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Sample records for monitoring pyrethroid resistance

  1. Pyrethroid resistance in mosquitoes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NANNAN LIU; QIANG XU; FANG ZHU; LEE ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    Repeated blood feedings throughout their life span have made mosquitoes ideal transmitters of a wide variety of disease agents. Vector control is a very important part of the current global strategy for the control of mosquito-associated diseases and insecticide application is the most important component in this effort. Pyrethroids, which account for 25% of the world insecticide market, are currently the most widely used insecticides for the indoor control of mosquitoes and are the only chemical recommended for the treatment of mosquito nets, the main tool for preventing malaria in Africa. However, mosquito-borne diseases are now resurgent, largely because of insecticide resistance that has developed in mosquito vectors and the anti-parasite drug resistance of parasites. This paper reviews our current knowledge of the molecular mechanisms governing metabolic detoxification and the development of target site insensitivity that leads to pyrethroid resistance in mosquitoes.

  2. Establishment of quantitative sequencing and filter contact vial bioassay for monitoring pyrethroid resistance in the common bed bug, Cimex lectularius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Keon Mook; Lee, Da-Young; Yoon, Kyong Sup; Kwon, Deok Ho; Kim, Heung Chul; Klein, Terry A; Clark, J Marshall; Lee, Si Hyeock

    2010-07-01

    Two point mutations (V419L and L925I) in the voltage-sensitive sodium channel alpha-subunit gene have been identified in deltamethrin-resistant bed bugs. A quantitative sequencing (QS) protocol was developed to establish a population-based genotyping method as a molecular resistance-monitoring tool based on the frequency of the two mutations. The nucleotide signal ratio at each mutation site was generated from sequencing chromatograms and plotted against the corresponding resistance allele frequency. Frequency prediction equations were generated from the plots by linear regression, and the signal ratios were shown to highly correlate with resistance allele frequencies (r2 > 0.9928). As determined by QS, neither mutation was found in a bed bug population collected in 1993. Populations collected in recent years (2007-2009), however, exhibited completely or nearly saturating L925I mutation frequencies and highly variable frequencies of the V419L mutation. In addition to QS, the filter contact vial bioassay (FCVB) method was established and used to determine the baseline susceptibility and resistance of bed bugs to deltamethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin. A pyrethroid-resistant strain showed >9,375- and 6,990-fold resistance to deltamethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin, respectively. Resistance allele frequencies in different bed bug populations predicted by QS correlated well with the FCVB results, confirming the roles of the two mutations in pyrethroid resistance. Taken together, employment of QS in conjunction with FCVB should greatly facilitate the detection and monitoring of pyrethroid-resistant bed bugs in the field. The advantages of FCVB as an on-site resistance-monitoring tool are discussed.

  3. Sodium Channel Mutations and Pyrethroid Resistance in Aedes aegypti

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    Yuzhe Du

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Pyrethroid insecticides are widely used to control insect pests and human disease vectors. Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary targets of pyrethroid insecticides. Mutations in the sodium channel have been shown to be responsible for pyrethroid resistance, known as knockdown resistance (kdr, in various insects including mosquitoes. In Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, the principal urban vectors of dengue, zika, and yellow fever viruses, multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms in the sodium channel gene have been found in pyrethroid-resistant populations and some of them have been functionally confirmed to be responsible for kdr in an in vitro expression system, Xenopus oocytes. This mini-review aims to provide an update on the identification and functional characterization of pyrethroid resistance-associated sodium channel mutations from Aedes aegypti. The collection of kdr mutations not only helped us develop molecular markers for resistance monitoring, but also provided valuable information for computational molecular modeling of pyrethroid receptor sites on the sodium channel.

  4. Sodium Channel Mutations and Pyrethroid Resistance in Aedes aegypti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Zhorov, Boris S.; Dong, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are widely used to control insect pests and human disease vectors. Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary targets of pyrethroid insecticides. Mutations in the sodium channel have been shown to be responsible for pyrethroid resistance, known as knockdown resistance (kdr), in various insects including mosquitoes. In Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, the principal urban vectors of dengue, zika, and yellow fever viruses, multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms in the sodium channel gene have been found in pyrethroid-resistant populations and some of them have been functionally confirmed to be responsible for kdr in an in vitro expression system, Xenopus oocytes. This mini-review aims to provide an update on the identification and functional characterization of pyrethroid resistance-associated sodium channel mutations from Aedes aegypti. The collection of kdr mutations not only helped us develop molecular markers for resistance monitoring, but also provided valuable information for computational molecular modeling of pyrethroid receptor sites on the sodium channel. PMID:27809228

  5. Monitoring for resistance to organophosphorus and pyrethroid insecticides in varroa mite populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    The occurrence of resistance in Varroa mite populations is a serious threat to the beekeeping industry and crops that rely on the honey bee for pollination. Integrated pest management strategies for control of this pest include the judicious use of insecticides. To monitor field populations of Varro...

  6. Development of Resistance to Pyrethroid in Culex pipiens pallens Population under Different Insecticide Selection Pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Linna; Hu, Hongxia; Ma, Kai; Zhou, Dan; Yu, Jing; Zhong, Daibin; Fang, Fujin; Chang, Xuelian; Hu, Shengli; Zou, Feifei; Wang, Weijie; Sun, Yan; Shen, Bo; Zhang, Donghui; Ma, Lei; Zhou, Guofa; Yan, Guiyun; Zhu, Changliang

    2015-01-01

    Current vector control programs are largely dependent on pyrethroids, which are the most commonly used and only insecticides recommended by the World Health Organization for insecticide-treated nets (ITNs). However, the rapid spread of pyrethroid resistance worldwide compromises the effectiveness of control programs and threatens public health. Since few new insecticide classes for vector control are anticipated, limiting the development of resistance is crucial for prolonging efficacy of pyrethroids. In this study, we exposed a field-collected population of Culex pipiens pallens to different insecticide selection intensities to dynamically monitor the development of resistance. Moreover, we detected kdr mutations and three detoxification enzyme activities in order to explore the evolutionary mechanism of pyrethroid resistance. Our results revealed that the level of pyrethroid resistance was proportional to the insecticide selection pressure. The kdr and metabolic resistance both contributed to pyrethroid resistance in the Cx. pipiens pallens populations, but they had different roles under different selection pressures. We have provided important evidence for better understanding of the development and mechanisms of pyrethroid resistance which may guide future insecticide use and vector management in order to avoid or delay resistance.

  7. Development of Resistance to Pyrethroid in Culex pipiens pallens Population under Different Insecticide Selection Pressures.

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    Linna Shi

    Full Text Available Current vector control programs are largely dependent on pyrethroids, which are the most commonly used and only insecticides recommended by the World Health Organization for insecticide-treated nets (ITNs. However, the rapid spread of pyrethroid resistance worldwide compromises the effectiveness of control programs and threatens public health. Since few new insecticide classes for vector control are anticipated, limiting the development of resistance is crucial for prolonging efficacy of pyrethroids. In this study, we exposed a field-collected population of Culex pipiens pallens to different insecticide selection intensities to dynamically monitor the development of resistance. Moreover, we detected kdr mutations and three detoxification enzyme activities in order to explore the evolutionary mechanism of pyrethroid resistance. Our results revealed that the level of pyrethroid resistance was proportional to the insecticide selection pressure. The kdr and metabolic resistance both contributed to pyrethroid resistance in the Cx. pipiens pallens populations, but they had different roles under different selection pressures. We have provided important evidence for better understanding of the development and mechanisms of pyrethroid resistance which may guide future insecticide use and vector management in order to avoid or delay resistance.

  8. Diversity of knockdown resistance alleles in a single house fly population facilitates adaptation to pyrethroid insecticides.

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    Kasai, S; Sun, H; Scott, J G

    2017-02-01

    Insecticide use exerts a tremendous selection force on house fly populations, but the frequencies of the initial resistance mutations may not reach high levels if they have a significant fitness cost in the absence of insecticides. However, with the continued use of the same (or similar) insecticides, it is expected that new mutations (conferring equal or greater resistance, but less of a fitness cost) will evolve. Pyrethroid insecticides target the insect voltage sensitive sodium channel (VSSC) and have been widely used for control of house flies at animal production facilities for more than three decades. There are three Vssc mutations known that cause resistance to pyrethroids in house flies: knockdown resistance (kdr, L1014F), kdr-his (L1014H) and super-kdr (M918T + L1014F). Whether or not there are any new mutations in house fly populations has not been examined for decades. We collected house flies from a dairy in Kansas (USA) and selected this population for three generations. We discovered multiple new Vssc alleles, including two that give very high levels of resistance to most pyrethroids. The importance of these findings to understanding the evolution of insecticide resistance, designing appropriate resistance monitoring and management schemes, and the future of pyrethroids for house fly control are discussed. © 2016 The Royal Entomological Society.

  9. Pyrethroid resistance reduces the efficacy of space sprays for dengue control on the island of Martinique (Caribbean.

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    Sébastien Marcombe

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dengue fever is reemerging on the island of Martinique and is a serious threat for the human population. During dengue epidemics, adult Aedes aegypti control with pyrethroid space sprays is implemented in order to rapidly reduce transmission. Unfortunately, vector control programs are facing operational challenges with the emergence of pyrethroid resistant Ae. aegypti populations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To assess the impact of pyrethroid resistance on the efficacy of treatments, applications of deltamethrin and natural pyrethrins were performed with vehicle-mounted thermal foggers in 9 localities of Martinique, where Ae. aegypti populations are strongly resistant to pyrethroids. Efficacy was assessed by monitoring mortality rates of naturally resistant and laboratory susceptible mosquitoes placed in sentinel cages. Before, during and after spraying, larval and adult densities were estimated. Results showed high mortality rates of susceptible sentinel mosquitoes treated with deltamethrin while resistant mosquitoes exhibited very low mortality. There was no reduction of either larval or adult Ae. aegypti population densities after treatments. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first documented evidence that pyrethroid resistance impedes dengue vector control using pyrethroid-based treatments. These results emphasize the need for alternative tools and strategies for dengue control programs.

  10. High level of pyrethroid resistance in an Anopheles funestus population of the Chokwe District in Mozambique.

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    Nelson Cuamba

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although Anopheles funestus is difficult to rear, it is crucial to analyse field populations of this malaria vector in order to successfully characterise mechanisms of insecticide resistance observed in this species in Africa. In this study we carried out a large-scale field collection and rearing of An. funestus from Mozambique in order to analyse its susceptibility status to insecticides and to broadly characterise the main resistance mechanisms involved in natural populations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 3,000 F(1 adults were obtained through larval rearing. WHO susceptibility assays indicated a very high resistance to pyrethroids with no mortality recorded after 1 h 30 min exposure and less than 50% mortality at 3 h 30 min. Resistance to the carbamate, bendiocarb was also noted, with 70% mortality after 1h exposure. In contrast, no DDT resistance was observed, indicating that no kdr-type resistance was involved. The sequencing of the acetylcholinesterase gene indicated the absence of the G119S and F455W mutations associated with carbamate and organophosphate resistance. This could explain the absence of malathion resistance in this population. Both biochemical assays and quantitative PCR implicated up-regulated P450 genes in pyrethroid resistance, with GSTs playing a secondary role. The carbamate resistance observed in this population is probably conferred by the observed altered AChE with esterases also involved. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The high level of pyrethroid resistance in this population despite the cessation of pyrethroid use for IRS in 1999 is a serious concern for resistance management strategies such as rotational use of insecticides. As DDT has now been re-introduced for IRS, susceptibility to DDT needs to be closely monitored to prevent the appearance and spread of resistance to this insecticide.

  11. Multiple origins of pyrethroid insecticide resistance across the species complex of a nontarget aquatic crustacean, Hyalella azteca.

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    Weston, Donald P; Poynton, Helen C; Wellborn, Gary A; Lydy, Michael J; Blalock, Bonnie J; Sepulveda, Maria S; Colbourne, John K

    2013-10-08

    Use of pesticides can have substantial nonlethal impacts on nontarget species, including driving evolutionary change, often with unknown consequences for species, ecosystems, and society. Hyalella azteca, a species complex of North American freshwater amphipods, is widely used for toxicity testing of water and sediment and has frequently shown toxicity due to pyrethroid pesticides. We demonstrate that 10 populations, 3 from laboratory cultures and 7 from California water bodies, differed by at least 550-fold in sensitivity to pyrethroids. The populations sorted into four phylogenetic groups consistent with species-level divergence. By sequencing the primary pyrethroid target site, the voltage-gated sodium channel, we show that point mutations and their spread in natural populations were responsible for differences in pyrethroid sensitivity. At least one population had both mutant and WT alleles, suggesting ongoing evolution of resistance. Although nonresistant H. azteca were susceptible to the typical neurotoxic effects of pyrethroids, gene expression analysis suggests the mode of action in resistant H. azteca was not neurotoxicity but was oxidative stress sustained only at considerably higher pyrethroid concentrations. The finding that a nontarget aquatic species has acquired resistance to pesticides used only on terrestrial pests is troubling evidence of the impact of chronic pesticide transport from land-based applications into aquatic systems. Our findings have far-reaching implications for continued uncritical use of H. azteca as a principal species for monitoring and environmental policy decisions.

  12. Biannual monitoring of pyrethroid and neonicotinoid susceptibility in Danish pollen beetle (Meligethes aeneus F.) populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Caroline; Kristensen, Michael; Jensen, Karl-Martin Vagn

    2015-01-01

    The pollen beetle (Meligethes aeneus F.) is a serious pest in the northern countries in oilseed rape. To determine the present level of pyrethroid and neonicotinoid susceptibility of Danish pollen beetle populations, standardized methods recommended by IRAC (Insecticide Resistance Action Committee......) were used. Pollen beetle populations were collected from 47 locations of Denmark with the help of the consultants and the farmers of the various regions in 2014. Further six populations were tested from Sweden and one from Germany. In the following year 2015, the monitoring continued to find out......, if the resistance level which was determined in 2014 was stable in selected regions. Therefore pollen beetle populations from 14 locations in Denmark and five locations in Germany have been tested. For all tests the standardised methods for pyrethroids, the Adult-vial-test No. 11 and the Adult-vials-test No. 21...

  13. Molecular biology of insect sodium channels and pyrethroid resistance.

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    Dong, Ke; Du, Yuzhe; Rinkevich, Frank; Nomura, Yoshiko; Xu, Peng; Wang, Lingxin; Silver, Kristopher; Zhorov, Boris S

    2014-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are essential for the initiation and propagation of the action potential in neurons and other excitable cells. Because of their critical roles in electrical signaling, sodium channels are targets of a variety of naturally occurring and synthetic neurotoxins, including several classes of insecticides. This review is intended to provide an update on the molecular biology of insect sodium channels and the molecular mechanism of pyrethroid resistance. Although mammalian and insect sodium channels share fundamental topological and functional properties, most insect species carry only one sodium channel gene, compared to multiple sodium channel genes found in each mammalian species. Recent studies showed that two posttranscriptional mechanisms, alternative splicing and RNA editing, are involved in generating functional diversity of sodium channels in insects. More than 50 sodium channel mutations have been identified to be responsible for or associated with knockdown resistance (kdr) to pyrethroids in various arthropod pests and disease vectors. Elucidation of molecular mechanism of kdr led to the identification of dual receptor sites of pyrethroids on insect sodium channels. Many of the kdr mutations appear to be located within or close to the two receptor sites. The accumulating knowledge of insect sodium channels and their interactions with insecticides provides a foundation for understanding the neurophysiology of sodium channels in vivo and the development of new and safer insecticides for effective control of arthropod pests and human disease vectors.

  14. Molecular Biology of Insect Sodium Channels and Pyrethroid Resistance

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    Dong, Ke; Du, Yuzhe; Rinkevich, Frank; Nomura, Yoshiko; Xu, Peng; Wang, Lingxin; Silver, Kristopher; Zhorov, Boris S.

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are essential for the initiation and propagation of the action potential in neurons and other excitable cells. Because of their critical roles in electrical signaling, sodium channels are targets of a variety of naturally occurring and synthetic neurotoxins, including several classes of insecticides. This review is intended to provide an update on the molecular biology of insect sodium channels and the molecular mechanism of pyrethroid resistance. Although mammalian and insect sodium channels share fundamental topological and functional properties, most insect species carry only one sodium channel gene, compared to multiple sodium channel genes found in each mammalian species. Recent studies showed that two posttranscriptional mechanisms, alternative splicing and RNA editing, are involved in generating functional diversity of sodium channels in insects. More than 50 sodium channel mutations have been identified to be responsible for or associated with knockdown resistance (kdr) to pyrethroids in various arthropod pests and disease vectors. Elucidation of molecular mechanism of kdr led to the identification of dual receptor sites of pyrethroids on insect sodium channels. Most of the kdr mutations appear to be located within or close to the two receptor sites. The accumulating knowledge of insect sodium channels and their interactions with insecticides provides a foundation for understanding the neurophysiology of sodium channels in vivo and the development of new and safer insecticides for effective control of arthropod pests and human disease vectors. PMID:24704279

  15. Pyrethroid and DDT Resistance and Organophosphate Susceptibility among Anopheles spp. Mosquitoes, Western Kenya.

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    Wanjala, Christine L; Mbugi, Jernard P; Ototo, Edna; Gesuge, Maxwell; Afrane, Yaw A; Atieli, Harrysone E; Zhou, Guofa; Githeko, Andrew K; Yan, Guiyun

    2015-12-01

    We conducted standard insecticide susceptibility testing across western Kenya and found that the Anopheles gambiae mosquito has acquired high resistance to pyrethroids and DDT, patchy resistance to carbamates, but no resistance to organophosphates. Use of non-pyrethroid-based vector control tools may be preferable for malaria prevention in this region.

  16. Bed bugs evolved unique adaptive strategy to resist pyrethroid insecticides.

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    Zhu, Fang; Gujar, Hemant; Gordon, Jennifer R; Haynes, Kenneth F; Potter, Michael F; Palli, Subba R

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in genomic and post-genomic technologies have facilitated a genome-wide analysis of the insecticide resistance-associated genes in insects. Through bed bug, Cimex lectularius transcriptome analysis, we identified 14 molecular markers associated with pyrethroid resistance. Our studies revealed that most of the resistance-associated genes functioning in diverse mechanisms are expressed in the epidermal layer of the integument, which could prevent or slow down the toxin from reaching the target sites on nerve cells, where an additional layer of resistance (kdr) is possible. This strategy evolved in bed bugs is based on their unique morphological, physiological and behavioral characteristics and has not been reported in any other insect species. RNA interference-aided knockdown of resistance associated genes showed the relative contribution of each mechanism towards overall resistance development. Understanding the complexity of adaptive strategies employed by bed bugs will help in designing the most effective and sustainable bed bug control methods.

  17. Pyrethroid resistance in an Anopheles funestus population from Uganda.

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    John C Morgan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The susceptibility status of Anopheles funestus to insecticides remains largely unknown in most parts of Africa because of the difficulty in rearing field-caught mosquitoes of this malaria vector. Here we report the susceptibility status of the An. funestus population from Tororo district in Uganda and a preliminary characterisation of the putative resistance mechanisms involved. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A new forced egg laying technique used in this study significantly increased the numbers of field-caught females laying eggs and generated more than 4000 F1 adults. WHO bioassays indicated that An. funestus in Tororo is resistant to pyrethroids (62% mortality after 1 h exposure to 0.75% permethrin and 28% mortality to 0.05% deltamethrin. Suspected DDT resistance was also observed with 82% mortality. However this population is fully susceptible to bendiocarb (carbamate, malathion (organophosphate and dieldrin with 100% mortality observed after exposure to each of these insecticides. Sequencing of a fragment of the sodium channel gene containing the 1014 codon conferring pyrethroid/DDT resistance in An. gambiae did not detect the L1014F kdr mutation but a correlation between haplotypes and resistance phenotype was observed indicating that mutations in other exons may be conferring the knockdown resistance in this species. Biochemical assays suggest that resistance in this population is mediated by metabolic resistance with elevated level of GSTs, P450s and pNPA compared to a susceptible strain of Anopheles gambiae. RT-PCR further confirmed the involvement of P450s with a 12-fold over-expression of CYP6P9b in the Tororo population compared to the fully susceptible laboratory colony FANG. CONCLUSION: This study represents the first report of pyrethroid/DDT resistance in An. funestus from East Africa. With resistance already reported in southern and West Africa, this indicates that resistance in An. funestus may be more widespread

  18. Optimization and validation of molecular diagnosis of pyrethroid pesticide resistance in Brazilian populations of horn flies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrethroid resistance is a serious problem to cattle producers in Brazil. There are specific resistance-associated mutations, known as kdr and super-kdr, in the region of DNA that codes for the target of pyrethroids, the sodium channel protein. The presence of these mutations in the sodium channel c...

  19. Pyrethroid resistance and cross-resistance in the German cockroach, Blattella germanica (L).

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    Wei, Y; Appel, A G; Moar, W J; Liu, N

    2001-11-01

    A German cockroach (Blatella germanica (L)) strain, Apyr-R, was collected from Opelika, Alabama after control failures with pyrethroid insecticides. Levels of resistance to permethrin and deltamethrin in Apyr-R (97- and 480-fold, respectively, compared with a susceptible strain, ACY) were partially or mostly suppressed by piperonyl butoxide (PBO) and S,S,S,-tributylphosphorotrithioate (DEF), suggesting that P450 monooxygenases and hydrolases are involved in resistance to these two pyrethroids in Apyr-R. However, incomplete suppression of pyrethroid resistance with PBO and DEF implies that one or more additional mechanisms are involved in resistance. Injection, compared with topical application, resulted in 43- and 48-fold increases in toxicity of permethrin in ACY and Apyr-R, respectively. Similarly, injection increased the toxicity of deltamethrin 27-fold in ACY and 28-fold in Apyr-R. These data indicate that cuticular penetration is one of the obstacles for the effectiveness of pyrethroids against German cockroaches. However, injection did not change the levels of resistance to either permethrin or deltamethrin, suggesting that a decrease in the rate of cuticular penetration may not play an important role in pyrethroid resistance in Apyr-R. Apyr-R showed cross-resistance to imidacloprid, with a resistance ratio of 10. PBO treatment resulted in no significant change in the toxicity of imidacloprid, implying that P450 monooxygenase-mediated detoxication is not the mechanism responsible for cross-resistance. Apyr-R showed no cross-resistance to spinosad, although spinosad had relatively low toxicity to German cockroaches compared with other insecticides tested in this study. This result further confirmed that the mode of action of spinosad to insects is unique. Fipronil, a relatively new insecticide, was highly toxic to German cockroaches, and the multi-resistance mechanisms in Apyr-R did not confer significant cross-resistance to this compound. Thus, we propose

  20. Indication of pyrethroid resistance in the main malaria vectorAnopheles stephensi from Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hassan Vatandoost; Ahmad Ali Hanafi-Bojd

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To investiagte insecticide resistance in target species for better insecticide resistance managemnet in malaria control programs.Methods:The status of insecticide resistance to different imagicides inAnopheles stephensi(An. stephensi) includingDDT4%, lambdacyhalothrin 0.50%, deltamethrin0.05%, permethrin0.75%, cyfluthrin0.15% and etofenprox0.50% was performed according toWHO standard method.Results:The mortality rate to lambdacyhalothrin, permethrin, cyfluthrin, deltamethrin, etofenprox andDDT was(88.0±3.2),(92.0±2.7),(52.0±5.0),(96.0±2.2),(90.0±3.0) and(41.0±5.7) percent, respectively at diagnostic dose for one hour exposure time followed by24 h recovery period.Conclusions:These results showed first indication of pyrethroid resistance inAn. stephensiin a malarious area, from southernIran.There is widespread, multiple resistances in the country inAn. stephensi to organochlorine and some report of tolerance to organophosphate insecticides and recently to pyrethroids.However, results of this paper will provide a clue for monitoring and mapping of insecticide resistance in the main malaria vector for implementation of any vector control.

  1. Pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles gambiae, in Bomi County, Liberia, compromises malaria vector control.

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    Emmanuel A Temu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Long Lasting Insecticidal Nets (LLIN and Indoor Residual Spraying (IRS have both proven to be effective malaria vector control strategies in Africa and the new technology of insecticide treated durable wall lining (DL is being evaluated. Sustaining these interventions at high coverage levels is logistically challenging and, furthermore, the increase in insecticide resistance in African malaria vectors may reduce the efficacy of these chemical based interventions. Monitoring of vector populations and evaluation of the efficacy of insecticide based control approaches should be integral components of malaria control programmes. This study reports on entomological survey conducted in 2011 in Bomi County, Liberia. METHODS: Anopheles gambiae larvae were collected from four sites in Bomi, Liberia, and reared in a field insectary. Two to five days old female adult An gambiae s.l. were tested using WHO tube (n=2027 and cone (n=580 bioassays in houses treated with DL or IRS. A sample of mosquitoes (n=169 were identified to species/molecular form and screened for the presence of knock down resistance (kdr alleles associated with pyrethroid resistance. RESULTS: Anopheles gambiae s.l tested were resistant to deltamethrin but fully susceptible to bendiocarb and fenithrothion. The corrected mortality of local mosquitoes exposed to houses treated with deltamethrin either via IRS or DL was 12% and 59% respectively, suggesting that resistance may affect the efficacy of these interventions. The presence of pyrethroid resistance was associated with a high frequency of the 1014F kdr allele (90.5% although this mutation alone cannot explain the resistance levels observed. CONCLUSION: High prevalence of resistance to deltamethrin in Bomi County may reduce the efficacy of malaria strategies relying on this class of insecticide. The findings highlight the urgent need to expand and sustain monitoring of insecticide resistance in Liberian malaria vectors

  2. Novel Mutations in the Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel of Pyrethroid-Resistant Varroa destructor Populations from the Southeastern USA

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    González-Cabrera, Joel; Rodríguez-Vargas, Sonia; Davies, T. G. Emyr; Field, Linda M.; Schmehl, Daniel; Ellis, James D.; Krieger, Klemens; Williamson, Martin S.

    2016-01-01

    The parasitic mite Varroa destructor has a significant worldwide impact on bee colony health. In the absence of control measures, parasitized colonies invariably collapse within 3 years. The synthetic pyrethroids tau-fluvalinate and flumethrin have proven very effective at managing this mite within apiaries, but intensive control programs based mainly on one active ingredient have led to many reports of pyrethroid resistance. In Europe, a modification of leucine to valine at position 925 (L925V) of the V. destructor voltage-gated sodium channel was correlated with resistance, the mutation being found at high frequency exclusively in hives with a recent history of pyrethroid treatment. Here, we identify two novel mutations, L925M and L925I, in tau-fluvalinate resistant V. destructor collected at seven sites across Florida and Georgia in the Southeastern region of the USA. Using a multiplexed TaqMan® allelic discrimination assay, these mutations were found to be present in 98% of the mites surviving tau-fluvalinate treatment. The mutations were also found in 45% of the non-treated mites, suggesting a high potential for resistance evolution if selection pressure is applied. The results from a more extensive monitoring programme, using the Taqman® assay described here, would clearly help beekeepers with their decision making as to when to include or exclude pyrethroid control products and thereby facilitate more effective mite management programmes. PMID:27191597

  3. Novel Mutations in the Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel of Pyrethroid-Resistant Varroa destructor Populations from the Southeastern USA.

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    Joel González-Cabrera

    Full Text Available The parasitic mite Varroa destructor has a significant worldwide impact on bee colony health. In the absence of control measures, parasitized colonies invariably collapse within 3 years. The synthetic pyrethroids tau-fluvalinate and flumethrin have proven very effective at managing this mite within apiaries, but intensive control programs based mainly on one active ingredient have led to many reports of pyrethroid resistance. In Europe, a modification of leucine to valine at position 925 (L925V of the V. destructor voltage-gated sodium channel was correlated with resistance, the mutation being found at high frequency exclusively in hives with a recent history of pyrethroid treatment. Here, we identify two novel mutations, L925M and L925I, in tau-fluvalinate resistant V. destructor collected at seven sites across Florida and Georgia in the Southeastern region of the USA. Using a multiplexed TaqMan® allelic discrimination assay, these mutations were found to be present in 98% of the mites surviving tau-fluvalinate treatment. The mutations were also found in 45% of the non-treated mites, suggesting a high potential for resistance evolution if selection pressure is applied. The results from a more extensive monitoring programme, using the Taqman® assay described here, would clearly help beekeepers with their decision making as to when to include or exclude pyrethroid control products and thereby facilitate more effective mite management programmes.

  4. Pyrethroid resistance in Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus: Important mosquito vectors of human diseases.

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    Smith, Letícia B; Kasai, Shinji; Scott, Jeffrey G

    2016-10-01

    Aedes aegypti and A. albopictus mosquitoes are vectors of important human disease viruses, including dengue, yellow fever, chikungunya and Zika. Pyrethroid insecticides are widely used to control adult Aedes mosquitoes, especially during disease outbreaks. Herein, we review the status of pyrethroid resistance in A. aegypti and A. albopictus, mechanisms of resistance, fitness costs associated with resistance alleles and provide suggestions for future research. The widespread use of pyrethroids has given rise to many populations with varying levels of resistance worldwide, albeit with substantial geographical variation. In adult A. aegypti and A. albopictus, resistance levels are generally lower in Asia, Africa and the USA, and higher in Latin America, although there are exceptions. Susceptible populations still exist in several areas of the world, particularly in Asia and South America. Resistance to pyrethroids in larvae is also geographically widespread. The two major mechanisms of pyrethroid resistance are increased detoxification due to P450-monooxygenases, and mutations in the voltage sensitive sodium channel (Vssc) gene. Several P450s have been putatively associated with insecticide resistance, but the specific P450s involved are not fully elucidated. Pyrethroid resistance can be due to single mutations or combinations of mutations in Vssc. The presence of multiple Vssc mutations can lead to extremely high levels of resistance. Suggestions for future research needs are presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Pinpointing P450s associated with pyrethroid metabolism in the dengue vector, Aedes aegypti: developing new tools to combat insecticide resistance.

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    Bradley J Stevenson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pyrethroids are increasingly used to block the transmission of diseases spread by Aedes aegypti such as dengue and yellow fever. However, insecticide resistance poses a serious threat, thus there is an urgent need to identify the genes and proteins associated with pyrethroid resistance in order to produce effective counter measures. In Ae. aegypti, overexpression of P450s such as the CYP9J32 gene have been linked with pyrethroid resistance. Our aim was to confirm the role of CYP9J32 and other P450s in insecticide metabolism in order to identify potential diagnostic resistance markers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have expressed CYP9J32 in Escherichia coli and show that the enzyme can metabolize the pyrethroids permethrin and deltamethrin. In addition, three other Ae. aegypti P450s (CYP9J24, CYP9J26, CYP9J28 were found capable of pyrethroid metabolism, albeit with lower activity. Both Ae. aegypti and Anopheles gambiae P450s (CYP's 6M2, 6Z2, 6P3 were screened against fluorogenic and luminescent substrates to identify potential diagnostic probes for P450 activity. Luciferin-PPXE was preferentially metabolised by the three major pyrethroid metabolisers (CYP9J32, CYP6M2 and CYP6P3, identifying a potential diagnostic substrate for these P450s. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: P450s have been identified with the potential to confer pyrethroid resistance in Ae.aegypti. It is recommended that over expression of these enzymes should be monitored as indicators of resistance where pyrethroids are used.

  6. Combined target site (kdr) mutations play a primary role in highly pyrethroid resistant phenotypes of Aedes aegypti from Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Nazawi, Ashwaq M; Aqili, Jabir; Alzahrani, Mohammed; McCall, Philip J; Weetman, David

    2017-03-27

    their proximity, Makkah and Jeddah exhibit significant differences in pyrethroid resistance phenotypes, with some evidence to suggest a different balance of mechanisms, for example with more impact associated with CYP450s in the Jeddah strain, and the dual kdr mutations 989P and 1016G in the more resistant Makkah strain. The results overall demonstrate a major role for paired target site mutations in pyrethroid resistance and highlight their utility for diagnostic monitoring.

  7. Distribution of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel (Nav) Alleles among the Aedes aegypti Populations In Central Java Province and Its Association with Resistance to Pyrethroid Insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayono, Sayono; Hidayati, Anggie Puspa Nur; Fahri, Sukmal; Sumanto, Didik; Dharmana, Edi; Hadisaputro, Suharyo; Asih, Puji Budi Setia; Syafruddin, Din

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of insecticide resistant Aedes aegypti mosquitoes has hampered dengue control efforts. WHO susceptibility tests, using several pyrethroid compounds, were conducted on Ae. aegypti larvae that were collected and raised to adulthood from Semarang, Surakarta, Kudus and Jepara in Java. The AaNaV gene fragment encompassing kdr polymorphic sites from both susceptible and resistant mosquitoes was amplified, and polymorphisms were associated with the resistant phenotype. The insecticide susceptibility tests demonstrated Ae, aegypti resistance to the pyrethroids, with mortality rates ranging from 1.6%-15.2%. Three non-synonymous polymorphisms (S989P, V1016G and F1534C) and one synonymous polymorphism (codon 982) were detected in the AaNaV gene. Eight AaNaV alleles were observed in specimens from Central Java. Allele 3 (SGF) and allele 7 (PGF) represent the most common alleles found and demonstrated strong associations with resistance to pyrethroids (OR = 2.75, CI: 0.97-7.8 and OR = 7.37, CI: 2.4-22.5, respectively). This is the first report of 8 Ae. aegypti AaNaV alleles, and it indicates the development of resistance in Ae. aegypti in response to pyrethroid insecticide-based selective pressure. These findings strongly suggest the need for an appropriate integrated use of insecticides in the region. The 989P, 1016G and 1534C polymorphisms in the AaNaV gene are potentially valuable molecular markers for pyrethroid insecticide resistance monitoring.

  8. Distribution of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel (Nav Alleles among the Aedes aegypti Populations In Central Java Province and Its Association with Resistance to Pyrethroid Insecticides.

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    Sayono Sayono

    Full Text Available The emergence of insecticide resistant Aedes aegypti mosquitoes has hampered dengue control efforts. WHO susceptibility tests, using several pyrethroid compounds, were conducted on Ae. aegypti larvae that were collected and raised to adulthood from Semarang, Surakarta, Kudus and Jepara in Java. The AaNaV gene fragment encompassing kdr polymorphic sites from both susceptible and resistant mosquitoes was amplified, and polymorphisms were associated with the resistant phenotype. The insecticide susceptibility tests demonstrated Ae, aegypti resistance to the pyrethroids, with mortality rates ranging from 1.6%-15.2%. Three non-synonymous polymorphisms (S989P, V1016G and F1534C and one synonymous polymorphism (codon 982 were detected in the AaNaV gene. Eight AaNaV alleles were observed in specimens from Central Java. Allele 3 (SGF and allele 7 (PGF represent the most common alleles found and demonstrated strong associations with resistance to pyrethroids (OR = 2.75, CI: 0.97-7.8 and OR = 7.37, CI: 2.4-22.5, respectively. This is the first report of 8 Ae. aegypti AaNaV alleles, and it indicates the development of resistance in Ae. aegypti in response to pyrethroid insecticide-based selective pressure. These findings strongly suggest the need for an appropriate integrated use of insecticides in the region. The 989P, 1016G and 1534C polymorphisms in the AaNaV gene are potentially valuable molecular markers for pyrethroid insecticide resistance monitoring.

  9. ITN mixtures of chlorfenapyr (Pyrrole) and alphacypermethrin (Pyrethroid) for control of pyrethroid resistant Anopheles arabiensis and Culex quinquefasciatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxborough, Richard M; Kitau, Jovin; Matowo, Johnson; Feston, Emmanuel; Mndeme, Rajab; Mosha, Franklin W; Rowland, Mark W

    2013-01-01

    Pyrethroid resistant Anopheles gambiae malaria vectors are widespread throughout sub-Saharan Africa and continued efficacy of pyrethroid ITNs is under threat. Chlorfenapyr is a promising pyrrole insecticide with a unique mechanism of action conferring no cross-resistance to existing public health insecticides. Mixtures of chlorfenapyr (CFP) and alphacypermethrin (alpha) may provide additional benefits over chlorfenapyr or alphacypermethrin used alone. An ITN mixture of CFP 100 mg/m(2)+alpha 25 mg/m(2) was compared with CFP 100 mg/m(2) and alpha 25 mg/m(2) in a small-scale experimental hut trial in an area of wild An. arabiensis. The same treatments were evaluated in tunnel tests against insectary-reared pyrethroid susceptible and resistant Culex quinquefasciatus. Performance was measured in terms of insecticide-induced mortality, and blood-feeding inhibition. Tunnel tests showed that mixtures of CFP 100+ alpha 25 were 1.2 and 1.5 times more effective at killing susceptible Cx. quinquefasciatus than either Alpha 25 (P = 0.001) or CFP 100 (P = 0.001) ITNs. Mixtures of CFP100+ alpha 25 were 2.2 and 1.2 times more effective against resistant Cx. quinquefasciatus than either alpha 25 (P = 0.001) or CFP100 (P = 0.003) ITNs. CFP 100+ alpha 25 produced higher levels of blood-feeding inhibition than CFP alone for susceptible (94 vs 46%, P = 0.001) and resistant (84 vs 53%, P = 0.001) strains. In experimental huts the mixture of CFP 100+ Alpha 25 killed 58% of An. arabiensis, compared with 50% for alpha and 49% for CFP, though the differences were not significant. Blood-feeding inhibition was highest in the mixture with a 76% reduction compared to the untreated net (P = 0.001). ITN mixtures of chlorfenapyr and alphacypermethrin should restore effective control of resistant populations of An. gambiae malaria vectors, provide protection from blood-feeding, and may have benefits for resistance management, particularly in areas with low or moderate

  10. ITN mixtures of chlorfenapyr (Pyrrole and alphacypermethrin (Pyrethroid for control of pyrethroid resistant Anopheles arabiensis and Culex quinquefasciatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard M Oxborough

    Full Text Available Pyrethroid resistant Anopheles gambiae malaria vectors are widespread throughout sub-Saharan Africa and continued efficacy of pyrethroid ITNs is under threat. Chlorfenapyr is a promising pyrrole insecticide with a unique mechanism of action conferring no cross-resistance to existing public health insecticides. Mixtures of chlorfenapyr (CFP and alphacypermethrin (alpha may provide additional benefits over chlorfenapyr or alphacypermethrin used alone. An ITN mixture of CFP 100 mg/m(2+alpha 25 mg/m(2 was compared with CFP 100 mg/m(2 and alpha 25 mg/m(2 in a small-scale experimental hut trial in an area of wild An. arabiensis. The same treatments were evaluated in tunnel tests against insectary-reared pyrethroid susceptible and resistant Culex quinquefasciatus. Performance was measured in terms of insecticide-induced mortality, and blood-feeding inhibition. Tunnel tests showed that mixtures of CFP 100+ alpha 25 were 1.2 and 1.5 times more effective at killing susceptible Cx. quinquefasciatus than either Alpha 25 (P = 0.001 or CFP 100 (P = 0.001 ITNs. Mixtures of CFP100+ alpha 25 were 2.2 and 1.2 times more effective against resistant Cx. quinquefasciatus than either alpha 25 (P = 0.001 or CFP100 (P = 0.003 ITNs. CFP 100+ alpha 25 produced higher levels of blood-feeding inhibition than CFP alone for susceptible (94 vs 46%, P = 0.001 and resistant (84 vs 53%, P = 0.001 strains. In experimental huts the mixture of CFP 100+ Alpha 25 killed 58% of An. arabiensis, compared with 50% for alpha and 49% for CFP, though the differences were not significant. Blood-feeding inhibition was highest in the mixture with a 76% reduction compared to the untreated net (P = 0.001. ITN mixtures of chlorfenapyr and alphacypermethrin should restore effective control of resistant populations of An. gambiae malaria vectors, provide protection from blood-feeding, and may have benefits for resistance management, particularly in areas with low or

  11. Cuticle thickening associated with pyrethroid resistance in the major malaria vector Anopheles funestus

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    Coetzee M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria in South Africa is primarily transmitted by Anopheles funestus Giles. Resistance to pyrethroid insecticides in An. funestus in northern Kwazulu/Natal, South Africa, and in neighbouring areas of southern Mozambique enabled populations of this species to increase their ranges into areas where pyrethroids were being exclusively used for malaria control. Pyrethroid resistance in southern African An. funestus is primarily conferred by monooxygenase enzyme metabolism. However, selection for this resistance mechanism is likely to have occurred in conjunction with other factors that improve production of the resistance phenotype. A strong candidate is cuticle thickening. This is because thicker cuticles lead to slower rates of insecticide absorption, which is likely to increase the efficiency of metabolic detoxification. Results Measures of mean cuticle thickness in laboratory samples of female An. funestus were obtained using scanning electron microscopy (SEM. These females were drawn from a laboratory colony carrying the pyrethroid resistance phenotype at a stable rate, but not fixed. Prior to cuticle thickness measurements, these samples were characterised as either more or less tolerant to permethrin exposure in one experiment, and either permethrin resistant or susceptible in another experiment. There was a significant and positive correlation between mean cuticle thickness and time to knock down during exposure to permethrin. Mean cuticle thickness was significantly greater in those samples characterised either as more tolerant or resistant to permethrin exposure compared to those characterised as either less tolerant or permethrin susceptible. Further, insecticide susceptible female An. funestus have thicker cuticles than their male counterparts. Conclusion Pyrethroid tolerant or resistant An. funestus females are likely to have thicker cuticles than less tolerant or susceptible females, and females generally have

  12. Immunoassays and Biosensors for Monitoring Environmental and Human Exposure to Pyrethroid Insecticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Ki Chang; Kim, Hee-Joo; Mccoy, Mark R.; Gee, Shirley J.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2010-01-01

    This manuscript describes some of the early work on pyrethroid insecticides in the Casida laboratory and briefly reviews the development and application of immunochemical approaches for the detection of pyrethroid insecticides and their metabolites for monitoring environmental and human exposure. Multiple technologies can be combined to enhance the sensitivity and speed of immunochemical analysis. The pyrethroid assays are used to illustrate the use of some of these immunoreagents such as antibodies, competitive mimics, and novel binding agents such as phage-displayed peptides. We also illustrate reporters such as fluorescent dyes, chemiluminescent compounds, and luminescent lanthanide nanoparticles, as well as the application of magnetic separation, and automatic instrumental systems, biosensor and novel immunological technologies. These new technologies alone and in combination result in an improved ability to determine both if effective levels of pyrethroids are being used in the field as well as evaluate possible contamination. PMID:21105656

  13. Infestation by pyrethroids resistant bed bugs in the suburb of Paris, France

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    Durand R.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Bed bugs are hematophagous insects responsible for a re-emerging and challenging indoor pest in many countries. Bed bugs infestations may have health consequences including nuisance biting, cutaneous and systemic reactions. This resurgence can probably be attributed to factors such as increased international travel and development of resistance against insecticides. Resistance against pyrethroids has been reported several times from the USA and rarely in Europe. In France, very few data on bed bugs are available. The present study aimed to assess the infestation by bed bugs of a complex of two high-rise apartment buildings in the suburb of Paris and to evaluate their susceptibility to pyrethroid insecticides. We inspected for bed bugs 192 out of 198 apartments units (97% and interviewed their residents. 76 (39.6% apartments were infested. Among the 97 residents living in infested apartments, 53 (54.6% reported bed bug bites. A total of 564 bed bugs were collected in the infested units. Bioassays showed that 54 out of 143 bed bugs were resistant to pyrethroids (37.8%; 95% confidence interval: 29.9-45.7%. DNA sequencing showed that all bed bugs tested (n = 124 had homozygous L925I kdr-like gene mutation. The level of pyrethroid resistance found indicates that this phenomenon was already established in the site and prompts the need to reevaluate the wide use of pyrethroids to control bed bugs.

  14. Infestation by pyrethroids resistant bed bugs in the suburb of Paris, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, R; Cannet, A; Berdjane, Z; Bruel, C; Haouchine, D; Delaunay, P; Izri, A

    2012-11-01

    Bed bugs are hematophagous insects responsible for a re-emerging and challenging indoor pest in many countries. Bed bugs infestations may have health consequences including nuisance biting, cutaneous and systemic reactions. This resurgence can probably be attributed to factors such as increased international travel and development of resistance against insecticides. Resistance against pyrethroids has been reported several times from the USA and rarely in Europe. In France, very few data on bed bugs are available. The present study aimed to assess the infestation by bed bugs of a complex of two high-rise apartment buildings in the suburb of Paris and to evaluate their susceptibility to pyrethroid insecticides. We inspected for bed bugs 192 out of 198 apartments units (97%) and interviewed their residents. 76 (39.6%) apartments were infested. Among the 97 residents living in infested apartments, 53 (54.6%) reported bed bug bites. A total of 564 bed bugs were collected in the infested units. Bioassays showed that 54 out of 143 bed bugs were resistant to pyrethroids (37.8%; 95% confidence interval: 29.9-45.7%). DNA sequencing showed that all bed bugs tested (n=124) had homozygous L925I kdr-like gene mutation. The level of pyrethroid resistance found indicates that this phenomenon was already established in the site and prompts the need to reevaluate the wide use of pyrethroids to control bed bugs.

  15. Control of pyrethroid-resistant Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes with chlorfenapyr in Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N'Guessan, Raphael; Boko, Pelagie; Odjo, Abiba; Knols, Bart; Akogbeto, Martin; Rowland, Mark

    2009-04-01

    To compare the efficacy of chlorfenapyr applied on mosquito nets and as an indoor residual spray against populations of Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus in an area of Benin that shows problematic levels of pyrethroid resistance. Eight-week trial conducted in experimental huts. Indoor residual spraying killed 82.9% of An. gambiae overall (mean mortality: 79.5%) compared to 53.5% overall (mean mortality: 61.7%) in the hut containing the lower dosed ITN. Analysis of data on a fortnightly basis showed high levels of mosquito mortality and blood-feeding inhibition during the first few weeks after treatment. Control of C. quinquefasciatus by the IRS and ITN interventions showed a similar trend to that of An. gambiae and though the average level of mortality was lower it was still much higher than with pyrethroid treatments against this population. Chlorfenapyr's reputation for being rather slow acting was evident particularly at lower dosages. The treatments showed no evidence of excito-repellent activity in this trial. Chlorfenapyr has the potential to control pyrethroid resistant populations of A. gambiae. There is a need to develop long-lasting formulations of chlorfenapyr to prolong its residual life on nets and sprayed surfaces. On nets it could be combined with a contact irritant pyrethroid to give improved protection against mosquito biting while killing pyrethroid-resistant mosquitoes that come into contact with the net.

  16. Biological monitoring of pyrethroid exposure of pest control workers in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Kamijima, Michihiro; Imai, Ryota; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Kameda, Yohei; Asai, Kazumi; Okamura, Ai; Naito, Hisao; Ueyama, Jun; Saito, Isao; Nakajima, Tamie; Goto, Masahiro; Shibata, Eiji; Kondo, Takaaki; Takagi, Kenji; Takagi, Kenzo; Wakusawa, Shinya

    2007-11-01

    Synthetic pyrethroids such as cypermethrin, deltamethrin and permethrin, which are usually used in pest control operations, are metabolized to 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA) and excreted in urine. Though 3-PBA can be used to assess exposure to pyrethroids, there are few reports describing urinary 3-PBA levels in Japan. This study aimed to investigate the seasonal variation of the exposure levels of pyrethroids and the concentration of urinary 3-PBA among pest control operators (PCOs) in Japan. The study subjects were 78 and 66 PCOs who underwent a health examination in December 2004 and in August 2005, respectively. 3-PBA was determined using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The geometric mean concentration of urinary 3-PBA in winter (3.9 microg/g creatinine) was significantly lower than in summer (12.2 microg/g creatinine) (p0.05), respectively. A significant association of 3-PBA levels and pyrethroid spraying was thus observed only in winter. In conclusion, the results of the present study show that the exposure level of pyrethroids among PCOs in Japan assessed by monitoring urinary 3-PBA was higher than that reported in the UK but comparable to that in Germany. Further research should be accumulated to establish an occupational reference value in Japan.

  17. An amino acid substitution (L925V associated with resistance to pyrethroids in Varroa destructor.

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    Joel González-Cabrera

    Full Text Available The Varroa mite, Varroa destructor, is an important pest of honeybees and has played a prominent role in the decline in bee colony numbers over recent years. Although pyrethroids such as tau-fluvalinate and flumethrin can be highly effective in removing the mites from hives, their intensive use has led to many reports of resistance. To investigate the mechanism of resistance in UK Varroa samples, the transmembrane domain regions of the V. destructor voltage-gated sodium channel (the main target site for pyrethroids were PCR amplified and sequenced from pyrethroid treated/untreated mites collected at several locations in Central/Southern England. A novel amino acid substitution, L925V, was identified that maps to a known hot spot for resistance within the domain IIS5 helix of the channel protein; a region that has also been proposed to form part of the pyrethroid binding site. Using a high throughput diagnostic assay capable of detecting the mutation in individual mites, the L925V substitution was found to correlate well with resistance, being present in all mites that had survived tau-fluvalinate treatment but in only 8 % of control, untreated samples. The potential for using this assay to detect and manage resistance in Varroa-infected hives is discussed.

  18. An amino acid substitution (L925V) associated with resistance to pyrethroids in Varroa destructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Cabrera, Joel; Davies, T G Emyr; Field, Linda M; Kennedy, Peter J; Williamson, Martin S

    2013-01-01

    The Varroa mite, Varroa destructor, is an important pest of honeybees and has played a prominent role in the decline in bee colony numbers over recent years. Although pyrethroids such as tau-fluvalinate and flumethrin can be highly effective in removing the mites from hives, their intensive use has led to many reports of resistance. To investigate the mechanism of resistance in UK Varroa samples, the transmembrane domain regions of the V. destructor voltage-gated sodium channel (the main target site for pyrethroids) were PCR amplified and sequenced from pyrethroid treated/untreated mites collected at several locations in Central/Southern England. A novel amino acid substitution, L925V, was identified that maps to a known hot spot for resistance within the domain IIS5 helix of the channel protein; a region that has also been proposed to form part of the pyrethroid binding site. Using a high throughput diagnostic assay capable of detecting the mutation in individual mites, the L925V substitution was found to correlate well with resistance, being present in all mites that had survived tau-fluvalinate treatment but in only 8 % of control, untreated samples. The potential for using this assay to detect and manage resistance in Varroa-infected hives is discussed.

  19. Alternative treatments for indoor residual spraying for malaria control in a village with pyrethroid- and DDT-resistant vectors in The Gambia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangena, J.A.A.; Adiamoh, M.; Alessandro, D' U.; Jarju, L.; Jawara, M.; Jeffries, D.; Malik, N.; Nwakanma, D.; Kaur, H.; Takken, W.; Lindsay, S.W.; Pinder, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Malaria vector control is threatened by resistance to pyrethroids, the only class of insecticides used for treating bed nets. The second major vector control method is indoor residual spraying with pyrethroids or the organochloride DDT. However, resistance to pyrethroids frequently confe

  20. Combining indoor residual spraying with chlorfenapyr and long-lasting insecticidal bed nets for improved control of pyrethroid-resistant Anopheles gambiae: an experimental hut trial in Benin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ngufor, Corine; N'Guessan, Raphael; Boko, Pelagie; Odjo, Abibatou; Vigninou, Estelle; Asidi, Alex; Akogbeto, Martin; Rowland, Mark

    2011-01-01

    .... Chlorfenapyr IRS and a pyrethroid-impregnated polyester LLIN (WHO approved) were tested separately and together in experimental huts in southern Benin against pyrethroid resistant Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus...

  1. Evaluation of piperonyl butoxide as a deltamethrin synergist for pyrethroid-resistant bed bugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Alvaro; Potter, Michael F; Haynes, Kenneth F

    2009-12-01

    An understanding of the mechanisms of insecticide resistance in the bed bug, Cimex lectularius L., has the potential to lead to new approaches for the control of resistant populations. We used the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (P450) inhibitor piperonyl butoxide (PBO) to assess the role of P450s in deltamethrin resistance in three field-collected bed bug strains, LA-1, CIN-1 and WOR-1. In addition, we exposed two highly resistant strains, CIN-1 and WOR-1 (resistance ratio [RR] >2,500-fold), to dry residues of piperonyl butoxide-synergized pyrethroid formulations to determine the utility of synergism by PBO. Piperonyl butoxide synergized deltamethrin in all three strains, but its impact was variable. The synergistic ratio varied from 40 in CIN-1 to 176 in WOR-1. Because the resistance ratio for each strain after piperonyl butoxide treatment was 174 and 39, respectively, our results suggest that P450s have some involvement in deltamethrin resistance, but other resistance mechanisms must be involved as well. No significant synergistic effect of formulated deltamethrin was observed with the addition of synergized pyrethrins or formulated piperonyl butoxide in the CIN-1 strain, but synergism occurred in the WOR-1 strain. Addition of PBO to pyrethroids is not a comprehensive solution to pyrethroid resistance because strains vary in both overall resistance level and the proportion of that resistance attributable to P450s.

  2. Cuticle Thickening in a Pyrethroid-Resistant Strain of the Common Bed Bug, Cimex lectularius L. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilly, David G; Latham, Sharissa L; Webb, Cameron E; Doggett, Stephen L

    2016-01-01

    Thickening of the integument as a mechanism of resistance to insecticides is a well recognised phenomenon in the insect world and, in recent times, has been found in insects exhibiting pyrethroid-resistance. Resistance to pyrethroid insecticides in the common bed bug, Cimex lectularius L., is widespread and has been frequently inferred as a reason for the pest's resurgence. Overexpression of cuticle depositing proteins has been demonstrated in pyrethroid-resistant bed bugs although, to date, no morphological analysis of the cuticle has been undertaken in order to confirm a phenotypic link. This paper describes examination of the cuticle thickness of a highly pyrethroid-resistant field strain collected in Sydney, Australia, in response to time-to-knockdown upon forced exposure to a pyrethroid insecticide. Mean cuticle thickness was positively correlated to time-to-knockdown, with significant differences observed between bugs knocked-down at 2 hours, 4 hours, and those still unaffected at 24 hours. Further analysis also demonstrated that the 24 hours survivors possessed a statistically significantly thicker cuticle when compared to a pyrethroid-susceptible strain of C. lectularius. This study demonstrates that cuticle thickening is present within a pyrethroid-resistant strain of C. lectularius and that, even within a stable resistant strain, cuticle thickness will vary according to time-to-knockdown upon exposure to an insecticide. This response should thus be considered in future studies on the cuticle of insecticide-resistant bed bugs and, potentially, other insects.

  3. Bendiocarb, a potential alternative against pyrethroid resistant Anopheles gambiae in Benin, West Africa

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    Irish Seth

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anopheles gambiae, the main malaria vector in Benin has developed high level of resistance to pyrethroid insecticides, which is a serious concern to the future use of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLIN and indoor residual spraying (IRS. In this context, one of the pathways available for malaria vector control would be to investigate alternative classes of insecticides with different mode of action than that of pyrethroids. The goal of this study was to evaluate under field conditions the efficacy of a carbamate (bendiocarb and an organophosphate (fenitrothion against pyrethroid-resistant An. gambiae s.s. Methods Wild populations and females from laboratory colonies of five days old An. gambiae were bio-assayed during this study. Two pyrethroids (deltamethrin and alphacypermethrin, an organophosphate (fenitrothion, a carbamate (bendiocarb and a mixture of an organophosphate (chlorpyriphos + a pyrethroid deltamethrin were compared in experimental huts as IRS treatments. Insecticides were applied in the huts using a hand-operated compression sprayer. The deterrency, exophily, blood feeding rate and mortality induced by these insecticides against An. gambiae were compared to the untreated control huts. Results Deltamethrin, alphacypermethrin and bendiocarb treatment significantly reduced mosquito entry into the huts (p An. gambiae (in the first month and 77.8% (in the fourth month. Bendiocarb and the mixture chlorpyriphos/deltamethrin mortality rates ranged from 97.9 to 100% the first month and 77.7-88% the third month respectively. Conclusion After four months, fenitrothion, bendiocarb and the mixture chlorpyriphos/deltamethrin performed effectively against pyrethroid-resistant Anopheles. These results showed that bendiocarb could be recommended as an effective insecticide for use in IRS operations in Benin, particularly as the mixture chlorpyriphos/deltamethrin does not have WHOPES authorization and complaints were mentioned

  4. Control of pyrethroid-resistant Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes with chlorfenapyr in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N'Guessan, R.; Boko, P.; Odjo, A.; Knols, B.G.J.; Akogbeto, M.; Rowland, M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy of chlorfenapyr applied on mosquito nets and as an indoor residual spray against populations of Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus in an area of Benin that shows problematic levels of pyrethroid resistance. Method Eight-week trial conducted in experimental

  5. Control of pyrethroid-resistant Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes with chlorfenapyr in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N'Guessan, R.; Boko, P.; Odjo, A.; Knols, B.G.J.; Akogbeto, M.; Rowland, M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy of chlorfenapyr applied on mosquito nets and as an indoor residual spray against populations of Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus in an area of Benin that shows problematic levels of pyrethroid resistance. Method Eight-week trial conducted in experimental

  6. Transcription profiling of a recently colonised pyrethroid resistant Anopheles gambiae strain from Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donnelly Martin J

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mosquito resistance to the pyrethroid insecticides used to treat bednets threatens the sustainability of malaria control in sub-Saharan Africa. While the impact of target site insensitivity alleles is being widely discussed the implications of insecticide detoxification – though equally important – remains elusive. The successful development of new tools for malaria intervention and management requires a comprehensive understanding of insecticide resistance, including metabolic resistance mechanisms. Although three enzyme families (cytochrome P450s, glutathione S-transferases and carboxylesterases have been widely associated with insecticide detoxification the role of individual enzymes is largely unknown. Results Here, constitutive expression patterns of genes putatively involved in conferring pyrethroid resistance was investigated in a recently colonised pyrethroid resistant Anopheles gambiae strain from Odumasy, Southern Ghana. RNA from the resistant strain and a standard laboratory susceptible strain, of both sexes was extracted, reverse transcribed and labelled with either Cy3- or Cy5-dye. Labelled cDNA was co-hybridised to the detox chip, a custom-made microarray containing over 230 A. gambiae gene fragments predominantly from enzyme families associated with insecticide resistance. After hybridisation, Cy3- and Cy5-signal intensities were measured and compared gene by gene. In both females and males of the resistant strain the cytochrome P450s CYP6Z2 and CYP6M2 are highly over-expressed along with a member of the superoxide dismutase (SOD gene family. Conclusion These genes differ from those found up-regulated in East African strains of pyrethroid resistant A. gambiae and constitute a novel set of candidate genes implicated in insecticide detoxification. These data suggest that metabolic resistance may have multiple origins in A. gambiae, which has strong implications for the management of resistance.

  7. Distribution of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel (Nav) Alleles among the Aedes aegypti Populations In Central Java Province and Its Association with Resistance to Pyrethroid Insecticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayono, Sayono; Hidayati, Anggie Puspa Nur; Fahri, Sukmal; Sumanto, Didik; Dharmana, Edi; Hadisaputro, Suharyo; Asih, Puji Budi Setia; Syafruddin, Din

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of insecticide resistant Aedes aegypti mosquitoes has hampered dengue control efforts. WHO susceptibility tests, using several pyrethroid compounds, were conducted on Ae. aegypti larvae that were collected and raised to adulthood from Semarang, Surakarta, Kudus and Jepara in Java. The AaNaV gene fragment encompassing kdr polymorphic sites from both susceptible and resistant mosquitoes was amplified, and polymorphisms were associated with the resistant phenotype. The insecticide susceptibility tests demonstrated Ae, aegypti resistance to the pyrethroids, with mortality rates ranging from 1.6%–15.2%. Three non-synonymous polymorphisms (S989P, V1016G and F1534C) and one synonymous polymorphism (codon 982) were detected in the AaNaV gene. Eight AaNaV alleles were observed in specimens from Central Java. Allele 3 (SGF) and allele 7 (PGF) represent the most common alleles found and demonstrated strong associations with resistance to pyrethroids (OR = 2.75, CI: 0.97–7.8 and OR = 7.37, CI: 2.4–22.5, respectively). This is the first report of 8 Ae. aegypti AaNaV alleles, and it indicates the development of resistance in Ae. aegypti in response to pyrethroid insecticide-based selective pressure. These findings strongly suggest the need for an appropriate integrated use of insecticides in the region. The 989P, 1016G and 1534C polymorphisms in the AaNaV gene are potentially valuable molecular markers for pyrethroid insecticide resistance monitoring. PMID:26939002

  8. Contact Bioassays with Phenoxybenzyl and Tetrafluorobenzyl Pyrethroids against Target-Site and Metabolic Resistant Mosquitoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Horstmann

    Full Text Available Mosquito strains that exhibit increased tolerance to the chemical class of compounds with a sodium channel modulator mode of action (pyrethroids and pyrethrins are typically described as "pyrethroid resistant". Resistance to pyrethroids is an increasingly important challenge in the control of mosquito-borne diseases, such as malaria or dengue, because one of the main interventions (the distribution of large numbers of long-lasting insecticide-treated bed nets currently relies entirely on long-lasting pyrethroids. Increasing tolerance of target insects against this class of insecticides lowers their impact in vector control. The current study suggests that the level of metabolic resistance depends on the structure of the molecule and that structurally different compounds may still be effective because detoxifying enzymes are unable to bind to these uncommon structures.Treated surface contact bioassays were performed on susceptible Aedes aegypti, East African knockdown resistance (kdr Anopheles gambiae (strain RSP-H and metabolically resistant Anopheles funestus (strain FUMOZ-R with different pyrethroids, such as cypermethrin, ß-cyfluthrin, deltamethrin, permethrin and transfluthrin (alone and in combination with the synergist piperonyl butoxide. The nonfluorinated form of transfluthrin was also assessed as a single agent and in combination with piperonyl butoxide.Although the dosages for pyrethroids containing a phenoxybenzyl moiety have exhibited differences in terms of effectiveness among the three tested mosquito species, the structurally different transfluthrin with a polyfluorobenzyl moiety remained active in mosquitoes with upregulated P450 levels. In trials with transfluthrin mixed with piperonyl butoxide, the added synergist exhibited no efficacy-enhancing effect.The results of this study suggest that transfluthrin has the potential to control P450-mediated metabolically resistant mosquitoes because the structural formula of

  9. Local evolution of pyrethroid resistance offsets gene flow among Aedes aegypti collections in Yucatan State, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra-Rodriguez, Karla; Beaty, Meaghan; Lozano-Fuentes, Saul; Denham, Steven; Garcia-Rejon, Julian; Reyes-Solis, Guadalupe; Machain-Williams, Carlos; Loroño-Pino, Maria Alba; Flores-Suarez, Adriana; Ponce-Garcia, Gustavo; Beaty, Barry; Eisen, Lars; Black, William C

    2015-01-01

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti is the major vector of the four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV1-4). Previous studies have shown that Ae. aegypti in Mexico have a high effective migration rate and that gene flow occurs among populations that are up to 150 km apart. Since 2000, pyrethroids have been widely used for suppression of Ae. aegypti in cities in Mexico. In Yucatan State in particular, pyrethroids have been applied in and around dengue case households creating an opportunity for local selection and evolution of resistance. Herein, we test for evidence of local adaptation by comparing patterns of variation among 27 Ae. aegypti collections at 13 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs): two in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene para known to confer knockdown resistance, three in detoxification genes previously associated with pyrethroid resistance, and eight in putatively neutral loci. The SNPs in para varied greatly in frequency among collections, whereas SNPs at the remaining 11 loci showed little variation supporting previous evidence for extensive local gene flow. Among Ae. aegypti in Yucatan State, Mexico, local adaptation to pyrethroids appears to offset the homogenizing effects of gene flow.

  10. Local Evolution of Pyrethroid Resistance Offsets Gene Flow Among Aedes aegypti Collections in Yucatan State, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra-Rodriguez, Karla; Beaty, Meaghan; Lozano-Fuentes, Saul; Denham, Steven; Garcia-Rejon, Julian; Reyes-Solis, Guadalupe; Machain-Williams, Carlos; Loroño-Pino, Maria Alba; Flores-Suarez, Adriana; Ponce-Garcia, Gustavo; Beaty, Barry; Eisen, Lars; Black, William C.

    2015-01-01

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti is the major vector of the four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV1–4). Previous studies have shown that Ae. aegypti in Mexico have a high effective migration rate and that gene flow occurs among populations that are up to 150 km apart. Since 2000, pyrethroids have been widely used for suppression of Ae. aegypti in cities in Mexico. In Yucatan State in particular, pyrethroids have been applied in and around dengue case households creating an opportunity for local selection and evolution of resistance. Herein, we test for evidence of local adaptation by comparing patterns of variation among 27 Ae. aegypti collections at 13 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs): two in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene para known to confer knockdown resistance, three in detoxification genes previously associated with pyrethroid resistance, and eight in putatively neutral loci. The SNPs in para varied greatly in frequency among collections, whereas SNPs at the remaining 11 loci showed little variation supporting previous evidence for extensive local gene flow. Among Ae. aegypti in Yucatan State, Mexico, local adaptation to pyrethroids appears to offset the homogenizing effects of gene flow. PMID:25371186

  11. Chlorfenapyr: a new insecticide with novel mode of action can control pyrethroid resistant malaria vectors

    OpenAIRE

    Srivastava Harish C; Bhatt Rajendra M; Sharma Poonam; Barik Tapan K; Raghavendra Kamaraju; Sreehari Uragayala; Dash Aditya P

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Malaria vectors have acquired widespread resistance to many of the currently used insecticides, including synthetic pyrethroids. Hence, there is an urgent need to develop alternative insecticides for effective management of insecticide resistance in malaria vectors. In the present study, chlorfenapyr was evaluated against Anopheles culicifacies and Anopheles stephensi for its possible use in vector control. Methods Efficacy of chlorfenapyr against An. culicifacies and An. ...

  12. Mechanisms of pyrethroid resistance in Haematobia irritans (Muscidae) from Mato Grosso do Sul state, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Horn fly resistance to pyrethroid insecticides occurs throughout Brazil, but knowledge about the involved mechanisms is still in an incipient stage. This survey was aimed to identify the mechanisms of horn fly resistance to cypermethrin in Mato Grosso do Sul state, Brazil. Impregnated filter paper bioassays using cypermethrin, synergized or not with piperonyl butoxide (PBO) and triphenyl phosphate (TPP), were conducted from March 2004 to June 2005 in horn fly populations (n = 33) from all ove...

  13. Evaluation of indoor residual spraying with the pyrrole insecticide chlorfenapyr against pyrethroid-susceptible Anopheles arabiensis and pyrethroid-resistant Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxborough, R M; Kitau, J; Matowo, J; Mndeme, R; Feston, E; Boko, P; Odjo, A; Metonnou, C G; Irish, S; N'guessan, R; Mosha, F W; Rowland, M W

    2010-10-01

    Chlorfenapyr is a pyrrole insecticide with a unique non-neurological mode of action. Laboratory bioassays of chlorfenapyr comparing the mortality of pyrethroid-susceptible and -resistant Anopheles gambiae s.s. and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes indicated that operational cross-resistance is unlikely to occur (resistance ratio ranged between 0 and 2.1). Three trials of chlorfenapyr indoor residual spraying were undertaken in experimental huts in an area of rice irrigation in northern Tanzania that supports breeding of A. arabiensis. Daily mosquito collections were undertaken to assess product performance primarily in terms of mortality. In the second trial, 250mg/m(2) and 500mg/m(2) chlorfenapyr were tested for residual efficacy over 6 months. Both dosages killed 54% of C. quinquefasciatus, whilst for A. arabiensis 250mg/m(2) killed 48% compared with 41% for 500mg/m(2); mortality was as high at the end of the trial as at the beginning. In the third trial, 250mg/m(2) chlorfenapyr was compared with the pyrethroid alpha-cypermethrin dosed at 30mg/m(2). Chlorfenapyr performance was equivalent to the pyrethroid against A. arabiensis, with both insecticides killing 50% of mosquitoes. Chlorfenapyr killed a significantly higher proportion of pyrethroid-resistant C. quinquefasciatus (56%) compared with alpha-cypermethrin (17%). Chlorfenapyr has the potential to be an important addition to the limited arsenal of public health insecticides for indoor residual control of A. arabiensis and pyrethroid-resistant species of mosquito. Copyright © 2010 Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  14. Pilot study on the combination of an organophosphate-based insecticide paint and pyrethroid-treated long lasting nets against pyrethroid resistant malaria vectors in Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosqueira, Beatriz; Soma, Dieudonné D; Namountougou, Moussa; Poda, Serge; Diabaté, Abdoulaye; Ali, Ouari; Fournet, Florence; Baldet, Thierry; Carnevale, Pierre; Dabiré, Roch K; Mas-Coma, Santiago

    2015-08-01

    A pilot study to test the efficacy of combining an organophosphate-based insecticide paint and pyrethroid-treated Long Lasting Insecticide Treated Nets (LLINs) against pyrethroid-resistant malaria vector mosquitoes was performed in a real village setting in Burkina Faso. Paint Inesfly 5A IGR™, comprised of two organophosphates (OPs) and an Insect Growth Regulator (IGR), was tested in combination with pyrethroid-treated LLINs. Efficacy was assessed in terms of mortality for 12 months using Early Morning Collections of malaria vectors and 30-minute WHO bioassays. Resistance to pyrethroids and OPs was assessed by detecting the frequency of L1014F and L1014S kdr mutations and Ace-1(R)G119S mutation, respectively. Blood meal origin was identified using a direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The combination of Inesfly 5A IGR™ and LLINs was effective in killing 99.9-100% of malaria vector populations for 6 months regardless of the dose and volume treated. After 12 months, mortality rates decreased to 69.5-82.2%. The highest mortality rates observed in houses treated with 2 layers of insecticide paint and a larger volume. WHO bioassays supported these results: mortalities were 98.8-100% for 6 months and decreased after 12 months to 81.7-97.0%. Mortality rates in control houses with LLINs were low. Collected malaria vectors consisted exclusively of Anopheles coluzzii and were resistant to pyrethroids, with a L1014 kdr mutation frequency ranging from 60 to 98% through the study. About 58% of An. coluzzii collected inside houses had bloodfed on non-human animals. Combining Inesfly 5A IGR™ and LLINs yielded a one year killing efficacy against An. coluzzii highly resistant to pyrethroids but susceptible to OPs that exhibited an anthropo-zoophilic behaviour in the study area. The results obtained in a real setting supported previous work performed in experimental huts and underscore the need to study the impact that this novel strategy may have on clinical

  15. Level of CYP4G19 Expression Is Associated with Pyrethroid Resistance in Blattella germanica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-zhou Guo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available German cockroaches have become a large problem in the Shenzhen area because of their pesticide resistance, especially to pyrethroid. A pyrethroid called “Jia Chong Qing” to prevent pests for a long time were found to be resistant to “Jia Chong Qing” with resistance index of 3.88 measured using RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry analysis showed that both CYP4G19 mRNA and CYP4G19 protein expression levels in the wild strain were substantially higher than that of a sensitive strain. dsRNA segments derived from the target gene CYP4G19 were prepared using in vitro transcription and were microinjected into abdomens of the wild strain. Two to eight days after injection, the result showed that CYP4G19 mRNA expressions were significantly reduced in the groups injected with dsRNAs.

  16. Evaluation of the pyrrole insecticide chlorfenapyr against pyrethroid resistant and susceptible Anopheles funestus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, S V; Kaiser, M L; Wood, O R; Coetzee, M; Rowland, M; Brooke, B D

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the pyrrole insecticide chlorfenapyr, which has a novel non-neurotoxic mode of action and is a promising alternative to conventional adulticides, against Anopheles funestus. The toxicity of a range of concentrations of chlorfenapyr against pyrethroid resistant and susceptible laboratory reared southern African An. funestus was assessed using standard WHO protocols and analysed using probit analysis. The pyrethroid resistant strain showed consistently higher LD50 and LD95 values compared to the susceptible strain, but these differences were not statistically significant and the magnitude was twofold at most. The LD50 values recorded for An. funestus are approximately three-fold higher than those reported elsewhere for other species of anopheline. Monooxygenase based pyrethroid resistance in An. funestus does not influence the toxic effect of chlorfenapyr. It is unlikely that such a small decrease in susceptibility of An. funestus to chlorfenapyr relative to other anophelines would have any operational implications. Chlorfenapyr is an important addition to insecticides available for malaria vector control, and could be used as a resistance management tool to either circumvent or slow the development of resistance.

  17. First report of pyrethroid resistance in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus larvae (Say, 1821) from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziapour, Seyyed Payman; Kheiri, Sadegh; Asgarian, Fatemeh; Fazeli-Dinan, Mahmoud; Yazdi, Fariborz; Mohammadpour, Reza Ali; Aarabi, Mohsen; Enayati, Ahmadali

    2016-04-01

    Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus is one of the most important hard ticks parasitizing cattle in northern Iran. The aim of this study was to evaluate pyrethroid resistance levels of this species from Nur County, northern Iran. The hard ticks were collected through a multistage cluster randomized sampling method from the study area and fully engorged female R. (B.) annulatus were reared in a controlled insectary until they produced larvae for bioassay. Seventeen populations of the hard ticks were bioassayed with cypermethrin and 12 populations with lambda-cyhalothrin using a modified larval packet test (LPT). Biochemical assays to measure the contents/activity of different enzyme groups including mixed function oxidases (MFOs), glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) and general esterases were performed. Population 75 showed a resistance ratio of 4.05 with cypermethrin when compared with the most susceptible field population 66 at the LC50 level. With lambda-cyhalothrin the resistance ratio based on LC50 was 3.67 when compared with the susceptible population. The results of biochemical assays demonstrated significantly elevated levels of GSTs and esterases in populations tested compared with the heterozygous susceptible filed population and a correlation coefficient of these enzymes was found in association to lambda-cyhalothrin resistance. Based on the results, pyrethroid acaricides may operationally fail to control R. (B.) annulatus in North of Iran. This study is the first document of pyrethroid resistance in R. (B.) annulatus populations from Iran.

  18. Wide spread cross resistance to pyrethroids in Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) from Veracruz state Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Adriana E; Ponce, Gustavo; Silva, Brenda G; Gutierrez, Selene M; Bobadilla, Cristina; Lopez, Beatriz; Mercado, Roberto; Black, William C

    2013-04-01

    Seven F1 strains of Aedes aegypti (L.) were evaluated by bottle bioassay for resistance to the pyrethroids d-phenothrin, permethrin, deltamethrin, lambda-cyalothrin, bifenthrin, cypermethrin, alpha-cypermethrin, and z-cypermethrin. The New Orleans strain was used as a susceptible control. Mortality rates after a 1 h exposure and after a 24 h recovery period were determined. The resistance ratio between the 50% knockdown values (RR(KC50)) of the F1 and New Orleans strains indicated high levels of knockdown resistance. The RR(KC50) with alpha-cypermethrin varied from 10 to 100 among strains indicating high levels of knockdown resistance. Most of the strains had moderate resistance to d-phenothrin. Significant but much lower levels of resistance were detected for lambda-cyalothrin, permethrin, and cypermethrin. For zeta-cypermethrin and bifenthrin, only one strain exhibited resistance with RR(KC50) values of 10- and 21-fold, respectively. None of the strains showed RR(KC50) >10 with deltamethrin, and moderate resistance was seen in three strains, while the rest were susceptible. Mosquitoes from all strains exhibited some recovery from all pyrethroids except d-phenothrin. Regression analysis was used to analyze the relationship between RR(LC50) and RR(KC50). Both were highly correlated (R2 = 0.84-0.97) so that the slope could be used to determine how much additional pyrethroid was needed to ensure lethality. Slopes ranged from 0.875 for d-phenothrin (RR(LC50) approximately equal to RR(KC50)) to 8.67 for lambda-cyalothrin (-8.5-fold more insecticide needed to kill). Both RR(LC50) and RR(KC50) values were highly correlated for all pyrethroids except bifenthrin indicating strong cross-resistance. Bifenthrin appears to be an alternative pyrethroid without strong cross-resistance that could be used as an alternative to the current widespread use of permethrin in Mexico.

  19. Target-site resistance to pyrethroid insecticides in German populations of the cabbage stem flea beetle, Psylliodes chrysocephala L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Christoph T; Müller, Andreas; Heimbach, Udo; Nauen, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Cabbage stem flea beetle, Psylliodes chrysocephala L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) is a major pest of winter oilseed rape in several European countries particularly attacking young emerging plants in autumn. Over the last several decades, pyrethroid insecticides have been foliarly applied to control flea beetle outbreaks. Recent control failures in northern Germany suggested pyrethroid resistance development in cabbage stem flea beetles, which were confirmed by resistance monitoring bioassays using lambda-cyhalothrin in an adult vial test. The purpose of this study was to investigate the presence of polymorphisms in the para-type voltage-gated sodium channel gene of P. chrysocephala known to be involved in knock-down resistance (kdr). By using a degenerate primer approach we PCR amplified part of the para-type sodium channel gene and identified in resistant flea beetles a single nucleotide polymorphism resulting in an L1014F (kdr) mutation within domain IIS6 of the channel protein, known as one of the chief pyrethroid target-site resistance mechanisms in several other pest insects. Twenty populations including four archived museum samples collected between 1945 and 1958 were analyzed using a newly developed pyrosequencing diagnostic assay. The assay revealed a kdr allele frequency of 90-100% in those flea beetle populations expressing high-level cross-resistance in discriminating dose bioassays against different pyrethroids such as lambda-cyhalothrin, tau-fluvalinate, etofenprox and bifenthrin. The presence of target-site resistance to pyrethroids in cabbage stem flea beetle is extremely worrying considering the lack of effective alternative modes of action to control this pest in Germany and other European countries, and is likely to result in major control problems once it expands to other geographies. The striking fact that cabbage stem flea beetle is next to pollen beetle, Meligethes aeneus the second coleopteran pest in European winter oilseed rape resisting

  20. Target-site resistance to pyrethroids in European populations of pollen beetle, Meligethes aeneus F

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nauen, Ralf; Zimmer, Christoph T; Andrews, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    by cytochrome P450 monooxygenases was implicated in the resistance of several pollen beetle populations from different European regions. Here, we have also investigated the possible occurrence of a target-site mechanism caused by modification of the pollen beetle para-type voltage-gated sodium channel gene. We....... No super-kdr mutations (e.g. M918T) known to cause resistance to pyrethroids were detected. The implications of these results for resistance management strategies of pollen beetle populations in oilseed rape crops are discussed....

  1. Carbamate and Pyrethroid Resistance in the Akron Strain of Anopheles gambiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutunga, James M.; Anderson, Troy D.; Craft, Derek T.; Gross, Aaron D.; Swale, Daniel R.; Tong, Fan; Wong, Dawn M.; Carlier, Paul R.; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Insecticide resistance in the malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae is a serious problem, epitomized by the multi-resistant Akron strain, originally isolated in the country of Benin. Here we report resistance in this strain to pyrethroids and DDT (13-fold to 35-fold compared to the susceptible G3 strain), but surprisingly little resistance to etofenprox, a compound sometimes described as a “pseudo-pyrethroid.” There was also strong resistance to topically-applied commercial carbamates (45-fold to 81-fold), except for the oximes aldicarb and methomyl. Biochemical assays showed enhanced cytochrome P450 monooxygenase and carboxylesterase activity, but not that of glutathione-S-transferase. A series of substituted α,α,α,-trifluoroacetophenone oxime methylcarbamates were evaluated for enzyme inhibition potency and toxicity against G3 and Akron mosquitoes. The compound bearing an unsubstituted phenyl ring showed the greatest toxicity to mosquitoes of both strains. Low cross resistance in Akron was retained by all analogs in the series. Kinetic analysis of acetylcholinesterase activity and its inhibition by insecticides in the G3 strain showed inactivation rate constants greater than that of propoxur, and against Akron enzyme inactivation rate constants similar to that of aldicarb. However, inactivation rate constants against recombinant human AChE were essentially identical to that of the G3 strain. Thus, the acetophenone oxime carbamates described here, though potent insecticides that control resistant Akron mosquitoes, require further structural modification to attain acceptable selectivity and human safety. PMID:26047119

  2. Identification of differentially expressed microRNAs in Culex pipiens and their potential roles in pyrethroid resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Shanchao; Guo, Qin; Wang, Weijie; Hu, Shengli; Fang, Fujin; Lv, Yuan; Yu, Jing; Zou, Feifei; Lei, Zhentao; Ma, Kai; Ma, Lei; Zhou, Dan; Sun, Yan; Zhang, Donghui; Shen, Bo; Zhu, Changliang

    2014-12-01

    Pyrethroids are the major class of insecticides used for mosquito control. Excessive and improper use of insecticides, however, has resulted in pyrethroid resistance, which has become a major obstacle for mosquito control. The development of pyrethroid resistance is a complex process involving many genes, and information on post-transcription regulation of pyrethroid resistance is lacking. In this study, we extracted RNA from mosquitoes in various life stages (fourth-instar larvae, pupae, male and female adult mosquitoes) from deltamethrin-sensitive (DS) and resistant (DR) strains. Using illumina sequencing, we obtained 13760296 and 12355472 reads for DS-strains and DR-strains, respectively. We identified 100 conserved miRNAs and 42 novel miRNAs derived from 21 miRNA precursors in Culex pipiens. After normalization, we identified 28 differentially expressed miRNAs between the two strains. Additionally, we found that cpp-miR-71 was significant down regulated in female adults from the DR-strain. Based on microinjection and CDC Bottle Bioassay data, we found that cpp-miR-71 may play a contributing role in deltamethrin resistance. The present study provides the firstly large-scale characterization of miRNAs in Cu. pipiens and provides evidence of post-transcription regulation. The differentially expressed miRNAs between the two strains are expected to contribute to the development of pyrethroid resistance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Deep sequencing of pyrethroid-resistant bed bugs reveals multiple mechanisms of resistance within a single population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelman, Zach N; Kilcullen, Kathleen A; Koganemaru, Reina; Anderson, Michelle A E; Anderson, Troy D; Miller, Dini M

    2011-01-01

    A frightening resurgence of bed bug infestations has occurred over the last 10 years in the U.S. and current chemical methods have been inadequate for controlling this pest due to widespread insecticide resistance. Little is known about the mechanisms of resistance present in U.S. bed bug populations, making it extremely difficult to develop intelligent strategies for their control. We have identified bed bugs collected in Richmond, VA which exhibit both kdr-type (L925I) and metabolic resistance to pyrethroid insecticides. Using LD(50) bioassays, we determined that resistance ratios for Richmond strain bed bugs were ∼5200-fold to the insecticide deltamethrin. To identify metabolic genes potentially involved in the detoxification of pyrethroids, we performed deep-sequencing of the adult bed bug transcriptome, obtaining more than 2.5 million reads on the 454 titanium platform. Following assembly, analysis of newly identified gene transcripts in both Harlan (susceptible) and Richmond (resistant) bed bugs revealed several candidate cytochrome P450 and carboxylesterase genes which were significantly over-expressed in the resistant strain, consistent with the idea of increased metabolic resistance. These data will accelerate efforts to understand the biochemical basis for insecticide resistance in bed bugs, and provide molecular markers to assist in the surveillance of metabolic resistance.

  4. Deep sequencing of pyrethroid-resistant bed bugs reveals multiple mechanisms of resistance within a single population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zach N Adelman

    Full Text Available A frightening resurgence of bed bug infestations has occurred over the last 10 years in the U.S. and current chemical methods have been inadequate for controlling this pest due to widespread insecticide resistance. Little is known about the mechanisms of resistance present in U.S. bed bug populations, making it extremely difficult to develop intelligent strategies for their control. We have identified bed bugs collected in Richmond, VA which exhibit both kdr-type (L925I and metabolic resistance to pyrethroid insecticides. Using LD(50 bioassays, we determined that resistance ratios for Richmond strain bed bugs were ∼5200-fold to the insecticide deltamethrin. To identify metabolic genes potentially involved in the detoxification of pyrethroids, we performed deep-sequencing of the adult bed bug transcriptome, obtaining more than 2.5 million reads on the 454 titanium platform. Following assembly, analysis of newly identified gene transcripts in both Harlan (susceptible and Richmond (resistant bed bugs revealed several candidate cytochrome P450 and carboxylesterase genes which were significantly over-expressed in the resistant strain, consistent with the idea of increased metabolic resistance. These data will accelerate efforts to understand the biochemical basis for insecticide resistance in bed bugs, and provide molecular markers to assist in the surveillance of metabolic resistance.

  5. Chlorfenapyr: a pyrrole insecticide for the control of pyrethroid or DDT resistant Anopheles gambiae (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N'Guessan, R; Boko, P; Odjo, A; Akogbéto, M; Yates, A; Rowland, M

    2007-04-01

    Owing to the development and spread of pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles gambiae in Africa there is an urgent need to develop alternative insecticides to supplement the pyrethroids. Chlorfenapyr is a pyrrole insecticide first commercialized for the control of agricultural pests and termites. Performance against An. gambiae bearing kdr (pyrethroid and DDT resistance) or Ace-1(R) insensitive acetylcholinesterase (organophosphate and carbamate resistance) mechanisms was studied using a variety of adult bioassay tests including a simulated-experimental hut system (tunnel tests) that allows uninhibited mosquito behaviour/insecticide interactions. Strains resistant to pyrethroids and organophosphates showed no cross resistance to chlorfenapyr. In cone bioassays on treated netting the mortality of adult mosquitoes showed an unexpected curvilinear response, with highest mortality occurring at intermediate dosages. Adults expressed irritability to chlorfenapyr at higher dosages, which might explain the dosage-mortality trend. Toxic activity of chlorfenapyr was slow compared to conventional neurotoxic insecticides and additional mortality occurred between 24h and 72 h. In tunnel tests, the dosage-mortality trend showed a more typical sigmoid response and most mortality occurred during the first 24h. Mosquito penetration through the holed, treated netting showed only limited inhibition and blood-feeding was not inhibited. Mortality rates in the kdr strain exposed to chlorfenapyr treated netting in tunnel tests were much higher than with permethrin treated netting over the same 100-500 mg/m(2) dosage range. Chlorfenapyr has potential for malaria control in treated-net or residual spraying applications in areas where mosquitoes are pyrethroid resistant. For treated-net applications chlorfenapyr might be combined with pyrethroid as a mixture to provide personal protection as well as to give control of resistant mosquitoes.

  6. Pyrethroid Resistance Alters the Blood-Feeding Behavior in Puerto Rican Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes Exposed to Treated Fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerging insecticide resistance is a major issue for vector control; it decreases effectiveness of insecticides, thereby requiring greater quantities for comparable control with a net increase in risk of disease resurgence, product cost, and damage risk to the ecosystem. Pyrethroid resistance has b...

  7. Trends in DDT and pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles gambiae s.s. populations from urban and agro-industrial settings in southern Cameroon

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    Kerah-Hinzoumbé Clément

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pyrethroid insecticides are widely used for insect pest control in Cameroon. In certain insect species, particularly the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae, resistance to this class of insecticides is a source of great concern and needs to be monitored in order to sustain the efficacy of vector control operations in the fields. This study highlights trends in DDT and pyrethroid resistance in wild An. gambiae populations from South Cameroon. Methods Mosquitoes were collected between 2001 and 2007 in four sites in South Cameroon, where insecticides are used for agricultural or personal protection purposes. Insecticide use was documented in each site by interviewing residents. Batches of 2-4 days old adult female mosquitoes reared from larval collections were tested for susceptibility to DDT, permethrin and deltamethrin using standard WHO procedures. Control, dead and survivors mosquitoes from bioassays were identified by PCR-RFLP and characterized for the kdr mutations using either the AS-PCR or the HOLA method. Results Four chemical insecticide groups were cited in the study sites: organochlorines, organophosphates, carbamates and pyrethroids. These chemicals were used for personal, crop or wood protection. In the four An. gambiae populations tested, significant variation in resistance levels, molecular forms composition and kdr frequencies were recorded in the time span of the study. Increases in DDT and pyrethroid resistance, as observed in most areas, were generally associated with an increase in the relative frequency of the S molecular form carrying the kdr mutations at higher frequencies. In Mangoum, however, where only the S form was present, a significant increase in the frequency of kdr alleles between 2003 to 2007 diverged with a decrease of the level of resistance to DDT and pyrethroids. Analyses of the kdr frequencies in dead and surviving mosquitoes showed partial correlation between the kdr genotypes and resistance

  8. Pyrethroid resistance is widespread among Florida populations of Aedes aegypti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aedes aegypti is an efficient vector of a number of diseases that affect man and is of increasing concern because of the reemergence of dengue and recent identification of locally acquired chikungunya in Florida. Pesticide resistance in this species has been demonstrated in several neighboring coun...

  9. Olyset Duo® (a pyriproxyfen and permethrin mixture net: an experimental hut trial against pyrethroid resistant Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus in Southern Benin.

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    Corine Ngufor

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alternative compounds which can complement pyrethroids on long-lasting insecticidal nets (LN in the control of pyrethroid resistant malaria vectors are urgently needed. Pyriproxyfen (PPF, an insect growth regulator, reduces the fecundity and fertility of adult female mosquitoes. LNs containing a mixture of pyriproxyfen and pyrethroid could provide personal protection through the pyrethroid component and reduce vector abundance in the next generation through the sterilizing effect of pyriproxyfen. METHOD: The efficacy of Olyset Duo, a newly developed mixture LN containing pyriproxyfen and permethrin, was evaluated in experimental huts in southern Benin against pyrethroid resistant Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus. Comparison was made with Olyset Net® (permethrin alone and a LN with pyriproxyfen alone (PPF LN. Laboratory tunnel tests were performed to substantiate the findings in the experimental huts. RESULTS: Overall mortality of wild pyrethroid resistant An. gambiae s.s. was significantly higher with Olyset Duo than with Olyset Net (50% vs. 27%, P = 0.01. Olyset DUO was more protective than Olyset Net (71% vs. 3%, P<0.001. The oviposition rate of surviving blood-fed An. gambiae from the control hut was 37% whereas none of those from Olyset Duo and PPF LN huts laid eggs. The tunnel test results were consistent with the experimental hut results. Olyset Duo was more protective than Olyset Net in the huts against wild pyrethroid resistant Cx. quinquefasciatus although mortality rates of this species did not differ significantly between Olyset Net and Olyset Duo. There was no sterilizing effect on surviving blood-fed Cx. quinquefasciatus with the PPF-treated nets. CONCLUSION: Olyset Duo was superior to Olyset Net in terms of personal protection and killing of pyrethroid resistant An. gambiae, and sterilized surviving blood-fed mosquitoes. Mixing pyrethroid and pyriproxyfen on a LN shows potential for malaria control and

  10. Detection of the high risk pyrethroid resistant Varroa destructor mites in apiaries of the Warmia-Mazury province in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipiński, Zbigniew; Szubstarski, Jarosław; Szubstarska, Dagna

    2007-01-01

    The aim of our current study was to investigate the possible occurence of pyrethroid (taufluvalinate) resistant Varroa mites infestations in 24 randomly chosen apiaries of Warmia-Mazury province of northeast Poland. The methodology used for the analysis of resistant Varroa strains strictly followed the protocol described by Milani. We identified 3 apiaries that were infested with high risk pyrethroid resistance mites and a further 9 apiaries that were free from this resitance. The brood samples collected from the remaining apiaries did not contain sufficient numbers of parasites to enable us to properly perform the assay. Our finding that 25% of the tested brood samples showed a high risk of fully pyrethroid resistant Varroa mite contamination indicates that resistant Varroa may become wide spread in apiaries in Poland. Interestingly these high risk resistant mites were found in honeybee colonies with low levels of Varroa infestation, with an average rate of 2.16%. We also discuss the role of amitraz (amidine) in the phenomenon of Varroa resistance to pyrethroids.

  11. Impact of Insecticide Resistance on the Effectiveness of Pyrethroid-Based Malaria Vectors Control Tools in Benin: Decreased Toxicity and Repellent Effect.

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    Fiacre R Agossa

    Full Text Available Since the first evidence of pyrethroids resistance in 1999 in Benin, mutations have rapidly increased in mosquitoes and it is now difficult to design a study including a control area where malaria vectors are fully susceptible. Few studies have assessed the after effect of resistance on the success of pyrethroid based prevention methods in mosquito populations. We therefore assessed the impact of resistance on the effectiveness of pyrethroids based indoor residual spraying (IRS in semi-field conditions and long lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs in laboratory conditions. The results observed showed low repulsion and low toxicity of pyrethroids compounds in the test populations. The toxicity of pyrethroids used in IRS was significantly low with An. gambiae s.l (< 46% but high for other predominant species such as Mansonia africana (93% to 97%. There were significant differences in terms of the repellent effect expressed as exophily and deterrence compared to the untreated huts (P<0.001. Furthermore, mortality was 23.71% for OlyseNet® and 39.06% for PermaNet®. However, with laboratory susceptible "Kisumu", mortality was 100% for both nets suggesting a resistance within the wild mosquito populations. Thus treatment with pyrethroids at World Health Organization recommended dose will not be effective at reducing malaria in the coming years. Therefore it is necessary to study how insecticide resistance decreases the efficacy of particular pyrethroids used in pyrethroid-based vector control so that a targeted approach can be adopted.

  12. Managing insecticide resistance in malaria vectors by combining carbamate-treated plastic wall sheeting and pyrethroid-treated bed nets

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    Pennetier Cédric

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pyrethroid resistance is now widespread in Anopheles gambiae, the major vector for malaria in sub-Saharan Africa. This resistance may compromise malaria vector control strategies that are currently in use in endemic areas. In this context, a new tool for management of resistant mosquitoes based on the combination of a pyrethroid-treated bed net and carbamate-treated plastic sheeting was developed. Methods In the laboratory, the insecticidal activity and wash resistance of four carbamate-treated materials: a cotton/polyester blend, a polyvinyl chloride tarpaulin, a cotton/polyester blend covered on one side with polyurethane, and a mesh of polypropylene fibres was tested. These materials were treated with bendiocarb at 100 mg/m2 and 200 mg/m2 with and without a binding resin to find the best combination for field studies. Secondly, experimental hut trials were performed in southern Benin to test the efficacy of the combined use of a pyrethroid-treated bed net and the carbamate-treated material that was the most wash-resistant against wild populations of pyrethroid-resistant An. gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus. Results Material made of polypropylene mesh (PPW provided the best wash resistance (up to 10 washes, regardless of the insecticide dose, the type of washing, or the presence or absence of the binding resin. The experimental hut trial showed that the combination of carbamate-treated PPW and a pyrethroid-treated bed net was extremely effective in terms of mortality and inhibition of blood feeding of pyrethroid-resistant An. gambiae. This efficacy was found to be proportional to the total surface of the walls. This combination showed a moderate effect against wild populations of Cx. quinquefasciatus, which were strongly resistant to pyrethroid. Conclusion These preliminary results should be confirmed, including evaluation of entomological, parasitological, and clinical parameters. Selective pressure on resistance

  13. A Linkage Map and QTL Analysis for Pyrethroid Resistance in the Bed Bug Cimex lectularius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountain, Toby; Ravinet, Mark; Naylor, Richard; Reinhardt, Klaus; Butlin, Roger K

    2016-12-07

    The rapid evolution of insecticide resistance remains one of the biggest challenges in the control of medically and economically important pests. Insects have evolved a diverse range of mechanisms to reduce the efficacy of the commonly used classes of insecticides, and finding the genetic basis of resistance is a major aid to management. In a previously unstudied population, we performed an F2 resistance mapping cross for the common bed bug, Cimex lectularius, for which insecticide resistance is increasingly widespread. Using 334 SNP markers obtained through RAD-sequencing, we constructed the first linkage map for the species, consisting of 14 putative linkage groups (LG), with a length of 407 cM and an average marker spacing of 1.3 cM. The linkage map was used to reassemble the recently published reference genome, facilitating refinement and validation of the current genome assembly. We detected a major QTL on LG12 associated with insecticide resistance, occurring in close proximity (1.2 Mb) to a carboxylesterase encoding candidate gene for pyrethroid resistance. This provides another example of this candidate gene playing a major role in determining survival in a bed bug population following pesticide resistance evolution. The recent availability of the bed bug genome, complete with a full list of potential candidate genes related to insecticide resistance, in addition to the linkage map generated here, provides an excellent resource for future research on the development and spread of insecticide resistance in this resurging pest species. Copyright © 2016 Fountain et al.

  14. A Linkage Map and QTL Analysis for Pyrethroid Resistance in the Bed Bug Cimex lectularius

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    Toby Fountain

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The rapid evolution of insecticide resistance remains one of the biggest challenges in the control of medically and economically important pests. Insects have evolved a diverse range of mechanisms to reduce the efficacy of the commonly used classes of insecticides, and finding the genetic basis of resistance is a major aid to management. In a previously unstudied population, we performed an F2 resistance mapping cross for the common bed bug, Cimex lectularius, for which insecticide resistance is increasingly widespread. Using 334 SNP markers obtained through RAD-sequencing, we constructed the first linkage map for the species, consisting of 14 putative linkage groups (LG, with a length of 407 cM and an average marker spacing of 1.3 cM. The linkage map was used to reassemble the recently published reference genome, facilitating refinement and validation of the current genome assembly. We detected a major QTL on LG12 associated with insecticide resistance, occurring in close proximity (1.2 Mb to a carboxylesterase encoding candidate gene for pyrethroid resistance. This provides another example of this candidate gene playing a major role in determining survival in a bed bug population following pesticide resistance evolution. The recent availability of the bed bug genome, complete with a full list of potential candidate genes related to insecticide resistance, in addition to the linkage map generated here, provides an excellent resource for future research on the development and spread of insecticide resistance in this resurging pest species.

  15. A Linkage Map and QTL Analysis for Pyrethroid Resistance in the Bed Bug Cimex lectularius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountain, Toby; Ravinet, Mark; Naylor, Richard; Reinhardt, Klaus; Butlin, Roger K.

    2016-01-01

    The rapid evolution of insecticide resistance remains one of the biggest challenges in the control of medically and economically important pests. Insects have evolved a diverse range of mechanisms to reduce the efficacy of the commonly used classes of insecticides, and finding the genetic basis of resistance is a major aid to management. In a previously unstudied population, we performed an F2 resistance mapping cross for the common bed bug, Cimex lectularius, for which insecticide resistance is increasingly widespread. Using 334 SNP markers obtained through RAD-sequencing, we constructed the first linkage map for the species, consisting of 14 putative linkage groups (LG), with a length of 407 cM and an average marker spacing of 1.3 cM. The linkage map was used to reassemble the recently published reference genome, facilitating refinement and validation of the current genome assembly. We detected a major QTL on LG12 associated with insecticide resistance, occurring in close proximity (1.2 Mb) to a carboxylesterase encoding candidate gene for pyrethroid resistance. This provides another example of this candidate gene playing a major role in determining survival in a bed bug population following pesticide resistance evolution. The recent availability of the bed bug genome, complete with a full list of potential candidate genes related to insecticide resistance, in addition to the linkage map generated here, provides an excellent resource for future research on the development and spread of insecticide resistance in this resurging pest species. PMID:27733453

  16. The cytochrome P450 CYP6P4 is responsible for the high pyrethroid resistance in knockdown resistance-free Anopheles arabiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Sulaiman S.; Riveron, Jacob M.; Stott, Robert; Irving, Helen; Wondji, Charles S.

    2016-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are the front line vector control tools used in bed nets to reduce malaria transmission and its burden. However, resistance in major vectors such as Anopheles arabiensis is posing a serious challenge to the success of malaria control. Herein, we elucidated the molecular and biochemical basis of pyrethroid resistance in a knockdown resistance-free Anopheles arabiensis population from Chad, Central Africa. Using heterologous expression of P450s in Escherichia coli coupled with metabolism assays we established that the over-expressed P450 CYP6P4, located in the major pyrethroid resistance (rp1) quantitative trait locus (QTL), is responsible for resistance to Type I and Type II pyrethroid insecticides, with the exception of deltamethrin, in correlation with field resistance profile. However, CYP6P4 exhibited no metabolic activity towards non-pyrethroid insecticides, including DDT, bendiocarb, propoxur and malathion. Combining fluorescent probes inhibition assays with molecular docking simulation, we established that CYP6P4 can bind deltamethrin but cannot metabolise it. This is possibly due to steric hindrance because of the large vdW radius of bromine atoms of the dihalovinyl group of deltamethrin which docks into the heme catalytic centre. The establishment of CYP6P4 as a partial pyrethroid resistance gene explained the observed field resistance to permethrin, and its inability to metabolise deltamethrin probably explained the high mortality from deltamethrin exposure in the field populations of this Sudano-Sahelian An. arabiensis. These findings describe the heterogeneity in resistance towards insecticides, even from the same class, highlighting the need to thoroughly understand the molecular basis of resistance before implementing resistance management/control tools. PMID:26548743

  17. The cytochrome P450 CYP6P4 is responsible for the high pyrethroid resistance in knockdown resistance-free Anopheles arabiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Sulaiman S; Riveron, Jacob M; Stott, Robert; Irving, Helen; Wondji, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are the front line vector control tools used in bed nets to reduce malaria transmission and its burden. However, resistance in major vectors such as Anopheles arabiensis is posing a serious challenge to the success of malaria control. Herein, we elucidated the molecular and biochemical basis of pyrethroid resistance in a knockdown resistance-free Anopheles arabiensis population from Chad, Central Africa. Using heterologous expression of P450s in Escherichia coli coupled with metabolism assays we established that the over-expressed P450 CYP6P4, located in the major pyrethroid resistance (rp1) quantitative trait locus (QTL), is responsible for resistance to Type I and Type II pyrethroid insecticides, with the exception of deltamethrin, in correlation with field resistance profile. However, CYP6P4 exhibited no metabolic activity towards non-pyrethroid insecticides, including DDT, bendiocarb, propoxur and malathion. Combining fluorescent probes inhibition assays with molecular docking simulation, we established that CYP6P4 can bind deltamethrin but cannot metabolise it. This is possibly due to steric hindrance because of the large vdW radius of bromine atoms of the dihalovinyl group of deltamethrin which docks into the heme catalytic centre. The establishment of CYP6P4 as a partial pyrethroid resistance gene explained the observed field resistance to permethrin, and its inability to metabolise deltamethrin probably explained the high mortality from deltamethrin exposure in the field populations of this Sudano-Sahelian An. arabiensis. These findings describe the heterogeneity in resistance towards insecticides, even from the same class, highlighting the need to thoroughly understand the molecular basis of resistance before implementing resistance management/control tools.

  18. Study of Different Effects of Nets Impregnated with Different Pyrethroids on Susceptible and Resistant Strains of Anopheles stephensi

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    M.H. Hodjati

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objectives: A laboratory study was carried out to investigate the insecticidal, irritant and anti-feeding effects of nets treated with various pyrethroids against susceptible and highly pyrethroid resistant strains of An. stephensi. Materials & Methods: Tests were carried out inside a mosquito cage measuring 25×25×25 cm where mosquitoes were offered the opportunity to feed blood on an arm through the top face of the cage which had been pyrethroid treated.Results: With all the pyrethroids tested, the resistant strain spent a longer time in contact with a treated net, which was in contact with a human arm, than did the susceptible strain. With permethrin the resistant strain fed significantly more successfully through the treated netting than did the susceptible strain. With deltamethrin there was a non-significant tendency in the same direction in comparing the two strains. However, with alphacypermethrin there was a non-significant tendency in the reverse direction. After 15 min in the cage which tested for the ability to feed through a pyrethroid treated net, observed mortality was higher with the susceptible than the resistant strain. Conclusion: Thus there was no sign that the longer resting of the resistant strain on treated netting would compensate for the fact that a higher dose was needed to kill this strain. Such compensation had been suggested with the West African An. gambiae where treated nets continue to work well against a highly resistant wild population. However this does not seem to apply to our resistant An. stephens.

  19. Mechanisms of pyrethroid resistance inHaematobia irritans (Muscidae from Mato Grosso do Sul state, Brazil

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    Antonio Thadeu Medeiros Barros

    Full Text Available Horn fly resistance to pyrethroid insecticides occurs throughout Brazil, but knowledge about the involved mechanisms is still in an incipient stage. This survey was aimed to identify the mechanisms of horn fly resistance to cypermethrin in Mato Grosso do Sul state, Brazil. Impregnated filter paper bioassays using cypermethrin, synergized or not with piperonyl butoxide (PBO and triphenyl phosphate (TPP, were conducted from March 2004 to June 2005 in horn fly populations (n = 33 from all over the state. All populations were highly resistant to cypermethrin, with resistance factors (RF ranging from 89.4 to 1,020.6. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays to detect the knockdown resistance (kdr mutation also were performed in 16 samples. The kdr mutation was found in 75% of the tested populations, mostly with relatively low frequencies (<20%, and was absent in some highly resistant populations. Addition of TPP did not significantly reduce the LC50 in any population. However, PBO reduced LC50s above 40-fold in all tested populations, resulting in RFs ≤ 10 in most cases. Horn fly resistance to cypermethrin is widespread in the state, being primarily caused by an enhanced activity of P450 mono-oxygenases and secondarily by reduced target site sensitivity.

  20. Chlorfenapyr: a new insecticide with novel mode of action can control pyrethroid resistant malaria vectors

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    Srivastava Harish C

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria vectors have acquired widespread resistance to many of the currently used insecticides, including synthetic pyrethroids. Hence, there is an urgent need to develop alternative insecticides for effective management of insecticide resistance in malaria vectors. In the present study, chlorfenapyr was evaluated against Anopheles culicifacies and Anopheles stephensi for its possible use in vector control. Methods Efficacy of chlorfenapyr against An. culicifacies and An. stephensi was assessed using adult bioassay tests. In the laboratory, determination of diagnostic dose, assessment of residual activity on different substrates, cross-resistance pattern with different insecticides and potentiation studies using piperonyl butoxide were undertaken by following standard procedures. Potential cross-resistance patterns were assessed on field populations of An. culicifacies. Results A dose of 5.0% chlorfenapyr was determined as the diagnostic concentration for assessing susceptibility applying the WHO tube test method in anopheline mosquitoes with 2 h exposure and 48 h holding period. The DDT-resistant/malathion-deltamethrin-susceptible strain of An. culicifacies species C showed higher LD50 and LD99 (0.67 and 2.39% respectively values than the DDT-malathion-deltamethrin susceptible An. culicifacies species A (0.41 and 2.0% respectively and An. stephensi strains (0.43 and 2.13% respectively and there was no statistically significant difference in mortalities among the three mosquito species tested (p > 0.05. Residual activity of chlorfenapyr a.i. of 400 mg/m2 on five fabricated substrates, namely wood, mud, mud+lime, cement and cement + distemper was found to be effective up to 24 weeks against An. culicifacies and up to 34 weeks against An. stephensi. No cross-resistance to DDT, malathion, bendiocarb and deltamethrin was observed with chlorfenapyr in laboratory-reared strains of An. stephensi and field-caught An. culicifacies

  1. Chlorfenapyr: a new insecticide with novel mode of action can control pyrethroid resistant malaria vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavendra, Kamaraju; Barik, Tapan K; Sharma, Poonam; Bhatt, Rajendra M; Srivastava, Harish C; Sreehari, Uragayala; Dash, Aditya P

    2011-01-25

    Malaria vectors have acquired widespread resistance to many of the currently used insecticides, including synthetic pyrethroids. Hence, there is an urgent need to develop alternative insecticides for effective management of insecticide resistance in malaria vectors. In the present study, chlorfenapyr was evaluated against Anopheles culicifacies and Anopheles stephensi for its possible use in vector control. Efficacy of chlorfenapyr against An. culicifacies and An. stephensi was assessed using adult bioassay tests. In the laboratory, determination of diagnostic dose, assessment of residual activity on different substrates, cross-resistance pattern with different insecticides and potentiation studies using piperonyl butoxide were undertaken by following standard procedures. Potential cross-resistance patterns were assessed on field populations of An. culicifacies. A dose of 5.0% chlorfenapyr was determined as the diagnostic concentration for assessing susceptibility applying the WHO tube test method in anopheline mosquitoes with 2 h exposure and 48 h holding period. The DDT-resistant/malathion-deltamethrin-susceptible strain of An. culicifacies species C showed higher LD50 and LD99 (0.67 and 2.39% respectively) values than the DDT-malathion-deltamethrin susceptible An. culicifacies species A (0.41 and 2.0% respectively) and An. stephensi strains (0.43 and 2.13% respectively) and there was no statistically significant difference in mortalities among the three mosquito species tested (p > 0.05). Residual activity of chlorfenapyr a.i. of 400 mg/m2 on five fabricated substrates, namely wood, mud, mud+lime, cement and cement + distemper was found to be effective up to 24 weeks against An. culicifacies and up to 34 weeks against An. stephensi. No cross-resistance to DDT, malathion, bendiocarb and deltamethrin was observed with chlorfenapyr in laboratory-reared strains of An. stephensi and field-caught An. culicifacies. Potentiation studies demonstrated the antagonistic

  2. Investigating the molecular mechanisms of organophosphate and pyrethroid resistance in the fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Renato A; Omoto, Celso; Field, Linda M; Williamson, Martin S; Bass, Chris

    2013-01-01

    The fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda is an economically important pest of small grain crops that occurs in all maize growing regions of the Americas. The intensive use of chemical pesticides for its control has led to the selection of resistant populations, however, to date, the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance have not been characterised. In this study the mechanisms involved in the resistance of two S. frugiperda strains collected in Brazil to chlorpyrifos (OP strain) or lambda-cyhalothrin (PYR strain) were investigated using molecular and genomic approaches. To examine the possible role of target-site insensitivity the genes encoding the organophosphate (acetylcholinesterase, AChE) and pyrethroid (voltage-gated sodium channel, VGSC) target-site proteins were PCR amplified. Sequencing of the S. frugiperda ace-1 gene identified several nucleotide changes in the OP strain when compared to a susceptible reference strain (SUS). These result in three amino acid substitutions, A201S, G227A and F290V, that have all been shown previously to confer organophosphate resistance in several other insect species. Sequencing of the gene encoding the VGSC in the PYR strain, identified mutations that result in three amino acid substitutions, T929I, L932F and L1014F, all of which have been shown previously to confer knockdown/super knockdown-type resistance in several arthropod species. To investigate the possible role of metabolic detoxification in the resistant phenotype of the OP and PYR stains all EST sequences available for S. frugiperda were used to design a gene-expression microarray. This was then used to compare gene expression in the resistant strains with the susceptible reference strain. Members of several gene families, previously implicated in metabolic resistance in other insects were found to be overexpressed in the resistant strains including glutathione S-transferases, cytochrome P450s and carboxylesterases. Taken together these results provide

  3. Investigating the molecular mechanisms of organophosphate and pyrethroid resistance in the fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda.

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    Renato A Carvalho

    Full Text Available The fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda is an economically important pest of small grain crops that occurs in all maize growing regions of the Americas. The intensive use of chemical pesticides for its control has led to the selection of resistant populations, however, to date, the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance have not been characterised. In this study the mechanisms involved in the resistance of two S. frugiperda strains collected in Brazil to chlorpyrifos (OP strain or lambda-cyhalothrin (PYR strain were investigated using molecular and genomic approaches. To examine the possible role of target-site insensitivity the genes encoding the organophosphate (acetylcholinesterase, AChE and pyrethroid (voltage-gated sodium channel, VGSC target-site proteins were PCR amplified. Sequencing of the S. frugiperda ace-1 gene identified several nucleotide changes in the OP strain when compared to a susceptible reference strain (SUS. These result in three amino acid substitutions, A201S, G227A and F290V, that have all been shown previously to confer organophosphate resistance in several other insect species. Sequencing of the gene encoding the VGSC in the PYR strain, identified mutations that result in three amino acid substitutions, T929I, L932F and L1014F, all of which have been shown previously to confer knockdown/super knockdown-type resistance in several arthropod species. To investigate the possible role of metabolic detoxification in the resistant phenotype of the OP and PYR stains all EST sequences available for S. frugiperda were used to design a gene-expression microarray. This was then used to compare gene expression in the resistant strains with the susceptible reference strain. Members of several gene families, previously implicated in metabolic resistance in other insects were found to be overexpressed in the resistant strains including glutathione S-transferases, cytochrome P450s and carboxylesterases. Taken together these results

  4. Pinpointing P450s Associated with Pyrethroid Metabolism in the Dengue Vector, Aedes aegypti: Developing New Tools to Combat Insecticide Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pyrethroids are increasingly used to block the transmission of diseases spread by Aedes aegypti such as dengue and yellow fever. However, insecticide resistance poses a serious threat, thus there is an urgent need to identify the genes and proteins associated with pyrethroid resistance in order to produce effective counter measures. In Ae. aegypti, overexpression of P450s such as the CYP9J32 gene have been linked with pyrethroid resistance. Our aim was to confirm the role of CYP9J...

  5. Detection and evolution of resistance to the pyrethroid cypermethrin in Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) populations in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrantonio, P V; Junek, T A; Parker, R; Mott, D; Siders, K; Troxclair, N; Vargas-Camplis, J; Westbrook, J K; Vassiliou, V A

    2007-10-01

    The bollworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), is a key pest of cotton in Texas. Bollworm populations are widely controlled with pyrethroid insecticides in cotton and exposed to pyrethroids in other major crops such as grain sorghum, corn, and soybeans. A statewide program that evaluated cypermethrin resistance in male bollworm populations using an adult vial test was conducted from 2003 to 2006 in the major cotton production regions of Texas. Estimated parameters from the most susceptible field population currently available (Burleson County, September 2005) were used to calculate resistance ratios and their statistical significance. Populations from several counties had statistically significant (P Nueces County in 2004, and Williamson and Uvalde Counties in 2005. These findings explain the observed pyrethroid control failures in various counties in Texas. Based on the assumption that resistance is caused by a single gene, the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium formula was used for estimation of frequencies for the putative resistant allele (q) using 3 and 10 microg/vial as discriminatory dosages for susceptible and heterozygote resistant insects, respectively. The influence of migration on local levels of resistance was estimated by analysis of wind trajectories, which partially clarifies the rapid evolution of resistance to cypermethrin in bollworm populations. This approach could be used in evaluating resistance evolution in other migratory pests.

  6. Relationship between kdr mutation and resistance to pyrethroid and DDT insecticides in natural populations of Anopheles gambiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, Lisa; Fondjo, Etienne; Patchoké, Salomon; Diallo, Brehima; Lee, Yoosook; Ng, Arash; Ndjemai, Hamadou M; Atangana, Jean; Traore, Sekou F; Lanzaro, Gregory; Cornel, Anthony J

    2008-03-01

    The spread of insecticide resistance genes in Anopheles gambiae Giles sensu stricto threatens to compromise vector-based malaria control programs. Two mutations at the same locus in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene are known to confer knockdown resistance (kdr) to pyrethroids and DDT. Kdr-e involves a leucine-serine substitution, and it was until recently thought to be restricted to East Africa, whereas kdr-w, which involves a leucine-phenylalanine substitution, is associated with resistance in West Africa. In this study, we analyze the frequency and relationship between the kdr genotypes and resistance to type I and type II pyrethroids and DDT by using WHO test kits in both the Forest-M and S molecular forms of An. gambiae in Cameroon. Both kdr-w and kdr-e polymorphisms were found in sympatric An. gambiae, and in many cases in the same mosquito. Kdr-e and kdr-w were detected in both forms, but they were predominant in the S form. Both kdr-e and kdr-w were closely associated with resistance to DDT and weakly associated with resistance to type II pyrethroids. Kdr-w conferred greater resistance to permethrin than kdr-e. We also describe a modified diagnostic designed to detect both resistant alleles simultaneously.

  7. Do pyrethroid-resistant Hyalella azteca have greater bioaccumulation potential compared to non-resistant populations? Implications for bioaccumulation in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muggelberg, Leslie L; Huff Hartz, Kara E; Nutile, Samuel A; Harwood, Amanda D; Heim, Jennifer R; Derby, Andrew P; Weston, Donald P; Lydy, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    The recent discovery of pyrethroid-resistant Hyalella azteca populations in California, USA suggests there has been significant exposure of aquatic organisms to these terrestrially-applied insecticides. Since resistant organisms are able to survive in relatively contaminated habitats they may experience greater pyrethroid bioaccumulation, subsequently increasing the risk of those compounds transferring to predators. These issues were evaluated in the current study following toxicity tests in water with permethrin which showed the 96-h LC50 of resistant H. azteca (1670 ng L(-1)) was 53 times higher than that of non-resistant H. azteca (31.2 ng L(-1)). Bioaccumulation was compared between resistant and non-resistant H. azteca by exposing both populations to permethrin in water and then measuring the tissue concentrations attained. Our results indicate that resistant and non-resistant H. azteca have similar potential to bioaccumulate pyrethroids at the same exposure concentration. However, significantly greater bioaccumulation occurs in resistant H. azteca at exposure concentrations non-resistant organisms cannot survive. To assess the risk of pyrethroid trophic transfer, permethrin-dosed resistant H. azteca were fed to fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) for four days, after which bioaccumulation of permethrin and its biotransformation products in fish tissues were measured. There were detectable concentrations of permethrin in fish tissues after they consumed dosed resistant H. azteca. These results show that bioaccumulation potential is greater in organisms with pyrethroid resistance and this increases the risk of trophic transfer when consumed by a predator. The implications of this study extend to individual fitness, populations and food webs.

  8. Field resistance of Spodoptera litura (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) to organophosphates, pyrethroids, carbamates and four newer chemistry insecticides in Hunan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Hong; Su, Qi; Zhou, Xiaomao; Bai, Lianyang

    2013-01-01

    The present studies were carried out to evaluate resistance in the populations of Spodoptera litura Fab. (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae) from five districts of Hunan Province in China to various insecticides from 2010 to 2012 using a standard leaf dip bioassay method. For organophosphates and pyrethroids, resistance ratios compared with a susceptible Lab-BJ strain were in the range of 14-229-fold for organophosphates and 12-227-fold for pyrethroids. Similarly, relative low levels of resistance to emamectin, indoxacarb, and chlorfenapyr were observed in all five populations. In contrast, the resistance to carbamates (thiodicarb or methomyl) was significantly higher than that of organophosphates, pyrethroids and newer chemistry insecticides. The pairwise correlation coefficients of LC50 values indicated that the newer chemistry insecticides and old generation insecticides were not significant except abamectin, which was negatively significantly correlated with methomyl. A significant correlation was observed between thiodicarb, methomyl, and deltamethrin, whereas resistance to bifenthrin showed no correlations with resistance to other insecticides except deltamethrin. The results are discussed in relation to integrated pest management for S. litura with special reference to management of field evolved resistance to insecticides.

  9. Alternative treatments for indoor residual spraying for malaria control in a village with pyrethroid- and DDT-resistant vectors in the Gambia.

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    Julie-Anne A Tangena

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malaria vector control is threatened by resistance to pyrethroids, the only class of insecticides used for treating bed nets. The second major vector control method is indoor residual spraying with pyrethroids or the organochloride DDT. However, resistance to pyrethroids frequently confers resistance to DDT. Therefore, alternative insecticides are urgently needed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Insecticide resistance and the efficacy of indoor residual spraying with different insecticides was determined in a Gambian village. Resistance of local vectors to pyrethroids and DDT was high (31% and 46% mortality, respectively while resistance to bendiocarb and pirimiphos methyl was low (88% and 100% mortality, respectively. The vectors were predominantly Anopheles gambiae s.s. with 94% of them having the putative resistant genotype kdr 1014F. Four groups of eight residential compounds were each sprayed with either (1 bendiocarb, a carbamate, (2 DDT, an organochlorine, (3 microencapsulated pirimiphos methyl, an organophosphate, or (4 left unsprayed. All insecticides tested showed high residual activity up to five months after application. Mosquito house entry, estimated by light traps, was similar in all houses with metal roofs, but was significantly less in IRS houses with thatched roofs (p=0.02. Residents participating in focus group discussions indicated that IRS was considered a necessary nuisance and also may decrease the use of long-lasting insecticidal nets. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Bendiocarb and microencapsulated pirimiphos methyl are viable alternatives for indoor residual spraying where resistance to pyrethroids and DDT is high and may assist in the management of pyrethroid resistance.

  10. Cloning and characterization of two glutathione S-transferases from pyrethroid resistant Culex pipiens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samra, Aman I; Kamita, Shizuo G; Yao, Hong-Wei; Cornel, Anthony J; Hammock, Bruce D

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The Marin strain of Culex pipiens Say is a pyrethroid-resistant population that was collected in Marin County, California, in 2001 and subsequently maintained in the laboratory under regular permethrin exposure. RESULTS In this study, two genes, CpGSTd1 and CpGSTd2, encoding glutathione S-transferase (GST) were cloned from Cx. pipiens Marin. Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences, CpGSTD1 and CpGSTD2, of these genes indicated that they belong to the Delta class of insect GSTs. The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of CpGSTd1 and CpGSTd2 were 59% and 48% identical, respectively. CpGSTD1 and CpGSTD2 were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography. The recombinant GSTs exhibited unique selectivity towards the general GST substrates CDNB and DCNB, and also differed in their sensitivity to known inhibitors of GSTs. CpGSTD1 exhibited peroxidase activity with cumene hydroperoxide, while CpGSTD2 appeared to lack this activity. CpGSTD1 was able to metabolize DDT, while DDT metabolism by CpGSTD2 was not detectable. CpGSTD1 and CpGSTD2 showed no detectable metabolism of permethrin. Gene expression of CpGSTd1 and CpGSTd2 in Marin mosquitoes was elevated by about 2-fold in comparison to that found in a pyrethroid-sensitive mosquito strain. CONCLUSION Our results indicated that CpGSTD1 and CpGSTD2 have unique biochemical characteristics but they did not appear to play major roles in permethrin resistance in Marin mosquitoes. PMID:22290868

  11. Resistance differences between chlorpyrifos and synthetic pyrethroids in Cimex lectularius population from Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpinen, Ole; Kristensen, Michael; Jensen, Karl-Martin Vagn

    2011-11-01

    Bed bug, Cimex lectularius L., populations were investigated for resistance against permethrin and chlorpyrifos in a topical application bioassay, after an initial establishment of a discriminating dose with a susceptible population. For both insecticides, ca. two times the lethal dose LD(99) was selected: 2,560 ng of permethrin and 200 ng of chlorpyrifos per bed bug, respectively. Bed bugs were collected from infested homes in Denmark at ten locations and bred in the laboratory. The frequency of permethrin-resistant individuals was high in Danish bed bug populations as susceptible individuals were only found in three of ten populations. In contrast, the frequency of chlorpyrifos-resistant individuals was low in Danish bed bug populations, but resistant individuals were found in five of ten populations. To test the significance of the observed resistance, we performed tarsal contact test with commercially available insecticides. The test indicated that both a permethrin and a deltamethrin product had very low efficacy against the field-collected bed bug populations. Despite the reduced sensitivity to synthetic pyrethroids, all populations tested in the tarsal test on the commercial product with micro-encapsulated chlorpyrifos resulted in close to 100% mortality.

  12. Multiple Resistances Against Formulated Organophosphates, Pyrethroids, and Newer-Chemistry Insecticides in Populations of Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) from Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qayyum, Mirza Abdul; Wakil, Waqas; Arif, Muhammad Jalal; Sahi, Shahbaz Talib; Saeed, Noor Abid; Russell, Derek Allan

    2015-02-01

    Field populations of Helicoverpa armigera Hübner from 15 localities across the Punjab, Pakistan, were assessed by the leaf dip method for resistance against formulated organophosphates, pyrethroids, and newer insecticide groups. Resistance levels in H. armigera have been incrementally increasing for organophosphate and pyrethroid insecticides after decades of use in Pakistan. Resistance ratios (RRs) documented for organophosphates were 24- to 116-fold for profenofos and 22- to 87-fold for chlorpyrifos. For pyrethroids, RRs were 3- to 69-fold for cypermethrin and 3- to 27-fold for deltamethrin. Resistance levels against newer chemistries were 2- to 24-fold for chlorfenapyr, 1- to 22-fold for spinosad, 1- to 20-fold for indoxacarb, 1- to 18-fold for abamectin, and 1- to 16-fold for emamectin benzoate. Resistant populations of H. armigera were mainly in the southern part of the Punjab, Pakistan. The most resistant populations were collected from Pakpattan, Multan, and Muzzafargarh. Of the nine insecticides tested, LC50 and LC90 values were lower for newer insecticide groups; resistance levels were moderate to very high against organophosphates, very low to high against pyrethroids, and very low to low against the newer-chemistry insecticides. These findings suggest that the newer-chemistry insecticides with different modes of action could be included in insecticide rotations or replace the older insecticides. Supplementing the use of synthetic insecticides with safer alternatives could help to successfully lower the farmer's reliance on insecticides and the incidence of resistance due to repeated use of insecticides against major insect pests. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Toxicity of pyrethroids and repellency of diethyltoluamide in two deltamethrin-resistant colonies of Triatoma infestans Klug, 1834 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae

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    Valeria Sfara

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the currrent investigation was to evaluate (a the toxicity of three pyrethroids (deltamethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, and tetramethrin; (b the effect of these insecticides on the locomotor activity; and (c the repellent effect of N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide (DEET on two deltamethrin-resistant strains of Triatoma infestans from Argentina (El Chorro and La Toma, and one susceptible strain. The resistance ratios (RRs obtained for the La Toma strain were: > 10,769, 50.7, and > 5.2 for deltamethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, and tetramethrin respectively. The RRs for the El Chorro strain were: > 10,769, 85.8, and > 5.2 for deltamethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, and tetramethrin respectively. The hyperactivity usually caused by the three pyrethroids was in both the deltamethrin-resistant strains compared to the susceptible reference strain. No differences were observed in the repellent effect of DEET between the three groups. These results indicate that the deltamethrin-resistant insects have a cross resistance to lambda-cyhalothrin and tetramethrin, and are also resistant to the first symptom of pyrethroid poisoning (hyperactivity. However, the sensorial process related to DEET repellency does not appear to be altered.

  14. Testing the causality between CYP9M10 and pyrethroid resistance using the TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9 technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itokawa, Kentaro; Komagata, Osamu; Kasai, Shinji; Ogawa, Kohei; Tomita, Takashi

    2016-04-20

    Recently-emerging genome editing technologies have enabled targeted gene knockout experiments even in non-model insect species. For studies on insecticide resistance, genome editing technologies offer some advantages over the conventional reverse genetic technique, RNA interference, for testing causal relationships between genes of detoxifying enzymes and resistance phenotypes. There were relatively abundant evidences indicating that the overexpression of a cytochrome P450 gene CYP9M10 confers strong pyrethroid resistance in larvae of the southern house mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus. However, reverse genetic verification has not yet been obtained because of the technical difficulty of microinjection into larvae. Here, we tested two genome editing technologies, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN)s and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/Cas9), to disrupt CYP9M10 in a resistant strain of C. quinquefasciatus. Additionally, we developed a novel, effective approach to construct a TALE using the chemical cleavage of phosphorothioate inter-nucleotide linkages in the level 1 assembly. Both TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9 induced frame-shifting mutations in one or all copies of CYP9M10 in a pyrethroid-resistant strain. A line fixed with a completely disrupted CYP9M10 haplotype showed more than 100-fold reduction in pyrethroid resistance in the larval stage.

  15. Widespread pyrethroid and DDT resistance in the major malaria vector Anopheles funestus in East Africa is driven by metabolic resistance mechanisms.

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    Charles Mulamba

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Establishing the extent, geographical distribution and mechanisms of insecticide resistance in malaria vectors is a prerequisite for resistance management. Here, we report a widespread distribution of insecticide resistance in the major malaria vector An. funestus across Uganda and western Kenya under the control of metabolic resistance mechanisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Female An. funestus collected throughout Uganda and western Kenya exhibited a Plasmodium infection rate between 4.2 to 10.4%. Widespread resistance against both type I (permethrin and II (deltamethrin pyrethroids and DDT was observed across Uganda and western Kenya. All populations remain highly susceptible to carbamate, organophosphate and dieldrin insecticides. Knockdown resistance plays no role in the pyrethroid and DDT resistance as no kdr mutation associated with resistance was detected despite the presence of a F1021C replacement. Additionally, no signature of selection was observed on the sodium channel gene. Synergist assays and qRT-PCR indicated that metabolic resistance plays a major role notably through elevated expression of cytochrome P450s. DDT resistance mechanisms differ from West Africa as the L119F-GSTe2 mutation only explains a small proportion of the genetic variance to DDT resistance. CONCLUSION: The extensive distribution of pyrethroid and DDT resistance in East African An. funestus populations represents a challenge to the control of this vector. However, the observed carbamate and organophosphate susceptibility offers alternative solutions for resistance management.

  16. Evidence of Tolerance to Silica-Based Desiccant Dusts in a Pyrethroid-Resistant Strain of Cimex lectularius (Hemiptera: Cimicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilly, David G; Webb, Cameron E; Doggett, Stephen L

    2016-12-09

    Insecticide resistance in bed bugs (Cimex lectularius and Cimex hemipterus) has become widespread, which has necessitated the development of new IPM (Integrated Pest Management) strategies and products for the eradication of infestations. Two promising options are the diatomaceous earth and silica gel-based desiccant dusts, both of which induce dehydration and eventual death upon bed bugs exposed to these products. However, the impact of underlying mechanisms that confer resistance to insecticides, such as cuticle thickening, on the performance of these dusts has yet to be determined. In the present study, two desiccant dusts, CimeXa Insecticide Dust (silica gel) and Bed Bug Killer Powder (diatomaceous earth) were evaluated against two strains of C. lectularius; one highly pyrethroid-resistant and one insecticide-susceptible. Label-rate doses of both products produced 100% mortality in both strains, albeit over dissimilar time-frames (3-4 days with CimeXa vs. 14 days with Bed Bug Killer). Sub-label rate exposure to CimeXa indicated that the pyrethroid-resistant strain possessed a degree of tolerance to this product, surviving 50% longer than the susceptible strain. This is the first study to suggest that mechanisms conferring resistance to pyrethroids, such as cuticular thickening, may have potential secondary impacts on non-synthetic insecticides, including desiccant dusts, which target the bed bug's cuticle.

  17. Evidence of Tolerance to Silica-Based Desiccant Dusts in a Pyrethroid-Resistant Strain of Cimex lectularius (Hemiptera: Cimicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Lilly

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Insecticide resistance in bed bugs (Cimex lectularius and Cimex hemipterus has become widespread, which has necessitated the development of new IPM (Integrated Pest Management strategies and products for the eradication of infestations. Two promising options are the diatomaceous earth and silica gel-based desiccant dusts, both of which induce dehydration and eventual death upon bed bugs exposed to these products. However, the impact of underlying mechanisms that confer resistance to insecticides, such as cuticle thickening, on the performance of these dusts has yet to be determined. In the present study, two desiccant dusts, CimeXa Insecticide Dust (silica gel and Bed Bug Killer Powder (diatomaceous earth were evaluated against two strains of C. lectularius; one highly pyrethroid-resistant and one insecticide-susceptible. Label-rate doses of both products produced 100% mortality in both strains, albeit over dissimilar time-frames (3–4 days with CimeXa vs. 14 days with Bed Bug Killer. Sub-label rate exposure to CimeXa indicated that the pyrethroid-resistant strain possessed a degree of tolerance to this product, surviving 50% longer than the susceptible strain. This is the first study to suggest that mechanisms conferring resistance to pyrethroids, such as cuticular thickening, may have potential secondary impacts on non-synthetic insecticides, including desiccant dusts, which target the bed bug’s cuticle.

  18. Bioefficacy of long-lasting insecticidal nets against pyrethroid-resistant populations of Anopheles gambiae s.s. from different malaria transmission zones in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Okia, Michael; Ndyomugyenyi, Richard; Kirunda, James; Byaruhanga, Anatol; Adibaku, Seraphine; Lwamafa, Denis K; Kironde, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Background There are major concerns over sustaining the efficacy of current malaria vector control interventions given the rapid spread of resistance, particularly to pyrethroids. This study assessed the bioefficacy of five WHO-recommended long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) against pyrethroid-resistant Anopheles gambiae field populations from Uganda. Methods Adult An. gambiae from Lira, Tororo, Wakiso and Kanungu districts were exposed to permethrin (0.75%) or deltamethrin (0.05%) in stan...

  19. A simplified high-throughput method for pyrethroid knock-down resistance (kdr detection in Anopheles gambiae

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    Walker Edward D

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A single base pair mutation in the sodium channel confers knock-down resistance to pyrethroids in many insect species. Its occurrence in Anopheles mosquitoes may have important implications for malaria vector control especially considering the current trend for large scale pyrethroid-treated bednet programmes. Screening Anopheles gambiae populations for the kdr mutation has become one of the mainstays of programmes that monitor the development of insecticide resistance. The screening is commonly performed using a multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR which, since it is reliant on a single nucleotide polymorphism, can be unreliable. Here we present a reliable and potentially high throughput method for screening An. gambiae for the kdr mutation. Methods A Hot Ligation Oligonucleotide Assay (HOLA was developed to detect both the East and West African kdr alleles in the homozygous and heterozygous states, and was optimized for use in low-tech developing world laboratories. Results from the HOLA were compared to results from the multiplex PCR for field and laboratory mosquito specimens to provide verification of the robustness and sensitivity of the technique. Results and Discussion The HOLA assay, developed for detection of the kdr mutation, gives a bright blue colouration for a positive result whilst negative reactions remain colourless. The results are apparent within a few minutes of adding the final substrate and can be scored by eye. Heterozygotes are scored when a sample gives a positive reaction to the susceptible probe and the kdr probe. The technique uses only basic laboratory equipment and skills and can be carried out by anyone familiar with the Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA technique. A comparison to the multiplex PCR method showed that the HOLA assay was more reliable, and scoring of the plates was less ambiguous. Conclusion The method is capable of detecting both the East and West African kdr alleles

  20. Lambda-Cyhalothrin Resistance in the Lady Beetle Eriopis connexa (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) Confers Tolerance to Other Pyrethroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, J B; Rodrigues, A R S; Barros, E M; Santos, D S

    2015-02-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are widely recommended to control insect defoliators but lack efficacy against most aphid species. Thus, conserving aphid predators such as the lady beetle Eriopis connexa (Germar) is important to pest management in crop ecosystems that require pyrethroid sprays. In a greenhouse, early fourth-instar larvae and 5-day-old adults from susceptible (S) and resistant (R) E. connexa populations were caged on lambda-cyhalothrin-treated cotton plants, after which survival and egg production (for those caged at adult stage) were assessed. In the laboratory, similar groups were subjected to dried residues and topical treatment with one of eight pyrethroids (alpha-cypermethrin, bifenthrin, deltamethrin, esfenvalerate, fenpropathrin, permethrin, zeta-cypermethrin, and lambda-cyhalothrin), the organophosphate methidathion, or water and wetting agent. After caging on treated cotton terminals, 66% of the R-population larvae survived to adulthood, compared with 2% of those from the S-population. At 12 d after caging at adult stage under the same conditions, 64% of the females from the R-population survived and laid eggs, compared with 100% mortality and no oviposition for the S-females. In trials involving dried insecticide residues, gain in survival based on the survival difference (percentage for R-population minus percentage for S-population) across all tested pyrethroids varied from 3 to 63% for larvae and from 3 to 70% for adults. In trials involving topical sprays of the tested pyrethroids, survival differences ranged from 36 to 96% for larvae and from 21 to 82% for adults. Fenpropathrin and bifenthrin were the least and most toxic, respectively. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Pyrethroid resistance in southern African Anopheles funestus extends to Likoma Island in Lake Malawi

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    Edwardes M

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A mosquito survey was carried out on the island of Likoma in Lake Malawi with a view to collecting baseline data to determine the feasibility of implementing an integrated malaria vector control programme. No vector control interventions are currently being applied on the island apart from the sporadic use of treated and untreated bed nets. Results Large numbers of Anopheles funestus were found resting inside houses. WHO susceptibility tests were carried out on wild caught females and 1-5 day old F-1 female progeny. Wild caught females were tested on deltamethrin (77.8% mortality and bendiocarb (56.4% mortality. Female progeny were tested on deltamethrin (41.4% mortality, permethrin (40.4%, bendiocarb (52.5%, propoxur (7.4%, malathion, fenitrothion, DDT, dieldrin (all 100% and pirimiphos-methyl (98.9%. The malaria parasite rate was 4.9%. A small number of Anopheles arabiensis were also collected. Conclusion This locality is 1,500 km north of the currently known distribution of pyrethroid resistant An. funestus in southern Africa. The susceptibility results mirror those found in southern Mozambique and South African populations, but are markedly different to An. funestus populations in Uganda, indicating that the Malawi resistance has spread from the south.

  2. Impact of insecticide-treated nets on wild pyrethroid resistant Anopheles epiroticus population from southern Vietnam tested in experimental huts

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    Trung Ho

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study, the efficacy of insecticide-treated nets was evaluated in terms of deterrence, blood-feeding inhibition, induced exophily and mortality on a wild resistant population of Anopheles epiroticus in southern Vietnam, in order to gain insight into the operational consequences of the insecticide resistance observed in this malaria vector in the Mekong delta. Method An experimental station, based on the model of West Africa and adapted to the behaviour of the target species, was built in southern Vietnam. The study design was adapted from the WHO phase 2 guidelines. The study arms included a conventionally treated polyester net (CTN with deltamethrin washed just before exhaustion, the WHO recommended long-lasting insecticidal net (LLIN PermaNet 2.0® unwashed and 20 times washed and PermaNet 3.0®, designed for the control of pyrethroid resistant vectors, unwashed and 20 times washed. Results The nets still provided personal protection against the resistant An. epiroticus population. The personal protection ranged from 67% for deltamethrin CTN to 85% for unwashed PermaNet 3.0. Insecticide resistance in the An. epiroticus mosquitoes did not seem to alter the deterrent effect of pyrethroids. A significant higher mortality was still observed among the treatment arms despite the fact that the An. epiroticus population is resistant against the tested insecticides. Conclusion This study shows that CTN and LLINs still protect individuals against a pyrethroid resistant malaria vector from the Mekong region, where insecticide resistance is caused by a metabolic mechanism. In the light of a possible elimination of malaria from the Mekong region these insights in operational consequences of the insecticide resistance on control tools is of upmost importance.

  3. In the hunt for genomic markers of metabolic resistance to pyrethroids in the mosquito Aedes aegypti: An integrated next-generation sequencing approach.

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    Faucon, Frederic; Gaude, Thierry; Dusfour, Isabelle; Navratil, Vincent; Corbel, Vincent; Juntarajumnong, Waraporn; Girod, Romain; Poupardin, Rodolphe; Boyer, Frederic; Reynaud, Stephane; David, Jean-Philippe

    2017-04-01

    The capacity of Aedes mosquitoes to resist chemical insecticides threatens the control of major arbovirus diseases worldwide. Until alternative control tools are widely deployed, monitoring insecticide resistance levels and identifying resistance mechanisms in field mosquito populations is crucial for implementing appropriate management strategies. Metabolic resistance to pyrethroids is common in Aedes aegypti but the monitoring of the dynamics of resistant alleles is impeded by the lack of robust genomic markers. In an attempt to identify the genomic bases of metabolic resistance to deltamethrin, multiple resistant and susceptible populations originating from various continents were compared using both RNA-seq and a targeted DNA-seq approach focused on the upstream regions of detoxification genes. Multiple detoxification enzymes were over transcribed in resistant populations, frequently associated with an increase in their gene copy number. Targeted sequencing identified potential promoter variations associated with their over transcription. Non-synonymous variations affecting detoxification enzymes were also identified in resistant populations. This study not only confirmed the role of gene copy number variations as a frequent cause of the over expression of detoxification enzymes associated with insecticide resistance in Aedes aegypti but also identified novel genomic resistance markers potentially associated with their cis-regulation and modifications of their protein structure conformation. As for gene transcription data, polymorphism patterns were frequently conserved within regions but differed among continents confirming the selection of different resistance factors worldwide. Overall, this study paves the way of the identification of a comprehensive set of genomic markers for monitoring the spatio-temporal dynamics of the variety of insecticide resistance mechanisms in Aedes aegypti.

  4. RNA-seq analyses of changes in the Anopheles gambiae transcriptome associated with resistance to pyrethroids in Kenya: identification of candidate-resistance genes and candidate-resistance SNPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonizzoni, Mariangela; Ochomo, Eric; Dunn, William Augustine; Britton, Monica; Afrane, Yaw; Zhou, Guofa; Hartsel, Joshua; Lee, Ming-Chieh; Xu, Jiabao; Githeko, Andrew; Fass, Joseph; Yan, Guiyun

    2015-09-17

    The extensive use of pyrethroids for control of malaria vectors, driven by their cost, efficacy and safety, has led to widespread resistance. To favor their sustainable use, the World Health Organization (WHO) formulated an insecticide resistance management plan, which includes the identification of the mechanisms of resistance and resistance surveillance. Recognized physiological mechanisms of resistance include target site mutations in the para voltage-gated sodium channel, metabolic detoxification and penetration resistance. Such understanding of resistance mechanisms has allowed the development of resistance monitoring tools, including genotyping of the kdr mutation L1014F/S in the para gene. The sequence-based technique RNA-seq was applied to study changes in the transcriptome of deltamethrin-resistant and -susceptible Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes from the Western Province of Kenya. The resulting gene expression profiles were compared to data in the most recent literature to derive a list of candidate resistance genes. RNA-seq data were analyzed also to identify sequence polymorphisms linked to resistance. A total of five candidate-resistance genes (AGAP04177, AGAP004572, AGAP008840, AGAP007530 and AGAP013036) were identified with altered expression between resistant and susceptible mosquitoes from West and East Africa. A change from G to C at position 36043997 of chromosome 3R resulting in A101G of the sulfotransferase gene AGAP009551 was significantly associated with the resistance phenotype (odds ratio: 5.10). The kdr L1014S mutation was detected at similar frequencies in both phenotypically resistant and susceptible mosquitoes, suggesting it is no longer fully predictive of the resistant phenotype. Overall, these results support the conclusion that resistance to pyrethroids is a complex and evolving phenotype, dependent on multiple gene functions including, but not limited to, metabolic detoxification. Functional convergence among metabolic detoxification

  5. Mosquito nets treated with a mixture of chlorfenapyr and alphacypermethrin control pyrethroid resistant Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes in West Africa.

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    N'Guessan, Raphael; Ngufor, Corine; Kudom, Andreas A; Boko, Pelagie; Odjo, Abibathou; Malone, David; Rowland, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of insecticide treated nets is under threat across Africa south of the Sahara from the selection of pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes. To maintain progress against malaria it is necessary to identify alternative residual insecticides for mosquito nets. Mixtures of pyrethroid and insecticides with novel mode of action provide scope for both improved control and management of resistance through concurrent exposure to unrelated insecticides. The pyrrole chlorfenapyr and the pyrethroid alphacypermethrin were tested individually and as a mixture on mosquito nets in an experimental hut trial in southern Benin against pyrethroid resistant An gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes. The nets were deliberately holed to simulate the effect of wear and tear. The nets treated with the mixture of chlorfenapyr 200 mg/m² and alphacypermethrin 25 mg/m² killed a proportion of An gambiae (77%, 95%CI: 66-86%) significantly greater than nets treated with alphacypermethrin 25 mg/m(2) (30%, 95%CI: 21-41%) but not significantly different from nets treated with chlorfenapyr 200 mg/m² (69%, 95%CI: 57-78%). The nets treated with the mixtures procured personal protection against An gambiae biting(58-62%) by a greater margin than the alphacypermethrin treated net (39%), whereas the chlorfenapyr treated net was not protective. A similar trend in mortality and blood feeding inhibition between treatments was observed in Cx quinquefasciatus to that seen in An. gambiae, although the effects were lower. A mixture of alphacypermethrin with chlorfenapyr applied at 100 mg/m² had an effect similar to the mixture with chlorfenapyr at 200 mg/m². The effectiveness of ITNs against pyrethroid resistant mosquitoes was restored by the mixture: the alphacypermethrin component reduced human-vector contact while the chlorfenapyr controlled pyrethroid-resistant mosquitoes. The complementary action of these unrelated insecticides demonstrates that the combination on

  6. Antimosquito property of Petroselinum crispum (Umbellifereae) against the pyrethroid resistant and susceptible strains of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intirach, J; Junkum, A; Lumjuan, N; Chaithong, U; Jitpakdi, A; Riyong, D; Wannasan, A; Champakaew, D; Muangmoon, R; Chansang, A; Pitasawat, B

    2016-12-01

    The increasing and widespread resistance to conventional synthetic insecticides in vector populations has underscored the urgent need to establish alternatives in the mosquito management system. This study was carried out with the aim to investigate the antimosquito property, larvicidal and adulticidal potential, of plant products against both the pyrethroid-susceptible and resistant strains of Aedes aegypti. Seventeen plant products, including essential oils and ethanolic extracts, were obtained by steam distillation and extraction with 95 % ethanol, respectively. Their larvicidal activity was screened, using World Health Organization (WHO) procedures against A. aegypti, Muang Chiang Mai-susceptible (MCM-S) strain. The most effective product was a candidate for investigating larvicidal and adulticidal potential against three laboratory strains of A. aegypti, comprising MCM-S, Pang Mai Dang-resistant (PMD-R), and Upakut-resistant (UPK-R). Potential toxicity of the plant candidate was compared with that of synthetic temephos, permethrin, and deltamethrin. Chemical constituents of the most effective plant product also were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Results obtained from the preliminary screening revealed the varying larvicidal efficacy of plant-derived products against MCM-S A. aegypti, with mortality ranging from 0 to 100 %. The larvicidal activity of seven effective plant products was found to be dose dependent, with the highest efficacy established from Petroselinum crispum fruit oil, followed by oils of Foeniculum vulgare, Myristica fragrans, Limnophila aromatica, Piper sarmentosum, Curcuma longa, and M. fragrans ethanolic extract (LC50 values of 43.22, 44.84, 47.42, 47.94, 49.19, 65.51, and 75.45 ppm, respectively). Essential oil of P. crispum was then investigated further and proved to be a promising larvicide and adulticide against all strains of A. aegypti. The pyrethroid-resistant strains of both PMD-R and UPK-R A. aegypti

  7. Dynamics of knockdown pyrethroid insecticide resistance alleles in a field population of Anopheles gambiae s.s. in southwestern Nigeria

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    T.S. Awolola, A.O. Oduola, I.O. Oyewole, J.B. Obansa, C.N. Amajoh

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Pyrethroid insecticide resistance in the malaria vector Anopheles gambiaeGiles is mainly associated with reduced target site sensitivity arising from a single point mutation inthe sodium channel gene, often referred to as knockdown resistance (kdr. This resistance mechanismis widespread in West Africa and was reported for the first time in Nigeria in 2002. Here we presentchanges in the susceptibility/resistance status of the molecular ‘M’ and ‘S’ forms of An. gambiae andthe frequency of the kdr alleles from 2002–05.Methods: Adult anophelines were sampled quarterly inside human dwellings from January 2002 toDecember 2005 and adults reared from wild larvae were identified using morphological keys. Samplesbelonging to the An. gambiae complex were subjected to PCR assays for species identification anddetection of molecular ‘M’ and ‘S’ forms. Insecticide susceptibility tests were carried out usingstandard WHO procedures and test kits only on 2–3 days old adult An. gambiae s.s. reared fromlarval collections. The kdr genotypes were determined in both live and dead specimens of An. gambiaes.s. using alleles-specific polymerase chain reaction diagnostic tests.Results: The overall collection showed that the molecular ‘S’ form was predominant (>60% but theproportions of both forms in the mosquito populations from 2002–05 were not statistically different.Both forms also occurred throughout the period without apparent relationship to wet or dry season.Insecticide susceptibility tests did not show any significant increase in the resistance status recordedfor either Permethrin or DDT from 2002–05, rather, an improvement in the susceptibility status ofthe mosquitoes to these insecticides was observed from 2004–05 relative to the tests performed in2002–03.Conclusion: The proportion of the molecular ‘M’ and ‘S’ form of An. gambiae and the kdr frequencieshave not increased significantly from 2002

  8. Gene amplification, ABC transporters and cytochrome P450s: unraveling the molecular basis of pyrethroid resistance in the dengue vector, Aedes aegypti.

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    Vassiliki Bariami

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pyrethroid insecticides are widely utilized in dengue control. However, the major vector, Aedes aegypti, is becoming increasingly resistant to these insecticides and this is impacting on the efficacy of control measures. The near complete transcriptome of two pyrethroid resistant populations from the Caribbean was examined to explore the molecular basis of this resistance. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Two previously described target site mutations, 1016I and 1534C were detected in pyrethroid resistant populations from Grand Cayman and Cuba. In addition between two and five per cent of the Ae. aegypti transcriptome was differentially expressed in the resistant populations compared to a laboratory susceptible population. Approximately 20 per cent of the genes over-expressed in resistant mosquitoes were up-regulated in both Caribbean populations (107 genes. Genes with putative monooxygenase activity were significantly over represented in the up-regulated subset, including five CYP9 P450 genes. Quantitative PCR was used to confirm the higher transcript levels of multiple cytochrome P450 genes from the CYP9J family and an ATP binding cassette transporter. Over expression of two genes, CYP9J26 and ABCB4, is due, at least in part, to gene amplification. SIGNIFICANCE: These results, and those from other studies, strongly suggest that increases in the amount of the CYP9J cytochrome P450s are an important mechanism of pyrethroid resistance in Ae. aegypti. The genetic redundancy resulting from the expansion of this gene family makes it unlikely that a single gene or mutation responsible for pyrethroid resistance will be identified in this mosquito species. However, the results from this study do pave the way for the development of new pyrethroid synergists and improved resistance diagnostics. The role of copy number polymorphisms in detoxification and transporter genes in providing protection against insecticide exposure requires further investigation.

  9. The role of the Aedes aegypti Epsilon glutathione transferases in conferring resistance to DDT and pyrethroid insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumjuan, Nongkran; Rajatileka, Shavanthi; Changsom, Donch; Wicheer, Jureeporn; Leelapat, Posri; Prapanthadara, La-aied; Somboon, Pradya; Lycett, Gareth; Ranson, Hilary

    2011-03-01

    The Epsilon glutathione transferase (GST) class in the dengue vector Aedes aegypti consists of eight sequentially arranged genes spanning 53,645 bp on super contig 1.291, which maps to chromosome 2. One Epsilon GST, GSTE2, has previously been implicated in conferring resistance to DDT. The amino acid sequence of GSTE2 in an insecticide susceptible and a DDT resistant strain differs at five residues two of which occur in the putative DDT binding site. Characterization of the respective recombinant enzymes revealed that both variants have comparable DDT dehydrochlorinase activity although the isoform from the resistant strain has higher affinity for the insecticide. GSTe2 and two additional Epsilon GST genes, GSTe5 and GSTe7, are expressed at elevated levels in the resistant population and the recombinant homodimer GSTE5-5 also exhibits low levels of DDT dehydrochlorinase activity. Partial silencing of either GSTe7 or GSTe2 by RNA interference resulted in an increased susceptibility to the pyrethroid, deltamethrin suggesting that these GST enzymes may also play a role in resistance to pyrethroid insecticides.

  10. Syntetiske pyrethroider i private hjem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karl-Martin Vagn; Fomsgaard, Inge S.; Kilpinen, Ole Østerlund;

    2015-01-01

    A number of different methods are tested to elucidate the accumulation of synthetic pyrethroids in private homes. When the target pest is resistant, there is a potential risk that persistent synthetic pyrethroids accumulate because of repeated treatments. The highest residue found was 8260 µg...

  11. Evaluation of the role of CYP6B cytochrome P450s in pyrethroid resistant Australian Helicoverpa armigera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubor, Vladimir D; Heckel, David G

    2007-02-01

    The AN02 strain of Helicoverpa armigera from eastern Australia exhibits 50-fold, PBO-suppressible resistance to the pyrethroid insecticide fenvalerate. The semidominant resistance gene RFen1 was previously mapped to AFLP Linkage Group 13. In evaluating the cytochrome P450 genes CYP6B7, CYP6B6, and CYP6B2 as candidates for RFen1, we found that they occur in a tandem array in the genome, next to the gene encoding the para-type sodium channel; the target of pyrethroid insecticides. We mapped these genes to AFLP Linkage Group 14, thus rejecting mutations within the P450 cluster or para as candidates for RFen1. RFen1 genotypes produced slightly different mRNA levels of the three P450s, but the differences were too small to convincingly account for resistance. We conclude that even if one or more of these P450s metabolize fenvalerate, they are unlikely to be responsible for the resistance in AN02.

  12. Incidence, Spread and Mechanisms of Pyrethroid Resistance in European Populations of the Cabbage Stem Flea Beetle, Psylliodes chrysocephala L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae.

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    Dorte H Højland

    Full Text Available Cabbage stem flea beetle (CSFB, Psylliodes chrysocephala L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae is a major early season pest of oilseed rape throughout Europe. Pyrethroids have been used for controlling this pest by foliar application, but in recent years control failures have occurred, particularly in Germany due to the evolution of knock-down resistance (kdr. The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence and spread of pyrethroid resistance in CSFB collected in Germany, Denmark and the United Kingdom during 2014. The level of pyrethroid resistance was measured in adult vial tests and linked to the presence of kdr genotypes.Although kdr (L1014F genotypes are present in all three countries, marked differences in pyrethroid efficacy were found in adult vial tests. Whereas Danish CSFB samples were in general susceptible to recommended label rates, those collected in the UK mostly resist such rates to some extent. Moderately resistant and susceptible samples were found in Germany. Interestingly, some of the resistant samples from the UK did not carry the kdr allele, which is in contrast to German CSFB. Pre-treatment with PBO, prior to exposure to λ-cyhalothrin suggested involvement of metabolic resistance in UK samples.Danish samples were mostly susceptible with very low resistance ratios, while most other samples showed reduced sensitivity in varying degrees. Likewise, there was a clear difference in the presence of the kdr mutation between the three countries. In the UK, the presence of kdr genotypes did not always correlate well with resistant phenotypes. This appears to be primarily conferred by a yet undisclosed, metabolic-based mechanism. Nevertheless our survey disclosed an alarming trend concerning the incidence and spread of CSFB resistance to pyrethroids, which is likely to have negative impacts on oilseed production in affected regions due to the lack of alternative modes of action for resistance management purposes.

  13. Cotton pest management practices and the selection of pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles gambiae population in Northern Benin

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    Yadouleton Anges

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pyrethroid insecticides, carbamate and organophosphate are the classes of insecticides commonly used in agriculture for crop protection in Benin. Pyrethroids remain the only class of insecticides recommended by the WHO for impregnation of bed nets. Unfortunately, the high level of pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles gambiae s.l., threatens to undermine the success of pyrethroid treated nets. This study focuses on the investigation of agricultural practices in cotton growing areas, and their direct impact on larval populations of An. gambiae in surrounding breeding sites. Methods The protocol was based on the collection of agro-sociological data where farmers were subjected to semi-structured questionnaires based on the strategies used for crop protection. This was complemented by bioassay tests to assess the susceptibility of malaria vectors to various insecticides. Molecular analysis was performed to characterize the resistance genes and the molecular forms of An. gambiae. Insecticide residues in soil samples from breeding sites were investigated to determine major factors that can inhibit the normal growth of mosquito larvae by exposing susceptible and resistant laboratory strains. Results There is a common use by local farmers of mineral fertilizer NPK at 200 kg/ha and urea at 50 kg/hectare following insecticide treatments in both the Calendar Control Program (CCP and the Targeted Intermittent Control Program (TICP. By contrast, no chemicals are involved in Biological Program (BP where farmers use organic and natural fertilizers which include animal excreta. Susceptibility test results confirmed a high resistance to DDT. Mean mortality of An. gambiae collected from the farms practicing CCP, TICP and BP methods were 33%, 42% and 65% respectively. An. gambiae populations from areas using the CCP and TICP programs showed resistance to permethrin with mortality of 50% and 58% respectively. By contrast, bioassay test results of

  14. Role of kdr and esterase-mediated metabolism in pyrethroid-resistant populations of Haematobia irritans irritans (Diptera: Muscidae) in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Felix D; Barros, A Thadeu M

    2006-09-01

    The horn fly, Haematobia irritans irritans (L.) (Diptera: Muscidae), has become a problem for Brazilian cattle producers even though its introduction into Brazil is relatively recent. Failure to control this cattle pest is becoming a concern, and horn fly populations from several ranches from the state of Mato Grosso do Sul were surveyed for pyrethroid resistance. Susceptibility bioassays revealed that cypermethrin resistance was widespread and reached high levels in horn fly populations throughout the state, with resistance factors (RFs) ranging from 50.4 to 704.8. Synergist bioassays failed to detect a major role for esterases as a pyrethroid resistance mechanism in these populations, except for the highly pyrethroid-resistant Estrela do Oeste population (RF = 704.8). The kdr sodium channel gene mutation was not detected in eight of the 13 populations, but Oeste exhibited this mutation. Neither the superkdr sodium channel gene mutation nor a resistance-associated gene mutation in the HialphaE7 carboxylesterase were found in any of the fly populations. Although target site insensitivity (kdr) and esterase-mediated metabolism occur in horn fly populations from Mato Grosso do Sul state, it seems that they are not the major mechanism causing pyrethroid resistance in most of these populations.

  15. Loss of protection with insecticide-treated nets against pyrethroid-resistant Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes once nets become holed: an experimental hut study

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    Irish SR

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important advantage of pyrethroid-treated nets over untreated nets is that once nets become worn or holed a pyrethroid treatment will normally restore protection. The capacity of pyrethroids to kill or irritate any mosquito that comes into contact with the net and prevent penetration of holes or feeding through the sides are the main reasons why treated nets continue to provide protection despite their condition deteriorating over time. Pyrethroid resistance is a growing problem among Anopheline and Culicine mosquitoes in many parts of Africa. When mosquitoes become resistant the capacity of treated nets to provide protection might be diminished, particularly when holed. An experimental hut trial against pyrethroid-resistant Culex quinquefasciatus was therefore undertaken in southern Benin using a series of intact and holed nets, both untreated and treated, to assess any loss of protection as nets deteriorate with use and time. Results There was loss of protection when untreated nets became holed; the proportion of mosquitoes blood feeding increased from 36.2% when nets were intact to between 59.7% and 68.5% when nets were holed to differing extents. The proportion of mosquitoes blood feeding when treated nets were intact was 29.4% which increased to 43.6–57.4% when nets were holed. The greater the number of holes the greater the loss of protection regardless of whether nets were untreated or treated. Mosquito mortality in huts with untreated nets was 12.9–13.6%; treatment induced mortality was less than 12%. The exiting rate of mosquitoes into the verandas was higher in huts with intact nets. Conclusion As nets deteriorate with use and become increasingly holed the capacity of pyrethroid treatments to restore protection is greatly diminished against resistant Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes.

  16. Phenotypic and genotypic profile of pyrethroid resistance in populations of the mosquito Aedes aegypti from Goiânia, Central West Brazil

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    Francesca Guaracyaba Garcia Chapadense

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTINTRODUCTION:The mosquito Aedes aegypti has evolved resistance to pyrethroid insecticides. The present study evaluated Ae. aegypti from Goiânia for the resistant phenotype and for mutations associated with resistance.METHODS:Insecticide dose-response bioassays were conducted on mosquitoes descended from field-collected eggs, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR was used to genotype 90 individuals at sites implicated in pyrethroid resistance.RESULTS:All mosquito populations displayed high levels of resistance to deltamethrin, as well as high frequencies of the 1016Ile kdr and 1534Cys kdrmutations.CONCLUSIONS:Aedes aegypti populations in the Goiânia area are highly resistant to deltamethrin, presumably due to high frequencies of kdr(knockdown-resistance mutations.

  17. Determination of metabolic resistance mechanisms in pyrethroid-resistant and fipronil-tolerant brown dog ticks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiden, A L; Kaufman, P E; Oi, F M; Dark, M J; Bloomquist, J R; Miller, R J

    2017-09-01

    Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille) (Ixodida: Ixodidae) is a three-host dog tick found worldwide that is able to complete its' entire lifecycle indoors. Options for the management of R. sanguineus are limited and its' control relies largely on only a few acaricidal active ingredients. Previous studies have confirmed permethrin resistance and fipronil tolerance in R. sanguineus populations, commonly conferred by metabolic detoxification or target site mutations. Herein, five strains of permethrin-resistant and three strains of fipronil-tolerant ticks were evaluated for metabolic resistance using synergists to block metabolic enzymes. Synergist studies were completed with triphenyl phosphate (TPP) for esterase inhibition, piperonyl butoxide (PBO) for cytochrome P450 inhibition, and diethyl maleate (DEM) for glutathione-S-transferase inhibition. Additionally, increased esterase activity was confirmed using gel electrophoresis. The most important metabolic detoxification mechanism in permethrin-resistant ticks was increased esterase activity, followed by increased cytochrome P450 activity. The inhibition of metabolic enzymes did not have a marked impact on fipronil-tolerant tick strains. © 2017 The Royal Entomological Society.

  18. Is imidacloprid an effective alternative for controlling pyrethroid-resistant populations of Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) in the Gran Chaco ecoregion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal, Guillermo; Picollo, María Inés; Toloza, Ariel Ceferino

    2014-09-01

    The prevention of Chagas disease is based primarily on the chemical control of Triatoma infestans (Klug) using pyrethroid insecticides. However, high resistance levels, correlated with control failures, have been detected in Argentina and Bolivia. A previous study at our laboratory found that imidacloprid could serve as an alternative to pyrethroid insecticides. We studied the delayed toxicity of imidacloprid and the influence of the blood feeding condition of the insect on the toxicity of this insecticide; we also studied the effectiveness of various commercial imidacloprid formulations against a pyrethroid-resistant T. infestans population from the Gran Chaco ecoregion. Variations in the toxic effects of imidacloprid were not observed up to 72 h after exposure and were not found to depend on the blood feeding condition of susceptible and resistant individuals. Of the three different studied formulations of imidacloprid on glass and filter paper, only the spot-on formulation was effective. This formulation was applied to pigeons at doses of 1, 5, 20 and 40 mg/bird. The nymphs that fed on pigeons treated with 20 mg or 40 mg of the formulation showed a higher mortality rate than the control group one day and seven days post-treatment (p imidacloprid was effective against pyrethroid-resistant T. infestans populations at the laboratory level.

  19. Is imidacloprid an effective alternative for controlling pyrethroid-resistant populations of Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae in the Gran Chaco ecoregion?

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    Guillermo Carvajal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The prevention of Chagas disease is based primarily on the chemical control of Triatoma infestans (Klug using pyrethroid insecticides. However, high resistance levels, correlated with control failures, have been detected in Argentina and Bolivia. A previous study at our laboratory found that imidacloprid could serve as an alternative to pyrethroid insecticides. We studied the delayed toxicity of imidacloprid and the influence of the blood feeding condition of the insect on the toxicity of this insecticide; we also studied the effectiveness of various commercial imidacloprid formulations against a pyrethroid-resistant T. infestans population from the Gran Chaco ecoregion. Variations in the toxic effects of imidacloprid were not observed up to 72 h after exposure and were not found to depend on the blood feeding condition of susceptible and resistant individuals. Of the three different studied formulations of imidacloprid on glass and filter paper, only the spot-on formulation was effective. This formulation was applied to pigeons at doses of 1, 5, 20 and 40 mg/bird. The nymphs that fed on pigeons treated with 20 mg or 40 mg of the formulation showed a higher mortality rate than the control group one day and seven days post-treatment (p < 0.01. A spot-on formulation of imidacloprid was effective against pyrethroid-resistant T. infestans populations at the laboratory level.

  20. L925I mutation in the Para-type sodium channel is associated with pyrethroid resistance in Triatoma infestans from the Gran Chaco region.

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    Natalia Capriotti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chagas' disease is an important public health concern in Latin America. Despite intensive vector control efforts using pyrethroid insecticides, the elimination of Triatoma infestans has failed in the Gran Chaco, an ecoregion that extends over Argentina, Paraguay, Bolivia and Brazil. The voltage-gated sodium channel is the target site of pyrethroid insecticides. Point mutations in domain II region of the channel have been implicated in pyrethroid resistance of several insect species. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In the present paper, we identify L925I, a new pyrethroid resistance-conferring mutation in T. infestans. This mutation has been found only in hemipterans. In T. infestans, L925I mutation occurs in a resistant population from the Gran Chaco region and is associated with inefficiency in the control campaigns. We also describe a method to detect L925I mutation in individuals from the field. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The findings have important implications in the implementation of strategies for resistance management and in the rational design of campaigns for the control of Chagas' disease transmission.

  1. Distribution of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel (Nav) Alleles among the Aedes aegypti Populations In Central Java Province and Its Association with Resistance to Pyrethroid Insecticides

    OpenAIRE

    Sayono Sayono; Anggie Puspa Nur Hidayati; Sukmal Fahri; Didik Sumanto; Edi Dharmana; Suharyo Hadisaputro; Puji Budi Setia Asih; Din Syafruddin

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of insecticide resistant Aedes aegypti mosquitoes has hampered dengue control efforts. WHO susceptibility tests, using several pyrethroid compounds, were conducted on Ae. aegypti larvae that were collected and raised to adulthood from Semarang, Surakarta, Kudus and Jepara in Java. The AaNa V gene fragment encompassing kdr polymorphic sites from both susceptible and resistant mosquitoes was amplified, and polymorphisms were associated with the resistant phenotype. The insecticide...

  2. Mechanisms of pyrethroid resistance in the dengue mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti: target site insensitivity, penetration, and metabolism.

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    Shinji Kasai

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aedes aegypti is the major vector of yellow and dengue fevers. After 10 generations of adult selection, an A. aegypti strain (SP developed 1650-fold resistance to permethrin, which is one of the most widely used pyrethroid insecticides for mosquito control. SP larvae also developed 8790-fold resistance following selection of the adults. Prior to the selections, the frequencies of V1016G and F1534C mutations in domains II and III, respectively, of voltage-sensitive sodium channel (Vssc, the target site of pyrethroid insecticide were 0.44 and 0.56, respectively. In contrast, only G1016 alleles were present after two permethrin selections, indicating that G1016 can more contribute to the insensitivity of Vssc than C1534. In vivo metabolism studies showed that the SP strain excreted permethrin metabolites more rapidly than a susceptible SMK strain. Pretreatment with piperonyl butoxide caused strong inhibition of excretion of permethrin metabolites, suggesting that cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s play an important role in resistance development. In vitro metabolism studies also indicated an association of P450s with resistance. Microarray analysis showed that multiple P450 genes were over expressed during the larval and adult stages in the SP strain. Following quantitative real time PCR, we focused on two P450 isoforms, CYP9M6 and CYP6BB2. Transcription levels of these P450s were well correlated with the rate of permethrin excretion and they were certainly capable of detoxifying permethrin to 4'-HO-permethrin. Over expression of CYP9M6 was partially due to gene amplification. There was no significant difference in the rate of permethrin reduction from cuticle between SP and SMK strains.

  3. Control of pyrethroid and DDT-resistant Anopheles gambiae by application of indoor residual spraying or mosquito nets treated with a long-lasting organophosphate insecticide, chlorpyrifos-methyl

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    Chabi Joseph

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Scaling up of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs and indoor residual spraying (IRS with support from the Global Fund and President's Malaria Initiative is providing increased opportunities for malaria control in Africa. The most cost-effective and longest-lasting residual insecticide DDT is also the most environmentally persistent. Alternative residual insecticides exist, but are too short-lived or too expensive to sustain. Dow Agrosciences have developed a microencapsulated formulation (CS of the organophosphate chlorpyrifos methyl as a cost-effective, long-lasting alternative to DDT. Methods Chlorpyrifos methyl CS was tested as an IRS or ITN treatment in experimental huts in an area of Benin where Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasiactus are resistant to pyrethroids, but susceptible to organophosphates. Efficacy and residual activity was compared to that of DDT and the pyrethroid lambdacyalothrin. Results IRS with chlorpyrifos methyl killed 95% of An. gambiae that entered the hut as compared to 31% with lambdacyhalothrin and 50% with DDT. Control of Cx. quinquefasciatus showed a similar trend; although the level of mortality with chlorpyrifos methyl was lower (66% it was still much higher than for DDT (14% or pyrethroid (15% treatments. Nets impregnated with lambdacyhalothrin were compromized by resistance, killing only 30% of An. gambiae and 8% of Cx. quinquefasciatus. Nets impregnated with chlorpyrifos methyl killed more (45% of An gambiae and 15% of Cx. quinquefasciatus, but its activity on netting was of short duration. Contact bioassays on the sprayed cement-sand walls over the nine months of monitoring showed no loss of activity of chlorpyrifos methyl, whereas lambdacyhalothrin and DDT lost activity within a few months of spraying. Conclusion As an IRS treatment against pyrethroid resistant mosquitoes chlorpyrifos methyl CS outperformed DDT and lambdacyhalothrin. In IRS campaigns, chlorpyrifos methyl CS should

  4. Combining indoor residual spraying with chlorfenapyr and long-lasting insecticidal bed nets for improved control of pyrethroid-resistant Anopheles gambiae: an experimental hut trial in Benin

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    Ngufor Corine

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neither indoor residual spraying (IRS nor long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs are able to fully interrupt transmission in holoendemic Africa as single interventions. The combining of IRS and LLINs presents an opportunity for improved control and management of pyrethroid resistance through the simultaneous presentation of unrelated insecticides. Method Chlorfenapyr IRS and a pyrethroid-impregnated polyester LLIN (WHO approved were tested separately and together in experimental huts in southern Benin against pyrethroid resistant Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus. The bed nets were deliberately holed with either six or 80 holes to examine the effect of increasing wear and tear on protectiveness. Anopheles gambiae were genotyped for the kdr gene to assess the combination's potential to prevent the selection of pyrethroid resistance. Results The frequency of kdr was 84%. The overall mortality rates of An. gambiae were 37% and 49% with the six-hole and 80-hole LLINs, respectively, and reached 57% with chlorfenapyr IRS. Overall mortality rates were significantly higher with the combination treatments (82-83% than with the LLIN or IRS individual treatments. Blood feeding (mosquito biting rates were lowest with the 6-hole LLIN (12%, intermediate with the 80-hole LLIN (32% and highest with untreated nets (56% with the 6-hole and 54% with the 80-hole nets. Blood feeding (biting rates and repellency of mosquitoes with the combination of LLIN and chlorfenapyr IRS showed significant improvement compared to the IRS treatment but did not differ from the LLIN treatments indicating that the LLINs were the primary agents of personal protection. The combination killed significantly higher proportions of Cx. quinquefasciatus (51%, 41% than the LLIN (15%, 13% or IRS (32% treatments. Conclusion The chlorfenapyr IRS component was largely responsible for controlling pyrethroid-resistant mosquitoes and the LLIN component was largely

  5. Combining indoor residual spraying with chlorfenapyr and long-lasting insecticidal bed nets for improved control of pyrethroid-resistant Anopheles gambiae: an experimental hut trial in Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngufor, Corine; N'Guessan, Raphael; Boko, Pelagie; Odjo, Abibatou; Vigninou, Estelle; Asidi, Alex; Akogbeto, Martin; Rowland, Mark

    2011-11-16

    Neither indoor residual spraying (IRS) nor long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) are able to fully interrupt transmission in holoendemic Africa as single interventions. The combining of IRS and LLINs presents an opportunity for improved control and management of pyrethroid resistance through the simultaneous presentation of unrelated insecticides. Chlorfenapyr IRS and a pyrethroid-impregnated polyester LLIN (WHO approved) were tested separately and together in experimental huts in southern Benin against pyrethroid resistant Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus. The bed nets were deliberately holed with either six or 80 holes to examine the effect of increasing wear and tear on protectiveness. Anopheles gambiae were genotyped for the kdr gene to assess the combination's potential to prevent the selection of pyrethroid resistance. The frequency of kdr was 84%. The overall mortality rates of An. gambiae were 37% and 49% with the six-hole and 80-hole LLINs, respectively, and reached 57% with chlorfenapyr IRS. Overall mortality rates were significantly higher with the combination treatments (82-83%) than with the LLIN or IRS individual treatments. Blood feeding (mosquito biting) rates were lowest with the 6-hole LLIN (12%), intermediate with the 80-hole LLIN (32%) and highest with untreated nets (56% with the 6-hole and 54% with the 80-hole nets). Blood feeding (biting) rates and repellency of mosquitoes with the combination of LLIN and chlorfenapyr IRS showed significant improvement compared to the IRS treatment but did not differ from the LLIN treatments indicating that the LLINs were the primary agents of personal protection. The combination killed significantly higher proportions of Cx. quinquefasciatus (51%, 41%) than the LLIN (15%, 13%) or IRS (32%) treatments. The chlorfenapyr IRS component was largely responsible for controlling pyrethroid-resistant mosquitoes and the LLIN component was largely responsible for blood feeding inhibition and personal

  6. Mosquito nets treated with a mixture of chlorfenapyr and alphacypermethrin control pyrethroid resistant Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes in West Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael N'Guessan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of insecticide treated nets is under threat across Africa south of the Sahara from the selection of pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes. To maintain progress against malaria it is necessary to identify alternative residual insecticides for mosquito nets. Mixtures of pyrethroid and insecticides with novel mode of action provide scope for both improved control and management of resistance through concurrent exposure to unrelated insecticides. METHODS: The pyrrole chlorfenapyr and the pyrethroid alphacypermethrin were tested individually and as a mixture on mosquito nets in an experimental hut trial in southern Benin against pyrethroid resistant An gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes. The nets were deliberately holed to simulate the effect of wear and tear. RESULTS: The nets treated with the mixture of chlorfenapyr 200 mg/m² and alphacypermethrin 25 mg/m² killed a proportion of An gambiae (77%, 95%CI: 66-86% significantly greater than nets treated with alphacypermethrin 25 mg/m(2 (30%, 95%CI: 21-41% but not significantly different from nets treated with chlorfenapyr 200 mg/m² (69%, 95%CI: 57-78%. The nets treated with the mixtures procured personal protection against An gambiae biting(58-62% by a greater margin than the alphacypermethrin treated net (39%, whereas the chlorfenapyr treated net was not protective. A similar trend in mortality and blood feeding inhibition between treatments was observed in Cx quinquefasciatus to that seen in An. gambiae, although the effects were lower. A mixture of alphacypermethrin with chlorfenapyr applied at 100 mg/m² had an effect similar to the mixture with chlorfenapyr at 200 mg/m². CONCLUSION: The effectiveness of ITNs against pyrethroid resistant mosquitoes was restored by the mixture: the alphacypermethrin component reduced human-vector contact while the chlorfenapyr controlled pyrethroid-resistant mosquitoes. The complementary action of these

  7. Indoor application of attractive toxic sugar bait (ATSB) in combination with mosquito nets for control of pyrethroid-resistant mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Zachary P; Oxborough, Richard M; Tungu, Patrick K; Kirby, Matthew J; Rowland, Mark W; Irish, Seth R

    2013-01-01

    Attractive toxic sugar bait (ATSB) sprayed onto vegetation has been successful in controlling Anopheles mosquitoes outdoors. Indoor application of ATSB has yet to be explored. The purpose of this study was to determine whether ATSB stations positioned indoors have the potential to kill host-seeking mosquitoes and constitute a new approach to control of mosquito-borne diseases. Insecticides were mixed with dyed sugar solution and tested as toxic baits against Anopheles arabiensis, An. Gambiae s.s. and Culex quinquefasciatus in feeding bioassay tests to identify suitable attractant-insecticide combinations. The most promising ATSB candidates were then trialed in experimental huts in Moshi, Tanzania. ATSB stations were hung in huts next to untreated mosquito nets occupied by human volunteers. The proportions of mosquitoes killed in huts with ATSB treatments relative to huts with non-insecticide control treatments huts were recorded, noting evidence of dye in mosquito abdomens. In feeding bioassays, chlorfenapyr 0.5% v/v, boric acid 2% w/v, and tolfenpyrad 1% v/v, mixed in a guava juice-based bait, each killed more than 90% of pyrethroid-susceptible An. Gambiae s.s. and pyrethroid-resistant An. arabiensis and Cx. quinquefasciatus. In the hut trial, mortality rates of the three ATSB treatments ranged from 41-48% against An. arabiensis and 36-43% against Cx. quinquefasciatus and all were significantly greater than the control mortalities: 18% for An. arabiensis, 7% for Cx. quinquefasciatus (pmosquito nets for controlling mosquitoes. Indoor ATSB constitute a novel application method for insecticide classes that act as stomach poisons and have not hitherto been exploited for mosquito control. Combined with LLIN, indoor use of ATSB has the potential to serve as a strategy for managing insecticide resistance.

  8. In vitro acaricidal activity of Murraya koenigii (L.) Spreng (Rutaceae) extracts against synthetic pyrethroid-resistant Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nirbhay Kumar; Jyoti; Vemu, Bhaskar; Singh, Harkirat; Prerna, Mranalini; Daundkar, Prashant S; Sharma, S K; Dumka, V K

    2015-04-01

    Larval packet test was used for detection of resistance status against cypermethrin and deltamethrin, the most commonly used synthetic pyrethroids in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus collected from Faridkot district, Punjab (India). The slope of mortality, lethal concentration for 50 % (LC50) and resistance levels were determined from the regression graphs of probit mortality of ticks plotted against log values of increasing concentrations of cypermethrin and deltamethrin. Results indicated presence of resistance of levels I and II against cypermethrin (resistance factor (RF) = 2.82) and deltamethrin (RF = 8.44), respectively. Adult immersion test was used to assess the acaricidal activity of aqueous (MLAq), ethanol (MLE), chloroform (MLC), acetone (MLA) and hexane (MLH) extracts of leaves of Murraya koenigii against these synthetic pyrethroid (SP)-resistant engorged adult females of R. (B.) microplus by determination of per cent adult mortality, reproductive index (RI), per cent inhibition of oviposition (%IO) and hatching rate. The per cent mortality caused by various extracts at concentrations ranging from 0.625 to 10.0% varied from 0.0 to 100.0% with maximum per cent mortality of 10.0, 100.0, 70.0, 40.0 and 10.0 recorded against MLAq, MLE, MLC, MLA and MLH, respectively. Among all extracts, the highest acaricidal property against SP-resistant R. (B.) microplus was exhibited by the MLE as it showed the minimum LC50 [95% confidence limit (CL)] values of 2.97% (2.82-3.12%), followed by MLC as 10.26% (8.84-11.91 %) and MLA as 18.22% (16.18-20.52%). The average egg mass weight recorded in live ticks treated with various concentrations of different extracts was lower than the respective control group ticks and was significantly (p < 0.01) lower in ticks treated with MLH extract. However, no significant effect on hatchability of eggs of treated groups when compared to control was recorded. A significant (p < 0.05) decrease in the RI was recorded in

  9. Pyrethroid-resistance is modulated by miR-92a by targeting CpCPR4 in Culex pipiens pallens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Kai; Li, Xixi; Hu, Hongxia; Zhou, Dan; Sun, Yan; Ma, Lei; Zhu, Changliang; Shen, Bo

    2017-01-01

    The wide use of pyrethroids has resulted in the emergence and spread of resistance in mosquito populations, which represent a major obstacle in the struggle against vector-borne diseases. Resistance to pyrethroids is a complex genetic phenomenon attributed by polygenetic inheritance. We previously have sequenced and analyzed the miRNA profiles of Culex pipiens pallens. MiR-92a was found to be overexpressed in a deltamethrin-resistant (DR) strain. The association of miR-92a with pyrethroid-resistance was investigated by quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR). Expression levels of miR-92a were 2.72-fold higher in the DR strain than in the deltamethrin-susceptible (DS) strain. Bioinformatic analysis suggested that CpCPR4, a mosquito cuticle gene, is the target of miR-92a. Dual luciferase reporter assays further confirmed that CpCPR4 is modulated by miR-92a through binding to a specific target site in the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR). Microinjection of the miR-92a inhibitor upregulated CpCPR4 expression levels, leading to an increase in the susceptibility of the DR strain in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) bottle bioassay (a surveillance tool for detecting resistance to insecticides in vector populations). Taken together, our findings indicate that miR-92a regulates pyrethroid-resistance through its interaction with CpCPR4. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. In vitro acaricidal activity of ethanolic and aqueous floral extracts of Calendula officinalis against synthetic pyrethroid resistant Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godara, R; Katoch, R; Yadav, A; Ahanger, R R; Bhutyal, A D S; Verma, P K; Katoch, M; Dutta, S; Nisa, F; Singh, N K

    2015-09-01

    Detection of resistance levels against deltamethrin and cypermethrin in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus collected from Jammu (India) was carried out using larval packet test (LPT). The results showed the presence of resistance level II and I against deltamethrin and cypermethrin, respectively. Adult immersion test (AIT) and LPT were used to evaluate the in vitro efficacy of ethanolic and aqueous floral extracts of Calendula officinalis against synthetic pyrethroid resistant adults and larvae of R. (B.) microplus. Four concentrations (1.25, 2.5, 5 and 10 %) of each extract with four replications for each concentration were used in both the bioassays. A concentration dependent mortality was observed and it was more marked with ethanolic extract. In AIT, the LC50 values for ethanolic and aqueous extracts were calculated as 9.9 and 12.9 %, respectively. The egg weight of the live ticks treated with different concentrations of the ethanolic and aqueous extracts was significantly lower than that of control ticks; consequently, the reproductive index and the percent inhibition of oviposition values of the treated ticks were reduced. The complete inhibition of hatching was recorded at 10 % of ethanolic extract. The 10 % extracts caused 100 % mortality of larvae after 24 h. In LPT, the LC50 values for ethanolic and aqueous extracts were determined to be 2.6 and 3.2 %, respectively. It can be concluded that the ethanolic extract of C. officinalis had better acaricidal properties against adults and larvae of R. (B.) microplus than the aqueous extract.

  11. Co-occurrence of point mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel of pyrethroid-resistant Aedes aegypti populations in Myanmar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Kawada

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Single amino acid substitutions in the voltage-gated sodium channel associated with pyrethroid resistance constitute one of the main causative factors of knockdown resistance in insects. The kdr gene has been observed in several mosquito species; however, point mutations in the para gene of Aedes aegypti populations in Myanmar have not been fully characterized. The aim of the present study was to determine the types and frequencies of mutations in the para gene of Aedes aegypti collected from used tires in Yangon City, Myanmar. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We determined high pyrethroid resistance in Aedes aegypti larvae at all collection sites in Yangon City, by using a simplified knockdown bioassay. We showed that V1016G and S989P mutations were widely distributed, with high frequencies (84.4% and 78.8%, respectively. By contrast, we were unable to detect I1011M (or I1011V or L1014F mutations. F1534C mutations were also widely distributed, but with a lower frequency than the V1016G mutation (21.2%. High percentage of co-occurrence of the homozygous V1016G/S989P mutations was detected (65.7%. Additionally, co-occurrence of homozygous V1016G/F1534C mutations (2.9% and homozygous V1016G/F1534C/S989P mutations (0.98% were detected in the present study. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Pyrethroid insecticides were first used for malaria control in 1992, and have since been constantly used in Myanmar. This intensive use may explain the strong selection pressure toward Aedes aegypti, because this mosquito is generally a domestic and endophagic species with a preference for indoor breeding. Extensive use of DDT for malaria control before the use of this chemical was banned may also explain the development of pyrethroid resistance in Aedes aegypti.

  12. Co-occurrence of point mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel of pyrethroid-resistant Aedes aegypti populations in Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Hitoshi; Oo, Sai Zaw Min; Thaung, Sein; Kawashima, Emiko; Maung, Yan Naung Maung; Thu, Hlaing Myat; Thant, Kyaw Zin; Minakawa, Noboru

    2014-01-01

    Single amino acid substitutions in the voltage-gated sodium channel associated with pyrethroid resistance constitute one of the main causative factors of knockdown resistance in insects. The kdr gene has been observed in several mosquito species; however, point mutations in the para gene of Aedes aegypti populations in Myanmar have not been fully characterized. The aim of the present study was to determine the types and frequencies of mutations in the para gene of Aedes aegypti collected from used tires in Yangon City, Myanmar. We determined high pyrethroid resistance in Aedes aegypti larvae at all collection sites in Yangon City, by using a simplified knockdown bioassay. We showed that V1016G and S989P mutations were widely distributed, with high frequencies (84.4% and 78.8%, respectively). By contrast, we were unable to detect I1011M (or I1011V) or L1014F mutations. F1534C mutations were also widely distributed, but with a lower frequency than the V1016G mutation (21.2%). High percentage of co-occurrence of the homozygous V1016G/S989P mutations was detected (65.7%). Additionally, co-occurrence of homozygous V1016G/F1534C mutations (2.9%) and homozygous V1016G/F1534C/S989P mutations (0.98%) were detected in the present study. Pyrethroid insecticides were first used for malaria control in 1992, and have since been constantly used in Myanmar. This intensive use may explain the strong selection pressure toward Aedes aegypti, because this mosquito is generally a domestic and endophagic species with a preference for indoor breeding. Extensive use of DDT for malaria control before the use of this chemical was banned may also explain the development of pyrethroid resistance in Aedes aegypti.

  13. Impact of long-lasting insecticidal nets on prevalence of subclinical malaria among children in the presence of pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles culicifacies in Central India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chourasia, Mehul Kumar; Kamaraju, Raghavendra; Kleinschmidt, Immo; Bhatt, Rajendra M; Swain, Dipak Kumar; Knox, Tessa Bellamy; Valecha, Neena

    2017-04-01

    Subclinical (asymptomatic) cases of malaria could be a major barrier to the success of malaria elimination programs. This study has evaluated the impact of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) on the prevalence of subclinical malaria in the presence of pyrethroid resistance in the main malaria vector Anopheles culicifacies on malaria transmission among a cohort of children in villages of the Keshkal sub-district in Chhattisgarh state. A cohort of 6582 children ages less than 14 years was enrolled from 80 study clusters. Post monsoon survey was carried out at baseline before LLIN distribution, and 5862 children were followed up in the subsequent year. Study outcomes included assessment of subclinical malarial infections and use of LLINs among the study cohort in the presence of varied levels of pyrethroid resistance. In the baseline survey, the proportion of subclinical malaria was 6·1%. LLIN use during the previous night was 94·8%. Overall, prevalence of subclinical malaria was significantly reduced to 1% (pmalaria (OR: 0·25, 95% CI=0·12-0·52, pmalaria (OR: 0·25, 95% CI=0·11-0·58, p=0·001) despite the presence of pyrethroid resistance in the study area. In this low transmission area, sleeping under LLINs significantly reduced the burden of malaria among children. In the presence of pyrethroid resistant malaria vector, a high LLIN use of 94·5% was observed to have significantly brought down the proportion of subclinical malaria among the cohort children. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Mosquito Nets Treated with a Mixture of Chlorfenapyr and Alphacypermethrin Control Pyrethroid Resistant Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus Mosquitoes in West Africa: e87710

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Corine Ngufor; Andreas A Kudom; Pelagie Boko; Abibathou Odjo; David Malone; Mark Rowland

    2014-01-01

    .... Methods The pyrrole chlorfenapyr and the pyrethroid alphacypermethrin were tested individually and as a mixture on mosquito nets in an experimental hut trial in southern Benin against pyrethroid...

  15. Indoor Application of Attractive Toxic Sugar Bait (ATSB) in Combination with Mosquito Nets for Control of Pyrethroid-Resistant Mosquitoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Zachary P.; Oxborough, Richard M.; Tungu, Patrick K.; Kirby, Matthew J.; Rowland, Mark W.; Irish, Seth R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Attractive toxic sugar bait (ATSB) sprayed onto vegetation has been successful in controlling Anopheles mosquitoes outdoors. Indoor application of ATSB has yet to be explored. The purpose of this study was to determine whether ATSB stations positioned indoors have the potential to kill host-seeking mosquitoes and constitute a new approach to control of mosquito-borne diseases. Methods Insecticides were mixed with dyed sugar solution and tested as toxic baits against Anopheles arabiensis, An. Gambiae s.s. and Culex quinquefasciatus in feeding bioassay tests to identify suitable attractant-insecticide combinations. The most promising ATSB candidates were then trialed in experimental huts in Moshi, Tanzania. ATSB stations were hung in huts next to untreated mosquito nets occupied by human volunteers. The proportions of mosquitoes killed in huts with ATSB treatments relative to huts with non-insecticide control treatments huts were recorded, noting evidence of dye in mosquito abdomens. Results In feeding bioassays, chlorfenapyr 0.5% v/v, boric acid 2% w/v, and tolfenpyrad 1% v/v, mixed in a guava juice-based bait, each killed more than 90% of pyrethroid-susceptible An. Gambiae s.s. and pyrethroid-resistant An. arabiensis and Cx. quinquefasciatus. In the hut trial, mortality rates of the three ATSB treatments ranged from 41-48% against An. arabiensis and 36-43% against Cx. quinquefasciatus and all were significantly greater than the control mortalities: 18% for An. arabiensis, 7% for Cx. quinquefasciatus (p<0.05). Mortality rates with ATSB were comparable to those with long lasting insecticidal nets previously tested against the same species in this area. Conclusions Indoor ATSB shows promise as a supplement to mosquito nets for controlling mosquitoes. Indoor ATSB constitute a novel application method for insecticide classes that act as stomach poisons and have not hitherto been exploited for mosquito control. Combined with LLIN, indoor use of ATSB has the

  16. Indoor application of attractive toxic sugar bait (ATSB in combination with mosquito nets for control of pyrethroid-resistant mosquitoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary P Stewart

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Attractive toxic sugar bait (ATSB sprayed onto vegetation has been successful in controlling Anopheles mosquitoes outdoors. Indoor application of ATSB has yet to be explored. The purpose of this study was to determine whether ATSB stations positioned indoors have the potential to kill host-seeking mosquitoes and constitute a new approach to control of mosquito-borne diseases. METHODS: Insecticides were mixed with dyed sugar solution and tested as toxic baits against Anopheles arabiensis, An. Gambiae s.s. and Culex quinquefasciatus in feeding bioassay tests to identify suitable attractant-insecticide combinations. The most promising ATSB candidates were then trialed in experimental huts in Moshi, Tanzania. ATSB stations were hung in huts next to untreated mosquito nets occupied by human volunteers. The proportions of mosquitoes killed in huts with ATSB treatments relative to huts with non-insecticide control treatments huts were recorded, noting evidence of dye in mosquito abdomens. RESULTS: In feeding bioassays, chlorfenapyr 0.5% v/v, boric acid 2% w/v, and tolfenpyrad 1% v/v, mixed in a guava juice-based bait, each killed more than 90% of pyrethroid-susceptible An. Gambiae s.s. and pyrethroid-resistant An. arabiensis and Cx. quinquefasciatus. In the hut trial, mortality rates of the three ATSB treatments ranged from 41-48% against An. arabiensis and 36-43% against Cx. quinquefasciatus and all were significantly greater than the control mortalities: 18% for An. arabiensis, 7% for Cx. quinquefasciatus (p<0.05. Mortality rates with ATSB were comparable to those with long lasting insecticidal nets previously tested against the same species in this area. CONCLUSIONS: Indoor ATSB shows promise as a supplement to mosquito nets for controlling mosquitoes. Indoor ATSB constitute a novel application method for insecticide classes that act as stomach poisons and have not hitherto been exploited for mosquito control. Combined with LLIN, indoor

  17. Pyrethroid resistance in the major malaria vector Anopheles arabiensis from Gwave, a malaria-endemic area in Zimbabwe

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    Brooke Basil D

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insecticide resistance can present a major obstacle to malaria control programmes. Following the recent detection of DDT resistance in Anopheles arabiensis in Gokwe, Zimbabwe, the underlying resistance mechanisms in this population were studied. Methods Standard WHO bioassays, using 0.75% permethrin, 4% DDT, 5% malathion, 0.1% bendiocarb and 4% dieldrin were performed on wild-collected adult anopheline mosquitoes and F1 progeny of An. arabiensis reared from wild-caught females. Molecular techniques were used for species identification as well as to identify knockdown resistance (kdr and ace-1 mutations in individual mosquitoes. Biochemical assays were used to determine the relative levels of detoxifying enzyme systems including non-specific esterases, monooxygenases and glutathione-S-transferases as well as to detect the presence of an altered acetylcholine esterase (AChE. Results Anopheles arabiensis was the predominant member of the Anopheles gambiae complex. Of the 436 An. arabiensis females, 0.5% were positive for Plasmodium falciparum infection. WHO diagnostic tests on wild populations showed resistance to the pyrethroid insecticide permethrin at a mean mortality of 47% during February 2006 and a mean mortality of 68.2% in January 2008. DDT resistance (68.4% mean mortality was present in February 2006; however, two years later the mean mortality was 96%. Insecticide susceptibility tests on F1 An. arabiensis families reared from material from two separate collections showed an average mean mortality of 87% (n = 758 after exposure to 4% DDT and 65% (n = 587 after exposure to 0.75% permethrin. Eight families were resistant to both DDT and permethrin. Biochemical analysis of F1 families reared from collections done in 2006 revealed high activity levels of monooxygenase (48.5% of families tested, n = 33, p An. arabiensis colony. Knockdown resistance (kdr and ace-IR mutations were not detected. Conclusion This study confirmed

  18. Nationwide investigation of the pyrethroid susceptibility of mosquito larvae collected from used tires in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Hitoshi; Higa, Yukiko; Nguyen, Yen T; Tran, Son H; Nguyen, Hoa T; Takagi, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    Pyrethroid resistance is envisioned to be a major problem for the vector control program since, at present, there are no suitable chemical substitutes for pyrethroids. Cross-resistance to knockdown agents, which are mainly used in mosquito coils and related products as spatial repellents, is the most serious concern. Since cross-resistance is a global phenomenon, we have started to monitor the distribution of mosquito resistance to pyrethroids. The first pilot study was carried out in Vietnam. We periodically drove along the national road from the north end to the Mekong Delta in Vietnam and collected mosquito larvae from used tires. Simplified susceptibility tests were performed using the fourth instar larvae of Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus, and Culex quinquefasciatus. Compared with the other species, Ae. aegypti demonstrated the most prominent reduction in susceptibility. For Ae. aegypti, significant increases in the susceptibility indices with a decrease in the latitude of collection points were observed, indicating that the susceptibility of Ae. aegypti against d-allethrin was lower in the southern part, including mountainous areas, as compared to that in the northern part of Vietnam. There was a significant correlation between the susceptibility indices in Ae. aegypti and the sum of annual pyrethroid use for malaria control (1998-2002). This might explain that the use of pyrethroids as residual treatment inside houses and pyrethroid-impregnated bed nets for malaria control is attributable to low pyrethroid susceptibility in Ae. aegypti. Such insecticide treatment appeared to have been intensively administered in the interior and along the periphery of human habitation areas where, incidentally, the breeding and resting sites of Ae. aegypti are located. This might account for the strong selection pressure toward Ae. aegypti and not Ae. albopictus.

  19. Three years of insecticide resistance monitoring in Anopheles gambiae in Burkina Faso: resistance on the rise?

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    Badolo Athanase

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and methods A longitudinal Anopheles gambiae s.l. insecticide-resistance monitoring programme was established in four sentinel sites in Burkina Faso. For three years, between 2008 and 2010, WHO diagnostic dose assays were used to measure the prevalence of resistance to all the major classes of insecticides at the beginning and end of the malaria transmission season. Species identification and genotyping for target site mutations was also performed and the sporozoite rate in adults determined. Results At the onset of the study, resistance to DDT and pyrethroids was already prevalent in An. gambiae s.l. from the south-west of the country but mosquitoes from the two sites in central Burkina Faso were largely susceptible. Within three years, DDT and permethrin resistance was established in all four sites. Carbamate and organophosphate resistance remains relatively rare and largely confined to the south-western areas although a small number of bendiocarb survivors were found in all sites by the final round of monitoring. The ace-1R target site resistance allele was present in all localities and its frequency exceeded 20% in 2010 in two of the sites. The frequency of the 1014F kdr mutation increased throughout the three years and by 2010, the frequency of 1014F in all sites combined was 0.02 in Anopheles arabiensis, 0.56 in An. gambiae M form and 0.96 in An. gambiae S form. This frequency did not differ significantly between the sites. The 1014S kdr allele was only found in An. arabiensis but its frequency increased significantly throughout the study (P = 0.0003 and in 2010 the 1014S allele frequency was 0.08 in An. arabiensis. Maximum sporozoite rates (12% were observed in Soumousso in 2009 and the difference between sites is significant for each year. Conclusion Pyrethroid and DDT resistance is now established in An. gambiae s.l. throughout Burkina Faso. Results from diagnostic dose assays are highly variable within and

  20. Acaricidal activity of Cymbopogon winterianus, Vitex negundo and Withania somnifera against synthetic pyrethroid resistant Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nirbhay Kumar; Jyoti; Vemu, Bhaskar; Nandi, Abhijit; Singh, Harkirat; Kumar, Rajender; Dumka, V K

    2014-01-01

    Detection of resistance levels against cypermethrin and deltamethrin, the most commonly used synthetic pyrethroids (SPs) against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus collected from Moga, Punjab (India) was carried out using larval packet test. Results indicated the presence of resistance of level I and III against cypermethrin (resistance factors (RF) = 4.67) and deltamethrin (RF = 34.2), respectively. Adult immersion test was used to assess the acaricidal activity of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of leaves of Cymbopogon winterianus, Vitex negundo, and Withania somnifera along with roots of V. negundo against the SP resistant engorged females of R. (B.) microplus. The efficacy of various extracts was assessed by estimation of percent adult mortality, reproductive index (RI), percent inhibition of oviposition (%IO), and hatching rate. A concentration dependent increase in tick mortality was recorded which was more marked with various ethanolic extracts, and highest mortality was recorded in ticks treated with ethanolic extract of leaves of C. winterianus. The LC50 values were determined by applying regression equation analysis to the probit transformed data of mortality for various aqueous and ethanolic extracts. Acaricidal property was recorded to be higher in ethanolic extracts, and high activity was found with the ethanolic extract of leaves of C. winterianus with LC50 (95% CL) values of 0.46% (0.35-0.59%), followed by W. somnifera as 5.21% (4.45-6.09%) and V. negundo as 7.02% (4.58-10.74%). The egg mass weight of the live ticks treated with different concentrations of the various extract was significantly (p < 0.01) lower than that of control ticks; consequently, the RI and the %IO value of the treated ticks were reduced. Further, complete inhibition of hatching was recorded in eggs laid by ticks treated with ethanolic extracts of leaves of V. negundo and aqueous extracts of leaves of W. somnifera. The results of the current study indicate that extracts of C

  1. 4-Methoxymethyl-2,3,5,6-tetrafluorobenzyl alcohol as a urinary biomarker for monitoring of metofluthrin, a fluorine-containing pyrethroid, in exposed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Toshiaki

    2015-02-01

    A fluorine-containing pyrethroid metofluthrin is widely used recently in mosquito repellents. The urinary excretion kinetics of its metabolites was evaluated in rats to establish an optimal biomarker for monitoring metofluthrin exposure of the general population. After metofluthrin had been administered intraperitoneally to rats, the urinary excretion kinetics of the major metofluthrin metabolites was evaluated by moment analysis. The urinary excretion amounts of 4-methoxymethyl-2,3,5,6-tetrafluorobenzyl alcohol were estimated to be proportional to the absorption amounts over a wide exposure range. Urinary 4-methoxymethyl-2,3,5,6-tetrafluorobenzyl alcohol was considered to be an optimal biomarker for metofluthrin exposure.

  2. Acaricidal properties of Ricinus communis leaf extracts against organophosphate and pyrethroids resistant Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Srikanta; Tiwari, Shashi Shankar; Srivastava, Sharad; Sharma, Anil Kumar; Kumar, Sachin; Ray, D D; Rawat, A K S

    2013-02-18

    Indian cattle ticks have developed resistance to commonly used acaricides and an attempt has been made to formulate an ecofriendly herbal preparation for the control of acaricide resistant ticks. A 95% ethanolic extract of Ricinus communis was used to test the efficacy against reference acaricide resistant lines by in vitro assay. In in vitro assay, the extract significantly affects the mortality rate of ticks in dose-dependent manner ranging from 35.0 ± 5.0 to 95.0 ± 5.0% with an additional effect on reproductive physiology of ticks by inhibiting 36.4-63.1% of oviposition. The leaf extract was found effective in killing 48.0, 56.7 and 60.0% diazinon, deltamethrin and multi-acaricide resistant ticks, respectively. However, the cidal and oviposition limiting properties of the extract were separated when the extract was fractionated with hexane, chloroform, n-butanol and water. The HPTLC finger printing profile of R. communis leaf extract under λ(max.) - 254 showed presence of quercetin, gallic acid, flavone and kaempferol which seemed to have synergistic acaricidal action. In vivo experiment resulted in 59.9% efficacy on Ist challenge, however, following 2nd challenge the efficacy was reduced to 48.5%. The results indicated that the 95% ethanolic leaf extract of R. communis can be used effectively in integrated format for the control of acaricide resistant ticks.

  3. Transgenic expression of the Aedes aegypti CYP9J28 confers pyrethroid resistance in Drosophila melanogaster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlidi, N.; Monastirioti, M.; Daborn, P.; Van Leeuwen, T.; Vontas, J.

    2012-01-01

    The emergence and spread of insecticide resistance in mosquitoes, such as the major vector of dengue and yellow fever Aedes aegypti, is a major public health problem. A number of studies have been conducted to-date aiming to identify specific molecular changes that are associated with the phenotype,

  4. Transgenic expression of the Aedes aegypti CYP9J28 confers pyrethroid resistance in Drosophila melanogaster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlidi, N.; Monastirioti, M.; Daborn, P.; Van Leeuwen, T.; Vontas, J.

    2012-01-01

    The emergence and spread of insecticide resistance in mosquitoes, such as the major vector of dengue and yellow fever Aedes aegypti, is a major public health problem. A number of studies have been conducted to-date aiming to identify specific molecular changes that are associated with the phenotype,

  5. Proteolysis on the body surface of pyrethroid-sensitive and resistant Varroa destructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachecka, Aneta; Borsuk, Grzegorz; Olszewski, Krzysztof; Paleolog, Jerzy; Lipiński, Zbigniew

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the activity of proteases and protease inhibitors sampled from the body surface of tau-fluvalinate-sensitive and resistant V. destructor. Proteins were isolated from the tau-fluvalinate-sensitive and resistant mites, while mites untreated with tau-fluvalinate constituted the control. Subsequently, the following methodology was applied: protein concentration assay by the Lowry method - as modified by Schacterle and Pollack; assay of proteolytic activity in relation to various substrates (gelatine, haemoglobin, ovoalbumin, albumin, cytochrome C, casein) by the modified Anson method; identification of proteolytic activity in relation to diagnostic inhibitors of proteolytic enzymes (pepstatin A, PMSF, iodoacetamide, o-phenantrolin), using the Lee and Lin method; identification of acidic, neutral and basic protease activities by means of the modified Anson method; electrophoretic analysis of proteins in a polyacrylamide gel for protease detection with the Laemmli method and for protease inhibitor detection with the Felicioli method. The highest value of protein concentration was found in the tau-fluvalinate-sensitive V. destructor, while the highest activity levels of acidic, neutral and alkaline proteases were observed in the tau-fluvalinate-resistant mites. Aspartic, serine, thiolic and metallic proteases were found in the drug-resistant and drug-sensitive Varroa mites. The control samples were found to contain aspartic and serine proteases. In an acidic and alkaline environment, the results revealed a complete loss of inhibitor activities in the in vitro analyses and electrophoresis. Serine protease inhibitor activities (at pH 7.0) were high, especially in the group of tau-fluvalinate-resistant mites.

  6. Synergism between demethylation inhibitor fungicides or gibberellin inhibitor plant growth regulators and bifenthrin in a pyrethroid-resistant population of Listronotus maculicollis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramoutar, D; Cowles, R S; Requintina, E; Alm, S R

    2010-10-01

    In 2007-2008, the "annual bluegrass weevil," Listronotus maculicollis Kirby (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), a serious pest of Poa annua L. (Poales: Poaceae) on U.S. golf courses, was shown to be resistant to two pyrethroids, bifenthrin and lambda-cyhalothrin. In 2008, we showed that bifenthrin resistance was principally mediated by oxidase detoxification (cytochrome P450 [P450]). P450s can be inhibited by demethylation inhibitor fungicides and gibberellin inhibitor plant growth regulators, both of which are commonly used on golf courses. We tested these compounds for synergistic activity with bifenthin against a pyrethroid-resistant population of L. maculicollis. The LD50 value for bifenthrin was significantly reduced from 87 ng per insect (without synergists) to 9.6-40 ng per insect after exposure to the fungicides fenarimol, fenpropimorph, prochloraz, propiconazole, and pyrifenox and the plant growth regulators flurprimidol, paclobutrazol, and trinexapac-ethyl. Simulated field exposure with formulated products registered for use on turf revealed enhanced mortality when adult weevils were exposed to bifenthrin (25% mortality, presented alone) combined with field dosages of propiconizole, fenarimol, flurprimidol, or trinexapac-ethyl (range, 49-70% mortality).

  7. 昆虫对拟除虫菊酯类杀虫剂的代谢抗性机制研究进展%Mechanism of insect metabolic resistance to pyrethroid insecticides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈澄宇; 史雪岩; 髙希武

    2016-01-01

    随着拟除虫菊酯类杀虫剂在卫生和农业害虫防治中的广泛应用,昆虫对此类杀虫剂产生抗性的报道越来越多。目前已明确昆虫对拟除虫菊酯类杀虫剂的抗性机制包括表皮穿透率下降、靶标抗性以及代谢抗性,其中代谢抗性机制较为普遍,而且其与昆虫对多种杀虫剂的交互抗性关系密切。目前,随着基因组、转录组以及蛋白质组学等新技术的发展及应用,昆虫对拟除虫菊酯类杀虫剂的代谢抗性机制研究也取得了很多新进展。昆虫体内细胞色素 P450酶(P450s)、羧酸酯酶(CarE)及谷胱甘肽S-转移酶(GSTs)等重要解毒酶系的改变均与昆虫对拟除虫菊酯类杀虫剂的代谢抗性有关,其中这3类解毒酶的活性及相关基因表达量的变化是昆虫对此类杀虫剂产生代谢抗性的主要原因。明确昆虫对拟除虫菊酯类杀虫剂的代谢抗性机制,对合理使用此类杀虫剂及延缓抗药性的产生均具有重要意义。本文在总结拟除虫菊酯类杀虫剂代谢路径及相关生物酶研究概况的基础上,综述了近年来有关昆虫对此类杀虫剂代谢抗性机制研究的主要进展。%With indiscriminate use of pyrethroid insecticides on agricultural and urban settings insect pests, the pyrethroid resistance in insects has occurred widely. The resistance mechanisms of insects to pyrethroid insecticides include the resistance caused by the decline of insect cuticular penetration rate, insensitive target resistance and metabolic resistance. Among those mechanisms, the metabolic resistance of insects to pyrethroids is more commonly existed and closely related to insects cross resistance to a variety of insecticides. Recently, many new achievements on the mechanisms of insect metabolic resistance to pyrethroids insecticides have been obtained, with the application of new techniques such as proteomics, transcriptome and genomic techniques. The changes of

  8. Field efficacy of a new mosaic long-lasting mosquito net (PermaNet (R) 3.0) against pyrethroid-resistant malaria vectors : a multi centre study in Western and Central Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Corbel, Vincent; Chabi, Joseph; Dabiré, R. K.; Etang, J.; Nwane, P.; Pigeon, O.; Akogbeto, M.; Hougard, Jean-Marc

    2010-01-01

    Background: Due to the spread of pyrethroid-resistance in malaria vectors in Africa, new strategies and tools are urgently needed to better control malaria transmission. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performances of a new mosaic long-lasting insecticidal net (LLIN), i.e. PermaNet (R) 3.0, against wild pyrethroid-resistant Anopheles gambiae s.l. in West and Central Africa. Methods: A multi centre experimental hut trial was conducted in Malanville (Benin), Vallee du Kou (Burkina Fas...

  9. Field efficacy of a new mosaic long-lasting mosquito net (PermaNet® 3.0) against pyrethroid-resistant malaria vectors: a multi centre study in Western and Central Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Pigeon Olivier; Nwane Philippe; Etang Josiane; Dabiré Roch K; Chabi Joseph; Corbel Vincent; Akogbeto Martin; Hougard Jean-Marc

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Due to the spread of pyrethroid-resistance in malaria vectors in Africa, new strategies and tools are urgently needed to better control malaria transmission. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performances of a new mosaic long-lasting insecticidal net (LLIN), i.e. PermaNet® 3.0, against wild pyrethroid-resistant Anopheles gambiae s.l. in West and Central Africa. Methods A multi centre experimental hut trial was conducted in Malanville (Benin), Vallée du Kou (Burkina...

  10. Two Novel Bioassays to Assess the Effects of Pyrethroid-Treated Netting on Knockdown-Susceptible Versus Resistant Strains of Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denham, Steven; Eisen, Lars; Beaty, Meaghan; Beaty, Barry J; Black, William C; Saavedra-Rodriguez, Karla

    2015-03-01

    We describe 2 new mosquito bioassays for use with insecticide-treated netting or other textiles. The 1st is a cylinder bioassay in which a mosquito is forced to contact treated material regardless of where it lands within the bioassay construct. The 2nd is a repellency/irritancy and biting-inhibition bioassay (RIBB) in which human arms and breath are used as attractants. Mosquitoes have the choice to pass through holes cut in untreated or treated netting to move from a center release chamber into side chambers to reach arms and potentially bite. Trials were conducted with pyrethroid-susceptible (New Orleans), moderately resistant (Hunucmá), and highly resistant (Vergel) strains of Aedes aegypti. Tests with netting treated with different pyrethroids demonstrated the utility of the cylinder bioassay to quantify knockdown and mortality following exposure to treated netting, and of the RIBB to quantify spatial repellency/contact irritancy of the treated netting and biting inhibition after females land on and then pass through holes in the treated netting. Both tested brands of pyrethroid-treated mosquitocidal netting (DuraNet® and NetProtect®) were effective against New Orleans but ineffective against Vergel strains. Mortality in the cylinder bioassay was 100% for New Orleans for all tested brands of treated netting, but only 10-14% for Vergel. Rates of passage through treated netting to reach a human arm in the RIBB were 10-15% for New Orleans versus 24-37% for Vergel. The reduction in biting after passage through treated netting, compared with untreated netting in the same trial replicates, was 12-39% for New Orleans versus ≤9% for Vergel.

  11. Personal protection of long lasting insecticide-treated nets in areas of Anopheles gambiae s.s. resistance to pyrethroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paré-Toé Léa

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of mosquito nets pre-treated with insecticide, Long Lasting Impregnated Nets (LLINs that last the life span of the net, is a solution to the difficulty of the re-impregnation of conventional nets. Even if they showed a good efficacy in control conditions, their efficacy in the field, particularly in areas with resistance of Anopheles gambiae to pyrethroids, is not well documented. This study compares wide (Olyset® and small (Permanet® mesh LLINs in field conditions, using entomological parameters. Methods The two LLINs were tested in a rice-growing area of south-western Burkina Faso (West Africa with year around high density of the main malaria vector An. gambiae s.s. In the study village (VK6, there is a mixed population of two molecular forms of An. gambiae, the S-form which dominates during the rainy season and the M-form which dominates the rest of the year. The two LLINs Olyset® and Permanet® were distributed in the village and 20 matched houses were selected for comparison with four houses without treated nets. Results Mosquito entrance rate was ten fold higher in control houses than in houses with LLINs and there was no difference between the two net types. Among mosquitoes found in the houses, 36 % were dead in LLIN houses compared to 0% in control houses. Blood feeding rate was 80 % in control houses compared to 43 % in LLIN houses. The type of net did not significantly impact any of these parameters. No mosquitoes were found inside Permanet®, whereas dead or dying mosquitoes were collected inside the Olyset®. More than 60% of mosquitoes found on top or inside the nets had had blood meals from cattle, as shown by ELISA analysis. Conclusion The percentage of blood-fed mosquitoes in a bed net study does not necessarily determine net success. The efficacy of the two types of LLINs was comparable, during a period when the S-form of An. gambiae was carrying the kdr gene. Significantly higher numbers

  12. Involvement of metabolic resistance and F1534C kdr mutation in the pyrethroid resistance mechanisms of Aedes aegypti in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthusamy, R; Shivakumar, M S

    2015-08-01

    Pesticide resistance poses a serious problem for worldwide mosquito control programs. Resistance to insecticides can be caused by an increased metabolic detoxification of the insecticide and/or by target site insensitivity. In the present study, we estimated the tolerance of Indian Aedes aegypti populations using adult bioassays that revealed high resistance levels of the field populations to permethrin (RR-6, 5.8 and 5.1 folds) compared to our susceptible population. Enzymatic assays revealed increased activities of glutathione S-transferase and carboxylesterase enzymes in the field populations comparatively to the susceptible population. PBO synergist assays did not confirm that cytochrome P450 monooxygenase metabolic detoxification acted as a major cause of resistance. Hence the role of target site resistance was therefore investigated. A single substitution Phe1534Cys in the voltage gated sodium channel was found in domain III, segment 6 (III-S6) of the resistance populations (allele frequency=0.59, 0.51 and 0.47) suggesting its potential role in permethrin resistance in A. aegypti.

  13. Chlorfenapyr (A Pyrrole Insecticide) Applied Alone or as a Mixture with Alpha-Cypermethrin for Indoor Residual Spraying against Pyrethroid Resistant Anopheles gambiae sl: An Experimental Hut Study in Cove, Benin

    OpenAIRE

    Ngufor, C; Critchley, J; Fagbohoun, J; N'Guessan, R.; Todjinou, D; Rowland, M

    2016-01-01

    Background Indoor spraying of walls and ceilings with residual insecticide remains a primary method of malaria control. Insecticide resistance in malaria vectors is a growing problem. Novel insecticides for indoor residual spraying (IRS) which can improve the control of pyrethroid resistant malaria vectors are urgently needed. Insecticide mixtures have the potential to improve efficacy or even to manage resistance in some situations but this possibility remains underexplored experimentally. C...

  14. Field efficacy of a new mosaic long-lasting mosquito net (PermaNet® 3.0 against pyrethroid-resistant malaria vectors: a multi centre study in Western and Central Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pigeon Olivier

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the spread of pyrethroid-resistance in malaria vectors in Africa, new strategies and tools are urgently needed to better control malaria transmission. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performances of a new mosaic long-lasting insecticidal net (LLIN, i.e. PermaNet® 3.0, against wild pyrethroid-resistant Anopheles gambiae s.l. in West and Central Africa. Methods A multi centre experimental hut trial was conducted in Malanville (Benin, Vallée du Kou (Burkina Faso and Pitoa (Cameroon to investigate the exophily, blood feeding inhibition and mortality induced by PermaNet® 3.0 (i.e. a mosaic net containing piperonyl butoxide and deltamethrin on the roof comparatively to the WHO recommended PermaNet® 2.0 (unwashed and washed 20-times and a conventionally deltamethrin-treated net (CTN. Results The personal protection and insecticidal activity of PermaNet 3.0 and PermaNet® 2.0 were excellent (>80% in the "pyrethroid-tolerant" area of Malanville. In the pyrethroid-resistance areas of Pitoa (metabolic resistance and Vallée du Kou (presence of the L1014F kdr mutation, PermaNet® 3.0 showed equal or better performances than PermaNet® 2.0. It should be noted however that the deltamethrin content on PermaNet® 3.0 was up to twice higher than that of PermaNet® 2.0. Significant reduction of efficacy of both LLIN was noted after 20 washes although PermaNet® 3.0 still fulfilled the WHO requirement for LLIN. Conclusion The use of combination nets for malaria control offers promising prospects. However, further investigations are needed to demonstrate the benefits of using PermaNet® 3.0 for the control of pyrethroid resistant mosquito populations in Africa.

  15. New Introductions, Spread of Existing Matrilines, and High Rates of Pyrethroid Resistance Result in Chronic Infestations of Bed Bugs (Cimex lectularius L. in Lower-Income Housing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald W Raab

    Full Text Available Infestations of the common bed bug (Cimex lectularius L. have increased substantially in the United States in the past 10-15 years. The housing authority in Harrisonburg, Virginia, conducts heat-treatments after bed bugs are detected in a lower-income housing complex, by treating each infested unit at 60°C for 4-6 hours. However, a high frequency of recurrent infestations called into question the efficacy of this strategy. Genetic analysis using Bayesian clustering of polymorphic microsatellite loci from 123 bed bugs collected from 23 units from May 2012 to April 2013 in one building indicated that (a 16/21 (73% infestations were genetically similar, suggesting ineffective heat-treatments or reintroductions from within the building or from a common external source, followed by local spread of existing populations; and (b up to 5 of the infestations represented new genotypes, indicating that 5 new populations were introduced into this building in one year, assuming they were not missed in earlier screens. There was little to no gene flow among the 8 genetic clusters identified in the building. Bed bugs in the U.S. often possess one or both point mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel, termed knockdown resistance (kdr, from valine to leucine (V419L and leucine to isoleucine (L925I that confer target-site resistance against pyrethroid insecticides. We found that 48/121 (40% bed bugs were homozygous for both kdr mutations (L419/I925, and a further 59% possessed at least one of the kdr mutations. We conclude that ineffective heat treatments, new introductions, reintroductions and local spread, and an exceptionally high frequency of pyrethroid resistance are responsible for chronic infestations in lower-income housing. Because heat treatments fail to protect from reintroductions, and pesticide use has not decreased the frequency of infestations, preventing new introductions and early detection are the most effective strategies to avoid bed bug

  16. Reconsideration of Anopheles rivulorum as a vector of Plasmodium falciparum in western Kenya: some evidence from biting time, blood preference, sporozoite positive rate, and pyrethroid resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawada Hitoshi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anopheles gambiae, An. arabiensis, and An. funestus are widespread malaria vectors in Africa. Anopheles rivulorum is the next most widespread species in the An. funestus group. The role of An. rivulorum as a malaria vector has not been fully studied, although it has been found to be a minor or opportunistic transmitter of Plasmodium falciparum. Methods Mosquitoes were collected indoors over a 12-hour period using a light source attached to a rotating bottle collector in order to determine peak activity times and to provide DNA for meal source identification. Gravid female mosquitoes were collected indoors via an aspirator to generate F1 progeny for testing insecticidal susceptibility. Blood meal sources were identified using a multiplexed PCR assay for human and bovine cytochrome-B, and by matching sequences generated with primers targeting vertebrate and mammalian cytochrome-B segments to the Genbank database. Results Anopheles rivulorum fed on human blood in the early evening between 18:00 and 20:00, when insecticide-treated bed nets are not in use, and the presence of Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites in 0.70% of the An. rivulorum individuals tested was demonstrated. Susceptibility to permethrin, deltamethrin, and DDT is higher in An. rivulorum (84.8%, 91.4%, and 100%, respectively than in An. funestus s.s. (36.8%, 36.4%, and 70%, respectively, whereas mortality rates for propoxur and fenitrothion were 100% for both species. Resistance to pyrethroids was very high in An. funestus s.s. and the potential of the development of high resistance was suspected in An. rivulorum. Conclusion Given the tendency for An. rivulorum to be active early in the evening, the presence of P. falciparum in the species, and the potential for the development of pyrethroid resistance, we strongly advocate reconsideration of the latent ability of this species as an epidemiologically important malaria vector.

  17. New Introductions, Spread of Existing Matrilines, and High Rates of Pyrethroid Resistance Result in Chronic Infestations of Bed Bugs (Cimex lectularius L.) in Lower-Income Housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, Ronald W; Moore, Julia E; Vargo, Edward L; Rose, Lucy; Raab, Julie; Culbreth, Madeline; Burzumato, Gracie; Koyee, Aurvan; McCarthy, Brittany; Raffaele, Jennifer; Schal, Coby; Vaidyanathan, Rajeev

    2016-01-01

    Infestations of the common bed bug (Cimex lectularius L.) have increased substantially in the United States in the past 10-15 years. The housing authority in Harrisonburg, Virginia, conducts heat-treatments after bed bugs are detected in a lower-income housing complex, by treating each infested unit at 60°C for 4-6 hours. However, a high frequency of recurrent infestations called into question the efficacy of this strategy. Genetic analysis using Bayesian clustering of polymorphic microsatellite loci from 123 bed bugs collected from 23 units from May 2012 to April 2013 in one building indicated that (a) 16/21 (73%) infestations were genetically similar, suggesting ineffective heat-treatments or reintroductions from within the building or from a common external source, followed by local spread of existing populations; and (b) up to 5 of the infestations represented new genotypes, indicating that 5 new populations were introduced into this building in one year, assuming they were not missed in earlier screens. There was little to no gene flow among the 8 genetic clusters identified in the building. Bed bugs in the U.S. often possess one or both point mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel, termed knockdown resistance (kdr), from valine to leucine (V419L) and leucine to isoleucine (L925I) that confer target-site resistance against pyrethroid insecticides. We found that 48/121 (40%) bed bugs were homozygous for both kdr mutations (L419/I925), and a further 59% possessed at least one of the kdr mutations. We conclude that ineffective heat treatments, new introductions, reintroductions and local spread, and an exceptionally high frequency of pyrethroid resistance are responsible for chronic infestations in lower-income housing. Because heat treatments fail to protect from reintroductions, and pesticide use has not decreased the frequency of infestations, preventing new introductions and early detection are the most effective strategies to avoid bed bug

  18. Monitoring of total type ii pyrethroid pesticides in citrus oils and water by converting to a common product 3-phenoxybenzoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Mark R; Yang, Zheng; Fu, Xun; Ahn, Ki Chang; Gee, Shirley J; Bom, David C; Zhong, Ping; Chang, Dan; Hammock, Bruce D

    2012-05-23

    Pyrethroids are a class of insecticides that are becoming increasingly popular in agricultural and home use applications. Sensitive assays for pyrethroid insecticides in complex matrices are difficult with both instrumental and immunochemical methods. Environmental analysis of the pyrethroids by immunoassay requires either knowing which pyrethroids contaminate the source or the use of nonspecific antibodies with cross-reactivities to a class of compounds. We describe an alternative method that converts the type II pyrethroids to a common chemical product, 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA), prior to analysis. This method is much more sensitive than detecting the parent compound, and it is much easier to detect a single compound rather than an entire class of compounds. This is useful in screening for pyrethroids as a class or in situations where a single type of pyrethroid is used. We demonstrated this technique in both citrus oils and environmental water samples with conversion rates of the pyrethroid to 3-PBA that range from 45 to 75% and methods that require no extraction steps for either the immunoassay or the liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) techniques. Limits of detection for this technique applied to orange oil are 5 nM, 2 μM, and 0.8 μM when detected by LC-MS/MS, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and immunoassay, respectively. The limit of detection for pyrethroids in water when detected by immunoassay was 2 nM.

  19. Investigation of organophosphate and pyrethroid resistance in vector mosquitoes in China%中国媒介蚊虫对有机磷类和拟除虫菊酯类杀虫剂的抗性调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘斯璐; 崔峰; 燕帅国; 乔传令

    2011-01-01

    蚊虫由于其特殊的行为、生理以及与人类生活关系紧密而成为传播人类疾病的重要媒介,自20世纪化学杀虫剂广泛使用后,蚊虫就与这种环境变化协同进化,即通过生理生化多种机制产生抗药性.该文综述了自90年代以来,我国7种媒介蚊虫尖音库蚊复组、中华按蚊、三带喙库蚊、微小按蚊、雷氏按蚊、白纹伊蚊和埃及伊蚊对有机磷类和拟除虫菊酯类杀虫剂的抗性调查结果.这些媒介蚊虫对两类杀虫剂均产生了一定程度的抗药性.对有机磷类杀虫剂进行抗性检测比较多的农药是马拉硫磷和敌敌畏,只有少数地区表现为敏感,大部分地区的蚊虫对其表现出不同程度的抗性.拟除虫菊酯类杀虫剂是近年使用最广泛的杀虫剂,大部分检测地区的蚊虫对该类杀虫剂也表现出不同程度的抗性.%Mosquitoes, due to their special behavior, physiology and close relationship with human beings, act as important vectors of some human diseases. The resistance of mosquitoes to insecticides is considered to be a recent evolutionary adaptation to environmental changes in response to the use of chemical insecticides. In this review we summarize the resistance monitor data on organophosphate and pyrethroid resistance in seven mosquito species in China (Culex pipiens complex, Anopheles sinensis, Cx. tritaeniorhynchus, An. minimus, An. lesteri, Aedes albopictus and Ae. aegypti) since 1990s. The documents showed that these mosquitoes in most regions of China have evolved to be resistant at various levels to organophosphate and pyrethroid insecticides, even though some of them still keep sensitive to the two kinds of insecticides.

  20. Knockdown resistance in pyrethroid-resistant horn fly (Diptera: Muscidae populations in Brazil Resistência Knockdown em populações de mosca-dos-chifres do Brasil resistentes aos piretróides

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    Gustavo A. Sabatini

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the kdr (knockdown resistance resistance-associated gene mutation and determine its frequency in pyrethroid-resistant horn fly (Haematobia irritans populations, a total of 1,804 horn flies of 37 different populations from all Brazilian regions (North, Northeast, Central-West, Southeast, and South were molecular screened through polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The kdr gene was not detected in 87.08% of the flies. However, the gene was amplified in 12.92% of the flies, of which 11.70% were resistant heterozygous and 1.22% were resistant homozygous. Deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE was found only in 1 ranch with an excess of heterozygous. When populations were grouped by region, three metapopulations showed significant deviations of HWE (Central-West population, South population and Southeast population. This indicates that populations are isolated one from another and kdr occurrence seems to be an independent effect probably reflecting the insecticide strategy used by each ranch. Although resistance to pyrethroids is disseminated throughout Brazil, only 48% of resistant populations had kdr flies, and the frequency of kdr individuals in each of these resistant populations was quite low. But this study shows that, with the apparent exception of the Northeast region, the kdr mechanism associated with pyrethroid resistance occurs all over Brazil.Com o objetivo de verificar a ocorrência e determinar a frequência da mutação kdr (knock down resistance em populações de Haematobia irritans (mosca-dos-chifres resistentes aos piretróides, foram analisados 1.804 indivíduos de 37 populações de todas as Regiões do Brasil. Com exceção da Região Nordeste, o kdr (knock down resistance gene foi encontrado em populações de todas as regiões. A mutação não foi detectada em 87,08% dos indivíduos. Entretanto, o gene foi amplificado de 12,92% das moscas, das quais 11,70% se mostraram heterozigotas resistentes e 1

  1. Evaluation of PermaNet 3.0 a deltamethrin-PBO combination net against Anopheles gambiae and pyrethroid resistant Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes: an experimental hut trial in Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Malima Robert; Maxwell Caroline; Magesa Stephen; Tungu Patrick; Masue Dennis; Sudi Wema; Myamba Joseph; Pigeon Olivier; Rowland Mark

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Combination mosquito nets incorporating two unrelated insecticides or insecticide plus synergist are designed to control insecticide resistant mosquitoes. PermaNet 3.0 is a long-lasting combination net incorporating deltamethrin on the side panels and a mixture of deltamethrin and synergist piperonyl butoxide (PBO) on the top panel. PBO is an inhibitor of mixed function oxidases implicated in pyrethroid resistance. Method An experimental hut trial comparing PermaNet 3.0, P...

  2. Pyrethroid susceptibility of malaria vectors in four Districts of western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochomo, Eric; Bayoh, Nabie M; Kamau, Luna; Atieli, Francis; Vulule, John; Ouma, Collins; Ombok, Maurice; Njagi, Kiambo; Soti, David; Mathenge, Evan; Muthami, Lawrence; Kinyari, Teresa; Subramaniam, Krishanthi; Kleinschmidt, Immo; Donnelly, Martin James; Mbogo, Charles

    2014-07-04

    Increasing pyrethroid resistance in malaria vectors has been reported in western Kenya where long lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) and indoor residual spraying (IRS) are the mainstays of vector control. To ensure the sustainability of insecticide-based malaria vector control, monitoring programs need to be implemented. This study was designed to investigate the extent and distribution of pyrethroid resistance in 4 Districts of western Kenya (Nyando, Rachuonyo, Bondo and Teso). All four Districts have received LLINs while Nyando and Rachuonyo Districts have had IRS campaigns for 3-5 years using pyrethroids. This study is part of a programme aimed at determining the impact of insecticide resistance on malaria epidemiology. Three day old adult mosquitoes from larval samples collected in the field, were used for bioassays using the WHO tube bioassay, and mortality recorded 24 hours post exposure. Resistance level was assigned based on the 2013 WHO guidelines where populations with Kenya. This resistance does not seem to be associated with either species or location. Insecticide resistance can vary within small geographical areas and such heterogeneity may make it possible to evaluate the impact of resistance on malaria and mosquito parameters within similar eco-epidemiological zones.

  3. [Resistance of Anopheles gambiae s.l. to pyrethroids and DDT at Tiassalékro, an irrigated rice-growing village in the southern forest of Ivory Coast].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konan, K G; Koné, A B; Konan, Y L; Fofana, D; Konan, K L; Diallo, A; Ziogba, J C; Touré, M; Kouassi, K P; Doannio, J M C

    2011-10-01

    An assessment of the sensitivity of Anopheles gambiae s.l.to three pyrethroids (alphacypermethrin, permethrin, deltamethrin) and DDT has been carried out with a laboratory strain (Kisumu reference sensitive strain) and a wild strain (Tiassalékro strain) using larvae from an irrigated rice-growing area of Tiassalékro, located in the southern forest of Ivory Coast. The sensitivity tests were performed according to the standard WHO cylinder tests with adult female A. gambiae s.l. aged 2 to 4 days. The results showed that the strain of Tiassalékro is resistant to the three tested pyrethroids and DDT. The molecular forms M and S were identified, with a predominance of M form. The resistance mechanism involved is the Kdr mutation. In this region, control measures against malaria vectors by using bed nets impregnated with these insecticides or household sprays could be compromised.

  4. Frequencies of pyrethroid resistance-associated mutations of Vssc1 and CYP6D1 in field populations of Musca domestica L. in Turkey.

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    Taşkın, Vatan; Başkurt, Sibel; Doğaç, Ersin; Taşkin, Belgin Göçmen

    2011-12-01

    House flies were collected from 16 different provinces in the Aegean and Mediterranean regions of Turkey, and the frequencies of pyrethroid resistance-associated mutations in Vssc1 and CYP6D1 in these field-collected populations were studied. Although there is no organized resistance management program for house fly control in Turkey, it is known that different groups of insecticides, including pyrethroids, are used. The frequencies of both Vssc1 and CYP6D1 alleles were weighted toward the susceptibles, with Vssc1-susceptible alleles having higher frequencies in both regions (0.75 in Aegean and 0.69 in Mediterranean populations) than CYP6D1-susceptible alleles (0.65 in Aegean and 0.56 in Mediterranean populations). The frequencies of kdr-his alleles were higher than the frequencies of kdr alleles in these populations. While the frequencies of kdr-his alleles were close to each other in the Aegean (0.23) and Mediterranean (0.17) populations, the frequencies of kdr alleles remarkably differed in these two regions, with values of 0.02 and 0.14, respectively. In contrast to Europe, Asia, and the U.S.A., no super-kdr allele was detected in the samples from both regions. We identified six and eight different Vssc1+CYP6D1 genotype classes in the Aegean and Mediterranean regions, respectively. The three most common genotype classes in the regions were susceptible Vssc1 with heterozygous CYP6D1v1 (29%), sus/kdr-his1 with heterozygous CYP6D1v1 (23%), and susceptible Vssc1 with CYP6D1 (22%). The total frequencies of these three most common genotype classes (approximately 75%) obtained in our study were very close to the value obtained in Florida in a previous study, which was related by the similarity of temperature patterns between Florida and the corresponding regions of Turkey. This may reflect the lack of overwintering fitness cost associated with resistance alleles in both climates.

  5. Experimental hut evaluation of bednets treated with an organophosphate (chlorpyrifos-methyl or a pyrethroid (lambdacyhalothrin alone and in combination against insecticide-resistant Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes

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    Corbel Vincent

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pyrethroid resistant mosquitoes are becoming increasingly common in parts of Africa. It is important to identify alternative insecticides which, if necessary, could be used to replace or supplement the pyrethroids for use on treated nets. Certain compounds of an earlier generation of insecticides, the organophosphates may have potential as net treatments. Methods Comparative studies of chlorpyrifos-methyl (CM, an organophosphate with low mammalian toxicity, and lambdacyhalothrin (L, a pyrethroid, were conducted in experimental huts in Côte d'Ivoire, West Africa. Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes from the area are resistant to pyrethroids and organophosphates (kdr and insensitive acetylcholinesterase Ace.1R. Several treatments and application rates on intact or holed nets were evaluated, including single treatments, mixtures, and differential wall/ceiling treatments. Results and Conclusion All of the treatments were effective in reducing blood feeding from sleepers under the nets and in killing both species of mosquito, despite the presence of the kdr and Ace.1R genes at high frequency. In most cases, the effects of the various treatments did not differ significantly. Five washes of the nets in soap solution did not reduce the impact of the insecticides on A. gambiae mortality, but did lead to an increase in blood feeding. The three combinations performed no differently from the single insecticide treatments, but the low dose mixture performed encouragingly well indicating that such combinations might be used for controlling insecticide resistant mosquitoes. Mortality of mosquitoes that carried both Ace.1R and Ace.1S genes did not differ significantly from mosquitoes that carried only Ace.1S genes on any of the treated nets, indicating that the Ace.1R allele does not confer effective resistance to chlorpyrifos-methyl under the realistic conditions of an experimental hut.

  6. Chlorfenapyr (A Pyrrole Insecticide) Applied Alone or as a Mixture with Alpha-Cypermethrin for Indoor Residual Spraying against Pyrethroid Resistant Anopheles gambiae sl: An Experimental Hut Study in Cove, Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngufor, Corine; Critchley, Jessica; Fagbohoun, Josias; N'Guessan, Raphael; Todjinou, Damien; Rowland, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Indoor spraying of walls and ceilings with residual insecticide remains a primary method of malaria control. Insecticide resistance in malaria vectors is a growing problem. Novel insecticides for indoor residual spraying (IRS) which can improve the control of pyrethroid resistant malaria vectors are urgently needed. Insecticide mixtures have the potential to improve efficacy or even to manage resistance in some situations but this possibility remains underexplored experimentally. Chlorfenapyr is a novel pyrrole insecticide which has shown potential to improve the control of mosquitoes which are resistant to current WHO-approved insecticides. The efficacy of IRS with chlorfenapyr applied alone or as a mixture with alpha-cypermeththrin (a pyrethroid) was evaluated in experimental huts in Cove, Southern Benin against wild free flying pyrethroid resistant Anopheles gambiae sl. Comparison was made with IRS with alpha-cypermethrin alone. Fortnightly 30-minute in situ cone bioassays were performed to assess the residual efficacy of the insecticides on the treated hut walls. Survival rates of wild An gambiae from the Cove hut site in WHO resistance bioassays performed during the trial were >90% with permethrin and deltamethrin treated papers. Mortality of free-flying mosquitoes entering the experimental huts was 4% in the control hut. Mortality with alpha-cypermethrin IRS did not differ from the control (5%, P>0.656). The highest mortality was achieved with chlorfenapyr alone (63%). The alpha-cypermethrin + chlorfenapyr mixture killed fewer mosquitoes than chlorfenapyr alone (43% vs. 63%, P<0.001). While the cone bioassays showed a more rapid decline in residual mortality with chlorfenapyr IRS to <30% after only 2 weeks, fortnightly mortality rates of wild free-flying An gambiae entering the chlorfenapyr IRS huts were consistently high (50-70%) and prolonged, lasting over 4 months. IRS with chlorfenapyr shows potential to significantly improve the control of malaria

  7. Pyrethroid Resistance in Malaysian Populations of Dengue Vector Aedes aegypti Is Mediated by CYP9 Family of Cytochrome P450 Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, Intan H; Kamgang, Basile; Ibrahim, Sulaiman S; Riveron, Jacob M; Irving, Helen; Wondji, Charles S

    2017-01-01

    Dengue control and prevention rely heavily on insecticide-based interventions. However, insecticide resistance in the dengue vector Aedes aegypti, threatens the continued effectiveness of these tools. The molecular basis of the resistance remains uncharacterised in many endemic countries including Malaysia, preventing the design of evidence-based resistance management. Here, we investigated the underlying molecular basis of multiple insecticide resistance in Ae. aegypti populations across Malaysia detecting the major genes driving the metabolic resistance. Genome-wide microarray-based transcription analysis was carried out to detect the genes associated with metabolic resistance in these populations. Comparisons of the susceptible New Orleans strain to three non-exposed multiple insecticide resistant field strains; Penang, Kuala Lumpur and Kota Bharu detected 2605, 1480 and 425 differentially expressed transcripts respectively (fold-change>2 and p-value ≤ 0.05). 204 genes were commonly over-expressed with monooxygenase P450 genes (CYP9J27, CYP6CB1, CYP9J26 and CYP9M4) consistently the most up-regulated detoxification genes in all populations, indicating that they possibly play an important role in the resistance. In addition, glutathione S-transferases, carboxylesterases and other gene families commonly associated with insecticide resistance were also over-expressed. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis indicated an over-representation of GO terms linked to resistance such as monooxygenases, carboxylesterases, glutathione S-transferases and heme-binding. Polymorphism analysis of CYP9J27 sequences revealed a high level of polymorphism (except in Joho Bharu), suggesting a limited directional selection on this gene. In silico analysis of CYP9J27 activity through modelling and docking simulations suggested that this gene is involved in the multiple resistance in Malaysian populations as it is predicted to metabolise pyrethroids, DDT and bendiocarb. The predominant

  8. Pyrethroid Resistance in Malaysian Populations of Dengue Vector Aedes aegypti Is Mediated by CYP9 Family of Cytochrome P450 Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, Intan H.; Kamgang, Basile; Ibrahim, Sulaiman S.; Riveron, Jacob M.; Irving, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Background Dengue control and prevention rely heavily on insecticide-based interventions. However, insecticide resistance in the dengue vector Aedes aegypti, threatens the continued effectiveness of these tools. The molecular basis of the resistance remains uncharacterised in many endemic countries including Malaysia, preventing the design of evidence-based resistance management. Here, we investigated the underlying molecular basis of multiple insecticide resistance in Ae. aegypti populations across Malaysia detecting the major genes driving the metabolic resistance. Methodology/Principal Findings Genome-wide microarray-based transcription analysis was carried out to detect the genes associated with metabolic resistance in these populations. Comparisons of the susceptible New Orleans strain to three non-exposed multiple insecticide resistant field strains; Penang, Kuala Lumpur and Kota Bharu detected 2605, 1480 and 425 differentially expressed transcripts respectively (fold-change>2 and p-value ≤ 0.05). 204 genes were commonly over-expressed with monooxygenase P450 genes (CYP9J27, CYP6CB1, CYP9J26 and CYP9M4) consistently the most up-regulated detoxification genes in all populations, indicating that they possibly play an important role in the resistance. In addition, glutathione S-transferases, carboxylesterases and other gene families commonly associated with insecticide resistance were also over-expressed. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis indicated an over-representation of GO terms linked to resistance such as monooxygenases, carboxylesterases, glutathione S-transferases and heme-binding. Polymorphism analysis of CYP9J27 sequences revealed a high level of polymorphism (except in Joho Bharu), suggesting a limited directional selection on this gene. In silico analysis of CYP9J27 activity through modelling and docking simulations suggested that this gene is involved in the multiple resistance in Malaysian populations as it is predicted to metabolise

  9. The impact of pyrethroid resistance on the efficacy of insecticide-treated bed nets against African anopheline mosquitoes: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Strode

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Pyrethroid insecticide-treated bed nets (ITNs help contribute to reducing malaria deaths in Africa, but their efficacy is threatened by insecticide resistance in some malaria mosquito vectors. We therefore assessed the evidence that resistance is attenuating the effect of ITNs on entomological outcomes.We included laboratory and field studies of African malaria vectors that measured resistance at the time of the study and used World Health Organization-recommended impregnation regimens. We reported mosquito mortality, blood feeding, induced exophily (premature exit of mosquitoes from the hut, deterrence, time to 50% or 95% knock-down, and percentage knock-down at 60 min. Publications were searched from 1 January 1980 to 31 December 2013 using MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Science Citation Index Expanded, Social Sciences Citation Index, African Index Medicus, and CAB Abstracts. We stratified studies into three levels of insecticide resistance, and ITNs were compared with untreated bed nets (UTNs using the risk difference (RD. Heterogeneity was explored visually and statistically. Included were 36 laboratory and 24 field studies, reported in 25 records. Studies tested and reported resistance inconsistently. Based on the meta-analytic results, the difference in mosquito mortality risk for ITNs compared to UTNs was lower in higher resistance categories. However, mortality risk was significantly higher for ITNs compared to UTNs regardless of resistance. For cone tests: low resistance, risk difference (RD 0.86 (95% CI 0.72 to 1.01; moderate resistance, RD 0.71 (95% CI 0.53 to 0.88; high resistance, RD 0.56 (95% CI 0.17 to 0.95. For tunnel tests: low resistance, RD 0.74 (95% CI 0.61 to 0.87; moderate resistance, RD 0.50 (95% CI 0.40 to 0.60; high resistance, RD 0.39 (95% CI 0.24 to 0.54. For hut studies: low resistance, RD 0.56 (95% CI 0.43 to 0.68; moderate resistance, RD 0.39 (95% CI 0.16 to 0.61; high resistance, RD 0

  10. Chemical composition and larvicidal activity of edible plant-derived essential oils against the pyrethroid-susceptible and -resistant strains of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutthanont, Nataya; Choochote, Wej; Tuetun, Benjawan; Junkum, Anuluck; Jitpakdi, Atchariya; Chaithong, Udom; Riyong, Doungrat; Pitasawat, Benjawan

    2010-06-01

    The chemical compositions and larvicidal potential against mosquito vectors of selected essential oils obtained from five edible plants were investigated in this study. Using a GC/MS, 24, 17, 20, 21, and 12 compounds were determined from essential oils of Citrus hystrix, Citrus reticulata, Zingiber zerumbet, Kaempferia galanga, and Syzygium aromaticum, respectively. The principal constituents found in peel oil of C. hystrix were beta-pinene (22.54%) and d-limonene (22.03%), followed by terpinene-4-ol (17.37%). Compounds in C. reticulata peel oil consisted mostly of d-limonene (62.39%) and gamma-terpinene (14.06%). The oils obtained from Z. zerumbet rhizome had alpha-humulene (31.93%) and zerumbone (31.67%) as major components. The most abundant compounds in K. galanga rhizome oil were 2-propeonic acid (35.54%), pentadecane (26.08%), and ethyl-p-methoxycinnamate (25.96%). The main component of S. aromaticum bud oil was eugenol (77.37%), with minor amounts of trans-caryophyllene (13.66%). Assessment of larvicidal efficacy demonstrated that all essential oils were toxic against both pyrethroid-susceptible and resistant Ae. aegypti laboratory strains at LC50, LC95, and LC99 levels. In conclusion, we have documented the promising larvicidal potential of essential oils from edible herbs, which could be considered as a potentially alternative source for developing novel larvicides to be used in controlling vectors of mosquito-borne disease.

  11. Pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles gambiae leads to increased susceptibility to the entomopathogenic fungi Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Howard, A.F.V.; Koenraadt, C.J.M.; Farenhorst, M.; Knols, B.G.J.; Takken, W.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Entomopathogenic fungi are being investigated as a new mosquito control tool because insecticide resistance is preventing successful mosquito control in many countries, and new methods are required that can target insecticide-resistant malaria vectors. Although laboratory studies have

  12. Pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles gambiae leads to increased susceptibility to the entomopathogenic fungi Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Howard, A.F.V.; Koenraadt, C.J.M.; Farenhorst, M.; Knols, B.G.J.; Takken, W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Entomopathogenic fungi are being investigated as a new mosquito control tool because insecticide resistance is preventing successful mosquito control in many countries, and new methods are required that can target insecticide-resistant malaria vectors. Although laboratory studies have

  13. Detection of target site resistance to pyrethroids and organophosphates in the horn fly using multiplex polymerase chain reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    The horn fly, Haematobia irritans L., is an obligate blood-feeding fly and the primary insect pest parasitizing cattle in the United States. Pesticide resistance has become a huge problem for cattle producers and although several mechanisms of resistance are possible, target site resistance is the m...

  14. Ecology, monitoring and mapping of insecticide resistance of malaria vector, Anopheles culicifacies (Diptera: Culicidae to different imagicides in Iran

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    Hassan Vatandoost

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To work on bioecology and to monitor and map the insecticide resistance of malaria vector, Anopheles culicifacies (An. culicifacies (Diptera: Culicidae in Iran. Methods: Mosquitoes were collected from different breeding places in Sistan and Baluchistan Province and then reread at insectary. F1 generation was used for susceptibility tests. All the impregnated papers were provided by World Health Organization (WHO and tests were carried out according to WHO guideline. Results: Results of adult susceptibility tests against female An. culicifecies revealed that this species was resistant to dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane, dieldrin, tolerated to bendiocarb, propoxur and deltamethrin and susceptible to other imagicides recommended by WHO. An. culicifecies was resistant to organochlorine insecticides and tolerant to organophosphae, carbamate and pyrethroids. Conclusions: Results of the ecology and susceptibility status of malaria vectors will help authorities to make decision for vector control. More biomedical assays was required to found the mechanisms of insecticide resistance.

  15. Discriminating lethal concentrations and efficacy of six pyrethroids for control of Aedes aegypti in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juntarajumnong, Waraporn; Pimnon, Sunthorn; Bangs, Michael J; Thanispong, Kanutcharee; Chareonviriyaphap, Theeraphap

    2012-03-01

    Establishing baseline insecticide discriminating doses is crucial in accurately determining susceptibility status and changing temporal patterns of physiological response in mosquito populations. Pyrethroids are the predominant chemicals used for controlling adult Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus, both vectors of dengue viruses, in Thailand. Presently, only 2 pyrethroids, permethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin, have published diagnostic dose rates for monitoring Ae. aegypti. This study established the diagnostic lethal concentrations for 6 different pyrethroids available in Thailand for dengue vector control. United States Department of Agriculture insecticide-susceptible strain of Ae. aegypti was used to establish the baseline concentrations for subsequent susceptibility testing of field populations. Our findings showed lower discriminating concentrations for lambda-cyhalothrin and permethrin than those recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO), at 2.5- and 1.7-fold lower dosing, respectively. The susceptibility status of 3 different geographical populations of field-collected Ae. aegypti were tested using the standard WHO procedures. All 3 field strains demonstrated varying levels of physiological resistance to each compound. We conclude that establishing the baseline diagnostic concentration of an insecticide is of paramount importance in accurately determining the susceptibility status in field-collected mosquitoes. If possible, discriminating doses should be established for all insecticides and test assays run concurrently with a known susceptible strain for more accurate monitoring of resistance in mosquito populations in Thailand.

  16. Evidence that agricultural use of pesticides selects pyrethroid resistance within Anopheles gambiae s.l. populations from cotton growing areas in Burkina Faso, West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hien, Aristide Sawdetuo; Soma, Dieudonné Diloma; Hema, Omer; Bayili, Bazoma; Namountougou, Moussa; Gnankiné, Olivier; Baldet, Thierry; Diabaté, Abdoulaye; Dabiré, Kounbobr Roch

    2017-01-01

    Many studies have shown the role of agriculture in the selection and spread of resistance of Anopheles gambiae s.l. to insecticides. However, no study has directly demonstrated the presence of insecticides in breeding sources as a source of selection for this resistance. It is in this context that we investigated the presence of pesticide residues in breeding habitats and their formal involvement in vector resistance to insecticides in areas of West Africa with intensive farming. This study was carried out from June to November 2013 in Dano, southwest Burkina Faso in areas of conventional (CC) and biological cotton (BC) growing. Water and sediment samples collected from breeding sites located near BC and CC fields were submitted for chromatographic analysis to research and titrate the residual insecticide content found there. Larvae were also collected in these breeding sites and used in toxicity tests to compare their mortality to those of the susceptible strain, Anopheles gambiae Kisumu. All tested mosquitoes (living and dead) were analyzed by PCR for species identification and characterization of resistance genes. The toxicity analysis of water from breeding sites showed significantly lower mortality rates in breeding site water from biological cotton (WBC) growing sites compared to that from conventional cotton (WCC) sites respective to both An. gambiae Kisumu (WBC: 80.75% vs WCC: 92.75%) and a wild-type strain (49.75% vs 66.5%). The allele frequencies L1014F, L1014S kdr, and G116S ace -1R mutations conferring resistance, respectively, to pyrethroids and carbamates / organophosphates were 0.95, 0.4 and 0.12. Deltamethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin were identified in the water samples taken in October/November from mosquitoes breeding in the CC growing area. The concentrations obtained were respectively 0.0147ug/L and 1.49 ug/L to deltamethrin and lambdacyhalothrin. Our results provided evidence by direct analysis (biological and chromatographic tests) of the role

  17. Pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles gambiae leads to increased susceptibility to the entomopathogenic fungi Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Howard, A.F.V.; Koenraadt, C.J.M.; Farenhorst, M.; Knols, B.G.J.; Takken, W.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Entomopathogenic fungi are being investigated as a new mosquito control tool because insecticide resistance is preventing successful mosquito control in many countries, and new methods are required that can target insecticide-resistant malaria vectors. Although laboratory studies have pr

  18. Pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles gambiae leads to increased susceptibility to the entomopathogenic fungi Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Howard, A.F.V.; Koenraadt, C.J.M.; Farenhorst, M.; Knols, B.G.J.; Takken, W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Entomopathogenic fungi are being investigated as a new mosquito control tool because insecticide resistance is preventing successful mosquito control in many countries, and new methods are required that can target insecticide-resistant malaria vectors. Although laboratory studies have pr

  19. Monitoring for Insecticide Resistance in Asian Citrus Psyllid (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) Populations in Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanga, Lambert H B; Eason, Julius; Haseeb, Muhammad; Qureshi, Jawwad; Stansly, Philip

    2016-04-01

    The development of insecticide resistance in Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, populations is a serious threat to the citrus industry. As a contribution to a resistance management strategy, we developed a glass vial technique to monitor field populations of Asian citrus psyllid for insecticide resistance. Diagnostic concentrations needed to separate susceptible genotypes from resistant individuals were determined for cypermethrin (0.5 μg per vial), malathion (1.0 μg per vial), diazinon (1.0 μg per vial), carbaryl (1.0 μg per vial), carbofuran (0.1 μg per vial), methomyl (1.0 μg per vial), propoxur (1.0 μg per vial), endosulfan (1.0 μg per vial), imidacloprid (0.5 μg per vial), acetamiprid (5.0 μg per vial), chlorfenapyr (2.5 μg per vial), and fenpyroximate (2.5 μg per vial). In 2014, resistance to two carbamate insecticides (carbaryl and carbofuran), one organophosphate (malathion), one pyrethroid (cypermethrin), and one pyrazole (fenpyroximate) was detected in field populations of Asian citrus psyllid in Immokalee, FL. There was no resistance detected to diazinon, methomyl, propoxur, endosulfan, imidacloprid, and chlorfenapyr. The levels of insecticide resistance were variable and unstable, suggesting that resistance could be successfully managed. The results validate the use of the glass vial bioassay to monitor for resistance in Asian citrus psyllid populations and provide the basis for the development of a resistance management strategy designed to extend the efficacy of all classes of insecticides used for control of the Asian citrus psyllid.

  20. Impact of insecticide-treated nets on wild pyrethroid resistant Anopheles epiroticus population from southern Vietnam tested in experimental huts

    OpenAIRE

    Trung Ho; Speybroeck Niko; Berkvens Dirk; Chinh Vu; Van Bortel Wim; Coosemans Marc

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background In this study, the efficacy of insecticide-treated nets was evaluated in terms of deterrence, blood-feeding inhibition, induced exophily and mortality on a wild resistant population of Anopheles epiroticus in southern Vietnam, in order to gain insight into the operational consequences of the insecticide resistance observed in this malaria vector in the Mekong delta. Method An experimental station, based on the model of West Africa and adapted to the behaviour of the target...

  1. Pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles gambiae leads to increased susceptibility to the entomopathogenic fungi Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knols Bart GJ

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Entomopathogenic fungi are being investigated as a new mosquito control tool because insecticide resistance is preventing successful mosquito control in many countries, and new methods are required that can target insecticide-resistant malaria vectors. Although laboratory studies have previously examined the effects of entomopathogenic fungi against adult mosquitoes, most application methods used cannot be readily deployed in the field. Because the fungi are biological organisms it is important to test potential field application methods that will not adversely affect them. The two objectives of this study were to investigate any differences in fungal susceptibility between an insecticide-resistant and insecticide-susceptible strain of Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto, and to test a potential field application method with respect to the viability and virulence of two fungal species Methods Pieces of white polyester netting were dipped in Metarhizium anisopliae ICIPE-30 or Beauveria bassiana IMI391510 mineral oil suspensions. These were kept at 27 ± 1°C, 80 ± 10% RH and the viability of the fungal conidia was recorded at different time points. Tube bioassays were used to infect insecticide-resistant (VKPER and insecticide-susceptible (SKK strains of An. gambiae s.s., and survival analysis was used to determine effects of mosquito strain, fungus species or time since fungal treatment of the net. Results The resistant VKPER strain was significantly more susceptible to fungal infection than the insecticide-susceptible SKK strain. Furthermore, B. bassiana was significantly more virulent than M. anisopliae for both mosquito strains, although this may be linked to the different viabilities of these fungal species. The viability of both fungal species decreased significantly one day after application onto polyester netting when compared to the viability of conidia remaining in suspension. Conclusions The insecticide-resistant

  2. Identification of genes involved in pyrethroid-, propoxur-, and dichlorvos- insecticides resistance in the mosquitoes, Culex pipiens complex (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun-xiao; Guo, Xiao-xia; Zhang, Ying-mei; Dong, Yan-de; Xing, Dan; Yan, Ting; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Heng-duan; Zhao, Tong-yan

    2016-05-01

    Culex pipiens pallens and Cx. p. quinquefasciatus are important vectors of many diseases, such as West Nile fever and lymphatic filariasis. The widespread use of insecticides to control these disease vectors and other insect pests has led to insecticide resistance becoming common in these species. In this study, high throughout Illumina sequencing was used to identify hundreds of Cx. p. pallens and Cx. p. quinquefasciatus genes that were differentially expressed in response to insecticide exposure. The identification of these genes is a vital first step for more detailed investigation of the molecular mechanisms involved in insecticide resistance in Culex mosquitoes.

  3. Temporal frequency of knockdown resistance mutations, F1534C and V1016G, in Aedes aegypti in Chiang Mai city, Thailand and the impact of the mutations on the efficiency of thermal fogging spray with pyrethroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plernsub, Suriya; Saingamsook, Jassada; Yanola, Jintana; Lumjuan, Nongkran; Tippawangkosol, Pongsri; Walton, Catherine; Somboon, Pradya

    2016-10-01

    In Thailand, control of dengue outbreaks is currently attained by the use of space sprays, particularly thermal fogging using pyrethroids, with the aim of killing infected Aedes mosquito vectors in epidemic areas. However, the principal dengue vector, Aedes aegypti, is resistant to pyrethroids conferred mainly by mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene, F1534C and V1016G, termed knockdown resistance (kdr). The objectives of this study were to determine the temporal frequencies of F1534C and V1016G in Ae. aegypti populations in relation to pyrethroid resistance in Chiang Mai city, and to evaluate the impact of the mutations on the efficacy of thermal fogging with the pyrethroid deltamethrin. Larvae and pupae were collected from several areas around Chiang Mai city during 2011-2015 and reared to adulthood for bioassays for deltamethrin susceptibility. These revealed no trend of increasing deltamethrin resistance during the study period (mortality 58.0-69.5%, average 62.8%). This corresponded to no overall change in the frequencies of the C1534 allele (0.55-0.66, average 0.62) and G1016 allele (0.34-0.45, average 0.38), determined using allele specific amplification. Only three genotypes of kdr mutations were detected: C1534 homozygous (VV/CC); G1016/C1534 double heterozygous (VG/FC); and G1016 homozygous (GG/FF) indicating that the F1534C and V1016G mutations occurred on separate haplotypic backgrounds and a lack of recombination between them to date. The F1 progeny females were used to evaluate the efficacy of thermal fogging spray with Damthrin-SP(®) (deltamethrin+S-bioallethrin+piperonyl butoxide) using a caged mosquito bioassay. The thermal fogging spray killed 100% and 61.3% of caged mosquito bioassay placed indoors and outdoors, respectively. The outdoor spray had greater killing effect on C1534 homozygous and had partially effect on double heterozygous mosquitoes, but did not kill any G1016 homozygous mutants living outdoors. As this selection

  4. Evaluation of PermaNet 3.0 a deltamethrin-PBO combination net against Anopheles gambiae and pyrethroid resistant Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes: an experimental hut trial in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malima Robert

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Combination mosquito nets incorporating two unrelated insecticides or insecticide plus synergist are designed to control insecticide resistant mosquitoes. PermaNet 3.0 is a long-lasting combination net incorporating deltamethrin on the side panels and a mixture of deltamethrin and synergist piperonyl butoxide (PBO on the top panel. PBO is an inhibitor of mixed function oxidases implicated in pyrethroid resistance. Method An experimental hut trial comparing PermaNet 3.0, PermaNet 2.0 and a conventional deltamethrin-treated net was conducted in NE Tanzania using standard WHOPES procedures. The PermaNet arms included unwashed nets and nets washed 20 times. PermaNet 2.0 is a long-lasting insecticidal net incorporating deltamethrin as a single active. Results Against pyrethroid susceptible Anopheles gambiae the unwashed PermaNet 3.0 showed no difference to unwashed PermaNet 2.0 in terms of mortality (95% killed, but showed differences in blood-feeding rate (3% blood-fed with PermaNet 3.0 versus 10% with PermaNet 2.0. After 20 washes the two products showed no difference in feeding rate (10% with 3.0 and 9% with 2.0 but showed small differences in mortality (95% with 3.0 and 87% with 2.0. Against pyrethroid resistant Culex quinquefasciatus, mediated by elevated oxidase and kdr mechanisms, the unwashed PermaNet 3.0 killed 48% and PermaNet 2.0 killed 32% but after 20 washes there was no significant difference in mortality between the two products (32% killed by 3.0 and 30% by 2.0. For protecting against Culex PermaNet 3.0 showed no difference to PermaNet 2.0 when either unwashed or after 20 washes; both products were highly protective against biting. Laboratory tunnel bioassays confirmed the loss of biological activity of the PBO/deltamethrin-treated panel after washing. Conclusion Both PermaNet products were highly effective against susceptible Anopheles gambiae. As a long-lasting net to control or protect against pyrethroid

  5. Simultaneous detection of Pyrethroid, Organophosphate and Cyclodiene target site resistance in Haematobia irritans (Diptera: Muscidae) by multiplex Polymerase chain reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    The horn fly, Haematobia irritans irritans (Linnaeus, 1758), is an important pest that causes significant economic losses to the livestock industry, but insecticide resistance in horn fly populations has made horn fly control increasingly difficult to achieve. In this study, we developed a multiplex...

  6. Efficacy of Olyset® Duo, a permethrin and pyriproxyfen mixture net against wild pyrethroid-resistant Anopheles gambiae s.s. from Côte d'Ivoire: an experimental hut trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffi, Alphonsine A; Ahoua Alou, Ludovic P; Djenontin, Armel; Kabran, Jean-Paul K; Dosso, Youssouf; Kone, Aboubacar; Moiroux, Nicolas; Pennetier, Cedric

    2015-01-01

    Pyrethroid resistance in malaria vectors has spread across sub-Saharan Africa. Alternative tools and molecules are urgently needed for effective vector control. One of the most promising strategies to prevent or delay the development of resistance is to use at least two molecules having unrelated modes of action in combination in the same bed net. We evaluated in experimental huts in Côte d'Ivoire, a new polyethylene long-lasting insecticidal net (LN) product, Olyset® Duo, incorporating permethrin (PER) and pyriproxyfen (PPF), an insect growth regulator (IGR). PPF alone or in combination with permethrin had a significant impact on fertility (7-12% reduction relative to control) and no effect on fecundity of wild multi-resistant An. gambiae s.s. These results triggered crucial research questions on the behaviour of targeted mosquitoes around the LN. To maximize the sterilizing effect of PPF in the combination, there would be a need for a trade-off between the necessary contact time of the insect with PPF and the surface content of the pyrethroid insecticide that is bioavailable and induces excito-repellency. © A.A. Koffi et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2015.

  7. Efficacy of Olyset® Duo, a permethrin and pyriproxyfen mixture net against wild pyrethroid-resistant Anopheles gambiae s.s. from Côte d’Ivoire: an experimental hut trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koffi Alphonsine A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrethroid resistance in malaria vectors has spread across sub-Saharan Africa. Alternative tools and molecules are urgently needed for effective vector control. One of the most promising strategies to prevent or delay the development of resistance is to use at least two molecules having unrelated modes of action in combination in the same bed net. We evaluated in experimental huts in Côte d’Ivoire, a new polyethylene long-lasting insecticidal net (LN product, Olyset® Duo, incorporating permethrin (PER and pyriproxyfen (PPF, an insect growth regulator (IGR. PPF alone or in combination with permethrin had a significant impact on fertility (7–12% reduction relative to control and no effect on fecundity of wild multi-resistant An. gambiae s.s. These results triggered crucial research questions on the behaviour of targeted mosquitoes around the LN. To maximize the sterilizing effect of PPF in the combination, there would be a need for a trade-off between the necessary contact time of the insect with PPF and the surface content of the pyrethroid insecticide that is bioavailable and induces excito-repellency.

  8. High Impedance Comparator for Monitoring Water Resistivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holewinski, Paul K.

    1984-01-01

    A high-impedance comparator suitable for monitoring the resistivity of a deionized or distilled water line supplying water in the 50 Kohm/cm-2 Mohm/cm range is described. Includes information on required circuits (with diagrams), sensor probe assembly, and calibration techniques. (JN)

  9. Unexpected Failures to Control Chagas Disease Vectors With Pyrethroid Spraying in Northern Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevitz, J. M.; Gaspe, M. S.; Enríquez, G. F.; Vassena, C. V.; Alvarado-Otegui, J. A.; Provecho, Y. M.; Mougabure Cueto, G. A; Picollo, M. I.; Kitron, U.; Gürtler, R. E.

    2013-01-01

    Effectiveness of the elimination efforts against Triatoma infestans (Klug) in South America through residual application of pyrethroid insecticides has been highly variable in the Gran Chaco region. We investigated apparent vector control failures after a standard community-wide spraying with deltamethrin SC in a rural area of northeastern Argentina encompassing 353 houses. Insecticide spraying reduced house infestation less than expected: from 49.5% at baseline to 12.3 and 6.7% at 4 and 8 mo postspraying, respectively. Persistent infestations were detected in 28.4% of houses, and numerous colonies with late-stage bugs were recorded after the interventions. Laboratory bioassays showed reduced susceptibility to pyrethroids in the local bug populations. Eleven of 14 bug populations showed reduced mortality in diagnostic dose assays (range, 35 ± 5% to 97 ± 8%) whereas the remainder had 100% mortality. A fully enclosed residual bug population in a large chicken coop survived four pyrethroid sprays, including two double-dose applications, and was finally suppressed with malathion. The estimated resistance ratio of this bug population was 7.17 (range, 4.47–11.50). Our field data combined with laboratory bioassays and a residual foci experiment demonstrate that the initial failure to suppress T. infestans was mainly because of the unexpected occurrence of reduced susceptibility to deltamethrin in an area last treated with pyrethroid insecticides 12 yr earlier. Our results underline the need for close monitoring of the impact of insecticide spraying to provide early warning of possible problems due to enhanced resistance or tolerance and determine appropriate responses. PMID:23270166

  10. Mechanisms of pyrethroid resistance in Haematobia irritans (Muscidae from Mato Grosso do Sul state, Brazil Mecanismos de resistência da Haematobia irritans (Muscidae a piretróides em Mato Grosso do Sul, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Thadeu Medeiros Barros

    Full Text Available Horn fly resistance to pyrethroid insecticides occurs throughout Brazil, but knowledge about the involved mechanisms is still in an incipient stage. This survey was aimed to identify the mechanisms of horn fly resistance to cypermethrin in Mato Grosso do Sul state, Brazil. Impregnated filter paper bioassays using cypermethrin, synergized or not with piperonyl butoxide (PBO and triphenyl phosphate (TPP, were conducted from March 2004 to June 2005 in horn fly populations (n = 33 from all over the state. All populations were highly resistant to cypermethrin, with resistance factors (RF ranging from 89.4 to 1,020.6. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays to detect the knockdown resistance (kdr mutation also were performed in 16 samples. The kdr mutation was found in 75% of the tested populations, mostly with relatively low frequencies (Resistência da mosca-dos-chifres a inseticidas piretróides ocorre em todo o país, entretanto, o conhecimento sobre os mecanismos envolvidos é ainda incipiente. Este estudo objetivou identificar os mecanismos de resistência desta mosca à cipermetrina em Mato Grosso do Sul. Bioensaios utilizando papéis impregnados com cipermetrina, isoladamente ou sinergizada por butóxido de piperonila (PBO ou trifenil fosfato (TPP, foram realizados de março∕2004 a junho∕2005 em 33 populações. Todas as populações apresentaram elevada resistência à cipermetrina, com fatores de resistência (FR variando de 89,4 a 1.020,6. Ensaios de reação em cadeia da polimerase (PCR visando a detecção de kdr (“knockdown resistance” foram realizados em 16 amostras. A mutação kdr foi detectada em 75% das populações, geralmente em baixas frequências (<20% e ausente em algumas populações resistentes. A adição de TPP não reduziu significativamente a CL50 em nenhuma população. Entretanto, o PBO reduziu em mais de 40 vezes a CL50 de todas as populações testadas, resultando em FR ≤ 10 na maioria dos casos. Resist

  11. Coke fouling monitoring by electrical resistivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bombardelli, Clovis; Mari, Livia Assis; Kalinowski, Hypolito Jose [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Eletrica e Informatica Industrial (CPGEI)

    2008-07-01

    An experimental method to simulate the growth of the coke fouling that occurs in the oil processing is proposed relating the thickness of the encrusted coke to its electrical resistivity. The authors suggest the use of the fouling electrical resistivity as a transducer element for determining its thickness. The sensor is basically two electrodes in an electrically isolated device where the inlay can happen in order to compose a purely resistive transducer. Such devices can be easily constructed in a simple and robust form with features capable to face the high temperatures and pressures found in relevant industrial processes. For validation, however, it is needed a relationship between the electrical resistivity and the fouling thickness, information not yet found in the literature. The present work experimentally simulates the growth of a layer of coke on an electrically insulating surface, equipped with electrodes at two extremities to measure the electrical resistivity during thermal cracking essays. The method is realized with a series of consecutive runs. The results correlate the mass of coke deposited and its electrical resistivity, and it can be used to validate the coke depositions monitoring employing the resistivity as a control parameter. (author)

  12. Susceptibility of Cimex lectularius (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) to pyrethroid insecticides and to insecticidal dusts with or without pyrethroid insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, John F; Cowles, Richard S

    2012-10-01

    Relative increases of bed bug, Cimex lectularius L., populations are probably due in large measure to their resistance to pyrethroids, which have been used extensively against urban pests. A Connecticut population of bed bugs was assessed for sensitivity to pyrethroids and exposed to commonly-used commercial insecticides applied to various substrates on which the residues were allowed to age for 0-24 wk. Type I and type II pyrethroids differed in toxicity when applied at a high dosage (1 microg) per bed bug. Some type II pyrethroids (cyfluthrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, cis-cypermethrin, and deltamethrin) caused > 80% mortality, whereas exposure to type I pyrethroids caused 0.95) an exponential rise to a maximum model from which the survival half-life (S1/2) was calculated directly. Tempo Dust (Bayer Environmental Science, Montvale, NJ) killed bed bugs relatively quickly, as did Syloid 244 (Grace Davison, Columbia, MD) and Drione (Bayer Environmental Science, Montvale, NJ) on hardboard and mattress fabric substrates (S1/2 Companies, Waterbury, CT), displayed reduced residual toxicity as they aged; the mortality was < 50% on some substrates after 4 d. Desiccant dusts, with their physical mode of action and long residual activity, appear to be superior to sprayable pyrethroid products for killing bed bugs.

  13. Identification and characterisation of Aedes aegypti aldehyde dehydrogenases involved in pyrethroid metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nongkran Lumjuan

    Full Text Available Pyrethroid insecticides, especially permethrin and deltamethrin, have been used extensively worldwide for mosquito control. However, insecticide resistance can spread through a population very rapidly under strong selection pressure from insecticide use. The upregulation of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH has been reported upon pyrethroid treatment. In Aedes aegypti, the increase in ALDH activity against the hydrolytic product of pyrethroid has been observed in DDT/permethrin-resistant strains. The objective of this study was to identify the role of individual ALDHs involved in pyrethroid metabolism.Three ALDHs were identified; two of these, ALDH9948 and ALDH14080, were upregulated in terms of both mRNA and protein levels in a DDT/pyrethroid-resistant strain of Ae. aegypti. Recombinant ALDH9948 and ALDH14080 exhibited oxidase activities to catalyse the oxidation of a permethrin intermediate, phenoxybenzyl aldehyde (PBald, to phenoxybenzoic acid (PBacid.ALDHs have been identified in association with permethrin resistance in Ae. aegypti. Characterisation of recombinant ALDHs confirmed the role of this protein in pyrethroid metabolism. Understanding the biochemical and molecular mechanisms of pyrethroid resistance provides information for improving vector control strategies.

  14. Monitoring the agricultural landscape for insect resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Joseph; Glaser, J. A.; Copenhaver, Ken

    Farmers in 25 countries on six continents are using plant biotechnology to solve difficult crop production challenges and conserve the environment. In fact, 13.3 million farmers, which include 90 percent of the farming in developing countries, choose to plant biotech crops. Over the past decade, farmers increased area planted in genetically modified (GM) crops by more than 10 percent each year, thus increasing their farm income by more than 44 billion US dollars (1996-2007), and achieved economic, environmental and social benefits in crops such as soybeans, canola, corn and cotton. To date, total acres of biotech crops harvested exceed more than 2 billion with a proven 13-year history of safe use. Over the next decade, expanded adoption combined with current research on 57 crops in 63 countries will broaden the advantages of genetically modified foods for growers, consumers and the environment. Genetically modified (GM) crops with the ability to produce toxins lethal to specific insect pests are covering a larger percentage of the agricultural landscape every year. The United States department of Agriculture (USDA) estimated that 63 percent of corn and 65 percent of cotton contained these specific genetic traits in 2009. The toxins could protect billions of dollars of loss from insect damage for crops valued at greater than 165 billion US dollars in 2008. The stable and efficient production of these crops has taken on even more importance in recent years with their use, not only as a food source, but now also a source of fuel. It is in the best interest of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to ensure the continued efficacy of toxin producing GM crops as their use reduces pesticides harmful to humans and animals. However, population genetics models have indicated the risk of insect pests developing resistance to these toxins if a high percentage of acreage is grown in these crops. The USEPA is developing methods to monitor the agricultural

  15. Danish Integrated Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring and Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Ole E.; Emborg, Hanne-Dorthe; Bagger-Skjøt, Line; Jensen, Vibeke F.; Rogues, Anne-Marie; Skov, Robert L.; Agersø, Yvonne; Brandt, Christian T.; Seyfarth, Anne Mette; Muller, Arno; Hovgaard, Karin; Ajufo, Justin; Bager, Flemming; Aarestrup, Frank M.; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Wegener, Henrik C.; Monnet, Dominique L.

    2007-01-01

    Resistance to antimicrobial agents is an emerging problem worldwide. Awareness of the undesirable consequences of its widespread occurrence has led to the initiation of antimicrobial agent resistance monitoring programs in several countries. In 1995, Denmark was the first country to establish a systematic and continuous monitoring program of antimicrobial drug consumption and antimicrobial agent resistance in animals, food, and humans, the Danish Integrated Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring and Research Program (DANMAP). Monitoring of antimicrobial drug resistance and a range of research activities related to DANMAP have contributed to restrictions or bans of use of several antimicrobial agents in food animals in Denmark and other European Union countries. PMID:18217544

  16. The highly polymorphic CYP6M7 cytochrome P450 gene partners with the directionally selected CYP6P9a and CYP6P9b genes to expand the pyrethroid resistance front in the malaria vector Anopheles funestus in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveron, Jacob M; Ibrahim, Sulaiman S; Chanda, Emmanuel; Mzilahowa, Themba; Cuamba, Nelson; Irving, Helen; Barnes, Kayla G; Ndula, Miranda; Wondji, Charles S

    2014-09-27

    Pyrethroid resistance in the major malaria vector Anopheles funestus is rapidly expanding across Southern Africa. It remains unknown whether this resistance has a unique origin with the same molecular basis or is multifactorial. Knowledge of the origin, mechanisms and evolution of resistance are crucial to designing successful resistance management strategies. Here, we established the resistance profile of a Zambian An. funestus population at the northern range of the resistance front. Similar to other Southern African populations, Zambian An. funestus mosquitoes are resistant to pyrethroids and carbamate, but in contrast to populations in Mozambique and Malawi, these insects are also DDT resistant. Genome-wide microarray-based transcriptional profiling and qRT-PCR revealed that the cytochrome P450 gene CYP6M7 is responsible for extending pyrethroid resistance northwards. Indeed, CYP6M7 is more over-expressed in Zambia [fold-change (FC) 37.7; 13.2 for qRT-PCR] than CYP6P9a (FC15.6; 8.9 for qRT-PCR) and CYP6P9b (FC11.9; 6.5 for qRT-PCR), whereas CYP6P9a and CYP6P9b are more highly over-expressed in Malawi and Mozambique. Transgenic expression of CYP6M7 in Drosophila melanogaster coupled with in vitro assays using recombinant enzymes and assessments of kinetic properties demonstrated that CYP6M7 is as efficient as CYP6P9a and CYP6P9b in conferring pyrethroid resistance. Polymorphism patterns demonstrate that these genes are under contrasting selection forces: the exceptionally diverse CYP6M7 likely evolves neutrally, whereas CYP6P9a and CYP6P9b are directionally selected. The higher variability of CYP6P9a and CYP6P9b observed in Zambia supports their lesser role in resistance in this country. Pyrethroid resistance in Southern Africa probably has multiple origins under different evolutionary forces, which may necessitate the design of different resistance management strategies.

  17. Using a near-infrared spectrometer to estimate the age of anopheles mosquitoes exposed to pyrethroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikulu, Maggy T; Majambere, Silas; Khatib, Bakar O; Ali, Abdullah S; Hugo, Leon E; Dowell, Floyd E

    2014-01-01

    We report on the accuracy of using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to predict the age of Anopheles mosquitoes reared from wild larvae and a mixed age-wild adult population collected from pit traps after exposure to pyrethroids. The mosquitoes reared from wild larvae were estimated as 8 d for both susceptible and resistant groups. The age structure of wild-collected mosquitoes was not significantly different for the pyrethroid-susceptible and pyrethroid-resistant mosquitoes (P = 0.210). Based on these findings, NIRS chronological age estimation technique for Anopheles mosquitoes may be independent of insecticide exposure and the environmental conditions to which the mosquitoes are exposed.

  18. Immune disorders induced by exposure to pyrethroid insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolarczyk, Justyna; Pekar, Joanna; Nieradko-Iwanicka, Barbara

    2017-06-08

    Pyrethroids are biocides, which belong to the third generation of insecticides. They are used as biocides, insecticides and medicines. These agents react selectively, because they are less harmful to birds and mammals (due to poor intestinal absorption and rapid detoxification in the body of homeothermic organisms) and they are poisonous for fish and insects. The aim of the article is to present the current state of knowledge on the effects of pyrethroids on the immune system based on the latest scientific research. The mechanism of action of pyrethroids include the delaying closure of voltage- sensitive sodium and chloride channels (including GABA- dependent channels). These compounds are neurotoxic. Studies have shown that they cause numerous immune disorders contributing to lowering of immunity in humans and animals. Exposure to pyrethroids can cause inhibition of proliferation of peripheral blood leukocytes and reducing the concentration of IgG immunolgobulines. They also cause reduced macrophages and decrease in interleukin 2 (IL-2), interleukin 8 (IL-8), interleukin 12p70 (IL-12p70), and interferon γ (IFN-γ). Some of these compounds cause increase of liver weight and increase of bone marrow cellularity, and may induce apoptosis of the thymus. Pyrethroids can cause allergies and asthma. Their immunosuppressive effects can impair host resistance against infections. Exposure to these compounds can also contribute to induction of the cancer, especially in patients with impaired immune function.

  19. Danish integrated antimicrobial in resistance monitoring and research program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammerum, Anette Marie; Heuer, Ole Eske; Emborg, Hanne-Dorthe

    2007-01-01

    Resistance to antimicrobial agents is an emerging problem worldwide. Awareness of the undesirable consequences of its widespread occurrence has led to the initiation of antimicrobial agent resistance monitoring programs in several countries. In 1995, Denmark was the first country to establish a s...... activities related to DANMAP have contributed to restrictions or bans of use of several antimicrobial agents in food animals in Denmark and other European Union countries....... a systematic and continuous monitoring program of antimicrobial drug consumption and antimicrobial agent resistance in animals, food, and humans, the Danish Integrated Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring and Research Program (DANMAP). Monitoring of antimicrobial drug resistance and a range of research......Resistance to antimicrobial agents is an emerging problem worldwide. Awareness of the undesirable consequences of its widespread occurrence has led to the initiation of antimicrobial agent resistance monitoring programs in several countries. In 1995, Denmark was the first country to establish...

  20. Complex Electrical Resistivity for Monitoring DNAPL Contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen R. Brown; David Lesmes; John Fourkas

    2003-09-12

    Nearly all Department of Energy (DOE) facilities have landfills and buried waste areas. Of the various contaminants present at these sites, dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) are particularly hard to locate and remove. There is an increasing need for external or non-invasive sensing techniques to locate DNAPLs in the subsurface and to track their spread and monitor their breakdown or removal by natural or engineered means. G. Olhoeft and colleagues have published several reports based on laboratory studies using the complex resistivity method which indicate that organic solvents, notably toluene, PCE, and TCE, residing in clay-bearing soils have distinctive electrical signatures. These results have suggested to many researchers the basis of an ideal new measurement technique for geophysical characterization of DNAPL pollution. Encouraged by these results we proposed to bring the field measurement of complex resistivity as a means of pollution characterization from the conceptual stage to practice. We planned to document the detectability of clay-organic solvent interactions with geophysical measurements in the laboratory, develop further understanding of the underlying physical and chemical mechanisms, and then apply these observations to develop field techniques. As with any new research endeavor we note the extreme importance of trying to reproduce the work of previous researchers to ensure that any effects observed are due to the physical phenomena occurring in the specimen and not due to the particular experimental apparatus or method used. To this end, we independently designed and built a laboratory system, including a sample holder, electrodes, electronics, and data analysis software, for the measurement of the complex electrical resistivity properties of soil contaminated with organic solvents. The capabilities and reliability of this technique were documented. Using various standards we performed measurement accuracy, repeatability, and noise immunity

  1. Advances in the study of molecular mechanisms of resistance to pyrethroids in Anopheles mosquitoes%按蚊拟除虫菊酯类杀虫剂抗性相关分子机理的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐铁龙

    2012-01-01

    In response to selection pressure from pesticides, Anopheles mosquitoes have evolved resistance to those pesticides. These mosquitoes have different mechanisms of resistance to different types of pesticides since those pesticides have different mechanisms of action. This paper summarizes recent advances in the study of factors such as esterases, P45O monooxygenases, glutathione S-transferases, and insensitive sodium channels that may relate to resistance to pyrethroids in Anopheles mosquitoes,%在杀虫剂的选择压力下蚊虫形成抗药性,不同类型的杀虫剂,由于其作用机制不同,其抗性分子机制也会有所不同.本文对按蚊拟除虫菊酯类杀虫剂抗药性相关因素酯酶、细胞色素P450单加氧酶、谷胱甘肽S-转移酶及神经轴突钠离子通道等的研究进展进行了综述.

  2. A sodium channel mutation identified in Aedes aegypti selectively reduces cockroach sodium channel sensitivity to type I, but not type II pyrethroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhaonong; Du, Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Dong, Ke

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary target of pyrethroid insecticides. Numerous point mutations in sodium channel genes have been identified in pyrethroid-resistant insect species, and many have been confirmed to reduce or abolish sensitivity of channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes to pyrethroids. Recently, several novel mutations were reported in sodium channel genes of pyrethroid-resistant Aedes mosquito populations. One of the mutations is a phenylalanine (F) to cysteine (C) change in segment 6 of domain III (IIIS6) of the Aedes mosquito sodium channel. Curiously, a previous study showed that alanine substitution of this F did not alter the action of deltamethrin, a type II pyrethroid, on a cockroach sodium channel. In this study, we changed this F to C in a pyrethroid-sensitive cockroach sodium channel and examined mutant channel sensitivity to permethrin as well as five other type I or type II pyrethroids in Xenopus oocytes. Interestingly, the F to C mutation drastically reduced channel sensitivity to three type I pyrethroids, permethrin, NRDC 157 (a deltamethrin analogue lacking the α-cyano group) and bioresemthrin, but not to three type II pyrethroids, cypermethrin, deltamethrin and cyhalothrin. These results confirm the involvement of the F to C mutation in permethrin resistance, and raise the possibility that rotation of type I and type II pyrethroids might be considered in the control of insect pest populations where this particular mutation is present.

  3. Ecotoxicology of synthetic pyrethroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maund, S J; Campbell, P J; Giddings, J M; Hamer, M J; Henry, K; Pilling, E D; Warinton, J S; Wheeler, J R

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter we review the ecotoxicology of the synthetic pyrethroids (SPs). SPs are potent, broad-spectrum insecticides. Their effects on a wide range of nontarget species have been broadly studied, and there is an extensive database available to evaluate their effects. SPs are highly toxic to fish and aquatic invertebrates in the laboratory, but effects in the field are mitigated by rapid dissipation and degradation. Due to their highly lipophilic nature, SPs partition extensively into sediments. Recent studies have shown that toxicity in sediment can be predicted on the basis of equilibrium partitioning, and whilst other factors can influence this, organic carbon content is a key determining variable. At present for SPs, there is no clear evidence for adverse population-relevant effects with an underlying endocrine mode of action. SPs have been studied intensively in aquatic field studies, and their effects under field conditions are mitigated from those measured in the laboratory by their rapid dissipation and degradation. Studies with a range of test systems have shown consistent aquatic field endpoints across a variety of geographies and trophic states. SPs are also highly toxic to bees and other nontarget arthropods in the laboratory. These effects are mitigated in the field through repellency and dissipation of residues, and recovery from any adverse effects tends to be rapid.

  4. Distinct roles of the DmNav and DSC1 channels in the action of DDT and pyrethroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinkevich, Frank D; Du, Yuzhe; Tolinski, Josh; Ueda, Atsushi; Wu, Chun-Fang; Zhorov, Boris S; Dong, Ke

    2015-03-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav channels) are critical for electrical signaling in the nervous system and are the primary targets of the insecticides DDT and pyrethroids. In Drosophila melanogaster, besides the canonical Nav channel, Para (also called DmNav), there is a sodium channel-like cation channel called DSC1 (Drosophila sodium channel 1). Temperature-sensitive paralytic mutations in DmNav (para(ts)) confer resistance to DDT and pyrethroids, whereas DSC1 knockout flies exhibit enhanced sensitivity to pyrethroids. To further define the roles and interaction of DmNav and DSC1 channels in DDT and pyrethroid neurotoxicology, we generated a DmNav/DSC1 double mutant line by introducing a para(ts1) allele (carrying the I265N mutation) into a DSC1 knockout line. We confirmed that the I265N mutation reduced the sensitivity to two pyrethroids, permethrin and deltamethrin of a DmNav variant expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Computer modeling predicts that the I265N mutation confers pyrethroid resistance by allosterically altering the second pyrethroid receptor site on the DmNav channel. Furthermore, we found that I265N-mediated pyrethroid resistance in para(ts1) mutant flies was almost completely abolished in para(ts1);DSC1(-/-) double mutant flies. Unexpectedly, however, the DSC1 knockout flies were less sensitive to DDT, compared to the control flies (w(1118A)), and the para(ts1);DSC1(-/-) double mutant flies were even more resistant to DDT compared to the DSC1 knockout or para(ts1) mutant. Our findings revealed distinct roles of the DmNav and DSC1 channels in the neurotoxicology of DDT vs. pyrethroids and implicate the exciting possibility of using DSC1 channel blockers or modifiers in the management of pyrethroid resistance.

  5. Detection and monitoring of insect resistance to transgenic Bt crops

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANGNENG HUANG

    2006-01-01

    Transgenic crops expressing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) endotoxins have become one of the most important tools for managing corn and cotton insect pests in the US and other countries. The widespread adoption of transgenic Bt crops could place a high degree of selection pressure on the target insect populations and accelerate development of resistance, raising concerns about the long-term durability of Bt plants as an effective pest management tool. Conservation of Bt susceptibility in insects has become one of the most active research areas in modern agriculture. One of the key factors for a successful Bt resistance management plan is to have a cost-effective monitoring system that can provide information on: (i) the initial Bt resistance allele frequencies at low levels in field insect populations; and (ii) early shifts in Bt resistance allele frequencies so that proactive measures for managing resistance can be deployed well before field control failures. Developing such a monitoring program has been difficult because: (i) resistance traits that occur at very low frequencies are hard to detect; (ii) many factors affect the sensitivity and accuracy of a Bt resistance monitoring program; and (iii) monitoring resistance is costly. Several novel methods for detecting Bt resistance alleles developed during the last decade have made a cost-effective monitoring system possible. Future studies should focus on how to improve and standardize the methodologies for insect sampling and Bt resistance detection.

  6. Evaluation of efficacy of Interceptor(®) G2, a long-lasting insecticide net coated with a mixture of chlorfenapyr and alpha-cypermethrin, against pyrethroid resistant Anopheles gambiae s.l. in Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayili, Koama; N'do, Severin; Namountougou, Moussa; Sanou, Roger; Ouattara, Abdoulaye; Dabiré, Roch K; Ouédraogo, Anicet G; Malone, David; Diabaté, Abdoulaye

    2017-05-08

    Malaria vectors have acquired widespread resistance throughout sub-Saharan Africa to many of the currently used insecticides. Hence, there is an urgent need to develop alternative strategies including the development of new insecticides for effective management of insecticide resistance. To maintain progress against malaria, it is necessary to identify other residual insecticides for mosquito nets. In the present WHOPES phase II analogue study, the utility of chlorfenapyr, a pyrrole class insecticide mixed with alpha-cypermethrin on a long-lasting mosquito bed net was evaluated against Anopheles gambiae s.l. Bed nets treated with chlorfenapyr and alpha-cypermethrin and mixture of both compounds were tested for their efficacy on mosquitoes. Washed (20 times) and unwashed of each type of treated nets and were tested according to WHOPES guidelines. Efficacy of nets were expressed in terms of blood-feeding inhibition rate, deterrence, induced exophily and mortality rate. The evaluation was conducted in experimental huts of Vallée du Kou seven (VK7) in Burkina Faso (West Africa) following WHOPES phase II guidelines. In addition, a WHOPES phase I evaluation was also performed. Mixture treated nets killed significantly (P  0.05) different from nets treated with chlorfenapyr 200 mg/m(2) unwashed (86%). The washed and unwashed nets treated with the mixtures resulted in personal protection against An. gambiae s.l. biting 34 and 44%. In contrast the personal protection observed for washed and unwashed alpha-cypermethrin treated nets generated (14 and 24%), and chlorfenapyr solo treated net was rather low (22%). Among all nets trialled, the combination of chlorfenapyr and alpha-cypermethrin on bed nets provided better mortality in phase II after 20 washes. Results suggest that this combination could be a potential insecticide resistance management tool for preventing malaria transmission in areas compromised by the spread of pyrethroid resistance.

  7. Mediation of pyrethroid insecticide toxicity to honey bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae) by cytochrome P450 monooxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Reed M; Wen, Zhimou; Schuler, Mary A; Berenbaum, May R

    2006-08-01

    Honey bees, Apis mellifera L., often thought to be extremely susceptible to insecticides in general, exhibit considerable variation in tolerance to pyrethroid insecticides. Although some pyrethroids, such as cyfluthrin and lambda-cyhalothrin, are highly toxic to honey bees, the toxicity of tau-fluvalinate is low enough to warrant its use to control parasitic mites inside honey bee colonies. Metabolic insecticide resistance in other insects is mediated by three major groups of detoxifying enzymes: the cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s), the carboxylesterases (COEs), and the glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). To test the role of metabolic detoxification in mediating the relatively low toxicity of tau-fluvalinate compared with more toxic pyrethroid insecticides, we examined the effects of piperonyl butoxide (PBO), S,S,S-tributylphosphorotrithioate (DEF), and diethyl maleate (DEM) on the toxicity of these pyrethroids. The toxicity of the three pyrethroids to bees was greatly synergized by the P450 inhibitor PBO and synergized at low levels by the carboxylesterase inhibitor DEF. Little synergism was observed with DEM. These results suggest that metabolic detoxification, especially that mediated by P450s, contributes significantly to honey bee tolerance of pyrethroid insecticides. The potent synergism between tau-fluvalinate and PBO suggests that P450s are especially important in the detoxification of this pyrethroid and explains the ability of honey bees to tolerate its presence.

  8. 76 FR 4120 - The National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System Strategic Plan 2011-2015; Request for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration The National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System... public comment of a document for The National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) entitled... systems monitoring antimicrobial resistance in other countries. Foodborne diseases are an important cause...

  9. 75 FR 16817 - 2010 Scientific Meeting of the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System; Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-02

    ... announcing a public meeting entitled ``2010 Scientific Meeting of the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System.'' The topic to be discussed is the results from the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) and related antimicrobial resistance monitoring and research, including activities...

  10. The antimicrobial resistance crisis: management through gene monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is an acknowledged crisis for humanity. Its genetic origins and dire potential outcomes are increasingly well understood. However, diagnostic techniques for monitoring the crisis are currently largely limited to enumerating the increasing incidence of resistant pathogens. Being the end-stage of the evolutionary process that produces antimicrobial resistant pathogens, these measurements, while diagnostic, are not prognostic, and so are not optimal in managing this crisis. A better test is required. Here, using insights from an understanding of evolutionary processes ruling the changing abundance of genes under selective pressure, we suggest a predictive framework for the AMR crisis. We then discuss the likely progression of resistance for both existing and prospective antimicrobial therapies. Finally, we suggest that by the environmental monitoring of resistance gene frequency, resistance may be detected and tracked presumptively, and how this tool may be used to guide decision-making in the local and global use of antimicrobials. PMID:27831476

  11. Danish integrated antimicrobial in resistance monitoring and research program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammerum, Anette Marie; Heuer, Ole Eske; Emborg, Hanne-Dorthe

    2007-01-01

    Resistance to antimicrobial agents is an emerging problem worldwide. Awareness of the undesirable consequences of its widespread occurrence has led to the initiation of antimicrobial agent resistance monitoring programs in several countries. In 1995, Denmark was the first country to establish a s...

  12. Fate of Pyrethroids in Farmland Ponds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, B. B.; Sørensen, P. B.; Stuer-Lauridsen, F.;

    Pyrethroids constitute a group of widely used insecticides, which are toxic to aquatic organisms. This report presents the results from a 2-year study of the fate of pyrethroids in ponds, i.e. their distribution in the water column, the sediment and the surface microlayer respectively. The measur......Pyrethroids constitute a group of widely used insecticides, which are toxic to aquatic organisms. This report presents the results from a 2-year study of the fate of pyrethroids in ponds, i.e. their distribution in the water column, the sediment and the surface microlayer respectively...

  13. Properties and applications of pyrethroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, M

    1976-04-01

    Improved understanding of the factors determining the insecticidal activity, the mammalian toxicity, and the stability in air and light of natural and synthetic pyrethroids has led to a series of new compounds with a very favorable combination of properties. Their characteristics include outstanding potency to insects, low toxicity to mammals associated with rapid metabolic breakdown and, in appropriate cases, adequate stability on plant surfaces even in bright sunlight. Initial tests indicate that even the more stable compounds are degraded rapidly in soil, so if the trials at present in progress reveal no toxicological or environmental hazards, within a few years synthetic pyrethroids should be available to control a wide range of domestic, veterinary, horticultural, agricultural, and forest pests at low rates of application.

  14. Knockdown and lethal effects of eight commercial nonconventional and two pyrethroid insecticides against moderately permethrin-resistant adult bed bugs, Cimex lectularius (L.) (Hemiptera: Cimicidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The common bed bug, Cimex lectularius (L.) (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) is undergoing a rapid resurgence in the United States during the last decade which has created a notable pest management challenge largely because the pest has developed resistance against DDT, organophosphates, carbamates, and pyreth...

  15. Multiple mutations in the para-sodium channel gene are associated with pyrethroid resistance in Rhipicephalus microplus from the United States and Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhipicephalus microplus is an invasive tick vector that transmits the protozoan parasites Babesia bovis and B. bigemina, the causative agents of bovine babesiosis (cattle fever). Acaricide resistant R. microplus populations have become a major problem for many cattle producing areas of the world. Py...

  16. 76 FR 16795 - The National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System Strategic Plan 2011-2015; Request for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration The National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System... National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) entitled ``NARMS Strategic Plan 2011-2015... obtain documents at either http://www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/SafetyHealth/AntimicrobialResistance...

  17. Resmethrin, the first modern pyrethroid insecticide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderlund, David M

    2015-06-01

    The discovery of resmethrin almost five decades ago was the seminal event in the development of pyrethroid insecticides as important pest management tools, the value of which endures to this day. This brief review considers the development of pyrethroids from the perspective of the discovery of resmethrin. I describe the pathway to the discovery of resmethrin and the unique properties that differentiated it from the pyrethrins and earlier synthetic pyrethroids is described. I also summarize information on metabolic fate and mechanisms of selective toxicity, first elucidated with resmethrin, that have shaped our understanding of pyrethroid toxicology since that time. Finally, I review the discovery pathway that led from resmethrin to the development of the first photostable, agriculturally useful pyrethroids that established the importance of this insecticide class.

  18. Health Monitoring of TPS Structures by Measuring Their Electrical Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preci, Arianit; Herdrich, Georg; Steinbeck, Andreas; Auweter-Kurtz, Monika

    Health Monitoring in aerospace applications becomes an emerging technology leading to the development of systems capable of continuously monitoring structures for damage with minimal human intervention. A promising sensing method to be applied on hot structures and thermal protection systems is the electrical resistance measurement technique, which is barely investigated up to now. This method benefits from the advantageous characteristics of self-monitoring materials, such as carbon fiber-reinforced materials. By measuring the variation of the electrical resistance of these materials information on possibly present mechanical damage can be derived. In order to set up a database on electric properties of relevant materials under relevant conditions and to perform a proof-of-concept for this health monitoring method a facility has been laid out, which allows for the measurement of the electrical resistance of thermal protection system relevant materials at temperatures up to 2000°C. First preliminary measurements of the surface resistance of a graphite sample have been performed and are presented. It has been proven necessary to make some modifications to the setup. Therefore, the remaining measurements with graphite and C/C-SiC samples are subject of further investigation which will be performed in the future.

  19. Role of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Guido; Bombelli, Michele; Seravalle, Gino; Brambilla, Gianmaria; Dell'oro, Raffaella; Mancia, Giuseppe

    2013-06-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring has gained growing popularity in the diagnosis and treatment of essential hypertension for several reasons, such as the lack of the so-called white-coat effect, the greater reproducibility as compared with clinic blood pressure, the ability to provide information on blood pressure phenomena of prognostic value and the closer relationship with the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. All the above-mentioned main features of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring are also true for resistant hypertension. In addition, however, in resistant hypertension, blood pressure monitoring allows one to precisely define the diagnosis of this clinical condition, by excluding the presence of white-coat hypertension, which is responsible for a consistent number of "false" resistant hypertensive cases. The approach also allows one to define the patterns of blood pressure variability in this clinical condition, as well as its relationships with target organ damage. Finally, it allows one to assess the effects of therapeutic interventions, such as renal nerves ablation, aimed at improving blood pressure control in this hypertensive state. The present paper will critically review the main features of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in resistant hypertension, with particular emphasis on the diagnosis and treatment of this high-risk hypertensive state.

  20. Pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles gambiae s.s. and Anopheles arabiensis in western Kenya: phenotypic, metabolic and target site characterizations of three populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    OCHOMO, E.; BAYOH, M. N.; BROGDON, W. G.; GIMNIG, J. E.; OUMA, C.; VULULE, J. M.; WALKER, E. D.

    2016-01-01

    Field and laboratory investigations revealed phenotypic, target site and metabolic resistance to permethrin in an Anopheles gambiae s.s. (Diptera: Culicidae) population in Bungoma District, a region in western Kenya in which malaria is endemic and rates of ownership of insecticide-treated bednets are high. The sensitivity of individual An. gambiae s.l. females as indicated in assays using World Health Organization (WHO) test kits demonstrated reduced mortality in response to permethrin, deltamethrin and bendiocarb. Estimated time to knock-down of 50% (KDT50) of the test population in Centers for Disease Control (CDC) bottle bioassays was significantly lengthened for the three insecticides compared with that in a susceptible control strain. Anopheles arabiensis from all three sites showed higher mortality to all three insecticides in the WHO susceptibility assays compared with the CDC bottle assays, in which they showed less sensitivity and longer KDT50 than the reference strain for permethrin and deltamethrin. Microplate assays revealed elevated activity of β-esterases and oxidases, but not glutathione-S-transferase, in An. gambiae s.s. survivors exposed to permethrin in bottle bioassays compared with knocked down and unexposed individuals. No An. arabiensis showed elevated enzyme activity. The 1014S kdr allele was fixed in the Bungoma An. gambiae s.s. population and absent from An. arabiensis, whereas the 1014F kdr allele was absent from all samples of both species. Insecticide resistance could compromise vector control in Bungoma and could spread to other areas as coverage with longlasting insecticide-treated bednets increases. PMID:22861380

  1. Molecular monitoring of Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinin in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genton Blaise

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs are recommended for use against uncomplicated malaria in areas of multi-drug resistant malaria, such as sub-Saharan Africa. However, their long-term usefulness in these high transmission areas remains unclear. It has been suggested that documentation of the S769N PfATPase6 mutations may indicate an emergence of artemisinin resistance of Plasmodium falciparum in the field. The present study assessed PfATPase6 mutations (S769N and A623E in 615 asymptomatic P. falciparum infections in Tanzania but no mutant genotype was detected. This observation suggests that resistance to artemisinin has not yet been selected in Tanzania, supporting the Ministry of Health's decision to adopt artemether+lumefantrine as first-line malaria treatment. The findings recommend further studies to assess PfATPase6 mutations in sentinel sites and verify their usefulness in monitoring emergency of ACT resistance.

  2. Measurement Methodology for Monitoring Fouling Resistance in Condenser of Chiller

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Dan; GAN Li-si; CAO Yong

    2009-01-01

    This paper established an on-line monitoring model for fouling resistance of cooling water based on heat transfer theory,which was mainly applied to the fouling resistance test for condenser of chiller in operation,and the test requirements were presented.It proves that the load ratio of chiller has big influence on the test re-sult,and the best load ratio for test is the range of 80%~100%.A case has been executed to validate the mod-el's feasibility.

  3. Testing the evolvability of an insect carboxylesterase for the detoxification of synthetic pyrethroid insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppin, Chris W; Jackson, Colin J; Sutherland, Tara; Hart, Peter J; Devonshire, Alan L; Russell, Robyn J; Oakeshott, John G

    2012-05-01

    Esterases have been implicated in metabolic resistance to synthetic pyrethroids in several insect species but little is yet known of the molecular basis for these effects. In this work modern directed evolution technology was used to test to what extent it is possible to genetically enhance the pyrethroid hydrolytic activity of the E3 carboxylesterase from the blowfly Lucilia cuprina. High throughput screening of a random mutant library with individual stereoisomers of fluorogenic analogues of two type II pyrethroids identified 17 promising variants that were then also tested with the commercial pyrethroid deltamethrin. Between them, these variants displayed significantly improved activities for all the substrates tested. Amino acid substitutions at ten different residues were clearly implicated in the improvements, although most only enhanced activity for a subset of the stereoisomers. Several new combinations of the most promising amino acid substitutions were then made, and negative epistatic effects were found in most of the combinations, but significant improvements were also found in a minority of them. The best mutant recovered contained three amino acid changes and hydrolysed deltamethrin at more than 100 times the rate of wild-type E3. Structural analysis shows that nine of the ten mutated residues improving pyrethroid or analogue activities cluster in putative substrate binding pockets in the active site, with the three mutations of largest effect all increasing the volume of the acyl pocket.

  4. Monitoring of Insecticide Resistance and Genetic Analysis of Triazophos Resistance in Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera:Pyralidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ze-wen; CAO Ming-zhang; HAN Zhao-jun; SHEN Jin-liang; ZHANG Ling-chun; ZHANG Jin-zhen; LU Mei; LIU Xiao-yu; ZHOU Wei-jun

    2004-01-01

    During 2001 and 2002, insecticide resistance in the fourth instar larvae of striped stem borer (Chilo suppressalis), which were collected from Zhejiang, Jiangsu, Anhui and Jiangxi provinces in China, was monitored using topical application method. Low level of resistance to fipronil (6.5-fold) was detected for the first time in RA (Rui'an) population from southeast Zhejiang, but the other six populations tested remained susceptible to this recently introduced insecticide. No resistance to abamectin had been found after examining six populations from Zhejiang, Jiangsu and Anhui provinces. Resistance to triazophos was monitored in ten populations from the four Provinces, and very high level resistance(163.1-fold) was found in RA population, moderate (18.2-fold) in WZ (Wenzhou, Zhejiang Province) population, and low (6.7- to 9.7-fold) in populations of CS (Changshu), XS (Xishan) and JT (Jintan) from south Jiangsu, whereas the other five populations were susceptible. All the nine populations monitored were resistant to monosultap with varying degree, i.e. high level (113.7- and 57.6-fold, respectively) of resistance in RA and YF (Yifeng, Jiangxi Province) populations, moderate (11.0- to 29.7-fold) in WZ, CS, JT and TH (Taihu, Anhui Province) populations, low (6.7- and 7.5-fold, respectively) in XY (Xinyang, Jiangsu Province) and XS populations, and the lowest (3.7-fold) in GY (Guanyun, Jiangsu Province) population. Inheritance of resistance in triazophos selected strain Rts was studied through reciprocal cross and backcross experiments. The preliminary results indicated that inheritance of triazophos resistance in Rts strain was incompletely dominant, with degrees of dominance being 0.46 and 0.68 for reciprocal crosses, and that the resistance was controlled by a major gene, though minor modifying gene(s) might be involved.

  5. A review of plant protection against the olive fly (Bactrocera oleae (Rossi, 1790 Gmelin and molecular methods to monitor the insecticide resistance alleles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Hladnik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Olive fly (Bactrocera oleae (Rossi, 1790 Gmelin is one of the most important olive pests worldwide. Most plant protection measures are based on insecticides, especially organophosphates, pyrethroids, and recently a spinosad. Insecticides are used as cover sprays or in more environmentally friendly methods in which insecticides are used in combination with attractants and pheromones as bait sprays or for mass trapping. However, due to negative impacts of insecticides to environment, new plant protection methods are constantly developing with the aim to lower the consumption of insecticides or even to eliminate them by biological control with entomopathogenic organisms, sterile insect technique (SIT, or transgenic method RIDL (release of insects carrying a dominant lethal. However, these methods need to be improved in order to guarantee adequate protection. Alternative methods than those traditionally used are required due to long term usage causing the development of resistance to the insecticides, ultimately lowering their effectiveness. Molecular methods for monitoring the frequencies of resistant alleles and the current status of resistance alleles in olive growing countries are reviewed here.

  6. Results from two years of resistivity monitoring at Cerro Prieto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilt, M.J.; Goldstein, N.E.

    1981-01-01

    Dipole-dipole resistivity measurements for the combined purposes of reservoir delineation and resistivity monitoring were first made at Cerro Prieto in 1978 and have continued on an annual basis since then. Two 20 km long dipole-dipole lines with permanently emplaced electrodes at one kilometer spacings were established over the field area; one of these lines is remeasured annually. Resistivity measurements are taken using a 25 kW generator capable of up to 80A output and a microprocessor controlled signal averaging receiver; this high power-low noise system is capable of highly accurate measurements even at large transmitter-receiver separations. Standard error calculations for collected data indicate errors less than 5% for all points, but 95% confidence intervals show error limits about 2 to 4 times higher. Analysis of collected data indicate little change in the apparent resistivity of the upper 300 m over the field production zone and that in this section measurements are relatively insensitive to the annual rainfall cycle. Apparent resistivity increases were observed over the older producing zone at Cerro Prieto at depths of 1 km and greater. Large zones of decreasing apparent resistivity were observed flanking the zone of increases on both sides. The increase in apparent resistivity in the production region may be due to an increasing fraction of steam in the reservoir resulting from a production related decline in reservoir pressure. Alternatively the increases may be the result of fresh water influx from the Colorado River. The zone of declining resistivity flanking the area of increase may be due to the movement of saline waters into the reservoir region as a result of the pressure decline. Quantitative modeling of observed changes is impractical owing to the high uncertainty in estimating apparent resistivity changes and the nonuniqueness of models.

  7. Pyrethroid toxicity in silver catfish, Rhamdia quelen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco P. Montanha

    2012-12-01

    . Concerning the sublethal and lethal concentrations, Silver Catfish was sensitive to the tested concentrations of Cypermethrin, showing symptoms of poisoning, such as loss of balance, swimming alteration, dyspnea (they kept their mouths and opercula open, upright swimming and sudden spiral swimming movements. The intensity of such symptoms varied in proportion to the concentration used. The concentrations above 3.0mg/L were considered lethal to the species, since every animal exposed to concentrations between 3.0 and 20.0mg/L had died, while concentrations between 1.0 and 2.5mg/L were considered sublethal. Lethal concentration of Cypermethrin to Silver catfish, in 96 hours, was 1.71 milligram per liter of water. Concerning the sublethal concentration of Cypermethrin and Deltamethrin during the initial embryonic development, the results show that both pyrethroids had significantly decreased the analyzed parameters when comparing them with the control group. It was concluded that, even with the fish being more resistant to pyrethroids in comparison with other species, both the young animals and the ones in stage of embryonic development were susceptible to the effects of these pesticides.

  8. The insecticide resistance status of malaria vectors in the Mekong region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Leen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge on insecticide resistance in target species is a basic requirement to guide insecticide use in malaria control programmes. Malaria transmission in the Mekong region is mainly concentrated in forested areas along the country borders, so that decisions on insecticide use should ideally be made at regional level. Consequently, cross-country monitoring of insecticide resistance is indispensable to acquire comparable baseline data on insecticide resistance. Methods A network for the monitoring of insecticide resistance, MALVECASIA, was set up in the Mekong region in order to assess the insecticide resistance status of the major malaria vectors in Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam. From 2003 till 2005, bioassays were performed on adult mosquitoes using the standard WHO susceptibility test with diagnostic concentrations of permethrin 0.75% and DDT 4%. Additional tests were done with pyrethroid insecticides applied by the different national malaria control programmes. Results Anopheles dirus s.s., the main vector in forested malaria foci, was susceptible to permethrin. However, in central Vietnam, it showed possible resistance to type II pyrethroids. In the Mekong delta, Anopheles epiroticus was highly resistant to all pyrethroid insecticides tested. It was susceptible to DDT, except near Ho Chi Minh City where it showed possible DDT resistance. In Vietnam, pyrethroid susceptible and tolerant Anopheles minimus s.l. populations were found, whereas An. minimus s.l. from Cambodia, Laos and Thailand were susceptible. Only two An. minimus s.l. populations showed DDT tolerance. Anopheles vagus was found resistant to DDT and to several pyrethroids in Vietnam and Cambodia. Conclusion This is the first large scale, cross-country survey of insecticide resistance in Anopheles species in the Mekong Region. A unique baseline data on insecticide resistance for the Mekong region is now available, which enables the follow-up of trends

  9. Monitoring of antimicrobial resistance in pathogenic bacteria from livestock animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallmann, Jürgen

    2006-06-01

    Facing the problem of development and spreading of bacterial resistance, preventive strategies are considered the most appropriate means to counteract. The establishment of corresponding management options relies on scientifically defensible efforts to obtain objective data on the prevalence of bacterial resistance in healthy and diseased livestock. Additionally, detailed statistics are needed on the overall amount of antimicrobial agents dispensed in Germany. The collection of valid data on the prevalence of resistance requires representative and cross-sectional studies. The German national antimicrobial resistance monitoring of the Federal Office of Consumer Protection and Food Safety (BVL) determines the current quantitative resistance level of life-stock pathogens, in order to permit the evaluation and surveillance of the distribution of resistances on a valid basis. Essential key features determining the design of these studies comprise (1) a statistically valid sampling program. This incorporates regional differences in animal population density, (2) the avoidance of "copy strains", (3) testing of no more than two bacterial strains belonging to one species per herd, (4) testing only if no antimicrobial therapy preceded sample collection, and (5) the use of standardized methods [e.g. microdilution broth method to determine the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC)]. The analysis and interpretation of this data permits reliable identification and definition of epidemiological characteristics of resistance and its development in animal associated bacteria, such as geographically and time wise differentiated profiles on its prevalence, the emergence of unknown phenotypes of resistance and an assessment of the threat resistant bacteria from animals pose for humans. In applied antimicrobial therapy, the data can serve as a decision guidance in choosing the antimicrobial agent most adapted to the prevailing epidemiological situation. The susceptibility testing

  10. Development of a Landslide Monitoring System using Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hen-Jones, R. M.; Hughes, P. N.; Glendinning, S.; Gunn, D.; Chambers, J.; Stirling, R.

    2015-12-01

    Current assessments of slope stability rely on the use of point sensors, the results of which are often difficult to interpret, have relatively high associated installation and maintenance costs, and do not provide large-area coverage. A new system is currently under development, based on the use of integrated geophysical - geotechnical sensors to monitor ground water conditions via electrical resistivity tomography. This study presents the results of an in-situ electrical resistivity tomography survey, gathered over a two year investigation period at a full-scale clay test embankment in Northumberland, UK. The 3D resistivity array comprised 288 electrodes, at 0.7m grid spacing, covering an area of approximately 90 m2. The first year of investigation involved baseline data collection, followed by a second year which saw a series of deliberate interventions targeted at weakening the slope, to determine whether corresponding geotechnical property changes would be reflected in resistivity images derived from ERT. These interventions included the manual extension of four tension cracks already present in the slope, and the installation of a sprinkler system, eight months later. Laboratory methods were employed to derive a system of equations for relating resistivity to geotechnical parameters more directly relevant to slope stability, including moisture content, suction and shear strength. These equations were then applied to resistivity data gathered over the baseline and intervention periods, yielding geotechnical images of the subsurface which compared well with in-situ geotechnical point sensors. During the intervention period, no slope movement was recorded, however, tensiometers at 0.5 m and 1.0 m depths showed elevated pore pressures, with positive pressures being recorded at depths less than 0.5 m. Resistivity images were successful in capturing the extension of the tension cracks, and in identifying the development of a potential shear failure plane as water

  11. Monitoring Damage Accumulation in Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Electrical Resistivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Craig E.; Morscher, Gregory N.; Xia, Zhenhai H.

    2008-01-01

    The electric resistance of woven SiC fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites were measured under tensile loading conditions. The results show that the electrical resistance is closely related to damage and that real-time information about the damage state can be obtained through monitoring of the resistance. Such self-sensing capability provides the possibility of on-board/in-situ damage detection and accurate life prediction for high-temperature ceramic matrix composites. Woven silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (SiC/SiC) ceramic matrix composites (CMC) possess unique properties such as high thermal conductivity, excellent creep resistance, improved toughness, and good environmental stability (oxidation resistance), making them particularly suitable for hot structure applications. In specific, CMCs could be applied to hot section components of gas turbines [1], aerojet engines [2], thermal protection systems [3], and hot control surfaces [4]. The benefits of implementing these materials include reduced cooling air requirements, lower weight, simpler component design, longer service life, and higher thrust [5]. It has been identified in NASA High Speed Research (HSR) program that the SiC/SiC CMC has the most promise for high temperature, high oxidation applications [6]. One of the critical issues in the successful application of CMCs is on-board or insitu assessment of the damage state and an accurate prediction of the remaining service life of a particular component. This is of great concern, since most CMC components envisioned for aerospace applications will be exposed to harsh environments and play a key role in the vehicle s safety. On-line health monitoring can enable prediction of remaining life; thus resulting in improved safety and reliability of structural components. Monitoring can also allow for appropriate corrections to be made in real time, therefore leading to the prevention of catastrophic failures. Most conventional nondestructive

  12. Molecular cloning and characterization of a novel pyrethroid-hydrolyzing esterase originating from the Metagenome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pyrethroids and pyrethrins are widely used insecticides. Extensive applications not only result in pest resistance to these insecticides, but also may lead to environmental issues and human exposure. Numerous studies have shown that very high exposure to pyrethroids might cause potential problems to man and aquatic organisms. Therefore, it is important to develop a rapid and efficient disposal process to eliminate or minimize contamination of surface water, groundwater and agricultural products by pyrethroid insecticides. Bioremediation is considered to be a reliable and cost-effective technique for pesticides abatement and a major factor determining the fate of pyrethroid pesticides in the environment, and suitable esterase is expected to be useful for potential application for detoxification of pyrethroid residues. Soil is a complex environment considered as one of the main reservoirs of microbial diversity on the planet. However, most of the microorganisms in nature are inaccessible as they are uncultivable in the laboratory. Metagenomic approaches provide a powerful tool for accessing novel valuable genetic resources (novel enzymes and developing various biotechnological applications. Results The pyrethroid pesticides residues on foods and the environmental contamination are a public safety concern. Pretreatment with pyrethroid-hydrolyzing esterase has the potential to alleviate the conditions. To this end, a pyrethroid-hydrolyzing esterase gene was successfully cloned using metagenomic DNA combined with activity-based functional screening from soil, sequence analysis of the DNA responsible for the pye3 gene revealed an open reading frame of 819 bp encoding for a protein of 272 amino acid residues. Extensive multiple sequence alignments of the deduced amino acid of Pye3 with the most homologous carboxylesterases revealed moderate identity (45–49%. The recombinant Pye3 was heterologously expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3

  13. The Skid Resistance Evaluation on the Longterm Monitored Road Sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotek Peter

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the analysis of the skid resistance results measured at the long-term monitored road sections in Slovakia in perspective of the possibility of the deterioration functions determination for the purposes of the pavement management system. There were 11 road sections evaluated, on which have been surface characteristics measured since 1998. The focus was on the evaluation of the longitudinal friction coefficient Mu measured by device Skiddometer BV11, which is the property of the Slovak Road Administration. Beside the Mu parameter, the test conditions were observed and evaluated, as well (measured speed, air and surface temperature, type of asphalts of the wearing course, traffic load, and the season (spring, autumn, respectively in which the skid resistance measurements were performed. In conclusion, there was reviewed a presumption of the possibility to determine a deterioration functions for skid resistance in point of view the quality of the data, which have been collected on the Slovak long-term monitored road sections.

  14. The Skid Resistance Evaluation on the Longterm Monitored Road Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotek, Peter; Kováč, Matúš; Decký, Martin

    2014-12-01

    The article deals with the analysis of the skid resistance results measured at the long-term monitored road sections in Slovakia in perspective of the possibility of the deterioration functions determination for the purposes of the pavement management system. There were 11 road sections evaluated, on which have been surface characteristics measured since 1998. The focus was on the evaluation of the longitudinal friction coefficient Mu measured by device Skiddometer BV11, which is the property of the Slovak Road Administration. Beside the Mu parameter, the test conditions were observed and evaluated, as well (measured speed, air and surface temperature, type of asphalts of the wearing course, traffic load, and the season (spring, autumn, respectively) in which the skid resistance measurements were performed. In conclusion, there was reviewed a presumption of the possibility to determine a deterioration functions for skid resistance in point of view the quality of the data, which have been collected on the Slovak long-term monitored road sections.

  15. Synergy between repellents and non-pyrethroid insecticides strongly extends the efficacy of treated nets against Anopheles gambiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N'Guessan Raphaël

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To manage the kdr pyrethroid-resistance in Anopheline malaria vectors, new compounds or new strategies are urgently needed. Recently, mixing repellents (DEET and a non-pyrethroid insecticide (propoxur was shown to be as effective as deltamethrin, a standard pyrethroid, under laboratory conditions, because of a strong synergy between the two compounds. In the present study, the interactions between two repellents (DEET and KBR 3023 and a non-pyrethroid insecticide (pyrimiphos methyl or PM on netting were investigated. The residual efficacy and the inhibition of blood feeding conferred by these mixtures were assessed against Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes. Methods DEET and KBR 3023 were mixed with pyrimiphos methyl (PM, a organophosphate (OP insecticide. The performance of mono- and bi-impregnated nets against adult mosquitoes was assessed using a miniaturized, experimental hut system (laboratory tunnel tests that allows expression of behavioural responses to insecticide, particularly the mortality and blood feeding effects. Results Both mixtures (PM+DEET and PM+KBR3023 induced 95% mortality for more than two months compared with less than one week for each compound used alone, then reflecting a strong synergy between the repellents and PM. A similar trend was observed with the blood feeding rates, which were significantly lower for the mixtures than for each component alone. Conclusion Synergistic interactions between organophosphates and repellents may be of great interest for vector control as they may contribute to increase the residual life of impregnated materials and improve the control of pyrethroid-resistance mosquitoes. These results prompt the need to evaluate the efficacy of repellent/non-pyrethroid insecticide mixtures against field populations of An. gambiae showing high level of resistance to Ops and pyrethroids.

  16. [Preliminary results of antibiotic resistance monitoring in the Netherlands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mevius, D J; Veldman, K T; van der Giessen, A; van Leeuwen, W J

    2000-03-01

    Qualitative tests are used to monitor antimicrobial resistance in bacteria of animal origin in the Netherlands. Quantitative information on trends in resistance is thus not obtained. Moreover, in general a limited panel of antibiotics is tested. The present study describes resistance in zoonotic food-borne pathogens Salmonella, Campylobacter, and Escherichia coli O157 isolated from human clinical cases and from faeces of healthy food animals in 1998 and 1999, as determined with quantitative susceptibility tests. The resistance of the indicator organisms E. coli and Enterococcus faecium isolated from faecal samples of broilers and pigs randomly sampled at slaughterhouses was also determined. For this end, faecal samples from veal calves were sampled in 1996 and 1997 at the three main Dutch veal calf slaughterhouses. In 1998 only a limited number of faecal samples of veal calves were taken at farms. For E. coli and Salmonella the following antibiotics were tested: amoxicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, piperacillin, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, imipenem, gentamicin, doxycycline, trimethoprim, trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole, ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, florfenicol, carbadox, and flumequine. For E. faecium the following antibiotics were tested: amoxicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, chloramphenicol, doxycycline, erythromycin, vancomycin, teicoplanin, streptomycin ('high level' > 2000 mg/ml), gentamicin ('high level' > 500 mg/ml), ciprofloxacin, bacitracin, flavofosfolipol, salinomycin, quinupristin-dalfopristin, virginiamycin, tilmicosin, avilamycin, and everninomycin. For Campylobacter the following antibiotics were tested: erythromycin, doxycycline, gentamicin, carbadox, flavofosfolipol, ciprofloxacin, trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole, amoxicillin, and metronidazole.

  17. Solid-state, resistive hydrogen sensors for safety monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffheins, B.S.; Lauf, R.J.; Fleming, P.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Nave, S.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1993-07-01

    Solid-state, resistive hydrogen sensors have been designed and fabricated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Sensor response has been successfully tested with H{sub 2} gas in argon and air under ambient temperature and pressure, while immersed in transformer oil at temperatures between 25{degrees}C and 90{degrees}C, and under site-specific conditions at Westinghouse Savannah River Co. Current versions of the sensors (25 {times} 25 {times} 0.6 mm) are small enough to be incorporated into hand-held leak detectors or distributed sensor systems for safety monitoring throughout a large area. Another foreseeable application is in electrical power transformers where the buildup of hydrogen gas accompanies oil breakdown. The use of these sensors to monitor transformer oil changes could help predict and prevent catastrophic failure.

  18. Potential use of Piper nigrum ethanol extract against pyrethroid-resistant Aedes aegypti larvae Utilização em potencial do extrato alcoólico de Piper nigrum como larvicida em Aedes aegypti resistente a piretróides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Kato Simas

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Fractionation of Piper nigrum ethanol extract, biomonitored by assays on pyrethroid-resistant Aedes aegypti larvae yielded isolation of the larvicidal amides piperolein-A and piperine. Comparing LC50 values, the ethanol extract (0. 98 ppm was the most toxic, followed by piperolein-A (1. 46ppm and piperine (1. 53ppm.O fracionamento do extrato etanólico de Piper nigrum biomonitorado por ensaios em larvas de Aedes aegypti resistentes a piretróides resultou no isolamento das amidas larvicidas piperoleína-A e piperina. Comparando-se os valores de CL50, o extrato etanólico (0. 98ppm foi o mais tóxico, seguido pela piperoleína-A (1. 46ppm e piperina (1. 53ppm.

  19. Chlorfenapyr resistance in two-spotted spider mite (Acari: Tetranychidae) from Australian cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herron, G A; Rophail, J; Wilson, L J

    2004-01-01

    The responses of Tetranychus urticae Koch from Australian cotton to chlorfenapyr has been monitored since the 1997--1998 growing season. Resistance was first detected in the 2001--2002 season and then increased quickly in both level and proportion of resistant strains detected. In response, the resistance management strategy for chlorfenapyr use in cotton was altered and now recommends a further restriction of use from two to one spray per season. There was no evidence of negative cross-resistance to the pyrethroid bifenthrin, but chlorfenapyr was associated with an undefined negative cross-resistance.

  20. Recent advances of pyrethroids for household use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujihara, Kazuya; Mori, Tatsuya; Matsuo, Noritada

    2012-01-01

    Development of pyrethroids for household use and recent advances in the syntheses of (1R)-trans-chrysanthemic acid, the acid moiety of most of the household pyrethroids, are reviewed. As another important acid moiety, we discovered norchrysanthemic acid to have a significant vapor action at room temperature when esterified with fluorobenzyl alcohols. In particular, 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-4-methoxymethylbenzyl (1R)-trans-norchrysanthemate (metofluthrin) exhibits the highest potency in mosquito coil formulations as well as the vapor action at room temperature against various mosquitoes. Structure-activity relationships of norchrysanthemic acid esters and synthetic studies of norchrysanthemic acid are discussed.

  1. Infiltration front monitoring using 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxarango, Laurent; Audebert, Marine; Guyard, Helene; Clement, Remi

    2016-04-01

    The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) geophysical method is commonly used to identify the spatial distribution of electrical resisitivity in the soil at the field scale. Recent progress in commercial acquisition systems allows repeating fast acquisitions (10 min) in order to monitor a 3D dynamic phenomenon. Since the ERT method is sensitive to moisture content variations, it can thus be used to delineate the infiltration shape during water infiltration. In heterogeneous conditions, the 3D infiltration shape is a crucial information because it could differ significantly from the homogeneous behavior. In a first step, the ERT method is validated at small scale ( 10m). Two examples of leachate injection monitoring in municipal solid waste landfills are used to put forward benefits and limitations of the ERT-MICS method. Effective infiltration porosities in a range between 3% and 8% support the assumption of a flow in heterogeneous media. Audebert, M., R. Clément, N. Touze-Foltz, T. Günther, S. Moreau, and C. Duquennoi (2014), Time-lapse ERT interpretation methodology for leachate injection monitoring based on multiple inversions and a clustering strategy (MICS), Journal of Applied Geophysics, 111, 320-333. Keywords: ERT, infiltration front, field survey

  2. Underpinning sustainable vector control through informed insecticide resistance management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward K Thomsen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There has been rapid scale-up of malaria vector control in the last ten years. Both of the primary control strategies, long-lasting pyrethroid treated nets and indoor residual spraying, rely on the use of a limited number of insecticides. Insecticide resistance, as measured by bioassay, has rapidly increased in prevalence and has come to the forefront as an issue that needs to be addressed to maintain the sustainability of malaria control and the drive to elimination. Zambia's programme reported high levels of resistance to the insecticides it used in 2010, and, as a result, increased its investment in resistance monitoring to support informed resistance management decisions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A country-wide survey on insecticide resistance in Zambian malaria vectors was performed using WHO bioassays to detect resistant phenotypes. Molecular techniques were used to detect target-site mutations and microarray to detect metabolic resistance mechanisms. Anopheles gambiae s.s. was resistant to pyrethroids, DDT and carbamates, with potential organophosphate resistance in one population. The resistant phenotypes were conferred by both target-site and metabolic mechanisms. Anopheles funestus s.s. was largely resistant to pyrethroids and carbamates, with potential resistance to DDT in two locations. The resistant phenotypes were conferred by elevated levels of cytochrome p450s. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Currently, the Zambia National Malaria Control Centre is using these results to inform their vector control strategy. The methods employed here can serve as a template to all malaria-endemic countries striving to create a sustainable insecticide resistance management plan.

  3. Inhibition of Human Drug Transporter Activities by the Pyrethroid Pesticides Allethrin and Tetramethrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chedik, Lisa; Bruyere, Arnaud; Le Vee, Marc; Stieger, Bruno; Denizot, Claire; Parmentier, Yannick; Potin, Sophie; Fardel, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Pyrethroids are widely-used chemical insecticides, to which humans are commonly exposed, and known to alter functional expression of drug metabolizing enzymes. Limited data have additionally suggested that drug transporters, that constitute key-actors of the drug detoxification system, may also be targeted by pyrethroids. The present study was therefore designed to analyze the potential regulatory effects of these pesticides towards activities of main ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and solute carrier (SLC) drug transporters, using transporter-overexpressing cells. The pyrethroids allethrin and tetramethrin were found to inhibit various ABC and SLC drug transporters, including multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 2, breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), organic anion transporter polypeptide (OATP) 1B1, organic anion transporter (OAT) 3, multidrug and toxin extrusion transporter (MATE) 1, organic cation transporter (OCT) 1 and OCT2, with IC50 values however ranging from 2.6 μM (OCT1 inhibition by allethrin) to 77.6 μM (OAT3 inhibition by tetramethrin) and thus much higher than pyrethroid concentrations (in the nM range) reached in environmentally pyrethroid-exposed humans. By contrast, allethrin and tetramethrin cis-stimulated OATP2B1 activity and failed to alter activities of OATP1B3, OAT1 and MATE2-K, whereas P-glycoprotein activity was additionally moderately inhibited. Twelve other pyrethoids used at 100 μM did not block activities of the various investigated transporters, or only moderately inhibited some of them (inhibition by less than 50%). In silico analysis of structure-activity relationships next revealed that molecular parameters, including molecular weight and lipophilicity, are associated with transporter inhibition by allethrin/tetramethrin and successfully predicted transporter inhibition by the pyrethroids imiprothrin and prallethrin. Taken together, these data fully demonstrated that two pyrethoids, i.e., allethrin and tetramethrin, can

  4. Inhibition of Human Drug Transporter Activities by the Pyrethroid Pesticides Allethrin and Tetramethrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chedik, Lisa; Bruyere, Arnaud; Le Vee, Marc; Stieger, Bruno; Denizot, Claire; Parmentier, Yannick; Potin, Sophie; Fardel, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Pyrethroids are widely-used chemical insecticides, to which humans are commonly exposed, and known to alter functional expression of drug metabolizing enzymes. Limited data have additionally suggested that drug transporters, that constitute key-actors of the drug detoxification system, may also be targeted by pyrethroids. The present study was therefore designed to analyze the potential regulatory effects of these pesticides towards activities of main ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and solute carrier (SLC) drug transporters, using transporter-overexpressing cells. The pyrethroids allethrin and tetramethrin were found to inhibit various ABC and SLC drug transporters, including multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 2, breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), organic anion transporter polypeptide (OATP) 1B1, organic anion transporter (OAT) 3, multidrug and toxin extrusion transporter (MATE) 1, organic cation transporter (OCT) 1 and OCT2, with IC50 values however ranging from 2.6 μM (OCT1 inhibition by allethrin) to 77.6 μM (OAT3 inhibition by tetramethrin) and thus much higher than pyrethroid concentrations (in the nM range) reached in environmentally pyrethroid-exposed humans. By contrast, allethrin and tetramethrin cis-stimulated OATP2B1 activity and failed to alter activities of OATP1B3, OAT1 and MATE2-K, whereas P-glycoprotein activity was additionally moderately inhibited. Twelve other pyrethoids used at 100 μM did not block activities of the various investigated transporters, or only moderately inhibited some of them (inhibition by less than 50%). In silico analysis of structure-activity relationships next revealed that molecular parameters, including molecular weight and lipophilicity, are associated with transporter inhibition by allethrin/tetramethrin and successfully predicted transporter inhibition by the pyrethroids imiprothrin and prallethrin. Taken together, these data fully demonstrated that two pyrethoids, i.e., allethrin and tetramethrin, can

  5. Physical conditions affecting pyrethroid toxicity in arthropods.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jagers op Akkerhuis, G.A.J.M.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to obtain mechanistic information about how the toxicity of pesticides in the field is affected by physical factors, pesticide bioavailability and arthropod behaviour. The pyrethroid insecticide deltamethrin and linyphiid spiders were selected as pesticide-effect model. In

  6. Is cumulated pyrethroid exposure associated with prediabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Rune; Jørs, Erik; Lander, Flemming;

    2014-01-01

    , cumulative exposure) was assessed from questionnaire data. Participants were asked about symptoms of diabetes. Blood samples were analyzed for glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), a measure of glucose regulation. No association was found between pyrethroid exposure and diabetes symptoms. The prevalence...

  7. Soil Moisture Monitoring using Surface Electrical Resistivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calamita, Giuseppe; Perrone, Angela; Brocca, Luca; Straface, Salvatore

    2017-04-01

    The relevant role played by the soil moisture (SM) for global and local natural processes results in an explicit interest for its spatial and temporal estimation in the vadose zone coming from different scientific areas - i.e. eco-hydrology, hydrogeology, atmospheric research, soil and plant sciences, etc... A deeper understanding of natural processes requires the collection of data on a higher number of points at increasingly higher spatial scales in order to validate hydrological numerical simulations. In order to take the best advantage of the Electrical Resistivity (ER) data with their non-invasive and cost-effective properties, sequential Gaussian geostatistical simulations (sGs) can be applied to monitor the SM distribution into the soil by means of a few SM measurements and a densely regular ER grid of monitoring. With this aim, co-located SM measurements using mobile TDR probes (MiniTrase), and ER measurements, obtained by using a four-electrode device coupled with a geo-resistivimeter (Syscal Junior), were collected during two surveys carried out on a 200 × 60 m2 area. Two time surveys were carried out during which Data were collected at a depth of around 20 cm for more than 800 points adopting a regular grid sampling scheme with steps (5 m) varying according to logistic and soil compaction constrains. The results of this study are robust due to the high number of measurements available for either variables which strengthen the confidence in the covariance function estimated. Moreover, the findings obtained using sGs show that it is possible to estimate soil moisture variations in the pedological zone by means of time-lapse electrical resistivity and a few SM measurements.

  8. Identification and characterization of a novel thermostable pyrethroid-hydrolyzing enzyme isolated through metagenomic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Xinjiong

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pyrethroid pesticides are broad-spectrum pest control agents in agricultural production. Both agricultural and residential usage is continuing to grow, leading to the development of insecticide resistance in the pest and toxic effects on a number of nontarget organisms. Thus, it is necessary to hunt suitable enzymes including hydrolases for degrading pesticide residues, which is an efficient "green" solution to biodegrade polluting chemicals. Although many pyrethroid esterases have consistently been purified and characterized from various resources including metagenomes and organisms, the thermostable pyrethroid esterases have not been reported up to the present. Results In this study, we identified a novel pyrethroid-hydrolyzing enzyme Sys410 belonging to familyV esterases/lipases with activity-based functional screening from Turban Basin metagenomic library. Sys410 contained 280 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass (Mr of 30.8 kDa and was overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3 in soluble form. The optimum pH and temperature of the recombinant Sys410 were 6.5 and 55°C, respectively. The enzyme was stable in the pH range of 4.5-8.5 and at temperatures below 50°C. The activity of Sys410 decreased a little when stored at 4°C for 10 weeks, and the residual activity reached 94.1%. Even after incubation at 25°C for 10 weeks, it kept 68.3% of its activity. The recombinant Sys410 could hydrolyze a wide range of ρ-nitrophenyl esters, but its best substrate is ρ-nitrophenyl acetate with the highest activity (772.9 U/mg. The enzyme efficiently degraded cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, sumicidin, and deltamethrin under assay conditions of 37°C for 15 min, with exceeding 95% hydrolysis rate. Conclusion This is the first report to construct metagenomic libraries from Turban Basin to obtain the thermostable pyrethroid-hydrolyzing enzyme. The recombinant Sys410 with broad substrate specificities and high activity was the most

  9. Long-lasting insecticidal nets no longer effectively kill the highly resistant Anopheles funestus of southern Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glunt, Katey D; Abílio, Ana Paula; Bassat, Quique; Bulo, Helder; Gilbert, Allison E; Huijben, Silvie; Manaca, Maria Nélia; Macete, Eusebio; Alonso, Pedro; Paaijmans, Krijn P

    2015-08-05

    Chemical insecticides are crucial to malaria control and elimination programmes. The frontline vector control interventions depend mainly on pyrethroids; all long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) and more than 80% of indoor residual spraying (IRS) campaigns use chemicals from this class. This extensive use of pyrethroids imposes a strong selection pressure for resistance in mosquito populations, and so continuous resistance monitoring and evaluation are important. As pyrethroids have also been used for many years in the Manhiça District, an area in southern Mozambique with perennial malaria transmission, an assessment of their efficacy against the local malaria vectors was conducted. Female offspring of wild-caught Anopheles funestus s.s. females were exposed to deltamethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin and permethrin using the World Health Organization (WHO) insecticide-resistance monitoring protocols. The 3-min WHO cone bioassay was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the bed nets distributed or available for purchase in the area (Olyset, permethrin LLIN; PermaNet 2.0, deltamethrin LLIN) against An. funestus. Mosquitoes were also exposed to PermaNet 2.0 for up to 8 h in time-exposure assays. Resistance to pyrethroids in An. funestus s.s. was extremely high, much higher than reported in 2002 and 2009. No exposure killed more than 25.8% of the mosquitoes tested (average mortality, deltamethrin: 6.4%; lambda-cyhalothrin: 5.1%; permethrin: 19.1%). There was no significant difference in the mortality generated by 3-min exposure to any net (Olyset: 9.3% mortality, PermaNet 2.0: 6.0%, untreated: 2.0%; p = 0.2). Six hours of exposure were required to kill 50% of the An. funestus s.s. on PermaNet 2.0. Anopheles funestus s.s. in Manhiça is extremely resistant to pyrethroids, and this area is clearly a pyrethroid-resistance hotspot. This could severely undermine vector control in this district if no appropriate countermeasures are undertaken. The National Malaria Control

  10. Toxicological effects of pyrethroids on non-target aquatic insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antwi, Frank B; Reddy, Gadi V P

    2015-11-01

    The toxicological effects of pyrethroids on non-target aquatic insects are mediated by several modes of entry of pyrethroids into aquatic ecosystems, as well as the toxicological characteristics of particular pyrethroids under field conditions. Toxicokinetics, movement across the integument of aquatic insects, and the toxicodynamics of pyrethroids are discussed, and their physiological, symptomatic and ecological effects evaluated. The relationship between pyrethroid toxicity and insecticide uptake is not fully defined. Based on laboratory and field data, it is likely that the susceptibility of aquatic insects (vector and non-vector) is related to biochemical and physiological constraints associated with life in aquatic ecosystems. Understanding factors that influence aquatic insects susceptibility to pyrethroids is critical for the effective and safe use of these compounds in areas adjacent to aquatic environments.

  11. Spectroscopic studies on the photochemical decarboxylation mechanisms of synthetic pyrethroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yusuke; Ishizaka, Shoji; Kitamura, Noboru

    2012-12-01

    A novel radical trapping technique combined with a fluorescence spectroscopic analysis has been employed to investigate the radical intermediates produced by photodecarboxylation of four synthetic pyrethroids: fenvalerate (SMD), fenpropathrin (DTL), cyphenothrin (GKL), and cypermethrin (AGT). Under photoirradiation at >290 nm, all pyrethroids underwent direct photolysis via homolytic cleavage of the carbon-oxygen bonds in the ester groups. The consumed amount of a nitroxide free radical, as a trapping agent for the intermediate radical of a pyrethroid, was determined by ESR, which was the measure of the reaction yield of a photochemically generated α-cyano-3-phenoxybenzyl radical common to all pyrethroids. The reactivities of the pyrethroids studied was in the sequence of SMD > DTL > GKL > AGT. Furthermore, nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy demonstrated that geminate recombination of the radical pair within a solvent cage is the main deactivation route of the photochemically generated α-cyano-3-phenoxybenzyl radical common for all pyrethroids studied.

  12. Using a near-infrared spectrometer to estimate the age of anopheles mosquitoes exposed to pyrethroids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggy T Sikulu

    Full Text Available We report on the accuracy of using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS to predict the age of Anopheles mosquitoes reared from wild larvae and a mixed age-wild adult population collected from pit traps after exposure to pyrethroids. The mosquitoes reared from wild larvae were estimated as <7 or ≥7 d old with an overall accuracy of 79%. The age categories of Anopheles mosquitoes that were not exposed to the insecticide papers were predicted with 78% accuracy whereas the age categories of resistant, susceptible and mosquitoes exposed to control papers were predicted with 82%, 78% and 79% accuracy, respectively. The ages of 85% of the wild-collected mixed-age Anopheles were predicted by NIRS as ≤8 d for both susceptible and resistant groups. The age structure of wild-collected mosquitoes was not significantly different for the pyrethroid-susceptible and pyrethroid-resistant mosquitoes (P = 0.210. Based on these findings, NIRS chronological age estimation technique for Anopheles mosquitoes may be independent of insecticide exposure and the environmental conditions to which the mosquitoes are exposed.

  13. Which intervention is better for malaria vector control: insecticide mixture long-lasting insecticidal nets or standard pyrethroid nets combined with indoor residual spraying?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngufor, Corine; Fagbohoun, Josias; Critchley, Jessica; N'Guessan, Raphael; Todjinou, Damien; Malone, David; Akogbeto, Martin; Rowland, Mark

    2017-08-16

    Malaria control today is threatened by widespread insecticide resistance in vector populations. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends the use of a mixture of unrelated insecticides for indoor residual spraying (IRS) and long-lasting insecticidal nets (LNs) or as a combination of interventions for improved vector control and insecticide resistance management. Studies investigating the efficacy of these different strategies are necessary. The efficacy of Interceptor(®) G2 LN, a newly developed LN treated with a mixture of chlorfenapyr (a pyrrole) and alpha-cypermethrin (a pyrethroid), was compared to a combined chlorfenapyr IRS and Interceptor(®) LN (a standard alpha-cypermethrin LN) intervention in experimental huts in Cove Southern Benin, against wild, free-flying, pyrethroid-resistant Anopheles gambiae s.l. A direct comparison was also made with a pyrethroid-only net (Interceptor(®) LN) alone and chorfenapyr IRS alone. WHO resistance bioassays performed during the trial demonstrated a pyrethroid resistance frequency of >90% in the wild An. gambiae s.l. from the Cove hut site. Mortality in the control (untreated net) hut was 5%. Mortality with Interceptor(®) LN (24%) was lower than with chlorfenapyr IRS alone (59%, P chlorfenapyr IRS intervention and the mixture net (Interceptor(®) G2 LN) provided significantly higher mortality rates (73 and 76%, respectively) and these did not differ significantly between both treatments (P = 0.15). Interceptor LN induced 46% blood-feeding inhibition compared to the control untreated net, while chlorfenapyr IRS alone provided none. Both mixture/combination strategies also induced substantial levels of blood-feeding inhibition (38% with combined interventions and 30% with Interceptor(®) G2 LN). A similar trend of improved mortality of pyrethroid-resistant An. gambiae s.l. from Cove was observed with Interceptor(®) G2 LN (79%) compared to Interceptor LN (42%, P chlorfenapyr and alpha-cypermethrin together as a

  14. Evaluation of Deep Subsurface Resistivity Imaging for Hydrofracture Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hibbs, Andrew [GroundMetrics, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Wilt, Michael [GroundMetrics, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    2016-09-28

    This report describes the results of the first of its kind monitoring of a hydrofracture operation with electromagnetic measurements. The researchers teamed with oil and gas producer Encana Corporation to design and execute a borehole to surface monitoring of three fracture stages at a well pad in central Colorado. The field project consisted of an equipment upgrade, a survey design and modeling phase, several weeks of data collection, and data processing and interpretation. Existing Depth to Surface Resistivity (DSR) instrumentation was upgraded to allow for continuous high precision recording from downhole sources. The full system can now collect data continuously for up to 72 hours, which is sufficient to measure data for 10 frac stages. Next we used numerical modeling and frac treatment data supplied by Encana to design a field survey to detect EM signal from induced fractures. Prior to modeling we developed a novel technique for using well casing as an antenna for a downhole source. Modeling shows that 1) a measurable response for an induced fracture could be achieved if the facture fluid was of high salinity 2) an optimum fracture response is created when the primary source field is parallel to the well casing but perpendicular to the fracture direction. In mid-July, 2014 we installed an array of more than 100 surface sensors, distributed above the treatment wells and extending for approximately 1 km north and 750 m eastward. We applied a 0.6 Hz square wave signal to a downhole current electrode located in a horizontal well 200 m offset from the treatment well with a return electrode on the surface. The data were transmitted to a recording trailer via Wi-Fi where we monitored receiver and transmitter channels continuously in a 72-hour period which covered 7 frac stages, three of which were high salinity. Although the background conditions were very noisy we were able to extract a clear signal from the high salinity stages. Initial data interpretation attempts

  15. Pyrethroid as a Substance of Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravesh Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a case of a 22-year-old Hispanic male with a history of bipolar disorder and methamphetamine dependence who was admitted after presenting with suicidal ideations by slashing his throat with a machete. The patient had been smoking and inhaling “processed” pyrethroid for about eight weeks as an inexpensive methamphetamine substitute. He reported experiencing a “rush” similar to methamphetamine after using pyrethroid from liquid insecticide that had been heated (electrocuted or sprayed on hot metal sheets until it crystallized. The patient presented with no significant physical markings or findings but claimed to have his suicidal ideations precipitated by concerns of ill effects of pyrethroid on his health. He also had positive urine drug screen for methamphetamine, which he admitted to using on the day of admission. We conclude that it is important for physicians to maintain a high level of suspicion for alternate and uncommon substances of abuse as well as risks for suicidal tendencies in these patients.

  16. Developmental neurotoxicity of pyrethroid insecticides in zebrafish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMicco, Amy; Cooper, Keith R; Richardson, Jason R; White, Lori A

    2010-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are one of the most commonly used residential and agricultural insecticides. Based on the increased use of pyrethroids and recent studies showing that pregnant women and children are exposed to pyrethroids, there are concerns over the potential for developmental neurotoxicity. However, there have been relatively few studies on the developmental neurotoxicity of pyrethroids. In this study, we sought to investigate the developmental toxicity of six common pyrethroids, three type I compounds (permethrin, resmethrin, and bifenthrin) and three type II compounds (deltamethrin, cypermethrin, and lambda-cyhalothrin), and to determine whether zebrafish embryos may be an appropriate model for studying the developmental neurotoxicity of pyrethroids. Exposure of zebrafish embryos to pyrethroids caused a dose-dependent increase in mortality and pericardial edema, with type II compounds being the most potent. At doses approaching the LC(50), permethrin and deltamethrin caused craniofacial abnormalities. These findings are consistent with mammalian studies demonstrating that pyrethroids are mildly teratogenic at very high doses. However, at lower doses, body axis curvature and spasms were observed, which were reminiscent of the classic syndromes observed with pyrethroid toxicity. Treatment with diazepam ameliorated the spasms, while treatment with the sodium channel antagonist MS-222 ameliorated both spasms and body curvature, suggesting that pyrethroid-induced neurotoxicity is similar in zebrafish and mammals. Taken in concert, these data suggest that zebrafish may be an appropriate alternative model to study the mechanism(s) responsible for the developmental neurotoxicity of pyrethroid insecticides and aid in identification of compounds that should be further tested in mammalian systems.

  17. Homology modeling of mosquito cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in pyrethroid metabolism: insights into differences in substrate selectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongnoparut Pornpimol

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytochrome P450 enzymes (P450s have been implicated in insecticide resistance. Anopheles minumus mosquito P450 isoforms CYP6AA3 and CYP6P7 are capable of metabolizing pyrethroid insecticides, however CYP6P8 lacks activity against this class of compounds. Findings Homology models of the three An. minimus P450 enzymes were constructed using the multiple template alignment method. The predicted enzyme model structures were compared and used for molecular docking with insecticides and compared with results of in vitro enzymatic assays. The three model structures comprise common P450 folds but differences in geometry of their active-site cavities and substrate access channels are prominent. The CYP6AA3 model has a large active site allowing it to accommodate multiple conformations of pyrethroids. The predicted CYP6P7 active site is more constrained and less accessible to binding of pyrethroids. Moreover the predicted hydrophobic interface in the active-site cavities of CYP6AA3 and CYP6P7 may contribute to their substrate selectivity. The absence of CYP6P8 activity toward pyrethroids appears to be due to its small substrate access channel and the presence of R114 and R216 that may prevent access of pyrethroids to the enzyme heme center. Conclusions Differences in active site topologies among CYPAA3, CYP6P7, and CYP6P8 enzymes may impact substrate binding and selectivity. Information obtained using homology models has the potential to enhance the understanding of pyrethroid metabolism and detoxification mediated by P450 enzymes.

  18. EFFECTS OF ACUTE PYRETHROID EXPOSURE ON THERMOREGULATION IN RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrethroid insecticides produce acute neurotoxicity in mammals. According to the FQPA mandate, the USEPA is required to consider the risk of cumulative toxicity posed to humans through exposure to pyrethroid mixtures. Thermoregulatory response (TR) is being used to determine if t...

  19. Towards an identification of the pyrethroid pharmacophore. A molecular modelling study of some pyrethroid esters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byberg, J R; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen; Klemmensen, P D

    1987-01-01

    . These pharmacophores are based on the relationship between molecular structure and biological activity for a number of pyrethroid esters. The pharmacophores, which describe the relative location in space of the unsaturated systems, the dimethyl groups and the ester moiety, may be useful in the design of novel...

  20. Monitoring bacterial resistance to chloramphenicol and other antibiotics by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry using selected reaction monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Anthony M; Medina, Audrie M; Royall, Ariel E; Herzog, Norbert K; Niesel, David W

    2013-06-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a growing problem worldwide. For this reason, clinical laboratories often determine the susceptibility of the bacterial isolate to a number of different antibiotics in order to establish the most effective antibiotic for treatment. Unfortunately, current susceptibility assays are time consuming. Antibiotic resistance often involves the chemical modification of an antibiotic to an inactive form by an enzyme expressed by the bacterium. Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) has the ability to quickly monitor and identify these chemical changes in an unprecedented time scale. In this work, we used SRM as a technique to determine the susceptibility of several different antibiotics to the chemically modifying enzymes β-lactamase and chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, enzymes used by bacteria to confer resistance to major classes of commonly used antibiotics. We also used this technique to directly monitor the effects of resistant bacteria grown in a broth containing a specific antibiotic. Because SRM is highly selective and can also identify chemical changes in a multitude of antibiotics in a single assay, SRM has the ability to detect organisms that are resistant to multiple antibiotics in a single assay. For these reasons, the use of SRM greatly reduces the time it takes to determine the susceptibility or resistance of an organism to a multitude of antibiotics by eliminating the time-consuming process found in other currently used methods.

  1. Muscle recovery after a session of resistance training monitored through serum creatine kinase

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    de Castro, Antonio Paulo Andre; Vianna, Jeferson Macedo; Damasceno, Vinicius de Oliveira; de Matos, Dihogo Gama; Filho, Mauro Lucio Mazini; Reis, Victor Manuel Machado

    2011-01-01

    De Castro APA, Vianna JM, Damasceno VO, Matos DG, Mazini Filho ML, Reis VMM. Muscle Recovery after a Session of Resistance Training Monitored through Serum Creatine Kinase. JEPonline 2011; 14(5):38-45...

  2. Monitoring of antimicrobial resistance among food animals: Principles and limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2004-01-01

    Large amounts of antimicrobial agents are in the production of food animals used for therapy and prophylactics of bacterial infections and in feed to promote growth. The use of antimicrobial agents causes problems in the therapy of infections through the selection for resistance among bacteria...... pathogenic for animals or humans. Current knowledge regarding the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance in food animals, the quantitative impact of the use of different antimicrobial agents on selection for resistance and the most appropriate treatment regimes to limit the development of resistance......, there are major differences between programmes designed to detect changes in a national population, individual herds or groups of animals. In addition, programmes have to be designed differently according to whether the aim is to determine changes in resistance for all antimicrobial agents or only...

  3. Quantitative resistance level (MIC) of Pasteurella multocida isolated from pigs between 2004 and 2006: national resistance monitoring by the BVL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, Heike; Schröer, Ulrike; Wallmann, Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    The National Resistance Monitoring of the Federal Office of Consumer Protection and Food Safety (BVL) is to determine the prevalence of resistance of bacterial pathogens from animals using a valid database. From 2004 to 2006, a total of 1,472 Pasteurella multocida strains isolated from pigs with acute respiratory tract diseases was submitted to the BVL and examined. Of these, 1,11 (75.5 %) were included in the study and tested using 24 different antimicrobial substances. The results showed that the resistance level is generally low, with the exception of the substances tetracycline, trimethoprim, and the combination trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. It also became clear that resistance data need to be evaluated separately for each of the animal production categories, so that a realistic figure of the current resistance level can be presented. This knowledge provides information about the resistance situation in Germany, and helps deduce the necessary management measures that must be taken to minimize resistance to antibiotics. Furthermore, it provides valuable information that can form the basis for empirical therapy, so that the National Resistance Monitoring makes an important contribution to the safety of food derived from animals and consequently aids the improvement of consumer protection.

  4. "Insecticide Resistance /Susceptibility Monitoring in Anopheles pulcherrimus (Diptera: Culicidae in Ghasreghand District, Sistan and Baluchistan Province, Iran"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AH Zahirnia

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Two organochlorine, one organophosphate, two carbamate and two pyrethroid insecticides have been studied for their comparative study against fieldcollected An.pulcherrimus. The trail was conducted in Ghasreghand district, Sistan and Baluchistan province, Southeastern Iran using WHO impregnated papers at the diagnostic dose. Results revealed that this species exhibit resistant to 0.4% dieldrin (mortality 86 ± 2.07. Dose response regression line from interval exposure times to 0.4% dieldrin showed that LT50 and LT90 was 14 and 76 minutes, respectively. The efficacles of other insecticides such as 4% DDT, 5% malathion, 0.1% bendiocarb, 0.1% propoxur, 0.25% permethrin and 0.1% lambdacyhalothrin were maximum when mosquitoes exposed 1 hour at diagnostic dose followed by 24 hour recovery period.

  5. Insecticide resistance in Anopheles gambiae from south-western Chad, Central Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etang Josiane

    2008-09-01

    . Conclusion This first investigation of malaria vector susceptibility to insecticides in Chad revealed variable levels of resistance to pyrethroid insecticides (permethrin and deltamethrin in most An. gambiae s.l. populations. Resistance was associated with the L1014F kdr mutation in the S form of An. gambiae s.s.. Alternative mechanisms, probably of metabolic origin are involved in An. arabiensis. These results emphasize the crucial need for insecticide resistance monitoring and in-depth investigation of resistance mechanisms in malaria vectors in Chad. The impact of reduced susceptibility to pyrethroids on ITN efficacy should be further assessed.

  6. Evaluation of an antimicrobial resistance monitoring program for campylobacter in poultry by simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regula, G.; Wong, Danilo Lo Fo; Ledergerber, U.

    2005-01-01

    An ideal national resistance monitoring program should deliver a precise estimate of the resistance situation for a given combination of bacteria and antimicrobial at a low cost. To achieve this, decisions need to be made on the number of samples to be collected at each of different possible...... sampling points. Existing methods of sample size calculation can not be used to solve this problem, because sampling decisions do not only depend on the prevalence of resistance and sensitivity and specificity of resistance testing, but also on the prevalence of the bacteria, and test characteristics...... of isolation of these bacteria. Our aim was to develop a stochastic simulation model that optimized a national resistance monitoring program, taking multi-stage sampling, imperfect sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic tests, and cost-effectiveness considerations into account. The process of resistance...

  7. Electrical resistance tomography to monitor vadose water movement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, A.; Daily, W. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); LaBrecque, D. (Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States))

    1991-09-01

    We report results of one test in which Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) was used to map the changes in electrical resistivity in the vadose zone as a function of time while water infiltration occurred. The ERT images were used to infer shape and movement of the infiltration plume in the unsaturated soil. We supplied a continuous water source at a point about 10 feet below the surface (at the end of a shallow screened hole) for only a short time -- 2.5 hours. This pulsed source introduced a slug'' of water whose infiltration was followed to about 60 foot depth during a 23 hour period. The ERT images show resistivity decreases as the water content of the vadose zone increased while water was added to the soil; the resistivity of the soil later increased after the supply of water was cut-off and the induced soil moisture began to subside.

  8. Pyrethroid insecticides in urban salmon streams of the Pacific Northwest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weston, D.P., E-mail: dweston@berkeley.edu [Department of Integrative Biology, University of California, 3060 Valley Life Sciences Bldg., Berkeley, CA 94720-3140 (United States); Asbell, A.M., E-mail: aasbell@berkeley.edu [Department of Integrative Biology, University of California, 3060 Valley Life Sciences Bldg., Berkeley, CA 94720-3140 (United States); Hecht, S.A., E-mail: scott.hecht@noaa.gov [NOAA Fisheries, Office of Protected Resources, 510 Desmond Drive S.E., Lacey, WA 98503 (United States); Scholz, N.L., E-mail: nathaniel.scholz@noaa.gov [NOAA Fisheries, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle, WA 98112 (United States); Lydy, M.J., E-mail: mlydy@siu.edu [Fisheries and Illinois Aquaculture Center and Department of Zoology, Southern Illinois University, 171 Life Sciences II, Carbondale, IL 62901 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Urban streams of the Pacific Northwest provide spawning and rearing habitat for a variety of salmon species, and food availability for developing salmon could be adversely affected by pesticide residues in these waterbodies. Sediments from Oregon and Washington streams were sampled to determine if current-use pyrethroid insecticides from residential neighborhoods were reaching aquatic habitats, and if they were at concentrations acutely toxic to sensitive invertebrates. Approximately one-third of the 35 sediment samples contained measurable pyrethroids. Bifenthrin was the pyrethroid of greatest concern with regards to aquatic life toxicity, consistent with prior studies elsewhere. Toxicity to Hyalella azteca and/or Chironomus dilutus was found in two sediment samples at standard testing temperature (23 deg. C), and in one additional sample at a more environmentally realistic temperature (13 deg. C). Given the temperature dependency of pyrethroid toxicity, low temperatures typical of northwest streams can increase the potential for toxicity above that indicated by standard testing protocols. - Highlights: > Salmon-bearing creeks can be adversely impacted by insecticides from urban runoff. > Pyrethroid insecticides were found in one-third of the creeks in Washington and Oregon. > Two creeks contained concentrations acutely lethal to sensitive invertebrates. > Bifenthrin was of greatest concern, though less than in prior studies. > Standard toxicity testing underestimates the ecological risk of pyrethroids. - Pyrethroid insecticides are present in sediments of urban creeks of Oregon and Washington, though less commonly than in studies elsewhere in the U.S.

  9. Electropolymerized multiwalled carbon nanotubes/polypyrrole fiber for solid-phase microextraction and its applications in the determination of pyrethroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liangbi; Chen, Wenfeng; Ma, Chunhua; Du, Dan; Chen, Xi

    2011-03-15

    A novel solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber coated with multiwalled carbon nanotubes/polypyrrole (MWCNTs/Ppy) was prepared with an electrochemical method and used for the extraction of pyrethroids in natural water samples. The results showed that the MWCNTs/Ppy coated fiber had high organic stability, and remarkable acid and alkali resistance. In addition, the MWCNTs/Ppy coated fiber was more effective and superior to commercial PDMS and PDMS/DVD fibers in extracting pyrethroids in natural water samples. Under optimized conditions, the calibration curves were found to be linear from 0.001 to 10 μg mL(-1) for five of the six pyrethroids studied, the exception being fenvalerate (which was from 0.005 to 10 μg mL(-1)), and detection limits were within the range 0.12-0.43 ng mL(-1). The recoveries of the pyrethroids spiked in water samples at 10 ng mL(-1) ranged from 83 to 112%.

  10. Resistance to Conventional and New Insecticides in House Flies (Diptera: Muscidae) From Poultry Facilities in Punjab, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Naeem; Ali Shad, Sarfraz; Ismail, Muhammad

    2015-04-01

    House flies, Musca domestica L., are pests of poultry facilities and have the ability to develop resistance against different insecticides. This study was conducted to assess the resistance status of house flies to pyrethroid, organophosphate, and novel chemistry insecticides from poultry facilities in Punjab, Pakistan. Five adult house fly populations were studied for their resistance status to selected conventional and novel chemistry insecticides. For four pyrethroids, the range of resistance ratios was 14-55-fold for cypermethrin, 11-45-fold for bifenthrin, 0.84-4.06-fold for deltamethrin, and 4.42-24-fold for lambda-cyhalothrin when compared with a susceptible population. Very low levels of resistance were found to deltamethrin compared with the other pyrethroids. For the three organophosphate insecticides, the range of resistance ratios was 1.70-16-fold for profenofos, 7.50-60-fold for chlorpyrifos, and 4.37-53-fold for triazophos. Very low levels of resistance were found to profenofos compared with the other insecticides. For five novel chemistry insecticides, the range of resistance ratios was 1.20-16.00-fold for fipronil, 3.73-7.16-fold for spinosad, 3.06-23-fold for indoxacarb, 0.96-5.88-fold for abamectin, and 0.56-3.07-fold for emamectin benzoate. Rotation of insecticides with different modes of action showing no or very low resistance may prevent insecticide resistance in house flies. Regular insecticide resistance monitoring and integrated management plans on poultry farms are required to prevent resistance development, field control failures, and environmental pollution. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Monitoring Central Venous Catheter Resistance to Predict Imminent Occlusion: A Prospective Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Joshua; Tang, Li; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E; Brennan, Rachel C; Shook, David R; Stokes, Dennis C; Monagle, Paul; Curtis, Nigel; Worth, Leon J; Allison, Kim; Sun, Yilun; Flynn, Patricia M

    2015-01-01

    Long-term central venous catheters are essential for the management of chronic medical conditions, including childhood cancer. Catheter occlusion is associated with an increased risk of subsequent complications, including bloodstream infection, venous thrombosis, and catheter fracture. Therefore, predicting and pre-emptively treating occlusions should prevent complications, but no method for predicting such occlusions has been developed. We conducted a prospective trial to determine the feasibility, acceptability, and efficacy of catheter-resistance monitoring, a novel approach to predicting central venous catheter occlusion in pediatric patients. Participants who had tunneled catheters and were receiving treatment for cancer or undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation underwent weekly catheter-resistance monitoring for up to 12 weeks. Resistance was assessed by measuring the inline pressure at multiple flow-rates via a syringe pump system fitted with a pressure-sensing transducer. When turbulent flow through the device was evident, resistance was not estimated, and the result was noted as "non-laminar." Ten patients attended 113 catheter-resistance monitoring visits. Elevated catheter resistance (>8.8% increase) was strongly associated with the subsequent development of acute catheter occlusion within 10 days (odds ratio = 6.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-21.5; p change in resistance greater than 8.8% or a non-laminar result predicted subsequent occlusion (odds ratio = 6.8; 95% confidence interval, 2.0-22.8; p = 0.002; sensitivity, 80%; specificity, 63%). Participants rated catheter-resistance monitoring as highly acceptable. In this pediatric hematology and oncology population, catheter-resistance monitoring is feasible, acceptable, and predicts imminent catheter occlusion. Larger studies are required to validate these findings, assess the predictive value for other clinical outcomes, and determine the impact of pre-emptive therapy. Clinicaltrials

  12. Absence of knockdown resistance suggests metabolic resistance in the main malaria vectors of the Mekong region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sochantha Tho

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As insecticide resistance may jeopardize the successful malaria control programmes in the Mekong region, a large investigation was previously conducted in the Mekong countries to assess the susceptibility of the main malaria vectors against DDT and pyrethroid insecticides. It showed that the main vector, Anopheles epiroticus, was highly pyrethroid-resistant in the Mekong delta, whereas Anopheles minimus sensu lato was pyrethroid-resistant in northern Vietnam. Anopheles dirus sensu stricto showed possible resistance to type II pyrethroids in central Vietnam. Anopheles subpictus was DDT- and pyrethroid-resistant in the Mekong Delta. The present study intends to explore the resistance mechanisms involved. Methods By use of molecular assays and biochemical assays the presence of the two major insecticide resistance mechanisms, knockdown and metabolic resistance, were assessed in the main malaria vectors of the Mekong region. Results Two FRET/MCA assays and one PCR-RFLP were developed to screen a large number of Anopheles populations from the Mekong region for the presence of knockdown resistance (kdr, but no kdr mutation was observed in any of the study species. Biochemical assays suggest an esterase mediated pyrethroid detoxification in An. epiroticus and An. subpictus of the Mekong delta. The DDT resistance in An. subpictus might be conferred to a high GST activity. The pyrethroid resistance in An. minimus s.l. is possibly associated with increased detoxification by esterases and P450 monooxygenases. Conclusion As different metabolic enzyme systems might be responsible for the pyrethroid and DDT resistance in the main vectors, each species may have a different response to alternative insecticides, which might complicate the malaria vector control in the Mekong region.

  13. Relative potencies of Type I and Type II pyrethroids for inhibition of spontaneous firing in neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrethroids insecticides commonly used in pest control disrupt the normal function of voltage-sensitive sodium channels. We have previously demonstrated that permethrin (a Type I pyrethroid) and deltamethrin (a Type II pyrethroid) inhibit sodium channel-dependent spontaneous netw...

  14. Determination of seven pyrethroids and six pyrethrins in water by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ccanccapa, alexander; Masia, Ana; Pico, Yolanda

    2016-04-01

    Pyrethroids are the synthetic analogues of pyrethrins which were developed as pesticides from the extracts of dried and powdered flower heads of Chrysanthemum cinerariaefolium. They are increasingly used in agriculture due to their broad biological activity and slow development of pest resistance. Contamination of fresh-water ecosystems appears either because of the direct discharge of industrial and agricultural effluents or as a result of effluents from sewage treatment works; residues can thus accumulate in the surrounding biosphere [1, 2]. These substances, mostly determined by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) can be difficult to analyse due to their volatility and degradability. The purpose of this study is, as an alternative, to develop a fast and sensitive multi-residue method for the target analysis of 7 pyrethroids and the 6 natural pyrethrins currently used in water samples by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The compounds included in the study were acrinathrin, etofenprox, cyfluthrin, esfenvalerate, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin and flumethrin as pyrethroids and a commercial mix of pyrethrins containing Cinerin I, Jasmolin I, pyrethrin I, cinerin II, jasmolin II, pyrethrins II in different percentages. As a preliminary step, the ionization and fragmentation of the compounds were optimized injecting individual solutions of each analyte at 10 ppm in the system, using a gradient elution profile of water-methanol both with 10 mM ammonium formate. The ESI conditions were: capillary voltage 4000 V, nebulizer15 psi, source temperature 300◦C and gas flow 10 L min-1. [M+H]+, [M+Na]+ ,[M+NH3]+ ,[M+NH4+]+ were tested as precursor ions. The most intense signal was for ammonium adduct for all compounds. The optimal fragmentor range for product ions were between 20 to 80 ev and the collision energy ranged between 5 to 86 ev. The efficiency of the method was tested in water samples from Turia River without any known exposure to

  15. Monitoring of early warning indicators for HIV drug resistance in antiretroviral therapy clinics in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzangare, J; Gonese, E; Mugurungi, O; Shamu, T; Apollo, T; Bennett, D E; Kelley, K F; Jordan, M R; Chakanyuka, C; Cham, F; Banda, R M

    2012-05-01

    Monitoring human immunodeficiency virus drug resistance (HIVDR) early warning indicators (EWIs) can help national antiretroviral treatment (ART) programs to identify clinic factors associated with HIVDR emergence and provide evidence to support national program and clinic-level adjustments, if necessary. World Health Organization-recommended HIVDR EWIs were monitored in Zimbabwe using routinely available data at selected ART clinics between 2007 and 2009. As Zimbabwe's national ART coverage increases, improved ART information systems are required to strengthen routine national ART monitoring and evaluation and facilitate scale-up of HIVDR EWI monitoring. Attention should be paid to minimizing loss to follow-up, supporting adherence, and ensuring clinic-level drug supply continuity.

  16. USE OF CARBOXYLESTERASE ACTIVITY TO REMOVE PYRETHROID-ASSOCIATED TOXICITY TO CERIODAPHNIA DUBIA AND HYALELLA AZTECA IN TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION EVALUATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheelock, Craig E.; Miller, Jeff L.; Miller, Mike J.; Phillips, Bryn M.; Huntley, Sarah A.; Gee, Shirley J.; Tjeerdema, Ronald S.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2006-01-01

    Increases in the use and application of pyrethroid insecticides have resulted in concern regarding potential effects on aquatic ecosystems. Methods for the detection of pyrethroids in receiving waters are required to monitor environmental levels of these insecticides. One method employed for the identification of causes of toxicity in aquatic samples is the toxicity identification evaluation (TIE); however, current TIE protocols do not include specific methods for pyrethroid detection. Recent work identified carboxylesterase treatment as a useful method for removing/detecting pyrethroid-associated toxicity. The present study has extended this earlier work and examined the ability of carboxylesterase activity to remove permethrin- and bifenthrin-associated toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia and Hyalella azteca in a variety of matrices, including laboratory water, Sacramento River (CA, USA) water, and Salinas River (CA, USA) interstitial water. Esterase activity successfully removed 1,000 ng/L of permethrin-associated toxicity and 600 ng/L of bifenthrin-associated toxicity to C. dubia in Sacramento River water. In interstitial water, 200 ng/L of permethrin-associated toxicity and 60 ng/L of bifenthrin-associated toxicity to H. azteca were removed. The selectivity of the method was validated using heat-inactivated enzyme and bovine serum albumin, demonstrating that catalytically active esterase is required. Further studies showed that the enzyme is not significantly inhibited by metals. Matrix effects on esterase activity were examined with municipal effluent and seawater in addition to the matrices discussed above. Results confirmed that the esterase retains catalytic function in a diverse array of matrices, suggesting that this technique can be adapted to a variety of aquatic samples. These data demonstrate the utility of carboxylesterase treatment as a viable step to detect the presence of pyrethroids in receiving waters. PMID:16629136

  17. National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System: Two Decades of Advancing Public Health Through Integrated Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Beth E; Tate, Heather; Plumblee, Jodie R; Dessai, Uday; Whichard, Jean M; Thacker, Eileen L; Robertson Hale, Kis; Wilson, Wanda; Friedman, Cindy R; Griffin, Patricia M; McDermott, Patrick F

    2017-08-09

    Drug-resistant bacterial infections pose a serious and growing public health threat globally. In this review, we describe the role of the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) in providing data that help address the resistance problem and show how such a program can have broad positive impacts on public health. NARMS was formed two decades ago to help assess the consequences to human health arising from the use of antimicrobial drugs in food animal production in the United States. A collaboration among the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the United States Department of Agriculture, and state and local health departments, NARMS uses an integrated "One Health" approach to monitor antimicrobial resistance in enteric bacteria from humans, retail meat, and food animals. NARMS has adapted to changing needs and threats by expanding surveillance catchment areas, examining new isolate sources, adding bacteria, adjusting sampling schemes, and modifying antimicrobial agents tested. NARMS data are not only essential for ensuring that antimicrobial drugs approved for food animals are used in ways that are safe for human health but they also help address broader food safety priorities. NARMS surveillance, applied research studies, and outbreak isolate testing provide data on the emergence of drug-resistant enteric bacteria; genetic mechanisms underlying resistance; movement of bacterial populations among humans, food, and food animals; and sources and outcomes of resistant and susceptible infections. These data can be used to guide and evaluate the impact of science-based policies, regulatory actions, antimicrobial stewardship initiatives, and other public health efforts aimed at preserving drug effectiveness, improving patient outcomes, and preventing infections. Many improvements have been made to NARMS over time and the program will continue to adapt to address emerging resistance threats, changes in

  18. Comparative transcriptome analyses of deltamethrin-resistant and -susceptible Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes from Kenya by RNA-Seq.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariangela Bonizzoni

    Full Text Available Malaria causes more than 300 million clinical cases and 665,000 deaths each year, and the majority of the mortality and morbidity occurs in sub-Saharan Africa. Due to the lack of effective vaccines and wide-spread resistance to antimalarial drugs, mosquito control is the primary method of malaria prevention and control. Currently, malaria vector control relies on the use of insecticides, primarily pyrethroids. The extensive use of insecticides has imposed strong selection pressures for resistance in the mosquito populations. Consequently, resistance to pyrethroids in Anopheles gambiae, the main malaria vector in sub-Saharan Africa, has become a major obstacle for malaria control. A key element of resistance management is the identification of resistance mechanisms and subsequent development of reliable resistance monitoring tools. Field-derived An. gambiae from Western Kenya were phenotyped as deltamethrin-resistant or -susceptible by the standard WHO tube test, and their expression profile compared by RNA-seq. Based on the current annotation of the An. gambiae genome, a total of 1,093 transcripts were detected as significantly differentially accumulated between deltamethrin-resistant and -susceptible mosquitoes. These transcripts are distributed over the entire genome, with a large number mapping in QTLs previously linked to pyrethorid resistance, and correspond to heat-shock proteins, metabolic and transport functions, signal transduction activities, cytoskeleton and others. The detected differences in transcript accumulation levels between resistant and susceptible mosquitoes reflect transcripts directly or indirectly correlated with pyrethroid resistance. RNA-seq data also were used to perform a de-novo Cufflinks assembly of the An. gambiae genome.

  19. Slope monitoring by using 2-D resistivity method at Sungai Batu, Pulau Pinang, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azman, Muhamad Iqbal Mubarak Faharul; Yusof, Azim Hilmy Mohd; Ismail, Nur Azwin; Ismail, Noer El Hidayah

    2017-07-01

    Slope is a dynamic system of geo-environmental phenomena that related to the movement of the soil and rock masses. In Pulau Pinang, the occurrence of slope related phenomena such as landslide and rock fall has become a huge issue especially during rainy season as the government would have to invest more for the people safety. 2-D resistivity method is one of the geophysical methods that can be applied to overcome this issue thus prepare countermeasure actions. Monitoring is one of the common acquisition technique that has been used in solving such issue. This technique was applied to identify and monitor changes at the suspected area and thus, countermeasure steps can be taken accordingly and not blindfolded. Starting from August until November 2016, a 200 m survey line of 2-D resistivity survey had been conducted monthly at Sungai Batu, Pulau Pinang slope for monitoring purpose. Three resistivity ranges were able to detect within the subsurface. Resistivity value of 250 - 400 Ωm indicated the low resistivity value and interpreted as the weak zone located at distance of 90 - 120 m with depth of 10 m. Intermediate resistivity value was interpreted as weathered granite zone with resistivity value of 400 - 1500 Ωm was found at almost along survey line. High resistivity value was > 5000 Ωm and interpreted as granitic bedrock located at depth of > 20 m. Aside from weathered granite zone and weak zone, a fracture was found develop over time at distance of 130 - 140 m. The features found have the potential to be the cause for slope failure phenomena to occur. As a conclusion, monitoring slope using 2-D resistivity method is a success and indeed helpful in overcome landslide and rock fall issue as a pre-countermeasure action.

  20. Monitoring antifolate resistance in intermittent preventive therapy for malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venkatesan, Meera; Alifrangis, Michael; Roper, Cally;

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum genes Pfdhfr and Pfdhps have rendered sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) ineffective for malaria treatment in most regions of the world. Yet, SP is efficacious as intermittent preventive therapy in pregnant women (IPTp) and infants (IPTi) and as seasonal malaria...... control in children (SMC). SP-IPTp is being widely implemented in sub-Saharan Africa. SP-IPTi is recommended where the prevalence of SP-resistant malaria parasites is low, whereas SMC is recommended for areas of intense seasonal malaria transmission. The continuing success of these interventions depends...

  1. Evaluation of atmospheric corrosion on electroplated zinc and zinc nickel coatings by Electrical Resistance (ER) Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Per

    2013-01-01

    ER (Electrical Resistance) probes provide a measurement of metal loss, measured at any time when a metal is exposed to the real environment. The precise electrical resistance monitoring system can evaluate the corrosion to the level of nanometers, if the conductivity is compensated for temperature...... for the automotive industry, off-shore construction or component and devices used in harsh industrial environments. The ER monitoring makes it possible to study the corrosion rate on-line in remote locations as a function of temperature, relative humidity and changes in the composition of the atmosphere. Different...

  2. Monitoring of antibiotic consumption and development of resistance by enterobacteria in a tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veličković-Radovanović, R; Stefanović, N; Damnjanović, I; Kocić, B; Antić, S; Dinić, M; Petrović, J; Mitić, R; Catić-Djordjević, A

    2015-08-01

    Antibiotics are the most frequently used drugs in hospitalized patients, but studies have shown that the prescribed antibiotics may be inappropriate and may contribute to antibiotic resistance. We carried out a survey of antibiotic consumption and antibiotic resistance in our tertiary care university hospital, from 2005 to 2013. We focus on cephalosporins, one of the most prescribed groups of antibiotics in the tertiary health care. The objective was to identify any relationship between ceftriaxone consumption and resistance by enterobacteria. Antibiotics consumption and antimicrobial resistance were monitored in the tertiary care university hospital from 2005 to 2013. Data on the use of antibiotics in surgical inpatients were obtained and expressed as defined daily doses per 100 bed days. Bacterial resistances were given as percentages of resistant isolates. There was an increasing trend in cephalosporins consumption from 9·56 DBD (2005) to 23·32 DBD (2013), with ceftriaxone as the most frequently used cephalosporin, 3·6 DBD (2005) to 10·78 DBD (2013). E. coli and P. mirabilis resistance to ceftriaxone increased significantly from 22% in 2005 to 47% in 2013 and from 31% in 2005 to 60% in 2013, respectively. We found a significant correlation between ceftriaxone consumption and E. coli resistance (r = 0·895, P antibiotic. E. coli and P. mirabilis resistance to ceftriaxone increased significantly over the study period. E. coli resistance increased with ceftriaxone consumption. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Pyrethroid pesticide effects on behavioral responses of aquatic isopods to danger cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Carolyn K; Poquette, Signe R; Whitlow, W Lindsay

    2014-04-01

    The present study sought to evaluate the behavioral responses of non-target organisms in order to determine whether phototactic responses of isopods to danger cues are altered as a function of exposure to the pyrethroid pesticides λ-cyhalothrin and bifenthrin. Experiments conducted on Gnorimosphaeroma oregonensis identified sublethal behavioral responses to pyrethroids, λ-cyhalothrin and bifenthrin at concentrations 0.15 ng/mL, 0.025 ng/mL, and 0.005 ng/mL. Experimental setup tested isopod phototactic responses across six treatments: control, pyrethroid, hemolymph, predator, hemolymph + pyrethroid, and predator + pyrethroid. Isopods exhibited no preference for phototactic responses in the control and pyrethroid treatments. When exposed to danger cues (hemolymph or predator), isopods exhibited significant negative phototaxis, as expected. When exposure to danger cues was combined with pyrethroids, isopods again exhibited no preference for phototactic response. Experiments indicate that pyrethroids diminish isopod's negatively phototactic response to danger cues.

  4. Influence of Pyrethroid Insecticides on Sodium and Calcium Influx in Neocortical Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrethroid insecticides bind to voltage-gated sodium channels and modify their gating kinetics, thereby disrupting neuronal function. Using murine neocortical neurons in primary culture, we have compared the ability of 11 structurally diverse pyrethroid insecticides to evoke Na+ ...

  5. Monitoring a Nuclear Factor-κB Signature of Drug Resistance in Multiple Myeloma*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Yun; Remily-Wood, Elizabeth R.; Oliveira, Vasco; Yarde, Danielle; He, Lili; Cheng, Jin Q.; Mathews, Linda; Boucher, Kelly; Cubitt, Christopher; Perez, Lia; Gauthier, Ted J.; Eschrich, Steven A.; Shain, Kenneth H.; Dalton, William S.; Hazlehurst, Lori; Koomen, John M.

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of acquired drug resistance results from multiple compensatory mechanisms acting to prevent cell death. Simultaneous monitoring of proteins involved in drug resistance is a major challenge for both elucidation of the underlying biology and development of candidate biomarkers for assessment of personalized cancer therapy. Here, we have utilized an integrated analytical platform based on SDS-PAGE protein fractionation prior to liquid chromatography coupled to multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry, a versatile and powerful tool for targeted quantification of proteins in complex matrices, to evaluate a well-characterized model system of melphalan resistance in multiple myeloma (MM). Quantitative assays were developed to measure protein expression related to signaling events and biological processes relevant to melphalan resistance in multiple myeloma, specifically: nuclear factor-κB subunits, members of the Bcl-2 family of apoptosis-regulating proteins, and Fanconi Anemia DNA repair components. SDS-PAGE protein fractionation prior to liquid chromatography coupled to multiple reaction monitoring methods were developed for quantification of these selected target proteins in amounts of material compatible with direct translation to clinical specimens (i.e. less than 50,000 cells). As proof of principle, both relative and absolute quantification were performed on cell line models of MM to compare protein expression before and after drug treatment in naïve cells and in drug resistant cells; these liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring results are compared with existing literature and Western blots. The initial stage of a systems biology platform for examining drug resistance in MM has been implemented in cell line models and has been translated to MM cells isolated from a patient. The ultimate application of this platform could assist in clinical decision-making for individualized patient treatment. Although these specific assays have

  6. Monitoring a nuclear factor-κB signature of drug resistance in multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Yun; Remily-Wood, Elizabeth R; Oliveira, Vasco; Yarde, Danielle; He, Lili; Cheng, Jin Q; Mathews, Linda; Boucher, Kelly; Cubitt, Christopher; Perez, Lia; Gauthier, Ted J; Eschrich, Steven A; Shain, Kenneth H; Dalton, William S; Hazlehurst, Lori; Koomen, John M

    2011-11-01

    The emergence of acquired drug resistance results from multiple compensatory mechanisms acting to prevent cell death. Simultaneous monitoring of proteins involved in drug resistance is a major challenge for both elucidation of the underlying biology and development of candidate biomarkers for assessment of personalized cancer therapy. Here, we have utilized an integrated analytical platform based on SDS-PAGE protein fractionation prior to liquid chromatography coupled to multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry, a versatile and powerful tool for targeted quantification of proteins in complex matrices, to evaluate a well-characterized model system of melphalan resistance in multiple myeloma (MM). Quantitative assays were developed to measure protein expression related to signaling events and biological processes relevant to melphalan resistance in multiple myeloma, specifically: nuclear factor-κB subunits, members of the Bcl-2 family of apoptosis-regulating proteins, and Fanconi Anemia DNA repair components. SDS-PAGE protein fractionation prior to liquid chromatography coupled to multiple reaction monitoring methods were developed for quantification of these selected target proteins in amounts of material compatible with direct translation to clinical specimens (i.e. less than 50,000 cells). As proof of principle, both relative and absolute quantification were performed on cell line models of MM to compare protein expression before and after drug treatment in naïve cells and in drug resistant cells; these liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring results are compared with existing literature and Western blots. The initial stage of a systems biology platform for examining drug resistance in MM has been implemented in cell line models and has been translated to MM cells isolated from a patient. The ultimate application of this platform could assist in clinical decision-making for individualized patient treatment. Although these specific assays have

  7. Resistance monitoring of human pathogenic bacteria in Germany, SWOT analysis and examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Wolfgang

    2006-06-01

    Determination of antibiotic resistance has two main goals in clinical-microbiological diagnosis. One aspect is preservation of antibacterial chemotherapy. Furthermore, trends in resistance development should be monitored and should serve as an early warning-system for occurrence and spread of new and clinically important antibiotic resistances. Plenty of data on antibiotic resistance is gathered on a routine basis in medical-microbiological diagnosis and often it is stored in electronic databases that could be interlinked. The main reason that the available data is not being used for resistance monitoring in Germany is the widely used methodology of the agar diffusion test. It is the cheapest and by far the most inaccurate method of determining resistance. The test results are not always comparable with tests for all substance groups from national standards (also limited international comparability). Trend analysis of the resistance situation in Germany can therefore only be determined through individual studies. These studies are discussed according to a SWOT analysis (SWOT = Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats).

  8. Permanent electrical resistivity measurements for monitoring water circulation in clayey landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gance, J.; Malet, J.-P.; Supper, R.; Sailhac, P.; Ottowitz, D.; Jochum, B.

    2016-03-01

    Landslides developed on clay-rich slopes are controlled by the soil water regime and the groundwater circulation. Spatially-distributed and high frequency observations of these hydrological processes are important for improving our understanding and prediction of landslide triggering. This work presents observed changes in electrical resistivity monitored at the Super-Sauze clayey landslide with the GEOMON 4D resistivity instrument installed permanently on-site for a period of one year. A methodological framework for processing the raw measurement is proposed. It includes the filtering of the resistivity dataset, the correction of the effects of non-hydrological factors (sensitivity of the device, sensitivity to soil temperature and fluid conductivity, presence of fissures in the topsoil) on the filtered resistivity values. The interpretation is based on a statistical analysis to define possible relationships between the rainfall characteristics, the soil hydrological observations and the soil electrical resistivity response. During the monitoring period, no significant relationships between the electrical response and the measured hydrological parameters are evidenced. We discuss the limitations of the method due to the effect of heat exchange between the groundwater, the vadose zone water and the rainwater that hides the variations of resistivity due to variations of the soil water content. We demonstrate that despite the absence of hydrogeophysical information for the vadose zone, the sensitivity of electrical resistivity monitoring to temperature variations allows imaging water fluxes in the saturated zone and highlighting the existence of matrix and preferential flows that does not occur at the same time and for the same duration. We conclude on the necessity to combine electrical resistivity measurements with distributed soil temperature measurements.

  9. 76 FR 37356 - 2011 Scientific Meeting of the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System; Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-27

    ... adequate sampling for resistance trends? (2) What are some additional sources for unbiased food animal... Monitoring System.'' The topic to be discussed is animal and retail sampling methods for the National...-5974. Contact Person: Aleta Sindelar, Center for Veterinary Medicine (HFV-3), Food and Drug...

  10. Selection for high levamisole resistance in Haemonchus contortus monitored with an egg-hatch assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, R.; Borgsteede, F.H.M.; Boersema, J.H.; Roos, M.H.

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the characteristics of selection for levamisole resistance in Haemonchus contortus, the consecutive nematode generations of an in vivo selection were monitored with a newly developed egg-hatch assay. The in vivo selection was started with a population not previously exposed to any ant

  11. Series Resistance Monitoring for Photovoltaic Modules in the Vicinity of MPP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sera, Dezso

    2010-01-01

    the time period with reduced power production. This paper focuses on the estimation of series resistance of flat silicone PV panels or arrays during operation, in the vicinity of their MPP. The method presented in this paper helps to detect failures by monitoring changes in the panel’s or array’s series...

  12. Monitoring the Resistive Plate Chambers in the Muon Spectrometer of ATLAS.

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Qahtani, Shaikha

    2017-01-01

    A software was developed to monitor the resistive plate chambers. The purpose of the program is to detect any weak or dead chambers and locate them for repair. The first use of the program was able to spot several chambers with problems to be investigated.

  13. Metalloprobes for functional monitoring of tumour multidrug resistance by nuclear imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Filipa; Paulo, António; Santos, Isabel

    2011-05-28

    Cancer chemotherapy has been used since the early 1950s and still remains one the major therapeutic options for many malignant tumours. A major obstacle to successful cancer chemotherapy is drug resistance. Frequently resistance is intrinsic to the cancer, but as therapy becomes more effective, acquired resistance has also become more frequent. One form of resistance, named multidrug resistance (MDR), is responsible for the failure of tumours to respond to a wide spectrum of chemotherapeutic agents. The in vivo monitoring of MDR could assist in the selection of patients for therapy and can avoid ineffective and potentially toxic treatments. Therefore, methods for functionally interrogating MDR transport activity have been sought, namely single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET). Cationic radiotracers originally developed as SPECT myocardial imaging agents, such as [(99m)Tc(MIBI)(6)](+) and [(99m)Tc(tetrofosmin)(2)O(2)](+), are used for both early cancer detection and non-invasive monitoring of the tumour MDR transport function. With the ultimate goal of obtaining better performing radioprobes for MDR imaging, other metal-based complexes and/or small molecules have also been synthesized and biologically evaluated. In this perspective we will report on the chemical efforts made to find metalloprobes for in vivo monitoring of MDR by nuclear imaging techniques. The current knowledge on the biological mechanisms and proteins involved in tumour MDR will be also briefly presented, as its understanding is invaluable for the rational design and biological evaluation of new radioprobes.

  14. IDENTIFIKASI MUTASI NOKTAH PADA” GEN VOLTAGE GATED SODIUM CHANNEL” Aedes aegypti RESISTEN TERHADAP INSEKTISIDA PYRETHROID DI SEMARANG JAWA TENGAH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widiarti Widiarti

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The identification of a point mutation in voltage-gated sodium channel gene was conducted on the major of dengue vector Aedes aegypti from Simongan Village, Semarang Municypality Central Java, which occurred to be resistant toward malathion and cypermethrin base on WHO methodology standard (impregnated paper.  The objectives of this studi was to identify the point mutation on the codon 1014  of voltage gated sodium channel gene of Ae. aegypti mosquitoes which was associated  with the vector resistance of pyrethroid group. The detection of a point mutation of  voltage-gated sodium channel was conducted using DNA extraction and semi nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification of the mosquitoes resistant strain. The susceptibility test (as a screening resistant phenotype showed that few samples of Ae. aegypti from Simongan Village, Semarang Municypality Central Java resistant to malathion 0,8 % ( organophosphate group and cypermethrin 0,25 % (pyrethroid group. The sequencing result showed that there has been a mutation from the leucine (TTA which turned to be phenylalanin (TTT (kdr-w type on the codon 1014 at the voltage gated sodium channel gene of Ae. aegypti mosquitoes from  Simongan Village, Semarang Municypality Central Java, which was associated with the pyrethroid insecticide resistance. There were 78 % mosquitoes which brought  mutation alel kdr-w type on the codon 1014 F. Therefore dengue vector control activities should not use any pyrethroid insecticide group. Key  Words :  Resistance,  Aedes   aegypti,  Voltage   Gated   Sodium  Channel    (VGSC,  Point  Mutation. Abstrak Identifikasi mutasi noktah pada  gen Voltage Gated Sodium Channel (VGSC telah dilakukan pada nyamuk Aedes aegypti dari Kelurahan Simongan Kota Semarang, yang telah resisten terhadap insektisida Malathion dan Cypermethrin pada screening susceptibility test (Standar WHO Impregnated paper. Tujuan penelitian adalah untuk mendeteksi

  15. Simultaneous On-State Voltage and Bond-Wire Resistance Monitoring of Silicon Carbide MOSFETs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Baker

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In fast switching power semiconductors, the use of a fourth terminal to provide the reference potential for the gate signal—known as a kelvin-source terminal—is becoming common. The introduction of this terminal presents opportunities for condition monitoring systems. This article demonstrates how the voltage between the kelvin-source and power-source can be used to specifically monitor bond-wire degradation. Meanwhile, the drain to kelvin-source voltage can be monitored to track defects in the semiconductor die or gate driver. Through an accelerated aging test on 20 A Silicon Carbide Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor-Field-Effect Transistors (MOSFETs, it is shown that there are opposing trends in the evolution of the on-state resistances of both the bond-wires and the MOSFET die. In summary, after 50,000 temperature cycles, the resistance of the bond-wires increased by up to 2 mΩ, while the on-state resistance of the MOSFET dies decreased by approximately 1 mΩ. The conventional failure precursor (monitoring a single forward voltage cannot distinguish between semiconductor die or bond-wire degradation. Therefore, the ability to monitor both these parameters due to the presence of an auxiliary-source terminal can provide more detailed information regarding the aging process of a device.

  16. Towards mechanisms-guided resistivity-based monitoring of damage evolution in laminated composites

    KAUST Repository

    Lubineau, Gilles

    2013-04-05

    A convenient health monitoring technique for detecting degradation in laminated composite is to monitor the change of electrical resistance along multiple conduction paths within the structure. Yet, the relations between the global modification of resistivity and the exact underlying damage map is still unclear that makes diffcult to interpret these nondestructive-testing results. The challenge is then to be able to reconstruct from these global observation the underlying damage map. This is even more diffcult due to the numerous underlying damage mechanisms that can take place either at the inter laminar of intra laminar level. This paper intends to provide some preliminary insights about strategies to recover the damage state based only on global measurements. We focus here on transverse cracking detection. We introduce the homogenization process that defines at the meso scale an equivalent homogeneous ply that is energetically equivalent to the cracked one. This can be used as a first tool to reconstruct damage maps based on global resistivity measurements.

  17. Estimation of pyrethroid pesticide intake using regression ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Population-based estimates of pesticide intake are needed to characterize exposure for particular demographic groups based on their dietary behaviors. Regression modeling performed on measurements of selected pesticides in composited duplicate diet samples allowed (1) estimation of pesticide intakes for a defined demographic community, and (2) comparison of dietary pesticide intakes between the composite and individual samples. Extant databases were useful for assigning individual samples to composites, but they could not provide the breadth of information needed to facilitate measurable levels in every composite. Composite sample measurements were found to be good predictors of pyrethroid pesticide levels in their individual sample constituents where sufficient measurements are available above the method detection limit. Statistical inference shows little evidence of differences between individual and composite measurements and suggests that regression modeling of food groups based on composite dietary samples may provide an effective tool for estimating dietary pesticide intake for a defined population. The research presented in the journal article will improve community's ability to determine exposures through the dietary route with a less burdensome and costly method.

  18. Histological Changes in the Lung and Liver Tissues in Mice Exposed to Pyrethroid Inhalation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadeem SHEIKH

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Cypermethrin, a type II pyrethroid, is one of the most widely used insecticides in Pakistan. It is considered to be a safe pesticide; however, the possible health hazards of this pyrethroid have been ignored. Cypermethrin may become an air pollutant and adversely affect the health of non-target organisms, leading to acute or chronic disorders. The present work aims to investigate the effects of cypermethrin on lung and liver tissues due to inhalation exposure. The study is performed on 16 mature Swiss albino mice, including controls. The animals are divided into 4 groups (4 mice each and exposed to 0.5 % dilution of cypermethrin in an inhalation chamber (40×35×25 cm3 for different time periods, whereas control animals are not exposed to any insecticide. The histopathological changes in lungs and liver tissues reveal that cypermethrin exposure induces time dependent changes in the liver and in the lungs. It damages the normal organization of liver tissues, causing liver injury due to necrosis, significant decrease in number of cells, and widening of sinusoids and fibrosis. Inhalation exposure of cypermethrin results in significant hyperplasia, clumping of cells and necrosis in the lungs. It also induces pulmonary edema, alveolitis, and pulmonary fibrosis by the deposition of collagen. Taking these findings together, it may be concluded that cypermethrin and other pyrethroids cause hazardous effects in non-target organisms through inhalation exposure. Serious efforts and awareness are required to monitor and reduce the insecticide induced health hazards in third world countries.doi:10.14456/WJST.2014.67

  19. Simultaneous determination of eight metabolites of organophosphate and pyrethroid pesticides in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xin Y; Sun, Li S; Huang, Meng Y; Xu, Wei L; Wang, Ying; Wang, Na

    2017-01-02

    A simultaneous method for quantifying eight metabolites of organophosphate pesticides and pyrethroid pesticides in urine samples has been established. The analytes were extracted using liquid-liquid extraction coupled with WCX solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridges. Eight metabolites were chemically derivatized before analysis using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS-MS). The separation was performed on a HP-5MS capillary column (30 m × 0.25 mm × 0.25 µm) with temperature programming. The detection was performed under electro-spray ionization (ESI) in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. An internal standard method was used. The extraction solvent, types of SPE cartridges and eluents were optimized by comparing the sample recoveries under different conditions. The results showed that the calibration curves of the five organophosphorus pesticides metabolites were linear in the range of 0.2-200 μg/L (r(2) ≥ 0.992) and that of the three pyrethroid pesticides metabolites were linear in the range of 0.025-250 μg/L (r(2) ≥ 0.991). The limits of detection (LODs, S/N ≥ 3) and the limits of quantification (LOQs, S/N ≥ 10) of the eight metabolites were 0.008-0.833 μg/L and 0.25-2.5 μg/L, respectively. The recoveries of the eight metabolites ranged from 54.08% to 82.49%. This efficient, stable, and cost-effective method is adequate to handle the large number of samples required for surveying the exposure level of organophosphorus and pyrethroid pesticides in the general population.

  20. Evidence of carbamate resistance in urban populations of Anopheles gambiae s.s. mosquitoes resistant to DDT and deltamethrin insecticides in Lagos, South-Western Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oduola Adedayo O

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Resistance monitoring is essential in ensuring the success of insecticide based vector control programmes. This study was carried out to assess the susceptibility status of urban populations of Anopheles gambiae to carbamate insecticide being considered for vector control in mosquito populations previously reported to be resistant to DDT and permethrin. Methods Two – three day old adult female Anopheles mosquitoes reared from larval collections in 11 study sites from Local Government Areas of Lagos were exposed to test papers impregnated with DDT 4%, deltamethrin 0.05% and propoxur 0.1% insecticides. Additional tests were carried out to determine the susceptibility status of the Anopheles gambiae population to bendiocarb insecticide. Members of the A. gambiae complex, the molecular forms, were identified by PCR assays. The involvement of metabolic enzymes in carbamate resistance was assessed using Piperonyl butoxide (PBO synergist assays. The presence of kdr-w/e and ace-1R point mutations responsible for DDT-pyrethroid and carbamate resistance mechanisms was also investigated by PCR. Results Propoxur resistance was found in 10 out of the 11 study sites. Resistance to three classes of insecticides was observed in five urban localities. Mortality rates in mosquitoes exposed to deltamethrin and propoxur did not show any significant difference (P > 0.05 but was significantly higher (P A. gambiae s.s (M form. The kdr -w point mutation at allelic frequencies between 45%-77% was identified as one of the resistant mechanisms responsible for DDT and pyrethroid resistance. Ace-1R point mutation was absent in the carbamate resistant population. However, the possible involvement of metabolic resistance was confirmed by synergistic assays conducted. Conclusion Evidence of carbamate resistance in A. gambiae populations already harbouring resistance to DDT and permethrin is a clear indication that calls for the implementation of

  1. Application of column tests and electrical resistivity methods for leachate transport monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wychowaniak Dorota

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Development of the human civilization leads to the pollution of environment. One of the contamination which are a real threat to soil and groundwater are leachates from landfills. In this paper the solute transport through soil was considered. For this purpose, the laboratory column tests of chlorides tracer and leachates transport on two soil samples have been carried out. Furthermore, the electrical resistivity method was applied as auxiliary tool to follow the movements of solute through the soil column what allowed to compare between the results obtained with column test method and electrical resistivity measurements. Breakthrough curves obtained by conductivity and resistivity methods represents similar trends which leads to the conclusion about the suitability of electrical resistivity methods for contamination transport monitoring in soil-water systems.

  2. Experiments on exploring and monitoring landslip-mass using geoelectric resistivity observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AN Jin-zhen; ZHOU Ping-gen; MA Mai-ning; CHEN Feng; DONG Ying; ZHONG Pei-lin

    2008-01-01

    In the experiments, a high-density resistivity method is used to explore the electric structure of landslip mass, and a resistivity-changing anisotropy method is used to monitor the orientation and speed of main fracture extending of landslip mass. The results are as follows. ① The exploring experiments have verified a part of creep deformation borderline, the depth and thickness of groundwater horizon, and the property of superstrata in the landslip mass investigated formerly, which have proved that the landslip belts contain rich groundwater; ② The main fracture extending orien-tation inferred from the resistivity-changing anisotropy accords with the strike of fracture belt of landslip mass de-duced from GPS displacement. Moreover, the changing rates of resistivity-changing anisotropy coefficient matches with the changing speeds of deep displacement of landslip mass were measured by suing clinometer in the bore-hole.

  3. Small scale monitoring of a bioremediation barrier using miniature electrical resistivity tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentenac, Philippe; Hogson, Tom; Keenan, Helen; Kulessa, Bernd

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess, in the laboratory, the efficiency of a barrier of oxygen release compound (ORC) to block and divert a diesel plume migration in a scaled aquifer model using miniature electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) as the monitoring system. Two plumes of contaminant (diesel) were injected in a soil model made of local sand and clay. The diesel plumes migration was imaged and monitored using a miniature resistivity array system that has proved to be accurate in soil resistivity variations in small-scaled models of soil. ERT results reflected the lateral spreading and diversion of the diesel plumes in the unsaturated zone. One of the contaminant plumes was partially blocked by the ORC barrier and a diversion and reorganisation of the diesel in the soil matrix was observed. The technique of time-lapse ERT imaging showed that a dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contaminant like diesel can be monitored through a bioremediation barrier and the technique is well suited to monitor the efficiency of the barrier. Therefore, miniature ERT as a small-scale modelling tool could complement conventional techniques, which require more expensive and intrusive site investigation prior to remediation.

  4. Residual pyrethroids in fresh horticultural products in Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldana-Madrid, Maria L; Valenzuela-Quintanar, Ana I; Silveira-Gramont, Maria I; Rodríguez-Olibarría, Guillermo; Grajeda-Cota, Patricia; Zuno-Floriano, Fabiola G; Miller, Marion G

    2011-10-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the presence of cyhialothrin, cyfluthrin, cypermethrin, fenvalerate, and deltamethrin in vegetables produced and consumed in Sonora, Mexico. A total of 345 samples were collected from cluster sampling of markets and fields. Approximately 9% of the samples tested positive for pyrethroids (residue range 0.004-0.573 mg kg(-1)). Based on the results, the potential toxicological risk of human exposure to the pyrethroid insecticides measured in vegetables appears to be minimal, with the estimated exposure being 1,000 times lower than admissible levels.

  5. The "peeling" method to process apparent resistivity data for earthquake precursory monitoring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Considering the fact that there is only one pair of fixed potential poles in one direction used to monitor the resis-tivity changes under the observatory station which may indicate process of earthquake preparation, based on the precondition that the resistivity structure is 1-dimensional under the observatory station, and by way of equivalent model put forward by the authors, this paper suggests a kind of method trying to separate the resistivity changes in deep layers from that of the shallow layer. Analysis shows that, to obtain the same measured data with the same array, any a multi-layered geo-electrical structure can be equivalently taken as a two-layered one, we call it equivalent model. In this paper, the resistivity and thickness of the upper layer of the equivalent model are equal to that of the first layer of the original one, the resistivity of the lower layer of the equivalent model is obtained with calculation according to the requirement of equivalence, its value is relevant with the resistivities and thicknesses of all layer of the original model except for the first one, so the resistivity change of the equivalent layer can indi-cate the synthetic effect of variation of all layers of the original model except for the first one. The primary resear-ch results show that this method can work well.

  6. Resistance Monitoring for Eight Insecticides on the Sweetpotato Whitefly (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaoli; Zhang, Youjun; Yang, Xin; Xie, Wen; Wu, Qingjun

    2017-03-01

    The sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), is an important pest of many crops worldwide. Because control of B. tabaci still depends on the application of insecticides in China, monitoring the insecticide resistance of B. tabaci populations is essential for achieving control and for managing resistance. In this study, field populations of B. tabaci on vegetables were collected in three regions of China in 2011, 2012, and 2013. The resistance of these populations (all of which were determined to belong to biotype Q) to eight insecticides (abamectin, spinetoram, imidacloprid, thiamethoxam, acetamiprid, nitenpyram, chlorpyrifos, and bifenthrin) was assessed by the leaf-dip method. No resistance to abamectin and spinetoram was detected. All of the B. tabaci populations exhibited resistance to neonicotinoid insecticides; the resistance was 3.6- to 125.0-fold greater than that of a susceptible reference strain. The traditional insecticides chlorpyrifos and bifenthrin had very low toxicity. Bemisia tabaci specimens in some regions exhibited annual differences in resistance to some of the insecticides. The data presented will be helpful for making decisions on the proper insecticide usage in the field.

  7. A better resolution for integrating methods for monitoring Plasmodium falciparum resistance to antimalarial drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Ghani, Rashad; Al-Maktari, Mohamed T; Al-Shibani, Latifa A; Allam, Amal F

    2014-09-01

    Effective chemotherapy is the mainstay of malaria control. However, resistance of falciparum malaria to antimalarial drugs compromised the efforts to eliminate the disease and led to the resurgence of malaria epidemics. Three main approaches are used to monitor antimalarial drug efficacy and drug resistance; namely, in vivo trials, in vitro/ex vivo assays and molecular markers of drug resistance. Each approach has its implications of use as well as its advantages and drawbacks. Therefore, there is a need to use an integrated approach that would give the utmost effect to detect resistance as early as its emergence and to track it once spread. Such integration becomes increasingly needed in the era of artemisinin-based combination therapy as a forward action to deter resistance. The existence of regional and global networks for the standardization of methodology, provision of high quality reagents for the assessment of antimalarial drug resistance and dissemination of open-access data would help in approaching an integrated resistance surveillance system on a global scale.

  8. Monitoring of olive oil mills' wastes using electrical resistivity tomography techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simyrdanis, Kleanthis; Papadopoulos, Nikos; Kirkou, Stella; Sarris, Apostolos; Tsourlos, Panagiotis

    2014-08-01

    Olive oil mills' wastes (OOMW) are one of the byproducts of the oil production that can lead to serious environmental pollution when they are deposited in ponds dug on the ground surface. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) method can provide a valuable tool in order to monitor through time the physical flow of the wastes into the subsurface. ERT could potentially locate the electrical signature due to lower resistivity values resulting from the leakage of OOMW to the subsurface. For this purpose, two vertical boreholes were installed (12m depth, 9 m apart) in the vicinity of an existing pond which is filled with OOMW during the oil production period. The test site is situated in Saint Andreas village about 15km south of the city of Rethymno (Crete, Greece). Surface ERT measurements were collected along multiple lines in order to reconstruct the subsurface resistivity models. Data acquisition was performed with standard and optimized electrode configuration protocols. The monitoring survey includes the ERT data collection for a period of time. The study was initiated before the OOMW were deposited in the pond, so resistivity fluctuations are expected due to the flow of OOMW in the porous subsurface media through time. Preliminary results show the good correlation of the ERT images with the drilled geological formations and the identification of low resistivity subsurface zone that could be attributed to the flow of the wastes within the porous layers.

  9. Series Resistance Monitoring for Photovoltaic Modules in the Vicinity of MPP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sera, Dezso

    2010-01-01

    Faults and performance deterioration issues related to increases of the series resistance in PV modules or arrays are one of the most common causes to decrease the energy yield of photovoltaic installations. Therefore, the early detection of such failure types is very important in order to minimize...... the time period with reduced power production. This paper focuses on the estimation of series resistance of flat silicone PV panels or arrays during operation, in the vicinity of their MPP. The method presented in this paper helps to detect failures by monitoring changes in the panel’s or array’s series...

  10. Evaluation of atmospheric corrosion on electroplated zinc and zinc nickel coatings by Electrical Resistance (ER) Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Per

    2013-01-01

    ER (Electrical Resistance) probes provide a measurement of metal loss, measured at any time when a metal is exposed to the real environment. The precise electrical resistance monitoring system can evaluate the corrosion to the level of nanometers, if the conductivity is compensated for temperature...... and magnetic fields. With this technique very important information about the durability of a new conversion coatings for aluminum, zinc and zinc alloys exposed to unknown atmospheric conditions can be gathered. This is expected to have a major impact on a number of industrial segments, such as test cars...

  11. Molecular determinants on the insect sodium channel for the specific action of type II pyrethroid insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Luo, Ningguang; Liu, Zhiqi; Lee, Jung-Eun; Khambay, Bhupinder; Dong, Ke

    2009-01-15

    Pyrethroid insecticides are classified as type I or type II based on their distinct symptomology and effects on sodium channel gating. Structurally, type II pyrethroids possess an alpha-cyano group at the phenylbenzyl alcohol position, which is lacking in type I pyrethroids. Both type I and type II pyrethroids inhibit deactivation consequently prolonging the opening of sodium channels. However, type II pyrethroids inhibit the deactivation of sodium channels to a greater extent than type I pyrethroids inducing much slower decaying of tail currents upon repolarization. The molecular basis of a type II-specific action, however, is not known. Here we report the identification of a residue G(1111) and two positively charged lysines immediately downstream of G(1111) in the intracellular linker connecting domains II and III of the cockroach sodium channel that are specifically involved in the action of type II pyrethroids, but not in the action of type I pyrethroids. Deletion of G(1111), a consequence of alternative splicing, reduced the sodium channel sensitivity to type II pyrethroids, but had no effect on channel sensitivity to type I pyrethroids. Interestingly, charge neutralization or charge reversal of two positively charged lysines (Ks) downstream of G(1111) had a similar effect. These results provide the molecular insight into the type II-specific interaction of pyrethroids with the sodium channel at the molecular level.

  12. Long-term autonomous resistivity monitoring of oil-contaminated sediments from the Deepwater Horizon spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heenan, J. W.; Slater, L. D.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Atekwana, E. A.; Ross, C.; Nolan, J. T.; Atekwana, E. A.; Werkema, D. D.; Fathepure, B.

    2012-12-01

    outside of the contaminated location exhibit relatively uniform resistivity or show clear evidence of seasonal effect. Temperature-corrected resistivity changes show no direct correlation with pore fluid specific conductance changes, suggesting that specific conductance changes (e.g. due to tides) have little influence on imaged resistivity structure. Microbial data suggest that resistivity changes within the contaminated location resulted from biodegradation, showing the presence of native populations capable of degrading aromatic hydrocarbons at salinities ranging from 6 to 15 % NaCl within the contaminated location. Aqueous geochemical measurements performed on samples from the site further indicate that at depth intervals coincident with the resistivity anomaly, marked increases in the concentration of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were observed suggesting biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbon although other DIC generating processes such as organic matter degradation coupled to sulfate and iron reduction were also prominent. This experiment demonstrates the potential viability of long-term autonomous electrical monitoring as a means of decreasing the frequency of more costly and invasive chemical analysis of natural attenuation.

  13. Experimental results on rock resistivity and its applications in monitoring and predicting natural disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianguo; Zhu, Tao; Tang, Baolin

    2017-04-01

    There have been many earthquakes occurring in Chinese Mainland. These earthquakes, especially large earthquakes, often cause immeasurable loss. For instance, the 2008 Wenchuan Ms8.0 earthquake killed 70, 000 people and caused 17, 000 people missing. It is well known that this earthquake was not predicted. Why? Were there no precursors? After analyzing the geo-electrical resistivity recording at Chengdu station which is only about 36 km to the epicenter, we find that resistivity had changed abnormally very significantly along NE direction but no outstanding abnormal changes had been observed along NW direction before the earthquake. Perhaps this non-consistent changes result in that this earthquake was not predicted. However, in another standpoint, can another observation way be found to supplement the current geo-electrical resistivity observation in Chinese Mainland in order to improve the probability of catching the precursor? This motivates us to conduct experiments in lab and field. Apparent resistivity data are acquired along three common-midpoint measuring lines during the fixed-rate uniaxial compression on two sets of dry man-made samples and a Magnetite sample. We construct the relative resistivity change images (RRCIs). Our results indicate that all RRCIs show a trending change with stress: with the increase of stress, the resistivity-decreased region (RDR) in the RRCIs shrinks/expands, while the resistivity-increased region (RIR) expands/shrinks gradually, which is in agreement with the field experimental results of earthquake monitoring (Feng et al., 2001). Our results encourage us to conclude that the trending changes in RRCI with stress could probably become a useful indicator in monitoring and predicting earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and large-scale geologic movements. This work is supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC, Grant 41574083).

  14. Evaluation of organophosphorus and synthetic pyrethroid insecticides against six vector mosquitoe species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montada Dorta Domingo

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Three organophosphorus compounds- malathion, folithion and temephos- and two synthetic pyrethroids- alphamethrin and deltamethrin- were used for monitoring the susceptibility status of larvae and adults of six vector mosquitoe species: Culex quinquefasciatus (Filariasis and Aedes albopictus (Dengue (both laboratory and field strains; laboratory strains of Aedes aegypti (Dengue, Anopheles slephensi and Anopheles culicifacies (Malaria, and Culex tritaeniorhynchus (Japanese encephalitis in India. From the LC50 values obtained for these insecticides, it was found that all mosquito species including the field strains of Cx. quinquefasciatus and Ae. albopictus were highly susceptible Except for Cx. quinquefasciatus (field strain against malathion, 100% mortality was observed at the discriminating dosages recommended by World Health Organization. The residual effect of alphamethrin, deltamethrin, malathion and folithion at 25 mg (ai/m² on different surfaces against six species of vector mosquitoes showed that alphamethrin was the most effective on all four treated surfaces (mud, plywood, cement and thatch. Nevertheless, residual efficacy lasted longer on thatch than on the other surfaces. Therefore, synthetic pyrethroids such as alphamethrin can be effectively employed in integrated vector control operations.

  15. Evaluation of organophosphorus and synthetic pyrethroid insecticides against six vector mosquitoe species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingo Montada Dorta

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available Three organophosphorus compounds- malathion, folithion and temephos- and two synthetic pyrethroids- alphamethrin and deltamethrin- were used for monitoring the susceptibility status of larvae and adults of six vector mosquitoe species: Culex quinquefasciatus (Filariasis and Aedes albopictus (Dengue (both laboratory and field strains; laboratory strains of Aedes aegypti (Dengue, Anopheles slephensi and Anopheles culicifacies (Malaria, and Culex tritaeniorhynchus (Japanese encephalitis in India. From the LC50 values obtained for these insecticides, it was found that all mosquito species including the field strains of Cx. quinquefasciatus and Ae. albopictus were highly susceptible Except for Cx. quinquefasciatus (field strain against malathion, 100% mortality was observed at the discriminating dosages recommended by World Health Organization. The residual effect of alphamethrin, deltamethrin, malathion and folithion at 25 mg (ai/m² on different surfaces against six species of vector mosquitoes showed that alphamethrin was the most effective on all four treated surfaces (mud, plywood, cement and thatch. Nevertheless, residual efficacy lasted longer on thatch than on the other surfaces. Therefore, synthetic pyrethroids such as alphamethrin can be effectively employed in integrated vector control operations.

  16. A novel fast response and radiation-resistant scintillator detector for beam loss monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Y.; Tang, Z.; Li, C.; Li, X.; Shao, M.

    2017-07-01

    At high luminosity area, beam loss monitor with fast response and high radiation resistance is crucial for accelerator operation. In this article, we report the design and test results of a fast response and radiation-resistant scintillator detector as the beam loss monitor for high luminosity collider, especially at low energy region such as RFQ. The detector is consisted of a 2 cm× 2 cm× 0.5 cm LYSO crystal readout by a 6 mm × 6 mm Silicon photomultiplier. Test results from various radioactive sources show that the detector has good sensitivity to photons from tens of keV to several MeV with good linearity and energy resolution (23% for 60 keV γ-ray). For field test, two such detectors are installed outside of the vacuum chamber shell of an 800 MeV electron storage ring. The details of the test and results are introduced.

  17. Estimation of Recharge from Long-Term Monitoring of Saline Tracer Transport Using Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haarder, Eline Bojsen; Jensen, Karsten Høgh; Binley, Andrew;

    2015-01-01

    The movement of a saline tracer added to the soil surface was monitored in the unsaturated zone using cross-borehole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and subjected to natural rainfall conditions. The ERT data were inverted and corrected for subsurface temperature changes, and spatial moment...... methods. In September 2011, a saline tracer was added across a 142-m2 area at the surface at an application rate mimicking natural infiltration. The movement of the saline tracer front was monitored using cross-borehole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT); data were collected on a daily to weekly...... basis and continued for 1 yr after tracer application. The ERT data were inverted and corrected for temperature changes in the subsurface, and spatial moment analysis was used to calculate the tracer mass, position of the center of mass, and thereby the downwardly recharging flux. The recovered mass...

  18. Protective efficacy of Anopheles minimus CYP6P7 and CYP6AA3 against cytotoxicity of pyrethroid insecticides in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) insect cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duangkaew, P; Kaewpa, D; Rongnoparut, P

    2011-08-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) are enzymes known to metabolize a wide variety of compounds including insecticides. Their overexpression leading to enhanced insecticide detoxification could result in insecticide resistance in insects. The increased mRNA expression of two P450 genes, CYP6P7 and CYP6AA3, has been previously observed in laboratory-selected deltamethrin-resistant Anopheles minimus, a major malaria vector in Southeast Asia, suggesting their role in detoxification of pyrethroids. In this study CYP6P7 and CYP6AA3 were expressed in insect Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells via baculovirusdirected expression system. Insecticide detoxification capabilities of Sf9 cells with and without expression of CYP6P7 or CYP6AA3 were evaluated using 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2- yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays. The results revealed that CYP6P7- or CYP6AA3-expressing cells showed significantly higher cytoprotective capability than parental Sf9 cells against cytotoxicity of pyrethroids including permethrin, cypermethrin and deltamethrin. Such cytoprotective effect was not observed for bioallethrin (pyrethroid), chlorpyrifos (organophosphate) and propoxur (carbamate). Moreover, expression of CYP6AA3, but not CYP6P7, could protect cells against λ-cyhalothrin cytotoxicity. In MTT assays upon co-incubation with piperonyl butoxide (P450 inhibitor), cytoprotective ability of CYP6P7 and CYP6AA3 against deltamethrin was diminished, implying that pyrethroid detoxification was due to activities of P450 enzymes. Insecticide detoxification capabilities of CYP6P7 and CYP6AA3 observed from MTT assays were correlated to their pyrethroid metabolizing activities observed from in vitro reconstitution enzymatic assays. Thus MTT assays using cells expressing P450 enzymes of interest could be primarily used to determine detoxification activities of enzymes against cytotoxic insecticides.

  19. Antimicrobial resistance monitoring projects for zoonotic and indicator bacteria of animal origin: common aspects and differences between EASSA and EFSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyaert, Hilde; de Jong, Anno; Simjee, Shabbir; Thomas, Valérie

    2014-07-16

    Resistance monitoring programmes are essential to generate data for inclusion in the scientific risk assessment of the potential for transmission of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria or their resistance determinants from food-producing animals to humans. This review compares the technical specifications on monitoring of antimicrobial resistance in zoonotic Salmonella, Campylobacter and indicator Escherichia coli and Enterococcus as performed by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) with veterinary pharmaceutical industry's European Antimicrobial Susceptibility Surveillance in Animals (EASSA) programme. The authors conclude that most of EFSA's recent monitoring recommendations have been covered by EASSA since the start of the latter programme in 1998. The major difference between the two programmes is the classification into 'susceptible' versus 'resistant'. While EFSA categorises all isolates with an MIC value above the epidemiological cut-off value as 'resistant', EASSA differentiates between 'percentage decreased susceptible' and 'percentage clinical resistant' strains by applying both epidemiological cut-off values and clinical breakpoints. Because there is still a need to further improve harmonisation among individual EU Member State activities, Animal Health Industry welcomes EFSA's initiative to further improve the quality of resistance monitoring as it is of utmost importance to apply standardised collection procedures and harmonised susceptibility testing, when monitoring antimicrobial resistance across Europe.

  20. Monitoring CO2 migration in a shallow sand aquifer using 3D crosshole electrical resistivity tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Xianjin; Lassen, Rune Nørbæk; Jensen, Karsten Høgh;

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) crosshole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was used to monitor a pilot CO2 injection experiment at Vrøgum, western Denmark. The purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of the ERT method for detection of small electrical conductivity (EC) changes during the first 2....... The combined HBB and VBB data sets were inverted using a difference inversion algorithm for cancellation of coherent noises and enhanced resolution of small changes. ERT detected the small bulk EC changes (resistive gaseous CO2. The primary factors that control...... bulk EC changes may be caused by limited and variable ERT resolution, low ERT sensitivity to resistive anomalies and uncalibrated CO2 gas saturation. ERT data show a broader CO2 plume while water sample EC had higher fine-scale variability. Our ERT electrode configuration can be optimized for more...

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING OF LEAKS USING TIME LAPSED LONG ELECTRODE ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RUCKER DF; FINK JB; LOKE MH; MYERS DA

    2009-11-05

    Highly industrialized areas pose significant challenges for surface based electrical resistivity characterization and monitoring due to the high degree of metallic infrastructure. The infrastructure is typically several orders of magnitude more conductive than the desired targets, preventing the geophysicist from obtaining a clear picture of the subsurface. These challenges may be minimized if steel-cased wells are used as long electrodes. We demonstrate a method of using long electrodes in a complex nuclear waste facility to monitor a simulated leak from an underground storage tank. The leak was simulated by injecting high conductivity fluid in a perforated well and the resistivity measurements were made before and after the leak test. The data were processed in four dimensions, where a regularization procedure was applied in both the time and space domains. The results showed a lowered resistivity feature develop south of the injection site. The time lapsed regularization parameter had a strong influence on the differences in inverted resistivity between the pre and post datasets, potentially making calibration of the results to specific hydrogeologic parameters difficult.

  2. Neurotoxicological effects and the mode of action of pyrethroid insecticides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijverberg, H.P.M.; Bercken, Joep van den

    1990-01-01

    Neuroexcitatory symptoms of acute poisoning of vertebrates by pyrethroids are related to the ability of these insecticides to modify electrical activity in various parts of the nervous system. Repetitive nerve activity, particularly in the sensory nervous system, membrane depolarization, and enhance

  3. In vivo dermal absorption of pyrethroid pesticides in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The potential for exposure to pyrethroid pesticides has risen recently because of their increased use. The objective of this study was to examine the in vivo dermal absorption of bifenthrin, deltamethrin and permethrin in the rat. Hair on the dorsal side of anesthetized adult m...

  4. Immunotoxicity of the pyrethroid insecticides deltametrin and alpha-cypermetrin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard; Claesson, M. H.; Ropke, C.

    1996-01-01

    The synthetic pyrethroids deltametrin and alpha-cypermetrin were studied for effects on the immune system in 28-day studies in F344 male rats. Sixteen rats per group were dosed with either deltametrin 0, 1, 5, or 10 mg/kg body wt./day or alpha-cypermetrin 0, 4, 8, or 12 mg/kg body wt./day in soy ...

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING OF LEAKS USING TIME LAPSED LONG ELECTRODE ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MYERS DA; RUCKER DF; FINK JB; LOKE MH

    2009-12-16

    Highly industrialized areas pose challenges for surface electrical resistivity characterization due to metallic infrastructure. The infrastructure is typically more conductive than the desired targets and will mask the deeper subsurface information. These challenges may be minimized if steel-cased wells are used as long electrodes in the area near the target. We demonstrate a method of using long electrodes to electrically monitor a simulated leak from an underground storage tank with both synthetic examples and a field demonstration. The synthetic examples place a simple target of varying electrical properties beneath a very low resistivity layer. The layer is meant to replicate the effects of infrastructure. Both surface and long electrodes are tested on the synthetic domain. The leak demonstration for the field experiment is simulated by injecting a high conductivity fluid in a perforated well within the S tank farm at Hanford, and the resistivity measurements are made before and after the leak test. All data are processed in four dimensions, where a regularization procedure is applied in both the time and space domains. The synthetic test case shows that the long electrode ERM could detect relative changes in resistivity that are commensurate with the differing target properties. The surface electrodes, on the other hand, had a more difficult time matching the original target's footprint. The field results shows a lowered resistivity feature develop south of the injection site after cessation of the injections. The time lapsed regularization parameter has a strong influence on the differences in inverted resistivity between the pre and post injection datasets, but the interpretation of the target is consistent across all values of the parameter. The long electrode ERM method may provide a tool for near real-time monitoring of leaking underground storage tanks.

  6. HIV-1 drug resistance mutations among antiretroviral-naive HIV-1-infected patients in Asia: results from the TREAT Asia Studies to Evaluate Resistance-Monitoring Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sungkanuparph, Somnuek; Oyomopito, Rebecca; Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Sirisanthana, Thira; Li, Patrick C K; Kantipong, Pacharee; Lee, Christopher K C; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Messerschmidt, Liesl; Law, Matthew G; Phanuphak, Praphan

    2011-04-15

    Of 682 antiretroviral-naïve patients initiating antiretroviral therapy in a prospective, multicenter human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) drug resistance monitoring study involving 8 sites in Hong Kong, Malaysia, and Thailand, the prevalence of patients with ≥1 drug resistance mutation was 13.8%. Primary HIV drug resistance is emerging after rapid scaling-up of antiretroviral therapy use in Asia.

  7. Monitoring radio-frequency heating of contaminated soils using electrical resistance tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, A.L.; Daily, W.D.

    1993-09-01

    Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) was used to monitor a radio-frequency heating process for the insitu remediation of volatile organic compounds from subsurface water and soil at the Savannah River Site, near Aiken, South Carolina. A dipole antenna located in a horizontal well in the unsaturated zone was used to heat a contaminated clay layer. The heat-induced changes were tomographically imaged by their effects on the formation electrical resistivity. The resistivity changes observed appear to be related to heating and vaporization of the pore water, formation of steam condensate, and infiltration of rainwater through the heated zones and adjacent areas. There is a clear asymmetry downward in the resistivity decreases associated with the heating process. The resistivity decreases observed in the vicinity of the heating well are believed to be caused by the heating and downward migration of warm water originally located within a radius of a few feet around the heating well; the magnitude of the change is between 10--20%. The decreasing resistivity implies an increasing rate of radio wave attenuation as heating progressed; therefore, the rate of energy deposition around the heating well increased while the penetration distance of the radio waves decreased. Saturation changes in the clay near the antenna during heating were estimated to be 50--55% based on the observed resistivity decreases. Resistivity changes observed at distances greater than 3 meters to one side of the antenna appear to be related to rainwater infiltration. We propose that gaps in near surface clay layers allow rainwater to migrate downward and reach the top of clay rich zone penetrated by the antenna borehole. The water may then accumulate along the top of the clay.

  8. Modelling of snowmelt infiltration in heterogeneous seasonally-frozen soil monitored by electrical resistivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, H. K.; Binley, A. M.; Voss, C.

    2016-12-01

    Infiltration during snowmelt can be highly heterogeneous due to the formation of ice on the ground surface below the snow cover. In situations where snow is contaminated, such as along highways and airports due to de-icing agents, it is important to predict the zone of infiltration, because this will determine the retention time and potential for degradation in the unsaturated zone. In 2001, infiltration during snowmelt was monitored over a small area (4m2) using time-lapse electrical resistivity monitoring at Gardermoen, Norway. Data revealed a spatio-temporal variable infiltration pattern related to micro topography of the ground surface (French and Binley, 2004). In this study, we want to test the suitability of a newly developed numerical model for water and heat transport including phase change in a variably saturated soil against field observations. Monitored weather and snow data defined the boundary conditions of a simulated unsaturated profile with seasonal freezing. The dependency of capillary pressure and permeability on water saturation is taken from van Genuchten equation with the addition of a scaling parameter, to account for the heterogeneity of the hydraulic permeability. Soil physical data and heterogeneity (variance and correlation structure of the permeability) was based on local soil measurements. The available amount of meltwater for infiltration over the area was based on average snowmelt measurements at the site. Different infiltration scenarios were tested. Soil temperatures, TDR measurements of soil moisture, a tracer experiment conducted at an adjacent site and changes in electrical resistivity were used to validate the model of infiltration and thawing. The model was successful in reproducing the thawing and soil moisture patterns observed in the soil, and hence looks like a promising tool for predicting snowmelt infiltration and melting of ground frost in a sandy unsaturated soil. ReferencesFrench, H.K. and Binley, A. (2004) Snowmelt

  9. Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance in the Food Supply Chain and Its Implications for FDA Policy Initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawack, Kelson; Li, Min; Booth, James G; Love, Will; Lanzas, Cristina; Gröhn, Yrjö T

    2016-09-01

    In response to concerning increases in antimicrobial resistance (AMR), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has decided to increase veterinary oversight requirements for antimicrobials and restrict their use in growth promotion. Given the high stakes of this policy for the food supply, economy, and human and veterinary health, it is important to rigorously assess the effects of this policy. We have undertaken a detailed analysis of data provided by the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS). We examined the trends in both AMR proportion and MIC between 2004 and 2012 at slaughter and retail stages. We investigated the makeup of variation in these data and estimated the sample and effect size requirements necessary to distinguish an effect of the policy change. Finally, we applied our approach to take a detailed look at the 2005 withdrawal of approval for the fluoroquinolone enrofloxacin in poultry water. Slaughter and retail showed similar trends. Both AMR proportion and MIC were valuable in assessing AMR, capturing different information. Most variation was within years, not between years, and accounting for geographic location explained little additional variation. At current rates of data collection, a 1-fold change in MIC should be detectable in 5 years and a 6% decrease in percent resistance could be detected in 6 years following establishment of a new resistance rate. Analysis of the enrofloxacin policy change showed the complexities of the AMR policy with no statistically significant change in resistance of both Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli to ciprofloxacin, another second-generation fluoroquinolone.

  10. Electrical Resistivity Monitoring of an Active Hydrothermal Degassing Area at Solfatara, Phlegrean Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandemeulebrouck, J.; Byrdina, S.; Grangeon, J.; Lebourg, T.; Bascou, P.; Mangiacapra, A.

    2015-12-01

    Campi Flegrei caldera (CFc) is an active volcanic complex covering a ~100 km² densely populated area in the western part of Naples (Italy) that is presently showing clear signs of unrest. Solfatara volcano, a tuff cone crater formed ~4000 yrs B.P. ago by phreato-magmatic eruptions represents the main degassing outflow of CFc. Magmatic gases which are exsolved from a ~8 km deep magmatic reservoir mix at 4 km depth with meteoric hydrothermal fluids then reach the surface in the Solfatara area. These hydrothermal and magmatic gases, mainly H2O and CO2, are released through both diffuse degassing structures and fumaroles. In the frame of the MedSuv (Mediterranean Supervolcanoes) FP7 european project , we are performing a time-lapse electrical resistivity monitoring of an active degassing area of Solfatara. Using a 500-m-long cable and 48 electrodes, an electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is performed on a two-day basis since May 2013. The time-lapse inversion of the ERT gives an image of the temporal variations of resistivity up to 100 m depth that can be compared with the variations of ground deformation, CO2 flux, soil temperature and seismic ambient noise. Resistivity variations can originate from fluid composition, gas ratio and temperature. For example, the abrupt change of resistivity that was observed mid-2014 during a period of uplift and gas flux increase, could be associated with the rise of hydrothermal fluids.

  11. Monitoring solute fluxes: Integrating electrical resistivity with multi-compartment sampler techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloem, Esther; Fernandez, Perrine; French, Helen K.

    2016-04-01

    The impact of agriculture, industry, airport activities on soil and water quality is strongly influenced by soil heterogeneity. To improve risk assessment, monitoring, and treatment strategies, we require a better understanding of the effect of soil heterogeneity on contaminant movement and better methods for monitoring heterogeneous contaminated transport. Sufficient characterization of spatial and temporal distribution of contaminant transport requires measurements of water and solute fluxes at multiple locations with a high temporal resolution. During this presentation, we will show a newly developed instrument, which combines multi-compartment sampling with electrical resistivity measurements, to observe spatial and temporal fluxes of contaminants. Solute monitoring is often limited to observations of resident concentrations, while flux concentrations govern the movement of solutes in soils. Bloem et al. (2010) developed a multi-compartment sampler (MCS) which is capable of measuring fluxes at a high spatial resolution under natural conditions. The sampler is divided into 100 separate compartments of 31 by 31 mm. Flux data can be recorded at a high time resolution (every 5 minutes). Tracer leaching can be monitored by frequently sampling the collected leachate while leaving the sampler buried in situ. To optimize the monitoring of tracer leaching and measure real solute fluxes the multi-compartment sampler has been extended with 121 electrodes. The electrodes are mounted at each corner of each compartment to measure the electrical conductivity above each compartment while water percolates through the compartments. By using different electrode couples, the setup can also be used to image above the multi-compartment sampler. The instrument can be used for detailed studies both in the laboratory and in the field. For laboratory experiments a transparent column is used which fits perfect on top of the MCS. We present a selection of the integrated electrical

  12. Detecting and monitoring of water inrush in tunnels and coal mines using direct current resistivity method: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Shucai Li; Bin Liu; Lichao Nie; Zhengyu Liu; Mingzhen Tian; Shirui Wang; Maoxin Su; Qian Guo

    2015-01-01

    Detecting, real-time monitoring and early warning of underground water-bearing structures are critically important issues in prevention and mitigation of water inrush hazards in underground engineering. Direct current (DC) resistivity method is a widely used method for routine detection, advanced detection and real-time monitoring of water-bearing structures, due to its high sensitivity to groundwater. In this study, the DC resistivity method applied to underground engineering is reviewed and...

  13. Landslide Monitoring in Southwestern China via Time-lapse Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, D.; Hu, X.; Shan, C.

    2016-12-01

    The dynamic monitoring of landslides in engineering geology has focused on the correlation among landslide stability, rainwater infiltration, and subsurface hydrogeology. However, the understanding of this complicated correlation is still poor and inadequate. Thus, in this study, we investigated a typical landslide in southwestern China via time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (TLERT) in November 2013, August 2014 and May 2016. From the data, shallow sediments showed short-term resistivity variability due to evaporation and rainfall, whereas deep zone exhibited seasonal fluctuations related to dry season, rainy season and snow melting during springtime. We also studied landslide mechanisms based on the spatiotemporal characteristics of surface water infiltration and flow within the landslide body. Combined with borehole data, inverted resistivity models accurately defined the interface between Quaternary sediments and bedrock. Preferential flow pathways attributed to fracture zones and fissures were also delineated. In addition, we found that surface water permeates through these pathways into the slipping mass and drains away as fissure water in the fractured bedrock, probably causing the weakly weathered layer to gradually soften and erode, eventually leading to a landslide. Clearly, TLERT dynamic monitoring can provide precursory information of critical sliding and can be used in landslide stability analysis and prediction.

  14. Highly permselective membrane surface modification by cold plasma-induced grafting polymerization of molecularly imprinted polymer for recognition of pyrethroid insecticides in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rongrong; Guo, Xiaoqing; Shi, Xizhi; Sun, Aili; Wang, Lin; Xiao, Tingting; Tang, Zigang; Pan, Daodong; Li, Dexiang; Chen, Jiong

    2014-12-02

    Specific molecularly imprinted membranes (MIMs) for pyrethroid insecticides were developed and characterized for the first time in this study by cold plasma-induced grafting polymerization using methacrylic acid as a functional monomer and cypermethrin (CYP) as a template. The nonimprinted membranes (NIMs) were also synthesized using the same procedure without the template. Meanwhile, AFM, XPS, ATR-FTIR, contact angle, and permselectivity experiments were conducted to elucidate the imprinting and recognition properties of MIMs. Results demonstrated that MIMs exhibited excellent imprinting effect and high permselectivity. A molecularly imprinted-membrane-assisted solvent extraction (MI-MASE) method based on the MIMs was established. The operating conditions were optimized for group-selective extraction of the five pyrethroid insecticides. Compared with NIMs, higher extraction recoveries (83.8% to 100.6%) of the five pyrethroid insecticides by gas chromatography-electron capture detector (GC-ECD) were obtained using MIMs at three spiked levels in fish samples; the RSD values were lower than 8.3%. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) defined as the concentrations at which the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio is 3:1 and 10:1, respectively, were in the range of 0.26 to 0.42 μg/kg and 0.77 to 1.27 μg/kg, respectively. No matrix effect of the developed MI-MASE was observed by gas chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (GC/MS/MS). These results demonstrated a highly selective, efficient, and environment-friendly MI-MASE technique for preconcentration and purification of pyrethroid insecticides from seafood, followed by GC-ECD and GC/MS/MS. The excellent applicability and potential of MI-MASE for routine monitoring of pyrethroid pesticides in food samples has also been confirmed.

  15. Micronuclei induction in Rana catesbeiana tadpoles by the pyrethroid insecticide lambda-cyhalothrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campana Marcela Alejandra

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrethroid lambda-cyhalothrin genotoxicity was evaluated using the micronucleus test in Rana catesbeiana tadpoles. The effects of concentration and exposure time on the micronuclei frequency were studied in blood smears obtained from tadpoles exposed to four concentrations (0.02, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 mg/L of the compound for 24, 48, 72 and 96 h and 8, 15, 20 and 30 days. As a positive control, tadpoles were exposed to cyclophosphamide (5 mg/L. The micronucleated cell frequency was expressed per 1,000 cells. R. catesbeiana tadpoles exposed to increasing concentrations of lambda-cyhalothrin showed an increase in the micronuclei frequency in peripheral blood. Tadpoles exposed to cyclophosphamide (CP also showed a significant increase in micronucleated erythrocytes which peaked after 15 days. These results suggest that R. catesbeiana tadpoles may provide a useful model for monitoring water pollution.

  16. Valve Movement response of the Mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis to cypermethrin (pyrethroid-insecticide)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Ayad, M.; Ait Fdill, M.; Mouabad, A.

    2009-07-01

    The Moroccan lagoons are economically important and ecologically very sensitive. They are affected by pollution from a range of sources, especially by agricultural pollution from the adjacent agricultural areas that use huge quantities of organic pesticides. These products can be harmful to non target organisms by drainage. A biological monitor for the water quality surveillance using mussels is described. It was deigned to characterize the toxicity of the Cypermethrin (pesticide-pyrethroid ) to the coastal environment by assessing its sublethal effect on valve movement of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. In this method the valve behaviour of exposed mussels to Cypermethrin is compared with normal valve opening (control and the reduction in the time of normal opening is used as a rapid response to detect contaminants. (Author)

  17. Monitoring and adaptive resistance management in Australia for Bt-cotton: current status and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downes, Sharon; Mahon, Rod; Olsen, Karen

    2007-07-01

    In the mid-1990 s the Australian Cotton industry adopted an insect-resistant variety of cotton (Ingard) which expresses the Bt toxin Cry1Ac that is specific to a group of insects including the target Helicoverpa armigera. A conservative resistance management plan (RMP), that restricted the area planted to Ingard, was implemented to preserve the efficacy of Cry1Ac until two-gene transgenic cotton was available. In 2004/05 Bollgard II replaced Ingard as the transgenic cotton available in Australia. It improves on Ingard by incorporating an additional insecticidal protein (Cry2Ab). If an appropriate refuge is grown, there is no restriction on the area planted to Bollgard II. In 2004/05 and 2005/06 the Bollgard II acreage represented approximately 80 of the total area planted to cotton in Australia. The sensitivity of field-collected populations of H. armigera to Bt products was assayed before and subsequent to the widespread deployment of Ingard cotton. In 2002 screens against Cry2Ab were developed in preparation for replacement of Ingard with Bollgard II. There have been no reported field failures of Bollgard II due to resistance. However, while alleles that confer resistance to H. armigera in the field are rare for Cry1Ac, they are surprisingly common for Cry2Ab. We present an overview of the current approach adopted in Australia to monitor and adaptively manage resistance to Bt-cotton in field populations of H. armigera and discuss the implications of our findings to date. We also highlight future challenges for resistance management in Australia, many of which extend to other Bt-crop and pest systems.

  18. Electrical Resistivity Tomography monitoring reveals groundwater storage in a karst vadose zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watlet, A.; Kaufmann, O.; Van Camp, M. J.; Triantafyllou, A.; Cisse, M. F.; Quinif, Y.; Meldrum, P.; Wilkinson, P. B.; Chambers, J. E.

    2016-12-01

    Karst systems are among the most difficult aquifers to characterize, due to their high heterogeneity. In particular, temporary groundwater storage that occurs in the unsaturated zone and the discharge to deeper layers are difficult processes to identify and estimate with in-situ measurements. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) monitoring is meant to track changes in the electrical properties of the subsurface and has proved to be applicable to evidence and quantify hydrological processes in several types of environments. Applied to karst systems, it has particularly highlighted the challenges in linking electrical resistivity changes to groundwater content with usual approaches of petrophysical relationships, given the high heterogeneity of the subsurface. However, taking up the challenge, we undertook an ERT monitoring at the Rochefort Cave Laboratory (Belgium) lasting from Spring 2014 to Winter 2016. This includes 3 main periods of several months with daily measurements, from which seasonal groundwater content changes in the first meters of the vadose zone were successfully imaged. The monitoring concentrates on a 48 electrodes profile that goes from a limestone plateau to the bottom of a sinkhole. 3D UAV photoscans of the surveyed sinkhole and of the main chamber of the nearby cave were performed. Combined with lithological observations from a borehole drilled next to the ERT profile, the 3D information made it possible to project karstified layers visible in the cave to the surface and assess their potential locations along the ERT profile. Overall, this helped determining more realistic local petrophysical properties in the surveyed area, and improving the ERT data inversion by adding structural constraints. Given a strong air temperature gradient in the sinkhole, we also developed a new approach of temperature correction of the raw ERT data. This goes through the solving (using pyGIMLI package) of the 2D ground temperature field and its temporal

  19. Monitoring Resistance to Spinosad in the Melon Fly (Bactrocera cucurbitae in Hawaii and Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Chun Hsu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinosad is a natural insecticide with desirable qualities, and it is widely used as an alternative to organophosphates for control of pests such as the melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett. To monitor the potential for development of resistance, information about the current levels of tolerance to spinosad in melon fly populations were established in this study. Spinosad tolerance bioassays were conducted using both topical applications and feeding methods on flies from field populations with extensive exposure to spinosad as well as from collections with little or no prior exposure. Increased levels of resistance were observed in flies from the field populations. Also, higher dosages were generally required to achieve specific levels of mortality using topical applications compared to the feeding method, but these levels were all lower than those used for many organophosphate-based food lures. Our information is important for maintaining effective programs for melon fly management using spinosad.

  20. The development and validation of using inertial sensors to monitor postural change in resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleadhill, Sam; Lee, James Bruce; James, Daniel

    2016-05-03

    This research presented and validated a method of assessing postural changes during resistance exercise using inertial sensors. A simple lifting task was broken down to a series of well-defined tasks, which could be examined and measured in a controlled environment. The purpose of this research was to determine whether timing measures obtained from inertial sensor accelerometer outputs are able to provide accurate, quantifiable information of resistance exercise movement patterns. The aim was to complete a timing measure validation of inertial sensor outputs. Eleven participants completed five repetitions of 15 different deadlift variations. Participants were monitored with inertial sensors and an infrared three dimensional motion capture system. Validation was undertaken using a Will Hopkins Typical Error of the Estimate, with a Pearson׳s correlation and a Bland Altman Limits of Agreement analysis. Statistical validation measured the timing agreement during deadlifts, from inertial sensor outputs and the motion capture system. Timing validation results demonstrated a Pearson׳s correlation of 0.9997, with trivial standardised error (0.026) and standardised bias (0.002). Inertial sensors can now be used in practical settings with as much confidence as motion capture systems, for accelerometer timing measurements of resistance exercise. This research provides foundations for inertial sensors to be applied for qualitative activity recognition of resistance exercise and safe lifting practices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Monitoring crack development in fiber concrete beam by using electrical resistivity imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiwattanachang, N.; Giao, P. H.

    2011-10-01

    Accurate detection of damaged concrete zones plays an important role in selecting the proper remedial technique. This study presents results from an application of the electrical imaging method to monitor the development of cracks in fiber concrete beams. The study showed that resistivity measurements on the concrete specimens were able to detect the increase of concrete resistivity with the curing time that reached about 65 Ωm after 28 days of curing. A similar development trend of concrete compressive strength was also found. Two types of cracks were investigated, i.e., artificial cracks made of plastic sheets inserted in concrete and cracks developed during a four-step loading test. A mini-electric imaging survey with Wenner array was conducted on the tension face of the beams. To deal with the effect of the beam size new procedures to correct resistivity measurements before inversion were proposed and successfully applied in this study. The results indicated that both crack direction and depth could be accurately determined in the inverted resistivity sections.

  2. Two-dimensional inversion of resistivity monitoring data from the Cerro Prieto geothermal field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, N. E.; Sasaki, Y.; Wilt, M. J.

    1985-03-01

    Two dimensional iterative, least-squares inversions were performed on dc resistivity data obtained over the geothermal field at five successive times during the 1979-1983 period. The solutions gave the percent change in resistivity within each of 47 rectangular blocks representing the reservoir and recharge regions. The changes are consistent with hydrogeologic and recharge models, on the basis of geophysical well logs, well cuttings, well production, geochemical and reservoir engineering data. The solutions support the model of a reservoir that is recharged mainly by cooler, less saline water, causing changes in both pore fluid resistivity and the extent of boiling near the wells. There may be a component of high-temperature recharge from below and to the east, but flow may be impeded by a two-phase zone. Notwithstanding the various sources of error and uncertainty in the data acquisition and 2-D inversions, repetitive, high precision dc resistivity monitoring seems to be a useful method for assessing reservoir conditions when used in conjunction with production and reservoir engineering data and analysis.

  3. Label-free longitudinal monitoring of melanogenesis in the evolution of melanoma treatment resistance (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osseiran, Sam; Wang, Hequn; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Garraway, Levi A.; Evans, Conor L.

    2017-02-01

    While melanoma is not the most common form of skin cancer, it represents the vast majority of skin cancer-related deaths. Indeed, while combination therapies such as Dabrafenib and Trametinib have shown great promise in clinical trials for treating metastatic disease, some melanoma subtypes nevertheless develop resistances to front-line treatments. Under in vitro conditions, some metastatic human melanoma cell lines have been observed to evolve resistance to treatment while simultaneously changing color under brightfield microscopy, hinting at perturbations in pigment synthesis. The process known as melanogenesis gives rise to the two forms of melanin found in mammals: eumelanin, a dark brown/black pigment, and pheomelanin, a much more pale red/blond pigment. Interestingly, pheomelanin has been shown to contribute to the onset and development of melanoma in an ultraviolet-radiation-independent manner through a mechanism of oxidative stress. Eumelanin, on the other hand, is a known antioxidant whose chemical properties seem to shield cells against oxidative damage. To study these pigments in closer detail, nonlinear optical microscopy including coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) was used for the specific visualization and quantification of the relative abundance of pheomelanin and eumelanin within these treatment resistant cell lines. These microscopy toolkits provide a means to monitor changes in pigmentation in a noninvasive and non-destructive manner without the use of exogenous dyes to better understand the molecular basis of treatment resistance.

  4. Reconstruction of landslide movements by inversion of 4-D electrical resistivity tomography monitoring data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Paul; Chambers, Jonathan; Uhlemann, Sebastian; Meldrum, Philip; Smith, Alister; Dixon, Neil; Loke, Meng Heng

    2016-02-01

    Reliable tomographic inversion of geoelectrical monitoring data from unstable slopes relies critically on knowing the electrode positions, which may move over time. We develop and present an innovative inverse method to recover movements in both surface directions from geoelectrical measurements made on a grid of monitoring electrodes. For the first time, we demonstrate this method using field data from an active landslide to recover sequences of movement over timescales of days to years. Comparison with GPS measurements demonstrated an accuracy of within 10% of the electrode spacing, sufficient to correct the majority of artifacts that would occur in subsequent image reconstructions if incorrect positions are used. Over short timescales where the corresponding subsurface resistivity changes were smaller, the constraints could be relaxed and an order-of-magnitude better accuracy was achievable. This enabled the onset and acceleration of landslide activity to be detected with a temporal resolution of a few days.

  5. Identification of electrical resistance of fresh state concrete for nondestructive setting process monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Sung Woo [Dept. of Safety Engineering, Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Concrete undergoes significant phase changes from liquid to solid states as hydration progresses. These phase changes are known as the setting process. A liquid state concrete is electrically conductive because of the presence of water and ions. However, since the conductive elements in the liquid state of concrete are consumed to produce non-conductive hydration products, the electrical conductivity of hydrating concrete decreases during the setting process. Therefore, the electrical properties of hydrating concrete can be used to monitor the setting process of concrete. In this study, a parameter identification method to estimate electrical parameters such as ohmic resistance of concrete is proposed. The effectiveness of the proposed method for monitoring the setting process of concrete is experimentally validated.

  6. Pyrethroid-Degrading Microorganisms and Their Potential for the Bioremediation of Contaminated Soils: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cycoń, Mariusz; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides have been used to control pests in agriculture, forestry, horticulture, public health and for indoor home use for more than 20 years. Because pyrethroids were considered to be a safer alternative to organophosphate pesticides (OPs), their applications significantly increased when the use of OPs was banned or limited. Although, pyrethroids have agricultural benefits, their widespread and continuous use is a major problem as they pollute the terrestrial and aquatic environments and affect non-target organisms. Since pyrethroids are not degraded immediately after application and because their residues are detected in soils, there is an urgent need to remediate pyrethroid-polluted environments. Various remediation technologies have been developed for this purpose; however, bioremediation, which involves bioaugmentation and/or biostimulation and is a cost-effective and eco-friendly approach, has emerged as the most advantageous method for cleaning-up pesticide-contaminated soils. This review presents an overview of the microorganisms that have been isolated from pyrethroid-polluted sites, characterized and applied for the degradation of pyrethroids in liquid and soil media. The paper is focused on the microbial degradation of the pyrethroids that have been most commonly used for many years such as allethrin, bifenthrin, cyfluthrin, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin, fenpropathrin, fenvalerate, and permethrin. Special attention is given to the bacterial strains from the genera Achromobacter, Acidomonas, Bacillus, Brevibacterium, Catellibacterium, Clostridium, Lysinibacillus, Micrococcus, Ochrobactrum, Pseudomonas, Serratia, Sphingobium, Streptomyces, and the fungal strains from the genera Aspergillus, Candida, Cladosporium, and Trichoderma, which are characterized by their ability to degrade various pyrethroids. Moreover, the current knowledge on the degradation pathways of pyrethroids, the enzymes that are involved in the cleavage of

  7. Pyrethroid-Degrading Microorganisms and Their Potential for the Bioremediation of Contaminated Soils: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Sebastian Cycoń

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Pyrethroid insecticides have been used to control pests in agriculture, forestry, horticulture, public health and for indoor home use for more than 20 years. Because pyrethroids were considered to be a safer alternative to organophosphate pesticides (OPs, their applications significantly increased when the use of OPs was banned or limited. Although pyrethroids have agricultural benefits, their widespread and continuous use is a major problem as they pollute the terrestrial and aquatic environments and affect non-target organisms. Since pyrethroids are not degraded immediately after application and because their residues are detected in soils, there is an urgent need to remediate pyrethroid-polluted environments. Various remediation technologies have been developed for this purpose; however, bioremediation, which involves bioaugmentation and/or biostimulation and is a cost-effective and eco-friendly approach, has emerged as the most advantageous method for cleaning-up pesticide-contaminated soils. This review presents an overview of the microorganisms that have been isolated from pyrethroid-polluted sites, characterized and applied for the degradation of pyrethroids in liquid and soil media. The paper is focused on the microbial degradation of the pyrethroids that have been most commonly used for many years such as allethrin, bifenthrin, cyfluthrin, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin, fenpropathrin, fenvalerate and permethrin. Special attention is given to the bacterial strains from the genera Achromobacter, Acidomonas, Bacillus, Brevibacterium, Catellibacterium, Clostridium, Lysinibacillus, Micrococcus, Ochrobactrum, Pseudomonas, Serratia, Sphingobium, Streptomyces and the fungal strains from the genera Aspergillus, Candida, Cladosporium and Trichoderma, which are characterized by their ability to degrade various pyrethroids. Moreover, the current knowledge on the degradation pathways of pyrethroids, the enzymes that are involved in the

  8. Monitoring CO2 migration in a shallow sand aquifer using 3D crosshole electrical resistivity tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Xianjin; Lassen, Rune Nørbæk; Jensen, Karsten Høgh;

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) crosshole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was used to monitor a pilot CO2 injection experiment at Vrøgum, western Denmark. The purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of the ERT method for detection of small electrical conductivity (EC) changes during the first 2...... the migration of a CO2 plume consist of buoyancy of gaseous CO2, local heterogeneity, groundwater flow and external pressure exerted by the injector. The CO2 plume at the Vrøgum site migrated mostly upward due to buoyancy and it also skewed toward northeastern region by overcoming local groundwater flow...

  9. Monitoring response and resistance to the novel arsenical darinaparsin in an AML patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten Holm eNielsen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML with inversion of chromosome 3 is characterized by overexpression of EVI1 and carries a dismal prognosis. Arsenic-containing compounds have been described to be efficacious in malignancies overexpressing EVI1. Here we describe a case of AML with inv(3(q21q26.2 treated with the organic arsenical darinaparsin. Using a personalized medicine approach, different arsenicals were screened for anti-leukemic effect against the patient’s cells ex vivo. The most promising compound, darinaparsin, was selected for in vivo treatment. Clinical effect was almost immediate, with a normalization of temperature, a stabilization of white blood cell (WBC counts and an increased quality of life. Longitudinal monitoring of patient response and resistance incorporating significant correlative studies on patient derived blood samples over the two cycles of darinaparsin given to this patient allowed us to evaluate potential mechanisms of response and resistance. The anti-leukemic effects of darinaparsin correlated with inhibition of the alternative NF-κB pathway and production of the inflammatory cytokine IL-8. Emergence of resistance was suspected during treatment cycle 2 and supported by xenograft studies in nude mice. Darinaparsin resistance correlated with an attenuation of the effect of treatment on the alternative NF-κB pathway. The results from this patient indicate that darinaparsin may be a good treatment option for inv(3 AML and that inhibition of the alternative NF-κB pathway may be predictive of response. Longitudinal monitoring of disease response as well as several correlative parameters allowed for the generation of novel correlations and predictors of response to experimental therapy in a heavily pretreated patient.

  10. Influence of container adsorption upon observed pyrethroid toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia and Hyalella azteca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheelock, Craig E.; Miller, Jeff L.; Miller, Mike J.; Phillips, Bryn M.; Gee, Shirley J.; Tjeerdema, Ronald S.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2006-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are known for their potential toxicity to aquatic invertebrates and many fish species. A significant problem in the study of pyrethroid toxicity is their extreme hydrophobicity. They can adsorb to test container surfaces and many studies, therefore, report pyrethroid levels as nominal water concentrations. In this study, pyrethroid adsorption to sampling and test containers was measured and several container treatments were examined for their ability to decrease pyrethroid adsorption. None of the chemical treatments were successful at preventing pyrethroid loss from aqueous samples, but vortexing of containers served to resuspend pyrethroids. The effects of the observed adsorption on Ceriodaphnia dubia and Hyalella azteca permethrin toxicity were examined. Species-specific results showed a time-dependent decrease in toxicity following pyrethroid adsorption to test containers for C. dubia, but not for H. azteca. These results demonstrate that pyrethroid adsorption to containers can significantly affect the observed outcome in toxicity-testing and serves as a caution for researchers and testing laboratories. PMID:15951033

  11. Pyrethroid-Induced Reproductive Toxico-Pathology in Non-Target Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latif Ahmad§, Ahrar Khan* and Muhammad Zargham Khan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pesticides used against agricultural pests and ecto-parasite infestation in animals may also induce injurious effects in humans, pets and farm animals. The pyrethroid pesticides are rapidly replacing other insecticides due to relatively lower toxicity for mammals. However, they have now become an environmental issue due to excessive use in agriculture, livestock production, leather industry and shampoos etc. In addition to various clinical, hemato-biochemical, immunosuppressive and neuro-toxicological effects of pyrethroids, more danger has been suspected with respect to reproductive toxicity. The fetal resorption and early fetal mortality rate were found to be significantly increased in female animals allowed mating with males exposed to pyrethroids. The testicular and epididymal sperm counts and serum testosterone concentrations in pyrethroid treated animals were decreased. Moreover, abnormal spermatozoa, degenerated spermatozoa, arrested spermatogenesis and connective tissue proliferation in testes, and tailless spermatozoa in epididymis were reported with pyrethroid exposure. A decrease in pregnancy rate, number of implantation sites and total number of recovered fetuses have also been reported in female animals receiving pyrethroid treatment during gestation and allowed mating with untreated male rabbits. The progeny of pyrethroid exposed parents also showed toxic effects. Disruption of certain steroidogenic enzymes and nuclear receptors in has been reported in pyrethroid exposed animals. This review concludes that pyrethroid exposure is responsible for endocrine disruption and decreases fertility in both sexes of various non-target species and produces fetal mortality, which may be prevented by vitamin E supplementation due to its anti-oxidant potential.

  12. The association between environmental exposure to pyrethroids and sperm aneuploidy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, Michał; Jurewicz, Joanna; Wielgomas, Bartosz; Piskunowicz, Marta; Sobala, Wojciech; Radwan, Paweł; Jakubowski, Lucjusz; Hawuła, Wanda; Hanke, Wojciech

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study is to determine whether the environmental exposure to pyrethroids was associated with males sperm chromosome disomy. The study population consisted of 195 men who attended the infertility clinic for diagnostic purposes and who had normal semen concentration of 20-300×10(6) mL(-1) or slight oligozoospermia (semen concentration of 15-20×10(6) mL(-1)) (WHO, 1999). Participants were interviewed and provided a semen sample. The pyrethroids metabolites: 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3PBA), cis-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane carboxylic acid (CDCCA), trans-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane carboxylic acid (TDCCA) and cis-2,2-dibromovinyl-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (DBCA) were analysed in the urine using a validated gas chromatography ion-tap mass spectrometry method. Sperm aneuploidy was assessed using multicolor FISH (DNA probes specific for chromosomes X, Y, 18, 13, 21). Our results showed that CDCCA >50th percentile was associated with disomy of chromosome 18 (p=0.05) whereas the level of TDCCA in urine >50th percentile was related to XY disomy (p=0.04) and disomy of chromosome 21 (p=0.05). Urinary 3PBA level ⩽50 and >50 percentile was related to disomy of sex chromosomes: XY disomy (p=0.05 and p=0.02 respectively), Y disomy (p=0.04 and 0.02 respectively), disomy of chromosome 21 (p=0.04 and p=0.04 respectively) and total disomy (p=0.03 and p=0.04 respectively). Additionally disomy of chromosome 18 was positively associated with urinary level of 3PBA >50 percentile (p=0.03). The results reported here are found that pyrethroids may be a sperm aneugens. These findings may be of concern due to increased pyrethroid use and prevalent human exposure.

  13. Synthesis and Insecticidal Activity of an Oxabicyclolactone and Novel Pyrethroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elson S. de Alvarenga

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Deltamethrin, a member of the pyrethroids, one of the safest classes of pesticides, is among some of the most popular and widely used insecticides in the World. Our objective was to synthesize an oxabicyclolactone 6 and five novel pyrethroids 8–12 from readily available furfural and D-mannitol, respectively, and evaluate their biological activity against four insect species of economic importance namely A. obtectus, S. zeamais, A. monuste orseis, and P. americana. A concise and novel synthesis of 6,6-dimethyl-3-oxabicyclo[3.1.0]hexan-2-one (6 from furfural is described. Photochemical addition of isopropyl alcohol to furan-2(5H-one afforded 4-(1'-hydroxy-1'-methylethyltetrahydro-furan-2-one (3. The alcohol 3 was directly converted into 4-(1'-bromo-1'-methylethyl-tetrahydrofuran-2-one (5 in 50% yield by reaction with PBr3 and SiO2. The final step was performed by cyclization of 5 with potassium tert-butoxide in 40% yield. The novel pyrethroids 8–12 were prepared from methyl (1S,3S-3-formyl-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane-1-carboxylate (7a by reaction with five different aromatic phosphorous ylides. Compounds 6–12 presented high insecticidal activity, with 6 and 11 being the most active. Compound 6 killed 90% of S. zeamais and 100% of all the other insects evaluated. Compound 11 killed 100% of all insects tested.

  14. Landslide monitoring in southwestern China via time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Dong; Hu Xiang-Yun; Shan Chun-Ling; Li Rui-Heng

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic monitoring of landslides in engineering geology has focused on the correlation among landslide stability, rainwater infiltration, and subsurface hydrogeology. However, the understanding of this complicated correlation is still poor and inadequate. Thus, in this study, we investigated a typical landslide in southwestern China via time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (TLERT) in November 2013 and August 2014. We studied landslide mechanisms based on the spatiotemporal characteristics of surface water infi ltration andfl ow within the landslide body. Combined with borehole data, inverted resistivity models accurately defined the interface between Quaternary sediments and bedrock. Preferential fl ow pathways attributed to fracture zones andfi ssures were also delineated. In addition, we found that surface water permeates through these pathways into the slipping mass and drains away asfi ssure water in the fractured bedrock, probably causing the weakly weathered layer to gradually soften and erode, eventually leading to a landslide. Clearly, TLERT dynamic monitoring can provide precursory information of critical sliding and can be used in landslide stability analysis and prediction.

  15. The emergence of insecticide resistance in central Mozambique and potential threat to the successful indoor residual spraying malaria control programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilding Craig S

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria vector control by indoor residual spraying was reinitiated in 2006 with DDT in Zambézia province, Mozambique. In 2007, these efforts were strengthened by the President's Malaria Initiative. This manuscript reports on the monitoring and evaluation of this programme as carried out by the Malaria Decision Support Project. Methods Mosquitoes were captured daily through a series of 114 window exit traps located at 19 sentinel sites, identified to species and analysed for sporozoites. Anopheles mosquitoes were collected resting indoors and tested for insecticide resistance following the standard WHO protocol. Annual cross sectional household parasite surveys were carried out to monitor the impact of the control programme on prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum in children aged 1 to 15 years. Results A total of 3,769 and 2,853 Anopheles gambiae s.l. and Anopheles funestus, respectively, were captured from window exit traps throughout the period. In 2010 resistance to the pyrethroids lambda-cyhalothrin and permethrin and the carbamate, bendiocarb was detected in An. funestus. In 2006, the sporozoite rate in An. gambiae s.s. was 4% and this reduced to 1% over 4 rounds of spraying. The sporozoite rate for An. funestus was also reduced from 2% to 0 by 2008. Of the 437 Anopheles arabiensis identified, none were infectious. Overall prevalence of P. falciparum in the sentinel sites fell from 60% to 32% between October 2006 and October 2008. Conclusion Both An. gambiae s.s. and An. funestus were controlled effectively with the DDT-based IRS programme in Zambézia, reducing disease transmission and burden. However, the discovery of pyrethroid resistance in the province and Mozambique's policy change away from DDT to pyrethroids for IRS threatens the gains made here.

  16. In vitro metabolic clearance of pyrethroid pesticides by rat and human hepatic microsomes and cytochrome P450 isoforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Species differences in the intrinsic clearance (CLint) and the enzymes involved in the metabolism of pyrethroid pesticides were examined in rat and human hepatic microsomes. The pyrethroids bifenthrin, S-bioallethrin, bioresmethrin, β-cyfluthrin, cypermethrin, cis-per...

  17. Molecular surveillance as monitoring tool for drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum in Suriname.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhin, Malti R; Labadie-Bracho, Mergiory; Bretas, Gustavo

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this translational study was to show the use of molecular surveillance for polymorphisms and copy number as a monitoring tool to track the emergence and dynamics of Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance. A molecular baseline for Suriname was established in 2005, with P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt) and P. falciparum multidrug resistance (pfmdr1) markers and copy number in 40 samples. The baseline results revealed the existence of a uniformly distributed mutated genotype corresponding with the fully mefloquine-sensitive 7G8-like genotype (Y184F, S1034C, N1042D, and D1246Y) and a fixed pfmdr1 N86 haplotype. All samples harbored the pivotal pfcrtK76T mutation, showing that chloroquine reintroduction should not yet be contemplated in Suriname. After 5 years, 40 samples were assessed to trace temporal changes in the status of pfmdr1 polymorphisms and copy number and showed minor genetic alterations in the pfmdr1 gene and no significant changes in copy number, thus providing scientific support for prolongation of the current drug policy in Suriname.

  18. Process Management Development for Quality Monitoring on Resistance Weldment of Nuclear Fuel Rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Tae Hyung; Yang, Kyung Hwan; Kim, In Kyu [KEPCO, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The current, welding force, and displacement are displayed on the indicator during welding. However, real-time quality control is not performed. Due to the importance of fuel rod weldment, many studies on welding procedures have been conducted. However, there are not enough studies regarding weldment quality evaluation. On the other hand, there are continuous studies on the monitoring and control of welding phenomena. In resistance welding, which is performed in a very short time, it is important to find the process parameters that well represent the weld zone formation and the welding process. In his study, Gould attempted to analyze melt zone formation using the finite difference method. Using the artificial neural network, Javed and Sanders, Messler Jr et al., Cho and Rhee, Li and Gong et al. estimated the size of the melt zone by mapping a nonlinear functional relation between the weldment and the electrode head movement, which is a typical welding process parameter. Applications of the artificial intelligence method include fuzzy control using electrode displacement, fuzzy control using the optimal power curve, neural network control using the dynamic resistance curve, fuzzy adaptive control using the optimal electrode curve, etc. Therefore, this study induced quality factors for the real-time quality control of nuclear fuel rod end plug weldment using instantaneous dynamic resistance (IDR), which incorporates the instantaneous value of secondary current and voltage of the transformer, and using instantaneous dynamic force (IDF), obtained real-time during welding.

  19. Quality monitoring of resistance spot welding based on electrode displacement characteristics analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Pengxian; ZHANG Hongjie; CHEN Jianhong; MA Yuezhou

    2007-01-01

    A new method is developed to monitor joint quality based on the information collection and process in spot welding.First,twelve parameters related to weld quality are mined from electrode displacement signal on the basis of different phases of nugget formation marked by simultaneous dynamic resistance signal.Second,through correlation analysis of the parameters and taking tensile-shear strength of the spot-welded joint as evaluation target,different characteristic parameters are reasonably selected.At the same time,linear regression,nonlinear regression and radial basis function (RBF) neural network models are set up to evaluate weld quality between the selected parameters and tensileshear strength.Finally,the validity of the proposed models is certified.Results show that all of the models can be used to monitor joint quality.For the RBF neural network model,which is more effective for monitoring weld quality than the others,the average error validated is 2.88% and the maximal error validated is under 10%.

  20. Core-scale electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) monitoring of CO2-brine mixture in Fontainebleau sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, David; Ledo, Juanjo; Queralt, Pilar; Bellmunt, Fabian; Luquot, Linda; Gouze, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    The main goal of the monitoring stage of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is to obtain an accurate estimation of the subsurface CO2 accumulation and to detect any possible leakage. Laboratory experiments are necessary to investigate the small scale processes governing the CO2-brine-rock interaction. They also provide a means to calibrate the results coming from field scale geophysical methods. In this work we set up an experimental system which is able to perform Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) measurements on centimeter-scale rock samples at various P-T conditions. We present the results of two new experiments related to CO2 monitoring, performed on a cylindrical (4 × 8 cm) Fontainebleau rock sample. In the first one, we have quantified the CO2 saturation at different volume fractions, representing zones from a deep saline aquifer with varying degrees of saturation. In the second one, we have monitored and quantified the effect of CO2 dissolution in the brine at a pressure of 40 bar during eight days, emulating the invasion of CO2 into a shallow aquifer. Results highlight the importance of accounting for the contribution of surface conductivity in highly CO2-saturated regions, even in clay-free rocks, and also for brine conductivity variation due to CO2 dissolution. Ignoring any of these effects will end up in a CO2 saturation underestimation. We present a modified CO2 saturation equation to account for these two influences.

  1. The use of soil electrical resistivity to monitor plant and soil water relationships in vineyards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brillante, L.; Mathieu, O.; Bois, B.; van Leeuwen, C.; Lévêque, J.

    2015-03-01

    Soil water availability deeply affects plant physiology. In viticulture it is considered a major contributor to the "terroir" effect. The assessment of soil water in field conditions is a difficult task, especially over large surfaces. New techniques are therefore required in order to better explore variations of soil water content in space and time with low disturbance and with great precision. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) meets these requirements for applications in plant sciences, agriculture and ecology. In this paper, possible techniques to develop models that allow the use of ERT to spatialise soil water available to plants are reviewed. An application of soil water monitoring using ERT in a grapevine plot in Burgundy (north-east France) during the vintage 2013 is presented. We observed the lateral heterogeneity of ERT-derived fraction of transpirable soil water (FTSW) variations, and differences in water uptake depend on grapevine water status (leaf water potentials measured both at predawn and at solar noon and contemporary to ERT monitoring). Active zones in soils for water movements were identified. The use of ERT in ecophysiological studies, with parallel monitoring of plant water status, is still rare. These methods are promising because they have the potential to reveal a hidden part of a major function of plant development: the capacity to extract water from the soil.

  2. TRACKING PYRETHROID TOXICITY IN SURFACE WATER SAMPLES: EXPOSURE DYNAMICS AND TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION TOOLS FOR LABORATORY TESTS WITH HYALELLA AZTECA (AMPHIPODA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deanovic, Linda A; Stillway, Marie; Hammock, Bruce G; Fong, Stephanie; Werner, Inge

    2017-09-09

    Pyrethroid insecticides are commonly used in pest control and are present at toxic concentrations in surface waters of agricultural and urban areas worldwide. Monitoring is challenging due to their high hydrophobicity and low toxicity thresholds, which often fall below the detection limits of analytical methods. Standard daphnid bioassays used in surface water monitoring are not sensitive enough to protect more susceptible invertebrate species such as the amphipod, Hyalella azteca, and chemical loss during toxicity testing is of concern. In this study, we quantified toxicity loss during storage and testing, using both natural and synthetic water, and present a tool to enhance toxic signal strength for improved sensitivity of H. azteca toxicity tests. The average half-life during storage in LDPE cubitainers at 4°C of five pyrethroids (permethrin, bifenthrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, cyfluthrin, esfenvalerate) and one organophosphate (chlorpyrifos; used as reference) was 1.4 d, and piperonyl butoxide (PBO) proved an effective tool to potentiate toxicity. We conclude that toxicity tests on ambient water samples containing these hydrophobic insecticides are likely to underestimate toxicity present in the field, and mimic short pulse rather than continuous exposures. Where these chemicals are of concern, the addition of PBO during testing can yield valuable information on their presence or absence. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. "SUSCEPTIBILITY AND IRRITABILITY LEVELS OF MAIN MALARIA VECTORS TO SYNTHETIC PYRETHROIDS IN THE ENDEMIC AREAS OF IRAN"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Vatandosst N. Borhani

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The rational use of insecticides largely depends on a broad knowledge of the susceptibility and irritability levels of malaria vectors to currently used insecticides especially pyrethroids. In this study the susceptibility and irritability levels of Anopheles stephensi and An.culicifacies to DDT 4%,malathion 5%, propoxur 0.1%, deltamethrin 0.025%, lambdacyhalothrin 0.1%, cyfluthrin 0.1% and permethrin 0.25% were determined. Susceptibility and irritability tests on adult mosquitoes were carried out according to WHO methods. The results showed that An.stephensi was resistant to DDT 4% and mortality rates to this insecticide in Gavdary and Abtar areas were 64.2%±3.9 and 61.8%±4.36, respectively. An.stephensi was assumed susceptible to other insecticides. An.culicifacies was found susceptible to all the tested insecticides. The irritability tests carried out with pyrethroids exhibited that permethrin 0.25% had the highest irritancy effect against both species. Lambdacyhalothrin 0.1% and deltamethrin 0.025% had the least irritancy effect against An.stephensi and An.culicifacies, respectively. Average numbers of take offs/females/minute of An.stephensi to permethrin, deltamethrin, cyfluthrin and lambdacyhalothrin were 6.64±1.04, 3.11±0.67, 2.73±0.61 and 2.57±0.67, respectively. These figures for An.culicifacies were 2.24±0.37, 1.44±0.38, 1.59±0.35 and 1.46±0.5, respectively. Irritancy effect of pyrethroids should come in consideration while they are used for control of malaria vectors.

  4. Efficacy of imidacloprid and fipronil gels over synthetic pyrethroid and propoxur aerosols in control of German cockroaches (Dictyoptera: Blatellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, V K; Agarwal, Ashok; Choudhary, Varsha; Singh, Rajiv; Ahmed, Nadeem; Sharma, Mahender; Narula, Kusum; Agrawal, Pooja

    2010-03-01

    Resistance amongst cockroaches has been reported to most of the spray insecticides apart from the problem of food contamination and inconvenience. Gel baits which can be selectively applied have been found effective in control of cockroaches in laboratory studies but very few field studies are available. This trial was planned to evaluate the efficacy of fipronil (0.01%) and imidacloprid (2.15%) gels over synthetic pyrethroid (0.02% deltamethrin + 0.13% allethrin) and propoxur (2%) aerosols in control of cockroaches in the field. Survey was done to find out pre-treatment density in catering establishments and houses by visual count and sticky trap methods. A total of 10 catering establishments and 10 houses having high cockroach infestation were selected by sampling (two catering establishments and houses for each insecticidal treatment and two for control). Propoxur and synthetic pyrethroid aerosols were used for spraying the infested sites once only. Single application of fipronil and imidacloprid gels was used as crack and crevice treatment. Visual count method gave better indications of cockroach infestation as compared to sticky trap method, hence, the same was followed for post-treatment evaluation every week up to 12 weeks. Synthetic pyrethroid could not bring about the desired reduction in cockroach infestation in the present study. Single application of fipronil gel was able to reduce cockroach infestation up to 96.8% at the end of 12 weeks whereas imidacloprid application resulted in 90.9% reduction and propoxur resulted in 77.5%. However, propoxur was more effective in reducing the cockroach density by first week in comparison to imidacloprid and fipronil gels but its efficacy started declining after 8th week. Difference was found statistically significant by Kruskal-Wallis H-test. The study reports the efficacy of propoxur aerosol, imidacloprid gel and fipronil gel baits for control of cockroaches.

  5. Analysing deltamethrin susceptibility and pyrethroid esterase activity variations in sylvatic and domestic Triatoma infestans at the embryonic stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santo-Orihuela, Pablo Luis; Carvajal, Guillermo; Picollo, María Inés; Vassena, Claudia Viviana

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the deltamethrin susceptibility of eggs from Triatoma infestans populations and the contribution of pyrethroid esterases to deltamethrin degradation. Insects were collected from sylvatic areas, including Veinte de Octubre and Kirus-Mayu (Bolivia) and from domiciliary areas, including El Palmar (Bolivia) and La Pista (Argentina). Deltamethrin susceptibility was determined by dose-response bioassays. Serial dilutions of deltamethrin (0.0005-1 mg/mL) were topically applied to 12-day-old eggs. Samples from El Palmar had the highest lethal dose ratio (LDR) value (44.90) compared to the susceptible reference strain (NFS), whereas the Veinte de Octubre samples had the lowest value (0.50). Pyrethroid esterases were evaluated using 7-coumaryl permethrate (7-CP) on individually homogenised eggs from each population and from NFS. The El Palmar and La Pista samples contained 40.11 and 36.64 pmol/min/mg protein, respectively, and these values were statistically similar to NFS (34.92 pmol/min/mg protein) and different from Kirus-Mayu and Veinte de Octubre (27.49 and 22.69 pmol/min/mg protein, respectively). The toxicological data indicate that the domestic populations were resistant to deltamethrin, but no statistical contribution of 7-CP esterases was observed. The sylvatic populations had similar LDR values to NFS, but lower 7-CP esterase activities. Moreover, this is the first study of the pyrethroid esterases on T. infestans eggs employing a specific substrate (7-CP). PMID:24402155

  6. Pyrethroid insecticides in bed sediments from urban and agricultural streams across the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hladik, Michelle; Kuivila, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are hydrophobic compounds that partition to streambed sediments and have been shown to cause toxicity to non-target organisms; their occurrence is well documented in parts of California, but there have been limited studies in other urban and agricultural areas across the United States. To broaden geographic understanding of pyrethroid distributions, bed sediment samples were collected and analyzed from 36 streams in 25 states, with about 2/3 of the sites in urban areas and 1/3 in agricultural areas. At least one pyrethroid (of the 14 included in the analysis) was detected in 78% of samples. Seven pyrethroids were detected in one or more samples. Bifenthrin was the most frequently detected (58% of samples), followed by permethrin (31%), resmethrin (17%), and cyfluthrin (14%). The other three detected pyrethroids (cyhalothrin, cypermethrin and delta/tralomethrin) were found in two or fewer of the samples. Concentrations ranged from 0.3 to 180 ng g-1 dry weight. The number of pyrethroids detected were higher in the urban samples than in the agricultural samples, but the highest concentrations of individual pyrethroids were split between urban and agricultural sites. The pyrethroids detected in the agricultural areas generally followed use patterns. Predicted toxicity was greater for urban areas and attributed to bifenthrin, cyfluthrin and cypermethrin, while in agricultural areas the toxicity was mainly attributed to bifenthrin.

  7. Interactions of pyrethroid insecticides with GABA sub A and peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devaud, L.L.

    1988-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are potent proconvulsants in the rat. All pyrethroids evincing proconvulsant activity elicited a similar 25-30% maximal reduction of seizure threshold. The Type II pyrethroids were the most potent proconvulsants with 1R{alpha}S, cis cypermethrin having an ED{sub 50} value of 6.3 nmol/kg. The proconvulsant activity of both Type I and Type II pyrenthroids was blocked by pretreatment with PK 11195, the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PTBR) antagonist. In contrast, phenytoin did not antagonize the proconvulsant activity of either deltamethrin or permethrin. Pyrethroids displaced the specific binding of ({sup 3}H)Ro5-4864 to rat brain membranes with a significant correlation between the log EC{sub 50} values for their activities as proconvulsants and the log IC{sub 50} values for their inhibition of ({sup 3}H)Ro5-4864 binding. Both Ro5-4864 and pyrethroid insecticides were found to influence specific ({sup 35}S)TBPS binding in a GABA-dependent manner. PK 11195 and the Type II pyrethroid, deltamethrin antagonized the Ro5-4864-induced modulation of ({sup 35}S)TBPS binding. Pyrethroid insecticides, Ro5-4864 and veratridine influenced GABA-gated {sup 36}Chloride influx. Moreover, the Type II pyrethroids elicited an increase in {sup 36}chloride influx in the absence of GABA-stimulation. Both of these actions were antagonized by PK 11195 and tetrodotoxin.

  8. Environmental modeling and exposure assessment of sediment-associated pyrethroids in an agricultural watershed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuzhou Luo

    Full Text Available Synthetic pyrethroid insecticides have generated public concerns due to their increasing use and potential effects on aquatic ecosystems. A modeling system was developed in this study for simulating the transport processes and associated sediment toxicity of pyrethroids at coupled field/watershed scales. The model was tested in the Orestimba Creek watershed, an agriculturally intensive area in California' Central Valley. Model predictions were satisfactory when compared with measured suspended solid concentration (R(2 = 0.536, pyrethroid toxic unit (0.576, and cumulative mortality of Hyalella azteca (0.570. The results indicated that sediment toxicity in the study area was strongly related to the concentration of pyrethroids in bed sediment. Bifenthrin was identified as the dominant contributor to the sediment toxicity in recent years, accounting for 50-85% of predicted toxicity units. In addition, more than 90% of the variation on the annual maximum toxic unit of pyrethroids was attributed to precipitation and prior application of bifenthrin in the late irrigation season. As one of the first studies simulating the dynamics and spatial variability of pyrethroids in fields and instreams, the modeling results provided useful information on new policies to be considered with respect to pyrethroid regulation. This study suggested two potential measures to efficiently reduce sediment toxicity by pyrethroids in the study area: [1] limiting bifenthrin use immediately before rainfall season; and [2] implementing conservation practices to retain soil on cropland.

  9. Increase of sodium current after pyrethroid insecticides in mouse neuroblastoma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigt, G.S.F.; Neyt, H.C.; Zalm, J.M. van der; Bercken, J. van der

    1987-01-01

    The effects of 4 different pyrethroid insecticides on sodium channel gating in internally perfused, cultured mouse neuroblastoma cells (N1E-115) were studied using the suction pipette, voltage clamp technique. Pyrethroids increased the amplitude of the sodium current, sometimes by more than 200%. Ac

  10. Assessing Dietary Exposure to Pyrethroid Insecticides by LC/MS/MS of Food Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction Pyrethroid insecticides are widely used to control household pests such as cockroaches, for public works control of mosquitoes, and on crops and livestock. Though more toxic to insects than to mammals, some pyrethroids are highly toxic to fish, bees, and cats. Perme...

  11. TIME COURSE OF THE TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSE OF RAT CEREBROCORTICAL TISSUE AFTER ACUTE IN VIVO PYRETHROID EXPOSURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrethroid insecticides disrupt neuronal function by interfering with the function of voltage-sensitive Na+ channels (VSSCs). Distinct differences in the pharmacological actions of pyrethroid sub-types (Type I or Type II) on VSSCs have been observed. The impact of these pharmac...

  12. The joint toxicity of type I, II, and nonester pyrethroid insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleier, Jerome J; Peterson, Robert K D

    2012-02-01

    Evidence suggests that there are separate binding domains for type I and II pyrethroid insecticides on the voltage gated sodium channel of the nerve cell axon, but there are no studies that have examined the mixture toxicity of nonester pyrethroids and type I and II pyrethroids. Therefore, we examined the effect of nonester pyrethroid (etofenprox), type I (permethrin), and type II (cypermethrin) pyrethroid insecticides alone and in all combinations to Drosophila melanogaster Meigen. The combination of permethrin + etofenprox and permethrin + cypermethrin demonstrated antagonistic toxicity, while the combination of cypermethrin + etofenprox demonstrated synergistic toxicity. The mixture ofpermethrin + cypermethrin + etofenprox demonstrated additive toxicity. The toxicity of permethrin + cypermethrin was significantly lower than the toxicity of cypermethrin alone, but the combination was not significantly different from permethrin alone. The toxicity of permethrin + cypermethrin + etofenprox was significantly greater than the toxicity of both permethrin and etofenprox alone, but it was significantly lower than cypermethrin alone. The mixture of permethrin and etofenprox was significantly less toxic than permethrin. The explanation for the decreased toxicity observed is most likely because of the competitive binding at the voltage-gated sodium channel, which is supported by physiological and biochemical studies of pyrethroids. Our results demonstrate that the assumption that the mixture toxicity of pyrethroids would be additive is not adequate for modeling the mixture toxicity of pyrethroids to insects.

  13. Mechanisms of pyrethroid insecticide-induced stimulation of calcium influx in neocortical neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrethroid insecticides bind to voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) and modify their gating kinetics, thereby disrupting neuronal function. Pyrethroids have also been reported to alter the function of other channel types, including activation of voltage-gated Ca2+ calcium chann...

  14. OXIDATIVE AND HYDROLYTIC METABOLISM OF TYPE I PYRETHROIDS IN RAT HEPATIC MICROSOMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrethroids are a class of neurotoxic insecticides used in a variety of agricultural and household activities. Increased potential for human exposure to pyrethroids has prompted pharmacokinetic research. To that end, our lab has determined the in vitro clearance of the Type I p...

  15. OXIDATIVE AND HYDROLYTIC METABOLISM OF TYPE I PYRETHROIDS IN RAT AND HUMAN HEPATIC MICROSOMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrethroids are a class of neurotoxic insecticides used in a variety of agricultural and household activities. Increased potential for human exposure to pyrethroids has prompted pharmacokinetic research. To that end, our laboratory has determined the in vitro clearance of the T...

  16. 76 FR 82296 - Pyrethrins/Pyrethroid Cumulative Risk Assessment; Extension of Comment Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-30

    ... AGENCY Pyrethrins/Pyrethroid Cumulative Risk Assessment; Extension of Comment Period AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice; extension of comment period. SUMMARY: EPA issued a notice... called ``the pyrethroids'') and opened a public comment period on this document and other supporting...

  17. ACTIONS OF PYRETHROID INSECTICIDES ON THE SPONTANEOUS RELEASE OF GLUTAMATE FROM CULTURED HIPPOCAMPAL NEURONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrethroid insecticides increase the excitability of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Modulation of voltage-gated sodium channels is likely to play a primary role in this effect, but recent studies have suggested that pyrethroid effects on other ion channels may contri...

  18. Pyrethroid effects on freshwater invertebrates: A meta-analysis of pulse exposures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jes Jessen; Wiberg-Larsen, Peter; Kristensen, Esben Astrup

    2013-01-01

    Pyrethroids are widely used insecticides that may seriously harm aquatic organisms. Being strongly hydrophobic, pyrethroids in solution occur only in short pulses but may be retained in sediments for longer periods. Consequently, most studies consider the chronic exposure of sediment dwelling org...

  19. Detecting and monitoring of water inrush in tunnels and coal mines using direct current resistivity method:A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shucai Li; Bin Liu; Lichao Nie; Zhengyu Liu; Mingzhen Tian; Shirui Wang; Maoxin Su; Qian Guo

    2015-01-01

    Detecting, real-time monitoring and early warning of underground water-bearing structures are critically important issues in prevention and mitigation of water inrush hazards in underground engineering. Direct current (DC) resistivity method is a widely used method for routine detection, advanced detection and real-time monitoring of water-bearing structures, due to its high sensitivity to groundwater. In this study, the DC resistivity method applied to underground engineering is reviewed and discussed, including the observation mode, multiple inversions, and real-time monitoring. It is shown that a priori information constrained inversion is desirable to reduce the non-uniqueness of inversion, with which the accuracy of detection can be significantly improved. The focused resistivity method is prospective for advanced detection;with this method, the flanking interference can be reduced and the detection dis-tance is increased subsequently. The time-lapse resistivity inversion method is suitable for the regions with continuous conductivity changes, and it can be used to monitor water inrush in those regions. Based on above-mentioned features of various methods in terms of benefits and limitations, we propose a three-dimensional (3D) induced polarization method characterized with multi-electrode array, and introduce it into tunnels and mines combining with real-time monitoring with time-lapse inversion and cross-hole resistivity method. At last, the prospective applications of DC resistivity method are discussed as follows: (1) available advanced detection technology and instrument in tunnel excavated by tunnel boring machine (TBM), (2) high-resolution detection method in holes, (3) four-dimensional (4D) monitoring technology for water inrush sources, and (4) estimation of water volume in water-bearing structures.

  20. Towards the establishment and standardization of a veterinary antimicrobial resistance surveillance and monitoring programme in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Nel

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to establish a repeatable, standardized laboratory procedure for monitoring the development of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria isolated from animals and food of animal origin in South Africa, with reagents prepared in-house. The emergence of resistance and the spread of resistant bacteria can be limited by implementing a veterinary antimicrobial drug policy, in which inter alia systematic monitoring and prudent use play essential roles. The bacteria included in this study represented three different categories, namely zoonotic bacteria (Salmonella, indicator bacteria (Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium and veterinary pathogens (Mannheimia haemolytica. Thirty isolates of each species were collected with the aim of standardizing the laboratory methodology for a future national veterinary surveillance and monitoring programme. Susceptibility to ten selected antimicrobial drugs was determined by means of minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs using the microdilution method. The method according to the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards was used as the standard. Multi-well plates containing varying dilutions of antimicrobial drugs and prepared in-house for MIC determinations, yielded repeatable results. Storage of plates for 2 months at -70 oC did not influence results meaningfully. Within this limited sample of bacteria, MIC results did not indicate meaningful resistance against any of the ten selected antimicrobial drugs. The findings of the study will be used to establish a national veterinary antimicrobial resistance surveillance and monitoring programme in South Africa. To allow for international comparison of data, harmonisation of the surveillance and monitoring programme in accordance with global trends is encouraged. Ideally it should be combined with a programme monitoring the quantities of antimicrobial drugs used. The aim is to contribute to slowing down

  1. Detecting and monitoring of water inrush in tunnels and coal mines using direct current resistivity method: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shucai Li

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Detecting, real-time monitoring and early warning of underground water-bearing structures are critically important issues in prevention and mitigation of water inrush hazards in underground engineering. Direct current (DC resistivity method is a widely used method for routine detection, advanced detection and real-time monitoring of water-bearing structures, due to its high sensitivity to groundwater. In this study, the DC resistivity method applied to underground engineering is reviewed and discussed, including the observation mode, multiple inversions, and real-time monitoring. It is shown that a priori information constrained inversion is desirable to reduce the non-uniqueness of inversion, with which the accuracy of detection can be significantly improved. The focused resistivity method is prospective for advanced detection; with this method, the flanking interference can be reduced and the detection distance is increased subsequently. The time-lapse resistivity inversion method is suitable for the regions with continuous conductivity changes, and it can be used to monitor water inrush in those regions. Based on above-mentioned features of various methods in terms of benefits and limitations, we propose a three-dimensional (3D induced polarization method characterized with multi-electrode array, and introduce it into tunnels and mines combining with real-time monitoring with time-lapse inversion and cross-hole resistivity method. At last, the prospective applications of DC resistivity method are discussed as follows: (1 available advanced detection technology and instrument in tunnel excavated by tunnel boring machine (TBM, (2 high-resolution detection method in holes, (3 four-dimensional (4D monitoring technology for water inrush sources, and (4 estimation of water volume in water-bearing structures.

  2. Monitoring six-phase ohmic heating of contaminated soils using electrical resistance tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, A.L.; Daily, W.D.

    1994-09-01

    Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) was used to monitor six-phase ohmic heating used for the insitu remediation of volatile organic compounds from subsurface water and soil at the Savannah River Site, near Aiken, South Carolina. The changes in electrical conductivity caused by six-phase ohmic-heating in a clay layer located in the vadose zone were monitored during a period of approximately 2 months, before, during and after heating. From an array of electrodes located in 4 boreholes, we collected electrical resistivity data between five pairs of adjacent holes pairs. This data was used to calculate tomographs which showed the electrical conductivity changes along five vertical planes. The difference tomographs show the combined effects of moisture redistribution and heating caused by six-phase heating and vapor extraction. The tomographs show that most of the clay layer increased in electrical conductivity during the first 3 weeks of the 4 week long heating phase. At this time, the electrical conductivities near the center of the heating array were twice as large as the pre-heat conductivities. Then the electrical conductivity started to decrease for portions of the clay layer closest to the vapor extraction well. We propose that the conductivity decreases are due to the removal of moisture by the heating and vacuum extraction. Parts of the clay layer near the extraction well reached electrical conductivities as low as 40% of the pre-heating values. We propose that these regions of lower than ambient electrical conductivities are indicators of regions where the vapor removal by vacuum extraction was most effective. At the end of the heating phase, our estimates suggest that the clay saturation may have dropped to as low as 10% based on the observed conductivity changes.

  3. Allelic Variation of Cytochrome P450s Drives Resistance to Bednet Insecticides in a Major Malaria Vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman S Ibrahim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Scale up of Long Lasting Insecticide Nets (LLINs has massively contributed to reduce malaria mortality across Africa. However, resistance to pyrethroid insecticides in malaria vectors threatens its continued effectiveness. Deciphering the detailed molecular basis of such resistance and designing diagnostic tools is critical to implement suitable resistance management strategies. Here, we demonstrated that allelic variation in two cytochrome P450 genes is the most important driver of pyrethroid resistance in the major African malaria vector Anopheles funestus and detected key mutations controlling this resistance. An Africa-wide polymorphism analysis of the duplicated genes CYP6P9a and CYP6P9b revealed that both genes are directionally selected with alleles segregating according to resistance phenotypes. Modelling and docking simulations predicted that resistant alleles were better metabolizers of pyrethroids than susceptible alleles. Metabolism assays performed with recombinant enzymes of various alleles confirmed that alleles from resistant mosquitoes had significantly higher activities toward pyrethroids. Additionally, transgenic expression in Drosophila showed that flies expressing resistant alleles of both genes were significantly more resistant to pyrethroids compared with those expressing the susceptible alleles, indicating that allelic variation is the key resistance mechanism. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis and functional analyses demonstrated that three amino acid changes (Val109Ile, Asp335Glu and Asn384Ser from the resistant allele of CYP6P9b were key pyrethroid resistance mutations inducing high metabolic efficiency. The detection of these first DNA markers of metabolic resistance to pyrethroids allows the design of DNA-based diagnostic tools to detect and track resistance associated with bednets scale up, which will improve the design of evidence-based resistance management strategies.

  4. Geophysical monitoring of simulated graves with resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, conductivity and GPR in Colombia, South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Carlos Martin; Pringle, Jamie K; Saumett, Miguel; Evans, Gethin T

    2016-04-01

    In most Latin American countries there are significant numbers of both missing people and forced disappearances, ∼71,000 Colombia alone. Successful detection of buried human remains by forensic search teams can be difficult in varying terrain and climates. Three clandestine burials were simulated at two different depths commonly encountered in Latin America. In order to gain critical knowledge of optimum geophysical detection techniques, burials were monitored using: ground penetrating radar, magnetic susceptibility, bulk ground conductivity and electrical resistivity up to twenty-two months post-burial. Radar survey results showed good detection of modern 1/2 clothed pig cadavers throughout the survey period on 2D profiles, with the 250MHz antennae judged optimal. Both skeletonised and decapitated and burnt human remains were poorly imaged on 2D profiles with loss in signal continuity observed throughout the survey period. Horizontal radar time slices showed good anomalies observed over targets, but these decreased in amplitude over the post-burial time. These were judged due to detecting disturbed grave soil rather than just the buried targets. Magnetic susceptibility and electrical resistivity were successful at target detection in contrast to bulk ground conductivity surveys which were unsuccessful. Deeper burials were all harder to image than shallower ones. Forensic geophysical surveys should be undertaken at suspected burial sites.

  5. Clinical characteristics of resistant hypertension evaluated by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansui, Yasuo; Matsumura, Kiyoshi; Kida, Haruko; Sakata, Satoko; Ohtsubo, Toshio; Ibaraki, Ai; Kitazono, Takanari

    2014-01-01

    Strict control of blood pressure is important to prevent cardiovascular disease, although it is sometimes difficult to decrease blood pressure to target levels. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical characteristics of resistant hypertension evaluated by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. One hundred in-hospital patients, whose 24-hour average blood pressure was higher than 130/80 mmHg even after treatment with more than three antihypertensive drugs, were included in the present analysis. Circadian variation of blood pressure was evaluated by nocturnal fall in systolic blood pressure. Average blood pressures of all patients were high in both daytime and nighttime, 150.0/82.9 and 143.8/78.2 mmHg, respectively. Twenty patients had been treated with hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. In 63 patients out of the other 80 patients (79%), estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was also decreased (blood pressure variation only by renal dysfunction. These results show that a large number of the patients with resistant hypertension suffered from renal dysfunction, although it was difficult to explain altered circadian blood pressure variation based on renal dysfunction alone.

  6. A Review of Ten Years of the Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends (SMART from 2002 to 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Biedenbach

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Surveillance of antimicrobial agent resistance provides important information to guide microbiologists and infectious disease specialists understanding of the control and the spread of resistance mechanisms within the local environment. Continued monitoring of antimicrobial resistance patterns in the community and in local hospital environments is essential to guide effective empiric therapy. The Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends (SMART has monitored the in vitro susceptibility patterns of clinical Gram-negative bacilli to antimicrobial agents collected worldwide from intra-abdominal infections since 2002 and urinary tract infections since 2009. Resistance trends, with a particular focus on carbapenem resistance and the rate of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs, were analyzed. Isolates from intra-abdominal infections (n = 92,086 and urinary-tract infections (n = 24,705 were collected and tested using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute methods. This review presents carbapenem susceptibility and ESBL rates over ten years of SMART study analysis, including key publications during this period. The SMART study has proved to be a valuable resource in determining pathogen prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility over the last ten years and continues to provide evidence for regulatory susceptibility breakpoints and clinical decision making.

  7. Monitoring in vitro efficacy of Holarrhena antidysenterica against multidrug resistant enteropathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakti Rath

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess antibacterial activities of leaf and bark extracts of Holarrhena antidysenterica (H. antidysenterica, used by an Indian aborigine for ailments of human gastrointestinal tract, against eight extended spectrum β-lactamase producing multidrug resistant enteropathogens. Methods: Antibacterial activities of eight solvent-extracts of the plant were monitored by the agar-well diffusion method on lawns of all bacteria. Further, minimum inhibitory concentrations and minimum bactericidal concentrations of the best three solvent extracts were determined by the micro-broth dilution method. Preliminary phytochemical analysis of the active leaf and bark extracts were carried out. Results: It was found that Enterobacter aerogenes was resistant to 14 of 16 antibiotics, likewise, Escherichia coli to 13, Klebsiella sp. to 14, Salmonella paratyphi to 7, Salmonella typhi to 15, Shigella dysenteriae and Shigella sonnei to 14, Vibrio cholerae to 4 of 16 antibiotics. It was found that plant-extracts with petroleum ether and n-hexane had the least antibacterial activity. Extracts of leaves with chloroform, methanol, and water registered moderate antibacterial activity, whereas bark-extracts with ethyl acetate, acetone, and ethanol had a comparatively higher antibacterial activity on all these strains. Maximum sizes of zone of inhibition due to leaf extracts with ethyl acetate, acetone, and ethanol, and on the other hand, bark extracts with ethyl acetate, acetone and methanol were recorded against these bacteria; minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration values of specifically these extracts were determined. Phytochemical analysis of the methanolic bark extract of H. antidysenterica confirmed the presence of alkaloids, terpenoids, reducing sugars, tannins, and flavonoids. Conclusions: Data analysis revealed that leaves and bark of H. antidysenterica could serve as complementary/supplementary drugs along with suitable

  8. Relative permeability of fractured wellbore cement: an experimental investigation using electrical resistivity monitoring for moisture content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, W.; Rod, K. A.; Strickland, C. E.

    2016-12-01

    Permeability is a critical parameter needed to understand flow in subsurface environments; it is particularly important in deep subsurface reservoirs where multiphase fluid flow is common, such as carbon sequestration and geothermal reservoirs. Cement is used in the annulus of wellbores due to its low permeable properties to seal aquifers, reducing leaks to adjacent strata. Extreme subsurface environments of CO2 storage and geothermal production conditions will eventually reduce the cement integrity, propagating fracture networks and increasing the permeability for air and/or water. To date, there have been no reproducible experimental investigations of relative permeability in fractured wellbore cement published. To address this gap, we conducted a series of experiments using fractured Portland cement monoliths with increasing fracture networks. The monolith cylinder sides were jacketed with heavy-duty moisture-seal heat-shrink tubing, then fractured using shear force applied via a hydraulic press. Fractures were generated with different severity for each of three monoliths. Stainless steel endcaps were fixed to the monoliths using the same shrink-wrapped jacket. Fracture characteristics were determined using X-ray microtomography and image analysis. Flow controllers were used to control flow of water and air to supply continuous water or water plus air, both of which were delivered through the influent end cap. Effluent air flow was monitored using a flow meter, and water flow was measured gravimetrically. To monitor the effective saturation of the fractures, a RCON2 concrete bulk electrical resistivity test device was attached across both endcaps and a 0.1M NaNO3 brine was used as the transport fluid to improve resistivity measurements. Water content correlated to resistivity measurements with a r2 > 0.96. Data from the experiments was evaluated using two relative permeability models, the Corey-curve, often used for modeling relative permeability in porous media

  9. Direct current (DC) resistivity and Induced Polarization (IP) monitoring of active layer dynamics at high temporal resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doetsch, J.; Fiandaca, G.; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas;

    2015-01-01

    With permafrost thawing and changes in active layer dynamics induced by climate change, interactions between biogeochemical and thermal processes in the ground are of great importance. Here, active layer dynamics have been monitored using direct current (DC) resistivity and induced polarization (IP...... the soil freezing as a strong increase in resistivity. While the freezing horizon generally moves deeper with time, some variations in the freezing depth are observed along the profile. Comparison with depth-specific soil temperature indicates an exponential relationship between resistivity and below...

  10. The biological activity of a novel pyrethroid: metofluthrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugano, Masayo; Ishiwatari, Takao

    2012-01-01

    Metofluthrin (commercial name: SumiOne(®), Eminence(®)) is a novel pyrethroid insecticide developed by Sumitomo Chemical Co., Ltd. Metofluthrin has extremely high insecticidal activity to various pest insects, especially to mosquitoes. In addition, Metofluthrin has relatively high volatility and low mammalian toxicity. Metofluthrin is therefore suitable for use not only in conventional mosquito control formulations such as coils and liquid vaporizers, but also in a variety of novel devices that do not require heating, such as fan vaporizers and paper and resin emanators. Here we describe the insecticidal activity of Metofluthrin mainly against mosquitoes in various formulations in both laboratory and field trials.

  11. Anopheles darlingi and Anopheles marajoara (Diptera: Culicidae susceptibility to pyrethroids in an endemic area of the Brazilian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Kardec Ribeiro Galardo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: INTRODUCTION: This study aimed to evaluate the susceptibility of Anopheles darlingi Root (1926 and Anopheles marajoara Galvão & Damasceno (1942 to pyrethroids used by the National Malaria Control Program in Brazil. METHODS: Mosquitoes from Amapá, Brazilian Amazon, were assessed for resistance to cypermethrin, deltamethrin, and alpha-cypermethrin. Insecticide-impregnated bottles were used as suggested by the CDC/Atlanta. RESULTS: Diagnostic dose for Anopheles darlingi was 12.5µg/bottle during 30 min of exposure. Concentrations for Anopheles marajoara were 20µg/bottle of cypermethrin and deltamethrin and 12.5µg/bottle of alpha-cypermethrin. CONCLUSIONS : No resistance was recorded for Anopheles darlingi , but Anopheles marajoara requires attention.

  12. Activity of increased specific and non-specific esterases and glutathione transferases associated with resistance to permethrin in pediculus humanus capitis (phthiraptera: pediculidae) from Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Silvia; Zerba, Eduardo; Picollo, Maria I; Audino, Paola Gonzalez

    2010-01-01

    Enhanced metabolism by oxidative enzymes is a major cause of pyrethroid resistance in insects. In this work, we evaluated the role of specific and non-specific esterases in head louse populations from Buenos Aires with different levels of resistance to permethrin. As esterase activity is substrate-dependent, four different esters were used as unspecific substrates in order to obtain a better characterization of the possible role of these enzymes in the resistance phenomenon. The unspecific substrates were phenylthioacetate, 1- and 2-naphtyl-acetate, and p-nitrophenyl acetate. A 7-coumaryl permethrate was synthesized and used as a specific substrate to measure pyrethroid esterases by a very sensitive microfluorometric method. The results on pyrethroid esterase activity obtained with this substrate showed that these enzymes contribute to the detoxifying activity in resistant populations, although no correlation was found between pyrethroid esterase activity and resistance ratios. In this study, we established that the activity of esterase against specific and non-specific substrates is increased in pyrethroid-resistant populations of head lice from Buenos Aires. Also, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) resistance values demonstrated that there is a DDT cross-resistance phenomenon in pyrethroid-resistant head louse populations and suggested that an alteration in the receptor of the nervous system (kdr gen) is a key factor of the resistance phenomena in these head louse populations.

  13. A long-term monitoring of resistivity variation at the Wushangting mud volcano site in Southwestern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, P.; Chen, L.

    2007-12-01

    We used a two-dimensional (2D) time-lapse electrical resistivity method in monitoring the activities of mud volcanoes. The mud volcano is a geomorphic feature formed by gases and fluid gushing through fault fissures at the mudstone area. The extensively eruption of fluid in mud volcanoes in the Yanchao area of southwestern Taiwan reveals the activities of the active Chishan Fault. However, there are no direct evidence showing the relationships between erupted gas volumes and fault activities. Through the time-lapse resistivity monitoring in the area, we hope to provide useful information to evaluate the fault activities. Our in-field monitoring site is located at the Wushangting Preservation Zone, which are on the Chishan Fault line in Yanchao. The measuring period is from July 2006 to May 2007, measuring frequency is once a week in the first month and is decreased to about once a month in the following months. The average resistivity at the research site is between 3.36 to 9.43 Ohm-m. During the period, the major changes of resistivity are located between the surface and a depth of 3-m. On December 26th, 2006, three earthquakes occurred as high as 6.7, 6.4, 5.2 at the Richter scale outside the sea of PingTung county, about 100 km southwest from the monitoring site. After the earthquakes, the resistivity is found to be raised up 2 to 5 Ohm-m between the surface and a depth of 3-m. There are a lot of reasons that may cause the changes of resistivity, for example, the temperature, the humidity, the earthquake activities and its subsequent influence, i.e., gas or fluid emission from the subsurface. After examine the weather records during the monitoring period, we suggest that the decrease of resitivity in the monitoring site is most likely to be the subsequent influence of the earthquake activities. Currently, we are continuing the resistivity monitoring surveys and hope to provide more data in order to be compared with the previous observation records.

  14. Pyrethroid Activity-Based Probes for Profiling Cytochrome P450 Activities Associated with Insecticide Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, Hanafy M.; O' Neill, Paul M.; Hong, David; Finn, Robert; Henderson, Colin; Wright, Aaron T.; Cravatt, Benjamin; Hemingway, Janet; Paine, Mark J.

    2014-01-18

    Pyrethroid insecticides are used to control a diverse spectrum of diseases spread by arthropods. We have developed a suite of pyrethroid mimetic activity based probes (PyABPs) to selectively label and identify P450s associated with pyrethroid metabolism. The probes were screened against pyrethroid metabolizing and non-metabolizing mosquito P450s, as well as rodent microsomes to measure labeling specificity, plus CPR and b5 knockout mouse livers to validate P450 activation and establish the role for b5 in probe activation. Using a deltamethrin mimetic PyABP we were able to profile active enzymes in rat liver microsomes and identify pyrethroid metabolizing enzymes in the target tissue. The most reactive enzyme was a P450, CYP2C11, which is known to metabolize deltamethrin. Furthermore, several other pyrethroid metabolizers were identified (CYPs 2C6, 3A4, 2C13 and 2D1) along with related detoxification enzymes, notably UDP-g’s 2B1 - 5, suggesting a network of associated pyrethroid metabolizing enzymes, or ‘pyrethrome’. Considering the central role that P450s play in metabolizing insecticides, we anticipate that PyABPs will aid the identification and profiling of P450s associated with insecticide pharmacology in a wide range of species, improving understanding of P450-insecticide interactions and aiding the development of new tools for disease control.

  15. Direct current (DC) resistivity and induced polarization (IP) monitoring of active layer dynamics at high temporal resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doetsch, Joseph; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas; Christiansen, Anders V.

    2015-01-01

    With permafrost thawing and changes in active layer dynamics induced by climate change, interactions between biogeochemical and thermal processes in the ground are of great importance. Here, active layer dynamics have been monitored using direct current (DC) resistivity and induced polarization (IP...... and subsurface temperatures supplemented the DC-IP measurements. A time-lapse DC-IP monitoring system has been acquiring at least six datasets per day on a 42-electrode profile with 0.5. m electrode spacing since July 2013. Remote control of the data acquisition system enables interactive adaptation...... of the measurement schedule, which is critically important to acquire data in the winter months, where extremely high contact resistances increase the demands on the resistivity meter. Data acquired during the freezing period of October 2013 to February 2014 clearly image the soil freezing as a strong increase...

  16. Synergistic insecticidal and repellent effects of combined pyrethroid and repellent-impregnated bed nets using a novel long-lasting polymer-coating multi-layer technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulde, Michael K; Nehring, Oliver

    2012-08-01

    effects of multi-layer polymer-coating LLIRNs may overcome LLIN-triggered selection pressure for development of new kdr- and metabolic pyrethroid resistances while simultaneously increasing protective efficacy also against kdr- and metabolic pyrethroid-resistant mosquitoes substantially due to the repellent-induced effects of LLIRNs thus indicating that this approach is a promising new candidate for future bed net, curtain, and window screen impregnation aiming at optimized prevention from mosquito-borne diseases.

  17. Insecticide resistance status in Anopheles gambiae in southern Benin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corbel Vincent

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence of pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles gambiae has become a serious concern to the future success of malaria control. In Benin, the National Malaria Control Programme has recently planned to scaling up long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs and indoor residual spraying (IRS for malaria prevention. It is, therefore, crucial to monitor the level and type of insecticide resistance in An. gambiae, particularly in southern Benin where reduced efficacy of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs and IRS has previously been reported. Methods The protocol was based on mosquito collection during both dry and rainy seasons across forty districts selected in southern Benin. Bioassay were performed on adults collected from the field to assess the susceptibility of malaria vectors to insecticide-impregnated papers (permethrin 0.75%, delthamethrin 0.05%, DDT 4%, and bendiocarb 0.1% following WHOPES guidelines. The species within An. gambiae complex, molecular form and presence of kdr and ace-1 mutations were determined by PCR. Results Strong resistance to permethrin and DDT was found in An. gambiae populations from southern Benin, except in Aglangandan where mosquitoes were fully susceptible (mortality 100% to all insecticides tested. PCR showed the presence of two sub-species of An. gambiae, namely An. gambiae s.s, and Anopheles melas, with a predominance for An. gambiae s.s (98%. The molecular M form of An. gambiae was predominant in southern Benin (97%. The kdr mutation was detected in all districts at various frequency (1% to 95% whereas the Ace-1 mutation was found at a very low frequency (≤ 5%. Conclusion This study showed a widespread resistance to permethrin in An. gambiae populations from southern Benin, with a significant increase of kdr frequency compared to what was observed previously in Benin. The low frequency of Ace-1 recorded in all populations is encouraging for the use of bendiocarb as an alternative insecticide to

  18. Technical specifications on randomised sampling for harmonised monitoring of antimicrobial resistance in zoonotic and commensal bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    European Food Safety Authority

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available To monitor antimicrobial resistance in zoonotic and indicator bacteria from food-producing animal populations and meat thereof under Decision 2013/652/EC, a guidance for randomised sampling procedures is provided. Prospective and retrospective sampling plans for samples and isolates are addressed. The former involves collecting sufficient numbers of representative animal and food samples from which recovered isolates are tested for susceptibility; the latter involves selecting randomly Salmonella isolates from collections constituted within the framework of either the national control programmes in poultry flocks or from verification of the compliance with process hygiene criterion in broiler carcases. A generic proportionate stratified sampling process is proposed and numerical illustrations of proportional allocation are provided. Stratified sampling of Salmonella isolates from poultry primary productions is performed with proportional allocation to the size of the isolate collections available in the official laboratories. An alternative approach would be a simple random sampling within the sampling frame of flocks positive for Salmonella. Stratified sampling of caecal samples, accounting for at least 60 % of the domestic production of food-producing animal populations monitored, with proportionate allocation to the slaughterhouse production, allows for the collection of representative isolates of Campylobacter and indicator E. coli and enterococci in various animal populations. Stratified sampling of Salmonella isolates from broiler carcases is proposed with proportional allocation to the size of the isolate collections available in the official laboratories involved in verifying the compliance with the Salmonella process hygiene criterion. These isolates may be complemented with those recovered by the food business operator. Sampling of different chilled fresh meat categories is targeted at retail outlets serving the final consumer, with

  19. Simultaneous determination of 18 pyrethroids in indoor air by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Toshiaki

    2009-06-26

    An analytical method was developed for the simultaneous measurement of 18 pyrethroids (allethrin, bifenthrin, cyfluthrin, cypermethrin, cyphenothrin, deltamethrin, empenthrin, fenpropathrin, furamethrin, imiprothrin, metofluthrin, permethrin, phenothrin, prallethrin, profluthrin, resmethrin, tetramethrin and transfluthrin) in indoor air. The pyrethroids were collected for 24 h using a combination of adsorbents (quartz fiber filter disk and Empore C18 disk), with protection from light, and then extracted with acetone, concentrated, and analyzed by GC/MS. They could be determined accurately and precisely (detection limits: ca. 1 ng/m(3)). The collected pyrethroid samples could be stored for up to one month at 4 degrees C in a refrigerator.

  20. Technical specifications on the harmonised monitoring and reporting of antimicrobial resistance in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in food-producing animals and food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    European Food Safety Authority

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available

    In this report, proposals to improve the harmonisation of monitoring of prevalence, genetic diversity and antimicrobial resistance in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSAfrom food-producing animals and food derived thereof by the European Union Member States are presented. The primary route of zoonotic transmission of MRSA is considered to be the direct or indirect occupational contact of livestock professionals with colonised animals, while the role of food as a source of human colonisation or infection is presently considered to be low. Sampling recommendations have therefore prioritised several different food-producing animal populations previously described as MRSA reservoirs and, to a lesser extent, food produced by these animals. Monitoring in primary production, including at slaughter, is pivotal because of the main transmission route, while additional monitoring in food may help with the assessment of consumers’ exposure via this route. A consistent monitoring in broiler flocks, fattening pigs and dairy cattle, as well as in veal calves under 1 year of age and fattening turkey flocks, in those countries where production exceeds 10 million tonnes slaughtered/year, is recommended every third year on a rotating basis. It is proposed that breeding poultry flocks and breeding pigs, as well as meat and raw milk products, are monitored on a voluntary basis. Representative sampling should be made within the framework of the national Salmonella control programmes for the poultry populations targeted, at the slaughterhouse for calves and either on farm or at the slaughterhouse for fattening pigs. Harmonised analytical methodologies for identification, typing and further characterisation of MRSA are proposed. The use of the microdilution method applied to a harmonised set of antimicrobials, and interpreted using EUCAST epidemiological cut-off values for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of MRSA, is recommended

  1. Temporal variability of pyrethroid metabolite levels in bedtime, morning, and 24-h urine samples for 50 adults in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Marsha K; Sobus, Jon R; Barr, Dana Boyd; Croghan, Carry W; Chen, Fu-Lin; Walker, Richard; Alston, Lillian; Andersen, Erik; Clifton, Matthew S

    2016-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are widely used to control insects in both agricultural and residential settings worldwide. Few data are available on the temporal variability of pyrethroid metabolites in the urine of non-occupationally exposed adults. In this work, we describe the study design and sampling methodology for the Pilot Study to Estimate Human Exposures to Pyrethroids using an Exposure Reconstruction Approach (Ex-R study). Two major objectives were to quantify the concentrations of several pyrethroid metabolites in bedtime, first morning void (FMV), and 24-h urine samples as concentration (wet weight), specific-gravity (SG) corrected, creatinine (CR) corrected, and excretion rate values for 50 Ex-R adults over a six-week monitoring period and to determine if these correction approaches for urine dilution reduced the variability of the biomarker levels. The Ex-R study was conducted at the United States Environmental Protection Agency's Human Studies Facility in Chapel Hill, North Carolina USA and at participants' homes within a 40-mile radius of this facility. Recruitment of participants and field activities occurred between October 2009 and May 2011. Participants, ages 19-50 years old, provided daily food, activity, and pesticide-use diaries and collected their own urine samples (bedtime, FMV, and 24-h) during weeks 1, 2, and 6 of a six-week monitoring period. A total of 2503 urine samples were collected from the study participants. These samples were analyzed for the pyrethroid metabolites 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA), cis/trans-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethyl-cyclopropane carboxylic acid (cis/trans-DCCA), and 2-methyl-3-phenylbenzoic acid (MPA) using high performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Only 3-PBA was frequently detected (>50%) in the adult urine samples. Median urinary 3-PBA levels were 0.88 ng/mL, 0.96 ng/mL-SG, 1.04 ng/mg, and 1.04 ng/min for concentration, SG-corrected, CR-corrected, and excretion rate values, respectively

  2. Electrical Resistance and Acoustic Emission Measurements for Monitoring the Structural Behavior of CFRP Laminate

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Wei

    2015-07-12

    Electrical resistance and acoustic emission (AE) measurement are jointly used to monitor the degradation in CFRP laminates subjected to tensile tests. The objective of this thesis is to perform a synergertic analysis between a passive and an active methods to better access how these perform when used for Structural Health Moni- toring (SHM). Laminates with three different stacking sequences: [0]4, [02/902]s and [+45/ − 45]2s are subjected to monotonic and cyclic tensile tests. In each laminate, we carefully investigate which mechanisms of degradation can or cannot be detect- ed by each technique. It is shown that most often, that acoustic emission signals start before any electrical detection is possible. This is is explained based on the redundance of the electrical network that makes it less sensitive to localized damages. Based on in depth study of AE signals clustering, a new classification is proposed to recognize the different damage mechanims based on only two parameters: the RA (rise time/amplitude) and the duration of the signal.

  3. Weldability and Monitoring of Resistance Spot Welding of Q&P and TRIP Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Russo Spena

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This work aims at investigating the spot weldability of a new advanced Quenching and Partitioning (Q&P steel and a Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP steel for automotive applications by evaluating the effects of the main welding parameters on the mechanical performance of their dissimilar spot welds. The welding current, the electrode tip voltage and the electrical resistance of sheet stack were monitored in order to detect any metal expulsion and to evaluate its severity, as well as to clarify its effect on spot strength. The joint strength was assessed by means of shear and cross tension tests. The corresponding fracture modes were determined through optical microscopy. The welding current is the main process parameter that affects the weld strength, followed by the clamping force and welding time. Metal expulsion can occur through a single large expulsion or multiple expulsions, whose effects on the shear and cross tension strength have been assessed. Longer welding times can limit the negative effect of an expulsion if it occurs in the first part of the joining process. The spot welds exhibit different fracture modes according to their strengths. Overall, a proper weldability window for the selected process parameters has been determined to obtain sound joints.

  4. Responding to the challenge of antimalarial drug resistance by routine monitoring to update national malaria treatment policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Lasse S; Ringwald, Pascal

    2007-01-01

    additional information about changing patterns of resistance. However, some of the tests are technically demanding, and thus there is a need for more resources for training and capacity building in endemic countries to be able to adequately respond to the challenge of drug resistance....... of rational and updated malaria treatment policies, but defining and updating such policies requires a sufficient volume of high-quality drug-resistance data collected at national and regional levels. Three main tools are used for drug resistance monitoring, including therapeutic efficacy tests, in vitro...... tests, and analyses of molecular markers. Data obtained with the therapeutic efficacy test conducted according to the standard protocol of the World Health Organization are most useful for updating national treatment policies, while the in vitro test and molecular markers can provide important...

  5. Monitoring resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis in the field by performing bioassays with each Cry toxin separately

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Tetreau

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti is increasingly used worldwide for mosquito control and is the only larvicide used in the French Rhône-Alpes region since decades. The artificial selection of mosquitoes with field-persistent Bti collected in breeding sites from this region led to a moderate level of resistance to Bti, but to relatively high levels of resistance to individual Bti Cry toxins. Based on this observation, we developed a bioassay procedure using each Bti Cry toxin separately to detect cryptic Bti-resistance evolving in field mosquito populations. Although no resistance to Bti was detected in none of the three mosquito species tested (Aedes rusticus, Aedes sticticus and Aedes vexans, an increased tolerance to Cry4Aa (3.5-fold and Cry11Aa toxins (8-fold was found in one Ae. sticticus population compared to other populations of the same species, suggesting that resistance to Bti may be arising in this population. This study confirms previous works showing a lack of Bti resistance in field mosquito populations treated for decades with this bioinsecticide. It also provides a first panorama of their susceptibility status to individual Bti Cry toxins. In combination with bioassays with Bti, bioassays with separate Cry toxins allow a more sensitive monitoring of Bti-resistance in the field.

  6. Monitoring resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis in the field by performing bioassays with each Cry toxin separately.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetreau, Guillaume; Stalinski, Renaud; David, Jean-Philippe; Després, Laurence

    2013-11-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) is increasingly used worldwide for mosquito control and is the only larvicide used in the French Rhône-Alpes region since decades. The artificial selection of mosquitoes with field-persistent Bti collected in breeding sites from this region led to a moderate level of resistance to Bti, but to relatively high levels of resistance to individual Bti Cry toxins. Based on this observation, we developed a bioassay procedure using each Bti Cry toxin separately to detect cryptic Bti-resistance evolving in field mosquito populations. Although no resistance to Bti was detected in none of the three mosquito species tested (Aedes rusticus, Aedes sticticus and Aedes vexans), an increased tolerance to Cry4Aa (3.5-fold) and Cry11Aa toxins (8-fold) was found in one Ae. sticticus population compared to other populations of the same species, suggesting that resistance to Bti may be arising in this population. This study confirms previous works showing a lack of Bti resistance in field mosquito populations treated for decades with this bioinsecticide. It also provides a first panorama of their susceptibility status to individual Bti Cry toxins. In combination with bioassays with Bti, bioassays with separate Cry toxins allow a more sensitive monitoring of Bti-resistance in the field.

  7. Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography: a powerful tool for landslide monitoring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, A.

    2011-12-01

    The extreme rainfall events and the quick snowmelt occurrences play an important role in the triggering of the landslides. The occurrence of one of these factors can determine the variation of water content in the first layers of the subsoil and as a consequence a quick soil saturation inducing both an increase in pore-water pressures and the overloaded of the slopes progressively collapsing. The electrical resistivity, self-potential, electromagnetic induction and GPR methods can be considered as the most appropriate for assessing the presence of water in the underground. Such methods allow us to study the behavior of water content over much wider and deeper areas than those offered by traditional methods (thermo-gravimetric, tensiometric, TDR, etc) based on spot measures and concerning small volumes. In particular, the Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), which has already proved to be a powerful tool both for the geometrical reconstruction of a landslide body (location of sliding surface, estimation of the thickness of the slide material) and the individuation of high water content areas, can be considered as an alternative tool to be employed for a qualitative and quantitative water content monitoring in the first layers of the subsoil. Indeed, time-lapse 2D ERT can be tested in order to gather information on the temporal and spatial patterns of water infiltration processes and water content variation. This work reports the preliminary results from a new prototype system planned to obtain time-lapse 2D ERTs, TDR and precipitation measurements in two landslide areas located in the Southern Apennine chain (Italy). The system was planned with the aim to estimate the variation of the resistivity parameter on a long period considering the water content variation, the rain water infiltration and the seasonal changes. The prototype system, linked to a pc used for storing data and managing the time interval acquisition, consists of: a resistivimeter connected to a

  8. Determination of pyrethroid residues in tobacco and cigarette smoke by capillary gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jibao; Liu, Baizhan; Zhu, Xiaolan; Su, Qingde

    2002-07-26

    The extraction of fenpropathrin, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, fenvalerate and deltamethrin from tobacco (Nicotina tobaccum) and cigarette smoke condensate with acetone, followed by partition of resulting acetone mixture with petroleum ether, was investigated and found suitable for capillary gas chromatography (GC) residue analysis. Florisil column clean-up was found to provide clean-up procedure for tobacco and cigarette smoke condensate permitting analysis to < or = 0.01 microgram.g-1 for most of the pyrethroids by GC with a 63Ni electron capture detector (GC-ECD). Quantitative determination was obtained by the method of external standards. Cigarettes made from flue-cured tobacco spiked with different amounts of pyrethroids were used and the pyrethroid levels in mainstream smoke were determined. For all the pyrethroid residues, 1.51-15.50% were transferred from tobacco into cigarette smoke.

  9. Pyrethroid insecticide exposure and reproductive hormone levels in healthy Japanese male subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoshinaga, J; Imai, K; Shiraishi, H

    2014-01-01

    The associations between serum levels of reproductive hormones (follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin, inhibin B and calculated free testosterone) and urinary metabolite concentration of pyrethroid insecticides [3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA)...

  10. Assessing the occurrence and distribution of pyrethroids in water and suspended sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hladik, M.L.; Kuivila, K.M.

    2009-01-01

    The distribution of pyrethroid insecticides in the environment was assessed by separately measuring concentrations in the dissolved and suspended sediment phases of surface water samples. Filtered water was extracted by HLB solid-phase extraction cartridges, while the sediment on the filter was sonicated and cleaned up using carbon and aluminum cartridges. Detection limits for the 13 pyrethroids analyzed by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry were 0.5 to 1 ng L-1 for water and 2 to 6 ng g for the suspended sediments. Seven pyrethroids were detected in six water samples collected from either urban or agricultural creeks, with bifenthrin detected the most frequently and at the highest concentrations. In spiked water samples and field samples, the majority of the pyrethroids were associated with the suspended sediments.

  11. Passive dosing of pyrethroid insecticides to Daphnia magna: Expressing excess toxicity by chemical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard Schmidt, Stine; Gan, Jay; Kretschmann, A. C.

    2015-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are nerve poisons and used as active ingredients in pesticide mixtures available for household and agriculture. The compounds are hydrophobic, and their strong sorption to organic material may result in decreasing exposure levels during toxicity tests and consequent...

  12. Quantitative resistance level (MIC) of Escherichia coli isolated from calves and pigs suffering from enteritis: national resistance monitoring by the BVL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröer, Ulrike; Kaspar, Heike; Wallmann, Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    National Resistance Monitoring of the Federal Office of Consumer Protection and Food Safety (BVL), which was put into service in 2001, has made it possible to implement a valid and representative database on the basis of which the resistance situation, development and spread in animal pathogens can be evaluated. Escherichia coil (E. coli) strains originating from calves and pigs suffering from enteritis were first included in the investigations in the 2004/2005 study. A total of 258 bovine and 492 porcine E. coli strains were tested using the broth microdilution method to determine the in vitro susceptibility (minimum inhibitory concentration) to 23 (fattening pigs) and 28 (calves, piglets, weaners) different antimicrobial substances. Considerable prevalences of resistance were found for some antimicrobials. The strains originating from both animal species displayed high prevalences of resistance for tetracycline, trimethoprim, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, doxycycline and ampicillin. Reduced susceptibility was detected particularly in the E. coli strains from calves. The data reveal that the resistance level of E. coli strains isolated from cases of enteric disease in calves and pigs is altogether higher than has so far been reported in pathogens causing different diseases and in other food-producing animal species. Based on the results presented, it is possible to assess the current resistance situation for E. coli strains in calves and pigs in Germany. This in turn helps to deduce the necessary management measures that can be taken in order to minimise resistance to antibiotics. Furthermore, the data help to decide on adequate therapy of E. coli infections of the intestinal tract in calves and pigs and encourage the responsible use of antibiotics in the interests of animal health and consumer protection.

  13. Purification and preliminary characterization of permethrinase from a pyrethroid-transforming strain of Bacillus cereus.

    OpenAIRE

    Maloney, S E; Maule, A; Smith, A. R.

    1993-01-01

    Bacillus cereus SM3 was isolated on a mineral salts medium with Tween 80 as the primary carbon source. It was able to hydrolyze second- and third-generation pyrethroids, thereby generating noninsecticidal products. The enzyme responsible for this hydrolytic reaction was named permethrinase for this study. This is the first instance in which pyrethroid detoxification has been achieved with a cell-free microbial enzyme system. Permethrinase was purified by ion-exchange chromatography and gel fi...

  14. Formulation Effects and the Off-target Transport of Pyrethroid Insecticides from Urban Hard Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Controlled rainfall experiments utilizing drop forming rainfall simulators were conducted to study various factors contributing to off-target transport of off-the-shelf formulated pyrethroid insecticides from concrete surfaces. Factors evaluated included active ingredient, product formulation, time between application and rainfall (set time), and rainfall intensity. As much as 60% and as little as 0.8% of pyrethroid applied could be recovered in surface runoff depending primarily on product f...

  15. Gossypol-enhanced P450 gene pool contributes to cotton bollworm tolerance to a pyrethroid insecticide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xiao-Yuan; Xue, Xue-Yi; Huang, Yong-Ping; Chen, Xiao-Ya; Mao, Ying-Bo

    2012-09-01

    Cotton plants accumulate phytotoxins, including gossypol and related sesquiterpene aldehydes, to resist insect herbivores and pathogens. To counteract these defensive plant secondary metabolites, cotton bollworms (Helicoverpa armigera) elevate their production of detoxification enzymes, including cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s). Besides their tolerance to phytotoxin, cotton bollworms have quickly developed resistance to deltamethrin, a widely used pyrethroid insecticide in cotton field. However, the relationship between host plant secondary metabolites and bollworm insecticide resistance is poorly understood. Here, we show that exogenously expressed CYP6AE14, a gossypol-inducible P450 of cotton bollworm, has epoxidation activity towards aldrin, an organochlorine insecticide, indicating that gossypol-induced P450s participate in insecticide metabolism. Gossypol-ingested cotton bollworm larvae showed higher midgut P450 enzyme activities and exhibited enhanced tolerance to deltamethrin. The midgut transcripts of bollworm larvae administrated with different phytochemicals and deltamethrin were then compared by microarray analysis, which showed that gossypol and deltamethrin induced the most similar P450 expression profiles. Gossypol-induced P450s exhibited high divergence and at least five of them (CYP321A1, CYP9A12, CYP9A14, CYP6AE11 and CYP6B7) contributed to cotton bollworm tolerance to deltamethrin. Knocking down one of them, CYP9A14, by plant-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) rendered the larvae more sensitive to the insecticide. These data demonstrate that generalist insects can take advantage of secondary metabolites from their major host plants to elaborate defence systems against other toxic chemicals, and impairing this defence pathway by RNAi holds a potential for reducing the required dosages of agrochemicals in pest control.

  16. Evidence of carbamate resistance in urban populations of Anopheles gambiae s.s. mosquitoes resistant to DDT and deltamethrin insecticides in Lagos, South-Western Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Resistance monitoring is essential in ensuring the success of insecticide based vector control programmes. This study was carried out to assess the susceptibility status of urban populations of Anopheles gambiae to carbamate insecticide being considered for vector control in mosquito populations previously reported to be resistant to DDT and permethrin. Methods Two – three day old adult female Anopheles mosquitoes reared from larval collections in 11 study sites from Local Government Areas of Lagos were exposed to test papers impregnated with DDT 4%, deltamethrin 0.05% and propoxur 0.1% insecticides. Additional tests were carried out to determine the susceptibility status of the Anopheles gambiae population to bendiocarb insecticide. Members of the A. gambiae complex, the molecular forms, were identified by PCR assays. The involvement of metabolic enzymes in carbamate resistance was assessed using Piperonyl butoxide (PBO) synergist assays. The presence of kdr-w/e and ace-1R point mutations responsible for DDT-pyrethroid and carbamate resistance mechanisms was also investigated by PCR. Results Propoxur resistance was found in 10 out of the 11 study sites. Resistance to three classes of insecticides was observed in five urban localities. Mortality rates in mosquitoes exposed to deltamethrin and propoxur did not show any significant difference (P > 0.05) but was significantly higher (P insecticide resistance management strategies to combat the multiple resistance identified. PMID:22686575

  17. Pyrethroid activity-based probes for profiling cytochrome P450 activities associated with insecticide interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Hanafy M; O'Neill, Paul M; Hong, David W; Finn, Robert D; Henderson, Colin J; Wright, Aaron T; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Hemingway, Janet; Paine, Mark J I

    2013-12-03

    Pyrethroid insecticides are used to control diseases spread by arthropods. We have developed a suite of pyrethroid mimetic activity-based probes (PyABPs) to selectively label and identify P450s associated with pyrethroid metabolism. The probes were screened against pyrethroid-metabolizing and nonmetabolizing mosquito P450s, as well as rodent microsomes, to measure labeling specificity, plus cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase and b5 knockout mouse livers to validate P450 activation and establish the role for b5 in probe activation. Using PyABPs, we were able to profile active enzymes in rat liver microsomes and identify pyrethroid-metabolizing enzymes in the target tissue. These included P450s as well as related detoxification enzymes, notably UDP-glucuronosyltransferases, suggesting a network of associated pyrethroid-metabolizing enzymes, or "pyrethrome." Considering the central role P450s play in metabolizing insecticides, we anticipate that PyABPs will aid in the identification and profiling of P450s associated with insecticide pharmacology in a wide range of species, improving understanding of P450-insecticide interactions and aiding the development of unique tools for disease control.

  18. Application of genomic technologies to measure and monitor antibiotic resistance in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jian-Qiang; Cui, Li; Chen, Qing-Lin; An, Xin-Li; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2017-01-01

    One of the richest reservoirs of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and genes, animal intestinal microbiota contributes to the spread of antibiotic resistance in the environment and, potentially, to human pathogens. Both culture-based genomic technology and culture-independent metagenomics have been developed to investigate the abundance and diversity of antibiotic resistance genes. The characteristics, strengths, limitations, and challenges of these genomic approaches are discussed in this review in the context of antibiotic resistance in animals. We also discuss the advances in single-cell genomics and its potential for surveillance of antibiotic resistance in animals. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  19. Successful treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis with combination therapy using linezolid and rifampicin under therapeutic drug monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashizawa, Nobuyuki; Tsuji, Yasuhiro; Kawago, Koyomi; Higashi, Yoshitsugu; Tashiro, Masato; Nogami, Makiko; Gejo, Ryuichi; Narukawa, Munetoshi; Kimura, Tomoatsu; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro

    2016-05-01

    Linezolid is an effective antibiotic against most gram-positive bacteria including drug-resistant strains such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Although linezolid therapy is known to result in thrombocytopenia, dosage adjustment or therapeutic drug monitoring of linezolid is not generally necessary. In this report, however, we describe the case of a 79-year-old woman with recurrent methicillin-resistant S. aureus osteomyelitis that was successfully treated via surgery and combination therapy using linezolid and rifampicin under therapeutic drug monitoring for maintaining an appropriate serum linezolid concentration. The patient underwent surgery for the removal of the artificial left knee joint and placement of vancomycin-impregnated bone cement beads against methicillin-resistant S. aureus after total left knee implant arthroplasty for osteoarthritis. We also initiated linezolid administration at a conventional dose of 600 mg/h at 12-h intervals, but reduced it to 300 mg/h at 12-h intervals on day 9 because of a decrease in platelet count and an increase in serum linezolid trough concentration. However, when the infection exacerbated, we again increased the linezolid dose to 600 mg/h at 12-h intervals and performed combination therapy with rifampicin, considering their synergistic effects and the control of serum linezolid trough concentration via drug interaction. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus infection improved without reducing the dose of or discontinuing linezolid. The findings in the present case suggest that therapeutic drug monitoring could be useful for ensuring the therapeutic efficacy and safety of combination therapy even in patients with osteomyelitis who require long-term antibiotic administration.

  20. Solutions Network Formulation Report. Using NASA Sensors to Perform Crop Type Assessment for Monitoring Insect Resistance in Corn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, David; Copenhaver, Ken; Anderson, Daniel; Hilbert, Kent

    2007-01-01

    The EPA (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency) is tasked to monitor for insect pest resistance to transgenic crops. Several models have been developed to understand the resistance properties of insects. The Population Genetics Simulator model is used in the EPA PIRDSS (Pest Infestation and Resistance Decision Support System). The EPA Office of Pesticide Programs uses the DSS to help understand the potential for insect pest resistance development and the likelihood that insect pest resistance will negatively affect transgenic corn. Once the DSS identifies areas of concern, crews are deployed to collect insect pest samples, which are tested to identify whether they have developed resistance to the toxins in transgenic corn pesticides. In this candidate solution, VIIRS (Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite) vegetation index products will be used to build hypertemporal layerstacks for crop type and phenology assessment. The current phenology attribute is determined by using the current time of year to index the expected growth stage of the crop. VIIRS might provide more accurate crop type assessment and also might give a better estimate on the crop growth stage.

  1. Adaptation and evaluation of the bottle assay for monitoring insecticide resistance in disease vector mosquitoes in the Peruvian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brogdon William G

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to establish whether the "bottle assay", a tool for monitoring insecticide resistance in mosquitoes, can complement and augment the capabilities of the established WHO assay, particularly in resource-poor, logistically challenging environments. Methods Laboratory reared Aedes aegypti and field collected Anopheles darlingi and Anopheles albimanus were used to assess the suitability of locally sourced solvents and formulated insecticides for use with the bottle assay. Using these adapted protocols, the ability of the bottle assay and the WHO assay to discriminate between deltamethrin-resistant Anopheles albimanus populations was compared. The diagnostic dose of deltamethrin that would identify resistance in currently susceptible populations of An. darlingi and Ae. aegypti was defined. The robustness of the bottle assay during a surveillance exercise in the Amazon was assessed. Results The bottle assay (using technical or formulated material and the WHO assay were equally able to differentiate deltamethrin-resistant and susceptible An. albimanus populations. A diagnostic dose of 10 μg a.i./bottle was identified as the most sensitive discriminating dose for characterizing resistance in An. darlingi and Ae. aegypti. Treated bottles, prepared using locally sourced solvents and insecticide formulations, can be stored for > 14 days and used three times. Bottles can be stored and transported under local conditions and field-assays can be completed in a single evening. Conclusion The flexible and portable nature of the bottle assay and the ready availability of its components make it a potentially robust and useful tool for monitoring insecticide resistance and efficacy in remote areas that require minimal cost tools.

  2. Sampling strategies in antimicrobial resistance monitoring: evaluating how precision and sensitivity vary with the number of animals sampled per farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takehisa; Hayama, Yoko; Hidano, Arata; Kobayashi, Sota; Muroga, Norihiko; Ishikawa, Kiyoyasu; Ogura, Aki; Tsutsui, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Because antimicrobial resistance in food-producing animals is a major public health concern, many countries have implemented antimicrobial monitoring systems at a national level. When designing a sampling scheme for antimicrobial resistance monitoring, it is necessary to consider both cost effectiveness and statistical plausibility. In this study, we examined how sampling scheme precision and sensitivity can vary with the number of animals sampled from each farm, while keeping the overall sample size constant to avoid additional sampling costs. Five sampling strategies were investigated. These employed 1, 2, 3, 4 or 6 animal samples per farm, with a total of 12 animals sampled in each strategy. A total of 1,500 Escherichia coli isolates from 300 fattening pigs on 30 farms were tested for resistance against 12 antimicrobials. The performance of each sampling strategy was evaluated by bootstrap resampling from the observational data. In the bootstrapping procedure, farms, animals, and isolates were selected randomly with replacement, and a total of 10,000 replications were conducted. For each antimicrobial, we observed that the standard deviation and 2.5-97.5 percentile interval of resistance prevalence were smallest in the sampling strategy that employed 1 animal per farm. The proportion of bootstrap samples that included at least 1 isolate with resistance was also evaluated as an indicator of the sensitivity of the sampling strategy to previously unidentified antimicrobial resistance. The proportion was greatest with 1 sample per farm and decreased with larger samples per farm. We concluded that when the total number of samples is pre-specified, the most precise and sensitive sampling strategy involves collecting 1 sample per farm.

  3. Sampling strategies in antimicrobial resistance monitoring: evaluating how precision and sensitivity vary with the number of animals sampled per farm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehisa Yamamoto

    Full Text Available Because antimicrobial resistance in food-producing animals is a major public health concern, many countries have implemented antimicrobial monitoring systems at a national level. When designing a sampling scheme for antimicrobial resistance monitoring, it is necessary to consider both cost effectiveness and statistical plausibility. In this study, we examined how sampling scheme precision and sensitivity can vary with the number of animals sampled from each farm, while keeping the overall sample size constant to avoid additional sampling costs. Five sampling strategies were investigated. These employed 1, 2, 3, 4 or 6 animal samples per farm, with a total of 12 animals sampled in each strategy. A total of 1,500 Escherichia coli isolates from 300 fattening pigs on 30 farms were tested for resistance against 12 antimicrobials. The performance of each sampling strategy was evaluated by bootstrap resampling from the observational data. In the bootstrapping procedure, farms, animals, and isolates were selected randomly with replacement, and a total of 10,000 replications were conducted. For each antimicrobial, we observed that the standard deviation and 2.5-97.5 percentile interval of resistance prevalence were smallest in the sampling strategy that employed 1 animal per farm. The proportion of bootstrap samples that included at least 1 isolate with resistance was also evaluated as an indicator of the sensitivity of the sampling strategy to previously unidentified antimicrobial resistance. The proportion was greatest with 1 sample per farm and decreased with larger samples per farm. We concluded that when the total number of samples is pre-specified, the most precise and sensitive sampling strategy involves collecting 1 sample per farm.

  4. Effect of Photoperiod On Permethrin Resistance In Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, O Karina; Ponce, Gustavo; Lopez, Beatriz; Gutierrez, Selene M; Rodriguez, Iram P; Reyes, Guadalupe; Saavedra, Karla J; Black, William C; Garcia, Julian; Beaty, Barry; Eisen, Lars; Flores, Adriana E

    2016-12-01

    Living organisms have been exposed to light-dark cycles that allowed them to adapt to different ecological niches. Circadian cycles affect hormone release, metabolism, and response to xenobiotic compounds. Current studies have shown that insect susceptibility to toxic agents depends on circadian cycles, mainly because the biochemical processes involved in detoxification and responses to oxidative stress are modulated by this process. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of photoperiod on resistance to permethrin in Aedes aegypti . Collections of Ae. aegypti from 4 locations in Yucatan, southern Mexico, were subjected to 2 different photoperiod schemes: dark (0 h light:24 h dark) and natural photoperiod (12 h light:12 h dark). The comparison of both photoperiods was evaluated with respect to permethrin resistance using bottle bioassays and by monitoring the possible mechanism related such as enzymatic activity and by the frequency of 2 knockdown resistance mutations in the voltage-dependent sodium channel gene (V1016I and F1534C). The susceptible strain was used as a reference. The mosquitoes in dark photoperiod showed a reduction in resistance to the pyrethroid. The α-esterases and glutathione S-transferase enzymatic activities showed lower levels in the dark photoperiod, and the frequencies of V1016I knockdown resistance mutation showed significant difference between photoperiod schemes.

  5. Study of wet etching thin films of indium tin oxide in oxalic acid by monitoring the resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mammana, Suelene S., E-mail: ssmammana@abinfo.com.br [Brazilian Association for Informatics - ABINFO, Rua Deusdete Martins Gomes 163, CEP 13084-723, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Greatti, Alessandra; Luiz, Francis H.; Costa, Francisca I. da; Mammana, Alaide P. [Brazilian Association for Informatics - ABINFO, Rua Deusdete Martins Gomes 163, CEP 13084-723, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Calligaris, Guilherme A.; Cardoso, Lisandro P. [Institute of Physics Gleb Wataghin, State University of Campinas-UNICAMP, CEP 13083-859, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Mammana, Carlos I.Z.; Engelsen, Daniel den [Brazilian Association for Informatics - ABINFO, Rua Deusdete Martins Gomes 163, CEP 13084-723, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2014-09-30

    We describe a study on wet etching of thin films of indium tin oxide (ITO) using a simple method by monitoring the resistance of the thin film in aqueous solutions of oxalic acid and hydrochloric acid. Generally three different regimes can be distinguished during etching ITO in acids: (1) initial etching, which is slow, (2) a fast etching phase and (3) slow etching stage at the end. These regimes are explained in terms of a porosity–roughness model. This porosity model has been confirmed largely by X-ray reflection measurements at grazing incidence, roughness measurements and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A reliable method for monitoring the resistance during etching has been developed. This method is based on a 2-strips measuring jig with a very low series contact resistance. The activation energy of the etch rate of ITO films was found to be 80 ± 5 kJ/mol for oxalic acid and 56 ± 5 kJ/mol for HCl. SEM analyses in the final stage of the etching process indicate an enrichment of Sn in the residual film material. These observations are explained in terms of preferential etching of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}. X-ray analyses showed that the density of the ITO film decreased by etching. By adding ferric chloride to the oxalic acid solution we could accelerate the etch rate substantially. - Highlights: • Etching of indium tin oxide thin films by monitoring the resistance. • Oxalic acid has 2–3 times lower etch rate than concentrated HCl. • The etch rate in oxalic acid can be accelerated substantially by adding FeCl{sub 3}. • The proposed etching model for indium tin oxide was confirmed by X-ray analysis and scanning electron microscopy. • Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy analyses showed preferential etching of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}, enriching the film with SnO{sub 2}.

  6. Ez-response as a monitor of a Baikal rift fault electrical resistivity: 3D modelling studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. L. Trofimov

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available 3D numerical studies have shown that the vertical voltage above the Baikal deep-water fault is detectable and that respective transfer functions, Ez-responses, are sensitive to the electrical resistivity changes of the fault, i.e. these functions appear actually informative with respect to the resistivity «breath» of the fault. It means that if the fault resistivity changed, conventional electromagnetic instruments would be able to detect this fact by measurement of the vertical electric field, Ez, or the vertical electric voltage just above the fault as well as horizontal magnetic field on the shore. Other electromagnetic field components (Ex, Ey, Hz do not seem to be sensitive to the resistivity changes in such a thin fault (as wide as 500 m. On the other hand, such changes are thought to be able to indicate a change of a stress state in the earthquake preparation zone. Besides, the vertical profile at the bottom of Lake Baikal is suitable for electromagnetic monitoring of the fault electrical resistivity changes. Altogether, the vertical voltage above the deep-water fault might be one of earthquake precursors.

  7. Electrical Resistivity Imaging for Long-Term Monitoring of Contaminant Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The results from this experiment strongly suggest that the resistivity changes seen are the results of the biodegradation of the oil. This conclusion was further supported by the results of the microcosm experiment. These results demonstrate the utility of the resistivity method ...

  8. Efficacy of PermaNet® 2.0 and PermaNet® 3.0 against insecticide-resistant Anopheles gambiae in experimental huts in Côte d'Ivoire

    OpenAIRE

    Koffi Alphonsine A; Koudou Benjamin G; Malone David; Hemingway Janet

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Pyrethroid resistance in vectors could limit the efficacy of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) because all LLINs are currently treated with pyrethroids. The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and wash resistance of PermaNet® 3.0 compared to PermaNet® 2.0 in an area of high pyrethroid in Côte d'Ivoire. PermaNet® 3.0 is impregnated with deltamethrin at 85 mg/m2 on the sides of the net and with deltamethrin and piperonyl butoxide on the roof. PermaNet® 2.0 i...

  9. Impact of a pharmacist-led oral chemotherapy-monitoring program in patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jay M; Holle, Lisa M; Clement, Jessica M; Bunz, Thomas; Niemann, Christopher; Chamberlin, Kevin W

    2016-12-01

    With the introduction of oral chemotherapy, the paradigm for cancer treatment is shifting. Use of oral chemotherapy agents offers a non-invasive option for patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. However, these medications are not without challenges including strict adherence for optimal effects, novel toxicity profiles, frequent lab parameter monitoring, high cost, and proper handling and disposal methods. Pharmacists are positioned to play a key role in providing patients with the education required to assure an optimal treatment course is carried out. Two cohorts of patients receiving abiraterone, bicalutamide, or enzalutamide for metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer seen in our outpatient cancer center 21 months before and 24 months after the implementation of a pharmacist-led oral chemotherapy-monitoring program in December of 2012 were retrospectively compared. Patients were evaluated for number of interventions, adherence to lab parameter monitoring, and overall time on each therapy. Of the 64 patients identified, 31 patients fulfilled inclusion criteria. A significant increase in the average number of interventions per patient (6.9 vs. 2.6; P = 0.004) and adherence to lab parameter monitoring (10 vs. 3; P = 0.04) in the post-program implementation cohort was found. However, no significant difference in overall time on therapy (10.3 vs. 8.1; P = 0.341) between the two groups was observed. These results suggest a potential opportunity exists to maximize oral chemotherapy treatment outcomes with the addition of a formalized monitoring program directed by an oncology pharmacist. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Validated TLC-densitometry method for the simultaneous analysis of pyrethroid insecticides in agricultural and domestic products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musharraf Syed

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pyrethroids are widely used for the control of pests and insects, as pyrethroids are believed to pose little risk to human health and environment. However, exposure to the pyrethroids exceeding the label directions might adversely affect human health and environment. Hence a careful selection of environment friendly household product is required that must contain exactly the label claimed pyrethroids amount. Results A sensitive and robust TLC-densitometric method for simultaneous quantification of commonly used synthetic pyrethroids including esbiothrin, alpha-cypermethrin and cis/trans permethrin in agricultural and domestic products has been developed and validated. TLC aluminum sheets, precoated with 0.2 mm thick layer of silica gel 60 F-254, were used for chromatographic process. Densitometric analysis of chromatoplates was carried out in absorbance mode at corresponding λmax of each pyrethroid. Equally valid common mobile phase for all pyrethroids consisted of hexane-dichloromethane-ethylacetate-formic acid (8:1.5:0.4:0.1 v/v/v/v which provided sharp and symmetrical peaks of esbiothrin, alpha-cypermethrin, trans-permethrin and cis-permethrin, at Rf 0.31, 0.53, 0.6 and 0.65, respectively. Linear regression data for respective calibration curves showed a good linearity for all pyrethroids with r = 0.991-0.996. Limits of detection (LOD and limits of quantification (LOQ for all pyrethroids were found in the range of 1.6-2.8 and 4.9-8.5 ng/spot, respectively. Conclusions The developed method is applicable for separating the mixture of pyrethroids and at the same time, it is also valid for separating their isomers. The method is reproducible, precise and accurate for the quantitative determination of pyrethroids in agricultural and domestic products.

  11. Front-End Control and Monitoring System for the Resistive Plate Chambers at the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Thyssen, Filip

    2011-01-01

    An online control and monitoring system has recently been developed to automatically configure and continuously monitor FEB parameters. A fine-grained software model of hardware and detector components, organized in a dual hierarchical tree structure, facilitates command and data flow. A novel web-based user-interface allows control of an...

  12. Electrical resistivity tomography as monitoring tool for unsaturated zone transport: an example of preferential transport of deicing chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrer, Markus; Lissner, Heidi; Bloem, Esther; French, Helen; Totsche, Kai Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive spatially resolved monitoring techniques may hold the key to observe heterogeneous flow and transport behavior of contaminants in soils. In this study, time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was employed during an infiltration experiment with deicing chemical in a small field lysimeter. Deicing chemicals like potassium formate, which frequently impact soils on airport sites, were infiltrated during snow melt. Chemical composition of seepage water and the electrical response was recorded over the spring period 2010. Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomographs are able to show the infiltration of the melt water loaded with ionic constituents of deicing chemicals and their degradation product hydrogen carbonate. The tomographs indicate early breakthrough behavior in parts of the profile. Groundtruthing with pore fluid conductivity and water content variations shows disagreement between expected and observed bulk conductivity. This was attributed to the different sampling volume of traditional methods and ERT due to a considerable fraction of immobile water in the soil. The results show that ERT can be used as a soil monitoring tool on airport sites if assisted by common soil monitoring techniques.

  13. Monitoring active layer thaw and freeze-back in four different periglacial landforms in Svalbard using Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliussen, H.; Oswald, A.; Watanabe, T.; Christiansen, H. H.; Matsuoka, N.

    2012-04-01

    Thawing and freezing of the active layer has an important impact on the underlying permafrost through latent heat effects and changes in effective thermal conductivity and mechanisms of heat transport. Information on the active layer freeze/thaw dynamics is therefore important to understand the permafrost response to climate variability. In addition, active layer deepening may be an early sign of permafrost degradation, making monitoring programs such as the CALM network important. Active layer depths are traditionally measured by mechanical probing in fine-grained sediments or by vertical arrays of ground temperature sensors. The first technique prevents measurements to be made in stony sediments, while the latter technique gives only a point value of the active layer depth. In this study we have tested Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) as a tool to measure and monitor active layer depth and freeze/thaw dynamics. The electrical resistivity of the ground is largely dependent on the unfrozen water content, making resistivity monitoring a potentially valuable tool to delineate freeze and thaw extent, and patterns in soil moisture. The results presented here are part of the IPY 2007-2009 research project 'Permafrost Observatory Project: A Contribution to the Thermal State of Permafrost in Norway and Svalbard' (TSP NORWAY) and the IPA periglacial working group project on 'High-Resolution Periglacial Climate Indicators'. Electrode arrays were installed permanently in four different periglacial landforms in the Adventdalen valley area in central Svalbard; a solifluction slope in May 2007, a loess terrace (the UNISCALM site) in September 2007, and a mudboil site and ice-wedge site in June 2009 (Watanabe et al., submitted). The arrays were 16m long, giving maximum profile depths of 2m, and electrodes were installed with 0.2m spacing. Measurements were made with irregular but approximately two- to four-week time intervals, depending on weather conditions and

  14. Efficacy of imidacloprid and fipronil gels over synthetic pyrethroid and propoxur aerosols in control of German cockroaches (Dictyoptera: Blatellidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.K. Agrawal

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Resistance amongst cockroaches has been reported to most of the sprayinsecticides apart from the problem of food contamination and inconvenience. Gel baits which canbe selectively applied have been found effective in control of cockroaches in laboratory studies butvery few field studies are available. This trial was planned to evaluate the efficacy of fipronil(0.01% and imidacloprid (2.15% gels over synthetic pyrethroid (0.02% deltamethrin + 0.13%allethrin and propoxur (2% aerosols in control of cockroaches in the field.Methods: Survey was done to find out pre-treatment density in catering establishments and housesby visual count and sticky trap methods. A total of 10 catering establishments and 10 houseshaving high cockroach infestation were selected by sampling (two catering establishments andhouses for each insecticidal treatment and two for control. Propoxur and synthetic pyrethroidaerosols were used for spraying the infested sites once only. Single application of fipronil andimidacloprid gels was used as crack and crevice treatment. Visual count method gave betterindications of cockroach infestation as compared to sticky trap method, hence, the same was followedfor post-treatment evaluation every week up to 12 weeks.Results: Synthetic pyrethroid could not bring about the desired reduction in cockroach infestationin the present study. Single application of fipronil gel was able to reduce cockroach infestation upto 96.8% at the end of 12 weeks whereas imidacloprid application resulted in 90.9% reduction andpropoxur resulted in 77.5%. However, propoxur was more effective in reducing the cockroachdensity by first week in comparison to imidacloprid and fipronil gels but its efficacy started decliningafter 8th week. Difference was found statistically significant by Kruskal-Wallis H-test.Conclusion: The study reports the efficacy of propoxur aerosol, imidacloprid gel and fipronil gelbaits for control of cockroaches.

  15. Real-time Series Resistance Monitoring in PV Systems; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deceglie, M. G.; Silverman, T. J.; Marion, B.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2015-06-14

    We apply the physical principles of a familiar method, suns-Voc, to a new application: the real-time detection of series resistance changes in modules and systems operating outside. The real-time series resistance (RTSR) method that we describe avoids the need for collecting IV curves or constructing full series-resistance-free IV curves. RTSR is most readily deployable at the module level on apply the physical principles of a familiar method, suns-Voc, to a new application: the real-time detection of series resistance changes in modules and systems operating outside. The real-time series resistance (RTSR) method that we describe avoids the need for collecting IV curves or constructing full series-resistance-free IV curves. RTSR is most readily deployable at the module level on micro-inverters or module-integrated electronics, but it can also be extended to full strings. Automated detection of series resistance increases can provide early warnings of some of the most common reliability issues, which also pose fire risks, including broken ribbons, broken solder bonds, and contact problems in the junction or combiner box. We describe the method in detail and describe a sample application to data collected from modules operating in the field.

  16. Environmentally Relevant Mixing Ratios in Cumulative Assessments: A Study of the Kinetics of Pyrethroids and Their Ester Cleavage Metabolites in Blood and Brain; and the Effect of a Pyrethroid Mixture on the Motor Activity of Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    National surveys of United States households and child care centers have demonstrated that pyrethroids are widely distributed in indoor habited dwellings and this suggests that co-exposure to multiple pyrethroids occurs in nonoccupational settings. The purpose of this research wa...

  17. ANALYSIS OF THE MOTOR NEUROTOXICITY INDUCED BY ACUTE ORAL EXPOSURE TO MULTIPLE PYRETHROID COMPOUNDS IN THE RAT USING AN ADDITIVITY MODEL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Use of pyrethroids has increased in the last decade, and co-exposure to multiple pyrethroids has been reported in humans. Pyrethroids produce neurotoxicity in mammals at dosages far below those producing lethality. The Food Quality Protection Act requires the EPA to consider cumu...

  18. Structure-related effects of pyrethroid insecticides on the lateral-line sense organ and on peripheral nerves of the clawed frog, Xenopus laevis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijverberg, H.P.M.; Ruigt, GeS. F.; Bercken, J. van den

    1982-01-01

    The effects of seven different pyrethroid insecticides on the lateral-line sense organ and on peripheral nerves of the clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, were investigated by means of electrophysiological methods. The results show that two classes of pyrethroid can be clearly distinguished. (i) Pyrethroid

  19. Fault Zone Resistivity Structure and Monitoring at the Taiwan Chelungpu Drilling Project (TCDP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Wen Chiang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The Taiwan Chelungpu-fault drilling project (TCDP has undertaken scientific drilling and directly sampled the sub-surface rupture of the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake. Audio-magnetotelluric (AMT measurements were used to investigate electrical resistivity structure at the TCDP site from 2004 - 2006. These data show a geoelectric strike direction of N15°E to N30°E. Inversion and forward modeling of the AMT data were used to generate a 1-D resistivity model that has a prominent low resistivity zone (< 10 ohm-m between depths of 1100 and 1500 m. When combined with porosity measurements, theAMT measurements imply that the ground water has a resistivity of 0.55 ohm-m at the depth of the fault zone.

  20. On the use of electrical resistivity methods in monitoring infiltration of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-07-09

    Jul 9, 2013 ... polluting air, water and soil with ash particles (including the problem of .... field resistivity data were acquired with a high spatial resolu- tion. In this protocol, the ..... Gulf Publishing Company, Houston, Texas. WHITE PA (1988) ...

  1. Real-Time Series Resistance Monitoring in PV Systems Without the Need for IV Curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deceglie, Michael G.; Silverman, Timothy J.; Marion, Bill; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    2015-06-14

    We apply the physical principles of a familiar method, suns-Voc, to a new application: the real-time detection of series resistance changes in modules and systems operating outside. The real-time series resistance (RTSR) method that we describe avoids the need for collecting IV curves or constructing full series-resistance-free IV curves. RTSR is most readily deployable at the module level on micro-inverters or module-integrated electronics, but it can also be extended to full strings. Automated detection of series resistance increases can provide early warnings of some of the most common reliability issues, which also pose fire risks, including broken ribbons, broken solder bonds, and contact problems in the junction or combiner box. We describe the method in detail and describe a sample application to data collected from modules operating in the field.

  2. Molecular monitoring of Plasmodium falciparum super-resistance to sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kavishe, Reginald A; Kaaya, Robert D; Nag, Sidsel;

    2016-01-01

    and in private drug shops in sub-Saharan Africa. This study reports on the prevalence and distribution of Pfdhps mutations A540E and A581G in Tanzania. When found together, these mutations confer high-level SP resistance (sometimes referred to as 'super-resistance'), which is associated with loss in protective......BACKGROUND: Sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) is recommended for prophylactic treatment of malaria in pregnancy while artemisinin combination therapy is the recommended first-line anti-malarial treatment. Selection of SP resistance is ongoing since SP is readily available in health facilities...... = 85.3, p resistance. A high prevalence of Pfdhps-581G was observed in Tanga (56.6 %) in northeastern Tanzania and in Kagera (20.4 %) in northwestern Tanzania and the 540-581 EG haplotype was found at 54.5 and 19...

  3. Monitoring and Analysis on Multi Drug Resistance of Escherichia coli from Captive Population Amur Tiger

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue; Yuan; Li; Fengyong; Sun; Jing; Cai; Longhui; Wu; Qingming; Zhou; Ming; Huang; Xianguang; Hua; Yuping

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the multi drug resistance to Escherichia coli from captive population Amur tiger,E. coli strains were isolated from the fecal samples of tiger in Heilongjiang Amur Tiger Park in Harbin. The sensitivity of E. coli isolates to 14 antibiotics was determined by scrip diffusion method. The results indicated that all the isolates varied in drug resistance to different antibiotics; the isolates gave high resistance to ampicillin,with a drug fast rate of 100%; over80% of the isolates were resistant to tetracycline and Paediatric Compound Sulfamethoxazole Tablets(SMZ- TMP),and over 70% of the isolates were sensitive to aztreonam,amoxicillin /potassium clavulanate. Most of the isolates had high sensitive to aztreonam and amoxicillin / clavulanate acid.

  4. Optimization of pyrethroid and repellent on fabrics against Stegomyia albopicta (=Aedes albopictus) using a microencapsulation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, T-T; Wang, L-K; Cheng, J-L; Hu, Y-Z; Zhao, J-H; Zhu, G-N

    2015-03-01

    A new approach employing a combination of pyrethroid and repellent is proposed to improve the protective efficacy of conventional pyrethroid-treated fabrics against mosquito vectors. In this context, the insecticidal and repellent efficacies of commonly used pyrethroids and repellents were evaluated by cone tests and arm-in-cage tests against Stegomyia albopicta (=Aedes albopictus) (Diptera: Culicidae). At concentrations of LD50 (estimated for pyrethroid) or ED50 (estimated for repellent), respectively, the knock-down effects of the pyrethroids or repellents were further compared. The results obtained indicated that deltamethrin and DEET were relatively more effective and thus these were selected for further study. Synergistic interaction was observed between deltamethrin and DEET at the ratios of 5 : 1, 2 : 1, 1 : 1 and 1 : 2 (but not 1 : 5). An optimal mixing ratio of 7 : 5 was then microencapsulated and adhered to fabrics using a fixing agent. Fabrics impregnated by microencapsulated mixtures gained extended washing durability compared with those treated with a conventional dipping method. Results indicated that this approach represents a promising method for the future impregnation of bednet, curtain and combat uniform materials.

  5. Urinary concentrations of metabolites of pyrethroid insecticides in textile workers, Eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dasheng; Wang, Dongli; Feng, Chao; Jin, Yu'e; Zhou, Zhijun; Wu, Chunhua; Lin, Yuanjie; Wang, Guoquan

    2013-10-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides have been applied in the production of cotton, wool and textile. In order to examine whether textile workers are exposed to pyrethroid insecticides, we recruited 50 textile workers in two textile plants in Eastern China. Their urine samples were collected for the measurement of pyrethroid metabolites: cis- and trans-isomers of 2,2-dichlorovinyl-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (cis-Cl2CA and trans-Cl2CA) and 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA). Our results showed that textile workers were exposed to high levels of pyrethroid insecticides. cis-Cl2CA and 3-PBA were dominant metabolites with concentrations of 0.17-261μg/L