WorldWideScience

Sample records for monitoring requirements needed

  1. IDENTIFICATION OF DOE'S POST-CLOSURE MONITORING NEEDS AND REQUIREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    The 2006 plan sets an ambitious agenda for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) and the remediation of sites contaminated by decades of nuclear weapons production activities. The plan's primary objective is to reduce overall clean up costs by first eliminating the environmental problems that are most expensive to control and safely maintain. In the context of the 2006 Plan, closure refers to the completion of area or facility specific cleanup projects. The cleanup levels are determined by the planned future use of the site or facility. Use restrictions are still undecided for most sites but are highly probable to exclude residential or agricultural activities. Most of the land will be remediated to ''industrial use'' levels with access restrictions and some areas will be closed-off through containment. Portions of the site will be reserved for waste disposal, either as a waste repository or the in-situ immobilization of contaminated soil and groundwater, and land use will be restricted to waste disposal only. The land used for waste disposal will require monitoring and maintenance activities after closure. Most of the land used for industrial use may also require such postclosure activities. The required postclosure monitoring and maintenance activities will be imposed by regulators and stakeholders. Regulators will not approve closure plans without clearly defined monitoring methods using approved technologies. Therefore, among all other more costly and labor-intensive closure-related activities, inadequate planning for monitoring and lack of appropriate monitoring technologies can prevent closure. The purpose of this project is to determine, document, and track the current and evolving postclosure monitoring requirements at DOE-EM sites. This information will aid CMST-CP in guiding its postclosure technology development and deployment efforts.

  2. Department of Labor Needs to Give CETA Prime Sponsors More Guidance and Assistance for Implementing Monitoring Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-03

    minimun the IMUs’ yearly monitoring plan must include 15 areas of emphasis. (See enc. I.) The letter recommended a minimum of one comprehensive...Financial management 8. Allowance payment system 9. Participant wages and benefits 10. Client tracking system 11. Complaint/grievance procedure * 12

  3. 40 CFR 433.12 - Monitoring requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements. (a) In lieu of requiring monitoring for TTO, the permitting authority (or, in the case of... the permit limitation for total toxic organics (TTO), I certify that, to the best of my knowledge and... TTO standard, the industrial discharger need analyse for only those pollutants which would...

  4. Habitat monitoring needs for Arapaho NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the refuge's ideas on what level of monitoring is needed for each habitat objective. Habitat objectives include riparian habitat, wetland habitat,...

  5. The need for monitoring metabolic status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderveen, John E.

    2005-05-01

    Modern military operations utilize complex technologies that require high levels of readiness and sustained cognitive and physical performance of combat military combat personnel. These military operations often depend on weapon systems that use advanced computer technology coupled with an array of sensors that provide continuous information on the battlefield environment and on equipment function. However there is a lack of real-time information on status of the personnel who control these systems and who are vital to mission success. Failure of the human element renders the weapon system useless so it is important to know if an individual is physically and cognitively fit to perform his or her task. Based on the premise that status of metabolic processes provide an early indication of a change in an individuals physiological status, monitoring of selective biomarkers of metabolism and organ function can provide insight on the individual"s ability to perform mission tasks. During combat individuals may not be aware that they have reached a compromised physiological condition due to dehydration, physical exertion, stress, fatigue, sleep deprivation, exposure to toxins or other condition that may affect physical and cognitive performance and health. Systems that can provide the individual or his or her commander with information about significant changes in one or more metabolic functions could permit timely intervention to correct the condition. In the event that serious injury has already occurred to an individual, metabolic monitoring can provide valuable intelligence needed for decisions on achieving mission objectives.

  6. Performance, requirements and testing in individual monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Julius, H.W.; Christensen, P.; Marshall, T.O.

    1990-01-01

    monitoring, and in particular of those related to the energy and angular dependences of the dosemeters. These data are important for the testing of the dosimetry systems. Finally testing programmes in individual monitoring are discussed and four categories of testing are proposed.......For implementation of the ICRP requirements in practical routine monitoring, a specification is needed with respect to specific performance criteria of the dosimetry system. This includes the dosemeters, and procedures for initial and on-going testing of the dosimetry systems to ensure...... that the specified criteria are continuously met. Methods are here specified for establishing performance criteria, and satisfying the ICRP overall accuracy requirements for individual monitoring. Furthermore, procedures are given for obtaining numerical values of the uncertainties connected with individual...

  7. Understanding user needs for carbon monitoring information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duren, R. M.; Macauley, M.; Gurney, K. R.; Saatchi, S. S.; Woodall, C. W.; Larsen, K.; Reidmiller, D.; Hockstad, L.; Weitz, M.; Croes, B.; Down, A.; West, T.; Mercury, M.

    2015-12-01

    The objectives of the Understanding User Needs project for NASA's Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) program are to: 1) engage the user community and identify needs for policy-relevant carbon monitoring information, 2) evaluate current and planned CMS data products with regard to their value for decision making, and 3) explore alternative methods for visualizing and communicating carbon monitoring information and associated uncertainties to decision makers and other stakeholders. To meet these objectives and help establish a sustained link between science and decision-making we have established a multi-disciplinary team that combines expertise in carbon-cycle science, engineering, economics, and carbon management and policy. We will present preliminary findings regarding emerging themes and needs for carbon information that may warrant increased attention by the science community. We will also demonstrate a new web-based tool that offers a common framework for facilitating user evaluation of carbon data products from multiple CMS projects.

  8. Need for improved monitoring in patients with acromegaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Julie M

    2015-01-01

    Acromegaly is a rare and insidious disease characterized by the overproduction of growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) and is most commonly due to a pituitary adenoma. Patients with acromegaly who experience prolonged exposure to elevated levels of GH and IGF1 have an increased mortality risk and progressive worsening of disease-related comorbidities. Multimodal treatment with surgery, medical therapy, and radiotherapy provides biochemical control, defined by recent acromegaly clinical guidelines from the Endocrine Society as a reduction of GH levels to acromegaly, even those without clinical symptoms of disease, require long-term monitoring of GH and IGF1 levels if the benefits associated with biochemical control are to be maintained and the risk of developing recurrent disease is to be abated. However, suboptimal monitoring is common in patients with acromegaly, and this can have negative health effects due to delays in detection of recurrent disease and implementation of appropriate treatment. Because of the significant health consequences associated with prolonged exposure to elevated levels of GH and IGF1, optimal monitoring in patients with acromegaly is needed. This review article will discuss the biochemical assessments used for therapeutic monitoring in acromegaly, the importance of monitoring after surgery and medical therapy or radiotherapy, the consequences of suboptimal monitoring, and the need for improved monitoring algorithms for patients with acromegaly. PMID:26381160

  9. COMPARING LEGAL REQUIREMENTS AND USER NEEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gristina

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Road transport has always played an important role in a country’s growth and, in order to manage road networks and ensure a high standard of road performance (e.g. durability, efficiency and safety, both public and private road inventories have been implemented using databases and Geographical Information Systems. They enable registering and managing significant amounts of different road information, but to date do not focus on 3D road information, data integration and interoperability. In an increasingly complex 3D urban environment, and in the age of smart cities, however, applications including intelligent transport systems, mobility and traffic management, road maintenance and safety require digital data infrastructures to manage road data: thus new inventories based on integrated 3D road models (queryable, updateable and shareable on line are required. This paper outlines the first step towards the implementation of 3D GIS-based road inventories. Focusing on the case study of the “Road Cadastre” (the Italian road inventory as established by law, it investigates current limitations and required improvements, and also compares the required data structure imposed by cadastral legislation with real road users’ needs. The study aims to: a determine whether 3D GIS would improve road cadastre (for better management of data through the complete life-cycle infrastructure projects; b define a conceptual model for a 3D road cadastre for Italy (whose general principles may be extended also to other countries.

  10. Review of FEWS NET biophysical monitoring requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, K W; Underwood, L W [Science Systems and Applications, Incorporated, 411 West Michigan Street, Poplarville, MS 39470 (United States); Brown, M E [NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 614.4, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Verdin, J P [United States Geological Survey, National Integrated Drought Information System, NOAA/ESRL, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States)], E-mail: kenton_ross@ssaihq.com, E-mail: molly.brown@nasa.gov, E-mail: verdin@usgs.gov, E-mail: lauren_underwood@ssaihq.com

    2009-04-15

    The Famine Early Warning System Network (FEWS NET) provides monitoring and early warning support to decision makers responsible for responding to famine and food insecurity. FEWS NET transforms satellite remote sensing data into rainfall and vegetation information that can be used by these decision makers. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has recently funded activities to enhance remote sensing inputs to FEWS NET. To elicit Earth observation requirements, a professional review questionnaire was disseminated to FEWS NET expert end-users; it focused upon operational requirements to determine additional useful remote sensing data and, subsequently, to assess whether such data would be beneficial as FEWS NET biophysical supplementary inputs. The review was completed by over 40 experts from around the world. Reviewers were asked to evaluate the relative importance of environmental variables and spatio-temporal requirements for Earth science data products, in particular for rainfall and vegetation products. The results showed that spatio-temporal resolution requirements are complex and need to vary according to place, time, and hazard; that high resolution remote sensing products continue to be in demand; and that rainfall and vegetation products are valued as data that provide actionable food security information.

  11. Review of FEWS NET Biophysical Monitoring Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, K. W.; Brown, Molly E.; Verdin, J.; Underwood, L. W.

    2009-01-01

    The Famine Early Warning System Network (FEWS NET) provides monitoring and early warning support to decision makers responsible for responding to famine and food insecurity. FEWS NET transforms satellite remote sensing data into rainfall and vegetation information that can be used by these decision makers. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has recently funded activities to enhance remote sensing inputs to FEWS NET. To elicit Earth observation requirements, a professional review questionnaire was disseminated to FEWS NET expert end-users: it focused upon operational requirements to determine additional useful remote sensing data and; subsequently, beneficial FEWS NET biophysical supplementary inputs. The review was completed by over 40 experts from around the world, enabling a robust set of professional perspectives to be gathered and analyzed rapidly. Reviewers were asked to evaluate the relative importance of environmental variables and spatio-temporal requirements for Earth science data products, in particular for rainfall and vegetation products. The results showed that spatio-temporal resolution requirements are complex and need to vary according to place, time, and hazard: that high resolution remote sensing products continue to be in demand, and that rainfall and vegetation products were valued as data that provide actionable food security information.

  12. Future Research Needs for Long-Term Monitoring Program Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minsker, B. S.; Dougherty, D. E.; Williams, G.; Davis, C. B.

    2002-05-01

    An ASCE Task Committee is preparing a manual of practice on long-term monitoring (LTM) program design for groundwater (including vadose) systems. The committee has identified several areas for future research and technology transfer that will improve LTM design. LTM is an on-going activity aimed at assessing remediation performance, containment integrity, and/or continued non-contamination of the subsurface and groundwater. LTM has different goals and needs than site characterization, so data collection, analysis, and modeling approaches must evolve to meet these new needs. Many new sensors and field measurement methods for LTM are under development, and research is needed to develop methods to integrate these data sources with more traditional samples drawn from wells to maximize the information extracted from the data. These new methods need to be able to provide information to assess performance of waste management activities and to understand long-term behavior by optimizing the collection and analysis of multiple data types. The effects of different sampling and measurement methods on monitoring results and their implications for the design of LTM programs also require study. Additional research needs include development of methods to assess flow control strategies, to identify monitoring redundancy in fractured media, and to better incorporate uncertainty into the LTM design process. Well-tested, documented, and open datasets are needed to validate and compare the performance of methods. Technology transfer activities must address the need for evolution of regulatory guidance to encompass the types of data analysis that are needed to assess remediation or containment performance, to identify appropriate LTM plans, and to incorporate novel data collection methods that may support better decision quality through the use of more extensive measurements with lower individual precisions than traditional measurements or may measure an indicator parameter rather than

  13. Translation of User Needs to System Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    written under the premise that the current state of the art of system development does not warrant or support a formal standards document.” Experience...1992). C4I for the warrior. Washington, D.C. Carson, R., Aslaksen, E., Caple, G., Davies, P., Griego , R., Kohl, R., et al. (2004). Requirements...Hilliard, R. (2004). ANSI/IEEE 1471 and systems engineering. Systems Engineering Journal, 7(3), 257-270. Maier, M., & Rechtin, E. (2002). The art of

  14. 40 CFR 63.8 - Monitoring requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... standard(s) unless the Administrator— (i) Specifies or approves the use of minor changes in methodology for the specified monitoring requirements and procedures (see § 63.90(a) for definition); or (ii) Approves... (see § 63.90(a) for definition). (iii) Owners or operators with flares subject to § 63.11(b) are...

  15. VA Health Care: Processes to Evaluate, Implement, and Monitor Organizational Structure Changes Needed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    VA HEALTH CARE Processes to Evaluate, Implement, and Monitor Organizational Structure Changes Needed Report to...Monitor Organizational Structure Changes Needed What GAO Found Recent internal and external reviews of Veterans Health Administration (VHA...operations have identified deficiencies in its organizational structure and recommended changes that would require significant restructuring to address

  16. Required accuracy and dose thresholds in individual monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, P.; Griffith, R.V.

    1994-01-01

    to energy and angular dependencies of the dosemeter. In type testing of personal dosimetry systems, the estimated overall standard deviation of the dosimetry system is the main parameter to be tested. An important characteristic of a personal dosimetry system is its capability of measuring low doses......The paper follows the approach given in recent revisions of CEC and IAEA recommendations on requirements in individual monitoring for external radiations. The ICRP requirements on overall accuracy for individual monitoring, as given in ICRP Publication 35 (1982), form the basis...... for the specification of detailed accuracy requirements which are needed in practical routine monitoring. The ICRP overall accuracy requirement is defined as an allowable maximum uncertainty factor at the 95% confidence level for a single measurement of the relevant dose quantity, i.e. H(p)(10) and H(p)(0.07). From...

  17. Requirements to a Norwegian National Automatic Gamma Monitoring System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauritzen, B.; Hedemann Jensen, P.; Nielsen, F

    2005-04-01

    An assessment of the overall requirements to a Norwegian gamma-monitoring network is undertaken with special emphasis on the geographical distribution of automatic gamma monitoring stations, type of detectors in such stations and the sensitivity of the system in terms of ambient dose equivalent rate increments above the natural background levels. The study is based upon simplified deterministic calculations of the radiological consequences of generic nuclear accident scenarios. The density of gamma monitoring stations has been estimated from an analysis of the dispersion of radioactive materials over large distances using historical weather data; the minimum density is estimated from the requirement that a radioactive plume may not slip unnoticed in between stations of the monitoring network. The sensitivity of the gamma monitoring system is obtained from the condition that events that may require protective intervention measures should be detected by the system. Action levels for possible introduction of sheltering and precautionary foodstuff restrictions are derived in terms of ambient dose equivalent rate. For emergency situations where particulates contribute with only a small fraction of the total ambient dose equivalent rate from the plume, it is concluded that measurements of dose rate are sufficient to determine the need for sheltering; simple dose rate measurements however, are inadequate to determine the need for foodstuff restrictions and spectral measurements are required. (au)

  18. Monitoring of Individual Needs in Diabetes (MIND)-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoek, Frank J; Kersch, Nancy Y A; Eldrup, Ebbe

    2012-01-01

    To test the effects of implementing computer-assisted Monitoring of Individual Needs in Diabetes (MIND) in routine diabetes care on psychological status and glycemic control, identify predictors of poor psychological outcomes, and evaluate care providers' experiences.......To test the effects of implementing computer-assisted Monitoring of Individual Needs in Diabetes (MIND) in routine diabetes care on psychological status and glycemic control, identify predictors of poor psychological outcomes, and evaluate care providers' experiences....

  19. Filaria control and elimination: diagnostic, monitoring and surveillance needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molyneux, David H

    2009-04-01

    Gold standard diagnosis using blood films or skin snips has dimished relevance as mass drug distribution programmes for control of filaria infections expand. The view of 'diagnosis' and its relevance at the individual level has changed, as it has been recognised that the spectrum of programmatic processes (mapping, mass drug interventions, monitoring and evaluation, and surveillance) require different approaches as different questions are asked at each stage. The feasibility and relevance of skin biopsy or blood film examination is challenged when mass drug distribution seeks to treat all eligibles in communities. The need to expand programmes rapidly by identifying the highest risk communities has seen the development of rapid assessment methods, such as rapid epidemiological mapping of onchocerciasis (REMO) and rapid epidemiological assessment (REA) for onchocerciasis, immunochromatographic test (ICT)-based mapping for lymphatic filariasis (LF), and Rapid Assessment Procedure for Loiasis (RAPLOA) for Loa, to reduce the risk of serious adverse events and to guide projects in high-risk communities. As programmes reduce the prevalence through mass drug distribution, more sensitive techniques are required to define endpoints, for LF in particular where the programmatic goal is elimination; for onchocerciasis, sensitive surveillance tools are required particularly in those areas where such risks of recrudescence are high. Whilst much progress has been made in the development and deployment of rapid methods, there are still specific needs for antigen detection in onchocerciasis, whilst standardisation of a panel of tools for LF will allow the definition of endpoint parameters so that countries can decide when mass drug administration (MDA) can be stopped and have a sensitive post-MDA surveillance system.

  20. Requirements of CLIC Beam Loss Monitoring System

    CERN Document Server

    Sapinski, M; Holzer, EB; Jonker, M; Mallows, S; Otto, T; Welsch, C

    2010-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) [1] is a proposed multi-TeV linear electron-positron collider being designed by a world-wide collaboration. It is based on a novel twobeam acceleration scheme in which two beams (drive and main beam) are placed in parallel to each other and energy is transferred from the drive beam to the main one. Beam losses on either of them can have catastrophic consequences for the machine, because of high intensity (drive beam) or high energy and small emittance (main beam). In the framework of machine protection, a Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system has to be put in place. This paper discusses the requirements for the beam loss system in terms of detector sensitivity, resolution, dynamic range and ability to distinguish losses originating from various sources. The two-beam module where the protection from beam losses is particularly challenging and important, is studied.

  1. 40 CFR 51.190 - Ambient air quality monitoring requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ambient air quality monitoring... PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Ambient Air Quality Surveillance § 51.190 Ambient air quality monitoring requirements. The requirements for monitoring ambient...

  2. Telemonitoring for independently living elderly: inventory of needs & requirements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakkes, S.; Morsch, R.; Krose, B.; Maitland, J.; Augusto, J.C.; Caulfield, B.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the precise focus required of a telemonitoring system for the domain of independently living elderly. Particularly, we investigate (1) the needs of telemonitoring for this particular domain, and (2) the requirements for such a telemonitoring system. For our investigation

  3. Long-Term Monitoring Research Needs: A DOE Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, B.; Davis, C. B.

    2002-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management is responsible for dealing with the nation's legacy of Cold War radioactive and hazardous waste and contamination. Major efforts are underway to deal with this legacy; these are expected to last up to decades and cost up to billions of dollars at some sites. At all sites, however, active remediation must eventually cease; if hazards then remain, the site must enter into a long-term stewardship mode. In this talk we discuss aspects of long-term monitoring pertinent to DOE sites, focusing on challenges to be faced, specific goals or targets to be met, and research needs to be addressed in order to enable DOE to meet its long-term stewardship obligations. DOE LTM research needs fall into three major categories: doing what we can do now much more efficiently; doing things we cannot do now; and proving the validity of our monitoring programs. Given the enormity of the DOE obligations, it will be highly desirable to develop much more efficient monitoring paradigms. Doing so will demand developing autonomous, remote monitoring networks of in situ sensors capable of replacing (or at least supplementing to a large extent) conventional groundwater and soil gas sampling and analysis programs. The challenges involved range from basic science (e.g., inventing in situ sensors for TCE that do not demand routine maintenance) to engineering (attaining superior reliability in data reporting in remote networks) to ergonomics (developing decent ways of selecting and presenting the "right" information from the monitoring network) to regulatory affairs (presenting convincing evidence that the more efficient systems actually provide superior monitoring). We explore these challenges in some detail, focusing on the "long" in long-term monitoring as it applies to DOE sites. Monitoring system performance validation and, ultimately, regulator and stakeholder acceptance of site closure and long-term stewardship plans depend

  4. 40 CFR 413.03 - Monitoring requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... lieu of monitoring for TTO, the control authority may allow industrial users of POTWs to make the... for total toxic organics (TTO), I certify that, to the best of my knowledge and belief, no dumping of... or leak into the wastewater. (c) If monitoring is necessary to measure compliance with the...

  5. 40 CFR 63.564 - Monitoring requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... obtained. For monitoring equipment purchased from a vendor, verification of the operational status of the... when the measured values (i.e., daily calibrations, multipoint calibrations, and performance audits... pressure device once each calendar year with a reference pressure monitor (traceable to National...

  6. 40 CFR 63.364 - Monitoring requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... obtained. For monitoring equipment purchased from a vendor, verification of the operational status of the... operated. From 15-minute or shorter period temperature values, a data acquisition system for the... year with a reference temperature monitor (traceable to National Institute of Standards and...

  7. Monitoring of Individual Needs in Diabetes (MIND)-2

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To test the effects of implementing computer-assisted Monitoring of Individual Needs in Diabetes (MIND) in routine diabetes care on psychological status and glycemic control, identify predictors of poor psychological outcomes, and evaluate care providers’ experiences. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The MIND procedure was implemented as part of the annual review in diabetes clinics across eight countries in a prospective observational study with a 1-year follow-up. MIND encompasses well...

  8. 40 CFR 63.828 - Monitoring requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... product and packaging rotogravure or wide-web flexographic presses with intermittently-controllable work... emission monitors to measure total organic volatile matter concentration and volumetric gas flow rate...

  9. Microwave Remote Sensing: Needs and Requirements Concerning Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels

    2003-01-01

    Spaceborne microwave remote sensing instruments, like the imaging radiometer and the synthetic aperture radar, are over timed faced with two partly conflicting requirements: performance expectations (resolutions, sensitivity, coverage) steadily increase with resource allocations (weight, power, b......, bulk, cost) decrease. This results in needs and requirements to the development of advanced technology thus enabling the future advanced systems to be viable and realistic.......Spaceborne microwave remote sensing instruments, like the imaging radiometer and the synthetic aperture radar, are over timed faced with two partly conflicting requirements: performance expectations (resolutions, sensitivity, coverage) steadily increase with resource allocations (weight, power...

  10. 40 CFR 63.1657 - Monitoring requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... compressed air supply for pulse-jet baghouses. (iv) An appropriate methodology for monitoring cleaning cycles... document “Fabric Filter Bag Leak Detection Guidance” (EPA-454/R-98-015). Other bag leak detection systems... baghouse for air leaks, torn or broken bags or filter media, or any other condition that may cause...

  11. 40 CFR 63.605 - Monitoring requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... rock dryer or phosphate rock calciner subject to the provisions of this subpart shall install... either the mass flow of phosphorus-bearing feed material to the dryer or calciner, or the mass flow of product from the dryer or calciner. The monitoring system shall have an accuracy of ±5 percent over...

  12. 40 CFR 52.346 - Air quality monitoring requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air quality monitoring requirements. 52... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Colorado § 52.346 Air quality monitoring... VIII Administrator, the State submitted a revised Air Quality Monitoring State Implementation Plan....

  13. 40 CFR 146.68 - Testing and monitoring requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to provide other site specific data; (iii) Periodic monitoring of the ground water quality in the first aquifer overlying the injection zone; (iv) Periodic monitoring of the ground water quality in the... Applicable to Class I Hazardous Waste Injection Wells § 146.68 Testing and monitoring requirements....

  14. 40 CFR 146.13 - Operating, monitoring and reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...; (iii) Periodic monitoring of the ground water quality in the first aquifer overlying the injection zone; (iv) Periodic monitoring of the ground water quality in the lowermost USDW; and (v) Any additional... Applicable to Class I Wells § 146.13 Operating, monitoring and reporting requirements. (a)...

  15. 40 CFR 63.9631 - What are my monitoring requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) through (e) and monitor the daily average secondary voltage, daily average stack outlet temperature, and... maintain a bag leak detection system to monitor the relative change in particulate matter loadings... according to the requirements in paragraphs (a)(1) through (8) of this section. (1) Monitor the...

  16. 40 CFR 429.12 - Monitoring requirements. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monitoring requirements. 429.12 Section 429.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES... requirements....

  17. Radiation monitoring in interventional cardiology: a requirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, T.; Uruchurtu, E. S.

    2017-01-01

    The increasing of procedures using fluoroscopy in interventional cardiology procedures may increase medical and patients to levels of radiation that manifest in unintended outcomes. Such outcomes may include skin injury and cancer. The cardiologists and other staff members in interventional cardiology are usually working close to the area under examination and they receive the dose primarily from scattered radiation from the patient. Mexico does not have a formal policy for monitoring and recording the radiation dose delivered in hemodynamic establishments. Deterministic risk management can be improved by monitoring the radiation delivered from X-ray devices. The objective of this paper is to provide cardiologist, techniques, nurses, and all medical staff an information on DR levels, about X-ray risks and a simple a reliable method to control cumulative dose.

  18. Contaminant monitoring of hydraulic systems. The need for reliable data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, M.J. [Pall Europe Ltd., Portsmouth (United Kingdom)] Rinkinen, J. [Tampere University of Technology, Tampere (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    The need for both reliable operation of hydraulic and lubrication systems and long component lives has focused users to the benefits of controlling the contamination in the hydraulic fluid. Maximum operating (target) levels are being implemented as part of a condition based maintenance regime. If these are exceeded, maintenance effort is directed to correcting the rise in consummation level, and so make optimum use of resources as maintenance effort is only affected when it is necessary to do so. Fundamental to ibis aspect of condition based monitoring is the provision of accurate and reliable data in the shortest possible time. This way, corrective actions can be implemented immediately so minimising the damage to components. On-line monitoring devices are a way of achieving this and are seeing increased use, but some are affected by the condition of the fluid. Hence, there is a potential for giving incorrect data which will waste time and effort by initiating unnecessary corrective actions. A more disturbing aspect is the effect on the user of continual errors. The most likely effect would be a loss of confidence in the technique or even complete rejection of it and hence the potential benefits will be lost. This presentation explains how contaminant monitoring techniques are applied to ensure that the potential benefits of operating with clean fluids is realised. It examines the sources of error and shows how the user can interrogate the data and satisfy himself of its authenticity. (orig.) 14 refs.

  19. 40 CFR 410.02 - Monitoring requirements. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Monitoring requirements. 410.02 Section 410.02 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS TEXTILE MILLS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY General Provisions § 410.02 Monitoring requirements....

  20. 40 CFR 63.751 - Monitoring requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... design flow rate and organic concentration in the gas stream vented to the carbon adsorption system. The... requirements of part 60, appendix A, Method 21, sections 2, 3, 4.1, 4.2, and 4.4. The calibration gas shall either be representative of the compounds to be measured or shall be methane, and shall be at...

  1. 40 CFR 60.13 - Monitoring requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... shall be subject to the provisions of this section upon promulgation of performance specifications for... Performance Specification 1, appendix B, of this part before the performance test required under § 60.8 is... under § 60.8 or within 30 days thereafter in accordance with the applicable performance specification...

  2. From needs to requirements for computer systems: the added value of ergonomics in needs analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couix, Stanislas; Darses, Françoise; De-La-Garza, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    It is widely recognised that ergonomists must contribute during needs analysis. However, few studies have investigated the specific contributions of ergonomists at this stage of the design process. In this study, this contribution is studied through the requirement document produced by the design team. For each requirement, the source (i.e. who formulated the requirement), justification (why the requirement is needed), type (functional, interaction, operational, physical, organizational), and scope (entire system or part thereof) were analysed. Results indicate that the various actors are complementary and work collectively to define the various dimensions of the system. With end-users, the ergonomist worked on the global aspects of the system: function, conditions of use and organizational dimension. Alone, he defined the global interaction of the system. The various functions derived from the global function were defined in collaboration with engineers. However, while engineers contributed to defining how these functions would work, as well as their technical conditions of use, the ergonomist focused on their purpose, and, with end-users, on their organizational aspects. Finally, results suggest that neither the ergonomist's specific knowledge in ergonomics, nor work analysis were sufficient to derive his requirements; both are mandatory.

  3. Productive needs and training requirements: philosophy in high school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Sueli de Faria Sforni

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The discipline of philosophy has not been a constant presence in the basic education curriculum throughout the history of Brazilian education. This inconsistency was the reason that triggered the need to conduct an investigation into the factors that determine its inclusion/exclusion in the Brazilian High School. The survey was conducted through a bibliographic and documental research in order to analyze the historical development of the discipline of philosophy in that level of education. The time period delimitation of the research was from the Colonial Brazil period to the insertion of Brazil in the neoliberal political-economic context. The study revealed that the oscillation of the presence of philosophy in the curricula of schools in Brazil was influenced by the needs of the productive sector, as the formation requirements that were started within the economic system.

  4. Needs and Requirements for Future Research Reactors (ORNL Perspectives)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilas, Germina [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bryan, Chris [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gehin, Jess C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-02-10

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is a vital national and international resource for neutron science research, production of radioisotopes, and materials irradiation. While HFIR is expected to continue operation for the foreseeable future, interest is growing in understanding future research reactors features, needs, and requirements. To clarify, discuss, and compile these needs from the perspective of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) research and development (R&D) missions, a workshop, titled “Needs and Requirements for Future Research Reactors”, was held at ORNL on May 12, 2015. The workshop engaged ORNL staff that is directly involved in research using HFIR to collect valuable input on the reactor’s current and future missions. The workshop provided an interactive forum for a fruitful exchange of opinions, and included a mix of short presentations and open discussions. ORNL staff members made 15 technical presentations based on their experience and areas of expertise, and discussed those capabilities of the HFIR and future research reactors that are essential for their current and future R&D needs. The workshop was attended by approximately 60 participants from three ORNL directorates. The agenda is included in Appendix A. This document summarizes the feedback provided by workshop contributors and participants. It also includes information and insights addressing key points that originated from the dialogue started at the workshop. A general overview is provided on the design features and capabilities of high performance research reactors currently in use or under construction worldwide. Recent and ongoing design efforts in the US and internationally are briefly summarized, followed by conclusions and recommendations.

  5. Requirements to a Norwegian national automatic gamma monitoring system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, B.; Jensen, Per Hedemann; Nielsen, F.

    2005-01-01

    An assessment of the overall requirements to a Norwegian gamma-monitoring network is undertaken with special emphasis on the geographical distribution of automatic gamma monitoring stations, type of detectors in such stations and the sensitivity of thesystem in terms of ambient dose equivalent rate...

  6. 50 CFR 660.312 - Vessel Monitoring System (VMS) requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vessel Monitoring System (VMS... West Coast Groundfish Fisheries § 660.312 Vessel Monitoring System (VMS) requirements. (a) What is a VMS? A VMS consists of a NMFS OLE type-approved mobile transceiver unit that automatically...

  7. 40 CFR 464.03 - Monitoring and reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Monitoring and reporting requirements. (a) As an alternative to monitoring for TTO (total toxic organics), an... Grease standard shall be considered equivalent to complying with the TTO standard. Alternate Oil and Grease standards are provided as substitutes for the TTO standards provided in §§ 464.15, 464.16,...

  8. 50 CFR 216.185 - Requirements for monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Low Frequency Active (SURTASS LFA sonar) Sonar § 216.185 Requirements for monitoring. (a) In order to... sunset); (2) Use low frequency passive SURTASS sonar to listen for vocalizing marine mammals; and (3)...

  9. Energy efficiency monitoring--which sensors are really needed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murer, Martin J; Alonso-Herranz, Elisa; de Waal, Chantal M W; Spliethoff, Hartmut; van Berlo, Marcel A J; Gohlke, Oliver

    2013-05-01

    Plant balancing of waste-to-energy plants is a key issue in determining plant performance and operating efficiency. Traditionally, plant efficiency is determined only during the acceptance test by the means of an ex-post energy balance. For continuous operation, energy efficiency is estimated on a monthly or yearly basis using the waste throughput and average lower heating value. At Afval Energie Bedrijf in Amsterdam efficiency has to be reported on a monthly basis. Measured data from 83 positions is required to obtain the efficiency of the Hoog Rendement Central block with an ex-post energy balance on a continuous basis. This study investigated the importance of the different sensors. Efficiency calculations were performed after discarding the less important measuring positions. The measured data was replaced by the design value in the calculation. The total average margin of error per year for the efficiency value was found to be only 0.1% when the 23 most significant (instead of 83) measuring points were used, whereas individual values may differ by less than 0.5%. Operators of plants with fewer sensors can monitor their efficiency continuously if they know the most important positions.

  10. 40 CFR 141.625 - Conditions requiring increased monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conditions requiring increased monitoring. 141.625 Section 141.625 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Stage 2 Disinfection Byproducts Requirements § 141.625 Conditions...

  11. Integrating scales of seagrass monitoring to meet conservation needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neckles, Hilary A.; Kopp, Blaine S.; Peterson, Bradley J.; Pooler, Penelope S.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated a hierarchical framework for seagrass monitoring in two estuaries in the northeastern USA: Little Pleasant Bay, Massachusetts, and Great South Bay/Moriches Bay, New York. This approach includes three tiers of monitoring that are integrated across spatial scales and sampling intensities. We identified monitoring attributes for determining attainment of conservation objectives to protect seagrass ecosystems from estuarine nutrient enrichment. Existing mapping programs provided large-scale information on seagrass distribution and bed sizes (tier 1 monitoring). We supplemented this with bay-wide, quadrat-based assessments of seagrass percent cover and canopy height at permanent sampling stations following a spatially distributed random design (tier 2 monitoring). Resampling simulations showed that four observations per station were sufficient to minimize bias in estimating mean percent cover on a bay-wide scale, and sample sizes of 55 stations in a 624-ha system and 198 stations in a 9,220-ha system were sufficient to detect absolute temporal increases in seagrass abundance from 25% to 49% cover and from 4% to 12% cover, respectively. We made high-resolution measurements of seagrass condition (percent cover, canopy height, total and reproductive shoot density, biomass, and seagrass depth limit) at a representative index site in each system (tier 3 monitoring). Tier 3 data helped explain system-wide changes. Our results suggest tiered monitoring as an efficient and feasible way to detect and predict changes in seagrass systems relative to multi-scale conservation objectives.

  12. 50 CFR 216.255 - Requirements for monitoring and reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... section may include retention of marine mammals without the need for a separate scientific research permit... animals sighted. (4) Conduct shipboard monitoring to reduce impacts to protected species. Trained marine..., including the time of sighting and the direction of travel, into a marine animal tracking and...

  13. ECG Monitoring in Cardiac Rehabilitation: Is It Needed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenland, Philip; Pomilla, Paul V.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the controversial use of continuous electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring as a safety measure in cardiac rehabilitation exercise programs. Little evidence substantiates its value for all patients during exercise. In the absence of empirical evidence documenting the worth of this expensive procedure, it is recommended for use with high-risk…

  14. The Need and Requirements for Validating Damage Detection Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Medina, E. A., Lindgren, E. A., Buynak, C. F., Steffes, G., Derriso , M., “Model-assisted Probabilistic Reliability Assessment for Structural Health...130 Aircraft”, Aircraft Airworthiness and Sustainment, (Austin, TX, 2010). 9. Lindgren, E. A., Buynak, C. F., Aldrin, J. C., Median, E. A., Derriso ...G., Derriso , M., "Model- assisted Probabilistic Reliability Assessment for Structural Health Monitoring Systems," Review of Progress in QNDE, Vol

  15. Monitored Retrievable Storage System Requirements Document. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    This Monitored Retrievable Storage System Requirements Document (MRS-SRD) describes the functions to be performed and technical requirements for a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility subelement and the On-Site Transfer and Storage (OSTS) subelement. The MRS facility subelement provides for temporary storage, at a Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) operated site, of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) contained in an NRC-approved Multi-Purpose Canister (MPC) storage mode, or other NRC-approved storage modes. The OSTS subelement provides for transfer and storage, at Purchaser sites, of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) contained in MPCs. Both the MRS facility subelement and the OSTS subelement are in support of the CRWMS. The purpose of the MRS-SRD is to define the top-level requirements for the development of the MRS facility and the OSTS. These requirements include design, operation, and decommissioning requirements to the extent they impact on the physical development of the MRS facility and the OSTS. The document also presents an overall description of the MRS facility and the OSTS, their functions (derived by extending the functional analysis documented by the Physical System Requirements (PSR) Store Waste Document), their segments, and the requirements allocated to the segments. In addition, the top-level interface requirements of the MRS facility and the OSTS are included. As such, the MRS-SRD provides the technical baseline for the MRS Safety Analysis Report (SAR) design and the OSTS Safety Analysis Report design.

  16. CAD/CAM data management needs, requirements and options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopatka, R. S.; Johnson, T. G.

    1978-01-01

    The requirements for a data management system in support of technical or scientific applications and possible courses of action were reviewed. Specific requirements were evolved while working towards higher level integration impacting all phases of the current design process and through examination of commercially marketed systems and related data base research. Arguments are proposed for varied approaches in implementing data base systems ranging from no action necessary to immediate procurement of an existing data base management system.

  17. 7 CFR 227.36 - Requirements of needs assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... children and areas where nutrition education may assist in positive changes; (15) Problems encountered in..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS NUTRITION EDUCATION AND TRAINING PROGRAM State Coordinator... listed below to enable State agencies to determine their nutrition education and training needs for...

  18. Medicare and Medicaid: Stronger Enforcement of Nursing Home Requirements Needed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-07-22

    diet as prescribed, (2) rehabilita- tive nursing care as needed, and (3) proper care to prevent decubitus ulcers ( bedsores ) and deformities; and is (1...residents had bedsores , and that one of the residents had a bedsore on the hip that was four inches in diameter with muscle visible. The surveyor also...Weaknesses in Enforcement System Allow Repeat Offenders to Avoid Penalty of the four had bedsores . The nursing home’s plan of correction stated that a

  19. Careful monitoring of human rights needed -- Dr. Wiwat Rojanapithayakorn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-12-01

    In his talk, Joint UN Program on HIV/AIDS team leader Dr. Wiwat Rojanapithayakorn made a plea for the careful monitoring of human rights with respect to the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Since the start of the HIV/AIDS pandemic, a total of 47 million people have been infected with HIV, 14 million have died of AIDS, with 33 million afflicted with the virus by the end of 1998. In the wake of this global crisis comes the widespread abuse of human rights and fundamental freedoms worldwide. Many HIV/AIDS patients suffer from discrimination, intolerance, and prejudice. Hence, protection of human rights is crucial to safeguard human dignity in the context of HIV/AIDS, and to warrant an effective public health and social responses to this epidemic. All states, regardless of their political, economic and cultural systems, have the obligation to promote and protect universal human rights standards and fundamental freedoms of all peoples.

  20. Doctoral degree in health professions: professional needs and legal requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marušić, Matko; Mimica, Mladen; Mihanović, Frane; Janković, Stipan

    2013-01-01

    To respond to ever increasing complexity of health care professions, education of nurses, midwives, physiotherapists, radiology engineers, and medical laboratory workers, has been upgraded to pregraduate, graduate and postgraduate university levels. In Croatia, nursing was defined as a branch of clinical medical science in 1997. Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina have introduced first two levels, but there is a strong need for the third one (doctoral degree). It should last three years and contain 180 ECTS points. It includes acquisition of evidence-based advanced health care, and the ability for independent research and critical analysis. Doctoral degrees in health professions are instrumental for academic careers of faculty of health professions. Yet this will not separate them from their patients or make them administrators, as the majority of their work will still be spent alongside patients. Copyright © 2013 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  1. Needs assessment for patients food intake monitoring among Indonesian healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budiningsari, D; Shahar, S; Abdul Manaf, Z; Susetyowati, S

    2017-08-18

    The aim of this study was to provide a needs assessment related to the current practice of food intake monitoring for hospitalized adult patients among healthcare professionals and obtain feedback for the development of a new dietary assessment tool. Continuous effort has been made to identify patients at high risk of malnutrition, but monitoring and documentation of nutritional intake are relative less emphasized upon. A needs assessment through a cross-sectional study design was carried out at six hospitals in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. A self-administered semi-structured questionnaire was filled out by 111 respondents recruited from three different professions (nurses, dietitians and serving assistants) in the wards. Seventy per cent of the respondents perceived that the current dietary assessment tool used to record patients' food intake was simple; however, the disadvantage of this tool was its tedious process of computing nutritional values of food consumed. Furthermore, more than half respondents encountered problems in conducting food intake record of patients, primarily due to limited number of human resources, followed by time constraints and perception that such dietary assessment as not part of their job scope. This study has revealed important information in developing a simple, valid and reliable dietary assessment tool for monitoring food intake of hospitalized patients to be applied by interdisciplinary hospital professionals. Awareness of the important on monitoring nutrient intake of patients should be emphasized among healthcare professionals. The current dietary assessment tool requires modification due to lengthy time taken to complete the task and poor accuracy in intake estimation. Hospitals should provide protocols and guidelines of cooperation among interdisciplinary professionals, including nurses, which includes a simple dietary assessment tool to assist nutritional management of hospitalized patients. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  2. Requirements of radioprotectors for military and emergency needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, R I

    1988-01-01

    Uncontrolled exposure to radiation from nuclear weapons, space, or accidents presents challenges unlike those met in radiotherapy. For example, the time and quality of exposure are uncertain. Thus it is necessary to develop radioprotectors that can be given chronically (e.g. as vitamin combinations), or shortly before exposure (e.g. as WR-2721 and related compounds), or after exposure (e.g. as immunomodulators) to cover all possible situations of use. Also, for military purposes, performance capability, as well as survival from acute effects, must be maintained. In contrast to clinical and experimental exposure, it is likely that stem cells will survive in military and accident situations, making supportive therapy (e.g. fluids, antibiotics) of real value. Radioprotectors that can increase cell survival or enhance repopulation by the remaining cells can reduce the time required for supportive therapy and enhance its effectiveness. First-generation agents to accomplish this may be combinations of agents to mitigate free radical damage such as dietary supplements or WR-2721 and related compounds. Immunomodulators, either microbial agents (e.g. glucan, TDM) or recombinant cytokines (e.g. interleukin-1, colony-stimulating factor), can enhance hematopoietic and functional cell recovery after irradiation. Synergistic effects can be demonstrated with some combinations of these agents. This is important because agents with individual DRFs of less than two can be significant radioprotectors in combinations. Whether these combinations are effective against combined injury remains to be determined. Future research into mechanisms of radiation-induced damage and natural repair mechanisms should lead to even better second-generation radioprotectants.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. 34 CFR 364.33 - What is required to meet minority needs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is required to meet minority needs? 364.33 Section... Requirements? § 364.33 What is required to meet minority needs? The State plan must demonstrate how the State will address the needs of individuals with significant disabilities from minority group...

  4. 40 CFR 75.74 - Annual and ozone season monitoring and reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... every five years and is also required if the flow monitor polynomial coefficients or K factor(s) are...-diluent monitoring system, each flow rate monitoring system, each moisture monitoring system and each... not apply, and, for flow rate monitoring systems, the required RATA load level(s) (or operating level...

  5. Engineering Runtime Requirements-Monitoring Systems Using MDA Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skene, James; Emmerich, Wolfgang

    The Model-Driven Architecture (MDA) technology toolset includes a language for describing the structure of meta-data, the MOF, and a language for describing consistency properties that data must exhibit, the OCL. Off-the-shelf tools can generate meta-data repositories and perform consistency checking over the data they contain. In this paper we describe how these tools can be used to implement runtime requirements monitoring of systems by modelling the required behaviour of the system, implementing a meta-data repository to collect system data, and consistency checking the repository to discover violations. We evaluate the approach by implementing a contract checker for the SLAng service-level agreement language, a language defined using a MOF meta-model, and integrating the checker into an Enterprise JavaBeans application. We discuss scalability issues resulting from immaturities in the applied technologies, leading to recommendations for their future development.

  6. Monitoring physiology trainee needs to focus professional society responses: the APS Trainee Needs Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyas, Marsha L; Lowy, Melinda E; Sweazea, Karen L; Alvarez, Diego F

    2011-06-01

    In 2004 and 2007, the American Physiological Society (APS) Trainee Advisory Committee (TAC) conducted surveys of graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and new investigators in physiology to identify topics and issues important to those trainees. Two major trends emerged from the data. First, trainees in 2007 expressed somewhat greater interest in professional development information than did those in 2004. Second, needs expressed by trainees in both years were closely related to their specific career development stage. Survey findings guided the TAC and other APS committees and groups to focus their efforts toward the issues that were of the greatest interest to trainees. It also led to improved communication with trainees and increased involvement of trainees in APS governance.

  7. Future monitoring and research needs for forest ecosystems in a changing environment: an introduction

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    In order to identify future monitoring and research needs, a COST Strategic workshop on the role of "Forest ecosystems in a changing environment" assembled nearly 180 scientists from 30 countries in Istanbul on 11-13 March 2008. The workshop specifically tackled the fields of climate change and forests, ozone, atmospheric deposition and critical loads, biodiversity, as well as quality assurance in forest monitoring.

  8. Technical Needs for Enhancing Risk Monitors with Equipment Condition Assessment for Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coble, Jamie B.; Coles, Garill A.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Berglin, Eric J.; Wootan, David W.; Mitchell, Mark R.

    2013-04-04

    requirements, including the need to operate in different coolant environments, higher operating temperatures, and longer operating cycles between planned refueling and maintenance outages. These features, along with the relative lack of operating experience for some of the proposed advanced designs, may limit the ability to estimate event probability and component POF with a high degree of certainty. Incorporating real-time estimates of component POF may compensate for a relative lack of established knowledge about the long-term component behavior and improve operational and maintenance planning and optimization. The particular eccentricities of advanced reactors and small modular reactors provide unique challenges and needs for advanced instrumentation, control, and human-machine interface (ICHMI) techniques such as enhanced risk monitors (ERM) in aSMRs. Several features of aSMR designs increase the need for accurate characterization of the real-time risk during operation and maintenance activities. A number of technical gaps in realizing ERM exist, and these gaps are largely independent of the specific reactor technology. As a result, the development of a framework for ERM would enable greater situational awareness regardless of the specific class of reactor technology. A set of research tasks are identified in a preliminary research plan to enable the development, testing, and demonstration of such a framework. Although some aspects of aSMRs, such as specific operational characteristics, will vary and are not now completely defined, the proposed framework is expected to be relevant regardless of such uncertainty. The development of an ERM framework will provide one of the key technical developments necessary to ensure the economic viability of aSMRs.

  9. 40 CFR 468.03 - Monitoring and reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... monitoring procedure for TTO, indirect dischargers may monitor for oil and grease and meet the alternate... alternate monitoring oil and grease standards shall be considered to meet the TTO standard....

  10. Performance monitoring in hip fracture surgery--how big a database do we really need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, G A D; Metcalfe, A J; Johansen, A; O'Doherty, D

    2010-04-01

    Systems for collecting information about patient care are increasingly common in orthopaedic practice. Databases can allow various comparisons to be made over time. Significant decisions regarding service delivery and clinical practice may be made based on their results. We set out to determine the number of cases needed for comparison of 30-day mortality, inpatient wound infection rates and mean hospital length of stay, with a power of 80% for the demonstration of an effect at a significance level of pdata on 1050 hip fracture patients admitted to a city teaching hospital. Detection of a 10% difference in 30-day mortality would require 14,065 patients in each arm of any comparison, demonstration of a 50% difference would require 643 patients in each arm; for wound infections, demonstration of a 10% difference in incidence would require 23,921 patients in each arm and 1127 patients for demonstration of a 50% difference; for length of stay, a difference of 10% would require 1479 patients and 6660 patients for a 50% difference. This study demonstrates the importance of considering the population sizes before comparisons are made on the basis of basic hip fracture outcome data. Our data also help illustrate the impact of sample size considerations when interpreting the results of performance monitoring. Many researchers will be used to the fact that rare outcomes such as inpatient mortality or wound infection require large sample sizes before differences can be reliably demonstrated between populations. This study gives actual figures that researchers could use when planning studies. Statistically meaningful analyses will only be possible with major multi-centre collaborations, as will be possible if hospital Trusts participate in the National Hip Fracture Database.

  11. Required accuracy and dose thresholds in individual monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, P.; Griffith, R.V.

    1994-01-01

    this uncertainty factor, a value of 21% can be evaluated for the allowable maximum overall standard deviation for dose measurements at dose levels near the annual dose limits increasing to 45% for dose levels at the lower end of the dose range required to be monitored. A method is described for evaluating...... the overall standard deviation of the dosimetry system by combining random and systematic uncertainties in quadrature, and procedures are also given for determining each individual uncertainty connected to the dose measurement. In particular, attention is paid to the evaluation of the combined uncertainty due...... to energy and angular dependencies of the dosemeter. In type testing of personal dosimetry systems, the estimated overall standard deviation of the dosimetry system is the main parameter to be tested. An important characteristic of a personal dosimetry system is its capability of measuring low doses...

  12. Close monitoring as a contextual stimulator : How need for structure affects the relation between close monitoring and work outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietzschel, Eric F.; Slijkhuis, Marjette; Van Yperen, Nico W.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we argue and demonstrate that employees' Personal Need for Structure (PNS) moderates the negative effects of close monitoring on job satisfaction, intrinsic work motivation, and innovative job performance (as rated by their supervisors). In a field study (N=295), we found that emplo

  13. Awareness during anaesthesia for surgery requiring evoked potential monitoring: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pritish J Korula

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evoked potential monitoring such as somatosensory-evoked potential (SSEP or motor-evoked potential (MEP monitoring during surgical procedures in proximity to the spinal cord requires minimising the minimum alveolar concentrations (MACs below the anaesthetic concentrations normally required (1 MAC to prevent interference in amplitude and latency of evoked potentials. This could result in awareness. Our primary objective was to determine the incidence of awareness while administering low MAC inhalational anaesthetics for these unique procedures. The secondary objective was to assess the adequacy of our anaesthetic technique from neurophysiologist′s perspective. Methods: In this prospective observational pilot study, 61 American Society of Anesthesiologists 1 and 2 patients undergoing spinal surgery for whom intraoperative evoked potential monitoring was performed were included; during the maintenance phase, 0.7-0.8 MAC of isoflurane was targeted. We evaluated the intraoperative depth of anaesthesia using a bispectral (BIS index monitor as well as the patients response to surgical stimulus (PRST scoring system. Post-operatively, a modified Bruce questionnaire was used to verify awareness. The adequacy of evoked potential readings was also assessed. Results: Of the 61 patients, no patient had explicit awareness. Intraoperatively, 19 of 61 patients had a BIS value of above sixty at least once, during surgery. There was no correlation with PRST scoring and BIS during surgery. Fifty-four out of 61 patient′s evoked potential readings were deemed ′good′ or ′fair′ for the conduct of electrophysiological monitoring. Conclusions: This pilot study demonstrates that administering low MAC inhalational anaesthetics to facilitate evoked potential monitoring does not result in explicit awareness. However, larger studies are needed to verify this. The conduct of SSEP electrophysiological monitoring was satisfactory with the use of this

  14. 47 CFR 73.53 - Requirements for authorization of antenna monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for authorization of antenna... antenna monitors. (a) Antenna monitors shall be verified for compliance with the technical requirements in...) An antenna monitor shall meet the following specifications: (1) The monitor shall be designed...

  15. Federal Health Care Center: VA and DOD Need to Develop Better Information to Monitor Operations and Improve Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    requirement to include two more reports, resulting in GAO reports in 2011, 2012, and 2016. 5GAO, VA and DOD Health Care: First Federal Health ...FEDERAL HEALTH CARE CENTER VA and DOD Need to Develop Better Information to Monitor Operations and Improve Efficiency...Government Accountability Office Highlights of GAO-17-197, a report to congressional committees January 2017 FEDERAL HEALTH CARE CENTER VA and DOD

  16. Satellite data acquisition requirements for monitoring of permafrost in polar regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Annett

    2015-04-01

    Requirements for space based monitoring of permafrost features had been already defined within the IGOS Cryosphere Theme Report at the start of the IPY in 2007 (IGOS, 2007). In 2012 the Polar Space Task Group (PSTG, http://www.wmo.int/pages/prog/sat/pstg_en.php) has been established as the coordinating body of space agencies, in particular the Space Task Group (STG), for space -based observations of Polar Regions after the International Polar Year (IPY) and under the auspices of the World Meteorological Organization's (WMO) Executive Council Panel of Experts on Polar Observations Research and Services (EC-PORS). The PSTG identified the need to review the requirements for permafrost monitoring and to update these requirements as necessary in 2013. Relevant surveys with focus on satellite data are already available from the ESA DUE Permafrost User requirements survey (2009), the United States National Research Council (2014) and the ESA - CliC - IPA - GTN -P workshop in February 2014. These reports have been reviewed and specific needs discussed within the community. Acquisition requirements for monitoring of especially terrain changes (incl. rock glaciers and coastal erosion) and lakes (extent, ice properties etc.) with respect to current satellite missions have been specified. Of special interest for these applications are SAR missions. Current acquisition strategies for space borne SAR data only partially cover polar permafrost regions and some of the longterm in-situ measurement sites. Many stations are located in the proximity to coastal areas and glaciers which to some extent may allow joint usage by different cryosphere applications but requirements may deviate. The results of the discussion are presented in this paper.

  17. Review of neutron calibration facilities and monitoring techniques: new needs for emerging fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gressier, V

    2014-10-01

    Neutron calibration facilities and monitoring techniques have been developed since the middle of the 20th century to support research and nuclear power energy development. The technical areas needing reference neutron fields and related instruments were mainly cross section measurements, radiation protection, dosimetry and fission reactors, with energy ranging from a few millielectronvolts to about 20 MeV. The reference neutron fields and calibration techniques developed for these purposes will be presented in this paper. However, in recent years, emerging fields have brought new needs for calibration facilities and monitoring techniques. These new challenges for neutron metrology will be exposed with their technical difficulties.

  18. 40 CFR 141.87 - Monitoring requirements for water quality parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monitoring requirements for water... § 141.87 Monitoring requirements for water quality parameters. All large water systems, and all small... representative of water quality and treatment conditions throughout the system. (d) Monitoring after State...

  19. 40 CFR 141.26 - Monitoring frequency and compliance requirements for radionuclides in community water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... for radionuclides in community water systems. (a) Monitoring and compliance requirements for gross... source of water must begin to conduct initial monitoring for the new source within the first quarter... initial monitoring requirements, a community water system having only one entry point to the distribution...

  20. 10 CFR 20.1502 - Conditions requiring individual monitoring of external and internal occupational dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conditions requiring individual monitoring of external and internal occupational dose. 20.1502 Section 20.1502 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Surveys and Monitoring § 20.1502 Conditions requiring individual monitoring of external and internal...

  1. 50 CFR 216.155 - Requirements for monitoring and reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) Systematic visual observations, by those individuals, described in paragraph (c) of this section, on pinniped... monitoring measures: (1) Visual Land-Based Monitoring. (i) Prior to each missile launch, an observer(s) will... subpart. (5) Both the 60-day and final reports will be subject to review and comment by the...

  2. Eliciting caregivers’ needs for remote activity monitoring in early dementia at home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerema, S.T.; Brul, M.; Willems, C.; Hermens, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: With an increasing prevalence of dementia in the Netherlands from 235.000 in 2008 (1 per 70 inhabitants) up to an estimated 500.000 in 2050 (1 per 34 inhabitants), assisting technologies are needed to support care delivery in the home environment. Remote activity monitoring systems sho

  3. Tourism Development in the Dutch Wadden Area : Spatial-Temporal Characteristics and Monitoring Needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijtsma, Frans J; Broersma, Lourens; Daams, Michiel N; Hoekstra, H; Werner, Gelijn

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a spatial and temporal analysis of tourism in the Dutch Wadden area and identifies policy dilemmas and monitoring needs. The analysis is temporal because historical, current and future aspects of tourism development are addressed; it is spatial because the spatial differentiaton

  4. 40 CFR 63.1452 - What are my monitoring requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... document, “Fabric Filter Bag Leak Detection Guidance,” EPA-454/R-98-015, September 1997. You may obtain a... mechanisms. (iii) Check the compressed air supply for pulse-jet baghouses each day. (iv) Monitor...

  5. Using a Functional Architecture to Identify Human-Automation Trust Needs and Design Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Intelligence , Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) mission without a continuous communication link to human operators for trust needs. The factors that affect...performance link to human knowledge, perception and beliefs. From the analysis , automation design requirements that link to the identified trust...performing an Intelligence , Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) mission without a continuous communication link to human operators for trust needs

  6. 77 FR 13977 - Quality Assurance Requirements for Continuous Opacity Monitoring Systems at Stationary Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-08

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 60 RIN 2060-AH23 Quality Assurance Requirements for Continuous Opacity Monitoring... final rule titled, ``Quality Assurance Requirements for Continuous Opacity Monitoring Systems at... electronically in www.regulations.gov or in hard copy at the Procedure 3--Quality Assurance Requirements for...

  7. 77 FR 13997 - Quality Assurance Requirements for Continuous Opacity Monitoring Systems at Stationary Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-08

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 60 RIN 2060-AH23 Quality Assurance Requirements for Continuous Opacity Monitoring... rule titled, ``Quality Assurance Requirements for Continuous Opacity Monitoring Systems at Stationary....regulations.gov or in hard copy at the Procedure 3--Quality Assurance Requirements for Continuous Opacity...

  8. 77 FR 8160 - Quality Assurance Requirements for Continuous Opacity Monitoring Systems at Stationary Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 60 RIN 2060-AH23 Quality Assurance Requirements for Continuous Opacity Monitoring...--Quality Assurance Requirements for Continuous Opacity Monitoring Systems at Stationary Sources Docket, EPA.... Rules establishing quality assurance requirements impose no costs independent from national emission...

  9. 40 CFR 141.88 - Monitoring requirements for lead and copper in source water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... § 141.88 Monitoring requirements for lead and copper in source water. (a) Sample location, collection... water samples in accordance with the following requirements regarding sample location, number of samples... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monitoring requirements for lead...

  10. 40 CFR 141.86 - Monitoring requirements for lead and copper in tap water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... § 141.86 Monitoring requirements for lead and copper in tap water. (a) Sample site location. (1) By the... requirements of § 141.87(e)(2), that it has re-qualified for triennial monitoring. (vii) Any water system... requirements for lead (i.e., a “lead waiver”), the water system must provide certification and...

  11. Resolution requirements for monitor viewing of digital flat-panel detector radiographs: a contrast detail analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peer, Siegfried; Giacomuzzi, Salvatore M.; Peer, Regina; Gassner, Eva; Steingruber, Iris; Jaschke, Werner [Department of Radiology, University Hospital, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2003-02-01

    With the introduction of digital flat-panel detector systems into clinical practice, the still unresolved question of resolution requirements for picture archiving communication system (PACS) workstation monitors has gained new momentum. This contrast detail analysis was thus performed to define the differences in observer performance in the detection of small low-contrast objects on clinical 1K and 2K monitor workstations. Images of the CDRAD 2.0 phantom were acquired at varying exposures on an indirect-type digital flat-panel detector. Three observers evaluated a total of 15 images each with respect to the threshold contrast for each detail size. The numbers of correctly identified objects were determined for all image subsets. No significant difference in the correct detection ratio was detected among the observers; however, the difference between the two types of workstations (1K vs 2K monitors) despite less than 3% was significant at a 95% confidence level. Slight but statistically significant differences exist in the detection of low-contrast nodular details visualized on 1K- and 2K-monitor workstations. Further work is needed to see if this result holds true also for comparison of clinical flat-panel detector images and may, for example, exert an influence on the diagnostic accuracy of chest X-ray readings. (orig.)

  12. Monitoring and control of microbioreactors: An expert opinion on development needs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gernaey, Krist; Baganz, Frank; Franco-Lara, Ezequiel

    2012-01-01

    This perspective article is based on an expert panel review on microbioreactor applications in biochemical and biomedical engineering that was organized by the M3C (measurement, monitoring, modelling and control) Working Group of the European Section of Biochemical Engineering Science (ESBES......) in the European Federation of Biotechnology (EFB). The aim of the panel was to provide an updated view on the present status of the subject and to identify critical needs and issues for furthering the successful development of microbioreactor monitoring and control. This will benefit future bioprocess development...

  13. Internal exposure in nuclear medicine: application of IAEA criteria to determine the need for internal monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Maranhão Dantas

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The manipulation of unsealed sources in nuclear medicine poses significant risks of internal exposure to the staff. According to the International Atomic Energy Agency, the radiological protection program should include an evaluation of such risks and an individual monitoring plan, assuring acceptable radiological safety conditions in the workplace. The IAEA Safety Guide RS-G-1.2 recommends that occupational monitoring should be implemented whenever it is likely that committed effective doses from annual intakes of radionuclides would exceed 1 mSv. It also suggests a mathematical criterion to determine the need to implement internal monitoring. This paper presents a simulation of the IAEA criteria applied to commonly used radionuclides in nuclear medicine, taking into consideration usual manipulated activities and handling conditions. It is concluded that the manipulation of 131I for therapy presents the higher risk of internal exposure to the workers, requiring the implementation of an internal monitoring program by the Nuclear Medicine Centers.A manipulação de fontes abertas em Serviços de Medicina Nuclear envolve riscos de exposição externa e contaminação interna. O plano de proteção radiológica das Instalações licenciadas pela CNEN deve incluir a avaliação de tais riscos e propor um programa de monitoração individual de forma a controlar as exposições e garantir a manutenção das condições de segurança radiológica. As recomendações da AIEA apresentadas no Safety Guide RS-G-1.2 sugerem que seja implementado um programa de monitoração interna do trabalhador sempre que houver possibilidade da contaminação interna conduzir a valores de dose efetiva comprometida anual igual ou superior a 1 mSv. Este trabalho apresenta a simulação da aplicação de tais critérios para os radionuclídeos mais utilizados na área de Medicina Nuclear, levando-se em consideração as condições usuais de manipulação das fontes e as

  14. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment Requirement Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, J A

    2009-12-30

    This revision of the LLNL Fire Protection Baseline Needs Assessment (BNA) was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and LLNL Division Leader for Fire Protection and reviewed by Martin Gresho, Sandia/CA Fire Marshal. The document follows and expands upon the format and contents of the DOE Model Fire Protection Baseline Capabilities Assessment document contained on the DOE Fire Protection Web Site, but only address emergency response. The original LLNL BNA was created on April 23, 1997 as a means of collecting all requirements concerning emergency response capabilities at LLNL (including response to emergencies at Sandia/CA) into one BNA document. The original BNA documented the basis for emergency response, emergency personnel staffing, and emergency response equipment over the years. The BNA has been updated and reissued five times since in 1998, 1999, 2000, 2002, and 2004. A significant format change was performed in the 2004 update of the BNA in that it was 'zero based.' Starting with the requirement documents, the 2004 BNA evaluated the requirements, and determined minimum needs without regard to previous evaluations. This 2010 update maintains the same basic format and requirements as the 2004 BNA. In this 2010 BNA, as in the previous BNA, the document has been intentionally divided into two separate documents - the needs assessment (1) and the compliance assessment (2). The needs assessment will be referred to as the BNA and the compliance assessment will be referred to as the BNA Compliance Assessment. The primary driver for separation is that the needs assessment identifies the detailed applicable regulations (primarily NFPA Standards) for emergency response capabilities based on the hazards present at LLNL and Sandia/CA and the geographical location of the facilities. The needs assessment also identifies areas where the modification of the requirements in the applicable NFPA standards is appropriate, due to the improved fire protection

  15. 40 CFR 63.773 - Inspection and monitoring requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Oil and Natural Gas Production.... Owners or operators that install and operate a flare in accordance with § 63.771(d)(1)(iii) are exempt... feasible point to the catalyst bed outlet. (C) For a flare, a heat sensing monitoring device equipped...

  16. 40 CFR 141.74 - Analytical and monitoring requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... from Ozone Science & Engineering, Pergamon Press Ltd., Fairview Park, Elmsford, New York 10523. Copies... 21, 2003, available from Industrial Test Systems, Inc., 1875 Langston St., Rock Hill, SC 29730. Free... method for use with a continuous monitoring instrument provided the chemistry, accuracy, and...

  17. 40 CFR 63.1209 - What are the monitoring requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Administrator to use CEMS for compliance monitoring for particulate matter, mercury, semivolatile metals, low... ensure compliance with the relevant standard on a continuous basis. (B) Mercury. You may petition the... that affect adsorption and establish limits on those parameters based on the carbon used in...

  18. 40 CFR 63.11583 - What are my monitoring requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... practices at all times. (b) Operate a control device parameter (such as pressure drop or water flow, as... pressure drop. (2) Installation of the bag leak detector, parameter monitoring device, or CPMS at a... alert operators of a leak in the control device filter material. If a bag leak detection system...

  19. 40 CFR 146.23 - Operating, monitoring, and reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...)); and (5) Hydrocarbon storage and enhanced recovery may be monitored on a field or project basis rather... information may be included by reference. (2) Owners or operators of hydrocarbon storage and enhanced recovery... fluid disposal operations; (ii) Monthly for enhanced recovery operations; (iii) Daily during the...

  20. Integrating behavioral-motive and experiential-requirement perspectives on psychological needs: a two process model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Kennon M

    2011-10-01

    Psychological need theories offer much explanatory potential for behavioral scientists, but there is considerable disagreement and confusion about what needs are and how they work. A 2-process model of psychological needs is outlined, viewing needs as evolved functional systems that provide both (a) innate psychosocial motives that tend to impel adaptive behavior and (b) innate experiential requirements that when met reinforce adaptive behavior and promote mental health. The literature is reviewed to find support for 8 hypotheses derived from this model: that certain basic psychosocial motives are present at birth; that successful enactment of these motives supports the functioning and wellness of all humans; that individual differences in these motives develop in childhood; that these strong motive dispositions tend to produce the satisfying experiences they seek; that motive dispositions do not moderate the effect of motive-corresponding need satisfaction on well-being but do moderate the effect of assigned goal-type on rated self-concordance for those goals; that need dissatisfaction and need satisfaction correspond to the separable behavioral-motive and experiential-reward aspects of needs; and that motives and needs can become decoupled when chronic dissatisfaction of particular requirements warps or depresses the corresponding motives, such that the adaptive process fails in its function. Implications for self-determination theory and motive disposition theory are considered.

  1. High priority needs for range-wide monitoring of North American landbirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Erica H.; Altman, B.L.; Bart, J.; Beardmore, C.J.; Berlanga, H.; Blancher, P.J.; Butcher, G.S.; Demarest, D.W.; Dettmers, R.; Hunter, W.C.; Iñigo-Elias, Eduardo E.; Panjabi, A.O.; Pashley, D.N.; Ralph, C.J.; Rich, T.D.; Rosenberg, K.V.; Rustay, C.M.; Ruth, J.M.; Will, T.C.

    2005-01-01

    This document is an extension of work done for the Partners in Flight North American Landbird Conservation Plan (Rich et al. 2004). The Continental Plan reviewed conservation status of the 448 native landbird species that regularly breed in the United States and Canada. Two groups of species were identified as having high conservation importance: the PIF Watch List, made up of species for which there is conservation concern, and Stewardship Spices that are particularly characteristic of regional avifaunas. In addition, continental scale monitoring needs were identified for all species. Here we extend the monitoring needs aspect of the Plan, providing additional detail and suggesting the best means of filling the gaps in broad-scale, long-term trend monitoring. This analysis and report was compiled by the Partners in Flight (PIF) Science Committee as a contribution to current work by the North American Bird Conservation Initiative to assess the status of bird population monitoring in North America and to make recommendations for improvements.

  2. The Need for Regular Monitoring and Prediction of Ephemeral Water Bodies in SERVIR Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Eric

    2017-01-01

    With remote sensing and modeling techniques available today it is possible to regularly identify and monitor the presence of surface water globally, for a wide range of applications. Many of the available datasets and tools, however, do not adequately resolve small or ephemeral water bodies in a timely enough fashion to make local and subnational decisions about water resources management in developing regions. This presentation introduces a specific need focused on a basin in Senegal to develop a capability to identify and disseminate timely information on small and ephemeral water bodies, and we seek feedback on methods proposed to address this need.

  3. 40 CFR Table 3 of Subpart Aaaa to... - Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 3 Table 3 of Subpart AAAA to Part 60 Protection of Environment... Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) For the following continuous emission monitoring systems...

  4. Groundwater monitoring in the context of EU legislation: reality and integration needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevauviller, Ph

    2005-02-01

    A wide range of environmental policies are based on the monitoring of chemical and/or biological parameters which are used to evaluate the environmental status of relevant compartments (e.g. water, soil, air) with the ultimate aim of making appropriate management decisions. The soundness of policy decisions is therefore directly related to the reliability of the environmental monitoring programmes. Monitoring reliability in turn is predominantly linked to scientific and technological progress. Hence a correct design, development and implementation process of environmental policies is, at least in part, dependent upon a proper integration of scientific and technological advances (in monitoring, but also for all kinds of permit procedures, remediation strategies etc.). This paper examines science-policy integration needs in support of groundwater environmental monitoring, with focus on on-going policy developments. The article aims to summarise key information on groundwater policy and EU scientific developments to raise awareness of the scientific community involved in this issue and to enhance communication among scientists and policy-makers.

  5. GTRI Remote Monitoring System: Training and Operational Needs Assessment Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, Debra E.; Fox, Sorcha

    2012-04-20

    The mission of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administrations (NNSA's) Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) is to identify, secure, recover and facilitate the disposition of vulnerable nuclear and high-risk radioactive materials around the world that pose a threat to the United States and the international community. The GTRI's unique mission to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological materials located at civilian sites worldwide directly addresses recommendations of the 9/11 Commission1, and is a vital part of the President's National Security Strategy and the Global Initiative. The GTRI Remote Monitoring System (RMS) is a standalone security system that includes radiation and tamper alarms, and CCTV; which can be transmitted securely over the Internet to multiple on-site and off-site locations. Through our experiences during installation of the system at 162 sites, plus feedback received from Alarm Response Training course participants, site input to project teams and analysis of trouble calls; indications were that current system training was lacking and inconsistent. A survey was undertaken to gather information from RMS users across the nation, to evaluate the current level of training and determine what if any improvements needed to be made. Additional questions were focused on the operation of the RMS software. The training survey was initially sent electronically to 245 users at the RMS sites and achieved a 37.6% return rate. Analysis of the resulting data revealed that 34.6% of the respondents had not received training or were unsure if they had, despite the fact that vendor engineers provide training at installation of the system. Any training received was referred to as minimal, and brief, not documented, and nothing in writing. 63.7% of respondents said they were either not at all prepared or only somewhat prepared to use the RMS software required to effectively operate the

  6. 47 CFR 11.52 - EAS code and Attention Signal Monitoring requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false EAS code and Attention Signal Monitoring... SYSTEM (EAS) Emergency Operations § 11.52 EAS code and Attention Signal Monitoring requirements. (a) EAS Participants must be capable of receiving the Attention Signal required by § 11.32(a)(9) and emergency...

  7. 40 CFR 264.97 - General ground-water monitoring requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... FACILITIES Releases From Solid Waste Management Units § 264.97 General ground-water monitoring requirements. The owner or operator must comply with the following requirements for any ground-water monitoring... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General ground-water...

  8. 40 CFR 63.2269 - What are my monitoring installation, operation, and maintenance requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Composite Wood Products Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.2269 What are my monitoring installation... moisture monitoring. For each furnish or veneer moisture meter, you must meet the requirements in... in the 25 to 35 percent (dry basis) moisture content range. For veneer redryers, use a...

  9. Low Cost Environmental Sensors for Spaceflight: NMP Space Environmental Monitor (SEM) Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Henry B.; Buehler, Martin G.; Brinza, D.; Patel, J. U.

    2005-01-01

    An outstanding problem in spaceflight is the lack of adequate sensors for monitoring the space environment and its effects on engineering systems. By adequate, we mean low cost in terms of mission impact (e.g., low price, low mass/size, low power, low data rate, and low design impact). The New Millennium Program (NMP) is investigating the development of such a low-cost Space Environmental Monitor (SEM) package for inclusion on its technology validation flights. This effort follows from the need by NMP to characterize the space environment during testing so that potential users can extrapolate the test results to end-use conditions. The immediate objective of this effort is to develop a small diagnostic sensor package that could be obtained from commercial sources. Environments being considered are: contamination, atomic oxygen, ionizing radiation, cosmic radiation, EMI, and temperature. This talk describes the requirements and rational for selecting these environments and reviews a preliminary design that includes a micro-controller data logger with data storage and interfaces to the sensors and spacecraft. If successful, such a sensor package could be the basis of a unique, long term program for monitoring the effects of the space environment on spacecraft systems.

  10. 40 CFR 63.1429 - Process vent monitoring requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions for Polyether Polyols Production § 63... required and should be equipped with a continuous recorder. If an acid or base absorbent is used, a...

  11. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment Requirement Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, J A

    2009-12-30

    This revision of the LLNL Fire Protection Baseline Needs Assessment (BNA) was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and LLNL Division Leader for Fire Protection and reviewed by Martin Gresho, Sandia/CA Fire Marshal. The document follows and expands upon the format and contents of the DOE Model Fire Protection Baseline Capabilities Assessment document contained on the DOE Fire Protection Web Site, but only address emergency response. The original LLNL BNA was created on April 23, 1997 as a means of collecting all requirements concerning emergency response capabilities at LLNL (including response to emergencies at Sandia/CA) into one BNA document. The original BNA documented the basis for emergency response, emergency personnel staffing, and emergency response equipment over the years. The BNA has been updated and reissued five times since in 1998, 1999, 2000, 2002, and 2004. A significant format change was performed in the 2004 update of the BNA in that it was 'zero based.' Starting with the requirement documents, the 2004 BNA evaluated the requirements, and determined minimum needs without regard to previous evaluations. This 2010 update maintains the same basic format and requirements as the 2004 BNA. In this 2010 BNA, as in the previous BNA, the document has been intentionally divided into two separate documents - the needs assessment (1) and the compliance assessment (2). The needs assessment will be referred to as the BNA and the compliance assessment will be referred to as the BNA Compliance Assessment. The primary driver for separation is that the needs assessment identifies the detailed applicable regulations (primarily NFPA Standards) for emergency response capabilities based on the hazards present at LLNL and Sandia/CA and the geographical location of the facilities. The needs assessment also identifies areas where the modification of the requirements in the applicable NFPA standards is appropriate, due to the improved fire protection

  12. VA Health Care: Improvements Needed in Monitoring Antidepressant Use for Major Depressive Disorder and in Increasing Accuracy of Suicide Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    VA HEALTH CARE Improvements Needed in Monitoring Antidepressant Use for Major Depressive Disorder and in Increasing...00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE VA Health Care: Improvements Needed in Monitoring Antidepressant Use for Major Depressive Disorder and in Increasing... disorder with mixed anxiety and depressed mood. 29American Psychiatric Association: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual. Depression not otherwise

  13. 78 FR 16184 - Revision to Ambient Nitrogen Dioxide Monitoring Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-14

    ... 98th percentile form averaged over three years and a level of 100 parts per billion (ppb), reflecting... 53 ppb. As part of the NAAQS rulemaking, the EPA promulgated revisions to requirements for minimum... groups and one citizen supporting the proposed revisions to the schedule for implementing near-road NO 2...

  14. 75 FR 81126 - Revisions to Lead Ambient Air Monitoring Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-27

    ... Physicians for a Healthy Environment, Leslie and Jack Warden, WEACT for Environmental Justice and the Wasatch... requirements, the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), the Missouri Coalition for the Environment... provisions of the final lead NAAQS rule. See Missouri Coalition for the Environment, et al. v. EPA, (DC...

  15. Safety requirements, facility user needs, and reactor concepts for a new Broad Application Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryskamp, J.M. [ed.; Liebenthal, J.L.; Denison, A.B.; Fletcher, C.D.

    1992-07-01

    This report describes the EG&G Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD) Broad Application Test Reactor (BATR) Project that was conducted in fiscal year 1991. The scope of this project was divided into three phases: a project process definition phase, a requirements development phase, and a preconceptual reactor design and evaluation phase. Multidisciplinary teams of experts conducted each phase. This report presents the need for a new test reactor, the project process definition, a set of current and projected regulatory compliance and safety requirements, a set of facility user needs for a broad range of projected testing missions, and descriptions of reactor concepts capable of meeting these requirements. This information can be applied to strategic planning to provide the Department of Energy with management options.

  16. Safety requirements, facility user needs, and reactor concepts for a new Broad Application Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryskamp, J.M. (ed.); Liebenthal, J.L.; Denison, A.B.; Fletcher, C.D.

    1992-07-01

    This report describes the EG G Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD) Broad Application Test Reactor (BATR) Project that was conducted in fiscal year 1991. The scope of this project was divided into three phases: a project process definition phase, a requirements development phase, and a preconceptual reactor design and evaluation phase. Multidisciplinary teams of experts conducted each phase. This report presents the need for a new test reactor, the project process definition, a set of current and projected regulatory compliance and safety requirements, a set of facility user needs for a broad range of projected testing missions, and descriptions of reactor concepts capable of meeting these requirements. This information can be applied to strategic planning to provide the Department of Energy with management options.

  17. Comparison and Cost Analysis of Drinking Water Quality Monitoring Requirements versus Practice in Seven Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonny Crocker

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Drinking water quality monitoring programs aim to support provision of safe drinking water by informing water quality management. Little evidence or guidance exists on best monitoring practices for low resource settings. Lack of financial, human, and technological resources reduce a country’s ability to monitor water supply. Monitoring activities were characterized in Cambodia, Colombia, India (three states, Jordan, Peru, South Africa, and Uganda according to water sector responsibilities, monitoring approaches, and marginal cost. The seven study countries were selected to represent a range of low resource settings. The focus was on monitoring of microbiological parameters, such as E. coli, coliforms, and H2S-producing microorganisms. Data collection involved qualitative and quantitative methods. Across seven study countries, few distinct approaches to monitoring were observed, and in all but one country all monitoring relied on fixed laboratories for sample analysis. Compliance with monitoring requirements was highest for operational monitoring of large water supplies in urban areas. Sample transport and labor for sample collection and analysis together constitute approximately 75% of marginal costs, which exclude capital costs. There is potential for substantive optimization of monitoring programs by considering field-based testing and by fundamentally reconsidering monitoring approaches for non-piped supplies. This is the first study to look quantitatively at water quality monitoring practices in multiple developing countries.

  18. Comparison and cost analysis of drinking water quality monitoring requirements versus practice in seven developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker, Jonny; Bartram, Jamie

    2014-07-18

    Drinking water quality monitoring programs aim to support provision of safe drinking water by informing water quality management. Little evidence or guidance exists on best monitoring practices for low resource settings. Lack of financial, human, and technological resources reduce a country's ability to monitor water supply. Monitoring activities were characterized in Cambodia, Colombia, India (three states), Jordan, Peru, South Africa, and Uganda according to water sector responsibilities, monitoring approaches, and marginal cost. The seven study countries were selected to represent a range of low resource settings. The focus was on monitoring of microbiological parameters, such as E. coli, coliforms, and H2S-producing microorganisms. Data collection involved qualitative and quantitative methods. Across seven study countries, few distinct approaches to monitoring were observed, and in all but one country all monitoring relied on fixed laboratories for sample analysis. Compliance with monitoring requirements was highest for operational monitoring of large water supplies in urban areas. Sample transport and labor for sample collection and analysis together constitute approximately 75% of marginal costs, which exclude capital costs. There is potential for substantive optimization of monitoring programs by considering field-based testing and by fundamentally reconsidering monitoring approaches for non-piped supplies. This is the first study to look quantitatively at water quality monitoring practices in multiple developing countries.

  19. 40 CFR Table 4 of Subpart Aaaa to... - Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 4 Table 4 of Subpart AAAA to Part 60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Monitoring Systems (CEMS) For the following pollutants Use the following span values for your CEMS Use the following performance specifications in appendix B of this part for your CEMS If needed to meet...

  20. Small- and Medium-Sized Commercial Building Monitoring and Controls Needs: A Scoping Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katipamula, Srinivas; Underhill, Ronald M.; Goddard, James K.; Taasevigen, Danny J.; Piette, M. A.; Granderson, J.; Brown, Rich E.; Lanzisera, Steven M.; Kuruganti, T.

    2012-10-31

    Buildings consume over 40% of the total energy consumption in the U.S. A significant portion of the energy consumed in buildings is wasted because of the lack of controls or the inability to use existing building automation systems (BASs) properly. Much of the waste occurs because of our inability to manage and controls buildings efficiently. Over 90% of the buildings are either small-size (<5,000 sf) or medium-size (between 5,000 sf and 50,000 sf); these buildings currently do not use BASs to monitor and control their building systems from a central location. According to Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), about 10% of the buildings in the U.S. use BASs or central controls to manage their building system operations. Buildings that use BASs are typically large (>100,000 sf). Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) were asked by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Program (BTP) to identify monitoring and control needs for small- and medium-sized commercial buildings and recommend possible solutions. This study documents the needs and solutions for small- and medium-sized buildings.

  1. Use of High-Frequency In-Home Monitoring Data May Reduce Sample Sizes Needed in Clinical Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko H Dodge

    Full Text Available Trials in Alzheimer's disease are increasingly focusing on prevention in asymptomatic individuals. This poses a challenge in examining treatment effects since currently available approaches are often unable to detect cognitive and functional changes among asymptomatic individuals. Resultant small effect sizes require large sample sizes using biomarkers or secondary measures for randomized controlled trials (RCTs. Better assessment approaches and outcomes capable of capturing subtle changes during asymptomatic disease stages are needed.We aimed to develop a new approach to track changes in functional outcomes by using individual-specific distributions (as opposed to group-norms of unobtrusive continuously monitored in-home data. Our objective was to compare sample sizes required to achieve sufficient power to detect prevention trial effects in trajectories of outcomes in two scenarios: (1 annually assessed neuropsychological test scores (a conventional approach, and (2 the likelihood of having subject-specific low performance thresholds, both modeled as a function of time.One hundred nineteen cognitively intact subjects were enrolled and followed over 3 years in the Intelligent Systems for Assessing Aging Change (ISAAC study. Using the difference in empirically identified time slopes between those who remained cognitively intact during follow-up (normal control, NC and those who transitioned to mild cognitive impairment (MCI, we estimated comparative sample sizes required to achieve up to 80% statistical power over a range of effect sizes for detecting reductions in the difference in time slopes between NC and MCI incidence before transition.Sample size estimates indicated approximately 2000 subjects with a follow-up duration of 4 years would be needed to achieve a 30% effect size when the outcome is an annually assessed memory test score. When the outcome is likelihood of low walking speed defined using the individual-specific distributions of

  2. 77 FR 8209 - Quality Assurance Requirements for Continuous Opacity Monitoring Systems at Stationary Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 60 RIN 2060-AH23 Quality Assurance Requirements for Continuous Opacity Monitoring... standards as specified in federally enforceable regulations. The quality assurance requirements will be... standards to the quality assurance requirements in Appendix F of 40 CFR Part 60 in the ``Rules and...

  3. 77 FR 18709 - Quality Assurance Requirements for Continuous Opacity Monitoring Systems at Stationary Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-28

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 60 RIN 2060-AH23 Quality Assurance Requirements for Continuous Opacity Monitoring... final rule. SUMMARY: The EPA published a direct final rule titled ``Quality Assurance Requirements for....regulations.gov or in hard copy at the Procedure 3--Quality Assurance Requirements for Continuous Opacity...

  4. 40 CFR Appendix P to Part 51 - Minimum Emission Monitoring Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Requirements P Appendix P to Part 51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Pt. 51, App. P Appendix P to Part 51—Minimum Emission Monitoring Requirements 1.0 Purpose. This appendix P sets forth...

  5. Health information needs of professional nurses required at the point of care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmeralda Ricks

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Professional nurses work in dynamic environments and need to keep up to date with relevant information for practice in nursing to render quality patient care. Keeping up to date with current information is often challenging because of heavy workload, diverse information needs and the accessibility of the required information at the point of care. Objectives: The aim of the study was to explore and describe the information needs of professional nurses at the point of care in order to make recommendations to stakeholders to develop a mobile library accessible by means of smart phones when needed. Method: The researcher utilised a quantitative, descriptive survey design to conduct this study. The target population comprised 757 professional nurses employed at a state hospital. Simple random sampling was used to select a sample of the wards, units and departments for inclusion in the study. A convenience sample of 250 participants was selected. Two hundred and fifty structured self-administered questionnaires were distributed amongst the participants. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the data. Results: A total of 136 completed questionnaires were returned. The findings highlighted the types and accessible sources of information. Information needs of professional nurses were identified such as: extremely drug-resistant tuberculosis, multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis, HIV, antiretrovirals and all chronic lifestyle diseases. Conclusion: This study has enabled the researcher to identify the information needs required by professional nurses at the point of care to enhance the delivery of patient care. The research results were used to develop a mobile library that could be accessed by professional nurses.

  6. Monitoring cognitive function and need with the automated neuropsychological assessment metrics in Decompression Sickness (DCS) research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesthus, Thomas E.; Schiflett, Sammuel G.

    1993-01-01

    Hypobaric decompression sickness (DCS) research presents the medical monitor with the difficult task of assessing the onset and progression of DCS largely on the basis of subjective symptoms. Even with the introduction of precordial Doppler ultrasound techniques for the detection of venous gas emboli (VGE), correct prediction of DCS can be made only about 65 percent of the time according to data from the Armstrong Laboratory's (AL's) hypobaric DCS database. An AL research protocol concerned with exercise and its effects on denitrogenation efficiency includes implementation of a performance assessment test battery to evaluate cognitive functioning during a 4-h simulated 30,000 ft (9144 m) exposure. Information gained from such a test battery may assist the medical monitor in identifying early signs of DCS and subtle neurologic dysfunction related to cases of asymptomatic, but advanced, DCS. This presentation concerns the selection and integration of a test battery and the timely graphic display of subject test results for the principal investigator and medical monitor. A subset of the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics (ANAM) developed through the Office of Military Performance Assessment Technology (OMPAT) was selected. The ANAM software provides a library of simple tests designed for precise measurement of processing efficiency in a variety of cognitive domains. For our application and time constraints, two tests requiring high levels of cognitive processing and memory were chosen along with one test requiring fine psychomotor performance. Accuracy, speed, and processing throughout variables as well as RMS error were collected. An automated mood survey provided 'state' information on six scales including anger, happiness, fear, depression, activity, and fatigue. An integrated and interactive LOTUS 1-2-3 macro was developed to import and display past and present task performance and mood-change information.

  7. Ground Water Monitoring Requirements for Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    The groundwater monitoring requirements for hazardous waste treatment, storage and disposal facilities (TSDFs) are just one aspect of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste management strategy for protecting human health and the

  8. 40 CFR 98.44 - Monitoring and QA/QC requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electricity Generation § 98.44 Monitoring and QA/QC requirements. Follow the applicable quality assurance procedures for CO2 emissions in appendices B, D, and G to 40 CFR part 75....

  9. Nutritional requirements of surgical and critically-ill patients: do we really know what they need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Clare L

    2004-08-01

    Malnutrition remains a problem in surgical and critically-ill patients. In surgical patients the incidence of malnutrition ranges from 9 to 44%. Despite this variability there is a consensus that malnutrition worsens during hospital stay. In the intensive care unit (ICU), 43% of the patients are malnourished. Although poor nutrition during hospitalisation may be attributable to many factors, not least inadequacies in hospital catering services, there must also be the question of whether those patients who receive nutritional support are being fed appropriately. Indirect calorimetry is the 'gold standard' for determining an individual's energy requirements, but limited time and financial resources preclude the use of this method in everyday clinical practice. Studies in surgical and ICU patient populations have been reviewed to determine the 'optimal' energy and protein requirements of these patients. There are only a small number of studies that have attempted to measure energy requirements in the various surgical patient groups. Uncomplicated surgery has been associated with energy requirements of 1.0-1.15 x BMR whilst complicated surgery requires 1.25-1.4 x BMR in order to meet the patient's needs. Identifying the optimal requirements of ICU patients is far more difficult because of the heterogeneous nature of this population. In general, 5.6 kJ (25 kcal)/kg per d is an acceptable and achievable target intake, but patients with sepsis or trauma may require almost twice as much energy during the acute phase of their illness. The implications of failing to meet and exceeding the requirements of critically-ill patients are also reviewed.

  10. Hydrological education and training needs in Sub-Saharan Africa: requirements, constraints and progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Hughes

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents a perspective on the education and training needs related to hydrology and water resources science within the sub-Saharan Africa region and discusses the requirements of the region, some of the relatively recent developments and initiatives and some of the constraints that exist and remain difficult to surmount. The requirements include the development of academic research capacity and technical skill for both the private and public sector at a variety of levels. Some of the constraints that exist include a lack of adequate funding, lack of follow-up after short training courses, lack of institutional support to continue training, and competition for major water resources development projects from organizations outside the region. One of the main conclusions is that to sustain both educational and practical expertise in hydrology and water resources science within the region there is a need to build a "critical mass" of local expertise. Part of this could be achieved by increasing networking within the region and promoting the sharing of information, tools and expertise. There is also a need to promote institutional support.

  11. Hydrological education and training needs in sub-Saharan Africa: requirements, constraints and progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Hughes

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents a perspective on the education and training needs related to hydrology and water resources science within the sub-Saharan Africa region and discusses the requirements of the region, some of the relatively recent developments and initiatives and some of the constraints that exist and remain difficult to surmount. The requirements include the development of academic research capacity and technical skill for both the private and public sector at a variety of levels. Some of the constraints that exist include a lack of adequate funding, lack of follow-up after short training courses, lack of institutional support to continue training, and competition for major water resources development projects from organizations outside the region. One of the main conclusions is that to sustain both educational and practical expertise in hydrology and water resources science within the region there is a need to build a "critical mass" of local expertise. Part of this could be achieved by increasing networking within the region and promoting the sharing of information, tools and expertise. There is also a need to promote institutional support.

  12. Sedentary Behavior in Preschoolers: How Many Days of Accelerometer Monitoring Is Needed?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonwoo Byun

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The reliability of accelerometry for measuring sedentary behavior in preschoolers has not been determined, thus we determined how many days of accelerometry monitoring are necessary to reliably estimate daily time spent in sedentary behavior in preschoolers. In total, 191 and 150 preschoolers (three to five years wore ActiGraph accelerometers (15-s epoch during the in-school (≥4 days and the total-day (≥6 days period respectively. Accelerometry data were summarized as time spent in sedentary behavior (min/h using three different cutpoints developed for preschool-age children (<37.5, <200, and <373 counts/15 s. The intraclass correlations (ICCs and Spearman-Brown prophecy formula were used to estimate the reliability of accelerometer for measuring sedentary behavior. Across different cutpoints, the ICCs ranged from 0.81 to 0.92 for in-school sedentary behavior, and from 0.75 to 0.81 for total-day sedentary behavior, respectively. To achieve an ICC of ≥0.8, two to four days or six to nine days of monitoring were needed for in-school sedentary behavior and total-day sedentary behavior, respectively. These findings provide important guidance for future research on sedentary behavior in preschool children using accelerometry. Understanding the reliability of accelerometry will facilitate the conduct of research designed to inform policies and practices aimed at reducing sedentary behavior in preschool children.

  13. Sensor Needs and Requirements for Fuel Cells and CIDI/SIDI Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, R.S.

    2000-03-01

    To reduce U.S. dependence on imported oil, improve urban air quality, and decrease greenhouse gas emissions, the Department of Energy (DOE) is developing advanced vehicle technologies and fuels. Enabling technologies for fuel cell power systems and direct-injection engines are being developed by DOE through the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV), a government-industry collaboration to produce vehicles having up to three times the fuel economy of conventional mid-size automobiles. Sensors have been identified as a research and development need for both fuel cell and direct-injection systems, because current sensor technologies do not adequately meet requirements. Sensors are needed for emission control, for passenger safety and comfort, to increase system lifetime, and for system performance enhancement through feedback and control. These proceedings document the results of a workshop to define sensor requirements for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems and direct-injection engines for automotive applications. The recommendations from this workshop will be incorporated into the multi-year R&D plan of the DOE Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies. The objectives of the workshop were to: define the requirements for sensors; establish R&D priorities; identify the technical targets and technical barriers; and facilitate collaborations among participants. The recommendations from this workshop will be incorporated into the multi-year R&D plan of the DOE Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies.

  14. Flow cytometry quality requirements for monitoring of minimal disease in plasma cell myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldaker, Teri A; Wallace, Paul K; Barnett, David

    2016-01-01

    Current therapeutic approaches for plasma cell myeloma (PCM) attain an overall survival of more than 6 years for the majority of newly diagnosed patients. However, PFS and OS are the only accepted FDA clinical endpoints for demonstrating drug efficacy before they can be become frontline therapeutic options. There is, however, recognition that the increasing gap between drug development and approval for mainstream therapeutic use needs to be shortened. As such regulatory bodies such as the FDA are now considering whether biomarker response evaluation, as in measurement of minimal residual disease (MRD) as assessed by flow cytometry (FC), can provide an early, robust prediction of survival and therefore improve the drug approval process. Recently, FC MRD using a standardized eight-color antibody methodology has been shown to have a minimum sensitivity of 0.01% and an upper sensitivity of 0.001%. To ensure that all laboratories using this approach achieve the same levels of sensitivity it is crucially important to have standardized quality management procedures in place. This manuscript accompanies those published in this special issue and describes the minimum that is required for validating and quality monitoring of this highly specific test to ensure any laboratory, irrespective of location, will achieve the expected quality standards required. © 2015 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  15. Developing a 3D Road Cadastral System: Comparing Legal Requirements and User Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gristina, S.; Ellul, C.; Scianna, A.

    2016-10-01

    Road transport has always played an important role in a country's growth and, in order to manage road networks and ensure a high standard of road performance (e.g. durability, efficiency and safety), both public and private road inventories have been implemented using databases and Geographical Information Systems. They enable registering and managing significant amounts of different road information, but to date do not focus on 3D road information, data integration and interoperability. In an increasingly complex 3D urban environment, and in the age of smart cities, however, applications including intelligent transport systems, mobility and traffic management, road maintenance and safety require digital data infrastructures to manage road data: thus new inventories based on integrated 3D road models (queryable, updateable and shareable on line) are required. This paper outlines the first step towards the implementation of 3D GIS-based road inventories. Focusing on the case study of the "Road Cadastre" (the Italian road inventory as established by law), it investigates current limitations and required improvements, and also compares the required data structure imposed by cadastral legislation with real road users' needs. The study aims to: a) determine whether 3D GIS would improve road cadastre (for better management of data through the complete life-cycle infrastructure projects); b) define a conceptual model for a 3D road cadastre for Italy (whose general principles may be extended also to other countries).

  16. 50 CFR 18.128 - What are the mitigation, monitoring, and reporting requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... require a monitor on the site of the activity or on board drill ships, drill rigs, aircraft, icebreakers... or require that the operator conduct activities after the female bears emerge from their dens. We... Alaska Regional Director (Attn: Marine Mammals Management Office) within 90 days after completion...

  17. 78 FR 55060 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Expanded Vessel Monitoring System Requirement...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-09

    ... commercial fishing vessels are required to install and use a vessel monitoring system (VMS) that... pilot VMS program was implemented on January 1, 2004. The pilot program required vessels registered to Pacific Coast groundfish fishery limited entry permits to carry and use VMS transceiver units...

  18. An assessment of monitoring requirements and costs of 'Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCallum Ian

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Negotiations on a future climate policy framework addressing Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD are ongoing. Regardless of how such a framework will be designed, many technical solutions of estimating forest cover and forest carbon stock change exist to support policy in monitoring and accounting. These technologies typically combine remotely sensed data with ground-based inventories. In this article we assess the costs of monitoring REDD based on available technologies and requirements associated with key elements of REDD policy. Results We find that the design of a REDD policy framework (and specifically its rules can have a significant impact on monitoring costs. Costs may vary from 0.5 to 550 US$ per square kilometre depending on the required precision of carbon stock and area change detection. Moreover, they follow economies of scale, i.e. single country or project solutions will face relatively higher monitoring costs. Conclusion Although monitoring costs are relatively small compared to other cost items within a REDD system, they should be shared not only among countries but also among sectors, because an integrated monitoring system would have multiple benefits for non-REDD management. Overcoming initialization costs and unequal access to monitoring technologies is crucial for implementation of an integrated monitoring system, and demands for international cooperation.

  19. Changing requirements and resulting needs for IT-infrastructure for longitudinal research in the neurosciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckow, Karoline; Quade, Matthias; Rienhoff, Otto; Nussbeck, Sara Y

    2016-01-01

    The observation of growing "difficulties" in IT-infrastructures in neuroscience research during the last years led to a search for reasons and an analysis on how this phenomenon is reflected in the scientific literature. With a retrospective analysis of nine examples of multicenter research projects in the neurosciences and a literature review the observation was systematically analyzed. Results show that the rise in complexity mainly stems from two reasons: (1) more and more need for information on quality and context of research data (metadata) and (2) long-term requirements to handle the consent and identity/pseudonyms of study participants and biomaterials in relation to legal requirements. The combination of these two aspects together with very long study times and data evaluation periods are components of the subjectively perceived "difficulties". A direct consequence of this result is that big multicenter trials are becoming part of integrated research data environments and are not standing alone for themselves anymore. This drives up the resource needs regarding the IT-infrastructure in neuroscience research. In contrast to these findings, literature on this development is scarce and the problem probably underestimated.

  20. Mediterranean agriculture: More efficient irrigation needed to compensate increases in future irrigation water requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fader, Marianela; Shi, Sinan; von Bloh, Werner; Bondeau, Alberte; Cramer, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Irrigation in the Mediterranean is of vital importance for food security, employment and economic development. Our research shows that, at present, Mediterranean region could save 35% of water by implementing more efficient irrigation and conveyance systems. Some countries like Syria, Egypt and Turkey have higher saving potentials than others. Currently some crops, especially sugar cane and agricultural trees, consume in average more irrigation water per hectare than annual crops (1). Also under climate change, more efficient irrigation is of vital importance for counteracting increases in irrigation water requirements. The Mediterranean area as a whole might face an increase in gross irrigation requirements between 4% and 18% from climate change alone by the end of the century if irrigation systems and conveyance are not improved. Population growth increases these numbers to 22% and 74%, respectively, affecting mainly the Southern and Eastern Mediterranean. However, improved irrigation technologies and conveyance systems have large water saving potentials, especially in the Eastern Mediterranean, and may be able to compensate to some degree the increases due to climate change and population growth. Both subregions would need around 35% more water than today if they could afford some degree of modernization of irrigation and conveyance systems and benefit from the CO2-fertilization effect (1). However, in some scenarios (in this case as combinations of climate change, irrigation technology, influence of population growth and CO2-fertilization effect) water scarcity may constrain the supply of the irrigation water needed in future in Algeria, Libya, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, Serbia, Morocco, Tunisia and Spain (1). In this study, vegetation growth, phenology, agricultural production and irrigation water requirements and withdrawal were simulated with the process-based ecohydrological and agro-ecosystem model LPJmL ("Lund-Potsdam-Jena managed Land") after a

  1. Analysis of requirements and the necessary investments in the railway station adjustment program for persons with special needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atanasković Predrag

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available People with special needs from the standpoint of social communities have specific requirements for access, mobility, entry and exit of railway vehicles designated to transport passengers. The EU has defined standards and requirements related to persons with special needs. The aim of this paper is to analyze the technical requirements of equipment and identify the necessary investment funds related to the increasing mobility of persons with special needs in the rail transportation system. This analysis would be one of the initial steps approaching the conditions and requirements that apply in the EU in adapting the system of transport for people with special needs.

  2. Requirements to micro-unmanned aircraft systems in civil protection and environmental monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer-Stabel, Peter; Hardt, Christopher [Univ. of Applied Sciences Trier, Birkenfeld (Germany). Dept. of Environmental Planning

    2013-07-01

    Especially in application fields such as environmental monitoring or in the field of information and operations management with technical or natural disasters, increased demands on communication and sensor technology to micro unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) are given. These are currently covered by the system manufacturers, however inadequately. The use case of wildlife monitoring with micro UAS comes with some special requirements and problems, addressed in this paper. (orig.)

  3. Revisiting Parental Monitoring : Evidence that Parental Solicitation Can be Effective When Needed Most

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laird, Robert D.; Marrero, Matthew D.; Sentse, Miranda

    2010-01-01

    Studies using valid measures of monitoring activities have not found the anticipated main effects linking greater monitoring activity with fewer behavioral problems. This study focused on two contexts in which monitoring activities may be particularly influential. Early adolescents (n = 218, M age =

  4. Revisiting Parental Monitoring : Evidence that Parental Solicitation Can be Effective When Needed Most

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laird, Robert D.; Marrero, Matthew D.; Sentse, Miranda

    2010-01-01

    Studies using valid measures of monitoring activities have not found the anticipated main effects linking greater monitoring activity with fewer behavioral problems. This study focused on two contexts in which monitoring activities may be particularly influential. Early adolescents (n = 218, M age =

  5. Data needs and computational requirements for ST decision making. Internal deliverable ID6.2.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clement, Rémy; Tournebise, Pascal; Perkin, Samuel

    at the interfaces between the short-term operation planning and real-time decision making process. Adhering to the title of the task, the various chapters in the deliverable discusses the exogenous factors, i.e., load forecasting, component failure rates and influence of weather and renewable energy sources......The objective of this deliverable is to present the requirements for adapting available tools/models and identifying data needs for probabilistic reliability analysis and optimal decision-making in the short-term decision making process. It will serve as a basis for the next tasks of GARPUR work...... written by several partners, two of them being European TSOs, and the four other being academic partners. Special attention has been paid to address every topic in short-term decision making process as considered within GARPUR, and so that no important issue has been forgotten in the grey zones...

  6. EXAMINING STUDENTS’ NEEDS FOR ENGLISH AS REQUIRED COURSE IN DIPONEGORO UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Wulandari

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at finding out what students need in taking English as required course, what students want to learn, and how they want to learn. The data were taken from 500 questionnaires distributed to students. The data revealed that most of the students do have positive attitude in learning English, and because of this the students have more chances to take the best of their learning. However, as most of the students also take English because they are required to do so, there are also some factors that may discourage learners’ motivation in learning, i.e. materials selection, and teaching methods. Kajian ini ditujukan untuk mengetahui apa yang diinginkan oleh mahasiswa dalam mengambil mata kuliah MKDU Bahasa Inggris, secara spesifik untuk mengetahui materi apa yang mereka ingin pelajari, dan bagaimana mereka ingin mempelajarinya. Data diambil dari kuesioner yang disebarkan pada 500 mahasiswa. Analisis data menunjukkan bahwa sebagian besar siswa memiliki sikap bahasa yang positif  dalam mepelajari Bahasa Inggris, dan oleh karenanya mahasiswa memiliki kesempatan lebih banyak untuk mengambil keuntungan terbesar dari perkuliahan tersebut. Namun demikian, karena sebagian besar mahasiswa mengambil mata kuliah tersebut karena kewajiban, ada beberapa hal yang menyurutkan motivasi mahasiswa, yakni pemilihan materi, dan metode mengajar dosen  Bahasa Inggris.

  7. PROFITABILITY IN THE CONTEXT OF THE NEEDS AND REQUIREMENTS OF SUSTAINABLE FARMS DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela SIMTION

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Market economy requires from any farm particular efforts for the profitability of products and organizational structures as well as for the increase in a higher pace of the profitability of each product in order to achieve the level of competitiveness imposed by the competitive market and the modernization needs of agriculture from the given stage. Under the new conditions created by globalization and environmental requirements, modernization is closely related to promotion of sustainable development for agriculture and the entire countryside. Holdings must strive in their work towards sustainable, competitive profitability, which can not be admitted as maximum at all costs, taking into account the environment and human health. Thus, should any financial analysis include not only physic but also the value of natural resources and the environment? Therefore, it is necessary to introduce the concept of sustainable agriculture, adapted to the conditions of each country, as an organizational capacity to grow in the future, effectively and rationally exploiting its natural, economic and social resources, in harmony with the surrounding environment, in the benefit of the producers and ensuring food security for current and future generations.

  8. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 58 - Quality Assurance Requirements for SLAMS, SPMs and PSD Air Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Appendix A to Part 58—Quality Assurance Requirements for SLAMS, SPMs and PSD Air Monitoring 1. General... specifies the minimum quality system requirements applicable to SLAMS air monitoring data and PSD data for... of the air being measured. Monitoring organizations must develop quality assurance project...

  9. Depot Maintenance: Improved Strategic Planning Needed to Ensure That Army and Marine Corps Depots Can Meet Future Maintenance Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    of Representatives DEPOT MAINTENANCE Improved Strategic Planning Needed to Ensure That Army and Marine Corps Depots Can Meet Future...Depot Maintenance. Improved Strategic Planning Needed to Ensure That Army and Marine Corps Depots Can Meet Future Maintenance Requirements 5a... Strategic Planning Needed to Ensure That Army and Marine Corps Depots Can Meet Future Maintenance Requirements Highlights of GAO-09-865, a report to

  10. Unmanned Carrier-based Aircraft System: Navy Needs to Demonstrate Match between Its Requirements and Available Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    UNMANNED CARRIER -BASED AIRCRAFT SYSTEM Navy Needs to Demonstrate Match between Its Requirements and Available...DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Unmanned Carrier -based Aircraft System: Navy Needs to Demonstrate Match between Its...UNMANNED CARRIER -BASED AIRCRAFT SYSTEM Navy Needs to Demonstrate Match between Its Requirements and Available Resources Why GAO Did This Study The

  11. Critical evaluation of factors required to terminate the postclosure monitoring period at solid waste landfills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlaz, M.A.; Rooker, A.P.; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2002-01-01

    requirements and regulatory activity that might be required to prepare regulators for the large number of requests to terminate postclosure monitoring expected over the next 20 years. An approach in which the frequency and extent of postclosure monitoring is reduced as warranted by site-specific data......Regulations governing the disposal of solid waste in landfills specify that they must be monitored for 30 years after closure unless this period is extended by the governing regulatory authority. Given the wide range of conditions under which refuse is buried, technical criteria, rather than...... water or groundwater. The acceptability of gaseous releases should be evaluated against criteria for odors, the potential for subsurface migration, and greenhouse gas and ozone precursor emissions. The approach presented here must be tested on a site-specific basis to identify additional data...

  12. 40 CFR 63.7188 - What are my monitoring installation, operation, and maintenance requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Semiconductor Manufacturing Compliance Requirements § 63.7188 What are my monitoring installation, operation... emissions of your semiconductor process vent through a closed vent system to a control device, you must... evaluation procedure in § 63.7187(i) to demonstrate compliance, you must use the information from the...

  13. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Jjj of... - Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 6 Table 6 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62 Protection of Environment... Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Pt. 62, Subpt. JJJ, Table 6 Table 6 to Subpart JJJ...

  14. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Jjj of... - Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) a

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) a 7 Table 7 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Pt. 62, Subpt. JJJ, Table 7 Table 7 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62...

  15. 10 CFR 50.65 - Requirements for monitoring the effectiveness of maintenance at nuclear power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... maintenance at nuclear power plants. 50.65 Section 50.65 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC... Construction Permits § 50.65 Requirements for monitoring the effectiveness of maintenance at nuclear power..., including normal shutdown operations. (a)(1) Each holder of an operating license for a nuclear power......

  16. 40 CFR 63.996 - General monitoring requirements for control and recovery devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Closed Vent Systems, Control Devices, Recovery Devices and Routing to a Fuel Gas System or a Process § 63.996 General monitoring requirements for... cycle and the temperature of the carbon bed determined within 15 minutes of the completion of...

  17. 77 FR 59053 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Monitoring and Enforcement Requirements in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-26

    ... the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Monitoring and Enforcement Requirements in the Bering Sea and... sampled, or carry one observer and use a motion-compensated scale to weigh Pacific cod before it is....S. groundfish fisheries of the exclusive economic zone off Alaska under the Fishery Management...

  18. Required sample size for monitoring stand dynamics in strict forest reserves: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diego Van Den Meersschaut; Bart De Cuyper; Kris Vandekerkhove; Noel Lust

    2000-01-01

    Stand dynamics in European strict forest reserves are commonly monitored using inventory densities of 5 to 15 percent of the total surface. The assumption that these densities guarantee a representative image of certain parameters is critically analyzed in a case study for the parameters basal area and stem number. The required sample sizes for different accuracy and...

  19. 40 CFR 141.85 - Public education and supplemental monitoring requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Public education and supplemental monitoring requirements. 141.85 Section 141.85 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... lead more than healthy adults. Lead is stored in the bones, and it can be released later in...

  20. Linking requirements with capabilities for deforestation monitoring in the context of the UNFCCC-REDD process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herold, Martin [GOFC-GOLD Land Cover Project Office, Department of Earth Observation, Friedrich-Schiller University, Jena 07743 (Germany); Johns, Tracy [Joanneum Research, Institute for Energy Research, Graz 8010 (Austria)

    2007-10-15

    As the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change nears the end of a two-year period of evaluation of the issue of reducing emissions from deforestation in developing countries, participating countries have agreed on the need to address this globally important source of greenhouse gas emissions. Negotiations on policy frameworks to monitor and reduce deforestation rely on an understanding of the scientific and technical capacity to support these efforts. Current UNFCCC programs to improve observation of land and forest cover change can provide valuable input to a future policy mechanism focusing on deforestation emissions from developing countries. Countries participating in the current debate have officially referenced the value of remote sensing tools and methods for deforestation monitoring, and have identified specific needs and goals related to their implementation. Based on these identified needs, this paper outlines recommendations for a monitoring framework that can be globally applied with sufficient levels of accuracy and certainty. This framework can serve as a starting point for monitoring programs, and can be modified in response to expected progress in establishing an international policy framework for reducing emissions from deforestation.

  1. Future needs and requirements for AMS {sup 14}C standards and reference materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, E. Marian E-mail: marian@stats.gla.ac.uk; Boaretto, Elisabetta; Bryant, Charlotte; Cook, Gordon T.; Gulliksen, Steinar; Harkness, Doug D.; Heinemeier, Jan; McGee, Edward; Naysmith, Philip; Possnert, Goran; Plicht, Hans van der; Strydonck, Mark van

    2004-08-01

    {sup 14}C measurement uses a number of standards and reference materials with different properties. Historically the absolute calibration of {sup 14}C measurement was tied to 1890 wood, through the 'primary' standard of NBS-OxI (produced by the National Bureau of Standards, now NIST - National Institute of Standards and technology) subsequently replaced by NBS-OxII. These are both internationally calibrated and certified materials, whose {sup 14}C activities are known absolutely. A second tier of materials, often called secondary standards or reference materials, and including internationally recognised materials such as ANU-sucrose (now also IAEA-C6), Chinese - sucrose and the IAEA C1-C6 series, augmented by additional oxalic acid samples are also used routinely. The activity of these materials has been estimated from large numbers of measurements made by many laboratories. Recently, further natural materials from the Third and Fourth International Radiocarbon Inter-comparisons (TIRI and FIRI) have been added to this list. The activities of these standards and reference materials span both the applied {sup 14}C age range and the chemical composition range of typical samples, but this is not achieved uniformly and there is a continuing need for reference materials for laboratory quality control and measurement-traceability purposes. In this paper, we review the development of {sup 14}C standards and reference materials and consider the future requirements for such materials within the {sup 14}C AMS community.

  2. Geometric Aspects of Ground Augmentation of Satellite Networks for the Needs of Deformation Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protaziuk, Elżbieta

    2016-06-01

    Satellite measurements become competitive in many tasks of engineering surveys, however, in many requiring applications possibilities to apply such solutions are still limited. The possibility to widely apply satellite technologies for displacements measurements is related with new challenges; the most important of them relate to increasing requirements concerning the accuracy, reliability and continuity of results of position determination. One of the solutions is a ground augmentation of satellite network, which intention is to improve precision of positioning, ensure comparable accuracy of coordinates and reduce precision fluctuations over time. The need for augmentation of GNSS is particularly significant in situations: where the visibility of satellites is poor because of terrain obstacles, when the determined position is not precise enough or a satellites constellation does not allow for reliable positioning. Ground based source/sources of satellite signal placed at a ground, called pseudosatellites, or pseudolites were intensively investigated during the last two decades and finally were developed into groundbased, time-synchronized transceivers, that can transmit and receive a proprietary positioning signal. The paper presents geometric aspects of the ground based augmentation of the satellite networks using various quality measures of positioning geometry, which depends on access to the constellation of satellites and the conditions of the observation environment. The issue of minimizing these measures is the key problem that allows to obtain the position with high accuracy. For this purpose, the use of an error ellipsoid is proposed and compared with an error ellipse. The paper also describes the results of preliminary accuracy analysis obtained at test area and a comparison of various measures of the quality of positioning geometry.

  3. Metrological Needs for Monitoring Aquatic Environments: From the Demonstration of Metrological Traceability to the Decision Making Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardy-Fontan, Sophie; Guigues, Nathalie; Lalere, Béatrice; Vaslin-Reimann, Sophie

    2014-08-01

    In Europe, the implementation of the Water Framework Directive WFD, in 2001, marks a strong standpoint. In addition to its objectives of a return to good chemical and good ecological status by the year 2015, it fixes the achievement of trends over space and time. The new requirements that arise from the WFD put considerable financial pressure on water management authorities. Because the overall decision-making process relies most of the time on acquired data, it puts considerable pressures on the display of high quality biological as well as chemical environmental measurements. However, performing measurements implies that i) the demonstration of their metrological traceability ii) the evidence of their achievement thanks to accurate and sensitive analytical methods and iii) their statement with a reliable estimate of expanded uncertainty is thoroughly addressed. Moreover, the measurement representativeness, especially in highly dynamic environment, is of prime interest in a context where comparability over space and time is needed. As a consequence, considerable challenges are dwelt on metrologists with great emphasis on parameters that are under regulation. This paper will discuss a panorama of the unavoidable metrological questions that have to be addressed: from the definition of the measurand to the final estimation of uncertainty; from the initial performances demonstration of methods to the final demonstration of mastery and capabilities through inter comparison laboratories and reference materials. A focus will be made on upcoming alternative monitoring approaches that are seldom addressed from a metrological point of view.

  4. Functions and requirements for Hanford single-shell tank leakage detection and monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruse, J.M.; Ohl, P.C.

    1995-04-19

    This document provides the initial functions and requirements for leakage detection and monitoring applicable to past and potential future leakage from the Hanford Site`s 149 single-shell high-level waste tanks. This mission is a part of the overall mission of the Westinghouse Hanford Company Tank Waste Remediation System division to remediate the tank waste in a safe and acceptable manner. Systems engineering principles are being applied to this effort. This document reflects the an initial step in the systems engineering approach to decompose the mission into primary functions and requirements. The document is considered approximately 30% complete relative to the effort required to produce a final version that can be used to support demonstration and/or procurement of technologies. The functions and requirements in this document apply to detection and monitoring of below ground leaks from SST containment boundaries and the resulting soil contamination. Leakage detection and monitoring is invoked in the TWRS Program in three fourth level functions: (1) Store Waste, (2) Retrieve Waste, and (3) Disposition Excess Facilities (as identified in DOE/RL-92-60 Rev. 1, Tank Waste Remediation System Functions and Requirements).

  5. Sharik 1.0: User Needs and System Requirements for a Web-Based Tool to Support Collaborative Sensemaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Sharik 1.0: User Needs and System Requirements for a Web -Based Tool to Support Collaborative Sensemaking Shadi Ghajar-Khosravi...Conclusion A web -based collaborative sensemaking system is proposed to support the user tasks involved in the Intelligence Cycle of Canadian Forces...parentheses after the title.) Sharik 1.0: User Needs and System Requirements for a Web -Based Tool to Support Collaborative Sensemaking 4

  6. The experience of family members of ICU patients who require extensive monitoring: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Claudia DiSabatino; Custard, Kristi

    2014-09-01

    A mixed methods study using family research with a phenomenological approach (n = 5 families) was conducted to explore family members' perceptions about the extensive monitoring technology used on their critically ill family member after cardiac surgery, as experienced when family members initially visited the patient in the cardiovascular intensive care unit. Five relevant themes emerged: overwhelmed by all of the machines; feelings of uncertainty; methods of coping; meaning of the numbers on the machines; and need for education.

  7. Condition monitoring requirements for the development of a space nuclear propulsion module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    To facilitate the development of a space nuclear propulsion module for manned flights to Mars, requirements must be established early in the technology cycle. The long lead times for the acquisition of the engine system and nuclear test facilities demands that the engine system, size, performance, safety goals and condition monitoring philosophy be defined at the earliest possible time. These systems are highly complex and require a large multi-disciplinary systems engineering team to develop and track the requirements and to ensure that the as-built system reflects the intent of the mission. An effective methodology has been devised coupled with sophisticated computer tools to effectivly develop and interpret the functional requirements. These requirements can then be decomposed down to the specification level for implementation. This paper discusses the application of the methodology and the analyses to develop condition monitoring requirements under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center (LeRC) Nuclear Propulsion Office (NPO).

  8. Resolution requirements for monitor viewing of digital flat-panel detector radiographs: a contrast detail analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peer, Siegfried; Steingruber, Iris; Gassner, Eva; Peer, Regina; Giacomuzzi, Salvatore M.

    2002-05-01

    Since the introduction of digital flat panel detectors into clinical routine the discussion on monitor specifications for primary soft copy reading has gained new impetus. Major concerns exist for viewing of tiny opacities such as pulmonary nodules. In this study CDRAD phantom images were acquired on a caesium iodid/amorphous silicon detector at varying exposure levels. Images were read three times by three observers on a clinical 1K and 2K monitor workstation. All typical workstation functions such as magnification and window/level setting were applied during image reading. Correct detection ratios were calculated according to the CDRAD evaluation manual. Observer ratings were highest for high dose exposure and 2K monitor reading. No significant difference was detected in the correct detection ratio of observers. However, the difference between the two types of workstations (1K versus 2K monitors) despite less than 3% was significant at a 95% confidence level. This is in good accordance with recently published clinical studies. However, further clinical work will be needed to strengthen this laboratory based impression. Given these subtle differences in low contrast detail detection on 1K and 2K clinical PACS workstation we should probably rethink the recommendations of various national boards for the use of 2K monitors.

  9. 40 CFR 63.8575 - What do I need to know about operation, maintenance, and monitoring plans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Clay Ceramics... unit such that the measurement is representative of control of the exhaust emissions (e.g., on or... quality assurance procedures consistent with the requirements in § 63.8(d). (10) Continuous monitoring...

  10. The need for complementary hydraulic analysis in post-restoration monitoring of river restoration projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endreny, T. A.; Soulman, M. M.

    2011-03-01

    River restoration design methods are incrementally improved by studying and learning from monitoring data in previous projects. In this paper, we report post-restoration monitoring data for a Natural Channel Design (NCD) restoration project along 1600 m (10 channel wavelengths) of the Batavia Kill in the Catskill Mountains, NY, implemented in 2001 and 2002. The NCD project used a reference-reach to determine channel form, empirical relations between the project site and reference site bankfull dimensions to size channel geometry, and hydraulic and sediment computations to test channel capacity and sediment stability. In addition 12 cross-vanes and 48 j-hook vanes used in NCD for river training were installed to protect against bank erosion and maintain scour pools for fish habitat. Changes in pool depths were monitored with surveys from 2002-2004, and then after the channel-altering April 2005 flood. Aggradation in pools was attributed to cross-vane arms not concentrating flow in the center of the channel, which subsequently caused flow splitting and 4 partial point bar avulsions during the 2005 flood. Hydrodynamic simulation at the 18 m3s-1 bankfull flow suggested avulsions occurred where vanes allowed erosive bank scour to initiate the avulsion cut, and once the flow was split, the diminished in-channel flow caused more aggradation in the pools. In this project post-restoration monitoring had detected aggradation and considered it a problem. The lesson for the larger river restoration community is monitoring protocol should include complementary hydraulic and sediment analysis to comprehend potential consequences and develop preventative maintenance. River restoration and monitoring teams should be trained in robust hydraulic and sediment analytical methods that help them extend project restoration goals.

  11. The need for complementary hydraulic analysis in post-restoration monitoring of river restoration projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Endreny

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available River restoration design methods are incrementally improved by studying and learning from monitoring data in previous projects. In this paper, we report post-restoration monitoring data for a Natural Channel Design (NCD restoration project along 1600 m (10 channel wavelengths of the Batavia Kill in the Catskill Mountains, NY, implemented in 2001 and 2002. The NCD project used a reference-reach to determine channel form, empirical relations between the project site and reference site bankfull dimensions to size channel geometry, and hydraulic and sediment computations to test channel capacity and sediment stability. In addition 12 cross-vanes and 48 j-hook vanes used in NCD for river training were installed to protect against bank erosion and maintain scour pools for fish habitat. Changes in pool depths were monitored with surveys from 2002–2004, and then after the channel-altering April 2005 flood. Aggradation in pools was attributed to cross-vane arms not concentrating flow in the center of the channel, which subsequently caused flow splitting and 4 partial point bar avulsions during the 2005 flood. Hydrodynamic simulation at the 18 m3s−1 bankfull flow suggested avulsions occurred where vanes allowed erosive bank scour to initiate the avulsion cut, and once the flow was split, the diminished in-channel flow caused more aggradation in the pools. In this project post-restoration monitoring had detected aggradation and considered it a problem. The lesson for the larger river restoration community is monitoring protocol should include complementary hydraulic and sediment analysis to comprehend potential consequences and develop preventative maintenance. River restoration and monitoring teams should be trained in robust hydraulic and sediment analytical methods that help them extend project restoration goals.

  12. Monitoring Conformance and Containment for Geological Carbon Storage: Can Technology Meet Policy and Public Requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, D. C.; Osadetz, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Province of Alberta, Canada identified carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a key element of its 2008 Climate Change strategy. The target is a reduction in CO2 emissions of 139 Mt/year by 2050. To encourage uptake of CCS by industry, the province has provided partial funding to two demonstration scale projects, namely the Quest Project by Shell and partners (CCS), and the Alberta Carbon Trunk Line Project (pipeline and CO2-EOR). Important to commercial scale implementation of CCS will be the requirement to prove conformance and containment of the CO2 plume injected during the lifetime of the CCS project. This will be a challenge for monitoring programs. The Containment and Monitoring Institute (CaMI) is developing a Field Research Station (FRS) to calibrate various monitoring technologies for CO2 detection thresholds at relatively shallow depths. The objective being assessed with the FRS is sensitivity for early detection of loss of containment from a deeper CO2 storage project. In this project, two injection wells will be drilled to sandstone reservoir targets at depths of 300 m and 700 m. Up to four observation wells will be drilled with monitoring instruments installed. Time-lapse surface and borehole monitoring surveys will be undertaken to evaluate the movement and fate of the CO2 plume. These will include seismic, microseismic, cross well, electrical resistivity, electromagnetic, gravity, geodetic and geomechanical surveys. Initial baseline seismic data from the FRS will presented.

  13. 10 CFR 30.72 - Schedule C-Quantities of radioactive materials requiring consideration of the need for an...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Schedule C-Quantities of radioactive materials requiring... § 30.72 Schedule C—Quantities of radioactive materials requiring consideration of the need for an emergency plan for responding to a release. Radioactive material 1 Release fraction Quantity...

  14. A Next Generation Air Monitor: Combining Orion and ISS Requirements for a Common Major Constituent Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchfield, David E.; Tissandier, Michael; Niu, William Hsein-Chi; Lewis, John F.

    2013-01-01

    The Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) is a mass spectrometer-based instrument designed to provide critical monitoring of six major atmospheric constituents; nitrogen, oxygen, hydrogen, carbon dioxide, methane, and water vapor on-board the International Space Station. The analyzer has been an integral part of the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) since the station went on-line. The Orion Air Monitor (OAM) was derived from the MCA and heavily optimized for reduced mass, lower power, faster water vapor response, and maintenance-free operation. The resulting OAM is approximately the size of the analyzer portion of the MCA, orbital-replacement unit 02 (ORU 02), while incorporating the functions of three other modules: Data Processing and Communication (ORU 01), Verification Gas Assembly (ORU 08), and Low Voltage Power Supply (ORU 04). The overlap in MCA and OAM requirements makes it possible to derive a common Air Monitor design that spans both applications while minimally impacting the weight and power limits imposed by the Multipurpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). Benefits to ISS include the retirement of ORUs 01, 04, and 08, reducing up-mass and eliminating EEE parts obsolescence issues through the extended ISS mission phases. Benefits to MPCV and future deployed habitats under the Constellation program include greater interchangeability across ECLSS subsystems. This paper discusses the results of the requirements development study, where a superset of ISS and Orion air monitoring requirements were distilled; evaluated against increases in OAM functionality, mass, and power; and traded-off where possible using simple operating mode modifications. A system architecture and preliminary design addressing the common requirements will be presented.

  15. Support Required for Primary and Secondary Students with Communication Disorders and/or Other Learning Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Sharynne; McKinnon, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Prioritization of school students with additional learning needs is a reality due to a finite resource base. Limited evidence exists regarding teachers' prioritization of primary and secondary school students with additional learning needs. The aim of the present article was to differentiate teachers' perceptions of the level of support required…

  16. Support Required for Primary and Secondary Students with Communication Disorders and/or Other Learning Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Sharynne; McKinnon, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Prioritization of school students with additional learning needs is a reality due to a finite resource base. Limited evidence exists regarding teachers' prioritization of primary and secondary school students with additional learning needs. The aim of the present article was to differentiate teachers' perceptions of the level of support required…

  17. Coral Reef Monitoring Needs Assessment Workshop U.S. Virgin Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Virgin Island Department of Planning and Natural Resources (DPNR) held a workshop September 11-13, 2007 in St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) to begin the process of designing a monitoring program that meets multiple mana...

  18. Coral Reef Monitoring Needs Assessment Workshop U.S. Virgin Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Virgin Island Department of Planning and Natural Resources (DPNR) held a workshop September 11-13, 2007 in St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) to begin the process of designing a monitoring program that meets multiple mana...

  19. LCMS landscape change monitoring system—results from an information needs assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin Megown; Brian Schwind; Don Evans; Mark. Finco

    2015-01-01

    Understanding changes in land use and land cover over space and time provides an important means to evaluate complex interactions between human and biophysical systems, to project future conditions, and to design mitigation and adaptive management strategies. Assessing and monitoring landscape change is evolving into a foundational element of climate change adaptation...

  20. An overview of aerodynamic research and technology requirements as related to some military needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spearman, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    Based on unclassified sources, a general review is presented of some military needs in light of the perceived U.S.S.R. doctrine, force balances, inventory growth, inventory items, and current actions. The Soviets appear to be attempting to increase their sphere of influence throught economic and political control as well as possible military control of land, sea, air, and space. To offset such possibilities, certain areas of deterrent needs that the Western World might pursue are suggested. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of research and technology related to aerospace systems as part of the deterrent needs.

  1. Proceedings of the symposium on assessing the industrial hygiene monitoring needs for the coal conversion and oil shale industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, O. Jr. (ed.)

    1979-03-01

    This work was supported by the United States Department of Energy, Division of Biomedical and Environmental Research, Analysis and Assessment Program, through the Safety and Environmental Protection Division at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The symposium program included presentations centering around the themes: Recognition of Occupational Health Monitoring Requirements for the Coal Conversion and Oil Shale Industries and Status of Dosimetry Technology for Occupational Health Monitoring for the Coal Conversion and Oil Shale Industries. Sixteen papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA; six had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

  2. VA Health Care: Improved Monitoring Needed for Effective Oversight of Care for Women Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Health Care Letter 1 Background 6 VHA Lacks Complete and Accurate Data on VAMC Compliance with Environment of Care Requirements for Women Veterans...of Care Requirements 40 Appendix IV Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Gynecologist Availability 44 Appendix V Veterans Affairs (VA) Clinics...Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Requirements Related to the Outpatient Environment of Care for Women Veterans, December 2015-March 2016 40 Table

  3. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Bbbb of... - Model Rule-Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Model Rule-Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 6 Table 6 to Subpart BBBB of Part 60 Protection of Environment...—Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) For the following continuous...

  4. Survey of statistical and sampling needs for environmental monitoring of commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberhardt, L.L.; Thomas, J.M.

    1986-07-01

    This project was designed to develop guidance for implementing 10 CFR Part 61 and to determine the overall needs for sampling and statistical work in characterizing, surveying, monitoring, and closing commercial low-level waste sites. When cost-effectiveness and statistical reliability are of prime importance, then double sampling, compositing, and stratification (with optimal allocation) are identified as key issues. If the principal concern is avoiding questionable statistical practice, then the applicability of kriging (for assessing spatial pattern), methods for routine monitoring, and use of standard textbook formulae in reporting monitoring results should be reevaluated. Other important issues identified include sampling for estimating model parameters and the use of data from left-censored (less than detectable limits) distributions.

  5. Needs Assessment and Telecommunications Cost Benefit Analysis for Army Medical Department Continuing Clinical Education Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-04-01

    Care Providers Toward Slow-Scan Video. CMA Journal , 127, p. 225. Hoffman, C. J., & McKinney, W. A. (1983). Advanced Technology - Multi- Media...Nursing Removable Prosthodontics -- 4 Periodontics Endodontics Advanced Cardiac Life Support Nursing Documentation Computer Technology Application ---3...delivery. As needs change and technology advances in the future, this trend may also change. The strength of this study over past studies is that needs

  6. Impact of shock requiring norepinephrine on the accuracy and reliability of subcutaneous continuous glucose monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzinger, Ulrike; Warszawska, Joanna; Kitzberger, Reinhard; Herkner, Harald; Metnitz, Philipp G H; Madl, Christian

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate the impact of circulatory shock requiring norepinephrine therapy on the accuracy and reliability of a subcutaneous continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) in critically ill patients. A prospective, validation study of a medical intensive care unit at a university hospital was carried out. Continuous glucose monitoring was performed subcutaneously in 50 consecutive patients on intensive insulin therapy (IIT), who were assessed according to the a priori strata of circulatory shock requiring norepinephrine therapy or not. A total of 736 pairs of sensor glucose (SG)/blood glucose (BG) values were analysed (502 without and 234 with norepinephrine therapy). For all values, repeated measures Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean difference of 0.08 mmol/l (limits of agreement: -1.26 and 1.43 mmol/l). Circulatory shock requiring norepinephrine therapy did not influence the relation of arterial BG with SG in a multivariable random effects linear regression analysis. The covariates norepinephrine dose, body mass index (BMI), glucose level and severity of illness also had no influence. Insulin titration grid analysis showed that 98.6% of the data points were in the acceptable treatment zone. No data were in the life-threatening zone. Circulatory shock requiring norepinephrine therapy, as well as other covariates, had no influence on the accuracy and reliability of the CGMS in critically ill patients.

  7. We Need to Talk... Developing Communicating Power Supplies to Monitor & Control Miscellaneous Electric Loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Andrew; Lanzisera, Steven; Liao, Anna; Meier, Alan

    2014-08-11

    Plug loads represent 30percent of total electricity use in residential buildings. Significant energy savings would result from an accurate understanding of which miscellaneous electric devices are using energy, at what time, and in what quantity. Commercially available plug load monitoring and control solutions replace or limit the attached device's native controls - forcing the user to adapt to a separate set of controls associated with the monitoring and control hardware. A better solution is integration of these capabilities at the power supply level. In this paper, we demonstrate a method achieving this integration. Our solution allows unobtrusive power monitoring and control while retaining native device control features. Further, our prototype enables intelligent behaviors by allowing devices to respond to the state of one another automatically. The CPS enables energy savings while demonstrating an added level of functionality to the user. If CPS technology became widespread in devices, a combination of automated and human interactive solutions would enable high levels of energy savings in buildings.

  8. Reduction of Doppler effect for the needs of wayside condition monitoring system of railway vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dybała, Jacek; Radkowski, Stanisław

    2013-07-01

    Technology of acoustic condition monitoring of vehicles in motion is based on the assumption that diagnostically relevant information is stored in the acoustic signal generated by a passing vehicle. Analyzing the possibilities of increasing the effectiveness of condition monitoring of a passing vehicle with stationary microphones, it should be noted that the acoustic signal recorded in these conditions is disturbed with the disturbance resulting from the Doppler effect. Reduction of signal's frequential structure disturbance resulting from the Doppler effect allows efficient analysis of changes in frequential structure of recorded signals and as a result extraction of relevant diagnostic information related with technical condition of running gear of vehicle. This article presents a method for removal of signal's frequential structure disturbances related with relative move of vehicles and stationary monitoring station. For elimination of the frequential non-stationary of signals disturbance-oriented dynamic signal resampling method was used. The paper provides a test of two methods for defining the time course of local disturbance of signal's frequential structure: the method based on the Hilbert transform and the method of analytical description of signal's disturbance based on the knowledge of a phenomenon that causes frequential non-stationarity of signals. As an example, the results of the processing and analysis of acoustic signals recorded by wayside measuring station, during the passage of WM-15A railway vehicle on an experimental track of Polish Railway Institute, are presented.

  9. Monitoring fluid status at the outpatient level: the need for more precision.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDonald, Ken

    2012-02-01

    Accurate determination of fluid status in patients with heart failure is a critical aspect of care of this population. Early detection of emerging fluid overload would allow for prompt intervention, potentially aborting clinical deterioration and avoiding hospitalization. While many strategies are available to determine fluid status of patients, all areas are compromised by less-than-optimal sensitivity and specificity. Recent work on the role of bioimpedance as a means of assessing a patient\\'s fluid status indicates that this parameter may have a role in monitoring patients with heart failure. This article reviews present techniques available for assessment of fluid status and focuses on the additional information provided by bioimpedance assessment.

  10. Monitoring fluid status at the outpatient level: the need for more precision.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDonald, Ken

    2010-07-01

    Accurate determination of fluid status in patients with heart failure is a critical aspect of care of this population. Early detection of emerging fluid overload would allow for prompt intervention, potentially aborting clinical deterioration and avoiding hospitalization. While many strategies are available to determine fluid status of patients, all areas are compromised by less-than-optimal sensitivity and specificity. Recent work on the role of bioimpedance as a means of assessing a patient\\'s fluid status indicates that this parameter may have a role in monitoring patients with heart failure. This article reviews present techniques available for assessment of fluid status and focuses on the additional information provided by bioimpedance assessment.

  11. Meeting the Needs for Released Nanomaterials Required for Further Testing—The SUN Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nowack, Bernd; Boldrin, Alessio; Caballero, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    testing. In addition, ENM-free reference materials are needed since many processes not only release ENM but also nanosized fragments from the ENM-containing matrix that may interfere with further tests. The SUN consortium (Project on “Sustainable Nanotechnologies”, EU seventh Framework funding) uses...

  12. A needs assessment of the number of comprehensive addiction care physicians required in a Canadian setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McEachern, Jasmine

    2016-05-13

    Medical professionals adequately trained to prevent and treat substance use disorders are in short supply in most areas of the world. Whereas physician training in addiction medicine can improve patient and public health outcomes, the coverage estimates have not been established. We estimated the extent of the need for medical professionals skilled in addiction medicine in a Canadian setting.

  13. Employer Manpower Needs and Job Entry Requirements for Paralegals within Johnson County, Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatham, Elaine L.

    In order to determine whether a paralegal program could be successfully implemented at Johnson County Community College, surveys were sent to 262 local attorneys (with a 24% response rate) and to 41 members of the Kansas City Association of Legal Assistants (71% response). Emphasis was placed on determining area employment needs and the…

  14. A signal pre-processing algorithm designed for the needs of hardware implementation of neural classifiers used in condition monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabrowski, Dariusz; Hashemiyan, Zahra; Adamczyk, Jan

    2015-01-01

    and bucket wheel excavators. In this paper, a signal pre-processing algorithm designed for condition monitoring of planetary gears working in non-stationary operation is presented. The algorithm is dedicated for hardware implementation on Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs). The purpose of the algorithm......%, it can be performed in real-time conditions and its implementation does not require many resources of FPGAs....

  15. Does monitoring need for care in patients diagnosed with severe mental illness impact on Psychiatric Service Use? Comparison of monitored patients with matched controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sytema Sjoerd

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effectiveness of services for patients diagnosed with severe mental illness (SMI may improve when treatment plans are needs based. A regional Cumulative Needs for Care Monitor (CNCM introduced diagnostic and evaluative tools, allowing clinicians to explicitly assess patients' needs and negotiate treatment with the patient. We hypothesized that this would change care consumption patterns. Methods Psychiatric Case Registers (PCR register all in-patient and out-patient care in the region. We matched patients in the South-Limburg PCR, where CNCM was in place, with patients from the PCR in the North of the Netherlands (NN, where no CNCM was available. Matching was accomplished using propensity scoring including, amongst others, total care consumption and out-patient care consumption. Date of the CNCM assessment was copied to the matched controls as a hypothetical index date had the CNCM been in place in NN. The difference in care consumption after and before this date (after minus before was analysed. Results Compared with the control region, out-patient care consumption in the CNCM region was significantly higher after the CNCM index date regardless of treatment status at baseline (new, new episode, persistent, whereas a decrease in in-patient care consumption could not be shown. Conclusions Monitoring patients may result in different patterns of care by flexibly adjusting level of out-patient care in response to early signs of clinical deterioration.

  16. Advances in Remote Sensing of Agriculture: Context Description, Existing Operational Monitoring Systems and Major Information Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement Atzberger

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Many remote sensing applications are devoted to the agricultural sector. Representative case studies are presented in the special issue “Advances in Remote Sensing of Agriculture”. To complement the examples published within the special issue, a few main applications with regional to global focus were selected for this review, where remote sensing contributions are traditionally strong. The selected applications are put in the context of the global challenges the agricultural sector is facing: minimizing the environmental impact, while increasing production and productivity. Five different applications have been selected, which are illustrated and described: (1 biomass and yield estimation, (2 vegetation vigor and drought stress monitoring, (3 assessment of crop phenological development, (4 crop acreage estimation and cropland mapping and (5 mapping of disturbances and land use/land cover (LULC changes. Many other applications exist, such as precision agriculture and irrigation management (see other special issues of this journal, but were not included to keep the paper concise. The paper starts with an overview of the main agricultural challenges. This section is followed by a brief overview of existing operational monitoring systems. Finally, in the main part of the paper, the mentioned applications are described and illustrated. The review concludes with some key recommendations.

  17. Air Force Working Capital Fund: Actions Needed to Manage Cash Balances to Required Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    may transfer budget authority only as authorized by law. “ cash levels should be maintained at 7 to 10 days of operational cost and six months of...USTRANSCOM documentation to ascertain the reasons.6 To address the second objective, we obtained and analyzed AFWCF budget documents and cash ...requirement, we analyzed DOD budget and accounting reports to determine the dollar amount of transfers made for the period. We analyzed cash transfers

  18. Basic and Combined Economic needs Monitoring in the Industry Development Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silka Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of economic processes and phenomena occurs cyclically with occasional deceleration or acceleration. In general, this development is accompanied by all known phases of business activity. The article reveals a new evaluation mechanism of the achieved results of the business activity growth, based on the determination of the current economic organization structure generation, the criteria for economic needs and interests. This approach allows us to critically assess the growth limits, and to form the conditions for further progressive development.

  19. Internet snapshot survey: A novel methodology to monitor novel psychotropic substances and its need in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, Ananya; Sharma, Pawan

    2016-06-01

    Recently there has been upsurge in the use of novel psychoactive substances, commonly known as legal highs. There is limited data available on the use and availability of these substances. Internet snapshot methodology has been successfully used in Europe and America to understand rapidly adapting internet based drug market but no data is available from Asian region. Hence there is need of application of similar methodology in Asia to explore and gauge the problem statement about these substances.

  20. Needs Assessment to Define the Training Requirements for a Basic Skills Education Program (BSEP) Curriculum Development. Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-01

    NA H lA NAIJ T AP!, - 747. . . - .r>.r-- .rr- Lfl * NEEDS ASSESSMENT TO DEFINE THE TRAINI1C REZUIRME~S FOR A t BASIC SKIIlS EDUCATION PRORAM CBSEP...8217 s. He."she must possess good speaking and hond ,rlting skills to communicate effectively oraily ’ ar.d in written. Some basic math skills are required

  1. Manpower Projections, Recruitment Needs and Training Requirements for Commercial Airline Pilots in the United States 1968-1979.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Robert Marchand

    This study evaluated the reported airline pilot shortage in relation to certified air carriers; recruitment needs for qualified applicants; training requirements as recommended by air carriers, airline captains, and flight officers; and airline pilot supply and demand during 1968-79. A literature review on foreign and domestic pilot shortages was…

  2. Development of Individual Equipment Requirements for the Afghan National Army Needs Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ASFF CECO GIRo HF LCM NTM OCIE SCIP TAC VHF itional Co tain additio ctor Genera ibution Unit gestions ggest or req ing by phon...Very High , visit the W il/audit/repo 664-8937) Office of the 664-9142), ense Office ty Inspector gestions /13 Drive 350-1500 tional Army tional...and to assist NTM-A/CSTC-A in predicting necessary stock levels. The contracts required contractors to periodically provide NTM-A/CSTC-A electronic

  3. Tracheal tube and laryngeal mask cuff pressure during anaesthesia - mandatory monitoring is in need

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokamp, K.Z.; Secher, N.H.; Møller, Ann

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To prevent endothelium and nerve lesions, tracheal tube and laryngeal mask cuff pressure is to be maintained at a low level and yet be high enough to secure air sealing. METHOD: In a prospective quality-control study, 201 patients undergoing surgery during anaesthesia (without...... and age, body mass index, type of surgery, or time from induction of anaesthesia to the time the cuff pressure was measured. CONCLUSION: For maintenance of epithelia flow and nerve function and at the same time secure air sealing, this evaluation indicates that the cuff pressure needs to be checked...

  4. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Northwest Atlantic finfish : available and needed knowledge for monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellou, J.; Leonard, J. [Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Dartmouth, NS (Canada). Bedford Inst. of Oceanography; Collier, T.K. [National Marine Fisheries Service, Seattle, WA (United States). Northwest Fisheries Center; Ariese, F. [Free Univ. of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Analytical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy

    2004-07-01

    This study addressed some of the human health risk factors associated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). These toxic chemicals degrade with time, depending on their source and structure. However, they can also persist long enough and exist at elevated levels to have a possible toxic risk associated with exposure. Most studies on invertebrates have examined bioaccumulation rather than biotransformation. Biotransformation occurs more readily in vertebrates because they have active mixed function oxygenase enzymes. The fate of the oxidation products is of particular interest because they are associated with the formation of DNA-adducts that have carcinogenic effects. Exposed organisms can be monitored for chemical, biochemical or biological endpoints. This study examined PAH concentrations in small finfish such as capelin, sand lance, American plaice, yellowtail flounder and herring collected from the district of the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization. Variables included pool size, size differences within species, lipid content and location. The exposure routes for bioaccumulation were respiration and feeding. The two sources were combustion and fossil fuels. All samples showed signs of alkylated naphthalene which would have been take up by respiration. They were likely derived from petroleum seeps in the water column. Smaller fish had higher concentrations of 3 alkylated naphthalenes. This paper described the relative concentrations in whole fish and internal organs. Measurements carried out prior to development of the Hibernia oil fields revealed baseline levels. Biotransformation products must yet be measured in order to assess future exposure and effects, particularly with long term exposure to waste water. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Assessing and implementing training requirements for staff at plants to meet safety, environment and job needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagasse, L. (Manitoba Hydro, Winnipeg, MB (Canada))

    1999-01-01

    The rationale for and the process to establish a team to develop a framework for a training plan, determine the cost of such a program for all employees of the Power Supply Division of Manitoba Hydro, and to establish guidelines for implementation of the plan are described. The end result of the process is a job profile and skill and knowledge inventory for some 25 job families within the Power Supply Division; a form to establish training needs for all employees for a three year period which will provide the basis for a three-year training plan and budget; an implementation guide and training plan spreadsheet to facilitate the implementation process; and a series of performance indicators. 4 figs.

  6. Genomic selection needs to be carefully assessed to meet specific requirements in livestock breeding programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth eJonas

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Genomic selection is a promising development in agriculture, aiming improved production by exploiting molecular genetic markers to design novel breeding programs and to develop new markers-based models for genetic evaluation. It opens opportunities for research, as novel algorithms and lab methodologies are developed. Genomic selection can be applied in many breeds and species. Further research on the implementation of genomic selection in breeding programs is highly desirable not only for the common good, but also the private sector (breeding companies. It has been projected that this approach will improve selection routines, especially in species with long reproduction cycles, late or sex-limited or expensive trait recording and for complex traits. The task of integrating genomic selection into existing breeding programs is, however, not straightforward. Despite successful integration into breeding programs for dairy cattle, it has yet to be shown how much emphasis can be given to the genomic information and how much additional phenotypic information is needed from new selection candidates. Genomic selection is already part of future planning in many breeding companies of pigs and beef cattle among others, but further research is needed to fully estimate how effective the use of genomic information will be for the prediction of the performance of future breeding stock. Genomic prediction of production in crossbreeding and across-breed schemes, costs and choice of individuals for genotyping are reasons for a reluctance to fully rely on genomic information for selection decisions. Breeding objectives are highly dependent on the industry and the additional gain when using genomic information has to be considered carefully. This review synthesizes some of the suggested approaches in selected livestock species including cattle, pig, chicken and fish. It outlines tasks to help understanding possible consequences when applying genomic information in

  7. Core competency requirements among extension workers in peninsular Malaysia: Use of Borich's needs assessment model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, Sulaiman; Man, Norsida; Nawi, Nolila Mohd; Latif, Ismail Abd; Samah, Bahaman Abu

    2017-06-01

    The study described the perceived importance of, and proficiency in core agricultural extension competencies among extension workers in Peninsular Malaysia; and evaluating the resultant deficits in the competencies. The Borich's Needs Assessment Model was used to achieve the objectives of the study. A sample of 298 respondents was randomly selected and interviewed using a pre-tested structured questionnaire. Thirty-three core competency items were assessed. Instrument validity and reliability were ensured. The cross-sectional data obtained was analysed using SPSS for descriptive statistics including mean weighted discrepancy score (MWDS). Results of the study showed that on a scale of 5, the most important core extension competency items according to respondents' perception were: "Making good use of information and communication technologies/access and use of web-based resources" (M=4.86, SD=0.23); "Conducting needs assessments" (M=4.84, SD=0.16); "organizing extension campaigns" (M=4.82, SD=0.47) and "Managing groups and teamwork" (M=4.81, SD=0.76). In terms of proficiency, the highest competency identified by the respondents was "Conducting farm and home visits (M=3.62, SD=0.82) followed by 'conducting meetings effectively' (M=3.19, SD=0.72); "Conducting focus group discussions" (M=3.16, SD=0.32) and "conducting community forums" (M=3.13, SD=0.64). The discrepancies implying competency deficits were widest in "Acquiring and allocating resources" (MWDS=12.67); use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) and web-based resources in agricultural extension (MWDS=12.59); and report writing and sharing the results and impacts (MWDS=11.92). It is recommended that any intervention aimed at developing the capacity of extension workers in Peninsular Malaysia should prioritize these core competency items in accordance with the deficits established in this study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Bridging information requirements and information needs assessment: do scenarios and vignettes provide a link?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Urquhart

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to compare the philosophies of the vignette and critical incident techniques in information behaviour research, with the methodologies used in object oriented analysis such as use case scenarios and CRC (class, responsibility, collaboration cards. The principles of object oriented analysis are outlined, noting the emphasis on obtaining the "storyline" or "scripts" for information requirements analysis through use cases and CRC cards.  The critical incident technique and vignettes are used to obtain valid interpretations of users" information behaviour, using a storyline approach for data collection (and analysis which is similar to that of object oriented analysis. Some examples illustrate how techniques developed in object oriented analysis could be used for data display in information behaviour studies. Concludes that the methods developed by software engineering could be adapted usefully for information behaviour research.

  9. Real-Time Series Resistance Monitoring in PV Systems Without the Need for IV Curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deceglie, Michael G.; Silverman, Timothy J.; Marion, Bill; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    2015-06-14

    We apply the physical principles of a familiar method, suns-Voc, to a new application: the real-time detection of series resistance changes in modules and systems operating outside. The real-time series resistance (RTSR) method that we describe avoids the need for collecting IV curves or constructing full series-resistance-free IV curves. RTSR is most readily deployable at the module level on micro-inverters or module-integrated electronics, but it can also be extended to full strings. Automated detection of series resistance increases can provide early warnings of some of the most common reliability issues, which also pose fire risks, including broken ribbons, broken solder bonds, and contact problems in the junction or combiner box. We describe the method in detail and describe a sample application to data collected from modules operating in the field.

  10. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Bbbb of... - Model Rule-Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 7 Table 7 to Subpart BBBB of Part 60 Protection of Environment...—Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) For the following pollutants Use the following span values for CEMS Use the following performance specifications in appendix B of this part for...

  11. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Ffff of... - Model Rule-Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 4 Table 4 to Subpart FFFF of Part 60 Protection of Environment...—Model Rule—Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) As stated in § 60.3039, you... CEMS Use the following performance specifications (P.S.) in appendix B of this part for your CEMS...

  12. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Ppp of... - Process Vents From Continuous Unit Operations-Monitoring, Recordkeeping, and Reporting Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Process Vents From Continuous Unit Operations-Monitoring, Recordkeeping, and Reporting Requirements 6 Table 6 to Subpart PPP of Part 63... Subpart PPP of Part 63—Process Vents From Continuous Unit Operations—Monitoring, Recordkeeping, and...

  13. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Ggg of... - Wastewater-Inspection and Monitoring Requirements for Waste Management Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Wastewater-Inspection and Monitoring..., Subpt. GGG, Table 7 Table 7 to Subpart GGG of Part 63—Wastewater—Inspection and Monitoring Requirements...(b)(7)63.1256(b)(8) Inspect wastewater tank for control equipment failures and improper...

  14. 77 FR 39959 - Draft Guidance To Implement Requirements for the Treatment of Air Quality Monitoring Data...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    ... Air Quality Monitoring Data Influenced by Exceptional Events AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... for the Treatment of Air Quality Monitoring Data Influenced by Exceptional Events and associated... Treatment of Air Quality Monitoring Data Influenced by Exceptional Events and associated attachments and...

  15. Reporting quality of survival analyses in medical journals still needs improvement. A minimal requirements proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraira, Víctor; Muriel, Alfonso; Emparanza, José I; Pijoan, José I; Royuela, Ana; Plana, María Nieves; Cano, Alejandra; Urreta, Iratxe; Zamora, Javier

    2013-12-01

    We reviewed publications with two main objectives: to describe how survival analyses are reported across medical journal specialties and to evaluate changes in reporting across periods and journal specialties. Systematic review of clinical research articles published in 1991 and 2007, in 13 high-impact medical journals. The number of articles performing survival analysis published in 1991 (104) and 2007 (240) doubled (17% vs. 33.5%; P = 0.000), although not uniformly across specialties. The percentage of studies using regression models and the number of patients included also increased. The presentation of results improved, although only the reporting of precision of effect estimates reached satisfactory levels (53.1% in 1991 vs. 94.2% in 2007; P = 0.000). Quality of reporting also varied across specialties; for example, cardiology articles were less likely than oncology ones to discuss sample size estimation (odds ratio = 0.12; 95% confidence interval: 0.05, 0.30). We also detected an interaction effect between period and specialty regarding the likelihood of reporting precision of curves and precision of effect estimates. The application of survival analysis to medical research data is increasing, whereas improvement in reporting quality is slow. We propose a list of minimum requirements for improved application and description of survival analysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Tracheal tube and laryngeal mask cuff pressure during anaesthesia - mandatory monitoring is in need

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Møller Ann M

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To prevent endothelium and nerve lesions, tracheal tube and laryngeal mask cuff pressure is to be maintained at a low level and yet be high enough to secure air sealing. Method In a prospective quality-control study, 201 patients undergoing surgery during anaesthesia (without the use of nitrous oxide were included for determination of the cuff pressure of the tracheal tubes and laryngeal masks. Results In the 119 patients provided with a tracheal tube, the median cuff pressure was 30 (range 8 - 100 cm H2O and the pressure exceeded 30 cm H2O (upper recommended level for 54 patients. In the 82 patients provided with a laryngeal mask, the cuff pressure was 95 (10 - 121 cm H2O and above 60 cm H2O (upper recommended level for 56 patients and in 34 of these patients, the pressure exceeded the upper cuff gauge limit (120 cm H2O. There was no association between cuff pressure and age, body mass index, type of surgery, or time from induction of anaesthesia to the time the cuff pressure was measured. Conclusion For maintenance of epithelia flow and nerve function and at the same time secure air sealing, this evaluation indicates that the cuff pressure needs to be checked as part of the procedures involved in induction of anaesthesia and eventually checked during surgery.

  17. Veterinary medicine educational requirements to meet the needs of the US Agency for International Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Gerald B

    2006-01-01

    The US Agency for International Development (USAID) works within the overall purpose of US foreign assistance to improve the lives of the citizens of the developing world. Through partnerships with other agencies, organizations, and governments, and using its field offices around the world, USAID strives to develop local capacity and thus build sustainable development. Two specific USAID programs pertinent to veterinary medicine are global health and agriculture. In the area of global health, veterinarians can aid USAID's work to improve the quality, availability, and use of essential health services that specifically target maternal and child health, HIV/AIDS, family planning and reproductive health, infectious diseases, environmental health, nutrition, and other life-saving areas. The challenge of making the agricultural sector in a developing country more productive is a critical one for USAID and a clear area for input from the veterinary profession. Animal agriculture is the largest single sector of agricultural economies in most developing countries, and livestock remains a critical component of poverty alleviation. There are educational requirements that benefit anyone working at USAID and can be met prior to admittance to a DVM program, as part of a DVM curriculum, or in post-graduate training/employment, such as proficiency in a foreign language; environmental sciences background; familiarity with accounting and management techniques; expertise in foreign animal diseases, zoonotic diseases, epidemiology, food safety, and nutrition, as well as the application to human health of those areas; an advanced degree such as an MPH; and management experience. Appropriately trained veterinarians can make enormous contributions to USAID's global efforts to improve the health and agriculture sectors of developing nations.

  18. SNM gamma-ray fingerprint monitor functional requirements and design specifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bieber, A.M. Jr.; Kane, W.R.

    1994-07-01

    A number of DOE facilities need to perform confirmatory inventory measurements on items of special nuclear material (SNM). The DOE Office of Safeguards and Security (OSS) has tasked the Safeguards, Safety and Nonproliferation Division (SSN) of the Department of Advanced Technology at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to develop a high-resolution gamma-ray-spectroscopy-based instrument for performing confirmatory inventory measurements on such materials, a ``gamma-ray fingerprint monitor`` (GRFM). This document is a conceptual design for the SSN GRFM system. This conceptual design is based on previous experience with measurements of plutonium-bearing materials and comparison of gamma-ray spectrum features, not on actual tests of the procedures or hardware described. As a result, modifications may be necessary when actual prototype hardware and software are tested in realistic circumstances on actual materials of interest.

  19. Understanding Climate Policy Data Needs. NASA Carbon Monitoring System Briefing: Characterizing Flux Uncertainty, Washington D.C., 11 January 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Molly E.; Macauley, Molly

    2012-01-01

    inverse approach based on the CO2 model of GEOS ]Chem. The forward model ensembles will be used to build understanding of relationships among surface flux perturbations, transport uncertainty and atmospheric carbon concentration. This will help construct uncertainty estimates and information on the true spatial resolution of the top-down flux calculations. The relationship between the top-down and bottom-up flux distributions will be documented. Because the goal of NASA CMS is to be policy relevant, the scientists involved in the flux modeling pilot need to understand and be focused on the needs of the climate policy and decision making community. If policy makers are to use CMS products, they must be aware of the modeling effort and begin to design policies that can be evaluated with information. Improving estimates of carbon sequestered in forests, for example, will require information on the spatial variability of forest biomass that is far more explicit than is presently possible using only ground observations. Carbon mitigation policies being implemented by cities around the United States could be designed with the CMS data in mind, enabling sequential evaluation and subsequent improvements in incentives, structures and programs. The success of climate mitigation programs being implemented in the United States today will hang on the depth of the relationship between scientists and their policy and decision making counterparts. Ensuring that there is two-way communication between data providers and users is important for the success both of the policies and the scientific products meant to support them..

  20. A Socio-Economic and Environmental Information Needs Knowledge Base (SEE-IN KB) in Support of SDG Implementation and Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plag, H. P.; Jules-Plag, S.

    2016-12-01

    The UN Agenda 2030 has seventeen Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to be reach by 2030, which are detailed in 170 Targets. A monitioring framework of 240 SDG Indicators provides the metrics to measure progress towards these targets. The SDG Indicators are report cards for the progress towards the targets and a measure to assess potential impacts of policies and other means in support of SDG implementation. The Socio-Economic and Environmental Information Needs Knowledge Base (SEE-IN KB) collects information on objects such as user types, applications, observational requirements, a number of needs, societal goals and targets, indicators and indices, models, services, and datasets, as well as the interconnections between these objects, including links to Essential Variables (EVs). This enables gap analyses, prioritizations of Earth observations, and discovery of products and services meeting the information needs. "What if?" questions supports knowledge creation supporting the development of policies and activities to make progress towards the SDGs. Increasingly, user types, applications and requirements are linked to actual persons, models and datasets, respectively, and this allows both the social networking of providers and users and the execution of business processes. A core function of the SEE-IN KB is to facilitate the linkage of societal goals, targets, and indicators to EVs that need to be monitored in order to measure progress towards the targets. Applying a goal-based approach used to identify the EVs to the SDG Indicators revealed that some SDG Indicators require traditional Earth observations for quantification, while many of the EVs are related to the built environment. For many of the SDG Indicators, integration of socio-economic statistical data with environmental data, including in situ observations, is of importance. The goal-based approach was also applied to the SDG Targets, and this analysis showed that many of the Targets would benefit from

  1. Stochastic modeling to identify requirements for centralized monitoring of distributed wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, T; Maurer, M

    2012-01-01

    Distributed (decentralized) wastewater treatment can, in many situations, be a valuable alternative to a centralized sewer network and wastewater treatment plant. However, it is critical for its acceptance whether the same overall treatment performance can be achieved without on-site staff, and whether its performance can be measured. In this paper we argue and illustrate that the system performance depends not only on the design performance and reliability of the individual treatment units, but also significantly on the monitoring scheme, i.e. on the reliability of the process information. For this purpose, we present a simple model of a fleet of identical treatment units. Thereby, their performance depends on four stochastic variables: the reliability of the treatment unit, the respond time for the repair of failed units, the reliability of on-line sensors, and the frequency of routine inspections. The simulated scenarios show a significant difference between the true performance and the observations by the sensors and inspections. The results also illustrate the trade-off between investing in reactor and sensor technology and in human interventions in order to achieve a certain target performance. Modeling can quantify such effects and thereby support the identification of requirements for the centralized monitoring of distributed treatment units. The model approach is generic and can be extended and applied to various distributed wastewater treatment technologies and contexts.

  2. The need for integration of drought monitoring tools for proactive food security management in sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadesse, T.; Haile, M.; Senay, G.; Wardlow, B.D.; Knutson, C.L.

    2008-01-01

    Reducing the impact of drought and famine remains a challenge in sub-Saharan Africa despite ongoing drought relief assistance in recent decades. This is because drought and famine are primarily addressed through a crisis management approach when a disaster occurs, rather than stressing preparedness and risk management. Moreover, drought planning and food security efforts have been hampered by a lack of integrated drought monitoring tools, inadequate early warning systems (EWS), and insufficient information flow within and between levels of government in many sub-Saharan countries. The integration of existing drought monitoring tools for sub-Saharan Africa is essential for improving food security systems to reduce the impacts of drought and famine on society in this region. A proactive approach emphasizing integration requires the collective use of multiple tools, which can be used to detect trends in food availability and provide early indicators at local, national, and regional scales on the likely occurrence of food crises. In addition, improving the ability to monitor and disseminate critical drought-related information using available modern technologies (e.g., satellites, computers, and modern communication techniques) may help trigger timely and appropriate preventive responses and, ultimately, contribute to food security and sustainable development in sub-Saharan Africa. ?? 2008 United Nations.

  3. Electronic Nose Testing Procedure for the Definition of Minimum Performance Requirements for Environmental Odor Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eusebio, Lidia; Capelli, Laura; Sironi, Selena

    2016-09-21

    Despite initial enthusiasm towards electronic noses and their possible application in different fields, and quite a lot of promising results, several criticalities emerge from most published research studies, and, as a matter of fact, the diffusion of electronic noses in real-life applications is still very limited. In general, a first step towards large-scale-diffusion of an analysis method, is standardization. The aim of this paper is describing the experimental procedure adopted in order to evaluate electronic nose performances, with the final purpose of establishing minimum performance requirements, which is considered to be a first crucial step towards standardization of the specific case of electronic nose application for environmental odor monitoring at receptors. Based on the experimental results of the performance testing of a commercialized electronic nose type with respect to three criteria (i.e., response invariability to variable atmospheric conditions, instrumental detection limit, and odor classification accuracy), it was possible to hypothesize a logic that could be adopted for the definition of minimum performance requirements, according to the idea that these are technologically achievable.

  4. Electronic Nose Testing Procedure for the Definition of Minimum Performance Requirements for Environmental Odor Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Eusebio

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite initial enthusiasm towards electronic noses and their possible application in different fields, and quite a lot of promising results, several criticalities emerge from most published research studies, and, as a matter of fact, the diffusion of electronic noses in real-life applications is still very limited. In general, a first step towards large-scale-diffusion of an analysis method, is standardization. The aim of this paper is describing the experimental procedure adopted in order to evaluate electronic nose performances, with the final purpose of establishing minimum performance requirements, which is considered to be a first crucial step towards standardization of the specific case of electronic nose application for environmental odor monitoring at receptors. Based on the experimental results of the performance testing of a commercialized electronic nose type with respect to three criteria (i.e., response invariability to variable atmospheric conditions, instrumental detection limit, and odor classification accuracy, it was possible to hypothesize a logic that could be adopted for the definition of minimum performance requirements, according to the idea that these are technologically achievable.

  5. Electronic Nose Testing Procedure for the Definition of Minimum Performance Requirements for Environmental Odor Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eusebio, Lidia; Capelli, Laura; Sironi, Selena

    2016-01-01

    Despite initial enthusiasm towards electronic noses and their possible application in different fields, and quite a lot of promising results, several criticalities emerge from most published research studies, and, as a matter of fact, the diffusion of electronic noses in real-life applications is still very limited. In general, a first step towards large-scale-diffusion of an analysis method, is standardization. The aim of this paper is describing the experimental procedure adopted in order to evaluate electronic nose performances, with the final purpose of establishing minimum performance requirements, which is considered to be a first crucial step towards standardization of the specific case of electronic nose application for environmental odor monitoring at receptors. Based on the experimental results of the performance testing of a commercialized electronic nose type with respect to three criteria (i.e., response invariability to variable atmospheric conditions, instrumental detection limit, and odor classification accuracy), it was possible to hypothesize a logic that could be adopted for the definition of minimum performance requirements, according to the idea that these are technologically achievable. PMID:27657086

  6. Methods for Calculating Energy Requirements for Processes in Which a Reactant Is Also a Fuel: Need for Standardization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, H. Y.; Olivas-Martinez, Miguel

    2014-09-01

    When a process involves both endothermic chemical reactions and heat generation from the combustion of fuels, the choice of endothermic reactions to include in computing the "energy requirement" for the overall process is arbitrary and can be a source of confusion. It is shown that the essential question becomes whether the heat of combustion of a reactant, which can be used as a fuel, should be included in the energy requirement value. It is noted that the choice is a matter of convention, but it is important to clearly state what convention is followed in presenting the results of energy calculations. There is a need to select a standard approach because the presented value of "energy requirement" of a process depends on the choice. This problem is illustrated using the example of ironmaking by different processes including a novel flash ironmaking process under development at the University of Utah. The authors advocate using just the "process energy requirement" as the standard value of the energy requirement for a process in which a reactant is also a fuel.

  7. Use of retrospective data to assess ecotoxicological monitoring needs for terrestrial vertebrates residing in Atlantic coast estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, J.B.; Rattner, B.A.; Golden, N.H.

    2003-01-01

    The 'Contaminant Exposure and Effects--Terrestrial Vertebrates' (CEE-TV) database contains 4,336 records of ecotoxicological information for free-ranging amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals residing in Atlantic and Florida Gulf coast estuaries and their drainages. To identify spatial data gaps, those CEE-TV records for which the specific study location were known (n=2,740) were combined with watershed and wildlife management unit boundaries using Geographic Information Systems software. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Index of Watershed Indicators (IWI), which classifies watersheds based on water quality and their vulnerability to pollution, was used to prioritize these data gaps. Of 136 watersheds in the study area, 15 that are classified by the IWI as having water quality problems or high vulnerability to pollution lacked terrestrial vertebrate ecotoxicological monitoring or research in the past decade. Older studies within some of these watersheds documented high levels of contaminants in wildlife tissues. Of 90 National Wildlife Refuge units, 42 without current data fall within watersheds of concern. Of 40 National Park units larger than 1 km2, 17 without current data fall within watersheds of concern. Issues encountered in this analysis highlighted the need for spatially and temporally replicated field monitoring programs that utilize random sampling. Without data from such studies, it will be difficult to perform unbiased assessments of regional trends in contaminant exposure and effects in terrestrial vertebrates.

  8. Drug persistence and need for dose intensification to adalimumab therapy; the importance of therapeutic drug monitoring in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonczi, Lorant; Kurti, Zsuzsanna; Rutka, Mariann; Vegh, Zsuzsanna; Farkas, Klaudia; Lovasz, Barbara D; Golovics, Petra A; Gecse, Krisztina B; Szalay, Balazs; Molnar, Tamas; Lakatos, Peter L

    2017-08-08

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) aid therapeutic decision making in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who lose response to anti-TNF therapy. Our aim was to evaluate the frequency and predictive factors of loss of response (LOR) to adalimumab using TDM in IBD patients. One hundred twelve IBD patients (with 214 TDM measurements, CD/UC 84/28, male/female 50/62, mean age CD/UC: 36/35 years) were enrolled in this consecutive cohort from two referral centres in Hungary. Demographic data were comprehensively collected and harmonized monitoring strategy was applied. Previous and current therapy, laboratory data and clinical activity were recorded at the time of TDM. Patients were evaluated either at the time of suspected LOR or during follow-up. TDM measurements were determined by commercial ELISA (LISA TRACKER, Theradiag, France). Among 112 IBD patients, LOR/drug persistence was 25.9%/74.1%. The cumulative ADA positivity (>10 ng/mL) and low TL (intensification was needed in 29.5% of the patients. Female gender and ADA positivity were associated with LOR (female gender: p intensification were frequent during adalimumab therapy and support the selective use of TDM in IBD patients treated with adalimumab. ADA positivity and gender were predictors of LOR.

  9. Producing the BEANs needed for person-centred healthcare decision making requires translating the wisdom of the clinical crowd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Mette Kjer; Eiring, Øystein; Nielsen, Jesper Bo

    to online version). The criteria included (Response, Remission, and Tolerability) were determined by data availability in trials and are not those that would be produced by a survey of person-as-patient important outcomes. Minimally the latter would distinguish different types of side effects and adverse...... research practical relevance for person-centred care. Major benefits in the form of establishing priorities for person-centred research will follow by way of ‘backward translation’ of the need for better BEANs for many person-as-patient important outcomes.......Producing the BEANs needed for person-centred healthcare decision making requires translating the wisdom of the clinical crowd Mette Kjer Kaltoft, University of Southern Denmark Øystein Eiring, Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services Jesper Bo Nielsen, University of Southern Denmark...

  10. Data needs and computational requirements for asset management decision making. Internal deliverable ID5.2.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Catrinu-Renstrom, Maria; Clement, Rémy; Tournebise, Pascal

    The objective of this deliverable is to present the requirements for adapting available tools/models and identifying data needs for reliability analysis and optimal decision-making for asset management decision making process. It will serve as a basis for the next tasks of GARPUR work package 5...... addressing to the requirements of RMAC criterion developed in work package 2. The report has been written by several partners, three of them being European TSOs, and the three other being academic partners. Special attention has been paid to address every topic in asset management decision making process...... decision making process, as described in work package 2. Some advanced models exist in scientific literature to characterize the spatio-temporal variation and correlations of relevant factors. Some of these models have been proposed in academia, and offer improved representation with respect to those...

  11. Producing the BEANs needed for person-centred healthcare decision making requires translating the wisdom of the clinical crowd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Mette Kjer; Eiring, Øystein; Nielsen, Jesper Bo

    Producing the BEANs needed for person-centred healthcare decision making requires translating the wisdom of the clinical crowd Mette Kjer Kaltoft, University of Southern Denmark Øystein Eiring, Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services Jesper Bo Nielsen, University of Southern Denmark...... Glenn Salkeld, University of Sydney School of Public Health Jack Dowie, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (presenting) Abstract (500) Person-centred care is the increasingly avowed aim of health services and professionals. To be meaningful such care requires a shared decision making process...... in which an individual's preferences over the multiple criteria that matter to them are synthesised with the Best Estimate Available Now (at the point of decision) for how well each of the available options will perform on each criterion. Conventional evidence-based approaches can meet the latter...

  12. Wireless sensor network for helicopter rotor blade vibration monitoring: Requirements definition and technological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez Ramirez, Andrea; Das, Kallol; Loendersloot, Richard; Tinga, Tiedo; Havinga, Paul; Basu, Biswajit

    2013-01-01

    The main rotor accounts for the largest vibration source for a helicopter fuselage and its components. However, accurate blade monitoring has been limited due to the practical restrictions on instrumenting rotating blades. The use of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) for real time vibration monitoring

  13. 40 CFR 63.11527 - What are the monitoring requirements for new and existing sources?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... paragraph (b)(1) of this section. (4) When operating a CPMS, if the 3-hour average pressure drop or scrubber.... Manufacturer's specifications for pressure drop and liquid flow rate will be used to determine normal... filters—(1) Visual monitoring. You must conduct visual monitoring of the monovent or fabric filter...

  14. Getting Out of Orbit: Water Recycling Requirements and Technology Needs for Long Duration Missions Away from Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barta, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    Deep-space crewed missions will not have regular access to the Earth's resources or the ability to rapidly return to Earth if a system fails. As crewed missions extend farther from Earth for longer periods, habitation systems must become more self-sufficient and reliable for safe, healthy, and sustainable human exploration. For human missions to Mars, Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) must be able operate for up to 1,100 days with minimal spares and consumables. These missions will require capabilities to more fully recycle atmospheric gases and wastewater to substantially reduce mission costs. Even with relatively austere requirements for use, water represents one of the largest consumables by mass. Systems must be available to extract and recycle water from all sources of waste. And given that there will be no opportunity to send samples back to Earth for analysis, analytical measurements will be limited to monitoring hardware brought on board the spacecraft. The Earth Reliant phase of NASA's exploration strategy includes leveraging the International Space Station (ISS) to demonstrate advanced capabilities for a robust and reliable ECLSS. The ISS Water Recovery System (WRS) includes a Urine Processor Assembly (UPA) for distillation and recovery of water from urine and a Water Processor Assembly (WPA) to process humidity condensate and urine distillate into potable water. Possible enhancements to more fully "close the water loop" include recovery of water from waste brines and solid wastes. A possible game changer is the recovery of water from local planetary resources through use of In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) technologies. As part of the development and demonstration sequence, NASA intends to utilize cis-Lunar space as a Proving Ground to verify systems for deep space habitation by conducting extended duration missions to validate our readiness for Mars.

  15. Ambulatory Holter monitoring in asymptomatic patients with DDD pacemakers - do we need ACC/AHA Guidelines revision?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudzik, Michal; Klimczak, Artur; Wranicz, Jerzy Krzysztof

    2013-10-31

    We sought to determine the usefulness of ambulatory 24-hour Holter monitoring in detecting asymptomatic pacemaker (PM) malfunction episodes in patients with dual-chamber pacemakers whose pacing and sensing parameters were proper, as seen in routine post-implantation follow-ups. Ambulatory 24-hour Holter recordings (HM) were performed in 100 patients with DDD pacemakers 1 day after the implantation. Only asymptomatic patients with proper pacing and sensing parameters (assessed on PM telemetry on the first day post-implantation) were enrolled in the study. The following parameters were assessed: failure to pace, failure to sense (both oversensing and undersensing episodes) as well as the percentage of all PM disturbances. Despite proper sensing and pacing parameters, HM revealed PM disturbances in 23 patients out of 100 (23%). Atrial undersensing episodes were found in 12 patients (p < 0.005) with totally 963 episodes and failure to capture in 1 patient (1%). T wave oversensing was the most common ventricular channel disorder (1316 episodes in 9 patients, p < 0.0005). Malfunction episodes occurred sporadically, leading to pauses of up to 1.6 s or temporary bradycardia, which were, nevertheless, not accompanied by clinical symptoms. No ventricular pacing disturbances were found. Asymptomatic pacemaker dysfunction may be observed in nearly 25% of patients with proper DDD parameters after implantation. Thus, ambulatory HM during the early post-implantation period may be a useful tool to detect the need to reprogram PM parameters.

  16. Mediterranean irrigation under climate change: more efficient irrigation needed to compensate for increases in irrigation water requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fader, M.; Shi, S.; von Bloh, W.; Bondeau, A.; Cramer, W.

    2016-03-01

    compensate to some degree for the increases due to climate change and population growth. Both subregions would need around 35 % more water than today if they implement some degree of modernization of irrigation and conveyance systems and benefit from the CO2-fertilization effect. Nevertheless, water scarcity may pose further challenges to the agricultural sector: Algeria, Libya, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, Serbia, Morocco, Tunisia and Spain have a high risk of not being able to sustainably meet future irrigation water requirements in some scenarios. The results presented in this study point to the necessity of performing further research on climate-friendly agro-ecosystems in order to assess, on the one hand, their degree of resilience to climate shocks and, on the other hand, their adaptation potential when confronted with higher temperatures and changes in water availability.

  17. 40 CFR 98.344 - Monitoring and QA/QC requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) of this section, you may use total gaseous organic concentration analyzers and calculate the methane... composition monitor determines CH4 concentration on a dry basis, moisture content. (1) ASME...

  18. 50 CFR 18.118 - What are the mitigation, monitoring, and reporting requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... active seismic-source vessels and/or exploratory drilling operations. No more than four simultaneous... area. Monitors will act as an early detection system in regard to proximate bear activity to...

  19. Future needs for biomedical transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, F. T.

    1971-01-01

    In summary there are three major classes of transducer improvements required: improvements in existing transducers, needs for unexploited physical science phenomena in transducer design, and needs for unutilized physiological phenomena in transducer design. During the next decade, increasing emphasis will be placed on noninvasive measurement in all of these areas. Patient safety, patient comfort, and the need for efficient utilization of the time of both patient and physician requires that noninvasive methods of monitoring be developed.

  20. Engineering Analysis of Intermediate Loop and Process Heat Exchanger Requirements to Include Configuration Analysis and Materials Needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.M. Lillo; R.L. Williamson; T.R. Reed; C.B. Davis; D.M. Ginosar

    2005-09-01

    The need to locate advanced hydrogen production facilities a finite distance away from a nuclear power source necessitates the need for an intermediate heat transport loop (IHTL). This IHTL must not only efficiently transport energy over distances up to 500 meters but must also be capable of operating at high temperatures (>850oC) for many years. High temperature, long term operation raises concerns of material strength, creep resistance and general material stability (corrosion resistance). IHTL design is currently in the initial stages. Many questions remain to be answered before intelligent design can begin. The report begins to look at some of the issues surrounding the main components of an IHTL. Specifically, a stress analysis of a compact heat exchanger design under expected operating conditions is reported. Also the results of a thermal analysis performed on two ITHL pipe configurations for different heat transport fluids are presented. The configurations consist of separate hot supply and cold return legs as well as annular design in which the hot fluid is carried in an inner pipe and the cold return fluids travels in the opposite direction in the annular space around the hot pipe. The effects of insulation configurations on pipe configuration performance are also reported. Finally, a simple analysis of two different process heat exchanger designs, one a tube in shell type and the other a compact or microchannel reactor are evaluated in light of catalyst requirements. Important insights into the critical areas of research and development are gained from these analyses, guiding the direction of future areas of research.

  1. Rapid screening test for gestational diabetes: public health need, market requirement, initial product design, and experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigl, Bernhard H.; Zwisler, Greg; Peck, Roger; Abu-Haydar, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    Gestational diabetes is a global epidemic where many urban areas in Southeast Asia have found prevalence rates as high as 20%, exceeding the highest prevalence rates in the developed world. It can have serious and life-threatening consequences for mothers and babies. We are developing two variants of a new, simple, low-cost rapid test for screening for gestational diabetes mellitus for use primarily in low-resource settings. The pair of assays, both semiquantitative rapid diagnostic strip tests for glycated albumin, require neither fasting nor an oral glucose challenge test. One variant is an extremely simple strip test to estimate the level of total glycated albumin in blood. The other, which is slightly more complex and expensive, is a test that determines the ratio of glycated albumin to total albumin. The screening results can be used to refer women to receive additional care during delivery to avoid birth complications as well as counseling on diet and exercise during and after pregnancy. Results with the latter test may also be used to start treatment with glucose-lowering drugs. Both assays will be read visually. We present initial results of a preliminary cost-performance comparison model evaluating the proposed test versus existing alternatives. We also evaluated user needs and schematic paper microfluidics-based designs aimed at overcoming the challenge of visualizing relatively narrow differences between normal and elevated levels of glycated albumin in blood.

  2. 77 FR 35925 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Monitoring and Enforcement Requirements in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    ... conveyor belt in the factory before any sorting or processing was done. As described below, the operations... give an estimate of catch for unsampled sets. The current sampling methodologies produce accurate catch... current observer sampling station inspection and approval regulations or processes. Under both monitoring...

  3. Use of models to support the monitoring requirements in the water framework directive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Højberg, A.L.; Refsgaard, J.C.; Geer, F. van; Jørgensen, L.F.; Zsuffa, I.

    2007-01-01

    Implementation of the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) poses many new challenges to European water managers. Monitoring programmes play a key role to assess the status and identify possible trends in the environmental conditions of river basins; to gain new knowledge on water processes and to

  4. 40 CFR 63.9804 - What are my monitoring system installation, operation, and maintenance requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., oxidation, and galvanic corrosion. (c) For each pressure CPMS that is used to monitor the pressure drop... where it is easily recognized by plant operating personnel. (6) For positive pressure fabric filter... pressure or induced air fabric filters, the bag leak detector must be installed downstream of the...

  5. 75 FR 43487 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Vessel Monitoring System Requirements in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ... vessel monitoring system (VMS) units on their vessels when directed to do so by NOAA enforcement personnel. VMS units automatically send periodic reports on the position of the vessel. NOAA uses the..., VMS installation and annual maintenance are considered public burden. This request combines three...

  6. 77 FR 36488 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Vessel Monitoring System Requirements Under the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ... near real-time satellite-based position-fixing transmitters (``Vessel Monitoring System-VMS-units'') at... must transmit: (1) ``On/off reports'' to NMFS whenever the VMS unit is turned off while the vessel is in port, (2) ``activation reports'' to NMFS prior to the first use of a VMS unit, and (3)...

  7. New Approach to Purging Monitoring Wells: Lower Flow Rates Reduce Required Purging Volumes and Sample Turbidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is generally accepted that monitoring wells must be purged to access formation water to obtain “representative” ground water quality samples. Historically anywhere from 3 to 5 well casing volumes have been removed prior to sample collection to evacuate the standing well water...

  8. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Eeee of... - Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 3 Table 3 to Subpart EEEE of Part 60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Systems (CEMS) As stated in § 60.2940, you must comply with the following: For the followingpollutants Use the following span values for your CEMS Use the following performance specifications (P.S.)...

  9. Use of models to support the monitoring requirements in the water framework directive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Højberg, A.L.; Refsgaard, J.C.; Geer, F. van; Jørgensen, L.F.; Zsuffa, I.

    2007-01-01

    Implementation of the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) poses many new challenges to European water managers. Monitoring programmes play a key role to assess the status and identify possible trends in the environmental conditions of river basins; to gain new knowledge on water processes and to asse

  10. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Ggg of... - Monitoring Requirements for Control Devices a

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... a diversion was detected at any time during each hour. 2. Valves sealed closed with car-seal or lock... heater fuel Temperature monitoring device... cycle(s) 1. For each regeneration cycle, record the total regeneration stream mass or volumetric...

  11. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Mmm of... - Monitoring Requirements for Control Devices a

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... 2. Valves sealed closed with car-seal or lock-and-key configuration 2. Monthly inspections of sealed... the primary fuel Temperature monitoring device installed in firebox b Combustion temperature Every 15... volumetric flow during carbon bed regeneration cycle(s) 1. For each regeneration cycle, record the...

  12. 40 CFR 141.563 - What follow-up action is my system required to take based on continuous turbidity monitoring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... combined filter effluent (CFE) for systems with 2 filters that monitor CFE in lieu of individual filters... consecutive recordings 15 minutes apart at the same filter (or CFE for systems with 2 filters that monitor CFE... as specified in paragraph (c) of this section was required. Systems with 2 filters that monitor CFE...

  13. 40 CFR 98.164 - Monitoring and QA/QC requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements in § 98.3(i) of this part. (2) Determine the carbon content and the molecular weight annually of... analysis is required to determine the carbon content and molecular weight of the fuel and feedstock. (3... methods to determine the carbon content for all fuels and feedstocks, and molecular weight of...

  14. Military Personnel: Army Needs a Requirement for Capturing Data and Clear Guidance on Use of Military for Civilian or Contractor Positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    MILITARY PERSONNEL Army Needs a Requirement for Capturing Data and Clear Guidance on Use of Military for Civilian... Clear Guidance on Use of Military for Civilian or Contractor Positions 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...congressional committees June 2015 MILITARY PERSONNEL Army Needs a Requirement for Capturing Data and Clear Guidance on Use of Military for Civilian

  15. Requirements and Implementation Feasibility for a CubeSat Thermal Infrared Imaging System to Monitor the Structure of Volcanic Ash Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsen, D.; Carroll, R.; Webley, P.; Hawkins, J.

    2014-12-01

    The 2010 eruption of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland caused the cancellation of approximately 108,000 flights over an 8-day period, disrupted air traffic worldwide, and cost the airline industry more than $400 million per day. The inconvenience and economic impact of this and similar events, such as Puyehue-Cordon-Caulle in 2011, have heightened the interest in developing improved satellite remote sensing techniques for monitoring volcanic plumes and drifting clouds. For aviation safety, the operational/research community has started to move towards classifying the concentrations within volcanic plumes and clouds. Additionally, volcanic ash transport and dispersion (VATD) models are often used for forecasting ash cloud locations and they require knowledge of the structure of the erupting column to improve their ash simulations and also downwind 3-D maps of the ash cloud to calibrate/validate their modeling output. Existing remote sensing satellites utilize a brightness temperature method with thermal infrared (TIR) measurements from 10 - 12 μm to determine mass loading of volcanic ash along a single line of sight, but they have infrequent revisit times and they cannot resolve the three-dimensional structure of the ash clouds. A cluster of CubeSats dedicated to the monitoring of volcanic ash and plumes could provide both more frequent updates and the multi-aspect images needed to resolve the density structure of volcanic ash clouds and plumes. In this presentation, we discuss the feasibility and requirements for a CubeSat TIR imaging system and the associated on-board image processing that would be required to monitor the structure of volcanic ash clouds from Low Earth Orbit.

  16. Power Control and Monitoring Requirements for Thermal Vacuum/Thermal Balance Testing of the MAP Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Chris; Hinkle, R. Kenneth (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The specific heater control requirements for the thermal vacuum and thermal balance testing of the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) Observatory at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Maryland are described. The testing was conducted in the 10m wide x 18.3m high Space Environment Simulator (SES) Thermal Vacuum Facility. The MAP thermal testing required accurate quantification of spacecraft and fixture power levels while minimizing heater electrical emissions. The special requirements of the MAP test necessitated construction of five (5) new heater racks.

  17. Uber die Vereinbarkeit individueller Bildungsbedurfnisse und betrieblicher Qualifikationsanforderungen (On the Compatibility of Individual Needs for Education and Employment-Related Qualification Requirements).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heid, Helmut

    1999-01-01

    States that a tendency has developed to orientate educational-practical acting using learners' educational needs, while representatives of the employment system deduce political and practical educational maxims from requirements that result from economic structural changes. Defines the instructional importance of individual educational needs and…

  18. Uber die Vereinbarkeit individueller Bildungsbedurfnisse und betrieblicher Qualifikationsanforderungen (On the Compatibility of Individual Needs for Education and Employment-Related Qualification Requirements).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heid, Helmut

    1999-01-01

    States that a tendency has developed to orientate educational-practical acting using learners' educational needs, while representatives of the employment system deduce political and practical educational maxims from requirements that result from economic structural changes. Defines the instructional importance of individual educational needs and…

  19. Sunsynchronous low Earth orbit spacecraft concepts and technology requirements for global change monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, L. Bernard; Butterfield, Ansel J.; Taback, Israel; Garn, Paul A.; Burrowbridge, Donald R., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The Global Change Technology Initiative listing of instruments for operation in low Earth, sunsynchronous orbits contain 21 entries, of which 20 are carried aboard multi-instrument spacecraft. This list identifies the temporal requirements for repetition of measurements and also includes groups of instruments that make complementing measurements. Definitions for individual spacecraft follows the temporal and grouping requirements to establish constellations which will provide the measurement data. The definitions of constellations for multi-instrument spacecraft show two alternatives: a constellation of 10 spacecraft, each compatible with launch by a Delta booster; a constellation of 4 spacecraft, each requiring a Titan booster. Operating subsystems for the individual spacecraft can use modular concepts that are adaptations based upon current plans for improving the performance of the NASA-Goddard Multimission Modular units. The descriptions of the spacecraft and constellations begins with a compilation of instrument related requirements that define the principal system performance parameters and operating capabilities.

  20. Franchise Values, Regulatory Monitoring, and Capital Requirements in Optimal Bank Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Barnebeck; Harr, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that financial deregulation is likely to make standard prudential regulatory instruments less effective in curbing excessive risk-taking incentives among banks. This has interesting implications for optimal bank regulation. When there is an increase in competition......, the optimal capital requirement should increase, whereas regulatory auditing should decrease. In contrast, when there is an increase in gambling yields, auditing should always increase, whereas the optimal capital requirement may increase or decrease....

  1. Insufficient fluconazole exposure in pediatric cancer patients and the need for therapeutic drug monitoring in critically ill children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Elst, Kim CM; Pereboom, Marieke; van den Heuvel, Edwin R; Kosterink, Jos G W; Scholvinck, Elisabeth H.; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C

    2014-01-01

    Background. Fluconazole is recommended as first-line treatment in invasive candidiasis in children and infants. Although timely achievement of adequate exposure of fluconazole improves outcome, therapeutic drug monitoring is currently not recommended. Methods. We conducted a retrospective study of c

  2. Wireless sensor and data transmission needs and technologies for patient monitoring in the operating room and intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paksuniemi, M; Sorvoja, H; Alasaarela, E; Myllyla, R

    2005-01-01

    In the intensive care unit, or during anesthesia, patients are attached to monitors by cables. These cables obstruct nursing staff and hinder the patients from moving freely in the hospital. However, rapidly developing wireless technologies are expected to solve these problems. To this end, this study revealed problem areas in current patient monitoring and established the most important medical parameters to monitor. In addition, usable wireless techniques for short-range data transmission were explored and currently employed wireless applications in the hospital environment were studied. The most important parameters measured of the patient include blood pressures, electrocardiography, respiration rate, heart rate and temperature. Currently used wireless techniques in hospitals are based on the WMTS and WLAN standards. There are no viable solutions for short-range data transmission from patient sensors to patient monitors, but potentially usable techniques in the future are based on the WPAN standards. These techniques include Bluetooth, ZigBee and UWB. Other suitable techniques might be based on capacitive or inductive coupling. The establishing of wireless techniques depends on ensuring the reliability of data transmission, eliminating disturbance by other wireless devices, ensuring patient data security and patient safety, and lowering the power consumption and price.

  3. SafeLand guidelines for landslide monitoring and early warning systems in Europe - Design and required technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazin, S.

    2012-04-01

    Landslide monitoring means the comparison of landslide characteristics like areal extent, speed of movement, surface topography and soil humidity from different periods in order to assess landslide activity. An ultimate "universal" methodology for this purpose does not exist; every technology has its own advantages and disadvantages. End-users should carefully consider each one to select the methodologies that represent the best compromise between pros and cons, and are best suited for their needs. Besides monitoring technology, there are many factors governing the choice of an Early Warning System (EWS). A people-centred EWS necessarily comprises five key elements: (1) knowledge of the risks; (2) identification, monitoring, analysis and forecasting of the hazards; (3) operational centre; (4) communication or dissemination of alerts and warnings; and (5) local capabilities to respond to the warnings received. The expression "end-to-end warning system" is also used to emphasize that EWSs need to span all steps from hazard detection through to community response. The aim of the present work is to provide guidelines for establishing the different components for landslide EWSs. One of the main deliverables of the EC-FP7 SafeLand project addresses the technical and practical issues related to monitoring and early warning for landslides, and identifies the best technologies available in the context of both hazard assessment and design of EWSs. This deliverable targets the end-users and aims to facilitate the decision process by providing guidelines. For the purpose of sharing the globally accumulated expertise, a screening study was done on 14 EWSs from 8 different countries. On these bases, the report presents a synoptic view of existing monitoring methodologies and early-warning strategies and their applicability for different landslide types, scales and risk management steps. Several comprehensive checklists and toolboxes are also included to support informed

  4. Patient needs and point-of-care requirements for HIV load testing in resource-limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usdin, Martine; Guillerm, Martine; Calmy, Alexandra

    2010-04-15

    Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) is an international, independent medical nongovernmental organization. One way in which MSF acts to improve patient care is to assist in the identification and development of adapted and appropriate tools for use in resource-limited settings. One strategy to achieve this goal is through active collaborations with scientists and developers, to make some of the field needs known and to help define the medical strategy behind the implementation of new diagnostic tests. Tests used in the field need to be effective in often extreme conditions and must also deliver high-quality, reliable results that can be used in the local context. In this article, we discuss some patient and health care provider needs for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) load measurement in resource-limited settings. This is just one of the areas in which effective, quality tools are desperately needed, not only by MSF and other international nongovernmental organizations, but also by many other health service providers. We hope that, by clearly defining the needs of patients in MSF clinics-as well as we can assess this-and by explaining why these tools are needed, how they should perform, and how their results can be integrated into a program, we will encourage the development of such tools and hasten their implementation in areas where they are so urgently needed.

  5. 40 CFR 63.8600 - What are my monitoring installation, operation, and maintenance requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Clay Ceramics Manufacturing Testing and Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.8600 What are my....5 inch of water or a transducer with a minimum measurement sensitivity of 1 percent of the pressure... Filter Bag Leak Detection Guidance,” (EPA-454/R-98-015, September 1997). This document is available...

  6. 40 CFR 63.7331 - What are the installation, operation, and maintenance requirements for my monitors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... pushing emissions, you must install, operate, and maintain CPMS to measure and record the pressure drop... the pressure drop across each multicyclone during each push according to the requirements in... a manner consistent with the guidance document, “Fabric Filter Bag Leak Detection Guidance”...

  7. 40 CFR 63.11092 - What testing and monitoring requirements must I meet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... Should the Administrator deem the prior test data unacceptable, the facility is still required to meet... suction line, with the measurements displayed on a gauge that can be visually observed. Each carbon bed... valve sequencing, cycle time, gasoline flow, purge air flow, and operating temperatures....

  8. 40 CFR 98.34 - Monitoring and QA/QC requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) The carbon content and, if applicable, molecular weight of the fuels shall be determined according to... the carbon content and molecular weight of the fuel is required if the necessary equipment is in place... a particular type of fuel, sampling and analysis for carbon content and molecular weight...

  9. Hydrogen Monitoring Requirements in the Global Technical Regulation on Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttner, William; Rivkin, Carl; Burgess, Robert; Hartmann, Kevin; Bubar, Max; Post, Matthew; Boon-Brett, Lois; Weidner, Eveline; Moretto, Pietro

    2016-07-01

    The United Nations Global Technical Regulation (GTR) Number 13 (Global Technical Regulation on Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles) is the defining document regulating safety requirements in hydrogen vehicles, and in particular fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV). GTR Number 13 has been formally implemented and will serve as the basis for the national regulatory standards for FCEV safety in North America (Canada, United States), Japan, Korea, and the European Union. The GTR defines safety requirement for these vehicles, including specifications on the allowable hydrogen levels in vehicle enclosures during in-use and post-crash conditions and on the allowable hydrogen emissions levels in vehicle exhaust during certain modes of normal operation. However, in order to be incorporated into national regulations, that is, in order to be binding, methods to verify compliance to the specific requirements must exist. In a collaborative program, the Sensor Laboratories at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in the United States and the Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy and Transport in the Netherlands have been evaluating and developing analytical methods that can be used to verify compliance to the hydrogen release requirement as specified in the GTR.

  10. Monitoring and control requirement definition study for dispersed storage and generation (DSG). Volume II. Final report, Appendix A: selected DSG technologies and their general control requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    A major aim of the US National Energy Policy, as well as that of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, is to conserve energy and to shift from oil to more abundant domestic fuels and renewable energy sources. Dispersed Storage and Generation (DSG) is the term that characterizes the present and future dispersed, relatively small (<30 MW) energy systems, such as solar thermal electric, photovoltaic, wind, fuel cell, storage battery, hydro, and cogeneration, which can help achieve these national energy goals and can be dispersed throughout the distribution portion of an electric utility system. The purpose of this survey and identification of DSG technologies is to present an understanding of the special characteristics of each of these technologies in sufficient detail so that the physical principles of their operation and the internal control of each technology are evident. In this way, a better appreciation can be obtained of the monitoring and control requirements for these DSGs from a remote distribution dispatch center. A consistent approach is being sought for both hardware and software which will handle the monitoring and control necessary to integrate a number of different DSG technologies into a common distribution dispatch network. From this study it appears that the control of each of the DSG technologies is compatible with a supervisory control method of operation that lends itself to remote control from a distribution dispatch center.

  11. Sound insulation between dwellings in multi-storey housing in Greenland - Need and feasibility of increased requirements?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit; Thysell, Erik

    2014-01-01

    constructed housing estates, 4-8 storeys. Main constructions are in-situ cast concrete. Unexpectedly, the results showed fulfilment of requirements, in most cases with a high margin. It was concluded that strengthening of requirements could be made without big changes in building practice or enforcement...

  12. Reducing maternal mortality: better monitoring, indicators and benchmarks needed to improve emergency obstetric care. Research summary for policymakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collender, Guy; Gabrysch, Sabine; Campbell, Oona M R

    2012-06-01

    Several limitations of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) indicators and benchmarks are analysed in this short paper, which synthesises recent research on this topic. A comparison between Sri Lanka and Zambia is used to highlight the inconsistencies and shortcomings in current methods of monitoring EmOC. Recommendations are made to improve the usefulness and accuracy of EmOC indicators and benchmarks in the future.

  13. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Barfuss, Brad C.; Gervais, Todd L.

    2008-01-01

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP – U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection – Air Emissions. In these NESHAP assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at buildings that are part of the consolidated laboratory campus of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the NESHAP assessment performed in 2007.

  14. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.; Barnett, J. Matthew

    2011-05-13

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants ([NESHAP]; U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these NESHAP assessments, potential unabated off-site doses were evaluated for emission locations at buildings that are part of the consolidated laboratory campus of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the NESHAP assessment performed in 2010.

  15. Safeguarding the Health of the NASA Astronaut Community: the Need for Expanded Medical Monitoring for Former NASA Astronauts Under the Astronaut Occupational Health Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Meredith; Lee, Lesley; Wear, Mary; Van Baalen, Mary; Rhodes, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    The astronaut community is unique, and may be disproportionately exposed to occupational hazards not commonly seen in other communities. The extent to which the demands of the astronaut occupation and exposure to spaceflight-related hazards affect the health of the astronaut population over the life course is not completely known. Provision of health screening services to active and former astronauts ensures individual, mission, and community health and safety. Currently, the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Flight Medicine Clinic (FMC) provides extensive medical monitoring to active astronauts throughout their careers. Upon retirement, astronauts may voluntarily return to the JSC FMC for an annual preventive exam. However, current retiree monitoring includes only selected screening tests, representing an opportunity for augmentation. The potential latent health effects of spaceflight demand an expanded framework of testing for former astronauts. The need is two-fold: screening tests widely recommended for other aging communities are necessary for astronauts to rule out conditions resulting from the natural aging process (e.g., colonoscopy, mammography), as opposed to conditions resulting directly from the astronaut occupation; and increased breadth of monitoring services will improve the understanding of occupational health risks and longitudinal health of the astronaut community, past, present, and future. To meet this need, NASA has begun an extensive exploration of the overall approach, cost, and policy implications of expanding existing medical monitoring under the Astronaut Occupational Health program for former NASA astronauts.

  16. Requirement for safety monitoring for approved multiple sclerosis therapies: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommer, P S; Zettl, U K; Kieseier, B; Hartung, H-P; Menge, T; Frohman, E; Greenberg, B M; Hemmer, B; Stüve, O

    2014-03-01

    During the last two decades, treatment options for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) have broadened tremendously. All agents that are currently approved for clinical use have potential side effects, and a careful risk-benefit evaluation is part of a decision algorithm to identify the optimal treatment choice for an individual patient. Whereas glatiramer acetate and interferon beta preparations have been used in MS for decades and have a proven safety record, more recently approved drugs appear to be more effective, but potential risks might be more severe. The potential complications of some novel therapies might not even have been identified to their full extent. This review is aimed at the clinical neurologist in that it offers insights into potential adverse events of each of the approved MS therapeutics: interferon beta, glatiramer acetate, mitoxantrone, natalizumab, fingolimod and teriflunomide, as well as recently approved therapeutics such as dimethyl fumarate and alemtuzumab. It also provides recommendations for monitoring the different drugs during therapy in order to avoid common side effects.

  17. Associations between statewide prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) requirement and physician patterns of prescribing opioid analgesics for patients with non-cancer chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsien-Chang; Wang, Zhi; Boyd, Carol; Simoni-Wastila, Linda; Buu, Anne

    2018-01-01

    State-level prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) have been implemented in most states. PDMPs enable registered prescribers to obtain real-time information on patients' prescription history to reduce non-medical use of controlled drugs. This study examined whether PDMP implementation and different levels of PDMP requirements were associated with physicians' patterns of prescribing opioid analgesics for patients with non-cancer chronic pain. This is a secondary analysis study using cross-sectional national data. Patients with non-cancer chronic pain from the 2012 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey were included (weighted N=81,018,131; unweighted N=3295). Heckman two-step selection procedure employing two logistic regressions was used to explore the associations between PDMP requirements and physicians' prescribing behaviors, controlling for physician characteristics, patient characteristics, physician-healthcare system interaction, and physician-patient relationship, guided by the Eisenberg's model of physician decision making. State PDMP implementation status and requirement levels were not associated with physician opioid prescribing for non-cancer chronic pain treatment (p's ranged 0.30-0.32). Patients with Medicare coverage were more likely to be prescribed opioid analgesics than those with private health insurance (OR=1.55, prequirements and enforcement for prescribers and related stakeholders. Future studies also are needed to identify characteristics contributing to PDMP effectiveness in reducing non-medical use of prescription opioids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Materials Requirements for Advanced Energy Systems - New Fuels. Volume 3: Materials Research Needs in Advanced Energy Systems Using New Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-07-01

    principal new fuel studied; hydrogen-derived fuels considere-d were ammonia, hydrazine, boranes, silanes, carbon monoxide, and methyl alcohol . The...NEEDED 𔄁O SbPPOR1 THE USE -F Item I No. Equipment Class Fuel Problem Ares. Type of Solution Materials Problema . Malerials E 1 . TURBINES (Con’t) 1.4.1 H...methyl alcohol . The materials implica- tionsof the use, transportation, and storage of oxygen (produced as a by-product in hydrogen generation) and of

  19. 40 CFR Table A-1 to Subpart A of... - Summary of Applicable Requirements for Reference and Equivalent Methods for Air Monitoring of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Reference and Equivalent Methods for Air Monitoring of Criteria Pollutants A Table A-1 to Subpart A of Part...) AMBIENT AIR MONITORING REFERENCE AND EQUIVALENT METHODS General Provisions Pt. 53, Subpt. A, Table A-1 Table A-1 to Subpart A of Part 53—Summary of Applicable Requirements for Reference and...

  20. Recurrence of adverse drug reactions following inappropriate re-prescription: better documentation, availability of information and monitoring are needed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Carolien M J; Jansen, Paul A F; van Marum, Rob J; Grouls, René J E; Korsten, Erik H M; Egberts, Antoine C G

    2010-07-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a common, and often preventable, cause of hospital admission, especially in the elderly, and can occur during hospitalization. In this current opinion article, we present three cases of recurrence of a serious ADR due to re-prescription of a withdrawn medication that highlight the need for a system to prevent the undesirable re-prescription of medications withdrawn because of an ADR. In addition, we describe an electronic system that could help prevent undesirable re-prescription following an ADR. Such a system should document ADRs systematically at the patient level, make this information available to relevant healthcare providers and the patient, and flag re-prescription of the offending drug. The effectiveness and cost effectiveness of such a system would need to be determined.

  1. Best Practices. Increased Focus on Requirements and Oversight Needed to Improve DOD’s Acquisition Environment and Weapon System Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    Similar to DOD’s MIL-Q-9858A, ISO 9001 includes requirements for controlling a product’s design and development, and production, as well as processes...2 The ISO 9001 standard provides a framework for managing an organization’s...AS9100 is a set of quality standards for the aerospace industry; ISO /TS 16949 is a set of standards for the automotive industry. 4GAO, Best

  2. Minimally disruptive medicine is needed for patients with multimorbidity: time to develop computerised medical record systems to meet this requirement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Schattner

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Minimally disruptive medicine (MDM is proposed as a method for more appropriately managing people with multiple chronic disease. Much clinical management is currently single disease focussed, with people with multimorbidity being managed according to multiple single disease guidelines. Current initiatives to improve care include education about individual conditions and creating an environment where multiple guidelines might be simultaneously supported. The patientcentred medical home (PCMH is an example of the latter. However, educational programmes and PCMH may increase the burden on patients.Problem The cumulative workload for patients in managing the impact of multiple disease-specific guidelines is only relatively recently recognised. There is an intellectual vacuum as to how best to manage multimorbidity and how informatics might support implementing MDM. There is currently no alternative to multiple singlecondition- specific guidelines and a lack of certainty, should the treatment burden need to be reduced, as to which guideline might be ‘dropped’.Action The best information about multimorbidity is recorded in primary care computerised medical record (CMR systems and in an increasing number of integrated care organisations. CMR systems have the potential to flag individuals who might be in greatest need. However, CMR systems may also provide insights into whether there are ameliorating factors that might make it easier for them to be resilient to the burden of care. Data from such CMR systems might be used to develop the evidence base about how to better manage multimorbidity.Conclusions There is potential for these information systems to help reduce the management burden on patients and clinicians. However, substantial investment in research-driven CMR development is needed if we are to achieve this.

  3. Exploring the challenges of habitation design for extended human presence beyond low-earth orbit: Are new requirements and processes needed?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robinson, D.K.R.; Sterenborg, Glenn; Häuplik, Sandra; Aguzzi, Manuela

    2008-01-01

    With the renewed interest in a sustained human presence beyond low-earth orbit, habitation in space, on planets and on moons is an area that requires re-evaluation in terms of mission and habitat design—there is a need for a paradigmatic move from a design focus on short-term LEO missions to that of

  4. Exploring the challenges of habitation design for extended human presence beyond low-earth orbit: are new requirements and processes needed?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robinson, Douglas K.R.; Sterenborg, Glenn; Häuplik, Sandra; Aguzzi, Manuela

    2008-01-01

    With the renewed interest in a sustained human presence beyond low-earth orbit, habitation in space, on planets and on moons is an area that requires re-evaluation in terms of mission and habitat design—there is a need for a paradigmatic move from a design focus on short-term LEO missions to that of

  5. 32 CFR Appendix D to Part 37 - What Common National Policy Requirements May Apply and Need To Be Included in TIAs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What Common National Policy Requirements May Apply and Need To Be Included in TIAs? D Appendix D to Part 37 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DoD GRANT AND AGREEMENT REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT...

  6. Continuous Glucose Monitoring Analysis as Predictor of Islet Yield and Insulin Requirements in Autologous Islet Transplantation After Complete Pancreatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, George Ivanov; Cercone, Renee; Tiwari, Mukesh; Rilo, Horacio L. R.

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the pretransplant continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) data of 45 patients that underwent total pancreatectomy followed by autologous islet transplantation (AIT) at the University of Arizona Medical Center. Traditional and novel metrics of CGM time series were correlated to the total islet count (TIC), islet equivalents (IEQs), and weight-normalized IEQs (IEQ/kg). In a subset cohort (n = 26) we analyzed the relationship among the infused number of islets, the CGM indicators, and the first recorded insulin requirement after the procedure. We conclude that receiving a high islet yield is sufficient yet not necessary to achieve low or null insulin requirements within the first 50 days after surgery. Furthermore, CGM inertia and CGM length of curve (2 novel CGM indicators) are shown to be correlated to islet yield, and the CGMs normalized area (Ao) and time ratio above hyperglycemic level (To) are strongly correlated to insulin requirement. A screening test based on To is shown to have 100% sensitivity and 88% specificity discriminating insulin independence upon discharge. PMID:25190081

  7. Chemical gas sensors and the characterization, monitoring and sensor technology needs of the US Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastiaans, G.J.; Haas, W.J. Jr.; Junk, G.A.

    1993-10-01

    The Office of Technology Development within the Dept. of Energy (DOE) has the responsibility of providing new technologies to aid the environmental restoration and waste management (ER/WM) activities of the DOE. There is a perception that application and judicious development of chemical sensor technologies could result in large cost savings and reduced risk to the health and safety of ER/WM personnel. A number of potential gas sensor applications which exist within DOE ER/WM operations are described. The capabilities of several chemical sensor technologies and their potential to meet the needs of ER/WM applications in the present or near term future are discussed.

  8. Drinking water quality and public health in Southwestern Saudi Arabia: The need for a national monitoring program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jobran M Alqahtani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the Study: The aim was to investigate the bacteriological quality of drinking water, and explore the factors involved in the knowledge of the public about the quality of drinking water in Najran region, Saudi Arabia. Study Design: A cross-sectional descriptive study. Materials and Methods: A total of 160 water samples were collected. Total coliforms, fecal coliform, and fecal streptococci were counted using Most Probable Number method. The bacterial genes lacZ and uidA specific to total coliforms and Escherichia coli, respectively, were detected using multiplex polymerase chain reaction. An interview was conducted with 1200 residents using a questionnaire. Results: Total coliforms were detected in 8 (20% of 40 samples from wells, 13 (32.5% of 40 samples from tankers, and 55 (68.8% of 80 samples from roof tanks. Twenty (25% and 8 (10% samples from roof tanks were positive for E. coli and Streptococcus faecalis, respectively. Of the 1200 residents participating in the study, 10%, 45.5%, and 44.5% claimed that they depended on municipal water, bottled water, and well water, respectively. The majority (95.5% reported the use of roof water tanks as a source of water supply in their homes. Most people (80% believed that drinking water transmitted diseases. However, only 25% of them participated in educational programs on the effect of polluted water on health. Conclusions: Our results could help health authorities consider a proper regular monitoring program and a sustainable continuous assessment of the quality of well water. In addition, this study highlights the importance of the awareness and educational programs for residents on the effect of polluted water on public health.

  9. Real-Time Series Resistance Monitoring in PV Systems Without the Need for I-V Curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deceglie, Michael G. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Silverman, Timothy J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Marion, Bill [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kurtz, Sarah R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-10-01

    We apply the physical principles of a familiar method, suns-Voc, to a new application: the real-time detection of series resistance changes in modules and systems operating outside. The real-time series resistance (RTSR) method that we describe avoids the need for collecting I-V curves or constructing full series resistance-free I-V curves. RTSR is most readily deployable at the module level on microinverters or module-integrated electronics, but it can also be extended to full strings. We found that automated detection of series resistance increases can provide early warnings of some of the most common reliability issues, which also pose fire risks, including broken ribbons, broken solder bonds, and contact problems in the junction or combiner box. We also describe the method in detail and describe a sample application to data collected from modules operating in the field.

  10. 6-Iso-chlortetracycline or keto form of chlortetracycline? Need for clarification for relevant monitoring of chlortetracycline residues in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaugain, Murielle; Gautier, Sophie; Bourcier, Sophie; Jacques, Anne-Marie; Laurentie, Michel; Abjean, Jean-Pierre; Hurtaud-Pessel, Dominique; Verdon, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Chlortetracycline (CTC) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic used in veterinary medicine for pulmonary or digestive infections and having a regulatory maximum residue limit (MRL) necessitating an official analytical control method. The purpose of this study was to clarify the identification of different forms of CTC observed in standard solution, in spiked muscle samples and in naturally incurred muscle samples of pigs analysed by LC-MS/MS and to demonstrate the in vivo formation of 6-iso-chlortetracycline and 4-epi-6-iso-CTC as a metabolite of CTC and 4-epi-CTC in muscle. The six following forms were identified, all being isobaric with a protonated molecule at m/z 479 (precursor ion): the keto-enol forms of CTC and the keto-enol forms of 4-epi-chlortetracycline (4-epi-CTC), 6-iso-chlortetracycline (6-iso-CTC) and 4-epi-6-iso-chlortetracycline (4-epi-6-iso-CTC). The 6-iso-CTC and 4-epi-6-iso-CTC were observed only in incurred pig samples so were identified for the first time as metabolites of CTC and 4-epi-CTC. Identification of the different forms was obtained by comparing incurred muscle samples with standard solutions and with spiked samples. Then the differences between the features of the chromatograms obtained by LC-TQ-MS and the fragmentation study of the different forms of CTC obtained by LC-Q-TOF-MS helped us to support this identification. The extraction steps and the LC-MS/MS conditions developed to analyse muscle tissue samples are described. This clarification concerning the rigorous identification of chromatographic peaks allowed us to evaluate the relevance of our monitoring method with regard to the regulations in place in the European Union and could be of help to laboratories involved in official control of antibiotic residues in food of animal origin. Additional results are also presented highlighting the transformation of the CTC when prepared in a mixture with other antibiotics.

  11. Crop Monitoring Based on SPOT-5 Take-5 and Sentinel-1A Data for the Estimation of Crop Water Requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Navarro

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Optical and microwave images have been combined for land cover monitoring in different agriculture scenarios, providing useful information on qualitative and quantitative land cover changes. This study aims to assess the complementarity and interoperability of optical (SPOT-5 Take-5 and synthetic aperture radar (SAR (Sentinel-1A data for crop parameter (basal crop coefficient (Kcb values and the length of the crop’s development stages retrieval and crop type classification, with a focus on crop water requirements, for an irrigation perimeter in Angola. SPOT-5 Take-5 images are used as a proxy of Sentinel-2 data to evaluate the potential of their enhanced temporal resolution for agricultural applications. In situ data are also used to complement the Earth O=observation (EO data. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI and dual (VV + VH polarization backscattering time series are used to compute the Kcb curve for four crop types (maize, soybean, bean and pasture and to estimate the length of each phenological growth stage. The Kcb values are then used to compute the crop’s evapotranspiration and to subsequently estimate the crop irrigation requirements based on a soil water balance model. A significant R2 correlation between NDVI and backscatter time series was observed for all crops, demonstrating that optical data can be replaced by microwave data in the presence of cloud cover. However, it was not possible to properly identify each stage of the crop cycle due to the lack of EO data for the complete growing season.

  12. FUNCTIONS AND REQUIREMENTS FOR RUSSIAN PULSATING MONITOR DEPLOYMENT IN THE GUNITE AND ASSOCIATED TANKS AT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Albert

    1999-01-01

    This document provides functions and requirements to support deployment of pulsating mixer pump technology in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Gunite and Associated Tanks to mobilize and mix the settled sludge and solids in these tanks. In FY 1998 pulsating mixer pump technology, a jet mixer powered by a reciprocating air supply, was selected for FY 1999 deployment in one of the GAAT tanks to mobilize settled solids. Pulsating mixer pump technology was identified in FY 1996 during technical exchanges between the US Department of Energy (DOE) Tanks Focus Area Retrieval and Closure program, the DOE Environmental Management International Programs, and delegates from Russia as a promising technology that could be implemented in the US. The pulsating mixer pump technology, provided by the Russian Integrated Mining Chemical Company, was tested at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to observe its ability to mobilize settled solids. Based on the results of this demonstration, ORNL and DOE staff determined that a modified pulsating mixer pump would meet project needs for bulk mobilization of Gunite tank sludge prior to deployment of other retrieval systems. The deployment of this device is expected to significantly reduce the costs of operation and maintenance of more expensive retrieval systems. The functions and requirements presented here were developed by evaluating the results and recommendations that resulted from the pulsating mixer pump demonstration at PNNL, and by coupling this with the remediation needs identified by staff at ORNL involved with the remediation of the Gunite and Associated Tanks.

  13. HEALTH NEEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivera Radulovic

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Human needs are of great interest to different scientific fields: sociology, anthropology, psychology, medicine, economy… Malinowski, Maslow, Adler and From have largely contributed to studying the needs. While trying to define the need concept, not only one definition is acceptable. In psychology, need is defined as a lack or disorder, i.e. the necessity to dislodge this lack. It was Maslow who gave the fullest classification and explanation of human needs. If we start from the fact that need represents the lack or deficit of something, in this context health needs would indicate the lack of health, and the measurement of health needs would be the same as the measurement of health. Therefore, almost all human needs can be enumerated as health needs, i.e. those which, after being satisfied, can lead to physical, psychical and social welfare. According to WHO, health needs can be defined as scientifically settled evasions from health which require preventive, curative and probably regulative and eradicative measurements. According to the medical method used by the health service while regarding the needs, the emphasis is on morbidity, mortality, incidence, prevalence, inability, etc. Usually, when we have very low level of health culture, and the responsibility for personal health is in most of the cases unacceptable, for the health service user the curative services will have priority over preventive ones. The measurement of health needs is a complex task. The needs can be regarded through medical documentation and by perception of the needs by people in the community.

  14. Remote sensing in precision farming: real-time monitoring of water and fertilizer requirements of agricultural crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberman, Arkadi; Ben Asher, Jiftah; Kopeika, Norman S.

    2016-10-01

    The advancements in remote sensing in combination with sensor technology (both passive and active) enable growers to analyze an entire crop field as well as its local features. In particular, changes of actual evapo-transpiration (ET) as a function of water availability can be measured remotely with infrared radiometers. Detection of crop water stress and ET and combining it with the soil water flow model enable rational irrigation timing and application amounts. Nutrient deficiency, and in particular nitrogen deficiency, causes substantial crop losses. This deficiency needs to be identified immediately. A faster the detection and correction, a lesser the damage to the crop yield. In the present work, to retrieve ET a novel deterministic approach was used which is based on the remote sensing data. The algorithm can automatically provide timely valuable information on plant and soil water status, which can improve the management of irrigated crops. The solution is capable of bridging between Penman-Monteith ET model and Richards soil water flow model. This bridging can serve as a preliminary tool for expert irrigation system. To support decisions regarding fertilizers the greenness of plant canopies is assessed and quantified by using the spectral reflectance sensors and digital color imaging. Fertilization management can be provided on the basis of sampling and monitoring of crop nitrogen conditions using RS technique and translating measured N concentration in crop to kg/ha N application in the field.

  15. These Shoes Are Made for Walking: Sensitivity Performance Evaluation of Commercial Activity Monitors under the Expected Conditions and Circumstances Required to Achieve the International Daily Step Goal of 10,000 Steps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra O'Connell

    Full Text Available Physical activity is a vitally important part of a healthy lifestyle, and is of major benefit to both physical and mental health. A daily step count of 10,000 steps is recommended globally to achieve an appropriate level of physical activity. Accurate quantification of physical activity during conditions reflecting those needed to achieve the recommended daily step count of 10,000 steps is essential. As such, we aimed to assess four commercial activity monitors for their sensitivity/accuracy in a prescribed walking route that reflects a range of surfaces that would typically be used to achieve the recommended daily step count, in two types of footwear expected to be used throughout the day when aiming to achieve the recommended daily step count, and in a timeframe required to do so.Four commercial activity monitors were worn simultaneously by participants (n = 15 during a prescribed walking route reflective of surfaces typically encountered while achieving the daily recommended 10,000 steps. Activity monitors tested were the Garmin Vivofit ™, New Lifestyles' NL-2000 ™ pedometer, Withings Smart Activity Monitor Tracker (Pulse O2 ™, and Fitbit One ™.All activity monitors tested were accurate in their step detection over the variety of different surfaces tested (natural lawn grass, gravel, ceramic tile, tarmacadam/asphalt, linoleum, when wearing both running shoes and hard-soled dress shoes.All activity monitors tested were accurate in their step detection sensitivity and are valid monitors for physical activity quantification over the variety of different surfaces tested, when wearing both running shoes and hard-soled dress shoes, and over a timeframe necessary for accumulating the recommended daily step count of 10,000 steps. However, it is important to consider the accuracy of activity monitors, particularly when physical activity in the form of stepping activities is prescribed as an intervention in the treatment or prevention of a

  16. Monitoring the inputs required to extend and sustain hygiene promotion: findings from the GLAAS 2013/2014 survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreland, Leslie D; Gore, Fiona M; Andre, Nathalie; Cairncross, Sandy; Ensink, Jeroen H J

    2016-08-01

    There are significant gaps in information about the inputs required to effectively extend and sustain hygiene promotion activities to improve people's health outcomes through water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) interventions. We sought to analyse current country and global trends in the use of key inputs required for effective and sustainable implementation of hygiene promotion to help guide hygiene promotion policy and decision-making after 2015. Data collected in response to the GLAAS 2013/2014 survey from 93 countries of 94 were included, and responses were analysed for 12 questions assessing the inputs and enabling environment for hygiene promotion under four thematic areas. Data were included and analysed from 20 External Support Agencies (ESA) of 23 collected through self-administered surveys. Firstly, the data showed a large variation in the way in which hygiene promotion is defined and what constitutes key activities in this area. Secondly, challenges to implement hygiene promotion are considerable: include poor implementation of policies and plans, weak coordination mechanisms, human resource limitations and a lack of available hygiene promotion budget data. Despite the proven benefits of hand washing with soap, a critical hygiene-related factor in minimising infection, GLAAS 2013/2014 survey data showed that hygiene promotion remains a neglected component of WASH. Additional research to identify the context-specific strategies and inputs required to enhance the effectiveness of hygiene promotion at scale are needed. Improved data collection methods are also necessary to advance the availability and reliability of hygiene-specific information. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Adherence with physical activity monitoring wearable devices in a community-based population: observations from the Washington, D.C., Cardiovascular Health and Needs Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yingling, Leah R; Mitchell, Valerie; Ayers, Colby R; Peters-Lawrence, Marlene; Wallen, Gwenyth R; Brooks, Alyssa T; Troendle, James F; Adu-Brimpong, Joel; Thomas, Samantha; Henry, JaWanna; Saygbe, Johnetta N; Sampson, Dana M; Johnson, Allan A; Graham, Avis P; Graham, Lennox A; Wiley, Kenneth L; Powell-Wiley, Tiffany

    2017-01-17

    Wearable mobile health (mHealth) technologies offer approaches for targeting physical activity (PA) in resource-limited, community-based interventions. We sought to explore user characteristics of PA tracking, wearable technology among a community-based population within a health and needs assessment. In 2014-2015, we conducted the Washington, D.C., Cardiovascular Health and Needs Assessment in predominantly African-American churches among communities with higher obesity rates and lower household incomes. Participants received a mHealth PA monitor and wirelessly uploaded PA data weekly to church data collection hubs. Participants (n = 99) were 59 ± 12 years, 79% female, and 99% African-American, with a mean body mass index of 33 ± 7 kg/m(2). Eighty-one percent of participants uploaded PA data to the hub and were termed "PA device users." Though PA device users were more likely to report lower household incomes, no differences existed between device users and non-users for device ownership or technology fluency. Findings suggest that mHealth systems with a wearable device and data collection hub may feasibly target PA in resource-limited communities.

  18. 40 CFR 63.3968 - What are the requirements for continuous parameter monitoring system installation, operation, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... Monitoring failures that are caused in part by poor maintenance or careless operation are not malfunctions... install a device to monitor pressure drop across the zeolite wheel or rotary carbon bed. The pressure... signal simulations or via relative accuracy testing. (v) Conduct an accuracy audit every quarter and...

  19. 40 CFR 63.4168 - What are the requirements for continuous parameter monitoring system installation, operation, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL... monitor pressure drop across the zeolite wheel or rotary carbon bed. The pressure monitoring device must... pressure sensor(s) in or as close to a position that provides a representative measurement of the pressure...

  20. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart G of... - Process Vents-Monitoring, Recordkeeping, and Reporting Requirements For Maintaining a TRE Index...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., and Reporting Requirements For Maintaining a TRE Index Value >1.0 and. â¤4.0 4 Table 4 to Subpart G of... for Organic Hazardous Air Pollutants From the Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry for... TRE Index Value >1.0 and. ≤4.0 Final recovery device Parameters to be monitored a Recordkeeping...

  1. 40 CFR 60.4237 - What are the monitoring requirements if I am an owner or operator of an emergency stationary SI...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the monitoring requirements if I am an owner or operator of an emergency stationary SI internal combustion engine? 60.4237 Section 60.4237 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW...

  2. Communications infrastructure requirements for telemedicine/telehealth in the context of planning for and responding to natural disasters: Considering the need for shared regional networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, John Carver

    1991-01-01

    During the course of recent years the frequency and magnitude of major disasters - of natural, technological, or ecological origin - have made the world community dramatically aware of the immense losses of human life and economic resources that are caused regularly by such calamities. Particularly hard hit are developing countries, for whom the magnitude of disasters frequently outstrips the ability of the society to cope with them. In many cases this situation can be prevented, and the recent trend in disaster management has been to emphasize the importance of preparedness and mitigation as a means of prevention. In cases of disaster, a system is needed to respond to relief requirements, particularly the delivery of medical care. There is no generic telecommunications infrastructure appropriate for the variety of applications in medical care and disaster management. The need to integrate telemedicine/telehealth into shared regional disaster management telecommunications networks is discussed. Focus is on the development of infrastructure designed to serve the needs of disaster prone regions of the developing world.

  3. Alternative drugs go global: possible lead and/ or mercury intoxication from imported natural health products and a need for scientifically evaluated poisoning monitoring from environmental exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budnik, Lygia Therese; Baur, Xaver; Harth, Volker; Hahn, Axel

    2016-01-01

    With increases in globalization, cultural remedies from Chinese, Ayurvedic, Arab and other traditions have become more available to international consumers, offering unfamiliar "Natural Health Products" (NHP), used as alternative medicine or supplementary medicine. Contamination with toxic ingredients including lead, mercury, arsenic, and other toxic elements has been documented in several of these products from various parts of the globe, particularly from some parts of Asia and the Orient. We have been following this development in the last 6 years and have analyzed n = 20 such products (60 analyses) from patients with intoxication symptoms in a pilot study, showing alarming high concentrations of mercury and/or lead (the first one in "therapeutic" doses). 82 % of the studied NHP contained lead concentrations above the EU limit for dietary supplements. 62 % of the samples exceeded the limit values for mercury. Elevated blood lead and mercury levels in patients along with clinical intoxication symptoms corroborate the causal assumption of intoxication (s). We present one detailed clinical case report of severe lead and mercury intoxications and give an overview about blood concentration related symptoms and signs of n = 41 case reports of mercury intoxications of the German monitoring BfR-DocCenter. For NHP there is evidence on a distinct toxicological risk with alarming low awareness for a possible intoxication which prevents potentially life-saving diagnostic steps in affected cases. In many cases patients do not communicate the events to their physicians or the local health authority so that case reports (e.g. the BfR-DocCentre) are missing. Thus, there is an urgent need to raise awareness and to initiate more suitable monitory systems (e.g. National Monitoring of Poisonings) and control practice protecting the public.

  4. Increased vitamin D intake differentiated according to skin color is needed to meet requirements in young Swedish children during winter: a double-blind randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öhlund, Inger; Lind, Torbjörn; Hernell, Olle; Silfverdal, Sven-Arne; Karlsland Åkeson, Pia

    2017-07-01

    Background: Dark skin and low exposure to sunlight increase the risk of vitamin D insufficiency in children.Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the amount of vitamin D needed to ascertain that most children >4 y of age attain sufficient serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [S-25(OH)D; i.e., ≥50 nmol/L] during winter regardless of latitude and skin color.Design: In a longitudinal, double-blind, randomized, food-based intervention study, 5- to 7-y-old children from northern (63°N) and southern (55°N) Sweden with fair (n = 108) and dark (n = 98) skin were included. Children, stratified by skin color by using Fitzpatrick's definition, were randomly assigned to receive milk-based vitamin D3 supplements that provided 2 (placebo), 10, or 25 μg/d during 3 winter months.Results: Mean daily vitamin D intake increased from 6 to 17 μg and 26 μg in the intervention groups supplemented with 10 and 25 μg, respectively. In the intention-to-treat analysis, 90.2% (95% CI: 81.1%, 99.3%) of fair-skinned children randomly assigned to supplementation of 10 μg/d attained sufficient concentrations, whereas 25 μg/d was needed in dark-skinned children to reach sufficiency in 95.1% (95% CI: 88.5%, 100%). In children adherent to the study product, 97% (95% CI: 91.3%, 100%) and 87.9% (95% CI: 76.8%, 99%) of fair- and dark-skinned children, respectively, achieved sufficient concentrations if supplemented with 10 μg/d. By using 95% prediction intervals for 30 and 50 nmol S-25(OH)D/L, intakes of 6 and 20 μg/d are required in fair-skinned children, whereas 14 and 28 μg/d are required in children with dark skin.Conclusion: Children with fair and dark skin require vitamin D intakes of 20 and 28 μg/d, respectively, to maintain S-25(OH)D ≥50 nmol/L, whereas intakes of 6 and 14 μg/d, respectively, are required to maintain concentrations ≥30 nmol/L during winter. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01741324. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  5. Improving education due to the need to adapt it to the requirements of the economic development and of the labor market - issues of past history and contemporary features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Nistor

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Improving education has been and continues to be a necessary condition in any society. Education contributes to increase the level of civilization, to develop the individual personality, but also to increase the level of the economic development. Organization and subsequent reorganization of the Romanian education system has been pursuing desiring to adapt better it better to the labor market needs and to adapt it to the international education system. The management strategies which are applied in this area should be considered adapting it to the domestic and international labor market conditions to the new education methods and techniques, used at the international level. The new trends desiring to transform the economy into a green economy require increased investments in education, in order to train the specialists in new green areas.

  6. A DOE contractor`s perspective of environmental monitoring requirements at a low-level waste facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferns, T.W. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., ID (United States)

    1989-11-01

    Environmental monitoring at a low-level waste disposal facility (LLWDF) should, (1) demonstrate compliance with environmental laws; (2) detect any spatial or temporal environmental changes; and (3) provide information on the potential or actual exposure of humans and/or the environment to disposed waste and/or waste by-products. Under the DOE Order system the LLWDF site manager has more freedom of implementation for a monitoring program than either the semi-prescriptive NRC, or the prescriptive EPA hazardous waste programs. This paper will attempt to compare and contrast environmental monitoring under the different systems (DOE, NRC, and EPA), and determine if the DOE might benefit from a more prescriptive system.

  7. Some design constraints required for the use of generic software in embedded systems: Packages which manage abstract dynamic structures without the need for garbage collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Charles S.

    1986-01-01

    The embedded systems running real-time applications, for which Ada was designed, require their own mechanisms for the management of dynamically allocated storage. There is a need for packages which manage their own internalo structures to control their deallocation as well, due to the performance implications of garbage collection by the KAPSE. This places a requirement upon the design of generic packages which manage generically structured private types built-up from application-defined input types. These kinds of generic packages should figure greatly in the development of lower-level software such as operating systems, schedulers, controllers, and device driver; and will manage structures such as queues, stacks, link-lists, files, and binary multary (hierarchical) trees. Controlled to prevent inadvertent de-designation of dynamic elements, which is implicit in the assignment operation A study was made of the use of limited private type, in solving the problems of controlling the accumulation of anonymous, detached objects in running systems. The use of deallocator prodecures for run-down of application-defined input types during deallocation operations during satellites.

  8. Vital Sign and Location/Attitude Monitoring with Sensor Networks for the Proposed Rescue System for Disabled and Elderly Persons Who Need a Help in Evacuation from Disaster Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Arai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Method and system for vital sign (Body temperature, blood pressure, bless, Heart beat pulse rate, and consciousness and location/attitude monitoring with sensor network for the proposed rescue system for disabled and elderly persons who need a help in evacuation from disaster areas is proposed. Experimental results show that all of vital signs as well as location and attitude of the disabled and elderly persons are monitored with the proposed sensor networks.

  9. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Ppp of... - Process Vents From Batch Unit Operations-Monitoring, Recordkeeping, and Reporting Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions for Polyether Polyols Production Pt. 63, Subpt. PPP, Table 5 Table 5 to... all instances when monitoring data are not collected—PR. d,e If a base absorbent is used, report all pH values that are below the minimum operating values. If an acid absorbent is used, report all...

  10. 40 CFR 63.4568 - What are the requirements for continuous parameter monitoring system installation, operation, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... caused in part by poor maintenance or careless operation are not malfunctions. Any period for which the... install a device to monitor pressure drop across the zeolite wheel or rotary carbon bed. The pressure... simulations or via relative accuracy testing. (v) Conduct an accuracy audit every quarter and after every...

  11. Validation of limited sampling models (LSM) for estimating AUC in therapeutic drug monitoring - is a separate validation group required?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Proost, J. H.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Limited sampling models (LSM) for estimating AUC in therapeutic drug monitoring are usually validated in a separate group of patients, according to published guidelines. The aim of this study is to evaluate the validation of LSM by comparing independent validation with cross-validation us

  12. 40 CFR Table 11 to Subpart G of... - Wastewater-Inspection and Monitoring Requirements for Waste Management Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wastewater-Inspection and Monitoring... Operations, and Wastewater Pt. 63, Subpt. G, Table 11 Table 11 to Subpart G of Part 63—Wastewater—Inspection... wastewater tank for control equipment failures and improper work practices Initially Semi-annually...

  13. Environmental Monitoring Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Althouse, P E; Bertoldo, N A; Bowen, B M; Brown, R A; Campbell, C G; Christofferson, E; Gallegos, G M; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Larson, J M; Laycak, D; Mathews, S; Peterson, S R; Revelli, M J; Rueppel, D; Williams, R A; Wilson, K; Woods, N

    2005-11-23

    The purpose of the environmental monitoring plan (EMP) is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with DOE operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from DOE activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of the DOE activity. In addition, the EMP addresses the analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality; (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of radionuclide samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work; and (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. Until recently, environmental monitoring at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was required by DOE Order 5400.1, which was canceled in January 2003. LLNL is in the process of adopting the ISO 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, which contains requirements to perform and document environmental monitoring. The ISO 14001 standard is not as prescriptive as DOE Order 5400.1, which expressly required an EMP. LLNL will continue to prepare the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that the work is conducted appropriately. The environmental monitoring addressed by the plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, and effluent and surveillance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of the compliance with the

  14. Monitoring Cray Cooling Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, Don E [ORNL; Ezell, Matthew A [ORNL; Becklehimer, Jeff [Cray, Inc.; Donovan, Matthew J [ORNL; Layton, Christopher C [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    While sites generally have systems in place to monitor the health of Cray computers themselves, often the cooling systems are ignored until a computer failure requires investigation into the source of the failure. The Liebert XDP units used to cool the Cray XE/XK models as well as the Cray proprietary cooling system used for the Cray XC30 models provide data useful for health monitoring. Unfortunately, this valuable information is often available only to custom solutions not accessible by a center-wide monitoring system or is simply ignored entirely. In this paper, methods and tools used to harvest the monitoring data available are discussed, and the implementation needed to integrate the data into a center-wide monitoring system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is provided.

  15. Hepatitis A in Puglia (South Italy after 10 years of universal vaccination: need for strict monitoring and catch-up vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chironna Maria

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Raw seafood consumption was identified as the major risk factor for hepatitis A during the large epidemic of 1996 and 1997 in Puglia (South Italy. In Puglia, vaccination for toddlers and preadolescents has been recommended since 1998. The aim of the study was to evaluate the incidence, seroprevalence, molecular epidemiology, and environmental circulation of hepatitis A virus (HAV in Puglia more than ten years after the introduction of anti-HAV vaccination in the regional immunization program. Methods Data on the incidence of acute hepatitis A in Puglia were analyzed. Characteristics and risk factors of 97 acute hepatitis A cases occurring in 2008–2009 were analyzed. Serum samples from 868 individuals aged 0 to 40 years were tested for anti-HAV antibodies. Fecal samples from 49 hepatitis A cases were analyzed by sequence analysis in the VP1/P2A region. In 2008, 203 mussel samples and 202 water samples from artesian wells were tested for HAV-RNA. Results Between 1998 and 2009, the incidence of acute hepatitis A declined from 14.8 to 0.8 per 100,000. The most frequent risk factors reported by cases in 2008–2009 were shellfish consumption (85% and travel outside of Puglia or Italy (26%. Seroepidemiologic survey revealed high susceptibility to HAV in children and adults up to age 30 (65%-70%. None of the mussel or water samples were HAV-positive. Phylogenetic analysis revealed co-circulation of subtypes IA (74% and IB (26% and clustering of strains with strains from Germany and France, and those previously circulating in Puglia. Conclusion Vaccination and improved sanitation reduced the incidence of hepatitis A. Strict monitoring and improved vaccination coverage are needed to prevent disease resurgence.

  16. 42 CFR 495.316 - State monitoring and reporting regarding activities required to receive an incentive payment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) Provider adoption, implementation, or upgrade of certified EHR technology activities and payments; and (2... upgraded certified EHR technology. (ii) Aggregated data tables representing the provider adoption... STANDARDS FOR THE ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORD TECHNOLOGY INCENTIVE PROGRAM Requirements Specific to...

  17. Cognitive coping style (monitoring and blunting) and the need for information, information satisfaction and shared decision making among patients with haematological malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rood, J.A.J.; van Zuuren, F.J.; Stam, F.; van der Ploeg, T.; Huijgens, P.C.; Verdonck-de Leeuw, I.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: A haematological malignancy is a serious, life-altering disease and may be characterised as an uncontrollable and unpredictable stress situation. In dealing with potentially threatening information, individuals generally utilise two main cognitive coping styles: monitoring (the tendency

  18. 40 CFR 60.4345 - What are the requirements for the continuous emission monitoring system equipment, if I choose to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... choose to use this option? If the option to use a NOX CEMS is chosen: (a) Each NOX diluent CEMS must be..., Procedure 1 in appendix F to this part is not required. Alternatively, a NOX diluent CEMS that is installed... subpart. The relative accuracy test audit (RATA) of the CEMS shall be performed on a lb/MMBtu basis....

  19. Analysis of polymer molecules including reaction monitoring and control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoenmakers, P.; van Herk, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    To monitor, control, and optimize emulsion polymerisations, there is a need to perform a variety of different measurements. The monomer conversion is a key parameter to monitor and control the reaction. A rapid response is required for real-time reaction monitoring. This chapter considers on-line an

  20. Around-the-clock ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is required to properly diagnose resistant hypertension and assess associated vascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermida, Ramón C; Ayala, Diana E; Ríos, María T; Fernández, José R; Mojón, Artemio; Smolensky, Michael H

    2014-07-01

    Diagnosis of resistant hypertension (RH) is currently based upon awake-time office blood pressure (BP). An increasing number of studies have documented abnormally elevated sleep-time BP in most RH patients, indicating that diagnosis of true RH cannot be determined solely by comparison of office BP with either patient awake-time BP self-measurements or awake-BP mean from ambulatory monitoring (ABPM), as is customary in the published literature. Moreover, the ABPM-determined sleep-time BP mean is an independent and stronger predictor of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease (CVD) risk than either daytime office/ABPM-derived awake or 24-hour means. Results of the recently completed MAPEC (Monitorización Ambulatoria para Predicción de Eventos Cardiovasculares) prospective outcomes study, which included a large cohort of RH patients, established that time of treatment relative to circadian rhythms constituted a critically important yet often neglected variable with respect to BP control. The study found that bedtime versus morning ingestion of the full dose of ≥1 BP-lowering medications resulted in both better therapeutic normalization of sleep-time BP and reduced CVD morbidity and mortality, including in RH patients. Accordingly, ABPM is highly recommended to properly diagnose and manage true RH, with a bedtime hypertension medication regimen as the therapeutic scheme of choice.

  1. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the fast flux test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickels, J M; Dahl, N R

    1992-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in US Department of Energy Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could affect employee or public safety or the environment. A Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determination was performed during calendar year 1991 and the evaluation requires the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements.

  2. Need for liquid-crystal display monitors having the capability of rendering higher than 8 bits in display-bit depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiwasa, Takeshi; Morishita, Junji; Hatanaka, Shiro; Ohki, Masafumi; Toyofuku, Fukai; Higashida, Yoshiharu

    2009-01-01

    Our purpose in this study was to examine the potential usefulness of liquid-crystal display (LCD) monitors having the capability of rendering higher than 8 bits in display-bit depth. An LCD monitor having the capability of rendering 8, 10, and 12 bits was used. It was calibrated to the grayscale standard display function with a maximum luminance of 450 cd/m(2) and a minimum of 0.75 cd/m(2). For examining the grayscale resolution reported by ten observers, various simple test patterns having two different combinations of luminance in 8, 10, and 12 bits were randomly displayed on the LCD monitor. These patterns were placed on different uniform background luminance levels, such as 0, 50, and 100%, for maximum luminance. All observers participating in this study distinguished a smaller difference in luminance than one gray level in 8 bits irrespective of background luminance levels. As a result of the adaptation processes of the human visual system, observers distinguished a smaller difference in luminance as the luminance level of the test pattern was closer to the background. The smallest difference in luminance that observers distinguished was four gray levels in 12 bits, i.e., one gray level in 10 bits. Considering the results obtained by use of simple test patterns, medical images should ideally be displayed on LCD monitors having 10 bits or greater so that low-contrast objects with small differences in luminance can be detected and for providing a smooth gradation of grayscale.

  3. Monitoring Hadoop

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Gurmukh

    2015-01-01

    This book is useful for Hadoop administrators who need to learn how to monitor and diagnose their clusters. Also, the book will prove useful for new users of the technology, as the language used is simple and easy to grasp.

  4. The current state of engineered nanomaterials in consumer goods and waste streams: the need to develop nanoproperty-quantifiable sensors for monitoring engineered nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Wise K; Brasuel M

    2011-01-01

    Kelsey Wise, Murphy BrasuelDepartment of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Colorado College, Colorado Springs, CO, USAAbstract: As nanomaterials are harnessed for medicine and other technological advances, an understanding of the toxicology of these new materials is required to inform our use. This toxicological knowledge will be required to establish the medical and environmental regulations required to protect consumers and those involved in nanomaterial manufacturing. Nanoparticles of titanium o...

  5. Natural resource inventory and monitoring for Ulaan Taiga Specially Protected Areas—An assessment of needs and opportunities in northern Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Peggy E.; Meyer, Joseph B.; Chow, Leslie S.

    2017-03-10

    Between 1997 and 2011, Mongolia established three specially protected areas in the north-central part of the country to protect various high-value resources. These areas are jointly referred to as the Ulaan Taiga Specially Protected Areas. In accordance with the goals of the draft general management plan, this report identifies options for initiating an inventory and monitoring program for the three protected areas. Together, the three areas comprise over 1.5 million hectares of mountainous terrain west of Lake Hovsgol and bordering the Darkhad Valley. The area supports numerous rare ungulates, endangered fish, and over 40 species of threatened plants. Illegal mining, illegal logging, and poaching pose the most immediate threats to resources. As a first step, a review of published literature would inform natural resource management at the Ulaan Taiga Specially Protected Areas because it would inform other inventories.Vegetation classification and mapping also would inform other inventory efforts because the process incorporates geographic analysis to identify environmental gradients, fine-scale sampling that captures species composition and structure, and landscape-scale results that represent the variety and extent of habitats for various organisms. Mapping using satellite imagery reduces the cost per hectare.Following a determination of existing knowledge, field surveys of vertebrates and vascular plants would serve to build species lists and fill in gaps in existing knowledge. For abiotic resources, a focus on monitoring air quality, evaluating and monitoring water quality, and assembling and storing weather data would provide information for correlating resource response status with changing environmental conditions.Finally, we identify datasets that, if incorporated into a geographic information system, would inform resource management. They include political boundaries, infrastructure, topography, surficial geology, hydrology, fire history, and soils.In terms

  6. Unmet Needs of Children with Special Health Care Needs in a Specialized Day School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruda, Mary M.; Kelly, Mary; Newinsky, Karina

    2011-01-01

    Children with Special Health Care Needs (CSHCN) represent a significant component of the pediatric population. They often present to schools with multiple and increasingly complex health issues, including medical technology dependency. Their daily variation in health status requires close monitoring and communication among caregivers. Limited…

  7. Establishing Bedding Requirements during Transport and Monitoring Skin Temperature during Cold and Mild Seasons after Transport for Finishing Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John McGlone

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The broad aim of this study was to determine whether bedding level in the transport trailer influenced pig performance and welfare. Specifically, the objective was to define the bedding requirements of pigs during transportation in commercial settings during cold and mild weather. Animals (n = 112,078 pigs on 572 trailers used were raised in commercial finishing sites and transported in trailers to commercial processing plants. Dead on arrival (DOA, non-ambulatory (NA, and total dead and down (D&D data were collected and skin surface temperatures of the pigs were measured by infrared thermography. Data were collected during winter (Experiment 1 and fall/spring (Experiment 2. Total D&D percent showed no interaction between bedding level and outside air temperature in any experiments. Average skin surface temperature during unloading increased with outside air temperature linearly in both experiments (P < 0.01. In conclusion, over-use of bedding may be economically inefficient. Pig skin surface temperature could be a useful measure of pig welfare during or after transport.

  8. Need of a disaster alert system for India through a network of real-time monitoring of sea-level and other meteorological events

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A.; Desai, R.G.P.

    Need of a disaster alert system (DAS) capable of online transmission of real-time integrated sea-level and surface meteorological data is discussed. In addition to INSAT platform transmit terminal, VHF, etc., the ubiquitous cellular phone network...

  9. Ethernet Flow Monitoring with IPFIX

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstede, R.J.; Drago, Idilio; Sperotto, Anna; Pras, Aiko

    The increasing amount of network traffic and the huge bandwidth needed to carry it requires managers to use scalable solutions to monitor their networks. Nowadays, flow-based techniques, such as Cisco’s NetFlow, provide aggregated network data and an overview of network activity at the IP layer.

  10. Ethernet Flow Monitoring with IPFIX

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstede, Rick; Drago, Idilio; Sperotto, Anna; Pras, Aiko

    2011-01-01

    The increasing amount of network traffic and the huge bandwidth needed to carry it requires managers to use scalable solutions to monitor their networks. Nowadays, flow-based techniques, such as Cisco’s NetFlow, provide aggregated network data and an overview of network activity at the IP layer. How

  11. Requirements for an Advanced Low Earth Orbit (LEO) Sounder (ALS) for Improved Regional Weather Prediction and Monitoring of Greenhouse Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Chahine, Moustafa T.; Susskind, Joel

    2008-01-01

    Hyperspectral infrared atmospheric sounders (e.g., the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on Aqua and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on Met Op) provide highly accurate temperature and water vapor profiles in the lower to upper troposphere. These systems are vital operational components of our National Weather Prediction system and the AIRS has demonstrated over 6 hrs of forecast improvement on the 5 day operational forecast. Despite the success in the mid troposphere to lower stratosphere, a reduction in sensitivity and accuracy has been seen in these systems in the boundary layer over land. In this paper we demonstrate the potential improvement associated with higher spatial resolution (1 km vs currently 13.5 km) on the accuracy of boundary layer products with an added consequence of higher yield of cloud free scenes. This latter feature is related to the number of samples that can be assimilated and has also shown to have a significant impact on improving forecast accuracy. We also present a set of frequencies and resolutions that will improve vertical resolution of temperature and water vapor and trace gas species throughout the atmosphere. Development of an Advanced Low Earth Orbit (LEO) Sounder (ALS) with these improvements will improve weather forecast at the regional scale and of tropical storms and hurricanes. Improvements are also expected in the accuracy of the water vapor and cloud properties products, enhancing process studies and providing a better match to the resolution of future climate models. The improvements of technology required for the ALS are consistent with the current state of technology as demonstrated in NASA Instrument Incubator Program and NOAA's Hyperspectral Environmental Suite (HES) formulation phase development programs.

  12. Requirements for an Advanced Low Earth Orbit (LEO) Sounder (ALS) for improved regional weather prediction and monitoring of greenhouse gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Chahine, Moustafa T.; Susskind, Joel

    2008-12-01

    Hyperspectral infrared atmospheric sounders (e.g. the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on Aqua and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on MetOp) provide highly accurate temperature and water vapor profiles in the lower to upper troposphere. These systems are vital operational components of our National Weather Prediction system and the AIRS has demonstrated over 6 hrs of forecast improvement on the 5 day operational forecast1. Despite the success in the mid troposphere to lower stratosphere, a reduction in sensitivity and accuracy has been seen in these systems in the boundary layer over land. In this paper we demonstrate the potential improvement associated with higher spatial resolution (1km vs currently 13.5 km) on the accuracy of boundary layer products with an added consequence of higher yield of cloud free scenes. This latter feature is related to the number of samples that can be assimilated and has also shown to have a significant impact on improving forecast accuracy. We also present a set of frequencies and resolutions that will improve vertical resolution of temperature and water vapor and trace gas species throughout the atmosphere. Development of an Advanced Low Earth Orbit (LEO) Sounder (ALS) with these improvements will improve weather forecast at the regional scale and of tropical storms and hurricanes. Improvements are also expected in the accuracy of the water vapor and cloud properties products, enhancing process studies and providing a better match to the resolution of future climate models. The improvements of technology required for the ALS are consistent with the current state of technology as demonstrated in NASA Instrument Incubator Program and NOAA's Hyperspectral Environmental Suite (HES) formulation phase development programs.

  13. Monitoring madness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankinship, S.

    2006-01-15

    High quality continuous emission monitoring capability can be as essential as high quality emission control equipment. Future mercury monitoring and control requirements add to the justification for better CEMS. The article discusses two prominent mercury measurement methods - the cold vapour atomic absorptive spectrometer (CVAAs) and the atomic absorptive spectrometer (AFS). It stresses the importance of maintaining a CEMS. 1 photo.

  14. An Assessment of Environmental Health Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macatangay, Ariel V.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental health fundamentally addresses the physical, chemical, and biological risks external to the human body that can impact the health of a person by assessing and controlling these risks in order to generate and maintain a health-supportive environment. In manned spacecraft, environmental health risks are mitigated by a multi-disciplinary effort, employing several measures including active and passive controls, by establishing environmental standards (SMACs, SWEGs, microbial and acoustics limits), and through environmental monitoring. Human Health and Performance (HHP) scientists and Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) engineers consider environmental monitoring a vital component to an environmental health management strategy for maintaining a healthy crew and achieving mission success. ECLS engineers use environmental monitoring data to monitor and confirm the health of ECLS systems, whereas HHP scientists use the data to manage the health of the human system. Because risks can vary between missions and change over time, environmental monitoring is critical. Crew health risks associated with the environment were reviewed by agency experts with the goal of determining risk-based environmental monitoring needs for future NASA manned missions. Once determined, gaps in environmental health knowledge and technology, required to address those risks, were identified for various types of exploration missions. This agency-wide assessment of environmental health needs will help guide the activities/hardware development efforts to close those gaps and advance the knowledge required to meet NASA manned space exploration objectives. Details of the roadmap development and findings are presented in this paper.

  15. State policies and requirements for management of uranium mining and milling in New Mexico. Volume V. State policy needs for community impact assistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandevender, S.G.

    1980-04-01

    The report contained in this volume describes a program for management of the community impacts resulting from the growth of uranium mining and milling in New Mexico. The report, submitted to Sandia Laboratories by the New Mexico Department of Energy and Minerals, is reproduced without modification. The state recommends that federal funding and assistance be provided to implement a growth management program comprised of these seven components: (1) an early warning system, (2) a community planning and technical assistance capability, (3) flexible financing, (4) a growth monitoring system, (5) manpower training, (6) economic diversification planning, and (7) new technology testing.

  16. A review of nuclear data needs and their status for fusion reactor technology with some suggestions on a strategy to satisfy the requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Cheng, E.T. [TSI Research, Inc., Solana Beach, CA (United States)

    1991-09-01

    A review was performed on the needs and status of nuclear data for fusion-reactor technology. Generally, the status of nuclear data for fusion has been improved during the past two decades due to the dedicated effort of the nuclear data developers. However, there are still deficiencies in the nuclear data base, particularly in the areas of activation and neutron scattering cross sections. Activation cross sections were found to be unsatisfactory in 83 of the 153 reactions reviewed. The scattering cross sections for fluorine and boron will need to be improved at energies above 1 MeV. Suggestions concerning a strategy to address the specific fusion nuclear data needs for dosimetry and activation are also provided.

  17. Do Inclusion Practices for Pupils with Special Educational Needs in the English as a Foreign Language Class in Israel Reflect Inclusion Laws and Language Policy Requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russak, Susie

    2016-01-01

    The study of additional languages is mandatory for all pupils in most European countries. Usually, the first foreign language is English. This is due to the status of English as a global language. According to inclusion laws, pupils with special educational needs (SEN) should be taught in regular classes with support services by teachers with…

  18. Do Inclusion Practices for Pupils with Special Educational Needs in the English as a Foreign Language Class in Israel Reflect Inclusion Laws and Language Policy Requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russak, Susie

    2016-01-01

    The study of additional languages is mandatory for all pupils in most European countries. Usually, the first foreign language is English. This is due to the status of English as a global language. According to inclusion laws, pupils with special educational needs (SEN) should be taught in regular classes with support services by teachers with…

  19. Study Water Availability of Malino River to Meet the Need of Water Requirement in District Ongka Malino, Central Sulawesi of Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Wayan Sutapa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Global climate change is marked by changes in weather patterns and climate patterns result in increased or reduced rainfall in some areas. Decreased rainfall as input variables watershed due to irregularities global climate will affect the flow of the river, both annual river flow and seasonal dynamics. One of the basic human needs are affected by global warming is the water. The importance of adequate water supply for the community public hearings mandated by the declaration of the United Nations in 2000 which set the year 2015 as the horizon for achieving the Millennium Development Goal's (MDG’s. This is confirmed again at the Earth Summit in Johannesburg in September 2002 on the preparation of programs and strategies in 2015 for water supply and sanitation. In this study, the availability of water is analyzed by the FJ. Mock model and water needs were analyzed based on the guidelines for water needs. The analysis showed that there is excess water in January and May to August and the lack of water in the Month of February and the month of September to December. To overcome the shortage of water is necessary to change the cropping pattern and prioritize water for the needs of the population and livestock.

  20. Smart Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel - Integrated Structural Health Monitoring System to Meet Space Exploration and International Space Station Mission Assurance Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulsberry, Regor; Nichols, Charles; Waller, Jess

    2012-01-01

    Currently there are no integrated NDE methods for baselining and monitoring defect levels in fleet for Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) or related fracture critical composites, or for performing life-cycle maintenance inspections either in a traditional remove-and-inspect mode or in a more modern in situ inspection structural health monitoring (SHM) mode. Implicit in SHM and autonomous inspection is the existence of quantitative accept-reject criteria. To be effective, these criteria must correlate with levels of damage known to cause composite failure. Furthermore, implicit in SHM is the existence of effective remote sensing hardware and automated techniques and algorithms for interpretation of SHM data. SHM of facture critical composite structures, especially high pressure COPVs, is critical to the success of nearly every future NASA space exploration program as well as life extension of the International Space Station. It has been clearly stated that future NASA missions may not be successful without SHM [1]. Otherwise, crews will be busy addressing subsystem health issues and not focusing on the real NASA mission

  1. Radiation detectors: needs and prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armantrout, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    Important applications for x- and ..gamma..-ray spectroscopy are found in prospecting, materials characterization, environmental monitoring, the life sciences, and nuclear physics. The specific requirements vary for each application with varying degrees of emphasis on either spectrometer resolution, detection efficiency, or both. Since no one spectrometer is ideally suited to this wide range of needs, compromises are usually required. Gas and scintillation spectrometers have reached a level of maturity, and recent interest has concentrated on semiconductor spectrometers. Germanium detectors are showing continuing refinement and are the spectrometers of choice for high resolution applications. The new high-Z semiconductors, such as CdTe and HgI/sub 2/, have shown steady improvement but are limited in both resolution and size and will likely be used only in applications which require their unique properties.

  2. The current state of engineered nanomaterials in consumer goods and waste streams: the need to develop nanoproperty-quantifiable sensors for monitoring engineered nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Kelsey; Brasuel, Murphy

    2011-07-01

    As nanomaterials are harnessed for medicine and other technological advances, an understanding of the toxicology of these new materials is required to inform our use. This toxicological knowledge will be required to establish the medical and environmental regulations required to protect consumers and those involved in nanomaterial manufacturing. Nanoparticles of titanium oxide, carbon nanotubes, semiconductor quantum dots, gold, and silver represent a high percentage of the nanotechnology currently available or currently poised to reach consumers. For these nanoparticles, this review aims to identify current applications, the current methods used for characterization and quantification, current environmental concentrations (if known), and an introduction to the toxicology research. Continued development of analytical tools for the characterization and quantification of nanomaterials in complex environmental and biological samples will be required for our understanding of the toxicology and environmental impact of nanomaterials. Nearly all materials exhibit toxicity at a high enough concentration. Robust, rapid, and cost effective analytical techniques will be required to determine current background levels of anthropogenic, accidental, and engineered nanoparticles in air, water, and soil. The impact of the growing number of engineered nanoparticles used in consumer goods and medical applications can then be estimated. This will allow toxicological profiles relevant to the demonstrated or predicted environmental concentrations to be determined.

  3. The current state of engineered nanomaterials in consumer goods and waste streams: the need to develop nanoproperty-quantifiable sensors for monitoring engineered nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wise K

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Kelsey Wise, Murphy BrasuelDepartment of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Colorado College, Colorado Springs, CO, USAAbstract: As nanomaterials are harnessed for medicine and other technological advances, an understanding of the toxicology of these new materials is required to inform our use. This toxicological knowledge will be required to establish the medical and environmental regulations required to protect consumers and those involved in nanomaterial manufacturing. Nanoparticles of titanium oxide, carbon nanotubes, semiconductor quantum dots, gold, and silver represent a high percentage of the nanotechnology currently available or currently poised to reach consumers. For these nanoparticles, this review aims to identify current applications, the current methods used for characterization and quantification, current environmental concentrations (if known, and an introduction to the toxicology research. Continued development of analytical tools for the characterization and quantification of nanomaterials in complex environmental and biological samples will be required for our understanding of the toxicology and environmental impact of nanomaterials. Nearly all materials exhibit toxicity at a high enough concentration. Robust, rapid, and cost effective analytical techniques will be required to determine current background levels of anthropogenic, accidental, and engineered nanoparticles in air, water, and soil. The impact of the growing number of engineered nanoparticles used in consumer goods and medical applications can then be estimated. This will allow toxicological profiles relevant to the demonstrated or predicted environmental concentrations to be determined.Keywords: titanium dioxide nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, semiconductor quantum dots, gold nanoparticles, silver nanoparticles, nanoparticles environmental concentrations

  4. Defense Headquarters: DOD Needs to Reassess Personnel Requirements for the Office of Secretary of Defense, Joint Staff, and Military Service Secretariats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    requirements as part of the effort to identify efficiencies as directed by former Secretary of Defense Robert Gates in 2010, as part of the OSD...Director), Tracy Barnes, Gabrielle A. Carrington, Neil Feldman , David Keefer, Carol D. Petersen, Bethann E. Ritter Snyder, Michael Silver, Amie Steele

  5. Science Information Requirements of Scientists: The Need for a Scientific Request Receiver and Processor in an Information Clearinghouse, Technical Report 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinkade, Robert G.; And Others

    Determined were the functional design requirements of two components of an information system, the request-receiver and request-processor. The participants were 46 university biological scientists in the Washington, D.C. area who agreed to place requests by telephone with a specially established clearinghouse. A trained, experienced biological…

  6. Additional requirements for charitable hospitals; community health needs assessments for charitable hospitals; requirement of a section 4959 excise tax return and time for filing the return. Final regulations and removal of temporary regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-31

    This document contains final regulations that provide guidance regarding the requirements for charitable hospital organizations added by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010. The regulations will affect charitable hospital organizations

  7. New guidelines are needed to manage heat stress in elite sports--The Fédération Internationale de Volleyball (FIVB) Heat Stress Monitoring Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Roald; Reeser, Jonathan C

    2012-09-01

    There seems to be a discrepancy between the available heat stress guidelines and the actual risk of heat-related illness among professional beach volleyball players competing under hot and humid conditions. To monitor heat stress and record cases of heat-related medical forfeits on the Swatch FIVB Beach Volleyball World Tour. The FIVB Heat Stress Monitoring Protocol covered events on the FIVB Beach Volleyball World Tour and FIVB Beach Volleyball World Championships during the 2009, 2010 and 2011 seasons (51 events, most of these double gender). The protocol consisted of (1) measuring the Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) on centre court prior to the start of every match, and (2) recording any heat-related medical forfeits during the tournament. Data were collected during 48 of 51 events. There were nine events where the peak WBGT exceeded the US Navy Black flag conditions of >32.3°C and an additional two events where the peak WBGT exceeded 31°C, (meeting Red flag conditions.) In two events, the average WBGT equalled at least 31°C. One case of a medical forfeit related to heat stress was recorded over the 3-year surveillance period: an athlete whose fluid balance was compromised from a 3-day bout of acute gastroenteritis. The incidence of significant heat illness among athletes competing on the FIVB Beach Volleyball World Tour appears to be quite low, even though weather conditions frequently result in a WBGT index >32°C. Currently available guidelines appear to be inadequate to fully assess the risk of heat stress and too conservative to inform safety decisions in professional beach volleyball.

  8. Special needs require special attention: a pilot project implementing the paediatric pain profile for children with profound neurological impairment in an in-patient setting following surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Katie A; Franck, Linda S

    2011-09-01

    There is a lack of knowledge regarding the implementation of pain assessment tools for children with profound neurological impairment (PNI) in in-patient settings. This article describes a pilot project to evaluate the Paediatric Pain Profile (PPP) for children with PNI undergoing surgery. Five families of children 5 to 16 years of age with a primary diagnosis of cerebral palsy and admitted for surgical procedures were interviewed. Nineteen nurses completed questionnaires and children's pain management documentation was audited. The project identified issues in three areas of pain management: implementation process, individualised pain management and partnership. The PPP required pre-admission assessment and parental involvement, and was considered time-consuming by nurses. Individualised pain assessment and intervention was difficult to achieve, as was shared assessment and documentation among parents and nurses. Despite initial resistance to change, with greater use there was growing appreciation of the value of components of the PPP. Further exploration of the PPP tool in practice is required before its use can be widely recommended for children with PNI in in-patient settings. Future studies are required to determine which of the available pain assessment tools has the greatest accuracy and utility for assessment of post-operative pain in children with PNI.

  9. Example of the application of the PERSONA methodology in the definition of needs and requirements for the WeTakeCare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbera-Guillem, Ricard; Poveda-Puente, Rakel; Neumann, Silke; Becker, Heidrun; Ramírez, Miguel; Wienholtz, Arno; Schaedler, Inge

    2015-01-01

    In user-centred design and marketing, personas are fictional characters created to represent the different user types that might use a site, brand, or product in a similar way [1]. As in other projects, the main application and use value of the persona approach in WeTakeCare project has been to depict and thus make "vivid" the characters and the milieus created and selected. It has helped to better understand and communicate the differences among the potential users. It has also helped to understand the heterogeneity and diversity of the users' lives and to focus on how to meet their actual needs [2].

  10. Projected Cropping Patterns, Livestock Enterprises, Processing Activities, Capital Requirements, Employment, Income, and Training Needs for Alternative Farm Organizational Structures for the Navajo Indian Irrigation Project. A Special Report to the Four Corners Regional Commission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, William D.; And Others

    Information on the expected cropping patterns, livestock enterprises, processing and related activities, income and employment opportunities, capital needs, and training requirements for alternative farm organizational structures that could be selected for development of the Navajo Indian Irrigation Project is presented in this report. The major…

  11. Needs analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄静雅

    2009-01-01

    Though needs analysis has been seen as one of the fundamental defining characteristics of ESP,it is not unknown in GPE.it is a salient stage,especially for the task option and syllabus evaluation.In this essay,the meaning of needs,the importance of needs analysis,and the way to implement needs analysis are subject to analysis.

  12. Remote monitoring of pipeline operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bost, R.C. [ERM-Southwest, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); White, D. [Glenrose Systems, Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The demands for monitoring of pipeline operations have recently increased greatly due to new regulatory requirements. Most companies rely upon conventional System Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system architecture to meet their needs. Current systems are often plagued by limited data conversion and processing capacity at the workstations. A state-of-the-art Data Acquisition Node (DAN) that relieves the workstation of much of its workload is described in this paper. Use of this DAN may eliminate the need for installing completely new systems. It facilitates marrying foreign devices to existing operation monitoring systems to satisfy new regulatory requirements. The DAN allows a system to utilize commercial communications satellites or other communication networks and real-time, object oriented programming and different devices and data requirements without the necessity of custom software development.

  13. Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Nevada

    1999-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy manages the Nevada Test Site in a manner that meets evolving DOE Missions and responds to the concerns of affected and interested individuals and agencies. This Routine Radiological Monitoring Plan addressess complicance with DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 and other drivers requiring routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance on the Nevada Test Site. This monitoring plan, prepared in 1998, addresses the activities conducted onsite NTS under the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision. This radiological monitoring plan, prepared on behalf of the Nevada Test Site Landlord, brings together sitewide environmental surveillance; site-specific effluent monitoring; and operational monitoring conducted by various missions, programs, and projects on the NTS. The plan provides an approach to identifying and conducting routine radiological monitoring at the NTS, based on integrated technical, scientific, and regulatory complicance data needs.

  14. Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallegos, G M; Bertoldo, N A; Blake, R G; Campbell, C G; Grayson, A R; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Rosene, C A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K R; Jones, H E

    2012-03-02

    The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. Specifically, environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring is also a major component of compliance demonstration for permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality; (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work; and (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. LLNL prepares the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that environmental monitoring work, which is integral to the implementation of LLNL's Environmental Management System, is conducted appropriately. Furthermore, the Environmental Monitoring Plan helps LLNL ensure compliance with DOE Order 231.1 Change 2, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting

  15. Priority knowledge needs. Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    This report gives an overview of the knowledge needs identified during the work on the scientific basis for the management plan. The overview includes knowledge needs identified in: the impact assessments for various sectors; the reports on the vulnerability of particularly valuable areas; proposed indicators for a monitoring system; cumulative environmental effects; conflicting interests and the need for coordination; and the report on analysis of population and, economic activity and ecosystem services. In addition, the working group has identified several additional knowledge needs. The present report summarises the 2010 status report and describes new developments since its publication.(Author)

  16. User requirements and user acceptance of current and next-generation satellite mission and sensor complement, oriented toward the monitoring of water resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castruccio, P. A.; Loats, H. L., Jr.; Fowler, T. R.; Robinson, P.

    1975-01-01

    Principal water resources users were surveyed to determine the applicability of remotely sensed data to their present and future requirements. Analysis of responses was used to assess the levels of adequacy of LANDSAT 1 and 2 in fulfilling hydrological functions, and to derive systems specifications for future water resources-oriented remote sensing satellite systems. The analysis indicates that water resources applications for all but the very large users require: (1) resolutions on the order of 15 meters, (2) a number of radiometric levels of the same order as currently used in LANDSAT 1 (64), (3) a number of spectral bands not in excess of those used in LANDSAT 1, and (4) a repetition frequency on the order of 2 weeks. The users had little feel for the value of new sensors (thermal IR, passive and active microwaves). What is needed in this area is to achieve specific demonstrations of the utility of these sensors and submit the results to the users to evince their judgement.

  17. Structural health monitoring with a wireless vibration sensor network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basten, T.G.H.; Sas, P; Schiphorst, F.B.A.; Jonckheere, S.; Moens, D.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced maintenance strategies for infrastructure assets such as bridges or off shore wind turbines require actual and reliable information of the maintenance status. Structural health monitoring based on vibration sensing can help in supplying the input needed for structural health monitoring appl

  18. Structural health monitoring with a wireless vibration sensor network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basten, T.G.H.; Sas, P; Schiphorst, F.B.A.; Jonckheere, S.; Moens, D.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced maintenance strategies for infrastructure assets such as bridges or off shore wind turbines require actual and reliable information of the maintenance status. Structural health monitoring based on vibration sensing can help in supplying the input needed for structural health monitoring

  19. Structural health monitoring with a wireless vibration sensor network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basten, T.G.H.; Schiphorst, F.B.A.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced maintenance strategies for infrastructure assets such as bridges or off shore wind turbines require actual and reliable information of the maintenance status. Structural health monitoring based on vibration sensing can help in supplying the input needed for structural health monitoring appl

  20. UWB Radar for health monitoring applications

    OpenAIRE

    Trullenque Ortiz, Martín

    2016-01-01

    There is a need for non-invasive monitoring system of key cardio-pulmonary functions and other internal structures. UWB radar offers advantages for health monitoring applications: - Skin contact not required - Works through clothing and skin - Extremely high-resolution UWB able to detect sub-mm movement of internal structures - Insensitive to environmental conditions - Low-power transceivers are relatively inexpensive and easily miniaturized - Enables a new class of wearable/wireless health m...

  1. Biological Monitoring Team

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Biological Monitoring Team (BMT) was a pilot project focused on addressing NWRS inventory and monitoring needs in Regions 3 and 5. The BMT was a precursor to the...

  2. Recombination monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S. Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blaskiewicz, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-02-03

    This is a brief report on LEReC recombination monitor design considerations. The recombination produced Au78+ ion rate is reviewed. Based on this two designs are discussed. One is to use the large dispersion lattice. It is shown that even with the large separation of the Au78+ beam from the Au79+ beam, the continued monitoring of the recombination is not possible. Accumulation of Au78+ ions is needed, plus collimation of the Au79+ beam. In another design, it is shown that the recombination monitor can be built based on the proposed scheme with the nominal lattice. From machine operation point of view, this design is preferable. Finally, possible studies and the alternative strategies with the basic goal of the monitor are discussed.

  3. Nutritional Requirements for Children with Special Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Michael; Drucker, Richard

    2008-01-01

    In the last few decades, there has been an alarming and disturbing increase in infant and childhood behavioral and physiologic disorders. These include, but are not limited to, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), dyslexia, dyspraxia, autism, cerebral palsy, mental retardation, and Down syndrome to name just a few. The society has…

  4. Nutritional Requirements for Children with Special Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Michael; Drucker, Richard

    2008-01-01

    In the last few decades, there has been an alarming and disturbing increase in infant and childhood behavioral and physiologic disorders. These include, but are not limited to, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), dyslexia, dyspraxia, autism, cerebral palsy, mental retardation, and Down syndrome to name just a few. The society has…

  5. Northern pipelines : challenges and needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dean, D.; Brownie, D. [ProLog Canada Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada); Fafara, R. [TransCanada PipeLines Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    Working Group 10 presented experiences acquired from the operation of pipeline systems in a northern environment. There are currently 3 pipelines operating north of 60, notably the Shiha gas pipeline near Fort Liard, the Ikhil gas pipeline in Inuvik and the Norman Wells oil pipeline. Each has its unique commissioning, operating and maintenance challenges, as well as specific training and logistical support requirements for the use of in-line inspection tools and other forms of integrity assessment. The effectiveness of cathodic protection systems in a permafrost northern environment was also discussed. It was noted that the delay of the Mackenzie Gas Pipeline Project by two to three years due to joint regulatory review may lead to resource constraints for the project as well as competition for already scarce human resources. The issue of a potential timing conflict with the Alaskan Pipeline Project was also addressed as well as land use issues for routing of supply roads. Integrity monitoring and assessment issues were outlined with reference to pipe soil interaction monitoring in discontinuous permafrost; south facing denuded slope stability; base lining projects; and reclamation issues. It was noted that automatic welding and inspection will increase productivity, while reducing the need for manual labour. In response to anticipated training needs, companies are planning to involve and train Aboriginal labour and will provide camp living conditions that will attract labour. tabs., figs.

  6. Interactive Execution Monitoring of Agent Teams

    CERN Document Server

    Berry, P; Wilkins, D E; 10.1613/jair.1112

    2011-01-01

    There is an increasing need for automated support for humans monitoring the activity of distributed teams of cooperating agents, both human and machine. We characterize the domain-independent challenges posed by this problem, and describe how properties of domains influence the challenges and their solutions. We will concentrate on dynamic, data-rich domains where humans are ultimately responsible for team behavior. Thus, the automated aid should interactively support effective and timely decision making by the human. We present a domain-independent categorization of the types of alerts a plan-based monitoring system might issue to a user, where each type generally requires different monitoring techniques. We describe a monitoring framework for integrating many domain-specific and task-specific monitoring techniques and then using the concept of value of an alert to avoid operator overload. We use this framework to describe an execution monitoring approach we have used to implement Execution Assistants (EAs) ...

  7. Biosensors and Automation for Bioprocess Monitoring and Control

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Bioprocess monitoring and control is a complex task that needs rapid and reliable methods which are adaptable to continuous analysis. Process monitoring during fermentation is widely applicable in the field of pharmaceutical, food and beverages and wastewater treatment. The ability to monitor has direct relevance in improving performance, quality, productivity, and yield of the process. In fact, the complexity of the bioprocesses requires almost real time insight into the dynamic process for ...

  8. Monitoring Teams by Overhearing: A Multi-Agent Plan-Recognition Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Kaminka, G A; Tambe, M; 10.1613/jair.970

    2011-01-01

    Recent years are seeing an increasing need for on-line monitoring of teams of cooperating agents, e.g., for visualization, or performance tracking. However, in monitoring deployed teams, we often cannot rely on the agents to always communicate their state to the monitoring system. This paper presents a non-intrusive approach to monitoring by 'overhearing', where the monitored team's state is inferred (via plan-recognition) from team-members' routine communications, exchanged as part of their coordinated task execution, and observed (overheard) by the monitoring system. Key challenges in this approach include the demanding run-time requirements of monitoring, the scarceness of observations (increasing monitoring uncertainty), and the need to scale-up monitoring to address potentially large teams. To address these, we present a set of complementary novel techniques, exploiting knowledge of the social structures and procedures in the monitored team: (i) an efficient probabilistic plan-recognition algorithm, well...

  9. Identification of needs and requirements defined by services subordinated to the Minister of the Interior and Administration in key technology and user interfaces to develop a concept of the Video Signals Integrator (VSI) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowiecka, Danuta; Tyburska, Agata; Struniawski, Jarosław; Jastrzebski, Pawel; Jewartowski, Blazej; Pozniak, Krzysztof; Kasprowicz, Grzegorz; Pastuszak, Grzegorz; Trochimiuk, Maciej; Abramowski, Andrzej; Gaska, Michal; Frasunek, Przemysław; Nalbach-Moszynska, Małgorzata; Brawata, Sebastian; Bubak, Iwona; Gloza, Małgorzata

    2016-09-01

    Preventing and eliminating the risks of terrorist attacks or natural disasters as well as an increase in the security of mass events and critical infrastructure requires the application of modern technologies. Therefore there is a proposal to construct a tool that integrates video signals transmitted by devices that are a part of video monitoring systems functioning in Poland. The article presents selected results of research conducted by the Police Academy in Szczytno under the implemented project for national defense and security on "Video Signals Integrator" Acronym - VSI. Project Leader: Warsaw University of Technology. The consortium: Police Academy in Szczytno, Atende Software Ltd., VORTEX Ltd. No. DOBBio7/ 01/02/2015 funded by the National Centre for Research and Development.

  10. Active Job Monitoring in Pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, Eileen; Fischer, Max; Giffels, Manuel; Jung, Christopher; Petzold, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Recent developments in high energy physics (HEP) including multi-core jobs and multi-core pilots require data centres to gain a deep understanding of the system to monitor, design, and upgrade computing clusters. Networking is a critical component. Especially the increased usage of data federations, for example in diskless computing centres or as a fallback solution, relies on WAN connectivity and availability. The specific demands of different experiments and communities, but also the need for identification of misbehaving batch jobs, requires an active monitoring. Existing monitoring tools are not capable of measuring fine-grained information at batch job level. This complicates network-aware scheduling and optimisations. In addition, pilots add another layer of abstraction. They behave like batch systems themselves by managing and executing payloads of jobs internally. The number of real jobs being executed is unknown, as the original batch system has no access to internal information about the scheduling process inside the pilots. Therefore, the comparability of jobs and pilots for predicting run-time behaviour or network performance cannot be ensured. Hence, identifying the actual payload is important. At the GridKa Tier 1 centre a specific tool is in use that allows the monitoring of network traffic information at batch job level. This contribution presents the current monitoring approach and discusses recent efforts and importance to identify pilots and their substructures inside the batch system. It will also show how to determine monitoring data of specific jobs from identified pilots. Finally, the approach is evaluated.

  11. Accident management information needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, D.J.; Ward, L.W.; Nelson, W.R.; Meyer, O.R. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1990-04-01

    The tables contained in this Appendix A describe the information needs for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) with a large, dry containment. To identify these information needs, the branch points in the safety objective trees were examined to decide what information is necessary to (a) determine the status of the safety functions in the plant, i.e., whether the safety functions are being adequately maintained within predetermined limits, (b) identify plant behavior (mechanisms) or precursors to this behavior which indicate that a challenge to plant safety is occurring or is imminent, and (c) select strategies that will prevent or mitigate this plant behavior and monitor the implementation and effectiveness of these strategies. The information needs for the challenges to the safety functions are not examined since the summation of the information needs for all mechanisms associated with a challenge comprise the information needs for the challenge itself.

  12. Who Needs a Pacemaker?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of portable EKGs are Holter and event monitors . Holter and Event Monitors A Holter monitor records the heart's electrical activity for a ... EKG. An event monitor is similar to a Holter monitor. You wear an event monitor while doing ...

  13. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart G of... - Process Vents-Monitoring, Recordkeeping, and Reporting Requirements for Complying With 98 Weight...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... combustion device other than a flare) (Continued) Scrubber liquid and gas flow rates 1. Continuous records of... data are collected f—PR. Flare Presence of a flame at the pilot light 1. Hourly records of whether the... flare are absent—PR. Recapture devices The appropriate monitoring device identified in table 4 when,...

  14. Technical infrastructure monitoring at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Stowisek, Jan; Suwalska, Anna

    2006-01-01

    The Technical Infrastructure Monitoring system (TIM) is used to monitor and control CERN's technical services from the CERN Control Centre (CCC). The system's primary function is to provide CCC operators with reliable real-time information about the state of the laboratory's extensive and widely distributed technical infrastructure. TIM is also used to monitor all general services required for the operation of CERN's accelerator complex and the experiments. A flexible data acquisition mechanism allows TIM to interface with a wide range of technically diverse installations, using industry standard protocols wherever possible and custom designed solutions where needed. The complexity of the data processing logic, including persistence, logging, alarm handling, command execution and the evaluation of datadriven business rules is encapsulated in the system's business layer. Users benefit from a suite of advanced graphical applications adapted to operations (synoptic views, alarm consoles, data analysis tools etc....

  15. Storage monitoring systems for the year 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsen, C.; Pollock, R.

    1997-12-31

    In September 1993, President Clinton stated the US would ensure that its fissile material meet the highest standards of safety, security, and international accountability. Frequent human inspection of the material could be used to ensure these standards. However, it may be more effective and less expensive to replace these manual inspections with virtual inspections via remote monitoring technologies. To prepare for this future, Sandia National Laboratories has developed several monitoring systems, including the Modular Integrated Monitoring System (MIMS) and Project Straight-Line. The purpose of this paper is to describe a Sandia effort that merges remote monitoring technologies into a comprehensive storage monitoring system that will meet the near-term as well as the long-term requirements for these types of systems. Topics discussed include: motivations for storage monitoring systems to include remote monitoring; an overview of the needs and challenges of providing a storage monitoring system for the year 2000; an overview of how the MIMS and Straight-Line can be enhanced so that together they create an integrated and synergistic information system by the end of 1997; and suggested milestones for 1998 and 1999 to assure steady progress in preparing for the needs of 2000.

  16. Next Generation Microbiology Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, C. M.; Oubre, C. M.; Elliott, T. F.; Castro, V. A.; Pierson, D. L.

    2012-01-01

    technology. During 2011, this study focused on evaluating potable water requirements by assembling a forum of internal and external experts from NASA, other federal agencies, and academia. Key findings from this forum included: (1) Preventive design and operational strategies should be stringent and the primary focus of NASA's mitigation efforts, as they are cost effective and can be attained with conventional technology. (2) Microbial monitoring hardware should be simple and must be able to measure the viability of microorganisms in a sample. Multiple monitoring technologies can be utilized as long as at the microorganisms being identified can also be confirmed as viable. (3) Evidence showing alterations in the crew immune function and microbial virulence complicates risk assessments and creates the need for very conservative requirements. (4) One key source of infectious agents will always be the crew, and appropriate preventative measures should be taken preflight. (5) Water systems should be thoroughly disinfected (sterilized if possible) preflight and retain a residual biocide throughout the mission. Future forums will cover requirements for other types of samples, specifically spaceflight food and environmental samples, such as vehicle air and vehicle and cargo surfaces. An interim report on the potable water forum has been delivered to the Human Research Program with a final report on the recommendations for all sample types being delivered in September 2013.

  17. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2008-03-12

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to conduct environmental monitoring. Environmental monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is conducted in order to: (a) Verify and support compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, permits, and orders; (b) Establish baselines and characterize trends in the physical, chemical, and biological condition of effluent and environmental media; (c) Identify potential environmental problems and evaluate the need for remedial actions or measures to mitigate the problems; (d) Detect, characterize, and report unplanned releases; (e) Evaluate the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control, and pollution abatement programs; and (f) Determine compliance with commitments made in environmental impact statements, environmental assessments, safety analysis reports, or other official DOE documents. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) explains the rationale and design criteria for the environmental monitoring program, extent and frequency of monitoring and measurements, procedures for laboratory analyses, quality assurance (QA) requirements, program implementation procedures, and direction for the preparation and disposition of reports. Changes to the environmental monitoring program may be necessary to allow the use of advanced technology and new data collection techniques. This EMP will document changes in the environmental monitoring program. Guidance for preparation of EMPs is contained in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance.

  18. TEACHER NEEDED

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Part-time teacher of primary English needed from 1st December 2002 to teach English National Curriculum (KS2) and NLS to mother tongue or good second language English-speakers aged 7-10. 4 hours contact time per week, team planning, marking and meetings. Candidates should be English mother tongue qualified teachers, confident, flexible classroom practitioners and team players. For further details and how to apply: engnat@hotmail.com or 04 50 40 82 66. Apply as soon as possible, and in any case before November 20th. English National Programme - Lycée International, Ferney-Voltaire

  19. TEACHERS NEEDED

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The English Language Programme of the Lycée International de Ferney-Voltaire has two teaching posts available for la rentrée 2001. 1. Part-time teacher of Primary-level English Candidates for the post need to be mother-tongue English speakers. They should have a relevant degree and teaching qualification. The post involves teaching the English curriculum to pupils who are within the French educational system. Classes take place on Tuesday afternoons at the Lycée. Team spirit necessary as teachers work as a team. Induction & training are offered. 2. Part-time teacher of Secondary-level history-geography Candididates for the post need to be mother-tongue English speakers. They should have a relevant degree in history or geography and also a strong interest in the other subject. They should have a relevant teaching qualification and be confident classroom practioners. For more information on either of these posts please contact the school office on 04.50.40.82...

  20. Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallegos, G M; Blake, R G; Bertoldo, N A; Campbell, C G; Coty, J; Folks, K; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K

    2010-01-27

    The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program. Specifically, in conformance with DOE Order 450.1A, Attachment 1, paragraph 1(b)(5), environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring also serves to demonstrate compliance with permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality. (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work. (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. Until its cancellation in January 2003, DOE Order 5400.1 required the preparation of an environmental monitoring plan. Neither DOE Order 450.1A nor the ISO 14001 standard are as prescriptive as DOE Order 5400.1, in that neither expressly requires an EMP. However, LLNL continues to prepare the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for

  1. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations for the 600 Area facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-08-01

    This document determines the need for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans for Westinghouse Hanford Company's 600 Area facilities on the Hanford Site. The Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations were prepared in accordance with A Guide For Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans (WHC 1991). Five major Westinghouse Hanford Company facilities in the 600 Area were evaluated: the Purge Water Storage Facility, 212-N, -P, and -R Facilities, the 616 Facility, and the 213-J K Storage Vaults. Of the five major facilities evaluated in the 600 Area, none will require preparation of a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan.

  2. Distributed flexible reconfigurable condition monitoring and diagnosis technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU You-min; YANG Shu-zi; DU Run-sheng

    2006-01-01

    As manufacturing becomes increasingly decentralized,flexible and reconfigurable,more research needs to be done on monitoring and diagnosis technology that accommodate these new trends.The distributed condition monitoring and diagnosis technology based on the "flexible and reconfigurable" concept is studied here.A condition monitoring diagnosis model based on the distributed flexible and reconfigurable idea is proposed in this paper.The component makeup and functions of this model are discussed in detail.The model can fulfill in most instances the manufacturing system requirements for changing the configuration of the monitoring diagnosis system according to different manufacturing system configurations.This model also realizes the flexibility and reconfigurability of the monitoring diagnosis system in some degree.The model has already spawned a successful prototype for monitoring a chemical plant in accomplishing monitoring and control of the production process and equipment.Finally,some future research work is pointed out.

  3. VHA mental health information system: applying health information technology to monitor and facilitate implementation of VHA Uniform Mental Health Services Handbook requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trafton, Jodie A; Greenberg, Greg; Harris, Alex H S; Tavakoli, Sara; Kearney, Lisa; McCarthy, John; Blow, Fredric; Hoff, Rani; Schohn, Mary

    2013-03-01

    To describe the design and deployment of health information technology to support implementation of mental health services policy requirements in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). Using administrative and self-report survey data, we developed and fielded metrics regarding implementation of the requirements delineated in the VHA Uniform Mental Health Services Handbook. Finalized metrics were incorporated into 2 external facilitation-based quality improvement programs led by the VHA Mental Health Operations. To support these programs, tailored site-specific reports were generated. Metric development required close collaboration between program evaluators, policy makers and clinical leadership, and consideration of policy language and intent. Electronic reports supporting different purposes required distinct formatting and presentation features, despite their having similar general goals and using the same metrics. Health information technology can facilitate mental health policy implementation but must be integrated into a process of consensus building and close collaboration with policy makers, evaluators, and practitioners.

  4. STAFF NEEDED

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The English National Programme, part of the Lycée International de Ferney-Voltaire (France) needs the following staff for September 2001: A part-time teacher of primary English The post involves teaching the English curriculum to pupils who are within the French educational system: Classes take place on Tuesday afternoons at the Lycée, Team spirit necessary as teachers work as a team, Induction & training are offered. A part time teacher of senior secondary history-geography in English A part time teacher of secondary mathematics in English Teachers must be mother-tongue English speakers and have a relevant degree and/or teaching qualification. For the history-geography post, either history or geography degrees are acceptable. Please send your c.v. and a letter of application to Peter Woodburn, Head, English National Programme, Lycée International, 01216 Ferney-Voltaire, France. (Email: engnat@hotmail.com) Telephone 04 50 40 82 66 for further details of posts. Ple...

  5. Measuring needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Murianni

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The interest in measuring the health of populations, through measuring the demand and offers of health care, is deeply rooted in history. Population health indicators in use today are built upon from mortality measures from the 1500s; regular census information starting from the 1800s; civil registration records of vital statistics commencing in the 1850s; regular national surveys, which were first initiated in the 1950s; and health system and other administrative databases used widely since the 1960s. The ancient Greeks believed that the God of medicine had two daughters: Hygeia and Panacea, the first was the goddess of prevention and wellness, while the second was the goddess of treatment. Thus suggesting that people have long believed that there is more to health than health care. Today the actual concept of population health recognizes many interconnected aspects of society, the environment, and individuals all contributing to health. To increase opportunities for comparability, more valid, comprehensive and standardized ways of measuring and reporting on population health indicators are needed. The use of health indicators contributes to overall population health goals, namely improving the health populations, reducing health inequalities and measuring the performance of health care system. The objective of performance assessment is to provide governments and populations with information about the state of their health care system.

  6. Monitoring solar-thermal systems: An outline of methods and procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, A. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Southwest Technology Development Inst.

    1994-04-01

    This manual discusses the technical issues associated with monitoring solar-thermal systems. It discusses some successful monitoring programs that have been implemented in the past. It gives the rationale for selecting a program of monitoring and gives guidelines for the design of new programs. In this report, solar thermal monitoring systems are classified into three levels. For each level, the report discusses the kinds of information obtained by monitoring, the effort needed to support the monitoring program, the hardware required, and the costs involved. Ultimately, all monitoring programs share one common requirement: the collection of accurate data that characterize some aspect or aspects of the system under study. This report addresses most of the issues involved with monitoring solar thermal systems. It does not address such topics as design fundamentals of thermal systems or the relative merits of the many different technologies employed for collection of solar energy.

  7. Diabetes Monitoring System Using Mobile Computing Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashael Saud Bin-Sabbar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a chronic disease that needs to regularly be monitored to keep the blood sugar levels within normal ranges. This monitoring depends on the diabetic treatment plan that is periodically reviewed by the endocrinologist. The frequent visit to the main hospital seems to be tiring and time consuming for both endocrinologist and diabetes patients. The patient may have to travel to the main city, paying a ticket and reserving a place to stay. Those expenses can be reduced by remotely monitoring the diabetes patients with the help of mobile devices. In this paper, we introduce our implementation of an integrated monitoring tool for the diabetes patients. The designed system provides a daily monitoring and monthly services. The daily monitoring includes recording the result of daily analysis and activates to be transmitted from a patient’s mobile device to a central database. The monthly services require the patient to visit a nearby care center in the patient home town to do the medical examination and checkups. The result of this visit entered into the system and then synchronized with the central database. Finally, the endocrinologist can remotely monitor the patient record and adjust the treatment plan and the insulin doses if need.

  8. Affordable flow cytometry for enumeration of absolute CD4+ T-lymphocytes to identify subtype C HIV-1 infected adults requiring antiretroviral therapy (ART and monitoring response to ART in a resource-limited setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mucheche Mary

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The World Health Organization (WHO's "3 × 5 program" has spurred efforts to place 3 million people on combination antiretroviral therapy (ART for treatment of AIDS in resource-limited countries. Paradoxically, the cost of CD4+ T-lymphocyte count essential for decision-making to commence HIV positive adults on ART as well as for monitoring responses to ART remains unaffordable in most resource-limited countries. Thus, low-cost methods for enumerating CD4+ T-lymphocyte are urgently needed. Objective To evaluate Cyflow cytometry (Cyflow SL, Partec, Munster, Germany for enumeration of absolute CD4+ T-lymphocyte in subtype C HIV-1 seropositive subjects using FACSCount (Becton and Dickinson, Immunocytometry Systems, San Jose, CA, USA as the "predicate method". Methods A total of 150 HIV-1 seropositive subjects were included in the evaluation exercise. Fifty-eight specimens were collected from pregnant HIV-1 seropositive women (subtype C drug resistance study. Twenty-seven specimens were collected from women and their spouses with AIDS followed in a Duke ART study to assess the immunologic and virologic responses to generic ART, comprising Stavudine, Lamivudine and Nevirapine (Stalanev, Varichem Labs, Harare, Zimbabwe. Sixty-five specimens were collected from AIDS patients enrolled in an ongoing Kaposi Sarcoma (KS study to investigate impact of ART on KS progression. Enumeration of CD4+ T-lymphocytes using FACSCount is routinely conducted for all the three studies. The Medical Research Council of Zimbabwe and Medicines Control Authority of Zimbabwe approved the studies. Whole blood was collected in EDTA vacutainer tubes and aliquoted into two tubes (200 μL in each. CD4+ T-lymphocyte counts were enumerated using a Cyflow counter, in the Department of Immunology and a FACSCount in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology within 6 hours of phlebotomy following manufacturers' instructions. Results Using linear regression analysis

  9. Statutory Management Requirements on "Animal Identification and Registration" (Act A7, Act A8: monitoring methods for compliance and related costs in four Italian farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisanna Speroni

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The European and national laws concerning the identification and registration of livestock are meant to make possible their traceability and facilitate food safety and animal health, especially in case of a disease outbreak; such rules have also become prerequisites that farmers must meet to obtain single farm payments under the common agricultural policy. Failure to comply with these obligations entails the reduction or exclusion from direct payments. Act A7, reports the obligations imposed by the EC Regulation 1760/2000 establishing a system for the identification and registration of bovine animals and regarding the labelling of beef and beef products; Act A8, report the obligations established by the EC Reg. 21/2004 establishing a system for the identification and registration of sheep and goats. The project MO.NA.CO. monitored the application of rules for identification and registration of cattle, sheep and goats and their costs. The system of identification and registration of dairy cows resulted well organized with a good level of coordination between the involved actors in both farms. The activities necessary for compliance with rules of identification and registration of cattle are distributed throughout the year, but vary from day to day. The average total cost for annual obligations amounted to € 533.34 year-1 while the average cost for individual fulfilment in the monitoring period amounted to € 4.10. Even in the case of sheep and goats, the monitoring showed a good cooperation between farms and technicians. However, some difficulties were detected, mainly due to the size of the rumen boluses and the limited effectiveness of the ear tags. The operators suggested using smaller rumen boluses and tattoo instead of ear tags; they also suggest to extend the period within which the animals have to be labelled from the current 6 months to 9 months. The cost of compliance amounted to € 5.27 head-1 for sheep and € 4.90 head-1 for

  10. Space needs of broilers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokkers, E.A.M.; Boer, de I.J.M.; Koene, P.

    2011-01-01

    There is continuing debate about the space needs and requirements of broiler chickens, The aims of this study were to measure the amount of floor area a six-week-old broiler occupies for different behaviours and to use the obtained results in two models to estimate the number of birds that can be

  11. Monitoring tropical deforestation for emerging carbon markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeFries, R.; Townshend, J. [Department of Geography, University of Maryland, College Park (United States); Asner, G. [Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, CA (United States); Achard, F. [Joint Research Centre JRC, European Commission EC, Ispra (Italy); Justice, C. [Department of Geography, University of Maryland, College Park (United States); Laporte, N. [Woods Hole Research Center, Woods Hole, MA (United States); Price, K. [University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Small, C. [Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, New York (United States)

    2005-07-01

    The ability to quantify and verify tropical deforestation is critically important for assessing carbon credits from reduced deforestation. Analysis of satellite data is the most practicable approach for routine and timely monitoring of forest cover at the national scale. To develop baselines of historical deforestation as proposed elsewhere in this book, and to detect new deforestation, we address the following issues: (1) Are data available to monitor and verify tropical deforestation?: The historical database is adequate to develop baselines of tropical deforestation in the 1990's and current plans call for the launch of a Landsat class sensor after 2010. However a coordinated effort to assemble data from Landsat, ASTER, IRS, and other high resolution sensors is needed to maintain coverage for monitoring deforestation in the current decade and to ensure future observations; (2) Are there accepted, standard methods for monitoring and verifying tropical deforestation?: Effective methods for nearly-automated regional monitoring have been demonstrated in the research arena, but have been implemented for operational monitoring only in a few cases. It is feasible to establish best practices for monitoring and verifying deforestation through agreement among international technical experts. A component of this effort is to define types of forest and forest disturbances to be included in monitoring systems; and (3) Are the institutional capabilities in place for monitoring tropical deforestation?: A few tropical rainforest countries have expertise, institutions, and programs in place to monitor deforestation (e.g. Brazil and India) and US and European institutions are technically able to monitor deforestation across the tropics. However, many tropical countries require development of national and regional capabilities. This capability underpins the long-term viability of monitoring tropical deforestation to support compensated reductions.The main obstacles are

  12. Not used to public transport any longer. A study about transport service based on needs and requirements in Siljansnaes; Man har vant sig av med kollektivtrafik. En studie om transportservice baserad paa behov och vanor i Siljansnaes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warsen, Lisa

    2000-05-01

    The goal of the transport policy is that every citizen shall have a transport service on a reasonable level. In sparsely populated areas the public transport service is on a low level and many groups without a private car will have small possibilities to travel to different activities. Siljansnaes, with nearly 2000 citizens, is a small region in the community Leksand in Dalarna where the transport problem have been more tangible. The aim of this project has been to create a transport system more based on the needs and requirements. Also the people who lives in Siljansnaes in their leisure times are a part in the project. They are almost as many as the permanent living ones. The result also has been built on the goal of a higher care of the environment. The transport solution contains; village-bus, car-pooling, changed price system for public transport, but also a partnership between the citizens, the community and the regional transport company (Dalatrafik). The project as a process has the goal that the people in Siljansnaes should take part of the solution and the responsibility for the operation of the system.

  13. Monitoring beach changes using GPS surveying techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Robert; Leach, Mark P.; Paine, Jeffrey G.; Cardoza, Michael A.

    1993-01-01

    A need exists for frequent and prompt updating of shoreline positions, rates of shoreline movement, and volumetric nearshore changes. To effectively monitor and predict these beach changes, accurate measurements of beach morphology incorporating both shore-parallel and shore-normal transects are required. Although it is possible to monitor beach dynamics using land-based surveying methods, it is generally not practical to collect data of sufficient density and resolution to satisfy a three-dimensional beach-change model of long segments of the coast. The challenge to coastal scientists is to devise new beach monitoring methods that address these needs and are rapid, reliable, relatively inexpensive, and maintain or improve measurement accuracy.

  14. Environmental Monitoring Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Althouse, P E; Biermann, A; Brigdon, S L; Brown, R A; Campbell, C G; Christofferson, E; Clark, L M; Folks, K J; Gallegos, G M; Gouveia, F J; Grayson, A; Harrach, R J; Hoppes, W G; Jones, H; Mathews, S; Merrigan, J R; Peterson, S R; Revelli, M; Rueppel, D; Sanchez, L; Tate, P J; Vellinger, R J; Ward, B; Williams, R

    2006-01-10

    Environmental monitoring personnel from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) prepared this ''Environmental Monitoring Plan'' (EMP) to meet the requirements in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ''Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance'' (DOE 1991) and applicable portions of DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 (see WSS B93 and B94 in Appendix B). ''Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance'' is followed as a best management practice; under Work Smart Standards, LLNL complies with portions of DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 as shown in Appendix B. This document is a revision of the May 1999 EMP (Tate et al. 1999) and is current as of March 1, 2002. LLNL is one of the nation's premier applied-science national security laboratories. Its primary mission is to ensure that the nation's nuclear weapons remain safe, secure, and reliable, and to prevent the spread and use of nuclear weapons worldwide. LLNL's programs in advanced technologies, energy, environment, biosciences, and basic science apply LLNL's unique capabilities and enhance the competencies needed for this national security mission. LLNL's mission also involves working with industrial and academic partners to increase national competitiveness and improve science education. LLNL's mission is dynamic and has changed over the years to meet new national needs. In keeping with the Laboratory's mission, the environment, safety, and health (ES&H) have top priority. LLNL's policy is to perform work in a manner that protects the health and safety of employees and the public, preserves the quality of the environment, and prevents property damage. The environment, safety, and health are to be priority considerations in the planning and execution of all work activities at the Laboratory (LLNL 2001

  15. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2004-02-19

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to conduct environmental monitoring. Environmental monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is conducted in order to: (a) Verify and support compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, permits, and orders; (b) Establish baselines and characterize trends in the physical, chemical, and biological condition of effluent and environmental media; (c) Identify potential environmental problems and evaluate the need for remedial actions or measures to mitigate the problem; (d) Detect, characterize, and report unplanned releases; (e) Evaluate the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control, and pollution abatement programs; and (f) Determine compliance with commitments made in environmental impact statements, environmental assessments, safety analysis reports, or other official DOE documents. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) has been written to contain the rationale and design criteria for the monitoring program, extent and frequency of monitoring and measurements, procedures for laboratory analyses, quality assurance (QA) requirements, program implementation procedures, and direction for the preparation and disposition of reports. Changes to the environmental monitoring program may be necessary to allow the use of advanced technology and new data collection techniques. This EMP will document any proposed changes in the environmental monitoring program. Guidance for preparation of Environmental Monitoring Plans is contained in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance. The plan will be effective when it is approved by the appropriate Head of Field Organization or their designee. The plan discusses major environmental monitoring and hydrology activities at the WIPP and describes the programs established to ensure that WIPP operations do not

  16. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2004-02-19

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to conduct environmental monitoring. Environmental monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is conducted in order to: (a) Verify and support compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, permits, and orders; (b) Establish baselines and characterize trends in the physical, chemical, and biological condition of effluent and environmental media; (c) Identify potential environmental problems and evaluate the need for remedial actions or measures to mitigate the problem; (d) Detect, characterize, and report unplanned releases; (e) Evaluate the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control, and pollution abatement programs; and (f) Determine compliance with commitments made in environmental impact statements, environmental assessments, safety analysis reports, or other official DOE documents. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) has been written to contain the rationale and design criteria for the monitoring program, extent and frequency of monitoring and measurements, procedures for laboratory analyses, quality assurance (QA) requirements, program implementation procedures, and direction for the preparation and disposition of reports. Changes to the environmental monitoring program may be necessary to allow the use of advanced technology and new data collection techniques. This EMP will document any proposed changes in the environmental monitoring program. Guidance for preparation of Environmental Monitoring Plans is contained in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance. The plan will be effective when it is approved by the appropriate Head of Field Organization or their designee. The plan discusses major environmental monitoring and hydrology activities at the WIPP and describes the programs established to ensure that WIPP operations do not

  17. VENTILATION NEEDS DURING CONSTRUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.R. Gorrell

    1998-07-23

    The purpose of this analysis is to determine ventilation needs during construction and development of the subsurface repository and develop systems to satisfy those needs. For this analysis, construction is defined as pre-emplacement excavation and development is excavation that takes place simultaneously with emplacement. The three options presented in the ''Overall Development and Emplacement Ventilation Systems'' analysis (Reference 5.5) for development ventilation will be applied to construction ventilation in this analysis as well as adding new and updated ventilation factors to each option for both construction and development. The objective of this analysis is to develop a preferred ventilation system to support License Application Design. The scope of this analysis includes: (1) Description of ventilation conditions; (2) Ventilation factors (fire hazards, dust control, construction logistics, and monitoring and control systems); (3) Local ventilation alternatives; (4) Global ventilation options; and (5) Evaluation of options.

  18. Nuclear reactor effluent monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minns, J.L.; Essig, T.H. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Radiological environmental monitoring and effluent monitoring at nuclear power plants is important both for normal operations, as well as in the event of an accident. During normal operations, environmental monitoring verifies the effectiveness of in-plant measures for controlling the release of radioactive materials in the plant. Following an accident, it would be an additional mechanism for estimating doses to members of the general public. This paper identifies the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulatory basis for requiring radiological environmental and effluent monitoring, licensee conditions for effluent and environmental monitoring, NRC independent oversight activities, and NRC`s program results.

  19. 40 CFR 74.61 - Monitoring plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monitoring plan. 74.61 Section 74.61... OPT-INS Monitoring Emissions: Combustion Sources § 74.61 Monitoring plan. (a) Monitoring plan. The... monitoring plan that includes the information required in a monitoring plan under § 75.53 of this...

  20. Managing System of Systems Requirements with a Requirements Screening Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald R. Barden

    2012-07-01

    Figuring out an effective and efficient way to manage not only your Requirement’s Baseline, but also the development of all your individual requirements during a Program’s/Project’s Conceptual and Development Life Cycle Stages can be both daunting and difficult. This is especially so when you are dealing with a complex and large System of Systems (SoS) Program with potentially thousands and thousands of Top Level Requirements as well as an equal number of lower level System, Subsystem and Configuration Item requirements that need to be managed. This task is made even more overwhelming when you have to add in integration with multiple requirements’ development teams (e.g., Integrated Product Development Teams (IPTs)) and/or numerous System/Subsystem Design Teams. One solution for tackling this difficult activity on a recent large System of Systems Program was to develop and make use of a Requirements Screening Group (RSG). This group is essentially a Team made up of co-chairs from the various Stakeholders with an interest in the Program of record that are enabled and accountable for Requirements Development on the Program/Project. The RSG co-chairs, often with the help of individual support team, work together as a Program Board to monitor, make decisions on, and provide guidance on all Requirements Development activities during the Conceptual and Development Life Cycle Stages of a Program/Project. In addition, the RSG can establish and maintain the Requirements Baseline, monitor and enforce requirements traceability across the entire Program, and work with other elements of the Program/Project to ensure integration and coordination.

  1. Generating Local Needs through Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    á Rogvi, Sofie; Juul, Annegrete; Langstrup, Henriette

    2016-01-01

    The rhetoric of need is commonplace in discourses of technology and innovation, as well as in global health. Users are said to have a need for innovative technology, and citizens in resource-poor regions to have a need for improved healthcare. In this article we follow a global health technology......—more specifically, a piece of software for monitoring diabetes quality—from Denmark, where it was developed, to Jakarta, Indonesia, where it was introduced in 2012–13. Using ethnographic material, we show how the need for a specific technology is constituted through the very process of moving a technology from one...

  2. Engineering considerations for corrosion monitoring of gas gathering pipeline systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, T.G.; Asperger, R.G.

    1987-01-01

    Proper corrosion monitoring of gas gathering pipelines requires a system review to determine the appropriate monitor locations and types of monitoring techniques. This paper develops and discusses a classification of conditions such as flow regime and gas composition. Also discussed are junction categories which, for corrosion monitoring, need to be considered from two points of view. The first is related to fluid flow in the line and the second is related corrosion inhibitor movement along the pipeline. The appropriate application of the various monitoring techniques such as coupons, hydrogen detectors, electrical resistance probe and linear polarization probes are discussed in relation to flow regime and gas composition. Problems caused by semi-conduction from iron sulfide are considered. Advantages and disadvantages of fluid gathering methods such as pots and flow-through drips are discussed in relation to their reliability as on-line monitoring locations.

  3. Development of regulatory technical rationale for risk monitoring program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Chang Hyun; Kim, Ju Youl; Kim, Yoon Ik; Yang, Hui Chang; Lee, Yong Suk; Ahn, Kwang Won; Kim, Se Hyung [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    In Korea, the risk monitoring program will be developed and applied to each plants till 2003 by the severe accident management plan to enhance the safety functions of the nuclear power plants. Through this plan, the risk monitoring for the full power and low power and shutdown operation will be performed. Therefore the development of consistent risk monitoring system and overall regulatory guides for the risk monitoring program are necessary. The objective of this study is the development of regulatory technical rationales for the nuclear power plant risk monitoring program and the derivation of the requirements need for the development of risk monitoring system. Through this the improvement of regulatory effectiveness to assure the safe operation of nuclear power plant, is expected.

  4. Development of regulatory technical rationale for risk monitoring program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Chang Hyun; Kim, Ju Youl; Kim, Yoon Ik; Yang, Hui Chang; Lee, Yong Suk; Ahn, Kwang Won; Kim, Se Hyung [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    In Korea, the risk monitoring program will be developed and applied to each plants till 2003 by the severe accident management plan to enhance the safety functions of the nuclear power plants. Through this plan, the risk monitoring for the full power and low power and shutdown operation will be performed. Therefore the development of consistent risk monitoring system and overall regulatory guides for the risk monitoring program are necessary. The objective of this study is the development of regulatory technical rationales for the nuclear power plant risk monitoring program and the derivation of the requirements need for the development of risk monitoring system. Through this the improvement of regulatory effectiveness to assure the safe operation of nuclear power plant, is expected.

  5. Nocturnal continuous glucose monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Christiane; Kristensen, Peter Lommer; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik;

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: A reliable method to detect biochemical nocturnal hypoglycemia is highly needed, especially in patients with recurrent severe hypoglycemia. We evaluated reliability of nocturnal continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in patients with type 1 diabetes at high risk of severe...

  6. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Monitoring Well Inspection and Maintenance Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-09-01

    This document is the fourth revision of the Monitoring Well Inspection and Maintenance Plan for groundwater monitoring wells installed at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This plan describes the systematic approach for: inspecting the physical condition of monitoring wells at Y-12, determining maintenance needs that extend the life of a well, and identifying those wells that no longer meet acceptable monitoring well design or well construction standards and require plugging and abandonment. This plan applies to groundwater monitoring wells installed at Y-12 and the related waste management facilities located within the three hydrogeologic regimes.

  7. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Monitoring Well Inspection and Maintenance Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-09-01

    This document is the fourth revision of the Monitoring Well Inspection and Maintenance Plan for groundwater monitoring wells installed at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This plan describes the systematic approach for: inspecting the physical condition of monitoring wells at Y-12, determining maintenance needs that extend the life of a well, and identifying those wells that no longer meet acceptable monitoring well design or well construction standards and require plugging and abandonment. This plan applies to groundwater monitoring wells installed at Y-12 and the related waste management facilities located within the three hydrogeologic regimes.

  8. LEGACY MANAGEMENT REQUIRES INFORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CONNELL, C.W.; HILDEBRAND, R.D.

    2006-12-14

    ''Legacy Management Requires Information'' describes the goal(s) of the US Department of Energy's Office of Legacy Management (LM) relative to maintaining critical records and the way those goals are being addressed at Hanford. The paper discusses the current practices for document control, as well as the use of modern databases for both storing and accessing the data to support cleanup decisions. In addition to the information goals of LM, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, known as the ''Tri-Party Agreement'' (TPA) is one of the main drivers in documentation and data management. The TPA, which specifies discrete milestones for cleaning up the Hanford Site, is a legally binding agreement among the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The TPA requires that DOE provide the lead regulatory agency with the results of analytical laboratory and non-laboratory tests/readings to help guide them in making decisions. The Agreement also calls for each signatory to preserve--for at least ten years after the Agreement has ended--all of the records in its or its contractors, possession related to sampling, analysis, investigations, and monitoring conducted. The tools used at Hanford to meet TPA requirements are also the tools that can satisfy the needs of LM.

  9. An autonomous structural health monitoring solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Featherston, Carol A.; Holford, Karen M.; Pullin, Rhys; Lees, Jonathan; Eaton, Mark; Pearson, Matthew

    2013-05-01

    Combining advanced sensor technologies, with optimised data acquisition and diagnostic and prognostic capability, structural health monitoring (SHM) systems provide real-time assessment of the integrity of bridges, buildings, aircraft, wind turbines, oil pipelines and ships, leading to improved safety and reliability and reduced inspection and maintenance costs. The implementation of power harvesting, using energy scavenged from ambient sources such as thermal gradients and sources of vibration in conjunction with wireless transmission enables truly autonomous systems, reducing the need for batteries and associated maintenance in often inaccessible locations, alongside bulky and expensive wiring looms. The design and implementation of such a system however presents numerous challenges. A suitable energy source or multiple sources capable of meeting the power requirements of the system, over the entire monitoring period, in a location close to the sensor must be identified. Efficient power management techniques must be used to condition the power and deliver it, as required, to enable appropriate measurements to be taken. Energy storage may be necessary, to match a continuously changing supply and demand for a range of different monitoring states including sleep, record and transmit. An appropriate monitoring technique, capable of detecting, locating and characterising damage and delivering reliable information, whilst minimising power consumption, must be selected. Finally a wireless protocol capable of transmitting the levels of information generated at the rate needed in the required operating environment must be chosen. This paper considers solutions to some of these challenges, and in particular examines SHM in the context of the aircraft environment.

  10. Using citizen science to monitor pollination services

    OpenAIRE

    Birkin, Linda; Goulson, Dave

    2015-01-01

    1. Pollination by insects is a vital ecosystem service and the need for its assessment is increasing in recognition and political pressure, but there are currently no large-scale systematic monitoring schemes in place to measure the direct provision of this service.\\ud 2. This study tested a protocol for using a citizen science approach to quantify pollination service provision in gardens and allotments, requiring participants to grow Vica faba L. plants and carry out some simple manipulation...

  11. Vegetation monitoring using low-altitude, large-scale imagery from radio-controlled drones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilter, Mark Charles

    As both farmers and range managers are required to manage larger acreage, new methods for vegetation monitoring need to be developed. The methods need to increase information and yield, and at the same time reduce labor requirements and cost. This dissertation discusses how the use of radio controlled aircraft can collect large scale imagery that can be used to monitor vegetation. Several methods are explored which reduce the labor requirements for collecting and recording data. The work demonstrates the effectiveness of these methods and presents details of the procedures used. Many of the techniques have historically been used with aerial photographs and satellite imagery. However, the use of these procedures to collect detailed data at a scale required for vegetation monitoring is new. Image processing procedures are also demonstrated to have promise in changing the way ranges are monitored.

  12. An Assessment of Environmental Health Needs for Manned Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macatangay, Ariel V.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental health fundamentally addresses the physical, chemical, and biological risks external to the human body that can impact the health of a person by assessing and controlling these risks in order to generate and maintain a health-supportive environment. Environmental monitoring coupled with other measures including active and passive controls and the implementation of environmental standards (SMACs, SWEGs, microbial and acoustics limits) are used to ensure environmental health in manned spacecraft. NASA scientists and engineers consider environmental monitoring a vital component to an environmental health management strategy for maintaining a healthy crew and achieving mission success. Environmental monitoring data confirms the health of ECLS systems, in addition to contributing to the management of the health of human systems. Crew health risks associated with the environment were reviewed by agency experts with the goal of determining risk-based environmental monitoring needs for future NASA manned missions. Once determined, gaps in knowledge and technology, required to address those risks, were identified for various types of Exploration missions. This agency-wide assessment of environmental health needs will help guide the activities/hardware development efforts to close those gaps and advance the knowledge required to meet NASA manned space exploration objectives. Details of this assessment and findings are presented in this paper.

  13. Environmental Monitoring Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, R.C. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1993-07-01

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. This revision to the Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to document the changes made to the Monitoring Program during 1992. Some of the data (most notably the statistical analyses of past monitoring data) has not been changed.

  14. [Effect of work with computer monitors on the visual system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niesłuchowska, M

    1994-03-01

    Computer users complain of numerous visual discomforts. The paper discusses those connected with eye fatigue and changes in visual functions associated with the work with monitor screens; these can be alleviated with an ergonomic organization of the work unit. There is a need for a determination of the requirements in visual functions for computer users.

  15. Global nuclear material monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, J.A.; Monlove, H.O.; Goulding, C.A.; Martinez, B.J.; Coulter, C.A.

    1997-08-01

    This is the final report of a one-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project provided a detailed systems design for advanced integrated facility monitoring and identified the components and enabling technologies required to facilitate the development of the monitoring system of the future.

  16. Care needs and workload required by institutionalised psychiatric patients Necesidades de cuidados y carga de trabajo de pacientes psiquiátricos institucionalizados Necessidades de cuidados e carga de trabalho de enfermagem a pacientes psiquiátricos institucionalizados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Ayako Mukai

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This descriptive study used a quantitative approach to assess the nursing care needs of patients with mental disorders, the mean number of care hours these patients were provided and the workload these patients require nursing team. METHODS: The research was conducted in a public neuropsychiatric hospital located in south eastern Brazil in 2010 and included 105 patients as subjects. A patient classification tool was applied to characterise care profiles. Statistical analysis was performed using principal component analysis and analysis of variance. RESULTS: Patients were predominantly in the low care category (73.3%. The mean care hours ranged from 0.57 to 0.88 for nurses and 1.97 to 3.16 for nursing assistants, and the workload ranged from 119.6 to 183 hours . CONCLUSIONS: The present study showed that the care needs of most patients were at a low level of dependency and that most patients did not need to be institutionalised. Furthermore, it was found that the care hours provided by the nursing staff were not sufficient to meet the care needs of the patients.OBJETIVOS: El propósito de este estudio descriptivo con abordaje cuantitativo fue investigar las necesidades de cuidados de enfermería de pacientes con trastornos mentales, el promedio de horas de asistencia prestadas y la carga de trabajo del equipo de enfermería. MÉTODO: El estudio fue realizado en 2010 en un hospital neuropsiquiátrico público situado en la región sudeste de Brasil e incluyó 105 pacientes. Un instrumento de clasificación de pacientes fue aplicado para caracterizar el perfil asistencial. El tratamiento estadístico fue realizado mediante Análisis de Componentes Principales y Análisis de Varianza. RESULTADOS: Predominaron los pacientes de la categoría discreta de cuidados (73,3%. El promedio de horas de asistencia varió entre 0,57 y 0,88 (enfermeros y entre 1,97 y 3,16 (auxiliares de enfermería y la carga de trabajo entre 119,6 y 183 horas

  17. Facility effluent monitoring plan for 242-A evaporator facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crummel, G.M.; Gustavson, R.D.

    1995-02-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U.S. Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could affect employee or public safety or the environment. A facility effluent monitoring plan determination was performed during Calendar Year 1991 and the evaluation showed the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-1. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated, as a minimum, every three years.

  18. Lunar Health Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Orbital Research has successfully demonstrated a dry electrode (no electrolyte or gel required) for heart rate and ECG monitoring. Preliminary data has indicated...

  19. Respiratory monitoring with an acceleration sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Tomohiro; Takegawa, Hideki; Ageishi, Tatsuya; Takashina, Masaaki; Numasaki, Hodaka; Matsumoto, Masao; Teshima, Teruki, E-mail: teshima@sahs.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Yamadaoka 1-7, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2011-10-07

    Respiratory gating radiotherapy is used to irradiate a local area and to reduce normal tissue toxicity. There are certain methods for the detection of tumor motions, for example, using internal markers or an external respiration signal. However, because some of these respiratory monitoring systems require special or expensive equipment, respiratory monitoring can usually be performed only in limited facilities. In this study, the feasibility of using an acceleration sensor for respiratory monitoring was evaluated. The respiratory motion was represented by means of a platform and measured five times with the iPod touch (registered) at 3, 4 and 5 s periods of five breathing cycles. For these three periods of the reference waveform, the absolute means {+-} standard deviation (SD) of displacement were 0.45 {+-} 0.34 mm, 0.33 {+-} 0.24 mm and 0.31 {+-} 0.23 mm, respectively. On the other hand, the corresponding absolute means {+-} SD for the periods were 0.04 {+-} 0.09 s, 0.04 {+-} 0.02 s and 0.06 {+-} 0.04 s. The accuracy of respiratory monitoring using the acceleration sensor was satisfactory in terms of the absolute means {+-} SD. Using the iPod touch (registered) for respiratory monitoring does not need special equipment and makes respiratory monitoring easier. For these reasons, this system is a viable alternative to other respiratory monitoring systems.

  20. A plasma process monitor/control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, J.O.; Ward, P.P.; Smith, M.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Markle, R.J. [Advanced Micro Devices, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a system to monitor plasma processes for control of industrial applications. The system is designed to act as a fully automated, sand-alone process monitor during printed wiring board and semiconductor production runs. The monitor routinely performs data collection, analysis, process identification, and error detection/correction without the need for human intervention. The monitor can also be used in research mode to allow process engineers to gather additional information about plasma processes. The plasma monitor can perform real-time control of support systems known to influence plasma behavior. The monitor can also signal personnel to modify plasma parameters when the system is operating outside of desired specifications and requires human assistance. A notification protocol can be selected for conditions detected in the plasma process. The Plasma Process Monitor/Control System consists of a computer running software developed by Sandia National Laboratories, a commercially available spectrophotometer equipped with a charge-coupled device camera, an input/output device, and a fiber optic cable.

  1. Mobile Surveillance and Monitoring Robots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimberly, Howard R.; Shipers, Larry R.

    1999-07-14

    Long-term nuclear material storage will require in-vault data verification, sensor testing, error and alarm response, inventory, and maintenance operations. System concept development efforts for a comprehensive nuclear material management system have identified the use of a small flexible mobile automation platform to perform these surveillance and maintenance operations. In order to have near-term wide-range application in the Complex, a mobile surveillance system must be small, flexible, and adaptable enough to allow retrofit into existing special nuclear material facilities. The objective of the Mobile Surveillance and Monitoring Robot project is to satisfy these needs by development of a human scale mobile robot to monitor the state of health, physical security and safety of items in storage and process; recognize and respond to alarms, threats, and off-normal operating conditions; and perform material handling and maintenance operations. The system will integrate a tool kit of onboard sensors and monitors, maintenance equipment and capability, and SNL developed non-lethal threat response technology with the intelligence to identify threats and develop and implement first response strategies for abnormal signals and alarm conditions. System versatility will be enhanced by incorporating a robot arm, vision and force sensing, robust obstacle avoidance, and appropriate monitoring and sensing equipment.

  2. Coastwide Reference Monitoring System (CRMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    In 1990, the U.S. Congress enacted the Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection and Restoration Act (CWPPRA) in response to growing awareness of a land loss crisis in Louisiana. Projects funded by CWPPRA require monitoring and evaluation of project effectiveness, and there is also a need to assess the cumulative effects of all projects to achieve a sustainable coastal environment. In 2003, the Louisiana Office of Coastal Protection and Restoration (OCPR) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) received approval from the CWPPRA Task Force to implement the Coastwide Reference Monitoring System (CRMS) as a mechanism to monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of CWPPRA projects at the project, region, and coastwide levels. The CRMS design implements a multiple reference approach by using aspects of hydrogeomorphic functional assessments and probabilistic sampling. The CRMS program is as dynamic as the coastal habitats it monitors. The program is currently funded through CWPPRA and provides data for a variety of user groups, including resource managers, academics, landowners, and researchers.

  3. Research: Use of Monitor Watchers in Hospitals: Characteristics, Training, and Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Marjorie; Ruppel, Halley; Blake, Nancy; Phillips, JoAnne

    2016-01-01

    Monitor watchers, or personnel whose job it is to watch the central cardiac monitor and alert clinicians of patient events, are used in many hospitals. Monitor watchers may be used to improve timely response to alarms and combat the effects of alarm fatigue. However, little research has been done on the use of monitor watchers, and their practices have not been well described. Therefore, the purpose of our study was to examine the use of monitor watchers and their characteristics, training, and practices. Participants were recruited to complete an online survey on monitor watcher practice via two professional nursing organizations. A total of 413 responded to the survey, including 411 nurses and two non-nurse professionals, and 61% reported that their hospital used monitor watchers. Of these, 60% indicated that their hospitals have been using monitor watchers for more than 10 years, and 62% said that the monitor watchers were located remotely from the patient care unit. Many (68%) reported that monitor watchers worked 12-hour shifts, and a majority said that monitor watchers were required to have a certificate in electrocardiographic monitoring (67%) and be high school graduates (64%). Most (70%) respondents reported that monitor watchers alerted the nurse of an event via a mobile phone carried by the nurse. The results of this survey revealed that monitor watcher practices varied widely. Further research is needed to determine if the use of monitor watchers has an impact on patient outcomes.

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AT THE NALUNAQ GOLD MINE, SOUTH GREENLAND, 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Lis; Birch Larsen, Morten

    This twelfth environmental monitoring programme was conducted in the Nalunaq area, about 40 km from Nanortalik, South Greenland, from 18-31 August 2015. The environmental monitoring programme is conducted to discover and avoid unwanted environmental impacts of the former mining industry. Since...... into the Kirkespir Valley and Kirkespir Bay environment. The content of metals in the terrestrial, freshwater, and marine environment in the Kirkespir Valley and Bay is decreasing and is considered minor. DCE/GINR assess that no requirement for further actions to reduce the environmental impact is needed....... Environmental monitoring will continue in 2016 and 2019....

  5. Sensors for environmental monitoring and long-term environmental stewardship.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, David Russell; Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Davis, Mary Jo (Science Applications International Corporation, Albuquerque, NM)

    2004-09-01

    This report surveys the needs associated with environmental monitoring and long-term environmental stewardship. Emerging sensor technologies are reviewed to identify compatible technologies for various environmental monitoring applications. The contaminants that are considered in this report are grouped into the following categories: (1) metals, (2) radioisotopes, (3) volatile organic compounds, and (4) biological contaminants. Regulatory drivers are evaluated for different applications (e.g., drinking water, storm water, pretreatment, and air emissions), and sensor requirements are derived from these regulatory metrics. Sensor capabilities are then summarized according to contaminant type, and the applicability of the different sensors to various environmental monitoring applications is discussed.

  6. Integrated monitoring plan for the Hanford groundwater monitoring project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E.; McDonald, J.P.; Mercer, R.B.; Newcomer, D.R.; Thornton, E.C.

    1998-09-01

    Groundwater is monitored in hundreds of wells at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of requirements. Separate monitoring plans are prepared for various requirements, but sampling is coordinated and data are shared among users to avoid duplication of effort. The US Department of Energy (DOE) manages these activities through the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project (groundwater project), which is the responsibility of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The groundwater project does not include all of the monitoring to assess performance of groundwater remediation or all monitoring associated with active facilities. This document is the first integrated monitoring plan for the groundwater project and contains: well and constituent lists for monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders; other, established monitoring plans by reference; and a master well/constituent/frequency matrix for the entire Hanford Site.

  7. Monitoring Leverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geanakoplos, John; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    We argue that leverage is a central element of economic cycles and discuss how leverage can be properly monitored. While traditionally the interest rate has been regarded as the single key feature of a loan, we contend that the size of the loan, i.e., the leverage, is in fact a more important...... measure of systemic risk. Indeed, systemic crises tend to erupt when highly leveraged economic agents are forced to deleverage, sending the economy into recession. We emphasize the importance of measuring both the average leverage on old loans (which captures the economy's vulnerability) and the leverage...... offered on new loans (which captures current credit conditions) since the economy enters a crisis when leverage on new loans is low and leverage on old loans is high. While leverage plays an important role in several economic models, the data on leverage is model-free and simply needs to be collected...

  8. Monitoring of radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-02-01

    The guide specifies the requirements for the monitoring of radiation exposure in instances where radiation is used. In addition to workers, the guide covers students, apprentices and visitors. The guide shall also apply to exposure from natural radiation. However, the monitoring of radiation exposure in nuclear power plants is dealt with in YVL Guide 7.10 and 7.11. The guide defines the concepts relevant to the monitoring of radiation exposure and provides guidelines for determining the necessity of monitoring and subsequently arranging such in different operations. In addition, the guide specifies the criteria for the approval and regulatory control of the dosimetric service.

  9. Monitoring of radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-02-01

    The guide specifies the requirements for the monitoring of radiation exposure in instances where radiation is used. In addition to workers, the guide covers students, apprentices and visitors. The guide shall also apply to exposure from natural radiation. However, the monitoring of radiation exposure in nuclear power plants is dealt with in YVL Guide 7.10 and 7.11. The guide defines the concepts relevant to the monitoring of radiation exposure and provides guidelines for determining the necessity of monitoring and subsequently arranging such in different operations. In addition, the guide specifies the criteria for the approval and regulatory control of the dosimetric service.

  10. Environmental monitoring plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, R.C.

    1997-02-01

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. 52 refs., 10 figs., 12 tabs.

  11. Technical Assistance Needs Assessments (TANAs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Technical Assistance Needs Assessment (TANA) is a process to identify whether a community requires additional support from EPA in order to understand technical information and have meaningful participation in the Superfund decision-making process.

  12. ATLAS Future Framework Requirements Group Report

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Future Frameworks Requirements Group was constituted in Summer 2013 to consider and summarise the framework requirements from trigger and offline for configuring, scheduling and monitoring the data processing software needed by the ATLAS experiment. The principal motivation for such a re-examination arises from the current and anticipated evolution of CPUs, where multiple cores, hyper-threading and wide vector registers require a shift to a concurrent programming model. Such a model requires extensive changes in the current Gaudi/Athena frameworks and offers the opportunity to consider how HLT and offline processing can be better accommodated within the ATLAS framework. This note contains the report of the Future Frameworks Requirements Group.

  13. Conceptualising Human Needs and Wellbeing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Gasper (Des)

    2007-01-01

    markdownabstractNEEDS AND WELLBEING: ISSUES AND THEMES What are the relationships between human needs and human wellbeing? I will address the question by considering the conceptual linkages between these two umbrella categories. This requires investigation of the nature of each of them as a

  14. Monitoring product safety in the postmarketing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharrar, Robert G; Dieck, Gretchen S

    2013-10-01

    The safety profile of a medicinal product may change in the postmarketing environment. Safety issues not identified in clinical development may be seen and need to be evaluated. Methods of evaluating spontaneous adverse experience reports and identifying new safety risks include a review of individual reports, a review of a frequency distribution of a list of the adverse experiences, the development and analysis of a case series, and various ways of examining the database for signals of disproportionality, which may suggest a possible association. Regulatory agencies monitor product safety through a variety of mechanisms including signal detection of the adverse experience safety reports in databases and by requiring and monitoring risk management plans, periodic safety update reports and postauthorization safety studies. The United States Food and Drug Administration is working with public, academic and private entities to develop methods for using large electronic databases to actively monitor product safety. Important identified risks will have to be evaluated through observational studies and registries.

  15. 40 CFR 63.1350 - Monitoring requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... carbon injection. The accuracy of the rate measurement device must be ±1 percent of the rate being... filter), detectors may share the system instrumentation and alarm. (6) All BLDS must be installed... leak detection system include concepts from EPA's “Fabric Filter Bag Leak Detection Guidance”...

  16. 40 CFR 63.1258 - Monitoring Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... gas other than methane in air may be used if the instrument does not respond to methane or if the... each condenser, the owner or operator shall establish the maximum condenser outlet gas temperature or... shall establish the minimum temperature of the gases exiting the combustion chamber as the...

  17. 40 CFR 63.1547 - Monitoring requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... removal mechanisms. (3) Daily check of compressed air supply for pulse-jet baghouses. (4) An appropriate... Agency guidance document “Fabric Filter Bag Leak Detection Guidance” (EPA-454/R-98-015). Other bag leak..., torn or broken bags or filter media, or any other condition that may cause an increase in emissions....

  18. 40 CFR 63.1510 - Monitoring requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) For positive pressure fabric filter systems, a bag leak detection system must be installed in each baghouse compartment or cell. For negative pressure or induced air fabric filters, the bag leak detector... maintaining a load cell, carrier gas/lime flow indicator, carrier gas pressure drop measurement system...

  19. 40 CFR 63.548 - Monitoring requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... or filter media. (iii) Replacing defective bags or filter media, or otherwise repairing the control... broken filters. (2) Replacing defective filter media, or otherwise repairing the control device. (3... the total hydrocarbon compliance test and determine an arithmetic average for the recorded temperature...

  20. 40 CFR 63.453 - Monitoring requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... (b) A CMS shall be operated to measure the temperature in the firebox or in the ductwork immediately... times as requested by the Administrator. The visual inspection shall include inspection of ductwork...) through (k)(5) of this section identifies visible defects in ductwork, piping, enclosures or...

  1. 40 CFR 63.526 - Monitoring requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... expected to yield the highest flow rate and concentration. Engineering assessment includes, but is not... purpose of determining de minimis status for emission points, engineering assessment may be used to.... (D) Design analysis based on accepted chemical engineering principles, measurable process...

  2. 40 CFR 444.12 - Monitoring Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... I,” EPA-600/R-94-111, May 1994. 8 American National Standard on Photographic Processing Effluents.... . American Society for Testing and Materials, 1916 Race Street, Philadelphia, PA 19103. (4) “Methods for the...., Dept. 0742, McLean, VA 22109-0742. (8) “American National Standard on Photographic Processing...

  3. 40 CFR 430.02 - Monitoring requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AND STANDARDS THE PULP, PAPER, AND PAPERBOARD POINT SOURCE CATEGORY General Provisions § 430.02...-TCF: Pertains to any fiber line that does not use exclusively TCF bleaching processes. b TCF: Pertains to any fiber line that uses exclusively TCF bleaching processes, as disclosed by the discharger...

  4. 40 CFR 141.132 - Monitoring requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... water from a single aquifer as one treatment plant for determining the minimum number of TTHM and HAA5... One sample per year per treatment plant during month of warmest water temperature. Locations... water sample per quarter per treatment plant 2 Locations representing maximum residence time. 1...

  5. 40 CFR 63.625 - Monitoring requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Phosphate Fertilizers Production Plants § 63... continuously measures and permanently records the flow rate of the scrubbing liquid to each scrubber in the... liquid to each scrubber in the process scrubbing system is ±20 percent of the baseline average...

  6. Technical requirements for implementation of an individual monitoring service for evaluation of operational quantity HP(10) using thermoluminescent dosimetry; Requisitos tecnicos para a implantacao de um servico de monitoracao individual externa de corpo inteiro para fotons utilizando dosimetria termoluminescente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francisco, Adelaide Benedita Armando

    2016-11-01

    This work aims to establish technical requirements for the development of a TLDs system for the assessment of operational quantity H{sub P}(10), in order to implement an external individual monitoring service in countries who do not have. This allows a better understanding of the technic and the thermoluminescent dosimetry system, thus contributing to identify the technical criteria to be followed by a dosimetry laboratory and evaluation of the dosimetric system performance. For this, the review of the specific literature of the dosimetry field was conducted and later the type and performance tests that must be followed by a dosimetric system were reproduced in practice. In additional was made a analysis of internationals standards norms and the technical regulation used in Brazil, to define the essentials type testes to a dosimetric system. To check the performance of a dosimetry system, a performance analysis of the Brazilian TLDs system was carried out over the past 6 years using the trumpet curve, where it was observed that most of TLDs system, in this review period, were approved and have excellent performance. The technical requirements for the development of a thermoluminescent dosimetry system ensure that the system provides technically reliable results and allow demonstration of compliance with the standard criteria established by national and international standards, and the implementation of the dosimetry system, is verified the compliance of the annual doses limits set for occupationally exposed. (author)

  7. Foster Care: State Practices for Assessing Health Needs, Facilitating Service Delivery, and Monitoring Children's Care. Report to the Chairman, Subcommittee on Income Security and Family Support, Committee on Ways and Means, House of Representatives. GAO-09-26

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kay; Bascetta, Cynthia A.

    2009-01-01

    Providing health care services for foster children, who frequently have significant health care needs, can be challenging. The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) oversees foster care, but state child welfare agencies are responsible for ensuring that these children receive health care services, which are often financed by Medicaid. In…

  8. Lunar Health Monitor (LHM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisy, Frederick J.

    2015-01-01

    Orbital Research, Inc., has developed a low-profile, wearable sensor suite for monitoring astronaut health in both intravehicular and extravehicular activities. The Lunar Health Monitor measures respiration, body temperature, electrocardiogram (EKG) heart rate, and other cardiac functions. Orbital Research's dry recording electrode is central to the innovation and can be incorporated into garments, eliminating the need for conductive pastes, adhesives, or gels. The patented dry recording electrode has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The LHM is easily worn under flight gear or with civilian clothing, making the system completely versatile for applications where continuous physiological monitoring is needed. During Phase II, Orbital Research developed a second-generation LHM that allows sensor customization for specific monitoring applications and anatomical constraints. Evaluations included graded exercise tests, lunar mission task simulations, functional battery tests, and resting measures. The LHM represents the successful integration of sensors into a wearable platform to capture long-duration and ambulatory physiological markers.

  9. Routine environmental monitoring schedule, calendar year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markes, B.M., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-12-10

    This document provides the Environmental Restorations Contractor (ERC) and the Project Hanford Management Contractor.(PHMC) a schedule in accordance with the WHC-CM-7-5, Environmental Compliance` and BHI- EE-02, Environmental Requirements, of monitoring and sampling routines for the Near-Field Monitoring (NFM) program during calendar year (CY) 1997. Every attempt will be made to consistently follow this schedule; any deviation from this schedule will be documented by an internal memorandum (DSI) explaining the reason for the deviation. The DSI will be issued by the scheduled performing organization and directed to Near-Field Monitoring. The survey frequencies for particular sites are determined by the technical judgment of Near- Field Monitoring and may depend on the site history, radiological status, use, and general conditions. Additional surveys may be requested at irregular frequencies if conditions warrant. All radioactive wastes sites are scheduled to be surveyed at least annually. Any newly discovered wastes sites not documented by this schedule will be included in the revised schedule for CY 1998. The outside perimeter road surveys of 200 East and West Area and the rail survey from the 300 Area to Columbia Center will be performed in the year 2000 per agreement with Department of Energy. Richland Field Office. This schedule does not discuss staffing needs, nor does it list the monitoring equipment to be used in completing specific routines. Personnel performing routines to meet this schedule shall communicate any need for assistance in completing these routines to Radiological Control management and Near-Field Monitoring. After each routine survey is completed, a copy of the survey record, maps, and data sheets will be forwarded to Near-Field Monitoring. These routine surveys will not be considered complete until this documentation is received. At the end of each month, the ERC and PHMC radiological control organizations shall forward a copy of the Routine

  10. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Monitoring Well Inspection And Maintenance Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-09-01

    This document is the fourth revision of the Monitoring Well Inspection and Maintenance Plan for groundwater monitoring wells installed at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This plan describes the systematic approach for:  inspecting the physical condition of monitoring wells at Y-12,  determining maintenance needs that extend the life of a well, and  identifying those wells that no longer meet acceptable monitoring well design or well construction standards and require plugging and abandonment.

  11. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Monitoring Well Inspection And Maintenance Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-09-01

    This document is the fourth revision of the Monitoring Well Inspection and Maintenance Plan for groundwater monitoring wells installed at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This plan describes the systematic approach for:  inspecting the physical condition of monitoring wells at Y-12,  determining maintenance needs that extend the life of a well, and  identifying those wells that no longer meet acceptable monitoring well design or well construction standards and require plugging and abandonment.

  12. Value activity monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    de Alencar Silva, P.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Current value modeling ontologies are grounded on the economic premise that profit sharing is a critical condition to be assessed during the configuration of a value constellation. Such a condition ought to be reinforced through a monitoring mechanism design, since a value model expresses only promises (but not assurances) of value creation. Hence there is a need to extend current value modeling ontologies with a monitoring ontology. This ontology will enable business practitioners ...

  13. Data monitoring committees: Promoting best practices to address emerging challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Thomas R; DeMets, David L; Roe, Matthew T; Wittes, Janet; Calis, Karim A; Vora, Amit N; Meisel, Alan; Bain, Raymond P; Konstam, Marvin A; Pencina, Michael J; Gordon, David J; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Hennekens, Charles H; Neaton, James D; Pearson, Gail D; Andersson, Tomas Lg; Pfeffer, Marc A; Ellenberg, Susan S

    2017-04-01

    Data monitoring committees are responsible for safeguarding the interests of study participants and assuring the integrity and credibility of clinical trials. The independence of data monitoring committees from sponsors and investigators is essential in achieving this mission. Creative approaches are needed to address ongoing and emerging challenges that potentially threaten data monitoring committees' independence and effectiveness. An expert panel of representatives from academia, industry and government sponsors, and regulatory agencies discussed these challenges and proposed best practices and operating principles for effective functioning of contemporary data monitoring committees. Prospective data monitoring committee members need better training. Options could include didactic instruction as well as apprenticeships to provide real-world experience. Data monitoring committee members should be protected against legal liability arising from their service. While avoiding breaches in confidentiality of interim data remains a high priority, data monitoring committees should have access to unblinded efficacy and safety data throughout the trial to enable informed judgments about risks and benefits. Because overly rigid procedures can compromise their independence, data monitoring committees should have the flexibility necessary to best fulfill their responsibilities. Data monitoring committee charters should articulate principles that guide the data monitoring committee process rather than list a rigid set of requirements. Data monitoring committees should develop their recommendations by consensus rather than through voting processes. The format for the meetings of the data monitoring committee should maintain the committee's independence and clearly establish the leadership of the data monitoring committee chair. The independent statistical group at the Statistical Data Analysis Center should have sufficient depth of knowledge about the study at hand and

  14. From numbers to ecosystems and biodiversity: A mechanistic approach to monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Ferreira

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Diverse political, cultural and biological needs epitomise the contrasting demands impacting on the mandate of the South African National Parks (SANParks to maintain biological diversity. Systems-based approaches and strategic adaptive management (learn by doing enable SANParks to accommodate these demands. However, such a management strategy creates new information needs, which require an appropriate analytical approach. We use conceptual links between objectives, indicators, mechanisms and modulators to identify key concerns in the context of and related to management objectives. Although our suggested monitoring designs are based mostly on defined or predicted underlying mechanisms of a concern, SANParks requires inventory monitoring to evaluate its key mandate. We therefore propose a predictive inventory approach based on species assemblages related to habitat preferences. Inventories alone may not always adequately serve unpacking of mechanisms: in some cases population size needs to be estimated to meet the information needs of management strategies, but actual population sizes may indirectly affect how the species impact on other values. In addition, ecosystem objectives require multivariate assessments of key communities, which can be used in trend analysis. SANParks therefore needs to know how to detect and define trends efficiently, which, in turn, requires precision of measures of variables. Conservation implications: Current research needs with regard to monitoring should focus on defining designs to yield optimal precision whilst taking methodology, survey trade-offs and analytical approaches into account. Use of these directives and research will guide monitoring during evaluation of SANParks objectives at various scales.

  15. Integrated monitoring and surveillance system demonstration project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aumeier, S.E.; Walters, G. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kotter, D.; Walrath, W.M.; Zamecnik, R.J. [Lockheed-Martin Idaho Technologies Company, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1997-07-01

    We present a summary of efforts associated with the installation of an integrated system for the surveillance and monitoring of stabilized plutonium metals and oxides in long-term storage. The product of this effort will include a Pu storage requirements document, baseline integrated monitoring and surveillance system (IMSS) prototype and test bed that will be installed in the Fuel Manufacturing Facility (FMF) nuclear material vault at Argonne National Laboratory - West (ANL-W), and a Pu tracking database including data analysis capabilities. The prototype will be based on a minimal set of vault and package monitoring requirements as derived from applicable DOE documentation and guidelines, detailed in the requirements document, including DOE-STD-3013-96. The use of standardized requirements will aid individual sites in the selection of sensors that best suit their needs while the prototype IMSS, located at ANL-W, will be used as a test bed to compare and contrast sensor performance against a baseline integrated system (the IMSS), demonstrate system capabilities, evaluate potential technology gaps, and test new hardware and software designs using various storage configurations. With efforts currently underway to repackage and store a substantial quantity of plutonium and plutonium-bearing material within the DOE complex, this is an opportune time to undertake such a project. 4 refs.

  16. Technical support for the Ohio Clean Coal Technology Program. Volume 2, Baseline of knowledge concerning process modification opportunities, research needs, by-product market potential, and regulatory requirements: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olfenbuttel, R.; Clark, S.; Helper, E.; Hinchee, R.; Kuntz, C.; Means, J.; Oxley, J.; Paisley, M.; Rogers, C.; Sheppard, W.; Smolak, L. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1989-08-28

    This report was prepared for the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) under Grant Agreement No. CDO/R-88-LR1 and comprises two volumes. Volume 1 presents data on the chemical, physical, and leaching characteristics of by-products from a wide variety of clean coal combustion processes. Volume 2 consists of a discussion of (a) process modification waste minimization opportunities and stabilization considerations; (b) research and development needs and issues relating to clean coal combustion technologies and by-products; (c) the market potential for reusing or recycling by-product materials; and (d) regulatory considerations relating to by-product disposal or reuse.

  17. Monitoring Evolution at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Andrade, P; Murphy, S; Pigueiras, L; Santos, M

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two years, the operation of the CERN Data Centres went through significant changes with the introduction of new mechanisms for hardware procurement, new services for cloud provisioning and configuration management, among other improvements. These changes resulted in an increase of resources being operated in a more dynamic environment. Today, the CERN Data Centres provide over 11000 multi-core processor servers, 130 PB disk servers, 100 PB tape robots, and 150 high performance tape drives. To cope with these developments, an evolution of the data centre monitoring tools was also required. This modernisation was based on a number of guiding rules: sustain the increase of resources, adapt to the new dynamic nature of the data centres, make monitoring data easier to share, give more flexibility to Service Managers on how they publish and consume monitoring metrics and logs, establish a common repository of monitoring data, optimise the handling of monitoring notifications, and replace the previous ...

  18. Developing the Tools for Geologic Repository Monitoring - Andra's Monitoring R and D Program - 12045

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buschaert, S.; Lesoille, S.; Bertrand, J.; Mayer, S.; Landais, P. [ANDRA, 1-7 rue Jean-Monnet, F-92298 Chatenay-Malabry cedex (France)

    2012-07-01

    The French Safety Guide recommends that Andra develop a monitoring program to be implemented during repository construction and conducted until (and possibly after) closure, in order to confirm expected behavior and enhance knowledge of relevant processes. To achieve this, Andra has developed an overall monitoring strategy and identified specific technical objectives to inform disposal process management on evolutions relevant to both the long term safety and reversible, pre-closure management of the repository. Andra has launched an ambitious R and D program to ensure that reliable, durable, metrologically qualified and tested monitoring systems will be available at the time of repository construction in order to respond to monitoring objectives. After four years of a specific R and D program, first observations are described and recommendations are proposed. The results derived from 4 years of Andra's R and D program allow three main observations to be shared. First, while other industries also invest in monitoring equipment, their obvious emphasis will always be on their specific requirements and needs, thus often only providing a partial match with repository requirements. Examples can be found for all available sensors, which are generally not resistant to radiation. Second, the very close scrutiny anticipated for the geologic disposal process is likely to place an unprecedented emphasis on the quality of monitoring results. It therefore seems important to emphasize specific developments with an aim at providing metrologically qualified systems. Third, adapting existing technology to specific repository needs, and providing adequate proof of their worth, is a lengthy process. In conclusion, it therefore seems prudent to plan ahead and to invest wisely in the adequate development of those monitoring tools that will likely be needed in the repository to respond to the implementers' and regulators' requirements, including those agreed and developed

  19. Meteorological Monitoring Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hancock, H.A. Jr. [ed.; Parker, M.J.; Addis, R.P.

    1994-09-01

    The purpose of this technical report is to provide a comprehensive, detailed overview of the meteorological monitoring program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. The principle function of the program is to provide current, accurate meteorological data as input for calculating the transport and diffusion of any unplanned release of an atmospheric pollutant. The report is recommended for meteorologists, technicians, or any personnel who require an in-depth understanding of the meteorological monitoring program.

  20. Assessment of education requirements for patients with rheumatoid arthritis, based on the Polish version of the Educational Needs Assessment Tool (Pol-ENAT), in the light of some health problems - A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierakowska, Matylda; Klepacka, Małgorzata; Sierakowski, Stanisław Józef; Pawlak-Buś, Katarzyna; Leszczyński, Piotr; Majdan, Maria; Olesińska, Marzena; Romanowski, Wojciech; Bykowska-Sochacka, Małgorzata; Jeka, Sławomir; Sierakowska, Justyna Anna; Ndosi, Mwidimi; Krajewska-Kułak, Elżbieta

    2016-06-02

    Patients with chronic rheumatoid arthritis (RA) need advice in order to face the problems of everyday life, as well as suffering associated with the disease. Health professionals should attempt to raise the level of resourcefulness and independence of the patient. To assess the relationship between the deficit of knowledge about RA and the degree of pain, fatigue, morning stiffness, assessment of disease activity as well as functional efficiency. The study was conducted on 277 patients with RA in 7 rheumatologic centres in Poland. The method applied was the questionnaire Pol-ENAT (0-156); HAQ DI (0-3); analog scales (0-100). Mean (SD) age was 53.28 (13.01) and disease duration 13.70 (10.63) years. The mean (SD) value was 54.93 (23.17) for pain, 52.97 (21.98) for fatigue, 48.28 (24.76) for morning stiffness (0-100 mm). HAQ DI was 1.40 (0.66), with an upward trend with duration of disease (passessed with HAQ DI. The study shows that health education should be targeted at young patients with early RA. In the case of the severity of morning joints stiffness, there is a need to increase knowledge about the methods of mobility aids, self-care and the possibility of obtaining support.

  1. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD7 and RAD16 genes are required for inducible excision of endonuclease III sensitive-sites, yet are not needed for the repair of these lesions following a single UV dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, A D; Waters, R

    1997-01-31

    The RAD7 and RAD16 genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have roles in the repair of UV induced CPDs in nontranscribed genes [1], and in the repair of CPDs in the nontranscribed strand of transcribed genes [2]. Previously, we identified an inducible component to nucleotide excision repair (NER), which is absent in a rad16 delta strain [3]. We have examined the repair of UV induced endonuclease III sensitive-sites (EIIISS), and have shown repair of these lesions to proceed by NER but their removal from nontranscribed regions is independent of RAD7 and RAD16. Furthermore, EIIISS are repaired with equal efficiency from both transcribed and nontranscribed genes [4]. In order to dissect the roles of RAD7 and RAD16 in the above processes we examined the repair of EIIISS in the MAT alpha and HML alpha loci, which are, respectively, transcriptionally active and inactive in alpha haploid cells. These loci have elevated levels of these lesions after UV (in genomic DNA EIIISS constitute about 10% of total lesions, whereas CPDs are about 70% of total lesions). We have shown that excision of UV induced EIIISS is enhanced following a prior UV irradiation. No enhancement of repair was detected in either the rad7 delta or the rad16 delta mutant. The fact that RAD7 and RAD16 are not required for the repair of EIIISS per se yet are required for the enhanced excision of these lesions from MAT alpha and HML alpha suggests two possibilities. These genes have two roles in NER, namely in the repair of CPDs from nontranscribed sequences, and in enhancing NER itself regardless of whether these genes' products are required for the excision of the specific lesion being repaired. In the latter case, the induction of RAD7 and RAD16 may increase the turnover of complexes stalled in nontranscribed DNA so as to increase the availability of NER proteins for the repair of CPDs and EIIISS in all regions of the genome.

  2. 76 FR 13969 - Notice of Request for Approval of an Information Collection; National Animal Health Monitoring...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ...; National Animal Health Monitoring System; Needs Assessments AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection... National Animal Health Monitoring System needs assessments. DATES: We will consider all comments that we...-2908. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: National Animal Health Monitoring System; Needs...

  3. Geomatics Education: Need Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, A.

    2014-11-01

    the other hand, the industry requires high skilled manpower, high experienced manpower. This is a low equilibrium situation. Since the need is enhancing day by day, the shortage of the skilled manpower is increasing, the need of the geomatics education emerges. This paper researches on the need assessment of the education in geospatial specialization. It emphasises on the challenges and issues prevail in geospatial education and in the specialized fields of remote sensing and GIS. This paper analyse the need assessment through all the three actors: government, geospatial industry and education institutions.

  4. Hydrogen and Oxygen Gas Monitoring System Design and Operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee C. Cadwallader; Kevin G. DeWall; J. Stephen Herring

    2007-06-01

    This paper describes pertinent design practices of selecting types of monitors, monitor unit placement, setpoint selection, and maintenance considerations for gas monitors. While hydrogen gas monitors and enriched oxygen atmosphere monitors as they would be needed for hydrogen production experiments are the primary focus of this paper, monitors for carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide are also discussed. The experiences of designing, installing, and calibrating gas monitors for a laboratory where experiments in support of the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) are described along with codes, standards, and regulations for these monitors. Information from the literature about best operating practices is also presented. The NHI program has two types of activities. The first, near-term activity is laboratory and pilot-plant experimentation with different processes in the kilogram per day scale to select the most promising types of processes for future applications of hydrogen production. Prudent design calls for indoor gas monitors to sense any hydrogen leaks within these laboratory rooms. The second, longer-term activity is the prototype, or large-scale plants to produce tons of hydrogen per day. These large, outdoor production plants will require area (or “fencepost”) monitoring of hydrogen gas leaks. Some processes will have oxygen production with hydrogen production, and any oxygen releases are also safety concerns since oxygen gas is the strongest oxidizer. Monitoring of these gases is important for personnel safety of both indoor and outdoor experiments. There is some guidance available about proper placement of monitors. The fixed point, stationary monitor can only function if the intruding gas contacts the monitor. Therefore, monitor placement is vital to proper monitoring of the room or area. Factors in sensor location selection include: indoor or outdoor site, the location and nature of potential vapor/gas sources, chemical and physical data of the

  5. Support for Self-Regulation in Learning Complex Topics from Multimedia Explanations: Do Learners Need Extensive or Minimal Support?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodicio, Hector Garcia; Sanchez, Emilio; Acuna, Santiago R.

    2013-01-01

    Acquiring complex conceptual knowledge requires learners to self-regulate their learning by planning, monitoring, and adjusting the process but they find it difficult to do so. In one experiment, we examined whether learners need broad systems of support for self-regulation or whether they are also able to learn with more economical support…

  6. Need to monitoring the particulate components and gaseous components of the I-131 in air, on Radiological monitoring networks. impact of the accident of Fukushima Dai-chi in Spain; Necesidad de monitorizar las componentes particulada y gaseosa del {sup 1}31I en aire, en redes de vigilancia radiologica. Impacto en Espana del accidente de Fukushima DAI-ICHI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeza Espasa, A.; Caballero Andrada, M.; Corbacho Merino, J. A.; Ontalba Salamanca, M. A.; Rodriguez Perulero, A.; Valencia Corrales, D.; Vasco Vargas, J.

    2013-07-01

    Following a nuclear accident with significant overseas evacuations, it should be accurately determined concentration radio iodines into the atmosphere, given its important contribution to the radiological impact produced. Automatic networks radiation monitoring aim to provide as quickly as possible, reliable information on these radiological changes, to take necessary countermeasures. (Author)

  7. WHO NEEDS INTERCULTURAL COMPETENCES?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen – Laura ZARZU

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The current essay focuses on the need for formal education in the area of intercultural communication and training of intercultural competences. It builds on cultural identity and diversity literature, on the experiment conducted in the Low Countries in introducing a new topic for students from social sciences referring to intercultural communication and on reports and papers of international companies, organizations and agencies. The argument of globalization which should give equal opportunities to each and every world’s citizen adds pressure on managers dealing with multicultural teams. Intercultural competences gain importance in recruiting, while turning cultural diversity in team performance requires skills, knowledge and experience. Managing cultural diversity presupposes that people are aware, recognize, understand and deal with differences. Thus intercultural communication should be studied as a stand-alone topic or imbedded in other subjects in different forms of education or training, so people are prepared for intercultural, social and professional relationships.

  8. Improved Marine Waters Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazov, Atanas; Yakushev, Evgeniy; Milkova, Tanya; Slabakova, Violeta; Hristova, Ognyana

    2017-04-01

    IMAMO - Improved Marine Waters Monitoring is a project under the Programme BG02: Improved monitoring of marine waters, managed by Bulgarian Ministry of environment and waters and co-financed by the Financial Mechanism of the European Economic Area (EEA FM) 2009 - 2014. Project Beneficiary is the Institute of oceanology - Bulgarian Academy of Sciences with two partners: Norwegian Institute for Water Research and Bulgarian Black Sea Basin Directorate. The Project aims to improve the monitoring capacity and expertise of the organizations responsible for marine waters monitoring in Bulgaria to meet the requirements of EU and national legislation. The main outcomes are to fill the gaps in information from the Initial assessment of the marine environment and to collect data to assess the current ecological status of marine waters including information as a base for revision of ecological targets established by the monitoring programme prepared in 2014 under Art. 11 of MSFD. Project activities are targeted to ensure data for Descriptors 5, 8 and 9. IMAMO aims to increase the institutional capacity of the Bulgarian partners related to the monitoring and assessment of the Black Sea environment. The main outputs are: establishment of real time monitoring and set up of accredited laboratory facilities for marine waters and sediments chemical analysis to ensure the ability of Bulgarian partners to monitor progress of subsequent measures undertaken.

  9. What Strategies Are Appropriate for Monitoring Children outside of Family Care and Evaluating the Impact of the Programs Intended to Serve Them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ager, Alastair; Zimmerman, Cathy; Unlu, Kathy; Rinehart, Richard; Nyberg, Beverly; Zeanah, Charles; Hunleth, Jean; Bastiaens, Ida; Weldy, Andre; Bachman, Gretchen; Blum, Alexander B.; Strottman, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To strengthen the evidence-base for policy and practice for support of children outside of family care requires effective, efficient and sustainable mechanisms for monitoring and evaluation. Toward that end, two core questions guided a systematic review of evidence: What strategies are appropriate for monitoring the needs and…

  10. Optimization of Sensor Monitoring Strategies for Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klise, K. A.; Laird, C. D.; Downey, N.; Baker Hebert, L.; Blewitt, D.; Smith, G. R.

    2016-12-01

    Continuous or regularly scheduled monitoring has the potential to quickly identify changes in air quality. However, even with low-cost sensors, only a limited number of sensors can be placed to monitor airborne pollutants. The physical placement of these sensors and the sensor technology used can have a large impact on the performance of a monitoring strategy. Furthermore, sensors can be placed for different objectives, including maximum coverage, minimum time to detection or exposure, or to quantify emissions. Different objectives may require different monitoring strategies, which need to be evaluated by stakeholders before sensors are placed in the field. In this presentation, we outline methods to enhance ambient detection programs through optimal design of the monitoring strategy. These methods integrate atmospheric transport models with sensor characteristics, including fixed and mobile sensors, sensor cost and failure rate. The methods use site specific pre-computed scenarios which capture differences in meteorology, terrain, concentration averaging times, gas concentration, and emission characteristics. The pre-computed scenarios become input to a mixed-integer, stochastic programming problem that solves for sensor locations and types that maximize the effectiveness of the detection program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. No need for speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Lori L; Hagstrom, Steve G

    2012-07-01

    Confirmation by a nursing home resident's physician is frequently required prior to transport from the facility to a hospital. So in cases for which the need to transport isn't truly urgent but the assigned priority is lights and siren, EMS often rush to the scene only to wait while physician confirmation is obtained. With the protocol in place, routine response for non-urgent transport needs means that confirmation from the physician is often already being sought or has been received by the time the ambulance arrives. This theoretically places the crew "back in service" sooner. Reducing unnecessary lights-and-siren ambulance response in communities employing this type of response model can improve use of EMS resources. For example, some community-level EMS protocols in the Allina Health EMS service area have local police and fire dispatched to all medical 9-1-1 calls. In non-emergent situations for which the protocol is now used, police and fire are no longer dispatched in situations they would previously have been dispatched concurrent with an unnecessary emergent response. The Allina Health Skilled Facility Ambulance Response Program provides an example of how EMS agencies can partner successfully with skilled-nursing facilities to promote the most appropriate use of ambulance services and effectively reduce the frequency of unnecessary emergent response. Limiting the use of lights-and-siren arrival to only those situations for which it's truly warranted improves safety and benefits nursing home residents by alleviating anxiety and disruption.

  12. Fortification Challenges and Needs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Experience in many parts of the developing world has shown thatfood fortification offers a cost-effective and sustainable solution to the problem of micronutrient malnutrition. Building on the advances in science and technology and backed by studies on the economic benefits of fortification programs, governments and industry are beginning to respond positively to the call of nutrition advocates to adopt fortification as a long-term strategy. On the other hand, formidable challenges still remain in many countries in Asia, constraining the widespread adoption of this strategy. The science and technology community needs to provide adequate scientific and technological information as basis for planning and decision making. The government faces the challenge of providing the enabling environment for all stakeholders to cooperate in the fortification effort. Industry faces the challenge of adapting its production system to the requirements of fortification in order that they can contribute to social objectives while pursuing their economic objectives. The international and bilateral aid agencies need to seek tried and innovative ways to support the multiple players of food fortification, as these players in turn face the challenges that confront them.

  13. Fortification Challenges and Needs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RODOLFOF.FLORENTINO

    2001-01-01

    Experience in many parts of the developing world has shown that food fortification offers a costeffective and sustainable solution to the problem of micronutrient malnutrition.Building on the advances in science and technology and backed by studies on the economic benefits of fortification programs,govenments and industry are beginning to respond positively to the call of nutrition advocates to adopt fortification as a long-term strategy.On the other hand,formidable challenges still remain in many countries in Asia,constraining the widespread adoption of this strategy,The science and technology community needs to provide adequate scientific and technological information as basis for planning and decision making,The governent faces the challenge of providing the enabling environment for all stakeholders to cooperate in the fortification effort.Industry faces the challenge of adapting its production system to the requirements of fortification in oreder that they can contribute to social bojectives while pursuing their economic objectives,The international and bilateral aid agencies need to seek tried and innovative ways to support the multiple players of food fortification,as these players in turn face the challenges that confront them.

  14. Specific measures and analysis of requirements of emergency patients in need of psy-chological nursing in ICU%ICU急诊患者对心理护理的需求分析及具体措施

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张华丽; 王媛; 卢晓娥

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the demand of emergency patients in need of psychological nursing in ICU and explore the measures of psychological nursing.Methods 445 cases of emergency patients, treated in the hospital from September 2012 to September 2013, were selected as the research object.The psychological care need was self-made.The analysis scale of the demand of psychological nursing was made by ourselves and at the same time questionnaire survey was carried out.The demand of psychological nursing before the be-ginning of psychological nursing was measured by using the MSSNS.The plan of targeted psychological nursing was made according to the content of the questionnaire and the effect of nursing was recorded.Results The results of the analysis scale of psychological nursing care showed that the patients needed the nurses'kind attitude and friendly greetings and the nurses could understand the patients.MSSNS scale showed that the negative psychological score of patients was (85.13±10.92)%, including the sub item score inside, which was at a rela-tively high level.The effect of nursing showed that the average of the total time of psychological nursing that the patients received was (81.4±7.1) min and the times of psychological nursing was (1.97±0.32) times.After the effective psychological nursing, the MSSNS scores of patients decreased to (62.32±8.51)%, including the sub item score, which was significantly lower than before (P<0.05) and there was statistical significance.Conclusions Patients in ICU have high demand for psychological nursing, and nursing staff needs to make a effective plan of psychological nursing to deal with the treatment.%目的:评价 ICU急诊患者对心理护理的需求,并探讨具体的心理护理措施。方法以2012年9月至2013年9月间入住我院ICU的445例急诊患者为研究对象,自制心理护理需求分析量表,同时利用MSSNS(非精神科住院患者心理状态评定量表)进行问卷调查,统计

  15. Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System Description Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.F. Loros

    2000-06-29

    consists of instrument and control equipment and components necessary to provide human operators with sufficient information to monitor and control the operation of the repository in an efficient and safe manner. The system consists of operator consoles and workstations, multiple video display terminals, communications and interfacing equipment, and instrument and control software with customized configuration to meet the needs of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Process and logic controllers and the associated input/output units of each system interfaced with this system will be configured into Remote Terminal Units (RTU) and located close to the systems to be monitored and controlled. The RTUs are configured to remain operational should communication with CCC operations be lost. The system provides closed circuit television to selectively view systems, operations, and equipment areas and to aid in the operation of mechanical systems. Control and monitoring of site utility systems will be located in the CCC. Site utilities include heating, ventilation, and air conditioning equipment; plant compressed air; plant water; firewater; electrical systems; and inert gases, such as nitrogen, if required. This system interfaces with surface and subsurface systems that either generate output data or require remote control input. The system interfaces with the Site Communications System for bulk storage of operational data, on-site and off-site communication, and a plant-wide public announcement system. The system interfaces with the Safeguards and Security System to provide operational status and emergency alarm indications. The system interfaces with the Site Operation System to provide site wide acquisition of data for analysis and reports, historical information for trends, utility information for plant operation, and to receive operating plans and procedures.

  16. The NASA Carbon Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtt, G. C.

    2015-12-01

    Greenhouse gas emission inventories, forest carbon sequestration programs (e.g., Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD and REDD+), cap-and-trade systems, self-reporting programs, and their associated monitoring, reporting and verification (MRV) frameworks depend upon data that are accurate, systematic, practical, and transparent. A sustained, observationally-driven carbon monitoring system using remote sensing data has the potential to significantly improve the relevant carbon cycle information base for the U.S. and world. Initiated in 2010, NASA's Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) project is prototyping and conducting pilot studies to evaluate technological approaches and methodologies to meet carbon monitoring and reporting requirements for multiple users and over multiple scales of interest. NASA's approach emphasizes exploitation of the satellite remote sensing resources, computational capabilities, scientific knowledge, airborne science capabilities, and end-to-end system expertise that are major strengths of the NASA Earth Science program. Through user engagement activities, the NASA CMS project is taking specific actions to be responsive to the needs of stakeholders working to improve carbon MRV frameworks. The first phase of NASA CMS projects focused on developing products for U.S. biomass/carbon stocks and global carbon fluxes, and on scoping studies to identify stakeholders and explore other potential carbon products. The second phase built upon these initial efforts, with a large expansion in prototyping activities across a diversity of systems, scales, and regions, including research focused on prototype MRV systems and utilization of COTS technologies. Priorities for the future include: 1) utilizing future satellite sensors, 2) prototyping with commercial off-the-shelf technology, 3) expanding the range of prototyping activities, 4) rigorous evaluation, uncertainty quantification, and error characterization, 5) stakeholder

  17. Monitoring as an information management task in hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wentz, Bernhard

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The increasing complexity of information systems requires a systematic monitoring of the information system’s architecture, components, and operation within the strategic, tactical, and operational information management. While there exists a broad methodical assistance for information system’s planning and directing, the monitoring aspect suffers from lacking awareness of the problem on the part of the information manager and missing knowledge about appropriate methods. The paper emphasizes the need for systematic monitoring and gives an overview of the most important methods and tools to support systematic monitoring of the HIS and its components. The overview is presented according to the levels of information management. Basis were best practice approaches like ITIL and COBIT, economic science’s approaches like the Balanced Scorecard as well as appropriate information management’s literature.

  18. 33 CFR 154.525 - Monitoring devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monitoring devices. 154.525... Monitoring devices. The COTP may require the facility to install monitoring devices if the installation of monitoring devices at the facility would significantly limit the size of a discharge of oil or...

  19. Tribal Air Quality Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Dennis

    2001-01-01

    The Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) (Flagstaff, Arizona) provides training and support for tribal professionals in the technical job skills needed for air quality monitoring and other environmental management tasks. ITEP also arranges internships, job placements, and hands-on training opportunities and supports an…

  20. Ultrasonic wireless health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Lionel; Lefeuvre, Elie; Guyomar, Daniel; Richard, Claude; Guy, Philippe; Yuse, Kaori; Monnier, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    The integration of autonomous wireless elements in health monitoring network increases the reliability by suppressing power supplies and data transmission wiring. Micro-power piezoelectric generators are an attractive alternative to primary batteries which are limited by a finite amount of energy, a limited capacity retention and a short shelf life (few years). Our goal is to implement such an energy harvesting system for powering a single AWT (Autonomous Wireless Transmitter) using our SSH (Synchronized Switch Harvesting) method. Based on a non linear process of the piezoelement voltage, this SSH method optimizes the energy extraction from the mechanical vibrations. This AWT has two main functions : The generation of an identifier code by RF transmission to the central receiver and the Lamb wave generation for the health monitoring of the host structure. A damage index is derived from the variation between the transmitted wave spectrum and a reference spectrum. The same piezoelements are used for the energy harvesting function and the Lamb wave generation, thus reducing mass and cost. A micro-controller drives the energy balance and synchronizes the functions. Such an autonomous transmitter has been evaluated on a 300x50x2 mm 3 composite cantilever beam. Four 33x11x0.3 mm 3 piezoelements are used for the energy harvesting and for the wave lamb generation. A piezoelectric sensor is placed at the free end of the beam to track the transmitted Lamb wave. In this configuration, the needed energy for the RF emission is 0.1 mJ for a 1 byte-information and the Lamb wave emission requires less than 0.1mJ. The AWT can harvested an energy quantity of approximately 20 mJ (for a 1.5 Mpa lateral stress) with a 470 μF storage capacitor. This corresponds to a power density near to 6mW/cm 3. The experimental AWT energy abilities are presented and the damage detection process is discussed. Finally, some envisaged solutions are introduced for the implementation of the required data

  1. How to evaluate energy requirement of bum patients——a question still needs farther investigation%烧伤患者热量供应——尚待探讨课题

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪仕良

    2008-01-01

    After a series of study of early feeding(EF),we consider the evaporative heat loss from the burn wound is not the main mechanism of burn hypermetabolism.EF could resuscitate the intestine,preserve its structural inte-gnty and function,prevent bacterial translocation and release of inflammatory mediators,reduce muscle protein catabolism and hypermetabolism.Our studies concerning the relationship between EF and hypermetabolism have already extended to involve hypothalamus now.At the end of 1960s,the advancement in "Intravenous Hyperalimentation" has epoch-making significance,but it has been found later that energy has been oversupplied by this measure,thus it exacerbated visceral loading and led to disorder of internal environment,and it has been found not beneficial to alleviate hypermetabolism.Whether "hypoealoric nutrition" for post-operative patients of G-I(gastro-intestine)surgery is applicable to severe bum patients remains as a problem.Some specialists suggest it is better to supply 126~146 kJ·kg-1·d-1 in severe burn patients.After evaluating the bias and precision of 46 methods of estimating energy supply of burn patients reported from 1953 to 2000,Dikerson RN et al.concluded that the most precise,unbiased methods were those of Milner(1994),Zawaeki(1970)and TMMU(1993,Third Military Medical University formula).Though formulas are simple and convenient to estimate energy supplementation,however,it is difficult to evaluate the requirement of energy when the patient's condition changes immensely.

  2. Analytical Performance Requirements for Systems for Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose With Focus on System Accuracy: Relevant Differences Among ISO 15197:2003, ISO 15197:2013, and Current FDA Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freckmann, Guido; Schmid, Christina; Baumstark, Annette; Rutschmann, Malte; Haug, Cornelia; Heinemann, Lutz

    2015-07-01

    In the European Union (EU), the ISO (International Organization for Standardization) 15197 standard is applicable for the evaluation of systems for self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) before the market approval. In 2013, a revised version of this standard was published. Relevant revisions in the analytical performance requirements are the inclusion of the evaluation of influence quantities, for example, hematocrit, and some changes in the testing procedures for measurement precision and system accuracy evaluation, for example, number of test strip lots. Regarding system accuracy evaluation, the most important change is the inclusion of more stringent accuracy criteria. In 2014, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States published their own guidance document for the premarket evaluation of SMBG systems with even more stringent system accuracy criteria than stipulated by ISO 15197:2013. The establishment of strict accuracy criteria applicable for the premarket evaluation is a possible approach to further improve the measurement quality of SMBG systems. However, the system accuracy testing procedure is quite complex, and some critical aspects, for example, systematic measurement difference between the reference measurement procedure and a higher-order procedure, may potentially limit the apparent accuracy of a given system. Therefore, the implementation of a harmonized reference measurement procedure for which traceability to standards of higher order is verified through an unbroken, documented chain of calibrations is desirable. In addition, the establishment of regular and standardized post-marketing evaluations of distributed test strip lots should be considered as an approach toward an improved measurement quality of available SMBG systems.

  3. Monitoring and verification R&D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilat, Joseph F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Budlong - Sylvester, Kory W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fearey, Bryan L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 Nuclear Posture Review (NPR) report outlined the Administration's approach to promoting the agenda put forward by President Obama in Prague on April 5, 2009. The NPR calls for a national monitoring and verification R&D program to meet future challenges arising from the Administration's nonproliferation, arms control and disarmament agenda. Verification of a follow-on to New START could have to address warheads and possibly components along with delivery capabilities. Deeper cuts and disarmament would need to address all of these elements along with nuclear weapon testing, nuclear material and weapon production facilities, virtual capabilities from old weapon and existing energy programs and undeclared capabilities. We only know how to address some elements of these challenges today, and the requirements may be more rigorous in the context of deeper cuts as well as disarmament. Moreover, there is a critical need for multiple options to sensitive problems and to address other challenges. There will be other verification challenges in a world of deeper cuts and disarmament, some of which we are already facing. At some point, if the reductions process is progressing, uncertainties about past nuclear materials and weapons production will have to be addressed. IAEA safeguards will need to continue to evolve to meet current and future challenges, and to take advantage of new technologies and approaches. Transparency/verification of nuclear and dual-use exports will also have to be addressed, and there will be a need to make nonproliferation measures more watertight and transparent. In this context, and recognizing we will face all of these challenges even if disarmament is not achieved, this paper will explore possible agreements and arrangements; verification challenges; gaps in monitoring and verification technologies and approaches; and the R&D required to address these gaps and other monitoring and verification challenges.

  4. Evaluation of Self-Ratings for Health Information Behaviour Skills Requires More Heterogeneous Sample, but Finds that Public Library Print Collections and Health Information Literacy of Librarians Needs Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Perryman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To understand public library users’ perceptions of ability to locate, evaluate, and use health information; to identify barriers experienced in finding and using health information; and to compare self-ratings of skills to an administered instrument. Design – Mixed methods. Setting – Main library and two branches of one public library system in Florida. Subjects – 20 adult library users purposively selected from 131 voluntary respondents to a previously conducted survey (Yi, 2014 based on age range, ethnicity, gender, and educational level. Of the 20, 13 were female; 11 White, 8 Black, 1 Native American; most had attained college or graduate school education levels (9 each, with 2 having graduated from high school. 15 respondents were aged 45 or older. Methods – Intensive interviews conducted between April and May 2011 used critical incident technique to inquire about a recalled health situation. Participants responded to questions about skill self-appraisal, health situation severity, information seeking and assessment behaviour, use of information, barriers, and outcome. Responses were compared to results of the short form of the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (S-TOFHLA test, administered to participants. Main Results – On a scale of 100, participants’ S-TOFHLA scores measured at high levels of proficiency, with 90% rating 90 points or above. Self-ratings of ability to find health information related to recalled need were ”excellent” (12 participants or “good” (8 participants. Fourteen participants did not seek library assistance; 12 began their search on the Internet, 5 searched the library catalogue, and 3 reported going directly to the collection. Resource preferences were discussed, although no frequency descriptions were provided. 90% of participants self-rated their ability to evaluate the quality of health information as “good” or “excellent.” Participants selected authority

  5. Adults Need Vaccines, Too!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Adult Vaccinations Adults Need Vaccines, Too! Past Issues / Summer 2015 Table of Contents ... of the millions of adults not receiving the vaccines you need? What vaccines do you need? All ...

  6. Stripline Beam Position Monitors For "ELBE"

    CERN Document Server

    Evtushenko, P; Büttig, H; Michel, P; Schurig, R; Wustmann, B

    2001-01-01

    At the Forschungszentrum Rossendorf (FZR), the superconducting electron linear accelerator ELBE is under construction. It will deliver an electron beam with an energy of up to 40 MeV at an average beam current of up to 1mA. The accelerator uses standing wave DESY type RF cavities operating at 1.3 GHz. A non-destructive system for the measurement of the beam position at about 30 locations is needed. To obtain the required resolution of 100μm, a system of stripline beam position monitors (BPM) is under design.

  7. Mobility Monitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schæbel, Anne-Lise; Dybbro, Karina Løvendahl; Andersen, Lisbeth Støvring;

    2015-01-01

    Undersøgelse af digital monitorering af plejehjemsbeboeres vendinger under søvn på Fremtidens Plejehjem, Nørresundby......Undersøgelse af digital monitorering af plejehjemsbeboeres vendinger under søvn på Fremtidens Plejehjem, Nørresundby...

  8. Stereo Vision for SPHERES-based Navigation and Monitoring Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Maintenance operations and scientific research on the International Space Station (ISS) require active monitoring. Currently the majority of monitoring and recording...

  9. Does Education Need a Copernicus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, George

    1986-01-01

    The changes in the U.S. population and society in the last 70 years have been so substantial that the old system of school and university learning needs more than tinkering and probably requires bold, imaginative recasting for a new age. (Author/MSE)

  10. Faculty Trends and Projected Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Barbara A.

    1983-01-01

    Matching faculty with projected staffing needs requires creation of a broad-based inventory of faculty talents and interests, but such a database also suggests a number of faculty placement alternatives, including more productive faculty use, increased industry outplacement, and combining academic and nonacademic employment or administrative…

  11. Nutrient Needs of Young Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willenberg, Barbara; Hemmelgarn, Melinda

    1991-01-01

    Explains the nutritional requirements of children and adolescents, and the physiological roles of the major nutrients. Details the nutrient needs of young athletes, including pre- and postgame meals and fluid replacement. Discusses eating disorders and obesity. Advocates a diet rich in complex carbohydrates. (BC)

  12. Scientific customer needs - NASA user

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, David C.

    1987-01-01

    Some requirements for scientific users of the Space Station are considered. The use of testbeds to evaluate design concepts for information systems, and for interfacing between designers and builders of systems is examined. The need for an information system that provides an effective interaction between ground-based users and their space-based equipment is discussed.

  13. Faculty Trends and Projected Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Barbara A.

    1983-01-01

    Matching faculty with projected staffing needs requires creation of a broad-based inventory of faculty talents and interests, but such a database also suggests a number of faculty placement alternatives, including more productive faculty use, increased industry outplacement, and combining academic and nonacademic employment or administrative…

  14. Safety system status monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, J.R.; Morgenstern, M.H.; Rideout, T.H.; Cowley, P.J.

    1984-03-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory has studied the safety aspects of monitoring the preoperational status of safety systems in nuclear power plants. The goals of the study were to assess for the NRC the effectiveness of current monitoring systems and procedures, to develop near-term guidelines for reducing human errors associated with monitoring safety system status, and to recommend a regulatory position on this issue. A review of safety system status monitoring practices indicated that current systems and procedures do not adequately aid control room operators in monitoring safety system status. This is true even of some systems and procedures installed to meet existing regulatory guidelines (Regulatory Guide 1.47). In consequence, this report suggests acceptance criteria for meeting the functional requirements of an adequate system for monitoring safety system status. Also suggested are near-term guidelines that could reduce the likelihood of human errors in specific, high-priority status monitoring tasks. It is recommended that (1) Regulatory Guide 1.47 be revised to address these acceptance criteria, and (2) the revised Regulatory Guide 1.47 be applied to all plants, including those built since the issuance of the original Regulatory Guide.

  15. Blood pressure monitors for home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007482.htm Blood pressure monitors for home To use the sharing features ... ask you to keep track of your blood pressure at home. To do this, you will need ...

  16. MEMS glaucoma monitoring device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Smitha; Austin, Michael

    2007-04-01

    Glaucoma is a serious disease, affecting millions of people worldwide requiring continuous monitoring of Intra Ocular Pressure (IOP) to avoid the risk of blindness. Current laboratory measurements are infrequent, intrusive and do not indicate the progression of the disease. The paper reports on the development of an implantable Glaucoma monitoring system that can monitor IOP in the eye to indicate any elevation in risk to the patient. A mathematical model of the anterior chamber of the eye was used to analyze the complex fluid flow and pressure balance in the eye. This was done in order to determine the performance requirements of the actuator, sensor and transmission electronics that could be integrated on a single microchip using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology, to carry out the testing internally. The accuracy of the system was theoretically tested against results from external medical tests. The results were found to be comparable.

  17. Characteristics and applications of small, portable gaseous air pollution monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKercher, Grant R; Salmond, Jennifer A; Vanos, Jennifer K

    2017-04-01

    Traditional approaches for measuring air quality based on fixed measurements are inadequate for personal exposure monitoring. To combat this issue, the use of small, portable gas-sensing air pollution monitoring technologies is increasing, with researchers and individuals employing portable and mobile methods to obtain more spatially and temporally representative air pollution data. However, many commercially available options are built for various applications and based on different technologies, assumptions, and limitations. A review of the monitor characteristics of small, gaseous monitors is missing from current scientific literature. A state-of-the-art review of small, portable monitors that measure ambient gaseous outdoor pollutants was developed to address broad trends during the last 5-10 years, and to help future experimenters interested in studying gaseous air pollutants choose monitors appropriate for their application and sampling needs. Trends in small, portable gaseous air pollution monitor uses and technologies were first identified and discussed in a review of literature. Next, searches of online databases were performed for articles containing specific information related to performance, characteristics, and use of such monitors that measure one or more of three criteria gaseous air pollutants: ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and carbon monoxide. All data were summarized into reference tables for comparison between applications, physical features, sensing capabilities, and costs of the devices. Recent portable monitoring trends are strongly related to associated applications and audiences. Fundamental research requires monitors with the best individual performance, and thus the highest cost technology. Monitor networking favors real-time capabilities and moderate cost for greater reproduction. Citizen science and crowdsourcing applications allow for lower-cost components; however important strengths and limitations for each application must be addressed

  18. The tropospheric monitoring instrument

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voert, M.J. te; Brakel, R. van; Witvoet, G.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal and opto-mechanical design and analysis work has been done on the Tropospheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI), a spectrometer on the Copernicus Sentinel 5 Precursor satellite. To verify compliance with the stringent opto-mechanical stability requirements, detailed thermal and thermo-mechani

  19. Environmental monitoring of migrant children schools and survey of their health service requirement in Jiading District%嘉定区外来务工子女学校环境监测及卫生服务需求调查*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张一英; 袁红; 张琴; 董玉婷

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To understand the environmental sanitation condition of the migrant children schools and their health service requirement. Methods:All of 18 migrant children schools were investigated in Jiading District and among them ifve schools were interviewed in semi-structure groups and investigated with the questionnaire. Results:The hardware facilities in the migrant children schools were relatively poor in Jiading District. The management compliance rate of the system of vaccination certiifcate inspection was 77.78%, which was signiifcantly lower than that of the public schools by 100%. The compliance rates of seven management indicators of student common disease monitoring, prevention and treatment plan and measure, propaganda activity, health education, mental health, smoking cessation, and others were lower than those of the public primary and secondary schools on the average, whose difference had statistical signiifcance (P<0.01). Conclusion:The requirement of the health service in the migrant children schools needs the policy support, and the daily management needs to be strengthened.%目的:了解外来务工子女学校在环境卫生状况和卫生服务方面的需求。方法:调查嘉定区全部18所外来务工子女学校,其中对5所学校开展半结构的小组访谈和问卷调查。结果:嘉定区外来务工子女学校硬件设施相对较差。新生入学预防接种证查验制度的管理达标率为77.78%,明显低于公办学校的100.00%;学生常见病监测、防治计划措施、宣传活动、健康教育、心理卫生、控烟工作及宣传活动七项管理指标达标率均低于公办中小学校,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01)。结论:外来务工子女学校的健康服务需要政策支持,并加强日常管理。

  20. Determining information management needs for enhanced international safeguards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badalamente, R.V. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); DeLand, S.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Whiteson, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Anzelon, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-08-01

    The Safeguards Information Management System initiative is a program of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation aimed at supporting the International Atomic Energy Agency`s (IAEA) efforts to strengthen safeguards through the enhancement of information management capabilities. The DOE hopes to provide the IAEA with the ability to correlate and analyze data from existing and new sources of information, including publicly available information, information on imports and exports, design information, environmental monitoring data, and non-safeguards information. The first step in this effort is to identify and define IAEA requirements. In support of this, we have created a users` requirements document based on interviews with IAEA staff that describes the information management needs of the end user projected by the IAEA, including needs for storage, retrieval, analysis, communication, and visualization of data. Also included are characteristics of the end user and attributes of the current environment. This paper describes our efforts to obtain the required information. We discuss how to accurately represent user needs and involve users for an international organization with a multi-cultural user population. We describe our approach, our experience in setting up and conducting the interviews and brainstorming sessions, and a brief discussion of what we learned.