rats completely reversed the expression of HSP72 to the same level as sham controls. Our results clearly indicate the cardioprotective effects of exercise training on changes in cardiac myofilament Ca2+ activation in ovariectomized rats. Alterations in expression of beta1-adrenergic receptors and HSP72 may, in part, play a mechanistic role in the cardioprotective effects.

  10. Effects of different durations of treadmill training exercise on bone mineral density in growing rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Ertem

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of different durations of treadmill training exercise (daily for 30 min and 60 min on bone mineral density (BMD in young growing rats. Training consisted of treadmill running at 5 days per week during a period of 13 weeks. The rats in 30 min and 60 min exercise groups began to training on day 63 of life and had maintained for at least a week, with a minimal progression as a guide to the rats’ training and adaptation to the treadmill. Running time was gradually increased from 15 min to 30 and 60 min per session for two exercise groups respectively. Control rats were kept in the cages at the same environmental conditions and daily inspected to control their health. At the end of 13 weeks, bone mineral densities of the bilateral tibia of all rats were measured .with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA (QDR 4500/W, Hologic Inc., Bedford, MA, USA and results were evaluated. There were significantly increases in BMD of right and left tibia of rats in 30 min exercise group at post-exercise period (p<0.01 for both sides when compared to the control group. BMD of right and left tibia of rats were also correlated with each other (r=0.556 and p=0.003. Otherwise, there is a positive correlation between pre- and post-exercise body weights of rats (r=0.588 and p=0.002. From our results, we concluded that subjects should perform moderate running exercise for development of bone mass and its protection during the lifelong. However, intensity and duration of performing exercise are required to put in order for every ages or actual physical conditions.

  11. User Evaluation of a Bone Conduction Communication Headset During the Patriot 2007 Joint Field Training Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    cognitive readiness of military personnel participating in the annual Patriot Field Training Exercise (FTX) at Volk Field and Fort McCoy, Wisconsin...in the exercise. The goal of the ARL/HRED study was to assess the degree to which cognitive readiness metrics can be used as a predictor of Soldier...DURBIN BLDG 4506 ( DCD ) RM 107 FORT RUCKER AL 36362-5000 1 ARMY RSCH LABORATORY – HRED RDRL HRM CK J REINHART 10125 KINGMAN RD BLDG

  12. Exercise training in the management of patients with resistant hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fernando; Ribeiro; Rui; Costa; José; Mesquita-Bastos

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is a very prevalent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The prevalence of resistant hypertension, i.e., uncontrolled hypertension with 3 or more antihypertensive agents including 1 diuretic, is between 5% and 30% in the hypertensive population. The causes of resistant hypertension are multifactorial and include behavioral and biological factors, such as nonadherence to pharmacological treatment. All current treatment guidelines highlight the positive role of physical exercise as a non-pharmacological tool in the treatment of hypertension. This paper draws attention to the possible role of physical exercise as an adjunct non-pharmacological tool in the management of resistant hypertension. A few studies have investigated it, employing different methodologies, and taken together they have shown promising results. In summary, the available evidence suggests that aerobic physical exercise could be a valuable addition to the optimal pharmacological treatment of patients with resistant hypertension.

  13. Beneficial effects of previous exercise training on renal changes in streptozotocin-induced diabetic female rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Liliany S de Brito; Silva, Fernanda A; Correia, Vicente B; Andrade, Clara EF; Dutra, Bárbara A; Oliveira, Márcio V; de Magalhães, Amélia CM; Volpini, Rildo A; Seguro, Antonio C; Coimbra, Terezila M

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of aerobic exercise performed both previously and after the induction of diabetes mellitus on changes of renal function and structure in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Female wistar rats were divided into five groups: sedentary control (C + Se); trained control (C + Ex); sedentary diabetic (D + Se); trained diabetic (D + Ex) and previously trained diabetic (D + PEx). The previous exercise consisted of treadmill running for four weeks before the induction of diabetes mellitus. After induction of diabetes mellitus with streptozotocin, the D + PEx, D + Ex and C + Ex groups were submitted to eight weeks of aerobic exercise. At the end of the training protocol, we evaluate the serum glucose, insulin and 17β-estradiol levels, renal function and structure, proteinuria, and fibronectin, collagen IV and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) renal expressions. Induction of diabetes mellitus reduced the insulin and did not alter 17β-estradiol levels, and exercise did not affect any of these parameters. Previous exercise training attenuated the loss of body weight, the blood glucose, the increase of glomerular filtration rate and prevented the proteinuria in the D + PEx group compared to D + Se group. Previous exercise also reduced glomerular hypertrophy, tubular and glomerular injury, as well as the expressions of fibronectin and collagen IV. These expressions were associated with reduced expression of TGF-β1. In conclusion, our study shows that regular aerobic exercise especially performed previously to induction of diabetes mellitus improved metabolic control and has renoprotective action on the diabetic kidney. PMID:26490345

  14. Benefits of Exercise Training For Computer-Based Staff: A Meta Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mothna Mohammed

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Office workers sit down to work for approximately 8 hours a day and, as a result, many of them do not have enough time for any form of physical exercise. This can lead to musculoskeletal discomforts, especially low back pain and recently, many researchers focused on home/office-based exercise training for prevention/treatment of low back pain among this population. Objective: This Meta analyses paper tried to discuss about the latest suggested exercises for the office workers based on the mechanisms and theories behind low back pain among office workers. Method: In this Meta analyses the author tried to collect relevant papers which were published previously on the subject. Google Scholar, Scopus, and PubMed were used as sources to find the articles. Only articles that were published using the same methodology, including office workers, musculoskeletal discomforts, low back pain, and exercise training keywords, were selected. Studies that failed to report sufficient sample statistics, or lacked a substantial review of past academic scholarship and/or clear methodologies, were excluded. Results: Limited evidence regarding the prevention of, and treatment methods for, musculoskeletal discomfort, especially those in the low back, among office workers, is available. The findings showed that training exercises had a significant effect (p<0.05 on low back pain discomfort scores and decreased pain levels in response to office-based exercise training. Conclusion: Office-based exercise training can affect pain/discomfort scores among office workers through positive effects on flexibility and strength of muscles. As such, it should be suggested to occupational therapists as a practical way for the treatment/prevention of low back pain among office workers.

  15. The influence of aetiology on the benefits of exercise training in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes-Correa, Ligia M; Ueno-Pardi, Linda M; Trevizan, Patricia F; Santos, Marcelo R; da Silva, Carlos Henrique P; Franco, Fábio Gm; Alves, Maria Janieire Nn; Rondon, Maria Urbana Pb; Negrao, Carlos E

    2017-03-01

    Background Exercise training improves neurovascular control and functional capacity in heart failure (HF) patients. However, the influence of the aetiology on these benefits is unknown. We compared the effects of exercise training on neurovascular control and functional capacity in idiopathic, ischaemic and hypertensive HF patients. Design Subjects consisted of 45 exercise-trained HF patients from our database (2000-2015), aged 40-70 years old, functional class II/III and ejection fraction ≤40%, and they were divided into three groups: idiopathic ( n = 11), ischaemic ( n = 18) and hypertensive ( n = 16). Methods Functional capacity was determined by cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) was recorded by microneurography. Forearm blood flow (FBF) was measured by venous occlusion plethysmography. Results Four months of exercise training significantly reduced MSNA and significantly increased FBF in all groups. However, the relative reduction in MSNA was greater in hypertensive patients compared with that in idiopathic patients (frequency: -34% vs . -15%, p = 0.01; incidence: -31% vs . -12%, p = 0.02). No differences were found between hypertensive patients and ischaemic patients. The relative increase in FBF was greater in hypertensive patients than in ischaemic and idiopathic patients (42% vs. 15% and 17%, respectively, p = 0.02). The relative increase in forearm vascular conductance was greater in hypertensive patients compared with those in ischaemic and idiopathic patients (57% vs . 13% and 26%, respectively, p = 0.001). Exercise training significantly and similarly increased peak oxygen consumption in all groups. Conclusion The exercise-induced improvement in neurovascular control is more pronounced in hypertensive HF patients than in idiopathic and ischaemic HF patients. The increase in functional capacity is independent of aetiology.

  16. Benefits of exercise training in the treatment of heart failure: study with a control group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Mário Sérgio Vaz da

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Exercise training programs have been proposed as adjuncts to treatment of heart failure. The effects of a 3-month-exercise-training-program with 3 exercise sessions per week were assessed in patients with stable systolic chronic heart failure. METHODS: We studied 24 patients with final left ventricle diastolic diameter of 70±10mm and left ventricular ejection fraction of 37±4%. Mean age was 52±16 years. Twelve patients were assigned to an exercise training group (G1, and 12 patients were assigned to a control group (G2. Patients underwent treadmill testing, before and after exercise training, to assess distance walked, heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and double product. RESULTS: In G2 group, before and after 3 months, we observed, respectively distance walked, 623±553 and 561± 460m (ns; peak heart rate, 142±23 and 146± 33b/min (ns; systolic blood pressure, 154±36 and 164±26 mmHg (ns; and double product, 22211± 6454 and 24293±7373 (ns. In G1 group, before and after exercise, we observed: distance walked, 615±394 and 970± 537m (p<0.003 peak heart rate, 143±24 and 143±29b/min (ns; systolic blood pressure, 136±33 and 133±24 mmHg (ns; and double product, 19907± 7323 and 19115±5776, respectively. Comparing the groups, a significant difference existed regarding the variation in the double product, and in distance walked. CONCLUSION: Exercise training programs in patients with heart failure can bring about an improvement in physical capacity.

  17. Are Injuries More Common With CrossFit Training Than Other Forms of Exercise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimek, Chelsey; Ashbeck, Christopher; Brook, Alexander J; Durall, Chris

    2017-03-02

    Clinical Scenario: CrossFit is a form of exercise that incorporates rapid and successive high-intensity, ballistic movements. As CrossFit becomes an increasingly popular fitness option, it is important to determine how rates of injury compare to more traditional forms of exercise. This review was conducted to ascertain the incidence of injury with CrossFit relative to other forms of exercise. Focused Clinical Question: Are injuries more common with CrossFit training than other forms of exercise? Summary of Key Findings The literature was searched for studies that compared injury rates among individuals who participated in CrossFit fitness programs to participants in other exercise programs The search initially yielded >100 results which was narrowed down to three level 2b retrospective cohort studies that was deemed to have met inclusion/exclusion criteria In all three reviewed studies, the reported incidences of injuries associated with CrossFit training programs were comparable or lower than rates of injury in Olympic weightlifting, distance running, track and field, rugby, or gymnastics. Clinical Bottom Line: Current evidence suggests that the injury risk from CrossFit training is comparable to Olympic weightlifting, distance running, track and field, rugby, football, ice hockey, soccer or gymnastics. Injuries to the shoulder(s) appear to be somewhat common with CrossFit. However, the certitude of these conclusions is questionable given the lack of randomization, control, or uniform training in the reviewed studies. Clinicians should be aware that injury is more prevalent in cases where supervision is not always available to athletes. This is more often the case for male participants who may not actively seek supervision during CrossFit exercise. Strength of Recommendation: Level 2b evidence from three retrospective cohort studies indicates that the risk of injury from participation in CrossFit is comparable to or lower than some common forms of exercise or

  18. Impairments in site-specific AS160 phosphorylation and effects of exercise training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Consitt, Leslie A; Van Meter, Jessica; Newton, Christopher A

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if site-specific phosphorylation at the level of Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160) is altered in skeletal muscle from sedentary humans across a wide range of the adult lifespan (18 to 84 years) and if endurance- and/or strength-oriented exercise training...... in whole-body insulin action were associated with impairments in insulin-induced phosphorylation of skeletal muscle AS160 on sites Ser-588, Thr-642, Ser-666 and phospho-Akt substrate (PAS), but not Ser-318 or Ser-751. Twelve weeks of either endurance- or strength-oriented exercise training increased whole...... population and that exercise training is an effective intervention for treating these impairments....

  19. Eccentric exercise training as a countermeasure to non-weight-bearing soleus muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Christopher R.; Ryan, Mirelle J.; Booth, Frank W.

    1992-01-01

    This investigation tested whether eccentric resistance training could prevent soleus muscle atrophy during non-weight bearing. Adult female rats were randomly assigned to either weight bearing +/- intramuscular electrodes or non-weight bearing +/- intramuscular electrodes groups. Electrically stimulated maximal eccentric contractions were performed on anesthetized animals at 48-h intervals during the 10-day experiment. Non-weight bearing significantly reduced soleus muscle wet weight (28-31 percent) and noncollagenous protein content (30-31 percent) compared with controls. Eccentric exercise training during non-weight bearing attenuated but did not prevent the loss of soleus muscle wet weight and noncollagenous protein by 77 and 44 percent, respectively. The potential of eccentric exercise training as an effective and highly efficient counter-measure to non-weight-bearing atrophy is demonstrated in the 44 percent attenuation of soleus muscle noncollagenous protein loss by eccentric exercise during only 0.035 percent of the total non-weight-bearing time period.

  20. Effect of training in the fasted state on metabolic responses during exercise with carbohydrate intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Bock, K; Derave, W; Eijnde, B O

    2008-01-01

    program (6 wk, 3 day/wk, 1-2 h, 75% of peak Vo(2)) in moderately active males. They trained in the fasted (F; n = 10) or carbohydrate-fed state (CHO; n = 10) while receiving a standardized diet [65 percent of total energy intake (En) from carbohydrates, 20%En fat, 15%En protein]. Before and after...... adaptations in peak Vo(2) whether carried out in the fasted or carbohydrate-fed state. Although there was a decrease in exercise-induced glycogen breakdown and an increase in proteins involved in fat handling after fasting training, fat oxidation during exercise with carbohydrate intake was not changed....... similarly increased between F and CHO. Fatty acid binding protein (FABPm) content increased significantly in F (P = 0.007). Intramyocellular triglyceride content (IMCL) remained unchanged in both groups. After training, pre-exercise glycogen content was higher in CHO (545 +/- 19 mmol/kg dry wt; P = 0...

  1. Eccentric exercise training as a countermeasure to non-weight-bearing soleus muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Christopher R.; Ryan, Mirelle J.; Booth, Frank W.

    1992-01-01

    This investigation tested whether eccentric resistance training could prevent soleus muscle atrophy during non-weight bearing. Adult female rats were randomly assigned to either weight bearing +/- intramuscular electrodes or non-weight bearing +/- intramuscular electrodes groups. Electrically stimulated maximal eccentric contractions were performed on anesthetized animals at 48-h intervals during the 10-day experiment. Non-weight bearing significantly reduced soleus muscle wet weight (28-31 percent) and noncollagenous protein content (30-31 percent) compared with controls. Eccentric exercise training during non-weight bearing attenuated but did not prevent the loss of soleus muscle wet weight and noncollagenous protein by 77 and 44 percent, respectively. The potential of eccentric exercise training as an effective and highly efficient counter-measure to non-weight-bearing atrophy is demonstrated in the 44 percent attenuation of soleus muscle noncollagenous protein loss by eccentric exercise during only 0.035 percent of the total non-weight-bearing time period.

  2. Ground-based walking training improves quality of life and exercise capacity in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton, Sally L; Ng, L W Cindy; McKeough, Zoe J; Jenkins, Sue; Hill, Kylie; Eastwood, Peter R; Hillman, David R; Cecins, Nola; Spencer, Lissa M; Jenkins, Christine; Alison, Jennifer A

    2014-10-01

    This study was designed to determine the effect of ground-based walking training on health-related quality of life and exercise capacity in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). People with COPD were randomised to either a walking group that received supervised, ground-based walking training two to three times a week for 8-10 weeks, or a control group that received usual medical care and did not participate in exercise training. 130 out of 143 participants (mean±sd age 69±8 years, forced expiratory volume in 1 s 43±15% predicted) completed the study. Compared to the control group, the walking group demonstrated greater improvements in the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire total score (mean difference -6 points (95% CI -10- -2), pimproves quality of life and endurance exercise capacity in people with COPD.

  3. Exercise training accelerates the removal from plasma of LDL-like nanoemulsion in moderately hypercholesterolemic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficker, Elisabeth S; Maranhão, Raul C; Chacra, Ana P M; Neves, Vanessa C; Negrão, Carlos E; Martins, Vanessa C N; Vinagre, Carmen G C de M

    2010-09-01

    Exercise training improves plasma lipid profile and diminishes risk of coronary heart disease. Previously, we showed that training increases LDL plasma clearance, as tested by an artificial LDL-like nanoemulsion method, presumably by increasing LDL receptor activity. In this study, we investigated whether training could also improve LDL clearance in hypercholesterolemic subjects (HCh) that are exposed to increased risk of cardiovascular events. Twenty sedentary HCh and 20 normolipidemic (NL) sedentary volunteers were divided into four groups: 12 HCh submitted to 4-month training program, 8 HCh with no exercise program, 12 NL submitted to 4-month training and 8 NL with no exercise program. An LDL-like nanoemulsion labeled with (14)C-cholesteryl ester was injected intravenously into all subjects and plasma samples were collected during 24 h after injection to determine the fractional clearance rate (FCR, in h(-1)) by compartmental analysis. The study was performed on the first and on the last day of the 4-month study period. In both, trained HCh and NL groups, training increased nanoemulsion FCR by 36% (0.0443+/-0.0126; 0.0602+/-0.0187, p=0.0187 and 0.0503+/-0.0203; 0.0686+/-0.0216, p=0.0827, respectively). After training, LDL cholesterol diminished in both HCh and NL groups. In HCh, but not in NL group, LDL susceptibility to oxidation decreased, but oxidized LDL was unchanged. In both non-trained groups FCR was the same for the last and the 4-month previous evaluation. In HCh, exercise training increased the removal of LDL as tested by the nanoemulsion, and this probably accounted for decreased LDL cholesterol and diminished LDL susceptibility to oxidation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Glucose clearance in aged trained skeletal muscle during maximal insulin with superimposed exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dela, Flemming; Mikines, K J; Larsen, J J

    1999-01-01

    clamp with a final 30 min of superimposed two-legged exercise at 70% of individual maximal heart rate. With superimposed exercise, leg glucose extraction decreased (P exercise, leg......Insulin and muscle contractions are major stimuli for glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and have in young healthy people been shown to be additive. We studied the effect of superimposed exercise during a maximal insulin stimulus on glucose uptake and clearance in trained (T) (1-legged bicycle...... +/- 8, DM: 70 +/- 10 ml. min(-1). kg leg(-1)) compared with UT (H: 63 +/- 8, DM: 45 +/- 7 ml. min(-1). kg leg(-1)) but not different between groups (P > 0.05). From these results it can be concluded that, in both diabetic and healthy aged muscle, exercise adds to a maximally insulin-stimulated glucose...

  5. Exercise training improves obesity‐related lymphatic dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hespe, Geoffrey E.; Kataru, Raghu P.; Savetsky, Ira L.; García Nores, Gabriela D.; Torrisi, Jeremy S.; Nitti, Matthew D.; Gardenier, Jason C.; Zhou, Jie; Yu, Jessie Z.; Jones, Lee W.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Obesity results in perilymphatic inflammation and lymphatic dysfunction.Lymphatic dysfunction in obesity is characterized by decreased lymphatic vessel density, decreased collecting lymphatic vessel pumping frequency, decreased lymphatic trafficking of immune cells, increased lymphatic vessel leakiness and changes in the gene expression patterns of lymphatic endothelial cells.Aerobic exercise, independent of weight loss, decreases perilymphatic inflammatory cell accumulation, improves lymphatic function and reverses pathological changes in gene expression in lymphatic endothelial cells. Abstract Although previous studies have shown that obesity markedly decreases lymphatic function, the cellular mechanisms that regulate this response remain unknown. In addition, it is unclear whether the pathological effects of obesity on the lymphatic system are reversible with behavioural modifications. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to analyse lymphatic vascular changes in obese mice and to determine whether these pathological effects are reversible with aerobic exercise. We randomized obese mice to either aerobic exercise (treadmill running for 30 min per day, 5 days a week, for 6 weeks) or a sedentary group that was not exercised and analysed lymphatic function using a variety of outcomes. We found that sedentary obese mice had markedly decreased collecting lymphatic vessel pumping capacity, decreased lymphatic vessel density, decreased lymphatic migration of immune cells, increased lymphatic vessel leakiness and decreased expression of lymphatic specific markers compared with lean mice (all P < 0.01). Aerobic exercise did not cause weight loss but markedly improved lymphatic function compared with sedentary obese mice. Exercise had a significant anti‐inflammatory effect, resulting in decreased perilymphatic accumulation of inflammatory cells and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression. In addition, exercise normalized isolated lymphatic

  6. Exercise training improves obesity-related lymphatic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hespe, Geoffrey E; Kataru, Raghu P; Savetsky, Ira L; García Nores, Gabriela D; Torrisi, Jeremy S; Nitti, Matthew D; Gardenier, Jason C; Zhou, Jie; Yu, Jessie Z; Jones, Lee W; Mehrara, Babak J

    2016-08-01

    Obesity results in perilymphatic inflammation and lymphatic dysfunction. Lymphatic dysfunction in obesity is characterized by decreased lymphatic vessel density, decreased collecting lymphatic vessel pumping frequency, decreased lymphatic trafficking of immune cells, increased lymphatic vessel leakiness and changes in the gene expression patterns of lymphatic endothelial cells. Aerobic exercise, independent of weight loss, decreases perilymphatic inflammatory cell accumulation, improves lymphatic function and reverses pathological changes in gene expression in lymphatic endothelial cells. Although previous studies have shown that obesity markedly decreases lymphatic function, the cellular mechanisms that regulate this response remain unknown. In addition, it is unclear whether the pathological effects of obesity on the lymphatic system are reversible with behavioural modifications. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to analyse lymphatic vascular changes in obese mice and to determine whether these pathological effects are reversible with aerobic exercise. We randomized obese mice to either aerobic exercise (treadmill running for 30 min per day, 5 days a week, for 6 weeks) or a sedentary group that was not exercised and analysed lymphatic function using a variety of outcomes. We found that sedentary obese mice had markedly decreased collecting lymphatic vessel pumping capacity, decreased lymphatic vessel density, decreased lymphatic migration of immune cells, increased lymphatic vessel leakiness and decreased expression of lymphatic specific markers compared with lean mice (all P exercise did not cause weight loss but markedly improved lymphatic function compared with sedentary obese mice. Exercise had a significant anti-inflammatory effect, resulting in decreased perilymphatic accumulation of inflammatory cells and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression. In addition, exercise normalized isolated lymphatic endothelial cell gene expression of lymphatic

  7. Effects of high-intensity exercise training in a pulmonary rehabilitation programme for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Meng-Jer; Lan, Chou-Chin; Chen, Ning-Hung; Huang, Chung-Chi; Wu, Yao-Kuang; Cho, Hsio-Ying; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2007-05-01

    The benefits of pulmonary rehabilitation for patients with COPD depend on the intensity of training. Traditional pulmonary rehabilitation programmes (PRPs) do not consistently achieve high-intensity training and have variable training effects. This study examined the effects of high-intensity exercise training on cardiac and pulmonary function in COPD patients. Patients with COPD participated in a 6-week, cardiopulmonary exercise test-based PRP. Spirometry, 6-min walking distance and cardiopulmonary exercise test were used to evaluate cardiopulmonary function, respiratory muscle strength and endurance at rest, during exercise and before and after the programme. Patients were encouraged to complete high-intensity exercise with a targeted training intensity of at least 75% maximum oxygen uptake (VO(2)). Thirty-four COPD patients were enrolled into the study; 16 completed the high-intensity training, 18 did not. At the end of the 12-session PRP, submaximal exercise capacity (6-min walking distance, 461.8 +/- 77.2-502.7 +/- 66.9 m, P training and those who did not. Only the patients who completed high-intensity training had significant improvements in FVC (2.47 +/- 0.70-2.70 +/- 0.62 L, P = 0.024) at rest, maximal exercise capacity (peak VO(2), 1001.6 +/- 286.4-1116.1 +/- 320.4 mL/min, P = 0.020) and work efficiency (7.3 +/- 1.4-8.4 +/- 1.8 mL/min/watt, P = 0.026). There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in the change in the physiological parameters before and after exercise. Exercise training in a PRP improved submaximal exercise capacity. Only patients who completed high-intensity exercise training showed improvements in maximal exercise capacity, FVC and work efficiency.

  8. Effects of presurgical exercise training on systemic inflammatory markers among patients with malignant lung lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lee W; Eves, Neil D; Peddle, Carolyn J; Courneya, Kerry S; Haykowsky, Mark; Kumar, Vikaash; Winton, Timothy W; Reiman, Tony

    2009-04-01

    Systemic inflammation plays an important role in the initiation, promotion, and progression of lung carcinogenesis. The effects of interventions to lower inflammation have not been explored. Accordingly, we conducted a pilot study to explore the effects of exercise training on changes in biomarkers of systemic inflammation among patients with malignant lung lesions. Using a single-group design, 12 patients with suspected operable lung cancer were provided with structured exercise training until surgical resection. Participants underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing, 6 min walk testing, pulmonary function testing, and blood collection at baseline and immediately prior to surgical resection. Systemic inflammatory markers included intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, C-reactive protein, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. The overall exercise adherence rate was 78%, with patients completing a mean of 30 +/- 25 sessions. Mean peak oxygen consumption increased 2.9 mL.kg-1.min-1 from baseline to presurgery (p = 0.016). Results indicate that exercise training resulted in a significant reduction in ICAM-1 (p = 0.041). Changes in other inflammatory markers did not reach statistical significance. Change in cardiorespiratory fitness was not associated with change in systemic inflammatory markers. This exploratory study provides an initial step for future studies to elucidate the potential role of exercise, as well as identify the underlying mechanisms of action, as a means of modulating the relationship between inflammation and cancer pathogenesis.

  9. A STUDY ON EFFECTIVENESS OF TREADMILL EXERCISE TRAINING IN GAIT PARAMETERS OF CHRONIC STROKE CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Divan Mohaideen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Stroke is the leading cause of death and the most common cause of disability. This study determined the effects of Treadmill Aerobic Exercise on spatial and temporal gait parameters among stroke patients. Materials & Methods: In this study, Thirty -nine subjects with hemiparetic stroke underwent Treadmill Aerobic Exercise four times weekly for six months from December 2006 to June 2007. This study has taken place in Department of Physical therapy and Rehabilitation, GSN multi Specialty hospital and research Centre, Hyderabad, India. We measured the spatial and temporal gait parameters of the subjects before and after Treadmill Aerobic Exercise training by the means of 30-foot timed walks, 6 minute distance walks with usual assistive devices and 8metre instrumented walkway without assistive devices. Pre and post training results were compared and contrast. Results: This study results that the Treadmill Aerobic Exercise improved 30-foot walks by 17% and 6 minute walk by 23%. Unassisted walking velocity increased 22%, stride length increased 13% and cadence increased 7%. Paretic and non-paretic step lengths increased significantly, and respective step times increased significantly. Discussion: Large study should be done with treadmill exercise training along with other skills for the better results to improve the gait parameters in chronic stroke cases. Conclusion: This study shows the evidence for positive changes in spatial and temporal gait parameters of subjects with stroke after Treadmill Aerobic Exercise.

  10. Application of A Physiological Strain Index in Evaluating Responses to Exercise Stress – A Comparison Between Endurance and High Intensity Intermittent Trained Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żebrowska, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The study evaluated differences in response to exercise stress between endurance and high-intensity intermittent trained athletes in a thermoneutral environment using a physiological strain index (PSI). Thirty-two subjects participated in a running exercise under normal (23°C, 50% RH) conditions. The group included nine endurance trained athletes (middle-distance runners - MD), twelve high-intensity intermittent trained athletes (soccer players - HIIT) and eleven students who constituted a control group. The exercise started at a speed of 4 km·h–1 which was increased every 3 min by 2 km·h–1 to volitional exhaustion. The heart rate was recorded with a heart rate monitor and aural canal temperature was measured using an aural canal temperature probe. The physiological strain index (PSI) and the contribution of the circulatory and thermal components to the overall physiological strain were calculated from the heart rate and aural canal temperature. The physiological strain index differed between the study and control participants, but not between the MD and HIIT groups. The physiological strain in response to exercise stress in a thermoneutral environment was mainly determined based on the circulatory strain (MD group - 73%, HIIT group – 70%). The contribution of the circulatory and thermal components to the physiological strain did not differ significantly between the trained groups (MD and HIIT) despite important differences in morphological characteristics and training-induced systemic cardiovascular and thermoregulatory adaptations. PMID:28149347

  11. Application of A Physiological Strain Index in Evaluating Responses to Exercise Stress – A Comparison Between Endurance and High Intensity Intermittent Trained Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pokora Ilona

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The study evaluated differences in response to exercise stress between endurance and high-intensity intermittent trained athletes in a thermoneutral environment using a physiological strain index (PSI. Thirty-two subjects participated in a running exercise under normal (23°C, 50% RH conditions. The group included nine endurance trained athletes (middle-distance runners - MD, twelve high-intensity intermittent trained athletes (soccer players - HIIT and eleven students who constituted a control group. The exercise started at a speed of 4 km·h–1 which was increased every 3 min by 2 km·h–1 to volitional exhaustion. The heart rate was recorded with a heart rate monitor and aural canal temperature was measured using an aural canal temperature probe. The physiological strain index (PSI and the contribution of the circulatory and thermal components to the overall physiological strain were calculated from the heart rate and aural canal temperature. The physiological strain index differed between the study and control participants, but not between the MD and HIIT groups. The physiological strain in response to exercise stress in a thermoneutral environment was mainly determined based on the circulatory strain (MD group - 73%, HIIT group – 70%. The contribution of the circulatory and thermal components to the physiological strain did not differ significantly between the trained groups (MD and HIIT despite important differences in morphological characteristics and training-induced systemic cardiovascular and thermoregulatory adaptations.

  12. Training and muscle ammonia and amino acid metabolism in humans during prolonged exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graham, T E; Turcotte, L P; Kiens, Bente

    1995-01-01

    We studied the responses of NH3 and amino acids (AA) to prolonged exercise (3 h) in trained (Tr; n = 6) and untrained (Utr; n = 6) men. Each subject exercised the knee extensor muscles of one leg at 60% of maximum capacity. Thigh blood flow and femoral arteriovenous differences (0, 30, 60, 120, 150....... Under these conditions, prolonged dynamic knee extensor exercise is associated with a large release of alpha-amino moieties both as NH3 and as Gln as well as a net protein catabolism; these responses are similar in Tr and Utr....

  13. Effect of Exercise Training on Enos Expression, NO Production and Oxygen Metabolism in Human Placenta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson; Bustamante, Juanita; Czerniczyniec, Analia; Aguilar de Plata, Ana C.; Lores-Arnaiz, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the effects of combined aerobic and resistance exercise training during the second half of pregnancy on endothelial NOS expression (eNOS), nitric oxide (NO) production and oxygen metabolism in human placenta. Methods The study included 20 nulliparous in gestational week 16–20, attending prenatal care at three tertiary hospitals in Colombia who were randomly assigned into one of two groups: The exercise group (n = 10) took part in an exercise session three times a week for 12 weeks which consisted of: aerobic exercise at an intensity of 55–75% of their maximum heart rate for 60 min and 25 mins. Resistance exercise included 5 exercise groups circuit training (50 repetitions of each) using barbells (1–3 kg/exercise) and low-to-medium resistance bands. The control group (n = 10) undertook their usual physical activity. Mitochondrial and cytosol fractions were isolated from human placental tissue by differential centrifugation. A spectrophotometric assay was used to measure NO production in cytosolic samples from placental tissue and Western Blot technique to determine eNOS expression. Mitochondrial superoxide levels and hydrogen peroxide were measured to determine oxygen metabolism. Results Combined aerobic and resistance exercise training during pregnancy leads to a 2-fold increase in eNOS expression and 4-fold increase in NO production in placental cytosol (p = 0.05). Mitochondrial superoxide levels and hydrogen peroxide production rate were decreased by 8% and 37% respectively in the placental mitochondria of exercising women (p = 0.05). Conclusion Regular exercise training during the second half of pregnancy increases eNOS expression and NO production and decreases reactive oxygen species generation in human placenta. Collectively, these data demonstrate that chronic exercise increases eNOS/NO production, presumably by increasing endothelial shear stress. This adaptation may contribute to the beneficial effects of

  14. "The effect of supervised exercise training on psychological characteristics and physical fitness after myocardial infarction "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Boshtam M

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available Regarding the increasing prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD especially myocardial infarction (MI, and the insufficiency of information in the field of physical rehabilitation, this study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of a course of physical rehabilitation on the psychological status and physical characteristics f cardiac patients. In this study, the effect of 8 weeks exercise training, 3 sessions of 45 minutes duration per week, on the physical and psychological function of MI patients was evaluated. Eighty patients who were referred to the rehabilitation unit of Isfahan cardiovascular Research Center were randomly divided into two groups of exercise and non-exercise. The data of pre and post exercise course were analyzed with the SPSS software using the two-sample t-test and multiple liner regression. The comparison of the mean changes of functional capacity. Weight, body mass index (BMI, heart rate, and systolic and diastolic blood pressures between exercise and non-exercise groups after 8 weeks showed significant difference for all studied factors (P<0.05. Also, investigating the psychological characteristics such as depression, anxiety and hostility scores indicated a significant change after exercise training (P<0.05. Personality and behavior showed no significant difference. This study suggests the functional has a significant effect on improving the function capacity and psychological behavior in post MI patients.

  15. Blood Volume: Importance and Adaptations to Exercise Training, Environmental Stresses and Trauma/Sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawka, Michael N.; Convertino, Victor A.; Eichner, E. Randy; Schnieder, Suzanne M.; Young, Andrew J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews the influence of several perturbations (physical exercise, heat stress, terrestrial altitude, microgravity, and trauma/sickness) on adaptations of blood volume (BV), erythrocyte volume (EV), and plasma volume (PV). Exercise training can induced BV expansion; PV expansion usually occurs immediately, but EV expansion takes weeks. EV and PV expansion contribute to aerobic power improvements associated with exercise training. Repeated heat exposure induces PV expansion but does not alter EV. PV expansion does not improve thermoregulation, but EV expansion improves thermoregulation during exercise in the heat. Dehydration decreases PV (and increases plasma tonicity) which elevates heat strain and reduces exercise performance. High altitude exposure causes rapid (hours) plasma loss. During initial weeks at altitude, EV is unaffected, but a gradual expansion occurs with extended acclimatization. BV adjustments contribute, but are not key, to altitude acclimatization. Microgravity decreases PV and EV which contribute to orthostatic intolerance and decreased exercise capacity in astronauts. PV decreases may result from lower set points for total body water and central venous pressure, which EV decrease bay result form increased erythrocyte destruction. Trauma, renal disease, and chronic diseases cause anemia from hemorrhage and immune activation, which suppressions erythropoiesis. The re-establishment of EV is associated with healing, improved life quality, and exercise capabilities for these injured/sick persons.

  16. Mitochondrial and performance adaptations to exercise training in mice lacking skeletal muscle LKB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Colby B; Madsen, Steven R; Hallowell, David M; Goring, Darren M J; Moore, Timothy M; Hardman, Shalene E; Heninger, Megan R; Atwood, Daniel R; Thomson, David M

    2013-10-15

    LKB1 and its downstream targets of the AMP-activated protein kinase family are important regulators of many aspects of skeletal muscle cell function, including control of mitochondrial content and capillarity. LKB1 deficiency in skeletal and cardiac muscle (mLKB1-KO) greatly impairs exercise capacity. However, cardiac dysfunction in that genetic model prevents a clear assessment of the role of skeletal muscle LKB1 in the observed effects. Our purposes here were to determine whether skeletal muscle-specific knockout of LKB1 (skmLKB1-KO) decreases exercise capacity and mitochondrial protein content, impairs accretion of mitochondrial proteins after exercise training, and attenuates improvement in running performance after exercise training. We found that treadmill and voluntary wheel running capacity was reduced in skmLKB1-KO vs. control (CON) mice. Citrate synthase activity, succinate dehydrogenase activity, and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase content were lower in KO vs. CON muscles. Three weeks of treadmill training resulted in significantly increased treadmill running performance in both CON and skmLKB1-KO mice. Citrate synthase activity increased significantly with training in both genotypes, but protein content and activity for components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain increased only in CON mice. Capillarity and VEGF protein was lower in skmLKB1-KO vs. CON muscles, but VEGF increased with training only in skmLKB1-KO. Three hours after an acute bout of muscle contractions, PGC-1α, cytochrome c, and VEGF gene expression all increased in CON but not skmLKB1-KO muscles. Our findings indicate that skeletal muscle LKB1 is required for accretion of some mitochondrial proteins but not for early exercise capacity improvements with exercise training.

  17. Autophagy is required for exercise training-induced skeletal muscle adaptation and improvement of physical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira, Vitor A; Okutsu, Mitsuharu; Zhang, Mei; Greene, Nicholas P; Laker, Rhianna C; Breen, David S; Hoehn, Kyle L; Yan, Zhen

    2013-10-01

    Pathological and physiological stimuli, including acute exercise, activate autophagy; however, it is unknown whether exercise training alters basal levels of autophagy and whether autophagy is required for skeletal muscle adaptation to training. We observed greater autophagy flux (i.e., a combination of increased LC3-II/LC3-I ratio and LC3-II levels and reduced p62 protein content indicating a higher rate of initiation and resolution of autophagic events), autophagy protein expression (i.e., Atg6/Beclin1, Atg7, and Atg8/LC3) and mitophagy protein Bnip3 expression in tonic, oxidative muscle compared to muscles of either mixed fiber types or of predominant glycolytic fibers in mice. Long-term voluntary running (4 wk) resulted in increased basal autophagy flux and expression of autophagy proteins and Bnip3 in parallel to mitochondrial biogenesis in plantaris muscle with mixed fiber types. Conversely, exercise training promoted autophagy protein expression with no significant increases of autophagy flux and mitochondrial biogenesis in the oxidative soleus muscle. We also observed increased basal autophagy flux and Bnip3 content without increases in autophagy protein expression in the plantaris muscle of sedentary muscle-specific Pgc-1α transgenic mice, a genetic model of augmented mitochondrial biogenesis. These findings reveal that endurance exercise training-induced increases in basal autophagy, including mitophagy, only take place if an enhanced oxidative phenotype is achieved. However, autophagy protein expression is mainly dictated by contractile activity independently of enhancements in oxidative phenotype. Exercise-trained mice heterozygous for the critical autophagy protein Atg6 showed attenuated increases of basal autophagy flux, mitochondrial content, and angiogenesis in skeletal muscle, along with impaired improvement of endurance capacity. These results demonstrate that increased basal autophagy is required for endurance exercise training-induced skeletal

  18. Key role of endothelium in the eNOS-dependent cardioprotection with exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, C; Nascimento, A; Bolea, G; Meyer, G; Gayrard, S; Lacampagne, A; Cazorla, O; Reboul, C

    2017-01-01

    Modulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation is recognized as a main trigger of the cardioprotective effects of exercise training on heart vulnerability to ischemia-reperfusion (IR). However, this enzyme is expressed both in coronary endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes and the contribution of each one to such cardioprotection has never been challenged. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of eNOS from the cardiomyocytes vs. the endothelium in the exercise cardioprotection. Male Wistar rats were assigned to a chronic aerobic training (Ex) (vs. sedentary group; Sed) and we investigated the role of eNOS in the effects of exercise on sensitivity to IR or anoxia-reoxygenation (A/R) at whole heart, isolated cardiomyocytes and left coronary artery (LCA) levels. We observed that exercise increased eNOS activation (Ser1177 phosphorylation) and protein S-nitrosylation in whole heart but not at cardiomyocyte level, suggesting the specific target of endothelial cells by exercise. Consistently, in isolated cardiomyocytes submitted to the A/R procedure, exercise reduced cell death and improved cells contractility, but independently of the eNOS pathway. Next, to evaluate the contribution of endothelial cells in exercise cardioprotection, LCA were isolated before and after an IR procedure performed on Langendorff hearts. Exercise improved basal relaxation sensitivity to acetylcholine and markedly reduced the alteration of endothelium-dependent coronary relaxation induced by IR. Furthermore, inactivation of coronary endothelial cells activity just before IR, obtained with a bolus of Triton X-100, totally suppressed cardioprotective effects of exercise on both left ventricular functional recovery after IR and infarct size, whereas no effect of Triton X-100 was observed in Sed group. In conclusion, these results show that coronary endothe